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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01016
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 03-13-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01016
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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Red Devils top FrostproofPAGE1COrgan player heading for nationalPAGE2ANEWS-SUN Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 31 | 75 cents www.newssun .com HighLow 79 50Complete Forecast PAGE 8A Bright, sunny and pleasant Forecast Question: Do you think the teacher merit pay and tenure bill will become law this time? Next question: Should the state's driving age be raised from 16 to 17? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Inside Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453O nline: www.newssun.com Yes 77.6% No 22.4% 099099401007 Total votes: 49 Arts & Entertainment4D Books6D Business1B Chalk Talk4B Classifieds5B Community Briefs2A Community Calendar7C Crossword Puzzle2D Dear Abby2D Deed Transfers3B Editorial & Opinion3A Food3D Living1D Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times2D Sports1C Index locally owned community mindedHeartlandNational Bank Avon Park800 West Main St.863.453.6000Lake Placid600 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.699.1300Sebring327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1300Sun n Lake North5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1322www.heartlandnb.com By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING More billing discrepancies have been discovered in invoices submitted by County Attorney Ross Macbeth, but this time there is also a claim from Macbeth that the county underpaid him by more than $27,000 during from 2000-2002. In a letter dated March 1, the county attorney stated that a cost of living adjustment should have been paid to his office, but was not due to a lack of oversight on the particulars of his contract. "The county paid me approximately $27,971.21 less than it should have paid me during the twoyear time period," Macbeth wrote. "As with all the other items you have questioned, neither my staff, nor the Board's staff, not the Clerk's staff identified and rectified the billing error.". In the letter dated March 1, Macbeth told Clerk of Courts employee Dawn Simpson that in addition to the under billing, more over-billing was also discovered. The letter shows that a spot check of 12 invoices covering a time period of 2002-2004 discovered another $3,636.86 is owed back to the county. Macbeth's responses show that on invoice 76, dated Dec. 6, 2002, Macbeth's office billed 11 hours instead of one hour for engineering services in November of that year. On invoice 77, dated Jan. 10, 2003, his office billed 11 hours again instead of one hour for code enforcement work. When totaled up, Macbeth's over billing for the spot checks have amounted to $23,789.90 to date, and covers ju st 22 of more than 1,000 monthly invoi ces. Macbeth has been county attorn ey since 1998. Macbeth paid back the discover ed overcharges discovered earlier, accor ding to Clerk of Courts Bob Germain e, but did not include a check for t he recent discovery of $3,636.86, h is office stated on Friday. "When it is all said and done, w e owed him," said Simpson. "His sprea dsheet shows that we owe hi m $27,971.21, so there was no need f or Macbeth says county underpaid him $27,000 Macbeth See MACBETH, page 7A BYBRIANAWASHINGTON and ED BALDRIDGE News-SunSEBRING "I'm sa fe and that I will contact the m ASAP," replied Mari ne Corporal Jonathan Aval os when asked if he had an ything to say to family an d friends on Friday. Avalos is an Avon Pa rk graduate who was station ed in Japan during the magn itude 8.9 earthquake th at rocked the small count ry early Friday morning easte rn time. Luckily Avalos and fello w APHS graduate Lan ce Corporal Christopher Bow er are stationed in Okinaw a, which was far enough fro m the epicenter of the eart hquake reported as bein g the most powerful to hit t he country in recorded histo ry that they were never in danger. Interviewed via Faceboo k, Avalos reported that pho ne lines were down and he w as trying to let family an d friends know he was OK v ia the Internet from the base. Christopher Bower w as also doing fine, according to Avalos. Bower and Avalos bo th participated in the Air For ce Junior ROTC together an d graduated as Red Devils in 2008. Both enlisted together v ia the "buddy system," attend ed AP grad in Japan: I'm safe' Courtesy pho to Lance Corporal Christopher Bower (left) and Corporal Jonathan Avalos, are doing just fine after the recordbreaking earthquake hit Japan. Two local Marines stationed on island of Okinawa See PAIR, page 7A By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comLAKE PLACID South Florida Community College students enrolled in Dr. Nancy Dale's communication course have been having participating in a learning experience that wasn't on the syllabus they received at the start of the semester. The Voices of Freedom Worldwide project was thought up by Dale after viewing the protests in Egypt that took place last month. "I thought that the students could use the experiences of what's going on over there to become more culturally aware," said Dale. David Frost is one of the students in the "living classroom" and explained what the students have been doing with the unexpected addition to the class. "Since the beginning of the Egyptian Protests on Jan. 28, the class has been communicating with Egyptians through the Voices of Egyptians/ Americans Facebook page," explained Frost. SFCC students listen to Voices of Freedom See STUDENTS, page 7A St. Patrick's Day about more than shamrocks and smooches PAGE1D Using Facebook to talk to protesters in Middle East Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and 12 Hours Fan of the Year namedPAGE2A 10-8: In Service New home for West Sebring VFD up and running News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Kailey Gorham, 7, and Manny the dog check out the new home for the West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department on Hammock Road Saturday morning. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING After 14 months of planning and eight months of construction, the West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department will hold its open house and ribbon cutting for its new station at 3802 Hammock Road today. The open house will be from 2-4 p.m. and the public is welcome. Assistant Chief Billy Kingston explained how much of a difference the new facility from than the old one. "If you remember the old building, it was nothing but a shell," Kingston said with a chuckle. "This is beyond an improvement." Station 10 will serve the areas from Sparta Road to Sebring Hills. Kingston and the firefighters and EMS personnel are looking forward to serving the areas via the new facility. "We will be more efficient and better able to serve everyone on this side of town. It won't be anymore leaving from home or from the station on Longview. We have a place that is central and that we can leave from to get to where we need to go quicker," Kingston said. For the first time, the facility will be able to house EMS in the building. "No one wanted to hang around here before," Kingston said of the old station. That will most certainly change now. The new facility has plenty of space and room to house two engines as well as other specialty pieces. Kingston expressed interest in getting a tanker sometime in the near future. "Our engine holds 1,800 gallons of This is beyond an improvement.'BILLYKINGSTON assistant chief See NEW, page 5A

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By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Sharon Weatherhead has been playing the organ since the age of 11, and always felt the organ was a beloved hobby of hers. But she has found more passion for her craft during the last couple years, and it paid off with a second state championship. Three weeks ago, Weatherhead, who splits her time between Sebring and Fort Myers, competed in the state competition three weeks ago against 19 others in her category, advanced hobbyist. "There are three levels hobbyist, advanced hobbyist, and professional categories. I'm an advanced hobbyist, which means I play with all three keyboards including the pedals down below there," Weatherhead explained. Weatherhead was the 2009 and 2011 winner of the organ competition. She recently joined the Highlands County Organ Society. After winning the competition in Fort Myers, Weatherhead is awarded an all-expenses-paid trip to Las Vegas for the national competition. The competition will be held at the Monte Carlo Hotel and Resort on May 7. Weatherhead took lessons until she was 19, however she never played competitively. Weatherhead only plays for her own love of the instrument. "I just zone out. I relax when I'm playing. I come home at night and I just play. It's for my own enjoyment. I could easily teach lessons but I just do it for enjoyment," she said. Her winning piece for this year's competition was a semi-classical piece, "Czardas" by Vitorio Monti. Weatherhead explained the difference between the organ and playing a piano and how she feels the organ is a good way to expand musical talents. "Playing the organ is like being the conductor of the orchestra," Weatherhead started. "Each of those buttons has a different sound, a different instrument. You can make the organ sound like anything you want." Weatherhead feels her love of the organ at such a young age grew into her love for music itself and she believes the organ will do the same for many young musicians. "It's a good instrument to play. It makes students'ears so much better at music," she said. Before heading off to Las Vegas in May, Weatherhead is planning to get plenty of practice. At home, Weatherhead plays on her own personal Roland American Classic organ, and the Highlands County Organ Society also provides ample opportunity to keep those fingers moving. The Highlands County Organ Society is a small group of seven members who share their love of music and the organ together. Weatherhead, along with her fellow musicians spend their Friday evenings at Fletchers Music located inside the Lakeshore Mall in Sebring. The group plays from 6:30-9 p.m. Weatherhead will be the featured player at Fletchers until her appearance at the national organ competition on May 7. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South € Sebring, Florida 33870 A Harbor Point Media Company OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday PHONE: 863-385-6155 MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954 NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870 USPS … ISSN 0163-3988 Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry office(s)CIRCULATION SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before 11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their account. Please call 385-6155.SUBSCRIPTION RATES12 mo.7% FL taxTotal HOME DELIVERY$60.46$4.23$64.69 IN FLORIDA MAIL92.236.4698.69 OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL105.99105.99 Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. Romona Washington … Publisher and Executive Editor863-385-6155, ext. 515 Kaylor & Kaylor P.A.Social Security Disability LawNew Claims € Hearing Before A Judge Reconsiderations € Appeals Court 8 6 3 3 8 2 1 9 0 0 Mark Kaylor March 9 6917384352x:5Next jackpot $4 millionMarch 5 5614232429x:4 March 2 3711194041x:4 March 11 23131819 March 10 117192124 March 9 614293536 March 8 1217182227 March 11 (n) 9882 March 11 (d) 1352 March 10 (n) 3339 March 10 (d) 2593 March 11(n) 59 8 March 11 (d) 66 1 March 10 (n) 48 3 March 10(d) 13 7 March 11 1617273613 March 8 252731359 March 4 269277 March 1 317232918 March 9 1220284048 PB: 8 PP: 2Next jackpot $54 millionMarch 5 223314248 PB: 21 PP: 2 March 2 731505158 PB: 6 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center Part time resident to participate in national organ competition News Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Sharon Weatherhead is a member of the Highlands County Organ Society. Playing since the age of 11, Weatherhead has won numerous competitions including her recent title as state champion. The musician will compete in the national contest in Las Vegas in May. POLICEBLOTTER The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, March 10: Eric Antonio Barajas, 19, of Lake Placid, was charged with battery on an officer/firefighter/EMT, resisting an officer without violence, and possession of marijuana. Zeneida Luz Chapelin, 23, of Lake Placid, was arrested on an out-of-county warrant reference no valid driver license. Matthew Frank Dugger, 23, of Venus, was arrested on two out-of-county warrants reference violation of probation for possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. Steven Milo Griffin, 20, of Lake Placid, was charged with dealing in stolen property, and grand theft of motor vehicle. Amado Leal Leon, 24, of Sebring, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. Juan Lopez, 22, of Lake Placid, was charged with possession of marijuana and possession and or use of drug equipment. Jesus Gabriel Mangual, 24, of Sebring, was charged with withholding support of children or spouse. Bruno Montoya Mendoz, 29, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. JR Moore, 23, of Lake Placid, was charged with resisting an officer without violence. Steven Anthony Pickett, 24, of Lake Placid, was charged with non-support of children or spouse. COMMUNITYBRIEFS By BARRYFOSTER Special to the News-SunSEBRING Former 12 Hours broadcaster and longtime race enthsiast Bill Farmer has been named the Fan of the Year for the 59th running of the Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring presented by Fresh from Florida. Farmer first began attending the Race in 1975 after cajoling his father for years to "take me to Sebring." He has not missed a Race since then, watching the action fromone of the most prized spots on the track justat the start/finish line. "Dad would sit on top of a motor home with his buddies and watch the gridding of the cars prior to the race, watch the Race, then watch Victory Lane, all with a perfect view of the pits and within 50 feet of the start/finish line," wrote Farmer's daughter Monica in her nomination letter. In 1996, Farmer was invited to join a team and serve as a turn reporter for the Grand Prix Radio Network in broadcasting Sebring and several other Florida road races. Later, he worked the pits and the booth broadcast for the races, calling the action and interviewing drivers, team owners, sponsors and dignitaries. "It was unbelievable to be such a big fan of Sebring then to be able to interview the winning drivers live in Victory Lane. It was a surreal expe rience," Farmer said. Farmer now has settled back to simply watch the Race, but he st ill tunes into the broadcast to follow t he action. Again this year the Race w ill be aired locally on WWTK 730 AM Farmer named Fan of the Year for 12 Hours Railroad crossing closed temporarilySEBRING The railroad crossing at Arbuckle Creek Road and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard will be closed starting at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday until possibly the end of the week for repairs. Adetour will be posted. Call the Highlands County Engineering Department at 402-6877.Boat ramp closed temporarilyAVON PARK Highlands County Parks and Recreation Department will close the Lake Adelaide boat ramp at 2124 West Shore Road for repair and maintenance from Monday through May 12. It is schedule to reopen Friday, May 13.WSVFD plans open house at new stationSEBRING The West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department will hold an open house of their new station Station 10 at 3517 Hammock Road to the public from 2-4 p.m. today. Light refreshments will be served. Everyone is welcome to attend and tour the new station house.LPPD offers First Aid ClassLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Police Department will give an American Heart Association First Aid Clas s at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. The class is $20 for anyon e who has taken the CPR Class from the police department, or $30 for those who are taking the First Aid Class alone. The CPR Class will be offered later and will cost only $20 for First Aid Class attendees. Certification is good fo r three years. Homeowners Association meets MondaySEBRING Monthly meetings of the Highlands County Homeowners Association are held the second Monday of each month at the Sebring Country Estates Club House, 3240 Grand Prix Ave. The March 14 meeting is open to the public and will be held from 9-1 1 a.m. Free coffee, hot tea and donuts are provided. Registered Nurse Suzanne Crews, Parish Nursing coordinator, will present a program on Care Giving. She will cover top ics such as risk for caregivers, legal issues, how t o talk to doctors, efficient medicine use, local resources, what is dement ia and how to plan. Good Shepherd Hospice will present a program explaining their mission and give an overview of their many programs avai lable to the public. As the area's first free-standing Continued on page 6A Associated PressAfederal appeals court h as agreed to act swiftly in c onsidering a Florida j udge's ruling that P resident Obama's health c are overhaul is unconstit utional. The 11th Circuit Court o f Appeals in Atlanta said F riday that it had agreed t o expedite the appeal, sett ing a faster timetable than e ven the federal governm ent had requested. The decision means the f ederal government must f ile its first set of court p apers on the issues in the c ase by April 4, and the s tate of Florida has until M ay 4 to file its papers. T he federal government w ould file additional p apers by May 18. The appeals court said it h ad not made a decision o n a request that the initial r eview be held before all 1 0 federal judges. The Justice Department s aid in a filing this week t hat expedited treatment o f the case was warranted b ecause of the far-reachi ng nature of the decision b y a federal judge who d eclared the entire law u nconstitutional. Court speeds up health overhaul appeal Associated PressTITUSVILLE SeaWorld in Florida has released its 1,000th rehabilitated sea turtle at Canaveral National Seashore. The loggerhead turtle put back in the Atlantic on Friday was brought to SeaWorld in September. It suffered from lockjaw and weighed 70 pounds. After rehabilitation, it regained normal function of its jaw and is back to a normal weight of 102 pounds. The park's Animal Rescue & Rehabilitation Team has cared for more than 1,500 turtles since its sea turtle rescue program began at SeaWorld Orlando back in 1980. Turtles most often suffer from injuries from fishing line, hooks and nets, eating trash and plastic bags, boat strikes, natural illnesses and oil contamination. SeaWorld releases 1,000th rehabilitated sea turtle

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But it is a little early to s tart talking about eliminati ng departments or jobs. It is not too early to get b ehind the elected officials w ho are calling for cuts. The county has to consider a ll of its options to fill what C hairwoman Barbara Stewart c alled an $11 million hole. The county commission b efore Jack Richie, Greg H arris and Don Elwell used r ainy day funds to fill the h ole, but does not have that o ption this year. As a matter o f fact, all those years of e xperience on the board b efore those three did not f oresee such a long lasting d own turn and literal crash in t he housing market in H ighlands. Who could? Additionally, there has to b e an educational process b ecause those three are new t o the bench, so to speak. Although it is not their f ault that the county has dug a n $11 million hole, the curr ent commission will still h ave to look into options of f illing it. All options. The county is far from b roke, arguably, it is hard to u nderstand how any organization that has $79 million in revenue can be called "broke," but the board does have to make level-headed decisions about where to trim services and where to stop funding this year. Next year does not look any better right now because of rising gas costs and the state making slashes. But those leading our county have made no official decisions yet, they are just looking at options. Is it hard to have those discussions, especially when families and livelihoods are at stake? Yep. One thing is for sure, we all agree that there will have to be cuts, and that the county will definitely have to forego $5,000 coffee machines in this fiscal atmosphere, but level heads and intelligent discussion should be had at this point. Additionally, instead of claiming how "successful" a county department has been in the past, county staff should be presenting a 10minute presentation on what their department does and how that impacts the quality of life in Highlands County. And then they should be volunteering to cut their own services and budgets, already pitching in and not waiting to be told to find ways to cut. Yes, Parks and Recreation is important, and so is Road and Bridge and the rest of the county departments, but there has to be a unilateral cut within those departments from the top to the bottom, and salaries and jobs needs to be the last resort right now. Maybe we as citizens can live without county funded housing. Maybe the ARC can find funding elsewhere, but those departments need to volunteer to bring forward their own cuts in services now, not later, but now. Richie asked several departments to "help us out here" by volunteering those cuts ahead of time. Elwell suggested that commissioners were not there to practice micro-managing budgets, but they would wade through them line per line if they had to. Cuts have to be made at several different points not because the services are unnecessary or important, but because the county must live on its allowance now. Should there be concern? Sure. We all have to tighten our belts in this economy, but there is no need to run around like our hair is on fire. Use your favorite towel and dry your eyes, roll up your sleeves, get behind your elected officials and start making smart decisions. Don't panic, at least not yet. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 3ATODAY'SEDITORIALTODAY'SLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION Editor's Note: Due to an e rror, the final portion of F riday's editorial was not p rinted. Here is the editorial i n its entirity. The News-Sun a plogizes for the error. It is that time of year again. This Saturday night r emember to set your clocks a head an hour or you might m iss church Sunday morning. To help you remember, here a re a few facts about the cust om, culled from webexh ibits.org/daylightsaving. The goal of daylight saving i s to take an hour of daylight f rom the morning and add it to t he evening. It turns out the idea of dayl ight saving has been around f or centuries. Benjamin F ranklin wrote about the conc ept in 1784, although there w as no interest in it at the t ime. The first regular use of dayl ight saving came during W orld War I, when both E ngland and Germany made u se of it. In the United States the i dea has been popular and in u se for decades, although t here have been many experim ents and adjustments along t he way. As recently as 2007 Congress set the time changes for the second Sunday in March and the first Sunday in November. One constant, though, has been the 2 a.m. moment of change, because it creates the fewest disruptions. It took years for daylight saving to standardize the United States, as in the '50s and '60s each locality could choose when to reset its clocks. For example, the state of Iowa alone had 23 different start and stop dates. And on one 35-mile long stretch of bus route between Ohio and West Virginia, passengers had to change their watches seven times. Today Arizona is the only state in the union that does not use daylight saving time, although the Navaho Nation, partially in Arizona, does follow the practice, while the Hopi Indians whose reservation is completely surrounded by the Navahos like Arizona, do not change their clocks. There are other little oddities about daylight saving. For example, scientists in Antarctica, which has no daylight in winter, and 24 hours of sunlight in the summer, use daylight saving time. This is so they can synchronize with their supply bases in Chile and New Zealand. For the most bizarre consequence, however, take a case of twins born in the fall when the time is turned back. Say the first child arrives at 1:55 a.m. and the second child comes 10 minutes later. This means the second child was born at 1:05 a.m. and is now the elder by 50 minutes. On the other hand, during the spring change when clocks move forward, no children are born between 2 and 3 a.m. Daylight saving time reminds us yet again that time, writ large, is entirely relative. The world's time zones, for example, are all measured from the Meridian line passing through Greenwich, England, and have been since 1884. The fact that this point was chosen has nothing to do with science, and everything to do with the fact that England was then the world power and simply decreed time on Earth started with there. Friday's editorial ... all of it So Don and I are driving back from Bible Study and I notice CNN sent me a breaking news alert. This is possible since my Blackberry gets my email sent to it. Not that I'm bragging on my phone or anything like that. Anyway, the news alert says that Wisconsin senators have managed to vote on Governor Walker's plan to limit collective bargaining for public sector workers. My first response to the news was "How?" I mean, wasn't the whole point of the Democratic senators running away from home to prevent this from happening? Well, it turned out that the Republicans managed to pull a fast one. They separated the collective bargaining provision from the fiscal portions of the bill. While they needed a quorum for any budgetary bill, other bills didn't have such a requirement. So they were able to ram the vote through. As you might guess, the opposition was not happy with this move. The senators were escorted from the state capitol building under guard while protesters fought to get in. Democrats accuse the Republicans of violating an open meetings law. There is a call to recall the Republican senators. People were mad before this latest move. If anyone thought this would calm them down, they were sadly mistaken. One Republican Senator being interviewed on Fox News actually said he thought some Democrats would thank them for this so they could return home. I don't know what gave him that idea, but given the lousy day I've been having I wish I had some of his crazy optimism. Readers probably assume that I approve of the Republicans'actions, given how hard I was on the Democrats in my previous column on this topic. If so, my reaction will surprise you, because I'm not really crazy about this move at all. I understand being frustrated. I still think the Democrats were wrong to flee the state like they did and thus block the whole voting process. Maybe if the Republicans had done this weeks ago o r even before the Democrats cut and ran I'd feel better about the whole thing. But I don't. Ramming the collective bargaining provision through like this is an inyour-face move. It pretend s that you aren't going to have to work with your opponents at some point down the line. It gives the other side ammunition it makes it look as if all you cared about was the one provision and not the budg et as a whole. Wisconsin is a picture o f what is wrong with the political discourse in this country. And both sides ar e to blame. Rather than work togeth er towards what is best for their state, both Democrats and Republicans made dec isions based on what they thought would give them political gain. This is mad dening. And it's not restricted to Wisconsin. Partisan postur ing occurs on all levels of government. Look at Washington, D.C. We are facing the possibility of a government shutdown because the Democrats and Republicans would rather snipe at each other than deal with the very real problems we have with a debt that could cripple us down the line. And please don't send m e e-mail saying, "Well, MY side is trying to do the righ t thing." It takes two to tango, and two to fight. Both sides are guilty of this kind of garbage, and frankly I'm fed up with th e whole lot of them. Sadly, Wisconsin is teaching us an unfortunate lesson: that party politics i s alive and well and probabl y not going away any time soon. How depressing. Laura Ware can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady@ embarqmail.com Nobody wins in Wisconsion mess Laura's Look Laura Ware Don't panic yet D on't panic. It's a long process, and this year the county budget presentations have started earlier. E verything is on the table. Rail system makes no senseEditor: I would like to give a response to Randy Ludacer's letter to the high speed rail. For one thing we both had the name wrong. It should say light rail system, because speed between the three cities are going to be at highway speed being so close together. And talking about good for government, what is the strategic demand for our government to have or use this rail system? He also compared tthree cities to a whole country, such as Japan and China, where land is at a premium and the terrain is not suitable for roads! And how is a 1 1/2 hour rail system here in South Central Florida so important to us as a nation? We here in Florida and the United States, as a whole, have highways and roadway systems that are un-equaled. If you use that rail from here in Lake Placid where both Randy and me are from, we would have at the very least 1 hour and 45 minutes to the rail system, then we would have to park our auto at a cost when we could drive to all three of the cities in the same time period. It is beyond my comprehension as to how this short expensive light rail will help America as Randy states in his letter. Now to nuclear power here in Florida, does anyone know what it takes for a reactor? And the water from the cool down, where is the waste water going to go? Florida is built on sand and springs. Like I have always heard, you had better build your house on rock. Maybe some smart person may enlighten me. Please do. C.F. Neeley Lake PlacidLegion Post helps Humane SocietyEditor: Many thanks go out to the members and veterans of the American Legion Post 74 in Sebring for their support and contributions for the very successful food drive for the Humane Society, sponsored by the Sons of the American Legion Squadron 74. The Humane Society was grateful to receive well over 200 pounds of dog, c at and canned food to help t he sheltered pets until they c an be adopted. With the help, support an d generosity from the Post an d Lowe's, the S.A.L. we re able to acquire a gas gr ill that was raffled at t he Valentine's Day Ste ak Dinner offered from t he kitchen volunteers at Po st 74. Congratulations to D an and Robin, winners of t he gas grill; proceeds from t he raffle will help benefit t he Veteran's Services of Highlands County. Randy Sallis (command er for the Sons of the Americ an Legion Squadron 74) pu rchased four $25 SweetB ay gift cards and present ed them to the Veteran 's Services in an effort to he lp some of our veterans th at need assistants. Thank you one and all f or your valued and continu ed support in our efforts to he lp our community and the ve terans that served to prote ct our country and flag. Randy Sal lis Command er Sons of the America n Legion Squadron 7 4 Sebrin g

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Page 4ANews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 5A Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The ann ual banquet of the Historic al Society of Avon Park, he ld Feb. 12, saw the election of eight individuals to the boa rd of directors for a three-ye ar term. Four of those elected a re returning for another thre eyear term, while the remai ning four are brand new to t he board. Returnees include Ren ee Bennett, Roberta Flower s, Jean Jordan and Betty Jordo n Pierce. The newcomers a re Thetis Casey, Jim Dea l, Donna Faucett and Car yl Ryan. Remaining on the boa rd are Maxine Floyd, Jim Kelle y, Joyce Kelley, Duane Kopt a, Theda Miracle, Jean Elli ot Prescott, Eile en Sachsenmaier, Par ke Sutherland, Nancy Webe r, Wendell "Winkie" William s and Helen Young. Stepping down were Ma ry Lee King, Mary Pard ee Roberts and Margar et Turnbull, who was announc ed as "Board Member of t he Year." Elected as president o n Feb. 21 was Sachsenmaie r, who joined the board la st year. She replaces outgoin g president Larry Levey, wh o had served for the past fi ve years. Re-elected were William s as vice-president, Flowers as recording secretary, an d Bennett as treasurer. New ly elected as an officer w as Weber, who replaces Bet ty Jordon Pierce as correspo nding secretary. Elaine Lev ey remains as museum director Several new faces join AP Historical Society w ater. Atanker holds 3,600 g allons, so it would benefit u s to have one. We could b ring it on a call if we neede d to," Kingston said. The inside of Station 10 i s a clean, fully decorated v ision. The full kitchen is a n added luxury that the f irefighters and EMS were n ot accustomed to with the o ld building. "We didn't have any of t his before. No couches, no m eeting or training room, n o stove, so this is very diff erent and honestly it brings u s all closer together. There i s always somebody in here c ooking and offering the o ther guys something," K ingston said. The 30 active volunteers c an now enjoy one another w hile they wait for calls or e mergencies rather than runn ing home or back and forth b etween stations. "It's good that they have a central place when they h ave down time. We don't h ave to be all over the p lace," said Kingston. Chief Scott Mann's office s its right of the meeting r oom adjacent to a separate E MS office. Down the hall, t here are restrooms and s hower facilities for women a nd men volunteers and a cross the hall from those, q uarters with multiple bunk b eds. "We try to keep things s omewhat separate. That's w hy they (EMS) have these t hree rooms. They have sepa rate beds also because they a re here around the clock," s aid Kingston. Station 10 will be a 24h our EMS station, while f irefighters will rotate out a nd come and go throughout t he day and night. "There will always be E MS here and there is usually always one of us here. In fact, I think there is someone sleeping in there now," Kingston said with a chuckle. WSVFD requests EMS on certain calls. For house fires and auto accidents, EMS is required to cover along with WSVFD. EMS personnel have 160 hours of fire training as well as WSVFD having first responder training. "It's just more hands; more help on scene. Sharing the space with EMS is going good," said Kingston. The initial budget of the construction of Station 10 was at $1 million, however after all was said and done, the construction totaled just at $600,000. "We came out ahead, so it was great for us. We are on an assessment district budget, so that means whatever we have left over it just doesn't go away,'it goes into a savings account. We can use it later to buy a new engine or that tanker that we may need," explained Kingston. As for the unusual color of the building, Kingston laughed as he explained. "It was supposed to be more red. It was supposed to be salmon. The splotch was a lot darker than what it is now, but it's different. "I think we kind of fit in this area with this color, too, so it's fine," Kingston said. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by ROBYN BAKALUS West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department Station 10 is manned 24 hours a day by the Emergency Medical Services. New fire, EMSstation ready for public debut News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department Assistant Chief Billy Kingston talks Saturday morning about some of the amenities being enjoyed by firefighters and Emergency Medical Technicians at the new fire station on Hammock Road in Sebring. A new modern kitchen helps first responders feel at home.

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Page 6ANews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com GUARANTEED WEIGHT LOSS! CALL TODAY (863) 471-2500 LOSE YOUR WEIGHT FOR THE LAST TIME! 13 Ryant Blvd. SebringCorner of 27 & Ryant Blvd.SAVE 50% OFF ENROLLMENT FEES Hurry! Offer Ends Soon! At the Florida National Cemetary at Bushnell, FL, South Florida National Cemetary at Lake Worth, FL or Sarasota National Cemetary at Sarasota, FL Pr oud to Serve Sebring, Lake Placid & Avon Park Proud to Serve Sebring, Lake Placid & Avon Park h ospice house, the Somers H ospice House offers a nearb y option for patients and t heir families requiring s hort-term, inpatient service s, such as pain management a nd symptom control. H ospice's goal is making a d ifference in the lives of p atients and families affecte d by end-of-life illnesses. Call chairman Rick Ingler f or any additional informat ion at 273-5182.SALT meets TuesdaySEBRING The H ighlands County Seniors a nd Law Enforcement T ogether (S.A.L.T.) Council w ill hold its monthly meeti ng on Tuesday at Lake P lacid Town Hall, 311 W. I nterlake Blvd. The meeting, h osted by the Lake Placid P olice Department, will b egin at 10 a.m. Chief of P olice Phil Williams will s peak on tax return frauds a nd other forms of identity t heft. The public is invited to a ttend and there is no c harge, however reservations a re requested. To reserve a s eat at this presentation cont act S.A.L.T. president Janet T indell at 443-0747 or Nell H ays at 385-0024. For more information on f uture S.A.L.T. meetings or t o volunteer for this organiz ation, contact Tindell or H ays.Parkinson's Disease Support Group meets MondaySEBRING The P arkinson's Disease Support G roup for the Highlands C ounty area will meet at 10 a .m. Monday at First Baptist C hurch of Sebring, corner of P ine and Lemon Street. The program this month w ill be Elder Law attorney R oy Wilkes. All persons with P arkinson's disease and their f amilies are welcome to a ttend. There is no charge. For more information, call 4 53-6589 or 453-6149. The Highlands County P arkinson's Support Group i s part of the national netw ork of support groups affili ated with the American P arkinson's Disease A ssociation. More than 1 m illion Americans have P arkinson's Disease. Today p eople with Parkinson's dise ase and their families can f ind help and information f rom their local support g roup.Red Hatters plan for Green FlingSEBRING Lunch tickets a re on sale through Tuesday f or South Central Florida R ed Hatters Green Fling. T he event takes place T hursday, March 24. Men a re welcomed guests when a ccompanied by a Red Hat L ady. Doors open at 9 a.m. Advance tickets for lunch are $ 9.95 and Bingo Packs will be sold at the event. Acelebratory Red Hat Parade will kick off the event consisting of holiday theme hats of red or purple with touches of green, gold or favorite holiday colors. Prizes will be awarded for Best of Show at 10:30 a.m. Lunch buffet opens at 11 a.m. and bingo session will close out the event. To purchase tickets or for more information, call 465-0161.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK The American Legion Post 69 will host karaoke by Naomi at 4 p.m. today. The Auxiliary and Legion will meet at 7 p.m. Monday. Bingo is set for 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. For more information, call 453-4553. The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 will host karaoke by Bildi from 5-8 p.m. Tuesday. For more information and menu selection, call 452-9853. The Lake Placid Moose 2374 will host karaoke with Bil-Di at 3 p.m. today. A meat raffle is set for 4 p.m. Thuesday. For more information and menu selection, call 465-0131. SEBRING Eagles Aerie 4240 will host its monthly karaoke/birthday party from 4-7 p.m. today. Members and their qualified guests are asked to bring a dish to pass for the pot luck dinner. Jewels in the Night Entertainment will spin the karaoke discs. Contact the Aerie at 655-4007. Sebring 126 OES will host a corned beef lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. today at the Masonic Lodge, 1809 Home Ave. The menu includes corned beef, cabbage, garlic potatoes and carrots, dessert and beverage. Cost is $7. Tickets are available at the door. Carousel of Colors' is todayLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid China Painters are presenting their annual tea, "Carousel of Colors"!, today in the Caladium Arts & Crafts Co-op, 132 Interlake Blvd. Lake Placid has the largest club of porcelain artists in the region and will be displaying their colorful hand-painted china. The artists will offer some beautiful hand painted pieces for sale. Live demonstrations of porcelain painting will be presented throughout this event. One of the highlights of the tea is the silent auction, where exceptional pieces by members of the World Organization of Porcelain Artists are auctioned off. Members will serve tea, delicious finger food and desserts from 12:30-3 p.m. There is no charge to attend. For more information about the Lake Placid China Painters, contact Joilynn Littleton, events chairman, at 699-9532 or e-mail elizaislandgirl@yahoo.com.Micki Kuhn in concert at ReflectionsAVON PARK Recording artist Micki Kuhn will present a concert of inspirational music at Reflections on Silver Lake at 6:30 p.m. today. Kuhn will perform a variety of beloved old hymns and southern gospel favorites. Alove offering will be taken. For further information, call 452-5037.Lunch Bunch meets MondaySEBRING Fairmount Mobile Estates Lunch Bunch will meet at 11 a.m. Monday at Homer's Smorgasbord. Hosts will be Lois and Jim Stausholm and Pat and Don Butts. Everyone welcome.Recreation Club plans activitiesSEBRING The Sebring Recreation Club, at 333 Pomegranate Ave., will host the following events this week: Monday Pro shuffleboard tournament Doubles M/LAvon Park, 9 a.m.; ladies social club, 1 p.m.; shuffleboard scrambles, 1:15 p.m. Tuesday Pro-shuffleboard tournament Doubles M/LAvon Park, 9 a.m. Wednesday Nickel scrambles, 1:15 p.m.; line dancing lessons, 5:15 p.m.; line dancing, 6:15 p.m. Thursday Hosscollar, 9:30 a.m. Friday Mini-shuffleboard tournament, 1:15 p.m. Saturday Ice cream shuffleboard, 1:15 p.m. For more information, call 385-2966.Woman's Club hosts luncheon, fashion showSEBRING The GFWC Woman's Club of Sebring is hosting a "Passion of Fashion" Luncheon and Fashion Show at 4260 Lakeview Drive at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, March 19. The deadline for reservations is Wednesday. Seven models will wearing the latest fashions from Sue's Cubby Hole, Belk Dept. Store, Beall's Dept. Store, and Dress Barn. Catering will be by the Twin Oaks Antiques and Tea Room. Numerous door prizes, raffles, money tree will be available. Tickets are $20. For reservations, call 6581278. Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS Classified Ads € 385-6155 NEWS-SUN Courtesy pho to Heartland Christian School fifth and sixth grade students recently qualified to compete in the ACSI Regional Spelling Bee at Merritt Island.Pictured from left to right include Sara Luepschen (sixth grade), Gracie Duncan (fifth grade), Nala Price (sixth grade), Sarah Nortelus (fifth grade), Hannah Kaszubowski (sixth grade) and Jordan Meyer (fifth grade).Nala Price won fourth place overall in the sixth grade division, and Sarah Nortelus won second place pverall in the fifth grade division Top spellers Special to the News-SunSEBRING In recognition of Pi Day on March 14 and to build math awareness, Sylvan Learning, North America's leading provider of in-center and live, online tutoring at home to students of all ages, grades and skill levels, is offering free math resources to families. Pi Day is the annual observance of the love of math and the mathematical constant Pi, commonly approximated as 3.14. To celebrate Pi Day, Sylvan Learning is providing a free new online Math Activity Book with 30 days of math concepts, trivia, questions and puzzles. Parents, students and even educators can log on to Sylvan's website to download and print activities and math games. "Effort and attitude in math matters," says Annette Miller of Sylvan Learning located in Sebring. "Math skills build over time, so missing one early essential component can translate into long-term difficulties that can slow future progress. The Math Activity Book can be used by the entire family, including parents, to open a mathematical dialog that will revive forgotten concepts and practice skills." Miller is also encouraging parents to play an active role in boosting their childs math skills by offering the following tips for getting them interested in math at an early age: Make math connections to everyday life. There are many opportunities for children to see the value of math in everyday occurrences. Think of tasks that you do everyday rearranging a teenager's room is a lesson in geometry and equally cutting slices of pie can teach fractions. The more parents talk about math while completing these tasks, the more students will realize its importance. Involve your children in real-life family decisions. Encourage them to plan a family activity while remaining within the budget. For example, ask your children to plan a night at the movies or create a budget for the family vacation. Demonstrate your math ability. Think out loud so your child can hear your analytical reasoning. For younger children, count your change or discuss which measuring cup is needed when baking a birthday cake. For older students, calculate discounts when shopping or estimate how much money will be needed to fill up the gas tank. Mathematize care er choices. Casually talk abo ut mathematics while hig hlighting the types of ma th needed in your children s chosen careers. Video gam e designers, architects, do ctors, football coaches, mus icians and chefs apply ma th skills in their daily work. Praise your children 's academic progress. Te ll your children you are prou d of their math efforts, ev en when they struggle. Wh en students are confident in their abilities, they enjo y learning. That love of lear ning in turn leads to a wi llingness to try new, academ ic experiences. Sylvan Learning's onli ne Math Activity Book pr ovides 30 days of math wr iting topics, questions an d puzzles. Families can dow nload the booklet an d answers by contactin g Annette Miller of Sylv an Learning located in Sebrin g at 385-0745 or 676@sylvanGLECenters. co m Parents looking for add itional math resources an d information can vis it www.SylvanMathPrep.co m to receive on-the-spot ma th guidance during homewo rk time and obtain free acce ss to over 700 interactive ma th lessons for pre-algebr a, algebra, geometry and ma th test preparation for the SA T and ACT. Make the math connection on Pi Day GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCEƒ

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By JACOB ADELMAN Associated PressLOS ANGELES Nancy Niijima switched on the TV in her room at the Keiro retirement home to see images from her native country of submerged neighborhoods, cars being carried in giant ocean tides, collapsed buildings and cracked roads. "It's like science fiction, not like what really happens in Japan," said Niijima, who is concerned about her sister in the Okinawa island chain, whom she has been unable to reach. The good news is that she has no family near the hardest-hit areas. In the Los Angeles area and other U.S. regions with large Japanese-American and Japanese expatriate populations, those with ties to the Asian country expressed shock at the damage wrought by the 8.9-magnitude quake and fear for the safety of their loved ones there. They also grew frustrated with their inability to reach family and loved ones back in Japan, normally not an issue in such a technologically advanced nation where the Internet and cell phones provide numerous ways to communicate with people in the U.S. "I tried calling my sister in Japan, but all the phone lines were jammed," said Misa Washio, a clerk at a counter selling pens in a Kinokuniya Japanese language bookstore in New York City, who learned of the quake from a friend early Friday and quickly switched on the radio. "I tried about 10 times." The quake, the largest that Japan has experienced in recorded history, struck when it was 1 a.m. in New York and 10 p.m. in California. Doug Erber, president of the Japan America Society of Southern California, said his office has been fielding a constant stream of queries from people who have not been able to reach friends and family in Japan. "The phone has not stopped ringing, and text messages and e-mails," he said. "It's been a busy day just trying to keep up. I think I got about 45 minutes of sleep last night." Erber's organization had added a special section to its website with links to resources that could help users track down loved ones in Japan. These included services by Japan's biggest mobile phone providers that allow users to input friends'phone numbers to access messages posted about them. The site also links to Google's Person Finder service for the Japan earthquake, where users can ask for and provide information about individuals in Japan they've been unable to reach. Google spokesman James Yood said many of roughly 17,000 entries on the site by midafternoon Friday were from the United States, although he did not know how many. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 7A LIMITED SPACE … CALLTODAY! 5 DAYS a week$ 30 Get In Shape Learn Self Defense Improve Self Esteem Make Better Grades MARTIAL ARTS AMERICA471-2467 Best After School Program in SebringFREEPICKUP from: Kindergarten Learning Center, Cracker Trail, Sun-N-Lakes, Woodlawn, Fred Wild, Memorial, Hill Gustat, Sebring Middle/High Located on Kenilworth Sebring*Some Restrictions Apply Life Care, Not Day Care h im to send us a check for t he $3,636.86." Jerome Kaszubowski, s enior director of business s ervices with the Clerk's O ffice, confirmed S impson's assessment. "He (Macbeth) said he d oesn't intend to invoice t he county for the $27,000. I am not sure that our d epartment agrees with the $ 27,000 or not yet. We need t o take a closer look at it," K aszubowski said. "At this p oint, we are not planning o n asking him to pay the $ 3,600. We need to check h is invoices against the ( cost of living allocation) b efore we verify the $ 27,000. "That was a long time a go, and he already told us h e as not going to bill us for t he cost of living raises that w ere missed. But, it's a lmost a wash, isn't it?" K aszubowski stated when a sked about the total billing d iscrepancies versus the a mount Macbeth said he is o wed. When asked if there was a need for a line-by-line a udit of Macbeth's billing, K aszubowski said no. "We are not going to do a ny more at this point," he s aid. Kaszubowski did want to a ssure taxpayers that his o ffice looks at all invoices c losely and that new proced ures were in place to make s ure these issues were f ixed. "Since Bob has been in o ffice, we have placed new p rocedures in place that c lear up matters like this. S ince 2009, we have not h ad any more problems," K aszubowski said. The first spot audit was i nitiated at the request of t he News-Sun after an i nvestigation revealed that M acbeth had billed 56 h ours of his own time in o ne day in 2008. The recent look into M acbeth's billing was at t he request of county comm issioner Don Elwell. "I knew that we had s tarted looking at the bills, a nd I asked if the clerk's o ffice could take a look at t he earlier dates as well. T hey gave some indication t hat they had planned to do t hat anyhow, but I am glad w e are looking at everyt hing," Elwell said. "I reall y don't want to go into d epth about the findings yet b ecause I have not seen the d ocuments yet, but I will s ay that if money is owed to t he county, our first duty is t o make sure it is paid b ack." Elwell went on to discuss t he potential under-billing, b ut was not sure where the c ounty stood on that issue. "Like any vendor, if they d id not bill us and then five y ears later claimed that we o wed them for, say, comp uters, I am not sure that t hey have a leg to stand on. B ut we will have to look at t he circumstances surr ounding the claim," Elwell s aid. Continued from page 1A basic training together in Parris Island, and were deployed to Japan, but are currently in separate bases on the island of Okinawa, which is part of Japan. Bower is a field MPat Camp Hansen and Avalos is an aviation supply specialist at Camp Futenma. Although Avalos was awaiting deployment to help with victims, he was not overly aware of any other happenings "Unfortunately at a time like that, all military members get secured to their base until further notice. Right now I hear we are good and that the mainland was the only affected region," he wrote in Facebook chat. "They are good. I had talked to them but I don't know if they had to evacuate," Avalos said about Bower and his family. Avalos'tour in Japan is almost up and he stated that the next station would be Afghanistan. He wrote that he was currently waiting for the orders to help out around the country. "I know we deployed some marines like recon. But if they are still requesting more, I hope I will have that chance," he wrote. When asked if he wanted to say anything else to friends in the U.S., he responded "That so far all the U.S. military members are safe. And not to worry back at home because we already have started sending aid to the people in need." Continued from page 1A The students have spoken to numerous Egyptians, Muslims and other Middle Eastern protesters via the page. The direct dialogue was started in hopes of better understanding as well as empathizing with those in that part of the world. Emily Lundy is a Lake Placid High School student who participates in the dual enrollment program. Lundy, along with the other classmates, research different areas and topics and use the site as "real-time data" to further class discussion. Since the ending of the Egyptian protests, the class has focused their time on Libya as well as other Middle Eastern issues they find relevant to the United States and themselves. "The language is difficult. Sometimes it's hard to understand what someone is trying to say, which is part of what we are learning. It's not just a geography or a religion barrier; it's language, it's culture. They are going through things we've never had to deal with," said Lundy. Dale and Frost feel that the project is an important part of American students becoming more aware of what's going on beyond themselves. "The students can learn so much but they have to do the work and broaden their scope. The dialogues allow them to hear people their age doing things that are changing their world," Dale said. Continued from page 1A Special to the News-SunSEBRING It's time to rev up for an exciting week of fun at Duffer's Sports Grille as plans are set for Race Week with the 2011 Race Party and St. Patrick's Day Party. On Wednesday, the local band Quick Fire will be on stage at Duffer's for the 2011 Race Party. They play a variety of rock, southern rock and Top 40 dance music. There is no cover charge. There will not be any blues and jazz that night during dinner because of the set up needed for the race party. There will be two 12 Hours of Sebring race tickets given away during the evening. Everyone who is Irish or pretends to be Irish will enjoy all the fun on St. Patrick's Day with good food, drinks and music provided by Billy Glades from 6-9 p.m. J & B Karaoke will continue with music later that evening from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. The Longshot Band w ill be on stage from 6-9 p.m Friday to entertain durin g the dinner hour. Southe rn Style Karaoke will ta ke over after that from 9 p.m to 1 a.m. After watching the 1 2 Hours of Sebring, come o n out from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m Saturday, March 19 to enjo y the dance music provid ed by the band T he Edgeukaters. They play a variety of rock, southe rn rock and blues tunes th at keep everyone on the dan ce floor. All entertainment is fre e. Duffer's is a smoke fr ee environment. During t he dinner entertainment, it is open to everyone includin g children. After 9 p.m ., patrons must be 21 yea rs old and older to enter. Reservations are apprec iated for parties of five or more during the dinner ho ur entertainment. For mo re details, call 382-633 9. Duffer's is at 6940 U.S. 2 7 North. Duffer's revs up for fun during Race Week Follow the News-Sun online on www.twitter.com/thenewssun Courtesy photo Dr. Nancy Dale's communications class discusses recent events in the Middle East. Students communicate with people in middle of Mid-East protests Macbeth billing saga goes on Pair of local Marines OK after earthquake Japanese-Americans seek news of quake back home I have not seen the documents yet, but I will say that if money is owed to the county, our first duty is to make sure it is paid back.'DONELWELL county commissioner

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Page 8ANews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644€LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NO DEALER FEE, PLUS TAX & TAG, STATE FEE, O% withALLY, SEBC RULES APPLY. NO DEALER FEESExpires 3/05/11 NO DEALER FEES SINCE 1931 TODAYBright sunshine79 / 50Winds: SE at 4-8 mphNice with plenty of sunshine81 / 55Winds: ESE at 4-8 mphMONDAYPartly sunny and pleasant81 / 55Winds: SSE at 6-12 mphTUESDAYSunny and nice81 / 56Winds: ESE at 6-12 mphWEDNESDAYSunny and pleasant82 / 58Winds: ENE at 7-14 mphTHURSDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. Washington Washington 58/36 58/36 New York NewYork 53/32 53/32 Miami Miami 78/63 78/63 Atlanta Atlanta 72/53 72/53 Detroit Detroit 42/22 42/22 Houston Houston 76/61 76/61 Chicago Chicago 39/24 39/24 Minneapolis Minneapolis 36/22 36/22 Kansas City KansasCity 52/34 52/34 El Paso ElPaso 78/43 78/43 Denver Denver 58/31 58/31 Billings Billings 58/35 58/35 Los Angeles LosAngeles 66/51 66/51 San Francisco SanFrancisco 60/50 60/50 Seattle Seattle 52/41 52/41 Washington 58/36 New York 53/32 Miami 78/63 Atlanta 72/53 Detroit 42/22 Houston 76/61 Chicago 39/24 Minneapolis 36/22 Kansas City 52/34 El Paso 78/43 Denver 58/31 Billings 58/35 Los Angeles 66/51 San Francisco 60/50 Seattle 52/41 Snow showers will linger in the eastern Great Lakes and northern New England today as a cold front pulls away from the Northeast. Blustery winds will also set up over the region. Meanwhile, a developing system on the southern Plains will spark some scattered showers from northeastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma into western North Carolina. Warm air will engulf the Gulf and Southeast coasts ahead of this system, allowing temperatures to rise as much as 5 to 10 degrees above normal in many cities and towns. U.S. Cities National Forecast for March 13Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. Weather (W):ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Albuquerque 69/40/pc 71/41/pc 71/42/pc Atlanta 72/53/pc 71/52/pc 65/45/r Baltimore 56/33/pc 50/32/pc 52/38/s Birmingham 70/53/pc 71/47/sh 63/45/r Boston 52/30/pc 37/29/pc 44/34/s Charlotte 72/48/pc 59/43/r 55/42/r Cheyenne 50/29/s 62/33/c 56/31/pc Chicago 39/24/pc 41/28/s 52/35/pc Cleveland 44/23/c 35/26/pc 50/37/pc Columbus 46/30/c 46/30/pc 61/42/pc Dallas 73/55/c 71/54/sh 73/57/pc Denver 58/31/pc 70/36/pc 63/34/pc Detroit 42/22/c 38/25/s 48/34/pc Harrisburg 54/31/pc 47/29/pc 52/35/s Honolulu 83/67/s 84/70/s 84/71/pc Houston 76/61/pc 77/57/c 76/58/pc Indianapolis 50/30/c 49/31/pc 58/42/pc Jackson, MS 70/55/pc 73/46/sh 66/44/pc Kansas City 52/34/pc 58/38/pc 55/35/c Lexington 60/36/c 49/33/pc 57/42/pc Little Rock 62/49/r 59/40/r 64/49/pc Los Angeles 66/51/pc 72/52/pc 72/54/s Louisville 58/38/c 51/35/r 59/44/pc Memphis 62/49/r 58/39/r 62/48/pc Milwaukee 39/24/pc 41/29/s 48/36/c Minneapolis 36/22/c 39/33/pc 49/32/sh Nashville 62/45/r 55/38/r 57/44/pc New Orleans 76/59/pc 75/59/c 74/55/pc New York City 53/32/pc 46/34/pc 51/39/s Norfolk 62/43/pc 49/39/pc 52/47/c Oklahoma City 56/38/c 65/46/c 66/49/pc Philadelphia 55/32/pc 48/34/pc 50/39/s Phoenix 82/56/pc 83/60/s 87/58/s Pittsburgh 41/24/c 40/26/pc 53/37/s Portland, ME 46/25/pc 36/18/pc 42/28/s Portland, OR 53/43/r 56/45/r 55/44/r Raleigh 72/46/pc 56/40/r 55/44/r Rochester 38/24/sf 35/21/pc 51/34/s St. Louis 52/34/pc 53/37/sh 60/43/pc San Francisco 60/50/pc 62/46/sh 62/51/c Seattle 52/41/r 55/41/r 55/41/r Wash., DC 58/36/pc 52/37/pc 54/42/s Cape Coral 80/53/s 83/55/s 83/57/pc Clearwater 76/56/s 79/57/s 79/60/pc Coral Springs 78/61/s 78/63/s 79/62/pc Daytona Beach 74/48/s 76/54/s 78/54/pc Ft. Laud. Bch 77/63/s 78/65/s 79/67/pc Fort Myers 80/54/s 83/58/s 83/59/pc Gainesville 76/42/s 78/48/pc 79/50/pc Hollywood 78/59/s 78/61/s 80/62/pc Homestead AFB 76/60/s 77/61/s 76/62/pc Jacksonville 74/45/s 78/49/pc 77/51/pc Key West 76/66/s 77/67/s 78/66/pc Miami 78/63/s 79/65/s 80/65/pc Okeechobee 75/49/s 77/55/s 78/57/pc Orlando 77/50/s 80/55/s 81/55/pc Pembroke Pines 78/59/s 78/61/s 80/62/pc St. Augustine 70/46/s 72/53/pc 73/54/pc St. Petersburg 76/55/s 79/57/s 81/61/pc Sarasota 77/53/s 78/54/s 78/55/pc Tallahassee 78/41/s 78/46/pc 76/49/c Tampa 76/53/s 78/57/s 78/60/pc W. Palm Bch 77/58/s 78/61/s 79/63/pc Winter Haven 77/52/s 80/56/s 80/55/pc Acapulco 89/71/s 88/71/s 89/74/s Athens 63/49/s 63/51/pc 66/54/pc Beirut 60/48/s 62/52/s 67/56/s Berlin 59/45/c 55/39/c 51/36/pc Bermuda 70/63/s 67/60/s 65/60/s Calgary 48/30/s 47/24/pc 43/35/pc Dublin 45/32/pc 46/39/c 48/37/pc Edmonton 40/28/s 40/21/pc 38/24/s Freeport 75/58/s 76/58/s 76/59/s Geneva 51/46/r 62/44/pc 64/48/c Havana 84/57/s 83/57/s 83/60/s Hong Kong 73/66/s 75/64/pc 73/57/c Jerusalem 54/36/s 55/39/s 63/43/s Johannesburg 83/58/pc 79/56/t 75/57/t Kiev 53/42/pc 57/42/pc 43/21/r London 52/34/pc 48/39/r 55/41/r Montreal 34/12/sn 27/14/s 32/25/s Moscow 37/35/s 43/37/c 38/21/sn Nice 61/48/r 66/53/sh 63/52/sh Ottawa 34/10/c 29/14/s 38/23/s Quebec 34/12/sn 21/3/s 27/19/s Rio de Janeiro 84/74/sh 84/73/sh 83/74/sh Seoul 57/41/pc 55/36/pc 43/27/pc Singapore 85/76/t 85/77/t 84/76/t Sydney 86/70/sh 79/68/sh 81/66/pc Toronto 39/19/c 34/19/s 38/30/s Vancouver 51/42/r 47/42/r 49/42/r Vienna 65/52/c 63/51/c 62/51/c Warsaw 56/44/pc 56/45/c 46/28/c Winnipeg 20/4/s 31/26/pc 38/19/sf A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High .............................................. 3:17 a.m. Low ............................................... 9:05 a.m. High .............................................. 3:22 p.m. Low ............................................... 9:37 p.m. Bright sunshine today. Clear tonight. Nice tomorrow with plenty of sunshine. Tuesday: partly sunny and pleasant. Wednesday and Thursday: sunny and nice. Run-off from winter snow followed by torrential rain led to massive ” ooding on the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania and New York on this date in 1936. Bright sunshine today. Winds east-southeast 4-8 mph. Expect a full day of sunshine with average relative humidity 45% and good drying conditions. Clear tonight. € Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. € Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. € All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. FirstFullLastNew Mar 12Mar 19Mar 26Apr 3 Today Monday Sunrise 7:38 a.m. 7:37 a.m. Sunset 7:34 p.m. 7:34 p.m. Moonrise 1:21 p.m. 2:22 p.m. Moonset 2:34 a.m. 3:26 a.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2011Jacksonville 74/45 Gainesville 76/42 Ocala 78/43 Daytona Beach 74/48 Orlando 77/50 Winter Haven 77/52 Tampa 76/53 Clearwater 76/56 St. Petersburg 76/55 Sarasota 77/53 Fort Myers 80/54 Naples 79/55 Okeechobee 75/49 West Palm Beach 77/58 Fort Lauderdale 77/63 Miami 78/63 Tallahassee 78/41 Apalachicola 72/46 Pensacola 73/54 Key West Avon Park 79/50 Sebring 79/50 Lorida 77/51 Lake Placid 79/50 Venus 80/50 Brighton 77/50 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High .............................................. 8:13 p.m. Low ............................................... 3:55 a.m. High .....................................................none Low ......................................................none UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 6 8 6 2 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 76/66 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 11.95 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Tuesday ......................................... 83 Low Tuesday .......................................... 58 High Wednesday .................................... 85 Low Wednesday .................................... 60 High Thursday ....................................... 68 Low Thursday ........................................ 43Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 27% Expected air temperature ....................... 79 Makes it feel like .................................... 76BarometerTuesday ...............................................30.12 Wednesday .........................................30.06 Thursday .............................................30.21PrecipitationTuesday ...............................................0.00Ž Wednesday .........................................0.34Ž Thursday .............................................0.81Ž Month to date ..................................... 1.58Ž Year to date ......................................... 4.45Ž

