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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00968
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 01-23-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:00968
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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Show off your photosPAGE1CDragons, Devils winPAGE1DSFCC to honor Ed Christy at ball fieldPAGE2ASebring native David Aguila to appear on The Tonight Show' PAGE2ANEWS-SUN Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 10 | 75 cents www.newssun .com HighLow 65 36Complete Forecast PAGE 8A A full day of sunshine and cool Forecast Question: Would you fly in an experimental airplane? Next question: Do you think the drop in local unemployment is just temporary? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Inside Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453O nline: www.newssun.com Yes 21.3% No 78.7% 099099401007 Total votes: 75 Arts & Leisure3C Business1B Chalk Talk5B Classifieds5D Community Briefs2A Community Calendar2B Crossword Puzzle2C Dear Abby2C Editorial & Opinion3A Living1C Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times2C Police Blotter2A School Menus6B Sports 1D State News7B Index locally owned community mindedHeartlandNational Bank Avon Park800 West Main St.863.453.6000Lake Placid600 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.699.1300Sebring327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1300Sun n Lake North5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1322www.heartlandnb.com By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comTALLAHASSEE Florida's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in December 2010 was 12 percent, unchanged from November, but Highlands County's rate declined to 12 percent from 13.4 percent in the last two months of last year. Highlands saw an increase in available labor at 1,040, from 40,024 in November to 41,06 in December, as the fruit harvesting season began ramping up. Still, that left 4,918 Highlands residents without a job in December. The state ironically ended the year with the same rate that it started with in January, 12 percent seasonally unadjusted, leaving Florida with just more than 1.1 million unemployed workers. State labor leaders stated on Friday that statewide there has been a slight upturn in the job market with 43,000 jobs created since December of 2009. "Although 12 percent unemployment is too high, a sixth straight month of job gains over the year is a positive sign, and with Governor Scott's emphasis on strategies to spark and support jo b creation, we anticipate co ntinued improvement in o ur economy," Agency f or Workforce Innovatio n Director Cynthia R. Loren zo said in her monthly pre ss release. Local unemployment rate drops in December By TAMARALUSH Associated PressVERO BEACH While Florida farm ers have lost some of their crop to co ld weather for the second year in a row, th ey say a fast-spreading, incurable bacter ia presents a greater threat to their trees an d the citrus industry. Citrus greening has destroyed grov es in the U.S., Brazil, Asia and Afric a. Detected in Florida in 2005, it leav es fruit sour, malformed and unusabl e. Eventually, it kills the tree. "Citrus is our signature crop," sa id Florida Agriculture Commissioner Ada m Putnam. "The sheer economic impact it has on our state it doesn't matt er whether you live in a condo tower o n Miami Beach or you live in Zol fo Springs, Florida, this impacts you as a Floridian because the demise of t he Florida citrus industry would have env ironmental, economic and soci al impacts." The disease has been particularly de vastating because it takes years for citr us trees to reach peak production, and t he disease targets young trees, making it d ifficult for growers to replace those th at have been lost. "It's probably is one of the bigge st negative impacts in Florida today, sho rt Greening a bigger threat to citrus than cold weather Citrus greening is devastating, and still has no cure News Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Park Elementary's first principal, Dan Johnson, shares his memories of how the school came to be 20 years ago and his role as the principal the first ten years. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comAVON PARK Hundreds of past students, former administrators, and little Panthers all packed the cafeteria at Park Elementary in honor of the school's 20 year anniversary on Thursday. The chorus students sang numerous songs they had practiced over the last few weeks. The crowd enjoyed several speeches and dedications from many of the students throughout their original renditions. Park Elementary School was opened on January 23, 1990. The school is unique as it is the only school in Avon Park whose mascot is not a Red Devil. "We let the students choose the mascot for our school," explained Dan Johnson, Park Elementary's first principal. "I had assumed we would be the Red Devils as well, but the faculty and community had other ideas in mind." Johnson led Park from 19902000 Under his care an d administration, the scho ol began to grow and excel fast er than anyone could of ima gined. Park Elementary's se cond principal was P at Landress, from 2000-200 5, until the third principal, S ue McCollum, stepped in fro m her position at Sun N'La ke Elementary. McCollum seemed deep ly touched by the students, pa rents, and faculty who had gat hPark Elementary celebrates 20 years See PARK, page 4A See CITRUS, page 5A See LOCAL, page 4A Division of Plant Indust ry Healthy murcotts sit among fruit infected with citrus greening. Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING The snow at the Sebring International Raceway began to fall around 8 a.m. on Saturday morning according to volunteer Chuck Stevens. And by fall, Stevens meant from a truck. The man-made snow is created by placing ice blocks into a shredder. The trucks then "spit out" white fluffy snow. The large pile was ready to go when the doors opened at 10 a.m. The annual Winter Fest, sponsored by Big Brothers and Big Sisters, took place on Saturday and the crowd was filled with smiling kids and adults. There were plenty of vendors and activities for kids to enjoy including face painting, a rock wall, and, of course, that big pile of white snow. "Each group gets about five minutes in the snow," said Stevens. Winter Fest draws big crowd to Raceway Snow Day News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS William Beaulieu, 2, thinks about throwing a snow ball Saturday morning during the Sixth Annual Snow Fest at the Sebring International Raceway. News-Sun photo by ROBYN BAKALUS Kaleigh Nataleigh is overjoyed Saturday morning at the sight of a large pile of snow during the annual Snow Fest event in Sebring. See WINTER, page 7A

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Special to the News-SunAVON PARK In memory of SFCC business professor and Panther Athletics supporter Ed Christy, the SFCC Athletics Department is hosting "Ed Christy Day at the Ballpark" on Friday. Aspecial ceremony will be held on Panther Field at 1:50 p.m., prior to the start of the game. Christy's family will be recognized and presented with a plaque and a special jersey with his name on the back. SFCC Panther baseball players will also wear the initials E.C. on their sleeves during all SFCC Panther Baseball home games this season. "Ed was very loved here, not only by the employees but by the students as well," said Rick Hitt, SFCC athletic director. "He was a student advocate and mentor, and he supported the student athletes he had in his classes. They wanted to do something special to recognize him." "Ed taught a lot of the players, and he respected them," said his wife, Dorry Christy. "We even drove to Tampa once just so he could watch Jessie Litsch pitch when the Toronto Blue Jays played the Rays. He was very proud of all of them." Christy understood the value of sports. He was an athlete himself, playing soccer in college, and later coaching his sons' soccer team when they were younger. He believed sports were about more than just playing a game, and that they taught teamwork, ethics, and the value of hard work. He attended almost all of SFCC's athletic events. "When something is that important to someone, you want to recognize it," Hitt said. "It's our way of providing a day that both of Ed's families can come together and celebrate his life." "You can't imagine how honored we feel that Coach Hitt and the athletes decided to do this," Dorry Christy said. "We have family coming in from all over the U.S. for this day. Ed would be very honored." Page 2ANews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South € Sebring, Florida 33870 A Harbor Point Media Company OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday PHONE: 863-385-6155 MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954 NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870 USPS … ISSN 0163-3988 Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry office(s)CIRCULATION SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before 11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their account. Please call 385-6155.SUBSCRIPTION RATES12 mo.7% FL taxTotal HOME DELIVERY$60.46$4.23$64.69 IN FLORIDA MAIL92.236.4698.69 OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL105.99105.99 Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. Romona Washington … Publisher and Executive Editor863-385-6155, ext. 515 Personal Injury & Wrongful Death Medical & Nursing Home Malpractice Workers'Compensatioin Social Security Disability Automobile Accidents K A Y L O R R & & K A Y L O R R P A M A R K K K A Y L O R Lawyers, Past and Present. Helping the Injured Since 1968205 S. Commerce Ave € Sebring, Florida 863-382-1900 GUARANTEED WEIGHT LOSS! CALL TODAY (863) 471-2500 LOSE YOUR WEIGHT FOR THE LAST TIME! 13 Ryant Blvd. SebringCorner of 27 & Ryant Blvd.SAVE 50% OFF ENROLLMENT FEES Now Through Jan. 31st Jan. 19 91214333552x:4Next jackpot $21 millionJan. 15 111439414953x:4 Jan. 12 4512192349x:2 Jan. 21 59282931 Jan. 20 5682528 Jan. 19 46172935 Jan. 18 113161830 Jan. 21 (n) 2447 Jan. 21 (d) 4192 Jan. 20 (n) 0693 Jan. 20 (d) 4260 Jan. 21(n) 87 4 Jan. 21 (d) 15 6 Jan. 20 (n) 25 4 Jan. 20(d) 73 9 Jan. 21 112192410 Jan. 18 113434410 Jan. 14 1015203321 Jan. 11 91926313 Jan. 19 2236515659 PB: 32 PP: 3Next jackpot $118 millionJan. 15 913222337 PB: 31 PP: 3 Jan. 12 1921234048 PB: 27 PP: 4 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center Friends of the Lake Placid Memorial Library plan annual dinnerLAKE PLACID The Friends of the Lake Placid Memorial Library will hold their annual dinner and meeting at 6 p.m. Monday at the Lake Placid Woman's Club, 10 N. Main St. The speaker this year is Hank Mattson, "The Cracker Cowboy Poet," who lives in Lake Placid. Mattson is a working cowboy poet performing at cowboy poetry gatherings from Florida to Utah. He's a member of the Florida Cattlemen's Association, the Professional Rodeo Hall of Fame Society and the Friends of Florida Folk. Mattson uses his own works and those of turnof-the-century punchers to chronicle and preserve the life and times of the many Florida Folks who for more than 400 years have been working cattle. He was named the winner of the 2007 Laura Rider Award for Florida Folk Poetry. Hank has an audio CD, "Tellin'It Like It Was," available to the public. The Friends of the Library is a non-profit organization of library supporters who provide funds through membership fees, book sales, gifts and donations that are used to provide things for the library that are not adequately funded by the state or county. This is especially important now with the major budget cu ts affecting our libraries. The annual membershi p which includes the upcom ing dinner is $15 for singles or $30 for families. Call the library at 6993705 for reservations or sign up on your next visi t to the library.Donate blood on the Big Red BusSEBRING Donate blood on the Big Red Bu s this week and receive a free movie ticket in the mail. The bus will be at the First United Methodist Church in Sebring from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. today. From 3-6 p.m. Monday it will be at the First Presbyterian Church in Lake Placid. Call 382-4499 with questions.Tea Party go to commission meeting TuesdaySEBRING The Highlands Tea Party plan s to attend the Highlands County Board of County Commission meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday. Members and organize rs plan to show their suppor t for the commissioners The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, Jan. 20: Carol Osman Boyajian, 68, of Miami, was charged with DUI. Dustin Errol Brown, 21, of Sebring, was charged with possession of marijuana, possession and or use of drug equipment, and operating a motor vehicle without a valid driver license. Zeneida Luz Chapelin, 23, of Lake Placid, was arrested on an out-ofcounty warrant reference no valid driver license. Isabel Hernandez Cuellar, 28, of Sebring, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference forgery and utter forged instrument. Drew Eli Fellin, 28, of Sebring, was charged with possession of weapon or ammo by convicted felon, possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana, and possession of drug equipment. Edward Allen Ferrell, 26, of Avon Park, was charged with possession and or use of drug equipment, and possession of marijuana. Jose Gonzalez, 19, of Frostproof, was charged with fraud, operating a vehicle without valid license, and possession of liquor by person under 21 years of age. Derick Demon Hammonds, 31, of Avon park, was charged with cruelty toward a child. Modesto Cortes Hernandez, 27, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. Jose Islas-Perez, 47, of Avon Park, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. Roosevelt Jones Jr., 48, of Avon Park, was charged with resisting an officer and DUI. Phillip Jackson Reddick, 30, of Sebring, was charged with fraudinsufficient funds. Angel Rivera, 29, of Labelle, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. Andres Jose Ruiz, 27, of Lake Placid, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. Shawn Cassidy Stidham, 23, of Sebring, was charged with violation of probation reference resisting an officer without violence. Dontavia Shayaza Strange, 19, of Avon Park, was charged with petit theft. Louis Timothy Wells, 39, of Avon Park, was charged with failure to appear reference knowingly driving with license suspended/ revoked. Benito Zavala, 23, of Avon Park, was charged with three counts of failure to appear reference alcohol beverage sell/give service to person under 21 years of age, and criminal mischief. POLICEBLOTTER Ed Christy Day at the Ballpark set at Panther Field Friday Christy COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued on page 6A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Lenny Kesterson of Lake Placid entertains guests Saturday during the 80th Anniversary Party at the American Legion Post 25 in Lake Placid. American Legion celebrates 80 years Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155 By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Talented. That is the one word that can describe Sebring High School graduate David Aguila. From the age of 10, Aguila has had a trumpet in his hand. Before he even graduated high school, Aguila knew that being a part of the orchestra was his destiny, but he wouldn't stop there. Aguila has big dreams of becoming an instructor and one day a conductor. Those dreams might be helped out with a little national television exposure, which is what he will get Wednesday night when he appears on NBC's "The Tonight Show." Aguila currently resides in Rochester, N.Y., were he is a secondyear undergrad at the Eastman School of Music. "I knew I wanted to do music and play the trumpet. I've always wanted to teach at a collegiate level and go beyond that as well," Aguila said. Before heading to the Empire State, the 2006 SHS grad attended South Florida Community College and was a member of the SFCC Brass Band Choir. "I've been very fortunate to have been involved in so many different organizations in Highlands County. The SFCC Brass Choir, Sebring band, the Heartland Honor band ... it's just made my love of music that much deeper," explained Aguila. With an accomplished resume, including Principal Chair in t he Sarasota Youth Orchestra and livin g in Europe while participating in oth er world-renowned ensembles, o ne would think that those would be t he reasons the 23-year-old landed a sp ot on Jay Leno's "Tonight Show" couc h. But it isn't. Aguila has another talent that he wants to show the world, only th is one is a bit of a secret. "I've been doing this since 200 4. I've competed in many competitio ns Aguila to reveal hidden talent on The Tonight Show' Show will air Wednesday on NBC See AGUILA, page 7A Associated PressFORTPIERCE A Florida man is behind bars after authorities say he stabbed his dog 26 times. The St. Lucie County Sheriff's Office says Joseph Grady Barker told investigators he was tired of his pet's incessant barking. Authorities say he paid a friend $20 to drive him and the pit bull to a canal. He then allegedly struck the 3year-old canine on the head several times with a tire iron and tossed him into the canal. After seeing the dog was still alive, Barker allegedly recaptured him and repeatedly stabbed him in the neck. Afamily member who learned about the incident found the dog's body at the canal and notified authorities. The 35-year-old Barker was charged Friday with animal cruelty and is being held without bail at the St. Lucie County Jail. Florida man accused of stabbing his dog 26 times

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 3A EDITORIAL& OPINION TODAY'SEDITORIALTODAY'SLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com Education is the key to a better FloridaEditor: Children throughout Florida and across the nation are struggling to achieve their dreams of a college education due to skyrocketing tuition costs and the rising prices of textbooks and living expenses. Even the Florida Bright Futures program, which was designed to reward students for their academic achievements, has scaled back its college funding and created more stringent requirements. We have to do better so our children are more educated to meet the challenges of tomorrow. There is a bright spot in education that is also one of Florida's best kept secrets and should be given greater attention. Take Stock in Children, a statewide non-profit organization, has a solid 16-year history of working with more than 800 public schools in 67 counties to provide mentors, scholarships and hope to lowincome and at-risk youth. It is the only combined scholarship mentoring program in the state with the goal of breaking the cycle of poverty through education, and continues to report an unparalleled high school graduation rate of 92 percent with 81 percent enrolling in college. Take Stock in Children's high school dropout prevention efforts contribute to the economic viability of our community. High school graduates contribute 46 percent more in taxes, have longer lives with less public health dependency, are eight times less likely to be imprisoned, and are three times more likely to be employed and not dependent on government assistance. The total benefit to the state of Florida is estimated to be $300,000 over a lifetime. The total cost to support a graduate in the program is approximately $24,000; therefore providing nearly 1,300 percent return on investment. Arole model program, Take Stock in Children identifies thousands of students in middle and high school to sign a contract pledging to remain drug and crime free and maintain a 2.5 grade point average. Students in the program spend at least one hour per week with mentors who provide encouragement, guidance and support. Students that fulfill these requirements then receive a full scholarship to a state college or university of their choice. Take Stock in Children currently serves nearly 8,000 students annually, but there are thousands more that still need our help. Now is the time to fulfill the vision of improving education to result in a qualified workforce and stronger communities. Individuals and businesses can mentor students or provide resources that will have an everlasting impression on the lives of the children who are our future. Education is the key to a better Florida and Take Stock in Children is proud to be the state's resource to help students achieve their dreams. Richard A. Berkowitz Chairman of the Board Take Stock in ChildrenTeens need to be careful on streetsEditor: As I was returning home to Sun 'N Lake today (Thursday) around 3:15 p.m., waiting at the left turn signal at Sun 'N Lake, I noticed three teenagers running across the street not on the crosswalk, but against the light. If I had not been watching closely, I would have killed all three of them. Not kidding. They were laughing at the fourth teenager across the street who didn't take a chance to "make it." I don't want to kill three kids. I also don't want them taking these kinds of stupid chances. Look around you! Do you want to be another death like we have each day in Tampa? If I knew your parents' phone numbers, I would be calling them. Please, take better care of your lives. They are precious. And if I see you again, be sure you will get a piece of my mind ... and a hug. Rena Newman Sebring Earlier this month Don and I had a potential problem going through a toll booth. We were headed to the Orlando airport, which meant taking a toll road. The problem was that as we approached the toll plaza, we discovered that the only two lanes open were the Sunpass an d the exact change lanes. There was no one who could give change. This stymied us. We don't have a Sunpass, and neither of us had expected to need change, counting on a human being to b e around to take our cash and giv e us change. Afrantic search of my purse came up with less tha n the required amount. This was not looking good. Fortunately there was a place we could turn around so we weren't faced with breaking the law. We backtracked on Interstate 4 and got our hands o n some change. Then we took another route to the airport, which was still a toll road but a t least there were people mannin g the booths. We didn't want to drive through the toll booth without paying because a) we do the be st we can to obey the law, and b) it wasn't worth whatever fine they'd slap us with for not paying the toll. Neither of us remembers what it was, but tru st me it was a lot more then the handful of change they wanted for the privilege of driving the highway. At least all we were looking at was a fine. AChinese farmer and gravel dealer recently faced a much harsher sentence in China life in prison. I am not kidding. According to a report I read on cbsnews.com Shi Jianfeng was accused of using fake military license plate s on two of his trucks. Since mili tary vehicles are exempt from paying tolls, those two trucks rode for free more than 2,300 times. Shi was charged with fraud and sentenced to life in prison. Now, I agree ducking tolls mor e than 2,000 times deserves some kind of punishment. But life? Apparently his fellow citizen s felt the same way. Chinese com plained in commentaries and online posts about the sentence which was harsher than those handed down for rape or murde r. Not only that, they began to attack the tolls themselves, argu ing that they were too high. I find it encouraging that the Chinese government actually responded to the outcry. And no it wasn't by trying to shut up th e complainers. Aspokesman from the prosecutor's office said they'd sent the case back to the police for "more investigation." Apparently Shi's younger broth er claimed responsibility for the fraud. The court in charge of th e case is being questioned about their handling of the case. According to the prosecutor' s office, Shi could still face seve n years in prison for forgery, which still seems a bit much to me. But it's a lot better than lif e. As for the high tolls, the article says that the vice minister o f transportation said in a news conference that the tolls would be gradually reduced. There wa s no timetable or details given, and I'm uncertain as to whether Chinese government promises carry any more weight than American government promises Time will tell. The morals of this cautionary tale are as follows: you should carry change with you when traveling to the Orlando airport ; ducking tolls in China can get you in a lot of trouble; and eve n in China, public outcry can sometimes get things done. That last gives me hope for China. If the citizens can get tolls lowered, what else could they do if they wanted to? Something to think about. Laura Ware is a Sebring resident She can be contacted by e-mail a t bookwormlady@embarqmail.com Taking its toll Laura's Look Laura Ware MacLaine is the dead r inger for a reclusive t ycoon's dead wife, a key p oint in the plot. Now, in those opening s cenes, when Caine's charact er imagines how his brilliant p lan is going to work, everyt hing comes off exactly as he h oped. MacLaine is beautiful; her c haracter never says a word a nd follows Caine's direct ions exactly. She is mysterio us, uncomplaining, obedie nt. Then comes the wet, cold s plash of reality, as Caine's c haracter approaches M acLaine in person. Nothing g oes right after that. Outside of Caine's imagin ation, MacLaine's character h as ideas of her own, and the s trength of mind to voice t hem. She is feisty, argument ative and not inclined to foll ow directions. Then the r eclusive tycoon turns out to b e more in touch with the w orld than first thought, and f ar shrewder than Caine a nticipated. In no time, his plan has g one ridiculously wrong and C aine is in nothing but troub le, including having fallen i n love with MacLaine. Isn't that just like real life? We anticipate a project, or a special event, and in our mind's eye, everything we want to happen goes according to plan. Then we actually take on the project, or attend the special event, and nothing goes the way we thought it would. Thus it is especially for every individual who ever won public office. What starts as an inspiration in the morning shower, and turns into a good idea by lunch, can end up a disaster before dinner. Which is another way of saying that when lots of people are involved, simple becomes complicated in a hurry. Take the Sebring City Council and the fencing issue. With the best of intentions the council is rewriting the current fence ordinance to standardize setbacks and loosen some restrictions. You might think something that straightforward would be easy to create. You'd be wrong. Like Caine's character in "Gambit," the council began its work expecting smooth sailing. Instead, council meetings are drawing larger audiences than usual, as residents upset with the privacy, self-expression, financial and property rights issues raised by the proposed fence ordinance, come to city hall to speak their minds. Like Caine's character, the council has discovered it has a feisty and argumentative public as a partner one not inclined to accept all the council's ideas just because. Just like Caine's character couldn't control MacLaine's character, so the council can forget about waving a magic wand and having the people of Sebring fall in behind them everyone united in purpose and equally motivated. Which is why we commend the Sebring City Council for listening to its constituents when they spoke in anger and opposition. It is hard enough to admit a mistake in a quiet side room surrounded by allies; it is much more embarrassing to do so in public. Last Tuesday the Sebring council responded to public pressure in the best, most democratic sense when it reversed itself and agreed chain link fences should be allowed for use in front yards. Recognizing the version of the fence ordinance before it was unfair and confusing, the council voted it down and directed the city attorney to rewrite it before going further. We hope the newest version of the ordinance is one that allows for affordable protection, individual expression, community safety, and individual property rights. Sounds simple doesn't it? Did we mention that Caine's character in the movie gets caught? Kudos to Sebring council for accepting reality I n 1966, Michael Caine and Shirley MacLaine starred in a movie called "Gambit." The story opens with Caine p laying a sophisticated thief planning to h ire MacLaine to pose as his wife in a c omplicated plot involving the theft of a p riceless statue. EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com To make sure the editorial pages aren't dominated by the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion of the staff or editors of the News-Sun All items will run on a first-come basis as space permits, although more timely ones could be moved up. We believe your viewpoints are just as important as any community leader or government official, so consider this a personal invitation to get your two cents in. The NewsSun has a long history of encouraging public discussion through letters, guest columns, and Reader's Response questionnaires. Providing this forum for our readers is a pleasure, not an obligation.

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e red on Thursday evening. M cCollum had nothing but k ind words to say about her e xperiences at the school. "I find that each time I c ome back here the passion is s till here...the dedication of o ur superintendent, our board m embers, and the teachers h ere at Park Elementary, it's j ust so wonderful to see and t o have been a part of it," M cCollum said. Park Elementary's current p rincipal, Brenda Longshore, w as in school administration f or nine years before becomi ng principal in 2007 and has f elt as if she was "home" all t his time. "I was born and raised h ere, my kids went to school h ere, these people, these stud ents are my family. And I l ove it here at Park," said L ongshore. Longshore and her assist ant principal, Debra T hompson, along with a crew o f teachers, plan to continue t he Park tradition of setting a l asting foundation in element ary students. Park's total enrollment is 5 59 students and it is currentl y a B-grade school, falling o ne letter last year. However, L ongshore and the school c ommunity all feel that the s tudents are avid learners and t hinkers and are confident that the school will continue to excel. "God Bless Park Elementary with many more years to come," said McCollum as she closed out her speech. The crowd cheered with agreement and continued to celebrate the night with their community. Continued from page 1A Page 4ANews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com Ask us about DirecTV 4.1 Cu.Ft. 2 Oven Racks Lift Up Slab Cooktop 2600W Bake 3000W Broil$599Electric Range Model #WDS6063860ŽDLP HD, 3D Ready,8 Color Processor, 2 Component/Composite Video Inputs 21 Cu.Ft.Top Freezer, 2 Glass Shelves, Gallon Door StorageMODEL #FRT21HS6JQRefrigerator WASHER & DRYER 46WX800U, BDX3000 & 2 PR. FPT-AGO1 BUNDLE PAC ALL 3D46WX800U 46Ž240 Hz HDTV,3D Ready, Built In Wi-Fi,Photo Frame Capacity, 1080P Full HD Cinespeed, High Rec PC Input FOR THE PAIR FOR PAIR WHILE THEY LAST$549MODEL #FEF316BQ BDX3000 Full HD 3D Playback,Built In Wi-Fi, Picture In Picture,Dolby True HD & DTS-HD Master Audio,Internet Streaming Capability FPT-AG013D Glasses (2 Pair) Large Glass Area,Wide Frame Design,Adjustable Nose Pad,75 Hrs.Battery Life All For $1995 WASHER & DRYER Model #WDSR2120JWW27ŽTop Load, 3.2 Cu.Ft., 8 Wash Cycles, Flex Care AgitatorModel #DBLR333EGWW27ŽElectric Dryer, 5.8 Cu.Ft.,3 Dry CyclesBISQUE ONLY WHILE THEY LAST$299WHITE & BISQUE WHILE THEY LAST $1149Model #WCVH6800JWW27ŽFront Load, 4.0 Cu.Ft., 26 Wash Cycles, Stainless Steel Drum Model #DCVH680EJWW27ŽElectric Dryer, Deluxe Dryer Rack, Moisture Sensor, Multiple Cycles$999 Television $169WHITE & BLACK ONLYModel #MWV150K1.5 Cu.Ft.,900 Watts, 10 Power Levels, Touch Control, 12ŽGlass Turntable MICROWAVE WE ARE A FULL SERVICE TV REPAIR CENTER. IMPORTANT NOTICE TO: HIGHLANDS COUNTY HOMEOWNERS FROM: C. RAYMOND MCINTYRE, HIGHLANDS COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER RE: HOMESTEAD EXEMPTION FILING PERIOD The annual filing period for Homestead Exemption is January 1, 2011 through March 1, 2011. Please visit our office at the Government Center in Sebring to file applications for all exemptions. The following is a list of all exemptions offered to you as a resident of Florida: Homestead Exemption (Maximum of $50,000): In order to qualify you must own your home and make it your permanent residence on or before January 1, 2011 and be a full-time resident of Florida (requires Florida drivers license if you drive, Florida vehicle tag for your vehicle if you own a vehicle, and voters I.D. in the county in which you live if you are a registered voter.) If divorced please provide copy of your divorce papers. Additional Senior Homestead Exemption ($15,000): To qualify you must meet the requirements listed above for homestead exemption and you must be over 65 years of age (as of January 1, 2011) and have an adjusted gross income of $25,780 (household income) or less for the year 2010. Please contact our office for more details on income requirements for this exemption. (This exemption amount applies only to the taxable value for Board of County Commissioners.) Widows Exemption ($500): To qualify you must meet the same criteria as listed above for Homestead Exemption and you must be a widow. Widowers Exemption ($500): To qualify you must meet the same criteria as listed above for Homestead Exemption and you must be a widower. Disability Exemption (Varies depending on the type and level of disability): To qualify you must meet the same requirements listed above for Homestead Exemption and certain requirements regarding doctors documentation or VAs letter regarding your disability. Contact our office for specific requirements concerning this exemption. We will have clerks in Avon Park and Lake Placid to take applications at the following locations and times: Avon Park … City Hall Council Chambers … Tuesday January 25th From 10am to 4pm Address: 110 E. Main St. Lake Placid … City Office … Wednesday & Thursday January 26th & 27th From 10:00 am to 4:00 pm Address: 311 W. Interlake Blvd We are located at 560 South Commerce Avenue in Sebring or you can contact us at the following numbers: Avon Park (453-7538) Sebring (402-6659) Lake Placid (465-2464) News Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Former and current principals and administrators were honored at Park Elementary's 20 year celebration. The front row of the cafeteria was filled with familiar faces including Pat Landress, Marge Jernigan, Dan Johnson, and current principal Brenda Longshore. Florida's total nonagricultural jobs d eclined 17,900 from November to D ecember, with construction still taking the b iggest hit of 20,200 from December to D ecember. "As opportunities increase, we encourage j ob seekers and employers to stay in regular c ontact with their local One-Stop Career C enters and take advantage of Florida's many a vailable employment and training prog rams." Liberty County in the Panhandle had the state's lowest jobless rate at 7.7 in December. It was followed by Monroe, 7.9 percent; Alachua, 8.2 percent; Leon and Okaloosa, 8.3 percent, and Wakulla, 8.4 percent. Most of those counties have high proportions of government employment including universities and military bases. Flagler and Hendry counties posted the highest unemployment rate of 15.7 percent each. They were followed by Hernando, 14.5 percent; St. Lucie, 14.1 percent; Marion, 14 percent, and Indian River, 13.6 percent. Continued from page 1A Park Elementary celebrates two decades of serving students Local jobless numbers fall in December

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Associated PressHOUSTON Gabrielle G iffords is under intensive c are at Texas Medical Center a fter a flawless trip from A rizona, where throngs of w ell-wishers gave her a f arewell that brought a tearful s mile from the congressw oman. Her new team of doctors p lanned to start her therapy f or a bullet wound to the b rain immediately. She will b e sent to the center's rehabili tation hospital, TIRR M emorial Hermann, after s everal days of evaluation. Giffords has "great rehabili tation potential," Dr. Gerard F rancisco, chief medical offic er at Memorial Hermann, s aid Friday. "She will keep us b usy, and we will keep her b usy as well." The first thing is to determ ine the extent of her injuries a nd the impact on her abilities t o move and communicate. S he hasn't spoken yet, and i t's unknown whether she will s uffer permanent disabilities. Earlier in the day, the carav an carrying the congressw oman swept past cheering c rowds as she left the hospital i n Tucson, Ariz., where she d azzled doctors with her r ecovery from being shot in t he head two weeks ago. Children sat on their pare nts'shoulders as the motorc ade passed. Many waved. O thers carried signs wishing Gabby" well. "She responded very well t o that smiling and even t earing a little bit," said Dr. R andall Friese, a surgeon at t he University Medical C enter trauma center in T ucson who traveled with G iffords. "It was very emot ional and very special." Agunman shot Giffords a nd 18 other people on Jan. 8 a s she met with constituents o utside a grocery store in T ucson. Six people died. The s uspect in the attack, Jared L oughner, 22, is being held in federal custody. Since she was hospitalized, Giffords has made progress nearly every day, with characteristically cautious surgeons calling her improvement remarkable. Each new press conference seemingly yields a few more details about the Giffords that her family knows. Tracy Culbert, a nurse who accompanied Giffords and the congresswoman's husband, Houston-based astronaut Mark Kelly, on the flight, described her as being captivated by a ring on Culbert's finger. The nurse took it off and Giffords put it on her own hand. "She was taking it off my hand and I asked if she wanted to see it," Culbert said. Asked how she felt about leaving Giffords on Friday to return to Arizona, Culbert replied, "Do you want me to cry? "She's a very gentle person," Culbert said, "and her personality is coming out with her touches, the way she touches us, the way she looks at us, and I am very lucky to know her." Then, she added: "I have a lot of hope for her, and I know she's going to do great." Doctors said Giffords will stay in the intensive care unit for now because she has a drain to remove fluid buildup in her brain. She was going to begin rehab immediately, with a session scheduled for Friday afternoon. Because part of her skull was removed during surgery, a helmet was made to protect her brain. Friese said Giffords'husband asked them to make another one with the Arizona flag on it. "We immediately got one the next day," Friese said. Specialists ranging from physical and occupational therapists to speech therapists and psychologists will give a slew of tests to see what she can and cannot do. They'll determine the strength of her legs and her ability to stand and walk. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 5A LIMITED SPACE … CALLTODAY! 5 DAYS a week$ 30 Get In Shape Learn Self Defense Improve Self Esteem Make Better Grades MARTIAL ARTS AMERICA471-2467 Best After School Program in SebringFREEPICKUP from: Kindergarten Learning Center, Cracker Trail, Sun-N-Lakes, Woodlawn, Fred Wild, Memorial, Hill Gustat, Sebring Middle/High Located on Kenilworth Sebring*Some Restrictions Apply Life Care, Not Day Care www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644€LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NO DEALER FEE, PLUS TAX & TAG, STATE FEE, O% withALLY, SEBC RULES APPLY. 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Page 6ANews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com 2521US27N. Sebring(NexttoHomeDepot)(863)386-9859Sebrings Own Meat LoafBaked 1/4 Chicken Pot Roast Country Fried ChickenServed with side and rollSpaghetti Chicken ParmesanServed with garlic breadONLY $7.99Includes Choice of Soda, Tea or CoffeeTHURSDAYLadies Night 6-10pmLadies Drink Free € Well & Draft Karaoke 9pm FRIDAYPrime Rib Dinner10 oz. $15 € 14 oz. $17 Karaoke 8pmSATURDAYAll-U-Can-Eat WingsOnly $15SAT & SUN$1 Drafts EARLY BIRDS11am … 5pm Daily changing their scheduled day meetings to meet the needs of those that work.Highlands Park Volunteer Fire Department elects officersLAKE PLACID The Highlands Park Volunteer Fire Department will hold its annual election of officers at the monthly business meeting on Monday. The meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the firehouse, 1317 Columbus St. All Highlands Park residents are encouraged to attend. For additional information, feel free to call Chief Richard Gavagni at 699-0491 or 243-9441.Orchid Society meets MondaySEBRING The Orchid Society of Highlands County will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. Monday. The meetings are held at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center, 4509 George Blvd. In preparation for the show on March 26-27, the program this month will be on how to prepare plants and construct a container display. The society will also be holding its annual auction on Feb. 12. Guests are always welcome and participants do not have to be knowledgeable of orchids to attend. For additional information, call 4652830 or e-mail at orchidman124@yahoo.com or go to the Web site http://orchidsocietyhighlands.org/. Commodities to be distributedSEBRING February 2011 Commodities will be distributed from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday and Friday, Feb. 10-11 at The Salvation Army, 3135 Kenilworth Blvd. An error was made on the date printed on the handout for February Commodities. If you don't have a 2011 Commodities Card, you can register in the office and receive your Commodities to take with you. If you have any other questions, call the Commodities hotline 3857548, ext. 306.Masons install officers TuesdaySEBRING Highlands Chapter 64, Royal Arch Masons and Heartland Council 43, Royal and Select Masters will have their annual installation of officers at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Sebring Masonic Lodge. Installing officers are Micheal Padrom, for the chapter; James Keaveny, for the council; Steven Steele, marshal; and Gabe Moitozo, chaplain. For more information on the installation or activities, call L. Alvin Hill Sr. at (615) 504-0109 or Tim James Keaveny at 471-9549 OES serves ham dinnerSEBRING Sebring 126 Order of the Eastern Star will host a ham dinner from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. today at the Masonic Lodge, 1809 Home Ave. Cost is $7 each. Tickets are available at the door.Pilates in the Park on Jan. 29 SEBRING The Sebring Gold's Gym is partnering with the Sebring Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) to host a Pilates in the Park event at 10 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 29 in Downtown Sebring's Circle Park. This event is free for anyone to attend and perfect for any exercise level. Come enjoy the beauty and charm of Circle Park while increasing your strength and flexibility. Participants are encouraged to bring a mat or towel and enjoy 50 minutes of pilates fun. After the class, Gold's Gym will give away a onemonth free membership and distribute free week-long passes for everyone who attends. Events planned for lodges, postsAVON PARK Highlands County Moose Lodge 2494 will host Tiki Hut music by Lora Patton at 3 p.m. today. 40/8 meeting is at 6 p.m. Tuesday; cabaneinside, voiture outside. The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 will have the NFLBig Ticket up at 1 p.m. today. Karaoke by Dan Mussellman from 5-8 p.m. Tuesday. For details and menu selection, call 452-9853. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose Lodge 2374 will host karaoke with Double D on today. For details and menu selection, call 465-0131. The Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 will host music by Frankie Monday. ABPOE board meeting is set for 7:30 p.m. BPOE initiation is at 7 p.m. Tuesday. For details and menu selection, call 465-2661. SEBRING The Sebring Moose Lodge will host bingo at 1 p.m. today. Texas Hold-em will be played from 7-10 p.m. Monday. For more informa tion and menu selection, ca ll 655-3920.Patty Waszak performs at ReflectionsAVON PARK Patty Waszak will bring her show to Reflections on Silver Lake at 6:30 p.m. Monday. Waszak is a vocalist, musician, comedienne and has been known to dance a step or two. Her enthusiasm for enter tainment and sincere love o f her audience is evident in every performance. Tickets for this lively, up tempo show are $7. For more information call 4525037. New Odyssey Show comes to Sebring Village MondaySEBRING Sebring Village presents New Odyssey Show Three Guy s, Thirty Instruments at 7:30 p.m. Monday. Outstanding arrangements of almost every style are performed o n 30 different musical instruments. This act is versatile, funny, novel, talented, polished, family-oriented and awesome in presentation. Tickets are $10. For mor e information or to purchase tickets, call 386-0045 or 273-0875.Recreation Club plans several eventsSEBRING The Sebrin g Recreation Club will host the following events this week: Monday 9 a.m., State AM/any doubles tournament/Avon Park; 1 p.m., Ladies Social Club; 1:15 p.m., shuffleboard scrambles. Tuesday 9 a.m., State AM/any doubles tournament/Avon Park; 12:30 p.m ., bridge; 3 p.m., ping pong. Wednesday 1 p.m., pinochle; 1:15 p.m., shuffle board league; 6:30 p.m., lin e dancing. Thursday 9 a.m., shuf fleboard tournament/any doubles/no two pros; 1 p.m ., euchre; 3 p.m., ping pong; 7 p.m., bingo. Friday 9 a.m., shuffle board tournament/any doubles/no two pros; 12:30 p.m ., Bridge. For details, call (262) 22 43819.Shrine Ladies Bunco canceledAVON PARK The Bunco game scheduled for Tuesday at the Highlands Shrine Club has been cancelled. The next event will take place on Tuesday, Feb 22. Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS o f the housing collapse," s aid Louis Schacht, a Vero B each farmer whose family h as grown oranges for 60 y ears. Trees don't pass the bact eria to each other. Instead, g reening also known as y ellow dragon disease, HIB o r, in Chinese, H uanglongbing is spread b y insects. There is no cure. Hundreds of researchers f rom more than a dozen c ountries converged on O rlando last week to talk a bout the disease and hear t he latest research. They f ound hope in one a nnouncement: A U niversity of Florida-led g roup of international scient ists has assembled the g enome sequences for two c itrus varieties sweet o range and Clementine m andarin in an effort to d etermine why trees are so s usceptible to greening. E ventually, they hope to e ngineer varieties that a ren't. "There is nothing we h ave today that is effective a gainst the bacteria," said D an Gunter, chief operating o fficer of the Citrus R esearch and Development F oundation Inc., which f unds research on greening a nd other citrus issues. Two percent to 3 percent o f Florida's citrus trees die i n a typical year because of t hings like cold weather, b ugs or old age. But since g reening emerged, 4 percent t o 5 percent have been lost e ach year, experts said. Since most of Florida's o ranges become juice, while C alifornia mainly grows t hose found in lunch boxes, g reening could eventually a ffect consumers at the b reakfast table. "Greening means lower availability of juice, more uncertainty of juice supplies," said Bob Norberg, the deputy executive director of research and operations at the Florida Department of Citrus. Analysts say shoppers can already expect to pay more after a hard freeze damaged one-third of Florida's early orange crop varieties and nearly half of the midseason crop this year. Replacing trees killed by greening has proved costly and, in some cases, futile. Young trees need irrigation and expensive fertilizer and take time to grow. In their early years, they produce less fruit than older trees. And, in a cruel twist of fate, young trees appear to be the most susceptible to the insect that transmits the greening bacteria. "The insect that transmits the disease generally is looking for new growth on a tree," Norberg said. "Young trees are all new growth and that insect is more attracted by younger trees." At Schacht's grove on Florida's east coast, the smell of sweet juice fills the air as he packs fat honeybell tangelos, navel oranges and ruby red grapefruit into boxes for customers across the United States. In the nearby retail store, Schacht's father serves slices of the citrus and little cups of juice to visiting tourists. The family farm sits in the middle of the so-called Indian River growing area, which stretches from coastal Palm Beach to Daytona Beach and 20 miles inland. It's the biggest orange and grapefruit growing area in Florida, contributing a sizeable chunk to the state's $9 billion citrus industry, and farmers say the calcium-rich soil and tropical breezes make their fruit especially tasty. Schacht, however, worries about his and other growers'future in the area. Like most other farmers, he first learned of greening in 2005 and, shortly afterward, found it in a 3-year-old Valencia orange tree. Since then, 40 of his 280 acres of trees have been affected. Scientists say the bacteria and insects responsible for greening entered the U.S. in Miami-Dade County and spread north. Schacht's groves were in the path. "It's hard to identify," said Schacht, pointing to a scraggly tree with yellow leaves and puny, green oranges. "It affects the leaves first, they have a blotchy yellowness. Alot of times, it's mistaken for a nutrient deficiency." Some farmers are trying to control the disease by using certain combinations of nutrients. Meanwhile, Schacht shakes his head and says he's not sure what to do about the 40 acres he's lost. He doesn't want to spend the money on new trees, irrigation and fertilizer, only to lose them to the disease again. "When you see what it does to a tree, it's pretty bad," he said. Continued from page 1A MCTphoto A citrus tree affected with greening is removed from a grove near Miami. Citrus greening a major threat There is nothing we have today that is effective against the bacteria.'DANGUNTER Citrus Research and Development Foundation By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comAVON PARK Two of H ighlands County's middle s chools recently held m ythology bees and awarde d the first winners of the c ontests at each school. S everal students at Avon P ark and Hill-Gustat M iddle Schools have been s tudying Greek mythology s ince the fall months in o rder to participate in the c ompetition. Students took a written e xam in late November and t he students with the best s cores were allowed to c ompete in the second, live p hase of the contest, an oral c ompetition where students f ielded questions on ancient Greek mythology. The students were broadcast on a large screen in each of the schools'commons where family, friends and faculty were able to cheer on their little experts. APMS held their competition in the evening and HGMS held theirs the following morning. After a heated competition at each school, the three top winners were awarded with trophies and $20 gift certificates to Books-A-Million. The winners from Avon Park's 2010 Mythology Bee were Andrew Mullins in first place, second place was Joshua King and third was 2009 champion Koy McGrath. The winner at Hill-Gustat was Siddarth Ananthan. Second place was Zach Dunlavy and third place was Gauri Persad. Daniel Fantin is the media specialist at both Hill Gustat and Avon Park Middle Schools and played a large role in the coordination of the bees. "All the students participating in the mythology bees did their best and worked hard. We certainly appreciate their hard work. Thank you to all the contestants and a big congratulations to the winners," said Fantin. Middle schools students show off their Greek mythology knowledge Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155 NEWS-SUN€ 385-6155

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 7A Contact Usƒ By Phone (863) 385-6155 By Mail 2227 US Hwy 27S Sebring, FL 33870 By E-Mail www.newssun.com/contact/ "When the lines get long, l ike they are now, we try to c ut it back a minute so that e veryone gets to play." Stevens is on his second y ear as a Winter Fest volunt eer. He, along with two S ebring High School stud ents 10th graders Olivia N apper and Juniett Gonzalez worked hard to keep the l ittle ones having as much f un as possible. "This is our first year, we h eard about the volunteering t hrough the Key Club so we d ecided to sign up," said N apper. "It's really fun to watch t he little kids enjoy the s now," Gonzalez said. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by ROBYN BAKALUS Navaeh Tyson, 4, enjoys spending time with her dad Kenny on Saturday during the Snow Fest in Sebring. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Eli Clemons, 2, gets his hands into the snow during Saturday's Winter Fest. Winter Fest a hit once again By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comTALLAHASSEE F igures for crash fatalities s tatewide have declined for t he fifth straight year, but H ighlands County actually s aw a slight increase in 2010. Last year, Florida experie nced 2,430 traffic crash f atalities, a three-decade low n umber of traffic crash fatali ties and an annual decrease o f more than five percent, a ccording to preliminary data f rom the Florida Department o f Highway Safety and Motor V ehicles. By comparison, 2,563 peop le died in traffic crashes in 2 009. The number of crash fatali ties in 2010 is the lowest the s tate has seen since 1978 e ven though the Sunshine State's population has doubled since that time. "It is encouraging to see the number of traffic fatalities continue to drop, and the department will continue our efforts to educate motorists and aggressively enforce the traffic laws to create the safest possible driving environment," DHSMVexecutive director Julie L. Jones said. "Unfortunately, we know all too well the devastating impact that even a single fatality resulting from a careless, inattentive or impaired driver can have on a family and community." Highlands, on the other hand, had 19 fatalities in 2010, according to the DHSMVreport, up slightly over the 15 fatalities in 2009. Five of those fatalities resulted from the Feb. 22 tour bus crash at Lake Francis Road and U.S. 27. Motor vehicle crashes are the No. 1 killer of people between the ages of 5-34, said the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in the report released by the DHSMVon Friday. Additionally, the CDC reported that, "seat belt use is the single most effective way to save lives and reduce injuries in crashes" and "using seat belts reduces serious injuries and deaths in crashes by about 50 percent." To learn more about DHSMVand the services offered, visit www.flhsmv.gov or follow them on Twitter at at FDHSMV. Traffic crash stats show state down, Highlands up in fatalities i ncluding the World C ompetition in Orlando in 2 005," Aguila explained. Aguila went on to explain h ow long of a process it's b een to appear on "The T onight Show." Apparently i t's not an easy thing to a ccomplish. "I sent a tape off to the s how back in 2007 and the t imes just always conflicted. T hey are really nice though, t hey've always kept in touch t hrough e-mail and they call p retty often too. I got an em ail on last week saying they c ould book, they sent my t icket a few days after and I 'll be appearing on W ednesday," Aguila said. "I'm so proud of him," s aid Aguila's mother Y olanda. "The community h as been so supportive of h im." The "hidden talent" Aguila p osses is quite impressive a nd though he's always kept i t a secret, Aguila is ready to b roadcast it to the world. "I've spent a lot of time m astering it. Music has helped me do that. Music has a rhythm, it has a pattern and so does (his hidden talent) but instead of sounds it's colors and patterns," explained Aguila. Aguila is excited to finally show his other talent to the world, and the fact that he does the hidden talent all while playing his trumpet is mind boggling and surely a sight to see. "I'm really excited. I've kept it a secret for almost five years and as far as I know I'm the only one in the world who can do this." David Aguila will be appearing on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno on Wednesday at 11:35 p.m. He will be returning to Highlands County for a community fundraiser in March. He will be playing his trumpet for a benefit in Avon Park and may even showcase his other talent for the local community. Continued from page 1A Aguila ready to reveal hidden talent to the world on Tonight Show' I'm really excited. I've kept it a secret for almost five years and as far as I know I'm the only one in the world who can do this..'DAVIDAGUILA musician and ??? Did YouKNOW?EMERGENCY VEHICLESUpon the immediate approach of an authorized emergency vehicle,while en route to meet an existing emergency,the driver of every other vehicle shall,when such emergency vehicle is giving audible signals by siren,exhaust whistle, or other adequate device,or visible signals by the use of displayed blue or red lights,yield the right-of-way to the emergency vehicle and shall immediately proceed to a position parallel to,and as close as reasonable to the closest edge of the curb of the roadway,clear of any intersection and shall stop and remain in position until the authorized emergency vehicle has passed,unless otherwise directed by any law enforcement officer.YOUCANBETICKETEDFORFAILINGTOPULL OVERANDSTOPWHENANAMBULANCE, POLICE, FIREOROTHEREMERGENCYVEHICLEIS TRAVELLINGTOMEETANEMERGENCY. BELOWISTHEFLORIDALAW.

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Page 8ANews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com GettingYouBack onYourFeetIsJust theFirstStep! GettingYouBack onYourFeetIsJust theFirstStep!Keith A. Bowyer, Jr., PTBest Physical Therapist2006 € 2007 € 2008 € 2009 € 2010License FL PT 16172Herdman Certifiedin Vestibular Rehabilitation If youre injured or facing surgery, we provide personalized physical therapy care to help you recover quickly and safely. From hands-on therapy to pain management techniques and therapeutic exercise, our expert team will put their extensive training and experience to work for you. Call us today to schedule an appointment at your convenience.Shoulder, Hip, Knee & Back Therapy.Most Insurance Plans Accepted100 YMCA Ln. Sebring, Fl 33875863-382-2949 visit us on the web at www.bowyerpt.com Also treating dizziness & balance BOWYERPHYSICALTHERAPY BOWYERPHYSICALTHERAPY Acapulco8868s Berlin3221sf Calgary3615pc Dublin4335pc Edmonton348pc Freeport6651s Geneva3527s Hong Kong6653pc Jerusalem5942s Kiev2719c London4336s h Montreal0-17s Nice5541s Ottawa-5-17s Quebec-2-18s Rio de Janeiro8877s Sydney8470s Toronto7-7c Vancouver4541r Winnipeg205s n Albuquerque4522pc5126pc5329s Atlanta4928s4736c4826r Baltimore3016s2421c3232sn Birmingham5230pc5031r4824r Boston194pc136s2318pc Charlotte4629s4030c4233sn Cheyenne4120c4126pc4422pc Chicago1610c2819sn2814pc Cleveland174pc2623sn2821sn Columbus208pc2927sn3422sn Dallas5127c5931s5534pc Denver4720pc4624c5322pc Detroit148pc2219sn2819sn Harrisburg276pc1818pc2821sn Honolulu8168s8166s8168s Houston6142sh5735pc5935pc Indianapolis2313c3222sn3018sn Jacksonville5530s6438c6433r Kansas City1412sn3513sn3120pc Lexington2620pc3928sn3523sn Little Rock4828c4829c4728pc Los Angeles7348s7748s7852s Louisville2922c4128sn3623sn Memphis4730c4430c4026c Miami6854s7357pc7555pc Minneapolis76c194sn2110pc Nashville3926c4330sn4022sn New Orleans6044pc6138r5535c New York City255pc1717pc3030sn Norfolk3720s3533c4735sn Oklahoma City3521c4922pc4927pc Philadelphia277pc1919pc3030sn Phoenix6942s7044s7247s Pittsburgh183pc2422c3322sn Portland18-2pc9-4s188s Raleigh4528s3733c4432sn Rochester12-7sf1510c2616sn St.Louis2216sn3716sn3017pc San Francisco6344s6242s6244s Seattle4742r5240r5037pc Tampa6140s6752pc6750sh Washington, DC3116s2825c3632sn Weather History Heat index ¨ Five-Day forecast for Highlands County High 65/Low 36High 72/Low 44High 69/Low 43High 65/Low 39High 64/Low 42 W inds:NE at 4-8 mph.Winds:ESE at 4-8 mph.Winds:W at 10-20 mph.Winds:NNW at 7-14 mph.Winds:NW at 7-14 mph.TODAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAY A full day of sunshine Intervals of clouds and sunshine Chance for a couple of showers Intervals of clouds and sun Mostly sunny AccuWeather UVIndexTMThe higher the UV index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2, Low;3-5, Moderate;6-7, High; 8-10, Very High;11+ Extreme9 a.m.11 a.m.1 p.m.3 p.m.5 p.m. 14541 U.S.cities World cities Florida citiesWeather ( W ): s -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice. CityHiLoWCityHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCityHiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCityHiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCityHiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCityHiLoWHiLoWHiLoWFor 3 p.m.today For today Browning, Mont., had a world record 100-degree-plus change on Jan.23, 1916.After a morning reading of 44, arctic air dropped the temperature to 56 below zero overnight. Relative humidity ....................28% Expected air temperature ........64¡ Makes it feel like ......................65¡ Sun and moon Moon phases LastNewFirstFull Jan 26Feb 2Feb 11Feb 18 Washington W a s h i n g t o n 31/16 3 1 / 1 6 New York N e w Y o r k 25/5 2 5 / 5 Miami M i a m i 68/54 6 8 / 5 4 Atlanta A t l a n t a 49/28 4 9 / 2 8 Detroit D e t r o i t 14/8 1 4 / 8 Houston H o u s t o n 61/42 6 1 / 4 2 Chicago C h i c a g o 16/10 1 6 / 1 0 Minneapolis M i n n e a p o l i s 7/6 7 / 6 Kansas City K a n s a s C i t y 14/12 1 4 / 1 2 El Paso E l P a s o 52/24 5 2 / 2 4 Denver D e n v e r 47/20 4 7 / 2 0 Billings B i l l i n g s 42/23 4 2 / 2 3 Los Angeles L o s A n g e l e s 73/48 7 3 / 4 8 San Francisco S a n F r a n c i s c o 63/44 6 3 / 4 4 Seattle S e a t t l e 47/42 4 7 / 4 2 Washington 31/16 New York 25/5 Miami 68/54 Atlanta 49/28 Detroit 14/8 Houston 61/42 Chicago 16/10 Minneapolis 7/6 Kansas City 14/12 El Paso 52/24 Denver 47/20 Billings 42/23 Los Angeles 73/48 San Francisco 63/44 Seattle 47/42 Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands ar e highs for the day.Forecast high and low temperatures are given for selected citie s. Bitterly cold air will remain entrenched over the Northeast and Midwest today.A storm on the central Plains will bring snow to Missouri, southern Illinois and northern Arkansas.A couple inches of snow will blanket some cities and towns in this area, making roads slippery and treacherous.Spotty showers will dampen areas farther south in Arkansas into eastern Texas.Light snow will also fall over North Dakota and northern Minnesota as another storm system edges past to the north. National Forecast for January 23 A full day of sunshine today.Partly cloudy and chilly tonight.Intervals of clouds and sunshine tomorrow.Tuesday:partly sunny with a couple of showers possible.Wednesday:intervals of clouds and sun. Thursday:mostly sunny. Avon Park Tallahassee Jacksonville St.Petersburg Miami Sebring Lorida Lake Placid Venus 64/41 64/41 65/37 64/37 58/26 55/30 61/41 68/54 65/36Shown is today's weather.Temperatures are today's highs and tonight's lows Regional forecast Water restrictions Almanac Farm reportA full day of sunshine today.Winds northeast 4-8 mph.Expect a full day of sunshine with average relative humidity 45% and fair drying conditions.Partly cloudy tonight. FRONTS Shower s T-storm Rain Flurries Snow Ice Cold Warm StationaryDaytona Beach6137s6643pc6941sh Ft.Laud.Bch6854s7256pc7554pc Fort Myers6545s7049pc7248pc Gainesville5726s6338c6632r Homestead AFB6750s7253pc7651pc Jacksonville5530s6438c6433r Key West6459s7160pc7361pc Miami6854s7357pc7555pc Orlando6241s6845pc7144sh Pensacola6044pc6242r5832r Sarasota6342s6445pc7047sh Tallahassee5826s6342c6227r Tampa6140s6752pc6750sh W.Palm Bch6650s7153pc7549pcTemperature(Readings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake Placid)High Tuesday ..........................79 Low Tuesday ............................55 High Wednesday ....................82 Low Wednesday ......................51 High Thursday ........................82 Low Thursday ..........................55 Precipitation Tuesday ..............................0.13" Wednesday ........................0.00" Thursday ............................0.00" Month to date ......................0.99" Year to date ........................0.99" Barometer Tuesday ..............................29.92 Wednesday ........................30.07 Thursday ............................29.85 Tides(Readings at St.Petersburg)High ..............................3:47 a.m. Low ............................10:31 a.m. High ..............................4:43 p.m. Low ............................10:50 p.m.(Readings at Palm Beach)High ............................11:08 a.m. Low ..............................4:36 a.m. High ............................11:40 p.m. Low ..............................5:05 p.m. Lake Levels Lake Jackson ....................78.36' Lake Okeechobee ..............12.43' Normal ..............................14.51' TodaySunrise ....7:14 a.m. Sunset ......6:02 p.m. Moonrise 10:25 p.m. Moonset ....9:41 a.m. MondaySunrise ....7:13 a.m. Sunset ......6:03 p.m. Moonrise 11:28 p.m. Moonset ..10:20 a.m.If your address (house number) ends in... ...0 or 1, water only on Monday ...2 or 3, water only on Tuesday ...4 or 5, water only on Wednesday ...6 or 7, water only on Thursday ...8 or 9*, water only on Friday and locations without a discernible address TodayTodayNational summary:Regional summary: Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather,Inc. 2011 -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110sAccuWeather.com The Newspaper All Around Your Worldƒ In the Classroomcurrent events vocabulary geography At the Officebusiness news networking Over Coffeegarage sales local advertising community Family Timetravel recreation family events Sunday Morningcomics games puzzles Onlinelocal events email highlights 24-hour updates Support your local newspaper and the continued tradition of quality journalism by renewing your subscription today,and well continue to deliver. Thanks,readers! Rain,Sleet,Hail,Heat,Potholes,Flat Tires... Nothing stops them from making their deliveries!www.newssun.com We celebrate how the newspaper has evolved to meet our changing needs without sacrificing the quality coverage youve come to expect. Day after day, anywhere you go,the newspaper delivers. Whether in print or online,it brings us the latest headlines from across town and around the world,local events,lots of laughs, touching stories,money-saving offers and so much more. Call 863-385-6155 for home delivery!

