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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00924
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 10/10/2010
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:00924
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Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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Teen, tweens deal with hearing loss PAGE16BPowerful puzzlers prevail over beastPAGE2ANEWS-SUN Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.comVolume 91/Number 121 | 75 cents www.newssun .com HighLow 87 60Complete Forecast PAGE 16A Pleasant with a mix of sun and clouds Forecast Question: Should class size limits be loosened due to the economy? Next question: Have you studied the state constitutional amendments that will be on the ballot in November? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453O nline: www.newssun.com Yes 63.3% No 36.7% 099099401007 Total votes: 60 Arts & Leisure14B Business10A Chalk Talk8B Classifieds12A Community Briefs6A Community Calendar6B Crossword Puzzle15B Dear Abby15B Editorial & Opinion4A Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times15B NBA Preview4B School Menus7B Senior Scene12B Sports On TV2B Index locally owned community mindedHeartlandNational Bank Avon Park800 West Main St.863.453.6000Lake Placid600 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.699.1300Sebring327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1300Sun n Lake North5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1322www.heartlandnb.com News-Sun file pho to Officials are saying the winter wildfire season could be a bad one in some parts of the state. Special to the News-SunTALLAHASSEE Dry conditions in at least some parts of the state coupled with a long-range forecast calling for a significant drying cycle threaten a potentially severe wildfire season, Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services Commissioner Charles H. Bronson said today. The culprits are a lack of any major tropical storm activity so far this season and the existence of La Nina conditions, which are expected to continue until at least early next year. Meteorologists define La Nina conditions as abnormally cold sea surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean, which generally trigger severe wildfire activity in Florida. In fact, five of Florida's most active wildfire years have occurred during or immediately after a period when the Pacific Ocean had unusually cold sea temperatures. "This weather cycle calls for a warmer and drier winter here in Florida, and when you combine that with the lack of any real rainfall associated with tropical systems so far this season, we have to expect a tough wildfire season ahead," Bronson said. During the recently completed fiscal year, Bronson's Division of Forestry reported a record volume of prescribed or controlled burning Tough wildfire season predicted See FIRES, page 7A By CURTANDERSON Associated Press WriterMIAMI Alot of people talk about supporting U.S. troops who are overseas in harm's way. Florida voters have a chance in the November election to do something tangible by approving a new property tax break for thousands of military personnel. Amendment 2 would create a new tax homestead exemption for troops serving in certain conflict areas outside the United States. If it passes, the Legislature would then decide exactly which conflict regions qualify. State Rep. Mike Horner, RKissimmee, said he proposed the amendment after hearing stories of Florida-based soldiers serving in Afghanistan who were worried about paying property tax bills back home. "These folks are in a combat situation and they need to focus on what's important, which is the mission at hand, and not whether they are going to be able to keep the house," Horner said. The measure passed the state House and Senate unanimously and polls show three out of four Floridians are in favor of the measure, which will appear on the Nov. 2 ballot. Like all amendments, it must be approved by 60 perProperty tax break for military on ballot See TAX, page 7A Avon Park . .19 Mulberry . .6 Lake Wales .37 Sebring . .3 Island Coast .54 Lake Placid . .0FULLCOVERAGESPORTS, 1B News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Andre Wilson was named homecoming king and Christina Pinillos was crowned homecoming queen for Lake Placid High School Friday night. Lake Placid royalty By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comAVON PARK For decades, the American agricultural model has been one of big farms and ranches using science and the economies of volume to produce large yields, whether growing plants or raising livestock. Lately, however, a change in thinking has begun as a new generation of farmers enter the field, and consumers become more interested in where and how their food was grown or raised. As local production becomes more popular, niche markets are emerging. Several families in Highlands County are a part of this new movement, perhaps the leading edge of more to come. These new small farms bring a different kind of innovation to the equation a respect for the animals being raised, a sense of obligation to them and developing alliances among themselves to share best practices an d enhance education. Many of these new farme rs were raised on farms, left t he field for other careers and th en came back. For many their ope ration is more hobby than bus iness, about lifestyle as much as anything else, but that doesn 't mean it's not serious. In som e cases the hobby becomes so su ccessful it turns into a full-tim e endeavor. Cary and Darlene Pigman a re the quintessential example of this new breed. Cary Pigman was raised on a farm in Ohio. Darlene Pigm an grew up a city girl in Canada. H e A lamb for ewe and a lamb for me News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEYHerd animals, sheep are ruminants, meaning they have fourstomachs and chew cud. See FARM, page 9A By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Back on the Circle after two weeks away, contestants in the Heartland Idol's Teen Division finale put on a wonderful show Thursday night, the young ladies producing sophisticated music and polished performances for an audience of over 300 people. Song choices ran a wide gamut, from Aretha Franklin's "Chain of Fools" to Lady Gaga's "Speechless." Lauren Scaffe, 15, from Lake Placid, started out the evening singing "Chain of Fools" with feeling and energy, bringing cheers from the audience and judges alike. "You came to win," said Mike Henry. "You're the one to beat," said Larry Moore. Scaffe wins Teen Idol title News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Lauren Scaffe sings Chain of Fools' to open the competition Thursday night. The 15-year-old from Lake Placid proved to be the best, taking home the title. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Mark Brignoni of Sebring sings Jessie's Girl' on Thursday evening during the Heartland Idol adult qualifier at the Circle in downtown Sebring. See TEEN, page 7A Obituaries Virginia Hiller Age 93, of Lake Placid Joan McColley Age 86, of Lake Placid Mildred Perez of Sebring Obituaries, Page 6A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING Sebring Poli ce Department Cmdr. Steve Carr co nfirmed on Friday that former cou nty Solid Waste Director K en Wheeler has filed criminal charg es against the county for publ ic records violations. Calls to Wheeler's cell phone o n Friday were not returned, but t he incident report from the SP D shows that Wheeler is claimin g that Public Information Officer Gloria Rybinski, Acting County Administrator Rick Helms and Services Director June Fisher allegedly refuse to produce public records to Wheeler und er Florida Statute 119. Listed as just miscellaneo us crimes, the narrative of the com plaint was exempted from publ ic record because of the ongoin g investigation, according to Carr. Rybinski said on Friday that s he does not know what recor ds Wheeler is talking about. "I have no idea why he com plained. He has gotten everythin g he has requested," Rybinski sai d. "I don't know what he is claimin g. "To the best of my knowledg e, everything has been given to him He says he has not gotten record s, Wheeler files public record charges on county officers Criminal complaint filed with SPD Wheeler See WHEELER, page 6A Follow us on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun

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The News-Sun would l ike to remind the readers t hat the names listed b elow reflect those who h ave been charged with a c rime, but they are all i nnocent until proven guilty b y a court of law. If anyone l isted here is acquitted or h as charges dropped, they c an bring in proof of such d ecision or mail a copy to t he paper and the NewsS un will be happy to report t hat information. The N ews-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 2 7 South, Sebring, FL 3 3870. The following people w ere booked into the H ighlands County Jail on T hursday, Oct. 7: Robert Lincoln B aldwin, 48, of Lake P lacid, was sentenced to 9 0 days for DUI. Kevin Bryant Fogle, 1 8, of Avon Park, was c harged with petit theft. Linda Chandler H errera, 49, of Arcadia, w as sentenced to 30 days i n jail for driving with a s uspended license. Fredy Arteada Otero, 2 5, of Lehigh Acres, was b ooked on an ICE detaine r. Amos Lamarr Pickett, 5 4, of Sebring, was charged with out-of-county warrants for possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, armed burglary and grand theft of a firearm. Matthew Austin Rogers, 32, of Sebring, was sentenced to 240 days in jail for petit theft. Shawn Charles Sullivan, 35, of Lake Placid, was charged with non-support. Armando Cisneros Vasquez, 31, of Avon Park, was charged with battery. Jerry Dean Walker, 26, of Sebring, was charged with out-of-county warrants for possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, armed burglary and grand theft of a firearm. Robert Edward Young, 45, of Sebring, was sentenced to 30 days for DUI. B y ED BALDRIDGE e d.baldridge@newssun.comIt maybe the most comp lex puzzle ever assembled i n Highlands County, but it w as definitely the longest o ne three local friends have e ver attempted. It all began when Sebring r esident Mervyan Gompert r eceived the largest puzzle h e has ever seen from his g randson. The box shows a picture o f the New York Harbor with t he city's current skyline b ehind and it contained 7 ,500 pieces. After some thought, he d ecided to enlist the help of t hree friends who have w orked on puzzles with him i n the past. So Gompert called upon D ick Tuttle, Lenny R obertson and Eldon Clute, w ho were ready to help, but n one had anticipated the a mount of work they would e nd up doing by the time t hey finished. Their wives bailed out e arly on, according to G ompert. "It was certainly frustrati ng at times, and it definitely t urned out to be some hard w ork," Gompert said. What made the puzzle so d ifficult was that every 17 i nches, the pattern of the c ut-out pieces repeated making it harder to recognize what pieces belonged where. The patterns are complex, including a gray sea and a cloud-filled blue sky surrounding one of the most eye-catching skylines on the planet that contains more than 500 individual and distinct buildings. When they finished, the puzzle stretched 8 feet, 6 inches long and 3-feet-6 tall and was missing three pieces. "We had to make three pieces and paint them to match. I bet you couldn't find them," Gompert said. The directions on the box state that if they could finish in three and a half hours, they would be entered into the Guinness Book of World Records. "It took us three hours to get it all out of the box and turned over," Clute laughed. They started on the monster in August of 2009, and finished late in November that same year. Clute assembled the majority of the puzzle, according to the three, working late into the night sometimes and starting early the next morning because the puzzle was spread out over several tables in his home. The crew regularly works on 500to 1,700-piece puzzles, spending hours pouring over the jigs, and Tuttle, who was down with knee surgery for a time during the project, thinks that some puzzles are fun. There are larger puzzles out there, Gompert said, and the next size up is 24,000 pieces, which is listed by Guinness as the "World's Largest Commercial Jigsaw Puzzle," but the trio has already decided that may be a bit much for them. "Never again," said Clute said. "It was a corker, that's for sure." "I knew it was too big when we took it out of the box," Clute added. "It's good therapy, but I think we will stick to the 1,700 piece ones for a while," Tuttle joked. They backed the puzzle with a glue designed specifically to hold them together, and framed it in wood before hanging it in Gompert's garage. Asmall plaque in the lower left hand corner has their names all the reward they get for their Herculean effort. The puzzle was made in Germany by F.X.S Puzzle Studios, and costs $284. Their advice to other puzzlers out there? "Don't get one this big," Clute laughed. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.com Personal Injury & Wrongful Death Medical & Nursing Home Malpractice Workers'Compensatioin Social Security Disability Automobile Accidents K A Y L O R R & & K A Y L O R R P A M A R K K K A Y L O R Lawyers, Past and Present. Helping the Injured Since 1968205 S. Commerce Ave € Sebring, Florida 863-382-1900 Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South € Sebring, Florida 33870 A Harbor Point Media Company OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday PHONE: 863-385-6155 MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954 NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870 USPS … ISSN 0163-3988 Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry office(s)CIRCULATION SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before 11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their account. Please call 385-6155.SUBSCRIPTION RATES12 mo.7% FL taxTotal HOME DELIVERY$60.46$4.23$64.69 IN FLORIDA MAIL92.236.4698.69 OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL105.99105.99 Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. Romona Washington … Publisher and Executive Editor863-385-6155, ext. 515 Restaurant & Coffee ShopSebring Square382-2333Mon-Sat 6:30am-2pm Sunday 7am-2pmThe Best Part of Waking Up! This week onlyDAILY BREAKFASTSPECIAL ONLY$3002 eggs, ham, homefries or grits and toast! with purchase of coffee, tea or soda. Reg. Price $599 Oct. 6 202429303653x:3Next jackpot $2 millionOct. 2 61730343947x:3 Sept. 28 41718194547x:5 Oct. 8 1117262836 Oct. 7 25252836 Oct. 6 1319242934 Oct. 5 812162224 Oct. 8 (n) 2842 Oct. 8 (d) 3052 Oct. 7 (n) 9593 Oct. 7 (d) 6582 Oct. 8 (n) 33 3 Oct. 8(d) 55 0 Oct. 7(n) 52 7 Oct. 7 (d) 73 4 Oct. 8 122293922 Oct. 5 37131612 Oct. 1 925263917 Sept. 28 228424411 Oct. 6 1426374146 PB: 24 PP: 5Next jackpot $20 millionOct. 2 1220303647 PB: 25 PP: 4 Sept. 29 1344515255 PB: 30 PP: 4 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Dick Tuttle (from left), Mervyan Gompert, Eldon Clute stand in front of the 7500 piece puzzle of the New York City skyline that they put together from Aug. 2009-Nov. 2009. Lenny Robinson (not pictured) also helped assemble the puzzle. Prevailing over a prodigious puzzle Courtesy photo Work on the huge puzzle took several months and also took up several tables in Eldon Clute's home. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comAVON PARK More than 45 students from Parkveiw school in Avon Park raced on their tricycles and bikes around the campus as a part of Parkview's second annual Trike-A-Thon Friday. Students ages 2-7 all hopped on their wheels and competed to see who the fastest rider was, not knowing that they were secretly building fundamentals in health and physical activity. "The kids and their families rode their tricycles/bicycles and walked for about an hour in order to build awareness for physical fitness and healthy eating habits for the entire family," explained Candice Anderson. Anderson is co-owner of the Parkview Preschool. Anderson and her partner Brittany McGuire put together this event to help families get ideas on how to promote healthy lifestyles not only at school but in the home. The students at Parkview are given weekly physical education homework "assignments" created by their instructors. The assignments are developed with healthy eating, physical, and learning habits th at help students even wh en they are away from t he classroom. "The teachers want to promote family bon ds while fostering health y habits," explain ed Anderson. The Trike-A-Thon n ot only benefits the studen ts bodies and minds, it al so helps with the student s' school activities. Studen ts and their families receiv ed pledges from family an d friends to participate in t he Trike-A-Thon. "All of the donatio ns received will be used to p ay for field trips througho ut the school year," said t he owners. "Everyone had a great time." When 3-year-old Co ri McClelland, was asked if she "won" the Trike-A Thon, she proudly yell ed that they "all won." The event was not abo ut who won or lost, but abo ut growing healthy and stron g bodies and minds. The st udents enjoyed the secon dyear event and becam e more aware of how phys ical activity is fun and exc iting. Not only can exerci se and play-time benefit t he body, it gives families mo re time to be together. Students race for fitness, promote healthy habits Courtesy pho to (From left to right) Yeilanie Ayala, Lindsey Hall, Paige Jahna, Eli Early, Cohen Marin, and Layna Hood, students at Parkview Pre-K, race during the second annual Trike-A-Thon. POLICEBLOTTER Associated PressTAMPA Two chickens in Hernando County have tested positive for West Nile Virus, and in Hillsborough County, health officials say a suspected case of Eastern Equine Encephalitis has cropped up. Health officials in both counties issued statements about the mosquito-borne illnesses Friday. Seven cases of West Nile Virus have been reported in Florida in humans this year. There is no vaccine for the illness. Eastern Equine Encephalitis is a rare disease that is caused by a virus spread by infected mosquitoes. West Nile found in 2 counties Classified Ads € 385-6155 NEWS-SUN

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010Page 3A Presented by: Cross Country Automotive Services Automotive Network Sponsored by: 2010 October 14th. . . . . . Adult Qualifier October 21st. . . . . . Adult Semi-Final October 28th. . Adult Semi-Final & Halloween Show November 4th . . . Adult Semi-Final & Sr. Idol November 11th. . . . . Rain Day (if needed) November 13th. . . . . . Adult Final TM O n n t h e e C i r c l e e i n n D o w n t o w n n S e b r i n g W ld Clover Images $ $2 0 0 0 G r a n d d P r i z e F o o d d € € F u n C o m e e W a t c h h & C h e e r r F o r r Y o u r F a v o r i t e e I d o l For more info: www.heartlandidol.com 2010 Jr Heartland Idol Nala Price! 2010 Teen Heartland Idol Lauren Scaffe! By BILLKACZOR and CHRISTINE ARMARIO Associated Press WritersMIAMI School districts a re taking or preparing to t ake such drastic steps as i ncreasing taxes, moving a dministrators and librarians i nto classrooms and busing s tudents to other schools to m eet Florida's class-size limi ts, which might be loosened b y an amendment that's on t he Nov. 2 ballot. Some are recalling laid off t eachers, hiring lower-paid associate teachers," encoura ging students to take more o nline virtual courses, and p utting kids from two grade l evels in a single classroom. Class-size reduction advoc ates including teachers u nions and Republican legi slative leaders blame each o ther for compliance measu res that are causing chaos, b oth sides agree. Regardless of who's at f ault, schools are racing to c omply with the class-size a mendment voters added to t he Florida Constitution in 2 002 before head counts are t aken Oct. 11-15. Those limi ts, going into full effect for t he first time this fall, would b e loosened if voters approve A mendment 8. Like all a mendments, it requires a 60 p ercent vote to pass. Unless that happens, t hough, the existing requirem ents must be met. They are s upported by the unions and s uch groups as the Florida P TAand the National A ssociation for the A dvancement of Colored P eople but opposed by most G OPpoliticians, who have l ong argued the class size l imits are just too costly. "There's going to be stress f rom now until we get t here," said Judith Marte, c hief budget officer for M iami-Dade County schools. There's just not enough m oney." There would be enough in most districts if Amendment 8 is approved the state would save $350 million to $1 billion a year, according to Florida TaxWatch, a private budget watchdog group. The amendment is the Republican-controlled Legislature's answer to the 2002 citizen initiative, which got on the ballot through a petition drive led by U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek, a Miami Democrat now running for the U.S Senate. Class-size requirements have been phased in since then. Last year, districts had to meet the limits on a school average basis. This year, each core curriculum classroom must have no more than 18 students in prekindergarten through third grade; 22 in fourth through eighth grade; and 25 in high school. Amendment 8 would raise the cap for individual classes by three students in prekindergarten through third grade and by five in the higher grades. Also, schools still would have to meet the existing limits on an average basis just as they did last year. The statewide teachers union has failed twice to get the proposed amendment nullified by the courts. The lastest was Thursday when the Florida Supreme Court unanimously ruled the ballot summary accurately describes what the amendment would do. In the meantime schools must conform to the requirements in every classroom. Some are using "problematic" methods to comply, Education Commissioner Eric Smith said. He's troubled by reports of elementary schools putting children from two grade levels, such as first and second grade, in one classroom because that means the teacher has to deal with two sets of standards. Some high school students are having trouble getting advanced classes and electives such as music and art that face elimination due to teachers being reassigned to core academic subjects covered by the class-size requirements. "At the end of the day we're going to find a lot of schools I hope districts, but schools that are in compliance," Smith said. "Now the real question is going to be at what academic cost did they get into compliance." The St. Johns County School District is experimenting with associate teachers, who are hired at a starting pay of $26,000 compared to $42,000 for a regular teacher. Associates, who must be certified teachers, are teamed with regular teachers when a classroom exceeds its limit to bring it back into compliance. If a class grows beyond a certain level it's then split with the associate getting his or her own class and becoming a regular teacher at full pay. Compliance efforts already have taken a toll on teachers, said Karen Aronowitz, president of United Teachers of Dade, the local teachers union in Miami. "Everybody's miserable," Aronowitz said. "Certified people are being used to teach classes, which is fine, except that if it's the media specialist, and then you're not able to keep your media center open for as many periods as it should be open." It's a never-ending chore, said Miami-Dade's Marte. "We work on it every day, sometimes two times a day," she said. "Most of us go home and take it to bed, and because the way the law is written you can have a school in compliance today and two more kiddos show up and they are out of compliance." Afew districts, including Broward, Palm Beach and Orange counties, some of the state's largest, are increasing local taxes to pay for classsize expenses although that's supposed to a state responsibility. Orange County Superintendent Ronald Blocker said the tax increase was the only way to avoid shifting media center staffers, fine and performing arts teachers and guidance counselors into core curriculum classrooms to meet the class size limits. "When we ran the numbers we saw that in order to achieve this (without the tax increase) we would probably cannibalize by repurposing teachers in larger numbers," Blocker said. "We didn't want to destroy the very things that made us a quality district." Even with the tax increase, which is expected to bring in up to $26 million, the district still is moving some administrators into classrooms and using multi-grade classes, Blocker said. Some schools are finding ways to comply without going to such extremes as busing, cutting electives an d tax increases, including Leo n High School in Tallahassee. "We made the current class-size amendment work ... without resorting to the scare tactics that politicians are resorting to and, honest ly, our teachers and kids could not be happier," Principal Rocky Hanna said Hanna credits the school district for shifting funding from administration to class rooms, but he still has made adjustments. That's include d hiring part-time teachers, often young and desperate for jobs, and keeping the computer lab open all day t o encourage students to take virtual classes. He eliminated a couple driver education classes and schedulers spent long hours making sure no class had more than 25 students. "I didn't have to cut my newspaper class or my year book class or the arts," Hanna said. He initially sup ported Amendment 8 but sa id he switched sides because there's no guarantee the expected savings would stil l be used for education. Failure to comply with th e class-size requirements cou ld cost districts millions in penalties. The Department o f Education earlier this year predicted about a third of Florida's classrooms will be out of compliance with resulting penalties totaling $131 million. The fines are new this year. "We believe that was don e just solely to create the very crisis that is out there with the public schools in an effort to get people excited enough to vote for Amendment 8," said Ron State schools struggling to cope with class size chaos MCT Florida schools are searching for ways to comply with the class size amendement and hoping to get some relief in the November election. There's going to be stress from now until we get there. There's just not enough money.'JUDITHMARTE chief budget officer, Miami-Dade schools See CLASS, page 7A

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O n Sept. 29, some 1,700 people brave d a powerful rains torm in Miami to a ttend a "Milk P arty" rally in supp ort of the recently f ormed Children's M ovement of F lorida, which a ims to bring attent ion to the plight of t he youngest and m ost neglected resi dents of this state. Forget the bitter political e nvironment this is a n oble cause that everyone in F lorida, regardless of party o r political inclination, can s upport because, heaven k nows, the children of F lorida need help. By practically every sign ificant measure of child ren's needs, this state cons istently ranks among the l owest in the union, often c lose to last. Almost 800,000 child ren, nearly one out of five, d oes not have health insura nce, double the national a verage. Florida ranks 49th i n the nation in the percenta ge of uninsured children. When uninsured child ren in this state are finally a ble to enter a hospital, they a re 1.5 times more likely to d ie than insured children. Florida ranks 47th in t he percentage of women r eceiving prenatal care in the f irst trimester. Florida has a high rate o f child abuse 29.6 cases p er thousand children, more t han double the national rate. The depressing list goes o n. The state's pre-kinderg arten program, which ranks 34th among 38 states in perpupil funding, fails to meet most of the national standards. Funding for oncepromising mentoring programs has been slashed. The organizers of the "Milk Party," a takeoff on the tea party, are betting that the people of Florida are fed up and ready to do something about it. ... It's not merely a matter of helping children, but of creating a better future for Florida. Improved care for children results in increased school achievement and graduation rates, reduced crime (and less money spent for incarceration), and fewer costs to the public for hospitalization, insurance and other needs. The ultimate result is a stronger economy. ... It's the best news and the best hope Florida's children have had in a long time. An editorial from the Miami Herald.The Florida Legislature's shameless purge of the Public Service Commission is complete. Now it is time to reform the process for selecting these important regulators.Just nine months after the PSC's historic pro-consumer rejection of record rate hike requests by Florida's two largest power companies, four of the PSC's five members have been unceremoniously replaced. Gov. Charlie Crist recently appointed West Palm Beach Assistant City Manger Eduardo Balbis, an engineer by training, and Tampa business law attorney Julie Brown to the five-member PSC. They are set to assume their $130,036-a-year jobs in January. Balbis and Brown join Jacksonville City Councilman Art Graham, who is president of an environmental consulting firm, and state Rep. Ronald Brise of North Miami, a pastor who also heads a consulting firm and a telecommunications company, as new members of the PSC. ... Regardless of whether the new PSC foursome are good, qualified appointments has been lost in a pall of brazen politics that enveloped the selection process. Panama City accountant Steve Stevens and former newspaper editor David Klement were rejected during confirmation hearings just weeks after the FPLand Progress Energy votes, and Nancy Argenziano and Nathan Skop were candid early on that they knew their days were numbered because they had dared to cross the big utilities which for, well, ever had gotten whatever they asked for from the PSC. Argenziano and Skop also had led a vocal and visible campaign to bring obviously needed ethics reforms to an agency where regulators were openly cozy with the regulated. The Legislature not only frowned upon their ethic reform efforts, it rejected all legislative proposals for any changes at the PSC. Throughout this whole sorry episode, it has become powerfully clear that our lawmakers care more about the interests of the big utilities than the interests of Florida consumers. ... The Legislature refused to enact reforms at the PSC in the face of blatant unethical practices by commissioners and staffers alike. So it is doubtful we can expect them to do the right thing and reform the PSC nominating process in a manner that removes all doubt about the objectivity and purpose of those recommending PSC appointees. Yet, that is exactly what should be done during the next session. An editorial from the Ocala Star-Banner.. Page 4ANews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION TODAY'SEDITORIALTODAY'SLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com Warning: according to a recent news story, your laptop can be dangerous. We're not talking dangerous as in if you spend most of your time on it playing games and being on Facebook it will turn your brain to oatmeal. Nor is this something like if you are silly enough to leave your laptop on the floor you can trip over it and hurt yourself. No, this deals with the consequences of actually using a device called a laptop on your lap for long periods of time. According of this story that my friend Randy alerted me to, if you put your laptop on your lap for long periods of time, you can develop a condition called "toasted skin syndrome." In a case cited by the article, a 12year-old boy developed a "sponge-patterned" skin discoloration on one thigh after spending a few months playing computer games for several hours a day. This medical condition is caused by exposure to high heat sources. Apparently it's a condition seen in people such as bakers and glassblowers. Extended use of a heating pad can also cause it. Also, apparently, by people using their laptops on their laps heavily. While usually harmless, it can lead to permanent marking of the skin. In rare cases, it apparently can lead to skin cancer, though the article states that there have not been any recorded cases of laptop-related skin cancer. Apparently a number of major laptop manufacturers tell people in the user manual not to place a laptop on the lap or on exposed skin for a long time for fear of burns. You know, that manual that you and I normally don't bother reading? I can testify that the bottom of a laptop can get hot. I have actually used my laptop on my lap and even if I'm wearing pants it can get uncomfortable after a while. That's why I usually put something between my lap and my computer. That's not too hard to figure out, is it? So far only 10 cases of toasted skin syndrome from laptop use have been report ed in medical journals over the last six years. I'm wondering if anyone has tried t o sue a computer company fo r getting this by putting a ho t laptop on their lap. "After all," they'll say, "it's called a LAPtop, isn't it?" Maybe this is why you hear these portable comput ers called "notebooks" now I remember when a noteboo k was something with paper i n it that you used in school. Soon that's going to seem dated. Two men claiming to sel l computers in Mississippi didn't have the problem of their products producing toasted skin syndrome. That's because the "compu ters" they were trying to ped dle were blocks of wood, wrapped in duct tape and bubblewrap, with Toshiba stickers slapped on them. Apparently, no one was fooled, and the gentlemen were arrested and charged with trademark infringemen t. According to the article, they'd also stuffed binders with paper and tried to sell them as computers as well. You have to wonder abou t the IQ of the gentlemen under arrest. These are the kinds of guys who would keep a hot laptop in their laps until their legs fell off. My last laptop story comes from Ontrack Data Recovery's 2005 top ten lis t of strangest (and funniest) data recovery disasters. Number one for that year was the case of a laptop pulled out of warehouse storage after 10 years. Engineers who opened it up discovered "hundreds of husks of dead and decaying cockroaches." Ew. I'll take a hot laptop over an infested one any da y of the week. Laura Ware is a Sebring re sident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady @ embarqmail.com Is your laptop making you toast? Laura's Look Laura Ware Other viewpoints Double Duece continues car show E ditor: Double Duece is still having t heir car show every first Saturday o f the month. Would like to have m ore people to come out and enjoy s ome music, fun. If you interested please contact m e at my e-mail address at timb er_wolf907@yahoo.com or blueb ird1514@yahoo.com. Danny Bailey Sebring W ar will never end E ditor: What happens when the fire goes o ut? The inner core of fire at the cent er of Earth that is and it will some d ay, you know. Will Earth become another dead p lanet like Mars and the other o uter planets? Will all life on Earth end, or will men stop making wars on each other and use their brains to immigrate to another planet like Venus, or some other planet? As long as the big rich industrialists that run our countries and make their billions of dollars in profits, turning out guns, tanks, planes, bombs, rockets and bullets, for war, it will never end. Something to think about. Don H. Streeter SebringThe American Dream notEditor: I've come from what many here in America would call a "thirdworld country," although in fact it is not it is quite advanced. The current social situation there in my homeland, though, is grievous indeed, with crime totally out of control. One's life is in jeopardy daily. So I came to America seeking refuge and as it's great motto says the "American Dream." But the dream has turned into a nightmare. Why is that, you say? There was in the land I left a constant threat against my life and property; it was like some sort of ugly creature lurking in the shadows, awaiting my turn for the spoiling of life and goods. Now here, in these United States, I find that the ugly creature is alive and well, only that he lurks about in this land of freedom with a different mask but the pursuit is the same: My life and goods. And what is the mask this time around? It is an ever-increasing taxation that sinks me ever-deeper into the abyss of anxiety, the likes of which I must confess I never felt back there in the land of my fathers. Ever so slowly this taxation it doesn't matter what form it takes, it is the confiscation of my earnings under threat of violence continues to gnaw away at my meager income, until, sooner or later, I will be forced out of my only means of protection in this cruel world: My home. This cruel taxation which many force upon just so they maintain their own personal lifestyle, at our expense has taken the form of a trap, one out of which there is no escaping. It is a "Gulag Archipelago" dejavu ... all over again. It is created in such a way that those imposing it upon us also come up with the necessary legal means to force on us, slowly, one taxation at a time, a little here, a little there. By the time you wake up, there's a lean upon your humble abode and out to the street you go. I felt anxiety in my homeland, but this terror I now feel is something I've never had to endure before. Taxes must be paid, no questions asked. But we are over-taxed as it is and the end is only and eventually the confiscation of our homes. By the way, this is the heart of Marxist theory: "to destroy the family, you must first destroy private property ... via ever-increasin g taxation." I spend countless hours lying o n my bed through the night thinking pondering where shall I go from here, to escape this oppression, fo r the sake of my dearest wife? Shal l I be forced to leave her homeless? Bruce Roessl er Sebrin g Apple Festival was treatEditor: Well we did the Apple Festival and it was all they advertised it to be. There was everything there th at you can make from apples except the thing that I particularly wante d. Apple cider. One of the trips we used to mak e annually when I lived in southern Ohio was the trip to Rouster's Apple Orchards just out of Continued on page 5A

