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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00962
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 01-09-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:00962
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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Affordable home designPAGE16BDevils trounce TenorocPAGE1BAPPD promotes one, hires anotherPAGE2ANEWS-SUN Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 4 | 75 cents www.newssun .com HighLow 68 48Complete Forecast PAGE 16A Partly sunny and pleasant Forecast Question: Should the city of Sebring outlaw building chain link fences in front yards? Next question: Do you give blood on a regular basis? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Obituaries Margaret Burns Age 97, of Sebring Esther Cook Age 91, of Sebring James Leonard Age 53, of Sebring James Newell Age 90, of Lake Placid Mary Thornburg Age 95, of Sebring Paul Wagner Age 84, of Sebring Harry Whaley Age 81, of Lake Placid Obituaries, Page 6A Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453O nline: www.newssun.com Yes 20.4% No 79.6% 099099401007 Total votes: 108 Arts & Leisure5B Business10A Classifieds12A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar12B Crossword Puzzle15B Dear Abby15B Editorial & Opinion4A Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times15B Senior Scene8B Index locally owned community mindedHeartlandNational Bank Avon Park800 West Main St.863.453.6000Lake Placid600 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.699.1300Sebring327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1300Sun n Lake North5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1322www.heartlandnb.com News-Sun staffSEBRING Highlan ds County Sheriff's Offi ce investigators are trying to determine why a Sebring m an shot his wife and then turn ed the gun on himse lf Wednesday. According to a HCS O press release, deputies we re called to 6402 Cambrid ge Drive at 12:45 p.m. o n Wednesday after two bodi es were discovered at the res idence by a relative. Deputi es found 48-year-old Stac ey Dreessen and 52-year-o ld Lincoln Dreessen dead. On Thursday, the Distri ct 10 Medical Examiner rul ed that Stacey Dreessen's dea th was a homicide and Linco ln Dreesen's death was a su icide. No further information h as been released by the HCSO Anyone with any inform ation about this couple or t he incident is requested to co ntact Det. Mike Huften at 40 27250 or 402-7200. Anyone wishing to rema in anonymous and be eligib le for a cash reward is asked to call Heartland Crim e Stoppers at 1-800-226-TIP S (8477), or on the internet at www.heartlandcrimestoppe rs .com. Anonymity is guara nteed. 2 dead in murdersuicide in Sebring Man shot wife, then himself News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Chelsea and Ryan Logston are regular blood donors and have each donated a total of two gallons. The Logston's make blood donation a family affair by bringing along their kids; Courtney, pictured here, while R.J. and Regan eat cookies in the break room. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING January is National Volunteer Blood Donor Month. There is a good reason for this, beyond the carry over of good will from Christmas. In fact, nationally January is notorious for being the month of fewest donations, said Deah Spires, the donor development coordinator for Florida's Blood Centers, so having a major publicity campaign reminds and encourages individuals to roll up a sleeve right when the need is greatest. Here in Highlands County, however, as winter residents arrive, donations pick up considerably. There is a paradox, however, Spires said. Just as there are more people giving blood during the season, there are also more people needing blood; often donations are offset by transfusions. "Last year on the blood mobile we collected 4,181 units," Spires said. "That's pretty average." She added the total represented a great deal of effort. "We're out there six days a week and maintain contact with churches, schools, and businesses." she said. "There is no consistency, we have to work it." Season of giving continues See BLOOD, page 5A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Despite the state of the economy, a business incubator in Avon Park has already achieved some success and has filled the allocated spaces within a few short months of opening. "I am very impressed with the success so far. I am pleased and admire the APCRAand the city for putting it together," said Elmer Hall, Chairman of EDC's Business Accelerator committee. "It is an ugly job market out there and will be for years to come, people can move, take lesser jobs or start their own. We hope to support all three," Hall said. Avon Park started its business incubator in July after a joint effort from the Highland County Economic Development Commission, the City and the Community Redevelopment Agency partnered to get the ball rolling. "This is a good thing for Avon Park," said Main Street Redevelopment member Will Bennett in a meeting earlier in the year. "This has the potential to create jobs in the downtown area, and it has the potential to spin off new businesses that will continue to create jobs." The original plan was to look at renovating the upstairs portion of the Avon Park Community Center at a cost of $44,000, but after the lett er went out inviting others to offer su ggestions, local business owner Ca rl Cool and his wife Maureen thoug ht their building at 203 W. Main S t. would be a good fit. "We had the office space, and t he building is set up for this. It ju st seemed to be a good idea," Carl Co ol Avon Park's business incubator a success so far See BUSINESS, page 7A Follow the News-Sun on www.facebook.com/newssun News Sun pho to by SAMANTH A GHOLA R Former Sebring Blue Streak and NFLstar Ronnie Lippett visited The Boys & Girls Club on Thursday afternoon. Lippett shared his personal stories of bullying and how he stay out of trouble while striving to achieve a goal. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING The children at the local Boys & Girls Club got a treat from a famous visitor on Thursday afternoon. Former NFLstar Ronnie Lippett stopped by to share a few inspirational words with the young members. Lippett, who was a standout at Sebring High School before moving on to star at the University of Miami and then the NFL, told stories of how he was bullied when he was in elementary school. He asked the students if any of them had ever been bullied and several hands went up. Lippett then began telling the kids what he did to avoid being caught up in trouble at a young age. "I wasn't very big when I was in elementary school and this other kid used to pick on me all the time, so I told a teacher and after a while the bully left me alone," said Lippett. Lippett, who was an all-pro defensive back with the New England Patriots in 1986 and 1987 and played in Super Bowl XX, explained to the students that kids shouldn't allow others to be bullied either. "If you have a chance to help somebody, then do so," said Lippett. "It's just the right thing to do, and you never know what that person could do for you later on in life," Lippett said. Lippett reiterated the importance of being responsible and staying level-headed when it comes to bully situations and went on to explain that not everyone is looking to bully you, but to drag you down the wrong path as well. Hometown hero Lippett visits Boys & Girls Club of Sebring Former NFL star delivers anti-bullying message LIPPETT, page 7A

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By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK The Avon P ark Police Department prom oted one officer and hired a s econd one on Friday in order t o establish a firm chain of c ommand, according to Chief M ichael J. Rowan. Jason Lister was promoted f rom sergeant to commander, a nd John King was hired into a lieutenant position. Rowan served as comm ander, and his promotion to c hief left that position open. "Jason was the logical c hoice. He has the experie nce, and he was already filli ng in for some of the work t hat was there," Rowan said. Lister has 15 years of e xperience as a law enforcem ent officer, 13 of those y ears in Avon Park. King has more than 30 years in law enforcement, and before his retirement a few years ago was the resident Officer in Charge for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement for more than 20 years. He was responsible, according to Rowan, for overseeing FDLE investigations in Highlands, Hardee, DeSoto and Okeechobee counties. Before that, King served as a Detective Sergeant for the Highlands County Sheriff. "John is bringing a lot of experience to the department. He is also bringing a lot of knowledge that he is willing to pass along to younger officers, especially in the patrol division," Rowan explained. Rowan took some heat from city council on Monday for his decisions. The elected officials showed some concern over financial matters, but Rowan assured them that he was well within his budget, and his duties, in making the moves. "Keep in mind that this is being done without adding one cent to the budget. All I am doing is moving a sergeant position to a commander and replacing a sergeant that we were going to hire anyhow with a lieutenant," Rowan said. "We get a lot of experience in key leadership positions and we stay within the budget set by council." "I am going to hold the city manager directly responsible because I think it's his job to assist you to interpret the guidelines that run the city," Councilman Parke Sutherland said. But Rowan countered that adding a lieutenant would actually save the city money in overtime. "Let's say that I have someone call out sick. Now we have to bring in an offduty officer to cover, and pay that officer overtime. With a lieutenant, not only will the call out get covered, but there is no overtime," Rowan explained. Special to the News-Sun During the five years that S ebring author and journalist P atricia Pond wrote as a corr espondent to the News-Sun, s he published more than 100 f eature articles with her own p hotos. She wrote about the peop le, the activities and the natu ral resources of Central F lorida. Some of these articles f ormed the theme for her b ook, "Stories from Florida's H eartland: How People and T heir Homes Connect Our P ast to Our Present." But it was her stories about t he historical houses and the f amilies who lived in them t hat drew the most attention. "Atwo-part series about t he Sears houses in H ighlands County became t he story that wouldn't die' p eople couldn't hear enough a bout them. I had invitations t o speak to groups and lect ure at South Florida C ommunity College," Pond r ecently told Carole Goad, a rchivist for the Sebring H istorical Society. Goad is working with Pond t o prepare a display of some o f these articles for her a ppearance at the Society's q uarterly meeting Jan. 22 at n oon in the Sebring Civic C enter. The author will talk about h er experiences in discovering the history and architecture that characterize the communities of Sebring, Avon Park and Lake Placid. She emphasized that the stories are about the people who lived in the houses, not just architectural features. "I was able to trace some families back four and five generations, interviewing the children and grandchildren of the founders and settlers of the towns," she said. Adramatic story emerged when she followed the history of Sebring's popular Twin Oaks Tea Room. "From the son of the original builder, I heard that more than 80 years ago, the house witnessed the heroic act of a young father saving his family during one of Florida's worst hurricanes. This old vernacular house has been in three different locations and served many practical purposes. The house's journey and the family's story created a new chapter," Pond said. She also researched background details that document and embellish the stories, including amusing and quirky anecdotes. The book is illustrated with 50 photos, contemporary and archival. Its beautiful full-color cover features a montage of 33 photos of the people and places described in the stories. The price is $20 per copy and Pond is donating half the proceeds to the non-profit organizations handling the sale of the book. It is available from: Sebring Historical Society, in the Sebring Library building, rear entrance, 321 W. Center Ave., 471-2522, Monday through Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Avon Park Historical Society Depot Museum, (off West Main Street), 3 North Museum Ave., 453-3525 or 414-3316. Lake Placid Mural Society at the Lake Placid Welcome Center, 18 N. Oak Ave. (one block off Interlake Boulevard), 531-0211. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South € Sebring, Florida 33870 A Harbor Point Media Company OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday PHONE: 863-385-6155 MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954 NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870 USPS … ISSN 0163-3988 Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry office(s)CIRCULATION SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before 11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their account. Please call 385-6155.SUBSCRIPTION RATES12 mo.7% FL taxTotal HOME DELIVERY$60.46$4.23$64.69 IN FLORIDA MAIL92.236.4698.69 OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL105.99105.99 Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. Romona Washington … Publisher and Executive Editor863-385-6155, ext. 515 Personal Injury & Wrongful Death Medical & Nursing Home Malpractice Workers'Compensatioin Social Security Disability Automobile Accidents K A Y L O R R & & K A Y L O R R P A M A R K K K A Y L O R Lawyers, Past and Present. Helping the Injured Since 1968205 S. Commerce Ave € Sebring, Florida 863-382-1900 Jan. 5 111619213745x:2Next jackpot $13 millionJan. 1 51626414853x:2 Dec. 28 172528454748x:2 Jan. 7 210182136 Jan. 6 2481420 Jan. 5 1251720 Jan. 4 1112202127 Jan. 7 (n) 2220 Jan. 7 (d) 6839 Jan. 6 (n) 9489 Jan. 6 (d) 4664 Jan. 7(n) 58 4 Jan. 7 (d) 18 3 Jan. 6 (n) 39 7 Jan. 6(d) 77 3 Jan. 7 913212616 Jan. 4 41011141 Dec. 31 789288 Dec. 28 152135425 Jan. 5 2226323840 PB: 7 PP: 5Next jackpot $51 millionJan. 1 1822374754 PB: 36 PP: 2 Dec. 29 316182037 PB: 30 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center Courtesy photo Sebring author Patricia Pond displays some of the articles that she wrote during her five years as a correspondent to the News Sun. The articles inspired the theme of her recently published book Stories From Florida's Heartland: How People and Their Homes Connect Our Past to Our Present.' News-Sun articles inspire book Zwayer set to speak at chamberLAKE PLACID Eric Zwayer, Highlands County tax collector, will be the guest speaker at the Greater Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce January membership luncheon. The membership luncheon will be held at noon Wednesday at the Lake Placid Elks Lodge. The luncheon is sponsored by the Highlands County Economic Development Council. Cost is $8 per person. RSVPthe chamber on Monday. Menu selection is soup and salad buffet.Homeowners group meets MondaySEBRING The monthly meetings of the Highlands County Homeowners Association are held on the second Monday of each month at the Sebring Country Estates Clubhouse, 3240 Grand Prix Ave. This month's meeting is open to the public and will be held from 9-11 a.m. Free coffee, hot tea and donuts are provided. Suzanne Crews, R.N., Parish Nursing coordinator, will present a program on diabetes. Diabetes, also known as the silent killer, when left untreated, can lead to heart attack, stroke, amputations, blindness and kidney failure. Type 2 diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in the United States. Debra Caruso, RN, MPH, CDE, Healthy Start director for Highlands County Health Department, will educate guests on the diabetes related programs available through the Health Department. Call 273-5182 for information.AP Lakes plans Jan. 15 breakfastAVON PARK The Avon Park Lakes Association's first breakfast of the winter at the clubhouse, 2714 Nautilus Drive, will be from 8-9:3 0 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 15. Th e menu is sausage gravy over homemade biscuits o r pancakes, sausage links and scrambled eggs, with coffee and orange juice. The public is invited an d the price is $4 for adults and $2 for children. Sebring Chamber plans membership lunch on ThursdaySEBRING The Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce Membershi p Luncheon will be held at 11:45 a.m. Thursday at T he Island View Lakeside Restaurant & Pub, Sun 'N Lake. The luncheon is sponsored by Florida Hospital Heartland Division. Cost is $10 per person. RSVPthe chamber on or before Monday.Tanglewood presents the Fabulous Hub CapsSEBRING The Hubcaps are heralded as one of the best oldies "Show Bands" in the cou ntry. Their talents in the vocal, instrumental and comedy will entertain and bring back memories of the past music. Performing together since 1974, this sevenpiece band shows no sign s of slowing down. The Hubcaps continue to capt ivate audiences with their high-energy tributes to original artists like Little Richard, James Brown, Tina Turner, Bobby Darin Sonny and Cher, The Flamingos, Ray Charles, The Beach Boys, Willie Nelson and Patsy Cline, Elton John and Frank Sinatra just to name a few With an extensive repertoire of Doo-Wop group harmony, Classic Rock an d Roll, Rock-a-Billy, Motown and R & B musi c. The Fabulous Hubcaps look forward to proving that "Rock and Roll is Alive and Well!" COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued on page 6A APPD promotes one officer, hires another News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE Newly appointed Commander Jason Lister (left) and Lt. John King are administered their oaths of office by Avon Chief Michael Rowan on Friday at the Avon Park Police Department. Program features An Evening of Memories'Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Tickets are now on sale for t he annual banquet of the Historical Society of A von Park. It takes place Sat., Feb. 12, at the H otel Jacaranda, with a social hour at 6:30 p.m. a nd dinner, featuring prime rib and staffed c hicken breast, at 7. Cost is $30 and tickets are a vailable from the hotel, the Depot Museum and t he Avon Park Chamber of Commerce. The program is a change of pace from past b anquets. Called "An Evening of Memories," it w ill consist of members of the audience telling their stories of Avon Park. "The idea for this program came from Charlotte Truitt's book, APeople's History of Avon Park, 2010,'" said Jean Jordan, banquet committee member. The recently published book contains 52 stories from Avon Park residents. "The program is open to anyone wanting to participate," Jordan said, "so bring your memories to share." Also on the agenda is the election of board members for a three-year term. Election of officers for 2011 takes place at the board meeting on Feb. 21. "APeople's History" will be on sale at the banquet, along with other items from the Depot Museum's gift shop. For more information, call Donna Faucett, banquet chairperson, at 453-3284. Avon Park Historical Society to hold annual banquet

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 3A PUBLIC AUCTIONSunday, January 9, 2011Preview 12 Noon € Auction 1 PM Quality Inn and Suites 6525 US 27 North € Sebring, FLWe have not been doing any auctions for the last nine months. We have accumulated a lot of items.KING SIZE MAHOGANY POSTER BED 7' ROUND DINING TABLE W/SIX CHAIRS, SERVER & LAZY SUSAN BRONZE SCULPTURE & FOUNTAINS CHAIRS € LAMPS € CRYSTAL PAINTINGS € PRINTS € MIRRORS COLLECTIONS OFHAND BLOWNGERMAN ART GLASS CARPETS HAND PAINTED MOROCCAN LAMPTABLE HAND PAINTED CHINESE BLANKET CHEST VINTAGE PURPLE VELOUR LOVE SEAT 54" TEMPLE VASES € TAPESTRY CUSTOMDESIGNER PICTURES & PRINTS TWO LIMITED EDITION CANVASREPRODUCTIONS OFORIGINALOIL PAINTINGSBY RED SKELTON, NUMBERED & SIGNED BY RED INCLUDING SEAL& REDS FINGERPRINT JEWELRY 18KT WHITE GOLD RING, 18.42KT WHITE GOLD TANZANITE PLUS 1.15KT DIAMOND, 18KT WHITE GOLD RING, 6.22KT COLOMBIAN EMERALD PLUS .66KT DIAMOND, 18KT W/GOLD DIAMOND BRACELET, 6.11KT WHITE PRINCESSCUT DIAMOND, 18KT W/GOLD RING W/3 ROUND (1.84KT) DIAMOND SOLITAIRES, 14KT W.G. RING WITH EXTREMELY RARE 17KT COLOR CHANGE TANZANITEMUCH MORE „ TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTIONTerms: Cash, Check, MasterCard, Visa & Discover. 10% BP cash & ck 12% cc. Items subject to prior sales. Delivery Available. Auctioneer … Lee Fleming AB884 AU1224941-350-8964

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Water is such an important, p leasant part of our lives we o ften take it for granted, w hich can be a problem, b ecause water is more than i mportant. It was and still is, e ssential for life. To drive that point home, h ere are a few water facts as o utlined in a report by the I nstitute of Science and P ublic Affairs at Florida State U niversity, published in 2 002. Its lead author is E lizabeth D. Purdum. All over the world, water is c ontinuously circulating b etween the sky, land and sea. It is the only substance that e xists in nature as a liquid, a s olid and a gas. Unlike most liquids, howe ver, water expands rather t han shrinks when cooled, w hich is why water is lighter w hen frozen and floats. Plants and animals are b etween 50 and 97 percent w ater the human body is 7 0 percent water. The vast majority of the w ater on Earth, however, is s alt water. Only 3 percent is fresh water, and only 1 percent of that is available for use. Here in Florida we depend entirely on local rainfall to meet our fresh water needs. The state has a hydrologic divide that runs roughly from Gainesville to Daytona Beach. Only 44 percent of the state's rain falls south of this divide, yet the area is home to 78 percent of the state's permanent population and accounts for 75 percent of the state's water use. Rain water flows through the state's canals, rivers and lakes from which many communities pump their irrigation. Rain also drains slowly into the aquifer, where it is pumped out for human consumption. With a state population of more than 15 million people, our heavy water use has contributed to the shrinkage of lakes, creation of sink holes and saltwater intrusion. But changing weather patterns have significant impact as well. Take the most recent information from the South Florida Water Management District October, November and December of 2010 were the three driest months since record keeping began in 1932. Rain fall averaged less than three inches throughout SFWMD's 16 counties, which is roughly 35 percent of the normal. And that drought came on top of a year that was already drier than normal; and 2010 came after several years of below-average rain fall. All of this means we need to remain water conscious and continue to do our best conserving water. Oh, we know who wants to hear, yet again, how important it is to turn off the faucet while brushing our teeth, and who wants to shift from automatically controlling an irrigation system to getting out and doing it by hand. It's all such a nuisance. Sadly, we can kick and scream as much as we like, fume with the perceived unfairness, blame our politicians, utility heads and scientists or simply ignore the situation. But, nature is what it is. We would do best sticking to reality. An inconvenience, while annoying, is nothing compared to dying of thirst. Page 4ANews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION TODAY'SEDITORIAL 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com So today the new Congress met for the first time. Among other things, the new lawmakers voted that new bills had to cite their constitutional authority. There are also plans to read the Constitution on the floor of the House later this week. Some people have reacted quite negatively to this last bit. According to The Washington Post, some Democrats are concerned that the document is being treated like the word of God. The article quotes Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D NY) as saying, among other things, "You are not supposed to worship your constitution. You are supposed to govern your government by it." I happen to agree with Representative Nadler on this statement. I just fail to see how wanting that to happen and actually reading the Constitution is equal to worshipping it. I talk a lot about the Constitution. I spent a lot of time during the health care debate asking someone anyone to show me the constitutional authority for the federal government to take over health care. No one responded, which makes me think no one else can find it either. Am I the only one who cares about this? The federal government has taken on more and more powers over the years. And we as a people have not stopped to ask them whether or not they had the authority to do so. Now the federal government is far larger and more powerful than the founding fathers ever dreamed of. Perhaps we are at fault because we ourselves know little about the document that we base our form of government on. How many of us have sat down and read the Constitution for ourselves? Well, if you have access to a computer you can get your hands on a copy of the Constitution. All you have to do is point your Web rowser to this site: http://libertyonline.hypermall.com/constitution.html. It is there for you to download, print out, and peruse at your leisure. It's not easy reading, because it's written in 18th century English, which is n ot exactly like 21st century English. If you try to skim the thing, you might not mi sunderstand what it's saying For example, there's this paragraph talking about wh o can be elected as a Representative: "No person shall be a Representative who shall n ot have attained to the age of twenty five years, and been seven years a citizen of the United States, and who sha ll not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that state in which he shall be chosen." Read that fast enough an d you'll come away thinking that a Representative shoul dn't live in the state he repre sents. Actually, haven't we had one or two Congressme n or Senators who tried to pu ll something like that? I'm all for reading the Constitution. Not only on t he floor of the House of Representatives, but in our schools and homes as well. It's only the foundation of our system of government, after all. And if I recall correctly, didn't the 112th Congress a ll swear that they would "pre serve, defend, and protect" this very Constitution? Wouldn't it be a lot easier t o keep that promise if they actually knew what the thin g said? No, I don't think we need to worship the Constitution But surely there is nothing wrong with respecting and knowing it. And I cannot se e anything wrong with it bein g read out loud in the House. Who knows? Maybe a repr esentative or two will learn something from it. And tha t could be a good thing. Laura Ware is a Sebring re sident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady @ embarqmail.com Reading the Constitution Laura's Look Laura Ware EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automati cally rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words We have to make room for everybody. Letters of loca l concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; o r e-mail editor@newssun.com. To make sure the editorial pages aren't dominated b y the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion o f the staff or editors of the News-Sun. All items will run on a first-come basis as space per mits, although more timely ones could be moved up. We believe your viewpoints are just as important as any community leader or government official, so conside r this a personal invitation to get your two cents in. TheNews-Sunhas a long history of encouraging public dis cussion through letters, guest columns, and Reader' s Response questionnaires. Providing this forum for ou r Every year about now, the media i ntroduce us to the most fascinating p eople of the prior year. They always overlook people like J oe Horne. Atailgunner in the Army Air Corps d uring World War II, Horne and his c rew enjoyed 11 successful missions. They didn't expect to survive their 1 2th: orders to bomb a heavily guarded m unitions plant in Munich. As they approached their target, H orne fought off German fighter p lanes. German flak was another matt er. Heavy flak hit the plane hard. It lost a ltitude so fast that its windows shatt ered. The landing gear was destroyed. Their only hope was to make it a cross the Swiss border for a crash l anding. As the plane's belly hit the ground as uprooted earth and stones w hipped through the broken windows the pilot told the crew to evacuate b efore the plane exploded. Horne dived out a window and was b ruised and cut as he tumbled along the g round but he survived. The Swiss would detain him in i nternment camps in Adelboden, S witzerland, for six months camps, w rites Cathryn Prince in "Shot from the S ky," that were a dark secret of World W ar II. So long as he did as told, he was free t o move about the town. He learned to s ki and even had time to fall in love w ith a beautiful Swiss girl. But he and a few others crossed the line when they got into a fistfight with Nazi sympathizers. They spent 30 days in the Wauwilermoos military prison in Lucerne, where they received little food or water and occasional beatings. After his release there, he and his crew were about to attempt an escape from their camp when word arrived that all Americans detained in Switzerland were being repatriated. On leave in Pittsburgh, Horne attended a dance. He fell hard for a striking woman across the room love at first sight. Her name was Dorothy Kvederis. He would marry her four years later. He joined the post office in 1946, when he was discharged. After two and a half years of attending college at night, Horne decided to suspend his studies. He was happy with his life. By 1954, he and Dorothy had saved enough to buy a house the house in which he still lives. He and Dorothy would be blessed with a daughter and two sons a teacher, dentist and corporate executive, respectively. He loved his job. During the last 40 years of his 46-year postal career, he delivered mail in a predominantly black section of Pittsburgh, PA. Despite numerous opportunities to take over cushier routes inside air-conditioned high-rise buildings, he loved his route and would give it up only when he retired in 1992. He and Dorothy finally had time to enjoy life. They traveled. They attended church every morning. They spent time with family and friends. Their carefree existence ended on Oct. 4, 1992, when Dorothy suffered a stroke. Horne would spend the next 14 years caring for her getting no more than two hours of sleep every night until she died in 2006. Now 85, he misses her desperately, but his days are full. The old Irishman (his grandfather changed the family name from "Horan" to "Horne," hoping it would help him find work at a time when the Irish faced "need not apply" signs) is a passionate Notre Dame fan. He has a zest for living, a fine wit and he puts a spring in the step of anyone lucky enough to cross his path. Yeah, he was never famous or rich, but he was surely influential. Great civilizations are built on the shoulders of such giants. If only the media featured more people like Joe Horne at this time every year. Tom Purcell, a freelance writer is also a humor columnist for the Pittsburgh TribuneReview, and is nationally syndicated exclusively by Cagle Cartoons newspaper syndicate. E-mail Tom at Purcell@ca g lecartoons.com. Fascinating doesn't necessarily mean famous Guest Column Tom Purcell Water covers 75 percent of the Earth, just not most of Florida T here's nothing more refreshing than diving into a swimming pool on a hot day; or more relaxing than f ishing Lake June-in-Winter; or more c ivilizing than a long hot shower.

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Associated PressPITTSBURGH The tech slang app" was voted the 2010 "Word of the Y ear" Friday by the American Dialect S ociety, beating out Cookie Monster's nom, nom, nom, nom." The shortened slang term for a comp uter or smart phone application was p icked by the linguists group as the w ord that best sums up the country's p reoccupation last year. "Nom" a chat-, tweet-, and textf riendly syllable that connotes "yummy f ood" was the runner-up. It derives f rom the Sesame Street character's s ound as he devours his favorite food. The vote came at a Pittsburgh hotel ballroom during the national conference of the Linguistic Society of America, an umbrella group that includes the Dialect Society. About 120 of the 1,000 conference attendees voted in the "competition" with neither side entirely satisfied. Critics of "app" said the word was somewhat stale, while proponents said 2010 was the year the word became omnipresent with one arguing that her elderly mother knows the term, even though the woman doesn't have any apps. "Nom" supporters simply liked it's cheeriness. "Some years there's a very clear choice," said Allan Metcalf, the Dialect Society's executive secretary. In 2001, for instance, the Word of the Year was 9/11. "I think this past year there wasn't anything clearly dominant," Metcalf said. "But there's no question 'app'is a very powerful word." Though the "Word Of The Year" is perhaps the best known item on the national conference agenda, it's hardly the most serious. The program includes discussion of such subjects as school curriculum and raising education standards. And that's one reason Metcalf said the "Word Of The Year" isn't universally popular among the conferees. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 5A Ask us about DirecTV 4.1 Cu.Ft. 2 Oven Racks Lift Up Slab Cooktop 2600W Bake 3000W Broil$599Electric Range Model #WDS6063860ŽDLP HD, 3D Ready,8 Color Processor, 2 Component/Composite Video Inputs 21 Cu.Ft.Top Freezer, 2 Glass Shelves, Gallon Door StorageMODEL #FRT21HS6JQRefrigerator WASHER & DRYER 46WX800U, BDX3000 & 2 PR. FPT-AGO1 BUNDLE PAC ALL 3D46WX800U 46Ž240 Hz HDTV,3D Ready, Built In Wi-Fi,Photo Frame Capacity, 1080P Full HD Cinespeed, High Rec PC Input FOR PAIR WHILE THEY LAST$549MODEL #FEF316BQ BDX3000 Full HD 3D Playback,Built In Wi-Fi, Picture In Picture,Dolby True HD & DTS-HD Master Audio,Internet Streaming Capability FPT-AG013D Glasses (2 Pair) Large Glass Area,Wide Frame Design, Adjustable Nose Pad, 75 Hrs.Battery Life All For $1995 WASHER & DRYER Model #WDSR2120JWW27ŽTop Load, 3.2 Cu.Ft., 8 Wash Cycles, Flex Care AgitatorModel #DBLR333EGWW27ŽElectric Dryer, 5.8 Cu.Ft.,3 Dry CyclesBISQUE ONLY WHILE THEY LAST$299WHITE & BISQUE WHILE THEY LAST $1099FOR PAIR WHILE THEY LASTModel #MVWB300WQ28ŽTop Load, 4.7 Cu.Ft., 3 Temp, 10 Wash Cycles, Pure Clean Rinse Model #MEDB200VQ29ŽElectric Dryer, Supersize Capacity, 7 Cycles, 5 Temp Settings, Front Lint Filter$999 Television $169WHITE & BLACK ONLYModel #MWV150K1.5 Cu.Ft.,900 Watts, 10 Power Levels, Touch Control, 12ŽGlass Turntable MICROWAVE Spires said her top comm unity contributors are T anglewood and Buttonwood B ay, with The Palms a close t hird. "The best employer is C ross Country," she said, and high school students a re wonderful. "For example, in March l ast year we collected 744 p ints of blood, mostly b ecause of the students. In A pril we only collected 389 p ints, because they were on v acation." The blood mobile is a v ital tool. While many people come t o the collection center on U .S. 27, it is far more comm on for blood banks to go to d onors than it is for donors t o come to the blood bank. If it's not convenient, peop le don't do it," Spires said. The economy has hurt d onations as well, she said, a nd in two ways. When people are laid off, t hey tend to forget about t hings like donating blood, e specially if they have been u sed to the blood mobile c oming around. On the other hand, many e mployers are not replacing t he people who have been let g o, so there are still fewer donors visiting the blood mobile at local businesses. Ablood donation may be made every 56 days. The Logstons make it a family affair when Ryan and Courtney visit the center throughout the year. The couple and their three children R.J., Regan, and Chelsea all were present at the center on Saturday. Courtney, who had donated earlier in the morning, watched over the three kids as daddy Ryan took his turn. "We always come together and take turns and watch the kids," Courtney explained. In fact it was Courtney and her mother who inspired Ryan to become a blood donor 10 years ago. "Well, when I met her, she and her mom were always donating and that's how I got into it," Ryan said. "I've been donating since I was 16," said Courtney. The couple shared orange juice and the kids munched on cookies as Ryan finished up his turn. Ryan had last donated on Nov. 1 and has donated over two gallons to date. Continued from page 1A STOP BY AND SEE ALL OF THE GREAT DEALS INSIDEAS WELL ASOUTSIDEON THESALESTABLES!$10 … 20 … 30 SALE283 US 27 North € SEBRINGVillage Fountain Plaza www.thebulbbin.com Assorted Lamps & Mirrors Ceiling Fans Chandeliers The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, Jan. 6, 2011: Coy Lee Bellamy, 24, of Lake Placid, was charged with battery. Benigno Calvillo, 23, of Frostproof, was charged with criminal mischief. Michael Craig Darge, 35, of Hudson, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference possession of cannabis and possession of oxycodone. Betty Ann Faircloth, 40, of Avon Park, was charged with possession and or use of narcotic equipment, possession of a controlled substance without a prescription, possession of marijuana, and possession of a harmful new legend drug without a prescription. Mark Ravi Morris Fields, 41, of Avon Park, was charged with failure to appear reference battery. Kamesh Lautrice Liafortune, 20, of Bradenton, was charged with failure to appear reference battery. Tony Glen McMillan, 39, of Sebring, was charged with driving while license suspended. Alvin Tyrone Moses, 48, of Tallahassee, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference uttering forged bills, grand theft. David Allen North, 44, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of probation reference aggravated battery. Luis Gustavo Ramos, 30, of Lake Placid, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without valid license. Gabriel Garnica Rosales, 23, of Lake Placid, was arrested on two out-of-county warrants reference DUI and driving without valid license. Jarcara Diona Taylor, 23, of Avon park, was charged with petit theft. Brandi Artika Thomas, 23, of Avon Park, was charged with auto theft. Albert Cheaviler, 23, of Lake Placid, was charged with driving while license suspended. Lisa Ann Wilson, 37, of Sebring, was charged with city ordinance. POLICEBLOTTER News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Ryan Logston is tended to by phlebotomist Kessy Garcia on Saturday morning, while donating blood in Sebring. Blood donations are always needed Linguists vote app' Word of the Year for 2010

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Doors and snack bar opens at 6 p.m. The show is at 7 p.m. today. Tickets are $12, available at the door. Tanglewood is one-half mile north of Walmart on U.S. 27. For information, call 402-0763.Parkinson's support group meets MondaySEBRING The Parkinson's disease support group for the Highlands County area will meet at 10 a.m. Monday at First Baptist Church of Sebring, corner of Lemon and Pine streets. The program this month will be Faye Kern, coordinator of the American Parkinson's Disease Association. She will present the latest updates on Parkinson's treatments. All persons with Parkinson's disease and their families are welcome to attend. There is no charge. For information, call 4536589 or 453-6419. The Highlands County Parkinson's Support Group is part of the national network of support groups affiliated with the American Parkinson's Disease Association. More than 1 million Americans have Parkinson's disease. Today people with Parkinson's and their families can find help and information from their local support group.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK Highlands County Moose Lodge 2494 will have Tiki Hut music by Shirley and Gary today. The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 will have NFLBig Ticket on the screen at 1 p.m. today. Karaoke by Peg and Perry is set for 5-8 p.m. Tuesday. For details and menu selection, call 452-9853. LAKE PLACID The Veterans of Foreign Wars 3880 Ladies Auxiliary will meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday. For details, call 699-5444. The Lake Placid Moose Lodge 2374 will host karaoke with Wild Bill today. For details, call 4650131. The Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 will have music by Frankie Monday. The BPOE board will meet at 7:30 p.m. The BPOE meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday. For details, call 465-2661. SEBRING The Sebring Moose Lodge will have bingo at 1 p.m. today. Texas Hold-em is set for 7-10 p.m. Monday. For more information, call 6553920. Sebring Eagles Aerie 4240 will host its monthly karaoke/birthday party for the month from 4-7 p.m. today. Jewels in the Night Entertainment will spin the karaoke discs. For more information, call the Aerie at 655-4007.West Sebring VFD meets TuesdaySEBRING The West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department's next annual board meeting will be at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Station House No. 9, 2300 Longview Court off of Sebring Parkway. Refreshments will be served. The public is welcome to attend. Anyone interested in joining the West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department may call 471-5344.Woman's Club to hear about Safe HouseSEBRING The GFWC Woman's Club of Sebring, 4260 Lakeview Drive, will meet at noon Monday. The Public Affairs Department will host the event. Acatered luncheon of Kentucky Fried Chicken and fixings will be offered at $5 each. Lucy Mull, Safe House outreach specialist, will be the guest speaker. Phone cards are the Safe House project this month. Call 385-7268 for information about club membership. The annual spaghetti dinner will be held from 5-7 p.m. Thursday for an $8 donation. Walk-ins are welcome.2011 Commodities Certification setSEBRING Each client will need to certify for 2011 in order to receive commodities beginning in January. Certification for 2011 will be from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Wednesday. Commodities certification and distribution for January will be from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday and Friday. Call 385-7548 for any questions. The Salvation Army is at 3135 Kenilworth Blvd.Lunch Bunch meets MondaySEBRING The Fairmount Mobile Estates Lunch Bunch will meet at 11 a.m. Monday at Homers Smorgasbord. Members will hold their annual auction. Bring a gift valued at $5 or more to be auctioned. The proceeds will provide operating expenses for the coming year. There will also be a 50/50 drawing and door prizes. Hosts are Lois and Jim Stausholm, and Dee and Doug Ingraham.Recreation Club plans eventsSEBRING The Sebring Recreation Club will host the following events this week: Monday 1 p.m., Ladies Social Club; 1:15 p.m., shuffleboard scrambles; 7 p.m., membership meeting. Tuesday 9 a.m., county tournament; 12:30 p.m., bridge; 3 p.m., ping pong. Wednesday 1 p.m., pinochle; 1:15 p.m., shuffleboard league; 5:15 p.m., line dancing lessons; 6:30 p.m., line dancing. For details, call (262) 2243819.Book publisher to return for writers meetingSEBRING The Florida Writer's Association group, "Sebring Scribbler's and Scribes," will hold its first meeting of the new year at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the clubhouse in Sebring Village, 4343 Schumacher Road, just west of U.S. 27 near the Walmart. The guest speaker is Ted Bowman, who will continue his discussion on solving publishing mysteries and missing the stumbling blocks and pitfalls of the industry. For more information, call Barbara Beswick at 4029181.MS Support Group meets TuesdaySEBRING The Multiple Sclerosis Support Group meets the second Tuesday of each month at Highlands Regional Medical Center at 7 p.m. The next meeting is this week. The meeting will be held in the second floor class room. Friends and family a re welcome. For information, call 465 3138.Highlands Park has annual meetingLAKE PLACID The annual meeting of Highland s Park Estates Association w ill be held at 1:30 p.m. today i n the clubhouse, in the Beachpark on Lake Istokpoga at the end of Nichel, which becomes Dee r Glen. Election of officers and directors for the next year takes place during this meeting. The board is also develop ing a wish list for future pu rchases and inclusion in the next budget. Take part in th e decision making by attending the meetings. If you have seen any inte resting birds or animals in your yard or neighborhood, share the information with neighbors. Everyone in the development and guests are invited Visit with your neighbors, learn of future plans and take part in the process while enjoying delicious refreshments.Gem and Mineral Club meets TuesdaySEBRING The next meeting of the Highlands Gem and Mineral Club will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday i n the rear fellowship hall of the Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway. There are no fees or dues, and all wh o are interested in lapidary ar e welcome. Carolyn Beahm will ente rtain with her adventures at William Holland School of Lapidary Arts last August and her trip to Spain, Portugal and South American throughout December. The birthstone for Januar y is garnet. If you have some specimens, show them off. Some club materials will be available for making additions to rock collection s. Call 453-7054 for more information. Margaret BurnsMargaret M. Burns, 97, o f Sebring died Jan. 2, 2 011. Born in Brooklyn, N .Y., she has lived in H ighlands County for 22 y ears. She was a switchb oard operator and a librari an. She was a member at S t. James Catholic Church i n Lake Placid. She is survived by her s isters, Mary Grote and H annah Lynott. Amemorial service will b e at St. James Catholic C hurch, Lake Placid, i mmediately following the 9 a.m. Mass Friday, Jan. 1 4. Arrangements entrusted t o Chandler Funeral Home, L ake Placid. Esther CookEsther M. Cook, 91, of S ebring died Jan. 1, 2011. S he was a native of B rockings, S.D., moving to t he area in 1999. She was a F oster Parent. She is survived by child ren, Sharon Handy, Susan C rannell, Sandra Cook, M arcy Cook, Beverly Kilts, S teven Cook, Donald C ook, and Scott Cook; b rother, Everett Pierce; sist ers, Clarissa and Winifred; 1 7 grandchildren and 35 g reat-grandchildren Morris Funeral Chapel, S ebring, was in charge of a rrangements.James LeonardJames Allen "Bud" L eonard, 53, of Sebring d ied Jan. 4, 2011. Born in M ineral Wells, Texas, he m oved to Sebring in 1975. H e was a truck driver and w orked at Highlands Ridge G olf Course. He is survived by his d aughter, Jessica Pimentel; s ister, Barbara Bateman; a nd three grandchildren. Amemorial service will b e held at 2 p.m. Sunday, J an. 16 at the StephensonN elson Funeral Home C hapel, Sebring.James NewellJames Newell, 90, of Lake Placid died Jan. 5, 2010. B orn in Danville, Ky., he h ad been a resident of H ighlands County for 10 y ears. He served his count ry as a Marine for 31 y ears. He retired as an i nsurance salesman and t hen became owner of a s tove shop in Gahanna, O hio. He is survived by his w ife of 26 years, Betty; s on, James L.; stepchild ren, Robert, Richard, R aymond, and Randall R abe, Roxanne McNeer, R olenda Sawyer, and R enee Gonzales; two g randchildren and eight g reat-grandchildren. Words of comfort to the f amily may be sent to w ww.scottfuneralservices.c om. Arrangements entrusted to Scott Funeral Home, Lake Placid.Mary ThornburgMary M. Thornburg, 95, of Sebring, died Jan. 6, 2011. Born in Accident, Md., She is survived by a son, Herman; a daughter, Ruth Ann Wolfe; a sister, Lena Beitzel; eight grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren and nine greatgreat-grandchildren. Amemorial service will be held at 10 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 23 at Christ Fellowship Church, New Life Way. StephensonNelson Funeral Home, Sebring, is in charge of arrangements.Paul WagnerPaul Wagner, 84, of Sebring died Jan. 5, 2011. Born in Washington, DC, he moved to Sebring in 1983. He was a U.S. Navy veteran and retired as a bookkeeper in the door manufacturing industry in California. He is survived by his sisters, Nancy Soderland and Katherine Farrow. The family will receive friends from 1-2 p.m. Monday, Jan. 10 at Morris Funeral Chapel, Sebring, with a service to follow at 2 p.m. Military honors will be at Lakeview Memorial Gardens. Condolences may be expressed at www.morrisfuneralchapel.com.Harry WhaleyHarry L. "Bucky" Whaley, 81, of Lake Placid, died Jan. 2011 at Florida Hospital Lake Placid. He was born in Quincy, Ill., moved to Lake Placid in 1959 from Quincy and went into the citrus grove business, then into the air conditioning business before retiring in 2001. He was a member of the First Baptist Church of Lake Placid. He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Wilma; his daughter, Connie Hogue; a sister, Betty McClean; a brother, Kenneth Whatley and two grandchildren. The family will receive friends from 4-6 p.m. Monday at the Scott Funeral Home, 504 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid. Funeral services will be held 11 a.m. Tuesday at the First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, 119 E. Royal Palm Ave., with Rev. Brett Morey celebrating. Burial will follow at the Oak Hill Cemetery. Words of comfortcan be made at www.scottfuneralservices.c om. Arrangements entrusted to the Scott Funeral Home. Page 6ANews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com At the Florida National Cemetary at Bushnell, FL, South Florida National Cemetary at Lake Worth, FL or Sarasota National Cemetary at Sarasota, FL Pr oud to Serve Sebring, Lake Placid & Avon Park Proud to Serve Sebring, Lake Placid & Avon Park E.O. Koch Construction1417 Swank Avenue € Sebring, FL 33870(863) 385-8649COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTIONLet our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property, build your dream home,or do your remodeling.For all of your Aluminum,Steel,and Conventional construction needsŽEmail: kochcon@strato.netState Certified License #CGC1515338 SEAMLESS GUTTERS … Specials5 INCH GUTTERS$2.99PER LINEAR FOOT6 INCH GUTTERS$3.99PER LINEAR FOOTMany Colors Available COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued from page 2A OBITUARIES Associated PressFORTLAUDERDALE Awildlife refuge and r anching conservation area w ould be carved out of 1 50,000 acres in the E verglades headwaters n orth of Lake Okeechobee u nder a proposal unveiled F riday by Interior Secretary K en Salazar. The proposal, still under s tudy by the U.S. Fish and W ildlife Service, envisions g overnment purchase from w illing sellers of about 5 0,000 acres along the K issimmee River valley. A nother 100,000 acres w ould be preserved under c onservation easements and o ther agreements with priv ate landowners that r estrict development and o ther uses. Salazar told reporters the g oal is to protect threatened w ildlife and habitat, i mprove water quality f lowing into Lake Okeechobee and preserve the region's "rural working landscapes." "The Everglades are unique," Salazar said. "They are probably one of the most important ecosystems we have in the United States." The plan is the second involving Everglades restoration from Salazar in as many months. In December, the secretary proposed raising an additional 5.5 miles of the cross-South Florida Tamiami Trail highway to improve water flow into Everglades National Park which represents about one-fifth of the original Everglades. Aone-mile bridge span is under construction now. The headwaters proposal announced Friday would add to the federal purchase last year of about 26,000 acres in the region. Interior chief announces Glades headwaters refuge

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"Sometimes you think s omeone is your friend and t hey want you to cut class or g et into trouble just so they c an have someone to act out w ith, well that's just as bad. S ome people are just out t here to make you get into m ischief and cause you h arm," Lippett explained. The speech ended with L ippett telling the kids that s ports is what kept him out of t rouble and that having a d ream and a goal can be all t hat a kid needs to get where t hey want to go in life. The nearly 150 energetic k ids were excited to slam L ippett with question after q uestion. Most questions w ere about Lippett's two c hampionship rings, one on e ach hand, that the students couldn't keep their eyes off of. Lippett shared his stories of how he came to be a member of a championship team and how each and everyone of the kids have the same opportunities as he had. They were happy to know that they could accomplish just as much, if not more, as a hometown hero. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 7A HarveyWhen Elwood P. Dowd starts to introduce his imaginary friend, Harvey, a six-and-a-half-foot rabbit, to guests at a society party, his sister, Veta, has seen as much of his eccentric behavior as she can tolerate. Problems arise, however, when Veta herself is mistakenly assumed to be on the verge of lunacy. This merry comedy by Mary Chase has become one of the most popular ever produced. Sponsored by Eye Specialists of Mid-FloridaOpens January 14th and runs through January 30thTickets on sale now at the box of“ce 10 AM … 2 PM 382-2525 or online at www.highlandslittletheatre.org. Presents FIRST NIGHTERS PERFORMANCE JAN. 12TH Some Risks Are Worth Taking. Your Health Isnt One of Them. Medicare and almost all insurance accepted First, 32 people die every day of skin cancer in the USA. Second, most skin cancer deaths are preventable. Therefore, forgiveness is the chance to prevent skin cancer with a Dermatology skin exam. Therefore, forgiveness is the Lord offering you free will to not be a statistic. SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE. OR LET US DO IT FOR YOU.Darrin A. Rotman, M. D. Julie L. Iellimo, P. A. C. Jennifer A. Wolf, P. A. C.863-386-0786Darrin A. Rotman, M.D. s aid on Thursday. Cool and his engineering c ompany brought three jobs i nto town when he bought the b uilding, but he stated that t he incubator has created an a dditional 13 jobs that did n ot exist in the city. "I think it is a success," s aid Cool. "We met the goal o f getting five of the offices f illed with businesses, and w e have added jobs to the c ommunity." And, the deal with Cool s aved the city money, he a dded. "They had budgeted $ 44,000, but we contracted w ith the EDC for two years at $ 18,000 per year. That's a s avings overall," Cool said. Cool also has offices left over that he rents out to the right businesses at reasonable rates. "We are not using the space now, we just have three employees on the engineering side," Cool said. The incubator plan gives start-up businesses a chance to get going with low overhead. Fax, phone with unlimited local and long distance, highspeed Internet, a receptionist, mentoring services and a conference room are provided in addition to the office space. The offices rent for $300 per month, but the EDC picks up the tab because of the city and CRAparticipation, so a start-up business can concentrate on just getting clients and growing. "The idea is to give them al they need to get a business going and then they are helped to move out into the area and another business is brought in to incubate," Cool said. In addition to the incubator spaces, Cool has three additional offices that he can rent out to small or startup business not on the incubator plan. "We have a psychologist from the coast that has taken one, but we still have two more spaces that we can rent out," Cool said. For more information on the space or the incubator, call Cool at 453-0524 or the EDC at 888-388-4233. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Business incubator office spaces feature a desk, chairs, a phone, individual air conditioning units, high-speed internet and also include the use of a kitchen, bathrooms, a board room and all utilities for $300 a month in downtown Avon Park. Business incubator up and running in AP Continued from page 1A Lippett speaks to local Boys & Girls Club Associated PressATLANTA In a remarkable t urnabout, federal health officials s ay many Americans are now gett ing too much fluoride because of i ts presence not just in drinking w ater but in toothpaste, mouthwash a nd other products, and it's causing s plotches on children's teeth and p erhaps more serious problems. The U.S. Department of Health a nd Human Services announced p lans Friday to lower the recomm ended level of fluoride in drinking w ater for the first time in nearly 50 y ears, based on a fresh review of t he science. The announcement is likely to r enew the battle over fluoridation, e ven though the addition of fluoride t o drinking water is considered one o f the greatest public health succ esses of the 20th century. The U.S. prevalence of decay in at least one tooth among teens has declined from about 90 percent to 60 percent. The government first began urging municipal water systems to add fluoride in the early 1950s. Since then, it has been put in toothpaste and mouthwash. It is also in a lot of bottled water and in soda. Some kids even take fluoride supplements. Now, young children may be getting too much. "Like anything else, you can have too much of a good thing," said Dr. Howard Pollick, a professor at the University of California, San Francisco's dental school and spokesman for the American Dental Association. One reason behind the change: About 2 out of 5 adolescents have tooth streaking or spottiness because of too much fluoride, a government study found recently. In extreme cases, teeth can be pitted by the mineral though many cases are so mild only dentists notice it. The problem is generally considered cosmetic and not a reason for serious concern. The splotchy tooth condition, fluorosis, is unexpectedly common in youngsters ages 12 through 15 and appears to have grown more common since the 1980s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But there are also growing worries about more serious dangers from fluoride. The Environmental Protection Agency released two new reviews of research on fluoride Friday. One of the studies found that prolonged, high intake of fluoride can increase the risk of brittle bones, fractures and crippling bone abnormalities. Critics of fluoridated water seized on the proposed change Friday to renew their attacks on it a battle that dates back to at least the Cold War 1950s, when it was denounced by some as a step toward Communism. Many activists nowadays don't think fluoride is essential, and they praised the government's new steps. "Anybody who was anti-fluoride was considered crazy," said Deborah Catrow, who successfully fought a ballot proposal in 2005 that would have added fluoride to drinking water in Springfield, Ohio. "It's amazing that people have been so convinced that this is an OK thing to do." Dental and medical groups applauded the announcement. "This change is necessa ry because Americans have access to more sources of fluoride than th ey did when water fluoridation w as first introduced," Dr. O. Mario n Burton, president of the Americ an Academy of Pediatrics, said in a statement. The fluoridated water standa rd since 1962 has been a range of 0 .7 parts per million for warmer c limates where people used to drin k more water to 1.2 parts per millio n in cooler regions. The new proposal from HH S would set the recommended level at just 0.7. Meanwhile, the EPAsaid it is reviewing whether to lower t he maximum allowable level of flu oride in drinking water from the cu rrent 4 parts per million. Government says too much fluoride intake causing splotchy teeth The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Page 8ANews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com 3010 US 27 South Sebring863-385-3939

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 9A 3010 US 27 South Sebring863-385-3939

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Special to the News-SunRidge Area Arc Resale Stores are bustling with activity this winter. Sales are strong and thankfully donations have been abundant. What's missing are the extra hands it takes to accept the donations, as well as sort, price, stock shelves, check electrical appliances, run the cash register, and other tasks. Proceeds from the sale of the donated goods go towards the operation of programs and services provided by the Arc for children and adults with developmental and other disabilities. The Arc provides services in Highlands, Hardee and Polk counties. If you have a few hours to spare, please stop by either of the Arc's Resale Stores. They are located at 899 W. Main St., Avon Park and at 1010 S. 6th Avenue, Wauchula. Volunteer applications are also available at the Arc 's administration building at 120 W. College Drive, Avo n Park. Call 452-1295, ext. 11 0 for more information. Page 10ANews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com LIMITED SPACE … CALLTODAY! 5 DAYS a week$ 30 Get In Shape Learn Self Defense Improve Self Esteem Make Better Grades MARTIAL ARTS AMERICA471-2467 Best After School Program in SebringFREEPICKUP from: Kindergarten Learning Center, Cracker Trail, Sun-N-Lakes, Woodlawn, Fred Wild, Memorial, Hill Gustat, Sebring Middle/High Located on Kenilworth Sebring*Some Restrictions Apply Life Care, Not Day Care Bella Vista Music ScheduleSunday, Jan. 9Gary Oliver 2PM … 5PM,Tiki BarTuesdaysStanman,Music/DJ/Jokes/Blues6PM … 9PM, LoungeWednesdaysGary OliverOl Rock & Roll on Keyboard6PM … 9PM, LoungeThursdaysBildis Funtastic Karaoke, 6PM … 9PM, LoungeFridaysBad Habit Band 9PM … 1AM, LoungeSundaysGary OliverOl Rock & Roll on Keyboard2PM … 5PM,Tiki HutStanmanMUSIC € ENTERTAINMENT GREAT FOOD € DANCINGAll Right Here!2451 US 27 South € Avon Park453-3331Located on Lake GlenadaReservations AcceptedNew Ownership & Newly RenovatedLarge Groups Welcome Best Deal of the DayLunch or Dinner 2 FOR THE PRICE OF 1 Lunch2 for $795 Dinner2 for $995to$1995MUST PURCHASE 2 BEVERAGESNot good with any other promotion. THE NEW HOT SPOT! BildiGary Oliver LIVE BAND EVERY FRIDAY! PRIME RIB DINNER$1099EVERY SUNDAYALL DAY11AM … 8PMIncludes garlic sticks, potato or pasta, vegetable, choice of soup or salad with purchase of beverage. 863-453-3331 € Visit Our Lakeside Tiki Bar BUSINESS Courtesy pho to Heartland for Children wishes to thank all of local businesses, individuals, families and organizations that helped provide holiday gifts for 1,219 local children in Highlands, Hardee and Polk counties through the sixth annual Rudolph Round-up Toy Drive. The staff at Waypoints Financial Office in Sebring (here) and their clients joined together again this year to sponsor a toy drive that was very successful. Volunteers needed at Arc Resale Stores Thanks for the holiday help You'll probably hate me f or bringing this up, but it's t ime to begin planning for y our 2011 taxes or at l east, about the tax implicat ions of your retirement a ccount contributions. For the second year in a r ow, one widely used inflat ion measurement, the D epartment of Labor's C onsumer Price Index for U rban Consumers (CPI-U), r emained flat for the quarter e nding Sept. 30, 2010, comp ared to the same period a y ear earlier. That's import ant because the IRS uses t his measurement to determ ine whether dozens of taxr elated numbers will stay t he same or increase from y ear to year. Bottom line: In 2011, m ost contribution levels r emain unchanged. Here's a n overview of common r etirement savings plans: Defined contribution p lans. The maximum annual c ontribution to 401(k), 4 03(b), 457(b) and federal T hrift Savings plans r emains unchanged at $ 16,500 (plus an additional $ 5,500 if you're at least 50). O ther factors to remember: Your plan may limit t he percentage of pay you c an contribute so, depending o n your salary, your maxim um contribution may actua lly be less. Company-matching c ontributions don't count t oward your maximum cont ribution. With pretax contribut ions, your account grows t ax-free until withdrawn, at w hich point withdrawals are t axed at the rate then in e ffect. With after-tax contributions, you pay income tax on the money now, but your contributions and their earnings will not be taxed at retirement. Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs). The maximum annual contribution to IRAs remains unchanged at $5,000 (plus another $1,000 if 50 or older). Contributions to a regular IRAare not impacted by your income, but if your modified adjusted gross income (AGI) exceeds certain limits, the maximum contribution to Roth IRAs gradually phases out: For singles/heads of households the phase-out range is $107,000 to $122,000 in AGI (up from $105,000 to $120,000 in 2010). For married couples filing jointly, it's $169,000 to $179,000 (up from $167,000 to $177,000). Afew rules on deducting IRAcontributions on your tax return: If you're single, a head of household or married and neither spouse is covered by an employerprovided retirement plan, you can deduct the full IRA contribution, regardless of income. If you are covered by an employer plan and are single/head of household, the tax deduction phases out for AGI between $56,000 and $66,000 (unchanged from 2010); if married and filing jointly, it's $90,000 to $110,000 (up from $89,000 to $109,000 in 2010). If you're married and aren't covered by an employer plan but your spouse is, the IRAdeduction is phased out if your combined AGI is between $160,000 (s/b $169,000) and $179,000 (up from $167,000 to $177,000). For more details, read IRS Publication 590 at www.irs.gov. Afinal note: As an incentive for lowand moderateincome workers to save for retirement through an IRA or company-sponsored plan, many are eligible for a savers credit of up to $1,000 ($2,000 if filing jointly). This credit lowers your tax bill, dollar for dollar, in addition to any other tax deduction you already receive for your contribution. Qualifying income ceiling limits for the Retirement Savers'Tax Credit increased in 2011 to $55,600 for joint filers, $42,375 for heads of household, and $28,250 for singles or married persons filing separately. Consult IRS Form 8880 for more information. Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. To follow Jason on www.twitter.com/PracticalMoney. Retirement contribution limits largely unchanged Personal Finance Jason Alderman