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BUSINESS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, March 13, 2011 Nobody likes being nagged, but I'm going to risk reader displeasure by reminding everyone that there are hefty financial consequences if you owe income taxes and do not file a return on time or at least request a filing extension. Ordinarily, the federal income tax deadline is April 15, but this year the IRS has granted a reprieve until April 18. Nevertheless, here's why procrastinating is a bad idea: If your 2010 federal tax return (or extension request) isn't postmarked or electronically filed by April 18, the penalty on any taxes you owe increases dramatically. Generally, you'll have to pay an additional 5 percent for each full or partial month you're late, plus interest, up to a maximum penalty of 25 percent. However, if you file your return or request an extension on time, the penalty drops to 0.5 percent per month, plus interest. Here's how it can add up: Say you owe $2,000 in federal income tax. If you haven't requested an extension, you would be charged an additional $100 (5 percent) for each month you're late. Had you filed for an extension, the penalty would drop to only $10 a mont h (0.5 percent). Contact the IR S early if you won 't be able to pay on time. They may even waive the penalty, depending on your circumstances. Call 800-829-1040 or visit www.irs.go v for more informa tion. Another way to avoid a penalty: The IRS accepts payment by credit or debi t card, with a small conven ience fee that is tax deductible if you itemize expenses. Just be sure to pay off your card balance within a few months, or the interest accrued migh t exceed the penalty. Afew additional tax-fi ling tips:Find out what's newBecause the tax code changes every year, scan the IRS'Tax Information for Individuals website fo r updates before diving in. Many of your questions a re likely answered in its Frequently Asked Questions section.Make sure your return is accurateCommon tax-filing errors include: Tax filing deadline looms, so don't wait Personal Finance Jason Alderman Courtesy photo Cross Country staff member Scott Durban does finishing work around doorways inside a Habitat home at Mason's Ridge. Special to the News-SunSEBRING Cross C ountry Automotive Services i n Sebring came out Feb. 23 i n two separate groups to w ork on the house they've s ponsored at Mason's Ridge. C ross Country has been i nvolved in the success of H ighlands County Habitat for H umanity since the business a rrived in Highlands County. "Cross Country Associates h ad fun while working hard," C heryl Sharp, senior recruiter a t Cross Country said. "This g ift of time and sweat equity w ill make a difference and c hange lives." The three-bedroom, twob ath home on Inspiration D rive will be purchased by G race Johnson for her and h er three grandchildren. "We caulked and painted, a nd laughed out loud," Sharp said. "I'm not sure who is benefiting more, Cross Country Associates or Ms. Johnson. We had a good time and a good feeling when the day was done. The joy and pride is tremendous." To learn how your organization can get involved, contact Jennifer McGee at 4022915 orjmcgee@habitathighlands.org Highlands County Habitat for Humanity is a nonprofit, Christian organization dedicated to eliminating substandard housing, homelessness and to making adequate, affordable shelter a matter of conscience and action. Habitat is founded on the conviction that every man, woman, and child should have a simple, decent, affordable place to live in dignity and safety. Cross Country spends work day at Mason's Ridge By ESTHER HARRIS Special to the News-SunFor years, Social Security has s tressed the convenience, security, and s afety of getting benefit payments elect ronically. Soon, direct deposit (or D irect Express) will not only be the best w ay to receive federal benefit payments, i t will be the only way. That's because the U.S. Department o f the Treasury announced a new rule t hat will phase out paper checks for F ederal benefit and non-tax payments by March 1, 2013. Here is how the transition will work. Anyone applying for Social Security or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits on or after May 1, 2011, will receive their payments electronically, while those already receiving paper checks will need to switch to electronic payments by March 1, 2013. Anyone already receiving their benefit payments electronically will continue to receive their payment as usual on their payment day. People receiving benefits have the option of direct deposit to a bank or credit union account (of their choice) or into a Direct Express Debit MasterCard card account (a Treasury-recommended prepaid card option). You can visit www.GoDirect.org to learn more. Social Security, SSI, Veterans Affairs, Railroad Retirement Board, Office of Personnel Management benefits, and other non-tax payments are included. Electronic federal benefit payments a must See PAYMENTS, page 2B See TAX, page 2B

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Page 2BNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com ROOFING SPECIALIST SERVING HIGHLANDS COUNTY SINCE 1989 Shingles Flat Roofs Roof Repairs Mobile Home Roofovers -FULLYLICENSED & INSURED385-4690State Lic # RC 0066817 QUALITY WORK AT A REASONABLE PRICE FREEESTIMATES ELECT WHO?This is a campaign against Melanoma. One in 72 people will contract the disease. You must elect yourself to lead against it. It is a potential matter of life and death.Melanoma*Usually a non-symptomatic growth on the skin with multiple colors and irregular edges.We can protect you against this silent killer. We are your skin police. Call now, elect a proactive preventative skin team.American Institute of Dermatology, P.A.Darrin A. Rotman, M.D. Julie Iellimo, P.A.-C Jennifer Wolf, P.A.-C Medicare and all major insurances accepted in network* New Patients Welcome863-386-0786*individual must call for veri“cation of bene“ts. This is not a guarantee. For most people getting m onthly benefits, this won't r eally be a change; already 8 o ut of 10 beneficiaries receive p ayments electronically. Why the push for electronic p ayments instead of paper c hecks received in the mail? It's safer: no risk of c hecks being lost or stolen; It's easy and reliable: no n eed to wait for the mail or go to the bank to cash a check; It saves taxpayers money: no cost for postage and paper and printing; It saves you money: no check-cashing fees or bank fees; and It's good for the environment: it saves paper and eliminates transportation costs. If you still get your check in the mail, you don't need to wait for the new rule to go into effect to enjoy the benefits of electronic payments. Please visit www.godirect.org today and begin getting your Social Security and SSI payments the safe, easy, inexpensive, and green way electronically. Esther Harris is the Social Security district manager in Sebring. Continued from page 1B Omitting or filling in i ncorrect/illegible taxpayer I D numbers, filing status, d ependent names and Social S ecurity numbers Documentation not a ttached (W-2s, supplement al forms, etc.) Omitting income items Tax return not signed a nd dated Information entered on t he wrong lines Child tax credit incorr ectly calculated Math errors. (Tax softw are does the math, but y ou're still responsible for e ntering correct numbers init ially.) A sk for helpIf calculating your own t axes is too confusing or t ime-consuming, consider u sing tax-completion softw are like Turbo Tax, or hire a tax professional. Asharp p reparer could save you a b undle by finding hidden c redits or deductions. If cost is an issue, several f ree options are available to s eniors, military and lowa nd middle-income taxpaye rs: The IRS sponsors the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA) and Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE). Read Free Tax Preparation on the IRS website for information. AARPTax-Aide volunteers, who are trained by the IRS, provide free tax preparation to lowand middleincome taxpayers, with special attention to people over age 60. Go to www.aarp.org/taxaide for information. Military personnel and their families worldwide can get free assistance through a program offered through VITA. Check with your base for details. Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. To participate in a free, online Financial Literacy and Education Summit on April 4, 2011, go to www.practicalmoneyskills.com/summit2011 Continued from page 1B BUSINESS Riley & Waldron Join 7L BrandsLAKE PLACID 7L Brands, LLC, a division of Lykes Bros. Inc., is pleased to announce the addition of William Riley and Michael Waldron to the company. Riley is the new general manager and brings more than 30 years of of experience to the company as he has held positions as president, executive vice president, general manager, vice president operations and plant manager at multiple sites for companies in the U.S., Panama, Guatemala and Costa Rica. Waldron joins 7LBrands as the company's new sales manager. He brings nine years of horticulture sales experience to the company and has served in several industry leadership roles, including state director for the Florida Nursery, Growers and Landscape Association (FNGLA) Board of Directors for six years. 7LBrands manufacturers, distributes and markets premium mulch products (both pine and eucalyptus) from their 66,000-acre renewable forest, which is located in South Central Florida and has been responsibly managed according to the highest environmental standards for more than 50 years. For more information, visit www.7LBrands.com.Starting Your Business seminar plannedAVON PARK "Starting Your Business" is a free seminar presented by the Small Business Development Center at USF that will be held on Wednesday, March 23, at South Florida Community College Corporate and Continuing Education Room T05 from 2-4:30 p.m. It is designed for person s thinking of starting a smal l business or who have start ed a business and want to make sure they did it correctly. Licenses, marketing entity selection and business planning are among the items discussed. The seminar will be pre sented by David Noel, cer tified business analyst wit h the SBDC. Seating is limited, so please call Noel at 7847378. Michael Waldron William Riley Snapshots Tax deadline coming up quickly Metro Services Getting your taxes done early can save you a lot of headaches in April. Payments going all electronic Associated PressSAN FRANCISCO A pple Inc.'s updated version o f its iPad tablet computer w as available in stores Friday a fternoon but those who c ouldn't wait to say they own t he gadget beat the crowds by o rdering one online before t he sun rises. The Cupertino, Calif., c ompanyopened online sales o f the iPad 2 at 1 a.m. PST, h ours before they will be a vailable in stores nationw ide at 5 p.m. local time. When the original version o f the iPad went on sale in A pril, Apple said it sold more t han 300,000 in the first day. It ended up selling more than 15 million in its first nine months on sale, including 7.3 million to holiday shoppers during the OctoberDecember quarter. The new iPad model comes with several improvements over the original version but the same price tag $499 to $829, depending on storage space and whether they can connect to the Internet over a cellular network hobbling efforts by rivals at breaking Apple's hold on the emerging market for tablet computers. The iPad 2 looks much like the first iPad, only with a sleeker, lighter body with a curved back. Among changes is the inclusion of cameras, one on the front and one on the back for video chatting. With the original iPad, Apple proved there is a large market for a tablet that's less than a laptop and more than a smart phone, yet performs many of the same tasks. Competitors including Dell Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. have been trying to lure consumers with smaller tablets, without much success. In February, Motorola Mobility Inc.'s Xoom went on sale with a new version of Google Inc.'s Android software that was designed for tablets, not smart phones. M CT IPad 2 sales fire off with pre-dawn online orders Associated PressMADISON, Wis. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker succeeded Friday in taking away nearly all collective bargaining rights from the vast majority of the state's public employees, quietly capping weeks of contentious debate and delivering an epic defeat to the labor movement with a private bill signing. Walker planned to hold a ceremonial signing later in the day. The proposal touched off a national debate over labor rights for public employees, and its implementation is a key victory for Republicans who have targeted unions in nationwide efforts to slash government spending. But labor leaders said they plan to use the setback to fire up their membe rs nationwide and mount a major counteratta ck against Republicans at the ballot box in 2012. The measure passed the state's Assemb ly on Thursday following more than thr ee weeks of protests that drew tens of tho usands of people to the Capitol in oppositio n. The Senate cleared the way for passage wi th a surprise move Wednesday that allow ed them to move the measure forward witho ut 14 Democratic senators present. The bill forces state workers to pay mo re for their pensions and health care benefi ts, which is estimated to save Wisconsin $3 0 million. Walker officially cuts collective bargaining

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 3B Associated Press LAJOYA, Texas As T exas farmhands prepared t his winter to burn stalks of s ugarcane for harvest along t he Rio Grande, four masked m en on ATVs suddenly surr ounded the crew members a nd ordered them to leave. Farmer Dale Murden has l ittle doubt they were M exican drug traffickers. "They hide stuff in there," M urden said of the dense s ugarcane crops, some as h igh as 14 feet. "It was very i ntimidating for my guys. Y ou got men dressed in b lack, looking like thugs and t elling them to get back." Texas farmers and ranche rs say confrontations like t hese are quietly adding up. T his month the Texas D epartment of Agriculture, g oing beyond its usual p urview that includes school l unches and regulating gas p umps, launched a website p ublicizing what it calls a w orsening situation "threate ning the lives of our fellow c itizens and jeopardizing our n ation's food supply." However, some Texas D emocratic lawmakers say t he danger is being wildly o verstated, and U.S. Border P atrol officials said they are n ot aware of landowners in t he Rio Grande Valley facing i ncreasing threats. The launch last week of ProtectYourTexasBorder.com also left the state somewhat embarrassed after the site's message board quickly filled with postings calling for vigilante justice and the killing of illegal immigrants. The postings have since been removed. Texas Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples, a Republican in the job once held by Gov. Rick Perry, condemned those postings Thursday. But he said they shouldn't detract from the site's goal of getting more federal resources to the Texas border. "The website demonstrates in undeniable form that greater federal government presence is needed. We need to keep this as a lookout post," Staples said. But Texas state Sen. Jose Rodriguez said the site is misleading, lacking any data that puts the incidents or danger in context. "For the site to convey the impression that we are under a serious threat and that there's all this concern, including to the food supply, it's just total exaggeration of reality," Rodriguez said. "It's unacceptable." Still, there is little doubt of increased unease on Texas border farms. Most brazen among the reported confrontations occurred earlier this year on the sugarcane field near Rio Grande City. In February, a Hidalgo County employee was similarly threatened by three men along the border river to stop clearing brush near a canal, said Troy Allen, general manager of the Delta Lake Irrigation District. Allen said another of his workers has taken to locking himself inside the water pump houses along the Rio Grande. If someone knocks, Allen said, he doesn't answer. "Five years ago, if someone wanted a drink of water we'd give it to them," Allen said of illegal immigrants passing through. "We have a situation that's getting pretty serious in my opinion." Last weekend, on a ranch adjacent to land owned by country music star George Strait, authorities said a ranch foreman was shot at by men inside a pickup truck who were found trespassing. The foreman returned fire, and no one was hurt. Staples pointed out the bullet holes as proof of the escalating threat along the border. Webb County Sheriff's Department spokeswoman Maru De La Paz, however, said there was no evidence tying the shooting to suspected drug trafficker s. Several growers and ranchers say their jobs start ed becoming more dangerous about two years ago. An Arizona rancher was gunned down in 2009 while checking water lines on his property, in what authoritie s suspect was a killing carrie d out by a scout for drug smugglers. No arrests have been made. Apart from tha t incident, Arizona agricultur al leaders say they've heard of no direct threats toward their farmers and ranchers. In Texas, the run-ins with traffickers are largely anecdotal. Border Patrol spokesman Mark Qualia sa id any confrontations would b e investigated by local law enforcement, but added tha t landowners "haven't been expressing those feelings to us." Staples said farmers are scared to speak out. Last week, a 2 1/2-hour meeting between Staples and about 20 farmers was closed to reporters over concern farm ers wouldn't otherwise attend. "I told (farmers) we have to tell this story so our poli cymakers understand the critical nature of what's being said," Staples said. BUSINESS Texas farmers say drug war making job dangerous Don Bartletti/Los Angeles Times/MCT From her property outside of Brownsville, Texas, Debbie Loop peers through the 18-foothigh U.S./Mexico border fence that slices through her citrus groves and has divided her family's residences. The steel barrier was put up about a half-mile north of the Rio Grande River, which marks the borderline. Now, her house is on the north side of the fence and her son's homes are on the south side. Jan. 3, 2011Carlson Family to Asif M alik, L2 Blk 10 Orange B lossom Est. Unit 5 /7/10/Other, $2,200. Robert F. Smith to James M Smith Jr., L7 Blk 340 L eisure Lakes Sec. 9, $ 6,500. Peter Direnzo to Homer A Castle, L6 Blk CC S pring Lake Village VII, $ 12,000. Federal Home Loan M ortgage Corp. to Richard R Hill, L4 Blk 12 Avocado P ark, $96,000. Percy L. Manley III to D avid Piper, L1 Blk 63 H illside Lake Est., $9,900. Patti Vasquez to David P iper, L1 Blk 63 Hillside L ake Est., $9,900. Nancy Atkisson to David P iper, L1 Blk 63 Hillside L akes Est., $2,200. Nivaldo L. Vega to H umberto Camejo, TR 3/22 H idden C ountry/Easements, $ 68,100. U.S. Bank to Michael M organ, L259 Sebring H ills, $74,900. Fernando Ramos to B etty L. Manning, L35 Blk 6 0 Placid Lakes Sec. 6, $ 105,000. Margaret Cicchini to C hris Ambis, Unit 76 V illages of Highlands R idge Phase VIII, $ 158,000. Melanie C. Wagner to H olly C. Bryant, PTL1 Blk B B Spring Lake Village V I/Other, $119,000. Larry J. Ross to Steven K empe, L61/62 Blk 5 Erin P ark, $85,000.Jan. 4Wauchula State Bank to J ohn T. Young, L30 Blk 3 H arder Hall Country Club I I, $163,800. Evelyn L. Zellefrow to A bner Rodriguez, L393 S ebring Ridge Sec. A, $ 3,000. Wells Fargo Bank to D avid A. Broder, L4 Blk 2 A ltamont Place Add 2, $ 18,000. Mildred H. Heaver to D iovie C. Entia, L63066 308 Avon Park Lakes Unit 2 0/Others, $4,000. Harold Dean Wakefield t o George T. Morgan, L615 S ebring Hills, $47,300. Bennie Contreras to J ohn L. Venable, L54 Blk 5 L ake & Ranch Club 3rd Add, $138,000. Suntrust Bank to Abderrahim McHatet, L28 Blk 97 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 8, $2,600. Bobby Heffner to Tracie Ellison, L7 PTL6 Blk 161 Sebring Highlands, $46,000. Nancy Jetton to Rick R. Buntenbach, L31 Blk Q Spring Lake Village III, $79,900.Jan. 5Sara L. McGann to Beneficial Florida Inc., PT Sec. 3-36-28/Easement, $218,800. Highlands Professional Properties Inc. to Yogigastro1, L1 Highlands Professional Properties Sub, $99,600. Bank of America to Peggy I. Scott, L3 Blk B Meadowlake Sub, $185,000. Bank of New York Mellon to Sarah Brouillard, Unit 156 Kenwood Townhomes, $17,500. Don D. Crouch to Terance P. Ault, L454 Francis Mobile Est. Add No. 4, $40,000.Jan. 6Roger Craton to Erica Lynne-Musser, PTSec. 1639-29/Easement, $4,000. Francisco J. Arevalo to Nelson Quintero, L15 Blk 19 Highlands Park Est. Sec D, $11,000. Cecil M. Wilson to Robert O. Moore Sr., PTL1 Blk 15 Town of Avon Park, $85,000. Lisa A. Crockatt Finnegan to Joseph Kanson Jr., L51-B Cormorant Point Sub Unit II, $143,000. Wilco Loan Associates to Walter L. Johnson, PTSec. 18-36-28/Others, $1,800,000. Homesales Inc. of Delaware to Little Anthony Gordon, L11 PTL10/12 Blk I Tulane Sub, $12,500. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Michael G. Cleveley, L11 Blk 23 Sebring Country Est. Sec. 1, $112,000. U.S. Bank to Elga Gamez Andrade, L11102/11103 Avon Park Lakes Unit 34, $58,900. Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. to Ashley Rini, PT Sec. 23-39-28, $5,000.Jan. 7Marilyn Mazei to Thomas Jay Smith, Unit C-23 Bluffs of Sebring Condo Phase II, $50,000. Patricia Ann McMahon to David L.E. Anderson, L452 Golf Hammock Unit V, $98,000. Sean Franco to Marion C. Stivers, L18 Blk 1 Fairway Lake Est., $15,000. Venus Caribbean Group to Moe Ranches, L3 Town of Venus No. 2, $115,000. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Paul W. Dinnen, L1/2 Blk 58 Leisure Lakes Sec. 16, $79,000. Bernice Meek to Jack D. Allbee, L2/3 Blk 17 Sebring Country Est. Sec. 1, $75,000. Gladys Eaglen to Daniel Deuel, L7510-7516 Avon Park Lakes Unit 23, $36,000. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Kathleen Hill Mullennix, L20/21 Blk 358 Leisure Lakes Sec. 17, $70,000. Steven P. Sullivan to Zane Chappy, L24 Blk 283 Placid Lakes Sec. 20, $86,000. Charles Joseph Pausley II to Larry Fields, L12 Blk 21 Sebring Country Est. Sec. 1, $83,000. Alice Paisley to Theodore N. Tzovarras, L1-3 Blk 7 Southside Park Sub Unrec, $15,000. Barbara Ann Dean to Karen Sue Buice, Farm L31 Basket Lake Groves, $9,000. Pamela S. Lowery to Danny Edward Lowery, Farm L31 Basket Lake Groves, $9,000. Lois L. George to Spencer R. Pittman, L22 The Knoll Sub, $20,000. Bank of America to Eduardo C. Rosario Jr., Unit 5D The Manors, $13,000. Betty A. Wallace to Cecil Parrish, L2 Lake Damon Villas South Phase 4, $106,000.Jan. 10Bobbie Gordon Clinton to IRAServices Trust Company, Unit G-6 Bluffs of Sebring Condo Phase 7, $90,000. Don Sewell to Victor M. Seralde, L16 Blk 26 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 2, $107,000. Latin American Investors Corp. to Edwin Santana, L369 Sebring Ranchettes Sec. A, $1,600. Electrical Specialty Services Inc. to Abderrahim McHatet, PT Sec. 36-35-28, $130,000. Suntrust Bank to Robert T. Jones, L1 PT2 Blk 265 Lake Sebring Sub, $64,500. David B. Kotchman to Michael V. Burzesi Jr., L23 Blk 119 Leisure Lakes Sec. 11, $27,000. Aurora Loan Services to Kenneth Mahaffa, L845/846 Avon Park Lakes Unit 3, $18,500. Federal National Mortgage Assn. to David P. Bragg, L14 Blk 204 Leisure Lakes Sec. 3, $47,500. Carmen O. Rosario to Ciara E. Cruz, Unit 12-D The Manors II, $17,100. Harry Jenner to Hans Zieten, L10 Blk 2 Bluff Hammock Est., $11,500. Empirical Group Inc. to Scott J. Link, PTSec. 1137-29, $152,500. William Roger Carter to Shirley A. Shamblin, L5 Blk 263 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 13, $180,000. Rosemary T. Stowe to Duane J. Sugg, L1107 Sebring Hills, $65,000. Eugenia Riters to Owen E. Criswell, L8 Blk 10 Harder Hall Country Club II, $155,000. Bruce M. Chapman to Eugene G. Musselman, L234 Golf Hammock Unit III-A, $160,000. Robyn Elisabeth Spiegel to Rebecca L. Perez, L5/6 Blk 3 Lake Saddlebags Sub, $10,000. William T. Sleboda to Lake Forest Investments, L22 PTL23 Blk B Orange Heights, $58,000. Decamp Limited Family Partnership Ltd. to Spencer M. Gregory, L35 Blk F Lake Placid Camp Florida Resort Replat, $42,000. U.S. Bank to John Martin, L9288-9292 Avon Park Lakes Unit 28, $66,000.Jan. 11William W. Ruge to Robert S. Shaw, L3ABlk 0 Tomoka Heights Sec. 3, $95,000. Midflorida Credit Union to George C. Pope, L357 Golf Hammock Unit IV, $172,500. Paul E. Stuckey Livin g Trust to James Stuckey, L 6 Blk MM Spring Lake Villag e V, $22,600. Suntrust Bank to Abderrahim McHatet, L3 4 Blk 357 Sun 'N Lake Es t. Sebring Unit 16, $2,500. James E. Oxer to Romilio Perez, L11 Blk A Meadowlake Su b, $199,000. Kathy S. Doerr to Roy R Frazier, L19 Blk 14 3 Northside Sub, $18,000. Barbara A. Hewle tt MacKenzie to Emi ly Cogswell, L10 Century H ill Sub, $35,000. Ronald Fuertes to Ma rc Hazebrouck, PTGov't. L1 1 In Sec. 33-35-29, $50,000 Jan. 12Deutsche Bank Nation al Trust Co. to Jeremiah 's International Trading C o. Inc.,L17 Blk 196 Plac id Lakes Sec. 18, $2,000. Reginald Chitwood to Ken Wojcik, L46 The Grov e On Lake Franci s, $135,000. Diner Citrus & Catt le Company to Glenn Ellio tt Beck Family Trust, PTSe c. 9-34-29, $520,000. American Golf Cart 2833 Hwy 27 S. € Avon Park (863) 453-CART(2278)2007S Starting at $1595includes top, window & charger, NEW & USED TIRES & BATTERIES BATTERIES:Trojan PowerTron American Over 75 New & Used Carts To Choose From DEEDTRANFERS

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Breakfasts and lunches being served in the Highlands County School District for the upcoming week of March 14-18 include: HIGH SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, orange glazed carrots, cheddar cheese stick, tossed salad, applesauce snacking cake, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's cheeseburger pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, cocoa clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, hash brown patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, carrots and dip, great northern beans, diced pears, dried blueberries, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, hash brown patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's cheeseburger pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, broccoli, potato wedges, Colby Jack cheese stick, salsa, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, assorted cereal, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted juices, assorted fresh fruit, assorted milk. Lunch Chicken tenders, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, chicken patty on bun, PBJ sandwich meal, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, chef salad meal, baked french fries, carrots and dip, corn, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, assorted milk. ACADEMY SCHOOLS Monday Lunch Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, carrots and dip, applesauce snacking cake, strawberry cup, assorted juice, assorted milk. Tuesday Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, mashed potatoes, green beans, cocoa clodhoppers, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, assorted milk. Wednesday Lunch Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, baked buffalo chips, carrots and dip, dried blueberries, assorted juice, assorted milk. Thursday Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, broccoli, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Friday Lunch Cheeseburger, dill stack, Sun Chips, fresh apple slices, chocolate chip cookie, assorted juice, assorted milk. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadsticks, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, orange glazed carrots, cheddar cheese stick, tossed salad, applesauce snacking cake, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, cocoa clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Breakfast pizza, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, carrots and dip, great northern beans, diced pears, dried blueberries, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, broccoli, potato wedges, Colby Jack cheese stick, salsa, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, assorted cereal, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, burger, cheeseburger, chicken tenders, dinner roll, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, chef salad meal, PBJ sandwich meal, carrots and dip, corn, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, assorted milk. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Cinnamon Toast Crisp, string cheese, orange juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Homestyle pork roast, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, turkey chef salad, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, green beans, apple crisp, very berry juice bar, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Tuesday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Blueberry/sausage pancake, strawberry cup, chocolate milk, Uncrustable peanut butter and jelly sandwich, peach cup, chocolate milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, scalloped potatoes, corn cobbettes, rosy applesauce, very berry juice bar, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Wednesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, peach cup, chocolate milk, blueberry/sausage pancake, strawberry cup, chocolate milk. Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, orange glazed carrots, tossed salad, cocoa clodhoppers, fresh apple slices, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Breakfast frittata, grape juice, chocolate milk, whole grain Poptarts, apple juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Cheeseburger, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, dill stack, potato puffs, carrots and dip, fruited Jell-O, very berry juice bar, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, hash brown patty, assorted cereal, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Whole grain Poptarts, apple juice, chocolate milk, breakfast frittata, grape juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, mixed vegetables, ice cream sandwich, peach cup, fresh apple slices, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. KINDERGARTEN LEARNINGCENTER Monday Lunch Homestyle pork roast, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, green beans, apple crisp, assorted milk. Tuesday Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, scalloped potatoes, corn cobbettes, rosy applesauce, assorted milk. Wednesday Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, orange glazed carrots, cocoa clodhoppers, fresh apple slices, assorted milk. Thursday Lunch Cheeseburger, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, potato puffs, carrots and dip, fruited Jell-O, assorted milk. Friday Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, mixed vegetables, ice cream sandwich, peach cup, assorted milk. Page 4BNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com Save$25 … $300 per unit on select Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their enduring craftsmanship and energy-ef“cient designs, they present exceptional value „ smart style thats energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings from January 14 through April 29, 2011 with mail-in rebates on select styles. Ask us for details. *Manufacturers rebate offer valid for purchases made January 14 through April 29, 2011. Limitations and restrictions apply. As k for details. 2011 Hunter Douglas. and TM are trademarks of Hunter Douglas. Family owned & operated since 1978 CHALKTALK School Menus Highlands Seminole Club offers Haywood O. Taylor ScholarshipThe Highlands Seminole Club is now accepting applications for the Haywood O. Taylor Endowned Scholarship. Highlands County graduates who expect to attend The Florida State University in the Fall 2011 semester are encouraged to apply by March 31. Previous recipients are also encouraged to re-apply. More than $80,000 in scholarships h as been awarded from the endowment over t he past 10 years. Scholarship applications are available o n the club Web site at highlandsseminoles.o rg or they can be found at guidance offices at all three public high schools. Fred Wild hosts PTO meetingSEBRING Fred Wild Elementa ry School will host a PTO meeting at 2:15 p.m Thursday, followed by the SAC at 2:45 p.m Snapshots Courtesy pho to Students in Chris Stephan's science class at Avon Park Middle School dissect an owl pellet to learn what kind of prey the predator has eaten. News-SunAVON PARK Seventh grade science students in Chris Stephan's Science classes at Avon Park Middle School are getting a handson lesson in ecology. Stephan's classes have been focusing in on the food chain and the food web and discussing predator/prey relationships. One of the best ways to learn about that is to conduct an owl pellet lab. "Owls eat mice, rats, etc. They then regurgitate the bones and fur in an egg size pellet," Stephan said. "My students worked in teams to dissect these pellets and found them loaded with bones such as skull bones, ribs, jaw, vertebrae, and leg bones. "We even found in one group what looked like a bat wing and part of a skull." The students then separate these bones into types, an d glue them on constructio n paper to be displayed in t he room. The students will ev en guess as to what kind of an imal the prey was. "This is a very fun way to learn about predators an d prey and to see that thin gs are not always beautiful in an ecosystem, but totally na tural and necessary," Steph an said. APMS science students studying predator/prey relationships

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, March 13, 2011Page 5B 3310 Hwy. 27 South Sebring, FL33870EOEE-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.comFor more information about Cross Country Automotive Services,we encourage you to visit our website at: www.CrossCountry-Auto.co mComprehensive Benefit PackageNow Hiring Full & Part Time Customer Service AssociatesAdditional Opportunities for Spanish as a second language Starting at $9.00 an hour Carmen Kimber Associate of the MonthI feel Happy when I help people.Ž Carmen Kimber Be a HERO like Carmen Kimber863-402-2786AGreatPlaceto Work!€ Tuition Reimbursement € Life Insurance € Vacation Time € Holiday Pay € Medical € Dental Supervisors Positions Available Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or le ss. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads p laced under the Bargain BuysŽ discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom se t ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad st ating Each,Ž the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open RateŽ pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain BuysŽ specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home,Ž are allowed to be pla ced under the Bargain BuyŽ category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS € Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 385-6155. € The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08008937 GMAC-CONV-Team 2 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. March 13, 20, 2011 1050LegalsMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 30th day of March, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 11 AND 12, BLOCK 2, LAKE SIRENA SHORES RESUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 11, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 315 SIRENA DRIVE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on March 7, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAIN Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-000209 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, Plaintiff, vs. ORLANDO MARRERO, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated March 07, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-000209 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, is the Plaintiff and ORLANDO MARRERO; JACQUELINE MARRERO; TENANT #1 N/K/A BRANDI SCHNEIDER are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASE1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001604 SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., Plaintiff, vs. LARRY W. LANGMAN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated February 14, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-001604 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., is the Plaintiff and LARRY W. LANGMAN; SHELLY D. LANGMAN; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 24th day of March, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: THAT PORTION OF LOTS 4 AND 5, LYING NORTH OF STATE ROAD 621 RIGHT-OF-WAY, LOT 6, LESS STATE ROAD 621 RIGHT OF WAY; ALL OF LOTS 7,8,9,10, AND 11, BLOCK C, BREEZY POINT PARK, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 52, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 917 LAKE JUNE ROAD, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on February 15, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAIN Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F09104250 SAXONFID-SPECFHLMC**See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. March 6, 13, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-42 IN RE: ESTATE OF HELEN B. RICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of HELEN B. RICE, deceased, whose date of death was December 26, 2010, and whose social security number is xxx-xx-xxxx, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 6, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ John Ellis Rice 2640 W. Southampton Road Avon Park, Florida 33825 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ David F. Lanier E-Mail Address: lanier@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No. 045399 DAVID F. LANIER P.O. Box 400 Avon Park, Florida 33826-0400 Telephone: (863)453-4457 March 6, 13, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. PC 11-77 Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF ROBERT D. YOUNG, SR. Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ROBERT D. YOUNG, SR., deceased, whose date of death was January 21, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Clerk of the Court, Highlands County Courthouse, 530 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida. The names and addresses of the personal representative and thepersonal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVCE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 6, 2011. Personal Representative: Helen Young 1454 Golf View Drive S Avon Park, Florida 33825 Attorney for Personal Representative: James V. Lobozzo, Jr. Attorney for Helen Young Florida Bar Number: 274178 MCCLURE & LOBOZZO 211 S. Ridgewood DriveSebring, Florida 33870 Telephone: (863) 402-1888 Fax: (863) 471-0751 E-Mail: jlobozzo@mllaw.net March 6, 13, 2011 within 30 days from the date this action is filed with the Clerk of the Department. March 13, 201 1050Legals A ttachment A File No.: EM 0238833-006 STATE OF FLORIDADEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTIONNOTICE OF DETERMINATION FOR A MODIFICATION The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice modify the Environmental Resource Permit, (File No.: 0238833-004), for the Kissimmee River RestorationIstokpoga Canal Improvements to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to perform repairs to eroded areas and install an additional 12,262 square feet of riprap below the Ordinary High Water Line at the S-67 structure. The activity is located at within the Istokpoga Canal, Class III Waters, northeast of the S-67 Structure in Highlands County, Florida. The Department's file on this matter is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holi-days, at the Department of Environmental Protection, Attention: Dianne K. Hughes, 400 North Congress Avenue, Suite 200, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, Telephone: 561-6816703. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition for an administrative hearing is timely filed under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., before the deadline for filing a petition. On the filing of a timely and sufficient petition, this action will not be final and effective until further order of the Department. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the filing of a petition means that the Department's final action may be different from the position taken by it in this notice. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. Pursuant to Rule 28106.201, F.A.C., a petition for an administrative hearing must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency's file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner's representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner's substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warant reversal or modification of the agency's proposed action; (f)A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency's proposed action, including an explanation of how the alleged facts relate to the specific rules or statutes; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency's proposed action. The petition must be filed (received by the Clerk) in the Office ofGeneral Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Also, a copy of the petition shall be mailed to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3), F.S. must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice or within 14 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. The failure to file a petition within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of that person's right to request an administrative determination (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., or to intervene in this proceeding and participate as a party to it. Any subsequent intervention (in a proceeding initiated by another party) will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. Under Rule 62-110.106(4), F.A.C., a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline for filing a petition for an administrative hearing. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running of the time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. Mediation is not available in this proceeding. A ny party to this action has the right to seek judicial review pursuant to Section 120.68, F.S., by filing a Notice of Appeal pursuant to Rules 9.110 and 9.190, Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure, with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, M.S. 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000; and by filing a copy of the Notice of Appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate District Court of Appeal. The Notice of Appeal must be filed 1050Legals Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

PAGE 14

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-000591 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, F.S.B F/K/A WORLD SAVINGS BANK, F.S.B., Plaintiff, vs. LATEEFAH HAWTHORNE, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 14, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2010-CA000591 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as successor in interest to Wachovia Mortgage, F.S.B. f/k/a World Savings Bank, F.S.B., is the Plaintiff and Lateefah Hawthorne, Samuel Hawthorne, CitiFinancial Equity Services, Inc. are the defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 24th day of March, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOTS 8 AND 9, HILTON HEIGHTS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 13, PAGE 65, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A /K/A 128 COMPASS AVENUE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 15th day of February, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001433 DIVISION: HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR ACE SECURITIES CORP. HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2006-NC1, Plaintiff, vs. ELIZABETH ANN CRISAFULLI, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 14, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-001433 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for ACE Securities Corp. Home Equity Loan Trust, Series 2006-NC1, is the Plaintiff and Elizabeth Ann Crisafulli, Jeffrey Crisafulli, a/k/a Jeffrey A. Crisafulli, Manor Hill Owners' Association, Inc., a/k/a Manor Hill Property Owners A ssociation, Inc., Any And All Unknown Parties Claiming by, Through, Under, And Against The Herein named Individual Defendant(s) Who are not Known To Be Dead Or Alive, Whether Said Unknown Parties May Claim An Interest in Spouses, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Or Other Claimants are the defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 24th day of March, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 13, IN BLOCK 266, OF SUN 'N LAKES ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 71, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A /K/A 2501 SUNRISE DRIVE, SEBRING, FL 33872 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 15th day of February, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 2011 PUBLIC AUCTION FOR TOWING & STORAGE 1998 CHEVROLET 1GCCS1948W8127933 ON MARCH 25, 2011, AT 9:00AM AT PRECISION AUTO BODY 734 CR 621 EAST LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 March 13, 2011 NOTICE OF SALE Notice of Public Sale of a 1998 Key West Stealth boat, HIN #KWEST143L798, trailer VIN #1ZJBB19128C007786, Yamaha motor C115TLRW ID# 332423. Owners: Kenneth Lambert and/or Donald Chancey of Wauchula, FL. Sale to be held to satisfy repair and storage lien on April 21, 2011, 8 a.m., at Gone Fishin' Marine, 236 Commercial Way, Sebring, FL. March 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-84 IN RE: ESTATE OF DANA RAY ANTHONY a.k.a. DANA R. ANTHONY NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of DANA RAY A NTHONY a.k.a. DANA R. ANTHONY, deceased, whose date of death was January 23, 2011, and whose social security number is xxx-xx-xxxx, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) Y EARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 6, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Gail Anthony 101 Fenton Avenue Laconia, New Hampshire 03246 A ttorney for Personal Representative: / s/ David F. Lanier E-Mail Address: lanier@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No. 045399 DAVID F. LANIER P.O. Box 400 A von Park, Florida 33826-0400 Telephone: (863)453-4457 March 6, 13, 2011 1050Legals

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun March 13, 2011Page 7B The Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce is now accepting resumes for the position of President/CEO. Applicants must possess a strong financial background with excellent administrative, organizational and marketing skills. Salary is competitive. Resumes will be accepted until 5 p.m. Friday, March 18. Finalists will be interviewed Friday, March 25. Send resumes to: Attention Search Committee Chair, Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce, 227 U.S. 27 North, Sebring, FL33870. Florida Home Health is seeking licensed Physical Therapists and MSW looking to join a dynamically driven team focused on the goals of maximizing seniors ability to thrive in their home and community. As an employer, Florida Home Health, provides employees with the tools, continuing education, and supportive atmosphere to meet the unique needs of the elderly. To apply, e-mail your resum to Lisapeters@almostfamily. com or call 239-823-5535.License # 299992569 Motivated, Enthusiastic Professionals Wanted to Join Our Team!1996 FORDCROWN VICTORIA Regularly serviced, Looks and Runs GREAT! Excellent gas mileage, needs A/C work. $1700. 863-382-0310 9450Automotive for Sale2010 ENCLOSEDtrailer 24'X 8'X 7' escape door GW 10,000 lb. $7500, 2005 20'X8' flat GW10,000 $3500, 2002 10'X7' utility GW 1,900 lb. $2500. 863-260-1709 9220Utility Trailers ATV KAWASAKIBAYOU 220 Low Hours! Adult Driven! Garage Kept! Very Good Condition! $1300 OBO. 863-381-2414 1973 NORTON850 COMMANDO New professional restoration, very low miles includes Owner's Manual. One Owner Rare Find Great Price 863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation1996 TRAVELMASTER MOTOR HOME Good condition. Awnings, generator, lots of extras. Good tires. $11,000. 863-314-8557. 8450Motor Homes RV 38'2010 5TH Wheel. EAGLE RIDGE by HEARTLAND, 2BR, 1BA, 2 slides, fiberglass, W/D, awning. All options. $29,000 obo. Immediate Sale! 321-437-5887 CAMPER -1999 PROWLER LS Excellent Condition, Super Slide-out, Queen Bed, Many Extras. $7500 OBO. 570-352-7766 2011 39FT. Monte Carlo 2 slides, 2BR, sleeps 8, CHA, washer / dryer, self contained, microwave and awning. Every option. Limited Edition. $23,500. MUST SELL! 630-631-1795 2010 BMXUTV 500 4 Seater, 4 X 4. $7400. 8633865445 2010 38'HY-LINE Travel Trailer Park Model. Very Clean. 2 Slide outs, W/D, Bayfront, non-smoke, no pets. Will Deliver. Lake Josephine RV Resort area. $21,000. 941-518-4040SEBRING RACESPOTSThree (3) Reserved Parking Spots on Turn 15. Great View, on Concrete. $400 each; Take Some or All! Call 863-381-9526 8400RecreationalVehiclesPOOL SUPPLIES:Pump, Filter, Pool Cleaner (Barracuda) & Chlorine Tablets for above ground pool. All for $300. Call 863-453-7663. 8300Pools & SuppliesPONTOON BOAT20 foot Bass Tracker, New deck, 50hp. Mercury, with trailer. $3500 715-573-8889 or come by at 150 Jade Way, Lake Placid. 8050Boats & Motors 8000 RecreationNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states tha t all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & Supplies SEBRING -MOVING SALE! 2802 Orange Grove Dr., Sat-Sun, Mar 12th & 13, 9am-6pm. Living Room, Bedroom & Some Kitchen Items. SEBRING -BIGGGGG YARD SALE! 2454 Lakeview Dr. Fri Sat Sun Mar 11-12-13, Clean Under cover Furn., to knick knacks. Plus all in between. AVON PARKHAIR DEPOT 2650 US 27, N., Sun, Mar 13th. Antiques, Nice Furniture, Solid Wood Hutch, Tables & Chairs, Tools, Table Saw, Mattresses, Lamps, Paintings, Milk Cans, Videos, Dishes, & Lots More! Must Downsize! 8TH ANNUALGIGANTIC GARAGE SALE BLOW OUT Sunday, March 13th, 9am-2pm Quality Inn 6525 US 27, North Appliances, antiques, art work, bedding, blankets, books, chairs, clocks, computers, construction supplies, desks, furniture, housewares, jewelry, kitchen equipment, lamps, mattresses, men's and women's clothing, office equipment and supplies, photocopiers, printers, scanners, sheets, telephones, tools, towels...& More! Over 5,000 sf of A/C Stuff! Bring your donated canned & boxed food items to benefit Helping Haiti A portion of the Gigantic Garage Sale proceeds & items go to benefit H.C. Habitat for HumanityCan't Make It? Call 385-4500 for Leftovers! 7320Garage &Yard Sales WOODEN WHITEspiral reupholstered padded chairs (2) both for $40 863-382-6006 VACUUM -Upright, excellent condition, clean as a whistle! $20 863-402-2285 TABLE -42'' Glass Top with 4 chairs on wheels. $50. 863-385-4612 RECLINER -LAZYBOY, Ladies size, light blue coudoroy, in new condition w/arm covers. $75. 863-332-5012 PAPER WEIGHT6'', Glass, with flower inside. $20. 863-873-7201 or 863-441-0448 NAVAJO -Bracelet / watch band. Silver / turquoise, heavy. $80 863-402-2285 DS -PINK, like new w/case & 2 games. Asking $90 OBO. Call 863-381-1839. DRAFTING T-SQUARE48'' Stainless Steel, $10. 863-873-7201 or 863-414-0448 7310Bargain Buys DOG STROLLERfolding, Red & Black. Like new. $45. 863-452-1618 BIRD BATHdecorative concrete. $20 863-382-6006 BED EXTENDERfor Chevy Colorado truck. $75 863-243-1633 BARBIE DOLLHOUSE 4 ft w/furniture. Asking $90 OBO. Call 863-381-1839. ARMOIRE -White wood 36" wide X 64" high X 18" deep. 2 doors & 3 drawers. $65. 863-385-4701 7310Bargain Buys TOOL MAN'SDELIGHT 10" Delta table saw w/ access., Craftsman 10" radial saw, 15 1/2 drill press & 10" band saw, 8" Tradesman 5 sp. bench drill press. Call 863-471-6794 4-8 pm. COVER /ADCO for RV trailers 28' 7" X 31' 6", never opened still in orig,pkg. a bargin $150 863-453-7027 BED FRAME-wood full size, excel. cond., 36" Sony TV w/ media stand, entertainment tower, twin matress, Craftsman lawn mower. 863-471-6674 7300Miscellaneous NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS! HIGHPOINT FURNITURE OUTLET STORE 2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRINGNorthofLowes&acrossfrom HomeDepot 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise SEBRING (2)Available 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 GARAGE 32'X 60' BLOCK BUILDING, cement floor, 12' X 12' door, 100 amp electrical service. $450 monthly. S. Marion Rd, Avon Park 269-420-6331 6750Commercial Rental LOOKING FORSEASONAL RENTAL 2BR, 2BA Condo or House for Jan-Feb-Mar 2012. In Sebring Preferred Call 863-658-1564, before 10 am or after 8 pm, or email: eliskagantert@rogers.com HOG/TURKEY LEASE2 Ethical Bowhunters seeking hog/turkey lease. No dogs, guns, ATV's, or mess. Contact: Irv, 608-516-8615 or irv.xpress@gmail.com 6650Wanted to RentSEBRING 20'X40'Warehouse, 12' overhead door, on busy Highway 27 across from Lakeshore Mall. 863-385-3474 6550Warehousesfor Rent SEBRING -Furnished, 1BR with private bath, in Senior RV Resort. Washer/Dryer, Cable, full use of house. No Pets, No Smoking. For more information call Gloria, 863-257-1577 SEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, W/D, Satellite, full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for RentSEBRING -Weekly/Multi-Week Condo Rentals Avail. Now. Located on Little Lake Jackson across from Harder Hall Golf Club. Lots of ammenities. Starting @ $500/wk. 863-385-5005, ext. 0 6320Seasonal Property SEBRING -Harder Hall Executive Home on Golf Course. 3BR, 2BR, 2CG, Nice screen porch, 1900 sq ft liv. Appl's included. 1 year lease, no smoke. $850/mo. + sec. dep. 863-381-3990. SEBRING -Harder Hall area, 2BR, 2BA, 1CG, screened porch. $725/mo. plus & security deposit. View by appointment. Call 863-381-6747, leave message. The Avon Park Housing Authority is now taking applications for North Central Heights Homes, a new Rent RestrictedŽ single family home development in Avon Park consisting of 20 Two Bedroom, 46 Three Bedroom and 4 Four Bedroom homes. Rents will average in the low $400s for 2 br. homes and low to mid $500 & $600s for the 3 & 4 Br. homes. Applications open for Avon Park residents only; February 14 … March 11, 2011 and all other applicants after March 11, 2011. For further information, contact: Avon Park Housing Authority at 863-452-4432, Ext. 2220 6300Unfurnished Houses SEBRING -Fully Furnished2BR with fenced yard & concrete utility room w/Washer/Dryer. Will consider pets. $550/mo + $400 security deposit. Extra pet deposit. 863-243-4580 SEBRING -Country Club of Sebring. 2BR, 2BA, den, lanai, pool, beautifully furnished/decorated. Available April 1st. Call 863-386-0340. LAKE PLACIDNewer 3BR, 2BA, seasonal or monthly. Excellent furniture & appliances, near lake & boat ramp, No smoking or dogs. $1450/mo. After season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119 6250Furnished Houses SEBRING FREE 1/2 mo rent, free cable, lg clean 1/1 tile floors. quiet / safe. No dogs 863-385-1999 AVON PARKAFFORDABLE RENTRidgedale Apartments1, 2, 3 & 4 Br Apts Central Location, water & trash included Rent subsidized „ Based on household income. No Application Fee Call 863-452-4432 TTY 800-955-8771 EQUAL HOUSINGOPPORTUNITY LAKE PLACID2BR, 1BA & 1BR, 1BA available immediately. Includes laundry facility / water / sewage. 1st. & security. No Pets! 561-706-6743 LAKE PLACIDNewly remodled! 2/BR, 2/BA, screened patio, Washer / Dryer, Excellent Conditio n. Includes water. $500 monthly plus 1 mo. security. 954-695-8348 KEY LAKEVILLASLAKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING 2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean & quiet, Screen porch, Outside patio, Central air, Washer/Dryer hookup, $585/mo., first & security. No Pets. 863-465-2740 AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsSEBRING -Downtown on the Circle. Weekly. or Monthy, starting at $150 wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets. 306 circle. 863-386-9100 or 954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask for John. 863-414-7535 6150FurnishedApartmentsSEBRING -UNFURNISHED 2203 Colma Ave., 2/BR, 1/BA & Patio. No smokers & no pets. $450 monthly, 1st. and last, plus $300 security deposit. 561-379-6823 or 561-965-4458 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 Rentals WHISPERING PINESVILLAGE 55 plus. 3BR, 2BA. Fully furnished & 3BR, 3BA, Partially furnished. Must see to appreciate. Call Mary 863-385-8806 VENUS -3/BR, 2/BA, large deck with pool & hot tub, 2 1/2 acres, Pole barn and fenced yard. Appliances stay. Rent or Leas w/ option to buy, considered. 863-441-5038 SEBRING -2BR, 1.5BA in 55+ Park. All new inside, completely furnished, includes Washer/Dryer, 32'' flat screen TV. All new windows, FL Room, carport. Free yard sprinkler system. Best Park in Sebring! Low lot rent. Not in Pet Section. Priced to sell quick...by owner. Background check required by park owner. 863-382-0219 PALM HARBORHOMES has closed 2 Model Centers. Save up to 60K on select models. Call 1-800-622-2832. AVON PARK12X46, 1BR, 1BA in Avon Mobile Home Park. New gas cook stove, carport, screened room, shed, other recent updates. Reasonable lot rent. Asking $6500. 574-518-8483 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesATTENTION: CASH for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4320Real Estate WantedBEAUTIFUL LOTSin Sebring and Lake Placid areas. Golf and Lake Communities. $3900. email Lotsfor5000.com or Call Sal 863-633-0050 4220Lots for SaleAVON PARK-DUPLEX-VIILLA in Orangewood Acres Newly painted inside and out. New roof in 2009, New counter tops and sinks. All updated appliances incl. Excellent community. Own your own land. 863-257-1873 4180Duplexes for Sale SEBRING 3BR,2BA 1CG, CBS Home 303 Virginia Pl. $119,00 or 2BR, 2BA, MH 5151 Barnum St. $42,500 10% Down Owner Financing Call 863-835-1445 SEBRING -Quiet Neighborhood on great fishing lake; 2,000 sf, 3BR, 2.5BA remodeled home with large garage & boat house. $219,000. 863-655-2278 MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE! SEBRING NO NEED FOR A BANK! Owner Financing 3BR, 1BA remodeled, NICE HOME! Woodlawn Elem. area. 1243 Fernvale Ave. 863-227-2717 4080Homes for SaleSebringAVON PARKMediterranean Home on Lake Lillian, 3000 sq ft+ Guest Cottage. Central Heat/Air, Fireplace, Sun Porch, Open Stairway, Hardwood Flrs, $249K. 863-453-8955/863-453-0392 (eve). 4060Homes for SaleAvon ParkSEBRING -RURAL LIVING adjacent to great fishing lake close to Sebring. 3BR, 2BA home, pole barn, 5 acres fenced, zoned agriculture $150,000. 863-655-2278 Make Offer! 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial TRUCK DRIVERWANTED Clean driving record a must! Apply in person 3636 Desoto Rd. Sebring. TEACHERS NEEDED For Christian Preschool Substitute Teacher/10 days in March Assistant Teacher Needed Call 863-443-2344 SUNRISE COMMUNITYINC is currently accepting applications for the position of: Direct Support Staff. Qualified applicants must meet the following: 18 yrs. old, High school diploma or equivalent, 1 yr. experience medical, or childcare setting, must be able to pass law enforcement background screening and drug test. All interested can call for appt. and application informaton: Sunrise Community Inc. 1014 6th Ave. S., Wauchula, Fl. 33873. 863-773-0434 ext. 305 EOE / DFWP SEEKING WELLEXPERIENCED MEDICAL OFFICE HELP P/T. Excellent billing/collection, communication, typing, computer skills & medical terminology are A MUST Fax resume to: 863-471-3206 or email to: medicalofficebilling@yahoo.com MERCHANDISERQUARTERday per monthGDS seeks a dependable individual to merchandise magazines, books and handle special projects in Sebring. Must own a late model vehicle with valid drivers license and auto insurance. Must also be computer literate with access to both email and the Internet. E.mail resume to: recuruiter@slobalinstore.com LPN'S WANTED Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility serving adults with developmental disabilities is seeking Licensed Practical Nurses P/T and PRN. We offer a casual work environment, competitive wage and benefits package. For details call Barb at 863-452-5141 LOCAL PRE-SCHOOLHIRING for several positions. Experience preferred but not required. Benefits available. Call 863-382-2727 to schedule an interview. JANITORIAL/RESTAURANT CLEANING Immediate opening for F/T Professional Sub Contractor to clean restaurant. Experience preferred, will train if necessary. Flexible hours. Call M-F, 9-5 1-800-577-1318 HIRING NAILTECH Pedicure, Manicure, Acrylic Nails. Full or Part Time. Paid on Commission. Call Tommy at 727-512-9335 or 863-873-2527.RESTAURANT HIRINGSERVERS, COOKS, & BEVERAGE CART SERVERS Needed at Springlake Golf Resort. Apply Monday through Saturday10am 5pm. For directions only, call 863-655-0900 2100Help Wanted HIGHLY MOTIVATED Individual needed for full-time General Office/Bookkeeper/Receptionist position with busy law practice. Needs to be able to work independently, and be extremely organized with attention to details. Excellent computer and communication skills are required. Send Resume to: Reply Box #2198 News Sun, 2227 US 27, S. Sebring, FL 33870 REGISTERED NURSE part time (20 hrs. per week). Dependable transportation is required. Home Health experience preferred in order to train and monitor, Personal Care Workers doing in-home services. Good oral and written communication skills are necessary. A non-clinical position. Apply in person at NU-HOPE ELDER CARE SERVICES, 6414 US HWY 27 South, Sebring. EOE DFWP 2100Help WantedBRICK MASONRYINSTRUCTOR Avon Park The Home Builders Institute is seeking a brick masonry instructor. Five years related experience plus HS diploma / equivalent required. For details, including qualifications, visit www.hbi.org/jobs. EOE/M/F/D/V UTILITY POLE INSPECTION Career Opportunity. Will train, valid drivers license & travel required. Long term employment. Contact Dennis @ 404-7911990 or dpremo@asplundh.com M/F/V/D/EOE 2050Job Opportunities 2000 Employment 1200Lost & FoundCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 385-6155 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements Highlands County Sheriff's Office Request for Proposals (RFP)RFP 11-01 Enterprise-Wide Document Imaging Software The Highlands County Sheriff's Office is seeking RFP's from vendors to provide a fully developed, integrated, and implemented solution, along with technical support/services, for an ENTERPRISE-WIDE DOCUMENT IMAGING SOFTWARE. A ll requests for copies of this RFP should be directed to: Deb J. Olson, General Services Manager, Highlands County Sheriff's Office, 434 Fernleaf Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 (863) 402-7266, Facsimile (863) 402-7344. A ll technical questions may be forwarded to Rob Jordon, Administrator of Information Services, Highlands County Sheriff's Office Law Enforcement Bureau, 434 Fernleaf Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 (863) 402-7257 Proposals must be submitted in a sealed envelope and marked with the bid number and name to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to the Highlands County Sheriff's Office, 434 Fernleaf Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M. March 31, 2011 at which time they will be opened. March 13, 20, 2011***************************************** HIGHLANDS COUNTY LEGAL NOTICES ***************************************** The following legal notices are from the Highlands County Board of County Commissioners and are being published in the font, size, and leading as per their specifications. 1055HighlandsCounty LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-484GCS DIVISION: A MERICAN HOME MORTGAGE SERVICING, INC., Plaintiff, vs. MAHABIR PURAN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 14, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-484GCS of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which American Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc., is the Plaintiff and Mahabir Puran, John Doe n/k/a Roberto Madina, City of Sebring, are the defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 24th day of March, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 13, BLOCK 58, OF ORIGINAL TOWN OF SEBRING, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA, OF WHICH HIGHLANDS COUNTY WAS FORMERLY A PART. A /K/A 217 MANGO STREET, SEBRING, FL 33870 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 15th day of February, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 2011 1050Legals Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classified ads get fast results NEED TOBE WITH MY OWNER Beautiful cat (kitten at the time) showed up at our home, in the summer months, in the area of Pioneer Rd & CR 17. She had been declawed and well kept by her owner. Would love to return her to her family. Call 863-453-6469

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com

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By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE PLACID In what is proving to be a standout year for Lake Placid baseball, the wins keep piling up. And rather than fighting for a spot in the middle of the pack, the Dragons are making a push toward the top of the district standings after Friday's 14-4, five-inning win over visiting Mulberry. Toeing the rubber for the first time since being sidelined by a wrist injury, Clayton Mason went through the first inning unscathed before his offense got him an early lead. With one out, Terry Coyne doubled on a fly to center and Dylan Weber-Callahan took one square in the back to put runners on first and second. Kyle Barber then lifted a fly to right that couldn't be handled, bringing Coyne in, and Tyler Carr knocked Weber-Callahan home with a two-strike sacrifice fly. The Panthers looked to put a dent in the lead when a lead-off double, a hit batter and a walk loaded the bases with nobody out. Mulberry did tally one run, when an attempted pick-off from catcher to third got away, but Mason recovered to strike out the next three batters and hold the 2-1 edge. Timely hitting and a sketchy Panther defense paved the way to three more runs in the second, with Brandon Wells reaching on a single and moving to second on an error allowing Brody Carr to reach. Coyne then double We lls home and an error on a Weber-Callahan fly ba ll brought in both Carr an d Coyne to score. Mulberry would scrat ch for a few more runs, but th ey SPORTS C SECTION News-Sun Sunday, March 13, 2011 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Nate Greene lashed this double down the third-baseline during Sebring's near-miracle comeback against Lake Wales Friday night. News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E Terry Coyne steps on home plate for the first of many Lake Placid runs in Friday's 14-4 win over visiting Mulberry. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING "The toughe st game is the first game a fter a loss," said Sebring h ead coach Hoppy Rewis, s peaking of the task of taki ng on a top-notch Lake W ales squad after T uesday's 5-2 loss a t Winter Haven. But that's two g ames in a row that w e've had trouble g etting started." The Blue Streaks, a fter all, had been r iding high with the loss to t he Blue Devils being the f irst of the season. And though Friday's s tart was especially slow, S ebring finished strong in n early pulling out a miracle w in before they fell one run short in the 9-8 loss to the Highlanders. Down 9-0 after three torturous innings could very well have sent the Streaks home early. Acombination of walks, errors and hit batsmen had given Lake Wales those nine runs on a grand total of four hits through those first three innings. And though Jesse Baker had plated a run for the home team with an RBI double to left in the bottom of the third off Florida signee Justin Schafer, the Highlanders had the bases loaded with two out off reliever Nate Greene in the top of the fifth. Arocketed fly ball into left center could well have spelled the end, had it not been for center fielder Even Lewis getting on his horse and tracking it down with a running catch to end the inning with no damage done. And from there, the comeback began. "It could have been 12-1 and we could have packed it in and gone home early," Rewis said. "I've had some teams that may have done that, but not this group." With Schafer lifted for relievers with the seemingly insurmountable lead, Lewis drew a one-out walk in the bottom of the fifth and moved to third when Baker bounced a double off Nearly a miracle Lake Wales9Sebring8 See SEBRING, page 4C By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comTuesday's six-team track and field invitational saw a slew of strong performances from area athletes as the Lady Blue Streaks won the girls side of the meet. Avon Park got a leg up early, with Angelique Ligon winning both the 100and 200-meter dashes before Taylor Tubbs got Sebring off and running with a win in the 400. The Streaks showed their strength in the longer distances, with Hannah Schroeder then winning the 800 and Emily Smith the 1,600. Tubbs and Smith followed with a one, two finish, respectively, in the 3,200 before Destiny McCartney swept the hurdles events, winning both the 100and Strong showings at Sebring Invite By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Avon P ark (6-4) drew first blood i n the first to set the stage f or a 4-2 win against F rostproof on Friday night. Red Devil Lane Crosson t ook advantage of a cold B ulldog pitcher when he led the game off with a single on the first throw. "We made a couple of mistakes that t hey capitalized on, and we d idn't do the same when we h ad the opportunity," F rostproof head coach J eremy Byrd said. "I think t heir pitcher did a great job o n quieting our bats, and t hat the difference in the g ame." Frostproof (3-5) would a nswer Crosson in the top o f the second when Reily J ohnson got on with a sing le and then was driven in b y Jacob Smith who also m ade it home before the i nning was out. The game settled into b attle of pitchers at that p oint and Avon Park's Brad T orres went the distance, t hrowing 106 pitches, six s trike outs and just three w alks. Frostproof's Tray Norris threw 78, struck out eight and walked none. "There were two good pitchers throwing tonight. Brad threw a good game tonight, and he had some good defense behind him," said Avon Park coach Whit Cornell. "I was definitely hitting my spots and both were working for me. My slider started working for me in the second inning so I just worked off of that," said Torres after the game. Alfred Brown scored in the second for Avon Park and then again in the fourth Devils top Dogs in pitcher's duel News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE Red Devil Brad Torres checks the runner at first as he winds up for the pitch Friday against Frostproof. Avon Park4Frostproof2 News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHN E Shalantay Rose leapt to wins in both the triple and high jump Tuesday, helping propel the Lady Streaks to victory in the six-team invitational. See TRACK, page 3C See AP, page 4C Dragons power past Panthers Lake Placid14Mulberry4 See LP, page 4C Special to the News-SunSEBRING For years, the GTdivision at Sebring has been the most diverse and has provided some of the most exciting racing action. In fact, it was the 2007 finish between the Risi Competizione Ferrari and the Flying Lizards Porsche at the Mobil One 12 Hours that was judged by fans to be the most thrilling moments in the first decade of American Le Mans Series action, This year should be no exception as Corvette, Porsche, Ferrari, Jaguar, Ford, Lamborghini, Pano z and BMWduke it out in th e once-around-the-clock cla ssic. With the addition of com petitors for th e Intercontinental Le Mans th at GT field again loaded for 12 Hours See 12 Hours, page 4C ALMS.com pho to The GT field for this year's 12 Hours of Sebring looks as crowded and competitive as ever.