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010Page 5A $799 3 PIECE KITCHEN! $8981.5 Cu Ft Microwave, 10 Power Levels, Sensor Cooking 5.3 Cu Ft, Self Cleaning Oven, Advanced Baking System, 2 Flat Oven RacksMODEL # MWV150K MODEL #FEF352FS 17 Cu Ft,Energy Star,Top Freezer, Wire ShelvesMODEL #HTH171BBTR 26 Cu Ft Side by Side,Humidity Controlled Crispers,Spill Safe Shelves,Energy Saver,Ice/Water In Door,Filtering SystemModel #FFHS2611LQ $59927ŽTop Load Washer w/3.2 cu.ft.Capacity 12 Wash Cycles 4 Water Levels Electromechanical Controls Ask us about DirecTV Washer & Dryer Pair MODEL #WDSR2120JWW27ŽElect.Dryer w/5.8 cu.ft. Capacity € 3 Dry Cycles Electromechanical Controls Auto Dry FeatureMODEL #DBLR333EGWFor Pair $299Porcelain Basket 8 Cycles 4 TemperaturesTop Load WasherMODEL #ETW440WQCASH & CARRY $2795 Cycles3Temperatures6.5 Cu Ft Dryer MODEL #EED440WQCASH & CARRY $2492-Level SoilSettler WashSystem5 CyclesIn-the-RackSilverwareBasketLargeCapacityDishwasherMODEL #TUD4700SQ $599 42Ž Plasma HDTVModel #LG42PJ350Surround Sound, Digital Audio Output,Energy Star, True Slim Frames $429Self Clean Oven,Dual Element Bake, Storage Drawer,Quick Set III Oven ControlsModel # JBP62DNWW 30Ž Electric Rangewhite onlyWHILE THEY LAST FOR ALL THREE EDITORIAL& OPINION O wensburg, a little town a bout 30 miles east of C incinnatti. They had an e xtensive orchard there and i n the fall sold the products t hey generated from the o rchard. As with the local s how they had everything i ncluding apple cider. It was t he best cider that I ever t asted. They would not d ivulge the method of maki ng the brew but it sure was d elicious. My father-in-law had a f arm just up the road from R ousters and we used to s pend weekends up there. N aturally, as we passed R ousters we would pick up a c ouple of gallons of cider for t he weekend. The gang w ould clean it up in no time a nd I would have to pick up a couple more bottles on the way home for our use. We wanted to get to the Palms Festival early so we left home (we live on the other side of the lake) about 8 a.m. and arrived at the Palms shortly thereafter. Trouble is, we were a day early. I goofed looking at the calendar and thought it was Thursday when it was only Wednesday, one of the penalties of old age. Anyway, the next day we got there and went through the show. What a spectacle. There was everything you can think of that had to do with apples, apple pies, tarts, dumplings, apple butter, apple jelly, comforters with apple motifs on them, sugar bowls (my wife bought one, for me she said), towels and napkins and many more items. Since Halloween is just around the corner, there were plenty of pumpkins and fall decorations. It has been a couple of years since I attended the festival due to hospital stays and other things us old folks endure but I will sure be there next year to enjoy the sights and tastes. The Palms was packed with old folks Thursday morning (I'm sure that the younger gang was all at work and will be there this evening and all day Saturday). It will be worth the trip even if you don't spend a penny, just to look at the decorations and the foods that are presented. If I have missed the Friday issue of the paper I'm sorry. If you missed the festival you missed a good show and it was all free. Woodie Jackson Sebring Continued from page 4A The Democratic Party is spending nearly 100 million dollars raised in part from foreign contributions to help elect more immigration reform minded men and women to Congress. If you happen to be a conservative of the Grand Old tea Party variety, how does such startling "amnesty" related news make you feel? Suspicious? Fearful? Angry? Perhaps even more xenophobic than usual? Each of those emotional responses would be expected from tea partiers had the Democratic Party actually taken this foreign money it has not. The "U.S." Chamber of Commerce however, is a different story entirely. According to an investigative report by the Center for American Progress'Think Progress blog, the Chamber has pledged to spend $75 million to defeat Democratic gubernatorial, house and senate candidates in the November mid-term elections a dollar figure that towers over the campaign spending of other outfits. The exposŽ found that this money will come from the Chamber's general account "which solicits" funds from foreign corporations and governments. As the report notes, gulf coast killing BPand other foreign corporations are active Chamber boosters but that support pales in comparison to the massive money the Chamber raises from independent and government run corporations in foreign locales like "China, India, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Brazil, Russia and many other places" around the world. Imagine for a moment if a group like the right-wing reviled though now defunct community group ACORN had been caught receiving money from Middle Eastern corporations in Egypt and Saudi Arabia. Fox News would run the story day and night while tea party heads the nation over exploded. Heck, if Fox News actually covered this story like it has others, it wouldn't even be calling these businesses "foreign corporations," instead they would be called "terror companies" and we would be seeing segments asking why the Chamber has an office just 3.5 miles from ground zero. How insensitive. Of course, News Corp. Fox News'parent company gave the "U.S." Chamber of Commerce a $1 million donation recently, so refrain from holding your breath because they're not likely to obsess over the group's foreign funding. Revelations about the Chamber's shadowy foreign stash of cash should not be a surprise to those following the organization's recent escapades. Earlier this year it was discovered that major health insurance companies and their professional lobbying organization America's Health Insurance Plans (AHIP) were secretly funding $10-20 million worth of the Chamber's misleading ads against health care reform. So, why would foreign entities be interested in defeating Democratic candidates this fall? I'm sure that Democratic efforts to stop sending American jobs over seas to other countries are just the tip of the issues iceberg. The Chamber has respond ed saying that no foreign "money is used for political activities." This categorical denial is far from trustworth y without the confirmation of an independent third-party source and the Chamber isn 't likely to open its books for public inspection any time soon. Such a denial does not even pass the smell test. Think about it. If the "U.S." Chamber of Commerce has an annual budget of $150 million and plans on spending $75 million from its "general account" on politics, then every foreign dollar raised pads its bottom line making it easier to spend money on politics without jeopardizing the funding of other Chamb er initiatives. In recent years, several major American companies Apple, Nike, PG&E, PNM, and Exelon for example have parted ways wit h the Chamber over the organ ization's denial of the reality of global climate change. Perhaps it is time for othe r American corporate Chamb er backers to show their patrio tism and ask if they like the idea of our nation's politica l candidates being influenced directly by what amounts to foreign interests. At the very least, shouldn 't we expect our own government to be made in America ? Karl Frisch is a progressive political communications consultant based in Washington, DC. He can be reached at KarlFrisch.com. Chamber campaign stash awash in foreign cash Guest Column Karl FrischTODAY'SLETTERS

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V irginia HillerVirginia Baskin Hiller, 9 3, of Lake Placid, died T hursday, Oct. 7, 2010. She w as born in Miami and r etired from the Dade C ounty School Board's p urchasing department and m oved to Lake Placid in 1 975. Survivors include brother L audric Baskin of Yuma, A riz.; son Richard Ward of L akeland and daughter B arbara Darsey of L awrenceville, Ga., eight g randchildren and 10 greatg randchildren and several s tep grandchildren and g reat grandchildren. Amemorial service will b e held 1 p.m. today at the S cott Funeral Home in L ake Placid with family a nd friends celebrating. B urial will follow at the O ak Hill Cemetery. In lieu o f flowers the family r equest donations to the A lzheimer Research. Words o f comfort to the family c an be made by visiting w ww.scottfuneralservices.c o m. Funeral arrangements e ntrusted to the Scot F uneral Home, Lake P lacid.Joan J. McColleyJoan J. McColley, 86, of Lake Placid, died Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2010. She was born in Detroit, Mich., and moved to Lake Placid in 2000. She was a homemaker and was a member of the St. James Catholic Church. Survivors include children Bryan McColley, Brenda Parenteau, Beta Schweiger, Beth McColley and Blythe McColley, 10 grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. Services celebrating Mrs. McColley's life will be held next spring in Gladwin, Mich. In lieu of flowers the family suggest please give the gift of life and give blood. Words of comfort for the family can be made by visiting www.scottfuneralservices.com. Cremation arrangements entrusted to the Scott Funeral Home, Lake Placid.Mildred PerezMildred Perez, of Sebring, died Sept. 5, 2010. She had been a resident of Sebring for 38 years, coming from Brooklyn, N.Y. Survivors include son Joseph Perez of Daytona Beach; daughters Milagros Cardona Martin, of Sebring, and Evelyn Diaz; brother Alphonso Muniz of Sebring; 10 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren. Services were held Saturday. Burial was at Pinecrest Cemetery in Sebring. Arrangements were handled by Swann's Mortuary, Sebring. Dinner Lake boat ramp to close for repairsSEBRING Dinner Lake boat ramp will be closed for repair and maintenance from Oct. 25 through Nov. 23. It is schedule to reopen Tuesday, Nov. 24. For further information on boat ramp closings you may contact the Highlands County Parks and Recreation Department at 402-6812.Events planned at lodges, posts AVON PARK American Legion Post 69, 1301 W. Bell St., will have its regular meeting at 7 p.m. Monday. This meeting will include a special election for the office of second vice commander. Due to this special election, the meeting will be closed to Post 69 members only. Karaoke by Naomi will be at 4 p.m. today. Legion Auxiliary and S.A.L. meets at 6 p.m. Monday. Abake sale will be held Tuesay during bingo. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose 2374 will have NASCAR at Santa Ana on at 3 p.m. today. Moose Legion meets at 6 p.m. Monday. For details, call 465-0131. The VFW3880 Ladies Auxiliary will meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday. For details, call 699-5444. SEBRING The Sebring Eagles will celebrate October birthdays from 4-7 p.m. today. Those members with an October birthday will receive a free drink. Bring a dish to pass. Peggy and Perry will host karaoke from 4-7 p.m. For further details, call 6554007; members and guests welcome.LPPD offers CPR class on Oct. 26LAKE PLACID The next CPR Class taught by the Lake Placid Police Department will be at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 26. All proceeds are used to purchase training equipment and other needs for the police department. The proceeds of this class will be used to fund the department's annual kids bicycle safety rodeo at 10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 6. Last year, 85 kids attended the rodeo and were taught how to safely ride bikes. The CPR instructors time is totally donated. Classes with more than 10 students are accommodated by the Lake Placid Holiday Inn, who has been allowing the use of its conference room free of charge.Woman's Club begins a new seasonSEBRING The GFWC Woman's Club of Sebring will meet at noon, Monday at 4260 Lakeview Drive. The Home Life Department will host the event. The speaker will be Laurie Jones, RN, CBPN-IC from Florida Hospital's new Breast Care Center. She will speak about October's emphasis, Breast Cancer Awareness. Members are asked to wear pink to honor those who have experienced this disease. The president's mission for the year is the Safe House. The donations to the project for October are stationery, envelopes and stamps. Attendees are asked to help with this endeavor. The Safe House is in need of strollers; members of the community are also asked to help us with this request. The catered luncheon is by previous reservation only. Call 385-7268 for club membership information. Manor Hill Property Owners meetSEBRING The Sun 'N Lake Manor Hill Property Owners will hold their quarterly meeting at 7 p.m. Monday in the community center.HC Homeowners to meet MondaySEBRING The Highlands County Homeowners Association Inc. will meet from 9-11 a.m., on Monday, Oct. 11 at Sebring Country Estates Clubhouse. Jim Wheatley, Sales/Marketing with Choice Environmental will discuss the county's new waste pickup company for Highlands County. Wheatley will be available to answer any questions from the floor. Ronnie Carter past chairman of the EDC/IDAwill give a presentation on why you should consider voting No on Amendment No. 4. Paula House will give a presentation on why you should consider voting Yes on Amendment No. 4. After both presentations are completed, questions will be taken from the floor.Parkinson's group to meet MondaySEBRING The Parkinson's disease support group for the Highlands County area will meet at 10 a.m. on the second Monday at First Baptist Church of Sebring (corner of Pine and Lemon streets). Adietician will speak on good nutrition for Parkinson's. All persons with Parkinson's disease and their families are welcome to attend. There is no charge. For more information, call 453-6589 or 453-6419. The Highlands County Parkinson's Support Group is part of the national network of support groups affiliated with the American Parkinson's Disease Association. More than a million Americans have Parkinson' s disease. Today people with Parkinson's disease and the ir families can find help and information from their loca l support group.Lunch Bunch meets MondaySEBRING Fairmount Lunch Bunch will meet Monday at Homer's Smorgasbord. Hosted by Pa t and Harry Hicks, everyone is invited.Lunch Club Wednesday meets this weekSEBRING Lunch Club Wednesday, a ladies networking club for all women will meet Wednesday at Sebring Elks Lodge. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. and program starts at noon with lunch. Reservations are not required, but everyone is required to purchase a $10 lunch ticket. This month's "Rise and Shine" speaker is member Florida Hospital concerning the new Breast Care Center Attendees will learn more about how the community will be served with these new services, technology and specialists at the Florid a Hospital Breast Care Cente r. There will be a special appearance of the LCWma scot, "Mama Moo," who wil l encourage women of the importance of screenings. In addition, several mem bers will be on hand to offe r pink hair extensions for a $10 donation. The proceeds will be given back to the community. Lunch Club Wednesday members are business women, students, retirees, lobbyists, entrepreneurs and more. New members are always welcomed. This month there will be more than 24 showcases an d door prizes donated from members. In honor of Brea st Cancer Awareness month th e grand prize will be sponsored by Florida Hospital's Seascape Imaging and raffled for $1 a ticket. These proceeds will be donated back to Lunch Club Wednesday. The grand priz e is a large pink beach baske t with several gift items and a complimentary digital mam mogram appointment includ ing the radiologist reading (valued at $350). For more information co ntact Diana Albritton, LCW founder, at 381-8170, e-ma il her at albrittoninsurance @earthlink.net or visit www.lunchclubwednesday. com. Page 6ANews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.com Our father John Mason Moran quietly passed away in his apartment in Sebring on October 5, 2010. He was 93 years young and will be remembered as a longtime member of the Lions Club International and the organizer of the Avon Park Lions golf tournament. He was a member of the First United Methodist Church in Avon Park. He is survived by his sister, Mary Bush and his brother, Jearld Moran and 2 sisters-inlaw, Dottie Moran and Mildred Moran and his 3 sons, John, Jr., Charles, and Garrett and their families. There will be a service celebrating Dads life in Burnsville, West Virginia on Monday, October 25, 2010 and he will be laid to rest next to his beloved wife of 63 years, Imogene Moran in Burnsville. STEPHENSON-NELSON FUNERAL HOME Avon Park, Florida 33825 863-453-3101JOHN MASON MORAN Maureen C. Jodell, age 87, of Minneapolis, MN and Sebring, FL, passed away October 1, 2010. Preceded in death by parents, brother Harold E. Clark Jr. sister Marguerite Rosenthal & loving husband of 52 years Clyde M. 'Sam' Jodell. Survived by daughter Patty (Wade) Evans, Minneapolis; grandson Aaron; and son, Shawn T. McHugh, Vail, Co. Maureen was a secretary for Braniff Airlines and Dayton Development. An avid golfer, she participated in many tournaments. She was the Meadowbrook Club Champion several years, played in the first USGA Women's Public Golf tournament as well as the USGA Women's Senior Championships. In 1976 and 1997 she was winner of the MWGA Senior State Amateur. She also won the MN Senior Women's Public Championship in 1979 & 1980. She accomplished four 'Hole in Ones', with two being in FL, and two in MN. Other favorite hobbies were calligraphy, stained glass, card making, watercolor, & bridge. She and Clyde spent 25 happy years at their winter home in Sebring, Florida and summers in Minneapolis. doing what they loved, playing golf. Maureen was past president of the local chapter of National Secretaries and past president of MN WPGA. Memorial Mass of Christian Burial Tuesday October 12, 2010 11:30 AM at St. Richard's Catholic Church, 7540 Penn Ave. So., Richfield, MN. Visitation Tuesday 1 hour prior to mass at church only. Lunch to follow at church. Burial beside Clyde at Fort Snelling National Cemetery. Memorials preferred to Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, 3001 Metro Dr. Bloomington, MN 55425 or to donor's choice. MAUREEN C. JODELL COMMUNITYBRIEFS Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid P olice Department is planning its Fifth A nnual Bike Rodeo for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., o n Saturday, Nov. 6 on Oak Avenue in front o f the police department building. P articipating youth will receive a bag full o f goodies donated by area merchants. B icycle safety helmets will be given away, t hanks to the Florida Department of T ransportation's Bicycle Safety Program. The event is free and open to the public. Florida leads the nation on bicycle relate d deaths. The department hopes fun and e ducational events like this one will help r educe children from getting hurt while o perating their bicycles. The rodeo will provide young people w ith new skills for riding safely, including l earning the rules of the road and the develo pment of good bike habits. Members of the Highlands Pedalers bicyc le club will be on hand to inspect bicycles a nd provide tips on the proper care and m aintenance of their bikes. For families who do not have bicycles, b ikes will be loaned free for use at the event. Agrant from the state DOThave given the department an entire fleet of loaner bikes, as well as free helmets, which will be given away. The event includes free helmet fitting for children receiving new helmets as well as those who already own one. The fittings will be done by certified instructors trained by the Florida Bicycle Association. Also planned is a special appearance by a number of crash dummies, who offer a special message to the children. Free hot dogs, chips and drinks will be served to participants and their families. "This event would not be possible without the support provided us from the Lake Placid community," LPPD Chief Phil Williams said. The police department is looking for donations of food stuffs and additional help from interested volunteers. Anyone wanting to help and/or provide either financial assistance or a prize donation is asked to contact Officer Heather Mulligan at 699-3759, or any on-duty officer. Pre-registration forms are now available at the police department. LPPD planning Bike Rodeo Nov. 6 OBITUARIES b ut the only thing he has not p icked up are some that he h as not paid for." Rybinski stated that W heeler was asking for v oice mails, e-mails and s everal other records from t he county, and from his a ppeal, it was clear that he h ad gotten his records so f ar. "His appeal quoted severa l of the records he wanted. H e has asked for a namec learing hearing too, but I d on't know what he is talki ng about," Rybinski said. Wheeler was released in S eptember because of inapp ropriate behavior, accordi ng to a report from Helms. The termination letter f rom Helms dated Sept. 17 s tated that Wheeler used video recordings to "intimidate" employees. Additionally, according to the letter, Wheeler refused to provide detailed information on the hours he worked, and he "failed to comply with written or verbal instructions" from a supervisor. "You are terminated from employment as a result of these additional violations in light of your recent disciplinary action," Helms wrote. Wheeler was placed on suspension notice two weeks before that by Helms because of employee issues at the landfill. Wednesday's termination appeal hearing for former Solid Waste Director Ken Wheeler was canceled last Friday and rescheduled for Oct. 12 at 1 p.m. At Wheeler's request, County Engineer Ramon Gavarrete was chosen as the appeals officer. Gavarrete is currently interim solid waste director. Continued from page 1A Wheeler files criminal charges "I have no idea why he complained. He has gotten everything he has requested. I don't know what he is claiming.'GLORIARYBINSKI county public information officer Associated PressSAN JOSE MINE, Chile Adrilling rig punched t hrough to the underground p urgatory where 33 miners h ave been trapped for 66 a gonizing days under the C hilean desert, raising c heers, tears and hopes on S aturday. Champagne sprayed and h ard hats tumbled off heads a s rescue workers pressed c lose to the drill, hugging e ach other and shouting for j oy. Down in "Camp Hope," w here the miners'relatives w aited, people waved flags a nd cried as one man energ etically rang a brass bell e ven before the siren sounde d confirming the escape s haft had reached the mine rs. The men are still several days away from efforts to bring them to the surface: the rescue team wants to eliminate even a remote chance of something going wrong on their way up, and plans to carefully inspect the shaft with a video camera before deciding whether to reinforce it. "We feel an enormous happiness, now that i'm going to have my brother," said Darwin Contreras, whose brother Pedro, a 26year-old heavy machine operator, is stuck down below. "When the siren rang out, it was overwhelming. Now we just have to wait for them to get out, just a little bit longer now." The "Plan B" drill won a three-way race against two other drills to carve a hole wide enough for an escape capsule to pull the miners out one by one. While "Plan A" and "Plan C" stalled after repeatedly veering off course, the "Plan B" drill reached the miners at a point 2,041 feet (622 meters) below the surface at 8:05 a.m., after 33 days of drilling. Jeff Hart of Denver, Colorado, operated the drill, and said the entire rescue crew erupted with cheers when the T130 broke through. "There is nothing more important than saving, possibly saving 33 lives. There's no more important job than that," Hart said. A way out for Chile's 33 trapped miners

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010Page 7A HIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS HOME REPAIR OUTREACH The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners Housing Department will be accepting applications under the Home Repair Program effective October 15, 2010 for Very Low and Low Income homeowners. If you are a homeowner in need of home repairs, please call for appointment. Home Repairs may include roofing, plumbing, electrical, walls, ceilings, floors, septic systems and warm weather retro-fits. Please bring a picture ID, proof of ownership, proof of income for all household members over the age of 18, and Social Security Cards. For more information, please contact Lucy Castillo at 863-402-6926. LIMITED SPACE … CALLTODAY! 5 DAYS a week$ 30 Get In Shape Learn Self Defense Improve Self Esteem Make Better Grades MARTIAL ARTS AMERICA471-2467 Best After School Program in SebringFREEPICKUP from: Kindergarten Learning Center, Cracker Trail, Sun-N-Lakes, Woodlawn, Fred Wild, Memorial, Hill Gustat, Sebring Middle/High Located on Kenilworth Sebring*Some Restrictions Apply Life Care, Not Day Care both in State Forests and on private land an action that has reduced the amount of flammable fuels in forests and on timber lands should major wildfires occur. But citizens, too, can do their part to protect themselves and their property, Bronson said. "Homeowners should make every effort to assure that their homes are protected against wildfires, even if fire services cannot reach them in time," Bronson said. The three most important tips to protect homes from wildfires are: Clean roofs and gutters to eliminate debris, including leaves, twigs, pine needles and palm fronds. Keep the area directly next to the home free of anything that can easily catch fire, including flammable plants. They can be replaced with less flammable varieties. Maintain and keep the landscape within 30 foot of a home sufficiently watered to deter flames from approaching the home if a fire occurs. Floridians can remain aware of the current wildfire danger in their areas by regularly checking the Fire Danger Index at http://fdi.fldof.com. The index is easy to understand as it uses a simple rating system that classifies regions of the state as having low, moderate, high, very high or extreme conditions. Residents can also visit the Florida Division of Forestry website at http://www.FLDOF.com or call their local Division of Forestry office. Continued from page 1A M eyer, a lawyer for the F lorida Education A ssociation, the statewide t eachers union. Previously, if a district w as out of compliance, s tate class-size money w as shifted from its opera tional to capital outlay b udget. One of Amendment 8's c hief sponsors, Sen. Don G atez, defended the fines b ecause otherwise the L egislature would be t reating the constitution with a wink and a n udge." The Niceville R epublican called the form er penalty provision ridiculous" because it s imply let districts "take m oney out of one pocket a nd put it in the other." Meyer also has been h ired by the Florida S chool Boards A ssociation, although it s upports Amendment 8, f or a potential lawsuit c hallenging the new p enalties. "The day somebody g ets a notice of a penalty w e will litigate the next d ay," said Wayne B lanton, the association's e xecutive director. Meyer said he'll argue t he fines are invalid b ecause it's the L egislature, not the s chool districts, that's v iolating the Florida C onstitution by failing to a dequately fund class s ize. "They're living in a f antasy world because the L egislature has done t hat," responded another A mendment 8 sponsor, R ep. Will Weatherford, R -Wesley Chapel. "We've s pent $19 billion funding t he class-size amendment s ince 2004." It would be up to the c ourts to decide what the c onstitution means when i t says "the legislature s hall make adequate prov ision to ensure" classs ize limits are met. The bureaucratic w heels, though, move s lowly and it's unlikely a ny penalties would be i mposed until after the e lection, Blanton said. I t'll be a moot issue, t hough, if Amendment 8 p asses because it's r etroactive to the beginn ing of the school year. "Most of the scare stor ies will go away," B lanton said. "If we're n ot successful in that, t hen there's going to be s ome very, very tough t imes next legislative sess ion because there will be e ven additional pressure o n the Legislature to fund a ll of the class size r equirements." Continued from page 3A c ent of the voters to pass. If the tax break had a pplied to personnel i nvolved in the A fghanistan and Iraq w ars in 2008, more than 2 5,000 military personnel w ould have qualified for t he exemption, according t o the state Revenue E stimating Conference. The price tag was p egged at about $14 mill ion in lost tax revenue. N o opposition has e merged, including none f rom cities or counties t hat would be directly a ffected. The exact amount of e ach individual tax break w ould be set by the L egislature and based on t he number of days a pers on was deployed in the c onflict region during the p receding calendar year. Continued from page 1A And indeed she was, taking first place and the $600 prize. Jacqueline Alonso, 13, of Venus, was the last performer. Wearing black and looking twice her age, Jacqueline sang Dusty Springfield's "Because You Love Me" with authority and emotion. "You show a maturity beyond your age," said celebrity judge Joe Morano, a retired teacher of drama who taught Idol founder Diana Walker when she was in high school. "You're going to knock em dead." Moore agreed, "I loved it," he said. "You tell the story with your eyes." "An amazing job to end the night," said Henry. Jacqueline was awarded with second place and a $300 prize. Carmen Ortiz, 17, of Lake Placid, had the difficult task of following Lauren. She sang "I Have Nothing" by Whitney Houston, and won the crowd with a voice almost as powerful. "Singing like that is making it very, very tough on the judges," said judge Scott Maxon. "You were just wonderful." Carmen won third place and $150. Megan Harvey, 15, of Sebring, owned the stage, showed no doubt and used body language to sell Lady Gaga's difficult song, "Speechless." "Outstanding," said Maxon. "You have great stage presence. I was really impressed." Tiffani Broder, 14, of Lake Placid, was the only finalist to wear a costume. Singing Taylor Swift's "Love Story" she dressed as a princess with flowing robes. The judges, however, had difficulty hearing her voice over the background accompaniment, asking her to sing a refrain acappella. She showed a lovely, warm voice and it was easy to see how she became a finalist. In fact, the only disappointment in the evening was when David Flowers, one emcee, was unable to get Don Elwell, the other emcee, to commit to dying his hair pink. Thursday was also the second qualifying round for adults. Of seven contestants, four advanced to the semifinals: Mark Brignoni, 23 of Sebring; Manny Conception, 42, of Avon Park; Shannon Marrero, 33, of Sebring; and Rex Nantz, 49 of Sebring. The best advice of the night came from Joe Morano. "Don't lose contact with the audience," he said, "Deal with the audience. Sell to us. Deliver it to us." Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Manny Conception of Avon Park sings Turn the Page' Thursday night. Teen Heartland Idol winner named Class size on ballot Tax breaks for military up for vote Fire danger is high By MATTSEDENSKY Associated Press WriterMIAMI BEACH Republican gubernatorial candidate Rick Scott ended months of speculation over his tax returns, finally releasing filings Friday night that showed about $24.8 million in earnings over the preceding three years. Scott's campaign posted on its Web site 412 pages of returns, mostly showing income earned on a diverse range of investments. Scott and his wife reported earnings of about $13.1 million in 2007, $3.7 million in 2008 and $7.9 million in 2009. All told, the couple reported income of $24.77 million for those years. The release came as Scott's first debate against his Democratic opponent Alex Sink aired across Florida on Univision. In it, Scott said he has lived the American dream and wan ts to ensure others have t he same opportunity, a clai m that Sink challenged. "You are out of tou ch with reality and the w ay Floridians are living here ," said Sink, the Florida chi ef financial officer, wh o released five years of t ax returns last month. S he reported earnings of $274,538 in 2009 an d $286,032 in 2008, thoug h she and her husband fil ed separately. Scott previously repo rted a net worth of $218 m illion. He made the bulk of h is money headin g Columbia/HCAHealthca re Corp., which he founde d. The board ousted him in 1997 amid a massive frau d investigation that result ed in a $1.7 billion fine for t he company. Scott left the compan y with more than $300 m illion in compensation. Filings show Scott earned $24.8M over past three years The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Did YouKNOW?EMERGENCY VEHICLESUpon the immediate approach of an authorized emergency vehicle,while en route to meet an existing emergency,the driver of every other vehicle shall,when such emergency vehicle is giving audible signals by siren,exhaust whistle, or other adequate device,or visible signals by the use of displayed blue or red lights,yield the right-of-way to the emergency vehicle and shall immediately proceed to a position parallel to,and as close as reasonable to the closest edge of the curb of the roadway,clear of any intersection and shall stop and remain in position until the authorized emergency vehicle has passed,unless otherwise directed by any law enforcement officer.YOUCANBETICKETEDFORFAILINGTOPULL OVERANDSTOPWHENANAMBULANCE, POLICE, FIREOROTHEREMERGENCYVEHICLEIS TRAVELLINGTOMEETANEMERGENCY. BELOWISTHEFLORIDALAW.