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By JEANNINE AVERSA APEconomics WriterWASHINGTON F ederal Reserve Chairman B en Bernanke sketched a m ore optimistic view of the e conomy Friday but said the F ed's $600 billion bondb uying program is needed b ecause unemployment will l ikely stay elevated for up to f ive more years. Bernanke told the Senate B udget Committee that t here's rising evidence that a "self-sustaining" recovery i s taking hold. He said he expects s tronger growth because c onsumers and businesses w ill boost spending this y ear. Bernanke spoke an hour a fter the government r eleased a disappointing e mployment report. E mployers added only 1 03,000 jobs in December. T he unemployment rate fell t o 9.4 percent partly b ecause people gave up l ooking for jobs. Many e conomists had forecast m uch bigger job gains and w ere looking for a signal t hat businesses were stepp ing up hiring. Asked about December's 1 03,000 job gains, B ernanke said if the pace of h iring doesn't increase, we're not going to see sust ained declines in the unemp loyment rate." The Fed chief defended t he central bank's move to b uy $600 billion in T reasurys through June and g ave no hint that it would c hange its course. The bond p urchases are designed to b oost the economy by lowe ring interest rates, encoura ging spending and lifting s tock prices. The program has been c riticized by Republicans in C ongress and some Fed o fficials who contend it will d o little to help the economy a nd could hurt it by unleashi ng inflation and speculative b uying on Wall Street. C hina, Germany and Brazil c omplained it was really a s cheme to push down the v alue of the dollar, giving U .S. exporters a competitive e dge. The Fed chief said the t hreat of deflation a dang erous drop in prices, wages a nd in the values of homes a nd stocks and the potent ial for persistently high u nemployment were suffic ient reasons to launch the p rogram. Bernanke predicted that t he overall pace of the econo my will be "moderately s tronger" this year. He said t he Fed has seen "increased e vidence that a self-sustaini ng recovery" is taking p lace. Factories are cranking up p roduction. The service sector is growing at its fastest pace in more than four years. Fewer people applied for unemployment benefits over the past month than in any other four-week period in more than two years. Consumers are spending more freely, and a payroll tax cut is likely to boost their activity further. Tax cuts are also likely to lead businesses to expand and hire more. But weakness in job growth could slow this momentum, Bernanke cautioned, especially if consumers spend less. Bernanke said unemployment is likely to be around 8 percent two years from now. Other threats to the economic outlook, Bernanke said, are: Adepressed housing market, where growth in foreclosures could push down home prices even more. Deeper spending cuts and more layoffs from state and local governments. Rising gasoline prices, which now top $3 a gallon. There's good news for tax filers in 2011. The due date for 2010 Federal income tax returns is Monday, April 18 instead of the usual date of April 15. As you prepare your tax documents, don't forget you'll need Social Security numbers for your children if you want to claim them as dependents on your return. In most cases, parents request a Social Security number for their child when applying for a birth certificate. The state agency that issues birth certificates shares the child's information with us and we mail the Social Security card to you. However, if you didn't apply for a number at the hospital, you must apply at a Social Security office or by mail. To do so you will need: Acompleted Application For ASocial Security Card (Form SS-5); Original documents proving your child's: U.S. citizenship; Age; and Identity; and Original documents proving your identity. After you apply, we will verify the child's birth record and mail your child's Social Security card to you. If you do not get a Social Security number for your child before the April 18 tax filing deadline but you still need to claim the child as a deduction on your tax return, you can: File your income tax return without claiming the child and then file an amended income tax return when the child has a Social Security number; or File with the Internal Revenue Service to extend the deadline for filing your tax return. Parents can claim their adopted child for tax purposes while the adoption process is still pending. You will need to contact the Internal Revenue Service fo r Form W-7A, Application fo r Taxpayer Identification Number for Pending U.S. Adoptions. We can assign your adopted child a Social Security number before the adoption is complete, but you may want to wait. Then you can apply for the number using your child's new name, with your name as parent. Remember, a Social Security number is not just for taxes. Your child also may need a Social Security number for government ben efits or other reasons, such as opening a bank account or obtaining medical coverage If you need to apply for your child's Social Security card and number, now is th e time. To learn more, read our online publication, Social Security Numbers for Children, at www.socialsec urity.gov/pubs/10023.html. Esther Harris is the Social Security district manager at the Sebring branch. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 11A COUNTRY CLUB REALTY 863-382-6575www .CountryClubRealtyofSebring.comTWO LOCATIONSTOSERVE YOU GOLF HAMMOCK 1 Hammock Circle € Sebring, FL 33872 COUNTRY CLUB OF SEBRING 4800 Haw Branch Rd. € Sebring, FL 33872863-382-6575BRUNNERS MOBILEOPEN HOUSE TODAY!1PM-3PM Your Host: Call Mary Clark: 863-414-7281US 27 North to (R) after Safari Motel & Sweety Pies, then (L) at Robin Ct. to home on (L).FURNISHED! Furnished 2 bed, 2 bath manufactured home in great location on well landscaped lawn! Large family room, eatin kitchen, carport w/ shed. Utility room w/ washer & dryer, new roof, small office / craft room too! 1830 Robin Ct. $54,900214905 GOLF HAMMOCK Your Host: PRICE REDUCED! Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575S 27 to Hammock Rd to (R) at entrance of Golf Hammock (Golf Hammock Drive) to (R) on Par Rd to (R) on Cormorant Point Dr to home on (L).STUNNING GOLF VIEW! This lovely 2/2 has modern paint, new carpeting, pavered patio & beautiful landscaping. Newer appliances, new roof in 2002, this home is move-in ready. Youll love the back porch and the great view overlooking the #4 tee! 3508 Cormorant Point Dr.$119,500213002 HARDER HALL Your Host: PRICE REDUCED!! Call Patty Roberts: 863-381-5765US 27 to Golfview Dr., continue past Lakewood Rd., (L) on Leaf to home on (R).MUSTSEE! 2/2/2 plus den, freshly painted interior, vaulted ceilings, cypress trim & base, solid work benches in garage, dining room plus large breakfast bar, newer appliances and custom tile, his & her vanities, nice fenced yard, must see!! 3923 Leaf Rd.$119,900215291 GOLF HAMMOCK Your Host: A GOLF LIFE! Call Shirley Faulk: 863-202-0936US 27 to (W) on Hammock Rd to (R ) into entrance of Golf Hammock to (R) on Par Rd to (R) on Cormorant Point Dr to (R ) on Waterwood to (L) on Golf Haven Terrace to home on (R ).WINTER RETREAT! Cozy w creature comforts; 2 bed, 2 bath split bedroom plan includes an eat-in kitchen, inside laundry, enclosed & winterized back porch and oversized 1 car garage. 3705 Golf Haven Terr.$120,500210928 GOLF HAMMOCK Your Host: BRING CLUBS! Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575US 27 to Hammock Rd into entrance of Golf Hammock (Golf Hammock Dr) to (R ) on Par Rd to (R ) on Cormorant Point Dr to home on (L).SEE TO BELIEVE! Spacious and newly renovated 2/2 with a den/office. Overlooking the 4th fairway, this home has a garage with a separate golf cart garage. Check out the beautiful yard! 3610 Cormorant Point Dr.$120,900210889 GOLF HAMMOCK Your Host: MAKE AN OFFER! Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575US 27 to Hammock Road to Golf Hammock Dr. to (R) on Par Rd. to (R) on Cormorant Point Dr. to (R) on Sugar Pine Circle to home on (R).PLEASING JACUZZI! Take a look at this beauty! Open & bright floor custom 3 bed 2 bath floor plan in excellent condition. 1700 lsf, cathedral ceilings and large lanai. Movein ready too! Come out today youll fall in love with this home! 2909 Sugar Pine$138,500215974 GOLF HAMMOCK Your Host: WET BAR TOO! Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575US 27 to Hammock Rd. to (R ) at Golf Hammock entrance past pro shop to (R ) on Mulligan Rd to (R ) on Duffer Rd to home on the right.HOT TUB PARADISE! You need to see this 2/2 today! Fantastic private yard romantic hot tub, cathedral ceilings, newer appliances, Florida room w/ entertainment center & wet bar. Lots more too. Priced right too! 3705 Duffer Rd. $144,900215470 GOLF HAMMOCK Your Host: CORNER CUTIE!! Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575US 27 to Hammock Rd. to (R ) at Golf Hammock entrance, go past pro shop to (R ) on Mulligan Rd to home on (L).EASY TO LOVE! This 3/2 sits on a huge corner lot w/ fruit trees. Wood burning fireplace, gorgeous stone work, skylights & covered porch. Great golf community lifestyle at a good price. Come by today! 1701 Mulligan Rd.$154,900214662 GOLF HAMMOCK Your Host: CORNER LOT!! Call Helen Ferry: 863-381-1089US 27 to Hammock Rd to (R ) into Golf Hammock, go around clubhouse to (R ) on Mulligan Rd, to home on corner of Divot and Mulligan.OVERSIZED GARAGE! 3 bed 2 bath on corner lot and 2.5 car garage! Split plan, vaulted ceilings, kitchen w/breakfast bar, open to dining. Large breakfast nook, spacious master w/ his & her walk-in closets. New roof/ AC in 2005 too! 4003 Divot Rd.$169,900214072 HIGHLANDSRIDGE Your Host: WATER & GOLF! Call Sandee Halbert: 863-414-8090Sebring Pkwy to (L) on Home Ave to stop sign and (L) on 17N to (R ) at Powerline Rd to (L) into Highlands Ridge (Clubhouse Dr) to (R ) at Fairway Vista to (L) on Carter Creek Dr to home on (L).BETTER THAN NEW! Golf course living at its best! Lovely golf & water views. Great split plan w/ neutral colors, upgrades galore w/ plantation shutters throughout. Large master suite and 3rd bedroom has builtin Murphy bed! See this beauty today! 4013 Carter Creek Dr.$284,900212424 OWN W/ NO FEES! BUSINESS Courtesy photo T he Heartland Cultural Alliance in partnership with Brewster's Coffee House will present a series of readings titled Scribes Night Out, Sharing the Art of our Local W ordsmiths. The semimonthly series will take place on the second and fourth Sunday of the month. The event will launch with Highlands County novelist, and HCA member, Sunny Serafino reading some of her poems as well as excerpts from recent works and short stories. Other local writers will be invited share their works in this first of its kind series celebrating the art of the written word. Starting today from 6:30 until closing at Brewster's Coffee House, 2191 U.S. 27 N.The public is invited to this free event. Claim those little tax deductions: Social Security numbers for kids Guest Column Esther Harris Scribes Night Out set at Brewster's Bernanke: 4-5 years to reach normal unemployment levels The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Page 12ANews-Sun Sunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.co m Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or le ss. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads p laced under the Bargain BuysŽ discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom se t ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad st ating Each,Ž the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open RateŽ pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain BuysŽ specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home,Ž are allowed to be pla ced under the Bargain BuyŽ category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS € Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 385-6155. € The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 FUNDS. January 2, 9, 2011 1050LegalsAs Clerk of Said Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM OF LIEN WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING 1050Legals660.39 feet to the Point of Beginning, as Recorded in the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Real Property Address: 605 Highway 66 West, Sebring, FL 33875 Real Property Tax ID#: C-16-35-29-A00-0012-0000. DATED on December 23, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-530-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH D. LAGROW; RHONDA K. LAGROW; RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA; UNITED STATE OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; NORTH AMERICAN SPECIALTY INSURANCE COMPANY; AND ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, AND TENANT #4, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 Notice is given that pursuant to a Final Judgment in Foreclosure Against Defendants, KENNETH LAGROW and RHONDA LAGROW, dated the 4th day of August, 2010, in Case No. 10-530-GCS, of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK is the Plaintiff and KENNETH LAGROW and RHONDA LAGROW, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on the 25th day of January, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure Against Defendants, KENNETH LAGROW and RHONDA LAGROW, and described as follows: That part of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4, lying South of the Southerly right-of-way line of State Road 66 in Section 16, Township 35 South, Range 29 East, being more particularly described as follows: Begin at the Southwest corner of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4; thence North 0 degrees 17'31'' East along the West line of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 a distance of 77.05 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way line of State Road 66 West; said point lying on a circular curve to the right, having a radius of 5679.58 feet and a central angle of 1 degree 11'18''; thence along said curved right-of-way line on an arc distance of 117.79 feet; thence South 22 degrees 20'13'' East along said right-of-way line a distance of 25.73 feet to a point on said Southerly right-of-way line of State Road 66 West, said point lying on a circular curve to the right, having a radius of 5654.58 feet and a central angle of 5 degrees 52'39''; thence along said curved right-of-way line an arc distance of 580.06 feet to the intersection of said right-of-way line with the East line of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4; thence South 0 degrees 18'50'' West along said East line a distance of 293.08 feet to the Southeast corner of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4; thence south 89 degrees 16'29'' West along the South line of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 a distance of and for Highlands County, Florida in which American Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc. a Delaware Corporation, f/k/a AH Mortgage Acquisition Co., Inc., is the Plaintiff and Maureen Griffin; Bank of America, NA; are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 25th day of January, 2011, the following described property as set forth ins said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 42, BLOCK 52, PLACID LAKES SECTION SIX, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 68, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 111 LEMON RD NW, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852-9786 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 23rd day of December, 2010. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk January 2, 9, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 08-CA-00711 DIVISION: AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE SERVICING, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION, F/K/A AH MORTGAGE ACQUISITION CO., INC., Plaintiff, vs. MAUREEN GRIFFIN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 23, 2010, and entered in Case No. 08-CA-00711 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 28-2010-CA-000039 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION F/K/A FIRST UNION NATIONAL BANK Plaintiff, vs. ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, LEGATEES, DEVISEES, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES, CREDITORS AND ANY OTHER PERSON CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST ELIZABETH J. HOFFRICHTER AKA ELIZABETH HOFFRICHTER, DECEASED, ET AL Defendants, RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment in Foreclosure dated November 8, 2010 entered in Case No. 28-2010-CA-000039 of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION F/K/A FIRST UNION NATIONAL BANK is Plaintiff and ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, LEGATEES, DEVISEES, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES, CREDITORS AND ANY OTHER PERSON CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST ELIZABETH J. HOFFRICHTER AKA ELIZABETH HOFFRICHTER, DECEASED; ____, AS THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ELIZABETH J. HOFFRICHTER AKA ELIZABETH HOFFRICHTER, IF ANY; MICHAEL J. HOFFRICHTER; ____, AS THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL J. HOFFRICHTER N/K/A ANGEL HOFFRICHTER; STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s), whether living or not, and whether said unknown parties claims as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, or in any other capacity, claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s) are the Defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 a.m., on the 10th day of March, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 99, FAIRMOUNT MOBILE ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. 1979 ALLARD MOBILE HOME VIN # 4785ATITLE# 16664826 VIN# 4785BTITLE# 16664825 Street Address: 3607 NEW YORK AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA 33872 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the dateo f the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 6th day of December, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK By: /s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk January 9, 16, 2011 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 314 ENOS AVE., LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 23rd day of December, 2010. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk January 2, 9, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 08-00314 DIVISION: ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. A NDRES LEON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 23, 2010, and entered in Case No. 08-00314 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which OneWest Bank, FSB, is the Plaintiff and Andres Leon, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 25th day of January, 2011, the following described property as set forth ins said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 15, IN BLOCK 144, OF PLACID LAKES SECTION ELEVEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-001287 OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, Plantiff, vs. JEFFREY M. DRESSEL, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALBERT W. ROTH Last Known Address: UNKNOWN A ddress Attempted At: 3651 US HIGHWAY 27 LOT 88, SEBRING, FL 33870 CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 17, BLOCK 1, HARDER HALL COUNTRY CLUB II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 13, PAGE 46, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before February 10, 2011 a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE NEWS SUN and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 28th day of December, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Annette Daff As Deputy Clerk January 2, 9, 2011 1050Legals 1000 Announcements Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classified ads get fast results

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, January 9, 2010Page 13 A PROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORYPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY Install doors, windows, flooring, plumbing & more!Licensed & InsuredLic# HM0096HANDYMAN BOBCall 863-452-5201 or 863-449-1744 A & E LAWN MOWER REPAIRBeltsƒBlades New & Used Parts12 S.Forest Ave. Avon Park,FL 33825863-452-0389 Service € Repair € Supplies € Equipment Delivered Right to your DoorPool Service & Mobile Retail(863) 382-7728Fax (863) 402-2200 poolparadise101@aol.com www.poolparadiseonline.com Brad & Julie Kurtz Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 863385-0404Now Offering: Animal Nuisance Control and Removal Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-2750 1405 US 27 North Sebring, FL 33870 C A M P B E L L  S S C O L L I S I O N C E N T E R , I N C Jim Campbell Owner Ser vice A vailable 7 Days A W eek Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com EXTRAORDINAIRE HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING LLC 863-451-2399Mike & Kandy Sheldone CEO/Owner Lic# CAC 1816569All Service Calls $40 ResidentialCommercial Insured € Free EstimatesService by People Who CareChad, Krista & Michael P.O. Box 6987 Avon Park, FL 33826-6987 Office: 863-655-9328 cklawn@strato.net WANDA KLINE WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESSSee what one drop of your blood indicates as to YOUR nutritional health and well-being. By appointment only863-414-4066 LIVEBLOODANALYSISŽ MIKES PAINTINGInterior & Exterior Residential & Mobile Homes Also Pressure Washing Over 25 Years Experience Free Estimates € Lic. & Ins.863-657-2362 &WILLIAMSJANITORIALCARPETCLEANING$1095 Per Room3 Rooms Minimum € Upholstery Cleaning € All Types of Flooring € Free EstimatesLic € Bonded € Ins(863) 214-1940 CASH for JUNK(954) 963-7138 Cars, Trucks, Vans no title necessary LEGREES863-215-3754Edward LeGreeMOBILE CARWASH & DETAILING SUE IS BACKSue Leninsky from Titusville, Pa. with 42 years experience is working Mon. 8-4 € Sat. 8-noon at SALONTAZMANIA1505 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park 863-452-2396 JUDISPLACEOFHAIR& NAILS271 US 27 North, Sebring Wed. … Fri. 8-4 863-382-9911 Call for an appointment with Sue Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 863-465-7491TREE SERVICE,INC.Joe Johnsons TRIMMING € REMOVAL SOD INSTALLATION € STUMP GRINDING LOT CLEARING € PRESSURE CLEANING Will Beat Any Written Estimate!Peoples Choice Award Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Call For Details863-381-9013*Single Story Homes under 1500 total sq.ft. Roofs € Driveways € Walks € Additional Services $9900 HOUSE WASH*FLORIDA PRESSURE CLEANING LLC. 3310 Hwy. 27 South Sebring, FL33870EOEE-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.comFor more information about Cross Country Automotive Services,we encourage you to visit our website at: www.CrossCountry-Auto.co mComprehensive Benefit Package€ Tuition Reimbursement € Life Insurance € Vacation Time € Holiday Pay € Medical € DentalNow Hiring Full & Part Time Customer Service AssociatesStarting at $9.00 an hour Marie Nancy Simelus Associate of the MonthBe a HERO like Marie Nancy Simelus863-402-2786AGreatPlaceto Work!TV STATIONFOR SALE. SEBRING! $75,000. 478-741-1710. email: wrecktech@yahoo.com 3050BusinessOpportunities 3000 FinancialUTILITIES SERVICEWORKER I GRADE LEVEL 103 The City of Avon Park is accepting applications for a full-time Utilities Service Worker I. This position is entry-level in the installation, repair, and maintenance of the City's water distribution and wastewater collection system. Upon hire, employee performs unskilled work involving heavy manual labor; however, through on-the-job training the employee performs progressively responsible semi-skilled tasks in installing, maintaining, and repairing of water mains and sanitary sewers, and other work in connection with the water and wastewater systems. The employee will operate a variety of machinery and equipment in performing work assignments. Minimum qualifications: High school diploma or GED equivalency, with sufficient practical training or experience to demonstrate necessary skills and abilities, preferable in Utilities operations and must possess a valid Florida Drivers License. Must be able to communicate effectively, verbally and in writing, and be able to complete math problems in various units of measurement. A general knowledge of the City's geography is a must. Starting hourly rate is $10.1962. The City of Avon Park is a Smoke and drug-free Workplace. E.O.E. Applications available at City Hall, Human Resource Office, 110 E Main St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Applications close on Friday, January 14, 2011 at 4:30 p.m. FRONT DESKRECEPTIONIST F/T position available in Sebring Dental Office. Experience absolutely necessary. Fax resume to: 863-471-0436 CAREGIVERSNOW HIRINGFor caring, compassionate caregivers. You must be 21 yrs old with a HS Diploma/GED, pass a criminal & driving record check. Call HR between 9am and 4 pm M-F. 866-757-9686 or visit: ck381.ersp.biz/employment 2100Help WantedFIRE CHIEFThe City of Avon Park is seeking a full-time Fire Chief who under general administrative direction of the City Manager, plans, organizes, directs, and reviews the activities and operations of the Fire Department including fire prevention, fire code enforcement responsibilities and supervision per state statute, suppression, public education, emergency medical services and other activities designed to protect lives and property. Certified Firefighter II and Fire Officer I required as prescribed by Florida State Bureau of Fire Standards. Fire Officer II preferred and minimum certification of EMT-B desired. An Associate Degree with specialized training in fire department operations and administration a must. A Bachelor's Degree with major course work in fire science or fire administration is preferred. A minimum of ten (10) years of experience in fire suppression, rescue, and the delivery of emergency medical services with at least five (5) years in a managerial/supervisory capacity equivalent to the rank of Lieutenant or two years as a Captain or above. Salary compensable DOQ. Applications and job description is available at the City of Avon Park, 110 E. Main St., Avon Park, FL 33825 or can be obtained on our website: www.avonpark.cc All applications must be accompanied with a copy of applicants Florida driver's license. This position will remain open until filled. The City of Avon Park is a smoke and drug-free workplace. E.O.E. Return completed applications to City Hall, Human Resource Dept., 110 E Main St., Avon Park, FL 33825 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentLOST DOGHIENZ 57, solid black, looks like Border Collie in the face, has bright orange collar & tag. Missing since New Year's Eve from Lakeview Dr. REWARD. 863-382-8216 1200Lost & Found 1100AnnouncementsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-1207 GCS LOTSOURCE, INC., a Florida corporation, Plaintiff, vs. CLYDE M. WILSON, as Trustee under Land Trust Number 0312397, his unknown assigns, successors in interest, or any other party claiming, by, through, under or against him, Defendants. NOTICE OF SUIT PROPERTY TO: CLYDE M. WILSON, as Trustee under Land Trust Number 0312397, his unknown assigns, successors in interest, or any other party claiming, by, through, under or against him YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to Quiet Title on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: Lot 22,Block 37, SEBRING COUNTRY ESTATES, Section 2, According to the Plat thereof as recorded in the Plat Book 7, Page 34, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to Thomas J. Wohl, Swaine & Harris, P.A., 425 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, the Plaintiff's attorney, and file the original with the Clerk of the above styled court on or before day of February 4, 2011; otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 28th day of December, 2010. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, (863)534-4690, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice of Suit; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call TDD (863)534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711. January 9, 16, 2011 1050Legals DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155 LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday.CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:385-6155 News-Sun Classified

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Page 14ANews-Sun Sunday, January 9, 2010www.newssun.co m Call 385-6155 and a Sales Representative will be glad to assist you!1992 NISSANSENTRA Under 100 K miles, new tires, RUNS GREAT! $2100 or MAKE OFFER! 863-471-2906 or 863-414-1691. 9450Automotive for SaleRIMS -18'' Mondera Davanti, on Kumho Low Profile 225/40ZR 18 Tires. LIKE NEW! $1000. 863-385-5425. 9350Automotive Parts& Accessories2004 KAWASAKI750 Vulcan. One Owner, Garage Kept! 6796 miles. $3,500. 863-471-9341. 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 TransportationMOTOR HOME,26' WINNEBAGO ASPECT. 35,000 miles, excellent condition. New A/C, 2 awnings, new battery, $41,500 OBO, 863-257-0597. 8450Motor Homes2010 32'HY-LINE Travel Trailer. 2 slide outs, Washer & Dryer, many more options. MUST SELL! $17,900 obo. Will deliver. 630-631-8722 (cell). 8400RecreationalVehicles TRAVEL TRAILERStarcraft 30 ft, 2000, 4 X 16 slide out. Also, '96 Chevy Truck, heavy duty w/ tow pkg. Can be seen Highland Wheels Estate. Both for $12,000. Call 765-603-7764 2003 SEADOO GTX JETSKI Mint Condition! 59 hrs. $5000. 863-385-5425 8400RecreationalVehicles PONTOON 22ft., 60 H.p. Evinrude, Great condition, runs well, full Bimini on Lake June. $4500. 863-465-5343 20' PONTOONBOAT 2004 WEERES. New carpet, seats & bimini top. Includes fish finder and large live well. 50hp Mercury w/power tilt. Boat & motor less than 50 hrs operation. Galvanized trailer. $6,500. Please call 863-465-2364 or 863-699-0307 8050Boats & Motors 8000 Recreation NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & SuppliesHELP! WIFENEEDS A VERY GOOD DEPENDABLE CAR NOW!Please help me find her one! 863-465-0978 7340Wanted to Buy SEBRING -Moving Sale! 2812 Vine Lane Oak Ridge Mobile Park, Fri & Sat Jan 14 & 15, 8am-?Lots Of Good Things, Too Much To List! SEBRING -500 Summit Dr. Fri-SatSun, Jan 7-8-9, 8am-2pm. Clothing, books, golf clubs & golf bags, computer hardware, electronics, household items. Much More! AVON PARKLake Bonnet Village off SR 17 between Avon Park & Sebring, Annual Baked Goods & Garage Sale. Coffee & Donuts & Funnel Cakes. Jan 15th, 8am 11am. A.P. -GARAGE SALE Jan. 13-14-15, 8am to 4pm, 423 Malcolm St., Avon Park. Tools, wood planer, lathe, fishing gear, lawn tractor and misc. 7320Garage &Yard Sales TV &STAND stand oak colored with storage; TV 20'' & silver in color. Both $75.00. 863-414-2131 SKATEBOARD/BIKE RAMPSwith platform. Xgames brand. Good condition. $30 863-452-6798 FOLDING BICYCLE$25 812-664-1132 BIKE 18"Boys Next Brand. Includes a helmet, like new. $30. 863-452-6798 BABY COCKATIELBeautiful! $75 863-385-2503 4 TONColeman cen. ac unit, fan motor replaced 2 yrs ago, serv. every yr., att. to air handle. $100 863-655*0881 7310Bargain Buys3 WHEELMiami Sun bicycle $35 812-664-1132 7310Bargain BuysPORTABLE HEATER,EDEN PURE Model 500. LIKE NEW! Only used 2 months! $250.00. Call 863-385-9551. 7300Miscellaneous NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS! HIGHPOINT FURNITURE OUTLET STORE 2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRINGNorthofLowes&acrossfrom HomeDepot 7180Furniture 7000 MerchandiseSEBRING -Fully Remodeled Commercial Building in Historic Downtown. 1850 sq ft, office, 2BA, large indoor storage & fully fenced back storage facility. High volume traffic area, Great for Business! 863-385-3474 or 863-381-2717 6750Commercial RentalDOWNTOWN SEBRING Professional Office as low as $229/mo. A/C & Utilities included. Conf. room, elevator, single & double suites. Low cost DSL avail. 863-385-1705 www.HainzCenter.com 6600Business & OfficesFor Rent SEBRING -Sun 'n Lake, Clean, 2BR, 2BA split floor plan house, large screen porch and big back yard. No smoke or pets, quiet area, $625/mo. View by appt. Avail. Jan 15th. 317-413-4859 SEBRING -LAKE JACKSON 2BR. 2BA., near boat ramp & Mall. Screened porch, W/D hookup, refrigerator & stove Pets OK! $750 monthly. 863-385-7237 SEBRING -3BR, 1BA with carport, near High School, laundry room, fenced yard. $550/mo., security deposit waived to right person. 863-835-0408 SEBRING -2BR, 1BA all wood home, $675/mo. + $500 security deposit. 3303 Pompino Dr. Avgerage electric bill $90/mo. Call 863-402-0400 LAKE PLACIDPlacid Lakes, Remodeled 2BR, 2BA home located on canal leading to Lake June. Kitchen appliances included, new flooring throughout. No Smoke No Pets. $750/mo. Details call 863-243-3149 LAKE PLACID2BR, 1BA, new floors/paint, fenced yard, close to boat ramp, nice landscape, quiet area, no smoke, $550/mo. 863-699-1119 HOUSES /MOBILE HOMES Call for Availability NO Security NO Last NO Dogs 863-381-4410 or 863-381-5174 6300Unfurnished Houses SEBRING: 1BR,1 BA Guest House / Cottage in quiet / private neighborhood with all utilities included: Electric, Water & Direct TV. No Pets, No Smokers. Harder Hall ares, 1/8 mile from 2 golf courses. $800 per month + deposit. Call 863-381-9437 LAKE PLACIDNewer 3BR, 2BA, seasonal or monthly. Excellent furniture & appliances, near lake & boat ramp, No smoking or dogs. $1300/mo. After season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119 6250Furnished Houses SEBRING -DINNER LAKE AREA 1BR, 1BA Apartments for Rent. $395/mo. Includes water. Large rooms, fresh paint & tile floors. Call Gary Johnson @ 863-381-1861 SEBRING -Clean 1BR, 1BA, living rm., utility w/ W-D hookup, new screened vinyl patio, near Walmart & Homer's area. You pay electric, I pay cable & utilities. Ideal for 1 or 2 adults. Prefer year round renter, no dogs. $450 mly. + $450 sec. dp. Move in now $650 to the right party! Call after 1pm for details. 732-222-0344RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 LEMONTREE APARTMENTSAvon Park, FL 33825 1BR, 1BA $495/Month+ $200 Security Deposit2BR, 1BA $645/Month+ $500 Security Deposit Pets Welcome* Washer/Dryer Microwave & WSG Included Call Alan, (386) 503-8953 LAKE PLACID2BR. / 2BA. W /D hookup. Large fenced yard, screened patio, water included. Excellent Condition. $525 monthly plus 1 mo. deposit. 8636958348 BEST RENTAL IN TOWN! Large 2BR, 1BA totally remodeled, washer/dryer hook-ups. Available Immediately! Call 321-537-5681 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile, New paint, New appliances, Screened patios & W/D hook ups. Call 863-452-0469. 6200UnfurnishedApartments AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsAVON MOBILEHOME PARK 1BR. FURNISHED. 55 PLUS. SORRY NO PETS. 863-453-3415 6150FurnishedApartmentsLAKE PLACIDGolf Villas Efficiencies with kitchenette, furnished, includes; electric & all utilities, swimming pool; W/D available. $425/mo. Call Ireland Sanders, 863-465-1400. 6100Villas & CondosFor RentSEBRING -3008 Spinks Rd., 2BR, 1BA, W/D hookup, new appliances, ceramic tile throughout. No Pets. Close to HRMC & Sebring High School. Avail. Immediately $500/mo. 863-273-1756. 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 Rentals SEBRING -RV Park, Close to Downtown, 1BR, 1BA & Efficiencies, $325-$400/mo; 2BR 2BA, $400/mo. EASY MOVE-IN RATES! 863-655-3504 SEBRING -RV Park, Close to Downtown, 1BR, 1BA & Efficiencies, $325-$400/mo; 2BR 2BA, $400/mo. EASY MOVE-IN RATES! 863-655-3504 LAKE PLACIDSun 'n Lakes Estates, Doublewide, 3BR, 2BA Mobile Home. The best in Country Living! $580/month. Call Michelle @ 863-381-5661. 5150Mobile HomesFor Rent PALM HARBORHomes has closed 2 Model Centers. Save up to 60K on select models. Call 1-800-622-2832 AVON MOBILEHOME PARK 55 PLUS. PARK MODEL, LOW LOT RENT. $4000. SORRY NO PETS. 863-449-1072 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSEBRING -FOR SALE BY OWNER 2BR, 2BA Condo at the beautiful Bluffs of Sebring, a 55+ gated community. First Floor with Carport & Storage Room. Furnished with several upgrades; clubhouse, pool, tennis & other activities. $84,900 OBO. Great view of Lake Mary Jane. Call 863-385-0552 or 863-873-1426 4120Villas & CondosFor SaleSEBRING -Edgewater Village Lakeview Dr. 2BR, 2BA, 1CG Villa. Beautifully furnished. New kitchen, laundry, TV. Low Maintenance fee includes Cable TV, Clubhouse, heated pool. Private street. Avail Immed. 863-402-9138 4080Homes for SaleSebring A VON PARK3BR, 2BA, 1CG 1400 sq ft home. $68,900. Available after Feb. 28, 2011. Owner Financing possible with 10% down, good credit report and work record. 863-453-5631 ATTENTION: CASH for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate Laid off? Work from home. Be your own bo$$. First, call the Federal Trade Commission to find out how to spot work at home schemes, 1-877-FTC-HELP. A message from the News-Sun and the FTC. Looking for a Federal or Postal job? What looks like the ticket to a secure job might be a scam. For information, call the Federal Trade Commission toll free 1-877-FTC-HELP or visit www.ftc.gov. A message from the News-Sun and the FTC. CASTLE HILL Apartments of Avon ParkAccepting Applications for 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals 62 years or older, handicap/disabled, regardless of age. For rental information & applications please call: 863-452-6565 TDD: 1-800-955-8771 THIS INSTITUTION IS AN Equal Opportunity Provider and EmployerLos Apt. de Castle Hill de Avon ParkEstan aceptando aplicaciones para Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras. Disponible a personas de 62 ancs o mas, incapacidad fisica/mental, no importa la edad. Para mas informacion favor de llamar 863-452-6565. TDD: 1-800-955-8771 Esta Institucion Es De Igualdad De Oportunidad Al Proveedor, Y Empleador AKC ENGLISHBULLDOG PUPPY A picture is worth a thousand words! Call 877-394-3996

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 15A Every Day! www.AdvantageFloorCoverings.com www.AdvantageFloorCoverings.com DuPont Stainmaster € Mohawk € Anso € Tarkett Vinyl € Tile € Laminate Hardwood € Carpet 207 U.S. 27 South € Lakeview Plaza € Sebring7/10 Mile South of Lakeshore Mall385-1224 COUPON REQUIRED2 ROOMS & HALL $6900Green Seal Approved. Environmentally Friendly. Dries in 2 to 3 hours. Residential only. Rooms over 250 sq. ft. & living/dining rooms count as 2 rooms. Not valid with any other offer.EXPIRES 01/28/11Non-Allergenic18 YEARS EXPERIENCE COUPON REQUIREDLAMINATE FLOORS $359Floor prep & trim pieces not included. Not valid with any other offer.EXPIRES 01/28/11Sq. Ft. Installed Now Offering CARPET CLEANING COUPON REQUIREDIN STOCK CARPET $167Installed with 6 lb. pad. Not valid with any other offer.EXPIRES 01/28/11Sq. Ft. Installed($14.99 sq. yd.) COUPON REQUIREDIN STOCK BERBER $178Installed with 6 lb. pad. Not valid with any other offer.EXPIRES 01/28/11Sq. Ft. Installed($15.99 sq. yd.) Starting AtStarting At Financing Available!

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Page 16ANews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com If youre injured or facing surgery, we provide personalized physical therapy care to help you recover quickly and safely. From hands-on therapy to pain management techniques and therapeutic exercise, our expert team will put their extensive training and experience to work for you. Call us today to schedule an appointment at your convenience. Most Insurance Plans Accepted 100 YMCA Ln. Sebring, Fl 33875863-382-2949 visit us on the web at www.bowyerpt.comBOWYERPHYSICAL THERAPYBOWYERPHYSICAL THERAPYDIGNAROURAAlso treating dizziness & balance.As far as my experience with doctors, the only place I have found some help with my problem is Bowyer Physical Therapy. Im very pleased with the service and dedication of their staff. Thanks to God and to them, I have finally found relief. I am very happy with my care.Ž Keith A. Bowyer, Jr., PTBest Physical Therapist 2006 € 2007€ 2008€ 2009 € 2010License FL PT 16172 H e r d m a n n C e r t i f i e d in Vestibular RehabilitationKeith A. Bowyer, Jr., PTBest Physical Therapist 2006 € 2007€ 2008€ 2009 € 2010License FL PT 16172 H e r d m a n n C e r t i f i e d in Vestibular Rehabilitation Acapulco8870s Berlin4229sh Calgary9-3sf Dublin4235pc Edmonton9-5sf Freeport7256pc Geneva4339sh Hong Kong6352s Jerusalem5446sh Kiev3532sh London4334s Montreal2516s n Nice6147s h Ottawa2214c Quebec2521s n Rio de Janeiro9176s Sydney8071t Toronto2410c Vancouver3623s n Winnipeg9-1c Albuquerque4425s3916pc3922pc Atlanta3527pc3527sn4325pc Baltimore3517pc3422pc3227sn Birmingham3428sn3626sn4223pc Boston3722pc3624pc3631pc Charlotte3725pc3529sn3525sn Cheyenne242sn115sf66s Chicago2517pc2819c2918sf Cleveland2415pc2619pc2821sn Columbus2416pc2921c3119sn Dallas3829sn4227c3722s Denver263sn123sn14-7s Detroit2614pc2618pc2819sf Harrisburg3116pc3220pc3023sn Honolulu7766s7964r7871s Houston4534r5032c5030pc Indianapolis2716pc3020c3017sf Jacksonville5243c7048r5936pc Kansas City2719sn2814sn195c Lexington2619pc3021c3120c Little Rock3326sn3625c3722pc Los Angeles5542pc6245pc6446s Louisville3022pc3526c3522sf Memphis3429c3426c3723pc Miami7366pc7866pc8064s Minneapolis8-3c110sf10sf Nashville3226pc3327sn3623sf New Orleans5142r5035c5133s New York City3523pc3525pc3530sn Norfolk4024pc3729c4129sn Oklahoma City3826c3115sn2612pc Philadelphia3121pc3322pc3426sn Phoenix6042s6041s6342pc Pittsburgh2616c2718pc3020sn Portland3616pc3519pc3525pc Raleigh3924pc3429sn3926sn Rochester3018sf2917sf3122c St.Louis2619c3423c2714sf San Francisco5238pc5137pc5240sh Seattle3727sf3723pc3423s Tampa6356pc7259t6848s Washington, DC3421pc3426pc3228sn Weather History Heat index ¨ Five-Day forecast for Highlands County High 68/Low 48High 76/Low 59High 73/Low 50High 70/Low 45High 65/Low 40 W inds:ENE at 7-14 mph.Winds:S at 10-20 mph.Winds:WNW at 7-14 mph.Winds:NNE at 7-14 mph.Winds:NNE at 8-16 mph.TODAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAY Partly sunny Breezy with some sun Mostly sunnySunshine and patchy clouds Partly sunny AccuWeather UVIndexTMThe higher the UV index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2, Low;3-5, Moderate;6-7, High; 8-10, Very High;11+ Extreme9 a.m.11 a.m.1 p.m.3 p.m.5 p.m. 13531 U.S.cities World cities Florida citiesWeather ( W ): s -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice. CityHiLoWCityHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCityHiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCityHiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCityHiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCityHiLoWHiLoWHiLoWFor 3 p.m.today For today A deadly tornado ripped through Reading, Pa., on Jan.9, 1889, killing dozens and injuring hundreds of people.It was the first of two twisters to hit Reading in 1889. Relative humidity ....................41% Expected air temperature ........67¡ Makes it feel like ......................66¡ Sun and moon Moon phases FirstFullLastNew Jan 12Jan 19Jan 26Feb 2 Washington W a s h i n g t o n 34/21 3 4 / 2 1 New York N e w Y o r k 35/23 3 5 / 2 3 Miami M i a m i 73/66 7 3 / 6 6 Atlanta A t l a n t a 35/27 3 5 / 2 7 Detroit D e t r o i t 26/14 2 6 / 1 4 Houston H o u s t o n 45/34 4 5 / 3 4 Chicago C h i c a g o 25/17 2 5 / 1 7 Minneapolis M i n n e a p o l i s 8/-3 8 / 3 Kansas City K a n s a s C i t y 27/19 2 7 / 1 9 El Paso E l P a s o 56/34 5 6 / 3 4 Denver D e n v e r 26/3 2 6 / 3 Billings B i l l i n g s 19/-2 1 9 / 2 Los Angeles L o s A n g e l e s 55/42 5 5 / 4 2 San Francisco S a n F r a n c i s c o 52/38 5 2 / 3 8 Seattle S e a t t l e 37/27 3 7 / 2 7 Washington 34/21 New York 35/23 Miami 73/66 Atlanta 35/27 Detroit 26/14 Houston 45/34 Chicago 25/17 Minneapolis 8/-3 Kansas City 27/19 El Paso 56/34 Denver 26/3 Billings 19/-2 Los Angeles 55/42 San Francisco 52/38 Seattle 37/27 Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands ar e highs for the day.Forecast high and low temperatures are given for selected citie s. Rain, accompanied by a few rumbles of thunder, will drench the western and central Gulf Coasts today as a storm system edges eastward over the Gulf of Mexico.Farther north, a wintry mix of snow, slee t and rain will span a zone from northeastern Texas through Alabama.Meanwhile, a snowstorm will unfold over the central and northern Plains.The heaviest snow will target Nebraska, Colorado and southeastern Wyoming, where several inches is possible.The Northwest will stay unsettled, with showers along the coast. National Forecast for January 9 Partly sunny today.Partly cloudy tonight.Breezy tomorrow with some sun.Tuesday and Wednesday:mostly sunny.Thursday: partly sunny. Avon Park Tallahassee Jacksonville St.Petersburg Miami Sebring Lorida Lake Placid Venus 70/52 70/52 68/49 68/48 49/44 52/43 64/57 73/66 68/48Shown is today's weather.Temperatures are today's highs and tonight's lows Regional forecast Water restrictions Almanac Farm reportPartly sunny today.Winds east-northeast 7-14 mph. Expect 4-8 hours of sunshine with average relative humidity 55% and good drying conditions.Partly cloudy tonight. FRONTS Shower s T-storm Rain Flurries Snow Ice Cold Warm StationaryDaytona Beach6153pc7459t7246pc Ft.Laud.Bch7267pc7866pc8064s Fort Myers7155pc7662pc7754s Gainesville5646c7050r6336pc Homestead AFB7163pc7663pc7864s Jacksonville5243c7048r5936pc Key West7267pc7767s7868s Miami7366pc7866pc8064s Orlando6350pc7558t7350s Pensacola4444c5838r5132pc Sarasota6653pc7563t7252s Tallahassee4944c6241r5731pc Tampa6356pc7259t6848s W.Palm Bch6964pc7865pc7959sTemperature(Readings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake Placid)High Tuesday ..........................76 Low Tuesday ............................52 High Wednesday ....................81 Low Wednesday ......................56 High Thursday ........................68 Low Thursday ..........................34 Precipitation Tuesday ..............................0.00" Wednesday ........................0.01" Thursday ............................0.67" Month to date ......................0.68" Year to date ........................0.68" Barometer Tuesday ..............................30.06 Wednesday ........................29.84 Thursday ............................29.94 Tides(Readings at St.Petersburg)High ..............................4:04 a.m. Low ............................10:56 a.m. High ..............................5:23 p.m. Low ............................11:27 p.m.(Readings at Palm Beach)High ............................11:40 a.m. Low ..............................5:18 a.m. High ....................................none Low ..............................5:45 p.m. Lake Levels Lake Jackson ....................78.36' Lake Okeechobee ..............12.46' Normal ..............................14.51' TodaySunrise ....7:15 a.m. Sunset ......5:51 p.m. Moonrise 10:19 a.m. Moonset ..10:44 p.m. MondaySunrise ....7:15 a.m. Sunset ......5:52 p.m. Moonrise 10:50 a.m. Moonset ..11:35 p.m.If your address (house number) ends in... ...0 or 1, water only on Monday ...2 or 3, water only on Tuesday ...4 or 5, water only on Wednesday ...6 or 7, water only on Thursday ...8 or 9*, water only on Friday and locations without a discernible address TodayTodayNational summary:Regional summary: Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather,Inc. 2011 -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110sAccuWeather.com

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SPORTS B SECTION Inside This Section Prowl cancels season . . .3B Sparano's status . . .3B BCS apathy . . .3B Heat/Magic get wins . . .4B Lincicome to play men's event .4B News-Sun Sunday, January 9, 2011 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE A shleigh Albrecht fires one down the fairway Thursday during the Harder Hall's delayed second round. After W ednesday's record-breaking 63, Albrecht's second round 74 dropped her out of the lead. But she gained a share of the lead with a third-round 69 Friday. News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E Cheyenne Woods watches her approach shot toward the first hole Friday. Woods had moved into the lead with a strong second round in inclement conditions, but fell into a tie with Ashleigh Albrecht heading into Saturday's final round. News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Lady Blue Streak Ivy Pintor powers up 100 pounds in the bench press to help her win the 119 class in Thursday's four-team meet at Sebring. News-Sun photo by BETH BALDRIDGE Jeffery Campbell dunks one late in the game to help the Red Devils with their 67-49 win over district rival Tenoroc Friday night By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comLAKELANDThe Avon P ark boys basketball team u sed a second-half press to b eat the Tenoroc Titans 67-49 o n the road Friday night. "We played a good game. T enoroc is a good team, and t hey showed that the first h alf," head coach Luther C lemons said. "We came out w ith the press in the third p eriod and played a very g ood game to beat them." "This is how I expect us to p lay every game. We have the t alent and the teamwork, and t onight they all clicked t ogether," Clemons added. The Devils jumped out f ront 17-10 in the first perio d, but Titan Karlos Odum l ed Tenoroc to a 29-29 tie at t he half. Odum's 18 points for the n ight would not be enough to d eter a Devil counter attack i n the second half. Reggie Baker's air attack f rom the outside and Alonzo R obetson's ground assault in t he paint would net both p layers 22 points for the D evils, despite Robertson's t ender knee which looks to be a day-to-day issue. It was a fourth period dunk from senior Jeffery Campbell that capped the game for Avon Park and put the crowd on their feet and a technical warning for the Avon Park bench. "It was a good play, and that is definitely newspaper material," Clemons said. "Overall, I am pleased with our performance." Odum answered 30 seconds later with his own slam, but the Devils were already out front 67-47 with just 1:30 left on the clock. The win puts the 12-3 Devils in the driver's seat in 3ADistrict 9 with a 7-0 record, and drops Tenoroc to 9-5 overall and 5-2 in the district. Avon Park stays at home on Monday night to face Lake Placid in their second meeting of the regular season. In other action, the Lady Red Devils avenged a 14point loss to Tenoroc earlier this season with a win by the same amount Friday night, topping the Lady Titans 5137 and giving them their first district loss. The APladies are back at it Tuesday with an away game at Lake Placid. Red Devils temper Titans By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING In grand Harder Hall tradition, the 56th Annual Women's Invitation looks to be going down to the wire again as round one leader Ashleigh Albrecht has weathered the weather, delays and a hard, two-day charge from Cheyenne Woods to go into Saturday's final round at a 10-under-par tie. Both golfers are on pace to potentially break the tournament record of 13-under par, set just two years ago by Candace Schepperle. With five golfers currently at least six under, and a clear, calm day forecast for Saturday's play, the record could very well fall. Thursday's morning monsoon pushed play back, but didn't stop Woods from methodically working her way through the course, following up her first-round 67 with a 69 in very unfavorable scoring conditions. Albrecht was holding steady through the second round, but when darkness fell, she still had six holes to play. "I had gotten to two under for the day and then bogeyed my last hole," Albrecht said. "But for how it was that day, I managed to keep things in play." So it was back on the course bright and early Friday morning to finish up her second round under clear, blue skies. Her fortunes, however, weren't so bright as she finished the second round at a two-over 74, to fall one back of Woods heading into Friday's regular schedule though it was anything but regular. Because of the delay, the format changed to a shotgun start with each hole being occupied, many with two foursomes, when things teed off. This led to some lags, but the first part of the round was advantageous for scoring. And right off the bat the race was on as Woods and Albrecht each birdied their first two holes, though by the end of the front nine, Woods 32 had dropped her to 12under-par, while Albrecht's 35 had her at eight under. Coming down to the wire See HARDER, page 4B By LAUREN WELBORN Special to the News-SunSEBRING Practice makes perfect is perhaps the best clichŽ to describe the recent efforts of the Sebring Varsity girls'soccer team. As they continue to face teams who previously beat them, the Lady Streaks are coming back to win against teams such as Lake Wales, whom they beat 2-1 on Thursday night after losing to them earlier this season. With this new inspiration, they continued on to face the Haines City Friday night. At their last match, the Lady Hornets had ended the game in their favor, 1-0. However, Sebring would turn the tables with their own victory to move themselves above Haines City in the overall district seeding. Sebring came out strong, but so did the Lady Hornets. No one goalie was any less pressured than the other as each defense worked hard to protect its' home end of the field. Junior keeper Megan Williams held her own with help from sophomo re defenders Michelle Voln y and Ashley Longabaugh. This would hold t he game scoreless at halftim e. However, the only go al for the night was soo n scored by left-footed juni or Jennifer Cochran in the se cond half. After a scramble in t he box, Cochran was able to move past the Haines Ci ty goalie and find an und efended spot of the net. Despite the excitemen t, the Lady Streaks knew th ey needed to maintain the ir composure. With plenty of time st ill left on the clock, the gir ls upheld the same pressu re against the Hornets an d kept them off the scor eboard to secure the win. "We keep getting bett er each game," said seni or captain Nina Mercur e. "These teams are expectin g an easy win, and we ju st won't allow it." The Lady Streaks clo se out their home schedu le Monday on Senior Night as they host Mulberry befo re closing out the regular se ason Thursday at La ke Placid. Lady Streaks on a roll By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING Continuing to build on their own strength, as well as that of their season thus far, the Lady Blue Streaks topped a four-team meet Thursday at the Firemen's Field Fieldhouse. Squaring off with LaBelle, Hardee and DeSoto, Sebring finished first in six weight classes and totaled up 56 points to the Cowgirls 35, the Lady Wildcats 20 and the Bulldogs 7. Beginning with the 101 class, Amanda Hicks powered her way to a win with 70 pounds lifted in both the bench press and clean and jerk for a 140-pound total. The Streaks didn't get a win at 110, but Carlee Hill and Bianca Nortelus helped add some points to the total with a second and third, respectively. Hill and Nortelus both totaled 180 pounds for their two lifts, with Hill getting 90 on both her lifts and Nortelus going 95 and 85. The pre-meet weigh-in tiebreaker, though, went Hill's way. Sebring went first and second at 119 with Ivy Pintor and Febe Murillo doing the honors. Pintor nearly cracked the 200-pound barrier, coming up just 10 pounds short with 100 on the bench and 90 in the clean and jerk. Out of her regulation attempts, Pintor gave 95 a t ry and stuck it, boding well as the sectional qualifi er approaches. Murillo went 85 and 80 f or a 165 total for her secon dplace finish. Brittany Lockhart conti nued her dominance in the 12 9 class, cruising past the 20 0pound mark with a 115 ben ch and 110 jerk for an easy w in with 225. The Lady Streaks also g ot a one, two finish at 139. Lauren Welborn an d Destiny Sutton turned t he trick with Welborn totalin g 225, with a 105 bench an d 120 jerk, while Sutton we nt 95 and 110 for a 205 total. Sebring's lady lifters push to win See STREAKS, p a g e 3B

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Umpire Clinic coming upSEBRING Amandatory umpire's clinic will be held on Saturday, Jan. 22 from 8 a.m.-12 p.m. at the Highlands County Sports Complex located on Sheriff's Tower Road in Sebring. If you are an umpire, you must attend this clinic for necessary training. All umpires must be certified to participate in the upcoming leagues. Certification fee is $50. If you are interested in becoming an umpire, please call Dan Jamison for more information. Open registration for ALLadult softball players, men and women, is ongoing. Registration is for next year's leagues. If you are interested in playing organized softball, please sign up at the Highlands County Sports Complex. For more information, please contact Dan Jamison at the Highlands County Sports Complex (863) 402-6755.New Year Golf BenefitSEBRING ANew Year's golf tournament to benefit Eddie Bateman will tee off Saturday, Jan. 15 on the Deer Run course at Sun N Lake. The four-person scramble format will kick off with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. Cost is $55 per person/$220 per team. There are also sponsorships available. AGold sponsorship is $1,000 and gets four hole signs, a banner and one team entry. ASilver sponsorship is $500 and includes two hole signs, a banner and one team entry. ABronze sponsorship gets two hole signs and a banner and a single hole sponsorship, for $100, gets one hole sign. There are also single sponsor donations available for $25. For more information, contact Jady Prescott at 381-2117 or jady_52@hotmail.com .Panther Volleyball CampAVONPARK The South Florida Community College Volleyball program will be hosting a four week training camp running from Jan. 6-Feb. 3 for players from 6th to 12th grade. The camp will meet Tuesday's and Thursday's from 6:30-8:30 p.m. and provides individual skill development and basic tactics. All campers will receive individual and team instruction from Coach Kim Crawford and members of the 2010-11 Lady Panthers. Crawford is a three-time college AllAmerican and played professionally in Europe, on the Bud Light Professional Beach Tour for Team Nike and on the Pro California Grass Tour. She has been trained by many Olympic coaches and looks forward to sharing her vast volleyball knowledge with all camp participants. The camp cost is $100 and is limited to the first 30 to register. To register, go to www.southflorida.edu and select the volleyball site. Click on "volleyball camp," print out Admissions Application and Emergency Treatment forms. Mail Admissions Application and Emergency Treatment forms as indicated on application form, or bring to the Cashier's Office in Building B. For more information, contact the SFCC Athletic Department at the following campus phone numbers at extensio n 7037 Avon Park/Sebring, 784-703 7; Lake Placid, 465-5300; DeSoto, 49 47500; Hardee, 773-2252; or ema il kim.crawford@southflorida.edu .Panther 5KAVON PARK The second annu al South Florida Community Colle ge Panther 5K Run/Walk has been plann ed for Saturday, Feb. 26 at the SFC C Highland Campus. The SFCC Foundation, Inc. and B ill Jarrett Ford Mercury are sponsoring t he event, and proceeds benefit the college 's intercollegiate athletics programs. The entry fee for the SFCC Panther 5 K Run/Walk is $20 through Feb. 16 and $2 5 from Feb. 17 through the day of the rac e. Students with a current I.D. may regi ster for $15. Every participant receives a Dri-F it long-sleeve shirt sizes cannot be gua ranteed for those who enter after Feb. 17 Registration is 7-7:45 a.m. on race d ay in the parking lot in front of the SFC C University Center. The race begins at 8 a.m. Entry forms are available online at www.southflorida.edu/panther5k Participants can mail their copies an d entry fees to the SFCC Foundation, In c., 13 East Main Street, Avon Park, F L 33825; or fax forms to 863-453-8023 an d call 863-453-3133 with credit card info rmation. For more information about the SFC C Panther 5K, call the SFCC Foundation at 863-453-3133. Youth Baseball Yard SaleSEBRING Amulti-family yard sa le will be held at Max Long Sports Compl ex on Saturday, Jan. 15 to benefit Tea m Sebring baseball. These 12-year olds are going to Cooperstown, NYin August 2011 to pa rticipate in the American Youth Baseba ll Invitational Tournament.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worsh ip Center presents the First Annual Go lf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun sta rt at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes o ne team of four golfers, one tee sign and tw o green signs. Gold Sponsor $300 includes one tea m of four golfers, one green sign. Silver Sponsor $150 includes o ne green sign, one tee sign. Bronze Sponsor $100 includes o ne green sign. Individual player $60 includes gre en fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26 ). Team of Four Golfers $240 includ es green fees, cart and lunch ($280 aft er March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, F L 33871. Or register online at wingsoffaithchri stianworshipcenter.com Proceeds to be donated to scholarsh ip program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jaso n Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhanke rson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com WILD-CARD PLAYOFFS Saturday, Jan. 8 New Orleans at Seattle, late N.Y. Jets at Indianapolis, late Sunday, Jan. 9 Baltimore at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Green Bay at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS Saturday, Jan. 15 Indianapolis, Kansas City or Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m. Green Bay, New Orleans or Seattle at Atlanta, 8 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 16 Philadelphia, New Orleans or Seattle at Chicago, 1 p.m. N.Y. Jets, Kansas City or Baltimore at New England, 4:30 p.m. CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS Sunday, Jan. 23 NFC, 3 p.m. AFC, 6:30 p.m. PRO BOWL Sunday, Jan. 30 AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. SUPER BOWL Sunday, Feb. 6 At Arlington, Texas AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB Boston287.800 New York2114.6007 Philadelphia1521.4171312Toronto1224.3331612New Jersey1026.2781812Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami299.763 Orlando2412.6674 Atlanta2414.6325 Charlotte1221.3641412Washington925.26518 Central Division WLPctGB Chicago2312.657 Indiana1419.4248 Milwaukee1321.382912Detroit1124.31412 Cleveland828.2221512WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio306.833 Dallas269.743312New Orleans2116.568912Memphis1719.47213 Houston1620.44414 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City2413.649 Utah2413.649 Denver2015.5713 Portland2017.5414 Minnesota928.24315 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Lakers2611.703 Golden State1521.4171012Phoenix1420.4121012L.A. Clippers1124.31414 Sacramento825.24216 ___ Thursday's Games Oklahoma City 99, Dallas 95 Sacramento 122, Denver 102 Friday's Games San Antonio 90, Indiana 87 Philadelphia 105, Chicago 99 Washington 97, New Jersey 77 Boston 122, Toronto 102 Memphis 110, Utah 99 Portland 108, Minnesota 98 Orlando 110, Houston 95 Miami 101, Milwaukee 95, OT Golden State 116, Cleveland 98 L.A. Lakers 101, New Orleans 97 New York 121, Phoenix 96 Saturday's Games Indiana at Atlanta, late Washington at Charlotte, late Milwaukee at New Jersey, late Philadelphia at Detroit, late Boston at Chicago, late Memphis at Oklahoma City, late Orlando at Dallas, late Utah at Houston, late Sunday's Games Sacramento at Toronto, 1 p.m. Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. Minnesota at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Miami at Portland, 9 p.m. New Orleans at Denver, 9 p.m. New York at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA Pittsburgh261245613697 Philadelphia2510555135106 N.Y. Rangers2415351124106 N.Y. Islanders122063090122 New Jersey102822271128 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Boston211264811188 Montreal221634710297 Buffalo1718539111118 Ottawa161963892124 Toronto1620436105121 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Tampa Bay2412553123130 Washington2312652120107 Atlanta2216650137136 Carolina1915644117120 Florida1819238107103WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Detroit2610557143117 Nashville211364810496 Chicago2218347133124 St. Louis2013646106110 Columbus2018343103124 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA Vancouver27855914097 Colorado2115547136130 Minnesota2015545103114 Calgary1820440112123 Edmonton1320733101138 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA Dallas2413553120116 Anaheim2218448116123 San Jose2115547118115 Phoenix1913846112115 Los Angeles2217145118101 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Thursday's Games Toronto 6, St. Louis 5, SO Montreal 2, Pittsburgh 1, SO Minnesota 3, Boston 1 Philadelphia 4, New Jersey 2 Phoenix 2, Colorado 0 Edmonton 2, N.Y. Islanders 1 Nashville 5, Los Angeles 2 Buffalo 3, San Jose 0 Friday's Games Chicago 3, Ottawa 2, SO N.Y. Rangers 3, Dallas 2, SO Detroit 5, Calgary 4, SO Toronto 9, Atlanta 3 Carolina 5, Florida 3 Vancouver 6, Edmonton 1 Anaheim 6, Columbus 0 Saturday's Games New Jersey at Philadelphia, late N.Y. Islanders at Colorado, late Boston at Montreal, late Tampa Bay at Ottawa, late Minnesota at Pittsburgh, late Florida at Washington, late N.Y. Rangers at St. Louis, late Buffalo at Phoenix, late Nashville at San Jose, late Detroit at Vancouver, late Columbus at Los Angeles, late Sunday's Games Atlanta at Carolina, 1:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at New Jersey, 5 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 6 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Chicago, 7 p.m. San Jose at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Friday's Scores EAST Baruch 61, Hunter 52 Canisius 62, Siena 61 E. Mennonite 98, Penn St.-Beaver 71 Fairfield 59, Marist 44 Hartwick 59, Nazareth, N.Y. 54 Iona 70, St. Peter's 52 Loyola, Md. 82, Manhattan 67 Ramapo 94, Vassar 69 Rider 82, Niagara 65 St. John Fisher 80, Utica 66 SOUTH Campbell 65, Kennesaw St. 52 Centre 65, Sewanee 51 Wheeling Jesuit 82, Bluefield St. 62 MIDWEST Butler 79, Cleveland St. 56 Creighton 72, S. Illinois 66, OT Drake 64, Bradley 58 Indiana St. 70, N. Iowa 45 Missouri St. 65, Evansville 50 Valparaiso 79, Youngstown St. 55 Wichita St. 65, Illinois St. 51 FARWEST Rocky Mountain 72, Carroll, Mont. 60 Montana St.-Northern 75, Great Falls 67 Friday's Scores EAST Army 54, Colgate 40 Baruch 73, Hunter 43 Nazareth, N.Y. 50, Hartwick 49 Quinnipiac 60, Monmouth, N.J. 57 Sacred Heart 65, Fairleigh Dickinson 39 Susquehanna 67, Goucher 58 Utica 77, St. John Fisher 66 SOUTH Centre 82, Sewanee 45 Roanoke 68, Washington & Lee 61 Temple 60, Charlotte 57 Wheeling Jesuit 64, Bluefield St. 41 MIDWEST Bethany Lutheran 74, Finlandia 65 FAR WEST CS Bakersfield 90, Concordia, Calif. 63 Carroll, Mont. 81, Rocky Mountain 67 Colo.-Colo. Springs 69, Western St., Colo. 62 Great Falls 85, Montana St.-Northern 73 Mesa, Colo. 82, CSU-Pueblo 70BASEBALLMajor League Baseball MLBNamed Lou Koskovolis senior vice president of corporate sales and marketing. American League TEXAS RANGERSDesignated RHP Guillermo Moscoso for assignment, National League ST. LOUIS CARDINALSPromoted Michael Girsch to assistant general manager and Sig Mejdal to director, amateur draft analysis. WASHINGTON NATIONALSSigned 1B Adam LaRoche to two-year contract.BASKETBALLNational Basketball Association MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVESActivated F Anthony Tolliver.FOOTBALLNational Football League NFLFined Indianapolis LB Gary Brackett $35,000 for his hit on Tennessee LS Ken Amato during a Jan. 2 game. Fined Baltimore LB Terrell Suggs $15,000 for striking Bengals wide receiver Jerome Simpson in the face after a play. Fined New England NT Vince Wilfork and Miami DE Paul Soliai $10,000 each for roughing the passer. Fined Oakland DL John Henderson $7,500 for slamming Kansas City QB Matt Cassel to the ground. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTSPlaced DL Mike Wright on injured reserve. Suspended DE Brandon Deaderick for undisclosed reasons. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERSNamed Jim Harbaugh coach. SEATTLE SEAHAWKSSigned G Lemuel Jeanpierre and CB Josh Pinkard from the practice squad. TENNESSEE TITANSSigned LS Jake Ingram, LB Kevin Malast and QB Brett Ratliff to future contracts.HOCKEYNational Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANESRecalled C Jon Matsumoto from Charlotte (AHL). Placed F Jiri Tlusty on injured reserve, retroactive to Dec. 16. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKSRecalled D Nick Leddy from Rockford (AHL). DALLAS STARSAcquired F Jamie Langenbrunner from New Jersey for a conditional 2011 secondor thirdround draft pick. NASHVILLE PREDATORSReassigned F Linus Klasen to Milwaukee (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERSRecalled F Jeremy Colliton from Bridgeport (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTESReassigned G Matt Climie to San Antonio (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORSRecalled G Robin Lehner from Binghamton (AHL). ST. LOUIS BLUESAssigned F Adam Cracknell to Peoria (AHL). Recalled F T.J. Hensick from Peoria. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid MONDAY: Girls Weightlifting at Sebring,5 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at Avon Park,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball vs.Avon Park, 6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer at Tenoroc,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer at Hardee,6/7:30 p.m. THURSDAY: Girls Soccer at Sebring,6/7:30 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Girls Basketball vs.Winter Haven,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.Mulberry, 6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Weightlifting vs.Lake Placid,5 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at Lake Wales,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball at Frostproof, 6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer vs.Osceola,6/7:30 p.m. Walker TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at All Saints,7 p.m.; Girls Basketball at All Saints,5:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Boys Basketball at Moore Haven,7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball at Moore Haven,6 p.m. Heartland Christian MONDAY: JV Basketball at West Glades,4:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at Haven Christian,7:30 p.m. TUESDAY,Jan.18: Boys Basketball vs.Victory Prep,6:30 p.m. THURSDAY,Jan.20: Boys Basketball at Moore Haven,6/7:30 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Girls Weightlifting vs.LaBelle,5 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Lake Placid,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball at Lake Placid,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer vs.Ft.Meade,6:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer at Okeechobee, 6 p.m. THURSDAY: Girls Basketball at Bartow,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer vs.Hardee,7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.Hardee,6 p.m.; Girls Weightlifting at DeSoto,5:30 p.m. S S K K A A T T I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . Skating & Gymnastics Spectacular . . . . . . N N B B C C C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Kansas at Michigan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S SM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Notre Dame at Marquette . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Wisconsin at Michigan State . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 7 7 p p . m m . Texas at Texas Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 p p . m m . Georgia Tech at Clemson . . . . . .. . . . . . . . S S U U N N 9 9 p p . m m . Florida at Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E F F O O O O T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 p p . m m . Kraft Bowl Boston College vs. Nevada . E E S S P P N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . BCS Championship Auburn vs. Oregon E E S S P P N NTimes, games, channels all subject to change N N F F L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Baltimore at Kansas City . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Green Bay at Philadelphia . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S SG G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 a a . m m . EuroPGA Africa Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 6 6 p p . m m . PGA Hyundai Tournament of Champs . G G O O L L F FW W O O M M E E N N ' S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . Dayton at Xavier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Arkansas at Mississippi State . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 5 5 p p . m m . Tulane at Alabama-Birmingham . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N B B A A S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 p p . m m . Miami at Portland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NB B O O W W L L I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . PBA U.S. vs. The World . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N LIVESPORTSONTV NFL Playoffs NHL NBA M. College Basketball Transactions W. College Basketball Page 2BNews-Sun Sunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.co m

