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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00906
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: February 27, 2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
sobekcm - UF00028423_00906
System ID: UF00028423:00906
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

Full Text




^A ^^www.newssun .





NEWS- UN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927


Dragons
power to win
PAGE 1 D


Colby accused
of shoplifting
PAGE 6A


FWC: Lorida man Keeping up
shot sandhill crane with your baby

PAGE 2A PAGE 1 C


Sunday, February 27, 2011


www.newssun.com


Volume 92/Number 25 I 75 cents


Missed stop sign leads to grow house arrests


Foggy in the
then partly
High

84
Complete F
PAGE


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"I


Questi
Is cutting
state govern
best way to
state's budge





- -- -


Total vote


Next question
state employ
collective bai
Make your voice
www.newss


Diann E. I
Age 61, of A
Robert J.
Age 77, of La
Mary E. IM
Age 73, of Elk
Obituaries,

Arts & Entertainme
Business
Chalk Talk
Classifieds
Community Briefs
Community Calend
Crossword Puzzle
Dear Abby_
Deed Transfers
Editorial &. Opinion
Lottery Numbers
Movie Times
Police Blotter
Religon__
Sports On TV
Follow
News-Si


www.twitter.com/
and


www.facebook.co



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Page 6A

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News-Sun staff
SEBRING A traffic stop for run-
ning a stop sign led to the discovery
of a marijuana grow house operation
that landed two men in jail and more
than 100 pounds of marijuana being
seized from a house on Bayhill Lane
Wednesday morning.
According to a Highlands County
Sheriff's Office report, Det. Michael
Ahrens spotted a 2002 Ford E-150
van that failed to stop at a stop sign at


Piling up



the pills

Operation Medicine
Cabinet a success
By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
( ;, '. 1;t*;. "I 'i - ;,1- ,1 .')II
SEBRING Highlands County's
second Operation Medicine Chest
appeared to be another success Friday
afternoon.
The operation is a joint effort by the
Highlands County Sheriff's Office, the
Avon Park Police Department, the
Sebring Police Department, the Lake
Placid Police Department and Drug
Free Highlands to properly dispose of
dangerous drugs.
Four collection centers were set up,
manned by volunteers who accept any
kind of medications from anyone- no
questions asked.
The medications are put into boxes,
sealed, and taken away for proper dis-
posal.
A full tally of this operation won't be
ready until Monday, but Sebring Police
Chief Tom Dettman was delighted
when, approaching 2 p.m. the time
volunteers stopped collecting his
lobby had two stacks of the boxes

See PILLS, page 7A


More than 100 pounds of marijuana

found in home on Bayhill Lane


the intersection of Bayhill Lane and
Edgewater Terrace, and pulled the
van over.
When Ahrens approached the van,
he reported that "an extremely strong
odor of cannabis was emitting from
the interior of the vehicle." While


talking with the driver, 23-year-old
Miguel Angel Leon Jr. of Miami,
Ahrens could see several -items used
in the operation of a marijuana grow
house inside the back of the van, he
wrote.
During a search of the van,


News-Sun )photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
Sebring police officer Rick Little (left) and Chief Tom Dettman
stand next stacks of boxes filled with medications of all kinds.
They were collected at the police station between 7:30 a.m. and
2 p.m. Friday, during the county's second Operation Medicine
Cabinet.


The Group addresses school issues


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.coain
SEBRING Members of the
business community and school
officials discussed the district's
recent drop in the accountability
grade at Thursday meeting of The
Group for Better Government.
The overall grade for Highlands
County's School District dropped
from a "B" to a "C" with the last
state assessment.
"Our school's grades hurt
development," said Marlene


'Our public school
system is a failure.
We need a different
approach.'
STEVE FRUIT
Group member
Barger from Lake Placid, a mem-
ber of The Group.
"f11 you are trying to bring a
school in and they see the wonder-


ful community, the great parks,
and then a 'C' school, they often
choose to go somewhere else. It's
a lose-lose for everyone," said
Barger.
"What plans do you have to
improve the performance?"
Barger asked Becky Fleck, assis-
tant superintendent for Highlands
County.
Fleck gave a presentation on
how the grading system works.
See GROUP, page 7A


deputies found two air conditioner
units, air conditioner ducts, electrical
wiring, a homemade electrical panel
with multiple outlets and power sup-
ply boxes, several plastic plant pots
and numerous wooden stands. All of
the items in the van smelled like mar-
ijuana, and some of the pots and
stands had marijuana residue on
them, Ahrens reported.
See GROW, page 7A


Commission


to discuss


attorney


position

Studying in-house post
versus outside lawyer
By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@niewssuni.com
SEBRING County staff will present
information to commissioners on Tuesday
for discussion about keeping an attorney on
retainer or having one on staff.
With budget deficits of more than $11
million looming on the horizon, commis-
sioners voted to cut overall funding to
municipalities from recreation by $60,000
in order to stem the outgo-
ing deficit before starting
on the budget work for the '
2010-il fiscal year. The
budget is due on July 15.
With these budget con-
cerns in mind, the question
has been asked if it is Macbeth
cheaper to hire in-house
council or keep the current arrangement of
retaining County Attorney Ross Macbeth on
an hourly basis.
A county report dated Sept. 15, 2010
showed that taxpayers had already paid
Macbeth $358,020 for the year in litigation
and legal fees and that Macbeth bills the
county for his services at $191.50 per hour.
Macbeth has come under fire recently for
over-billing the county more than $20,000,
which was all returned when brought to his
attention.
According to the backup agenda packet,
staff recommended "no action requested"
on the topic and provided a phone survey of
10 cities and two surveys from the Florida
League of Counties for reference.
The provided League of Counties surveys
are from 2007 and 211i'. when county rev-
enues were riding high.
Additionally, staff provided a report

See COUNTY, page 7A


AP firefighters, cops show

support for Wisconsin workers


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.comi
AVON PARK Members of both the
Avon Park Police Department and Fire
Departments used their time off to show
their support for public workers in
Wisconsin Friday morning when they
held a protest at the corner of U.S. 27 and
Main Street.
"We want to show support for our
brothers and sisters in Wisconsin, Indiana
and Ohio," said Sgt. Detective David Sass
as he held a sign and waived to passing
traffic.
"This was kind of a last-minute thing,
but both departments decided to work
together on this," Sass said.


'We are out here to fight
against pension reform'

STEVE KEMPE
Avon Park firefighter

"We are out here to fight against pen-
sion reform," said firefighter Steve
Kempe, member of Local 3132
Professional Firefighters.
The protest did not gather a large atten-
dance, nor did it last more than a couple
of hours, but Sass said it was just a begin-
ning.

See AP, page 7A


News-Sun photo by IE) BA1LDRIDG1F
Avon Park firefighter Steve Kempe holds up a pair of signs during
Friday's demonstration on the side of U.S. 27. Firefighters and
police demonstrated in support of state workers in the IlIhid -',(.


*1


Heartland
National.'Bank


Avon Park
800 West Main St.
863.453.6000
F 'bit


Lake Placid Sebring
600 U.S. Hwy 27 N. 327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.
863.699.1300 863.386.1300
wwtv.heartlandnb.corm


Sun 'n Lake North
5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.
863.386.1322
tj


. 1 e









News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


www.newssun.com


POLICE
BLOTTER

The News-Sun would like
to remind the readers that
the names listed below
reflect those who have
been charged with a
crime, but they are all
innocent until proven
guilty by a court of law. If
anyone listed here is
acquitted or has charges
dropped, they can bring in
proof of such decision or
mail a copy to the paper
and the News-Sun will be
happy to report that infor-
mation. The News-Sun is
at 2227 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring, FL 33870.

The following people
were booked into the
Highlands County Jail on
Thursday, Feb. 24:
* Gregory Joseph Allen,
24, of Sebring, was
charged with driving while
license suspended.
* Samantha Lynn
Barfield, 26, of Avon Park,
was charged with failure
to appear reference know,
ingly driving with license
suspended/revoked.
* Dennis Troy Bass, 61,
of Okeechobee, was
charged with possession
of a controlled substance
without a prescription,
possession and or use of
drug equipment, and pos-
session of marijuana.
* Michael Duane
Batterbee, 32, of Sebring,
was charged with driving
while license suspended.
* Attrice Lorenzo
Brooks, 34, of Avon Park,
was charged with grand
theft, burglary of an unoc-
cupied dwelling and non
support of children or
spouse.
* Andrew Joseph
D'Alessandro, 24, of
Sebring, was charged with
fraud-impersonate/false
identification to a law
enforcement, officer, and
two counts of violation of
probation reference pos-
session of marijuana and
possession of a controlled
substance.
* Amanda Lee Day, 26, of
Sebring, was charged with
two counts of possession
of a controlled substance
without a prescription,
possession of a harmful
new legend drug without a
prescription, possession
and or use of drug equip-
ment, and possession of
marijuana.
* John Paul Doty, 38, of
Avon Park, was charged
with battery.
* Bacilio Gil Escoria, 36,
of Quincy, was charged
with a violation of a
municipal ordinance.
* John Michael Fedd, 22,
of Sebring, was charged
with driving while license
suspended.
* Pedro Fuentes-
Cordero, 23, of Lake
Placid, was charged with
operating a motor vehicle
without a valid license.
* Latasha Lee Green, 22,
of Lake Placid, was
charged with failure to
appear reference posses-
sion of drug parapherna-
lia.
* Genya Yanee Harris,
33, of Sebring, was
charged with aggravated
battery.
* Michael Dewayne
Hawthorne, 35, of
Sebring, was charged with
driving while license sus-
pended.
* Ricky Allen James, 48,
of Sebring, was charged
with two counts of failure
to appear reference resist-
ing/obstructing officer
without violence and bat-


tery.
* Daniel Dennis
Langman, 18, of Lake
Placid, was charged with
grand theft and burglary
of an occupied dwelling.
* Mirta Gonzalez
Lezscano, 46, of Sebring,
was charged with traffick-
ing opium or a derivative,
three counts of posses-
sion of a controlled sub-
stance without a prescrip-
tion, and possession and
or use of drug equipment.
Continued on page 7A


Year-long mission trip nearly funded for pastor and family


By SAMANTHA GHOLAR
sgllholar@newrssu n.c(omi
AVON PARK Pastor Jeremy
Hurd, his wife Melvina, and their two
young children are about to follow
their hearts and God's command to
spread Christianity and help out in
the world.
The family announced its plans to
take a- year-long mission trip to El
Salvador back in early September and
needs to raise $32,000 to cover the
cost of the airfare, lodging, personal
expenses, visas, and insurance for the
full year.
In September, the Hurds had just


began the fundraising for their trip
and now, five months later, the fami-
ly has nearly accomplished its goal.
"We are just over 70 percent fund-
ed now," said Pastor Hurd.
The work, of course, is not yet
complete and the Hurds are diligently
working along with their church and
community to complete their goal by
spring.
"We've had a few fundraisers with-
in the last couple months and we have
a few more coming up very soon that
we hope the community will come
out and support," said Hurd.
Community Bible Church will be


holding a conference on Sunday
through Wednesday.
The Hurds will be two of the fea-
tured missionaries speaking on
Monday and Tuesday nights, offering
their experiences from previous mis-
sion trips and work.
A second event will be held the fol-
lowing weekend on Saturday, March
4 when Community Bible Church
will be holding its annual rummage
sale.
Patrons are invited to purchase all
sorts of items including furniture,
electronics, clothing and much more.
Breakfast (sausage gravy, biscuits


Coronation


Courtesy photo
Former Valentine's Queen Angie Luft, of Sebring, (from left) crowns the 2011 queen
Sandra Harper, of Avon Park, while former king Andre Rushing, of Avon Park, crowns the
new king Alex Lopez, of Sebring. The coronation took place at Ridge Area Arc in Avon Park
during the annual Valentine's Day Party on Feb. 18 hosted by CenturyLink. Consumers
and staff voted on the king and queen. There was a light lunch and a disc jockey who
played music also provided by CenturyLink. Prizes were given out to the king and queen
candidates and for various dance contests.


COMMUNITY BRIEFS


FHREDI meets
Monday
LAKE PLACID A pub-
lic meeting of the Florida's
Heartland Rural Economic
Development Initiative Inc.
and Floridal's Freshwater
Frontier Inc board of direc-
tors will meet at I10 a.m..
Monday at the Heartland
Education ConIsortitum, 1096
U.S. 27 North.
For more in formation call
Gina Reynolds at 385-4900.

SFCC hosting
Heartland Senior
Games in March
AVON PARK South
Florida Community College
(SFCC) Community
Education announces
Heartland Senior Games
2011. The Heartland Senior
Games run March 1-23 and
cost $15 to participate.
The Heartland Senior
Games is sanctioned by the
Florida Sports Foundation
and qualifies athletes for the
Florida Senior Games State
Championships. The mission
of the games is to encourage
and promote healthy
lifestyles for anyone over 50
and to provide them oppor-
tunity to compete at the
local, state and national lev-
els.
Events will be held
throughout Highlands
County in bowling, golf,
basketball, billiards, shuffle-
board, pickleball, cycling,
swimming, horseshoes and
tennis. Medals are awarded
for first, second and third
place, male and female, in
each sport and age category.
Register in Building B,
Highlands Campus or any
SFCC campus or center. For
more information, contact
Community Education at
453-6661, 465-5300, 773-
2252, or 494-7500, ext.
7388.

Scrapboo.king
workshop set for
March 5
AVON PARK An intro-
ductory class on scrapbook-
ing will be held in the Depot
Museum from I -3 p.m.
Saturday, March 5, spon-
sored by the Historical
Society of Avon Park. Cost,
payable at the door, is $)10
per person and includes all
supplies and a snack. The
class is open to the public
and to all ages.


The session will be led by
Donna Faucett, a 15-year
scrapbooking enthusiast and
a former consultant for
"Creative Memories."
All participants are asked
to bring six to 10 photos
they are willing to trim,.
preferably of the same event.
Each person will leave the
workshop with a finished
page that can be added to a
scrapbook. Information will
also be offered about scrap-
booking products and where
they can be obtained.
"Scrapbooking is a cre-
ative hobby that tells the
story of your life and your
family's life." Faucett said.
"It's your history. Tell it
your way."
Reservations are required
and can be made by calling
the museum at 453-3525
anytime between 10 a.m.
and 3 p.m. Wednesday
through Friday.

New hours at Toby's
Clown House, Gift
Shop and Museum
LAKE PLACID Toby's
Gift Shop and Museum will
now be open from noon to 4
p.m. Monday-Friday.
Beginning Saturday March 5
the clown house/museumn
will be open to the public
from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.
These hours will be effective
until May 1. There is no cost
of admission.
To celebrate these new
hours, the public is invited
to Toby's garage sale from 8
a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
March 5. There will be lots
of clowns and face painting
for the kids, as well as
pulled pork sandwiches, cold
drinks and popcorn for sale.

Masonic Lodge plans
open house
LAKE PLACID Have
you ever wondered what the
Freemasons do or read books
or seen movies about them?
Then this is your opportunity
to come find out more about
who they are and what they
(do.
Lake Placid Masonic
Lodge will have an open
house from 12-3 p.m. today.
There will be free hot dogs
and also clowns to entertain
the kids.
Lake Placid Masonic
Lodge is at 102 N. Main
Ave., one block north of the
Interlake and Main Avenue
intersection. For more infor-


mation contact Devin
Wilson at 243-1356.

Events planned at
lodges, posts
AVON PARK
The American Legion
Post 69 will have karaoke by
Naomi at 4 .m. today. Sons
of the American Legino
meet at 6 p.m. Monday. For
details and menu selections.
call 453-4553.
LAKE PLACID
The Lake Placid Moose

Continued on page 6A


and drink) and lunch (hot dogs, chips
and drink) will be served during the
rummage sale. '
Community Bible Church is locat-
ed at 1400 County Road 17A North in
Avon Park.
Hurd and his family are looking
forward to fulfilling the financial
needs of the mission and helping their
community as well as those outside it
through their incredible opportunity.
For more information about the
events or how to donate contact the
Community Bible Church office 452-
5643 or Jeremy Hurd at 399-0653.


Man jailed for


shooting sandhill


crane in Lorida


News-Sun staff
LORIDA A 76-year-
old Lorida man was arrest-
ed on Wednesday by the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
and charged with shooting
a protected sandhill crane
in January.
According to a report by
FWC officer Erika
Zimmerman, a witness
reported seeing Ralph
Hulon shoot the crane with
a BB gun three times on
Jan. 9, then go back into his
house and get a small-cal-
iber rifle and shooting the
bird again.
The bird was seen laying


under a bush near a canal
with "its wings extended,
legs at odd angles and its
head barely up," the report
said. Additional witnesses
reported seeing blood com-
ing from the bird's chest
area and that one of its
wings was hanging down.
Zimmerman reported
that she had observed the
bird on numerous occasions
and that it still appeared
injured.
Hulon was charged with
wounding of a species des-
ignated as threatened and
cruelty to animals. He was
released on $1,500 bond.


Woman charged with

padding payroll checks


News-S;un staff
LAKE PLACID Lake
Placid police arrested 40-
year-old Linda Denise Stock
of Lake Placid on Wednesday
and charged her with stealing
money from her employer for
more than two years.
According to the arrest
report, Stock stole $3,280
from Tiles by Fran. Police
say she stole the money by
adding between $20 and $50
to her payroll checks. Stock
had authorization to sign
checks, the report said, but


did not have the authority to
add money to them.
The report said that Stock
admitted to stealing the
money a total of 72 checks
- because she was denied a
raise. Business records indi-
cate she covered her tracks by
adding the stolen amounts to
other accounts payable.
She was charged with
grand theft and fraud, both
third-degree felonies, and
was released after posting
$2,000 bond.


OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870
OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday
PHONE: 863-385-6155
MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954
NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453

CIRCULATION
SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not
receive your horne delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone tihe circulation
department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before
11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to
you. Subscribers who notify us offer the limes mentioned will receive credit to their
account. Please call 385-6155.


POSTMASTER: Send address change to:
News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870
USPS ISSN 0163-3988
Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL
and additional entry offices)


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
HOME DELIVERY
IN FLORIDA MAIL
OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL


12 mo.
$60.46
92.23
105.99


7% FL tax
S4.23
6.46


Total
$64.69
98.69
105.99


Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on
Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.
Romona Washington Publisher and Executive Editor
863-385-6155, ext. 515


Page 2A


Feb. 23 4 11 32 38 40 49 x:4
LotIt FLORIDA Next jackpot $20 million

Center Feb. 19 3 12 16 30 37 46 x:4
rW. L.ul.. Feb. 15 8 16 17 26 45 47 x:5
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Feb. 22 2 14 17 19 22 .,. Feb. 24(d) 4 1 7 5

Feb. 25 6 8 34 40 4 13 Feb.25(n) 5 2 4
Feb. 22 2 11 35 36 0 14 rC H'') Feb. 25 (d) 5 4 2
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Feb. 15 3 20 31 39 4 10 Feb. 24(d) 6 8 1

Feb. 23 29 32 36 39 49 PB: 29 PP: 3 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawings
Nextjackpot$184millionre twice per da (d) is the
~ 0 Next jackpot $184 million ,,daYti,,e draining. (n) is the
Feb. 19 3 12 34 37 42 PB: 36 PP: 5 nighttimendrawing.
Feb. 16 9 13 21 23 48 PB: 24 PP: 2 PB: Power Ball PP: Power Play












NEWS-SUN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927

Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, Florida 33870
A Harbor Point Media Company









www.newssun.com


News-Sun # Sunday, February 27, 2011


EDITORIAL & OPINION


T e haven't

W talked this
V much about
a game-playing com-
puter since Deep
Blue beat a Russian
at chess.
The IBM-designed computer
beat Garry Kasparov in chess in
1997. Its descendant, IBM's
Watson, beat "Jeopardy!" cham-
pions Ken Jennings and Brad
Rutter recently in that trivia con-
test, and once again it's got
lowly humans, pondering our
eventual second-class status to
the almighty machine.
There's the excitement -
just think of the advances in
speech therapy or speech recog-
nition for people with disabili-
ties. And the fear will it take
away jobs? And if so, who is
going to pay the mortgage?
That Watson is the eventual
result of years of human collabo-
ration and design is lost in that
discussion.
The computer game story
that is certainly less attention-
getting but more unnerving:
Monopoly, the great family
board game that taught genera-
tions of children strategy and
how to count, and the value of
saving up money for future
opportunities, now has a com-
puter in the middle of the board.
A player doesn't have to count
out spaces or keep a shrewd eye
on her brother, that cheat. The
computer does it. And no need
to count up money, select an
honest banker or keep track of
anything at all. Do you have
enough money for a hotel? You


High speed boondoggle a
rip-off
Editor:
I never thought I would agree with a
Republican, especially Rick Scott, but
on the subject of the high speed boon-
doggle I do. It would be the biggest
rip-off this 'state has even seen.
Politicians don't really care about a fast
train, they're drooling over getting
their grubby little paws on all that
money.
For the past 35 years the state of
Florida has been tossing around the
idea of a high speed rail. In 1976 "The
Florida Transit Corridor Study" was
mandated by the Florida Legislature to
study the feasibility for a High Speed
Rail (HSR) between Daytona Beach
and St. Petersburg.
In 2000 C.C. "Doc" Dockery spent
$3 million of his own money to get a
constitutional amendment on the state
ballot that required the state to build a
high-speed rail system.
Now in 2011 Scott said in a state-
ment, "This project (HSR) would be far
too costly to taxpayers and I believe
the risk far outweighs the benefits." He
said it wasn't clear just who would
want to go from the Orlando airport to
Tampa (that has its own international
airport), or why they just wouldn't
drive the short distance to Disney
World instead. The fear is that the state
will be stuck covering huge operating
losses if ticket sales don't pan out as
projected.
It takes about Y hour and 30 minutes
to drive from Tampa to Orlando, with a
stop in Lakeland. Lakeland is 38 miles
from Tampa, by the time that train got
up to 70 mph it would be slowing
down.
Some questions.
There are several different types of
high sped trains electric, diesel,
Maglev, which would be implemented?


don't need to know just put
your card in the computer, and it
will tell you.
It's aimed at children, and
lord knows, we don't want them
to have fun while learning math
skills or decision-making.
There's no need to learn compli-
cated or ,simple rules, either.
'The first thing I said was, 'The
next thing they'll do away with is
the players.'" said Dale
Crabtree, a U.S. Monopoly
championship finalist, in an
interview with the UK's Daily
Mail.
But back Watson. Facing
defeat, Jennings scrawled an
answer on his screen: "I, for one,
welcome our new computer
overlords." The "Simpsons" ref-
erence was funny when a come-
dy writer wrote it (character
Kent Brockman, offering sub-


mission to Earth's pending giant
insect rulers). Offered as a
"meme" in a timely, self-depre-
cating, most human way, it made
fans laugh.
Humans can build fast com-
puters. Some say Watson's
buzzer response made the com-
petition unfair. And humans can
build computers and programs
that understand speech pat-
terns, even nuance, and comput-
ers that are highly accurate.
They can figure out how to keep
computers cool enough not to
flame out, and they can figure
out gentle transportation
options to get a computer from
Ato B.
But until a computer can
build a human, and one that can
move himself around and make
his own way to a game show,
and show empathy and para-


TODAY'S LETTERS
Elevated or ground level'?
Who would ride it'?
How much would a ticket from
Tampa to Orlando cost?
How much would parking at either
end cost'?
MapQuest shows it's only 85 miles
between Tampa and Orlando, so why
not drive?
Who would cover construction cost
over runs'?
Some have said jobs would be creat-
ed. Yes, while under construction but
then what'?
Who would be getting a huge part of
the money for the actual trains?
European train builders. They have the
experience because they've been build-
ing trains that can hit speeds of up to
220 mph for years. In Europe and
Japan they can hit those high speeds
because they travel over hundreds of
miles. A high speed train between
Tallahassee and Miami, 484 miles,
makes more sense because the driving
time is about 9-12 hours between the
two cities.
Sandy Oleesky
Sebring

What's good for one should
be for all
Editor:
I have the perfect solution for solv-
ing our financial deficit. Insist that all
the boneheads running our governments
including the cities, counties, states and
(most of all) our federal government,
take a 10 percent cut in their outra-
geous salaries. Additionally, insist that
the boneheads running our federal gov-
ernment accept term limits and elimi-
nate the right to continue living off the
backs of us taxpayers when they leave
office.
Let's see them worry about their next
jobs like the rest of us do.
With this comes paying in Social
Security, dealing with the same health


TODAY'S EDITORIAL


Other viewpoints


An editorial from Th
Camera in Boulder,


care as us constituents and ta
Let's see that they deal with
laws that they voted on and a
for us. No more voting them
special privileges including
geous raises.
Is it going to take a public
get these changes'?