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Page 8ANews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.com Paid Advertisement

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010Page 9A HOME PROTECTION **Call for details465-3352Lic# EF0000229 $195.00**Only i s a doctor with Florida H ospital Heartland Division. S he just left Aeromed, where s he served as a nurse, in o rder to open Front Porch D ogs on the Circle in S ebring. Together they raise lambs f or meat on their 10-acre f arm east of Avon Park. The idea of woolly lambs i n warm Florida might seem a contradiction, and indeed t he number of sheep operat ions in the state is small. Not considered a major c ontributor to the economy, t he state does not keep statist ics regarding production. But the Pigmans, who k new they wanted to raise s omething, did research. What made raising sheep i n Central Florida possible, t hey learned, was the develo pment of a new breed, a mix o f the dorper sheep from S outh Africa and the St. C roix sheep from the C aribbean. Called St. Augustine, the n ew breed is not a wool prod ucer. It does develop a coat, b ut that mats and falls off by i tself. The animals are low maint enance, hardy and handle the h eat. They also produce a h igh-quality, lean meat. Grass-fed lambs taste the b est, Pigman said, so the s heep spend time in pastures, t heir diet supplemented with a lfalfa hay from Ohio and s ome feed. The Pigmans discovered s heep aren't the sharpest tool i n the barn. "Abrain-damaged sheep i sn't a whole lot different from a normal one," Pigman said, affectionately scratching a ewe behind her ears. Sheep are animals of habit who prefer routine and no surprises. They are herd animals, moving in unison, wheeling together like a flock of birds or a school of fish. Full-grown sheep are a medium-sized animal, the ewes averaging 90 pounds apiece, the rams 180. Aperson has to be careful around rams, who are almost always in an amorous state of mind. "Never turn your back on a ram," Pigman said. And don't scratch or pet a ram's forehead. While the horns have been bred out of the breed, touching their foreheads sparks old instincts. They take it as an invitation to a head butting contest. The hard part, of course, is knowing the lamb's destiny. Which is why the Pigmans take their responsibility seriously, "We have an obligation to keep them safe and healthy and in a comfortable environment. "Even if they are going to slaughter we have that duty," Cary Pigman said, adding that God directs the food chain. The Pigmans do not process their lambs. The animals are sold on the hoof, for $80 or $90 a head, and taken to a butcher in Ocala. The buyer then picks up the meat from him. The Pigmans said the Moslem community is their biggest market. Because of this their lambs are killed in the Moslem tradition of halaal, a word that like kosher denotes religious dietary laws. Asharp knife is used to cut the throat, the act done so quickly the animal doesn't know what's happening. Darlene Pigman may be reached at 382-1767 Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Darlene Pigman and her husband Cary Pigman are entering their fifth year of raising lambs f or meat. She uses some of it to make treats for dogs, which she sells at her store, Front Porch Dogs, on the Circle in Sebring. Farm raises lambs in Avon Park News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Cary Pigman and his wife named their farm after the place he proposed to her, Guelph Park in Canada. In addition to the sheep, they have chickens, two horses and several dogs. Associated PressMIAMI The judge overseeing hundreds o f lawsuits arising from the Gulf of Mexico o il spill has chosen 15 attorneys for lead roles i n the multibillion-dollar case. Among the chosen is former Agriculture S ecretary and U.S. Rep. Mike Espy, now a l awyer in Mississippi. One prominent name o mitted by New Orleans U.S. District Judge C arl Barbier was David Boies, who represente d Al Gore in the 2000 presidential recount battle. These lawyers will lead the cause for thousands of fishermen, business people, property owners and others who have sued BPPLC and other companies involved in the oil spill. They also get a larger share of a settlement or damages. Two lawyers, James Roy and Stephen Herman, will head an executive panel to coordinate the larger group. Oil lawsuit judge picks 15 lawyers for lead roles Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155

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BUSINESS 10A PAGE News-Sun Sunday, October 10, 2010 SpectatorsFREEAdmission OktoberFest 2010 The Avon Park Main Street CRA and Chamber of Commerce present:www.apoktoberfest.com Food,Fun &Chrome! Car ShowTrophies € Best of Show € Late Models & Antiques Tons ofPRIZESOctober 16th11am 8pmon Museum AvenueAvon Park SWAP MEET Eat,Drink&BeMerry! Call 863-443-0617 for more info € Rain or Shine News-Sun photo by Katara Simmons Work progresses on the renovations to the building at Hal McRae and US 27 S. which is being converted into a MidFlorida Bank. The work is scheduled to be finished sometime in January 2011, according to workers on site. Special to the News-SunThe Florida Rural Broadband Alliance is pleased to announce the election of its first Board of Governors. These leaders represent the economic, education, government and business interests in the 14 counties that will be served by FRBA. They include: Ted Everett, Executive Director for Washington County Chamber of Commerce and Economic Development Officer, was selected as Chairman of the Board of Governor's. Everett said "broadband has been a vision for Washington County and all of the rural counties in the region, and Florida, for years and he appreciates the opportunity to serve in this capacity." William (Bill) Lambert, Director of Economic Development for Hardee County, was selected as Vice-Chair from the South Central Rural Area of Critical Economic Concern (RACEC). Implementing this project means more jobs being created and numerous quality of life improvements for the impacted area, according to Lambert. Ted Lakey, Administrator for Jackson County, was selected as Vice-Chair from the Northwest RACEC, and agrees that this project is long over due and will make a big difference in the lives of everyone in these rural areas. FRBAis a limited liability company formed between two non-profit economic development corporationsFlorida's Heartland REDI in south central Florida, and Opportunity Florida in Northwest Florida. The Alliance was awarded nearly $24 million to provide cost-effective Middle Mile broadband infrastructure and high capacity to 14 counties and tribal lands, located in northwest and heartland Florida. These communities are currently without broadband service or underserved. This technology deployment is designed to advance economic opportunity and improve healthcare, education, public safety and entertainment. Broadband Alliance selects officers Old building becoming new bank branch In the coming weeks, millions of Americans will receive 2011 employee benefit open enrollment materials. Yes, it's a pain to wade through all that information, but simply opting for your current coverage could prove to be a costly mistake. Here's why: Plan changes. Many benefit plans especially medical change coverage details from year to year. If you have more than one option to choose from, compare plan features side by side to ensure you're choosing the best plan for your current situation. Common changes include: Increased monthly premiums for employee and/or dependent coverage. Increased deductible and/or copayment amounts for doctor visits, prescriptions, preventive care, hospitalization, dental or vision benefits, etc. Revised drug formularies (the list of covered medications, including copayment levels for different drug classifications). Preferred doctors or hospitals may withdraw from the plan's preferred provider network, boosting the cost to use them or even eliminating them as an option. Raising maximum yearly out-of-pocket expense limits. In addition, the Affordable Care Act states that group medical plans offerin g dependent cover age now must extend that cove rage to adult children under 26 in most cases, even if they no longer live with you or are claimed as your dependent. Ask your Benefi ts Department if th is provision applies and how much you would pay in additional premiums. (To learn more abou t provisions under the Act, visit www.healthcare.gov. ) Compare with spouse's coverage. Compare your employer's plans with those offered by your spouse's employer, partic ularly when deciding wher e to insure your children. Just make sure it's apples to-apples. For example, one plan may charge lowe r premiums but have highe r deductibles and copayments; or it may limit needed coverage say your kid takes an asthma medication that one plan doesn't cover. Review flexible spending account (FSA) contributions. If offered by you r employer, health care and dependent care FSAs are a great way to offset the financial impact of medic al and dependent care expenses. With FSAs, you pay eligible out-of-pocke t medical and dependent care expenses on a pre-tax basis; that is, before feder Be careful when choosing 2011 benefits Personal Finance Jason Alderman See USE, page 11A By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER Associated Press WriterWASHINGTON B usinesses have hired 8.1 m illion workers under a n ew program that prov ides tax breaks for hiri ng unemployed workers, t he Treasury Department s aid Friday. The report, however, d oes not estimate how m any of those jobs would h ave been added without t he tax break. President Barack O bama signed a law in M arch that exempts busin esses hiring people who h ave been unemployed f or at least 60 days from p aying the 6.2 percent S ocial Security payroll t ax through December. E mployers get an addit ional $1,000 credit if n ew workers stay on the j ob a full year. Treasury released a r eport Friday estimating t hat from Feb. 10 to Aug. 1 0, businesses hired 8.1 m illion workers who q ualify for the tax breaks. T hey added 1.2 million f rom July 10 to Aug. 10, t he report said. Many employers have a lso cut jobs the gove rnment announced on F riday that a wave of g overnment layoffs in S eptember outpaced w eak hiring in the private Treasury: 8.1M hires qualify for new tax break See TAX, page 11A

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By ALAN ZIBEL APReal Estate WriterWASHINGTON P otential flaws in foreclosure d ocuments are threatening to t hrow the real estate industry i nto a full-blown crisis, as B ank of America on Friday b ecame the first bank to stop s ales of foreclosed homes in a ll 50 states. The move, along with a nother decision on foreclos ures by PNC Financial S ervices Inc., adds to growi ng concerns that mortgage l enders have been evicting h omeowners using flawed c ourt papers. Charlotte, N.C.-based B ank of America Corp., the n ation's largest bank, said F riday it would stop sales of f oreclosed homes in all 50 s tates as it reviews docum ents used to process forec losures. Aweek earlier, the c ompany had said it would o nly stop such sales in the 23 s tates where foreclosures m ust be approved by a judge. "We will stop foreclosure s ales until our assessment has b een satisfactorily complete d," company spokesman D an Frahm said in a statem ent. "Our ongoing assessm ent shows the basis for our p ast foreclosure decisions is a ccurate." Bank of America did not d isclose how many homeo wners would be affected. State and federal officials h ave been ramping up press ure on the mortgage industry o ver worries about potential l egal violations amid growi ng evidence that mortgage c ompany employees or their l awyers signed documents in f oreclosure cases without v erifying the information in t hem. Also Friday, Sen. C hristopher Dodd, D-Conn, t he chairman of the Senate B anking Committee, said he w ould hold a hearing on the i ssue next month. "American families should n ot have to worry about losi ng their homes to sloppy bureaucratic mismanagement or fraud," Dodd said. "Regulators at the federal, state, and local levels have a responsibility to uphold the law and protect consumers from unfair foreclosure, and lenders have a duty to not cut corners around the law." Adocument obtained last week by the Associated Press showed a Bank of America official acknowledging in a legal proceeding that she signed thousands of foreclosure documents a month and typically didn't read them. The official, Renee Hertzler, said in a February deposition that she signed 7,000 to 8,000 foreclosure documents a month. Earlier in the week, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., urged five large mortgage lenders to suspend foreclosures in Nevada until they have set up systems to make sure homeowners aren't "improperly directed into foreclosure proceedings." Nevada is not among the states where banks had suspended foreclosures. Also Friday, PNC Financial Services Group Inc. said it is halting most foreclosures and evictions in 23 states for a month so it can review whether documents it submitted to courts complied with state laws. An official at the Pittsburgh-based bank confirmed the decision on Friday, which was reported earlier by the New York Times. The official requested anonymity because the decision hasn't been publicly announced. PNC becomes the fourth major U.S. lender to halt some foreclosures amid evidence that mortgage company employees or their lawyers signed documents in foreclosure cases without verifying the information in them. In addition to PNC and Bank of America, Ally Financial's GMAC Mortgage unit and JPMorgan Chase & Co. have announced similar moves in the past two weeks. In some states, lenders can foreclose quickly on delinquent mortgage borrowers. By contrast, the 23 states use a lengthy court process. They require documents to verify information on the mortgage, including who owns it. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010Page 11A Family owned & operated since 1978 E.O. Koch Construction1417 Swank Avenue € Sebring, FL 33870(863) 385-8649COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTIONLet our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property, build your dream home,or do your remodeling.For all of your Aluminum,Steel,and Conventional construction needsŽEmail: kochcon@strato.netState Certified License #CGC1515338 € ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS € RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL DESIGN € REMODELING € ALUMINUM € ROOFING€ Carports, Patios, Siding, Fascia€ SEAMLESS GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS Newborns € Children € AdolescentsOFFICE HOURS: Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., F.A.A.P. Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., F.A.A.P. Anoop Palta, M.D., F.A.A.P. Vishakha Nakhate, M.D., F.A.A.P. David Kleczek, P.A.C. Amy Grimes, P.A.C. Mercy L. Seralde, M.D. Maria C. Perez, M.D. Maria B. Asis, M.D., F.A.A.P. Megan Neff, ARNPAvon Park Pediatrics,P.A. & Sebring Pediatrics,LLCWe accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid SEBRING382-0770AVON PARK453-7337 Specializing in the treatment of € Allergies € Asthma € Attention Deficit Disorder Immunizations € Check-ups € Obesity Counseling SEBRING: MON. … FRI. … 8:30AM … 5:00PMSATURDAY … 8:30AM … 12:00 NOON … SEBRING ONLYAVON PARK: MON. & WED. … 8:30AM … 7:00PM TUES., THURS., & FRI. … 8:30AM … 5:00PM LAKE PLACID699-1414 a l, state and Social Security t axes are deducted from your p aycheck. This reduces your t axable income and theref ore, your taxes. You must re-enroll in F SAs each year amounts d on't carry over year to year. I f your health insurance d eductibles and copayments a re increasing, consider i ncreasing your FSAcontrib utions accordingly. To learn m ore about how FSAs work, v isit Practical Money Skills f or Life (www.practicalm oneyskills.com/benefits), V isa Inc.'s free personal f inancial management site. Consider family status c hanges. If you marry, d ivorce, or gain or lose d ependents, it could impact t he type and cost of your c overage options. For examp le: Compare maternity and p ediatric benefits offered by t he various medical plan options. Slightly lower monthly premiums might not be worth more restrictive coverage. If you use a dependent care FSA, carefully estimate how much childcare (or day care for eligible adult dependents) you'll need next year to maximize your tax advantage. Similarly, consider family status changes when estimating eligible expenses for your health care FSA. Recalibrate life insurance and disability coverage. It's worth spending a few minutes reviewing your benefit coverage options for next year, especially when you consider the potential financial consequences of not doing so. Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ PracticalMoney. Continued from page 10A sector, reducing the nation's payrolls by a net total of 95,000 jobs. However, there has been a net increase of 613,000 jobs since the start of the year, according to the government's business payroll survey. "Targeted programs like the HIRE Act tax credit provide an incentive for private-sector employers to hire new workers sooner than they otherwise would," Assistant Treasu ry Secretary Alan B. Krueg er said in a statement. "Sin ce it's only in effect throug h the end of the year, t he HIRE Act encourages bus inesses to accelerate hirin g in order to get the max imum benefit from this tem porary tax credit." Economists have sa id there is no way to kno w how many of the unem ployed workers would ha ve been hired without the t ax credit. Continued from page 10A Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South Florida Community College’s Corporate and Continuing Education Department will offer a Dealing with Difficult People workshop from 1-5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 22 at the SFCC Highlands Campus. The cost is $125. Workers often encounter challenging internal and external customers. This workshop will introduce participants to the types an d causes of troublesome pe ople and behaviors, as we ll as effective approaches to dealing with different pe rsonalities and challengin g situations. To register for this wor kshop, call SFC C Registration at 784-7416 or 784-7405. For more info rmation, call Lorrie Ke y, coordinator, corporate an d continuing education, at 784-7033. Learn to deal with difficult people BUSINESS Tax breaks help businesses BofA halts foreclosure sales in 50 states Use caution when selecting 2011 benefits MCTphoto Foreclosures have skyrocketed the last few years due to the economic meltdown.

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Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or le ss. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads p laced under the Bargain BuysŽ discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom se t ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad st ating Each,Ž the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open RateŽ pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain BuysŽ specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home,Ž are allowed to be pla ced under the Bargain BuyŽ category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS € Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 385-6155. € The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 THE CIRCUITCOURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 28-2009-CA-000277 COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. RHONDA J. CONNELLY, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 13, 2010 and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-000277 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., is the Plaintiff, and RHONDA J. CONNELLY; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RHONDA J. CONNELLY N/K/A ROBERT ARMSTRONG; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INCORPORATED, AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYIN THECIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 28-2009-CA-000038 COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP PLAINTIFF -VSBERNARD TIMM A/K/A BERNARD A. TIMM; SARAH TIMM; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION DEFENDANT(S) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 13, 2010, entered in Civil Case No. 28-2009-CA-000038 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, SEBRING, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash atJURY ASSEMBLY ROOM, BASEMENTat the HIGHLANDS County Courthouse located at 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUEin SEBRING, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 15th day of October, 2010 the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, towit: LOT 41, IN BLOCK 21, OF LAKE HAVEN ESTATES, SECTION TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 61, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must le a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of September, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J. STERN, P.A. ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND ROAD SUITE 400 Plantation, FL 33324-3920 (954) 233-8000 08-13392 CWF October 3, 10, 2010 MENT SECTION 3, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 55, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 109 LONGVIEW ROAD, SEBRING, FL 33875 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must le a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on September 16, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F09045960 CHASEDIRECT-SPECFHLMC**See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. October 3, 10, 2010 1050Legals THE CIRCUITCOURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 28-2009-CA-000623 CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ROGER BASS JR. A/K/A ROGER G. BASS, JR., A/K/A ROGER G. BASS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 13, 2010 and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-000623 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, is the Plaintiff, and ROGER BASS JR. A/K/A ROGER G. BASS, JR., A/K/A ROGER G. BASS; MONICA J. BASS;are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 15th day of October, 2010, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 65, OF SEBRING SHORES DEVELOPTHE CIRCUITCOURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 28-2008-CA-001620 CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. EUGENIO DIAZ, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 13, 2010 and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-001620 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, is the Plaintiff, and EUGENIO DIAZ; CHARMIN P. DIAZ A/K/A CHARMIN PRESCOTT DIAZ; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; CHAMPION MORTGAGE, A DIVISION OF KEYBANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 15th day of October, 2010, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 6, BLOCK 147, LAKEWOOD TERRACES, SHEET NO. 3, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, AT PAGE 94, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 4100 THOMPSON AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33875 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must le a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on September 16, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08105274 CHASEDIRECT-SPECFHLMC**See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. October 3, 10, 2010 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08021282 NBNY-CONV**See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. October 3, 10, 2010 1050LegalsCOURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 15th day of October, 2010, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 37 SOUTH, RANGE 33 EAST, HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, COMMONLY REFERRED TO AS A PORTION OF LOT 3, GREAT OAKS ESTATES, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION, SAID PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: FOR A POINT OF REFERENCE COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST ONE QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 10; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF THE NORTHWEST ONE QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 10, A DISTANCE OF 33.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF LARSON DAIRY ROAD; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 718.81 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THAT PARCEL OF LAND AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1875, PAGE 627, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS MARKED BY A 5/8 FEET IRON ROD AND PLASTIC CAP STAMPED LB 5402; THENCE DEPARTING SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, NORTHERLY ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID PARCEL THE FOLLOWING COURSE AND DISTANCES: NORTH 25 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 973.56 FEET, T A 5/8 FEET IRON ROD; NORTH 52 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1097.61 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 52 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 305.70 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1,219.66 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 33 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 226.54 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1102.64 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A 66.00 FOOT WIDE INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT LYING IN SECTIONS 3 AND 10, TOWNSHIP 37 SOUTH, RANGE 33 EAST, HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID EASEMENT LYING 33.00 FEET ON EAST SIDE OF, ADJACENT TO AND PARALLEL WITH THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE: FOR A POINT OF REFERENCE COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST ONE QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 10, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF THE NORTHWEST ONE QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 10, A DISTANCE OF 33.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF LARSON DIARY ROAD; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 1551.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,214.82 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVATURE WITH A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 200.00 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 33 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 03 SECOND THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 117.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 33 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 971.71 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVATURE WITH A CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF 200.00 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 56 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 32 SECONDS; THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 196.03 FEET; THENCE NORTH 22 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 2,468.90 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVATURE WITH A CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF 200.00 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 87 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 13 SECONDS; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 305.39 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 67 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 589.04 FEET; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST, DISTANCE OF 183.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF TERMINUS. A/K/A LOT 3B GREAT OAKS ESTATES, LORIDA, FL 33857 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must le a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on September 16, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 1050Legals THE CIRCUITCOURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 28-2008-CA-377GCS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. HARRY A. RODRIGUEZ, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 13, 2010 and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-377GCS of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., is the Plaintiff, and HARRY A. RODRIGUEZ; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY IN THECIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 28-2009-CA-000703 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. PLAINTIFF -VSRACHEL WELLER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RACHEL WELLER IF ANY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION DEFENDANT(S) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 13, 2010, entered in Civil Case No. 28-2009-CA-000703 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, SEBRING, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash atJURY ASSEMBLY ROOM, BASEMENTat the HIGHLANDS County Courthouse located at 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUEin SEBRING, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 15th day of October, 2010 the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, towit: LOTS 4397 AND 4398, AVON PARK LAKES, UNIT 14, AS RECORDED IN THE PLAT THEREOF IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 7, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must le a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of September, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J. STERN, P.A. ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND ROAD SUITE 400 Plantation, FL 33324-3920 (954) 233-8000 09-44599 CWF October 3, 10, 2010 situate in Highlands County, Florida, described as: Street Address: a/k/a 623 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 Lot 3, Block B, Less that portion lying Northeasterly of the Northeasterly Right-ofWay of U.S. Highway 27 and less road Rightof-Way, Lake Jackson Boulevard Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 63, of the Public Records of DeSoto County, Florida, of which Highlands County was formerly a part, and in Transcript Book Page 10, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. at public sale to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, in Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on the 28th day of October, 2010. SIGNED this 1st day of October, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2010 1050Legals IN THECIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-612 GCS WAUCHULA STATE BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES RODNEY WALKER, a single man; WHY NOT CORPORATION OF SEBRING, a Florida corporation d/b/a WHY NOT LOUNGE; GREGORY S. CLARK; CLERK OF COURTS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA; BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY; STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; DIVISION OF ALCOHOL BEVERAGES AND TOBACCO; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a nal decree of foreclosure entered in the above-titled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. PC 10-358 Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF JEAN A. MAXON WARWIN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JEAN A. MAXON WARWIN, deceased, whose date of death was July 30, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Clerk of the Court, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must le their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must le their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of rst publication of this notice is October 3, 2010. Personal Representative: Sandra Hurner 3604 Golfview Rd. Sebring, Florida 33875 Attorney for Personal Representative: John K. McClure Attorney for Sandra Hurner Florida Bar No. 286958 MCCLURE & LOBOZZO 211 S. Ridgewood Dr. Sebring, Florida 33870 Telephone: (863) 402-1888 Fax: (863) 402-2436 October 3, 10, 2010 THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must le their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of rst publication of this Notice is October 10, 2010. Person Giving Notice: Donna L. Schrock 22 Miami Drive Lake Placid, Florida 33852 ANDREW B. JACKSON ATTORNEY AT LAW Attorneys for Person Giving Notice 150 NORTH COMMERCE AVENUE P.O. BOX 2025 SEBRING, FL 33871-2025 Telephone: (863) 382-3686 By: /s/ Andrew B. Jackson ANDREW B. JACKSON, ESQ. Florida Bar No. 0038826 October 10, 17, 2010 1050LegalsIN THECIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. PC 10-408 IN RE: ESTATE OF FLOSSIE JANE WILLIAMS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notied that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of Flossie Jane Williams, deceased, File Number PC 10-408; by the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division; the address of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was February 12, 2010; that the total value of the estate is $Exempt and that the names and addresses of those whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Donna L. Schrock Bill Williams, 962 Loggerhead Island Daytona Beach, FL 32937 Dianna Thompson 611 NW 45th Ave. Coconut Creek, FL 33066 Barbara Patterson 4355 84th Ave. N.Apt. 1007, Pinellas Park, FL 33781 Continued on Exhibit A EXHIBIT ``A'' to Notice to Creditors (Summary Administration) FLOSSIE JANE WILLIAMS REVOCABLE TRUST utd 7/03/09 c/o Donna L. Schrock ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED 1050Legals 1000 Announcements Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classied ads get fast results Page 12ANews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.co m

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Call 385-6155 and a Sales Representative will be glad to assist you! NOTICE OFMEETING BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND THE SPRING LAKE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT The Spring Lake Improvement District will be meeting with the USDA at 420 S. State Road 7, Suite 166, Royal Palm Beach, FL 33414 on Tuesday, October 26, 2010, 10:00 a.m. Two Supervisors, the District Engineer, and the District Manager will be attending the meeting. A USDA Area Specialist will facilitate the meeting and will review and discuss grants and loans for improvements to the District storm water system. EACH PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THE MEETING IS ADVISED THAT PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, INCLUDING THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. Joseph DeCerbo District Manager October 10, 2010 PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION Pursuant to Section 324 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know act of 1986 (EPCRA), the following information is available to the public upon request during normal business hours by contacting the Florida, District VII, Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) for Hazardous Materials. Hazardous Material Safety Data Sheets Facility Hazardous Chemical Inventory Forms Section 304 Chemical Release Follow-up Notications District VII, LEPC Hazardous Materials Emergency Plan The District VII LEPC services residents of DeSoto, Hardee, Highlands, Okeechobee, and Polk Counties. EPCRA requires that any business that regularly uses, handles, or stores certain hazardous chemicals register with State and local regulatory agencies. If you have never registered or wish to verify your requirement to register, contact the LEPC at the address or phone number listed below. If you have previously complied, be sure your notications are current penalties for non-compliance are severe. To obtain notication information or to learn more about EPCRA, please contact: Florida District VII LEPC 555 East Church Street P.O. Box 2089 Bartow, Florida 33831 863-534-7130 ext. 107 October 10, 2010 A/K/A 4022 YOUTH CARE LANE, SEBRING, FL 33870 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must le a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on September 16, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08084699 NMNC-SPECFHLMC**See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. October 3, 10, 2010 1050Legals THE CIRCUITCOURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 28-2008-CA-001297 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. MARSHAS MYRTHIL, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated April 06, 2010 and entered in Case No. 282008-CA-001297 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff, and MARSHAS MYRTHIL; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARSHAS MYRTHIL; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1 N/K/A JAMES LAVIGNE, and TENANT #2 N/K/A DELIA LAVIGNE; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 15th day of October, 2010, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 16, IN BLOCK 1, OF ALTAMONT PLACE ADDITION NO. 2 ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 45, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN THECIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 10-413 IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES F. McCOLLUM Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JAMES F. McCOLLUM, deceased, whose date of death was August 14, 2010, and whose Social Security Number is is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must le their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must le their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of rst publication of this Notice is October 10, 2010. Personal Representative: /s/ Susan S. McCollum 4120 Lakeview Drive Sebring, FL 33870 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Robert E. Livingston Florida Bar No. 0031259 445 S. Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 Telephone: (863) 385-5156 October 10,17, 2010 1050Legals THE CIRCUITCOURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 28-2008-CA-000760 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. ENRIQUE LABRADOR A/K/A ENRIQUE C. LABRADOR, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 13, 2010 and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-000760 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff, and ENRIQUE LABRADOR A/K/A ENRIQUE C. LABRADOR; LANA D. LABRADOR; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 15th day of October, 2010, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1, IN BLOCK 742, OF SUN N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, UNIT 15R1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 15, PAGE 64, BEING A REPLAT OF UNIT 15 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 15, PAGE 40, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 5200 SAVONA DRIVE, SEBRING, FL 33872 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must le a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on September 16, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 f08051335 nmnc-specfhlmc**See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. October 3, 10, 2010 Court on September 3, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F07053126 FIDLITTON-CONV**See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. October 3, 10, 2010 1050Legals THE CIRCUITCOURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 07001067GCS LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF MAY 1, 2006 GSAMP TRUST 2006-HE3, Plaintiff, vs. YOEL R. PEREZ A/K/A YOEL RAFAEL PEREZ, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 13, 2010 and entered in Case No. 07001067GCS of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF MAY 1, 2006 GSAMP TRUST 2006-HE3, is the Plaintiff, and YOEL R. PEREZ A/K/A YOEL RAFAEL PEREZ; JANY MANEIRO; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INCORPORATED, AS NOMINEE FOR SPECIALIZED LOAN SERVICING, LLC; AVON PARK LAKES ASSOCIATION; TENANT #1 N/K/A MELINA PANTOJA, and TENANT #2 N/K/A MARCOS PANTOJA are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 15th day of October, 2010, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 920 AND 921, AVON PARK LAKES UNIT NO. 3, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 90, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 2052 WEST COLUMBINE ROAD, AVON PARK, FL 33825 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must le a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this IN THECIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 10-866-GCS CAMP FLORIDA PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Plaintiff vs. TOBOISE SECURITY TRUST, Defendant. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: TOBOISE SECURITY TRUST 8930 STATE ROAD 84 #120 & # 129 DAVIE, FLORIDA 33324 and TOBOISE SECURITY TRUST 5620 DEWEY STREET WEST HOLLYWOOD, FL 33023 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a lien on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: Lot 37, Block M, of a replat of a portion of Lake Placid Camp Florida Resort, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 15, Page 93, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida has been led against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ANDREW B. JACKSON, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 2025, Sebring, Florida 33871, on or before November 8, 2010, and le the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated on September 29, 2010. Honorable Robert W. Germaine Clerk of Court, Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo October 3, 10, 2010 1050Legals THE CIRCUITCOURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 2007-507-GCS LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR OWNIT MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-7, Plaintiff, vs. PATRICIA A. GONZALEZ, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 13, 2010 and entered in Case No. 2007-507-GCS of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR OWNIT MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-7, is the Plaintiff, and PATRICIA A. GONZALEZ; EMILIO C. GONZALEZ; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC; TENANT #1 N/K/A ROBERT SELF are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 15th day of October, 2010, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 11 AND LOT 12, BLOCK 207, ALTAMONT PLACE ADDITION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 72, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 1517 MELADY AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must le a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on September 3, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F07018691 FIDLITTON-CONV**See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. October 3, 10, 2010 IN THECIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CASE NO. 10000477GCS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK F/K/A WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK FA, Plaintiff, -vsLELAND G. LEITNER, et.al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 29, 2010, and entered in Case No. 10000477GCS of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK F/K/A WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK FA, is a Plaintiff and LELAND G. LEITNER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LELAND G. LEITNER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANTS #2 are the Defendants. ROBERT W. GERMAINE as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 430 S. Commerce Ave., Room 105, Sebring, FL 33870, at 11:00 A.M. on October 26, 2010, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE ATTACHED LEGAL DESCRIPTION AS EXHIBIT ``A'' EXHIBIT ``A'' Commence at the Southwest corner of Section 10, Township 35 South, Range 28 East; thence run South 89 48'24'' East along the South line of Section 10 for a distance of 2,650.00 feet for the Point of Beginning; thence run North for a distance of 583.37 feet; thence South 89 48'24'' East for a distance of 50.00 feet; thence North for a distance of 126.63 feet; thence South 89 48'24'' East for a distance of 575.00 feet; thence South for a distance of 710.00 feet to a point on the South line of Section 10; thence North 89 48'24'' West a distance of 625.00 feet to the Point of Beginning; said lands lying and being in Highlands County, Florida. SUBJECT to restrictions, reservations and easements of record. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must le a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 30th day of September, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk Ben-Ezra & Katz, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312 Telephone: (305) 770-4100 Fax: (305) 653-2329 October 10, 17, 2010 IN THECIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-612 GCS WAUCHULA STATE BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES RODNEY WALKER, a single man; WHY NOT CORPORATION OF SEBRING, a Florida corporation d/b/a WHY NOT LOUNGE; GREGORY S. CLARK; CLERK OF COURTS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA; BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY; STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; DIVISION OF ALCOHOL BEVERAGES AND TOBACCO; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a nal decree of foreclosure entered in the above-titled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the Alcohol Beverage License #BEV3800661 5COP Dual License secured by Liquor License Note dated April 3, 2009 at public sale to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, in Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on the 28th day of October, 2010. SIGNED this 8th day of October, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2010 ing should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. October 3, 10, 2010 1050Legals THE CIRCUITCOURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 28-2008-CA-350GCS HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR DEUTSCHE BANK ALT 2006-AB3, Plaintiff, vs. ONIVALDO RETT JR., et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 13, 2010 and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-350GCS of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR DEUTSCHE BANK ALT 2006-AB3, is the Plaintiff, and ONIVALDO RETT JR.; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 15th day of October, 2010, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1 AND LOT 2, IN BLOCK 6, OF HIGHLANDS PARK ESTATES, SECTION D, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, AT PAGE 86, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 42 DARTMOOR AVENUE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must le a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on September 16, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08018755 ASC-CONV**See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceedIN THECIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 28-2008-CA-000336GCS GOVERNMENT NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, INC. PLAINTIFF -VSSAMUEL SCOTT WIGGINS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAMUEL SCOTT WIGGINS IF ANY; MORGAN MARTIN A/K/A MORGAN E. MARTIN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MORGAN MARTIN A/K/A MORGAN E. MARTIN IF ANY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION DEFENDANT(S) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 13, 2010, entered in Civil Case No. 28-2008-CA-000336GCS of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, SEBRING, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM, BASEMENTat the HIGHLANDS County Courthouse located at 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUEin SEBRING, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 15th day of October, 2010 the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: THE NORTH HALF (N1/2) OF LOTS 23 AND 24 OF BLOCK 88, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN CHANCERY ORDER BOOK NO. 3, AT PAGE 111, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA; MARE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF LOT 24, RUN THENCE IN A SOUTHEASTERLY DIRECTION ALONG PERSIMMON AVENUE, A DISTANCE OF SEVENTY-FIVE FEET (75') TO A POINT, THENCE IN A SOUTHWESTERLY DIRECTION TO HIBISCUS STREET A DISTANCE OF ONE HUNDRED FEET (100') TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY LINE OF LOT 23, THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID BOUNDARY LINE A DISTANCE OF SEVENTY-FIVE (75') TO THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 23, THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOTS 23 AND 24 A DISTANCE OF ONE HUNDRED FEET (100') TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must le a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of September, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J. STERN, P.A. ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND ROAD SUITE 400 Plantation, FL 33324-3920 (954) 233-8000 08-46065 (BON) October 3, 10, 2010 WIDE FINANCIAL CORPORATION; TENANT #1 N/K/A CHRISTINE WALDON, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 15th day of October, 2010, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 6, LEE WAY HEIGHTS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 14, PAGE 43, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 3807 LEE WAY COURT, SEBRING, FL 33875 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must le a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on September 16, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F09012295 COUNTRYCAL-SPECFHLMC**See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. October 3, 10, 2010 1050Legalswww.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010Page 13A

