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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00959
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 01-02-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:00959
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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PAGE 1

By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comOnce again, a flip in the calendar does not mean that the story will end, and the News-Sun has selected 11 stories this year that we feel will continue to be news in 2011.Jeff Carlson caseADUI story usually has very little play in a newspaper these days unless there is a death involved. Ex-County Commissioner Jeff Carlson made the headlines in July when the boat he was driving hit a channel marker in Indian river, which caused the death of his wife, Julie. Carlson faces charges of boating under the influence manslaughter and vessel homicide, death of another person. He was suspended from the county commission in November. The effects of that fateful night will never be finished, but this particular case could stretch far into the New Year.UnemploymentNow that the Christmas rush is over, and along with it the outflow of unexpected cash into the local economy, it's time to focus on the fact that Highlands County's jobless rate broke 13 percent in December, a dramatic jump from the 8.5 percent unemployment rate from November of 2008. The question remains of how high will unemployment numbers in Highlands County go before they top out. County budgetAs housing values continue to decrease, so do ad valorem taxes. With an estimated 10 percent less in the county coffers, commissioners will have to dig deep to offset the loss in revenue. With contingency reserves almost depleted from the last two years of decline, and what will have to be sacrificed to reach a "balanced" budget?Gas pricesThey touch everyone one everywhere from the cost of food to how much it takes to get to work each day. Gas prices are edging up again they broke $3 per gallon just after Christmas and some economists predict that the national average will get closer to $5 per gallon by the end of 2011.Sheriff's buildingWith overcrowding, a lapsing lease at Liberty Star Plaza, where will the sherHow frozen iguanas made news in '10PAGE2AStewart: Budget can't take sheriff's buildingPAGE2ANEWS-SUN Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 1 | 75 cents www.newssun .com HighLow 78 56Complete Forecast PAGE 12A Mostly sunny and pleasantly warm Forecast Question: Would you be able to operate your vehicle if gas was $5 per gallon? Next question: Do you make one or more new year's resolutions each year? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Obituaries Roy Blevins Age 92, of Lake Placid George Flowers Jean O'Keeffe Age 87, of Sebring Marge Ryan Age 89, of Avon Park Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 26.2% No 73.8% 099099401007 Total votes: 65 Arts10B Business8A Classifieds10A Community Briefs5A Community Calendar11B Crossword Puzzle11B Dear Abby11B Editorial & Opinion4A Environment10B Health12B Horoscope9B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times11B Sports On TV2B Index locally owned community mindedHeartlandNational Bank Avon Park800 West Main St.863.453.6000Lake Placid600 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.699.1300Sebring327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1300Sun n Lake North5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1322www.heartlandnb.com11 for 11 11 for 11 Gas prices Home prices Harder Hall Carlson Parker The top things to watch in the coming year By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y christopher.tuffley@newssun.co m SEBRING On Sunda y, Jan. 3, 2010 the News-Su n published an article call ed "10 for '10" a look at wh at the editorial board thoug ht would be among the mo st important stories of the yea r. Now, on Jan. 2, 2011 he re is a summary of how tho se stories played out.ElectionsLast year the News-Su n wondered if campaign prom ises of change would trick le down to Highlands County. They did. The county board of com missioners complete ly changed its make up wh en Commissioner C. Guy Max cy stepped down to run for t ax collector, Commission er Edgar Stokes retired, an d incumbent Don Bates w as defeated. Don Elwell, Gr eg Harris and Jack Richie, a ll Republicans, were ea ch elected to the county com mission for the first time. Commissioner Jeff Carlso n had to resign his seat aft er being charged with boatin g under the influence. His se at has yet to be filled by t he governor. Only Barbara Stewart is left from the commission s itting a year ago. She w as elected chairperson of t he commission by her ne w peers. The voters of Sebrin g returned two city counc il incumbents to office Joh n Griffin and Scott Stanley. Voters in Avon Pa rk replaced city council memb er AlJoe Hinson with loc al attorney Parke Sutherland who is the husband of Mar ia Sutherland, Avon Park 's assistant city manager. Vote rs returned Avon Park May or Sharon Schuler to office. In Lake Placid, vote rs replaced Mayor To m Katsanis with John Holbroo k who had served as may or the term before Katsanis Looking at the top 10 for '10, a year later See 10, page 6A News-Sun file Darrel Smith was nearly killed when this Mustang struck him as he was riding his recumbent bike in August of 2007 on Hammock Road. He is now a strong advocate of bicycle safety. See 11, page 7A By ROMONAWASHINGTON editor@newssun.comSEBRING It was like any other day at work for Darrel Smith. He rode his bike about six miles to work as a ranger at Highlands Hammock State Park. His day was full of routine duties and then at the end of his day he began his trek back home on his recumbent bicycle. That's where things became tragically different. Arecumbent bicycle is a three-wheel cycle that sits significantly lower to the ground. Smith was struck by a car on the recreation trail that parallels Hammock Road. Florida Highway Patrol said at the time that Smith failed to yield to the car that struck him. There were no citations issued in the accident. The August 2007 accident nearly cost Smith his life. He laid days in a hospital bed in a drug-induced coma, and he wasn't able to return home until two months later. He suffered a "small" brain hemorrhage, broke his right wrist, his pelvis in three places, Highlands Pedalers, Smith want to share safety laws Park ranger still hurting from near-fatal accident in 2007 See SMITH, page 3A By ROMONAWASHINGTO N romona.washington@newssun.co m Darrel Smith, a longtim e cyclist and member of Highlands Pedalers, sa id those using the roadways of Highlands County, for t he most part, do a great job of sharing the roads and follow ing the laws. "I'd say at least 95 perce nt of us here respect each oth er and rules that are in place," he said. There are some, howe ver, that need to be reminded of what the laws are. Some of the laws includ ed Some of the rules of the road See RULES, page 3A Set attainable resolutions for 2011 12A Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and

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By BRENDAN FARRINGTON Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Some lessons learned in Florida this year: Giant African snail mucus can make you sick. Don't let your dog near frozen iguanas. Burials at sea don't work so well if the body doesn't sink. And if you're a woman visiting a federal detention center, wear a bra, but make sure it doesn't have an underwire. Florida lived up to its reputation for being an odd state in 2010, a year where stupid crimes, poor decisions and general weirdness seemingly showed no geographical or age limits. Like the 3-year-old who took a bag of marijuana to school in Columbia County, the 81-year-old Marion County man busted for selling pot and the 19-year-old arrested for lighting up a joint in a Palm Beach Gardens bookstore while waiting for Ozzy Osbourne's autograph. In other marijuana news, an Osceola County man chose his front yard, visible from the street, to grow pot. He was arrested when the plants, some seven-feet tall, were spotted. AFlorida Keys man was a little smarter and grew his weed in the woods. He was arrested when deputies took the plants and left a note that said, "Thanks for the grow! You want them back? Call for the price." He called, offered $200 and then met deputies to get the plants back. Then there was the man pulled over in Manatee County who claimed the crack in his crack wasn't his. Officers found bags of marijuana and crack cocaine stuffed between the man's butt cheeks. He said the pot was his but "the white stuff is not mine." Among other bizarre traffic stops, a man with a fake badge, flashing green lights and a holstered gun pulled over motorists and asked them if they had drugs or alcohol. Police said he reeked of booze and charged him with DUI and impersonating an officer. Marion County deputies said a 61-year-old man they pulled over took one more drink in front of them before submitting to, and failing, a field sobriety test. ACollier County deputy called a cab for a drunk bar patron, only to see the cab return a few minutes later and the patron get out and try to drive away. The man was charged with DUI. Alcohol played a role in many other stories, like the 55-year-old woman injured when trying to use the bathroom in a motor home traveling down I-10 in the Panhandle. She somehow fell onto the highway. Then there was the Daytona Beach man who lied to officers about being carjacked because he was too embarrassed to admit he let a stranger take his pickup on a beer run. The man never returned. A32-year-old Pasco County man called 911 to complain his mother took his beer. Police in Deland said a man walked out of a bar and head-butted a street preacher who called him a sinner. A man in Marion County almost chewed his brother's ear off during a drunken fight over a dog. APasco County man was charged with slashing his father with a knife during an argument over who would walk the dog. There were other strange dog stories. Aman was walking his Jack Russell terrier in Tampa when an alligator snatched it. He pulled out his handgun and started shooting at the gator. It let go of the dog, but the pet wasn't breathing until the man performed CPR and revived it. South Florida veterinarians began seeing an unusual number of paralyzed dogs and concluded they had a rare disease caught after coming in contact with iguanas killed during a cold snap. Dogs weren't always the victim. AHernando County man was run over by his own pickup truck after his dog jumped into the running vehicle and put it in gear. In other truck news, a death row inmate filed and lost a lawsuit seeking to keep a restored 1971 Chevy pickup that he stole from the couple he killed. Several people in Miami complained to authorities when they got sick after consuming mucus from a giant African snail as part of a religious ceremony. Among some threatening items bomb squads had to handle this year: a box with two kittens in Cocoa and a stuffed pony in Orange County. Authorities blew up the stuffed pony, but spared the kittens. AMelbourne street was shut down for three hours, the time it took the bomb squad to figure out the flashing object in the middle of the street was a restaurant pager. An Orlando-area police station was evacuated when an elderly woman walked in with a grenade she found pin intact. It wasn't the year to mess with the elderly. An 84-yearold man was arrested in Bay County for allegedly hitting a deputy with his cane. An 80-year-old Brooksville woman was found guilty of bilking friends and neighbors out of more than $1 million in a phony lottery scheme, telling them she won a fortune in a Dutch lottery and asking them for money. Would-be robbers knocked an 83-year-old man to the ground in Clearwater only to turn and run when the victim pulled a gun on them. A69-year-old woman turned back a robber after picking up the gun he dropped in her car while smashing the windshield with it. He also dropped his cell phone and was caught. A19-year-old robbing a Pensacola pharmacy put down his gun to look into a bag of drugs that was handed to him. The pharmacist Page 2ANews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South € Sebring, Florida 33870 A Harbor Point Media Company OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday PHONE: 863-385-6155 MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954 NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870 USPS … ISSN 0163-3988 Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry office(s)CIRCULATION SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before 11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their account. Please call 385-6155.SUBSCRIPTION RATES12 mo.7% FL taxTotal HOME DELIVERY$60.46$4.23$64.69 IN FLORIDA MAIL92.236.4698.69 OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL105.99105.99 Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. Romona Washington … Publisher and Executive Editor863-385-6155, ext. 515 Kaylor & Kaylor P.A.Social Security Disability LawNew Claims € Hearing Before A Judge Reconsiderations € Appeals Court 8 6 3 3 8 2 1 9 0 0 Mark Kaylor Dec. 28 172528454748x:2Next jackpot $9 millionDec. 25 32532333451x:3 Dec. 22 61216374652x:3 Dec. 30 1014192433 Dec. 29 58121726 Dec. 28 246812 Dec. 27 16122631 Dec. 30 (n) 7518 Dec. 30 (d) 5426 Dec. 29 (n) 8500 Dec. 29 (d) 7541 Dec. 30(n) 49 6 Dec. 30 (d) 48 2 Dec. 29 (n) 90 3 Dec. 29(d) 02 1 Dec. 28 152135425 Dec. 24 422303722 Dec. 21 1415374218 Dec. 17 23839401 Dec. 29 316182037 PB: 30 PP: 2Next jackpot $25 millionDec. 25 117385052 PB: 24 PP: 2 Dec. 22 1133444647 PB: 12 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center MCTphoto An iguana is belly up in south Florida after a cold snap. Some of the lizards wake up after the weather warms, but many died after 2010's record cold snap in January and were eaten by dogs, which got sick. Snail mucus, frozen iguanas and potheads By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING The debate continues over what to do with the growing needs of the Highlands County Sheriff's Department, but it is not likely to get resolved quickly. In their meeting on Dec. 21, commissioners kicked around some ideas presented by interim County Administrator Rick Helms, but board chair Barbara Stewart made it clear that the money was not there this budget year for a new building. "The numbers show that all we can afford is an adequate, good facility," Stewart said about the proposed $11 million building requested by Sheriff Susan Benton. Helms offered several other options for the board to look at before the lease expired at the sheriff's current location for administrative offices at George Boulevard and U.S. 27. The lease expires in 2012. One of the spaces Helms is investigating is the Bank of America building, and another is the SunTrust building, both in downtown Sebring. Finally, Helms said that he even contacted the City of Sebring about its complex, which is just around the corner from the current jail. City Manager Scott Noethlich said the idea w as not out of the question if t he city council agreed Commissioner Gr eg Harris once again raised t he option of the Restoratio n Church on Sparta Road. "Are we just wastin g time? We are not going to be able to purchase and re novate this building for $ 5 million," Harris said abo ut the proposed options. It ain't gonna happen." "Do you want the ul timate, ultimate, or do yo u want something functio nal?" Stewart asked. "Once we look at the se again, do we put the se options to rest?" Harr is asked Stewart. Stewart asserted that t he commission had to find an adequate facility for t he right amount of money, an d stated that Helms w as working on doing that, b ut Harris pointed out that t he downtown buildings we re not the best fiscal choices "Take out the emotion al aspect of moving the sher iff out of downtown, an d Restoration could be pu rchased and renovated a l ot cheaper than these oth er options downtown," Harr is said. "And you get a who le lot of land on top of that." Stewart asked Helms to continue with his look at the proposed propertie s, and to return with a repo rt by the second Tuesday in January. Stewart: no money for new sheriff's building in budget All had an effect on some of the strange news stories from our state in 2010 See STRANGE, page 3A News-Sun f ile The vacant Restoration Center on Sparta Road has been proposed as a good site for the new sheriff administration offices. News-Sun staffSEBRING Tickets go o n sale Monday for the T AG for the Cure F ashion Show and Cross C ountry Music Revue to b e held later this month a t Tanglewood. All proc eeds from the show will g o towards the T anglewood Cancer D rive for Relay for Life. Neil Simpson, this y ear's Tanglewood C ancer Benefit chairman, s aid the models will be T anglewood residents w ho will model fashions f rom Belk, Dress Barn, I deal Golf, Maxcy's M en's Wear, Steve & Co. a nd Sue's Cubby Hole. Tickets are $15, with a ll proceeds going to the c ancer benefit. Tickets w ill be on sale Mondays b efore and after coffee a nd from 3-4 p.m. T hursdays. Doors will open at 6:15 p .m. Saturday, Jan. 29 for t he fashion show and m usic revue. Hors d'oeuv res will be served from 6 :30-7 p.m. Dessert will b e served at intermission. B ring your own drinks. T here will be lots of raff le prizes and a 50/50 d rawing. Musicians will include T om DiGrazia, Patrick H otchkiss and Mary F ulton. Dancers will i nclude Vickie Buck, T ammy Dilsaver, Sandy R adawiec, Barb Snyder, T om Stadler, and Marcie T aylor. Models will include G ordon Armitage, M argaret Buffone, D arlene Bradley, M ichelle Coleman, Larry C onrad, Sharon Hering, B onnie Huffman, Bill K err, Luanne Kerr, Tom M app, Brian McKenzie, D ick Miller, Artie N ichols, Debbie Rogers, W ayne Roswell, Joan R ulli, Marilyn Salberg, E laine Schmidt, Stella S igler, Sandy Trull, D avid Werry, and Horst W olff. Fashion show will benefit Relay for Life Tickets go on sale Monday for show at Tanglewood Associated PressTALLAHASSEE, G ov. Charlie Crist says F lorida residents showed tremendous spirit and r esolve" in a challenging y ear. In his New Year's mess age, the outgoing govern or says he's grateful for h aving had the opportunity to serve the state. Crist says that when faced with economic strain and the oil spill in t he Gulf of Mexico, F lorida residents r esponded with "courage, t alent and dedication." He s ays that gives him hope f or Florida's future. Crist also says he's p roud of his accomplishm ents as governor, i ncluding reducing the c rime rate and taking s teps to make government m ore transparent. He says he's praying f or success for R epublican Gov.-elect R ick Scott, who takes o ver next week. Crist: Florida showed spirit, resolve in '10 Crist

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 3A Ask us about DirecTV 4.1 Cu.Ft. 2 Oven Racks Lift Up Slab Cooktop 2600W Bake 3000W Broil$599Electric Range Model #WDS6063860ŽDLP HD, 3D Ready,8 Color Processor, 2 Component/Composite Video Inputs 21 Cu.Ft.Top Freezer, 2 Glass Shelves, Gallon Door StorageMODEL #FRT21HS6JQRefrigerator WASHER & DRYER 46WX800U, BDX3000 & 2 PR. 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For a while, he walked with the aid of a w alker, then a cane. Today, he gets around f ine. He lives in constant pain, but at l east he's alive and well. "My biking caused my accident b ut it was the only reason I was s trong enough to survive. I am dama ged but I am still here to tell," S mith said. Smith believes he survived the a ccident so that he can help spread t he word to all users of the road to follow the r ules. "I am 63 years old and have had a very g ood life but I believe I survived to inform a ll of us to share the road and respect our p laces on it," he said. To help in his endeavor, the Highlands Pedalers are distributing a Florida law enforcement guide that reviews pedestrian traffic laws in one half and bicycle traffic laws in the other. The small, bright green booklet is put out by the Florida Bicycle Association. The booklets are available by contacting the Highlands Pedalers, www.highlandspedalers.com. Smith said, "Bicycle accidents aren't fun. It's hard on the pocket book and the family. I know the gal who hit me was in therapy for months. She hurt just like I did; in a different way, but she hurt. I will hurt forever. "My accident was an accident but it was helped by driving with distractions. I have been guilty of it also. Like anxiety over being late, talking on a cell phone and early evening. I just want everyone to understand to share the road. The laws are there for everyone," he said. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by SCOTTDRESSE L Greg Branning was inside his rental home on Pebble Beach Drive in Sun 'N Lake late Thursday night when he heard a noise from the garage. He found his car on fire when he went to investigate. He said he tried to move the car out of the garage, but the flames had already damaged the car to the point it was immobile. By the time firefighters arrived, the garage was engulfed in flames. The fire was contained to the garage, but both cars were destroyed and the rest of the house had smoke damage. Branning, his girlfriend and their two dogs were able to escape unharmed. Car fire nearly claims home Smith Smith wants people to learn rules to keep bicyclists safe i n the law enforcement guide r eviewing pedestrian and b icyclist traffic laws include:Pedestrians Aperson operating a b icycle on and along a sidew alk or crosswalk has the r ights and duties applicable t o a pedestrian under the s ame circumstances, but m ust yield to pedestrians and g iven an audible warning b efore passing one and r emains subject to bicycle e quipment requirements. ( ss316.2065) Where sidewalks are p rovided, no pedestrian s hall, unless required by o ther circumstances, walk a long and upon the portion o f a roadway paved for v ehicular traffic (ss316.1303 ) No person shall drive a v ehicle except by human p ower on a sidewalk or sidew alk area, except on a drivew ay (ss316.1995) An except ion is made for electric personal assistive mobility devices. No person shall stop, stand or park a vehicle on a sidewalk (ss316.1945-1) No pedestrian shall suddenly leave a curb or other place of safety and walk or run into the path of a vehicle which is so close that it is impossible for the driver to yield (ss316.130-8) When a vehicle is stopped at a crosswalk to permit a pedestrian to cross the roadway, the driver of any other vehicle approaching from the rear shall not overtake and pass such stopped vehicle (ss316.1309)Bicyclists Aperson in control of a vehicle on a street or highway is a driver (ss316.0031). As a driver, a cyclist must follow the traffic rules common to all drivers. As the driver of a bicycle, he must also obey rules adopted specifically for bicycles. Every bicycle must be equipped with a brake or brakes that allow the rider to stop within 25 feet from a speed of 10 mph on dry, level, clean pavement (ss316.2065-14) Acyclist driving against the direction of traffic on the roadway should be warned or cited. The driver of a vehicle overtaking a bicycle or other non-motorized vehicle must pass the bicycle or other non-motorized vehicle at a safe distance of not less than 3 feet between the vehicle and the bicycle or other nonmotorized vehicle. Every driver of a vehicle shall exercise due care to avoid colliding with any pedestrian or bicyclist (ss316.130-15) Cyclists may ride two abreast only within a single lane and when not impeding traffic. To get a copy of the guide book, contact the Highlands Pedalers group, or visit highlandspedalers.com. Continued from page 3A A few of the rules for pedestrians, bikers grabbed the gun and the man was tripped and held until police came. Aman walked into a Destin bank, waved a gun and fled with $6,000 but left his wallet behind. He was quickly captured. Karma? St. Petersburg police said a 58-year-old woman pointed a gun at her daughter, then shot herself in leg when she lowered the weapon. AJacksonville woman reported her baby daughter missing and was arrested when officers found the baby girl in a gym bag in the back of her car. AClay County woman was arrested after posting a photo of her baby with a bong on her Facebook page. Police say a mother gave her 23-year-old son $50 for gas and said she needed a ride so she could meet a man 60 miles away and have sex for money. Both were charged in the Polk County prostitution sting. Aman told Gainesville police a hooker robbed him after he broke off negotiations for paid sex when he realized she had bad teeth. An Orlando woman coming off a cruise ship with her family was arrested and spent 36 hours in jail when authorities thought she was a prostitute. It turns out she shared the same name but not the same profession of a woman wanted by police. Tampa-area identical twi ns were arrested after one couldn't make a court appearance and the other filled in. Their fingerprints weren't identical. Afederal prosecutor in Miami was arrested on a felony charge after strippin g down to his boxer shorts an d going for a swim at a barsid e pool. Awoman complained to police that she and her daughter got a flash of his junk as he got out. And finally, a Miami attorney said she was kept from visiting her client at a federal detention center because the underwire of h er bra set off the metal detector. After she took it off, sh e said guards wouldn't let he r in because she was braless. Continued from page 2A Strange news was plentiful in '10

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H ere in the News-Sun we are in a greement good r iddance to 2010, a t rial in patience and f aith if ever there w as one.The year was both quick a nd plodding that is, m onths flew by while each d ay dragged on forever. We survived yet another e lection cycle, even though it w as angry, divided and rude, l acked meaningful debate a nd settled nothing. Election day promised r elief by ending, at least temp orarily, political advertising a nd television discussions o nly to discover the day after t he election that the blah, b lah, blah debates of 2012 h ad already begun. The economy plodded on w ith repeated reports that r ecovery is just around the c orner. But still, unemploym ent rose in Highlands C ounty. Overseas, terrorists continued to bomb our soldiers and their own fellow citizens. In this country, children were abducted and killed. Ford Mercury was given the ax, gasoline prices crept back up to over $3 a gallon, the Gulf of Mexico and its estuaries were drenched in oil, and weather records of all kinds were broken across the country from floods to droughts, from very hot to very cold. Oh yes, 2010 remains a vivid, if painful memory. But, will 2011 will be any better? Worse? Or more of the same? Who knows? Rather than depress ourselves with serious gloom and doom, however because actually our editorial board is on the optimistic side we thought we'd make some sunny predictions about the immediate future. Predictions, that hopefully will divert you, but if they come true we will accept the blame for. For example, we predict the City of Sebring will accept an offer of $19.23 for Harder Hall, although it will turn out the buyer is a Chinese syndicate that manufacturers asphalt. We predict that with rising gas prices, Sebring International Raceway will convert to a harness track, with dog racing once a month and a flea market every other Thursday. We predict the new venue will attract crowds from some parts of Highlands County. We predict the Historic Circle in Sebring, in an effort to get more people downtown, will install giant, electronic billboards earning it the nickname "The Times Square Circle of the South." Heartland Idol contestants and Central Florida Motorcycle clubs will work together to remove the signs for the week of the Ride to the Heartland and the Idol finale. We predict the town of Lake Placid will buy the Tower and surrounding shopping center to turn into a government office/ community center/action park with bungee jumping allowed from town council office windows. Town residents will have free access to the stairs, but in keeping with strict budget management, the elevator will be subject to a user fee and county residents living outside Lake Placid City limits will have to pay double. We predict that Avon Park will create the position of Most High Exalted First Responder for Life. This individual will be issued two hats, so as to always arrive at emergencies properly dressed. This way, when the Most High Exalted First Responder For Life gets out of a car wearing a SWAThelmet, the firefighters know the emergency has nothing to do with them and go home, thus saving the city overtime; or, if wearing a fire helmet, vice versa. Finally we predict the News-Sun will begin publishing eight editions a week, two on Sundays, win a Pulitzer Prize for a summer series on kids and cavities, and be featured in the Wall Street Journal for our prescient editorials predicting the future. Page 4ANews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION TODAY'SEDITORIALTODAY'SLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com Update on Septic Tank Cleaning/ inspection billEditor: Update on Florida Law (SB550), passed during the 2010 session of the state le gislature, concerning Septic Tank Cleaning/inspection. House Bill (HB 13) has been filed in the Florida House of Representatives to change the wording of the bill passed (SB550) during the 2010 session. The word ing of HB13 directly relate s to the septic tank inspection/cleaning issue. I have been in contact with local state representatives and have the idea that they will support HB13. There are also a number of bills in the Senate concerning the wording of SB550. If you wish to follow the progress of HB 13 you can sign on to the Florida Legislature Web site, www.myfloridahouse.gov, and click on "Bills". In the search box that says Bill Number, enter 13 and retur n key. The following informatio n comes from the above refer enced Web site. HB13 Reads: Onsite Sewage Treatment and Disposal Systems: Revises legislative intent; eliminate s provisions directing DOH t o create & administer statewide septic tank evalua tion program; eliminates procedures & criteria for evaluation program; terminates grant program for repair of onsite sewage trea tment disposal systems iden tified pursuant to evaluatio n program, to conform; elimi nates provisions authorizing DOH to collect evaluation report fee & provisions rela ting to disposition of fee pro ceeds & revenue-neutral fe e schedule. Effective Date: upon becoming a law Introduced by Coley (cosponsors) Adkins; Broxson ; Corcoran; Crisafulli; Drake ; Ford; Hudson; Plakon; Smi th Updates to follow until t he Septic Tank bill is repealed or at least the wording concerning septic tanks is changed. Tom Singleta ry Avon Pa rk EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign you r letter and include you r address and phone num ber. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your let ters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address ; fax 385-1954; or e-ma il editor@newssun.com To make sure the edito rial pages aren't dominat ed by the same writers letters are limited to two per month and a gues t column can be submitted once every three months Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of tha t author and not necessari ly the opinion of the staf f or editors of the News Sun All items will run on a first-come basis as space permits, although more timely ones could be moved up. We believe your view points are just as impor tant as any community leader or government offi cial, so consider this a personal invitation to ge t your two cents in. A few tongue-in-cheek predictions for 2011 Ah, New Year's Eve. W hat a great night to revisit t he past year. Though I'd rather revisit 1 999. The unemployment rate w as 4.2 percent in 1999. Dot-com stocks were still c reating lots of paper mill ionaires. The U.S. deficit for that y ear was $1 billion that's r ight, "billion" with a "b," a f ar cry from the $1 trillion to $ 2 trillion it is nowadays. Things were going so w ell, we had to make up c rises, such as Y2K, the M illennium Bug! Because computerized d evices used only two digits t o record the date "99" f or "1999" numerous g litches were expected to o ccur at exactly 12 a.m. on J an. 1, 2000, when at least s ome of the devices would m istake "00" for "1900." Senators held press conf erences to warn the public t o prepare for the worst. President Clinton told us t o keep a lookout for terrori sts, who might take advant age of the potential chaos. Federal bureaucrats even a ppeared competent. They established mobile c ommand centers on the N ational Mall, where thous ands of New Year's Eve r evelers would celebrate. They directed police, firem en, FBI agents and CIA o peratives to crawl around o ur nation's capital to thwart a nyone looking to pull any f unny business. They made detailed prepar ations cots, blankets, b ottled water, canned goods, s helter, portable lighting t o respond to any and every c ontingency. But nothing happened. When the clock struck m idnight that New Year's E ve, there were few glitches, b ut no chaos and zero mass h ysteria of any kind. Y2K, wrote The Wall S treet Journal, was, essent ially, a giant hoax. That was the downside of A merica then. We were at o ur best in preparing for c rises that weren't real. We lived in a fiction of o ur own creation fake w ealth, fake security, fake s pending promises at the l ocal, state and federal levels t hat we'd never be able to a fford. Boy, would the realities of the next decade be a bear. No sooner did 2000 begin than the dot-com bubble burst, wiping out trillions in paper wealth. In 2001, terrorists would catch us with our pants down, striking us hard. Aworried Federal Reserve would begin a series of interest-rate cuts to pump "easy money" into the economy. That easy money, combined with bad government policies to both create (Citizens Reinvestment Act) and buy (Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac) bundles of risky subprime home loans, would fuel a housing bubble. The housing bubble would burst in 2008, wiping out trillions in wealth and kicking off the worst recession since the Great Depression. Voters would kick Republicans out of office. Democrats, controlling the presidency and both houses of Congress, would make more fake promises we will never keep and would spend, by New Year's Eve 2010, nearly $4 trillion more than we had. The unemployment rate would be stuck at nearly 10 percent. State and local governments would begin to default on debt payments. And all these woes would seem small compared to the $100 trillion in unfunded liabilities that generous politicians saddled our country with liabilities we may never be able to pay for. To be sure, our reckoning has finally arrived. As bad as the past decade has been, the next decade will be plenty worse unless we embrace the difficult, painful business of getting our house in order. Tom Purcell, a freelance writer is also a humor columnist for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, and is nationally syndicated exclusively by Cagle Cartoons newspaper syndicate. E-mail Tom at Purcell@caglecartoons.com. Partying like it's 1999 Guest Column Tom Purcell We need free bodies and free minds free labor and free thoughts, chainless hands and fetterless brains. Free labor will give us wealth. Free thought will give us truth.'ROBERT G. INGERSOLL lawyer, statesman, 1949 EXPRESSIONSOFFREESPEECH

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Zwayer is speaker at chamber luncheonLAKE PLACID Eric Z wayer, Highlands County t ax collector, will be the g uest speaker at the Greater L ake Placid Chamber of C ommerce January members hip luncheon. The luncheon w ill be held at noon W ednesday, Jan. 12 at the L ake Placid Elks Lodge. The luncheon is sponsored b y Highlands County E conomic Development C ouncil. Cost is $8 per person. R SVPthe chamber on or b efore Monday, Jan. 10.Recreation Club plans activitiesSEBRING The Sebring R ecreation Club will host t he following events this w eek: Sunday, 3 p.m., board m eeting. Monday, 9 a.m., Orange B lossom tournament; 1 p.m., L adies Social Club. Tuesday, 9 a.m., Orange B lossom tournament; 12:30 p .m., Bridge; 3 p.m., ping p ong. For details, call (262) 2243 819.Events planned at lodges, postsSEBRING The Sebring Moose Lodge w ill have bingo at 1 p.m. t oday. The Women of The M oose meet at 7 p.m. Monday, while Texas Holdem is offered from 7-10 p.m. Euchre and pool will be played at 7 p.m. Tuesdays all month. For more information, call 655-3920.Highlands Tea Party is backSEBRING The Highlands Tea Party is rested and ready to do its best to educate everyone on upcoming legislation from the state, federal government, and the county, getting ready for the 2012 election. The next meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Quality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27. The topic will be Fair Tax with David Foxworth. Adinner buffet will be served at 5:30 p.m. for $8 each.Make a resolution to donate bloodThe Florida Blood Centers-Highlands blood mobile will be at several locations Monday and Tuesday. Receive a free movie ticket by mail in you donate. Donating blood is not only safe and simple, but it saves lives as well. When you donate blood you receive a mini physical that includes a cholesterol check. The blood mobile will be at Gold's Gym from 2-7 p.m. Monday and from 4-7:30 p.m. Tuesday. It will also be at Lake Placid Health Care from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday. There is no upper age limit to donate blood. If you have questions, call 3824499. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 5A RELEASE THE POUNDS …ONLY 20 DAYS LEFT! CALL TODAY (863) 471-2500 LOSE YOURWEIGHT FORTHE LAST TIME! 13 Ryant Blvd., SebringCorner of 27 & Ryant Blvd.Pre-Grand Opening Fees End December 31, 2010Save 66% on Enrollment NOW! COMMUNITYBRIEFS Roy BlevinsRoy Haskell Blevins, 92, of Lake Placid died Dec. 28, 2010 at the Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Born in Illinois, he moved to Lake Placid in 1971. He served his country in the U.S. Army during World War II. He worked for Scotty's until his retirement. He was an active member of the Faith Baptist Church. He is survived by his loving wife of 70 years, Marie; daughter, Linda Keen; son, David; sisters, Delora Ford and Ina Tucker; three grandchildren; and four greatgrandchildren. Aservice to celebrate Haskell's life was held Jan. 1 at Faith Baptist Church with Pastor Travis Hudson celebrating. Burial was private at Oak Hill Cemetery. Words of comfort to the family can be made by visiting www.scottfuneralservices.com Arrangements entrusted to the Scott Funeral Home, Lake Placid. George FlowersGeorge Steven Flowers died Dec. 21, 2010. Born in Fort Lauderdale, he moved to Highlands County in 2002. He was a fabricator of sheet metal. He is survived by his companion, Marianna Estrada; sons, George Jr. and Robert; sisters, Pat Adams, Sylvia Neubauer, Linda Briggs, Elaine King and Marcia Lau; and four grandchildren. There was a memorial service on Dec. 31 at Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church.Jean O'KeeffeJean Y. O'Keeffe, 87, of Sebring died Dec. 30, 2010. Born in Norwich, Conn., she moved to the area in 1966. She was a homemaker and a member of St. Catherine Catholic Church. She is survived by her son, Daniel J. Jr., three grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. The family will recieve friends from 4-6 p.m. today at Morris Funeral Chape l, Sebring. Aservice will be held at 11:30 a.m. Mond ay at Morris Funeral Chap el with burial following at Lakeview Memori al Gardens. Condolences m ay be expressed at www.mo rrisfuneralchapel.com .Marjorie RyanMarjorie Ryan, 89, of Avon Park died Dec. 2 4, 2010. She is survived b y her lovin g husban d, Claude J. Ryan; fo ur sons Charle s Vealey George Vealey, Lloyd Rya n, Mark Ryan; 26 grandch ildren and 36 great-grandch ildren. Amemorial service w ill be held at Avon Park Chur ch of the Nazarene at 11 a.m Friday. The family h as requested that in lieu of flowers memorial contrib utions be made to Avon Pa rk Church of the Nazarene. Ryan OBITUARIES For many of us, the season o f gluttony begins with c andy-laden Halloween, cont inues through bountiful T hanksgiving and festive C hristmas, and wraps up with p arty-time New Year's Eve. J anuary hopefully represents a clean slate and, for many p eople, a cleaner plate. While lifestyle and diet r esolutions are not new, the n ew year is still a welcome a nd opportune time to make a f resh start in healthy eating, i ncluding developing better s nacking habits. Indeed, finding snacks that f it into a resolved new way of e ating is not always easy, e specially when snacks have l ong been viewed as an indulg ent reward. The good news f or those intent on starting 2 011 with a different snacki ng mindset is that a wider a rray of better-for-you produ cts are available and the o verall approach to eating b etter is more focused on s ensibility than on fleeting f ads. Here are some tips for foll owing up season's greetings w ith more reasoned eatings: Think big picture. Many d iet and health experts agree t hat a more general, practical a pproach to snacking is easie r to adhere to than a specific a nd often rigid diet. Balance a nd moderation may not be t he most buzzworthy terms, b ut they are the basis of succ ess. Follow your natural i nstincts. As more people r esolve to eat green and c lean, especially at the start o f another year, a growing n umber of organic and natur al food products are availa ble at their supermarket. S nyder's of Hanover's popul ar line of organic snack f oods, for instance, includes O rganic Pretzel Sticks, availa ble in honey wheat, multig rain and 8 grains and seeds v arieties. Pack some extra nutrient p unch. If you are going to s nack, why not add some o ther healthy ingredients? T ry multi-grain snack foods, f or instance, to inject some f iber into your daily diet. Remember, restricted d iets don't mean restricted t aste. If you, like millions of A mericans, are looking for g luten-free products, you can f ind many more choices on t oday's grocery shelves. All kinds of your favorite snacks, from cookies to chips to pretzels, are easier to find than ever before Snyder's of Hanover, for example, now offers Gluten Free Sticks. These treats can be enjoyed by those who must follow gluten-free diets on a doctor's recommendation and those who just want to try something different. Crunch it up. Studies have shown that snacks with a crunch provide a more satisfying snacking experience. Keeping this in mind, make sure to stock your pantry with a variety of crunchy apples, carrots, and pretzels to keep you from reaching for that sugary donut instead. Gain some (portion) control. Like moderation and balance, watching one's portions isn't a trendy notion, but it is a tried-and-true approach to healthy snacking. Sitting down at the computer or in front or the television with pre-packaged 100calorie snack packs of popular treats like Snyder's of Hanover pretzels, ensures that you won't go overboard or over recommended portion sizes. Add some flavor. Take advantage of the many flavors available in today's snack foods that can satisfy your cravings and allow you to savor what you're eating. Snackers craving some heat might enjoy spicy varieties like buffalo wing and jalapeno flavored pretzel pieces, while those with a sweet tooth can get their fix with choices like honeytinged or cinnamon-dusted snacks. Indulge just enough. Watching what you eat doesn't mean you have to swear off everything tasty that you love even chocolate. A handful of chocolate covered pretzels are still a good choice compared to other high fat, high calorie chocolate snacks. Balance eating with moving. Again, it's not a news flash that exercise is important to the body's metabolism and to overall health and wellness, but taking time to engage in some extra physical activity (it could be treadmill time or even opting for the stairs instead of the elevator) makes snacking all the much more satisfying, and less guilt-inducing. Plus, if you're used to just doing cardio now is the time to amp up your routine with weights and resistance training and see results much faster. Ultimately, improving your eating and lifestyle habits doesn't have to mean radical change. From shedding those extra pounds that crept up during the fall and early winter holidays, to pledging to eat in a more organic, natural or sustainable way, resolutions don't have to be so daunting. And by the time next January rolls around, you may not even need to make such resolutions in the first place. ARAContent How to keep those healthy eating resolutions in January and beyond By BRENTKALLESTAD Associated PressTALLAHASSEE A circuit court judge sided with the Florida Legislature on Thursday in a lawsuit over who has authority to set tuition for the state's 11 public universities. Chief Circuit Judge Charles Francis ruled against former Gov. and U.S. Sen. Bob Graham, who sued to establish the Board of Governors as the body responsible for setting tuition. Graham helped lead a citizen initiative that amended the Florida Constitution to create the board in 2002. The intent was to curtail political interference with the universities. Graham's attorney, Robin Gibson, said he will appeal the decision to the 1st District Court of Appeal. The case is expected to wind its way to the Florida Supreme Court. "It's fundamental to our form of government that legislative powers are limited by the constitution, and the will of the people as expressed in the constitution is to prevail over the Legislature," Gibson said Thursday. "We contend that a simple reading of the amendment shows that the people have given the full power to govern the university system to the Board of Governors." At issue is whether t he state constitutional amen dment voters adopted in 200 2 to establish the boa rd rescinded the Legislature 's power for setting tuition an d fees and transferred it to t he board. The plaintiffs also inclu ded former U.S. Rep. Lo u Frey and former Flori da State University Preside nt Talbot "Sand y" D'Alemberte, who al so argued the board has so le authority over tuition. They sued in 2007. T he board joined them but wit hdrew earlier this year aft er agreeing with t he Legislature to share tuitio nsetting authority. Judge: Legislature has authority to set tuition

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Page 6ANews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com 1/3/11 www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644€LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 SERVING CENTRAL FLORIDA FOR 79 YEARS Since 1931NO DEALER FEE, PLUS TAX & TAG, STATE FEE, O% withALLY, SEBC RULES APPLY. 2010JEEP WRANGLERUNLIMITEDX NEW2010DODGE CHALLENGER NEW2010RAM2500 CREW4X4CUMMINSTURBODIESEL NEW2010JEEP WRANGLERSPORT4X4 NEW2010DODGE JOURNEY NEW2010JEEP COMPASS NEW2010CHRYSLER SEBRINGTOURINGJX054 DX052 TX115JX059 CX139 JX079 TX131 NO DEALER FEES 2010DODGEGRAND CARAVANSE Retail.............. $25,835 Rebate............ -$1,750 VanBonus......... -$750 WellsBonus.... -$1,750 ChryslerGroupor VanOwnerBonus -$1,000 $20,585* TX136 2010CHRYSLER TOWN-N-COUNTRY $30,520* CX100 0% FOR 72 MOS Retail.............. $37,270 Rebate............ -$2,000 VanBonus......... -$750 WellsBonus.... -$2,000 ChryslerGroupor VanOwnerBonus -$2,000 0% FOR 72 MOS $26,080Rebate.......... -$2,500 WellsBonus..... -$581 BigFinish......... -$500 $ 22,499 $26,280Rebate.......... -$2,000 WellsBonus..... -$781 BigFinish......... -$500 $ 22,999 $26,555WellsBonus.. -$1,381 BigFinish......... -$500 $ 24,674 $50,175Rebate.......... -$3,500 EngineBonus -$1000 WellsBonus.. -$4,500 $ 41,175 $23,635Rebate.......... -$2,000 WellsBonus.. -$1,136 BigFinish......... -$500 $ 20,599 $24,300Rebate............. -$500 WellsBonus.. -$1,301 BigFinish......... -$500 $ 21,999 $22,885Rebate.......... -$2,500 WellsBonus..... -$886 BigFinish......... -$500 $ 18,999 YEAR END CLEARANCE a nd Cheryl Brantley-Davis a nd Debra Worley were electe d to the town council. The school board also saw c hanges as retiring chairman W ally Randall was replaced b y Avon Park High School c oach Ronnie Jackson and i ncumbent Richard Norris w as defeated by Bill B rantley. School board memb er Andy Tuck ran unopp osed. After Highlands County T ax Collector Charles L. B ryan passed away, Eric Z wayer handily won a sevenc andidate race to fill the posit ion.The real estate marketChallenges remain in the l ocal real estate market. Going into 2010 the NewsS un hoped that "a glut of i nventory and lower interest r ates may prove positive for t he real estate market in H ighlands County." The trends did not go that w ay. According to Realtor Chip B oring, residential values are n ot yet recovering. "Very few homes in H ighlands County are priced o ver $400,000, so not only a re fewer homes selling, w hat homes are selling, are s elling for less than they w ere appraised only a few y ears ago," he said in a recent t elephone interview. Boring added there was a c onsiderable inventory of h ousing already on the mark et. Until that was in use, c reating a need for additional h ousing stock, he didn't see a t remendous improvement any t ime soon. He did feel comf ortable predicting it could take another 14 months to sell off the residential backlog. He warned, however, that while the commercial real estate market has not been as economically ravaged as the residential segment, the situation has signs of changing. With the retail economy still sluggish, some small businesses may find themselves unable to meet their mortgage obligations, forced to close their doors. Boring said there is a silver lining in all this news. With foreclosures occurring at a record pace, it is a buyer's market. This is an excellent time for finding good deals in real estate, Boring said, especially for buyers with money in the bank.The local economy and employmentWith a collapsed housing market and unemployment at 11.7 percent in December 2009, the News-Sun hoped new store openings, like the Aldi grocery store and the rumored Sam's Club, would make a positive impact. While Aldi opened, however, Sam's Club remains only a town council member's dream. And while some new small businesses opened, each downtown area has its share of empty storefronts. The local economy remained stagnant, and the county's unemployment rate grew worse. November 2010's figures revealed Highlands County ends the year with an unemployment rate of 13.4 percent. That means it is among the hardest hit counties in the state ranking 12th in unemployment out of 67 counties. The state as a whole ended the year with an unemployment rate of 12 percent, and the nation one of 9.3 percent. Acontinuing discussion among elected officials and business is focused on how to diversify the economy while growing the job market.Harder HallThis still lovely from a distance Spanish, pink, city-owned albatross is in exactly the same situation it was on Jan. 3, 2010 when the News-Sun wrote, "The city of Sebring is still trying to find a buyer for Harder Hall who will be able to actually pay for the historic hotel." AP city managerIt took the better part of 2010, but Avon Park did get its city manager position filled. Maria Sutherland, formerly the city's project manager, served for months as interim city manager, as two separate searches were made one by the Ridge Riders, a volunteer consulting group of retired city and planning officials, and a home grown committee that created the final list. Bruce Behrens was hired on Sept. 13. His last position had been as city manager of Summerton, S.C. Behrens has since promoted Sutherland to the position of assistant city manger.Eagle Training CenterStrong resistance from county residents caused the controversial project to be dropped. It was almost immediately replaced, however, by another building proposal actually three separate housing sub-divisions in the southern part of the county. Environmental groups are as opposed to the sub-divisions as they were to the training center. The state's Department of Community Affairs agrees, having rejected the county 's comprehensive plan th at includes the sub-divisions. Currently the county is saying it will sue for an appeal. Concerned individ uals and organizations li ke Dale Gillis of the Highlan ds County Audubon Society are asking the county to sto p the appeal process, or at lea st determine the cost of an appeal.Impact feesWith construction wo rk virtually dead in the wate r, impact fees did not play a significant role in Highlan ds County this year. In fact, th ey have been sidelined for t he present. Continued from page 1A Looking back on how the 10 for '10' turned out News-Sun f ile The general election in November, and the primary before it, were big news in 2010. News-Sun file Bruce Behrens was hired as city manager in Avon Park on Sept. 13. NEWS-SUN

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i ff's administrative staff go i n 2012 when they have to c lock in? Adirection has to be set in t he upcoming year by county c ommissioners in order to m ake sure that an evere xpanding need is met for t hose who serve and protect t he county.Harder HallAnother group has opened d iscussions about the H ighlands County landmark, b ut after 2009 started off w ith such promise for the b eleaguered white elephant, S ebring City Council was t old in October that develope rs for Harder Hall were h aving trouble getting the f unding needed for the purc hase and the deal unraveled i n 2010. What direction will S ebring take in a solution w ith the old building, and h ow much taxpayer money is g oing to be spent to get there a re just a few of the quest ions surrounding the old h otel. A von Park city managerAfter over a year of s earch, rejection and r esearch, Bruce Behrens was s elected to serve as Avon P ark's City manager, but r ecent discussions show that M ayor Sharon Schuler and D eputy Mayor Brenda Gray are not happy with decisions Behrens made about a public safety director. Will the City of Charm settle down and fix the financial issues, or will Behrens be looking towards greener pastures before the year is ended?Real estate marketThe keystone to holding up other economic factors in Highlands County over the last 10 years, the real estate market saw some bounce in 2009, but continued to drop in the last year, mostly due to the deals on interest, foreclosures and short sales. The term "strategic foreclosure" became a common term throughout Highlands County over the past six months, but has the housing market reached the bottom, or will there be a double dip in the downward spiral?DCA and developmentHighlands County Commissioners will have to decide how much of a legal bill they will pay for an upcoming battle with the Department of Community Affairs, and one of the questions is what will that department look like after Gov. Rick Scott takes office. Highlands County taxpayers are asking how much they have to pay for future development that may not come in the next 5-10 years.RecreationCounty staff has come up with a new plan to redistribute recreation funding, but the plan will not be announced until next year. Municipalities will have to figure out what "share" they will get and how to budget around that new plan, especially Avon Park and Lake Placid. Look for user fees or park closures in the near future if financial trends continue.Parker trialThe community was faced with the a lot of emotion when ex-Avon Park Police Officer James Parker was arrested in May of 2009 for the death of 22-month-old Kaedyn Short, and his trial should be held this year. Short died from bruises and a skull fracture, and Parker is charged with first degree murder and aggrava ted child abuse. Apre-trial conference is on the docket in February. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 7A LIMITED SPACE … CALLTODAY! 5 DAYS a week$ 30 Get In Shape Learn Self Defense Improve Self Esteem Make Better Grades MARTIAL ARTS AMERICA471-2467 Best After School Program in SebringFREEPICKUP from: Kindergarten Learning Center, Cracker Trail, Sun-N-Lakes, Woodlawn, Fred Wild, Memorial, Hill Gustat, Sebring Middle/High Located on Kenilworth Sebring*Some Restrictions Apply Life Care, Not Day Care Positive Medical Transport(863) 655-0030 Think Positive!!Have A Happy New Year from 5 generations of family at Positive Medical TransportŽ Continued from page 1A Budgets, Harder Hall and real estate bear watching once again News-Sun f ile The budget to operate places like Lake June Park in Lake Placid may be hard to come by in 2011, which could put a stop to some recreation. Associated PressST. PETERSBURG December's w ave of unusually cold weather has d estroyed much of Florida's green beans a nd sweet corn, which means shoppers w ill pay more at the grocery store and s ee more imports on the shelves. Florida is the nation's largest produce r of green beans and sweet corn the k ind of corn we eat, not the kind we put i n our gas tanks. According to the Florida Department of Agriculture, the state lost $273 million from the December freezes alone including nearly 9,000 acres of crops. The statistics are compiled only through Dec. 20, which means they don't even account for the problems caused by this week's cold. 2010 dealt a one-two punch for the state's farms. An 11-day spell in January was one of the area's coldest periods on record, and December has had an unprecedented trio of cold fronts. Sam Accursio lost nearly all of his pickling cucumbers at his Homestead farm last January. Eleven months later, about half of his new crop has been wiped out. "It's crazy," Accursio said. "I've never experienced a growing season where we've had four frosts in one year." Florida agriculture loses $273M in first December freezes