Bouquets
Miller Air big help to
Editor:
Highlands MOTA (Museun
Arts) would like to offer a pu
you to Rick Miller at Miller A
Conditioning for years of pub
ice Rick and his staff hnve dc


time and equipment to the museum and
Highlands Art League and made them-
selves available without fail. It is
through this generous spirit and dedica-
tion to this community that cultural
organizations like these exist'.
We are very fortunate to have neigh-
bors who are dedicated to making our
county a great place to live.
Please come and enjoy our current
exhibit honoring Black History Month.
Susan Milarn and
the Museum Commnittee

Help after fall on the
sidewalk means a lot
Editor:
Help I've fallen and I can't get up -
I want to thank the two women and the
gentleman (whose names I neglected to
get) for coming to my rescue on
Monday, Feb. 21 in front of Yum's
Chinese Restaurant in Sebring when I
fell off the curb and couldn't gOt up.
Without the three of you I probably
would have had to call 911.
Thank you and God bless.
Arlene Jordan
Sebring


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phrase the "Simpsons" just to
make other humans laugh, we
won't cede to the overlords. Not
just yet.


For the past few days I've
been trying very hard to see
both sides of the issue in the
ongoing battle between
Wisconsin Governor Scott
Walker and the teacher's
union.
I can understand the gov-
ernor's position. The state
has to produce a balanced
budget. In order to accom-
plish that, spending has to be
cut. He's trying to avoid lay-
offs. In his mind, asking the
teachers to make some con-
cessions in their collective
bargaining rights is a way to
avoid the state going into the
red.


I can also understand to a
e Daily certain extent the teachers'
Colo. position. I was a teacher
many years ago and having
sat behind a desk I know the
job is not an easy one. Being
asked to accept changes in
benefits can seem like a hard
thing. And giving up some
of their power when it comes
to collective bargaining? I
can see where that might be
a deal-killer for some.
But my understanding
nil when it comes to the teach-
ers' side of things keeps
shrinking after a couple of
stunts their side has pulled.
First, let's talk about the
Democratic state senators
L who decided they'd rather
run than fight. Instead of
i doing their jobs, they've
deserted their post in order
to prevent a vote in the state
senate on the governor's
budget. To me, this isn't
governing it's being child-
ish and maybe a little cow-
ardly. Fight for what you
x worries, believe in don't go running
the same to another state and take pot-
pproved shots.
selves Those of you who think
outra- this act is such a great idea,
let me ask you this: What if
revolt to our Republican senators and
representatives had tried to
Billie Goff pull such a stunt when the
Avon Park vote for President Obama's
health care plan came up'?
Would this still seem to be
an appropriate response to a
MOlA bill one opposes? Or would
you accuse them of shirking
n of the their duty?
blic thank You can't have it both
Air ways. Condemn one side for
dlic serv- this, you have to condemn
onnated both.


Laura's
Look
Laura Ware

And then there are the
teachers who have apparent-
ly been getting fake doctor's
notes so they can claim the
time they've taken off of
teaching to protest can count
towards their sick days.
I'm actually not sure
which group involved in that
particular scheme makes me
madder: the teachers asking
for the notes or the doctors
writing them. Both are not
taking their jobs seriously,
and both are setting unfortu-
nate precedents.
Which of these teachers,
once this is all over and
they're back in the class-
room teaching, can speak
about honesty? How will
they hold their students
accountable or question any
excuses the kids bring them
when they've set this kind of
example?
Speaking of example, let's
talk about the rhetoric that's
spun out of control.
Comparing Governor Walker
to Hitler? Are you serious?
Suggesting that the governor
be shot or threatening to
burn down a legislator's
house, as was reported on
foxnews.com? What hap-
pened to all the calls for
civility in the public arena?
I'm not about to predict
how the situation in
Wisconsin will shake out.
They are required to have a
balanced budget so some
way, some how, that is going
to happen. 'It may come
down to who blinks first.
I have to wonder what the
students of Wisconsin are
learning from all this.
Perhaps both sides should
ask themselves what they are
teaching the young people
with their example. Not all
learning is done from books.
And make no mistake the
kids in Wisconsin are watch-
ing.
Are. they learning the right
lessons?

Laura Ware is a Sebring resi-
dent. She can be contacted by
e-mail at bookwormlady@
embarqmail.com


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a guest column can be submitted once every three
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Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the
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All items will run on a first-come basis as space per-
mits, although more timely ones could be moved up.
We believe your viewpoints are just as important as
any community leader or government official, so consider
this a personal invitation to get your two cents in. The
News-Sun has a long history of encouraging public dis-
cussion through letters, guest columns, and Reader's
Response questionnaires.


The Wisconsin mess


Page 3A


4








News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


www. newssun.comrn


Get bugged at MOSI in Tampa


You can play
with, and
even eat, bugs
Special to News-Sun
TAMPA If your children
get ants in their pants during
the weekends and start bug-
ging you about something
fun to do. consider bugging
out at MOSI.
The Museum of Science
and Industry is a family
favorite for the inquisitively
inclined and it's just a hop,
skip and jump away from
Highlands County long,
enough to say you "got away
for the weekend" but close
enough to not break the bank
with fuel creeping past $3.19
per gallon.
"Harry's Big Adventure:
My Bug World!" continues
through May 31.
Harry is a Chinese praying
mantis who welcomes the
bipedal mammals into his
world, offering humanoid
visitors the chance to see
insects up close. learning
more about them through
interactive displays, a "pet-
ting zoo" and eating them.
"It's hard to get people
over the creep factor." Bug
Chef Jayme Necaise said,
drawing a parallel that might
bug some. "If it lives in the
sea, for some reason, it's a
bug but 'Hey, I'll eat it.'"
Necaise is the director of
animal and visitor programs


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Bug' Chef Jayme Necaise sautees meal worms to be served
during 'Harry's Big Adventure: My Bug World' at Museum
of Science and Industry in Tampa.


for New Orleans-based
Audubon Nature Institute's
Insectarium.
Ironically, ANI is not the
title sponsor of the MOSI
exhibit.
That honor goes to
Terminix, the pest control
specialists and a partnership
with Audubon seems an
unlikely marriage.
"Even bug guys like
myself appreciate that bugs
are very good at making
more of themselves," the bug
chef said as he sauteed meal
worms, baked crickets and
fried banana cricket fritters.
"A lot of times, they will
reach pest status and that's
when their numbers need to
be controlled."
Terminix, he said, provides
the human intervention need-


ed to help property owners
avoid crippling bug infesta-
tions.
"Without insects, humans
would last very long," a sales
manager for Terminix's
Tampa office said. "In nature,
termites are great. If they
didn't take care of all the
dead and de L, ing wood,
then somebody would have
to. We just try to protect
homes and structures.'"
Children, in addition to
sampling Necaise's culinary
critters, could engage in a
bug spitting contest and even
don a pest control inspector's
white lab coat and hard hat to
inspect a model home and
learn how they can help their
parents keep critters at bay.
Entry to MOSI and the
insect exhibit is $19.95 for


News.-Sun photo by KATARA S I \ \ IONS
Jorge Rodriguez and Will Sleghorn watch closely last weekend as Madagascar hissing cock-
roaches race toward the finish line during the Roach Races at the Museum of Science and
Industry in Tampa. The race was part of 'Harry's Big Adventure: My Bug World' exhibit at
MOSI.


children 2-12 and includes
one IMAX dome movie.
Adults pay $23.95 and sen-
iors get in for $21.95.
Admission is all day and
includes re-entry.
It's an approximately a
two-hour drive from
Highlands County.
Directionscan be found at:
http://goo.gl/ll1 BJ9 (case sen-
sitive). For more informa-
tion, visit mosi.org.

KevinJ. Shutt is freelance jour-
nalist and political blogger at
Vhe Shutt Chute
(kevinJshutt. corn).


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Meal worms have almost as much protein as lean ground
beef.


Sebring CRA buying property to add parking downtown


By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
SEBRING Sebring's
Community Redevelopment
Agency is in the process of buying
two small parcels near the former
Bank of America at Ridgewood and
Lakeview drives.
One piece, the small triangle
where northbound Lakeview turns
and becomes Ridgewood. will be


landscaped and turned into an gate-
way. The area is too small for any
structure.
Pete Pollard, director of the CRA,
said Friday, the CRA hopes to
install an electronic sign there that
would announce. upcoming events.
He warned, however, that the idea is


still only a suggestion.
The second piece of property the
CRA is buying is at the corner of
Ridgewood Drive and Wall Street
- between Alma's Beauty Salon
and the Etcetera Boutique. Part of
Lhe Bank of America's former park-
ing lot, the site has 21 spaces that


will become city parking.
Gene Brenner, Chairman of the
CRA, said Friday that the closing
date for the sale was Thursday,
March 3. He thought that date might
be pushed back because of a formal-
ity.
Historically, when the city's CRA


bought property, the city was given
the title. This means, however, that
the city council has to vote to
accept the title.
That procedure is listed on the
agenda for the city's Tuesday meet-
ing.
Should the council agree to
receive the two properties the clos-
ing should happen quickly.


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www.newssun.com


News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


WELCOME BACK


WINTER FRIENDS!

While you were gone Florida Hospital worked hard to
provide you with the best health care in the Heartland.


Our new state-of-the-art Heart
& Vascular Center is the only
local center that performs life
saving coronary angiplasty
procedures. Our average door
to balloon time of 37 minutes
beats the national average of 90
minutes. Door to balloon time
is the clinical measure which
marks the total time elapsing
from entering the emergency
department until the cardiac
procedure begins.

Florida Hospital's ICU Nurses
were featured in "Advance for
,. Nurses," a national magazine,
applauding their efforts for
keeping heart patients safe and
their outcomes healthy. The
article highlights the steps
Florida Hospital has taken to
become a highly-rated heart fa-
cility with better outcomes that
larger coastal cities like Miami,
Tampa and Jacksonville.

As of August 1, 2010, all
Florida Hospital campuses
became Tobacco-Free.
) Tobacco products cannot be
used in or on any Florida
Hospital property, including
roads and parking lots.
Florida Hospitals Health
Education Department
(38616476) offers smoking
cessation classes to anyone
wishing to become tobacco free.

Meet Laurie Jones, RN,
CBPN-IS, our Breast
Patient Navigator at the New
Breast Care Center. Laurie
will help you to navigate your
health care if you have an
abnormal mammogram or are
diagnosed with breast cancer,
to make informed choices
about quality treatment.
Our Breast Patient Navigator
is available to help you
through the healing process.
For more information,
call Laurie at 402-7575

Computerized Physician Order
Entry (CPOE) is the newest
tool in patient care at Florida
Hospital. CPOE improves
patient safety through fewer
medication errors and
increasing the speed of care.
Florida Hospital will join
the ranks of only 8% of the
nation's hospitals to
incorporate this advanced
technology, which reduces
medical errors by 88%.


The Florida Hospital Center
for Bone, Joint & Spine is a
comprehensive patient centered
service to guide you through
your journey to an active and
healthy'lifestyle. Our Joint
Replacement Care Coordinator,
Christene Griffin, is here to
. assist and walk you through
the treatment process. Simply
call Christene at 402-5514.

We are now the only certified
Primary Stroke Center in the
Heartland. When a stroke
occurs, time is of the essence.
Working closely.with EMS,
our Emergency Department
helps to identify and begin
treating stroke patients before
they arrive, because every
minute can make a difference.

In the past year, Florida
Hospital has welcomed many
new board certified physicians
to our team of skilled doctors.
Among these physicians are,
an Interventional Cardiologist,
a Pediatric Hospitalist, a
Radiologist specializing in
Breast Care, a Vascular Surgeon,
and many more specialties.
Florida Hospital Heartland
Medical Center in Sebring &
Lake Placid, and Florida
Hospital Wauchula developed
a Physician Directory. This
directory will be mailed to
your home this month.

In October, we opened the
Breast Care Center. This.
center offers the newest
technology for mammography
and biopsies with a dedicated
Board Certified Radiologist,
specializing in breast care.
Florida Hospital and our local
Chambers of Commerce
paired with nine local salons
to increase Breast Cancer
Awareness "One Pink Strand
at a Time." Together we
raised almost $8,000 that
benefitted the new Florida
Hospital Breast Care Center.

New surgical technology has
given minimally invasive
surgery a new meaning.
Florida Hospital now offers
surgeries varying from spine to
hysterectomy using minimally
invasive techniques. IThis way,
you spend very little time in
the hospital and more
time enjoying life.


FLORIDA HOSPITAL
HEARTLAND MEDICAL CENTER


CARDIAC
ON CALL


BREATHE EAS

t


Page 5A









News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


Page 6A


www.newssun.com


Learning how to save a life


Courtesy photo
Emilly Williamson', health and safety instructor for the American Red Cross, teaches Aktion
Club members Carl Smith how to properly place his hands on the abdomen of Aktion Club
volunteer Nancy Mellon so he can simulate abdominal thrusts. Aktion Club members were
learning how to save someone's life if they are choking. Aktion Club meets every third
Thursday of the month at 2:15 p.m. at Ridge Area Arc, Avon Park. This is a civic club for
people with disabilities that is sponsored by the Sebring Kiwanis Club. New officers were
also elected for the upcoming year. Officers are Ralph Meyers, president; Sara Canali, vice
president; Angie Luft, secretary; and Teresa Messer, treasurer.




Colby accused of shoplifting


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.comi
SEBRING Sebring
Walmart security detained
open government activist
Preston Colby on Friday,
accusing him of petty theft.
Colby, 68, was given a
notice to appear and was
issued a trespass order to stay
out of Walmart.
"It was an unfortunate
incident, and I regret that it
happened," Colby said.
Colby was accused of try-
ing to take a 12-pack of
Tecante beer and a trailer
light kit that were on the bot-
tom of his buggy when he
checked out in electronics.
The merchandise in ques-
tion totaled $35.41, and
Colby had paid for multiple
other items in his cart.
"I forgot they were there,"
Colby said. "The clerk didn't
point them out. and I had
been distracted by the clerk,
who was struggling while.he
was trying to scan some


roses, and by the crowd that
was waiting in line for me to
finish," he said.
When Colby approached
the front door, two individu-
als stopped him and asked to
see his receipt.
"They asked for my
receipt. I
showed them
it and they
said I did not
pay for the
stuff on the
bottom of the
cart. I said
Colby 'OK' and
they asked if
I would return and pay for
them. I told them I was out of
checks, and they asked if I
would follow them to the
security room, which I did,"
Colby said.
In the police report, a
Walmart associate stated that
Colby refused to pay for the
items and refused to show his
receipt originally, but Colby
claims that he called the


Sebring Police Department
when the two security people
"got in his face" and would
not let him go to the rest-
room.
"I called Chief (Tom)
Dettman and asked him to
send out a supervisor because
the Walmart associates were
starting to upset me," Colby
said. "It wasn't belligerent
until they tried to play third-
degree games in their securi-
ty office, then I got bellioer-
ent. I am the wrong guy to do
that to."
Colby was taken to the
Sebring Police Department
by Sgt. Tom Gilliard after
seeing Emergency Medical
Personnel in Walmart.
Colby was never booked,
but a misdemeanor case of
petty theft was filed with the
Clerk of Courts on Tuesday,
and Colby is scheduled for
arraignment before Judge
Anthony Ritcnour at 8:30
a.m. on March 24.


OBITUARIES


DIANN E. DEVERO
Diann E. Devero, 61, of
Avon Park, Fia. passed away
Feb. 20, 2011, in Avon Park,
Fla.. She retired from United
Telephone Company of
Florida and was a correction-
al officer for the Avon Park
Correctional Institute. She
was a stewardess and mem-
ber of the Usher Board of
New Mt. Olive A.M.E.
Church.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Charles H. Devero,
Avon Park;
son, Otis
Asbury Jr.,
Fort Myers,
Fla.; daugh-
ter, Debra
Knight, Cape
Coral, Fla.;
Devero mother, Ellen
Rich, Avon
Park; brothers, John Rich Jr.,
Avon Park, Bennie J. Rich.,
Willingboro, N.J., Henry Lee
Rich, East Winsor, N.J.; sis-
ters, Ruth Lee Cosby, Mary
Kirkland, Hatie Gilbert, all of
Avon Park; grandchildren,
Roshoada L. Knight, Tonda
L, Knight, Darrell R. Knight,
Jaquasia L. Asbury.
Visitation will be from 11
a.m. to 1 p.m. and funeral
service will be at 1 p.m. Sat.,
Feb. 26, 2011 at New Mt.
Olive A.M.E. Church, 818 S.
Delaney Ave. Avon Park, Fla.
Rev. Larry Keys will offici-
ate. Interment at Lakeview
Memorial Gardens.
Arrangements have been


entrusted to:
Marion's Community
Funeral Chapel
Avon Park, Fla. 33825
863-4525272

ROBERT J. HASTON
Robert J. Haston, 77, of
Lake Placid went to be with
his Lord Friday morning,
Feb. 25, 2011 at the Lake
Placid Health Care Center.
He was born on April 28,
1933 in Binghamton, N.Y., to
parents John and Alta (Aten)
Haston. He served his coun-
try in the U.S. Air Force dur-
ing the Korean Conflict.
After serving in the Air Force
he received his master's
degree in education at
Springfield College in
Springfield, Mass. After col-
lege, Mr. Haston worked at
several YMCA's in the New
York and New Jersey area,
retiring from the YMCA in
Wichita, Kansas as the youth
director.
He moved to Lake Placid
in 1986, and was active as a
volunteer in several service
organizations, and was a
member of the Sebring Noon
Rotary Club and the First
Presbyterian Church of Lake
Placid.
Mr. Haston is survived by
his loving wife of 30 years,
Nancy.
There will be a service to
celebrate Mr. Haston's life on
Sunday. 3 p.m., Feb. 27, 2011
at the First Presbyterian
Church of Lake Placid, 118


N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid.
with Rev. Ray Cameron cele-
brating. The family suggests
donations in Mr. Haston's
memory to the First
Presbyterian Church
Building Fund.
Words of comfort to the
family can be made by visit-
ing www.scottfuneralser-
vices.com.
Arrangements entrusted to:
Scott Foncral Home
Lake Placid, FL 33852
863-465-4134

Death notice

Mary E. Mastith, 73, of
Elkhart, Ind., died
Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2011.
Elkhart Cremation Services,
Elkhart, Ind.


COMMUNITY BRIEFS


Continued from page 2A
Lodge 2374 will host music
with BobKat today (call for
time). For details and menu
selection, call 465-0131.

Free line dancing
lessons offered
SEBRING Free line
dancing lessons will be
offered from 6-8 p.m. every
Monday in March at
Duffer's Spoirts Grille.
Maureen Hecox, a certi-
fied line dancing instructor,
will teach some basic steps
during the first hour for
those who want to learn the
moves. In the second hour,
everyone will apply what
they learned as they dance
to music.
Duffer's is at 6940 U.S.
27 North. For details, call
382-6339.

Recreation Club
plans events
SEBRING The
Sebring Recreation Club.
333 Pomegranate Ave., will
host the following events
this week:
Monday AM State
AM/Any Doubles
Shuffleboard Tournament, 9
a.m.; Ladies Social Club, 1
p.m.
For more information,
call 385-2966.

Orchid Society
meets Monday
SEBRING The Orchid
Society of Highlands
County will hold its month-
ly meeting at 7 p.m.