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 3B STARTS TOMORROW 655-6252 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E Calee Hill locks out this 90-pound clean and jerk Thursday, helping her to a secondplace finish in her weight class as Sebring won its' home weightlifting meet over visiting LaBelle, Hardee and DeSoto. Kemoy Newman picked up another win for Sebring at 154 as she benched 115 and clean and jerked 120 for a 235 total. Shelby Hicks added some points to the cause with a third-place finish in the class by lifting matching 105s for a 210 total. The Sebring wins finished in the 183 class with Roenecka Freeman combining her lifts for 195. The Streaks will have the upcoming week to put in some more work as they ready to host the Sectional Qualifier Saturday, Jan. 1 5 at 9 a.m. They then will partake in the annual Travis Tod d Invitational at Avon Pa rk Thursday, Jan. 20 as a fin al warm-up for the Sta te Qualifier in Port Charlot te Wednesday, Jan. 26. Continued from 1B Streaks win, host Sectionals Saturday By RALPH D. RUSSO Associated PressSCOTTSDALE, Ariz. P layoff pushing lawmakers a nd political action committ ees are far from the biggest p roblems facing the Bowl C hampionship Series these d ays. Apathy seems to have set i n among many college footb all fans toward the sport's m arquee games, and bowl o fficials indicate they are r eady to try and fix it. The problem really isn't t he BCS national title game. T ickets to Monday's showd own between No. 1 Auburn a nd second-ranked Oregon a re a hot item. It's the undercard the O range, Fiesta and Sugar b owls, and to a far lesser e xtent the Rose Bowl that c ould use a boost. Ticket sales for some of t hose games have been slugg ish, and ratings generally h ave been lukewarm for m atchups that haven't gotten t he casual fan excited. "We have to find a way to r evitalize the market place," S ugar Bowl executive direct or Paul Hoolahan said. The ratings for Hoolahan's g ame were down a touch, f rom 8.5 last year when the g ame was on Fox to 8.4 this s eason, ESPN's first as the T Vhome of the BCS t hough the Superdome in N ew Orleans was filled to c apacity Tuesday for BCSn ewcomer Arkansas and O hio State, one of college f ootball's glamour programs a nd a reliable draw with its e normous alumni base. The Fiesta Bowl and the O range Bowl had more serio us issues. The Fiesta Bowl on Jan. 1 b etween Oklahoma and C onnecticut drew a 6.7 rati ng, down 22 percent from l ast year, and UConn sold o nly about 5,000 of the 1 7,500 tickets the school was r equired to buy from organize rs. Attendance at the U niversity of Phoenix S tadium in Glendale, Ariz., w as 67,232, about 6,000 b elow capacity for the game. At the Orange Bowl in M iami, Stanford and Virginia T ech drew a 7.1 overnight r ating, down from last year's 7 .2 for Georgia Tech-Iowa, a nd the attendance of 65,453 w as about 9,000 below c apacity at Sun Life Stadium a s neither team came close to s elling its allotment of 1 7,500 tickets. Geography was clearly an i ssue for those two games. In a perfect world, S tanford would have played i n Arizona, far closer to its c ampus in Palo Alto, Calif., a nd Connecticut could have shot down to south Florida. But the way BCS berths are dolled out prevented that. "Anytime we can make it better for fans that want to support their teams and for the quality and the excitement of the game and the attraction of the matchups, that seems a sensible thing to address and to discuss," Fiesta Bowl executive director John Junker said Friday. "That may not be easy to do, but I think there's some obvious value." He also added: "I'm not sure it's all necessarily, solely geographic." While Junker praised Connecticut and its fans, the Huskies were clearly a problem for the BCS this season. They earned the program's first BCS bid by winning the Big East's automatic berth, but they were 8-4 and a huge underdog against Oklahoma, sneaking into the last spot in the APTop 25 at the very end of the regular season. The game played out about as expected with the Sooners winning 48-20. No one in the bowl business likes lopsided games. That's why, even though it made more sense geographically for the Orange Bowl to take UConn, given the choice between the Huskies and fifth-ranked Stanford, with Heisman Trophy runner-up Andrew Luck, officials in Miami understandably went for the more attractive team even if it meant empty seats in the stadium. "We can't just focus in on the gate," Orange Bowl CEO Eric Poms said. Poms also said he was pleased with the opportunity to bring a Pac-10 to the Orange Bowl, just like he was thrilled to bring a Big Ten team in Iowa there last year. The Orange Bowl's relationship with the Atlantic Coast Conference clearly hasn't been what either side would have hoped. With Miami and Florida State struggling to win the league in recent years, the ACC's representative in the Orange Bowl has been Virginia Tech three times in the past four years. Hokies fans flocked to Charlotte, N.C., for the ACC title game in early December, but were not so enthusiastic about gobbling up Orange Bowl tickets again. Return bowl trips generally aren't ideal for anyone involved. "Within the system there's a great degree of agreement that one of our primary goals is the experience for the student-athlete and frequent return trips probably doesn't serve that at its best," Junker said. To make matters worse, from an Orange Bowl standpoint, Stanford then went on to run away with the game in the second half, winning 4012 and celebrating before rows and rows of empty seats. So what can be done? Bowl officials aren't ready to present specific ideas and don't think for a second that a playoff will be one of those ideas but there are a few others that will likely be tossed around in New Orleans when bowl officials and conference commissioners get together for their annual BCS meeting. Aminimum BCS ranking for automatic qualifiers. Away to eliminate future UConn-type problems would make conference champions have to reach a certain ranking to secure a spot. That number would need to be no higher than around 18th for the conferences to even listen. Mandating geographical considerations, so teams play closer to home. Making more teams atlarge eligible, which could require lifting the rule that limits conferences to no more than two BCS bids. So an 11th-ranked, two-loss LSU could still make it to a bigmoney bowl. Allow for more horsetrading. The system doesn't allow much (if any) flexibility for the bowls to broker deals to trade teams. BCS executive director Bill Hancock files some of the apathy issues under "unintended consequences" of a system that basically works, and isn't sure this season's problems are anything more than just that this season's problems. "You have to be careful to evaluate the difference between a blip and a paradigm shift," he said. "In every enterprise, you're making a mistake if you're not trying to improve it every year. The commissioners are absolutely committed to making this the best it can be ... through collaborative conversations." Fan apathy could be greatest threat to BCS We have to find a way to revitalize the market place.'PAULHOOLAHAN Sugar Bowl exec. director By STEVEN WINE Associated PressDAVIE The Miami D olphins'strange week took a nother bizarre turn Friday, l eaving coach Tony S parano's status still in d oubt. The Dolphins scheduled a l ate-afternoon news confere nce to announce the retent ion of Sparano, but the sess ion was postponed 20 minu tes before the scheduled s tart. Nearly two hours later, the D olphins rescheduled the s ession for Saturday. Aspokesman gave no reas on for the postponement. The Dolphins'cross-count ry courtship of Stanford c oach Jim Harbaugh ended l ate Thursday, and he was h ired Friday to coach the San F rancisco 49ers. With Harbaugh no longer a n option, the Dolphins were e xpected to retain Sparano, w ho has one year left on his c ontract. Sparano met Friday at the t eam complex with owner Stephen Ross and general manager Jeff Ireland, but there was no announcement regarding who will coach the Dolphins in 2011. The news conference promised to be an entertaining exercise in damage control. While in limbo this week, Sparano reported to work daily, even as Ross and Ireland flew to California to get spurned by Harbaugh. Conducting a coaching search when the Dolphins still had a coach threatened to undermine Sparano, whose status was already shaky because of his team's lateseason meltdown. The sequence of events also raised questions about the state of his relationship with Ireland, which dates back eight years when both were with the Dallas Cowboys. The offseason has gone much like the latter part of the season for the Dolphins, who lost their final three games, including a 38-7 drubbing at New England in their finale last Sunday. Ross said before the season he expected the Dolphins to reach the Super Bowl, but instead they finished 7-9 and failed for the eighth time in nine years to reach the playoffs. Sparano led Miami to that lone postseason berth in 2008, his first year as an NFL coach. He has a three-year record of 25-23. Sparano's status still in question MCTphoto Is Tony Sparano still the Dolphins head coach? By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Fans were surprised on Wednesday night when they discovered that the Heartland Prowl season had been cancelled. Anote on the door of the South Florida Community College Gym announced that the game on Wednesday and that all future games for this season were cancelled. The Prowl is part of the American Basketball Association, a semi-pro group that has grown to over 60 teams since it began in 1999. The Prowl posted a winning record, winning two and losing just one, befo re cancelling their secon d matchup of the seaso n against the Florida Makos at South Florida Communi ty College on Wednesday. Team owner and gener al manager Levi William s could not be contacted f or comment at press time. Prowl season cancelled

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By KYLE HIGHTOWER Associated PressORLANDO Whether t he Orlando Magic's rebuilt r oster is good enough to win a n NBAtitle remains to be s een. But what's becoming c learer by the day is that the M agic certainly have more t han enough offensive w eapons to take the pressure o ff All-Star center Dwight H oward when needed. With Howard saddled with e arly foul trouble, Orlando g ot 18 points apiece from B randon Bass and Jason R ichardson, and 16 points off t he bench from Ryan A nderson to beat the Houston R ockets 110-95 Friday night. The victory extended the M agic's season-best winning s treak to eight games. Orlando clung to a threep oint advantage at the half, b ut blew open the game after s tarting the third quarter on a 1 9-5 run to build a 74-55 c ushion. Bass had seven points duri ng the spurt as the Magic o utscored the Rockets 39-21 i n the period to take a 92-71 l ead into the fourth. Anderson led all players w ith 13 points in the third. "That's the good thing that w e do have, is guys that can s tretch the court and take a l ot of attention," said A nderson, who was one of s ix Magic players in double f igures. "Dwight doesn't h ave to score 30 points in the g ame to be felt. He opens the c ourt up for everybody." Bass, Richardson and A nderson helped overcome a 2 7-point night by Kevin M artin, who was coming off a 45-point performance in a loss to Portland on Wednesday. "We fell apart in the third quarter," Houston coach Rick Adelman said. "We struggled offensively, we just gave in at the other end. We gave up 39 points, that's not going to do it on the road." When Howard was in the game for Orlando, he drew lots of attention from an undersized Houston frontcourt. The Rockets were playing without 6-foot-6 starting center Chuck Hayes, who has missed five straight games with a sore right ankle, but had a big body in the middle in 6-10 Jordan Hill. But when Hill and forward Luis Scola attempted to double-team Howard, it opened up plenty of lanes for almost everyone else in a Magic uniform. The Magic took a 53-50 lead into halftime, but needed every one of the opening 24 minutes to earn that early edge. The Rockets led by as many as nine points in a fastpaced first quarter in which both teams shot over 50 percent from the floor. Martin had 19 in the first half, including 11 in the first quarter, as he exploited a lane that was mostly void of Howard's presence. Howard picked up two quick fouls in the first quarter and got his third whistle of the night with 9:33 remaining in the second quarter. He logged just 10 minutes of action in the half. The Magic stayed close and on the backs of Richardson and Bass, who had 13 and 11 first half points, respectively. Orlando also shot 51 percent from the field and 4 of 9 from the 3-point line. "It was pretty much an even game going into halftime," Martin said. "He (Howard) sat the whole second quarter and it was one of those games going back and forth. He just showed what his presence can do on the court in the third quarter. Because none of us is going to grow into 7-foot-2 and become a shot blocker overnight." Defending champion Kyle R oig, four shots back when t he round began, made the t urn with a 34 to keep her w ithin reach as well at six u nder. That's around the time a c hilly afternoon wind kicked u p, adding another layer to t hese crazy first three days of t he tournament. "I had a good front nine, b ut the back nine just felt terr ible," Woods said, adding t hat the wind didn't effect h er. "It was my short game t hat messed me up and let me d own on the back nine." That messing up translated t o a two-over 38, giving her a 7 0 for the day and bringing h er three-round total to 10u nder. Albrecht, meanwhile, was s orting through her own u neven day. "It was very sloppy and I d id a lot of scrambling t oday," she said. Scramble she did, as she o vercame three bogies for the r ound with six birdies to c ome in with a 69 and the 10u nder tie with Woods. And then, there she was, l ooming in the not-so-distant b ackground, Roig kicked it u p a notch with a back nine 3 4 for a 68 on the day to put h er two shots off the lead h eading into Saturday's final r ound. "I think I played well," she s aid, also adding that the c hilly, often strong breezes w eren't a problem. "The last t wo tournaments I have been i n were very windy, so I've k ind of gotten used to it." The final player in Friday's f inal foursome, Cydney C lanton, kept herself in the r ace. Coming into the round, the A uburn senior fell back at p oints during the round but w as back to six under by the e nd with her 71. Playing in the group ahead o f them, Victoria Tanco m oved into the final group f or Saturday with a 68 to put h er three shots off the lead. Ginger Howard had the s hot of the day Friday, comi ng up with a double eagle on t he par five sixth hole, helping her to a round of 66 and getting her to within six shots of the lead. Also within striking distance on the final day are Holly Clyburn, five under, and Leona Maguire and Erica Popson, both at three under. Even amid the strong competition, however, the two leaders definitely found the enjoyment of the day. "It was my first time playing with Ashleigh and Kyle," Woods said. "I definitely had a lot of fun playing with and getting to know them." Amindset Albrecht seeks to continue. "It's about having fun," she said. "I just want to go out, play my own game and have some fun." And so it comes down to the final day, with two strong players tied for the lead, a group of tough and the defending champ just two strokes back a defending champ all to familiar with the scenario. "There's a lot of golf left," Roig said. "It could come down to the last hole, just like it did for me last year." Check www.newssun.com for a recap of Saturday's final round. Page 4BNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com 6 MONTH MEMBERSHIPS NOW AVAILABLE (863) 382-0500 € 3201 Golfview Rd. € Sebring(863) 382-0744for 9 Hole Executive RatesPrices good thru 3/31/10 Incl. Tax & CartMonday thru Friday:8am … 1pm $36By 8, After 1 $29 Saturday & Sunday: $29 Wednesday, Jan 12thTanglewood Health Fair 3000 Tanglewood Pkwy Off Hwy 27 (1/2 Mile North Walmart Sebring)Monday, Jan 17thLakeshore Mall (Meeting Room) News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Kyle Roig sends her chip shot up onto the second green in Friday's third-round play of the Harder Hall Invitational. The defending champion, Roig shot a 68 on the day to pull to within two shots of the lead. Continued from 1B Harder Invite set for wild finish By COLIN FLY Associated PressMILWAUKEE Chris Bosh had 16 points and 12 rebounds, leading the surging Miami Heat in a 101-95 overtime victory over the Milwaukee Bucks on Friday night that extended their road winning streak to 12 games. Miami has won 20 of its last 21 after a 9-8 start, but this was by far one of the grittiest games the Heat have played as they inch closer to the 1971-72 Lakers'record streak of 16 consecutive road wins. Bosh, who made several key plays down the stretch, scored 10 of his 16 in the fourth quarter and overtime, while LeBron James added 18 of his 26 points in the first half to go along with 10 rebounds. It appeared this game wouldn't be close after Miami led big early. But Andrew Bogut had a career-high 27 rebounds and scored 12 points despite a 4-of-17 effort from the field, Chris Douglas-Roberts scored 3 0 points off the bench an d Earl Boykins hit a layu p over 7-foot-3 Zydrun as Ilgauskas to send the gam e to overtime. This was the first of fi ve straight on the road f or Miami. It started in a place whe re the Lakers'streak ended 3 9 years ago, but the He at never trailed in overtime. With the game tied at 9 5, Bosh hit two free throw s and after John Salmo ns missed a 3-pointer, Carl os Arroyo added a layup th at made it 97-93. Boykins made a wi ld shot off the glass that c ut the lead to two with 1:0 1 left, but couldn't hit a lon g 3-pointer that would' ve given the Bucks the lead o n their next possession an d finished with 14 points. Dwyane Wade, who h ad 14 points, grabbed t he rebound and Arroyo hit tw o free throws with 8.9 se conds to play. James added two mo re for the final margin. Bosh scores 16 points as Heat hang tough Third-quarter spurt lifts Magic over Rockets Associated PressTAVARES Brittany Lincicome will play in a men's tournament next week as part of her preparations for the LPGATour season. The long-hitting Lincicome, a three-time winner on the LPGATour, has entered the NGA Hooters Tour's Bridgestone Winter Series event at Deer Island Golf Club. She will be the first current LPGATour player to play in a Winter Series tournament. "(The LPGATour) fi nished in December, and I need to keep playing to g et ready for next season ," Lincicome said Frida y. "This will be my seven th year on the LPGATour an d I still get nervous when I tee off (in the LPGAse ason-opening event) in Thailand. This tourname nt is close to home and has a lot of competition in it. I think it's a great way for m e to get some of the nerv es out before our seaso n starts." LPGA's Lincicome enters men's tournament

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Special to the News-SunSEBRING During the m onth of January, the H ighlands Art League will f eature an exhibit by a group o f women artists who have s hared some unique experie nces. Afew years ago several of t he women met at the art l eague to paint and soon an i dea for a painting gett ogether outside of Florida s prang into being. They met for several years i n North Carolina at Lake T suga, and then at a bed and b reakfast called Plum Tree I nn on the banks of the North T oe River in the small village o f Plum Tree. Needless to say, their s hared experience led them to e xplore the idea of expanding t heir horizons and in 2008 t hey met on the Almalfi C oast of Italy at a small fishi ng village, Massa Lubrense. I n 2009 and 2010, they chose t o visit the American southw est, first in Colorado and t hen in Taos, N.M. Of the 20 women involved w ith the group, usually nine o r 10 will participate in an a dventure. Not all of them are from F lorida but the group, known a s "The Painting Divas," will o pen their exhibit as artists of t he month at HALon Friday, J an. 14 for the downtown g allery walk. Featured in this month's e xhibit are Susan Clark, B arbara Howell and Wanda H unter from Louisville, Miss.; Betty Ferrell from Cordova, Tenn.; Barbara Wade from Nebo, N.C. and Sebring; Rose Besch from Oswego, N.Y. and Sebring; Cathy Futral from Frostproof; Lisa Ferrier from Deerfield Beach; Mary Jane Delestang from Avon Park; Anne Reynolds from Lake Placid; and Shirley Stone from Sebring. Women artists featured at HAL www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 5B 1/10/11 www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644€LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 Since 1931NO DEALER FEE, PLUS TAX & TAG, STATE FEE, O% withALLY, SEBC RULES APPLY. 2010JEEP WRANGLERUNLIMITEDX NEW2010DODGE CHALLENGER NEW2010RAM2500 CREW4X4CUMMINSTURBODIESEL NEW2010JEEP WRANGLERSPORT4X4 NEW2010DODGE JOURNEY NEW2010JEEP COMPASS NEW2010CHRYSLER SEBRINGTOURINGJX054 DX052 NO DEALER FEES 2010DODGEGRAND CARAVANSEWAS ............ $25,835 Rebate............ -$1,750 VanBonus......... -$750 WellsBonus.... -$1,750 ChryslerGroupor VanOwnerBonus -$1,000 $ 20,585 *2010CHRYSLER TOWN-N-COUNTRY 0% FOR 72 MOSWAS ............ $37,270 Rebate............ -$2,000 VanBonus......... -$750 WellsBonus.... -$2,000 ChryslerGroupor VanOwnerBonus -$2,000 0% FOR 72 MOS WAS$26,080 $ 21,999 NOW WAS$26,280 $ 22,999 NOW TX136 NOW $ 30,520 NOW CX100 WAS$26,555 $ 22,999 NOW TX115 WAS$50,175 $ 40,999 NOW JX079 WAS$23,635 $ 19,999 NOW TX131 WAS$24,475 $ 20,999 NOW WAS$22,885 $ 17,999 NOW CX139 CLEARANCE2010 MODEL YEAR ARTS& LEISURE Courtesy photo Barbara Howell and Wanda Hunter (above), both from Louisville, Miss., join The Painting Divas' on a painting get-together in New Mexico. There work will be among that displayed at the Highlands Art League in January. Cathy Futral (Right), of Frostproof, paints in Colorado. She is one of the Painting Divas,' who will have their work on display at the Highlands Art League this month. The Painting Divas' to open show Friday Special to the News-SunAVON PARK JG Big Star Productions will present 2010 Country Legend of the Year Gene Watson & The Farewell Party Band in concert on Friday, Feb. 4 at South Florida Community College, 600 West College Drive. Also appearing will be local country music favorites, BJ Slaughter and The Country Classic Band, as well as Chris MacArthur & The Florida Cracker Boys. Doors open at 5:15 p.m.; the show starts at 6 p.m. Ticket prices are $25 for general admission, $35 for reserved seating and $50 for reserved seats plus a personal Meet & Greet with the artists. For special needs seating, call (863) 494-0577. Tickets can be purchased online at www.JGBigStarProduction s.com (all major credit cards are accepted) or call (863) 494-0577 General admission only tickets are available at these Mid-Florida Credit Union locations: Okeechobee, Lake Placid, Sebring (both locations), Avon Park, Wauchula and Arcadia. Watson has six No. 1 Country Hits, 23 top tens, more than 75 charted songs and 49 albums. His 2009 released album received great critical praise including "Album of the Year" from one site. USAToday says, "Gene Watson is one of country's finest singers." Associated Press states, "He's never sounded better, which is saying something." His country classi cs include "Love In The H ot Afternoon," "Paper Rosie ," "Farewell Party," "Should I Come Home (Or Should I Go Crazy)," "Nothing Su re Looked Good On You ," "Any Which Way Yo u Can," "Fourteen Car at Mind," "Speak Soft ly (You're Talking To M y Heart)," "You're Out Doin g What I'm Here Doin g Without," "Sometimes I Get Lucky," and "Drinki n' My Way Back Home," ju st to name a few. Watson is a member of the Texas Country Mus ic Hall of Fame and was vot ed Entertainer of the Year b y R.O.P.E, a music society of his peers Considered one of t he finest pure-country singe rs of his generation an d known as "The Singer 's Singer," Watson offers u p one of the greatest trad itional country shows in t he business. His stunnin g voice captivates audienc es and keeps his fans comin g back again and again. Country legend Gene Watson in concert Feb. 4 Courtesy pho to The legendary voice of Gene Watson and The Farewell Party Band comes to South Florida Community College in February. Follow the news while you follow your friends. Check out the News-Sun online at www.newssun.com or get updates on your favorie social networking sites www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun

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Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South Florida Community College Jazz Series presents an evening of hot jazz starring the Marty Grosz Quartet, during its Jazz Series, at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in the 245seat SFCC University Center Auditorium. Jazz guitarist, historian, and vocalist Marty Grosz is today's foremost jazz rhythm guitarist and chord soloist. He is one of the few major jazz guitarists who doesn't use an amplifier and is among the last remaining proponents of the acoustic guitar tradition in jazz. His vocals have become as much in demand at recording sessions and jazz concerts as his driving guitar rhythm. They are delivered in styles ranging from barrelhouse abandon to whispered restraint and are often mischievous. Grosz is a brilliant acoustic guitarist whose solos bring back the sound of Carl Kress and Dick McDonough of the 1930s, while his vocals are very much in the Fats Waller tradition. Grosz will be accompanied by Vince Giordano, a bandleader and authority on recreating the sounds of the 1920s and '30s. Giordano is obsessive about musical authenticity in resurrecting heroes like Bix Beiderbecke, Fletcher Henderson, and Jelly Roll Morton. He is well known in New York City for performing with his band The Nighthawks. Also joining Grosz is one of the most wide-ranging instrumentalists, Scott Robinson. Robinson has been heard on the tenor sax, trumpet, clarinet, and bass sax. He has been heard numerous times on film, radio, and television, and his discography now includes over 165 recordings. Dan Block will also be performs in the quartet. Block has a master's degree from the Julliard School in clarinet. He has been a member of Giordano's Nighthawks for the past 25 years. The 2010-11 Jazz Series is sponsored by John and Evelyn Mills, and Tom and Nancy Mitchell. The performance sponsor is Forrest H. Hilton, CPA, PAand Ruth Austin. Tickets range from $21 to $24 and may be purchased online at http://performances.southflorida.edu. Tickets may also be purchased by calling the SFCC Box Office at 784-7178 or by visiting the SFCC Box Office located in the front of the SFCC Theatre for the Performing Arts, 60 0 West College Drive, fro m 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m Monday-Friday. Page 6BNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com Established 19311600 US 27 South € Avon Park Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home4001 Sebring Parkway Sebring, 385-0125 111 E. Circle St. Avon Park, 453-3101 Chris T.Nelson Craig M. Nelson Darin S. MacNeil W .W LUMBER CO. 465-3331Hwy. 27 S. Lake Placid"We're More Than Just Lumber" COMPLETE Building SuppliesPlease support the above businesses. They have made this page possible. Inspirational Thoughtsby Patricia Valentine THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502 Residential Commercial Mobile Homes"Small Enough to Know You Large Enough to Serve You"500 South Lake Avenue 382-8300 453-3019 THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502But when the fullness of the time was come,God sent forth his Son,made of a woman,made under the lawŽ. The Bible is filled with examples of people waiting for Gods promises.Abraham and Sarah waited for God to give them their promised son.The children of Israel waited in captivity for their deliverer to appear.David waited on God while he was being pursued by Sauls men. Israel waited for her Messiah,and the disciples waited for the coming of the Holy Spirit.We are waiting now for our blessed hope,the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ for His church. God always came through for those who waited on Him.The promised Son was born.The deliverer appeared.Enemies were defeated;the Messiah was sent;and the Holy Spirit came. One day we who are waiting expectantly will be caught up in the clouds to be with our Lord forever.God is never late,and He never forgets His promise.David said,Wait on the Lord;be of good courage,and he shall strengthen thine heart:wait,I say,on the LordŽ.Psalm 27:14. Dont give up on your promise.Keep believing God and it shall come to pass.Be Blessed! Attend the Church of Your Choice! PUBLIC HEARING NOTICEAll interested parties within Hardee, Highlands, and Okeechobee counties are hereby advised that the Transportation Disadvantaged Local Coordinating Board will hold a public hearing during their regular Board meeting on January 26, 2011 at 1:30 p.m. at the Okeechobee County Public Health Department, 1728 NW 9thAvenue, Okeechobee, FL 33427. This public hearing is being held for the purpose of receiving input on the Transportation Disadvantaged program coordinated by Veolia Transportation Services, Inc. Transportation to the public hearing will be provided on a “rst come “rst served basis to eligible persons who call to make transportation reservations. To make transportation reservations call: All of Hardee County … 773-0015 All of Okeechobee County 357-9900 Avon Park … 452-0239 Lake Placid … 699-0995 Sebring 382-0139 All other areas … 1-800-260-0139 Individuals who need accommodations such as Braille, tape, large print or an interpreter should call Marcia Staszko at the Central Florida Regional Planning Council, 1-800-297-8041 ext 103 at least 5 days prior to the meeting. Written comments will be accepted. Send comments to: Marcia Staszko, Central Florida Regional Planning Council, P.O. Box 2089, Bartow, FL 33830 ARTS& LEISURE Courtesy photo Gail Tuttle is the featured crafter at the Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative for the month of January. She enjoys sewing, crocheting and bead work. Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The C aladium Arts and Crafts C ooperative announces that G ail Tuttle is the first memb er of the Co-op to be s elected as the Crafter of the M onth for January 2011. T uttle is a retired teacher, t he mother of four and the g randmother of eight. She j oined the Caladium Co-op i n October of 1997 after m oving to Lake Placid from O hio. Recently, she returned t o Ohio to be close to family a nd is now a "snowbird," w orking at the Co-op in the w inter and early spring. Tuttle has served on n umerous committees, has b een president-elect and p resident and is presently serving as chairperson of the Trash and Treasure/Chili Lunch to be held March 19. Most of Tuttle's crafts include sewing in some form or other. She makes casserole carriers, appliqued tea towels, adult clothing protectors (a.k.a. bibs), placemats, crocheted scarf necklaces, among many other crafts. She works Tuesdays at the front desk of the Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative and would love for people to stop in and say "Hello." The Co-op is at 132 E. Interlake Blvd. Call 6995940 or visit the Web site www.caladiumarts.org for further information. Tuttle is Co-op's featured crafter Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Veteran Broadway and concert star William Michals performs during South Florida Community College's Matinee Series at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 18 in the SFCC Theatre for the Performing Arts. Otherwise known as "American's Baritone," Michals recently appeared in the landmark revival of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "South Pacific" at Lincoln Center in New York City. Michals made his Broadway debut as "The Beast" in Disney's "Beauty and the Beast," and later returned to play Gaston in the same production. His career has continued in such roles as Javert in "Les Miserables," Billy Flynn in "Chicago," Don Quixote in "Man of La Mancha," Harold Hill in "The Music Man," and the title role in "Phantom." Arecipient of the prestigious Anselmo Award, he also earned recognition for his portrayal of Chauvelin in the recent national tour of "The Scarlet Pimpernel." Audiences across the country have enjoyed him as Captain von Trapp in "The Sound of Music" and as Billy Flynn in "Chicago." Not only has Michals played the great theatrical venues of the nation including Carnegie Hall, Broadway's fabled Palace Theatre, Los Angeles' Ahmanson, and Washington D.C.'s Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, but he's also entertained in New York's finest rooms, including the Rainbow Room, the Four Seasons, and the Grand Ballroom of the Plaza. Michals regularly appears with the country's leading orchestras, including the San Francisco, San Diego, Utah, and Hartford symphonies, the New York Pops, and recently appeared with Peter Nero and the Philly Pops for a sold-out evening of "Broadway Showstoppers." He has sung "The StarSpangled Banner" for major league sporting events from coast to coast, and enjoys the rare distinction of performing for the joint leadership of the House and Senate inside The United States Capitol. Symphonic performances of "The House I Live In" and John Williams'"America, The Dream Goes On" have garnered the praise and admiration of many D.C. notable s, especially Sen. Orrin Hatc h. Mayor Rudy Giuliani perso nally called upon Michals to open the Dec. 11, 200 1 memorial service at Groun d Zero with a solo, a cappel la rendition of "Let There B e Peace On Earth." William's credits exten d into the operatic world, in New York, Boston, and in concert at the Aspen an d Tanglewood music festivals The 2011 Matinee Series is sponsored by Jean Moyer, D r. and Mrs. Placido M. Roqu iz Jr., and Drs. Abe an d Carmelita Lim. Tickets range from $15 to $20 and may be purchas ed online 24 hours a day, sev en days a week, at http://pe rformances.southflorida.ed u. Tickets may also be pu rchased by calling the SFC C Box Office at 784-7178 or b y visiting the SFCC Box Offi ce in the front of the SFC C Theatre for the Performin g Arts, 600 W. College Driv e, from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m Monday-Friday. America's Baritone' William Michals set to perform at SFCC on Jan. 18 Courtesy photo William Michals will bring his experience as a Broadway and concert star to the South Florida Community College stage on Jan. 18 as part of the Matinee Series. Marty Grosz Quartet presents hot jazz of the 1920s and '30s Courtesy pho to Jazz guitarist, historian and vocalist Marty Grosz will bring his quartet to South Florida Community College on Wednesday for an evening of jazz as part of the Jazz Series. Special to the News-SunSEBRING "Men of all a ges who like to sing in the s hower should try the g reater fun and camaraderie o f four-part harmony barb ershop singing," said S tirling Snyder, chapter p resident of the Heartland H armonizers Barbershop C horus. To give them an opportun ity, the chorus will hold a g uest night at 7 p.m. T uesday at the Sebring High S chool, 3514 Kenilworth B lvd. "Guests are welcome to b ring others along to enjoy t he singing and to particip ate in the wholesome a tmosphere of our meeti ngs," Snyder said. "As our c harter states, we accept for m embership congenial men of good character from all walks of life and occupations." Guests will be entertained by chapter quartets and chorus and will have the opportunity to sing with other men in their own voice range tenor, lead, baritone, or bass. "If you read music, fine," chorus director Bob Thiel said. "But you can also learn barbershop by singing with other men having the same voice range that you have. We have CD's and music with which you can learn your part at home. Many Barbershoppers, some of them in good quartets, cannot read music, but learn their parts very well." For information, call 3865048 or 471-2294. Shower' singers invited to harmonize Special to the News-SunSEBRING Vintage H earts Band will perform f rom 7-9 p.m. Saturday as p art of Highlands H ammock State Park's M usic in the Park series. Come hear Americana m usic performed by V intage Hearts in the picnic a rea. Concert admission is j ust $5 per person (accompanied children 12 and under admitted free of charge.) Picnic baskets/coolers are welcome. Bring lawn chairs or blankets and a flashlight. All ticket proceeds benefit park improvements. Call 386-6094 for more information. Normal park entrance fee of $6 per car is waived after 6 p.m. Music in the Park Saturday

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 7B SEBRING DISCOUNT BEVERAGES3750 U.S. 27 North, Unit C1 € 471-2277Next to Fairmount Cinema 6 € Open Mon-Sat 9-6 Closed Sunday Tobacco Products, Candy, Cold Beer, Housewares, Gifts & MORE!LOW PRICES € MANY GOOD BARGAINS € CLOSEOUTS!*Prices do not include tax. Natural Light and Natural IceAll Old Milwaukees Best … Reg, Lt, Ice12 Pack $6.99 Budweiser and Bud Light 12 Pack $10.99 Busch, Busch Light and Bud Ice18 Pack $11.29 Good Quality Sunglasses$4 ea 2 for $7 Zippo Lighters All 20% Off Smoke Odor ExterminatorCandles/Spray Can $6.79/$5.79 305s and ROMY 3 Pack Deal $10.30 For 3 Misty $44.99 Carton Galaxy 100% ADDITIVE FREE Natural or Cigarette $29.49 Carton Newport$48.49 Carton € 3 Pack Deal $4.99 Ea. USA Gold $43.99 Carton Seneca $31.69 Carton Smokin Joes $30.99 Carton Cigarette Style Little CigarsMany Brands $6.99 … $10.99 Carton Monday, January 10 11 am 3 pm1540 Lakeview Drive Sebring, FL ARTS& LEISURE SUNDAY BRUNCH11am 1:30pm Lunch served after 1:30pmwith purchase of beverageReceive$200 OFFExpires 12-31-10 Trishs Paradise GrilleHighlands Ridge South(863) 382-2131$1095 Special to the News-Sun AVON PARK Astellar s eason of South Florida C ommunity College Matinee S eries performances begins w ith the David Osborne Trio a t 1:30 p.m. Tuesday in the S FCC Theatre for the P erforming Arts. Otherwise k nown as "Pianist to the P residents," pianist David O sborne has performed at the W hite House for presidents R egan, Bush, Clinton, G.W. B ush, and Obama. He regul arly performs for Jimmy C arter in Plains, Ga., who has s aid, "David Osborne is one o f the finest pianists in the U nited States." His performa nce includes bass and d rums. Osborne uses his classical s tudy and technique to exec ute flawless piano performa nces of Broadway, romantic, classical, and ageless standards of the American songbook. His touch and feel for romantic love songs has created a style that is unique and has earned him the title "Master of the Romantic Piano." Osborne has performed throughout the United States including a nine-year stay performing at the Marriott Orlando World Center. Osborne then moved to St. Louis to work at the Adam's Mark Hotel and perform with the St. Louis Symphony. He went on to perform at a restaurant at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas for 12 years and is only the third pianist to hold the job. He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at the historic Paramount Theater in 2010. The Los Angeles Music Awards and Hollywood Fame Awards committee chose Osborne as a recipient of the lifetime piano achievement award in 2010. Afew of Osbourne's more significant recent events include a concert for the American Breast Cancer Awareness Foundation, an interview and performance on TV's "The 700 Club," a concert for the Steinway and Sons International convention of worldwide dealers at the Beverly Hills Hotel, two concerts for Don Hall, CEO of Hallmark Cards, and a performance in Las Vegas, playing the Steinway Pianos of Vladimir Horowitz, Van Cliburn, and George Gershwin at Southern Nevada Music as a part of Steinway and Sons Legendary Instruments of the Immortals Tour. The 2011 Matinee Series is sponsored by Jean Moyer, Dr. and Mrs. Placido M. Roquiz Jr., and Drs. Abe and Carmelita Lim. Ten Matinee Series performances scheduled for the 2011 season. Tickets range from $16 to $21 and may be purchased online 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at http://performances.southflorida.edu. Tickets may also be purchased by calling the SFCC Box Office at 784-7178 or by visiting the SFCC Box Office in the front the of the SFCC Theatre for the Performing Arts, 600 West College Drive, from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. David Osborne, Pianist to the Presidents,' to perform at SFCC Tuesday Courtesy pho to David Osborne has performed at the White House for presidents Regan, Bush, Clinton, G.W. Bush, and Obama, and regularly performs for Jimmy Carter in Plains, Ga. on Tuesday, he will perform at South Florida Community College as part of the Matinee Series. Special to the News-SunLAKE WALES The Lake W ales Arts Council presents t he Afiara String Quartet in c oncert on Thursday. The p erformance begins at 7:30 p .m. at the Lake Wales Arts C enter. The quartet's program at t he Lake Wales Arts Center in L ake Wales is an exciting m ix of the traditional and c ontemporary. The classic p ortion of the Quartet's prog ram includes Haydn's String Q uartet No. 25 in C major a nd Beethoven's String Q uartet No. 7 in F major. A lso they will perform John H alle's 7-minute Sphere(')s" and Dan B ecker's "Lockdown", which w ere especially commiss ioned for them by the Banff C enter in Canada and the C ommon Sense Composers C ollective. Formed in 2006, the Afiara S tring Quartet balances a l ively interest in new works w ith deep insight into core c lassical repertoire. Their r ecent appearances througho ut North America and intern ationally include performa nces last season at the L ibrary of Congress, Alice T ully Hall, Carnegie Hall's W eill Recital Hall, as well as p erformances at Indiana U niversity's Summer Music F estival, Princeton U niversity's Summer C hamber Music Series, the S an Jose Chamber Music S ociety, and the Calgary P roMusica Series. Tickets can be purchased at the Lake Wales Arts Center, 1099 State Road 60 East, or by phone (863) 6768426. Tickets are $20 for members, $25 for non-members, $5 for students with ID. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Friday. Visit the new Web site at www.lakewalesartscouncil.org. The Lake Wales Arts Council, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization whose mission is to promote, encourage and celebrate the arts for the enhancement of community life. The Arts Center is located at 1099 S.R. 60 East in Lake Wales. The Arts Center is open year round, Monday through Friday, 9:00 am to 4:00 pm. For more information, please call 863-676-8426. lakewalesartscouncil.org. Lake Wales Arts Council presents Afiara String Quartet in concert on Thursday Courtesy photo The Afiara String Quartet will bring an exciting mix of the traditional and contemporary to concert on Thursday. The performance begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Lake Wales Arts Center. Classified Ads € 385-6155 NEWS-SUN Did YouKNOW?In Florida, the bicycle is legally defined as a vehicle. Bicyclists using a public roadway are considered operators of motor vehicles and are responsible for observing all traffic laws. With few exceptions, there is only one road and it is up to motorists and bicyclists to treat each other with care and respect. Adherence to the law is the foundation of respect.

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com Youll LikeWhat You Hear Hearing comfortably in noise.It has been one of the biggest problems for people who wear hearing aids.The IQ is the only hearing aid with Voice IQ and InVision Directionality.Together, these cutting-edge technologies are designed to preserve speech understanding in noise.So you may hear conversations, not commotion. Dont take our word for it.Visit Lampe & Kiefer or starkey. com today and hear the IQ difference for yourself.Let the Conversation begin. Try the new S Series iQ for yourself, and hear how far technology has come. Call today at 863.385.3497A REMARKABLE NEW EXPERIENCE FOR YOUR EARS … AND YOUR LIFE!Introducing the IQ … changing the way people hear conversations. 130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, Florida863-385-3497 Mon. Fri. 9am 4pm Closed Wednesdays SENIORSCENE Born in a "haunted house" in 1919 in the wide open spaces of Central Florida at Parker's Place near Kenansville, Dillon Thomas, legendary "cow hunter," lives today in LaBelle. "When we were kids there was still dry blood on the floor where Willingham, an outlaw from England, shot a man dead in the house. My daddy nailed a board over the hole so us kids wouldn't get blood on us. I believe in sprits as in the Bible Jesus asked Cain, Where is Abel' and Cain replied with a question, Am I my brother's keeper?'Jesus said, His blood just spoke a sound.'" "Daddy moved from Okeechobee where he was born, to Parker's Place as a working cowboy. He later was a cowhand at Yeehaw Junction. In the 1900's, we moved around a lot as daddy followed the work. We lived a simple life when we were kids moving into wooden houses provided by ranch owners where he worked cattle. The houses usually had a pitcher pump and outhouse. We went to town only once a month," Thomas explains. "My uncle Walter Thomas was also a cow hunter'born in 1893. Uncle Walter moved to Corkscrew Swamp where he about starved to death; it was the hell-hole' of Florida dense and thick with swamp. In those days, you took a chance when you moved to see if you could make it. We stayed for some time with Uncle Thomas at Corkscrew then moved to Fort Myers where people took up a collection to get us a place to live. "However, Uncle Thomas got lucky in Fort Myers and went into real estate. It was the Florida boom days between 1925-26 and land was selling cheap. I never understood how he did it, but Uncle Thomas became the richest man outside of Henry Ford and Thomas Edison. He owned all the land on both sides of what is now Highway 75 leading into Fort Myers. With a family of five kids, he lived in a big house with horse stables, a garage, and all the kids had Model-Tautomobiles. I remember getting inside his seven-passenger limousine and smelling the new leather," says Thomas. "My daddy worked for Uncle Thomas building a packing house but when the Great Depression hit, Uncle Thomas'assets were frozen and he was cleaned out. He went broke and moved to Texas to try again. During this time, Daddy couldn't' get a job, so we moved to Felda where he grew watermelons. He drove all night in his Model-T, about 60 miles through the woods, back to Fort Myers to sell them. I started school when we lived near Kenansville and was 8 years old when I went into the first grade. In Felda, I entered third grade and was already 10 years old." With a chuckle, Thomas recalls that his teacher one time said to him, Dillon, we need to send you home because you haven't shaved.'"I was much older than the other kids in the third grade with all the moving around and changing schools." Excerpts from an upcoming book by Nancy Dale, The Legacy of the Florida Pioneer Cow Hunters' In Their Own Words.' For personally inscribed books of the true stories of pioneer cow hunters' visit www.nancydalephd.com. Taking a chance when a move was necessary Courtesy pho to Dillon Thomas was born in a haunted house' in 1919 in the wide open spaces of Central Florida at Parker's Place near Kenansville. Today he lives in LaBelle. Wild Florida Nancy Dale Editor's note: T his is the first of a three-part series. Now that you a re unstressed a fter reading N ovember's colu mn. Let's conside r your situation. You are out of a j ob or stuck in o ne you don't l ike. You think you can't d o anything about it. ( Positive cognitive thinki ng is another column.) T he unemployment rate in F lorida is 11.5 percent. Y ou have no money to start a business. Ableak picture. But let's look at what s ome other people have d one about it. Ayoung man named R andy was out of a job w ith little higher education a nd no prospects. He has b een helping his mother a nd father, doing errands a nd around the house. T hey live in a small develo pment. Aneighbor saw h im working in the yard a nd thought he was the g ardener. They stopped and a sked if he would work for t hem. He said he would be g lad to help them since he w asn't working and of c ourse he wouldn't charge t hem. Nevertheless when h e was through they insiste d that he accept a $20 b ill. They also gave him a l oad of tomatoes from their g arden. Now he is busy e nough to schedule his j obs around the location of h ouses he works for. For e xample, the four houses o n Jasmine Street one day a nd a cluster of houses on a nother street the next day. Susie loved to garden a nd she set her plants in b eautiful pots that she decorated herself. She lived on a busy thorofare and she placed her pots in the front yard. Soon people began to stop by and wanted to buy them. In order to replace her pots she haunts garage sales, junk shops, Dumpsters, always on the look out for something salvageable that she cleans up and paints in wonderful colors and imaginative designs. Now however she lives in a small development with no access to passerby traffic. Besides she wants to do other things but isn't sure what. So we talked and I suggested that she make three lists: one, what she loves to do; two, what she thinks her talents are and three, what she hates to do. When you compare the lists and eliminate what you hate to do even if you have the talent for it you will probably come up with insight into what you want to do. As for outlets, there are many in Highlands County: The fair's flea markets and nurseries and garden organizations that would welcome her product. Also since she researches the plants diligently, she could write a column on plants. In the year 2000 Leslie was pregnant and had to have complete bed rest. She couldn't even have a baby shower. To cheer her up her friend decided to make a fabulous decorated cake for her. Leslie enjoyed it so much. When Create your own job Pearl's Gem Pearl Carter The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Continued on page 9B

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In my 92 years of l iving, I have met a nd become friends w ith hundreds of f olks; some renown a nd others just plain p eople. But all have i n some way or o ther made a mark i n my life. Big n ames or little, they a ll bring back fond m emories of events a nd places long ago visited a nd wistfully remembered. There was Anne C adwalader of southern O hio, whose parents were t he first settlers in the Fort W ashington area, later to b ecome the great city of C incinnati. During my teenage years, s he became a second mother t o me. We met during my r oaming with a fishing b uddy and ended up with an i nvitation to a continuing W ednesday evening dinner a nd entertainment with my b uddy's dad and Mrs. Cad. Mrs. Cad's husband has p assed away before I ever m et her. He had been a wellk nown doctor in our home t own (Norwood, Ohio) and s he was living by herself w ith only a daytime housem an and cook. I guess I s hould have placed Sam's ( her valet's) name on the list o f people of interest. He was a very special black man. M rs. Cad taught me how the other half" lived. She w as not the type of high s ociety gal you see nowad ays but was a common e very day human being. L oved music, the outdoors a nd kids. My buddy and I spent many happy hours in Mrs. Cad's company. The fourth member of our Wednesday gathering was the father of my buddy, David Besuden Sr. His folks had been friends with the Cads from way back and he was continuing the tradition. Mr. B was an old-time auto race driver who had competed with Barney Oldfield, Louis Chevrolet and other drivers of the 1920s. He was also a hunter and fisherman and took me on my first trip out of the country, to Canada, where we had fishing and sightseeing beyond compare. John Henderson was an economics teacher at Norwood High School. He was a very big man physically and mentally. He instilled in me some of the what I call virtues of manhood. In addition to being a teacher he was also a sportsman. He loved hunting and fishing, imparted his knowledge to some of us youngsters. He was a big building block to my manhood. Beatrice Patton was the wife of General George Patton of the Third Armored Cavalry fame in World War II. I met her on a flight from Godman Field at Louisville, Ky., where she had attended the dedication of the Patton Museum of Armor. I was riding co-pilot on the C-47 that was taking her home. After about a half-hour in the air, I went back into the passenger compartment to see if everyone was comfortable. As I passed a seat about halfway down the aisle, a small hand reached out from a seat, took my arm and pulled me over. "Are you married Lieutenant?" She asked. Ensuring her that I was, she started unpinning a beautiful orchid that was pinned to her lapel. She stopped pulling out the pin and said, "Son of a bitch, I better not give you this or my daughter will kick my ass. But thank you never the less." I assured her that no thanks were necessary and continued on my way thinking that that was the end of it. However, when I returned to Godman Field for my monthly flying lesson, I was called into Operations Office and handed an envelope with the gold embossed initials BAPon the outside and a card that said, "Thank you Lieutenant Jackson for a lovely flight" and signed Beatrice A. Patton. I told the officer behind the desk that I thought that was a very nice gesture. He immediately said "Wait just a minute" and started pulling bottles from a box by the desk. Mrs. Patton had sent four bottles of fine liquors to each member of the crew. She was really a mate for old blood and guts. The lady must have been 70 years old when I met her. So the newspaper clipping 10 years later came as a shock to me when I read that Mrs. Patton had been killed when a horse threw her when jumping a fence while fox hunting in Virginia. The next gentleman that I met was at a skeet range in Gainesville, where I was making my weekly visit to get in a little shooting. As I walked into the club, I noticed a car with amateur radio operators'plates on it. Being a new Ham myself when I got to the range and there being only two people shooting, I asked the gentleman if he was the Ham operator. His answer was :No, but my wife is." He then introduced his wife and himself and I discovered that I was now acquainted with Paul Tibbets, the pilot of the Enola Gay the bomber that ended World War II with the bombing of Hiroshima, Japan. I shot skeet and had drinks in the club with them many times thereafter. I found him a very humble man and not the least desirous of being remembered for his feat. His only flaw was that his wife was a better shot than he was. Robert Scott, the author of the best seller "God is My Co-Pilot," I met when I was returning from Florida to Cincinnati after spending the winter in Chiefland. We were going into Mason, Ga., when I remembered the Scott was curator at the Museum Onwarner-Robbins Airfield and figured that I would stop and see if he was there and get my copy of his book autographed. I walked into the operations office and asked if Colonel Scott was there. "No the Colonel is not here but the general is." I asked if he was available and was directed to his office on the fourth floor. I left my wife in the waiting room and proceeded to the general's office. I opened the door to his office and walked in. He stood up and reached out to shake hands with me and asked what he could do for me. When I handed him the book that I had bought more than 40 years previous, he looked shocked and wanted to know when and where I had gotten the book. When I told him that it was purchased at O'Hare Field on my way to reassignment to Japan he started asking questions and we talked Air Corps talk for the next hour. Yes, I knew that Ruth was waiting downstairs but she would forgive the long wait. He autographed the flyleaf with the notation "After all these years" and signed his name. This book is one of the treasures in my keepsake chest and will be given to my son on my demise. Yes, Ruth forgave me for the long wait. Gene Autry I met while on a ferrying trip to northeastern India. He was flying copilot on a B-24 and I was in a C-47 enroute via South America and Africa to an air field in India. We had left Morrison Field in Florida, stopped overnight in Puerto Rico, British Guiana and were now in Belem, Brazil. Each night as we were stopping, Gene would put on a small show for the local GIs and as we were all drinking and conversing in the officers'club. After the show, I got into a conversation with the cowboy. Don't remember what we talked about, but we struck up a good friendship. Our trip continued south to Natal then across the ocean to Ascencion Island, Gold Coast Africa, Dakar, Marachech, Cairo, and Karachi picked up a pair of the boots. They were the mark of a tested perry pilot in those days. Gene was a little different, he picked up four pairs of them. The answer to my question why he said, One pair for me, on e pair for my boy and two fo r my museum. Sunny Serifino is an author of multiple books who was having a book sig ning at an affair we were playing in and in the course of events, she happened to see a copy of a book that I had written for my grandkids'kids. She asked if she might read it and naturally I said yes. When she returned the book, it was with a lette r giving me rave reviews on the book. The rest of my famous li st I must admit I met vicariou sly through my love of reading. Here I was able to become acquainted with the world traveler, James Mischner, through his fine tomes. Louis Lamour took me through many trips through the old west and along with him on his real travel around the world. I dived the many oceans with Clive Cussler and Dirk Pit and "took to the woods" with Louise Rich in her tra vels in Maine. I have piled u p enough memories in my travels for two or three peo ple so I thought I might share some of the friendships with you who happen to get to read this article. Woody Jackson is a Sebring resident who enjoys writing stories o f days gone by. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 9B Hard To Find Sizes And Widths For Men And WomenŽ New Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:30-5:30, Saturday 9:30-5:001621 B Edgewood Dr. Order by Phone! Order by Phone! CUSTOMER APPRECIATION Week! LAKELAND Comfort Shoes Comfort ShoesHAVEN Comfort Shoes Comfort Shoes Week! EverydayLowFactoryOutletPricesLadies Mens Ladies SandalsFreetimeŽ5 Colors S-XW SimplifyŽ5 Colors S-XW RelaxedŽN, M, W HuggyŽN, M, W BouttimeŽ6-15 S-XW StrippyŽ(For Dress) TimeoutŽ6-15 S-XWSAS TabbyŽ NEW ARRIVAL SAVEANEXTRA $ 15 OFF!Exp. 1/17/11 Hard To Find Sizes And Widths For Men And WomenŽ New Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:30-5:30, Saturday 9:30-5:001621 B Edgewood Dr. Order by Phone! Order by Phone! CUSTOMER APPRECIATION Week! LAKELAND Comfort Shoes Comfort ShoesHAVEN Comfort Shoes Comfort Shoes Week! EverydayLowFactoryOutletPricesLadies Mens Ladies SandalsFreetimeŽ5 Colors S-XW SimplifyŽ5 Colors S-XW RelaxedŽN, M, W HuggyŽN, M, W BouttimeŽ6-15 S-XW StrippyŽ(For Dress) TimeoutŽ6-15 S-XWSAS TabbyŽ NEW ARRIVAL SAVEANEXTRA $ 15 OFF!Exp. 1/17/11 SENIORSCENE Names renown and plain in my memory Woody's Wisdom Woody Jackson By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and JENNIFER AGIESTA Associated PressWASHINGTON The f irst baby boomers was old e nough to qualify for M edicare Jan. 1, and many f ear the program's obituary w ill be written before their o wn. Anew Associated PressG fK poll finds that baby b oomers believe by a ratio of 2 -to-1 they won't be able to r ely on the giant health insura nce plan throughout their r etirement. The boomers took a runn ing dive into adolescence a nd went on to redefine work a nd family, but getting old is m aking them nervous. Now, 43 percent say they d on't expect to be able to d epend on Medicare forever, w hile only 20 percent think t heir Medicare is secure. The r est have mixed feelings. Yet the survey also shows a surprising willingness a mong adults of all ages to s acrifice to preserve M edicare benefits that most Americans say they deserve after years of paying taxes into the system at work. Take the contentious issue of Medicare's eligibility age, fixed at 65, while the qualifying age for Social Security is rising gradually to 67. Initially, 63 percent of boomers in the poll dismissed the idea of raising the eligibility age to keep Medicare afloat financially. But when the survey forced them to choose between raising the age or cutting benefits, 59 percent said raise the age and keep the benefits. "I don't mind the fact that people may have to work a little longer," said Lynn Barlow, 60, a real estate agent who lives outside Atlanta. Especially if there's time to plan, laboring a few extra years allows people to save more for retirement. Bring up benefit cuts and Barlow isn't nearly as accommodating. "I started working when I was 16 and I expect a benefit after putting into it for so many years," she said. As Medicare reaches a historic threshold, the poll also found differences by age, gender and income among baby boomers. Medicare is a middle-class bulwark against the ravages of illness in old age. It covers 46 million elderly and disabled people at an annual cost of about $500 billion. But the high price of American-style medicine, stressing intensive treatment and the latest innovations, is already straining program finances. Add the number of baby boomers, more than 70 million born between 1946 and 1964, and Medicare's fiscal foundation starts to shake. Here's the math: when the last of the boomers reaches age 65 in about two decades, Medicare will be covering more than 80 million people. At the same time, the ratio of workers paying taxes to support the program will have plunged from 3.5 for each person receiving benefits currently, to 2.3. Poll: Baby bommers fear outliving Medicare s he was able, she bought a b ook at Michael's and pract iced on family and friends. T hen she took a course on d ecorating. Her cakes were s o much in demand that she b egan to charge to compens ate for her time and supp lies. When she moved to H ighlands County she was a s ingle mother with two child ren. Although her finances w ere OK, she needed to supp lement her income but her s kill in the medical field in H ighalands County only paid a quarter of what she previo usly was earning so she t ook a job as a cocktail waitr ess. (Did I tell you she is g orgeous.) When one of the p atrons said she needed someone to clean, never one to pass up an opportunity, she volunteered for the job still doing her cakes and witnessing. It was a natural to add catering when people ordered cakes from her so she quit her waitress job and was in business for herself, catering baking specialty cakes and house cleaning. Now she has a full page ad for her baking and catering business and has another idea in the works for an auxiliary product that will fit into her catering business. What I get a tickle out of is her answering machine message: This is Two Angel Cake and Catering Co and housecleaning." Do any of you remember Bob Newhardt's routine? "This is the Newhardt's Air Line Company and washing machine repair service." Do you have computer skills, like how to get onto Facebook or navigate financial sites? Offer services to the elderly? Or for that matter anyone who needs help. Sounds easy? No it isn't. But I do believe that with sine thought and dedication most people can create their own jobs. However there are responsibilities and pitfalls. Which I will describe in the next article. Pearl Carter is a Lake Placid resident. E-mail her at timely87@comcast.net. Create your own job Continued from page 8B