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Metro ServicesTax season is right around the corner, which can be good news or bad news depending on the individual. For those accustomed to getting a tax return, that annual financial windfall is welcomed with open arms. On the other hand, those used to a tax bill every April are far less enthusiastic when tax time rolls around. With tax season on the horizon once again, it's time to start preparing to file a return. The following guide can help individuals get their tax materials in order, whether they're filing themselves or enlisting the help of a tax professional.Income DocumentsIt's easy to get confused when attempting to file a tax return.For men and women who visit the local library for their filing information, that table full of documents can be intimidating. What's more, the Internal Revenue Service Web site can be difficult to navigate for those who have not visited it in the past. No document is more necessary than a W-2, which employers must provide by the end of January. Men and women will get one from each of their employers, so those who work multiple jobs, even part-time jobs, will need a W-2 for each job they've worked in the past 12 months. Additional documents that can be necessary might pertain to investment income, business or farming income, alimony received, and forms for state and local income tax refunds. Agood rule of thumb to avoid getting lost in the documents is to start as early as possible the more extensive or complicated the employment and income history may be. For example, men and women with one job and no outside income should be able to file quickly and easily. The more extensive a person's investment portfolio or the more jobs a person has, the more difficult it will likely be to file the return. So start early if things are complicated.CreditsThe government gives men and women all sorts of credits that reduce the amount of the income taxed. These include homebuyer credits, IRAcontributions, green energy credits, or student loan interest. Homebuyer credits: A properly executed settlement statement must be attached to a return, and men and women should keep in mind the IRS now has greater authority to deny homebuyer credits. IRAcontributions: A year-end account summary or bank statement is often all that's needed. Green energy credits. Among the items potentially eligible for residential energy credits are insulation, energy efficient exterior windows, energy efficient HVAC appliances, and solar hot water heaters. Of course, receipts will be necessary for those attempting to earn a credit for any of these items. Student loan interest: A year-end loan statement should be received sometime in January. Personal ItemsTo file a tax return, individuals will need their own social security number, as well as that of anyone else they might be helping or listing on their own return. This includes a spouse and any dependents. If preparing someone else's tax return, be sure to inform them this information will be needed to avoid any delays. For those men and women who will be enlisting a professional to prepare their return, bring all of this information to the meeting. Tax season is especially busy for accountants and tax prep professionals, so it might be difficult to secure another appointment should you forPage 8ANews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com 401 West Interlake Blvd. € Lake Placid, FL 33852(863) 465-1725 BUSINESS If you dread making N ew Year's resolutions b ecause you're afraid y ou'll fall short, take heart: O ne minor setback doesn't m ean having to write off t he rest of the year. You'll p robably have more succ ess if you start out with s mall steps and gain m omentum as you go, w hether it's losing weight, l owering debt or boosting r etirement savings. If your goal is to i mprove your personal f inances, here are a few i deas to get you started: Most dieters know that t he key to success using W eight Watchers is to m onitor every morsel you e at. You become more a ware of and thus, more l ikely to change, behavi oral patterns that caused y ou to overeat in the first p lace. You can use the s ame strategy when d esigning a livable budget. For a month or two, w rite down every cent you s pend: rent, food, gas, c lothes, cable, insurance ( health, auto, home), 4 01(k) contributions, entert ainment everything. The l ist will probably be eyeo pening. Along with the u sual suggestions like b rown-bagging lunch more o ften and fewer to-go coff ees, try these relatively p ainless ways to trim e xpenses: Pay bills on time and s end at least the minimum a mount due. You'll avoid l ate fees and related intere st rate increases, and it w ill improve your credit s core. Balance your checking a ccount regularly and use i n-network ATMs to avoid f ees. If your employer offers f lexible spending accounts, u se them to pay health and d ependent care expenses w ith pretax dollars. If y ou're in the 25 percent t ax bracket that means e xpenses you'd have paid f or anyway will cost 25 p ercent less. Reduce energy bills by t urning down the thermos tat, weatherproofing your h ome, turning off "energy v ampire" appliances when n ot in use and buying energ y-efficient appliances. Raise insurance d eductibles and shop a round for better rates. With the money you s ave, start paying down d ebts more quickly. One s trategy that often works is t o list all outstanding bala nces and their corresponding interest rates. Then each month pay the minimum amount due on each account except pay as much as possible on the highest-rate account or loan. Once it's paid off, move to the next-highestrate account, and so on. At the same time, start building an emergency fund. Although the ideal of having six to nine months' worth of expenses saved may sound insurmountable, don't be discouraged. Start slowly with a few dollars each month. It won't be missed and might just save you from needing an expensive short-term loan to cover emergency car repairs or another unexpected bill. And finally, look to the future. Buying a home, paying for college and retirement are all big-ticket items that require sound budgeting and credit management skills. Here are several helpful resources: Find free budgeting tools, including interactive budget calculators, at the government's www.mymoney.gov, the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (www.nfcc.org), Mint.com (www.mint.com) and Visa Inc.'s Practical Money Skills for Life (www.practicalmoneyskills.com/budg eting). Wealth Watchers applies techniques gleaned from Weight Watchers to personal financial management (www.ewealthwatchers.com). MyFICO.com (www.myfico.com/CreditE ducation) explains the ins and outs of credit reports and credit scores. What's My Score (also run by Visa) offers tips on ways to improve your credit score and a free credit score estimator (www.WhatsMyScore.org). Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. To follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ PracticalMoney. Resolve to improve your finances Personal Finance Jason Alderman Did YouKNOW?In Florida, the bicycle is legally defined as a vehicle. Bicyclists using a public roadway are considered operators of motor vehicles and are responsible for observing all traffic laws. With few exceptions, there is only one road and it is up to motorists and bicyclists to treat each other with care and respect. Adherence to the law is the foundation of respect. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Tis the season to start gathering tax data Metro Services Avoid the stress of tax time by preparing documents well in advance of April 15. Associated PressNEWYORK T he Web may seem like t he land of something f or nothing. Free video. Fr ee news. Even free too ls such as word processin g and spreadsheets. But almost two-thir ds of adult Internet users in the U.S. have paid f or access to at least one of these intangible item s online, according to a new survey from the Pe w Internet and Americ an Life Project. Whether people w ill pay for different types of material on the Web is among the most pressin g questions facing med ia companies in the 21 st century. As people shift the ir attention to the Intern et from more tradition al ways of enjoying medi a, the companies that pr ovide everything fro m movies to mystery nove ls want to make sure th ey can still get paid for wh at they do. The big TVne tworks want viewers to pay for full access to episodes of their favori te shows. Newspaper com panies want readers to pay for news. Book pu blishers want higher pric es for digital editions of ne w releases. The new figures fro m Pew suggest paying f or content online is at lea st not a completely foreig n idea for most people. About a third of respondents said th ey have paid for digit al music. Same for softwar e. Behind that cam e mobile apps for ce ll phones or tablet compu ters at 21 percent. Th en digital games at 19 pe rcent and newspaper, ma gazine or journal articles at 18 percent. The survey found th at among people who pa id for content, the typic al user spent about $10 a month. Study: Web users will pay for some stuff

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By PAULWISEMAN APEconomics WriterWASHINGTON Far f ewer people are applying for u nemployment benefits as t he year ends, raising hopes f or a healthier job market in 2 011. Applications are at their l owest level since July 2008, t he Labor Department says. T hey fell to 388,000 in the w eek ending Dec. 25, bringi ng the four-week average to 4 14,000. Until mid-October, t he four-week average had b een stuck above 450,000 m ost of the year. Economists say the numb er of people applying for u nemployment benefits pred icts where the job market w ill go over the next few m onths so much so that t hey use this data to help f orecast economic growth. "We're starting to see a p ickup in job growth," says C onference Board economist K enneth Goldstein. "We may even get to a p oint, conceivably by spring, w here the consumer is going t o say that it no longer feels l ike we're still in a recess ion." He expects the economy to g enerate 100,000 to 150,000 j obs a month by spring, up f rom an average 86,500 a m onth in 2010. That's an improvement, b ut still not enough to cause b ig drop in the unemploym ent rate. To Paul Kasriel, c hief economist at Northern T rust, fewer people applying f or unemployment benefits s uggests the unemployment r ate will slip from 9.8 percent i n November to 9.7 percent e arly next year; that would m ean about 150,000 fewer u nemployed. The Conference Board's G oldstein says the unemploym ent rate might actually rise f or a few months as an i ncrease in job openings lures e ven more job seekers back i nto the labor market. He d oesn't expect the unemploym ent rate to start dropping u ntil mid-2011 and says it w ill finish the year above 9 p ercent. The good news is that layo ffs have fallen back to prer ecession levels. In October, 1 .7 million people were laid o ff or fired the lowest figu re since August 2006, more t han a year before the Great R ecession started. Layoffs a nd dismissals peaked at 2.6 m illion in January 2009. "We've stopped the losses, a nd things are kind of turning a round," says Mark C hristiansen, deputy director o f the Workforce D evelopment Center in R iverside, Calif., which has o ne of the nation's highest unemployment rates. In past downturns, the economy didn't start generating jobs until applications for unemployment benefits consistently fell below 400,000 a week. But some economists say the old rule of thumb is outdated. Payrolls were already growing this year when applications were still well above 450,000 a week One reason: The labor force has grown by 25 million people over the past two decades. "You would expect the level of initial jobless claims to be higher the larger the labor force," Northern Turst's Kasriel says. Another: Since the Great Recession, the unemployed, knowing their job search may be long and difficult, have been more likely to apply for benefits than they used to be. Previously, there were 1.25 laid-off workers for every person applying for benefits. Now, claims and layoffs are about equal, notes Zach Pandl, economist at Nomura Securities. That means each claim represents fewer laidoff workers. Even if they've stopped cutting, employers have been slow to hire. In October, there were still 4.4 unemployed for every job opening. "It's not really been the layoff rate that's been the problem in most of 2010," says Gary Burtless, senior fellow in economics studies at the Brookings Institution. "It's been the failure of employers to create vacancies." But vacancies are expected to open up in 2011. Asurvey released this month by the Business Roundtable found that 45 percent of big company CEOs planned to add jobs over the next six months, up from 31 percent in the third quarter; just 18 percent planned to cut jobs. Asurvey by the staffing firm Manpower found that companies are more optimistic about hiring than they've been in two years. "We're going to start to see jobs added. It's just going to take longer than anyone would want to get to somewhere more comfortable," says Manpower CEO Jeff Joerres "The first quarter is classically a slow hiring quarter. After that, we're going to see numbers that seem more like a recovery." www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 9A SERVICE … 6 DAYS A WEEK 2833 Hwy 27 S. € Avon Park € 453-CART (2278) Email us at: ezgotxt@aol.comAmerican Golf Cart Golf Cart BatteriesFrom $6495& Up+ Tax & ExchangeCLEARANCE2007 CartsWhile They Last! Battery Charger Repair NEW & USEDGas & ElectricGolf Carts 2-4 PassengerVehiclesReconditionedGolf Carts We Buy Old Carts SUNDAY BRUNCH11am 1:30pm Lunch served after 1:30pmwith purchase of beverageReceive$200 OFFExpires 12-31-10 Trishs Paradise GrilleHighlands Ridge South(863) 382-2131$1095 Contact Usƒ By Phone (863) 385-6155 By Mail 2227 US Hwy 27S Sebring, FL 33870 By E-Mail www.newssun.com/contact/ BUSINESS Fewer join unemployment rolls; good sign for '11 At a glanceHere are the states with the largest changes in applications, and some of the reasons for the shifts. The data is for the week ending Dec. 18, one week behind the nationwide figures. States with the largest declines: California: Down 7,656, due to fewer layoffs in agriculture Illinois: Down 3,149, due to fewer layoffs in construction and services Georgia: Down 1,935, due to fewer layoffs in the construction, trade, service and manufacturing industries Pennsylvania: Down 1,574, due to fewer layoffs in the construction and industrial machinery industries Texas: Down 1,494, due to fewer layoffs in trade and manufacturing States with the largest increases: New Jersey: Up 5,235, due to layoffs in the construction, services, transportation and manufacturing industries Michigan: Up 3,087, due to layoffs in the auto industry Missouri: Up 2,404, due to layoffs in construction and services Florida: Up 2,281, due to layoffs in services, manufacturing and agriculture Oregon: Up 2,026, no reason given

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Page 10ANews-Sun Sunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.co m Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or le ss. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads p laced under the Bargain BuysŽ discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom se t ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad st ating Each,Ž the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open RateŽ pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain BuysŽ specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home,Ž are allowed to be pla ced under the Bargain BuyŽ category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS € Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 385-6155. € The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2009-1951-GCS TD BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. PAULINE E. DELMARR and MICHAEL A. DELMARR, her husband, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 17, 2010 (the ``Judgment''), entered in Civil Case No. 09-1951-GCS of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which TD BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and PAULINE E. DELMARR and MICHAEL A. DELMARR, her husband, are Defendants. I will sell the Property as defined in the Judgment and as set forth below at a public sale on January 14, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. to the ``highest bidder'', for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. The ``highest bidder'' for purposes of this Notice of Sale, is defined as the party who bids the largest amount of money to purchase the Property ad who completes the sale in a timely fashion, as hereinafter set out. The one who bids the largest amount of money to purchase the Property shall be permitted to complete the sale by delivering to the Clerk, the balance of such bid, over and above the deposit, by 5:00 p.m. on the day of the sale. The following Property located in Highlands County, Florida, is the subject of this Notice of Sale: Lot 24, Block 105, SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, Unit 8, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 9, Page 58, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Street Address: 5760 San Juan Drive, Sebring, Florida 33872 (``Property''). Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on December 17, 2010. BOB GERMAINE Clerk of Circuit Court By: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk December 26, 2010; January 2, 2011 the intersection of said right-of-way line with the East line of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4; thence South 0 degrees 18'50'' West along said East line a distance of 293.08 feet to the Southeast corner of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4; thence south 89 degrees 16'29'' West along the South line of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 a distance of 660.39 feet to the Point of Beginning, as Recorded in the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Real Property Address: 605 Highway 66 West, Sebring, FL 33875 Real Property Tax ID#: C-16-35-29-A00-0012-0000. DATED on December 23, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of Said Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM OF LIEN WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. January 2, 9, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-530-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH D. LAGROW; RHONDA K. LAGROW; RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA; UNITED STATE OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; NORTH AMERICAN SPECIALTY INSURANCE COMPANY; AND ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, AND TENANT #4, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 Notice is given that pursuant to a Final Judgment in Foreclosure Against Defendants, KENNETH LAGROW and RHONDA LAGROW, dated the 4th day of August, 2010, in Case No. 10-530-GCS, of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK is the Plaintiff and KENNETH LAGROW and RHONDA LAGROW, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on the 25th day of January, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure Against Defendants, KENNETH LAGROW and RHONDA LAGROW, and described as follows: That part of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4, lying South of the Southerly right-of-way line of State Road 66 in Section 16, Township 35 South, Range 29 East, being more particularly described as follows: Begin at the Southwest corner of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4; thence North 0 degrees 17'31'' East along the West line of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 a distance of 77.05 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way line of State Road 66 West; said point lying on a circular curve to the right, having a radius of 5679.58 feet and a central angle of 1 degree 11'18''; thence along said curved right-of-way line on an arc distance of 117.79 feet; thence South 22 degrees 20'13'' East along said right-of-way line a distance of 25.73 feet to a point on said Southerly right-of-way line of State Road 66 West, said point lying on a circular curve to the right, having a radius of 5654.58 feet and a central angle of 5 degrees 52'39''; thence along said curved right-of-way line an arc distance of 580.06 feet to are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 25th day of January, 2011, the following described property as set forth ins said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 15, IN BLOCK 144, OF PLACID LAKES SECTION ELEVEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 314 ENOS AVE., LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 23rd day of December, 2010. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk January 2, 9, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 08-00314 DIVISION: ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. A NDRES LEON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 23, 2010, and entered in Case No. 08-00314 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which OneWest Bank, FSB, is the Plaintiff and Andres Leon, IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY Case #: 10-1353 GCS Judge: Cowden EDWARD H. DAWES and MERNEL D. DAWES, Plaintiff(s), -vs.ROBERTO ENRIQUE CASTROMAN VEZZANI, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Roberto Enrique CASTROMAN Vezzani Residence and Address unknown Last known adress: PO Box 5673 Caracas 1010, Venezuela or if any of the aforesaid persons is dead, then his or her unknown heirs, devisees, legatees or grantees; and any and all other persons or parties claiming by, though, under or against them; and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status, if known, claiming under any of the above named or described Defendant(s) or parties or claiming to have any right, title or interest in and to the lands hereinafter described as Defendant(s). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an Action to Quiet Title for the following described property, to wit: Lot 2, Block 351, SUN 'N LAKES ESTATS OF SEBRING UNIT 16, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 4, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are requiredt o serve a copy of your written defenses, if any to it, on the Plaintiff(s) attorney, whose name and address is: David F. Lanier, Esq., P.O. Box 400, A von Park, Florida 33826-0400, and file the original with the Clerk of the above styled Court on or before January 28, 2011, otherwise a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court on December 21, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of said Circuit Court By: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk December 26, 2010; January 2, 9, 16, 2011 1050Legals 1000 Announcements Classified ads get fast results

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, January 2, 2011Page 11 A STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF DRAFT PERMIT The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) gives notice of its preparation of a draft permit for Bishop Brothers Dairy, to be issued to Bishop Brothers Dairy, Inc. The proposed permit authorizes the operation of the waste management system in accordance with the approved Nutrient Management Plan, which also limits the herd size and management practices. The permit will also provide coverage under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), as delegated to the state by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The dairy is located at 2300 Bishop Dairy Road, Sebring, Florida 33870. Any interested person may submit written comments on the draft permit of the Department or may submit a written request for a public meeting to Bradley Akers, FDEP Southeast District, 400 North Congress Avenue, Suite 200, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, in accordance with rule 62-620.555 of the Florida Administrative Code. The comments or request for a public meeting must contain the information set forth below and must be received in the Office within 30 days of publication of this notice. Failure to submit comments or request a public meeting within this time period shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to submit comments or request a public meeting under Rule 62-620.555, Florida Administrative Code. The comments or request for a public meeting must contain the following information: (a) The commenter's name, address, and telephone number, the applicant's name and address, the Department Permit File Number and the county in which the project is proposed; (b) A statement of how and when notice of the Department action or proposed action was received; (c) A statement of the facts the Department should consider in making the final decision; (d) A statement of which rules or statutes require reversal or modification of the Department action or proposed action; and (e) If desired, a request that a public meeting be scheduled including a statement of the nature of the issues proposed to be raised at the meeting. However, the Department may not always grant a request for a public meeting. Therefore, written comments should be submitted within 30 days of publication of this notice, even if a public meeting is requested. If a public meeting is scheduled the public comment period is extended until the close of the public meeting. If a public meeting is held any person may submit oral or written statements and data at the meeting on the Department proposed action. As a result of significant public comment the Department final action may be different from the position taken by it in this draft permit. The permit application file and supporting data NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 5.341 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending Rule 5.341, Use of Time-Out and Physical Restraint for Students With Disabilities. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, January 18, 2011, at 5:00 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed amendment is to make changes to the policy in accordance with requirements set forth in recent Florida legislation. A summary of the proposed amendment is as follows: The District shall implement behavioral management interventions for disruptive students to prevent and reduce significant disruptive behavior and to provide for the physical safety and security of students and staff when students pose a threat to themselves and/or others. The focus shall be on the use of the least restrictive but effective intervention(s) for each student. The following interventions shall be available: Time Out (nonexclusion time out and exclusion time out), Seclusion and Physical Restraint. Manual physical restraint is the use of physical restraint techniques that involve physical force to restrict free movement of all or part of a student's body. It is a method to prevent a student from harming himself/herself or others and may only be implemented by trained, qualified school personnel. All intervention methods shall be documented and reported according to District policy. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b), Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendent's office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,BY: Wally CoxSuperintendent & ex officio secretary January 2, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-001287 OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, Plantiff, vs. JEFFREY M. DRESSEL, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALBERT W. ROTH Last Known Address: UNKNOWN Address Attempted At: 3651 US HIGHWAY 27 LOT 88, SEBRING, FL 33870 CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 17, BLOCK 1, HARDER HALL COUNTRY CLUB II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 13, PAGE 46, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before February 10, 2011 a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE NEWS SUN and file the original with the Cler k of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 28th day of December, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Annette Daff As Deputy Cler k January 2, 9, 2011 1050Legals NOTICE OF INTENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER ADOPTION SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A CONTENT AREA SPECIALISTREADING CURRICULUM AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY intends to amend the job description for a Content Area Specialist Reading Curriculum at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. The proposed amendment to the job description shall be effective upon adoption. Pursuant to Section 120.54, Florida Statutes, any affected person has twenty-one (21) days after publication of this notice to request the opportunity to present evidence and argument to the School Board of Highlands County, Florida regarding the proposed job description. Such hearing must be requested in writing and received by Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870, within 21 days after publication of this notice. If such hearing is requested, it will be held Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:45 p.m. Any person desiring to attend such a hearing is requested to call the Superintendent's office to verify whether such hearing has been requested. The purpose and effect of the proposed job description is to add new minimum qualifications for a Content Area Specialist Reading Curriculum. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications are 1. A valid Florida educator's certificate; (2) A Master's degree from an accredited institution or a Bachelor's degree from an accredited educational institution with 10 years of successful teaching or relevant experience in a related field; (3) Knowledge of curriculum and/or discipline program design, implementation and evaluation in the assigned area as reflected in job performance assessments; (4) Physical Requirements: exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required; (5) Satisfactory clearance of a criminal history records check and drug screening; Additional desired job qualifications are: (1) Reading certification/endorsement (2) Specialized knowledge in effective teaching strategies; (3) Proficiency in effective instruction of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS), resulting in documented student learning gains; (4) Knowledge in assessment data and evaluation of student learning needs/achievement. The Primary Performance Responsibilities are: (1) Works collaboratively with district and school staff to develop strategies, establish diagnostic and intervention services where appropriate or deemed necessary, and assist in directing curricular/instructional decision-making to directly impact student growth and achievement; (2) Commits to the vision and mission of the district and curriculum department; (3) Serves as a member of the district and school-based curriculum leadership councils to articulate curriculum content, programs and resources; (4) Works across multiple subject areas and serves as a subject area specialist; (5) Integrates technology in content area; (6) Collaborate in writing in District Reading Plan (7) Stays current on latest research and legislation in education through professional reading, attending state/national meetings/conferences, workshops, collaborating with other districts, and acting as a member of a professional organization; (8) Acts as liaison between the district, state, and national subject area organizations; (9) Evaluates effectiveness of and manages assigned programs, processes, and procedures; (10) Understands and utilizes collaborative planning strategies; (11) Works directly with school-based teachers to develop standards-based micro and macro curriculum plans; (12) Works with feeder school units to develop K-12 articulated curriculum guides; (13) Models and mentors school-based teachers in planning, implementation, and evaluation of effective, research-based instruction, including literacy and intervention strategies; (14) Organizes and facilitates professional development activities for applicable school-based teachers. (15) Provides training in all state approved reading endorsement competencies; (16) Oversees administration of statewide and district progress monitoring assessment in content area; (17) Serves as district-level administrator of the local instructional improvement system (database); (18) Identifies and develops shortand long-range plans based on student needs consistent with district, state and/or curriculum requirements; (20) Leads and supports school-level curriculum resource teachers; (21) Collaborates with other Heartland Educational Consortium members on curriculum and training; (22) Serves on the district Problem Solving/RtI Committee; (23) Organizes and facilitates district adoptions of instructional materials; (24) Submits all fee payments, membership fees, and assessment fees in a timely fashion; (25) Interprets and utilizes data (including, but not limited to, standardized and other test results; (26) Identifies, selects, develops or modifies instructional materials to support learning objectives to meet the needs of students with diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds, learning styles, and special needs; (27) Communicates effectively, orally and in writing, with other professionals, students, parents, and community; (28) Effectively and efficiently manages materials and assigned equipment; (29) Establishes and maintains effective and efficient record keeping procedures including student records subject to the requirements of the Family Rights and Privacy Act; (30) Maintains a positive, organized, and safe working environment; (31) Manages time effectively; (32) Attends meetings and trainings as needed; (33) Fulfills professional responsibilities; (34) Writes or facilitates writing grants to obtain additional funding or resources; (35) Acts in a professional and ethical manner and adheres at all times to the Code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct; and (36) Performs other incidental tasks consistent with the goals and objectives of this position. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b), Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendent's office (Attn. Connie Scobey), George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.HIGHLANDS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, BY: Wally Cox, Superintendent & ex officio secretary. January 2, 2011 Notice is hereby given that Downtown Mini Storage LLC will sell at public auction at 195 S. Railroad Ave., Avon Park, Florida 33825 at 1:00 P.M. Saturday 8th January 2011 to the highest bidder. Items held for Shantay Edmund, TV, TV Stand, Toys, Drawers, Bookshelf, bags and boxes of unknown contents. Items held for Reyes Hernandez, Shelves, Fishing rod, Weedeater, Pump, Cushions, bags and boxes of unknown contents. Items held for Krystal Miller, Washer, Dryer, Dresser, Ottoman, Toys, Twin Mattress, boxes and bags of unknown contents. Items held for Freddie Johnson, Luggage, pet carrier, armoire, fishing rod, stereo, dresser, wooden bed frame, end table, boxes and bags of unknown contents. Items held for Connie Hodge, Dining Table & Chairs, Sports Equipment, crib, Toys, Stereo, Dresser, Video Cabinet, boxes and bags of unknown contents. January 2, 2011 1050Legals NOTICE OF INTENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER ADOPTION SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A CONTENT AREA SPECIALISTSCIENCE CURRICULUM AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY intends to amend the job description for a Content Area Specialist Science Curriculum at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. The proposed amendment to the job description shall be effective upon adoption. Pursuant to Section 120.54, Florida Statutes, any affected person has twenty-one (21) days after publication of this notice to request the opportunity to present evidence and argument to the School Board of Highlands County, Florida regarding the proposed job description. Such hearing must be requested in writing and received by Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870, within 21 days after publication of this notice. If such hearing is requested, it will be held Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:45 p.m. Any person desiring to attend such a hearing is requested to call the Superintendent's office to verify whether such hearing has been requested. The purpose and effect of the proposed job description is to add new minimum qualifications for a Content Area Specialist Science Curriculum. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications are 1. A valid Florida educator's certificate; (2) A Master's degree from an accredited institution or a Bachelor's degree from an accredited educational institution with 10 years of successful teaching or relevant experience in a related field; (3) Knowledge of curriculum and/or discipline program design, implementation and evaluation in the assigned area as reflected in job performance assessments; (4) Physical Requirements: exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required; (5) Satisfactory clearance of a criminal history records check and drug screening; Additional desired job qualifications are: (1) Specialized knowledge in effective teaching strategies; (2) Proficiency in effective instruction of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS), resulting in documented student learning gains; (3) Knowledge in assessment data and evaluation of student learning needs/achievement. The Primary Performance Responsibilities are: (1) Works collaboratively with district and school staff to develop strategies, establish diagnostic and intervention services where appropriate or deemed necessary, and assist in directing curricular/instructional decision-making to directly impact student growth and achievement; (2) Commits to the vision and mission of the district and curriculum department; (3) Serves as a member of the district and school-based curriculum leadership councils to articulate curriculum content, programs and resources; (4) Works across multiple subject areas and serves as a subject area specialist; (5) Integrates technology in content area; (6) Stays current on latest research and legislation in education through professional reading, attending state/national meetings/conferences, workshops, collaborating with other districts, and acting as a member of a professional organization (7) Acts as liaison between the district, state, and national subject area organizations; (8) Evaluates effectiveness of and manages assigned programs, processes, and procedures; (9) Understands and utilizes collaborative planning strategies; (10) Works directly with school-based teachers to develop standards-based micro and macro curriculum plans; (11) Works with feeder school units to develop K-12 articulated curriculum guides; (12) Models and mentors school-based teachers in planning, implementation, and evaluation of effective, research-based instruction, including literacy and intervention strategies; (13) Organizes and facilitates professional development activities for applicable school-based teachers. (14) Identifies and develops shortand long-range plans based on student needs consistent with district, state and/or curriculum requirements; (15) Leads and supports school-level curriculum resource teachers; (16) Develops and provides instructional classroom resources for school-based teacher; (17) Oversees administration of statewide and district progress monitoring assessments in content area; (18) Serves as district-level administrator of the local instructional improvement system (database); (19) Collaborates with other Heartland Educational Consortium members on curriculum and training; (20) Organizes and facilitates professional development funded through grants (EETT, Splash, etc); (21) Works directly with school-based teachers in preparation for administration of the end-o-course (EOC) exams; (22) Services as the district contact and organizer for the Air Force Science and Math awards banquet; (23) Serves on the district Problem Solving/RtI Committee; (24) Organizes and facilitates district adoptions of instructional materials; (25) Submits all fee payments, membership fees, and assessment fees in a timely fashion; (26) Interprets and utilizes data (including, but not limited to, standardized and other test results; (27) Identifies, selects, develops or modifies instructional materials to support learning objectives to meet the needs of students with diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds, learning styles, and special needs; (28) Communicates effectively, orally and in writing, with other professionals, students, parents, and community; (29) Effectively and efficiently manages materials and assigned equipment; (30) Establishes and maintains effective and efficient record keeping procedures including student records subject to the requirements of the Family Rights and Privacy Act; (31) Maintains a positive, organized, and safe working environment; (32) Manages time effectively; (33) Attends meetings and trainings as needed; (34) Fulfills professional responsibilities; (35) Writes or facilitates writing grants to obtain additional funding or resources; (36) Acts in a professional and ethical manner and adheres at all times to the Code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct; and (37) Performs other incidental tasks consistent with the goals and objectives of this position. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b), Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendent's office (Attn. Connie Scobey), George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.HIGHLANDS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, B Y: Wally Cox, Superintendent & ex officio secretary. January 2, 2011 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the ficitious name of FAILURE UNIVERSITY, located at 3209 Avery Ct., in the County of Highlands, in the City of Sebring, Florida 33870 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Sebring, Florida, this 29th day of December, 2010. Demetri A. Duncan December 31, 2010 1050Legals NOTICE OF INTENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER ADOPTION SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A CONTENT AREA SPECIALIST-MATH CURRICULUM AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY intends to amend the job description for a Content Area Specialist Math Curriculum at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. The proposed amendment to the job description shall be effective upon adoption. Pursuant to Section 120.54, Florida Statutes, any affected person has twenty-one (21) days after publication of this notice to request the opportunity to present evidence and argument to the School Board of Highlands County, Florida regarding the proposed job description. Such hearing must be requested in writing and received by Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870, within 21 days after publication of this notice. If such hearing is requested, it will be held Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:45 p.m. Any person desiring to attend such a hearing is requested to call the Superintendent's office to verify whether such hearing has been requested. The purpose and effect of the proposed job description is to add new minimum qualifications for a Content Area Specialist Math Curriculum. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications are 1. A valid Florida educator's certificate; (2) A Master's degree from an accredited institution or a Bachelor's degree from an accredited educational institution with 10 years of successful teaching or relevant experience in a related field; (3) Knowledge of curriculum and/or discipline program design, implementation and evaluation in the assigned area as reflected in job performance assessments; (4) Physical Requirements: exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required; (5) Satisfactory clearance of a criminal history records check and drug screening; (6) Additional desired job qualifications are: (1) Specialized knowledge in effective teaching strategies; (2) Proficiency in effective instruction of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS), resulting in documented student learning gains; (3) Knowledge in assessment data and evaluation of student learning needs/achievement. The Primary Performance Responsibilities are: (1) Works collaboratively with district and school staff to develop strategies, establish diagnostic and intervention services where appropriate or deemed necessary, and assist in directing curricular/instructional decision-making to directly impact student growth and achievement; (2) Commits to the vision and mission of the district and curriculum department; (3) Serves as a member of the district and school-based curriculum leadership councils to articulate curriculum content, programs and resources; (4) Works across multiple subject areas and serves as a subject area specialist; (5) Integrates technology in content area; (6) Stays current on latest research and legislation in education through professional reading, attending state/national meetings/conferences, workshops, collaborating with other districts, and acting as a member of a professional organization; (7) Acts as liaison between the district, state, and national subject area organizations; (8) Evaluates effectiveness of and manages assigned programs, processes, and procedures; (9) Understands and utilizes collaborative planning strategies; (10) Works directly with school-based teachers to develop standards-based micro and macro curriculum plans; (11) Works with feeder school units to develop K-12 articulated curriculum guides; (12) Models and mentors school-based teachers in planning, implementation, and evaluation of effective, research-based instruction, including literacy and intervention strategies; (13) Oversees administration of statewide and district progress monitoring assessment in content area; (14) Serves as district-level administrator of the local instructional improvement system (database); (15) Organizes and facilitates professional development activities for applicable school-based teachers; (16) Identifies and develops shortand long-range plans based on student needs consistent with district, state and/or curriculum requirements; (17) Leads and supports school-level curriculum resource teachers; (18) Collaborates with other Heartland Educational Consortium members on curriculum and training; (19) Works directly with school-based teachers in preparation for administration of the end-of-course (EOC) exams; (20) Serves as district contact and organizer for the Air Force Science and Math awards banquet; (21) Serves on the district Problem Solving/RtI Committee; (22) Develops and provides instructional classroom resources for school-based teachers; (23) Organizes and facilitates district adoptions of instructional materials; (24) Submits all fee payments, membership fees, and assessment fees in a timely fashion; (25) Interprets and utilizes data (including, but not limited to, standardized and other test results; (26) Identifies, selects, develops or modifies instructional materials to support learning objectives to meet the needs of students with diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds, learning styles, and special needs; (27) Communicates effectively, orally and in writing, with other professionals, students, parents, and community; (28) Effectively and efficiently manages materials and assigned equipment; (29) Establishes and maintains effective and efficient record keeping procedures including student records subject to the requirements of the Family Rights and Privacy Act; (30) Maintains a positive, organized, and safe working environment; (31) Manages time effectively; (32) Attends meetings and trainings as needed; (33) Fulfills professional responsibilities; (34) Writes or facilitates writing grants to obtain additional funding or resources; (35) Acts in a professional and ethical manner and adheres at all times to the Code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct; and (36) Performs other incidental tasks consistent with the goals and objectives of this position. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b), Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendent's office (Attn. Connie Scobey), George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.HIGHLANDS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, BY: Wally Cox, Superintendent & ex officio secretary. January 2, 2011 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of ONE STOP MINI MART, in Highlands County, Florida, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Sebring, Florida, this 14th day of December, 2010. One Stop Mini Mart of Sebring, Inc. a Florida corporation By: /s/ Rafael Rivero Rafael Rivero, President January 2, 2011 tained at the Superintendent's office (Attn. Connie Scobey), George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.HIGHLANDS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, BY: Wally Cox, Superintendent & ex officio secretary. January 2, 2011 1050Legals NOTICE OF INTENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER ADOPTION SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A CONTENT AREA SPECIALIST-INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY intends to amend the job description for a Content Area Specialist Instructional Technology at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. The proposed amendment to the job description shall be effective upon adoption. Pursuant to Section 120.54, Florida Statutes, any affected person has twenty-one (21) days after publication of this notice to request the opportunity to present evidence and argument to the School Board of Highlands County, Florida regarding the proposed job description. Such hearing must be requested in writing and received by Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870, within 21 days after publication of this notice. If such hearing is requested, it will be held Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:45 p.m. Any person desiring to attend such a hearing is requested to call the Superintendent's office to verify whether such hearing has been requested. The purpose and effect of the proposed job description is to add new minimum qualifications for a Content Area Specialist Instructional Technology. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications are 1. A valid Florida educator's certificate; (2) A Master's degree from an accredited institution or a Bachelor's degree from an accredited educational institution with 10 years of successful teaching or relevant experience in a related field; (3) Knowledge of curriculum and/or discipline program design, implementation and evaluation in the assigned area as reflected in job performance assessments; (4) Physical Requirements: exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required; (4) Satisfactory clearance of a criminal history records check and drug screening. Additional desired job qualifications are: (1) Specialized knowledge in effective teaching strategies; (2) Proficiency in effective instruction of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS), resulting in documented student learning gains; (3) Knowledge in assessment data and evaluation of student learning needs/achievement. The Primary Performance Responsibilities are: (1) Works collaboratively with district and school staff to develop strategies, establish diagnostic and intervention services where appropriate or deemed necessary, and assist in directing curricular/instructional decision-making to directly impact student growth and achievement; (2) Commits to the vision and mission of the district and curriculum department; (3) Serves as a member of the district and school-based curriculum leadership councils to articulate curriculum content, programs and resources; (4) Provides technology support and ongoing training for school-level technology resource teachers (TRT); (5) Provides technology support to K-12 classroom teachers to enhance instruction and academic activities; (6) Assist school-level technology committees in writing school technology plans; (7) Stays current on test research and legislation in technology education through professional reading, attending state/national meetings/conferences, workshops, collaborating with other districts, and acting as a member of a professional organization; (8) Researches new software programs and materials related to technology; (9) Assists in the development and implementation of the District Technology Plan; (10) Collaborates with MIS in the management of the electronic gradebook; (11) Facilitates collection of data on technology integration, resources and planning as required by state surveys or as requested for grants, research, or public information; (12) Establishes, maintains, monitors and updates curriculum based, district-wide systems and/or software as assigned; (13) Evaluates effectiveness of and manages assigned programs, processes, and procedures; (14) Understands and utilizes collaborative planning strategies; (15) Organizes and facilitates professional development activities, in technology, for curriculum based, district-wide systems and software to appropriate personnel; (16) Serves as district administrator for the local instructional improvement system (database); (17) Oversees administration of statewide and district progress monitoring assessments in technology; (18) Identifies and develops shortand long-range plans based on student needs consistent with district, state and/or technology requirements; (19) Serves as district administrator of A3 (electronic IEP and individual progress monitoring plans); (20) Knowledgeable of district-wide assessment tools current in use; (21) Assists district in maintaining copyright/CIPA compliance; (22) Organizes and facilitates district adoptions of district software site licenses; (23) Submits all fee payments, membership fees, and assessment fees in a timely fashion; (24) Identifies, selects, develops or modifies technology software/equipment to support learning objectives to meet the needs of students with diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds, learning styles, and special needs; (25) Communicates effectively, orally and in writing, with other professionals, students, parents, and community; (26) Effectively and efficiently manages materials and assigned equipment; (27) Maintains a positive, organized, and safe working environment; (28) Manages time effectively; (29) Attends meeting sand trainings as needed; (30) Fulfills professional responsibilities; (31) Writes or facilitates writing grants to obtain additional funding or resources (32) Acts in a professional and ethical manner and adheres at all times to the code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct; and (33) Performs other incidental tasks consistent with the goals and objectives of this position. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b), Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obNOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADOPTION OF A PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO WATER RATES, FEES, CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS, AND METER CONVERSION POLICIES FOR THE SPRING LAKE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT The Spring Lake Improvement District will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, January 12, 2011, 7:00 p.m. at the Spring Lake Community Center located on Spring Lake Boulevard, in Pine Breeze Park, for the purpose of hearing public comment and objections of certain rates, fees, construction standards, and meter conversion policies for the District's water utility system. The District will consider updated policies and new rates and fees for meter conversion. Any changes will go into effect immediately. EACH PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT MEETINGS IS ADVISED THAT PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, INCLUDING THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. JOSEPH DECERBO DISTRICT MANAGER DECEMBER 26, 2010 JANUARY 2, 2011 of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.HIGHLANDS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, BY: Wally Cox, Superintendent & ex officio secretary. January 2, 2011 1050Legals NOTICE OF INTENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER A DOPTION SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A CONTENT AREA SPECIALISTFEDERAL PROGRAMS AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY intends to amend the job description for a Content Area Specialist Federal Programs at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. The proposed amendment to the job description shall be effective upon adoption. Pursuant to Section 120.54, Florida Statutes, any affected person has twenty-one (21) days after publication of this notice to request the opportunity to present evidence and argument to the School Board of Highlands County, Florida regarding the proposed job description. Such hearing must be requested in writing and received by Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870, within 21 days after publication of this notice. If such hearing is requested, it will be held Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:45 p.m. Any person desiring to attend such a hearing is requested to call the Superintendent's office to verify whether such hearing has been requested. The purpose and effect of the proposed j ob description is to add new minimum qualifications for a Content Area Specialist Federal Programs. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications are 1. A valid Florida educator's certificate; (2) A Master's degree from an accredited institution or a Bachelor's degree from an accredited educational institution with 10 years of successful teaching or relevant experience in a related field; (3) Knowledge of curriculum and/or discipline program design, implementation and evaluation in the assigned area as reflected in job performance assessments; (4) Physical Requirements: exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required; (5) Satisfactory clearance of a criminal history records check and drug screening; Additional desired job qualifications are: (1) Specialized knowledge in effective teaching strategies; (2) Proficiency in effective instruction of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS), resulting in documented student learning gains; (3) Knowledge in assessment data and evaluation of student learning needs/achievement. The Primary Performance Responsibilities are: (1) Works collaboratively with district and school staff to develop strategies, establish diagnostic and intervention services where appropriate or deemed necessary, and assist in directing curricular/instructional decision-making to directly impact student growth and achievement; (2) Commits to the vision and mission of the district and curriculum department; (3) Serves as a member of the district and school-based curriculum leadership councils to articulate curriculum content, programs and resources; (4) Provides assistance and support to migrant advocates; (5) Integrates technology in content area; (6) Monitors migrant early childhood programs (7) Writes and monitors Federal Title grants; (8) Assists in the development of grant budgets; (9) Coordinates the administration of CELLA; (10) Coordinates implementation of school choice based on Differentiated Accountability and AYP; (12) Serves on the district Solving/RtI Committee; (13) Responds to needs of migrant families; (14) Provides supplemental academic counseling for migrant students; (15) Organizes and monitors migrant after school tutorial programs; (16) Coordinates and/or performs necessary duties pertinent to the Migrant Summer Institute, Migrant Summer Camps, Migrant Scholarship program, Close-up Program, Who's Who selection, migrant banquet, etc. (18) Serves on Inter-agency Committee; (19) A ssists with Migrant Parent Involvement Centers at school sites; (20) Evaluates effectiveness of and manages assigned programs, processes, and procedures; (21) Understands and utilizes collaborative planning strategies; (22) Organizes and facilitates professional development activities appropriate personnel; (23) Identifies and develops shortand long-range plans based on student needs consistent with district, state and/or federal requirements; (24) Knowledgeable of district-wide assessment tools currently in use (25) Submits all fee payments, membership fees, and assessment fees in a timely fashion; (26) Identifies, selects, develops or modifies instructional materials to support learning objectives to meet the needs of students with diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds, learning styles, and special needs; (27) Communicates effectively, orally and in writing, with other professionals, students, parents, and community; (28) Effectively and efficiently manages materials and assigned equipment; (29) Maintains a positive, organized, and safe working environment; (30) Manages time effectively; (31) A ttends meetings and trainings as needed; (32) Fulfills professional responsibilities; (33) Writes or facilitates writing grants to obtain additional funding or resources; (34) Acts in a professional and ethical manner and adheres at all times to the Code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct; and (35) Performs other incidental tasks consistent with the goals and objectives of this position. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b), Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendent's office (Attn. Connie Scobey), George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 08-CA-00711 DIVISION: A MERICAN HOME MORTGAGE SERVICING, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION, F/K/A AH MORTGAGE A CQUISITION CO., INC., Plaintiff, vs. MAUREEN GRIFFIN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 23, 2010, and entered in Case No. 08-CA-00711 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which American Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc. a Delaware Corporation, f/k/a AH Mortgage Acquisition Co., Inc., is the Plaintiff and Maureen Griffin; Bank of A merica, NA; are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury A ssembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 25th day of January, 2011, the following described property as set forth ins said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 42, BLOCK 52, PLACID LAKES SECTION SIX, A CCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 68, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA A /K/A 111 LEMON RD NW, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852-9786 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 23rd day of December, 2010. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk January 2, 9, 2011 1050Legals

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Page 12ANews-Sun Sunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com PROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORYPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY Install doors, windows, flooring, plumbing & more!Licensed & InsuredLic# HM0096HANDYMAN BOBCall 863-452-5201 or 863-449-1744 A & E LAWN MOWER REPAIRBeltsƒBlades New & Used Parts12 S.Forest Ave. Avon Park,FL 33825863-452-0389 Service € Repair € Supplies € Equipment Delivered Right to your DoorPool Service & Mobile Retail(863) 382-7728Fax (863) 402-2200 poolparadise101@aol.com www.poolparadiseonline.com Brad & Julie Kurtz 863385-0404Now Offering: Animal Nuisance Control and Removal Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-2750 1405 US 27 North Sebring, FL 33870 C A M P B E L L  S S C O L L I S I O N C E N T E R , I N C Jim Campbell Owner Ser vice A vailable 7 Days A W eek Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com EXTRAORDINAIRE HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING LLC 863-451-2399Mike & Kandy Sheldone CEO/Owner Lic# CAC 1816569All Service Calls $40 ResidentialCommercial Insured € Free EstimatesService by People Who CareChad, Krista & Michael P.O. Box 6987 Avon Park, FL 33826-6987 Office: 863-655-9328 cklawn@strato.net WANDA KLINE WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESSSee what one drop of your blood indicates as to YOUR nutritional health and well-being. By appointment only863-414-4066 LIVEBLOODANALYSISŽ MIKES PAINTINGInterior & Exterior Residential & Mobile Homes Also Pressure Washing Over 25 Years Experience Free Estimates € Lic. & Ins.863-657-2362 &WILLIAMSJANITORIALCARPETCLEANING$1095 Per Room3 Rooms Minimum € Upholstery Cleaning € All Types of Flooring € Free EstimatesLic € Bonded € Ins(863) 214-1940 CASH for JUNK(954) 963-7138 Cars, Trucks, Vans no title necessary AUCTIONTues & Fri 6:30 P.M.Preview: 4-6:30 P.M. 863-633-8393 4490 US 27, S., SEBRING, FL 33870Household Items € Tools € Appliances & MUCH … MUCH MORE!50/50 Drawing & Give Aways Every AuctionEstates Bought & Sold LEGREES863-215-3754Edward LeGreeMOBILE CARWASH & DETAILING SUE IS BACKSue Leninsky from Titusville, Pa. with 42 years experience is working Mon. 8-4 € Sat. 8-noon at SALONTAZMANIA1505 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park 863-452-2396 JUDISPLACEOFHAIR& NAILS271 US 27 North, Sebring Wed. … Fri. 8-4 863-382-9911 Call for an appointment with Sue 863-465-7491TREE SERVICE,INC.Joe Johnsons TRIMMING € REMOVAL SOD INSTALLATION € STUMP GRINDING LOT CLEARING € PRESSURE CLEANING Will Beat Any Written Estimate!Peoples Choice Award Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Avon Park (863) 453-2525 Lake Placid (863) 699-2525 Lake Wales (863) 679-9200 Sebring (863) 382-1515 Wauchula (863) 767-1515Sebring Fax (863) 382-9939 W al-Mart Loca tions: Lake Wales (863) 676-0569 Sebring (863) 385-5371 Avon Park (863) 452-7010 INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED 3310 Hwy. 27 South Sebring, FL33870EOEE-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.comFor more information about Cross Country Automotive Services,we encourage you to visit our website at: www.CrossCountry-Auto.co mComprehensive Benefit Package€ Tuition Reimbursement € Life Insurance € Vacation Time € Holiday Pay € Medical € DentalNow Hiring Full & Part Time Customer Service AssociatesStarting at $9.00 an hour Sarah Turner Associate of the MonthBe a HERO like Sarah Turner863-402-2786AGreatPlaceto Work! DIRECTOR, EPI… Full-time, 10-month position to coordinate and manage the functions of SFCCs Educator Preparation Institute as well as teach EPI classes (generally scheduled on Saturdays). Masters degree in Education, Educational Leadership, or closely related field required. P-12 teaching experience required. Educational leadership experience preferred. Current Florida teaching certification preferred. Clinical educator training or national board teacher certification preferred. Must maintain Highlands County Schools level two background clearance. Competency in basic computer skills including but not limited to Microsoft Word, Power Point, Publisher, Excel, and Outlook. Experience working with relational database software (specifically BANNER) preferred. Must be flexible for scheduling, including Saturdays. Must have reliable transportation for travel throughout the service district and adjacent counties. Starting annual salary: $38,000-$42,000.STUDENT SERVICESADVISOR, CAREER CENTER … Full-time, year-round position responsible for providing general college information, academic advising, scheduling, and career planning services. Bachelors degree required. Academic advising or guidance experience preferred. Demonstrated ability in communicating effectively with people from diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds required. Starting annual salary: $26,000-$28,500. Full-time positions offer comprehensive benefits, including retirement, health/life insurance, and vacation/sick leave. Detailed position announcements and application information located on our website. Application deadline for both positions is 5 p.m., Tuesday, January 11, 2011.SFCC ISAN EQUALACCESS/EQUALOPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION600 West College Drive Avon Park, FL 33825 (863)453-6661 € FAX (863) 784-7497 E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu www.southflorida.edu/hr/ CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 385-6155 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements***************************************** HIGHLANDS COUNTY LEGAL NOTICES ***************************************** The following legal notices are from the Highlands County Board of County Commissioners and are being published in the font, size, and leading as per their specifications. 1055HighlandsCounty Legalsing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2010, at which they will be opened. Bids received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The BCC will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at the above meeting. Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this bid. The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors (IMWID) reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District. The IMWID Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Commissioners as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: jminor@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service.Board of County Commissioners as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors, Purchasing Department; Highlands County, Florida Website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net December 26, 2010; January 2, 2011 1055HighlandsCounty LegalsHIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS(HCBCC)GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASINGINVITATION TO BID (ITB) The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands County as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for:ITB 11-020 LEASE OF 398 ACRES OF PROPERTY AT 202 DRIGGERS ROAD, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 NIGP CODE COMMODITY/SERVICES CODE: 971-35Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net"www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, CPPB, Highlands County General Services/Purchasing Department Assistant Purchasing Director 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33875-5803 Phone: 863-402-6524 Fax: 863-402-6735; or E-Mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:dgilbert@hcbcc.org"dgilbert@hcbcc.orgBidder will submit one (1) original and two (2) copies of their bid, in an envelope that must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name so as to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to Highlands County Purchas1055HighlandsCounty Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIRCUIT CIVIL CASE NO. 28-2010-CA-000670GCS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH WACHOVIA BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. SIMON LORENZO BROWN, JR., et al., Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 29, 2010, and Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 21, 2010, both entered in Case No. 28-2010-CA-000670 of the Circuit Court for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida, in, at 11:00 a.m. and on the 14th day of January, 2011 the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment: Lot 16, GRAN-LORE RANCHETTES, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 12, Page 13, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Together with that certain 1993 Fleetwood Mobile Home Identification #FLFLP70A21273SK and FLFLP70B21273SK. TOGETHER WITH all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, rights, appurtenances, rents royalties,mineral, oil and gas rights and profits, water rights and stock and all fixtures now or hereafter attached to the property. **ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE.** WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on December 21, 2010. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities A ct, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending this notice no later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, visa Florida Relay Service. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit and County Court By: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk December 26, 2010; January 2, 2011 are available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the DEP Southeast District office, 400 North Congress A venue, Suite 200, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, Tel. (561) 681-6600. January 2, 2011 1050Legals