Monday. Meetings are held
at the Bert J. Harris Jr.
Agricultural Center, 4509
George Blvd. The speaker
this month will be Charlie
Chapman, owner of
Chapman's Orchids in
Apopka. His presentation
will be on Cymbidium
Orchids and he will have
plants for sale.
Guests are always wel-
come and participants do
not have to be knowledge-
able of orchids to attend.
The society is also
preparing for its annual
orchid show, which will be
held on March 26 and 27.
For additional informa-
tion, call 465-2830 or e-
mail
orchidman 124@yahoo.com
or go to the Web site
littp://orchidsocietyhigh-
lands.org/.
*
Pennsylvania school
retirees to meet
SEBRING Retirees
from professional and sup-
port staff positions in
Pennsylvania public educa-
tion who live full or part
time in the U.S. 27 corridor
between Okeechobee and
Haines City will be getting
together on Tuesday, March
8. Social time at the Inn On
the Lakes will begin at 11
a.m. This will be followed
by a luncheon and meeting,
at which recent
Pennsylvania retirement
legislation and other items
of mutual interest will be
discussed.
The sponsoring Citrus


Chapter is a friendly group
which is affiliated with the
largest group in
Pennsylvania dedicated
exclusively to and directed
exclusively by, school
retirees, the Pennsylvania
Association of School
Retirees. For information
and/or reservations, call
471-3769 or 314-0219.

Elvis Wade to
perform at Church
of the. Redeemer
AVON PARK Elvis
Wade will perform at the
Episcopal Church of the
Redeemer on Tuesday.
This benefit performance
will be held at 2 p.m. and
refreshments will be served
at the intermission.
The church is on U.S. 27
in Avon Park, across from.
Wells Motors. Tickets are
$10 and can be purchased
by calling 368-1494.

Blood Mobile sets
up in Lake Placid
LAKE PLACID -
Florida Blood Centers-
Highlands blood mobile
will be at Florida Hospital-
Lake Placid from 2-4:30
p.m. Tuesday.
All donors will receive a
T-shirt and a mini physical
when they donate.
If you have not donated
blood in the last 56 days,
you are encouraged to do
so. One donation can save
the lives of three people.
Call 382-4499 with ques-
tions.


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FROM THE SOURCE... NEWS-SUN

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News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


Pills pile up for Operation Medicine Cabinet's second year


Continued from page IA reach-
i
above his head, every last one filled
with bottles of pills.
"We have 17 boxes," he said,
"and each one weighs from 30 to 40
pounds. You figure it out."
Last fall, the first Operation
Medicine Cabinet collected almost
1.000 pounds county wide.


Friday afternoon, with possibly
half that amount collected in
Sebring alone, Dettman had hopes
of setting a new record.
Prescriptions and over-the-count-
er medications that are out of date
or no longer used are dangerous in
several ways.
A medicine might not work the
way it is supposed to, for example,


or not deliver enough of a needed
ingredient; their bottles crowd the
medicine cabinet making for confu-
sion, raising the odds of an accident
and providing temptation to an
addict.
Dettman and Officer Rick Little,
who organized Sebring's collection,
agreed the most unusual drop-off
came from the Sudan Interior


Mission, which had a collection of
its own and brought all the medica-
tions in one delivery.
The pills had been removed from
the bottles and put into big clear
plastic bags. Seeing the pills by
themselves brought home how
many there were, and in how many
colors
"They looked like full gumball


machines," Little said of the stuffed
plastic bags.
Dettman said he was especially
pleased when a doctor brought in
out-dated medicine samples.
"I hope other doctors think to do
that," Dettman said.
He also hopes this becomes a reg-
ularly scheduled event.


County to look at attorney position Tuesday


Continued from page 1A
dated March 2010 which stated that 29
Florida Counties had retained outside
council instead of making them staff.
It is not clear if those numbers have
changed since that survey was conduct-
ed more than a year ago.
The phone survey of the 10 cities
dated Nov. 10., 2010 did show that coun-
ties of comparable size actually budget-
ed and paid less for legal council than
Highlands.
Santa Rosa County. with a population


Grow


house


busted
Continued from 1A
Leon gave consent for
deputies to search a house
at 6300 Bayhill Lane.
Inside, deputies found
that the grow house had
been dismantled, but
there was plenty of equip-
ment still left inside, such
as grow lights, pumps and
fans, not to mention the
four garbage bags full of
56.6 pounds of marijuana.
There were also 67
garbage bags that each
had a large amount of soil
with a root ball and a
cannabis stalk. The
weight of the cannabis
plants found inside those
bags totaled 45.5 pounds
for a total of 102 pounds
of pot seized.
Progress Energy report-
ed that the theft of electri-
cal services totaled
$25,469.83.'
Leon was charged with
marijuana producing,
marijuana trafficking,
grand larceny, theft of
utility services for manu-
facture of a controlled
substance and possession
of drug equipment. He
was being held Friday on
$132,500 bond.
Jorge Carlos Franco,
also 23 and from Miami, a
passenger in the van. was
,booked on the same
charges and was being
'held on without bond
,Friday.


Panel reviews

adoptive
girl's death
Associated Press
MIAMI In the after-
math of a shocking child
death, Florida officials
'announced Friday that
'they will now immediately
'contact law enforcement
agencies when they
receive an allegation that a
child may be in imminent
danger.
The announcement of
the new policy follows
revelations that the
Department of Children
and Families failed to
notify authorities of a hot-
line allegation that 10-
year-old twins adopted
from foster care might be
victims of abuse. Agency
workers conducted their
own four-day search.
The girl's body was
found last week, stuffed in
plastic bags in the back of
her father's truck along a
busy interstate highway.
Her brother was found in
the front seat, doused in a
toxic chemical, and he
was hospitalized with seri-
ous burns.
Their adoptive father,
Jorgc B3arahona, has
pleaded not guilty to
attempted first-degree
murder and aggravated
child ahuseC.


of 144,508, listed an attorney as a staff
member and budgeted $254,740 for a
total of two positions.
Nassau County, according to the
phone survey, has a population of
72,588, and pays its attorney $141,000
annually, but budgeted $567,027 for the
entire legal department with a staff of
three for 2010.
Sumter County responded that it has a
population of 95,326, retains outside
council and budgeted $280,400 for its
entire legal services in 2010.


Okeechobee County, population
39,703 according to county staff
research, retains two outside attorneys
on annual contracts and budgeted
$177,291 for all legal and litigation
services.
Polk County's commission, with a
population of 584,343, pays its in-house
attorney $150,000 per year, according
to the staff research, but has a legal staff
of 11 and a budget of $1.2 million for its
legal department.


Courtesy photo
Residents at the Palms of Sebring recently were present to watch a memory come to life as
they celebrated 'Olga Davis Day.' Nancy Hawk, activities coordinator, discovered that one
of the residents had written a song that was sung by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir in the
past. After months of trying to find the sheet music for this composition, it was located.
Cecil Hess, chaplain at the Palms of Sebring, was called on to play the song on the piano
and Alyssa Hughes from the social services department volunteered to sing it. Olga Davis
was presented with roses and thoroughly enjoyed listening to the song she had written.
This was buried deep within her memory and it was a pleasure to watch the joy on her
face as she listened once again to this tribute she had titled 'Christ's Birthday.'



Group talks about school problems


Continued from page 1A
and explained that there were
problems with the grading
system and the overall
assessment testing process.
Fleck also told The Group
that the district was lobbying
the state for a fair grading
system.
"There are lots of positive
stories concerning the
schools. Every day you can
pick up any newspaper and
see a positive story on educa-
tion," Fleck said. "We have a
76 percent graduation rate,
we have several tutoring pro-
grams and we have a lot of
dedicated people working on
this."
Fleck also addressed issues
about teacher relations, par-
ent involvement and how stu-
dents with learning disabili-
ties are included into the gen-


eral population many times
and not receiving separate
focus.
"The whole school can be
dragged down by the results
from 50 students," Fleck
said.
"You are addressing the
symptoms, not the problem,"
Barger countered. "The sys-
tem is designed to bring good
students down, not raise all
students up."
Several members of The
Group stressed their desire to
have a separate vocational
track and academic track
within the high school sys-
tem, but Fleck explained that
vocational concerns were
being addressed for the dis-
trict through South Florida
Community College's Career
Academy.
"We currently have over


100 students enrolled in that
program, and it is growing
every year," Fleck said.
The Group also asked for
an explanation on why no
Highlands County student
has participated in the locally
held science fair for the last
five years.
"Teachers felt that the stu-
dents could receive a more
productive effort by collabo-
rating group projects in the
classrooms," Fleck said.
No definitive plans devel-
oped out of the discussion,
and some felt that there need-
ed to be a plan worked out
soon.
"Our public school system
is a failure," said Steve Fruit,
a local real estate agent.
"Throwing money at it is not
fixing'it. We need a different
approach."


Rail plan gets another reprieve


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Hours
after the Obama administra-
tion gave Florida Gov. Rick
Scott a week to reconsider
his opposition to a revised
proposal for high-speed
.trains between Tampa and
Orlando, the Republican kept
up his harsh criticism of the
project.
U.S. Transportation
Secretary Ray LaHood
offered the reprieve after
meeting with Scott in
Washington. At stake is $2.4
billion the federal govern-
ment would take back if Scott
doesn't approve the project.
"He asked me for addition-
al information about the
state's role in this project, the
responsibilities of the Florida
Department of
Transportation, as well as
how the state would he pro-
tected 'from liability,"
alaHood said in a statement..


"He has committed to make a
final decision by the end of
next week."
If Scott balks, the money
would be reallocated to one
or more other states seeking
high-speed rail funding,
including California, New
York and
Rhode Island.
"I believe
high speed
rail is a feder-
al boondog-
gle, as I said
Scott more than a
week ago,"
Scott said. "I communicated
to Secretary LaHood that as
long as Florida remains on
the hook for cost overruns,
operating costs and pay-
backs in the case of default, I
will vigorously oppose this
project."
As recently as Thursday
night, LaHood told a meeting
of U.S. mayors including


several from Florida the
project was dead and the
money offered to Florida
would go to other states, said
Mort Downey, a top-level
Clinton administration trans-
portation official and an
adviser to President Barack
Obama's 2008 presidential
campaign.
But after meeting with
Scott, LaHood gave the gov-
ernor until next Friday to
make a decision on the
revised proposal worked out
with Tampa, Lakeland,
Orlando and Miami officials
to absolve the state of finan-
cial or legal obligation by
turning the project over to the
local governments.
Scott and the president
have political capital riding
on the Florida project.
Obama has sought to make
a national high-speed rail
system a signature project of
his administration.


POLICE BLOTTER


Continued from page 2A
+ Paulyn Josephine
Mercer, 22, of Lake Wales,
was charged with petit theft.
+ Don Lawton Morgan, 24,
of Okeechobee, was
charged with possession of
marijuana and possession
and or use of drug equip-
ment.
* Brent Michael Rice, 23,
homeless, was charged with
two counts of violation of
conditional release refer-
ence breach of peace or dis-
orderly conduct and resist-
ing arrest without violence.
* Kathryn Louise Rowland,
50, of Sebring, was charged
with battery.
* Antonio Miguel Salcedo,
32, of Sebring, was charged
with possession of a con-
trolled substance without a
prescription, possession
and or use of drug equip-
ment, possession of mari-
juana.
* Leticia Santana, 43, of
Lake Placid, was charged


with driving with an expired
license.
* James Robert Scherer,
77, of Sebring, was charged
with simple assault.
* Clayton Eugene Smith,
38, of Sebring, was charged
with arson.
* Derek Walker, 37, of
Sebring,. was charged with
possession of a weapon or
ammunition by a convicted
Florida felon.
* Katholene Amanda
Walton, 28, of Lake Placid,
was charged with violation
of probation reference
worthless check.
* Marcus Waugh, 20, of
Avon Park, was charged
with three counts of failure
to appear reference no valid
driver license, alcohol bev-
erage in possession of per-
son under 21 years of age,
and petit retail theft.
* Andrew James Whatley,
23, of Sebring, was charged
with violation of probation
reference burglary of an
unoccupied structure.


Continued from page 1A
"I'm out here because I
also want people to know
that I contribute 5 percent
to my pension every pay
check and I pay for my
health care. Not everyone
knows that, and that is
important in this debate,"
Sass said.
"I don't want the fire-
fighters, police and teach-
ers in Wisconsin think that
they are alone in this and


that we support them," Sass
added. "We are going to do
this again."
"I understand that the
whole country is hurting,
but the governor is trying to
balance the budget on our
pensions. Our. pensions
make up just 2 percent of
the overall budget, but the
government is trying to fix
their spending on that 2
percent. That is just ridicu-
lous," Kempe said.


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Page 7A


Memory comes to life


AP police, firefighters show

support of state workers


I1EW-SN









News-Sun + Sunday, February 27, 2011


www. newssun.corn


Five-Day forecast for Highlands County
TODAY MONDAY TUESDAY


Fog in the morning; mostly
sunny
840 /610
Winds: SSE at 7-14 mph


Mostly sunny

830/620
Winds: S at 8-16 mph


Pensacola
474/63

Almanac
Temperature
Readings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake Placid
High Tuesday ..................................... 85
Low Tuesday .... ........... 500
High Wednesday .................. 84o
Low Wednesday ...... ......................58o
High Thursday ...... .........................83
Low Thursday ........................................ 56
Heat Index
For 3 p.m. today
Relative humidity .................................. 40%
Expected air temperature 4............. 84
M akes it feel like ..... .......... ..... 840
Barometer
Tuesday .................... ...... ..... ... 30.11
Wednesday .... ... .......... ... 30.13
Thursday ................. ............. .......... 30.07
Precipitation
Tuesday ................ .............. 0.00"
W wednesday ........ ....... ..... ...... .. 0.00"
Thursday .......................................... 0.00"
M month to date .... ............................. 0.22"
Year to date ....... .... ........ .......... 2.87"


Tides
Readings at St. Petersburg
High ............. .........................9:53 p.m .
Low ............. ..........................5:10 a.m .
H igh ....... ........... ........................ none
Low ..... ....... ................. ......... .... none
Readings at Palm Beach
High ................................. ....... 4:32 a.m .
Low ............................................ 10 :25 a.m .
H igh .......................... ................ 4:45 p.m .
Lov .................... ..................... 10 :5 1 p .m .
Lake Levels
Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterday
Lake Jackson .................................... 78.36'
Lake Okeechobee ............................... 12.23'
N orm al ............................................... 14 .5 1'
UV Index Today
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index" number,
the greater the need for eye and skin protection,


Chance for a couple of
showers
810 /620
Winds: WSW at 7-14 mph




Tallihassee
80/55


2 Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise


10 a.m. Noon 2p.m. 4p.m.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate: 6-7 High;
8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2011
AccuWeather.com


UUMoonset


WEDNESDAY


Nice with sun and some
clouds
800 /580
Winds: NE at 7-14 mph


Apalachicola
; 72/59


Regional Summary
Patchy fog in the morning; otherwise, mostly sunny today,
Mainly clear tonight. Mostly sunny tomorrow. Tuesday:
variable clouds with a couple of showers possible.
Wednesday and Thursday: sun and some clouds.




S ,Avon Park
84/61

Sebring
84/61
SLorida
83/63


Lake Placid
84/61' %,


Brighton
82/62 *


Venus
84/61



Farm Report
Fog in the morning; otherwise, mostly sunny
today. Winds south-southeast 7-14 mph.
Expect 6-10 hours of sunshine with average
relative humidity 60% and good drying condi-
tions.
Weather History
On Feb. 27, 1717, the first in a series of
storms to hit New England struck Boston. The
city was snowbound for three weeks with a
total of 36 inches from the gieat snow.


Today
6:52 a.m.
6:26 p.m.
3:16 a.m.
2:05 p.m.


Monday
6:51 a.m.
6:27 p.m.
.4:01 a.m.
3:01 p.m.


New First Full Last

Mar4 Mara
Mar 4 Mar 12 Mar 19 Mar 26


THURSDAY


Partly sunny, breezy and
pleasant
780/550
Winds: ENE at 10-20 mph


Jacksonville
80/55:
Rk -


*Gainesville
83/55


.Ocala
83/57





Clearwater Tampa
82/64' 80/564
S ,t WrnterH
4 84/63
St. Petersburg 84/6
82/64 ,
8 Sarasota
80/61


Fort Myers
j 84/63
-J Vl *


Shown is today's
weather. Temperatures
are today's highs and
tonight's lows.


Naples
85162


Water Restrictions
* Even addresses may water on Thursday and
Sunday.
* Odd addresses may water on Wednesday
and Saturday.
* All watering should take place before 10
a.m. and after 4 p.m. Key West

Florida Cities


Today
City Hi/Lo/W
Cape Coral 85/62/s
Clearwater 82/64/s
Coral Springs 81/68/s
Daytona Beach 81/62/s
Ft. Laud. Bch 82/72/s
Fort Myers 84/63/s
Gainesville 83/55/s
Hollywood 84/67/s
Homestead AFB 79/69/s
Jacksonville 80/55/s
Key West 79/71/s


Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
83/63/s
82/65/s
80/65/s
82/63/pc
80/67/s
83/64/s
81/61/pc
82/64/s
79/65/s
81/62/pc
80/70/s


Tue.
Hi/Lo/W
83/64/sh
79/62/sh
82/65/pc
76/60/sh
81/66/s
83/65/sh
79/53/shi
83/65/pc
80/63/s
77/51/s
79/69/s


National Forecast for February 27
... .... Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day
\\ Seattle- **
\ \\ 42/33 *; ----.-..-....., \

*Billings *
S* 34/22 f-Minneapolis MILDER '.
34/14 Detr'oit -
7 L / Chica 40/38 NewYork-
San Francisco I "'7 4/36- J L /-
53/43 -*. n* n 2e
SCOLD* Denver L... ...2. .
*1 -*46/24 \Kansas City \ / Washington
S-*' *\'58/32,\\\y"\\\'\ J 58/48

i Los Angeles, -*k-- t. "
'58/40 Aat
Atnta PLEASANT
El Paso WINDY 76/59
55/28 ." - -15


-Houston


UdylUlild DUeac Cold Warm Stationa, U80C6 Miami
81162/. .. ,'W, 82/70


S10o s Os 0 I 0 50s 40s 50s 60s 70s IL80s 90 10
84/6u National Suniniar)
*' '., ':*:ih "[,:m ,, It I r '-. ni i i' N j 11 i :.:|T|.- :.'n : 11 I ir.., '.:n i ,.) In 1'. 1 ,I I the storm ,
Sl' -' I r il l: i i r iI : .- i .I., 1. .ii : ,., 11 r l : in Ij,,' .. 1i n r i ,l 1 m m oist flow
.: 1 ]. : 11 i l l hi l : ,. jI[. i : i i i, .i .. I. 1. *I : ,.,i i I i i ..I i ji.,.i ..,-I I h. ,: i jg e fo r th e
.j ; ,, 1 ,.I. I. I 1 in :rm. i I H' , ii 'l 1. i ir.. i ill. m i -j ,.ii i o i r,,i r -.:,r ,,rth across the
Haven
U.S. Cities


Okeechobee
81/65 City
Albuquerque
Atlanta
Baltimore
West Palm Beach Birmingham
82/68 a Boston
Charlotte
Cheyenne
rr Chicago
Fort Lauderdale Cleveland
82/72, Columbus
Dallas
Denver
", Detroit
Miami Harrisburg
82/70 Honolulu
', Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
.- Kansas City
Lexington
/' Little Rock


Today
City Hi/Lo/W
Miami 82/70/s
Okeechobee 81/65/s
Orlando 84/60/s
Pembroke Pines 84/67/s
St. Augustine 77/62/s
St. Petersburg 82/64/s
Sarasota 80/61/s
Tallahassee 80/55/s
Tampa 80/64/s
W. Palm Bch 82/68/s
Winter Haven 84/63/s


Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
81/68/s
82/61/s
85/62/s
82/64/s
78/63/pc
82/65/s
79/63/s
77/61/pc
80/64/s
81/65/s
84/61/s


Tue.
Hi/Lo/W
82/68/s
81/61/sho
81/61/sh
83/65/pc
73/58/sh
78/61/sh
77/63/sh
79/44/s
75/60/sh
82/63/pc
81/62/sih


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstormns. r-rain, sf-snow
flurries, sn-snow. i-ice.


City
Acapulco
Athens
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Page 8A


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World Cities


City ,
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
Oklahoma City
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Raleigh
Rochester
St. Louis
San Francisco
Seattle
Wash., DC



City
London
Montreal
Moscow
Nice
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Quebec
Rio de Janeiro
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Sydney
Toronto
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg


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FERURYIS HEART MONTH^^^


r
1
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A.









SECTION




BUSINESS


News-Sun


Personal
Finance
Jason Aladerman

Insurance

reality

check
When it comes to
insurance, many people
face the Goldilocks
dilemma: Am I buying
too much coverage, not
enough, or just the right
amount? How do you
determine your proper
insurance levels while
ensuring you don't waste
money on unneeded cov-
erage or worse, leave
your family exposed?
Here are a few consid-
erations:
Everyone needs
medical insurance. One
serious accident or illness
could wipe out your sav-
ings and plunge you into
debt or bankruptcy. If
covered through your
employer, carefully com-
pare all plans offered.
The one with the lowest
premium may not be your
best option. Consider
how other factors add up
- deductibles, copay-
ments, allowed/disal-
lowed benefits, out-of-
network charges, medica-
tion charges, etc. Also
See INSURANCE, 3B


MCT photo
President Obama is pressing business leaders to help middle-class families.

Obama asks business leaders to

do their part for middle class


By JULIE PACE
Associated Press
WASHINGTON As corporate profits
rise and Wall Street earnings soar, President
Barack Obama is pressing American busi-
ness leaders to create more jobs and find
ways for struggling middle-class families to
share in the nation's economic recovery.
Obama says the private sector has to do
its part to ensure that "we're not simply cre-
ating an economy in which one segment of it
is doing very well, but the rest of the folks
are out there treading water.'
"I don't know exactly where your future
customers come from if they don't have
jobs," Obama said Thursday during the first
meeting of his newly created jobs and com-
petitiveness council.
The president asked the 22-member coun-
cil. comprised of business and labor leaders,
to come up with new ideas for increasing
hiring and boosting economic growth. He
listed streamlining regulations and reforming
tax laws as steps he would consider for cre-
ating jobs and bringing down the unemploy-
ment rate, stuck at about 9 percent.


7 don't know exactly where
your future customers come
from if they don't have jobs.'