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BUSINESS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, January 23, 2011 SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. EXPIRES 1-29-11 www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644 LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NO DEALER FEESPLUS TAX, TAG, & STATE FEES. Since 1931 MOST WANTED DEALS MOST WANTED DEALS 2008 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT WAS$ 23995 NOW$ 21999 #X0127 2008 CHR YSLER TOWN & COUNTRY T O U R ING WAS$ 20995 NOW$ 18889 #L0143 2005 CHR YSLER PT CRUISER CONV. WAS$ 12999 NOW$ 10888 #X0120 2006 CHR YSLER 300 LIMITED WAS$ 18995 NOW$ 15888 #TX114A 2006 DODGE DURANGO SLT WAS$ 16995 NOW$ 14399 #CX032B 2008 TOYOTA FJ CRUISER 4X4 WAS$ 24995 NOW$ 22888 #X0148 2010 DODGE CHARGER SXT WAS$ 19995 NOW$ 18898 #X0154 2010 DODGE JOURNEY WAS$ 20995 NOW$ 18999 #X0156 WAS$ 15995 NOW$ 13888 #X0140A 2008 CHR YSLER SEBRING TOURING CONV. WAS$ 19995 NOW$ 17888 #0147 WAS$ 18995 NOW$ 16889 #CX129A WAS$ 24995 NOW$ 21888 #X01582008 TOYOTA SCION XB 2010 SEBRING TOURING CONVERTIBLE 2007 CHRYSLER PACIFICA TOURING 3rd Row SeatCome by & check em out! News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Lisa Baldwin (left) and Rose Sapp at Scrap Paper Scissors in Lake Placid. Their business has expanded three times in 25 months. The ladies say it's because scrapping is a great hobby, and their customers are more like friends and family. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comLAKE PLACID And they said it couldn't be done. Lisa Baldwin is seated at a table in her store and meeting place, Scrap Paper Scissors at 244 Interlake Blvd. She puts down the project she's working on and laughs. "I can't tell you how many people told me it was a bad idea," Baldwin said, referring to when she first got the idea of opening a place where people interested in making scrap books and other paper projects could come for instruction, supplies, work space and a good conversation. In fact, Baldwin's move into her new address almost directly across the street from her first shop is the third expansion for the business in just over two years. While some businesses struggle, Scrap Paper Scissors has gone from needing 900 square feet, to 1,500 squares feet to 2,500 square feet all in 25 months. "Our business neighbors along the road call us the little engine that could," Baldwin said, laughing in delight. But more has changed over the years than size. Baldwin began the business with a partner, who soon dropped out of the arrangement. Baldwin worked alone for months, all the Cut and paste has new meaning in Lake Placid Scrap Paper Scissors keeps expanding See SCRAP, page 3B Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) will host its next "What's Up Downtown" meeting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Cusworth Pub inside the Kenilworth Lodge. The meeting will provide updates on the CRA's new business incentive programs, Streetscape project, Downtown Sebring events, and CRAmarketing initiatives. "We encourage anyone who has an interest in Downtown Sebring is encouraged to attend these informative meetings that are well attended by merchants, government officials, residents, potential business owners, realtors and media," said Pete Pollard, CRAexecuti ve director. The mission of the CR A is to bring about the ec onomic revitalization of an established target area. T o create a re-investment env ironment that attracts priva te investors into the area. T o promote improvemen ts within the redevelopme nt area through renovation an d restoration of buildings, as well as to encourage ne w construction. To acquire t he funding necessary to ma ke the infrastructure improv ements necessary to attra ct investment dollars an d improve the assessed ta xable value of district prope rties and to assist the cham ber of commerce and dow ntown merchants in the ir efforts to market the dow ntown businesses. Find out What's Up Downtown?' in Sebring on Tuesday Special to the News-SunSEBRING Island View Lakefront Restaurant & Pub, at Sun 'N Lake Golf Course, is open to the public with a brand new menu Monday through Saturday. Island View provides a casual atmosphere with classic island sophistication. The special Sunset Dining menu offered from 3-5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, exceptional Friday night Chef's Creations, regularly sche duled entertainment and fam ily fun nights bring a flair of fun to a flavorful dinin g experience. Executive Chef Kev in Heim comes with 12 yea rs experience at The Rit zCarlton, bringing a passio n for flavor and visu al panache in his offerings. For the full menu an d additional information, vi sit IslandViewRestaurant.co m or call 382-1191. Island View restaurant offers flavors to savor Between holiday shopp ing bills now coming d ue, increased winter h eating bills and the u pcoming income tax s eason, many people are f eeling the pinch. Your b est bet for getting back o n track is probably to t rim expenses. Here are several ideas big and small that m ight do the trick: Lower your thermos tat. Each degree you l ower it saves up to 3 p ercent on your heating b ill. Turning down your t hermostat 10 to 15 d egrees for eight hours at n ight can save about 5 to 1 5 percent. For a $300 m onthly heating bill, t hat's up to $45 in savi ngs. Up to 30 percent of h eated or cooled air can b e lost through leaks, so a dd insulation, apply w eather stripping around w indows and doors and Feeling the pinch? Personal Finance Jason Alderman See BELT, page 3B

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T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sunon a ny changes in this listing by c alling 385-6155, ext. 516; s end any changes by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail t hem to News-SunCommunity C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 L ake Placid has lounge hours f rom 1-9 p.m. Live music is f rom 5-8 p.m. For details, call 4 65-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p .m. Members and guests o nly. Post is at 528 N. Pine S t., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Highlands Shrine Club, 2 604 State Road 17 South, at 2 -4 p.m. has country music p layed by Just Country. D onation $3 for single, and $5 f or couple. Refreshments a vailable. Everyone welcome. Inerstate chapter of A .B.A.T.E. meets the last S unday of every month at The B lue Crab, 825 Ridgewood D r., Sebring at 11 a.m. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2 661 lounge is open from 1-7 p .m. Card games start at 1:30 p .m. The lodge is open to m embers and their guests. For d etails, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has k araoke in the pavilion. H orseshoes played at 9:30 a .m. Food available at 4 p.m. O pen to members and qualif ied guests only. Loyal Order of Moose H ighlands County Lodge No. 2 494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon P ark. Cards start at 4 p.m. M usic outside Tiki Hut at 3 p .m. Lodge phone number 4 52-0579. Overeaters Anonymous, m eets from 4-5 p.m. in second f loor conference roomNo. 3 at F lorida Hospital Heartland M edical Center, 4200 Sun N L ake Blvd., Sebring. For d etails, call 382-7731. No d ues, fees or weigh-ins. For d etails on the organization, go t o www.oa.org. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves lunch at 2 p.m. at the c lub, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. F or details, call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2 259 offers NASCAR racing in t he pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar o pen and kitchen open from 25 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S. 9 8, Sebring. For details, call 6 55-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 3880 serves hamburgers f rom 4-5:30 p.m. and plays p oker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1 224 County Road 621 East, L ake Placid. For details, call 6 99-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 plays euchre at 1 :30 p.m. and E&J Karaoke is f rom 4:30-7:30 p.m. at the p ost, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, S ebring. For details, call 3858 902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN W ITH ME family group meets a t 10:30 a.m. every Monday at t he Heartland Christian Church o n Alt. 27 in Sebring. The c hurch is behind Southgate S hopping Center where Publix i s. F or more information call 3855 714. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal C hurch, Lakeshore Drive, S ebring. For more details, call 3 85-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous O ne Day At ATime group m eets for a closed discussion a t 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant P resbyterian Church, 4500 S un N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. F or details, call 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 6:30 p.m. at R osewood Center, 517 U.S. 2 7 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at S t. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. F or details, call 202-0647. American Legion Placid P ost 25Lake Placid has shuff leboard at 1 p.m. Lounge h ours are 12-9 p.m. For d etails, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen noon to 8 p.m. Happy h our from 4-6 p.m. Call 4711 448. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and guests. For details, call 3850234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake Placid. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-8118. Diabetes Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday from 1-2:30 p.m. in Florida Hospital Conference Room 3 in Sebring. Call 4020177 for guest speaker list. Dual Diagnosed (Addiction and Mental Health) Support Group meets from 7-8:30 p.m. the fourth Monday at 4023 Sun 'N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 386-5687. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The AgriCenter. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Garden Club of Sebring meets noon, fourth Monday, Sebring Civic Center. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets the second and fourth Monday at the Sebring Country Estates Civic Association clubhouse, 3240 Grand Prix Drive (down the street from Wal-Mart). Dancing will be held every month until April 2008. Classes are being started now in the Sebring and Lake Placid area. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or visit the Web site at www.samdun.net.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 314-8877. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Democratic Executive Committee meets 7 p.m. fourth Monday in the Democratic Party Headquarters, 4216 Sebring Parkway, Sebring. For details, call 699-6052. Highlands County Rotary Club meets at 6 p.m. at Charlie's Restaurant, Commerce Street, Sebring. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. For details, call 402-6540. Highlands Sertoma Club meets noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. Highlands County Senior Squadron, Civil Air Patrol the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary meets the second and fourth Monday nights at the Sebring Airport Terminal Building. All are welcome. For further information, call 471-1433 between 4 and 7 p.m. Lake Placid American Legion Post 25 meets 8 p.m., Legion hall. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. National Association for the Advancement of the Colored People, Highlands County Branch meets 7:30 p.m., 401 Tulane, Avon Park. Orchid Society of Highlands County meets 7 p.m. on the fourth Monday at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center, 4509 George Blvd., Sebring. Call Ed Fabik at 465-2830 for details. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 12-4:30 p.m. second and fourth Monday in Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. No meetings from end of May to October. For details, call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Brady's, Sebring. Sebring AARP meets 1:30 p.m., The Palms, Pine Street, Sebring. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 has pizza and darts at 7:30 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. For information, call 471-2522. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 plays Texas Hold em at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Monday at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing. For details, call 6553920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. For details, call Judy O'Boyle at 260-0831. Veterans of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliary Post 4300 meets 2 p.m. fourth Monday, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Volunteers of America of Florida is a nonprofit organization in Sebring that specializes in assisting person's with mental illness. We are pleased to announce our Drop in Center is open to individuals with a mental illness 6 days a week from 11am to 3 pm. The center offers a welcoming environment where individuals are accepted and feel comfortable. For more information please contact Wendy at 863382-2022.TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parking available south of old church. 8 & 40 Salon 687 Call Betty Darmer, 465-2272, for details. Alzheimer's/Dementia Seminar held at 11 a.m. every fourth Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid. Also sponsored by Nurse on Call. Covers common signs of dementia, coping and care giving tips, disease management, organizations, etc. Call 465-0568. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For details, call 4657940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Audubon Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Masonic Lodge, downtown Lake Placid on the corner of Main and Park. Bring a covered dish to share, utensils and plates, at 6:30 p.m. or come at 7:30 p.m. for presentations by guest speaker. The public is invited. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. For details, call 452-2385. AvonPark Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Beta Sigma Phi, Xi Nu Sigma Chapter of Avon Park, meets the second and fourth Tuesday each month in the members home. Call president Mary Joinerr at 382-4488 or vice president Linda Webster at 385-1124. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. Everyone is welcome. For more details, call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at "The Rock," Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost selfesteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. For details, contact Celebrate Recovery coordinator Pam Sim by calling 453-3345, ext. 106. The Computer Club at Buttonwood Bay meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month November through March. We invite anyone interested in expanding their computer knowledge to attend the Buttonwood Bay Bytes Computer Club meeting. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For more details, call 385-3288. Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 471-2294 or 386-5098. Heartland Symphony Orchestra rehearsals from 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesdays in the Green Room in the South Florida Community College auditorium building. Bring music and instruments. New members welcome. Call conductor Bryan Johnson at 800949-7248, ext. 7231. Highlands County Community Orchestra rehearses each Tuesday in the Green Room of the South Florida Community College Performing Arts Theater, 5:307:30 p.m. Entrance is at the rear of the building. String players especially needed. Strings call Eugene Longo at 699-1975; winds call Kim Houser at 453-6049 for more information. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets first and third Tuesday, St. Agnes Episcopal Church, Sebring. Call Lynn Ullinn for meeting times at 314-0557 or e-mail luckyduck@mymailstation.com. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Call 382-0312. Knights of Columbus Council 5441 meets 8 p.m. every second and fourth Tuesday at Knights of Columbus Hall, 900 U.S. 27 N., Sebring. For details, call 385-0987. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Jaycees meets 7:30 p.m., Jaxson's. Board meeting, 6:30 p.m. Call Joe Collins, 655-5545, for details. LAKEPLACIDLIONSClub meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday each month at Herons Garden, 501 US 27 North, Lake Placid. Call Jeanne at 699-0743. Lake Placid Women of the Moose has a business meeting at 7:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday at the lodge. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Masonic Lodge meets 8 p.m., 106 N. Main St., Lake Placid. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Churc h, 1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup. c om. For details, call 382-7731 Visit www.oa.org for more information on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Placid Lake s Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. For details, call 4654888. Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) offers a full range of voluntee r opportunities for people age 55 and over. RSVPmeets on the fourth Tuesday each month, 10 a.m., at the Highlands Little Theatre. Please join us for coffee and to learn more about current volunteer opportunities in Highlands County. Any interested and enrolled volunteers are invited to attend. For mor e information call Kris Schmidt, coordinator, RSVP, at 7847189. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near th e library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-3829 or 471-9900. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If interested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sign in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Cost is $2. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves soft shell tacos 5 7 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing. Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. For details, call 655 3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. an d table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dee's Restaurant, Sebring. For details, call Scot t Albritton at 402-1819. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 6 -7 p.m. at the Atonement Lutheran Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Communit y Bible Church, 1400 CR-17A N., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. For details, call 452 1093. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 has a card tournament at 2 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 3858902. Page 2BNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com COMMUNITYCALENDAR NEWS-SUN€ 385-6155

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c aulk around ducts, plumbi ng bypasses and other openi ngs. Water heating is the t hird-largest home energy e xpense, so try lowering y our water heater temperat ure to 120 degrees or lower t o see if it's still comforta ble. Energy Star products cons ume up to 50 percent less e nergy and water than stand ard models (visit w ww.energystar.gov). Compact fluorescent l amps use up to 75 percent l ess energy than incandesc ent bulbs and last three to 1 0 times longer. Although i nitially more expensive, t hey last six to 15 times l onger. Afaucet leaking one d rop per second wastes a bout 2,000 gallons a year. If you have lowd eductible home, renter's or a uto insurance (say $250), a sk your insurer how much y our premiums would drop b y raising the deductible to $ 500 or $1,000. Many save 1 5 to 30 percent or more. Balance your checkb ook to avoid fees for overd rawn accounts and returned c hecks. Ask your bank about p hone or e-mail alerts when y our balance drops below a certain level or payments are due. Switch to free checking. You can shop rates for banks at www.bankrate.com and find credit unions for which you're eligible at the Credit Union National Association (www.cuna.org). Consider generic vs. brand-name drugs; copayments are usually much lower. Ask whether your insurance offers quantity discounts for mail-order prescriptions. Often, the copayment for a 60or 90-day supply will equal a 30-day supply at a regular pharmacy. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about pharmaceutical companies'drug assistance programs for uninsured or low-income people. There's a lot of paperwork involved, but you could save thousands of dollars if you qualify. Examine your phone bill for services you're not using like call waiting, call forwarding or caller ID. Dropping them could save $100 a year or more, depending on your plan. Slow down. Fuel efficiency drops about 5 mpg for each 10-mile speed increase over 55 mph. And finally, this may be my favorite off-the-wall tip: By switching from Ariel, the most common type font, to Century Gothic, someone printing 25 pages a week on their home printer could save $20 a year in ink costs. For more cost-saving ideas: AARPhas great tips on the "Budgeting & Saving" site (www.aarp.org). America Saves is full of savings strategies and links to other resources (www.americasaves.org). Visa Inc.'s free personal financial management program Practical Money Skills for Life (www.practicalmoneyskills.com) offers numerous savings and budgeting tools. Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. To follow Jason Alderman on Twitter go to ww.twitter.com/ PracticalMoney. Special to the News-SunSEBRING Bob T rautman retired in 1988 a fter selling his forklift and i ndustrial equipment corpor ation, a recreational vehicle b usiness and a leasing comp any. While retired in the Florida K eys, it was evident that he w as not ready for retirement. W ith 50 plus years in sales, b usiness ownership and auto r acing, he realized "retirem ent" was not in his vocabul ary. Thus, another career in r eal estate developed, an i ndustry Bob had previously v entured in back in 1959. Now Bob Trautman and his w ife, Nancy, have signed w ith Re/Max Realty Plus in S ebring. When Gina Bexley, r ecruiter for Re/Max asked B ob Trautman "What awards and accomplishments have you earned and achieved over the years?," his answer was, "My list of awards is extensive, as it consists of 'thousands' of friends, clients and customers I have had the opportunity and pleasure to serve; plus the associates and acquaintances who I have worked and shared time and friendship with." In addition, an honor he cherishes is to have been voted multiple times by the public as "Realtor of the Year," an award earned by fulfilling the needs of those whom he had the opportunity to serve in the Florida Keys and Highlands County. More recently, he won the Sales Associate of the Year award with Exit Realty. "It is interesting that Trautman would rather talk about the number of people and families that he has helped over the years versus sales volume, dollars earned and/or awards," Bexley said. "But if you really want to get him going, ask about his marketing ideas, techniques and actions taken to promote and sell a listing. "Or, if you are a buyer, how to find what you are looking for, negotiating a purchase price, handling financial matters, inspections, legal aspects and documents necessary prior to and after closing." The Trautmans can be reached directly at 385-0477. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 3B COUNTRY CLUB REALTY 863-382-6575www .CountryClubRealtyofSebring.comTWO LOCATIONSTOSERVE YOUGOLF HAMMOCK 1 Hammock Cir cle € Sebring, FL 33872 C OUNTR Y C LUB OF SEBRIN G 4800 Haw Branch Rd. € Sebring, FL 33872863-382-6575OPEN HOUSE TODAY!SUNDAY 1PM-3PM US 27 to Hammock Rd to (R) at entrance of Golf Hammock (Golf Hammock Drive) to (R) on Par Rd to (R) on Cormorant Point Dr to home on (L).213002 PRICE REDUCED! Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575 US 27 to Golfview Dr (Inn On the Lakes) to (L) on Lafayette to (L) on Dozier to (L) on Santa Barbara to home on (L).215197 T AKE A TOUR! Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575 US 27 to Hammock Rd to right into Golf Hammock (Golf Hammock Drive), left at first street (Lost Ball Dr) to home on (R ). 215043 SPE CTACULAR! Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575STUNNING GOLF VIEW!Modern paint, gorgeous pavered patio and beautiful landscaping overlooks #4 tee in a great golf neighborhood! See it now! 3508 Cormorant Point Dr.$114,500LOVE THE POOL!Saltwater pool … open design … cathedral ceilings … stainless appliances … breakfast bar … and more! Youll fall in love with this gorgeous home. See it today! 4071 Santa Barbara$194,500PRIVATE & PLAYFULAwesome golf views! Lush, tropical & private tiled living room, wood floor in the great room, crown molding & gorgeous stone work! Romantic Jacuzzi tub too! Come on by! 3028 Lost Ball Dr.$224,900GOLF HAMMOCK HARDER HALL GOLF HAMMOCK Kim Reed Broker/Owner863-381-6575 Your Host w hile begging her best f riend, Rose Sapp, to join h er. "I begged," said Baldwin. "She begged," said Sapp, l aughing. "And then I begged some m ore," said Baldwin, adding i t was only when someone o ffered to buy the store that S app finally relented and b ecome Baldwin's business p artner. "I'm glad I held out for R ose," Baldwin said, as they b oth laughed some more. It was Sapp who brought d iversity to the business. Now, in addition to scrapb ooking, stamping and card m aking, Scrap Paper S cissors can also provide p rofessional embroidery, g lass etching, heat press, and a ll forms of stationery, i ncluding wedding or gradua tion invitations. The women also plan to o pen a custom framing and m atting section sometime w ithin the year. Baldwin and Sapp both l ove what they call crop sess ions the most. Every first and third F riday in the month they o pen the store from 6 to 10 p .m., providing a place for s crapbookers to gather and w ork on individual projects o f their own with access to t he store's resources. It is a relaxed, informal s etting, Sapp said, as much a time to enjoy good company and conversation as it is to work on a project. A$5 fee covers the expenses. Baldwin and Sapp have hosted a weekend-long crop events in the past, and hope to do another this spring. The first event drew hobbyists from as far as Orlando and Michigan. Their customers are almost all women. "Husbands stop at the tile," said Sapp, pointing toward the front door where carpeting met ceramic. Then she told about a young male high school student who came in to make a specific project for school. He came in wary and left proud of his work, she said. For more information, call 465-3250. Continued from page 1B Continued from page 1B BUSINESS News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Lisa Baldwin (left) and Rose Sapp have made a business out of hobbies at Scrap Paper Scissors in Lake Placid. Bob and Nancy Trautman Trautmans sign with Re/Max Realty Plus Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Patrick J. Franklin, Avon Park, a Modern Woodmen of America representative, has attained the Fraternal Insurance Counselor (FIC) designation. The FIC title is an educational designation that can be earned by career life insurance representatives associated with fraternal insurance societies. Representatives devote more than one year to meet the examination and career development criteria set by the Fraternal Field Managers Association. Founded in 1883, Modern Woodmen of America touches lives and secures futures. The fraternal benefit society offers financial services and fraternal member benefits to individuals and families throughout the United States. Securities offer ed through MWAFinanci al Services Inc., a whol ly owned subsidiary of Modern Woodmen of America, 1701 1st Avenu e, Rock Island, IL6120 1, phone (309) 558-310 0. Member: FINRA, SIP C. Products are available in most states. Individual re presentatives may not be licensed to sell all produc ts. Franklin complets FIC course Patrick Franklin Belt-tightening tips for the current economy Scrap Paper Scissors a success Metro Services Fixing a faucet that is leaking one drop per second can save about 2,000 gallons of water per year. Associated PressWASHINGTON Nearly two thirds of drivers could have more cornbased ethanol in their fuel tanks under an Environmental Protection Agency decision Friday. The agency said that 15 percent ethanol blended with gasoline is safe for cars and light-duty trucks manufactured between 2001 and 2006, expanding an October decision that the higher blend is safe for cars built since 2007. The maximum gasoline blend has been 10 percent ethanol. The fuel is popular in farm country because mo st ethanol comes from co rn and other grains. It fac es strong opposition, howeve r, from the auto industr y, environmentalists, catt le ranchers, food compani es and a broad coalition of other groups. Those groups say th at using corn to make ethan ol makes animal feed mo re expensive, raises prices at the grocery store and tea rs up the land. There ha ve already been several law suits filed against the EPA EPA approves more ethanol in fuel for cars

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Page 4BNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com 50%OFF GRAND OPENING Now thru Jan. 31st50% OFF ENROLLMENT FEES!YOUVE EXPERIENCED PART OF THE SOLUTION...NOW DISCOVER THE LOSE YOUR WEIGHT FOR THE LAST TIME. 863-471-250013 Ryant Blvd. SebringCorner of 27 & Ryant Blvd. CALLTODAY! GRAND OPENING 50% OFF € Tired of exercise programs that dont get you to your goal? € Tired of diets that dont work € Tired of losing weight but not keeping it off? Dr. Keatley Waldron Medical Director Sherri Pickard Office Manager With Total Solutions youll lose 4-24 inches in 7 visits and lose 2 to 7 lbs. average per week*GUARANTEED WEIGHT LOSS GUARANTEED! By JIM KUHNHENN Associated PressSCHENECTADY, N.Y. P resident Barack Obama said F riday that "putting the economy i nto overdrive" is a top priority, e ven as a new poll showed the publ ic giving him poor marks in this a rea. The Associated Press-GfK poll u nderscored the selling job that c onfronts the president as he prep ares to seek a second term: People l ike Obama personally, but just 35 p ercent say the economy's gotten b etter during his tenure. Appearing in Schenectady, N.Y., o n Friday, Obama announced that h e was naming GE CEO Jeffrey I mmelt as the head of a Council on J obs and Competitiveness, his latest m ove to court a business communit y that he's clashed with amid cont inued high unemployment. A ddressing workers at a General E lectric plant, Obama recommitted h imself to spending the next two y ears trying to speed up the econ omic recovery. His success or failu re there is likely to be the central i ssue of the coming 2012 president ial campaign. "Our job is to do everything we can to ensure that businesses can take root, and folks can find good jobs," the president said. "We're going to build stuff, and invent stuff," said Obama, emphasizing the need to boost American exports to countries around the world, an issue that was a focus during the visit of Chinese President Hu Jintao to the White House this week. "That's where the customers are. It's that simple," Obama said. His choice of Immelt to head the competitiveness panel won applause from the Chamber of Commerce, which called it a "promising step" toward creating jobs and enhancing U.S. competitiveness. But the Alliance for American Manufacturing condemned the choice, dismissing Immelt as "an outsourcing CEO" whose appointment would "alienate working class voters." That underscored a fine line for Obama in pushing for growth into the global marketplace while still looking out for the interests of U.S. workers. The competitiveness panel replaces Obama's Economic Recovery Advisory Board, which had been chaired by former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker. Obama announced late Thursday that Volcker, as expected, was ending his tenure. The change in the advisory board signals Obama's intention to shift from policies that were designed to stabilize the economy after the 2008 financial meltdown, to a renewed focus on increasing employment. The White House says the board's mission will be to help generate ideas from the private sector to speed up economic growth and promote American competitiveness. The shift in focus is aimed at winning over a public that remains skeptical of the administration's economic policies. Over half of those surveyed in the AP-GfK poll disapprove of how Obama has handled the economy, and 75 percent rate the economy as poor. However, three-quarters do say it's unrealistic to expect noticeable improvements after two years; they say it will take longer. Mindful of those sentiments Obama told listeners Friday that "it's a great thing that the economy's growing but it's not growing fast enough." For Obama, the visit to General Electric Co. was also an opportunity to claim credit for tax, trade and energy policies pursued by his administration as the nation attempts to recover from the wor st recession since the 1930s. It's t he first of many treks during the se cond half of his term that the pres ident is expected to take to put a more hopeful countenance on t he economy amid stubbornly hig h unemployment. The GE plant is benefiting from a power turbine contract with Ind ia announced during Obama 's Southeast Asia trip in Novembe r. Immelt also has been an advocate of alternative forms of energy, and t he GE facility, the company's large st energy plant, is the future site of GE's advanced battery manufactu ring program. New battery technol ogy has become something of an Obama pet project as a symbol of innovation, clean energy and jo b creation. Immelt's appointment ad ds another corporate insider to t he White House orbit, underscorin g the administration's efforts to bui ld stronger ties to the business com munity. Earlier this month, Obam a named former Commerce secreta ry and JPMorgan Chase executi ve William Daley as chief of staff. By CHRIS KAHN APBusiness WriterNEWYORK General E lectric Co. said Friday that f ourth-quarter net income i ncreased 52 percent as the c ompany made more money i n both its lending and indust rial businesses. The lending arm, GE C apital, drove the company's r esults in the final three m onths of 2010 as it dealt w ith fewer loan defaults. R isky loans hammered the c ompany during the financial c risis, forcing GE to book h uge writedowns. Industrial sales also rose d uring the fourth quarter and o rders for equipment, an i ndication of future business, j umped 20 percent. "GE exits 2010 with sign ificant momentum," CEO J eff Immelt said. The compan y also is benefiting from the O bama administration's r ecent diplomatic and trade e fforts with India and China. The results show that risi ng energy and raw material c osts so far haven't cooled o ff global demand for cons umer products. "Most of the growth is c oming from overseas," E dward Jones analyst Matt C ollins said. "China, India, t he Middle East and other e merging markets, they're i nvesting in infrastructure." G E relies so heavily on e merging markets for sales t hat it's no longer considered a bellwether of the U.S. e conomy, analysts said. GE signed $1.6 billion w orth of deals in India on the h eels of President Obama's r ecent trip there, including $ 750 million in contracts w ith India's Reliance Power. On Wednesday, as Chinese President Hu Jintao visited the U.S., the White House said GE will form a cleanenergy venture with Shenhua Energy Co. GE estimates the deal has the potential to generate up to $2.5 billion in U.S. exports. Immelt has said he expects GE's profits will be driven by industrial growth in China. In November he pledged that GE will invest $2 billion through 2012 to help China tackle its energy and infrastructure needs. GE, which makes products from dishwashers to wind turbines, and finances large projects around the globe, said net income in the final three months of the year rose to $4.46 billion, or 42 cents per share, from $2.94 billion, or 28 cents per share, a year ago. Earnings from continuing operations were 36 cents a share. That topped analysts' expectations of 32 cents per share, according to FactSet. GE said revenue grew year-over-year for the first time in nine quarters, increasing 1 percent to $41.4 billion. Wall Street expected revenue of $40.3 billion. Overall orders grew 12 percent from a year ago. Besides the increase in equipment orders, services business orders rose 5 percent. Immelt noted that orders grew 4 percent at GE's energy infrastructure business, which accounted for a quarter of GE's operating revenue and more than a third of GE's operating profit last year. GE's total backlog stood at a record $175 billion on Dec. 31. GE has made a number of acquisitions recently to expand its energy business. It agreed in October to buy turbine-maker Dresser Inc. for $3 billion. In December, GE said it would acquire Wellstream Holdings PLC, which makes pipes and other equipment for deep-water oil production, for $1.3 billion. And GE said last week it would buy electrical equipment maker Lineage Power Holdings Inc. for $520 million. GE Capital saw a surge of activity in the fourth quarter. Net income soared to $1.1 billion from $99 million in the year-ago period. Loan volume increased 30 percent and losses and impairments dropped by $300 million from the third quarter. The Fairfield, Conn., company also said profit rose 38 percent at NBC Universal. GE expects to close the sale of a majority stake in NBC to Comcast this quarter. GE shares rose $1.33, or 7.2 percent, to $19.76 in afternoon trading. BUSINESS Obama seeks to highlight nation's economic potential MCTphoto President Barack Obama wants to put the economy in overdrive.' MCTphoto J eff Immelt, CEO of GE, says his company exits 2010 with significant momentum.' GE boosts 4th quarter income 52% Most of the growth is coming from overseas. China, India, the Middle East and other emerging markets, they're investing in infrastructure.'MATTCOLLINS analyst, Edward Jones By SANDYSHORE APBusiness WriterGas pump prices that are around $3 a gallon now may seem like a bargain by the time your kids are on Easter egg hunts. Pump prices have risen nearly 9 percent since Dec. 1 and topped $3.10 a gallon this week. That's the highest level since October 2008. The price may rise or fall a little over the next few months, but analysts expect it to range between $3.20 and $3.75 gallon by March and April ahead of the summer driving season. The national average for regular gasoline about $3.12 a gallon on Friday, according to AAA, Wright Express and Oil Price Information Service. That's nearly 12 cents more than a month ago and 38 cents above a year ago. Average pump prices range from $2.81 to $3.70 in major cities. For example, the average in Salt Lake City is $2.74 a gallon and in New Orleans it's $2.97 a gallon. Drivers in San Francisco pay $3.44 a gallon, and in Honolulu gas is $3.58 a gallon. Americans typically drive less in the wi nter. Demand is about 1 percentage poi nt higher than a year ago but remains weak er than the historical average, said energy an alyst Jim Ritterbusch. The nation's gasoli ne supplies remain above the five-year averag e. Over the next couple of months, refineri es will conduct regular maintenance to prepa re for the changeover to summer driving mixe s. That could affect supplies, but gas pric es should remain steady to a few cents mor e, according to oil analyst Tom Kloza of O il Price Information Service. By spring he expects the average price to rise to between $3.50 and $3.75 a gallo n. Ritterbusch expects $3.20 to $3.25 a gallo n by Memorial Day. For every penny the price at the pum p increases, it costs consumers overall an add itional $4 million. Get ready for higher prices at the pump The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 5B DANCING & LIVE MUSIC DAILY SundaysGary Oliver 2PM … 5PM,Tiki BarTuesdaysStanman,Music/DJ/Jokes/Blues6PM … 9PM, LoungeWednesdaysGary OliverOl Rock & Roll on Keyboard6PM … 9PM, LoungeThursdaysBildis Funtastic Karaoke, 6PM … 9PM, LoungeFridaysBig Freddie Live 6PM … 9PM, LoungeSaturdaysStanman,Music/DJ/Jokes/Blues5PM … 8PM, Lounge Double Back,Southern Rock Band9PM … 1AM, Lounge Dance & WIN a 1980 Vintage Gibson GuitarSundaysGary OliverOl Rock & Roll on Keyboard2PM … 5PM,Tiki HutStanman2451 US 27 SouthAvon Park453-3331On Lake Glenada Open 7 Days Reser v a tions Accepted Ne w Owner ship & Ne wly Reno v a ted Lar ge Gr oups W elcomeVisit Our Lakeside Tiki Bar Best Deal of the DayLunch or Dinner 2 FOR THE PRICE OF 1 Lunch2 for $795 Dinner2 for $995to$1995MUST PURCHASE 2 BEVERAGESNot good with any other promotion. Does not include Early Bird or other specials. Gar y Oliver DANCE CONTESTWinner gets 1980 Vintage Gibson Guitar PRIME RIB ORNY STRIP DINNER$1099EVERY SUNDAY ALL DAY 11AM … 8PMIncludes garlic sticks, potato or pasta, vegetable, choice of soup or salad with purchase of beverage. Grand Opening Mixer € Thurs., Jan. 28 € 4PM … ? Free Food € Live Music in Tiki & Lounge Bildi s FunTastic Karaoke MUSTPRESENT COUPON Big Freddie Courtesy photo Accepting checks for the phone book recycling project this year are (front row) Lake Placid High School senior Emily Lundy, Florida Association of Student Councils state secretary, and senior Joslyn Morales, Student Government Association member for first place, $400; Rebekah Kogelschatz, teacher, Lake Placid Middle School, third place (tie), $100; Richard Kogelschsatz, Dean, Kindergarten Learning Center, Honorable Mention; Patricia Willard, Math and Science Resource teacher, Project Liaison; (back row) Mark Delaney, chair, KHCB; Jan Sutton, Dex Publishing; Kaye Bowers, principal, Woodlawn Elementary, second place winner $200 and Christopher Lavely, teacher, Cracker Trail Elementary, third place winner (tie), $100. CHALKTALK Courtesy pho to Heartland Christian School recently celebratedCrusader Students of the Month' and Character Award Winners Thankfulness'.Pictured here are kindergarten through fifth-grade students, and included in the front row are Max Carlisle and Audrey Sofo;second row students areKyle Fronda, Sam Beaulieu, Arianna Bullington, Ivy Guevara and Hagen Stamps-Hill; third row includes Julia Moody, Jabez Asuncion, Andrew Cardoso, Levi Zimmer and Chris Cardoso.David Kaser, HCS headmaster, is also pictured. DSAC meets Feb. 7SEBRING The Highlands County District School Advisory Council (DSAC) will meet from 67:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 7 in the Garland Boggus Board Room at the School Board of Highlands County, 426 School St. The primary agenda item for this meeting is School Resource Officers and Gangs. If you are a person with a disability who requires reasonable accommodations in order to attend a District School Advisory Council meeting, call 4715608 three days prior to the scheduled meeting date and time. SFCC DeSoto Campus welcomes new director ARCADIASouth Florida Community College (SFCC) hosts an open house to welcome the new director of the SFCC DeSoto Campus, Suzanne Demers, at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Demers comes to SFCC from Florida State College at Jacksonville where she was the open campus learning technologies coordinator for distance learning. Prior to Florida State College at Jacksonville, she held a position with Embry-Riddle Aeronautic al University as the associat e director and interim direc tor of the Jacksonville Campus. She honorably served the United States Navy on the strike fighter attack jet known as the F/ A 18 Hornet. Demers graduated from Southern Illinois University with a Bachelo r of Science in workforce education, training and curriculum development, magna cum laude. She completed her graduate work with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and earned a Master of Science in management degree. She previously resided in Middleburg, where she and her husband, Michael, raised six children and fostered four boys. They now reside in Arcadia. The DeSoto Campus is located in Arcadia at 2251 N.E. Turner Ave. For mor e information about the DeSoto Open House, con tact SFCC Community Relations and Marketing at 784-7250. Snapshots Special to the News-SunSEBRING DEX Publishing, Keep Highlands County Beautiful and Highlands County Recycling recognized the winners of the telephone book recycling competition at the Jan. 18 Highlands County School Board meeting. Dex Publishing promotes the recycling of telephone directories each year by offering first, second and third place winners' monetary awards. This year for the first time there was a tie for third place. In honor of America Recycles Day for 2010, Dex upped the first place award to $400 for first place. Mark Delaney, chairman of Keep Highlands County Beautiful Board of Directors, along with Jan Sutton, local marketing consultant for Dex, presented the checks to school representatives. Highlands County schools recognized for directory recycling Special to the News-SunTALLAHASSEE Families have less than two weeks left to purchase a Florida Prepaid College Plan at current plan prices. Enrolling children by the Jan. 31 deadline is easy to do online at www.myfloridaprepaid.com. According to a recent article in USAToday, college graduates have been insulated from the worst effects of the recession, which resulted in 10 percent unemployment for high school graduates and 15.7 percent unemployment for those without a high school diploma. These high unemployment rates illustrate the importance of earning a four-year degree; persons with at least a bachelor's degree experienced only 5.1 percent unemployment. "The earlier families begin saving for college, the better," says chairman Duane Ottenstroer of the Florida Prepaid College Board. "This year, we evolved to make plans more comprehensive and expanded our consumer-friendly savings choices with the introduction of a new plan option the 4Year Florida College Plan to allow a student to obtain a bachelor's degree in many workforce related areas such as teaching, nursing and business management at one of Florida's 28 Colleges." Aprepaid college savings plan can be purchased for children and grandchildren as soon as they are born and up until the 11th grade. Four flexible plan options are available through the Florida Prepaid College Board to lock in tuition and most fees at Florida's 11 state universities and 28 colleges (formerly known as community colleges). For the first time, this open enrollment period, families also have the option to purchase the new 4-year Florida College Plan, which prepays the cost of earning a bachelor's degree from a Florida college offering workforcerelated four-year degree programs. When children are ready for college, the plan's full dollar value, what would be paid to a Florida higher education institution, can be transferred to most private and out-of-state colleges. Only a $50 application fee is due by the Jan. 31 deadline. The first plan payment is not due until April 20, 2011. Families can visit www.myfloridaprepaid.com or call 1-800-552-GRAD (4723) to order an Enrollment Kit in English or Spanish and speak to a customer service representative. Florida Prepaid enrollment deadline is Jan. 31 Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID South F lorida Community C ollege's Community E ducation Department is o ffering a variety of classes t his spring at the SFCC L ake Placid Center. The Cardio-Fitness class c onsists of aerobic and f loor exercises. The class is h eld from 8-9 a.m. M onday, Wednesday, and F riday. Pilates and Stretch C ombo class consists of a 3 0-minute Pilates workout a nd 30 minutes of stretchi ng and exercises. The class m eets from 9-10 a.m. M onday, Wednesday, and F riday. Interval Training targets t oning and flexible fitness. T he class consists of a 20m inute aerobic workout, a 2 0-minute step workout a nd a 20-minute weight t raining workout. The class i s held from 4:30-5:30 p.m. M onday, Tuesday, and T hursday. The Pilates and Muscle M ovement class consists of a n aerobic workout, step w orkout, interval training, a nd Pilates. Class is held f rom 5:30-6:30 p.m. M onday, Tuesday, and T hursday. The Cardio-Fitness, P ilates and Stretch Combo, I nterval Training, and P ilates and Muscle M ovement classes run on a c ontinuing monthly basis. T hese classes are taught by K athy Rouse and offer a h igh intensity, low-impact a erobic workout with a card iovascular workout at a c ontrolled level. All classes i nclude the use of stability b ars, resistance bands, h and weights, balls, glide rs, heavy hoops, and mats. T he registration fee for a f our-week morning session i s $30.25. The registration f ee for a four-week aftern oon session is $30.25. Tai Chi is a high intensit y strengthening and s tretching exercise that i mproves flexibility and b alance. The class meets w ith instructor Karin G runden from 8-9 a.m. and 9 -10 a.m. Tuesdays and T hursdays through Feb. 24. T he cost is $44. The SFCC Lake Placid C enter is also offering c logging classes with i nstructor Patricia Kules on M ondays through March 2 1. Beginning Clogging m eets 6:30-7:30 p.m., and I ntermediate Clogging m eets 5:30-6:30 p.m. The c ost is $44. To register or for more i nformation on Community E ducation classes, call 4 65-3003 or 465-5300, ext. 7 082. SFCC LP Center offers classes Heartland Christian honors top students Courtesy photo South Florida Community College held its annual spring Club Rush on Jan. 13. More than 15 clubs and student organizations participated in the recruiting event. Shemika Smith joins the Communications Club, which is advised by SFCC developmental writing professor Beth Andrews. SFCC holds Club Rush Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155

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Breakfasts and lunches b eing served in the H ighlands County School D istrict for the upcoming w eek of Jan. 24-28 i nclude: HIGH SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast French t oast sticks, sausage p atty, Cheerios, Trix cerea l, Frosted Flakes, C innamon Toast Crunch, c heese filled breadstick, p ear fruit cup, assorted f resh fruit, assorted juice, c hocolate milk, white milk, s trawberry milk. Lunch Beefaroni, garl ic breadstick, burger, c heeseburger, chicken p atty on bun, Mama S ofia's cheese pizza, M ama Sofia's pepperoni p izza, ham sub meal, t urkey sub meal, dill stack, P eanut Butter and Jelly s andwich meal, chef salad m eal, baked french fries, b roccoli, tossed salad, C olby Jack cheese stick, b lack forest cake, fruit c ocktail cup, assorted f resh fruit, assorted juice, c hocolate milk, white milk, s trawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken b iscuit, Cheerios, Trix c ereal, Frosted Flakes, C innamon Toast Crunch, c heese filled breadstick, s trawberry cup, assorted f resh fruit, assorted juice, c hocolate milk, strawberry m ilk, white milk. Lunch Baked chicke n, dinner roll, burger, c heeseburger, chicken p atty on bun, Mama S ofia's cheese pizza, M ama Sofia's pepperoni p izza, ham sub meal, t urkey sub meal, dill stack, P BJ sandwich meal, chef s alad meal, mashed potat oes, chicken gravy, green b eans, carrots and dip, d ried blueberries, cut fresh f ruit, assorted fresh fruit, a ssorted juice, chocolate m ilk, strawberry milk, w hite milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast p izza, hash brown patty, C heerios, Trix cereal, F rosted Flakes, Cinnamon T oast Crunch, cheese f illed breadstick, apricot c up, assorted fresh fruit, a ssorted juice, chocolate m ilk, white milk, strawberr y milk. Lunch Corn dog, M ama Sofia's cheese p izza, Mama Sofia's pepp eroni pizza, hot and spicy c hicken sandwich, ham s ub meal, dill stack, PBJ s andwich meal, chef salad m eal, baked beans, carr ots and dip, string c heese, assorted juice, a ssorted fresh fruit, potato c hips, cocoa clodhoppers, c hocolate milk, white milk, s trawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast f rittata, hash brown patty, b reakfast pizza, Cheerios, T rix cereal, Frosted F lakes, Cinnamon Toast C runch, cheese filled b readstick, peach cup, a ssorted fresh fruit, a ssorted juice, chocolate m ilk, white milk, strawberr y milk. Lunch Tacos, salsa, y ellow rice, burger, c heeseburger, chicken p atty on bun, Mama S ofia's cheese pizza, M ama Sofia's pepperoni p izza, ham sub meal, t urkey sub meal, dill stack, P BJ sandwich meal, chef s alad meal, great northern b eans, cheddar cheese stick, rosy applesauce, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast Sausage biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted juices, assorted fresh fruit, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Asian chicken nuggets, salsa, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, corn, carrots and dip, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, diced peaches, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ACADEMYSCHOOLS Monday Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, broccoli, tossed salad, black forest cake, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, mashed potatoes, green beans, dried blueberries, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch Corn dog, baked beans, carrots and dip, assorted juice, cocoa clodhoppers, potato chips, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, great northern beans, carrots and dip, cut fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Lunch Chicken tenders, dinner roll, Sun Chips, tossed salad, diced peaches, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast French toast sticks, sausage patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, broccoli, tossed salad, Colby Jack cheese stick, black forest cake, fruit cocktail cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, dried blueberries, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Ultimate Breakfast Round, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Corn dog, cheese burger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, ham sub meal, dill stack, chef salad meal, PBJ sandwich meal, baked beans, carrots and dip, string cheese, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, potato chips, cocoa clodhoppers, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast frittata, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Tacos, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, great northern beans, cheddar cheese stick, rosy applesauce, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast Sausage biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, burger, cheeseburger, chicken tenders, salsa, dinner roll, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad plate, corn, carrots and dip, tossed salad, diced peaches, chocolate chip cookie, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ELEMENTARYSCHOOLS Monday Breakfast French toast sticks, sausage patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Maple waffle stick, string cheese, pear fruit cup, chocolate milk. Lunch Chicken nuggets, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich, turkey chef salad, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green peas, fruit cocktail cup, very berry juice bar, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Chicken biscuit, grape juice, chocolate milk, hard cooked egg, giant graham, apple juice. Lunch Spaghetti, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, green beans, vanilla clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, fresh apple slices, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Hard cooked egg, giant graham, apple juice, chocolate milk, chicken biscuit, grape juice. Lunch Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, corn dog, potato puffs, carrots and dip, diced peaches, cinnamon bears, apple juice grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast frittata, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Sausage biscuit, apricot cup, chocolate milk, Ultimate Breakfast Round, orange juice. Lunch Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, corn, great northern beans, fruit cocktail cup, very berry juice bar, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast Sausag e biscuit, Cheerios, Tr ix cereal, Frosted Flake s, Cinnamon Toast Crunc h, string cheese, strawber ry cup, assorted fresh fru it, apple juice, grape juic e, orange juice, fruit blen d juice, chocolate milk, whi te milk, strawberry mil k. Breakfast in th e Classroom: Ultima te Breakfast Round, orang e juice, chocolate mil k, sausage biscuit, apric ot cup. Lunch Mama Sofia 's pepperoni pizza, Mam a Sofia's cheese pizz a, Uncrustable PBJ san dwich, turkey chef sala d, salsa, corn cobbette s, chocolate chip cooki e, diced peaches, fres h apple slices, apple juic e, grape juice, orange juic e, fruit blend juice, chocola te milk, white milk, strawbe rry milk. KINDERGARTEN LEARNING CENTER Monday Lunch Chicke n nuggets, dinner ro ll, Uncrustable Peanut Butt er and Jelly sandwic h, mashed potatoes, chicke n gravy, green peas, fru it cocktail cup, chocola te milk, white milk, strawbe rry milk. Tuesday Lunch Spaghet ti, meat sauce, garlic brea dstick, Uncrustable PB J sandwich, green bean s, vanilla clodhoppers, c ut fresh fruit, chocolate mil k, white milk, strawber ry milk. Wednesday Lunch Uncrustab le PBJ sandwich, corn do g, potato puffs, carrots an d dip, diced peache s, Goldfish crackers, appl esauce cup, chocolate mil k, white milk, strawber ry milk. Thursday Lunch Tacos, tac o toppers, salsa, yellow ric e, Uncrustable PBJ san dwich, great northe rn beans, fruit cocktail cu p, chocolate milk, white mil k, strawberry milk. Friday Lunch Mama Sofia 's cheese pizza, Uncrustab le PBJ sandwich, corn co bbettes, chocolate ch ip cookie, diced peache s, chocolate milk, white mil k, strawberry milk. Page 6BNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com AVON PARK 452-5800 € SEBRING 382-3363 LAKE PLACID 465-1530Its more than just carpet The cleaning of the second piece must be of equal or lesser value to the first service price.Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 ft. and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Not valid with any other coupon. Expires 01/31/11.Emergency Water Damage Restoration3 ROOMS CARPET CLEANEDA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 01/31/11.$95002 ROOMS CARPET CLEANEDA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 01/31/11.$7500 ƒit s our conference room.UPHOLSTERY: CLEAN ONE PIECE OF UPHOLSTERY AT REGULAR PRICE AND RECEIVE A SECOND PIECE1/2 OFF SCHOOLMENUS Get the paper delivered to you! NEWS-SUN€385-6155

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By CURTANDERSON APLegal Affairs WriterMIAMI By the time p olice came to arrest him on m urder charges, 22-year-old J ohnny Simms whose m any tattoos included the w ord "savage" and images l aced with violence a lready had a long criminal h istory that began with theft a nd trespass charges when he w as 14. The Miami man killed in a T hursday shootout that left t wo police officers dead was w hat police called a career c riminal: He'd been arrested f or cocaine and marijuana t rafficking, burglary, car theft a nd armed robbery, according t o a copy of Simms'criminal h istory obtained Friday by T he Associated Press. He was a rrested 11 times as a juven ile and became more violent a s the years passed. Simms finally went to p rison in March 2007 for g rand theft and robbery conv ictions, getting out on prob ation in February 2009, a ccording to state prison r ecords. It would be only a f ew months before he was a rrested again on robbery and c ocaine charges and sent b ack to prison in August 2 010. Prison officials meticul ously documented Simms' n umerous tattoos that a ppeared to reflect his crimin al lifestyle. Those included a n AK-47 image and the w ord "gun" on his left hand; t he word "savage" on his r ight hand; several dollar s igns; the words "Lil Pimp" o n his right arm; and "10-20L ife" on his right hand a r eference to Florida's mandat ory sentences for using guns i n crimes. Simms'second stretch in p rison lasted a few weeks, m ainly because of credit for t ime served in jail. He was r eleased Sept. 3, 2010. His p robation provided no r equirements for keeping tabs o n him. "This is a type of probation t hat is always objected to by p rosecutors," said Ed G riffith, spokesman for M iami-Dade County State A ttorney Katherine F ernandez Rundle. Afew weeks after his r elease came the slaying that u ltimately led to the fatal p olice shootout. According to a Miami p olice affidavit, Simms overh eard a phone conversation i nvolving his sister, 20-yearo ld Shenica Simms, who had g otten into an argument with a man outside a batteredl ooking apartment building w here she was visiting f riends. Cornelious Larry, 27, h ad "started to curse and verbally disrespect her" in the parking lot on Oct. 16, the affidavit said. Witnesses later told police that Simms'brother, 16-yearold Demetrius Simms, was with Shenica and was carrying a silver-colored revolver. His sister told officers that the younger brother, Demetrius, warned Larry "to stop disrespecting his sister," according to the police affidavit. About that time Johnny Simms rode up on a bicycle and both brothers confronted Larry. Shenica Simms, according to the affidavit, "said she knew something bad was about to happen so she turned around to walk away." Gunshots rang out and Larry crumpled on a staircase. Witnesses identified Johnny Simms as Larry's killer; one saw him hand the silver-colored handgun back to his younger brother before they both fled. Eventually, the killing brought a four-person team of Miami-Dade fugitive investigators Thursday to the duplex in crime-ridden Liberty City, where Simms was living with his mother and other relatives. Cmdr. Nancy Perez, a Miami-Dade police spokeswoman, said previous efforts to persuade Simms through family members to turn himself in had failed. So the officers, wearing body armor, knocked on the door and Simms'mother opened it. Without warning, police say Simms came out of another room and shot at the officers with a handgun, killing veteran detectives Roger Castillo, 41, and Amanda Haworth, 44. Simms was shot and killed by detective Oscar Placencia, who was not hurt. Afourth member of the fugitive team, detective Deidre Beecher, suffered a minor knee injury. The confrontation lasted only a few seconds. Family members said they had no inkling Simms would come out shooting, though authorities say Simms was determined not to be taken alive. "This is a guy who was never going back to prison," Griffith said. Willie Williams, Simms' stepfather, said he was at work at the time of the shooting and expressed condolences to the families of the officers. But Williams objected to some descriptions of his stepson as a violent thug. "It was three human beings regardless if they were police officers or not," Williams said. "They portray him as if he was an animal. He is a human being. He is a child of God." Associated Press writer Suzette Laboy contributed to this story. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 7B NEW ORLEANS BUS TRIP(863) 382-7788 March 27, 2011 7 DaysONLY$62900 (per person … Based on double occupancy) HOMETOWN TRAVEL, INC. NEW ORLEANS BUS TRIP March 27, 2011 7 DaysONLY$62900 2930 US Hwy 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 2930 US Hwy 27 South Sebring, FL 33870(863) 382-7788HOMETOWN TRAVEL, INC. Save$25 … $300 per unit on select Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their enduring craftsmanship and energy-ef“cient designs, they present exceptional value „ smart style thats energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings from January 14 through April 29, 2011 with mail-in rebates on select styles. Ask us for details. *Manufacturers rebate offer valid for purchases made January 14 through April 29, 2011. Limitations and restrictions apply. As k for details. 2011 Hunter Douglas. and TM are trademarks of Hunter Douglas. Family owned & operated since 1978 STATENEWS Miami police shootout suspect considered career criminal C.M. Guerrero/Miami Herald/MCT City of Miami Police at the scene of a shooting where two police officers were shot and killed, and a suspect was also shot and killed in Miami on Thursday. This was a guy who was never going back to prison.'EDGRIFFITH Miami-Dade County state attorney spokesman By TAMARALUSH Associated PressTAMPA The owner of a Florida wildlife rescue center is living in a cage with two lions, a fundraising stunt that has riled other animal rescue groups and underscores how difficult it is to keep such sanctuaries afloat. James Jablon with Wildlife Rehabilitation of Hernando County, a semirural area about an hour north of Tampa, is halfway through his month of eating, sleeping and otherwise hanging out with the carnivorous cats. Wearing a microphone, he talks with people who watch streaming video of his "captivity" online and post comments. He maintains his unusual idea is a harmless way to raise $150,000 to keep the center home to 100 animals of all types running for the next two years. It is unclear how much money he has raised so far. Those in the animal sanctuary world say it's extremely expensive to raise and care for exotic animals, especially when a single tiger can eat upward of 60 pounds of meat a week. "It's been incredibly difficult for sanctuaries," said Josephine Martell, a spokeswoman for the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries, a Washington-based accreditation group. "It's just like every other business, sanctuaries are cutting back on staff and capacity." Actress Tippi Hedre n, who starred in Alfr ed Hitchcock's "The Bird s" and runs the Shamba la Preserve in Acton, Cali f., said it costs her more th an $75,000 a month to feed h er 65 big cats. "Sanctuaries everywhe re are folding because of t he economy," she said. Last September, the Wi ld Animal Orphanage in S an Antonio closed its doo rs due to "overpopulatio n, underfunding and inad equate housing for the an imals," a message on t he defunct sanctuary's websi te said. About 400 animals we re displaced because of t he closing, and Martell said it was difficult to find hom es for them because oth er sanctuaries are so cas hstrapped. Even in the face of su ch shortfalls, Hedren and ot hers questioned the wisdo m of Jablon's stepping in to the lions'den. Jablon is "taking his li fe into his hands," Hedr en said. The stunt is not just da ngerous but exploitativ e, said Pat Derby, owner of the Performing Anim al Welfare Society, addin g that it sends the wrong me ssage to the public. "We're supposed to be protecting the animals, n ot exploiting them," sa id Derby, a former Hollywoo d animal trainer who h as three sanctuaries in California. Jablon wouldn't spe ak with The Associated Pres s, saying that a London pu blicity-photo agency is ha ndling media requests. That agency said th at some large organizatio ns like the APwould have to pay for access to him an d the facility. The APdo es not pay for interviews. Man spends month in lions' den to raise cash Hoping to get $150k to keep animal center alive for 2 years Associated PressMIAMI The Florida B oard of Medicine has unanim ously passed regulations on p ain management clinics that w ill impose about $65 million i n costs on the private sector. Health News Florida r eports the rules adopted F riday set out the requirem ents for standards of care, i nspections, accreditation and training in pain management practices. The board acted although Gov. Rick Scott has ordered a halt rule-making until his office can review proposals for their potential affect on businesses. The panel agreed to send letters to the governor's office and Legislature seeking immediate approval of the rules. State Board of Medicine passes pain clinic rules

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com 130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, Florida863-385-3497Mon. Fri. 9am 4pm Closed WednesdaysHighlands Countys Oldest Established Hearing Aid Of“ceSet it and forget it.Wi Series works with Starkeys SurfLink’ Media streamer, our set-and-forget wireless transmitter.With SurfLink, theres no manual pairing involved. Once you plug it into your TV or stereo, youre done! € It automatically streams sound directly to your hearing aids when your in range. € You can transition from one device to another simply by moving from room to room. € It lets other in the room listen to the TV or stereo at the volume they prefer.No matter where you are or what youre doing,Wi Series is designed to make listening easier. Its the ideal hearing aid for people who are active and on the go, enjoy spending relaxing time at home „ or both.