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, January 2, 2011Page 13 A Call 385-6155 and a Sales Representative will be glad to assist you!1992 NISSANSENTRA Under 100 K miles, new tires, RUNS GREAT! $2100 or MAKE OFFER! 863-471-2906 or 863-414-1691. 9450Automotive for SaleRIMS -18'' Mondera Davanti, on Kumho Low Profile 225/40ZR 18 Tires. LIKE NEW! $1000. 863-385-5425. 9350Automotive Parts& Accessories2004 KAWASAKI750 Vulcan. One Owner, Garage Kept! 6796 miles. $3,500. 863-471-9341. 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation2003 SEADOO GTX JETSKI Mint Condition! 59 hrs. $5000. 863-385-5425 8400RecreationalVehiclesBIG GUNSHOWHighlands County Fair Grounds Sebring, FLJan. 8th & 9thSAT. 9-5; SUN. 9-4 Concealed Course At Show! Call 321-777-7455 8350Sporting Goods 8000 Recreation NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. FREE TOGOOD HOME 2 Black Male KITTENS. 10 wks, need loving home. Super sweet, kid & dog friendly. 863-381-5999 or anarahlee@aol.com 7520Pets & SuppliesLOOKING FORused car in VERY GOOD CONDITION Call 863-465-0978. 7340Wanted to BuySEBRING -MOVING SALE! 2023 Fernway St., off Hammock Rd., Fri-Sat-Sun-Mon, Dec 31-Jan 3, 8am-? SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE! EVERYTHING MUST GO! 7320Garage &Yard Sales WATER FILTERReverse Osmosis system, good condition. $50 863-873-3801 TIRE &WHEEL, large, LT 265/70 R17. One only. $65. 863-699-1119. RUG 5'5'' X 7' 10". Green / pink / white. $50. 678-491-7856 MINI FRIDGEw/ freezer, black. $100. 863-201-3769 LEATHER JACKETS2 Mens, size XL, black, like new. $70 863-699-0466 LATINO COCKATIELBaby bird, 4 mos. old, Beautiful! Needs good home. $100 863-385-2503 COFFEE MAKERGevalia (12 cup) LIKE NEW! $10 obo. 863-471-2502 EXTENTION LADDER24 ft. Like new $24. 863-655-1762 DRILL MILWAUKEEcordless w/ case. heavy duty. Orig. $200 will sell. $100. 863-873-3801 CALLOWAY DRIVERNew Big Bertha 460 9 degree. $100 863-382-6006 BOAT ANCHOR25 pounds. $75 863-699-1119 BIKE HELMETSTrex & Trio, both for $25. 863-382-6006 7310Bargain Buys NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS! HIGHPOINT FURNITURE OUTLET STORE 2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRINGNorthofLowes&acrossfrom HomeDepot 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise SEBRING -3BR, 1BA with carport, near High School, laundry room, fenced yard. $550/mo., security deposit waived to right person. 863-835-0408 SEBRING -2BR, 1BA all wood home, $675/mo. + $500 security deposit. 3303 Pompino Dr. Avgerage electric bill $90/mo. Call 863-402-0400 6300Unfurnished Houses LAKE PLACID2BR, 1BA, new floors/paint, fenced yard, close to boat ramp, nice landscape, quiet area, no smoke, $550/mo. 863-699-1119 HOUSES /MOBILE HOMES Call for Availability NO Security NO Last NO Dogs 863-381-4410 or 863-381-5174 6300Unfurnished Houses SEBRING: 1BR,1 BA Guest House / Cottage in quiet / private neighborhood with all utilities included: Electric, Water & Direct TV. No Pets, No Smokers. Harder Hall ares, 1/8 mile from 2 golf courses. $800 per month + deposit. Call 863-381-9437 LAKE PLACIDNewer 3BR, 2BA, seasonal or monthly rental. Excellent furniture & appliances, near lake & boat ramp. No Smoking or dogs. 863-699-1119 6250Furnished Houses SEBRING -DINNER LAKE AREA 1BR, 1BA Apartments for Rent. $395/mo. Includes water. Large rooms, fresh paint & tile floors. Call Gary Johnson @ 863-381-1861 SEBRING -Clean 1BR, 1BA, living rm., utility w/ W-D hookup, new screened vinyl patio, near Walmart & Homer's area. You pay electric, I pay cable & utilities. Ideal for 1 or 2 adults. Prefer year round renter, no dogs. $450 mly. + $450 sec. dp. Move in now $650 to the right party! Call after 1pm for details. 732-222-0344 RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile, New paint, New appliances, Screened patios & W/D hook ups. Call 863-452-0469. BEST RENTAL IN TOWN! Large 2BR, 1BA totally remodeled, washer/dryer hook-ups. Available Immediately! Call 321-537-5681 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsLEMONTREE APARTMENTSAvon Park, FL 33825 1BR, 1BA $495/Month+ $200 Security Deposit2BR, 1BA $645/Month+ $500 Security Deposit Pets Welcome* Washer/Dryer Microwave & WSG Included Call Alan, (386) 503-8953 AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 863-453-8538 AVON PARK** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsLAKE PLACIDGolf Villas Efficiencies with kitchenette, furnished, includes; electric & all utilities, swimming pool; W/D available. $425/mo. Call Ireland Sanders, 863-465-1400. 6100Villas & CondosFor Rent SEBRING -CUTE 2BR, 1BA, new tile floors & insulation. Kids and most pets ok. 4911 Manatee. $490/mo. + $300 security deposit to move in. 863-446-7274 or 863-471-0840 SEBRING -3008 Spinks Rd., 2BR, 1BA, W/D hookup, new appliances, ceramic tile throughout. No Pets. Close to HRMC & Sebring High School. Avail. Immediately $500/mo. 863-273-1756. LAKE PLACIDPlacid Lakes, unfurnished 2BR / 2BA. 863-699-0897 or 863-840-2013 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 Rentals SEBRING -RV Park, Close to Downtown, 1BR, 1BA & Efficiencies, $325-$400/mo; 2BR 2BA, $400/mo. EASY MOVE-IN RATES! 863-655-3504 SEBRING -RV Park, Close to Downtown, 1BR, 1BA & Efficiencies, $325-$400/mo; 2BR 2BA, $400/mo. EASY MOVE-IN RATES! 863-655-3504 LAKE PLACIDSun 'n Lakes Estates, Doublewide, 3BR, 2BA Mobile Home. The best in Country Living! $580/month. Call Michelle @ 863-381-5661. 5150Mobile HomesFor RentPALM HARBORHomes Short Sales/Reop's/Used Homes 3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides Won't Last!! $3500 40k John-800-622-2832 Ext.210 5100Mobile HomeLots for Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSEBRING -Edgewater Village Lakeview Dr. 2BR, 2BA, 1CG Villa. Beautifully furnished. New kitchen, laundry, TV. Low Maintenance fee includes Cable TV, Clubhouse, heated pool. Private street. Avail Immed. 863-402-9138 4080Homes for SaleSebring AVON PARK3BR, 2BA, 1CG 1400 sq ft home. $68,900. Available after Feb. 28, 2011. Owner Financing possible with 10% down, good credit report and work record. 863-453-5631 AVON PARK3BR, 2BA, 1CG 1400 sq ft home. $68,900. Available after Feb. 28, 2011. Owner Financing possible with 10% down, good credit report and work record. 863-453-5631 4040Homes For SaleATTENTION: CASH for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 FinancialTHE HOMEBUILDERS INSTITUTE has an immediate need for a PAINTING INSTRUCTOR. In this role, you will instruct program participants using approved curriculum, and develop supporting training materials; coordinate hands-on training activities including on-site projects, emphasizing proper tool and equipment use, safety, and standard painting practices; monitor and coach trainees; and perform various administrative and reporting functions, as required. Qualifications include a HS diploma or equivalent; at least seven years painting experience; teaching/training experience preferred; strong communications skills; the ability to work with at-risk youth; satisfactory results of an extensive criminal background screening; completion of Protective Action Response training; completion of the Test of Adult Basic Education; and proficiency with computers and MS Office. Apply at www.hbi.org/jobs. EOE/AA/M/F/D/VCAREGIVERSNOW HIRINGFor caring, compassionate caregivers. You must be 21 yrs old with a HS Diploma/GED, pass a criminal & driving record check. Call HR between 9am and 4 pm M-F. 866-757-9686 or visit: ck381.ersp.biz/employment FIRE CHIEFThe City of Avon Park is seeking a full-time Fire Chief who under general administrative direction of the City Manager, plans, organizes, directs, and reviews the activities and operations of the Fire Department including fire prevention, fire code enforcement responsibilities and supervision per state statute, suppression, public education, emergency medical services and other activities designed to protect lives and property. Certified Firefighter II and Fire Officer I required as prescribed by Florida State Bureau of Fire Standards. Fire Officer II preferred and minimum certification of EMT-B desired. An Associate Degree with specialized training in fire department operations and administration a must. A Bachelor's Degree with major course work in fire science or fire administration is preferred. A minimum of ten (10) years of experience in fire suppression, rescue, and the delivery of emergency medical services with at least five (5) years in a managerial/supervisory capacity equivalent to the rank of Lieutenant or two years as a Captain or above. Salary compensable DOQ. Applications and job description is available at the City of Avon Park, 110 E. Main St., Avon Park, FL 33825 or can be obtained on our website: www.avonpark.cc All applications must be accompanied with a copy of applicants Florida driver's license. This position will remain open until filled. The City of Avon Park is a smoke and drug-free workplace. E.O.E. Return completed applications to City Hall, Human Resource Dept., 110 E Main St., Avon Park, FL 33825 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment 1550ProfessionalServicesNEED SOMEONEto take care of your loved one? In their OWN HOME? Excellent references...25 years exp. Call Joanie at 863-471-9726. 1400Health CareServices Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classified ads get fast results LOOKING FOR AN APARTMENT? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday.AKC ENGLISHBULLDOG PUPPY A picture is worth a thousand words! Call 877-394-3996 CASTLE HILL Apartments of Avon ParkAccepting Applications for 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals 62 years or older, handicap/disabled, regardless of age. For rental information & applications please call: 863-452-6565 TDD: 1-800-955-8771 THIS INSTITUTION IS AN Equal Opportunity Provider and EmployerLos Apt. de Castle Hill de Avon ParkEstan aceptando aplicaciones para Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras. Disponible a personas de 62 ancs o mas, incapacidad fisica/mental, no importa la edad. Para mas informacion favor de llamar 863-452-6565. TDD: 1-800-955-8771 Esta Institucion Es De Igualdad De Oportunidad Al Proveedor, Y Empleador

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By BRETTMARTEL Associated PressNEWORLEANS R aheem Morris has seen the B uccaneers rise from the r anks of prohibitive long s hots to that of a credible t hreat since his last time i nside the Louisiana S uperdome one year ago. As much as things have c hanged in Tampa Bay, the s econd-year coach can only h ope for the same result in t his season's trip to the Big E asy. The Buccaneers had only t wo victories and quarterb ack Josh Freeman was a m istake-prone rookie w hen they went into the d ome in 2009 and posted a s tunning upset over a Saints s quad that was on its way to a Super Bowl title. In hindsight, that result is s tarting to look m ore like an i ndication of a y oung team t hat was learni ng, improving a nd on the b rink of turning a corner. When the B uccaneers (96 ) line up a gainst the S aints (11-4) in t heir regulars eason finale t his Sunday, t hey'll do so w ith playoff h opes still intact. Avictory over New O rleans, combined with l osses by the New York G iants and Green Bay P ackers, would vault the B ucs into the postseason for t he first time since 2007. "Last year was about us g oing out and trying to i mprove every week. We had a young team last year and w e were developing a young q uarterback," Morris said. It was a great test for F reeman. ... We played well. W e played fast. We played h ard. We played consistent a nd we were able to get a w in there and a very signific ant win for us in our develo pment and where we wante d to go. It only helped us g enerate some positive pub f or the offseason to get us going in the right direction." It would be far less shocking if Tampa Bay were to win this time around. Drew Brees made it clear the Saints respect how far the Bucs have come from their 3-13 2009 campaign. "You look at maybe the way people perceived them prior to the season, where there's no way those guys make the playoffs, they're young and all this stuff ... yet, here they are knocking on the door," Brees said. "They're saying, 'If we take care of our business, not only do we have a chance at the playoffs, but at 10 wins.' That's a big deal in this league. That's hard to do, especially with a young team. "Josh Freeman's played exceptionally well," Brees continued. "I think they're well-coached and you just see them playing with a lot of fire, passion, emotion and intensity. That's how this game needs to be played." The Saints may have more to gain by resting top players than winning the game if out-of-town scores show that Atlanta is cruising to an NFC South clinching victory over struggling Carolina. If the Falcons win, New Orleans is locked into the fifth seed in the NFC and will open the playoffs the following week at the winner of Sunday night's St. Louis-Seattle game. However, if Atlanta loses, the defending champs could capture the top overall seed in the NFC for a secondstraight season if they beat the Bucs. Saints coach Sean Payton said he has no intention of scoreboard watching or resting any players at the expense of a victory. "We're doing everything we can in our power to get our 12th win. Period," Payton said. "It would be different if the times were different, but we're full speed ahead." The last time these teams met on Oct. 17, it wasn't close. The Saints won 31-6 and racked up 212 yards on the ground, including 158 yards by surprising undrafted rookie Chris Ivory. Since then, another undrafted rookie running back has burst onto the scene for Tampa Bay. LeGarrette Blount needs SPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, January 2, 2011 BARRYWILNER Associated PressNEWYORK As one of t he strangest NFLseasons o n and off the field winds d own, football fans can b egin contemplating playoff m atchups, followed by the S uper Bowl, then the draft. And then, perhaps, nothi ng. Dark stadiums. Empty S unday afternoons and M onday nights. No fantasy t eams. The collective bargaining a greement between the l eague and the players e xpires March 4. Team owners have gone f rom voicing optimism to b asically clamming up about r eaching a contract with the p layers union any time soon. Commissioner Roger G oodell and NFLPAexecut ive director DeMaurice S mith emphasize the need f or substantive negotiations n ow. Yet the two sides remain f ar apart on the major issues, p articularly the players' s hare of revenues, and a s witch to an 18-game regular s eason. "If both sides give a little, e veryone will get a lot," G oodell says, "especially the f ans." Counters Smith, "The players believe this lockout is going to occur." They certainly do, say Tom Condon and Ben Dogra, two of the NFL's top player agents, with a clientele that includes the Manning brothers, Drew Brees and Patrick Willis. "I think the players are taking this very seriously," says Condon, who has been through three other labor disputes: in 1974 as a rookie, in 82 as a part of the negotiations, and as an outside counsel to the players in 1987. "They know what is at stake here and all the reaction to preparing for it has been positive. We have encouraged them to talk to their player reps, who are their direct lines to the union, to discuss the issues, and to discuss the issues among themselves." Broncos safety Brian Dawkins, a 15-year veteran, says he has advised younger players on saving money. Chiefs linebacker Mike Vrabel, a 14-year veteran and, like Dawkins, a member of the union executive committee, adds that the NFLPAhas asked every agent to discuss saving money with their clients. "I think the players are more sophisticated and the issues are drawn pretty clearly. Basically what has occurred is that a CBAis in place the owners voted to accept, and certainly the players accepted, in 2006. And the owners had the option to opt out, they did in 2008, and they want to take back some of that money." That is a central issue. NFLowners say they need a restructured deal because they can't afford the revenue split of the CBAabout to expire. NFLrevenues are expected to be near $9 billion for 2010, with nearly 60 percent of designated revenues going to players. Owners claim huge debts from building stadiums and starting up the NFLNetwork and other ventures, making NFL labor: What's ahead? Perhaps silence MCTphoto Roger Goodell, right, has a friendly chat with John Madden and Andy Reid this past summer. In the coming months, chats could get pretty heated for Goodell as he tries to work out a deal between the owners and the players association in hopes of avoidiing a lockout. See NFL, p a g e 3B And Another Thing... Dan Hoehne With a new year dawning and some resolutions alread y broken, a quick look back a t the past 12 months shows a stunning amount of success for li'l ol'Highlands County. I mean, one would think that Asuccess for one loca l team would make for a goo d year, and yet we were blessed with quite a few. Avon Park made itself quite familiar with the Lakeland Center as grapplers Charles Hubbard and Omar Torres earned a trip t o the state wrestling meet an d took second and sixth in their respective weight classes. Just weeks later, the Red Devil cagers made the trip to Lakeland as they concluded an historic run to the school's third Final Four appearance ever. Spring saw numerous co llege scholarships signed by county athletes, including a staggering six Lake Placid football players getting the chance to continue their playing careers on the college level. Summer brought about Dixie season and wound up with not only a state championship for the Sebring Ozone squad, but a Dixie World Series title as well. Another group of youngsters fought their way to a championship as the Avon Park Youth Football Mitey Mites produced a State Super Bowl winner in the fall. And though another strong season couldn't get the Blue Streak high schoo l football team to the playoff s, their play drew some deserved attention as they were selected to play in the 25th Annual Osceola Coun ty Rotary Scholarship Bowl. The game saw the succes s of the season continue with a 33-20 win over Atlantic. Fall also saw Lake Placi d volleyball, despite a regime change and underdog status claim its'sixth consecutive district title in rousing fash ion sweeping top-seed an d previously undefeated in di strict McKeel in a stunning championship match. These, of course, were just some of the highlights of grand achievement in th e county, though let us not forget the numerous other athletes who took their talents to the highest stage rather than to South Beach. From weightlifters to swimmers and divers to golfers and runners in track and cross country alike, no t to mention pole vaulters, leapers and throwers many area athletes earned spots to State. The little county that could 2010 showed that the kids of Highlands County not only could, but did. And from accomplishme nt comes a higher standard to strive for, so who knows what 2011 will bring? Dan Hoehne is the Sports Editor of the News-Sun. He can be reached at daniel.hoehne@newssun.com. Quite a year for the little county that could MCTphotos The coaching of Raheem Morris and the play of Josh Freeman has brought new respect, and a potential playoff spot, for this young Buccaneer team. Saints seek to snuff out Bucs' playoff hopes See BUCS, page 3B You just see them playing with a lot of fire, passion, emotion and intensity. That's how this game needs to be played.'DREWBREES Saints QB

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Elks Lodge 1529 Golf TourneySEBRING The monthly Elks golf tournament will be held on Monday Jan. 3 at Harder Hall Country Club. Cost for the 8 a.m. shotgun start is $32 per player. To register either your team or as an individual player, contact Jack McLaughlin at 471-3295 or by email at jacknjudy33872@gmail.com Check in not later than 7:40 AM in the Harder Hall Golf Course restaurant area.New Year Golf BenefitSEBRING ANew Year's golf tournament to benefit Eddie Bateman will tee off Saturday, Jan. 15 on the Deer Run course at Sun N Lake. The four-person scramble format will kick off with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. Cost is $55 per person/$220 per team. There are also sponsorships available. AGold sponsorship is $1,000 and gets four hole signs, a banner and one team entry. ASilver sponsorship is $500 and includes two hole signs, a banner and one team entry. ABronze sponsorship gets two hole signs and a banner and a single hole sponsorship, for $100, gets one hole sign. There are also single sponsor donations available for $25. For more information, contact Jady Prescott at 381-2117 or jady_52@hotmail.com .Panther Volleyball CampAVONPARK The South Florida Community College Volleyball program will be hosting a four week training camp running from Jan. 6-Feb. 3 for players from 6th to 12th grade. The camp will meet Tuesday's and Thursday's from 6:30-8:30 p.m. and provides individual skill development and basic tactics in a positive learning environment. All campers will receive individual and team instruction from Coach Kim Crawford and members of the 2010-11 Lady Panthers. Crawford is a three-time college AllAmerican and played professionally in Europe, on the Bud Light Professional Beach Tour for Team Nike and on the Pro California Grass Tour. She has been trained by many Olympic coaches and looks forward to sharing her vast volleyball knowledge with all camp participants. The camp cost is $100 and is limited to the first 30 to register. To register, go to www.southflorida.edu and select the volleyball site. Click on "volleyball camp," print out Admissions Application and Emergency Treatment forms. Mail Admissions Application and Emergency Treatment forms as indicated on application form, or bring to the Cashier's Office in Building B. For more information, contact the SFCC Athletic Department at the following campus phone numbers at extension 7037 Avon Park/Sebring, 784-7037; Lake Placid, 465-5300; DeSoto, 4947500; Hardee, 773-2252; or email kim.crawford@southflorida.edu .YMCA New Year's 5KSEBRING The Highlands County Family YMCAwill hold it's first annu al New Year's Day 5K Run/Walk starting at 9 a.m. at Highlands Hammock State Pa rk on Saturday, Jan. 1, 2011. To register for the 5k run go to t he YMCAto pick up an entry form. Race day registration starts at 8 a.m. Entry fee is $20. For more information contact Jonath an at the YMCA, 863-382-9622.Panther 5KAVON PARK The second annu al South Florida Community Colle ge Panther 5K Run/Walk has been plann ed for Saturday, Feb. 26 at the SFC C Highland Campus. The SFCC Foundation, Inc. and B ill Jarrett Ford Mercury are sponsoring t he event, and proceeds benefit the college 's intercollegiate athletics programs. The entry fee for the SFCC Panther 5 K Run/Walk is $20 through Feb. 16 and $2 5 from Feb. 17 through the day of the rac e. Students with a current I.D. may regi ster for $15. Every participant receives a Dri-F it long-sleeve shirt sizes cannot be gua ranteed for those who enter after Feb. 17 Registration is 7-7:45 a.m. on race d ay in the parking lot in front of the SFC C University Center. The race begins at 8 a.m. Entry forms are available online at www.southflorida.edu/panther5k Participants can mail their copies an d entry fees to the SFCC Foundation, In c., 13 East Main Street, Avon Park, F L 33825; or fax forms to 863-453-8023 an d call 863-453-3133 with credit card info rmation. For more information about the SFC C Panther 5K, call the SFCC Foundation at 863-453-3133. The Foundation will be closed for wi nter break Saturday, Dec. 18 throug h Tuesday, Jan. 4. KOC Free Throw ChampionshipsSEBRING All boys and girls ages 1 014 are invited to participate in the loc al level of competition for the 2011 Knigh ts of Columbus Free Throw Championship The local competition will be held o n Saturday, Jan. 8 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Highlands County Family YMCA located 100 YMCALn., off of Hammo ck Road. The Knights of Columbus Free Thro w Championship is sponsored annuall y, with winners progressing through loca l, district, and state competitions. International championships a re announce by the K of C internation al headquarters based on scores from t he state-level competitions. All boys and girls will compete in the ir respective age and gender division s, based on their age as of January 1, 2011 All contestants on the local level a re recognized for their participation. Since it beginning in 1972, over 2 .5 million youths have participated in t he contest. For entry forms or additional inform ation contact: Justin Platt at (863) 44 62171, or by email at jplatt23@msn.com Participants may also register throug h their schools or at the court on the day of competition. Participants are required to furnish a birth certificate or passport as proof of age, and written parental consent prior to participation. AMERICAN CONFERENCEEast WLTPctPFPA y-New England1320.867480306 x-N.Y. Jets1050.667329297 Miami780.467266295 Buffalo4110.267276387 South WLTPctPFPA Indianapolis960.600412368 Jacksonville870.533336385 Tennessee690.400336316 Houston5100.333356410 North WLTPctPFPA x-Pittsburgh1140.733334223 x-Baltimore1140.733344263 Cleveland5100.333262291 Cincinnati4110.267315382 West WLTPctPFPA y-Kansas City1050.667356295 San Diego870.533408294 Oakland780.467379361 Denver4110.267316438NATIONAL CONFERENCEEast WLTPctPFPA y-Philadelphia1050.667426363 N.Y. Giants960.600377333 Washington690.400288360 Dallas5100.333380423 South WLTPctPFPA x-Atlanta1230.800383278 x-New Orleans1140.733371284 Tampa Bay960.600318305 Carolina2130.133186377 North WLTPctPFPA y-Chicago1140.733331276 Green Bay960.600378237 Minnesota690.400268328 Detroit5100.333342356 West WLTPctPFPA St. Louis780.467283312 Seattle690.400294401 San Francisco5100.333267339 Arizona5100.333282396 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ___ Sunday, Jan. 2 Oakland at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 1 p.m. Miami at New England, 1 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 1 p.m. Carolina at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m. San Diego at Denver, 4:15 p.m. Chicago at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m. Jacksonville at Houston, 4:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Washington, 4:15 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m. Tennessee at Indianapolis, 4:15 p.m. St. Louis at Seattle, 8:20 p.m. End of Regular SeasonEASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB Boston246.800 New York1814.5637 Philadelphia1319.40612 Toronto1120.3551312New Jersey923.28116 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami259.735 Orlando2112.636312Atlanta2113.6184 Charlotte1119.36712 Washington822.26715 Central Division WLPctGB Chicago2010.667 Indiana1317.4337 Milwaukee1218.4008 Detroit1121.34410 Cleveland824.25013WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio284.875 Dallas247.774312New Orleans1814.56310 Houston1516.4841212Memphis1418.43814 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City2211.667 Utah2211.667 Denver1813.5813 Portland1716.5155 Minnesota825.24214 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Lakers2210.688 Phoenix1317.4338 Golden State1219.387912L.A. Clippers1023.3031212Sacramento623.2071412___ Thursday's Games Orlando 112, New York 103 San Antonio 99, Dallas 93 Portland 100, Utah 89 Friday's Games New Jersey at Chicago, late New Orleans at Boston, late Golden State at Charlotte, late Washington at Indiana, late Toronto at Houston, late Atlanta at Oklahoma City, late Detroit at Phoenix, late Philadelphia at L.A. Lakers, late Saturday's Games Cleveland at Chicago, late New Orleans at Washington, late Golden State at Miami, late New Jersey at Minnesota, late Oklahoma City at San Antonio, late Sacramento at Denver, late Memphis at Utah, late Dallas at Milwaukee, late Sunday's Games Indiana at N.Y. Knicks, 1 p.m. Atlanta at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 6 p.m. Dallas at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Houston at Portland, 9 p.m. Phoenix at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA Pittsburgh251135312691 Philadelphia23955112697 N.Y. Rangers221424611898 N.Y. Islanders101962680115 New Jersey92522062115 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Boston201154510277 Montreal20162429490 Ottawa161843686112 Buffalo151843498108 Toronto131943084110 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Tampa Bay2211549119121 Washington2212549117105 Atlanta2014646126119 Carolina1715438102108 Florida16171339389WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Detroit249452128103 St. Louis19125439597 Chicago2016343123113 Columbus191534196107 Nashville17136408791 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA Vancouver22854912190 Colorado2012545129120 Minnesota171453991103 Calgary1618335100107 Edmonton121773194124 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA Dallas2212448109105 Los Angeles221414511391 San Jose2013545114108 Anaheim1917442102116 Phoenix171274198103 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Thursday's Games Columbus at Toronto, late Boston at Atlanta, late Montreal at Tampa Bay, late San Jose at Chicago, late Colorado at Edmonton, late Philadelphia at Los Angeles, late Friday's Games Atlanta at New Jersey, late Montreal at Florida, late Nashville at Minnesota, late N.Y. Islanders at Detroit, late Ottawa at Columbus, late Philadelphia at Anaheim, late Vancouver at Dallas, late Phoenix at St. Louis, late Colorado at Calgary, late Saturday's Games Washington vs. Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh, PA, late Boston at Buffalo, late Toronto at Ottawa, late New Jersey at Carolina, late N.Y. Rangers at Tampa Bay, late San Jose at Los Angeles, late Calgary at Edmonton, late Sunday's Games Atlanta at Montreal, 1 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at Detroit, 5 p.m. Dallas at St. Louis, 6 p.m. Columbus at Nashville, 6 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Vancouver at Colorado, 8 p.m. Chicago at Anaheim, 8 p.m.FOOTBALLNational Football League NFL Fined the New York Jets $100,000 for violating league rules when assistant coach Sal Alosi tripped Miami's Nolan Carroll on the sideline during a punt return. Reduced the fine of Pittsburgh LB James Harrison for his Oct. 17 hit on Cleveland WR Mohamed Massaquoi from $75,000 to $50,000. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS Placed KR Courtney Roby on injured reserve. Signed WR Adrian Arrington from the practice squad. NEW YORK GIANTS Signed CB Brian Witherspoon. Placed KR Will Blackmon on injured reserve. NEW YORK JETS Signed DB Isaiah Trufant from the practice squad. Signed DL Matt Kroul to the practice squad. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS Placed TE Antonio Gates on injured reserve. Signed FB Billy Latsko.HOCKEYNational Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKSPlaced C Ryan Getzlaf on injured reserve. BOSTON BRUINS Assigned D Ryan Donald from Reading (ECHL) to Providence (AHL) and D Cody Wild from Providence to Reading. CAROLINA HURRICANES Reassigned F Jon Matsumoto and D Bryan Rodney to Charlotte (AHL). COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS Activated C Derek MacKenzie from the injured list. DALLAS STARS Assigned C Aaron Gagnon to Texas (AHL). MINNESOTA WILD Recalled D Jared Spurgeon from Houston (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS Recalled F Brian Rolston and RW Nick Palmieri from Albany (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS Recalled D Dylan Reese and F Jesse Joensuu from Bridgeport (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS Assigned C Todd White to Connecticut (AHL). American Hockey League BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERS Recalled F Mike Selitto from Danbury (Federal). CHARLOTTE CHECKERS Recalled D Ethan Graham and F Matthew Pistilli from Florida (ECHL). TORONTO MARLIES Recalled F Matt Caruana from Reading (ECHL). ECHL ECHL Suspended Ontario D Doug Krantz one game and fined him an undisclosed amount for his actions during Wednesday's game at Victoria. IDAHO STEELHEADS Released D Dustin Molle. READING ROYALS Signed G Scott Darling. Central Hockey League RAPID CITY RUSH Signed G Tim Boron. Waived G Jim Spratt.LACROSSENational Lacrosse League EDMONTON RUSH Signed T Bobby McBride and D David Morgan. Released D Ian Crashley. Moved T Devan Wray to the practice roster.SOCCERMLS LOS ANGELES GALAXYSigned D Frankie Hejduk to a one-year contract.COLLEGEBYU Announced the resignation of offensive coordinator Robert Anae. CONCORDIA, TEXAS Announced the resignation of men's soccer coach Wesley Schevers. INDIANA Named Brent Pease offensive coordinator. MINNESOTA Named Jay Sawvel defensive backs coach, Brian Anderson defensive quality control assistant, Nate Griffin offensive quality control assistant, Adam Clark director of player personnel, Billy Glasscock director of recruiting operations and Eric Klein strength and conditioning coach. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid MONDAY: Girls Basketball at Sebring,6/7:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at Mulberry,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball vs.Mulberry, 6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer at McKeel,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.McKeel,6/7:30 p.m. FRIDAY,Jan.7: Girls Basktball vs.Okeechobee,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer at Frostproof,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.Frostproof,6/7:30 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Boys Basketball at Frostproof,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball vs.Lake Placid, 6/7:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Girls Soccer at Lake Wales,6/7:30 p.m. THURSDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Haines City,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer at Haines City, 6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.Poinciana,6:30 p.m.; Girls Weightlifting hosts meet,5 p.m. Walker TUESDAY: Girls Basketball at Sebring JV,6 p.m. THURSDAY: Girls Basketball at Victory Christian,6 p.m.; Boys Basketball at Victory Christian,7:30 p.m. SATURDAY: Boys Basketball at Heartland Christian,6:30/8 p.m. Heartland Christian TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at Wellington Christian,American Airlines Arena,Miami,2 p.m. THURSDAY: JV Basketball vs.Moore Haven,6 p.m. SATURDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Walker Memorial,6:30/8 p.m. Avon Park TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at McKeel,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball vs.McKeel,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer vs.Tenoroc,6:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer at Tenoroc,6:30 p.m. THURSDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Hardee,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball at Lake Region, 6:30 p.m. FRIDAY: Boys Soccer at Hardee,7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer at Hardee,6 p.m. C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . St. Francis at North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 5 5 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . LSU at Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 7 7 : : 33 0 0 p p . m m . Miami at Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Georgetown vs. St. John's . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Indiana at Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2C C O O L L L L E E G G E E F F O O O O T T B B A A L L L L M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Orange Bowl Stanford vs. Virginia. . . . E E S S P P N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Sugar Bowl Arkansas vs. Ohio State . . E E S S P P N NTimes, games, channels all subject to change N N F F L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Regional Miami at New England . . . . . . C C B B S S 1 1 p p . m m . Regional Tampa Bay at New Orleans . . F F O O X X 4 4 p p . m m . San Diego at Denver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 4 4 p p . m m . Arizona at San Francisco . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 8 8 : : 1 1 5 5 p p . m m . St. Louis at Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CG G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . ADT Skills Challenge, Day 2 . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CW W O O M M E E N N ' S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Arkansas at Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 2 2 p p . m m . Tennessee at LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 8 8N N B B A A M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Miami at Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Milwaukee at Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N LIVESPORTSONTV NFL NHL Transactions NBA Page 2BNews-Sun Sunday, January 11, 2011www.newssun.co m

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JANIE McCAULEY Associated PressSTANFORD, Calif. S tanford really does have U Conn's number. Top-ranked Connecticut's r ecord 90-game winning s treak in women's basketball e nded Thursday night when N o. 9 Stanford outplayed the H uskies from the start in a 7 1-59 victory at Maples P avilion where the C ardinal have their own s treak going. Stanford hasn't lost in 52 g ames at home. The Cardinal t ook an early 13-point lead, n ever trailed and didn't let t he mighty Huskies back in it a fter halftime in this one. They kept pounding the b all inside and banging the b oards. UConn fans accustomed to w atching coach Geno Auriemma's team blow past opponents hadn't seen a loss since the 2008 NCAAsemifinals Stanford got the Huskies that time, too, 82-73 in the Final Four at Tampa, Fla. "At some point reality had to set in, and today reality set in," Auriemma said. "I'm not destroyed about it. Winning that many games in a row, it's unheard of." These teams have a bit of a history. Last season, Stanford almost beat Maya Moore and UConn in the national championship game before losing 53-47. That the Cardinal won in the rematch shouldn't have been a total surprise. Stanford was unbeatable at home, had given the Huskies fits in past meetings, and UConn came close to losing to then-No. 2 Baylor last month. Jeanette Pohlen hit five 3pointers on the way to a career-high 31 points for the Cardinal (9-2). Moore couldn't find a rhythm until it was too late, held to 14 points on 5-of-15 shooting. "I thought we let it get away from us," Auriemma said. "I think the atmosphere and what was going on and when Maya couldn't get going early. I think it affected the rest of our guys. We just didn't play like ourselves. Give credit to Stanford. I think they played an unbelievably good game." Last week, the Huskies (12-1) topped the 88-game winning streak set by John Wooden's UCLAmen's team from 1971-74 by beating No. 22 Florida State 93-62, then won their 90th in a row this week at Pacific. Pohlen sealed it with six free throws in the final 42.5 seconds. She shot 8-for-15 overall and had nine rebounds and six assists. Nnemkadi Ogwumike added 12 points and six rebounds and Kayla Pedersen 11 rebounds for an inspired Stanford squad that held a 43-36 advantage on the boards. "I thought we showed moments of fight where we came together and were playing together at times," Moore said. "Then we would hurt ourselves ... and momentum would shift right back to them." Special to the News-Sun The Lake Placid Youth B aseball Board has a nnounced they are taking r egistrations for the upcomi ng 2011 season until T hursday, Jan. 13 2011. The open draft will be held o n Saturday, Jan. 15 for ages 7 -8 and 9-10. No registrations will be t aken after this date and the p layers draft is mandatory. Any player not showing up f or evaluation willbe rand omly placed on a team. League Age For T-Ball and B aseball is child's age as of A pril 30, 2011. Baseball age groups are as f ollows :T-Ball ( age 5-6) B aseball (7-8) and Baseball ( 9-10). League Age For Softball is c hild's age as of January 1, 2 011. The Softball age groups a re as follows : Softball (7-8) a nd Softball (9-10). Registration prices are as follows T-Ballis $ 40with Baseball and Softball being $50. Registration forms will be handed out at schools the week of Jan 4 and registrations will also be available on the new web site www.lpyb.net. Questions regarding Baseball can be directed to Sheri Griffin at 441-1955. Questions regarding Softball can be directed to Linette Wells at441-2320. The registration form, your payment (Make Check Payable to Lake Placid Youth Baseball) and a copy of your child's birth certificate can be mailed or dropped off at the following locations: Brantley Properties ( 417 Interlake Blvd) or mailed to LPYB -PO BOX 1668 Lake Placid 33862. The league is also looking for coaches, team sponsors or banner sponsors. The season will be kicking off on Saturday, Feb. 12. Board President Randy Harris encourages everyone to come out and see the amazing youth in our area play the great game of baseball. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 3B BIG GUN SHOW!At the Highlands County Fairgrounds Convention Center Saturday, Jan. 8th9:00 am … 5:00 pmSunday, Jan. 9th9:00 am … 4:00 pm Concealed Weapons Course At Show!781 Magnolia Ave. € Sebring321-777-7455 Only$5.00per person www.flgunshows.com 6 MONTH MEMBERSHIPS NOW AVAILABLE (863) 382-0500 € 3201 Golfview Rd. € Sebring(863) 382-0744for 9 Hole Executive RatesPrices good thru 12/31/10 Incl. Tax & CartMonday thru Friday:8am … 1pm $25By 8, After 1 $20 Saturday & Sunday: $20 HAPPY HOLIDAYS WEVE GOT YOU COVERED! Shades € Shutters Wood Blinds € Verticals Custom Draperies & Bedding Wallpaper & More! Kelly Grif“n,ASID i t impossible to be profitable. According to the NFL, the a verage player salary rose a bout 35 percent from $1.4 m illion in 2005 the last y ear of the old deal to $1.9 m illion in 2009. Figures for this season a ren't comparable because t here's no salary cap. The players insist the l eague and the game is h ealthy, pointing to huge p ayouts from the networks, i mpressive TVratings, solid a ttendance, profitable mark eting partnerships and overs eas interest. The players have asked the t eams to open their books. Goodell responds that the p layers know where the l eague's money is being s pent "down to the penny." As the NFLprepares for t he final 16 regular-season g ames of the season, intense n egotiations aren't on the i mmediate horizon. Although no deadlines are i mminent, it's difficult not to be concerned about 2011 and beyond. That doesn't mean a gloom-and-doom scenario is upon us. "The best way to get through it is make all parties have an understanding of the ramifications of a stoppage," Dogra says. "You are very hopeful because there are intelligent people on both sides of the table, the sport is the most popular and very profitable for all parties involved." Also remember that the NFLhas not missed games because of labor problems since 1987, when the players went on strike for the second time in five years. "If both sides are equally committed and equally focused," NFLexecutive vice president of labor and chief counsel Jeff Pash says, "then there's no reason why we can't get an agreement." AP Pro Football Writer Howard Fendrich in Washington and AP Sports Writer Rachel Cohen in New York contributed to this stor y Continued from 1B NFL offseason could last for a while Special to the News-SunThe Avon Park Chamber of Commerce presents the 14th Annual Chamber Golf Tournament, sponsored by Heartland National Bank, Highlands Independent Bank, Florida Hospital, CenturyLink, Avon Park Main Street CRA, Progress Energy, The News-Sun, Highlands Today and Bernie Little Distributors Saturday, Feb. 12 at River Greens Golf Course. The format is two-person scramble with registration at 7 a.m. and shotgun start at 8 a.m. The $60, per-perso n entry fee includes go lf, lunch, range ball s, refreshments on t he course and tourname nt prizes. A$2,000 Hole-in-O ne prize is sponsored by t he Cohan Radio Group. We have hole sponso rships available for $10 0 that include a profession al sign on a golf hole to pr omote your business. To obtain an entry form or for more informatio n, contact the Avon Pa rk Chamber office at 45 33350. Avon Park Chamber Golf Tournament Lake Placid Youth Baseball/Softball Registration o nly 59 yards against New O rleans to hit the 1,000-yard m ark and his 941 yards rushi ng leads all rookies. The 6-foot, 247-pound p ower back has 33 carries for 2 74 yards an average of 8.3 y ards per carry in his past t wo games. He has also memorably h urdled two defenders this s eason in games against A rizona and Seattle. "He looks good. Some peop le say he's not athletic, but I don't know how they can say that," Saints defensive tackle Remi Ayodele said. "He's running full-speed and he's jumping over guys." Even with Blount's emergence, the Buccaneers still have to prove they can beat an elite team. They are 0-5 against teams that currently have winning records. When the Saints throttled Tampa Bay earlier this season, they did so without Pierre Thomas, who returned from an ankle injury three games ago. Thomas began to look more like himself in the Saints'1714 playoff-clinching victory over Atlanta last Monday night. "I definitely wanted to show everybody what I could bring to the table because it's been a while," said Thomas, who had 102 total yards from scrimmage at Atlanta. "I'm close to being back to my normal self." If the Bucs are unable to deal with Thomas, Brees, and the rest of the Saints'sixthranked offense, they'll be disappointed to have ended their season with a loss, but not with how far they've come since this time last year. "You take away some gratification from ... playing some meaningful games in this part of the season," Morris said. "Hopefully we can get some luck on our side this weekend with some other people doing some things for us, but we have to do our job." Continued from 1B Bucs have come a long way, regardless UConn's win streak ends at 90 in loss to Stanford

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Page 4BNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com SUBSCRIBE TODAY!863-385-6155www.newssun.com

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 5B GRAND OPENING GOING ON NOW! Meet Denise Waldron of Sebring ƒ Before After Denise Lost 34 lbs 31 inches 10% body fatSINCE 8/18/10! SUPER STAR 863-471-250013 Ryant Blvd. SebringCorner of 27 & Ryant Blvd.CALLTODAY!GRANDOPENING50% OFF LOSE YOUR WEIGHT FOR THE LAST TIME. Lose 2-7 pounds per week ... GUARANTEED!* Save 50% off enrollment fee.Our members have told us time and again ... ... Losing Weight With Our Program Is Easy ... Almost Effortless. 50%OFF Metro ServicesWith another year in the books a nd a new one already in full s wing, now is a great time to look b ack on what the world was like 1 00 years ago, with some of the m ost notable events of 1911.January The Kappa Alpha Psi F raternity is founded at Indiana U niversity in Bloomington, I ndiana. The fraternity is still a round to this day, with more than 1 50,000 members and 700 chapters i n the United States and overseas. Aviator Eugene Burton Ely l ands his aircraft on the deck of the U SS Pennsylvania in San Francisco h arbor. The successful landing m arked the first time an aircraft l anded on a ship.February The first official air mail f light takes place when Henri P equet, a 23-year-old Frenchman, d elivers 6,500 letters after flying f rom Allahabad, India to Naini, I ndia. The historic trip took roughl y 13 minutes.March 146 people perish in a fire at t he Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in N ew York City. The majority of the v ictims were women, and the fire r emains one of the city's largest i ndustrial disasters. Actress Jean Harlow, later k nown as the "Blonde Bombshell," i s born in Kansas City, Mo. A pril Aviator Pierre Prier completes t he first non-stop flight from L ondon to Paris in just under four h ours. The Great Fire of 1911 b egins, eventually destroying much o f Bangor, Maine. By the time the f ire is extinguished, damage in e xcess of $3 million has been done a nd hundreds of people are left h omeless. Despite of all the dama ge, only two people died in the f ire, one of which is a firefighter.May Pancho Villa launches an attack against government troops in Ciudad Juarez during the Mexican Revolution. Two days after the attack's launch, the government's troops surrender. Citing the Sherman Antitrust Act, Standard Oil is declared an unreasonable monopoly by the United States Supreme Court. The first Indianapolis 500 race is run. Ray Harroun, driving the No. 32 Marmon "Wasp," wins.June George Vof the United Kingdon and Mary of Teck are crowned at London's Westminster Abbey. July Pre-World War I tensions are escalated by the presence of the German warship Panther in the Moroccan port of Agadir. Ginger Rogers, who would rise to fame as an actress and be widely remembered as Fred Astaire's longtime dancing partner, is born in Independence, Mo.August At the Louvre in Paris, France, the Mona Lisa is discovered stolen. Widely described as the greatest art theft of the 20th century, the crime was perpetrated by Italian Vincenzo Peruggia, who hid the painting in his Paris apartment, even while being questioned by local police. Lucille Ball, who would go on to Hollywood stardom thanks in large part for her role on the iconic television series "I Love Lucy," is born in Jamestown, N.Y.September Italy declares war on the Ottoman Empire. Poet Guillaume Apollinaire is arrested on suspicion of stealing the Mona Lisa. Apollinaire is released from custody within a week of his arrest.October Aviator Orville Wright stays in the air for nearly 10 minutes in a glider at KillDevils Hills, N.C.November Chevrolet is founded by Louis Chevrolet and deposed General Motors founder William C. Durant. Suffragettes storm the Parliament in London. All are arrested and imprisoned. Future American singer and cowboy actor Roy Rogers is born in Cincinnati, Ohio.December The Bonnot Gang, a French criminal anarchist group who would utilize cutting edge technology, including automobiles, to aide in their criminal activity, robs its first bank. 100 years ago: Notable events of 1911 MCTphotos The first Indianapolis 500, won by Ray Harroun in the No. 32 Marmon Wasp' (above)was run in 1911. Also that year, the Mona Lisa was stolen from the Louvre in PAris.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 7B Sponsors: Highlands Independent Bank Kiwanis Club of Sebring Florida Hospital News-Sun Highlands Today Alan Jay Automotive Network Metro ServicesThe oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico m ay now be capped and the plumes of v isible oil dissipated, but that doesn't m ean the disaster still isn't wreaking h avoc on the environment, nor is the s pill no longer a threat. The Journal of the American Medical A ssociation reported in the fall of 2010 t hat the Gulf spill can still impact h uman health and seafood safety. Shrimp, oysters and crabs may pose t he greatest immediate risk, simply b ecause they have had trouble ridding t heir systems of dangerous polycyclic a romatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These a re the same substances found in cigar ette smoke and soot. Long-term dama ge may come from consumption of bigg er fish, like mackerel, swordfish and t una, that feed on smaller invertebrates a nd other marine life. These fish, which a lready may be high in mercury and o ther carcinogens, could absorb higher c oncentrations of these substances. Although marine life experts and doct ors say that the threat is real in Gulfarea fish, U.S. Federal officials dispute the claims and have said ongoing testing is aggressive and sufficient to protect public health. In terms of individuals living in the coastal areas, within close proximity to where the oil spill took place, experts say there is lower risk from inhalation of toxic chemicals now than there were in the early days of the spill. Testing has uncovered that levels of benzene, one of the more dangerous chemicals in the oil, have been low. This indicates there is little risk for breathing in vapors for residents. Another potential threat is the dissipated oil itself. Gulf of Mexico researchers discovered a large plume made up of oil droplets located 3,000 feet under the water's surface shortly after the spill started. According to Samantha Joye, a University of Georgia marine scientist, "Dispersed oil and dissolved oil is no less of a threat than surficial oil floating on the surface because that material still carries with it two potentially important biological effects: One is toxicity and that's related to the concentration of oil in the environment. The other is oxygen demand and that's related to the stimulation of biodegradation and oxygen consumption from the oil in the environment." Joye also notes consumption of oil by microbial agents below the surface of the water may not be a good thing. That's because microbes are using a lot of oxygen in these isolated areas, creating low-oxygen environments that may end up suffocating marine life on the sea floor. The gases that were spewed along with the oil itself could also be of concern, primarily because these methane, propane and ethane gases generally haven't been monitored and tested for safe levels. It may be years before the true side effects of the Gulf oil spill are realized, and environmentalists and health experts warn people to be careful about the foods they consume. ENVIRONMENT Metro Services T he environmental impact of the Gulf oil spill goes far beyond the obvious damage. Gulf oil disaster could still be a threat Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155 Metro ServicesDo you recycle and reuse? Are organic foods your specialty? Is your hybrid car your pride and joy? Chances are if ecofriendly living is a priority to you, then you may want to extend this lifestyle to the way you raise your child. It's easier than ever to raise a baby by following "green" values. Here are a few ways to do so. Rely on gently-used clothing. Anew baby will grow very quickly. This means that you will be moving up to larger clothing sizes every few months. Not only is purchasing new clothing expensive, but it is also wasteful. Stock up on the staples, such as snap-close t-shirts and socks and trade other clothes with family and friends. You can also find baby clothes swaps online. Once the clothes your baby has outgrown pile up, trade them away or find a place where they can be donated, such as a women's shelter. Use glass bottles. If you are breastfeeding and want to supplement with bottle feeding or you simply prefer baby formula, consider using glass bottles. Glass baby bottles are making a comeback. They're durable, free of harmful chemicals and, once outgrown, they can be given away or recycled. Switch to cloth diapers. With the innovations in reusable diapers, it's very easy to make the swit ch from disposable. Today 's cloth diapers are multi-la yered, and many feature a fiber strip in the middle f or even more absorbanc y. They even have easy cl osures, eliminating the ne ed for diaper pins. Disposable diapers ha ve dyes, bleaching agents an d chemical liquid absorber s. All of which have t he potential to cause skin ir ritation. Cloth diapers can be washed by commercial di aper-cleaning service s, which efficiently use wat er and dryers. Choose organic food s. Baby foods have evolve d, and now you can find seve ral brands of organic foo ds at your local grocery stor e. Even better than purchasin g commercial food is to ma ke baby food yourself. Just be aware that som e produce, such as carro ts, can produce nitrates if stored for a long time. S o it's best to make batches of food and use them rath er quickly. Afood processor mak es easy work of grinding foo d down for baby's delica te palate. Simply cook dow n most foods and mix the m with a little water, if nece ssary. Use green cleanin g supplies. Exposure to har sh chemicals can be especial ly dangerous for small ch ildren. Therefore, resolve to u se environmentally friend ly products in and around t he home, especially wh en cleaning items your bab y will touch or use. Easy ways to raise a green' baby Metro ServicesWhile everyone understands savings, it's p ossible to save and still support the local b usinessman, while also helping the planet. S hopping locally might seem more costly on t he surface, but in many ways shopping locall y is the most economically, not to mention e nvironmentally, responsible thing a consumer c an do. Conserve fuel. Shopping at one of the l arger discount chains might produce results at t he register, but unless you have such a store r ight in your hometown, those savings aren't w hat they appear. That's because discount c hains might be farther away from home, m eaning you'll be spending considerably more o n fuel just to get what likely amounts to a m inimal discount. The local businessman m ight not be able to match the big chain's p rice, but he can likely offer the item at a price similar to the big chains, but without the additional cost of fuel. Reduce pollution. Local businesses often don't place the tall orders of their big chain counterparts. While their inventory might be less, that inventory is typically delivered in more environmentally friendly vehicles. Larger chains receive the vast majority of their items via big trucks that guzzle gas and produce pollution. So while shopping at the Mom and Pop might seem like a small favor to a neighbor, it's a big favor to the environment. Future considerations. Kids learn a lot from Mom and Dad's behavior. Parents can instill a valuable lesson in social and environmental responsibility by supporting local businessmen. If kids learn early to shop conscientiously, they're more likely to carry that behavior into adulthood, contributing to the planet's longterm health as well. Shopping local helps the planet