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA

While many Americans are either without
jobs or are under employed, corporate prof-
its continue to rise and 2010 saw record-set-
ting earnings for some Wall Street banks.
Still, many of those companies and banks
are keeping trillions of dollars on the side-
lines, wary of investing while the economic
recovery is still fragile.
Some members of the council said their
companies' economic data are showing the
signs of economic disparity.
American Express CEO Kenneth Chenault
said affluent Americans are spending again
but lower- and middle-class people are not,
in part because they don't have access to
credit. And those who do, Chenault said. are
See OBAMA, page 2B


Sunday, February 27, 2011

H&R Block offers free

Second Look review


Special to the News-Siun
SEBRING Sixty per-
cent of American taxpayers
trust tax preparers to pre-
pare their taxes and find
every tax credit and deduc-
tion allowed by law. Other
taxpayers choose to prepare
their taxes themselves.
Unfortunately, many of
them make serious mistakes
on their returns.
Participating H&R Block
retail tax offices will offer
free Second Look(r)
reviews through March 31.
This program helps taxpay-
ers ensure the accuracy of
2007-2010 returns not pre-
pared by H&R Block.
"I don't like doing taxes;
numbers aren't my thing,"
said Theresa Dudley-Ayers,
Greenback, Tenn. "There's
a lot I guessed at and I have,
a feeling I guessed wrong."
In fact, Dudley-Ayers over-
looked several valuable
credits and deductions.
After an H&R Block
Second Look, her tax pro-
fessional was able to find
her more than $5,000 back
on her tax return.
Dudley-Ayers' story,
along with several other
like-stories, became the
backbone of the company's
new, successful, national
advertising campaign. This
campaign showcased
Second Look(r) events in
Greenback, Tenn., and Los
Angeles, in which a number
of people were found with
major errors on their
returns. Some of them
overlooked credits and
deductions. You can view
some of the success stories
by going to www.neverset-


tieforless.com.
Some of the more com-
monly missed credits and
deductions include:
Making Work Pay
Credit Up to $800 for
married filing jointly and
$400 for single filers is
available for the last time
on the 2010 tax return
American Opportunity
Credit This $2,500 credit
is available to cover each
eligible student's first four
years of college, potentially
equaling a $10,000 credit
over four years
Energy efficient
upgrades The 2009-10
maximum credit of $1,500
is available on home
upgrades such as exterior
windows, exterior doors,
and energy efficient fur-
naces, central air-condi-
tioners, and many other
items.
Earned Income Tax
Credit Missed by approxi-
mately 20 percent of those
who are eligible, this credit
can mean an additional
$5,666 refund for lower-
income working taxpayers.
"Let's face it, these are
tough economic times, and
no one can afford to leave
money on the table," said
Lisa Berish, area manager
at H&R Block.
"Taxpayers too often
overlook credits and deduc-
tions to which they are enti-
tled. and are missing out on
possibly hundreds or thou-
sands of dollars. They trust
their tax preparers and do-
it-yourself software pack-
ages to oet it right for them.
See REVIEW, page 2B


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News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


WWW.newssun. Con


BUSINESS


State spending cuts slow US economic growth in fourth quarter


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Deeper spend-
ing cuts by state and local govern-
ments weighed down U.S. economic
growth in the final three months of
last year.
The government's new estimate
for the October-December quarter
illustrates how growing state budget
crises could hold back the economic
recovery.
The Commerce Department
reported Friday that economic
growth increased at an annual rate of
2.8 percent in the final quarter of last
year. That was down from the initial
estimate of 3.2 percent.
The weaker figure was disappoint-
ing and prompted some economists
to lower their forecasts for economic
growth in the current January-March
quarter.


State and local governments,
wrestling with budget shortfalls, cut
spending at a 2.4 percent pace. That
was much deeper than the 0.9 per-
cent annualized cut first estimated
and was the most sincp the start of
2010.
Consumers spent a little less than
first thought. Their spending rose at
a rate of 4.1 percent, slightly smaller
than the initial estimate of 4.4 per-
cent. Still, it was the best showing
since 2006. And it suggests
Americans will play a larger role this
year in 'helping the economy grow,
especially with more money from a
Social Security tax cut.
One of the crucial questions is
whether consumers can spend
enough this year to help offset nega-
tive forces in the economy -


notably struggling state and local
governments and a wobbly housing
market that has depressed homes
values.
Rising energy prices also pose a
danger. If oil prices were to rise to
.$150 or more a barrel and then stay
there for months, another recession
is possible, economists said.
Gasoline prices would near $5 a gal-
lon. Consumers and businesses
would spend much less, and some
employers might slash jobs.
"Consumers stumbled a bit to start
the year, and while we expect them
to pick up the pace some in coming
months, the recent rise in energy
prices poses a notable headwind,"
said economist Michael Feroli at JP
Morgan Chase Bank.
Overall economic growth in the


October-December quarter was mar-
ginally better than the 2.6 percent
pace logged in the prior quarter. The
economy has steadily grown after
hitting a difficult patch last spring.
But rising oil prices and budget cuts
by state and local government are
creating headwinds.
Feroli and other analysts now pre-
dict the economy will gtow at a pace
around 3.5 percent in the January-
March quarter. That's down from
earlier estimates in the 4 percent-
plus range.
Government stimulus is fading
and budget cuts at the federal level
could further hamper economic
growth.
The federal government trimmed
spending at the end of the year,
entirely reflecting cuts to defense


spending. And a showdown over the
U.S. budget is taking place on
Capitol Hill between Democrats and
Republicans, threatening a govern-
ment shutdown.
For all of last year, the economy
grew 2.8 percent, the most in five
years, according to revised figures.
That was down a bit from the 2.9
percent growth first estimated a
month .ago. However, it was an
improvement from 2009 when the
economy suffered-its worst decline
in more than 60 years.
Still, economic growth must be
stronger to make a noticeable dent in
unemployment, which was 9 percent
last month. The economy would
need to grow 5 percent for a whole
year to significantly bring down the
unemployment rate.


Dell Realty

Team joins

Heartland

Real Estate
Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING One of
Highlands County's top
real estate firms,
Heartland Real Estate'
Corp., is pleased to
announce the addition of
the Dell Realty Team,
which includes Pat Dell,
Dawn Dell and Chris
Gillian.
With more than 46
combined years of real
estate experience, this
father, daughter and son-
in-law team are all
licensed real estate bro-
kers and long-time resi-
dents of Sebring special-
izing in waterfront, golf
course, acreage, residen-
tial, estates and reloca-
tions.
"We are thrilled to
have Pat, Dawn and Chris
join the HREC family,"
said Jimmy Wohl, HREC
president/broker.
"As realtors who are
truly dedicated to their
clients and this region of,
the state, the Dell Realty
Team is a perfect fit for
our company's business
model."
All three members of
the Dell Realty Team
have served in the U.S.
military. Pat Dell re-
located from
Pennsylvania to Florida
after his childhood.
He has brokered real
estate in Highlands
County for 33 years,
ranging from golf courses
to assisted living facili-
ties to mobile home
parks.
Dawn Dell has served
in many leadership roles
in Highlands County, was
elected Realtor of the
Year (2006-07) by her
peers, and is a life-long
Florida resident.
Gillian is a life-long
resident of Highlands
County and has a degree
in agriculture.
"Whether you are buy-
ing or selling any type of
property anywhere in the
Heartland Region area,
our team is not only com-
mitted to helping you
accomplish your real
estate goals, but we treat
you like family because
we are family," Wohl
said.
"The addition of the
Dell Realty Team
enhances what we can do
for our clients."
Heartland Real Estate
Corporation is a real
estate brokerage and
development firm in
Sebring for more than 20
years.
With extensive knowl-
edge in all areas of real
estate investment, HREC,
specializes in develop-
ment, agricultural, com-
mercial and residential
properties.
For more information,
visit www.heartlandre.net
or call 382-3887.


Chainsaw art sale benefits hospital


Courtesy photo by Mountain Top
Ronnie and Vivianne Waldr6n of Sunnyland Egg Farm and Ranch pose with a six foot tall
wooden cowboy created by chainsaw artist Rod Green and auctioned off during the 74th
Annual Highlands County Fair in Sebring. The Waldrons paid $750 for the creation and
proceeds went benefit the All Children's Hospital.



Marabel earns NAR Short Sales

and Foreclosure certification


Special to thei Nw's-Sun
SEBRING Stephen
Marabel with EXIT Realty
All Stars has earned the
nationally recognized Short
Sales and Foreclosure
Resource certification. The
National Association of
Realtors offers the SFR certi-
fication to Realtors who want
to help both buyers and sell-
ers navigate these complicat-
ed transactions, as demand
for professional expertise
with distressed sales grows.
According to a recent NAR
survey, nearly one-third of all
existing homes sold recently
were either short sales or
foreclosures. For many real
estate professionals, short
sales and foreclosures are the
new "traditional" transaction.
Realtors who have earned the
SFR certification know how


to help sellers maneuver the
complexities of short sales as
well as help buyers pursue
short sale and foreclosure
opportunities.
"As leading advocates for
homeownership, Realtors
believe that any family that
loses its home to foreclosure
is one family too many, but
unfortunately, there are situa-
tions in which people just
cannot afford to keep their
homes, and a foreclosure or a
short sale results," said 2009
NAR President Charles
McMillan, a broker with
Coldwell Banker Residential
Brokerage in Dallas-Fort
Worth. "Foreclosures and
short sales can offer nno rtui-


cities for home buyers
benefit the larger commu
as well, but it's extrer


Review your taxes for fre


Continued from page 1B
H&R Block tax professionals
undergo specific training on
new tax laws every year. It's
the clients' money. We're
just getting them all the
refund that they deserve."
According to The Tax
Institute at H&R Block, a
nationwide survey showed
62 percent of taxpayers did-
n't know they could file an
amended return to claim


missed credits or deduct
Generally, taxpayers
amend a return to claii
refund up to three years i
the return due date, mal
the deadline to amend a 2
return April 18.
Taxpayers who want
take advantage of this lim
time offer can find an H
Block office near them, a
tax professional who
their needs,
www.hrblock.com.


Obama prods business


Continued from page 1B
wary of using it because of,
uncertainty over the strength
of the economy.
"Seventy-five percent of
the credit out there is not
being used," Chenault said.
"We've got to solve this
credit issue."
Obama created the com-
petitiveness council last
month, naming General
Electric CEO Jeffrey Immelt
as its head. The move came
as Obama sought to increase
his outreach to the business
community and shift his


economic policies from
short-term stabilization t
increasing employment.
The economy and joble
ness remain top concerns
many voters.
Immelt said the council
plans to deliver recomme
nations to the president w
in 90 days.
The White House said
council will hold its next
meeting outside of
Washington as part of an
effort to draw ideas from
business owners and world
across the country.


important to have the help of a
real estate professional like a
Realtor who has earned the
SFR certification for these
kinds of purchases."
The certification program
includes training on how to
qualify sellers for short sales,
negotiate with lenders, protect
buyers, and limit risk, and
provides resources to help
Realtors stay current on
national and state-specific
information as the market for
these distressed properties
evolves. To earn the SFR cer-
tification, Realtors are
required to take one core
course and three Webinars.
Visit www.realtorsfr.org.


Lake June West

Townhomes

swamped by Parade

of Homes visitors


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID Mike
Chapman and the sales
staff of Lake June West
Townhomes had no idea
that the first two days of
the Parade of Homes pro-
motion would generate
interest and visitors to the
point that the three sales
people closed the weekend
with strained and tired
voices.
According to Al Moretz,
of the Highlands County
Builders Association
(HCBA), the Parade of
Homes promotion ends at 5
p.m. today. Interested par-
ties should contact the
HCBA at 382-1304 for a
list of participating com-
munities.
Upon completion, Lake
June West will feature 49
Key West style townhomes
featuring two floor plans
situated on more than
1,000 feet of sandy beach
with fabulous views of
Lake June and Scrub State
Park across the lake. There
are barbecue areas, a pri-
vate boat ramp and' 20 of
the community's 49 boat
docks were completed last
month. Each dock has
water and electric. The end
of the dock pier features a
large sunning area.
Two fully furnished
models are open daily from


9 a.m. to 5 p.m. According
to Chapman, "Interior
Designer Karen Forsythe
and the Badcock Furniture
design team did a fantastic
job selecting furniture, art-
, work and accessories that
are perfect for our lakefront
living lifestyle." Gayle
Chapman of Chapman Real
Estate Corp stated, "We
receive compliments on our
models daily. Everybody
loves them! The designs
and furnishings make you
feel like you're at the Ritz
on the lake with all the cozy
soft leather couches," she
added.
According to Chapman,
this is a one of a kind
opportunity to purchase a
waterfront home on Lake
June especially with the
Lake June West Golf and
Athletic Club located right
across the street. The com-
bination of the beachfront
townhomes and the Athletic
Club amenities make this a
true resort setting offered
no where else in Highlands
County. There is also a
Vacation Rental
Management Program
available to assist you in
managing your vacation
property.
For additional informa-
tion, call 465-9185 or visit
the Web site at www.lake-
junewesttownhomes.com.


Classified ads get results!
Call 385-6155


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nity,
newly gThe Heartland Harmonizers Chorus4
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J5 7S3


Page 2B









www.newssun. com


News-Sun + Sunday, February 27, 2011


BUSINESS


Insurance can be tricky, so make sure you have the right coverage


Continued from page 1B
compare options available through
your spouse's job.
If you're not covered, explore
other options:
If recently laid off, ask about
COBRA continuation coverage
through your former employer.
If under age 26, you may be
able to enroll in a parent's plan.
Visit www.heal.thcare.gov for
details.
High-deductible plans pro-
vide comprehensive coverage for
catastrophic illnesses at much
lower premiums than comparable
low-deductible plans.
Most states provide high-risk
insurance for people who don't
qualify for private insurance. It's
costly, but no one can be denied.


Visit www.naschip.org for informa-
tion.
Life insurance. If you're sin-
gle with no dependents, you may
get by with minimal or no life
insurance. But if family depends
on your income, many experts rec-
ommend buying coverage worth at
least'five to 10 times your salary.
After your kids are grown you may
be able to lower your coverage; but
carefully consider your spouse's
retirement needs.
Car insurance. Most states
require car insurance for good rea-
son: It protects you financially
should you cause an accident or be
hit by an uninsured driver. Rates
vary considerably depending on:
coverage and deductible levels for
liability, uninsured motorist and


Don't forego critical
coverage to save a few
bucks: It's not worth it
in the long run.

collision; age and driving record;
vehicle year and model; number of
insured family members; and secu-
rity features (alarm, airbags,
secured parking, etc.)
To lower car insurance costs,
Ruth Stroup, a Farmers Insurance
Group agent from Oakland, Calif.,
suggests:
Comparison shop with other car-
riers.
Increasing your deductibles from
$250 to $ 1,000 might lower your
premium by 15 to 30 percent.


Ask about discounts for safe
drivers, age 55-plus, linked home-
owners/renters insurance, etc.
Stroup adds, "My biggest tip on
auto insurance is to make sure your
liability insurance relates to your
net worth and income. It only takes
one accident to wipe out your sav-
ings. Transferring this risk to an
insurance company is very inex-
pensive for good drivers."
Homeowners insurance. Your
home is probably your largest
investment, so don't risk losing it
and its contents through an unfore-
seen disaster, accident or robbery.
Renters also need insurance:
Although the building is insured by
the owner, your contents are not. A
few tips:
Review your coverage periodi-


cally to adjust for inflation, home
improvements, new possessions,
change in marital/family status,
etc.
Compare your rate with other
insurance carriers, but get "apples
to apples" quotes, since policies
may have varying provisions.
Buy additional coverage on
expensive items like jewelry, art
and computers, which may have
limited coverage.
Don't forego critical coverage to
save a few bucks: It's not worth it
in the long run.

Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial
education programs. To participate in a
free, online Financial Literacy and
Education Summit on April 4, 2011, go
to www.practicalmoneyskills. com/sum-
mit2011.


Loss of contract

another letdown for

struggling Gulf Coast


Pentagon picks
Boeing over EADS
By BOB JOHNSON
Associated Press
MOBILE, Ala. Out-of-
work carpenter Anthony
Wayne Lamar had planned to
be one of the first people in
line for a job building new
Air Force refueling tankers
on the Gulf Coast. Like many
others, he is struggling
through hard times in a
region beset not just by the
sour economy but by an oil
spill and hurricanes.
"God knows we need it,"
said Lamar, 53, sitting in a
downtown park.
Now, however, Lamar
must look elsewhere for
work.
The central Gulf Coast
took another hit Thursday as
the Pentagon turned down a
bid by European Aeronautic
Defence and Space Co., or
EADS, which wanted to
assemble the planes in
Mobile, and instead awarded
a $35 billion contract for
about 180 aircraft to Boeing
Co.
The decision was a rever-
sal of fortune for Mobile.
EADS had initially won the
tanker project, setting off cel-
ebrations on the coast, but
then lost it after the govern-
ment upheld a protest by
Boeing in 2008. A review
uncovered irregularities in
the contract process and the
project was rebid. Boeing
came out on top the second
time.
Bitterly disappointed over
the Pentagon's decision, Rep.
Jo Bonner, R-Mobile, sug-
gested the fight may not be
over.
"This competition has been
challenged before and it's not
unlikely it will be challenged
again," Bonner said.
The announcement also
drew deeply disappointed
reactions in Europe, where
the aircraft manufacturer
promised to discuss the deci-
sion with the U.S. military.
In the meantime, rather
than drawing workers from
places like sleepy Coden or
Tillmans Corner on the
Alabama coast and
Pascagoula across the
Mississippi line, Chicago-
based Boeing plans to send
thousands of jobs to
Washington state and Kansas,
where much of the work will
be done.
The news was especially
hard for unemployed resi-
dents who had hoped to find
a job if the plane had been
built in Mobile by EADS.
The project was expected to
create as many as 2,000 jobs
at the airplane factory itself
and another 50,000 positions
at parts suppliers and other
support businesses.
Had EADS won, the tanker
would have been assembled
at Brookley Field, located at
a now-closed Air Force base


that employed some 13.000
people when it shut down in
1969. Many had hoped to see
the site become a major
employer again.
While the boost would
have been biggest in Mobile,
people all along the Gulf
Coast were counting on the
project coming to Alabama.
Economic promoters in
Pensacola even organized a
party to watch the official
announcement at a Panhandle
restaurant.
The mood at Pensacola's
Fish House Restaurant rapid-
ly turned to disappointment
as word spread that the work
was going to Boeing, not
EADS.
"-We've had hurricanes.
we've had oil, we've (had)
all these. What we need now
are jobs." said Collier
Merrill, chairman of
Pensacola Bay Area Chamber
of Commerce.
Pockets along the coast are
still recovering from back-to-
back strikes by hurricanes
Ivan and Katrina in 2004 and
'05, and last year's BP oil
disaster in the Gulf of
Mexico delivered major hits
to the region's tourist and
seafood industries. Seafood
markets are still lagging, and
no one knows how many vis-
itors will return as winter
turns into spring.
The latest jobless *rates
released by the state showed
unemployment in Mobile
County in December at 9.9
percent, well above the
state's overall rate of 8.9 per-
cent. Neither rate was sea-
sonally adjusted.
On the Mississippi Gulf
Coast, where many lots are
still empty after businesses
and homes were bulldozed
following Katrina, the execu-
tive director of the Jackson
County Economic
Development Foundation
said losing the tanker work
left him "terribly disappoint-
ed."
"It would have meant a
great deal economically, not
just to the Mobile (area) but
the entire Gulf.Coast region,"
George Freeland said.
Mobile attorney Jim
Patterson, a retired Navy hel-
icopter pilot, said he hoped
the loss wouldn't damage the
reputation of area workers.
"It's not going to kill us to
not get it. The rest of the
country needs to understand
this isn't a cow pasture down
here. We have a pretty edu-
cated work force. Look at the
car plants. We're building a
naval ship in Mobile. That's
pretty sophisticated stuff,"
Patterson said.
Losing the project wasn't a
complete catastrophe to Bill
Sisson, executive director of
the Mobile Airport Authority.
"Certainly it's a' loss and
we are very disappointed.
But these were jobs that were
not here yet," Sisson said.


Associated Press
NEW YORK Oil prices wavered
Friday as refineries in Europe prepared
for a sustained loss in high-quality
Libyan crude.
The Libyan rebellion has all but shut
down exports from the oil-rich nation,
and traders say it's hard to gauge how
much world supplies and prices -
will be affected as similar uprisings
unfold in North Africa and the Middle
East.
"Everyone's a nervous wreck,"
PFGBest analyst Phil Flynn said.
"What we're seeing is perhaps the
greatest threat to global oil supply since
the Persian Gulf War."
Oil prices soared nearly $20 per bar-
rel in the past week as the Libyan upris-
ing expanded across the country, peak-
ing at $103.41 on Thursday. The effect
could be felt at gas stations across the
U.S., where pump prices are already


AV N

PARK

/il^^


the highest ever for this time of year.
A gallon of regular shot up 11.6 cents
in the past three days to a national aver-
age of $3.29, according to AAA,
Wright Express and Oil Price
Information Service. That included a
spike of nearly 6 cents on Friday, .,the
largest one-day increase since Sept. 14,
2008.
The International Energy Agency
and Saudi Arabia have both tried to
soothe energy markets in recent days,
promising to tap into spare supplies and
make up for any sustained production
losses out of Libya. Libya produces
about 1.6 million barrels per day, less
than 2 percent of world consumption,
and it exports much of that oil to
Europe.
The IEA member nations have about
1.6 billion barrels in reserves. The
Saudis produce about 8.5 million bar-
rels per day and could ramp that up to


12 million or more.
European leaders said their oil sup-
plies are currently not in danger, and
they are in contact with OPEC officials
this week while preparing for a sus-
tained shutdown in Libyan crude.
Italy's economic minister said he
didn't expect any supply problems and
his country could supplement its sup-
plies through spot oil markets. Italy
also has started importing more natural
gas from Norway, Algeria and Russia.
Libya supplied about 12 percent of
Italy's natural gas.
Spain said it would lower highway
speed limits, cut train ticket prices to
get more riders on board and use more
biofuel to offset any shortages from
Libya.
Still, analysts are not sure how long
spare supplies would last if similar
protests disrupt oil production in other
parts of the world.