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LIVING C SECTION News-Sun Sunday, January 23, 2011 FAMILYFEATURES T he kids at the beach ... the grandkids at Christmas ... the sunset shots of your last vacation ... you've got plenty o f great photos that you'd love to s hare. Why not show them off in s ome creative displays that you m ade yourself? Crafters are always coming up w ith unique and beautiful ways to s howcase family photos. These two c rafts use an unexpected, but very h andy, tool a laminator. Laminators, available in stores s uch as Costco and Hobby Lobby, a re no longer relegated to schools a nd offices. More compact models, s uch as those offered by Purple C ows, are small enough to use at h ome, yet versatile enough to be u sed in a variety of projects. Not o nly can the Purple Cows Hot & C old Laminator be used to protect d ocuments, photos, artwork, notes a nd more, it can also be a wonderful c reative tool in projects like these u nique photo books. To get more fun and creative proje ct ideas and how-tos, as well a s videos and tutorials, visit w ww.purplecows.net. M ini Brag Book A Purple Cows Designer Project b y Robin Gibson T ools: Purple Cows Hot Laminator#3020 Purple Cows #1040 2-in-1 Combo Trimmer Short Wave DesignerClick Blade #2803 Hole punch Rub-on applicatortool Cornerrounder S upplies: Rub-ons Patterned paper Letterstickers Cardstock Fluid chalk ink, various colors Glue GliderPro Permatac Cartridge Black journaling pen 1. Print or crop your photos to 2 x 3-inch size. If desired, round photo corners using the corner rounder. 2. Select your background papers/cardstock and, using your combo trimmer, cut a background for each photo. Vary your cut edges by using the guillotine blade for a straight cut, or the rotary cutter and your Short Wave Designer Blade for a decorative edge cut. 3. Decide if your photos will be centered or off-set, and adhere to the background papers using your Glue Glider Pro. For applying larger rub-on letters alongside the photo, you may need the photo off-center, as desired. 4. Apply rub-on letters to the top or along the side of each photo/background as desired, using the rub-on applicator tool. 5. Write any journaling in the "banner" area of appropriate rub-on, and apply to the bottom of the desired photograph. 6. For your front page, choose a blank journal block and trim around the edges with scissors. Ink with chalk ink.Howtoshowcase yourfavoritephoto s LaminatorTipsFigure out what kinds of projects you want to work on before buying a laminator. If you plan to protect heat-sensitive paper printed with ink or photos that may not stand up to heat, a cold laminator will work best. It uses an adhesive activated by pressure instead of heat. Ahot laminator melts an adhesive, which can be either a plastic sheet or a laminator pouch, depending on the type of laminator.Clearly Unique Travel Album APurple Cows Designer Project by Robin Gibson Tools: Purple Cows Hot and Cold Laminator#3025 Purple Cows Freestyle Mouse Kit #6045 Hole punch Supplies: Purple Cows Hot Pockets 5 x 7 #4021 Vellum quotes 1/2 inch double-sided tape Small beads, such as Beader's Paradise Emerald Mix & Topaz LusterMix Wide brown ribbon 2 book rings 1. Place 2 photos back-to-back (this will make 1 page). Choose a vellum quote and trim it using your favorite decorative-edged click blade with the Freestyle Mouse Kit. 2. Place the quote directly onto your photo in a place where it can be clearly seen. Run the hot pocket through the laminator Instantly you have a photo page. 3. On the surface of your photo page, place a strip of doublesided tape along each edge of your now-sealed photo. Repeat this step on the backside of the photo page as well, before you embellish. 4. Now you are ready to place the beads around the photo edge. Do this step inside a shoe-box lid, for easy catching and clean up of the loose beads. Pour the beads over the photo and pres s them into the tape. Shake off loose beads, and save for anothe r page. 5. Repeat step 4 on the backside of the page, so both pictures no w have beaded frames. Repeat steps 1 to 5 for each page in your book. 6. Line up your pages and punch holes in the left-hand side, using a crop-a-dile or other type of hole punch tool. Make ring covers by folding a wide piece of brown (scrap) ribbo n in half, and sewing a seam down the edge. Run the rings through until you have enough "scrunch" to your liking. Cut the ribbon end an d secure the rings through the pages of your book. 7. Adhere to one of your pre-cut background papers, as desired. 8. Apply your brag book title to the journal block, using rub-ons. 9. Turn on laminator, so it can be warming up while you ink the edges of your mini-pages using the chalk inks as desired. 10. Adhere 2 mini-pages back to back, so when laminated, they will be one page of your brag book. 11. Set your now-completed mini-pages into the 2 x 3 Hot Pockets, and run them through your laminator so they are permanently sealed. 12. To hang your Mini Brag Book on a lanyard, line up pages and use a hole punch to make holes where it will attach to the lanyard. When laminating items that do not fill the pocket, especially the leading edge, place the pocket on top of a plain sheet of paper or lightweight cardstock (the same size or larger than the pocket) when you send it through the laminator. This will act as a carrier sheet and keep the hot pocket from curling or getting caught in the unit.

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One morning while vacat ioning in Colorado, my husb and, Ken, and his friend, H oward, left on a nine-mile h ike into the back country of R ocky Mountain National P ark, a challenge Ken had b een looking forward to. After lunch, my friend, A lynn, and I would take a m ore leisurely hike in the P ark. Little did I expect that i t would become a different k ind of challenge for me. Alynn informed me that s ince the guys would drive i nto RMNPat one entrance, b ut come out at another, I w ould need to drive my car t hat day.This way, when we w ere done, she could pick up t heir car parked in the area w here we hiked and I could f ollow her to their destinat ion site and leave the car f or them. Suddenly, the balloon of a nticipation deflated into one o f anxiety. "Me, drive?!" I questioned a nd exclaimed. I felt vulnerable as I hadn 't driven winding mountain r oads in ages. And when we a re on vacation, Ken does all o f the driving and I enjoy s ight seeing. "Lord," I prayed, "would Y ou please return confidence t o me as You gave me when w e lived in the mountains of northern New Jersey?" Then I had three boys and car pooled with others transporting kids up and down mountain roads in all kinds of weather.With those memories and firm reliance on God, I took a deep breath and Alynn and I climbed into our car with me at the wheel. God answered my prayers. Instead of feelings of anxiety, I felt infused with freedom and confidence. How fun it was to drive these serpentine roads.Thankfulness welled up in me. When we got to RMNP, I purchased my life-long senior membership card.Then we continued up, up, up to our particular hiking spot where the guys had left the other car. What a fantastic, glorious day we had together. At last, it was time to descend and this time I was in the car alone following my friend to the next destination.Once again we curved and circled around going from paved to dirt roads. I remembered the verse in Philippians 4: 6, NKJV, that says, "Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God; and the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus." I wasn't alone in the car. I never was, am or will be.The Lord is my constant companion.Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a NewsSun correspondent and an award-winning writer. Page 2CNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com ROOFING SPECIALIST SERVING HIGHLANDS COUNTY SINCE 1989 Shingles Flat Roofs Roof Repairs Mobile Home Roofovers -FULLYLICENSED & INSURED385-4690State Lic # RC 0066817 QUALITY WORK AT A REASONABLE PRICE FREEESTIMATES STOP BY AND SEE ALL OF THE GREAT DEALS INSIDEAS WELL ASOUTSIDEON THESALESTABLES!$10 … 20 … 30 SALE283 US 27 North € SEBRINGVillage Fountain Plaza www.thebulbbin.com Assorted Lamps & Mirrors Ceiling Fans Chandeliers NO STRINGS ATTACHEDR(Ashton Kutcher,Natalie Portman)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30COUNTRY STRONGPG13(Gwyneth Paltrow,Tim McGraw)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30TANGLED 2DPG(Animated)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30THE FIGHTERR(Mark Wahlberg,Christian Bale)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30HOW DO YOU KNOWPG13(Reese Witherspoon,Owen Wilson)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30UNSTOPPABLEPG13(Denzel Washington,Rosario Dawson)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15 The NewFAIRMOUNTCINEMA63750 US 27 N. Sebring NOW SHOWINGFriday 01/21 Thursday 01/27 Suick CinemasInformation 385-9980 Office 385-9908New Dolby Digital SoundAll Seats $6.00for Matinee COMING SOONFeb 11JUST GO WITH IT DIVERSIONS GETINBy GAILGRABOWSKI ACROSS 1 Heist, say 6 Pooch without papers 10 "Beowulf," for one 14 Nuance 19 Full of energy 20 U.S. Open stadium 21 "__ chance!" 22 It's west of Daytona Beach 23 Compelling read 25 Go here and there 26 Opera hero, often 27 Common starting hr. 28 Oberlin, e.g. 30 Ancient market 32 Mark of distinction 34 Respond to an alarm 35 Exchange worker 36 "But __ a man in Reno": Johnny Cash lyric 37 Damage 38 Way out there 42 Short talk 43 Spa fixture 47 Colorful card game 48 Colt 45 brewer 50 __ Cong 51 Santa __ winds 52 Digital interpreter 54 Toledo title: Abbr. 55 Sch. whose mascot is Sam the Minuteman 57 Top in the 'hood 59 Molten rock 60 Mockery 62 Succubus 63 Had leftovers, say 64 Lose locks 66 Refinery sight 71 LAX postings 72 Tribal symbol 74 Arabic holy book 75 Former Colt .45 77 Tropical eel 78 Keys 79 Magical start 81 Org. with much swinging 84 Stallion, for one 85 Up to, briefly 86 Former "Last Comic Standing" host Jay 87 Resort east of Grand Junction 89 Mythical flier 90 Landscaping tool 95 Subtle help 96 Team neckwear 98 Fathers and grandfathers 99 CSA leader 100 Seven-time Grammy winner Morissette 102 Exchange 104 Tons 105 Twilled fabric 106 Travel agency offering 110 Line dance step 113 Peaks 114 Pen or pencil, e.g. 115 Airport freebie 119 In need of dough 120 Record 121 Like hands co-opted by the Devil? 122 Freshwater eel, at sushi bars 123 Wound up 124 Roy Rogers's birth name 125 Beautician, at times 126 They may be rough DOWN 1 Tube top 2 Menu catchphrase 3 Greedy sort 4 Toss-up ratio 5 Hit the hay 6 Colt carrier 7 Annapolis inst. 8 They have fewer privileges 9 Thrice, in Rx's 10 Neither here nor there 11 Resort attractions 12 Tilted type: Abbr. 13 Canon holder 14 Carries 15 Party pitcherful 16 Shuffle cousin 17 Flush 18 Come by honestly 24 Take some heat from? 28 Plumbing problem 29 Woman of the future? 30 Clamoring en masse 31 Site of some trash talk 33 Excellent, slangily 35 Local govt. units 36 Fertility goddess 37 Demain, across the Pyrenees 39 Dairy Queen option 40 Lack of vigor 41 Many Shakespearean characters 44 Sailor's "Stop!" 45 Futurist's tool 46 __ Lee Bunton, a.k.a. Baby Spice 49 Shoddy ship 53 Movie with a posse 56 A–o part 57 "Ballet Rehearsal" artist 58 Broken mirror, to some 61 Without a flaw 62 Show some spunk 64 Cath. church eponym 65 Jinx 67 Silent approval 68 "Good Times" actress 69 Iridescent shell layer 70 Manhattan sch. 73 Sasquatch, for instance 76 Airport screening gp. 78 "Maybe, maybe not" 79 Computerized course, e.g. 80 Woeful cry 82 Spirit in a bottle 83 Social crawlers 86 Not so hot 88 It's opposite the eye 91 Hi-tech read 92 Rout 93 Keister 94 One with ropelike tresses 97 Parts of Alaska's Denali Highway are built on them 101 Alliance 103 Refuse 104 Crummy 106 It's history 107 Feel the pain 108 "You're not serious!" 109 Plug away 111 Eye with ideas 112 Hungarian castle city 115 Box top 116 Diamond putout 117 Chronology datum 118 PX patron Solution on page 7B DearAbby: My husband gave a friend of his I'll call him "Fred" a place to stay and nursed him back to health after Fred was critically injured while driving an ATV. Fred was drunk at the time. That was six years ago, and Fred is still here. While he has helped my husband with a few chores, he does not work. My husband provides him with a travel trailer, utilities, food and beer money. Fred is 47 years old and perfectly capable of working. My husband doesn't seem able to have a discussion with Fred. Am I selfish and un-Christian? This is straining my marriage. Please help. Feeling Used in Arizona DearFeeling Used: I'll try. Although your husband may have had the noblest of motives in taking his injured friend in after his injury and nursing him back to health, he's doing the man no favors by continuing to foster his dependence. While I can see what Fred is getting out of this, it's time your husband explained to you what HE is getting out of it. Under the circumstances, your feelings of being encroached upon are 100 percent valid. DearAbby: I am a foster mother to four children of different races. One is African-American, two are Hispanic and one is Caucasian. My hus band and I are Caucasian, and we have two children o f our own. Abby, my kids may have different colors and origins, but they are all our very own. They ha ve chores, go to schoo l and are responsible kids. We love them dearly and would move a mountain one pebbl e at a time for each one if needed. When I am out and about with all six kids, I get nasty looks and nastier comments about them. I am tired of people looking down on me for our "weird" family. One person even suggested that I get my tubes tied and stop sleeping around! Do I ignore these comments? I refuse to tell peopl e that they are foster kids. Th ey have been hurt enough and do not need to be reminded about their parents living elsewhere. Foster Mom Amand a Dear Amanda: People ten d to look at anything that is "different." Arainbow coali tion of children is bound to draw a second look, and by now you should know it comes with the territory. Th at does not, however, justify th e rude personal attack you received from the one perso n. And in my opinion you should have shamed him or her by responding that you are a foster parent, because it happens to be the truth. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren. Wife is sick of houseguest who's regained his health Confidence on winding mountain roads Pause And Consider Jan Merop Follow the News-Sun online on www.twitter.com/thenewssun Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155 Recently, I offered 15 parenting r esolutions for the new year. This w eek, I'm making a prediction: 2 011 will see the beginning of a revo lution in what and where America's c hildren eat. Over the next decade, it w ill become more cool for a parent t o have a slim child than a child w ho makes straight A's. The childhood obesity problem in t his country is a disgrace. We have t he best economy and the best health c are system in the world and nearly o ne in five of our children ages 6 to 1 9 are obese. That's up from a pproximately one in 20 in 1980. A nd consider that childhood obesity w as pretty much a non-issue when I w as a kid. Being overweight during childh ood and adolescence significantly i ncreases a child's risk of developi ng high cholesterol, hypertension, r espiratory ailments, orthopedic problems, depression and type 2 diabetes during his/her childhood years. Furthermore, being obese in childhood greatly increases the likelihood the child will have serious weightrelated health problems as an adult. Needless to say, the child's estimated lifespan is much shorter than that of a child of normal weight. The hospital costs associated with childhood obesity are in the mega-millions. The US Department of Health and Human Services says "the causes of childhood obesity are multi-factorial." No they're not. The reason so many of our children are obese is because they consume too much bad stuff and move too little. Their diets are high in bad carbohydrates (i.e., junk food) like French fries, sodas, and sweets, and low in fresh vegetables, fruits, and healthy sources of protein. They spend entirely too much time in front of televisions, video games, and computers and not enough time in physical activity. And make no mistake, the best physical activity for a child is free play. Achild enrolled in an adult-micromanaged sport is not getting half the exercise kids got playing sandlot games in the 1950s and 60s, when childhood obesity was very rare. In rare instances, a medical issue may precede childhood obesity, but the typical overweight kid has a lifestyle problem. As such, the solution is for parents to begin making their children's weight a high priority. Yes, schools need to eliminate carbo-load lunches along with soda and snack machines, but in the final analysis, childhood obesity is going to be prevented and solved at home. This is not rocket science. Eat at least 90 percent of your meals at home, around the table as opposed to in front of a television set. If that means taking your kids out of most after-school activities, do it! Most of them involve minimal activity anyway. Prepare meals that are hearthealthy. When your children are hungry between meals, give them apples, cheese and raw vegetables. When they're thirsty, direct them to the faucet. Garden with your kids. Studies have shown that children who garden with their parents eat what they grow and have, as a consequence, healthier diets. They actually like vegetables! Gardening is also a source of great exercise. Exercise with your children. Tak e daily walks and bicycle rides with your kids. Play catch. Throw Frisbees. When they say they're bored, point to the back door. Don't allow televisions, video game consoles, or computers in yo ur children's rooms, and restrict total screen time to no more than one hour per day. As screen time has increased for America's kids, so ha s their weight. Perhaps most important, find ou t what you should weigh, get there, and stay there. Having an overweight parent greatly increases a child's chances of being overweigh t. Good health tends to run in familie s. Family psychologist John Rosemond answers parents' questions on his website at www.rosemond.com. Childhood obesity is almost all caused by child's lifestyle Living With Children John Rosemond Dear Abby

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Every year, the month of January boasts the post-holiday sales for home decor. For an opportunity to spruce up the house and ward off the winter blues with a new work of art, January offers the starving artists sales. Picasso for $50You've seen the TVads, "Buy a framed, sofa-sized oil painting for only $49.99!" You think to yourself, "For only $49.99, no wonder the artists are starving." Then, you temporarily consider checking out the art sale at the local hotel. You know better than to buy a work of art for a mere 50 bucks, yet you're still curious. Here's the scoop on the starving artists. Your fantasy image of a handsome young artist standing at his easel with palette in hand overlooking a snowy mountain landscape creating a masterpiece just for you is just that a fantasy. On some level, we like the emotional image that artists are starving for the love of art! We don't like to think of the art world as a business. Assembly line artDespite the reality check, the inexpensive starving artist pieces are often cheap oleographs. An oleograph is a commercial print. For example, an image of a still life is printed by machine onto a piece of canvas and allowed to dry. After drying, a clear varnish is applied to the entire surface of the canvas over the printed picture to simulate brushstrokes. Oleographs refer to an artistic imitation; just as oleo is imitation butter, an oleograph is an imitation painting. What do you expect for $49.99 ? Machine-made masterpiecesSome starving artist sales keep the age-old art sweatshops in business. In some cases, workers stand for hours in front of a machine that supports a long roll of blank canvas. The machine repositions the blank canvas at intervals automatically. Workers stand before a designated area of blank canvas at a distance from one other. Each worker is responsible for painting one image of the painting's entire composition. For instance, when producing a landscape painting, Artist No. 1 will paint a tree, Artist No. 2 will paint a bird, and so on. After quickly completing the work of his particular area, the canvas is mechanically repositioned to expose the next area of blank canvas. The workers repeat the process. So Artist No. 1 who paints the tree will stand and paint that same tree another 500 times or for the next 16 hours straight. All of the workers continue this piecemeal procedure until hundreds of look-alike landscape paintings are produced. Each completed sofasized painting is cut from the end of the canvas roll and stapled to a wooden stretcher. Crates of paintings are then shipped from sweatshops to your local hotel lobby. Sign itSince there are several artists involved in the factory production of paintings, who signs the paintings? There is one artist whose job it is to sign all of the paintings. Now that you know the inside scoop on some of th e inexpensive starving artist s sales, don't you think that your $50 would be better spent on a good pencil sketch or small painting b y a student artist from the local art school? I certainl y do. Ph.D. antiques appraiser, author, and award-winning TV personality, Dr. Lori presents antique appraisal events nationwide and antiques themed cruises. As seen on NBC's The Tonight Show and Comedy Central's The Daily Show, watch Dr. Lori on the national TV morning show, Daytime on NBC WFLA 8 at 10 AM. Visit DrLoriV.com, Facebook.com/DoctorLori, or call (888) 431-1010. Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Lake P lacid Art League will host i ts 24th annual Art Show & S ale at the Bert J. Harris Jr. A gricultural Center in S ebring from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. S aturday, Jan. 29. Admission i s free to the public, and door p rizes will be presented e very 30 minutes inside the a uditorium. The Art Show will take p lace inside the auditorium a nd outside in tents. More t han 50 artists will be pres enting their creations for s ale and they will be judged b y Jack and Steven Van Dam f or cash awards and ribbons. The Lake Placid High S chool art students will e xhibit their artwork in the f oyer of the auditorium, and t hey will compete for their o wn cash prizes and ribbons. Barbara Wade and Bill S nyder will judge the stud ents'artwork. Refreshments will be a vailable and will include d onuts and coffee in the early m orning, hot dogs, chili, barb ecue sandwiches, various d rinks and desserts later in t he morning and afternoon. T hey will be prepared to sell a nd served by Art League m embers who volunteer to p roduce this winter event for t he community. Photographers RayLynn Dease and K.M. Thornton from Frostproof will exhibit their nature photography of wildlife and landscapes. Richard Marino of Lake Wales will have a booth with his handmade ceramics. These artists will be exhibiting for the first time at the Lake Placid Art League. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 3C SEBRING DISCOUNT BEVERAGES3750 U.S. 27 North, Unit C1 € 471-2277Next to Fairmount Cinema 6 € Open Mon-Sat 9-6 Closed Sunday Tobacco Products, Candy, Cold Beer, Housewares, Gifts & MORE!LOW PRICES € MANY GOOD BARGAINS € CLOSEOUTS!*Prices do not include tax. Natural Light and Natural IceAll Old Milwaukees Best … Reg, Lt, Ice12 Pack $6.99 Budweiser and Bud Light 12 Pack $10.99 Busch, Busch Light and Bud Ice18 Pack $11.29 Good Quality Sunglasses$4 ea 2 for $7 Zippo Lighters All 20% Off Smoke Odor ExterminatorCandles/Spray Can $6.79/$5.79 305s and ROMY 3 Pack Deal $10.30 For 3 Misty $45.99 Carton Galaxy 100% ADDITIVE FREE Natural Cigarette $29.49 Carton Newport$50.49 Carton € 3 Pack Deal $5.19 Ea. USA Gold $43.99 Carton Seneca $31.69 Carton Smokin Joes $31.99 Carton Cigarette Style Little CigarsMany Brands $6.99 … $10.99 Carton E.O. Koch Construction1417 Swank Avenue € Sebring, FL 33870(863) 385-8649COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTIONLet our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property, build your dream home,or do your remodeling.For all of your Aluminum,Steel,and Conventional construction needsŽEmail: kochcon@strato.netState Certified License #CGC1515338 SEAMLESS GUTTERS … Specials5 INCH GUTTERS$2.99PER LINEAR FOOT6 INCH GUTTERS$3.99PER LINEAR FOOTMany Colors Available Courtesy photo Richard Marino, of Lake Wales, will have some of his handmade ceramic pieces, like this bowl, on exhibit at the Lake Placid Art League's 24th annual Show & Sale on Jan. 29. Courtesy photo The nature photography of RayLynn Dease and K.M. Thornton, both of Frostproof, will be on exhibit Jan. 29 at the Lake Placid Art League 24th Annual Art Show & Sale at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center in Sebring. Lake Placid Art League Art Show & Sale is Jan. 29 ARTS& LEISURE Special to the News-SunSEBRING Get ready for the finest m usic of the '70s, right here in Tanglewood! With the new resurgence of the '70s port rayed in part by the hugely popular live m usical production and now the worldwide r elease of "Mamma Mia," the movie. The m usic of ABBAis finding its way back into t he hearts of those who lived it then and taki ng over the hearts of those who are experie ncing it for the first time now. Adbacadabra promises to continue the m omentum by performing 20 of the group's g reatest hits in full ABBAfashion and flair. You won't be able to sit still in your seats as songs like "S.O.S.," "Super Trooper" and "Dancing Queen" are recreated with such precision, you'll swear you were listening to the originals themselves. The show is authentic in music and dress and is performed to live music that will leave you excited and melancholy ... at the same time. Doors and snack bar opens at 6 p.m. The show is at 7 p.m. Tickets are $12. Tanglewood is one-half mile north of Walmart on U.S. 27. For information, call 402-0763. ABBA music coming to Tanglewood Courtesy photo T he Tanglewood Residents' Cancer Benefit was in full swing this week but had its ups and downs.Some of the models were really up about the fashions they were able to choose as they visited Dress Barn and Belk in preparation for the USA Tour for the Cure' Fashion Show being held at Tanglewood on Jan. 29. The men Artie Nichols (from left), Gordon A rmitage, David Werry and Wayne Roswell flex their muscles at Belk while searching for the perfect outfits. Tickets are $15 and may be purchased at Tanglewood. For more information call 382-9507. Tanglewood fashion show set for Jan. 29 Evaluating the starving artists' sales Art & Antiques Dr. Lori Courtesy pho to A starving artist' floral still life painting. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Page 4CNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 5C ARTS& LEISURE Special to the News-SunSEBRING Elvis Wade Cummings will be hosting the second annual benefit show for Special STARS from 8-10 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 12 at Duffer's Sports Grille. Tickets are $20 per person for the Elvis Wade Sweetheart Show. It is a perfect Valentine's gift for all sweethearts and even for those who just love to hear the music by the King of Rock n'Roll. Cummings, known as "Elvis Wade," is a professional Elvis Presley impersonator who has been doing this show worldwide since 1968. He performed with the Jordanaires, Presley's longtime back-up vocalists, for more than 12 years. His wife Sandy Posey will join him on stage at Duffer's to sing. She was a hit singer in the 1960s. Rowdy Rodney Holt, of Zolfo Springs, will perform oldies, rock and country dance music afterwards from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. for everyone to enjoy dancing at no charge to the public. The ticket also includes an entry in the drawing for the Elvis Sweetheart Package, which features "The 50 Greatest Love Songs" CD by Elvis and other items. You must be present to win. All proceeds benefit more than 250 special athletes in Highlands and Hardee counties with physical or mental disabilities. They participate in more than 12 different sports and seven recreation al activities throughout t he year. Funding for these pr ograms is based on donatio ns and it is strictly operated b y volunteers. Dinner is not included in the ticket price. Reservatio ns for dinner can be made fro m 6-8 p.m. and everyone c an order from the menu. Gues ts attending the show w ill receive $2 off per person o n any dinner entree at Duffer 's. Tickets are available at Duffer's, 6940 U.S. 2 7 North, Sebring, 382-6339 or call Special STARS coord inator Cindy Marshall at 45 21295, ext. 124 or 443-043 8. Make checks payable to Special STARS. Seating is limited so purchase ticke ts ahead of time. Elvis Wade returns to help Special STARS Courtesy pho to Elvis Wade Cummings and his wife Sandy Posey sing together at last year's benefit for Special STARS and plan to return tot Duffer's Sports Grille on Feb. 12 for the Elvis Wade Sweetheart Show to help local special athletes. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Awardw inning author Ron Cooper k icks off the South Florida C ommunity College H umanities Department R eading Series at 7 p.m. T hursday in Building H, R oom 110, at the SFCC H ighlands Campus. Cooper i s the author of Hume's F ork, a finalist for the Bread L oaf Literary Prize for F iction. His newest novel, Purple Jesus," tells the s tory of a love triangle b etween a deranged young m an, a young woman, and a m onk who is experiencing r eligious doubt. Inspired by southern g othic writers such as W illiam Faulkner, Flannery O 'Connor, and Truman C apote, as well as his own u pbringing in Lowcountry, S.C., Cooper writes about southern life and people. It is a theme that runs through the majority of his fiction. "There's a certain character about the south where I grew up," Cooper said. "Most authors write about middle and upper class people and tend to make fun of or portray the poor, backwoods people in a negative light, but they are a complex people that experience the same trials and emotions as everyone else." Cooper is also the author of Heidegger and Whitehead: A Phenomenological Examination into the Intelligibility of Experience and is a past president of the Florida Philosophical Association. He is a professor of Humanities at the College of Central Florida. The Humanities Department Reading Series features fiction and nonfiction writers who focus on regional themes. Future reading series authors include historian of Florida's postwar retirement boom Gary Mormino, Feb. 10, and non-fiction writer Les Standiford, April 5. An Open Mic Night will be held April 14. The series is free and open to the public. It is funded by a grant from Anne Reynolds. For more information, call Dr. Charlotte Pressler, professor, English/Humanities at 7847247. Reading Series begins with award-winning author Cooper Courtesy photo Harvey chats with Highlands Little Theatre president Art Harriman and Nadine Tedstone at the Sebring Chamber of Commerce Mixer on Jan. 20. Harvey' runs through J an 30. Harvey' mixes it up Associated PressLOS ANGELES Oprah Winfrey has staged many a family reunion on her talk show. But on Monday's episode, she promises, the drama will be about her. Winfrey told viewers Thursday that she will have a reunion of her own on "The Oprah Winfrey Show." She wouldn't say with whom only that it involves something she's learned about recently and is known to only a few people close to her. Winfrey promises to spill family secrets Monday

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Page 6CNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. children's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. children's mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September to May our youth group meets. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Ed Howell, transitional pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 3823695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30 and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 9 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family and Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confessions: 3-3:45 p.m. Saturdays, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first Friday, or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is "Jesus is First at First Christian Church."Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunda y Worship Service, 9 a.m.; Sunda y Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.; Sunda y Evening Service, 6 p.m .; Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP Build it, and they will come. Some s pecies of wildlife have proven that they w ill take up temporary occupancy if you f ollow their rules of habitat. Among t hose species are bluebirds, bats, wood d ucks, mallards, and Canada geese. There are very specific rules to follow i n both building and placing artificial n ests, if you want to be successful over t ime in attracting specific birds. Wildlife a gencies offer free plans on the Internet, a s well, and there are books with d etailed plans and instructions on locat ion of specific nests. Of course, the nesting structures can a lso be purchased. The world wide web h as a wealth of helpful information on n esting structures: you can quickly get v ery good information from an Internet s earch with key words such as bluebird b oxes, mallard nests, or bat houses. Although birds may have particular n eeds, they aren't fussy about the box b eing mathematically perfect. A ppearance is not usually their main c oncern. What they do need is a nesting s ite that is safe, weatherproof, high e nough and in an area where predators w on't be able to get to them easily. If there is no natural shelter around, it i s best to place the box facing south-east t o north, to avoid strong direct sunlight a nd the heaviest rain. The box can be t ilted forward a bit so that the rainwater w ill run off of it. To discourage predat ors, the box can be placed near a thorny b ush or chicken-wire can be installed a round the entrance area as long as it d oes not obstruct the bird's comings and goings. If squirrels want to make the box their home, a metal plate around the entrance hole can deter them from enlarging it and getting in. It's a good idea to clean the box at the end of the breeding season. This is not difficult and should be done by removing the old nesting materials inside and then use boiling water to cleanse it. This will kill any parasites that may be present. It is important not to use insecticides because it may harm the bird when it returns; boiling water is sufficient. Bird nesting boxes can also be used by many species in the winter months. Instead of taking the box down, leave it up so that our feathered friends can have a warm place to rest up in the colder months. Here are some great tips for putting up bird boxes from the United States Geological Survey Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center: 1. Know where you'll put the nest. Read about other biological needs of your intended species, such as food and cover needs of young. For instance, the mallard hen and ducklings leave the nest together within 12 hours of hatching to look for nearby wetlands with emergent plants for cover and aquatic insects to eat. 2. Follow specific construction plans. Size of box, materials, size of the opening and other details are critical. For instance, if the precise opening isn't used, competitor birds will likely be more of a problem. 3. Think about aesthetics. Curved shapes and earth tones blend into the outdoors better than sharp angles and glossy paint. 4. Plan now for maintenance. Lack of maintenance is the number one cause of failure for most nest structures. For instance, waterfowl don't carry nest material to their sites, so you have to do that for them. 5. Have some patience. Don't get discouraged if your nest isn't used immediately. Where birds aren't used to nest structures, it could be several years before they try them. Once they do, they and their offspring are likely to return year after year.Did you know?The decline of the Pileated woodpecker almost led to the extinction of the wood duck from North America. Why? Wood ducks use the woodpecker's holes in trees for nests. Man-made nest boxes have more recently come to the rescue. Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District (www.highlandsswcd.org). Build your own: Nests for wood ducks, mallards, bluebirds and bats Courtesy pho to Properly built and placed, manmade nesting structures can be successful for wood ducks, mallards, Canada geese, bluebirds, kestrels, bats and screech owls. News From The Watershed Corine Burgess

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 7C CROSSWORDSOLUTION EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer .Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun 'N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid C ity" Children's Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, "prime-timers," and Bible s tudies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. JEWISH Temple Israel of Highlands C ounty, 382-7744. Rabbi Lorraine R udenberg; www.templeisr aelofhcfl.org.Temple Israel is a R eform Temple that promotes the e nduring and fundamental princip les of Judaism. Through prayer, s tudy and friendship we strive to e nrich our lives and insure Jewish c ontinuity in Highlands County. F riday Evening Shabbat Services, 7 :30 p.m.; Saturday afternoon intro t o Hebrew, 12:30 p.m.; Saturday i ntro to Judaism, 2 p.m.; Saturday a fternoon Torah Study, 3:30 p.m.; H avdallah, 5 p.m. Jan. 7-8; Jan. 21; F eb. 4; Feb. 18-19; March 4-5; M arch 18-19 Purim; April 1-2; April 1 5-16; April 18, 6 p.m., Pesach 1st N ight Seder; April 29-30 Yom H ashoah; May 13-14; May 27-28. E very Thursday will be Hebrew and B ible classes with Howard Salles, 1 2:30-4:30 p.m. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Monday of month; Ladies Group WELCAmeets at noon second Monday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable Garden Club meets as needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Like to sing? Come join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Children's Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 8:15 and 10 a.m.; Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Esther and Mary Circles business meeting, 3:30 p.m. third Thursday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 7 p.m. second Tuesday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday; Family Movie, 4 p.m. third Sunday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group, 6-7:30 p.m.; Senior High Youth Group, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gayle Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30 a.m.; and contemporary worship is at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.presbychurch.org. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness mee ting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meetin g and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bib le study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women 's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesda y: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All mee tings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave ., Sebring. For more information, vis it the Web site www.salvationarm ysebring.com or call Major Bruc e Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Summe r Schedule, Sunday School 9:0 0 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on life's journey, you're we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP Aries (March 21-April 20) There a re strange things happening, Aries, but i t's better to just go with the flow. Who k nows, maybe you'll like the change of p ace and its effect on your lifestyle. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Better d ays lie ahead, Taurus. It's just a matter o f waiting a few weeks. In the interim, s tart a new project that will take your m ind off of your worries. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Make t he most of time spent with friends, G emini, because for a little while you w ill be flying under the radar while you h andle a few necessities that have been o verlooked. Cancer(June 22-July 22) There's m uch more to you than meets the eye, C ancer, but you don't often give others a peek into your inner thoughts unless t hey truly earn it. Someone special does t his week. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) You've been f eeling a bit gloomy, Leo, and it's u nderstandable based on how much y ou've had going on. But it's easy to c hange your mood if you surround yours elf with friends. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Generosity is a good thing, Virgo, but not when you put others continually before you put yourself. Reassess your values and make an effort to make changes. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) When one door closes another door opens, Libra. Look at the positive side of things and embrace the changes that are happening to you. If you dwell on the negative, you can't succeed. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) There's so much going on that it's any wonder you can still function on a daily basis, Scorpio. Although times may be stressful, things will work out in the end. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) A relationship is blooming, Sagittarius, and you're not sure how you feel about it just yet. Take a few more weeks to work through your feelings and form a solid opinion. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) You have an eye for value, Capricorn, and it will help you realize a good deal this week. Share the wealth with other people if you can. Tuesday is a banner day. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 8) Aquarius, take firm hold of the financial reigns because overspending could be the downfall to an important relationship. Curb any purchase for a few days. Pisces (Feb. 10-March 20) Creativity is blooming, Pisces, but you're not sure how to harness your artistic energy. Redesigning a room could help. Jan. 23 Rutger Hauer, actor, 67; Jan. 24 Ed Helms, actor, 37; Jan. 25 Alicia Keys, singer, 30; Jan. 26 Cameron Bright, actor, 18; Jan. 27 Patton Oswalt, comedian, 42; Jan. 28 Joey Fatone, entertainer, 34; Jan. 29 Adam Lambert, singer, 29. Better days lie ahead, Taurus; generosity is a good thing, Virgo Classified Ads € 385-6155 NEWS-SUN

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Special to the News-SunSEBRING Heartland Cultural Alliance presents "Scribes Night Out, Sharing the Art of Our Local Wordsmiths," featuring readings by Jan Merop from her book "Pause...and Consider, Keeping in step with life while in tune with heaven" at 6:30 p.m. today. Merop is a well known spiritual writer and columnist for the News-Sun. A preview of her new book featuring reflections on photographs by her husband, Ken, will also be presented. Surprise guests and an open mike for local writers will follow. The event will take place until closing at Brewster's Coffee House, 2191 U.S. 27 North. For more information or to schedule a reading e-mail sherryc@vistanet.net or call 471-3174 or e-mail Fred Leavitt at info@heartlandculturalalliance.org or call 402-8238. Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID Native F loridians Buck and Linda C ooper were 1998 recipients o f Florida Audubon's distinq uished Allan Cruickshank M emorial Award for their w ork in Florida conservation p rojects. Resident naturalists at S treet Nature Center in W inter Haven, Linda also s erved as fditor of Lake R egion Audubon Society's Eagles View" as well cent ral Florida's compiler for F OS publication "Florida F ield Naturalist. With more than 700 s pecies of birds on their life's l ist, Buck and Linda will s hare with Highlands County C hapter members their d ream of a lifetime -their e xperience to visit A ntarctica where they witn essed firsthand rarely seen b irds and wildlife. Members of Highlands A udubon Chapter invite m embers and the public to m eet the Coopers at their monthly meeting on Tuesday at the Masonic Lodge on corner of Park and Main Street. Bring utensils and a dish to share and join all for a potluck supper at 6:30 p.m. or arrive at 7:30 p.m. for the presentation. Highlands Audubon meets the fourth Tuesday each month September through May. Page 8CNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com Established 19311600 US 27 South € Avon Park Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home4001 Sebring Parkway Sebring, 385-0125 111 E. Circle St. Avon Park, 453-3101 Chris T.Nelson Craig M. Nelson Darin S. MacNeil W .W LUMBER CO. 465-3331Hwy. 27 S. Lake Placid"We're More Than Just Lumber" COMPLETE Building SuppliesPlease support the above businesses. They have made this page possible. Inspirational Thoughtsby Patricia Valentine THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502 Residential Commercial Mobile Homes"Small Enough to Know You Large Enough to Serve You"500 South Lake Avenue 382-8300 453-3019 THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502Joel 2:25-26,And I will restore to you the years that the locust hath eaten,the cankerworm,and the caterpiller,and the palmerworm,and my great army which I sent among you.And ye shall eat in plenty,and be satisfied,and praise the name of the Lord your God,that hath dealt wondrously with you:and my people shall never be ashamed.ŽThe same God who brings judgment is pleased to restore blessing to those who repent.God can restore people to usefulness in spite of past disobedience.The desire of the enemy is to destroy and consume lives just as the cankerworm,caterpiller and palmerworm that Joel described.God promises that His people who come to Him will have their lives restored by His might and power. God can take even the most wrecked life and build it again.There is no situation too hopeless for God.Ephesians 3:20 says,Now unto him that is able to do exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that worketh in us.Ž What God want to do in our lives is beyond what we can ask or think.Take the limit off and watch God work. Attend the Church of Your Choice! Newborns € Children € AdolescentsOFFICE HOURS: Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., F.A.A.P. Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., F.A.A.P. Anoop Palta, M.D., F.A.A.P. Vishakha Nakhate, M.D., F.A.A.P. David Kleczek, P.A.C. Amy Grimes, P.A.C. Mercy L. Seralde, M.D. Maria C. Perez, M.D. Maria B. Asis, M.D., F.A.A.P. Megan Neff, ARNPAvon Park Pediatrics,P.A. & Sebring Pediatrics,LLCWe accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid SEBRING382-0770AVON PARK453-7337 Specializing in the treatment of € Allergies € Asthma € Attention Deficit Disorder Immunizations € Check-ups € Obesity Counseling SEBRING: MON. … FRI. … 8:30AM … 5:00PMSATURDAY … 8:30AM … 12:00 NOON … SEBRING ONLYAVON PARK: MON. & WED. … 8:30AM … 7:00PM TUES., THURS., & FRI. … 8:30AM … 5:00PM LAKE PLACID699-1414 Courtesy art An acrylic study in light and shadow by Anne Watson. In painting, drawing, using any of our creative gifts, we are able to see and learn many of life's real and important lessons. In the past week, no less than three, maybe more, people expressed to me heartfelt grief in different situations where someone had hurt them or someone they love. "The least they could have done was come to me" was the plaintive cry of each one. We've all felt that way I have felt the same way myself, haven't we all? It seems the common thread between all these disappointments was a loss of dignity from the failures of others to consider the feelings of those around them before acting, or choosing not to act. I tell my students all the time that, as we use our creative gifts and talents, especially in painting and drawing, what we learn is not only for the paper or the canvas, but for the canvas' of our life. In all the situations above, my friends and I needed to ponder a fundamental lesson in perspective it is impossible for any two people to see anything at all from the exact same perspective at the same time. When a student paints from life, they have to move from their spot and allow me to step into it for me to be able to see how they are doing in their work. And in life, if we wish to have a better view, we can choose to remove ourselves from our feelings of disappointment, and place ourselves in the spot where the one who hurt us stood, to get a better picture of what they saw from their perspective. We may not like what we see there, but at least we will have a better possibility of seeing as they saw. And we allow ourselves the opportunity of seeing the other in new light ... In my own painting and in my teaching, light is what it is all about strong and beautiful contrasts that chase the darkness away. Learning to draw and paint facilitates for us the lessons in life that help us see beauty and chase the dark clouds away. Anne Watson teaches in Avon Park, Sebring and Lake Placid, and has studios at the Highlands Art League's Yellow House Gallery & Gift Shop, and in Avon Park. She may be reached at anne@annewatsonstudio.com. Lessons in light and life ARTS& LEISURE Perspective 101 Anne Watson Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South Florida Community College brings the past to life with Bobby Horton when he performs "Songs & Stories of the Civil War" at 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 29 at The Arbor, 111 W. Oak St. in Arcadia. Horton has performed twice to sell-out crowds at SFCC in Avon Park, and this new venue provides arts and entertainment to DeSoto County and surrounding area residents. Dressed in 19th century costume and using period musical instruments, Horton explores the stories of both the North and South through the music they loved. Each song is placed in context with historical background and portrays the struggles, hopes, and fears of Americans during this long historical conflict. These songs and stories tell of families left behind, fallen comrades, the hope of going home, and the pride, bravery, and patriotism of the volunteers who answered their country's call. This is not just a performance for Civil War buffs, but for anyone who loves great music, inspired storytelling, and an afternoon of unforgettable entertainment. Aseasoned performer, Horton is a multi-instrumentalist, composer, producer, and music historian. For more than 30 years he has performed with t he musical-comedy grou p, Three On AString. He h as also produced and pe rformed music scores f or eight Ken Burns PBS film s, two programs for the A& E network, and nine films f or the National Park Servic e. He has been performin g "Songs and Stories of t he Civil War" coast to coa st since 1985. Residing in Birmingham Ala, Horton has contribut ed to many projects, includin g Ken Burn's specials: T he Civil War, Baseba ll, Thomas Jefferson, Lew is and Clark, and Frank Lloy d Wright. His series of recordings of authent ic period music has be en acclaimed by historic al organizations and public ations throughout the Unit ed States and Europe. The major sponsor f or this performance is Mosai c. Tickets are gener al admission $15. Tickets m ay be purchased online 2 4 hours a day, seven days a week, at http://performan ces.southflorida.edu. Ticke ts may also be purchased b y visiting the SFCC DeSo to Campus, 2251 NE Turn er Ave. in Arcadia from 8 a.m to 6 p.m. Monday throug h Thursday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m Friday, or by calling t he SFCC Box Office at 78 47178 from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday-Friday Bobby Horton to present Songs & Stories of the Civil War' at SFCC Courtesy pho to Bobby Horton will present Songs & Stories of the Civil War' at 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 29 in Arcadia. This is a South Florida Community College sponsored event. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The S outh Florida C ommunity College ( SFCC) Student Nurses A ssociation (SNA) will p resent "The Heart of the A rts" by the Florida D ance Theatre troupe at 7 :30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 18 i n the SFCC Theatre for t he Performing Arts, H ighlands Campus. The t roupe will perform class ical and modern ballet a nd modern dance. "The Heart of the Arts d ance performance will b e an evening of profess ional dance to entertain a nd enrich the lives of our c ommunity. Our heart and c ompassion is at the core o f everything we do t hrough the SFCC S tudent Nurses A ssociation. We hope that t he community will open i ts heart to our cause and e njoy this performance," s aid Amy Wuthrich, presi dent of SFCC SNA. Tickets are $15 for g eneral admission and $ 10 for students, child ren, and groups of 10 or m ore. All proceeds will b enefit the SFCC Student N urses Association. T ickets can be purchased t hrough the SFCC Box O ffice, 784-7178. C ontact the SFCC N ursing Department at 4 53-6661, 465-5300, 4 94-7500, 773-2252, ext. 7 225. The Heart of the Arts' dance show set at SFCC Audubon hosts distinguished birders Courtesy photo Native Floridians Buck and Linda Cooper will be the featured speakers at the Highlands Audubon Chapter meeting on Tuesday. Merop featured at Scribes Night Out' Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155

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We all have our favorites, w ho we're rooting for on t his the penultimate day of t he NFLseason. Steeler Nation is ready to r oll to yet another Super B owl while those backing t he J-E-T-S Jets, Jets, Jets a re harkening back to the d ays of "Broadway Joe." Cheeseheads are hoping to a dd another trophy to Title T own and fans of da Bears a re in full Super Bowl S huffle mode. But while all those with r ooting interests have chosen s ides and are fervent in the h opes that their team takes t he next step, the NFLand i ts'participating networks a re already giddy no matter w ho comes out winners t oday because they've a lready won. When it comes down to it, i t's about ratings and money. And given the four teams l eft, it matters little beyond t his point what the Super B owl match-up will be as the r atings will be a bonanza any w hich way you look at it. Consider the teams playi ng today. With the Bears and Jets, y ou have the league's two l argest markets, so of course y ou'd think they would be t he most hoped for as Super B owl opponents. But in the Steelers and Packers, you have what are likely the two biggest fan bases, outside of the Cowboys and it's no slam dunk that both aren't at least as big as those Lone Star followers. Combine the big markets and the massive fan bases and it's a win-win no matter how it washes out. The Bears are as old as the League itself, with the Packers not far behind. So you've got generations of fans brought up with them. Multiple championships, a laundry list of Hall of Famers and iconic histories. The Steelers, while not as long-standing as the previous two, have a winning history in the Super Bowl era unparalleled and it's fair share of Hall of Famers and iconic figures as well. And then you have the Jets, who also don't quite the longevity, but have one of the biggest upsets in Super Bowl history. Not to mention that they've been a lightning rod all season long and, after all, they represent New York. They may play second fiddle to the Giants throughout the majority of the boroughs, but even if only Queens was tuning in, they'd do a pretty good share. Today's games, in and of themselves, should draw astounding ratings that could well rival or pass some previous Super Bowls. In both cases, you have the big fan base versus the big market. Steeler Nation against New York, Cheeseheads against da Bears. And amid the cheers of the fans, the clash of pads and helmets as they strive for a trip to Dallas and Super Bowl XLV the League is hearing the cha-ching of the cash register. Dan Hoehne is the Sports Editor of the News-Sun. He can be reached at daniel.hoehne@newssun.com. NFL, networks in no-lose situation By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK The Avon Park boys basketball team pulled out a 70-65 win in overtime Friday night, defeating district rival Mulberry in a close contest. "We would get ahead and then blow it," Red Devil head coach Luther Clemons said. "We would get ahead by 10 or 12 points and then we would have a breakdown. Well, we played hard, but we would get a lead and then get sloppy. We have to stop that." Avon Park and Mulberry both came out in a manto-man defense, but neither team could create a turnover in the first period, which ended tied at 13-all. Mulberry was forced to go to their bench early in the second to keep fresh legs on the floor as the Devils pulled out a 32-23 lead by the half. By the end of the fourth, Mulberry was able to pull close and a three-pointer from way downtown from Panther Frank Gonzalez but the Panthers out front with 19 seconds left on the clock. Avon Park's Charlie Brown answered with 9 seconds left to tie the game at 60 all. But Mulberry's answer, again from Gonzalez and outside the three, came up short as did Panther Kevin Simmons'layup after t he rebound. Simmons would net 2 0 points for the night, an d Gonzalez would hang clo se with 17 points. SPORTS D SECTION Inside This Section Rays sign Manny, Damon . . .3D Holyfield back in the ring . . .3D News-Sun Sunday, January 23, 2011 MCTphot os Can Brian Urlacher and the Bears defense cool off a red hot Aaron Rodgers? News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Andre Wilson keeps Doug Dyer on his hip as he calls for the ball on the low block. Wilson would score all 11 of Lake Placid's first-quarter points in Friday's 71-63 win over Frostproof. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE PLACID Between A ndre Wilson's early scoring b inge and Kirk Veley's triple d ouble, Lake Placid was able t o hold off a game Bulldog s quad in Friday's 71-63 win t hat wasn't secured until the f inal minutes. After a l ackluster T uesday loss t o Tenoroc, t he Dragons w ere eager to p ut exam w eek behind t hem, but it w as Wilson who shouldered t he load early on. "They threw a zone at us, w hich we hadn't seen from t hem and we were having s ome trouble with it," head c oach David Veley said. With Kirk at the point, with h is height, he could see over t he defense and kept finding A ndre." So much so that the 11-10 l ead at the end of the period s aw all 11 points coming f rom Wilson inside. He made it Wilson 13, Dragons fend off Frostproof Lake Placid71Frostproof63 See LP, page 4D News-Sun photo by BETH BALDRIDG E Marcus Dewberry went for a game-high 31 points Friday in Avon Park's overtime win against Mulberry. Devils hold of Mulberry in OT Avon Park70Mulberry65 See AP, page 4D And Another Thing... Dan Hoehne Who You Got? News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Red Devil Jessi Guzman tries to get Kathleen's Derek Smith flipped Saturday morning at the annual Spiegel Memorial Wrestling Invitational. Guzman would get a pin at the 1:23 mark of the third period in this match. Annual Spiegel Invitational fills the mats Special to the News-SunSEBRING On Thursday, Jan. 20 the Highlands Merchants and Blue Jays duked it out in an extra inning game with Merchants carrying away the victory 21-17. Glenn Minic was high man, going 5-for-5 with a triple. Mike Jurmu was 4-for-5 with two doubles and having 4-for-5 were Harry Bell and Cal Bready. Don Ward, Charley Quinn, Harold Binel and John Laysack each contributed 3-for-5 for their times at bat. The Blue Jays had 28 hits, mostlydonatedby Bob Weisshaving5-for-5 and Carl Puffenberger and Jerry O'Brian going 4-for-5. Doran Quigg had 4-for-4. The Silent Salesman started slow and fell behind 7-3 after three innings. In the 4th inning the Salesman scored five runs to take the lead 8-5, at which point the Rebels'bats went into neutral for a final score of 18-9 with Salesman o n top. Ken Filppula relieved t he starting pitcher in the thi rd inning and with thehelp of very good defensive pla ys held the Rebels to only tw o more runs the remainder of the game. Hitters having an ou tstanding day at bat we re Bob Roth, 5-for-5includin g a double and scored thr ee times. Ross "Spider" McMin n had 4-for-5 including a do uSebring Seniors slugging it out See SENIORS, page 4D