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. Crossroads Community Church 114 South Central Ave., Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 4534453. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship: 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday Children's Church: 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Adult Bible Study and Youth/Royal Explorers, 7 p.m. Pastor: John E. Dumas. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. children's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. children's mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($3 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September to May our youth group meets. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Ed Howell, transitional pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 3823695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F., Pastor. Masses Saturday Vigil: 4 p.m. Sunday: 7:30, 9 and 10:30 a.m. and noon Spanish Mass. Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confessions: 3-3:45 p.m. Saturdays, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first Friday, or by appointment. Enrollment for Catholic School grades K3 through 5 not being accepted. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is "Jesus is First at First Christian Church."Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunda y Worship Service, 9 a.m.; Sunda y Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.; Sunda y Evening Service, 6 p.m .; Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP As we walk along the e arth's surface, we may not t hink about how much action i s going on beneath us. Did y ou know that water is cons tantly moving and flowing i nto crevices and holes? The w ater that is stored underg round is very important to u s. We are fortunate to have s uch an amazing source of t his life giving liquid in the f orm of the Floridan aquifer. T his is one of the most prod uctive aquifers in the world a nd it stretches about 1 00,000 square miles under f our states including Florida, A labama, Georgia and South C arolina. Aquifers are critically i mportant to all life. Most of o ur drinking water comes f rom Florida's aquifers. An a quifer is defined as an u nderground layer of permea ble rock, sediment, or soil t hat yields water. The pore s paces in aquifers are filled w ith water and are interconn ected, so that water flows t hrough them. Basically an a quifer is an underground r eservoir of water. Because of the groundwat er, which is released from o ur aquifers, natural ecosyst ems, agriculture, outdoor recreation and human health are sustained. There are three water bearing aquifers, in the subsurface underlying Highlands County the surficial, intermediate and Floridan aquifers systems. Most of the water used in Highlands County, almost 90 percent, is withdrawn from the upper Floridan aquifer. Recently a major groundwater study, the first in 50 years, was completed for Highlands County. The study was conducted by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and funded by Highlands County, USGS, Southwest Florida Water Management District and the South Florida Water Management District. The objective of the study was to determine the chemical quality and levels of the groundwater in Highlands County. This information is essential to develop and manage the water supply effectively. The study found that Highlands County appears to have sufficient groundwater resources of good chemical quality for present and future needs. According to the study, groundwater withdrawals in Highlands County have increased from 37 million gallons/day (mgd) in 1965 to 107 mgd in 2005. This increase is due, in part, to the population growth, but is primarily the result of a large increase in agricultural activities. The USGS study included sampling from both public and private wells throughout the County. The Highlands County Natural Resources Advisory Commission (NRAC) is working on developing a long-term groundwater monitoring program to detect trends in water quality or levels. The purpose of the plan is to identify potential problems early, before they become major, so corrective action can be taken with minimal cost and minimal impact on water users. Florida is becoming more populated every day. As the recent study shows, the demand for water has tripled since 1965. Water is one of our most important natural resources and the Floridan Aquifer provides billions of gallons of water per day. It supplies almost all of the state's drinking water and feeds into over 600 natural springs. We are fortunate that this recent study has shown good news for Highlands County. As good stewards of our precious natural resources, it is imperative that we continue with these types of studies and monitor the hydrogeology and groundwater of Highlands County to ensure our water stays clean and plentiful. Written in cooperation by Tor Rothman and Corine Burgess. Corine Burgess is an Environmental Specialist for the Parks & Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil and Water Conservation District. (www.highlandsswcd.org). US Geological Survey completes groundwater study Courtesy pho to Groundwater released from the aquifers sustain natural ecosystems, agriculture, outdoor recreation and human health. News From The Watershed Corine Burgess

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 9B CROSSWORDSOLUTION EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer .Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun 'N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid C ity" Children's Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, "prime-timers," and Bible s tudies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. JEWISH Temple Israel of Highlands C ounty, 382-7744. Rabbi Lorraine R udenberg; www.templeisr aelofhcfl.org.Temple Israel is a R eform Temple that promotes the e nduring and fundamental princip les of Judaism. Through prayer, s tudy and friendship we strive to e nrich our lives and insure Jewish c ontinuity in Highlands County. F riday Evening Shabbat Services, 7 :30 p.m.; Saturday afternoon intro t o Hebrew, 12:30 p.m.; Saturday i ntro to Judaism, 2 p.m.; Saturday a fternoon Torah Study, 3:30 p.m.; H avdallah, 5 p.m. Jan. 7-8; Jan. 21; F eb. 4; Feb. 18-19; March 18-19 P urim; April 1-2; April 15-16; April 1 8, 6 p.m., Pesach 1st Night Seder; A pril 29-30 Yom Hashoah; May 131 4; May 27-28. Every Thursday will b e Hebrew and Bible classes with H oward Salles, 12:30-4:30 p.m. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Monday of month; Ladies Group WELCAmeets at noon second Monday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable Garden Club meets as needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Like to sing? Come join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Children's Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Youth group meets at 5 p.m. Friday. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Esther and Mary Circles business meeting, 3:30 p.m. third Thursday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 7 p.m. second Tuesday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday; Family Movie, 4 p.m. third Sunday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group, 6-7:30 p.m.; Senior High Youth Group, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gayle Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30 a.m.; and contemporary worship is at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.presbychurch.org. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 382-9092. Dale Bargar, bishop; David Ward, first counselor; and Steve Austin, second counselor. Family History Center: 3821822. Sunday services: Sacrament meeting, 10 a.m.; Sunday school, 11:20 a.m.; and Priesthood/Relief Society, 12 p.m. Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. Youth activities from 7-8:20 p.m. Wednesday: 11-year-old Scouts, 78:20 p.m. first and third Wednesday; and activity days for 8-11 year old boys and girls from 78:20 p.m. second and fourth Wednesday. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruc e Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Summe r Schedule, Sunday School 9:0 0 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on life's journey, you're we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP Special to the News-SunAries (March 21-April 20) Be e specially decisive this week, Aries. I mportant decisions won't settle thems elves. You can ask for advice, but you u ltimately have to make the choice. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, t his an especially important week to stay a lert. Open up your eyes and ears and be r eady for all that is about to come your w ay. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini, d on't allow yourself to be taken advant age of this week. Your good nature may l eave you in a precarious position but g et some friends to help back you up. Cancer(june 22-July 22) Cancer, s omeone seeks your advice this week b ut you are not around to offer it. Help t he best you can when this person turns t o you down the road. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Learn to l ove yourself as much as others do, Leo. S elf-confidence is something you are k nown to have in abundance, but for s ome reason it has been waning of late. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo, a void blaming others for your situation. Some self-examination reveals you are the only one that can be held accountable. It's time for a change. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Libra, hold on tight to your decision-making powers this week. Some difficult decisions are on the horizon, but others are bound to turn up to support you. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Scorpio, all of the stress that has been piling up for the last several months is about to come to an end. Enjoy the respite while you can and plan a much-needed vacation. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Sagittarius, open your home to a family member in need this week. While it may not be the ideal situation, a measure of goodwill every now and then is good for the soul. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) Capricorn, now is the time to reciprocate for all of those favors that others have done for you. When someone close to you asks for a favor, be the first to jump. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) Aquarius, if others aren't open to your advice, don't persist in giving it. Take a break from offering advice and focus on your own situation if the time allows it. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Pisces, though you and a romantic partner are world's apart in interests, this opposite nature is what has attracted you to each other. Jan. 2 Cuba Gooding Jr., actor, 43; Jan. 3 Eli Manning, athlete, 30; Jan. 4 Michael Stipe, singer, 51; Jan. 5 Bradley Cooper, actor, 36; Jan. 6 Joey Adams, actress, 40; Jan. 7 David Caruso, actor, 55; Jan. 8 David Bowie, singer, 64. Taurus needs to stay alert this week; avoid blaming others, Virgo Classified Ads € 385-6155 NEWS-SUN

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Page 10BNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com The Hotel JACARANDA $8.99 Lunch is served 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Friday and Sunday. Friday Seafood Buet9.99$ Dr. Rey Pardo, M. D. 13 Ryant Blvd., Sebring, FL 33870 (863)382-2110IMAGINE YOUR LIFEƒ WITHOUT PAIN!Our goal is not only to uncover the symptoms, but to find out the real source of your pain. Dr. Pardo is a Board Certified Interventional Pain Management Physician. He specializes in offering targeted therapeutic procedures along with individualized physical medicine, rehabilitation and physical therapy care. Our team is able to offer expert care for injured patients with: neck/back/extremity pain, headaches, arm or leg numbness, tingling and weakness due to herniated discs and/or many other spinal and soft tissue injuries. We strive to help the patient become symptom free, functional and active while avoiding surgery and drug dependency. Our services include:€ Epidural and facet joint steroid injections of the Cervical, Thoracic and Lumbosacral spine € Lumbar transforaminal steroid injections € Selective nerve root blocks € Sacroiliac joint steroid injections € Intermediate and major bursa (e.g., subacromial, trochanteric) and intraarticular steroid injections (e.g., shoulder, hip, knee and ankle joints) € Piriformis muscle injections € Trigger Point Injections € Myofascial Pain Treatment (e.g., trigger point injections) CALL TODAY FOR A CONSULTATION! (863) 382-2110 Atrip to the French Riviera and sites such as St. Tropez and Monte Carlo remain, for most folks, a once-in-al ifetime dream vacation. So, w hen you find yourself jets etting in locales that are the w ell known playgrounds for t he rich and famous, how do y ou purchase souvenirs at r easonable prices? Amid the fast cars, palat ial buildings, and massive y achts, buying a t-shirt for 3 0 euros ($39) seems like a c heap alternative in Monte C arlo. What do you do if y ou are looking to collect s omething of significance at r easonable prices? Set your b udget and shop like a pro-a f rugal pro. W hat's the scoop?When shopping for souv enirs, it is important to l earn about the place you are v isiting. Learn about its hist ory and understand what m akes it famous. For i nstance, St. Tropez came of a ge in the 1950s when B ridget Bardot and other celebs vacationed there. The most famous film industry insiders made St. Tropez a hot spot. So, items associated with film stars are good and easy to find souvenirs from St. Tropez. Price pointsSt. Tropez is located within the region of Provence. Provence is known for its fine painters and sculptors, colorful pottery, country French printed textiles, melodic cicada bugs, and lavender fields. If you want to collect something traditional from St. Tropez, take home an inexpensive lavender sachet (about 4 euros or $5) or a printed cotton tablecloth (about 15 euros or $19). They are fine reminders of this chic town on the French Riviera and they won't break your bank account. In Monte Carlo (a.k.a., Charles'Mount), Monaco, souvenirs associated with Princess Grace and other members of the Grimaldi family are always popular. Objects that reflect the history of Hollywood starlet turned princess, nee Grace Kelly, and her prince of a husband, Prince Rainier are immortalized in souvenirs ranging from posters to mugs to cabinet plates. At the cathedral in Monte Carlo-the site of the royal wedding in 1956-visitors will not only have an opportunity to pay their respects at the tombs of the prince and princess but they will be able to view a litany of 16th and 17th Century French paintings on display there. In July of 2011, the Monte Carlo cathedral will be the site of the wedding of Princess Grace's only son, Prince Albert II, offering collectors many new objects to amass associated with the lavish wedding. Of course, Monte Carlo is home to the always exciting Grand Prix. Collectibles relating to the great race come in many shapes, sizes, and price ranges. Caps, keychains, and magnets featuring the world's fastest cars like Ferrari, Lambourgini, and Buggatti are available in Monte Carlo's tourist shops at very reasonable prices. Ph.D. antiques appraiser, author, and award-winning TV personality, Dr. Lori presents antique appraisal events nationwide and antiques themed cruises. As seen on NBC's The Tonight Show and Comedy Central's The Daily Show, watch Dr. Lori on the national TV morning show, Daytime on NBC WFLA 8 at 10 AM. Visit DrLoriV.com, Facebook.com/DoctorLori, or call (888) 431-1010. ARTS Souvenir shopping on the French Riviera Art & Antiques Dr. Lori Dr. Lori photo In St. Tropez, fine art is sold in posh galleries and on the main streets. Here, you can negotiate directly with the artist and go home with a masterpiece. By JENNIFER FORKER For The Associated PressIt's the time of year that b egs for more light, so prov ide it with lustrous vases a nd candle holders that imit ate the mercury glass sold in h ome-goods catalogs. That glass is itself imitat ion, of the 19th century glass c reated to emulate the look of s ilver. Mercury glass has that s ilvery cast and more its s hine often has a mirror-like q uality. In antique mercury glass a nd costly reproductions, d ouble-walled clear glass is h and-blown in molds and i njected with a silver-looking w ash (there is no silver, or m ercury, in the making of t his glass). "Mercury glass it's reall y loved for that sparkle that i t has," says Rachael Liska, s enior editor of Fresh Home m agazine. "But it's really e xpensive." Asmall, hand-blown a ntique vase can fetch $100, a ccording to Liska. Larger, m ore elaborate or colored p ieces can cost 10 times m ore. Reproduction mercury g lass may cost less an 8by-14 1/2-inch vase at Pottery Barn lists for $59. But you also can try doing it yourself. In a less costly but convincing do-it-yourself version, created by Liska, sheets of silver leaf are attached to the insides of inexpensive clear glass vases and votives, sealed, and embellished with silver paint. That's it. "What's great about this is you can't mess it up," says Liska. "As I found out, it's also really fun." Depending on the materials you use, the result can throw as much sparkle and shine as the original. Experiment. Find your mix of silvery and shine. And throw some light on this new year.Imitation Mercury GlassSupplies: Clear vase or votive with a wide opening Silver leaf (sold in sheets) Metal leaf spray adhesive Metal leaf spray sealer Krylon Looking Glass Mirror-Like Paint (available at many ACE Hardware retailers), or metallic silver spray paint Newspaper to cover work space Assembly: 1. Wash and thoroughly dry your glass vessel. 2. Working in a well-ventilated space (or outside), lightly spray the inside of the vessel with adhesive. Allow to dry (about 10 minutes). It will be tacky to the touch. 3. Attach torn pieces of silver leaf to the inside of the vessel, smoothing down edges. You want a patchy look, so imperfection is key. Cover 90 percent of the vessel, leaving little spaces clear (to simulate the look of oxidized, flaking mercury glass). 4. Lightly spray the inside of the vessel with sealer, and allow to dry (about 15 minutes). 5. For added depth, lightly spray the inside of the vessel with spray paint. Tip: You can substitute silver Mirrachrome, a reflective automobile spray paint, for the last step, for even more glasslike shine. Online: http://freshhomeblog.com Craft some silvery glass for a shiny New Year's project The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sunon any c hanges in this listing by calling 3 85-6155, ext. 516; send any c hanges by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail t hem to News-SunCommunity C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 L ake Placid has lounge hours f rom 1-9 p.m. Live music is f rom 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p .m. Members and guests only. P ost is at 528 N. Pine St., S ebring. Call 471-1448. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2 661 lounge is open from 1-7 p .m. Card games start at 1:30 p .m. The lodge is open to m embers and their guests. Call 4 65-2661. Lake Placid Moose has k araoke in the pavilion. H orseshoes played at 9:30 a .m. Food available at 4 p.m. O pen to members and qualified g uests only. Loyal Order of Moose H ighlands County Lodge No. 2 494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon P ark. Cards start at 4 p.m. M usic outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. L odge phone number 4520 579. Overeaters Anonymous, m eets from 4-5 p.m. in second f loor conference roomNo. 3 at F lorida Hospital Heartland M edical Center, 4200 Sun N L ake Blvd., Sebring. Call 3827 731. No dues, fees or weighi ns. For details on the organizat ion, go to www.oa.org. Ridge Area Missionary S oldiers AvonPark P athfinder Club meets from 9 a .m. to noon every first and t hird Sunday at 58 E. Sixth St., A von Park. Call 471-2143. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves lunch at 2 p.m. at the c lub, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. C all 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 o ffers NASCAR racing in the p avilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open a nd kitchen open from 2-5 p.m. L odge is at 11675 U.S. 98, S ebring. Call 655-3920. Society for Creative A nachronism (Local Chapter: S hire of Stagridge) meets at 2 p .m. first and third Sunday at B rewster's Coffee House on U .S. 27 in Sebring. Call 2145 522. The Artists'Group at South F lorida Community College will h old a critique clinic the first S unday of every month, 2-4 p .m., at the Hotel Jacaranda, A von Park. Professional local a rtists will discuss and evaluate p articipants'paintings. The fee i s $5 with a two painting limit. F or more information, call 7847 346. U.S. Military Vets M otorcycle Club meets at 1 p .m. on the first Sunday of e ach month at VFW Post 9 853, State Road 64 West and N orth Oliva Drive. For informat ion call Hocky at (954) 5924 847 Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 3880 serves hamburgers f rom 4-5:30 p.m. and plays p oker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1 224 County Road 621 East, L ake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 plays euchre at 1:30 p .m. and E&J Karaoke is from 4 :30-7:30 p.m. at the post, 2 011 SE Lakeview Drive, S ebring. Call 385-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN W ITH ME family group meets a t 10:30 a.m. every Monday at t he Heartland Christian Church o n Alt. 27 in Sebring. The c hurch is behind Southgate S hopping Center where Publix i s. F or more information call 3855 714. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal C hurch, Lakeshore Drive, S ebring. For more details, call 3 85-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous O ne Day At ATime group m eets for a closed discussion a t 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant P resbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. Call 3 14-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 6:30 p.m. at R osewood Center, 517 U.S. 27 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 202-0647. Ambucs a local charity that assists people with disabilities, meets at noon every first Monday at R.J. Gator's Sea Grill and Bar, Sebring. The meeting is open to the public. Call 386-4387. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 12-9 p.m. Legion and auxiliary boards meet at 6 p.m. General meeting at 7 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. Call 4711448. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and guests. Call 385-0234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. AvonPark Veterans Honor Guard meets first Monday at the American Legion Post 69, AvonPark. Call 382-0315. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake Placid. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. Corvette Cruisers meets at 6:30 p.m. first and third Monday at the Dairy Queen in front of The Home Depot, Sebring. Call Ed Robson at 655-2092. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The Agri-Center. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets from 7:30-9:30 p.m. the first and third Monday at Sebring Civic Center from December through April. There will be alternating mainstream and plus dancing with rounds. Casual dress or square dance attire is acceptable. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or e-mail him at samdunn@samdunn.net.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 3148877. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County Agri-Civic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. Call 402-6540. Highlands County Rotary Club meets at 6 p.m. at Charlie's Restaurant, Commerce Street, Sebring. Highlands Stamp Club meets the first Monday. Talk and swap at St. John's United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive. Call Bob Gleisner at 471-6526 or Budd Steinke at 382-9373. Insulin Pump Support Group meets from 3:30-5:30 p.m. first Monday at Conference Room 2, Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center, 4200 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 402-0177. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Democratic Club meets at 6 p.m. first Monday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call Bill Sayles at 699-6773 for details. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Meetings held first and third Mondays at 8 p.m. Lodge phone number 452-0579. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. National Association for Advancement of Colored People, Highlands County Branchmeets 7:30 p.m., 401 Tulane, Avon Park. Patriots Chapter, Daughter of the American Revolution meets at 1:30 p.m. on the first Monday of each month September through May at the Church of the Redeemer Parish Hall on U.S. 27 directly across from Wells Motor Company, three-tenths of a mile north of the South Florida Community College stoplight. Call 4712096. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Brady's, Sebring. Sebring AARP meets 1:30 p.m., The Palms, Pine Street, Sebring. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. For information, call 471-2522. Sebring Optimist Club meets at 6:15 p.m. first and third Mondays at Jim's house. Call Jim Harrison at 381-9767 or Gabriel Read at 453-2859. Sebring Women of the Moose has chapter meeting at 7 p.m. Monday at the lodge, 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 382-8782. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 has a joint officers meeting on the first Monday of each month at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. Smoke-free environment. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Moose Club 2259 serves beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. The Women of the Moose meets at 7 p.m. the first Monday for chapter enrollment, refreshments and trivia pursuit. Call 655-3920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. Call Judy O'Boyle at 260-0831. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444.TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parking available south of old church. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. Call 452-2385. Avon Park Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Avon Park Lions Club meets 6:45 p.m., dinner included, Lions Club, 1218 W. Bell St., Avon Park. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. Everyone is welcome. For more details, call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at "The Rock," Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost selfesteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. For details, contact Celebrate Recovery coordinator Pam Sim by calling 453-3345, ext. 106. Fleet Reserve Association Board of Directors Heartland Branch No. 173 meets 7 p.m., Branch Hall, 1402 Roseland Ave., Sebring. Regular meeting, first Tuesday after board of directors meeting. Call 4716109 for details. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For more details, call 385-3288. Florida Native Plant Society meets at 7 p.m. the first Tuesday in Conference Room 3 at the Highlands County Agri-Civic Center, 4509 George Blvd., Sebring. Call Roy Stewart at (863) 632-0914. Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 4712294 or 386-5098. Heartland Insulin Pump Support Group meets the first Tuesday of the month at 3 p.m. at the Highlands County Health Dept., 7205 S. George Blvd., Sebring. If you would like more information on insulin pumps or are a pump wearer and would like to share ideas and suggestions, please join us. For more information, contact Kathy McNeil at 414-6444. Heartland Symphony Orchestra rehearsals from 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesdays in the Green Room in the South Florida Community College auditorium building. Bring music and instruments. New members welcome. Call conductor Bryan Johnson at 800949-7248, ext. 7231. Highlands County Adoption Support Group meets from 7-8:30 p.m. first Tuesday at Quality Inn & Suites Conference Center, 6525 U.S. 27 North, Sebring. For more details, call 382-0352. Highlands County Lodge of the Order Sons and Daughters of Italy in America meets the first Tuesday of each month at Visions ADTin Sebring. The officers meet at 6 p.m. and the general meeting will follow at 7 p.m. Call Philomena Greco at 402-0048. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets on the first and third Tuesday of each month at the Women's Club of Sebring, 4260 Lakeview Drive, across from Veterans' Beach, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For information, call 471-0694 or e-mailsbringquilter@embarqmail.com Highlands Tea Party has an educational and informational meeting at 6:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesday of each month at the Quality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27 in Sebring. Call 6990743 or e-mail thehighlandsteaparty@yahoo.com. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Call 382-0312. Italian-American Social Club of Highlands County meets the first Tuesday of each month at Visions ADT. Officers meet at 6:30 p.m.. with general meeting (men and women) at 7 p.m. For more information, call Jeanne at 382-1945. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Jaycees meets 7:30 p.m., first and third Tuesdays, Jaxson's. Board meetings at 6:30 p.m. on second Tuesday. Call Joe Collins, 655-5545. Lake Placid Toastmasters meet the first and third Tuesday at 6 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 101 S. Oak Ave. in Lake Placid. The web address is www.toastmasters.org. For information call Cathy Schreima at 382-3574 or Linda Udall at 386-6495. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Multiple Sclerosis Support Group meets 7 p.m. second Tuesday at Highlands Regional Medical Center, Sebring, in the first floor doctor's conference room. For more details, call 465-3138. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more nor mal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephin e Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Sevent hday Adventist Church, 1410 W Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup.c o m. Call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org for more information on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday and has blood pressure screening from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. first and third Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call 465-4888. Placid Lakes Home and Property Owners Associatio n Inc. has its board meetings at 7 p.m. first Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call 465-4888 for details. Annual meetings are in February. Quarterly meetings are in May, September and December. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near the library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-3829 or 471-9900. Scleroderma Support Group Meeting is the first Tuesday of each month from 1 2 pm. at the Sebring Library, 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring. Call 402-6716. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If inte rested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sig n in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:3 0 p.m. No experience necessary Cost is $2. Smoke-free enviro nment. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Lions Club meets at noon at Dot's Restaurant, 950 Sebring Square. For infor mation call 382-2333. Sebring Moose Lodge 225 9 serves soft shell tacos 5-7 p.m and beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. Call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. Call 385-2966 or leave a nam e, number and message. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dee's Restaurant, Sebring. Call Scott Albritton at 402-1819. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 67 p.m. at the Atonement Luthera n Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Community Bible Church, 1400 CR-17AN ., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. Call 452-1093. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. The ladies au xiliary board meeting is at 10 a.m. For more details, call 699 5444. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 11B AVON PARK 452-5800 € SEBRING 382-3363 LAKE PLACID 465-1530Its more than just carpet The cleaning of the second piece must be of equal or lesser value to the first service price.Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 ft. and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Not valid with any other coupon. Expires 1/11/11.Emergency Water Damage Restoration3 ROOMS CARPET CLEANEDA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 1/11/11.$95002 ROOMS CARPET CLEANEDA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 1/11/11.$7500 ƒit s her spa.UPHOLSTERY: CLEANONE PIECEOF UPHOLSTERY AT REGULAR PRICEAND RECEIVEASECONDPIECE1/2 OFF ROOFING SPECIALIST SERVING HIGHLANDS COUNTY SINCE 1989 Shingles Flat Roofs Roof Repairs Mobile Home Roofovers -FULLYLICENSED & INSURED385-4690State Lic # RC 0066817 QUALITY WORK AT A REASONABLE PRICE FREEESTIMATES COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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By LEANNE ITALIE Associated PressAt 45, DeEtte Sauer was a d ead woman walking. She was morbidly obese, h er heart disease so serious a d octor warned her to expect an event at any time." Eaten u p by her marketing career, s truggling to raise three kids, s he smoked, drank and never, e ver exercised. Sauer remembers a vacat ion when at 5-foot-5 and 2 30 pounds she couldn't m ake it onto a small boat for a day out with her family. That's when it hit me. I was a n elected cripple. I had done i t to myself." She got busy, slowly shedd ing the weight through sens ible eating and exercise. She b egan to walk around her H ouston neighborhood, then s he discovered the pool. Now 6 9, the woman who once had a supermom complex is a c ompetitive, medal-winning s enior swimmer. "It literally saved my life," S auer said, adding that her b est event is the butterfly a stroke she learned at age 6 2. To trainers with lots of c lients well beyond 50, Sauer i s the holy grail, somebody w ho works hard and effic iently, taking care to avoid i njury while maintaining m otivation, strength and e ndurance through careful w orkouts. Getting fit later in l ife is one thing, they said, b ut staying that way at 60, 70 a nd 80 is another. "Going from running to w alking, going from the t readmill to the elliptical as w e age. It can be really frust rating, mentally debilitati ng," said Chris Freytag, a y oga and Pilates instructor a nd contributing fitness edit or for Prevention magazine. "Even for me. I'm 45 and s ay oh God, I can just see it c oming. There's going to be s ome wear and tear. That d oesn't mean I have to give u p, but I have to make some c hanges." Back, hips, knees, balance, c ardio all can be trouble s pots and big blows to a posit ive attitude for seniors, said F reytag and fitness expert D enise Austin, who was Jack L aLanne's sidekick on televis ion and went on to her own w orkout shows, DVDs and b ooks. At 53, she has a new b ook out in January, "Get E nergy!"FlexibilityPilates and yoga are great w ays to stay strong and flexib le beyond 50 because both c an be easily modified, the e xperts said. "I'm into the core as you a ge," Austin said. "Your s pine is your lifeline. Keep it h ealthy, keep it strong. As we a ge we lose flexibility and i t's really important to our t endons and ligaments to stay p liable and keep all the fluids i n our joints going." She suggests increasing f loor work to take pressure o ff the knees. Can't touch y our toes anymore? Use an e lastic band for the same s tretch, or to replace weight t raining that might grow dang erous. Arthritis can make gripp ing difficult at a time when t issue is losing elasticity, w hich might mean giving up h eavy free weights in each h and or on an overhead press. The technique isn't there a nymore, it falls down and t hey hurt a shoulder. I've s een it a million times b efore," Austin said. Taking the time to stretch, t o reopen joints and muscles a fter a workout, is increasi ngly important as we age p articularly crucial at 60, 70 o r older, Freytag said. "The l ower back and hip flexors g et really tight. The two are c orrelated. What I tell people i s you are no longer able to s kip stretching after a workout." Freytag recommends at least five to 10 minutes of stretching after a workout, when the muscles are warm. "Back when we were younger we could skip it."BalanceWarming up BEFORE a workout is key to balance. For running seniors, Austin suggests five minutes of walking before getting into a gradual run, or intervals of walking and running. "It's very important as you age to change it up more, to surprise your muscles and work them differently," she said. Runners may need to balance workouts with more strength training and stretching to avoid hip and knee problems, adding muscle work for the abs so important for balance and flexibility. Add five minutes of strength training and five minutes of stretching, Austin suggests. "Really concentrate on the center of your body. Your core. It is truly the powerhouse of your body. It affects how you walk, your flexors, it protects your back. That's why Pilates is great." Balance issues don't have to put an end to staying fit. Work out in a chair or use one to lean on if you're feeling unsteady. "There's a ton you can do in a chair," Freytag said. "In a gym, there's a huge trend toward functional training, meaning doing things that kind of mimic the functionality of your daily activities." Standing on a domeshaped Bosu ball, for example. "You're creating your own passive range of motion, whereas a machine in a gym is a fixed range of motion," she said. Freytag called balance a "use it or lose it" proposition. "There are so many classes at gyms for folks over 60," she said. "The biggest thing for people who are athletes already is to keep positive and just think about the fact that you're going to train smarter. You're not going to stop. It's just that you have to change."CardioWith heart disease stalking both men and women, aging doesn't have to mean the end to a decent cardio workout. Riding a bicycle is easier on the hips than running, for instance. Trim back on running to a couple of days a week and supplement on the bike. "You can get on a bike and spin like heck," Freytag said. "You can still push yourself as hard as you would have but with less pain." For runners who can't bring themselves to give it up, run slower, walk and run, or cross-train. She suggests cardio work four days a week but only at high energy twice in that period. Dancing is also a good way to get the heart rate up, Austin said. "It changes movements and it changes your muscle twitchings." At 93, Esther Robinson wouldn't give up her life of fitness for anything. Active all her life, she still hits her local gym ("I like to bench press"), but dancing is something she can enjoy with others. "When I was 60 or something, I got into square dancing," the great-grandmother said. "I like the music and the movement of it." Take a page from Sauer's story and hit the pool. "Swimming is easy on the joints. You'll keep your love of sports." Robinson also loves to swim. Sauer said her 78-year-old husband is also extremely fit. At a water park with their grandson they spotted no seniors at the top of a water slide five flights up. "They're missing out," she said. "I've never had so much fun in my life." Page 12BNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com Newborns € Children € AdolescentsOFFICE HOURS: Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., F.A.A.P. Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., F.A.A.P. Anoop Palta, M.D., F.A.A.P. Vishakha Nakhate, M.D., F.A.A.P. David Kleczek, P.A.C. Amy Grimes, P.A.C. Mercy L. Seralde, M.D. Maria C. Perez, M.D. Maria B. Asis, M.D., F.A.A.P. Megan Neff, ARNPAvon Park Pediatrics,P.A. & Sebring Pediatrics,LLCWe accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid SEBRING382-0770AVON PARK453-7337 HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM ALL OF US SEBRING: MON. … FRI. … 8:30AM … 5:00PMSATURDAY … 8:30AM … 12:00 NOON … SEBRING ONLYAVON PARK: MON. & WED. … 8:30AM … 7:00PM TUES., THURS., & FRI. … 8:30AM … 5:00PM LAKE PLACID699-1414 Some Risks Are Worth Taking. Your Health Isnt One of Them. Medicare and almost all insurance accepted First, 32 people die every day of skin cancer in the USA. Second, most skin cancer deaths are preventable. Therefore, forgiveness is the chance to prevent skin cancer with a Dermatology skin exam. Therefore, forgiveness is the Lord offering you free will to not be a statistic. SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE. OR LET US DO IT FOR YOU.Darrin A. Rotman, M. D. Julie L. Iellimo, P. A. C. Jennifer A. Wolf, P. A. C.863-386-0786Darrin A. Rotman, M.D. Established 19311600 US 27 South € Avon Park Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home4001 Sebring Parkway Sebring, 385-0125 111 E. Circle St. Avon Park, 453-3101 Chris T.Nelson Craig M. Nelson Darin S. MacNeil W .W LUMBER CO. 465-3331Hwy. 27 S. Lake Placid"We're More Than Just Lumber" COMPLETE Building SuppliesPlease support the above businesses. They have made this page possible. Inspirational Thoughtsby Patricia Valentine THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502 Residential Commercial Mobile Homes"Small Enough to Know You Large Enough to Serve You"500 South Lake Avenue 382-8300 453-3019 THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502I Corinthians 6:20,For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body,and in your Spirit,which are Gods.Ž The price paid was the blood shed on Calvary.Christ gave His life,that we might have life.Without the basics,were like a ship adrift,blown about by every breeze that arises.To hold steady throughout the storm,as ships got to be anchored to something secure, something that wont give way no matter how rough the seas.We are bound to be battered if we float aimlessly on lifes seas.We need an anchor,something to hold firm and steady.The Bible provides that anchor.We must be anchored to the principles of the Word of God,otherwise well drift amidst.As the year is closing and we enter the New Year,be sure you have your anchor secured.From my heart to yours,Have a Blessed and Prosperous New Year. Attend the Church of Your Choice! HEALTH Fit at 50 can also mean fit at 60, 70, 80 with some changes Metro Services Cardio workouts are an important part of staying fit at any age. Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155

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William Meyer, an assist ant professor of psychiatry a t Duke University, objects t o a recent column of mine i n which I recommended that p arents move a toddler out o f their bed by telling him t hat "The Doctor" said he c an't sleep with them any l onger (a second child is on t he way). In a letter to the e ditor of the Raleigh News a nd Observer, Meyer says t hat this is a lie and "sets up t he child to feel an unwarr anted anger" toward health c are professionals. Would I, Meyer asks, e ncourage parents to tell a c hild that the police disapp rove of something the child i s doing? No, but that's not a v alid comparison. The D octor does not frighten c hildren into behaving prope rly. For the overwhelming m ajority of children, physic ians as helpful authority f igures with whom they feel c omfortable. (It is also relev ant to note that the pediatric ians I've spoken to conc erning The Doctor have no p roblem with him.) As I said in the column in q uestion, I invented The D octor some years ago and have since frequently recommended that parents of young children invoke his authority to resolve various parenting issues. A few years ago, The Doctor cured a young girl of compulsive hair-pulling. More recently, he cured another youngster of constant complaints to the effect that certain of her clothes itched. He has cured young children of refusing to stay in bed, refusing to eat vegetables, picking sores on their skin, and being afraid to be in a room alone. When parents have a less than satisfactory experience with something I recommend, they often let me know. No parent has ever reported a bad experience with The Doctor. Meyer's claim that this approach might cause a child to develop "unwarranted anger toward health care professionals" amounts to unfounded speculation. Parenting is not a science, but my recommendations are far from capricious. They are based on more than 30 years of personal and professional experience as well as the best research available concerning child development, behavior, and mental health. In that last regard, the idea for The Doctor came from the work of Milton Erickson, an unorthodox but highly successful psychiatrist. If you're interested, his work is the subject of much discussion on the Internet. Telling a child that The Doctor has rendered judgment on a behavior or an issue (as in, the child occupying his parents'bed) simply gives the "last word" concerning the problem situation to a third party whose authority the child already recognizes, thus circumventing the possibility of a parent-child power struggle. More often than not, The Doctor also redefines the problem. For example, a 4-yearold's frequent tantrums are indication that the child is not getting enough sleep (misbehavior becomes a medical issue). The Doctor therefore prescribes that when the child throws more than one tantrum a day, his parents must put him to bed immediately after dinner so that he can catch up on his sleep and be a happier camper. The almost invariable result is that the tantrums completely stop within a few weeks and the child is indeed much happier (and so are his parents). Professor Meyer says I'm off the mark. I have to say, his reasoning is fairly logical, but where young children are concerned, logic does not always apply. Family psychologist John Rosemond answers parents' questions on his Web site at www.rosemond.com. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 13B TANGLED 2DPG(Animated)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30THE FIGHTERR(Mark Wahlberg,Christian Bale)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30HOW DO YOU KNOWPG13(Reese Witherspoon,Owen Wilson)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30FASTERR(The Rock)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15UNSTOPPABLEPG13(Denzel Washington,Rosario Dawson)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15DUE DATER(Robert Downey Jr.,Zack Galafinakis)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15 The NewFAIRMOUNTCINEMA63750 US 27 N. Sebring NOW SHOWINGFriday 12/24 Thursday 01/06 Suick CinemasInformation 385-9980 Office 385-9908New Dolby Digital SoundAll Seats $6.00for Matinee COMING SOONJan 7SEASON OF THE WITCH E.O. Koch Construction1417 Swank Avenue € Sebring, FL 33870(863) 385-8649COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTIONLet our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property, build your dream home,or do your remodeling.For all of your Aluminum,Steel,and Conventional construction needsŽEmail: kochcon@strato.netState Certified License #CGC1515338 € ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS € RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL DESIGN € REMODELING € ALUMINUM € ROOFING€ Carports, Patios, Siding, Fascia€ SEAMLESS GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS DIVERSIONS E-LITERATURE"By JOHN LAMPKIN ACROSS 1 Risked 8 Orderly type? 14 Take a __: attempt 20 Like the movie "Airplane!" 21 Hardly religious 22 Vacation choice 23 Specific item in a sleepwear collection? 25 Bridal trails 26 Rat tail? 27 Robert who played Roderigo in Welles's "Othello" 28 Royal pain 30 Back muscle, for short 31 Jacob's first wife 33 City west of Mesa 35 Complicated 37 Indy car's lack 40 Plated, in a way 43 Kyoto ties 46 Question 47 How a rock band's equipment damage was blamed? 49 Logging channel 50 Retriever's retrieval 52 Store charge, often 53 Mil. base stores 54 More than just nodded 55 Pianist John 56 Jazz trumpeter's nickname 58 Fixed up 60 Jazz trumpeter's nickname 61 Per se 63 Bite response 66 Fax forerunner 68 Amazonian oddsmaker? 72 Niblick, nowadays 75 Stuttgart title 76 Writes John a letter? 80 Thurman of film 81 Ejects, as lava 83 Hairy herd 86 Feast 87 Kathy of country 89 Pro __ 92 N.T. book attributed to Paul 93 Second lady after Tipper 94 Certain hip-hop dancer 95 Dressing room sprite? 98 Author Kesey 99 __ Trophy: biennial European golf event 100 From head to foot 101 The "0" in "4 5 0," on a scoreboard 103 Ruhr valley city 105 See 69-Down 107 Intro for John? 108 Malaprop or Miniver 110 Turnover, e.g. 113 Hops-drying kilns 115 Advanced teaching deg. 118 Part of ASAP 120 Fabric softener delivered overseas? 123 Adopt the naturist philosophy 124 Consecrate, in a way 125 Architectural molding 126 Fashioned 127 Dictators' underlings 128 Paddle-wheel craft DOWN 1 Hammett canine 2 Believed, to Tweety 3 Smooch in the shadows 4 Aggressive pinballer 5 It might mean "I'm hungry!" 6 Hero's birthplace? 7 Narcissus snubbed her 8 "The Nutcracker __" 9 1959-'60 heavyweight champ Johansson 10 Recital rebuke 11 Totally 12 "Grace Before Meat" essayist 13 Some bar shots 14 Climbed 15 Shots 16 Mozart's birthplace, now: Abbr. 17 Goat's friend? 18 Boating on the briny 19 Set of questions 24 "It couldn't be worse!" 29 Barrie baddie 32 "Dilbert" intern 34 Phone on stage, e.g. 36 Recital highlights 37 Dreads sporter 38 Richard's counterpart in the 1956 election 39 Girl leader? 41 German border river 42 Meet, as a challenge 44 Beatnik's "Got it" 45 Wrest 48 Record holder? 49 Slide show effect 51 Coal channel 54 Smooth and soft 56 Hillary helper 57 Actor Grant 59 __ volente: God willing 62 Sculptor's tool 64 Indians, on scoreboards 65 Ginseng, for one 67 Sexy sleepwear 69 With 105-Across, "GoodFellas" Oscar winner 70 Open for Christmas 71 Short 72 Ices, maybe 73 A scandal often ruins one 74 Aboriginal Walkman? 77 Success/failure metaphor 78 Central 79 Jeremy and friends, in "Zits" comics 82 Yemen's capital 84 It's heard a lot in Los Angeles 85 Buckeye State 88 Three, in 84-Down 90 How a youngster might watch a parade, with "on" 91 End in __ 93 Apollo's instrument 95 Movers with motors 96 Uncomplicated type of question 97 "Great" feature of Jupiter 100 Quit 102 Quimby in Beverly Cleary books 104 Hammett hero 106 Play groups 108 Texter's output: Abbr. 109 Ginseng, for one 111 Christmas classic opening 112 Wild harangue 114 Muscle twitches 116 Suffix with confer 117 Colorful worker? 119 Of no value, in Normandy 121 Hamburg article 122 Dr. of hip-hop Solution on page 5B Stars draped their splendor over the inky night sky.However, I could barely see myself putting one foot in front of the other. As we reached our car and drove the dark Colorado country roads, our headlights weren't enough. Only high beams could penetrate and give us enough light to gauge what was ahead. High beams are wonderful. But, they're hazardous when they are shining in your eyes from another vehicle coming towards you. Even having them bore into your car from behind is distressing. Recently, I was reading in Matthew 5: 14, NKJV, where Jesus tells his disciples, "You are the light of the world." What kind of light a high beam that blinds as it approaches or pushes and prods from behind? Or the kind of light Jesus described a lamp on a lamp stand to give light to all who are in the house. Have you ever entered a house that has dull, dingy lighting? How about one where every light is lit and glaring? In either case, we're either squinting or hiding our eyes to protect them. But lights that attract and point the way clearly are inviting. As we enter this New Year, it's important to remember that a dark world can be brightened by even a single candle. When that glow penetrates the darkness all are drawn to its warmth. Add other candles and more darkness is dispelled. Sometimes it seems our batteries are weak and we barely cast a glow that attracts. Other times, we have strong convictions or passions and long to have others jump on board. In either case, if we're not care ful, we'll find ourselves alone from lack of interest o r because we've tried to force our dream on others. Dim lights make people sleepy while high beams repel. However, if we approach this year in the light of Scripture, we will not be so dull that others will squint and move on; nor be a beam that repels and causes them to turn away. Rather, we will be that bright, inviting light that magnetizes others to Jesus not our cause and then, i n turn, he will illumine his wi ll for them.Those same verses sound like this in The Message: "Here's another way to pu t it:You're here to be light, bringing out the God-colors in the world I'm putting you on a light stand. Now that I've put you there shine! Keep open house, be generous with your lives." Let's shine invitingly in 2011. Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent and an award-winning writer. Are those high beams or lamplight? Pause And Consider Jan Merop DearAbby: My husband "Larry" and I have b een married three months. I adore him, his famil y and most of his friends. Two of them, however, I can barely tolerate. They show up at our house u nannounced and stay for hours. Larry is too nice to say anything to them about t hese drop-in visits. They also make disparaging c omments about their wives, complaining cons tantly about their "nagging" and their "faults." O ne of them has repeatedly cheated on his wife. I don't want my husband around these men who o bviously don't like their wives. I'm afraid what t hey say will "rub off" on him. I have explained t he reasons I dislike his friends, but he says I have n othing to worry about. That doesn't change the w ay I feel. What can I do? Worried Wife in Arkansas DearWorried Wife: Have a little patience and s top telling your husband you think his friends are a threat to your marriage. Instead, schedule as m uch social time as you can with other couples w ho have healthy relationships. It shouldn't take l ong for your husband to realize what sad sacks t hose two are. Not all friendships last forever. Sometimes people outgrow them, and that's what I'm hoping your husband will realize without you acting like his "keeper." DearAbby: I am a longtime member of the U.S. Air Force who has three college-age sons and a 13-year-old daughter, "Carly." Their mother and I divorced eight years ago. I've done everything I can to stay a part of all their lives. My sons and I get out for an occasional round of golf or watch the game over dinner, but Carly and I have reached a disconnect. We were close until early last summer swimming, shopping, vacationing or just hanging out at my house. She and my wife have a good relationship. But something has changed. Now, when we make plans for a movie or dinner or whatever, Carly makes an excuse at the last minute to break it. I asked her what's going on, but she won't tell me. My wife says it's just her age, but I don't understand why I am the one who gets cut out of her life. Carly's mother and I don't have the best relationship, and she's not interested in discussing these matters, but she says Carly is "just being Carly." Abby, am I worried about nothing? Is my wife right or could there be another issue? Still a Dad in the U.S.A.F. DearStill a Dad: Stop panicking and listen to the women. Your little girl may have been Daddy's girl until last summer ... but she's a teenager now. It's normal for teens to disengage from their parents and develop interests of their own, so relax and don't push. Let Carly know you're there for her and eventually she'll start coming around again. What you have described is not unusual for girls her age. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To order How to Write Letters for All Occasions,' send a businesssized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby Letter Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included in the price.) Two of man's friends don't pass muster with new wife Even a fictitious third party can sometimes help Living With Children John Rosemond Dear Abby Classified Ads € 385-6155 NEWS-SUN

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LIVING 14B PAGE News-Sun Sunday, January 2, 2011 Set on finding your dream job this year? That can take a lot of research and long-range planning. To start, update your resume or promise to apply for at least one job a week. If you want to change your current work situation, you must first get clear about what you want, Robbins, the life coach, says. Something new and bold, like your own business? Or a complete career switch? This is when reaching out and seeking a little help or advice can yield results, Robbins says. "Our view of ourselves is so distorted, and very few people are naturally good at things like negotiating or selling themselves." As the saying goes, it's all about networking. Ask yourself: What's my ideal work situation given the reality of my life? Start broad and then zero in on your goal, and how you can make that happen, Robbins says. If you want a raise or promotion, seek the advice of a mentor, life coach or higher-up friends in similar industries. Remember, if you tell just one good friend about this resolution, the friend will never let you forget it. "Friends give you a kick in the butt or a hug when you need it," Robbins says. "Just when you want to give up on your search, they send you an e-mail or phone call and reignite the flame." Dropping double-digit pounds or multiple dress sizes can be unrealistic. Instead, resolve to walk an hour five days a week, or trade an afternoon Frappuccino for a skim milk cappuccino, Calvo says. See the changes as a lifestyle. Or, maybe for you, start off with one day a week, and work your way up. Remember, a safe measurement of weight loss for most people is one to two pounds a week, Calvo adds. Each pound should be celebrated. "Congratulate yourself with small rewards a new book, a relaxing day, great running shoes," she says. When it comes to eating healthfully, cutting back on portions or bringing an apple to work every day are obvious resolutions. Less obvious: Eating more slowly, and not eating in front of the TV. "When you sit down and focus on your meal, you get more than the substance," Calvo says. "You get the aroma, textures and flavors, all of which contribute to satiety." Other easy resolutions: Eat breakfast. "It triggers a metabolic boost that lasts all day," Calvo says. Also, get calorie smart. Most people don't realize how many calories are in common foods, she says. The most important thing to remember? "If you go to a wedding and chow down or eat all the bread in a basket, don't use that as an excuse to give up," Calvo says. "Tomorrow's another day." BYJESSICAYADEGARANContra Costa Timesoping to change careers, get married and drop 20 pounds before Valentine's Day? Baby steps, people. Baby steps. Most of us default on our new year's resolutions, and it's hardly surprising. We aim too high and expect immediate results. Experts say it's time to reevaluate our approach. "The way we go about resolutions doesn't really work," says Mike Robbins, a life coach and author of "Focus on the Good Stuff: The Power of Appreciation." "People have these great intentions but they don't have any support, structure or accountability to make them happen." Instead, use Dec. 31 as a day to put closure on the past year, reflect on what you accomplished, what you learned and choose something to let go of, Robbins says. That way, come New Year's morning, you're ready to start fresh and devise precise, goal-oriented resolutions rather than murky intentions such as "spending more time with the kids," Robbins says. Be sure to write down your resolutions. Tape them to the wall. Share them with someone, and check in every few months to stay on track. Making smaller, attainable resolutions that grow with you and making more of them is going to ensure you meet your goals in the long run, says Trisha Calvo, executive editor of Shape magazine. "What you should be doing is making specific actionable promises to yourself that you can actually keep," she says. Below, the experts tackle five common resolutions and offer realistic alternatives. This New Year's, try setting attainable resolutions to achieve real results Proclaiming this as the year you'll get rich could result in disappointment. Instead, promise to save more money, or finally join your 401(k). The good thing about numbers is that you can track them, Robbins says. So whether you want a higher salary or a specific revenue for your business, you need to have a number in mind. Close your eyes and imagine it. Pretend it's the end of 2008 and brag about the financial goal you met, Robbins says. "It helps people to visualize it." If you're trying to save money, set up a separate account so you can track it. Then break up the amount. Putting away $416.66 a month isn't as daunting as saving $5,000 this year. "Set yourself up for success by using daily, weekly and monthly goals as ways to get there," Robbins says. Remember, if your resolution is simply an actionitem joining your company's 401(k), lowering your cable bill then it's just a matter of doing it. "Action items are 100 percent up to you," Robbins says. You fed the homeless on Christmas and loved the altruistic high so much you've vowed to make this the year you make the world a better place. But can your shoulders handle the weight? Instead, pick a charity or cause and volunteer three hours of your time a month. "Find at least one cause and choose an amount of money or time that works for you," Robbins says. Then, commit. Whether it's one day a month at a food bank or $5 a week to a homeless person, make specific promises to give. Also, remember your biggest source is a skill you can share with others. Are you an accountant or a writer? Do you have access to teachers? "We all have talents and we don't realize how valuable they can be to other people," Robbins says. Realizing that can be the greatest resolution of all.Setting your sights on getting married this year? That's a lofty goal if you're currently unattached. Instead, resolve to get out there more by joining a group or signing up for online dating, says Terry Fitzpatrick, chief operating officer of the Bostonbased matchmaking service the Right One. If you're in your 20s, join groups and get involved in charities. For example, in an election year, one of the best places to meet "like-minded singles is to join a political campaign," Fitzpatrick says, adding that online dating is another great choice for twentysomethings. Online dating and groups are fine for people in their 30s and beyond, but they tend to have fewer single people in those age groups, Fitzpatrick says. It's a good time to consider consulting a matchmaker, especially if you seek expert advice in other areas of your life. No matter your age, if you live in the suburbs, get out and go where the action is, Fitzpatrick says. You'll meet people walking to the corner store. Above all, keep this resolution realistic. If you have a list of 10 must-have qualities, resolve to broaden the flexible ones, such as age and height, Fitzpatrick says. You'll be glad you did.Illustrations by David Steinlicht /St. Paul Pioneer Press/MCT