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HOPE 3-on-3SEBRING The First Annual HOPE Community 3-on-3 basketball tournament will take place Saturday, April 2 at the Sebring High School gym from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at a cost of $5 per player. The tournament will have male and female brackets consisting of threeorfour player teams from ages 7-18-years old. Registration forms can be found in the front office at Sebring High School and must be turned in by Friday, March 18. For more information, contact Lavaar Scott at 214-3880 or email LaV39@yahoo.com .Avon Park Mall Festival 5KAVON PARK The 26th Annual Avon Park Mall Festival 5K Run/Walk is set for Friday night, March 25, at the Old Armory Building at 6:00 p.m. Registration will begin at 5:00 p.m. in the building across from the tennis courts in Donaldson Park. Entry fee is $15 through March 21 and $20 from March 22 thru race day sign up. Tee shirts guaranteed to only the first 100 entrants, so sign up early. Those desiring an entry form may email cbrojek@comcast.net or call Chet at 385-4736. Mail your checks payable to Central Florida Striders, along with the signed application to Central Florida Striders, 3310 Par Road, Sebring, FL33872. The race benefits the boys and girls track teams at Avon Park High School.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worship Center presents the First Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one team of four golfers, one tee sign and two green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes one team of four golfers, one green sign; Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100 includes one green sign. Individual player $60 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26). Team of Four Golfers $240 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL 33871, or register online at wingsoffaithchristianworshipcenter.com Proceeds to be donated to scholarship program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jason Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhankerson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com ."Doc Owen" Golf TourneyAVON PARK The Avon Park Noon Rotary Club will host its Second Annual David "Doc Owen" Golf tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Highlands Ridge North. The two-person scramble-format entry fee is $60 per person with prizes in flight groups, lunch, goodie bag and refreshments on the course. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun tee time. Entry information and check payable to Avon Park Noon Rotary mailed to Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Rd, Sebring, FL 33872. Golfers should include their names and handicaps along with their check. Those needing a form may email Brojek at cbrojek@comcast.net or call a t 385-4736. Business entry of two-persons plus a hole sign for a total of $200 is available for the first time this year. All Rotary club members are urged to support participate in the event that ben efits local Rotary charity projects. Business hole signs for $100 are also available by contacting Chet via email o r phone.SHSBasketball CampSEBRING The SHS basketball program will be hosting a basketball camp for boys and girls, in 2nd-6th grade, on Monday, March 28, and Tuesday, March 29, from 8 a.m.4 p.m. The cost of the camp is $20 and is appropriate for players of all skill level s and experience. Current and former Streaks will be on hand to help with the camp, which will also feature contests, competitions and prizes. Campers can either bring their own lunch or purchase lunch there for a reasonable price. Please contact Coach Lee at 441-122 1, or by email at leem@highlands.k12.fl.u s Sandy Foster MemorialSEBRING NU-HOPE Elder Care Services annual golf tournament is just around the corner. The NU-HOPE Board of Directors ha s chosen to rename the golf tournament this year in memory of Sandy Foster, fo rmer Executive Director of NU-HOPE Elder Care Services. Sandy passed away very unexpectedl y in September of last year. Sandy loved golf and ran a very successful golf tournament for 13 years; in his memory the tournament will be renamed the "Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament." This year we are continuing with Sandy's passion for the tournament with flight, raffle and door prizes. In the last three years the field was full, with a wait list, so sign up soon! The first annual Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament will be held on April 9, with an 8:30 a.m shotgun start, at the Country Club of Sebring. The tournament will be a two-person scramble format. Entry fee will be $60 per person ($12 0 per team) which includes lunch afterwards and refreshments during the tournament. Registration forms are available at the Country Club of Sebring Pro Shop (John Vickers) or can be obtained via mail or fax by calling Debbie Slade at 382-2134. Business sponsorships are also available for this event. The revenue from this event is used for the local match'amount this organi zation needs each year to secure federal and state grant funds in our effort to co ntinue providing home and communitybased services to the frail and needy eld erly residents of Highlands and Hardee Counties. Barefoot Waterski Tournament in Fort MyersFORTMYERS The 10th annual Deuceapalooza Barefoot Endurance Tournament is set for April 9 in Fort Myers. This tournament is open to waterski enthusiasts of all ages. Trophies and cash prizes will be hand ed out. Participants will receive a free T shirt. For information, call Deuce at (239) 693-1975. EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB x-Boston4617.730 New York3430.5311212Philadelphia3431.52313 New Jersey2143.3282512Toronto1847.27729 Southeast Division WLPctGB x-Miami4421.677 Orlando4125.621312Atlanta3728.5697 Charlotte2738.41517 Washington1647.25427 Central Division WLPctGB y-Chicago4618.719 Indiana2738.4151912Milwaukee2538.3972012Detroit2343.34824 Cleveland1252.18834WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB x-San Antonio5312.815 Dallas4718.7236 New Orleans3829.56716 Memphis3630.5451712Houston3333.5002012Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City4123.641 Denver3827.585312Portland3728.569412Utah3432.5158 Minnesota1750.2542512Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Lakers4620.697 Phoenix3330.5241112Golden State2936.4461612L.A. Clippers2541.37921 Sacramento1548.2382912x-clinched playoff spot ___ Thursday's Games Miami 94, L.A. Lakers 88 Dallas 127, New York 109 Denver 116, Phoenix 97 Friday's Games Charlotte 97, Portland 92 New Jersey 102, L.A. Clippers 98, OT Toronto 108, Indiana 98 Philadelphia 89, Boston 86 Chicago 94, Atlanta 76 Minnesota 122, Utah 101 Oklahoma City 104, Detroit 94 San Antonio 108, Sacramento 103 Golden State 123, Orlando 120, OT Saturday's Games Memphis at Miami, late Portland at Atlanta, late L.A. Clippers at Washington, late Utah at Chicago, late Philadelphia at Milwaukee, late Sacramento at New Orleans, late L.A. Lakers at Dallas, late San Antonio at Houston, late Detroit at Denver, late Sunday's Games Oklahoma City at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Charlotte at Toronto, 1 p.m. Orlando at Phoenix, 3:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Boston, 6 p.m. Indiana at New York, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Golden State, 9 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA Philadelphia4219690215177 Pittsburgh3921886196167 N.Y. Rangers3530474195169 New Jersey3132466143172 N.Y. Islanders27321064192218 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Boston3821985205164 Montreal3724781181172 Buffalo3326874194193 Toronto29291068178209 Ottawa2534959153209 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Washington39201088185168 Tampa Bay3822884201205 Carolina31271072194206 Atlanta28281268189219 Florida2732963169188WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Detroit4020888222196 Chicago3724781223189 Nashville34241078173159 Columbus3127971185204 St. Louis3128971190202 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA Vancouver4416997225162 Calgary3625981211199 Minnesota3527777176184 Colorado2633860189235 Edmonton2337955171226 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA San Jose3922785192174 Dallas3723882191190 Los Angeles3825581189166 Phoenix35231181197198 Anaheim3726579193197 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Thursday's Games Vancouver 5, San Jose 4, SO Buffalo 4, Boston 3, OT Philadelphia 3, Toronto 2 Ottawa 2, Florida 1 St. Louis 4, Montreal 1 Nashville 4, Minnesota 0 Phoenix 3, Calgary 0 Friday's Games N.Y. Islanders 4, Boston 2 Washington 2, Carolina 1 Los Angeles 4, Columbus 2 Detroit 2, Edmonton 1, OT New Jersey 3, Atlanta 2, OT Ottawa 2, Tampa Bay 1 Dallas 4, Minnesota 0 Anaheim 6, Colorado 2 Saturday's Games Montreal at Pittsburgh, late Buffalo at Toronto, late N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, late Atlanta at Philadelphia, late Columbus at Carolina, late Tampa Bay at Florida, late Detroit at St. Louis, late Colorado at Nashville, late Vancouver at Calgary, late N.Y. Rangers at San Jose, late Sunday's Games Chicago at Washington, 12:30 p.m. Edmonton at Pittsburgh, 3 p.m. Los Angeles at Dallas, 3 p.m. Ottawa at Buffalo, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Anaheim, 8 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUEWLPct Kansas City95.643 Seattle74.636 Detroit106.625 Minnesota76.538 Texas76.538 Boston87.533 Baltimore66.500 Los Angeles78.467 Toronto67.462 New York68.429 Oakland68.429 Chicago58.385 Tampa Bay58.385 Cleveland48.333NATIONAL LEAGUEWLPct San Francisco124.750 Atlanta95.643 Colorado95.643 Cincinnati85.615 Washington85.615 Philadelphia96.600 Milwaukee86.571 St. Louis76.538 New York78.467 Pittsburgh78.467 San Diego67.462 Chicago68.429 Florida58.385 Los Angeles510.333 Houston511.313 Arizona512.294 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. ___ Friday's Games Minnesota 3, Boston (ss) 2 Detroit 7, St. Louis 4 Toronto 10, N.Y. Yankees (ss) 3 Pittsburgh 8, Tampa Bay 7 Boston (ss) 9, Houston (ss) 3 Atlanta 6, N.Y. Yankees (ss) 2 Philadelphia 13, Baltimore 6 N.Y. Mets 10, Florida 0 Chicago Cubs 4, Chicago White Sox 3 Milwaukee 4, Oakland (ss) 3 Cleveland 5, Seattle 5, tie, 10 innings Oakland (ss) 9, L.A. Dodgers 2 L.A. Angels 9, Arizona 8 Texas 5, Cincinnati 5, tie Colorado 4, Kansas City 3, 10 innings Houston (ss) 7, Washington 6 San Francisco 6, San Diego 4 Saturday's Games Pittsburgh (ss) vs. Toronto (ss), late N.Y. Yankees vs. Washington, late Tampa Bay vs. Philadelphia (ss), late Baltimore vs. Houston, late Philadelphia (ss) vs. Pittsburgh (ss), late N.Y. Mets vs. Atlanta, late Minnesota vs. St. Louis, late Florida vs. Boston, late Toronto (ss) vs. Detroit, late L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs. San Francisco, late Oakland vs. Seattle, late L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs. Kansas City, late Arizona vs. Milwaukee, late Texas vs. Chi. White Sox, late Cincinnati (ss) vs. Chi. Cubs (ss), late San Diego vs. Colorado, late L.A. Angels vs. Cleveland, late Chi. Cubs (ss) vs. Cincinnati (ss), late Arizona vs. Colorado, late Sunday's Games Houston (ss) vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Minnesota (ss) at Fort Myers, 1 p.m. Houston (ss) vs. Detroit (ss) at Lakeland, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1 p.m. Minnesota (ss) vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 1 p.m. Detroit (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1 p.m. Washington vs. Florida at Jupiter, 1 p.m. Boston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1 p.m. St. Louis vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Las Vegas, 3:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Colorado vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. L.A. Dodgers (ss) at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Seattle vs. L.A. Angels (ss) at Tempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (ss) vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chi. Cubs (ss) vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, 4:10 p.m. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid MONDAY: Baseball at Sonrise,7 p.m.; Softball at Pemayetv Emahakv,5:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball at Sebring,7 p.m. THURSDAY: Boys Tennis at DeSoto,4:30 p.m.; Girls Tennis vs.DeSoto,4:30 p.m. FRIDAY: Softball vs.Sonrise Christian,6 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Softball at Hardee,5:30/7:30 p.m.; Boys Tennis at Avon Park,4 p.m.; Girls Tennis vs.Avon Park,4 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Lake Placid,7 p.m.; Softball at DeSoto,5:30/7 p.m.; Track hosts quad meet,4:30 p.m. SFCC MONDAY: Baseball vs.State College of Florida,6 p.m. TUESDAY: Softball vs.Hillsborough,5 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball at State College of Florida,6 p.m. THURSDAY: Softball vs.St.Petersburg,5 p.m. FRIDAY: Baseball at Polk State College,6 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Boys Tennis vs.Sebring,4 p.m.; Girls Tennis at Sebring,4 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball at DeSoto,7 p.m.; Boys Tennis vs.DeSoto,4 p.m. THURSDAY: Boys/Girls Tennis at Okeechobee,3:30 p.m. FRIDAY: Softball at Sebring,5:30/7:30 p.m. A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NHRA Lucas Oil Series . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 6 6 p p . m m . NHRA Tire Kingdom Gatornationals . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N H H L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Chicago at Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CM M L L B B P P R R E E S S E E A A S S O O N N S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs . . . . . . . . . W W G G N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . N.Y. Yankees at Boston, Ft. Myers . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2S S N N O O W W B B O O A A R R D D I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Burton U.S. Open Championships. . E E S S P P N N 2 2C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Atlantic 10 Tournament Final . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 1 1 p p . m m . SEC Tournament Final . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C C 1 1 p p . m m . ACCTournament Final . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Big Ten Tournament Final . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 6 6 p p . m m . NCAA Championship Selection Show . . . . C C B B S ST TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NITTournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NITTournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . NIT Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 1 1 1 1 p p . m m . NIT Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . E E S S P P N N 2 2C C O O L L L L E E G G E E L L A A C C R R O O S S S S E E S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 0 0 a a . m m . Georgetown at Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NW W O O M M E E N N ' S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Women's Selection Special. . . E E S S P P N NTimes, games, channels all subject to change M M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E S S O O C C C C E E R R T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Los Angeles at Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NG G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . PGA WGC Cadillac Championship . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA WGC Cadillac Championship . . . . . N N B B C C 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Puerto Rico Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m .. PGA Toshiba Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FH H I I G G H H S S C C H H O O O O L L G G I I R R L L S S B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . Florida Tournament Final . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NN N B B A A S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Orlando at Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C CM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . San Antonio at Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Orlando at L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N LIVESPORTSONTV NBA NHL MLB Preseason Page 2CNews-Sun Sunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.co m

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 3C TO ADVERTISE ON THIS PAGE CALL ANGI 386-5626 Located Inside Inn On The Lakes Hotel € 3100 Golfview Rd. € Sebring, FL863-314-0348 FREE BEERWith Purchase of Appetizer or Entree! Great Golf Value Par 72 Championship Golf Course Golf Instruction & Practice Facility Full-service Caddyshack Restaurant & Bar Sebring GolfClub call 863-314-5919 or online at www.mysebring.com Located off Hwy 27 in Sebring 3118 Golfview Rd., Sebring, FL 33875 To schedule a tee time OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 6 MONTH MEMBERSHIPS NOW AVAILABLE (863) 382-0500 € 3201 Golfview Rd. € Sebring(863) 382-0744for 9 Hole Executive RatesPrices good thru 3/31/10 Incl. Tax & CartMonday thru Friday:8am … 1pm $36By 8, After 1 $29 Saturday & Sunday: $25 471-ZENO (9366)4325 Sun N Lake Blvd. SebringMon 3 9 Tues-Thurs 11 9 € Fri 11-10 Sat 3-10 € Closed Sunday402-22222934 US 27 S. (Publix Shopping Center) € Sebring Tues -Thur 3 9 € Fri Sat 3 10 Closed Sunday & MondaySERVING HIGHLANDS FOR MORETHAN 25 YEARS ZENOS WE DELIVER! Small Personal Pizza or 6 WingsWith purchase of a large 16" 2 Topping Pizza at $14.99 FREE Not valid with any other offer. Expires 03/31/11 RATES YOUVE BEEN DREAMING ABOUT GOLF SEBRINGS FRIENDLIEST GOLF COURSE VOTED #1 LOCAL COURSE 2010 2222 GOLF HAMMOCK DR., SEBRING863-382-2151golfhammockcc@embarqmail.com Coupon Required FRIDAY1:00 pmSHOTGUN SPECIAL $ 24CALL FOR TEE TIMESExpires 03-31-11 18 HOLES7am-8am....$27008am-Noon..$3300Noon-2pm..$2700After 2pm...$2300All Rates Includes Tax 9 HOLES7am-3pm....$1800After 3pm...$1500Weekend Rates7am-2pm....$25002pm Close..$2000 After a beautiful month of February a nd some great trips out on area waters, S ebring Kayak Tours doesn't let up in M arch, offering several trips throughout t he month. Saturday March 19, 8 p.m. Moonlight Paddle Lake Jackson Watch a spectacular mixture of pink a nd orange hues as the sun sets on the s himmering waters of Lake Jackson. And then marvel at the beauty of a full m oon. End your day with a very relaxing trip u nder the stars. We recommend that you have some k ayaking experience. We will launch from Veteran's Beach a nd paddle our way across to the City P ier (where we will get out, stretch and h ave a snack) and then paddle our way b ack to Veteran's Beach (or vice versa d epending on weather conditions). Sunday March 20, 4 p.m. Sunset Tour Arbuckle Creek/ I stokpoga Park We will meet and launch from the boat r amp on Lake Istokpoga Park off of Hwy 9 8 in Sebring. We'll paddle upstream to our favorite "get out/stretch/snack/swim" spot and then paddle our way back to the Park. This is a late afternoon (sunset) trip with approximately 2 1/2 hours of paddling. Ideal for beginners and first-timers as well as seasoned paddlers. Saturday March 26, 10 a.m. Alafia River Lithia Springs Park The Alafia River is a narrow, twisting trail with large oak, cypress and cedar trees that line the banks and form a canopy overhead. Paddlers share the peace and quiet with wading birds and turtles. The Alafia is a fairly swift river, especially for central Florida, and some small shoals are exposed in low water creating small (very small) rapids... Yippee! We will meet at Lithia Springs Park and shuttle you to the launch site at Alderman Ford Park. This is a full day trip with approximately 3 1/2 4 hrs of paddling time including a break for lunch about halfway. Sunday March 27, 4 p.m. Sunset Tour Arbuckle Creek/ Istokpoga Park We will meet and launch from the boat ramp on Lake Istokpoga Park off of Hwy 98 in Sebring. We'll paddle upstream to our favorite "get out/stretch/snack/swim" spot and then paddle our way back to the Park. This is a late afternoon (sunset) trip with approximately 2 1/2 hours of paddling. Ideal for beginners and first-timers as well as seasoned paddlers. All trips are $39 per person (single or tandem), $19 for those bringing their own kayaks. All reservations must be confirmed via phone or email no later than 24 hrs prior to the trip. Kayaking is a water activity you will get wet. so dress appropriately. Kayaking is also a year-round activity in Florida and Sebring Kayak Tours do not typically cancel tours due to "cooler" weather or due to rain, unless encounter dangerous thunder/lightning is encountered. Sebring Kayak Tours reserves the right to cancel any tours that do not meet the minimum amount of participants. Plenty of Kayak Tours on tap in March Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Seventy and Over Sebring Softball League is winding down with only Tuesday's game being played last week. Thursday's games were cancelled due to stormy weather. Silent Salesman played Allstate Insurancein a hotlycontested game that was a see-saw affair all the way. It took an extra inning of play with Allstate coming out on top 15-14. Aunique feature of the game was that RudyPribble was both the winning and losing pitcher. That happened because Rudy pitched for his Allstate team and also pitched for the shorthanded Salesman. Ray Wilson also helped with the pitching. The Salesman banged out 34 hits but left twenty runners standing on the bases. Leading themassive hitting attackwas Russ Moody, 5-for-6, and Gene Hanfordcollected two hits including ahome run. Having four hits each were Al Taratuta, "Spider" McMinn and Les Smith, who also had a double. Knocking out three hits each were Fred Moore, Stu Hayner and Bob Fahnestock. Jim Longman contributed three hits including a double and rounding out the slugfest was Bob Roth with three hits. Allstate's Ray Wilson was 3-for-4 including a double. Athreesome having 3for-4 were Glenn Wears h, MarvinKnutilla and Ga lo Gonzales. Highlands Merchan ts ran over the Rebels with a 17-6 score. Their Don Ward was 3for-4 with adouble and a home run. Charlie Quinn was 3for-4 and Shawn Kildo ff was 3-for 3. Having two hits ea ch were Glenn Minic, E d Carroll, Harry Bell an d Harold Dinel. Millers Heating and A ir Conditioning left the Bl ue Jays in the cold with a 2 36 win. Millers Kyle Saunder s' hot bat got himthr ee triples and a double f or eight RBI. Jerry Kauffm an went5-for-5 with a do uble. Dale DeMar had 4-for -4 and Ed Lindberg had thr ee hits including a double. Rod Palmer and Tomm y Royal were 3-for-5 an d Syd Collins, Don Shee ts and Pete Mathews ea ch had two hits. The Blue Jays Richa rd Godfrey was their hig h hitter having 4-for -4 including a doub le andatriple. Having 3-for-4 we re Doran Quigg,Don an d Leo Lypps. DaleBaughman, Ji m Johnson and John Pen na each had two hits. There aregames ne xt Tuesday and Thursd ay that round out the seaso n at the much appreciat ed Highlands County Spor ts Complex. Heavy hitting for Sebring 70s 3 00-meter distances. The Lady Devils notched a nother win in the 4X100 r elay, with Ligon, Zakia Hart, T akeisha Williams and J asmine Wilson finishing in a t ime of 52.46. Smith, Tubbs, Schroeder a nd Tamra McMahon again s howed distance to be a S ebring strong-suit, winning t he 4X800 by well over one m inute ahead of the field. Shalantay Rose then added t he jumping events to the S treak's list of wins as she t ied for the top in the high j ump and won the triple jump o utright while Justus Martin a dded a second-place finish i n the pole vault, clearing 7f eet, 6-inches. And when the dust settled, the Lady Streaks had totaled up 115.50 points to take the team win, staying just ahead of Frostproof's 109.50. The Bulldogs ran away with the boys side of the meet, racking up 126 points, but Sebring and Avon Park had their share of highlights as the Streaks finished second as a team and the Devils third. Much like Ligon did for the girls, Travous Knight won the 100and 200-meter dashes to get Avon Park off to a fast start with Sebring's Donovan White then taking second in the 400 to get Sebring on the board. Evan Wilburn added another six points for the Streaks with his second-place finish in the 1,600 and eight more points for his win in the 3,200. Sebring edged ahead of Frostproof in the 4X100 relay, with Wesley Baggett, Devante Pough, Clarence Counts and Devin Clarke finishing in 44.33, less than one second ahead of the Bulldog bunch. The Red Devils took second in the 4X400, with Lacy Turner, Akub Antoine, Angel Perez and Knight finishing just three seconds behind Frostproof. The Streaks then got a topthree sweep in the high jump as the 5-foot-11 Clarke cleared an eye-opening 6feet, 4-inches with White and Pough each clearing 5-foot10. The pole vault saw Sebring's Colton Dillon and Avon Park's Clinton Faircloth each top the 12-foot mark for a first-place tie while Blue Streak Adrion Khan cleared 11-feet, 6-inches for third. Clarke added the long jump to his list of wins on the day, leaping 20-feet, 9-inches, and Sebring got a win in the discus from Patric Morris whose heave of 119-feet, 4inches took first by nine feet. The Streaks and Devils will be joined by the Lake Placid squad, among others, this Tuesday with Avon Park hosting the meet at Joe Franza stadium. Continued from 1C Track and Field at Franza Tuesday

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Page 4CNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com t he "Crow's Nest" in left. Greene then ripped a doub le down the third-base line t o drive two home and cut the l ead to a still daunting 9-3. Greene worked a one, t wo, three sixth and the S treaks scratched for one m ore run on a Baker sacrif ice fly to right. Three up and three down in the top of the seventh gave Sebring one more shot, down 9-4. Showing patience at the plate, Gunnar Westergom, Kyle Cunningham and Alex Griffin drew walks to load the bases with nobody out. Seth Abeln then sent a deep fly to left to bring Westergom in before Matt Randall just got under one for a fly out to straight-away center for the second out. But Lewis picked Randall up, blasting a three-run homer over the wall in leftcenter to make it a 9-8 game. Baker followed with his third double of the night, this one to right-center, but a slow chopper to short and a slick pick-up of a throw in the dirt at first, ended things by an eyelash. "They say if you can't beat them, scare them and we sure gave them a scare," Rewis said. "Year in and year out, Sebring can play with anyone in the state. We saw tonight, and Tuesday, that we can play with these teams and in the second go round we'll have a better chance." Continued from 1C Sebring gives Lake Wales a scare HOUSEWORK DODGERS High Games Barbara Fletcher . . . . . .227 Kayleen Gray . . . . . . . .205 Barbara Beacham . . . . . .190 High Series Jeanne Roozeboom . . . . .569 Susie Kirkman . . . . . . .530 Jo Shook . . . . . . . . .495 HIGHLANDS WOMEN High Games Barbara Baiownik . . . . . .190 Donna Carlson . . . . . . .189 Sylvia Lewis . . . . . . . .180 High Series Donna Carlson . . . . . . .506 Barbara Gaiownik . . . . . .479 Lora Kelly . . . . . . . . .470 HIGHLANDS MEN High Games Joe Stacy . . . . . . . . .279 Mike Freese . . . . . . . .279 Frank Peterson . . . . . . .279 High Series Michael Lamere . . . . . .746 Mark Davis . . . . . . . .725 Mike Freese . . . . . . . .717 LI'L CANES High Games Trenton Knapp . . . . . . .88 Daniel Lynch . . . . . . . .86 Michael Flowers . . . . . . .50 High Series Trenton Knapp . . . . . . .172 Daniel Lynch . . . . . . . .159 Michael Flowers . . . . . . .98K K e e g g e e l l B B o o w w l l i i n n g g C C e e n n t t e e r r L L e e a a g g u u e e S S c c o o r r e e s s along with Matt Roberts to cap the win for the Devils. Brown would go two-forthree on the night. The team is back in actio n Tuesday with a non-distri ct date at DeSoto. Continued from 1C AP at DeSoto Tuesday w ere trading those with the c rooked numbers that the D ragon bats were producing a nd their own defense was g iving up. Such a trade off just wasn't going to get it done and Lake Placid ended it early with the mercy-rule win. Now 6-1 overall on the regular season, the victory moves the Dragons to 4-1 in district play, with the only loss to front-running McKeel. The team hits the road this week, with a Monday contest at Sonrise Christian and Tuesday's match-up at Sebring. Continued from 1C LP moves season record to 6-1 m eans a mix of teams from a ll over the world to go with t he ALMS manufacturer's b attle and yet another "comp etition within a competit ion" on the track. Rahal Letterman Racing r eturns to defend their GT M anufacturer's C hampionship for BMWwith t wo revised BMWM3 GT's. T he M3s sport a new aero p ackage and bodywork as w ell as new livery. Last year was a good one f or the team, with a BMWon t he podium at every race. Defending GTdriver's c hampions, Joerg B ergmeister and Patrick L ong return in a new 2011 N o. 45 Flying Lizard Porsche 9 11 GT3 RSR. The sister #44 Porsche will b e piloted by Darren Law and t eam owner, Seth Neiman. Risi Competizione has b een one of the strongest teams in GTsports car racing over the past decade. This year they move from the Ferrari 430GTto the newest incarnation of the marque the Ferrari 458 Italia. The Sebring circuit is famous for jarring loose parts and this new version is not yet race-tested. Scott Sharp's Extreme Speed Motorsports also will campaign a pair of Patron sponsored, Ferrari F458s. They have been doing extensive testing at Sebring and are looking to run a hard 12 Hours in their new wheels from Italy. The Krohn Racing team returns to the Sebring International Raceway this year with a new car, new number and competing under its own banner. The team has a the new Ferrari 430 GTand now runs on Dunlop Tires. They will run both in the ALMS and Intercontinetal Cup series and will continue in their trademark neon green livery. Last year's GT2 debut for Team Corvette was miserable and marked the beginning of what proved to be a tough year for the factory representatives of America's sports car. Team Corvette has been restructured for what they hope to be a banner year in 2011. The Falken Tires Porsche ran their first full ALMS season in 2010 showing promise and even leading at Sebring early on. This year they have reached an agreement with Derrick Walker and Walker Racing to conduct their race team operations for the season. When ALMS introduced the GTC class, the main idea was to provide a ladder for teams to move up into a GT program. Paul Miller racing will take this step from GTC to GTthis season, fielding a Porsche 911 GT3 RSR on Yokohoma Tires. The 2011 season portends to be a big one for Robertson Racing. Having two cars and a pro lineup in one car will cut development time and the Michelin Tires should really help to transform the car. Like Team Corvette, Paul Gentilozzi's Rocket Sports Racing Jaguar RSRs had a very difficult 2010. Plagued with mechanical problems the team has revised the Jags for the new season and are looking to match some of the new competition on the track. This year's 12 Hours marks the debut of the West Yokohama Racing Lamborghini Gallardo in the GTdivision. The LP560 GThas been prepared by German based Reiter Engineering the people behind the very successful FIAGT3 and FIAGT1 cars in Europe and Japan. Panoz Racing has entered a GTversion of its new street car, the Abruzzi. The new car will feature a a mid-engine design with a supercharged Chevroled LS 9 as the powerplant. The body is composed of a Recyclable Energy Absorbing Matrix System (REAMS) which is said to be lighter and stronger than carbon Fiber. The Intercntinental Cup also will bring a number of cars to Sebring, they will be designated as GTE AM for the purpose of the ILMC opener here/ The new Vantage GT2 team Gulf AMR Middle East will make their Aston Martin racing debut at Sebring. The new racer will be based around the road goin g V12 Vantage although th is will be heavily modified to compete in GT3 champ ionships around the world. Front runners at the LM S last season, the British-bas ed CRS Racing will campaig n yet another Ferrari F430G T in the ILMC. The French Larbre has h ad great success across man y categories of sports car ra cing including multiple wi ns at Le Mans. They ha ve acquired a Pratt & Mill er GT2 Corvette C6R for t he ILMC competition. Meanwhile, defendin g GT2 Le Mans winners Proto n Competition will run the fu ll ILMC schedule with the ir famous blue 911 GT3 RS R with Porsche stando ut Richard Lietz. Continued from 1C 12 Hours GT field looks as strong, competitive as ever

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 5C 130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, Florida863-385-3497Mon. Fri. 9am 4pm Closed WednesdaysHighlands Countys Oldest Established Hearing Aid Of“ceSet it and forget it.Wi Series works with Starkeys SurfLink’ Media streamer, our set-and-forget wireless transmitter.With SurfLink, theres no manual pairing involved. Once you plug it into your TV or stereo, youre done! € It automatically streams sound directly to your hearing aids when your in range. € You can transition from one device to another simply by moving from room to room. € It lets other in the room listen to the TV or stereo at the volume they prefer.No matter where you are or what youre doing,Wi Series is designed to make listening easier. Its the ideal hearing aid for people who are active and on the go, enjoy spending relaxing time at home „ or both. SENIORSCENE E ditor's note: This c olumn was intended t o be the second in a t hree-part series, but i nadvertently has now b ecome the final part o f the series as part t hree actually ran in F ebruary. So you have gone t he imaginative route o f creating your own j ob no matter what that may be. W ord of mouth or other techn iques have brought you payi ng customers or rewards for y our service or product. You a re now in business. That is a lmost the easiest part. What do you do now? What d o you do with the money you h ave earned? Spend it? Open a b ank account to replenish your o riginal outlay and sales? The hard part is, what comes n ext. How do you advance y ourself; solidify your posit ion? How do you follow the p ath of the straight and narrow i .e. the rules? And what are the r ules? Well, for example, do y ou collect sales tax for items y ou may be selling. What are t he zoning laws if you operate o ut of your house or the federa l tax benefits in deducting t hat space your business occup ies from your income tax. W hat are the requirements of f ederal, state or local governm ent? Where and how do you get t his information? Well, you s tart at the base level your o wn community. I went to the C lerk of the Courts, the Tax C ollector's Office, and A ARP's Web site for a list of g overnment pamphlets relating t o specific businesses. I went o n the Internet and was overw helmed with information. But s ave yourself time because we have a treasure here in Highlands County. South Florida Community College has a Small Business Development Center. David Noel is the director (davidnoel@usf.edu or 784-7378.) This is a free entrepreneurial counseling service. A certified business analyst aids you in deciding whether of not your particular project is feasible. They actually do a feasibility study on whether or not there is a market locally; what would be your cash flow; is it sufficient for you to make a living ... and at what level. They offer information on areas to research. They assist in a demographic study. Is there a niche area for your service or product? There are written pamphlets and handouts to review and study. Furthermore in the process of business counseling there is counseling on whether or not you have the personality, the drive to become an entrepreneur ... what is the reality of your situation without destroying your optimism. There is a two and one-half hour introductory course presented the last Wednesday of each month at the college. Call the above number to register. It is a good place to begin. Or you can set up a one-on-one counseling session. Either one is a good first step. These one-on-one sessions are free and there are as many sessions as necessary or needed. The cost? I can't begin to estimate it, but from my experience I can tell you that a consult with a professional career The pitfalls of creating your own job Pearl's Pearls Pearl Carter See PART, page 6C By JIM HOCH Senior Scene specialHow do you tell the Abe Gold story? It is painful. It is remarkable. It is beyond imagination. It evokes every emotion we know. It must, however, be told. Abe, himself, has put it down in a book that took decades to move from memories he tried to suppress before the words appeared on pages. Abraham Gold is a survivor of the Nazi concentration camps in Poland and Austria, including Auschwitz. He was sent there in the summer of 1944 at age 18; and left in May 1945. Because he was Jewish, he was condemned to "Hell on Earth." Not many in those Nazi "Hell Camps" left alive. This Tanglewood Good Guy made it out at World War II's end. He was assigned number "49119." This was sewn on his clothing. He had to wear a chain around his neck with this ID number on it. The treatment as a number was only the beginning. There is nothing about the time he spent there that he could ever forget. Some background: Abe and his identical twin brother, Martin, were the youngest boys to Jacob and Blanca Preisler. Because the parents could not produce a marriage certificate, the children had to take their mother's maiden name of "Gold." The twins joined six other sons and two daughters. The family lived in a small town Strimba, Transylvania nestled in the Carpathian Mountains. The village was predominantly Romanian and Hungarian. Early years for Abe and Martin were difficult for reasons of poor economy and scarce jobs, very harsh winters, many mouths to feed at the family table, and progressively more oppression directed at Jews. The family moved when some prospect of a better job for the well-educated Jacob arose. One home was completely lost to a flash flood. All the children had to do their parts to help with the household. Abe and Martin had to wake every winter morning to gather firewood for the stoves, which provided warmth, and cooking utensil. The parents struggled mightily to provide for their brood. Abe recalls how very hard his mother had to work to keep things together with such limited resources. Despite these obvious difficulties, Abe has mostly fon d memories of his early chil dhood. Even devising alte rnate routes of going to, an d returning from scho ol (because increasingly, t he locals tormented the Jewi sh children) presented a kind of game for Abe and Martin. Beginning at age 14, t he twins went to an apprenti ce academy away from hom e, to acquire work skills. A be was in lithography trainin g. Martin chose cabinet ma king. The school was tough. It was more like a milita ry basic training camp. Almo st no free time. Before an d after classes there we re assigned duties. The bo ys were able to earn som e money by performing chor es for some of their wealthi er classmates. Newscasts in early 194 4, though; clearly suggest ed life for Jews in the regio n Dillon Thomas, pioneer "cow hunter" from LaBelle, lived a difficult life in the early days of Florida following the cattle. Thomas learned how to survive conquering whatever circumstances he and his family faced. Despite the Florida "boom days" of the early 1900s, Thomas and his family had to make their own way as his daddy could not find a job. This meant another move to Felda; however, the small farm community did not offer an easier life. Dillon Thomas explains that shortly after they moved to Felda, "things got bad. Daddy had a mule and I had a pony. Then we moved again with a mule and wagon from Felda to Corkscrew. You never saw a dry spot during the rainy season in Corkscrew. At Corkscrew we raised corn, lots of sweet potatoes, and sugar cane. Daddy made syrup from the cane and ground the corn to feed the cattle. There was a one room school house where I went through fourth and fifth grades," says Thomas as he thinks about the past. "Once a month, Mamma and us kids washed up to go in the Model-Tto the Piggly Wiggly. Daddy paid one cent a pound for a side of bacon and three cents a pound for flour, sugar and salt. At Corkscrew, when I was 12 years old, I started as a cow hunter'dipping cattle and horses during the fever tick outbreak. The cows walked into a cement vat containing special chemicals then out the other side where the y were painted with a brush so Range Riders would not shoot them on open range; all painted cows had been dipped. Cows were cheap then; you could buy a cow for $5," Thomas sai d. "There were three families living i n Corkscrew besides our family and a lot of Whiddens. Uncle Thomas aske d me to help out with marking and branding.'We had to round up the cows on free range as there were no fence laws in those days. I had a half a day to help brand 500 cows. Everybody's cows all had their own brand. I had to watch the cowboys to see what calf belonged to what mamma. Agood cow man looked for the mamma to tell which was her cal f. The 1900s: Boom or Bust' days Wild Florida Nancy Dale See THOMAS, page 6C Abe Gold: A good guy recalls a terrible time Gold See HARD, page 6C

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w as in danger. First, it was t he far-right movement, k nown as the Iron Cross ( Fascists), takeover of H ungary. Only a short while l ater, Abe began to see the G erman tanks rolling into t own. The school announced i t would close. Students were t old that they needed to r eturn to their homes. At home, Abe discovered t hat several of his siblings h ad already departed during h is time at school. Iron Cross p rohibited Jews from being o ut of their homes from 5 p .m. to 7 a.m. Then, the d readed knock on the door c ame. Jews must prepare to l eave immediately. "You can t ake what you can carry in a k napsack. Do not ask where y ou will be going. You do not h ave the need to know!" The infirm, the elderly, the m others with infants. They a ll had to walk to the train s tation several miles away. W alk with haste. Fall out of t he procession and you were l eft for Iron Cross to deal w ith. If you had any jewelry, o r things of value; they were t aken from you. Upon arriving at A uschwitz, disembarking f rom the train, Abe heard, Men to the left. Women to t he right." No time for goodb yes. Never to see his mother o r sisters again. The wailing, s creaming, crying children, f alling, crawling, the fear s eared into a young man's m emory forever more. "Work, or the crematoriu m. The choice is yours," the S S officer told the men. "We n eed machinists to come over h ere," said another officer. A be had no time to delibera te. Lithography involved u sing a machine. He stepped u p. Martin did not. In the blink of an eye, identical twins never to see each other again. Another frightening train ride for Abe. This stop was Bad Warmbrunn in Poland. Long hours. Hard work. Little comraderie. Slight food and drink. Constant supervision. Abe knew two brothers who attempted escape. They got away, but not for long. Two days later, they were hanged for all to see as example. Sickness not attended to. Work injuries ignored. Abuse from guards. Abe saw it all. Many simply died in their beds, and were left to remind the living of their alternatives. Abe came down with a widespread virus; and believed he would not make it. In a testament to his grit and gift, he was back on his feet in three days. He knew others not so fortunate. All the time a man had to think was filled with wonder. "Wonder where are my siblings. My parents. My cousins. My friends." Such a heavy burden on your mind. "Some days they would march us to various buildings or work stations. It was a fast march, often in dreadful winter conditions. Those that fell out? The gunshots told their destiny," he says. On May 2, 1945; Abe was moved again to Dornau, Austria. This camp had the reputation of being the death camp. Go there and meet death. One way or the other. One meager meal per day. Some believed death to be the better choice. Not Abraham Gold. In less than a week at Dornau came word the war was over. The morning of May 8 was met with open gates. The SS officers and guards were gone. Was it an ambush? Atrick? Abe was the first one to pass through those open gates that morning to see his first freedom in more than a year. "I felt no joy or happiness. Only I thought of my family. Would they also be able to walk out of their confinement? It should be such a great feeling, but for me, only concern. My twin? Oh, Martin, please be safe and free." With nothing, and no one to guide him now, Abe relied on his own sheer will power to gather information, scrounge for meals, seek shelter, and maintain a scornful eye towards any officialdom. He had remained with four other young Polish men who walked out of Dornau with him; but each man had his own agenda to pursue. Eventually, he was able to catch a ride on a truck convoy carrying some Italian prisoners back across the Czech border, to Bratislava. In Bratislava, he found a train station and boarded a train for Budapest, Hungary. Exhausted, he fell asleep on the train ride. When he awoke, all his belongings had been stolen. AJewish Relief Agency in Budapest gave Abe some encouragement that some of his brothers were alive and back in his hometown. The agency also gave him some money to purchase a train ticket to Cluj, Romania. There they were. Four of his brothers had learned of his impending arrival, and they were at the train to greet him. But not Martin. Not Sulem. Abe felt his brothers knew more than they were telling, so he feared the worse for his remaining family. Abe set about searching for Martin. By July 1945, Abe knew he had to make a life of his own. AZionist organization was helping young men and women to obtain travel papers so they could go to Austria. Abe was ready. He went first to Vienna, then to Wels. In Wels, there were many displaced persons from Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary. Still trying to find information about Martin, Abe could not believe his eyes when before him appeared another brother, Sulem. Abe recalled that Sulem was the one of his elder brothers who most helped their parents keep the family together in those desperate times before Auschwitz. But, Sulem had no information regarding Martin. Abe stayed in Wels and was able to find work with the U.S. Army. He was in the motor pool, then in the post exchange store. By 1948, it became clear to Abe that he had to choose: 1. Stay in Wels doing insignificant work; 2. Follow some of his Jewish friends to Israel; or 3. Try to follow some others to the USA. Good fortune rode with Abe once more. He was able to catch a ship, leaving Bremen, Germany for the USA. During the transit they were told the ship would sail into Boston, and all persons must get off there. Abe wanted to go to New York because he knew he had an uncle in the city who may assist him in settling there. His determination got him to NYC. Abe had various jobs. In one noteworthy hitch as a tool and die maker, he was operating a punch press. The exact details of the accident escape Abe, but the accident left him with three crushed fingers. In the hospital they had to remove parts of each of those fingers. He got a draft notice. Abe did a short stint in the U.S. Army. Then, by spring 1951, he landed a decent job in printing. In April that year, at a dance at the 92nd Street YMCA, Abe and his buddies spotted three good-looking young ladies. Abe said, "I went right over to the prettiest of those girls, and asked her to dance." Four months later Abe and Sylvia were married. In the next 15 years that followed, Abe bought his own print shop; Abe and Sylvia had three daughters and a son. They were able to buy a nice home Orangeburg, N.Y. He sponsored and assisted three of his brothers to resettle in the NYC area. Of the surviving brothers, only Sulem was not now in the States. He had immigrated to Israel. Abe sold his business, and retired to the Poconos in 1987. He could not ta ke being idle so much. H e thought, "I was saved fro m the most inhuman treatmen ts man can inflict upon oth er men. I am so very fortuna te to be alive, to have Sylv ia and this wonderful famil y, and my life in the USA. I c an give back now." And, he di d. He began volunteering wi th an ambulance service in t he Poconos. He took the EM T exam, and passed it. H e sometimes drove the amb ulances. "I wanted to help sa ve lives," he said. In 1998, Abe and Sylv ia moved to West Palm Beac h. In a short while he began to volunteer at the Veteran s' Administration Hospit al there until they moved to Tanglewood in 2005. At age 85 Abe still wan ts to give back. What pleas es him most these days is accepting invitations to spe ak at elementary and midd le schools; to tell his story to children; to answer the ir questions; and (for sure) to read and re-read all the lette rs he gets from those kids aft er his visits to their schools. G o by his home, and he w ill gladly show you that bask et with every one of those ch ildren's letters to him. As mentioned earlier, A be has written his autobiogr aphy. It was not an easy tas k. The words brought back su ch terrible memories. His fami ly knew he had to get this do ne while he still had the tim e and good health. Page 6CNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com FRIDAYMarch 25thLake Placid Community Church 735 S. Sun N Lakes Blvd.TUESDAYMarch 29thLakeshore Mall Meeting Room SENIORSCENE c ounselor is upwards of $150 p er hour. This service is worth t housands of dollars. I call using this service opera ting from a position of s trength. You can evaluate if y ou have enough money to live o n while you are planning and s tarting your operation. What i s your infrastructure? This can b e as simple as a good file syst em or as complicated as a c omputer system. Do you have a team ... your wife, children, p artner? Do you need to incorp orate or operate as a DBA... D oing Business As? Is there an a ssociation for your type of b usiness? And what about f inancing? Do you borrow on y our credit card; get a bank l oan; borrow from relatives? All these questions are addressed. You are not on your own. You will be assisted all the way to a successful conclusion. As an adjunct to the training, it is a good idea to work in the area in which you wish to go into business. For example, if you want to start a nursery, go work in one. Do you really like it; have an aptitude for it? Does this sound daunting? It isn't meant to be, just precautionary My son Stephen used to say that planning your work and committing to it was 10 percent inspiration and 90 percent perspiration. Get busy on this. Go to work. Continued from page 5C Pearl Carter is writer, poet and a Lake Placid resident. E-mail her at timely87@comcast.net. Part 2 of using a consultant D on't ask me how I knew t hat, I can't answer. "I had to hand the cowb oys the right branding iron f or each cow. Ranching is m ore than a business, a cowb oy gets to love the land and i t's still there with me. I w orked all my life up until f our years ago and now I am 9 1 years old," says Thomas, w ho is lean and fit, wearing w ell the traditional cowboy p laid shirt, jeans, big belt b uckle and Stetson hat. "In the 1940's when fence l aws were passed, men with m oney started buying up a l ot of land for cattle ranchi ng. You couldn't give away t he land. One big cattle owner offered to buy cattle at $30 a head, which put the small guy in South Florida out of business. The railroad also bought up everything. There were a lot of hard feelings then and also a lot of cattle rustling," recalls Thomas. These are the life and times of the early pioneers who settled "old Florida," to be continued. Excerpts from new book available this spring, The Legacy of the Florida Pioneer Cow Hunters' In Their Own Words' by Nancy Dale. To order other books on cow hunters,' visit www.nancydalephd.com or call 214-8351. Continued from page 5C Thomas recalls Boom or Bust' days Hard times recalled by Tanglewood Good Guy' Continued on page 5C Seems like old Mother Nature has imbued most of us human beings with a gambling spirit. We see it daily on the roads. People making right turns from the left traffic lane, tailgating and a dozen other things that if someone didn't give in, they would become another traffic statistic. That's not the kind of gambling I wish to write about. Today, I want to dwell on the entertainment aspect of the sport. Say what you will, gambling can be most entertaining (if you are winning) or downright frustrating if you are losing. I am not into the big-time sport (Poker, Black Jack, Faro and the like). My liking is the unbeatable slot machines. Yes, I know some people come away from the casinos loaded with winnings. They are the folks who know when to quit. However, they will be back in a day or two to try their luck again and the odds will get them. The casinos in Vegas post signs in the area that they guarantee an 85 percent return on the machines in their halls. That gives them a 15 percent profit on every buck you stick into the slot. With the thousands of bucks thrown into the machine each hour the place is open, they can afford the occasional jackpot of thousands of dollars. The owners of casinos love to see people like me come into their places. We play penny and nickel slots and fill up the place. However, we do give the visitors the feeling that they are not alone in their search for entertainment and possibly if Lady Luck is with them tonight, they will strike it rich. When we drive to Okeechobee to t he Flamingo, Three Sevens or Stephanie 's, it is strictly for entertainment. I enjo y the drive there and back. Eagles, allig ators, bobcats, cougars and raccoon s, they are all there and just waiting to entertain you. Then when you get to t he casino, there is a hundred differe nt kinds of slots for you to play. Playin g the penny machines, if you don't go ho g wild and get hungry to win, you c an play for four hours on $20. For the $25 or $30 you throw away at the slots, you may win a few bucks to turn into a Walmart, Golden Corral or Visa gift card; they don't pay off in cash, Florida law. You would pay th at much or more to have a meal in a goo d restaurant and see a movie afterward. If you are wondering how this artic le fits into the Senior Scene section of t he paper, all you have to do is go down to A look at the entertainment of gambling Woody's Wisdom Woody Jackson