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SYF Meeting and electionsSEBRING Sebring Youth Football and Cheer will hold its'annual meeting on Thursday, Jan. 20 at 7:30 p.m., at 259 U.S. 27 N., Sebring. The meeting will hold elections for Executive and General Board positions and applications for Football and Cheer head coaches will also be accepted. If you have been looking for a way to give back to the community and have Football or Cheer experience, please come. Any questions, call Amy at 381-4801.Woman's Club Scholarship BenefitSEBRING The Woman's Club of Sebring will be holding a golf tournament to benefit its'scholarship fund Saturday, Feb. 19 at the Harder Hall Golf Course. The four-person scramble format will have check-in at 7 a.m. with an 8 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $55 per player or $220 per team and includes golf, cart, lunch and prizes. There is a Putting and Chipping contest available as well as a $2,000 Hole-In-One prize sponsored by the Cohan Radio Group. Entry forms are available at local pro shops and are to be sent to The Woman's Club of Sebring, P.O. Box 8174, Sebring, FL, 33872. Registration deadline is February 19. For an entry form or for more information, call Johnell West at 382-0824.Panther 5KAVON PARK The second annual South Florida Community College Panther 5K Run/Walk has been planned for Saturday, Feb. 26 at the SFCC Highland Campus. The SFCC Foundation, Inc. and Bill Jarrett Ford Mercury are sponsoring the event, and proceeds benefit the college's intercollegiate athletics programs. The entry fee for the SFCC Panther 5K Run/Walk is $20 through Feb. 16 and $25 from Feb. 17 through the day of the race. Students with a current I.D. may register for $15. Every participant receives a Dri-Fit long-sleeve shirt sizes cannot be guaranteed for those who enter after Feb. 17. Registration is 7-7:45 a.m. on race day in the parking lot in front of the SFCC University Center race starts at 8 a.m. Entry forms are available online at www.southflorida.edu/panther5k Participants can mail their copies and entry fees to the SFCC Foundation, Inc., 13 East Main Street, Avon Park, FL 33825; or fax forms to 863-453-8023 and call 863-453-3133 with credit card information. For more information about the SFCC Panther 5K, call the SFCC Foundation at 863-453-3133. Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worsh ip Center presents the First Annual Go lf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun sta rt at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes o ne team of four golfers, one tee sign and tw o green signs. Gold Sponsor $300 includes one tea m of four golfers, one green sign. Silver Sponsor $150 includes o ne green sign, one tee sign. Bronze Sponsor $100 includes o ne green sign. Individual player $60 includes gre en fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26 ). Team of Four Golfers $240 includ es green fees, cart and lunch ($280 aft er March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, F L 33871. Or register online at wingsoffaithchri stianworshipcenter.com Proceeds to be donated to scholarsh ip program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jaso n Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhanke rson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com .Our Lady of Grace eventsAVON PARK Our Lady of Gra ce Catholic Church has two benefit even ts coming up in the next two months. Tuesday, Feb. 22 they will host t he Todd Allen Show, Classic Branson an d Las Vegas-style entertainment at it's be st. Allen will perform a variety of styl es including Rock n Roll, Country and h is award-winning Elvis impersonations. The show will be held at the Our Lad y of Grace Catholic Church Grogan Cente r, at 595 E. Main St. in Avon Park, at 7 p.m For a donation of $10, tickets can be purchased at the Highlands Independe nt Bank and Heartland National Bank Avo n Park locations, Warren's Auto Sales an d the Avon Park Chamber of Commerce. The next event will be the First Annu al Golf Tournament at the River Greens 2 7Hole Golf Course Saturday, March 1 2 with an 8 a.m. tee-time. The cost of $60 per player includ es golf, cart, golf shirt and lunch, whi le River Greens members pay just $35. Sponsorships are available as we ll, starting with a $100 hole sponsor for a sign only. AHole Sponsor with Sign, plus a fr ee foursome, is $300, a Co-Sponsor Sig n, plus free foursome, with perogative to f ly their banner is $400 and a Major Spons or is $1,500. All proceeds from these events bene fit the Our Lady of Grace Scholarship Fun d. WILD-CARD PLAYOFFS Saturday, Jan. 8 Seattle 41, New Orleans 36 N.Y. Jets 17, Indianapolis 16 Sunday, Jan. 9 Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7 Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16 DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS Saturday, Jan. 15 Pittsburgh 31, Baltimore 24 Green Bay 48, Atlanta 21 Sunday, Jan. 16 Chicago 35, Seattle 24 N.Y. Jets 28, New England 21 CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS Sunday, Jan. 23 Green Bay at Chicago, 3 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 6:30 p.m. PRO BOWL Sunday, Jan. 30 AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. SUPER BOWL Sunday, Feb. 6 At Arlington, Texas AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB Boston339.786 New York2220.52411 Philadelphia1725.40516 Toronto1330.3022012New Jersey1231.2792112Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami3013.698 Orlando2815.6512 Atlanta2816.636212Charlotte1724.41512 Washington1229.29317 Central Division WLPctGB Chicago2914.674 Indiana1623.41011 Milwaukee1624.4001112Detroit1528.34914 Cleveland834.1902012WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio376.860 Dallas2715.643912New Orleans2816.636912Memphis2023.46517 Houston2024.4551712Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City2715.643 Utah2716.62812Denver2418.5713 Portland2420.5454 Minnesota1033.2331712Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Lakers3213.711 Phoenix2021.48810 Golden State1923.4521112L.A. Clippers1626.3811412Sacramento932.22021 ___ Thursday's Games Charlotte 100, Philadelphia 97 Chicago 82, Dallas 77 Portland 108, L.A. Clippers 93 Friday's Games New Jersey 89, Detroit 74 Orlando 112, Toronto 72 Phoenix 109, Washington 91 New Orleans 100, Atlanta 59 Boston 110, Utah 86 Milwaukee 102, Cleveland 88 Memphis 115, Houston 110 San Antonio 101, New York 92 Golden State 119, Sacramento 112, OT L.A. Lakers 107, Denver 97 Saturday's Games Atlanta at Charlotte, late Dallas at New Jersey, late Boston at Washington, late Phoenix at Detroit, late Toronto at Miami, late Utah at Philadelphia, late Cleveland at Chicago, late San Antonio at New Orleans, late New York at Oklahoma City, late Orlando at Houston, late Memphis at Milwaukee, late Indiana at Portland, late Golden State at L.A. Clippers, late Sunday's Games Indiana at Denver, 8 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA Philadelphia3111567164124 Pittsburgh2915462150112 N.Y. Rangers2719357140119 N.Y. Islanders1524737114152 New Jersey142933192140 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Boston2614759144107 Montreal2717458125114 Buffalo2121547129139 Toronto1922543119141 Ottawa1725741106157 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Tampa Bay2915563145153 Washington2614860135125 Atlanta2318854148156 Carolina2318652141146 Florida2120547124121WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Detroit2912664162138 Nashville2615658129112 Chicago2518454150130 St. Louis2217751124133 Columbus2220549123147 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA Vancouver2910866153115 Colorado2417654153151 Minnesota2418553123128 Calgary2121648133147 Edmonton1425735115159 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA Dallas2914563143129 Phoenix2415957138135 Anaheim2620456133141 San Jose2419553133132 Los Angeles2422149134119 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Thursday's Games Tampa Bay 3, Atlanta 2, SO San Jose 2, Vancouver 1, SO Buffalo 4, Boston 2 Toronto 5, Anaheim 2 New Jersey 2, Pittsburgh 0 Washington 2, N.Y. Islanders 1 Philadelphia 6, Ottawa 2 Carolina 4, N.Y. Rangers 1 Detroit 4, St. Louis 3, OT Nashville 5, Colorado 1 Dallas 4, Edmonton 2 Phoenix 2, Los Angeles 0 Friday's Games Tampa Bay 2, Florida 1, SO N.Y. Islanders 5, Buffalo 2 Montreal 7, Ottawa 1 Calgary 7, Dallas 4 Saturday's Games New Jersey at Philadelphia, late Chicago at Detroit, late Boston at Colorado, late Washington at Toronto, late Anaheim at Montreal, late Carolina at Pittsburgh, late N.Y. Rangers at Atlanta, late Columbus at St. Louis, late Los Angeles at Phoenix, late Calgary at Vancouver, late Minnesota at San Jose, late Sunday's Games Philadelphia at Chicago, 12:30 p.m. Florida at New Jersey, 3 p.m. Buffalo at N.Y. Islanders, 3 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 5 p.m. Nashville at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Friday's Scores EAST Baruch 62, Brooklyn 60 Fairfield 67, Canisius 60 Hobart 88, Vassar 57 Husson 77, Castleton St. 63 Iona 72, Niagara 66 Malone 77, Houghton 61 Rochester 77, Carnegie-Mellon 60 St. Peter's 77, Siena 69 Staten Island 90, John Jay 79 Washington, Mo. 80, NYU 76 SOUTH Belmont 67, S.C.-Upstate 62 ETSU 68, Lipscomb 67 MIDWEST Augustana,S.D. 97, Upper Iowa 77 Beloit 119, Grinnell 108 Butler 81, Wis.-Green Bay 75 Carroll, Wis. 81, Illinois College 78 Martin Luther 83, Presentation 69 Minn. St., Mankato 87, Bemidji St. 82 Minn. St., Mrhd 86, Concordia, St.P. 74 Minn.-Morris 94, Bethany Lutheran 80 Northwestern, Minn. 72, Northland 60 Ripon 77, Monmouth, Ill. 68 SW Minnesota St. 84, Minn. Duluth 67 St. Cloud St. 62, Minn.-Crookston 50 St. Norbert 60, Lake Forest 45 St. Scholastica 83, Crown, Minn. 67 Valparaiso 60, Wis.-Milwaukee 43 Wayne, Neb. 76, Winona St. 52 FAR WEST Adams St. 86, Regis 53 Great Falls 71, Rocky Mountain 54 Mntna St.-North. 73, Carroll, Mont. 54BASEBALLAmerican League BOSTON RED SOX Extended their player development contract with Portland (EL) for two years through 2014 season. CHICAGO WHITE SOX Exercised their 2012 contract option on manager Ozzie Guillen. LOS ANGELES ANGELSAcquired OF Vernon Wells from Toronto Blue Jays for C/1B Mike Napoli and OF Juan Rivera. TAMPA BAY RAYS Agreed to terms with RHP Jonah Bayliss, OF Chris Carter, RHP Dirk Hayhurst, INF Daniel Mayora and INF Ray Olmedo on minor league contracts. National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS Agreed to terms with OF Jeremy Reed on a minor league contract. NEW YORK METS Agreed to terms with LHP Tim Byrdak and RHP Blaine Boyer on minor league contracts. Named Tim Teufel manager, Ricky Bones pitching coach and Mike Easler hitting coach of Buffalo (IL). ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Agreed to terms with INF Nick Punto on a oneyear contract.FOOTBALLNational Football League JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Promoted receivers coach Todd Monken to quarterbacks coach, qualify control coach Johnny Cox to receivers coach and offensive staff assistant Matt Griffin to quality control coach. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at Sebring,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer at District Tournament,Mulberry,vs.McKeel,8 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Girls Weightlifting at State Qualifier,Port Charlotte,10:30 a.m. FRIDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Mulberry,6/7:30 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Avon Park,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer at District Tournament,Liberty,vs.Liberty,7 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Lake Placid,6/7:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Girls Weightlifting at State Qualifier,Port Charlotte,10:30 a.m. THURSDAY: Girls Basketball vs.Frostproof,6/7:30 p.m. Walker TUESDAY,Jan.25: Girls/Boys Basketball at City of Life,6/7:30 p.m. THURSDAY,Jan.27: Girls/Boys Basketball vs.AllSaints,6/7:30 p.m. MONDAY,Jan.31: Girls Basketball at District Tournament,All Saints Academy,TBD MONDAY,Feb.7: Boys Basketball at District Tournament,All Saints Academy,TBD Heartland Christian MONDAY: Boys Basketball vs.City of Life,5/6:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Haven Christian,5 p.m. FRIDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Southland Christian,5:30/7 p.m. SFCC FRIDAY: Baseball vs.Daytona State College,2 p.m. SATURDAY: Baseball vs.Webber International,doubleheader,1 p.m. SUNDAY,Jan.30: Baseball at Lake Sumter,1 p.m. MONDAY,Jan.31: Baseball at Webber International,6 p.m. TUESDAY,Feb.1: Softball vs.Seminole State,5 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Boys Basketball at Sebring,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer at District Tournament, Mulberry,vs.Frostproof,7 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Girls Weightlifting at State Qualifier,Port Charlotte,10:30 a.m. THURSDAY: Girls Basketball at DeSoto,6/7:30 p.m. FRIDAY: Boys Basketball vs.McKeel,6/7:30 p.m. S S K K I I I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Deer Valley Celebrity Skifest . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S T T E E N N N N I I S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Australian Open, Day 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 p p . m m . Australian Open, Round of 16 . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . Australian Open, Round of 16 . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 9 9 p p . m m . Australian Open, Quarterfinals. . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . Australian Open, Quarterfinals . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 p p . m m . Australian Open, Quarterfinals . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N H H L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Philadelphia at Chicago . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C C 5 5 p p . m m . Atlanta at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Toronto at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NM M O O T T O O R R C C Y Y C C L L E E R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n SupercrossFIM World Championship. . C C B B S SC C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n Miami at North Carolina State . . . . . . . . . . 4 4 4 4M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Notre Dame at Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . Baylor at Kansas State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Florida at Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . Purdue at Ohio State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E G G Y Y M M N N A A S S T T I I C C S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 5 5 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Kentucky at Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NTimes, games, channels all subject to change N N F F L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . Green Bay at Chicago . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S SG G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . EuroPGA Abu Dhabi Championship . . G G O O L L F F 4 4 p p . m m . PGA Bob Hope Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Mitsubishi Electric Championship G G O O L L F FW W O O M M E E N N ' S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Boston College at Georgia Tech . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 2 2 p p . m m . Alabama at South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 8 8 5 5 p p . m m . North Carolina at Maryland . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P NN 2 2M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Iowa at Ohio State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N B B A A M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Detroit at Orlando . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N LIVESPORTSONTV NFL Playoffs NBA NHL Transactions M. College Basketball Page 2DNews-Sun Sunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.co m

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 3D 6 MONTH MEMBERSHIPS NOW AVAILABLE (863) 382-0500 € 3201 Golfview Rd. € Sebring(863) 382-0744for 9 Hole Executive RatesPrices good thru 3/31/10 Incl. Tax & CartMonday thru Friday:8am … 1pm $36By 8, After 1 $29 Saturday & Sunday: $29 GRAND STAND SEATINGor BRING YOUR LAWN CHAIRS CONCESSIONS AVAILABLEREADYƒSETƒMOW!!! F AMILY FUN! SPEEDS UP TO 50 MPH SATURDAY € JAN 29th € 6pmSpectator Gates Open @ 5pm Children Under 12 FREE For more info or Group Rates call441-2642or Email: nomowman@hotmail.com 2155 Herrick Road Avon Park(Just west of Avon Park Airport) Proud Sponsor … Next RaceJAN 29th at 6pm APMower Plex ScheduleSpectator Admission Only$5for Adults$10Super Ticket Includes Pit Pass!Feb. 26 March 26 April 23 May 21 Want To Race? Call 441-2642 By MIKE FITZPATRICK Associated PressThree big-name outfielders f ound their new homes on a b usy night in baseball. Vernon Wells was traded F riday from Toronto to the L os Angeles Angels, giving t hem the big bat they wanted a ll winter. Manny Ramirez and J ohnny Damon were on the m ove, too they're about to b ecome teammates again, t his time in Tampa Bay. The Blue Jays shipped W ells, the high-priced fixture i n the middle of their lineup, t o Los Angeles for catcher M ike Napoli and outfielder J uan Rivera in one of the b iggest deals of the offseas on. "Moving forward and s tarting this new chapter is g oing to be a blast," the 32y ear-old Wells said on a conf erence call. The All-Star center fielder h as four years and $86 mill ion left on the $126 million, s even-year contract he signed w ith Toronto. Neither general manager, T ony Reagins of the Angels n or Alex Anthopoulos of the B lue Jays, would specifically s ay whether any money was i ncluded in the trade to offset W ells'salary. Instead, both GMs danced a round the question, simply s aying it was announced as a 2 -for-1 swap. Reagins said Wells'cont ract was "tolerable" and that h e got approval from upper m anagement. Wells waived his full not rade clause to join the A ngels. "The financial implicat ions were certainly a large c omponent," Anthopoulos s aid. "There's no question g oing forward this will give u s flexibility." Ramirez and Damon, both f ree agents, agreed to oney ear contracts with the Rays, a person familiar with the n egotiations told The A ssociated Press. The person spoke on cond ition of anonymity because t he agreements were subject t o physicals and had not been a nnounced. Damon gets $5.25 million a nd the chance to earn $ 750,000 in bonuses based o n attendance, the person s aid. Ramirez gets $2 mill ion. The moves mark the first m ajor additions for the AL E ast champions after a devast ating offseason in which one p rominent player after anothe r left cost-cutting Tampa B ay. Carl Crawford, Carlos P ena and Rafael Soriano s igned elsewhere as free a gents. Matt Garza and Jason B artlett were traded. Astrong bullpen was decim ated by the losses of J oaquin Benoit, Grant B alfour, Dan Wheeler, Randy C hoate and Chad Qualls. Ramirez and Damon p layed together for four years i n Boston and helped lead the R ed Sox to the 2004 World S eries title ending the t eam's 86-year championship drought. Both colorful characters are well past their primes, but if nothing else they could at least provide an attraction at Tropicana Field for a Rays team that drew just 1.86 million fans last year. The Angels are trying to regain their grip on the AL West. After winning three straight division titles and five of six, they slid to 80-82 last season. They had hoped to add Crawford or third baseman Adrian Beltre, but missed out on both expensive free agents. Wells should help. The three-time All-Star hit .273 with 31 home runs and 88 RBIs last season. He made his major league debut with Toronto in 1999 and quickly became one of baseball's most promising players. "Vernon is a player we have admired for some time," Reagins said in a statement. "He is a tremendous person and the type of player that will impact our club immediately, both on offense and defense." Nagged by injuries, Wells dipped in 2009 before a bounce-back season. Athree-time Gold Glove winner, he's looking forward to playing on real grass. Whether he stays in center remains to be seen. The Angels moved perennial Gold Glove winner Torii Hunter to right last season to make room for speedy Peter Bourjos. Whichever way they line up, Angels manager Mike Scioscia said he could have the best defensive outfield since the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1980s. The Blue Jays, out of the playoffs since winning their second straight World Series title in 1993, had been shopping Wells in an effort to free up some payroll. Anthopoulos thanked Wells for his time in Toronto, adding, "he was very sentimental when we spoke about this." The 29-year-old Napoli hit .238 with 26 homers and 68 RBIs last season, often filling in at first base for injured Kendry Morales. Napoli ranked among the ALleaders with one home run per 17.4 at-bats. He has hit at least 20 homers in three straight years and could help give Toronto time to break in rookie catcher J.P. Arencibia, the MVPof the Pacific Coast League last season. Napoli had filed for salary arbitration, asking for $6.1 million while the Angels offered $5.3 million. The 32-year-old Rivera hit .252 with 15 home runs and 52 RBIs last season. He is due to make $5.25 million this year. The 38-year-old Ramirez began last season with the Los Angeles Dodgers, then was claimed on waivers late in the summer by the Chicago White Sox. He hit a combined .298 with nine homers and 42 RBIs in the final season of a $45 million, two-year contract he signed with the Dodgers. Hampered by injuries, the longtime slugger had 320 plate appearances in 90 games. Still a power threat, he likely will be a designated hitter for the Rays. Ramirez's career took a downward turn in May 2009 when he was suspended 50 games for using a banned female fertility drug. The 12-time All-Star has 555 home runs, good for 14th on the career list, and 1,830 RBIs, which ranks 18th. He also helped Boston win the 2007 World Series, then was traded to the Dodgers the following season. The 37-year-old Damon spent last season with Detroit, batting .271 with eight homers and 51 RBIs, mostly as a DH. Weak-armed in left field and no longer the stolen base threat he once was, he remains very durable the two-time All-Star played 145 games last year and hit 36 doubles in 539 at-bats. Damon, from nearby Orlando, can pad his paycheck by making a difference at the gate for the Rays. He would get $150,000 each for 1.75 million, 1.85 million, 1.95 million, 2.05 million and 2.15 million in home attendance. AP Sports Writer Ronald Blum and AP Baseball Writer Ben Walker contributed to this report. Angels add Vernon Wells; Manny, Damon headed to TB MCTphoto Florida native Johnny Damon is returning home after signing a one-year deal with the Rays. Associated PressWHITE SULFUR S PRINGS, W.Va. Two y ears shy of 50, Evander H olyfield will enter the ring at T he Greenbrier resort in anothe r quest to become undisputed h eavyweight champion. Holyfield weighed in at 2 24 1/2 pounds for his fight S aturday night in the Casino C lub against journeyman S herman Williams. The bout is titled Redemption in America: T he Journey Begins Now." Six fights are on the underc ard. Holyfield fight the main event at The Greenbrier News-Sun photos by ED BALDRIDGE Above: German Soto rounds the final bend to complete Saturday's Highlands County Half Marathon. Right: Amy Zwayer looks ready to continue a full marathon as she comepetes Saturday morning at the Highlands County Half Marathon at Highlands Hammock State Park. Going (half) the distance

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Page 4DNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com Some Risks Are Worth Taking. Your Health Isnt One of Them. Medicare and almost all insurance accepted First, 32 people die every day of skin cancer in the USA. Second, most skin cancer deaths are preventable. Therefore, forgiveness is the chance to prevent skin cancer with a Dermatology skin exam. Therefore, forgiveness is the Lord offering you free will to not be a statistic. SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE. OR LET US DO IT FOR YOU.Darrin A. Rotman, M. D. Julie L. Iellimo, P. A. C. Jennifer A. Wolf, P. A. C.863-386-0786Darrin A. Rotman, M.D. F rostproof 10 as he opened t he second quarter with two f ree throws, but though othe rs would soon join the scori ng mix, the Bulldogs s tepped it up as well. Scores from Daniel K nighten and Jalen Johnson p ut Frostproof up one before D evontray Fleming's free t hrow tied it at 14-14. Fleming soon connected o n a three, but a floater from Z ack Barker and a three from J ack Bass again put the Dogs out in front. Back and forth it went with F rostproof building as much a s a five-point lead, but with t he Dragons then fighting b ack. Asteal and lay-in from B rody Carr eventually put L ake Placid up 31-30, but a t hree from Johnson at the b uzzer sent the Bulldogs into t he half with a 33-31 lead. Two Devontra Chisolm f ree throws to open the third r e-tied it, but Frostproof kept b attling back. The Dragons then seemed p rimed to break it open as F leming and Chisolm hit b ack-to-back threes and C hisolm converted a threep oint play that pushed the l ead to 46-39. But back came the B ulldogs, with Johnson and B arker raining down a pair of t reys with Carr and Ricky C obb then trading buckets for a narrow 48-47 Lake Placid l ead entering the fourth. Frostproof would get a nother Cobb score to take a 5 1-50 lead, but a Veley drive g ot it back for good for the D ragons. Fleming then scored inside a nd Carr connected from b eyond the arc for a 57-51 e dge. The Bulldogs would push b ack, but Lake Placid kept t hem at bay and were up five w ith about a minute to play before a foul and a pair of Frostproof technicals gained the Dragons four points at the line and all but sealed the win. "We came out with a better effort tonight and with Frostproof, it's always a battle," coach Veley said. "It's a district win, which is huge for us and where we get seeded is in our control." Now 10-8 overall and 6-4 in district play, the Dragons are eyeing a third or even second seed for the district tournament. While Johnson took game honors with 27 points for the Bulldogs, a balanced effort from Lake Placid won out. Wilson scored 19 and Fleming 17 with Veley getting 12 points, 11 rebounds and 11 assists. Carr added nine and Chisolm eight for the Dragons who were on the road at McKeel Saturday for an afternoon district tilt. See Wednesday's NewsSun for results of the contest. Continued from 1D LP win keeps them in hunt for high seed News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Kirk Veley scored 12 points, but also added 11 rebounds and 11 assists for a rare triple double in Lake Placid's Friday win. Devil Marcus Dewberry w ould set the pace in overt ime, scoring nine to put the D evils out front 70-65 when t he clock ran out. Dewberry would lead the s coring for the game with 31 p oints, outscoring the closest D evil Avierre Conner who s hot for 12. "It was a good game. E very time we come down h ere it is a good game," M ulberry coach Lester Hunt s aid. "We stayed focused on o ur defense and showed that w e could play with anyone in t his district." "Mulberry was a good g ame. They are always a t ough game," Clemons said. Charlie Brown got it done f or us tonight." Avon Park is back at it M onday at county rival S ebring and then welcome M cKeel to close out district p lay Friday, Jan. 28. Continued from 1D News-Sun photo by BETH BALDRIDGE Avierre Conner goes left to get past Mulberry's Frank Gonzalez in Friday night's overtime win. AP stays on top The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHN E Allie Mann scored 10 points to join Shannon Williams, who had 19, in double figures as the Lady Streaks stole one at Ridge Friday night by a 49-30 score. Lady Blue Streaks rip Ridge ble and triple, Bob Brooks went 3-5 with a triple, Russ Moody had 3-for-4 and Al Taratuta hit 2-for-3 scoring three runs. Stan Turl's Rebels Tom "Moose" Morrisseette hada triple with his 2-for-3 at bats. Going 3-for-3 were Jim Strietzel and Elwood Black. Diz Jones and Jack Grosso had 3-for-4 and Don Purdy was 2-for-2. Allstate Insurance won over Millers Heating and Air Conditioning 22-14 with Allstate's Bob MacCarrick and Glenn Wearsh each having 3-for-4. Moe Pier and Dave Crotser both hit 2-for-4. Millers Jim Hensley had 4-for-5 including a double and Dennis Birholz was 2-4 with a triple. Having 4-for-4 were Tom Royal and Dale DeMar. Kyle Saunders had 4-for-5. It was a beautiful day and we were pleased to see more spectators at the games. The second week of the Seventy and Over Softball League games at Highlands County Sports Complex began Tuesday, Jan. 18. It was unique that each of the three losing teams had a final score of five runs. Highlands Merchants and Millers Heating and Air Conditioning had a final score of 25-5, Blue Jays and Silent Salesman were 14-5 and Allstate and Rebels ended with 14-5. In the Highlands Merchants and Millers match-up, the only home run for the Merchants was driven in by Glenn Minic. Don Ward hit 3-for-3, Mike Jurmu and Harold Dinel each had 2-for-3, including a triple apiece, and Ron Lewis and Eddie Carroll went 2-for-2 with each having a double. Those hitting 2-for-3 were Harry Bell andJohn Schmidt. For Millers Jim Hensley had 3-for-4 including a triple, Bob Foxbeltedout a triple and Dennis Birholzhad 3-for-3. The Blue Jays won over Silent Salesman and the Jays'Bob Weiss hit a home run and Carl Puffenberger was 4-for-5 with a triple and a double. Erel Richardson had a 2for-3 day and Richard Godfrey was 2-for-4. For the Silent Salesma n, base hits were plentiful b ut RBIs were scarce as th ey lost to the determined Bl ue Jays. Leading the hit parade f or the Salesmen were Bo b Rothand Bob Brooks at 3for-3, Les Smith and K en Filppula each having2-fo r3, including a double an d Stu Hayner also connect ed for a two-bagger. Outstanding defense b y the Blue Jays had a lot to d o with the outcome of t he game. Arunning, shoestrin g catch of a sinking line dri ve by left fielder Richa rd Godfrey was a play th at brought cheers even fro m the Salesman's dugout. The Allstate and Rebe ls ended with Allstate on to p 17-5 as the Rebels'Ja ck Grosso had 3-for-3. Going 2-for-3 were D iz Jones, Don Purdy and Ji m Strietzel. The hits for Allstate we re made by Rudy Pribble wi th three hits, Dave Crotse r, Glenn Wearsh, K en Crandall and Mo Pierha ving two hits. Continued from 1D Seniors see Tuesday blowouts By JENNAFRYER Associated PressDAYTONABEACH NASCAR president Mike Helton has confirmed that drivers only will be allowed to race for one championship this season. The rule is designed to prevent Sprint Cup drivers from dominating the second-tier Nationwide Series. Full-time Cup drivers have won the last five Nationwide titles. Helton also says NASCAR is leaning toward a simpler points system for all three of its national series. The Associated Pre ss reported this week th at NASCAR has told teams it wants to scrap its 36-yea rold scoring system for a fo rmat that would award poin ts based on finishing positio n. Helton says bonus poin ts would be added to put an emphasis on winning race s. NASCAR president Helton discusses points system

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, January 23, 2011Page 5D Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or le ss. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads p laced under the Bargain BuysŽ discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom se t ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad st ating Each,Ž the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open RateŽ pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain BuysŽ specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home,Ž are allowed to be pla ced under the Bargain BuyŽ category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS € Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 385-6155. € The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR A SPECIAL EXCEPTION REQUEST HEARING NO. 1688 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a PUBLIC HEARING will be held before the HIGHLANDS COUNTY Board of Adjustment on the 8th day of February, 2011, beginning at 3:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as possible, in the County Commissioners' Board Room, Highlands County Government Center Building, 600 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida, to consider a special exception to allow church and church uses, within the area described as follows: approximately 1.25 acres located on the north side of Valerie Boulevard, just east of Highway U.S. 27, and legally described as follows: Lot 286 and Lots 307, 308 and 309, inclusive, SEBRING RIDGE SECTION A, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 45, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Any person or persons interested or affected by this change are invited to attend this hearing. You may submit comments in writing to the attention of Linda Conrad, Zoning Supervisor, P.O. Box 1926, Sebring, Florida 33871-1926, or you may call (863)402-6638, for further information. Please reference the above hearing number when calling or writing. ANY PERSON WHO MIGHT WISH TO APPEAL AN Y DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT IN PUBLIC HEARING OR MEETING IS HEREBY ADVISED THAT THEY WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, THEY MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE WHICH WILL INCLUDE THE TESTIMON Y AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John A. Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6510 (Voice), 863-402-6508 (TTY), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: jminor@hcbcc.org. Request for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. ONE OR MORE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MA Y BE PRESENT AT THE MEETING. Jim Brooks, Chairman January 23, 28, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: GC07-1141 YALE MORTGAGE CORPORATION Plaintiff, vs. HOWARD S. OSTROW; IRENE BASSINGTHWAITE; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Publish in THE NEWS-SUN NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 21, 2009, and an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated January 11, 2011, and entered in Case No. GC07-1141 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit, in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, where in YALE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, and HOWARD S. OSTROW, IRENE BASSINGTHWAITE, Defendant, I will to the highest bidder for cash on the 11th day of February, 2011, at 11:00AM, JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment lying and being situate in HIGHLANDS County, Florida, to wit: Lot 1, Lot 2 and Lot 3, of LAKESIDE HEIGHTS, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 52-T, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. AKA Lot 1, Lot 2 and Lot 3, of LAKESIDE HEIGHTS, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Boo k 1, Page 52-T, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. NOTICE: ANY PERSON WITH A DISABILITY REQUIRING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING SHOULD CONTACT 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (V), VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE, NOT LATER THAT SEVEN (7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE PROCEEDING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. THE CLERK SHALL RECEIVE A SERVICE CHARGE OF UP TO $70 FOR SERVICES IN MAKING, RECORDING, AND CERTIFYING THE SALE AND TITLE THAT SHALL BE ASSESSED AS COSTS. THE COURT, IN ITS DISCRETION, MAY ENLARGE THE TIME OF THE SALE.NOTICE OF THE CHANGED TIME OF SALE SHALL BE PUBLISHED AS PROVIDED HEREIN. DATED this 14th day of January, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Toni Kopp DEPUTY CLER K January 23, 30, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 09 1008 GCS LANSDOWNE MORTGAGE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, v. JENNY LABANINO, individually, JORGE LABANINO, individually, BOWEN & SON ROOFING, INC., et. al, Defendant, NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment entered in the above styled cause now pending in said Court, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870 at 11:00 A.M. on February 9, 2011 the following property: A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (SW 1/4) OF THE NORTHEAST ONE-QUARTER (NE 1/4) AND A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER (SE 1/4) OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 39 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EAST, LYING WITHIN HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. SAID PARCEL OF LAND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (NW 1/4) OF THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (SW 1/4) OF SAID SECTION 21; THENCE N 89 DEGREES 20'56'' E, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (NW 1/4) OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER (SE 1/4), A DISTANCE OF 288.87 FEET; THENCE N 00 DEGREES 06'44'' E, DEPARTING SAID SOUTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 25.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE N 00 DEGREES 44'06'' E, ALONG A LINE 288.84 FEET EAST OF AND PARALLEL WITH THE WEST LINE OF THE EAST ONE-HALF (E 1/2) OF SAID SECTION 21, A DISTANCE OF 2644.01 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (SW 1/4) OF THE NORTHEAST ONE-QUARTER (NE 1/4) OF SAID SECTION 21; THENCE N 89 DEGREES 46'19'' E, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 298.18 FEET; THENCE S 00 DEGREES 15'19'' E, A DISTANCE OF 2211.56 FEET; THENCE N 89 DEGREES 27'05'' W, A DISTANCE OF 83.17 FEET; THENCE S 63 DEGREES 18'21'' W A DISTANCE OF 148.03 FEET; THENCE S 01 DEGREES 36'55'' E A DISTANCE OF 366.88 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF OLD VENUS ROAD; THENCE S 89 DEGREES 20'56'' W, ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 108.05 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING 16.60 ACRES (723,030 SQUARE FEET), MORE OR LESS. Property Address: 53 Keel Road, Venus,Florida 33960. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER ASOF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated on January 12, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk January 16, 23, 2011 PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE Heartland Workforce will hold their usual quarterly joint meeting of the Executive Board and the Board of Directors on Wednesday, January 26, 2011 at 1:30 p.m. at Heartland Workforce, 5901 US Hwy 27 S., Sebring, FL. Persons interested in attending should arrive no later than 1:25 p.m. For more information see agenda posted on the Heartland Workforce website at www.hwib.org January 23, 2011 NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicles will be soled at public sale or auction to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78(2) of the Florida Statutes at 10:00 a.m. on 2/22/11 at 1118 WEIGLE AVE. Sebring, FL 33870 1971 FORD F61CVL80326 2000 FORD 1FMPU18L5YLB69105 1990 OLDS 1G3AL54N1L6376089 January 23, 2011 NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicles will be soled at public sale or auction to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78(2) of the Florida Statutes at 10:00 a.m. on 2/16/11 at 1118 WEIGLE AVE. Sebring, FL 33870 1992 GMC 1GKDT13W9N2522964 January 23, 2011 C-14-37-29-200-2470-0150. DATED on January 12, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of Said Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM OF LIEN WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. January 16, 23, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 09-1800-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. TRAVIS E. BACON; AND ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, AND TENANT #4, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 Notice is given that pursuant to a Final Judgment in Foreclosure Against Defendant, TRAVIS E. BACON, dated the 11th day of January, 2011, in Case No. 09-1800-GCS, of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK is the Plaintiff and KENNETH TRAVIS E. BACON is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on the 8th day of February, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure Against Defendant, TRAVIS E. BACON, and described as follows: Lot 14 and Lot 15, Block 247, PLACID LAKES SECTION 20, LESS AND EXCEPT The East 51.08 feet of Lot 15, Block 247, Placid Lakes, Section 20, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 9, Page 31, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Real Property Address: 740 Aleutian Street, N.E., Lake Placid, FL 33852. Real Property Tax ID#: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. GC 10-573 ARTHURINE C. KUEHNER, as Trustee of The Arthurine C. Kuehner Revocable Family Trust U/A dated 9/17/93 vs BRYAN TODD and BRANDI HICKS, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Highlands County, Florida, described as: Lot 9, Block 34, SEBRING COUNTRY ESTATES, SECTION TWO, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 34, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on the 8th day of February, A.D., 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ROBERT W. GERMAINE By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk *In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of Courts office at 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida 33870-3701, Telephone 863-402-6500 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-9771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, Via Florida Relay Service. January 16, 23, 2011 South 89 degrees 25'40'' West, a distance of 50.36 feet to a point; thence South 65degrees 151'52'' West, a distance of 93.79 feet to the Southwest corner of Lot 16; thence North 18 degrees 56'30'' West along the Easterly boundary of Lake Josephine Drive, a distance of 79.02 feet to the Point of Beginning. NOTICE: ANY PERSON WITH A DISABILITY REQUIRING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING SHOULD CONTACT 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (V), VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE, NOT LATER THAT SEVEN (7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE PROCEEDING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. THE CLERK SHALL RECEIVE A SERVICE CHARGE OF UP TO $70 FOR SERVICES IN MAKING, RECORDING, AND CERTIFYING THE SALE AND TITLE THAT SHALL BE ASSESSED AS COSTS. THE COURT, IN ITS DISCRETION, MAY ENLARGE THE TIME OF THE SALE.NOTICE OF THE CHANGED TIME OF SALE SHALL BE PUBLISHED AS PROVIDED HEREIN. DATED this 12th day of January, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak DEPUTY CLERK January 16, 23, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: GC08-494 WACOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB f/k/a WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. RODNEY ROSADO; LUCRECIA ROSADO; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Publish in THE NEWS-SUN NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order resetting Foreclosure Sale dated January 11, 2011, and entered in Case No. GC08-494 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit, in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, where in WACOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB f/k/a WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, and RODNEY ROSADO, LUCRECIA ROSADO, Defendant, I will to the highest bidder for cash on the 8th day of February, 2011, at 11:00am, at the JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM, BASEMENT, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment lying and being situate in HIGHLANDS County, Florida, to wit: Generally described as being part of Lot 16, in Block 1, of LAKE JOSEPHINE HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 92, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: Commence as a Point of Beginning at the Northeast corner of Lot 16; thence North 39 degrees 25'40'' East along the North boundary of Lot 16, a distance of 161.84 feet to a point; thence South 00 degrees 22' West parallel to and 35 feet West of the East boundary of Lot 16, a distance of 37.5 feet to a point; thence IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CASE NO. 09001074GCS DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ASSETS TRUST2007-5 MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-5, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM PAEDAE A/K/A WILLIAM H. PAEDAE; et. al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 6, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09001074GCS of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ASSETS TRUST2007-5 MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-5, is the Plaintiff and WILLIAM PAEDAE A/K/A WILLIAM H. PAEDAE; DELIA M. PAEDAE; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; are the defendants. ROBERT W. GERMAINE The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, ROOM 105, Sebring, FL 33870, at 11:00 AM, on February 8, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT A EXHIBIT ``A'' Lot 5, Block ``O'' SUBDIVISION, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 67, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida, LESS AND EXCEPT the following portion thereof; BEGIN at the Northwesterly corner of said Lot 5, being the common corner with Lot 6; thence run North 68 degrees 06 minutes 20 seconds East parallel with the Southeasterly line of said Lot 5 and 95 feet Northwesterly of as measured at right angles thereto, for a distance of 331.95 feet to a point on the shoreline of Lake Jackson; thence meander Northerly along the shoreline of said Lake Jackson for a distance of 57 feet more or less to a point, said point being in the Northwesterly line of said Lot 5; thence run Westerly along the Northwesterly line of said Lot 5 to the POINT OF BEGINNING of said excepted parcel. Property Address 4211 Lakeview Dr., Sebring, Florida 33870 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of January, 2011. Robert W. Germaine Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. January 16, 23, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-12 IN RE: ESTATE OF HELEN L. FELTHAM, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of HELEN L. FELTHAM, deceased, whose date of death was December 14, 2010, and whose social security number is 189-09-2237, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is January 16, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Jason Michael Feltham 2370 Craig Rd. Piffard, NY 14533 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Robert E. Livingston Florida Bar No. 0031259 445 S. Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 Telephone: (863)385-5156 January 16, 23, 2011 the original with the Clerk of this Court at 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870-3867, either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 11th day of January, 2011. ROBERT GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk January 16, 23, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 28-2010-CA-001270 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, GRANTEES, DEVISEES, LIENORS, TRUSTEES, AND CREDITORS OF JOHN O. TOROSIAN, DECEASED, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, GRANTEES, DEVISEES, LIENORS, TRUSTEES, AND CREDITORS OF JOHN O. TOROSIAN, DECEASED, AND ALL CLAIMANTS, PERSONS OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, AND WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST, JOHN O. TOROSIAN, DECEASED, OR ANY OF THE HEREIN NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS OR PARTIES CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN AND TO THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED Current residence unknown, but whose last known address was: 308 VILLAWAY, SEBRING, FL 33876 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County, Florida, to-wit: CLUSTER 3, UNIT B, OF COUNTRY CLUB VILLAS I OF SPRING LAKE, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 15, PAGE 74, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL 33716, on or before February 25, 2011 or within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Action, and file IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CASE NO. 101300GCS SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. HELEN PODDOUBNYI, et. al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: PODDOUBNYI FAMILY LIMITED PARTNERSHIP Last known address(es): C/O HELEN PODDOUBNYI, 2114 ELVADO RD., VISTA, CA, 92084 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage of the following described property: LOT 7, BLOCK 63, OF SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 51, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A mobile home with the VIN number N/A sits of the property. a/k/a 4010 MENDOZA AVE., SEBRING, FL 33872 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if an, to it, on Diana Chung, Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312 either on or before February 18, 2011. and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 10th day of January, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk January 16, 23, 2011 1050Legals 1000 Announcements Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what you're doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 385-6155. Classified ads get fast results Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

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Page 6DNews-Sun Sunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.co m PROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORYPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY Install doors, windows, flooring, plumbing & more!Licensed & InsuredLic# HM0096HANDYMAN BOBCall 863-452-5201 or 863-449-1744 A & E LAWN MOWER REPAIRBeltsƒBlades New & Used Parts12 S.Forest Ave. Avon Park,FL 33825863-452-0389 Service € Repair € Supplies € Equipment Delivered Right to your DoorPool Service & Mobile Retail(863) 382-7728Fax (863) 402-2200 poolparadise101@aol.com www.poolparadiseonline.com Brad & Julie Kurtz 863385-0404Now Offering: Animal Nuisance Control and Removal Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-2750 1405 US 27 North Sebring, FL33870 C A M P B E L L  S S C O L L I S I O N C E N T E R , I N C Jim Campbell Owner Ser vice A vailable 7 Days A W eek Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com EXTRAORDINAIRE HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING LLC 863-451-2399Mike & Kandy Sheldone CEO/Owner Lic# CAC 1816569All Service Calls $40 ResidentialCommercial Insured € Free EstimatesService by People Who CareChad, Krista & Michael P.O. Box 6987 Avon Park, FL 33826-6987 Office: 863-655-9328 cklawn@strato.net WANDA KLINE WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESSSee what one drop of your blood indicates as to YOUR nutritional health and well-being. By appointment only863-414-4066 LIVEBLOODANALYSISŽ MIKES PAINTINGInterior & Exterior Residential & Mobile Homes Also Pressure Washing Over 25 Years Experience Free Estimates € Lic. & Ins.863-657-2362 &WILLIAMSJANITORIALCARPETCLEANING$1095 Per Room3 Rooms Minimum € Upholstery Cleaning € All Types of Flooring € Free EstimatesLic € Bonded € Ins(863) 214-1940 863-465-7491TREE SERVICE,INC.Joe Johnsons TRIMMING € REMOVAL SOD INSTALLATION € STUMP GRINDING LOT CLEARING € PRESSURE CLEANING Will Beat Any Written Estimate!Peoples Choice Award Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Avon Park (863) 453-2525 Lake Placid (863) 699-2525 Lake Wales (863) 679-9200 Sebring (863) 382-1515 Wauchula (863) 767-1515Sebring Fax (863) 382-9939 W al-Mart Loca tions: Lake Wales (863) 676-0569 Sebring (863) 385-5371 Avon Park (863) 452-7010 INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED Call For Details863-381-9013*Single Story Homes under 1500 total sq.ft. Roofs € Driveways € Walks € Additional Services $9900 HOUSE WASH*FLORIDA PRESSURE CLEANING LLC. Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Compassionate, Professional Health Care For Your Loved Ones214 E. Stuart Ave. € Lake Wales, FL 33853 863-767-1120 € Fax 863-676-7291We Elderly Care, Inc.800-518-0403In Home Care Avon Park … Sebring … Lake Placid Private Pay … Long Term Insurance www.weelderlycare.comCindy DivietroCommunity Liaison Cell: 941-518-2478 Freedom Lawn CareGet the freedom you deserveCarl Horton ~OwnerVet. & Sr. Discount € Lawn Maintenance € Landscaping € Small Tree Work € Clean Ups € Free Estimates863-655-2526 Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 No job is too small. We can take care of all your home repairs and maintenance needs.€ Small Flooring Jobs € Some Electric & Plumbing863-381-6677 Free Estimates Rogers Handyman ServicesRoger McCartney JRlicensed and insured Rockys Tree Service LLC863-382-239724 Hour Emergency ServiceServing All Central Florida Area€ Fully Insured € Tree Removal € Tree Trimming € Free Estimates € Tree Topping € Stump GrindingSebring,FL 33870 The City of Sebring is recruiting for the following position(s): School Crossing Guard Closes: 2/4/11 For an application contact City of Sebring Police Department, 307 N Ridgewood Dr., Sebring, FL 33870 (863) 471-5108 or visit us on our website at www.mysebring.com. Drug Free Work place, EOE, Vet. Pref.EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY SEEKING WELLEXPERIENCED MEDICAL OFFICE HELP. Excellent billing/collection, communication, typing, computer skills & medical terminology are A MUST Fax resume to: 863-471-3206 or email to: medicalofficebilling@yahoo.com 2100Help WantedREAL ESTATEPARALEGAL Full time position immediately available for an experienced real estate paralegal. Candidates should have HUD-1 preparation and real estate litigation experience. Please respond with cover letter and resume to: Reply Box #2207, News Sun, 2227 US 27, S., Sebring, FL 33870 2100Help Wanted ONSITE SUPPORTENGINEER Large healthcare provider in the Sebring area is expanding and looking to fill this position. Candidate will have at least 10 years experience and be familiar with Windows 2003/2008 server, XP, Windows 7, SQL 2008, Terminal Server/Citrix, Cisco firewall and wireless devices. Previous healthcare support experience, Microsoft Certifications a plus. Some extended local travel required between remote and central offices. Fax resume to: 863-385-3866NOW HIRINGWait Staff, Pizza Makers, Delivery Help. Exp. Preferred. Apply in person, 2-5 pm Daily. ZENO'S 4325 Sun 'n Lake Blvd, Sebring, FL 33870 2100Help WantedNOW ACCEPTINGApplications for C.S.R. & Account Managers Applicant must be atleast 21yrs old, posses a clean FL Drivers Lic., be able to lift 50lbs unassited, and have a clean background. Apply in person at Rent King, 810 US Hwy 27 S., Avon Park, FL 33825. We are a Drug Free Workplace. 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment BABYSITTER NEEDEDF/T position for 4 months. Must have Infant CPR Certification. Background check. 863-446-3826 1450BabysittersNEED SOMEONEto take care of your loved one? In their OWN HOME? Excellent references...25 years exp. Call Joanie at 863-471-9726. 1400Health CareServicesLOST DOG,small, dirty brown color, wiry hair., blue sweater, pink collar. Missing Sun, Jan 16th, A. P. Est off Duncan Rd. Call 863-449-0259 1200Lost & FoundCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 385-6155 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements HIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING INVITATION TO BID (RFP) The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for: RFP 11-022 TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT SERVICES NIGP COMMODITY/SERVICES CODE: 918-85 Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, CPPB, Acting Director / Highlands County General Services/Purchasing Department 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33875-5803 Phone: 863-402-6524 Fax: 863-402-6735; or E-Mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:dgilbert@hcbcc.org" dgilbert@hcbcc.orgProposal submissions must be sealed and marked with the name of the proposer, and the RFP number and title "RFP 11-022 TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT SERVICES NIGP COMMODITY /SERVICE CODE: 918-85" so as to identify the enclosed proposal. Each submittal shall include (1) one original and (5) five copies of the proposal. Proposals must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803, so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday, February 17, 2011, at which time they will be opened. Proposals received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for the late deliveries of proposals that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service.One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at above bid opening.Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this RFP.The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Highlands County. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John A. Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), 863-402-6508 (TTY), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:Jminor@hcbcc.org" Jminor@hcbcc.org Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service.Board of County CommissionersPurchasing Department Highlands County,Florida Website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net January 16, 23, 2011 HIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING INVITATION TO BID (ITB) The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for: ITB 11-021 PEST CONTROL SERVICES FOR COUNTY BUILDINGS NIGP COMMODITY/SERVICES CODE:910-59 Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, CPPB, Assistant Director/Highlands County General Services/Purchasing Department 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, Florida 338755803 Phone: 863-402-6524 Fax: 863-402-6735; or E-Mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:dgilbert@hcbcc.org" dgilbert@hcbcc.org Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name so as to identify the enclosed bids. Bids must be delivered to the Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL. 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday; February 17, 2010, at which time they will be opened. Bids received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service.One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at above bid opening.Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this ITB.The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Highlands County. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. aThe Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John A. Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), 863-402-6508 (TTY), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:Jminor@hcbcc.org" Jminor@hcbcc.org Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service.Board of County CommissionersPurchasing Department Highlands County, Florida Website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net January 16, 23, 2011 ***************************************** HIGHLANDS COUNTY LEGAL NOTICES ***************************************** The following legal notices are from the Highlands County Board of County Commissioners and are being published in the font, size, and leading as per their specifications. 1055HighlandsCounty Legals LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, January 23, 2011Page 7D ROYAL CARE OF AVON PARKIsnt it nice to be in high demand? Everyone wants to hire you, how do you choose?AtRoyal Care of Avon Parkyou will “nd the choice easy. We offer an excellent bene“t package. You can earn up to two weeks vacation, and that is only in your “rst year of employment plus eight holidays. Salary based on experience. C.N.A. Full Time 7 … 3 shift NURSES Full Time 7am … 7pm and 7pm … 7am Apply in person at: Royal Care of Avon Park 1213 W. Stratford Rd. Avon Park, FL 33825 (863) 453-6674 EOE, M/F, DFWP 3310 Hwy. 27 South Sebring, FL33870EOEE-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.comFor more information about Cross Country Automotive Services,we encourage you to visit our website at: www.CrossCountry-Auto.co mComprehensive Benefit Package€ Tuition Reimbursement € Life Insurance € Vacation Time € Holiday Pay € Medical € DentalNow Hiring Full & Part Time Customer Service AssociatesAdditional Opportunities for Spanish as a second language Starting at $9.00 an hour Renea Gantt Associate of the MonthBe a HERO like Renea Gantt863-402-2786AGreatPlaceto Work! Contact Usƒ By Phone (863) 385-6155 By Mail 2227 US Hwy 27S Sebring, FL 33870 By E-Mail www.newssun.com/contact/ CASTLE HILL Apartments of Avon ParkAccepting Applications for 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals 62 years or older, handicap/disabled, regardless of age. For rental information & applications please call: 863-452-6565 TDD: 1-800-955-8771 THIS INSTITUTION IS AN Equal Opportunity Provider and EmployerLos Apt. de Castle Hill de Avon ParkEstan aceptando aplicaciones para Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras. Disponible a personas de 62 ancs o mas, incapacidad fisica/mental, no importa la edad. Para mas informacion favor de llamar 863-452-6565. TDD: 1-800-955-8771 Esta Institucion Es De Igualdad De Oportunidad Al Proveedor, Y Empleador 6'X12' 2008V-NOSE TRAILER w/tandem, EZ-lube axles, brakes on all 4 wheels, spare tire, side entry door, rear fold down door. $2,600. 863-991-5806 9220Utility Trailers 9000 Transportation RV 38'2010 5TH Wheel. EAGLE RIDGE by HEARTLAND, 2BR, 1BA, 2 slides, fiberglass, W/D, awning. All options. $30,000 obo. Immediate Sale! 321-437-5887 2010 38'HY-LINE TRAVEL TRAILER. Very Clean. 2 Slideouts, W/D, 20 gal hot water heater, cent. A/C, bayfront, non-smoke, no pets. Will Deliver. $22,300 obo. 941-518-4040 8400RecreationalVehicles 8000 Recreation NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states tha t all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. MINIATURE SCHNAUZERpuppies, 4 males available. Ready to go, POP, tails docked, dew claws done, 1st shots and health certificate. $450. Call Suzi 863-414-0241 after 3PM. 7520Pets & SuppliesHELP! WIFENEEDS A VERY GOOD DEPENDABLE CAR NOW!Please help me find her one! 863-465-0978 7340Wanted to Buy VILLAGE YARDSALE SAT. JAN. 29th 8AM NOON RAIN DATE FEB 5th MARANATHA VILLAGE Arbuckle Creek Rd. SEBRING615Moon Ranch Rd, Thur Fri -Sat-Sun Jan 20 thru 23 9 am 4 pm. Portable washer/dyer, 1000's of items. Hoarder Sale!! SEBRING -St. Agnes < < ANNUAL FLEA MARKET > > 3840 Lakeview Dr., Sat. Jan. 29th; 8-Noon. DON'T MISS THIS ONE! 7320Garage &Yard Sales SEBRING -BUTTONWOOD BAY MHP HUGE SALE @ Rec Hall, 10001 US 27, S. Sat, Jan 29th, 7am-11am. Coffee, Donuts & Bake Sale. LAKE PLACID-B & R Warhouse Bay #31, behind bowling alley, 722 US 27 S. Sat. Jan 22 8am-1pm. Furn, books, tackle, water skies, morotcycle lift, shark jaws, househld items MuchMore! 7320Garage &Yard Sales SOFA -Cream Color. $50 863-304-1419 RANGE -Kenmore. smooth glass top, white, works excellent, looks okay. $100 863-385-0650 PATIO TABLE,42'', w/4 chairs. $100. 863-402-0121 KITCHEN TABLEButcher Block Top w/4 chairs. Good Condition. $75. 863-385-2605 FREEZER UPRIGHT,$75. 863-273-8030 DISHWASHER LIKENEW! $75 863-273-8030 BIG TALKINGPooh nad Big Tigger. Both for $20 863-201-3769 BEACH PAINTINGVERY NICE. $20 863-201-3769 A/C UNIT4 Ton Coleman central unit, fan motor replaced, serviced yearly, attch to air handle. $100 863-655-0881 7310Bargain Buys OAK FIREWOODVarious thickness, cut in 1 foot lengths. Sellers give me price on all, (over a cord) 863-655-0521 ADULT TRICYCLEalmost new, large basket, large padded seat and brakes on handle bar. $200 obo. WHEELCHAIR lightweight $25 call 863-655-6212. BLACK DIAMONDtool box for pick-ups $125. Stainless steel grill guards $125. Utility trailer 7' X 12' w/ loading ramp $750. Refrigerator $125. Call 863-655-2166. 7300Miscellaneous 7180Furniture NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS! HIGHPOINT FURNITURE OUTLET STORE 2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRINGNorthofLowes&acrossfrom HomeDepot SEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, W/D, Satellite, full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for Rent WANTED -Qualified Renter /Buyer (% back). Lg clean beautiful home at 4037 Lakewood Rd. 1/2 mile S. of YMCA, (VIDEOLS.COM). (2nd lot & 2nd. garage? ) ask me. 863-214-6697. SEBRING -Harder Hall area, 2BR, 2BA, 1CG, screened porch, W/D hookups. $750/mo. plus last month & security deposit. View by appointment. Call 863-381-6747, leave message. LAKE PLACIDLeisure Lakes 2BR/ 2BA/ 2/CG, fenced back yard, central air & heat $ 600 mo. Plus 1st. & last Security. 863-465-3959 LAKE PLACID2BR, 1BA, Newly Remodeled! W/D, large yard. Convenient location, close to Interlake Blvd. $550/mo. Call 863-699-0476 or 863-243-3627. LAKE PLACID2BR, 1BA, new floors/paint, fenced yard, close to boat ramp, nice landscape, quiet area, no smoke, $550/mo. 863-699-1119 6300Unfurnished HousesLAKE PLACIDNewer 3BR, 2BA, seasonal or monthly. Excellent furniture & appliances, near lake & boat ramp, No smoking or dogs. $1300/mo. After season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119 6250Furnished Houses AVON PARKAFFORDABLE RENTRidgedale Apartments1, 2, 3 & 4 Br Apts Central Location, water & trash included Rent subsidized „ Based on household income. No Application Fee Call 863-452-4432 TTY 800-955-8771 EQUAL HOUSINGOPPORTUNITY LAKE PLACID2BR, 2BA, Washer/Dryer, screened patio, water included. Excellent Condition $525 monthly plus 1 mo. security. 954-695-8348 KEY LAKEVILLASLAKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING 2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean & quiet, Screen porch, Outside patio, Central air, Washer/Dryer hookup, $585/mo., first & security. No Pets. 863-465-2740 AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; 2BR, 1BA $645/mo +$500 security. W/D, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 1 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile, New paint, New appliances, Screened patios & W/D hook ups. Call 863-452-0469. AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartments 6200UnfurnishedApartments SEBRING -Cute 2BR, 1BA, fenced yard, most pets OK. $550 + $300 security deposit. 4909 Manatee Dr. 863-446-7274 LAKE PLACIDPlacid Lakes, Unfurnished 2BR, 2BA. 863-699-0897 or 863-840-2013 ***LAKE PLACID-LEISURELAKES*** Large 3BR, 1.5BA, 1CG, near Golf Course & Lake June. Clean & Quiet $550/mo. Water/Lawn Service included. No Pets. 863-465-9100 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 Rentals VENUS -New 4BR, 2BA (jacuzzi in master BA ) A/C, tile, W/D, porch, w/option of 20 acres. 8 horse barn, privacy fence, 1 block from Hwy 27. 305-725-0301 SEBRING -2BR, 2BA, CHA, W/D Hookup, Carport, Shed, City Water, Close to Shopping, No Pets. 863-840-0494 or 863-465-1451. (Others Available) LAKE PLACIDSun 'n Lakes Estates, Doublewide, 3BR, 2BA Mobile Home. The best in Country Living! $580/month. Call Michelle @ 863-381-5661. 5150Mobile HomesFor Rent SELECTION OF1 & 2 Bedroom Units For Sale in friendly/active 55+ Park, located near shopping, banks, & hospital. Reasonable lot rent incl. S/W/G & Lawn mowing. Call for more info. or to view units. No pets please. 863-385-7034 PALM HARBORHomes has closed 2 Model Centers. Save up to 60K on select models. Call 1-800-622-2832. LK PLACIDAlpine Village. Fully furn 2BR, 1.5BA w/side encl porch/other side carport, faces pond/lake, one of best locations in park. Lot rent $190/mo. 18K OBO. 301-730-5059 5050Mobile HomesFor SaleAVON PARKBY OWNER! 2BR, 1BA, CHA,150' X 62", enclosed sun rm.,W/D hook-up, land owned, citrus, storage units, REDUCED! $26,900. Financing? 1105 Peel St. 863-368-0275 or 608-647-8323 or 608-475-3060 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesLAKE PLACIDLeisure Lakes, 2 Beautiful side-by-side lots surveyed, partly cleared, walk to Lake Carrie $2,950 ea or $5,600 for both Owner will accept reasonable offer. Will Sacrifice! 863-465-9100 4220Lots for SaleSEBRING -FOR SALE BY OWNER 2BR, 2BA Condo at the beautiful Bluffs of Sebring, a 55+ gated community. First Floor with Carport & Storage Room. Furnished with several upgrades; clubhouse, pool, tennis & other activities. Great view of Lake Mary Jane. Call 863-385-0552 or 863-873-1426 4120Villas & CondosFor SaleSEBRING NEWLYREMODELED 3BR Home, one block from Woodlawn Elem. School. Nice, quiet neighborhood. 1243 Fernvale Ave. Possible Owner Financing. Call 863-675-3387 TODAY! 4080Homes for SaleSebringSEBRING -Edgewater Village Lakeview Dr. 2BR, 2BA, 1CG Villa. Beautifully furnished. New kitchen, laundry, TV. Low Maintenance fee includes Cable TV, Clubhouse, heated pool. Private street. Avail Immed. 863-402-9138 4080Homes for SaleSebringATTENTION: CASH for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 FinancialSERVERS &CART ATTENDANTS needed at Springlake Golf Resort. Apply Monday thru Saturday 10am 5pm. For directions only, call 863-655-0900. 2100Help Wanted WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 385-6155. Then shop till you drop! LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. FIND A SWEETHEART OF A DEAL! Search the News-Sun classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. Classified ads get fast results DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155

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Page 8DNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com