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Page 10BNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. Crossroads Community Church 114 South Central Ave., Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 4534453. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship: 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday Children's Church: 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Adult Bible Study and Youth/Royal Explorers, 7 p.m. Pastor: John E. Dumas. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. children's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. children's mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($3 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September to May our youth group meets. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Ed Howell, transitional pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 3823695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30 and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 9 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family and Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confessions: 3-3:45 p.m. Saturdays, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first Friday, or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is "Jesus is First at First Christian Church."Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunda y Worship Service, 9 a.m.; Sunda y Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.; Sunda y Evening Service, 6 p.m .; Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP If you're like me, you love your gardens and hate what the freezing cold weather does to them. There are some ways you can help to p rotect your plants though. E ven if your plants have suff ered severe damage from t he frost, don't fret, there are s teps you can take to help m end them and most of the t ime they will sprout new g rowth in the spring. One of the best ways to p rotect your plants from f reezes is to mulch them. M ulching protects plant r oots. Bark, straw, sawdust, peat m oss, leaves and grass clipp ings are the most common m aterials used for mulch. As a general rule, mulch s hould be about two inches d eep. Around trees and shrubs, t he mulch should be scraped a way from the trunk or main s tems. It is critical to check and m ake sure your plants are getting enough moisture. Every once in a while it is important to check your mulch and make sure that moisture is getting to the soil below. Especially in the cold winter months, the soil may dry out in certain areas. The combination of dry soil and cold temperatures can cause serious freeze damage to garden trees and shrubs. With some plants, covering is really the only way to protect them. Delicate species such as broadleaf evergreen shrubs and some flowering plants may require a bit of extra care to make it through the colder temperatures. Make sure when covering your plants, you use some type of cloth material. If polyethylene is used, it cuts off air to the plant and acts as a greenhouse for the vegetation underneath it. This causes the plant to go from cold lows at night to warmer highs in the day in a short period of time. This rapid temperature change can be fatal to plants. If you do use plastic, make sure it is vented and removed when the sun comes out during the day. Whatever material is used, always remove the coverings after the cold weather has passed. Some plants may require a bit of special care. Those plants that are in containers may need to be brought in from the cold. If you have a porch or garage that can be utilized until the cold snap passes, it could certainly save their lives. You don't necessarily need to put them in a heated area as this may be too drastic a change in temperature. Just remember when plants in containers are exposed to the freezing temperatures, they are receiving icy blasts from all four sides with little protection. They also get the cold from top to bottom so it is quite easy for them to freeze. Perennials and summer annuals, which are very delicate, may be covered with an inch of straw or hay during the cold winter. The best way to keep your yard looking its best all year round is to plant only varieties of plants that are hardy to this area. If you absolutely must have delicate plants, plant them in the highest part of the yard. Cold air settles to the lowest parts. Make sure to protect your plants from the wind. Large trees, fences and hedges can give great protection to the more delicate species. Remember when placing plants in the garden in the spring, think ahead to how the weather will affect them in their location. Place them in an area that is best for their survival in freezing temperatures. Plants that freeze slowly then thaw slowly have the least amount of damage. Putting a delicate plant where there is no shelter, shade and too much sun may be its death sentence. If your plants have already suffered damage, try not to fret. Often times, plants will come back beautifully in the spring. Some that you are certain are com pletely dead will begin to send up green shoots soon enough. There are some steps you can take to help them out though. Don't be in a hurry to prune. It is hard to look at those ugly, dead looking branches, but delay hard pruning on woody plants until new growth begins in the spring, then you can accurately determine which parts are alive and which ar e dead. Don't be too quick to dig up and remove plants that appear to be dead. They ma y eventually resprout from th e roots in April or May. After a freeze is over, check the water needs of plants in containers and in the ground. Remove the covers and pull mulch back that completely covered low plants. I hope your gardens survive the cold spells well, bu t even if your yard looks like the dead zone, don't worry spring will be here soon. Corine Burgess is an Environmental Specialist for the Parks & Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil and Water Conservation District. (www.highlandsswcd.org). The big freeze how to help your plants stay alive Courtesy photo Don't be too quick to dig up and remove plants that appear to be dead or damaged from a freeze. They may eventually resprout from the roots in April or May. News From The Watershed Corine Burgess

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 11B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the Redeemer .Service time is 9:30 with Holy Communion. Coffee hour following services. Newcomers welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mailredeemer1895@aol.com Web site:redeemeravon.com. The church is at 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park (two miles north of Sun 'N Lake Boulevard, across from Wells Dodge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. The Rev. Jim Kurtz, rector. Church office 3857649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL33852. Phone: 4650051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday evening: Holy Communion with Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child care available at the 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come see what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863) 8350869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid City" Children's Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, "prime-timers," and Bible studies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web atwww.sebringgrace.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration Ministries, (non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rogers. JEWISH Temple Israel of Highlands County, 382-7744. Rabbi Lorraine Rudenberg; www.templeisraelofhcfl.org.Temple Israel is a Reform Temple that promotes the enduring and fundamental principles of Judaism. Through prayer, study and friendship we strive to enrich our lives and insure Jewish continuity in Highlands County. Friday Evening Shabbat Services, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday afternoon intro to Hebrew, 12:30 p.m.; Saturday intro to Judaism, 2 p.m.; Saturday afternoon Torah Study, 3:30 p.m.; Havdallah, 5 p.m. Jan. 7-8; Jan. 21; Feb. 4; Feb. 18-19; March 18-19 Purim; April 1-2; April 15-16; April 18, 6 p.m., Pesach 1st Night Seder; April 29-30 Yom Hashoah; May 1314; May 27-28. Every Thursday will be Hebrew and Bible classes with Howard Salles, 12:30-4:30 p.m. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Monday of month; Ladies Group WELCAmeets at noon second Monday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable Garden Club meets as needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Like to sing? Come join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Children's Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 8:15 and 10 a.m.; Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Youth group meets at 5 p.m. Friday. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Esther and Mary Circles business meeting, 3:30 p.m. third Thursday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 7 p.m. second Tuesday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday; Family Movie, 4 p.m. third Sunday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group, 6-7:30 p.m.; Senior High Youth Group, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gayle Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30 a.m.; and contemporary worship is at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.presbychurch.org. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 382-9092. Dale Bargar, bishop; David Ward, first counselor; and Steve Austin, second counselor. Family History Center: 3821822. Sunday services: Sacrament meeting, 10 a.m.; Sunday school, 11:20 a.m.; and Priesthood/Relief Society, 12 p.m. Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. Youth activities from 7-8:20 p.m. Wednesday: 11-year-old Scouts, 78:20 p.m. first and third Wednesday; and activity days for 8-11 year old boys and girls from 78:20 p.m. second and fourth Wednesday. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL33870. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sund ays with Rick Heilig, youth direc tor The 10:55 a.m. Sunday wors hip service is broadcast over W ITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurs ery available at all services. First United Methodist Chur ch 200 South Lake Avenue, Av on Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759 R James Weiss, Pastor, Summ e Schedule, Sunday School 9 :00 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Memorial United Method is Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlo ok ing Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pas tor Claude H.L. Burnett, pasto ra assistant. Sunday schedu le Heritage Worship Service, 8 :30 a.m. (October-May only); Sch oo School for all ages, 9:30 a. m. Celebration Worship Service a 10:45 a.m.; New Song wors hip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nu rs ery care provided every Sun day morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p .m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p .m (October-May only). We o ffe Christ-centered Sunday sch oo classes, youth programs, B ible studies, book studies and Chris tian fellowship. We are a congrega tion that want to know Christ and m ake Him known. Call the church of fice at 465-2422 or check out ou church Web site at www.mem ori alumc.com. St. John United Method is Church, 3214 Grand Prix Dr ive Sebring, FL33872. The R ev Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pas tor Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sun day Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a .m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided fo r a services. Phone 382-17 36 www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Method is Church, 8170 Cozumel La ne (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Cl yde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship se rv ice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible St udy meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesd ay Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church office pho ne 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o Christ, where God is still spea k ing. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27 and Hammock Road). Sunday w or ship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion w ith worship first Sunday of mon th Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For m ore information, call the church office a 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@e arth link.net or check theWeb site sebringemmanuelucc.com. No matter who you are or where you are on life's journey, you're w el come here.PLACESTOWORSHIP CROSSWORDSOLUTION Special to the News-SunAries (March 21-April 20) Afew b umps along the way aren't going to d eter you this week, Aries. That's b ecause you're coasting along regardl ess of the obstacles in your way. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, i t could be a boring week, but that's OK b ecause a little boredom now and then o ffers you a chance to rest up. There's s ome interesting things around the corn er. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Beggars c an't be choosers, Gemini. When forced i nto a situation this week, you simply h ave to go with the flow, instead of t hinking you can call the shots. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Cancer, i t's time to rekindle a few relationships t hat you have let expire. You don't know w hen you may need a friend or loved o ne for help. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, a tricky s ituation requires a careful tongue and a q uick wit. Fortunately, this week you a re the master politician and can win o ver anyone with a wink and a smile. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Make a plan and stick with it, Virgo. Look to others to help you accomplish a longdesired goal. Realize that sacrifices must be made to make things work. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Libra, change may be scary, but you are ready to move forward. All of the uncomfortable things will be worth it in the long run. You just need to keep a cool head. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Scorpio, stop worrying about what others think and do what you want and think is right. Pleasing yourself is what you should concern you right now. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Sagittarius, it's hard to escape chaos this week, even when you hole yourself up in the house. But there's soon to be a silver lining behind this dark cloud. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) Capricorn, romance is difficult when you have such a full schedule. Pencil in some alone time with your partner because your relationship can use a boost. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) Aquarius, your bank account may be a tad on the empty side. But it should recover shortly. In the meantime, enjoy the fruits of all your hard work. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) All you need is a break, Pisces. You're bound to get that break this week. It will actually fall right into your lap. Jan. 9 Dave Matthews, singer, 44; Jan. 10 Pat Benatar, singer, 58; Jan. 11 Kim Coles, actress, 49; Jan. 12 Kirstie Alley, actress, 60; Jan. 13 Patrick Dempsey, actor, 45; Jan. 14 Jason Bateman, actor, 42; Jan. 15 Drew Brees, athlete, 32. Aries, don't worry about those bumps along the way; your're bound to get a break, Pisces Follow the News-Sun online on www.twitter.com/thenewssun

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T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sunon any c hanges in this listing by calling 3 85-6155, ext. 516; send any c hanges by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail t hem to News-SunCommunity C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 L ake Placid has lounge hours f rom 1-9 p.m. Live music is f rom 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p .m. Members and guests only. P ost is at 528 N. Pine St., S ebring. Call 471-1448. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2 661 lounge is open from 1-7 p .m. Card games start at 1:30 p .m. The lodge is open to m embers and their guests. Call 4 65-2661. Lake Placid Moose has k araoke in the pavilion. H orseshoes played at 9:30 a .m. Food available at 4 p.m. O pen to members and qualified g uests only. Overeaters Anonymous, m eets from 4-5 p.m. in second f loor conference roomNo. 3 at F lorida Hospital Heartland M edical Center, 4200 Sun N L ake Blvd., Sebring. Call 3827 731. No dues, fees or weighi ns. For details on the organizat ion, go to www.oa.org. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves lunch at 2 p.m. at the c lub, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. C all 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 o ffers NASCAR racing in the p avilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open a nd kitchen open from 2-5 p.m. L odge is at 11675 U.S. 98, S ebring. Call 655-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 3880 serves hamburgers f rom 4-5:30 p.m. and plays p oker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1 224 County Road 621 East, L ake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 plays euchre at 1:30 p .m. and E&J Karaoke is from 4 :30-7:30 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN WITH ME family group meets at 10:30 a.m. every Monday at the Heartland Christian Church on Alt. 27 in Sebring. The church is behind Southgate Shopping Center where Publix is. For more information call 3855714. Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal Church, Lakeshore Drive, Sebring. For more details, call 385-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous One Day At ATime group meets for a closed discussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday and Friday at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. Call 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 6:30 p.m. at Rosewood Center, 517 U.S. 27 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 202-0647.. American Legion Post 74 Sons of Legion meet at 6 p.m. Executive board meets at 7 p.m. on second Monday at the post, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. Post open noon-8 p.m. Call 4711448. AmVets Post 21 meets 6 p.m. second Monday, at the post, 2029 U.S. 27 South, Sebring. All members welcome. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and guests. Call 385-0234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake Placid. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. Diabetes Insulin Pump Support Group meets the second Monday from 3-4:30 p.m. in the Florida Hospital Heartland Division Diabetes Center, 4023 Sun N Lake. Call 402-0177 for more information. Diabetes Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday from 1-2:30 p.m. in Florida Hospital Conference Room 3 in Sebring. Call 4020177 for guest speaker list. Fairmount Mobile Estates Lunch Bunch meets at noon second Monday at Homer's Smorgasbord in Sebring. Call 382-0481. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The Agri-Center. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets the second and fourth Monday at the Sebring Country Estates Civic Association clubhouse, 3240 Grand Prix Drive (down the street from Wal-Mart). Dancing will be held every month until April 2008. Classes are being started now in the Sebring and Lake Placid area. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or visit the Web site at www.samdun.net.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 3148877. Heartland Riders Association meets at 6 p.m. second Monday at the Sebring Chamber of Commerce Welcome Center in Village Plaza (across from Sebring Gate Station). Call 402-1165. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Homeowners Association meets the second Monday of each month at 9 a.m. at the Sebring Country Estates Clubhouse at 3240 Grand Prix Drive in Sebring. Highlands County Parkinson's Support Group meets at 1 p.m. second Monday at the Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring. Call 453-6589 or 4522053. Highlands County Rotary Club meets at 6 p.m. at Charlie's Restaurant, Commerce Street, Sebring. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County Agri-Civic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. Call 402-6540. Highlands Sertoma Club meets at noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. Highlands County Senior Squadron, Civil Air Patrol the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary meets the second and fourth Monday nights at the Sebring Airport Terminal Building. All are welcome. For further information, call 471-1433 between 4 and 7 p.m. Highlands Woodcarvers Club meets at 6 p.m. second Monday at Highlands Art League, 351 W. Center Ave., Sebring. For more details, call Sandy Kohan at 414-1363 or Norm Pelland at 465-5510. Insulin Pump Support Group meets from 3-4:30 p.m. the second Monday of every month in conference Room 3 of Florida Hospital. This group is open to all insulin pump wearers, their families and anyone who is interested in knowing more about insulin pumps. Preregistration is not required. For information, call 402-0177. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Cards start at 4 p.m. Music outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. Lodge phone number 4520579. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 12-4:30 p.m. second and fourth Monday in Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. No meetings from end of May to October. Call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Brady's, Sebring. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. Smoke-free environment. For more details, call 471-355 7. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. For information, call 471-2522. Sebring Moose Lodge 225 9 plays Texas Hold em at 7 p.m the second and fourth Monday at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Be ef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing. Call 655-3920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 3:3 0 p.m. at the fellowship hall at th e First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. Call Judy O'Boyle at 260-0831. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Woman's Club of Sebring meets at noon on the second Monday for lunch, from Octob er throughMay, at the clubhouse 4260 Lakeview Drive, Sebring Call 385-7268. TUESDAY Aging Advocacy Council meets the 2nd Tuesday of eac h month in the Nu-Hope Conference Room at 11:30 a.m. for a brown bag lunch wi th the meeting starting at noon. Contact Debbie Slade at 3822134 Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelv e Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parkin g available south of old church. American Ex-POW Highlands County Chapter, meets 6 p.m. Call Ted Biever, 382-3285, for meeting place. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shu ffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 Page 12BNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. EXPIRES 2008 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT WAS$ 23995 NOW$ 21999#X0127 www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644 LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NO DEALER FEESPLUS TAX, TAG, & STATE FEES. PLUS TAX TAG TITLE SATISFIES 2007 DODGE CHARGER HEMI WAS$ 23150 NOW$ 21499#TX090A 2005 CHR YSLER PT CRUISER CONV. WAS$ 12999 NOW$ 10888 #X0120 2010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY WAS$ 23995 NOW$ 19789#X0157 2009 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER WAS$ 13995 NOW$ 11888#X0150 2008 TOYOTA FJ CRUISER 4X4 WAS$ 24995 NOW$ 22888 #X0148 2008 FORD EXPEDITION LIMITED WAS$ 31995 NOW$ 26999#CX042A 2010 DODGE JOURNEY WAS$ 20995 NOW$ 18999#X0156 WAS$ 15995 NOW$ 13888 #X0140A 2008 CHR YSLER SEBRING TOURING CONV. WAS$ 19995 NOW$ 17888#0147 WAS$ 19995 NOW$ 16999#TY002A WAS$ 16988 NOW$ 14995 #X01232008 TOYOTA SCION XB 2009 JEEP PATRIOT 4X4 Since 1931 2004 CHEVROLET 2500 CREW CAB COMMUNITYCALENDAR Continued on page 13B

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p .m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 R obert Britt St., AvonPark. B oys ages 11-17 are eligible to j oin. Call 452-2385. Avon Park Lakes A ssociation has Women's S alad Bar at noon on the seco nd Tuesday of each month. T he clubhouse is at 2714 N autilus Drive in Avon Park. Avon Park Library has stor ytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 e xcept during holidays. Avon Park Lions Club m eets 6:45 p.m., dinner, Lions C lub, 1218 W. Bell St., Avon P ark. Beta Sigma Phi, Xi Nu S igma Chapter of Avon Park, m eets the second and fourth T uesday each month in the m embers home. Call president M ary Joinerr at 382-4488 or v ice president Linda Webster at 3 85-1124. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9 -11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. E veryone is welcome. For more d etails, call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets e very Tuesday night at "The R ock," Union Congregational C hurch, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon P ark. Abarbecue meal is s erved at 6 p.m. for a donation. A t 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7 :30 p.m., the group breaks up i nto small groups for men and w omen. The program is d esigned for drug and alcohol a ddiction, divorce, death or illn ess grief, low or lost selfe steem or identity due to dysf unctional relationships, depress ion/anxiety, or any other need f or healing. For details, contact C elebrate Recovery coordinator P am Sim by calling 453-3345, e xt. 106. The Computer Club at B uttonwood Bay meets the s econd and fourth Tuesday of e ach month November through M arch. We invite anyone intere sted in expanding their comp uter knowledge to attend the B uttonwood Bay Bytes C omputer Club meeting. Fletcher Music Club meets e very Thursday and Tuesday at F letcher Music Center in L akeshore Mall, Sebring. For m ore details, call 385-3288. Happy Paws Dog O bedience Club Inc. meets at 7 p.m. second Tuesday at the F irst Baptist Church of Lake J osephine, 111 Lake Josephine D rive, Sebring. Obedience c lasses are available. All welc ome. Call 471-9778. Heartland Dog Club Inc. of F lorida meets at 6:30 p.m. seco nd Tuesday at Homer's Buffet, S ebring. Obedience classes (all b reeds) are held on W ednesday evenings at Sun N L ake Elementary School. C anine Good Citizen and T herapy Dog testing available. A KC-pointed shows held annua lly in April. Call 385-7474 or 3 85-7803 or visit w ww.HeartalndDogClubFlorida. o rg. Heartland Harmonizers B arbershop Chorus meets f rom 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring H igh School Music Room, S ebring. All men who enjoy s inging are invited. Reading m usic is not required. Call 4712 294 or 386-5098. Heartland Symphony O rchestra rehearsals from 5 :30-7 p.m. Tuesdays in the G reen Room in the South F lorida Community College a uditorium building. Bring m usic and instruments. New m embers welcome. Call cond uctor Bryan Johnson at 8009 49-7248, ext. 7231. Highlands County P arkinson's Support Group m eets at 1 p.m. second T uesday at the Alliance Church o f Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, S ebring. For details, 453-6589 o r 452-2053. Highlands Gem and M ineral Club meets 7 p.m., s econd Tuesday, Church of C hrist, 3800 Sebring Parkway, S ebring. Club does not meet in J uly, August or September. Call 4 53-7054. Hope Hospice grief support g roup meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W Center Ave., Sebring; and 4 :30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle A LF, across U.S. 27 from F lorida Hospital Lake Placid. C all 382-0312. Knights of Columbus C ouncil 5441 meets 8 p.m. e very second and fourth T uesday at Knights of C olumbus Hall, 900 U.S. 27 N., S ebring. Call 385-0987. Knights of Columbus Council 5441 Auxiliary meets 8 p.m. every second Tuesday at Knights of Columbus Hall, 900 U.S. 27 N., Sebring. Call 385-0987. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. LAKEPLACIDLIONSClub meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday each month at Herons Garden, 501 US 27 North, Lake Placid. Call Jeanne at 6990743. Lake Placid Moose has a general meeting and a Moose Legion meeting at 7:30 p.m. the second Tuesday at the lodge. Lake Placid Veterans of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliary 3880 meets 10 a.m. second Tuesday at 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444 for details. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Multiple Sclerosis Support Group meets at 7 p.m. second Tuesday at Highlands Regional Medical Center second floor class room. Friends and family are welcome. Call Janet Turvey at 465-3138. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventhday Adventist Church, 1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup.co m. Call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org for more information on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near the library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-3829 or 471-9900. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If interested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sign in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Cost is $2. Smoke-free environment. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves soft shell tacos 5-7 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing. Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. Call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. Call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dee's Restaurant, Sebring. Call Scott Albritton at 402-1819. The Sons of AMVETS meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month at the Post, 2029 U.S. 27 South, Sebring. Toby's Clown Alley has its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday at the Clown Foundation, 109 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 6-7 p.m. at the Atonement Lutheran Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Community Bible Church, 1400 CR-17AN., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. Call 452-1093. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. The ladies auxiliary meets at 10 a.m. every second Tuesday. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 has a card tournament at 2 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902.WEDNESDAY Adult Children of Alcoholics and Dysfunctional Families. New Life Group meets Wednesdays at 11:30 a.m. at Grace Bible Church, 4453 Thunderbird Road, Sebring. Call 446-0461. For details on the organization, go to www.adultchildren.org. American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Burgers served from 5-7 p.m.Live music is from 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. AmVets Ladies Auxiliary Post 21 meets at 11 a.m. the second Wednesday at Blue Crab Restaurant, Sebring. All members welcome. Avon Park Noon Rotary Club meets noon, Rotary Club Building, on corner of Verona Avenue and Pine Street, Avon Park. BALANCE, Lives in Transition, Inc. Qi-GONG Relaxation classes every Wednesday from 2:45-3 p.m. All classes and support groups are at 4023 Sun 'N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 386-5687. Balance Transitions (Support Group For People Suffering From Mental Illness) meets every Wednesday at 1 p.m. at 4023 Sun 'N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 386-5687. BALANCE, Lives in Transition, Inc. Family and Caregiver Support Group meets the second Wednesday of the month from 10:30 a.m. to noon at Daybreak Office,1346 US 27 North, Lake Placid. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. The Bridgettes meet at 12:15 p.m. at Sebring Recreation Center to play bridge. Call Sandra Yates at 655-5815. Christian Fellowship Group meets 7 p.m. Call 381-9005 or 381-9007. Country Swingers has dances at the Sebring Recreation Club, 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. Membership is required. Beginners dancing from 5:156:15 p.m. Advanced dancing is from 6:30-8:30 p.m. New dances taught every other week. Call 655-2398. Fraternal Order of Eagles 4240 Aerie meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesday at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details call 6554007. Heartland Herpetological Society meets 7 p.m., second Wednesday, Room 315, Cracker Trail Elementary School, Sebring. Call 385-6826 or 465-2228 for details.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September. Highlands County Narcotics Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. at the Lakeside house, 1513 S. Highlands Ave., AvonPark. Call the 24-hour hotline 1-800-850-7347 or (941) 616-0460. Highlands County Traffic Safety Committee meets 10 a.m., conference room 3, Highlands County Agri-Civic Center, Sebring, second Wednesday. Highlands Senior Center is open every Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at their new clubhouse, 3400 Sebring Parkway (the old Lions Club). Two live bands to dance to and great lunches. All area seniors are invited to join the festivities. Call 386-0752. Highlands Shrine Club, 2606 State Road 17 South, Avon Park (between Avon Park and Sebring) meets from 8:3010:30 a.m. for coffee and doughnuts and socializing for members and any interested person. Call 382-2208. Kiwanis Club of Sebring meets every Wednesday at noon at Homer's Restaurant. Call Grace Plants 273-1421 for more information. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 is open to members and their guests. Shuffleboard is at 1:30 p.m. Mah-Jong from 1-5 p.m. Lounge opens at 12:30 p.m. Steak night on the second Wednesday of each month. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Garden Club meets at 12:30 p.m. every second Wednesday (from September through May) for socialization and at 1 p.m. for dessert and beverage, followed by a meeting and gardening program at the Lake Placid Woman's Club, 10 N. Main Ave. Call 465-6106. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at night. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lake Placid Women of the Moose meets at 7 p.m. the second Wednesday at the lodge for a chapter night and enrollment. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Dinner served every Wednesday from 5:30-6:30 p.m.Lodge phone number 4520579. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 7 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Over The Hill Gang meets 10:15 a.m., Jim's Pistolarrow Range for target shooting. Call 655-4505. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 1-3 p.m. second Wednesday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Lake Placid (Morning Rotary) meets at 6:44 a.m. at The Heron's Garden, 501 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, just north of the Tower. Visiting Rotarians always welcome. Coffee only is $2; full breakfast is $7. Call 465-4834. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 Aerie members meet at 7 p.m. second Wednesday at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 hosts Wacky Wednesday from 5-6:30 p.m. serving a varied menu of food for $5 and special drink prices. Lounge open from 3-10 p.m. Open to Elk members and guests. Music provided from 4:30-7:30 p.m. Smokefree environment. Call 4713557. Sebring Jaycees meets 7:30 p.m., Jaycees Clubhouse, State Road 17, Sebring. Sebring Kiwanis meets noon, Homer's Smorgasbord, Sebring. Sebring Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves hamburgers, fries and fish sandwiches from 5-7 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing. There will be music from 4:307:30 p.m. Call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club has ice cream shuffleboard at 1:15 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. Call 385-2966. Suicide and Sudden Death Grief Support group meets every Wednesday, 6 p.m., at Unity Life Enrichment Center, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd, Sebring. Facilitated by licensed therapist. Call 381-4410. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL487 meets at 9 a.m. at Whispering Pines Baptist Church, 303 White Pine Drive, Sebring. Call 382-7716 or 3149485. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3800 plays poker at 2 p.m. at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 plays euchre at 6:30 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Service officer at post 12-3 p.m. Call 385-8902. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9853 Men's Auxiliary membership meeting is at 7 p.m. second Wednesday at the post, 75 N. Olivia Drive, Avon Park. Young Artists String Orchestra (YASO) rehearses each Wednesday at 5:15 p.m. at Lake Placid Church of the Nazarene (512 W. Interlake). We are looking for violin, viola, cello, and string bass players to be a part of this orchestra. For information, call Diane Osborne, conductor, at 6594541 or (503) 709-1440.THURSDAY Alzheimer's Association Support Group meets from 12 p.m. and from 6:30-7:30 p.m. at the Sebring Christian Church on Hammock Road. Call Lisa Rodriguez at 385-3444. American Legion Placid Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Card games played at 1 p.m. Pool tournament is 7 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Customer Appreciation Day. Free food. Happy hour all day. Call 4711448. Avon Park Founders Garden Club meets the second Thursday of the month from September through May. Meetings are held at members' homes. Phone 452-1927 for more information. Avon Park Moose Lodge 2494 plays euchre at 7 p.m. at the lodge on Walnut Street. Bravehearts an Ala-Non support group, meets from 1-2 p.m. at Spring Lake Presbyterian Church. Call 6553274. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays novice duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring, November through May. Call 385-8118. Central Avon Park Jaycees meets 7:30 p.m., Recreation Center, North Verona Avenue, Avon Park. Disabled American Veterans Ridge Chapter 49 meets 7 p.m., American Legion Building, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring, second Thursday. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For more details, call 385-3288. Fraternal Order of Eagles 4240 Aerie Auxiliary meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Thursday at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details call 655-4007. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club offers beginning dance lessons for new and returning dancers from 4-6 p.m. Thursday, and classes for last year's dancers from 2-4 p.m. at Reflections On Silver Lake in Avon Park. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or e-mail him at samdunn@samdunn.net. Heartland African Violet Society meets at 2:30 p.m. every second Thursday at Marina Cove at Highlands Ridge South off Powerline Road in the multipurpose room of Founder's Hall. Visitors are welcome. Call Shirley at 3855765 for details.Heartland Amputee Group meets at noon every second Thursday (October through April) at Handicapped Americans Love of Life Organization, 112 Medical Center Ave., Sebring, for a brown-bag lunch. Beverages provided. It is open to all level s of amputees, both recent and experienced, their family mem bers and friends. Call 385-119 6 or e-mail to hal loinc@embarqmail.com.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. provides free assisted riding sessions fo r adults and children with specia l needs from 9-11 a.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday at 118 W. College Drive, AvonPark. For details o r to volunteer, call Mary McClelland, coordinator, 4520006. Highlands County Narcotics Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. at St. Agnes Episcopal Church on Lakeview Drive in Sebring. Call the 24hour hotline 1-800-850-7347 o r (941) 616-0460. Highlands Federated Republican Women meet se cond Thursday at Inn on the Lakes, Golfview Drive, Sebring. Social hour and Dutc h treat dinner is at 5 p.m. Meetin g begins at 6 p.m. All Republicans are invited. For further information, call 4536783. Highlands Lake Volunteer Fire and Rescue meets 7 p.m ., at fire department, 2840 Highlands Blvd., Avon Park, second and fourth Thursday. Highlands County Corvett e Club meets 7:30 p.m. on second Thursday, Sebring Elks Lodge, corner of Kenilworth Boulevard and Lakeview Drive For more details, call 471-982 9. Highlands Little Theatre Youth Showstoppers meet a t 6 p.m. every second Thursday of the month. Learn what to do back stage as well as on stag e. All youth between 6 and 18 ar e invited to attend. Call 385-217 5. Hope Hospice grief suppor t group meets at 11 a.m. every Thursday at the Avon Park Library, 100 N. Museum Ave. Call 382-0312. Lake Placid Chapter 260 Order of The Eastern Star meets at 7:30 p.m. second an d fourth Thursday at the Masoni c Lodge on Main Street in Lake Placid. No meetings from July through September. Call 4654345. Lake Placid China Painter s Club meets 10 a.m. on secon d Thursday at 10 North Main Ave., Lake Placid from September through May. For more details, call 465-2256. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 has lounge hours beginning at 1 p.m. Card games an d bingo are at 6 p.m. with burgers, sandwiches and desserts served. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Ca ll 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose serves burgers, jumbo hot dogs and fries at 6 p.m. Music provided from 5:30-9 p.m. Darts at 7:30 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lake Placid Noon Rotary Club meets at noon at Peppercorn's, 525 W. Interlake Blvd. For more information, including how to order lunch in advance, call Forrest Steele a t 465-0113. Lake Placid Woodcarvers meet from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lorida Teens (TLT) a new ly formed part of the Greater Lorida Community Club, meet s www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 13B ROOFING SPECIALIST SERVING HIGHLANDS COUNTY SINCE 1989 Shingles Flat Roofs Roof Repairs Mobile Home Roofovers -FULLYLICENSED & INSURED385-4690State Lic # RC 0066817 QUALITY WORK AT A REASONABLE PRICE FREEESTIMATES Continued from page 12B COMMUNITYCALENDAR Continued on page 14B

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a t 7 p.m. Thursdays to play s oftball, volleyball and a variety o f other sports. Teens are e ncouraged to come to the c ommunity center. Loyal Order of Moose H ighlands County Lodge No. 2 494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon P ark. Tacos and wings served e very Thursday from 5:30-6:30 p .m. Cards at 6:30 p.m. Lodge p hone number 452-0579. Marine Corps League C racker Trail Detachment 1 004 meets 7 p.m., second T hursday, at Veterans of F oreign Wars Post, 2011 SE L akeview Drive, Sebring. Call J ohn Kelley at 386-0524. Mothers of Preschoolers ( MOPS) meets from 9-11 a.m. s econd and fourth Thursday f rom May-September at Grace B ible Church, 4541 T hunderbird Road (second c hurch on left). Call Heidi K atsanis at 441-3879. Web site i s at www.mops.org. Narcotics Anonymous Take I t Easy Group meets at 8 p.m. a t St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. F or information call Heartland a rea helpline (863) 683-0630. M ore information on other m eetings and events at w ww.naflheartland.org. Overeaters Anonymous m eets from 4-5 p.m. every T hursday at Ridge Area Arc C afeteria, 120 W. College D rive. No dues, fees or weighi ns. Visit www.FloridaRidge I ntergroup.com. Call 414-3172. V isit www.oa.org for more inform ation on OA. Overeaters Anonymous m eets from 5:30-6:30 p.m. e very Thursday at Wauchula S eventh-Day Adventist Church, 2 05 S. 11th Ave., Wauchula. No d ues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit w ww.FloridaRidge I ntergroup.com. Call (863) 7735 714. Peace of Highlands County m eets at 2 p.m. second T hursday at Sebring Church of t he Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., S ebring. Anon-profit, interden ominational organization that s ponsors programs promoting p eace. Call Paul K. Ferrell at 2 14-5522. Pine Ridge Promenaders w ill be dancing from 7:30-9:30 p .m. at the Sunshine RV Park r ecreation hall located 1,000 y ards east of U.S. 27 on State R oad 70. For more details, call D an or Nell Sherman at 4652 481 or 243-9676. Placid Lakes Bridge Club m eets 6-9 p.m. at Placid Lakes T own Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes B lvd. Call 465-4888. Ridge Area Writers meet at 1 0 a.m. the second and fourth T hursday in the conference r oom at the Sebring Public L ibrary. All writers are welcome. C all 465-5254. Sebring Breakfast Lions C lub meets 7 a.m. at Dot's R estaurant in Sebring Square. Sebring Country Estates C ivic Association hosts L adies Cards at 12:30 p.m. e very Thursday. Business m eeting every second T hursday at 7 p.m. Carry-in d inner every fourth Thursday at 6 p.m. Membership is $10 per p erson. Located at 3240 Grand P rix Drive. For all residents of S ebring Country Estates and G rand Prix Heights subdivision. P ublic rentals available for spec ial events. Call 385-9109. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves hamburgers and french f ries from 5-7 p.m. Music is f rom 6-9 p.m. at the club, 1 2921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 6 55-4007. Sebring Lodge 249 F&AM meets 7 p.m., second Thursday, 1809 Home Ave., Sebring. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 has an officers meeting at 7 p.m. and general meeting at 8 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing. Call 655-3920. Sebring Rhythm Cloggers dance at 6:30 p.m. at Highlands Hammock State Park Recreation Room in Sebring. If interested, call 3823735 or 382-6973. Sebring Sunrise Rotary Club meets 7 a.m., Sebring Elks Club, corner of Kenilworth Boulevard and Southeast Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Sweet Adeline's Show Chorus meets at 7 p.m. every Thursday in the AvonPark Rotary Club, 20 S. Verona Ave. Call Jeanne Parzygnat at 6990743; Bette Killeen at 446-3106 or Anita Helbig at 452-1927. Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets at Venus United Methodist Church, 962 County Road 731, Venus. Weigh in is from 5-5:30 p.m. Meeting is from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Call 4659165 for details. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. House Committee meeting at 10 a.m. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves hamburgers from 12-2:30 and plays bingo at 2 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For more details call 385-8902. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9853 bar bingo is at 1 p.m. every Thursday. Volunteers of America of Florida is a nonprofit organization in Sebring that specializes in assisting person's with mental illness. We are pleased to announce our Drop in Center is open to individuals with a mental illness 6 days a week from 11am to 3 pm. The center offers a welcoming environment where individuals are accepted and feel comfortable. For more information please contact Wendy at 863-382-2022.FRIDAY Alcoholics Anonymous One Day At ATime group meets for a closed discussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday and Friday at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. Call 314-0891. Alzheimer's Association Support Group meets at 6 p.m. second Friday at the Oaks of Avon in AvonPark. Call 3853444. American Legion Post 25 hosts a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. at the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake Placid. Cost is $6. Shrimp also is available for same price. Open to the public. Tickets in the lounge on Friday night. Lounge hours are from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 has karaoke from 7 p.m. until final call at the post, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Post open at noon. Happy Hour from 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Breakfast Rotary Club meets 7 a.m., Rotary Club building. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. Grand Prix Cloggers Beginner classes are at 9 a.m., EZ Intermediate classes are at 10 a.m., and Intermediate classes are at 11 a.m. every Friday at Reflection on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club offers a class in Lake Placid at the Sunshine RV Resort from 9-11 a.m. Friday. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 3826792 or e-mail him at samdunn@samdunn.net. Heartland AIDS Network meets 9 a.m., second Friday, Heartland Professional Plaza Learning Center, Sebring. Heartland Clubs meet at 3:30 p.m. on the second Friday of each month at Placid Lakes Town Hall Building, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call 699-6773. Highlands County Democratic Party 13th Precinct meets at 3:30 p.m. second Friday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd., Lake Placid. Call Bill Sayles at 699-6773. Highlands Social Dance Club hosts ballroom dancing every Friday, October through March from 7-9:30 p.m. at the Senior Center on Sebring Parkway. Dance the night away to the music of the area's Big Bands. All club dances are open to the public. Appropriate dress required. Admission is $5 for members and $7 for non-members. Call 471-0559. Lake Country Cruisers has a car show from 5-8 p.m. second Friday at Woody's Bar-B-Q parking lot, Lake Placid. There is a live disc jockey and door prizes. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 has lounge hours beginning at 1 p.m. There is a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. Cost is $8.50 per person. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose serves wings, fish and burgers at 6 p.m. Music provided from 7-11 p.m. Pool tournament is at 8 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Karaoke from 7-10 p.m. Lodge phone number 4520579. Narcotics Anonymous New Day Group meets at 6 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. S.A.L.T. Council (Seniors and Law Enforcement Together) meets the second Friday each month at 10 a.m. in the conference room of Florida Hospital Home Care Services located at 4005 Sun 'n Lake Blvd. For more information contact Grace Plants at 273-1421. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves chicken or fish baskets from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring, for a $4 donation. Blind darts is played at 7 p.m. Call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 serving buffet dinner at 5-7 p.m. Elks and guests invited. Dance music in ballroom at 7 p.m. Dinner and dance is $10 donation. For reservations, call 3858647 or 471-3557. Smoke-free environment. Lounge is open from 3-10 p.m. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave. Call 3852966 or leave a name, number and message. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3800 serves steak by the ounce from 5:30-7 p.m. every fourth Friday at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Texas Hold em lessons, 2 p.m. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves pizza from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902. SATURDAY American Association of University Women meets at 10 a.m. third Saturday at various locations. Call 465-2581 or 452-2493. American Legion Post 25 serves sirloin burgers from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake Placid. Jam session is from 2-4 p.m. The lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Members and guests invited. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 69 in AvonPark serves dinner at 5 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Lakes Association has a pancake breakfast on the third Saturday of every month. $4 for adults, $2 for children under 12. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. Avon Park Public Library has a free Adult Film Series at noon. Call 452-3803. Heartland Avian Society meets at 1 p.m. third Saturday at various homes or a restaurant. Pet bird owners meet to share food and fellowship and take occassional field trips. Looking for other bird owners to join us. Call Sharol at 4657350. Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. provides free assisted riding sessions for adults and children with special needs from 9-11 a.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday at 118 W. College Drive, AvonPark. For details or to volunteer, call Mary McClelland, coordinator, 4520006. Highlands Shrine Club, 2606 State Road 17 South, Avon Park (between Avon Park and Sebring) has a flea market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., country store open from 8 a.m. to noon and pancake breakfast served from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Vendors are welcome. No setup fee is charged for the summer months. Plenty of off road parking. Call 382-2208. Highlands Woodcarvers meet from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays at 825 Sunbird Terr. (Community Center off Thunderbird Road). Call Bob Seybolt at 471-6077. Historical Society of Greater Lake Placid meets at noon quarterly on the third Saturday of March, June, September, and December at the Masonic Hall, 106 N. Main for a potluck luncheon. Hot Rod Nights Cruise In, meets from 5-8 p.m. every third Saturday at the Home Depot parking lot in Sebring. Call 441 3051 or 441-3086. Lake Placid Art League ha s a class in Pastels/Acrylics taught by Llewellyn Rinald from from 9 a.m. to noon at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 opens the lounge at 1 p.m. Card games are played a t 1 p.m., and Bar Bingo is at 1:3 0 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Ca ll 465-2661. Narcotics Anonymous Ne w Day Group meets at 7 p.m. a t First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Overeaters Anonymous meets at 10:30 a.m. at First Presbyterian Church, Oak Street, Lake Placid. For more details, call 382-1821. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves dinner from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Music is from 7-10 p.m. Call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Club 2259 offers line dancing lessons at 2 p.m. the first and third Saturda y for members and guests at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-3920. Twelve Step Study Group for Adult Children of Alcoholics meets at 11 a.m. first and third Saturday, at first building south of Union Congregational Church, 105 N Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parkin g available south of old church. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. Spaghett i dinner and karaoke at 5:30 p.m. on the third Saturday of each month. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves a meal for $ 6 from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902. Page 14BNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com Save$25 … $300 per unit on select Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their enduring craftsmanship and energy-ef“cient designs, they present exceptional value „ smart style thats energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings from January 14 through April 29, 2011 with mail-in rebates on select styles. Ask us for details. *Manufacturers rebate offer valid for purchases made January 14 through April 29, 2011. Limitations and restrictions apply. As k for details. 2011 Hunter Douglas. and TM are trademarks of Hunter Douglas. Family owned & operated since 1978 Continued from page 13B COMMUNITYCALENDAR AVON PARK 452-5800 € SEBRING 382-3363 LAKE PLACID 465-1530Its more than just carpet The cleaning of the second piece must be of equal or lesser value to the first service price.Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 ft. and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Not valid with any other coupon. Expires 01/31/11.Emergency Water Damage Restoration3 ROOMS CARPET CLEANEDA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 01/31/11.$95002 ROOMS CARPET CLEANEDA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 01/31/11.$7500 ƒit s his dog park.UPHOLSTERY: CLEANONE PIECEOF UPHOLSTERY AT REGULAR PRICEAND RECEIVEASECONDPIECE1/2 OFF

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DearAbby: I divorced two years ago, after 40 years of marriage. The divorce papers read "irreconcilable differences." I made up my mind that I wouldn't badmouth my ex-wife, would use her name when speaking of her, and would rebuild my personal and social life as quickly as possible. Last year, I dated half a dozen widows. Without fail, during the course of the date, these lovely ladies would raise the subject of the death of their husbands. These women were beyond tears, but the pain in their eyes was evident. I heard stories about how they took care of a beloved husband while he was dying of cancer, or an unexplained sudden death and the anguish of trying to wake him from his eternal sleep. Christmas has just passed and it has been a long time since I have felt so alone. I went to the clubhouse in our community for dinner, but all my friends were either away for the holidays or entertaining friends and family and I couldn't intrude. While I listened to these widows, I have seen steely eyes soften and even heard them laugh. What an ego booster it has been for me. What I need now is some of my own medicine. I hope one day I'll find someone who doesn't need a handsome Jack, a good golfer or a sugar daddy. Until then, I'll just have to be a ... Lonesome George DearLonesome George: Because you're a good listener, please listen to me. It's time to become more involved in life. Enroll in adult education classes, learn to paint, take a writing class or an acting class or get some computer training. Volunteer your services. There are plenty of underprivileged people, people with disabilities and teens who could use a friend. Get involved in your political party, your church or a professional organization. Take dancing lessons. Join a gym or health club. Do some entertaining and ask your friends to bring a friend. And let your friends know you're available. You may not meet the perfect somebody right away, but you'll make new friends and one of them may have a friend who's perfect for you. DearAbby: My lifelong friend from childhood wonders why I am avoiding her. Now that I am in my 80s, the unfairness of a lie from our past is still plaguing me. Seventy-five years ago, at a Sunday school picnic, I saw "Mary Ann's" mother take something from another woman's purse. As she looked around, she caught my eye and an ugly expression came over he r face. Days later, Mary Ann told me people in our church were being told that I was a thief. Not having the maturity to ha ndle the enormous falsehood, and knowing it wasn't true, I chose to ignore it. But it didn't go away. It followed me all my life. Some years later, another friend advised me to talk to our minister, who told me t o pray about it. My prayer wa s that he would stand up in th e pulpit and declare my innocence, but it never came about and I eventually left the church. I learned later that Mary Ann's mother had a habit o f stealing from homes where she worked as a practical nurse. Losing my reputation because of this woman's weakness made the lie all the more painful, and I so want to be cleared at least i n my friend's eyes. But do I want to hurt my friend in revealing her mother's responsibility in switching the blame for her theft? Please help. In Lingering Pai n, Graham, Was h. DearIn Pain: Write Ma ry Ann a letter and tell her exactly what you have told me. I'm sure she knows her mother's character very we ll, and it will come as no shoc k to her. Then the two of you should decide together how her mother's slander of you should be handled. If she's your friend, she'll help you Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 15B COUNTRY STRONGPG13(Gwyneth Paltrow,Tim McGraw)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30TANGLED 2DPG(Animated)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30THE FIGHTERR(Mark Wahlberg,Christian Bale)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30HOW DO YOU KNOWPG13(Reese Witherspoon,Owen Wilson)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30FASTERR(The Rock)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15UNSTOPPABLEPG13(Denzel Washington,Rosario Dawson)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15 The NewFAIRMOUNTCINEMA63750 US 27 N. Sebring NOW SHOWINGFriday 01/07 Thursday 01/13 Suick CinemasInformation 385-9980 Office 385-9908New Dolby Digital SoundAll Seats $6.00for Matinee COMING SOONJan 7SEASON OF THE WITCH Newborns € Children € AdolescentsOFFICE HOURS: Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., F.A.A.P. Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., F.A.A.P. Anoop Palta, M.D., F.A.A.P. Vishakha Nakhate, M.D., F.A.A.P. David Kleczek, P.A.C. Amy Grimes, P.A.C. Mercy L. Seralde, M.D. Maria C. Perez, M.D. Maria B. Asis, M.D., F.A.A.P. Megan Neff, ARNPAvon Park Pediatrics,P.A. & Sebring Pediatrics,LLCWe accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid SEBRING382-0770AVON PARK453-7337 Specializing in the treatment of € Allergies € Asthma € Attention Deficit Disorder Immunizations € Check-ups € Obesity Counseling SEBRING: MON. … FRI. … 8:30AM … 5:00PMSATURDAY … 8:30AM … 12:00 NOON … SEBRING ONLYAVON PARK: MON. & WED. … 8:30AM … 7:00PM TUES., THURS., & FRI. … 8:30AM … 5:00PM LAKE PLACID699-1414 DIVERSIONS OUIBy JACK MCINTURFF ACROSS 1 Language group that includes Swahili 6 "Great" swingers 10 Yaks 14 "Get out!" 19 Yellow spreads 20 "Gloria" actress Rowlands 21 It will probably keep you in bed 22 Raccoon kin 23 Herb homily? 26 Canadian pianist Kuerti 27 It's usually over a door 28 Australia's __ Rock 29 Current concern 30 Dismayed cry 31 One begins "Rhapsody in Blue" 32 Witness to the Transfiguration of Jesus 33 Mag transformed by Helen Gurley Brown 36 Van Morrison's singing daughter 37 Union leavers 38 Hawaiian tuna 39 Like a stroller out of breath? 43 Fallen orbiter 44 Sound relatives 45 With no rocks 46 Suspect story, maybe 49 '90s game disc 50 Golf pro's protection? 55 Nest egg initials 56 Upgrade to five stars, say 58 Not rented 59 Capers 61 "Sherlock Holmes" actress Rachel 63 "What __ Is This?" 64 Wander 66 Attend to loose ends 67 Look uncertainly (for) 68 1972 Oscar refuser 69 Wrath 70 Coffee at church? 74 Hindu title 77 Elected ones 78 Former U.K. carrier 79 Slick trick 80 Lincoln progeny 81 Adoptee's goal? 86 Director's challenge 87 Remove with effort 91 Use the soapbox 92 Spanish others 94 Lures 95 Moccasin, e.g. 96 Pelvic bones 98 Areas above hooves 99 Pursue 100 Torino tongue 104 Pasta often served alla vodka 105 "Last Comic Standing" winning routine? 107 Drive-thru decision 108 It has banks in Switzerland 109 Not a happy fate 110 Writer Zora __ Hurston 111 Tries out 112 Lulus 113 Sound measure 114 Taunts DOWN 1 Speaker of note 2 Author Haley 3 Michael Corleone's bodyguard Al 4 Hand-played drum 5 Wartime diversion 6 To the max, in the disco era 7 Ivy League member 8 Stud attachment? 9 Dry and hot 10 Some wardens' concern 11 "__ Like You": Young Rascals hit 12 Keister 13 Place to be quiet 14 Like Super Bowl tickets, perhaps 15 Hustled 16 Kiwi or rhea 17 Sorry sort 18 They may have 84Down 24 One-time partner of novelist Miller 25 Giving the once-over 29 "Yada, yada, yada ..." 31 "__ Promise You": *NSYNC hit 32 Family car 33 Summer getaway 34 River formed at Pittsburgh 35 Knighted vintner's nickname? 36 Internet communications company 37 Golf's Slammin' Sammy 40 Pianist/composer Chasins 41 CafŽ additions 42 Denoting a loss 46 Dorm room Christmas tree? 47 Bugs 48 It may be stolen 50 Plotting aid 51 Not at all 52 Steal 53 Without direction 54 African antelope 57 http://ucla.__ 60 It may be financial or legal 61 Year of Super Bowl XXXVI 62 Muffin grain 63 Signs of spring 64 Former title-winning women's wrestler Stratus 65 Saree wearer 67 Forest clearing 68 Cruel, as force 71 Stomachs 72 Suit sizes 73 Irritate 75 Shankar music style 76 Nuptial vows 81 Bernie, Roz and Greg, in a 2004 film 82 They aren't stars 83 Understand 84 Spy covers 85 Like white water 87 Absolute ruler 88 Beckoning words 89 Score holders 90 Small finch 93 Capital city that hosted the 2007 Baseball World Cup 95 #, on scores 96 "Who's there?" reply 97 "Well, __-di-dah" 99 Indian spiced tea 100 A party to 101 Rhyme scheme of Kipling's "If " 102 Cairo's river 103 Plural suffix with Capri 105 Salary limit 106 Hugs, on card Solution on page 11B Loneliness dampens holiday cheer two years after divorce Dear Abby Just when I was comfortable, change p rodded and poked at me. Not that I was a stranger to change. A s a young and vulnerable single mothe r, I knew what it was to have the pillars o f support knocked out from under me. B ut I had overcome some of the obstac les and I wasn't planning on more. When my landlord told me that I n eeded to find another apartment, I was s hocked. My son and I had a good relat ionship with our landlord. But personal p references for their future changed and, u nfortunately, affected me and my pres chooler. Though I was comfortable in my prese nt, affordable housing, God wasn't as i nterested in my comfort as in my chara cter. How would I respond to this? W ould I bring it to him and seek his g uidance?Would I trust him again for t hat unknown future? What fruit would I bear for him t hrough this unexpected trial? That old memory surfaced as I studied about knowing God's voice by his relevance to me in various ways. He is not just the God of the past and the future. He is my God of now. I may not have had these descriptions to hang my hat on at that time. But, I clung to the Lord and acted in faith that he would guide and not let us down. He is so relevant to me that I can be sure I'm not hearing his voice if my mind is burdened with concerns about what might happen in the future. Matthew 6:34, NKJV, reminds us, "Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about its own things." Instead, I found comfort in knowing that he promised to never leave me or forsake me. I had no control over these changes; but, I knew that he was changeless. When I found myself leaning toward worry especially when I saw how expensive rents for other apartments were God's Word from Proverbs 3: 5 and 6 returned to me. "Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct your paths." From my perspective, my financial picture was muddy at best. But God knew what was available to me; and, he saw my financial picture from his viewpoint not mine. Faced with impossibilities or what seems like insurmountable obstacles? God is ever present. He is I Am. Depend on him to guide and provide in the here and now. Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent and an award-winnin g writer. Relevance to the here and now Pause And Consider Jan Merop Given that this is the first c olumn of a new year, I'm p roposing a number of pare nting New Year's R esolutions for my readers to c onsider. The list is by no m eans comprehensive. It's j ust a good beginning on w hat is probably a muchn eeded family revolution: 1. We will not throw e xpensive "event parties" for o ur children on their birthd ays. Instead, we will confine a ll birthday celebrations to o ur family, including extende d family. We will keep it u ncomplicated: a special dinn er of the birthday boy or g irl's favorite food, a cake, t he obligatory song, and a f ew simple gifts, mostly c lothing or useful things. 2. We will spend at least as m uch time helping our child ren develop good manners a s we do helping them get g ood grades in school, which m eans we will cut back sign ificantly on the time helping w ith the latter (in considerat ion of the fact that good m anners, which are express ions of respect for others, w ill take one further in life t han will good grades). Each w eek, we will work on one s pecific social courtesy, such as saying "excuse me" when you walk in front of someone. Taking two weeks off, that's 50 courtesies a year. 3.We will show our love for our neighbors by properly disciplining our children, insisting on proper behavior, and reprimanding immediately (even if that means in front of other people) when they behave otherwise, and on those occasions we will also insist they apologize appropriately. 4. If we have not already done so, we will assign a routine of daily chores to each of our children (at least those who have reached their third birthdays) and we will insist that said chores be done, and done properly, before they engage in recreation. 5. When our children ask us for cell phones, we will tell them that they may have cell phones when they are able to pay for them as well as the monthly bills. 6. When our children complain that they are the only kids who don't have cell phones (and do chores), we will tell them that learning how to be different is character-building. 7. Our children will not be able to order customized meals unless we take them to a restaurant. At home, they will eat what we are eating, and they will sit at the table until they are finished. We will do this so that when they are invited to eat at someone else's home, they will be the best of guests. 8. We will surely bond with our children, but we will not bond with them in the marital bed, nor will we bond with them in their beds. 9. In keeping with number 8, we will put our marriage first and our children second ... for their sake as well as ours. They will revolve around us; thus, they will not grow up thinking the world revolves around them. 10. If I am a single parent, I will take good care of myself for my sake as well as my children's. I will have an active, adult's only, social life. I will take plenty of personal time to simply relax and do those things I like to do. I will do all of that so that my children will not ever think the world revolves around them. 11. We/I will put our/my children to bed early so that we/I can end each day reconnecting as a couple or relaxing as a single. 12. We will eat as a family around our own table at least six nights a week. 13. We will keep afterschool activities to a minimum, and only let them enroll in activities that do not prevent us from delivering on number 11. 14. Instead of buying our children expensive things, we will help them develop hobbies and take them to museums and on trips. 15. We will do all of the above so that when they grow up, they will have wonderful memories of their childhoods and raise our grandchildren in a manner that honors us. John Rosemond answers parents' questions at www.rosemond.com. Parenting resolutions need to be included Living With Children John Rosemond

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LIVING 16B PAGE News-Sun Sunday, January 9, 2011 FAMILYFEATURES A s the colors, smells and textures begin to turn from one season to the next, many women begin to think about freshening up the inside of their homes. One easy way to update any home is to add a fresh scent that matches the room's dŽcor. Get inspired by the variety of vibrant c olors and aromas that each season brings and create an at-home scent e xperience with Glade Sense & Spray Automatic Freshener. Matching f ragrance to the look and style of the room, whether with colorful new t hrow pillows or a faux flower arrangement, makes updating a room e asy and cost-effective. Interior designer, home trend expert and frequent guest on HGTV E rinn Valencich knows exactly how to make small changes that can h ave a big impact. "Scent is a fantastic way to make any room feel w elcoming and complete without making any major renovations, w hich can be expensive and permanent," says Valencich. "Families t oday are searching for easy solutions to revamp their living spaces w ithout breaking the bank, and my customers often don't realize t hat dŽcor and scent are closely connected. Discovering a signature f ragrance will tremendously add to a room's design by creating a w arm and inviting atmosphere," she notes. In order to offer budget-friendly tips that families can use to update t heir living spaces, Valencich has partnered with Glade Sense & Spray A utomatic Freshener. Together, they hope these tips will enhance fami lies'at-home scent experience and show how affordable and easy it c an be to update any room by stimulating the senses through color, t exture and scent: 1 .Think outside the box. Look at items purely based on color and see a room in a whole new light. Valencich says painting an accent wall is one of the easiest ways to get a fresh pop of color into a room. To make the room cohesive, pick three accessories in that same color and position them around the room in a triangle pattern. This could be a few new throw pillows on the sofa and a vase on the mantle with a few chic blooms. Coffee table books with jackets in the accent color work great as styling accessories, as well. 2 .Bring the outdoors inside. Greenery is often overlooked in a home but really gives a room life. If a live tree is too much of a commitment, incorporate an artificial tree, plant or arrangement. Use a stylish pot and cover it with moss to create an inexpensive accessory. 3 .Create visual and tactile variety. Achieve a warm and inviting atmosphere using soft lighting with lamps and dimmers. Also use a variety of textures in the room. If there's a lot of wood in a room already, opt for a side table made from glass and metal materials, and choose upholstered dining chairs instead of using additional wood. 4 .Don't forget the finishing touch. If a room looks beautiful but lacks an inviting scent, the effect may fall flat. To bring a room together, don't forget to add fragrance as the finishing touch to home dŽcor with Glade Sense & Spray Automatic Freshener. The newly designed neutral vase blends into any room, and the motion activated sensor provides a signature fragrance to complement the room's design and ambiance. For more quick and easy tips, visit www.GladeScentandStyle.com. Bring the outdoors inside. Greenery is often overlooked in a home but really gives a room life If a live tree is too much of a commitment, incorporate an artificial tree, plant orarrangement. Fora casual beach-inspired look, mix aged wooden pieces, like a distressed end table, with a more formal collection of white vases with intricate floral detailing, and pairwith the Hawaiian Breeze scent.DiscoverScentPersonalitywith InteriorDesignerErinnValencich"Having a beautifully scented room encourages guests to linger in the space, relax and enjoy themselves because it is a positive reinforcement of the environment. I like the newly designed Glade Sense & Spray Automatic Freshener because it is dependable and can be incorporated into any room's dŽcor. The neutral colored vase-like design will look nice in any room while keeping the home smelling fresh with a desirable personalized fragrance."If a chic dŽcor is a personal favorite, the soft scent of Lavender & Vanilla will complete the room. To achieve this style, mix vintage-inspired fabrics like florals and stripes with worn pieces. For an added touch, try updating drawers and side tables with new knobs for a custom look. Soft slip-covered sofas and chairs add a comfortable and easy-to-care-for element.If you're desiring a layered, casual beach-inspired look, Hawaiian Breeze is the perfect scent for a finishing touch. The airy, fruity scent is laid back and reminiscent of an ocean breeze. Mix aged wooden pieces, like a distressed end table topped with several old metal cans holding fresh or artificial flowers. Place this next to a more formal collection of white intricate floral detailed vases. Bring in island influence with bamboo furniture or frames. The mix of old and new, with punches of soft blues and greens, creates a casual elegance.