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PROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORYPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY Install doors, windows, flooring, plumbing & more!Licensed & InsuredLic# HM0096HANDYMAN BOBCall 863-452-5201 or 863-449-1744 A & E LAWN MOWER REPAIRBeltsƒBlades New & Used Parts12 S.Forest Ave. Avon Park,FL 33825863-452-0389 Service € Repair € Supplies € Equipment Delivered Right to your DoorPool Service & Mobile Retail(863) 382-7728Fax (863) 402-2200 poolparadise101@aol.com www.poolparadiseonline.com Brad & Julie Kurtz Lease to Own € No Credit Check Low Price Guarantee 863-655-1446 12722 US 27, S., Sebring, FL 33876 Best Built Sheds €Barns € Lofted Barns € Garages € Utility Sheds 863385-0404Now Offering: Animal Nuisance Control and Removal TOOL DOME Any Tool € Any Trade € Closeouts € Liquidations 12722 US Hwy 27 S. €Sebring, FL 33876 Brought to Y OU byƒTHE BIG TOOL TENT SALE! 863-655-1446 8 6 3 2 5 3 0 8 3 8 € € P e t t G r o o m i n g € € A n i m a l l T r a i n i n g € € A n i m a l l P h o t o g r a p h yP a m p e r e d P o o c h e s Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-2750 1405 US 27 North Sebring, FL 33870 C A M P B E L L  S S C O L L I S I O N C E N T E R I N C Jim Campbell Owner Ser vice A vailable 7 Days A W eek Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com EXTRAORDINAIRE HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING LLC 863-451-2399Mike & Kandy Sheldone CEO/Owner Lic# CAC 1816569All Service Calls $40DID YOU KNOW?THENEWSSUNPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY ISONEOFTHEMOSTECONOMICAL&EFFECTIVEMEANSOFADVERTISINGTODAY? CALLJOYCE@ 863-385-6155OREMAIL: joyce.fettinger@newssun.com FORDETAILS!! WANDA KLINE WELLNESS COMPANYSee what one drop of your blood indicates as to YOUR nutritional health and well-being. By appointment only863-414-4066 LIVEBLOODANALYSISŽ ResidentialCommercial Insured € Free EstimatesService by People Who CareChad, Krista & Michael P.O. Box 6987 Avon Park, FL 33826-6987 Office: 863-655-9328 cklawn@strato.net AUCTIONEVERYFRIDAY6:30 P.M. PREVIEW: 4-6:30 P.M. *APPLIANCES*TOOLS* HOUSEHOLDGOODS*MISC. 4490 US 27 S., SEBRING, FL 33870 863-633-8393 AUCTIONEER: LEEBEGLEY The City of Sebring is accepting applications for vacancies on the following voluntary board: Historic Preservation Commission To be a member of the Historic Preservation Commission you must be a resident of the greater Sebring area (such area being defined as an area being within five miles of the city limits). The application for submission is located on the Citys web site at: www.mysebring.com. Click on City Board member applications. Please submit your completed application to City Hall, attn: Kathy Haley, City Clerk, at 368 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring or send by e-mail to: kathyhaley@mysebring.com City Hall is open Monday thru Friday … 8:00 a.m. … 5:00 p.m. Vacancy notice will remain open until filled.GEORGE HENSLEY, JR., MAYORCOUNCIL: JOHN CLARK, PRESIDENT SCOTT STANLEY, PRO-TEMPORE JOHN GRIFFIN MARGIE RHOADES BUD WHITLOCK KATHY HALEY, CMC CITY CLERK/TREASURERSCOTT NOETHLICHCITY ADMINISTRATORMIKE EASTMAN, CPAFINANCE DIRECTOR368 SO. COMMERCE. AVE. SEBRING, FL 33870 (863) 471-5100 € (863) 471-5142(FAX) Highlands County Board of County Commissioners For minimum qualifications and a full job description visit us on our website at www .hcbcc.net In order to be considered for employment you must complete our electronic job application or submit a completed paper application to be considered for employment with Highlands County BCC.The following position closes on 10/07/2010 The following position closes on 10/13/2010 Secretary II … 116 PG 9 $9.95/hour … $16.23/hour. Laborer 908 PG 7 $9.15/hour … $14.81/hour.EOE/Vet Pref/Drug Free Workplace The following position closes on 10/12/2010 Caretaker 906 PG 8 $9.57/hour … $15.39/hour. The following position closes on 10/14/2010Library Assistant I 423 PG 7 $9.57/hour … $15.36/hour. Groundskeeper I 905 PG 7 $9.57/hour … $15.36/hour. CAMP WINGMANN in Avon Park is seeking a P/T Kitchen Manage r/ Cook Salary negotiable. Some wee kends during school year and two and a half months in the summer. Must b e experienced, organized, love kids and b e a good cook! Camp Wingmann is a Christian youth camp afliated with th e Episcopal Church. Please send yo ur resume to: Camp Wingmann, 340 4 Wingmann Rd, Avon Park, FL 3382 5. Questions? Call 863-453-4800 BACK INTOUCH WellnessSpa has openings for a Nail Tech and an Esthetician FL License required. Commission paid weekly, all equipmen t and products provided. Please provide reference and experience to: backintouchdayspa@hotmail.com ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVES needed for Handy Ladies Personal Services; specializing in odd jobs for your home or personal needs. Call 863-832-9408 2100Help Wanted 2100Help Wanted 2100Help Wanted 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentLOSTJack Russel,lt.tan & white, area of little Lake Jackson. Collar may be attached. Call 863-382-0536 or 863-414-5716 1200Lost & FoundCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the rst day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the rst day your ad appears and we will be happy to x it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 385-6155 News-Sun Classied 1100Announcements ***************************************** HIGHLANDS COUNTY LEGAL NOTICES ***************************************** The following legal notices are from the Highlands County Board of County Commissioners and are being published in the font, size, and leading as per their specications. of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John A. Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: Jminor@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. Board of County Commissioners Purchasing Department; Highlands County, Florida Website: www.hcbcc.net October 10, 17, 2010 1055HighlandsCounty Legals HIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING (RFP) REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for: RFP 11-014 UNIFORM RENTAL AND CLEANING SERVICES NIGP COMMODITY/SERVICES CODE: 983-00 Specications may be obtained by downloading from our website: www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, Acting Director, Highlands County General Services/Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 Telephone: 863-4026524; Fax: 863-402-6735, or by E-Mail: dgilbert@hcbcc.org A MANDATORY Pre-Bid meeting will be held at 9:00 A.M. on WEDNESDAY, October 20, 2010 at the Highlands County General Services/Purchasing Department ofce at the above location. Proposal submissions must be sealed and marked with the name of the proposer, and the RFP number and title "RFP 11-014 RENTAL AND CLEANING OF UNIFORMS NIGP COMMODITY/SERVICES CODE: 983-00" so as to identify the enclosed proposal. Each submittal shall include one (1) original and ve (5) copies of the proposal. Proposals must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803, so as to reach said ofce no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday, November 11, 2010, at which time they will be opened. Proposals received later than the date and time as specied will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for the late deliveries of proposals that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at the above bid opening. Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this RFP. The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners (HCBCC/COUNTY) reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Highlands County. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis HC-408 10/02 CERTIFICATE TO ROLL I, the undersigned, hereby certify that I am the duly qualied and acting Property Appraiser in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida; as such I have satised myself that all included or includable on the TANGIBLE Property Assessment Roll for the aforesaid county is properly taxed so far as I have been able to ascertain; that the said roll in Pursuant to Section 197.323 of the Florida Statues, that the Highlands County Property Appraiser does hereby certify to the Highlands County Tax Collector on the 1st day of October 2010 ; and that all required extensions on the above described roll to show the tax attributable to all taxable property included therein have been made pursuant to law. I further certify that upon completion of this certicate and the attachment of same to the herein described Assessment Roll as a part thereof, that said Assessment Roll will be delivered to the Tax Collector of this county. In witness whereof, I have subscribed this certicate and caused the same to be attached to and made a part of the above described Assessment Roll this the 1st day of October, 2010 /s/ C. Raymond McIntyre, C.F.A. Property Appraiser of HIGHLANDS County, Florida October 10, 17, 2010 HC-408 10/02 CERTIFICATE TO ROLL I, the undersigned, hereby certify that I am the duly qualied and acting Property Appraiser in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida; as such I have satised myself that all included or includable on the REAL Property Assessment Roll for the aforesaid county is properly taxed so far as I have been able to ascertain; that the said roll in Pursuant to Section 197.323 of the Florida Statues, that the Highlands County Property Appraiser does hereby certify to the Highlands County Tax Collector on the 1st day of October 2010 ; and that all required extensions on the above described roll to show the tax attributable to all taxable property included therein have been made pursuant to law. I further certify that upon completion of this certicate and the attachment of same to the herein described Assessment Roll as a part thereof, that said Assessment Roll will be delivered to the Tax Collector of this county. In witness whereof, I have subscribed this certicate and caused the same to be attached to and made a part of the above described Assessment Roll this the 1st day of October, 2010 /s/ C. Raymond McIntyre, C.F.A. Property Appraiser of HIGHLANDS County, Florida October 10, 17, 2010 1055HighlandsCounty Legals IN THECIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 28-2009-CA-001577 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. JOHN FLANNERY; BARBARA FLANNERY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOHN FLANNERY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BARBARA FLANNERY; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendants, who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; WACHOVIA BANK, N.A. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 27, 2010, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in HIGHLANDS County, Florida described as: LOT 4, BLOCK C, OF FAIRWAY LAKES, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 12, PAGE 43, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 300 RIDGE CT., SEBRING, FL 338766263 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 o'clock a.m., on October 26, 2010. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must le a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Sebring, Florida this 28th day of September, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2010 IN THECIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 10-791-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ENRIQUE LABRADOR; LANA D. LABRADOR; Husband and Wife; MAURICIO E. LORENZO; THOMAS HILLIER; unknown spouse of THOMAS HILLIER; AND ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, AND TENANT #4, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment in Foreclosure Against Defendants, ENRIQUE LABRADOR and LANA D. LABRADOR, dated the 1st day of September, 2010, in Case No. 10-791-GCS, of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK is the Plaintiff and ENRIQUE LABRADOR and LANA D. LABRADOR are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Jury Assembly Room, of the Highlands County Courthouse, located at 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 26th day of October, 2010, the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure Against Defendants, ENRIQUE LABRADOR and LANA D. LABRADOR, and described as follows: South 207.17 feet and the North 196.00 feet of the South 403.08 feet of the East 131.33 feet, of Lot 4, in Block 26, of SUN N LAKES ESTATES ACRES, SECTION 34, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 24, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Real Property Address: 248 Highlands Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852, formerly 258 Highlands Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852 The Real Property tax identication number is: C-22-37-30-600-0260-0041, formerly C-22-37-30-600-0260-0040. DATED on September 30, 2010. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of Said Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk Published on the 10th and 17th day of October, 2010, in The News-Sun. October 10, 17, 2010 NOTICE OFREFERENDUM TO BE HELD ON NOVEMBER 2, 2010 FOR REGISTERED VOTERS WITHIN THE BOUNDARIES OF THE SPRING LAKE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT In conjunction with the general election of November 2, 2010, the Supervisor of Elections of Highlands County will conduct a referendum on the question of granting the Spring Lake Improvement District certain additional powers. All registered voters within the boundaries of the Spring Lake Improvement District will be eligible to vote. The voting will take place at the Spring Lake Community Center, Precinct 20, located in Pine Breeze Park on Spring Lake Blvd. Additional information on the referendum can be secured at the District Ofce, 115 Spring Lake Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33876. Joe DeCerbo District Manager October 1, 10, 17, 2010 1050Legals Classied ads get fast results DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classied ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155Page 14ANews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.com

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3310 Hwy. 27 South Sebring, FL33870EOEE-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.comFor more information about Cross Country Automotive Services,we encourage you to visit our website at: www.CrossCountry-Auto.co mComprehensive Benefit Package€ Tuition Reimbursement € Life Insurance € Vacation Time € Holiday Pay € Medical € DentalNow Hiring Full & Part Time Customer Service Associates Stacey Lasher Associate of the MonthBe a HERO like Stacey Lasher863-402-2786AGreatPlaceto Work! BUSINESSENGLISHINSTRUCTORPart-timepositiontoteachOccupationalBusinessEnglishtostudents inSFCCsMedicalSecretarial,AdministrativeOffice,andCareerAcademyprograms.BachelorsdegreeinEnglish,Communication,Business Administration,orotherrelatedfieldstronglypreferred.Minimumof two(2)yearsrelatedexperiencerequired.(Relatedcollegecoursework,programcompletion,orformaltrainingcoupledwithextensive experiencewillbeconsidered.)Teachingexperiencepreferred. Applicantsareaskedtoprovideacoverletterandwritingsamplesin additiontoacompleteSFCCinstructionalemploymentapplication. 8:00a.m.to9:30a.m.,TuesdaysandThursdays.Fallterm:August 23throughDecember17,2010.(Opportunitiesmaybeavailablefor Springterm.)HourlyRate:$19.49(Bachelorsdegreeorless),$23.03 (Mastersdegree)and$25.14(Doctorate).Openuntilfilled.Pleasevisit ourwebsiteformoreinformation.(863)784-7132.SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION600 West College Drive Avon Park, FL 33825 (863)784-7132 € FAX (863) 784-7497 E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu www.southflorida.edu/hr 1995 CHEVYCORSICA 49,700 original miles. Runs Great 863-873-3117 1993 CHEVROLETCaprice, 9 passen ger wagon, 165,000 miles. $2500 Call 863-471-9814 9450Automotive for Sale1986 HONDAGOLDWING Looks OK...Runs OK. $2,000 obo. 863-465-0461 9100Motorcycles & ATVs 9000 Transportation2010 ELITE39" travel trailer, 2 super slides, 2 a/c units, wash/dryer, tri-axel, d/washer, elec. awning over patio, tinted windows w/ awnings, replace. $28,900 Call 863-242-1059 8400Recreational Vehicles 2004 SWEETWATERPontoon 20', 90 hp, Yamaha 4 Stroke. Cruising interior with Lav., Bow remote control trolling motor. Stero, all USCG equipment. $9800 Call 863-531-0092 20 FT FIESTA PONTOON 50hp force motor, sh nder, trolling motor, ourescent lighting, generator, canvas fold down top, laminated ooring. $5000 Call 863-465-3902 8050Boats & Motors 8000 Recreation NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an ofcial health certicate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. BEAGLE PUPPYtri color male, 10 weeks, rst shots & vet. checked, P.O.P. $250 Call 863-382-3370 or 863-441-2711 7520Pets & SuppliesSEBRING -4429 Thompson Ave, off Golfview, Sat-Sun, Oct. 9th & 10th, 7:30 a.m. 2 p.m. Clothes, Tools, Household Items, Collectibles, Christmas, Kids Games & Toys, TV's, Electronics, Sm Appl's, Furniture, Ceramics Kiln,& MORE! GREAT PRICES! Proceeds will benet local projects through the Rotary Club of Highlands County. 7320Garage & Yard Sales WINDOWS ALUMINUMcrank out, with screens & solar lm, Real nice, (5). $25 863-402-2285 VCR PHILLIPSwith remote $25 Call 863-385-6433 after 4pm VACUUM ORECKXL upright, with extra bags. Very good condition, $50 863-402-2285 TYPEWRITER -Electric, Smith -Corona Excellent, $15. 863-873-3801 ROLL-TOP DESKSmall, $30 863-214-4185 GOLF IRONSHogan 3-9 $100 863-202-0313 FREEZER 15cu ft upright $85 Call 863-385-6433 after 4pm DOLL HOUSEPartially built, from kit. $25. 863-214-4185, after 6 pm. 7310Bargain Buys HUNTER'S DELIGHT-multiple trophy mounts, (8) large deer & (1) antelpoe $250 each 863-453-9612 FOR SALE:Washer, GE Heavy Dut y, large capacity, $85; Dryer, Kenmo re Super Capacity, $75; Mattress & bo x springs, queensize, incl's bed fram e, approx. 2 yrs old, No Kids!, $125; Che st of Drawers, all wood, no pressboard, 5 drawer, $35; Dresser & Chest o Drawe rs Set, all wood. Dresser is 5'W w /9 drawers. Chest is 34''W w/4 larg e drawers. Both $100. Refrigerato r, Kenmore, 18 cu. ft. w/ Ice Maker, $12 5. 863-443-2838 7300Miscellaneous DUAL RECLINERSOFA Microber, tan, $150; Love Seat, $75; Pastel Lounger, $75 obo. Call 863-655-5979 before 9 pm. NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS!Lamps $17, Barstools $39up, 3Pc Dropleaf dinette $197, 50-Dining Set $397up, 200-Recliners $247up, 2 Pc Queen Bed Set $297up, 4Pc bedroom sets $387up, 3Pc Living room tables $97up, 100-Headboards $79up.HIGHPOINT FURNITURE OUTLET STORE2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRINGNorth of Lowes & across from Home Depot 7180FurnitureDESK -Woverine Detroit (Org. 1887) Cherry wood, claw footed, 1 drawer, 42 W X 26' D X 30' H. Comes with custom glass protector. Very Nice! $250. Must pick up Avon park. Call 863-452-1492 7060Antiques Collectible REAL ESTATEAUCTION Nominal Opening Bid: $10,000 409 South Pine, Sebring 4BR 2BA 2,500sf+/Sells: 8:00AM Sat., Oct. 23 on site Open to the Public williamsauction.com 800-801-8003 Many properties now available for online bidding! A Buyer's Premium may apply. Williams & Williams FL RE LIC#BK3223097 DANIEL NELSON BROKER, W&W RE LIC#1032049 7020Auctions 7000 Merchandise4-BAY GARAGEWith 2 Car Lifts, large storage area. Great Location! Hwy 27, Avon Park. 863-453-7673 6750Commercial Rental SEBRING 3BR (possible 4BR), 1BA LARGEfenced yard with Citrus trees. Nice area, Indian Streets off Lakeview Dr $550/mo. Will negotiate. 863-446-1861 SEBRING -New 3BR,2BA, 1CG. Tile Floors, CHA, $675/mo. + security deposit. 863-453-3058 SEBRING LUXURY4BR, 2BA Home, 5 blocks across Hwy 27 from Florida Hospital. New CHA, new carpet & paint. $850 month + utilities. 863-402-1904 Sebring 7524 Sun n' Lake Blvd. BEST DEALIN HIGHLANDS! New 3R, 2BA, Executive Home, Tile Floors, 10' Ceilings, Stainless Steel Appl's; Incl's Dishwasher & Micro. $875/mo. + Sec. Dep. 863-446-7274 or 863-214-6323 SEBRING 3BR home, apartment sized rooms & large yard off NE Lakeview; $550/mo. Lease & References ; MOVE IN READY! Wolf Lake Realty 863-452-2299 LAKE PLACID3BR, 2BA, 2CG, single family house in nice neighborhood in Placid Lakes. fenced back yard, screened porch. Yearly lease $950. call 724-991-9350 LAKE PLACID3BR, 2BA, 1CG home in Leisure Lakes, screen porch. No Pets $600/mo. + 1st, last & security deposit. Please call 863-465-3959. LAKE PLACIDvery clean, 3/BR, 2/BA 1CG, Sylvan Shores, extras, nice yard. Non smokers. $850 monthly. Call 863-465-3838 or 863-441-2844 LAKE PLACID 3BR, 2BA in Sylvan Shores. Large privacy fenced back yard, pets considered. $750 month + 1st & security. Please call 863-633-9097 for more information. AVON PARK 609 W. PleasantSt.,off Hwy 27 near new Wal-Mart,4BR, 2BA 2 story, replace & wood oors. Sm pets OK, w/proof of vaccinations. $700/mo., $700 dep. Ref. required. 863-453-7218 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING Country Club of Sebring, 2BR, 2BA, den, lanai, pool. Available Oct. 1st December 31st. Call 812-482-4601 or 812-639-0512 6250Furnished HousesSEBRING DINNER LAKEAREA, 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments for rent. $395 $550/mo. Includes water, large rooms, fresh paint & tile oors. Call Gary Johnson @ 863-381-1861 .LEMONTREE APARTMENTS1015 West Bell St. Avon Park, FL 33825 (off US 27, behind Wendy's)1BR, 1BA $495 month + $200 security deposit (Water, Sewer & Garbage Incl) Pets Welcome Full Size Washer/Dryer Open 8 am 7 pm, 7 Days a Week Call Alan, (386) 503-8953 Castle Hill Apartments of Avon Park Accepting Applications for 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals 62 years or older, handicap/disabled, regardless of age. For rental information & applications, Please Call: 863-452-6565 TDD: 1-800-955-8771 This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider, and Employer.Los Apt. de Castle Hill de Avon ParkEstan aceptando aplicaciones para Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras. Disponible a personas de 62 anos o mas, Incapacidad sica/mental, no importa la edad. Para mas informacion favor de llamar 863-452-6565. TDD 1-800-955-8771 Esta Institucion Es De Igualdad De Oportunidad Al Proveedor, Y Empleador AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL: $325/mo. 863-453-8598 6200UnfurnishedApartments**NOW LEASING** PARK PLAZA A BRAND NEW RENTAL COMMUNITY LOCATED IN AVON PARK, FL SPACIOUS 2BR 2BA APARTMENT HOMES. **ONLY $575/mo.** A MUST SEE! ************************Please Call 305-932-4800 for more information. 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsSEBRING Small 1BR 1BA, furnished, W/G/S paid, near Sheriff's Dept, corner Nasturtium & Orange, $450 mo. + $450 security deposit, no pets, background check required. 863-382-8658 6150FurnishedApartments SPRING LAKE SPACIOUS 2/BR, 2/BA, tile, cathedral ceilings, screened lanai. Adults preferred, non-smoking, no pets, $625/mo. + sec. dep. Lawn mainenance included. 863-655-0451 SEBRING-2 story Town Home for rent 3BR/ 2.5BA 1CG., $800/mo. No smoking, no pets. PH: 863-655-0311 SEBRING -Newly Renovated 2BR 1BA Triplex; 3010 Spinks Rd.BR's & L.R. newly carpeted. $500 month. No Pets. Washing Machine avail. Close to HRMC, grocery & schools, Call 863-273-1756. SEBRING LIKE NEW! 2BR,2BA, Duplex located at the end of a quiet, dead-end street near Sebring High School. No Dogs. 545/mo. + util. & $300 deposit. Avail. Immed. 863-382-6556 LAKE PLACID -Clean & Quiet 2BR, 2BA Duplex on canal with dock. $675 month. Call 954-336-5570 or 786-315-3613 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 RentalsSEBRING (1)2BR, 2BA, W/D hookup, CHA, City water, close to shopping.No Pets. (2) 2BR, 1BA. $450 $600 mo. + Dp. 863-465-1451 or 863-840-0494 5150Mobile HomesFor Rent SELECTION of 1 & 2 Bedroom Units For Sale in friendly/active 55+ Park, located near shopping, banks, hospital, reasonable lot rent incl. S/W/G & lawn mowing. Call for more info. or to view units. No pets please 863-385-7034 PALM HARBORHOMES has closed 2 model centers. Save up to 60K on select models. Call 1-800-622-2832 $49,900 STEAL 2005 Doublewide, 4 bedrooms / 2 baths, Sebring,1800 plus sq. ft, Mint condition. Own land. Call Steve 863-801-1739 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesTHINK YOURHOME WON'T SELL? THINK AGAIN! We buy homes in your area! Call us now and sell your home today! Or ask your Realtor to give us a call. 863-385-3101 4320Real Estate WantedRecently Foreclosed, Special Financing Available, Any Credit, Any Income. Vacant Land... located at, 454 Hallmark Ave., Lake Placid, FL, $7,900 Visit www.roselandco.com/8SG Drive by then call (866) 249-0680. 4080Homes for SaleSebringATTENTION: Cash for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial SCOTTISH LADYCAREGIVER seeking employment. tlc, cooking, bathing, etc. 4 hrs Mon Fri, excellent references, experience w/ Alzheimer's Call 863-214-9037 SCOTTISH LADYCAREGIVER seeking employment. tlc, cooking, bathing, etc. 4 hrs Mon Fri, excellent references, experience w/ Alzheimer's Call 863-214-9037 2300Work WantedMERCHANDISING Position Available for Greeting Card Co. Straighting, replenishing products, approx. 2 mornings per wk, incl weekends. Internet access & land line req. Apply online: www.americangreetings.jobs/ .Click apply, click merchandiser application, click on "click here to apply". Use territory 2020. 2150Part-timeEmploymentMEDICAL SECRTARYNEEDED Doctors ofce experience preferred, computer skills necessary, PT/FT Fax resume to: 863-402-1090 2100Help WantedQC MANAGER needed for local precast hollowcore company. Experience with precast, quality control & concrete testing required. PCI Level I&II & ACI Certied preferred. Email resume/salary requirements to: juliem@ oridaprecastind.com or fax: 863-655-1215 PROJECT COORDINATOR: FT contract position, grant funded. Min. Associates Degree, Bachelors degree preferred. 2 years exp.in program and/or coalition development preferred. ASST. PROJECT COORDINATOR: PT contract position, grant funded. Min. high school diploma, Associates degree or higher preferred. At least one year experience in program and/or coalition development preferred. Demonstrated skills for both positions include background in data, program development, facilitation,and team player. Background in substance abuse & behavioral health desirable as positions are responsible for activities in a 5 year Drug Free Communities federal grant. Fax resume & cover letter to: 863-452-6882 or email to kelly.johnson@hrhn.org Specify position applying for. EOE/Drug Free. PART-TIME WORK,FULL-TIME PAY Looking for reliable, and motivated individuals in Avon Park, Sebring & Lake Placid to sell subscriptions for the News Sun. (Commission Only ). Earn $150+ per week, working part-time. Must be at least 18 yrs old & have transportation. Great for college students Call Tony, 863-385-6155, Ext. 522 ALL POSITIONS ARE INDEPENDENT CONTRACT POSITIONS PART-TIME PERSONAL CARE/HOME HEALTH help wanted for quadraplegic. Must have integrity and written references CNA preferred. Non-Smoker. Call 863-873-2040 THE HIGHLANDSCOUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT has an opening for a LICENSE PRACTICAL NURSE (LPN) position.This is an OPS (Other Personal Service) part time position, short term possibly longer Salary will be $13.50/ per hr. (there are no benets connected to this position).Minimum Qualications: Current active license as an LPN in the State of Florida Current CPR and First Aid certication in accordance with Florida Status 464. Please apply on-line at: https://jobs.my orida.com Refer to position number 64928193. MEDICAL OFFICE is seeking a RECEPTIONIST with experience in Billing & Front Desk. PT/FT. Send resumes to: Reply Box # 2203, News Sun, 2227 US 27, S., Sebring, FL 33870. LOOKING For Professional Individual with Personal Lines Insurance experience. Please Email resume to: sleal@wellsinsurance.com or fax to: 863-699-1925 2100Help WantedLAB TECHNICIANVercipia Biofuels is hiring an Agricultural Lab Techfor operations in Highlands County, FL. Position is currently located in Lorida, FL. The Ag Lab Technician is responsible for performing wet chemistry analytical tests including soil and energy crop analysis and reporting results to the Ag Ops Manager. The Ag Lab Technician is accountable for ensuring all necessary tests are completed accurately and in a timely manner. Initial Ag Lab equipment setup is also a dimension of this job with support from technical resources. Requires degree and three plus years of Lab experience (medical or other similiar lab experience). HPLC experience preferred. Please email resume to: HRJobs@vercipia.com GROWING MEDICALPRACTICE has openings Full/Part Time. Please send resume to: Reply Box 2214, The News Sun, 2227 US 27, S., Sebring, FL 33870.GAS SERVICEMAN INSTALLER DRIVER Ridge Propane Gas in Avon Park has an opening for an install-repairman and bobtail driver. Must be experienced with gas. Offering excellent pay and benets. Please call (863) 453-3959 or call toll free 1-877-528-2510 or email: warren@upgas.com for more details on pay and benets. Experienced LEAD TEACHER Needed for age 3. Preferable with CDA or Associates Degree in Early Childhood. Good hourly rates and Benets Avail. Call for appointment. 863-381-9199 2100Help WantedCUSTOMER SERVICECLERK Grade Level 104City of Avon Park is accepting applications for Entry Level Customer Service Clerk position in the Utility Billing Department. This is a responsible clerical position in establishing and terminating utility service accounts, processing utility payments, balance cash drawers, billing, and customer service. Must be knowledgeable in ofce practice procedures and be able to operate computer systems and associated software. Applicant must possess the ability to work with the general public in a professional and effective manner, exhibit excellent communication skills, and work under stressful situations and time constraints. Applicant must possess a High School Diploma or General Education Degree (GED) with three (3) years related experience and/or related administrative clerical training in customer service/ public relations; or equivalent combination of education and experience. A two (2) year degree is desired. There is a testing requirement for this position. Starting salary is $22,312.58 with an excellent benet package. Applications are available at City Hall, Human Resource Department, 110 E. Main Street, Avon Park, FL 33825. Applications close Tuesday, October 15, 2010 at 4:30 p.m. The City of Avon Park is a Smoke and Drug-Free workplace E.O.E. CLEWISTON OFFICE POSITION FT clerk needed, Must be willing to travel, cash handling experience a +. Fax Resume to 863-678-2170 2100Help Wanted LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME? Search the News-Sun Classieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture rst? Call News-Sun classieds, 385-6155. Then shop till you drop! LOOKING FOR AN APARTMENT? Search the News-Sun Classieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday.www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010Page 15A