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Show off your photosPAGE1CDragons, Devils winPAGE1DSFCC to honor Ed Christy at ball fieldPAGE2ASebring native David Aguila to appear on The Tonight Show PAGE2ANEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, January 23, 2011 www.newssun.com Volume 92/Number 10 | 75 cents www.newssun.com HighLow 65 36Complete Forecast PAGE 8A A full day of sunshine and cool Forecast Question: Would you fly in an experimental airplane? Next question: Do you think the drop in local unemployment is just temporary? www.newssun.comMake your voice heard at Online Inside Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453O nline: www.newssun.com Yes 21.3% No 78.7% 099099401007 Total votes: 75 Arts & Leisure 3C Business 1B Chalk Talk 5B Classifieds 5D Community Briefs2A Community Calendar2B Crossword Puzzle2C Dear Abby 2C Editorial & Opinion3A Living 1C Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times 2C Police Blotter 2A School Menus 6B Sports 1D State News7B Index locally owned community mindedHeartlandNational Bank Avon Park800 West Main St.863.453.6000Lake Placid600 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.699.1300Sebring327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1300Sun n Lake North5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1322www.heartlandnb.com By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comTALLAHASSEE Floridas seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in December 2010 was 12 percent, unchanged from November, but Highlands Countys rate declined to 12 percent from 13.4 percent in the last two months of last year. Highlands saw an increase in available labor at 1,040, from 40,024 in November to 41,06 in December, as the fruit harvesting season began ramping up. Still, that left 4,918 Highlands residents without a job in December. The state ironically ended the year with the same rate that it started with in January, 12 percent seasonally unadjusted, leaving Florida with just more than 1.1 million unemployed workers. State labor leaders stated on Friday that statewide there has been a slight upturn in the job market with 43,000 jobs created since December of 2009. Although 12 percent unemployment is too high, a sixth straight month of job gains over the year is a positive sign, and with Governor Scotts emphasis on strategies to spark and support jo b creation, we anticipate co ntinued improvement in o ur economy, Agency f or Workforce Innovatio n Director Cynthia R. Loren zo said in her monthly pre ss release. Local unemployment rate drops in December By TAMARALUSH Associated PressVERO BEACH While Florida farm ers have lost some of their crop to co ld weather for the second year in a row, th ey say a fast-spreading, incurable bacter ia presents a greater threat to their trees an d the citrus industry. Citrus greening has destroyed grov es in the U.S., Brazil, Asia and Afric a. Detected in Florida in 2005, it leav es fruit sour, malformed and unusabl e. Eventually, it kills the tree. Citrus is our signature crop, sa id Florida Agriculture Commissioner Ada m Putnam. The sheer economic impact it has on our state it doesnt matt er whether you live in a condo tower o n Miami Beach or you live in Zol fo Springs, Florida, this impacts you as a Floridian because the demise of t he Florida citrus industry would have env ironmental, economic and soci al impacts. The disease has been particularly de vastating because it takes years for citr us trees to reach peak production, and t he disease targets young trees, making it d ifficult for growers to replace those th at have been lost. Its probably is one of the bigge st negative impacts in Florida today, sho rt Greening a bigger threat to citrus than cold weather Citrus greening is devastating, and still has no cure News Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Park Elementarys first principal, Dan Johnson, shares his memories of how the school came to be 20 years ago and his role as the principal the first ten years. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comAVON PARK Hundreds of past students, former administrators, and little Panthers all packed the cafeteria at Park Elementary in honor of the schools 20 year anniversary on Thursday. The chorus students sang numerous songs they had practiced over the last few weeks. The crowd enjoyed several speeches and dedications from many of the students throughout their original renditions. Park Elementary School was opened on January 23, 1990. The school is unique as it is the only school in Avon Park whose mascot is not a Red Devil. We let the students choose the mascot for our school, explained Dan Johnson, Park Elementarys first principal. I had assumed we would be the Red Devils as well, but the faculty and community had other ideas in mind. Johnson led Park from 19902000 Under his care an d administration, the scho ol began to grow and excel fast er than anyone could of ima gined. Park Elementarys se cond principal was P at Landress, from 2000-200 5, until the third principal, S ue McCollum, stepped in fro m her position at Sun NLa ke Elementary. McCollum seemed deep ly touched by the students, pa rents, and faculty who had gat hPark Elementary celebrates 20 years See PARK, page 4A See CITRUS, page 5A See LOCAL, page 4A Division of Plant Indust ry Healthy murcotts sit among fruit infected with citrus greening. Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING The snow at the Sebring International Raceway began to fall around 8 a.m. on Saturday morning according to volunteer Chuck Stevens. And by fall, Stevens meant from a truck. The man-made snow is created by placing ice blocks into a shredder. The trucks then spit out white fluffy snow. The large pile was ready to go when the doors opened at 10 a.m. The annual Winter Fest, sponsored by Big Brothers and Big Sisters, took place on Saturday and the crowd was filled with smiling kids and adults. There were plenty of vendors and activities for kids to enjoy including face painting, a rock wall, and, of course, that big pile of white snow. Each group gets about five minutes in the snow, said Stevens. Winter Fest draws big crowd to Raceway Snow Day News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS William Beaulieu, 2, thinks about throwing a snow ball Saturday morning during the Sixth Annual Snow Fest at the Sebring International Raceway. News-Sun photo by ROBYN BAKALUS Kaleigh Nataleigh is overjoyed Saturday morning at the sight of a large pile of snow during the annual Snow Fest event in Sebring. See WINTER, page 7A

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Special to the News-SunAVON PARK In memory of SFCC business professor and Panther Athletics supporter Ed Christy, the SFCC Athletics Department is hosting Ed Christy Day at the Ballpark on Friday. Aspecial ceremony will be held on Panther Field at 1:50 p.m., prior to the start of the game. Christys family will be recognized and presented with a plaque and a special jersey with his name on the back. SFCC Panther baseball players will also wear the initials E.C. on their sleeves during all SFCC Panther Baseball home games this season. Ed was very loved here, not only by the employees but by the students as well, said Rick Hitt, SFCC athletic director. He was a student advocate and mentor, and he supported the student athletes he had in his classes. They wanted to do something special to recognize him. Ed taught a lot of the players, and he respected them, said his wife, Dorry Christy. We even drove to Tampa once just so he could watch Jessie Litsch pitch when the Toronto Blue Jays played the Rays. He was very proud of all of them. Christy understood the value of sports. He was an athlete himself, playing soccer in college, and later coaching his sons soccer team when they were younger. He believed sports were about more than just playing a game, and that they taught teamwork, ethics, and the value of hard work. He attended almost all of SFCCs athletic events. When something is that important to someone, you want to recognize it, Hitt said. Its our way of providing a day that both of Eds families can come together and celebrate his life. You cant imagine how honored we feel that Coach Hitt and the athletes decided to do this, Dorry Christy said. We have family coming in from all over the U.S. for this day. Ed would be very honored. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, Florida 33870 A Harbor Point Media Company OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday PHONE: 863-385-6155 MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954 NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870 USPS ISSN 0163-3988 Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry office(s)CIRCULATION SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before 11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their account. Please call 385-6155.SUBSCRIPTION RATES12 mo.7% FL taxTotal HOME DELIVERY$60.46$4.23$64.69 IN FLORIDA MAIL92.236.4698.69 OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL105.99105.99 Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. Romona Washington Publisher and Executive Editor863-385-6155, ext. 515 Personal Injury & Wrongful Death Medical & Nursing Home Malpractice WorkersCompensatioin Social Security Disability Automobile Accidents KAYLO R R & & KAYLO R R P.A. MAR K K KAYLOR Lawyers, Past and Present. Helping the Injured Since 1968205 S. Commerce Ave Sebring, Florida 863-382-1900 GUARANTEED WEIGHT LOSS!CALL TODAY (863) 471-2500 LOSE YOUR WEIGHT FOR THE LAST TIME!13 Ryant Blvd. SebringCorner of 27 & Ryant Blvd.SAVE 50% OFF ENROLLMENT FEES Now Through Jan. 31st Jan. 19 91214333552x:4Next jackpot $21 millionJan. 15 111439414953x:4 Jan. 12 4512192349x:2 Jan. 21 59282931 Jan. 20 5682528 Jan. 19 46172935 Jan. 18 113161830 Jan. 21 (n) 2447 Jan. 21 (d) 4192 Jan. 20 (n) 0693 Jan. 20 (d) 4260 Jan. 21(n) 87 4 Jan. 21 (d) 15 6 Jan. 20 (n) 25 4 Jan. 20(d) 73 9 Jan. 21 112192410 Jan. 18 113434410 Jan. 14 1015203321 Jan. 11 91926313 Jan. 19 2236515659 PB: 32 PP: 3Next jackpot $118 millionJan. 15 913222337 PB: 31 PP: 3 Jan. 12 1921234048 PB: 27 PP: 4 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center Friends of the Lake Placid Memorial Library plan annual dinnerLAKE PLACID The Friends of the Lake Placid Memorial Library will hold their annual dinner and meeting at 6 p.m. Monday at the Lake Placid Woman's Club, 10 N. Main St. The speaker this year is Hank Mattson, The Cracker Cowboy Poet, who lives in Lake Placid. Mattson is a working cowboy poet performing at cowboy poetry gatherings from Florida to Utah. Hes a member of the Florida Cattlemens Association, the Professional Rodeo Hall of Fame Society and the Friends of Florida Folk. Mattson uses his own works and those of turnof-the-century punchers to chronicle and preserve the life and times of the many Florida Folks who for more than 400 years have been working cattle. He was named the winner of the 2007 Laura Rider Award for Florida Folk Poetry. Hank has an audio CD, TellinIt Like It Was, available to the public. The Friends of the Library is a non-profit organization of library supporters who provide funds through membership fees, book sales, gifts and donations that are used to provide things for the library that are not adequately funded by the state or county. This is especially important now with the major budget cu ts affecting our libraries. The annual membershi p which includes the upcom ing dinner is $15 for singles or $30 for families. Call the library at 6993705 for reservations or sign up on your next visi t to the library.Donate blood on the Big Red BusSEBRING Donate blood on the Big Red Bu s this week and receive a free movie ticket in the mail. The bus will be at the First United Methodist Church in Sebring from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. today. From 3-6 p.m. Monday it will be at the First Presbyterian Church in Lake Placid. Call 382-4499 with questions.Tea Party go to commission meeting TuesdaySEBRING The Highlands Tea Party plan s to attend the Highlands County Board of County Commission meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday. Members and organize rs plan to show their suppor t for the commissioners The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, Jan. 20: Carol Osman Boyajian, 68, of Miami, was charged with DUI. Dustin Errol Brown, 21, of Sebring, was charged with possession of marijuana, possession and or use of drug equipment, and operating a motor vehicle without a valid driver license. Zeneida Luz Chapelin, 23, of Lake Placid, was arrested on an out-ofcounty warrant reference no valid driver license. Isabel Hernandez Cuellar, 28, of Sebring, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference forgery and utter forged instrument. Drew Eli Fellin, 28, of Sebring, was charged with possession of weapon or ammo by convicted felon, possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana, and possession of drug equipment. Edward Allen Ferrell, 26, of Avon Park, was charged with possession and or use of drug equipment, and possession of marijuana. Jose Gonzalez, 19, of Frostproof, was charged with fraud, operating a vehicle without valid license, and possession of liquor by person under 21 years of age. Derick Demon Hammonds, 31, of Avon park, was charged with cruelty toward a child. Modesto Cortes Hernandez, 27, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. Jose Islas-Perez, 47, of Avon Park, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. Roosevelt Jones Jr., 48, of Avon Park, was charged with resisting an officer and DUI. Phillip Jackson Reddick, 30, of Sebring, was charged with fraudinsufficient funds. Angel Rivera, 29, of Labelle, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. Andres Jose Ruiz, 27, of Lake Placid, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. Shawn Cassidy Stidham, 23, of Sebring, was charged with violation of probation reference resisting an officer without violence. Dontavia Shayaza Strange, 19, of Avon Park, was charged with petit theft. Louis Timothy Wells, 39, of Avon Park, was charged with failure to appear reference knowingly driving with license suspended/ revoked. Benito Zavala, 23, of Avon Park, was charged with three counts of failure to appear reference alcohol beverage sell/give service to person under 21 years of age, and criminal mischief. POLICEBLOTTER Ed Christy Day at the Ballpark set at Panther Field Friday Christy COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued on page 6A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Lenny Kesterson of Lake Placid entertains guests Saturday during the 80th Anniversary Party at the American Legion Post 25 in Lake Placid. American Legion celebrates 80 years Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155 By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Talented. That is the one word that can describe Sebring High School graduate David Aguila. From the age of 10, Aguila has had a trumpet in his hand. Before he even graduated high school, Aguila knew that being a part of the orchestra was his destiny, but he wouldnt stop there. Aguila has big dreams of becoming an instructor and one day a conductor. Those dreams might be helped out with a little national television exposure, which is what he will get Wednesday night when he appears on NBCs The Tonight Show. Aguila currently resides in Rochester, N.Y., were he is a secondyear undergrad at the Eastman School of Music. I knew I wanted to do music and play the trumpet. Ive always wanted to teach at a collegiate level and go beyond that as well, Aguila said. Before heading to the Empire State, the 2006 SHS grad attended South Florida Community College and was a member of the SFCC Brass Band Choir. Ive been very fortunate to have been involved in so many different organizations in Highlands County. The SFCC Brass Choir, Sebring band, the Heartland Honor band ... its just made my love of music that much deeper, explained Aguila. With an accomplished resume, including Principal Chair in t he Sarasota Youth Orchestra and livin g in Europe while participating in oth er world-renowned ensembles, o ne would think that those would be t he reasons the 23-year-old landed a sp ot on Jay Lenos Tonight Show couc h. But it isnt. Aguila has another talent that he wants to show the world, only th is one is a bit of a secret. Ive been doing this since 200 4. Ive competed in many competitio ns Aguila to reveal hidden talent on The Tonight Show Show will air Wednesday on NBC See AGUILA, page 7A Associated PressFORTPIERCE A Florida man is behind bars after authorities say he stabbed his dog 26 times. The St. Lucie County Sheriffs Office says Joseph Grady Barker told investigators he was tired of his pets incessant barking. Authorities say he paid a friend $20 to drive him and the pit bull to a canal. He then allegedly struck the 3year-old canine on the head several times with a tire iron and tossed him into the canal. After seeing the dog was still alive, Barker allegedly recaptured him and repeatedly stabbed him in the neck. Afamily member who learned about the incident found the dogs body at the canal and notified authorities. The 35-year-old Barker was charged Friday with animal cruelty and is being held without bail at the St. Lucie County Jail. Florida man accused of stabbing his dog 26 times

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 3A EDITORIAL& OPINION TODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com Education is the key to a better FloridaEditor: Children throughout Florida and across the nation are struggling to achieve their dreams of a college education due to skyrocketing tuition costs and the rising prices of textbooks and living expenses. Even the Florida Bright Futures program, which was designed to reward students for their academic achievements, has scaled back its college funding and created more stringent requirements. We have to do better so our children are more educated to meet the challenges of tomorrow. There is a bright spot in education that is also one of Floridas best kept secrets and should be given greater attention. Take Stock in Children, a statewide non-profit organization, has a solid 16-year history of working with more than 800 public schools in 67 counties to provide mentors, scholarships and hope to lowincome and at-risk youth. It is the only combined scholarship mentoring program in the state with the goal of breaking the cycle of poverty through education, and continues to report an unparalleled high school graduation rate of 92 percent with 81 percent enrolling in college. Take Stock in Childrens high school dropout prevention efforts contribute to the economic viability of our community. High school graduates contribute 46 percent more in taxes, have longer lives with less public health dependency, are eight times less likely to be imprisoned, and are three times more likely to be employed and not dependent on government assistance. The total benefit to the state of Florida is estimated to be $300,000 over a lifetime. The total cost to support a graduate in the program is approximately $24,000; therefore providing nearly 1,300 percent return on investment. Arole model program, Take Stock in Children identifies thousands of students in middle and high school to sign a contract pledging to remain drug and crime free and maintain a 2.5 grade point average. Students in the program spend at least one hour per week with mentors who provide encouragement, guidance and support. Students that fulfill these requirements then receive a full scholarship to a state college or university of their choice. Take Stock in Children currently serves nearly 8,000 students annually, but there are thousands more that still need our help. Now is the time to fulfill the vision of improving education to result in a qualified workforce and stronger communities. Individuals and businesses can mentor students or provide resources that will have an everlasting impression on the lives of the children who are our future. Education is the key to a better Florida and Take Stock in Children is proud to be the states resource to help students achieve their dreams. Richard A. Berkowitz Chairman of the Board Take Stock in ChildrenTeens need to be careful on streetsEditor: As I was returning home to Sun N Lake today (Thursday) around 3:15 p.m., waiting at the left turn signal at Sun N Lake, I noticed three teenagers running across the street not on the crosswalk, but against the light. If I had not been watching closely, I would have killed all three of them. Not kidding. They were laughing at the fourth teenager across the street who didnt take a chance to make it. I dont want to kill three kids. I also dont want them taking these kinds of stupid chances. Look around you! Do you want to be another death like we have each day in Tampa? If I knew your parents phone numbers, I would be calling them. Please, take better care of your lives. They are precious. And if I see you again, be sure you will get a piece of my mind ... and a hug. Rena Newman Sebring Earlier this month Don and I had a potential problem going through a toll booth. We were headed to the Orlando airport, which meant taking a toll road. The problem was that as we approached the toll plaza, we discovered that the only two lanes open were the Sunpass an d the exact change lanes. There was no one who could give change. This stymied us. We dont have a Sunpass, and neither of us had expected to need change, counting on a human being to b e around to take our cash and giv e us change. Afrantic search of my purse came up with less tha n the required amount. This was not looking good. Fortunately there was a place we could turn around so we werent faced with breaking the law. We backtracked on Interstate 4 and got our hands o n some change. Then we took another route to the airport, which was still a toll road but a t least there were people mannin g the booths. We didnt want to drive through the toll booth without paying because a) we do the be st we can to obey the law, and b) it wasnt worth whatever fine theyd slap us with for not paying the toll. Neither of us remembers what it was, but tru st me it was a lot more then the handful of change they wanted for the privilege of driving the highway. At least all we were looking at was a fine. AChinese farmer and gravel dealer recently faced a much harsher sentence in China life in prison. I am not kidding. According to a report I read on cbsnews.com Shi Jianfeng was accused of using fake military license plate s on two of his trucks. Since mili tary vehicles are exempt from paying tolls, those two trucks rode for free more than 2,300 times. Shi was charged with fraud and sentenced to life in prison. Now, I agree ducking tolls mor e than 2,000 times deserves some kind of punishment. But life? Apparently his fellow citizen s felt the same way. Chinese com plained in commentaries and online posts about the sentence which was harsher than those handed down for rape or murde r. Not only that, they began to attack the tolls themselves, argu ing that they were too high. I find it encouraging that the Chinese government actually responded to the outcry. And no it wasnt by trying to shut up th e complainers. Aspokesman from the prosecutors office said theyd sent the case back to the police for more investigation. Apparently Shis younger broth er claimed responsibility for the fraud. The court in charge of th e case is being questioned about their handling of the case. According to the prosecutor s office, Shi could still face seve n years in prison for forgery, which still seems a bit much to me. But its a lot better than lif e. As for the high tolls, the article says that the vice minister o f transportation said in a news conference that the tolls would be gradually reduced. There wa s no timetable or details given, and Im uncertain as to whether Chinese government promises carry any more weight than American government promises Time will tell. The morals of this cautionary tale are as follows: you should carry change with you when traveling to the Orlando airport ; ducking tolls in China can get you in a lot of trouble; and eve n in China, public outcry can sometimes get things done. That last gives me hope for China. If the citizens can get tolls lowered, what else could they do if they wanted to? Something to think about. Laura Ware is a Sebring resident She can be contacted by e-mail a t bookwormlady@embarqmail.com Taking its toll Lauras Look Laura Ware MacLaine is the dead r inger for a reclusive t ycoons dead wife, a key p oint in the plot. Now, in those opening s cenes, when Caines charact er imagines how his brilliant p lan is going to work, everyt hing comes off exactly as he h oped. MacLaine is beautiful; her c haracter never says a word a nd follows Caines direct ions exactly. She is mysterio us, uncomplaining, obedie nt. Then comes the wet, cold s plash of reality, as Caines c haracter approaches M acLaine in person. Nothing g oes right after that. Outside of Caines imagin ation, MacLaines character h as ideas of her own, and the s trength of mind to voice t hem. She is feisty, argument ative and not inclined to foll ow directions. Then the r eclusive tycoon turns out to b e more in touch with the w orld than first thought, and f ar shrewder than Caine a nticipated. In no time, his plan has g one ridiculously wrong and C aine is in nothing but troub le, including having fallen i n love with MacLaine. Isnt that just like real life? We anticipate a project, or a special event, and in our minds eye, everything we want to happen goes according to plan. Then we actually take on the project, or attend the special event, and nothing goes the way we thought it would. Thus it is especially for every individual who ever won public office. What starts as an inspiration in the morning shower, and turns into a good idea by lunch, can end up a disaster before dinner. Which is another way of saying that when lots of people are involved, simple becomes complicated in a hurry. Take the Sebring City Council and the fencing issue. With the best of intentions the council is rewriting the current fence ordinance to standardize setbacks and loosen some restrictions. You might think something that straightforward would be easy to create. Youd be wrong. Like Caines character in Gambit, the council began its work expecting smooth sailing. Instead, council meetings are drawing larger audiences than usual, as residents upset with the privacy, self-expression, financial and property rights issues raised by the proposed fence ordinance, come to city hall to speak their minds. Like Caines character, the council has discovered it has a feisty and argumentative public as a partner one not inclined to accept all the councils ideas just because. Just like Caines character couldnt control MacLaines character, so the council can forget about waving a magic wand and having the people of Sebring fall in behind them everyone united in purpose and equally motivated. Which is why we commend the Sebring City Council for listening to its constituents when they spoke in anger and opposition. It is hard enough to admit a mistake in a quiet side room surrounded by allies; it is much more embarrassing to do so in public. Last Tuesday the Sebring council responded to public pressure in the best, most democratic sense when it reversed itself and agreed chain link fences should be allowed for use in front yards. Recognizing the version of the fence ordinance before it was unfair and confusing, the council voted it down and directed the city attorney to rewrite it before going further. We hope the newest version of the ordinance is one that allows for affordable protection, individual expression, community safety, and individual property rights. Sounds simple doesnt it? Did we mention that Caines character in the movie gets caught? Kudos to Sebring council for accepting reality I n 1966, Michael Caine and Shirley MacLaine starred in a movie called Gambit. The story opens with Caine p laying a sophisticated thief planning to h ire MacLaine to pose as his wife in a c omplicated plot involving the theft of a p riceless statue. EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com. To make sure the editorial pages arent dominated by the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion of the staff or editors of the News-Sun. All items will run on a first-come basis as space permits, although more timely ones could be moved up. We believe your viewpoints are just as important as any community leader or government official, so consider this a personal invitation to get your two cents in. The NewsSun has a long history of encouraging public discussion through letters, guest columns, and Readers Response questionnaires. Providing this forum for our readers is a pleasure, not an obligation.

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e red on Thursday evening. M cCollum had nothing but k ind words to say about her e xperiences at the school. I find that each time I c ome back here the passion is s till here...the dedication of o ur superintendent, our board m embers, and the teachers h ere at Park Elementary, its j ust so wonderful to see and t o have been a part of it, M cCollum said. Park Elementarys current p rincipal, Brenda Longshore, w as in school administration f or nine years before becomi ng principal in 2007 and has f elt as if she was home all t his time. I was born and raised h ere, my kids went to school h ere, these people, these stud ents are my family. And I l ove it here at Park, said L ongshore. Longshore and her assist ant principal, Debra T hompson, along with a crew o f teachers, plan to continue t he Park tradition of setting a l asting foundation in element ary students. Parks total enrollment is 5 59 students and it is currentl y a B-grade school, falling o ne letter last year. However, L ongshore and the school c ommunity all feel that the s tudents are avid learners and t hinkers and are confident that the school will continue to excel. God Bless Park Elementary with many more years to come, said McCollum as she closed out her speech. The crowd cheered with agreement and continued to celebrate the night with their community. Continued from page 1A Page 4ANews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com Ask us about DirecTV4.1 Cu.Ft. 2 Oven Racks Lift Up Slab Cooktop 2600W Bake 3000W Broil$599Electric Range Model #WDS6063860DLP HD, 3D Ready,8 Color Processor, 2 Component/Composite Video Inputs 21 Cu.Ft.Top Freezer, 2 Glass Shelves, Gallon Door StorageMODEL #FRT21HS6JQRefrigerator WASHER & DRYER 46WX800U, BDX3000 & 2 PR. FPT-AGO1 BUNDLE PAC ALL 3D46WX800U 46240 Hz HDTV,3D Ready, Built In Wi-Fi,Photo Frame Capacity, 1080P Full HD Cinespeed, High Rec PC Input FOR THE PAIR FOR PAIR WHILE THEY LAST$549MODEL #FEF316BQ BDX3000 Full HD 3D Playback,Built In Wi-Fi, Picture In Picture,Dolby True HD & DTS-HD Master Audio,Internet Streaming Capability FPT-AG013D Glasses (2 Pair) Large Glass Area,Wide Frame Design,Adjustable Nose Pad,75 Hrs.Battery Life All For $1995 WASHER & DRYER Model #WDSR2120JWW27Top Load, 3.2 Cu.Ft., 8 Wash Cycles, Flex Care AgitatorModel #DBLR333EGWW27Electric Dryer, 5.8 Cu.Ft.,3 Dry CyclesBISQUE ONLY WHILE THEY LAST$299WHITE & BISQUE WHILE THEY LAST $1149Model #WCVH6800JWW27Front Load, 4.0 Cu.Ft., 26 Wash Cycles, Stainless Steel Drum Model #DCVH680EJWW27Electric Dryer, Deluxe Dryer Rack, Moisture Sensor, Multiple Cycles$999 Television $169WHITE & BLACK ONLYModel #MWV150K1.5 Cu.Ft.,900 Watts, 10 Power Levels, Touch Control, 12Glass Turntable MICROWAVE WE ARE A FULL SERVICE TV REPAIR CENTER. IMPORTANT NOTICE TO: HIGHLANDS COUNTY HOMEOWNERS FROM: C. RA YMOND MCINTYRE, HIGHLANDS COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER RE: HOMESTEAD EXEMPTION FILING PERIOD The annual filing period for Homestead Exemption is January 1, 2011 thr ough March 1, 2011. Please visit our office at the Government Center in Sebring to file applications for all exemptions. The following is a list of all exemptions of fered to you as a resident of Florida: Homestead Exemption (Maximum of $50,000): In order to qualify you must own your home and make it your permanent residence on or before January 1, 2011 and be a full-time resident of Florida (requires Florida drivers license if you drive, Florida vehicle tag for your vehicle if you own a vehicle, and voters I.D. in the county in which you live if you are a registered voter.) If divorced please provide copy of your divorce papers. Additional Senior Homestead Exemption ($15,000): To qualify you must meet the requirements listed above for homestead exemption and you must be over 65 years of age (as of January 1, 2011) and have an adjusted gross income of $25,780 (household income) or less for the year 2010. Please contact our office for more details on income requirements for this exemption. (This exemption amount applies only to the taxable value for Board of County Commissioners.) Widows Exemption ($500): To qualify you must meet the same criteria as listed above for Homestead Exemption and you must be a widow. Widowers Exemption ($500): To qualify you must meet the same criteria as listed above for Homestead Exemption and you must be a widower. Disability Exemption (Varies depending on the type and level of disability): To qualify you must meet the same requirements listed above for Homestead Exemption and certain requirements regarding doctors documentation or VAs letter regarding your disability. Contact our office for specific requirements concerning this exemption. We will have clerks in Avon Park and Lake Placid to take applications at the following locations and times: Avon Park City Hall Council Chambers Tuesday January 25th Fr om 10am to 4pm Address: 110 E. Main St. Lake Placid City Office Wednesday & Thursday January 26th & 27th From 10:00 am to 4:00 pm Address: 311 W. Interlake Blvd We are located at 560 South Commerce Avenue in Sebring or you can contact us at the following numbers: A von Park (453-7538) Sebring (402-6659) Lake Placid (465-2464) News Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Former and current principals and administrators were honored at Park Elementarys 20 year celebration. The front row of the cafeteria was filled with familiar faces including Pat Landress, Marge Jernigan, Dan Johnson, and current principal Brenda Longshore. Floridas total nonagricultural jobs d eclined 17,900 from November to D ecember, with construction still taking the b iggest hit of 20,200 from December to D ecember. As opportunities increase, we encourage j ob seekers and employers to stay in regular c ontact with their local One-Stop Career C enters and take advantage of Floridas many a vailable employment and training prog rams. Liberty County in the Panhandle had the states lowest jobless rate at 7.7 in December. It was followed by Monroe, 7.9 percent; Alachua, 8.2 percent; Leon and Okaloosa, 8.3 percent, and Wakulla, 8.4 percent. Most of those counties have high proportions of government employment including universities and military bases. Flagler and Hendry counties posted the highest unemployment rate of 15.7 percent each. They were followed by Hernando, 14.5 percent; St. Lucie, 14.1 percent; Marion, 14 percent, and Indian River, 13.6 percent. Continued from page 1A Park Elementary celebrates two decades of serving students Local jobless numbers fall in December

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Associated PressHOUSTON Gabrielle G iffords is under intensive c are at Texas Medical Center a fter a flawless trip from A rizona, where throngs of w ell-wishers gave her a f arewell that brought a tearful s mile from the congressw oman. Her new team of doctors p lanned to start her therapy f or a bullet wound to the b rain immediately. She will b e sent to the centers rehabili tation hospital, TIRR M emorial Hermann, after s everal days of evaluation. Giffords has great rehabili tation potential, Dr. Gerard F rancisco, chief medical offic er at Memorial Hermann, s aid Friday. She will keep us b usy, and we will keep her b usy as well. The first thing is to determ ine the extent of her injuries a nd the impact on her abilities t o move and communicate. S he hasnt spoken yet, and i ts unknown whether she will s uffer permanent disabilities. Earlier in the day, the carav an carrying the congressw oman swept past cheering c rowds as she left the hospital i n Tucson, Ariz., where she d azzled doctors with her r ecovery from being shot in t he head two weeks ago. Children sat on their pare ntsshoulders as the motorc ade passed. Many waved. O thers carried signs wishing Gabby well. She responded very well t o that smiling and even t earing a little bit, said Dr. R andall Friese, a surgeon at t he University Medical C enter trauma center in T ucson who traveled with G iffords. It was very emot ional and very special. Agunman shot Giffords a nd 18 other people on Jan. 8 a s she met with constituents o utside a grocery store in T ucson. Six people died. The s uspect in the attack, Jared L oughner, 22, is being held in federal custody. Since she was hospitalized, Giffords has made progress nearly every day, with characteristically cautious surgeons calling her improvement remarkable. Each new press conference seemingly yields a few more details about the Giffords that her family knows. Tracy Culbert, a nurse who accompanied Giffords and the congresswomans husband, Houston-based astronaut Mark Kelly, on the flight, described her as being captivated by a ring on Culberts finger. The nurse took it off and Giffords put it on her own hand. She was taking it off my hand and I asked if she wanted to see it, Culbert said. Asked how she felt about leaving Giffords on Friday to return to Arizona, Culbert replied, Do you want me to cry? Shes a very gentle person, Culbert said, and her personality is coming out with her touches, the way she touches us, the way she looks at us, and I am very lucky to know her. Then, she added: I have a lot of hope for her, and I know shes going to do great. Doctors said Giffords will stay in the intensive care unit for now because she has a drain to remove fluid buildup in her brain. She was going to begin rehab immediately, with a session scheduled for Friday afternoon. Because part of her skull was removed during surgery, a helmet was made to protect her brain. Friese said Giffordshusband asked them to make another one with the Arizona flag on it. We immediately got one the next day, Friese said. Specialists ranging from physical and occupational therapists to speech therapists and psychologists will give a slew of tests to see what she can and cannot do. Theyll determine the strength of her legs and her ability to stand and walk. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 5A LIMITED SPACE CALLTODAY! 5 DAYS a week$ 30 Get In Shape Learn Self Defense Improve Self Esteem Make Better GradesMARTIAL ARTS AMERICA471-2467Best After School Program in SebringFREEPICKUP from: Kindergarten Learning Center, Cracker Trail, Sun-N-Lakes, Woodlawn, Fred Wild, Memorial, Hill Gustat, Sebring Middle/High Located on Kenilworth Sebring*Some Restrictions Apply Life Care, Not Day Care www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NO DEALER FEE, PLUS TAX & TAG, STATE FEE, O% withALLY, SEBC RULES APPLY. 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Page 6ANews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com 2521US27N. Sebring(NexttoHomeDepot)(863)386-9859Sebrings OwnMeat LoafBaked 1/4 Chicken Pot Roast Country Fried ChickenServed with side and rollSpaghetti Chicken ParmesanServed with garlic breadONLY $7.99Includes Choice of Soda, Tea or CoffeeTHURSDAYLadies Night 6-10pmLadies Drink Free Well & Draft Karaoke 9pm FRIDAYPrime Rib Dinner10 oz. $15 14 oz. $17 Karaoke 8pmSATURDAYAll-U-Can-Eat WingsOnly $15SAT & SUN$1 Drafts EARLY BIRDS11am 5pm Daily changing their scheduled day meetings to meet the needs of those that work.Highlands Park Volunteer Fire Department elects officersLAKE PLACID The Highlands Park Volunteer Fire Department will hold its annual election of officers at the monthly business meeting on Monday. The meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the firehouse, 1317 Columbus St. All Highlands Park residents are encouraged to attend. For additional information, feel free to call Chief Richard Gavagni at 699-0491 or 243-9441.Orchid Society meets MondaySEBRING The Orchid Society of Highlands County will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. Monday. The meetings are held at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center, 4509 George Blvd. In preparation for the show on March 26-27, the program this month will be on how to prepare plants and construct a container display. The society will also be holding its annual auction on Feb. 12. Guests are always welcome and participants do not have to be knowledgeable of orchids to attend. For additional information, call 4652830 or e-mail at orchidman124@yahoo.com or go to the Web site http://orchidsocietyhighlands.org/. Commodities to be distributedSEBRING February 2011 Commodities will be distributed from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday and Friday, Feb. 10-11 at The Salvation Army, 3135 Kenilworth Blvd. An error was made on the date printed on the handout for February Commodities. If you dont have a 2011 Commodities Card, you can register in the office and receive your Commodities to take with you. If you have any other questions, call the Commodities hotline 3857548, ext. 306.Masons install officers TuesdaySEBRING Highlands Chapter 64, Royal Arch Masons and Heartland Council 43, Royal and Select Masters will have their annual installation of officers at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Sebring Masonic Lodge. Installing officers are Micheal Padrom, for the chapter; James Keaveny, for the council; Steven Steele, marshal; and Gabe Moitozo, chaplain. For more information on the installation or activities, call L. Alvin Hill Sr. at (615) 504-0109 or Tim James Keaveny at 471-9549 OES serves ham dinnerSEBRING Sebring 126 Order of the Eastern Star will host a ham dinner from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. today at the Masonic Lodge, 1809 Home Ave. Cost is $7 each. Tickets are available at the door.Pilates in the Park on Jan. 29 SEBRING The Sebring Golds Gym is partnering with the Sebring Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) to host a Pilates in the Park event at 10 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 29 in Downtown Sebrings Circle Park. This event is free for anyone to attend and perfect for any exercise level. Come enjoy the beauty and charm of Circle Park while increasing your strength and flexibility. Participants are encouraged to bring a mat or towel and enjoy 50 minutes of pilates fun. After the class, Golds Gym will give away a onemonth free membership and distribute free week-long passes for everyone who attends. Events planned for lodges, postsAVON PARK Highlands County Moose Lodge 2494 will host Tiki Hut music by Lora Patton at 3 p.m. today. 40/8 meeting is at 6 p.m. Tuesday; cabaneinside, voiture outside. The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 will have the NFLBig Ticket up at 1 p.m. today. Karaoke by Dan Mussellman from 5-8 p.m. Tuesday. For details and menu selection, call 452-9853. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose Lodge 2374 will host karaoke with Double D on today. For details and menu selection, call 465-0131. The Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 will host music by Frankie Monday. ABPOE board meeting is set for 7:30 p.m. BPOE initiation is at 7 p.m. Tuesday. For details and menu selection, call 465-2661. SEBRING The Sebring Moose Lodge will host bingo at 1 p.m. today. Texas Hold-em will be played from 7-10 p.m. Monday. For more informa tion and menu selection, ca ll 655-3920.Patty Waszak performs at ReflectionsAVON PARK Patty Waszak will bring her show to Reflections on Silver Lake at 6:30 p.m. Monday. Waszak is a vocalist, musician, comedienne and has been known to dance a step or two. Her enthusiasm for enter tainment and sincere love o f her audience is evident in every performance. Tickets for this lively, up tempo show are $7. For more information call 4525037. New Odyssey Show comes to Sebring Village MondaySEBRING Sebring Village presents New Odyssey Show Three Guy s, Thirty Instruments at 7:30 p.m. Monday. Outstanding arrangements of almost every style are performed o n 30 different musical instruments. This act is versatile, funny, novel, talented, polished, family-oriented and awesome in presentation. Tickets are $10. For mor e information or to purchase tickets, call 386-0045 or 273-0875.Recreation Club plans several eventsSEBRING The Sebrin g Recreation Club will host the following events this week: Monday 9 a.m., State AM/any doubles tournament/Avon Park; 1 p.m., Ladies Social Club; 1:15 p.m., shuffleboard scrambles. Tuesday 9 a.m., State AM/any doubles tournament/Avon Park; 12:30 p.m ., bridge; 3 p.m., ping pong. Wednesday 1 p.m., pinochle; 1:15 p.m., shuffle board league; 6:30 p.m., lin e dancing. Thursday 9 a.m., shuf fleboard tournament/any doubles/no two pros; 1 p.m ., euchre; 3 p.m., ping pong; 7 p.m., bingo. Friday 9 a.m., shuffle board tournament/any doubles/no two pros; 12:30 p.m ., Bridge. For details, call (262) 22 43819.Shrine Ladies Bunco canceledAVON PARK The Bunco game scheduled for Tuesday at the Highlands Shrine Club has been cancelled. The next event will take place on Tuesday, Feb 22. Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS o f the housing collapse, s aid Louis Schacht, a Vero B each farmer whose family h as grown oranges for 60 y ears. Trees dont pass the bact eria to each other. Instead, g reening also known as y ellow dragon disease, HIB o r, in Chinese, H uanglongbing is spread b y insects. There is no cure. Hundreds of researchers f rom more than a dozen c ountries converged on O rlando last week to talk a bout the disease and hear t he latest research. They f ound hope in one a nnouncement: A U niversity of Florida-led g roup of international scient ists has assembled the g enome sequences for two c itrus varieties sweet o range and Clementine m andarin in an effort to d etermine why trees are so s usceptible to greening. E ventually, they hope to e ngineer varieties that a rent. There is nothing we h ave today that is effective a gainst the bacteria, said D an Gunter, chief operating o fficer of the Citrus R esearch and Development F oundation Inc., which f unds research on greening a nd other citrus issues. Two percent to 3 percent o f Floridas citrus trees die i n a typical year because of t hings like cold weather, b ugs or old age. But since g reening emerged, 4 percent t o 5 percent have been lost e ach year, experts said. Since most of Floridas o ranges become juice, while C alifornia mainly grows t hose found in lunch boxes, g reening could eventually a ffect consumers at the b reakfast table. Greening means lower availability of juice, more uncertainty of juice supplies, said Bob Norberg, the deputy executive director of research and operations at the Florida Department of Citrus. Analysts say shoppers can already expect to pay more after a hard freeze damaged one-third of Floridas early orange crop varieties and nearly half of the midseason crop this year. Replacing trees killed by greening has proved costly and, in some cases, futile. Young trees need irrigation and expensive fertilizer and take time to grow. In their early years, they produce less fruit than older trees. And, in a cruel twist of fate, young trees appear to be the most susceptible to the insect that transmits the greening bacteria. The insect that transmits the disease generally is looking for new growth on a tree, Norberg said. Young trees are all new growth and that insect is more attracted by younger trees. At Schachts grove on Floridas east coast, the smell of sweet juice fills the air as he packs fat honeybell tangelos, navel oranges and ruby red grapefruit into boxes for customers across the United States. In the nearby retail store, Schachts father serves slices of the citrus and little cups of juice to visiting tourists. The family farm sits in the middle of the so-called Indian River growing area, which stretches from coastal Palm Beach to Daytona Beach and 20 miles inland. Its the biggest orange and grapefruit growing area in Florida, contributing a sizeable chunk to the states $9 billion citrus industry, and farmers say the calcium-rich soil and tropical breezes make their fruit especially tasty. Schacht, however, worries about his and other growersfuture in the area. Like most other farmers, he first learned of greening in 2005 and, shortly afterward, found it in a 3-year-old Valencia orange tree. Since then, 40 of his 280 acres of trees have been affected. Scientists say the bacteria and insects responsible for greening entered the U.S. in Miami-Dade County and spread north. Schachts groves were in the path. Its hard to identify, said Schacht, pointing to a scraggly tree with yellow leaves and puny, green oranges. It affects the leaves first, they have a blotchy yellowness. Alot of times, its mistaken for a nutrient deficiency. Some farmers are trying to control the disease by using certain combinations of nutrients. Meanwhile, Schacht shakes his head and says hes not sure what to do about the 40 acres hes lost. He doesnt want to spend the money on new trees, irrigation and fertilizer, only to lose them to the disease again. When you see what it does to a tree, its pretty bad, he said. Continued from page 1A MCTphoto A citrus tree affected with greening is removed from a grove near Miami. Citrus greening a major threat There is nothing we have today that is effective against the bacteria.DANGUNTER Citrus Research and Development Foundation By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comAVON PARK Two of H ighlands Countys middle s chools recently held m ythology bees and awarde d the first winners of the c ontests at each school. S everal students at Avon P ark and Hill-Gustat M iddle Schools have been s tudying Greek mythology s ince the fall months in o rder to participate in the c ompetition. Students took a written e xam in late November and t he students with the best s cores were allowed to c ompete in the second, live p hase of the contest, an oral c ompetition where students f ielded questions on ancient Greek mythology. The students were broadcast on a large screen in each of the schoolscommons where family, friends and faculty were able to cheer on their little experts. APMS held their competition in the evening and HGMS held theirs the following morning. After a heated competition at each school, the three top winners were awarded with trophies and $20 gift certificates to Books-A-Million. The winners from Avon Parks 2010 Mythology Bee were Andrew Mullins in first place, second place was Joshua King and third was 2009 champion Koy McGrath. The winner at Hill-Gustat was Siddarth Ananthan. Second place was Zach Dunlavy and third place was Gauri Persad. Daniel Fantin is the media specialist at both Hill Gustat and Avon Park Middle Schools and played a large role in the coordination of the bees. All the students participating in the mythology bees did their best and worked hard. We certainly appreciate their hard work. Thank you to all the contestants and a big congratulations to the winners, said Fantin. Middle schools students show off their Greek mythology knowledge Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155 NEWS-SUN 385-6155

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 7A Contact UsBy Phone(863) 385-6155By Mail2227 US Hwy 27S Sebring, FL 33870By E-Mailwww.newssun.com/contact/ When the lines get long, l ike they are now, we try to c ut it back a minute so that e veryone gets to play. Stevens is on his second y ear as a Winter Fest volunt eer. He, along with two S ebring High School stud ents 10th graders Olivia N apper and Juniett Gonzalez worked hard to keep the l ittle ones having as much f un as possible. This is our first year, we h eard about the volunteering t hrough the Key Club so we d ecided to sign up, said N apper. Its really fun to watch t he little kids enjoy the s now, Gonzalez said. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by ROBYN BAKALUS Navaeh Tyson, 4, enjoys spending time with her dad Kenny on Saturday during the Snow Fest in Sebring. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Eli Clemons, 2, gets his hands into the snow during Saturdays Winter Fest. Winter Fest a hit once again By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comTALLAHASSEE F igures for crash fatalities s tatewide have declined for t he fifth straight year, but H ighlands County actually s aw a slight increase in 2010. Last year, Florida experie nced 2,430 traffic crash f atalities, a three-decade low n umber of traffic crash fatali ties and an annual decrease o f more than five percent, a ccording to preliminary data f rom the Florida Department o f Highway Safety and Motor V ehicles. By comparison, 2,563 peop le died in traffic crashes in 2 009. The number of crash fatali ties in 2010 is the lowest the s tate has seen since 1978 e ven though the Sunshine States population has doubled since that time. It is encouraging to see the number of traffic fatalities continue to drop, and the department will continue our efforts to educate motorists and aggressively enforce the traffic laws to create the safest possible driving environment, DHSMVexecutive director Julie L. Jones said. Unfortunately, we know all too well the devastating impact that even a single fatality resulting from a careless, inattentive or impaired driver can have on a family and community. Highlands, on the other hand, had 19 fatalities in 2010, according to the DHSMVreport, up slightly over the 15 fatalities in 2009. Five of those fatalities resulted from the Feb. 22 tour bus crash at Lake Francis Road and U.S. 27. Motor vehicle crashes are the No. 1 killer of people between the ages of 5-34, said the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in the report released by the DHSMVon Friday. Additionally, the CDC reported that, seat belt use is the single most effective way to save lives and reduce injuries in crashes and using seat belts reduces serious injuries and deaths in crashes by about 50 percent. To learn more about DHSMVand the services offered, visit www.flhsmv.gov or follow them on Twitter at at FDHSMV. Traffic crash stats show state down, Highlands up in fatalities i ncluding the World C ompetition in Orlando in 2 005, Aguila explained. Aguila went on to explain h ow long of a process its b een to appear on The T onight Show. Apparently i ts not an easy thing to a ccomplish. I sent a tape off to the s how back in 2007 and the t imes just always conflicted. T hey are really nice though, t heyve always kept in touch t hrough e-mail and they call p retty often too. I got an em ail on last week saying they c ould book, they sent my t icket a few days after and I ll be appearing on W ednesday, Aguila said. Im so proud of him, s aid Aguilas mother Y olanda. The community h as been so supportive of h im. The hidden talent Aguila p osses is quite impressive a nd though hes always kept i t a secret, Aguila is ready to b roadcast it to the world. Ive spent a lot of time m astering it. Music has helped me do that. Music has a rhythm, it has a pattern and so does (his hidden talent) but instead of sounds its colors and patterns, explained Aguila. Aguila is excited to finally show his other talent to the world, and the fact that he does the hidden talent all while playing his trumpet is mind boggling and surely a sight to see. Im really excited. Ive kept it a secret for almost five years and as far as I know Im the only one in the world who can do this. David Aguila will be appearing on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno on Wednesday at 11:35 p.m. He will be returning to Highlands County for a community fundraiser in March. He will be playing his trumpet for a benefit in Avon Park and may even showcase his other talent for the local community. Continued from page 1A Aguila ready to reveal hidden talent to the world on Tonight Show Im really excited. Ive kept it a secret for almost five years and as far as I know Im the only one in the world who can do this..DAVIDAGUILA musician and ??? Did YouKNOW?EMERGENCY VEHICLESUpon the immediate approach of an authorized emergency vehicle,while en route to meet an existing emergency,the driver of every other vehicle shall,when such emergency vehicle is giving audible signals by siren,exhaust whistle, or other adequate device,or visible signals by the use of displayed blue or red lights,yield the right-of-way to the emergency vehicle and shall immediately proceed to a position parallel to,and as close as reasonable to the closest edge of the curb of the roadway,clear of any intersection and shall stop and remain in position until the authorized emergency vehicle has passed,unless otherwise directed by any law enforcement officer.YOUCANBETICKETEDFORFAILINGTOPULL OVERANDSTOPWHENANAMBULANCE, POLICE, FIREOROTHEREMERGENCYVEHICLEIS TRAVELLINGTOMEETANEMERGENCY. BELOWISTHEFLORIDALAW.

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Page 8ANews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com GettingYouBack onYourFeetIsJust theFirstStep! GettingYouBack onYourFeetIsJust theFirstStep!Keith A. Bowyer, Jr., PTBest Physical Therapist2006 2007 2008 2009 2010License FL PT 16172Herdman Certifiedin Vestibular Rehabilitation If youre injured or facing surgery, we provide personalized physical therapy care to help you recover quickly and safely. From hands-on therapy to pain management techniques and therapeutic exercise, our expert team will put their extensive training and experience to work for you. Call us today to schedule an appointment at your convenience.Shoulder, Hip, Knee & Back Therapy.Most Insurance Plans Accepted100 YMCA Ln. Sebring, Fl 33875863-382-2949 visit us on the web at www.bowyerpt.com Also treating dizziness & balanceBOWYERPHYSICALTHERAPYBOWYERPHYSICALTHERAPY Acapulco8868s Berlin3221sf Calgary3615pc Dublin4335pc Edmonton348pc Freeport6651s Geneva3527s Hong Kong6653pc Jerusalem5942s Kiev2719c London4336s h Montreal0-17s Nice5541s Ottawa-5-17s Quebec-2-18s Rio de Janeiro8877s Sydney8470s Toronto7-7c Vancouver4541r Winnipeg205s n Albuquerque4522pc5126pc5329s Atlanta4928s4736c4826r Baltimore3016s2421c3232sn Birmingham5230pc5031r4824r Boston194pc136s2318pc Charlotte4629s4030c4233sn Cheyenne4120c4126pc4422pc Chicago1610c2819sn2814pc Cleveland174pc2623sn2821sn Columbus208pc2927sn3422sn Dallas5127c5931s5534pc Denver4720pc4624c5322pc Detroit148pc2219sn2819sn Harrisburg276pc1818pc2821sn Honolulu8168s8166s8168s Houston6142sh5735pc5935pc Indianapolis2313c3222sn3018sn Jacksonville5530s6438c6433r Kansas City1412sn3513sn3120pc Lexington2620pc3928sn3523sn Little Rock4828c4829c4728pc Los Angeles7348s7748s7852s Louisville2922c4128sn3623sn Memphis4730c4430c4026c Miami6854s7357pc7555pc Minneapolis76c194sn2110pc Nashville3926c4330sn4022sn New Orleans6044pc6138r5535c New York City255pc1717pc3030sn Norfolk3720s3533c4735sn Oklahoma City3521c4922pc4927pc Philadelphia277pc1919pc3030sn Phoenix6942s7044s7247s Pittsburgh183pc2422c3322sn Portland18-2pc9-4s188s Raleigh4528s3733c4432sn Rochester12-7sf1510c2616sn St.Louis2216sn3716sn3017pc San Francisco6344s6242s6244s Seattle4742r5240r5037pc Tampa6140s6752pc6750sh Washington, DC3116s2825c3632sn Weather History Heat index Five-Day forecast for Highlands County High 65/Low 36High 72/Low 44High 69/Low 43High 65/Low 39High 64/Low 42 W inds:NE at 4-8 mph.Winds:ESE at 4-8 mph.Winds:W at 10-20 mph.Winds:NNW at 7-14 mph.Winds:NW at 7-14 mph.TODAY MONDAY TUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAY A full day of sunshine Intervals of clouds and sunshine Chance for a couple of showers Intervals of clouds and sun Mostly sunny AccuWeather UVIndexTMThe higher the UV index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2, Low;3-5, Moderate;6-7, High; 8-10, Very High;11+ Extreme9 a.m.11 a.m.1 p.m.3 p.m.5 p.m. 14541 U.S.cities World cities Florida citiesWeather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice. City HiLoWCity HiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCity HiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCity HiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCity HiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCity HiLoWHiLoWHiLoWFor 3 p.m.today For today Browning, Mont., had a world record 100-degree-plus change on Jan.23, 1916.After a morning reading of 44, arctic air dropped the temperature to 56 below zero overnight. Relative humidity ....................28% Expected air temperature ........64 Makes it feel like ......................65 Sun and moon Moon phases LastNewFirstFull Jan 26Feb 2Feb 11Feb 18 Washington Washington 31/16 31/16 New York New York 25/5 25/5 Miami Miami 68/54 68/54 Atlanta Atlanta 49/28 49/28 Detroit Detroit 14/8 14/8 Houston Houston 61/42 61/42 Chicago Chicago 16/10 16/10 Minneapolis Minneapolis 7/6 7/6 Kansas City Kansas City 14/12 14/12 El Paso El Paso 52/24 52/24 Denver Denver 47/20 47/20 Billings Billings 42/23 42/23 Los Angeles Los Angeles 73/48 73/48 San Francisco San Francisco 63/44 63/44 Seattle Seattle 47/42 47/42 Washington 31/16 New York 25/5 Miami 68/54 Atlanta 49/28 Detroit 14/8 Houston 61/42 Chicago 16/10 Minneapolis 7/6 Kansas City 14/12 El Paso 52/24 Denver 47/20 Billings 42/23 Los Angeles 73/48 San Francisco 63/44 Seattle 47/42 Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands ar e highs for the day.Forecast high and low temperatures are given for selected citie s. Bitterly cold air will remain entrenched over the Northeast and Midwest today.A storm on the central Plains will bring snow to Missouri, southern Illinois and northern Arkansas.A couple inches of snow will blanket some cities and towns in this area, making roads slippery and treacherous.Spotty showers will dampen areas farther south in Arkansas into eastern Texas.Light snow will also fall over North Dakota and northern Minnesota as another storm system edges past to the north. National Forecast for January 23 A full day of sunshine today.Partly cloudy and chilly tonight.Intervals of clouds and sunshine tomorrow.Tuesday:partly sunny with a couple of showers possible.Wednesday:intervals of clouds and sun. Thursday:mostly sunny. Avon Park Tallahassee Jacksonville St.Petersburg Miami Sebring Lorida Lake Placid Venus 64/41 64/41 65/37 64/37 58/26 55/30 61/41 68/54 65/36Shown is todays weather.Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows Regional forecast Water restrictions Almanac Farm reportA full day of sunshine today.Winds northeast 4-8 mph.Expect a full day of sunshine with average relative humidity 45% and fair drying conditions.Partly cloudy tonight. \000\000 )Tj ET Q BT 0 g /GS3 gs /T3_0 1 Tf 0 Tc 0 Tw 0.8654 0 0 0.9453 754.9871 1388.8313 Tm (\000 )Tj -20.325 6.775 Td (\000\000 \000\000 )Tj ET Q BT /T3_1 1 Tf 0.8654 0 0 0.9453 754.2283 1369.925 Tm (\000 )Tj -22.136 7.379 Td (\000\000 \000)Tj 0 11.659 TD (\000)Tj ET Q q 746.95 1400.119 31.154 -119.108 re W* n q 0 1520.645 810.014 -748.678 re W n q 0.9568024 0 0 1.0451508 0 0 cm 0 G 0.57 w 4 M 786.056 1289.006 19.738 11.532 re 805.794 1289.006 m h S Q Q Q q 752.103 1327.819 18.885 12.053 re W n BT /T3_3 1 Tf 0.8654 0 0 0.9453 751.8569 1327.4358 Tm (\000 \000 \000)Tj 0 12.419 TD (\000)Tj ET Q q 746.95 1400.119 31.154 -119.108 re W* n q 0 1520.645 810.014 -748.678 re W n q 0.9568024 0 0 1.0451508 0 0 cm 0 G 0.57 w 4 M 786.056 1251.471 19.738 11.532 re 805.794 1251.471 m h S Q Q Q q 752.103 1287.172 18.885 12.053 re W n BT 0 0 0 1 k /GS2 gs /T3_5 1 Tf 0.8654 0 0 0.9453 751.8912 1277.5795 Tm (\000)Tj 0 10.5 TD ()Tj ET Q BT 0 0 0 1 k /GS2 gs /T3_5 1 Tf 0.8654 0 0 0.9453 761.3024 1287.5051 Tm ()Tj ET q 752.103 1287.172 18.885 12.053 re W n BT /T3_5 1 Tf 0.8654 0 0 0.9453 770.7137 1287.5051 Tm ()Tj -21.75 10.5 Td (\000)Tj ET Q q 746.95 1400.119 31.154 -119.108 re W* n q 0 1520.645 810.014 -748.678 re W n q 0.9568024 0 0 1.0451508 0 0 cm 0.57 w 3.864 M 786.056 1231.573 19.738 11.532 re 805.794 1231.573 m h S Q q 0.9568024 0 0 1.0451508 0 0 cm 0 G 0.57 w 4 M /GS3 gs q 1 0 0 1 795.925 1240.207 cm 0 0 m S Q Q Q Q 0 0 0 0 k /GS1 gs 754.319 1255.183 41.629 10.703 re f BT 0 0 0 1 k /T1_8 1 Tf -0.0001 Tc 6.9232 0 0 7.5624 760.9736 1259.5129 Tm [(FRONTS Shower s T-storm Rain Flurries Snow Ice Cold Warm StationaryDaytona Beach6137s6643pc6941sh Ft.Laud.Bch6854s7256pc7554pc Fort Myers6545s7049pc7248pc Gainesville5726s6338c6632r Homestead AFB6750s7253pc7651pc Jacksonville5530s6438c6433r Key West6459s7160pc7361pc Miami6854s7357pc7555pc Orlando6241s6845pc7144sh Pensacola6044pc6242r5832r Sarasota6342s6445pc7047sh Tallahassee5826s6342c6227r Tampa6140s6752pc6750sh W.Palm Bch6650s7153pc7549pcTemperature(Readings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake Placid)High Tuesday ..........................79 Low Tuesday ............................55 High Wednesday ....................82 Low Wednesday ......................51 High Thursday ........................82 Low Thursday ..........................55 Precipitation Tuesday ..............................0.13" Wednesday ........................0.00" Thursday ............................0.00" Month to date ......................0.99" Year to date ........................0.99" Barometer Tuesday ..............................29.92 Wednesday ........................30.07 Thursday ............................29.85 Tides(Readings at St.Petersburg)High ..............................3:47 a.m. Low ............................10:31 a.m. High ..............................4:43 p.m. Low ............................10:50 p.m.(Readings at Palm Beach)High ............................11:08 a.m. Low ..............................4:36 a.m. High ............................11:40 p.m. Low ..............................5:05 p.m. Lake Levels Lake Jackson ....................78.36' Lake Okeechobee ..............12.43' Normal ..............................14.51' TodaySunrise ....7:14 a.m. Sunset ......6:02 p.m. Moonrise 10:25 p.m. Moonset ....9:41 a.m. MondaySunrise ....7:13 a.m. Sunset ......6:03 p.m. Moonrise 11:28 p.m. Moonset ..10:20 a.m.If your address (house number) ends in... ...0 or 1, water only on Monday ...2 or 3, water only on Tuesday ...4 or 5, water only on Wednesday ...6 or 7, water only on Thursday ...8 or 9*, water only on Friday and locations without a discernible address TodayTodayNational summary:Regional summary: Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather,Inc. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110sAccuWeather.com The NewspaperAll Around Your World In the Classroomcurrent events vocabulary geography At the Officebusiness news networking Over Coffeegarage sales local advertising community Family Timetravel recreation family events Sunday Morningcomics games puzzles Onlinelocal events email highlights 24-hour updates Support your local newspaper and the continued tradition of quality journalism by renewing your subscription today,and well continue to deliver. Thanks,readers! Rain,Sleet,Hail,Heat,Potholes,Flat Tires...Nothing stops them from making their deliveries!www.newssun.comWe celebrate how the newspaper has evolved to meet our changing needs without sacrificing the quality coverage youve come to expect. Day after day, anywhere you go,the newspaper delivers. Whether in print or online,it brings us the latest headlines from across town and around the world,local events,lots of laughs, touching stories,money-saving offers and so much more. Call 863-385-6155 for home delivery!