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Affordable home designPAGE16BDevils trounce TenorocPAGE1BAPPD promotes one, hires anotherPAGE2ANEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, January 9, 2011 www.newssun.com Volume 92/Number 4 | 75 cents www.newssun.com HighLow 68 48Complete Forecast PAGE 16A Partly sunny and pleasant Forecast Question: Should the city of Sebring outlaw building chain link fences in front yards? Next question: Do you give blood on a regular basis? www.newssun.comMake your voice heard at Online Obituaries Margaret Burns Age 97, of Sebring Esther Cook Age 91, of Sebring James Leonard Age 53, of Sebring James Newell Age 90, of Lake Placid Mar y Thornburg Age 95, of Sebring Paul Wagner Age 84, of Sebring Harry Whaley Age 81, of Lake Placid Obituaries, Page 6A Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453O nline: www.newssun.com Yes 20.4% No 79.6% 099099401007 Total votes: 108 Arts & Leisure 5B Business 10A Classifieds 12A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar12B Crossword Puzzle15B Dear Abby 15B Editorial & Opinion4A Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times 15B Senior Scene 8B Index locally owned community mindedHeartlandNational Bank Avon Park800 West Main St.863.453.6000Lake Placid600 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.699.1300Sebring327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1300Sun n Lake North5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1322www.heartlandnb.com News-Sun staffSEBRING Highlan ds County Sheriffs Offi ce investigators are trying to determine why a Sebring m an shot his wife and then turn ed the gun on himse lf Wednesday. According to a HCS O press release, deputies we re called to 6402 Cambrid ge Drive at 12:45 p.m. o n Wednesday after two bodi es were discovered at the res idence by a relative. Deputi es found 48-year-old Stac ey Dreessen and 52-year-o ld Lincoln Dreessen dead. On Thursday, the Distri ct 10 Medical Examiner rul ed that Stacey Dreessens dea th was a homicide and Linco ln Dreesens death was a su icide. No further information h as been released by the HCSO Anyone with any inform ation about this couple or t he incident is requested to co ntact Det. Mike Huften at 40 27250 or 402-7200. Anyone wishing to rema in anonymous and be eligib le for a cash reward is asked to call Heartland Crim e Stoppers at 1-800-226-TIP S (8477), or on the internet at www.heartlandcrimestoppe rs .com. Anonymity is guara nteed. 2 dead in murdersuicide in Sebring Man shot wife, then himself News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Chelsea and Ryan Logston are regular blood donors and have each donated a total of two gallons. The Logstons make blood donation a family affair by bringing along their kids; Courtney, pictured here, while R.J. and Regan eat cookies in the break room. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING January is National Volunteer Blood Donor Month. There is a good reason for this, beyond the carry over of good will from Christmas. In fact, nationally January is notorious for being the month of fewest donations, said Deah Spires, the donor development coordinator for Floridas Blood Centers, so having a major publicity campaign reminds and encourages individuals to roll up a sleeve right when the need is greatest. Here in Highlands County, however, as winter residents arrive, donations pick up considerably. There is a paradox, however, Spires said. Just as there are more people giving blood during the season, there are also more people needing blood; often donations are offset by transfusions. Last year on the blood mobile we collected 4,181 units, Spires said. Thats pretty average. She added the total represented a great deal of effort. Were out there six days a week and maintain contact with churches, schools, and businesses. she said. There is no consistency, we have to work it. Season of giving continues See BLOOD, page 5A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Despite the state of the economy, a business incubator in Avon Park has already achieved some success and has filled the allocated spaces within a few short months of opening. I am very impressed with the success so far. I am pleased and admire the APCRAand the city for putting it together, said Elmer Hall, Chairman of EDCs Business Accelerator committee. It is an ugly job market out there and will be for years to come, people can move, take lesser jobs or start their own. We hope to support all three, Hall said. Avon Park started its business incubator in July after a joint effort from the Highland County Economic Development Commission, the City and the Community Redevelopment Agency partnered to get the ball rolling. This is a good thing for Avon Park, said Main Street Redevelopment member Will Bennett in a meeting earlier in the year. This has the potential to create jobs in the downtown area, and it has the potential to spin off new businesses that will continue to create jobs. The original plan was to look at renovating the upstairs portion of the Avon Park Community Center at a cost of $44,000, but after the lett er went out inviting others to offer su ggestions, local business owner Ca rl Cool and his wife Maureen thoug ht their building at 203 W. Main S t. would be a good fit. We had the office space, and t he building is set up for this. It ju st seemed to be a good idea, Carl Co ol Avon Parks business incubator a success so far See BUSINESS, page 7A Follow the News-Sun on www.facebook.com/newssun News Sun pho to by SAMANTH A GHOLA R Former Sebring Blue Streak and NFLstar Ronnie Lippett visited The Boys & Girls Club on Thursday afternoon. Lippett shared his personal stories of bullying and how he stay out of trouble while striving to achieve a goal. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING The children at the local Boys & Girls Club got a treat from a famous visitor on Thursday afternoon. Former NFLstar Ronnie Lippett stopped by to share a few inspirational words with the young members. Lippett, who was a standout at Sebring High School before moving on to star at the University of Miami and then the NFL, told stories of how he was bullied when he was in elementary school. He asked the students if any of them had ever been bullied and several hands went up. Lippett then began telling the kids what he did to avoid being caught up in trouble at a young age. I wasnt very big when I was in elementary school and this other kid used to pick on me all the time, so I told a teacher and after a while the bully left me alone, said Lippett. Lippett, who was an all-pro defensive back with the New England Patriots in 1986 and 1987 and played in Super Bowl XX, explained to the students that kids shouldnt allow others to be bullied either. If you have a chance to help somebody, then do so, said Lippett. Its just the right thing to do, and you never know what that person could do for you later on in life, Lippett said. Lippett reiterated the importance of being responsible and staying level-headed when it comes to bully situations and went on to explain that not everyone is looking to bully you, but to drag you down the wrong path as well. Hometown hero Lippett visits Boys & Girls Club of Sebring Former NFL star delivers anti-bullying message LIPPETT, page 7A

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By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK The Avon P ark Police Department prom oted one officer and hired a s econd one on Friday in order t o establish a firm chain of c ommand, according to Chief M ichael J. Rowan. Jason Lister was promoted f rom sergeant to commander, a nd John King was hired into a lieutenant position. Rowan served as comm ander, and his promotion to c hief left that position open. Jason was the logical c hoice. He has the experie nce, and he was already filli ng in for some of the work t hat was there, Rowan said. Lister has 15 years of e xperience as a law enforcem ent officer, 13 of those y ears in Avon Park. King has more than 30 years in law enforcement, and before his retirement a few years ago was the resident Officer in Charge for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement for more than 20 years. He was responsible, according to Rowan, for overseeing FDLE investigations in Highlands, Hardee, DeSoto and Okeechobee counties. Before that, King served as a Detective Sergeant for the Highlands County Sheriff. John is bringing a lot of experience to the department. He is also bringing a lot of knowledge that he is willing to pass along to younger officers, especially in the patrol division, Rowan explained. Rowan took some heat from city council on Monday for his decisions. The elected officials showed some concern over financial matters, but Rowan assured them that he was well within his budget, and his duties, in making the moves. Keep in mind that this is being done without adding one cent to the budget. All I am doing is moving a sergeant position to a commander and replacing a sergeant that we were going to hire anyhow with a lieutenant, Rowan said. We get a lot of experience in key leadership positions and we stay within the budget set by council. I am going to hold the city manager directly responsible because I think its his job to assist you to interpret the guidelines that run the city, Councilman Parke Sutherland said. But Rowan countered that adding a lieutenant would actually save the city money in overtime. Lets say that I have someone call out sick. Now we have to bring in an offduty officer to cover, and pay that officer overtime. With a lieutenant, not only will the call out get covered, but there is no overtime, Rowan explained. Special to the News-Sun During the five years that S ebring author and journalist P atricia Pond wrote as a corr espondent to the News-Sun, s he published more than 100 f eature articles with her own p hotos. She wrote about the peop le, the activities and the natu ral resources of Central F lorida. Some of these articles f ormed the theme for her b ook, Stories from Floridas H eartland: How People and T heir Homes Connect Our P ast to Our Present. But it was her stories about t he historical houses and the f amilies who lived in them t hat drew the most attention. Atwo-part series about t he Sears houses in H ighlands County became t he story that wouldnt die p eople couldnt hear enough a bout them. I had invitations t o speak to groups and lect ure at South Florida C ommunity College, Pond r ecently told Carole Goad, a rchivist for the Sebring H istorical Society. Goad is working with Pond t o prepare a display of some o f these articles for her a ppearance at the Societys q uarterly meeting Jan. 22 at n oon in the Sebring Civic C enter. The author will talk about h er experiences in discovering the history and architecture that characterize the communities of Sebring, Avon Park and Lake Placid. She emphasized that the stories are about the people who lived in the houses, not just architectural features. I was able to trace some families back four and five generations, interviewing the children and grandchildren of the founders and settlers of the towns, she said. Adramatic story emerged when she followed the history of Sebrings popular Twin Oaks Tea Room. From the son of the original builder, I heard that more than 80 years ago, the house witnessed the heroic act of a young father saving his family during one of Floridas worst hurricanes. This old vernacular house has been in three different locations and served many practical purposes. The houses journey and the familys story created a new chapter, Pond said. She also researched background details that document and embellish the stories, including amusing and quirky anecdotes. The book is illustrated with 50 photos, contemporary and archival. Its beautiful full-color cover features a montage of 33 photos of the people and places described in the stories. The price is $20 per copy and Pond is donating half the proceeds to the non-profit organizations handling the sale of the book. It is available from: Sebring Historical Society, in the Sebring Library building, rear entrance, 321 W. Center Ave., 471-2522, Monday through Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Avon Park Historical Society Depot Museum, (off West Main Street), 3 North Museum Ave., 453-3525 or 414-3316. Lake Placid Mural Society at the Lake Placid Welcome Center, 18 N. Oak Ave. (one block off Interlake Boulevard), 531-0211. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, Florida 33870 A Harbor Point Media Company OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday PHONE: 863-385-6155 MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954 NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870 USPS ISSN 0163-3988 Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry office(s)CIRCULATION SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before 11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their account. Please call 385-6155.SUBSCRIPTION RATES12 mo.7% FL taxTotal HOME DELIVERY$60.46$4.23$64.69 IN FLORIDA MAIL92.236.4698.69 OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL105.99105.99 Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. Romona Washington Publisher and Executive Editor863-385-6155, ext. 515 Personal Injury & Wrongful Death Medical & Nursing Home Malpractice WorkersCompensatioin Social Security Disability Automobile Accidents KAYLO R R & & KAYLO R R P.A. MAR K K KAYLOR Lawyers, Past and Present. Helping the Injured Since 1968205 S. Commerce Ave Sebring, Florida 863-382-1900 Jan. 5 111619213745x:2Next jackpot $13 millionJan. 1 51626414853x:2 Dec. 28 172528454748x:2 Jan. 7 210182136 Jan. 6 2481420 Jan. 5 1251720 Jan. 4 1112202127 Jan. 7 (n) 2220 Jan. 7 (d) 6839 Jan. 6 (n) 9489 Jan. 6 (d) 4664 Jan. 7(n) 58 4 Jan. 7 (d) 18 3 Jan. 6 (n) 39 7 Jan. 6(d) 77 3 Jan. 7 913212616 Jan. 4 41011141 Dec. 31 789288 Dec. 28 152135425 Jan. 5 2226323840 PB: 7 PP: 5Next jackpot $51 millionJan. 1 1822374754 PB: 36 PP: 2 Dec. 29 316182037 PB: 30 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center Courtesy photo Sebring author Patricia Pond displays some of the articles that she wrote during her five years as a correspondent to the News Sun. The articles inspired the theme of her recently published book Stories From Florida's Heartland: How People and Their Homes Connect Our Past to Our Present. News-Sun articles inspire book Zwayer set to speak at chamberLAKE PLACID Eric Zwayer, Highlands County tax collector, will be the guest speaker at the Greater Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce January membership luncheon. The membership luncheon will be held at noon Wednesday at the Lake Placid Elks Lodge. The luncheon is sponsored by the Highlands County Economic Development Council. Cost is $8 per person. RSVPthe chamber on Monday. Menu selection is soup and salad buffet.Homeowners group meets MondaySEBRING The monthly meetings of the Highlands County Homeowners Association are held on the second Monday of each month at the Sebring Country Estates Clubhouse, 3240 Grand Prix Ave. This months meeting is open to the public and will be held from 9-11 a.m. Free coffee, hot tea and donuts are provided. Suzanne Crews, R.N., Parish Nursing coordinator, will present a program on diabetes. Diabetes, also known as the silent killer, when left untreated, can lead to heart attack, stroke, amputations, blindness and kidney failure. Type 2 diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in the United States. Debra Caruso, RN, MPH, CDE, Healthy Start director for Highlands County Health Department, will educate guests on the diabetes related programs available through the Health Department. Call 273-5182 for information.AP Lakes plans Jan. 15 breakfastAVON PARK The Avon Park Lakes Associations first breakfast of the winter at the clubhouse, 2714 Nautilus Drive, will be from 8-9:3 0 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 15. Th e menu is sausage gravy over homemade biscuits o r pancakes, sausage links and scrambled eggs, with coffee and orange juice. The public is invited an d the price is $4 for adults and $2 for children. Sebring Chamber plans membership lunch on ThursdaySEBRING The Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce Membershi p Luncheon will be held at 11:45 a.m. Thursday at T he Island View Lakeside Restaurant & Pub, Sun N Lake. The luncheon is sponsored by Florida Hospital Heartland Division. Cost is $10 per person. RSVPthe chamber on or before Monday.Tanglewood presents the Fabulous Hub CapsSEBRING The Hubcaps are heralded as one of the best oldies Show Bands in the cou ntry. Their talents in the vocal, instrumental and comedy will entertain and bring back memories of the past music. Performing together since 1974, this sevenpiece band shows no sign s of slowing down. The Hubcaps continue to capt ivate audiences with their high-energy tributes to original artists like Little Richard, James Brown, Tina Turner, Bobby Darin Sonny and Cher, The Flamingos, Ray Charles, The Beach Boys, Willie Nelson and Patsy Cline, Elton John and Frank Sinatra just to name a few With an extensive repertoire of Doo-Wop group harmony, Classic Rock an d Roll, Rock-a-Billy, Motown and R & B musi c. The Fabulous Hubcaps look forward to proving that Rock and Roll is Alive and Well! COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued on page 6A APPD promotes one officer, hires another News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE Newly appointed Commander Jason Lister (left) and Lt. John King are administered their oaths of office by Avon Chief Michael Rowan on Friday at the Avon Park Police Department. Program features An Evening of MemoriesSpecial to the News-SunAVON PARK Tickets are now on sale for t he annual banquet of the Historical Society of A von Park. It takes place Sat., Feb. 12, at the H otel Jacaranda, with a social hour at 6:30 p.m. a nd dinner, featuring prime rib and staffed c hicken breast, at 7. Cost is $30 and tickets are a vailable from the hotel, the Depot Museum and t he Avon Park Chamber of Commerce. The program is a change of pace from past b anquets. Called An Evening of Memories, it w ill consist of members of the audience telling their stories of Avon Park. The idea for this program came from Charlotte Truitts book, APeoples History of Avon Park, 2010, said Jean Jordan, banquet committee member. The recently published book contains 52 stories from Avon Park residents. The program is open to anyone wanting to participate, Jordan said, so bring your memories to share. Also on the agenda is the election of board members for a three-year term. Election of officers for 2011 takes place at the board meeting on Feb. 21. APeoples History will be on sale at the banquet, along with other items from the Depot Museums gift shop. For more information, call Donna Faucett, banquet chairperson, at 453-3284. Avon Park Historical Society to hold annual banquet

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 3A PUBLIC AUCTIONSunday, January 9, 2011Preview 12 Noon Auction 1 PM Quality Inn and Suites 6525 US 27 North Sebring, FLWe have not been doing any auctions for the last nine months. We have accumulated a lot of items.KING SIZE MAHOGANY POSTER BED 7' ROUND DINING TABLE W/SIX CHAIRS, SERVER & LAZY SUSAN BRONZE SCULPTURE & FOUNTAINS CHAIRS LAMPS CRYSTAL PAINTINGS PRINTS MIRRORS COLLECTIONS OFHAND BLOWNGERMAN ART GLASS CARPETS HAND PAINTED MOROCCAN LAMPTABLE HAND PAINTED CHINESE BLANKET CHEST VINTAGE PURPLE VELOUR LOVE SEAT 54" TEMPLE VASES TAPESTRY CUSTOMDESIGNER PICTURES & PRINTS TWO LIMITED EDITION CANVASREPRODUCTIONS OFORIGINALOIL PAINTINGSBY RED SKELTON, NUMBERED & SIGNED BY RED INCLUDING SEAL& REDS FINGERPRINT JEWELRY 18KT WHITE GOLD RING, 18.42KT WHITE GOLD TANZANITE PLUS 1.15KT DIAMOND, 18KT WHITE GOLD RING, 6.22KT COLOMBIAN EMERALD PLUS .66KT DIAMOND, 18KT W/GOLD DIAMOND BRACELET, 6.11KT WHITE PRINCESSCUT DIAMOND, 18KT W/GOLD RING W/3 ROUND (1.84KT) DIAMOND SOLITAIRES, 14KT W.G. RING WITH EXTREMELY RARE 17KT COLOR CHANGE TANZANITEMUCH MORE TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTIONTerms: Cash, Check, MasterCard, Visa & Discover. 10% BP cash & ck 12% cc. Items subject to prior sales. Delivery Available. Auctioneer Lee Fleming AB884 AU1224941-350-8964

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Water is such an important, p leasant part of our lives we o ften take it for granted, w hich can be a problem, b ecause water is more than i mportant. It was and still is, e ssential for life. To drive that point home, h ere are a few water facts as o utlined in a report by the I nstitute of Science and P ublic Affairs at Florida State U niversity, published in 2 002. Its lead author is E lizabeth D. Purdum. All over the world, water is c ontinuously circulating b etween the sky, land and sea. It is the only substance that e xists in nature as a liquid, a s olid and a gas. Unlike most liquids, howe ver, water expands rather t han shrinks when cooled, w hich is why water is lighter w hen frozen and floats. Plants and animals are b etween 50 and 97 percent w ater the human body is 7 0 percent water. The vast majority of the w ater on Earth, however, is s alt water. Only 3 percent is fresh water, and only 1 percent of that is available for use. Here in Florida we depend entirely on local rainfall to meet our fresh water needs. The state has a hydrologic divide that runs roughly from Gainesville to Daytona Beach. Only 44 percent of the states rain falls south of this divide, yet the area is home to 78 percent of the states permanent population and accounts for 75 percent of the states water use. Rain water flows through the states canals, rivers and lakes from which many communities pump their irrigation. Rain also drains slowly into the aquifer, where it is pumped out for human consumption. With a state population of more than 15 million people, our heavy water use has contributed to the shrinkage of lakes, creation of sink holes and saltwater intrusion. But changing weather patterns have significant impact as well. Take the most recent information from the South Florida Water Management District October, November and December of 2010 were the three driest months since record keeping began in 1932. Rain fall averaged less than three inches throughout SFWMDs 16 counties, which is roughly 35 percent of the normal. And that drought came on top of a year that was already drier than normal; and 2010 came after several years of below-average rain fall. All of this means we need to remain water conscious and continue to do our best conserving water. Oh, we know who wants to hear, yet again, how important it is to turn off the faucet while brushing our teeth, and who wants to shift from automatically controlling an irrigation system to getting out and doing it by hand. Its all such a nuisance. Sadly, we can kick and scream as much as we like, fume with the perceived unfairness, blame our politicians, utility heads and scientists or simply ignore the situation. But, nature is what it is. We would do best sticking to reality. An inconvenience, while annoying, is nothing compared to dying of thirst. Page 4ANews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION TODAYSEDITORIAL 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com So today the new Congress met for the first time. Among other things, the new lawmakers voted that new bills had to cite their constitutional authority. There are also plans to read the Constitution on the floor of the House later this week. Some people have reacted quite negatively to this last bit. According to The Washington Post, some Democrats are concerned that the document is being treated like the word of God. The article quotes Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D NY) as saying, among other things, You are not supposed to worship your constitution. You are supposed to govern your government by it. I happen to agree with Representative Nadler on this statement. I just fail to see how wanting that to happen and actually reading the Constitution is equal to worshipping it. I talk a lot about the Constitution. I spent a lot of time during the health care debate asking someone anyone to show me the constitutional authority for the federal government to take over health care. No one responded, which makes me think no one else can find it either. Am I the only one who cares about this? The federal government has taken on more and more powers over the years. And we as a people have not stopped to ask them whether or not they had the authority to do so. Now the federal government is far larger and more powerful than the founding fathers ever dreamed of. Perhaps we are at fault because we ourselves know little about the document that we base our form of government on. How many of us have sat down and read the Constitution for ourselves? Well, if you have access to a computer you can get your hands on a copy of the Constitution. All you have to do is point your Web rowser to this site: http://libertyonline.hypermall.com/constitution.html. It is there for you to download, print out, and peruse at your leisure. Its not easy reading, because its written in 18th century English, which is n ot exactly like 21st century English. If you try to skim the thing, you might not mi sunderstand what its saying For example, theres this paragraph talking about wh o can be elected as a Representative: No person shall be a Representative who shall n ot have attained to the age of twenty five years, and been seven years a citizen of the United States, and who sha ll not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that state in which he shall be chosen. Read that fast enough an d youll come away thinking that a Representative shoul dnt live in the state he repre sents. Actually, havent we had one or two Congressme n or Senators who tried to pu ll something like that? Im all for reading the Constitution. Not only on t he floor of the House of Representatives, but in our schools and homes as well. Its only the foundation of our system of government, after all. And if I recall correctly, didnt the 112th Congress a ll swear that they would pre serve, defend, and protect this very Constitution? Wouldnt it be a lot easier t o keep that promise if they actually knew what the thin g said? No, I dont think we need to worship the Constitution But surely there is nothing wrong with respecting and knowing it. And I cannot se e anything wrong with it bein g read out loud in the House. Who knows? Maybe a repr esentative or two will learn something from it. And tha t could be a good thing. Laura Ware is a Sebring re sident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady @ embarqmail.com Reading the Constitution Lauras Look Laura Ware EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automati cally rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words We have to make room for everybody. Letters of loca l concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; o r e-mail editor@newssun.com. To make sure the editorial pages arent dominated b y the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion o f the staff or editors of the News-Sun. All items will run on a first-come basis as space per mits, although more timely ones could be moved up. We believe your viewpoints are just as important as any community leader or government official, so conside r this a personal invitation to get your two cents in. TheNews-Sunhas a long history of encouraging public dis cussion through letters, guest columns, and Reader s Response questionnaires. Providing this forum for ou r Every year about now, the media i ntroduce us to the most fascinating p eople of the prior year. They always overlook people like J oe Horne. Atailgunner in the Army Air Corps d uring World War II, Horne and his c rew enjoyed 11 successful missions. They didnt expect to survive their 1 2th: orders to bomb a heavily guarded m unitions plant in Munich. As they approached their target, H orne fought off German fighter p lanes. German flak was another matt er. Heavy flak hit the plane hard. It lost a ltitude so fast that its windows shatt ered. The landing gear was destroyed. Their only hope was to make it a cross the Swiss border for a crash l anding. As the planes belly hit the ground as uprooted earth and stones w hipped through the broken windows the pilot told the crew to evacuate b efore the plane exploded. Horne dived out a window and was b ruised and cut as he tumbled along the g round but he survived. The Swiss would detain him in i nternment camps in Adelboden, S witzerland, for six months camps, w rites Cathryn Prince in Shot from the S ky, that were a dark secret of World W ar II. So long as he did as told, he was free t o move about the town. He learned to s ki and even had time to fall in love w ith a beautiful Swiss girl. But he and a few others crossed the line when they got into a fistfight with Nazi sympathizers. They spent 30 days in the Wauwilermoos military prison in Lucerne, where they received little food or water and occasional beatings. After his release there, he and his crew were about to attempt an escape from their camp when word arrived that all Americans detained in Switzerland were being repatriated. On leave in Pittsburgh, Horne attended a dance. He fell hard for a striking woman across the room love at first sight. Her name was Dorothy Kvederis. He would marry her four years later. He joined the post office in 1946, when he was discharged. After two and a half years of attending college at night, Horne decided to suspend his studies. He was happy with his life. By 1954, he and Dorothy had saved enough to buy a house the house in which he still lives. He and Dorothy would be blessed with a daughter and two sons a teacher, dentist and corporate executive, respectively. He loved his job. During the last 40 years of his 46-year postal career, he delivered mail in a predominantly black section of Pittsburgh, PA. Despite numerous opportunities to take over cushier routes inside air-conditioned high-rise buildings, he loved his route and would give it up only when he retired in 1992. He and Dorothy finally had time to enjoy life. They traveled. They attended church every morning. They spent time with family and friends. Their carefree existence ended on Oct. 4, 1992, when Dorothy suffered a stroke. Horne would spend the next 14 years caring for her getting no more than two hours of sleep every night until she died in 2006. Now 85, he misses her desperately, but his days are full. The old Irishman (his grandfather changed the family name from Horan to Horne, hoping it would help him find work at a time when the Irish faced need not apply signs) is a passionate Notre Dame fan. He has a zest for living, a fine wit and he puts a spring in the step of anyone lucky enough to cross his path. Yeah, he was never famous or rich, but he was surely influential. Great civilizations are built on the shoulders of such giants. If only the media featured more people like Joe Horne at this time every year. Tom Purcell, a freelance writer is also a humor columnist for the Pittsburgh TribuneReview, and is nationally syndicated exclusively by Cagle Cartoons newspaper syndicate. E-mail Tom at Purcell@ca g lecartoons.com. Fascinating doesnt necessarily mean famous Guest Column Tom Purcell Water covers 75 percent of the Earth, just not most of Florida T heres nothing more refreshing than diving into a swimming pool on a hot day; or more relaxing than f ishing Lake June-in-Winter; or more c ivilizing than a long hot shower.

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Associated PressPITTSBURGH The tech slang app was voted the 2010 Word of the Y ear Friday by the American Dialect S ociety, beating out Cookie Monsters nom, nom, nom, nom. The shortened slang term for a comp uter or smart phone application was p icked by the linguists group as the w ord that best sums up the countrys p reoccupation last year. Nom a chat-, tweet-, and textf riendly syllable that connotes yummy f ood was the runner-up. It derives f rom the Sesame Street characters s ound as he devours his favorite food. The vote came at a Pittsburgh hotel ballroom during the national conference of the Linguistic Society of America, an umbrella group that includes the Dialect Society. About 120 of the 1,000 conference attendees voted in the competition with neither side entirely satisfied. Critics of app said the word was somewhat stale, while proponents said 2010 was the year the word became omnipresent with one arguing that her elderly mother knows the term, even though the woman doesnt have any apps. Nom supporters simply liked its cheeriness. Some years theres a very clear choice, said Allan Metcalf, the Dialect Societys executive secretary. In 2001, for instance, the Word of the Year was 9/11. I think this past year there wasnt anything clearly dominant, Metcalf said. But theres no question appis a very powerful word. Though the Word Of The Year is perhaps the best known item on the national conference agenda, its hardly the most serious. The program includes discussion of such subjects as school curriculum and raising education standards. And thats one reason Metcalf said the Word Of The Year isnt universally popular among the conferees. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 5A Ask us about DirecTV4.1 Cu.Ft. 2 Oven Racks Lift Up Slab Cooktop 2600W Bake 3000W Broil$599Electric Range Model #WDS6063860DLP HD, 3D Ready,8 Color Processor, 2 Component/Composite Video Inputs 21 Cu.Ft.Top Freezer, 2 Glass Shelves, Gallon Door StorageMODEL #FRT21HS6JQRefrigerator WASHER & DRYER 46WX800U, BDX3000 & 2 PR. FPT-AGO1 BUNDLE PAC ALL 3D46WX800U 46240 Hz HDTV,3D Ready, Built In Wi-Fi,Photo Frame Capacity, 1080P Full HD Cinespeed, High Rec PC Input FOR PAIR WHILE THEY LAST$549MODEL #FEF316BQ BDX3000 Full HD 3D Playback,Built In Wi-Fi, Picture In Picture,Dolby True HD & DTS-HD Master Audio,Internet Streaming Capability FPT-AG013D Glasses (2 Pair) Large Glass Area,Wide Frame Design, Adjustable Nose Pad, 75 Hrs.Battery Life All For $1995 WASHER & DRYER Model #WDSR2120JWW27Top Load, 3.2 Cu.Ft., 8 Wash Cycles, Flex Care AgitatorModel #DBLR333EGWW27Electric Dryer, 5.8 Cu.Ft.,3 Dry CyclesBISQUE ONLY WHILE THEY LAST$299WHITE & BISQUE WHILE THEY LAST $1099FOR PAIR WHILE THEY LASTModel #MVWB300WQ28Top Load, 4.7 Cu.Ft., 3 Temp, 10 Wash Cycles, Pure Clean Rinse Model #MEDB200VQ29Electric Dryer, Supersize Capacity, 7 Cycles, 5 Temp Settings, Front Lint Filter$999 Television $169WHITE & BLACK ONLYModel #MWV150K1.5 Cu.Ft.,900 Watts, 10 Power Levels, Touch Control, 12Glass Turntable MICROWAVE Spires said her top comm unity contributors are T anglewood and Buttonwood B ay, with The Palms a close t hird. The best employer is C ross Country, she said, and high school students a re wonderful. For example, in March l ast year we collected 744 p ints of blood, mostly b ecause of the students. In A pril we only collected 389 p ints, because they were on v acation. The blood mobile is a v ital tool. While many people come t o the collection center on U .S. 27, it is far more comm on for blood banks to go to d onors than it is for donors t o come to the blood bank. If its not convenient, peop le dont do it, Spires said. The economy has hurt d onations as well, she said, a nd in two ways. When people are laid off, t hey tend to forget about t hings like donating blood, e specially if they have been u sed to the blood mobile c oming around. On the other hand, many e mployers are not replacing t he people who have been let g o, so there are still fewer donors visiting the blood mobile at local businesses. Ablood donation may be made every 56 days. The Logstons make it a family affair when Ryan and Courtney visit the center throughout the year. The couple and their three children R.J., Regan, and Chelsea all were present at the center on Saturday. Courtney, who had donated earlier in the morning, watched over the three kids as daddy Ryan took his turn. We always come together and take turns and watch the kids, Courtney explained. In fact it was Courtney and her mother who inspired Ryan to become a blood donor 10 years ago. Well, when I met her, she and her mom were always donating and thats how I got into it, Ryan said. Ive been donating since I was 16, said Courtney. The couple shared orange juice and the kids munched on cookies as Ryan finished up his turn. Ryan had last donated on Nov. 1 and has donated over two gallons to date. Continued from page 1A STOP BY AND SEE ALL OF THE GREAT DEALS INSIDEAS WELL ASOUTSIDEON THESALESTABLES!$10 20 30 SALE283 US 27 North SEBRINGVillage Fountain Plaza www.thebulbbin.com Assorted Lamps & Mirrors Ceiling Fans Chandeliers The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, Jan. 6, 2011: Coy Lee Bellamy, 24, of Lake Placid, was charged with battery. Benigno Calvillo, 23, of Frostproof, was charged with criminal mischief. Michael Craig Darge, 35, of Hudson, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference possession of cannabis and possession of oxycodone. Betty Ann Faircloth, 40, of Avon Park, was charged with possession and or use of narcotic equipment, possession of a controlled substance without a prescription, possession of marijuana, and possession of a harmful new legend drug without a prescription. Mark Ravi Morris Fields, 41, of Avon Park, was charged with failure to appear reference battery. Kamesh Lautrice Liafortune, 20, of Bradenton, was charged with failure to appear reference battery. Tony Glen McMillan, 39, of Sebring, was charged with driving while license suspended. Alvin Tyrone Moses, 48, of Tallahassee, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference uttering forged bills, grand theft. David Allen North, 44, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of probation reference aggravated battery. Luis Gustavo Ramos, 30, of Lake Placid, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without valid license. Gabriel Garnica Rosales, 23, of Lake Placid, was arrested on two out-of-county warrants reference DUI and driving without valid license. Jarcara Diona Taylor, 23, of Avon park, was charged with petit theft. Brandi Artika Thomas, 23, of Avon Park, was charged with auto theft. Albert Cheaviler, 23, of Lake Placid, was charged with driving while license suspended. Lisa Ann Wilson, 37, of Sebring, was charged with city ordinance. POLICEBLOTTER News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Ryan Logston is tended to by phlebotomist Kessy Garcia on Saturday morning, while donating blood in Sebring. Blood donations are always needed Linguists vote app Word of the Year for 2010

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Doors and snack bar opens at 6 p.m. The show is at 7 p.m. today. Tickets are $12, available at the door. Tanglewood is one-half mile north of Walmart on U.S. 27. For information, call 402-0763.Parkinsons support group meets MondaySEBRING The Parkinsons disease support group for the Highlands County area will meet at 10 a.m. Monday at First Baptist Church of Sebring, corner of Lemon and Pine streets. The program this month will be Faye Kern, coordinator of the American Parkinsons Disease Association. She will present the latest updates on Parkinsons treatments. All persons with Parkinsons disease and their families are welcome to attend. There is no charge. For information, call 4536589 or 453-6419. The Highlands County Parkinsons Support Group is part of the national network of support groups affiliated with the American Parkinsons Disease Association. More than 1 million Americans have Parkinsons disease. Today people with Parkinsons and their families can find help and information from their local support group.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK Highlands County Moose Lodge 2494 will have Tiki Hut music by Shirley and Gary today. The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 will have NFLBig Ticket on the screen at 1 p.m. today. Karaoke by Peg and Perry is set for 5-8 p.m. Tuesday. For details and menu selection, call 452-9853. LAKE PLACID The Veterans of Foreign Wars 3880 Ladies Auxiliary will meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday. For details, call 699-5444. The Lake Placid Moose Lodge 2374 will host karaoke with Wild Bill today. For details, call 4650131. The Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 will have music by Frankie Monday. The BPOE board will meet at 7:30 p.m. The BPOE meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday. For details, call 465-2661. SEBRING The Sebring Moose Lodge will have bingo at 1 p.m. today. Texas Hold-em is set for 7-10 p.m. Monday. For more information, call 6553920. Sebring Eagles Aerie 4240 will host its monthly karaoke/birthday party for the month from 4-7 p.m. today. Jewels in the Night Entertainment will spin the karaoke discs. For more information, call the Aerie at 655-4007.West Sebring VFD meets TuesdaySEBRING The West Sebring Volunteer Fire Departments next annual board meeting will be at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Station House No. 9, 2300 Longview Court off of Sebring Parkway. Refreshments will be served. The public is welcome to attend. Anyone interested in joining the West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department may call 471-5344.Womans Club to hear about Safe HouseSEBRING The GFWC Womans Club of Sebring, 4260 Lakeview Drive, will meet at noon Monday. The Public Affairs Department will host the event. Acatered luncheon of Kentucky Fried Chicken and fixings will be offered at $5 each. Lucy Mull, Safe House outreach specialist, will be the guest speaker. Phone cards are the Safe House project this month. Call 385-7268 for information about club membership. The annual spaghetti dinner will be held from 5-7 p.m. Thursday for an $8 donation. Walk-ins are welcome.2011 Commodities Certification setSEBRING Each client will need to certify for 2011 in order to receive commodities beginning in January. Certification for 2011 will be from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Wednesday. Commodities certification and distribution for January will be from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday and Friday. Call 385-7548 for any questions. The Salvation Army is at 3135 Kenilworth Blvd.Lunch Bunch meets MondaySEBRING The Fairmount Mobile Estates Lunch Bunch will meet at 11 a.m. Monday at Homers Smorgasbord. Members will hold their annual auction. Bring a gift valued at $5 or more to be auctioned. The proceeds will provide operating expenses for the coming year. There will also be a 50/50 drawing and door prizes. Hosts are Lois and Jim Stausholm, and Dee and Doug Ingraham.Recreation Club plans eventsSEBRING The Sebring Recreation Club will host the following events this week: Monday 1 p.m., Ladies Social Club; 1:15 p.m., shuffleboard scrambles; 7 p.m., membership meeting. Tuesday 9 a.m., county tournament; 12:30 p.m., bridge; 3 p.m., ping pong. Wednesday 1 p.m., pinochle; 1:15 p.m., shuffleboard league; 5:15 p.m., line dancing lessons; 6:30 p.m., line dancing. For details, call (262) 2243819.Book publisher to return for writers meetingSEBRING The Florida Writers Association group, Sebring Scribblers and Scribes, will hold its first meeting of the new year at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the clubhouse in Sebring Village, 4343 Schumacher Road, just west of U.S. 27 near the Walmart. The guest speaker is Ted Bowman, who will continue his discussion on solving publishing mysteries and missing the stumbling blocks and pitfalls of the industry. For more information, call Barbara Beswick at 4029181.MS Support Group meets TuesdaySEBRING The Multiple Sclerosis Support Group meets the second Tuesday of each month at Highlands Regional Medical Center at 7 p.m. The next meeting is this week. The meeting will be held in the second floor class room. Friends and family a re welcome. For information, call 465 3138.Highlands Park has annual meetingLAKE PLACID The annual meeting of Highland s Park Estates Association w ill be held at 1:30 p.m. today i n the clubhouse, in the Beachpark on Lake Istokpoga at the end of Nichel, which becomes Dee r Glen. Election of officers and directors for the next year takes place during this meeting. The board is also develop ing a wish list for future pu rchases and inclusion in the next budget. Take part in th e decision making by attending the meetings. If you have seen any inte resting birds or animals in your yard or neighborhood, share the information with neighbors. Everyone in the development and guests are invited Visit with your neighbors, learn of future plans and take part in the process while enjoying delicious refreshments.Gem and Mineral Club meets TuesdaySEBRING The next meeting of the Highlands Gem and Mineral Club will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday i n the rear fellowship hall of the Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway. There are no fees or dues, and all wh o are interested in lapidary ar e welcome. Carolyn Beahm will ente rtain with her adventures at William Holland School of Lapidary Arts last August and her trip to Spain, Portugal and South American throughout December. The birthstone for Januar y is garnet. If you have some specimens, show them off. Some club materials will be available for making additions to rock collection s. Call 453-7054 for more information. Margaret BurnsMargaret M. Burns, 97, o f Sebring died Jan. 2, 2 011. Born in Brooklyn, N .Y., she has lived in H ighlands County for 22 y ears. She was a switchb oard operator and a librari an. She was a member at S t. James Catholic Church i n Lake Placid. She is survived by her s isters, Mary Grote and H annah Lynott. Amemorial service will b e at St. James Catholic C hurch, Lake Placid, i mmediately following the 9 a.m. Mass Friday, Jan. 1 4. Arrangements entrusted t o Chandler Funeral Home, L ake Placid. Esther CookEsther M. Cook, 91, of S ebring died Jan. 1, 2011. S he was a native of B rockings, S.D., moving to t he area in 1999. She was a F oster Parent. She is survived by child ren, Sharon Handy, Susan C rannell, Sandra Cook, M arcy Cook, Beverly Kilts, S teven Cook, Donald C ook, and Scott Cook; b rother, Everett Pierce; sist ers, Clarissa and Winifred; 1 7 grandchildren and 35 g reat-grandchildren Morris Funeral Chapel, S ebring, was in charge of a rrangements.James LeonardJames Allen Bud L eonard, 53, of Sebring d ied Jan. 4, 2011. Born in M ineral Wells, Texas, he m oved to Sebring in 1975. H e was a truck driver and w orked at Highlands Ridge G olf Course. He is survived by his d aughter, Jessica Pimentel; s ister, Barbara Bateman; a nd three grandchildren. Amemorial service will b e held at 2 p.m. Sunday, J an. 16 at the StephensonN elson Funeral Home C hapel, Sebring.James NewellJames Newell, 90, of Lake Placid died Jan. 5, 2010. B orn in Danville, Ky., he h ad been a resident of H ighlands County for 10 y ears. He served his count ry as a Marine for 31 y ears. He retired as an i nsurance salesman and t hen became owner of a s tove shop in Gahanna, O hio. He is survived by his w ife of 26 years, Betty; s on, James L.; stepchild ren, Robert, Richard, R aymond, and Randall R abe, Roxanne McNeer, R olenda Sawyer, and R enee Gonzales; two g randchildren and eight g reat-grandchildren. Words of comfort to the f amily may be sent to w ww.scottfuneralservices.c om. Arrangements entrusted to Scott Funeral Home, Lake Placid.Mary ThornburgMary M. Thornburg, 95, of Sebring, died Jan. 6, 2011. Born in Accident, Md., She is survived by a son, Herman; a daughter, Ruth Ann Wolfe; a sister, Lena Beitzel; eight grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren and nine greatgreat-grandchildren. Amemorial service will be held at 10 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 23 at Christ Fellowship Church, New Life Way. StephensonNelson Funeral Home, Sebring, is in charge of arrangements.Paul WagnerPaul Wagner, 84, of Sebring died Jan. 5, 2011. Born in Washington, DC, he moved to Sebring in 1983. He was a U.S. Navy veteran and retired as a bookkeeper in the door manufacturing industry in California. He is survived by his sisters, Nancy Soderland and Katherine Farrow. The family will receive friends from 1-2 p.m. Monday, Jan. 10 at Morris Funeral Chapel, Sebring, with a service to follow at 2 p.m. Military honors will be at Lakeview Memorial Gardens. Condolences may be expressed at www.morrisfuneralchapel.com.Harry WhaleyHarry L. Bucky Whaley, 81, of Lake Placid, died Jan. 2011 at Florida Hospital Lake Placid. He was born in Quincy, Ill., moved to Lake Placid in 1959 from Quincy and went into the citrus grove business, then into the air conditioning business before retiring in 2001. He was a member of the First Baptist Church of Lake Placid. He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Wilma; his daughter, Connie Hogue; a sister, Betty McClean; a brother, Kenneth Whatley and two grandchildren. The family will receive friends from 4-6 p.m. Monday at the Scott Funeral Home, 504 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid. Funeral services will be held 11 a.m. Tuesday at the First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, 119 E. Royal Palm Ave., with Rev. Brett Morey celebrating. Burial will follow at the Oak Hill Cemetery. Words of comfortcan be made at www.scottfuneralservices.c om. Arrangements entrusted to the Scott Funeral Home. Page 6ANews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com At the Florida National Cemetary at Bushnell, FL, South Florida National Cemetary at Lake Worth, FL or Sarasota National Cemetary at Sarasota, FL Pr oud to Serve Sebring, Lake Placid & Avon Park Proud to Serve Sebring, Lake Placid & Avon Park E.O. Koch Construction1417 Swank Avenue Sebring, FL 33870(863) 385-8649COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTIONLet our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property, build your dream home,or do your remodeling.For all of your Aluminum,Steel,and Conventional construction needsEmail: kochcon@strato.net State Certified License #CGC1515338 SEAMLESS GUTTERS Specials5 INCH GUTTERS$2.99PER LINEAR FOOT6 INCH GUTTERS$3.99PER LINEAR FOOTMany Colors Available COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued from page 2A OBITUARIES Associated PressFORTLAUDERDALE Awildlife refuge and r anching conservation area w ould be carved out of 1 50,000 acres in the E verglades headwaters n orth of Lake Okeechobee u nder a proposal unveiled F riday by Interior Secretary K en Salazar. The proposal, still under s tudy by the U.S. Fish and W ildlife Service, envisions g overnment purchase from w illing sellers of about 5 0,000 acres along the K issimmee River valley. A nother 100,000 acres w ould be preserved under c onservation easements and o ther agreements with priv ate landowners that r estrict development and o ther uses. Salazar told reporters the g oal is to protect threatened w ildlife and habitat, i mprove water quality f lowing into Lake Okeechobee and preserve the regions rural working landscapes. The Everglades are unique, Salazar said. They are probably one of the most important ecosystems we have in the United States. The plan is the second involving Everglades restoration from Salazar in as many months. In December, the secretary proposed raising an additional 5.5 miles of the cross-South Florida Tamiami Trail highway to improve water flow into Everglades National Park which represents about one-fifth of the original Everglades. Aone-mile bridge span is under construction now. The headwaters proposal announced Friday would add to the federal purchase last year of about 26,000 acres in the region. Interior chief announces Glades headwaters refuge

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Sometimes you think s omeone is your friend and t hey want you to cut class or g et into trouble just so they c an have someone to act out w ith, well thats just as bad. S ome people are just out t here to make you get into m ischief and cause you h arm, Lippett explained. The speech ended with L ippett telling the kids that s ports is what kept him out of t rouble and that having a d ream and a goal can be all t hat a kid needs to get where t hey want to go in life. The nearly 150 energetic k ids were excited to slam L ippett with question after q uestion. Most questions w ere about Lippetts two c hampionship rings, one on e ach hand, that the students couldnt keep their eyes off of. Lippett shared his stories of how he came to be a member of a championship team and how each and everyone of the kids have the same opportunities as he had. They were happy to know that they could accomplish just as much, if not more, as a hometown hero. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 7A HarveyWhen Elwood P. Dowd starts to introduce his imaginary friend, Harvey, a six-and-a-half-foot rabbit, to guests at a society party, his sister, Veta, has seen as much of his eccentric behavior as she can tolerate. Problems arise, however, when Veta herself is mistakenly assumed to be on the verge of lunacy. This merry comedy by Mary Chase has become one of the most popular ever produced. Sponsored by Eye Specialists of Mid-FloridaOpens January 14th and runs through January 30thTickets on sale now at the box ofce 10 AM 2 PM, 382-2525 or online at www.highlandslittletheatre.org. Presents FIRST NIGHTERS PERFORMANCE JAN. 12TH Some Risks Are Worth Taking. Your Health Isnt One of Them. Medicare and almost all insurance acceptedFirst, 32 people die every day of skin cancer in the USA. Second, most skin cancer deaths are preventable. Therefore, forgiveness is the chance to prevent skin cancer with a Dermatology skin exam. Therefore, forgiveness is the Lord offering you free will to not be a statistic. SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE. OR LET US DO IT FOR YOU.Darrin A. Rotman, M. D. Julie L. Iellimo, P. A. C. Jennifer A. Wolf, P. A. C.863-386-0786Darrin A. Rotman, M.D. s aid on Thursday. Cool and his engineering c ompany brought three jobs i nto town when he bought the b uilding, but he stated that t he incubator has created an a dditional 13 jobs that did n ot exist in the city. I think it is a success, s aid Cool. We met the goal o f getting five of the offices f illed with businesses, and w e have added jobs to the c ommunity. And, the deal with Cool s aved the city money, he a dded. They had budgeted $ 44,000, but we contracted w ith the EDC for two years at $ 18,000 per year. Thats a s avings overall, Cool said. Cool also has offices left over that he rents out to the right businesses at reasonable rates. We are not using the space now, we just have three employees on the engineering side, Cool said. The incubator plan gives start-up businesses a chance to get going with low overhead. Fax, phone with unlimited local and long distance, highspeed Internet, a receptionist, mentoring services and a conference room are provided in addition to the office space. The offices rent for $300 per month, but the EDC picks up the tab because of the city and CRAparticipation, so a start-up business can concentrate on just getting clients and growing. The idea is to give them al they need to get a business going and then they are helped to move out into the area and another business is brought in to incubate, Cool said. In addition to the incubator spaces, Cool has three additional offices that he can rent out to small or startup business not on the incubator plan. We have a psychologist from the coast that has taken one, but we still have two more spaces that we can rent out, Cool said. For more information on the space or the incubator, call Cool at 453-0524 or the EDC at 888-388-4233. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Business incubator office spaces feature a desk, chairs, a phone, individual air conditioning units, high-speed internet and also include the use of a kitchen, bathrooms, a board room and all utilities for $300 a month in downtown Avon Park. Business incubator up and running in AP Continued from page 1A Lippett speaks to local Boys & Girls Club Associated PressATLANTA In a remarkable t urnabout, federal health officials s ay many Americans are now gett ing too much fluoride because of i ts presence not just in drinking w ater but in toothpaste, mouthwash a nd other products, and its causing s plotches on childrens teeth and p erhaps more serious problems. The U.S. Department of Health a nd Human Services announced p lans Friday to lower the recomm ended level of fluoride in drinking w ater for the first time in nearly 50 y ears, based on a fresh review of t he science. The announcement is likely to r enew the battle over fluoridation, e ven though the addition of fluoride t o drinking water is considered one o f the greatest public health succ esses of the 20th century. The U.S. prevalence of decay in at least one tooth among teens has declined from about 90 percent to 60 percent. The government first began urging municipal water systems to add fluoride in the early 1950s. Since then, it has been put in toothpaste and mouthwash. It is also in a lot of bottled water and in soda. Some kids even take fluoride supplements. Now, young children may be getting too much. Like anything else, you can have too much of a good thing, said Dr. Howard Pollick, a professor at the University of California, San Franciscos dental school and spokesman for the American Dental Association. One reason behind the change: About 2 out of 5 adolescents have tooth streaking or spottiness because of too much fluoride, a government study found recently. In extreme cases, teeth can be pitted by the mineral though many cases are so mild only dentists notice it. The problem is generally considered cosmetic and not a reason for serious concern. The splotchy tooth condition, fluorosis, is unexpectedly common in youngsters ages 12 through 15 and appears to have grown more common since the 1980s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But there are also growing worries about more serious dangers from fluoride. The Environmental Protection Agency released two new reviews of research on fluoride Friday. One of the studies found that prolonged, high intake of fluoride can increase the risk of brittle bones, fractures and crippling bone abnormalities. Critics of fluoridated water seized on the proposed change Friday to renew their attacks on it a battle that dates back to at least the Cold War 1950s, when it was denounced by some as a step toward Communism. Many activists nowadays dont think fluoride is essential, and they praised the governments new steps. Anybody who was anti-fluoride was considered crazy, said Deborah Catrow, who successfully fought a ballot proposal in 2005 that would have added fluoride to drinking water in Springfield, Ohio. Its amazing that people have been so convinced that this is an OK thing to do. Dental and medical groups applauded the announcement. This change is necessa ry because Americans have access to more sources of fluoride than th ey did when water fluoridation w as first introduced, Dr. O. Mario n Burton, president of the Americ an Academy of Pediatrics, said in a statement. The fluoridated water standa rd since 1962 has been a range of 0 .7 parts per million for warmer c limates where people used to drin k more water to 1.2 parts per millio n in cooler regions. The new proposal from HH S would set the recommended level at just 0.7. Meanwhile, the EPAsaid it is reviewing whether to lower t he maximum allowable level of flu oride in drinking water from the cu rrent 4 parts per million. Government says too much fluoride intake causing splotchy teeth The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Page 8ANews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com 3010 US 27 South Sebring863-385-3939

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 9A 3010 US 27 South Sebring863-385-3939

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Special to the News-SunRidge Area Arc Resale Stores are bustling with activity this winter. Sales are strong and thankfully donations have been abundant. Whats missing are the extra hands it takes to accept the donations, as well as sort, price, stock shelves, check electrical appliances, run the cash register, and other tasks. Proceeds from the sale of the donated goods go towards the operation of programs and services provided by the Arc for children and adults with developmental and other disabilities. The Arc provides services in Highlands, Hardee and Polk counties. If you have a few hours to spare, please stop by either of the Arcs Resale Stores. They are located at 899 W. Main St., Avon Park and at 1010 S. 6th Avenue, Wauchula. Volunteer applications are also available at the Arc s administration building at 120 W. College Drive, Avo n Park. Call 452-1295, ext. 11 0 for more information. Page 10ANews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com LIMITED SPACE CALLTODAY! 5 DAYS a week$ 30 Get In Shape Learn Self Defense Improve Self Esteem Make Better GradesMARTIAL ARTS AMERICA471-2467Best After School Program in SebringFREEPICKUP from: Kindergarten Learning Center, Cracker Trail, Sun-N-Lakes, Woodlawn, Fred Wild, Memorial, Hill Gustat, Sebring Middle/High Located on Kenilworth Sebring*Some Restrictions Apply Life Care, Not Day Care Bella Vista Music ScheduleSunday, Jan. 9Gary Oliver 2PM 5PM,Tiki BarTuesdaysStanman,Music/DJ/Jokes/Blues6PM 9PM, LoungeWednesdaysGary OliverOl Rock & Roll on Keyboard6PM 9PM, LoungeThursdaysBildis Funtastic Karaoke, 6PM 9PM, LoungeFridaysBad Habit Band 9PM 1AM, LoungeSundaysGary OliverOl Rock & Roll on Keyboard2PM 5PM,Tiki HutStanmanMUSIC ENTERTAINMENT GREAT FOOD DANCINGAll Right Here!2451 US 27 South Avon Park453-3331Located on Lake GlenadaReservations AcceptedNew Ownership & Newly RenovatedLarge Groups Welcome Best Deal of the DayLunch or Dinner 2 FOR THE PRICE OF 1 Lunch2 for $795 Dinner2 for $995to$1995MUST PURCHASE 2 BEVERAGESNot good with any other promotion. THE NEW HOT SPOT! BildiGary Oliver LIVE BAND EVERY FRIDAY! PRIME RIB DINNER$1099EVERY SUNDAYALL DAY11AM 8PMIncludes garlic sticks, potato or pasta, vegetable, choice of soup or salad with purchase of beverage.863-453-3331 Visit Our Lakeside Tiki Bar BUSINESS Courtesy pho to Heartland for Children wishes to thank all of local businesses, individuals, families and organizations that helped provide holiday gifts for 1,219 local children in Highlands, Hardee and Polk counties through the sixth annual Rudolph Round-up Toy Drive. The staff at Waypoints Financial Office in Sebring (here) and their clients joined together again this year to sponsor a toy drive that was very successful. Volunteers needed at Arc Resale Stores Thanks for the holiday help Youll probably hate me f or bringing this up, but its t ime to begin planning for y our 2011 taxes or at l east, about the tax implicat ions of your retirement a ccount contributions. For the second year in a r ow, one widely used inflat ion measurement, the D epartment of Labors C onsumer Price Index for U rban Consumers (CPI-U), r emained flat for the quarter e nding Sept. 30, 2010, comp ared to the same period a y ear earlier. Thats import ant because the IRS uses t his measurement to determ ine whether dozens of taxr elated numbers will stay t he same or increase from y ear to year. Bottom line: In 2011, m ost contribution levels r emain unchanged. Heres a n overview of common r etirement savings plans: Defined contribution p lans. The maximum annual c ontribution to 401(k), 4 03(b), 457(b) and federal T hrift Savings plans r emains unchanged at $ 16,500 (plus an additional $ 5,500 if youre at least 50). O ther factors to remember: Your plan may limit t he percentage of pay you c an contribute so, depending o n your salary, your maxim um contribution may actua lly be less. Company-matching c ontributions dont count t oward your maximum cont ribution. With pretax contribut ions, your account grows t ax-free until withdrawn, at w hich point withdrawals are t axed at the rate then in e ffect. With after-tax contributions, you pay income tax on the money now, but your contributions and their earnings will not be taxed at retirement. Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs). The maximum annual contribution to IRAs remains unchanged at $5,000 (plus another $1,000 if 50 or older). Contributions to a regular IRAare not impacted by your income, but if your modified adjusted gross income (AGI) exceeds certain limits, the maximum contribution to Roth IRAs gradually phases out: For singles/heads of households the phase-out range is $107,000 to $122,000 in AGI (up from $105,000 to $120,000 in 2010). For married couples filing jointly, its $169,000 to $179,000 (up from $167,000 to $177,000). Afew rules on deducting IRAcontributions on your tax return: If youre single, a head of household or married and neither spouse is covered by an employerprovided retirement plan, you can deduct the full IRA contribution, regardless of income. If you are covered by an employer plan and are single/head of household, the tax deduction phases out for AGI between $56,000 and $66,000 (unchanged from 2010); if married and filing jointly, its $90,000 to $110,000 (up from $89,000 to $109,000 in 2010). If youre married and arent covered by an employer plan but your spouse is, the IRAdeduction is phased out if your combined AGI is between $160,000 (s/b $169,000) and $179,000 (up from $167,000 to $177,000). For more details, read IRS Publication 590 at www.irs.gov. Afinal note: As an incentive for lowand moderateincome workers to save for retirement through an IRA or company-sponsored plan, many are eligible for a savers credit of up to $1,000 ($2,000 if filing jointly). This credit lowers your tax bill, dollar for dollar, in addition to any other tax deduction you already receive for your contribution. Qualifying income ceiling limits for the Retirement SaversTax Credit increased in 2011 to $55,600 for joint filers, $42,375 for heads of household, and $28,250 for singles or married persons filing separately. Consult IRS Form 8880 for more information. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To follow Jason on www.twitter.com/PracticalMoney. Retirement contribution limits largely unchanged Personal Finance Jason Alderman