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T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sunon any c hanges in this listing by calling 3 85-6155, ext. 516; send any c hanges by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail t hem to News-SunCommunity C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 L ake Placid has lounge hours f rom 1-9 p.m. Live music is f rom 5-8 p.m. For details, call 4 65-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p .m. Members and guests only. P ost is at 528 N. Pine St., S ebring. Call 471-1448. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2 661 lounge is open from 1-7 p .m. Card games start at 1:30 p .m. The lodge is open to m embers and their guests. For d etails, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has k araoke in the pavilion. H orseshoes played at 9:30 a .m. Food available at 4 p.m. O pen to members and qualified g uests only. Overeaters Anonymous, m eets from 4-5 p.m. in second f loor conference roomNo. 3 at F lorida Hospital Heartland M edical Center, 4200 Sun N L ake Blvd., Sebring. For d etails, call 382-7731. No dues, f ees or weigh-ins. Go to w ww.oa.org. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves lunch at 2 p.m. at the c lub, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. F or details, call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 o ffers NASCAR racing in the p avilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open a nd kitchen open from 2-5 p.m. L odge is at 11675 U.S. 98, S ebring. For details, call 6553 920. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 3880 serves hamburgers f rom 4-5:30 p.m. and plays p oker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1 224 County Road 621 East, L ake Placid. For details, call 6 99-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 Karaoke is from 5-8 p .m. at the post, 2011 SE L akeview Drive, Sebring. For d etails, call 385-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN W ITH ME family group meets a t 10:30 a.m. every Monday at t he Heartland Christian Church o n Alt. 27 in Sebring. The c hurch is behind Southgate S hopping Center where Publix i s. Call 385-5714. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal C hurch, Lakeshore Drive, S ebring. For more details, call 3 85-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous O ne Day At ATime group m eets for a closed discussion a t 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant P resbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. For d etails, call 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 6:30 p.m. at R osewood Center, 517 U.S. 27 S outh, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at S t. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. F or details, call 202-0647.. American Legion Post 74 S ons of Legion meet at 6 p.m. E xecutive board meets at 7 p .m. on second Monday at the p ost, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. H appy hour from 4-6 p.m. Post o pen noon-8 p.m. Call 4711 448. AmVets Post 21 meets 6 p .m. second Monday, at the p ost, 2029 U.S. 27 South, S ebring. All members welcome. AmVets Post 21 plays darts a t 7:30 p.m. for members and g uests. For details, call 3850 234. Avon Park Lakes A ssociation has shuffleboard a t 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. T he clubhouse is at 2714 N autilus Drive in Avon Park. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake P lacid. Bridge Club of Sebring ( American Contract Bridge C lub)plays duplicate games at 1 2:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf A ve., Sebring. For details, call 3 85-8118. Diabetes Insulin Pump S upport Group meets the second Monday from 3-4:30 p.m. in the Florida Hospital Heartland Division Diabetes Center, 4023 Sun N Lake. Call 402-0177 for more information. Diabetes Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday from 1-2:30 p.m. in Florida Hospital Conference Room 3 in Sebring. Call 4020177 for guest speaker list. Fairmount Mobile Estates Lunch Bunch meets at noon second Monday at Homer's Smorgasbord in Sebring. For details, call 382-0481. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The Agri-Center. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets the second and fourth Monday at the Sebring Country Estates Civic Association clubhouse, 3240 Grand Prix Drive (down the street from Wal-Mart). Dancing will be held every month until April 2008. Classes are being started now in the Sebring and Lake Placid area. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or visit the Web site at www.samdun.net.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 3148877. Heartland Riders Association meets at 6 p.m. second Monday at the Sebring Chamber of Commerce Welcome Center in Village Plaza (across from Sebring Gate Station). For details, call 402-1165. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Homeowners Association meets the second Monday of each month at 9 a.m. at the Sebring Country Estates Clubhouse at 3240 Grand Prix Drive in Sebring. Highlands County Parkinson's Support Group meets at 10 a.m. second Monday at First Baptist Church in Downtown Sebring. For details, call 453-6589. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County Agri-Civic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. For details, call 4026540. Highlands Sertoma Club meets at noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. Highlands County Senior Squadron, Civil Air Patrol the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary meets the second and fourth Monday nights at the Sebring Airport Terminal Building. All are welcome. For further information, call 471-1433 between 4 and 7 p.m. Highlands Woodcarvers Club meets at 6 p.m. second Monday at Highlands Art League, 351 W. Center Ave., Sebring. For more details, call Sandy Kohan at 414-1363 or Norm Pelland at 465-5510. Insulin Pump Support Group meets from 3-4:30 p.m. the second Monday of every month in conference Room 3 of Florida Hospital. This group is open to all insulin pump wearers, their families and anyone who is interested in knowing more about insulin pumps. Preregistration is not required. For information, call 402-0177. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. For details, call 4652661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Cards start at 4 p.m. Music outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. Call 452-0579. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 12-4:30 p.m. second and fourth Monday in Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. No meetings from end of May to October. Call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Brady's, Sebring. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Mondays. For details or info on lessons, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. Smoke-free environment. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. For information, call 471-2522. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 plays Texas Hold em at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Monday at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing. For details, call 655-3920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. For details, call Judy O'Boyle at 260-0831. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Woman's Club of Sebring meets at noon on the second Monday for lunch, from October throughMay, at the clubhouse, 4260 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-7268. TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parking available south of old church. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For details, call 4657940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. For details, call 452-2385. Avon Park Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Avon Park Lions Club meets 6:45 p.m., in the Lions Club, 1218 W. Bell St. Brown Bag Book Bunch book reader's group meets at noon on the third Tuesday of the month at Emmanuel United Church of Christ, 3115 Hope St., Sebring. Read the selected book, bring your bag lunch, and join in the lively and interesting discussions. For information on each month's book, call 471-1999. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. Everyone is welcome. For more details, call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at "The Rock," Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost selfesteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. For details, contact Celebrate Recovery coordinator Pam Sim by calling 453-3345, ext. 106. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For more details, call 385-3288. Friends of Highlands Hammock meets at 6:30 p.m. third Tuesday, Highlands Hammock State Park, Sebring. For more details, call 386-6099. Heartland Avian Society meets every fourth Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., at Huntington National Bank, 126 Center Ave., Sebring. For more details, call 465-9358. Heartland Dolittle Miniature Build meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday, St. Johns Methodist Church social hall, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring. For details, call 3823553. Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 4712294 or 386-5098. Heartland Symphony Orchestra rehearsals from 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesdays in the Green Room in the South Florida Community College auditorium building. Bring music and instruments. New members welcome. Call conductor Bryan Johnson at 800949-7248, ext. 7231. Highlands County Community Orchestra rehearses each Tuesday in the Green Room of the South Florida Community College Performing Arts Theater, 5:307:30 p.m. Entrance is at the rear of the building. String players especially needed. Strings call Eugene Longo at 6991975; winds call Kim Houser at 453-6049 for more information. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets on the first and third Tuesday of each month at the Women's Club of Sebring, 4260 Lakeview Drive, across from Veterans' Beach, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For information, call 471-0694 or e-mailsbringquilter@embarqmail.com Highlands Tea Party has an educational and informational meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Quality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27 in Sebring. Call 699-0743. Highlands County Veterans Council meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday in the conference room at the Veterans Services Office. The meeting is for the appointed delegate from each veteran organization in the county to meet to discuss current issues regarding veterans and veterans activities. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Call 382-0312. Lake HavenHomeowners Association meets the third Tuesday of the month, 5400 N. Lake Huckleberry Drive, Sebring. Covered dish dinner is at 6:30 p.m. and meeting is at 7:30 p.m. For more details, call 382-4858. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Jaycees meet 7:30 p.m., first and third Tuesdays, Jaxson's. Board meetings at 6:30 p.m., second Tuesday. For details, call Joe Collins, 655-5545. Lake Placid Moose has an officers meeting at 7:30 p.m. the third Tuesday at the lodge. Lake Placid Toastmasters meet the first and third Tuesday at 6 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 101 S. Oak Ave. in Lake Placid. The web address is www.toastmasters.org. For information call Cathy Schreima at 382-3574 or Linda Udall at 386-6495. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Masonic Lodge meets 8 p.m., 106 N. Main St., Lake Placid. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventhday Adventist Church, 1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup.co m. For details, call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org for more info rmation on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday and has blood pressure screening from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. first and third Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. For details, call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near the library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-3829 or 471-9900. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If inte rested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sig n in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:3 0 p.m. No experience necessary Cost is $2. Smoke-free enviro nment. Call 471-3557. Sebring Lions Club meets at noon at Dot's Restaurant, 950 Sebring Square. For infor mation call 382-2333. Sebring Lodge 249 F&AM meets 7:30 p.m., 1809 Home Ave., Sebring. Sebring Meals on Wheels Inc. hosts board of directors meeting at 1:30 p.m. the third Tuesday each month at the Sebring Hills Association Clubhouse, 200 Lark Ave., Sebring. For details, call Jim Smith at 382-8453. Sebring Moose Lodge 225 9 serves soft shell tacos 5-7 p.m at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Be ef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing.Euchre is played at 6:3 0 p.m. For details, call 655-3920 Sebring Model Railroad Club meets at 7:30 p.m. third Tuesday each month at the Sebring Parkway Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway Members build and run "HO" Guage model railroads. All rai l buffs are welcomed. For confir mation call Keith Williams at 385-1332. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dee's Restaurant, Sebring. For details, call Scott Albritton at 402-1819. "Souper" Book Group meets the third Tuesday of each month at noon at Emmanuel United Church of Christ to discuss the monthly book selection and enjoy a soup, salad and dessert lunch All book lovers are welcome. The church is at 3115 Hope S t., Sebring (1.8 miles west from corner of Highway 27 and Hammock Rd.) For information about the book of the month and reservations, call the church office 471-1999 or 452-2697. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 67 p.m. at the Atonement Luthera n Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Community Bible Church, 1400 CR-17AN ., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. For details, call 452-1093 U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliar y meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday, Sebring Jaycees building. Cal l 471-0393 or 385-2459. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. House Committee meets at 5:30 p.m For more details, call 699-544 4. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 7C Newborns € Children € AdolescentsOFFICE HOURS: Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., F.A.A.P. Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., F.A.A.P. Anoop Palta, M.D., F.A.A.P. Maria B. Asis, M.D., F.A.A.P Maria C. Perez, M.D. David Kleczek, P.A.-C. Amy Grimes, P.A.-C. Megan Neff, ARNP Mercy L. Seralde, M.D., F.A.A.P.Avon Park Pediatrics,P.A. & Sebring Pediatrics,LLCWe accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid SEBRING382-0770AVON PARK453-7337 Specializing in the treatment of € Allergies € Asthma € Attention Deficit Disorder Immunizations € Check-ups €Obesity Counseling SEBRING: MON. … FRI. … 8:30AM … 5:00PMSATURDAY … 8:30AM … 12:00 NOON … SEBRING ONLYAVON PARK: MON. & WED. … 8:30AM … 7:00PM TUES., THURS., & FRI. … 8:30AM … 5:00PM LAKE PLACID699-1414 COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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Page 8CNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. EXPIRES 3/19/11PLUS TAX, TAG, & STATE FEES. www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644 LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NO DEALER FEES Since 1931 #X0150 2008 DODGE AVENGER RT#CX107A1 #X0147 2007 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE#CX147A #TY032A 2008 JEEP COMPASS #CX130A 2007 DODGE RAM 3500 MEGACAB DIESEL#TY041B #TX126A 2004 CHRYLER TOWN & COUNTRY#CY023A 2003 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT2003 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LXI 2005 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT #CX1184 $ 32888 $ 11555 2006 CHRYSLER 300C $ 16999 $ 17888 $ 17888 $ 15888 $ 11999 $ 16888 2009 CHRYSLER PTCRUISER2008 TOYOTATUNDRA $ 25888ONE OWNER $ 12888 $ 13488 $ 9888 #JY004B #X0161 CERTIFIED CERTIFIED ONE OWNER LOW MILES CREAM PUFF CERTIFIED LEATHER LOADED NICE ONE OWNER CERTIFIED HEMI SWEET 2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE Courtesy photo What is the effect of music on plants? Does the bowl matter? Organic or inorganic? These are just a few of the questions investigated by Woodlawn Elementary School's fifth-graders. These budding scientists participated in the school's annual fifth grade HAART Science Fair. During a sixto eight-week period, the fifth-graders in Tim Bowers' (right) class tested different hypotheses using the scientific method, and shared their findings with creative display boards detailing procedures, variables and materials used and data collected. Background papers summarized current scientific information related to the experiment's topic in their science journals. Several parents, special guests, and Superintendent of the Highlands County School Board Wally Cox visited with participants on March 4 during the science fair's open house. Bowers and Cox are shown with a couple of fifth-grade students. Schools get important visitors Courtesy photo Members of the Student Council at Woodlawn Elementary School appreciated Sebring Mayor George Hensley coming to discuss the responsibilities of the mayor and for teaching them about our local government. T hey enjoyed how he explained the aspects of government in an exciting and simple way. They all agreed that they learned more about how the city government helps the commmunity. As they grow up in Sebring, they can work to make it a better place to live f or everyone. They would like to wish him the best of luck with his election to another term as mayor. Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun

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LIVING D SECTION News-Sun Sunday, March 13, 2011 Alook at other things associated with the color green: Love: Green was a symbol of budding love in the Middle Ages. The Romans associated green with Venus, goddess of love. Symbol of poison:Green dye used to be produced with copper and toxic arsenic. Napoleon Bonaparte's favorite color: His home on St. Helena had green wallpaper, paint and furniture. He was poisoned by arsenic fumes from the green dye. Islam: The prophet Mohammed loved green and it became the holy color of Islam. Fertility: Osiris was a god in ancient Egypt; he was regarded as a source of Earth's fertility. Also called "The Great Green." Catholic worship:In 1570 Pope Pius Vdeclared white, red, purple and green the colors of liturgy; green symbolized hope. 1.St. Patrick was born: A.AFrenchmanB.ABritonC.An Irishman2.Patrick was brought to Ireland as: A.Atourist on a Viking Lines cruiseB.Aslave of the BritonsC.Aslave of the Irish3.Patrick had a dream in which he was instructed on escaping Ireland in a boat exporting: A.Potatoes B.Cattle C.Wolfhounds 4. Ireland was the only country in Western Europe whose conversion to Catholicism produced no: A.Female saints B.Legends C.Martyrs 5. The first bishop of Ireland was: A.CharlemagneB.PalladiusC.Duns Scotus6.Besides the legend of banishing snakes in Ireland, Patrick is also said to have: A. Moved the rock of Cashel B.Raised the deadC.Altered the course of Viking ships 7. Which town has the most evidence to claim Patrick as its own: A. Tara B.Sligo C.Armagh 8. St. Patrick's Day was first celebrated outside the confines of the church in this city: A.Savannah, Ga. B.Boston C.New York 9.What pilgrimage site in Donegal, Ireland, famous in the Middle Ages, may have inspired Dante in writing "The Divine Comedy"? A.St. Patrick's Purgatory B.St. Patrick's Valley of the Lost C.Croaghpatrick 10.Patrick and Brigid are two of the three great saints of ancient Ireland. The other is: A.Michael B.Athelrod C.Columcille11.Who was the most famous dean of St. Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin? A. Rev. Ian Paisley B.Jonathan Swift C.Richard Brinsley Sheridan12.The conflicting dates of Patrick's years in Ireland, and the places where he supposedly lived, has prompted this theory: A. There were two PatricksB.Patrick is a mythC.There were dozens of Patricks13.Irish is the _____ most frequently reported ancestry in the United States census. A.FirstB.SecondC.Fifth14.Which is a traditional St. Patrick's Day dish? A.Collard greens and riceB.Corned beef and cabbageC.Rack of lamb and asparagus15.The world's first St. Patrick's Day parade was held in 1762 in what city? President Truman attended the parade in 1948. A.ChicagoB.BostonC.New York City 16. The U.S. Congress proclaimed March as Irish-American Heritage Month in what year? A. 1995B.1909C.190317.St. Patrick's Day became a holiday in Ireland in: A.1848 B.1798C.1903BonusQuestion1:Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland. Match the description with these other great Irishmen: A.Michael Collins_____ 1.The uncrowned king of IrelandB.Eamon de Valera _____ 2.The man who was Ireland C.Charles Stewart Parnell _____ 3.The man who made Ireland D.Brian Boru_____ 4.The king of Ireland Richard Atkinson/McClatchy Newspapers and MCT ILLUSTRATIONS BYCHRIS WARE/MCTHere's the story behind some Irish icons and St. Patrick: SHAMROCK: "Shamrock" comes from the Irish "seamrog" or little clover and refers to the wildflower. The small, three-leafed herb appears on the United Kingdom's coat of arms with the English rose and Scottish thistle. The shamrocks found in U.S. flower shops are often imposters. IRISH FLAG: Green stands for Catholics, orange for Protestants and white for a wish for harmony. LEPRECHAUNS: Fairies who work day and night mending shoes of other fairies. SHILLELAGH (shi-lay'-lee): Awalking stick. The word is Irish for stout oak club or cudgel. It's also the name of a forest that once stood in County Wicklow. PATRICK SAINT AND LEGEND: 387: Born in Britain to a Roman family. His original name was Maewyn. Early 400s: He was taken to Ireland as a slave; after six years, he escaped to France where he studied for priesthood. 432: He was sent back to Ireland as a Christian missionary by Pope Celestine I, who named him Patricius, which means noble in Latin. He introduced the Roman alphabet, Latin literature and Christianized the land. Familiar legend: He drove the snakes from Ireland by beating a drum. Bonus Question2: Four places in the United States are named Shamrock, the floral emblem of Ireland. Which of the following is not one of them: A.Mount GayShamrock, W.Va. B.Shamrock, TexasC. Shamrock River, Ind.SOURCE: "WIE FARBEN WIRKEN," BYEVAHELLER; "SHAMROCKS, HARPS AND SHILLELAGHS," BY EDNABARTH; "ALLABOUT AMERICAN HOLIDAYS," WORLD BOOK

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Page 2DNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU PG13(Matt Damon,Emily Blunt)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30RANGOPG(Animated Voices by Johnny Depp,Abigail Breslin)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30TAKE ME HOME TONIGHTR(Topher Grace,Anna Faris)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15HALL PASSR(Owen Wilson)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15GNOMEO & JULIET 2DG(Animated)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15THE KINGS SPEECHR(Geoffrey Rush,Colin Firth)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30 The NewFAIRMOUNTCINEMA63750 US 27 N. Sebring NOW SHOWINGFriday 03/11 Thursday 03/17 Suick CinemasInformation 385-9980 Office 385-9908New Dolby Digital SoundAll Seats $6.00for Matinee COMING SOONWe will be featuring: Mar 18 THE LINCOLN LAWYER DIVERSIONS I'SBEFOREE'SBy JACK MCINTURFF ACROSS 1 Like good jokes 7 Night music 11 Focus at a boxer's school? 20 Brought out 21 Got off 22 Source of a vital supply 23 Meek Jolly Roger crewmen? 25 Rear-ends, say 26 Theater aisles, usually 27 NASA's "Go" 28 Some reality show winners 30 Flowery welcomes 31 R.E.M. hit, with "The" 33 "Games People Play" author Eric 34 Hang behind 36 One-million link 37 Old strings 38 Sporty Italian wheels 42 Polish protector? 45 Spent the cold season (in) 46 Pro foe 48 How some soccer games end 49 N.J. neighbor 50 Selection word 51 Red-costumed actor in "Veggie Tales"? 53 Moses sent him into Canaan to spy 55 Misses some of the lecture, perhaps 56 Swedish city connected by a bridge to Copenhagen 57 Root vegetable 59 Take really short catnaps during a Henny Youngman routine? 69 Failed flier 70 Culture: Pref. 71 Collar victim 75 Spin-off starring Valerie Harper 76 Tiny nestling's cry? 81 Sets straight 83 Mil. spud duties 84 Paddled boats 85 Raw rocks 86 Mineral involved in much litigation 88 Ownership dispute? 90 "Casey at the Bat" autobiographer 91 Barrage 92 "To Kill a Mockingbird" Pulitzer winner 93 Boston transit syst. 94 Londonderry's river 95 R rating cause 100 Mideastern pastry dough 103 Kurdish relative 104 Confectionery collectible 105 Hair cover 106 Cry of anticipation 109 Meryl as a coquette? 112 Check before cutting 113 Stadium stratum 114 Oriole Park at __ Yards 115 Words before an important announcement 116 1974 CIA spoof 117 Hotel meetings, perhaps DOWN 1 It's not an original 2 Water source 3 Crooner Mel 4 Giraffe relative 5 Leaves alone 6 Pres. during Brown v. Board of Education 7 Chevy SUV 8 Supermodel Wek 9 Dessert choice 10 French isl. south of Newfoundland 11 Bean and Welles 12 Ball girl 13 Those, in Tenerife 14 Obama, e.g.: Abbr. 15 Form letters? 16 Drug money? 17 Zip 18 Credit card name under a red arc 19 Cupid's counterpart 24 Tropical grassland 29 Stowe novel subtitled "A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp" 32 NBC newsman Roger 33 One way to get to Paris 34 Novelist Deighton 35 Prado pictures 37 Old strings 38 Boston department store founder 39 River of Tuscany 40 Nevada senator 41 Time to beware 42 Stone marker 43 Request to a dealer 44 Coming-out party? 45 Like Tom Jones, by birth 46 SDI weapons 47 Oscar winner Patricia 49 Missile with a feathery flight 52 Benedict XVI, e.g. 53 Half a dance 54 Pen name 57 Proverbial sword beater 58 Occurring before: Abbr. 60 Block 61 '60s Israeli prime minister 62 Some 'Vette coverings 63 Unites 64 Jazz __ 65 Dramatist Fugard 66 Dear, in Dijon 67 You can get down on one 68 Illegal payments 71 Class-conscious gps.? 72 Formerly, formerly 73 Bumpkin 74 Fund for hammer parts? 76 "Circle of Friends" author Binchy 77 __-European languages 78 Corn holder 79 Accomplish 80 Bone: Pref. 82 Certain NCO 84 Orchestra members 87 It may be taken in a parlor 88 Popular shift 89 Early communications satellite 91 Put into groups 94 Elizabethan expo 95 Turns 96 Ones against us 97 Wikipedia policy 98 Math subgroup 99 Blissful settings 100 Douglas and others 101 Gangsta rap pioneer 102 Tibetan priest 103 Satyr's kin 104 Hunted 107 Make lace 108 Northwestern sch. where Cougar Gold cheese is made 110 Inside info 111 Pie chart fig. Solution on page 8D Special to the News-SunAires (March 21-April 20) Aries, instead of looking toward the horizon, it's better if you look right in front of you for a change. Otherwise you may miss important things. Taurus (April 21-May 21) In times of trouble this week, turn to a close friend who is bound to offer the assistance you need, Taurus. The stars indicate a potential disturbance on Tuesday. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini, you may want to change plans to invest money in a certain endeavor. Now is the time for saving and not spending. Buckle down at work for the time being. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Take a different tact regarding an important matter, Cancer. Things have not worked out so far, but that doesn't mean that things can't turn around quickly. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, the time has come to put matters of the heart before matters of the head. Reconnect with a romantic partner and share one-on-one time together this week. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo, someone from your past comes back into the picture this week. Take this opportunity to reminisce and catch up with this long lost old friend. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Libra, a missed opportunity may not be recovered. That's why it pays to act right away if you feel like the time is right for a change. Get yo ur financial ducks in a row fir st. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 2 2) Scorpio, it's not like you to act spontaneously, but tha t's just what you will do th is week. Sometimes it can fe el liberating to act on the spot Sagittarius (Nov. 23-De c. 21) Big changes are in sto re for you, Sagittarius, but yo u won't realize what they a re until they are right upon yo u. The latter part of the we ek can be downright hectic. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Ja n. 20) Capricorn, now th at you have settled into a sche dule, you can take on a fe w other responsibilities. But be careful not to bite off mo re than you can chew. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Fe b. 18) Aquarius, take a de ep breath and a step back to avoid lashing out at tho se around you. Acalming tim e is on the horizon, and it's ju st what you need. Pisces (Feb. 19-Marc h 20) Pisces, there are fe w chances to get the things yo u need done, so act while yo u are feeling motivated th is week. Famous birthdaysMarch 13 Emile Hirsc h, actor, 26; March 14 Kirb y Puckett, athlete, 50; Mar ch 15 Eva Longoria, actres s; 36; March 16 Erik Estrad a, actor, 62; March 17 M ia Hamm, athlete, 39. Taurus should turn to a close friend this week A"sick house" presents m any inconveniences, which o ur family knows first hand t hrough our first house. I loved being at home and k eeping our house clean and b righta haven for my husb and and sons. So, when Ken c ame home after work and t old me again that he only f elt sick when he stepped f oot into the house; I threw u p my hands in frustration a nd despair. We tried powerful vacuum c leaners; new cleaning and l aundry products; no pets of a ny kind; airing the house o ut. But, the problem persiste d. Then one cold evening, a fter building a fire in our w oodstove using moldy w ood, Ken's asthma gripped h im as never before. The rest of the evening w as a nightmare of rushing h im back and forth to the h ospital. Then the staff there h elped us unravel the myst ery by remembering what w e'd been doing earlier that e vening. Shortly thereafter o ur doctor ordered him to move out of the house realizing it had been mold all along creating a life or death situation for him. This next inconvenience had us reeling. How could we afford for him to live somewhere else until our house sold?My spirits were low; my worries high; and, my questions many. But, by the grace of God, a friend offered Ken an apartment until the spring. It was November, so we once again had some hopethough we loathed living apart. However, that's when we began to seek God in a new way and embrace the adventure. I'd pack up the kids, bring food and camp out with Daddy on weekends. I heard a Scripture in Isaiah 61: 1a & 2b, NKJV, which says, "The Spirit of the Lord God is upon Me, because the Lord has sent Me to heal the brokenheartedTo give them beauty for ashesthe garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness." Those words propelled me to see that God would bring beauty out of the ashes of the toxic smoke and its aftermath. G.K Chesterton has said, "An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered; an adventure is an inconvenience rightly considered." Rightly considered, the inconveniences of this problem caused us to grab hold of God's purposes. We journeyed with him through the adventure, eventually coming to Florida. The closing thoughts of the Isaiah passage cap off His purposes in adventures cleverly hidden as inconveniences:"That they may be called trees of righteousness, the planting of the Lord, that He may be glorified."Selah Adventure hides in inconveniences DearAbby: I'm the mother of a U .S. Navy sailor who has been the r ecipient of random acts of kindn ess from complete strangers. I w as most affected personally when a woman stopped us in a large p arking garage in Chicago to say, Thank you for your service, y oung man." And there was a s tranger who paid for my son's m eal in an airport when he had a l ayover on his way home for C hristmas. Another time, we were i n a line to see a movie and the a ttendant waved us to the front of t he line and everyone smiled a bout it. Whenever my son goes anyw here in uniform, he's stopped by p eople who just want to say thank y ou. I'm amazed and thrilled. Part of t he reason I am so touched is I was a teenager living in San Diego during the Vietnam era. At that time, young people in the military were cursed and reviled. It was a shameful time in our history when people serving their country could not be proud of their service. Today, I am proud of my son, and he is able to be proud of himself and his decision to enlist in the Navy. So, thank you to all you folks who show your gratitude to our service members by the little things you do. You not only touch that person, but their extended family as well. Proud Mom in Overland Park, Kan. DearProud Mom: I'm pleased to pass along your sentiments and honored you chose me to be the messenger. All of us owe our thanks and support to those brave young men and women who have dedicated themselves and who risk their lives in service to our country. Not only should we thank them when we see them, but we should also pray for their safe return. DearAbby: I work in a large department store attached to a shopping mall. Because many of the stores have no restrooms, customers come into our store to use the facilities. I'm happy they do because it gives us more business. However, I'm confused by some of the patrons. I think it shows good manners to end a cell phone call when visiting a restroom. While I was in there today, a woman entered the stall next to me and continued talking on her phone the entire time she was in there! It's disgusting, but it happens all the time. I'm uncomfortable using the restroom while someone is on the phone, and I'd be very offended if I was on the other end of the line. What's proper etiquette regarding cell phones in public restrooms? Is there anything I could say to someone who does this? Trying to Do My Business DearTrying: Your complaint is one I'm hearing increasingly often. For your safety, I do not advise correcting the manners of a stranger. While common sense and consideration for others (including the person on the other end of the line as well as the occupant of the next stall) would dictate conversation be put on hold while on the toilet, nothing you or I can do will prevent this invasion of personal privacy short of bringing a loud whoopee cushion with you during breaks and squeezing it in selfdefense. P.S. If you think we have it bad in the ladies'room, I have also heard about men talking on their cell phones while standing at the urinals. Heaven help us. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Good advice for everyone teens to seniors is in The Anger in All of Us and How to Deal With It.' To order, send a business-size, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds only) to: Dear Abby Anger Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included in the price.) Sailor's mom is touched by public's radom act of kindness toward son Dear Abby AVON PARK 452-5800 € SEBRING 382-3363 LAKE PLACID 465-1530We Could Have Saved This One! 3 ROOMS AND HALLA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 03/31/11.$9900 Pause And Consider Jan Merop

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 3D Adam Gertlers Use Up the Box Pantry TipsPunchy Potatoes: Add a teaspoon of prepared horseradish or Dijon mustard and a sprinkle of garlic powder to Hungry Jack Instant Mashed Potatoes for gourmet flavor ready in less than five minutes.Make dry spices last: Ground spices tend to lose pungency rather quickly. Buy spices like cinnamon, cayenne pepper, cumin, nutmeg, cloves and allspice whole and grind small batches as you need them. Its a good idea to have a separate coffee grinder for your spices. Save room and keep dry goods fresh: When you get home from the grocery store, transfer flours, pastas, cereals and other dry grains into resealable storage bags or containers. Simply label and date them with a marker, and youll be surprised at how much extra room youll have in your pantry. FAMILY FEATURES You probably dont know it, but you may have the secret ingredients for an exceptional Easter dinner in your pantry right now. The holidays are a perfect opportunity to sprinkle creativity into special meals by using stapleslikepancakemix,syrupandinstantmashedpotatoesinunexpected ways to craft new and delicious dishes the whole family will love. Celebrity Chef Adam Gertler, host of Food Networks Kid in a Candy Store,Ž along with Hungry Jack, have come up with original, easy-to-prepare recipes using everyday items to create a memorable Easter meal. Planning for a holiday meal can be stressful,Ž says Chef Gertler. But by looking to your pantry for inspiration, you will find ingredients to make a truly unique and special meal sure to delight your family and guests!Ž Here are ways to use up what you already have to make a complete Easter menu, including savory Bacon and Cheese Appetizer Bites Spinach Salad with Warm Maple Dijon Vinaigrette Maple Glazed Pork Tenderloin and a sweet Spiced Mocha Fudge Cake Youll create an Easter meal worth celebrating and make your hungry family a happy one. For more creative recipes and tips, visit www.useupthebox.com.Spiced Mocha Fudge CakeMakes: 12 servings Prep Time: 20 minutes Cook Time: 1 hourINGREDIENTSCAKE: Crisco Original No-Stick Cooking Spray 4 (1-ounce) squares unsweetened baking chocolate 3 tablespoons butter 1cup hot brewed Folgers Classic RoastCoffee 2/3 cup Hungry Jack Instant Mashed Potato Flakes 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional) 1 1/2 cups sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 4 large eggs, separated 1/2 cup PillsburyBESTAll Purpose Flour 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt Powdered sugar SPICED WHIPPED CREAM: 1/2 pint whipping cream 3 tablespoons powdered sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extractDIRECTIONS1.HEAT oven to 350F. Line bottom of a 9-inch springform pan with parch ment paper. Coat paper with no-stick cooking spray. Place chocolate and butter in medium microwave-safe bowl. Micro wave on HIGH power 45 to 60 seconds or until chocolate is melted and smooth when stirred. 2.COMBINEcoffee,potatoflakes,cinna mon and cayenne in large mixing bowl, stirring until moistened. Blend in sugar and vanilla. Blend in chocolate mixture and egg yolks. Stir together flour, baking powder and salt. Grad ually blend into chocolate mixture. 3.BEAT egg whites on medium speed of electric mixer until stiff. Add to choco late mixture and blend on low speed until completely blended, scraping sides and bottom of bowl frequently. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake 55 to 60 minutes or until set in center. Cool com pletely in pan on wire rack. Remove from pan. Sprinkle liberally with powdered sugar. 4.COMBINEwhipping cream, powdered sugar, cinnamon and vanilla in medium mixing bowl. Beat on medium speed of electric mixer until stiff. Serve with cake.Maple Glazed Pork TenderloinMakes: 4 servings Prep Time: 7 minutes Cook Time: 12 minutesINGREDIENTS1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves, crushed 1 teaspoon dried marjoram leaves, crushed 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon onion powder 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder 1 pound pork tenderloin, cut into 1/2-inch slices 1 tablespoon butter 2 tablespoons Hungry Jack Original Regular Syrup DIRECTIONS1.COMBINE thyme, marjoram, salt, onion powder and garlic powder in large reseal able food storage bag. Seal bag and shake well. Add pork slices. Seal bag. Shake to coat. 2.MELT butter in large nonstick skillet overmedium-high heat. Add pork mix ture. Cook and stir 8 to 10 minutes or until pork is browned and no longer pink in center.Add syrup. Cook and stir until pork is glazed. Spinach Salad with Warm Maple Dijon VinaigretteMakes: 4 servings Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 1 minuteINGREDIENTS1/4 cup HungryJack OriginalSyrup 3 tablespoons cider vinegar 4 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, minced, or 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1/2 cup Crisco 100% Extra Virgin Olive Oil 1 (6-ounce) bag fresh baby spinach leaves 1 small unpeeled red apple, cored and thinly sliced 1/2 cup crumbled blue cheese 2 tablespoons crumbled cooked bacon or real bacon bitsDIRECTIONS1.WHISK together syrup, vinegar, mustard, thyme, garlic, salt and pepper in a medium microwave-safe bowl until well blended. Gradually whisk in oil, stirring until thickened. 2.COMBINE spinach, apple, cheese and bacon in a large bowl. Just before serving, microwave vinaigrette on HIGH for 30 to 45 seconds or until warm. Drizzle salad with desired amount of vinaigrette; toss salad and serve immediately.Bacon and Cheese Appetizer BitesMakes: 24 appetizers Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutesINGREDIENTSCriscoOriginal No-Stick Cooking Spray 1/2 cup sour cream 1 tablespoon water 1 cup Hungry Jack Buttermilk Complete Pancake & Waffle Mix (Just Add Water) 1/2 cup (2 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese 1/4 cup bacon, cooked and crumbled 2 tablespoons butter, melted PaprikaDIRECTIONS1.HEAT oven to 400F. Spray cookie sheet with no-stick cooking spray. 2.MIX sour cream and water in medium bowl until well combined. Add pancake mix, cheese and bacon pieces. Stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Drop by rounded teaspoons onto pre pared cookie sheet. 3.BAKE 10 to 12 minutes or until lightly browned. Brush with melted butter, sprinkle with paprika. Serve warm. GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCEƒ FOOD

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Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID History records that porcelain was first made in China more than 1,200 years ago. Marco Polo introduced porcelain as we know it today to Europe from China in the 13th century. Painting, or the over glazing of china, reached its peak in Europe during the 1700's, but it was not until after the Civil War that the art became popular in America. Through the centuries, porcelain manufacturers employed china painters to achieve their over glaze designs for the retail market. As time went on and machinery was introduced for mass production, china painting shifted over to a fine art. Popular in the 1800's as a "cottage industry," artists created one of a kind pieces for galleries and gift shops. Today, we find porcelain painting is described as a "dying art," as the artists become older, teachers are scarce and more medium choices for artwork became readily available. Most porcelain artists learn from the art being passed down through generations or seeking teachers from their areas of the country, usually as a result of seeing this art presented through shows. The Lake Placid China Painting Club, members of the World Organization of Porcelain Artists, is dedicated to teaching, educating the public about china painting and restoring this beautiful art. The Lake Placid Club has about 27 adult members including six teachers and have four junior members. Lake Placid China Painting Club is one of the largest clubs in Florida. The public is invited today to "Carousel of Colors", the annual china painters tea and sale held from 12:30-3 p.m. at the Caladium Arts and Crafts Co-op, 132 Interlake Blvd. The artists will display their colorful hand-painted china and will also offer some beautiful hand-painted pieces for sale. Live demonstrations of porcelain painting will be presented throughout this event. One of the highlights of the tea is the silent auctio n, where exceptional pieces b y members of the Wor ld Organization of Porcela in Artists are auctioned off. The door prizes award ed every half hour have alwa ys been a big hit. Behold the beauty of th is art and enjoy the music of violins by local talented hig h school students. Tea, de licious finger food an d desserts will be served. The re is no charge to attend. For more informatio n about the Lake Placid Chi na Painters, contact Joilyn n Littleton, events chairman, at 699-9532 or e-mail elizai slandgirl@yahoo.com. Page 4DNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com ATTENTION RVers!!! 10001 US Hwy 27S Sebring, FL 33876(888) 859-5501 BUTTONWOOD BAY INVITES YOU TO TAKE A TOUR! Enter to WIN One of Three Free Stays! Wednesday, March 16th 1PM … 4 PMSign up Today Specials for New Guests! $ave Even More When You Bring A Buddy! ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Courtesy pho to This Grapes platter by Chris Filip is one of the pieces to be on display at the Lake Placid China Painting Club's event today. Lake Placid China painters tea and sale set for today Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Heartland Cultural Alliance Gallery of Fine Art at Sebring Airport will feature the work of Lake Placid wildlife artist Christine Yarbour during the month of March. The artist's reception will be from 4:30-6 p.m. Friday, March 18 at the Sebring Airport. There will be classical guitar music by Kenny Summers, wine and snacks. The free event is open to the public. Yarbour uses several mediums to express her talent. Oil, acrylics, pen and ink, pen and ink with watercolor, pen and ink with oil roughing and photography are the mediums she uses. Yarbour will soon be a published author and illustrator. Her book on wildlife along the Lake Wales Ridge contains approximately 100 drawings along with fully researched information and first-hand experiences with the animals. For more information contact Fred Leavitt at 402-8238, or e-mail info@heartlandculturalalliance.org. Yarbour's wildlife art on exhibit at HCA Courtesy pho to The work of wildlife artist Christine Yarbour will be on exhibit at Heartland Cultural Alliance Gallery of Fine Art at Sebring Airport during March. The artist's reception will be Friday. SEBRING Bright light f rom the setting sun s treamed in through the b ack door of the Highlands A rt League's Yellow House G allery as Tuesday e venings'Art Sparks!' e vent began. An expectant a udience marveled at the b eautifully lit work of phot ographer Bruce Behrens, a nd as the last bright swath o f sunlight disappeared f rom the entry, he declared, Now, let's take a look outs ide." It seemed as if it was too l ate. The sun had dipped b ehind a massive cloud, w hich reached all the way d own to the horizon. But w ith the mixed group of p hotographers and artists n ow outside, Behrens began a n awe-inspiring instruction i n finding the light'. God's umbrella," he called i t. Referring to the Master p ainters who used to look f or that 20-minute or so w indow at the end of the d ay, and rush outside to c apture the soft, but elegant l ight when it was so perfect, B ehrens enlisted the assist ance of colorful oil painter J ouetta Koning as his m odel. Behrens, who is Avon P ark's city manager, placed K oning above the crowd at t he porch rail, and showed h ow, though the light had s eemed to disappear, the d ome of the sky ifself was a cting as a reflecting u mblella in the same way t hat photographers use u mbrellas in photo shoots t o control or manipulate available light. He further showed how a black board placed opposite the source of light could absorb the light on that side of the subject, or a white one could reflect additional light, and continued around the fountain circle showing examples of ways to cpature the light which seemed to not be there. The evening continued indoors with Behrens presentation of the use of light in his photographs and those of other master photographers, with questions and lively discussion from the eager attendees. "God's umbrella" shed much light on a fascinating subject. Though, sadly, there will be no "Art Sparks!" presentation this coming Tuesday, the weekly sessions will resume on March 22 with a demonstration by artist Anne Watson, who will be bringing a painting from a start in acrylics toward its finish in oils. "Again, it is all about the light ..." she said, and invites everyone to this free event, which will begin promptly at 6 p.m. at the Yellow House Gallery, 1989 Lakeview Drive. For additional information on Bruce Behrens photography, call (407) 4032427. Anne Watson teaches painting in oils and acrylics, drawing and digital media at the Highlands Art League in Sebring, as well as in Avon Park and Lake Placid, and features a broad range of commercial and personal artwork. anne@annewatsonstudio.com and 449-0822. Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Orchid S ociety of Highlands C ounty will hold its fifth a nnual orchid show, Orchids in the Heartland," o n Saturday and Sunday, M arch 26-27 at the Bert J. H arris Jr. Agricultural C enter, 4509 George Blvd. T he hours of the show will b e from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. S aturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p .m. Sunday. Admission is $ 3 per person over the age o f 12. This is an American O rchid Society-judged s how, and trophies and ribb ons will be awarded to the b est plants in different categ ories. Individuals who h ave plants they want j udged need to bring them to t he Agri-Civic Center before 4 p.m. Friday, March 25. H ourly door prizes of o rchids and orchid-related i tems will be given away d uring the show and there w ill be an opportunity table w ith large blooming orchids o n it. The local society will h ave books on orchid growi ng for sale. Seven growers will offer r easonably priced quality o rchids from seedlings to m ature blooming plants and w ill provide exhibits includi ng educational information o n orchids. The Ridge O rchid Society from Polk C ounty and The Orchid S ociety of Highlands C ounty will also have e xhibits. Whatever the f ancy, there will be a plant. H icks Orchid Supplies will h ave a large assortment of o rchid supplies available, and American Group Travel will provide information on their tours, specifically orchid tours of Costa Rica. Two of the growers selling and displaying plants are members of the Orchid Society of Highlands County: Bill Ross, owner of Awesome Orchids in Lake Placid and Jim Elliott owner of Elliott Orchids in Okeechobee. The other growers are Orchid Mania, Myakka City; Ritter Tropic 1 Orchids, Kissimmee; Quest Orchids, Miami; Orchid Island Orchids, Vero Beach; and Featherstone Orchids, Dunnellon. More than 1,000 blooming orchids of various types will be on display for the public to see and enjoy. People new to orchids and those wanting to know about them won't want to miss this event and the opportunity to meet others who are knowledgeable and can answer questions about these stunning plants. Information on and applications for membership in The Orchid Society of Highlands County and the American Orchid Society will be available. The Orchid Society of Highlands County meets the fourth Monday of each month at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center. Its meetings present knowledgeable speakers on a variety of orchid topics. For additional information regarding the society or show, contact Pete Otway at 699-1575 or by email at gatorgalanddoughboy@emb arqmail.com. Information is also available on the society Web site, http://orchidsocietyhighlands.org/. Orchid Society prepares for show Courtesy photo Bruce Behrens surrounded by his by award-winning photos, discusses finding the light' for photographers and artists. God's umbrella Guest Column Anne Watson Courtesy photo The Orchid Society of Highlands County will hold its fifth annual orchid show, Orchids in the Heartland,' on Saturday and Sunday, March 26-27 at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center, 4509 George Blvd. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Special to the News-SunWAUCHULAThe Story of Jesus" Passion p lay will begin its 24th seas on the last weekend of M arch. The performances a re set for Friday and S aturday evenings at 7:30 p .m. beginning March 25 a nd 26, April 1 and 2, 8 and 9 15 and 16, 22 and 23. The "Story of Jesus" is m ore of a re-enactment r ather than a play. It is one o f the largest outdoor plays o f any kind in the United S tates. It has a cast of 225 p eople of all ages, including n early 75 teenagers. There are also 150 live a nimals that appear througho ut the entire performance h orses, camels, cattle, oxen, s heep, goats, donkeys, a lpachas, chickens, ducks, d ogs, pigeons. Special effects include p yro and fire effects, dry ice a nd oil smoke effects, lighti ng effects, flying angels, a b oat scene and indoor rain. The play portrays Jesus as a real touchable, believable p erson while preserving his d eity. People are always comp lementing that they felt t hey had really seen Jesus in a new and powerful way. "The play is really a life c hanging experience. Many p eople accept Christ at the e nd of the performance. S venty-five or more people a re baptized into Christ each y ear. Cast members are a vailable at the end of each p erformance to pray with t hose who come forward," s aid director Mike Graham. Practices go on for three m onths. Construction of the s et takes nearly one month at a bout 16 hours a day. The set i s 250 feet long just 50 feet short of a football field. The play is three hours long with a 20-minute intermission. Last year's attendance was 13,600 paying individuals and 2,500 complementary. Power and Light productions, a 501 c 3 organization established to promote the Gospel of Jesus Christ through any acceptable means, is the owner and sole producer of the play. The production company works toward that promotion especially through the arts and with an emphasis on youth ministry. Power and Light operated Club Forty 31, a Christian youth center for four years in Wauchula. However, the youth center was destroyed by Hurricane Charley as it swept through Hardee County in 2004. It was then that Power and Light established and began overseeing Life Church. The play originated in 1988 by the Lords Church of Wauchula and was sold to Power and Light in 2000. "By the way, even though both Real Life church and the Story of Jesus are ministries of Power and Light, they operate separately when it comes to finances. The church does not sponsor the play. Separate books are kept for the two different ministries. When people give money to the play, it is used for the play. If they give to Power and Light in general, it could be used for either ministry as needed," Graham said. Power and Light has only two full-time employees and four temporary employees during the play season. All cast members (200250), plus about 40 crew members are volunteers who work for the love of the Lord and the play. The volunteers are from nearly 40 different churches in Central Florida. The organization was given 40 acres of property on State Road 66 last year. The goal is to build a 2,000seat theatre to produce Christian drama. Graham has already completed the scripts for "The Story of Noah" and "The Story of Moses." "We believe the theatre is necessary to insure the future of the play. Preliminary plans have already been drawn, but no money has been raised. Ticket sales do not even generate enough to meet our annual expense. We rely on food and merchandise sales at the play, as well as donations," Graham said. Tickets are $18 for adults $18, $16 for seniors (62plus), children (12 and under), and groups of 25 and more. Courtesy photo T he Story of Jesus' Passion play will begin its 24th season the last weekend of March. Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative is proud to announce that Joanne Abel has been selected as the Artist/Crafter of the Month for March 2011. Abel was born and grew up in Northwestern Pennsylvania. She had her first experience with living in Florida when she attended college in Lakeland. Abel got married and moved to Illinois and raised three children in Naperville. When her youngest child graduated, she and her family moved to Florida. They joined her father in the marina business in Clewiston. Abel got interested in the pool business during that time and with the help of friends, bought a lot in Clewiston, built a store and opened their own business. In the meantime, she got interested in becoming a serious ceramist. She had developed an interest in ceramics in 1988 and decid ed to pursue a career in th at field. So the pool business w as sold, their home was sold an d they moved to Naples. S he built her dream shop to ma rket her ceramics and loves to spend time there. Abel had traveled to t he Lake Placid area when s he lived in Clewiston and vis ited the Caladium Arts an d Crafts Cooperative. At th at time the Co-op had a memb er who was a ceramist. Wh en she came back to the area to spend some time, she foun d that the Co-op no longer h ad a ceramist and she inquir ed into becoming a member. Abel has a wide variety of ceramics available from dis hes to Christmas items to ga rden items and many other s. You can see her work at t he Caladium Arts and Craf ts Cooperative, 132 E. Interla ke Blvd. For further inform ation, call 699-5940 or vi sit the Web site at www.caladi umarts.org. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 5D Established 19311600 US 27 South € Avon Park Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home4001 Sebring Parkway Sebring, 385-0125 111 E. Circle St. Avon Park, 453-3101 Chris T.Nelson Craig M. Nelson Darin S. MacNeil W .W LUMBER CO. 465-3331Hwy. 27 S. Lake Placid"We're More Than Just Lumber" COMPLETE Building SuppliesPlease support the above businesses. They have made this page possible. Inspirational Thoughtsby Patricia Valentine THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502 Residential Commercial Mobile Homes"Small Enough to Know You Large Enough to Serve You"500 South Lake Avenue 382-8300 453-3019 THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502St.Luke 5:5-6,And Simon answering said unto him, Master,we have toiled all the night,and have taken nothing:nevertheless at thy word I will let down the net. And when they had this done,they inclosed a great multitude of fishes:and their net brake.ŽIn the above scriptures,Peter chose to obey Jesus and as a result he experienced a stunning display of divine power.In our obedience to God and His word it may sometime require doing some things that appear to be unreasonable.Our obedience to God should never be based on whether something seems fitting to our way of thinking.That is not to say God always bypasses common sense,but oftentimes what He requires of us may not appear reasonable or match our preconceived ideas. Disobedience will cause us to miss out on what God has in stored for us.Nothing pleases a parent more than to have their children walking in obedience.God is even more pleased when His children are walking in obedience.Be Blessed! Attend the Church of Your Choice! Witford Reid M.D.Board Certified Anesthesiologist in Pain Management863-385-9333 Sebring Pain Management And Rehabilitation Center, Inc. 9 Ryant Blvd. Westshore Plaza, Sebring(1 Mile South of Lakeshore Mall on the Right)The ONLY JACHO ACCREDITEDPain Management Unit in Highlands CountySPECIALIZING IN:€ Back Pain € Auto Accidents € Neck Pain € Work Related Injuries VOTED 2009 Doctor of the Year ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT E.O. Koch Construction1417 Swank Avenue € Sebring, FL 33870(863) 385-8649COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTIONLet our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property, build your dream home,or do your remodeling.For all of your Aluminum,Steel,and Conventional construction needsŽEmail: kochcon@strato.netState Certified License #CGC1515338 € ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS € RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL DESIGN € REMODELING € ALUMINUM € ROOFING€ Carports, Patios, Siding, Fascia€ SEAMLESS GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS Abel is named March's Lake Placid Caladium Co-op Artist of Month Courtesy pho to Joanne Abel has made a profession in ceramics since 1988. She is the only ceramist member of the Lake Placid Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative and is this month's highlighted member. Story of Jesus' Passion play opens 24th season March 25 Follow the News-Sun online on www.twitter.com/thenewssun

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Page 6DNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. children's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. children's mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30 and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family and Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: 2:303:15 p.m. Saturdays, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first Friday, 9-10 a..m. Sundays, or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is "Jesus is First at First Christian Church."Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP Publisher's Weekly Best SellersHARDCOVER FICTION 1. "Sing You Home: ANovel" b y Jodi Picoult (Atria) 2. "The Wise Man's Fear" by P atrick Rothfuss (DAW) 3. "River Marked" by Patricia B riggs (Ace) 4. "Minding Frankie" by Maeve B inchy (Knopf) 5. "Treachery in Death" by J .D. Robb (Putnam Adult) 6. "ADiscovery of Witches" by D eborah Harkness (Viking) 7. "Tick Tock" by James P atterson, Michael Ledwidge ( Little, Brown) 8. "The Girl Who Kicked the H ornet's Nest" by Stieg Larsson ( Knopf) 9. "Pale Demon" by Kim H arrison (Harper Voyager) 10. "The Paris Wife: ANovel" b y Paula McLain (Ballantine B ooks) 11. "Gideon's Sword" by D ouglas Preston and Lincoln C hild (Grand Central Publishing) 12. "The Help" by Kathryn S tockett (Putnam/Amy Einhorn) 13. "Room: ANovel" by Emma D onoghue (Little, Brown) 14. "Twilight's Dawn: ABlack J ewels Book" by Anne Bishop ( Roc.) 15. "Night Vision" by Randy W ayne White (Putnam Adult) HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. "Unbroken: AWorld War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption" by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House) 2. "Blood, Bones & Butter: The Inadvertant Education of a Reluctant Chef" by Gabrielle Hamilton (Random House) 3. "Tell to Win: Connect, Persuade, and Triumph with the Hidden Power of Story" by Peter Guber (Crown Business) 4. "Cleopatra: ALife" by Stacy Schiff (Little, Brown) 5. "ASimple Government: Twelve Things We Really Need from Washington" by Mike Huckabee (Sentinel) 6. "In the Blink of an Eye: Dale, Daytona, and the Day that Changed Everything" by Michael Waltrip and Ellis Henican (Hyperion) 7. "Revolt!: How to Defeat Obama and Repeal His Socialist Programs" by Dick Morris and Eileen McGann (Broadside Books) 8. "Known and Unknown" by Donald Rumsfield (Sentinel) 9. "Decision Points" by George W. Bush (Crown) 10. "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother" by Amy Chua (Penguin Press) 11. "Surviving Your Serengeti: 7 Skills to Master Business and Life" by Stefan Swanepoel (Wiley) 12. "I Beat the Odds" by Michael Oher with Don Yaeger (Gotham) 13. "Life" by Keith Richards (Little, Brown) 14. "Untied: AMemoir of Family, Fame, and Floundering" by Meredith Baxter (Crown) 15. "Win: The Key Principles to Take Your Business from Ordinary to Extraordinary" by Frank I. Luntz (Hyperion) MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS 1. 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"The Crippled God: Boo k Ten of the Malazan Book of th e Fallen" by Steven Erikson (Tor ) BOOKS

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 7D EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer .Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun 'N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid C ity" Children's Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, "prime-timers," and Bible s tudies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Children's Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 8:15 and 10 a.m.; Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30 a.m.; and contemporary worship is at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on life's journey, you're we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP There is a place right here in Sebring that provides those who visit a unique and memorable natural experience. Combine that with exercise, competition and fundraising opportunities and you have the Inaugural Seminole 5-K t rail-run. On a beautiful Saturday m orning on March 5, 2011, 40 runn ers took off on the first run of its k ind held at the pristine Sun 'N L ake Preserve. The trail run took p articipants through parts of the P reserve that showcased the incredib le and unique beauty of the site. One of the management goals for t he Preserve is to "provide passive r ecreation and outdoor education." T he Highlands County Parks and N atural Resources Department is d oing just that by offering citizens t his type of event. Runner Sarah S mith said, "It's a great trail. I'd l ike to see more runs here. It is so m uch better than running on a road; i t's more exciting." Sarah's point of view was shared by many of the participants and all agreed that they would love to run at the site again. Kim Price, 34, came in first place with a time of 24 minutes and 48 seconds. She said, "I loved this race. I'm a cross country runner and I would like to see more races out here." All of the runners had positive comments and the Overall Male Winner, Danny Cool, 12, with a time of 26 minutes and 31 seconds, said, "That was fun! It was a lot more fun than just a 5K." Paula Jean Lunt, second place winner, said, "It was absolutely wonderful. It is the best 5K I've run in Sebring and I've been running for eight years." The run was a fund raiser for the Highlands Seminole Club and a chance for the Highlands County Parks & Natural Resources Department to showcase the passive recreational opportunities that the Preserve has to offer. Carlos Torres, district conservationist for the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), came in first in his age group with a time of 31:08. He said of the run, "This was fun. It was my first trail run and it was exciting to see nature. It is a great opportunity to share nature with the citizens in a healthy way. Once people find out how beautiful it is out here, the participation will increase." Javier Torres, also an employee of NRCS, was a first-timer for a long distance run and he felt that the run was challenging. He said, "It is a nice trail; it is very clean and beautiful out here." Former county administrator Carl Cool said, "It was fun and different. This is a great time of year for the run. I would like to see more runs out here." The event was a group effort between Highlands County staff, Highlands Seminole Club members and experienced 5K organizer Chet Brojek. Chet has been organizing these types of runs for about 40 years and assisted John Palmer and Erin McCarta, Highlands Seminole Club members, with the event. Working with staff from the Parks & Natural Resources Department, the 5K was laid out, trails were trimmed, maps were made, signs placed and all the preparations were made for the big day. This is the type of event that encourages citizens to be exposed to the rare and natural beauty of the area. By holding runs and other noninvasive events at the site, more and more people will understand its value. Erin McCarta, the Seminole Club's president, thanked Highlands County for allowing the runners to use the site. "Many of the runners didn't even know about the Preserve," McCarta said. Hopefully more events of this type will be held at the Sun 'N Lake Preserve in the future. The Preserve is approximately 1,350 acres and consists of various plant communities such as pine flatwoods, cypress swamp, cutthroat seeps, and various types of marshe s and wetlands. Hiking the rugged nature trails, biking, and fishing ar e some of the activities that are enjoyed by citizens who visit the Preserve. It is located at the end of Sun 'N Lake Boulevard in Sebring The run was certainly unique with its ruggedness. The trails at th e Sun 'N Lake Preserve are designed for hiking and biking and some areas are very narrow and required the athletes to run single-file. Runners were excited and challenged, but felt that it was just the right amount of difficulty for a fun time and a good run. Congratulations to all the runne rs for taking on this very exciting trai l run. The staff at Highlands County 's Parks and Natural Resources is encouraged by the success of the run. Thanks to the Highlands Seminole Club for recognizing the potential of the Sun 'N Lake Preserve for this type of event. We look forward to more passive recre ational activities and event. Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District. The pristine environment provides ideal backdrop for trail run News From The Watershed Corine Burgess Courtsey photo Carlos Torres placed first in his age group during the Inaugural Seminole Trail Run 5K at the Sun 'N Lakes Preserve on March 5. He stated, This is a great opportunity to share nature with the citizens in a healthy way.'