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BUSINESS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, January 23, 2011 SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. EXPIRES 1-29-11 www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644 LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NO DEALER FEESPLUS TAX, TAG, & STATE FEES. Since 1931 MOST WANTED DEALS MOST WANTED DEALS 2008 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT WAS$ 23995 NOW$ 21999#X0127 2008 CHR YSLER TOWN & COUNTRY T O U R ING WAS$ 20995 NOW$ 18889#L0143 2005 CHR YSLER PT CRUISER CONV. WAS$ 12999 NOW$ 10888#X0120 2006 CHR YSLER 300 LIMITED WAS$ 18995 NOW$ 15888#TX114A 2006 DODGE DURANGO SLT WAS$ 16995 NOW$ 14399#CX032B 2008 TOYOTA FJ CRUISER 4X4 WAS$ 24995 NOW$ 22888#X0148 2010 DODGE CHARGER SXT WAS$ 19995 NOW$ 18898#X0154 2010 DODGE JOURNEY WAS$ 20995 NOW$ 18999#X0156 WAS$ 15995 NOW$ 13888#X0140A 2008 CHR YSLER SEBRING TOURING CONV. WAS$ 19995 NOW$ 17888#0147 WAS$ 18995 NOW$ 16889#CX129A WAS$ 24995 NOW$ 21888#X01582008 TOYOTA SCION XB 2010 SEBRING TOURING CONVERTIBLE 2007 CHRYSLER PACIFICA TOURING 3rd Row SeatCome by & check em out! News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Lisa Baldwin (left) and Rose Sapp at Scrap Paper Scissors in Lake Placid. Their business has expanded three times in 25 months. The ladies say its because scrapping is a great hobby, and their customers are more like friends and family. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comLAKE PLACID And they said it couldnt be done. Lisa Baldwin is seated at a table in her store and meeting place, Scrap Paper Scissors at 244 Interlake Blvd. She puts down the project shes working on and laughs. I cant tell you how many people told me it was a bad idea, Baldwin said, referring to when she first got the idea of opening a place where people interested in making scrap books and other paper projects could come for instruction, supplies, work space and a good conversation. In fact, Baldwins move into her new address almost directly across the street from her first shop is the third expansion for the business in just over two years. While some businesses struggle, Scrap Paper Scissors has gone from needing 900 square feet, to 1,500 squares feet to 2,500 square feet all in 25 months. Our business neighbors along the road call us the little engine that could, Baldwin said, laughing in delight. But more has changed over the years than size. Baldwin began the business with a partner, who soon dropped out of the arrangement. Baldwin worked alone for months, all the Cut and paste has new meaning in Lake Placid Scrap Paper Scissors keeps expanding See SCRAP, page 3B Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) will host its next Whats Up Downtown meeting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Cusworth Pub inside the Kenilworth Lodge. The meeting will provide updates on the CRAs new business incentive programs, Streetscape project, Downtown Sebring events, and CRAmarketing initiatives. We encourage anyone who has an interest in Downtown Sebring is encouraged to attend these informative meetings that are well attended by merchants, government officials, residents, potential business owners, realtors and media, said Pete Pollard, CRAexecuti ve director. The mission of the CR A is to bring about the ec onomic revitalization of an established target area. T o create a re-investment env ironment that attracts priva te investors into the area. T o promote improvemen ts within the redevelopme nt area through renovation an d restoration of buildings, as well as to encourage ne w construction. To acquire t he funding necessary to ma ke the infrastructure improv ements necessary to attra ct investment dollars an d improve the assessed ta xable value of district prope rties and to assist the cham ber of commerce and dow ntown merchants in the ir efforts to market the dow ntown businesses. Find out Whats Up Downtown? in Sebring on Tuesday Special to the News-SunSEBRING Island View Lakefront Restaurant & Pub, at Sun N Lake Golf Course, is open to the public with a brand new menu Monday through Saturday. Island View provides a casual atmosphere with classic island sophistication. The special Sunset Dining menu offered from 3-5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, exceptional Friday night Chefs Creations, regularly sche duled entertainment and fam ily fun nights bring a flair of fun to a flavorful dinin g experience. Executive Chef Kev in Heim comes with 12 yea rs experience at The Rit zCarlton, bringing a passio n for flavor and visu al panache in his offerings. For the full menu an d additional information, vi sit IslandViewRestaurant.co m or call 382-1191. Island View restaurant offers flavors to savor Between holiday shopp ing bills now coming d ue, increased winter h eating bills and the u pcoming income tax s eason, many people are f eeling the pinch. Your b est bet for getting back o n track is probably to t rim expenses. Here are several ideas big and small that m ight do the trick: Lower your thermos tat. Each degree you l ower it saves up to 3 p ercent on your heating b ill. Turning down your t hermostat 10 to 15 d egrees for eight hours at n ight can save about 5 to 1 5 percent. For a $300 m onthly heating bill, t hats up to $45 in savi ngs. Up to 30 percent of h eated or cooled air can b e lost through leaks, so a dd insulation, apply w eather stripping around w indows and doors and Feeling the pinch? Personal Finance Jason Alderman See BELT, page 3B

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T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sunon a ny changes in this listing by c alling 385-6155, ext. 516; s end any changes by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail t hem to News-SunCommunity C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 L ake Placid has lounge hours f rom 1-9 p.m. Live music is f rom 5-8 p.m. For details, call 4 65-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p .m. Members and guests o nly. Post is at 528 N. Pine S t., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Highlands Shrine Club, 2 604 State Road 17 South, at 2 -4 p.m. has country music p layed by Just Country. D onation $3 for single, and $5 f or couple. Refreshments a vailable. Everyone welcome. Inerstate chapter of A .B.A.T.E. meets the last S unday of every month at The B lue Crab, 825 Ridgewood D r., Sebring at 11 a.m. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2 661 lounge is open from 1-7 p .m. Card games start at 1:30 p .m. The lodge is open to m embers and their guests. For d etails, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has k araoke in the pavilion. H orseshoes played at 9:30 a .m. Food available at 4 p.m. O pen to members and qualif ied guests only. Loyal Order of Moose H ighlands County Lodge No. 2 494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon P ark. Cards start at 4 p.m. M usic outside Tiki Hut at 3 p .m. Lodge phone number 4 52-0579. Overeaters Anonymous, m eets from 4-5 p.m. in second f loor conference roomNo. 3 at F lorida Hospital Heartland M edical Center, 4200 Sun N L ake Blvd., Sebring. For d etails, call 382-7731. No d ues, fees or weigh-ins. For d etails on the organization, go t o www.oa.org. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves lunch at 2 p.m. at the c lub, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. F or details, call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2 259 offers NASCAR racing in t he pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar o pen and kitchen open from 25 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S. 9 8, Sebring. For details, call 6 55-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 3880 serves hamburgers f rom 4-5:30 p.m. and plays p oker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1 224 County Road 621 East, L ake Placid. For details, call 6 99-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 plays euchre at 1 :30 p.m. and E&J Karaoke is f rom 4:30-7:30 p.m. at the p ost, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, S ebring. For details, call 3858 902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN W ITH ME family group meets a t 10:30 a.m. every Monday at t he Heartland Christian Church o n Alt. 27 in Sebring. The c hurch is behind Southgate S hopping Center where Publix i s. F or more information call 3855 714. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal C hurch, Lakeshore Drive, S ebring. For more details, call 3 85-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous O ne Day At ATime group m eets for a closed discussion a t 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant P resbyterian Church, 4500 S un N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. F or details, call 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 6:30 p.m. at R osewood Center, 517 U.S. 2 7 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at S t. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. F or details, call 202-0647. American Legion Placid P ost 25Lake Placid has shuff leboard at 1 p.m. Lounge h ours are 12-9 p.m. For d etails, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen noon to 8 p.m. Happy h our from 4-6 p.m. Call 4711 448. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and guests. For details, call 3850234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake Placid. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-8118. Diabetes Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday from 1-2:30 p.m. in Florida Hospital Conference Room 3 in Sebring. Call 4020177 for guest speaker list. Dual Diagnosed (Addiction and Mental Health) Support Group meets from 7-8:30 p.m. the fourth Monday at 4023 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 386-5687. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The AgriCenter. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Garden Club of Sebring meets noon, fourth Monday, Sebring Civic Center. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets the second and fourth Monday at the Sebring Country Estates Civic Association clubhouse, 3240 Grand Prix Drive (down the street from Wal-Mart). Dancing will be held every month until April 2008. Classes are being started now in the Sebring and Lake Placid area. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or visit the Web site at www.samdun.net.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 314-8877. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Democratic Executive Committee meets 7 p.m. fourth Monday in the Democratic Party Headquarters, 4216 Sebring Parkway, Sebring. For details, call 699-6052. Highlands County Rotary Club meets at 6 p.m. at Charlies Restaurant, Commerce Street, Sebring. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. For details, call 402-6540. Highlands Sertoma Club meets noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. Highlands County Senior Squadron, Civil Air Patrol the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary meets the second and fourth Monday nights at the Sebring Airport Terminal Building. All are welcome. For further information, call 471-1433 between 4 and 7 p.m. Lake Placid American Legion Post 25 meets 8 p.m., Legion hall. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. National Association for the Advancement of the Colored People, Highlands County Branch meets 7:30 p.m., 401 Tulane, Avon Park. Orchid Society of Highlands County meets 7 p.m. on the fourth Monday at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center, 4509 George Blvd., Sebring. Call Ed Fabik at 465-2830 for details. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 12-4:30 p.m. second and fourth Monday in Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. No meetings from end of May to October. For details, call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Bradys, Sebring. Sebring AARP meets 1:30 p.m., The Palms, Pine Street, Sebring. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 has pizza and darts at 7:30 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. For information, call 471-2522. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 plays Texas Hold em at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Monday at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing. For details, call 6553920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. For details, call Judy OBoyle at 260-0831. Veterans of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliary Post 4300 meets 2 p.m. fourth Monday, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Volunteers of America of Florida is a nonprofit organization in Sebring that specializes in assisting person's with mental illness. We are pleased to announce our Drop in Center is open to individuals with a mental illness 6 days a week from 11am to 3 pm. The center offers a welcoming environment where individuals are accepted and feel comfortable. For more information please contact Wendy at 863382-2022.TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parking available south of old church. 8 & 40 Salon 687 Call Betty Darmer, 465-2272, for details. Alzheimers/Dementia Seminar held at 11 a.m. every fourth Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid. Also sponsored by Nurse on Call. Covers common signs of dementia, coping and care giving tips, disease management, organizations, etc. Call 465-0568. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For details, call 4657940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Audubon Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Masonic Lodge, downtown Lake Placid on the corner of Main and Park. Bring a covered dish to share, utensils and plates, at 6:30 p.m. or come at 7:30 p.m. for presentations by guest speaker. The public is invited. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. For details, call 452-2385. AvonPark Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Beta Sigma Phi, Xi Nu Sigma Chapter of Avon Park, meets the second and fourth Tuesday each month in the members home. Call president Mary Joinerr at 382-4488 or vice president Linda Webster at 385-1124. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. Everyone is welcome. For more details, call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at The Rock, Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost selfesteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. For details, contact Celebrate Recovery coordinator Pam Sim by calling 453-3345, ext. 106. The Computer Club at Buttonwood Bay meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month November through March. We invite anyone interested in expanding their computer knowledge to attend the Buttonwood Bay Bytes Computer Club meeting. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For more details, call 385-3288. Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 471-2294 or 386-5098. Heartland Symphony Orchestra rehearsals from 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesdays in the Green Room in the South Florida Community College auditorium building. Bring music and instruments. New members welcome. Call conductor Bryan Johnson at 800949-7248, ext. 7231. Highlands County Community Orchestra rehearses each Tuesday in the Green Room of the South Florida Community College Performing Arts Theater, 5:307:30 p.m. Entrance is at the rear of the building. String players especially needed. Strings call Eugene Longo at 699-1975; winds call Kim Houser at 453-6049 for more information. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets first and third Tuesday, St. Agnes Episcopal Church, Sebring. Call Lynn Ullinn for meeting times at 314-0557 or e-mail luckyduck@mymailstation.com. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Call 382-0312. Knights of Columbus Council 5441 meets 8 p.m. every second and fourth Tuesday at Knights of Columbus Hall, 900 U.S. 27 N., Sebring. For details, call 385-0987. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Jaycees meets 7:30 p.m., Jaxsons. Board meeting, 6:30 p.m. Call Joe Collins, 655-5545, for details. LAKEPLACIDLIONSClub meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday each month at Herons Garden, 501 US 27 North, Lake Placid. Call Jeanne at 699-0743. Lake Placid Women of the Moose has a business meeting at 7:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday at the lodge. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Masonic Lodge meets 8 p.m., 106 N. Main St., Lake Placid. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Churc h, 1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup. c om. For details, call 382-7731 Visit www.oa.org for more information on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Placid Lake s Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. For details, call 4654888. Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) offers a full range of voluntee r opportunities for people age 55 and over. RSVPmeets on the fourth Tuesday each month, 10 a.m., at the Highlands Little Theatre. Please join us for coffee and to learn more about current volunteer opportunities in Highlands County. Any interested and enrolled volunteers are invited to attend. For mor e information call Kris Schmidt, coordinator, RSVP, at 7847189. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near th e library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-3829 or 471-9900. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If interested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sign in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Cost is $2. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves soft shell tacos 5 7 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing. Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. For details, call 655 3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. an d table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dees Restaurant, Sebring. For details, call Scot t Albritton at 402-1819. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 6 -7 p.m. at the Atonement Lutheran Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Communit y Bible Church, 1400 CR-17A N., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. For details, call 452 1093. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 has a card tournament at 2 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 3858902. Page 2BNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com COMMUNITYCALENDAR NEWS-SUN 385-6155

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c aulk around ducts, plumbi ng bypasses and other openi ngs. Water heating is the t hird-largest home energy e xpense, so try lowering y our water heater temperat ure to 120 degrees or lower t o see if its still comforta ble. Energy Star products cons ume up to 50 percent less e nergy and water than stand ard models (visit w ww.energystar.gov). Compact fluorescent l amps use up to 75 percent l ess energy than incandesc ent bulbs and last three to 1 0 times longer. Although i nitially more expensive, t hey last six to 15 times l onger. Afaucet leaking one d rop per second wastes a bout 2,000 gallons a year. If you have lowd eductible home, renters or a uto insurance (say $250), a sk your insurer how much y our premiums would drop b y raising the deductible to $ 500 or $1,000. Many save 1 5 to 30 percent or more. Balance your checkb ook to avoid fees for overd rawn accounts and returned c hecks. Ask your bank about p hone or e-mail alerts when y our balance drops below a certain level or payments are due. Switch to free checking. You can shop rates for banks at www.bankrate.com and find credit unions for which youre eligible at the Credit Union National Association (www.cuna.org). Consider generic vs. brand-name drugs; copayments are usually much lower. Ask whether your insurance offers quantity discounts for mail-order prescriptions. Often, the copayment for a 60or 90-day supply will equal a 30-day supply at a regular pharmacy. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about pharmaceutical companiesdrug assistance programs for uninsured or low-income people. Theres a lot of paperwork involved, but you could save thousands of dollars if you qualify. Examine your phone bill for services youre not using like call waiting, call forwarding or caller ID. Dropping them could save $100 a year or more, depending on your plan. Slow down. Fuel efficiency drops about 5 mpg for each 10-mile speed increase over 55 mph. And finally, this may be my favorite off-the-wall tip: By switching from Ariel, the most common type font, to Century Gothic, someone printing 25 pages a week on their home printer could save $20 a year in ink costs. For more cost-saving ideas: AARPhas great tips on the Budgeting & Saving site (www.aarp.org). America Saves is full of savings strategies and links to other resources (www.americasaves.org). Visa Inc.s free personal financial management program Practical Money Skills for Life (www.practicalmoneyskills.com) offers numerous savings and budgeting tools. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To follow Jason Alderman on Twitter go to ww.twitter.com/ PracticalMoney. Special to the News-SunSEBRING Bob T rautman retired in 1988 a fter selling his forklift and i ndustrial equipment corpor ation, a recreational vehicle b usiness and a leasing comp any. While retired in the Florida K eys, it was evident that he w as not ready for retirement. W ith 50 plus years in sales, b usiness ownership and auto r acing, he realized retirem ent was not in his vocabul ary. Thus, another career in r eal estate developed, an i ndustry Bob had previously v entured in back in 1959. Now Bob Trautman and his w ife, Nancy, have signed w ith Re/Max Realty Plus in S ebring. When Gina Bexley, r ecruiter for Re/Max asked B ob Trautman What awards and accomplishments have you earned and achieved over the years?, his answer was, My list of awards is extensive, as it consists of 'thousands' of friends, clients and customers I have had the opportunity and pleasure to serve; plus the associates and acquaintances who I have worked and shared time and friendship with. In addition, an honor he cherishes is to have been voted multiple times by the public as Realtor of the Year, an award earned by fulfilling the needs of those whom he had the opportunity to serve in the Florida Keys and Highlands County. More recently, he won the Sales Associate of the Year award with Exit Realty. It is interesting that Trautman would rather talk about the number of people and families that he has helped over the years versus sales volume, dollars earned and/or awards, Bexley said. But if you really want to get him going, ask about his marketing ideas, techniques and actions taken to promote and sell a listing. Or, if you are a buyer, how to find what you are looking for, negotiating a purchase price, handling financial matters, inspections, legal aspects and documents necessary prior to and after closing. The Trautmans can be reached directly at 385-0477. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 3B COUNTRY CLUB REALTY 863-382-6575www .CountryClubRealtyofSebring.comTWO LOCATIONSTOSERVE YOUGOLF HAMMOCK 1 Hammock Cir cle Sebring, FL 33872 C OUNTR Y C LUB OF SEBRIN G 4800 Haw Branch Rd. Sebring, FL 33872863-382-6575OPEN HOUSE TODAY!SUNDAY 1PM-3PM US 27 to Hammock Rd to (R) at entrance of Golf Hammock (Golf Hammock Drive) to (R) on Par Rd to (R) on Cormorant Point Dr to home on (L).213002 PRICE REDUCED!Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575 US 27 to Golfview Dr (Inn On the Lakes) to (L) on Lafayette to (L) on Dozier to (L) on Santa Barbara to home on (L).215197 T AKE A TOUR!Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575 US 27 to Hammock Rd to right into Golf Hammock (Golf Hammock Drive), left at first street (Lost Ball Dr) to home on (R ). 215043 SPE CTACULAR! Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575STUNNING GOLF VIEW!Modern paint, gorgeous pavered patio and beautiful landscaping overlooks #4 tee in a great golf neighborhood! See it now! 3508 Cormorant Point Dr.$114,500LOVE THE POOL!Saltwater pool open design cathedral ceilings stainless appliances breakfast bar and more! Youll fall in love with this gorgeous home. See it today! 4071 Santa Barbara$194,500PRIVATE & PLAYFULAwesome golf views! Lush, tropical & private tiled living room, wood floor in the great room, crown molding & gorgeous stone work! Romantic Jacuzzi tub too! Come on by! 3028 Lost Ball Dr.$224,900GOLF HAMMOCK HARDER HALL GOLF HAMMOCK Kim Reed Broker/Owner863-381-6575 Your Host w hile begging her best f riend, Rose Sapp, to join h er. I begged, said Baldwin. She begged, said Sapp, l aughing. And then I begged some m ore, said Baldwin, adding i t was only when someone o ffered to buy the store that S app finally relented and b ecome Baldwins business p artner. Im glad I held out for R ose, Baldwin said, as they b oth laughed some more. It was Sapp who brought d iversity to the business. Now, in addition to scrapb ooking, stamping and card m aking, Scrap Paper S cissors can also provide p rofessional embroidery, g lass etching, heat press, and a ll forms of stationery, i ncluding wedding or gradua tion invitations. The women also plan to o pen a custom framing and m atting section sometime w ithin the year. Baldwin and Sapp both l ove what they call crop sess ions the most. Every first and third F riday in the month they o pen the store from 6 to 10 p .m., providing a place for s crapbookers to gather and w ork on individual projects o f their own with access to t he stores resources. It is a relaxed, informal s etting, Sapp said, as much a time to enjoy good company and conversation as it is to work on a project. A$5 fee covers the expenses. Baldwin and Sapp have hosted a weekend-long crop events in the past, and hope to do another this spring. The first event drew hobbyists from as far as Orlando and Michigan. Their customers are almost all women. Husbands stop at the tile, said Sapp, pointing toward the front door where carpeting met ceramic. Then she told about a young male high school student who came in to make a specific project for school. He came in wary and left proud of his work, she said. For more information, call 465-3250. Continued from page 1B Continued from page 1B BUSINESS News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Lisa Baldwin (left) and Rose Sapp have made a business out of hobbies at Scrap Paper Scissors in Lake Placid. Bob and Nancy Trautman Trautmans sign with Re/Max Realty Plus Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Patrick J. Franklin, Avon Park, a Modern Woodmen of America representative, has attained the Fraternal Insurance Counselor (FIC) designation. The FIC title is an educational designation that can be earned by career life insurance representatives associated with fraternal insurance societies. Representatives devote more than one year to meet the examination and career development criteria set by the Fraternal Field Managers Association. Founded in 1883, Modern Woodmen of America touches lives and secures futures. The fraternal benefit society offers financial services and fraternal member benefits to individuals and families throughout the United States. Securities offer ed through MWAFinanci al Services Inc., a whol ly owned subsidiary of Modern Woodmen of America, 1701 1st Avenu e, Rock Island, IL6120 1, phone (309) 558-310 0. Member: FINRA, SIP C. Products are available in most states. Individual re presentatives may not be licensed to sell all produc ts. Franklin complets FIC course Patrick Franklin Belt-tightening tips for the current economy Scrap Paper Scissors a success Metro Services Fixing a faucet that is leaking one drop per second can save about 2,000 gallons of water per year. Associated PressWASHINGTON Nearly two thirds of drivers could have more cornbased ethanol in their fuel tanks under an Environmental Protection Agency decision Friday. The agency said that 15 percent ethanol blended with gasoline is safe for cars and light-duty trucks manufactured between 2001 and 2006, expanding an October decision that the higher blend is safe for cars built since 2007. The maximum gasoline blend has been 10 percent ethanol. The fuel is popular in farm country because mo st ethanol comes from co rn and other grains. It fac es strong opposition, howeve r, from the auto industr y, environmentalists, catt le ranchers, food compani es and a broad coalition of other groups. Those groups say th at using corn to make ethan ol makes animal feed mo re expensive, raises prices at the grocery store and tea rs up the land. There ha ve already been several law suits filed against the EPA EPA approves more ethanol in fuel for cars

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Page 4BNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com 50%OFF GRAND OPENING Now thru Jan. 31st50% OFF ENROLLMENT FEES!YOUVE EXPERIENCED PART OF THE SOLUTION...NOW DISCOVER THE LOSE YOUR WEIGHT FOR THE LAST TIME.863-471-250013 Ryant Blvd. SebringCorner of 27 & Ryant Blvd. CALLTODAY! GRAND OPENING 50% OFF Tired of exercise programs that dont get you to your goal? Tired of diets that dont work Tired of losing weight but not keeping it off? Dr. Keatley Waldron Medical Director Sherri Pickard Office Manager With Total Solutions youll lose 4-24 inches in 7 visits and lose 2 to 7 lbs. average per week*GUARANTEED WEIGHT LOSS GUARANTEED! By JIM KUHNHENN Associated PressSCHENECTADY, N.Y. P resident Barack Obama said F riday that putting the economy i nto overdrive is a top priority, e ven as a new poll showed the publ ic giving him poor marks in this a rea. The Associated Press-GfK poll u nderscored the selling job that c onfronts the president as he prep ares to seek a second term: People l ike Obama personally, but just 35 p ercent say the economys gotten b etter during his tenure. Appearing in Schenectady, N.Y., o n Friday, Obama announced that h e was naming GE CEO Jeffrey I mmelt as the head of a Council on J obs and Competitiveness, his latest m ove to court a business communit y that hes clashed with amid cont inued high unemployment. A ddressing workers at a General E lectric plant, Obama recommitted h imself to spending the next two y ears trying to speed up the econ omic recovery. His success or failu re there is likely to be the central i ssue of the coming 2012 president ial campaign. Our job is to do everything we can to ensure that businesses can take root, and folks can find good jobs, the president said. Were going to build stuff, and invent stuff, said Obama, emphasizing the need to boost American exports to countries around the world, an issue that was a focus during the visit of Chinese President Hu Jintao to the White House this week. Thats where the customers are. Its that simple, Obama said. His choice of Immelt to head the competitiveness panel won applause from the Chamber of Commerce, which called it a promising step toward creating jobs and enhancing U.S. competitiveness. But the Alliance for American Manufacturing condemned the choice, dismissing Immelt as an outsourcing CEO whose appointment would alienate working class voters. That underscored a fine line for Obama in pushing for growth into the global marketplace while still looking out for the interests of U.S. workers. The competitiveness panel replaces Obamas Economic Recovery Advisory Board, which had been chaired by former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker. Obama announced late Thursday that Volcker, as expected, was ending his tenure. The change in the advisory board signals Obamas intention to shift from policies that were designed to stabilize the economy after the 2008 financial meltdown, to a renewed focus on increasing employment. The White House says the boards mission will be to help generate ideas from the private sector to speed up economic growth and promote American competitiveness. The shift in focus is aimed at winning over a public that remains skeptical of the administrations economic policies. Over half of those surveyed in the AP-GfK poll disapprove of how Obama has handled the economy, and 75 percent rate the economy as poor. However, three-quarters do say its unrealistic to expect noticeable improvements after two years; they say it will take longer. Mindful of those sentiments Obama told listeners Friday that its a great thing that the economys growing but its not growing fast enough. For Obama, the visit to General Electric Co. was also an opportunity to claim credit for tax, trade and energy policies pursued by his administration as the nation attempts to recover from the wor st recession since the 1930s. Its t he first of many treks during the se cond half of his term that the pres ident is expected to take to put a more hopeful countenance on t he economy amid stubbornly hig h unemployment. The GE plant is benefiting from a power turbine contract with Ind ia announced during Obama s Southeast Asia trip in Novembe r. Immelt also has been an advocate of alternative forms of energy, and t he GE facility, the companys large st energy plant, is the future site of GEs advanced battery manufactu ring program. New battery technol ogy has become something of an Obama pet project as a symbol of innovation, clean energy and jo b creation. Immelts appointment ad ds another corporate insider to t he White House orbit, underscorin g the administrations efforts to bui ld stronger ties to the business com munity. Earlier this month, Obam a named former Commerce secreta ry and JPMorgan Chase executi ve William Daley as chief of staff. By CHRIS KAHN APBusiness WriterNEWYORK General E lectric Co. said Friday that f ourth-quarter net income i ncreased 52 percent as the c ompany made more money i n both its lending and indust rial businesses. The lending arm, GE C apital, drove the companys r esults in the final three m onths of 2010 as it dealt w ith fewer loan defaults. R isky loans hammered the c ompany during the financial c risis, forcing GE to book h uge writedowns. Industrial sales also rose d uring the fourth quarter and o rders for equipment, an i ndication of future business, j umped 20 percent. GE exits 2010 with sign ificant momentum, CEO J eff Immelt said. The compan y also is benefiting from the O bama administrations r ecent diplomatic and trade e fforts with India and China. The results show that risi ng energy and raw material c osts so far havent cooled o ff global demand for cons umer products. Most of the growth is c oming from overseas, E dward Jones analyst Matt C ollins said. China, India, t he Middle East and other e merging markets, theyre i nvesting in infrastructure. G E relies so heavily on e merging markets for sales t hat its no longer considered a bellwether of the U.S. e conomy, analysts said. GE signed $1.6 billion w orth of deals in India on the h eels of President Obamas r ecent trip there, including $ 750 million in contracts w ith Indias Reliance Power. On Wednesday, as Chinese President Hu Jintao visited the U.S., the White House said GE will form a cleanenergy venture with Shenhua Energy Co. GE estimates the deal has the potential to generate up to $2.5 billion in U.S. exports. Immelt has said he expects GEs profits will be driven by industrial growth in China. In November he pledged that GE will invest $2 billion through 2012 to help China tackle its energy and infrastructure needs. GE, which makes products from dishwashers to wind turbines, and finances large projects around the globe, said net income in the final three months of the year rose to $4.46 billion, or 42 cents per share, from $2.94 billion, or 28 cents per share, a year ago. Earnings from continuing operations were 36 cents a share. That topped analysts expectations of 32 cents per share, according to FactSet. GE said revenue grew year-over-year for the first time in nine quarters, increasing 1 percent to $41.4 billion. Wall Street expected revenue of $40.3 billion. Overall orders grew 12 percent from a year ago. Besides the increase in equipment orders, services business orders rose 5 percent. Immelt noted that orders grew 4 percent at GEs energy infrastructure business, which accounted for a quarter of GEs operating revenue and more than a third of GEs operating profit last year. GEs total backlog stood at a record $175 billion on Dec. 31. GE has made a number of acquisitions recently to expand its energy business. It agreed in October to buy turbine-maker Dresser Inc. for $3 billion. In December, GE said it would acquire Wellstream Holdings PLC, which makes pipes and other equipment for deep-water oil production, for $1.3 billion. And GE said last week it would buy electrical equipment maker Lineage Power Holdings Inc. for $520 million. GE Capital saw a surge of activity in the fourth quarter. Net income soared to $1.1 billion from $99 million in the year-ago period. Loan volume increased 30 percent and losses and impairments dropped by $300 million from the third quarter. The Fairfield, Conn., company also said profit rose 38 percent at NBC Universal. GE expects to close the sale of a majority stake in NBC to Comcast this quarter. GE shares rose $1.33, or 7.2 percent, to $19.76 in afternoon trading. BUSINESS Obama seeks to highlight nations economic potential MCTphoto President Barack Obama wants to put the economy in overdrive. MCTphoto J eff Immelt, CEO of GE, says his company exits 2010 with significant momentum. GE boosts 4th quarter income 52% Most of the growth is coming from overseas. China, India, the Middle East and other emerging markets, theyre investing in infrastructure.MATTCOLLINS analyst, Edward Jones By SANDYSHORE APBusiness WriterGas pump prices that are around $3 a gallon now may seem like a bargain by the time your kids are on Easter egg hunts. Pump prices have risen nearly 9 percent since Dec. 1 and topped $3.10 a gallon this week. Thats the highest level since October 2008. The price may rise or fall a little over the next few months, but analysts expect it to range between $3.20 and $3.75 gallon by March and April ahead of the summer driving season. The national average for regular gasoline about $3.12 a gallon on Friday, according to AAA, Wright Express and Oil Price Information Service. Thats nearly 12 cents more than a month ago and 38 cents above a year ago. Average pump prices range from $2.81 to $3.70 in major cities. For example, the average in Salt Lake City is $2.74 a gallon and in New Orleans its $2.97 a gallon. Drivers in San Francisco pay $3.44 a gallon, and in Honolulu gas is $3.58 a gallon. Americans typically drive less in the wi nter. Demand is about 1 percentage poi nt higher than a year ago but remains weak er than the historical average, said energy an alyst Jim Ritterbusch. The nations gasoli ne supplies remain above the five-year averag e. Over the next couple of months, refineri es will conduct regular maintenance to prepa re for the changeover to summer driving mixe s. That could affect supplies, but gas pric es should remain steady to a few cents mor e, according to oil analyst Tom Kloza of O il Price Information Service. By spring he expects the average price to rise to between $3.50 and $3.75 a gallo n. Ritterbusch expects $3.20 to $3.25 a gallo n by Memorial Day. For every penny the price at the pum p increases, it costs consumers overall an add itional $4 million. Get ready for higher prices at the pump The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 5B DANCING & LIVE MUSIC DAILY SundaysGary Oliver 2PM 5PM,Tiki BarTuesdaysStanman,Music/DJ/Jokes/Blues6PM 9PM, LoungeWednesdaysGary OliverOl Rock & Roll on Keyboard6PM 9PM, LoungeThursdaysBildis Funtastic Karaoke, 6PM 9PM, LoungeFridaysBig Freddie Live 6PM 9PM, LoungeSaturdaysStanman,Music/DJ/Jokes/Blues5PM 8PM, Lounge Double Back,Southern Rock Band9PM 1AM, Lounge Dance & WIN a 1980 Vintage Gibson GuitarSundaysGary OliverOl Rock & Roll on Keyboard2PM 5PM,Tiki HutStanman2451 US 27 SouthAvon Park453-3331On Lake Glenada Open 7 Days Reser v a tions Accepted Ne w Owner ship & Ne wly Reno v a ted Lar ge Gr oups W elcomeVisit Our Lakeside Tiki Bar Best Deal of the DayLunch or Dinner 2 FOR THE PRICE OF 1 Lunch2 for $795 Dinner2 for $995to$1995MUST PURCHASE 2 BEVERAGESNot good with any other promotion. Does not include Early Bird or other specials. Gar y Oliver DANCE CONTESTWinner gets 1980 Vintage Gibson Guitar PRIME RIB ORNY STRIP DINNER$1099EVERY SUNDAY ALL DAY 11AM 8PMIncludes garlic sticks, potato or pasta, vegetable, choice of soup or salad with purchase of beverage. Grand Opening Mixer Thurs., Jan. 28 4PM ? Free Food Live Music in Tiki & Lounge Bildi s FunTastic Karaoke MUSTPRESENT COUPONBig Freddie Courtesy photo Accepting checks for the phone book recycling project this year are (front row) Lake Placid High School senior Emily Lundy, Florida Association of Student Councils state secretary, and senior Joslyn Morales, Student Government Association member for first place, $400; Rebekah Kogelschatz, teacher, Lake Placid Middle School, third place (tie), $100; Richard Kogelschsatz, Dean, Kindergarten Learning Center, Honorable Mention; Patricia Willard, Math and Science Resource teacher, Project Liaison; (back row) Mark Delaney, chair, KHCB; Jan Sutton, Dex Publishing; Kaye Bowers, principal, Woodlawn Elementary, second place winner $200 and Christopher Lavely, teacher, Cracker Trail Elementary, third place winner (tie), $100. CHALKTALK Courtesy pho to Heartland Christian School recently celebratedCrusader Students of the Month and Character Award Winners Thankfulness.Pictured here are kindergarten through fifth-grade students, and included in the front row are Max Carlisle and Audrey Sofo;second row students areKyle Fronda, Sam Beaulieu, Arianna Bullington, Ivy Guevara and Hagen Stamps-Hill; third row includes Julia Moody, Jabez Asuncion, Andrew Cardoso, Levi Zimmer and Chris Cardoso.David Kaser, HCS headmaster, is also pictured. DSAC meets Feb. 7SEBRING The Highlands County District School Advisory Council (DSAC) will meet from 67:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 7 in the Garland Boggus Board Room at the School Board of Highlands County, 426 School St. The primary agenda item for this meeting is School Resource Officers and Gangs. If you are a person with a disability who requires reasonable accommodations in order to attend a District School Advisory Council meeting, call 4715608 three days prior to the scheduled meeting date and time. SFCC DeSoto Campus welcomes new director ARCADIASouth Florida Community College (SFCC) hosts an open house to welcome the new director of the SFCC DeSoto Campus, Suzanne Demers, at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Demers comes to SFCC from Florida State College at Jacksonville where she was the open campus learning technologies coordinator for distance learning. Prior to Florida State College at Jacksonville, she held a position with Embry-Riddle Aeronautic al University as the associat e director and interim direc tor of the Jacksonville Campus. She honorably served the United States Navy on the strike fighter attack jet known as the F/ A 18 Hornet. Demers graduated from Southern Illinois University with a Bachelo r of Science in workforce education, training and curriculum development, magna cum laude. She completed her graduate work with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and earned a Master of Science in management degree. She previously resided in Middleburg, where she and her husband, Michael, raised six children and fostered four boys. They now reside in Arcadia. The DeSoto Campus is located in Arcadia at 2251 N.E. Turner Ave. For mor e information about the DeSoto Open House, con tact SFCC Community Relations and Marketing at 784-7250. Snapshots Special to the News-SunSEBRING DEX Publishing, Keep Highlands County Beautiful and Highlands County Recycling recognized the winners of the telephone book recycling competition at the Jan. 18 Highlands County School Board meeting. Dex Publishing promotes the recycling of telephone directories each year by offering first, second and third place winners monetary awards. This year for the first time there was a tie for third place. In honor of America Recycles Day for 2010, Dex upped the first place award to $400 for first place. Mark Delaney, chairman of Keep Highlands County Beautiful Board of Directors, along with Jan Sutton, local marketing consultant for Dex, presented the checks to school representatives. Highlands County schools recognized for directory recycling Special to the News-SunTALLAHASSEE Families have less than two weeks left to purchase a Florida Prepaid College Plan at current plan prices. Enrolling children by the Jan. 31 deadline is easy to do online at www.myfloridaprepaid.com. According to a recent article in USAToday, college graduates have been insulated from the worst effects of the recession, which resulted in 10 percent unemployment for high school graduates and 15.7 percent unemployment for those without a high school diploma. These high unemployment rates illustrate the importance of earning a four-year degree; persons with at least a bachelors degree experienced only 5.1 percent unemployment. The earlier families begin saving for college, the better, says chairman Duane Ottenstroer of the Florida Prepaid College Board. This year, we evolved to make plans more comprehensive and expanded our consumer-friendly savings choices with the introduction of a new plan option the 4Year Florida College Plan to allow a student to obtain a bachelors degree in many workforce related areas such as teaching, nursing and business management at one of Floridas 28 Colleges. Aprepaid college savings plan can be purchased for children and grandchildren as soon as they are born and up until the 11th grade. Four flexible plan options are available through the Florida Prepaid College Board to lock in tuition and most fees at Floridas 11 state universities and 28 colleges (formerly known as community colleges). For the first time, this open enrollment period, families also have the option to purchase the new 4-year Florida College Plan, which prepays the cost of earning a bachelors degree from a Florida college offering workforcerelated four-year degree programs. When children are ready for college, the plans full dollar value, what would be paid to a Florida higher education institution, can be transferred to most private and out-of-state colleges. Only a $50 application fee is due by the Jan. 31 deadline. The first plan payment is not due until April 20, 2011. Families can visit www.myfloridaprepaid.com or call 1-800-552-GRAD (4723) to order an Enrollment Kit in English or Spanish and speak to a customer service representative. Florida Prepaid enrollment deadline is Jan. 31 Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID South F lorida Community C olleges Community E ducation Department is o ffering a variety of classes t his spring at the SFCC L ake Placid Center. The Cardio-Fitness class c onsists of aerobic and f loor exercises. The class is h eld from 8-9 a.m. M onday, Wednesday, and F riday. Pilates and Stretch C ombo class consists of a 3 0-minute Pilates workout a nd 30 minutes of stretchi ng and exercises. The class m eets from 9-10 a.m. M onday, Wednesday, and F riday. Interval Training targets t oning and flexible fitness. T he class consists of a 20m inute aerobic workout, a 2 0-minute step workout a nd a 20-minute weight t raining workout. The class i s held from 4:30-5:30 p.m. M onday, Tuesday, and T hursday. The Pilates and Muscle M ovement class consists of a n aerobic workout, step w orkout, interval training, a nd Pilates. Class is held f rom 5:30-6:30 p.m. M onday, Tuesday, and T hursday. The Cardio-Fitness, P ilates and Stretch Combo, I nterval Training, and P ilates and Muscle M ovement classes run on a c ontinuing monthly basis. T hese classes are taught by K athy Rouse and offer a h igh intensity, low-impact a erobic workout with a card iovascular workout at a c ontrolled level. All classes i nclude the use of stability b ars, resistance bands, h and weights, balls, glide rs, heavy hoops, and mats. T he registration fee for a f our-week morning session i s $30.25. The registration f ee for a four-week aftern oon session is $30.25. Tai Chi is a high intensit y strengthening and s tretching exercise that i mproves flexibility and b alance. The class meets w ith instructor Karin G runden from 8-9 a.m. and 9 -10 a.m. Tuesdays and T hursdays through Feb. 24. T he cost is $44. The SFCC Lake Placid C enter is also offering c logging classes with i nstructor Patricia Kules on M ondays through March 2 1. Beginning Clogging m eets 6:30-7:30 p.m., and I ntermediate Clogging m eets 5:30-6:30 p.m. The c ost is $44. To register or for more i nformation on Community E ducation classes, call 4 65-3003 or 465-5300, ext. 7 082. SFCC LP Center offers classes Heartland Christian honors top students Courtesy photo South Florida Community College held its annual spring Club Rush on Jan. 13. More than 15 clubs and student organizations participated in the recruiting event. Shemika Smith joins the Communications Club, which is advised by SFCC developmental writing professor Beth Andrews. SFCC holds Club Rush Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155

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Breakfasts and lunches b eing served in the H ighlands County School D istrict for the upcoming w eek of Jan. 24-28 i nclude: HIGH SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast French t oast sticks, sausage p atty, Cheerios, Trix cerea l, Frosted Flakes, C innamon Toast Crunch, c heese filled breadstick, p ear fruit cup, assorted f resh fruit, assorted juice, c hocolate milk, white milk, s trawberry milk. Lunch Beefaroni, garl ic breadstick, burger, c heeseburger, chicken p atty on bun, Mama S ofias cheese pizza, M ama Sofias pepperoni p izza, ham sub meal, t urkey sub meal, dill stack, P eanut Butter and Jelly s andwich meal, chef salad m eal, baked french fries, b roccoli, tossed salad, C olby Jack cheese stick, b lack forest cake, fruit c ocktail cup, assorted f resh fruit, assorted juice, c hocolate milk, white milk, s trawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken b iscuit, Cheerios, Trix c ereal, Frosted Flakes, C innamon Toast Crunch, c heese filled breadstick, s trawberry cup, assorted f resh fruit, assorted juice, c hocolate milk, strawberry m ilk, white milk. Lunch Baked chicke n, dinner roll, burger, c heeseburger, chicken p atty on bun, Mama S ofias cheese pizza, M ama Sofias pepperoni p izza, ham sub meal, t urkey sub meal, dill stack, P BJ sandwich meal, chef s alad meal, mashed potat oes, chicken gravy, green b eans, carrots and dip, d ried blueberries, cut fresh f ruit, assorted fresh fruit, a ssorted juice, chocolate m ilk, strawberry milk, w hite milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast p izza, hash brown patty, C heerios, Trix cereal, F rosted Flakes, Cinnamon T oast Crunch, cheese f illed breadstick, apricot c up, assorted fresh fruit, a ssorted juice, chocolate m ilk, white milk, strawberr y milk. Lunch Corn dog, M ama Sofias cheese p izza, Mama Sofias pepp eroni pizza, hot and spicy c hicken sandwich, ham s ub meal, dill stack, PBJ s andwich meal, chef salad m eal, baked beans, carr ots and dip, string c heese, assorted juice, a ssorted fresh fruit, potato c hips, cocoa clodhoppers, c hocolate milk, white milk, s trawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast f rittata, hash brown patty, b reakfast pizza, Cheerios, T rix cereal, Frosted F lakes, Cinnamon Toast C runch, cheese filled b readstick, peach cup, a ssorted fresh fruit, a ssorted juice, chocolate m ilk, white milk, strawberr y milk. Lunch Tacos, salsa, y ellow rice, burger, c heeseburger, chicken p atty on bun, Mama S ofias cheese pizza, M ama Sofias pepperoni p izza, ham sub meal, t urkey sub meal, dill stack, P BJ sandwich meal, chef s alad meal, great northern b eans, cheddar cheese stick, rosy applesauce, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast Sausage biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted juices, assorted fresh fruit, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Asian chicken nuggets, salsa, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, corn, carrots and dip, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, diced peaches, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ACADEMYSCHOOLS Monday Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, broccoli, tossed salad, black forest cake, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, mashed potatoes, green beans, dried blueberries, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch Corn dog, baked beans, carrots and dip, assorted juice, cocoa clodhoppers, potato chips, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, great northern beans, carrots and dip, cut fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Lunch Chicken tenders, dinner roll, Sun Chips, tossed salad, diced peaches, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast French toast sticks, sausage patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, broccoli, tossed salad, Colby Jack cheese stick, black forest cake, fruit cocktail cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, dried blueberries, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Ultimate Breakfast Round, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Corn dog, cheese burger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, ham sub meal, dill stack, chef salad meal, PBJ sandwich meal, baked beans, carrots and dip, string cheese, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, potato chips, cocoa clodhoppers, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast frittata, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Tacos, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, great northern beans, cheddar cheese stick, rosy applesauce, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast Sausage biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, burger, cheeseburger, chicken tenders, salsa, dinner roll, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad plate, corn, carrots and dip, tossed salad, diced peaches, chocolate chip cookie, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ELEMENTARYSCHOOLS Monday Breakfast French toast sticks, sausage patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Maple waffle stick, string cheese, pear fruit cup, chocolate milk. Lunch Chicken nuggets, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich, turkey chef salad, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green peas, fruit cocktail cup, very berry juice bar, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Chicken biscuit, grape juice, chocolate milk, hard cooked egg, giant graham, apple juice. Lunch Spaghetti, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, green beans, vanilla clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, fresh apple slices, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Hard cooked egg, giant graham, apple juice, chocolate milk, chicken biscuit, grape juice. Lunch Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, corn dog, potato puffs, carrots and dip, diced peaches, cinnamon bears, apple juice grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast frittata, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Sausage biscuit, apricot cup, chocolate milk, Ultimate Breakfast Round, orange juice. Lunch Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, corn, great northern beans, fruit cocktail cup, very berry juice bar, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast Sausag e biscuit, Cheerios, Tr ix cereal, Frosted Flake s, Cinnamon Toast Crunc h, string cheese, strawber ry cup, assorted fresh fru it, apple juice, grape juic e, orange juice, fruit blen d juice, chocolate milk, whi te milk, strawberry mil k. Breakfast in th e Classroom: Ultima te Breakfast Round, orang e juice, chocolate mil k, sausage biscuit, apric ot cup. Lunch Mama Sofia s pepperoni pizza, Mam a Sofias cheese pizz a, Uncrustable PBJ san dwich, turkey chef sala d, salsa, corn cobbette s, chocolate chip cooki e, diced peaches, fres h apple slices, apple juic e, grape juice, orange juic e, fruit blend juice, chocola te milk, white milk, strawbe rry milk. KINDERGARTEN LEARNING CENTER Monday Lunch Chicke n nuggets, dinner ro ll, Uncrustable Peanut Butt er and Jelly sandwic h, mashed potatoes, chicke n gravy, green peas, fru it cocktail cup, chocola te milk, white milk, strawbe rry milk. Tuesday Lunch Spaghet ti, meat sauce, garlic brea dstick, Uncrustable PB J sandwich, green bean s, vanilla clodhoppers, c ut fresh fruit, chocolate mil k, white milk, strawber ry milk. Wednesday Lunch Uncrustab le PBJ sandwich, corn do g, potato puffs, carrots an d dip, diced peache s, Goldfish crackers, appl esauce cup, chocolate mil k, white milk, strawber ry milk. Thursday Lunch Tacos, tac o toppers, salsa, yellow ric e, Uncrustable PBJ san dwich, great northe rn beans, fruit cocktail cu p, chocolate milk, white mil k, strawberry milk. Friday Lunch Mama Sofia s cheese pizza, Uncrustab le PBJ sandwich, corn co bbettes, chocolate ch ip cookie, diced peache s, chocolate milk, white mil k, strawberry milk. Page 6BNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com AVON PARK 452-5800 SEBRING 382-3363 LAKE PLACID 465-1530Its more than just carpet The cleaning of the second piece must be of equal or lesser value to the first service price.Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 ft. and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Not valid with any other coupon. Expires 01/31/11.Emergency Water Damage Restoration3 ROOMS CARPET CLEANEDA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 01/31/11.$95002 ROOMS CARPET CLEANEDA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 01/31/11.$7500 it s our conference room.UPHOLSTERY: CLEAN ONE PIECE OF UPHOLSTERY AT REGULAR PRICE AND RECEIVE A SECOND PIECE1/2 OFF SCHOOLMENUS Get the paper delivered to you! NEWS-SUN-6155

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By CURTANDERSON APLegal Affairs WriterMIAMI By the time p olice came to arrest him on m urder charges, 22-year-old J ohnny Simms whose m any tattoos included the w ord savage and images l aced with violence a lready had a long criminal h istory that began with theft a nd trespass charges when he w as 14. The Miami man killed in a T hursday shootout that left t wo police officers dead was w hat police called a career c riminal: Hed been arrested f or cocaine and marijuana t rafficking, burglary, car theft a nd armed robbery, according t o a copy of Simmscriminal h istory obtained Friday by T he Associated Press. He was a rrested 11 times as a juven ile and became more violent a s the years passed. Simms finally went to p rison in March 2007 for g rand theft and robbery conv ictions, getting out on prob ation in February 2009, a ccording to state prison r ecords. It would be only a f ew months before he was a rrested again on robbery and c ocaine charges and sent b ack to prison in August 2 010. Prison officials meticul ously documented Simms n umerous tattoos that a ppeared to reflect his crimin al lifestyle. Those included a n AK-47 image and the w ord gun on his left hand; t he word savage on his r ight hand; several dollar s igns; the words Lil Pimp o n his right arm; and -20L ife on his right hand a r eference to Floridas mandat ory sentences for using guns i n crimes. Simmssecond stretch in p rison lasted a few weeks, m ainly because of credit for t ime served in jail. He was r eleased Sept. 3, 2010. His p robation provided no r equirements for keeping tabs o n him. This is a type of probation t hat is always objected to by p rosecutors, said Ed G riffith, spokesman for M iami-Dade County State A ttorney Katherine F ernandez Rundle. Afew weeks after his r elease came the slaying that u ltimately led to the fatal p olice shootout. According to a Miami p olice affidavit, Simms overh eard a phone conversation i nvolving his sister, 20-yearo ld Shenica Simms, who had g otten into an argument with a man outside a batteredl ooking apartment building w here she was visiting f riends. Cornelious Larry, 27, h ad started to curse and verbally disrespect her in the parking lot on Oct. 16, the affidavit said. Witnesses later told police that Simmsbrother, 16-yearold Demetrius Simms, was with Shenica and was carrying a silver-colored revolver. His sister told officers that the younger brother, Demetrius, warned Larry to stop disrespecting his sister, according to the police affidavit. About that time Johnny Simms rode up on a bicycle and both brothers confronted Larry. Shenica Simms, according to the affidavit, said she knew something bad was about to happen so she turned around to walk away. Gunshots rang out and Larry crumpled on a staircase. Witnesses identified Johnny Simms as Larrys killer; one saw him hand the silver-colored handgun back to his younger brother before they both fled. Eventually, the killing brought a four-person team of Miami-Dade fugitive investigators Thursday to the duplex in crime-ridden Liberty City, where Simms was living with his mother and other relatives. Cmdr. Nancy Perez, a Miami-Dade police spokeswoman, said previous efforts to persuade Simms through family members to turn himself in had failed. So the officers, wearing body armor, knocked on the door and Simmsmother opened it. Without warning, police say Simms came out of another room and shot at the officers with a handgun, killing veteran detectives Roger Castillo, 41, and Amanda Haworth, 44. Simms was shot and killed by detective Oscar Placencia, who was not hurt. Afourth member of the fugitive team, detective Deidre Beecher, suffered a minor knee injury. The confrontation lasted only a few seconds. Family members said they had no inkling Simms would come out shooting, though authorities say Simms was determined not to be taken alive. This is a guy who was never going back to prison, Griffith said. Willie Williams, Simms stepfather, said he was at work at the time of the shooting and expressed condolences to the families of the officers. But Williams objected to some descriptions of his stepson as a violent thug. It was three human beings regardless if they were police officers or not, Williams said. They portray him as if he was an animal. He is a human being. He is a child of God. Associated Press writer Suzette Laboy contributed to this story. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 7B NEW ORLEANS BUS TRIP(863) 382-7788 March 27, 2011 7 DaysONLY$62900(per person Based on double occupancy)HOMETOWN TRAVEL, INC.NEW ORLEANS BUS TRIP March 27, 2011 7 DaysONLY$629002930 US Hwy 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 2930 US Hwy 27 South Sebring, FL 33870(863) 382-7788HOMETOWN TRAVEL, INC. Save$25 $300 per unit on select Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their enduring craftsmanship and energy-efcient designs, they present exceptional value smart style thats energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings from January 14 through April 29, 2011 with mail-in rebates on select styles. Ask us for details. *Manufacturers rebate offer valid for purchases made January 14 through April 29, 2011. Limitations and restrictions apply. Ask for details. 2011 Hunter Douglas. and TM are trademarks of Hunter Douglas. Family owned & operated since 1978 STATENEWS Miami police shootout suspect considered career criminal C.M. Guerrero/Miami Herald/MCT City of Miami Police at the scene of a shooting where two police officers were shot and killed, and a suspect was also shot and killed in Miami on Thursday. This was a guy who was never going back to prison.EDGRIFFITH Miami-Dade County state attorney spokesman By TAMARALUSH Associated PressTAMPA The owner of a Florida wildlife rescue center is living in a cage with two lions, a fundraising stunt that has riled other animal rescue groups and underscores how difficult it is to keep such sanctuaries afloat. James Jablon with Wildlife Rehabilitation of Hernando County, a semirural area about an hour north of Tampa, is halfway through his month of eating, sleeping and otherwise hanging out with the carnivorous cats. Wearing a microphone, he talks with people who watch streaming video of his captivity online and post comments. He maintains his unusual idea is a harmless way to raise $150,000 to keep the center home to 100 animals of all types running for the next two years. It is unclear how much money he has raised so far. Those in the animal sanctuary world say its extremely expensive to raise and care for exotic animals, especially when a single tiger can eat upward of 60 pounds of meat a week. Its been incredibly difficult for sanctuaries, said Josephine Martell, a spokeswoman for the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries, a Washington-based accreditation group. Its just like every other business, sanctuaries are cutting back on staff and capacity. Actress Tippi Hedre n, who starred in Alfr ed Hitchcocks The Bird s and runs the Shamba la Preserve in Acton, Cali f., said it costs her more th an $75,000 a month to feed h er 65 big cats. Sanctuaries everywhe re are folding because of t he economy, she said. Last September, the Wi ld Animal Orphanage in S an Antonio closed its doo rs due to overpopulatio n, underfunding and inad equate housing for the an imals, a message on t he defunct sanctuarys websi te said. About 400 animals we re displaced because of t he closing, and Martell said it was difficult to find hom es for them because oth er sanctuaries are so cas hstrapped. Even in the face of su ch shortfalls, Hedren and ot hers questioned the wisdo m of Jablons stepping in to the lionsden. Jablon is taking his li fe into his hands, Hedr en said. The stunt is not just da ngerous but exploitativ e, said Pat Derby, owner of the Performing Anim al Welfare Society, addin g that it sends the wrong me ssage to the public. Were supposed to be protecting the animals, n ot exploiting them, sa id Derby, a former Hollywoo d animal trainer who h as three sanctuaries in California. Jablon wouldnt spe ak with The Associated Pres s, saying that a London pu blicity-photo agency is ha ndling media requests. That agency said th at some large organizatio ns like the APwould have to pay for access to him an d the facility. The APdo es not pay for interviews. Man spends month in lions den to raise cash Hoping to get $150k to keep animal center alive for 2 years Associated PressMIAMI The Florida B oard of Medicine has unanim ously passed regulations on p ain management clinics that w ill impose about $65 million i n costs on the private sector. Health News Florida r eports the rules adopted F riday set out the requirem ents for standards of care, i nspections, accreditation and training in pain management practices. The board acted although Gov. Rick Scott has ordered a halt rule-making until his office can review proposals for their potential affect on businesses. The panel agreed to send letters to the governors office and Legislature seeking immediate approval of the rules. State Board of Medicine passes pain clinic rules

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com 130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, Florida863-385-3497Mon. Fri. 9am 4pm Closed WednesdaysHighlands Countys Oldest Established Hearing Aid OfceSet it and forget it.Wi Series works with Starkeys SurfLink Media streamer, our set-and-forget wireless transmitter.With SurfLink, theres no manual pairing involved. Once you plug it into your TV or stereo, youre done! It automatically streams sound directly to your hearing aids when your in range. You can transition from one device to another simply by moving from room to room. It lets other in the room listen to the TV or stereo at the volume they prefer.No matter where you are or what youre doing,Wi Series is designed to make listening easier. Its the ideal hearing aid for people who are active and on the go, enjoy spending relaxing time at home or both.