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By JEANNINE AVERSA APEconomics WriterWASHINGTON F ederal Reserve Chairman B en Bernanke sketched a m ore optimistic view of the e conomy Friday but said the F eds $600 billion bondb uying program is needed b ecause unemployment will l ikely stay elevated for up to f ive more years. Bernanke told the Senate B udget Committee that t heres rising evidence that a self-sustaining recovery i s taking hold. He said he expects s tronger growth because c onsumers and businesses w ill boost spending this y ear. Bernanke spoke an hour a fter the government r eleased a disappointing e mployment report. E mployers added only 1 03,000 jobs in December. T he unemployment rate fell t o 9.4 percent partly b ecause people gave up l ooking for jobs. Many e conomists had forecast m uch bigger job gains and w ere looking for a signal t hat businesses were stepp ing up hiring. Asked about Decembers 1 03,000 job gains, B ernanke said if the pace of h iring doesnt increase, were not going to see sust ained declines in the unemp loyment rate. The Fed chief defended t he central banks move to b uy $600 billion in T reasurys through June and g ave no hint that it would c hange its course. The bond p urchases are designed to b oost the economy by lowe ring interest rates, encoura ging spending and lifting s tock prices. The program has been c riticized by Republicans in C ongress and some Fed o fficials who contend it will d o little to help the economy a nd could hurt it by unleashi ng inflation and speculative b uying on Wall Street. C hina, Germany and Brazil c omplained it was really a s cheme to push down the v alue of the dollar, giving U .S. exporters a competitive e dge. The Fed chief said the t hreat of deflation a dang erous drop in prices, wages a nd in the values of homes a nd stocks and the potent ial for persistently high u nemployment were suffic ient reasons to launch the p rogram. Bernanke predicted that t he overall pace of the econo my will be moderately s tronger this year. He said t he Fed has seen increased e vidence that a self-sustaini ng recovery is taking p lace. Factories are cranking up p roduction. The service sector is growing at its fastest pace in more than four years. Fewer people applied for unemployment benefits over the past month than in any other four-week period in more than two years. Consumers are spending more freely, and a payroll tax cut is likely to boost their activity further. Tax cuts are also likely to lead businesses to expand and hire more. But weakness in job growth could slow this momentum, Bernanke cautioned, especially if consumers spend less. Bernanke said unemployment is likely to be around 8 percent two years from now. Other threats to the economic outlook, Bernanke said, are: Adepressed housing market, where growth in foreclosures could push down home prices even more. Deeper spending cuts and more layoffs from state and local governments. Rising gasoline prices, which now top $3 a gallon. Theres good news for tax filers in 2011. The due date for 2010 Federal income tax returns is Monday, April 18 instead of the usual date of April 15. As you prepare your tax documents, dont forget youll need Social Security numbers for your children if you want to claim them as dependents on your return. In most cases, parents request a Social Security number for their child when applying for a birth certificate. The state agency that issues birth certificates shares the childs information with us and we mail the Social Security card to you. However, if you didnt apply for a number at the hospital, you must apply at a Social Security office or by mail. To do so you will need: Acompleted Application For ASocial Security Card (Form SS-5); Original documents proving your childs: U.S. citizenship; Age; and Identity; and Original documents proving your identity. After you apply, we will verify the childs birth record and mail your childs Social Security card to you. If you do not get a Social Security number for your child before the April 18 tax filing deadline but you still need to claim the child as a deduction on your tax return, you can: File your income tax return without claiming the child and then file an amended income tax return when the child has a Social Security number; or File with the Internal Revenue Service to extend the deadline for filing your tax return. Parents can claim their adopted child for tax purposes while the adoption process is still pending. You will need to contact the Internal Revenue Service fo r Form W-7A, Application fo r Taxpayer Identification Number for Pending U.S. Adoptions. We can assign your adopted child a Social Security number before the adoption is complete, but you may want to wait. Then you can apply for the number using your childs new name, with your name as parent. Remember, a Social Security number is not just for taxes. Your child also may need a Social Security number for government ben efits or other reasons, such as opening a bank account or obtaining medical coverage If you need to apply for your childs Social Security card and number, now is th e time. To learn more, read our online publication, Social Security Numbers for Children, at www.socialsec urity.gov/pubs/10023.html. Esther Harris is the Social Security district manager at the Sebring branch. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 11A COUNTRY CLUB REALTY 863-382-6575www .CountryClubRealtyofSebring.comTWO LOCATIONSTOSERVE YOU GOLF HAMMOCK 1 Hammock Circle Sebring, FL 33872 COUNTRY CLUB OF SEBRING 4800 Haw Branch Rd. Sebring, FL 33872863-382-6575BRUNNERS MOBILEOPEN HOUSE TODAY!1PM-3PMYour Host: Call Mary Clark: 863-414-7281US 27 North to (R) after Safari Motel & Sweety Pies, then (L) at Robin Ct. to home on (L).FURNISHED! Furnished 2 bed, 2 bath manufactured home in great location on well landscaped lawn! Large family room, eatin kitchen, carport w/ shed. Utility room w/ washer & dryer, new roof, small office / craft room too! 1830 Robin Ct. $54,900214905 GOLF HAMMOCKYour Host: PRICE REDUCED!Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575S 27 to Hammock Rd to (R) at entrance of Golf Hammock (Golf Hammock Drive) to (R) on Par Rd to (R) on Cormorant Point Dr to home on (L).STUNNING GOLF VIEW! This lovely 2/2 has modern paint, new carpeting, pavered patio & beautiful landscaping. Newer appliances, new roof in 2002, this home is move-in ready. Youll love the back porch and the great view overlooking the #4 tee! 3508 Cormorant Point Dr.$119,500213002 HARDER HALLYour Host: PRICE REDUCED!!Call Patty Roberts: 863-381-5765US 27 to Golfview Dr., continue past Lakewood Rd., (L) on Leaf to home on (R).MUSTSEE! 2/2/2 plus den, freshly painted interior, vaulted ceilings, cypress trim & base, solid work benches in garage, dining room plus large breakfast bar, newer appliances and custom tile, his & her vanities, nice fenced yard, must see!! 3923 Leaf Rd.$119,900215291 GOLF HAMMOCKYour Host: A GOLF LIFE!Call Shirley Faulk: 863-202-0936US 27 to (W) on Hammock Rd to (R ) into entrance of Golf Hammock to (R) on Par Rd to (R) on Cormorant Point Dr to (R ) on Waterwood to (L) on Golf Haven Terrace to home on (R ).WINTER RETREAT! Cozy w creature comforts; 2 bed, 2 bath split bedroom plan includes an eat-in kitchen, inside laundry, enclosed & winterized back porch and oversized 1 car garage. 3705 Golf Haven Terr.$120,500210928 GOLF HAMMOCKYour Host: BRING CLUBS!Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575US 27 to Hammock Rd into entrance of Golf Hammock (Golf Hammock Dr) to (R ) on Par Rd to (R ) on Cormorant Point Dr to home on (L).SEE TO BELIEVE! Spacious and newly renovated 2/2 with a den/office. Overlooking the 4th fairway, this home has a garage with a separate golf cart garage. Check out the beautiful yard! 3610 Cormorant Point Dr.$120,900210889 GOLF HAMMOCKYour Host: MAKE AN OFFER!Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575US 27 to Hammock Road to Golf Hammock Dr. to (R) on Par Rd. to (R) on Cormorant Point Dr. to (R) on Sugar Pine Circle to home on (R).PLEASING JACUZZI! Take a look at this beauty! Open & bright floor custom 3 bed 2 bath floor plan in excellent condition. 1700 lsf, cathedral ceilings and large lanai. Movein ready too! Come out today youll fall in love with this home! 2909 Sugar Pine$138,500215974 GOLF HAMMOCKYour Host: WET BAR TOO!Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575US 27 to Hammock Rd. to (R ) at Golf Hammock entrance past pro shop to (R ) on Mulligan Rd to (R ) on Duffer Rd to home on the right.HOT TUB PARADISE! You need to see this 2/2 today! Fantastic private yard romantic hot tub, cathedral ceilings, newer appliances, Florida room w/ entertainment center & wet bar. Lots more too. Priced right too! 3705 Duffer Rd. $144,900215470 GOLF HAMMOCKYour Host: CORNER CUTIE!!Call Kim Reed: 863-381-6575US 27 to Hammock Rd. to (R ) at Golf Hammock entrance, go past pro shop to (R ) on Mulligan Rd to home on (L).EASY TO LOVE! This 3/2 sits on a huge corner lot w/ fruit trees. Wood burning fireplace, gorgeous stone work, skylights & covered porch. Great golf community lifestyle at a good price. Come by today! 1701 Mulligan Rd.$154,900214662 GOLF HAMMOCKYour Host: CORNER LOT!!Call Helen Ferry: 863-381-1089US 27 to Hammock Rd to (R ) into Golf Hammock, go around clubhouse to (R ) on Mulligan Rd, to home on corner of Divot and Mulligan.OVERSIZED GARAGE! 3 bed 2 bath on corner lot and 2.5 car garage! Split plan, vaulted ceilings, kitchen w/breakfast bar, open to dining. Large breakfast nook, spacious master w/ his & her walk-in closets. New roof/ AC in 2005 too! 4003 Divot Rd.$169,900214072 HIGHLANDSRIDGEYour Host: WATER & GOLF!Call Sandee Halbert: 863-414-8090Sebring Pkwy to (L) on Home Ave to stop sign and (L) on 17N to (R ) at Powerline Rd to (L) into Highlands Ridge (Clubhouse Dr) to (R ) at Fairway Vista to (L) on Carter Creek Dr to home on (L).BETTER THAN NEW! Golf course living at its best! Lovely golf & water views. Great split plan w/ neutral colors, upgrades galore w/ plantation shutters throughout. Large master suite and 3rd bedroom has builtin Murphy bed! See this beauty today! 4013 Carter Creek Dr.$284,900212424 OWN W/ NO FEES! BUSINESS Courtesy photo T he Heartland Cultural Alliance in partnership with Brewsters Coffee House will present a series of readings titled Scribes Night Out, Sharing the Art of our Local W ordsmiths. The semimonthly series will take place on the second and fourth Sunday of the month. The event will launch with Highlands County novelist, and HCA member, Sunny Serafino reading some of her poems as well as excerpts from recent works and short stories. Other local writers will be invited share their works in this first of its kind series celebrating the art of the written word. Starting today from 6:30 until closing at Brewsters Coffee House, 2191 U.S. 27 N.The public is invited to this free event. Claim those little tax deductions: Social Security numbers for kids Guest Column Esther Harris Scribes Night Out set at Brewsters Bernanke: 4-5 years to reach normal unemployment levels The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Page 12ANews-Sun Sunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.co m Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 385-6155. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 FUNDS. January 2, 9, 2011 1050LegalsAs Clerk of Said Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM OF LIEN WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING 1050Legals660.39 feet to the Point of Beginning, as Recorded in the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Real Property Address: 605 Highway 66 West, Sebring, FL 33875 Real Property Tax ID#: C-16-35-29-A00-0012-0000. DATED on December 23, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-530-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH D. LAGROW; RHONDA K. LAGROW; RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA; UNITED STATE OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; NORTH AMERICAN SPECIALTY INSURANCE COMPANY; AND ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, AND TENANT #4, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 Notice is given that pursuant to a Final Judgment in Foreclosure Against Defendants, KENNETH LAGROW and RHONDA LAGROW, dated the 4th day of August, 2010, in Case No. 10-530-GCS, of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK is the Plaintiff and KENNETH LAGROW and RHONDA LAGROW, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on the 25th day of January, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure Against Defendants, KENNETH LAGROW and RHONDA LAGROW, and described as follows: That part of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4, lying South of the Southerly right-of-way line of State Road 66 in Section 16, Township 35 South, Range 29 East, being more particularly described as follows: Begin at the Southwest corner of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4; thence North 0 degrees 17'31'' East along the West line of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 a distance of 77.05 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way line of State Road 66 West; said point lying on a circular curve to the right, having a radius of 5679.58 feet and a central angle of 1 degree 11'18''; thence along said curved right-of-way line on an arc distance of 117.79 feet; thence South 22 degrees 20'13'' East along said right-of-way line a distance of 25.73 feet to a point on said Southerly right-of-way line of State Road 66 West, said point lying on a circular curve to the right, having a radius of 5654.58 feet and a central angle of 5 degrees 52'39''; thence along said curved right-of-way line an arc distance of 580.06 feet to the intersection of said right-of-way line with the East line of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4; thence South 0 degrees 18'50'' West along said East line a distance of 293.08 feet to the Southeast corner of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4; thence south 89 degrees 16'29'' West along the South line of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 a distance of and for Highlands County, Florida in which American Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc. a Delaware Corporation, f/k/a AH Mortgage Acquisition Co., Inc., is the Plaintiff and Maureen Griffin; Bank of America, NA; are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 25th day of January, 2011, the following described property as set forth ins said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 42, BLOCK 52, PLACID LAKES SECTION SIX, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 68, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 111 LEMON RD NW, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852-9786 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 23rd day of December, 2010. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk January 2, 9, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 08-CA-00711 DIVISION: AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE SERVICING, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION, F/K/A AH MORTGAGE ACQUISITION CO., INC., Plaintiff, vs. MAUREEN GRIFFIN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 23, 2010, and entered in Case No. 08-CA-00711 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 28-2010-CA-000039 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION F/K/A FIRST UNION NATIONAL BANK Plaintiff, vs. ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, LEGATEES, DEVISEES, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES, CREDITORS AND ANY OTHER PERSON CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST ELIZABETH J. HOFFRICHTER AKA ELIZABETH HOFFRICHTER, DECEASED, ET AL Defendants, RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment in Foreclosure dated November 8, 2010 entered in Case No. 28-2010-CA-000039 of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION F/K/A FIRST UNION NATIONAL BANK is Plaintiff and ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, LEGATEES, DEVISEES, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES, CREDITORS AND ANY OTHER PERSON CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST ELIZABETH J. HOFFRICHTER AKA ELIZABETH HOFFRICHTER, DECEASED; ____, AS THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ELIZABETH J. HOFFRICHTER AKA ELIZABETH HOFFRICHTER, IF ANY; MICHAEL J. HOFFRICHTER; ____, AS THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL J. HOFFRICHTER N/K/A ANGEL HOFFRICHTER; STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s), whether living or not, and whether said unknown parties claims as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, or in any other capacity, claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s) are the Defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 a.m., on the 10th day of March, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 99, FAIRMOUNT MOBILE ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. 1979 ALLARD MOBILE HOME VIN # 4785ATITLE# 16664826 VIN# 4785BTITLE# 16664825 Street Address: 3607 NEW YORK AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA 33872 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the dateo f the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 6th day of December, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK By: /s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk January 9, 16, 2011 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 314 ENOS AVE., LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 23rd day of December, 2010. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk January 2, 9, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 08-00314 DIVISION: ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. A NDRES LEON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 23, 2010, and entered in Case No. 08-00314 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which OneWest Bank, FSB, is the Plaintiff and Andres Leon, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 25th day of January, 2011, the following described property as set forth ins said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 15, IN BLOCK 144, OF PLACID LAKES SECTION ELEVEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-001287 OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, Plantiff, vs. JEFFREY M. DRESSEL, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALBERT W. ROTH Last Known Address: UNKNOWN A ddress Attempted At: 3651 US HIGHWAY 27 LOT 88, SEBRING, FL 33870 CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 17, BLOCK 1, HARDER HALL COUNTRY CLUB II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 13, PAGE 46, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before February 10, 2011 a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE NEWS SUN and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 28th day of December, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Annette Daff As Deputy Clerk January 2, 9, 2011 1050Legals 1000 Announcements Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classified ads get fast results

PAGE 13

www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, January 9, 2010Page 13 A PROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORYPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY Install doors, windows, flooring, plumbing & more!Licensed & InsuredLic# HM0096HANDYMAN BOBCall 863-452-5201 or 863-449-1744 A & E LAWN MOWER REPAIRBeltsBlades New & Used Parts12 S.Forest Ave. Avon Park,FL 33825863-452-0389 Service Repair Supplies Equipment Delivered Right to your DoorPool Service & Mobile Retail(863) 382-7728Fax (863) 402-2200 poolparadise101@aol.com www.poolparadiseonline.com Brad & Julie Kurtz Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 863385-0404Now Offering: Animal Nuisance Control and Removal Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-2750 1405 US 27 North Sebring, FL 33870 CAMPBELL S S COLLISION CENTER , INC. Jim Campbell Owner Ser vice A vailable 7 Days A W eek Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com EXTRAORDINAIRE HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING LLC 863-451-2399Mike & Kandy Sheldone CEO/Owner Lic# CAC 1816569All Service Calls $40 ResidentialCommercial Insured Free EstimatesService by People Who CareChad, Krista & Michael P.O. Box 6987 Avon Park, FL 33826-6987 Office: 863-655-9328 cklawn@strato.net WANDA KLINE WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESSSee what one drop of your blood indicates as to YOUR nutritional health and well-being. By appointment only863-414-4066 LIVEBLOODANALYSIS MIKES PAINTINGInterior & Exterior Residential & Mobile Homes Also Pressure Washing Over 25 Years Experience Free Estimates Lic. & Ins.863-657-2362 &WILLIAMSJANITORIALCARPETCLEANING$1095 Per Room3 Rooms Minimum Upholstery Cleaning All Types of Flooring Free EstimatesLic Bonded Ins(863) 214-1940 CASH for JUNK(954) 963-7138 Cars, Trucks, Vans no title necessary LEGREES863-215-3754Edward LeGreeMOBILE CARWASH & DETAILING SUE IS BACKSue Leninsky from Titusville, Pa. with 42 years experience is working Mon. 8-4 Sat. 8-noon at SALONTAZMANIA1505 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park 863-452-2396 JUDISPLACEOFHAIR& NAILS271 US 27 North, Sebring Wed. Fri. 8-4 863-382-9911 Call for an appointment with Sue Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 863-465-7491TREE SERVICE,INC.Joe Johnsons TRIMMING REMOVAL SOD INSTALLATION STUMP GRINDING LOT CLEARING PRESSURE CLEANING Will Beat Any Written Estimate!Peoples Choice Award Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Call For Details863-381-9013*Single Story Homes under 1500 total sq.ft. Roofs Driveways Walks Additional Services $9900 HOUSE WASH*FLORIDA PRESSURE CLEANING LLC. 3310 Hwy. 27 South Sebring, FL33870EOEE-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.comFor more information about Cross Country Automotive Services,we encourage you to visit our website at: www.CrossCountry-Auto.co mComprehensive Benefit Package Tuition Reimbursement Life Insurance Vacation Time Holiday Pay Medical DentalNow Hiring Full & Part Time Customer Service AssociatesStarting at $9.00 an hour Marie Nancy Simelus Associate of the MonthBe a HERO like Marie Nancy Simelus863-402-2786AGreatPlaceto Work!TV STATIONFOR SALE. SEBRING! $75,000. 478-741-1710. email: wrecktech@yahoo.com 3050BusinessOpportunities 3000 FinancialUTILITIES SERVICEWORKER I GRADE LEVEL 103 The City of Avon Park is accepting applications for a full-time Utilities Service Worker I. This position is entry-level in the installation, repair, and maintenance of the Citys water distribution and wastewater collection system. Upon hire, employee performs unskilled work involving heavy manual labor; however, through on-the-job training the employee performs progressively responsible semi-skilled tasks in installing, maintaining, and repairing of water mains and sanitary sewers, and other work in connection with the water and wastewater systems. The employee will operate a variety of machinery and equipment in performing work assignments. Minimum qualifications: High school diploma or GED equivalency, with sufficient practical training or experience to demonstrate necessary skills and abilities, preferable in Utilities operations and must possess a valid Florida Drivers License. Must be able to communicate effectively, verbally and in writing, and be able to complete math problems in various units of measurement. A general knowledge of the Citys geography is a must. Starting hourly rate is $10.1962. The City of Avon Park is a Smoke and drug-free Workplace. E.O.E. Applications available at City Hall, Human Resource Office, 110 E Main St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Applications close on Friday, January 14, 2011 at 4:30 p.m. FRONT DESKRECEPTIONIST F/T position available in Sebring Dental Office. Experience absolutely necessary. Fax resume to: 863-471-0436 CAREGIVERSNOW HIRINGFor caring, compassionate caregivers. You must be 21 yrs old with a HS Diploma/GED, pass a criminal & driving record check. Call HR between 9am and 4 pm M-F. 866-757-9686 or visit: ck381.ersp.biz/employment 2100Help WantedFIRE CHIEFThe City of Avon Park is seeking a full-time Fire Chief who under general administrative direction of the City Manager, plans, organizes, directs, and reviews the activities and operations of the Fire Department including fire prevention, fire code enforcement responsibilities and supervision per state statute, suppression, public education, emergency medical services and other activities designed to protect lives and property. Certified Firefighter II and Fire Officer I required as prescribed by Florida State Bureau of Fire Standards. Fire Officer II preferred and minimum certification of EMT-B desired. An Associate Degree with specialized training in fire department operations and administration a must. A Bachelors Degree with major course work in fire science or fire administration is preferred. A minimum of ten (10) years of experience in fire suppression, rescue, and the delivery of emergency medical services with at least five (5) years in a managerial/supervisory capacity equivalent to the rank of Lieutenant or two years as a Captain or above. Salary compensable DOQ. Applications and job description is available at the City of Avon Park, 110 E. Main St., Avon Park, FL 33825 or can be obtained on our website: www.avonpark.cc All applications must be accompanied with a copy of applicants Florida drivers license. This position will remain open until filled. The City of Avon Park is a smoke and drug-free workplace. E.O.E. Return completed applications to City Hall, Human Resource Dept., 110 E Main St., Avon Park, FL 33825 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentLOST DOGHIENZ 57, solid black, looks like Border Collie in the face, has bright orange collar & tag. Missing since New Year's Eve from Lakeview Dr. REWARD. 863-382-8216 1200Lost & Found 1100AnnouncementsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-1207 GCS LOTSOURCE, INC., a Florida corporation, Plaintiff, vs. CLYDE M. WILSON, as Trustee under Land Trust Number 0312397, his unknown assigns, successors in interest, or any other party claiming, by, through, under or against him, Defendants. NOTICE OF SUIT PROPERTY TO: CLYDE M. WILSON, as Trustee under Land Trust Number 0312397, his unknown assigns, successors in interest, or any other party claiming, by, through, under or against him YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to Quiet Title on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: Lot 22,Block 37, SEBRING COUNTRY ESTATES, Section 2, According to the Plat thereof as recorded in the Plat Book 7, Page 34, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to Thomas J. Wohl, Swaine & Harris, P.A., 425 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, the Plaintiff's attorney, and file the original with the Clerk of the above styled court on or before day of February 4, 2011; otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 28th day of December, 2010. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, (863)534-4690, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice of Suit; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call TDD (863)534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711. January 9, 16, 2011 1050Legals DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155 LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday.CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:385-6155 News-Sun Classified

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Page 14ANews-Sun Sunday, January 9, 2010www.newssun.co m Call 385-6155 and a Sales Representative will be glad to assist you!1992 NISSANSENTRA Under 100 K miles, new tires, RUNS GREAT! $2100 or MAKE OFFER! 863-471-2906 or 863-414-1691. 9450Automotive for SaleRIMS -18'' Mondera Davanti, on Kumho Low Profile 225/40ZR 18 Tires. LIKE NEW! $1000. 863-385-5425. 9350Automotive Parts& Accessories2004 KAWASAKI750 Vulcan. One Owner, Garage Kept! 6796 miles. $3,500. 863-471-9341. 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 TransportationMOTOR HOME,26' WINNEBAGO ASPECT. 35,000 miles, excellent condition. New A/C, 2 awnings, new battery, $41,500 OBO, 863-257-0597. 8450Motor Homes2010 32'HY-LINE Travel Trailer. 2 slide outs, Washer & Dryer, many more options. MUST SELL! $17,900 obo. Will deliver. 630-631-8722 (cell). 8400RecreationalVehicles TRAVEL TRAILERStarcraft 30 ft, 2000, 4 X 16 slide out. Also, '96 Chevy Truck, heavy duty w/ tow pkg. Can be seen Highland Wheels Estate. Both for $12,000. Call 765-603-7764 2003 SEADOO GTX JETSKI Mint Condition! 59 hrs. $5000. 863-385-5425 8400RecreationalVehicles PONTOON 22ft., 60 H.p. Evinrude, Great condition, runs well, full Bimini on Lake June. $4500. 863-465-5343 20' PONTOONBOAT 2004 WEERES. New carpet, seats & bimini top. Includes fish finder and large live well. 50hp Mercury w/power tilt. Boat & motor less than 50 hrs operation. Galvanized trailer. $6,500. Please call 863-465-2364 or 863-699-0307 8050Boats & Motors 8000 Recreation NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & SuppliesHELP! WIFENEEDS A VERY GOOD DEPENDABLE CAR NOW!Please help me find her one! 863-465-0978 7340Wanted to Buy SEBRING -Moving Sale! 2812 Vine Lane Oak Ridge Mobile Park, Fri & Sat Jan 14 & 15, 8am-?Lots Of Good Things, Too Much To List! SEBRING -500 Summit Dr. Fri-SatSun, Jan 7-8-9, 8am-2pm. Clothing, books, golf clubs & golf bags, computer hardware, electronics, household items. Much More! AVON PARKLake Bonnet Village off SR 17 between Avon Park & Sebring, Annual Baked Goods & Garage Sale. Coffee & Donuts & Funnel Cakes. Jan 15th, 8am 11am. A.P. -GARAGE SALE Jan. 13-14-15, 8am to 4pm, 423 Malcolm St., Avon Park. Tools, wood planer, lathe, fishing gear, lawn tractor and misc. 7320Garage &Yard Sales TV &STAND stand oak colored with storage; TV 20'' & silver in color. Both $75.00. 863-414-2131 SKATEBOARD/BIKE RAMPSwith platform. Xgames brand. Good condition. $30 863-452-6798 FOLDING BICYCLE$25 812-664-1132 BIKE 18"Boys Next Brand. Includes a helmet, like new. $30. 863-452-6798 BABY COCKATIELBeautiful! $75 863-385-2503 4 TONColeman cen. ac unit, fan motor replaced 2 yrs ago, serv. every yr., att. to air handle. $100 863-655*0881 7310Bargain Buys3 WHEELMiami Sun bicycle $35 812-664-1132 7310Bargain BuysPORTABLE HEATER,EDEN PURE Model 500. LIKE NEW! Only used 2 months! $250.00. Call 863-385-9551. 7300Miscellaneous NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS! HIGHPOINT FURNITURE OUTLET STORE 2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRINGNorthofLowes&acrossfrom HomeDepot 7180Furniture 7000 MerchandiseSEBRING -Fully Remodeled Commercial Building in Historic Downtown. 1850 sq ft, office, 2BA, large indoor storage & fully fenced back storage facility. High volume traffic area, Great for Business! 863-385-3474 or 863-381-2717 6750Commercial RentalDOWNTOWN SEBRING Professional Office as low as $229/mo. A/C & Utilities included. Conf. room, elevator, single & double suites. Low cost DSL avail. 863-385-1705 www.HainzCenter.com 6600Business & OfficesFor Rent SEBRING -Sun 'n Lake, Clean, 2BR, 2BA split floor plan house, large screen porch and big back yard. No smoke or pets, quiet area, $625/mo. View by appt. Avail. Jan 15th. 317-413-4859 SEBRING -LAKE JACKSON 2BR. 2BA., near boat ramp & Mall. Screened porch, W/D hookup, refrigerator & stove Pets OK! $750 monthly. 863-385-7237 SEBRING -3BR, 1BA with carport, near High School, laundry room, fenced yard. $550/mo., security deposit waived to right person. 863-835-0408 SEBRING -2BR, 1BA all wood home, $675/mo. + $500 security deposit. 3303 Pompino Dr. Avgerage electric bill $90/mo. Call 863-402-0400 LAKE PLACIDPlacid Lakes, Remodeled 2BR, 2BA home located on canal leading to Lake June. Kitchen appliances included, new flooring throughout. No Smoke No Pets. $750/mo. Details call 863-243-3149 LAKE PLACID2BR, 1BA, new floors/paint, fenced yard, close to boat ramp, nice landscape, quiet area, no smoke, $550/mo. 863-699-1119 HOUSES /MOBILE HOMES Call for Availability NO Security NO Last NO Dogs 863-381-4410 or 863-381-5174 6300Unfurnished Houses SEBRING: 1BR,1 BA Guest House / Cottage in quiet / private neighborhood with all utilities included: Electric, Water & Direct TV. No Pets, No Smokers. Harder Hall ares, 1/8 mile from 2 golf courses. $800 per month + deposit. Call 863-381-9437 LAKE PLACIDNewer 3BR, 2BA, seasonal or monthly. Excellent furniture & appliances, near lake & boat ramp, No smoking or dogs. $1300/mo. After season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119 6250Furnished Houses SEBRING -DINNER LAKE AREA 1BR, 1BA Apartments for Rent. $395/mo. Includes water. Large rooms, fresh paint & tile floors. Call Gary Johnson @ 863-381-1861 SEBRING -Clean 1BR, 1BA, living rm., utility w/ W-D hookup, new screened vinyl patio, near Walmart & Homer's area. You pay electric, I pay cable & utilities. Ideal for 1 or 2 adults. Prefer year round renter, no dogs. $450 mly. + $450 sec. dp. Move in now $650 to the right party! Call after 1pm for details. 732-222-0344RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 LEMONTREE APARTMENTSAvon Park, FL 33825 1BR, 1BA $495/Month+ $200 Security Deposit2BR, 1BA $645/Month+ $500 Security Deposit Pets Welcome* Washer/Dryer Microwave & WSG Included Call Alan, (386) 503-8953 LAKE PLACID2BR. / 2BA. W /D hookup. Large fenced yard, screened patio, water included. Excellent Condition. $525 monthly plus 1 mo. deposit. 8636958348 BEST RENTAL IN TOWN! Large 2BR, 1BA totally remodeled, washer/dryer hook-ups. Available Immediately! Call 321-537-5681 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile, New paint, New appliances, Screened patios & W/D hook ups. Call 863-452-0469. 6200UnfurnishedApartments AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL: $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsAVON MOBILEHOME PARK 1BR. FURNISHED. 55 PLUS. SORRY NO PETS. 863-453-3415 6150FurnishedApartmentsLAKE PLACIDGolf Villas Efficiencies with kitchenette, furnished, includes; electric & all utilities, swimming pool; W/D available. $425/mo. Call Ireland Sanders, 863-465-1400. 6100Villas & CondosFor RentSEBRING -3008 Spinks Rd., 2BR, 1BA, W/D hookup, new appliances, ceramic tile throughout. No Pets. Close to HRMC & Sebring High School. Avail. Immediately $500/mo. 863-273-1756. 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 Rentals SEBRING -RV Park, Close to Downtown, 1BR, 1BA & Efficiencies, $325-$400/mo; 2BR 2BA, $400/mo. EASY MOVE-IN RATES! 863-655-3504 SEBRING -RV Park, Close to Downtown, 1BR, 1BA & Efficiencies, $325-$400/mo; 2BR 2BA, $400/mo. EASY MOVE-IN RATES! 863-655-3504 LAKE PLACIDSun 'n Lakes Estates, Doublewide, 3BR, 2BA Mobile Home. The best in Country Living! $580/month. Call Michelle @ 863-381-5661. 5150Mobile HomesFor Rent PALM HARBORHomes has closed 2 Model Centers. Save up to 60K on select models. Call 1-800-622-2832 AVON MOBILEHOME PARK 55 PLUS. PARK MODEL, LOW LOT RENT. $4000. SORRY NO PETS. 863-449-1072 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSEBRING -FOR SALE BY OWNER 2BR, 2BA Condo at the beautiful Bluffs of Sebring, a 55+ gated community. First Floor with Carport & Storage Room. Furnished with several upgrades; clubhouse, pool, tennis & other activities. $84,900 OBO. Great view of Lake Mary Jane. Call 863-385-0552 or 863-873-1426 4120Villas & CondosFor SaleSEBRING -Edgewater Village Lakeview Dr. 2BR, 2BA, 1CG Villa. Beautifully furnished. New kitchen, laundry, TV. Low Maintenance fee includes Cable TV, Clubhouse, heated pool. Private street. Avail Immed. 863-402-9138 4080Homes for SaleSebring A VON PARK3BR, 2BA, 1CG 1400 sq ft home. $68,900. Available after Feb. 28, 2011. Owner Financing possible with 10% down, good credit report and work record. 863-453-5631 ATTENTION: CASH for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate Laid off? Work from home. Be your own bo$$. First, call the Federal Trade Commission to find out how to spot work at home schemes, 1-877-FTC-HELP. A message from the News-Sun and the FTC. Looking for a Federal or Postal job? What looks like the ticket to a secure job might be a scam. For information, call the Federal Trade Commission toll free 1-877-FTC-HELP or visit www.ftc.gov. A message from the News-Sun and the FTC. CASTLE HILL Apartments of Avon ParkAccepting Applications for 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals 62 years or older, handicap/disabled, regardless of age. For rental information & applications please call: 863-452-6565 TDD: 1-800-955-8771 THIS INSTITUTION IS AN Equal Opportunity Provider and EmployerLos Apt. de Castle Hill de Avon ParkEstan aceptando aplicaciones para Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras. Disponible a personas de 62 ancs o mas, incapacidad fisica/mental, no importa la edad. Para mas informacion favor de llamar 863-452-6565. TDD: 1-800-955-8771 Esta Institucion Es De Igualdad De Oportunidad Al Proveedor, Y Empleador AKC ENGLISHBULLDOG PUPPY A picture is worth a thousand words! Call 877-394-3996

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 15A Every Day!www.AdvantageFloorCoverings.com www.AdvantageFloorCoverings.comDuPont Stainmaster Mohawk Anso Tarkett Vinyl Tile Laminate Hardwood Carpet 207 U.S. 27 South Lakeview Plaza Sebring7/10 Mile South of Lakeshore Mall385-1224 COUPON REQUIRED2 ROOMS & HALL $6900Green Seal Approved. Environmentally Friendly. Dries in 2 to 3 hours. Residential only. Rooms over 250 sq. ft. & living/dining rooms count as 2 rooms. Not valid with any other offer.EXPIRES 01/28/11Non-Allergenic18 YEARS EXPERIENCE COUPON REQUIREDLAMINATE FLOORS $359Floor prep & trim pieces not included. Not valid with any other offer.EXPIRES 01/28/11Sq. Ft. Installed Now Offering CARPET CLEANING COUPON REQUIREDIN STOCK CARPET $167Installed with 6 lb. pad. Not valid with any other offer.EXPIRES 01/28/11Sq. Ft. Installed($14.99 sq. yd.) COUPON REQUIREDIN STOCK BERBER $178Installed with 6 lb. pad. Not valid with any other offer.EXPIRES 01/28/11Sq. Ft. Installed($15.99 sq. yd.) Starting At Starting AtFinancing Available!

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Page 16ANews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com If youre injured or facing surgery, we provide personalized physical therapy care to help you recover quickly and safely. From hands-on therapy to pain management techniques and therapeutic exercise, our expert team will put their extensive training and experience to work for you. Call us today to schedule an appointment at your convenience. Most Insurance Plans Accepted 100 YMCA Ln. Sebring, Fl 33875863-382-2949 visit us on the web at www.bowyerpt.comBOWYERPHYSICAL THERAPYBOWYERPHYSICAL THERAPYDIGNAROURAAlso treating dizziness & balance.As far as my experience with doctors, the only place I have found some help with my problem is Bowyer Physical Therapy. Im very pleased with the service and dedication of their staff. Thanks to God and to them, I have finally found relief. I am very happy with my care. Keith A. Bowyer, Jr., PTBest Physical Therapist 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010License FL PT 16172 Herdma n n Certified in Vestibular RehabilitationKeith A. Bowyer, Jr., PTBest Physical Therapist 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010License FL PT 16172 Herdma n n Certified in Vestibular Rehabilitation Acapulco8870s Berlin4229sh Calgary9-3sf Dublin4235pc Edmonton9-5sf Freeport7256pc Geneva4339sh Hong Kong6352s Jerusalem5446sh Kiev3532sh London4334s Montreal2516s n Nice 6147s h Ottawa2214c Quebec2521s n Rio de Janeiro9176s Sydney8071t Toronto2410c Vancouver3623s n Winnipeg9-1c Albuquerque4425s3916pc3922pc Atlanta3527pc3527sn4325pc Baltimore3517pc3422pc3227sn Birmingham3428sn3626sn4223pc Boston3722pc3624pc3631pc Charlotte3725pc3529sn3525sn Cheyenne242sn115sf66s Chicago2517pc2819c2918sf Cleveland2415pc2619pc2821sn Columbus2416pc2921c3119sn Dallas3829sn4227c3722s Denver263sn123sn14-7s Detroit2614pc2618pc2819sf Harrisburg3116pc3220pc3023sn Honolulu7766s7964r7871s Houston4534r5032c5030pc Indianapolis2716pc3020c3017sf Jacksonville5243c7048r5936pc Kansas City2719sn2814sn195c Lexington2619pc3021c3120c Little Rock3326sn3625c3722pc Los Angeles5542pc6245pc6446s Louisville3022pc3526c3522sf Memphis3429c3426c3723pc Miami7366pc7866pc8064s Minneapolis8-3c110sf10sf Nashville3226pc3327sn3623sf New Orleans5142r5035c5133s New York City3523pc3525pc3530sn Norfolk4024pc3729c4129sn Oklahoma City3826c3115sn2612pc Philadelphia3121pc3322pc3426sn Phoenix6042s6041s6342pc Pittsburgh2616c2718pc3020sn Portland3616pc3519pc3525pc Raleigh3924pc3429sn3926sn Rochester3018sf2917sf3122c St.Louis2619c3423c2714sf San Francisco5238pc5137pc5240sh Seattle3727sf3723pc3423s Tampa6356pc7259t6848s Washington, DC3421pc3426pc3228sn Weather History Heat index Five-Day forecast for Highlands County High 68/Low 48High 76/Low 59High 73/Low 50High 70/Low 45High 65/Low 40 W inds:ENE at 7-14 mph.Winds:S at 10-20 mph.Winds:WNW at 7-14 mph.Winds:NNE at 7-14 mph.Winds:NNE at 8-16 mph.TODAY MONDAY TUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAY Partly sunny Breezy with some sun Mostly sunnySunshine and patchy clouds Partly sunny AccuWeather UVIndexTMThe higher the UV index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2, Low;3-5, Moderate;6-7, High; 8-10, Very High;11+ Extreme9 a.m.11 a.m.1 p.m.3 p.m.5 p.m. 13531 U.S.cities World cities Florida citiesWeather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice. City HiLoWCity HiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCity HiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCity HiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCity HiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCity HiLoWHiLoWHiLoWFor 3 p.m.today For today A deadly tornado ripped through Reading, Pa., on Jan.9, 1889, killing dozens and injuring hundreds of people.It was the first of two twisters to hit Reading in 1889. Relative humidity ....................41% Expected air temperature ........67 Makes it feel like ......................66 Sun and moon Moon phases FirstFullLastNew Jan 12Jan 19Jan 26Feb 2 Washington Washington 34/21 34/21 New York New York 35/23 35/23 Miami Miami 73/66 73/66 Atlanta Atlanta 35/27 35/27 Detroit Detroit 26/14 26/14 Houston Houston 45/34 45/34 Chicago Chicago 25/17 25/17 Minneapolis Minneapolis 8/-3 8/-3 Kansas City Kansas City 27/19 27/19 El Paso El Paso 56/34 56/34 Denver Denver 26/3 26/3 Billings Billings 19/-2 19/-2 Los Angeles Los Angeles 55/42 55/42 San Francisco San Francisco 52/38 52/38 Seattle Seattle 37/27 37/27 Washington 34/21 New York 35/23 Miami 73/66 Atlanta 35/27 Detroit 26/14 Houston 45/34 Chicago 25/17 Minneapolis 8/-3 Kansas City 27/19 El Paso 56/34 Denver 26/3 Billings 19/-2 Los Angeles 55/42 San Francisco 52/38 Seattle 37/27 Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands ar e highs for the day.Forecast high and low temperatures are given for selected citie s. Rain, accompanied by a few rumbles of thunder, will drench the western and central Gulf Coasts today as a storm system edges eastward over the Gulf of Mexico.Farther north, a wintry mix of snow, slee t and rain will span a zone from northeastern Texas through Alabama.Meanwhile, a snowstorm will unfold over the central and northern Plains.The heaviest snow will target Nebraska, Colorado and southeastern Wyoming, where several inches is possible.The Northwest will stay unsettled, with showers along the coast. National Forecast for January 9 Partly sunny today.Partly cloudy tonight.Breezy tomorrow with some sun.Tuesday and Wednesday:mostly sunny.Thursday: partly sunny. Avon Park Tallahassee Jacksonville St.Petersburg Miami Sebring Lorida Lake Placid Venus 70/52 70/52 68/49 68/48 49/44 52/43 64/57 73/66 68/48Shown is todays weather.Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows Regional forecast Water restrictions Almanac Farm reportPartly sunny today.Winds east-northeast 7-14 mph. Expect 4-8 hours of sunshine with average relative humidity 55% and good drying conditions.Partly cloudy tonight. \000\000 )Tj ET Q BT 0 g /GS3 gs /T3_0 1 Tf 0 Tc 0 Tw 0.8654 0 0 0.9528 754.9871 1387.8156 Tm (\000 )Tj -20.325 6.775 Td (\000\000 \000\000 )Tj ET Q BT /T3_1 1 Tf 0.8654 0 0 0.9528 754.2283 1368.7593 Tm (\000 )Tj -22.136 7.378 Td (\000\000 \000)Tj 0 11.659 TD (\000)Tj ET Q q 746.95 1399.193 31.154 -120.053 re W* n q 0 1520.642 810 -754.585 re W n q 0.9530334 0 0 1.0492859 0 0 cm 0.572 w 4 M 789.169 1282.64 19.816 11.578 re 808.984 1282.64 m h S Q Q Q q 752.103 1326.32 18.885 12.148 re W n BT /T3_3 1 Tf 0.8654 0 0 0.9528 751.8569 1325.9329 Tm (\000 \000 \000)Tj 0 12.419 TD (\000)Tj ET Q q 746.95 1399.193 31.154 -120.053 re W* n q 0 1520.642 810 -754.585 re W n q 0.9530334 0 0 1.0492859 0 0 cm 0.572 w 4 M 789.169 1244.956 19.816 11.578 re 808.984 1244.956 m h S Q Q Q q 752.103 1285.349 18.885 12.148 re W n BT 0 0 0 1 k /GS2 gs /T3_5 1 Tf 0.8654 0 0 0.9528 751.8912 1275.6809 Tm (\000)Tj 0 10.5 TD ()Tj ET Q BT 0 0 0 1 k /GS2 gs /T3_5 1 Tf 0.8654 0 0 0.9528 761.3024 1285.6853 Tm ()Tj ET q 752.103 1285.349 18.885 12.148 re W n BT /T3_5 1 Tf 0.8654 0 0 0.9528 770.7137 1285.6853 Tm ()Tj -21.75 10.5 Td (\000)Tj ET Q q 746.95 1399.193 31.154 -120.053 re W* n q 0 1520.642 810 -754.585 re W n q 0.9530334 0 0 1.0492859 0 0 cm 0 0 0 1 K 0.572 w 3.864 M 789.169 1224.979 19.816 11.578 re 808.984 1224.979 m h S Q q 0.9530334 0 0 1.0492859 0 0 cm 0.572 w 4 M /GS3 gs q 1 0 0 1 799.077 1233.648 cm 0 0 m S Q Q Q Q 0 0 0 0 k /GS1 gs 754.319 1253.107 41.629 10.788 re f BT 0 0 0 1 k /T1_8 1 Tf -0.0001 Tc 6.9232 0 0 7.6224 760.9736 1257.4711 Tm [(FRONTS Shower s T-storm Rain Flurries Snow Ice Cold Warm StationaryDaytona Beach6153pc7459t7246pc Ft.Laud.Bch7267pc7866pc8064s Fort Myers7155pc7662pc7754s Gainesville5646c7050r6336pc Homestead AFB7163pc7663pc7864s Jacksonville5243c7048r5936pc Key West7267pc7767s7868s Miami7366pc7866pc8064s Orlando6350pc7558t7350s Pensacola4444c5838r5132pc Sarasota6653pc7563t7252s Tallahassee4944c6241r5731pc Tampa6356pc7259t6848s W.Palm Bch6964pc7865pc7959sTemperature(Readings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake Placid)High Tuesday ..........................76 Low Tuesday ............................52 High Wednesday ....................81 Low Wednesday ......................56 High Thursday ........................68 Low Thursday ..........................34 Precipitation Tuesday ..............................0.00" Wednesday ........................0.01" Thursday ............................0.67" Month to date ......................0.68" Year to date ........................0.68" Barometer Tuesday ..............................30.06 Wednesday ........................29.84 Thursday ............................29.94 Tides(Readings at St.Petersburg)High ..............................4:04 a.m. Low ............................10:56 a.m. High ..............................5:23 p.m. Low ............................11:27 p.m.(Readings at Palm Beach)High ............................11:40 a.m. Low ..............................5:18 a.m. High ....................................none Low ..............................5:45 p.m. Lake Levels Lake Jackson ....................78.36' Lake Okeechobee ..............12.46' Normal ..............................14.51' TodaySunrise ....7:15 a.m. Sunset ......5:51 p.m. Moonrise 10:19 a.m. Moonset ..10:44 p.m. MondaySunrise ....7:15 a.m. Sunset ......5:52 p.m. Moonrise 10:50 a.m. Moonset ..11:35 p.m.If your address (house number) ends in... ...0 or 1, water only on Monday ...2 or 3, water only on Tuesday ...4 or 5, water only on Wednesday ...6 or 7, water only on Thursday ...8 or 9*, water only on Friday and locations without a discernible address TodayTodayNational summary:Regional summary: Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather,Inc. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110sAccuWeather.com

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SPORTS B SECTION Inside This Section Prowl cancels season . . .3B Sparanos status . . .3B BCS apathy . . .3B Heat/Magic get wins . . .4B Lincicome to play mens event .4B News-Sun Sunday, January 9, 2011 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE A shleigh Albrecht fires one down the fairway Thursday during the Harder Halls delayed second round. After W ednesdays record-breaking 63, Albrechts second round 74 dropped her out of the lead. But she gained a share of the lead with a third-round 69 Friday. News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E Cheyenne Woods watches her approach shot toward the first hole Friday. Woods had moved into the lead with a strong second round in inclement conditions, but fell into a tie with Ashleigh Albrecht heading into Saturdays final round. News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Lady Blue Streak Ivy Pintor powers up 100 pounds in the bench press to help her win the 119 class in Thursdays four-team meet at Sebring. News-Sun photo by BETH BALDRIDGE Jeffery Campbell dunks one late in the game to help the Red Devils with their 67-49 win over district rival Tenoroc Friday night By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comLAKELANDThe Avon P ark boys basketball team u sed a second-half press to b eat the Tenoroc Titans 67-49 o n the road Friday night. We played a good game. T enoroc is a good team, and t hey showed that the first h alf, head coach Luther C lemons said. We came out w ith the press in the third p eriod and played a very g ood game to beat them. This is how I expect us to p lay every game. We have the t alent and the teamwork, and t onight they all clicked t ogether, Clemons added. The Devils jumped out f ront 17-10 in the first perio d, but Titan Karlos Odum l ed Tenoroc to a 29-29 tie at t he half. Odums 18 points for the n ight would not be enough to d eter a Devil counter attack i n the second half. Reggie Bakers air attack f rom the outside and Alonzo R obetsons ground assault in t he paint would net both p layers 22 points for the D evils, despite Robertsons t ender knee which looks to be a day-to-day issue. It was a fourth period dunk from senior Jeffery Campbell that capped the game for Avon Park and put the crowd on their feet and a technical warning for the Avon Park bench. It was a good play, and that is definitely newspaper material, Clemons said. Overall, I am pleased with our performance. Odum answered 30 seconds later with his own slam, but the Devils were already out front 67-47 with just 1:30 left on the clock. The win puts the 12-3 Devils in the drivers seat in 3ADistrict 9 with a 7-0 record, and drops Tenoroc to 9-5 overall and 5-2 in the district. Avon Park stays at home on Monday night to face Lake Placid in their second meeting of the regular season. In other action, the Lady Red Devils avenged a 14point loss to Tenoroc earlier this season with a win by the same amount Friday night, topping the Lady Titans 5137 and giving them their first district loss. The APladies are back at it Tuesday with an away game at Lake Placid. Red Devils temper Titans By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING In grand Harder Hall tradition, the 56th Annual Womens Invitation looks to be going down to the wire again as round one leader Ashleigh Albrecht has weathered the weather, delays and a hard, two-day charge from Cheyenne Woods to go into Saturdays final round at a 10-under-par tie. Both golfers are on pace to potentially break the tournament record of 13-under par, set just two years ago by Candace Schepperle. With five golfers currently at least six under, and a clear, calm day forecast for Saturdays play, the record could very well fall. Thursdays morning monsoon pushed play back, but didnt stop Woods from methodically working her way through the course, following up her first-round 67 with a 69 in very unfavorable scoring conditions. Albrecht was holding steady through the second round, but when darkness fell, she still had six holes to play. I had gotten to two under for the day and then bogeyed my last hole, Albrecht said. But for how it was that day, I managed to keep things in play. So it was back on the course bright and early Friday morning to finish up her second round under clear, blue skies. Her fortunes, however, werent so bright as she finished the second round at a two-over 74, to fall one back of Woods heading into Fridays regular schedule though it was anything but regular. Because of the delay, the format changed to a shotgun start with each hole being occupied, many with two foursomes, when things teed off. This led to some lags, but the first part of the round was advantageous for scoring. And right off the bat the race was on as Woods and Albrecht each birdied their first two holes, though by the end of the front nine, Woods 32 had dropped her to 12under-par, while Albrechts 35 had her at eight under. Coming down to the wire See HARDER, page 4B By LAUREN WELBORN Special to the News-SunSEBRING Practice makes perfect is perhaps the best clich to describe the recent efforts of the Sebring Varsity girlssoccer team. As they continue to face teams who previously beat them, the Lady Streaks are coming back to win against teams such as Lake Wales, whom they beat 2-1 on Thursday night after losing to them earlier this season. With this new inspiration, they continued on to face the Haines City Friday night. At their last match, the Lady Hornets had ended the game in their favor, 1-0. However, Sebring would turn the tables with their own victory to move themselves above Haines City in the overall district seeding. Sebring came out strong, but so did the Lady Hornets. No one goalie was any less pressured than the other as each defense worked hard to protect its home end of the field. Junior keeper Megan Williams held her own with help from sophomo re defenders Michelle Voln y and Ashley Longabaugh. This would hold t he game scoreless at halftim e. However, the only go al for the night was soo n scored by left-footed juni or Jennifer Cochran in the se cond half. After a scramble in t he box, Cochran was able to move past the Haines Ci ty goalie and find an und efended spot of the net. Despite the excitemen t, the Lady Streaks knew th ey needed to maintain the ir composure. With plenty of time st ill left on the clock, the gir ls upheld the same pressu re against the Hornets an d kept them off the scor eboard to secure the win. We keep getting bett er each game, said seni or captain Nina Mercur e. These teams are expectin g an easy win, and we ju st wont allow it. The Lady Streaks clo se out their home schedu le Monday on Senior Night as they host Mulberry befo re closing out the regular se ason Thursday at La ke Placid. Lady Streaks on a roll By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING Continuing to build on their own strength, as well as that of their season thus far, the Lady Blue Streaks topped a four-team meet Thursday at the Firemens Field Fieldhouse. Squaring off with LaBelle, Hardee and DeSoto, Sebring finished first in six weight classes and totaled up 56 points to the Cowgirls 35, the Lady Wildcats 20 and the Bulldogs 7. Beginning with the 101 class, Amanda Hicks powered her way to a win with 70 pounds lifted in both the bench press and clean and jerk for a 140-pound total. The Streaks didnt get a win at 110, but Carlee Hill and Bianca Nortelus helped add some points to the total with a second and third, respectively. Hill and Nortelus both totaled 180 pounds for their two lifts, with Hill getting 90 on both her lifts and Nortelus going 95 and 85. The pre-meet weigh-in tiebreaker, though, went Hills way. Sebring went first and second at 119 with Ivy Pintor and Febe Murillo doing the honors. Pintor nearly cracked the 200-pound barrier, coming up just 10 pounds short with 100 on the bench and 90 in the clean and jerk. Out of her regulation attempts, Pintor gave 95 a t ry and stuck it, boding well as the sectional qualifi er approaches. Murillo went 85 and 80 f or a 165 total for her secon dplace finish. Brittany Lockhart conti nued her dominance in the 12 9 class, cruising past the 20 0pound mark with a 115 ben ch and 110 jerk for an easy w in with 225. The Lady Streaks also g ot a one, two finish at 139. Lauren Welborn an d Destiny Sutton turned t he trick with Welborn totalin g 225, with a 105 bench an d 120 jerk, while Sutton we nt 95 and 110 for a 205 total. Sebrings lady lifters push to win See STREAKS, p a g e 3B

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Umpire Clinic coming upSEBRING Amandatory umpires clinic will be held on Saturday, Jan. 22 from 8 a.m.-12 p.m. at the Highlands County Sports Complex located on Sheriffs Tower Road in Sebring. If you are an umpire, you must attend this clinic for necessary training. All umpires must be certified to participate in the upcoming leagues. Certification fee is $50. If you are interested in becoming an umpire, please call Dan Jamison for more information. Open registration for ALLadult softball players, men and women, is ongoing. Registration is for next years leagues. If you are interested in playing organized softball, please sign up at the Highlands County Sports Complex. For more information, please contact Dan Jamison at the Highlands County Sports Complex (863) 402-6755.New Year Golf BenefitSEBRING ANew Years golf tournament to benefit Eddie Bateman will tee off Saturday, Jan. 15 on the Deer Run course at Sun N Lake. The four-person scramble format will kick off with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. Cost is $55 per person/$220 per team. There are also sponsorships available. AGold sponsorship is $1,000 and gets four hole signs, a banner and one team entry. ASilver sponsorship is $500 and includes two hole signs, a banner and one team entry. ABronze sponsorship gets two hole signs and a banner and a single hole sponsorship, for $100, gets one hole sign. There are also single sponsor donations available for $25. For more information, contact Jady Prescott at 381-2117 or jady_52@hotmail.com.Panther Volleyball CampAVONPARK The South Florida Community College Volleyball program will be hosting a four week training camp running from Jan. 6-Feb. 3 for players from 6th to 12th grade. The camp will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30-8:30 p.m. and provides individual skill development and basic tactics. All campers will receive individual and team instruction from Coach Kim Crawford and members of the 2010-11 Lady Panthers. Crawford is a three-time college AllAmerican and played professionally in Europe, on the Bud Light Professional Beach Tour for Team Nike and on the Pro California Grass Tour. She has been trained by many Olympic coaches and looks forward to sharing her vast volleyball knowledge with all camp participants. The camp cost is $100 and is limited to the first 30 to register. To register, go to www.southflorida.edu and select the volleyball site. Click on volleyball camp, print out Admissions Application and Emergency Treatment forms. Mail Admissions Application and Emergency Treatment forms as indicated on application form, or bring to the Cashiers Office in Building B. For more information, contact the SFCC Athletic Department at the following campus phone numbers at extensio n 7037 Avon Park/Sebring, 784-703 7; Lake Placid, 465-5300; DeSoto, 49 47500; Hardee, 773-2252; or ema il kim.crawford@southflorida.edu.Panther 5KAVON PARK The second annu al South Florida Community Colle ge Panther 5K Run/Walk has been plann ed for Saturday, Feb. 26 at the SFC C Highland Campus. The SFCC Foundation, Inc. and B ill Jarrett Ford Mercury are sponsoring t he event, and proceeds benefit the college s intercollegiate athletics programs. The entry fee for the SFCC Panther 5 K Run/Walk is $20 through Feb. 16 and $2 5 from Feb. 17 through the day of the rac e. Students with a current I.D. may regi ster for $15. Every participant receives a Dri-F it long-sleeve shirt sizes cannot be gua ranteed for those who enter after Feb. 17 Registration is 7-7:45 a.m. on race d ay in the parking lot in front of the SFC C University Center. The race begins at 8 a.m. Entry forms are available online at www.southflorida.edu/panther5k Participants can mail their copies an d entry fees to the SFCC Foundation, In c., 13 East Main Street, Avon Park, F L 33825; or fax forms to 863-453-8023 an d call 863-453-3133 with credit card info rmation. For more information about the SFC C Panther 5K, call the SFCC Foundation at 863-453-3133. Youth Baseball Yard SaleSEBRING Amulti-family yard sa le will be held at Max Long Sports Compl ex on Saturday, Jan. 15 to benefit Tea m Sebring baseball. These 12-year olds are going to Cooperstown, NYin August 2011 to pa rticipate in the American Youth Baseba ll Invitational Tournament.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worsh ip Center presents the First Annual Go lf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun sta rt at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes o ne team of four golfers, one tee sign and tw o green signs. Gold Sponsor $300 includes one tea m of four golfers, one green sign. Silver Sponsor $150 includes o ne green sign, one tee sign. Bronze Sponsor $100 includes o ne green sign. Individual player $60 includes gre en fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26 ). Team of Four Golfers $240 includ es green fees, cart and lunch ($280 aft er March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, F L 33871. Or register online at wingsoffaithchri stianworshipcenter.com. Proceeds to be donated to scholarsh ip program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jaso n Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhanke rson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com. WILD-CARD PLAYOFFS Saturday, Jan. 8 New Orleans at Seattle, late N.Y. Jets at Indianapolis, late Sunday, Jan. 9 Baltimore at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Green Bay at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS Saturday, Jan. 15 Indianapolis, Kansas City or Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m. Green Bay, New Orleans or Seattle at Atlanta, 8 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 16 Philadelphia, New Orleans or Seattle at Chicago, 1 p.m. N.Y. Jets, Kansas City or Baltimore at New England, 4:30 p.m. CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS Sunday, Jan. 23 NFC, 3 p.m. AFC, 6:30 p.m. PRO BOWL Sunday, Jan. 30 AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. SUPER BOWL Sunday, Feb. 6 At Arlington, Texas AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB Boston287.800 New York2114.6007 Philadelphia1521.4171312Toronto1224.3331612New Jersey1026.2781812Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami299.763 Orlando2412.6674 Atlanta2414.6325 Charlotte1221.3641412Washington925.26518 Central Division WLPctGB Chicago2312.657 Indiana1419.4248 Milwaukee1321.382912Detroit 1124.31412 Cleveland828.2221512WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio306.833 Dallas269.743312New Orleans2116.568912Memphis1719.47213 Houston1620.44414 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City2413.649 Utah2413.649 Denver2015.5713 Portland2017.5414 Minnesota928.24315 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Lakers2611.703 Golden State1521.4171012Phoenix1420.4121012L.A. Clippers1124.31414 Sacramento825.24216 ___ Thursdays Games Oklahoma City 99, Dallas 95 Sacramento 122, Denver 102 Fridays Games San Antonio 90, Indiana 87 Philadelphia 105, Chicago 99 Washington 97, New Jersey 77 Boston 122, Toronto 102 Memphis 110, Utah 99 Portland 108, Minnesota 98 Orlando 110, Houston 95 Miami 101, Milwaukee 95, OT Golden State 116, Cleveland 98 L.A. Lakers 101, New Orleans 97 New York 121, Phoenix 96 Saturdays Games Indiana at Atlanta, late Washington at Charlotte, late Milwaukee at New Jersey, late Philadelphia at Detroit, late Boston at Chicago, late Memphis at Oklahoma City, late Orlando at Dallas, late Utah at Houston, late Sundays Games Sacramento at Toronto, 1 p.m. Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. Minnesota at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Miami at Portland, 9 p.m. New Orleans at Denver, 9 p.m. New York at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA Pittsburgh261245613697 Philadelphia2510555135106 N.Y. Rangers2415351124106 N.Y. Islanders122063090122 New Jersey102822271128 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Boston211264811188 Montreal221634710297 Buffalo1718539111118 Ottawa161963892124 Toronto1620436105121 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Tampa Bay2412553123130 Washington2312652120107 Atlanta2216650137136 Carolina1915644117120 Florida1819238107103WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Detroit2610557143117 Nashville211364810496 Chicago2218347133124 St. Louis2013646106110 Columbus2018343103124 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA Vancouver27855914097 Colorado2115547136130 Minnesota2015545103114 Calgary1820440112123 Edmonton1320733101138 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA Dallas2413553120116 Anaheim2218448116123 San Jose2115547118115 Phoenix1913846112115 Los Angeles2217145118101 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Thursdays Games Toronto 6, St. Louis 5, SO Montreal 2, Pittsburgh 1, SO Minnesota 3, Boston 1 Philadelphia 4, New Jersey 2 Phoenix 2, Colorado 0 Edmonton 2, N.Y. Islanders 1 Nashville 5, Los Angeles 2 Buffalo 3, San Jose 0 Fridays Games Chicago 3, Ottawa 2, SO N.Y. Rangers 3, Dallas 2, SO Detroit 5, Calgary 4, SO Toronto 9, Atlanta 3 Carolina 5, Florida 3 Vancouver 6, Edmonton 1 Anaheim 6, Columbus 0 Saturdays Games New Jersey at Philadelphia, late N.Y. Islanders at Colorado, late Boston at Montreal, late Tampa Bay at Ottawa, late Minnesota at Pittsburgh, late Florida at Washington, late N.Y. Rangers at St. Louis, late Buffalo at Phoenix, late Nashville at San Jose, late Detroit at Vancouver, late Columbus at Los Angeles, late Sundays Games Atlanta at Carolina, 1:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at New Jersey, 5 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 6 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Chicago, 7 p.m. San Jose at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Fridays Scores EAST Baruch 61, Hunter 52 Canisius 62, Siena 61 E. Mennonite 98, Penn St.-Beaver 71 Fairfield 59, Marist 44 Hartwick 59, Nazareth, N.Y. 54 Iona 70, St. Peter's 52 Loyola, Md. 82, Manhattan 67 Ramapo 94, Vassar 69 Rider 82, Niagara 65 St. John Fisher 80, Utica 66 SOUTH Campbell 65, Kennesaw St. 52 Centre 65, Sewanee 51 Wheeling Jesuit 82, Bluefield St. 62 MIDWEST Butler 79, Cleveland St. 56 Creighton 72, S. Illinois 66, OT Drake 64, Bradley 58 Indiana St. 70, N. Iowa 45 Missouri St. 65, Evansville 50 Valparaiso 79, Youngstown St. 55 Wichita St. 65, Illinois St. 51 FARWEST Rocky Mountain 72, Carroll, Mont. 60 Montana St.-Northern 75, Great Falls 67 Fridays Scores EAST Army 54, Colgate 40 Baruch 73, Hunter 43 Nazareth, N.Y. 50, Hartwick 49 Quinnipiac 60, Monmouth, N.J. 57 Sacred Heart 65, Fairleigh Dickinson 39 Susquehanna 67, Goucher 58 Utica 77, St. John Fisher 66 SOUTH Centre 82, Sewanee 45 Roanoke 68, Washington & Lee 61 Temple 60, Charlotte 57 Wheeling Jesuit 64, Bluefield St. 41 MIDWEST Bethany Lutheran 74, Finlandia 65 FAR WEST CS Bakersfield 90, Concordia, Calif. 63 Carroll, Mont. 81, Rocky Mountain 67 Colo.-Colo. Springs 69, Western St., Colo. 62 Great Falls 85, Montana St.-Northern 73 Mesa, Colo. 82, CSU-Pueblo 70BASEBALLMajor League Baseball MLBNamed Lou Koskovolis senior vice president of corporate sales and marketing. American League TEXAS RANGERSDesignated RHP Guillermo Moscoso for assignment, National League ST. LOUIS CARDINALSPromoted Michael Girsch to assistant general manager and Sig Mejdal to director, amateur draft analysis. WASHINGTON NATIONALSSigned 1B Adam LaRoche to two-year contract.BASKETBALLNational Basketball Association MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVESActivated F Anthony Tolliver.FOOTBALLNational Football League NFLFined Indianapolis LB Gary Brackett $35,000 for his hit on Tennessee LS Ken Amato during a Jan. 2 game. Fined Baltimore LB Terrell Suggs $15,000 for striking Bengals wide receiver Jerome Simpson in the face after a play. Fined New England NT Vince Wilfork and Miami DE Paul Soliai $10,000 each for roughing the passer. Fined Oakland DL John Henderson $7,500 for slamming Kansas City QB Matt Cassel to the ground. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTSPlaced DL Mike Wright on injured reserve. Suspended DE Brandon Deaderick for undisclosed reasons. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERSNamed Jim Harbaugh coach. SEATTLE SEAHAWKSSigned G Lemuel Jeanpierre and CB Josh Pinkard from the practice squad. TENNESSEE TITANSSigned LS Jake Ingram, LB Kevin Malast and QB Brett Ratliff to future contracts.HOCKEYNational Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANESRecalled C Jon Matsumoto from Charlotte (AHL). Placed F Jiri Tlusty on injured reserve, retroactive to Dec. 16. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKSRecalled D Nick Leddy from Rockford (AHL). DALLAS STARSAcquired F Jamie Langenbrunner from New Jersey for a conditional 2011 secondor thirdround draft pick. NASHVILLE PREDATORSReassigned F Linus Klasen to Milwaukee (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERSRecalled F Jeremy Colliton from Bridgeport (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTESReassigned G Matt Climie to San Antonio (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORSRecalled G Robin Lehner from Binghamton (AHL). ST. LOUIS BLUESAssigned F Adam Cracknell to Peoria (AHL). Recalled F T.J. Hensick from Peoria. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid MONDAY: Girls Weightlifting at Sebring,5 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at Avon Park,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball vs.Avon Park, 6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer at Tenoroc,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer at Hardee,6/7:30 p.m. THURSDAY: Girls Soccer at Sebring,6/7:30 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Girls Basketball vs.Winter Haven,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.Mulberry, 6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Weightlifting vs.Lake Placid,5 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at Lake Wales,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball at Frostproof, 6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer vs.Osceola,6/7:30 p.m. Walker TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at All Saints,7 p.m.; Girls Basketball at All Saints,5:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Boys Basketball at Moore Haven,7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball at Moore Haven,6 p.m. Heartland Christian MONDAY: JV Basketball at West Glades,4:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at Haven Christian,7:30 p.m. TUESDAY,Jan.18: Boys Basketball vs.Victory Prep,6:30 p.m. THURSDAY,Jan.20: Boys Basketball at Moore Haven,6/7:30 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Girls Weightlifting vs.LaBelle,5 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Lake Placid,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball at Lake Placid,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer vs.Ft.Meade,6:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer at Okeechobee, 6 p.m. THURSDAY: Girls Basketball at Bartow,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer vs.Hardee,7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.Hardee,6 p.m.; Girls Weightlifting at DeSoto,5:30 p.m. S S K K A A T T I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . Skating & Gymnastics Spectacular . . . . . . N N B B C C C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Kansas at Michigan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S SM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Notre Dame at Marquette . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Wisconsin at Michigan State . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 7 7 p p . m m . Texas at Texas Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 p p . m m . Georgia Tech at Clemson . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 9 9 p p . m m . Florida at T ennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E F F O O O O T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 p p . m m . Kraft Bowl Boston College vs. Nevada . E E S S P P N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . BCS Championship Auburn vs. Oregon E E S S P P N NTimes, games, channels all subject to change N N F F L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Baltimore at Kansas City . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Green Bay at Philadelphia . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S SG G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 a a . m m . EuroPGA Africa Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 6 6 p p . m m . PGA Hyundai Tournament of Champs . G G O O L L F FW W O O M M E E N N S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . Dayton at Xavier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Arkansas at Mississippi State . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 5 5 p p . m m . Tulane at Alabama-Birmingham . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N B B A A S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 p p . m m . Miami at Portland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NB B O O W W L L I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . PBA U.S. vs. The World . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N LIVESPORTSONTV NFL Playoffs NHL NBA M. College Basketball Transactions W. College Basketball Page 2BNews-Sun Sunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.co m