Thank You to the following

businesses for supporting the

Avon Park and Sebring

Chambers of Commerce.


For information about supporting your Chamber of Commerce on this page, contact us at: 863-385-6155


Looking for insurance for your
Business, Home or Autos?
We will shop and compare to help you find the
best coverage at the lowest price.



S Heacock Insurance


Call us today at (863) 385-5171





SB'OR 0 "M 0


AVON PARK


Mar 2 Apr 15


March 5
March 5
March 12


March 12


March 18
March 25-26


* Complete Car
Care
* Brakes
* Shocks


24 HOUR ROAD SERVICE
1109 W. MAIN STREET
AVON PARK


* Alignments
* Oil Service
* Tune-Ups


452-2031





Warren's Auto Sales
"A Good Car At A Fair Price"
SINCE 1977
811 T.S. Hwy. 27 South Avon Park, FL
(863) 452-2931 FAX (863) 453-7698
E-mail: warrens@strato.net
www.warrensautosales.com


"Your Ear Care Store"

Helping Highlands County

"Hear" Better For Over 40 Years


*KIEFER
rfunW%.oM ir rR
, "l/ Pti tA k~e 100 \i


Mon -Frin. 9am-4pm
Closed Wted
863-385-3497
130 S. Commerce Ave.
Sebring, FL 33870


P


SEBRING


March 1

March 3
March 4
March 10
March 11
March 13-19
March 13
March 15

March 19


Travelogue Adventure Film
Series
Circle of Speed
Heartland Pops
Chamber Mixer
Gallery & Downtown Walk
12 Hours of Sebring
Ride the Race Track
Travelogue Adventure Film
Series
Saturday Night Cruise Car Show


Page 3B


Oil prices waver as gas pump prices jump


Forrest H. Hilton, CPA, PA
Certified Public Accouniit:li
702 US 27 North
Avon Park, FL 33825
Phone: (863) 452-2906
Fax: (863) 452-1147
E-Mail: hiltoncpa@embarqmail.com


SFCC MOFAC Wildflower
Wayside Shrine Exhibit
Project Graduation Steak Dinner
Ridge Area ARC Spring Ball
Wells Motor Company Annual
Classic Car Show
The Heartland Harmonizers
Chorus Barbershop Show Time
Heartland POPs Concert
"Springtime on the Mall" Arts,
Crafts and Folk Music Festival


Follow the News-Sun
online on -g-U ?
www.lwilter.com/thenewssun


Cross *x^^^^^^
Coun^H try, ifT
=^^p^^'-" AUnTOMOT7IV3E SERVICES


UPOINVET


I


495-:9)









Page 4B


DEED TRANSFERS


News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


www.newssun.com


Dec. 21
Nathaniel Durham to
Nathaniel Durham, PT BIk
61 Town of Avon Park,
$5,500.
.Placid Acres Groves Inc.
to Price Groves, PT Sec.
1 9-36-30/Others,
$500,000.
Betty G. Leonard to
Federal National Mortgage
Assn., L14 BIk 2 Country
Walk, $130,400.
Walter L. Weller Jr. to
Pedro P. Perez, L30 BIk B
Lake Jackson Hts.,
$110,000.
Fannie Mae to Bank of
America, L2 BIk 13 Sylvan
Shores Est. Sec. B,
$34,000.
Bank of America to
Frank B. Cole, L2 BIk 13
Sylvan Shores Est. Sec. B,
$34,000.
Donald Soldini to Miguel
A. Gonzalez, PT L3 BIk 3
Uhl Sub/Other, $12,200.
CIS Investments Inc. to
Charles Swanson, L2 BIk
145 Kenilworth Heights,
$40,800.

Dec. 22
Gary Musselman to
Wauchula State Bank,
L13/14 Blk 47 Red Hill
Farms Add Avon Park
Lakes Unit K, $82,500.
Burkebuilt Inc. to
Beverly A. Burke, L15 BIk
95 Placid Lakes Sec.
14/Other, $114,000.
Terry L. McKamey to
Frederick A. Chmura, PT
L203 Blk 3 Leisure Lakes
Sec. 4A, $37,000.
Ralph Levingston to,
John R. Sanchez, L633
Sebring Hills/Other,
$160,000.
Roy G. Jenkins to
Heather Mary Schubert,
L245/246 Golf Hammock
Unit lilA, $122,400.
Wauchula State Bank to
Kenneth G. Barefield, PT
Sec. 16-33-29/Easement,
$22,500.
Luisa Farbman to Arthur
L. Lucas, Unit 605 Las
Palmas Resort, $18,000.
Judith A. Lord to Norde
D. Wilson, L26 BIk A Lake
Jackson Heights,
$115,000.

Dec. 23
Hitakee to Ernest A.
Barthel 1, L9 Valencia
Acres Sub, $48,000.
Christy C. Reed to
Robbie G. Lane, L3/23/24
BIk 6 Lorida Heights
Replat, $70,000.
U.S. Bank to Ralph
Demers, L79 Highlands
Homes Sub, $11,000.
Red to Anthony A.
Cardinale, L1 Bluffs on
Red Beach Lake, $70,000.
Clyde E. Burkholder to
Thomas A. Courtney, L6
BIk 50 Placid Lakes Sec.
6, $153,000.
Ronald L.'Ragland Sr. to
Max A. Gnagy, L169
Grayce's Mobile Est. Unit
2, $35,000.
Charles Moran V to
Jolyon W. McCamic, L6
BIk G Avon Lakes,
$115,000.
Margie A. Baker to R.
Elaine Strange, L15 BIk
521 Sebring Shores,
$49,900.
Hazel P. Hill to Jesse E.
Brannen, L28 BIk 2 Erin
Park, $54,000.
Samuel Caraballo to
Daniel Guillen, L26 BIk 60
Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring
Unit 5, $67,500.
Halford Ross Ryan to
Robert W. Stewart, L191
Colony Pointe Sub,
$30,000.

Dec. 28
Joseph Stephen Murphy
III to Terrence G. Van
Arkel, L10 BIk 9 Placid
Lakes Sec. 19, $112,500.


Michael J. Losquadro to
Jerald D. Blount, L11 Blk
100 Placid Lakes Sec. 14,
$35,000.
Michael J. Losquadro to
Howard Jones, L12 BIk
100 Placid Lakes Sec. 14,
$35,000.
U.S. Bank to Sandra 0.
Racine, L17 Sunset Pointe
On Dinner Lake Sub,
$130,500.
Marinais General


Contractors to Peggy
Yarbrough, L5381/5382
PT L5380 Avon Park
Lakes Unit 17, $15,000.
Raul Leonel Marrero to
Francisco J. Loaiza, L5
BIk 37 Sebring Hills South
Unit 2, $2,600.
Mary Ellen Granuzzo to
Judith L. Ryder, L19
Edgewater Village,
$88,000.
Mary C. Evans to Penny
L. Ferryman, L7 BIk 13
Lake Haven Est. Sec. 1,
$110,000.
Judith L. Ryder to
Cheryl A. Little, L6 BIk.29
Lake Haven Est. Sec. 2,
$99,300.
Suntrust Bank to
Hazieda Modikhan, L32
BIk 64 Sun 'N Lake Est.
Sec. 2, $2,500.
Tibty Inc. to Inversora
La Blanquilla Inc., L18 BIk
56 Sun 'N Lake Est.
Sebring 5, $64,000.
Tibty Inc. to Inversora
La Blanquilla Inc.,
L2583/2584 PT L2585
Avon Park Lakes Unit 9,
$67,000.
Carlson Family to
Manoucheka Luvic
Edmond; L9 BIk 8 Orange
Blossom Est. .Unit
10/Other, $2,300.
Oeun Jacobson to John
Costagliola, L7 BIk 6
Orange Blossom Est. Unit
12 Replat, $1,200.
Carlson Family to John
Costagliola, L4 Blk 7
Orange Blossom Est.
UNIT 10, $1,400.
Federal Home Loan
Mortgage Corp. to J.C.
Roulette, Unit 17 Pines of
Lake Huntley Condo,
$29,900.
U.S. Bank to Johannes
C. Zonneveld Jr., L22 BIk J
Spring Lake Village II,
$69,000.
Federal Home Loan
Mortgage Corp. to Yadira
I. Quintana Figueroa, L7
BIk 123 La Paloma,
$61,000.
Drew M. Dillworth to
Maggie Webb, L516
Sebring Ridge Sec. A,
$48,000.
Arch Bay Holdings to
Donna Stopanio, L9 BIk 9
Highlands Park Est. Sec.
D, $44,000.
William H. Steele to
Theodore B. Dyer, L16 BIk
B Lake Placid Camp
Florida Resort Replat,
$58,000.
Lucinda Byers to Maria
Lorenzo, L13 BIk 256 Sun
'N Lake Est. Sec. 20,
$125,000.
Aerial & Underground
Telecommunications Inc.
to First Haitian Baptist
Church of Avon Park Inc.,
L14/15 BIk 70 Town of
Avon Park, $19,000.
Wilner Marc to Robert H.
Thomason, L128/129
Sebring Ranchettes Sec.
A, $5,000.
Wilner Marc to Donald
B. Taylor, L126/127
Sebring Ranchettes Sec.
A, $5,000.

Dec. 29
Alfred M. Barnette to
Nathan Katz, L4 BIk 9
Vacation Est., $30,000.
Mark E. Gose to Michael
Bryant, L30 BIk 351 Sun 'N
Lake Est. Sebring Unit 16,
$175,000.
Timothy G. Potter to
Albert Larry Hero, L17 BIk
60 Sun 'N Lake Est.
Sebring Unit 5, $52,000.
Jed Allen McGinnis to
Beneficial Florida Inc., L2
PT L3 BIk 424 Highland
Towers Sub Revised,
$267,200.
Suntrust Bank to
Hannah Hosrom, L44-46
BIk 260 Sun 'N Lake Est.
Sebring Unit 13/Other,
$200,000.
Curtis L. Jennings to


Randy Jacobsson, L11 PT
L12 BIk 1 Lakeview Sub,
$370,000.
Nancy A. Bain to Nancy
A. Bain, L12 BIk 10
Sebring Hills South,
$35,000.
Nancy A. Bain to Nancy
A. Bain, L5 BIk 4 Lake
Haven Est. Sec. 1,
$31,000.
Nancy A. Bain to Nancy
A. Bain, L5 PT L4 F C Rae


Sub, $24,500.
Gail I. Decker to Steven
W. Honimar II, L28 BIk 21
Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring
Unit 2, $64,000.
Frank L. Rose to Dennis
P. Motz, L41 Sebring Falls,
$70,000.
Karen Otter to Nena D.
Dupree, L79 Pine & Lake
Sub, $150,000.

Dec. 30
Federal National
Mortgage Assn. to Ma Lia
Anne Yangco, L4 BIk 391
Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring
Unit 18, $92,000.
Carolyn W. Dosch to
Carolyn W. Dosch, L9 BIk
J Spring Lake VIg. V,
$27,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
. Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to


J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,


No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Rainbow Printing Inc. to
J&M Florida Properties,
No Legal Provided,
$1,500.
Southeastern Land
Developers to J&M Florida
Properties, No Legal
Provided, $1,500.
Southeastern Land
Developers to J&M Florida
Properties, No Legal
Provided, $1,500.
John T. Hall to Sherri
Marling, L18 BIk 3 Erin
Park, $58,000.
Jennifer O'Nan to
Jacques G. Clarke, L5/6
BIk 2 Sand Beach Sub,
$5,000:
Federal Home Loan
Mortgage Corp. to Fred A.


Edwards, L2 BIk 5 Grand
Prix Hts., $65,500.
Lake Jackson Holdings
to Frank Landon, L11 BIk 3
Sunset Beach Sub,
$230,000.
David Glenn Holley to
Doyle B. Roberts, L15 BIk
C Spring Lake Sec. 1,
$80,000.
Duckwood Holding to
Yvette Orjales, L14-16 BIk
52 Sebring Country Est.
Sec. 3, $13,000.
U,.S. Bank to Roy C.
Weeks, L18 BIk 64 Placid
Lakes Sec. 6, $30,000.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust Co. to Birgit Bodine,
L1 BIk 85 Placid Lakes
Sec. 8, $9,000.
Francis P. Gardner Jr. to
Digna G. Roura, PT L2/3
Villa Florcita, $20,000.
Ismael Montanez to
Charmaine Giraud, PT L5
BIk 9 Town of Avon Park,
$28,000.
Marliseay Baker
Houghton to City of Avon
Park CRA, L6 BIk 2 Oak
Park Sub, $50,000.
Luis F. Segarra to Felipe
Segarra Investment Corp.,
L11 BIk 4 Highlands Park
Est. Sec. Y, $3,500.
Luis D. Celaya to
Kenneth L. McEldowney,
L20 BIk 257 Sun 'N Lakes


Est. Sec. 20, $108,700.
Finvesta Inc. to Aixa
Nuno, L24 BIk 2 Orange
Blossom Est. Unit 8/Other,
$4,500.
Wauchula State Bank to
Leonard Alvin Smith, PT
Tract 15 Hillside Lake Est.,
$70,000.
Austin P. Myers to Frank
Joseph Suter Jr., L1 BIk 61
Placid Lakes Sec. 6,
$211,500.
George C. Lind to
William Z. Luke, L15 BIk
46 Sebring Country Est.
Sec. 2, $55,000.
Doris S. Lambert to
Kenneth A. Lambert, PT
L5/6 BIk 2 Lake June In
Winter, $10,500.
Randy L. Bennett to
Kenneth A. Lambert, PT
L5/6 BIk 2 Lake June In
Winter, $198,400.
Heartland National Bank
to Webbs 24/7 of Sebring
Inc., L1A-3A Northwood
Sub, $2,850,000.
Travis Kelton Hill Sr. to
MacBeth Associates Ltd.,
L62 PT L60 BIk 3 Sunset
Beach Sub, $320,000.
Quail Run Villas Inc. to
Highlands Independent
Bank, Unit 2 Quail Run
Villas L3 BIk 9 Lake Haven
Est. Sec. 1, $71,900.


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www. newssun.com


News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


RELIGION


Doing good work around the globe: Yantis to bring


message about mission work to Tanglewood today


By JIM HOCH
Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING Halfway
between Indianapolis and
South Bend, Ind.. is the little
burg of Metea, a small farm-
ing community where the
Yantis family has farmed for
three generations. Ben
Yantis, the third generation
farmer, started with 250 acres
but now has 1,000 acres of
prime farmland, planting
corn and beans and raised
livestock in the earlier years
of his farming career.
Yantis went to school in
this tiny place. He was a
good, hardworking son,
learning everything that his
dad could teach him about
running a farm and a farm
equipment business. His
mother and father imparted
much more than love and
nurture of the land. They
made sure their son grew up
in the church, being active in
the youth group, and was a
proper example for his sib-
lings and friends. "My par-
.ents were very influential in
my young life, and beyond.
They are my heroes," Yantis
said.
His parents, and his church
taught Yantis that "giving
back to those less fortunate is
a primary Christian princi-
ple." For more than 40 years
now. Yantis has tried to live
that principle with his wife of
41 years. Ruth Ann, who is
equally committed to this
doctrine.
During those years, Ben
and Ruth Ann had four chil-
dren. Their children have
presented them with 10
grandchildren. Ruth Ann was
not a farm girl, but she loved
the farm life and caught on


Death is a Divine appoint-
ment. (Hebrew 9:27) There
will be various emotions
expressed by your survivors
but the one we center on is
asked in the above question.
Biblically, we are intro-
duced to many different
responses to one's death.
Consider the following:
Athaliah ..."So all the
people of the land rejoiced
... for they had slain Athaliah
with the sword..." (2 Kings
11:20)
Johoram or Joram ...
"to no one's sorrow, depart-
ed" (2 Chronicles 21:20)
Abner ... "a prince and
a great man has fallen this
day in Israel" (2 Samuel
3:38)
+ Lazarus ... "Jesus
wept" (John 11:35)
Jesus ... "whole crowd
... seeing what had been
done, beat their breasts ...
(Luke 23:48)
+ Stephen ... "made great
lamentation over him." (Acts
8:2)
Dorcas ... "And all the
'widows stood by him weep-
ing" (Acts 9:39)
' The obvious question has
to be, why such a wide range
of emotions to death? And
the obvious answer is
because the way the
deceased lived. You cannot
live right and die wrong. The
Lord Jesus Christ teaches us
how to die in teaching us
how to live.
Let's explore two of these
reactions to death, Lazarus
and Dorcas.
Lazarus and his sisters,
Mary and Martha, were dear
friends to Jesus and their
home was a haven of rest
and support. (Luke 10:38;


..'T --. --..-- : .~ "



Courtesy photo
Ben Yantis enjoys playing pickleball when he's not doing
mission work.


quickly. Before they married.
Ben purchased the farm
equipment business from his
parents in 1962 and managed
the business until he sold it in
1993. They still have the
farm to run with their daugh-
ter and son-in-law.
Soon after they were mar-
ried they decided to take a
trip to Haiti to see exactly
how their church's mission
money was being used. He
has since had more that 50
missionary trips to his credit.
He has been to Haiti. Africa.
Albania, Romania, Belize,
Brazil. Venezuela, Chile.
Ecuador. Nicaragua. El
Salvador, Poland, Ukraine,
and British Guyana, South
America. Most years he
makes at least two mission-


ary trips.
"My wife and I actually
feel like we are missionaries
to the missionaries in differ-
ent parts of the world. The
need is so dire all over the
world." Yantis said.
All of his trips have been
through Global Outreach,
International, Tupelo, Miss.
or through the Norman
Walker Ministries of Alva.
Both are non-denominational
and Yantis has been on the
board of directors with
Global Outreach for more
than 20 years. He has felt
called lately to address the
great need and opportunity to
serve with Norman Walker's
missionary work in British
Guyana. He loves the people
he serves with there. As he


Guest
Column
Frank Parker

John 12:2) He was sharing in
the loss of the sisters.
Notice carefully two state-
ments about Dorcas: "... full
of good works and charitable
deeds which she did" and "...
showing the tunics and gar-
ments which Dorcas made
while she was with them"
(Acts 9:36.39). No wonder
the widows were weeping.
Did you notice the memori-
als the widow's had for
Dorcas? It was not stone.
brass or gold but rather
tunics and garments she had
made.
Now back to our original
question: Who will cry at
your funeral? How long will
it be for someone to realize
you are gone? Will there be
a void when you die? Heed
the admonition from
Revelation 14:13, "Then I
heard a voice from heaven
saying to me, "Write:
"Blessed are the dead, who
die in the Lord from now
on.' "Yes," says the Spirit,
"that they may rest from
their labors, and their works
follow them." "
The widow and son were
listening to the eulogy of the
deceased that seemed to be
endless. Finally, the mother
said to her son, "Go and see
if that is your father in the
casket." Who will cry at
your funeral? You are
preaching your funeral as
you live.

Frank Parker is a Sebring resi-
dent and can be reached at
frankparker27@yahoo. corn


says, "they speak English and
they are short like me!"
Twenty percent of the chil-
dren in British Guyana die of
dysentery or other water-
borne illness before they are
five years old. "I build water
pumps for use in shallow-
water wells in villages, and
in the bush country of
Guyana. I have a farm shop
in Indiana where 1 do most of
the manufacture and assem-
bly, but I also do some
assembly work here in
Florida as well," Yantis said.
Each trip is preceded by
packing a huge container
with these pumps, plus lots of
other supplies for the mission
work in Guyana. Yantis loads
thousands of pounds of
Bibles, Christian books,
pamphlets, school supplies,
along with boat motors.
sewing machines, tools, and
the pumps. These are sent by
ship in a 40-foot container
and timed to arrive prior to
Yantis' team arrival.
"Ruth Ann and I do all of
the missionary work from our
own funds," he said. Most of
the team members pay their
own way while some have
individuals or churches that
will sponsor them. Most trips
are made with 10-15 team
members. Many are like
Yantis and have done it
repeatedly.
In Guyana, the team sleeps
in tents. The bulk of the trav-
el is by boat to the villages.
Once there. Yantis said "the
villagers are eager to hear the
word of God as we share with
them. This is the first and
foremost important thing we
can share. The second most
important thing is that we put
in wells for good drinking


water. We provide supplies
like garden tools, machetes,
eyeglasses, shoes and cloth-
ing. I find that these desper-
ately poor indigenous people
are so willing to help them-
selves and our team just
gives them a little support
and encouragement. 'Most
trips we travel to different
areas, areas Ihat we learn
needs wells for water."
Probably Yantis' most spe-
cial recollection of the grati-
tude the people have for the
team's work was shown by a
young man who had wit-
nessed the missionary work
in his community over the
years. "On this last trip, he
asked me to visit with his
family. When I got there, the
only way he knew to show
me his appreciation was to
wash my feet. Both he and I
knew the significance of this
gesture. I will treasure that
forever."
Ben and Ruth Ann bought
a place in Tanglewood in
2004 and spend their winters
here.


is


Ben has made a 13-minute
video of the British Guyana
missionary trip he made in
January 2011 and it shows
the work they do, the people
they aid and the difficult cir-
cumstances the natives expe-
rience daily.
At 2 p.m. today in
Tanglewood's clubhouse,
Yantis will join Norman
Walker, of Norman Walker
Ministries, and will discuss
their mission work and com-
mitment. Yantis invites resi-
dents of Tanglewood and
Highlands County to come
and listen. There will be no
pressure to donate, but there
will be a container for any
donations. Yantis and Walker
would like to invite other
interested persons to join
them on their next British
Guyana trip in July this year
or January 2012.
Contact Yantis at 385-2378
or e-mail yantisra@aol.com,
or Norman Walker at
www.normanwalkermin-
istries.org for more informa-
tion.