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LIVING C SECTION News-Sun Sunday, January 23, 2011 FAMILYFEATURES T he kids at the beach ... the grandkids at Christmas ... the sunset shots of your last vacation ... youve got plenty o f great photos that youd love to s hare. Why not show them off in s ome creative displays that you m ade yourself? Crafters are always coming up w ith unique and beautiful ways to s howcase family photos. These two c rafts use an unexpected, but very h andy, tool a laminator. Laminators, available in stores s uch as Costco and Hobby Lobby, a re no longer relegated to schools a nd offices. More compact models, s uch as those offered by Purple C ows, are small enough to use at h ome, yet versatile enough to be u sed in a variety of projects. Not o nly can the Purple Cows Hot & C old Laminator be used to protect d ocuments, photos, artwork, notes a nd more, it can also be a wonderful c reative tool in projects like these u nique photo books. To get more fun and creative proje ct ideas and how-tos, as well a s videos and tutorials, visit w ww.purplecows.net. M ini Brag Book A Purple Cows Designer Project b y Robin Gibson T ools: Purple Cows Hot Laminator#3020 Purple Cows #1040 2-in-1 Combo Trimmer Short Wave DesignerClick Blade #2803 Hole punch Rub-on applicatortool Cornerrounder S upplies: Rub-ons Patterned paper Letterstickers Cardstock Fluid chalk ink, various colors Glue GliderPro Permatac Cartridge Black journaling pen 1. Print or crop your photos to 2 x 3-inch size. If desired, round photo corners using the corner rounder. 2. Select your background papers/cardstock and, using your combo trimmer, cut a background for each photo. Vary your cut edges by using the guillotine blade for a straight cut, or the rotary cutter and your Short Wave Designer Blade for a decorative edge cut. 3. Decide if your photos will be centered or off-set, and adhere to the background papers using your Glue Glider Pro. For applying larger rub-on letters alongside the photo, you may need the photo off-center, as desired. 4. Apply rub-on letters to the top or along the side of each photo/background as desired, using the rub-on applicator tool. 5. Write any journaling in the banner area of appropriate rub-on, and apply to the bottom of the desired photograph. 6. For your front page, choose a blank journal block and trim around the edges with scissors. Ink with chalk ink.Howtoshowcase yourfavoritephoto s LaminatorTipsFigure out what kinds of projects you want to work on before buying a laminator. If you plan to protect heat-sensitive paper printed with ink or photos that may not stand up to heat, a cold laminator will work best. It uses an adhesive activated by pressure instead of heat. Ahot laminator melts an adhesive, which can be either a plastic sheet or a laminator pouch, depending on the type of laminator.Clearly Unique Travel Album APurple Cows Designer Project by Robin Gibson Tools: Purple Cows Hot and Cold Laminator#3025 Purple Cows Freestyle Mouse Kit #6045 Hole punch Supplies: Purple Cows Hot Pockets 5 x 7 #4021 Vellum quotes 1/2 inch double-sided tape Small beads, such as Beaders Paradise Emerald Mix & Topaz LusterMix Wide brown ribbon 2 book rings 1. Place 2 photos back-to-back (this will make 1 page). Choose a vellum quote and trim it using your favorite decorative-edged click blade with the Freestyle Mouse Kit. 2. Place the quote directly onto your photo in a place where it can be clearly seen. Run the hot pocket through the laminator Instantly you have a photo page. 3. On the surface of your photo page, place a strip of doublesided tape along each edge of your now-sealed photo. Repeat this step on the backside of the photo page as well, before you embellish. 4. Now you are ready to place the beads around the photo edge. Do this step inside a shoe-box lid, for easy catching and clean up of the loose beads. Pour the beads over the photo and pres s them into the tape. Shake off loose beads, and save for anothe r page. 5. Repeat step 4 on the backside of the page, so both pictures no w have beaded frames. Repeat steps 1 to 5 for each page in your book. 6. Line up your pages and punch holes in the left-hand side, using a crop-a-dile or other type of hole punch tool. Make ring covers by folding a wide piece of brown (scrap) ribbo n in half, and sewing a seam down the edge. Run the rings through until you have enough scrunch to your liking. Cut the ribbon end an d secure the rings through the pages of your book. 7. Adhere to one of your pre-cut background papers, as desired. 8. Apply your brag book title to the journal block, using rub-ons. 9. Turn on laminator, so it can be warming up while you ink the edges of your mini-pages using the chalk inks as desired. 10. Adhere 2 mini-pages back to back, so when laminated, they will be one page of your brag book. 11. Set your now-completed mini-pages into the 2 x 3 Hot Pockets, and run them through your laminator so they are permanently sealed. 12. To hang your Mini Brag Book on a lanyard, line up pages and use a hole punch to make holes where it will attach to the lanyard. When laminating items that do not fill the pocket, especially the leading edge, place the pocket on top of a plain sheet of paper or lightweight cardstock (the same size or larger than the pocket) when you send it through the laminator. This will act as a carrier sheet and keep the hot pocket from curling or getting caught in the unit.

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One morning while vacat ioning in Colorado, my husb and, Ken, and his friend, H oward, left on a nine-mile h ike into the back country of R ocky Mountain National P ark, a challenge Ken had b een looking forward to. After lunch, my friend, A lynn, and I would take a m ore leisurely hike in the P ark. Little did I expect that i t would become a different k ind of challenge for me. Alynn informed me that s ince the guys would drive i nto RMNPat one entrance, b ut come out at another, I w ould need to drive my car t hat day.This way, when we w ere done, she could pick up t heir car parked in the area w here we hiked and I could f ollow her to their destinat ion site and leave the car f or them. Suddenly, the balloon of a nticipation deflated into one o f anxiety. Me, drive?! I questioned a nd exclaimed. I felt vulnerable as I hadn t driven winding mountain r oads in ages. And when we a re on vacation, Ken does all o f the driving and I enjoy s ight seeing. Lord, I prayed, would Y ou please return confidence t o me as You gave me when w e lived in the mountains of northern New Jersey? Then I had three boys and car pooled with others transporting kids up and down mountain roads in all kinds of weather.With those memories and firm reliance on God, I took a deep breath and Alynn and I climbed into our car with me at the wheel. God answered my prayers. Instead of feelings of anxiety, I felt infused with freedom and confidence. How fun it was to drive these serpentine roads.Thankfulness welled up in me. When we got to RMNP, I purchased my life-long senior membership card.Then we continued up, up, up to our particular hiking spot where the guys had left the other car. What a fantastic, glorious day we had together. At last, it was time to descend and this time I was in the car alone following my friend to the next destination.Once again we curved and circled around going from paved to dirt roads. I remembered the verse in Philippians 4: 6, NKJV, that says, Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God; and the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus. I wasnt alone in the car. I never was, am or will be.The Lord is my constant companion.Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a NewsSun correspondent and an award-winning writer. Page 2CNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com ROOFING SPECIALIST SERVING HIGHLANDS COUNTY SINCE 1989Shingles Flat Roofs Roof Repairs Mobile Home Roofovers -FULLYLICENSED & INSURED385-4690State Lic # RC 0066817 QUALITY WORK AT A REASONABLE PRICE FREEESTIMATES STOP BY AND SEE ALL OF THE GREAT DEALS INSIDEAS WELL ASOUTSIDEON THESALESTABLES!$10 20 30 SALE283 US 27 North SEBRINGVillage Fountain Plaza www.thebulbbin.com Assorted Lamps & Mirrors Ceiling Fans Chandeliers NO STRINGS ATTACHEDR(Ashton Kutcher,Natalie Portman)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30COUNTRY STRONGPG13(Gwyneth Paltrow,Tim McGraw)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30TANGLED 2DPG(Animated)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30THE FIGHTERR(Mark Wahlberg,Christian Bale)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30HOW DO YOU KNOWPG13(Reese Witherspoon,Owen Wilson)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30UNSTOPPABLEPG13(Denzel Washington,Rosario Dawson)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15 The NewFAIRMOUNTCINEMA63750 US 27 N. Sebring NOW SHOWINGFriday 01/21 Thursday 01/27 Suick CinemasInformation 385-9980 Office 385-9908New Dolby Digital SoundAll Seats $6.00for Matinee COMING SOONFeb 11JUST GO WITH IT DIVERSIONS GETINBy GAILGRABOWSKI ACROSS 1 Heist, say 6 Pooch without papers 10 Beowulf, for one 14 Nuance 19 Full of energy 20 U.S. Open stadium 21 __ chance! 22 Its west of Daytona Beach 23 Compelling read 25 Go here and there 26 Opera hero, often 27 Common starting hr. 28 Oberlin, e.g. 30 Ancient market 32 Mark of distinction 34 Respond to an alarm 35 Exchange worker 36 But __ a man in Reno: Johnny Cash lyric 37 Damage 38 Way out there 42 Short talk 43 Spa fixture 47 Colorful card game 48 Colt 45 brewer 50 __ Cong 51 Santa __ winds 52 Digital interpreter 54 Toledo title: Abbr. 55 Sch. whose mascot is Sam the Minuteman 57 Top in the hood 59 Molten rock 60 Mockery 62 Succubus 63 Had leftovers, say 64 Lose locks 66 Refinery sight 71 LAX postings 72 Tribal symbol 74 Arabic holy book 75 Former Colt .45 77 Tropical eel 78 Keys 79 Magical start 81 Org. with much swinging 84 Stallion, for one 85 Up to, briefly 86 Former Last Comic Standing host Jay 87 Resort east of Grand Junction 89 Mythical flier 90 Landscaping tool 95 Subtle help 96 Team neckwear 98 Fathers and grandfathers 99 CSA leader 100 Seven-time Grammy winner Morissette 102 Exchange 104 Tons 105 Twilled fabric 106 Travel agency offering 110 Line dance step 113 Peaks 114 Pen or pencil, e.g. 115 Airport freebie 119 In need of dough 120 Record 121 Like hands co-opted by the Devil? 122 Freshwater eel, at sushi bars 123 Wound up 124 Roy Rogerss birth name 125 Beautician, at times 126 They may be rough DOWN 1 Tube top 2 Menu catchphrase 3 Greedy sort 4 Toss-up ratio 5 Hit the hay 6 Colt carrier 7 Annapolis inst. 8 They have fewer privileges 9 Thrice, in Rxs 10 Neither here nor there 11 Resort attractions 12 Tilted type: Abbr. 13 Canon holder 14 Carries 15 Party pitcherful 16 Shuffle cousin 17 Flush 18 Come by honestly 24 Take some heat from? 28 Plumbing problem 29 Woman of the future? 30 Clamoring en masse 31 Site of some trash talk 33 Excellent, slangily 35 Local govt. units 36 Fertility goddess 37 Demain, across the Pyrenees 39 Dairy Queen option 40 Lack of vigor 41 Many Shakespearean characters 44 Sailors Stop! 45 Futurists tool 46 __ Lee Bunton, a.k.a. Baby Spice 49 Shoddy ship 53 Movie with a posse 56 Ao part 57 Ballet Rehearsal artist 58 Broken mirror, to some 61 Without a flaw 62 Show some spunk 64 Cath. church eponym 65 Jinx 67 Silent approval 68 Good Times actress 69 Iridescent shell layer 70 Manhattan sch. 73 Sasquatch, for instance 76 Airport screening gp. 78 Maybe, maybe not 79 Computerized course, e.g. 80 Woeful cry 82 Spirit in a bottle 83 Social crawlers 86 Not so hot 88 Its opposite the eye 91 Hi-tech read 92 Rout 93 Keister 94 One with ropelike tresses 97 Parts of Alaskas Denali Highway are built on them 101 Alliance 103 Refuse 104 Crummy 106 Its history 107 Feel the pain 108 Youre not serious! 109 Plug away 111 Eye with ideas 112 Hungarian castle city 115 Box top 116 Diamond putout 117 Chronology datum 118 PX patron Solution on page 7B DearAbby: My husband gave a friend of his Ill call him Fred a place to stay and nursed him back to health after Fred was critically injured while driving an ATV. Fred was drunk at the time. That was six years ago, and Fred is still here. While he has helped my husband with a few chores, he does not work. My husband provides him with a travel trailer, utilities, food and beer money. Fred is 47 years old and perfectly capable of working. My husband doesnt seem able to have a discussion with Fred. Am I selfish and un-Christian? This is straining my marriage. Please help. Feeling Used in Arizona DearFeeling Used: Ill try. Although your husband may have had the noblest of motives in taking his injured friend in after his injury and nursing him back to health, hes doing the man no favors by continuing to foster his dependence. While I can see what Fred is getting out of this, its time your husband explained to you what HE is getting out of it. Under the circumstances, your feelings of being encroached upon are 100 percent valid. DearAbby: I am a foster mother to four children of different races. One is African-American, two are Hispanic and one is Caucasian. My hus band and I are Caucasian, and we have two children o f our own. Abby, my kids may have different colors and origins, but they are all our very own. They ha ve chores, go to schoo l and are responsible kids. We love them dearly and would move a mountain one pebbl e at a time for each one if needed. When I am out and about with all six kids, I get nasty looks and nastier comments about them. I am tired of people looking down on me for our weird family. One person even suggested that I get my tubes tied and stop sleeping around! Do I ignore these comments? I refuse to tell peopl e that they are foster kids. Th ey have been hurt enough and do not need to be reminded about their parents living elsewhere. Foster Mom Amand a Dear Amanda: People ten d to look at anything that is different. Arainbow coali tion of children is bound to draw a second look, and by now you should know it comes with the territory. Th at does not, however, justify th e rude personal attack you received from the one perso n. And in my opinion you should have shamed him or her by responding that you are a foster parent, because it happens to be the truth. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren. Wife is sick of houseguest whos regained his health Confidence on winding mountain roads Pause And Consider Jan Merop Follow the News-Sun online on www.twitter.com/thenewssun Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155 Recently, I offered 15 parenting r esolutions for the new year. This w eek, Im making a prediction: 2 011 will see the beginning of a revo lution in what and where Americas c hildren eat. Over the next decade, it w ill become more cool for a parent t o have a slim child than a child w ho makes straight As. The childhood obesity problem in t his country is a disgrace. We have t he best economy and the best health c are system in the world and nearly o ne in five of our children ages 6 to 1 9 are obese. Thats up from a pproximately one in 20 in 1980. A nd consider that childhood obesity w as pretty much a non-issue when I w as a kid. Being overweight during childh ood and adolescence significantly i ncreases a childs risk of developi ng high cholesterol, hypertension, r espiratory ailments, orthopedic problems, depression and type 2 diabetes during his/her childhood years. Furthermore, being obese in childhood greatly increases the likelihood the child will have serious weightrelated health problems as an adult. Needless to say, the childs estimated lifespan is much shorter than that of a child of normal weight. The hospital costs associated with childhood obesity are in the mega-millions. The US Department of Health and Human Services says the causes of childhood obesity are multi-factorial. No theyre not. The reason so many of our children are obese is because they consume too much bad stuff and move too little. Their diets are high in bad carbohydrates (i.e., junk food) like French fries, sodas, and sweets, and low in fresh vegetables, fruits, and healthy sources of protein. They spend entirely too much time in front of televisions, video games, and computers and not enough time in physical activity. And make no mistake, the best physical activity for a child is free play. Achild enrolled in an adult-micromanaged sport is not getting half the exercise kids got playing sandlot games in the 1950s and 60s, when childhood obesity was very rare. In rare instances, a medical issue may precede childhood obesity, but the typical overweight kid has a lifestyle problem. As such, the solution is for parents to begin making their childrens weight a high priority. Yes, schools need to eliminate carbo-load lunches along with soda and snack machines, but in the final analysis, childhood obesity is going to be prevented and solved at home. This is not rocket science. Eat at least 90 percent of your meals at home, around the table as opposed to in front of a television set. If that means taking your kids out of most after-school activities, do it! Most of them involve minimal activity anyway. Prepare meals that are hearthealthy. When your children are hungry between meals, give them apples, cheese and raw vegetables. When theyre thirsty, direct them to the faucet. Garden with your kids. Studies have shown that children who garden with their parents eat what they grow and have, as a consequence, healthier diets. They actually like vegetables! Gardening is also a source of great exercise. Exercise with your children. Tak e daily walks and bicycle rides with your kids. Play catch. Throw Frisbees. When they say theyre bored, point to the back door. Dont allow televisions, video game consoles, or computers in yo ur childrens rooms, and restrict total screen time to no more than one hour per day. As screen time has increased for Americas kids, so ha s their weight. Perhaps most important, find ou t what you should weigh, get there, and stay there. Having an overweight parent greatly increases a childs chances of being overweigh t. Good health tends to run in familie s. Family psychologist John Rosemond answers parents questions on his website at www.rosemond.com. Childhood obesity is almost all caused by childs lifestyle Living With Children John Rosemond Dear Abby

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Every year, the month of January boasts the post-holiday sales for home decor. For an opportunity to spruce up the house and ward off the winter blues with a new work of art, January offers the starving artists sales. Picasso for $50Youve seen the TVads, Buy a framed, sofa-sized oil painting for only $49.99! You think to yourself, For only $49.99, no wonder the artists are starving. Then, you temporarily consider checking out the art sale at the local hotel. You know better than to buy a work of art for a mere 50 bucks, yet youre still curious. Heres the scoop on the starving artists. Your fantasy image of a handsome young artist standing at his easel with palette in hand overlooking a snowy mountain landscape creating a masterpiece just for you is just that a fantasy. On some level, we like the emotional image that artists are starving for the love of art! We dont like to think of the art world as a business. Assembly line artDespite the reality check, the inexpensive starving artist pieces are often cheap oleographs. An oleograph is a commercial print. For example, an image of a still life is printed by machine onto a piece of canvas and allowed to dry. After drying, a clear varnish is applied to the entire surface of the canvas over the printed picture to simulate brushstrokes. Oleographs refer to an artistic imitation; just as oleo is imitation butter, an oleograph is an imitation painting. What do you expect for $49.99 ? Machine-made masterpiecesSome starving artist sales keep the age-old art sweatshops in business. In some cases, workers stand for hours in front of a machine that supports a long roll of blank canvas. The machine repositions the blank canvas at intervals automatically. Workers stand before a designated area of blank canvas at a distance from one other. Each worker is responsible for painting one image of the paintings entire composition. For instance, when producing a landscape painting, Artist No. 1 will paint a tree, Artist No. 2 will paint a bird, and so on. After quickly completing the work of his particular area, the canvas is mechanically repositioned to expose the next area of blank canvas. The workers repeat the process. So Artist No. 1 who paints the tree will stand and paint that same tree another 500 times or for the next 16 hours straight. All of the workers continue this piecemeal procedure until hundreds of look-alike landscape paintings are produced. Each completed sofasized painting is cut from the end of the canvas roll and stapled to a wooden stretcher. Crates of paintings are then shipped from sweatshops to your local hotel lobby. Sign itSince there are several artists involved in the factory production of paintings, who signs the paintings? There is one artist whose job it is to sign all of the paintings. Now that you know the inside scoop on some of th e inexpensive starving artist s sales, dont you think that your $50 would be better spent on a good pencil sketch or small painting b y a student artist from the local art school? I certainl y do. Ph.D. antiques appraiser, author, and award-winning TV personality, Dr. Lori presents antique appraisal events nationwide and antiques themed cruises. As seen on NBCs The Tonight Show and Comedy Centrals The Daily Show, watch Dr. Lori on the national TV morning show, Daytime on NBC WFLA 8 at 10 AM. Visit DrLoriV.com, Facebook.com/DoctorLori, or call (888) 431-1010. Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Lake P lacid Art League will host i ts 24th annual Art Show & S ale at the Bert J. Harris Jr. A gricultural Center in S ebring from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. S aturday, Jan. 29. Admission i s free to the public, and door p rizes will be presented e very 30 minutes inside the a uditorium. The Art Show will take p lace inside the auditorium a nd outside in tents. More t han 50 artists will be pres enting their creations for s ale and they will be judged b y Jack and Steven Van Dam f or cash awards and ribbons. The Lake Placid High S chool art students will e xhibit their artwork in the f oyer of the auditorium, and t hey will compete for their o wn cash prizes and ribbons. Barbara Wade and Bill S nyder will judge the stud entsartwork. Refreshments will be a vailable and will include d onuts and coffee in the early m orning, hot dogs, chili, barb ecue sandwiches, various d rinks and desserts later in t he morning and afternoon. T hey will be prepared to sell a nd served by Art League m embers who volunteer to p roduce this winter event for t he community. Photographers RayLynn Dease and K.M. Thornton from Frostproof will exhibit their nature photography of wildlife and landscapes. Richard Marino of Lake Wales will have a booth with his handmade ceramics. These artists will be exhibiting for the first time at the Lake Placid Art League. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 3C SEBRING DISCOUNT BEVERAGES3750 U.S. 27 North, Unit C1 471-2277Next to Fairmount Cinema 6 Open Mon-Sat 9-6 Closed SundayTobacco Products, Candy, Cold Beer, Housewares, Gifts & MORE!LOW PRICES MANY GOOD BARGAINS CLOSEOUTS!*Prices do not include tax. Natural Light and Natural IceAll Old Milwaukees Best Reg, Lt, Ice12 Pack $6.99 Budweiser and Bud Light 12 Pack $10.99Busch, Busch Light and Bud Ice18 Pack $11.29 Good Quality Sunglasses$4 ea 2 for $7 Zippo Lighters All 20% Off Smoke Odor ExterminatorCandles/Spray Can $6.79/$5.79305s and ROMY 3 Pack Deal $10.30 For 3 Misty $45.99 CartonGalaxy 100% ADDITIVE FREE Natural Cigarette $29.49 Carton Newport$50.49 Carton 3 Pack Deal $5.19 Ea.USA Gold $43.99 Carton Seneca $31.69 Carton Smokin Joes $31.99 Carton Cigarette Style Little CigarsMany Brands $6.99 $10.99 Carton E.O. Koch Construction1417 Swank Avenue Sebring, FL 33870(863) 385-8649COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTIONLet our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property, build your dream home,or do your remodeling.For all of your Aluminum,Steel,and Conventional construction needsEmail: kochcon@strato.net State Certified License #CGC1515338 SEAMLESS GUTTERS Specials5 INCH GUTTERS$2.99PER LINEAR FOOT6 INCH GUTTERS$3.99PER LINEAR FOOTMany Colors Available Courtesy photo Richard Marino, of Lake Wales, will have some of his handmade ceramic pieces, like this bowl, on exhibit at the Lake Placid Art Leagues 24th annual Show & Sale on Jan. 29. Courtesy photo The nature photography of RayLynn Dease and K.M. Thornton, both of Frostproof, will be on exhibit Jan. 29 at the Lake Placid Art League 24th Annual Art Show & Sale at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center in Sebring. Lake Placid Art League Art Show & Sale is Jan. 29 ARTS& LEISURE Special to the News-SunSEBRING Get ready for the finest m usic of the s, right here in Tanglewood! With the new resurgence of the s port rayed in part by the hugely popular live m usical production and now the worldwide r elease of Mamma Mia, the movie. The m usic of ABBAis finding its way back into t he hearts of those who lived it then and taki ng over the hearts of those who are experie ncing it for the first time now. Adbacadabra promises to continue the m omentum by performing 20 of the groups g reatest hits in full ABBAfashion and flair. You wont be able to sit still in your seats as songs like S.O.S., Super Trooper and Dancing Queen are recreated with such precision, youll swear you were listening to the originals themselves. The show is authentic in music and dress and is performed to live music that will leave you excited and melancholy ... at the same time. Doors and snack bar opens at 6 p.m. The show is at 7 p.m. Tickets are $12. Tanglewood is one-half mile north of Walmart on U.S. 27. For information, call 402-0763. ABBA music coming to Tanglewood Courtesy photo T he Tanglewood Residents Cancer Benefit was in full swing this week but had its ups and downs.Some of the models were really up about the fashions they were able to choose as they visited Dress Barn and Belk in preparation for the USA Tour for the Cure Fashion Show being held at Tanglewood on Jan. 29. The men Artie Nichols (from left), Gordon A rmitage, David Werry and Wayne Roswell flex their muscles at Belk while searching for the perfect outfits. Tickets are $15 and may be purchased at Tanglewood. For more information call 382-9507. Tanglewood fashion show set for Jan. 29 Evaluating the starving artists sales Art & Antiques Dr. Lori Courtesy pho to A starving artist floral still life painting. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Page 4CNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 5C ARTS& LEISURE Special to the News-SunSEBRING Elvis Wade Cummings will be hosting the second annual benefit show for Special STARS from 8-10 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 12 at Duffers Sports Grille. Tickets are $20 per person for the Elvis Wade Sweetheart Show. It is a perfect Valentines gift for all sweethearts and even for those who just love to hear the music by the King of Rock nRoll. Cummings, known as Elvis Wade, is a professional Elvis Presley impersonator who has been doing this show worldwide since 1968. He performed with the Jordanaires, Presleys longtime back-up vocalists, for more than 12 years. His wife Sandy Posey will join him on stage at Duffers to sing. She was a hit singer in the 1960s. Rowdy Rodney Holt, of Zolfo Springs, will perform oldies, rock and country dance music afterwards from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. for everyone to enjoy dancing at no charge to the public. The ticket also includes an entry in the drawing for the Elvis Sweetheart Package, which features The 50 Greatest Love Songs CD by Elvis and other items. You must be present to win. All proceeds benefit more than 250 special athletes in Highlands and Hardee counties with physical or mental disabilities. They participate in more than 12 different sports and seven recreation al activities throughout t he year. Funding for these pr ograms is based on donatio ns and it is strictly operated b y volunteers. Dinner is not included in the ticket price. Reservatio ns for dinner can be made fro m 6-8 p.m. and everyone c an order from the menu. Gues ts attending the show w ill receive $2 off per person o n any dinner entree at Duffer s. Tickets are available at Duffers, 6940 U.S. 2 7 North, Sebring, 382-6339 or call Special STARS coord inator Cindy Marshall at 45 21295, ext. 124 or 443-043 8. Make checks payable to Special STARS. Seating is limited so purchase ticke ts ahead of time. Elvis Wade returns to help Special STARS Courtesy pho to Elvis Wade Cummings and his wife Sandy Posey sing together at last years benefit for Special STARS and plan to return tot Duffers Sports Grille on Feb. 12 for the Elvis Wade Sweetheart Show to help local special athletes. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Awardw inning author Ron Cooper k icks off the South Florida C ommunity College H umanities Department R eading Series at 7 p.m. T hursday in Building H, R oom 110, at the SFCC H ighlands Campus. Cooper i s the author of Humes F ork, a finalist for the Bread L oaf Literary Prize for F iction. His newest novel, Purple Jesus, tells the s tory of a love triangle b etween a deranged young m an, a young woman, and a m onk who is experiencing r eligious doubt. Inspired by southern g othic writers such as W illiam Faulkner, Flannery O Connor, and Truman C apote, as well as his own u pbringing in Lowcountry, S.C., Cooper writes about southern life and people. It is a theme that runs through the majority of his fiction. Theres a certain character about the south where I grew up, Cooper said. Most authors write about middle and upper class people and tend to make fun of or portray the poor, backwoods people in a negative light, but they are a complex people that experience the same trials and emotions as everyone else. Cooper is also the author of Heidegger and Whitehead: A Phenomenological Examination into the Intelligibility of Experience and is a past president of the Florida Philosophical Association. He is a professor of Humanities at the College of Central Florida. The Humanities Department Reading Series features fiction and nonfiction writers who focus on regional themes. Future reading series authors include historian of Floridas postwar retirement boom Gary Mormino, Feb. 10, and non-fiction writer Les Standiford, April 5. An Open Mic Night will be held April 14. The series is free and open to the public. It is funded by a grant from Anne Reynolds. For more information, call Dr. Charlotte Pressler, professor, English/Humanities at 7847247. Reading Series begins with award-winning author Cooper Courtesy photo Harvey chats with Highlands Little Theatre president Art Harriman and Nadine Tedstone at the Sebring Chamber of Commerce Mixer on Jan. 20. Harvey runs through J an 30. Harvey mixes it up Associated PressLOS ANGELES Oprah Winfrey has staged many a family reunion on her talk show. But on Mondays episode, she promises, the drama will be about her. Winfrey told viewers Thursday that she will have a reunion of her own on The Oprah Winfrey Show. She wouldnt say with whom only that it involves something shes learned about recently and is known to only a few people close to her. Winfrey promises to spill family secrets Monday

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Page 6CNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September to May our youth group meets. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Ed Howell, transitional pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 3823695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30 and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 9 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family and Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confessions: 3-3:45 p.m. Saturdays, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first Friday, or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunda y Worship Service, 9 a.m.; Sunda y Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.; Sunda y Evening Service, 6 p.m .; Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP Build it, and they will come. Some s pecies of wildlife have proven that they w ill take up temporary occupancy if you f ollow their rules of habitat. Among t hose species are bluebirds, bats, wood d ucks, mallards, and Canada geese. There are very specific rules to follow i n both building and placing artificial n ests, if you want to be successful over t ime in attracting specific birds. Wildlife a gencies offer free plans on the Internet, a s well, and there are books with d etailed plans and instructions on locat ion of specific nests. Of course, the nesting structures can a lso be purchased. The world wide web h as a wealth of helpful information on n esting structures: you can quickly get v ery good information from an Internet s earch with key words such as bluebird b oxes, mallard nests, or bat houses. Although birds may have particular n eeds, they arent fussy about the box b eing mathematically perfect. A ppearance is not usually their main c oncern. What they do need is a nesting s ite that is safe, weatherproof, high e nough and in an area where predators w ont be able to get to them easily. If there is no natural shelter around, it i s best to place the box facing south-east t o north, to avoid strong direct sunlight a nd the heaviest rain. The box can be t ilted forward a bit so that the rainwater w ill run off of it. To discourage predat ors, the box can be placed near a thorny b ush or chicken-wire can be installed a round the entrance area as long as it d oes not obstruct the birds comings and goings. If squirrels want to make the box their home, a metal plate around the entrance hole can deter them from enlarging it and getting in. Its a good idea to clean the box at the end of the breeding season. This is not difficult and should be done by removing the old nesting materials inside and then use boiling water to cleanse it. This will kill any parasites that may be present. It is important not to use insecticides because it may harm the bird when it returns; boiling water is sufficient. Bird nesting boxes can also be used by many species in the winter months. Instead of taking the box down, leave it up so that our feathered friends can have a warm place to rest up in the colder months. Here are some great tips for putting up bird boxes from the United States Geological Survey Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center: 1. Know where youll put the nest. Read about other biological needs of your intended species, such as food and cover needs of young. For instance, the mallard hen and ducklings leave the nest together within 12 hours of hatching to look for nearby wetlands with emergent plants for cover and aquatic insects to eat. 2. Follow specific construction plans. Size of box, materials, size of the opening and other details are critical. For instance, if the precise opening isnt used, competitor birds will likely be more of a problem. 3. Think about aesthetics. Curved shapes and earth tones blend into the outdoors better than sharp angles and glossy paint. 4. Plan now for maintenance. Lack of maintenance is the number one cause of failure for most nest structures. For instance, waterfowl dont carry nest material to their sites, so you have to do that for them. 5. Have some patience. Dont get discouraged if your nest isnt used immediately. Where birds arent used to nest structures, it could be several years before they try them. Once they do, they and their offspring are likely to return year after year.Did you know?The decline of the Pileated woodpecker almost led to the extinction of the wood duck from North America. Why? Wood ducks use the woodpeckers holes in trees for nests. Man-made nest boxes have more recently come to the rescue. Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District (www.highlandsswcd.org). Build your own: Nests for wood ducks, mallards, bluebirds and bats Courtesy pho to Properly built and placed, manmade nesting structures can be successful for wood ducks, mallards, Canada geese, bluebirds, kestrels, bats and screech owls. News From The Watershed Corine Burgess

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 7C CROSSWORDSOLUTION EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer.Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howes Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer Kid C ity Childrens Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, prime-timers, and Bible s tudies in Spanish. Kid City Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. JEWISH Temple Israel of Highlands C ounty, 382-7744. Rabbi Lorraine R udenberg; www.templeisr aelofhcfl.org.Temple Israel is a R eform Temple that promotes the e nduring and fundamental princip les of Judaism. Through prayer, s tudy and friendship we strive to e nrich our lives and insure Jewish c ontinuity in Highlands County. F riday Evening Shabbat Services, 7 :30 p.m.; Saturday afternoon intro t o Hebrew, 12:30 p.m.; Saturday i ntro to Judaism, 2 p.m.; Saturday a fternoon Torah Study, 3:30 p.m.; H avdallah, 5 p.m. Jan. 7-8; Jan. 21; F eb. 4; Feb. 18-19; March 4-5; M arch 18-19 Purim; April 1-2; April 1 5-16; April 18, 6 p.m., Pesach 1st N ight Seder; April 29-30 Yom H ashoah; May 13-14; May 27-28. E very Thursday will be Hebrew and B ible classes with Howard Salles, 1 2:30-4:30 p.m. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Monday of month; Ladies Group WELCAmeets at noon second Monday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable Garden Club meets as needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Like to sing? Come join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Childrens Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 8:15 and 10 a.m.; Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Esther and Mary Circles business meeting, 3:30 p.m. third Thursday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 7 p.m. second Tuesday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday; Family Movie, 4 p.m. third Sunday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group, 6-7:30 p.m.; Senior High Youth Group, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gayle Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30 a.m.; and contemporary worship is at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.presbychurch.org. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness mee ting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meetin g and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bib le study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women s Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesda y: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All mee tings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave ., Sebring. For more information, vis it the Web site www.salvationarm ysebring.com or call Major Bruc e Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Summe r Schedule, Sunday School 9:0 0 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on lifes journey, youre we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP Aries (March 21-April 20) There a re strange things happening, Aries, but i ts better to just go with the flow. Who k nows, maybe youll like the change of p ace and its effect on your lifestyle. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Better d ays lie ahead, Taurus. Its just a matter o f waiting a few weeks. In the interim, s tart a new project that will take your m ind off of your worries. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Make t he most of time spent with friends, G emini, because for a little while you w ill be flying under the radar while you h andle a few necessities that have been o verlooked. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Theres m uch more to you than meets the eye, C ancer, but you dont often give others a peek into your inner thoughts unless t hey truly earn it. Someone special does t his week. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Youve been f eeling a bit gloomy, Leo, and its u nderstandable based on how much y ouve had going on. But its easy to c hange your mood if you surround yours elf with friends. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Generosity is a good thing, Virgo, but not when you put others continually before you put yourself. Reassess your values and make an effort to make changes. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) When one door closes another door opens, Libra. Look at the positive side of things and embrace the changes that are happening to you. If you dwell on the negative, you cant succeed. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Theres so much going on that its any wonder you can still function on a daily basis, Scorpio. Although times may be stressful, things will work out in the end. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) A relationship is blooming, Sagittarius, and youre not sure how you feel about it just yet. Take a few more weeks to work through your feelings and form a solid opinion. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) You have an eye for value, Capricorn, and it will help you realize a good deal this week. Share the wealth with other people if you can. Tuesday is a banner day. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 8) Aquarius, take firm hold of the financial reigns because overspending could be the downfall to an important relationship. Curb any purchase for a few days. Pisces (Feb. 10-March 20) Creativity is blooming, Pisces, but youre not sure how to harness your artistic energy. Redesigning a room could help. Jan. 23 Rutger Hauer, actor, 67; Jan. 24 Ed Helms, actor, 37; Jan. 25 Alicia Keys, singer, 30; Jan. 26 Cameron Bright, actor, 18; Jan. 27 Patton Oswalt, comedian, 42; Jan. 28 Joey Fatone, entertainer, 34; Jan. 29 Adam Lambert, singer, 29. Better days lie ahead, Taurus; generosity is a good thing, Virgo Classified Ads 385-6155 NEWS-SUN

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Special to the News-SunSEBRING Heartland Cultural Alliance presents Scribes Night Out, Sharing the Art of Our Local Wordsmiths, featuring readings by Jan Merop from her book Pause...and Consider, Keeping in step with life while in tune with heaven at 6:30 p.m. today. Merop is a well known spiritual writer and columnist for the News-Sun. A preview of her new book featuring reflections on photographs by her husband, Ken, will also be presented. Surprise guests and an open mike for local writers will follow. The event will take place until closing at Brewsters Coffee House, 2191 U.S. 27 North. For more information or to schedule a reading e-mail sherryc@vistanet.net or call 471-3174 or e-mail Fred Leavitt at info@heartlandculturalalliance.org or call 402-8238. Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID Native F loridians Buck and Linda C ooper were 1998 recipients o f Florida Audubons distinq uished Allan Cruickshank M emorial Award for their w ork in Florida conservation p rojects. Resident naturalists at S treet Nature Center in W inter Haven, Linda also s erved as fditor of Lake R egion Audubon Societys Eagles View as well cent ral Floridas compiler for F OS publication Florida F ield Naturalist. With more than 700 s pecies of birds on their lifes l ist, Buck and Linda will s hare with Highlands County C hapter members their d ream of a lifetime -their e xperience to visit A ntarctica where they witn essed firsthand rarely seen b irds and wildlife. Members of Highlands A udubon Chapter invite m embers and the public to m eet the Coopers at their monthly meeting on Tuesday at the Masonic Lodge on corner of Park and Main Street. Bring utensils and a dish to share and join all for a potluck supper at 6:30 p.m. or arrive at 7:30 p.m. for the presentation. Highlands Audubon meets the fourth Tuesday each month September through May. Page 8CNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com Established 19311600 US 27 South Avon Park Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home4001 Sebring Parkway Sebring, 385-0125 111 E. Circle St. Avon Park, 453-3101 Chris T.Nelson Craig M. Nelson Darin S. MacNeil W .W LUMBER CO. 465-3331Hwy. 27 S. Lake PlacidWere More Than Just Lumber COMPLETE Building SuppliesPlease support the above businesses. They have made this page possible. Inspirational Thoughtsby Patricia Valentine THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502 Residential Commercial Mobile HomesSmall Enough to Know You Large Enough to Serve You500 South Lake Avenue 382-8300 453-3019 THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502Joel 2:25-26,And I will restore to you the years that the locust hath eaten,the cankerworm,and the caterpiller,and the palmerworm,and my great army which I sent among you.And ye shall eat in plenty,and be satisfied,and praise the name of the Lord your God,that hath dealt wondrously with you:and my people shall never be ashamed.The same God who brings judgment is pleased to restore blessing to those who repent.God can restore people to usefulness in spite of past disobedience.The desire of the enemy is to destroy and consume lives just as the cankerworm,caterpiller and palmerworm that Joel described.God promises that His people who come to Him will have their lives restored by His might and power. God can take even the most wrecked life and build it again.There is no situation too hopeless for God.Ephesians 3:20 says,Now unto him that is able to do exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that worketh in us. What God want to do in our lives is beyond what we can ask or think.Take the limit off and watch God work. Attend the Church of Your Choice! Newborns Children AdolescentsOFFICE HOURS: Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., F.A.A.P. Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., F.A.A.P. Anoop Palta, M.D., F.A.A.P. Vishakha Nakhate, M.D., F.A.A.P. David Kleczek, P.A.C. Amy Grimes, P.A.C. Mercy L. Seralde, M.D. Maria C. Perez, M.D. Maria B. Asis, M.D., F.A.A.P. Megan Neff, ARNPAvon Park Pediatrics,P.A. & Sebring Pediatrics,LLCWe accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid SEBRING382-0770AVON PARK453-7337 Specializing in the treatment of Allergies Asthma Attention Deficit Disorder Immunizations Check-ups Obesity Counseling SEBRING: MON. FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PMSATURDAY 8:30AM 12:00 NOON SEBRING ONLYAVON PARK: MON. & WED. 8:30AM 7:00PM TUES., THURS., & FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PM LAKE PLACID699-1414 Courtesy art An acrylic study in light and shadow by Anne Watson. In painting, drawing, using any of our creative gifts, we are able to see and learn many of lifes real and important lessons. In the past week, no less than three, maybe more, people expressed to me heartfelt grief in different situations where someone had hurt them or someone they love. The least they could have done was come to me was the plaintive cry of each one. Weve all felt that way I have felt the same way myself, havent we all? It seems the common thread between all these disappointments was a loss of dignity from the failures of others to consider the feelings of those around them before acting, or choosing not to act. I tell my students all the time that, as we use our creative gifts and talents, especially in painting and drawing, what we learn is not only for the paper or the canvas, but for the canvas of our life. In all the situations above, my friends and I needed to ponder a fundamental lesson in perspective it is impossible for any two people to see anything at all from the exact same perspective at the same time. When a student paints from life, they have to move from their spot and allow me to step into it for me to be able to see how they are doing in their work. And in life, if we wish to have a better view, we can choose to remove ourselves from our feelings of disappointment, and place ourselves in the spot where the one who hurt us stood, to get a better picture of what they saw from their perspective. We may not like what we see there, but at least we will have a better possibility of seeing as they saw. And we allow ourselves the opportunity of seeing the other in new light ... In my own painting and in my teaching, light is what it is all about strong and beautiful contrasts that chase the darkness away. Learning to draw and paint facilitates for us the lessons in life that help us see beauty and chase the dark clouds away. Anne Watson teaches in Avon Park, Sebring and Lake Placid, and has studios at the Highlands Art Leagues Yellow House Gallery & Gift Shop, and in Avon Park. She may be reached at anne@annewatsonstudio.com. Lessons in light and life ARTS& LEISURE Perspective 101 Anne Watson Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South Florida Community College brings the past to life with Bobby Horton when he performs Songs & Stories of the Civil War at 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 29 at The Arbor, 111 W. Oak St. in Arcadia. Horton has performed twice to sell-out crowds at SFCC in Avon Park, and this new venue provides arts and entertainment to DeSoto County and surrounding area residents. Dressed in 19th century costume and using period musical instruments, Horton explores the stories of both the North and South through the music they loved. Each song is placed in context with historical background and portrays the struggles, hopes, and fears of Americans during this long historical conflict. These songs and stories tell of families left behind, fallen comrades, the hope of going home, and the pride, bravery, and patriotism of the volunteers who answered their countrys call. This is not just a performance for Civil War buffs, but for anyone who loves great music, inspired storytelling, and an afternoon of unforgettable entertainment. Aseasoned performer, Horton is a multi-instrumentalist, composer, producer, and music historian. For more than 30 years he has performed with t he musical-comedy grou p, Three On AString. He h as also produced and pe rformed music scores f or eight Ken Burns PBS film s, two programs for the A& E network, and nine films f or the National Park Servic e. He has been performin g Songs and Stories of t he Civil War coast to coa st since 1985. Residing in Birmingham Ala, Horton has contribut ed to many projects, includin g Ken Burns specials: T he Civil War, Baseba ll, Thomas Jefferson, Lew is and Clark, and Frank Lloy d Wright. His series of recordings of authent ic period music has be en acclaimed by historic al organizations and public ations throughout the Unit ed States and Europe. The major sponsor f or this performance is Mosai c. Tickets are gener al admission $15. Tickets m ay be purchased online 2 4 hours a day, seven days a week, at http://performan ces.southflorida.edu. Ticke ts may also be purchased b y visiting the SFCC DeSo to Campus, 2251 NE Turn er Ave. in Arcadia from 8 a.m to 6 p.m. Monday throug h Thursday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m Friday, or by calling t he SFCC Box Office at 78 47178 from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday-Friday Bobby Horton to present Songs & Stories of the Civil War at SFCC Courtesy pho to Bobby Horton will present Songs & Stories of the Civil War at 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 29 in Arcadia. This is a South Florida Community College sponsored event. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The S outh Florida C ommunity College ( SFCC) Student Nurses A ssociation (SNA) will p resent The Heart of the A rts by the Florida D ance Theatre troupe at 7 :30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 18 i n the SFCC Theatre for t he Performing Arts, H ighlands Campus. The t roupe will perform class ical and modern ballet a nd modern dance. The Heart of the Arts d ance performance will b e an evening of profess ional dance to entertain a nd enrich the lives of our c ommunity. Our heart and c ompassion is at the core o f everything we do t hrough the SFCC S tudent Nurses A ssociation. We hope that t he community will open i ts heart to our cause and e njoy this performance, s aid Amy Wuthrich, presi dent of SFCC SNA. Tickets are $15 for g eneral admission and $ 10 for students, child ren, and groups of 10 or m ore. All proceeds will b enefit the SFCC Student N urses Association. T ickets can be purchased t hrough the SFCC Box O ffice, 784-7178. C ontact the SFCC N ursing Department at 4 53-6661, 465-5300, 4 94-7500, 773-2252, ext. 7 225. The Heart of the Arts dance show set at SFCC Audubon hosts distinguished birders Courtesy photo Native Floridians Buck and Linda Cooper will be the featured speakers at the Highlands Audubon Chapter meeting on Tuesday. Merop featured at Scribes Night Out Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155

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We all have our favorites, w ho were rooting for on t his the penultimate day of t he NFLseason. Steeler Nation is ready to r oll to yet another Super B owl while those backing t he J-E-T-S Jets, Jets, Jets a re harkening back to the d ays of Broadway Joe. Cheeseheads are hoping to a dd another trophy to Title T own and fans of da Bears a re in full Super Bowl S huffle mode. But while all those with r ooting interests have chosen s ides and are fervent in the h opes that their team takes t he next step, the NFLand i tsparticipating networks a re already giddy no matter w ho comes out winners t oday because theyve a lready won. When it comes down to it, i ts about ratings and money. And given the four teams l eft, it matters little beyond t his point what the Super B owl match-up will be as the r atings will be a bonanza any w hich way you look at it. Consider the teams playi ng today. With the Bears and Jets, y ou have the leagues two l argest markets, so of course y oud think they would be t he most hoped for as Super B owl opponents. But in the Steelers and Packers, you have what are likely the two biggest fan bases, outside of the Cowboys and its no slam dunk that both arent at least as big as those Lone Star followers. Combine the big markets and the massive fan bases and its a win-win no matter how it washes out. The Bears are as old as the League itself, with the Packers not far behind. So youve got generations of fans brought up with them. Multiple championships, a laundry list of Hall of Famers and iconic histories. The Steelers, while not as long-standing as the previous two, have a winning history in the Super Bowl era unparalleled and its fair share of Hall of Famers and iconic figures as well. And then you have the Jets, who also dont quite the longevity, but have one of the biggest upsets in Super Bowl history. Not to mention that theyve been a lightning rod all season long and, after all, they represent New York. They may play second fiddle to the Giants throughout the majority of the boroughs, but even if only Queens was tuning in, theyd do a pretty good share. Todays games, in and of themselves, should draw astounding ratings that could well rival or pass some previous Super Bowls. In both cases, you have the big fan base versus the big market. Steeler Nation against New York, Cheeseheads against da Bears. And amid the cheers of the fans, the clash of pads and helmets as they strive for a trip to Dallas and Super Bowl XLV the League is hearing the cha-ching of the cash register. Dan Hoehne is the Sports Editor of the News-Sun. He can be reached at daniel.hoehne@newssun.com. NFL, networks in no-lose situation By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK The Avon Park boys basketball team pulled out a 70-65 win in overtime Friday night, defeating district rival Mulberry in a close contest. We would get ahead and then blow it, Red Devil head coach Luther Clemons said. We would get ahead by 10 or 12 points and then we would have a breakdown. Well, we played hard, but we would get a lead and then get sloppy. We have to stop that. Avon Park and Mulberry both came out in a manto-man defense, but neither team could create a turnover in the first period, which ended tied at 13-all. Mulberry was forced to go to their bench early in the second to keep fresh legs on the floor as the Devils pulled out a 32-23 lead by the half. By the end of the fourth, Mulberry was able to pull close and a three-pointer from way downtown from Panther Frank Gonzalez but the Panthers out front with 19 seconds left on the clock. Avon Parks Charlie Brown answered with 9 seconds left to tie the game at 60 all. But Mulberrys answer, again from Gonzalez and outside the three, came up short as did Panther Kevin Simmonslayup after t he rebound. Simmons would net 2 0 points for the night, an d Gonzalez would hang clo se with 17 points. SPORTS D SECTION Inside This Section Rays sign Manny, Damon . . .3D Holyfield back in the ring . . .3D News-Sun Sunday, January 23, 2011 MCTphot os Can Brian Urlacher and the Bears defense cool off a red hot Aaron Rodgers? News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Andre Wilson keeps Doug Dyer on his hip as he calls for the ball on the low block. Wilson would score all 11 of Lake Placids first-quarter points in Fridays 71-63 win over Frostproof. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE PLACID Between A ndre Wilsons early scoring b inge and Kirk Veleys triple d ouble, Lake Placid was able t o hold off a game Bulldog s quad in Fridays 71-63 win t hat wasnt secured until the f inal minutes. After a l ackluster T uesday loss t o Tenoroc, t he Dragons w ere eager to p ut exam w eek behind t hem, but it w as Wilson who shouldered t he load early on. They threw a zone at us, w hich we hadnt seen from t hem and we were having s ome trouble with it, head c oach David Veley said. With Kirk at the point, with h is height, he could see over t he defense and kept finding A ndre. So much so that the 11-10 l ead at the end of the period s aw all 11 points coming f rom Wilson inside. He made it Wilson 13, Dragons fend off Frostproof Lake Placid71Frostproof63 See LP, page 4D News-Sun photo by BETH BALDRIDG E Marcus Dewberry went for a game-high 31 points Friday in Avon Parks overtime win against Mulberry. Devils hold of Mulberry in OT Avon Park70Mulberry65 See AP, page 4D And Another Thing... Dan Hoehne Who You Got? News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Red Devil Jessi Guzman tries to get Kathleens Derek Smith flipped Saturday morning at the annual Spiegel Memorial Wrestling Invitational. Guzman would get a pin at the 1:23 mark of the third period in this match. Annual Spiegel Invitational fills the mats Special to the News-SunSEBRING On Thursday, Jan. 20 the Highlands Merchants and Blue Jays duked it out in an extra inning game with Merchants carrying away the victory 21-17. Glenn Minic was high man, going 5-for-5 with a triple. Mike Jurmu was 4-for-5 with two doubles and having 4-for-5 were Harry Bell and Cal Bready. Don Ward, Charley Quinn, Harold Binel and John Laysack each contributed 3-for-5 for their times at bat. The Blue Jays had 28 hits, mostlydonatedby Bob Weisshaving5-for-5 and Carl Puffenberger and Jerry OBrian going 4-for-5. Doran Quigg had 4-for-4. The Silent Salesman started slow and fell behind 7-3 after three innings. In the 4th inning the Salesman scored five runs to take the lead 8-5, at which point the Rebelsbats went into neutral for a final score of 18-9 with Salesman o n top. Ken Filppula relieved t he starting pitcher in the thi rd inning and with thehelp of very good defensive pla ys held the Rebels to only tw o more runs the remainder of the game. Hitters having an ou tstanding day at bat we re Bob Roth, 5-for-5includin g a double and scored thr ee times. Ross Spider McMin n had 4-for-5 including a do uSebring Seniors slugging it out See SENIORS, page 4D