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Page 16ANews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.com EXPIRES 10-16-2010 SERVING CENTRAL FLORIDA FOR 79 YEARS NO DEALER FEES www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and Sebring NO DEALER FEESAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644€LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 Since 1931*W.A.C.THROUGH ALLY, PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE & DEALERINSTALLED OPTIONS. Hurry In For Best Selection! SAVE UP TO $ 7,000 0 % FOR 60 MOS. 2010DODGERAM15004X4 SAVE UP TO $ 7,000 0 % FOR 72 MOS. 2010CHRYSLERSEBRINGTOURING CONVERTIBLE OR SAVE UP TO $ 5,000 0 % FOR 60 MOS. 2010CHRYSLERTOWN&COUNTRY TOURING SAVE UP TO $ 6,000 0 % FOR 72 MOS. 2010CHRYSLER300S SAVE UP TO $ 6,634 0 % FOR 60 MOS. 2010DODGECALIBERSXT SAVE UP TO $ 4,500 0 % FOR 60 MOS. 2010JEEPLIBERTYSPORT OR OROR OROR Acapulco8875s Berlin6043s Calgary7330c Dublin6047pc Edmonton7438r Freeport8568s Geneva6950c Hong Kong8377r Jerusalem7961pc Kiev4741sh London6854p c Montreal5741s Nice7055c Ottawa5838s Quebec5236p c Rio de Janeiro6962s h Sydney7059s h Toronto6645p c Vancouver6046r Winnipeg7051p c Albuquerque7346s7246s7649s Atlanta8657s8558s8461pc Baltimore7952s7856s7353sh Birmingham8954s8857s8559pc Boston6648s6647s6147pc Charlotte8552s8551s8454s Cheyenne6137pc6837s5734sh Chicago8057s7755pc7050pc Cleveland7856s7252sh6648pc Columbus8456s8257pc7353pc Dallas9066s8762t8361pc Denver6840pc7342s6438sh Detroit7754s7250pc6645pc Harrisburg7653s7453s6949sh Honolulu8773s8774s8674s Houston8766s8565pc8563pc Indianapolis8659s8358pc7753pc Jacksonville8758s8760s8761s Kansas City8258pc7754t7753pc Lexington8656s8456pc8254pc Little Rock8856s8761pc8059pc Los Angeles9164s8161s8862s Louisville8659s8458pc8157pc Memphis9263s9163pc8763pc Miami8571pc8672pc8774pc Minneapolis7956pc7554pc6848sh Nashville8654s8756s8556pc New Orleans8664s8564s8465pc New York City6956s7458s6752sh Norfolk8260s8362s8460pc Oklahoma City8656pc7956t7654pc Philadelphia7257s7857s7052sh Phoenix9066s9168s9369s Pittsburgh7853s7555pc7150pc Portland6240s6037s6140pc Raleigh8654s8655s8756pc Rochester6445s6141pc6038pc St.Louis8658s8460pc8259pc San Francisco7255s7656s7954s Seattle5944r5744pc6046pc Tampa8768pc8669s8569pc Washington, DC8059s8160s7759pc Weather History Heat index ¨ Five-Day forecast for Highlands County High 87/Low 60High 88/Low 63High 88/Low 64High 88/Low 64High 87/Low 64 W inds:NE at 3-6 mph.Winds:E at 4-8 mph.Winds:ENE at 4-8 mph.Winds:NNE at 6-12 mph.Winds:N at 7-14 mph.TODAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAY I ntervals of clouds and sunshine Mostly sunny Partly sunnyMostly sunnyPartly sunny AccuWeather UVIndexTMThe higher the UV index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2, Low;3-5, Moderate;6-7, High; 8-10, Very High;11+ Extreme9 a.m.11 a.m.1 p.m.3 p.m.5 p.m. 03773 U.S.cities World cities Florida citiesWeather ( W ): s -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice. CityHiLoWCityHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCityHiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCityHiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCityHiLoWHiLoWHiLoWTodayTomorrowTuesdayCityHiLoWHiLoWHiLoWFor 3 p.m.today For today A World Series game was snowed out in Baltimore, Md., on Oct.10, 1979.The early snowstorm dumped 12 inches on Webster County, W.Va. Relative humidity ....................34% Expected air temperature ........86¡ Makes it feel like ......................85¡ Sun and moon Moon phases FirstFullLastNew Oct 14Oct 22Oct 30Nov 5 Washington W a s h i n g t o n 80/59 8 0 / 5 9 New York N e w Y o r k 69/56 6 9 / 5 6 Miami M i a m i 85/71 8 5 / 7 1 Atlanta A t l a n t a 86/57 8 6 / 5 7 Detroit D e t r o i t 77/54 7 7 / 5 4 Houston H o u s t o n 87/66 8 7 / 6 6 Chicago C h i c a g o 80/57 8 0 / 5 7 Minneapolis M i n n e a p o l i s 79/56 7 9 / 5 6 Kansas City K a n s a s C i t y 82/58 8 2 / 5 8 El Paso E l P a s o 83/49 8 3 / 4 9 Denver D e n v e r 68/40 6 8 / 4 0 Billings B i l l i n g s 74/50 7 4 / 5 0 Los Angeles L o s A n g e l e s 91/64 9 1 / 6 4 San Francisco S a n F r a n c i s c o 72/55 7 2 / 5 5 Seattle S e a t t l e 59/44 5 9 / 4 4 Washington 80/59 New York 69/56 Miami 85/71 Atlanta 86/57 Detroit 77/54 Houston 87/66 Chicago 80/57 Minneapolis 79/56 Kansas City 82/58 El Paso 83/49 Denver 68/40 Billings 74/50 Los Angeles 91/64 San Francisco 72/55 Seattle 59/44 Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands ar e highs for the day.Forecast high and low temperatures are given for selected citie s. A day of pleasant sunshine will unfold throughout the East today as high pressure remains in control over the region.Temperatures will also remain unusually warm along a vast swath from the Southeast and mid-Atlantic westward across the majority of the Plains.Scattered showers will dampen parts of South Dakota an d Nebraska as a storm system meanders eastward across the Plains.During the afternoon, spotty showers and thunderstorms will erupt over areas farther south, from Kansas into northwestern Texas. National Forecast for October 10 Intervals of clouds and sunshine today.Clear tonight. Mostly sunny tomorrow.Tuesday:partly sunny.Wednesday:mostly sunny. Thursday:partly sunny. Avon Park Tallahassee Jacksonville St.Petersburg Miami Sebring Lorida Lake Placid Venus 88/60 89/60 88/60 87/62 86/57 87/58 87/69 85/71 87/60Shown is today's weather.Temperatures are today's highs and tonight's lows Regional forecast Water restrictions Almanac Farm reportClouds and sun today. Winds northwest 3-6 mph. Expect 4-8 hours of sunshine with relative humidity 75% early, 35% in the afternoon and good drying conditions.Clear tonight. FRONTS Shower s T-storm Rain Flurries Snow Ice Cold Warm StationaryDaytona Beach8462pc8564s8663s Ft.Laud.Bch8672pc8773pc8674pc Fort Myers8865pc8866pc8868pc Gainesville8656s8759s8759s Homestead AFB8469pc8570pc8574pc Jacksonville8758s8760s8761s Key West8575s8476pc8677pc Miami8571pc8672pc8774pc Orlando8862pc8863s8864pc Pensacola8865s8864s8663pc Sarasota8563pc8565pc8765pc Tallahassee8657s8960s8958s Tampa8768pc8669s8569pc W.Palm Bch8667pc8669pc8671pcTemperature(Readings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake Placid)High Tuesday ..........................84 Low Tuesday ............................61 High Wednesday ....................82 Low Wednesday ......................62 High Thursday ........................83 Low Thursday ..........................29 Precipitation Tuesday ..............................0.00" Wednesday ........................0.00" Thursday ............................0.00" Month to date ......................0.00" Year to date ......................52.49" Barometer Tuesday ..............................30.10 Wednesday ........................30.11 Thursday ............................30.11 Tides(Readings at St.Petersburg)High ..............................2:56 a.m. Low ............................10:43 a.m. High ..............................5:50 p.m. Low ..............................9:16 p.m.(Readings at Palm Beach)High ............................11:14 a.m. Low ..............................4:33 a.m. High ............................11:23 p.m. Low ..............................5:03 p.m. Lake Levels Lake Jackson ....................78.36' Lake Okeechobee ..............13.92' Normal ..............................14.51' TodaySunrise ....7:22 a.m. Sunset ......7:03 p.m. Moonrise 10:25 a.m. Moonset ....9:14 p.m. MondaySunrise ....7:23 a.m. Sunset ......7:02 p.m. Moonrise 11:27 a.m. Moonset ..10:09 p.m.If your address (house number) ends in... ...0 or 1, water only on Monday ...2 or 3, water only on Tuesday ...4 or 5, water only on Wednesday ...6 or 7, water only on Thursday ...8 or 9*, water only on Friday and locations without a discernible address TodayTodayNational summary:Regional summary: Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather,Inc. 2010 -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110sAccuWeather.com

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By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK The A von Park Red Devils i mproved their district s tanding to 2-0 after t heir 19-6 victory over t he Mulberry Panthers F riday night at Joe F ranza Stadium. "It was an ugly win, b ut it was a win," said A von Park Head Coach Andy B onjokian after the game. "We can't rest on what we have done so far, we have a long ways to go," Bonjokian added about the 2-0 start in the district. The Devil's TK Miller scored with 3:58 on the clock in the first from the eight after a tremendous setup drive led by sophomore Tyler Johnson. Although Johnson has only been playing varsity for three weeks, he was able to pound out 114 yards on 12 carries and one touchdown before the night was over. "Tyler had a great game," Bonjokian said. "We were asking a lot from him, and he produced. We are looking forward to him running more in the future." Miller, who often plays on By KATE ROWLAND Special to the News-SunSEBRING The good n ews for Highlander fans is t he Lake Wales team that m ade it to the state semifin als before bowing out last y ear returned all but two s tarters this season. That's also the bad news f or the other six squads in t he competitive Class 3AD istrict 9. No. 3-ranked Lake Wales ( 5-0, 3-0 district) easi ly handed Sebring ( 4-1, 1-1) its first seas on loss in a 37-3 vict ory at Firemen's F ield on Friday. The high-scoring H ighlanders were the f irst team the Blue S treak defense had allowed m ore than one touchdown t his year. The Blue Streaks took an e arly 3-0 lead on a Donavon W hite, 20-yard field goal, b ut Sebring's offense stalled a fter that and the H ighlanders'Marcelo B onani made good on a 44y ard field goal to even the s core. His teammates added two t ouchdowns in the first half f or the 17-3 lead at halftime. Three second-half touchd owns put the game out of r each for the Blue Streaks. Sebring eked out 102 y ards total yardage in the g ame (46 passing and 56 r ushing), while Lake Wales a massed 303 total yards (123 p assing and 180 rushing). Glenn Redding led the Highlanders with 58 yards on 12 carries with one touchdown, and Kevin Prioleau rushed 56 yards on 13 carries with three touchdowns. Sebring's Trini Sutton had 42 yards rushing on nine carries and Damion Thompson added five carries for 26 yards. Quarterback Matt had six completions in 14 attempts for 46 yards. On the receiving end, Evan Lewis was 3for-29, Devin Clarke was 2-for-21 and Davaris Faulk was 1for-(minus)4. Lake Wales fourth touchdown was set up after a mishandled punt return. The Highlanders picked up the fumbled punt on the Sebring 17-yard line. The fifth touchdown came after Sebring shanked a punt that trickled 8 yards, giving the Highlanders possession on the Sebring 5-yard line. "We played against an extremely good football team that's ranked No. 3 in the state for a reason," said head coach Jared Hamlin. "We knew going into the game that we couldn't make mistakes and had to capitalize on any mistakes they made and we didn't do that tonight. "I give them all the credit. They're fast, they're physical and they're a very good football team. We made a few too many mistakes and they capitalized on them. Now we have to get ready for Winter Haven." Lake Wales won last year's game in a contest that was closer than the 28-3 final score indicates. Controversial calls led to a Sebring touchdown and safety being called back on penalties. Afight broke out between players in the third quarter and after a 12-minute delay, players from both teams were ejected from the game and a good portion of the Sebring squad was suspended from the following week's game, Highlands County Sheriff's Department had extra deputies on hand Friday in case things got out By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE PLACID "We knew how good they were," Green Dragon head coach Jason Holden said after his squad came up on the short end of a 54-0 Homecoming loss to the Gators of Island Coast. "They're the number six team in the state and have one of the top rushers in the state. They won district last year and only lost two players from that team. This was the kind of game you just hope to survive." And Lake Placid did, by and large, as no significant injuries were reported afterward. And though the score was as lopsided as it was, with the Gators seemingly scoring at will, the Dragons kept battling until the end, when a 32-yard field goal attempt at getting some points on the board came up short. The first of those Island Coast scores came just 18 seconds into the game when, after the opening kickoff put the Gators at their own oneyard line, Delmarick Pender, the second leading rusher in the state, promptly took it 99 yards for a touchdown. On their second series, quarterback Nelson Candelario hooked up with Phillip Woolbright on a 62yard gain to get it to the Lake Placid one before Candelario took it in himself for a 14-0 lead. The Dragon offense had trouble gaining much traction, leading to another one-touch score for Pender, as he took a handoff on the opening snap of the next series and darted around tacklers for a 43-yard TD with 3:50 left in the opening quarter. Three more trips into the end zone would come in the second quarter, ballooning the lead to 41-0 at the half, with Candelario throwing a 32-yarder to Jimmy Stewart, running one in from 52 yar ds out and Pender adding a 6 5 yarder. With a running clock f or the second half, thin gs moved quickly and t he Dragons seemed to get o n track a bit more with som e positive gains and semi-su stained drives. But the Gators continu ed their mastery of the one-pl ay scoring drives as Pender ( 6rushes, 314-yards, 4 TD s) took another long one all t he way on a 94-yard score. Lake Placid again start ed to move the ball with Ki rk Veley hitting Nevada Weav er for a 12-yard gain before A .J. Gayle rumbled for 15 yards But a diving interceptio n by Joshua Guffey thwart ed the series two plays later. Island Coast then mount ed it's longest drive of the gam e, seven plays that took it in to the fourth quarter and end ed with a 37-yard, Woolbrig ht touchdown run for the Gato rs final score. SPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, October 10, 2010 Avon Park19Mulberry6 Lake Wales37Sebring3 Island Coast54Lake Placid0 Gators off to the races See LP, p a g e 3B Courtesy photo from KIM GAUGER Zach Morris, #30, and Devante Pough, take care of Glenn Redding on this play, but Lake Wales got the better of Sebring Friday night, knocking the Streaks from the ranks of the unbeaten. Highlanders roll over Blue Streaks See SEBRING, page 5B News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE J oshua Guffey goes horizontal to take this pass away from Lake Placid's Andre Wilson Friday night in Island Coast's big win against the Dragons. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comIt was a Thursday of thre egame sweeps for Highlan ds County volleyball with tw o of the three contests seein g Sebring and SFCC comin g out on the wrong end. Still trying to muster the ir first Suncoast Conferen ce win, South Florida travel ed to face a Hillsborough squ ad smarting from a 3-2 defeat to State College of Flori da Tuesday night. The win had clinched t he conference title for t he Manatees and had the Lad y Hawks looking for a litt le revenge on whoever th ey next faced. That lead to 25-16 and 2 515 wins to start the matc h, before the Lady Panthers ba ttled to try to take the thi rd game and extend the match But try as they migh t, SFCC came up six poin ts short in the 25-19 loss. The Lady Blue Streak s, meanwhile, were at Hain es City, looking to atone for an earlier loss to the Lad y Hornets and trying to gi ve them their first district loss But Jessica Wilson w as having none of that, as the 5foot-9, high-flying hitt er almost single handedly di smantled Sebring's gals, tota ling 17 kills, three blocks an d nine digs. Those 20 points, off t he Off night for area Volleyball See VBall, page 3B Red Devils run down Panthers See AP, page 5B News-Sun photo by BETH BALDRIDG E Tyler Johnson, recently brought up to varsity, broke through in Sanders-esque fashion, Friday, carrying 12 times for 114 yards and a score.

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Lake Placid Senior SoftballLAKEPLACID The Lake Placid Senior Softball League will begin informal practices for the 2011 season starting Monday, Oct. 11 at 9:30 a.m. at the Lake June Ball Fields and will continue every Monday morning until league play begins. All interested players are invited to participate in these practices.Panther Baseball ShowcaseAVONPARK The South Florida Community College baseball program will be hosting a High School Baseball Showcase Camp Saturday, Nov. 13 and 20 from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. for the first 30 players registered. At $60 per person, the camp is open to 2011-2013 high school graduates with roster spots and scholarships available for the 11 year. SFCC Head Coach Rick Hitt will serve as showcase director, assisted by assistant coach Andy Polk. The camp will provide the opportunity for players to showcase their ability levels during a morning workout followed by a showcase game in the afternoon and a question and answer session with players and families following the game. Players are to bring their own individual baseball attire to Panther Field at the SFCC campus in Avon Park. To register, go to www.southflorida.edu and select "athletics" then "baseball." Click on "camps," then print out Admissions Application and Emergency Treatment forms. Mail the forms as indicated on the application form or register by phone at one of the Panther Baseball lines at extension 7036 Avon Park/Sebring: 4536661; Lake Placid: 465-5300; Arcadia: 494-7500; Wauchula: 773-2252. Both days of the camp begin with an 8:30 a.m. registration before the showcase activities get underway at 9 a.m.Hansen Center Golf TourneySEBRING Children's Home Society of Florida (CHS) invites golfers to the 2nd Annual Golf Tournament benefitting the Hansen Center in Highlands County on Saturday Nov. 13 at Sun N Lakes Golf and Country Club. The event will kick-off with registration at 7:30 a.m. followed by a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Lunch, along with an awards ceremony and prize drawings, will conclude the event at 1 p.m. All proceeds from the tournament will go directly to support this vital program for teen girls in Highlands County. Hansen Center, known in the community as Hansen House, provides emergency group care and shelter services for up to 12 girls ages 13-17 who have been removed from their homes due to abuse or neglect. For more information on sponsorships, volunteering or participating, contact Summer Rose Tucker at summer@fastlanepromotions.biz or 414-4452. Please visit us at www.chsfl.org or www.facebook.com/CHSgulfcoast .Boys & Girls Club GolfAVONPARK The Boys & Girls Club of Highlands County will be hosting its' First Annual Golf Classic on Saturday, Nov. 20 at the Pinecrest Golf Club. Registration will begin at 7:30 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Deadline for entry is Thursday, No v. 18, and Team and Hole Sponsorships a re available. All proceeds go to benefit the Boyss & Girls Club of Highlands County. For more information, go to www.hig hlandsbgc.com/golf.html or contact Do n Lamb at 399-0506.YMCABasketball, CheerSEBRING The Highlands Coun ty Family YMCAwill be taking sign-ups f or Youth Basketball now through Monda y, Nov. 1 for ages 4-15. We will be taking sign-ups for a Cheerleading Program ages 5-12 durin g that same time. Any questions call 382-9622.HAL GolfAVONPARK Highlands Art Leag ue will hold its'first annual golf tourname nt on Saturday, Oct. 23 at Pinecrest Go lf course in Avon Park. The event will kick off with registratio n at 7:30 a.m. followed by a shotgun start at 8:30a.m. The format is a two perso n scramble for $55 per person. There will be a $2000 Hole in O ne sponsored by Cohan Radio Group an d team prize money will be sponsored b y Barben Fruit Company. Lunch, along with an awards ceremon y and prize drawings, will conclude t he event. This fund raising event provides nece ssary monies to provide Highlands Coun ty with a museum, adult art classes an d instructors to provide art lessons for ch ildren year round. Please make checks payable to Highlands Art League. For more information or to regist er contact the pro shop at 453-7555, or f ax your information to 452-8242. For information on sponsorships co ntact Barb Hall at 863-452-0512.YMCA SpooktacularSEBRING The Highlands Coun ty Family YMCAwill be hosting its'3 rd Annual "Spooktacular" Saturday, Oct. 2 3 from 6-9 p.m. This is a community event that featur es a haunted house, games, bounce hous e, candy, prizes and refreshments. This is a great time to be had for t he entire family, so dress up your kids ( co stumes are optional ) and come enjoy a wonderful event. Any questions, call 382-9622."Night Moves" 5KSEBRING The Greater Sebrin g Chamber of Commerce has schedul ed their third 5K Run/Walk, "Night Moves ," sponsored by MidFlorida, Hodg es University, Highlands Independent Ban k, The NCTGroup and Highlands Region al Medical Center. The 5K will take place at 6:30 p.m. o n Friday, Oct. 15, on the Circle in dow ntown Sebring. Early entry fee is $15 and $20 the d ay of the race. Checks should be made payable to t he Greater Sebring Chamber of Commer ce and mailed to 227 US Hwy 27 Nort h, Sebring, FL33870. Each entrant will receive a T-shirt TShirt sizes will be guaranteed for pre-re gistered participants only. For questions, contact Greg Harris at 385-8448 or greg@sebring.org. DIVISION SERIESAMERICAN LEAGUE Texas 2, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday, Oct. 6 Texas 5, Tampa Bay 1 Thursday, Oct. 7 Texas 6, Tampa Bay 0 Saturday, Oct. 9 Tampa Bay at Texas, late Sunday, Oct. 10 Tampa Bay (Shields 13-15) at Texas (Hunter 13-4), if necessary Tuesday, Oct. 12 Texas at Tampa Bay, if necessary New York 2, Minnesota 0 Wednesday, Oct. 6 New York 6, Minnesota 4 Thursday, Oct. 7 New York 5, Minnesota 2 Saturday, Oct. 9 Minnesota at New York, late Sunday, Oct. 10 Minnesota (Blackburn 10-12) at New York (Burnett 10-15), if necessary Tuesday, Oct. 12 New York at Minnesota, if necessaryDIVISION SERIESNATIONAL LEAGUE Philadelphia 2, Cincinnati 0 Wednesday, Oct. 6 Philadelphia 4, Cincinnati 0 Friday, Oct. 8 Philadelphia 7, Cincinnati 5 Sunday, Oct. 10 Philadelphia (Hamels 12-11) at Cincinnati (Cueto 12-7) Monday, Oct. 11 Philadelphia at Cincinnati, if necessary Wednesday, Oct. 13 Cincinnati at Philadelphia, if necessary San Francisco 1, Atlanta 1 Thursday, Oct. 7 San Francisco 1, Atlanta 0 Friday, Oct. 8 Atlanta 5, San Francisco 4, 11 innings Sunday, Oct. 10 San Francisco (Sanchez 13-9) at Atlanta (Hudson 17-9) Monday, Oct. 11 San Francisco at Atlanta, if necessary Wednesday, Oct. 13 Atlanta at San Francisco, if necessaryAMERICAN CONFERENCEEast WLTPctPFPA N.Y. Jets310.75010661 New England310.75013196 Miami220.5006692 Buffalo040.00061125 South WLTPctPFPA Houston310.750108102 Jacksonville220.50071111 Indianapolis220.50011792 Tennessee220.5009868 North WLTPctPFPA Baltimore310.7506155 Pittsburgh310.7508650 Cincinnati220.5007978 Cleveland130.2506877 West WLTPctPFPA Kansas City3001.0006838 San Diego220.50011371 Denver220.5008785 Oakland130.25076107NATIONAL CONFERENCEEast WLTPctPFPA Washington220.5007379 N.Y. Giants220.5007288 Philadelphia220.5009579 Dallas120.3335453 South WLTPctPFPA Atlanta310.7509360 New Orleans310.7507972 Tampa Bay210.6675059 Carolina040.0004687 North WLTPctPFPA Chicago310.7506968 Green Bay310.75010673 Minnesota120.3334338 Detroit040.00082106 West WLTPctPFPA Arizona220.50058118 St. Louis220.5007752 Seattle220.5007577 San Francisco040.00052103 ___ Sunday's Games St. Louis at Detroit, 1 p.m. Denver at Baltimore, 1 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Houston, 1 p.m. Green Bay at Washington, 1 p.m. Chicago at Carolina, 1 p.m. Atlanta at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. New Orleans at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. Tennessee at Dallas, 4:15 p.m. San Diego at Oakland, 4:15 p.m. Philadelphia at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m. Open: Miami, New England, Pittsburgh, Seattle Monday's Game Minnesota at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEWLTPtsGFGA x-New York1485473527 x-Columbus1387463531 Kansas City9116332931 Chicago8118323335 Toronto FC8127312834 Philadelphia7147283245 New England7155262947 D.C.6183211942WESTERN CONFERENCEWLTPtsGFGA x-Los Angeles1765564122 x-Real Salt Lake1449514118 x-FC Dallas12213493922 Seattle1296423431 Colorado1188413727 San Jose1187402828 Houston7146273646 Chivas USA7154252636 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. xclinched playoff berth ___ Friday's Games Chicago 2, Columbus 0 Saturday's Games Real Salt Lake at New York, late Colorado at FC Dallas, late San Jose at D.C. United, late Seattle FC at Kansas City, late Toronto FC at Chivas USA, late Sunday's Games New England at Houston, 8:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB Boston201.000 Toronto101.00012New Jersey11.5001 New York01.000112Philadelphia02.0002 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami201.000 Orlando201.000 Washington21.66712Atlanta01.000112Charlotte02.0002 Central Division WLPctGB Cleveland11.500 Detroit11.500 Milwaukee11.500 Chicago12.33312Indiana02.0001WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB Memphis201.000 Dallas11.5001 Houston11.5001 New Orleans00.0001 San Antonio01.000112Northwest Division WLPctGB Minnesota201.000 Denver101.00012Utah101.00012Oklahoma City11.5001 Portland12.333112Pacific Division WLPctGB Golden State101.000 Sacramento11.50012L.A. Clippers12.3331 L.A. Lakers01.0001 Phoenix02.000112___ Friday's Games Orlando 93, Indiana 86 Detroit 115, Milwaukee 110, OT Chicago 107, Washington 96 Miami 103, Oklahoma City 96 Denver 109, Portland 99 Golden State 127, L.A. Clippers 87 Saturday's Games Philadelphia at New Jersey, late Indiana at Houston, late Charlotte vs. Milwaukee, late Memphis at New Orleans, late Miami at San Antonio, late Dallas vs. Phoenix, late Sunday's Games Toronto at Boston, 6 p.m. New Orleans at Orlando, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Houston, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Golden State, 10 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA Philadelphia1 00232 New Jersey0 01134 N.Y. Islanders0 00000 N.Y. Rangers0 00000 Pittsburgh0 10023 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Buffalo1 00221 Toronto1 00232 Boston0 00000 Montreal0 10023 Ottawa0 10012 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Carolina2 00464 Atlanta1 00242 Florida0 00000 Tampa Bay0 00000 Washington0 10024WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Detroit1 00240 Chicago0 01134 Nashville0 00000 St. Louis0 00000 Columbus0 10023 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA Colorado1 00243 Edmonton1 00240 Minnesota0 11146 Vancouver0 00000 Calgary0 10004 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA Dallas1 00243 San Jose1 00232 Los Angeles0 00000 Phoenix0 00000 Anaheim0 10004 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Friday's Games Carolina 2, Minnesota 1, SO San Jose 3, Columbus 2 Dallas 4, New Jersey 3, OT Detroit 4, Anaheim 0 Buffalo 2, Ottawa 1 Atlanta 4, Washington 2 Saturday's Games Phoenix vs. Boston, late Columbus vs. San Jose, late N.Y. Rangers at Buffalo, late Ottawa at Toronto, late Dallas at N.Y. Islanders, late Montreal at Pittsburgh, late New Jersey at Washington, late Atlanta at Tampa Bay, late Philadelphia at St. Louis, late Anaheim at Nashville, late Detroit at Chicago, late Los Angeles at Vancouver, late Sunday's Games Boston vs. Phoenix at Prague, Czech Republic, 10 a.m. Los Angeles at Calgary, 8 p.m. Florida at Edmonton, 8 p.m. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid MONDAY: Volleyball at Hardee,6/7:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Volleyball vs.McKeel,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Golf vs.Hardee,4 p.m.; Cross Country at Moore Haven,4:30 p.m.; Swim vs.Avon Park,Kathleen,5:30 p.m. THURSDAY: JV Football at Sebring,7 p.m.; Volleyball at Frostproof,6/7:30 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Boys Golf at Polk County Invitational,9 a.m. TUESDAY: Volleyball vs.Osceola,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Golf at Lake Region,4 p.m.; Swimming at Lake Region,5 p.m. THURSDAY: JV Football vs.Lake Placid,7 p.m.; Volleyball vs.Ridge,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Golf vs.Frostproof,4 p.m.; Heartland Christian TUESDAY: Volleyball vs.Moore Haven,5/6:30 p.m.; Boys Golf vs.Mulberry,4 p.m. THURSDAY: Volleyball at Vanguard,6 p.m. MONDAY,Oct.25: Volleyball at District Tournament,TBA SFCC TUESDAY: Volleyball at St.Petersburg,7 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball vs.IMG Academy,4 p.m. THURSDAY: Volleyball vs.Polk State,7 p.m. MONDAY,Oct.18: Volleyball at Lake Sumter,7 p.m. Avon Park TUESDAY: Volleyball vs.Mulberry,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Golf at Hardee,4 p.m.; Swim at Lake Placid,5:30 p.m. THURSDAY: JV Football vs.Mulberry,7 p.m.; Volleyball vs.McKeel Academy,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Golf at Tenoroc,4 p.m. S S O O C C C C E E R R T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n Brazil vs. Saudi Arabia. . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 8 8 p p m m United States vs. Colombia . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 M M L L B B P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p m m Tampa Bay at Texas, if necessary . . . T T B B S S 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m San Francisco at Atlanta . . . . . . T T B B S S 7 7 p p m m Philadelphia at Cincinnati . . . . . . T T N N T T 8 8 p p m m Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, if necessary . T T B B S SM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 5 5 p p m m Philadelphia at Cincinnati, if necessary . T T B B S S 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m San Francisco at Atlanta, if necessary . T T B B S ST TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 5 5 p p m m Texas at Tampa Bay, if necessary . . . T T B B S S 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m N.Y. Yankees at Minnesota, if necessary . T T B B S SA A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p m m NASCAR Pepsi 400. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p m m NHRA Toyo Tires Nationals, Elim.. . E E S S P P N NN N B B A A P P R R E E S S E E A A S S O O N N S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 6 6 p p m m New Orleans at Orlando . . . . . . . S S U U N NB B O O W W L L I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 a a m m PBA All-Star Shootout. . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m PBA All-Star Shootout. . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2Times, games, channels all subject to change N N F F L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p m m Jacksonville at Buffalo . . . . . . . C C B B S S 6 6 1 1 p p m m Denver at Baltimore . . . . . . . C C B B S S 1 1 0 0 1 1 p p m m Tampa Bay at Cincinnati . . . . . . F F O O X X 4 4 p p m m Tennessee at Dallas . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 8 8 : : 1 1 5 5 p p m m Philadelphia at San Francisco . . . .. N N B B C CM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m Minnesota at N.Y. Jets . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NG G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m PGA Constellation Energy Players . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p m m PGA McGladrey Classic . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m LPGA Navistar Classic . . . . . . G G O O L L F FW W O O M M E E N N S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E V V O O L L L L E E Y Y B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 p p m m South Carolina at Alabama . . . . . S S U U N N LIVESPORTSONTV Major League Baseball NHL NBA Preseason NFL Major League Soccer Page 2BNews-Sun Sunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.co m