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Who will cry at


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News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


www. newssun.com


ACADEMY AWARDS


Nominees agree keeping it real isn't always easier


By DERRIK J. LANG
AP Entertainment Writer
LOS ANGELES Playing real-
life people on film is one of the
trickier acting challenges, a feat
that the Academy Awards has recog-
nized more than 15 times over the
past decade. They're expected to do
it again at Sunday's ceremony, with
the real-world tales "The King's
Speech." "The Social Network,"
"The Fighter" and "127 Hours" all
up for multiple Oscars.
Portraying a nonfictional charac-
ter isn't a surefire way to win an
Oscar, but it sure seems to help an
actor's chances.
James Franco, who is serving
double duty as the show's co-host
and a best actor nominee for "127
Hours," felt just as much pressure
to portray real-life mountain
climber Aron Ralston as he did to
once play a fictional heroin addict
named Joey.
"You feel a different kind of
responsibility, but you can also feel
that for a fictional character," said
Franco, one of eight nominees this
year who portrayed a real person. "I
played a heroin addict once oppo-
site Robert De Niro (in 2002's "City
by the Sea"). There are lots of peo-
ple with heroin addictions, so you
feel a big responsibility to get that
right."
Some of this year's nominees
shaped their performances after


But playing a non-

fiction character

seems to help their

Oscar chances

meeting their real-world counter-
parts. The cast and crew of "*'The
Fighter" had access to the actual
Ward boxing brood from Lowell,
Mass., including Amy Adams, who
is up for a best supporting actress
trophy for her portrayal of bartender
Charlene Fleming, Micky Ward's
tough-as-nails second wife.
"How I looked at it was as a gift
because I was able to get a sense of
her energy, her intention, her per-
sonality, her manner," said Adams.
"It could be nerve-racking because
you want their approval, but at the
same time you know that you .are
there to tell the story that the direc-
tor is telling, so that can be a little
tricky, but mostly it is a gift."
Some of the Oscar contenders
never received such a present. Jesse
Eisenberg, who is nominated in the
best actor category for his prickly
take on Facebook co-founder Mark
Zuckerberg in "The Social
Network," didn't friend the inventor
of poking until long after filming,
when Zuckerberg popped up on the
episode of "Saturday Night Live"
he hosted last month.


"He was so sweet," said
Eisenberg. "The fact that he agreed
to come on and do that with me,
after what must be a very weird few
months of having a movie out about
yourself, and to not be involved
with it and not be in control of it, I
could only imagine if it was me, it
would be a little uncomfortable. It
was so wonderfully generous to
come and do that."
Tom Hooper, the director of best
picture front-runner "The King's
Speech," believes it's more chal-
lenging to create an honest and
accurate film chronicling a real-life
story, especially when the royal
family is involved. Hooper said he
didn't want to hurt Queen Elizabeth
all's feelings with his film about her
father's struggle to overcome his
stuttering:
In fact, nominated screenwriter
David Seidler waited more than 20
years to begin the project until after
the king's widow, Elizabeth, died in
2002 at her request.
"I think it is more difficult telling
a story about real people, particular-
ly iconic real people, than to tell
stories about fictional people,"
Hooper said. "When you are telling
stories about invented people, no
one is ever going to have an issue.
They will have an issue if it is a bad
film, but they are not going to go,
'But that character will never do
that."'


MCT photo
James Franco and Anne Hathaway host the Academy Awards tonight.
Franco is also nominated for best actor for his role in '127 Hours.'


By DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer
LOS ANGELES The
Academy Awards have been
kind to actresses making
their big-screen debuts. But
men in debut performances?
Not so much.
With her supporting-
actress nomination for the
Western "True Grit," 14-
year-old Hailee Steinfeld is
the 73rd first-time performer
to compete for an Oscar in
the show's 83-year history.
Fifty-year-old veteran
Melissa Leo is considered the
favorite to win supporting
actress for "The Fighter." But
Steinfeld is nominated in the
category that has been espe-
cially competitive for begin-
ners and for child actors.
Of the 72 previous
Hollywood novices nominat-
ed for Oscars, 31 were up for
supporting actress. Eight
won. including Jennifer
Hudson for 2006's
"Dreamgirls," Eva Marie
Saint for 1954's "On the
Waterfront" and Jo Van Fleet
for 1955's "East of Eden."
Two first-timers who won
supporting actress were even
younger than Steinfeld 10-
year-old Tatum O'Neal for
1973's "Paper Mocn" and I11-
year-old Anna Paquin for
1993's "The Piano." The only
other child actor to win an
Oscar, 16-year-old Patty
Duke, also earned it in the
supporting-actress category,
for 1962's "The Miracle'
Worker."
Men in debut roles have
earned 22 .nominations for
supporting actor, but only
one took the Oscar, Haing S.
Ngor for 1984's "The Killing
Fields" (that was a fruitful
year for male big-screen
debuts; along with Ngor, two
others were nominated for
supporting actor, Adolph
Caesar in "A Soldier's Story"
and John Malkovich in
"Places in the Heart").
Sixteen lead actresses
picked up Oscar nominations
for their first films, most
recently. Gabourey Sidibe a
year ago for "Precious." Four
first-timers won best-actress
Oscars: Marlee Matlin for
1986's "Children of a Lesser
God," Barbra Streisand for
1968's "Funny Girl," Julie
Andrews for 1964's "Mary
Poppins" and Shirley Booth
for 1952's "Come Back,
Little Sheba."
Best-actor nominations
have been hard to come by
for men in their first big-
screen jobs. Only three have
been nominated: Lawrence
Tibbett for 1930's "The


t'^U


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MCT photo
Hailee Steinfeld, 14, is nominated for her role in 'True
Grit.' The movie was her first role.


Rogue Song," Orson Welles
for 1941's "Citizen Kane"
and Montgomery Clift for
1948's "The Search." All
three lost.
With "Citizen Kane,"
Welles also was the first of
21 first-time filmmakers to
earn best-director nomina-
tions (he lost that one, too,
though he did win for origi-
nal screenplay).
Six first-time filmmakers
won the best-directing Oscar,
including Robert Redford for
1980's "Ordinary People"
and Kevin Costner for 1990's
"Dances With Wolves."
Among other supporting
players earning Oscar nomi-
nations for their first time on
screen are Oprah Winfrey
(1985's "The Color Purple"),
Glenn Close (1982's "The


World According to Garp").
Edward Norton (1996's
"Primal Fear"), Mikhail
Baryshnikov (1977's "The
Turning Point"), Lily Toinlin
(1975's "Nashville"), Angela
Lansbury (1944's "Gaslight")
and Sydney Greenstreet
(1941 's "The Maltese
Falcon").
Other best-actress nomi-
nees for debut roles include
Catalina Sandino Moreno
(2004's "Maria Full of
Grace"), Keisha Castle-
Hughes (2003's "Whale
Rider"), Emily Watson
(1996's "Breaking the
Waves"), Julie Walters
(1983's "Educating Rita"),
Martha Scott (1940's "Our
Town") and Greer Garson
(1939's "Goodbye, Mr.
Chips").


Page 6B


Debut actresses do well at


Oscars; not so for men


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I











www. newssun.corn


News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


The Community Calendar pro-
vides a brief listing of local
clubs and organizations who
meet on a regular basis. It is
the responsibility of the group
to update the News-Sun on
any changes in this listing by
calling 385-6155, ext. 516;
send any changes by e-mail to
editor@newssun.com; or mail
them to News-Sun Community
Calendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring, FL 33870.

SUNDAY
American Legion Post 25
Lake Placid has lounge hours
from 1-9 p.m. Live music is
from 5-8 p.m. For details, call
465-7940.
American Legion Post 74
open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6
p.m. Members and guests
only. Post is at 528 N. Pine
St., Sebring. Call 471-1448.
Highlands Shrine Club,
2604 State Road 17 South, at
2-4 p.m. has a new country
music group, the Twi-Lites,
along with Dianne Thompson
who sings music from the '40s
and '50s. Donation $3 for sin-
gle, and $5 for couple.
Refreshments available.
Everyone welcome.
Inerstate chapter of
A.B.A.T.E. meets the last
Sunday of every month at The
Blue Crab, 825 Ridgewood
Dr., Sebring at 11 a.m.
Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 lounge is open from 1-7
p.m. Card games start at 1:30
p.m. The lodge is open to
members and their guests. For
details, call 465-2661.
Lake Placid Moose has
karaoke in the pavilion.
Horseshoes played at 9:30
a.m. Food available at 4 p.m.
Open to members and qual-
fied guests only.
Loyal Order of Moose,
Highlands County Lodge No.
2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon
Park. Cards start at 4 p.m.
Music outside Tiki Hut at 3
p.m. Lodge phone number
452-0579.
Overeaters Anonymous,
meets from 4-5 p.m. in second
floor conference room No. 3 at
Florida Hospital Heartland
Medical Center, 4200 Sun 'N
Lake Blvd., Sebring. For
details, call 382-7731. No
dues, fees or weigh-ins. For
details on the organization, go
to www.oa.org.
Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the
club, .12921 U.S. 98, Sebring.
For details, call 655-4007.
Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 offers NASCAR racing in
the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar
open and kitchen open from 2-
5 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S.
98, Sebring. For details, call
655-3920.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880 serves hamburgers
from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays
poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post,
1224 County Road 621 East,
Lake Placid. For details, call
699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 Karaoke is from 5-8"
p.m. at the post, 2011 SE
Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For
details, call 385-8902.

MONDAY
* Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN
WITH ME family group meets
at 10:30 a.m. every Monday at
the Heartland Christian Church
on Alt. 27 in Sebring. The
church is behind Southgate
Shopping Center where Publix
is.
For more information call 385-
5714.
* Alcoholics Anonymous
meeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal
Church, Lakeshore Drive,
Sebring. For more details, call
385-8807.
* Alcoholics Anonymous
One Day At A Time group
meets for a closed discussion
at 9:30 a.m. Monday and
Friday at Covenant *
Presbyterian Church, 4500
Sun 'N Lakes Blvd., Sebring.
For details, call 314-0891.
* Alcoholics Anonymous
meeting, 6:30 p.m. at
Rosewood Center, 517 U.S.
27 South, Lake Placid.


SAlanon meets at 8 p.m. at
St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring.
For details, call 202-0647.
* American Legion Placid
Post 25 Lake Placid has shuf-
fleboard at 1 p.m. Lounge
hours are 12-9 p.m. For
details, call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 74
open noon to 8 p.m. Happy
hour from 4-6 p.m. Call 471-
1448.
* AmVets Post 21 plays darts


. at 7:30 p.m. for members and
guests. For details, call 385-
0234.
Avon Park Lakes
Association has shuffleboard
at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m.
The clubhouse is at 2714
Nautilus Drive in Avon Park.
Boy Scout Troop 482
meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave.,
Lake Placid.
Bridge Club of Sebring
(American Contract Bridge
Club) plays duplicate games at
12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf
Ave., Sebring. For details, call
385-8118.
Diabetes Support Group
meets the second and fourth
Monday from 1-2:30 p.m. in
Florida Hospital Conference
Room 3 in Sebring. Call 402-
0177 for guest speaker list.
Dual Diagnosed
(Addiction and Mental
Health) Support Group meets
from 7-8:30 p.m. the fourth
Monday at 4023 Sun 'N Lake
Blvd., Sebring. Call 386-5687.
Florida Association Home
and Community Education
meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly
on Monday at The Agri-
Center. The group of sewers
and crafters make items for
residents of adult congregate
living facilities. Call Penny
Bucher at 385-0949.
Garden Club of Sebring
meets noon, fourth Monday,
Sebring Civic Center.
Grand Prix Cloggers EZ
Intermediate and Intermediate
Clogging class are held at 9
a.m. every Monday at
Reflections on Silver Lake,
Avon Park. Call Julie for fur-
. their information at 386-0434.
* Harmony Hoedowners
Square Dance Club meets
the second and fourth Monday
at the Sebring Country Estates
Civic Association clubhouse,
3240 Grand Prix Drive (down
the street from Wal-Mart).
Dancing will be held every
month until April 2008. Classes
are being started now in the
Sebring and Lake Placid area.
For more information, call Sam
Dunn at 382-6792 or visit the
Web site at wwwsamdun.net.
* Heartland Horses &
Handicapped Inc. is offering
pony rides every Monday and
Wednesday from 4:30-6:30
p.m., weather permitting. $5
donation per child. Call 452-
0006 for more information. All
proceeds raised support our
free equine assisted riding pro-
gram for adults and children
with special needs, which
resumes in September.
* Heartland Pops rehearses
at 7 p.m. Monday at Avon
Park High School Band Room,
700 E. Main St., under the
direction of Anthony Jones.
Musicians of all ages are wel-
come.Call 314-8877.
E Highlands County Concert
Band rehearses 7-9 p.m.
every Monday at Sebring High
School band room. All musi-
cians are welcome. Vic
Anderson, musical director.
Call Bill Varner at 386-0855.
* Highlands County
Democratic Executive
Committee meets 7 p.m.
fourth Monday in the
Democratic Party
Headquarters, 4216 Sebring
Parkway, Sebring. For details,
call 699-6052.
* Highlands County Sewing
Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at
the Highlands County Agri-
Civic Center in the 4-H labora-
tory, Sebring. For details, call
402-6540.
* Highlands Sertoma Club
meets noon, Takis Family
Restaurant, Sebring.
* Highlands County Senior
Squadron, Civil Air Patrol the
U.S. Air Force Auxiliary meets
the second and fourth Monday
nights at the Sebring Airport
Terminal Building. All are wel-
come. For further information,
call 471-1433 between 4 and 7

* Lake Placid American
Legion Post 25 meets 8 p.m.,
Legion hall.
* Lake Placid Art League will
have classes in Drawing and
Painting, conducted by Anne


Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. at the Cultural
Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd.
From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart
will teach Fabric Painting at
the center. For information call
Dan Daszek at 465-7730.
* Lake Placid Elks 2661
opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at
the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2
p.m. Sign up for darts is at
6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m.
It is open to members and
their guests. For details, call


465-2661.
* Lake Placid Library has
storytime at 10 a.m. for ages
3-5 except during holidays.
* Lake Placid Moose plays
cards at 2 p.m. Open to mem-
bers and qualified guests only.
Lodge closes at 6 p.m.
* Let It Begin With Me
Alanon Group meets from
10:30 a.m. to noon every
Monday at Heartland Christian
Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South,
Sebring. For details about
Alanon, a self-help group for
families and friends of alco-
holics, call 385-5714.
* Narcotics Anonymous
Never Alone Candlelight
meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N.
Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near
the First Congregational
Church. For information call
Heartland area helpline (863)
683-0630. More information
on other meetings and events
at www.naflheartland.org.
* National Association for
the Advancement of the
Colored People, Highlands
County Branch meets 7:30
p.m., 401 Tulane, Avon Park.
* Orchid Society of
Highlands County meets 7
p.m. on the fourth Monday at
the Highlands County Agri-
Civic Center, 4509 George
Blvd., Sebring. Call Ed Fabik
at 465-2830 for details.
* Placid Lakes Bridge Club
meets 12-4:30 p.m. second
and fourth Monday in Placid
Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid
Lakes Blvd. No meetings from
end of May to October. For
details, call 465-4888.
* Rotary Club of Highlands
County meets at 6:15 p.m. at
Beef '0 Brady's, Sebring.
* Sebring AARP meets 1:30
p.m., The Palms, Pine Street,
Sebring.
* Sebring Bridge Club has
Bridge, ACBL Duplicate at the
clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf,
Sebring at 12:30 Mondays. For
details or info on lessons, call
385-8118.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
has pizza and darts at 7:30
p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S.
98, Sebring. For details, call
655-4007.
* Sebring Elks Lodge 1529
has the lounge open from 12-7
p.m. For more details, call
471-3557.
* Sebring Historical Society
open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday-Friday. Located in
back side of Sebring Public
Library building on Lake
Jackson. For information, call
471-2522.
* Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 plays Texas Hold 'em at
7 p.m. the second and fourth
Monday at 11675 U.S. 98,
Sebring. Beef franks and
Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to
closing. For details, call 655-
3920.
* Take Off Pounds Sensibly
FL 632, Sebring meets at
3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall
at the First Baptist Church of
Lake Josephine, Sebring. For
details, call Judy O'Boyle at
260-0831.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Ladies Auxiliary Post 4300
meets 2 p.m. fourth Monday,
2011 SE Lakeview Drive,
Sebring.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m.,
1224 County Road 621 East,
Lake Placid. For more details,
call 699-5444.
* Volunteers of America of
Florida is a nonprofit organi-
zation in Sebring that special-
izes in assisting person's with
mental illness. We are
pleased to announce our Drop
in Center is open to individuals
with a mental illness 6 days a
week from 11am to 3 pm. The
center offers a welcoming
environment where individuals
are accepted and feel comfort-
able. For more information
please contact Wendy at 863-
382-2022.

TUESDAY
* Al-Anon Family Groups
meet for discussion and
Twelve Step study at noon,
Union Congregational Church,


105 N. Forest Ave., Avon Park.
Parking available south of old
church.
* American Legion Placid
Post 25 Lake Placid has shuf-
fleboard and euchre, both at 1
p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m.
to 9 p.m. For details, call 465-
7940.
* American Legion Post 74
open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs
served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.
Call 471-1448.
* Avon Park Boy Scout


Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30
p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202
Robert Britt St., Avon Park.
Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to
join. For details, call 452-2385.
* Avon Park Library has sto-
rytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5
except during holidays.
* Avon Park Lions Club
meets 6:45 p.m., dinner includ-
ed, Lions Club, 1218 W. Bell
St., Avon Park.
* Busy Bee Craft Club meets
9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun
'N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring.
Everyone is welcome. For
more details, call 382-8431.
* Celebrate Recovery meets
every Tuesday night at "The
Rock," Union Congregational
Church, 28 N. Butler Ave.,
Avon Park. A barbecue meal is
served at 6 p.m. for a dona-
tion. At 6:45 p.m., members
meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group
breaks up into small groups for
men and women. The program
is designed for'drug and alco-
hol addiction, divorce, death or
illness grief, low or lost self-
esteem or identity due to dys-
functional relationships,
depression/anxiety, or any
other need for healing. For
details, contact Celebrate
Recovery coordinator Pam
Sim by calling 453-3345, ext.
106.
* Fleet Reserve Association
Board of Directors Heartland
Branch No. 173 meets 7 p.m.,
branch Hall, 1402 Roseland
Ave., Sebring. Regular meet-
ing, first Tuesday after board
of directors meeting. Call 471-
6109 for details.
* Fletcher Music Club meets
every Thursday and Tuesday
at Fletcher Music Center in
Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For
more details, call 385-3288.
* Florida Native Plant
Society meets at 7 p.m. the
first Tuesday in Conference
Room 3 at the Highlands
County Agri-Civic Center, 4509
George Blvd., Sebring. For
details, call Roy Stewart at
(863) 632-0914.
* Heartland Harmonizers
Barbershop Chorus meets
from 7-9:30 p.m. in the
Sebring High School Music
Room, Sebring. All men who
enjoy singing are invited.
Reading music is not required.
Call 471-2294 or 386-5098.
* Heartland Insulin Pump
Support Group meets the first
Tuesday of the month at 3
p.m. at the Highlands County
Health Dept., 7205 S. George
Blvd., Sebring. If you would
like more information on
insulin pumps or are a pump
wearer and would like to share
ideas and suggestions, please
join us. For more information,
contact Kathy McNeil at 414-
6444.
* Heartland Symphony
Orchestra rehearsals from
5:30-7 p.m. Tuesday in the
Green Room in the South
Florida Community College
auditorium building. Bring
music and instruments. New
members welcome. Call con-
ductor Bryan Johnson at 800-
949-7248, ext. 7231.
* Highlands County
Adoption Support Group
meets from 7-8:30 p.m. first
Tuesday at Quality Inn &
Suites Conference Center,
6525 U.S. 27 North, Sebring.
For more details, call 382-
0352.
* Highlands County
Community Orchestra
rehearses each Tuesday in the
Green Room of the South
Florida Community College
Performing Arts Theater, 5:30-
7:30 p.m. Entrance is at the
rear of the building. String
players especially needed.