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SYF Meeting and electionsSEBRING Sebring Youth Football and Cheer will hold itsannual meeting on Thursday, Jan. 20 at 7:30 p.m., at 259 U.S. 27 N., Sebring. The meeting will hold elections for Executive and General Board positions and applications for Football and Cheer head coaches will also be accepted. If you have been looking for a way to give back to the community and have Football or Cheer experience, please come. Any questions, call Amy at 381-4801.Womans Club Scholarship BenefitSEBRING The Womans Club of Sebring will be holding a golf tournament to benefit itsscholarship fund Saturday, Feb. 19 at the Harder Hall Golf Course. The four-person scramble format will have check-in at 7 a.m. with an 8 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $55 per player or $220 per team and includes golf, cart, lunch and prizes. There is a Putting and Chipping contest available as well as a $2,000 Hole-In-One prize sponsored by the Cohan Radio Group. Entry forms are available at local pro shops and are to be sent to The Womans Club of Sebring, P.O. Box 8174, Sebring, FL, 33872. Registration deadline is February 19. For an entry form or for more information, call Johnell West at 382-0824.Panther 5KAVON PARK The second annual South Florida Community College Panther 5K Run/Walk has been planned for Saturday, Feb. 26 at the SFCC Highland Campus. The SFCC Foundation, Inc. and Bill Jarrett Ford Mercury are sponsoring the event, and proceeds benefit the colleges intercollegiate athletics programs. The entry fee for the SFCC Panther 5K Run/Walk is $20 through Feb. 16 and $25 from Feb. 17 through the day of the race. Students with a current I.D. may register for $15. Every participant receives a Dri-Fit long-sleeve shirt sizes cannot be guaranteed for those who enter after Feb. 17. Registration is 7-7:45 a.m. on race day in the parking lot in front of the SFCC University Center race starts at 8 a.m. Entry forms are available online at www.southflorida.edu/panther5k Participants can mail their copies and entry fees to the SFCC Foundation, Inc., 13 East Main Street, Avon Park, FL 33825; or fax forms to 863-453-8023 and call 863-453-3133 with credit card information. For more information about the SFCC Panther 5K, call the SFCC Foundation at 863-453-3133. Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worsh ip Center presents the First Annual Go lf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun sta rt at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes o ne team of four golfers, one tee sign and tw o green signs. Gold Sponsor $300 includes one tea m of four golfers, one green sign. Silver Sponsor $150 includes o ne green sign, one tee sign. Bronze Sponsor $100 includes o ne green sign. Individual player $60 includes gre en fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26 ). Team of Four Golfers $240 includ es green fees, cart and lunch ($280 aft er March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, F L 33871. Or register online at wingsoffaithchri stianworshipcenter.com. Proceeds to be donated to scholarsh ip program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jaso n Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhanke rson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com.Our Lady of Grace eventsAVON PARK Our Lady of Gra ce Catholic Church has two benefit even ts coming up in the next two months. Tuesday, Feb. 22 they will host t he Todd Allen Show, Classic Branson an d Las Vegas-style entertainment at its be st. Allen will perform a variety of styl es including Rock n Roll, Country and h is award-winning Elvis impersonations. The show will be held at the Our Lad y of Grace Catholic Church Grogan Cente r, at 595 E. Main St. in Avon Park, at 7 p.m For a donation of $10, tickets can be purchased at the Highlands Independe nt Bank and Heartland National Bank Avo n Park locations, Warrens Auto Sales an d the Avon Park Chamber of Commerce. The next event will be the First Annu al Golf Tournament at the River Greens 2 7Hole Golf Course Saturday, March 1 2 with an 8 a.m. tee-time. The cost of $60 per player includ es golf, cart, golf shirt and lunch, whi le River Greens members pay just $35. Sponsorships are available as we ll, starting with a $100 hole sponsor for a sign only. AHole Sponsor with Sign, plus a fr ee foursome, is $300, a Co-Sponsor Sig n, plus free foursome, with perogative to f ly their banner is $400 and a Major Spons or is $1,500. All proceeds from these events bene fit the Our Lady of Grace Scholarship Fun d. WILD-CARD PLAYOFFS Saturday, Jan. 8 Seattle 41, New Orleans 36 N.Y. Jets 17, Indianapolis 16 Sunday, Jan. 9 Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7 Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16 DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS Saturday, Jan. 15 Pittsburgh 31, Baltimore 24 Green Bay 48, Atlanta 21 Sunday, Jan. 16 Chicago 35, Seattle 24 N.Y. Jets 28, New England 21 CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS Sunday, Jan. 23 Green Bay at Chicago, 3 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 6:30 p.m. PRO BOWL Sunday, Jan. 30 AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. SUPER BOWL Sunday, Feb. 6 At Arlington, Texas AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB Boston339.786 New York2220.52411 Philadelphia1725.40516 Toronto1330.3022012New Jersey1231.2792112Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami3013.698 Orlando2815.6512 Atlanta2816.636212Charlotte1724.41512 Washington1229.29317 Central Division WLPctGB Chicago2914.674 Indiana1623.41011 Milwaukee1624.4001112Detroit 1528.34914 Cleveland834.1902012WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio376.860 Dallas2715.643912New Orleans2816.636912Memphis2023.46517 Houston2024.4551712Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City2715.643 Utah2716.62812Denver 2418.5713 Portland2420.5454 Minnesota1033.2331712Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Lakers3213.711 Phoenix2021.48810 Golden State1923.4521112L.A. Clippers1626.3811412Sacramento932.22021 ___ Thursdays Games Charlotte 100, Philadelphia 97 Chicago 82, Dallas 77 Portland 108, L.A. Clippers 93 Fridays Games New Jersey 89, Detroit 74 Orlando 112, Toronto 72 Phoenix 109, Washington 91 New Orleans 100, Atlanta 59 Boston 110, Utah 86 Milwaukee 102, Cleveland 88 Memphis 115, Houston 110 San Antonio 101, New York 92 Golden State 119, Sacramento 112, OT L.A. Lakers 107, Denver 97 Saturdays Games Atlanta at Charlotte, late Dallas at New Jersey, late Boston at Washington, late Phoenix at Detroit, late Toronto at Miami, late Utah at Philadelphia, late Cleveland at Chicago, late San Antonio at New Orleans, late New York at Oklahoma City, late Orlando at Houston, late Memphis at Milwaukee, late Indiana at Portland, late Golden State at L.A. Clippers, late Sundays Games Indiana at Denver, 8 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA Philadelphia3111567164124 Pittsburgh2915462150112 N.Y. Rangers2719357140119 N.Y. Islanders1524737114152 New Jersey142933192140 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Boston2614759144107 Montreal2717458125114 Buffalo2121547129139 Toronto1922543119141 Ottawa1725741106157 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Tampa Bay2915563145153 Washington2614860135125 Atlanta2318854148156 Carolina2318652141146 Florida2120547124121WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Detroit2912664162138 Nashville2615658129112 Chicago2518454150130 St. Louis2217751124133 Columbus2220549123147 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA Vancouver2910866153115 Colorado2417654153151 Minnesota2418553123128 Calgary2121648133147 Edmonton1425735115159 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA Dallas2914563143129 Phoenix2415957138135 Anaheim2620456133141 San Jose2419553133132 Los Angeles2422149134119 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Thursdays Games Tampa Bay 3, Atlanta 2, SO San Jose 2, Vancouver 1, SO Buffalo 4, Boston 2 Toronto 5, Anaheim 2 New Jersey 2, Pittsburgh 0 Washington 2, N.Y. Islanders 1 Philadelphia 6, Ottawa 2 Carolina 4, N.Y. Rangers 1 Detroit 4, St. Louis 3, OT Nashville 5, Colorado 1 Dallas 4, Edmonton 2 Phoenix 2, Los Angeles 0 Fridays Games Tampa Bay 2, Florida 1, SO N.Y. Islanders 5, Buffalo 2 Montreal 7, Ottawa 1 Calgary 7, Dallas 4 Saturdays Games New Jersey at Philadelphia, late Chicago at Detroit, late Boston at Colorado, late Washington at Toronto, late Anaheim at Montreal, late Carolina at Pittsburgh, late N.Y. Rangers at Atlanta, late Columbus at St. Louis, late Los Angeles at Phoenix, late Calgary at Vancouver, late Minnesota at San Jose, late Sundays Games Philadelphia at Chicago, 12:30 p.m. Florida at New Jersey, 3 p.m. Buffalo at N.Y. Islanders, 3 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 5 p.m. Nashville at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Fridays Scores EAST Baruch 62, Brooklyn 60 Fairfield 67, Canisius 60 Hobart 88, Vassar 57 Husson 77, Castleton St. 63 Iona 72, Niagara 66 Malone 77, Houghton 61 Rochester 77, Carnegie-Mellon 60 St. Peters 77, Siena 69 Staten Island 90, John Jay 79 Washington, Mo. 80, NYU 76 SOUTH Belmont 67, S.C.-Upstate 62 ETSU 68, Lipscomb 67 MIDWEST Augustana,S.D. 97, Upper Iowa 77 Beloit 119, Grinnell 108 Butler 81, Wis.-Green Bay 75 Carroll, Wis. 81, Illinois College 78 Martin Luther 83, Presentation 69 Minn. St., Mankato 87, Bemidji St. 82 Minn. St., Mrhd 86, Concordia, St.P. 74 Minn.-Morris 94, Bethany Lutheran 80 Northwestern, Minn. 72, Northland 60 Ripon 77, Monmouth, Ill. 68 SW Minnesota St. 84, Minn. Duluth 67 St. Cloud St. 62, Minn.-Crookston 50 St. Norbert 60, Lake Forest 45 St. Scholastica 83, Crown, Minn. 67 Valparaiso 60, Wis.-Milwaukee 43 Wayne, Neb. 76, Winona St. 52 FAR WEST Adams St. 86, Regis 53 Great Falls 71, Rocky Mountain 54 Mntna St.-North. 73, Carroll, Mont. 54BASEBALLAmerican League BOSTON RED SOX Extended their player development contract with Portland (EL) for two years through 2014 season. CHICAGO WHITE SOX Exercised their 2012 contract option on manager Ozzie Guillen. LOS ANGELES ANGELSAcquired OF Vernon Wells from Toronto Blue Jays for C/1B Mike Napoli and OF Juan Rivera. TAMPA BAY RAYS Agreed to terms with RHP Jonah Bayliss, OF Chris Carter, RHP Dirk Hayhurst, INF Daniel Mayora and INF Ray Olmedo on minor league contracts. National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS Agreed to terms with OF Jeremy Reed on a minor league contract. NEW YORK METS Agreed to terms with LHP Tim Byrdak and RHP Blaine Boyer on minor league contracts. Named Tim Teufel manager, Ricky Bones pitching coach and Mike Easler hitting coach of Buffalo (IL). ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Agreed to terms with INF Nick Punto on a oneyear contract.FOOTBALLNational Football League JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Promoted receivers coach Todd Monken to quarterbacks coach, qualify control coach Johnny Cox to receivers coach and offensive staff assistant Matt Griffin to quality control coach. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at Sebring,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer at District Tournament,Mulberry,vs.McKeel,8 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Girls Weightlifting at State Qualifier,Port Charlotte,10:30 a.m. FRIDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Mulberry,6/7:30 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Avon Park,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer at District Tournament,Liberty,vs.Liberty,7 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Lake Placid,6/7:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Girls Weightlifting at State Qualifier,Port Charlotte,10:30 a.m. THURSDAY: Girls Basketball vs.Frostproof,6/7:30 p.m. Walker TUESDAY,Jan.25: Girls/Boys Basketball at City of Life,6/7:30 p.m. THURSDAY,Jan.27: Girls/Boys Basketball vs.AllSaints,6/7:30 p.m. MONDAY,Jan.31: Girls Basketball at District Tournament,All Saints Academy,TBD MONDAY,Feb.7: Boys Basketball at District Tournament,All Saints Academy,TBD Heartland Christian MONDAY: Boys Basketball vs.City of Life,5/6:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Haven Christian,5 p.m. FRIDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Southland Christian,5:30/7 p.m. SFCC FRIDAY: Baseball vs.Daytona State College,2 p.m. SATURDAY: Baseball vs.Webber International,doubleheader,1 p.m. SUNDAY,Jan.30: Baseball at Lake Sumter,1 p.m. MONDAY,Jan.31: Baseball at Webber International,6 p.m. TUESDAY,Feb.1: Softball vs.Seminole State,5 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Boys Basketball at Sebring,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer at District Tournament, Mulberry,vs.Frostproof,7 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Girls Weightlifting at State Qualifier,Port Charlotte,10:30 a.m. THURSDAY: Girls Basketball at DeSoto,6/7:30 p.m. FRIDAY: Boys Basketball vs.McKeel,6/7:30 p.m. S S K K I I I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Deer Valley Celebrity Skifest . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S T T E E N N N N I I S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Australian Open, Day 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 p p . m m . Australian Open, Round of 16 . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . Australian Open, Round of 16 . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 9 9 p p . m m . Australian Open, Quarterfinals. . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . Australian Open, Quarterfinals . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 p p . m m . Australian Open, Quarterfinals . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N H H L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Philadelphia at Chicago . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C C 5 5 p p . m m . Atlanta at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Toronto at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NM M O O T T O O R R C C Y Y C C L L E E R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n SupercrossFIM World Championship. . C C B B S SC C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n Miami at North Carolina State . . . . . . . . . . 4 4 4 4M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Notre Dame at Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . Baylor at Kansas State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Florida at Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . Purdue at Ohio State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E G G Y Y M M N N A A S S T T I I C C S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 5 5 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Kentucky at Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NTimes, games, channels all subject to change N N F F L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . Green Bay at Chicago . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S SG G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . EuroPGA Abu Dhabi Championship . . G G O O L L F F 4 4 p p . m m . PGA Bob Hope Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Mitsubishi Electric Championship G G O O L L F FW W O O M M E E N N S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Boston College at Georgia Tech . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 2 2 p p . m m . Alabama at South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 8 8 5 5 p p . m m . North Carolina at Maryland . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Iowa at Ohio State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N B B A A M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Detroit at Orlando . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N LIVESPORTSONTV NFL Playoffs NBA NHL Transactions M. College Basketball Page 2DNews-Sun Sunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.co m

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011Page 3D 6 MONTH MEMBERSHIPS NOW AVAILABLE(863) 382-0500 3201 Golfview Rd. Sebring(863) 382-0744for 9 Hole Executive RatesPrices good thru 3/31/10 Incl. Tax & CartMonday thru Friday:8am 1pm $36By 8, After 1 $29 Saturday & Sunday: $29 GRAND STAND SEATINGor BRING YOUR LAWN CHAIRS CONCESSIONS AVAILABLEREADYSETMOW!!! F AMILY FUN!SPEEDS UP TO 50 MPHSATURDAY JAN 29th 6pmSpectator Gates Open @ 5pm Children Under 12 FREE For more info or Group Rates call441-2642or Email: nomowman@hotmail.com 2155 Herrick Road Avon Park(Just west of Avon Park Airport) Proud Sponsor Next RaceJAN 29th at 6pm APMower Plex ScheduleSpectator Admission Only$5for Adults$10Super Ticket Includes Pit Pass!Feb. 26 March 26 April 23 May 21 Want To Race? Call 441-2642 By MIKE FITZPATRICK Associated PressThree big-name outfielders f ound their new homes on a b usy night in baseball. Vernon Wells was traded F riday from Toronto to the L os Angeles Angels, giving t hem the big bat they wanted a ll winter. Manny Ramirez and J ohnny Damon were on the m ove, too theyre about to b ecome teammates again, t his time in Tampa Bay. The Blue Jays shipped W ells, the high-priced fixture i n the middle of their lineup, t o Los Angeles for catcher M ike Napoli and outfielder J uan Rivera in one of the b iggest deals of the offseas on. Moving forward and s tarting this new chapter is g oing to be a blast, the 32y ear-old Wells said on a conf erence call. The All-Star center fielder h as four years and $86 mill ion left on the $126 million, s even-year contract he signed w ith Toronto. Neither general manager, T ony Reagins of the Angels n or Alex Anthopoulos of the B lue Jays, would specifically s ay whether any money was i ncluded in the trade to offset W ellssalary. Instead, both GMs danced a round the question, simply s aying it was announced as a 2 -for-1 swap. Reagins said Wellscont ract was tolerable and that h e got approval from upper m anagement. Wells waived his full not rade clause to join the A ngels. The financial implicat ions were certainly a large c omponent, Anthopoulos s aid. Theres no question g oing forward this will give u s flexibility. Ramirez and Damon, both f ree agents, agreed to oney ear contracts with the Rays, a person familiar with the n egotiations told The A ssociated Press. The person spoke on cond ition of anonymity because t he agreements were subject t o physicals and had not been a nnounced. Damon gets $5.25 million a nd the chance to earn $ 750,000 in bonuses based o n attendance, the person s aid. Ramirez gets $2 mill ion. The moves mark the first m ajor additions for the AL E ast champions after a devast ating offseason in which one p rominent player after anothe r left cost-cutting Tampa B ay. Carl Crawford, Carlos P ena and Rafael Soriano s igned elsewhere as free a gents. Matt Garza and Jason B artlett were traded. Astrong bullpen was decim ated by the losses of J oaquin Benoit, Grant B alfour, Dan Wheeler, Randy C hoate and Chad Qualls. Ramirez and Damon p layed together for four years i n Boston and helped lead the R ed Sox to the 2004 World S eries title ending the t eams 86-year championship drought. Both colorful characters are well past their primes, but if nothing else they could at least provide an attraction at Tropicana Field for a Rays team that drew just 1.86 million fans last year. The Angels are trying to regain their grip on the AL West. After winning three straight division titles and five of six, they slid to 80-82 last season. They had hoped to add Crawford or third baseman Adrian Beltre, but missed out on both expensive free agents. Wells should help. The three-time All-Star hit .273 with 31 home runs and 88 RBIs last season. He made his major league debut with Toronto in 1999 and quickly became one of baseballs most promising players. Vernon is a player we have admired for some time, Reagins said in a statement. He is a tremendous person and the type of player that will impact our club immediately, both on offense and defense. Nagged by injuries, Wells dipped in 2009 before a bounce-back season. Athree-time Gold Glove winner, hes looking forward to playing on real grass. Whether he stays in center remains to be seen. The Angels moved perennial Gold Glove winner Torii Hunter to right last season to make room for speedy Peter Bourjos. Whichever way they line up, Angels manager Mike Scioscia said he could have the best defensive outfield since the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1980s. The Blue Jays, out of the playoffs since winning their second straight World Series title in 1993, had been shopping Wells in an effort to free up some payroll. Anthopoulos thanked Wells for his time in Toronto, adding, he was very sentimental when we spoke about this. The 29-year-old Napoli hit .238 with 26 homers and 68 RBIs last season, often filling in at first base for injured Kendry Morales. Napoli ranked among the ALleaders with one home run per 17.4 at-bats. He has hit at least 20 homers in three straight years and could help give Toronto time to break in rookie catcher J.P. Arencibia, the MVPof the Pacific Coast League last season. Napoli had filed for salary arbitration, asking for $6.1 million while the Angels offered $5.3 million. The 32-year-old Rivera hit .252 with 15 home runs and 52 RBIs last season. He is due to make $5.25 million this year. The 38-year-old Ramirez began last season with the Los Angeles Dodgers, then was claimed on waivers late in the summer by the Chicago White Sox. He hit a combined .298 with nine homers and 42 RBIs in the final season of a $45 million, two-year contract he signed with the Dodgers. Hampered by injuries, the longtime slugger had 320 plate appearances in 90 games. Still a power threat, he likely will be a designated hitter for the Rays. Ramirezs career took a downward turn in May 2009 when he was suspended 50 games for using a banned female fertility drug. The 12-time All-Star has 555 home runs, good for 14th on the career list, and 1,830 RBIs, which ranks 18th. He also helped Boston win the 2007 World Series, then was traded to the Dodgers the following season. The 37-year-old Damon spent last season with Detroit, batting .271 with eight homers and 51 RBIs, mostly as a DH. Weak-armed in left field and no longer the stolen base threat he once was, he remains very durable the two-time All-Star played 145 games last year and hit 36 doubles in 539 at-bats. Damon, from nearby Orlando, can pad his paycheck by making a difference at the gate for the Rays. He would get $150,000 each for 1.75 million, 1.85 million, 1.95 million, 2.05 million and 2.15 million in home attendance. AP Sports Writer Ronald Blum and AP Baseball Writer Ben Walker contributed to this report. Angels add Vernon Wells; Manny, Damon headed to TB MCTphoto Florida native Johnny Damon is returning home after signing a one-year deal with the Rays. Associated PressWHITE SULFUR S PRINGS, W.Va. Two y ears shy of 50, Evander H olyfield will enter the ring at T he Greenbrier resort in anothe r quest to become undisputed h eavyweight champion. Holyfield weighed in at 2 24 1/2 pounds for his fight S aturday night in the Casino C lub against journeyman S herman Williams. The bout is titled Redemption in America: T he Journey Begins Now. Six fights are on the underc ard. Holyfield fight the main event at The Greenbrier News-Sun photos by ED BALDRIDGE Above: German Soto rounds the final bend to complete Saturdays Highlands County Half Marathon. Right: Amy Zwayer looks ready to continue a full marathon as she comepetes Saturday morning at the Highlands County Half Marathon at Highlands Hammock State Park. Going (half) the distance

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Page 4DNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com Some Risks Are Worth Taking. Your Health Isnt One of Them. Medicare and almost all insurance acceptedFirst, 32 people die every day of skin cancer in the USA. Second, most skin cancer deaths are preventable. Therefore, forgiveness is the chance to prevent skin cancer with a Dermatology skin exam. Therefore, forgiveness is the Lord offering you free will to not be a statistic. SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE. OR LET US DO IT FOR YOU.Darrin A. Rotman, M. D. Julie L. Iellimo, P. A. C. Jennifer A. Wolf, P. A. C.863-386-0786Darrin A. Rotman, M.D. F rostproof 10 as he opened t he second quarter with two f ree throws, but though othe rs would soon join the scori ng mix, the Bulldogs s tepped it up as well. Scores from Daniel K nighten and Jalen Johnson p ut Frostproof up one before D evontray Flemings free t hrow tied it at 14-14. Fleming soon connected o n a three, but a floater from Z ack Barker and a three from J ack Bass again put the Dogs out in front. Back and forth it went with F rostproof building as much a s a five-point lead, but with t he Dragons then fighting b ack. Asteal and lay-in from B rody Carr eventually put L ake Placid up 31-30, but a t hree from Johnson at the b uzzer sent the Bulldogs into t he half with a 33-31 lead. Two Devontra Chisolm f ree throws to open the third r e-tied it, but Frostproof kept b attling back. The Dragons then seemed p rimed to break it open as F leming and Chisolm hit b ack-to-back threes and C hisolm converted a threep oint play that pushed the l ead to 46-39. But back came the B ulldogs, with Johnson and B arker raining down a pair of t reys with Carr and Ricky C obb then trading buckets for a narrow 48-47 Lake Placid l ead entering the fourth. Frostproof would get a nother Cobb score to take a 5 1-50 lead, but a Veley drive g ot it back for good for the D ragons. Fleming then scored inside a nd Carr connected from b eyond the arc for a 57-51 e dge. The Bulldogs would push b ack, but Lake Placid kept t hem at bay and were up five w ith about a minute to play before a foul and a pair of Frostproof technicals gained the Dragons four points at the line and all but sealed the win. We came out with a better effort tonight and with Frostproof, its always a battle, coach Veley said. Its a district win, which is huge for us and where we get seeded is in our control. Now 10-8 overall and 6-4 in district play, the Dragons are eyeing a third or even second seed for the district tournament. While Johnson took game honors with 27 points for the Bulldogs, a balanced effort from Lake Placid won out. Wilson scored 19 and Fleming 17 with Veley getting 12 points, 11 rebounds and 11 assists. Carr added nine and Chisolm eight for the Dragons who were on the road at McKeel Saturday for an afternoon district tilt. See Wednesdays NewsSun for results of the contest. Continued from 1D LP win keeps them in hunt for high seed News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Kirk Veley scored 12 points, but also added 11 rebounds and 11 assists for a rare triple double in Lake Placids Friday win. Devil Marcus Dewberry w ould set the pace in overt ime, scoring nine to put the D evils out front 70-65 when t he clock ran out. Dewberry would lead the s coring for the game with 31 p oints, outscoring the closest D evil Avierre Conner who s hot for 12. It was a good game. E very time we come down h ere it is a good game, M ulberry coach Lester Hunt s aid. We stayed focused on o ur defense and showed that w e could play with anyone in t his district. Mulberry was a good g ame. They are always a t ough game, Clemons said. Charlie Brown got it done f or us tonight. Avon Park is back at it M onday at county rival S ebring and then welcome M cKeel to close out district p lay Friday, Jan. 28. Continued from 1D News-Sun photo by BETH BALDRIDGE Avierre Conner goes left to get past Mulberrys Frank Gonzalez in Friday nights overtime win. AP stays on top The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHN E Allie Mann scored 10 points to join Shannon Williams, who had 19, in double figures as the Lady Streaks stole one at Ridge Friday night by a 49-30 score. Lady Blue Streaks rip Ridge ble and triple, Bob Brooks went 3-5 with a triple, Russ Moody had 3-for-4 and Al Taratuta hit 2-for-3 scoring three runs. Stan Turls Rebels Tom Moose Morrisseette hada triple with his 2-for-3 at bats. Going 3-for-3 were Jim Strietzel and Elwood Black. Diz Jones and Jack Grosso had 3-for-4 and Don Purdy was 2-for-2. Allstate Insurance won over Millers Heating and Air Conditioning 22-14 with Allstates Bob MacCarrick and Glenn Wearsh each having 3-for-4. Moe Pier and Dave Crotser both hit 2-for-4. Millers Jim Hensley had 4-for-5 including a double and Dennis Birholz was 2-4 with a triple. Having 4-for-4 were Tom Royal and Dale DeMar. Kyle Saunders had 4-for-5. It was a beautiful day and we were pleased to see more spectators at the games. The second week of the Seventy and Over Softball League games at Highlands County Sports Complex began Tuesday, Jan. 18. It was unique that each of the three losing teams had a final score of five runs. Highlands Merchants and Millers Heating and Air Conditioning had a final score of 25-5, Blue Jays and Silent Salesman were 14-5 and Allstate and Rebels ended with 14-5. In the Highlands Merchants and Millers match-up, the only home run for the Merchants was driven in by Glenn Minic. Don Ward hit 3-for-3, Mike Jurmu and Harold Dinel each had 2-for-3, including a triple apiece, and Ron Lewis and Eddie Carroll went 2-for-2 with each having a double. Those hitting 2-for-3 were Harry Bell andJohn Schmidt. For Millers Jim Hensley had 3-for-4 including a triple, Bob Foxbeltedout a triple and Dennis Birholzhad 3-for-3. The Blue Jays won over Silent Salesman and the JaysBob Weiss hit a home run and Carl Puffenberger was 4-for-5 with a triple and a double. Erel Richardson had a 2for-3 day and Richard Godfrey was 2-for-4. For the Silent Salesma n, base hits were plentiful b ut RBIs were scarce as th ey lost to the determined Bl ue Jays. Leading the hit parade f or the Salesmen were Bo b Rothand Bob Brooks at 3for-3, Les Smith and K en Filppula each having2-fo r3, including a double an d Stu Hayner also connect ed for a two-bagger. Outstanding defense b y the Blue Jays had a lot to d o with the outcome of t he game. Arunning, shoestrin g catch of a sinking line dri ve by left fielder Richa rd Godfrey was a play th at brought cheers even fro m the Salesmans dugout. The Allstate and Rebe ls ended with Allstate on to p 17-5 as the RebelsJa ck Grosso had 3-for-3. Going 2-for-3 were D iz Jones, Don Purdy and Ji m Strietzel. The hits for Allstate we re made by Rudy Pribble wi th three hits, Dave Crotse r, Glenn Wearsh, K en Crandall and Mo Pierha ving two hits. Continued from 1D Seniors see Tuesday blowouts By JENNAFRYER Associated PressDAYTONABEACH NASCAR president Mike Helton has confirmed that drivers only will be allowed to race for one championship this season. The rule is designed to prevent Sprint Cup drivers from dominating the second-tier Nationwide Series. Full-time Cup drivers have won the last five Nationwide titles. Helton also says NASCAR is leaning toward a simpler points system for all three of its national series. The Associated Pre ss reported this week th at NASCAR has told teams it wants to scrap its 36-yea rold scoring system for a fo rmat that would award poin ts based on finishing positio n. Helton says bonus poin ts would be added to put an emphasis on winning race s. NASCAR president Helton discusses points system

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, January 23, 2011Page 5D Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 385-6155. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR A SPECIAL EXCEPTION REQUEST HEARING NO. 1688 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a PUBLIC HEARING will be held before the HIGHLANDS COUNTY Board of Adjustment on the 8th day of February, 2011, beginning at 3:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as possible, in the County Commissioners' Board Room, Highlands County Government Center Building, 600 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida, to consider a special exception to allow church and church uses, within the area described as follows: approximately 1.25 acres located on the north side of Valerie Boulevard, just east of Highway U.S. 27, and legally described as follows: Lot 286 and Lots 307, 308 and 309, inclusive, SEBRING RIDGE SECTION A, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 45, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Any person or persons interested or affected by this change are invited to attend this hearing. You may submit comments in writing to the attention of Linda Conrad, Zoning Supervisor, P.O. Box 1926, Sebring, Florida 33871-1926, or you may call (863)402-6638, for further information. Please reference the above hearing number when calling or writing. ANY PERSON WHO MIGHT WISH TO APPEAL AN Y DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT IN PUBLIC HEARING OR MEETING IS HEREBY ADVISED THAT THEY WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, THEY MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE WHICH WILL INCLUDE THE TESTIMON Y AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John A. Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6510 (Voice), 863-402-6508 (TTY), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: jminor@hcbcc.org. Request for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. ONE OR MORE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MA Y BE PRESENT AT THE MEETING. Jim Brooks, Chairman January 23, 28, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: GC07-1141 YALE MORTGAGE CORPORATION Plaintiff, vs. HOWARD S. OSTROW; IRENE BASSINGTHWAITE; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Publish in THE NEWS-SUN NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 21, 2009, and an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated January 11, 2011, and entered in Case No. GC07-1141 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit, in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, where in YALE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, and HOWARD S. OSTROW, IRENE BASSINGTHWAITE, Defendant, I will to the highest bidder for cash on the 11th day of February, 2011, at 11:00AM, JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment lying and being situate in HIGHLANDS County, Florida, to wit: Lot 1, Lot 2 and Lot 3, of LAKESIDE HEIGHTS, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 52-T, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. AKA Lot 1, Lot 2 and Lot 3, of LAKESIDE HEIGHTS, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Boo k 1, Page 52-T, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. NOTICE: ANY PERSON WITH A DISABILITY REQUIRING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING SHOULD CONTACT 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (V), VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE, NOT LATER THAT SEVEN (7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE PROCEEDING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. THE CLERK SHALL RECEIVE A SERVICE CHARGE OF UP TO $70 FOR SERVICES IN MAKING, RECORDING, AND CERTIFYING THE SALE AND TITLE THAT SHALL BE ASSESSED AS COSTS. THE COURT, IN ITS DISCRETION, MAY ENLARGE THE TIME OF THE SALE.NOTICE OF THE CHANGED TIME OF SALE SHALL BE PUBLISHED AS PROVIDED HEREIN. DATED this 14th day of January, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Toni Kopp DEPUTY CLER K January 23, 30, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 09 1008 GCS LANSDOWNE MORTGAGE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, v. JENNY LABANINO, individually, JORGE LABANINO, individually, BOWEN & SON ROOFING, INC., et. al, Defendant, NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment entered in the above styled cause now pending in said Court, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870 at 11:00 A.M. on February 9, 2011 the following property: A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (SW 1/4) OF THE NORTHEAST ONE-QUARTER (NE 1/4) AND A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER (SE 1/4) OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 39 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EAST, LYING WITHIN HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. SAID PARCEL OF LAND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (NW 1/4) OF THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (SW 1/4) OF SAID SECTION 21; THENCE N 89 DEGREES 20'56'' E, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (NW 1/4) OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER (SE 1/4), A DISTANCE OF 288.87 FEET; THENCE N 00 DEGREES 06'44'' E, DEPARTING SAID SOUTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 25.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE N 00 DEGREES 44'06'' E, ALONG A LINE 288.84 FEET EAST OF AND PARALLEL WITH THE WEST LINE OF THE EAST ONE-HALF (E 1/2) OF SAID SECTION 21, A DISTANCE OF 2644.01 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (SW 1/4) OF THE NORTHEAST ONE-QUARTER (NE 1/4) OF SAID SECTION 21; THENCE N 89 DEGREES 46'19'' E, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 298.18 FEET; THENCE S 00 DEGREES 15'19'' E, A DISTANCE OF 2211.56 FEET; THENCE N 89 DEGREES 27'05'' W, A DISTANCE OF 83.17 FEET; THENCE S 63 DEGREES 18'21'' W A DISTANCE OF 148.03 FEET; THENCE S 01 DEGREES 36'55'' E A DISTANCE OF 366.88 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF OLD VENUS ROAD; THENCE S 89 DEGREES 20'56'' W, ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 108.05 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING 16.60 ACRES (723,030 SQUARE FEET), MORE OR LESS. Property Address: 53 Keel Road, Venus,Florida 33960. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER ASOF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated on January 12, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk January 16, 23, 2011 PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE Heartland Workforce will hold their usual quarterly joint meeting of the Executive Board and the Board of Directors on Wednesday, January 26, 2011 at 1:30 p.m. at Heartland Workforce, 5901 US Hwy 27 S., Sebring, FL. Persons interested in attending should arrive no later than 1:25 p.m. For more information see agenda posted on the Heartland Workforce website at www.hwib.org January 23, 2011 NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicles will be soled at public sale or auction to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78(2) of the Florida Statutes at 10:00 a.m. on 2/22/11 at 1118 WEIGLE AVE. Sebring, FL 33870 1971 FORD F61CVL80326 2000 FORD 1FMPU18L5YLB69105 1990 OLDS 1G3AL54N1L6376089 January 23, 2011 NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicles will be soled at public sale or auction to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78(2) of the Florida Statutes at 10:00 a.m. on 2/16/11 at 1118 WEIGLE AVE. Sebring, FL 33870 1992 GMC 1GKDT13W9N2522964 January 23, 2011 C-14-37-29-200-2470-0150. DATED on January 12, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of Said Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM OF LIEN WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. January 16, 23, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 09-1800-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. TRAVIS E. BACON; AND ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, AND TENANT #4, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 Notice is given that pursuant to a Final Judgment in Foreclosure Against Defendant, TRAVIS E. BACON, dated the 11th day of January, 2011, in Case No. 09-1800-GCS, of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK is the Plaintiff and KENNETH TRAVIS E. BACON is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on the 8th day of February, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure Against Defendant, TRAVIS E. BACON, and described as follows: Lot 14 and Lot 15, Block 247, PLACID LAKES SECTION 20, LESS AND EXCEPT The East 51.08 feet of Lot 15, Block 247, Placid Lakes, Section 20, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 9, Page 31, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Real Property Address: 740 Aleutian Street, N.E., Lake Placid, FL 33852. Real Property Tax ID#: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. GC 10-573 ARTHURINE C. KUEHNER, as Trustee of The Arthurine C. Kuehner Revocable Family Trust U/A dated 9/17/93 vs BRYAN TODD and BRANDI HICKS, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Highlands County, Florida, described as: Lot 9, Block 34, SEBRING COUNTRY ESTATES, SECTION TWO, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 34, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on the 8th day of February, A.D., 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ROBERT W. GERMAINE By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk *In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of Courts office at 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida 33870-3701, Telephone 863-402-6500 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-9771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, Via Florida Relay Service. January 16, 23, 2011 South 89 degrees 25'40'' West, a distance of 50.36 feet to a point; thence South 65degrees 151'52'' West, a distance of 93.79 feet to the Southwest corner of Lot 16; thence North 18 degrees 56'30'' West along the Easterly boundary of Lake Josephine Drive, a distance of 79.02 feet to the Point of Beginning. NOTICE: ANY PERSON WITH A DISABILITY REQUIRING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING SHOULD CONTACT 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (V), VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE, NOT LATER THAT SEVEN (7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE PROCEEDING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. THE CLERK SHALL RECEIVE A SERVICE CHARGE OF UP TO $70 FOR SERVICES IN MAKING, RECORDING, AND CERTIFYING THE SALE AND TITLE THAT SHALL BE ASSESSED AS COSTS. THE COURT, IN ITS DISCRETION, MAY ENLARGE THE TIME OF THE SALE.NOTICE OF THE CHANGED TIME OF SALE SHALL BE PUBLISHED AS PROVIDED HEREIN. DATED this 12th day of January, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak DEPUTY CLERK January 16, 23, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: GC08-494 WACOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB f/k/a WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. RODNEY ROSADO; LUCRECIA ROSADO; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Publish in THE NEWS-SUN NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order resetting Foreclosure Sale dated January 11, 2011, and entered in Case No. GC08-494 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit, in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, where in WACOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB f/k/a WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, and RODNEY ROSADO, LUCRECIA ROSADO, Defendant, I will to the highest bidder for cash on the 8th day of February, 2011, at 11:00am, at the JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM, BASEMENT, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment lying and being situate in HIGHLANDS County, Florida, to wit: Generally described as being part of Lot 16, in Block 1, of LAKE JOSEPHINE HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 92, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: Commence as a Point of Beginning at the Northeast corner of Lot 16; thence North 39 degrees 25'40'' East along the North boundary of Lot 16, a distance of 161.84 feet to a point; thence South 00 degrees 22' West parallel to and 35 feet West of the East boundary of Lot 16, a distance of 37.5 feet to a point; thence IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CASE NO. 09001074GCS DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ASSETS TRUST2007-5 MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-5, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM PAEDAE A/K/A WILLIAM H. PAEDAE; et. al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 6, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09001074GCS of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ASSETS TRUST2007-5 MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-5, is the Plaintiff and WILLIAM PAEDAE A/K/A WILLIAM H. PAEDAE; DELIA M. PAEDAE; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; are the defendants. ROBERT W. GERMAINE The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, ROOM 105, Sebring, FL 33870, at 11:00 AM, on February 8, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT A EXHIBIT ``A'' Lot 5, Block ``O'' SUBDIVISION, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 67, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida, LESS AND EXCEPT the following portion thereof; BEGIN at the Northwesterly corner of said Lot 5, being the common corner with Lot 6; thence run North 68 degrees 06 minutes 20 seconds East parallel with the Southeasterly line of said Lot 5 and 95 feet Northwesterly of as measured at right angles thereto, for a distance of 331.95 feet to a point on the shoreline of Lake Jackson; thence meander Northerly along the shoreline of said Lake Jackson for a distance of 57 feet more or less to a point, said point being in the Northwesterly line of said Lot 5; thence run Westerly along the Northwesterly line of said Lot 5 to the POINT OF BEGINNING of said excepted parcel. Property Address 4211 Lakeview Dr., Sebring, Florida 33870 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of January, 2011. Robert W. Germaine Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. January 16, 23, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-12 IN RE: ESTATE OF HELEN L. FELTHAM, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of HELEN L. FELTHAM, deceased, whose date of death was December 14, 2010, and whose social security number is 189-09-2237, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is January 16, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Jason Michael Feltham 2370 Craig Rd. Piffard, NY 14533 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Robert E. Livingston Florida Bar No. 0031259 445 S. Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 Telephone: (863)385-5156 January 16, 23, 2011 the original with the Clerk of this Court at 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870-3867, either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 11th day of January, 2011. ROBERT GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk January 16, 23, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 28-2010-CA-001270 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, GRANTEES, DEVISEES, LIENORS, TRUSTEES, AND CREDITORS OF JOHN O. TOROSIAN, DECEASED, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, GRANTEES, DEVISEES, LIENORS, TRUSTEES, AND CREDITORS OF JOHN O. TOROSIAN, DECEASED, AND ALL CLAIMANTS, PERSONS OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, AND WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST, JOHN O. TOROSIAN, DECEASED, OR ANY OF THE HEREIN NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS OR PARTIES CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN AND TO THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED Current residence unknown, but whose last known address was: 308 VILLAWAY, SEBRING, FL 33876 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County, Florida, to-wit: CLUSTER 3, UNIT B, OF COUNTRY CLUB VILLAS I OF SPRING LAKE, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 15, PAGE 74, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL 33716, on or before February 25, 2011 or within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Action, and file IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CASE NO. 101300GCS SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. HELEN PODDOUBNYI, et. al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: PODDOUBNYI FAMILY LIMITED PARTNERSHIP Last known address(es): C/O HELEN PODDOUBNYI, 2114 ELVADO RD., VISTA, CA, 92084 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage of the following described property: LOT 7, BLOCK 63, OF SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 51, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A mobile home with the VIN number N/A sits of the property. a/k/a 4010 MENDOZA AVE., SEBRING, FL 33872 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if an, to it, on Diana Chung, Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312 either on or before February 18, 2011. and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 10th day of January, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk January 16, 23, 2011 1050Legals 1000 Announcements Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what youre doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 385-6155. Classified ads get fast results Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

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Page 6DNews-Sun Sunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.co m PROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORYPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY Install doors, windows, flooring, plumbing & more!Licensed & InsuredLic# HM0096HANDYMAN BOBCall 863-452-5201 or 863-449-1744 A & E LAWN MOWER REPAIRBeltsBlades New & Used Parts12 S.Forest Ave. Avon Park,FL 33825863-452-0389 Service Repair Supplies Equipment Delivered Right to your DoorPool Service & Mobile Retail(863) 382-7728Fax (863) 402-2200 poolparadise101@aol.com www.poolparadiseonline.com Brad & Julie Kurtz 863385-0404Now Offering: Animal Nuisance Control and Removal Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-2750 1405 US 27 North Sebring, FL33870 CAMPBELL S S COLLISION CENTER , INC. Jim Campbell Owner Ser vice A vailable 7 Days A W eek Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com EXTRAORDINAIRE HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING LLC 863-451-2399Mike & Kandy Sheldone CEO/Owner Lic# CAC 1816569All Service Calls $40 ResidentialCommercial Insured Free EstimatesService by People Who CareChad, Krista & Michael P.O. Box 6987 Avon Park, FL 33826-6987 Office: 863-655-9328 cklawn@strato.net WANDA KLINE WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESSSee what one drop of your blood indicates as to YOUR nutritional health and well-being. By appointment only863-414-4066 LIVEBLOODANALYSIS MIKES PAINTINGInterior & Exterior Residential & Mobile Homes Also Pressure Washing Over 25 Years Experience Free Estimates Lic. & Ins.863-657-2362 &WILLIAMSJANITORIALCARPETCLEANING$1095 Per Room3 Rooms Minimum Upholstery Cleaning All Types of Flooring Free EstimatesLic Bonded Ins(863) 214-1940 863-465-7491TREE SERVICE,INC.Joe Johnsons TRIMMING REMOVAL SOD INSTALLATION STUMP GRINDING LOT CLEARING PRESSURE CLEANING Will Beat Any Written Estimate!Peoples Choice Award Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Avon Park (863) 453-2525 Lake Placid (863) 699-2525 Lake Wales (863) 679-9200 Sebring (863) 382-1515 Wauchula (863) 767-1515Sebring Fax (863) 382-9939 W al-Mart Loca tions: Lake Wales (863) 676-0569 Sebring (863) 385-5371 Avon Park (863) 452-7010 INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED Call For Details863-381-9013*Single Story Homes under 1500 total sq.ft. Roofs Driveways Walks Additional Services $9900 HOUSE WASH*FLORIDA PRESSURE CLEANING LLC. Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Compassionate, Professional Health Care For Your Loved Ones214 E. Stuart Ave. Lake Wales, FL 33853 863-767-1120 Fax 863-676-7291We Elderly Care, Inc.800-518-0403In Home Care Avon Park Sebring Lake Placid Private Pay Long Term Insurance www.weelderlycare.comCindy DivietroCommunity Liaison Cell: 941-518-2478 Freedom Lawn CareGet the freedom you deserveCarl Horton ~OwnerVet. & Sr. Discount Lawn Maintenance Landscaping Small Tree Work Clean Ups Free Estimates863-655-2526 Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 No job is too small. We can take care of all your home repairs and maintenance needs. Small Flooring Jobs Some Electric & Plumbing863-381-6677 Free Estimates Rogers Handyman ServicesRoger McCartney JRlicensed and insured Rockys Tree Service LLC863-382-239724 Hour Emergency ServiceServing All Central Florida Area Fully Insured Tree Removal Tree Trimming Free Estimates Tree Topping Stump GrindingSebring,FL 33870 The City of Sebring is recruiting for the following position(s): School Crossing Guard Closes: 2/4/11 For an application contact City of Sebring Police Department, 307 N Ridgewood Dr., Sebring, FL 33870 (863) 471-5108 or visit us on our website at www.mysebring.com. Drug Free Work place, EOE, Vet. Pref.EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY SEEKING WELLEXPERIENCED MEDICAL OFFICE HELP. Excellent billing/collection, communication, typing, computer skills & medical terminology are A MUST Fax resume to: 863-471-3206 or email to: medicalofficebilling@yahoo.com 2100Help WantedREAL ESTATEPARALEGAL Full time position immediately available for an experienced real estate paralegal. Candidates should have HUD-1 preparation and real estate litigation experience. Please respond with cover letter and resume to: Reply Box #2207, News Sun, 2227 US 27, S., Sebring, FL 33870 2100Help Wanted ONSITE SUPPORTENGINEER Large healthcare provider in the Sebring area is expanding and looking to fill this position. Candidate will have at least 10 years experience and be familiar with Windows 2003/2008 server, XP, Windows 7, SQL 2008, Terminal Server/Citrix, Cisco firewall and wireless devices. Previous healthcare support experience, Microsoft Certifications a plus. Some extended local travel required between remote and central offices. Fax resume to: 863-385-3866NOW HIRINGWait Staff, Pizza Makers, Delivery Help. Exp. Preferred. Apply in person, 2-5 pm Daily. ZENO'S 4325 Sun 'n Lake Blvd, Sebring, FL 33870 2100Help WantedNOW ACCEPTINGApplications for C.S.R. & Account Managers. Applicant must be atleast 21yrs old, posses a clean FL Drivers Lic., be able to lift 50lbs unassited, and have a clean background. Apply in person at Rent King, 810 US Hwy 27 S., Avon Park, FL 33825. We are a Drug Free Workplace. 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment BABYSITTER NEEDEDF/T position for 4 months. Must have Infant CPR Certification. Background check. 863-446-3826 1450BabysittersNEED SOMEONEto take care of your loved one? In their OWN HOME? Excellent references...25 years exp. Call Joanie at 863-471-9726. 1400Health CareServicesLOST DOG,small, dirty brown color, wiry hair., blue sweater, pink collar. Missing Sun, Jan 16th, A. P. Est off Duncan Rd. Call 863-449-0259 1200Lost & FoundCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 385-6155 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements HIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING INVITATION TO BID (RFP) The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for: RFP 11-022 TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT SERVICES NIGP COMMODITY/SERVICES CODE: 918-85 Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, CPPB, Acting Director / Highlands County General Services/Purchasing Department 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33875-5803 Phone: 863-402-6524 Fax: 863-402-6735; or E-Mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:dgilbert@hcbcc.org" dgilbert@hcbcc.orgProposal submissions must be sealed and marked with the name of the proposer, and the RFP number and title RFP 11-022 TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT SERVICES NIGP COMMODITY /SERVICE CODE: 918-85 so as to identify the enclosed proposal. Each submittal shall include (1) one original and (5) five copies of the proposal. Proposals must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803, so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday, February 17, 2011, at which time they will be opened. Proposals received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for the late deliveries of proposals that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service.One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at above bid opening.Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this RFP.The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Highlands County. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John A. Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), 863-402-6508 (TTY), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:Jminor@hcbcc.org" Jminor@hcbcc.org Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service.Board of County CommissionersPurchasing Department Highlands County,Florida Website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net January 16, 23, 2011 HIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING INVITATION TO BID (ITB) The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for: ITB 11-021 PEST CONTROL SERVICES FOR COUNTY BUILDINGS NIGP COMMODITY/SERVICES CODE:910-59 Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, CPPB, Assistant Director/Highlands County General Services/Purchasing Department 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, Florida 338755803 Phone: 863-402-6524 Fax: 863-402-6735; or E-Mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:dgilbert@hcbcc.org" dgilbert@hcbcc.org Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name so as to identify the enclosed bids. Bids must be delivered to the Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL. 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday; February 17, 2010, at which time they will be opened. Bids received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service.One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at above bid opening.Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this ITB.The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Highlands County. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. aThe Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John A. Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), 863-402-6508 (TTY), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:Jminor@hcbcc.org" Jminor@hcbcc.org Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service.Board of County CommissionersPurchasing Department Highlands County, Florida Website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net January 16, 23, 2011 ***************************************** HIGHLANDS COUNTY LEGAL NOTICES ***************************************** The following legal notices are from the Highlands County Board of County Commissioners and are being published in the font, size, and leading as per their specifications. 1055HighlandsCounty Legals LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, January 23, 2011Page 7D ROYAL CARE OF AVON PARKIsnt it nice to be in high demand? Everyone wants to hire you, how do you choose?AtRoyal Care of Avon Parkyou will nd the choice easy. We offer an excellent benet package. You can earn up to two weeks vacation, and that is only in your rst year of employment plus eight holidays. Salary based on experience. C.N.A. Full Time 7 3 shift NURSES Full Time 7am 7pm and 7pm 7am Apply in person at: Royal Care of Avon Park 1213 W. Stratford Rd. Avon Park, FL 33825 (863) 453-6674 EOE, M/F, DFWP 3310 Hwy. 27 South Sebring, FL33870EOEE-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.comFor more information about Cross Country Automotive Services,we encourage you to visit our website at: www.CrossCountry-Auto.co mComprehensive Benefit Package Tuition Reimbursement Life Insurance Vacation Time Holiday Pay Medical DentalNow Hiring Full & Part Time Customer Service AssociatesAdditional Opportunities for Spanish as a second language Starting at $9.00 an hour Renea Gantt Associate of the MonthBe a HERO like Renea Gantt863-402-2786AGreatPlaceto Work! Contact UsBy Phone(863) 385-6155By Mail2227 US Hwy 27S Sebring, FL 33870By E-Mailwww.newssun.com/contact/CASTLE HILL Apartments of Avon ParkAccepting Applications for 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals 62 years or older, handicap/disabled, regardless of age. For rental information & applications please call: 863-452-6565 TDD: 1-800-955-8771 THIS INSTITUTION IS AN Equal Opportunity Provider and EmployerLos Apt. de Castle Hill de Avon ParkEstan aceptando aplicaciones para Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras. Disponible a personas de 62 ancs o mas, incapacidad fisica/mental, no importa la edad. Para mas informacion favor de llamar 863-452-6565. TDD: 1-800-955-8771 Esta Institucion Es De Igualdad De Oportunidad Al Proveedor, Y Empleador 6'X12' 2008V-NOSE TRAILER w/tandem, EZ-lube axles, brakes on all 4 wheels, spare tire, side entry door, rear fold down door. $2,600. 863-991-5806 9220Utility Trailers 9000 Transportation RV 38'2010 5TH Wheel. EAGLE RIDGE by HEARTLAND, 2BR, 1BA, 2 slides, fiberglass, W/D, awning. All options. $30,000 obo. Immediate Sale! 321-437-5887 2010 38'HY-LINE TRAVEL TRAILER. Very Clean. 2 Slideouts, W/D, 20 gal hot water heater, cent. A/C, bayfront, non-smoke, no pets. Will Deliver. $22,300 obo. 941-518-4040 8400RecreationalVehicles 8000 Recreation NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states tha t all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. MINIATURE SCHNAUZERpuppies, 4 males available. Ready to go, POP, tails docked, dew claws done, 1st shots and health certificate. $450. Call Suzi 863-414-0241 after 3PM. 7520Pets & SuppliesHELP! WIFENEEDS A VERY GOOD DEPENDABLE CAR NOW!Please help me find her one! 863-465-0978 7340Wanted to Buy VILLAGE YARDSALE SAT. JAN. 29th 8AM NOON RAIN DATE FEB 5th MARANATHA VILLAGE Arbuckle Creek Rd. SEBRING615Moon Ranch Rd, Thur Fri -Sat-Sun Jan 20 thru 23 9 am 4 pm. Portable washer/dyer, 1000's of items. Hoarder Sale!! SEBRING -St. Agnes < < ANNUAL FLEA MARKET > > 3840 Lakeview Dr., Sat. Jan. 29th; 8-Noon. DONT MISS THIS ONE! 7320Garage &Yard Sales SEBRING -BUTTONWOOD BAY MHP HUGE SALE @ Rec Hall, 10001 US 27, S. Sat, Jan 29th, 7am-11am. Coffee, Donuts & Bake Sale. LAKE PLACID-B & R Warhouse Bay #31, behind bowling alley, 722 US 27 S. Sat. Jan 22 8am-1pm. Furn, books, tackle, water skies, morotcycle lift, shark jaws, househld items MuchMore! 7320Garage &Yard Sales SOFA -Cream Color. $50 863-304-1419 RANGE -Kenmore. smooth glass top, white, works excellent, looks okay. $100 863-385-0650 PATIO TABLE,42'', w/4 chairs. $100. 863-402-0121 KITCHEN TABLEButcher Block Top w/4 chairs. Good Condition. $75. 863-385-2605 FREEZER UPRIGHT,$75. 863-273-8030 DISHWASHER LIKENEW! $75 863-273-8030 BIG TALKINGPooh nad Big Tigger. Both for $20 863-201-3769 BEACH PAINTINGVERY NICE. $20 863-201-3769 A/C UNIT4 Ton Coleman central unit, fan motor replaced, serviced yearly, attch to air handle. $100 863-655-0881 7310Bargain Buys OAK FIREWOODVarious thickness, cut in 1 foot lengths. Sellers give me price on all, (over a cord) 863-655-0521 ADULT TRICYCLEalmost new, large basket, large padded seat and brakes on handle bar. $200 obo. WHEELCHAIR lightweight $25 call 863-655-6212. BLACK DIAMONDtool box for pick-ups $125. Stainless steel grill guards $125. Utility trailer 7' X 12' w/ loading ramp $750. Refrigerator $125. Call 863-655-2166. 7300Miscellaneous 7180Furniture NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS! HIGHPOINT FURNITURE OUTLET STORE 2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRINGNorthofLowes&acrossfrom HomeDepotSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, W/D, Satellite, full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for Rent WANTED -Qualified Renter/Buyer (% back). Lg clean beautiful home at 4037 Lakewood Rd. 1/2 mile S. of YMCA, (VIDEOLS.COM). (2nd lot & 2nd. garage? ) ask me. 863-214-6697. SEBRING -Harder Hall area, 2BR, 2BA, 1CG, screened porch, W/D hookups. $750/mo. plus last month & security deposit. View by appointment. Call 863-381-6747, leave message. LAKE PLACIDLeisure Lakes 2BR/ 2BA/ 2/CG, fenced back yard, central air & heat $ 600 mo. Plus 1st. & last Security. 863-465-3959 LAKE PLACID2BR, 1BA, Newly Remodeled! W/D, large yard. Convenient location, close to Interlake Blvd. $550/mo. Call 863-699-0476 or 863-243-3627. LAKE PLACID2BR, 1BA, new floors/paint, fenced yard, close to boat ramp, nice landscape, quiet area, no smoke, $550/mo. 863-699-1119 6300Unfurnished HousesLAKE PLACIDNewer 3BR, 2BA, seasonal or monthly. Excellent furniture & appliances, near lake & boat ramp, No smoking or dogs. $1300/mo. After season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119 6250Furnished Houses AVON PARKAFFORDABLE RENTRidgedale Apartments1, 2, 3 & 4 Br Apts Central Location, water & trash included Rent subsidized Based on household income. No Application Fee Call 863-452-4432 TTY 800-955-8771 EQUAL HOUSINGOPPORTUNITY LAKE PLACID2BR, 2BA, Washer/Dryer, screened patio, water included. Excellent Condition $525 monthly plus 1 mo. security. 954-695-8348 KEY LAKEVILLASLAKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING 2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean & quiet, Screen porch, Outside patio, Central air, Washer/Dryer hookup, $585/mo., first & security. No Pets. 863-465-2740 AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; 2BR, 1BA $645/mo +$500 security. W/D, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 1 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile, New paint, New appliances, Screened patios & W/D hook ups. Call 863-452-0469. AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL: $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartments 6200UnfurnishedApartments SEBRING -Cute 2BR, 1BA, fenced yard, most pets OK. $550 + $300 security deposit. 4909 Manatee Dr. 863-446-7274 LAKE PLACIDPlacid Lakes, Unfurnished 2BR, 2BA. 863-699-0897 or 863-840-2013 ***LAKE PLACID-LEISURELAKES*** Large 3BR, 1.5BA, 1CG, near Golf Course & Lake June. Clean & Quiet $550/mo. Water/Lawn Service included. No Pets. 863-465-9100 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 Rentals VENUS -New 4BR, 2BA (jacuzzi in master BA ) A/C, tile, W/D, porch, w/option of 20 acres. 8 horse barn, privacy fence, 1 block from Hwy 27. 305-725-0301 SEBRING -2BR, 2BA, CHA, W/D Hookup, Carport, Shed, City Water, Close to Shopping, No Pets. 863-840-0494 or 863-465-1451. (Others Available) LAKE PLACIDSun 'n Lakes Estates, Doublewide, 3BR, 2BA Mobile Home. The best in Country Living! $580/month. Call Michelle @ 863-381-5661. 5150Mobile HomesFor Rent SELECTION OF1 & 2 Bedroom Units For Sale in friendly/active 55+ Park, located near shopping, banks, & hospital. Reasonable lot rent incl. S/W/G & Lawn mowing. Call for more info. or to view units. No pets please. 863-385-7034 PALM HARBORHomes has closed 2 Model Centers. Save up to 60K on select models. Call 1-800-622-2832. LK PLACIDAlpine Village. Fully furn 2BR, 1.5BA w/side encl porch/other side carport, faces pond/lake, one of best locations in park. Lot rent $190/mo. 18K OBO. 301-730-5059 5050Mobile HomesFor SaleAVON PARKBY OWNER! 2BR, 1BA, CHA,150' X 62", enclosed sun rm.,W/D hook-up, land owned, citrus, storage units, REDUCED! $26,900. Financing? 1105 Peel St. 863-368-0275 or 608-647-8323 or 608-475-3060 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesLAKE PLACIDLeisure Lakes, 2 Beautiful side-by-side lots surveyed, partly cleared, walk to Lake Carrie $2,950 ea or $5,600 for both Owner will accept reasonable offer. Will Sacrifice! 863-465-9100 4220Lots for SaleSEBRING -FOR SALE BY OWNER 2BR, 2BA Condo at the beautiful Bluffs of Sebring, a 55+ gated community. First Floor with Carport & Storage Room. Furnished with several upgrades; clubhouse, pool, tennis & other activities. Great view of Lake Mary Jane. Call 863-385-0552 or 863-873-1426 4120Villas & CondosFor SaleSEBRING NEWLYREMODELED 3BR Home, one block from Woodlawn Elem. School. Nice, quiet neighborhood. 1243 Fernvale Ave. Possible Owner Financing. Call 863-675-3387 TODAY! 4080Homes for SaleSebringSEBRING -Edgewater Village Lakeview Dr. 2BR, 2BA, 1CG Villa. Beautifully furnished. New kitchen, laundry, TV. Low Maintenance fee includes Cable TV, Clubhouse, heated pool. Private street. Avail Immed. 863-402-9138 4080Homes for SaleSebringATTENTION: CASH for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 FinancialSERVERS &CART ATTENDANTS needed at Springlake Golf Resort. Apply Monday thru Saturday 10am 5pm. For directions only, call 863-655-0900. 2100Help Wanted WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 385-6155. Then shop till you drop! LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. FIND A SWEETHEART OF A DEAL! Search the News-Sun classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. Classified ads get fast results DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155

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Page 8DNews-SunSunday, January 23, 2011www.newssun.com