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By DARLENE SUPERVILLE Associated PressWASHINGTON P resident Barack Obama s miled when he said his large e ars and funny name once m ade him a target of schooly ard harassment. But he was a ll seriousness Thursday w hen he told a White House c onference on bullying that t orment and intimidation m ust not be tolerated. Some 13 million students, a bout a third of all those a ttending school, are bullied e very year, the White House s aid. Experts say that puts t hem at greater risk of falling b ehind in their studies, abusi ng drugs or alcohol, or suff ering mental or other health p roblems. Kids who are seen a s different because of their r ace, clothes, disability or s exual orientation are more l ikely to be bullied. "If there's one goal of this c onference," Obama said, it's to dispel the myth that b ullying is just a harmless r ite of passage or an i nevitable part of growing up. I t's not." He spoke to more t han 100 parents, students, t eachers and others gathered t o discuss the problem and s hare ideas for solutions. "Bullying can have d estructive consequences for o ur young people. And it's n ot something we have to a ccept," he said. The issue has been getting m ore attention partly because t exting, Facebook, Twitter a nd other technologies are b eing used to carry it out i t's called cyberbullying a nd because of media covera ge of teens who have killed t hemselves after such taunti ng. Families of some of those y oungsters joined Obama at t he White House, including T ina Meier, of suburban St. L ouis. Meier's 13-year-old d aughter, Megan, hanged h erself in 2006 after falling v ictim to an Internet hoax c arried out, in part, by an a dult neighbor who posed as a boy. The neighbor, a w oman, was later convicted o f a federal misdemeanor in a l andmark cyberbullying trial. "No family should have to go through what these families have gone through," Obama said. "No child should feel that alone." Meier had a message for parents who want to take away their children's computers and other electronic devices to spare them from bullying: It won't work. She urged them instead to get a better understanding of what their kids are doing. "Technology is out there. We cannot shut it off. Children are not going to allow it to be shut off," Meier told participants. "We have to make sure that we have parents who understand what's going on in their child's online world, as well as the real world." Speaking as a parent and as a victim, Obama urged everyone to help end bullying by working to create an atmosphere at school where children feel safe and feel like they belong. He said that even he felt out of place growing up. "I have to say, with big ears and the name that I have, I wasn't immune," said Obama, who moved around a lot as a boy, being born in Hawaii and growing up there and in Indonesia. "I didn't emerge unscathed," he said. Obama said adults have too often turned a blind eye to the problem by chalking up the harassment to kids being kids. But he said a national attitude adjustment is in order because of the damage that bullying can do. AWhite House conference doesn't immediately solve any problem. But what it does do, particularly by involving the president, is tell the country that an issue is, in fact, a problem that requires a national response. In the case of bullying, the conference also gave Obama another chance to press his education agenda. He has tried to make bullying a part of that by warning that failure to address the behavior puts the U.S. at risk of falling behind other countries academically. Before breaking into smaller groups, conference participants heard from experts who study bullying. Discussions in the breakout sessions touched on anti-bullying efforts in schools, communities and on campuses, as well as on cyberbullying. Two other sessions were conducted online, including one with Sebelius answering questions. Michelle Obama said parents need to be more involved in their children's lives, their schools and their activities since youngsters "don't always tell us eve ry little detail." She said h er youngest daughter, 9-yea rold Sasha, often sa ys "Nothing" in response to questions about her day at school. The first lady, who intr oduced the president, al so urged adults to set an exam ple by treating others wi th compassion and respect, an d giving each other the bene fit of the doubt. "It sends a me ssage to our kids about ho w they treat others," she said. http://www.stopbullying. gov Page 8DNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com CROSSWORDSOLUTION MCTphoto President Barack Obama speaks with advance placement U.S. history students at Wakefield High School in Arlington, Va., on Monday. Obama to bullying victims: I know what it's like to be a bullied Associated PressHURON, Ohio Ohio's t ax department says a promi se that it would send a w oman a $200 million refund c heck was a mistake due to a s oftware glitch. The Sandusky Register r eports Denise Bossetti was a mong 9,700 taxpayers s tatewide who received Ohio D epartment of Taxation n otices about mega-refunds. I t's not clear if the other a mounts were as big as what B ossetti was told to expect. The woman from Huron in n orthern Ohio was sent a lett er dated Jan. 24 saying her $ 200 million refund could n ot be paid by direct deposit s o she'd be sent a check. Bossetti says she and her b oyfriend had a "big laugh" o ver the letter. Another dated a week later e xplained there'd been a softw are error. Tax department spokesman G ary Gudmundson says the p roblem has been fixed. Software blamed for Ohioan's $200M refund promise NEWS-SUN€ 385-6155



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Red Devils top FrostproofPAGE1COrgan player heading for nationalPAGE2ANEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, March 13, 2011 www.newssun.com Volume 92/Number 31 | 75 cents www.newssun.com HighLow 79 50Complete Forecast PAGE 8A Bright, sunny and pleasant Forecast Question: Do you think the teacher merit pay and tenure bill will become law this time? Next question: Should the states driving age be raised from 16 to 17? www.newssun.comMake your voice heard at Online Inside Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453O nline: www.newssun.com Yes 77.6% No 22.4% 099099401007 Total votes: 49 Arts & Entertainment4D Books 6D Business 1B Chalk Talk 4B Classifieds 5B Community Briefs2A Community Calendar7C Crossword Puzzle2D Dear Abby 2D Deed Transfers 3B Editorial & Opinion3A Food 3D Living 1D Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times 2D Sports 1C Index locally owned community mindedHeartlandNational Bank Avon Park800 West Main St.863.453.6000Lake Placid600 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.699.1300Sebring327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1300Sun n Lake North5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1322www.heartlandnb.com By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING More billing discrepancies have been discovered in invoices submitted by County Attorney Ross Macbeth, but this time there is also a claim from Macbeth that the county underpaid him by more than $27,000 during from 2000-2002. In a letter dated March 1, the county attorney stated that a cost of living adjustment should have been paid to his office, but was not due to a lack of oversight on the particulars of his contract. The county paid me approximately $27,971.21 less than it should have paid me during the twoyear time period, Macbeth wrote. As with all the other items you have questioned, neither my staff, nor the Boards staff, not the Clerks staff identified and rectified the billing error.. In the letter dated March 1, Macbeth told Clerk of Courts employee Dawn Simpson that in addition to the under billing, more over-billing was also discovered. The letter shows that a spot check of 12 invoices covering a time period of 2002-2004 discovered another $3,636.86 is owed back to the county. Macbeths responses show that on invoice 76, dated Dec. 6, 2002, Macbeths office billed 11 hours instead of one hour for engineering services in November of that year. On invoice 77, dated Jan. 10, 2003, his office billed 11 hours again instead of one hour for code enforcement work. When totaled up, Macbeths over billing for the spot checks have amounted to $23,789.90 to date, and covers ju st 22 of more than 1,000 monthly invoi ces. Macbeth has been county attorn ey since 1998. Macbeth paid back the discover ed overcharges discovered earlier, accor ding to Clerk of Courts Bob Germain e, but did not include a check for t he recent discovery of $3,636.86, h is office stated on Friday. When it is all said and done, w e owed him, said Simpson. His sprea dsheet shows that we owe hi m $27,971.21, so there was no need f or Macbeth says county underpaid him $27,000 Macbeth See MACBETH, page 7A BYBRIANAWASHINGTON and ED BALDRIDGE News-SunSEBRING Im sa fe and that I will contact the m ASAP, replied Mari ne Corporal Jonathan Aval os when asked if he had an ything to say to family an d friends on Friday. Avalos is an Avon Pa rk graduate who was station ed in Japan during the magn itude 8.9 earthquake th at rocked the small count ry early Friday morning easte rn time. Luckily Avalos and fello w APHS graduate Lan ce Corporal Christopher Bow er are stationed in Okinaw a, which was far enough fro m the epicenter of the eart hquake reported as bein g the most powerful to hit t he country in recorded histo ry that they were never in danger. Interviewed via Faceboo k, Avalos reported that pho ne lines were down and he w as trying to let family an d friends know he was OK v ia the Internet from the base. Christopher Bower w as also doing fine, according to Avalos. Bower and Avalos bo th participated in the Air For ce Junior ROTC together an d graduated as Red Devils in 2008. Both enlisted together v ia the buddy system, attend ed AP grad in Japan: Im safe Courtesy pho to Lance Corporal Christopher Bower (left) and Corporal Jonathan Avalos, are doing just fine after the recordbreaking earthquake hit Japan. Two local Marines stationed on island of Okinawa See PAIR, page 7A By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comLAKE PLACID South Florida Community College students enrolled in Dr. Nancy Dales communication course have been having participating in a learning experience that wasnt on the syllabus they received at the start of the semester. The Voices of Freedom Worldwide project was thought up by Dale after viewing the protests in Egypt that took place last month. I thought that the students could use the experiences of whats going on over there to become more culturally aware, said Dale. David Frost is one of the students in the living classroom and explained what the students have been doing with the unexpected addition to the class. Since the beginning of the Egyptian Protests on Jan. 28, the class has been communicating with Egyptians through the Voices of Egyptians/ Americans Facebook page, explained Frost. SFCC students listen to Voices of Freedom See STUDENTS, page 7A St. Patricks Day about more than shamrocks and smooches PAGE1D Using Facebook to talk to protesters in Middle East Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and 12 Hours Fan of the Year namedPAGE2A 10-8: In Service New home for West Sebring VFD up and running News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Kailey Gorham, 7, and Manny the dog check out the new home for the West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department on Hammock Road Saturday morning. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING After 14 months of planning and eight months of construction, the West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department will hold its open house and ribbon cutting for its new station at 3802 Hammock Road today. The open house will be from 2-4 p.m. and the public is welcome. Assistant Chief Billy Kingston explained how much of a difference the new facility from than the old one. If you remember the old building, it was nothing but a shell, Kingston said with a chuckle. This is beyond an improvement. Station 10 will serve the areas from Sparta Road to Sebring Hills. Kingston and the firefighters and EMS personnel are looking forward to serving the areas via the new facility. We will be more efficient and better able to serve everyone on this side of town. It wont be anymore leaving from home or from the station on Longview. We have a place that is central and that we can leave from to get to where we need to go quicker, Kingston said. For the first time, the facility will be able to house EMS in the building. No one wanted to hang around here before, Kingston said of the old station. That will most certainly change now. The new facility has plenty of space and room to house two engines as well as other specialty pieces. Kingston expressed interest in getting a tanker sometime in the near future. Our engine holds 1,800 gallons of This is beyond an improvement.BILLYKINGSTON assistant chief See NEW, page 5A

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By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Sharon Weatherhead has been playing the organ since the age of 11, and always felt the organ was a beloved hobby of hers. But she has found more passion for her craft during the last couple years, and it paid off with a second state championship. Three weeks ago, Weatherhead, who splits her time between Sebring and Fort Myers, competed in the state competition three weeks ago against 19 others in her category, advanced hobbyist. There are three levels hobbyist, advanced hobbyist, and professional categories. Im an advanced hobbyist, which means I play with all three keyboards including the pedals down below there, Weatherhead explained. Weatherhead was the 2009 and 2011 winner of the organ competition. She recently joined the Highlands County Organ Society. After winning the competition in Fort Myers, Weatherhead is awarded an all-expenses-paid trip to Las Vegas for the national competition. The competition will be held at the Monte Carlo Hotel and Resort on May 7. Weatherhead took lessons until she was 19, however she never played competitively. Weatherhead only plays for her own love of the instrument. I just zone out. I relax when Im playing. I come home at night and I just play. Its for my own enjoyment. I could easily teach lessons but I just do it for enjoyment, she said. Her winning piece for this years competition was a semi-classical piece, Czardas by Vitorio Monti. Weatherhead explained the difference between the organ and playing a piano and how she feels the organ is a good way to expand musical talents. Playing the organ is like being the conductor of the orchestra, Weatherhead started. Each of those buttons has a different sound, a different instrument. You can make the organ sound like anything you want. Weatherhead feels her love of the organ at such a young age grew into her love for music itself and she believes the organ will do the same for many young musicians. Its a good instrument to play. It makes studentsears so much better at music, she said. Before heading off to Las Vegas in May, Weatherhead is planning to get plenty of practice. At home, Weatherhead plays on her own personal Roland American Classic organ, and the Highlands County Organ Society also provides ample opportunity to keep those fingers moving. The Highlands County Organ Society is a small group of seven members who share their love of music and the organ together. Weatherhead, along with her fellow musicians spend their Friday evenings at Fletchers Music located inside the Lakeshore Mall in Sebring. The group plays from 6:30-9 p.m. Weatherhead will be the featured player at Fletchers until her appearance at the national organ competition on May 7. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, Florida 33870 A Harbor Point Media Company OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday PHONE: 863-385-6155 MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954 NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870 USPS ISSN 0163-3988 Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry office(s)CIRCULATION SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before 11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their account. Please call 385-6155.SUBSCRIPTION RATES12 mo.7% FL taxTotal HOME DELIVERY$60.46$4.23$64.69 IN FLORIDA MAIL92.236.4698.69 OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL105.99105.99 Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. Romona Washington Publisher and Executive Editor863-385-6155, ext. 515 Kaylor & Kaylor P.A.Social Security Disability LawNew Claims Hearing Before A Judge Reconsiderations Appeals Court 863-382-1900 Mark Kaylor March 9 6917384352x:5Next jackpot $4 millionMarch 5 5614232429x:4 March 2 3711194041x:4 March 11 23131819 March 10 117192124 March 9 614293536 March 8 1217182227 March 11 (n) 9882 March 11 (d) 1352 March 10 (n) 3339 March 10 (d) 2593 March 11(n) 59 8 March 11 (d) 66 1 March 10 (n) 48 3 March 10(d) 13 7 March 11 1617273613 March 8 252731359 March 4 269277 March 1 317232918 March 9 1220284048 PB: 8 PP: 2Next jackpot $54 millionMarch 5 223314248 PB: 21 PP: 2 March 2 731505158 PB: 6 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center Part time resident to participate in national organ competition News Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Sharon Weatherhead is a member of the Highlands County Organ Society. Playing since the age of 11, Weatherhead has won numerous competitions including her recent title as state champion. The musician will compete in the national contest in Las Vegas in May. POLICEBLOTTER The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, March 10: Eric Antonio Barajas, 19, of Lake Placid, was charged with battery on an officer/firefighter/EMT, resisting an officer without violence, and possession of marijuana. Zeneida Luz Chapelin, 23, of Lake Placid, was arrested on an out-of-county warrant reference no valid driver license. Matthew Frank Dugger, 23, of Venus, was arrested on two out-of-county warrants reference violation of probation for possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. Steven Milo Griffin, 20, of Lake Placid, was charged with dealing in stolen property, and grand theft of motor vehicle. Amado Leal Leon, 24, of Sebring, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. Juan Lopez, 22, of Lake Placid, was charged with possession of marijuana and possession and or use of drug equipment. Jesus Gabriel Mangual, 24, of Sebring, was charged with withholding support of children or spouse. Bruno Montoya Mendoz, 29, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. JR Moore, 23, of Lake Placid, was charged with resisting an officer without violence. Steven Anthony Pickett, 24, of Lake Placid, was charged with non-support of children or spouse. COMMUNITYBRIEFS By BARRYFOSTER Special to the News-SunSEBRING Former 12 Hours broadcaster and longtime race enthsiast Bill Farmer has been named the Fan of the Year for the 59th running of the Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring presented by Fresh from Florida. Farmer first began attending the Race in 1975 after cajoling his father for years to take me to Sebring. He has not missed a Race since then, watching the action fromone of the most prized spots on the track justat the start/finish line. Dad would sit on top of a motor home with his buddies and watch the gridding of the cars prior to the race, watch the Race, then watch Victory Lane, all with a perfect view of the pits and within 50 feet of the start/finish line, wrote Farmers daughter Monica in her nomination letter. In 1996, Farmer was invited to join a team and serve as a turn reporter for the Grand Prix Radio Network in broadcasting Sebring and several other Florida road races. Later, he worked the pits and the booth broadcast for the races, calling the action and interviewing drivers, team owners, sponsors and dignitaries. It was unbelievable to be such a big fan of Sebring then to be able to interview the winning drivers live in Victory Lane. It was a surreal expe rience, Farmer said. Farmer now has settled back to simply watch the Race, but he st ill tunes into the broadcast to follow t he action. Again this year the Race w ill be aired locally on WWTK 730 AM Farmer named Fan of the Year for 12 Hours Railroad crossing closed temporarilySEBRING The railroad crossing at Arbuckle Creek Road and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard will be closed starting at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday until possibly the end of the week for repairs. Adetour will be posted. Call the Highlands County Engineering Department at 402-6877.Boat ramp closed temporarilyAVON PARK Highlands County Parks and Recreation Department will close the Lake Adelaide boat ramp at 2124 West Shore Road for repair and maintenance from Monday through May 12. It is schedule to reopen Friday, May 13.WSVFD plans open house at new stationSEBRING The West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department will hold an open house of their new station Station 10 at 3517 Hammock Road to the public from 2-4 p.m. today. Light refreshments will be served. Everyone is welcome to attend and tour the new station house.LPPD offers First Aid ClassLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Police Department will give an American Heart Association First Aid Clas s at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. The class is $20 for anyon e who has taken the CPR Class from the police department, or $30 for those who are taking the First Aid Class alone. The CPR Class will be offered later and will cost only $20 for First Aid Class attendees. Certification is good fo r three years. Homeowners Association meets MondaySEBRING Monthly meetings of the Highlands County Homeowners Association are held the second Monday of each month at the Sebring Country Estates Club House, 3240 Grand Prix Ave. The March 14 meeting is open to the public and will be held from 9-1 1 a.m. Free coffee, hot tea and donuts are provided. Registered Nurse Suzanne Crews, Parish Nursing coordinator, will present a program on Care Giving. She will cover top ics such as risk for caregivers, legal issues, how t o talk to doctors, efficient medicine use, local resources, what is dement ia and how to plan. Good Shepherd Hospice will present a program explaining their mission and give an overview of their many programs avai lable to the public. As the areas first free-standing Continued on page 6A Associated PressAfederal appeals court h as agreed to act swiftly in c onsidering a Florida j udges ruling that P resident Obamas health c are overhaul is unconstit utional. The 11th Circuit Court o f Appeals in Atlanta said F riday that it had agreed t o expedite the appeal, sett ing a faster timetable than e ven the federal governm ent had requested. The decision means the f ederal government must f ile its first set of court p apers on the issues in the c ase by April 4, and the s tate of Florida has until M ay 4 to file its papers. T he federal government w ould file additional p apers by May 18. The appeals court said it h ad not made a decision o n a request that the initial r eview be held before all 1 0 federal judges. The Justice Department s aid in a filing this week t hat expedited treatment o f the case was warranted b ecause of the far-reachi ng nature of the decision b y a federal judge who d eclared the entire law u nconstitutional. Court speeds up health overhaul appeal Associated PressTITUSVILLE SeaWorld in Florida has released its 1,000th rehabilitated sea turtle at Canaveral National Seashore. The loggerhead turtle put back in the Atlantic on Friday was brought to SeaWorld in September. It suffered from lockjaw and weighed 70 pounds. After rehabilitation, it regained normal function of its jaw and is back to a normal weight of 102 pounds. The parks Animal Rescue & Rehabilitation Team has cared for more than 1,500 turtles since its sea turtle rescue program began at SeaWorld Orlando back in 1980. Turtles most often suffer from injuries from fishing line, hooks and nets, eating trash and plastic bags, boat strikes, natural illnesses and oil contamination. SeaWorld releases 1,000th rehabilitated sea turtle

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But it is a little early to s tart talking about eliminati ng departments or jobs. It is not too early to get b ehind the elected officials w ho are calling for cuts. The county has to consider a ll of its options to fill what C hairwoman Barbara Stewart c alled an $11 million hole. The county commission b efore Jack Richie, Greg H arris and Don Elwell used r ainy day funds to fill the h ole, but does not have that o ption this year. As a matter o f fact, all those years of e xperience on the board b efore those three did not f oresee such a long lasting d own turn and literal crash in t he housing market in H ighlands. Who could? Additionally, there has to b e an educational process b ecause those three are new t o the bench, so to speak. Although it is not their f ault that the county has dug a n $11 million hole, the curr ent commission will still h ave to look into options of f illing it. All options. The county is far from b roke, arguably, it is hard to u nderstand how any organization that has $79 million in revenue can be called broke, but the board does have to make level-headed decisions about where to trim services and where to stop funding this year. Next year does not look any better right now because of rising gas costs and the state making slashes. But those leading our county have made no official decisions yet, they are just looking at options. Is it hard to have those discussions, especially when families and livelihoods are at stake? Yep. One thing is for sure, we all agree that there will have to be cuts, and that the county will definitely have to forego $5,000 coffee machines in this fiscal atmosphere, but level heads and intelligent discussion should be had at this point. Additionally, instead of claiming how successful a county department has been in the past, county staff should be presenting a 10minute presentation on what their department does and how that impacts the quality of life in Highlands County. And then they should be volunteering to cut their own services and budgets, already pitching in and not waiting to be told to find ways to cut. Yes, Parks and Recreation is important, and so is Road and Bridge and the rest of the county departments, but there has to be a unilateral cut within those departments from the top to the bottom, and salaries and jobs needs to be the last resort right now. Maybe we as citizens can live without county funded housing. Maybe the ARC can find funding elsewhere, but those departments need to volunteer to bring forward their own cuts in services now, not later, but now. Richie asked several departments to help us out here by volunteering those cuts ahead of time. Elwell suggested that commissioners were not there to practice micro-managing budgets, but they would wade through them line per line if they had to. Cuts have to be made at several different points not because the services are unnecessary or important, but because the county must live on its allowance now. Should there be concern? Sure. We all have to tighten our belts in this economy, but there is no need to run around like our hair is on fire. Use your favorite towel and dry your eyes, roll up your sleeves, get behind your elected officials and start making smart decisions. Dont panic, at least not yet. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 3ATODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION Editors Note: Due to an e rror, the final portion of F ridays editorial was not p rinted. Here is the editorial i n its entirity. The News-Sun a plogizes for the error. It is that time of year again. This Saturday night r emember to set your clocks a head an hour or you might m iss church Sunday morning. To help you remember, here a re a few facts about the cust om, culled from webexh ibits.org/daylightsaving. The goal of daylight saving i s to take an hour of daylight f rom the morning and add it to t he evening. It turns out the idea of dayl ight saving has been around f or centuries. Benjamin F ranklin wrote about the conc ept in 1784, although there w as no interest in it at the t ime. The first regular use of dayl ight saving came during W orld War I, when both E ngland and Germany made u se of it. In the United States the i dea has been popular and in u se for decades, although t here have been many experim ents and adjustments along t he way. As recently as 2007 Congress set the time changes for the second Sunday in March and the first Sunday in November. One constant, though, has been the 2 a.m. moment of change, because it creates the fewest disruptions. It took years for daylight saving to standardize the United States, as in the s and s each locality could choose when to reset its clocks. For example, the state of Iowa alone had 23 different start and stop dates. And on one 35-mile long stretch of bus route between Ohio and West Virginia, passengers had to change their watches seven times. Today Arizona is the only state in the union that does not use daylight saving time, although the Navaho Nation, partially in Arizona, does follow the practice, while the Hopi Indians whose reservation is completely surrounded by the Navahos like Arizona, do not change their clocks. There are other little oddities about daylight saving. For example, scientists in Antarctica, which has no daylight in winter, and 24 hours of sunlight in the summer, use daylight saving time. This is so they can synchronize with their supply bases in Chile and New Zealand. For the most bizarre consequence, however, take a case of twins born in the fall when the time is turned back. Say the first child arrives at 1:55 a.m. and the second child comes 10 minutes later. This means the second child was born at 1:05 a.m. and is now the elder by 50 minutes. On the other hand, during the spring change when clocks move forward, no children are born between 2 and 3 a.m. Daylight saving time reminds us yet again that time, writ large, is entirely relative. The worlds time zones, for example, are all measured from the Meridian line passing through Greenwich, England, and have been since 1884. The fact that this point was chosen has nothing to do with science, and everything to do with the fact that England was then the world power and simply decreed time on Earth started with there. Fridays editorial ... all of it So Don and I are driving back from Bible Study and I notice CNN sent me a breaking news alert. This is possible since my Blackberry gets my email sent to it. Not that Im bragging on my phone or anything like that. Anyway, the news alert says that Wisconsin senators have managed to vote on Governor Walkers plan to limit collective bargaining for public sector workers. My first response to the news was How? I mean, wasnt the whole point of the Democratic senators running away from home to prevent this from happening? Well, it turned out that the Republicans managed to pull a fast one. They separated the collective bargaining provision from the fiscal portions of the bill. While they needed a quorum for any budgetary bill, other bills didnt have such a requirement. So they were able to ram the vote through. As you might guess, the opposition was not happy with this move. The senators were escorted from the state capitol building under guard while protesters fought to get in. Democrats accuse the Republicans of violating an open meetings law. There is a call to recall the Republican senators. People were mad before this latest move. If anyone thought this would calm them down, they were sadly mistaken. One Republican Senator being interviewed on Fox News actually said he thought some Democrats would thank them for this so they could return home. I dont know what gave him that idea, but given the lousy day Ive been having I wish I had some of his crazy optimism. Readers probably assume that I approve of the Republicansactions, given how hard I was on the Democrats in my previous column on this topic. If so, my reaction will surprise you, because Im not really crazy about this move at all. I understand being frustrated. I still think the Democrats were wrong to flee the state like they did and thus block the whole voting process. Maybe if the Republicans had done this weeks ago o r even before the Democrats cut and ran Id feel better about the whole thing. But I dont. Ramming the collective bargaining provision through like this is an inyour-face move. It pretend s that you arent going to have to work with your opponents at some point down the line. It gives the other side ammunition it makes it look as if all you cared about was the one provision and not the budg et as a whole. Wisconsin is a picture o f what is wrong with the political discourse in this country. And both sides ar e to blame. Rather than work togeth er towards what is best for their state, both Democrats and Republicans made dec isions based on what they thought would give them political gain. This is mad dening. And its not restricted to Wisconsin. Partisan postur ing occurs on all levels of government. Look at Washington, D.C. We are facing the possibility of a government shutdown because the Democrats and Republicans would rather snipe at each other than deal with the very real problems we have with a debt that could cripple us down the line. And please dont send m e e-mail saying, Well, MY side is trying to do the righ t thing. It takes two to tango, and two to fight. Both sides are guilty of this kind of garbage, and frankly Im fed up with th e whole lot of them. Sadly, Wisconsin is teaching us an unfortunate lesson: that party politics i s alive and well and probabl y not going away any time soon. How depressing. Laura Ware can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady@ embarqmail.com Nobody wins in Wisconsion mess Lauras Look Laura Ware Dont panic yet D ont panic. Its a long process, and this year the county budget presentations have started earlier. E verything is on the table. Rail system makes no senseEditor: I would like to give a response to Randy Ludacers letter to the high speed rail. For one thing we both had the name wrong. It should say light rail system, because speed between the three cities are going to be at highway speed being so close together. And talking about good for government, what is the strategic demand for our government to have or use this rail system? He also compared tthree cities to a whole country, such as Japan and China, where land is at a premium and the terrain is not suitable for roads! And how is a 1 1/2 hour rail system here in South Central Florida so important to us as a nation? We here in Florida and the United States, as a whole, have highways and roadway systems that are un-equaled. If you use that rail from here in Lake Placid where both Randy and me are from, we would have at the very least 1 hour and 45 minutes to the rail system, then we would have to park our auto at a cost when we could drive to all three of the cities in the same time period. It is beyond my comprehension as to how this short expensive light rail will help America as Randy states in his letter. Now to nuclear power here in Florida, does anyone know what it takes for a reactor? And the water from the cool down, where is the waste water going to go? Florida is built on sand and springs. Like I have always heard, you had better build your house on rock. Maybe some smart person may enlighten me. Please do. C.F. Neeley Lake PlacidLegion Post helps Humane SocietyEditor: Many thanks go out to the members and veterans of the American Legion Post 74 in Sebring for their support and contributions for the very successful food drive for the Humane Society, sponsored by the Sons of the American Legion Squadron 74. The Humane Society was grateful to receive well over 200 pounds of dog, c at and canned food to help t he sheltered pets until they c an be adopted. With the help, support an d generosity from the Post an d Lowes, the S.A.L. we re able to acquire a gas gr ill that was raffled at t he Valentines Day Ste ak Dinner offered from t he kitchen volunteers at Po st 74. Congratulations to D an and Robin, winners of t he gas grill; proceeds from t he raffle will help benefit t he Veterans Services of Highlands County. Randy Sallis (command er for the Sons of the Americ an Legion Squadron 74) pu rchased four $25 SweetB ay gift cards and present ed them to the Veteran s Services in an effort to he lp some of our veterans th at need assistants. Thank you one and all f or your valued and continu ed support in our efforts to he lp our community and the ve terans that served to prote ct our country and flag. Randy Sal lis Command er Sons of the America n Legion Squadron 7 4 Sebrin g

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 5A Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The ann ual banquet of the Historic al Society of Avon Park, he ld Feb. 12, saw the election of eight individuals to the boa rd of directors for a three-ye ar term. Four of those elected a re returning for another thre eyear term, while the remai ning four are brand new to t he board. Returnees include Ren ee Bennett, Roberta Flower s, Jean Jordan and Betty Jordo n Pierce. The newcomers a re Thetis Casey, Jim Dea l, Donna Faucett and Car yl Ryan. Remaining on the boa rd are Maxine Floyd, Jim Kelle y, Joyce Kelley, Duane Kopt a, Theda Miracle, Jean Elli ot Prescott, Eile en Sachsenmaier, Par ke Sutherland, Nancy Webe r, Wendell Winkie William s and Helen Young. Stepping down were Ma ry Lee King, Mary Pard ee Roberts and Margar et Turnbull, who was announc ed as Board Member of t he Year. Elected as president o n Feb. 21 was Sachsenmaie r, who joined the board la st year. She replaces outgoin g president Larry Levey, wh o had served for the past fi ve years. Re-elected were William s as vice-president, Flowers as recording secretary, an d Bennett as treasurer. New ly elected as an officer w as Weber, who replaces Bet ty Jordon Pierce as correspo nding secretary. Elaine Lev ey remains as museum director Several new faces join AP Historical Society w ater. Atanker holds 3,600 g allons, so it would benefit u s to have one. We could b ring it on a call if we neede d to, Kingston said. The inside of Station 10 i s a clean, fully decorated v ision. The full kitchen is a n added luxury that the f irefighters and EMS were n ot accustomed to with the o ld building. We didnt have any of t his before. No couches, no m eeting or training room, n o stove, so this is very diff erent and honestly it brings u s all closer together. There i s always somebody in here c ooking and offering the o ther guys something, K ingston said. The 30 active volunteers c an now enjoy one another w hile they wait for calls or e mergencies rather than runn ing home or back and forth b etween stations. Its good that they have a central place when they h ave down time. We dont h ave to be all over the p lace, said Kingston. Chief Scott Manns office s its right of the meeting r oom adjacent to a separate E MS office. Down the hall, t here are restrooms and s hower facilities for women a nd men volunteers and a cross the hall from those, q uarters with multiple bunk b eds. We try to keep things s omewhat separate. Thats w hy they (EMS) have these t hree rooms. They have sepa rate beds also because they a re here around the clock, s aid Kingston. Station 10 will be a 24h our EMS station, while f irefighters will rotate out a nd come and go throughout t he day and night. There will always be E MS here and there is usually always one of us here. In fact, I think there is someone sleeping in there now, Kingston said with a chuckle. WSVFD requests EMS on certain calls. For house fires and auto accidents, EMS is required to cover along with WSVFD. EMS personnel have 160 hours of fire training as well as WSVFD having first responder training. Its just more hands; more help on scene. Sharing the space with EMS is going good, said Kingston. The initial budget of the construction of Station 10 was at $1 million, however after all was said and done, the construction totaled just at $600,000. We came out ahead, so it was great for us. We are on an assessment district budget, so that means whatever we have left over it just doesnt go away,it goes into a savings account. We can use it later to buy a new engine or that tanker that we may need, explained Kingston. As for the unusual color of the building, Kingston laughed as he explained. It was supposed to be more red. It was supposed to be salmon. The splotch was a lot darker than what it is now, but its different. I think we kind of fit in this area with this color, too, so its fine, Kingston said. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by ROBYN BAKALUS West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department Station 10 is manned 24 hours a day by the Emergency Medical Services. New fire, EMSstation ready for public debut News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department Assistant Chief Billy Kingston talks Saturday morning about some of the amenities being enjoyed by firefighters and Emergency Medical Technicians at the new fire station on Hammock Road in Sebring. A new modern kitchen helps first responders feel at home.

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Page 6ANews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com GUARANTEED WEIGHT LOSS!CALL TODAY (863) 471-2500 LOSE YOUR WEIGHT FOR THE LAST TIME!13 Ryant Blvd. SebringCorner of 27 & Ryant Blvd.SAVE 50% OFF ENROLLMENT FEES Hurry! Offer Ends Soon! At the Florida National Cemetary at Bushnell, FL, South Florida National Cemetary at Lake Worth, FL or Sarasota National Cemetary at Sarasota, FL Pr oud to Serve Sebring, Lake Placid & Avon Park Proud to Serve Sebring, Lake Placid & Avon Park h ospice house, the Somers H ospice House offers a nearb y option for patients and t heir families requiring s hort-term, inpatient service s, such as pain management a nd symptom control. H ospices goal is making a d ifference in the lives of p atients and families affecte d by end-of-life illnesses. Call chairman Rick Ingler f or any additional informat ion at 273-5182.SALT meets TuesdaySEBRING The H ighlands County Seniors a nd Law Enforcement T ogether (S.A.L.T.) Council w ill hold its monthly meeti ng on Tuesday at Lake P lacid Town Hall, 311 W. I nterlake Blvd. The meeting, h osted by the Lake Placid P olice Department, will b egin at 10 a.m. Chief of P olice Phil Williams will s peak on tax return frauds a nd other forms of identity t heft. The public is invited to a ttend and there is no c harge, however reservations a re requested. To reserve a s eat at this presentation cont act S.A.L.T. president Janet T indell at 443-0747 or Nell H ays at 385-0024. For more information on f uture S.A.L.T. meetings or t o volunteer for this organiz ation, contact Tindell or H ays.Parkinsons Disease Support Group meets MondaySEBRING The P arkinsons Disease Support G roup for the Highlands C ounty area will meet at 10 a .m. Monday at First Baptist C hurch of Sebring, corner of P ine and Lemon Street. The program this month w ill be Elder Law attorney R oy Wilkes. All persons with P arkinsons disease and their f amilies are welcome to a ttend. There is no charge. For more information, call 4 53-6589 or 453-6149. The Highlands County P arkinsons Support Group i s part of the national netw ork of support groups affili ated with the American P arkinsons Disease A ssociation. More than 1 m illion Americans have P arkinsons Disease. Today p eople with Parkinsons dise ase and their families can f ind help and information f rom their local support g roup.Red Hatters plan for Green FlingSEBRING Lunch tickets a re on sale through Tuesday f or South Central Florida R ed Hatters Green Fling. T he event takes place T hursday, March 24. Men a re welcomed guests when a ccompanied by a Red Hat L ady. Doors open at 9 a.m. Advance tickets for lunch are $ 9.95 and Bingo Packs will be sold at the event. Acelebratory Red Hat Parade will kick off the event consisting of holiday theme hats of red or purple with touches of green, gold or favorite holiday colors. Prizes will be awarded for Best of Show at 10:30 a.m. Lunch buffet opens at 11 a.m. and bingo session will close out the event. To purchase tickets or for more information, call 465-0161.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK The American Legion Post 69 will host karaoke by Naomi at 4 p.m. today. The Auxiliary and Legion will meet at 7 p.m. Monday. Bingo is set for 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. For more information, call 453-4553. The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 will host karaoke by Bildi from 5-8 p.m. Tuesday. For more information and menu selection, call 452-9853. The Lake Placid Moose 2374 will host karaoke with Bil-Di at 3 p.m. today. A meat raffle is set for 4 p.m. Thuesday. For more information and menu selection, call 465-0131. SEBRING Eagles Aerie 4240 will host its monthly karaoke/birthday party from 4-7 p.m. today. Members and their qualified guests are asked to bring a dish to pass for the pot luck dinner. Jewels in the Night Entertainment will spin the karaoke discs. Contact the Aerie at 655-4007. Sebring 126 OES will host a corned beef lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. today at the Masonic Lodge, 1809 Home Ave. The menu includes corned beef, cabbage, garlic potatoes and carrots, dessert and beverage. Cost is $7. Tickets are available at the door. Carousel of Colors is todayLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid China Painters are presenting their annual tea, Carousel of Colors!, today in the Caladium Arts & Crafts Co-op, 132 Interlake Blvd. Lake Placid has the largest club of porcelain artists in the region and will be displaying their colorful hand-painted china. The artists will offer some beautiful hand painted pieces for sale. Live demonstrations of porcelain painting will be presented throughout this event. One of the highlights of the tea is the silent auction, where exceptional pieces by members of the World Organization of Porcelain Artists are auctioned off. Members will serve tea, delicious finger food and desserts from 12:30-3 p.m. There is no charge to attend. For more information about the Lake Placid China Painters, contact Joilynn Littleton, events chairman, at 699-9532 or e-mail elizaislandgirl@yahoo.com.Micki Kuhn in concert at ReflectionsAVON PARK Recording artist Micki Kuhn will present a concert of inspirational music at Reflections on Silver Lake at 6:30 p.m. today. Kuhn will perform a variety of beloved old hymns and southern gospel favorites. Alove offering will be taken. For further information, call 452-5037.Lunch Bunch meets MondaySEBRING Fairmount Mobile Estates Lunch Bunch will meet at 11 a.m. Monday at Homers Smorgasbord. Hosts will be Lois and Jim Stausholm and Pat and Don Butts. Everyone welcome.Recreation Club plans activitiesSEBRING The Sebring Recreation Club, at 333 Pomegranate Ave., will host the following events this week: Monday Pro shuffleboard tournament Doubles M/LAvon Park, 9 a.m.; ladies social club, 1 p.m.; shuffleboard scrambles, 1:15 p.m. Tuesday Pro-shuffleboard tournament Doubles M/LAvon Park, 9 a.m. Wednesday Nickel scrambles, 1:15 p.m.; line dancing lessons, 5:15 p.m.; line dancing, 6:15 p.m. Thursday Hosscollar, 9:30 a.m. Friday Mini-shuffleboard tournament, 1:15 p.m. Saturday Ice cream shuffleboard, 1:15 p.m. For more information, call 385-2966.Womans Club hosts luncheon, fashion showSEBRING The GFWC Womans Club of Sebring is hosting a Passion of Fashion Luncheon and Fashion Show at 4260 Lakeview Drive at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, March 19. The deadline for reservations is Wednesday. Seven models will wearing the latest fashions from Sues Cubby Hole, Belk Dept. Store, Bealls Dept. Store, and Dress Barn. Catering will be by the Twin Oaks Antiques and Tea Room. Numerous door prizes, raffles, money tree will be available. Tickets are $20. For reservations, call 6581278. Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS Classified Ads 385-6155 NEWS-SUN Courtesy pho to Heartland Christian School fifth and sixth grade students recently qualified to compete in the ACSI Regional Spelling Bee at Merritt Island.Pictured from left to right include Sara Luepschen (sixth grade), Gracie Duncan (fifth grade), Nala Price (sixth grade), Sarah Nortelus (fifth grade), Hannah Kaszubowski (sixth grade) and Jordan Meyer (fifth grade).Nala Price won fourth place overall in the sixth grade division, and Sarah Nortelus won second place pverall in the fifth grade division Top spellers Special to the News-SunSEBRING In recognition of Pi Day on March 14 and to build math awareness, Sylvan Learning, North Americas leading provider of in-center and live, online tutoring at home to students of all ages, grades and skill levels, is offering free math resources to families. Pi Day is the annual observance of the love of math and the mathematical constant Pi, commonly approximated as 3.14. To celebrate Pi Day, Sylvan Learning is providing a free new online Math Activity Book with 30 days of math concepts, trivia, questions and puzzles. Parents, students and even educators can log on to Sylvans website to download and print activities and math games. Effort and attitude in math matters, says Annette Miller of Sylvan Learning located in Sebring. Math skills build over time, so missing one early essential component can translate into long-term difficulties that can slow future progress. The Math Activity Book can be used by the entire family, including parents, to open a mathematical dialog that will revive forgotten concepts and practice skills. Miller is also encouraging parents to play an active role in boosting their childs math skills by offering the following tips for getting them interested in math at an early age: Make math connections to everyday life. There are many opportunities for children to see the value of math in everyday occurrences. Think of tasks that you do everyday rearranging a teenagers room is a lesson in geometry and equally cutting slices of pie can teach fractions. The more parents talk about math while completing these tasks, the more students will realize its importance. Involve your children in real-life family decisions. Encourage them to plan a family activity while remaining within the budget. For example, ask your children to plan a night at the movies or create a budget for the family vacation. Demonstrate your math ability. Think out loud so your child can hear your analytical reasoning. For younger children, count your change or discuss which measuring cup is needed when baking a birthday cake. For older students, calculate discounts when shopping or estimate how much money will be needed to fill up the gas tank. Mathematize care er choices. Casually talk abo ut mathematics while hig hlighting the types of ma th needed in your children s chosen careers. Video gam e designers, architects, do ctors, football coaches, mus icians and chefs apply ma th skills in their daily work. Praise your children s academic progress. Te ll your children you are prou d of their math efforts, ev en when they struggle. Wh en students are confident in their abilities, they enjo y learning. That love of lear ning in turn leads to a wi llingness to try new, academ ic experiences. Sylvan Learnings onli ne Math Activity Book pr ovides 30 days of math wr iting topics, questions an d puzzles. Families can dow nload the booklet an d answers by contactin g Annette Miller of Sylv an Learning located in Sebrin g at 385-0745 or 676@sylvanGLECenters. co m Parents looking for add itional math resources an d information can vis it www.SylvanMathPrep.co m to receive on-the-spot ma th guidance during homewo rk time and obtain free acce ss to over 700 interactive ma th lessons for pre-algebr a, algebra, geometry and ma th test preparation for the SA T and ACT. Make the math connection on Pi Day GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCE

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By JACOB ADELMAN Associated PressLOS ANGELES Nancy Niijima switched on the TV in her room at the Keiro retirement home to see images from her native country of submerged neighborhoods, cars being carried in giant ocean tides, collapsed buildings and cracked roads. Its like science fiction, not like what really happens in Japan, said Niijima, who is concerned about her sister in the Okinawa island chain, whom she has been unable to reach. The good news is that she has no family near the hardest-hit areas. In the Los Angeles area and other U.S. regions with large Japanese-American and Japanese expatriate populations, those with ties to the Asian country expressed shock at the damage wrought by the 8.9-magnitude quake and fear for the safety of their loved ones there. They also grew frustrated with their inability to reach family and loved ones back in Japan, normally not an issue in such a technologically advanced nation where the Internet and cell phones provide numerous ways to communicate with people in the U.S. I tried calling my sister in Japan, but all the phone lines were jammed, said Misa Washio, a clerk at a counter selling pens in a Kinokuniya Japanese language bookstore in New York City, who learned of the quake from a friend early Friday and quickly switched on the radio. I tried about 10 times. The quake, the largest that Japan has experienced in recorded history, struck when it was 1 a.m. in New York and 10 p.m. in California. Doug Erber, president of the Japan America Society of Southern California, said his office has been fielding a constant stream of queries from people who have not been able to reach friends and family in Japan. The phone has not stopped ringing, and text messages and e-mails, he said. Its been a busy day just trying to keep up. I think I got about 45 minutes of sleep last night. Erbers organization had added a special section to its website with links to resources that could help users track down loved ones in Japan. These included services by Japans biggest mobile phone providers that allow users to input friendsphone numbers to access messages posted about them. The site also links to Googles Person Finder service for the Japan earthquake, where users can ask for and provide information about individuals in Japan theyve been unable to reach. Google spokesman James Yood said many of roughly 17,000 entries on the site by midafternoon Friday were from the United States, although he did not know how many. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 7A LIMITED SPACE CALLTODAY! 5 DAYS a week$ 30 Get In Shape Learn Self Defense Improve Self Esteem Make Better GradesMARTIAL ARTS AMERICA471-2467Best After School Program in SebringFREEPICKUP from: Kindergarten Learning Center, Cracker Trail, Sun-N-Lakes, Woodlawn, Fred Wild, Memorial, Hill Gustat, Sebring Middle/High Located on Kenilworth Sebring*Some Restrictions Apply Life Care, Not Day Care h im to send us a check for t he $3,636.86. Jerome Kaszubowski, s enior director of business s ervices with the Clerks O ffice, confirmed S impsons assessment. He (Macbeth) said he d oesnt intend to invoice t he county for the $27,000. I am not sure that our d epartment agrees with the $ 27,000 or not yet. We need t o take a closer look at it, K aszubowski said. At this p oint, we are not planning o n asking him to pay the $ 3,600. We need to check h is invoices against the ( cost of living allocation) b efore we verify the $ 27,000. That was a long time a go, and he already told us h e as not going to bill us for t he cost of living raises that w ere missed. But, its a lmost a wash, isnt it? K aszubowski stated when a sked about the total billing d iscrepancies versus the a mount Macbeth said he is o wed. When asked if there was a need for a line-by-line a udit of Macbeths billing, K aszubowski said no. We are not going to do a ny more at this point, he s aid. Kaszubowski did want to a ssure taxpayers that his o ffice looks at all invoices c losely and that new proced ures were in place to make s ure these issues were f ixed. Since Bob has been in o ffice, we have placed new p rocedures in place that c lear up matters like this. S ince 2009, we have not h ad any more problems, K aszubowski said. The first spot audit was i nitiated at the request of t he News-Sun after an i nvestigation revealed that M acbeth had billed 56 h ours of his own time in o ne day in 2008. The recent look into M acbeths billing was at t he request of county comm issioner Don Elwell. I knew that we had s tarted looking at the bills, a nd I asked if the clerks o ffice could take a look at t he earlier dates as well. T hey gave some indication t hat they had planned to do t hat anyhow, but I am glad w e are looking at everyt hing, Elwell said. I reall y dont want to go into d epth about the findings yet b ecause I have not seen the d ocuments yet, but I will s ay that if money is owed to t he county, our first duty is t o make sure it is paid b ack. Elwell went on to discuss t he potential under-billing, b ut was not sure where the c ounty stood on that issue. Like any vendor, if they d id not bill us and then five y ears later claimed that we o wed them for, say, comp uters, I am not sure that t hey have a leg to stand on. B ut we will have to look at t he circumstances surr ounding the claim, Elwell s aid. Continued from page 1A basic training together in Parris Island, and were deployed to Japan, but are currently in separate bases on the island of Okinawa, which is part of Japan. Bower is a field MPat Camp Hansen and Avalos is an aviation supply specialist at Camp Futenma. Although Avalos was awaiting deployment to help with victims, he was not overly aware of any other happenings Unfortunately at a time like that, all military members get secured to their base until further notice. Right now I hear we are good and that the mainland was the only affected region, he wrote in Facebook chat. They are good. I had talked to them but I dont know if they had to evacuate, Avalos said about Bower and his family. Avalostour in Japan is almost up and he stated that the next station would be Afghanistan. He wrote that he was currently waiting for the orders to help out around the country. I know we deployed some marines like recon. But if they are still requesting more, I hope I will have that chance, he wrote. When asked if he wanted to say anything else to friends in the U.S., he responded That so far all the U.S. military members are safe. And not to worry back at home because we already have started sending aid to the people in need. Continued from page 1A The students have spoken to numerous Egyptians, Muslims and other Middle Eastern protesters via the page. The direct dialogue was started in hopes of better understanding as well as empathizing with those in that part of the world. Emily Lundy is a Lake Placid High School student who participates in the dual enrollment program. Lundy, along with the other classmates, research different areas and topics and use the site as real-time data to further class discussion. Since the ending of the Egyptian protests, the class has focused their time on Libya as well as other Middle Eastern issues they find relevant to the United States and themselves. The language is difficult. Sometimes its hard to understand what someone is trying to say, which is part of what we are learning. Its not just a geography or a religion barrier; its language, its culture. They are going through things weve never had to deal with, said Lundy. Dale and Frost feel that the project is an important part of American students becoming more aware of whats going on beyond themselves. The students can learn so much but they have to do the work and broaden their scope. The dialogues allow them to hear people their age doing things that are changing their world, Dale said. Continued from page 1A Special to the News-SunSEBRING Its time to rev up for an exciting week of fun at Duffers Sports Grille as plans are set for Race Week with the 2011 Race Party and St. Patricks Day Party. On Wednesday, the local band Quick Fire will be on stage at Duffers for the 2011 Race Party. They play a variety of rock, southern rock and Top 40 dance music. There is no cover charge. There will not be any blues and jazz that night during dinner because of the set up needed for the race party. There will be two 12 Hours of Sebring race tickets given away during the evening. Everyone who is Irish or pretends to be Irish will enjoy all the fun on St. Patricks Day with good food, drinks and music provided by Billy Glades from 6-9 p.m. J & B Karaoke will continue with music later that evening from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. The Longshot Band w ill be on stage from 6-9 p.m Friday to entertain durin g the dinner hour. Southe rn Style Karaoke will ta ke over after that from 9 p.m to 1 a.m. After watching the 1 2 Hours of Sebring, come o n out from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m Saturday, March 19 to enjo y the dance music provid ed by the band T he Edgeukaters. They play a variety of rock, southe rn rock and blues tunes th at keep everyone on the dan ce floor. All entertainment is fre e. Duffers is a smoke fr ee environment. During t he dinner entertainment, it is open to everyone includin g children. After 9 p.m ., patrons must be 21 yea rs old and older to enter. Reservations are apprec iated for parties of five or more during the dinner ho ur entertainment. For mo re details, call 382-633 9. Duffers is at 6940 U.S. 2 7 North. Duffers revs up for fun during Race Week Follow the News-Sun online on www.twitter.com/thenewssun Courtesy photo Dr. Nancy Dales communications class discusses recent events in the Middle East. Students communicate with people in middle of Mid-East protests Macbeth billing saga goes on Pair of local Marines OK after earthquake Japanese-Americans seek news of quake back home I have not seen the documents yet, but I will say that if money is owed to the county, our first duty is to make sure it is paid back.DONELWELL county commissioner

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Page 8ANews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NO DEALER FEE, PLUS TAX & TAG, STATE FEE, O% withALLY, SEBC RULES APPLY. NO DEALER FEESExpires 3/05/11 NO DEALER FEES SINCE 1931 TODAYBright sunshine79 / 50Winds: SE at 4-8 mphNice with plenty of sunshine81 / 55Winds: ESE at 4-8 mphMONDAYPartly sunny and pleasant81 / 55Winds: SSE at 6-12 mphTUESDAYSunny and nice81 / 56Winds: ESE at 6-12 mphWEDNESDAYSunny and pleasant82 / 58Winds: ENE at 7-14 mphTHURSDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. Washington Washington 58/36 58/36 New York NewYork 53/32 53/32 Miami Miami 78/63 78/63 Atlanta Atlanta 72/53 72/53 Detroit Detroit 42/22 42/22 Houston Houston 76/61 76/61 Chicago Chicago 39/24 39/24 Minneapolis Minneapolis 36/22 36/22 Kansas City KansasCity 52/34 52/34 El Paso ElPaso 78/43 78/43 Denver Denver 58/31 58/31 Billings Billings 58/35 58/35 Los Angeles LosAngeles 66/51 66/51 San Francisco SanFrancisco 60/50 60/50 Seattle Seattle 52/41 52/41 Washington 58/36 New York 53/32 Miami 78/63 Atlanta 72/53 Detroit 42/22 Houston 76/61 Chicago 39/24 Minneapolis 36/22 Kansas City 52/34 El Paso 78/43 Denver 58/31 Billings 58/35 Los Angeles 66/51 San Francisco 60/50 Seattle 52/41 Snow showers will linger in the eastern Great Lakes and northern New England today as a cold front pulls away from the Northeast. Blustery winds will also set up over the region. Meanwhile, a developing system on the southern Plains will spark some scattered showers from northeastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma into western North Carolina. Warm air will engulf the Gulf and Southeast coasts ahead of this system, allowing temperatures to rise as much as 5 to 10 degrees above normal in many cities and towns. U.S. Cities National Forecast for March 13Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue. Today Mon. Tue. Weather (W):s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Albuquerque 69/40/pc 71/41/pc 71/42/pc Atlanta 72/53/pc 71/52/pc 65/45/r Baltimore 56/33/pc 50/32/pc 52/38/s Birmingham 70/53/pc 71/47/sh 63/45/r Boston 52/30/pc 37/29/pc 44/34/s Charlotte 72/48/pc 59/43/r 55/42/r Cheyenne 50/29/s 62/33/c 56/31/pc Chicago 39/24/pc 41/28/s 52/35/pc Cleveland 44/23/c 35/26/pc 50/37/pc Columbus 46/30/c 46/30/pc 61/42/pc Dallas 73/55/c 71/54/sh 73/57/pc Denver 58/31/pc 70/36/pc 63/34/pc Detroit 42/22/c 38/25/s 48/34/pc Harrisburg 54/31/pc 47/29/pc 52/35/s Honolulu 83/67/s 84/70/s 84/71/pc Houston 76/61/pc 77/57/c 76/58/pc Indianapolis 50/30/c 49/31/pc 58/42/pc Jackson, MS 70/55/pc 73/46/sh 66/44/pc Kansas City 52/34/pc 58/38/pc 55/35/c Lexington 60/36/c 49/33/pc 57/42/pc Little Rock 62/49/r 59/40/r 64/49/pc Los Angeles 66/51/pc 72/52/pc 72/54/s Louisville 58/38/c 51/35/r 59/44/pc Memphis 62/49/r 58/39/r 62/48/pc Milwaukee 39/24/pc 41/29/s 48/36/c Minneapolis 36/22/c 39/33/pc 49/32/sh Nashville 62/45/r 55/38/r 57/44/pc New Orleans 76/59/pc 75/59/c 74/55/pc New York City 53/32/pc 46/34/pc 51/39/s Norfolk 62/43/pc 49/39/pc 52/47/c Oklahoma City 56/38/c 65/46/c 66/49/pc Philadelphia 55/32/pc 48/34/pc 50/39/s Phoenix 82/56/pc 83/60/s 87/58/s Pittsburgh 41/24/c 40/26/pc 53/37/s Portland, ME 46/25/pc 36/18/pc 42/28/s Portland, OR 53/43/r 56/45/r 55/44/r Raleigh 72/46/pc 56/40/r 55/44/r Rochester 38/24/sf 35/21/pc 51/34/s St. Louis 52/34/pc 53/37/sh 60/43/pc San Francisco 60/50/pc 62/46/sh 62/51/c Seattle 52/41/r 55/41/r 55/41/r Wash., DC 58/36/pc 52/37/pc 54/42/s Cape Coral 80/53/s 83/55/s 83/57/pc Clearwater 76/56/s 79/57/s 79/60/pc Coral Springs 78/61/s 78/63/s 79/62/pc Daytona Beach 74/48/s 76/54/s 78/54/pc Ft. Laud. Bch 77/63/s 78/65/s 79/67/pc Fort Myers 80/54/s 83/58/s 83/59/pc Gainesville 76/42/s 78/48/pc 79/50/pc Hollywood 78/59/s 78/61/s 80/62/pc Homestead AFB 76/60/s 77/61/s 76/62/pc Jacksonville 74/45/s 78/49/pc 77/51/pc Key West 76/66/s 77/67/s 78/66/pc Miami 78/63/s 79/65/s 80/65/pc Okeechobee 75/49/s 77/55/s 78/57/pc Orlando 77/50/s 80/55/s 81/55/pc Pembroke Pines 78/59/s 78/61/s 80/62/pc St. Augustine 70/46/s 72/53/pc 73/54/pc St. Petersburg 76/55/s 79/57/s 81/61/pc Sarasota 77/53/s 78/54/s 78/55/pc Tallahassee 78/41/s 78/46/pc 76/49/c Tampa 76/53/s 78/57/s 78/60/pc W. Palm Bch 77/58/s 78/61/s 79/63/pc Winter Haven 77/52/s 80/56/s 80/55/pc Acapulco 89/71/s 88/71/s 89/74/s Athens 63/49/s 63/51/pc 66/54/pc Beirut 60/48/s 62/52/s 67/56/s Berlin 59/45/c 55/39/c 51/36/pc Bermuda 70/63/s 67/60/s 65/60/s Calgary 48/30/s 47/24/pc 43/35/pc Dublin 45/32/pc 46/39/c 48/37/pc Edmonton 40/28/s 40/21/pc 38/24/s Freeport 75/58/s 76/58/s 76/59/s Geneva 51/46/r 62/44/pc 64/48/c Havana 84/57/s 83/57/s 83/60/s Hong Kong 73/66/s 75/64/pc 73/57/c Jerusalem 54/36/s 55/39/s 63/43/s Johannesburg 83/58/pc 79/56/t 75/57/t Kiev 53/42/pc 57/42/pc 43/21/r London 52/34/pc 48/39/r 55/41/r Montreal 34/12/sn 27/14/s 32/25/s Moscow 37/35/s 43/37/c 38/21/sn Nice 61/48/r 66/53/sh 63/52/sh Ottawa 34/10/c 29/14/s 38/23/s Quebec 34/12/sn 21/3/s 27/19/s Rio de Janeiro 84/74/sh 84/73/sh 83/74/sh Seoul 57/41/pc 55/36/pc 43/27/pc Singapore 85/76/t 85/77/t 84/76/t Sydney 86/70/sh 79/68/sh 81/66/pc Toronto 39/19/c 34/19/s 38/30/s Vancouver 51/42/r 47/42/r 49/42/r Vienna 65/52/c 63/51/c 62/51/c Warsaw 56/44/pc 56/45/c 46/28/c Winnipeg 20/4/s 31/26/pc 38/19/sf A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High .............................................. 3:17 a.m. Low ............................................... 9:05 a.m. High .............................................. 3:22 p.m. Low ............................................... 9:37 p.m. Bright sunshine today. Clear tonight. Nice tomorrow with plenty of sunshine. Tuesday: partly sunny and pleasant. Wednesday and Thursday: sunny and nice. Run-off from winter snow followed by torrential rain led to massive ooding on the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania and New York on this date in 1936. Bright sunshine today. Winds east-southeast 4-8 mph. Expect a full day of sunshine with average relative humidity 45% and good drying conditions. Clear tonight. Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. FirstFullLastNew Mar 12Mar 19Mar 26Apr 3 Today Monday Sunrise 7:38 a.m. 7:37 a.m. Sunset 7:34 p.m. 7:34 p.m. Moonrise 1:21 p.m. 2:22 p.m. Moonset 2:34 a.m. 3:26 a.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Jacksonville 74/45 Gainesville 76/42 Ocala 78/43 Daytona Beach 74/48 Orlando 77/50 Winter Haven 77/52 Tampa 76/53 Clearwater 76/56 St. Petersburg 76/55 Sarasota 77/53 Fort Myers 80/54 Naples 79/55 Okeechobee 75/49 West Palm Beach 77/58 Fort Lauderdale 77/63 Miami 78/63 Tallahassee 78/41 Apalachicola 72/46 Pensacola 73/54 Key West Avon Park 79/50 Sebring 79/50 Lorida 77/51 Lake Placid 79/50 Venus 80/50 Brighton 77/50 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High .............................................. 8:13 p.m. Low ............................................... 3:55 a.m. High .....................................................none Low ......................................................none UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 6 8 6 2 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 76/66 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 11.95 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Tuesday ......................................... 83 Low Tuesday .......................................... 58 High Wednesday .................................... 85 Low Wednesday .................................... 60 High Thursday ....................................... 68 Low Thursday ........................................ 43Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 27% Expected air temperature ....................... 79 Makes it feel like .................................... 76BarometerTuesday ...............................................30.12 Wednesday .........................................30.06 Thursday .............................................30.21PrecipitationTuesday ...............................................0.00 Wednesday .........................................0.34 Thursday .............................................0.81 Month to date ..................................... 1.58 Year to date ......................................... 4.45

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BUSINESS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, March 13, 2011 Nobody likes being nagged, but Im going to risk reader displeasure by reminding everyone that there are hefty financial consequences if you owe income taxes and do not file a return on time or at least request a filing extension. Ordinarily, the federal income tax deadline is April 15, but this year the IRS has granted a reprieve until April 18. Nevertheless, heres why procrastinating is a bad idea: If your 2010 federal tax return (or extension request) isnt postmarked or electronically filed by April 18, the penalty on any taxes you owe increases dramatically. Generally, youll have to pay an additional 5 percent for each full or partial month youre late, plus interest, up to a maximum penalty of 25 percent. However, if you file your return or request an extension on time, the penalty drops to 0.5 percent per month, plus interest. Heres how it can add up: Say you owe $2,000 in federal income tax. If you havent requested an extension, you would be charged an additional $100 (5 percent) for each month youre late. Had you filed for an extension, the penalty would drop to only $10 a mont h (0.5 percent). Contact the IR S early if you won t be able to pay on time. They may even waive the penalty, depending on your circumstances. Call 800-829-1040 or visit www.irs.go v for more informa tion. Another way to avoid a penalty: The IRS accepts payment by credit or debi t card, with a small conven ience fee that is tax deductible if you itemize expenses. Just be sure to pay off your card balance within a few months, or the interest accrued migh t exceed the penalty. Afew additional tax-fi ling tips:Find out whats newBecause the tax code changes every year, scan the IRSTax Information for Individuals website fo r updates before diving in. Many of your questions a re likely answered in its Frequently Asked Questions section.Make sure your return is accurateCommon tax-filing errors include: Tax filing deadline looms, so dont wait Personal Finance Jason Alderman Courtesy photo Cross Country staff member Scott Durban does finishing work around doorways inside a Habitat home at Masons Ridge. Special to the News-SunSEBRING Cross C ountry Automotive Services i n Sebring came out Feb. 23 i n two separate groups to w ork on the house theyve s ponsored at Masons Ridge. C ross Country has been i nvolved in the success of H ighlands County Habitat for H umanity since the business a rrived in Highlands County. Cross Country Associates h ad fun while working hard, C heryl Sharp, senior recruiter a t Cross Country said. This g ift of time and sweat equity w ill make a difference and c hange lives. The three-bedroom, twob ath home on Inspiration D rive will be purchased by G race Johnson for her and h er three grandchildren. We caulked and painted, a nd laughed out loud, Sharp said. Im not sure who is benefiting more, Cross Country Associates or Ms. Johnson. We had a good time and a good feeling when the day was done. The joy and pride is tremendous. To learn how your organization can get involved, contact Jennifer McGee at 4022915 orjmcgee@habitathighlands.org Highlands County Habitat for Humanity is a nonprofit, Christian organization dedicated to eliminating substandard housing, homelessness and to making adequate, affordable shelter a matter of conscience and action. Habitat is founded on the conviction that every man, woman, and child should have a simple, decent, affordable place to live in dignity and safety. Cross Country spends work day at Masons Ridge By ESTHER HARRIS Special to the News-SunFor years, Social Security has s tressed the convenience, security, and s afety of getting benefit payments elect ronically. Soon, direct deposit (or D irect Express) will not only be the best w ay to receive federal benefit payments, i t will be the only way. Thats because the U.S. Department o f the Treasury announced a new rule t hat will phase out paper checks for F ederal benefit and non-tax payments by March 1, 2013. Here is how the transition will work. Anyone applying for Social Security or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits on or after May 1, 2011, will receive their payments electronically, while those already receiving paper checks will need to switch to electronic payments by March 1, 2013. Anyone already receiving their benefit payments electronically will continue to receive their payment as usual on their payment day. People receiving benefits have the option of direct deposit to a bank or credit union account (of their choice) or into a Direct Express Debit MasterCard card account (a Treasury-recommended prepaid card option). You can visit www.GoDirect.org to learn more. Social Security, SSI, Veterans Affairs, Railroad Retirement Board, Office of Personnel Management benefits, and other non-tax payments are included. Electronic federal benefit payments a must See PAYMENTS, page 2B See TAX, page 2B