Strings call Eugene Longo at
699-1975; winds call Kim
Houser at 453-6049 for more
information.
* Highlands County Lodge
of the Order Sons and
Daughters of Italy in
America meets the first
Tuesday of each month at
Visions ADT in Sebring. The
officers meet at 6 p.m. and the
general meeting will follow at 7
p.m. For details, call
Philomena Greco at 402-0048.
* Highlands County Quilt
Guild meets on the first and
third Tuesday of each month at
the Women's Club of Sebring,
4260 Lakeview Drive, across
from Veterans' Beach, from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. For information,
call 471-0694 or e-mail
sbringquilter@ embarqmaiZ corn
* Highlands Tea Party has
an educational and informa-
tional meeting at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday at the Quality Inn,
6525 U.S. 27 in Sebring. Call
699-0743.
* Hope Hospice grief support
group meets at 11 a.m. at 319
W. Center Ave., Sebring; and
4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle
ALF, across U.S. 27 from
Florida Hospital Lake Placid.
Call 382-0312.
* Italian-American Social
Club of Highlands County
meets the first Tuesday of
each month at Visions ADT.
Officers meet at 6:30 p.m..
with general meeting (men and
women) at 7 p.m. For more
information, call Jeanne at
382-1945.
* Lake Placid Art League
has classes in Parchment
Embossing from 8 a.m. to
noon and 1-4 p.m. at the
Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall
Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant.
For information, call Dan
Daszek at 465-7730.
* Lake Placid Elks 2661
opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at
the lodge. Happy hour is from
2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30
p.m. The lodge is open to
members and their guests. For
details, call 465-2661.
* Lake Placid Grief Support
(Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30
p.m. every Tuesday at
Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S.'
27 North, Lake Placid, with
Charlie Stroup. Refreshments
served. Door prize given. Call
465-0568.
* Lake Placid Jaycees meets
7:30 p.m., first and third
Tuesday, Jaxson's. Board
meetings at 6:30 p.m. on sec-
ond Tuesday. For details, call
Joe Collins, 655-5545.
* Lake Placid Toastmasters
meet the first and third
Tuesday at 6 p.m. at First
Baptist Church, 101 S. Oak
Ave. in Lake Placid. The web
address is
www.toastmasters.org. For
information call Cathy
Schreima at 382-3574 or Linda
Udall at 386-6495.
Lorida Community Club
meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at
the Lorida Community Center
to plan events.
* Multiple Sclerosis Support
Group, meets 7 p.m. second
Tuesday at Highlands
Regional Medical Center,
Sebring, in the first floor doc-
tor's conference room. For
more details, call 465-3138.
* Nar-Anon Support Group
for family members or friends
of someone with a drug prob-
lem or addiction. Nar-Anon
helps attain serenity and a
more normal life for those
affected by the addictions of
loved ones, regardless of
whether or not he/she has
stopped using. 6 p.m. every
Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch
of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake


Josephine Drive, Sebring.
* Overeaters Anonymous
meets from 9-10 a.m. every
Tuesday at Avon Park
Seventh-day Adventist Church,
1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues,
fees or weigh-ins. Visit
www.FloridaRidgelntergroup.c
om. For details, call 382-7731.
Visit www.oa.org for more
information on OA.
* Placid Lakes Bridge Club
meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
every Tuesday and has blood
pressure screening from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. first and third
Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town
Hall,'2010 Placid Lakes Blvd.
For details, call 465-4888.
* Placid Lakes Home and
Property Owners
Association Inc. has its board
meetings at 7 p.m. first
Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town
Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd.
Call 465-4888 for details.
Annual meetings are in
February. Quarterly meetings
are in May, September and
December.
* Rotary Club of Sebring
(Noon) meets at noon at the
Sebring Civic Center, near the
library in downtown Sebring.
For information, call 385-3829
or 471-9900.
* Scleroderma Support
Group Meeting is the first
Tuesday of each month from
1-2 pm. at the Sebring Library,
319 W. Center Ave., Sebring.
Call 402-6716.
* Sebring Bridge Club will
have Duplicate Bridge games
every Tuesday evening. If
interested in playing Duplicate
Bridge, call 385-8118.
* Sebring Elks Lodge 1529
plays darts, beginning with
sign in at 6 p.m. Games start
at 6:30 p.m. No experience
necessary. Cost is $2. Smoke-
free environment. For more
details, call 471-3557.
* Sebring Lions Club meets
at noon at Dot's Restaurant,
950 Sebring Square. For infor-
mation call 382-2333.
* Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 serves soft shell tacos 5-
7 p.m. and beef franks and
Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to
closing at 11675 U.S. 98,
Sebring. Euchre is played at
6:30 p.m. For details, call 655-
3920.
* Sebring Recreation Club
plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and
table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333
Pomegranate Ave., Sebring.
For details, call 385-2966 or
leave a name, number and
message.
* Sertoma Club meets at 7
a.m. at Dee's Restaurant,
Sebring. For details, call Scott
Albritton at 402-1819.
* Take Off Pounds Sensibly
Chapter FL 99 meets from 6-7
p.m. at the Atonement
Lutheran Church, 1744
Lakeview Drive, Sebring.
* Take Off Pounds Sensibly
Chapter FL 618 has weigh in
from 4-430 p.m. at Community
Bible Church, 1400 CR-17A
N., Avon Park. Meeting is at
4:45 p.m. For details, call 452-
1093.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880, plays darts 6:30
p.m., 1224 County Road 621
E., Lake Placid. The ladies
auxiliary board meeting is at
10 a.m. For more details, call
699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 has sandwiches at
5 p.m. and Franke from 6-9
p.m. at the post, 2011 SE
Lakeview O)rive, Sebring. For
details, call 385-8902.
* Zonta Club of Highlands
County meets second
Tuesday. For more details, call
Rebekah Kogelschatz at 314-
9336.


Page 7B


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LIVING


News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011







KEEPING 'UP WITH YOUR


et


ween the sleepless


nights, spit-up and count-
less diaper changes, new
parents quickly realize that
chasing after their little
no


easy feat.
"When our first son was born, my hus-
band and
I focused on baby-proofing the house to
meet our little guy's needs. Before we
knew it, his energy had surpassed ours
and we needed to not only adapt our
home but ourselves," says Laila Ali, pro-
fessional athlete and mother to toddler
son and soon-to-
be-born baby
number two.
Huggies
teamed up with
Laila to help par-
ents conquer the
chaos of parent-
Laila Ali hood by offering
exclusive tips for
the everyday mom. According to Laila,
and other modern moms struggling to
keep up, little bundles of joy can often
have parents wishing for more hours in
the day.
"With only a few lifestyle changes,
your baby's exciting milestones don't
have to be accompanied by crazy days.
puffy eyes and fast food dinners."
explains Laila. "From squeezing in daily
fitness routines to finding little ways to
reward yourself it's possible to maxi-
mize your energy as you
chase after your running, dancing and
playing
little mover."
Check out these tips, and don't forget
to enjoy this special time in your active
baby's life.
To learn more about parenting rewards
from Huggies and obtain other tips on
how to enjoy the amazing ride of parent-
ing, visit www.Huggies.com.



1. Get moving.
Finding time to hit the gym isn't always
easy with a baby at home, so find ways
to incorporate aerobic activity into your
day. Walk to the library or supermarket
whenever possible, and be sure to get
your toddler out of her stroller so she
can walk some of the way, too. If walk-
ing to your destination isn't an option,
park the car far from entrances and
enjoy those extra steps of exercise.

2. Surround yourself
with support.
From sharing parenting advice to all
those special firsts in your baby's life,
connecting with other parents is a great
way to surround yourself with needed
support. Huggies" Brand is helping moms
all over the country come together by
teaming up with Meetup, the world's
largest online network of local groups,
to host 60 "Keep-Up Meetups" from
January to March. "Keep-Up Kits" will
be given away to help Meetup Moms
keep up with their little mover.

3. Laugh.
From the spit-up to the spilled milk,
don't be afraid to laugh off the silly situ-
ations. Laughter really is the best medi-
cine relieving stress and burning
extra calories. Remember, parenting is
never perfect, so the next time you find
yourself in the middle of that messy dia-
per change don't let yourself stress -
laugh it out instead.

4. Accept a helping hand.
For a first-time mother, it's hard to real-
ize you really can't do it all. Keeping up
with your little speedster all day can be
exhausting. When feeling overwhelmed
and ready to pull out your hair, it is ok
to admit that you really could use that
extra helping hand. Accept your family
or friend's offer to come over and keep
your little one entertained for a couple
of hours. Don't second guess this deci-
sion; be grateful and accept the favor
because you deserve it (and others relish
the time with your bundle of joy).

5. Don't forget to sleep.
Between the late night feedings and
round the clock diaper duty, it may seem
impossible to get more than a couple
hours of shut-eye. To keep from feeling
like you are going to fall asleep while at
the stroller wheel, try to fit in a midday
nap while your baby snoozes. For the
working mom. head to bed as soon as
possible once the little ones are tucked
snuggly in their beds. Teaming up with


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your partner and switching off middle-of-the-night feed-
ings and diaper changes can also save you from exhaus-
tion.

6. Take up a hobby.
Setting aside time to work on something you enjoy can
help clear your mind and leave you feeling refreshed and
rejuvenated. Don't be afraid to try out different hobbies
until you find the one that fits your schedule and interests.
If possible, incorporate your little one into your new hobby
as this can make for some very special bonding time.

7. Stay organized.
Organization is key to keeping stress to a minimum.
From making stuLe the diaper bag is prepared prior to a
long.,car ride or day at the playground, staying organized
and scheduling your day can help you stay cool, calm
and collected.

8. Reward yourself.
Parents deserve rewards for all that they do on days other
than Mother's Day and Father's Day. What's even better is
getting rewards on items they already purchase like dia-


pers. This season, enjoy a winning code in every pack of
Huggies' Little Movers diapers to cash in for prizes like
Starbucks gift cards and iPods. Submit each on-pack code
online and see details at www.Huggies.com to win.

9. Take a break.
Take regular breaks away from your children. It's easy
to brush off the importance of "me time" but it's a must
to keep you at your best whether it's taking a walk,
reading a book or going for a drive. "me time" cannot be'
underestimated.

10. Remember to treasure those
"aww-inspired" moments.
Last but certainly not least, remember to sit back and enjoy
the ride of a lifetime parenthood. From sharing photos
of your toddler on www.facebook.com/huggies to connect-
ing with other parents via www.twitter.com/huggics,
remember to treasure each and every moment.


FAMILY FEATURES


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News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


Page 2C

DIVI'RSION. '


www. newssun.corm


.m^ .. A -jAJ 9. U' U M. j. %JYI'


IT'S AN HONOR JUST To BE NOMINATED


ACROSS
1 *1964
7 *2006
12 Award since WWI
15 Try for a contract
18 Dressed like
Cinderella
19 "Pardon my_"
21 Letter after pi
22 With 39-Across,
soapbox racer, e.g.
23 Concerned with
pupils?
24 Shoemaker on a
horse
25 2009-'10 "At the
Movies" co-host
27 Sprayed in defense
28 *1968
30 Prefix with gram
31 Venetian evening
33 Yule VIP
34 "1 Put a Spell on You"
singer Simone
35 Bygone ruler
37 Sadie Hawkins Day
suitors
39 See 22-Across
42 PC backup key
43 *1972, with "The"
47 Item, such as inter-
est, recorded only when
earned
49 "Man alive!"
50 Prizes
53 J.D. holder
54 1981 World Series
co-MVP Ron
55 Rental ad abbr.
57 Made misty
60 Muslim pilgrim
64 Fertility clinic cells
65 *1982
67 *With 71-Across,
1962
71 See 67-Across
72 *1969
78 Baseball's "Master
Melvin"
79 Record of the year?
80 Take on, as tenants
81 Kyrgyzstan city
82 Op.
85 Cyclotron bit
87 Make sense
89 Peerless
91 Eye of round, etc.
96 *1980


98 Part of ETO;,Abbr.
99 Tennis shoe that
debuted at Wimbledon
in 1966
102 78-Across's 1,860,
briefly
103 Told, as a tale
104 Some PX patrons
106 Creeps
109 "Love Me, I'm a
Liberal" singer
111 It always increases
112 See 127-Across
116 Egyptian sky god
118 Needing serious
help
119 Make it to
120 Schleppers
121 Have the flu, say
122 Valuable deposit
123 Mambo bandleader
Tito
124 Vital supply lines
125 Once known as
126 According to
127 With 128-Across.
performer nominated for
112-Across (he didn't
win *any) in all of the
answers to starred clues
128 See 127-Across

DOWN
1 Like the most secure
passports nowadays
2 Summarize
3 Vitally
4 Leafy green
5 "Gadzooks!"
6 Original Dungeons &
Dragons co.
7 Facilities for many ex-
GIs
8 Buffalo's lake
9 "Gimme a Break" star
Carter et al.
10 Turned off
11 Descendants
12 Toasted
13 Tell partner
14 Squeeze album "
Fan Tutti Frutti"
15 Soft shoes
16 Like nail-biters
17 Take away
20 '20s-'30s skating
gold medalist
26 King's station


28 Hints
29 Empowering motto
32 Hunt subject
36 Kid
38 Didn't act
40 Grandmother of
Spain's Juan Carlos
41 Instead of
44 Remedy for a pain in
the neck
45 Note to _
46 "1 Darkness":
1999 Bonnie "Prince"
Billy album
48 Patronize, as an inn
51 Dallas cager
52 Sign of a big hit
56 Loads of
58 Psyche's lover
59 Variance, in the ver-
nacular
61 Gettysburg general
Stuart
62 Ho": 2008 Best
Original Song


By J. HOROWITZ & B. WALDEN


Solution on page 5C


63 Glass on the radio
64 Decree
65 "Who wants candy?"
.response
66 Kit Carson House site
67 Queens, N.Y., airport
68 Chicago Loop's _
Center
69 Broke the tape
70 "Ice Age" unit, e.g.
73 Dorm VIPs
74 Winnipeg winter hrs.
75 Spiciness
76 Rash reaction
77 It may involve draw-
ing
81 Light-minded pur-
suit?
82 Rate against
83 Quadrennial national
rite
84 Titans' home
86 Letters before xis
88 It runs through four
Great Lakes


90 Superiors of 104-
Across
91 Either parent in
"Heather Has Two
Mommies"
92 Prince Andrew's
younger daughter
93 Place to buy prints
94 Site with tweets
95 --Japanese War
97 Find a seat for, in
slang
100 Throw out
101 Grew quickly
105 Peter, Paul and
Mary: Abbr.
107 Rival of Helena
108 Obsession, for one
110 Fire
113 Individually
114 Center
115 Date opening?
117 Oscar's other
120 Way of the Eas


The first sounds
of a baby's cry fills
the delivery room
with awe and won-
der each and every
time a new infant is
born into the world.
The tears of joy in ,
the parent's eyes Paus
drop as benedic- Con
tions upon the new-
born they hold. Jan
I'll never forget how our
son presented his own son to
the waiting grandparents.
"A miracle," he said.
In his case, the birth of his
son involved miracles of an
ending deployment, paper-
work, transportation and
.amazingly being able to be
. present for the birth which
had been predicted for earli-
er; but, awaited his return.
But, though mountains
had been moved by
faith... the real .miracle was
in the delivery of this new
life filled with promise and
potential a child loved
instantly and completely.
This month marks one
year since another little one
was born into our family.
My great-nephew: and he is
that indeed. He is great. And
we believe God infused him
with this greatness a
largeness of acceptance, tol-
erance, healing and joy that
could only have come from
God's hand and heart.
This little boy was born
with special needs that
would require several surger-
ies throughout his infancy
and first year'of life. The
surgeries were essential for
his life.
As we prayed for this tiny
little boy undergoing such


delicate operations,
w we thanked God for
skilled surgeons;
while committing
him to the Great
Physician for the
ultimate healing,
.. strength and protec-
*e And tion he would need.
Each surgery
isider required weeks and
Merop months of healing
which was only preparing
him for the next round.
The miracle of his life was
reinforced each time he
awoke from yet another
operation with a peaceful
countenance and a bright
smile. That's not to say that
he didn't have trying times
and difficult hurdles...as did
his parents and grandparents.
Yet, through it all, this lit-
tle one led them and all of us
to a closer relationship with
God through prayer and faith
than we had known before.
Each time he went under
the anesthetic, we knew the
reality of God's presence.
We sensed that he was look-
ing into the face of God
from whom he had so
recently come and was being
held by him through it
all. As it is written in
Deuteronomy 33: 27,
NKJV...
"The eternal God is your
refuge, and underneath are
the everlasting arms."
We pray our "great" mira-
cle boy will march into the
New Year in health and
vigor growing as Jesus did
"in wisdom and stature, and
in favor with God and men."
(Luke 2:52). Selah

Jan Merop of Sebring is a News-
Sun correspondent.


Woman trapped by memories must break free of the past


Dear Abby: I am a 49-year-old
woman. I was recently contacted by
the boyfriend I had when I was in
my 20s. "Byron" was the love of my
life, but I foolishly broke up with
him. I then married a bum and had a
child I am raising by myself on a
very limited income.
I live in an apartment with mis-
matched furniture and have no
money in savings. My former flame
has done well and is now married
with three children. I sent him a let-
ter telling him how proud I am of
him and of what he has achieved.
His reply has brought back a flood
of memories, and I feel terrible
about where I am and being alone.
How can I get over this?
Byron's Long-Ago Ex
Dear Ex: If you want more frus-
tration and heartbreak, continue
swimming in your flood of memo-
ries. Keep in mind that you dumped
Byron "foolishly," and use that life
lesson to guide you going forward.
Because you are alone now does not
mean you'll be alone forever.


Metro Services
Aries (March 21-April
20) Aries, the easy road
isn't always the ideal one to
take. Try challenging your-
self this week, and you may
be surprised at the things
you learn about yourself.
Taurus (April 21-May
21) Taurus, it's hard to
pass up a proposition from a
friend, but that's just what
you must do this week to
avoid being sidetracked.
There will be other opportu-
nities.
Gemini (May 22-June
21) Gemini, once you
make up your mind it is dif-
ficult to talk you out of
something. But when a
friend asks you not to inter-
fere, honor this person's
wishes.
Cancer (June 22-July 22)


Living in an apartment
with mismatched furniture
does not mean your circunm- ..
stances can't or won't
improve. The answer to
your question is to stay
focused on the opportunities
in front of you rather than
looking over your shoulder.
That's how you get over Dear
this.

Dear Abby: My husband and I
have a serious difference of opinion,
and I'd like your input.
I am of Indian (Asian, not Native
American) origin, and I would like
our children to have Indian names
because I think they are more unique
and prettier.
My husband, who is American.
contends they are often difficult to
spell and pronounce, and moreover,
since we're an "American" family,
we ought to chose American names.
I disagree.
One of the names hlie would like to
give. I particularly dislike. IHe says it


- There are few things that
you find you can't tackle
this week, Cancer. The ones
that give you pause aren't
worth the effort anyway.
Lucky clays are ahead if
you're looking.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) -
Leo, think about an offer
that is made on Wednesday
as it could be time for a
change. Sagittarius enters
your life in an interesting
way.
Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22)
- Virgo, it's easy to offer up
excuses but it's not so easy
to get the job done. Change
your strategy because the
one you've adopted for a
while now isn't working.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Libra, it's time to make up
your mind about an impor-
tant change in your life. This


was his grandfather's name
and he would like to carry it
on. We don't have kids yet
and at this rate we're not
M; likely to anytime soon.
. "" What do you think about
this stalemate?
Contemplating
Parenthood
Abby Dear Contemplating: I
think the two of you should
compromise. Give the children
American first names and Indian
middle names. Problem solved.

Dear Abby: I waswith my
boyfriend for two years when he left
me for another woman. She was a
lunatic who was possessive and jeal-
ous. not to mention desperate.
After a while, he realized what he
had with me and wanted'to come
back. Because I still loved him, I
gave him another chance.
Abby, she hasn't stopped calling
him. She parks in his driveway
overnight. She refuses to take no for
an answer, although he stopped hav-


HOROSCOPE",


week devote all of your
attention to the pros and
cons of this situation.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
- Now that a certain obstacle
has been climbed, you can
start to relax and enjoy your-
self, Scorpio. Not that there
won't be any additional chal-
lenges: they will just be a
little easier.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) Sagittarius, there's not
much thai needs your atten-
tion this week, so concen-
trate on something that is
recreational or relaxing.
Think about going to a spa
or on a vacation.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan.


20) Capricorn, you are in
dire need of a change of
scenery, but a vacation is
just not in the cards right
now. The solution could be
to take a catr trip or make a
short visit with friends.
Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb.
18) Aquarius, take a few
moments to acquaint your-
self with the new changes
that have occurred. Once
you do you will quickly real-
ize how much better things
are now.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March
20) Stop and take a deep
breath this week, Pisces.
You'll find that you don't
have to zip through at a
break-neck pace anymore.

Famous birthdays
Feb. 27 Josh Groban,
singer (30); Feb. 28 Gilbert


Gottfried, Comic (56):
March I .lustin Bicber,
singer (17); March 2 Jon
Bon Jovi, singer (49); March
3 Jessica Biel, actress (29);
March 4 Khaled Hosseini,
author (46): March 5 Eva
Mendes, actress (37).


New Dolby Digital Soune
All Seats $.00 for Matinee


HALL PASS R
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GNOMEO &JULIET 2D G
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THE EAGLE PG13
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THE KING'S SPEECH R
(Geoffrey Rush, Colin Firth)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
NO STRINGS ATTACHED R
(Ashton Kutcher, Natalie Portman)
2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15

COMING SOON
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Celebrating a


year of miracles


ing anything to do with her.
Now for the-kicker: For his birth-
day. she bought them both a trip to a
Caribbean island and he accepted.
He said he was going only for the
trip, but I'm here and he is there
with her now. What should I do'?
Weeping in Winnipeg
Dear Weeping: Send him on
another trip a one-way trip out of
your life once and for all. Your
boyfriend is an opportunist, and you
deserve better.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van
Buren, also known asJeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her mother, Pauline
Phillips. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440,
Los Angeles, CA 90069. To order How to
Write Letters for All Occasions.'send a
business-sized, self-addressed envelope,
plus check or money order for $6 (U.S.
funds) to: Dear Abby Letter Booklet,
P.O. Box 447, Mount. Morris, IL 61054-
0447. (Postage is included in the price.)


Be sure to stop and take a deep breath this week, Pisces


GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT


FROM THE SOURCE... NEWS-S UN
I Iigllands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927


m


I


1


m


.

?









www.newssun.com


News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT


'The Sensuous Senator' hits

Tanglewood stage March 2


Courtesy photo
The National Intruder reporter (Delores Smith) sniffs
out scandal under the senator's bed in Tanglewood
Actor Guild's 'The Sensuous Senator.' Rehearsals for the
show are now in high gear. The Michael Parker play will
be on the Tanglewood stage at 7 p.m. March 2-4. The
$10 tickets may be purchased at the Tanglewood
Clubhouse (a half-mile north of the Sebring Walmart)
from 9:30-10 a.m. Monday and 3-4 p.m. Thursday.


TAG highlights

March artists


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK For
painters Betty Heim and
Louise Weis, creating beau-
tiful pieces of art has been
a part of their life for as
long as they can remember.
These two artists and The
Artists' Group (TAG) at
South Florida Community
College are a hidden gem
in Avon Park. Located in
the Hotel Jacaranda, TAG
consists of talented local
artists who teach and show-
case their paintings, pot-
tery, hand-painted glass-
works, jewelry design, and
drawings to the community.
TAG is showcasing these
two artists and their art
pieces in March.
Heim, a charter member
of TAG, is an artist profi-
cient in oil and watercolor
painting. She is a well-
known local artist who
holds art and teaching
degrees. Heim said her ear-
liest art influence came
from her mother who
encouraged her from the
time she was a little girl to
explore the world of art.
While proficient in sev-
eral media, most of her cur-
rent work is in watercolor
on Yupo. Painting with
watercolors on Yupo paper
allows the paint to "float on
top" of the paper and
allows colors to be brighter
and more intense.
Heim will teach a water-
color workshop in March.
She loves teaching classes
because her students are
enthusiastic and motivated
artists. This workshop will
be held from noon-4 p.m.
Thursday, March 3-31 and
costs $85.
Weis, also a charter
member of TAG, is an
acrylic and oil painter, and
hand paints china. She
became interested in art
when she took her first art


class in the eighth grade
and has been painting ever
since. She is now a popular
Florida artist and past
teacher. She taught the
majority of the time in
local schools while she was
living in Ketchikan,
Alaska.
Her favorite painting
media is acrylic, but has an
interest in other media.
"I like to paint a variety
of settings and media,"
Weis said. "I think it would
be boring to do the same
thing all of the time."
Most of her paintings
currently being featured in
TAG are landscapes of
Florida. She is also featur-
ing some hand-painted
pieces of china in TAG.
She will teach an acrylic
painting class in March.
Students may paint their
own subjects or paint along
with the instructor. The
class will have the opportu-
nity to complete two
acrylic paintings during a
five-week session. It will
be held on Wednesdays,
March 2-30, and costs $85.
"The best thing about
TAG is having a studio to
be able to focus solely on
art," Weis said. "It is a
great place to work because
we all have different talents
and collaborate with each
other."
TAG artists include
Betty Heim, Louise Weis,
Betty McCarthy, Nancy
Adams, Cecilia Smith,
Kathy Morgan, and Ruth
Poindexter. Visitors to TAG
are welcome to view and
purchase paintings, jewel-
ry, china, prints and note
cards of the featured artists
in the gallery. The TAG Art
Studio and Gallery is at 19 ,
E. Main St. For more infor-
mation, contact TAG at
784-7346.