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 3B STARTS TOMORROW655-6252 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E Calee Hill locks out this 90-pound clean and jerk Thursday, helping her to a secondplace finish in her weight class as Sebring won its home weightlifting meet over visiting LaBelle, Hardee and DeSoto. Kemoy Newman picked up another win for Sebring at 154 as she benched 115 and clean and jerked 120 for a 235 total. Shelby Hicks added some points to the cause with a third-place finish in the class by lifting matching 105s for a 210 total. The Sebring wins finished in the 183 class with Roenecka Freeman combining her lifts for 195. The Streaks will have the upcoming week to put in some more work as they ready to host the Sectional Qualifier Saturday, Jan. 1 5 at 9 a.m. They then will partake in the annual Travis Tod d Invitational at Avon Pa rk Thursday, Jan. 20 as a fin al warm-up for the Sta te Qualifier in Port Charlot te Wednesday, Jan. 26. Continued from 1B Streaks win, host Sectionals Saturday By RALPH D. RUSSO Associated PressSCOTTSDALE, Ariz. P layoff pushing lawmakers a nd political action committ ees are far from the biggest p roblems facing the Bowl C hampionship Series these d ays. Apathy seems to have set i n among many college footb all fans toward the sports m arquee games, and bowl o fficials indicate they are r eady to try and fix it. The problem really isnt t he BCS national title game. T ickets to Mondays showd own between No. 1 Auburn a nd second-ranked Oregon a re a hot item. Its the undercard the O range, Fiesta and Sugar b owls, and to a far lesser e xtent the Rose Bowl that c ould use a boost. Ticket sales for some of t hose games have been slugg ish, and ratings generally h ave been lukewarm for m atchups that havent gotten t he casual fan excited. We have to find a way to r evitalize the market place, S ugar Bowl executive direct or Paul Hoolahan said. The ratings for Hoolahans g ame were down a touch, f rom 8.5 last year when the g ame was on Fox to 8.4 this s eason, ESPNs first as the T Vhome of the BCS t hough the Superdome in N ew Orleans was filled to c apacity Tuesday for BCSn ewcomer Arkansas and O hio State, one of college f ootballs glamour programs a nd a reliable draw with its e normous alumni base. The Fiesta Bowl and the O range Bowl had more serio us issues. The Fiesta Bowl on Jan. 1 b etween Oklahoma and C onnecticut drew a 6.7 rati ng, down 22 percent from l ast year, and UConn sold o nly about 5,000 of the 1 7,500 tickets the school was r equired to buy from organize rs. Attendance at the U niversity of Phoenix S tadium in Glendale, Ariz., w as 67,232, about 6,000 b elow capacity for the game. At the Orange Bowl in M iami, Stanford and Virginia T ech drew a 7.1 overnight r ating, down from last years 7 .2 for Georgia Tech-Iowa, a nd the attendance of 65,453 w as about 9,000 below c apacity at Sun Life Stadium a s neither team came close to s elling its allotment of 1 7,500 tickets. Geography was clearly an i ssue for those two games. In a perfect world, S tanford would have played i n Arizona, far closer to its c ampus in Palo Alto, Calif., a nd Connecticut could have shot down to south Florida. But the way BCS berths are dolled out prevented that. Anytime we can make it better for fans that want to support their teams and for the quality and the excitement of the game and the attraction of the matchups, that seems a sensible thing to address and to discuss, Fiesta Bowl executive director John Junker said Friday. That may not be easy to do, but I think theres some obvious value. He also added: Im not sure its all necessarily, solely geographic. While Junker praised Connecticut and its fans, the Huskies were clearly a problem for the BCS this season. They earned the programs first BCS bid by winning the Big Easts automatic berth, but they were 8-4 and a huge underdog against Oklahoma, sneaking into the last spot in the APTop 25 at the very end of the regular season. The game played out about as expected with the Sooners winning 48-20. No one in the bowl business likes lopsided games. Thats why, even though it made more sense geographically for the Orange Bowl to take UConn, given the choice between the Huskies and fifth-ranked Stanford, with Heisman Trophy runner-up Andrew Luck, officials in Miami understandably went for the more attractive team even if it meant empty seats in the stadium. We cant just focus in on the gate, Orange Bowl CEO Eric Poms said. Poms also said he was pleased with the opportunity to bring a Pac-10 to the Orange Bowl, just like he was thrilled to bring a Big Ten team in Iowa there last year. The Orange Bowls relationship with the Atlantic Coast Conference clearly hasnt been what either side would have hoped. With Miami and Florida State struggling to win the league in recent years, the ACCs representative in the Orange Bowl has been Virginia Tech three times in the past four years. Hokies fans flocked to Charlotte, N.C., for the ACC title game in early December, but were not so enthusiastic about gobbling up Orange Bowl tickets again. Return bowl trips generally arent ideal for anyone involved. Within the system theres a great degree of agreement that one of our primary goals is the experience for the student-athlete and frequent return trips probably doesnt serve that at its best, Junker said. To make matters worse, from an Orange Bowl standpoint, Stanford then went on to run away with the game in the second half, winning 4012 and celebrating before rows and rows of empty seats. So what can be done? Bowl officials arent ready to present specific ideas and dont think for a second that a playoff will be one of those ideas but there are a few others that will likely be tossed around in New Orleans when bowl officials and conference commissioners get together for their annual BCS meeting. Aminimum BCS ranking for automatic qualifiers. Away to eliminate future UConn-type problems would make conference champions have to reach a certain ranking to secure a spot. That number would need to be no higher than around 18th for the conferences to even listen. Mandating geographical considerations, so teams play closer to home. Making more teams atlarge eligible, which could require lifting the rule that limits conferences to no more than two BCS bids. So an 11th-ranked, two-loss LSU could still make it to a bigmoney bowl. Allow for more horsetrading. The system doesnt allow much (if any) flexibility for the bowls to broker deals to trade teams. BCS executive director Bill Hancock files some of the apathy issues under unintended consequences of a system that basically works, and isnt sure this seasons problems are anything more than just that this seasons problems. You have to be careful to evaluate the difference between a blip and a paradigm shift, he said. In every enterprise, youre making a mistake if youre not trying to improve it every year. The commissioners are absolutely committed to making this the best it can be ... through collaborative conversations. Fan apathy could be greatest threat to BCS We have to find a way to revitalize the market place.PAULHOOLAHAN Sugar Bowl exec. director By STEVEN WINE Associated PressDAVIE The Miami D olphinsstrange week took a nother bizarre turn Friday, l eaving coach Tony S paranos status still in d oubt. The Dolphins scheduled a l ate-afternoon news confere nce to announce the retent ion of Sparano, but the sess ion was postponed 20 minu tes before the scheduled s tart. Nearly two hours later, the D olphins rescheduled the s ession for Saturday. Aspokesman gave no reas on for the postponement. The Dolphinscross-count ry courtship of Stanford c oach Jim Harbaugh ended l ate Thursday, and he was h ired Friday to coach the San F rancisco 49ers. With Harbaugh no longer a n option, the Dolphins were e xpected to retain Sparano, w ho has one year left on his c ontract. Sparano met Friday at the t eam complex with owner Stephen Ross and general manager Jeff Ireland, but there was no announcement regarding who will coach the Dolphins in 2011. The news conference promised to be an entertaining exercise in damage control. While in limbo this week, Sparano reported to work daily, even as Ross and Ireland flew to California to get spurned by Harbaugh. Conducting a coaching search when the Dolphins still had a coach threatened to undermine Sparano, whose status was already shaky because of his teams lateseason meltdown. The sequence of events also raised questions about the state of his relationship with Ireland, which dates back eight years when both were with the Dallas Cowboys. The offseason has gone much like the latter part of the season for the Dolphins, who lost their final three games, including a 38-7 drubbing at New England in their finale last Sunday. Ross said before the season he expected the Dolphins to reach the Super Bowl, but instead they finished 7-9 and failed for the eighth time in nine years to reach the playoffs. Sparano led Miami to that lone postseason berth in 2008, his first year as an NFL coach. He has a three-year record of 25-23. Sparanos status still in question MCTphoto Is Tony Sparano still the Dolphins head coach? By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Fans were surprised on Wednesday night when they discovered that the Heartland Prowl season had been cancelled. Anote on the door of the South Florida Community College Gym announced that the game on Wednesday and that all future games for this season were cancelled. The Prowl is part of the American Basketball Association, a semi-pro group that has grown to over 60 teams since it began in 1999. The Prowl posted a winning record, winning two and losing just one, befo re cancelling their secon d matchup of the seaso n against the Florida Makos at South Florida Communi ty College on Wednesday. Team owner and gener al manager Levi William s could not be contacted f or comment at press time. Prowl season cancelled

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By KYLE HIGHTOWER Associated PressORLANDO Whether t he Orlando Magics rebuilt r oster is good enough to win a n NBAtitle remains to be s een. But whats becoming c learer by the day is that the M agic certainly have more t han enough offensive w eapons to take the pressure o ff All-Star center Dwight H oward when needed. With Howard saddled with e arly foul trouble, Orlando g ot 18 points apiece from B randon Bass and Jason R ichardson, and 16 points off t he bench from Ryan A nderson to beat the Houston R ockets 110-95 Friday night. The victory extended the M agics season-best winning s treak to eight games. Orlando clung to a threep oint advantage at the half, b ut blew open the game after s tarting the third quarter on a 1 9-5 run to build a 74-55 c ushion. Bass had seven points duri ng the spurt as the Magic o utscored the Rockets 39-21 i n the period to take a 92-71 l ead into the fourth. Anderson led all players w ith 13 points in the third. Thats the good thing that w e do have, is guys that can s tretch the court and take a l ot of attention, said A nderson, who was one of s ix Magic players in double f igures. Dwight doesnt h ave to score 30 points in the g ame to be felt. He opens the c ourt up for everybody. Bass, Richardson and A nderson helped overcome a 2 7-point night by Kevin M artin, who was coming off a 45-point performance in a loss to Portland on Wednesday. We fell apart in the third quarter, Houston coach Rick Adelman said. We struggled offensively, we just gave in at the other end. We gave up 39 points, thats not going to do it on the road. When Howard was in the game for Orlando, he drew lots of attention from an undersized Houston frontcourt. The Rockets were playing without 6-foot-6 starting center Chuck Hayes, who has missed five straight games with a sore right ankle, but had a big body in the middle in 6-10 Jordan Hill. But when Hill and forward Luis Scola attempted to double-team Howard, it opened up plenty of lanes for almost everyone else in a Magic uniform. The Magic took a 53-50 lead into halftime, but needed every one of the opening 24 minutes to earn that early edge. The Rockets led by as many as nine points in a fastpaced first quarter in which both teams shot over 50 percent from the floor. Martin had 19 in the first half, including 11 in the first quarter, as he exploited a lane that was mostly void of Howards presence. Howard picked up two quick fouls in the first quarter and got his third whistle of the night with 9:33 remaining in the second quarter. He logged just 10 minutes of action in the half. The Magic stayed close and on the backs of Richardson and Bass, who had 13 and 11 first half points, respectively. Orlando also shot 51 percent from the field and 4 of 9 from the 3-point line. It was pretty much an even game going into halftime, Martin said. He (Howard) sat the whole second quarter and it was one of those games going back and forth. He just showed what his presence can do on the court in the third quarter. Because none of us is going to grow into 7-foot-2 and become a shot blocker overnight. Defending champion Kyle R oig, four shots back when t he round began, made the t urn with a 34 to keep her w ithin reach as well at six u nder. Thats around the time a c hilly afternoon wind kicked u p, adding another layer to t hese crazy first three days of t he tournament. I had a good front nine, b ut the back nine just felt terr ible, Woods said, adding t hat the wind didnt effect h er. It was my short game t hat messed me up and let me d own on the back nine. That messing up translated t o a two-over 38, giving her a 7 0 for the day and bringing h er three-round total to 10u nder. Albrecht, meanwhile, was s orting through her own u neven day. It was very sloppy and I d id a lot of scrambling t oday, she said. Scramble she did, as she o vercame three bogies for the r ound with six birdies to c ome in with a 69 and the 10u nder tie with Woods. And then, there she was, l ooming in the not-so-distant b ackground, Roig kicked it u p a notch with a back nine 3 4 for a 68 on the day to put h er two shots off the lead h eading into Saturdays final r ound. I think I played well, she s aid, also adding that the c hilly, often strong breezes w erent a problem. The last t wo tournaments I have been i n were very windy, so Ive k ind of gotten used to it. The final player in Fridays f inal foursome, Cydney C lanton, kept herself in the r ace. Coming into the round, the A uburn senior fell back at p oints during the round but w as back to six under by the e nd with her 71. Playing in the group ahead o f them, Victoria Tanco m oved into the final group f or Saturday with a 68 to put h er three shots off the lead. Ginger Howard had the s hot of the day Friday, comi ng up with a double eagle on t he par five sixth hole, helping her to a round of 66 and getting her to within six shots of the lead. Also within striking distance on the final day are Holly Clyburn, five under, and Leona Maguire and Erica Popson, both at three under. Even amid the strong competition, however, the two leaders definitely found the enjoyment of the day. It was my first time playing with Ashleigh and Kyle, Woods said. I definitely had a lot of fun playing with and getting to know them. Amindset Albrecht seeks to continue. Its about having fun, she said. I just want to go out, play my own game and have some fun. And so it comes down to the final day, with two strong players tied for the lead, a group of tough and the defending champ just two strokes back a defending champ all to familiar with the scenario. Theres a lot of golf left, Roig said. It could come down to the last hole, just like it did for me last year. Check www.newssun.com for a recap of Saturdays final round. Page 4BNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com 6 MONTH MEMBERSHIPS NOW AVAILABLE(863) 382-0500 3201 Golfview Rd. Sebring(863) 382-0744for 9 Hole Executive RatesPrices good thru 3/31/10 Incl. Tax & CartMonday thru Friday:8am 1pm $36By 8, After 1 $29 Saturday & Sunday: $29 Wednesday, Jan 12thTanglewood Health Fair 3000 Tanglewood Pkwy Off Hwy 27 (1/2 Mile North Walmart Sebring)Monday, Jan 17thLakeshore Mall (Meeting Room) News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Kyle Roig sends her chip shot up onto the second green in Fridays third-round play of the Harder Hall Invitational. The defending champion, Roig shot a 68 on the day to pull to within two shots of the lead. Continued from 1B Harder Invite set for wild finish By COLIN FLY Associated PressMILWAUKEE Chris Bosh had 16 points and 12 rebounds, leading the surging Miami Heat in a 101-95 overtime victory over the Milwaukee Bucks on Friday night that extended their road winning streak to 12 games. Miami has won 20 of its last 21 after a 9-8 start, but this was by far one of the grittiest games the Heat have played as they inch closer to the 1971-72 Lakersrecord streak of 16 consecutive road wins. Bosh, who made several key plays down the stretch, scored 10 of his 16 in the fourth quarter and overtime, while LeBron James added 18 of his 26 points in the first half to go along with 10 rebounds. It appeared this game wouldnt be close after Miami led big early. But Andrew Bogut had a career-high 27 rebounds and scored 12 points despite a 4-of-17 effort from the field, Chris Douglas-Roberts scored 3 0 points off the bench an d Earl Boykins hit a layu p over 7-foot-3 Zydrun as Ilgauskas to send the gam e to overtime. This was the first of fi ve straight on the road f or Miami. It started in a place whe re the Lakersstreak ended 3 9 years ago, but the He at never trailed in overtime. With the game tied at 9 5, Bosh hit two free throw s and after John Salmo ns missed a 3-pointer, Carl os Arroyo added a layup th at made it 97-93. Boykins made a wi ld shot off the glass that c ut the lead to two with 1:0 1 left, but couldnt hit a lon g 3-pointer that would ve given the Bucks the lead o n their next possession an d finished with 14 points. Dwyane Wade, who h ad 14 points, grabbed t he rebound and Arroyo hit tw o free throws with 8.9 se conds to play. James added two mo re for the final margin. Bosh scores 16 points as Heat hang tough Third-quarter spurt lifts Magic over Rockets Associated PressTAVARES Brittany Lincicome will play in a mens tournament next week as part of her preparations for the LPGATour season. The long-hitting Lincicome, a three-time winner on the LPGATour, has entered the NGA Hooters Tours Bridgestone Winter Series event at Deer Island Golf Club. She will be the first current LPGATour player to play in a Winter Series tournament. (The LPGATour) fi nished in December, and I need to keep playing to g et ready for next season , Lincicome said Frida y. This will be my seven th year on the LPGATour an d I still get nervous when I tee off (in the LPGAse ason-opening event) in Thailand. This tourname nt is close to home and has a lot of competition in it. I think its a great way for m e to get some of the nerv es out before our seaso n starts. LPGAs Lincicome enters mens tournament

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Special to the News-SunSEBRING During the m onth of January, the H ighlands Art League will f eature an exhibit by a group o f women artists who have s hared some unique experie nces. Afew years ago several of t he women met at the art l eague to paint and soon an i dea for a painting gett ogether outside of Florida s prang into being. They met for several years i n North Carolina at Lake T suga, and then at a bed and b reakfast called Plum Tree I nn on the banks of the North T oe River in the small village o f Plum Tree. Needless to say, their s hared experience led them to e xplore the idea of expanding t heir horizons and in 2008 t hey met on the Almalfi C oast of Italy at a small fishi ng village, Massa Lubrense. I n 2009 and 2010, they chose t o visit the American southw est, first in Colorado and t hen in Taos, N.M. Of the 20 women involved w ith the group, usually nine o r 10 will participate in an a dventure. Not all of them are from F lorida but the group, known a s The Painting Divas, will o pen their exhibit as artists of t he month at HALon Friday, J an. 14 for the downtown g allery walk. Featured in this months e xhibit are Susan Clark, B arbara Howell and Wanda H unter from Louisville, Miss.; Betty Ferrell from Cordova, Tenn.; Barbara Wade from Nebo, N.C. and Sebring; Rose Besch from Oswego, N.Y. and Sebring; Cathy Futral from Frostproof; Lisa Ferrier from Deerfield Beach; Mary Jane Delestang from Avon Park; Anne Reynolds from Lake Placid; and Shirley Stone from Sebring. Women artists featured at HAL www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 5B 1/10/11 www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 Since 1931NO DEALER FEE, PLUS TAX & TAG, STATE FEE, O% withALLY, SEBC RULES APPLY. 2010JEEPWRANGLERUNLIMITEDX NEW2010DODGECHALLENGERNEW2010RAM2500CREW4X4CUMMINSTURBODIESELNEW2010JEEPWRANGLERSPORT4X4NEW2010DODGEJOURNEYNEW2010JEEPCOMPASSNEW2010CHRYSLERSEBRINGTOURINGJX054 DX052 NO DEALER FEES2010DODGEGRAND CARAVANSEWAS............$25,835 Rebate............ -$1,750 VanBonus......... -$750 WellsBonus.... -$1,750ChryslerGroupor VanOwnerBonus-$1,000 $ 20,585 *2010CHRYSLER TOWN-N-COUNTRY 0% FOR 72 MOSWAS............$37,270 Rebate............ -$2,000 VanBonus......... -$750 WellsBonus.... -$2,000ChryslerGroupor VanOwnerBonus-$2,000 0% FOR 72 MOS WAS$26,080 $ 21,999 NOW WAS$26,280 $ 22,999 NOWTX136 NOW $ 30,520 NOWCX100 WAS$26,555 $ 22,999 NOWTX115 WAS$50,175 $ 40,999 NOWJX079 WAS$23,635 $ 19,999 NOWTX131 WAS$24,475 $ 20,999 NOW WAS$22,885 $ 17,999 NOWCX139 CLEARANCE2010 MODEL YEAR ARTS& LEISURE Courtesy photo Barbara Howell and Wanda Hunter (above), both from Louisville, Miss., join The Painting Divas on a painting get-together in New Mexico. There work will be among that displayed at the Highlands Art League in January. Cathy Futral (Right), of Frostproof, paints in Colorado. She is one of the Painting Divas, who will have their work on display at the Highlands Art League this month. The Painting Divas to open show Friday Special to the News-SunAVON PARK JG Big Star Productions will present 2010 Country Legend of the Year Gene Watson & The Farewell Party Band in concert on Friday, Feb. 4 at South Florida Community College, 600 West College Drive. Also appearing will be local country music favorites, BJ Slaughter and The Country Classic Band, as well as Chris MacArthur & The Florida Cracker Boys. Doors open at 5:15 p.m.; the show starts at 6 p.m. Ticket prices are $25 for general admission, $35 for reserved seating and $50 for reserved seats plus a personal Meet & Greet with the artists. For special needs seating, call (863) 494-0577. Tickets can be purchased online at www.JGBigStarProduction s.com (all major credit cards are accepted) or call (863) 494-0577 General admission only tickets are available at these Mid-Florida Credit Union locations: Okeechobee, Lake Placid, Sebring (both locations), Avon Park, Wauchula and Arcadia. Watson has six No. 1 Country Hits, 23 top tens, more than 75 charted songs and 49 albums. His 2009 released album received great critical praise including Album of the Year from one site. USAToday says, Gene Watson is one of countrys finest singers. Associated Press states, Hes never sounded better, which is saying something. His country classi cs include Love In The H ot Afternoon, Paper Rosie , Farewell Party, Should I Come Home (Or Should I Go Crazy), Nothing Su re Looked Good On You , Any Which Way Yo u Can, Fourteen Car at Mind, Speak Soft ly (Youre Talking To M y Heart), Youre Out Doin g What Im Here Doin g Without, Sometimes I Get Lucky, and Drinki n My Way Back Home, ju st to name a few. Watson is a member of the Texas Country Mus ic Hall of Fame and was vot ed Entertainer of the Year b y R.O.P.E, a music society of his peers Considered one of t he finest pure-country singe rs of his generation an d known as The Singer s Singer, Watson offers u p one of the greatest trad itional country shows in t he business. His stunnin g voice captivates audienc es and keeps his fans comin g back again and again. Country legend Gene Watson in concert Feb. 4 Courtesy pho to The legendary voice of Gene Watson and The Farewell Party Band comes to South Florida Community College in February. Follow the news while you follow your friends. Check out the News-Sun online at www.newssun.com or get updates on your favorie social networking sites www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun

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Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South Florida Community College Jazz Series presents an evening of hot jazz starring the Marty Grosz Quartet, during its Jazz Series, at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in the 245seat SFCC University Center Auditorium. Jazz guitarist, historian, and vocalist Marty Grosz is todays foremost jazz rhythm guitarist and chord soloist. He is one of the few major jazz guitarists who doesnt use an amplifier and is among the last remaining proponents of the acoustic guitar tradition in jazz. His vocals have become as much in demand at recording sessions and jazz concerts as his driving guitar rhythm. They are delivered in styles ranging from barrelhouse abandon to whispered restraint and are often mischievous. Grosz is a brilliant acoustic guitarist whose solos bring back the sound of Carl Kress and Dick McDonough of the 1930s, while his vocals are very much in the Fats Waller tradition. Grosz will be accompanied by Vince Giordano, a bandleader and authority on recreating the sounds of the 1920s and s. Giordano is obsessive about musical authenticity in resurrecting heroes like Bix Beiderbecke, Fletcher Henderson, and Jelly Roll Morton. He is well known in New York City for performing with his band The Nighthawks. Also joining Grosz is one of the most wide-ranging instrumentalists, Scott Robinson. Robinson has been heard on the tenor sax, trumpet, clarinet, and bass sax. He has been heard numerous times on film, radio, and television, and his discography now includes over 165 recordings. Dan Block will also be performs in the quartet. Block has a masters degree from the Julliard School in clarinet. He has been a member of Giordanos Nighthawks for the past 25 years. The 2010-11 Jazz Series is sponsored by John and Evelyn Mills, and Tom and Nancy Mitchell. The performance sponsor is Forrest H. Hilton, CPA, PAand Ruth Austin. Tickets range from $21 to $24 and may be purchased online at http://performances.southflorida.edu. Tickets may also be purchased by calling the SFCC Box Office at 784-7178 or by visiting the SFCC Box Office located in the front of the SFCC Theatre for the Performing Arts, 60 0 West College Drive, fro m 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m Monday-Friday. Page 6BNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com Established 19311600 US 27 South Avon Park Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home4001 Sebring Parkway Sebring, 385-0125 111 E. Circle St. Avon Park, 453-3101 Chris T.Nelson Craig M. Nelson Darin S. MacNeil W .W LUMBER CO. 465-3331Hwy. 27 S. Lake PlacidWere More Than Just Lumber COMPLETE Building SuppliesPlease support the above businesses. They have made this page possible. Inspirational Thoughtsby Patricia Valentine THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502 Residential Commercial Mobile HomesSmall Enough to Know You Large Enough to Serve You500 South Lake Avenue 382-8300 453-3019 THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502But when the fullness of the time was come,God sent forth his Son,made of a woman,made under the law. The Bible is filled with examples of people waiting for Gods promises.Abraham and Sarah waited for God to give them their promised son.The children of Israel waited in captivity for their deliverer to appear.David waited on God while he was being pursued by Sauls men. Israel waited for her Messiah,and the disciples waited for the coming of the Holy Spirit.We are waiting now for our blessed hope,the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ for His church. God always came through for those who waited on Him.The promised Son was born.The deliverer appeared.Enemies were defeated;the Messiah was sent;and the Holy Spirit came. One day we who are waiting expectantly will be caught up in the clouds to be with our Lord forever.God is never late,and He never forgets His promise.David said,Wait on the Lord;be of good courage,and he shall strengthen thine heart:wait,I say,on the Lord.Psalm 27:14. Dont give up on your promise.Keep believing God and it shall come to pass.Be Blessed! Attend the Church of Your Choice! PUBLIC HEARING NOTICEAll interested parties within Hardee, Highlands, and Okeechobee counties are hereby advised that the Transportation Disadvantaged Local Coordinating Board will hold a public hearing during their regular Board meeting on January 26, 2011 at 1:30 p.m. at the Okeechobee County Public Health Department, 1728 NW 9thAvenue, Okeechobee, FL 33427. This public hearing is being held for the purpose of receiving input on the Transportation Disadvantaged program coordinated by Veolia Transportation Services, Inc. Transportation to the public hearing will be provided on a rst come rst served basis to eligible persons who call to make transportation reservations. To make transportation reservations call: All of Hardee County 773-0015 All of Okeechobee County 357-9900 Avon Park 452-0239 Lake Placid 699-0995 Sebring 382-0139 All other areas 1-800-260-0139 Individuals who need accommodations such as Braille, tape, large print or an interpreter should call Marcia Staszko at the Central Florida Regional Planning Council, 1-800-297-8041 ext 103 at least 5 days prior to the meeting. Written comments will be accepted. Send comments to: Marcia Staszko, Central Florida Regional Planning Council, P.O. Box 2089, Bartow, FL 33830 ARTS& LEISURE Courtesy photo Gail Tuttle is the featured crafter at the Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative for the month of January. She enjoys sewing, crocheting and bead work. Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The C aladium Arts and Crafts C ooperative announces that G ail Tuttle is the first memb er of the Co-op to be s elected as the Crafter of the M onth for January 2011. T uttle is a retired teacher, t he mother of four and the g randmother of eight. She j oined the Caladium Co-op i n October of 1997 after m oving to Lake Placid from O hio. Recently, she returned t o Ohio to be close to family a nd is now a snowbird, w orking at the Co-op in the w inter and early spring. Tuttle has served on n umerous committees, has b een president-elect and p resident and is presently serving as chairperson of the Trash and Treasure/Chili Lunch to be held March 19. Most of Tuttles crafts include sewing in some form or other. She makes casserole carriers, appliqued tea towels, adult clothing protectors (a.k.a. bibs), placemats, crocheted scarf necklaces, among many other crafts. She works Tuesdays at the front desk of the Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative and would love for people to stop in and say Hello. The Co-op is at 132 E. Interlake Blvd. Call 6995940 or visit the Web site www.caladiumarts.org for further information. Tuttle is Co-ops featured crafter Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Veteran Broadway and concert star William Michals performs during South Florida Community Colleges Matinee Series at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 18 in the SFCC Theatre for the Performing Arts. Otherwise known as Americans Baritone, Michals recently appeared in the landmark revival of Rodgers and Hammersteins South Pacific at Lincoln Center in New York City. Michals made his Broadway debut as The Beast in Disneys Beauty and the Beast, and later returned to play Gaston in the same production. His career has continued in such roles as Javert in Les Miserables, Billy Flynn in Chicago, Don Quixote in Man of La Mancha, Harold Hill in The Music Man, and the title role in Phantom. Arecipient of the prestigious Anselmo Award, he also earned recognition for his portrayal of Chauvelin in the recent national tour of The Scarlet Pimpernel. Audiences across the country have enjoyed him as Captain von Trapp in The Sound of Music and as Billy Flynn in Chicago. Not only has Michals played the great theatrical venues of the nation including Carnegie Hall, Broadways fabled Palace Theatre, Los Angeles Ahmanson, and Washington D.C.s Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, but hes also entertained in New Yorks finest rooms, including the Rainbow Room, the Four Seasons, and the Grand Ballroom of the Plaza. Michals regularly appears with the countrys leading orchestras, including the San Francisco, San Diego, Utah, and Hartford symphonies, the New York Pops, and recently appeared with Peter Nero and the Philly Pops for a sold-out evening of Broadway Showstoppers. He has sung The StarSpangled Banner for major league sporting events from coast to coast, and enjoys the rare distinction of performing for the joint leadership of the House and Senate inside The United States Capitol. Symphonic performances of The House I Live In and John WilliamsAmerica, The Dream Goes On have garnered the praise and admiration of many D.C. notable s, especially Sen. Orrin Hatc h. Mayor Rudy Giuliani perso nally called upon Michals to open the Dec. 11, 200 1 memorial service at Groun d Zero with a solo, a cappel la rendition of Let There B e Peace On Earth. Williams credits exten d into the operatic world, in New York, Boston, and in concert at the Aspen an d Tanglewood music festivals The 2011 Matinee Series is sponsored by Jean Moyer, D r. and Mrs. Placido M. Roqu iz Jr., and Drs. Abe an d Carmelita Lim. Tickets range from $15 to $20 and may be purchas ed online 24 hours a day, sev en days a week, at http://pe rformances.southflorida.ed u. Tickets may also be pu rchased by calling the SFC C Box Office at 784-7178 or b y visiting the SFCC Box Offi ce in the front of the SFC C Theatre for the Performin g Arts, 600 W. College Driv e, from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m Monday-Friday. Americas Baritone William Michals set to perform at SFCC on Jan. 18 Courtesy photo William Michals will bring his experience as a Broadway and concert star to the South Florida Community College stage on Jan. 18 as part of the Matinee Series. Marty Grosz Quartet presents hot jazz of the 1920s and s Courtesy pho to Jazz guitarist, historian and vocalist Marty Grosz will bring his quartet to South Florida Community College on Wednesday for an evening of jazz as part of the Jazz Series. Special to the News-SunSEBRING Men of all a ges who like to sing in the s hower should try the g reater fun and camaraderie o f four-part harmony barb ershop singing, said S tirling Snyder, chapter p resident of the Heartland H armonizers Barbershop C horus. To give them an opportun ity, the chorus will hold a g uest night at 7 p.m. T uesday at the Sebring High S chool, 3514 Kenilworth B lvd. Guests are welcome to b ring others along to enjoy t he singing and to particip ate in the wholesome a tmosphere of our meeti ngs, Snyder said. As our c harter states, we accept for m embership congenial men of good character from all walks of life and occupations. Guests will be entertained by chapter quartets and chorus and will have the opportunity to sing with other men in their own voice range tenor, lead, baritone, or bass. If you read music, fine, chorus director Bob Thiel said. But you can also learn barbershop by singing with other men having the same voice range that you have. We have CDs and music with which you can learn your part at home. Many Barbershoppers, some of them in good quartets, cannot read music, but learn their parts very well. For information, call 3865048 or 471-2294. Shower singers invited to harmonize Special to the News-SunSEBRING Vintage H earts Band will perform f rom 7-9 p.m. Saturday as p art of Highlands H ammock State Parks M usic in the Park series. Come hear Americana m usic performed by V intage Hearts in the picnic a rea. Concert admission is j ust $5 per person (accompanied children 12 and under admitted free of charge.) Picnic baskets/coolers are welcome. Bring lawn chairs or blankets and a flashlight. All ticket proceeds benefit park improvements. Call 386-6094 for more information. Normal park entrance fee of $6 per car is waived after 6 p.m. Music in the Park Saturday

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 7B SEBRING DISCOUNT BEVERAGES3750 U.S. 27 North, Unit C1 471-2277Next to Fairmount Cinema 6 Open Mon-Sat 9-6 Closed SundayTobacco Products, Candy, Cold Beer, Housewares, Gifts & MORE!LOW PRICES MANY GOOD BARGAINS CLOSEOUTS!*Prices do not include tax. Natural Light and Natural IceAll Old Milwaukees Best Reg, Lt, Ice12 Pack $6.99 Budweiser and Bud Light 12 Pack $10.99Busch, Busch Light and Bud Ice18 Pack $11.29 Good Quality Sunglasses$4 ea 2 for $7 Zippo Lighters All 20% Off Smoke Odor ExterminatorCandles/Spray Can $6.79/$5.79305s and ROMY 3 Pack Deal $10.30 For 3 Misty $44.99 CartonGalaxy 100% ADDITIVE FREE Natural or Cigarette $29.49 Carton Newport$48.49 Carton 3 Pack Deal $4.99 Ea.USA Gold $43.99 Carton Seneca $31.69 Carton Smokin Joes $30.99 Carton Cigarette Style Little CigarsMany Brands $6.99 $10.99 Carton Monday, January 10 11 am 3 pm1540 Lakeview Drive Sebring, FL ARTS& LEISURE SUNDAY BRUNCH11am 1:30pm Lunch served after 1:30pmwith purchase of beverageReceive$200 OFFExpires 12-31-10 Trishs Paradise GrilleHighlands Ridge South(863) 382-2131$1095 Special to the News-Sun AVON PARK Astellar s eason of South Florida C ommunity College Matinee S eries performances begins w ith the David Osborne Trio a t 1:30 p.m. Tuesday in the S FCC Theatre for the P erforming Arts. Otherwise k nown as Pianist to the P residents, pianist David O sborne has performed at the W hite House for presidents R egan, Bush, Clinton, G.W. B ush, and Obama. He regul arly performs for Jimmy C arter in Plains, Ga., who has s aid, David Osborne is one o f the finest pianists in the U nited States. His performa nce includes bass and d rums. Osborne uses his classical s tudy and technique to exec ute flawless piano performa nces of Broadway, romantic, classical, and ageless standards of the American songbook. His touch and feel for romantic love songs has created a style that is unique and has earned him the title Master of the Romantic Piano. Osborne has performed throughout the United States including a nine-year stay performing at the Marriott Orlando World Center. Osborne then moved to St. Louis to work at the Adams Mark Hotel and perform with the St. Louis Symphony. He went on to perform at a restaurant at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas for 12 years and is only the third pianist to hold the job. He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at the historic Paramount Theater in 2010. The Los Angeles Music Awards and Hollywood Fame Awards committee chose Osborne as a recipient of the lifetime piano achievement award in 2010. Afew of Osbournes more significant recent events include a concert for the American Breast Cancer Awareness Foundation, an interview and performance on TVs The 700 Club, a concert for the Steinway and Sons International convention of worldwide dealers at the Beverly Hills Hotel, two concerts for Don Hall, CEO of Hallmark Cards, and a performance in Las Vegas, playing the Steinway Pianos of Vladimir Horowitz, Van Cliburn, and George Gershwin at Southern Nevada Music as a part of Steinway and Sons Legendary Instruments of the Immortals Tour. The 2011 Matinee Series is sponsored by Jean Moyer, Dr. and Mrs. Placido M. Roquiz Jr., and Drs. Abe and Carmelita Lim. Ten Matinee Series performances scheduled for the 2011 season. Tickets range from $16 to $21 and may be purchased online 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at http://performances.southflorida.edu. Tickets may also be purchased by calling the SFCC Box Office at 784-7178 or by visiting the SFCC Box Office in the front the of the SFCC Theatre for the Performing Arts, 600 West College Drive, from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. David Osborne, Pianist to the Presidents, to perform at SFCC Tuesday Courtesy pho to David Osborne has performed at the White House for presidents Regan, Bush, Clinton, G.W. Bush, and Obama, and regularly performs for Jimmy Carter in Plains, Ga. on Tuesday, he will perform at South Florida Community College as part of the Matinee Series. Special to the News-SunLAKE WALES The Lake W ales Arts Council presents t he Afiara String Quartet in c oncert on Thursday. The p erformance begins at 7:30 p .m. at the Lake Wales Arts C enter. The quartets program at t he Lake Wales Arts Center in L ake Wales is an exciting m ix of the traditional and c ontemporary. The classic p ortion of the Quartets prog ram includes Haydns String Q uartet No. 25 in C major a nd Beethovens String Q uartet No. 7 in F major. A lso they will perform John H alles 7-minute Sphere()s and Dan B eckers Lockdown, which w ere especially commiss ioned for them by the Banff C enter in Canada and the C ommon Sense Composers C ollective. Formed in 2006, the Afiara S tring Quartet balances a l ively interest in new works w ith deep insight into core c lassical repertoire. Their r ecent appearances througho ut North America and intern ationally include performa nces last season at the L ibrary of Congress, Alice T ully Hall, Carnegie Halls W eill Recital Hall, as well as p erformances at Indiana U niversitys Summer Music F estival, Princeton U niversitys Summer C hamber Music Series, the S an Jose Chamber Music S ociety, and the Calgary P roMusica Series. Tickets can be purchased at the Lake Wales Arts Center, 1099 State Road 60 East, or by phone (863) 6768426. Tickets are $20 for members, $25 for non-members, $5 for students with ID. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Friday. Visit the new Web site at www.lakewalesartscouncil.org. The Lake Wales Arts Council, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization whose mission is to promote, encourage and celebrate the arts for the enhancement of community life. The Arts Center is located at 1099 S.R. 60 East in Lake Wales. The Arts Center is open year round, Monday through Friday, 9:00 am to 4:00 pm. For more information, please call 863-676-8426. lakewalesartscouncil.org. Lake Wales Arts Council presents Afiara String Quartet in concert on Thursday Courtesy photo The Afiara String Quartet will bring an exciting mix of the traditional and contemporary to concert on Thursday. The performance begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Lake Wales Arts Center. Classified Ads 385-6155 NEWS-SUN Did YouKNOW?In Florida, the bicycle is legally defined as a vehicle. Bicyclists using a public roadway are considered operators of motor vehicles and are responsible for observing all traffic laws. With few exceptions, there is only one road and it is up to motorists and bicyclists to treat each other with care and respect. Adherence to the law is the foundation of respect.

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com Youll LikeWhat You HearHearing comfortably in noise.It has been one of the biggest problems for people who wear hearing aids.The IQ is the only hearing aid with Voice IQ and InVision Directionality.Together, these cutting-edge technologies are designed to preserve speech understanding in noise.So you may hear conversations, not commotion. Dont take our word for it.Visit Lampe & Kiefer or starkey. com today and hear the IQ difference for yourself.Let the Conversation begin. Try the new S Series iQ for yourself, and hear how far technology has come. Call today at 863.385.3497A REMARKABLE NEW EXPERIENCE FOR YOUR EARS AND YOUR LIFE!Introducing the IQ changing the way people hear conversations. 130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, Florida863-385-3497 Mon. Fri. 9am 4pm Closed Wednesdays SENIORSCENE Born in a haunted house in 1919 in the wide open spaces of Central Florida at Parkers Place near Kenansville, Dillon Thomas, legendary cow hunter, lives today in LaBelle. When we were kids there was still dry blood on the floor where Willingham, an outlaw from England, shot a man dead in the house. My daddy nailed a board over the hole so us kids wouldnt get blood on us. I believe in sprits as in the Bible Jesus asked Cain, Where is Abel and Cain replied with a question, Am I my brothers keeper?Jesus said, His blood just spoke a sound. Daddy moved from Okeechobee where he was born, to Parkers Place as a working cowboy. He later was a cowhand at Yeehaw Junction. In the 1900s, we moved around a lot as daddy followed the work. We lived a simple life when we were kids moving into wooden houses provided by ranch owners where he worked cattle. The houses usually had a pitcher pump and outhouse. We went to town only once a month, Thomas explains. My uncle Walter Thomas was also a cow hunterborn in 1893. Uncle Walter moved to Corkscrew Swamp where he about starved to death; it was the hell-hole of Florida dense and thick with swamp. In those days, you took a chance when you moved to see if you could make it. We stayed for some time with Uncle Thomas at Corkscrew then moved to Fort Myers where people took up a collection to get us a place to live. However, Uncle Thomas got lucky in Fort Myers and went into real estate. It was the Florida boom days between 1925-26 and land was selling cheap. I never understood how he did it, but Uncle Thomas became the richest man outside of Henry Ford and Thomas Edison. He owned all the land on both sides of what is now Highway 75 leading into Fort Myers. With a family of five kids, he lived in a big house with horse stables, a garage, and all the kids had Model-Tautomobiles. I remember getting inside his seven-passenger limousine and smelling the new leather, says Thomas. My daddy worked for Uncle Thomas building a packing house but when the Great Depression hit, Uncle Thomasassets were frozen and he was cleaned out. He went broke and moved to Texas to try again. During this time, Daddy couldnt get a job, so we moved to Felda where he grew watermelons. He drove all night in his Model-T, about 60 miles through the woods, back to Fort Myers to sell them. I started school when we lived near Kenansville and was 8 years old when I went into the first grade. In Felda, I entered third grade and was already 10 years old. With a chuckle, Thomas recalls that his teacher one time said to him, Dillon, we need to send you home because you havent shaved.I was much older than the other kids in the third grade with all the moving around and changing schools. Excerpts from an upcoming book by Nancy Dale, The Legacy of the Florida Pioneer Cow Hunters In Their Own Words. For personally inscribed books of the true stories of pioneer cow hunters visit www.nancydalephd.com. Taking a chance when a move was necessary Courtesy pho to Dillon Thomas was born in a haunted house in 1919 in the wide open spaces of Central Florida at Parkers Place near Kenansville. Today he lives in LaBelle. Wild Florida Nancy Dale Editors note: T his is the first of a three-part series. Now that you a re unstressed a fter reading N ovembers colu mn. Lets conside r your situation. You are out of a j ob or stuck in o ne you dont l ike. You think you cant d o anything about it. ( Positive cognitive thinki ng is another column.) T he unemployment rate in F lorida is 11.5 percent. Y ou have no money to start a business. Ableak picture. But lets look at what s ome other people have d one about it. Ayoung man named R andy was out of a job w ith little higher education a nd no prospects. He has b een helping his mother a nd father, doing errands a nd around the house. T hey live in a small develo pment. Aneighbor saw h im working in the yard a nd thought he was the g ardener. They stopped and a sked if he would work for t hem. He said he would be g lad to help them since he w asnt working and of c ourse he wouldnt charge t hem. Nevertheless when h e was through they insiste d that he accept a $20 b ill. They also gave him a l oad of tomatoes from their g arden. Now he is busy e nough to schedule his j obs around the location of h ouses he works for. For e xample, the four houses o n Jasmine Street one day a nd a cluster of houses on a nother street the next day. Susie loved to garden a nd she set her plants in b eautiful pots that she decorated herself. She lived on a busy thorofare and she placed her pots in the front yard. Soon people began to stop by and wanted to buy them. In order to replace her pots she haunts garage sales, junk shops, Dumpsters, always on the look out for something salvageable that she cleans up and paints in wonderful colors and imaginative designs. Now however she lives in a small development with no access to passerby traffic. Besides she wants to do other things but isnt sure what. So we talked and I suggested that she make three lists: one, what she loves to do; two, what she thinks her talents are and three, what she hates to do. When you compare the lists and eliminate what you hate to do even if you have the talent for it you will probably come up with insight into what you want to do. As for outlets, there are many in Highlands County: The fairs flea markets and nurseries and garden organizations that would welcome her product. Also since she researches the plants diligently, she could write a column on plants. In the year 2000 Leslie was pregnant and had to have complete bed rest. She couldnt even have a baby shower. To cheer her up her friend decided to make a fabulous decorated cake for her. Leslie enjoyed it so much. When Create your own job Pearls Gem Pearl Carter The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Continued on page 9B

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In my 92 years of l iving, I have met a nd become friends w ith hundreds of f olks; some renown a nd others just plain p eople. But all have i n some way or o ther made a mark i n my life. Big n ames or little, they a ll bring back fond m emories of events a nd places long ago visited a nd wistfully remembered. There was Anne C adwalader of southern O hio, whose parents were t he first settlers in the Fort W ashington area, later to b ecome the great city of C incinnati. During my teenage years, s he became a second mother t o me. We met during my r oaming with a fishing b uddy and ended up with an i nvitation to a continuing W ednesday evening dinner a nd entertainment with my b uddys dad and Mrs. Cad. Mrs. Cads husband has p assed away before I ever m et her. He had been a wellk nown doctor in our home t own (Norwood, Ohio) and s he was living by herself w ith only a daytime housem an and cook. I guess I s hould have placed Sams ( her valets) name on the list o f people of interest. He was a very special black man. M rs. Cad taught me how the other half lived. She w as not the type of high s ociety gal you see nowad ays but was a common e very day human being. L oved music, the outdoors a nd kids. My buddy and I spent many happy hours in Mrs. Cads company. The fourth member of our Wednesday gathering was the father of my buddy, David Besuden Sr. His folks had been friends with the Cads from way back and he was continuing the tradition. Mr. B was an old-time auto race driver who had competed with Barney Oldfield, Louis Chevrolet and other drivers of the 1920s. He was also a hunter and fisherman and took me on my first trip out of the country, to Canada, where we had fishing and sightseeing beyond compare. John Henderson was an economics teacher at Norwood High School. He was a very big man physically and mentally. He instilled in me some of the what I call virtues of manhood. In addition to being a teacher he was also a sportsman. He loved hunting and fishing, imparted his knowledge to some of us youngsters. He was a big building block to my manhood. Beatrice Patton was the wife of General George Patton of the Third Armored Cavalry fame in World War II. I met her on a flight from Godman Field at Louisville, Ky., where she had attended the dedication of the Patton Museum of Armor. I was riding co-pilot on the C-47 that was taking her home. After about a half-hour in the air, I went back into the passenger compartment to see if everyone was comfortable. As I passed a seat about halfway down the aisle, a small hand reached out from a seat, took my arm and pulled me over. Are you married Lieutenant? She asked. Ensuring her that I was, she started unpinning a beautiful orchid that was pinned to her lapel. She stopped pulling out the pin and said, Son of a bitch, I better not give you this or my daughter will kick my ass. But thank you never the less. I assured her that no thanks were necessary and continued on my way thinking that that was the end of it. However, when I returned to Godman Field for my monthly flying lesson, I was called into Operations Office and handed an envelope with the gold embossed initials BAPon the outside and a card that said, Thank you Lieutenant Jackson for a lovely flight and signed Beatrice A. Patton. I told the officer behind the desk that I thought that was a very nice gesture. He immediately said Wait just a minute and started pulling bottles from a box by the desk. Mrs. Patton had sent four bottles of fine liquors to each member of the crew. She was really a mate for old blood and guts. The lady must have been 70 years old when I met her. So the newspaper clipping 10 years later came as a shock to me when I read that Mrs. Patton had been killed when a horse threw her when jumping a fence while fox hunting in Virginia. The next gentleman that I met was at a skeet range in Gainesville, where I was making my weekly visit to get in a little shooting. As I walked into the club, I noticed a car with amateur radio operatorsplates on it. Being a new Ham myself when I got to the range and there being only two people shooting, I asked the gentleman if he was the Ham operator. His answer was :No, but my wife is. He then introduced his wife and himself and I discovered that I was now acquainted with Paul Tibbets, the pilot of the Enola Gay the bomber that ended World War II with the bombing of Hiroshima, Japan. I shot skeet and had drinks in the club with them many times thereafter. I found him a very humble man and not the least desirous of being remembered for his feat. His only flaw was that his wife was a better shot than he was. Robert Scott, the author of the best seller God is My Co-Pilot, I met when I was returning from Florida to Cincinnati after spending the winter in Chiefland. We were going into Mason, Ga., when I remembered the Scott was curator at the Museum Onwarner-Robbins Airfield and figured that I would stop and see if he was there and get my copy of his book autographed. I walked into the operations office and asked if Colonel Scott was there. No the Colonel is not here but the general is. I asked if he was available and was directed to his office on the fourth floor. I left my wife in the waiting room and proceeded to the generals office. I opened the door to his office and walked in. He stood up and reached out to shake hands with me and asked what he could do for me. When I handed him the book that I had bought more than 40 years previous, he looked shocked and wanted to know when and where I had gotten the book. When I told him that it was purchased at OHare Field on my way to reassignment to Japan he started asking questions and we talked Air Corps talk for the next hour. Yes, I knew that Ruth was waiting downstairs but she would forgive the long wait. He autographed the flyleaf with the notation After all these years and signed his name. This book is one of the treasures in my keepsake chest and will be given to my son on my demise. Yes, Ruth forgave me for the long wait. Gene Autry I met while on a ferrying trip to northeastern India. He was flying copilot on a B-24 and I was in a C-47 enroute via South America and Africa to an air field in India. We had left Morrison Field in Florida, stopped overnight in Puerto Rico, British Guiana and were now in Belem, Brazil. Each night as we were stopping, Gene would put on a small show for the local GIs and as we were all drinking and conversing in the officersclub. After the show, I got into a conversation with the cowboy. Dont remember what we talked about, but we struck up a good friendship. Our trip continued south to Natal then across the ocean to Ascencion Island, Gold Coast Africa, Dakar, Marachech, Cairo, and Karachi picked up a pair of the boots. They were the mark of a tested perry pilot in those days. Gene was a little different, he picked up four pairs of them. The answer to my question why he said, One pair for me, on e pair for my boy and two fo r my museum. Sunny Serifino is an author of multiple books who was having a book sig ning at an affair we were playing in and in the course of events, she happened to see a copy of a book that I had written for my grandkidskids. She asked if she might read it and naturally I said yes. When she returned the book, it was with a lette r giving me rave reviews on the book. The rest of my famous li st I must admit I met vicariou sly through my love of reading. Here I was able to become acquainted with the world traveler, James Mischner, through his fine tomes. Louis Lamour took me through many trips through the old west and along with him on his real travel around the world. I dived the many oceans with Clive Cussler and Dirk Pit and took to the woods with Louise Rich in her tra vels in Maine. I have piled u p enough memories in my travels for two or three peo ple so I thought I might share some of the friendships with you who happen to get to read this article. Woody Jackson is a Sebring resident who enjoys writing stories o f days gone by. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 9B Hard To Find Sizes And Widths For Men And Women New Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:30-5:30, Saturday 9:30-5:001621 B Edgewood Dr. Order by Phone! Order by Phone! CUSTOMER APPRECIATION Week! LAKELAND Comfort Shoes Comfort ShoesHAVEN Comfort Shoes Comfort Shoes Week! EverydayLowFactoryOutletPricesLadies Mens Ladies SandalsFreetime5 Colors S-XW Simplify5 Colors S-XW RelaxedN, M, W HuggyN, M, W Bouttime6-15 S-XW Strippy(For Dress) Timeout6-15 S-XWSAS Tabby NEW ARRIVAL SAVEANEXTRA $ 15 OFF!Exp. 1/17/11 Hard To Find Sizes And Widths For Men And Women New Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:30-5:30, Saturday 9:30-5:001621 B Edgewood Dr. Order by Phone! Order by Phone! CUSTOMER APPRECIATION Week! LAKELAND Comfort Shoes Comfort ShoesHAVEN Comfort Shoes Comfort Shoes Week! EverydayLowFactoryOutletPricesLadies Mens Ladies SandalsFreetime5 Colors S-XW Simplify5 Colors S-XW RelaxedN, M, W HuggyN, M, W Bouttime6-15 S-XW Strippy(For Dress) Timeout6-15 S-XWSAS Tabby NEW ARRIVAL SAVEANEXTRA $ 15 OFF!Exp. 1/17/11 SENIORSCENE Names renown and plain in my memory Woodys Wisdom Woody Jackson By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and JENNIFER AGIESTA Associated PressWASHINGTON The f irst baby boomers was old e nough to qualify for M edicare Jan. 1, and many f ear the programs obituary w ill be written before their o wn. Anew Associated PressG fK poll finds that baby b oomers believe by a ratio of 2 -to-1 they wont be able to r ely on the giant health insura nce plan throughout their r etirement. The boomers took a runn ing dive into adolescence a nd went on to redefine work a nd family, but getting old is m aking them nervous. Now, 43 percent say they d ont expect to be able to d epend on Medicare forever, w hile only 20 percent think t heir Medicare is secure. The r est have mixed feelings. Yet the survey also shows a surprising willingness a mong adults of all ages to s acrifice to preserve M edicare benefits that most Americans say they deserve after years of paying taxes into the system at work. Take the contentious issue of Medicares eligibility age, fixed at 65, while the qualifying age for Social Security is rising gradually to 67. Initially, 63 percent of boomers in the poll dismissed the idea of raising the eligibility age to keep Medicare afloat financially. But when the survey forced them to choose between raising the age or cutting benefits, 59 percent said raise the age and keep the benefits. I dont mind the fact that people may have to work a little longer, said Lynn Barlow, 60, a real estate agent who lives outside Atlanta. Especially if theres time to plan, laboring a few extra years allows people to save more for retirement. Bring up benefit cuts and Barlow isnt nearly as accommodating. I started working when I was 16 and I expect a benefit after putting into it for so many years, she said. As Medicare reaches a historic threshold, the poll also found differences by age, gender and income among baby boomers. Medicare is a middle-class bulwark against the ravages of illness in old age. It covers 46 million elderly and disabled people at an annual cost of about $500 billion. But the high price of American-style medicine, stressing intensive treatment and the latest innovations, is already straining program finances. Add the number of baby boomers, more than 70 million born between 1946 and 1964, and Medicares fiscal foundation starts to shake. Heres the math: when the last of the boomers reaches age 65 in about two decades, Medicare will be covering more than 80 million people. At the same time, the ratio of workers paying taxes to support the program will have plunged from 3.5 for each person receiving benefits currently, to 2.3. Poll: Baby bommers fear outliving Medicare s he was able, she bought a b ook at Michaels and pract iced on family and friends. T hen she took a course on d ecorating. Her cakes were s o much in demand that she b egan to charge to compens ate for her time and supp lies. When she moved to H ighlands County she was a s ingle mother with two child ren. Although her finances w ere OK, she needed to supp lement her income but her s kill in the medical field in H ighalands County only paid a quarter of what she previo usly was earning so she t ook a job as a cocktail waitr ess. (Did I tell you she is g orgeous.) When one of the p atrons said she needed someone to clean, never one to pass up an opportunity, she volunteered for the job still doing her cakes and witnessing. It was a natural to add catering when people ordered cakes from her so she quit her waitress job and was in business for herself, catering baking specialty cakes and house cleaning. Now she has a full page ad for her baking and catering business and has another idea in the works for an auxiliary product that will fit into her catering business. What I get a tickle out of is her answering machine message: This is Two Angel Cake and Catering Co and housecleaning. Do any of you remember Bob Newhardts routine? This is the Newhardts Air Line Company and washing machine repair service. Do you have computer skills, like how to get onto Facebook or navigate financial sites? Offer services to the elderly? Or for that matter anyone who needs help. Sounds easy? No it isnt. But I do believe that with sine thought and dedication most people can create their own jobs. However there are responsibilities and pitfalls. Which I will describe in the next article. Pearl Carter is a Lake Placid resident. E-mail her at timely87@comcast.net. Create your own job Continued from page 8B