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By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comOnce again, a flip in the calendar does not mean that the story will end, and the News-Sun has selected 11 stories this year that we feel will continue to be news in 2011.Jeff Carlson caseADUI story usually has very little play in a newspaper these days unless there is a death involved. Ex-County Commissioner Jeff Carlson made the headlines in July when the boat he was driving hit a channel marker in Indian river, which caused the death of his wife, Julie. Carlson faces charges of boating under the influence manslaughter and vessel homicide, death of another person. He was suspended from the county commission in November. The effects of that fateful night will never be finished, but this particular case could stretch far into the New Year.UnemploymentNow that the Christmas rush is over, and along with it the outflow of unexpected cash into the local economy, its time to focus on the fact that Highlands Countys jobless rate broke 13 percent in December, a dramatic jump from the 8.5 percent unemployment rate from November of 2008. The question remains of how high will unemployment numbers in Highlands County go before they top out. County budgetAs housing values continue to decrease, so do ad valorem taxes. With an estimated 10 percent less in the county coffers, commissioners will have to dig deep to offset the loss in revenue. With contingency reserves almost depleted from the last two years of decline, and what will have to be sacrificed to reach a balanced budget?Gas pricesThey touch everyone one everywhere from the cost of food to how much it takes to get to work each day. Gas prices are edging up again they broke $3 per gallon just after Christmas and some economists predict that the national average will get closer to $5 per gallon by the end of 2011.Sheriffs buildingWith overcrowding, a lapsing lease at Liberty Star Plaza, where will the sherHow frozen iguanas made news in PAGE2AStewart: Budget cant take sheriffs buildingPAGE2ANEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, January 2, 2011 www.newssun.com Volume 92/Number 1 | 75 cents www.newssun.com HighLow 78 56Complete Forecast PAGE 12A Mostly sunny and pleasantly warm Forecast Question: Would you be able to operate your vehicle if gas was $5 per gallon? Next question: Do you make one or more new years resolutions each year? www.newssun.comMake your voice heard at Online Obituaries Roy Blevins Age 92, of Lake Placid George Flowers Jean OKeeffe Age 87, of Sebring Marge Ryan Age 89, of A von Park Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453 Online: www.newssun.com Yes 26.2% No 73.8% 099099401007 Total votes: 65 Arts 10B Business 8A Classifieds 10A Community Briefs5A Community Calendar11B Crossword Puzzle11B Dear Abby 11B Editorial & Opinion4A Environment 10B Health 12B Horoscope 9B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times 11B Sports On TV 2B Index locally owned community mindedHeartlandNational Bank Avon Park800 West Main St.863.453.6000Lake Placid600 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.699.1300Sebring327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1300Sun n Lake North5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1322www.heartlandnb.com11 for 1 11 for 1 Gas prices Home prices Harder Hall Carlson Parker The top things to watch in the coming year By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y christopher.tuffley@newssun.co m SEBRING On Sunda y, Jan. 3, 2010 the News-Su n published an article call ed for a look at wh at the editorial board thoug ht would be among the mo st important stories of the yea r. Now, on Jan. 2, 2011 he re is a summary of how tho se stories played out.ElectionsLast year the News-Su n wondered if campaign prom ises of change would trick le down to Highlands County. They did. The county board of com missioners complete ly changed its make up wh en Commissioner C. Guy Max cy stepped down to run for t ax collector, Commission er Edgar Stokes retired, an d incumbent Don Bates w as defeated. Don Elwell, Gr eg Harris and Jack Richie, a ll Republicans, were ea ch elected to the county com mission for the first time. Commissioner Jeff Carlso n had to resign his seat aft er being charged with boatin g under the influence. His se at has yet to be filled by t he governor. Only Barbara Stewart is left from the commission s itting a year ago. She w as elected chairperson of t he commission by her ne w peers. The voters of Sebrin g returned two city counc il incumbents to office Joh n Griffin and Scott Stanley. Voters in Avon Pa rk replaced city council memb er AlJoe Hinson with loc al attorney Parke Sutherland who is the husband of Mar ia Sutherland, Avon Park s assistant city manager. Vote rs returned Avon Park May or Sharon Schuler to office. In Lake Placid, vote rs replaced Mayor To m Katsanis with John Holbroo k who had served as may or the term before Katsanis Looking at the top 10 for a year later See 10, page 6A News-Sun file Darrel Smith was nearly killed when this Mustang struck him as he was riding his recumbent bike in August of 2007 on Hammock Road. He is now a strong advocate of bicycle safety. See 11, page 7A By ROMONAWASHINGTON editor@newssun.comSEBRING It was like any other day at work for Darrel Smith. He rode his bike about six miles to work as a ranger at Highlands Hammock State Park. His day was full of routine duties and then at the end of his day he began his trek back home on his recumbent bicycle. Thats where things became tragically different. Arecumbent bicycle is a three-wheel cycle that sits significantly lower to the ground. Smith was struck by a car on the recreation trail that parallels Hammock Road. Florida Highway Patrol said at the time that Smith failed to yield to the car that struck him. There were no citations issued in the accident. The August 2007 accident nearly cost Smith his life. He laid days in a hospital bed in a drug-induced coma, and he wasnt able to return home until two months later. He suffered a small brain hemorrhage, broke his right wrist, his pelvis in three places, Highlands Pedalers, Smith want to share safety laws Park ranger still hurting from near-fatal accident in 2007 See SMITH, page 3A By ROMONAWASHINGTO N romona.washington@newssun.co m Darrel Smith, a longtim e cyclist and member of Highlands Pedalers, sa id those using the roadways of Highlands County, for t he most part, do a great job of sharing the roads and follow ing the laws. Id say at least 95 perce nt of us here respect each oth er and rules that are in place, he said. There are some, howe ver, that need to be reminded of what the laws are. Some of the laws includ ed Some of the rules of the road See RULES, page 3A Set attainable resolutions for 2011 12A Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and

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By BRENDAN FARRINGTON Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Some lessons learned in Florida this year: Giant African snail mucus can make you sick. Dont let your dog near frozen iguanas. Burials at sea dont work so well if the body doesnt sink. And if youre a woman visiting a federal detention center, wear a bra, but make sure it doesnt have an underwire. Florida lived up to its reputation for being an odd state in 2010, a year where stupid crimes, poor decisions and general weirdness seemingly showed no geographical or age limits. Like the 3-year-old who took a bag of marijuana to school in Columbia County, the 81-year-old Marion County man busted for selling pot and the 19-year-old arrested for lighting up a joint in a Palm Beach Gardens bookstore while waiting for Ozzy Osbournes autograph. In other marijuana news, an Osceola County man chose his front yard, visible from the street, to grow pot. He was arrested when the plants, some seven-feet tall, were spotted. AFlorida Keys man was a little smarter and grew his weed in the woods. He was arrested when deputies took the plants and left a note that said, Thanks for the grow! You want them back? Call for the price. He called, offered $200 and then met deputies to get the plants back. Then there was the man pulled over in Manatee County who claimed the crack in his crack wasnt his. Officers found bags of marijuana and crack cocaine stuffed between the mans butt cheeks. He said the pot was his but the white stuff is not mine. Among other bizarre traffic stops, a man with a fake badge, flashing green lights and a holstered gun pulled over motorists and asked them if they had drugs or alcohol. Police said he reeked of booze and charged him with DUI and impersonating an officer. Marion County deputies said a 61-year-old man they pulled over took one more drink in front of them before submitting to, and failing, a field sobriety test. ACollier County deputy called a cab for a drunk bar patron, only to see the cab return a few minutes later and the patron get out and try to drive away. The man was charged with DUI. Alcohol played a role in many other stories, like the 55-year-old woman injured when trying to use the bathroom in a motor home traveling down I-10 in the Panhandle. She somehow fell onto the highway. Then there was the Daytona Beach man who lied to officers about being carjacked because he was too embarrassed to admit he let a stranger take his pickup on a beer run. The man never returned. A32-year-old Pasco County man called 911 to complain his mother took his beer. Police in Deland said a man walked out of a bar and head-butted a street preacher who called him a sinner. A man in Marion County almost chewed his brothers ear off during a drunken fight over a dog. APasco County man was charged with slashing his father with a knife during an argument over who would walk the dog. There were other strange dog stories. Aman was walking his Jack Russell terrier in Tampa when an alligator snatched it. He pulled out his handgun and started shooting at the gator. It let go of the dog, but the pet wasnt breathing until the man performed CPR and revived it. South Florida veterinarians began seeing an unusual number of paralyzed dogs and concluded they had a rare disease caught after coming in contact with iguanas killed during a cold snap. Dogs werent always the victim. AHernando County man was run over by his own pickup truck after his dog jumped into the running vehicle and put it in gear. In other truck news, a death row inmate filed and lost a lawsuit seeking to keep a restored 1971 Chevy pickup that he stole from the couple he killed. Several people in Miami complained to authorities when they got sick after consuming mucus from a giant African snail as part of a religious ceremony. Among some threatening items bomb squads had to handle this year: a box with two kittens in Cocoa and a stuffed pony in Orange County. Authorities blew up the stuffed pony, but spared the kittens. AMelbourne street was shut down for three hours, the time it took the bomb squad to figure out the flashing object in the middle of the street was a restaurant pager. An Orlando-area police station was evacuated when an elderly woman walked in with a grenade she found pin intact. It wasnt the year to mess with the elderly. An 84-yearold man was arrested in Bay County for allegedly hitting a deputy with his cane. An 80-year-old Brooksville woman was found guilty of bilking friends and neighbors out of more than $1 million in a phony lottery scheme, telling them she won a fortune in a Dutch lottery and asking them for money. Would-be robbers knocked an 83-year-old man to the ground in Clearwater only to turn and run when the victim pulled a gun on them. A69-year-old woman turned back a robber after picking up the gun he dropped in her car while smashing the windshield with it. He also dropped his cell phone and was caught. A19-year-old robbing a Pensacola pharmacy put down his gun to look into a bag of drugs that was handed to him. The pharmacist Page 2ANews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, Florida 33870 A Harbor Point Media Company OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday PHONE: 863-385-6155 MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954 NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870 USPS ISSN 0163-3988 Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry office(s)CIRCULATION SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before 11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their account. Please call 385-6155.SUBSCRIPTION RATES12 mo.7% FL taxTotal HOME DELIVERY$60.46$4.23$64.69 IN FLORIDA MAIL92.236.4698.69 OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL105.99105.99 Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. Romona Washington Publisher and Executive Editor863-385-6155, ext. 515 Kaylor & Kaylor P.A.Social Security Disability LawNew Claims Hearing Before A Judge Reconsiderations Appeals Court 863-382-1900 Mark Kaylor Dec. 28 172528454748x:2Next jackpot $9 millionDec. 25 32532333451x:3 Dec. 22 61216374652x:3 Dec. 30 1014192433 Dec. 29 58121726 Dec. 28 246812 Dec. 27 16122631 Dec. 30 (n) 7518 Dec. 30 (d) 5426 Dec. 29 (n) 8500 Dec. 29 (d) 7541 Dec. 30(n) 49 6 Dec. 30 (d) 48 2 Dec. 29 (n) 90 3 Dec. 29(d) 02 1 Dec. 28 152135425 Dec. 24 422303722 Dec. 21 1415374218 Dec. 17 23839401 Dec. 29 316182037 PB: 30 PP: 2Next jackpot $25 millionDec. 25 117385052 PB: 24 PP: 2 Dec. 22 1133444647 PB: 12 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center MCTphoto An iguana is belly up in south Florida after a cold snap. Some of the lizards wake up after the weather warms, but many died after 2010s record cold snap in January and were eaten by dogs, which got sick. Snail mucus, frozen iguanas and potheads By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING The debate continues over what to do with the growing needs of the Highlands County Sheriffs Department, but it is not likely to get resolved quickly. In their meeting on Dec. 21, commissioners kicked around some ideas presented by interim County Administrator Rick Helms, but board chair Barbara Stewart made it clear that the money was not there this budget year for a new building. The numbers show that all we can afford is an adequate, good facility, Stewart said about the proposed $11 million building requested by Sheriff Susan Benton. Helms offered several other options for the board to look at before the lease expired at the sheriffs current location for administrative offices at George Boulevard and U.S. 27. The lease expires in 2012. One of the spaces Helms is investigating is the Bank of America building, and another is the SunTrust building, both in downtown Sebring. Finally, Helms said that he even contacted the City of Sebring about its complex, which is just around the corner from the current jail. City Manager Scott Noethlich said the idea w as not out of the question if t he city council agreed Commissioner Gr eg Harris once again raised t he option of the Restoratio n Church on Sparta Road. Are we just wastin g time? We are not going to be able to purchase and re novate this building for $ 5 million, Harris said abo ut the proposed options. It aint gonna happen. Do you want the ul timate, ultimate, or do yo u want something functio nal? Stewart asked. Once we look at the se again, do we put the se options to rest? Harr is asked Stewart. Stewart asserted that t he commission had to find an adequate facility for t he right amount of money, an d stated that Helms w as working on doing that, b ut Harris pointed out that t he downtown buildings we re not the best fiscal choices Take out the emotion al aspect of moving the sher iff out of downtown, an d Restoration could be pu rchased and renovated a l ot cheaper than these oth er options downtown, Harr is said. And you get a who le lot of land on top of that. Stewart asked Helms to continue with his look at the proposed propertie s, and to return with a repo rt by the second Tuesday in January. Stewart: no money for new sheriffs building in budget All had an effect on some of the strange news stories from our state in 2010 See STRANGE, page 3A News-Sun f ile The vacant Restoration Center on Sparta Road has been proposed as a good site for the new sheriff administration offices. News-Sun staffSEBRING Tickets go o n sale Monday for the T AG for the Cure F ashion Show and Cross C ountry Music Revue to b e held later this month a t Tanglewood. All proc eeds from the show will g o towards the T anglewood Cancer D rive for Relay for Life. Neil Simpson, this y ears Tanglewood C ancer Benefit chairman, s aid the models will be T anglewood residents w ho will model fashions f rom Belk, Dress Barn, I deal Golf, Maxcys M ens Wear, Steve & Co. a nd Sues Cubby Hole. Tickets are $15, with a ll proceeds going to the c ancer benefit. Tickets w ill be on sale Mondays b efore and after coffee a nd from 3-4 p.m. T hursdays. Doors will open at 6:15 p .m. Saturday, Jan. 29 for t he fashion show and m usic revue. Hors doeuv res will be served from 6 :30-7 p.m. Dessert will b e served at intermission. B ring your own drinks. T here will be lots of raff le prizes and a 50/50 d rawing. Musicians will include T om DiGrazia, Patrick H otchkiss and Mary F ulton. Dancers will i nclude Vickie Buck, T ammy Dilsaver, Sandy R adawiec, Barb Snyder, T om Stadler, and Marcie T aylor. Models will include G ordon Armitage, M argaret Buffone, D arlene Bradley, M ichelle Coleman, Larry C onrad, Sharon Hering, B onnie Huffman, Bill K err, Luanne Kerr, Tom M app, Brian McKenzie, D ick Miller, Artie N ichols, Debbie Rogers, W ayne Roswell, Joan R ulli, Marilyn Salberg, E laine Schmidt, Stella S igler, Sandy Trull, D avid Werry, and Horst W olff. Fashion show will benefit Relay for Life Tickets go on sale Monday for show at Tanglewood Associated PressTALLAHASSEE, G ov. Charlie Crist says F lorida residents showed tremendous spirit and r esolve in a challenging y ear. In his New Years mess age, the outgoing govern or says hes grateful for h aving had the opportunity to serve the state. Crist says that when faced with economic strain and the oil spill in t he Gulf of Mexico, F lorida residents r esponded with courage, t alent and dedication. He s ays that gives him hope f or Floridas future. Crist also says hes p roud of his accomplishm ents as governor, i ncluding reducing the c rime rate and taking s teps to make government m ore transparent. He says hes praying f or success for R epublican Gov.-elect R ick Scott, who takes o ver next week. Crist: Florida showed spirit, resolve in Crist

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For a while, he walked with the aid of a w alker, then a cane. Today, he gets around f ine. He lives in constant pain, but at l east hes alive and well. My biking caused my accident b ut it was the only reason I was s trong enough to survive. I am dama ged but I am still here to tell, S mith said. Smith believes he survived the a ccident so that he can help spread t he word to all users of the road to follow the r ules. I am 63 years old and have had a very g ood life but I believe I survived to inform a ll of us to share the road and respect our p laces on it, he said. To help in his endeavor, the Highlands Pedalers are distributing a Florida law enforcement guide that reviews pedestrian traffic laws in one half and bicycle traffic laws in the other. The small, bright green booklet is put out by the Florida Bicycle Association. The booklets are available by contacting the Highlands Pedalers, www.highlandspedalers.com. Smith said, Bicycle accidents arent fun. Its hard on the pocket book and the family. I know the gal who hit me was in therapy for months. She hurt just like I did; in a different way, but she hurt. I will hurt forever. My accident was an accident but it was helped by driving with distractions. I have been guilty of it also. Like anxiety over being late, talking on a cell phone and early evening. I just want everyone to understand to share the road. The laws are there for everyone, he said. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by SCOTTDRESSE L Greg Branning was inside his rental home on Pebble Beach Drive in Sun N Lake late Thursday night when he heard a noise from the garage. He found his car on fire when he went to investigate. He said he tried to move the car out of the garage, but the flames had already damaged the car to the point it was immobile. By the time firefighters arrived, the garage was engulfed in flames. The fire was contained to the garage, but both cars were destroyed and the rest of the house had smoke damage. Branning, his girlfriend and their two dogs were able to escape unharmed. Car fire nearly claims home Smith Smith wants people to learn rules to keep bicyclists safe i n the law enforcement guide r eviewing pedestrian and b icyclist traffic laws include:Pedestrians Aperson operating a b icycle on and along a sidew alk or crosswalk has the r ights and duties applicable t o a pedestrian under the s ame circumstances, but m ust yield to pedestrians and g iven an audible warning b efore passing one and r emains subject to bicycle e quipment requirements. ( ss316.2065) Where sidewalks are p rovided, no pedestrian s hall, unless required by o ther circumstances, walk a long and upon the portion o f a roadway paved for v ehicular traffic (ss316.1303 ) No person shall drive a v ehicle except by human p ower on a sidewalk or sidew alk area, except on a drivew ay (ss316.1995) An except ion is made for electric personal assistive mobility devices. No person shall stop, stand or park a vehicle on a sidewalk (ss316.1945-1) No pedestrian shall suddenly leave a curb or other place of safety and walk or run into the path of a vehicle which is so close that it is impossible for the driver to yield (ss316.130-8) When a vehicle is stopped at a crosswalk to permit a pedestrian to cross the roadway, the driver of any other vehicle approaching from the rear shall not overtake and pass such stopped vehicle (ss316.1309)Bicyclists Aperson in control of a vehicle on a street or highway is a driver (ss316.0031). As a driver, a cyclist must follow the traffic rules common to all drivers. As the driver of a bicycle, he must also obey rules adopted specifically for bicycles. Every bicycle must be equipped with a brake or brakes that allow the rider to stop within 25 feet from a speed of 10 mph on dry, level, clean pavement (ss316.2065-14) Acyclist driving against the direction of traffic on the roadway should be warned or cited. The driver of a vehicle overtaking a bicycle or other non-motorized vehicle must pass the bicycle or other non-motorized vehicle at a safe distance of not less than 3 feet between the vehicle and the bicycle or other nonmotorized vehicle. Every driver of a vehicle shall exercise due care to avoid colliding with any pedestrian or bicyclist (ss316.130-15) Cyclists may ride two abreast only within a single lane and when not impeding traffic. To get a copy of the guide book, contact the Highlands Pedalers group, or visit highlandspedalers.com. Continued from page 3A A few of the rules for pedestrians, bikers grabbed the gun and the man was tripped and held until police came. Aman walked into a Destin bank, waved a gun and fled with $6,000 but left his wallet behind. He was quickly captured. Karma? St. Petersburg police said a 58-year-old woman pointed a gun at her daughter, then shot herself in leg when she lowered the weapon. AJacksonville woman reported her baby daughter missing and was arrested when officers found the baby girl in a gym bag in the back of her car. AClay County woman was arrested after posting a photo of her baby with a bong on her Facebook page. Police say a mother gave her 23-year-old son $50 for gas and said she needed a ride so she could meet a man 60 miles away and have sex for money. Both were charged in the Polk County prostitution sting. Aman told Gainesville police a hooker robbed him after he broke off negotiations for paid sex when he realized she had bad teeth. An Orlando woman coming off a cruise ship with her family was arrested and spent 36 hours in jail when authorities thought she was a prostitute. It turns out she shared the same name but not the same profession of a woman wanted by police. Tampa-area identical twi ns were arrested after one couldnt make a court appearance and the other filled in. Their fingerprints werent identical. Afederal prosecutor in Miami was arrested on a felony charge after strippin g down to his boxer shorts an d going for a swim at a barsid e pool. Awoman complained to police that she and her daughter got a flash of his junk as he got out. And finally, a Miami attorney said she was kept from visiting her client at a federal detention center because the underwire of h er bra set off the metal detector. After she took it off, sh e said guards wouldnt let he r in because she was braless. Continued from page 2A Strange news was plentiful in

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H ere in the News-Sun we are in a greement good r iddance to 2010, a t rial in patience and f aith if ever there w as one.The year was both quick a nd plodding that is, m onths flew by while each d ay dragged on forever. We survived yet another e lection cycle, even though it w as angry, divided and rude, l acked meaningful debate a nd settled nothing. Election day promised r elief by ending, at least temp orarily, political advertising a nd television discussions o nly to discover the day after t he election that the blah, b lah, blah debates of 2012 h ad already begun. The economy plodded on w ith repeated reports that r ecovery is just around the c orner. But still, unemploym ent rose in Highlands C ounty. Overseas, terrorists continued to bomb our soldiers and their own fellow citizens. In this country, children were abducted and killed. Ford Mercury was given the ax, gasoline prices crept back up to over $3 a gallon, the Gulf of Mexico and its estuaries were drenched in oil, and weather records of all kinds were broken across the country from floods to droughts, from very hot to very cold. Oh yes, 2010 remains a vivid, if painful memory. But, will 2011 will be any better? Worse? Or more of the same? Who knows? Rather than depress ourselves with serious gloom and doom, however because actually our editorial board is on the optimistic side we thought wed make some sunny predictions about the immediate future. Predictions, that hopefully will divert you, but if they come true we will accept the blame for. For example, we predict the City of Sebring will accept an offer of $19.23 for Harder Hall, although it will turn out the buyer is a Chinese syndicate that manufacturers asphalt. We predict that with rising gas prices, Sebring International Raceway will convert to a harness track, with dog racing once a month and a flea market every other Thursday. We predict the new venue will attract crowds from some parts of Highlands County. We predict the Historic Circle in Sebring, in an effort to get more people downtown, will install giant, electronic billboards earning it the nickname The Times Square Circle of the South. Heartland Idol contestants and Central Florida Motorcycle clubs will work together to remove the signs for the week of the Ride to the Heartland and the Idol finale. We predict the town of Lake Placid will buy the Tower and surrounding shopping center to turn into a government office/ community center/action park with bungee jumping allowed from town council office windows. Town residents will have free access to the stairs, but in keeping with strict budget management, the elevator will be subject to a user fee and county residents living outside Lake Placid City limits will have to pay double. We predict that Avon Park will create the position of Most High Exalted First Responder for Life. This individual will be issued two hats, so as to always arrive at emergencies properly dressed. This way, when the Most High Exalted First Responder For Life gets out of a car wearing a SWAThelmet, the firefighters know the emergency has nothing to do with them and go home, thus saving the city overtime; or, if wearing a fire helmet, vice versa. Finally we predict the News-Sun will begin publishing eight editions a week, two on Sundays, win a Pulitzer Prize for a summer series on kids and cavities, and be featured in the Wall Street Journal for our prescient editorials predicting the future. Page 4ANews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION TODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com Update on Septic Tank Cleaning/ inspection billEditor: Update on Florida Law (SB550), passed during the 2010 session of the state le gislature, concerning Septic Tank Cleaning/inspection. House Bill (HB 13) has been filed in the Florida House of Representatives to change the wording of the bill passed (SB550) during the 2010 session. The word ing of HB13 directly relate s to the septic tank inspection/cleaning issue. I have been in contact with local state representatives and have the idea that they will support HB13. There are also a number of bills in the Senate concerning the wording of SB550. If you wish to follow the progress of HB 13 you can sign on to the Florida Legislature Web site, www.myfloridahouse.gov, and click on Bills. In the search box that says Bill Number, enter 13 and retur n key. The following informatio n comes from the above refer enced Web site. HB13 Reads: Onsite Sewage Treatment and Disposal Systems: Revises legislative intent; eliminate s provisions directing DOH t o create & administer statewide septic tank evalua tion program; eliminates procedures & criteria for evaluation program; terminates grant program for repair of onsite sewage trea tment disposal systems iden tified pursuant to evaluatio n program, to conform; elimi nates provisions authorizing DOH to collect evaluation report fee & provisions rela ting to disposition of fee pro ceeds & revenue-neutral fe e schedule. Effective Date: upon becoming a law Introduced by Coley (cosponsors) Adkins; Broxson ; Corcoran; Crisafulli; Drake ; Ford; Hudson; Plakon; Smi th Updates to follow until t he Septic Tank bill is repealed or at least the wording concerning septic tanks is changed. Tom Singleta ry Avon Pa rk EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign you r letter and include you r address and phone num ber. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your let ters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address ; fax 385-1954; or e-ma il editor@newssun.com. To make sure the edito rial pages arent dominat ed by the same writers letters are limited to two per month and a gues t column can be submitted once every three months Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of tha t author and not necessari ly the opinion of the staf f or editors of the News Sun. All items will run on a first-come basis as space permits, although more timely ones could be moved up. We believe your view points are just as impor tant as any community leader or government offi cial, so consider this a personal invitation to ge t your two cents in. A few tongue-in-cheek predictions for 2011 Ah, New Years Eve. W hat a great night to revisit t he past year. Though Id rather revisit 1 999. The unemployment rate w as 4.2 percent in 1999. Dot-com stocks were still c reating lots of paper mill ionaires. The U.S. deficit for that y ear was $1 billion thats r ight, billion with a b, a f ar cry from the $1 trillion to $ 2 trillion it is nowadays. Things were going so w ell, we had to make up c rises, such as Y2K, the M illennium Bug! Because computerized d evices used only two digits t o record the date f or numerous g litches were expected to o ccur at exactly 12 a.m. on J an. 1, 2000, when at least s ome of the devices would m istake for . Senators held press conf erences to warn the public t o prepare for the worst. President Clinton told us t o keep a lookout for terrori sts, who might take advant age of the potential chaos. Federal bureaucrats even a ppeared competent. They established mobile c ommand centers on the N ational Mall, where thous ands of New Years Eve r evelers would celebrate. They directed police, firem en, FBI agents and CIA o peratives to crawl around o ur nations capital to thwart a nyone looking to pull any f unny business. They made detailed prepar ations cots, blankets, b ottled water, canned goods, s helter, portable lighting t o respond to any and every c ontingency. But nothing happened. When the clock struck m idnight that New Years E ve, there were few glitches, b ut no chaos and zero mass h ysteria of any kind. Y2K, wrote The Wall S treet Journal, was, essent ially, a giant hoax. That was the downside of A merica then. We were at o ur best in preparing for c rises that werent real. We lived in a fiction of o ur own creation fake w ealth, fake security, fake s pending promises at the l ocal, state and federal levels t hat wed never be able to a fford. Boy, would the realities of the next decade be a bear. No sooner did 2000 begin than the dot-com bubble burst, wiping out trillions in paper wealth. In 2001, terrorists would catch us with our pants down, striking us hard. Aworried Federal Reserve would begin a series of interest-rate cuts to pump easy money into the economy. That easy money, combined with bad government policies to both create (Citizens Reinvestment Act) and buy (Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac) bundles of risky subprime home loans, would fuel a housing bubble. The housing bubble would burst in 2008, wiping out trillions in wealth and kicking off the worst recession since the Great Depression. Voters would kick Republicans out of office. Democrats, controlling the presidency and both houses of Congress, would make more fake promises we will never keep and would spend, by New Years Eve 2010, nearly $4 trillion more than we had. The unemployment rate would be stuck at nearly 10 percent. State and local governments would begin to default on debt payments. And all these woes would seem small compared to the $100 trillion in unfunded liabilities that generous politicians saddled our country with liabilities we may never be able to pay for. To be sure, our reckoning has finally arrived. As bad as the past decade has been, the next decade will be plenty worse unless we embrace the difficult, painful business of getting our house in order. Tom Purcell, a freelance writer is also a humor columnist for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, and is nationally syndicated exclusively by Cagle Cartoons newspaper syndicate. E-mail Tom at Purcell@caglecartoons.com. Partying like its 1999 Guest Column Tom Purcell We need free bodies and free minds free labor and free thoughts, chainless hands and fetterless brains. Free labor will give us wealth. Free thought will give us truth.ROBERT G. INGERSOLL lawyer, statesman, 1949 EXPRESSIONSOFFREESPEECH

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Zwayer is speaker at chamber luncheonLAKE PLACID Eric Z wayer, Highlands County t ax collector, will be the g uest speaker at the Greater L ake Placid Chamber of C ommerce January members hip luncheon. The luncheon w ill be held at noon W ednesday, Jan. 12 at the L ake Placid Elks Lodge. The luncheon is sponsored b y Highlands County E conomic Development C ouncil. Cost is $8 per person. R SVPthe chamber on or b efore Monday, Jan. 10.Recreation Club plans activitiesSEBRING The Sebring R ecreation Club will host t he following events this w eek: Sunday, 3 p.m., board m eeting. Monday, 9 a.m., Orange B lossom tournament; 1 p.m., L adies Social Club. Tuesday, 9 a.m., Orange B lossom tournament; 12:30 p .m., Bridge; 3 p.m., ping p ong. For details, call (262) 2243 819.Events planned at lodges, postsSEBRING The Sebring Moose Lodge w ill have bingo at 1 p.m. t oday. The Women of The M oose meet at 7 p.m. Monday, while Texas Holdem is offered from 7-10 p.m. Euchre and pool will be played at 7 p.m. Tuesdays all month. For more information, call 655-3920.Highlands Tea Party is backSEBRING The Highlands Tea Party is rested and ready to do its best to educate everyone on upcoming legislation from the state, federal government, and the county, getting ready for the 2012 election. The next meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Quality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27. The topic will be Fair Tax with David Foxworth. Adinner buffet will be served at 5:30 p.m. for $8 each.Make a resolution to donate bloodThe Florida Blood Centers-Highlands blood mobile will be at several locations Monday and Tuesday. Receive a free movie ticket by mail in you donate. Donating blood is not only safe and simple, but it saves lives as well. When you donate blood you receive a mini physical that includes a cholesterol check. The blood mobile will be at Golds Gym from 2-7 p.m. Monday and from 4-7:30 p.m. Tuesday. It will also be at Lake Placid Health Care from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday. There is no upper age limit to donate blood. If you have questions, call 3824499. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 5A RELEASE THE POUNDS ONLY 20 DAYS LEFT!CALL TODAY (863) 471-2500 LOSE YOURWEIGHT FORTHE LAST TIME!13 Ryant Blvd., SebringCorner of 27 & Ryant Blvd.Pre-Grand Opening Fees End December 31, 2010Save 66% on Enrollment NOW! COMMUNITYBRIEFS Roy BlevinsRoy Haskell Blevins, 92, of Lake Placid died Dec. 28, 2010 at the Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Born in Illinois, he moved to Lake Placid in 1971. He served his country in the U.S. Army during World War II. He worked for Scottys until his retirement. He was an active member of the Faith Baptist Church. He is survived by his loving wife of 70 years, Marie; daughter, Linda Keen; son, David; sisters, Delora Ford and Ina Tucker; three grandchildren; and four greatgrandchildren. Aservice to celebrate Haskells life was held Jan. 1 at Faith Baptist Church with Pastor Travis Hudson celebrating. Burial was private at Oak Hill Cemetery. Words of comfort to the family can be made by visiting www.scottfuneralservices.com. Arrangements entrusted to the Scott Funeral Home, Lake Placid. George FlowersGeorge Steven Flowers died Dec. 21, 2010. Born in Fort Lauderdale, he moved to Highlands County in 2002. He was a fabricator of sheet metal. He is survived by his companion, Marianna Estrada; sons, George Jr. and Robert; sisters, Pat Adams, Sylvia Neubauer, Linda Briggs, Elaine King and Marcia Lau; and four grandchildren. There was a memorial service on Dec. 31 at Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church.Jean OKeeffeJean Y. OKeeffe, 87, of Sebring died Dec. 30, 2010. Born in Norwich, Conn., she moved to the area in 1966. She was a homemaker and a member of St. Catherine Catholic Church. She is survived by her son, Daniel J. Jr., three grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. The family will recieve friends from 4-6 p.m. today at Morris Funeral Chape l, Sebring. Aservice will be held at 11:30 a.m. Mond ay at Morris Funeral Chap el with burial following at Lakeview Memori al Gardens. Condolences m ay be expressed at www.mo rrisfuneralchapel.com.Marjorie RyanMarjorie Ryan, 89, of Avon Park died Dec. 2 4, 2010. She is survived b y her lovin g husban d, Claude J. Ryan; fo ur sons Charle s Vealey George Vealey, Lloyd Rya n, Mark Ryan; 26 grandch ildren and 36 great-grandch ildren. Amemorial service w ill be held at Avon Park Chur ch of the Nazarene at 11 a.m Friday. The family h as requested that in lieu of flowers memorial contrib utions be made to Avon Pa rk Church of the Nazarene. Ryan OBITUARIES For many of us, the season o f gluttony begins with c andy-laden Halloween, cont inues through bountiful T hanksgiving and festive C hristmas, and wraps up with p arty-time New Years Eve. J anuary hopefully represents a clean slate and, for many p eople, a cleaner plate. While lifestyle and diet r esolutions are not new, the n ew year is still a welcome a nd opportune time to make a f resh start in healthy eating, i ncluding developing better s nacking habits. Indeed, finding snacks that f it into a resolved new way of e ating is not always easy, e specially when snacks have l ong been viewed as an indulg ent reward. The good news f or those intent on starting 2 011 with a different snacki ng mindset is that a wider a rray of better-for-you produ cts are available and the o verall approach to eating b etter is more focused on s ensibility than on fleeting f ads. Here are some tips for foll owing up seasons greetings w ith more reasoned eatings: Think big picture. Many d iet and health experts agree t hat a more general, practical a pproach to snacking is easie r to adhere to than a specific a nd often rigid diet. Balance a nd moderation may not be t he most buzzworthy terms, b ut they are the basis of succ ess. Follow your natural i nstincts. As more people r esolve to eat green and c lean, especially at the start o f another year, a growing n umber of organic and natur al food products are availa ble at their supermarket. S nyders of Hanovers popul ar line of organic snack f oods, for instance, includes O rganic Pretzel Sticks, availa ble in honey wheat, multig rain and 8 grains and seeds v arieties. Pack some extra nutrient p unch. If you are going to s nack, why not add some o ther healthy ingredients? T ry multi-grain snack foods, f or instance, to inject some f iber into your daily diet. Remember, restricted d iets dont mean restricted t aste. If you, like millions of A mericans, are looking for g luten-free products, you can f ind many more choices on t odays grocery shelves. All kinds of your favorite snacks, from cookies to chips to pretzels, are easier to find than ever before Snyders of Hanover, for example, now offers Gluten Free Sticks. These treats can be enjoyed by those who must follow gluten-free diets on a doctors recommendation and those who just want to try something different. Crunch it up. Studies have shown that snacks with a crunch provide a more satisfying snacking experience. Keeping this in mind, make sure to stock your pantry with a variety of crunchy apples, carrots, and pretzels to keep you from reaching for that sugary donut instead. Gain some (portion) control. Like moderation and balance, watching ones portions isnt a trendy notion, but it is a tried-and-true approach to healthy snacking. Sitting down at the computer or in front or the television with pre-packaged 100calorie snack packs of popular treats like Snyders of Hanover pretzels, ensures that you wont go overboard or over recommended portion sizes. Add some flavor. Take advantage of the many flavors available in todays snack foods that can satisfy your cravings and allow you to savor what youre eating. Snackers craving some heat might enjoy spicy varieties like buffalo wing and jalapeno flavored pretzel pieces, while those with a sweet tooth can get their fix with choices like honeytinged or cinnamon-dusted snacks. Indulge just enough. Watching what you eat doesnt mean you have to swear off everything tasty that you love even chocolate. A handful of chocolate covered pretzels are still a good choice compared to other high fat, high calorie chocolate snacks. Balance eating with moving. Again, its not a news flash that exercise is important to the bodys metabolism and to overall health and wellness, but taking time to engage in some extra physical activity (it could be treadmill time or even opting for the stairs instead of the elevator) makes snacking all the much more satisfying, and less guilt-inducing. Plus, if youre used to just doing cardio now is the time to amp up your routine with weights and resistance training and see results much faster. Ultimately, improving your eating and lifestyle habits doesnt have to mean radical change. From shedding those extra pounds that crept up during the fall and early winter holidays, to pledging to eat in a more organic, natural or sustainable way, resolutions dont have to be so daunting. And by the time next January rolls around, you may not even need to make such resolutions in the first place. ARAContent How to keep those healthy eating resolutions in January and beyond By BRENTKALLESTAD Associated PressTALLAHASSEE A circuit court judge sided with the Florida Legislature on Thursday in a lawsuit over who has authority to set tuition for the states 11 public universities. Chief Circuit Judge Charles Francis ruled against former Gov. and U.S. Sen. Bob Graham, who sued to establish the Board of Governors as the body responsible for setting tuition. Graham helped lead a citizen initiative that amended the Florida Constitution to create the board in 2002. The intent was to curtail political interference with the universities. Grahams attorney, Robin Gibson, said he will appeal the decision to the 1st District Court of Appeal. The case is expected to wind its way to the Florida Supreme Court. Its fundamental to our form of government that legislative powers are limited by the constitution, and the will of the people as expressed in the constitution is to prevail over the Legislature, Gibson said Thursday. We contend that a simple reading of the amendment shows that the people have given the full power to govern the university system to the Board of Governors. At issue is whether t he state constitutional amen dment voters adopted in 200 2 to establish the boa rd rescinded the Legislature s power for setting tuition an d fees and transferred it to t he board. The plaintiffs also inclu ded former U.S. Rep. Lo u Frey and former Flori da State University Preside nt Talbot Sand y DAlemberte, who al so argued the board has so le authority over tuition. They sued in 2007. T he board joined them but wit hdrew earlier this year aft er agreeing with t he Legislature to share tuitio nsetting authority. Judge: Legislature has authority to set tuition

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Page 6ANews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com 1/3/11 www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 SERVING CENTRAL FLORIDA FOR 79 YEARS Since 1931NO DEALER FEE, PLUS TAX & TAG, STATE FEE, O% withALLY, SEBC RULES APPLY. 2010JEEPWRANGLERUNLIMITEDX NEW2010DODGECHALLENGERNEW2010RAM2500CREW4X4CUMMINSTURBODIESELNEW2010JEEPWRANGLERSPORT4X4NEW2010DODGEJOURNEYNEW2010JEEPCOMPASSNEW2010CHRYSLERSEBRINGTOURINGJX054 DX052 TX115JX059 CX139 JX079 TX131 NO DEALER FEES2010DODGEGRAND CARAVANSERetail..............$25,835 Rebate............ -$1,750 VanBonus......... -$750 WellsBonus.... -$1,750ChryslerGroupor VanOwnerBonus-$1,000 $20,585*TX1362010CHRYSLER TOWN-N-COUNTRY $30,520*CX100 0% FOR 72 MOSRetail..............$37,270 Rebate............ -$2,000 VanBonus......... -$750 WellsBonus.... -$2,000ChryslerGroupor VanOwnerBonus-$2,000 0% FOR 72 MOS$26,080Rebate.......... -$2,500 WellsBonus..... -$581 BigFinish......... -$500 $ 22,499$26,280Rebate.......... -$2,000 WellsBonus..... -$781 BigFinish......... -$500 $ 22,999$26,555WellsBonus.. -$1,381 BigFinish......... -$500 $ 24,674$50,175Rebate.......... -$3,500 EngineBonus -$1000 WellsBonus.. -$4,500 $ 41,175$23,635Rebate.......... -$2,000 WellsBonus.. -$1,136 BigFinish......... -$500 $ 20,599$24,300Rebate............. -$500 WellsBonus.. -$1,301 BigFinish......... -$500 $ 21,999$22,885Rebate.......... -$2,500 WellsBonus..... -$886 BigFinish......... -$500 $ 18,999 YEAR END CLEARANCE a nd Cheryl Brantley-Davis a nd Debra Worley were electe d to the town council. The school board also saw c hanges as retiring chairman W ally Randall was replaced b y Avon Park High School c oach Ronnie Jackson and i ncumbent Richard Norris w as defeated by Bill B rantley. School board memb er Andy Tuck ran unopp osed. After Highlands County T ax Collector Charles L. B ryan passed away, Eric Z wayer handily won a sevenc andidate race to fill the posit ion.The real estate marketChallenges remain in the l ocal real estate market. Going into 2010 the NewsS un hoped that a glut of i nventory and lower interest r ates may prove positive for t he real estate market in H ighlands County. The trends did not go that w ay. According to Realtor Chip B oring, residential values are n ot yet recovering. Very few homes in H ighlands County are priced o ver $400,000, so not only a re fewer homes selling, w hat homes are selling, are s elling for less than they w ere appraised only a few y ears ago, he said in a recent t elephone interview. Boring added there was a c onsiderable inventory of h ousing already on the mark et. Until that was in use, c reating a need for additional h ousing stock, he didnt see a t remendous improvement any t ime soon. He did feel comf ortable predicting it could take another 14 months to sell off the residential backlog. He warned, however, that while the commercial real estate market has not been as economically ravaged as the residential segment, the situation has signs of changing. With the retail economy still sluggish, some small businesses may find themselves unable to meet their mortgage obligations, forced to close their doors. Boring said there is a silver lining in all this news. With foreclosures occurring at a record pace, it is a buyers market. This is an excellent time for finding good deals in real estate, Boring said, especially for buyers with money in the bank.The local economy and employmentWith a collapsed housing market and unemployment at 11.7 percent in December 2009, the News-Sun hoped new store openings, like the Aldi grocery store and the rumored Sams Club, would make a positive impact. While Aldi opened, however, Sams Club remains only a town council members dream. And while some new small businesses opened, each downtown area has its share of empty storefronts. The local economy remained stagnant, and the countys unemployment rate grew worse. November 2010s figures revealed Highlands County ends the year with an unemployment rate of 13.4 percent. That means it is among the hardest hit counties in the state ranking 12th in unemployment out of 67 counties. The state as a whole ended the year with an unemployment rate of 12 percent, and the nation one of 9.3 percent. Acontinuing discussion among elected officials and business is focused on how to diversify the economy while growing the job market.Harder HallThis still lovely from a distance Spanish, pink, city-owned albatross is in exactly the same situation it was on Jan. 3, 2010 when the News-Sun wrote, The city of Sebring is still trying to find a buyer for Harder Hall who will be able to actually pay for the historic hotel. AP city managerIt took the better part of 2010, but Avon Park did get its city manager position filled. Maria Sutherland, formerly the citys project manager, served for months as interim city manager, as two separate searches were made one by the Ridge Riders, a volunteer consulting group of retired city and planning officials, and a home grown committee that created the final list. Bruce Behrens was hired on Sept. 13. His last position had been as city manager of Summerton, S.C. Behrens has since promoted Sutherland to the position of assistant city manger.Eagle Training CenterStrong resistance from county residents caused the controversial project to be dropped. It was almost immediately replaced, however, by another building proposal actually three separate housing sub-divisions in the southern part of the county. Environmental groups are as opposed to the sub-divisions as they were to the training center. The states Department of Community Affairs agrees, having rejected the county s comprehensive plan th at includes the sub-divisions. Currently the county is saying it will sue for an appeal. Concerned individ uals and organizations li ke Dale Gillis of the Highlan ds County Audubon Society are asking the county to sto p the appeal process, or at lea st determine the cost of an appeal.Impact feesWith construction wo rk virtually dead in the wate r, impact fees did not play a significant role in Highlan ds County this year. In fact, th ey have been sidelined for t he present. Continued from page 1A Looking back on how the for turned out News-Sun f ile The general election in November, and the primary before it, were big news in 2010. News-Sun file Bruce Behrens was hired as city manager in Avon Park on Sept. 13. NEWS-SUN

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i ffs administrative staff go i n 2012 when they have to c lock in? Adirection has to be set in t he upcoming year by county c ommissioners in order to m ake sure that an evere xpanding need is met for t hose who serve and protect t he county.Harder HallAnother group has opened d iscussions about the H ighlands County landmark, b ut after 2009 started off w ith such promise for the b eleaguered white elephant, S ebring City Council was t old in October that develope rs for Harder Hall were h aving trouble getting the f unding needed for the purc hase and the deal unraveled i n 2010. What direction will S ebring take in a solution w ith the old building, and h ow much taxpayer money is g oing to be spent to get there a re just a few of the quest ions surrounding the old h otel. A von Park city managerAfter over a year of s earch, rejection and r esearch, Bruce Behrens was s elected to serve as Avon P arks City manager, but r ecent discussions show that M ayor Sharon Schuler and D eputy Mayor Brenda Gray are not happy with decisions Behrens made about a public safety director. Will the City of Charm settle down and fix the financial issues, or will Behrens be looking towards greener pastures before the year is ended?Real estate marketThe keystone to holding up other economic factors in Highlands County over the last 10 years, the real estate market saw some bounce in 2009, but continued to drop in the last year, mostly due to the deals on interest, foreclosures and short sales. The term strategic foreclosure became a common term throughout Highlands County over the past six months, but has the housing market reached the bottom, or will there be a double dip in the downward spiral?DCA and developmentHighlands County Commissioners will have to decide how much of a legal bill they will pay for an upcoming battle with the Department of Community Affairs, and one of the questions is what will that department look like after Gov. Rick Scott takes office. Highlands County taxpayers are asking how much they have to pay for future development that may not come in the next 5-10 years.RecreationCounty staff has come up with a new plan to redistribute recreation funding, but the plan will not be announced until next year. Municipalities will have to figure out what share they will get and how to budget around that new plan, especially Avon Park and Lake Placid. Look for user fees or park closures in the near future if financial trends continue.Parker trialThe community was faced with the a lot of emotion when ex-Avon Park Police Officer James Parker was arrested in May of 2009 for the death of 22-month-old Kaedyn Short, and his trial should be held this year. Short died from bruises and a skull fracture, and Parker is charged with first degree murder and aggrava ted child abuse. Apre-trial conference is on the docket in February. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 7A LIMITED SPACE CALLTODAY! 5 DAYS a week$ 30 Get In Shape Learn Self Defense Improve Self Esteem Make Better GradesMARTIAL ARTS AMERICA471-2467Best After School Program in SebringFREEPICKUP from: Kindergarten Learning Center, Cracker Trail, Sun-N-Lakes, Woodlawn, Fred Wild, Memorial, Hill Gustat, Sebring Middle/High Located on Kenilworth Sebring*Some Restrictions Apply Life Care, Not Day Care Positive Medical Transport(863) 655-0030 Think Positive!!Have A Happy New Year from 5 generations of family at Positive Medical Transport Continued from page 1A Budgets, Harder Hall and real estate bear watching once again News-Sun f ile The budget to operate places like Lake June Park in Lake Placid may be hard to come by in 2011, which could put a stop to some recreation. Associated PressST. PETERSBURG Decembers w ave of unusually cold weather has d estroyed much of Floridas green beans a nd sweet corn, which means shoppers w ill pay more at the grocery store and s ee more imports on the shelves. Florida is the nations largest produce r of green beans and sweet corn the k ind of corn we eat, not the kind we put i n our gas tanks. According to the Florida Department of Agriculture, the state lost $273 million from the December freezes alone including nearly 9,000 acres of crops. The statistics are compiled only through Dec. 20, which means they dont even account for the problems caused by this weeks cold. 2010 dealt a one-two punch for the states farms. An 11-day spell in January was one of the areas coldest periods on record, and December has had an unprecedented trio of cold fronts. Sam Accursio lost nearly all of his pickling cucumbers at his Homestead farm last January. Eleven months later, about half of his new crop has been wiped out. Its crazy, Accursio said. Ive never experienced a growing season where weve had four frosts in one year. Florida agriculture loses $273M in first December freezes