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Page 2BNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com ROOFING SPECIALIST SERVING HIGHLANDS COUNTY SINCE 1989Shingles Flat Roofs Roof Repairs Mobile Home Roofovers -FULLYLICENSED & INSURED385-4690State Lic # RC 0066817 QUALITY WORK AT A REASONABLE PRICE FREEESTIMATES ELECT WHO?This is a campaign against Melanoma. One in 72 people will contract the disease. You must elect yourself to lead against it. It is a potential matter of life and death.Melanoma*Usually a non-symptomatic growth on the skin with multiple colors and irregular edges.We can protect you against this silent killer. We are your skin police. Call now, elect a proactive preventative skin team.American Institute of Dermatology, P.A.Darrin A. Rotman, M.D. Julie Iellimo, P.A.-C Jennifer Wolf, P.A.-C Medicare and all major insurances accepted in network* New Patients Welcome863-386-0786*individual must call for verication of benets. This is not a guarantee. For most people getting m onthly benefits, this wont r eally be a change; already 8 o ut of 10 beneficiaries receive p ayments electronically. Why the push for electronic p ayments instead of paper c hecks received in the mail? Its safer: no risk of c hecks being lost or stolen; Its easy and reliable: no n eed to wait for the mail or go to the bank to cash a check; It saves taxpayers money: no cost for postage and paper and printing; It saves you money: no check-cashing fees or bank fees; and Its good for the environment: it saves paper and eliminates transportation costs. If you still get your check in the mail, you dont need to wait for the new rule to go into effect to enjoy the benefits of electronic payments. Please visit www.godirect.org today and begin getting your Social Security and SSI payments the safe, easy, inexpensive, and green way electronically. Esther Harris is the Social Security district manager in Sebring. Continued from page 1B Omitting or filling in i ncorrect/illegible taxpayer I D numbers, filing status, d ependent names and Social S ecurity numbers Documentation not a ttached (W-2s, supplement al forms, etc.) Omitting income items Tax return not signed a nd dated Information entered on t he wrong lines Child tax credit incorr ectly calculated Math errors. (Tax softw are does the math, but y oure still responsible for e ntering correct numbers init ially.) A sk for helpIf calculating your own t axes is too confusing or t ime-consuming, consider u sing tax-completion softw are like Turbo Tax, or hire a tax professional. Asharp p reparer could save you a b undle by finding hidden c redits or deductions. If cost is an issue, several f ree options are available to s eniors, military and lowa nd middle-income taxpaye rs: The IRS sponsors the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA) and Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE). Read Free Tax Preparation on the IRS website for information. AARPTax-Aide volunteers, who are trained by the IRS, provide free tax preparation to lowand middleincome taxpayers, with special attention to people over age 60. Go to www.aarp.org/taxaide for information. Military personnel and their families worldwide can get free assistance through a program offered through VITA. Check with your base for details. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To participate in a free, online Financial Literacy and Education Summit on April 4, 2011, go to www.practicalmoneyskills.com/summit2011 Continued from page 1B BUSINESS Riley & Waldron Join 7L BrandsLAKE PLACID 7L Brands, LLC, a division of Lykes Bros. Inc., is pleased to announce the addition of William Riley and Michael Waldron to the company. Riley is the new general manager and brings more than 30 years of of experience to the company as he has held positions as president, executive vice president, general manager, vice president operations and plant manager at multiple sites for companies in the U.S., Panama, Guatemala and Costa Rica. Waldron joins 7LBrands as the companys new sales manager. He brings nine years of horticulture sales experience to the company and has served in several industry leadership roles, including state director for the Florida Nursery, Growers and Landscape Association (FNGLA) Board of Directors for six years. 7LBrands manufacturers, distributes and markets premium mulch products (both pine and eucalyptus) from their 66,000-acre renewable forest, which is located in South Central Florida and has been responsibly managed according to the highest environmental standards for more than 50 years. For more information, visit www.7LBrands.com.Starting Your Business seminar plannedAVON PARK Starting Your Business is a free seminar presented by the Small Business Development Center at USF that will be held on Wednesday, March 23, at South Florida Community College Corporate and Continuing Education Room T05 from 2-4:30 p.m. It is designed for person s thinking of starting a smal l business or who have start ed a business and want to make sure they did it correctly. Licenses, marketing entity selection and business planning are among the items discussed. The seminar will be pre sented by David Noel, cer tified business analyst wit h the SBDC. Seating is limited, so please call Noel at 7847378. Michael Waldron William Riley Snapshots Tax deadline coming up quickly Metro Services Getting your taxes done early can save you a lot of headaches in April. Payments going all electronic Associated PressSAN FRANCISCO A pple Inc.s updated version o f its iPad tablet computer w as available in stores Friday a fternoon but those who c ouldnt wait to say they own t he gadget beat the crowds by o rdering one online before t he sun rises. The Cupertino, Calif., c ompanyopened online sales o f the iPad 2 at 1 a.m. PST, h ours before they will be a vailable in stores nationw ide at 5 p.m. local time. When the original version o f the iPad went on sale in A pril, Apple said it sold more t han 300,000 in the first day. It ended up selling more than 15 million in its first nine months on sale, including 7.3 million to holiday shoppers during the OctoberDecember quarter. The new iPad model comes with several improvements over the original version but the same price tag $499 to $829, depending on storage space and whether they can connect to the Internet over a cellular network hobbling efforts by rivals at breaking Apples hold on the emerging market for tablet computers. The iPad 2 looks much like the first iPad, only with a sleeker, lighter body with a curved back. Among changes is the inclusion of cameras, one on the front and one on the back for video chatting. With the original iPad, Apple proved there is a large market for a tablet thats less than a laptop and more than a smart phone, yet performs many of the same tasks. Competitors including Dell Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. have been trying to lure consumers with smaller tablets, without much success. In February, Motorola Mobility Inc.s Xoom went on sale with a new version of Google Inc.s Android software that was designed for tablets, not smart phones. M CT IPad 2 sales fire off with pre-dawn online orders Associated PressMADISON, Wis. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker succeeded Friday in taking away nearly all collective bargaining rights from the vast majority of the states public employees, quietly capping weeks of contentious debate and delivering an epic defeat to the labor movement with a private bill signing. Walker planned to hold a ceremonial signing later in the day. The proposal touched off a national debate over labor rights for public employees, and its implementation is a key victory for Republicans who have targeted unions in nationwide efforts to slash government spending. But labor leaders said they plan to use the setback to fire up their membe rs nationwide and mount a major counteratta ck against Republicans at the ballot box in 2012. The measure passed the states Assemb ly on Thursday following more than thr ee weeks of protests that drew tens of tho usands of people to the Capitol in oppositio n. The Senate cleared the way for passage wi th a surprise move Wednesday that allow ed them to move the measure forward witho ut 14 Democratic senators present. The bill forces state workers to pay mo re for their pensions and health care benefi ts, which is estimated to save Wisconsin $3 0 million. Walker officially cuts collective bargaining

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 3B Associated Press LAJOYA, Texas As T exas farmhands prepared t his winter to burn stalks of s ugarcane for harvest along t he Rio Grande, four masked m en on ATVs suddenly surr ounded the crew members a nd ordered them to leave. Farmer Dale Murden has l ittle doubt they were M exican drug traffickers. They hide stuff in there, M urden said of the dense s ugarcane crops, some as h igh as 14 feet. It was very i ntimidating for my guys. Y ou got men dressed in b lack, looking like thugs and t elling them to get back. Texas farmers and ranche rs say confrontations like t hese are quietly adding up. T his month the Texas D epartment of Agriculture, g oing beyond its usual p urview that includes school l unches and regulating gas p umps, launched a website p ublicizing what it calls a w orsening situation threate ning the lives of our fellow c itizens and jeopardizing our n ations food supply. However, some Texas D emocratic lawmakers say t he danger is being wildly o verstated, and U.S. Border P atrol officials said they are n ot aware of landowners in t he Rio Grande Valley facing i ncreasing threats. The launch last week of ProtectYourTexasBorder.com also left the state somewhat embarrassed after the sites message board quickly filled with postings calling for vigilante justice and the killing of illegal immigrants. The postings have since been removed. Texas Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples, a Republican in the job once held by Gov. Rick Perry, condemned those postings Thursday. But he said they shouldnt detract from the sites goal of getting more federal resources to the Texas border. The website demonstrates in undeniable form that greater federal government presence is needed. We need to keep this as a lookout post, Staples said. But Texas state Sen. Jose Rodriguez said the site is misleading, lacking any data that puts the incidents or danger in context. For the site to convey the impression that we are under a serious threat and that theres all this concern, including to the food supply, its just total exaggeration of reality, Rodriguez said. Its unacceptable. Still, there is little doubt of increased unease on Texas border farms. Most brazen among the reported confrontations occurred earlier this year on the sugarcane field near Rio Grande City. In February, a Hidalgo County employee was similarly threatened by three men along the border river to stop clearing brush near a canal, said Troy Allen, general manager of the Delta Lake Irrigation District. Allen said another of his workers has taken to locking himself inside the water pump houses along the Rio Grande. If someone knocks, Allen said, he doesnt answer. Five years ago, if someone wanted a drink of water wed give it to them, Allen said of illegal immigrants passing through. We have a situation thats getting pretty serious in my opinion. Last weekend, on a ranch adjacent to land owned by country music star George Strait, authorities said a ranch foreman was shot at by men inside a pickup truck who were found trespassing. The foreman returned fire, and no one was hurt. Staples pointed out the bullet holes as proof of the escalating threat along the border. Webb County Sheriffs Department spokeswoman Maru De La Paz, however, said there was no evidence tying the shooting to suspected drug trafficker s. Several growers and ranchers say their jobs start ed becoming more dangerous about two years ago. An Arizona rancher was gunned down in 2009 while checking water lines on his property, in what authoritie s suspect was a killing carrie d out by a scout for drug smugglers. No arrests have been made. Apart from tha t incident, Arizona agricultur al leaders say theyve heard of no direct threats toward their farmers and ranchers. In Texas, the run-ins with traffickers are largely anecdotal. Border Patrol spokesman Mark Qualia sa id any confrontations would b e investigated by local law enforcement, but added tha t landowners havent been expressing those feelings to us. Staples said farmers are scared to speak out. Last week, a 2 1/2-hour meeting between Staples and about 20 farmers was closed to reporters over concern farm ers wouldnt otherwise attend. I told (farmers) we have to tell this story so our poli cymakers understand the critical nature of whats being said, Staples said. BUSINESS Texas farmers say drug war making job dangerous Don Bartletti/Los Angeles Times/MCT From her property outside of Brownsville, Texas, Debbie Loop peers through the 18-foothigh U.S./Mexico border fence that slices through her citrus groves and has divided her family's residences. The steel barrier was put up about a half-mile north of the Rio Grande River, which marks the borderline. Now, her house is on the north side of the fence and her sons homes are on the south side. Jan. 3, 2011Carlson Family to Asif M alik, L2 Blk 10 Orange B lossom Est. Unit 5 /7/10/Other, $2,200. Robert F. Smith to James M Smith Jr., L7 Blk 340 L eisure Lakes Sec. 9, $ 6,500. Peter Direnzo to Homer A Castle, L6 Blk CC S pring Lake Village VII, $ 12,000. Federal Home Loan M ortgage Corp. to Richard R Hill, L4 Blk 12 Avocado P ark, $96,000. Percy L. Manley III to D avid Piper, L1 Blk 63 H illside Lake Est., $9,900. Patti Vasquez to David P iper, L1 Blk 63 Hillside L ake Est., $9,900. Nancy Atkisson to David P iper, L1 Blk 63 Hillside L akes Est., $2,200. Nivaldo L. Vega to H umberto Camejo, TR 3/22 H idden C ountry/Easements, $ 68,100. U.S. Bank to Michael M organ, L259 Sebring H ills, $74,900. Fernando Ramos to B etty L. Manning, L35 Blk 6 0 Placid Lakes Sec. 6, $ 105,000. Margaret Cicchini to C hris Ambis, Unit 76 V illages of Highlands R idge Phase VIII, $ 158,000. Melanie C. Wagner to H olly C. Bryant, PTL1 Blk B B Spring Lake Village V I/Other, $119,000. Larry J. Ross to Steven K empe, L61/62 Blk 5 Erin P ark, $85,000.Jan. 4Wauchula State Bank to J ohn T. Young, L30 Blk 3 H arder Hall Country Club I I, $163,800. Evelyn L. Zellefrow to A bner Rodriguez, L393 S ebring Ridge Sec. A, $ 3,000. Wells Fargo Bank to D avid A. Broder, L4 Blk 2 A ltamont Place Add 2, $ 18,000. Mildred H. Heaver to D iovie C. Entia, L63066 308 Avon Park Lakes Unit 2 0/Others, $4,000. Harold Dean Wakefield t o George T. Morgan, L615 S ebring Hills, $47,300. Bennie Contreras to J ohn L. Venable, L54 Blk 5 L ake & Ranch Club 3rd Add, $138,000. Suntrust Bank to Abderrahim McHatet, L28 Blk 97 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 8, $2,600. Bobby Heffner to Tracie Ellison, L7 PTL6 Blk 161 Sebring Highlands, $46,000. Nancy Jetton to Rick R. Buntenbach, L31 Blk Q Spring Lake Village III, $79,900.Jan. 5Sara L. McGann to Beneficial Florida Inc., PT Sec. 3-36-28/Easement, $218,800. Highlands Professional Properties Inc. to Yogigastro1, L1 Highlands Professional Properties Sub, $99,600. Bank of America to Peggy I. Scott, L3 Blk B Meadowlake Sub, $185,000. Bank of New York Mellon to Sarah Brouillard, Unit 156 Kenwood Townhomes, $17,500. Don D. Crouch to Terance P. Ault, L454 Francis Mobile Est. Add No. 4, $40,000.Jan. 6Roger Craton to Erica Lynne-Musser, PTSec. 1639-29/Easement, $4,000. Francisco J. Arevalo to Nelson Quintero, L15 Blk 19 Highlands Park Est. Sec D, $11,000. Cecil M. Wilson to Robert O. Moore Sr., PTL1 Blk 15 Town of Avon Park, $85,000. Lisa A. Crockatt Finnegan to Joseph Kanson Jr., L51-B Cormorant Point Sub Unit II, $143,000. Wilco Loan Associates to Walter L. Johnson, PTSec. 18-36-28/Others, $1,800,000. Homesales Inc. of Delaware to Little Anthony Gordon, L11 PTL10/12 Blk I Tulane Sub, $12,500. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Michael G. Cleveley, L11 Blk 23 Sebring Country Est. Sec. 1, $112,000. U.S. Bank to Elga Gamez Andrade, L11102/11103 Avon Park Lakes Unit 34, $58,900. Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. to Ashley Rini, PT Sec. 23-39-28, $5,000.Jan. 7Marilyn Mazei to Thomas Jay Smith, Unit C-23 Bluffs of Sebring Condo Phase II, $50,000. Patricia Ann McMahon to David L.E. Anderson, L452 Golf Hammock Unit V, $98,000. Sean Franco to Marion C. Stivers, L18 Blk 1 Fairway Lake Est., $15,000. Venus Caribbean Group to Moe Ranches, L3 Town of Venus No. 2, $115,000. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Paul W. Dinnen, L1/2 Blk 58 Leisure Lakes Sec. 16, $79,000. Bernice Meek to Jack D. Allbee, L2/3 Blk 17 Sebring Country Est. Sec. 1, $75,000. Gladys Eaglen to Daniel Deuel, L7510-7516 Avon Park Lakes Unit 23, $36,000. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Kathleen Hill Mullennix, L20/21 Blk 358 Leisure Lakes Sec. 17, $70,000. Steven P. Sullivan to Zane Chappy, L24 Blk 283 Placid Lakes Sec. 20, $86,000. Charles Joseph Pausley II to Larry Fields, L12 Blk 21 Sebring Country Est. Sec. 1, $83,000. Alice Paisley to Theodore N. Tzovarras, L1-3 Blk 7 Southside Park Sub Unrec, $15,000. Barbara Ann Dean to Karen Sue Buice, Farm L31 Basket Lake Groves, $9,000. Pamela S. Lowery to Danny Edward Lowery, Farm L31 Basket Lake Groves, $9,000. Lois L. George to Spencer R. Pittman, L22 The Knoll Sub, $20,000. Bank of America to Eduardo C. Rosario Jr., Unit 5D The Manors, $13,000. Betty A. Wallace to Cecil Parrish, L2 Lake Damon Villas South Phase 4, $106,000.Jan. 10Bobbie Gordon Clinton to IRAServices Trust Company, Unit G-6 Bluffs of Sebring Condo Phase 7, $90,000. Don Sewell to Victor M. Seralde, L16 Blk 26 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 2, $107,000. Latin American Investors Corp. to Edwin Santana, L369 Sebring Ranchettes Sec. A, $1,600. Electrical Specialty Services Inc. to Abderrahim McHatet, PT Sec. 36-35-28, $130,000. Suntrust Bank to Robert T. Jones, L1 PT2 Blk 265 Lake Sebring Sub, $64,500. David B. Kotchman to Michael V. Burzesi Jr., L23 Blk 119 Leisure Lakes Sec. 11, $27,000. Aurora Loan Services to Kenneth Mahaffa, L845/846 Avon Park Lakes Unit 3, $18,500. Federal National Mortgage Assn. to David P. Bragg, L14 Blk 204 Leisure Lakes Sec. 3, $47,500. Carmen O. Rosario to Ciara E. Cruz, Unit 12-D The Manors II, $17,100. Harry Jenner to Hans Zieten, L10 Blk 2 Bluff Hammock Est., $11,500. Empirical Group Inc. to Scott J. Link, PTSec. 1137-29, $152,500. William Roger Carter to Shirley A. Shamblin, L5 Blk 263 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 13, $180,000. Rosemary T. Stowe to Duane J. Sugg, L1107 Sebring Hills, $65,000. Eugenia Riters to Owen E. Criswell, L8 Blk 10 Harder Hall Country Club II, $155,000. Bruce M. Chapman to Eugene G. Musselman, L234 Golf Hammock Unit III-A, $160,000. Robyn Elisabeth Spiegel to Rebecca L. Perez, L5/6 Blk 3 Lake Saddlebags Sub, $10,000. William T. Sleboda to Lake Forest Investments, L22 PTL23 Blk B Orange Heights, $58,000. Decamp Limited Family Partnership Ltd. to Spencer M. Gregory, L35 Blk F Lake Placid Camp Florida Resort Replat, $42,000. U.S. Bank to John Martin, L9288-9292 Avon Park Lakes Unit 28, $66,000.Jan. 11William W. Ruge to Robert S. Shaw, L3ABlk 0 Tomoka Heights Sec. 3, $95,000. Midflorida Credit Union to George C. Pope, L357 Golf Hammock Unit IV, $172,500. Paul E. Stuckey Livin g Trust to James Stuckey, L 6 Blk MM Spring Lake Villag e V, $22,600. Suntrust Bank to Abderrahim McHatet, L3 4 Blk 357 Sun 'N Lake Es t. Sebring Unit 16, $2,500. James E. Oxer to Romilio Perez, L11 Blk A Meadowlake Su b, $199,000. Kathy S. Doerr to Roy R Frazier, L19 Blk 14 3 Northside Sub, $18,000. Barbara A. Hewle tt MacKenzie to Emi ly Cogswell, L10 Century H ill Sub, $35,000. Ronald Fuertes to Ma rc Hazebrouck, PTGovt. L1 1 In Sec. 33-35-29, $50,000 Jan. 12Deutsche Bank Nation al Trust Co. to Jeremiah s International Trading C o. Inc.,L17 Blk 196 Plac id Lakes Sec. 18, $2,000. Reginald Chitwood to Ken Wojcik, L46 The Grov e On Lake Franci s, $135,000. Diner Citrus & Catt le Company to Glenn Ellio tt Beck Family Trust, PTSe c. 9-34-29, $520,000. American Golf Cart 2833 Hwy 27 S. Avon Park (863) 453-CART(2278)2007S Starting at $1595includes top, window & charger, NEW & USED TIRES & BATTERIES BATTERIES:Trojan PowerTron AmericanOver 75 New & Used Carts To Choose From DEEDTRANFERS

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Breakfasts and lunches being served in the Highlands County School District for the upcoming week of March 14-18 include: HIGH SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, orange glazed carrots, cheddar cheese stick, tossed salad, applesauce snacking cake, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias cheeseburger pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, cocoa clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, hash brown patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, carrots and dip, great northern beans, diced pears, dried blueberries, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, hash brown patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias cheeseburger pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, broccoli, potato wedges, Colby Jack cheese stick, salsa, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, assorted cereal, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted juices, assorted fresh fruit, assorted milk. Lunch Chicken tenders, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, chicken patty on bun, PBJ sandwich meal, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, chef salad meal, baked french fries, carrots and dip, corn, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, assorted milk. ACADEMY SCHOOLS Monday Lunch Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, carrots and dip, applesauce snacking cake, strawberry cup, assorted juice, assorted milk. Tuesday Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, mashed potatoes, green beans, cocoa clodhoppers, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, assorted milk. Wednesday Lunch Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, baked buffalo chips, carrots and dip, dried blueberries, assorted juice, assorted milk. Thursday Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, broccoli, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Friday Lunch Cheeseburger, dill stack, Sun Chips, fresh apple slices, chocolate chip cookie, assorted juice, assorted milk. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadsticks, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, orange glazed carrots, cheddar cheese stick, tossed salad, applesauce snacking cake, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, cocoa clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Breakfast pizza, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, carrots and dip, great northern beans, diced pears, dried blueberries, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, broccoli, potato wedges, Colby Jack cheese stick, salsa, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, assorted cereal, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, burger, cheeseburger, chicken tenders, dinner roll, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, chef salad meal, PBJ sandwich meal, carrots and dip, corn, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, assorted milk. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Cinnamon Toast Crisp, string cheese, orange juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Homestyle pork roast, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, turkey chef salad, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, green beans, apple crisp, very berry juice bar, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Tuesday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Blueberry/sausage pancake, strawberry cup, chocolate milk, Uncrustable peanut butter and jelly sandwich, peach cup, chocolate milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, scalloped potatoes, corn cobbettes, rosy applesauce, very berry juice bar, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Wednesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, peach cup, chocolate milk, blueberry/sausage pancake, strawberry cup, chocolate milk. Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, orange glazed carrots, tossed salad, cocoa clodhoppers, fresh apple slices, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Breakfast frittata, grape juice, chocolate milk, whole grain Poptarts, apple juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Cheeseburger, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, dill stack, potato puffs, carrots and dip, fruited Jell-O, very berry juice bar, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, hash brown patty, assorted cereal, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Whole grain Poptarts, apple juice, chocolate milk, breakfast frittata, grape juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, mixed vegetables, ice cream sandwich, peach cup, fresh apple slices, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. KINDERGARTEN LEARNING CENTER Monday Lunch Homestyle pork roast, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, mashed potatoes, brown gravy green beans, apple crisp, assorted milk. Tuesday Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, scalloped potatoes, corn cobbettes, rosy applesauce, assorted milk. Wednesday Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, orange glazed carrots, cocoa clodhoppers, fresh apple slices, assorted milk. Thursday Lunch Cheeseburger, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, potato puffs, carrots and dip, fruited Jell-O, assorted milk. Friday Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, mixed vegetables, ice cream sandwich, peach cup, assorted milk. Page 4BNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com Save$25 $300 per unit on select Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their enduring craftsmanship and energy-efcient designs, they present exceptional value smart style thats energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings from January 14 through April 29, 2011 with mail-in rebates on select styles. Ask us for details. *Manufacturers rebate offer valid for purchases made January 14 through April 29, 2011. Limitations and restrictions apply. Ask for details. 2011 Hunter Douglas. and TM are trademarks of Hunter Douglas. Family owned & operated since 1978 CHALKTALK School Menus Highlands Seminole Club offers Haywood O. Taylor ScholarshipThe Highlands Seminole Club is now accepting applications for the Haywood O. Taylor Endowned Scholarship. Highlands County graduates who expect to attend The Florida State University in the Fall 2011 semester are encouraged to apply by March 31. Previous recipients are also encouraged to re-apply. More than $80,000 in scholarships h as been awarded from the endowment over t he past 10 years. Scholarship applications are available o n the club Web site at highlandsseminoles.o rg or they can be found at guidance offices at all three public high schools. Fred Wild hosts PTO meetingSEBRING Fred Wild Elementa ry School will host a PTO meeting at 2:15 p.m Thursday, followed by the SAC at 2:45 p.m Snapshots Courtesy pho to Students in Chris Stephans science class at Avon Park Middle School dissect an owl pellet to learn what kind of prey the predator has eaten. News-SunAVON PARK Seventh grade science students in Chris Stephans Science classes at Avon Park Middle School are getting a handson lesson in ecology. Stephans classes have been focusing in on the food chain and the food web and discussing predator/prey relationships. One of the best ways to learn about that is to conduct an owl pellet lab. Owls eat mice, rats, etc. They then regurgitate the bones and fur in an egg size pellet, Stephan said. My students worked in teams to dissect these pellets and found them loaded with bones such as skull bones, ribs, jaw, vertebrae, and leg bones. We even found in one group what looked like a bat wing and part of a skull. The students then separate these bones into types, an d glue them on constructio n paper to be displayed in t he room. The students will ev en guess as to what kind of an imal the prey was. This is a very fun way to learn about predators an d prey and to see that thin gs are not always beautiful in an ecosystem, but totally na tural and necessary, Steph an said. APMS science students studying predator/prey relationships

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, March 13, 2011Page 5B 3310 Hwy. 27 South Sebring, FL33870EOEE-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.comFor more information about Cross Country Automotive Services,we encourage you to visit our website at: www.CrossCountry-Auto.co mComprehensive Benefit PackageNow Hiring Full & Part Time Customer Service AssociatesAdditional Opportunities for Spanish as a second language Starting at $9.00 an hour Carmen Kimber Associate of the MonthI feel Happy when I help people. Carmen Kimber Be a HERO like Carmen Kimber863-402-2786AGreatPlaceto Work! Tuition Reimbursement Life Insurance Vacation Time Holiday Pay Medical Dental Supervisors Positions Available Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 385-6155. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08008937 GMAC-CONV-Team 2 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. March 13, 20, 2011 1050LegalsMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 30th day of March, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 11 AND 12, BLOCK 2, LAKE SIRENA SHORES RESUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 11, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 315 SIRENA DRIVE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on March 7, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAIN Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-000209 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, Plaintiff, vs. ORLANDO MARRERO, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated March 07, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-000209 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, is the Plaintiff and ORLANDO MARRERO; JACQUELINE MARRERO; TENANT #1 N/K/A BRANDI SCHNEIDER are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASE1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001604 SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., Plaintiff, vs. LARRY W. LANGMAN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated February 14, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-001604 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., is the Plaintiff and LARRY W. LANGMAN; SHELLY D. LANGMAN; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 24th day of March, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: THAT PORTION OF LOTS 4 AND 5, LYING NORTH OF STATE ROAD 621 RIGHT-OF-WAY, LOT 6, LESS STATE ROAD 621 RIGHT OF WAY; ALL OF LOTS 7,8,9,10, AND 11, BLOCK C, BREEZY POINT PARK, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 52, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 917 LAKE JUNE ROAD, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on February 15, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAIN Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F09104250 SAXONFID-SPECFHLMC**See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. March 6, 13, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-42 IN RE: ESTATE OF HELEN B. RICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of HELEN B. RICE, deceased, whose date of death was December 26, 2010, and whose social security number is xxx-xx-xxxx, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 6, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ John Ellis Rice 2640 W. Southampton Road Avon Park, Florida 33825 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ David F. Lanier E-Mail Address: lanier@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No. 045399 DAVID F. LANIER P.O. Box 400 Avon Park, Florida 33826-0400 Telephone: (863)453-4457 March 6, 13, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. PC 11-77 Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF ROBERT D. YOUNG, SR. Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ROBERT D. YOUNG, SR., deceased, whose date of death was January 21, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Clerk of the Court, Highlands County Courthouse, 530 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida. The names and addresses of the personal representative and thepersonal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVCE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 6, 2011. Personal Representative: Helen Young 1454 Golf View Drive S Avon Park, Florida 33825 Attorney for Personal Representative: James V. Lobozzo, Jr. Attorney for Helen Young Florida Bar Number: 274178 MCCLURE & LOBOZZO 211 S. Ridgewood DriveSebring, Florida 33870 Telephone: (863) 402-1888 Fax: (863) 471-0751 E-Mail: jlobozzo@mllaw.net March 6, 13, 2011 within 30 days from the date this action is filed with the Clerk of the Department. March 13, 201 1050Legals A ttachment A File No.: EM 0238833-006 STATE OF FLORIDADEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTIONNOTICE OF DETERMINATION FOR A MODIFICATION The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice modify the Environmental Resource Permit, (File No.: 0238833-004), for the Kissimmee River RestorationIstokpoga Canal Improvements to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to perform repairs to eroded areas and install an additional 12,262 square feet of riprap below the Ordinary High Water Line at the S-67 structure. The activity is located at within the Istokpoga Canal, Class III Waters, northeast of the S-67 Structure in Highlands County, Florida. The Departments file on this matter is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holi-days, at the Department of Environmental Protection, Attention: Dianne K. Hughes, 400 North Congress Avenue, Suite 200, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, Telephone: 561-6816703. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition for an administrative hearing is timely filed under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., before the deadline for filing a petition. On the filing of a timely and sufficient petition, this action will not be final and effective until further order of the Department. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the filing of a petition means that the Department's final action may be different from the position taken by it in this notice. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. Pursuant to Rule 28106.201, F.A.C., a petition for an administrative hearing must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agencys file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioners representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioners substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warant reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; (f)A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action, including an explanation of how the alleged facts relate to the specific rules or statutes; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agencys proposed action. The petition must be filed (received by the Clerk) in the Office ofGeneral Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Also, a copy of the petition shall be mailed to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3), F.S. must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice or within 14 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. The failure to file a petition within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of that person's right to request an administrative determination (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., or to intervene in this proceeding and participate as a party to it. Any subsequent intervention (in a proceeding initiated by another party) will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. Under Rule 62-110.106(4), F.A.C., a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline for filing a petition for an administrative hearing. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running of the time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. Mediation is not available in this proceeding. A ny party to this action has the right to seek judicial review pursuant to Section 120.68, F.S., by filing a Notice of Appeal pursuant to Rules 9.110 and 9.190, Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure, with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, M.S. 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000; and by filing a copy of the Notice of Appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate District Court of Appeal. The Notice of Appeal must be filed 1050Legals Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

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Page 6BNews-Sun March 13, 2011www.newssun.co m PROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORYPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY Install doors, windows, flooring, plumbing & more!Licensed & InsuredLic# HM0096HANDYMAN BOBCall 863-452-5201 or 863-449-1744 Service Repair Supplies Equipment Delivered Right to your DoorPool Service & Mobile Retail(863) 382-7728Fax (863) 402-2200 poolparadise101@aol.com www.poolparadiseonline.com Brad & Julie Kurtz Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-2750 1405 US 27 North Sebring, FL 33870 CAMPBELL S S COLLISION CENTER , INC. Jim Campbell Owner DID YOU KNOW?THENEWSSUNPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY ISONEOFTHEMOSTECONOMICAL&EFFECTIVEMEANSOFADVERTISINGTODAY? CALLJOYCE@ 863-385-6155OREMAIL: joyce.fettinger@newssun.com FORDETAILS!! WANDA KLINE WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESSSee what one drop of your blood indicates as to YOUR nutritional health and well-being. By appointment only863-414-4066 LIVEBLOODANALYSIS &WILLIAMSJANITORIALCARPETCLEANING$1095 Per Room3 Rooms Minimum Upholstery Cleaning All Types of Flooring Free EstimatesLic Bonded Ins(863) 214-1940 863-465-7491TREE SERVICE,INC.Joe Johnsons TRIMMING REMOVAL SOD INSTALLATION STUMP GRINDING LOT CLEARING PRESSURE CLEANING Will Beat Any Written Estimate!Peoples Choice Award Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Avon Park (863) 453-2525 Lake Placid (863) 699-2525 Lake Wales (863) 679-9200 Sebring (863) 382-1515 Wauchula (863) 767-1515Sebring Fax (863) 382-9939 W al-Mart Loca tions: Lake Wales (863) 676-0569 Sebring (863) 385-5371 Avon Park (863) 452-7010 INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED No job is too small. We can take care of all your home repairs and maintenance needs. Small Flooring Jobs Some Electric & Plumbing863-381-6677 Free Estimates Rogers Handyman ServicesRoger McCartney JRlicensed and insured Rockys Tree Service LLC863-382-239724 Hour Emergency ServiceServing All Central Florida Area Fully Insured Tree Removal Tree Trimming Free Estimates Tree Topping Stump GrindingSebring,FL 33870 20 Years experience Excellent References Daily Weekly BiweeklyMonthly Janitorial Service Recently Relocated to Lake Placid Sebring Looking To Build New Clientele 863-243-1801 / Shelly A long$1000per hour NO JOB TOO SMALL WE DO IT ALLHOME REPAIRS MAINTENANCE YARDWe Will Beat Anyones Price Call For Free Estimate305-797-1942 Fair and Honest Service Based on Christian ValuesAre You or a Loved One Living Alone? 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Monthly Bill Pay Bank Reconciliations Correspondence Insurance/Medicare AssistanceCall to see how we can help you863-385-0888NESTEGGBOOK@YAHOO.COMSpecializing in individuals Ser vice A vailable 7 Days A W eek Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com EXTRAORDINAIRE HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING LLC 863-451-2399Mike & Kandy Sheldone CEO/Owner Lic# CAC 1816569All Service Calls $40 Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Will Meet or Beat Any Price Family Owned &Operated with over 6 years experience Addison Lawn Care 863-441-0055 A Precise CutYARDCLEANUP, FULLLAWNCARE, HEDGETRIMMING& MORECOMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIALFor all your lawn needs,call Larry at381-0584for a Free Estimate & Great Service! IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-000591 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, F.S.B F/K/A WORLD SAVINGS BANK, F.S.B., Plaintiff, vs. LATEEFAH HAWTHORNE, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 14, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2010-CA000591 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as successor in interest to Wachovia Mortgage, F.S.B. f/k/a World Savings Bank, F.S.B., is the Plaintiff and Lateefah Hawthorne, Samuel Hawthorne, CitiFinancial Equity Services, Inc. are the defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 24th day of March, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOTS 8 AND 9, HILTON HEIGHTS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 13, PAGE 65, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A /K/A 128 COMPASS AVENUE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 15th day of February, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001433 DIVISION: HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR ACE SECURITIES CORP. HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2006-NC1, Plaintiff, vs. ELIZABETH ANN CRISAFULLI, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 14, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-001433 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for ACE Securities Corp. Home Equity Loan Trust, Series 2006-NC1, is the Plaintiff and Elizabeth Ann Crisafulli, Jeffrey Crisafulli, a/k/a Jeffrey A. Crisafulli, Manor Hill Owners' Association, Inc., a/k/a Manor Hill Property Owners A ssociation, Inc., Any And All Unknown Parties Claiming by, Through, Under, And Against The Herein named Individual Defendant(s) Who are not Known To Be Dead Or Alive, Whether Said Unknown Parties May Claim An Interest in Spouses, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Or Other Claimants are the defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 24th day of March, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 13, IN BLOCK 266, OF SUN 'N LAKES ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 71, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A /K/A 2501 SUNRISE DRIVE, SEBRING, FL 33872 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 15th day of February, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 2011 PUBLIC AUCTION FOR TOWING & STORAGE 1998 CHEVROLET 1GCCS1948W8127933 ON MARCH 25, 2011, AT 9:00AM AT PRECISION AUTO BODY 734 CR 621 EAST LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 March 13, 2011 NOTICE OF SALE Notice of Public Sale of a 1998 Key West Stealth boat, HIN #KWEST143L798, trailer VIN #1ZJBB19128C007786, Yamaha motor C115TLRW ID# 332423. Owners: Kenneth Lambert and/or Donald Chancey of Wauchula, FL. Sale to be held to satisfy repair and storage lien on April 21, 2011, 8 a.m., at Gone Fishin' Marine, 236 Commercial Way, Sebring, FL. March 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-84 IN RE: ESTATE OF DANA RAY ANTHONY a.k.a. DANA R. ANTHONY NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of DANA RAY A NTHONY a.k.a. DANA R. ANTHONY, deceased, whose date of death was January 23, 2011, and whose social security number is xxx-xx-xxxx, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) Y EARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 6, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Gail Anthony 101 Fenton Avenue Laconia, New Hampshire 03246 A ttorney for Personal Representative: / s/ David F. Lanier E-Mail Address: lanier@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No. 045399 DAVID F. LANIER P.O. Box 400 A von Park, Florida 33826-0400 Telephone: (863)453-4457 March 6, 13, 2011 1050Legals

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun March 13, 2011Page 7B The Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce is now accepting resumes for the position of President/CEO. Applicants must possess a strong financial background with excellent administrative, organizational and marketing skills. Salary is competitive. Resumes will be accepted until 5 p.m. Friday, March 18. Finalists will be interviewed Friday, March 25. Send resumes to: Attention Search Committee Chair, Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce, 227 U.S. 27 North, Sebring, FL33870. Florida Home Health is seeking licensed Physical Therapists and MSW looking to join a dynamically driven team focused on the goals of maximizing seniors ability to thrive in their home and community. As an employer, Florida Home Health, provides employees with the tools, continuing education, and supportive atmosphere to meet the unique needs of the elderly. To apply, e-mail your resum to Lisapeters@almostfamily. com or call 239-823-5535.License # 299992569 Motivated, Enthusiastic Professionals Wanted to Join Our Team!1996 FORDCROWN VICTORIA Regularly serviced, Looks and Runs GREAT! Excellent gas mileage, needs A/C work. $1700. 863-382-0310 9450Automotive for Sale2010 ENCLOSEDtrailer 24'X 8'X 7' escape door GW 10,000 lb. $7500, 2005 20'X8' flat GW10,000 $3500, 2002 10'X7' utility GW 1,900 lb. $2500. 863-260-1709 9220Utility Trailers ATV KAWASAKIBAYOU 220 Low Hours! Adult Driven! Garage Kept! Very Good Condition! $1300 OBO. 863-381-2414 1973 NORTON850 COMMANDO New professional restoration, very low miles includes Owner's Manual. One Owner Rare Find Great Price 863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation1996 TRAVELMASTER MOTOR HOME Good condition. Awnings, generator, lots of extras. Good tires. $11,000. 863-314-8557. 8450Motor Homes RV 38'2010 5TH Wheel. EAGLE RIDGE by HEARTLAND, 2BR, 1BA, 2 slides, fiberglass, W/D, awning. All options. $29,000 obo. Immediate Sale! 321-437-5887 CAMPER -1999 PROWLER LS Excellent Condition, Super Slide-out, Queen Bed, Many Extras. $7500 OBO. 570-352-7766 2011 39FT. Monte Carlo 2 slides, 2BR, sleeps 8, CHA, washer / dryer, self contained, microwave and awning. Every option. Limited Edition. $23,500. MUST SELL! 630-631-1795 2010 BMXUTV 500 4 Seater, 4 X 4. $7400. 8633865445 2010 38'HY-LINE Travel Trailer Park Model. Very Clean. 2 Slide outs, W/D, Bayfront, non-smoke, no pets. Will Deliver. Lake Josephine RV Resort area. $21,000. 941-518-4040SEBRING RACESPOTSThree (3) Reserved Parking Spots on Turn 15. Great View, on Concrete. $400 each; Take Some or All! Call 863-381-9526 8400RecreationalVehiclesPOOL SUPPLIES:Pump, Filter, Pool Cleaner (Barracuda) & Chlorine Tablets for above ground pool. All for $300. Call 863-453-7663. 8300Pools & SuppliesPONTOON BOAT20 foot Bass Tracker, New deck, 50hp. Mercury, with trailer. $3500 715-573-8889 or come by at 150 Jade Way, Lake Placid. 8050Boats & Motors 8000 RecreationNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states tha t all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & Supplies SEBRING -MOVING SALE! 2802 Orange Grove Dr., Sat-Sun, Mar 12th & 13, 9am-6pm. Living Room, Bedroom & Some Kitchen Items. SEBRING -BIGGGGG YARD SALE! 2454 Lakeview Dr. Fri Sat Sun Mar 11-12-13, Clean Under cover Furn., to knick knacks. Plus all in between. AVON PARKHAIR DEPOT 2650 US 27, N., Sun, Mar 13th. Antiques, Nice Furniture, Solid Wood Hutch, Tables & Chairs, Tools, Table Saw, Mattresses, Lamps, Paintings, Milk Cans, Videos, Dishes, & Lots More! Must Downsize! 8TH ANNUALGIGANTIC GARAGE SALE BLOW OUT Sunday, March 13th, 9am-2pm Quality Inn 6525 US 27, North Appliances, antiques, art work, bedding, blankets, books, chairs, clocks, computers, construction supplies, desks, furniture, housewares, jewelry, kitchen equipment, lamps, mattresses, men's and women's clothing, office equipment and supplies, photocopiers, printers, scanners, sheets, telephones, tools, towels...& More! Over 5,000 sf of A/C Stuff! Bring your donated canned & boxed food items to benefit Helping Haiti A portion of the Gigantic Garage Sale proceeds & items go to benefit H.C. Habitat for HumanityCan't Make It? Call 385-4500 for Leftovers! 7320Garage &Yard Sales WOODEN WHITEspiral reupholstered padded chairs (2) both for $40 863-382-6006 VACUUM -Upright, excellent condition, clean as a whistle! $20 863-402-2285 TABLE -42'' Glass Top with 4 chairs on wheels. $50. 863-385-4612 RECLINER -LAZYBOY, Ladies size, light blue coudoroy, in new condition w/arm covers. $75. 863-332-5012 PAPER WEIGHT6'', Glass, with flower inside. $20. 863-873-7201 or 863-441-0448 NAVAJO -Bracelet / watch band. Silver / turquoise, heavy. $80 863-402-2285 DS -PINK, like new w/case & 2 games. Asking $90 OBO. Call 863-381-1839. DRAFTING T-SQUARE48'' Stainless Steel, $10. 863-873-7201 or 863-414-0448 7310Bargain Buys DOG STROLLERfolding, Red & Black. Like new. $45. 863-452-1618 BIRD BATHdecorative concrete. $20 863-382-6006 BED EXTENDERfor Chevy Colorado truck. $75 863-243-1633 BARBIE DOLLHOUSE 4 ft w/furniture. Asking $90 OBO. Call 863-381-1839. ARMOIRE -White wood 36" wide X 64" high X 18" deep. 2 doors & 3 drawers. $65. 863-385-4701 7310Bargain Buys TOOL MAN'SDELIGHT 10" Delta table saw w/ access., Craftsman 10" radial saw, 15 1/2 drill press & 10" band saw, 8" Tradesman 5 sp. bench drill press. Call 863-471-6794 4-8 pm. COVER /ADCO for RV trailers 28' 7" X 31' 6", never opened still in orig,pkg. a bargin $150 863-453-7027 BED FRAME-wood full size, excel. cond., 36" Sony TV w/ media stand, entertainment tower, twin matress, Craftsman lawn mower. 863-471-6674 7300Miscellaneous NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS! HIGHPOINT FURNITURE OUTLET STORE 2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRINGNorthofLowes&acrossfrom HomeDepot 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise SEBRING (2)Available 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 GARAGE 32'X 60' BLOCK BUILDING, cement floor, 12' X 12' door, 100 amp electrical service. $450 monthly. S. Marion Rd, Avon Park 269-420-6331 6750Commercial Rental LOOKING FORSEASONAL RENTAL 2BR, 2BA Condo or House for Jan-Feb-Mar 2012. In Sebring Preferred Call 863-658-1564, before 10 am or after 8 pm, or email: eliskagantert@rogers.com HOG/TURKEY LEASE2 Ethical Bowhunters seeking hog/turkey lease. No dogs, guns, ATV's, or mess. Contact: Irv, 608-516-8615 or irv.xpress@gmail.com 6650Wanted to RentSEBRING 20'X40'Warehouse, 12' overhead door, on busy Highway 27 across from Lakeshore Mall. 863-385-3474 6550Warehousesfor Rent SEBRING -Furnished, 1BR with private bath, in Senior RV Resort. Washer/Dryer, Cable, full use of house. No Pets, No Smoking. For more information call Gloria, 863-257-1577 SEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, W/D, Satellite, full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for RentSEBRING -Weekly/Multi-Week Condo Rentals Avail. Now. Located on Little Lake Jackson across from Harder Hall Golf Club. Lots of ammenities. Starting @ $500/wk. 863-385-5005, ext. 0 6320Seasonal Property SEBRING -Harder Hall Executive Home on Golf Course. 3BR, 2BR, 2CG, Nice screen porch, 1900 sq ft liv. Appl's included. 1 year lease, no smoke. $850/mo. + sec. dep. 863-381-3990. SEBRING -Harder Hall area, 2BR, 2BA, 1CG, screened porch. $725/mo. plus & security deposit. View by appointment. Call 863-381-6747, leave message. The Avon Park Housing Authority is now taking applications for North Central Heights Homes, a new Rent Restricted single family home development in Avon Park consisting of 20 Two Bedroom, 46 Three Bedroom and 4 Four Bedroom homes. Rents will average in the low $400s for 2 br. homes and low to mid $500 & $600s for the 3 & 4 Br. homes. Applications open for Avon Park residents only; February 14 March 11, 2011 and all other applicants after March 11, 2011. For further information, contact: Avon Park Housing Authority at 863-452-4432, Ext. 2220 6300Unfurnished Houses SEBRING -Fully Furnished2BR with fenced yard & concrete utility room w/Washer/Dryer. Will consider pets. $550/mo + $400 security deposit. Extra pet deposit. 863-243-4580 SEBRING -Country Club of Sebring. 2BR, 2BA, den, lanai, pool, beautifully furnished/decorated. Available April 1st. Call 863-386-0340. LAKE PLACIDNewer 3BR, 2BA, seasonal or monthly. Excellent furniture & appliances, near lake & boat ramp, No smoking or dogs. $1450/mo. After season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119 6250Furnished Houses SEBRING FREE 1/2 mo rent, free cable, lg clean 1/1 tile floors. quiet / safe. No dogs 863-385-1999 AVON PARKAFFORDABLE RENTRidgedale Apartments1, 2, 3 & 4 Br Apts Central Location, water & trash included Rent subsidized Based on household income. No Application Fee Call 863-452-4432 TTY 800-955-8771 EQUAL HOUSINGOPPORTUNITY LAKE PLACID2BR, 1BA & 1BR, 1BA available immediately. Includes laundry facility / water / sewage. 1st. & security. No Pets! 561-706-6743 LAKE PLACIDNewly remodled! 2/BR, 2/BA, screened patio, Washer / Dryer, Excellent Conditio n. Includes water. $500 monthly plus 1 mo. security. 954-695-8348 KEY LAKEVILLASLAKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING 2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean & quiet, Screen porch, Outside patio, Central air, Washer/Dryer hookup, $585/mo., first & security. No Pets. 863-465-2740 AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL: $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsSEBRING -Downtown on the Circle. Weekly. or Monthy, starting at $150 wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets. 306 circle. 863-386-9100 or 954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask for John. 863-414-7535 6150FurnishedApartmentsSEBRING -UNFURNISHED 2203 Colma Ave., 2/BR, 1/BA & Patio. No smokers & no pets. $450 monthly, 1st. and last, plus $300 security deposit. 561-379-6823 or 561-965-4458 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 Rentals WHISPERING PINESVILLAGE 55 plus. 3BR, 2BA. Fully furnished & 3BR, 3BA, Partially furnished. Must see to appreciate. Call Mary 863-385-8806 VENUS -3/BR, 2/BA, large deck with pool & hot tub, 2 1/2 acres, Pole barn and fenced yard. Appliances stay. Rent or Leas w/ option to buy, considered. 863-441-5038 SEBRING -2BR, 1.5BA in 55+ Park. All new inside, completely furnished, includes Washer/Dryer, 32'' flat screen TV. All new windows, FL Room, carport. Free yard sprinkler system. Best Park in Sebring! Low lot rent. Not in Pet Section. Priced to sell quick...by owner. Background check required by park owner. 863-382-0219 PALM HARBORHOMES has closed 2 Model Centers. Save up to 60K on select models. Call 1-800-622-2832. AVON PARK12X46, 1BR, 1BA in Avon Mobile Home Park. New gas cook stove, carport, screened room, shed, other recent updates. Reasonable lot rent. Asking $6500. 574-518-8483 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesATTENTION: CASH for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4320Real Estate WantedBEAUTIFUL LOTSin Sebring and Lake Placid areas. Golf and Lake Communities. $3900. email Lotsfor5000.com or Call Sal 863-633-0050 4220Lots for SaleAVON PARK-DUPLEX-VIILLA in Orangewood Acres Newly painted inside and out. New roof in 2009, New counter tops and sinks. All updated appliances incl. Excellent community. Own your own land. 863-257-1873 4180Duplexes for Sale SEBRING 3BR,2BA 1CG, CBS Home 303 Virginia Pl. $119,00 or 2BR, 2BA, MH 5151 Barnum St. $42,500 10% Down Owner Financing Call 863-835-1445 SEBRING -Quiet Neighborhood on great fishing lake; 2,000 sf, 3BR, 2.5BA remodeled home with large garage & boat house. $219,000. 863-655-2278 MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE! SEBRING NO NEED FOR A BANK! Owner Financing 3BR, 1BA remodeled, NICE HOME! Woodlawn Elem. area. 1243 Fernvale Ave. 863-227-2717 4080Homes for SaleSebringAVON PARKMediterranean Home on Lake Lillian, 3000 sq ft+ Guest Cottage. Central Heat/Air, Fireplace, Sun Porch, Open Stairway, Hardwood Flrs, $249K. 863-453-8955/863-453-0392 (eve). 4060Homes for SaleAvon ParkSEBRING -RURAL LIVING adjacent to great fishing lake close to Sebring. 3BR, 2BA home, pole barn, 5 acres fenced, zoned agriculture $150,000. 863-655-2278 Make Offer! 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial TRUCK DRIVERWANTED Clean driving record a must! Apply in person 3636 Desoto Rd. Sebring. TEACHERS NEEDED For Christian Preschool Substitute Teacher/10 days in March Assistant Teacher Needed Call 863-443-2344 SUNRISE COMMUNITYINC is currently accepting applications for the position of: Direct Support Staff. Qualified applicants must meet the following: 18 yrs. old, High school diploma or equivalent, 1 yr. experience medical, or childcare setting, must be able to pass law enforcement background screening and drug test. All interested can call for appt. and application informaton: Sunrise Community Inc. 1014 6th Ave. S., Wauchula, Fl. 33873. 863-773-0434 ext. 305 EOE / DFWP SEEKING WELLEXPERIENCED MEDICAL OFFICE HELP P/T. Excellent billing/collection, communication, typing, computer skills & medical terminology are A MUST Fax resume to: 863-471-3206 or email to: medicalofficebilling@yahoo.com MERCHANDISERQUARTERday per monthGDS seeks a dependable individual to merchandise magazines, books and handle special projects in Sebring. Must own a late model vehicle with valid drivers license and auto insurance. Must also be computer literate with access to both email and the Internet. E.mail resume to: recuruiter@slobalinstore.com LPN'S WANTED Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility serving adults with developmental disabilities is seeking Licensed Practical Nurses P/T and PRN. We offer a casual work environment, competitive wage and benefits package. For details call Barb at 863-452-5141 LOCAL PRE-SCHOOLHIRING for several positions. Experience preferred but not required. Benefits available. Call 863-382-2727 to schedule an interview. JANITORIAL/RESTAURANT CLEANING Immediate opening for F/T Professional Sub Contractor to clean restaurant. Experience preferred, will train if necessary. Flexible hours. Call M-F, 9-5 1-800-577-1318 HIRING NAILTECH Pedicure, Manicure, Acrylic Nails. Full or Part Time. Paid on Commission. Call Tommy at 727-512-9335 or 863-873-2527.RESTAURANT HIRINGSERVERS, COOKS, & BEVERAGE CART SERVERS Needed at Springlake Golf Resort. Apply Monday through Saturday10am 5pm. For directions only, call 863-655-0900 2100Help Wanted HIGHLY MOTIVATED Individual needed for full-time General Office/Bookkeeper/Receptionist position with busy law practice. Needs to be able to work independently, and be extremely organized with attention to details. Excellent computer and communication skills are required. Send Resume to: Reply Box #2198 News Sun, 2227 US 27, S. Sebring, FL 33870 REGISTERED NURSE part time (20 hrs. per week). Dependable transportation is required. Home Health experience preferred in order to train and monitor, Personal Care Workers doing in-home services. Good oral and written communication skills are necessary. A non-clinical position. Apply in person at NU-HOPE ELDER CARE SERVICES, 6414 US HWY 27 South, Sebring. EOE DFWP 2100Help WantedBRICK MASONRYINSTRUCTOR Avon Park The Home Builders Institute is seeking a brick masonry instructor. Five years related experience plus HS diploma / equivalent required. For details, including qualifications, visit www.hbi.org/jobs. EOE/M/F/D/V UTILITY POLE INSPECTION Career Opportunity. Will train, valid drivers license & travel required. Long term employment. Contact Dennis @ 404-7911990 or dpremo@asplundh.com M/F/V/D/EOE 2050Job Opportunities 2000 Employment 1200Lost & FoundCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 385-6155 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements Highlands County Sheriffs Office Request for Proposals (RFP)RFP 11-01 Enterprise-Wide Document Imaging Software The Highlands County Sheriffs Office is seeking RFPs from vendors to provide a fully developed, integrated, and implemented solution, along with technical support/services, for an ENTERPRISE-WIDE DOCUMENT IMAGING SOFTWARE. A ll requests for copies of this RFP should be directed to: Deb J. Olson, General Services Manager, Highlands County Sheriffs Office, 434 Fernleaf Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 (863) 402-7266, Facsimile (863) 402-7344. A ll technical questions may be forwarded to Rob Jordon, Administrator of Information Services, Highlands County Sheriffs Office Law Enforcement Bureau, 434 Fernleaf Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 (863) 402-7257 Proposals must be submitted in a sealed envelope and marked with the bid number and name to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to the Highlands County Sheriffs Office, 434 Fernleaf Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M. March 31, 2011 at which time they will be opened. March 13, 20, 2011***************************************** HIGHLANDS COUNTY LEGAL NOTICES ***************************************** The following legal notices are from the Highlands County Board of County Commissioners and are being published in the font, size, and leading as per their specifications. 1055HighlandsCounty LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-484GCS DIVISION: A MERICAN HOME MORTGAGE SERVICING, INC., Plaintiff, vs. MAHABIR PURAN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 14, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-484GCS of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which American Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc., is the Plaintiff and Mahabir Puran, John Doe n/k/a Roberto Madina, City of Sebring, are the defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 24th day of March, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 13, BLOCK 58, OF ORIGINAL TOWN OF SEBRING, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA, OF WHICH HIGHLANDS COUNTY WAS FORMERLY A PART. A /K/A 217 MANGO STREET, SEBRING, FL 33870 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 15th day of February, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 2011 1050Legals Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classified ads get fast results NEED TOBE WITH MY OWNER. Beautiful cat (kitten at the time) showed up at our home, in the summer months, in the area of Pioneer Rd & CR 17. She had been declawed and well kept by her owner. Would love to return her to her family. Call 863-453-6469

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com

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By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE PLACID In what is proving to be a standout year for Lake Placid baseball, the wins keep piling up. And rather than fighting for a spot in the middle of the pack, the Dragons are making a push toward the top of the district standings after Fridays 14-4, five-inning win over visiting Mulberry. Toeing the rubber for the first time since being sidelined by a wrist injury, Clayton Mason went through the first inning unscathed before his offense got him an early lead. With one out, Terry Coyne doubled on a fly to center and Dylan Weber-Callahan took one square in the back to put runners on first and second. Kyle Barber then lifted a fly to right that couldnt be handled, bringing Coyne in, and Tyler Carr knocked Weber-Callahan home with a two-strike sacrifice fly. The Panthers looked to put a dent in the lead when a lead-off double, a hit batter and a walk loaded the bases with nobody out. Mulberry did tally one run, when an attempted pick-off from catcher to third got away, but Mason recovered to strike out the next three batters and hold the 2-1 edge. Timely hitting and a sketchy Panther defense paved the way to three more runs in the second, with Brandon Wells reaching on a single and moving to second on an error allowing Brody Carr to reach. Coyne then double We lls home and an error on a Weber-Callahan fly ba ll brought in both Carr an d Coyne to score. Mulberry would scrat ch for a few more runs, but th ey SPORTS C SECTION News-Sun Sunday, March 13, 2011 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Nate Greene lashed this double down the third-baseline during Sebrings near-miracle comeback against Lake Wales Friday night. News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E Terry Coyne steps on home plate for the first of many Lake Placid runs in Fridays 14-4 win over visiting Mulberry. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING The toughe st game is the first game a fter a loss, said Sebring h ead coach Hoppy Rewis, s peaking of the task of taki ng on a top-notch Lake W ales squad after T uesdays 5-2 loss a t Winter Haven. But thats two g ames in a row that w eve had trouble g etting started. The Blue Streaks, a fter all, had been r iding high with the loss to t he Blue Devils being the f irst of the season. And though Fridays s tart was especially slow, S ebring finished strong in n early pulling out a miracle w in before they fell one run short in the 9-8 loss to the Highlanders. Down 9-0 after three torturous innings could very well have sent the Streaks home early. Acombination of walks, errors and hit batsmen had given Lake Wales those nine runs on a grand total of four hits through those first three innings. And though Jesse Baker had plated a run for the home team with an RBI double to left in the bottom of the third off Florida signee Justin Schafer, the Highlanders had the bases loaded with two out off reliever Nate Greene in the top of the fifth. Arocketed fly ball into left center could well have spelled the end, had it not been for center fielder Even Lewis getting on his horse and tracking it down with a running catch to end the inning with no damage done. And from there, the comeback began. It could have been 12-1 and we could have packed it in and gone home early, Rewis said. Ive had some teams that may have done that, but not this group. With Schafer lifted for relievers with the seemingly insurmountable lead, Lewis drew a one-out walk in the bottom of the fifth and moved to third when Baker bounced a double off Nearly a miracle Lake Wales9Sebring8 See SEBRING, page 4C By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comTuesdays six-team track and field invitational saw a slew of strong performances from area athletes as the Lady Blue Streaks won the girls side of the meet. Avon Park got a leg up early, with Angelique Ligon winning both the 100and 200-meter dashes before Taylor Tubbs got Sebring off and running with a win in the 400. The Streaks showed their strength in the longer distances, with Hannah Schroeder then winning the 800 and Emily Smith the 1,600. Tubbs and Smith followed with a one, two finish, respectively, in the 3,200 before Destiny McCartney swept the hurdles events, winning both the 100and Strong showings at Sebring Invite By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Avon P ark (6-4) drew first blood i n the first to set the stage f or a 4-2 win against F rostproof on Friday night. Red Devil Lane Crosson t ook advantage of a cold B ulldog pitcher when he led the game off with a single on the first throw. We made a couple of mistakes that t hey capitalized on, and we d idnt do the same when we h ad the opportunity, F rostproof head coach J eremy Byrd said. I think t heir pitcher did a great job o n quieting our bats, and t hat the difference in the g ame. Frostproof (3-5) would a nswer Crosson in the top o f the second when Reily J ohnson got on with a sing le and then was driven in b y Jacob Smith who also m ade it home before the i nning was out. The game settled into b attle of pitchers at that p oint and Avon Parks Brad T orres went the distance, t hrowing 106 pitches, six s trike outs and just three w alks. Frostproofs Tray Norris threw 78, struck out eight and walked none. There were two good pitchers throwing tonight. Brad threw a good game tonight, and he had some good defense behind him, said Avon Park coach Whit Cornell. I was definitely hitting my spots and both were working for me. My slider started working for me in the second inning so I just worked off of that, said Torres after the game. Alfred Brown scored in the second for Avon Park and then again in the fourth Devils top Dogs in pitchers duel News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE Red Devil Brad Torres checks the runner at first as he winds up for the pitch Friday against Frostproof. Avon Park4Frostproof2 News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHN E Shalantay Rose leapt to wins in both the triple and high jump Tuesday, helping propel the Lady Streaks to victory in the six-team invitational. See TRACK, page 3C See AP, page 4C Dragons power past Panthers Lake Placid14Mulberry4 See LP, page 4C Special to the News-SunSEBRING For years, the GTdivision at Sebring has been the most diverse and has provided some of the most exciting racing action. In fact, it was the 2007 finish between the Risi Competizione Ferrari and the Flying Lizards Porsche at the Mobil One 12 Hours that was judged by fans to be the most thrilling moments in the first decade of American Le Mans Series action, This year should be no exception as Corvette, Porsche, Ferrari, Jaguar, Ford, Lamborghini, Pano z and BMWduke it out in th e once-around-the-clock cla ssic. With the addition of com petitors for th e Intercontinental Le Mans th at GT field again loaded for 12 Hours See 12 Hours, page 4C ALMS.com pho to The GT field for this years 12 Hours of Sebring looks as crowded and competitive as ever.