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Alonso 28, Chamberlain 21 Andrew Jackson 10, Terry Parker 0 Apopka 33, West Orange 6 Archbishop McCarthy 23, Olympic Heights 7 Armwood 41, King 0 Astronaut 30, Rockledge 0 Atlantic Coast 57, Father Lopez Catholic 0 Atlantic Community 20, Park Vista Community 14 Auburndale 35, Lake Nona 31 Aucilla Christian 41, Pope John Paul II 0 Avon Park 19, Mulberry 6 Baker County 46, Baldwin 25 Baker School 32, Bozeman School 0 Barrington Christian Academy 35, Sheridan Hills Christian 0 Barron Collier 28, Cypress Lake 19 Bartram Trail 16, Nease 8 Bell 29, St. Joseph Academy 21, OT Berean Christian 42, Zion Christian 36 Berkeley Prep 42, Lakeland Christian 0 Bishop Kenny 38, Englewood 6 Bishop Moore 26, South Sumter 10 Blake 21, Seminole Osceola 14 Blanche Ely 27, Monarch 8 Blountstown 41, West Gadsden 0 Bolles School 38, University Christian 19 Booker 28, Bayshore 27, OT Bradenton Christian 37, St. John Neumann 0 Bradford 26, Union County 24 Brandon 48, Wharton 20 Cape Coral 49, Palmetto Ridge 21 Carrollwood Day 47, All Saints 14 Central Florida Christian 43, Orlando Christian 26 Chaminade-Madonna College Prep 52, Somerset Academy 34 Charlotte 46, Palmetto 13 Choctawhatchee 49, Arnold 48, OT Choice Learning 19, Marathon 0 Christopher Columbus Catholic 37, Coral Gables 0 Clay 51, Ponte Vedra 14 Clearwater Central Catholic 21, Indian Rocks 13 Clewiston 60, Gateway Charter 0 Cocoa Beach 28, Eau Gallie 26 Cocoa 35, Satellite 6 Colonial 28, Orlando University 21 Cooper City 27, Fort Lauderdale 0 Coral Glades 21, Coral Springs Charter 14 Coral Shores 14, Mourning High School 0 Countryside 21, Clearwater 6 Creekside 42, Stanton College Prep 12 Crescent City 35, Holy Trinity Episcopal 24 Crestview 26, Ft. Walton Beach 20, 2OT Cypress Bay 35, Charles Flanagan 21 DeLand 44, Pine Ridge 0 Delray American Heritage 50, Pahokee 20 Douglas 31, Taravella 22 Dr. Phillips 45, Boone 0 Dunbar 34, LaBelle 3 Dunnellon 36, Citrus 7 Durant 49, Riverview 0 Dwyer 62, Palm Beach Lakes 6 East Lake 38, Palm Harbor University 28 East Lee County 34, Lely 31 East Ridge 42, Jupiter Christian 15 East River 27, St. Cloud 14 Ed White 56, R.E. Lee 0 Edgewater 55, Liberty 6 Episcopal 42, Fernandina Beach 14 Estero 46, DeSoto County 12 Evangelical Christian 28, Out-of-Door Academy 24 Everglades 56, West Broward 13 FAMU Developmental Research 62, Graceville 22 First Coast 19, Buchholz 7 Fleming Island 31, Seabreeze 10 Fletcher 41, Middleburg 25 Fort Pierce Central 14, Sebastian River 9 Fort Pierce Westwood 21, Merritt Island 3 Fort White 30, Florida 27, 2OT Foundation Academy 37, Seffner Christian 7 Freeport 15, South Walton 0 Gainesville 55, Lecanto 0 George Steinbrenner 31, St. Petersburg Catholic 14 Glades Central 40, Boca Raton Community 7 Glades Day 41, Summit Christian 7 Gulf Breeze 38, Rutherford 20 Gulf Coast 28, Ida S. Baker 7 Hallandale 8, Pembroke Pines 6 Hamilton County 18, Dixie County 9 Harmony 44, Poinciana 0 Hernando 56, Tavares 0 Hialeah 23, Miami Beach 8 Highlands Christian 55, Miami Douglas MacArthur North 20 Hillsborough 35, East Bay 14 Immokalee 36, Hardee 34 Interlachen 39, Taylor 14 Island Coast 54, Lake Placid 0 Jefferson County 43, Cottondale 0 Jefferson 50, Lakewood 14 Jensen Beach 35, Titusville 19 Jesuit 42, Lennard 7 John I. Leonard 35, Santaluces 18 Jones 35, Frostproof 0 Kathleen 28, Haines City 17 King's Academy 24, Benjamin 7 Kissimmee Osceola 35, George Jenkins 28 Lafayette 33, Mandarin Christian 27 Lake Brantley 42, Lyman 6 Lake Gibson 37, Bartow 7 Lake Highland 30, Cardinal Mooney 13 Lake Wales 37, Sebring 3 Lake Weir 17, Springstead 14 Lake Worth 42, Royal Palm Beach 13 Lakeland 59, Bayside 34 Lakewood Ranch 42, Port Charlotte 21 Land O'Lakes 50, Anclote 0 Landmark Christian 47, Merritt Island Christian 0 Largo 55, Leto 0 LaSalle 56, Doral Academy Charter 7 Leesburg 56, Eustis 27 Lehigh 27, Golden Gate 12 Leon 42, Chiles 14 Liberty County 48, Wewahitchka 0 Madison County 35, Godby 17 Mainland 21, Spruce Creek 0 Manatee 45, Sarasota 10 Mariner 24, Bishop Verot 20 Martin County 14, South Fork 7 MAST Academy 45, Lighthouse Christian 14 Melbourne 45, Port St. Lucie 21 Melbourne Central Catholic 48, University High School (Orange City) 21 Miami Belen Jesuit Prep 47, Mater Academy 7 Miami Central 25, Miami Northwestern 22 Miami Washington 42, Key West 13 Middleton 31, Strawberry Crest 14 Miramar 49, South Plantation 13 Mitchell 51, Zephyrhills 22 Monsignor Pace 27, Archbishop Carroll 14 Moore Haven 76, St. Stephen's Episcopal 39 Mount Dora 62, Newberry 26 Munroe Day 44, Bronson 21 Navarre 49, Milton 20 Niceville 35, Mosley 14 North Florida Christian 57, Eagle's View 12 North Marion 59, Belleview 0 Northview 35, Holmes County 14 Oak Ridge 28, Cypress Creek 0 Oakland Park Northeast 7, Deerfield Beach 0 Ocala Forest 24, Mandarin 14 Ocala Trinity Catholic 59, Keystone Heights 7 Ocala Vanguard 45, Eastside 0 Olympia 27, Wekiva 13 Orange Park 38, Sandalwood 28 Orlando Freedom 49, Gateway 6 Ormond Beach Calvary Christian 52, Florida Air Academy 6 Oviedo 14, Evans 0 Pace 42, Escambia 0 Palatka 34, Matanzas 16 Palm Bay 47, Viera 7 Pasco 45, Gulf 13 Pensacola Catholic 35, Marianna 19 Pensacola Washington 13, Bay 7 Pine Crest 28, North Broward 23 Pine Forest 29, Tate 8 Plant City 37, Bloomingdale 0 Plant 24, Gaither 16 Plantation American Heritage 44, Pompano Beach 7 Port St. Joe 39, Franklin County 26 Raines 49, Suwannee 14 Ribault 46, Santa Fe 22 Ridge Community 44, Lake Region 7 Ridgeview 16, Columbia 9 River Ridge 26, Hudson 13 Riverdale 39, Fort Myers 20 Robinson 28, Newsome 14 Sanford Seminole 20, Lake Mary 14 Santa Fe Catholic 39, Cambridge Christian 28 Sarasota Riverview 35, Dunedin 0 Seminole 10, St. Petersburg Northeast 7 Seminole Ridge 21, Palm Beach Central 10 Seven Rivers Christian 57, Leesburg The First Academy 0 Sickles 17, Boca Ciega 16 South Broward 52, McArthur 7 South Dade 21, Miami Palmetto 7 South Fort Myers 34, North Fort Myers 0 South Lake 56, Ocoee 7 Southeast 31, Braden River 0 Southwest Miami 14, Miami Sunset 7 Spoto 54, Dixie Hollins 0 St. Augustine 56, Menendez 0 St. Edward's 51, South Florida HEAT 6 St. Francis 28, Orangewood Christian 21 St. John Lutheran 60, Hernando Christian 0 St. Petersburg Canterbury 40, Shorecrest Prep 14 St. Petersburg 49, Gibbs 20 St. Thomas Aquinas 45, Nova 0 Stranahan 40, Forest Hill 6 Suncoast 21, Boynton Beach 20 Sunlake 29, Wesley Chapel 0 Tampa Bay Tech 21, Tampa Freedom 14 Tarpon Springs 2, Ridgewood 0 Taylor County 57, East Gadsden 17 Tenoroc 19, Celebration 0 The Villages 21, Chiefland 7 Treasure Coast 21, St. Lucie West Centennial High School 13 Trinity Christian-Jacksonville 42, Hawthorne 6 Trinity Prep 27, John Carroll Catholic 21 University School 42, Cardinal Newman 14 Venice 49, North Port 20 Vernon 55, Jay 13 Vero Beach 31, Palm Beach Gardens 21 Walton 28, Chipley 14 Warner Christ. 35, Deltona Trinity Christ. 0 Wellington 20, West Boca Raton Community 14 West Port 29, Brooksville Central 6 Western 21, Plantation 20 Westland Hialeah 27, Hialeah Gardens 20 Westminster Christian def. Upperroom Christian, forfeit Wildwood 16, Hilliard 7 Williston 43, Umatilla 3 Windermere 27, Cedar Creek Christian 12 Winter Park 35, Timber Creek 10 Winter Springs 28, Hagerty 21 Yulee 17, West Nassau County 6 www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010Page 3B der matology Darrin A.Rotman,M.D.What do FORGIVENESS and theNUMBER 32 have in common?First,32 people die every day of skin cancer in the USA. Second,most skin cancer deaths are preventable. Therefore,forgiveness is the chance to prevent skin cancer with a Dermatology skin exam. Therefore,forgiveness is the Lord offering you free will to not be a statistic. SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE. OR LET US DO IT FOR YOU.863-386-0786Darrin A.Rotman,M.D. Julie L.Iellimo,P.A.-C. Jennifer A.Wolf,P.A.-C. Medicare and almost all insurances accepted 6940 U.S. 27 N., Sebring 382-6339 8 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 16featuringPAT DUAXChristopher Cowles & Scott ThompsonBilly Glades performs at 10 p.m.$10 ticketsBuy in advance or at the door. Florida High School Football Scores Oct. 8 With one more drive left in them, Lake Placid hopped on the back of Gayle (27112), who carried six times for 31 yards. Ernie Edwards came in for a couple short runs to get the Dragons to the 14. AVeley pass near the goal line on third down couldn't be held onto, leading to the unsuccessful field-goal attempt. Granted, Island Coast, established in 2007, now has an enrollment of nearly 1,800 students, more than twice the size of Lake Placid, and have been running roughshod through their Class 2B schedule, and will be moving up at least a class or two next season. But size alone doesn't explain the Gators rise to power so soon. "There are lots of schools in their situation," Holden said. "It takes time for a program at a new school to get good. They're just really well coached and have come along real quickly." The Dragons have their bye this week to rest up, heal up and gear up for a Friday, Oct. 22 contest at Clewiston. "Clewiston is strong program," Holden said. "When they're up, they're great and when they are down, they're really good. The bye com es at a real good time for us to get ready for them." Continued from 1B News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E A.J. Gayle gets ready to lower his shoulder and blast through this would-be tackle Friday night. Gayle ran for 112 yards on 27 carries in the Green Dragons loss to Island Coast. LP no match for Gators kills and blocks, would be more than the Streaks would muster in any one game, and equaled the point total from the first and third games combined in the 25-10, 2515 and 25-10 loss. And though it wasn't a three-game sweep, the Lady Red Devils'3-1 loss at Fort Meade was as disappointing as one would have been. Heading into the match at 6-3 in district play, Avon Park had sole possession of third place with hopes to still move up, with a match against district-leading McKeel next week. But the Lady Miners stepped up and perhaps caught the Devils looking a bit too far ahead. "There was a lot of net action and they have some tall girls," head coach Stephanie Devlin said. "Setting is a big focus for us now looking forward to districts. We have to be more consistent. We had many hits, but not a lot of kil ls. We need to find the holes o n the court more." Avon Park hos ts Mulberry Tuesday befo re McKeel comes to tow n Thursday. Sebring welcom es Osceola Tuesday and Rid ge Thursday to complete the ir district schedule whi le SFCC travels to S t. Petersburg Tuesday an d hosts Polk State Colle ge Thursday. Continued from 1B VBall teams thumped Thursday

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Page 4BNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.com 1Amar'e Stoudemire, New York Knicks:Signing a huge contract with any New York team invites scrutiny Stoudemire never experienced in Phoenix. The Knicks are betting big that Stoudemire's past knee and eye ailments don't portend more and greater health problems.2David Lee, Golden State Warriors:Point guard Stephen Curry is thrilled to be hooking up with Lee in screen-and-roll plays for years to come.3Carlos Boozer, Chicago Bulls:Sure, he was a consolation prize in this special freeagent class. But he's also a great fit with center Joakim Noah, more of a rebounder/effort guy than a post-up player.4Kirk Hinrich, Washington Wizards:Chicago's urgency to dump payroll meant the Wizards got Hinrich for little more than salary-cap space. His experience, versatility and willingness to play off the bench makes him a pro's pro.5Tiago Splitter, San Antonio Spurs:The 25-year-old Brazilian finally comes to the NBA, just in time to help hold open the championship window on the Tim Duncan-Tony Parker1Kobe Bryant seems indestructible:Have you seen that mangled finger, and how little it affects Bryant's shooting? Hockey players have nothing on Bryant when it comes to toughness.2Bryant isn't quite so selfabsorbed:Much as Bryant emulated Michael Jordan early in his career, it took him years to understand being vested in teammates'success. Jordan made sure other Bulls saw the ball enough that they'd be ready to take a big shot. Bryant is finally getting that he can't do it by himself.3Pau Gasol might be the NBA's smartest player:He was a pre-med student in Spain and you can see that mental sophistication in the way he plays. It's not easy living in Kobe's orbit, but Gasol makes it look that way.4Ron Artest appears under control:He'll always be flaky and potentially volatile. But much as Jordan and Scottie Pippen kept Dennis Rodman in line with the Bulls, there are strong enough personalities around the Lakers to manage Artest's quirks another season.5This could be it for Phil Jackson:The travel is tough on Jackson's ailing joints. If this is his last season as coach, Jackson will be that much more willing to get into his players' Alook at the major story lines as the NBAapproaches tipoffgnore the rumors: The NBAnever seriously considered contracting the other 28 franchises to guarantee a Miami Heat-Los Angeles Lakers final. By mid-June the Heat's nine-figure experiment can LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh live in each other's orbits will have stretched across about 50 national television appearances. Contrary to the media crush the Heat moved training camp to a military base on the Florida Panhandle in search of sanity there are numerous other story lines this season: Can the Lakers repeat in what figures to be coach Phil Jackson's last go-around? Did the Bulls, Knicks and Nets actually help themselves in free-agency, or was all that salary-dumping for naught? Can Gilbert Arenas get his act together after an absurd incident involving handguns in Washington's locker room? How do Cleveland and Toronto bounce back from losing their best players ever? Here's a look at questions large and small concerning the upcoming season. 1John Wall, Washington Wizards:Defender can't hand-check a ballhandler anymore without fouling, and that means point guard Wall's changeof-direction, explosion to the basket and court vision will be a huge weapon, much as it's been for Chicago's Derrick Rose.2DeMarcus Cousins, Sacramento Kings:He did himself no favors with poor conditioning leading up to the draft, which dropped in to fifth. The Kings believe they got a steal at that spot, in a lowpost scorer with true-center size. 3Evan Turner, Philadelphia 76ers:Based on his performance at Ohio State and his mature presence in interviews, Turner looked as ready for the NBAas any rookie. But he underwhelmed with the Sixers'summer-league team in Orlando.4Greivis Vasquez, Memphis Grizzlies:The flair he played with at Maryland suggests a guy who'll figure out how to compete at any level.5Hassan Whiteside, Sacramento Kings:He averaged 5.4 blocks and 8.9 rebounds in his single season at Marshall. If he keeps channeling Marcus Camby, he'll be a second-round coup.1Darren Collison, Indiana Pacers:The former UCLA star was still there for New Orleans with the 21st pick in 2009. Chris Paul's injuries the second half of last season thrust Collison into the starting lineup, and he was so good, so fast, the Hornets traded him to Indiana to address other needs.2Wesley Matthews, Portland Trail Blazers:Matthews wasn't even drafted out of Marquette. But he was so good as a Utah Jazz rookie (9.4 ppg., 48 percent from the field, 38 percent from 3point range) that the shooting guard received a 5year, $33 million contract from Portland.3Wilson Chandler, New York Knicks:He has the skills at 6 feet 8 inches to play shooting guard, which creates all sorts of matchup problems for the opposing team.4Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors: Between his shooting range and stop-and-go handle, Curry is a scary point guard in an age when handcheck defense has been outlawed.5J.J. Redick, Orlando Magic:Redick worked hard on his conditioning and strength, and he's particularly effective spreading the floor around All-Star center Dwight Howard.1No counter-measure to Dwight Howard:For all the Heat's newfound firepower, Miami still has no true counter-measure for Orlando's Howard, the NBA's best center. Chris Bosh is gifted, but he's not that rugged big man you need to knock Howard off the low block.2This isn't a fantasy league:Real teams are a blend of people, not a compilation of statistics. We still don't know how Dwyane Wade, LeBron James and Bosh will adapt to touching the ball less. They're not selfish players, but each is used to being his team's first option.3Attention equals pressure and distraction:Why do you think the Heat sequestered themselves at a Panhandle military base for training camp? The curiosity about this team is sure to mean media overdose. Plus, the Heat will get the opposing teams'best effort every game.4What if somebody gets hurt?The expenditures it took to acquire James and Bosh and re-sign Wade make this as top-heavy a payroll as any in NBAhistory. There's not much depth should one of the stars go down for a lengthy period.5Don't forget those guys in L.A.:The defending-champion Lakers have two first-ballot Hall-of-Famers in shooting guard Kobe Bryant and coach Phil Jackson, plus a highlyskilled, brilliant big man in Pau Gasol.BYRICKBONNELLMcClatchy NewspapersALDIAZ/MIAMI HERALD/MCTThe Miami Heat's signing of free agents Chris Bosh, left, Dwyane Wade, center, and LeBron James, right, made headlines in July. WALLYSKALIJ/LOS ANGELES TIMES/MCTThe Los Angeles Lakers'Pau Gasol, left, fights to put up a shot against the Boston Celtics'Rasheed Wallace in Game 3 of the 2010 NBA Finals.BRYAN PATRICK/SACRAMENTO BEE/MCTAmar'e Stoudemire, left, battles for a loose ball with the Sacramento Kings'Beno Udrih, right, during a January 2010 game. Greivis Vasquez Darren Collison MARK HOFFMAN/MILWAUKEE JOURNALSENTINEL/MCTKobe Bryant and the Los Angeles Lakers have won back-to-back NBA championships and are strong favorites to win again.WALLYSKALIJ/ LOS ANGELES TIMES/MCT CHUCK LIDDY/ RALEIGH NEWS & OBSERVER/MCT The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010Page 5B Register NOW and Save 11th Annual Sebring Meals on Wheels Golf Scramble held at the on Saturday, November 6, 2010 Participants can register in advance and save money! Field limited to amateur golfers only. The entry fee is $5500 per person or $22000 for a foursome, if paid by October 31, 2010. After that date, the entry fee is $6000 per person or $24000for a foursome. The entry fee includes continental breakfast, golf and cart, lunch, a golf shirt and prizes.The “eld is limited to 144 golfers, so call the Sebring Meals on Wheels of“ce at 863-402-1818 to register. Deadline for all entries is November 5, 2010. Its not too late to become a Corporate Sponsor … CALL TODAY!Sebring Meals on Wheels, Inc. is a volunteer, non-pro“t 501-C-3 organization that raises all of its funds through donations with no government funding. HARDERHALLCOUNTRYCLUB HOLE IN ONE SPONSOR mow@strato.net ROOFING SPECIALIST SERVING HIGHLANDS COUNTY SINCE 1989 Shingles Flat Roofs Roof Repairs Mobile Home Roofovers -FULLYLICENSED & INSURED385-4690State Lic # RC 0066817 QUALITY WORK AT A REASONABLE PRICE FREEESTIMATES of hand again. Deputy D. Lightsey said the Sheriff's Department normally has five law enforcement officials at games but six were present Friday. Deputy Shannon Purvis said the scuttlebutt around both high and elementary schools was that fights were expected. "Even my fifth graders were saying Yeah, there's going to be a fight tonight'," Purvis said. "Usually the stands don't fill up until halftime, but they're full early tonight." Sebring travels to Winter Haven's Denison Stadium on Friday, Oct. 15, while Lake Wales will host Tenoroc. Winter Haven (4-1, 2-0) had a bye this week. The Blue Devils lost in the regional quarterfinals last year and their only defeat this season was a close 24-14 loss to 5Apowerhouse Lakeland in week two. Since then the Blue Devils have dominated their opponents. "We just have to come back next week and be read y to win," said Grubb. "T he season's not over. We st ill want to make the play of fs and hopefully get to pl ay Lake Wales again. "We didn't execute t he way we planned. We kne w they were a good footba ll team, we just made mo re mistakes than they did. W e still praise God." Winter Haven will have a go at the defending distri ct champs at Lake Wales'hom e field the following week, o n Oct. 22. Continued from 1B News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHN E Donovan White would connect on a 20-yard field goal to open the scoring Friday night, but that would be all the Blue Streaks would muster in the 37-3 loss to Lake Wales. Sebring mistakes prove costly CHRIS JENKINS Associated PressMILWAUKEE While b aseball is still refusing to f ully embrace video replay, a nother sport with balls and s trikes is getting on board. T he Professional Bowlers A ssociation will begin using r eplay to resolve disputed c alls. For competitors who v alue pinpoint accuracy, it's a move that's right up their a lley. "Everybody wants to win, b ut nobody wants to win by a n unfairly judged call," s aid PBAHall of Famer P arker Bohn III, who was i nvolved in a controversy o ver the impromptu use of r eplay during an event in 1 999 that led to players voti ng it out of the sport. The introduction of r eplay on a permanent basis i sn't expected to be a major c hange for bowling because o fficials don't anticipate m any situations where r eviews will be needed. There have been only a h andful of disputes in recent m emory that might have w arranted a second look. One area is foul line i nfractions, when a bowler's f oot slips past the line that m arks the beginning of the l ane as he delivers the ball. There also can be issues if a pinsetting machine knocks o ver a pin, which isn't supp osed to count. "It doesn't happen often," s ays PBAvice president and t our director Kirk von K rueger. "But it does happ en." Those calls currently are made by officials, along with an electronic eye that helps determine fouls. Now they'll be subject to video review at the tournament director's discretion, although only at events being covered by television. Players voted replay out in 1999, after officials used a replay on the spot to rule that Bohn committed a foul in a match against Pete Weber. Bohn was unhappy with use of replay in that situation but he's in favor of it today, and so are fellow bowlers. The measure will go into use when the season starts later this month. "It really helps make a decision cut and dried," Bohn said. "And that's what really matters." The move puts the PBA Tour in line with other sports where replay is an accepted fact of life. Major League Baseball began trying replay on a limited basis in late 2008, using it only to review potential home runs. By that point, most other major sports employed some form of video review. Now some in baseball are calling for expanded use of instant replay after umpires missed several calls in the divisional playoffs this week. After Rays manager Joe Maddon argued a close call and got ejected Thursday, fans chanted, "Replay! Replay!" "I believe it speaks to the point of the fact that you're (going) to see more discussions and eventually the implementation of more instant replay in our game," Maddon said. It's here now in bowling. And while the use of replay review will be the tournament director's decision, von Krueger said bowlers can lobby for reviews even if they don't have little red flags to toss, like in the NFL. "Aplayer could actually contest it, (saying) Hey, he fouled, and the official didn't catch it,'" von Krueger said. An unseen foul was the critical issue in the title match of an event in Austin, Texas in 1999, when Bohn appeared to foul on a spare attempt against Weber. Von Krueger was tournament director at the time and reviewed instant replay of the shot during the next commercial break, ruled that Bohn had fouled and negated the spare. Bohn said he was livid because the call was made well after play continued. "I pretty much blew my gasket at that point," Bohn said. In the wake of the controversy, PBAplayers voted against any future use of instant replay. Now it's back, and Bohn is fully on board. "It's really not a major difference for us," Bohn said. "It's an enhancement to make sure the correct call is made" Amid baseball blunders, even PBA turns to replay b oth sides of the ball, forced P anther quarterback M alcome Sanders'only i nterception, returning it 25 y ards to set up the Devils n ext touchdown before the h alf ended. ARyan Dick to Alonzo R obertson connection for 22 y ards put the Big Red o ffense out in front 13-0. Mulberry's lone touchd own came on a fluke play a t the end of the half when S anders connected with N icholas Cain at the eight. Cain was hit while trying t o turn towards the goal by A von Park's Charlie Brown, a nd the ball came loose. After several Red Devils a ttempted to recover, P anther Edward King fell on i t in the end zone, putting s ix on the board for M ulberry, who missed the p oint after. Mulberry went to an air a ttack after that success; S anders threw 21 attempts, b ut was only able to connect e ight times for 85 yards. Dick and Robertson could n ot seem to connect consist ently, and Bonjokian turned t o his ground offense to fini sh out the game, using J ohnson to eat up the clock i n the second half. The Devils scored quickl y in the third from a 12y ard jaunt by Johnson to p rovide for the final margin. Penalties seemed to hurt b oth teams in the second h alf, at one pint a zebra had t o throw his hat because he w as out of yellow hankies, and that seemed to bother Bonjokian some. "We had way too many penalties tonight. We were talking, and we were not focusing. They penalties often came at critical times, when we could have put them away, and that could have cost us the game. We will fix that problem this week," Bonjokian promised. The Devils play Fort Meade next week, and though it is not a district game, it is still important according to Bonjokian. "It is super important that we play our assignments and get better this week," he said. "Fort Meade is always a tough team, and if we are going to win we will have to stay focused. We did not do that tonight." Continued from 1B AP now 2-0 in district play News-Sun photo by BETH BALDRIDGE Alonzo Robertson hauls in this pass as he crosses the goal line for an Avon Park score.

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T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sun on any c hanges in this listing by calling 3 85-6155, ext. 516; send any c hanges by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com; or mail t hem to News-Sun Community C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 L ake Placid has lounge hours f rom 1-9 p.m. Live music is f rom 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p .m. Members and guests only. P ost is at 528 N. Pine St., S ebring. Call 471-1448. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2 661 lounge is open from 1-7 p .m. Card games start at 1:30 p .m. The lodge is open to m embers and their guests. For d etails, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has k araoke in the pavilion. H orseshoes played at 9:30 a .m. Food available at 4 p.m. O pen to members and qualified g uests only. Overeaters Anonymous, m eets from 4-5 p.m. in second f loor conference roomNo. 3 at F lorida Hospital Heartland M edical Center, 4200 Sun N L ake Blvd., Sebring. For d etails, call 382-7731. No dues, f ees or weigh-ins. For details o n the organization, go to w ww.oa.org Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves lunch at 2 p.m. at the c lub, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. F or details, call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 o ffers NASCAR racing in the p avilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open a nd kitchen open from 2-5 p.m. L odge is at 11675 U.S. 98, S ebring. Call 655-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 3880 serves hamburgers f rom 4-5:30 p.m. and plays p oker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1 224 County Road 621 East, L ake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 plays euchre at 1:30 p .m. and E&J Karaoke is from 4 :30-7:30 p.m. at the post, 2 011 SE Lakeview Drive, S ebring. For details, call 3858 902. MONDAY Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal C hurch, Lakeshore Drive, S ebring. For more details, call 3 85-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous O ne Day At ATime group m eets for a closed discussion a t 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant P resbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. For d etails, call 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 6:30 p.m. at R osewood Center, 517 U.S. 27 S outh, Lake Placid. Alzheimer's Association S upport Group meets at 2 p .m. at the Oaks of Avon, 1010 U .S. 27 North, AvonPark. For d etails, call 385-3444. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at S t. Agnes Episcopal Church, 6 60 NW Lakeview Drive, S ebring. For details, call 2020 647.. American Legion Post 74 S ons of Legion meet at 6 p.m. E xecutive board meets at 7 p .m. on second Monday at the p ost, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. H appy hour from 4-6 p.m. Post o pen noon-8 p.m. Call 4711 448. AmVets Bruce L. Simpson P ost 21 meets 6 p.m. second M onday, at the post, 2029 U.S. 2 7 South, Sebring, behind the A llstate building. For details, c all 385-0234. Avon Park Lakes A ssociation has shuffleboard a t 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. T he clubhouse is at 2714 N autilus Drive in Avon Park. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake P lacid. Bridge Club of Sebring ( American Contract Bridge C lub)plays duplicate games at 1 2:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf A ve., Sebring. For details, call 3 85-8118. Diabetes Insulin Pump S upport Group meets the seco nd Monday from 3-4:30 p.m. i n the Florida Hospital H eartland Division Diabetes C enter, 4023 Sun N Lake. Call 4 02-0177 for more information. Diabetes Support Group m eets the second and fourth Monday from 1-2:30 p.m. in Florida Hospital Conference Room 3 in Sebring. Call 4020177 for guest speaker list. Fairmount Mobile Estates Lunch Bunch meets at noon second Monday at Homer's Smorgasbord in Sebring. For details, call 382-0481. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets the second and fourth Monday at the Sebring Country Estates Civic Association clubhouse, 3240 Grand Prix Drive (down the street from Wal-Mart). Dancing will be held every month until April 2008. Classes are being started now in the Sebring and Lake Placid area. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or visit the Web site at www.samdun.net .Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 3148877. Heartland Riders Association meets at 6 p.m. second Monday at the Sebring Chamber of Commerce Welcome Center in Village Plaza (across from Sebring Gate Station). For details, call 402-1165. Highlands County Summer Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Debbie Forringer, director. Call 382-6821. Highlands County Homeowners Association meets the second Monday of each month at 9 a.m. at the Sebring Country Estates Clubhouse at 3240 Grand Prix Drive in Sebring. Highlands County Parkinson's Support Group meets at 1 p.m. second Monday at the Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring. For details, call 4536589 or 452-2053. Highlands County Rotary Club meets at 6 p.m. at Charlie's Restaurant, Commerce Street, Sebring. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County Agri-Civic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. For details, call 4026540. Highlands Sertoma Club meets at noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. Highlands County Senior Squadron, Civil Air Patrol the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary meets the second and fourth Monday nights at the Sebring Airport Terminal Building. All are welcome. For further information, call 471-1433 between 4 and 7 p.m. Highlands Woodcarvers Club meets at 6 p.m. second Monday at Highlands Art League, 351 W. Center Ave., Sebring. For more details, call Sandy Kohan at 414-1363 or Norm Pelland at 465-5510. Hope Hospice free grief support group meets at 2 p.m. at Union Congregational Church, 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Insulin Pump Support Group meets from 3-4:30 p.m. the second Monday of every month in conference Room 3 of Florida Hospital. This group is open to all insulin pump wearers, their families and anyone who is interested in knowing more about insulin pumps. Preregistration is not required. For information, call 402-0177. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. For details, call 4652661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Cards start at 4 p.m. Music outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. Lodge phone number 4520579. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 12-4:30 p.m. second and fourth Monday in Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. No meetings from end of May to October. For details, call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Brady's, Sebring. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. Smoke-free environment. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. Call 471-2522. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 plays Texas Hold em at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Monday at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing. For details, call 655-3920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. For details, call Judy O'Boyle at 260-0831. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Woman's Club of Sebring meets at noon on the second Monday for lunch, from October throughMay, at the clubhouse, 4260 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-7268. TUESDAY Aging Advocacy Council meets the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Nu-Hope Conference Room at 11:30 a.m. for a brown bag lunch with the meeting starting at noon. Contact Debbie Slade at 3822134 Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parking available south of old church. American Ex-POW Highlands County Chapter, meets 6 p.m. Call Ted Biever, 382-3285, for meeting place. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For details, call 4657940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. AmVets Post 21 plays darts from 5-8 p.m. for members and guests. For details, call 3850234. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. For details, call 452-2385. Avon Park Lakes Association has Women's Salad Bar at noon on the second Tuesday of each month. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. Avon Park Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Avon Park Lions Club meets 6:45 p.m., dinner, Lions Club, 1218 W. Bell St., Avon Park. Beta Sigma Phi, Xi Nu Sigma Chapter of Avon Park, meets the second and fourth Tuesday each month in the members home. Call president Mary Joinerr at 382-4488 or vice president Linda Webster at 385-1124. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. Everyone is welcome. For more details, call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at "The Rock," Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost selfesteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. For details, contact Celebrate Recovery coordinator Pam Sim by calling 453-3345, ext. 106. The Computer Club at Buttonwood Bay meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month November through March. We invite anyone interested in expanding their computer knowledge to attend the Buttonwood Bay Bytes Computer Club meeting. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For more details, call 385-3288. Happy Paws Dog Obedience Club Inc. meets at 7 p.m. second Tuesday at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Obedience classes are available. All welcome. Call 471-9778. Heartland Dog Club Inc. of Florida meets at 6:30 p.m. second Tuesday at Homer's Buffet, Sebring. Obedience classes (all breeds) are held on Wednesday evenings at Sun N Lake Elementary School. Canine Good Citizen and Therapy Dog testing available. AKC-pointed shows held annually in April. Call 385-7474 or 385-7803 or visit www.HeartalndDogClubFlorida. org Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 4712294 or 386-5098. Heartland Symphony Orchestra rehearsals from 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesdays in the Green Room in the South Florida Community College auditorium building. Bring music and instruments. New members welcome. Call conductor Bryan Johnson at 800949-7248, ext. 7231. Highlands County Parkinson's Support Group meets at 1 p.m. second Tuesday at the Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring. For details, 453-6589 or 452-2053. Highlands Gem and Mineral Club meets 7 p.m., second Tuesday, Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring. Club does not meet in July, August or September. For details, call 453-7054. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Knights of Columbus Council 5441 meets 8 p.m. every second and fourth Tuesday at Knights of Columbus Hall, 900 U.S. 27 N., Sebring. For details, call 3850987. Knights of Columbus Council 5441 Auxiliary meets 8 p.m. every second Tuesday at Knights of Columbus Hall, 900 U.S. 27 N., Sebring. For details, call 385-0987. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Lions Club meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday each month at Herons Garden, 501 US 27 North, Lake Placid. Call Jeanne at 6990743. Lake Placid Moose has a general meeting and a Moose Legion meeting at 7:30 p.m. the second Tuesday at the lodge. Lake Placid Veterans of Foreign Wars LadiesAuxiliary 3880 meets 10 a.m. second Tuesday at 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Multiple Sclerosis Support Group meets at 7 p.m. second Tuesday at Highlands Regional Medical Center second floor class room. Friends and family are welcome. For details, call Janet Turvey at 465-3138. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventhday Adventist Church, 1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup.co m. For details, call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org for more information on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. For details, call 4654888. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near the library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-3829 or 471-9900. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If interested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sig n in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:3 0 p.m. No experience necessary Cost is $2. Smoke-free enviro nment. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Lions Club meets at noon at the clubhouse, 340 0 Sebring Parkway, Sebring. Bingo at 6 p.m. Doors open at 4 p.m. Sebring Moose Lodge 225 9 serves soft shell tacos 5-7 p.m at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Be ef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing. Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. For details, call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dee's Restaurant, Sebring. For details, call Scott Albritton at 402-1819. Sons of Amvets meet at 2029 U.S. 27 South, Sebring for a general meeting at 7 p.m on the second Tuesday of every month. All sons are welcome. Toby's Clown Alley meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday at the American Legion in Lak e Placid. For details, call M.K. Hall at 699-5369. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 67 p.m. at the Atonement Luthera n Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Community Bible Church, 1400 CR-17AN ., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. For details, call 452-1093 Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. The ladies au xiliary meets at 10 a.m. every second Tuesday. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 has a card tournament at 2 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 3858902. Page 6BNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.com COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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Breakfasts and lunches being served in the Highlands County School District for the upcoming week of Oct. 11-15 (no school on Monday) include: HIGH SCHOOLS Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, salsa, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, fruit cocktail cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Roasted chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, cocoa clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, carrots and dip, corn cobbettes, diced pears, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, broccoli, potato wedges, Colby Jack cheese stick, salsa, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, fruit cocktail cup, assorted juices, assorted fresh fruit, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Chicken tenders, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, chicken patty on bun, PBJ sandwich meal, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, chef salad meal, baked french fries, carrots and dip, corn, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookies, diced peaches, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ACADEMY SCHOOLS Tuesday Lunch Roasted chicken, dinner roll, mashed potatoes, green beans, cocoa clodhoppers, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, baked buffalo chips, corn cobbettes, strawberry cup, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, broccoli, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Lunch Cheeseburger, dill stack, Sun Chips, fresh apple slices, chocolate chip cookie, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, salsa, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadsticks, fruit cocktail cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Roasted chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, cocoa clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Breakfast pizza, assorted juices, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, carrots and dip, corn cobbettes, diced pears, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, broccoli, potato wedges, Colby Jack cheese stick, salsa, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. F Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, fruit cocktail cup, assorted juices, assorted fresh fruit, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, burger, cheeseburger, chicken tenders, dinner roll, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, chef salad plate, PBJ sandwich meal, carrots and dip, corn, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, diced peaches, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Tuesday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, fruit cocktail cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Blueberry/sausage pancake, mixed fruit cup, chocolate milk, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Honey, peach cup. Lunch Barbecue pork on bun, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, ham chef salad, scalloped potatoes, baked beans, rosy applesauce, very berry juice bar, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Honey, peach cup, chocolate milk, blueberry/sausage pancake, mixed fruit cup. Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, orange glazed carrots, tossed salad, cocoa clodhoppers, fresh apple slices, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Breakfast frittata, grape juice, chocolate milk, strawberry banana yogurt, honey bear crackers, apple juice. Lunch Cheeseburger, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, dill stack, potato puffs, carrots and dip, fruited Jell-O, very berry juice bar, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, fruit cocktail cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Strawberry banana yogurt, honey bear crackers, apple juice, chocolate milk, breakfast frittata, grape juice. Lunch Cheese filled breadstick, marinara sauce, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, mixed vegetables, ice cream sandwich, diced peaches, fresh apple slices, apple juice, grape juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. KINDERGARTEN LEARNING CENTER Tuesday Lunch Barbecue pork on bun, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, scalloped potatoes, baked beans, rosy applesauce, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, orange glazed carrots, cocoa clodhoppers, fresh apple slices, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch Cheeseburger, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, potato puffs, carrots and dip, fruited Jell-O, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Lunch Cheese filled breadstick, marinara sauce, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, mixed vegetables, ice cream sandwich, diced peaches, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010Page 7B THINK YOUR HOME WONT SELL? THINK AGAIN!We buy houses in your area! Call us now and sell your home today! Or ask your Realtor to give us a call.863-385-3101 Witford Reid M.D.Board Certified Anesthesiologist in Pain Management863-385-9333 Sebring Pain Management And Rehabilitation Center, Inc. 9 Ryant Blvd. Westshore Plaza, Sebring(1 Mile South of Lakeshore Mall on the Right)The ONLY JACHO ACCREDITEDPain Management Unit in Highlands CountySPECIALIZING IN:€ Back Pain € Auto Accidents € Neck Pain € Work Related Injuries VOTED 2009 Doctor of the Year A NIGHT OF BROADWAYA reprise of the performances from the Zenon Awards, songs from the Great White Way are performed in a concert setting. From classics to new works, celebrate the American tradition of musical theatre. Tickets $20. This is a fundraiser to raise money for repairs and maintenance.October 15 … 17, 2010OKLAHOMA!November 5 … 21, 2010HARVEYJanuary 14 … 30, 2011THE WEDDING SINGERMarch 25 … April 10, 2011LITTLE WOMENJune 3 … 19, 2011THE SECRET GARDENAugust 19 … September 4, 2011 Season Tickets Now Available Sponsorship Opportunities Are Available863-382-2525356 W. Center Ave € Sebringwww.highlandslittletheatre.org AVON PARK 452-5800 € SEBRING 382-3363 LAKE PLACID 465-1530Its more than just carpet The cleaning of the second piece must be of equal or lesser value to the first service price.Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 ft. and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Not valid with any other coupon. Expires 10/31/10.Emergency Water Damage Restoration3 ROOMS CARPET CLEANEDA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 10/31/10.$95002 ROOMS CARPET CLEANEDA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 10/31/10.$7500 ƒit s our conference room.UPHOLSTERY: CLEAN ONE PIECE OF UPHOLSTERY AT REGULAR PRICE AND RECEIVE A SECOND PIECE1/2 OFF SCHOOLMENUS