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Metro ServicesTax season is right around the corner, which can be good news or bad news depending on the individual. For those accustomed to getting a tax return, that annual financial windfall is welcomed with open arms. On the other hand, those used to a tax bill every April are far less enthusiastic when tax time rolls around. With tax season on the horizon once again, its time to start preparing to file a return. The following guide can help individuals get their tax materials in order, whether theyre filing themselves or enlisting the help of a tax professional.Income DocumentsIts easy to get confused when attempting to file a tax return.For men and women who visit the local library for their filing information, that table full of documents can be intimidating. Whats more, the Internal Revenue Service Web site can be difficult to navigate for those who have not visited it in the past. No document is more necessary than a W-2, which employers must provide by the end of January. Men and women will get one from each of their employers, so those who work multiple jobs, even part-time jobs, will need a W-2 for each job theyve worked in the past 12 months. Additional documents that can be necessary might pertain to investment income, business or farming income, alimony received, and forms for state and local income tax refunds. Agood rule of thumb to avoid getting lost in the documents is to start as early as possible the more extensive or complicated the employment and income history may be. For example, men and women with one job and no outside income should be able to file quickly and easily. The more extensive a persons investment portfolio or the more jobs a person has, the more difficult it will likely be to file the return. So start early if things are complicated.CreditsThe government gives men and women all sorts of credits that reduce the amount of the income taxed. These include homebuyer credits, IRAcontributions, green energy credits, or student loan interest. Homebuyer credits: A properly executed settlement statement must be attached to a return, and men and women should keep in mind the IRS now has greater authority to deny homebuyer credits. IRAcontributions: A year-end account summary or bank statement is often all thats needed. Green energy credits. Among the items potentially eligible for residential energy credits are insulation, energy efficient exterior windows, energy efficient HVAC appliances, and solar hot water heaters. Of course, receipts will be necessary for those attempting to earn a credit for any of these items. Student loan interest: A year-end loan statement should be received sometime in January. Personal ItemsTo file a tax return, individuals will need their own social security number, as well as that of anyone else they might be helping or listing on their own return. This includes a spouse and any dependents. If preparing someone elses tax return, be sure to inform them this information will be needed to avoid any delays. For those men and women who will be enlisting a professional to prepare their return, bring all of this information to the meeting. Tax season is especially busy for accountants and tax prep professionals, so it might be difficult to secure another appointment should you forPage 8ANews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com 401 West Interlake Blvd. Lake Placid, FL 33852(863) 465-1725 BUSINESS If you dread making N ew Years resolutions b ecause youre afraid y oull fall short, take heart: O ne minor setback doesnt m ean having to write off t he rest of the year. Youll p robably have more succ ess if you start out with s mall steps and gain m omentum as you go, w hether its losing weight, l owering debt or boosting r etirement savings. If your goal is to i mprove your personal f inances, here are a few i deas to get you started: Most dieters know that t he key to success using W eight Watchers is to m onitor every morsel you e at. You become more a ware of and thus, more l ikely to change, behavi oral patterns that caused y ou to overeat in the first p lace. You can use the s ame strategy when d esigning a livable budget. For a month or two, w rite down every cent you s pend: rent, food, gas, c lothes, cable, insurance ( health, auto, home), 4 01(k) contributions, entert ainment everything. The l ist will probably be eyeo pening. Along with the u sual suggestions like b rown-bagging lunch more o ften and fewer to-go coff ees, try these relatively p ainless ways to trim e xpenses: Pay bills on time and s end at least the minimum a mount due. Youll avoid l ate fees and related intere st rate increases, and it w ill improve your credit s core. Balance your checking a ccount regularly and use i n-network ATMs to avoid f ees. If your employer offers f lexible spending accounts, u se them to pay health and d ependent care expenses w ith pretax dollars. If y oure in the 25 percent t ax bracket that means e xpenses youd have paid f or anyway will cost 25 p ercent less. Reduce energy bills by t urning down the thermos tat, weatherproofing your h ome, turning off energy v ampire appliances when n ot in use and buying energ y-efficient appliances. Raise insurance d eductibles and shop a round for better rates. With the money you s ave, start paying down d ebts more quickly. One s trategy that often works is t o list all outstanding bala nces and their corresponding interest rates. Then each month pay the minimum amount due on each account except pay as much as possible on the highest-rate account or loan. Once its paid off, move to the next-highestrate account, and so on. At the same time, start building an emergency fund. Although the ideal of having six to nine months worth of expenses saved may sound insurmountable, dont be discouraged. Start slowly with a few dollars each month. It wont be missed and might just save you from needing an expensive short-term loan to cover emergency car repairs or another unexpected bill. And finally, look to the future. Buying a home, paying for college and retirement are all big-ticket items that require sound budgeting and credit management skills. Here are several helpful resources: Find free budgeting tools, including interactive budget calculators, at the governments www.mymoney.gov, the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (www.nfcc.org), Mint.com (www.mint.com) and Visa Inc.s Practical Money Skills for Life (www.practicalmoneyskills.com/budg eting). Wealth Watchers applies techniques gleaned from Weight Watchers to personal financial management (www.ewealthwatchers.com). MyFICO.com (www.myfico.com/CreditE ducation) explains the ins and outs of credit reports and credit scores. Whats My Score (also run by Visa) offers tips on ways to improve your credit score and a free credit score estimator (www.WhatsMyScore.org). Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ PracticalMoney. Resolve to improve your finances Personal Finance Jason Alderman Did YouKNOW?In Florida, the bicycle is legally defined as a vehicle. Bicyclists using a public roadway are considered operators of motor vehicles and are responsible for observing all traffic laws. With few exceptions, there is only one road and it is up to motorists and bicyclists to treat each other with care and respect. Adherence to the law is the foundation of respect. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Tis the season to start gathering tax data Metro Services Avoid the stress of tax time by preparing documents well in advance of April 15. Associated PressNEWYORK T he Web may seem like t he land of something f or nothing. Free video. Fr ee news. Even free too ls such as word processin g and spreadsheets. But almost two-thir ds of adult Internet users in the U.S. have paid f or access to at least one of these intangible item s online, according to a new survey from the Pe w Internet and Americ an Life Project. Whether people w ill pay for different types of material on the Web is among the most pressin g questions facing med ia companies in the 21 st century. As people shift the ir attention to the Intern et from more tradition al ways of enjoying medi a, the companies that pr ovide everything fro m movies to mystery nove ls want to make sure th ey can still get paid for wh at they do. The big TVne tworks want viewers to pay for full access to episodes of their favori te shows. Newspaper com panies want readers to pay for news. Book pu blishers want higher pric es for digital editions of ne w releases. The new figures fro m Pew suggest paying f or content online is at lea st not a completely foreig n idea for most people. About a third of respondents said th ey have paid for digit al music. Same for softwar e. Behind that cam e mobile apps for ce ll phones or tablet compu ters at 21 percent. Th en digital games at 19 pe rcent and newspaper, ma gazine or journal articles at 18 percent. The survey found th at among people who pa id for content, the typic al user spent about $10 a month. Study: Web users will pay for some stuff

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By PAULWISEMAN APEconomics WriterWASHINGTON Far f ewer people are applying for u nemployment benefits as t he year ends, raising hopes f or a healthier job market in 2 011. Applications are at their l owest level since July 2008, t he Labor Department says. T hey fell to 388,000 in the w eek ending Dec. 25, bringi ng the four-week average to 4 14,000. Until mid-October, t he four-week average had b een stuck above 450,000 m ost of the year. Economists say the numb er of people applying for u nemployment benefits pred icts where the job market w ill go over the next few m onths so much so that t hey use this data to help f orecast economic growth. Were starting to see a p ickup in job growth, says C onference Board economist K enneth Goldstein. We may even get to a p oint, conceivably by spring, w here the consumer is going t o say that it no longer feels l ike were still in a recess ion. He expects the economy to g enerate 100,000 to 150,000 j obs a month by spring, up f rom an average 86,500 a m onth in 2010. Thats an improvement, b ut still not enough to cause b ig drop in the unemploym ent rate. To Paul Kasriel, c hief economist at Northern T rust, fewer people applying f or unemployment benefits s uggests the unemployment r ate will slip from 9.8 percent i n November to 9.7 percent e arly next year; that would m ean about 150,000 fewer u nemployed. The Conference Boards G oldstein says the unemploym ent rate might actually rise f or a few months as an i ncrease in job openings lures e ven more job seekers back i nto the labor market. He d oesnt expect the unemploym ent rate to start dropping u ntil mid-2011 and says it w ill finish the year above 9 p ercent. The good news is that layo ffs have fallen back to prer ecession levels. In October, 1 .7 million people were laid o ff or fired the lowest figu re since August 2006, more t han a year before the Great R ecession started. Layoffs a nd dismissals peaked at 2.6 m illion in January 2009. Weve stopped the losses, a nd things are kind of turning a round, says Mark C hristiansen, deputy director o f the Workforce D evelopment Center in R iverside, Calif., which has o ne of the nations highest unemployment rates. In past downturns, the economy didnt start generating jobs until applications for unemployment benefits consistently fell below 400,000 a week. But some economists say the old rule of thumb is outdated. Payrolls were already growing this year when applications were still well above 450,000 a week One reason: The labor force has grown by 25 million people over the past two decades. You would expect the level of initial jobless claims to be higher the larger the labor force, Northern Tursts Kasriel says. Another: Since the Great Recession, the unemployed, knowing their job search may be long and difficult, have been more likely to apply for benefits than they used to be. Previously, there were 1.25 laid-off workers for every person applying for benefits. Now, claims and layoffs are about equal, notes Zach Pandl, economist at Nomura Securities. That means each claim represents fewer laidoff workers. Even if theyve stopped cutting, employers have been slow to hire. In October, there were still 4.4 unemployed for every job opening. Its not really been the layoff rate thats been the problem in most of 2010, says Gary Burtless, senior fellow in economics studies at the Brookings Institution. Its been the failure of employers to create vacancies. But vacancies are expected to open up in 2011. Asurvey released this month by the Business Roundtable found that 45 percent of big company CEOs planned to add jobs over the next six months, up from 31 percent in the third quarter; just 18 percent planned to cut jobs. Asurvey by the staffing firm Manpower found that companies are more optimistic about hiring than theyve been in two years. Were going to start to see jobs added. Its just going to take longer than anyone would want to get to somewhere more comfortable, says Manpower CEO Jeff Joerres The first quarter is classically a slow hiring quarter. After that, were going to see numbers that seem more like a recovery. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 9A SERVICE 6 DAYS A WEEK 2833 Hwy 27 S. Avon Park 453-CART (2278) Email us at: ezgotxt@aol.comAmerican Golf Cart Golf Cart BatteriesFrom $6495& Up+ Tax & ExchangeCLEARANCE2007 CartsWhile They Last!Battery Charger Repair NEW & USEDGas & ElectricGolf Carts2-4 PassengerVehiclesReconditionedGolf Carts We Buy Old Carts SUNDAY BRUNCH11am 1:30pm Lunch served after 1:30pmwith purchase of beverageReceive$200 OFFExpires 12-31-10 Trishs Paradise GrilleHighlands Ridge South(863) 382-2131$1095 Contact UsBy Phone(863) 385-6155By Mail2227 US Hwy 27S Sebring, FL 33870By E-Mailwww.newssun.com/contact/ BUSINESS Fewer join unemployment rolls; good sign for At a glanceHere are the states with the largest changes in applications, and some of the reasons for the shifts. The data is for the week ending Dec. 18, one week behind the nationwide figures. States with the largest declines: California: Down 7,656, due to fewer layoffs in agriculture Illinois: Down 3,149, due to fewer layoffs in construction and services Georgia: Down 1,935, due to fewer layoffs in the construction, trade, service and manufacturing industries Pennsylvania: Down 1,574, due to fewer layoffs in the construction and industrial machinery industries Texas: Down 1,494, due to fewer layoffs in trade and manufacturing States with the largest increases: New Jersey: Up 5,235, due to layoffs in the construction, services, transportation and manufacturing industries Michigan: Up 3,087, due to layoffs in the auto industry Missouri: Up 2,404, due to layoffs in construction and services Florida: Up 2,281, due to layoffs in services, manufacturing and agriculture Oregon: Up 2,026, no reason given

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Page 10ANews-Sun Sunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.co m Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 385-6155. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2009-1951-GCS TD BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. PAULINE E. DELMARR and MICHAEL A. DELMARR, her husband, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 17, 2010 (the ``Judgment''), entered in Civil Case No. 09-1951-GCS of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which TD BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and PAULINE E. DELMARR and MICHAEL A. DELMARR, her husband, are Defendants. I will sell the Property as defined in the Judgment and as set forth below at a public sale on January 14, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. to the ``highest bidder'', for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. The ``highest bidder'' for purposes of this Notice of Sale, is defined as the party who bids the largest amount of money to purchase the Property ad who completes the sale in a timely fashion, as hereinafter set out. The one who bids the largest amount of money to purchase the Property shall be permitted to complete the sale by delivering to the Clerk, the balance of such bid, over and above the deposit, by 5:00 p.m. on the day of the sale. The following Property located in Highlands County, Florida, is the subject of this Notice of Sale: Lot 24, Block 105, SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, Unit 8, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 9, Page 58, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Street Address: 5760 San Juan Drive, Sebring, Florida 33872 (``Property''). Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on December 17, 2010. BOB GERMAINE Clerk of Circuit Court By: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk December 26, 2010; January 2, 2011 the intersection of said right-of-way line with the East line of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4; thence South 0 degrees 18'50'' West along said East line a distance of 293.08 feet to the Southeast corner of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4; thence south 89 degrees 16'29'' West along the South line of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 a distance of 660.39 feet to the Point of Beginning, as Recorded in the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Real Property Address: 605 Highway 66 West, Sebring, FL 33875 Real Property Tax ID#: C-16-35-29-A00-0012-0000. DATED on December 23, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of Said Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM OF LIEN WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. January 2, 9, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-530-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH D. LAGROW; RHONDA K. LAGROW; RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA; UNITED STATE OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; NORTH AMERICAN SPECIALTY INSURANCE COMPANY; AND ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, AND TENANT #4, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 Notice is given that pursuant to a Final Judgment in Foreclosure Against Defendants, KENNETH LAGROW and RHONDA LAGROW, dated the 4th day of August, 2010, in Case No. 10-530-GCS, of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK is the Plaintiff and KENNETH LAGROW and RHONDA LAGROW, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on the 25th day of January, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure Against Defendants, KENNETH LAGROW and RHONDA LAGROW, and described as follows: That part of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4, lying South of the Southerly right-of-way line of State Road 66 in Section 16, Township 35 South, Range 29 East, being more particularly described as follows: Begin at the Southwest corner of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4; thence North 0 degrees 17'31'' East along the West line of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 a distance of 77.05 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way line of State Road 66 West; said point lying on a circular curve to the right, having a radius of 5679.58 feet and a central angle of 1 degree 11'18''; thence along said curved right-of-way line on an arc distance of 117.79 feet; thence South 22 degrees 20'13'' East along said right-of-way line a distance of 25.73 feet to a point on said Southerly right-of-way line of State Road 66 West, said point lying on a circular curve to the right, having a radius of 5654.58 feet and a central angle of 5 degrees 52'39''; thence along said curved right-of-way line an arc distance of 580.06 feet to are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 25th day of January, 2011, the following described property as set forth ins said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 15, IN BLOCK 144, OF PLACID LAKES SECTION ELEVEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 314 ENOS AVE., LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 23rd day of December, 2010. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk January 2, 9, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 08-00314 DIVISION: ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. A NDRES LEON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 23, 2010, and entered in Case No. 08-00314 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which OneWest Bank, FSB, is the Plaintiff and Andres Leon, IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY Case #: 10-1353 GCS Judge: Cowden EDWARD H. DAWES and MERNEL D. DAWES, Plaintiff(s), -vs.ROBERTO ENRIQUE CASTROMAN VEZZANI, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Roberto Enrique CASTROMAN Vezzani Residence and Address unknown Last known adress: PO Box 5673 Caracas 1010, Venezuela or if any of the aforesaid persons is dead, then his or her unknown heirs, devisees, legatees or grantees; and any and all other persons or parties claiming by, though, under or against them; and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status, if known, claiming under any of the above named or described Defendant(s) or parties or claiming to have any right, title or interest in and to the lands hereinafter described as Defendant(s). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an Action to Quiet Title for the following described property, to wit: Lot 2, Block 351, SUN 'N LAKES ESTATS OF SEBRING UNIT 16, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 4, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are requiredt o serve a copy of your written defenses, if any to it, on the Plaintiff(s) attorney, whose name and address is: David F. Lanier, Esq., P.O. Box 400, A von Park, Florida 33826-0400, and file the original with the Clerk of the above styled Court on or before January 28, 2011, otherwise a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court on December 21, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of said Circuit Court By: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk December 26, 2010; January 2, 9, 16, 2011 1050Legals 1000 Announcements Classified ads get fast results

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, January 2, 2011Page 11 A STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF DRAFT PERMIT The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) gives notice of its preparation of a draft permit for Bishop Brothers Dairy, to be issued to Bishop Brothers Dairy, Inc. The proposed permit authorizes the operation of the waste management system in accordance with the approved Nutrient Management Plan, which also limits the herd size and management practices. The permit will also provide coverage under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), as delegated to the state by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The dairy is located at 2300 Bishop Dairy Road, Sebring, Florida 33870. Any interested person may submit written comments on the draft permit of the Department or may submit a written request for a public meeting to Bradley Akers, FDEP Southeast District, 400 North Congress Avenue, Suite 200, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, in accordance with rule 62-620.555 of the Florida Administrative Code. The comments or request for a public meeting must contain the information set forth below and must be received in the Office within 30 days of publication of this notice. Failure to submit comments or request a public meeting within this time period shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to submit comments or request a public meeting under Rule 62-620.555, Florida Administrative Code. The comments or request for a public meeting must contain the following information: (a) The commenter's name, address, and telephone number, the applicant's name and address, the Department Permit File Number and the county in which the project is proposed; (b) A statement of how and when notice of the Department action or proposed action was received; (c) A statement of the facts the Department should consider in making the final decision; (d) A statement of which rules or statutes require reversal or modification of the Department action or proposed action; and (e) If desired, a request that a public meeting be scheduled including a statement of the nature of the issues proposed to be raised at the meeting. However, the Department may not always grant a request for a public meeting. Therefore, written comments should be submitted within 30 days of publication of this notice, even if a public meeting is requested. If a public meeting is scheduled the public comment period is extended until the close of the public meeting. If a public meeting is held any person may submit oral or written statements and data at the meeting on the Department proposed action. As a result of significant public comment the Department final action may be different from the position taken by it in this draft permit. The permit application file and supporting data NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 5.341 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending Rule 5.341, Use of Time-Out and Physical Restraint for Students With Disabilities. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, January 18, 2011, at 5:00 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed amendment is to make changes to the policy in accordance with requirements set forth in recent Florida legislation. A summary of the proposed amendment is as follows: The District shall implement behavioral management interventions for disruptive students to prevent and reduce significant disruptive behavior and to provide for the physical safety and security of students and staff when students pose a threat to themselves and/or others. The focus shall be on the use of the least restrictive but effective intervention(s) for each student. The following interventions shall be available: Time Out (nonexclusion time out and exclusion time out), Seclusion and Physical Restraint. Manual physical restraint is the use of physical restraint techniques that involve physical force to restrict free movement of all or part of a students body. It is a method to prevent a student from harming himself/herself or others and may only be implemented by trained, qualified school personnel. All intervention methods shall be documented and reported according to District policy. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b), Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,BY: Wally CoxSuperintendent & ex officio secretary January 2, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-001287 OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, Plantiff, vs. JEFFREY M. DRESSEL, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALBERT W. ROTH Last Known Address: UNKNOWN Address Attempted At: 3651 US HIGHWAY 27 LOT 88, SEBRING, FL 33870 CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 17, BLOCK 1, HARDER HALL COUNTRY CLUB II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 13, PAGE 46, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before February 10, 2011 a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE NEWS SUN and file the original with the Cler k of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 28th day of December, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Annette Daff As Deputy Cler k January 2, 9, 2011 1050Legals NOTICE OF INTENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER ADOPTION SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A CONTENT AREA SPECIALISTREADING CURRICULUM AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY intends to amend the job description for a Content Area Specialist Reading Curriculum at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. The proposed amendment to the job description shall be effective upon adoption. Pursuant to Section 120.54, Florida Statutes, any affected person has twenty-one (21) days after publication of this notice to request the opportunity to present evidence and argument to the School Board of Highlands County, Florida regarding the proposed job description. Such hearing must be requested in writing and received by Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870, within 21 days after publication of this notice. If such hearing is requested, it will be held Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:45 p.m. Any person desiring to attend such a hearing is requested to call the Superintendents office to verify whether such hearing has been requested. The purpose and effect of the proposed job description is to add new minimum qualifications for a Content Area Specialist Reading Curriculum. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications are 1. A valid Florida educators certificate; (2) A Masters degree from an accredited institution or a Bachelors degree from an accredited educational institution with 10 years of successful teaching or relevant experience in a related field; (3) Knowledge of curriculum and/or discipline program design, implementation and evaluation in the assigned area as reflected in job performance assessments; (4) Physical Requirements: exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required; (5) Satisfactory clearance of a criminal history records check and drug screening; Additional desired job qualifications are: (1) Reading certification/endorsement (2) Specialized knowledge in effective teaching strategies; (3) Proficiency in effective instruction of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS), resulting in documented student learning gains; (4) Knowledge in assessment data and evaluation of student learning needs/achievement. The Primary Performance Responsibilities are: (1) Works collaboratively with district and school staff to develop strategies, establish diagnostic and intervention services where appropriate or deemed necessary, and assist in directing curricular/instructional decision-making to directly impact student growth and achievement; (2) Commits to the vision and mission of the district and curriculum department; (3) Serves as a member of the district and school-based curriculum leadership councils to articulate curriculum content, programs and resources; (4) Works across multiple subject areas and serves as a subject area specialist; (5) Integrates technology in content area; (6) Collaborate in writing in District Reading Plan (7) Stays current on latest research and legislation in education through professional reading, attending state/national meetings/conferences, workshops, collaborating with other districts, and acting as a member of a professional organization; (8) Acts as liaison between the district, state, and national subject area organizations; (9) Evaluates effectiveness of and manages assigned programs, processes, and procedures; (10) Understands and utilizes collaborative planning strategies; (11) Works directly with school-based teachers to develop standards-based micro and macro curriculum plans; (12) Works with feeder school units to develop K-12 articulated curriculum guides; (13) Models and mentors school-based teachers in planning, implementation, and evaluation of effective, research-based instruction, including literacy and intervention strategies; (14) Organizes and facilitates professional development activities for applicable school-based teachers. (15) Provides training in all state approved reading endorsement competencies; (16) Oversees administration of statewide and district progress monitoring assessment in content area; (17) Serves as district-level administrator of the local instructional improvement system (database); (18) Identifies and develops shortand long-range plans based on student needs consistent with district, state and/or curriculum requirements; (20) Leads and supports school-level curriculum resource teachers; (21) Collaborates with other Heartland Educational Consortium members on curriculum and training; (22) Serves on the district Problem Solving/RtI Committee; (23) Organizes and facilitates district adoptions of instructional materials; (24) Submits all fee payments, membership fees, and assessment fees in a timely fashion; (25) Interprets and utilizes data (including, but not limited to, standardized and other test results; (26) Identifies, selects, develops or modifies instructional materials to support learning objectives to meet the needs of students with diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds, learning styles, and special needs; (27) Communicates effectively, orally and in writing, with other professionals, students, parents, and community; (28) Effectively and efficiently manages materials and assigned equipment; (29) Establishes and maintains effective and efficient record keeping procedures including student records subject to the requirements of the Family Rights and Privacy Act; (30) Maintains a positive, organized, and safe working environment; (31) Manages time effectively; (32) Attends meetings and trainings as needed; (33) Fulfills professional responsibilities; (34) Writes or facilitates writing grants to obtain additional funding or resources; (35) Acts in a professional and ethical manner and adheres at all times to the Code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct; and (36) Performs other incidental tasks consistent with the goals and objectives of this position. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b), Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office (Attn. Connie Scobey), George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.HIGHLANDS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, BY: Wally Cox, Superintendent & ex officio secretary. January 2, 2011 Notice is hereby given that Downtown Mini Storage LLC will sell at public auction at 195 S. Railroad Ave., Avon Park, Florida 33825 at 1:00 P.M. Saturday 8th January 2011 to the highest bidder. Items held for Shantay Edmund, TV, TV Stand, Toys, Drawers, Bookshelf, bags and boxes of unknown contents. Items held for Reyes Hernandez, Shelves, Fishing rod, Weedeater, Pump, Cushions, bags and boxes of unknown contents. Items held for Krystal Miller, Washer, Dryer, Dresser, Ottoman, Toys, Twin Mattress, boxes and bags of unknown contents. Items held for Freddie Johnson, Luggage, pet carrier, armoire, fishing rod, stereo, dresser, wooden bed frame, end table, boxes and bags of unknown contents. Items held for Connie Hodge, Dining Table & Chairs, Sports Equipment, crib, Toys, Stereo, Dresser, Video Cabinet, boxes and bags of unknown contents. January 2, 2011 1050Legals NOTICE OF INTENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER ADOPTION SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A CONTENT AREA SPECIALISTSCIENCE CURRICULUM AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY intends to amend the job description for a Content Area Specialist Science Curriculum at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. The proposed amendment to the job description shall be effective upon adoption. Pursuant to Section 120.54, Florida Statutes, any affected person has twenty-one (21) days after publication of this notice to request the opportunity to present evidence and argument to the School Board of Highlands County, Florida regarding the proposed job description. Such hearing must be requested in writing and received by Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870, within 21 days after publication of this notice. If such hearing is requested, it will be held Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:45 p.m. Any person desiring to attend such a hearing is requested to call the Superintendents office to verify whether such hearing has been requested. The purpose and effect of the proposed job description is to add new minimum qualifications for a Content Area Specialist Science Curriculum. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications are 1. A valid Florida educators certificate; (2) A Masters degree from an accredited institution or a Bachelors degree from an accredited educational institution with 10 years of successful teaching or relevant experience in a related field; (3) Knowledge of curriculum and/or discipline program design, implementation and evaluation in the assigned area as reflected in job performance assessments; (4) Physical Requirements: exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required; (5) Satisfactory clearance of a criminal history records check and drug screening; Additional desired job qualifications are: (1) Specialized knowledge in effective teaching strategies; (2) Proficiency in effective instruction of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS), resulting in documented student learning gains; (3) Knowledge in assessment data and evaluation of student learning needs/achievement. The Primary Performance Responsibilities are: (1) Works collaboratively with district and school staff to develop strategies, establish diagnostic and intervention services where appropriate or deemed necessary, and assist in directing curricular/instructional decision-making to directly impact student growth and achievement; (2) Commits to the vision and mission of the district and curriculum department; (3) Serves as a member of the district and school-based curriculum leadership councils to articulate curriculum content, programs and resources; (4) Works across multiple subject areas and serves as a subject area specialist; (5) Integrates technology in content area; (6) Stays current on latest research and legislation in education through professional reading, attending state/national meetings/conferences, workshops, collaborating with other districts, and acting as a member of a professional organization (7) Acts as liaison between the district, state, and national subject area organizations; (8) Evaluates effectiveness of and manages assigned programs, processes, and procedures; (9) Understands and utilizes collaborative planning strategies; (10) Works directly with school-based teachers to develop standards-based micro and macro curriculum plans; (11) Works with feeder school units to develop K-12 articulated curriculum guides; (12) Models and mentors school-based teachers in planning, implementation, and evaluation of effective, research-based instruction, including literacy and intervention strategies; (13) Organizes and facilitates professional development activities for applicable school-based teachers. (14) Identifies and develops shortand long-range plans based on student needs consistent with district, state and/or curriculum requirements; (15) Leads and supports school-level curriculum resource teachers; (16) Develops and provides instructional classroom resources for school-based teacher; (17) Oversees administration of statewide and district progress monitoring assessments in content area; (18) Serves as district-level administrator of the local instructional improvement system (database); (19) Collaborates with other Heartland Educational Consortium members on curriculum and training; (20) Organizes and facilitates professional development funded through grants (EETT, Splash, etc); (21) Works directly with school-based teachers in preparation for administration of the end-o-course (EOC) exams; (22) Services as the district contact and organizer for the Air Force Science and Math awards banquet; (23) Serves on the district Problem Solving/RtI Committee; (24) Organizes and facilitates district adoptions of instructional materials; (25) Submits all fee payments, membership fees, and assessment fees in a timely fashion; (26) Interprets and utilizes data (including, but not limited to, standardized and other test results; (27) Identifies, selects, develops or modifies instructional materials to support learning objectives to meet the needs of students with diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds, learning styles, and special needs; (28) Communicates effectively, orally and in writing, with other professionals, students, parents, and community; (29) Effectively and efficiently manages materials and assigned equipment; (30) Establishes and maintains effective and efficient record keeping procedures including student records subject to the requirements of the Family Rights and Privacy Act; (31) Maintains a positive, organized, and safe working environment; (32) Manages time effectively; (33) Attends meetings and trainings as needed; (34) Fulfills professional responsibilities; (35) Writes or facilitates writing grants to obtain additional funding or resources; (36) Acts in a professional and ethical manner and adheres at all times to the Code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct; and (37) Performs other incidental tasks consistent with the goals and objectives of this position. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b), Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office (Attn. Connie Scobey), George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.HIGHLANDS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, B Y: Wally Cox, Superintendent & ex officio secretary. January 2, 2011 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the ficitious name of FAILURE UNIVERSITY, located at 3209 Avery Ct., in the County of Highlands, in the City of Sebring, Florida 33870 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Sebring, Florida, this 29th day of December, 2010. Demetri A. Duncan December 31, 2010 1050Legals NOTICE OF INTENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER ADOPTION SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A CONTENT AREA SPECIALIST-MATH CURRICULUM AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY intends to amend the job description for a Content Area Specialist Math Curriculum at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. The proposed amendment to the job description shall be effective upon adoption. Pursuant to Section 120.54, Florida Statutes, any affected person has twenty-one (21) days after publication of this notice to request the opportunity to present evidence and argument to the School Board of Highlands County, Florida regarding the proposed job description. Such hearing must be requested in writing and received by Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870, within 21 days after publication of this notice. If such hearing is requested, it will be held Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:45 p.m. Any person desiring to attend such a hearing is requested to call the Superintendents office to verify whether such hearing has been requested. The purpose and effect of the proposed job description is to add new minimum qualifications for a Content Area Specialist Math Curriculum. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications are 1. A valid Florida educators certificate; (2) A Masters degree from an accredited institution or a Bachelors degree from an accredited educational institution with 10 years of successful teaching or relevant experience in a related field; (3) Knowledge of curriculum and/or discipline program design, implementation and evaluation in the assigned area as reflected in job performance assessments; (4) Physical Requirements: exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required; (5) Satisfactory clearance of a criminal history records check and drug screening; (6) Additional desired job qualifications are: (1) Specialized knowledge in effective teaching strategies; (2) Proficiency in effective instruction of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS), resulting in documented student learning gains; (3) Knowledge in assessment data and evaluation of student learning needs/achievement. The Primary Performance Responsibilities are: (1) Works collaboratively with district and school staff to develop strategies, establish diagnostic and intervention services where appropriate or deemed necessary, and assist in directing curricular/instructional decision-making to directly impact student growth and achievement; (2) Commits to the vision and mission of the district and curriculum department; (3) Serves as a member of the district and school-based curriculum leadership councils to articulate curriculum content, programs and resources; (4) Works across multiple subject areas and serves as a subject area specialist; (5) Integrates technology in content area; (6) Stays current on latest research and legislation in education through professional reading, attending state/national meetings/conferences, workshops, collaborating with other districts, and acting as a member of a professional organization; (7) Acts as liaison between the district, state, and national subject area organizations; (8) Evaluates effectiveness of and manages assigned programs, processes, and procedures; (9) Understands and utilizes collaborative planning strategies; (10) Works directly with school-based teachers to develop standards-based micro and macro curriculum plans; (11) Works with feeder school units to develop K-12 articulated curriculum guides; (12) Models and mentors school-based teachers in planning, implementation, and evaluation of effective, research-based instruction, including literacy and intervention strategies; (13) Oversees administration of statewide and district progress monitoring assessment in content area; (14) Serves as district-level administrator of the local instructional improvement system (database); (15) Organizes and facilitates professional development activities for applicable school-based teachers; (16) Identifies and develops shortand long-range plans based on student needs consistent with district, state and/or curriculum requirements; (17) Leads and supports school-level curriculum resource teachers; (18) Collaborates with other Heartland Educational Consortium members on curriculum and training; (19) Works directly with school-based teachers in preparation for administration of the end-of-course (EOC) exams; (20) Serves as district contact and organizer for the Air Force Science and Math awards banquet; (21) Serves on the district Problem Solving/RtI Committee; (22) Develops and provides instructional classroom resources for school-based teachers; (23) Organizes and facilitates district adoptions of instructional materials; (24) Submits all fee payments, membership fees, and assessment fees in a timely fashion; (25) Interprets and utilizes data (including, but not limited to, standardized and other test results; (26) Identifies, selects, develops or modifies instructional materials to support learning objectives to meet the needs of students with diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds, learning styles, and special needs; (27) Communicates effectively, orally and in writing, with other professionals, students, parents, and community; (28) Effectively and efficiently manages materials and assigned equipment; (29) Establishes and maintains effective and efficient record keeping procedures including student records subject to the requirements of the Family Rights and Privacy Act; (30) Maintains a positive, organized, and safe working environment; (31) Manages time effectively; (32) Attends meetings and trainings as needed; (33) Fulfills professional responsibilities; (34) Writes or facilitates writing grants to obtain additional funding or resources; (35) Acts in a professional and ethical manner and adheres at all times to the Code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct; and (36) Performs other incidental tasks consistent with the goals and objectives of this position. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b), Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office (Attn. Connie Scobey), George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.HIGHLANDS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, BY: Wally Cox, Superintendent & ex officio secretary. January 2, 2011 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of ONE STOP MINI MART, in Highlands County, Florida, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Sebring, Florida, this 14th day of December, 2010. One Stop Mini Mart of Sebring, Inc. a Florida corporation By: /s/ Rafael Rivero Rafael Rivero, President January 2, 2011 tained at the Superintendents office (Attn. Connie Scobey), George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.HIGHLANDS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, BY: Wally Cox, Superintendent & ex officio secretary. January 2, 2011 1050Legals NOTICE OF INTENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER ADOPTION SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A CONTENT AREA SPECIALIST-INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY intends to amend the job description for a Content Area Specialist Instructional Technology at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. The proposed amendment to the job description shall be effective upon adoption. Pursuant to Section 120.54, Florida Statutes, any affected person has twenty-one (21) days after publication of this notice to request the opportunity to present evidence and argument to the School Board of Highlands County, Florida regarding the proposed job description. Such hearing must be requested in writing and received by Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870, within 21 days after publication of this notice. If such hearing is requested, it will be held Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:45 p.m. Any person desiring to attend such a hearing is requested to call the Superintendents office to verify whether such hearing has been requested. The purpose and effect of the proposed job description is to add new minimum qualifications for a Content Area Specialist Instructional Technology. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications are 1. A valid Florida educators certificate; (2) A Masters degree from an accredited institution or a Bachelors degree from an accredited educational institution with 10 years of successful teaching or relevant experience in a related field; (3) Knowledge of curriculum and/or discipline program design, implementation and evaluation in the assigned area as reflected in job performance assessments; (4) Physical Requirements: exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required; (4) Satisfactory clearance of a criminal history records check and drug screening. Additional desired job qualifications are: (1) Specialized knowledge in effective teaching strategies; (2) Proficiency in effective instruction of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS), resulting in documented student learning gains; (3) Knowledge in assessment data and evaluation of student learning needs/achievement. The Primary Performance Responsibilities are: (1) Works collaboratively with district and school staff to develop strategies, establish diagnostic and intervention services where appropriate or deemed necessary, and assist in directing curricular/instructional decision-making to directly impact student growth and achievement; (2) Commits to the vision and mission of the district and curriculum department; (3) Serves as a member of the district and school-based curriculum leadership councils to articulate curriculum content, programs and resources; (4) Provides technology support and ongoing training for school-level technology resource teachers (TRT); (5) Provides technology support to K-12 classroom teachers to enhance instruction and academic activities; (6) Assist school-level technology committees in writing school technology plans; (7) Stays current on test research and legislation in technology education through professional reading, attending state/national meetings/conferences, workshops, collaborating with other districts, and acting as a member of a professional organization; (8) Researches new software programs and materials related to technology; (9) Assists in the development and implementation of the District Technology Plan; (10) Collaborates with MIS in the management of the electronic gradebook; (11) Facilitates collection of data on technology integration, resources and planning as required by state surveys or as requested for grants, research, or public information; (12) Establishes, maintains, monitors and updates curriculum based, district-wide systems and/or software as assigned; (13) Evaluates effectiveness of and manages assigned programs, processes, and procedures; (14) Understands and utilizes collaborative planning strategies; (15) Organizes and facilitates professional development activities, in technology, for curriculum based, district-wide systems and software to appropriate personnel; (16) Serves as district administrator for the local instructional improvement system (database); (17) Oversees administration of statewide and district progress monitoring assessments in technology; (18) Identifies and develops shortand long-range plans based on student needs consistent with district, state and/or technology requirements; (19) Serves as district administrator of A3 (electronic IEP and individual progress monitoring plans); (20) Knowledgeable of district-wide assessment tools current in use; (21) Assists district in maintaining copyright/CIPA compliance; (22) Organizes and facilitates district adoptions of district software site licenses; (23) Submits all fee payments, membership fees, and assessment fees in a timely fashion; (24) Identifies, selects, develops or modifies technology software/equipment to support learning objectives to meet the needs of students with diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds, learning styles, and special needs; (25) Communicates effectively, orally and in writing, with other professionals, students, parents, and community; (26) Effectively and efficiently manages materials and assigned equipment; (27) Maintains a positive, organized, and safe working environment; (28) Manages time effectively; (29) Attends meeting sand trainings as needed; (30) Fulfills professional responsibilities; (31) Writes or facilitates writing grants to obtain additional funding or resources (32) Acts in a professional and ethical manner and adheres at all times to the code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct; and (33) Performs other incidental tasks consistent with the goals and objectives of this position. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b), Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obNOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADOPTION OF A PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO WATER RATES, FEES, CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS, AND METER CONVERSION POLICIES FOR THE SPRING LAKE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT The Spring Lake Improvement District will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, January 12, 2011, 7:00 p.m. at the Spring Lake Community Center located on Spring Lake Boulevard, in Pine Breeze Park, for the purpose of hearing public comment and objections of certain rates, fees, construction standards, and meter conversion policies for the District's water utility system. The District will consider updated policies and new rates and fees for meter conversion. Any changes will go into effect immediately. EACH PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT MEETINGS IS ADVISED THAT PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, INCLUDING THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. JOSEPH DECERBO DISTRICT MANAGER DECEMBER 26, 2010 JANUARY 2, 2011 of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.HIGHLANDS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, BY: Wally Cox, Superintendent & ex officio secretary. January 2, 2011 1050Legals NOTICE OF INTENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER A DOPTION SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A CONTENT AREA SPECIALISTFEDERAL PROGRAMS AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY intends to amend the job description for a Content Area Specialist Federal Programs at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. The proposed amendment to the job description shall be effective upon adoption. Pursuant to Section 120.54, Florida Statutes, any affected person has twenty-one (21) days after publication of this notice to request the opportunity to present evidence and argument to the School Board of Highlands County, Florida regarding the proposed job description. Such hearing must be requested in writing and received by Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870, within 21 days after publication of this notice. If such hearing is requested, it will be held Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 5:45 p.m. Any person desiring to attend such a hearing is requested to call the Superintendents office to verify whether such hearing has been requested. The purpose and effect of the proposed j ob description is to add new minimum qualifications for a Content Area Specialist Federal Programs. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications are 1. A valid Florida educators certificate; (2) A Masters degree from an accredited institution or a Bachelors degree from an accredited educational institution with 10 years of successful teaching or relevant experience in a related field; (3) Knowledge of curriculum and/or discipline program design, implementation and evaluation in the assigned area as reflected in job performance assessments; (4) Physical Requirements: exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required; (5) Satisfactory clearance of a criminal history records check and drug screening; Additional desired job qualifications are: (1) Specialized knowledge in effective teaching strategies; (2) Proficiency in effective instruction of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS), resulting in documented student learning gains; (3) Knowledge in assessment data and evaluation of student learning needs/achievement. The Primary Performance Responsibilities are: (1) Works collaboratively with district and school staff to develop strategies, establish diagnostic and intervention services where appropriate or deemed necessary, and assist in directing curricular/instructional decision-making to directly impact student growth and achievement; (2) Commits to the vision and mission of the district and curriculum department; (3) Serves as a member of the district and school-based curriculum leadership councils to articulate curriculum content, programs and resources; (4) Provides assistance and support to migrant advocates; (5) Integrates technology in content area; (6) Monitors migrant early childhood programs (7) Writes and monitors Federal Title grants; (8) Assists in the development of grant budgets; (9) Coordinates the administration of CELLA; (10) Coordinates implementation of school choice based on Differentiated Accountability and AYP; (12) Serves on the district Solving/RtI Committee; (13) Responds to needs of migrant families; (14) Provides supplemental academic counseling for migrant students; (15) Organizes and monitors migrant after school tutorial programs; (16) Coordinates and/or performs necessary duties pertinent to the Migrant Summer Institute, Migrant Summer Camps, Migrant Scholarship program, Close-up Program, Whos Who selection, migrant banquet, etc. (18) Serves on Inter-agency Committee; (19) A ssists with Migrant Parent Involvement Centers at school sites; (20) Evaluates effectiveness of and manages assigned programs, processes, and procedures; (21) Understands and utilizes collaborative planning strategies; (22) Organizes and facilitates professional development activities appropriate personnel; (23) Identifies and develops shortand long-range plans based on student needs consistent with district, state and/or federal requirements; (24) Knowledgeable of district-wide assessment tools currently in use (25) Submits all fee payments, membership fees, and assessment fees in a timely fashion; (26) Identifies, selects, develops or modifies instructional materials to support learning objectives to meet the needs of students with diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds, learning styles, and special needs; (27) Communicates effectively, orally and in writing, with other professionals, students, parents, and community; (28) Effectively and efficiently manages materials and assigned equipment; (29) Maintains a positive, organized, and safe working environment; (30) Manages time effectively; (31) A ttends meetings and trainings as needed; (32) Fulfills professional responsibilities; (33) Writes or facilitates writing grants to obtain additional funding or resources; (34) Acts in a professional and ethical manner and adheres at all times to the Code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct; and (35) Performs other incidental tasks consistent with the goals and objectives of this position. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b), Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office (Attn. Connie Scobey), George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 08-CA-00711 DIVISION: A MERICAN HOME MORTGAGE SERVICING, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION, F/K/A AH MORTGAGE A CQUISITION CO., INC., Plaintiff, vs. MAUREEN GRIFFIN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 23, 2010, and entered in Case No. 08-CA-00711 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which American Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc. a Delaware Corporation, f/k/a AH Mortgage Acquisition Co., Inc., is the Plaintiff and Maureen Griffin; Bank of A merica, NA; are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury A ssembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 25th day of January, 2011, the following described property as set forth ins said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 42, BLOCK 52, PLACID LAKES SECTION SIX, A CCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 68, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA A /K/A 111 LEMON RD NW, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852-9786 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 23rd day of December, 2010. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk January 2, 9, 2011 1050Legals

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Page 12ANews-Sun Sunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com PROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORYPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY Install doors, windows, flooring, plumbing & more!Licensed & InsuredLic# HM0096HANDYMAN BOBCall 863-452-5201 or 863-449-1744 A & E LAWN MOWER REPAIRBeltsBlades New & Used Parts12 S.Forest Ave. Avon Park,FL 33825863-452-0389 Service Repair Supplies Equipment Delivered Right to your DoorPool Service & Mobile Retail(863) 382-7728Fax (863) 402-2200 poolparadise101@aol.com www.poolparadiseonline.com Brad & Julie Kurtz 863385-0404Now Offering: Animal Nuisance Control and Removal Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-2750 1405 US 27 North Sebring, FL 33870 CAMPBELL S S COLLISION CENTER , INC. Jim Campbell Owner Ser vice A vailable 7 Days A W eek Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com EXTRAORDINAIRE HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING LLC 863-451-2399Mike & Kandy Sheldone CEO/Owner Lic# CAC 1816569All Service Calls $40 ResidentialCommercial Insured Free EstimatesService by People Who CareChad, Krista & Michael P.O. Box 6987 Avon Park, FL 33826-6987 Office: 863-655-9328 cklawn@strato.net WANDA KLINE WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESSSee what one drop of your blood indicates as to YOUR nutritional health and well-being. By appointment only863-414-4066 LIVEBLOODANALYSIS MIKES PAINTINGInterior & Exterior Residential & Mobile Homes Also Pressure Washing Over 25 Years Experience Free Estimates Lic. & Ins.863-657-2362 &WILLIAMSJANITORIALCARPETCLEANING$1095 Per Room3 Rooms Minimum Upholstery Cleaning All Types of Flooring Free EstimatesLic Bonded Ins(863) 214-1940 CASH for JUNK(954) 963-7138 Cars, Trucks, Vans no title necessary AUCTIONTues & Fri 6:30 P.M.Preview: 4-6:30 P.M. 863-633-8393 4490 US 27, S., SEBRING, FL 33870Household Items Tools Appliances & MUCH MUCH MORE!50/50 Drawing & Give Aways Every AuctionEstates Bought & Sold LEGREES863-215-3754Edward LeGreeMOBILE CARWASH & DETAILING SUE IS BACKSue Leninsky from Titusville, Pa. with 42 years experience is working Mon. 8-4 Sat. 8-noon at SALONTAZMANIA1505 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park 863-452-2396 JUDISPLACEOFHAIR& NAILS271 US 27 North, Sebring Wed. Fri. 8-4 863-382-9911 Call for an appointment with Sue 863-465-7491TREE SERVICE,INC.Joe Johnsons TRIMMING REMOVAL SOD INSTALLATION STUMP GRINDING LOT CLEARING PRESSURE CLEANING Will Beat Any Written Estimate!Peoples Choice Award Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Avon Park (863) 453-2525 Lake Placid (863) 699-2525 Lake Wales (863) 679-9200 Sebring (863) 382-1515 Wauchula (863) 767-1515Sebring Fax (863) 382-9939 W al-Mart Loca tions: Lake Wales (863) 676-0569 Sebring (863) 385-5371 Avon Park (863) 452-7010 INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED 3310 Hwy. 27 South Sebring, FL33870EOEE-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.comFor more information about Cross Country Automotive Services,we encourage you to visit our website at: www.CrossCountry-Auto.co mComprehensive Benefit Package Tuition Reimbursement Life Insurance Vacation Time Holiday Pay Medical DentalNow Hiring Full & Part Time Customer Service AssociatesStarting at $9.00 an hour Sarah Turner Associate of the MonthBe a HERO like Sarah Turner863-402-2786AGreatPlaceto Work! DIRECTOR, EPI Full-time, 10-month position to coordinate and manage the functions of SFCCs Educator Preparation Institute as well as teach EPI classes (generally scheduled on Saturdays). Masters degree in Education, Educational Leadership, or closely related field required. P-12 teaching experience required. Educational leadership experience preferred. Current Florida teaching certification preferred. Clinical educator training or national board teacher certification preferred. Must maintain Highlands County Schools level two background clearance. Competency in basic computer skills including but not limited to Microsoft Word, Power Point, Publisher, Excel, and Outlook. Experience working with relational database software (specifically BANNER) preferred. Must be flexible for scheduling, including Saturdays. Must have reliable transportation for travel throughout the service district and adjacent counties. Starting annual salary: $38,000-$42,000.STUDENT SERVICESADVISOR, CAREER CENTER Full-time, year-round position responsible for providing general college information, academic advising, scheduling, and career planning services. Bachelors degree required. Academic advising or guidance experience preferred. Demonstrated ability in communicating effectively with people from diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds required. Starting annual salary: $26,000-$28,500. Full-time positions offer comprehensive benefits, including retirement, health/life insurance, and vacation/sick leave. Detailed position announcements and application information located on our website. Application deadline for both positions is 5 p.m., Tuesday, January 11, 2011.SFCC ISAN EQUALACCESS/EQUALOPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION600 West College Drive Avon Park, FL 33825 (863)453-6661 FAX (863) 784-7497 E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu www.southflorida.edu/hr/ CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 385-6155 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements***************************************** HIGHLANDS COUNTY LEGAL NOTICES ***************************************** The following legal notices are from the Highlands County Board of County Commissioners and are being published in the font, size, and leading as per their specifications. 1055HighlandsCounty Legalsing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2010, at which they will be opened. Bids received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The BCC will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at the above meeting. Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this bid. The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors (IMWID) reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District. The IMWID Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Commissioners as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: jminor@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service.Board of County Commissioners as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors, Purchasing Department; Highlands County, Florida Website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net December 26, 2010; January 2, 2011 1055HighlandsCounty LegalsHIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS(HCBCC)GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASINGINVITATION TO BID (ITB) The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands County as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for:ITB 11-020 LEASE OF 398 ACRES OF PROPERTY AT 202 DRIGGERS ROAD, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 NIGP CODE COMMODITY/SERVICES CODE: 971-35Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net"www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, CPPB, Highlands County General Services/Purchasing Department Assistant Purchasing Director 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33875-5803 Phone: 863-402-6524 Fax: 863-402-6735; or E-Mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:dgilbert@hcbcc.org"dgilbert@hcbcc.orgBidder will submit one (1) original and two (2) copies of their bid, in an envelope that must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name so as to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to Highlands County Purchas1055HighlandsCounty Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIRCUIT CIVIL CASE NO. 28-2010-CA-000670GCS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH WACHOVIA BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. SIMON LORENZO BROWN, JR., et al., Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 29, 2010, and Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 21, 2010, both entered in Case No. 28-2010-CA-000670 of the Circuit Court for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida, in, at 11:00 a.m. and on the 14th day of January, 2011 the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment: Lot 16, GRAN-LORE RANCHETTES, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 12, Page 13, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Together with that certain 1993 Fleetwood Mobile Home Identification #FLFLP70A21273SK and FLFLP70B21273SK. TOGETHER WITH all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, rights, appurtenances, rents royalties,mineral, oil and gas rights and profits, water rights and stock and all fixtures now or hereafter attached to the property. **ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE.** WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on December 21, 2010. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities A ct, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending this notice no later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, visa Florida Relay Service. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit and County Court By: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk December 26, 2010; January 2, 2011 are available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the DEP Southeast District office, 400 North Congress A venue, Suite 200, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, Tel. (561) 681-6600. January 2, 2011 1050Legals