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HOPE 3-on-3SEBRING The First Annual HOPE Community 3-on-3 basketball tournament will take place Saturday, April 2 at the Sebring High School gym from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at a cost of $5 per player. The tournament will have male and female brackets consisting of threeorfour player teams from ages 7-18-years old. Registration forms can be found in the front office at Sebring High School and must be turned in by Friday, March 18. For more information, contact Lavaar Scott at 214-3880 or email LaV39@yahoo.com .Avon Park Mall Festival 5KAVON PARK The 26th Annual Avon Park Mall Festival 5K Run/Walk is set for Friday night, March 25, at the Old Armory Building at 6:00 p.m. Registration will begin at 5:00 p.m. in the building across from the tennis courts in Donaldson Park. Entry fee is $15 through March 21 and $20 from March 22 thru race day sign up. Tee shirts guaranteed to only the first 100 entrants, so sign up early. Those desiring an entry form may email cbrojek@comcast.net or call Chet at 385-4736. Mail your checks payable to Central Florida Striders, along with the signed application to Central Florida Striders, 3310 Par Road, Sebring, FL33872. The race benefits the boys and girls track teams at Avon Park High School.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worship Center presents the First Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one team of four golfers, one tee sign and two green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes one team of four golfers, one green sign; Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100 includes one green sign. Individual player $60 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26). Team of Four Golfers $240 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL 33871, or register online at wingsoffaithchristianworshipcenter.com. Proceeds to be donated to scholarship program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jason Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhankerson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com.Doc Owen Golf TourneyAVON PARK The Avon Park Noon Rotary Club will host its Second Annual David Doc Owen Golf tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Highlands Ridge North. The two-person scramble-format entry fee is $60 per person with prizes in flight groups, lunch, goodie bag and refreshments on the course. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun tee time. Entry information and check payable to Avon Park Noon Rotary mailed to Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Rd, Sebring, FL 33872. Golfers should include their names and handicaps along with their check. Those needing a form may email Brojek at cbrojek@comcast.net or call a t 385-4736. Business entry of two-persons plus a hole sign for a total of $200 is available for the first time this year. All Rotary club members are urged to support participate in the event that ben efits local Rotary charity projects. Business hole signs for $100 are also available by contacting Chet via email o r phone.SHSBasketball CampSEBRING The SHS basketball program will be hosting a basketball camp for boys and girls, in 2nd-6th grade, on Monday, March 28, and Tuesday, March 29, from 8 a.m.4 p.m. The cost of the camp is $20 and is appropriate for players of all skill level s and experience. Current and former Streaks will be on hand to help with the camp, which will also feature contests, competitions and prizes. Campers can either bring their own lunch or purchase lunch there for a reasonable price. Please contact Coach Lee at 441-122 1, or by email at leem@highlands.k12.fl.u s Sandy Foster MemorialSEBRING NU-HOPE Elder Care Services annual golf tournament is just around the corner. The NU-HOPE Board of Directors ha s chosen to rename the golf tournament this year in memory of Sandy Foster, fo rmer Executive Director of NU-HOPE Elder Care Services. Sandy passed away very unexpectedl y in September of last year. Sandy loved golf and ran a very successful golf tournament for 13 years; in his memory the tournament will be renamed the Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament. This year we are continuing with Sandys passion for the tournament with flight, raffle and door prizes. In the last three years the field was full, with a wait list, so sign up soon! The first annual Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament will be held on April 9, with an 8:30 a.m shotgun start, at the Country Club of Sebring. The tournament will be a two-person scramble format. Entry fee will be $60 per person ($12 0 per team) which includes lunch afterwards and refreshments during the tournament. Registration forms are available at the Country Club of Sebring Pro Shop (John Vickers) or can be obtained via mail or fax by calling Debbie Slade at 382-2134. Business sponsorships are also available for this event. The revenue from this event is used for the local matchamount this organi zation needs each year to secure federal and state grant funds in our effort to co ntinue providing home and communitybased services to the frail and needy eld erly residents of Highlands and Hardee Counties. Barefoot Waterski Tournament in Fort MyersFORTMYERS The 10th annual Deuceapalooza Barefoot Endurance Tournament is set for April 9 in Fort Myers. This tournament is open to waterski enthusiasts of all ages. Trophies and cash prizes will be hand ed out. Participants will receive a free T shirt. For information, call Deuce at (239) 693-1975. EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB x-Boston4617.730 New York3430.5311212Philadelphia3431.52313 New Jersey2143.3282512Toronto1847.27729 Southeast Division WLPctGB x-Miami4421.677 Orlando4125.621312Atlanta 3728.5697 Charlotte2738.41517 Washington1647.25427 Central Division WLPctGB y-Chicago4618.719 Indiana 2738.4151912Milwaukee2538.3972012Detroit 2343.34824 Cleveland1252.18834WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB x-San Antonio5312.815 Dallas4718.7236 New Orleans3829.56716 Memphis3630.5451712Houston3333.5002012Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City4123.641 Denver3827.585312Portland3728.569412Utah 3432.5158 Minnesota1750.2542512Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Lakers4620.697 Phoenix3330.5241112Golden State2936.4461612L.A. Clippers2541.37921 Sacramento1548.2382912x-clinched playoff spot ___ Thursdays Games Miami 94, L.A. Lakers 88 Dallas 127, New York 109 Denver 116, Phoenix 97 Fridays Games Charlotte 97, Portland 92 New Jersey 102, L.A. Clippers 98, OT Toronto 108, Indiana 98 Philadelphia 89, Boston 86 Chicago 94, Atlanta 76 Minnesota 122, Utah 101 Oklahoma City 104, Detroit 94 San Antonio 108, Sacramento 103 Golden State 123, Orlando 120, OT Saturdays Games Memphis at Miami, late Portland at Atlanta, late L.A. Clippers at Washington, late Utah at Chicago, late Philadelphia at Milwaukee, late Sacramento at New Orleans, late L.A. Lakers at Dallas, late San Antonio at Houston, late Detroit at Denver, late Sundays Games Oklahoma City at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Charlotte at Toronto, 1 p.m. Orlando at Phoenix, 3:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Boston, 6 p.m. Indiana at New York, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Golden State, 9 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA Philadelphia4219690215177 Pittsburgh3921886196167 N.Y. Rangers3530474195169 New Jersey3132466143172 N.Y. Islanders27321064192218 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Boston3821985205164 Montreal3724781181172 Buffalo3326874194193 Toronto29291068178209 Ottawa2534959153209 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Washington39201088185168 Tampa Bay3822884201205 Carolina31271072194206 Atlanta28281268189219 Florida2732963169188WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Detroit4020888222196 Chicago3724781223189 Nashville34241078173159 Columbus3127971185204 St. Louis3128971190202 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA Vancouver4416997225162 Calgary3625981211199 Minnesota3527777176184 Colorado2633860189235 Edmonton2337955171226 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA San Jose3922785192174 Dallas3723882191190 Los Angeles3825581189166 Phoenix35231181197198 Anaheim3726579193197 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Thursdays Games Vancouver 5, San Jose 4, SO Buffalo 4, Boston 3, OT Philadelphia 3, Toronto 2 Ottawa 2, Florida 1 St. Louis 4, Montreal 1 Nashville 4, Minnesota 0 Phoenix 3, Calgary 0 Fridays Games N.Y. Islanders 4, Boston 2 Washington 2, Carolina 1 Los Angeles 4, Columbus 2 Detroit 2, Edmonton 1, OT New Jersey 3, Atlanta 2, OT Ottawa 2, Tampa Bay 1 Dallas 4, Minnesota 0 Anaheim 6, Colorado 2 Saturdays Games Montreal at Pittsburgh, late Buffalo at Toronto, late N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, late Atlanta at Philadelphia, late Columbus at Carolina, late Tampa Bay at Florida, late Detroit at St. Louis, late Colorado at Nashville, late Vancouver at Calgary, late N.Y. Rangers at San Jose, late Sundays Games Chicago at Washington, 12:30 p.m. Edmonton at Pittsburgh, 3 p.m. Los Angeles at Dallas, 3 p.m. Ottawa at Buffalo, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Anaheim, 8 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUEWLPct Kansas City95.643 Seattle74.636 Detroit106.625 Minnesota76.538 Texas76.538 Boston87.533 Baltimore66.500 Los Angeles78.467 Toronto67.462 New York68.429 Oakland68.429 Chicago58.385 Tampa Bay58.385 Cleveland48.333NATIONAL LEAGUEWLPct San Francisco124.750 Atlanta95.643 Colorado95.643 Cincinnati85.615 Washington85.615 Philadelphia96.600 Milwaukee86.571 St. Louis76.538 New York78.467 Pittsburgh78.467 San Diego67.462 Chicago68.429 Florida58.385 Los Angeles510.333 Houston511.313 Arizona512.294 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. ___ Fridays Games Minnesota 3, Boston (ss) 2 Detroit 7, St. Louis 4 Toronto 10, N.Y. Yankees (ss) 3 Pittsburgh 8, Tampa Bay 7 Boston (ss) 9, Houston (ss) 3 Atlanta 6, N.Y. Yankees (ss) 2 Philadelphia 13, Baltimore 6 N.Y. Mets 10, Florida 0 Chicago Cubs 4, Chicago White Sox 3 Milwaukee 4, Oakland (ss) 3 Cleveland 5, Seattle 5, tie, 10 innings Oakland (ss) 9, L.A. Dodgers 2 L.A. Angels 9, Arizona 8 Texas 5, Cincinnati 5, tie Colorado 4, Kansas City 3, 10 innings Houston (ss) 7, Washington 6 San Francisco 6, San Diego 4 Saturdays Games Pittsburgh (ss) vs. Toronto (ss), late N.Y. Yankees vs. Washington, late Tampa Bay vs. Philadelphia (ss), late Baltimore vs. Houston, late Philadelphia (ss) vs. Pittsburgh (ss), late N.Y. Mets vs. Atlanta, late Minnesota vs. St. Louis, late Florida vs. Boston, late Toronto (ss) vs. Detroit, late L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs. San Francisco, late Oakland vs. Seattle, late L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs. Kansas City, late Arizona vs. Milwaukee, late Texas vs. Chi. White Sox, late Cincinnati (ss) vs. Chi. Cubs (ss), late San Diego vs. Colorado, late L.A. Angels vs. Cleveland, late Chi. Cubs (ss) vs. Cincinnati (ss), late Arizona vs. Colorado, late Sundays Games Houston (ss) vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Minnesota (ss) at Fort Myers, 1 p.m. Houston (ss) vs. Detroit (ss) at Lakeland, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1 p.m. Minnesota (ss) vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 1 p.m. Detroit (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1 p.m. Washington vs. Florida at Jupiter, 1 p.m. Boston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1 p.m. St. Louis vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Las Vegas, 3:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Colorado vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. L.A. Dodgers (ss) at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Seattle vs. L.A. Angels (ss) at Tempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (ss) vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chi. Cubs (ss) vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, 4:10 p.m. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid MONDAY: Baseball at Sonrise,7 p.m.; Softball at Pemayetv Emahakv,5:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball at Sebring,7 p.m. THURSDAY: Boys Tennis at DeSoto,4:30 p.m.; Girls Tennis vs.DeSoto,4:30 p.m. FRIDAY: Softball vs.Sonrise Christian,6 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Softball at Hardee,5:30/7:30 p.m.; Boys Tennis at Avon Park,4 p.m.; Girls Tennis vs.Avon Park,4 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Lake Placid,7 p.m.; Softball at DeSoto,5:30/7 p.m.; Track hosts quad meet,4:30 p.m. SFCC MONDAY: Baseball vs.State College of Florida,6 p.m. TUESDAY: Softball vs.Hillsborough,5 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball at State College of Florida,6 p.m. THURSDAY: Softball vs.St.Petersburg,5 p.m. FRIDAY: Baseball at Polk State College,6 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Boys Tennis vs.Sebring,4 p.m.; Girls Tennis at Sebring,4 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball at DeSoto,7 p.m.; Boys Tennis vs.DeSoto,4 p.m. THURSDAY: Boys/Girls Tennis at Okeechobee,3:30 p.m. FRIDAY: Softball at Sebring,5:30/7:30 p.m. A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NHRA Lucas Oil Series . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 6 6 p p . m m . NHRA Tire Kingdom Gatornationals . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N H H L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Chicago at Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CM M L L B B P P R R E E S S E E A A S S O O N N S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs . . . . . . . . . W W G G N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . N.Y. Yankees at Boston, Ft. Myers . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2S S N N O O W W B B O O A A R R D D I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Burton U.S. Open Championships. . E E S S P P N N 2 2C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Atlantic 10 Tournament Final . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 1 1 p p . m m . SEC Tournament Final . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C C 1 1 p p . m m . ACCTournament Final . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Big T en Tournament Final . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 6 6 p p . m m . NCAA Championship Selection Show . . . . C C B B S ST TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NITTournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NITTournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . NIT T ournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 1 1 1 1 p p . m m . NIT Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2C C O O L L L L E E G G E E L L A A C C R R O O S S S S E E S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 0 0 a a . m m . Georgetown at Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NW W O O M M E E N N S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Womens Selection Special. . . E E S S P P N NTimes, games, channels all subject to change M M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E S S O O C C C C E E R R T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Los Angeles at Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NG G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . PGA WGC Cadillac Championship . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA WGC Cadillac Championship . . . . . N N B B C C 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Puerto Rico Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA T oshiba Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FH H I I G G H H S S C C H H O O O O L L G G I I R R L L S S B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . Florida Tournament Final . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NN N B B A A S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Orlando at Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C CM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . San Antonio at Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Orlando at L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N LIVESPORTSONTV NBA NHL MLB Preseason Page 2CNews-Sun Sunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.co m

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 3C TO ADVERTISE ON THIS PAGE CALL ANGI 386-5626 Located Inside Inn On The Lakes Hotel 3100 Golfview Rd. Sebring, FL863-314-0348 FREE BEERWith Purchase of Appetizer or Entree! Great Golf ValuePar 72 Championship Golf Course Golf Instruction & Practice Facility Full-service Caddyshack Restaurant & Bar Sebring GolfClubcall 863-314-5919 or online at www.mysebring.com Located off Hwy 27 in Sebring 3118 Golfview Rd., Sebring, FL 33875 To schedule a tee time OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 6 MONTH MEMBERSHIPS NOW AVAILABLE(863) 382-0500 3201 Golfview Rd. Sebring(863) 382-0744for 9 Hole Executive RatesPrices good thru 3/31/10 Incl. Tax & CartMonday thru Friday:8am 1pm $36By 8, After 1 $29 Saturday & Sunday: $25 471-ZENO (9366)4325 Sun N Lake Blvd. SebringMon 3 9 Tues-Thurs 11 9 Fri 11-10 Sat 3-10 Closed Sunday402-22222934 US 27 S. (Publix Shopping Center) Sebring Tues -Thur 3 9 Fri Sat 3 10 Closed Sunday & MondaySERVING HIGHLANDS FOR MORETHAN 25 YEARS ZENOS WE DELIVER! Small Personal Pizza or 6 WingsWith purchase of a large 16" 2 Topping Pizza at $14.99 FREENot valid with any other offer. Expires 03/31/11 RATES YOUVE BEEN DREAMING ABOUT GOLF SEBRINGS FRIENDLIEST GOLF COURSE VO TED #1 LOCAL COURSE 2010 2222 GOLF HAMMOCK DR., SEBRING863-382-2151golfhammockcc@embarqmail.com Coupon RequiredFRIDAY1:00 pmSHOTGUN SPECIAL $ 24CALL FOR TEE TIMESExpires 03-31-11 18 HOLES7am-8am....$27008am-Noon..$3300Noon-2pm..$2700After 2pm...$2300All Rates Includes Tax 9 HOLES7am-3pm....$1800After 3pm...$1500Weekend Rates7am-2pm....$25002pm Close..$2000 After a beautiful month of February a nd some great trips out on area waters, S ebring Kayak Tours doesnt let up in M arch, offering several trips throughout t he month. Saturday March 19, 8 p.m. Moonlight Paddle Lake Jackson Watch a spectacular mixture of pink a nd orange hues as the sun sets on the s himmering waters of Lake Jackson. And then marvel at the beauty of a full m oon. End your day with a very relaxing trip u nder the stars. We recommend that you have some k ayaking experience. We will launch from Veterans Beach a nd paddle our way across to the City P ier (where we will get out, stretch and h ave a snack) and then paddle our way b ack to Veterans Beach (or vice versa d epending on weather conditions). Sunday March 20, 4 p.m. Sunset Tour Arbuckle Creek/ I stokpoga Park We will meet and launch from the boat r amp on Lake Istokpoga Park off of Hwy 9 8 in Sebring. Well paddle upstream to our favorite get out/stretch/snack/swim spot and then paddle our way back to the Park. This is a late afternoon (sunset) trip with approximately 2 1/2 hours of paddling. Ideal for beginners and first-timers as well as seasoned paddlers. Saturday March 26, 10 a.m. Alafia River Lithia Springs Park The Alafia River is a narrow, twisting trail with large oak, cypress and cedar trees that line the banks and form a canopy overhead. Paddlers share the peace and quiet with wading birds and turtles. The Alafia is a fairly swift river, especially for central Florida, and some small shoals are exposed in low water creating small (very small) rapids... Yippee! We will meet at Lithia Springs Park and shuttle you to the launch site at Alderman Ford Park. This is a full day trip with approximately 3 1/2 4 hrs of paddling time including a break for lunch about halfway. Sunday March 27, 4 p.m. Sunset Tour Arbuckle Creek/ Istokpoga Park We will meet and launch from the boat ramp on Lake Istokpoga Park off of Hwy 98 in Sebring. Well paddle upstream to our favorite get out/stretch/snack/swim spot and then paddle our way back to the Park. This is a late afternoon (sunset) trip with approximately 2 1/2 hours of paddling. Ideal for beginners and first-timers as well as seasoned paddlers. All trips are $39 per person (single or tandem), $19 for those bringing their own kayaks. All reservations must be confirmed via phone or email no later than 24 hrs prior to the trip. Kayaking is a water activity you will get wet. so dress appropriately. Kayaking is also a year-round activity in Florida and Sebring Kayak Tours do not typically cancel tours due to cooler weather or due to rain, unless encounter dangerous thunder/lightning is encountered. Sebring Kayak Tours reserves the right to cancel any tours that do not meet the minimum amount of participants. Plenty of Kayak Tours on tap in March Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Seventy and Over Sebring Softball League is winding down with only Tuesdays game being played last week. Thursdays games were cancelled due to stormy weather. Silent Salesman played Allstate Insurancein a hotlycontested game that was a see-saw affair all the way. It took an extra inning of play with Allstate coming out on top 15-14. Aunique feature of the game was that RudyPribble was both the winning and losing pitcher. That happened because Rudy pitched for his Allstate team and also pitched for the shorthanded Salesman. Ray Wilson also helped with the pitching. The Salesman banged out 34 hits but left twenty runners standing on the bases. Leading themassive hitting attackwas Russ Moody, 5-for-6, and Gene Hanfordcollected two hits including ahome run. Having four hits each were Al Taratuta, Spider McMinn and Les Smith, who also had a double. Knocking out three hits each were Fred Moore, Stu Hayner and Bob Fahnestock. Jim Longman contributed three hits including a double and rounding out the slugfest was Bob Roth with three hits. Allstates Ray Wilson was 3-for-4 including a double. Athreesome having 3for-4 were Glenn Wears h, MarvinKnutilla and Ga lo Gonzales. Highlands Merchan ts ran over the Rebels with a 17-6 score. Their Don Ward was 3for-4 with adouble and a home run. Charlie Quinn was 3for-4 and Shawn Kildo ff was 3-for 3. Having two hits ea ch were Glenn Minic, E d Carroll, Harry Bell an d Harold Dinel. Millers Heating and A ir Conditioning left the Bl ue Jays in the cold with a 2 36 win. Millers Kyle Saunder s hot bat got himthr ee triples and a double f or eight RBI. Jerry Kauffm an went5-for-5 with a do uble. Dale DeMar had 4-for -4 and Ed Lindberg had thr ee hits including a double. Rod Palmer and Tomm y Royal were 3-for-5 an d Syd Collins, Don Shee ts and Pete Mathews ea ch had two hits. The Blue Jays Richa rd Godfrey was their hig h hitter having 4-for -4 including a doub le andatriple. Having 3-for-4 we re Doran Quigg,Don an d Leo Lypps. DaleBaughman, Ji m Johnson and John Pen na each had two hits. There aregames ne xt Tuesday and Thursd ay that round out the seaso n at the much appreciat ed Highlands County Spor ts Complex. Heavy hitting for Sebring 70s 3 00-meter distances. The Lady Devils notched a nother win in the 4X100 r elay, with Ligon, Zakia Hart, T akeisha Williams and J asmine Wilson finishing in a t ime of 52.46. Smith, Tubbs, Schroeder a nd Tamra McMahon again s howed distance to be a S ebring strong-suit, winning t he 4X800 by well over one m inute ahead of the field. Shalantay Rose then added t he jumping events to the S treaks list of wins as she t ied for the top in the high j ump and won the triple jump o utright while Justus Martin a dded a second-place finish i n the pole vault, clearing 7f eet, 6-inches. And when the dust settled, the Lady Streaks had totaled up 115.50 points to take the team win, staying just ahead of Frostproofs 109.50. The Bulldogs ran away with the boys side of the meet, racking up 126 points, but Sebring and Avon Park had their share of highlights as the Streaks finished second as a team and the Devils third. Much like Ligon did for the girls, Travous Knight won the 100and 200-meter dashes to get Avon Park off to a fast start with Sebrings Donovan White then taking second in the 400 to get Sebring on the board. Evan Wilburn added another six points for the Streaks with his second-place finish in the 1,600 and eight more points for his win in the 3,200. Sebring edged ahead of Frostproof in the 4X100 relay, with Wesley Baggett, Devante Pough, Clarence Counts and Devin Clarke finishing in 44.33, less than one second ahead of the Bulldog bunch. The Red Devils took second in the 4X400, with Lacy Turner, Akub Antoine, Angel Perez and Knight finishing just three seconds behind Frostproof. The Streaks then got a topthree sweep in the high jump as the 5-foot-11 Clarke cleared an eye-opening 6feet, 4-inches with White and Pough each clearing 5-foot10. The pole vault saw Sebrings Colton Dillon and Avon Parks Clinton Faircloth each top the 12-foot mark for a first-place tie while Blue Streak Adrion Khan cleared 11-feet, 6-inches for third. Clarke added the long jump to his list of wins on the day, leaping 20-feet, 9-inches, and Sebring got a win in the discus from Patric Morris whose heave of 119-feet, 4inches took first by nine feet. The Streaks and Devils will be joined by the Lake Placid squad, among others, this Tuesday with Avon Park hosting the meet at Joe Franza stadium. Continued from 1C Track and Field at Franza Tuesday

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Page 4CNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com t he Crows Nest in left. Greene then ripped a doub le down the third-base line t o drive two home and cut the l ead to a still daunting 9-3. Greene worked a one, t wo, three sixth and the S treaks scratched for one m ore run on a Baker sacrif ice fly to right. Three up and three down in the top of the seventh gave Sebring one more shot, down 9-4. Showing patience at the plate, Gunnar Westergom, Kyle Cunningham and Alex Griffin drew walks to load the bases with nobody out. Seth Abeln then sent a deep fly to left to bring Westergom in before Matt Randall just got under one for a fly out to straight-away center for the second out. But Lewis picked Randall up, blasting a three-run homer over the wall in leftcenter to make it a 9-8 game. Baker followed with his third double of the night, this one to right-center, but a slow chopper to short and a slick pick-up of a throw in the dirt at first, ended things by an eyelash. They say if you cant beat them, scare them and we sure gave them a scare, Rewis said. Year in and year out, Sebring can play with anyone in the state. We saw tonight, and Tuesday, that we can play with these teams and in the second go round well have a better chance. Continued from 1C Sebring gives Lake Wales a scare HOUSEWORK DODGERS High Games Barbara Fletcher . . . . . .227 Kayleen Gray . . . . . . . .205 Barbara Beacham . . . . . .190 High Series Jeanne Roozeboom . . . . .569 Susie Kirkman . . . . . . .530 Jo Shook . . . . . . . . .495 HIGHLANDS WOMEN High Games Barbara Baiownik . . . . . .190 Donna Carlson . . . . . . .189 Sylvia Lewis . . . . . . . .180 High Series Donna Carlson . . . . . . .506 Barbara Gaiownik . . . . . .479 Lora Kelly . . . . . . . . .470 HIGHLANDS MEN High Games Joe Stacy . . . . . . . . .279 Mike Freese . . . . . . . .279 Frank Peterson . . . . . . .279 High Series Michael Lamere . . . . . .746 Mark Davis . . . . . . . .725 Mike Freese . . . . . . . .717 LIL CANES High Games Trenton Knapp . . . . . . .88 Daniel Lynch . . . . . . . .86 Michael Flowers . . . . . . .50 High Series Trenton Knapp . . . . . . .172 Daniel Lynch . . . . . . . .159 Michael Flowers . . . . . . .98K K e e g g e e l l B B o o w w l l i i n n g g C C e e n n t t e e r r L L e e a a g g u u e e S S c c o o r r e e s s along with Matt Roberts to cap the win for the Devils. Brown would go two-forthree on the night. The team is back in actio n Tuesday with a non-distri ct date at DeSoto. Continued from 1C AP at DeSoto Tuesday w ere trading those with the c rooked numbers that the D ragon bats were producing a nd their own defense was g iving up. Such a trade off just wasnt going to get it done and Lake Placid ended it early with the mercy-rule win. Now 6-1 overall on the regular season, the victory moves the Dragons to 4-1 in district play, with the only loss to front-running McKeel. The team hits the road this week, with a Monday contest at Sonrise Christian and Tuesdays match-up at Sebring. Continued from 1C LP moves season record to 6-1 m eans a mix of teams from a ll over the world to go with t he ALMS manufacturers b attle and yet another comp etition within a competit ion on the track. Rahal Letterman Racing r eturns to defend their GT M anufacturers C hampionship for BMWwith t wo revised BMWM3 GTs. T he M3s sport a new aero p ackage and bodywork as w ell as new livery. Last year was a good one f or the team, with a BMWon t he podium at every race. Defending GTdrivers c hampions, Joerg B ergmeister and Patrick L ong return in a new 2011 N o. 45 Flying Lizard Porsche 9 11 GT3 RSR. The sister #44 Porsche will b e piloted by Darren Law and t eam owner, Seth Neiman. Risi Competizione has b een one of the strongest teams in GTsports car racing over the past decade. This year they move from the Ferrari 430GTto the newest incarnation of the marque the Ferrari 458 Italia. The Sebring circuit is famous for jarring loose parts and this new version is not yet race-tested. Scott Sharps Extreme Speed Motorsports also will campaign a pair of Patron sponsored, Ferrari F458s. They have been doing extensive testing at Sebring and are looking to run a hard 12 Hours in their new wheels from Italy. The Krohn Racing team returns to the Sebring International Raceway this year with a new car, new number and competing under its own banner. The team has a the new Ferrari 430 GTand now runs on Dunlop Tires. They will run both in the ALMS and Intercontinetal Cup series and will continue in their trademark neon green livery. Last years GT2 debut for Team Corvette was miserable and marked the beginning of what proved to be a tough year for the factory representatives of Americas sports car. Team Corvette has been restructured for what they hope to be a banner year in 2011. The Falken Tires Porsche ran their first full ALMS season in 2010 showing promise and even leading at Sebring early on. This year they have reached an agreement with Derrick Walker and Walker Racing to conduct their race team operations for the season. When ALMS introduced the GTC class, the main idea was to provide a ladder for teams to move up into a GT program. Paul Miller racing will take this step from GTC to GTthis season, fielding a Porsche 911 GT3 RSR on Yokohoma Tires. The 2011 season portends to be a big one for Robertson Racing. Having two cars and a pro lineup in one car will cut development time and the Michelin Tires should really help to transform the car. Like Team Corvette, Paul Gentilozzis Rocket Sports Racing Jaguar RSRs had a very difficult 2010. Plagued with mechanical problems the team has revised the Jags for the new season and are looking to match some of the new competition on the track. This years 12 Hours marks the debut of the West Yokohama Racing Lamborghini Gallardo in the GTdivision. The LP560 GThas been prepared by German based Reiter Engineering the people behind the very successful FIAGT3 and FIAGT1 cars in Europe and Japan. Panoz Racing has entered a GTversion of its new street car, the Abruzzi. The new car will feature a a mid-engine design with a supercharged Chevroled LS 9 as the powerplant. The body is composed of a Recyclable Energy Absorbing Matrix System (REAMS) which is said to be lighter and stronger than carbon Fiber. The Intercntinental Cup also will bring a number of cars to Sebring, they will be designated as GTE AM for the purpose of the ILMC opener here/ The new Vantage GT2 team Gulf AMR Middle East will make their Aston Martin racing debut at Sebring. The new racer will be based around the road goin g V12 Vantage although th is will be heavily modified to compete in GT3 champ ionships around the world. Front runners at the LM S last season, the British-bas ed CRS Racing will campaig n yet another Ferrari F430G T in the ILMC. The French Larbre has h ad great success across man y categories of sports car ra cing including multiple wi ns at Le Mans. They ha ve acquired a Pratt & Mill er GT2 Corvette C6R for t he ILMC competition. Meanwhile, defendin g GT2 Le Mans winners Proto n Competition will run the fu ll ILMC schedule with the ir famous blue 911 GT3 RS R with Porsche stando ut Richard Lietz. Continued from 1C 12 Hours GT field looks as strong, competitive as ever

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 5C 130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, Florida863-385-3497Mon. Fri. 9am 4pm Closed WednesdaysHighlands Countys Oldest Established Hearing Aid OfceSet it and forget it.Wi Series works with Starkeys SurfLink Media streamer, our set-and-forget wireless transmitter.With SurfLink, theres no manual pairing involved. Once you plug it into your TV or stereo, youre done! It automatically streams sound directly to your hearing aids when your in range. You can transition from one device to another simply by moving from room to room. It lets other in the room listen to the TV or stereo at the volume they prefer.No matter where you are or what youre doing,Wi Series is designed to make listening easier. Its the ideal hearing aid for people who are active and on the go, enjoy spending relaxing time at home or both. SENIORSCENE E ditors note: This c olumn was intended t o be the second in a t hree-part series, but i nadvertently has now b ecome the final part o f the series as part t hree actually ran in F ebruary. So you have gone t he imaginative route o f creating your own j ob no matter what that may be. W ord of mouth or other techn iques have brought you payi ng customers or rewards for y our service or product. You a re now in business. That is a lmost the easiest part. What do you do now? What d o you do with the money you h ave earned? Spend it? Open a b ank account to replenish your o riginal outlay and sales? The hard part is, what comes n ext. How do you advance y ourself; solidify your posit ion? How do you follow the p ath of the straight and narrow i .e. the rules? And what are the r ules? Well, for example, do y ou collect sales tax for items y ou may be selling. What are t he zoning laws if you operate o ut of your house or the federa l tax benefits in deducting t hat space your business occup ies from your income tax. W hat are the requirements of f ederal, state or local governm ent? Where and how do you get t his information? Well, you s tart at the base level your o wn community. I went to the C lerk of the Courts, the Tax C ollectors Office, and A ARPs Web site for a list of g overnment pamphlets relating t o specific businesses. I went o n the Internet and was overw helmed with information. But s ave yourself time because we have a treasure here in Highlands County. South Florida Community College has a Small Business Development Center. David Noel is the director (davidnoel@usf.edu or 784-7378.) This is a free entrepreneurial counseling service. A certified business analyst aids you in deciding whether of not your particular project is feasible. They actually do a feasibility study on whether or not there is a market locally; what would be your cash flow; is it sufficient for you to make a living ... and at what level. They offer information on areas to research. They assist in a demographic study. Is there a niche area for your service or product? There are written pamphlets and handouts to review and study. Furthermore in the process of business counseling there is counseling on whether or not you have the personality, the drive to become an entrepreneur ... what is the reality of your situation without destroying your optimism. There is a two and one-half hour introductory course presented the last Wednesday of each month at the college. Call the above number to register. It is a good place to begin. Or you can set up a one-on-one counseling session. Either one is a good first step. These one-on-one sessions are free and there are as many sessions as necessary or needed. The cost? I cant begin to estimate it, but from my experience I can tell you that a consult with a professional career The pitfalls of creating your own job Pearls Pearls Pearl Carter See PART, page 6C By JIM HOCH Senior Scene specialHow do you tell the Abe Gold story? It is painful. It is remarkable. It is beyond imagination. It evokes every emotion we know. It must, however, be told. Abe, himself, has put it down in a book that took decades to move from memories he tried to suppress before the words appeared on pages. Abraham Gold is a survivor of the Nazi concentration camps in Poland and Austria, including Auschwitz. He was sent there in the summer of 1944 at age 18; and left in May 1945. Because he was Jewish, he was condemned to Hell on Earth. Not many in those Nazi Hell Camps left alive. This Tanglewood Good Guy made it out at World War IIs end. He was assigned number 19. This was sewn on his clothing. He had to wear a chain around his neck with this ID number on it. The treatment as a number was only the beginning. There is nothing about the time he spent there that he could ever forget. Some background: Abe and his identical twin brother, Martin, were the youngest boys to Jacob and Blanca Preisler. Because the parents could not produce a marriage certificate, the children had to take their mothers maiden name of Gold. The twins joined six other sons and two daughters. The family lived in a small town Strimba, Transylvania nestled in the Carpathian Mountains. The village was predominantly Romanian and Hungarian. Early years for Abe and Martin were difficult for reasons of poor economy and scarce jobs, very harsh winters, many mouths to feed at the family table, and progressively more oppression directed at Jews. The family moved when some prospect of a better job for the well-educated Jacob arose. One home was completely lost to a flash flood. All the children had to do their parts to help with the household. Abe and Martin had to wake every winter morning to gather firewood for the stoves, which provided warmth, and cooking utensil. The parents struggled mightily to provide for their brood. Abe recalls how very hard his mother had to work to keep things together with such limited resources. Despite these obvious difficulties, Abe has mostly fon d memories of his early chil dhood. Even devising alte rnate routes of going to, an d returning from scho ol (because increasingly, t he locals tormented the Jewi sh children) presented a kind of game for Abe and Martin. Beginning at age 14, t he twins went to an apprenti ce academy away from hom e, to acquire work skills. A be was in lithography trainin g. Martin chose cabinet ma king. The school was tough. It was more like a milita ry basic training camp. Almo st no free time. Before an d after classes there we re assigned duties. The bo ys were able to earn som e money by performing chor es for some of their wealthi er classmates. Newscasts in early 194 4, though; clearly suggest ed life for Jews in the regio n Dillon Thomas, pioneer cow hunter from LaBelle, lived a difficult life in the early days of Florida following the cattle. Thomas learned how to survive conquering whatever circumstances he and his family faced. Despite the Florida boom days of the early 1900s, Thomas and his family had to make their own way as his daddy could not find a job. This meant another move to Felda; however, the small farm community did not offer an easier life. Dillon Thomas explains that shortly after they moved to Felda, things got bad. Daddy had a mule and I had a pony. Then we moved again with a mule and wagon from Felda to Corkscrew. You never saw a dry spot during the rainy season in Corkscrew. At Corkscrew we raised corn, lots of sweet potatoes, and sugar cane. Daddy made syrup from the cane and ground the corn to feed the cattle. There was a one room school house where I went through fourth and fifth grades, says Thomas as he thinks about the past. Once a month, Mamma and us kids washed up to go in the Model-Tto the Piggly Wiggly. Daddy paid one cent a pound for a side of bacon and three cents a pound for flour, sugar and salt. At Corkscrew, when I was 12 years old, I started as a cow hunterdipping cattle and horses during the fever tick outbreak. The cows walked into a cement vat containing special chemicals then out the other side where the y were painted with a brush so Range Riders would not shoot them on open range; all painted cows had been dipped. Cows were cheap then; you could buy a cow for $5, Thomas sai d. There were three families living i n Corkscrew besides our family and a lot of Whiddens. Uncle Thomas aske d me to help out with marking and branding.We had to round up the cows on free range as there were no fence laws in those days. I had a half a day to help brand 500 cows. Everybodys cows all had their own brand. I had to watch the cowboys to see what calf belonged to what mamma. Agood cow man looked for the mamma to tell which was her cal f. The 1900s: Boom or Bust days Wild Florida Nancy Dale See THOMAS, page 6C Abe Gold: A good guy recalls a terrible time Gold See HARD, page 6C

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w as in danger. First, it was t he far-right movement, k nown as the Iron Cross ( Fascists), takeover of H ungary. Only a short while l ater, Abe began to see the G erman tanks rolling into t own. The school announced i t would close. Students were t old that they needed to r eturn to their homes. At home, Abe discovered t hat several of his siblings h ad already departed during h is time at school. Iron Cross p rohibited Jews from being o ut of their homes from 5 p .m. to 7 a.m. Then, the d readed knock on the door c ame. Jews must prepare to l eave immediately. You can t ake what you can carry in a k napsack. Do not ask where y ou will be going. You do not h ave the need to know! The infirm, the elderly, the m others with infants. They a ll had to walk to the train s tation several miles away. W alk with haste. Fall out of t he procession and you were l eft for Iron Cross to deal w ith. If you had any jewelry, o r things of value; they were t aken from you. Upon arriving at A uschwitz, disembarking f rom the train, Abe heard, Men to the left. Women to t he right. No time for goodb yes. Never to see his mother o r sisters again. The wailing, s creaming, crying children, f alling, crawling, the fear s eared into a young mans m emory forever more. Work, or the crematoriu m. The choice is yours, the S S officer told the men. We n eed machinists to come over h ere, said another officer. A be had no time to delibera te. Lithography involved u sing a machine. He stepped u p. Martin did not. In the blink of an eye, identical twins never to see each other again. Another frightening train ride for Abe. This stop was Bad Warmbrunn in Poland. Long hours. Hard work. Little comraderie. Slight food and drink. Constant supervision. Abe knew two brothers who attempted escape. They got away, but not for long. Two days later, they were hanged for all to see as example. Sickness not attended to. Work injuries ignored. Abuse from guards. Abe saw it all. Many simply died in their beds, and were left to remind the living of their alternatives. Abe came down with a widespread virus; and believed he would not make it. In a testament to his grit and gift, he was back on his feet in three days. He knew others not so fortunate. All the time a man had to think was filled with wonder. Wonder where are my siblings. My parents. My cousins. My friends. Such a heavy burden on your mind. Some days they would march us to various buildings or work stations. It was a fast march, often in dreadful winter conditions. Those that fell out? The gunshots told their destiny, he says. On May 2, 1945; Abe was moved again to Dornau, Austria. This camp had the reputation of being the death camp. Go there and meet death. One way or the other. One meager meal per day. Some believed death to be the better choice. Not Abraham Gold. In less than a week at Dornau came word the war was over. The morning of May 8 was met with open gates. The SS officers and guards were gone. Was it an ambush? Atrick? Abe was the first one to pass through those open gates that morning to see his first freedom in more than a year. I felt no joy or happiness. Only I thought of my family. Would they also be able to walk out of their confinement? It should be such a great feeling, but for me, only concern. My twin? Oh, Martin, please be safe and free. With nothing, and no one to guide him now, Abe relied on his own sheer will power to gather information, scrounge for meals, seek shelter, and maintain a scornful eye towards any officialdom. He had remained with four other young Polish men who walked out of Dornau with him; but each man had his own agenda to pursue. Eventually, he was able to catch a ride on a truck convoy carrying some Italian prisoners back across the Czech border, to Bratislava. In Bratislava, he found a train station and boarded a train for Budapest, Hungary. Exhausted, he fell asleep on the train ride. When he awoke, all his belongings had been stolen. AJewish Relief Agency in Budapest gave Abe some encouragement that some of his brothers were alive and back in his hometown. The agency also gave him some money to purchase a train ticket to Cluj, Romania. There they were. Four of his brothers had learned of his impending arrival, and they were at the train to greet him. But not Martin. Not Sulem. Abe felt his brothers knew more than they were telling, so he feared the worse for his remaining family. Abe set about searching for Martin. By July 1945, Abe knew he had to make a life of his own. AZionist organization was helping young men and women to obtain travel papers so they could go to Austria. Abe was ready. He went first to Vienna, then to Wels. In Wels, there were many displaced persons from Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary. Still trying to find information about Martin, Abe could not believe his eyes when before him appeared another brother, Sulem. Abe recalled that Sulem was the one of his elder brothers who most helped their parents keep the family together in those desperate times before Auschwitz. But, Sulem had no information regarding Martin. Abe stayed in Wels and was able to find work with the U.S. Army. He was in the motor pool, then in the post exchange store. By 1948, it became clear to Abe that he had to choose: 1. Stay in Wels doing insignificant work; 2. Follow some of his Jewish friends to Israel; or 3. Try to follow some others to the USA. Good fortune rode with Abe once more. He was able to catch a ship, leaving Bremen, Germany for the USA. During the transit they were told the ship would sail into Boston, and all persons must get off there. Abe wanted to go to New York because he knew he had an uncle in the city who may assist him in settling there. His determination got him to NYC. Abe had various jobs. In one noteworthy hitch as a tool and die maker, he was operating a punch press. The exact details of the accident escape Abe, but the accident left him with three crushed fingers. In the hospital they had to remove parts of each of those fingers. He got a draft notice. Abe did a short stint in the U.S. Army. Then, by spring 1951, he landed a decent job in printing. In April that year, at a dance at the 92nd Street YMCA, Abe and his buddies spotted three good-looking young ladies. Abe said, I went right over to the prettiest of those girls, and asked her to dance. Four months later Abe and Sylvia were married. In the next 15 years that followed, Abe bought his own print shop; Abe and Sylvia had three daughters and a son. They were able to buy a nice home Orangeburg, N.Y. He sponsored and assisted three of his brothers to resettle in the NYC area. Of the surviving brothers, only Sulem was not now in the States. He had immigrated to Israel. Abe sold his business, and retired to the Poconos in 1987. He could not ta ke being idle so much. H e thought, I was saved fro m the most inhuman treatmen ts man can inflict upon oth er men. I am so very fortuna te to be alive, to have Sylv ia and this wonderful famil y, and my life in the USA. I c an give back now. And, he di d. He began volunteering wi th an ambulance service in t he Poconos. He took the EM T exam, and passed it. H e sometimes drove the amb ulances. I wanted to help sa ve lives, he said. In 1998, Abe and Sylv ia moved to West Palm Beac h. In a short while he began to volunteer at the Veteran s Administration Hospit al there until they moved to Tanglewood in 2005. At age 85 Abe still wan ts to give back. What pleas es him most these days is accepting invitations to spe ak at elementary and midd le schools; to tell his story to children; to answer the ir questions; and (for sure) to read and re-read all the lette rs he gets from those kids aft er his visits to their schools. G o by his home, and he w ill gladly show you that bask et with every one of those ch ildrens letters to him. As mentioned earlier, A be has written his autobiogr aphy. It was not an easy tas k. The words brought back su ch terrible memories. His fami ly knew he had to get this do ne while he still had the tim e and good health. Page 6CNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com FRIDAYMarch 25thLake Placid Community Church 735 S. Sun N Lakes Blvd.TUESDAYMarch 29thLakeshore Mall Meeting Room SENIORSCENE c ounselor is upwards of $150 p er hour. This service is worth t housands of dollars. I call using this service opera ting from a position of s trength. You can evaluate if y ou have enough money to live o n while you are planning and s tarting your operation. What i s your infrastructure? This can b e as simple as a good file syst em or as complicated as a c omputer system. Do you have a team ... your wife, children, p artner? Do you need to incorp orate or operate as a DBA... D oing Business As? Is there an a ssociation for your type of b usiness? And what about f inancing? Do you borrow on y our credit card; get a bank l oan; borrow from relatives? All these questions are addressed. You are not on your own. You will be assisted all the way to a successful conclusion. As an adjunct to the training, it is a good idea to work in the area in which you wish to go into business. For example, if you want to start a nursery, go work in one. Do you really like it; have an aptitude for it? Does this sound daunting? It isnt meant to be, just precautionary My son Stephen used to say that planning your work and committing to it was 10 percent inspiration and 90 percent perspiration. Get busy on this. Go to work. Continued from page 5C Pearl Carter is writer, poet and a Lake Placid resident. E-mail her at timely87@comcast.net. Part 2 of using a consultant D ont ask me how I knew t hat, I cant answer. I had to hand the cowb oys the right branding iron f or each cow. Ranching is m ore than a business, a cowb oy gets to love the land and i ts still there with me. I w orked all my life up until f our years ago and now I am 9 1 years old, says Thomas, w ho is lean and fit, wearing w ell the traditional cowboy p laid shirt, jeans, big belt b uckle and Stetson hat. In the 1940s when fence l aws were passed, men with m oney started buying up a l ot of land for cattle ranchi ng. You couldnt give away t he land. One big cattle owner offered to buy cattle at $30 a head, which put the small guy in South Florida out of business. The railroad also bought up everything. There were a lot of hard feelings then and also a lot of cattle rustling, recalls Thomas. These are the life and times of the early pioneers who settled old Florida, to be continued. Excerpts from new book available this spring, The Legacy of the Florida Pioneer Cow Hunters In Their Own Words by Nancy Dale. To order other books on cow hunters, visit www.nancydalephd.com or call 214-8351. Continued from page 5C Thomas recalls Boom or Bust days Hard times recalled by Tanglewood Good Guy Continued on page 5C Seems like old Mother Nature has imbued most of us human beings with a gambling spirit. We see it daily on the roads. People making right turns from the left traffic lane, tailgating and a dozen other things that if someone didnt give in, they would become another traffic statistic. Thats not the kind of gambling I wish to write about. Today, I want to dwell on the entertainment aspect of the sport. Say what you will, gambling can be most entertaining (if you are winning) or downright frustrating if you are losing. I am not into the big-time sport (Poker, Black Jack, Faro and the like). My liking is the unbeatable slot machines. Yes, I know some people come away from the casinos loaded with winnings. They are the folks who know when to quit. However, they will be back in a day or two to try their luck again and the odds will get them. The casinos in Vegas post signs in the area that they guarantee an 85 percent return on the machines in their halls. That gives them a 15 percent profit on every buck you stick into the slot. With the thousands of bucks thrown into the machine each hour the place is open, they can afford the occasional jackpot of thousands of dollars. The owners of casinos love to see people like me come into their places. We play penny and nickel slots and fill up the place. However, we do give the visitors the feeling that they are not alone in their search for entertainment and possibly if Lady Luck is with them tonight, they will strike it rich. When we drive to Okeechobee to t he Flamingo, Three Sevens or Stephanie s, it is strictly for entertainment. I enjo y the drive there and back. Eagles, allig ators, bobcats, cougars and raccoon s, they are all there and just waiting to entertain you. Then when you get to t he casino, there is a hundred differe nt kinds of slots for you to play. Playin g the penny machines, if you dont go ho g wild and get hungry to win, you c an play for four hours on $20. For the $25 or $30 you throw away at the slots, you may win a few bucks to turn into a Walmart, Golden Corral or Visa gift card; they dont pay off in cash, Florida law. You would pay th at much or more to have a meal in a goo d restaurant and see a movie afterward. If you are wondering how this artic le fits into the Senior Scene section of t he paper, all you have to do is go down to A look at the entertainment of gambling Woodys Wisdom Woody Jackson