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Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South F lorida Community College C ommunity Education is o ffering new classes this fall a t the Highlands Campus, A von Park. Aquabics is a moderately p aced aerobic water exercise c lass. Aquacize is a water e xercise class for people with a rthritis and is sanctioned by t he Arthritis Foundation. C ontact the SFCC C ommunity Education d epartment for detailed days a nd times of these classes. Work out on state-of-thea rt, 10-station Nautilus e quipment in the Nautilus c lass. Afitness instructor will d esign a program with the s tudent's goals in mind. The c lass meets 5:30-6:30 p.m. or 6 :30-7:30 p.m. Monday and W ednesday, Oct. 18-Dec. 15, a nd the cost is $47 for each s ix-week session. Basic American Sign L anguage will teach students h ow to begin communicating w ith hearing impaired and d eaf family and friends. The c lass meets 3:15-5:15 p.m. O ct. 19-Dec. 14. The cost is $ 79. Basic Home Computer II w ill teach students how to c opy files and folders, use d esktop cleanup wizard, surf t he Internet, text layout, and e xamine automatic updates. The class meets 5:30-7:30 p.m. Mondays, Oct. 18-Dec. 6. The cost is $90 and includes a book. In Conversational Spanish, students will learn the fundamentals of speaking and understanding Spanish. The class meets 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Oct. 21-Dec. 16. The cost is $71. Digital Photography I will cover the element of light, history of the camera, patterns, and shapes. Bring a camera and enjoy the beauty of photography. The class meets Tuesdays, Oct. 19Dec. 7. The cost is $71. Digital Photography II takes digital photography to the next level. The class will cover lighting, composition, and lenses in length. The class meets 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Oct. 21-Dec. 16. The cost is $71. Register in Building B at the Highlands Campus or any SFCC campus or center. For more information, contact Lauren Redick in the SFCC Community Education Department at 453-6661, 465-5300, 773-2252, or 4947500, ext. 7388 or 7392. Page 8BNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.com CHALKTALK Courtesy photo Members of overall chapter winner Sebring High School FFA are (kneeling) Elton Gargano and (from left) Matthew Pettit, Taylor Crutchfield, Carlee Hill, Kari Ast, Brittany Palmerton, Kelby Mahoney, Ashley Palmer, Tara O'Berry Megan Stein, Lauren Welborn and Tia Goss. Special to the News-SunSEBRING On Saturday, O ct. 2, the Sebring Senior F FAhosted the annual PeaceR idge Federation contest. Tia G oss, Federation President f rom Sebring, emceed the e vent. The events were: P repared Public Speaking, E xtemporaneous Speaking, C reed, Opening & Closing C eremonies, Quiz Bowl and T ractor Driving. The following chapters w ere in attendance: Sebring S enior (SHS), Avon Park S enior (APHS), Avon Park M iddle (APMS), Hill-Gustat M iddle (HGMS) Lake Placid M iddle (LPMS) and Sebring M iddle (SMS). Winners were: Prepared Public S peaking: Megan Stein ( SHS), Calago Hipps ( APHS), Taylor Shoemaker ( HGMS). Extemporaneous Speaking: Charlie Brown (APHS), Megan Stein (SHS), Mariah Alvarez (HGMS). Creed: Jessica Belcher (HGMS), Kelby Mahoney (SHS), Angie Patino (APHS). Opening & Closing Ceremonies: SHS, HGMS, APMS. Quiz Bowl: APHS (Norma Badilla and Charlie Brown), HGMS (Teresa Ware and Jessica Belcher), SHS (Ashley Palmer and Tara O'Berry). Tractor Driving: APHS (Josh McClean), SHS (Matthew Pettit). Based on cumulative points Sebring Sr. was declared the overall chapter winner. In the business session Megan Stein of SHS was elected president for 201011. SHS wins Peace-Ridge FFA Federation Contests Special to the News-SunSEBRING T he School Advisory Counc il for Cracker Tra il Elementary will meet at 4 p.m., on Tuesday, Oct. 1 9 in the Media Center of Cracker Trail Elementar y. Mike Averyt, assista nt superintendent of bus iness operations, will be presenting informatio n regarding the class si ze amendment and the mi llage rate of .25, which a re on the November ballot Karen Ladinsky, liter acy curriculum resour ce teacher, will be di scussing the reading an d language arts as part of the School Improveme nt Plan. If you have a topic yo u want to place on t he agenda, call Laura Smi th at 471-5777 or e-mail at smithl2@Highlands.k1 2. fl.us. If you are a perso n with a disability wh o requires reasonab le accommodations in ord er to attend a school mee ting, call the school at 471-5777 three days in advance of the meeting If you speak a la nguage other than Englis h, a translator will be pr ovided for you. Cracker Trail SAC to meet Oct. 19 SFCC Community Education announces fall classes Did YouKNOW?In Florida, the bicycle is legally defined as a vehicle. Bicyclists using a public roadway are considered operators of motor vehicles and are responsible for observing all traffic laws. With few exceptions, there is only one road and it is up to motorists and bicyclists to treat each other with care and respect. Adherence to the law is the foundation of respect. Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010Page 9B EXPIRES 10-16-2010 www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and Sebring NO DEALER FEESAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644€LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644*PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE. NO DEALER FEES 2010 FORD RANGER $14,888 #TX127A $13,995 #DX043A $12,899 $23,559 #X0116 Only 3,000 Miles Immaculate3rd Row Seat2010 JEEP COMMANDER 4X4 2007 PONTIAC G6Well Equipped $13,889 V-6 Automatic Certified $17,997 Low Miles Automatic Extra Clean Leather Hemi Super Low Miles2006 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT 2008 KIA OPTIMA 2008 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING 2006 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 2007 DODGE DURANGO LIMITED 2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING TOURING CONVERTIBLE 2008 DODGE AVENGER SE 2008 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED X SPORT 2007 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4 $22,699$16,849$11,988$17,549$17,999$11,996 #TX076A #L0115A #CX125A #X0117 #X0127 #X0122 #CX089A #CX055A #CX112A1 Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Heartland Dog C lub of Florida announces a numb er of students as winners in their 2 010 Responsible Dog Ownership D ay contests. The Artist, P hotography, and Essays contests w ere each broken into four age g roups (Pre-K to grade 2, Grades 35 Middle Grades 6-8, and High S chool Grades 9-12). Prizes for the s tudents included gift cards, framed c ertificates, participation ribbons, a nd "goodie bags." Winners were: Photo Contest Grades 3-5 first p lace, Haylee Brunner, Cracker Trail Elementary School. Grades 68 first place, Shawn Turner, Avon Park Middle School; second place, Tiffany Crosson, APMS; third place, Heather Rose Reschke, APMS. Honorable Mention Victoria Perry, Jose Ramirez and Jeremy Aherns, all APMS students. Grades 9-12 first place, William Brunner, Sebring High School. Drawing Contest Grades Pre-K2 first place, Katherine Bubb, Kindergarten Learning Center; Grades 3-5 first place, Amy Schlosser, Avon Elementary School. Grades 6-8 first place, Julie Delgado; second place, Briauna Smith; third place, Cassidy Leighann Beers, all students at APMS. Honorable Mention Angel Leah Downing and Ryan Fountain, APMS students. Essay Contest "What is Responsible Dog Ownership?" or "Why I Am a Responsible Dog Owner" Grades 3-5 first place, Christopher Wolf, Sun N Lake Elementary School. Grades 6-8 first place, Kaley Terrell, Sebring Middle School. Grades 9-12 first place, Rachel Wolf, Sebring High School; second place, Rachael Henry, SHS. The Heartland Dog Club presented a special Outstanding Award to Christopher Wolf (SNL, fourth grade) for his imaginative and creative essay: What a Responsible Dog Owner Means To Me (....The Flea) "Responsible dog ownership really ticks'me off. How is a flea supposed to live when the dog's owner is always brushing him? Sometimes the dog's owner washes me right off the dog, right in the middle of my dinner! And when I try to hide in my dog's ear, t he owner takes him to the vet wh o cleans me right out of there. O ne nice thing about responsible do g ownership is that they keep the do g fat so at Thanksgiving time I ha ve plenty to eat. Sometimes that pesk y collar wakes me up on the wron g side of the bed. Life as a flea can be hard if you are trying to live on a dog with a responsible owner!" The Heartland Dog Club of Florida expresses a "thank you" to sponsors: Dr. Jim Waller, Citr us Animal Clinic and The Americ an Kennel Club, New York. Students win in Responsible Dog Ownership Day contests Courtesy phot os Winners in the Heartland Dog Club of Florida's 2010 Responsible Dog Ownership Day photo contest. CHALKTALK Courtesy photo Delta Kappa Gamma members at the Kindergarten Center w elcome new teacher Shannon Rivera. From left: Karen Howard, No'elle Stoll, Rivera, Elena Wirick-Velez, Carol W illard, and Laurie Stephen The local Gamma Alpha Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma, an organization of women educators, welcomed 32 new teachers to the teaching prof ession in Highlands County this September. The organization is pleased they have chosen local schools to begin or continue their careers. The purpose of the society is to honor women educators and to foster opportunities for prof essional growth and service in all fields of education. Delta Kappa Gamma welcomes 32 teachers The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Page 10BNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun that is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSun at 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. Crossroads Community Church 114 South Central Ave., Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 4534453. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship: 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday Children's Church: 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Adult Bible Study and Youth/Royal Explorers, 7 p.m. Pastor: John E. Dumas. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site, www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Children's Church; 4:30-7 p.m. Youth activities; 6 p.m. Vesper Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English, and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 4:45 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. children's choir rehearsals, youth activities and prayer meeting; 6:30 p.m. adult choir rehearsal; 7 p.m. children's mission groups; 8 p.m. Praise Team practice. Nursery provided for all services, except Sonshine House. LifeGroups (Bible studies) are offered on various days and times. Call 453-6681 for details. The 24/7 prayer line is (863) 452-1957. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Johnattan Solotero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. Friday schedule: 7 p.m., activities for adults, youth and children. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September to May our youth group meets. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. David Thomas, associate pastor music and senior adults; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastor Don Messenger. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Chuck Pausley, Youth Pastor; Ralph O. Burns, Assistant to the Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 6:30 p.m.; Youth Meeting for Teens, 6:30 p.m. Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Ed Howell, transitional pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 3823695 CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F., Pastor. Masses Saturday Vigil: 4 p.m. Sunday: 8 and 10:30 a.m. and noon Spanish Mass. Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon MondayFriday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confessions: 3-3:45 p.m. Saturdays, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first Friday, or by appointment. Enrollment for Catholic School grades K3 through 5 not being accepted. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; David Etherton, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Wednesday night meals, 5 p.m.; and Wednesday Bible Study, 6 p.m. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is "Jesus is First at First Christian Church." Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunda y Worship Service, 9 a.m.; Sunda y Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.; Sunda y Evening Service, 6 p.m .; Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP Folks that aren't from around here are always fascinated and sometimes horrified by the abundance of lizards we have in Florida. These m iniature dinosaur look-al ikes are common and quite u seful to our yards. Though m any may consider them a n uisance, having lizards in t he area reduces pest populat ions and indicates a healthy l andscape. There are about 10 native s pecies of lizards. U nfortunately, they are sadly o utnumbered by the invaders t hat have come here from o ther places. The problem w ith these visitors is that t hey eat the bugs, use the s pace and generally overtake t he natives. Of all the natives, perhaps t he green anole is the most c ommon. Most people know i t by the color changes from a bright green to a plain b rown color. This camouflagi ng technique helps them b lend in when predators approach or when they are going after prey. Often mistaken for the non-native chameleon, green anole's color change is the result of heat and sunlight. At lower temperatures, anoles remain dark; but once in the sun for a while, they turn bright green. The tiny creatures generally dwell in shrubs and trees. They are five to eight inches in length and the males display a bright pink dew lap, which is a flap of skin that expands out from the underside of the neck when it wants a date or is trying to drive off a competitor. The females lay eggs from spring to fall. They deposit their eggs about every two weeks in moist leaf litter or soft soil. The tiny one-quarter-inch, white eggs hatch in about five to seven weeks. Once grown, lizards live for about one year. Skinks are different in appearance than most lizards. The secretive southeastern five-lined skink is the native species in our county. They love the Florida climate and cannot tolerate cold weather. They can grow up to 9 inches long, are very shiny, have tiny arms and legs and their bodies are cylindrical. Often mistaken for snakes, they have beautiful, intricate, colorful patterns on their smooth bodies. Another snakelike characteristic is the flicking of their tongues. When skinks are young they appear dark blue to almost black with bright blue tails. Adults appear more brownish. The stripes on their streamlined bodies can range in color from light blue to yellow. They dig burrows to protect themselves and stay cool. They also have the ability to lose their tail when a predator grabs them, which allows them to escape. Males can be distinguished from females by observing their behavior. Males will run around with their mouths open toward another skink; if it attacks, it's a male; if it doesn't move or runs away, it's a female. The six-lined racerunner is a bit larger in size. They can grow up to 10 12 inches and six light-colored lines run down their sleek, dark bodies from head to tail. The difference between male and female is determined by the coloration on their underside. Males have light blue while females have white bellies. These lizards sport a tail that is twice the length of their bodies. They are generally found on the ground and they prefer dry habitats. They are extremely fast runners and have been clocked at speeds of 18 mph. Perhaps one of the most interesting of these mini reptiles is the Florida scrub lizard. These lizards are small, gray to gray-brown with spiny scales. The adults only grow to be about 5 inches long. Alarge brown stripe runs down each side of their bodies from the neck to the tail. As with the racerunner, the males have different coloration than the females. Males'undersides are marked with bright turquoise splotches on the sides of their bellies. They also have a black throat with small turquoise patches at the base. The females generally lack these bright colors on their bodies. Mating begins in February. Clutches of two to eight eggs are generally laid from April to August. Asingle female may lay eggs as many as five times in a season. The eggs take about 75 days to hatch. The young lizards reach maturity in about 10 months. As their name would indicate, the Florida scrub lizard lives nowhere else but in the sunshine state. They prefer dry upland scrubby areas as well as sandhill communities. They love the sun and need lots of open, sandy spaces. They are not particularly fond of climbing and are usually found foraging on the ground. They can be seen sunning themselves on logs or other objects such as fall en vegetation or rocks. They enjoy a diet of insects, spiders and other small arthropods. Whatever their variety, al l lizards are reptiles, meaning they are cold-blooded, lay eggs and are covered with scales. Some live in trees, others in burrows and some are ground loving. They are fascinating creatures and come in all sizes, colors and are equipped with some inte resting features. All lizards a re equipped with movable eyelids and external ear holes. Even though lizards may give some people the creeps or just be considered a nuisance, they are actually goo d to have around. All native lizards are harmless and non e has ever been known to attack a human! As far as pest control, a lizard is hard to beat. Watching the tiny prehistoric looking creature s can provide an interesting experience and provide the kids with hours of fun! Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District (www.highlandsswcd.org). Lizards sign of a healthy yard and hard to beat for controlling pests News From The Watershed Corine Burgess Courtesy photo Florida scrub lizards prefer the open, sandy spaces of the dry upland scrubby areas. They are not particularly fond of climbing and are usually found foraging on the ground. They can be seen sunning themselves on logs or other objects such as fallen vegetation or rocks.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010Page 11B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer .Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com The church is a t 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun 'N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid C ity" Children's Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, "prime-timers," and Bible s tudies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web at www.sebringg race.org INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. JEWISH Temple Israel of Highlands C ounty, 382-7744. Rabbi Lorraine R udenberg; www.templeisr aelofhcfl.org .Temple Israel is a R eform Temple that promotes the e nduring and fundamental princip les of Judaism. Through prayer, s tudy and friendship we strive to e nrich our lives and insure Jewish c ontinuity in Highlands County. F riday Evening Erev Shabbat S ervice, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday M orning Shabbat Minyon Service, 9 :30 a.m.; Saturday Morning Torah S tudy, 10:30 a.m.; Saturday A fternoon Shabbat Study, 3:30 p .m.; Havdallah, 5 p.m. On the foll owing dates: Oct. 1-2, Simchat T orah; Oct. 14-15, Oct. 29-30, Nov. 1 2-13, Nov. 26-27, Dec. 10-11, D ec. 24-25, Jan. 7-8, Jan. 21-22, F eb. 4-5, Feb. 18-19. Every T hursday will be Hebrew and Bible c lasses with Howard Salles, 12:304 :30 p.m. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Monday of month; Ladies Group WELCAmeets at noon second Monday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable Garden Club meets as needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Like to sing? Come join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see christlutheranavonpark.org Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Children's Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Anursery is provided for children up to 2 years old and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:30 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Youth group meets at 5 p.m. Friday. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3149195, lindadowning@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www. christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com Web site: www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net ; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Esther and Mary Circles business meeting, 3:30 p.m. third Thursday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 7 p.m. second Tuesday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday; Family Movie, 4 p.m. third Sunday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group, 6-7:30 p.m.; Senior High Youth Group, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gayle Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30 a.m.; and contemporary worship is at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.presbychurch.org. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 382-9092. Dale Bargar, bishop; David Ward, first counselor; and Steve Austin, second counselor. Family History Center: 3821822. Sunday services: Sacrament meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; and Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-1 p.m. Youth activities from 7-8:20 p.m. Wednesday: 11-year-old Scouts, 7-8:20 p.m. first and third Wednesday; and activity days for 8-11 year old boys and girls from 78:20 p.m. second and fourth Wednesday. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 5 p.m. Every fourth Thursday is Men's Fellowship, 6:30 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. Fo r more information, visit the Web si te www.salvationarmysebring.com o r call Captain Mary Holmes at 385 7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:55 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Summe r Schedule, Sunday School 9:0 0 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ear th link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on life's journey, you're we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP Metro ServicesAries (March 21-April 20) Aries, m aking an important decision might p rove difficult because your mind is raci ng. Until you can focus, there will be u nanswered questions. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, s teer clear of the path that seems the e asiest. It won't provide any satisfaction n or any of the answers you seek. Libra c an help lead the way on Tuesday. Gemini (May 22-June 21) There's a clash of personalities, Gemini, and y ou are caught right in the middle of the b attle. It could be tricky to come out u nscathed. But if anyone can do it, you c an. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Cancer, e xpect a few boring days ahead, which c an actually be a good thing for a person w ho has been run ragged lately. Take s ome time to unwind. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) You have to p inch a few pennies for the time being, L eo. Too many lavish expenses have left y ou a bit short. Buckle down to repleni sh the piggy bank. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo, relationship woes are nonexistent for a change. You and your partner are seeing eye-to-eye on just about everything, meaning smooth sailing for romance. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Libra, a siutation that seems too good to be true presents itself this week. Take advantage of the situation and enjoy your latest batch of good luck. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Scorpio, the coming week figures to be stressful. You simply have to hold yourself together until things can quiet down. Ask a friend for some support. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Sagittarius, make the most of time spent with a loved one because soon he or she won't be visiting as often. Make the most of the next few visits. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) Capricorn, people may view you one way while beneath the surface lies someone they would never expect. Keep others guessing; it's the key to your persona. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) Someone you love will need a little extra support in the days to come, Aquarius. See if you can spare some compassion and time for listening. It will be greatly appreciated. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Pisces, stop and smell the roses and revel in the little things. Moving too fast through life is no way to live. Enjoy yourself. Oct. 10 Bret Favre, Athlete, 41; Oct. 11 Emily Deschanel, actress, 34; Oct. 12 Hugh Jackman, actor, 42; Oct. 13 Marie Osmond, entertainer, 51; Oct. 14 Usher, singer, 31; Oct. 15 Sarah Ferguson, former duchess, 51; Oct. 16 John Mayer, singer, 33. Scorpio and Gemini, the coming week figures to be stressful CROSSWORDSOLUTION NEWS-SUN

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Page 12BNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.com Mon -Fri. 9am-4pmClosed Wed.863-385-3497130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, FL 33870 High performance features are intended to:€ Reduce listening effort and mental fatigue in noisy environments* € Virtually eliminate whistling or buzzing € Let you talk easily on the phone € Provide a comfortable fit, designed for your ear € Suit your lifestyle and budget with a variety of styles and technology levels I need to know the difference between Extra yardageŽ and Take out the garbage.Ž SENIORSCENE There are more than 100 restaurants listed in the Yellow Pages for Highlands County, but when we are in the North Sebring area my husband, who is almost a vegetarian, likes to go to Florida Hospital's cafeteria for lunch. (Not listed in the Highland's County Restaurant Guide Yellow Pages.) This day we had shopped. I was tired so I had visions of the courtesy van picking us up in the parking lot and riding us to the entrance of the cafeteria. There a wheelchair would be waiting so I could put my heavy purse on it and use it to hold onto like a walker. My vision came true and I proceeded to the food section where I parked the walker and took a tray. When I had made my selections I went to the coffee area and put the tray down clumsily. I groaned and awkwardly went to fill my cup. Akindly volunteer in her uniform gently took me around and asked if I was alright. Her touch was comforting and I felt as if I could melt in her arms. When I faced her I realized she was as old as I am and here I was "kvetching" (complaining only more so.) "How do you stand on your feet like that?" She was cleaning up the counter and setting the covers and stirrers to the cups in order. "It is only for four hours." We began to talk as women do. My food began to cool. I was leaning against the counter when the conversation got around to age and I said I'm as old as you are and I couldn't do a four-hour stint.'" "Oh I only do it two times a week, Monday and Thursday from 8 to 12, because I am 104." I nearly dropped my tray, but my writer's brain quickly revived me with the thought "this is a story." I forgot my lunch and stood talking to her. Grace Rutt told me she was born March 30, 1906. She is 104 (This was back in April. I procrastinate.) She has volunteered two times a week for the last nine years. Her husband died in 1998. They had five children but only four are living. The youngest is only 60 so she had her last child late in the childbearing years. She is in great health except for her memory, which is not as good as it used to be. (Nor is mine. How is yours?) Her hearing, she said, is off, but she had no problem hearing me and holding a full conversation. She misses reading but has fun shopping with her daughter, Hannah Eppel, with whom she lives. Hannah also volunteers in the hospital office. By this time, my feet hurt and my food was cold. We hugged and said goodbye. After lunch I went up to the volunteer office to speak with her daughter. Mrs. Eppel is the treasurer of the Florida Hospital Auxiliary Volunteers. When I mentioned Grace's name the whole office came to attention. Carole Seifer, director of volunteers, leaned over to comment, "She has volunteered 2,500 hours since she started in 1999." That means that to date, Sept. 20, 2010 she has logged in 2,064 hours. By the time this article comes out you can add eight hours a week from this date to date of publication. The office work stopped while other volunteers chimed in with bits of information about Grace. "She volunteers at the Seventh-day Adventist Church on Wednesday preparing food for people who cannot leave their homes." (I'll bet she delivers too!) This August she flew alo ne to Pennsylvania to visit h er two daughters there. And it was not the first time. It is almost a yearly event. In her earlier life she liv ed in Pennsylvania on a farm There were chickens an d cows and vegetables. S he was a housewife. One c an only imagine what a day w as like for a farm wife in t he olden days! Amazing Grace is an insp iration to all of us what dev otion to service and God c an do. I hope I get an invitatio n to her next birthday on Mar ch 30, 2011. Pearl Carter is a Lake Placid resident. E-mail her at time ly87@comcast.net Amazing Grace Courtesy phot o Grace Rutt, who turned 104 this year, is a familiar face around Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center. She volunteers two days a week at the hospital and has logged more than 2,000 volunteer hours. Pearl's Gem Pearl Carter With many losses of life a nd property, the Civil War l eft an indelible mark on t he lives of people who h omesteaded in small comm unities such as F ort Meade. After U nion soldiers b urnt down many f amily farms, l ives were devastated and m any homesteaders were f orced to relocate, includi ng the Skipper family. It m ust have been a formidab le challenge to uproot the l arge family to Orange C ounty, but they loaded t heir remaining possessions o n wagons to start over. After Fort Meade gradua lly rebuilt by 1871, the f amily returned to their h omestead. In wild Florida, tranquili ty was intermittent with n ew challenges, as ranche rs began to thrive with r ising cattle prices increasi ng their herds on the vast o pen ranges. The open r ange and higher cattle prices also created fertile ground for cattle rustlers. With no fence laws, the wide open territory was the next battle for ranchers as opportunists used any means to capture their herds. The Skippers, along with ranchers from five other counties, were continually victimized by violent assaults on their families and cattle. The rustlers altered and carved new brands on stolen cattle, many of them liquored up in violation of the law, and fighting any resistance. This period of lawlessness was called the DeSoto County "cattle wars," a violent time in Central Florida. However, ranchers did not remain passive and joined together to take the law into their own hands to protect their herds and families despite retribution Skippers: Sebring's historical pioneers Courtesy photo J ohn Skipper enjoys sharing stories of his family, pioneers of Highlands County and Central Florida. See CATTLE, page 13B The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Wild Florida Nancy Dale