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, January 2, 2011Page 13 A Call 385-6155 and a Sales Representative will be glad to assist you!1992 NISSANSENTRA Under 100 K miles, new tires, RUNS GREAT! $2100 or MAKE OFFER! 863-471-2906 or 863-414-1691. 9450Automotive for SaleRIMS -18'' Mondera Davanti, on Kumho Low Profile 225/40ZR 18 Tires. LIKE NEW! $1000. 863-385-5425. 9350Automotive Parts& Accessories2004 KAWASAKI750 Vulcan. One Owner, Garage Kept! 6796 miles. $3,500. 863-471-9341. 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation2003 SEADOO GTX JETSKI Mint Condition! 59 hrs. $5000. 863-385-5425 8400RecreationalVehiclesBIG GUNSHOWHighlands County Fair Grounds Sebring, FLJan. 8th & 9thSAT. 9-5; SUN. 9-4 Concealed Course At Show! Call 321-777-7455 8350Sporting Goods 8000 Recreation NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. FREE TOGOOD HOME 2 Black Male KITTENS. 10 wks, need loving home. Super sweet, kid & dog friendly. 863-381-5999 or anarahlee@aol.com 7520Pets & SuppliesLOOKING FORused car in VERY GOOD CONDITION Call 863-465-0978. 7340Wanted to BuySEBRING -MOVING SALE! 2023 Fernway St., off Hammock Rd., Fri-Sat-Sun-Mon, Dec 31-Jan 3, 8am-? SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE! EVERYTHING MUST GO! 7320Garage &Yard Sales WATER FILTERReverse Osmosis system, good condition. $50 863-873-3801 TIRE &WHEEL, large, LT 265/70 R17. One only. $65. 863-699-1119. RUG 5'5'' X 7' 10". Green / pink / white. $50. 678-491-7856 MINI FRIDGEw/ freezer, black. $100. 863-201-3769 LEATHER JACKETS2 Mens, size XL, black, like new. $70 863-699-0466 LATINO COCKATIELBaby bird, 4 mos. old, Beautiful! Needs good home. $100 863-385-2503 COFFEE MAKERGevalia (12 cup) LIKE NEW! $10 obo. 863-471-2502 EXTENTION LADDER24 ft. Like new $24. 863-655-1762 DRILL MILWAUKEEcordless w/ case. heavy duty. Orig. $200 will sell. $100. 863-873-3801 CALLOWAY DRIVERNew Big Bertha 460 9 degree. $100 863-382-6006 BOAT ANCHOR25 pounds. $75 863-699-1119 BIKE HELMETSTrex & Trio, both for $25. 863-382-6006 7310Bargain Buys NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS! HIGHPOINT FURNITURE OUTLET STORE 2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRINGNorthofLowes&acrossfrom HomeDepot 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise SEBRING -3BR, 1BA with carport, near High School, laundry room, fenced yard. $550/mo., security deposit waived to right person. 863-835-0408 SEBRING -2BR, 1BA all wood home, $675/mo. + $500 security deposit. 3303 Pompino Dr. Avgerage electric bill $90/mo. Call 863-402-0400 6300Unfurnished Houses LAKE PLACID2BR, 1BA, new floors/paint, fenced yard, close to boat ramp, nice landscape, quiet area, no smoke, $550/mo. 863-699-1119 HOUSES /MOBILE HOMES Call for Availability NO Security NO Last NO Dogs 863-381-4410 or 863-381-5174 6300Unfurnished Houses SEBRING: 1BR,1 BA Guest House / Cottage in quiet / private neighborhood with all utilities included: Electric, Water & Direct TV. No Pets, No Smokers. Harder Hall ares, 1/8 mile from 2 golf courses. $800 per month + deposit. Call 863-381-9437 LAKE PLACIDNewer 3BR, 2BA, seasonal or monthly rental. Excellent furniture & appliances, near lake & boat ramp. No Smoking or dogs. 863-699-1119 6250Furnished Houses SEBRING -DINNER LAKE AREA 1BR, 1BA Apartments for Rent. $395/mo. Includes water. Large rooms, fresh paint & tile floors. Call Gary Johnson @ 863-381-1861 SEBRING -Clean 1BR, 1BA, living rm., utility w/ W-D hookup, new screened vinyl patio, near Walmart & Homer's area. You pay electric, I pay cable & utilities. Ideal for 1 or 2 adults. Prefer year round renter, no dogs. $450 mly. + $450 sec. dp. Move in now $650 to the right party! Call after 1pm for details. 732-222-0344 RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile, New paint, New appliances, Screened patios & W/D hook ups. Call 863-452-0469. BEST RENTAL IN TOWN! Large 2BR, 1BA totally remodeled, washer/dryer hook-ups. Available Immediately! Call 321-537-5681 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsLEMONTREE APARTMENTSAvon Park, FL 33825 1BR, 1BA $495/Month+ $200 Security Deposit2BR, 1BA $645/Month+ $500 Security Deposit Pets Welcome* Washer/Dryer Microwave & WSG Included Call Alan, (386) 503-8953 AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL: $325/mo. 863-453-8538 AVON PARK** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsLAKE PLACIDGolf Villas Efficiencies with kitchenette, furnished, includes; electric & all utilities, swimming pool; W/D available. $425/mo. Call Ireland Sanders, 863-465-1400. 6100Villas & CondosFor Rent SEBRING -CUTE 2BR, 1BA, new tile floors & insulation. Kids and most pets ok. 4911 Manatee. $490/mo. + $300 security deposit to move in. 863-446-7274 or 863-471-0840 SEBRING -3008 Spinks Rd., 2BR, 1BA, W/D hookup, new appliances, ceramic tile throughout. No Pets. Close to HRMC & Sebring High School. Avail. Immediately $500/mo. 863-273-1756. LAKE PLACIDPlacid Lakes, unfurnished 2BR / 2BA. 863-699-0897 or 863-840-2013 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 Rentals SEBRING -RV Park, Close to Downtown, 1BR, 1BA & Efficiencies, $325-$400/mo; 2BR 2BA, $400/mo. EASY MOVE-IN RATES! 863-655-3504 SEBRING -RV Park, Close to Downtown, 1BR, 1BA & Efficiencies, $325-$400/mo; 2BR 2BA, $400/mo. EASY MOVE-IN RATES! 863-655-3504 LAKE PLACIDSun 'n Lakes Estates, Doublewide, 3BR, 2BA Mobile Home. The best in Country Living! $580/month. Call Michelle @ 863-381-5661. 5150Mobile HomesFor RentPALM HARBORHomes Short Sales/Reop's/Used Homes 3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides Won't Last!! $3500 40k John-800-622-2832 Ext.210 5100Mobile HomeLots for Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSEBRING -Edgewater Village Lakeview Dr. 2BR, 2BA, 1CG Villa. Beautifully furnished. New kitchen, laundry, TV. Low Maintenance fee includes Cable TV, Clubhouse, heated pool. Private street. Avail Immed. 863-402-9138 4080Homes for SaleSebring AVON PARK3BR, 2BA, 1CG 1400 sq ft home. $68,900. Available after Feb. 28, 2011. Owner Financing possible with 10% down, good credit report and work record. 863-453-5631 AVON PARK3BR, 2BA, 1CG 1400 sq ft home. $68,900. Available after Feb. 28, 2011. Owner Financing possible with 10% down, good credit report and work record. 863-453-5631 4040Homes For SaleATTENTION: CASH for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 FinancialTHE HOMEBUILDERS INSTITUTE has an immediate need for a PAINTING INSTRUCTOR. In this role, you will instruct program participants using approved curriculum, and develop supporting training materials; coordinate hands-on training activities including on-site projects, emphasizing proper tool and equipment use, safety, and standard painting practices; monitor and coach trainees; and perform various administrative and reporting functions, as required. Qualifications include a HS diploma or equivalent; at least seven years painting experience; teaching/training experience preferred; strong communications skills; the ability to work with at-risk youth; satisfactory results of an extensive criminal background screening; completion of Protective Action Response training; completion of the Test of Adult Basic Education; and proficiency with computers and MS Office. Apply at www.hbi.org/jobs. EOE/AA/M/F/D/VCAREGIVERSNOW HIRINGFor caring, compassionate caregivers. You must be 21 yrs old with a HS Diploma/GED, pass a criminal & driving record check. Call HR between 9am and 4 pm M-F. 866-757-9686 or visit: ck381.ersp.biz/employment FIRE CHIEFThe City of Avon Park is seeking a full-time Fire Chief who under general administrative direction of the City Manager, plans, organizes, directs, and reviews the activities and operations of the Fire Department including fire prevention, fire code enforcement responsibilities and supervision per state statute, suppression, public education, emergency medical services and other activities designed to protect lives and property. Certified Firefighter II and Fire Officer I required as prescribed by Florida State Bureau of Fire Standards. Fire Officer II preferred and minimum certification of EMT-B desired. An Associate Degree with specialized training in fire department operations and administration a must. A Bachelors Degree with major course work in fire science or fire administration is preferred. A minimum of ten (10) years of experience in fire suppression, rescue, and the delivery of emergency medical services with at least five (5) years in a managerial/supervisory capacity equivalent to the rank of Lieutenant or two years as a Captain or above. Salary compensable DOQ. Applications and job description is available at the City of Avon Park, 110 E. Main St., Avon Park, FL 33825 or can be obtained on our website: www.avonpark.cc All applications must be accompanied with a copy of applicants Florida drivers license. This position will remain open until filled. The City of Avon Park is a smoke and drug-free workplace. E.O.E. Return completed applications to City Hall, Human Resource Dept., 110 E Main St., Avon Park, FL 33825 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment 1550ProfessionalServicesNEED SOMEONEto take care of your loved one? In their OWN HOME? Excellent references...25 years exp. Call Joanie at 863-471-9726. 1400Health CareServices Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classified ads get fast results LOOKING FOR AN APARTMENT? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday.AKC ENGLISHBULLDOG PUPPY A picture is worth a thousand words! Call 877-394-3996 CASTLE HILL Apartments of Avon ParkAccepting Applications for 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals 62 years or older, handicap/disabled, regardless of age. For rental information & applications please call: 863-452-6565 TDD: 1-800-955-8771 THIS INSTITUTION IS AN Equal Opportunity Provider and EmployerLos Apt. de Castle Hill de Avon ParkEstan aceptando aplicaciones para Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras. Disponible a personas de 62 ancs o mas, incapacidad fisica/mental, no importa la edad. Para mas informacion favor de llamar 863-452-6565. TDD: 1-800-955-8771 Esta Institucion Es De Igualdad De Oportunidad Al Proveedor, Y Empleador

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Page 14ANews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. EXPIRES 01-08-11 2007 CHRYSLER PACIFICA TOURING WAS$ 17995 NOW$ 16889#CX129A 2007 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4 WAS$ 25999 NOW$ 23995#X0131 2008 DODGE AVENGER SXT WAS$ 12995 NOW$ 11888#L0136 2007 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LARED0 4X4 WAS$ 18995 NOW$ 17399#0130 2010 DODGE JOURNEY WAS$ 20995 NOW$ 18999#X0156 2008 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT WAS$ 23995 NOW$ 21999#X0127 2008 FORD EXPEDITION LIMITED WAS$ 31995 NOW$ 29989#CX042A 2005 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER CONV. WAS$ 12999 NOW$ 11999#X0120 2009 JEEP PATRIOT 4X4 WAS$ 16988 NOW$ 14995#X0123 www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644 LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 2007 DODGE CHARGER HEMI WAS$ 23150 NOW$ 21499#TX090A 2004 CHEVROLET 2500 CREW CAB WAS$ 19995 NOW$ 17888 2010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY WAS$ 23995 NOW$ 20765#X0157 NO DEALER FEES DEALER OWNED CLEARANCE NO DEALER FEESPLUS TAX, TAG, & STATE FEES. PLUS TAX TAG TITLE SATISFIES#TY002A

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By BRETTMARTEL Associated PressNEWORLEANS R aheem Morris has seen the B uccaneers rise from the r anks of prohibitive long s hots to that of a credible t hreat since his last time i nside the Louisiana S uperdome one year ago. As much as things have c hanged in Tampa Bay, the s econd-year coach can only h ope for the same result in t his seasons trip to the Big E asy. The Buccaneers had only t wo victories and quarterb ack Josh Freeman was a m istake-prone rookie w hen they went into the d ome in 2009 and posted a s tunning upset over a Saints s quad that was on its way to a Super Bowl title. In hindsight, that result is s tarting to look m ore like an i ndication of a y oung team t hat was learni ng, improving a nd on the b rink of turning a corner. When the B uccaneers (96 ) line up a gainst the S aints (11-4) in t heir regulars eason finale t his Sunday, t heyll do so w ith playoff h opes still intact. Avictory over New O rleans, combined with l osses by the New York G iants and Green Bay P ackers, would vault the B ucs into the postseason for t he first time since 2007. Last year was about us g oing out and trying to i mprove every week. We had a young team last year and w e were developing a young q uarterback, Morris said. It was a great test for F reeman. ... We played well. W e played fast. We played h ard. We played consistent a nd we were able to get a w in there and a very signific ant win for us in our develo pment and where we wante d to go. It only helped us g enerate some positive pub f or the offseason to get us going in the right direction. It would be far less shocking if Tampa Bay were to win this time around. Drew Brees made it clear the Saints respect how far the Bucs have come from their 3-13 2009 campaign. You look at maybe the way people perceived them prior to the season, where theres no way those guys make the playoffs, theyre young and all this stuff ... yet, here they are knocking on the door, Brees said. Theyre saying, If we take care of our business, not only do we have a chance at the playoffs, but at 10 wins. Thats a big deal in this league. Thats hard to do, especially with a young team. Josh Freemans played exceptionally well, Brees continued. I think theyre well-coached and you just see them playing with a lot of fire, passion, emotion and intensity. Thats how this game needs to be played. The Saints may have more to gain by resting top players than winning the game if out-of-town scores show that Atlanta is cruising to an NFC South clinching victory over struggling Carolina. If the Falcons win, New Orleans is locked into the fifth seed in the NFC and will open the playoffs the following week at the winner of Sunday nights St. Louis-Seattle game. However, if Atlanta loses, the defending champs could capture the top overall seed in the NFC for a secondstraight season if they beat the Bucs. Saints coach Sean Payton said he has no intention of scoreboard watching or resting any players at the expense of a victory. Were doing everything we can in our power to get our 12th win. Period, Payton said. It would be different if the times were different, but were full speed ahead. The last time these teams met on Oct. 17, it wasnt close. The Saints won 31-6 and racked up 212 yards on the ground, including 158 yards by surprising undrafted rookie Chris Ivory. Since then, another undrafted rookie running back has burst onto the scene for Tampa Bay. LeGarrette Blount needs SPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, January 2, 2011 BARRYWILNER Associated PressNEWYORK As one of t he strangest NFLseasons o n and off the field winds d own, football fans can b egin contemplating playoff m atchups, followed by the S uper Bowl, then the draft. And then, perhaps, nothi ng. Dark stadiums. Empty S unday afternoons and M onday nights. No fantasy t eams. The collective bargaining a greement between the l eague and the players e xpires March 4. Team owners have gone f rom voicing optimism to b asically clamming up about r eaching a contract with the p layers union any time soon. Commissioner Roger G oodell and NFLPAexecut ive director DeMaurice S mith emphasize the need f or substantive negotiations n ow. Yet the two sides remain f ar apart on the major issues, p articularly the players s hare of revenues, and a s witch to an 18-game regular s eason. If both sides give a little, e veryone will get a lot, G oodell says, especially the f ans. Counters Smith, The players believe this lockout is going to occur. They certainly do, say Tom Condon and Ben Dogra, two of the NFLs top player agents, with a clientele that includes the Manning brothers, Drew Brees and Patrick Willis. I think the players are taking this very seriously, says Condon, who has been through three other labor disputes: in 1974 as a rookie, in as a part of the negotiations, and as an outside counsel to the players in 1987. They know what is at stake here and all the reaction to preparing for it has been positive. We have encouraged them to talk to their player reps, who are their direct lines to the union, to discuss the issues, and to discuss the issues among themselves. Broncos safety Brian Dawkins, a 15-year veteran, says he has advised younger players on saving money. Chiefs linebacker Mike Vrabel, a 14-year veteran and, like Dawkins, a member of the union executive committee, adds that the NFLPAhas asked every agent to discuss saving money with their clients. I think the players are more sophisticated and the issues are drawn pretty clearly. Basically what has occurred is that a CBAis in place the owners voted to accept, and certainly the players accepted, in 2006. And the owners had the option to opt out, they did in 2008, and they want to take back some of that money. That is a central issue. NFLowners say they need a restructured deal because they cant afford the revenue split of the CBAabout to expire. NFLrevenues are expected to be near $9 billion for 2010, with nearly 60 percent of designated revenues going to players. Owners claim huge debts from building stadiums and starting up the NFLNetwork and other ventures, making NFL labor: Whats ahead? Perhaps silence MCTphoto Roger Goodell, right, has a friendly chat with John Madden and Andy Reid this past summer. In the coming months, chats could get pretty heated for Goodell as he tries to work out a deal between the owners and the players association in hopes of avoidiing a lockout. See NFL, p a g e 3B And Another Thing... Dan Hoehne With a new year dawning and some resolutions alread y broken, a quick look back a t the past 12 months shows a stunning amount of success for lil olHighlands County. I mean, one would think that Asuccess for one loca l team would make for a goo d year, and yet we were blessed with quite a few. Avon Park made itself quite familiar with the Lakeland Center as grapplers Charles Hubbard and Omar Torres earned a trip t o the state wrestling meet an d took second and sixth in their respective weight classes. Just weeks later, the Red Devil cagers made the trip to Lakeland as they concluded an historic run to the schools third Final Four appearance ever. Spring saw numerous co llege scholarships signed by county athletes, including a staggering six Lake Placid football players getting the chance to continue their playing careers on the college level. Summer brought about Dixie season and wound up with not only a state championship for the Sebring Ozone squad, but a Dixie World Series title as well. Another group of youngsters fought their way to a championship as the Avon Park Youth Football Mitey Mites produced a State Super Bowl winner in the fall. And though another strong season couldnt get the Blue Streak high schoo l football team to the playoff s, their play drew some deserved attention as they were selected to play in the 25th Annual Osceola Coun ty Rotary Scholarship Bowl. The game saw the succes s of the season continue with a 33-20 win over Atlantic. Fall also saw Lake Placi d volleyball, despite a regime change and underdog status claim itssixth consecutive district title in rousing fash ion sweeping top-seed an d previously undefeated in di strict McKeel in a stunning championship match. These, of course, were just some of the highlights of grand achievement in th e county, though let us not forget the numerous other athletes who took their talents to the highest stage rather than to South Beach. From weightlifters to swimmers and divers to golfers and runners in track and cross country alike, no t to mention pole vaulters, leapers and throwers many area athletes earned spots to State. The little county that could 2010 showed that the kids of Highlands County not only could, but did. And from accomplishme nt comes a higher standard to strive for, so who knows what 2011 will bring? Dan Hoehne is the Sports Editor of the News-Sun. He can be reached at daniel.hoehne@newssun.com. Quite a year for the little county that could MCTphotos The coaching of Raheem Morris and the play of Josh Freeman has brought new respect, and a potential playoff spot, for this young Buccaneer team. Saints seek to snuff out Bucs playoff hopes See BUCS, page 3B You just see them playing with a lot of fire, passion, emotion and intensity. Thats how this game needs to be played.DREWBREES Saints QB

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Elks Lodge 1529 Golf TourneySEBRING The monthly Elks golf tournament will be held on Monday Jan. 3 at Harder Hall Country Club. Cost for the 8 a.m. shotgun start is $32 per player. To register either your team or as an individual player, contact Jack McLaughlin at 471-3295 or by email at jacknjudy33872@gmail.com Check in not later than 7:40 AM in the Harder Hall Golf Course restaurant area.New Year Golf BenefitSEBRING ANew Years golf tournament to benefit Eddie Bateman will tee off Saturday, Jan. 15 on the Deer Run course at Sun N Lake. The four-person scramble format will kick off with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. Cost is $55 per person/$220 per team. There are also sponsorships available. AGold sponsorship is $1,000 and gets four hole signs, a banner and one team entry. ASilver sponsorship is $500 and includes two hole signs, a banner and one team entry. ABronze sponsorship gets two hole signs and a banner and a single hole sponsorship, for $100, gets one hole sign. There are also single sponsor donations available for $25. For more information, contact Jady Prescott at 381-2117 or jady_52@hotmail.com.Panther Volleyball CampAVONPARK The South Florida Community College Volleyball program will be hosting a four week training camp running from Jan. 6-Feb. 3 for players from 6th to 12th grade. The camp will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30-8:30 p.m. and provides individual skill development and basic tactics in a positive learning environment. All campers will receive individual and team instruction from Coach Kim Crawford and members of the 2010-11 Lady Panthers. Crawford is a three-time college AllAmerican and played professionally in Europe, on the Bud Light Professional Beach Tour for Team Nike and on the Pro California Grass Tour. She has been trained by many Olympic coaches and looks forward to sharing her vast volleyball knowledge with all camp participants. The camp cost is $100 and is limited to the first 30 to register. To register, go to www.southflorida.edu and select the volleyball site. Click on volleyball camp, print out Admissions Application and Emergency Treatment forms. Mail Admissions Application and Emergency Treatment forms as indicated on application form, or bring to the Cashiers Office in Building B. For more information, contact the SFCC Athletic Department at the following campus phone numbers at extension 7037 Avon Park/Sebring, 784-7037; Lake Placid, 465-5300; DeSoto, 4947500; Hardee, 773-2252; or email kim.crawford@southflorida.edu.YMCA New Years 5KSEBRING The Highlands County Family YMCAwill hold its first annu al New Years Day 5K Run/Walk starting at 9 a.m. at Highlands Hammock State Pa rk on Saturday, Jan. 1, 2011. To register for the 5k run go to t he YMCAto pick up an entry form. Race day registration starts at 8 a.m. Entry fee is $20. For more information contact Jonath an at the YMCA, 863-382-9622.Panther 5KAVON PARK The second annu al South Florida Community Colle ge Panther 5K Run/Walk has been plann ed for Saturday, Feb. 26 at the SFC C Highland Campus. The SFCC Foundation, Inc. and B ill Jarrett Ford Mercury are sponsoring t he event, and proceeds benefit the college s intercollegiate athletics programs. The entry fee for the SFCC Panther 5 K Run/Walk is $20 through Feb. 16 and $2 5 from Feb. 17 through the day of the rac e. Students with a current I.D. may regi ster for $15. Every participant receives a Dri-F it long-sleeve shirt sizes cannot be gua ranteed for those who enter after Feb. 17 Registration is 7-7:45 a.m. on race d ay in the parking lot in front of the SFC C University Center. The race begins at 8 a.m. Entry forms are available online at www.southflorida.edu/panther5k Participants can mail their copies an d entry fees to the SFCC Foundation, In c., 13 East Main Street, Avon Park, F L 33825; or fax forms to 863-453-8023 an d call 863-453-3133 with credit card info rmation. For more information about the SFC C Panther 5K, call the SFCC Foundation at 863-453-3133. The Foundation will be closed for wi nter break Saturday, Dec. 18 throug h Tuesday, Jan. 4. KOC Free Throw ChampionshipsSEBRING All boys and girls ages 1 014 are invited to participate in the loc al level of competition for the 2011 Knigh ts of Columbus Free Throw Championship The local competition will be held o n Saturday, Jan. 8 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Highlands County Family YMCA located 100 YMCALn., off of Hammo ck Road. The Knights of Columbus Free Thro w Championship is sponsored annuall y, with winners progressing through loca l, district, and state competitions. International championships a re announce by the K of C internation al headquarters based on scores from t he state-level competitions. All boys and girls will compete in the ir respective age and gender division s, based on their age as of January 1, 2011 All contestants on the local level a re recognized for their participation. Since it beginning in 1972, over 2 .5 million youths have participated in t he contest. For entry forms or additional inform ation contact: Justin Platt at (863) 44 62171, or by email at jplatt23@msn.com Participants may also register throug h their schools or at the court on the day of competition. Participants are required to furnish a birth certificate or passport as proof of age, and written parental consent prior to participation. AMERICAN CONFERENCEEast WLTPctPFPA y-New England1320.867480306 x-N.Y. Jets1050.667329297 Miami780.467266295 Buffalo4110.267276387 South WLTPctPFPA Indianapolis960.600412368 Jacksonville870.533336385 Tennessee690.400336316 Houston5100.333356410 North WLTPctPFPA x-Pittsburgh1140.733334223 x-Baltimore1140.733344263 Cleveland5100.333262291 Cincinnati4110.267315382 West WLTPctPFPA y-Kansas City1050.667356295 San Diego870.533408294 Oakland780.467379361 Denver4110.267316438NATIONAL CONFERENCEEast WLTPctPFPA y-Philadelphia1050.667426363 N.Y. Giants960.600377333 Washington690.400288360 Dallas5100.333380423 South WLTPctPFPA x-Atlanta1230.800383278 x-New Orleans1140.733371284 Tampa Bay960.600318305 Carolina2130.133186377 North WLTPctPFPA y-Chicago1140.733331276 Green Bay960.600378237 Minnesota690.400268328 Detroit5100.333342356 West WLTPctPFPA St. Louis780.467283312 Seattle690.400294401 San Francisco5100.333267339 Arizona5100.333282396 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ___ Sunday, Jan. 2 Oakland at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 1 p.m. Miami at New England, 1 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 1 p.m. Carolina at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m. San Diego at Denver, 4:15 p.m. Chicago at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m. Jacksonville at Houston, 4:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Washington, 4:15 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m. Tennessee at Indianapolis, 4:15 p.m. St. Louis at Seattle, 8:20 p.m. End of Regular SeasonEASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB Boston246.800 New York1814.5637 Philadelphia1319.40612 Toronto1120.3551312New Jersey923.28116 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami259.735 Orlando2112.636312Atlanta 2113.6184 Charlotte1119.36712 Washington822.26715 Central Division WLPctGB Chicago2010.667 Indiana 1317.4337 Milwaukee1218.4008 Detroit 1121.34410 Cleveland824.25013WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio284.875 Dallas247.774312New Orleans1814.56310 Houston1516.4841212Memphis1418.43814 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City2211.667 Utah2211.667 Denver1813.5813 Portland1716.5155 Minnesota825.24214 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Lakers2210.688 Phoenix1317.4338 Golden State1219.387912L.A. Clippers1023.3031212Sacramento623.2071412___ Thursdays Games Orlando 112, New York 103 San Antonio 99, Dallas 93 Portland 100, Utah 89 Fridays Games New Jersey at Chicago, late New Orleans at Boston, late Golden State at Charlotte, late Washington at Indiana, late Toronto at Houston, late Atlanta at Oklahoma City, late Detroit at Phoenix, late Philadelphia at L.A. Lakers, late Saturdays Games Cleveland at Chicago, late New Orleans at Washington, late Golden State at Miami, late New Jersey at Minnesota, late Oklahoma City at San Antonio, late Sacramento at Denver, late Memphis at Utah, late Dallas at Milwaukee, late Sundays Games Indiana at N.Y. Knicks, 1 p.m. Atlanta at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 6 p.m. Dallas at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Houston at Portland, 9 p.m. Phoenix at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA Pittsburgh251135312691 Philadelphia23955112697 N.Y. Rangers221424611898 N.Y. Islanders101962680115 New Jersey92522062115 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Boston201154510277 Montreal20162429490 Ottawa161843686112 Buffalo151843498108 Toronto131943084110 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Tampa Bay2211549119121 Washington2212549117105 Atlanta2014646126119 Carolina1715438102108 Florida16171339389WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Detroit249452128103 St. Louis19125439597 Chicago2016343123113 Columbus191534196107 Nashville17136408791 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA Vancouver22854912190 Colorado2012545129120 Minnesota171453991103 Calgary1618335100107 Edmonton121773194124 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA Dallas2212448109105 Los Angeles221414511391 San Jose2013545114108 Anaheim1917442102116 Phoenix171274198103 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Thursdays Games Columbus at Toronto, late Boston at Atlanta, late Montreal at Tampa Bay, late San Jose at Chicago, late Colorado at Edmonton, late Philadelphia at Los Angeles, late Fridays Games Atlanta at New Jersey, late Montreal at Florida, late Nashville at Minnesota, late N.Y. Islanders at Detroit, late Ottawa at Columbus, late Philadelphia at Anaheim, late Vancouver at Dallas, late Phoenix at St. Louis, late Colorado at Calgary, late Saturdays Games Washington vs. Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh, PA, late Boston at Buffalo, late Toronto at Ottawa, late New Jersey at Carolina, late N.Y. Rangers at Tampa Bay, late San Jose at Los Angeles, late Calgary at Edmonton, late Sundays Games Atlanta at Montreal, 1 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at Detroit, 5 p.m. Dallas at St. Louis, 6 p.m. Columbus at Nashville, 6 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Vancouver at Colorado, 8 p.m. Chicago at Anaheim, 8 p.m.FOOTBALLNational Football League NFL Fined the New York Jets $100,000 for violating league rules when assistant coach Sal Alosi tripped Miamis Nolan Carroll on the sideline during a punt return. Reduced the fine of Pittsburgh LB James Harrison for his Oct. 17 hit on Cleveland WR Mohamed Massaquoi from $75,000 to $50,000. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS Placed KR Courtney Roby on injured reserve. Signed WR Adrian Arrington from the practice squad. NEW YORK GIANTS Signed CB Brian Witherspoon. Placed KR Will Blackmon on injured reserve. NEW YORK JETS Signed DB Isaiah Trufant from the practice squad. Signed DL Matt Kroul to the practice squad. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS Placed TE Antonio Gates on injured reserve. Signed FB Billy Latsko.HOCKEYNational Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKSPlaced C Ryan Getzlaf on injured reserve. BOSTON BRUINS Assigned D Ryan Donald from Reading (ECHL) to Providence (AHL) and D Cody Wild from Providence to Reading. CAROLINA HURRICANES Reassigned F Jon Matsumoto and D Bryan Rodney to Charlotte (AHL). COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS Activated C Derek MacKenzie from the injured list. DALLAS STARS Assigned C Aaron Gagnon to Texas (AHL). MINNESOTA WILD Recalled D Jared Spurgeon from Houston (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS Recalled F Brian Rolston and RW Nick Palmieri from Albany (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS Recalled D Dylan Reese and F Jesse Joensuu from Bridgeport (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS Assigned C Todd White to Connecticut (AHL). American Hockey League BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERS Recalled F Mike Selitto from Danbury (Federal). CHARLOTTE CHECKERS Recalled D Ethan Graham and F Matthew Pistilli from Florida (ECHL). TORONTO MARLIES Recalled F Matt Caruana from Reading (ECHL). ECHL ECHL Suspended Ontario D Doug Krantz one game and fined him an undisclosed amount for his actions during Wednesdays game at Victoria. IDAHO STEELHEADS Released D Dustin Molle. READING ROYALS Signed G Scott Darling. Central Hockey League RAPID CITY RUSH Signed G Tim Boron. Waived G Jim Spratt.LACROSSENational Lacrosse League EDMONTON RUSH Signed T Bobby McBride and D David Morgan. Released D Ian Crashley. Moved T Devan Wray to the practice roster.SOCCERMLS LOS ANGELES GALAXYSigned D Frankie Hejduk to a one-year contract.COLLEGEBYU Announced the resignation of offensive coordinator Robert Anae. CONCORDIA, TEXAS Announced the resignation of mens soccer coach Wesley Schevers. INDIANA Named Brent Pease offensive coordinator. MINNESOTA Named Jay Sawvel defensive backs coach, Brian Anderson defensive quality control assistant, Nate Griffin offensive quality control assistant, Adam Clark director of player personnel, Billy Glasscock director of recruiting operations and Eric Klein strength and conditioning coach. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid MONDAY: Girls Basketball at Sebring,6/7:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at Mulberry,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball vs.Mulberry, 6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer at McKeel,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.McKeel,6/7:30 p.m. FRIDAY,Jan.7: Girls Basktball vs.Okeechobee,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer at Frostproof,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.Frostproof,6/7:30 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Boys Basketball at Frostproof,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball vs.Lake Placid, 6/7:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Girls Soccer at Lake Wales,6/7:30 p.m. THURSDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Haines City,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer at Haines City, 6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.Poinciana,6:30 p.m.; Girls Weightlifting hosts meet,5 p.m. Walker TUESDAY: Girls Basketball at Sebring JV,6 p.m. THURSDAY: Girls Basketball at Victory Christian,6 p.m.; Boys Basketball at Victory Christian,7:30 p.m. SATURDAY: Boys Basketball at Heartland Christian,6:30/8 p.m. Heartland Christian TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at Wellington Christian,American Airlines Arena,Miami,2 p.m. THURSDAY: JV Basketball vs.Moore Haven,6 p.m. SATURDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Walker Memorial,6:30/8 p.m. Avon Park TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at McKeel,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball vs.McKeel,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer vs.Tenoroc,6:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer at Tenoroc,6:30 p.m. THURSDAY: Boys Basketball vs.Hardee,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball at Lake Region, 6:30 p.m. FRIDAY: Boys Soccer at Hardee,7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer at Hardee,6 p.m. C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . St. Francis at North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 5 5 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . LSU at Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Miami at Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Georgetown vs. St. Johns . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Indiana at Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2C C O O L L L L E E G G E E F F O O O O T T B B A A L L L L M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Orange Bowl Stanford vs. Virginia. . . . E E S S P P N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Sugar Bowl Arkansas vs. Ohio State . . E E S S P P N NTimes, games, channels all subject to change N N F F L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Regional Miami at New England . . . . . . C C B B S S 1 1 p p . m m . Regional Tampa Bay at New Orleans . . F F O O X X 4 4 p p . m m . San Diego at Denver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 4 4 p p . m m . Arizona at San Francisco . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 8 8 : : 1 1 5 5 p p . m m . St. Louis at Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CG G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . ADT Skills Challenge, Day 2 . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CW W O O M M E E N N S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Arkansas at Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 2 2 p p . m m . Tennessee at LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 8 8N N B B A A M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Miami at Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Milwaukee at Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N LIVESPORTSONTV NFL NHL Transactions NBA Page 2BNews-Sun Sunday, January 11, 2011www.newssun.co m

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JANIE McCAULEY Associated PressSTANFORD, Calif. S tanford really does have U Conns number. Top-ranked Connecticuts r ecord 90-game winning s treak in womens basketball e nded Thursday night when N o. 9 Stanford outplayed the H uskies from the start in a 7 1-59 victory at Maples P avilion where the C ardinal have their own s treak going. Stanford hasnt lost in 52 g ames at home. The Cardinal t ook an early 13-point lead, n ever trailed and didnt let t he mighty Huskies back in it a fter halftime in this one. They kept pounding the b all inside and banging the b oards. UConn fans accustomed to w atching coach Geno Auriemmas team blow past opponents hadnt seen a loss since the 2008 NCAAsemifinals Stanford got the Huskies that time, too, 82-73 in the Final Four at Tampa, Fla. At some point reality had to set in, and today reality set in, Auriemma said. Im not destroyed about it. Winning that many games in a row, its unheard of. These teams have a bit of a history. Last season, Stanford almost beat Maya Moore and UConn in the national championship game before losing 53-47. That the Cardinal won in the rematch shouldnt have been a total surprise. Stanford was unbeatable at home, had given the Huskies fits in past meetings, and UConn came close to losing to then-No. 2 Baylor last month. Jeanette Pohlen hit five 3pointers on the way to a career-high 31 points for the Cardinal (9-2). Moore couldnt find a rhythm until it was too late, held to 14 points on 5-of-15 shooting. I thought we let it get away from us, Auriemma said. I think the atmosphere and what was going on and when Maya couldnt get going early. I think it affected the rest of our guys. We just didnt play like ourselves. Give credit to Stanford. I think they played an unbelievably good game. Last week, the Huskies (12-1) topped the 88-game winning streak set by John Wooden's UCLAmens team from 1971-74 by beating No. 22 Florida State 93-62, then won their 90th in a row this week at Pacific. Pohlen sealed it with six free throws in the final 42.5 seconds. She shot 8-for-15 overall and had nine rebounds and six assists. Nnemkadi Ogwumike added 12 points and six rebounds and Kayla Pedersen 11 rebounds for an inspired Stanford squad that held a 43-36 advantage on the boards. I thought we showed moments of fight where we came together and were playing together at times, Moore said. Then we would hurt ourselves ... and momentum would shift right back to them. Special to the News-Sun The Lake Placid Youth B aseball Board has a nnounced they are taking r egistrations for the upcomi ng 2011 season until T hursday, Jan. 13 2011. The open draft will be held o n Saturday, Jan. 15 for ages 7 -8 and 9-10. No registrations will be t aken after this date and the p layers draft is mandatory. Any player not showing up f or evaluation willbe rand omly placed on a team. League Age For T-Ball and B aseball is childs age as of A pril 30, 2011. Baseball age groups are as f ollows :T-Ball ( age 5-6) B aseball (7-8) and Baseball ( 9-10). League Age For Softball is c hilds age as of January 1, 2 011. The Softball age groups a re as follows : Softball (7-8) a nd Softball (9-10). Registration prices are as follows T-Ballis $ 40with Baseball and Softball being $50. Registration forms will be handed out at schools the week of Jan 4 and registrations will also be available on the new web site www.lpyb.net. Questions regarding Baseball can be directed to Sheri Griffin at 441-1955. Questions regarding Softball can be directed to Linette Wells at441-2320. The registration form, your payment (Make Check Payable to Lake Placid Youth Baseball) and a copy of your childs birth certificate can be mailed or dropped off at the following locations: Brantley Properties ( 417 Interlake Blvd) or mailed to LPYB -PO BOX 1668 Lake Placid 33862. The league is also looking for coaches, team sponsors or banner sponsors. The season will be kicking off on Saturday, Feb. 12. Board President Randy Harris encourages everyone to come out and see the amazing youth in our area play the great game of baseball. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 3B BIG GUN SHOW!At the Highlands County Fairgrounds Convention Center Saturday, Jan. 8th9:00 am 5:00 pmSunday, Jan. 9th9:00 am 4:00 pmConcealed Weapons Course At Show!781 Magnolia Ave. Sebring321-777-7455 Only$5.00per personwww.flgunshows.com 6 MONTH MEMBERSHIPS NOW AVAILABLE(863) 382-0500 3201 Golfview Rd. Sebring(863) 382-0744for 9 Hole Executive RatesPrices good thru 12/31/10 Incl. Tax & CartMonday thru Friday:8am 1pm $25By 8, After 1 $20 Saturday & Sunday: $20 HAPPY HOLIDAYS WEVE GOT YOU COVERED! Shades Shutters Wood Blinds Verticals Custom Draperies & Bedding Wallpaper & More! Kelly Grifn,ASID i t impossible to be profitable. According to the NFL, the a verage player salary rose a bout 35 percent from $1.4 m illion in 2005 the last y ear of the old deal to $1.9 m illion in 2009. Figures for this season a rent comparable because t heres no salary cap. The players insist the l eague and the game is h ealthy, pointing to huge p ayouts from the networks, i mpressive TVratings, solid a ttendance, profitable mark eting partnerships and overs eas interest. The players have asked the t eams to open their books. Goodell responds that the p layers know where the l eagues money is being s pent down to the penny. As the NFLprepares for t he final 16 regular-season g ames of the season, intense n egotiations arent on the i mmediate horizon. Although no deadlines are i mminent, its difficult not to be concerned about 2011 and beyond. That doesnt mean a gloom-and-doom scenario is upon us. The best way to get through it is make all parties have an understanding of the ramifications of a stoppage, Dogra says. You are very hopeful because there are intelligent people on both sides of the table, the sport is the most popular and very profitable for all parties involved. Also remember that the NFLhas not missed games because of labor problems since 1987, when the players went on strike for the second time in five years. If both sides are equally committed and equally focused, NFLexecutive vice president of labor and chief counsel Jeff Pash says, then theres no reason why we cant get an agreement. AP Pro Football Writer Howard Fendrich in Washington and AP Sports Writer Rachel Cohen in New York contributed to this stor y Continued from 1B NFL offseason could last for a while Special to the News-SunThe Avon Park Chamber of Commerce presents the 14th Annual Chamber Golf Tournament, sponsored by Heartland National Bank, Highlands Independent Bank, Florida Hospital, CenturyLink, Avon Park Main Street CRA, Progress Energy, The News-Sun, Highlands Today and Bernie Little Distributors Saturday, Feb. 12 at River Greens Golf Course. The format is two-person scramble with registration at 7 a.m. and shotgun start at 8 a.m. The $60, per-perso n entry fee includes go lf, lunch, range ball s, refreshments on t he course and tourname nt prizes. A$2,000 Hole-in-O ne prize is sponsored by t he Cohan Radio Group. We have hole sponso rships available for $10 0 that include a profession al sign on a golf hole to pr omote your business. To obtain an entry form or for more informatio n, contact the Avon Pa rk Chamber office at 45 33350. Avon Park Chamber Golf Tournament Lake Placid Youth Baseball/Softball Registration o nly 59 yards against New O rleans to hit the 1,000-yard m ark and his 941 yards rushi ng leads all rookies. The 6-foot, 247-pound p ower back has 33 carries for 2 74 yards an average of 8.3 y ards per carry in his past t wo games. He has also memorably h urdled two defenders this s eason in games against A rizona and Seattle. He looks good. Some peop le say hes not athletic, but I dont know how they can say that, Saints defensive tackle Remi Ayodele said. Hes running full-speed and hes jumping over guys. Even with Blounts emergence, the Buccaneers still have to prove they can beat an elite team. They are 0-5 against teams that currently have winning records. When the Saints throttled Tampa Bay earlier this season, they did so without Pierre Thomas, who returned from an ankle injury three games ago. Thomas began to look more like himself in the Saints1714 playoff-clinching victory over Atlanta last Monday night. I definitely wanted to show everybody what I could bring to the table because its been a while, said Thomas, who had 102 total yards from scrimmage at Atlanta. Im close to being back to my normal self. If the Bucs are unable to deal with Thomas, Brees, and the rest of the Saintssixthranked offense, theyll be disappointed to have ended their season with a loss, but not with how far theyve come since this time last year. You take away some gratification from ... playing some meaningful games in this part of the season, Morris said. Hopefully we can get some luck on our side this weekend with some other people doing some things for us, but we have to do our job. Continued from 1B Bucs have come a long way, regardless UConns win streak ends at 90 in loss to Stanford

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Page 4BNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com SUBSCRIBE TODAY!863-385-6155www.newssun.com

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 5B GRAND OPENING GOING ON NOW! Meet Denise Waldron of Sebring Before After Denise Lost 34 lbs 31 inches 10% body fatSINCE 8/18/10! SUPER STAR 863-471-250013 Ryant Blvd. SebringCorner of 27 & Ryant Blvd.CALLTODAY!GRANDOPENING50% OFF LOSE YOUR WEIGHT FOR THE LAST TIME. Lose 2-7 pounds per week ... GUARANTEED!* Save 50% off enrollment fee.Our members have told us time and again ... ... Losing Weight With Our Program Is Easy ... Almost Effortless. 50%OFF Metro ServicesWith another year in the books a nd a new one already in full s wing, now is a great time to look b ack on what the world was like 1 00 years ago, with some of the m ost notable events of 1911.January The Kappa Alpha Psi F raternity is founded at Indiana U niversity in Bloomington, I ndiana. The fraternity is still a round to this day, with more than 1 50,000 members and 700 chapters i n the United States and overseas. Aviator Eugene Burton Ely l ands his aircraft on the deck of the U SS Pennsylvania in San Francisco h arbor. The successful landing m arked the first time an aircraft l anded on a ship.February The first official air mail f light takes place when Henri P equet, a 23-year-old Frenchman, d elivers 6,500 letters after flying f rom Allahabad, India to Naini, I ndia. The historic trip took roughl y 13 minutes.March 146 people perish in a fire at t he Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in N ew York City. The majority of the v ictims were women, and the fire r emains one of the citys largest i ndustrial disasters. Actress Jean Harlow, later k nown as the Blonde Bombshell, i s born in Kansas City, Mo. A pril Aviator Pierre Prier completes t he first non-stop flight from L ondon to Paris in just under four h ours. The Great Fire of 1911 b egins, eventually destroying much o f Bangor, Maine. By the time the f ire is extinguished, damage in e xcess of $3 million has been done a nd hundreds of people are left h omeless. Despite of all the dama ge, only two people died in the f ire, one of which is a firefighter.May Pancho Villa launches an attack against government troops in Ciudad Juarez during the Mexican Revolution. Two days after the attacks launch, the governments troops surrender. Citing the Sherman Antitrust Act, Standard Oil is declared an unreasonable monopoly by the United States Supreme Court. The first Indianapolis 500 race is run. Ray Harroun, driving the No. 32 Marmon Wasp, wins.June George Vof the United Kingdon and Mary of Teck are crowned at Londons Westminster Abbey. July Pre-World War I tensions are escalated by the presence of the German warship Panther in the Moroccan port of Agadir. Ginger Rogers, who would rise to fame as an actress and be widely remembered as Fred Astaires longtime dancing partner, is born in Independence, Mo.August At the Louvre in Paris, France, the Mona Lisa is discovered stolen. Widely described as the greatest art theft of the 20th century, the crime was perpetrated by Italian Vincenzo Peruggia, who hid the painting in his Paris apartment, even while being questioned by local police. Lucille Ball, who would go on to Hollywood stardom thanks in large part for her role on the iconic television series I Love Lucy, is born in Jamestown, N.Y.September Italy declares war on the Ottoman Empire. Poet Guillaume Apollinaire is arrested on suspicion of stealing the Mona Lisa. Apollinaire is released from custody within a week of his arrest.October Aviator Orville Wright stays in the air for nearly 10 minutes in a glider at KillDevils Hills, N.C.November Chevrolet is founded by Louis Chevrolet and deposed General Motors founder William C. Durant. Suffragettes storm the Parliament in London. All are arrested and imprisoned. Future American singer and cowboy actor Roy Rogers is born in Cincinnati, Ohio.December The Bonnot Gang, a French criminal anarchist group who would utilize cutting edge technology, including automobiles, to aide in their criminal activity, robs its first bank. 100 years ago: Notable events of 1911 MCTphotos The first Indianapolis 500, won by Ray Harroun in the No. 32 Marmon Wasp (above)was run in 1911. Also that year, the Mona Lisa was stolen from the Louvre in PAris.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 7B Sponsors: Highlands Independent Bank Kiwanis Club of Sebring Florida Hospital News-Sun Highlands Today Alan Jay Automotive Network Metro ServicesThe oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico m ay now be capped and the plumes of v isible oil dissipated, but that doesnt m ean the disaster still isnt wreaking h avoc on the environment, nor is the s pill no longer a threat. The Journal of the American Medical A ssociation reported in the fall of 2010 t hat the Gulf spill can still impact h uman health and seafood safety. Shrimp, oysters and crabs may pose t he greatest immediate risk, simply b ecause they have had trouble ridding t heir systems of dangerous polycyclic a romatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These a re the same substances found in cigar ette smoke and soot. Long-term dama ge may come from consumption of bigg er fish, like mackerel, swordfish and t una, that feed on smaller invertebrates a nd other marine life. These fish, which a lready may be high in mercury and o ther carcinogens, could absorb higher c oncentrations of these substances. Although marine life experts and doct ors say that the threat is real in Gulfarea fish, U.S. Federal officials dispute the claims and have said ongoing testing is aggressive and sufficient to protect public health. In terms of individuals living in the coastal areas, within close proximity to where the oil spill took place, experts say there is lower risk from inhalation of toxic chemicals now than there were in the early days of the spill. Testing has uncovered that levels of benzene, one of the more dangerous chemicals in the oil, have been low. This indicates there is little risk for breathing in vapors for residents. Another potential threat is the dissipated oil itself. Gulf of Mexico researchers discovered a large plume made up of oil droplets located 3,000 feet under the waters surface shortly after the spill started. According to Samantha Joye, a University of Georgia marine scientist, Dispersed oil and dissolved oil is no less of a threat than surficial oil floating on the surface because that material still carries with it two potentially important biological effects: One is toxicity and thats related to the concentration of oil in the environment. The other is oxygen demand and thats related to the stimulation of biodegradation and oxygen consumption from the oil in the environment. Joye also notes consumption of oil by microbial agents below the surface of the water may not be a good thing. Thats because microbes are using a lot of oxygen in these isolated areas, creating low-oxygen environments that may end up suffocating marine life on the sea floor. The gases that were spewed along with the oil itself could also be of concern, primarily because these methane, propane and ethane gases generally havent been monitored and tested for safe levels. It may be years before the true side effects of the Gulf oil spill are realized, and environmentalists and health experts warn people to be careful about the foods they consume. ENVIRONMENT Metro Services T he environmental impact of the Gulf oil spill goes far beyond the obvious damage. Gulf oil disaster could still be a threat Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155 Metro ServicesDo you recycle and reuse? Are organic foods your specialty? Is your hybrid car your pride and joy? Chances are if ecofriendly living is a priority to you, then you may want to extend this lifestyle to the way you raise your child. Its easier than ever to raise a baby by following green values. Here are a few ways to do so. Rely on gently-used clothing. Anew baby will grow very quickly. This means that you will be moving up to larger clothing sizes every few months. Not only is purchasing new clothing expensive, but it is also wasteful. Stock up on the staples, such as snap-close t-shirts and socks and trade other clothes with family and friends. You can also find baby clothes swaps online. Once the clothes your baby has outgrown pile up, trade them away or find a place where they can be donated, such as a womens shelter. Use glass bottles. If you are breastfeeding and want to supplement with bottle feeding or you simply prefer baby formula, consider using glass bottles. Glass baby bottles are making a comeback. Theyre durable, free of harmful chemicals and, once outgrown, they can be given away or recycled. Switch to cloth diapers. With the innovations in reusable diapers, its very easy to make the swit ch from disposable. Today s cloth diapers are multi-la yered, and many feature a fiber strip in the middle f or even more absorbanc y. They even have easy cl osures, eliminating the ne ed for diaper pins. Disposable diapers ha ve dyes, bleaching agents an d chemical liquid absorber s. All of which have t he potential to cause skin ir ritation. Cloth diapers can be washed by commercial di aper-cleaning service s, which efficiently use wat er and dryers. Choose organic food s. Baby foods have evolve d, and now you can find seve ral brands of organic foo ds at your local grocery stor e. Even better than purchasin g commercial food is to ma ke baby food yourself. Just be aware that som e produce, such as carro ts, can produce nitrates if stored for a long time. S o its best to make batches of food and use them rath er quickly. Afood processor mak es easy work of grinding foo d down for babys delica te palate. Simply cook dow n most foods and mix the m with a little water, if nece ssary. Use green cleanin g supplies. Exposure to har sh chemicals can be especial ly dangerous for small ch ildren. Therefore, resolve to u se environmentally friend ly products in and around t he home, especially wh en cleaning items your bab y will touch or use. Easy ways to raise a green baby Metro ServicesWhile everyone understands savings, its p ossible to save and still support the local b usinessman, while also helping the planet. S hopping locally might seem more costly on t he surface, but in many ways shopping locall y is the most economically, not to mention e nvironmentally, responsible thing a consumer c an do. Conserve fuel. Shopping at one of the l arger discount chains might produce results at t he register, but unless you have such a store r ight in your hometown, those savings arent w hat they appear. Thats because discount c hains might be farther away from home, m eaning youll be spending considerably more o n fuel just to get what likely amounts to a m inimal discount. The local businessman m ight not be able to match the big chains p rice, but he can likely offer the item at a price similar to the big chains, but without the additional cost of fuel. Reduce pollution. Local businesses often dont place the tall orders of their big chain counterparts. While their inventory might be less, that inventory is typically delivered in more environmentally friendly vehicles. Larger chains receive the vast majority of their items via big trucks that guzzle gas and produce pollution. So while shopping at the Mom and Pop might seem like a small favor to a neighbor, its a big favor to the environment. Future considerations. Kids learn a lot from Mom and Dads behavior. Parents can instill a valuable lesson in social and environmental responsibility by supporting local businessmen. If kids learn early to shop conscientiously, theyre more likely to carry that behavior into adulthood, contributing to the planets longterm health as well. Shopping local helps the planet