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Page 10BNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. Crossroads Community Church, 114 South Central Ave., Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 4534453. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship: 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday Childrens Church: 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Adult Bible Study and Youth/Royal Explorers, 7 p.m. Pastor: John E. Dumas. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($3 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September to May our youth group meets. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Ed Howell, transitional pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 3823695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30 and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 9 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family and Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confessions: 3-3:45 p.m. Saturdays, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first Friday, or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunda y Worship Service, 9 a.m.; Sunda y Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.; Sunda y Evening Service, 6 p.m .; Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP If youre like me, you love your gardens and hate what the freezing cold weather does to them. There are some ways you can help to p rotect your plants though. E ven if your plants have suff ered severe damage from t he frost, dont fret, there are s teps you can take to help m end them and most of the t ime they will sprout new g rowth in the spring. One of the best ways to p rotect your plants from f reezes is to mulch them. M ulching protects plant r oots. Bark, straw, sawdust, peat m oss, leaves and grass clipp ings are the most common m aterials used for mulch. As a general rule, mulch s hould be about two inches d eep. Around trees and shrubs, t he mulch should be scraped a way from the trunk or main s tems. It is critical to check and m ake sure your plants are getting enough moisture. Every once in a while it is important to check your mulch and make sure that moisture is getting to the soil below. Especially in the cold winter months, the soil may dry out in certain areas. The combination of dry soil and cold temperatures can cause serious freeze damage to garden trees and shrubs. With some plants, covering is really the only way to protect them. Delicate species such as broadleaf evergreen shrubs and some flowering plants may require a bit of extra care to make it through the colder temperatures. Make sure when covering your plants, you use some type of cloth material. If polyethylene is used, it cuts off air to the plant and acts as a greenhouse for the vegetation underneath it. This causes the plant to go from cold lows at night to warmer highs in the day in a short period of time. This rapid temperature change can be fatal to plants. If you do use plastic, make sure it is vented and removed when the sun comes out during the day. Whatever material is used, always remove the coverings after the cold weather has passed. Some plants may require a bit of special care. Those plants that are in containers may need to be brought in from the cold. If you have a porch or garage that can be utilized until the cold snap passes, it could certainly save their lives. You dont necessarily need to put them in a heated area as this may be too drastic a change in temperature. Just remember when plants in containers are exposed to the freezing temperatures, they are receiving icy blasts from all four sides with little protection. They also get the cold from top to bottom so it is quite easy for them to freeze. Perennials and summer annuals, which are very delicate, may be covered with an inch of straw or hay during the cold winter. The best way to keep your yard looking its best all year round is to plant only varieties of plants that are hardy to this area. If you absolutely must have delicate plants, plant them in the highest part of the yard. Cold air settles to the lowest parts. Make sure to protect your plants from the wind. Large trees, fences and hedges can give great protection to the more delicate species. Remember when placing plants in the garden in the spring, think ahead to how the weather will affect them in their location. Place them in an area that is best for their survival in freezing temperatures. Plants that freeze slowly then thaw slowly have the least amount of damage. Putting a delicate plant where there is no shelter, shade and too much sun may be its death sentence. If your plants have already suffered damage, try not to fret. Often times, plants will come back beautifully in the spring. Some that you are certain are com pletely dead will begin to send up green shoots soon enough. There are some steps you can take to help them out though. Dont be in a hurry to prune. It is hard to look at those ugly, dead looking branches, but delay hard pruning on woody plants until new growth begins in the spring, then you can accurately determine which parts are alive and which ar e dead. Dont be too quick to dig up and remove plants that appear to be dead. They ma y eventually resprout from th e roots in April or May. After a freeze is over, check the water needs of plants in containers and in the ground. Remove the covers and pull mulch back that completely covered low plants. I hope your gardens survive the cold spells well, bu t even if your yard looks like the dead zone, dont worry spring will be here soon. Corine Burgess is an Environmental Specialist for the Parks & Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil and Water Conservation District. (www.highlandsswcd.org). The big freeze how to help your plants stay alive Courtesy photo Dont be too quick to dig up and remove plants that appear to be dead or damaged from a freeze. They may eventually resprout from the roots in April or May. News From The Watershed Corine Burgess

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 11B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the Redeemer.Service time is 9:30 with Holy Communion. Coffee hour following services. Newcomers welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mailredeemer1895@aol.com Web site:redeemeravon.com. The church is at 839 Howes Way, Avon Park (two miles north of Sun N Lake Boulevard, across from Wells Dodge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. The Rev. Jim Kurtz, rector. Church office 3857649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL33852. Phone: 4650051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday evening: Holy Communion with Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child care available at the 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come see what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863) 8350869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer Kid City Childrens Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, prime-timers, and Bible studies in Spanish. Kid City Day Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web atwww.sebringgrace.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration Ministries, (non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rogers. JEWISH Temple Israel of Highlands County, 382-7744. Rabbi Lorraine Rudenberg; www.templeisraelofhcfl.org.Temple Israel is a Reform Temple that promotes the enduring and fundamental principles of Judaism. Through prayer, study and friendship we strive to enrich our lives and insure Jewish continuity in Highlands County. Friday Evening Shabbat Services, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday afternoon intro to Hebrew, 12:30 p.m.; Saturday intro to Judaism, 2 p.m.; Saturday afternoon Torah Study, 3:30 p.m.; Havdallah, 5 p.m. Jan. 7-8; Jan. 21; Feb. 4; Feb. 18-19; March 18-19 Purim; April 1-2; April 15-16; April 18, 6 p.m., Pesach 1st Night Seder; April 29-30 Yom Hashoah; May 1314; May 27-28. Every Thursday will be Hebrew and Bible classes with Howard Salles, 12:30-4:30 p.m. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Monday of month; Ladies Group WELCAmeets at noon second Monday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable Garden Club meets as needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Like to sing? Come join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Childrens Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 8:15 and 10 a.m.; Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Youth group meets at 5 p.m. Friday. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Esther and Mary Circles business meeting, 3:30 p.m. third Thursday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 7 p.m. second Tuesday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday; Family Movie, 4 p.m. third Sunday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group, 6-7:30 p.m.; Senior High Youth Group, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gayle Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30 a.m.; and contemporary worship is at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.presbychurch.org. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 382-9092. Dale Bargar, bishop; David Ward, first counselor; and Steve Austin, second counselor. Family History Center: 3821822. Sunday services: Sacrament meeting, 10 a.m.; Sunday school, 11:20 a.m.; and Priesthood/Relief Society, 12 p.m. Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. Youth activities from 7-8:20 p.m. Wednesday: 11-year-old Scouts, 78:20 p.m. first and third Wednesday; and activity days for 8-11 year old boys and girls from 78:20 p.m. second and fourth Wednesday. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL33870. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sund ays with Rick Heilig, youth direc tor The 10:55 a.m. Sunday wors hip service is broadcast over W ITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurs ery available at all services. First United Methodist Chur ch 200 South Lake Avenue, Av on Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759 R James Weiss, Pastor, Summ e Schedule, Sunday School 9 :00 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Memorial United Method is Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlo ok ing Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pas tor Claude H.L. Burnett, pasto ra assistant. Sunday schedu le Heritage Worship Service, 8 :30 a.m. (October-May only); Sch oo School for all ages, 9:30 a. m. Celebration Worship Service a 10:45 a.m.; New Song wors hip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nu rs ery care provided every Sun day morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p .m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p .m (October-May only). We o ffe Christ-centered Sunday sch oo classes, youth programs, B ible studies, book studies and Chris tian fellowship. We are a congrega tion that want to know Christ and m ake Him known. Call the church of fice at 465-2422 or check out ou church Web site at www.mem ori alumc.com. St. John United Method is Church, 3214 Grand Prix Dr ive Sebring, FL33872. The R ev Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pas tor Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sun day Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a .m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided fo r a services. Phone 382-17 36 www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Method is Church, 8170 Cozumel La ne (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Cl yde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship se rv ice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible St udy meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesd ay Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church office pho ne 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o Christ, where God is still spea k ing. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27 and Hammock Road). Sunday w or ship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion w ith worship first Sunday of mon th Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For m ore information, call the church office a 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@e arth link.net or check theWeb site sebringemmanuelucc.com. No matter who you are or where you are on lifes journey, youre w el come here.PLACESTOWORSHIP CROSSWORDSOLUTION Special to the News-SunAries (March 21-April 20) Afew b umps along the way arent going to d eter you this week, Aries. Thats b ecause youre coasting along regardl ess of the obstacles in your way. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, i t could be a boring week, but thats OK b ecause a little boredom now and then o ffers you a chance to rest up. Theres s ome interesting things around the corn er. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Beggars c ant be choosers, Gemini. When forced i nto a situation this week, you simply h ave to go with the flow, instead of t hinking you can call the shots. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Cancer, i ts time to rekindle a few relationships t hat you have let expire. You dont know w hen you may need a friend or loved o ne for help. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, a tricky s ituation requires a careful tongue and a q uick wit. Fortunately, this week you a re the master politician and can win o ver anyone with a wink and a smile. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Make a plan and stick with it, Virgo. Look to others to help you accomplish a longdesired goal. Realize that sacrifices must be made to make things work. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Libra, change may be scary, but you are ready to move forward. All of the uncomfortable things will be worth it in the long run. You just need to keep a cool head. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Scorpio, stop worrying about what others think and do what you want and think is right. Pleasing yourself is what you should concern you right now. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Sagittarius, its hard to escape chaos this week, even when you hole yourself up in the house. But theres soon to be a silver lining behind this dark cloud. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) Capricorn, romance is difficult when you have such a full schedule. Pencil in some alone time with your partner because your relationship can use a boost. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) Aquarius, your bank account may be a tad on the empty side. But it should recover shortly. In the meantime, enjoy the fruits of all your hard work. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) All you need is a break, Pisces. Youre bound to get that break this week. It will actually fall right into your lap. Jan. 9 Dave Matthews, singer, 44; Jan. 10 Pat Benatar, singer, 58; Jan. 11 Kim Coles, actress, 49; Jan. 12 Kirstie Alley, actress, 60; Jan. 13 Patrick Dempsey, actor, 45; Jan. 14 Jason Bateman, actor, 42; Jan. 15 Drew Brees, athlete, 32. Aries, dont worry about those bumps along the way; yourre bound to get a break, Pisces Follow the News-Sun online on www.twitter.com/thenewssun

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T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sunon any c hanges in this listing by calling 3 85-6155, ext. 516; send any c hanges by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail t hem to News-SunCommunity C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 L ake Placid has lounge hours f rom 1-9 p.m. Live music is f rom 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p .m. Members and guests only. P ost is at 528 N. Pine St., S ebring. Call 471-1448. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2 661 lounge is open from 1-7 p .m. Card games start at 1:30 p .m. The lodge is open to m embers and their guests. Call 4 65-2661. Lake Placid Moose has k araoke in the pavilion. H orseshoes played at 9:30 a .m. Food available at 4 p.m. O pen to members and qualified g uests only. Overeaters Anonymous, m eets from 4-5 p.m. in second f loor conference roomNo. 3 at F lorida Hospital Heartland M edical Center, 4200 Sun N L ake Blvd., Sebring. Call 3827 731. No dues, fees or weighi ns. For details on the organizat ion, go to www.oa.org. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves lunch at 2 p.m. at the c lub, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. C all 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 o ffers NASCAR racing in the p avilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open a nd kitchen open from 2-5 p.m. L odge is at 11675 U.S. 98, S ebring. Call 655-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 3880 serves hamburgers f rom 4-5:30 p.m. and plays p oker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1 224 County Road 621 East, L ake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 plays euchre at 1:30 p .m. and E&J Karaoke is from 4 :30-7:30 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN WITH ME family group meets at 10:30 a.m. every Monday at the Heartland Christian Church on Alt. 27 in Sebring. The church is behind Southgate Shopping Center where Publix is. For more information call 3855714. Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal Church, Lakeshore Drive, Sebring. For more details, call 385-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous One Day At ATime group meets for a closed discussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday and Friday at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. Call 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 6:30 p.m. at Rosewood Center, 517 U.S. 27 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 202-0647.. American Legion Post 74 Sons of Legion meet at 6 p.m. Executive board meets at 7 p.m. on second Monday at the post, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. Post open noon-8 p.m. Call 4711448. AmVets Post 21 meets 6 p.m. second Monday, at the post, 2029 U.S. 27 South, Sebring. All members welcome. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and guests. Call 385-0234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake Placid. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. Diabetes Insulin Pump Support Group meets the second Monday from 3-4:30 p.m. in the Florida Hospital Heartland Division Diabetes Center, 4023 Sun N Lake. Call 402-0177 for more information. Diabetes Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday from 1-2:30 p.m. in Florida Hospital Conference Room 3 in Sebring. Call 4020177 for guest speaker list. Fairmount Mobile Estates Lunch Bunch meets at noon second Monday at Homers Smorgasbord in Sebring. Call 382-0481. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The Agri-Center. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets the second and fourth Monday at the Sebring Country Estates Civic Association clubhouse, 3240 Grand Prix Drive (down the street from Wal-Mart). Dancing will be held every month until April 2008. Classes are being started now in the Sebring and Lake Placid area. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or visit the Web site at www.samdun.net.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 3148877. Heartland Riders Association meets at 6 p.m. second Monday at the Sebring Chamber of Commerce Welcome Center in Village Plaza (across from Sebring Gate Station). Call 402-1165. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Homeowners Association meets the second Monday of each month at 9 a.m. at the Sebring Country Estates Clubhouse at 3240 Grand Prix Drive in Sebring. Highlands County Parkinsons Support Group meets at 1 p.m. second Monday at the Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring. Call 453-6589 or 4522053. Highlands County Rotary Club meets at 6 p.m. at Charlies Restaurant, Commerce Street, Sebring. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County Agri-Civic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. Call 402-6540. Highlands Sertoma Club meets at noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. Highlands County Senior Squadron, Civil Air Patrol the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary meets the second and fourth Monday nights at the Sebring Airport Terminal Building. All are welcome. For further information, call 471-1433 between 4 and 7 p.m. Highlands Woodcarvers Club meets at 6 p.m. second Monday at Highlands Art League, 351 W. Center Ave., Sebring. For more details, call Sandy Kohan at 414-1363 or Norm Pelland at 465-5510. Insulin Pump Support Group meets from 3-4:30 p.m. the second Monday of every month in conference Room 3 of Florida Hospital. This group is open to all insulin pump wearers, their families and anyone who is interested in knowing more about insulin pumps. Preregistration is not required. For information, call 402-0177. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Cards start at 4 p.m. Music outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. Lodge phone number 4520579. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 12-4:30 p.m. second and fourth Monday in Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. No meetings from end of May to October. Call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Bradys, Sebring. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. Smoke-free environment. For more details, call 471-355 7. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. For information, call 471-2522. Sebring Moose Lodge 225 9 plays Texas Hold em at 7 p.m the second and fourth Monday at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Be ef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing. Call 655-3920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 3:3 0 p.m. at the fellowship hall at th e First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. Call Judy OBoyle at 260-0831. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Womans Club of Sebring meets at noon on the second Monday for lunch, from Octob er throughMay, at the clubhouse 4260 Lakeview Drive, Sebring Call 385-7268. TUESDAY Aging Advocacy Council meets the 2nd Tuesday of eac h month in the Nu-Hope Conference Room at 11:30 a.m. for a brown bag lunch wi th the meeting starting at noon. Contact Debbie Slade at 3822134 Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelv e Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parkin g available south of old church. American Ex-POW Highlands County Chapter, meets 6 p.m. Call Ted Biever, 382-3285, for meeting place. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shu ffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 Page 12BNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. EXPIRES 2008 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT WAS$ 23995 NOW$ 21999#X0127 www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644 LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NO DEALER FEESPLUS TAX, TAG, & STATE FEES.PLUS TAX TAG TITLE SATISFIES 2007 DODGE CHARGER HEMI WAS$ 23150 NOW$ 21499#TX090A 2005 CHR YSLER PT CRUISER CONV. WAS$ 12999 NOW$ 10888#X0120 2010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY WAS$ 23995 NOW$ 19789#X0157 2009 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER WAS$ 13995 NOW$ 11888#X0150 2008 TOYOTA FJ CRUISER 4X4 WAS$ 24995 NOW$ 22888#X0148 2008 FORD EXPEDITION LIMITED WAS$ 31995 NOW$ 26999#CX042A 2010 DODGE JOURNEY WAS$ 20995 NOW$ 18999#X0156 WAS$ 15995 NOW$ 13888#X0140A 2008 CHR YSLER SEBRING TOURING CONV. WAS$ 19995 NOW$ 17888#0147 WAS$ 19995 NOW$ 16999#TY002A WAS$ 16988 NOW$ 14995#X01232008 TOYOTA SCION XB 2009 JEEP PATRIOT 4X4 Since 1931 2004 CHEVROLET 2500 CREW CAB COMMUNITYCALENDAR Continued on page 13B

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p .m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 R obert Britt St., AvonPark. B oys ages 11-17 are eligible to j oin. Call 452-2385. Avon Park Lakes A ssociation has Womens S alad Bar at noon on the seco nd Tuesday of each month. T he clubhouse is at 2714 N autilus Drive in Avon Park. Avon Park Library has stor ytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 e xcept during holidays. Avon Park Lions Club m eets 6:45 p.m., dinner, Lions C lub, 1218 W. Bell St., Avon P ark. Beta Sigma Phi, Xi Nu S igma Chapter of Avon Park, m eets the second and fourth T uesday each month in the m embers home. Call president M ary Joinerr at 382-4488 or v ice president Linda Webster at 3 85-1124. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9 -11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. E veryone is welcome. For more d etails, call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets e very Tuesday night at The R ock, Union Congregational C hurch, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon P ark. Abarbecue meal is s erved at 6 p.m. for a donation. A t 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7 :30 p.m., the group breaks up i nto small groups for men and w omen. The program is d esigned for drug and alcohol a ddiction, divorce, death or illn ess grief, low or lost selfe steem or identity due to dysf unctional relationships, depress ion/anxiety, or any other need f or healing. For details, contact C elebrate Recovery coordinator P am Sim by calling 453-3345, e xt. 106. The Computer Club at B uttonwood Bay meets the s econd and fourth Tuesday of e ach month November through M arch. We invite anyone intere sted in expanding their comp uter knowledge to attend the B uttonwood Bay Bytes C omputer Club meeting. Fletcher Music Club meets e very Thursday and Tuesday at F letcher Music Center in L akeshore Mall, Sebring. For m ore details, call 385-3288. Happy Paws Dog O bedience Club Inc. meets at 7 p.m. second Tuesday at the F irst Baptist Church of Lake J osephine, 111 Lake Josephine D rive, Sebring. Obedience c lasses are available. All welc ome. Call 471-9778. Heartland Dog Club Inc. of F lorida meets at 6:30 p.m. seco nd Tuesday at Homers Buffet, S ebring. Obedience classes (all b reeds) are held on W ednesday evenings at Sun N L ake Elementary School. C anine Good Citizen and T herapy Dog testing available. A KC-pointed shows held annua lly in April. Call 385-7474 or 3 85-7803 or visit w ww.HeartalndDogClubFlorida. o rg. Heartland Harmonizers B arbershop Chorus meets f rom 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring H igh School Music Room, S ebring. All men who enjoy s inging are invited. Reading m usic is not required. Call 4712 294 or 386-5098. Heartland Symphony O rchestra rehearsals from 5 :30-7 p.m. Tuesdays in the G reen Room in the South F lorida Community College a uditorium building. Bring m usic and instruments. New m embers welcome. Call cond uctor Bryan Johnson at 8009 49-7248, ext. 7231. Highlands County P arkinsons Support Group m eets at 1 p.m. second T uesday at the Alliance Church o f Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, S ebring. For details, 453-6589 o r 452-2053. Highlands Gem and M ineral Club meets 7 p.m., s econd Tuesday, Church of C hrist, 3800 Sebring Parkway, S ebring. Club does not meet in J uly, August or September. Call 4 53-7054. Hope Hospice grief support g roup meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W Center Ave., Sebring; and 4 :30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle A LF, across U.S. 27 from F lorida Hospital Lake Placid. C all 382-0312. Knights of Columbus C ouncil 5441 meets 8 p.m. e very second and fourth T uesday at Knights of C olumbus Hall, 900 U.S. 27 N., S ebring. Call 385-0987. Knights of Columbus Council 5441 Auxiliary meets 8 p.m. every second Tuesday at Knights of Columbus Hall, 900 U.S. 27 N., Sebring. Call 385-0987. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. LAKEPLACIDLIONSClub meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday each month at Herons Garden, 501 US 27 North, Lake Placid. Call Jeanne at 6990743. Lake Placid Moose has a general meeting and a Moose Legion meeting at 7:30 p.m. the second Tuesday at the lodge. Lake Placid Veterans of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliary 3880 meets 10 a.m. second Tuesday at 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444 for details. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Multiple Sclerosis Support Group meets at 7 p.m. second Tuesday at Highlands Regional Medical Center second floor class room. Friends and family are welcome. Call Janet Turvey at 465-3138. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventhday Adventist Church, 1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup.co m. Call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org for more information on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near the library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-3829 or 471-9900. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If interested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sign in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Cost is $2. Smoke-free environment. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves soft shell tacos 5-7 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing. Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. Call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. Call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dees Restaurant, Sebring. Call Scott Albritton at 402-1819. The Sons of AMVETS meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month at the Post, 2029 U.S. 27 South, Sebring. Tobys Clown Alley has its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday at the Clown Foundation, 109 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 6-7 p.m. at the Atonement Lutheran Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Community Bible Church, 1400 CR-17AN., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. Call 452-1093. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. The ladies auxiliary meets at 10 a.m. every second Tuesday. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 has a card tournament at 2 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902.WEDNESDAY Adult Children of Alcoholics and Dysfunctional Families. New Life Group meets Wednesdays at 11:30 a.m. at Grace Bible Church, 4453 Thunderbird Road, Sebring. Call 446-0461. For details on the organization, go to www.adultchildren.org. American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Burgers served from 5-7 p.m.Live music is from 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. AmVets Ladies Auxiliary Post 21 meets at 11 a.m. the second Wednesday at Blue Crab Restaurant, Sebring. All members welcome. Avon Park Noon Rotary Club meets noon, Rotary Club Building, on corner of Verona Avenue and Pine Street, Avon Park. BALANCE, Lives in Transition, Inc. Qi-GONG Relaxation classes every Wednesday from 2:45-3 p.m. All classes and support groups are at 4023 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 386-5687. Balance Transitions (Support Group For People Suffering From Mental Illness) meets every Wednesday at 1 p.m. at 4023 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 386-5687. BALANCE, Lives in Transition, Inc. Family and Caregiver Support Group meets the second Wednesday of the month from 10:30 a.m. to noon at Daybreak Office,1346 US 27 North, Lake Placid. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. The Bridgettes meet at 12:15 p.m. at Sebring Recreation Center to play bridge. Call Sandra Yates at 655-5815. Christian Fellowship Group meets 7 p.m. Call 381-9005 or 381-9007. Country Swingers has dances at the Sebring Recreation Club, 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. Membership is required. Beginners dancing from 5:156:15 p.m. Advanced dancing is from 6:30-8:30 p.m. New dances taught every other week. Call 655-2398. Fraternal Order of Eagles 4240 Aerie meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesday at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details call 6554007. Heartland Herpetological Society meets 7 p.m., second Wednesday, Room 315, Cracker Trail Elementary School, Sebring. Call 385-6826 or 465-2228 for details.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September. Highlands County Narcotics Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. at the Lakeside house, 1513 S. Highlands Ave., AvonPark. Call the 24-hour hotline 1-800-850-7347 or (941) 616-0460. Highlands County Traffic Safety Committee meets 10 a.m., conference room 3, Highlands County Agri-Civic Center, Sebring, second Wednesday. Highlands Senior Center is open every Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at their new clubhouse, 3400 Sebring Parkway (the old Lions Club). Two live bands to dance to and great lunches. All area seniors are invited to join the festivities. Call 386-0752. Highlands Shrine Club, 2606 State Road 17 South, Avon Park (between Avon Park and Sebring) meets from 8:3010:30 a.m. for coffee and doughnuts and socializing for members and any interested person. Call 382-2208. Kiwanis Club of Sebring meets every Wednesday at noon at Homer's Restaurant. Call Grace Plants 273-1421 for more information. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 is open to members and their guests. Shuffleboard is at 1:30 p.m. Mah-Jong from 1-5 p.m. Lounge opens at 12:30 p.m. Steak night on the second Wednesday of each month. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Garden Club meets at 12:30 p.m. every second Wednesday (from September through May) for socialization and at 1 p.m. for dessert and beverage, followed by a meeting and gardening program at the Lake Placid Womans Club, 10 N. Main Ave. Call 465-6106. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at night. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lake Placid Women of the Moose meets at 7 p.m. the second Wednesday at the lodge for a chapter night and enrollment. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Dinner served every Wednesday from 5:30-6:30 p.m.Lodge phone number 4520579. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 7 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Over The Hill Gang meets 10:15 a.m., Jims Pistolarrow Range for target shooting. Call 655-4505. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 1-3 p.m. second Wednesday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Lake Placid (Morning Rotary) meets at 6:44 a.m. at The Herons Garden, 501 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, just north of the Tower. Visiting Rotarians always welcome. Coffee only is $2; full breakfast is $7. Call 465-4834. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 Aerie members meet at 7 p.m. second Wednesday at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 hosts Wacky Wednesday from 5-6:30 p.m. serving a varied menu of food for $5 and special drink prices. Lounge open from 3-10 p.m. Open to Elk members and guests. Music provided from 4:30-7:30 p.m. Smokefree environment. Call 4713557. Sebring Jaycees meets 7:30 p.m., Jaycees Clubhouse, State Road 17, Sebring. Sebring Kiwanis meets noon, Homers Smorgasbord, Sebring. Sebring Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves hamburgers, fries and fish sandwiches from 5-7 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing. There will be music from 4:307:30 p.m. Call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club has ice cream shuffleboard at 1:15 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. Call 385-2966. Suicide and Sudden Death Grief Support group meets every Wednesday, 6 p.m., at Unity Life Enrichment Center, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd, Sebring. Facilitated by licensed therapist. Call 381-4410. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL487 meets at 9 a.m. at Whispering Pines Baptist Church, 303 White Pine Drive, Sebring. Call 382-7716 or 3149485. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3800 plays poker at 2 p.m. at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 plays euchre at 6:30 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Service officer at post 12-3 p.m. Call 385-8902. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9853 Mens Auxiliary membership meeting is at 7 p.m. second Wednesday at the post, 75 N. Olivia Drive, Avon Park. Young Artists String Orchestra (YASO) rehearses each Wednesday at 5:15 p.m. at Lake Placid Church of the Nazarene (512 W. Interlake). We are looking for violin, viola, cello, and string bass players to be a part of this orchestra. For information, call Diane Osborne, conductor, at 6594541 or (503) 709-1440.THURSDAY Alzheimers Association Support Group meets from 12 p.m. and from 6:30-7:30 p.m. at the Sebring Christian Church on Hammock Road. Call Lisa Rodriguez at 385-3444. American Legion Placid Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Card games played at 1 p.m. Pool tournament is 7 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Customer Appreciation Day. Free food. Happy hour all day. Call 4711448. Avon Park Founders Garden Club meets the second Thursday of the month from September through May. Meetings are held at members homes. Phone 452-1927 for more information. Avon Park Moose Lodge 2494 plays euchre at 7 p.m. at the lodge on Walnut Street. Bravehearts, an Ala-Non support group, meets from 1-2 p.m. at Spring Lake Presbyterian Church. Call 6553274. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays novice duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring, November through May. Call 385-8118. Central Avon Park Jaycees meets 7:30 p.m., Recreation Center, North Verona Avenue, Avon Park. Disabled American Veterans Ridge Chapter 49 meets 7 p.m., American Legion Building, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring, second Thursday. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For more details, call 385-3288. Fraternal Order of Eagles 4240 Aerie Auxiliary meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Thursday at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details call 655-4007. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club offers beginning dance lessons for new and returning dancers from 4-6 p.m. Thursday, and classes for last years dancers from 2-4 p.m. at Reflections On Silver Lake in Avon Park. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or e-mail him at samdunn@samdunn.net. Heartland African Violet Society meets at 2:30 p.m. every second Thursday at Marina Cove at Highlands Ridge South off Powerline Road in the multipurpose room of Founders Hall. Visitors are welcome. Call Shirley at 3855765 for details.Heartland Amputee Group meets at noon every second Thursday (October through April) at Handicapped Americans Love of Life Organization, 112 Medical Center Ave., Sebring, for a brown-bag lunch. Beverages provided. It is open to all level s of amputees, both recent and experienced, their family mem bers and friends. Call 385-119 6 or e-mail to hal loinc@embarqmail.com.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. provides free assisted riding sessions fo r adults and children with specia l needs from 9-11 a.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday at 118 W. College Drive, AvonPark. For details o r to volunteer, call Mary McClelland, coordinator, 4520006. Highlands County Narcotics Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. at St. Agnes Episcopal Church on Lakeview Drive in Sebring. Call the 24hour hotline 1-800-850-7347 o r (941) 616-0460. Highlands Federated Republican Women meet se cond Thursday at Inn on the Lakes, Golfview Drive, Sebring. Social hour and Dutc h treat dinner is at 5 p.m. Meetin g begins at 6 p.m. All Republicans are invited. For further information, call 4536783. Highlands Lake Volunteer Fire and Rescue meets 7 p.m ., at fire department, 2840 Highlands Blvd., Avon Park, second and fourth Thursday. Highlands County Corvett e Club meets 7:30 p.m. on second Thursday, Sebring Elks Lodge, corner of Kenilworth Boulevard and Lakeview Drive For more details, call 471-982 9. Highlands Little Theatre Youth Showstoppers meet a t 6 p.m. every second Thursday of the month. Learn what to do back stage as well as on stag e. All youth between 6 and 18 ar e invited to attend. Call 385-217 5. Hope Hospice grief suppor t group meets at 11 a.m. every Thursday at the Avon Park Library, 100 N. Museum Ave. Call 382-0312. Lake Placid Chapter 260 Order of The Eastern Star meets at 7:30 p.m. second an d fourth Thursday at the Masoni c Lodge on Main Street in Lake Placid. No meetings from July through September. Call 4654345. Lake Placid China Painter s Club meets 10 a.m. on secon d Thursday at 10 North Main Ave., Lake Placid from September through May. For more details, call 465-2256. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 has lounge hours beginning at 1 p.m. Card games an d bingo are at 6 p.m. with burgers, sandwiches and desserts served. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Ca ll 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose serves burgers, jumbo hot dogs and fries at 6 p.m. Music provided from 5:30-9 p.m. Darts at 7:30 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lake Placid Noon Rotary Club meets at noon at Peppercorns, 525 W. Interlake Blvd. For more information, including how to order lunch in advance, call Forrest Steele a t 465-0113. Lake Placid Woodcarvers meet from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lorida Teens (TLT), a new ly formed part of the Greater Lorida Community Club, meet s www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 13B ROOFING SPECIALIST SERVING HIGHLANDS COUNTY SINCE 1989Shingles Flat Roofs Roof Repairs Mobile Home Roofovers -FULLYLICENSED & INSURED385-4690State Lic # RC 0066817 QUALITY WORK AT A REASONABLE PRICE FREEESTIMATES Continued from page 12B COMMUNITYCALENDAR Continued on page 14B

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a t 7 p.m. Thursdays to play s oftball, volleyball and a variety o f other sports. Teens are e ncouraged to come to the c ommunity center. Loyal Order of Moose H ighlands County Lodge No. 2 494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon P ark. Tacos and wings served e very Thursday from 5:30-6:30 p .m. Cards at 6:30 p.m. Lodge p hone number 452-0579. Marine Corps League C racker Trail Detachment 1 004, meets 7 p.m., second T hursday, at Veterans of F oreign Wars Post, 2011 SE L akeview Drive, Sebring. Call J ohn Kelley at 386-0524. Mothers of Preschoolers ( MOPS) meets from 9-11 a.m. s econd and fourth Thursday f rom May-September at Grace B ible Church, 4541 T hunderbird Road (second c hurch on left). Call Heidi K atsanis at 441-3879. Web site i s at www.mops.org. Narcotics Anonymous Take I t Easy Group meets at 8 p.m. a t St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. F or information call Heartland a rea helpline (863) 683-0630. M ore information on other m eetings and events at w ww.naflheartland.org. Overeaters Anonymous m eets from 4-5 p.m. every T hursday at Ridge Area Arc C afeteria, 120 W. College D rive. No dues, fees or weighi ns. Visit www.FloridaRidge I ntergroup.com. Call 414-3172. V isit www.oa.org for more inform ation on OA. Overeaters Anonymous m eets from 5:30-6:30 p.m. e very Thursday at Wauchula S eventh-Day Adventist Church, 2 05 S. 11th Ave., Wauchula. No d ues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit w ww.FloridaRidge I ntergroup.com. Call (863) 7735 714. Peace of Highlands County m eets at 2 p.m. second T hursday at Sebring Church of t he Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., S ebring. Anon-profit, interden ominational organization that s ponsors programs promoting p eace. Call Paul K. Ferrell at 2 14-5522. Pine Ridge Promenaders w ill be dancing from 7:30-9:30 p .m. at the Sunshine RV Park r ecreation hall located 1,000 y ards east of U.S. 27 on State R oad 70. For more details, call D an or Nell Sherman at 4652 481 or 243-9676. Placid Lakes Bridge Club m eets 6-9 p.m. at Placid Lakes T own Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes B lvd. Call 465-4888. Ridge Area Writers meet at 1 0 a.m. the second and fourth T hursday in the conference r oom at the Sebring Public L ibrary. All writers are welcome. C all 465-5254. Sebring Breakfast Lions C lub meets 7 a.m. at Dots R estaurant in Sebring Square. Sebring Country Estates C ivic Association hosts L adies Cards at 12:30 p.m. e very Thursday. Business m eeting every second T hursday at 7 p.m. Carry-in d inner every fourth Thursday at 6 p.m. Membership is $10 per p erson. Located at 3240 Grand P rix Drive. For all residents of S ebring Country Estates and G rand Prix Heights subdivision. P ublic rentals available for spec ial events. Call 385-9109. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves hamburgers and french f ries from 5-7 p.m. Music is f rom 6-9 p.m. at the club, 1 2921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 6 55-4007. Sebring Lodge 249 F&AM meets 7 p.m., second Thursday, 1809 Home Ave., Sebring. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 has an officers meeting at 7 p.m. and general meeting at 8 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing. Call 655-3920. Sebring Rhythm Cloggers dance at 6:30 p.m. at Highlands Hammock State Park Recreation Room in Sebring. If interested, call 3823735 or 382-6973. Sebring Sunrise Rotary Club meets 7 a.m., Sebring Elks Club, corner of Kenilworth Boulevard and Southeast Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Sweet Adelines Show Chorus meets at 7 p.m. every Thursday in the AvonPark Rotary Club, 20 S. Verona Ave. Call Jeanne Parzygnat at 6990743; Bette Killeen at 446-3106 or Anita Helbig at 452-1927. Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets at Venus United Methodist Church, 962 County Road 731, Venus. Weigh in is from 5-5:30 p.m. Meeting is from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Call 4659165 for details. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. House Committee meeting at 10 a.m. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves hamburgers from 12-2:30 and plays bingo at 2 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For more details call 385-8902. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9853 bar bingo is at 1 p.m. every Thursday. Volunteers of America of Florida is a nonprofit organization in Sebring that specializes in assisting person's with mental illness. We are pleased to announce our Drop in Center is open to individuals with a mental illness 6 days a week from 11am to 3 pm. The center offers a welcoming environment where individuals are accepted and feel comfortable. For more information please contact Wendy at 863-382-2022.FRIDAY Alcoholics Anonymous One Day At ATime group meets for a closed discussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday and Friday at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. Call 314-0891. Alzheimers Association Support Group meets at 6 p.m. second Friday at the Oaks of Avon in AvonPark. Call 3853444. American Legion Post 25 hosts a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. at the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake Placid. Cost is $6. Shrimp also is available for same price. Open to the public. Tickets in the lounge on Friday night. Lounge hours are from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 has karaoke from 7 p.m. until final call at the post, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Post open at noon. Happy Hour from 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Breakfast Rotary Club meets 7 a.m., Rotary Club building. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. Grand Prix Cloggers Beginner classes are at 9 a.m., EZ Intermediate classes are at 10 a.m., and Intermediate classes are at 11 a.m. every Friday at Reflection on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club offers a class in Lake Placid at the Sunshine RV Resort from 9-11 a.m. Friday. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 3826792 or e-mail him at samdunn@samdunn.net. Heartland AIDS Network meets 9 a.m., second Friday, Heartland Professional Plaza Learning Center, Sebring. Heartland Clubs meet at 3:30 p.m. on the second Friday of each month at Placid Lakes Town Hall Building, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call 699-6773. Highlands County Democratic Party 13th Precinct meets at 3:30 p.m. second Friday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd., Lake Placid. Call Bill Sayles at 699-6773. Highlands Social Dance Club hosts ballroom dancing every Friday, October through March from 7-9:30 p.m. at the Senior Center on Sebring Parkway. Dance the night away to the music of the areas Big Bands. All club dances are open to the public. Appropriate dress required. Admission is $5 for members and $7 for non-members. Call 471-0559. Lake Country Cruisers has a car show from 5-8 p.m. second Friday at Woodys Bar-B-Q parking lot, Lake Placid. There is a live disc jockey and door prizes. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 has lounge hours beginning at 1 p.m. There is a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. Cost is $8.50 per person. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose serves wings, fish and burgers at 6 p.m. Music provided from 7-11 p.m. Pool tournament is at 8 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Karaoke from 7-10 p.m. Lodge phone number 4520579. Narcotics Anonymous New Day Group meets at 6 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. S.A.L.T. Council (Seniors and Law Enforcement Together) meets the second Friday each month at 10 a.m. in the conference room of Florida Hospital Home Care Services located at 4005 Sun 'n Lake Blvd. For more information contact Grace Plants at 273-1421. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves chicken or fish baskets from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring, for a $4 donation. Blind darts is played at 7 p.m. Call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 serving buffet dinner at 5-7 p.m. Elks and guests invited. Dance music in ballroom at 7 p.m. Dinner and dance is $10 donation. For reservations, call 3858647 or 471-3557. Smoke-free environment. Lounge is open from 3-10 p.m. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave. Call 3852966 or leave a name, number and message. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3800 serves steak by the ounce from 5:30-7 p.m. every fourth Friday at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Texas Hold em lessons, 2 p.m. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves pizza from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902. SATURDAY American Association of University Women meets at 10 a.m. third Saturday at various locations. Call 465-2581 or 452-2493. American Legion Post 25 serves sirloin burgers from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake Placid. Jam session is from 2-4 p.m. The lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Members and guests invited. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 69 in AvonPark serves dinner at 5 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Lakes Association has a pancake breakfast on the third Saturday of every month. $4 for adults, $2 for children under 12. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. Avon Park Public Library has a free Adult Film Series at noon. Call 452-3803. Heartland Avian Society meets at 1 p.m. third Saturday at various homes or a restaurant. Pet bird owners meet to share food and fellowship and take occassional field trips. Looking for other bird owners to join us. Call Sharol at 4657350. Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. provides free assisted riding sessions for adults and children with special needs from 9-11 a.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday at 118 W. College Drive, AvonPark. For details or to volunteer, call Mary McClelland, coordinator, 4520006. Highlands Shrine Club, 2606 State Road 17 South, Avon Park (between Avon Park and Sebring) has a flea market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., country store open from 8 a.m. to noon and pancake breakfast served from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Vendors are welcome. No setup fee is charged for the summer months. Plenty of off road parking. Call 382-2208. Highlands Woodcarvers meet from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays at 825 Sunbird Terr. (Community Center off Thunderbird Road). Call Bob Seybolt at 471-6077. Historical Society of Greater Lake Placid meets at noon quarterly on the third Saturday of March, June, September, and December at the Masonic Hall, 106 N. Main for a potluck luncheon. Hot Rod Nights Cruise In, meets from 5-8 p.m. every third Saturday at the Home Depot parking lot in Sebring. Call 441 3051 or 441-3086. Lake Placid Art League ha s a class in Pastels/Acrylics taught by Llewellyn Rinald from from 9 a.m. to noon at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 opens the lounge at 1 p.m. Card games are played a t 1 p.m., and Bar Bingo is at 1:3 0 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Ca ll 465-2661. Narcotics Anonymous Ne w Day Group meets at 7 p.m. a t First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Overeaters Anonymous meets at 10:30 a.m. at First Presbyterian Church, Oak Street, Lake Placid. For more details, call 382-1821. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves dinner from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Music is from 7-10 p.m. Call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Club 2259 offers line dancing lessons at 2 p.m. the first and third Saturda y for members and guests at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-3920. Twelve Step Study Group for Adult Children of Alcoholics meets at 11 a.m. first and third Saturday, at first building south of Union Congregational Church, 105 N Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parkin g available south of old church. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. Spaghett i dinner and karaoke at 5:30 p.m. on the third Saturday of each month. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves a meal for $ 6 from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902. Page 14BNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011www.newssun.com Save$25 $300 per unit on select Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their enduring craftsmanship and energy-efcient designs, they present exceptional value smart style thats energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings from January 14 through April 29, 2011 with mail-in rebates on select styles. Ask us for details. *Manufacturers rebate offer valid for purchases made January 14 through April 29, 2011. Limitations and restrictions apply. Ask for details. 2011 Hunter Douglas. and TM are trademarks of Hunter Douglas. Family owned & operated since 1978 Continued from page 13B COMMUNITYCALENDAR AVON PARK 452-5800 SEBRING 382-3363 LAKE PLACID 465-1530Its more than just carpet The cleaning of the second piece must be of equal or lesser value to the first service price.Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 ft. and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Not valid with any other coupon. Expires 01/31/11.Emergency Water Damage Restoration3 ROOMS CARPET CLEANEDA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 01/31/11.$95002 ROOMS CARPET CLEANEDA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 01/31/11.$7500 it s his dog park.UPHOLSTERY: CLEANONE PIECEOF UPHOLSTERY AT REGULAR PRICEAND RECEIVEASECONDPIECE1/2 OFF

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DearAbby: I divorced two years ago, after 40 years of marriage. The divorce papers read irreconcilable differences. I made up my mind that I wouldnt badmouth my ex-wife, would use her name when speaking of her, and would rebuild my personal and social life as quickly as possible. Last year, I dated half a dozen widows. Without fail, during the course of the date, these lovely ladies would raise the subject of the death of their husbands. These women were beyond tears, but the pain in their eyes was evident. I heard stories about how they took care of a beloved husband while he was dying of cancer, or an unexplained sudden death and the anguish of trying to wake him from his eternal sleep. Christmas has just passed and it has been a long time since I have felt so alone. I went to the clubhouse in our community for dinner, but all my friends were either away for the holidays or entertaining friends and family and I couldnt intrude. While I listened to these widows, I have seen steely eyes soften and even heard them laugh. What an ego booster it has been for me. What I need now is some of my own medicine. I hope one day Ill find someone who doesnt need a handsome Jack, a good golfer or a sugar daddy. Until then, Ill just have to be a ... Lonesome George DearLonesome George: Because youre a good listener, please listen to me. Its time to become more involved in life. Enroll in adult education classes, learn to paint, take a writing class or an acting class or get some computer training. Volunteer your services. There are plenty of underprivileged people, people with disabilities and teens who could use a friend. Get involved in your political party, your church or a professional organization. Take dancing lessons. Join a gym or health club. Do some entertaining and ask your friends to bring a friend. And let your friends know youre available. You may not meet the perfect somebody right away, but youll make new friends and one of them may have a friend whos perfect for you. DearAbby: My lifelong friend from childhood wonders why I am avoiding her. Now that I am in my 80s, the unfairness of a lie from our past is still plaguing me. Seventy-five years ago, at a Sunday school picnic, I saw Mary Anns mother take something from another womans purse. As she looked around, she caught my eye and an ugly expression came over he r face. Days later, Mary Ann told me people in our church were being told that I was a thief. Not having the maturity to ha ndle the enormous falsehood, and knowing it wasnt true, I chose to ignore it. But it didnt go away. It followed me all my life. Some years later, another friend advised me to talk to our minister, who told me t o pray about it. My prayer wa s that he would stand up in th e pulpit and declare my innocence, but it never came about and I eventually left the church. I learned later that Mary Anns mother had a habit o f stealing from homes where she worked as a practical nurse. Losing my reputation because of this womans weakness made the lie all the more painful, and I so want to be cleared at least i n my friends eyes. But do I want to hurt my friend in revealing her mothers responsibility in switching the blame for her theft? Please help. In Lingering Pai n, Graham, Was h. DearIn Pain: Write Ma ry Ann a letter and tell her exactly what you have told me. Im sure she knows her mothers character very we ll, and it will come as no shoc k to her. Then the two of you should decide together how her mothers slander of you should be handled. If shes your friend, shell help you Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 9, 2011Page 15B COUNTRY STRONGPG13(Gwyneth Paltrow,Tim McGraw)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30TANGLED 2DPG(Animated)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30THE FIGHTERR(Mark Wahlberg,Christian Bale)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30HOW DO YOU KNOWPG13(Reese Witherspoon,Owen Wilson)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30FASTER R(The Rock)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15UNSTOPPABLEPG13(Denzel Washington,Rosario Dawson)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15 The NewFAIRMOUNTCINEMA63750 US 27 N. Sebring NOW SHOWINGFriday 01/07 Thursday 01/13 Suick CinemasInformation 385-9980 Office 385-9908New Dolby Digital SoundAll Seats $6.00for Matinee COMING SOONJan 7SEASON OF THE WITCH Newborns Children AdolescentsOFFICE HOURS: Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., F.A.A.P. Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., F.A.A.P. Anoop Palta, M.D., F.A.A.P. Vishakha Nakhate, M.D., F.A.A.P. David Kleczek, P.A.C. Amy Grimes, P.A.C. Mercy L. Seralde, M.D. Maria C. Perez, M.D. Maria B. Asis, M.D., F.A.A.P. Megan Neff, ARNPAvon Park Pediatrics,P.A. & Sebring Pediatrics,LLCWe accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid SEBRING382-0770AVON PARK453-7337 Specializing in the treatment of Allergies Asthma Attention Deficit Disorder Immunizations Check-ups Obesity Counseling SEBRING: MON. FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PMSATURDAY 8:30AM 12:00 NOON SEBRING ONLYAVON PARK: MON. & WED. 8:30AM 7:00PM TUES., THURS., & FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PM LAKE PLACID699-1414 DIVERSIONS OUIBy JACK MCINTURFF ACROSS 1 Language group that includes Swahili 6 "Great" swingers 10 Yaks 14 "Get out!" 19 Yellow spreads 20 "Gloria" actress Rowlands 21 It will probably keep you in bed 22 Raccoon kin 23 Herb homily? 26 Canadian pianist Kuerti 27 It's usually over a door 28 Australia's __ Rock 29 Current concern 30 Dismayed cry 31 One begins "Rhapsody in Blue" 32 Witness to the Transfiguration of Jesus 33 Mag transformed by Helen Gurley Brown 36 Van Morrison's singing daughter 37 Union leavers 38 Hawaiian tuna 39 Like a stroller out of breath? 43 Fallen orbiter 44 Sound relatives 45 With no rocks 46 Suspect story, maybe 49 '90s game disc 50 Golf pro's protection? 55 Nest egg initials 56 Upgrade to five stars, say 58 Not rented 59 Capers 61 "Sherlock Holmes" actress Rachel 63 "What __ Is This?" 64 Wander 66 Attend to loose ends 67 Look uncertainly (for) 68 1972 Oscar refuser 69 Wrath 70 Coffee at church? 74 Hindu title 77 Elected ones 78 Former U.K. carrier 79 Slick trick 80 Lincoln progeny 81 Adoptee's goal? 86 Director's challenge 87 Remove with effort 91 Use the soapbox 92 Spanish others 94 Lures 95 Moccasin, e.g. 96 Pelvic bones 98 Areas above hooves 99 Pursue 100 Torino tongue 104 Pasta often served alla vodka 105 "Last Comic Standing" winning routine? 107 Drive-thru decision 108 It has banks in Switzerland 109 Not a happy fate 110 Writer Zora __ Hurston 111 Tries out 112 Lulus 113 Sound measure 114 Taunts DOWN 1 Speaker of note 2 Author Haley 3 Michael Corleone's bodyguard Al 4 Hand-played drum 5 Wartime diversion 6 To the max, in the disco era 7 Ivy League member 8 Stud attachment? 9 Dry and hot 10 Some wardens' concern 11 "__ Like You": Young Rascals hit 12 Keister 13 Place to be quiet 14 Like Super Bowl tickets, perhaps 15 Hustled 16 Kiwi or rhea 17 Sorry sort 18 They may have 84Down 24 One-time partner of novelist Miller 25 Giving the once-over 29 "Yada, yada, yada ..." 31 "__ Promise You": *NSYNC hit 32 Family car 33 Summer getaway 34 River formed at Pittsburgh 35 Knighted vintner's nickname? 36 Internet communications company 37 Golf's Slammin' Sammy 40 Pianist/composer Chasins 41 Caf additions 42 Denoting a loss 46 Dorm room Christmas tree? 47 Bugs 48 It may be stolen 50 Plotting aid 51 Not at all 52 Steal 53 Without direction 54 African antelope 57 http://ucla.__ 60 It may be financial or legal 61 Year of Super Bowl XXXVI 62 Muffin grain 63 Signs of spring 64 Former title-winning women's wrestler Stratus 65 Saree wearer 67 Forest clearing 68 Cruel, as force 71 Stomachs 72 Suit sizes 73 Irritate 75 Shankar music style 76 Nuptial vows 81 Bernie, Roz and Greg, in a 2004 film 82 They aren't stars 83 Understand 84 Spy covers 85 Like white water 87 Absolute ruler 88 Beckoning words 89 Score holders 90 Small finch 93 Capital city that hosted the 2007 Baseball World Cup 95 #, on scores 96 "Who's there?" reply 97 "Well, __-di-dah" 99 Indian spiced tea 100 A party to 101 Rhyme scheme of Kipling's "If 102 Cairo's river 103 Plural suffix with Capri 105 Salary limit 106 Hugs, on card Solution on page 11B Loneliness dampens holiday cheer two years after divorce Dear Abby Just when I was comfortable, change p rodded and poked at me. Not that I was a stranger to change. A s a young and vulnerable single mothe r, I knew what it was to have the pillars o f support knocked out from under me. B ut I had overcome some of the obstac les and I wasnt planning on more. When my landlord told me that I n eeded to find another apartment, I was s hocked. My son and I had a good relat ionship with our landlord. But personal p references for their future changed and, u nfortunately, affected me and my pres chooler. Though I was comfortable in my prese nt, affordable housing, God wasnt as i nterested in my comfort as in my chara cter. How would I respond to this? W ould I bring it to him and seek his g uidance?Would I trust him again for t hat unknown future? What fruit would I bear for him t hrough this unexpected trial? That old memory surfaced as I studied about knowing Gods voice by his relevance to me in various ways. He is not just the God of the past and the future. He is my God of now. I may not have had these descriptions to hang my hat on at that time. But, I clung to the Lord and acted in faith that he would guide and not let us down. He is so relevant to me that I can be sure Im not hearing his voice if my mind is burdened with concerns about what might happen in the future. Matthew 6:34, NKJV, reminds us, Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about its own things. Instead, I found comfort in knowing that he promised to never leave me or forsake me. I had no control over these changes; but, I knew that he was changeless. When I found myself leaning toward worry especially when I saw how expensive rents for other apartments were Gods Word from Proverbs 3: 5 and 6 returned to me. Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct your paths. From my perspective, my financial picture was muddy at best. But God knew what was available to me; and, he saw my financial picture from his viewpoint not mine. Faced with impossibilities or what seems like insurmountable obstacles? God is ever present. He is I Am. Depend on him to guide and provide in the here and now. Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent and an award-winnin g writer. Relevance to the here and now Pause And Consider Jan Merop Given that this is the first c olumn of a new year, Im p roposing a number of pare nting New Years R esolutions for my readers to c onsider. The list is by no m eans comprehensive. Its j ust a good beginning on w hat is probably a muchn eeded family revolution: 1. We will not throw e xpensive event parties for o ur children on their birthd ays. Instead, we will confine a ll birthday celebrations to o ur family, including extende d family. We will keep it u ncomplicated: a special dinn er of the birthday boy or g irls favorite food, a cake, t he obligatory song, and a f ew simple gifts, mostly c lothing or useful things. 2. We will spend at least as m uch time helping our child ren develop good manners a s we do helping them get g ood grades in school, which m eans we will cut back sign ificantly on the time helping w ith the latter (in considerat ion of the fact that good m anners, which are express ions of respect for others, w ill take one further in life t han will good grades). Each w eek, we will work on one s pecific social courtesy, such as saying excuse me when you walk in front of someone. Taking two weeks off, thats 50 courtesies a year. 3.We will show our love for our neighbors by properly disciplining our children, insisting on proper behavior, and reprimanding immediately (even if that means in front of other people) when they behave otherwise, and on those occasions we will also insist they apologize appropriately. 4. If we have not already done so, we will assign a routine of daily chores to each of our children (at least those who have reached their third birthdays) and we will insist that said chores be done, and done properly, before they engage in recreation. 5. When our children ask us for cell phones, we will tell them that they may have cell phones when they are able to pay for them as well as the monthly bills. 6. When our children complain that they are the only kids who dont have cell phones (and do chores), we will tell them that learning how to be different is character-building. 7. Our children will not be able to order customized meals unless we take them to a restaurant. At home, they will eat what we are eating, and they will sit at the table until they are finished. We will do this so that when they are invited to eat at someone elses home, they will be the best of guests. 8. We will surely bond with our children, but we will not bond with them in the marital bed, nor will we bond with them in their beds. 9. In keeping with number 8, we will put our marriage first and our children second ... for their sake as well as ours. They will revolve around us; thus, they will not grow up thinking the world revolves around them. 10. If I am a single parent, I will take good care of myself for my sake as well as my childrens. I will have an active, adults only, social life. I will take plenty of personal time to simply relax and do those things I like to do. I will do all of that so that my children will not ever think the world revolves around them. 11. We/I will put our/my children to bed early so that we/I can end each day reconnecting as a couple or relaxing as a single. 12. We will eat as a family around our own table at least six nights a week. 13. We will keep afterschool activities to a minimum, and only let them enroll in activities that do not prevent us from delivering on number 11. 14. Instead of buying our children expensive things, we will help them develop hobbies and take them to museums and on trips. 15. We will do all of the above so that when they grow up, they will have wonderful memories of their childhoods and raise our grandchildren in a manner that honors us. John Rosemond answers parents questions at www.rosemond.com. Parenting resolutions need to be included Living With Children John Rosemond

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LIVING 16B PAGE News-Sun Sunday, January 9, 2011 FAMILYFEATURES A s the colors, smells and textures begin to turn from one season to the next, many women begin to think about freshening up the inside of their homes. One easy way to update any home is to add a fresh scent that matches the rooms dcor. Get inspired by the variety of vibrant c olors and aromas that each season brings and create an at-home scent e xperience with Glade Sense & Spray Automatic Freshener. Matching f ragrance to the look and style of the room, whether with colorful new t hrow pillows or a faux flower arrangement, makes updating a room e asy and cost-effective. Interior designer, home trend expert and frequent guest on HGTV E rinn Valencich knows exactly how to make small changes that can h ave a big impact. Scent is a fantastic way to make any room feel w elcoming and complete without making any major renovations, w hich can be expensive and permanent, says Valencich. Families t oday are searching for easy solutions to revamp their living spaces w ithout breaking the bank, and my customers often dont realize t hat dcor and scent are closely connected. Discovering a signature f ragrance will tremendously add to a rooms design by creating a w arm and inviting atmosphere, she notes. In order to offer budget-friendly tips that families can use to update t heir living spaces, Valencich has partnered with Glade Sense & Spray A utomatic Freshener. Together, they hope these tips will enhance fami liesat-home scent experience and show how affordable and easy it c an be to update any room by stimulating the senses through color, t exture and scent: 1 .Think outside the box. Look at items purely based on color and see a room in a whole new light. Valencich says painting an accent wall is one of the easiest ways to get a fresh pop of color into a room. To make the room cohesive, pick three accessories in that same color and position them around the room in a triangle pattern. This could be a few new throw pillows on the sofa and a vase on the mantle with a few chic blooms. Coffee table books with jackets in the accent color work great as styling accessories, as well. 2 .Bring the outdoors inside. Greenery is often overlooked in a home but really gives a room life. If a live tree is too much of a commitment, incorporate an artificial tree, plant or arrangement. Use a stylish pot and cover it with moss to create an inexpensive accessory. 3 .Create visual and tactile variety. Achieve a warm and inviting atmosphere using soft lighting with lamps and dimmers. Also use a variety of textures in the room. If theres a lot of wood in a room already, opt for a side table made from glass and metal materials, and choose upholstered dining chairs instead of using additional wood. 4 .Dont forget the finishing touch. If a room looks beautiful but lacks an inviting scent, the effect may fall flat. To bring a room together, dont forget to add fragrance as the finishing touch to home dcor with Glade Sense & Spray Automatic Freshener. The newly designed neutral vase blends into any room, and the motion activated sensor provides a signature fragrance to complement the rooms design and ambiance. For more quick and easy tips, visit www.GladeScentandStyle.com. Bring the outdoors inside. Greenery is often overlooked in a home but really gives a room life If a live tree is too much of a commitment, incorporate an artificial tree, plant orarrangement. Fora casual beach-inspired look, mix aged wooden pieces, like a distressed end table, with a more formal collection of white vases with intricate floral detailing, and pairwith the Hawaiian Breeze scent.DiscoverScentPersonalitywith InteriorDesignerErinnValencichHaving a beautifully scented room encourages guests to linger in the space, relax and enjoy themselves because it is a positive reinforcement of the environment. I like the newly designed Glade Sense & Spray Automatic Freshener because it is dependable and can be incorporated into any rooms dcor. The neutral colored vase-like design will look nice in any room while keeping the home smelling fresh with a desirable personalized fragrance.If a chic dcor is a personal favorite, the soft scent of Lavender & Vanilla will complete the room. To achieve this style, mix vintage-inspired fabrics like florals and stripes with worn pieces. For an added touch, try updating drawers and side tables with new knobs for a custom look. Soft slip-covered sofas and chairs add a comfortable and easy-to-care-for element.If youre desiring a layered, casual beach-inspired look, Hawaiian Breeze is the perfect scent for a finishing touch. The airy, fruity scent is laid back and reminiscent of an ocean breeze. Mix aged wooden pieces, like a distressed end table topped with several old metal cans holding fresh or artificial flowers. Place this next to a more formal collection of white intricate floral detailed vases. Bring in island influence with bamboo furniture or frames. The mix of old and new, with punches of soft blues and greens, creates a casual elegance.