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010Page 13B SENIORSCENE f rom rustlers. In 1896, Sara Sota V igilance, a secret group led b y cattleman James Newton H ollingsworth, organized a v igilante force to attack r ustlers. After a long and c ostly battle of lives, the catt le wars subsided and the f irst talk of ending open r ange by fencing pastures w as moving closer to reality. F ence laws were not passed u ntil many years later when r oads were built for automobiles as migration into Florida continued to expand. Afinal requiem to John Levi Skipper published in The Fort Meade Leader, noted, "He was a man of sturdy character, virile, and positive of a different political faith from most of his neighbors. Many of his decedents seem to have inherited the characters of their sturdy old ancestor." One of John L. Skipper's 10 grandchildren was Jonathan ("Jack") Skipper, the great-grandfather of John Skipper, who still works cattle at the Skipper Cattle Corporation in Lake Placid. John Skipper talks about his ancestors surrounded in his home by memorabilia from his heritage. Excerpts from upcoming book by Nancy Dale, The Florida Pioneer Cow Hunters' In Their Own Words.' To order personally inscribed books for gifts, visit www.nancydalephd.com or call 214-8351. Continued from page 12B Cattle wars were a way of life Howdy. Since this is my f irst regular piece for the S enior Scene I think that the f irst order of business should b e to introduce myself to y ou all. My full name is Woodrow S amuel Jackson. I inherited t he first part cause I was b orn in Woodrow Wilson's h eyday. The middle part was t o honor my grandpa, S amuel Meyers, a wellk nown Kentuckian of the g ood days, and the last was t he old family name we have c arried from way back when. The place of birth is listed a s Cincinnati, Ohio, but I r emember spending most of m y early years in the outs kirts of the city. I spent my s chool years in the town of N orwood, completely surr ounded by the city of C incinnati. We were a comp lete city (50,000 souls) w ith our own mayor, counc il, police force and school s ystem. I attended Norwood High S chool for three and a half y ears and was then forced to l eave school to take a job at A llis Chalmer plant to help s upport the family. I enlisted in the Army Air Corps shortly after Pearl Harbor and spent the next 14 years flying for the United States, first as an aerial gunner, then a bombadier, navigator and finally as a ferry and transport pilot. I flew 14 different airplanes that were assigned to the Air Force and traveled over 47 of the states and seven-eighths of the way around the world. I worked for the CAAand Ford Motor Company until a cutback in personnel gave me an early retirement and the opportunity to move to Florida. Afriend to a vacation to the Chiefland area and found a chance to buy some lots in a new development just out of town for $800 an acre $100 down and $80 a month. I grabbed two acres sight unseen and since my son had already moved to Florida and my daughter had married and moved away, we were free as birds. We lived in Chiefland until 1993 when my first wife passed away and I had to leave the area. I moved to Sebring and have lived here happily since then. Oh yes, I got married again and we have lived together for the last 12 years. So that's the guy who will be coming into your parlors for the next few years (I hope). Oh yes, I forgot to tell you that I am 92 years old. Still get around without a cane or walker. Have a word processor to play with and a copier that I have about worn out writing a book on my life to be given to my grandkids and their kids. So that's the story of my life and as time goes by other details of it will appear. Unless the newspaper cuts me off. See you next month. The good Lord willing and the creek don't rise. Woody Jackson is a Sebring resident who enjoys writing stories of days gone by. A happy life leads to Sebring Woody's Wisdom Woody Jackson Chronic diseases, like heart disease and d iabetes, are among the most common, costly a nd preventable of all health problems in the U .S., according to the Centers for Disease C ontrol and Prevention (CDC). Fortunately, h ealth screening tests are an easy way to d etect these conditions early, so you can prev ent symptoms from worsening. And, if y ou're diagnosed with a condition, regular t esting can help determine how well you're m anaging the disease. Knowing your healthy range is key. Strive f or these numbers: For total cholesterol, the CDC identifies h ealthy levels as below 200 mg/dL. When l evels reach 240 mg/dLor higher, you b ecome at high risk for heart disease. For blood pressure, look for anything l ess than 120 over less than 80 mmHg, says t he CDC. Levels above that indicate prehyp ertension, which can lead to chronic high b lood pressure. Blood glucose levels also should be c hecked if you are determined to be at risk for d iabetes. Risk factors for diabetes include: Age 45 or older Overweight Family history of the disease High blood pressure Abnormal cholesterol readings "Both high blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol levels increase your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes," says CVS Pharmacist Susan Gordon. "For people who've been diagnosed with diabetes, consistent blood glucose monitoring is critical to keeping diabetes in control and preventing further complications." According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the basic goal for people with diabetes is a reading between 70 and 130 on an empty stomach, and less than 180 two hours after the start of a meal. If your blood sugar is too high for too long, you could be at risk for long-term complications. Fortunately, at-home testing kits make it easier for people to know their healthy ranges, and some products are covered by insurance if you have to manage a chronic condition like diabetes. "There are dozens of brands and styles to choose from when it comes to at-home testing kits," adds Gordon. "Your doctor or pharmacist can help determine the one that's best for you. Your pharmacist also can identify ways to save on testing products, such as by using generic test strips." ARAcontent Is your health passing the test? Contact Usƒ By Phone (863) 385-6155 By Mail 2227 US Hwy 27S Sebring, FL 33870 By E-Mail www.newssun.com/contact/ Metro ServicesWhen you're younger, it seems you can't w ait until retirement. After all, who wants to d eal with going to work every day and coping w ith coworkers and a boss? However, many p eople overlook the opportunities for sociali zation that working provides. You get out of t he house and see people apart from your f amily with whom you can converse. M any retirees find that life can be a bit boring a fter the job ends, primarily because they d on't have access to the same level of sociali zation as they once did. Making friends can keep you active and h ealthy. If you're a bit rusty in the friendm aking department, it's pretty much how it w as when you were younger. You simply m ust find individuals who have similar intere sts and goals. Volunteer in your community and y ou're bound to find potential friends who are like-minded. Take classes at a college or university. Many offer free or discounted rates for seniors. This is a great way to meet people of all ages and walks of life. Attend clubs at senior centers or houses of worship. It's likely that there are plenty of other people looking for relationships. Think about your interests. If you like fishing, sewing or boating, join a club that caters to those interests. Others who share your hobbies will be there. If you're new to an area, host an openhouse party and invite neighbors in for introductions and some socialization. Join a social networking site online. You can connect with people, potentially individuals who live close by. Ask existing friends if they have other friends to whom they can introduce you. Making friends after retirement The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Time OutŽ 6-15 S-XW Bout TimeŽ 6-15 S-XW RelaxedŽ N,M,W SimplifyŽ 5 Colors S-XW HuggyŽ N,M,W Free TimeŽ 5 colors S-XWLadiesMens Clip to Save $10 OFF Low Factory Outlet PricesCoupon Required. Not Valid with Any Other Offer. Exp. 10-31-10 CUSTOMER APPRECIATION CUSTOMER APPRECIATION Week! Factory Outlet Prices PLUS SAVE an Extra $10 OFF!Ladies Sandals830 Cypress Gardens Blvd., € Winter Haven Southeast Plaza next to Publix € 299-3851Order by Phone! Toll Free 1-800-824-8864Hard To Find Sizes And Widths For Men And WomenŽNew Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:30-5:30, Saturday 9:30-5:001621 B Edgewood Dr. Lakeland € 688-8335Toll Free 1-888-688-8335 Order by Phone!LAKELANDComfortShoesHAVEN ComfortShoesIn Stock Only € Select Styles StrippyŽ (For Dress) Will Ship For $7 Toll Free 888-688-8335 Order by Phone! NEWARRIVAL TabbyŽ 3 Colors S-XW

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Special to the News-SunFROSTPROOF One of G ospel music's most popular q uartets, The Dixie Melody B oys, will be featured at the R amon Theater in Frostproof o n Saturday, October 23. The Q uartet will share their u nique, four-part harmony d uring an exciting event b eginning at 7 p.m. Since organizing over four d ecades ago, The Dixie M elody Boys have enjoyed m uch success, including a G rammy nomination and n umerous Fan Award nomin ations from The Singing N ews Magazine, Southern G ospel Music's leading fan a nd trade publication. Hit releases have flowed t heir way in bunches, includi ng recent releases such as I'll Be Living That Way," "I W on't Compromise," Welcome Home," "Antioch C hurch Choir" and "I'm One O f Them." The thrill and excitement o f performing experienced by e ach group member night a fter night is most evident at e ach concert. Their goal of d elivering a first-class perf ormance filled with excitem ent, energy and lots of great t raditional, Southern gospel music are traits which have been instilled in each member by group leader Ed O'Neal, a 45-year gospel music veteran, who was inducted into the Southern Gospel Music Association Hall of Fame in 2004. These characteristics, united with their desire to never compromise their responsibility to spread the Gospel through Southern Gospel Music in a professional manner have allowed The Dixie Melody Boys to firmly establish a place at the forefront of Southern Gospel Music. The group's energy and excitement, coupled with their exceptional vocal blend is appealing to audiences of all ages, creating an exciting evening of musical pleasure. This exciting musical event promises to be enjoyable for the entire family. To obtain additional information, call 863-528-1140 or visit www.spradlenpromotions.com. Page 14BNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010www.newssun.com Established 19311600 US 27 South € Avon Park Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home4001 Sebring Parkway Sebring, 385-0125 111 E. Circle St. Avon Park, 453-3101 Chris T.Nelson Craig M. Nelson Darin S. MacNeil W .W LUMBER CO. 465-3331Hwy. 27 S. Lake Placid"We're More Than Just Lumber" COMPLETE Building SuppliesPlease support the above businesses. They have made this page possible. Inspirational Thoughtsby Patricia Valentine THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502 Residential Commercial Mobile Homes"Small Enough to Know You Large Enough to Serve You"500 South Lake Avenue 382-8300 453-3019 THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502Romans 8:18-19,For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us.For the earnest expectation of the creature waiteth for the manifestation of the sons of God.ŽThat is a powerful scripture.There is a time coming when God will so posses His children that we will manifest His glory to the whole world.We all await the day that we become like Christ.It is waiting for the day we become Gods holy love revealed to a world that desperately needs that love.Suffering is part of the human experience.In life there will always be times of pain,sickness and misery.In a fallen world,theyre unavoidable.But that suffering, as the scripture reads,is nothing compared to the glory God has prepared for us.We have to share in Christs sufferings in order to share in His glory.As the song writer wrote the words,no cross,no crown. You can know with an assurance,the glory has always far eclipsed the suffering.Go back and read Ecclesiastes 3:1,To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven.Ž Seasons have a beginning and an end.No season last forever.You may be experiencing some pain today,but remember,the suffering we endure is nothing compared to the glory God has prepared for us.Be Blessed! Attend the Church of Your Choice! FOOD MANAGER CERTIFICATION CLASS & EXAM October 28, 2010 Residence Inn Marriott in Sebring 3221 Tubbs Rd. Class starts at 10:00AM-2:00PM No need to travel out of town! Seating limited! Call now for Registration!954-806-3055 ARTS& LEISURE Special to the News-SunThe internationally a cclaimed United States A rmy Field Band and S oldiers'Chorus of W ashington, DC, continues i ts long history of presenting f ree public performances w hen it appears at South F lorida Community C ollege's Theatre for the P erforming Arts at 7:30 p.m. o n Saturday, Oct. 30. As the premier touring m usical representative for the U nited States Army, the Field B and and Soldiers'Chorus t ravels thousands of miles e ach year throughout the n ation and abroad, keeping t he will of the American peop le behind the members of t he armed forces and supporti ng diplomatic efforts around t he world. Since its formation i n 1946, the Field Band has a ppeared in all 50 states and i n more than 30 countries on f our continents. Along with the Soldiers' C horus, which was founded i n 1957, this 65-member conc ert band presents a powerful a nd diverse program of marches, overtures, popular music, patriotic selections, and instrumental and vocal solos. Amusic critic for the Boston Globe called a Field Band performance "a cause to stand up and cheer." Past performance highlights include World War II 50th anniversary commemorations in the United States and Europe, presidential inaugural parades, the rededication of the Statue of Liberty, nationally televised broadcasts on Memorial Day and Independence Day, and the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City. Joint concerts with many of the nation’s leading orchestras, including the Boston Pops, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, and Cincinnati Pops, have received rave reviews. The Field Band's members, selected by highly competitive audition, represent some of the finest musical talent in America. More than five decades as the military's most traveled musicians have earned them the title, "The Musical Ambassadors of the Army." Alimited number of tickets are available. Tickets are free and distributed on a firstcome, first-served basis. The fastest and preferred method of obtaining tickets is online at www.armyfieldband. com/tickets. Tickets can also be requested by indicating the desired number (limit two) and mailing a self-addressed, return stamped envelope to SFCC Box Office, 600 W. College Drive, Avon Park, FL33825. These tickets are only available only by mail or online. U.S. Army Field Band and Soldiers' Chorus coming to SFCC Courtesy photo The United States Army Field Band and Soldiers' Chorus will perform at South Florida Community College's Theatre for the Performing Arts at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 30. Dixie Melody Boys to perform in Frostproof Oct. 23 Courtesy photo The Dixie Melody Boys. Special to the News-SunSEBRING Everyone will be able to laugh and dance their night away as Duffer's Sports Grille adds more entertainment to the Comedy Night on Saturday, Oct. 16. Three comedians will take to the stage at 8 p.m. and finish at 10 p.m. Billy Glades, an acoustic oneman band, will play country, rock and Top 40 music for dancing after the comedy show until 1 a.m. He is a local published singer and songwriter. The headline comedian will be Patrick Duax. His childhood memories, adult observations and old west character Whiskey Dick, provoke uncontrollable laughter and cheers from diverse audiences. Duax has been on the comedy circuit for more than 10 years delighting audiences from coast to coast. These performances have led to numerous appearances on cable television as a comic and talk show guest. Duax has also appeared in the movies "My Girl" and "Cop & 1/2." His commercial work includes Hungry Howi es Pizza, The Home Shoppin g Network and Western Aut o. He recently appeared in an HBO special filmed in Negril, Jamaica. Joining Duax on sta ge will be Christopher Cowl es who has performed all ov er at comedy clubs and co lleges. He has appeared o n shows with comedia ns Tommy Chong, Tra cy Morgan, Michael Winslo w and J.J. Walker. He has done radio an d television shows and is t he host and production mana ger at Laugh-In Comed y Cafe in Ft. Myers. Opening the show will be Scott Thompson who h as been performing stand u p comedy for three years b ut has been telling funny st ories all his life. Tickets for the show a re $10 per person and that al so includes the musical ente rtainment afterwards. Th ey can be purchased in advance at Duffer's or at the door. For more details or to make reservations for di nner or the show, call 38 26339. Duffer's is at 694 0 U.S. 27 North, Sebring. Duffer's mixes laughter and music for entertainment Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Ridge Area Arc is pleased to announce WienerFest 2010 will be held Saturday, Nov. 13 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Avon Park Memorial Football Field on State Street. There will be food, beverages, arts and crafts, flea market, activities and exhibits available all day. The highlight of the day will be the Wiener Walk at 11 a.m. and Arc's second Wiener Dog Race afternoon. In the Wiener Walk, dachshunds and their owners wearing costumes (or not) will parade before the spectators. Awards will be given in three categories of costumes: Best-Dressed Wiener Dog, Best-Dressed Team (Wiener Dog/Person), and Be st Float (Wiener Dog riding in a pulled device). Pre-regi stration is required but the re is no entry fee. In the Wiener Dog Rac e, awards will be presented in four categories of dach shunds: Puppy Rac e, Senior/Disabled Rac e, Adult Race and Top Do g Race. Pre-registration is required. The cost is $1 0 per race. To register for t he Wiener Dog Race and/ or Wiener Walk contact Cind y at the Arc by phone at 45 21295, ext 124 or email at cmarshall@ridgeareaarc. or g. Vendors and exhibito rs who would like to reserve a spot should contact Conn ie at the Arc at 452-1295, ex t. 107. WienerFest 2010 set for Nov. 13 Special to the News-SunSEBRING The first meeting of the H ighlands Gem and Mineral Club for the 2 010-11 year will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday at t he Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, i n the rear of the fellowship hall. After a brief opening statement, the club w ill hear from Tiny Lord on the subject of the g emstone tourmaline, which happens to be an a lternate birthstone for October. There will by l apidary materials available for those who are i nterested in starting or adding to a collection. R ockhounds never have enough rocks. There are no membership dues or fees and a ll visitors, hobbyists and lapidarists are welc ome. The purpose of the club is to further the educational and scientific pursuit of the earth sciences, focusing on minerals, ores, gemstones and fossils, and promoting fellowship and sharing of information by talks, demonstrations, slide and video presentations and field trips when possible. Each month will feature short talks by members, who will demonstrate their interest in a particular area, followed by a feature presentation by guest speakers or by members. Attendees are encouraged to bring in any and all types of material or equipment for sale, trade or identification. Refreshments will be provided. For more information, call 453-7054. Gem and Mineral Club to hold first meeting of season Tuesday The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and

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DearAbby: My wife r ecently died of lung cancer. W hile the family would like h er ashes buried at the famil y plot, it was my wife's w ish for her remains to be s cattered in a favorite locat ion far away. Family memb ers are trying to discourage m e by raising all sorts of i ssues. Abby, is there any TSAor a irline rule/law that would p revent me from carrying m y wife's ashes on a flight t o another state? Missing My Lady Out West DearMissing: Please a ccept my deepest sympathy f or the loss of your wife. I s poke with Transportation S ecurity Administration s pokesman Greg Soule. One c hallenge with transporting c rematory remains may i nvolve the security screeni ng process. TSApersonnel will never a sk you to open an urn. H owever, if the urn is made o f metal that cannot be penet rated by X-ray, it would h ave to be packed in your c hecked baggage or shipped. S ome funeral homes will transfer ashes to a temporary plastic container in situations like this. Urns made of ceramic or wood typically do not present a challenge. Mr. Soule said he is not aware of any airline that prohibits passengers from traveling with crematory remains, but it's a good idea to check with the airline in advance. You should also visit www.tsa.gov, click on "For Travelers" and read the section on "Traveling With Special Items." DearAbby: I consider myself an intelligent, accomplished young woman. I get good grades. I aced my SATs and am an accomplished musician. My problem is I'm afraid I project an image that is too "girly" or immature. I have a naturally high voice and people seem surprised when they learn how well I do in school and in extracurricular activities. Sometimes I'm tempted to prove them wrong, but I'm also worried about the impression I give professors, employers and those who matter. How do I present myself more professionally so that people will take me seriously without sacrificing my femininity? Student in Oberlin, Ohio DearStudent: Whether it's fair or not, many people do form preconceptions because of the way someone presents heror himself. Two suggestions come immediately to mind. Ask an adult to go through your closet with you and help you coordinate outfits that are conservative and more mature than "school outfits." If you have the money, start investing in some clothes that are suited to a business environment. And last but not least talk to a voice coach or speech therapist about lowering the register of your voice, which will make you appear to be older and more assertive. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abby shares more than 100 of her favorite recipes in two booklets: "Abby's Favorite Recipes" and "More Favorite Recipes by Dear Abby." Send a business-size, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $12 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby Cookbooklet Set, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. One of the differences between parents of the 1950s and today's is that the former did not care what grades their children made in school. Mind you, they insisted that their children do their best, but if a child's best was average, his parents accepted that and did nothing to make him look like a better student than what he was. Today's parents, as a lot, seem to have great difficulty accepting less than A's on their children's report cards. As a consequence, they are found doing all they can to create the outward impression that their children are a cut above in the achievement department. Doing one's best is a character issue. When a parent does her best to insure good grades on her child's report cards, the report cards may in fact look good, but the child suffers in the long run. He never learns to do his best. He is disadvantaged, therefore, when faced with difficult problems. He never even really learns what he is capable of and becomes increasingly dependent upon his parents to solve problems for him. In short, while his grades do not suffer (in the short run), his character certainly does. It appears that the zeal to have one's child identified as gifted and talented and placed, therefore, on an advanced and accelerated track in school is misplaced. Anewly released study finds that only 3 percent of gifted and talented children live up to their potential. The study's author, educational psychologist Joan Freeman, tracked 210 gifted children into adulthood and discovered that only six achieved a level of vocational success commensurate with their abilities. To what did Freeman attribute this underachievement? Overinvolved, pushy parents who end up robbing their children of their childhoods. By all appearances, these kids are high achievers, but they are often not wellfounded, especially when it comes to social skills. "The pleasures and creativity of childhood are the basis of all great work," Freeman writes. She cites on e child who was considered a math prodigy. As an adu lt, he has failed to fin d any satisfying work and is currently working at a fastfood joint, flipping burgers. It appears that drive, personal ity, and social skills are as critical to su ccess as ability, perhaps moreso. Needless to say, drive cannot develo p if someone else is doing the driving. The day after this study was released I was in Connecticut doing my usual public-speaking thing. I bui lt much of my first talk around it, in an attempt to help the overachieving moms in the audience step back from the insanity they've bought into and find lives of their own outside of the role of mothe r (and help their children discover the true pleasures of childhood in the process). After the talk, a mom cam e up and told me that prior to having children she had worked in the admissions office of a prestigious New England private college. A disproportionate number of students at said college com e from the rolls of gifted and talented programs. "These young people are often lost without their parents'constant help and validation," she said. Their parents coach them through every difficulty, help them with their homework via the Internet, and stand ready to confront any professor who dares gives them less than A's. To paraphrase something my stepfather was fond of saying: An impressive transcript and a dollar will buy you a cup of coffee. John Rosemond answers parents' questions at www.rosemond.com. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 10, 2010Page 15B 30% OFFANY REGULAR PRICED ITEM IN STOCK!283 US 27 North € Village Fountain Plaza€ Sebring 471-2852www.thebulbbin.com € OUTDOOR LIGHTING € VANITY LIGHTS€ FANS € CHANDELIERSAND MOREExpires 10/17/10 THE SOCIALPG13 NETWORK(Jesse Eisenberg)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15YOU AGAIN PG(Betty White, Kristen Bell)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30THE TOWNR(Ben Affleck)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30EASY APG13(Emma Stone)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15MACHETE R(Danny Trejo)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30THE LOTTERY PG13 TICKET(Lil Bow Wow)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15 The NewFAIRMOUNTCINEMA63750 US 27 N. Sebring NOW SHOWINGFriday 10/01 Thursday 10/0 7 Suick CinemasInformation 385-9980 Office 385-9908New Dolby Digital Soun d All Seats $6.00for Matinee PERFECTIONBy DON GAGLIARDO ACROSS 1 They're in Vogue 6 Figs. disclosed before closings 10 Alley-oop setups, in hoops 14 Work on, as pipe bowl ash 18 Sex appeal 19 Fifth-century pope known as "the Great" 20 "There's no step 3!" product 21 Chick on ivories 22 Audible sleep aid 24 Stadium ticket datum 26 Wing 27 Trifle 28 Kept sacred 30 Where __ at 31 Singer Corinne Bailey et al. 33 Whole that's greater than the sum of its parts 35 Be in a bee 36 Monthly exp. 37 Fill with joy 39 Admonishing king? 40 Aide: Abbr. 42 "Me, Myself & __": 2000 film 43 Hiker's snack 46 It's transferred from iron to pants during pressing 49 "Wait __!" 50 All-inclusive 52 An atheist can't be one 53 Strikebreakers 56 Emmy-winning legal drama 58 Kid who moves a lot 63 One bit 64 Gets twisted 65 Cries of disgust 66 Miscellany 67 Barely sufficient 69 You, to you, at times? 71 With the bow, in music 72 Approximately 73 __-ling 74 Nods, often 75 Dec. purchase 77 "The vine that ate the South" 78 Brusque 79 It may need a boost 80 Bindle carrier 81 Meteor tail? 83 Warning sign 88 On and on 94 In reserve 95 Sharpen 97 Ed.'s request 98 "A __ this gout!": "Henry IV, Part 2" 99 Spinoff group 100 Two-piece piece 102 Northern lights 105 Paper towel brand 106 Consumed 107 1960 chart topper with the line "Are you somewhere up above" 109 Add (up) 111 Small songbird 112 Agreed to a proposal 114 Library reminder 117 Wading bird 118 __ insurance 119 Road for Tiberius 120 Code carriers 121 Versatile beans 122 Union mem. since 2/14/1912 123 Disney no longer used them after "The Little Mermaid" 124 It can make your heart pound DOWN 1 Turned on, with "up" 2 "Trs chic!" 3 Graciously greet 4 Able, facetiously 5 Ladies 6 Song pour les enfants 7 Architect I.M. 8 Stone home 9 College near Albany 10 Laser entertainment 11 Actor Epps 12 Leader overthrown by Castro 13 Part of an act 14 Kite on the links 15 Dispute settler 16 Dispute settler, perhaps 17 Decorative herb 21 Cow's second helping? 23 Yuletide quaff 25 Improved partner? 29 '70s extremist gp. 32 Mont-__-Anne: Quebec resort 34 Contract segment 36 Rapt ending 38 Make possible 41 "__ me!" 42 Black 44 __ Enterprise 45 Role for Jackie 47 Brewer of song 48 Horror film locale: Abbr. 51 Brits' thank-yous 53 __ und Drang 54 Ides assassin 55 Some choirboys 57 Ship that survived the Clashing Rocks 58 Instrument that's not seen and not heard 59 Blunder 60 Like "park the car," to a New Englander? 61 Songstress Mann 62 Fisher Price products 63 Achilles' cousin 64 Passed tediously 65 Cool sitcom guy 68 Krone-issuing land, to natives 69 Black __ spider 70 Ocular washing aid 73 Do a film editing job 76 Tours head? 77 155-mi. Asian strip that intersects the 38th parallel 78 Sonora uncle 80 [I'm so clever] 82 Broadway array 83 Prescribed amounts 84 Takeout order 85 "You gave it a shot!" 86 MLB post-season mo. 87 Banjoist, e.g. 89 Set apart from the rest 90 "Mazel __!" 91 On the way out 92 They're new at it 93 "CSI" procedure 96 Act of war? 100 More than ask 101 Rodeo rope 103 Valued old item 104 Small business successor, maybe 107 Boom letters? 108 Atmosphere: Pref. 110 Loose garment 113 Some Caltech grads 115 Business card abbr. 116 Theme answer count, amount of letters in each, word hidden in each, and, when repeated twice, today's date Solution on page 5B DIVERSIONS Flying with crematory ashes requires advanced planning There's more to a good education than good grades Living With Children John Rosemond He sat at our office desk as official a s any professional while I did a few t hings on the computer.Our five-yearo ld grandson, Jonathon, had wanted to b e with Gramma as she did some work. So I set him up at the desk with c rayons and paper and he quietly a mused himself. At one point, his mommy came by a nd saw him sitting there and asked if h e was O.K. "Yes, Mommy," he replied."I'm d oing my work." She and I smiled at each other and f elt the blessing that uniquely comes f rom the lips of a child.In our adult m inds, we had seen him in his child's r ole.But, in his mind, he had seen h imself in a grown-up role. Today is National Children's Day. I remember children's day when I w as growing up and the special recogn ition we received at church.Of c ourse, we also felt it entitled us to s ome special treats at home.But, our p arents reminded us that we were always treated specially. And we were because they considered us precious gifts from God and that made all the difference in their care of us. I love the way Psalm 127: 3-5 in "The Message" says, "Don't you see that children are God's best gift?The fruit of the womb his generous legacy?Like a warrior's fistful of arrows are the children of a vigorous youth.Oh, how blessed are you parents, with your quivers full of children!" As parents and now grandparents, we have the distinct pleasure of celebrating our children and grandchildren applauding them when they learn new things and achieve their goals. In a recent telephone conversation with Jonathon he said, "Guess what, Gramma and Pop-Pop?My bike doesn't have training wheels on anymore." "Wow!We are so proud of you!" "Yes, but I think I need to wear pads because I keep falling off!" We stifled a laugh as we encouraged him to keep trying and telling him we knew he would soon not need to worry about falling off. But some of our deepest joys come when he shares with us his love for the Lord and how Jesus helps him to do the right things. Whether we have children or grandchildren or not, just look around. There are plenty of children just waiting for us. Love, encourage, celebrate and influence these precious gifts from the Lord whether they are our own grown children, our grandchildren or children God brings in our path.Selah JanMerop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent and an award-winning writer. Celebrating and influencing children Pause And Consider Jan Merop Dear Abby

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LIVING 16B PAGE Inside This Section Arts & Leisure14B Chalk Talk8B Community Calendar6B Crossword15B Dear Abby15B Horoscope11B School Menus7B Senior Scene12B News-Sun Sunday, October 10, 2010Signsofhearingloss inyourteenLoss of hearing sensitivity, first to high-pitched (high-frequency) sounds, then eventually to lower pitches.Difficulty hearing conversations, especially in a group setting or in a noisy environment. Temporary or permanent ringing, buzzing or fluttering in one or both ears.Often asks people to repeat themselves. Needs to set the TVor radio volume louder than other people.Asense of fullness in the ears.Voices and other noises sound muffled and/or distorted. Photo courtesy of Getty ImagesFAMILYFEATURES I f you're the parent of a teen or tween, chances are you've wondered, half-jokingly, if your child hears anything you say. The reality is that there are over 6.5 million American children ages 12 to 19 living w ith some form of hearing loss and much of it i s preventable. N oise induced hearing loss E very day, we experience s ound in our environment f rom television and radio, to h ousehold appliances and d readed rush-hour traffic. N ormally, we hear these sounds a t safe levels that do not affect o ur hearing. However, when w e are exposed to harmful n oise, sounds that are too loud o r loud sounds that last a long t ime, sensitive structures in our i nner ear can be damaged, r esulting in noise induced heari ng loss (NIHL). Noise induced hearing l oss can be caused by a onet ime exposure to an intense impulse" sound, such as an e xplosion, or by continuous e xposure to loud sounds over an extended period o f time, such as a too-loud MP3 player. Accordi ng to the National Institute of Health (NIH), l ong-term exposure to 80 to 85 decibels, or any m ore than 15 minutes exposure to 100 decibels, c an lead to hearing loss. Music players like iPods c an top 100 decibels when turned all the way up. In fact, according to a survey conducted by H ear the World, a global initiative by leading h earing system manufacturer Phonak, exposure t o high noise levels was found to not only result i n gradual hearing loss, but also stress, aggression o r insomnia in 73 percent of those surveyed. M P3 players and yourteen A study released in the Journal of the American M edical Association found that 1 in 5 U.S. teens s uffer from some form of hearing loss. Among o ther culprits named, from nutrition to environm ental toxins, the use of the "earbud" style of h eadphones while listening to high decibel music w as found to be one reason for the increase. "It is no surprise that teens and young adults t oday are listening to music longer and potent ially louder than years past," said Dr. Craig K asper, Chief Audiology Officer of Audio Help H earing Centers and Hear the World spokesp erson. "Ongoing exposure to loud sounds daily, t hrough earphones for example, can have a direct i mpact on your hearing early in life and not just a s you age." How loud is too loud? If an earbud headphone s ounds loud to people nearby, it's too loud. If you suspect your child might have hearing l oss, contact your local audiologist for a complete h earing screening. For more information on heari ng loss and how loud is too loud, as well as an o nline hearing test, visit www.hear-the-world.com. R educing the risk T he good news is that noise induced hearing loss i s 100 percent preventable. "The impact of noise on hearing is often undere stimated because the damage may take place g radually. As a result, many people do little to p revent the process of hearing l oss that takes place throughout t heir lives due to the noise poll ution around them," said Dr. K asper. To protect hearing, Dr. K asper recommends these t ips for teens and tweens: 1. Be mindful of your hearing. Think about the level of noise you're exposed to as well as the duration of time you're in that noise. 2. When attending concerts or loud events, wear hearing protection. Most of us would never think to sunbathe without some form of SPF protection. Using either over-thecounter earplugs or custom-molded hearing protection is like SPF for your ears. 3. When listening to your iPod or other MP3 player, invest in a sound-isolating earphone, such as the AudŽo PFE by Phonak (see sidebar). This will reduce the amount of environmental sounds and allow you to turn the volume down. H earinglossin t eensandtweens i s on the riseAudŽo PFE Perfect Bass The AudŽo PFE (Perfect Fit Earphones) Perfect Bass are a set of high-end, sound-isolating earphones by leading hearing systems manufacturer Phonak. The AudŽo PFE provides exceptional fit with different, replaceable ear tips, great sound (even at low volume levels) without sacrificing the health of your ears, and starts below $100. The AudŽo PFE Perfect Bass can be purchased online at www.audeoworld.com. Topfivemisconceptions abouthearingloss1. Hearing loss is only for the elderly: Only 35 percent of people with hearing loss are older than age 64. There are over 6.5 million American children ages 12 to 19 living with some form of hearing loss. 2. If my child or I had hearing loss, my family doctor would have told me: Only 14 percent of physicians routinely screen for hearing loss during a physical. 3. Your hearing loss cannot be helped: With modern advances in technology, nearly 95 percent of people with a sensorineural hearing loss a type of hearing loss in which the root cause lies in the inner ear can be helped with hearing aids. 4. Hearing aids are large, clunky and obvious: Many modern hearing aids are nearly invisible to the naked eye and smaller than a quarter. 5. Hearing loss isn't serious enough to treat: Hearing loss can create social and emotional barriers for the individuals living with it, or the families of those it affects. Research shows that when left untreated, hearing loss can lead to reduced earning power, disruptions in family life and can cause a wide range of other psychological problems. Sound waves travel through the ear canal to the inner ear, where tiny hair cells convert the sound into nerve impulses that travel to hearing centers in the brain. Excessive noise can damage those cells and cause permanent hearing loss.


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