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. Crossroads Community Church, 114 South Central Ave., Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 4534453. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship: 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday Childrens Church: 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Adult Bible Study and Youth/Royal Explorers, 7 p.m. Pastor: John E. Dumas. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($3 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September to May our youth group meets. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Ed Howell, transitional pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 3823695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F., Pastor. Masses Saturday Vigil: 4 p.m. Sunday: 7:30, 9 and 10:30 a.m. and noon Spanish Mass. Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confessions: 3-3:45 p.m. Saturdays, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first Friday, or by appointment. Enrollment for Catholic School grades K3 through 5 not being accepted. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunda y Worship Service, 9 a.m.; Sunda y Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.; Sunda y Evening Service, 6 p.m .; Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP As we walk along the e arths surface, we may not t hink about how much action i s going on beneath us. Did y ou know that water is cons tantly moving and flowing i nto crevices and holes? The w ater that is stored underg round is very important to u s. We are fortunate to have s uch an amazing source of t his life giving liquid in the f orm of the Floridan aquifer. T his is one of the most prod uctive aquifers in the world a nd it stretches about 1 00,000 square miles under f our states including Florida, A labama, Georgia and South C arolina. Aquifers are critically i mportant to all life. Most of o ur drinking water comes f rom Floridas aquifers. An a quifer is defined as an u nderground layer of permea ble rock, sediment, or soil t hat yields water. The pore s paces in aquifers are filled w ith water and are interconn ected, so that water flows t hrough them. Basically an a quifer is an underground r eservoir of water. Because of the groundwat er, which is released from o ur aquifers, natural ecosyst ems, agriculture, outdoor recreation and human health are sustained. There are three water bearing aquifers, in the subsurface underlying Highlands County the surficial, intermediate and Floridan aquifers systems. Most of the water used in Highlands County, almost 90 percent, is withdrawn from the upper Floridan aquifer. Recently a major groundwater study, the first in 50 years, was completed for Highlands County. The study was conducted by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and funded by Highlands County, USGS, Southwest Florida Water Management District and the South Florida Water Management District. The objective of the study was to determine the chemical quality and levels of the groundwater in Highlands County. This information is essential to develop and manage the water supply effectively. The study found that Highlands County appears to have sufficient groundwater resources of good chemical quality for present and future needs. According to the study, groundwater withdrawals in Highlands County have increased from 37 million gallons/day (mgd) in 1965 to 107 mgd in 2005. This increase is due, in part, to the population growth, but is primarily the result of a large increase in agricultural activities. The USGS study included sampling from both public and private wells throughout the County. The Highlands County Natural Resources Advisory Commission (NRAC) is working on developing a long-term groundwater monitoring program to detect trends in water quality or levels. The purpose of the plan is to identify potential problems early, before they become major, so corrective action can be taken with minimal cost and minimal impact on water users. Florida is becoming more populated every day. As the recent study shows, the demand for water has tripled since 1965. Water is one of our most important natural resources and the Floridan Aquifer provides billions of gallons of water per day. It supplies almost all of the states drinking water and feeds into over 600 natural springs. We are fortunate that this recent study has shown good news for Highlands County. As good stewards of our precious natural resources, it is imperative that we continue with these types of studies and monitor the hydrogeology and groundwater of Highlands County to ensure our water stays clean and plentiful. Written in cooperation by Tor Rothman and Corine Burgess. Corine Burgess is an Environmental Specialist for the Parks & Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil and Water Conservation District. (www.highlandsswcd.org). US Geological Survey completes groundwater study Courtesy pho to Groundwater released from the aquifers sustain natural ecosystems, agriculture, outdoor recreation and human health. News From The Watershed Corine Burgess

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 9B CROSSWORDSOLUTION EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer.Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howes Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer Kid C ity Childrens Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, prime-timers, and Bible s tudies in Spanish. Kid City Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. JEWISH Temple Israel of Highlands C ounty, 382-7744. Rabbi Lorraine R udenberg; www.templeisr aelofhcfl.org.Temple Israel is a R eform Temple that promotes the e nduring and fundamental princip les of Judaism. Through prayer, s tudy and friendship we strive to e nrich our lives and insure Jewish c ontinuity in Highlands County. F riday Evening Shabbat Services, 7 :30 p.m.; Saturday afternoon intro t o Hebrew, 12:30 p.m.; Saturday i ntro to Judaism, 2 p.m.; Saturday a fternoon Torah Study, 3:30 p.m.; H avdallah, 5 p.m. Jan. 7-8; Jan. 21; F eb. 4; Feb. 18-19; March 18-19 P urim; April 1-2; April 15-16; April 1 8, 6 p.m., Pesach 1st Night Seder; A pril 29-30 Yom Hashoah; May 131 4; May 27-28. Every Thursday will b e Hebrew and Bible classes with H oward Salles, 12:30-4:30 p.m. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Monday of month; Ladies Group WELCAmeets at noon second Monday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable Garden Club meets as needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Like to sing? Come join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Childrens Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Youth group meets at 5 p.m. Friday. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Esther and Mary Circles business meeting, 3:30 p.m. third Thursday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 7 p.m. second Tuesday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday; Family Movie, 4 p.m. third Sunday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group, 6-7:30 p.m.; Senior High Youth Group, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gayle Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30 a.m.; and contemporary worship is at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.presbychurch.org. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 382-9092. Dale Bargar, bishop; David Ward, first counselor; and Steve Austin, second counselor. Family History Center: 3821822. Sunday services: Sacrament meeting, 10 a.m.; Sunday school, 11:20 a.m.; and Priesthood/Relief Society, 12 p.m. Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. Youth activities from 7-8:20 p.m. Wednesday: 11-year-old Scouts, 78:20 p.m. first and third Wednesday; and activity days for 8-11 year old boys and girls from 78:20 p.m. second and fourth Wednesday. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruc e Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Summe r Schedule, Sunday School 9:0 0 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on lifes journey, youre we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP Special to the News-SunAries (March 21-April 20) Be e specially decisive this week, Aries. I mportant decisions wont settle thems elves. You can ask for advice, but you u ltimately have to make the choice. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, t his an especially important week to stay a lert. Open up your eyes and ears and be r eady for all that is about to come your w ay. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini, d ont allow yourself to be taken advant age of this week. Your good nature may l eave you in a precarious position but g et some friends to help back you up. Cancer(june 22-July 22) Cancer, s omeone seeks your advice this week b ut you are not around to offer it. Help t he best you can when this person turns t o you down the road. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Learn to l ove yourself as much as others do, Leo. S elf-confidence is something you are k nown to have in abundance, but for s ome reason it has been waning of late. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo, a void blaming others for your situation. Some self-examination reveals you are the only one that can be held accountable. Its time for a change. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Libra, hold on tight to your decision-making powers this week. Some difficult decisions are on the horizon, but others are bound to turn up to support you. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Scorpio, all of the stress that has been piling up for the last several months is about to come to an end. Enjoy the respite while you can and plan a much-needed vacation. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Sagittarius, open your home to a family member in need this week. While it may not be the ideal situation, a measure of goodwill every now and then is good for the soul. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) Capricorn, now is the time to reciprocate for all of those favors that others have done for you. When someone close to you asks for a favor, be the first to jump. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) Aquarius, if others arent open to your advice, dont persist in giving it. Take a break from offering advice and focus on your own situation if the time allows it. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Pisces, though you and a romantic partner are worlds apart in interests, this opposite nature is what has attracted you to each other. Jan. 2 Cuba Gooding Jr., actor, 43; Jan. 3 Eli Manning, athlete, 30; Jan. 4 Michael Stipe, singer, 51; Jan. 5 Bradley Cooper, actor, 36; Jan. 6 Joey Adams, actress, 40; Jan. 7 David Caruso, actor, 55; Jan. 8 David Bowie, singer, 64. Taurus needs to stay alert this week; avoid blaming others, Virgo Classified Ads 385-6155 NEWS-SUN

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Page 10BNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com The Hotel JACARANDA $8.99 Lunch is served 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Friday and Sunday. Friday Seafood Buet9.99$ Dr. Rey Pardo, M. D. 13 Ryant Blvd., Sebring, FL 33870 (863)382-2110IMAGINE YOUR LIFE WITHOUT PAIN!Our goal is not only to uncover the symptoms, but to find out the real source of your pain. Dr. Pardo is a Board Certified Interventional Pain Management Physician. He specializes in offering targeted therapeutic procedures along with individualized physical medicine, rehabilitation and physical therapy care. Our team is able to offer expert care for injured patients with: neck/back/extremity pain, headaches, arm or leg numbness, tingling and weakness due to herniated discs and/or many other spinal and soft tissue injuries. We strive to help the patient become symptom free, functional and active while avoiding surgery and drug dependency. Our services include: Epidural and facet joint steroid injections of the Cervical, Thoracic and Lumbosacral spine Lumbar transforaminal steroid injections Selective nerve root blocks Sacroiliac joint steroid injections Intermediate and major bursa (e.g., subacromial, trochanteric) and intraarticular steroid injections (e.g., shoulder, hip, knee and ankle joints) Piriformis muscle injections Trigger Point Injections Myofascial Pain Treatment (e.g., trigger point injections)CALL TODAY FOR A CONSULTATION! (863) 382-2110 Atrip to the French Riviera and sites such as St. Tropez and Monte Carlo remain, for most folks, a once-in-al ifetime dream vacation. So, w hen you find yourself jets etting in locales that are the w ell known playgrounds for t he rich and famous, how do y ou purchase souvenirs at r easonable prices? Amid the fast cars, palat ial buildings, and massive y achts, buying a t-shirt for 3 0 euros ($39) seems like a c heap alternative in Monte C arlo. What do you do if y ou are looking to collect s omething of significance at r easonable prices? Set your b udget and shop like a pro-a f rugal pro. W hats the scoop?When shopping for souv enirs, it is important to l earn about the place you are v isiting. Learn about its hist ory and understand what m akes it famous. For i nstance, St. Tropez came of a ge in the 1950s when B ridget Bardot and other celebs vacationed there. The most famous film industry insiders made St. Tropez a hot spot. So, items associated with film stars are good and easy to find souvenirs from St. Tropez. Price pointsSt. Tropez is located within the region of Provence. Provence is known for its fine painters and sculptors, colorful pottery, country French printed textiles, melodic cicada bugs, and lavender fields. If you want to collect something traditional from St. Tropez, take home an inexpensive lavender sachet (about 4 euros or $5) or a printed cotton tablecloth (about 15 euros or $19). They are fine reminders of this chic town on the French Riviera and they wont break your bank account. In Monte Carlo (a.k.a., CharlesMount), Monaco, souvenirs associated with Princess Grace and other members of the Grimaldi family are always popular. Objects that reflect the history of Hollywood starlet turned princess, nee Grace Kelly, and her prince of a husband, Prince Rainier are immortalized in souvenirs ranging from posters to mugs to cabinet plates. At the cathedral in Monte Carlo-the site of the royal wedding in 1956-visitors will not only have an opportunity to pay their respects at the tombs of the prince and princess but they will be able to view a litany of 16th and 17th Century French paintings on display there. In July of 2011, the Monte Carlo cathedral will be the site of the wedding of Princess Graces only son, Prince Albert II, offering collectors many new objects to amass associated with the lavish wedding. Of course, Monte Carlo is home to the always exciting Grand Prix. Collectibles relating to the great race come in many shapes, sizes, and price ranges. Caps, keychains, and magnets featuring the worlds fastest cars like Ferrari, Lambourgini, and Buggatti are available in Monte Carlos tourist shops at very reasonable prices. Ph.D. antiques appraiser, author, and award-winning TV personality, Dr. Lori presents antique appraisal events nationwide and antiques themed cruises. As seen on NBCs The Tonight Show and Comedy Centrals The Daily Show, watch Dr. Lori on the national TV morning show, Daytime on NBC WFLA 8 at 10 AM. Visit DrLoriV.com, Facebook.com/DoctorLori, or call (888) 431-1010. ARTS Souvenir shopping on the French Riviera Art & Antiques Dr. Lori Dr. Lori photo In St. Tropez, fine art is sold in posh galleries and on the main streets. Here, you can negotiate directly with the artist and go home with a masterpiece. By JENNIFER FORKER For The Associated PressIts the time of year that b egs for more light, so prov ide it with lustrous vases a nd candle holders that imit ate the mercury glass sold in h ome-goods catalogs. That glass is itself imitat ion, of the 19th century glass c reated to emulate the look of s ilver. Mercury glass has that s ilvery cast and more its s hine often has a mirror-like q uality. In antique mercury glass a nd costly reproductions, d ouble-walled clear glass is h and-blown in molds and i njected with a silver-looking w ash (there is no silver, or m ercury, in the making of t his glass). Mercury glass its reall y loved for that sparkle that i t has, says Rachael Liska, s enior editor of Fresh Home m agazine. But its really e xpensive. Asmall, hand-blown a ntique vase can fetch $100, a ccording to Liska. Larger, m ore elaborate or colored p ieces can cost 10 times m ore. Reproduction mercury g lass may cost less an 8by-14 1/2-inch vase at Pottery Barn lists for $59. But you also can try doing it yourself. In a less costly but convincing do-it-yourself version, created by Liska, sheets of silver leaf are attached to the insides of inexpensive clear glass vases and votives, sealed, and embellished with silver paint. Thats it. Whats great about this is you cant mess it up, says Liska. As I found out, its also really fun. Depending on the materials you use, the result can throw as much sparkle and shine as the original. Experiment. Find your mix of silvery and shine. And throw some light on this new year.Imitation Mercury GlassSupplies: Clear vase or votive with a wide opening Silver leaf (sold in sheets) Metal leaf spray adhesive Metal leaf spray sealer Krylon Looking Glass Mirror-Like Paint (available at many ACE Hardware retailers), or metallic silver spray paint Newspaper to cover work space Assembly: 1. Wash and thoroughly dry your glass vessel. 2. Working in a well-ventilated space (or outside), lightly spray the inside of the vessel with adhesive. Allow to dry (about 10 minutes). It will be tacky to the touch. 3. Attach torn pieces of silver leaf to the inside of the vessel, smoothing down edges. You want a patchy look, so imperfection is key. Cover 90 percent of the vessel, leaving little spaces clear (to simulate the look of oxidized, flaking mercury glass). 4. Lightly spray the inside of the vessel with sealer, and allow to dry (about 15 minutes). 5. For added depth, lightly spray the inside of the vessel with spray paint. Tip: You can substitute silver Mirrachrome, a reflective automobile spray paint, for the last step, for even more glasslike shine. Online: http://freshhomeblog.com Craft some silvery glass for a shiny New Years project The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sunon any c hanges in this listing by calling 3 85-6155, ext. 516; send any c hanges by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail t hem to News-SunCommunity C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 L ake Placid has lounge hours f rom 1-9 p.m. Live music is f rom 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p .m. Members and guests only. P ost is at 528 N. Pine St., S ebring. Call 471-1448. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2 661 lounge is open from 1-7 p .m. Card games start at 1:30 p .m. The lodge is open to m embers and their guests. Call 4 65-2661. Lake Placid Moose has k araoke in the pavilion. H orseshoes played at 9:30 a .m. Food available at 4 p.m. O pen to members and qualified g uests only. Loyal Order of Moose H ighlands County Lodge No. 2 494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon P ark. Cards start at 4 p.m. M usic outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. L odge phone number 4520 579. Overeaters Anonymous, m eets from 4-5 p.m. in second f loor conference roomNo. 3 at F lorida Hospital Heartland M edical Center, 4200 Sun N L ake Blvd., Sebring. Call 3827 731. No dues, fees or weighi ns. For details on the organizat ion, go to www.oa.org. Ridge Area Missionary S oldiers AvonPark P athfinder Club meets from 9 a .m. to noon every first and t hird Sunday at 58 E. Sixth St., A von Park. Call 471-2143. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves lunch at 2 p.m. at the c lub, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. C all 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 o ffers NASCAR racing in the p avilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open a nd kitchen open from 2-5 p.m. L odge is at 11675 U.S. 98, S ebring. Call 655-3920. Society for Creative A nachronism (Local Chapter: S hire of Stagridge) meets at 2 p .m. first and third Sunday at B rewsters Coffee House on U .S. 27 in Sebring. Call 2145 522. The ArtistsGroup at South F lorida Community College will h old a critique clinic the first S unday of every month, 2-4 p .m., at the Hotel Jacaranda, A von Park. Professional local a rtists will discuss and evaluate p articipantspaintings. The fee i s $5 with a two painting limit. F or more information, call 7847 346. U.S. Military Vets M otorcycle Club meets at 1 p .m. on the first Sunday of e ach month at VFW Post 9 853, State Road 64 West and N orth Oliva Drive. For informat ion call Hocky at (954) 5924 847 Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 3880 serves hamburgers f rom 4-5:30 p.m. and plays p oker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1 224 County Road 621 East, L ake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 plays euchre at 1:30 p .m. and E&J Karaoke is from 4 :30-7:30 p.m. at the post, 2 011 SE Lakeview Drive, S ebring. Call 385-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN W ITH ME family group meets a t 10:30 a.m. every Monday at t he Heartland Christian Church o n Alt. 27 in Sebring. The c hurch is behind Southgate S hopping Center where Publix i s. F or more information call 3855 714. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal C hurch, Lakeshore Drive, S ebring. For more details, call 3 85-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous O ne Day At ATime group m eets for a closed discussion a t 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant P resbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. Call 3 14-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 6:30 p.m. at R osewood Center, 517 U.S. 27 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 202-0647. Ambucs, a local charity that assists people with disabilities, meets at noon every first Monday at R.J. Gators Sea Grill and Bar, Sebring. The meeting is open to the public. Call 386-4387. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 12-9 p.m. Legion and auxiliary boards meet at 6 p.m. General meeting at 7 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. Call 4711448. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and guests. Call 385-0234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. AvonPark Veterans Honor Guard meets first Monday at the American Legion Post 69, AvonPark. Call 382-0315. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake Placid. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. Corvette Cruisers meets at 6:30 p.m. first and third Monday at the Dairy Queen in front of The Home Depot, Sebring. Call Ed Robson at 655-2092. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The Agri-Center. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets from 7:30-9:30 p.m. the first and third Monday at Sebring Civic Center from December through April. There will be alternating mainstream and plus dancing with rounds. Casual dress or square dance attire is acceptable. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or e-mail him at samdunn@samdunn.net.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 3148877. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County Agri-Civic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. Call 402-6540. Highlands County Rotary Club meets at 6 p.m. at Charlies Restaurant, Commerce Street, Sebring. Highlands Stamp Club meets the first Monday. Talk and swap at St. Johns United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive. Call Bob Gleisner at 471-6526 or Budd Steinke at 382-9373. Insulin Pump Support Group meets from 3:30-5:30 p.m. first Monday at Conference Room 2, Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center, 4200 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 402-0177. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Democratic Club meets at 6 p.m. first Monday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call Bill Sayles at 699-6773 for details. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Meetings held first and third Mondays at 8 p.m. Lodge phone number 452-0579. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. National Association for Advancement of Colored People, Highlands County Branchmeets 7:30 p.m., 401 Tulane, Avon Park. Patriots Chapter, Daughter of the American Revolution meets at 1:30 p.m. on the first Monday of each month September through May at the Church of the Redeemer Parish Hall on U.S. 27 directly across from Wells Motor Company, three-tenths of a mile north of the South Florida Community College stoplight. Call 4712096. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Bradys, Sebring. Sebring AARP meets 1:30 p.m., The Palms, Pine Street, Sebring. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. For information, call 471-2522. Sebring Optimist Club meets at 6:15 p.m. first and third Mondays at Jims house. Call Jim Harrison at 381-9767 or Gabriel Read at 453-2859. Sebring Women of the Moose has chapter meeting at 7 p.m. Monday at the lodge, 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 382-8782. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 has a joint officers meeting on the first Monday of each month at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. Smoke-free environment. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Moose Club 2259 serves beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. The Women of the Moose meets at 7 p.m. the first Monday for chapter enrollment, refreshments and trivia pursuit. Call 655-3920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. Call Judy OBoyle at 260-0831. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444.TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parking available south of old church. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. Call 452-2385. Avon Park Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Avon Park Lions Club meets 6:45 p.m., dinner included, Lions Club, 1218 W. Bell St., Avon Park. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. Everyone is welcome. For more details, call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at The Rock, Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost selfesteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. For details, contact Celebrate Recovery coordinator Pam Sim by calling 453-3345, ext. 106. Fleet Reserve Association Board of Directors Heartland Branch No. 173 meets 7 p.m., Branch Hall, 1402 Roseland Ave., Sebring. Regular meeting, first Tuesday after board of directors meeting. Call 4716109 for details. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For more details, call 385-3288. Florida Native Plant Society meets at 7 p.m. the first Tuesday in Conference Room 3 at the Highlands County Agri-Civic Center, 4509 George Blvd., Sebring. Call Roy Stewart at (863) 632-0914. Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 4712294 or 386-5098. Heartland Insulin Pump Support Group meets the first Tuesday of the month at 3 p.m. at the Highlands County Health Dept., 7205 S. George Blvd., Sebring. If you would like more information on insulin pumps or are a pump wearer and would like to share ideas and suggestions, please join us. For more information, contact Kathy McNeil at 414-6444. Heartland Symphony Orchestra rehearsals from 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesdays in the Green Room in the South Florida Community College auditorium building. Bring music and instruments. New members welcome. Call conductor Bryan Johnson at 800949-7248, ext. 7231. Highlands County Adoption Support Group meets from 7-8:30 p.m. first Tuesday at Quality Inn & Suites Conference Center, 6525 U.S. 27 North, Sebring. For more details, call 382-0352. Highlands County Lodge of the Order Sons and Daughters of Italy in America meets the first Tuesday of each month at Visions ADTin Sebring. The officers meet at 6 p.m. and the general meeting will follow at 7 p.m. Call Philomena Greco at 402-0048. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets on the first and third Tuesday of each month at the Women's Club of Sebring, 4260 Lakeview Drive, across from Veterans' Beach, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For information, call 471-0694 or e-mailsbringquilter@embarqmail.com Highlands Tea Party has an educational and informational meeting at 6:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesday of each month at the Quality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27 in Sebring. Call 6990743 or e-mail thehighlandsteaparty@yahoo.com. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Call 382-0312. Italian-American Social Club of Highlands County meets the first Tuesday of each month at Visions ADT. Officers meet at 6:30 p.m.. with general meeting (men and women) at 7 p.m. For more information, call Jeanne at 382-1945. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Jaycees meets 7:30 p.m., first and third Tuesdays, Jaxsons. Board meetings at 6:30 p.m. on second Tuesday. Call Joe Collins, 655-5545. Lake Placid Toastmasters meet the first and third Tuesday at 6 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 101 S. Oak Ave. in Lake Placid. The web address is www.toastmasters.org. For information call Cathy Schreima at 382-3574 or Linda Udall at 386-6495. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Multiple Sclerosis Support Group, meets 7 p.m. second Tuesday at Highlands Regional Medical Center, Sebring, in the first floor doctors conference room. For more details, call 465-3138. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more nor mal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephin e Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Sevent hday Adventist Church, 1410 W Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup.c o m. Call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org for more information on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday and has blood pressure screening from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. first and third Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call 465-4888. Placid Lakes Home and Property Owners Associatio n Inc. has its board meetings at 7 p.m. first Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call 465-4888 for details. Annual meetings are in February. Quarterly meetings are in May, September and December. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near the library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-3829 or 471-9900. Scleroderma Support Group Meeting is the first Tuesday of each month from 1 2 pm. at the Sebring Library, 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring. Call 402-6716. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If inte rested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sig n in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:3 0 p.m. No experience necessary Cost is $2. Smoke-free enviro nment. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Lions Club meets at noon at Dots Restaurant, 950 Sebring Square. For infor mation call 382-2333. Sebring Moose Lodge 225 9 serves soft shell tacos 5-7 p.m and beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. Call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. Call 385-2966 or leave a nam e, number and message. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dees Restaurant, Sebring. Call Scott Albritton at 402-1819. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 67 p.m. at the Atonement Luthera n Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Community Bible Church, 1400 CR-17AN ., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. Call 452-1093. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. The ladies au xiliary board meeting is at 10 a.m. For more details, call 699 5444. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 11B AVON PARK 452-5800 SEBRING 382-3363 LAKE PLACID 465-1530Its more than just carpet The cleaning of the second piece must be of equal or lesser value to the first service price.Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 ft. and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Not valid with any other coupon. Expires 1/11/11.Emergency Water Damage Restoration3 ROOMS CARPET CLEANEDA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 1/11/11.$95002 ROOMS CARPET CLEANEDA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 1/11/11.$7500 it s her spa.UPHOLSTERY: CLEANONE PIECEOF UPHOLSTERY AT REGULAR PRICEAND RECEIVEASECONDPIECE1/2 OFF ROOFING SPECIALIST SERVING HIGHLANDS COUNTY SINCE 1989Shingles Flat Roofs Roof Repairs Mobile Home Roofovers -FULLYLICENSED & INSURED385-4690State Lic # RC 0066817 QUALITY WORK AT A REASONABLE PRICE FREEESTIMATES COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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By LEANNE ITALIE Associated PressAt 45, DeEtte Sauer was a d ead woman walking. She was morbidly obese, h er heart disease so serious a d octor warned her to expect an event at any time. Eaten u p by her marketing career, s truggling to raise three kids, s he smoked, drank and never, e ver exercised. Sauer remembers a vacat ion when at 5-foot-5 and 2 30 pounds she couldnt m ake it onto a small boat for a day out with her family. Thats when it hit me. I was a n elected cripple. I had done i t to myself. She got busy, slowly shedd ing the weight through sens ible eating and exercise. She b egan to walk around her H ouston neighborhood, then s he discovered the pool. Now 6 9, the woman who once had a supermom complex is a c ompetitive, medal-winning s enior swimmer. It literally saved my life, S auer said, adding that her b est event is the butterfly a stroke she learned at age 6 2. To trainers with lots of c lients well beyond 50, Sauer i s the holy grail, somebody w ho works hard and effic iently, taking care to avoid i njury while maintaining m otivation, strength and e ndurance through careful w orkouts. Getting fit later in l ife is one thing, they said, b ut staying that way at 60, 70 a nd 80 is another. Going from running to w alking, going from the t readmill to the elliptical as w e age. It can be really frust rating, mentally debilitati ng, said Chris Freytag, a y oga and Pilates instructor a nd contributing fitness edit or for Prevention magazine. Even for me. Im 45 and s ay oh God, I can just see it c oming. Theres going to be s ome wear and tear. That d oesnt mean I have to give u p, but I have to make some c hanges. Back, hips, knees, balance, c ardio all can be trouble s pots and big blows to a posit ive attitude for seniors, said F reytag and fitness expert D enise Austin, who was Jack L aLannes sidekick on televis ion and went on to her own w orkout shows, DVDs and b ooks. At 53, she has a new b ook out in January, Get E nergy!FlexibilityPilates and yoga are great w ays to stay strong and flexib le beyond 50 because both c an be easily modified, the e xperts said. Im into the core as you a ge, Austin said. Your s pine is your lifeline. Keep it h ealthy, keep it strong. As we a ge we lose flexibility and i ts really important to our t endons and ligaments to stay p liable and keep all the fluids i n our joints going. She suggests increasing f loor work to take pressure o ff the knees. Cant touch y our toes anymore? Use an e lastic band for the same s tretch, or to replace weight t raining that might grow dang erous. Arthritis can make gripp ing difficult at a time when t issue is losing elasticity, w hich might mean giving up h eavy free weights in each h and or on an overhead press. The technique isnt there a nymore, it falls down and t hey hurt a shoulder. Ive s een it a million times b efore, Austin said. Taking the time to stretch, t o reopen joints and muscles a fter a workout, is increasi ngly important as we age p articularly crucial at 60, 70 o r older, Freytag said. The l ower back and hip flexors g et really tight. The two are c orrelated. What I tell people i s you are no longer able to s kip stretching after a workout. Freytag recommends at least five to 10 minutes of stretching after a workout, when the muscles are warm. Back when we were younger we could skip it.BalanceWarming up BEFORE a workout is key to balance. For running seniors, Austin suggests five minutes of walking before getting into a gradual run, or intervals of walking and running. Its very important as you age to change it up more, to surprise your muscles and work them differently, she said. Runners may need to balance workouts with more strength training and stretching to avoid hip and knee problems, adding muscle work for the abs so important for balance and flexibility. Add five minutes of strength training and five minutes of stretching, Austin suggests. Really concentrate on the center of your body. Your core. It is truly the powerhouse of your body. It affects how you walk, your flexors, it protects your back. Thats why Pilates is great. Balance issues dont have to put an end to staying fit. Work out in a chair or use one to lean on if youre feeling unsteady. Theres a ton you can do in a chair, Freytag said. In a gym, theres a huge trend toward functional training, meaning doing things that kind of mimic the functionality of your daily activities. Standing on a domeshaped Bosu ball, for example. Youre creating your own passive range of motion, whereas a machine in a gym is a fixed range of motion, she said. Freytag called balance a use it or lose it proposition. There are so many classes at gyms for folks over 60, she said. The biggest thing for people who are athletes already is to keep positive and just think about the fact that youre going to train smarter. Youre not going to stop. Its just that you have to change.CardioWith heart disease stalking both men and women, aging doesnt have to mean the end to a decent cardio workout. Riding a bicycle is easier on the hips than running, for instance. Trim back on running to a couple of days a week and supplement on the bike. You can get on a bike and spin like heck, Freytag said. You can still push yourself as hard as you would have but with less pain. For runners who cant bring themselves to give it up, run slower, walk and run, or cross-train. She suggests cardio work four days a week but only at high energy twice in that period. Dancing is also a good way to get the heart rate up, Austin said. It changes movements and it changes your muscle twitchings. At 93, Esther Robinson wouldnt give up her life of fitness for anything. Active all her life, she still hits her local gym (I like to bench press), but dancing is something she can enjoy with others. When I was 60 or something, I got into square dancing, the great-grandmother said. I like the music and the movement of it. Take a page from Sauers story and hit the pool. Swimming is easy on the joints. Youll keep your love of sports. Robinson also loves to swim. Sauer said her 78-year-old husband is also extremely fit. At a water park with their grandson they spotted no seniors at the top of a water slide five flights up. Theyre missing out, she said. Ive never had so much fun in my life. Page 12BNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011www.newssun.com Newborns Children AdolescentsOFFICE HOURS: Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., F.A.A.P. Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., F.A.A.P. Anoop Palta, M.D., F.A.A.P. Vishakha Nakhate, M.D., F.A.A.P. David Kleczek, P.A.C. Amy Grimes, P.A.C. Mercy L. Seralde, M.D. Maria C. Perez, M.D. Maria B. Asis, M.D., F.A.A.P. Megan Neff, ARNPAvon Park Pediatrics,P.A. & Sebring Pediatrics,LLCWe accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid SEBRING382-0770AVON PARK453-7337 HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM ALL OF US SEBRING: MON. FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PMSATURDAY 8:30AM 12:00 NOON SEBRING ONLYAVON PARK: MON. & WED. 8:30AM 7:00PM TUES., THURS., & FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PM LAKE PLACID699-1414 Some Risks Are Worth Taking. Your Health Isnt One of Them. Medicare and almost all insurance acceptedFirst, 32 people die every day of skin cancer in the USA. Second, most skin cancer deaths are preventable. Therefore, forgiveness is the chance to prevent skin cancer with a Dermatology skin exam. Therefore, forgiveness is the Lord offering you free will to not be a statistic. SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE. OR LET US DO IT FOR YOU.Darrin A. Rotman, M. D. Julie L. Iellimo, P. A. C. Jennifer A. Wolf, P. A. C.863-386-0786Darrin A. Rotman, M.D. Established 19311600 US 27 South Avon Park Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home4001 Sebring Parkway Sebring, 385-0125 111 E. Circle St. Avon Park, 453-3101 Chris T.Nelson Craig M. Nelson Darin S. MacNeil W .W LUMBER CO. 465-3331Hwy. 27 S. Lake PlacidWere More Than Just Lumber COMPLETE Building SuppliesPlease support the above businesses. They have made this page possible. Inspirational Thoughtsby Patricia Valentine THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502 Residential Commercial Mobile HomesSmall Enough to Know You Large Enough to Serve You500 South Lake Avenue 382-8300 453-3019 THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502I Corinthians 6:20,For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body,and in your Spirit,which are Gods. The price paid was the blood shed on Calvary.Christ gave His life,that we might have life.Without the basics,were like a ship adrift,blown about by every breeze that arises.To hold steady throughout the storm,as ships got to be anchored to something secure, something that wont give way no matter how rough the seas.We are bound to be battered if we float aimlessly on lifes seas.We need an anchor,something to hold firm and steady.The Bible provides that anchor.We must be anchored to the principles of the Word of God,otherwise well drift amidst.As the year is closing and we enter the New Year,be sure you have your anchor secured.From my heart to yours,Have a Blessed and Prosperous New Year. Attend the Church of Your Choice! HEALTH Fit at 50 can also mean fit at 60, 70, 80 with some changes Metro Services Cardio workouts are an important part of staying fit at any age. Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155

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William Meyer, an assist ant professor of psychiatry a t Duke University, objects t o a recent column of mine i n which I recommended that p arents move a toddler out o f their bed by telling him t hat The Doctor said he c ant sleep with them any l onger (a second child is on t he way). In a letter to the e ditor of the Raleigh News a nd Observer, Meyer says t hat this is a lie and sets up t he child to feel an unwarr anted anger toward health c are professionals. Would I, Meyer asks, e ncourage parents to tell a c hild that the police disapp rove of something the child i s doing? No, but thats not a v alid comparison. The D octor does not frighten c hildren into behaving prope rly. For the overwhelming m ajority of children, physic ians as helpful authority f igures with whom they feel c omfortable. (It is also relev ant to note that the pediatric ians Ive spoken to conc erning The Doctor have no p roblem with him.) As I said in the column in q uestion, I invented The D octor some years ago and have since frequently recommended that parents of young children invoke his authority to resolve various parenting issues. A few years ago, The Doctor cured a young girl of compulsive hair-pulling. More recently, he cured another youngster of constant complaints to the effect that certain of her clothes itched. He has cured young children of refusing to stay in bed, refusing to eat vegetables, picking sores on their skin, and being afraid to be in a room alone. When parents have a less than satisfactory experience with something I recommend, they often let me know. No parent has ever reported a bad experience with The Doctor. Meyers claim that this approach might cause a child to develop unwarranted anger toward health care professionals amounts to unfounded speculation. Parenting is not a science, but my recommendations are far from capricious. They are based on more than 30 years of personal and professional experience as well as the best research available concerning child development, behavior, and mental health. In that last regard, the idea for The Doctor came from the work of Milton Erickson, an unorthodox but highly successful psychiatrist. If youre interested, his work is the subject of much discussion on the Internet. Telling a child that The Doctor has rendered judgment on a behavior or an issue (as in, the child occupying his parentsbed) simply gives the last word concerning the problem situation to a third party whose authority the child already recognizes, thus circumventing the possibility of a parent-child power struggle. More often than not, The Doctor also redefines the problem. For example, a 4-yearolds frequent tantrums are indication that the child is not getting enough sleep (misbehavior becomes a medical issue). The Doctor therefore prescribes that when the child throws more than one tantrum a day, his parents must put him to bed immediately after dinner so that he can catch up on his sleep and be a happier camper. The almost invariable result is that the tantrums completely stop within a few weeks and the child is indeed much happier (and so are his parents). Professor Meyer says Im off the mark. I have to say, his reasoning is fairly logical, but where young children are concerned, logic does not always apply. Family psychologist John Rosemond answers parents questions on his Web site at www.rosemond.com. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, January 2, 2011Page 13B TANGLED 2DPG(Animated)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30THE FIGHTERR(Mark Wahlberg,Christian Bale)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30HOW DO YOU KNOWPG13(Reese Witherspoon,Owen Wilson)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30FASTER R(The Rock)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15UNSTOPPABLEPG13(Denzel Washington,Rosario Dawson)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15DUE DATER(Robert Downey Jr.,Zack Galafinakis)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15 The NewFAIRMOUNTCINEMA63750 US 27 N. Sebring NOW SHOWINGFriday 12/24 Thursday 01/06 Suick CinemasInformation 385-9980 Office 385-9908New Dolby Digital SoundAll Seats $6.00for Matinee COMING SOONJan 7SEASON OF THE WITCH E.O. Koch Construction1417 Swank Avenue Sebring, FL 33870(863) 385-8649COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTIONLet our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property, build your dream home,or do your remodeling.For all of your Aluminum,Steel,and Conventional construction needsEmail: kochcon@strato.net State Certified License #CGC1515338 ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL DESIGN REMODELING ALUMINUM ROOFING Carports, Patios, Siding, Fascia SEAMLESS GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS DIVERSIONS E-LITERATUREBy JOHN LAMPKIN ACROSS 1 Risked 8 Orderly type? 14 Take a __: attempt 20 Like the movie Airplane! 21 Hardly religious 22 Vacation choice 23 Specific item in a sleepwear collection? 25 Bridal trails 26 Rat tail? 27 Robert who played Roderigo in Welless Othello 28 Royal pain 30 Back muscle, for short 31 Jacobs first wife 33 City west of Mesa 35 Complicated 37 Indy cars lack 40 Plated, in a way 43 Kyoto ties 46 Question 47 How a rock bands equipment damage was blamed? 49 Logging channel 50 Retrievers retrieval 52 Store charge, often 53 Mil. base stores 54 More than just nodded 55 Pianist John 56 Jazz trumpeters nickname 58 Fixed up 60 Jazz trumpeters nickname 61 Per se 63 Bite response 66 Fax forerunner 68 Amazonian oddsmaker? 72 Niblick, nowadays 75 Stuttgart title 76 Writes John a letter? 80 Thurman of film 81 Ejects, as lava 83 Hairy herd 86 Feast 87 Kathy of country 89 Pro __ 92 N.T. book attributed to Paul 93 Second lady after Tipper 94 Certain hip-hop dancer 95 Dressing room sprite? 98 Author Kesey 99 __ Trophy: biennial European golf event 100 From head to foot 101 The in 5 0, on a scoreboard 103 Ruhr valley city 105 See 69-Down 107 Intro for John? 108 Malaprop or Miniver 110 Turnover, e.g. 113 Hops-drying kilns 115 Advanced teaching deg. 118 Part of ASAP 120 Fabric softener delivered overseas? 123 Adopt the naturist philosophy 124 Consecrate, in a way 125 Architectural molding 126 Fashioned 127 Dictators underlings 128 Paddle-wheel craft DOWN 1 Hammett canine 2 Believed, to Tweety 3 Smooch in the shadows 4 Aggressive pinballer 5 It might mean Im hungry! 6 Heros birthplace? 7 Narcissus snubbed her 8 The Nutcracker __ 9 1959heavyweight champ Johansson 10 Recital rebuke 11 Totally 12 Grace Before Meat essayist 13 Some bar shots 14 Climbed 15 Shots 16 Mozarts birthplace, now: Abbr. 17 Goats friend? 18 Boating on the briny 19 Set of questions 24 It couldnt be worse! 29 Barrie baddie 32 Dilbert intern 34 Phone on stage, e.g. 36 Recital highlights 37 Dreads sporter 38 Richards counterpart in the 1956 election 39 Girl leader? 41 German border river 42 Meet, as a challenge 44 Beatniks Got it 45 Wrest 48 Record holder? 49 Slide show effect 51 Coal channel 54 Smooth and soft 56 Hillary helper 57 Actor Grant 59 __ volente: God willing 62 Sculptors tool 64 Indians, on scoreboards 65 Ginseng, for one 67 Sexy sleepwear 69 With 105-Across, GoodFellas Oscar winner 70 Open for Christmas 71 Short 72 Ices, maybe 73 A scandal often ruins one 74 Aboriginal Walkman? 77 Success/failure metaphor 78 Central 79 Jeremy and friends, in Zits comics 82 Yemens capital 84 Its heard a lot in Los Angeles 85 Buckeye State 88 Three, in 84-Down 90 How a youngster might watch a parade, with on 91 End in __ 93 Apollos instrument 95 Movers with motors 96 Uncomplicated type of question 97 Great feature of Jupiter 100 Quit 102 Quimby in Beverly Cleary books 104 Hammett hero 106 Play groups 108 Texters output: Abbr. 109 Ginseng, for one 111 Christmas classic opening 112 Wild harangue 114 Muscle twitches 116 Suffix with confer 117 Colorful worker? 119 Of no value, in Normandy 121 Hamburg article 122 Dr. of hip-hop Solution on page 5B Stars draped their splendor over the inky night sky.However, I could barely see myself putting one foot in front of the other. As we reached our car and drove the dark Colorado country roads, our headlights werent enough. Only high beams could penetrate and give us enough light to gauge what was ahead. High beams are wonderful. But, theyre hazardous when they are shining in your eyes from another vehicle coming towards you. Even having them bore into your car from behind is distressing. Recently, I was reading in Matthew 5: 14, NKJV, where Jesus tells his disciples, You are the light of the world. What kind of light a high beam that blinds as it approaches or pushes and prods from behind? Or the kind of light Jesus described a lamp on a lamp stand to give light to all who are in the house. Have you ever entered a house that has dull, dingy lighting? How about one where every light is lit and glaring? In either case, were either squinting or hiding our eyes to protect them. But lights that attract and point the way clearly are inviting. As we enter this New Year, its important to remember that a dark world can be brightened by even a single candle. When that glow penetrates the darkness all are drawn to its warmth. Add other candles and more darkness is dispelled. Sometimes it seems our batteries are weak and we barely cast a glow that attracts. Other times, we have strong convictions or passions and long to have others jump on board. In either case, if were not care ful, well find ourselves alone from lack of interest o r because weve tried to force our dream on others. Dim lights make people sleepy while high beams repel. However, if we approach this year in the light of Scripture, we will not be so dull that others will squint and move on; nor be a beam that repels and causes them to turn away. Rather, we will be that bright, inviting light that magnetizes others to Jesus not our cause and then, i n turn, he will illumine his wi ll for them.Those same verses sound like this in The Message: Heres another way to pu t it:Youre here to be light, bringing out the God-colors in the world Im putting you on a light stand. Now that Ive put you there shine! Keep open house, be generous with your lives. Lets shine invitingly in 2011. Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent and an award-winning writer. Are those high beams or lamplight? Pause And Consider Jan Merop DearAbby: My husband Larry and I have b een married three months. I adore him, his famil y and most of his friends. Two of them, however, I can barely tolerate. They show up at our house u nannounced and stay for hours. Larry is too nice to say anything to them about t hese drop-in visits. They also make disparaging c omments about their wives, complaining cons tantly about their nagging and their faults. O ne of them has repeatedly cheated on his wife. I dont want my husband around these men who o bviously dont like their wives. Im afraid what t hey say will rub off on him. I have explained t he reasons I dislike his friends, but he says I have n othing to worry about. That doesnt change the w ay I feel. What can I do? Worried Wife in Arkansas DearWorried Wife: Have a little patience and s top telling your husband you think his friends are a threat to your marriage. Instead, schedule as m uch social time as you can with other couples w ho have healthy relationships. It shouldnt take l ong for your husband to realize what sad sacks t hose two are. Not all friendships last forever. Sometimes people outgrow them, and thats what Im hoping your husband will realize without you acting like his keeper. DearAbby: I am a longtime member of the U.S. Air Force who has three college-age sons and a 13-year-old daughter, Carly. Their mother and I divorced eight years ago. Ive done everything I can to stay a part of all their lives. My sons and I get out for an occasional round of golf or watch the game over dinner, but Carly and I have reached a disconnect. We were close until early last summer swimming, shopping, vacationing or just hanging out at my house. She and my wife have a good relationship. But something has changed. Now, when we make plans for a movie or dinner or whatever, Carly makes an excuse at the last minute to break it. I asked her whats going on, but she wont tell me. My wife says its just her age, but I dont understand why I am the one who gets cut out of her life. Carlys mother and I dont have the best relationship, and shes not interested in discussing these matters, but she says Carly is just being Carly. Abby, am I worried about nothing? Is my wife right or could there be another issue? Still a Dad in the U.S.A.F. DearStill a Dad: Stop panicking and listen to the women. Your little girl may have been Daddys girl until last summer ... but shes a teenager now. Its normal for teens to disengage from their parents and develop interests of their own, so relax and dont push. Let Carly know youre there for her and eventually shell start coming around again. What you have described is not unusual for girls her age. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To order How to Write Letters for All Occasions, send a businesssized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby Letter Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included in the price.) Two of mans friends dont pass muster with new wife Even a fictitious third party can sometimes help Living With Children John Rosemond Dear Abby Classified Ads 385-6155 NEWS-SUN

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LIVING 14B PAGE News-Sun Sunday, January 2, 2011 Set on finding your dream job this year? That can take a lot of research and long-range planning. To start, update your resume or promise to apply for at least one job a week. If you want to change your current work situation, you must first get clear about what you want, Robbins, the life coach, says. Something new and bold, like your own business? Or a complete career switch? This is when reaching out and seeking a little help or advice can yield results, Robbins says. Our view of ourselves is so distorted, and very few people are naturally good at things like negotiating or selling themselves. As the saying goes, its all about networking. Ask yourself: Whats my ideal work situation given the reality of my life? Start broad and then zero in on your goal, and how you can make that happen, Robbins says. If you want a raise or promotion, seek the advice of a mentor, life coach or higher-up friends in similar industries. Remember, if you tell just one good friend about this resolution, the friend will never let you forget it. Friends give you a kick in the butt or a hug when you need it, Robbins says. Just when you want to give up on your search, they send you an e-mail or phone call and reignite the flame. Dropping double-digit pounds or multiple dress sizes can be unrealistic. Instead, resolve to walk an hour five days a week, or trade an afternoon Frappuccino for a skim milk cappuccino, Calvo says. See the changes as a lifestyle. Or, maybe for you, start off with one day a week, and work your way up. Remember, a safe measurement of weight loss for most people is one to two pounds a week, Calvo adds. Each pound should be celebrated. Congratulate yourself with small rewards a new book, a relaxing day, great running shoes, she says. When it comes to eating healthfully, cutting back on portions or bringing an apple to work every day are obvious resolutions. Less obvious: Eating more slowly, and not eating in front of the TV. When you sit down and focus on your meal, you get more than the substance, Calvo says. You get the aroma, textures and flavors, all of which contribute to satiety. Other easy resolutions: Eat breakfast. It triggers a metabolic boost that lasts all day, Calvo says. Also, get calorie smart. Most people dont realize how many calories are in common foods, she says. The most important thing to remember? If you go to a wedding and chow down or eat all the bread in a basket, dont use that as an excuse to give up, Calvo says. Tomorrows another day. BYJESSICAYADEGARANContra Costa Timesoping to change careers, get married and drop 20 pounds before Valentines Day? Baby steps, people. Baby steps. Most of us default on our new years resolutions, and its hardly surprising. We aim too high and expect immediate results. Experts say its time to reevaluate our approach. The way we go about resolutions doesnt really work, says Mike Robbins, a life coach and author of Focus on the Good Stuff: The Power of Appreciation. People have these great intentions but they dont have any support, structure or accountability to make them happen. Instead, use Dec. 31 as a day to put closure on the past year, reflect on what you accomplished, what you learned and choose something to let go of, Robbins says. That way, come New Years morning, youre ready to start fresh and devise precise, goal-oriented resolutions rather than murky intentions such as spending more time with the kids, Robbins says. Be sure to write down your resolutions. Tape them to the wall. Share them with someone, and check in every few months to stay on track. Making smaller, attainable resolutions that grow with you and making more of them is going to ensure you meet your goals in the long run, says Trisha Calvo, executive editor of Shape magazine. What you should be doing is making specific actionable promises to yourself that you can actually keep, she says. Below, the experts tackle five common resolutions and offer realistic alternatives. This New Years, try setting attainable resolutions to achieve real results Proclaiming this as the year youll get rich could result in disappointment. Instead, promise to save more money, or finally join your 401(k). The good thing about numbers is that you can track them, Robbins says. So whether you want a higher salary or a specific revenue for your business, you need to have a number in mind. Close your eyes and imagine it. Pretend its the end of 2008 and brag about the financial goal you met, Robbins says. It helps people to visualize it. If youre trying to save money, set up a separate account so you can track it. Then break up the amount. Putting away $416.66 a month isnt as daunting as saving $5,000 this year. Set yourself up for success by using daily, weekly and monthly goals as ways to get there, Robbins says. Remember, if your resolution is simply an actionitem joining your companys 401(k), lowering your cable bill then its just a matter of doing it. Action items are 100 percent up to you, Robbins says. You fed the homeless on Christmas and loved the altruistic high so much youve vowed to make this the year you make the world a better place. But can your shoulders handle the weight? Instead, pick a charity or cause and volunteer three hours of your time a month. Find at least one cause and choose an amount of money or time that works for you, Robbins says. Then, commit. Whether its one day a month at a food bank or $5 a week to a homeless person, make specific promises to give. Also, remember your biggest source is a skill you can share with others. Are you an accountant or a writer? Do you have access to teachers? We all have talents and we dont realize how valuable they can be to other people, Robbins says. Realizing that can be the greatest resolution of all.Setting your sights on getting married this year? Thats a lofty goal if youre currently unattached. Instead, resolve to get out there more by joining a group or signing up for online dating, says Terry Fitzpatrick, chief operating officer of the Bostonbased matchmaking service the Right One. If youre in your 20s, join groups and get involved in charities. For example, in an election year, one of the best places to meet like-minded singles is to join a political campaign, Fitzpatrick says, adding that online dating is another great choice for twentysomethings. Online dating and groups are fine for people in their 30s and beyond, but they tend to have fewer single people in those age groups, Fitzpatrick says. Its a good time to consider consulting a matchmaker, especially if you seek expert advice in other areas of your life. No matter your age, if you live in the suburbs, get out and go where the action is, Fitzpatrick says. Youll meet people walking to the corner store. Above all, keep this resolution realistic. If you have a list of 10 must-have qualities, resolve to broaden the flexible ones, such as age and height, Fitzpatrick says. Youll be glad you did.Illustrations by David Steinlicht /St. Paul Pioneer Press/MCT