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T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sunon any c hanges in this listing by calling 3 85-6155, ext. 516; send any c hanges by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail t hem to News-SunCommunity C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 L ake Placid has lounge hours f rom 1-9 p.m. Live music is f rom 5-8 p.m. For details, call 4 65-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p .m. Members and guests only. P ost is at 528 N. Pine St., S ebring. Call 471-1448. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2 661 lounge is open from 1-7 p .m. Card games start at 1:30 p .m. The lodge is open to m embers and their guests. For d etails, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has k araoke in the pavilion. H orseshoes played at 9:30 a .m. Food available at 4 p.m. O pen to members and qualified g uests only. Overeaters Anonymous, m eets from 4-5 p.m. in second f loor conference roomNo. 3 at F lorida Hospital Heartland M edical Center, 4200 Sun N L ake Blvd., Sebring. For d etails, call 382-7731. No dues, f ees or weigh-ins. Go to w ww.oa.org. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves lunch at 2 p.m. at the c lub, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. F or details, call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 o ffers NASCAR racing in the p avilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open a nd kitchen open from 2-5 p.m. L odge is at 11675 U.S. 98, S ebring. For details, call 6553 920. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 3880 serves hamburgers f rom 4-5:30 p.m. and plays p oker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1 224 County Road 621 East, L ake Placid. For details, call 6 99-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 Karaoke is from 5-8 p .m. at the post, 2011 SE L akeview Drive, Sebring. For d etails, call 385-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN W ITH ME family group meets a t 10:30 a.m. every Monday at t he Heartland Christian Church o n Alt. 27 in Sebring. The c hurch is behind Southgate S hopping Center where Publix i s. Call 385-5714. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal C hurch, Lakeshore Drive, S ebring. For more details, call 3 85-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous O ne Day At ATime group m eets for a closed discussion a t 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant P resbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. For d etails, call 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 6:30 p.m. at R osewood Center, 517 U.S. 27 S outh, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at S t. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. F or details, call 202-0647.. American Legion Post 74 S ons of Legion meet at 6 p.m. E xecutive board meets at 7 p .m. on second Monday at the p ost, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. H appy hour from 4-6 p.m. Post o pen noon-8 p.m. Call 4711 448. AmVets Post 21 meets 6 p .m. second Monday, at the p ost, 2029 U.S. 27 South, S ebring. All members welcome. AmVets Post 21 plays darts a t 7:30 p.m. for members and g uests. For details, call 3850 234. Avon Park Lakes A ssociation has shuffleboard a t 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. T he clubhouse is at 2714 N autilus Drive in Avon Park. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake P lacid. Bridge Club of Sebring ( American Contract Bridge C lub)plays duplicate games at 1 2:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf A ve., Sebring. For details, call 3 85-8118. Diabetes Insulin Pump S upport Group meets the second Monday from 3-4:30 p.m. in the Florida Hospital Heartland Division Diabetes Center, 4023 Sun N Lake. Call 402-0177 for more information. Diabetes Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday from 1-2:30 p.m. in Florida Hospital Conference Room 3 in Sebring. Call 4020177 for guest speaker list. Fairmount Mobile Estates Lunch Bunch meets at noon second Monday at Homers Smorgasbord in Sebring. For details, call 382-0481. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The Agri-Center. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets the second and fourth Monday at the Sebring Country Estates Civic Association clubhouse, 3240 Grand Prix Drive (down the street from Wal-Mart). Dancing will be held every month until April 2008. Classes are being started now in the Sebring and Lake Placid area. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or visit the Web site at www.samdun.net.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 3148877. Heartland Riders Association meets at 6 p.m. second Monday at the Sebring Chamber of Commerce Welcome Center in Village Plaza (across from Sebring Gate Station). For details, call 402-1165. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Homeowners Association meets the second Monday of each month at 9 a.m. at the Sebring Country Estates Clubhouse at 3240 Grand Prix Drive in Sebring. Highlands County Parkinsons Support Group meets at 10 a.m. second Monday at First Baptist Church in Downtown Sebring. For details, call 453-6589. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County Agri-Civic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. For details, call 4026540. Highlands Sertoma Club meets at noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. Highlands County Senior Squadron, Civil Air Patrol the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary meets the second and fourth Monday nights at the Sebring Airport Terminal Building. All are welcome. For further information, call 471-1433 between 4 and 7 p.m. Highlands Woodcarvers Club meets at 6 p.m. second Monday at Highlands Art League, 351 W. Center Ave., Sebring. For more details, call Sandy Kohan at 414-1363 or Norm Pelland at 465-5510. Insulin Pump Support Group meets from 3-4:30 p.m. the second Monday of every month in conference Room 3 of Florida Hospital. This group is open to all insulin pump wearers, their families and anyone who is interested in knowing more about insulin pumps. Preregistration is not required. For information, call 402-0177. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. For details, call 4652661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Cards start at 4 p.m. Music outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. Call 452-0579. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 12-4:30 p.m. second and fourth Monday in Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. No meetings from end of May to October. Call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Bradys, Sebring. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Mondays. For details or info on lessons, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. Smoke-free environment. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. For information, call 471-2522. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 plays Texas Hold em at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Monday at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing. For details, call 655-3920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. For details, call Judy OBoyle at 260-0831. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Womans Club of Sebring meets at noon on the second Monday for lunch, from October throughMay, at the clubhouse, 4260 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-7268. TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parking available south of old church. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For details, call 4657940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. For details, call 452-2385. Avon Park Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Avon Park Lions Club meets 6:45 p.m., in the Lions Club, 1218 W. Bell St. Brown Bag Book Bunch book readers group meets at noon on the third Tuesday of the month at Emmanuel United Church of Christ, 3115 Hope St., Sebring. Read the selected book, bring your bag lunch, and join in the lively and interesting discussions. For information on each months book, call 471-1999. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. Everyone is welcome. For more details, call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at The Rock, Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost selfesteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. For details, contact Celebrate Recovery coordinator Pam Sim by calling 453-3345, ext. 106. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For more details, call 385-3288. Friends of Highlands Hammock meets at 6:30 p.m. third Tuesday, Highlands Hammock State Park, Sebring. For more details, call 386-6099. Heartland Avian Society meets every fourth Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., at Huntington National Bank, 126 Center Ave., Sebring. For more details, call 465-9358. Heartland Dolittle Miniature Build meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday, St. Johns Methodist Church social hall, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring. For details, call 3823553. Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 4712294 or 386-5098. Heartland Symphony Orchestra rehearsals from 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesdays in the Green Room in the South Florida Community College auditorium building. Bring music and instruments. New members welcome. Call conductor Bryan Johnson at 800949-7248, ext. 7231. Highlands County Community Orchestra rehearses each Tuesday in the Green Room of the South Florida Community College Performing Arts Theater, 5:307:30 p.m. Entrance is at the rear of the building. String players especially needed. Strings call Eugene Longo at 6991975; winds call Kim Houser at 453-6049 for more information. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets on the first and third Tuesday of each month at the Women's Club of Sebring, 4260 Lakeview Drive, across from Veterans' Beach, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For information, call 471-0694 or e-mailsbringquilter@embarqmail.com Highlands Tea Party has an educational and informational meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Quality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27 in Sebring. Call 699-0743. Highlands County Veterans Council meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday in the conference room at the Veterans Services Office. The meeting is for the appointed delegate from each veteran organization in the county to meet to discuss current issues regarding veterans and veterans activities. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Call 382-0312. Lake HavenHomeowners Association meets the third Tuesday of the month, 5400 N. Lake Huckleberry Drive, Sebring. Covered dish dinner is at 6:30 p.m. and meeting is at 7:30 p.m. For more details, call 382-4858. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Jaycees meet 7:30 p.m., first and third Tuesdays, Jaxsons. Board meetings at 6:30 p.m., second Tuesday. For details, call Joe Collins, 655-5545. Lake Placid Moose has an officers meeting at 7:30 p.m. the third Tuesday at the lodge. Lake Placid Toastmasters meet the first and third Tuesday at 6 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 101 S. Oak Ave. in Lake Placid. The web address is www.toastmasters.org. For information call Cathy Schreima at 382-3574 or Linda Udall at 386-6495. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Masonic Lodge meets 8 p.m., 106 N. Main St., Lake Placid. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventhday Adventist Church, 1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup.co m. For details, call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org for more info rmation on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday and has blood pressure screening from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. first and third Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. For details, call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near the library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-3829 or 471-9900. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If inte rested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sig n in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:3 0 p.m. No experience necessary Cost is $2. Smoke-free enviro nment. Call 471-3557. Sebring Lions Club meets at noon at Dots Restaurant, 950 Sebring Square. For infor mation call 382-2333. Sebring Lodge 249 F&AM meets 7:30 p.m., 1809 Home Ave., Sebring. Sebring Meals on Wheels Inc. hosts board of directors meeting at 1:30 p.m. the third Tuesday each month at the Sebring Hills Association Clubhouse, 200 Lark Ave., Sebring. For details, call Jim Smith at 382-8453. Sebring Moose Lodge 225 9 serves soft shell tacos 5-7 p.m at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Be ef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing.Euchre is played at 6:3 0 p.m. For details, call 655-3920 Sebring Model Railroad Club meets at 7:30 p.m. third Tuesday each month at the Sebring Parkway Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway Members build and run HO Guage model railroads. All rai l buffs are welcomed. For confir mation call Keith Williams at 385-1332. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dees Restaurant, Sebring. For details, call Scott Albritton at 402-1819. Souper Book Group meets the third Tuesday of each month at noon at Emmanuel United Church of Christ to discuss the monthly book selection and enjoy a soup, salad and dessert lunch All book lovers are welcome. The church is at 3115 Hope S t., Sebring (1.8 miles west from corner of Highway 27 and Hammock Rd.) For information about the book of the month and reservations, call the church office 471-1999 or 452-2697. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 67 p.m. at the Atonement Luthera n Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Community Bible Church, 1400 CR-17AN ., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. For details, call 452-1093 U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliar y meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday, Sebring Jaycees building. Cal l 471-0393 or 385-2459. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. House Committee meets at 5:30 p.m For more details, call 699-544 4. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 7C Newborns Children AdolescentsOFFICE HOURS: Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., F.A.A.P. Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., F.A.A.P. Anoop Palta, M.D., F.A.A.P. Maria B. Asis, M.D., F.A.A.P Maria C. Perez, M.D. David Kleczek, P.A.-C. Amy Grimes, P.A.-C. Megan Neff, ARNP Mercy L. Seralde, M.D., F.A.A.P.Avon Park Pediatrics,P.A. & Sebring Pediatrics,LLCWe accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid SEBRING382-0770AVON PARK453-7337 Specializing in the treatment of Allergies Asthma Attention Deficit Disorder Immunizations Check-ups Obesity Counseling SEBRING: MON. FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PMSATURDAY 8:30AM 12:00 NOON SEBRING ONLYAVON PARK: MON. & WED. 8:30AM 7:00PM TUES., THURS., & FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PM LAKE PLACID699-1414 COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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Page 8CNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. EXPIRES 3/19/11PLUS TAX, TAG, & STATE FEES. www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644 LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NO DEALER FEES Since 1931 #X0150 2008 DODGE AVENGER RT#CX107A1 #X0147 2007 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE#CX147A #TY032A 2008 JEEP COMPASS #CX130A 2007 DODGE RAM 3500 MEGACAB DIESEL#TY041B #TX126A 2004 CHRYLER TOWN & COUNTRY#CY023A 2003 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT2003 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LXI 2005 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT #CX1184 $ 32888 $ 115552006 CHRYSLER 300C $ 16999 $ 17888 $ 17888 $ 15888 $ 11999 $ 168882009 CHRYSLER PTCRUISER2008 TOYOTATUNDRA $ 25888ONE OWNER $ 12888 $ 13488 $ 9888#JY004B #X0161 CERTIFIED CERTIFIED ONE OWNER LOW MILES CREAM PUFF CERTIFIED LEATHER LOADED NICE ONE OWNER CERTIFIED HEMI SWEET 2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE Courtesy photo What is the effect of music on plants? Does the bowl matter? Organic or inorganic? These are just a few of the questions investigated by Woodlawn Elementary Schools fifth-graders. These budding scientists participated in the schools annual fifth grade HAART Science Fair. During a sixto eight-week period, the fifth-graders in Tim Bowers (right) class tested different hypotheses using the scientific method, and shared their findings with creative display boards detailing procedures, variables and materials used and data collected. Background papers summarized current scientific information related to the experiment's topic in their science journals. Several parents, special guests, and Superintendent of the Highlands County School Board Wally Cox visited with participants on March 4 during the science fairs open house. Bowers and Cox are shown with a couple of fifth-grade students. Schools get important visitors Courtesy photo Members of the Student Council at Woodlawn Elementary School appreciated Sebring Mayor George Hensley coming to discuss the responsibilities of the mayor and for teaching them about our local government. T hey enjoyed how he explained the aspects of government in an exciting and simple way. They all agreed that they learned more about how the city government helps the commmunity. As they grow up in Sebring, they can work to make it a better place to live f or everyone. They would like to wish him the best of luck with his election to another term as mayor. Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun

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LIVING D SECTION News-Sun Sunday, March 13, 2011 Alook at other things associated with the color green: Love: Green was a symbol of budding love in the Middle Ages. The Romans associated green with Venus, goddess of love. Symbol of poison:Green dye used to be produced with copper and toxic arsenic. Napoleon Bonapartes favorite color: His home on St. Helena had green wallpaper, paint and furniture. He was poisoned by arsenic fumes from the green dye. Islam: The prophet Mohammed loved green and it became the holy color of Islam. Fertility: Osiris was a god in ancient Egypt; he was regarded as a source of Earths fertility. Also called The Great Green. Catholic worship:In 1570 Pope Pius Vdeclared white, red, purple and green the colors of liturgy; green symbolized hope. 1.St. Patrick was born: A.AFrenchmanB.ABritonC.An Irishman2.Patrick was brought to Ireland as: A.Atourist on a Viking Lines cruiseB.Aslave of the BritonsC.Aslave of the Irish3.Patrick had a dream in which he was instructed on escaping Ireland in a boat exporting: A.Potatoes B.Cattle C.Wolfhounds4.Ireland was the only country in Western Europe whose conversion to Catholicism produced no: A.Female saints B.Legends C.Martyrs5.The first bishop of Ireland was: A.CharlemagneB.PalladiusC.Duns Scotus6.Besides the legend of banishing snakes in Ireland, Patrick is also said to have: A. Moved the rock of Cashel B.Raised the deadC.Altered the course of Viking ships7.Which town has the most evidence to claim Patrick as its own: A. Tara B.Sligo C.Armagh8.St. Patricks Day was first celebrated outside the confines of the church in this city: A.Savannah, Ga. B.Boston C.New York 9.What pilgrimage site in Donegal, Ireland, famous in the Middle Ages, may have inspired Dante in writing The Divine Comedy? A.St. Patricks Purgatory B.St. Patricks Valley of the Lost C.Croaghpatrick 10.Patrick and Brigid are two of the three great saints of ancient Ireland. The other is: A.Michael B.Athelrod C.Columcille11.Who was the most famous dean of St. Patricks Cathedral in Dublin? A. Rev. Ian Paisley B.Jonathan Swift C.Richard Brinsley Sheridan12.The conflicting dates of Patricks years in Ireland, and the places where he supposedly lived, has prompted this theory: A. There were two PatricksB.Patrick is a mythC.There were dozens of Patricks13.Irish is the _____ most frequently reported ancestry in the United States census. A.FirstB.SecondC.Fifth14.Which is a traditional St. Patricks Day dish? A.Collard greens and riceB.Corned beef and cabbageC.Rack of lamb and asparagus15.The worlds first St. Patricks Day parade was held in 1762 in what city? President Truman attended the parade in 1948. A.ChicagoB.BostonC.New York City16.The U.S. Congress proclaimed March as Irish-American Heritage Month in what year? A. 1995B.1909C.190317.St. Patricks Day became a holiday in Ireland in: A.1848 B.1798C.1903BonusQuestion1:Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland. Match the description with these other great Irishmen: A.Michael Collins_____ 1.The uncrowned king of IrelandB.Eamon de Valera _____ 2.The man who was Ireland C.Charles Stewart Parnell _____ 3.The man who made Ireland D.Brian Boru_____ 4.The king of Ireland Richard Atkinson/McClatchy Newspapers and MCT ILLUSTRATIONS BYCHRIS WARE/MCTHeres the story behind some Irish icons and St. Patrick:SHAMROCK: Shamrock comes from the Irish seamrog or little clover and refers to the wildflower. The small, three-leafed herb appears on the United Kingdoms coat of arms with the English rose and Scottish thistle. The shamrocks found in U.S. flower shops are often imposters.IRISH FLAG:Green stands for Catholics, orange for Protestants and white for a wish for harmony.LEPRECHAUNS: Fairies who work day and night mending shoes of other fairies.SHILLELAGH (shi-lay-lee): Awalking stick. The word is Irish for stout oak club or cudgel. Its also the name of a forest that once stood in County Wicklow.PATRICK SAINT AND LEGEND: 387: Born in Britain to a Roman family. His original name was Maewyn. Early 400s: He was taken to Ireland as a slave; after six years, he escaped to France where he studied for priesthood. 432: He was sent back to Ireland as a Christian missionary by Pope Celestine I, who named him Patricius, which means noble in Latin. He introduced the Roman alphabet, Latin literature and Christianized the land. Familiar legend: He drove the snakes from Ireland by beating a drum.Bonus Question2:Four places in the United States are named Shamrock, the floral emblem of Ireland. Which of the following is not one of them: A.Mount GayShamrock, W.Va. B.Shamrock, TexasC. Shamrock River, Ind.SOURCE: WIE FARBEN WIRKEN, BYEVAHELLER; SHAMROCKS, HARPS AND SHILLELAGHS, BY EDNABARTH; ALLABOUT AMERICAN HOLIDAYS, WORLD BOOK

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Page 2DNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU PG13(Matt Damon,Emily Blunt)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30RANGO PG(Animated Voices by Johnny Depp,Abigail Breslin)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30TAKE ME HOME TONIGHTR(Topher Grace,Anna Faris)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15HALL PASSR(Owen Wilson)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15GNOMEO & JULIET 2DG(Animated)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15THE KINGS SPEECHR(Geoffrey Rush,Colin Firth)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30 The NewFAIRMOUNTCINEMA63750 US 27 N. Sebring NOW SHOWINGFriday 03/11 Thursday 03/17 Suick CinemasInformation 385-9980 Office 385-9908New Dolby Digital SoundAll Seats $6.00for Matinee COMING SOONWe will be featuring: Mar 18 THE LINCOLN LAWYER DIVERSIONS ISBEFOREESBy JACK MCINTURFF ACROSS 1 Like good jokes 7 Night music 11 Focus at a boxers school? 20 Brought out 21 Got off 22 Source of a vital supply 23 Meek Jolly Roger crewmen? 25 Rear-ends, say 26 Theater aisles, usually 27 NASAs Go 28 Some reality show winners 30 Flowery welcomes 31 R.E.M. hit, with The 33 Games People Play author Eric 34 Hang behind 36 One-million link 37 Old strings 38 Sporty Italian wheels 42 Polish protector? 45 Spent the cold season (in) 46 Pro foe 48 How some soccer games end 49 N.J. neighbor 50 Selection word 51 Red-costumed actor in Veggie Tales? 53 Moses sent him into Canaan to spy 55 Misses some of the lecture, perhaps 56 Swedish city connected by a bridge to Copenhagen 57 Root vegetable 59 Take really short catnaps during a Henny Youngman routine? 69 Failed flier 70 Culture: Pref. 71 Collar victim 75 Spin-off starring Valerie Harper 76 Tiny nestlings cry? 81 Sets straight 83 Mil. spud duties 84 Paddled boats 85 Raw rocks 86 Mineral involved in much litigation 88 Ownership dispute? 90 Casey at the Bat autobiographer 91 Barrage 92 To Kill a Mockingbird Pulitzer winner 93 Boston transit syst. 94 Londonderrys river 95 R rating cause 100 Mideastern pastry dough 103 Kurdish relative 104 Confectionery collectible 105 Hair cover 106 Cry of anticipation 109 Meryl as a coquette? 112 Check before cutting 113 Stadium stratum 114 Oriole Park at __ Yards 115 Words before an important announcement 116 1974 CIA spoof 117 Hotel meetings, perhaps DOWN 1 Its not an original 2 Water source 3 Crooner Mel 4 Giraffe relative 5 Leaves alone 6 Pres. during Brown v. Board of Education 7 Chevy SUV 8 Supermodel Wek 9 Dessert choice 10 French isl. south of Newfoundland 11 Bean and Welles 12 Ball girl 13 Those, in Tenerife 14 Obama, e.g.: Abbr. 15 Form letters? 16 Drug money? 17 Zip 18 Credit card name under a red arc 19 Cupids counterpart 24 Tropical grassland 29 Stowe novel subtitled A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp 32 NBC newsman Roger 33 One way to get to Paris 34 Novelist Deighton 35 Prado pictures 37 Old strings 38 Boston department store founder 39 River of Tuscany 40 Nevada senator 41 Time to beware 42 Stone marker 43 Request to a dealer 44 Coming-out party? 45 Like Tom Jones, by birth 46 SDI weapons 47 Oscar winner Patricia 49 Missile with a feathery flight 52 Benedict XVI, e.g. 53 Half a dance 54 Pen name 57 Proverbial sword beater 58 Occurring before: Abbr. 60 Block 61 s Israeli prime minister 62 Some Vette coverings 63 Unites 64 Jazz __ 65 Dramatist Fugard 66 Dear, in Dijon 67 You can get down on one 68 Illegal payments 71 Class-conscious gps.? 72 Formerly, formerly 73 Bumpkin 74 Fund for hammer parts? 76 Circle of Friends author Binchy 77 __-European languages 78 Corn holder 79 Accomplish 80 Bone: Pref. 82 Certain NCO 84 Orchestra members 87 It may be taken in a parlor 88 Popular shift 89 Early communications satellite 91 Put into groups 94 Elizabethan expo 95 Turns 96 Ones against us 97 Wikipedia policy 98 Math subgroup 99 Blissful settings 100 Douglas and others 101 Gangsta rap pioneer 102 Tibetan priest 103 Satyrs kin 104 Hunted 107 Make lace 108 Northwestern sch. where Cougar Gold cheese is made 110 Inside info 111 Pie chart fig. Solution on page 8D Special to the News-SunAires (March 21-April 20) Aries, instead of looking toward the horizon, it's better if you look right in front of you for a change. Otherwise you may miss important things. Taurus (April 21-May 21) In times of trouble this week, turn to a close friend who is bound to offer the assistance you need, Taurus. The stars indicate a potential disturbance on Tuesday. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini, you may want to change plans to invest money in a certain endeavor. Now is the time for saving and not spending. Buckle down at work for the time being. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Take a different tact regarding an important matter, Cancer. Things have not worked out so far, but that doesnt mean that things cant turn around quickly. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, the time has come to put matters of the heart before matters of the head. Reconnect with a romantic partner and share one-on-one time together this week. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo, someone from your past comes back into the picture this week. Take this opportunity to reminisce and catch up with this long lost old friend. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Libra, a missed opportunity may not be recovered. Thats why it pays to act right away if you feel like the time is right for a change. Get yo ur financial ducks in a row fir st. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 2 2) Scorpio, its not like you to act spontaneously, but tha ts just what you will do th is week. Sometimes it can fe el liberating to act on the spot Sagittarius (Nov. 23-De c. 21) Big changes are in sto re for you, Sagittarius, but yo u wont realize what they a re until they are right upon yo u. The latter part of the we ek can be downright hectic. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Ja n. 20) Capricorn, now th at you have settled into a sche dule, you can take on a fe w other responsibilities. But be careful not to bite off mo re than you can chew. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Fe b. 18) Aquarius, take a de ep breath and a step back to avoid lashing out at tho se around you. Acalming tim e is on the horizon, and its ju st what you need. Pisces (Feb. 19-Marc h 20) Pisces, there are fe w chances to get the things yo u need done, so act while yo u are feeling motivated th is week. Famous birthdaysMarch 13 Emile Hirsc h, actor, 26; March 14 Kirb y Puckett, athlete, 50; Mar ch 15 Eva Longoria, actres s; 36; March 16 Erik Estrad a, actor, 62; March 17 M ia Hamm, athlete, 39. Taurus should turn to a close friend this week Asick house presents m any inconveniences, which o ur family knows first hand t hrough our first house. I loved being at home and k eeping our house clean and b righta haven for my husb and and sons. So, when Ken c ame home after work and t old me again that he only f elt sick when he stepped f oot into the house; I threw u p my hands in frustration a nd despair. We tried powerful vacuum c leaners; new cleaning and l aundry products; no pets of a ny kind; airing the house o ut. But, the problem persiste d. Then one cold evening, a fter building a fire in our w oodstove using moldy w ood, Kens asthma gripped h im as never before. The rest of the evening w as a nightmare of rushing h im back and forth to the h ospital. Then the staff there h elped us unravel the myst ery by remembering what w ed been doing earlier that e vening. Shortly thereafter o ur doctor ordered him to move out of the house realizing it had been mold all along creating a life or death situation for him. This next inconvenience had us reeling. How could we afford for him to live somewhere else until our house sold?My spirits were low; my worries high; and, my questions many. But, by the grace of God, a friend offered Ken an apartment until the spring. It was November, so we once again had some hopethough we loathed living apart. However, thats when we began to seek God in a new way and embrace the adventure. Id pack up the kids, bring food and camp out with Daddy on weekends. I heard a Scripture in Isaiah 61: 1a & 2b, NKJV, which says, The Spirit of the Lord God is upon Me, because the Lord has sent Me to heal the brokenheartedTo give them beauty for ashesthe garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness. Those words propelled me to see that God would bring beauty out of the ashes of the toxic smoke and its aftermath. G.K Chesterton has said, An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered; an adventure is an inconvenience rightly considered. Rightly considered, the inconveniences of this problem caused us to grab hold of Gods purposes. We journeyed with him through the adventure, eventually coming to Florida. The closing thoughts of the Isaiah passage cap off His purposes in adventures cleverly hidden as inconveniences:That they may be called trees of righteousness, the planting of the Lord, that He may be glorified.Selah Adventure hides in inconveniences DearAbby: Im the mother of a U .S. Navy sailor who has been the r ecipient of random acts of kindn ess from complete strangers. I w as most affected personally when a woman stopped us in a large p arking garage in Chicago to say, Thank you for your service, y oung man. And there was a s tranger who paid for my sons m eal in an airport when he had a l ayover on his way home for C hristmas. Another time, we were i n a line to see a movie and the a ttendant waved us to the front of t he line and everyone smiled a bout it. Whenever my son goes anyw here in uniform, hes stopped by p eople who just want to say thank y ou. Im amazed and thrilled. Part of t he reason I am so touched is I was a teenager living in San Diego during the Vietnam era. At that time, young people in the military were cursed and reviled. It was a shameful time in our history when people serving their country could not be proud of their service. Today, I am proud of my son, and he is able to be proud of himself and his decision to enlist in the Navy. So, thank you to all you folks who show your gratitude to our service members by the little things you do. You not only touch that person, but their extended family as well. Proud Mom in Overland Park, Kan. DearProud Mom: Im pleased to pass along your sentiments and honored you chose me to be the messenger. All of us owe our thanks and support to those brave young men and women who have dedicated themselves and who risk their lives in service to our country. Not only should we thank them when we see them, but we should also pray for their safe return. DearAbby: I work in a large department store attached to a shopping mall. Because many of the stores have no restrooms, customers come into our store to use the facilities. Im happy they do because it gives us more business. However, Im confused by some of the patrons. I think it shows good manners to end a cell phone call when visiting a restroom. While I was in there today, a woman entered the stall next to me and continued talking on her phone the entire time she was in there! Its disgusting, but it happens all the time. Im uncomfortable using the restroom while someone is on the phone, and Id be very offended if I was on the other end of the line. Whats proper etiquette regarding cell phones in public restrooms? Is there anything I could say to someone who does this? Trying to Do My Business DearTrying: Your complaint is one Im hearing increasingly often. For your safety, I do not advise correcting the manners of a stranger. While common sense and consideration for others (including the person on the other end of the line as well as the occupant of the next stall) would dictate conversation be put on hold while on the toilet, nothing you or I can do will prevent this invasion of personal privacy short of bringing a loud whoopee cushion with you during breaks and squeezing it in selfdefense. P.S. If you think we have it bad in the ladiesroom, I have also heard about men talking on their cell phones while standing at the urinals. Heaven help us. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Good advice for everyone teens to seniors is in The Anger in All of Us and How to Deal With It. To order, send a business-size, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds only) to: Dear Abby Anger Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included in the price.) Sailors mom is touched by publics radom act of kindness toward son Dear Abby AVON PARK 452-5800 SEBRING 382-3363 LAKE PLACID 465-1530We Could Have Saved This One! 3 ROOMS AND HALLA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 03/31/11.$9900 Pause And Consider Jan Merop

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 3D Adam Gertlers Use Up the Box Pantry TipsPunchy Potatoes: Add a teaspoon of prepared horseradish or Dijon mustard and a sprinkle of garlic powder to Hungry Jack Instant Mashed Potatoes for gourmet flavor ready in less than five minutes.Make dry spices last: Ground spices tend to lose pungency rather quickly. Buy spices like cinnamon, cayenne pepper, cumin, nutmeg, cloves and allspice whole and grind small batches as you need them. Its a good idea to have a separate coffee grinder for your spices. Save room and keep dry goods fresh: When you get home from the grocery store, transfer flours, pastas, cereals and other dry grains into resealable storage bags or containers. Simply label and date them with a marker, and youll be surprised at how much extra room youll have in your pantry. FAMILY FEATURES You probably dont know it, but you may have the secret ingredients for an exceptional Easter dinner in your pantry right now. The holidays are a perfect opportunity to sprinkle creativity into special meals by using stapleslikepancakemix,syrupandinstantmashedpotatoesinunexpected ways to craft new and delicious dishes the whole family will love. Celebrity Chef Adam Gertler, host of Food Networks Kid in a Candy Store, along with Hungry Jack, have come up with original, easy-to-prepare recipes using everyday items to create a memorable Easter meal. Planning for a holiday meal can be stressful, says Chef Gertler. But by looking to your pantry for inspiration, you will find ingredients to make a truly unique and special meal sure to delight your family and guests! Here are ways to use up what you already have to make a complete Easter menu, including savory Bacon and Cheese Appetizer Bites Spinach Salad with Warm Maple Dijon Vinaigrette Maple Glazed Pork Tenderloin and a sweet Spiced Mocha Fudge Cake. Youll create an Easter meal worth celebrating and make your hungry family a happy one. For more creative recipes and tips, visit www.useupthebox.com.Spiced Mocha Fudge CakeMakes: 12 servings Prep Time: 20 minutes Cook Time: 1 hourINGREDIENTSCAKE: Crisco Original No-Stick Cooking Spray 4 (1-ounce) squares unsweetened baking chocolate 3 tablespoons butter 1cup hot brewed Folgers Classic RoastCoffee 2/3 cup Hungry Jack Instant Mashed Potato Flakes 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional) 1 1/2 cups sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 4 large eggs, separated 1/2 cup PillsburyBESTAll Purpose Flour 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt Powdered sugar SPICED WHIPPED CREAM: 1/2 pint whipping cream 3 tablespoons powdered sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extractDIRECTIONS1.HEAT oven to 350F. Line bottom of a 9-inch springform pan with parch ment paper. Coat paper with no-stick cooking spray. Place chocolate and butter in medium microwave-safe bowl. Micro wave on HIGH power 45 to 60 seconds or until chocolate is melted and smooth when stirred. 2.COMBINEcoffee,potatoflakes,cinna mon and cayenne in large mixing bowl, stirring until moistened. Blend in sugar and vanilla. Blend in chocolate mixture and egg yolks. Stir together flour, baking powder and salt. Grad ually blend into chocolate mixture. 3.BEAT egg whites on medium speed of electric mixer until stiff. Add to choco late mixture and blend on low speed until completely blended, scraping sides and bottom of bowl frequently. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake 55 to 60 minutes or until set in center. Cool com pletely in pan on wire rack. Remove from pan. Sprinkle liberally with powdered sugar. 4.COMBINEwhipping cream, powdered sugar, cinnamon and vanilla in medium mixing bowl. Beat on medium speed of electric mixer until stiff. Serve with cake.Maple Glazed Pork TenderloinMakes: 4 servings Prep Time: 7 minutes Cook Time: 12 minutesINGREDIENTS1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves, crushed 1 teaspoon dried marjoram leaves, crushed 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon onion powder 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder 1 pound pork tenderloin, cut into 1/2-inch slices 1 tablespoon butter 2 tablespoons Hungry Jack Original Regular Syrup DIRECTIONS1.COMBINE thyme, marjoram, salt, onion powder and garlic powder in large reseal able food storage bag. Seal bag and shake well. Add pork slices. Seal bag. Shake to coat. 2.MELT butter in large nonstick skillet overmedium-high heat. Add pork mix ture. Cook and stir 8 to 10 minutes or until pork is browned and no longer pink in center.Add syrup. Cook and stir until pork is glazed. Spinach Salad with Warm Maple Dijon VinaigretteMakes: 4 servings Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 1 minuteINGREDIENTS1/4 cup HungryJack OriginalSyrup 3 tablespoons cider vinegar 4 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, minced, or 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1/2 cup Crisco 100% Extra Virgin Olive Oil 1 (6-ounce) bag fresh baby spinach leaves 1 small unpeeled red apple, cored and thinly sliced 1/2 cup crumbled blue cheese 2 tablespoons crumbled cooked bacon or real bacon bitsDIRECTIONS1.WHISK together syrup, vinegar, mustard, thyme, garlic, salt and pepper in a medium microwave-safe bowl until well blended. Gradually whisk in oil, stirring until thickened. 2.COMBINE spinach, apple, cheese and bacon in a large bowl. Just before serving, microwave vinaigrette on HIGH for 30 to 45 seconds or until warm. Drizzle salad with desired amount of vinaigrette; toss salad and serve immediately.Bacon and Cheese Appetizer BitesMakes: 24 appetizers Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutesINGREDIENTSCriscoOriginal No-Stick Cooking Spray 1/2 cup sour cream 1 tablespoon water 1 cup Hungry Jack Buttermilk Complete Pancake & Waffle Mix (Just Add Water) 1/2 cup (2 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese 1/4 cup bacon, cooked and crumbled 2 tablespoons butter, melted PaprikaDIRECTIONS1.HEAT oven to 400F. Spray cookie sheet with no-stick cooking spray. 2.MIX sour cream and water in medium bowl until well combined. Add pancake mix, cheese and bacon pieces. Stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Drop by rounded teaspoons onto pre pared cookie sheet. 3.BAKE 10 to 12 minutes or until lightly browned. Brush with melted butter, sprinkle with paprika. Serve warm. GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCE FOOD

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Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID History records that porcelain was first made in China more than 1,200 years ago. Marco Polo introduced porcelain as we know it today to Europe from China in the 13th century. Painting, or the over glazing of china, reached its peak in Europe during the 1700s, but it was not until after the Civil War that the art became popular in America. Through the centuries, porcelain manufacturers employed china painters to achieve their over glaze designs for the retail market. As time went on and machinery was introduced for mass production, china painting shifted over to a fine art. Popular in the 1800s as a cottage industry, artists created one of a kind pieces for galleries and gift shops. Today, we find porcelain painting is described as a dying art, as the artists become older, teachers are scarce and more medium choices for artwork became readily available. Most porcelain artists learn from the art being passed down through generations or seeking teachers from their areas of the country, usually as a result of seeing this art presented through shows. The Lake Placid China Painting Club, members of the World Organization of Porcelain Artists, is dedicated to teaching, educating the public about china painting and restoring this beautiful art. The Lake Placid Club has about 27 adult members including six teachers and have four junior members. Lake Placid China Painting Club is one of the largest clubs in Florida. The public is invited today to Carousel of Colors, the annual china painters tea and sale held from 12:30-3 p.m. at the Caladium Arts and Crafts Co-op, 132 Interlake Blvd. The artists will display their colorful hand-painted china and will also offer some beautiful hand-painted pieces for sale. Live demonstrations of porcelain painting will be presented throughout this event. One of the highlights of the tea is the silent auctio n, where exceptional pieces b y members of the Wor ld Organization of Porcela in Artists are auctioned off. The door prizes award ed every half hour have alwa ys been a big hit. Behold the beauty of th is art and enjoy the music of violins by local talented hig h school students. Tea, de licious finger food an d desserts will be served. The re is no charge to attend. For more informatio n about the Lake Placid Chi na Painters, contact Joilyn n Littleton, events chairman, at 699-9532 or e-mail elizai slandgirl@yahoo.com. Page 4DNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com ATTENTION RVers!!!10001 US Hwy 27S Sebring, FL 33876(888) 859-5501BUTTONWOOD BAY INVITES YOU TO TAKE A TOUR!Enter to WIN One of Three Free Stays!Wednesday, March 16th 1PM 4 PMSign up Today Specials for New Guests! $ave Even More When You Bring A Buddy! ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Courtesy pho to This Grapes platter by Chris Filip is one of the pieces to be on display at the Lake Placid China Painting Clubs event today. Lake Placid China painters tea and sale set for today Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Heartland Cultural Alliance Gallery of Fine Art at Sebring Airport will feature the work of Lake Placid wildlife artist Christine Yarbour during the month of March. The artists reception will be from 4:30-6 p.m. Friday, March 18 at the Sebring Airport. There will be classical guitar music by Kenny Summers, wine and snacks. The free event is open to the public. Yarbour uses several mediums to express her talent. Oil, acrylics, pen and ink, pen and ink with watercolor, pen and ink with oil roughing and photography are the mediums she uses. Yarbour will soon be a published author and illustrator. Her book on wildlife along the Lake Wales Ridge contains approximately 100 drawings along with fully researched information and first-hand experiences with the animals. For more information contact Fred Leavitt at 402-8238, or e-mail info@heartlandculturalalliance.org. Yarbours wildlife art on exhibit at HCA Courtesy pho to The work of wildlife artist Christine Yarbour will be on exhibit at Heartland Cultural Alliance Gallery of Fine Art at Sebring Airport during March. The artists reception will be Friday. SEBRING Bright light f rom the setting sun s treamed in through the b ack door of the Highlands A rt Leagues Yellow House G allery as Tuesday e veningsArt Sparks! e vent began. An expectant a udience marveled at the b eautifully lit work of phot ographer Bruce Behrens, a nd as the last bright swath o f sunlight disappeared f rom the entry, he declared, Now, lets take a look outs ide. It seemed as if it was too l ate. The sun had dipped b ehind a massive cloud, w hich reached all the way d own to the horizon. But w ith the mixed group of p hotographers and artists n ow outside, Behrens began a n awe-inspiring instruction i n finding the light. Gods umbrella, he called i t. Referring to the Master p ainters who used to look f or that 20-minute or so w indow at the end of the d ay, and rush outside to c apture the soft, but elegant l ight when it was so perfect, B ehrens enlisted the assist ance of colorful oil painter J ouetta Koning as his m odel. Behrens, who is Avon P arks city manager, placed K oning above the crowd at t he porch rail, and showed h ow, though the light had s eemed to disappear, the d ome of the sky ifself was a cting as a reflecting u mblella in the same way t hat photographers use u mbrellas in photo shoots t o control or manipulate available light. He further showed how a black board placed opposite the source of light could absorb the light on that side of the subject, or a white one could reflect additional light, and continued around the fountain circle showing examples of ways to cpature the light which seemed to not be there. The evening continued indoors with Behrens presentation of the use of light in his photographs and those of other master photographers, with questions and lively discussion from the eager attendees. Gods umbrella shed much light on a fascinating subject. Though, sadly, there will be no Art Sparks! presentation this coming Tuesday, the weekly sessions will resume on March 22 with a demonstration by artist Anne Watson, who will be bringing a painting from a start in acrylics toward its finish in oils. Again, it is all about the light ... she said, and invites everyone to this free event, which will begin promptly at 6 p.m. at the Yellow House Gallery, 1989 Lakeview Drive. For additional information on Bruce Behrens photography, call (407) 4032427. Anne Watson teaches painting in oils and acrylics, drawing and digital media at the Highlands Art League in Sebring, as well as in Avon Park and Lake Placid, and features a broad range of commercial and personal artwork. anne@annewatsonstudio.com and 449-0822. Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Orchid S ociety of Highlands C ounty will hold its fifth a nnual orchid show, Orchids in the Heartland, o n Saturday and Sunday, M arch 26-27 at the Bert J. H arris Jr. Agricultural C enter, 4509 George Blvd. T he hours of the show will b e from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. S aturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p .m. Sunday. Admission is $ 3 per person over the age o f 12. This is an American O rchid Society-judged s how, and trophies and ribb ons will be awarded to the b est plants in different categ ories. Individuals who h ave plants they want j udged need to bring them to t he Agri-Civic Center before 4 p.m. Friday, March 25. H ourly door prizes of o rchids and orchid-related i tems will be given away d uring the show and there w ill be an opportunity table w ith large blooming orchids o n it. The local society will h ave books on orchid growi ng for sale. Seven growers will offer r easonably priced quality o rchids from seedlings to m ature blooming plants and w ill provide exhibits includi ng educational information o n orchids. The Ridge O rchid Society from Polk C ounty and The Orchid S ociety of Highlands C ounty will also have e xhibits. Whatever the f ancy, there will be a plant. H icks Orchid Supplies will h ave a large assortment of o rchid supplies available, and American Group Travel will provide information on their tours, specifically orchid tours of Costa Rica. Two of the growers selling and displaying plants are members of the Orchid Society of Highlands County: Bill Ross, owner of Awesome Orchids in Lake Placid and Jim Elliott owner of Elliott Orchids in Okeechobee. The other growers are Orchid Mania, Myakka City; Ritter Tropic 1 Orchids, Kissimmee; Quest Orchids, Miami; Orchid Island Orchids, Vero Beach; and Featherstone Orchids, Dunnellon. More than 1,000 blooming orchids of various types will be on display for the public to see and enjoy. People new to orchids and those wanting to know about them wont want to miss this event and the opportunity to meet others who are knowledgeable and can answer questions about these stunning plants. Information on and applications for membership in The Orchid Society of Highlands County and the American Orchid Society will be available. The Orchid Society of Highlands County meets the fourth Monday of each month at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center. Its meetings present knowledgeable speakers on a variety of orchid topics. For additional information regarding the society or show, contact Pete Otway at 699-1575 or by email at gatorgalanddoughboy@emb arqmail.com. Information is also available on the society Web site, http://orchidsocietyhighlands.org/. Orchid Society prepares for show Courtesy photo Bruce Behrens surrounded by his by award-winning photos, discusses finding the light for photographers and artists. Gods umbrella Guest Column Anne Watson Courtesy photo The Orchid Society of Highlands County will hold its fifth annual orchid show, Orchids in the Heartland, on Saturday and Sunday, March 26-27 at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center, 4509 George Blvd. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Special to the News-SunWAUCHULAThe Story of Jesus Passion p lay will begin its 24th seas on the last weekend of M arch. The performances a re set for Friday and S aturday evenings at 7:30 p .m. beginning March 25 a nd 26, April 1 and 2, 8 and 9 15 and 16, 22 and 23. The Story of Jesus is m ore of a re-enactment r ather than a play. It is one o f the largest outdoor plays o f any kind in the United S tates. It has a cast of 225 p eople of all ages, including n early 75 teenagers. There are also 150 live a nimals that appear througho ut the entire performance h orses, camels, cattle, oxen, s heep, goats, donkeys, a lpachas, chickens, ducks, d ogs, pigeons. Special effects include p yro and fire effects, dry ice a nd oil smoke effects, lighti ng effects, flying angels, a b oat scene and indoor rain. The play portrays Jesus as a real touchable, believable p erson while preserving his d eity. People are always comp lementing that they felt t hey had really seen Jesus in a new and powerful way. The play is really a life c hanging experience. Many p eople accept Christ at the e nd of the performance. S venty-five or more people a re baptized into Christ each y ear. Cast members are a vailable at the end of each p erformance to pray with t hose who come forward, s aid director Mike Graham. Practices go on for three m onths. Construction of the s et takes nearly one month at a bout 16 hours a day. The set i s 250 feet long just 50 feet short of a football field. The play is three hours long with a 20-minute intermission. Last years attendance was 13,600 paying individuals and 2,500 complementary. Power and Light productions, a 501 c 3 organization established to promote the Gospel of Jesus Christ through any acceptable means, is the owner and sole producer of the play. The production company works toward that promotion especially through the arts and with an emphasis on youth ministry. Power and Light operated Club Forty 31, a Christian youth center for four years in Wauchula. However, the youth center was destroyed by Hurricane Charley as it swept through Hardee County in 2004. It was then that Power and Light established and began overseeing Life Church. The play originated in 1988 by the Lords Church of Wauchula and was sold to Power and Light in 2000. By the way, even though both Real Life church and the Story of Jesus are ministries of Power and Light, they operate separately when it comes to finances. The church does not sponsor the play. Separate books are kept for the two different ministries. When people give money to the play, it is used for the play. If they give to Power and Light in general, it could be used for either ministry as needed, Graham said. Power and Light has only two full-time employees and four temporary employees during the play season. All cast members (200250), plus about 40 crew members are volunteers who work for the love of the Lord and the play. The volunteers are from nearly 40 different churches in Central Florida. The organization was given 40 acres of property on State Road 66 last year. The goal is to build a 2,000seat theatre to produce Christian drama. Graham has already completed the scripts for The Story of Noah and The Story of Moses. We believe the theatre is necessary to insure the future of the play. Preliminary plans have already been drawn, but no money has been raised. Ticket sales do not even generate enough to meet our annual expense. We rely on food and merchandise sales at the play, as well as donations, Graham said. Tickets are $18 for adults $18, $16 for seniors (62plus), children (12 and under), and groups of 25 and more. Courtesy photo T he Story of Jesus Passion play will begin its 24th season the last weekend of March. Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative is proud to announce that Joanne Abel has been selected as the Artist/Crafter of the Month for March 2011. Abel was born and grew up in Northwestern Pennsylvania. She had her first experience with living in Florida when she attended college in Lakeland. Abel got married and moved to Illinois and raised three children in Naperville. When her youngest child graduated, she and her family moved to Florida. They joined her father in the marina business in Clewiston. Abel got interested in the pool business during that time and with the help of friends, bought a lot in Clewiston, built a store and opened their own business. In the meantime, she got interested in becoming a serious ceramist. She had developed an interest in ceramics in 1988 and decid ed to pursue a career in th at field. So the pool business w as sold, their home was sold an d they moved to Naples. S he built her dream shop to ma rket her ceramics and loves to spend time there. Abel had traveled to t he Lake Placid area when s he lived in Clewiston and vis ited the Caladium Arts an d Crafts Cooperative. At th at time the Co-op had a memb er who was a ceramist. Wh en she came back to the area to spend some time, she foun d that the Co-op no longer h ad a ceramist and she inquir ed into becoming a member. Abel has a wide variety of ceramics available from dis hes to Christmas items to ga rden items and many other s. You can see her work at t he Caladium Arts and Craf ts Cooperative, 132 E. Interla ke Blvd. For further inform ation, call 699-5940 or vi sit the Web site at www.caladi umarts.org. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 5D Established 19311600 US 27 South Avon Park Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home4001 Sebring Parkway Sebring, 385-0125 111 E. Circle St. Avon Park, 453-3101 Chris T.Nelson Craig M. Nelson Darin S. MacNeil W .W LUMBER CO. 465-3331Hwy. 27 S. Lake PlacidWere More Than Just Lumber COMPLETE Building SuppliesPlease support the above businesses. They have made this page possible. Inspirational Thoughtsby Patricia Valentine THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502 Residential Commercial Mobile HomesSmall Enough to Know You Large Enough to Serve You500 South Lake Avenue 382-8300 453-3019 THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502St.Luke 5:5-6,And Simon answering said unto him, Master,we have toiled all the night,and have taken nothing:nevertheless at thy word I will let down the net. And when they had this done,they inclosed a great multitude of fishes:and their net brake.In the above scriptures,Peter chose to obey Jesus and as a result he experienced a stunning display of divine power.In our obedience to God and His word it may sometime require doing some things that appear to be unreasonable.Our obedience to God should never be based on whether something seems fitting to our way of thinking.That is not to say God always bypasses common sense,but oftentimes what He requires of us may not appear reasonable or match our preconceived ideas. Disobedience will cause us to miss out on what God has in stored for us.Nothing pleases a parent more than to have their children walking in obedience.God is even more pleased when His children are walking in obedience.Be Blessed! Attend the Church of Your Choice! Witford Reid M.D.Board Certified Anesthesiologist in Pain Management863-385-9333 Sebring Pain Management And Rehabilitation Center, Inc. 9 Ryant Blvd. Westshore Plaza, Sebring(1 Mile South of Lakeshore Mall on the Right)The ONLY JACHO ACCREDITEDPain Management Unit in Highlands CountySPECIALIZING IN: Back Pain Auto Accidents Neck Pain Work Related Injuries VOTED 2009 Doctor of the Year ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT E.O. Koch Construction1417 Swank Avenue Sebring, FL 33870(863) 385-8649COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTIONLet our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property, build your dream home,or do your remodeling.For all of your Aluminum,Steel,and Conventional construction needsEmail: kochcon@strato.net State Certified License #CGC1515338 ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL DESIGN REMODELING ALUMINUM ROOFING Carports, Patios, Siding, Fascia SEAMLESS GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS Abel is named Marchs Lake Placid Caladium Co-op Artist of Month Courtesy pho to Joanne Abel has made a profession in ceramics since 1988. She is the only ceramist member of the Lake Placid Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative and is this months highlighted member. Story of Jesus Passion play opens 24th season March 25 Follow the News-Sun online on www.twitter.com/thenewssun

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Page 6DNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30 and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family and Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: 2:303:15 p.m. Saturdays, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first Friday, 9-10 a..m. Sundays, or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP Publishers Weekly Best SellersHARDCOVER FICTION 1. Sing You Home: ANovel b y Jodi Picoult (Atria) 2. The Wise Mans Fear by P atrick Rothfuss (DAW) 3. River Marked by Patricia B riggs (Ace) 4. Minding Frankie by Maeve B inchy (Knopf) 5. Treachery in Death by J .D. Robb (Putnam Adult) 6. ADiscovery of Witches by D eborah Harkness (Viking) 7. Tick Tock by James P atterson, Michael Ledwidge ( Little, Brown) 8. The Girl Who Kicked the H ornets Nest by Stieg Larsson ( Knopf) 9. Pale Demon by Kim H arrison (Harper Voyager) 10. The Paris Wife: ANovel b y Paula McLain (Ballantine B ooks) 11. Gideons Sword by D ouglas Preston and Lincoln C hild (Grand Central Publishing) 12. The Help by Kathryn S tockett (Putnam/Amy Einhorn) 13. Room: ANovel by Emma D onoghue (Little, Brown) 14. Twilights Dawn: ABlack J ewels Book by Anne Bishop ( Roc.) 15. Night Vision by Randy W ayne White (Putnam Adult) HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. Unbroken: AWorld War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House) 2. Blood, Bones & Butter: The Inadvertant Education of a Reluctant Chef by Gabrielle Hamilton (Random House) 3. Tell to Win: Connect, Persuade, and Triumph with the Hidden Power of Story by Peter Guber (Crown Business) 4. Cleopatra: ALife by Stacy Schiff (Little, Brown) 5. ASimple Government: Twelve Things We Really Need from Washington by Mike Huckabee (Sentinel) 6. In the Blink of an Eye: Dale, Daytona, and the Day that Changed Everything by Michael Waltrip and Ellis Henican (Hyperion) 7. Revolt!: How to Defeat Obama and Repeal His Socialist Programs by Dick Morris and Eileen McGann (Broadside Books) 8. Known and Unknown by Donald Rumsfield (Sentinel) 9. Decision Points by George W. Bush (Crown) 10. Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother by Amy Chua (Penguin Press) 11. Surviving Your Serengeti: 7 Skills to Master Business and Life by Stefan Swanepoel (Wiley) 12. I Beat the Odds by Michael Oher with Don Yaeger (Gotham) 13. Life by Keith Richards (Little, Brown) 14. Untied: AMemoir of Family, Fame, and Floundering by Meredith Baxter (Crown) 15. Win: The Key Principles to Take Your Business from Ordinary to Extraordinary by Frank I. Luntz (Hyperion) MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS 1. ACreed in Stone Creek by Linda Lael Miller (HQN) 2. Live Wire by Lora Leigh (St. Martins Paperbacks) 3. The Silent Sea by Clive Cussler and Jack Du Brul (Berkley) 4. Deception: An Alex Delaware Novel by Jonathan Kellerman (Ballantine Books) 5. Harvest Moon by Robyn Carr (Mira) 6. Water for Elephants: A Novel by Sara Gruen (Algonquin) 7. An Engagement in Seattle: Groom Wantedride Wanted by Debbie Macomber (Mira) 8. Without Mercy by Lisa Jackson (Zebra) 9. The Lincoln Lawyer by Michael Connelly (Grand Central Publishing) 10. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson (Vintage) 11. Hidden Away by Maya Banks (Berkley) 12. Changes: ANovel of the Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (Roc.) 13. The Girl Who Played with Fire by Stieg Larsson (Vintage) 14. This Side of the Grave by Jeaniene Frost (Avon) 15. An Unlikely Countess: A Novel of the Malloren World by Jo Beverley (Signet) TRADE PAPERBACKS 1. Water for Elephants: A Novel by Sara Gruen (Algonquin) 2. Heaven is for Real: ALittle Boys Astounding Story of His Trip to Heaven and Back b y Todd Burpo, Sonja Burp o, Colton Burpo and Lynn Vince nt (Thomas Nelson) 3. Inside of a Dog b y Alexandra Horowitz (Scribner) 4. The Big Short by Micha el Lewis (Norton) 5. Cutting for Stone b y Abraham Verghese (Vintage) 6. The Postmistress b y Sarah Blake (Berkley) 7. Private by Jame s Patterson and Maxine Paet ro (Grand Central Publishing) 8. The Girl with the Drago n Tattoo by Stieg Larsso n (Vintage) 9. Little Bee by Chris Cleav e (Simon & Schuster) 10. The Kings Speech: Ho w One Man Saved the Britis h Monarchyby Mark Logue an d Peter Conradi (Sterling) 11. The Girl Who Played wi th Fire by Stieg Larsson (Vintage ) 12. Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aro n Ralston (Atria) 13. The Glass Castle b y Jeannette Walls (Scribner) 14. The Art of Racing in th e Rain: ANovel by Garth Ste in (Harper) 15. The Crippled God: Boo k Ten of the Malazan Book of th e Fallen by Steven Erikson (Tor ) BOOKS

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011Page 7D EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer.Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howes Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer Kid C ity Childrens Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, prime-timers, and Bible s tudies in Spanish. Kid City Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Childrens Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 8:15 and 10 a.m.; Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30 a.m.; and contemporary worship is at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on lifes journey, youre we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP There is a place right here in Sebring that provides those who visit a unique and memorable natural experience. Combine that with exercise, competition and fundraising opportunities and you have the Inaugural Seminole 5-K t rail-run. On a beautiful Saturday m orning on March 5, 2011, 40 runn ers took off on the first run of its k ind held at the pristine Sun N L ake Preserve. The trail run took p articipants through parts of the P reserve that showcased the incredib le and unique beauty of the site. One of the management goals for t he Preserve is to provide passive r ecreation and outdoor education. T he Highlands County Parks and N atural Resources Department is d oing just that by offering citizens t his type of event. Runner Sarah S mith said, Its a great trail. Id l ike to see more runs here. It is so m uch better than running on a road; i ts more exciting. Sarahs point of view was shared by many of the participants and all agreed that they would love to run at the site again. Kim Price, 34, came in first place with a time of 24 minutes and 48 seconds. She said, I loved this race. Im a cross country runner and I would like to see more races out here. All of the runners had positive comments and the Overall Male Winner, Danny Cool, 12, with a time of 26 minutes and 31 seconds, said, That was fun! It was a lot more fun than just a 5K. Paula Jean Lunt, second place winner, said, It was absolutely wonderful. It is the best 5K Ive run in Sebring and Ive been running for eight years. The run was a fund raiser for the Highlands Seminole Club and a chance for the Highlands County Parks & Natural Resources Department to showcase the passive recreational opportunities that the Preserve has to offer. Carlos Torres, district conservationist for the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), came in first in his age group with a time of 31:08. He said of the run, This was fun. It was my first trail run and it was exciting to see nature. It is a great opportunity to share nature with the citizens in a healthy way. Once people find out how beautiful it is out here, the participation will increase. Javier Torres, also an employee of NRCS, was a first-timer for a long distance run and he felt that the run was challenging. He said, It is a nice trail; it is very clean and beautiful out here. Former county administrator Carl Cool said, It was fun and different. This is a great time of year for the run. I would like to see more runs out here. The event was a group effort between Highlands County staff, Highlands Seminole Club members and experienced 5K organizer Chet Brojek. Chet has been organizing these types of runs for about 40 years and assisted John Palmer and Erin McCarta, Highlands Seminole Club members, with the event. Working with staff from the Parks & Natural Resources Department, the 5K was laid out, trails were trimmed, maps were made, signs placed and all the preparations were made for the big day. This is the type of event that encourages citizens to be exposed to the rare and natural beauty of the area. By holding runs and other noninvasive events at the site, more and more people will understand its value. Erin McCarta, the Seminole Clubs president, thanked Highlands County for allowing the runners to use the site. Many of the runners didnt even know about the Preserve, McCarta said. Hopefully more events of this type will be held at the Sun N Lake Preserve in the future. The Preserve is approximately 1,350 acres and consists of various plant communities such as pine flatwoods, cypress swamp, cutthroat seeps, and various types of marshe s and wetlands. Hiking the rugged nature trails, biking, and fishing ar e some of the activities that are enjoyed by citizens who visit the Preserve. It is located at the end of Sun N Lake Boulevard in Sebring The run was certainly unique with its ruggedness. The trails at th e Sun N Lake Preserve are designed for hiking and biking and some areas are very narrow and required the athletes to run single-file. Runners were excited and challenged, but felt that it was just the right amount of difficulty for a fun time and a good run. Congratulations to all the runne rs for taking on this very exciting trai l run. The staff at Highlands County s Parks and Natural Resources is encouraged by the success of the run. Thanks to the Highlands Seminole Club for recognizing the potential of the Sun N Lake Preserve for this type of event. We look forward to more passive recre ational activities and event. Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District. The pristine environment provides ideal backdrop for trail run News From The Watershed Corine Burgess Courtsey photo Carlos Torres placed first in his age group during the Inaugural Seminole Trail Run 5K at the Sun N Lakes Preserve on March 5. He stated, This is a great opportunity to share nature with the citizens in a healthy way.

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By DARLENE SUPERVILLE Associated PressWASHINGTON P resident Barack Obama s miled when he said his large e ars and funny name once m ade him a target of schooly ard harassment. But he was a ll seriousness Thursday w hen he told a White House c onference on bullying that t orment and intimidation m ust not be tolerated. Some 13 million students, a bout a third of all those a ttending school, are bullied e very year, the White House s aid. Experts say that puts t hem at greater risk of falling b ehind in their studies, abusi ng drugs or alcohol, or suff ering mental or other health p roblems. Kids who are seen a s different because of their r ace, clothes, disability or s exual orientation are more l ikely to be bullied. If theres one goal of this c onference, Obama said, its to dispel the myth that b ullying is just a harmless r ite of passage or an i nevitable part of growing up. I ts not. He spoke to more t han 100 parents, students, t eachers and others gathered t o discuss the problem and s hare ideas for solutions. Bullying can have d estructive consequences for o ur young people. And its n ot something we have to a ccept, he said. The issue has been getting m ore attention partly because t exting, Facebook, Twitter a nd other technologies are b eing used to carry it out i ts called cyberbullying a nd because of media covera ge of teens who have killed t hemselves after such taunti ng. Families of some of those y oungsters joined Obama at t he White House, including T ina Meier, of suburban St. L ouis. Meiers 13-year-old d aughter, Megan, hanged h erself in 2006 after falling v ictim to an Internet hoax c arried out, in part, by an a dult neighbor who posed as a boy. The neighbor, a w oman, was later convicted o f a federal misdemeanor in a l andmark cyberbullying trial. No family should have to go through what these families have gone through, Obama said. No child should feel that alone. Meier had a message for parents who want to take away their childrens computers and other electronic devices to spare them from bullying: It wont work. She urged them instead to get a better understanding of what their kids are doing. Technology is out there. We cannot shut it off. Children are not going to allow it to be shut off, Meier told participants. We have to make sure that we have parents who understand whats going on in their childs online world, as well as the real world. Speaking as a parent and as a victim, Obama urged everyone to help end bullying by working to create an atmosphere at school where children feel safe and feel like they belong. He said that even he felt out of place growing up. I have to say, with big ears and the name that I have, I wasnt immune, said Obama, who moved around a lot as a boy, being born in Hawaii and growing up there and in Indonesia. I didnt emerge unscathed, he said. Obama said adults have too often turned a blind eye to the problem by chalking up the harassment to kids being kids. But he said a national attitude adjustment is in order because of the damage that bullying can do. AWhite House conference doesnt immediately solve any problem. But what it does do, particularly by involving the president, is tell the country that an issue is, in fact, a problem that requires a national response. In the case of bullying, the conference also gave Obama another chance to press his education agenda. He has tried to make bullying a part of that by warning that failure to address the behavior puts the U.S. at risk of falling behind other countries academically. Before breaking into smaller groups, conference participants heard from experts who study bullying. Discussions in the breakout sessions touched on anti-bullying efforts in schools, communities and on campuses, as well as on cyberbullying. Two other sessions were conducted online, including one with Sebelius answering questions. Michelle Obama said parents need to be more involved in their childrens lives, their schools and their activities since youngsters dont always tell us eve ry little detail. She said h er youngest daughter, 9-yea rold Sasha, often sa ys Nothing in response to questions about her day at school. The first lady, who intr oduced the president, al so urged adults to set an exam ple by treating others wi th compassion and respect, an d giving each other the bene fit of the doubt. It sends a me ssage to our kids about ho w they treat others, she said. http://www.stopbullying. gov Page 8DNews-SunSunday, March 13, 2011www.newssun.com CROSSWORDSOLUTION MCTphoto President Barack Obama speaks with advance placement U.S. history students at Wakefield High School in Arlington, Va., on Monday. Obama to bullying victims: I know what its like to be a bullied Associated PressHURON, Ohio Ohios t ax department says a promi se that it would send a w oman a $200 million refund c heck was a mistake due to a s oftware glitch. The Sandusky Register r eports Denise Bossetti was a mong 9,700 taxpayers s tatewide who received Ohio D epartment of Taxation n otices about mega-refunds. I ts not clear if the other a mounts were as big as what B ossetti was told to expect. The woman from Huron in n orthern Ohio was sent a lett er dated Jan. 24 saying her $ 200 million refund could n ot be paid by direct deposit s o shed be sent a check. Bossetti says she and her b oyfriend had a big laugh o ver the letter. Another dated a week later e xplained thered been a softw are error. Tax department spokesman G ary Gudmundson says the p roblem has been fixed. Software blamed for Ohioans $200M refund promise NEWS-SUN 385-6155