Courtesy photo
Betty Heim, one of two artists highlighted by The
Artists' Group at South Florida Community College in
March, is proficient in oil and watercolor painting and
enjoys working on Yupo paper. The TAG Art Studio and
Gallery is at 19 E. Main St., Avon Park.


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK Three local
musicians will present an
evening of well-known folk,
bluegrass, pop, and country
music when they perform
with Grammy award-winning
vocalist Pat Surface during
South Florida Community
College's Kaleidoscope
Series at 7:30 p.m. Thursday,
March 3 in the SFCC
University Center
Auditorium.
The group was formed
after the Florida musician
who performs with Surface
canceled his appearance.
With less than two months
prior to the performance date,
Surface and Doug Andrews,
dean, SFCC Cultural
Programs, put together a new
group to perform Manny
Pitino on bass, Andrews on
keyboard, and Jim Robertson
on fiddle, guitar, and man-
dolin. "I knew both Manny
and Jim, and I thought they
would fill the sound out,"
Andrews said.
Pitino has more than 50
CD recordings and countless
performances throughout the
world to his credit. He has
performed with some of the
top names in the music busi-
ness, including Arturo
Sandoval, Selena, Gloria
Estefan, and more. Currently,
Pitino plays local gigs as well
as' with the local group,
Emanon Jazz.
Andrews, on keyboard, has
played locally since arriving
at SFCC in 1982. He has per-
formed as a soloist and in a
group setting and is also a
member of Emanon Jazz.


Courtesy photo
Jim Robertson (from left), Doug Andrews, and Manny
Pitino will perform with Pat Surface during the SFCC Jazz
Series on March 3.


Robertson has played the
fiddle with the Missouri
Oprey and throughout central
Florida. He also plays guitar
and mandolin and is known
locally for performing with
Back Porch Revival. He is a
four-time finalist in the
Florida State Fiddle contest.
Pat and Donna Surface hail
from the northern Minnesota
Boundary Waters Wilderness
area, merging the boarders of
the United States and
Canada. They are the core of
the most popular band in
northern Minnesota, the
Boundary Water Boys. Pat
Surface is a musician, song-
writer, singer, and storyteller
who has performed for well
more than 20 million people
and has 15 recordings to his
credit. His style of soulful
vocals paired with his guitar


playing, and his gift to weave
his music through stories and
humor leaves him constantly
in demand. Donna Surface is
a performance artist in sign
language.
' Their performance is
described as "something
fresh with the familiar," per-
forming popular songs such
as "I Can See Clearly Now,"
"Let It Be," "Country
Roads," "Mr. Bojangles,"
"What a Wonderful World,"
and "You've Got A Friend"
among other well know
selections from the genres of
country, folk, bluegrass, and
pop.
"Pat sings in the style of
James Taylor and Dan
Fogelberg," Andrews said.
"He is a balladeer and has a
pleasant and relaxing voice."
The season sponsors are


Courtesy photo
Grammy award-winning
vocalist Pat Surface will per-
form during South Florida
Community College's
Kaleidoscope Series at 7:30
p.m. Thursday, March 3.

Charles and Anne Reynolds,
Dr. and Mrs. Witford
Reid/Sebring Pain Mgmt. and
Dr. Richard and Elina
Campbell. The performance
sponsor is Gene Brenner, In
Memory of Jo Brenner.
Tickets range from $15 to
$18 and may be purchased
online at http://performanc-
es.southflorida.edu. Tickets
may also be purchased by
calling the SFCC Box Office
at 784-7178 or by visiting the
SFCC Box Office in the front
the of the SFCC Theatre for
the Performing Arts, 600 W.
College Drive, from 11:30
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday-
Friday.


Barrage brings high-energy show to SFCC


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK The high-
octane string group, Barrage,
featuring a multi-talented
cast of eight who perform an
eclectic mix of music, song,
and dance brings its show to
South Florida Community
College at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, March 5 in the
SFCC Theatre for the
Performing Arts. The per-
formance can be described as
Stomp meets Riverdance
with violins'.
This public performance is
part of the Barrage
"Animado" tour and features
an international cast that
delivers a show at a feverish
pace. The young cast of
Barrage has rock star looks
and impressive athletic


HCA to open

March show

on Saturday
Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING The Heartland
Cultural Alliance will be
opening its March show at
the HCA Art & Music
Gallery in the Kenilworth
Lodge at 5 p.m. Saturday.
Highland County artists in a
variety of medium will be
showing new and classic
works. The Artists Reception
will be followed by the music
of Don & Allen.
The reception is from 5-8
p.m. in the Grand Ballroom
in the Kenilworth Lodge.
Wine and snacks provided.
Classical guitar by Kenny
Summers. Open to the public.
free.
After 8 p.m. the dance
floor is open to the multi-
generational music of Don &
Allen. After 8 p.m. there will
be a $5 cover charge. Drinks
available for purchase. This
event is a fund raiser for the
Heartland Cultural Alliance.
For more information con-
tact Fred Leavitt at 402-8238,
or e-mail info@heartlandcul-
turalalliance.org. For more
information on the Heartland
Cultural Alliance visit
www.heartlandculturalal-
liance.org.


Courtesy photo
The high-octane string group, Barrage, features a multi-tal-
ented cast of eight who perform an eclectic mix of. music,
song, and dance. The group brings its show to South
Florida Community College on Saturday, March 5, 7:30
p.m.


prowess including deep knee-
bends, leaps, and pirouettes
which obliterates the stereo-
type of the nerdy violinist.
The group has been featured


on PBS, at Disneyfs Epcot
Center, on international TV
networks, and has toured in
more than 18 countries
worldwide. Following this


performance, the audience
will never think of fiddle
playing the same way again.
The performance is spon-
sored by Alan Jay
Automotive Network and Dr.
and Mrs. Rulx Ganthier Jr.
Tickets range from $22 to
$29 and may be purchased
online 24 hours a day, seven
days a week. at http://per-
formances.southflorida.edu.
Tickets may also be pur-
chased by calling the SFCC
Box Office at 784-7178 or by
visiting the SFCC Box Office
in the front of the SFCC
Theatre for the Performing
Arts, 600 W. College Drive,
from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Monday-Friday.


Attend the Church of Your Choice!


Inspirational Thoughts
I n Patricia I adentine

** St. Luke :5-c., "And Simon
answering said unto him,
Master, we have toiled all
the night, and have taken
nothing: nevertheless at thy
word I will let down the net.
And when they had this done. they inclosed a
great multitude of fishes: and their net
brake." In the above scriptures. Peter chose
to obey Jesus and as a result he experienced
a stunning display of divine power. In our
obedience to God and His word it may
sometime require doing some things that
appear to be unreasonable. ()Our obedience to
God should ne\ er be based on w whether
something seems lifting to our \\a\ ol
thinking. That is not to sa\ God al\ a\s
bypasses common sense, but ol tenimes \ hat
He requires ol us may not appear
reasonable or miatch our priconcei\ ed ideas.
Disobedience will cause tis to miss out on
what God has in stored.foi us. Notlhini
pleases a parent more than to ha\c heir
children walking in obedience. God is C.\ en
more pleased w hen His children are walking
in obedience. Be Blessed!


Stephienson-9 (son Funeraf[lHome



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Sebring, 385-0125 Craig M. Nelson
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Page 3C


Grammy Award-winning singer Surface


to perform at SFCC with local musicians









News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


www. newssun.com


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT


SAppraisal events reveal treasures


Courtesy photo
Anne Watson's 'Art Sparks!' demonstrations show the progression of her "fi\..-bji.hlc chal-
lenge' painting that will be one of those featured in the Yellow House Gallery's May Exhibit,
which will also introduce a special artwork challenge to the community at large.

Progression taught in 'Art Sparks!'

Tuesday at Yellow House Gallery


By ANNE WATSON
Special to the NAews-Sun
SEBRING There is a landscape larger
than the one you see ...
Well, in this case, a still life ... but the
principle is the same. Anne Watson's demon-
stration at the Yellow House Gallery's Art
Sparks Tuesday night weekly event this week
offered the concept of blocking in the colors
in a painting.
Watson likens the 'blocking in" process to
the way, in everyday life, so many of us use
our day planners or calendars to manage too
many things at once, blocking in the entire
day, or even week at once, and then viewing
it as a whole before making changes where
there are conflicts or gaps.
In painting, this process of covering the
canvas quickly allows the painter to get the
big picture in a short amount of time. assess
it, and make changes before putting in too
much time on any one area and finding too far
down the road that there were errors that
could have been corrected early on.
This is the painter's way of allowing him-


self to 'see the forest, rather than the trees',
and like so many other principles in painting.
it reminds us that sometimes it is beneficial
to do the same in our daily life.
Watson will continue the same painting in
her next demonstration, scheduled for the 6
p.m. Tuesday event on the fourth Tuesday in
March, as requested by this week's enthusias-
tic audience.
Next Tuesday's Art Sparks! will feature the,
second phase of Loretta Dewiitt's Pollack
Project, an audience interactive painting ini
the style of Jackson Pollack.
All are welcome at no charge.
Dewitt will begin promptly at 6pm, so
please arrive on time to see what art canll
spark in your life.

Anne lWatson teaches painting in oils and t arylics,
drawing and digital media at thli Highlands Art
League in Sebring, as ..' as in A.lon PIark and
Lake Placid, and features a broad range orfcom-
mercial and personal artwork. She can reached at
anneif@anneiwatsonstiudio.com and -1-19-0822.


As
you
know. I
condUct
mllore
than 100
antiques
appraisal
events
Art & around
the
Antiques world.
Di1: 0Loi Many of
my read-
ers have joined me at these
fun-filledl appraisal sessions
in cities I'ar and wide.
Recently, I have been travel-
ing to share information
with audiences about family
heirlooms, Ilea market finds,
and other objects.

A Dallas dazzler
I met Marcella at Visions:
The Women's Expo in
Dallas, Texas. While she
was working at the Expo,
she brought me this
Mexican muralist work on
paper that belonged to her
father to evaluate. The char-
acteristic work of art featur-
ing three doves was painted
in the manner of Diego
Rivera's style work. The
painting Marcella owned
was a study for a larger
mural work. It was a shock
to Marcella when I told her
that the painting which her
father had all these years
was worth $5,000 to $6.000.
She exclaimed, that day was
her best day at work!

Excitement in
Raleigh
I met April, a fan who
attended mn antiques
appraisal show at the
Southern Ideal Holme Show
in Raleigh. N.C. On the. last
dav of the three day event.
April brought her SO-some-
thing mother and her paint-
ing to the home show. I was
appraising a variety of


I~i I


Courtesy photo
Dr. Lori appraised April's painting at a show in Raleigh
recently. Her American painting was valued at $75,000 to
$95,000. April is holding the issue 6f the Saturday
Evening Post where her painting appeared.


objects from Native
American masks to iron
locks from San Quentin
prison, but the painting was
.the highlight of my last day
in Raleigh. April's painting
was handed down from her
uncle who worked at the
Saturday Evening Post and
was friends with esteemed
American artist, Norman
Rockwell and other major
figures in the world of
American illustration art.
I looked at the painting
carefully and saw it was
very well cared for. April
started shaking when I told
her that her painting
(accompanied by the 1960s
magazine publication) was
worth $75,000-$95.000!
That is what a willing buyer
will pay a willing seller for
it.

Appraisals at sea
I met Cherie on the
Celebrity Solstice cruise
ship during one of my spe-
cial theme cruises where I
present my antiques apprais-
al comedy shows. A lot of


people can't believe that
cruise guests bring items
onboard for me to appraise,
but they certainly do-in big
numbers. Cherie from
Davenport brought me her
Victorian era, sterling silver
snuff box that was used for
the storage of snuff, a popu-
lar drug of the 1800s made
from poppy seeds. Her snuff
box was worth $750.
While the objects that I
evaluate at my antiques
appraisal events are fasci-
nating, I am most intrigued
by the people and the stories
that audience members
share.

Celebrity Ph.D. antiques
appraiser, author, and award-
winning TVpe;sonality, Dr
Lori presents antique appraisal
events nationwide and antiques
themed cruises. As seen on
NBC's The Tonight Show and
Comedy Central's The Daily
Show, watch Dr Lori on the
national TV morning show,
Daytime on NBC WFLA 8 at
10AM. Visit DrLoriVcom,
Facebook.com/DoctorLori, or
call (888) 431-1010.


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www.neWSSun. corn


News-Sun + Sunday, February 27, 2011


CHALK TALK


Breakfasts and lunches
being served in the Highlands
County School District for the
upcoming week of Feb. 28
through March 4 include:

HIGH SCHOOLS
Monday
Breakfast Egg and
Cheese Daybreaker, assorted
cereal, cheese filled bread-
stick, pear fruit cup, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted juice,
assorted milk.
Lunch Penne pasta;
meat sauce, garlic breadstick,
burger, cheeseburger, chicken
patty on bun, Mama Sofia's
cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's
a pperoni pizza, ham sub
meal turkey sub meal, dill
smac', Peanut Butter and Jelly
sandwich meal, chef salad
meal, baked french fries,
orange glazed carrots, ched-
dar cheese stick, tossed salad,
applesauce snacking cake,
strawberry cup, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted juice,
assorted milk.
Tuesday
Breakfast Chicken bis-'
cuit, assorted cereal, cheese
filled breadstick, strawberry
cup, assorted fresh fruit,
assorted juice, chocolate milk,
strawberry milk, white milk.
Lunch Baked chicken,
dinner roll, burger, cheese-
burger, chicken patty on bun,
Mama Sofia's cheese pizza,
Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza,
cheeseburger pizza, ham sub
meal, turkey sub meal, dill
stack, PBJ sandwich meal,
chef salad meal, mashed
potatoes, chicken gravy, green
beans, carrots and dip, cocoa
clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, assorted milk.
Wednesday
Breakfast Breakfast
pizza, hash brown patty,
assorted cereal, cheese filled
breadstick, apricot cup,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, assorted milk.
Lunch Turkey enchi-
ladas, salsa, yellow rice, burg-
er, cheeseburger, hot and
spicy chicken sandwich,
grilled chicken sandwich,
Mama Sofia's cheese pizza,
Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza,
ham sub meal, turkey sub
meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich
meal, chef salad meal, baked
buffalo chips, carrots and dip,
great northern beans, diced
pears, dried blueberries,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, assorted milk.
Thursday
Breakfast Breakfast bur-
rito, salsa, hash brown patty,
assorted cereal, cheese filled
breadstick, peach cup, assort-
ed fresh fruit, assorted juice,
assorted milk.
Lunch Turkey and gravy,
egg noodles, dinner roll, burg-
er, cheeseburger, chicken
patty on bun, Mama Sofia's
cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's
pepperoni pizza, cheeseburg-
er pizza, ham sub meal, turkey
sub meal, dill stack, PBJ
sandwich meal, chef salad
meal, broccoli, potato
wedges, Colby Jack cheese
stick, salsa, apple crisp, cut
fresh fruit, assorted fresh
fruit, assorted juice, assorted
milk.
Friday
Breakfast Maple waffle
stick, assorted cereal, string
cheese, strawberry- cup,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, assorted milk.
Lunch Chicken tenders,
dinner roll, burger, cheese-
burger, Mama Sofia's cheese
pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni
pizza, chicken patty on bun,
PBJ sandwich meal, ham sub
meal, turkey sub meal, dill
stack, chef salad meal, baked
french fries, carrots and dip,
corn, tossed salad, chocolate
chip cookie, peach cup,
assorted juice, assorted fresh
fruit, assorted milk.


ACADEMY SCHOOLS
Monday
Lunch Penne pasta,
meat sauce, garlic breadstick,
carrots and dip, applesauce
snacking cake, strawberry
cup, assorted juice, assorted
milk.
Tuesday
Lunch Baked chicken,
dinner roll, mashed potatoes,
green beans, cocoa clodhop-
pers, assorted juice, assorted


School Menus

fresh fruit, assorted milk.
Wednesday
Lunch Turkey enchi-
ladas, salsa, yellow rice,
baked buffalo chips, carrots
and dip, dried blueberries,
assorted juice, assorted milk.
Thursday
Lunch Turkey and gravy,
egg noodles, dinner roll, broc-
coli, apple crisp, cut fresh
fruit, assorted juice, assorted
milk.
Friday
Lunch Cheeseburger,
dill stack, Sun Chips, fresh
apple slices, chocolate chip
cookie, assorted juice, assort-
ed milk.

MIDDLE SCHOOLS
Monday
Breakfast Egg and
Cheese Daybreaker, assorted
cereal, cheese filled bread-
sticks, pear fruit cup, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted juice,
assorted milk. Breakfast on
the Patio: Sausage biscuit,
assorted juices, assorted
milk.
Lunch Penne pasta,
meat sauce, garlic breadstick,
burger, cheeseburger, chicken
patty on bun, ham sub meal,
turkey sub meal, dill stack,
Peanut Butter and Jelly sand-
wich meal, chef salad meal,
orange glazed carrots, ched-
dar cheese stick, tossed salad,
applesauce snacking cake,
strawberry cup, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted juice,
assorted milk.
Tuesday
Breakfast Chicken bis-
cuit, assorted cereal, cheese
filled breadstick, strawberry
cup, assorted fresh fruit,
assorted juice, assorted milk.
Breakfast on the Patio:
Chicken biscuit, assorted
juice, assorted milk.
Lunch Baked chicken,
dinner roll, burger, cheese-
burger, chicken patty on bun,
ham sub meal, turkey sub
meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich
meal, chef salad meal,
mashed potatoes, chicken
gravy, green beans, carrots
and dip, cocoa clodhoppers,
cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh
fruit, assorted juice, assorted
milk.
Wednesday
Breakfast Breakfast
pizza, assorted cereal, cheese
filled breadstick, apricot cup,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, assorted milk. Breakfast
on the Patio: Breakfast pizza,
assorted juice, assorted milk.
Lunch Turkey enchi-
ladas, salsa, yellow rice, burg-
er, cheeseburger, hot and
spicy chicken sandwich,
grilled chicken sandwich, ham
sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill
stack, PBJ sandwich meal,
chef salad meal, baked buffalo
chips, carrots and dip, great
northern beans, diced pears,
dried blueberries, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted juice,
assorted milk.
Thursday
Breakfast Breakfast bur-
rito, salsa, hash brown patty,
assorted cereal, cheese filled
breadstick, peach cup, assort-
ed fresh fruit, assorted juice,
assorted milk. Breakfast on
the Patio: Chicken biscuit,
assorted juice, assorted milk.
.Lunch Turkey and gravy,
egg noodles, dinner roll, burg-
er, cheeseburger, chicken
patty on bun, ham sub meal,
turkey sub meal, dill stack,
PBJ sandwich meal, chef
salad meal, broccoli, potato
wedges, Colby Jack cheese
stick, salsa, apple crisp, cut
fresh fruit, assorted fresh
fruit, assorted juice, milk.
Friday
Breakfast Maple waffle
stick, assorted cereal, string
cheese, strawberry cup,
assorted juice, assorted fresh
fruit, assorted milk. Breakfast
on the Patio: Sausage biscuit,


assorted juice, assorted milk.
Lunch Mama Sofia's
pepperoni pizza, Mama Sofia's
cheese pizza, burger, cheese-
burger, chicken tenders, din-
ner roll, ham sub meal, turkey
sub meal, dill stack, chef salad
meal, PBJ sandwich meal,
carrots and dip, corn, tossed
salad, chocolate chip cookie,
peach cup, assorted fresh
fruit, assorted juice, assorted
milk.


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Monday
Breakfast Egg and
Cheese Daybreaker, assorted
cereal, cheese filled bread-
stick, pear fruit cup, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted juice,
assorted milk. Breakfast in the
Classroom: Cinnamon Toast
Crisp, string cheese, pear fruit
cup, chocolate milk.
Lunch Homestyle pork
roast, dinner roll, Uncrustable
Peanut Butter and Jelly sand-
wich, turkey chef salad,
mashed potatoes, brown
gravy, green beans, apple
crisp, very berry juice bar,
assorted juice, assorted milk.
Tuesday
Breakfast Breakfast bur-
rito, salsa, hash brown patty,
assorted cereal, cheese filled
breadstick, strawberry cup,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, assorted milk. Breakfast
in the Classroom:
Blueberry/sausage pancake,
strawberry cup, chocolate
milk, Uncrustable PBJ sand-
wich, peach cup, chocolate
milk.
Lunch Baked chicken,
dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ
sandwich, ham chef salad,
scalloped potatoes, corn cob-
bettes, rosy applesauce, very
berry juice bar, assorted juice,
assorted milk.
Wednesday
Breakfast Chicken bis-
cuit, assorted cereal, cheese
filled breadstick, apricot cup,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, assorted milk. Breakfast
in the Classroom: Uncrustable
PBJ sandwich, peach cup,
chocolate milk,
blueberry/sausage pancake,
strawberry cup, chocolate
milk.
Lunch Beefaroni, garlic
breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ
sandwich, turkey chef salad,
orange glazed carrots, tossed
salad, cocoa clodhoppers,
fresh apple slices, assorted
juice, assorted milk.
Thursday
Breakfast Breakfast
pizza, assorted cereal, cheese
filled breadstick, peach cup,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, assorted milk. Breakfast
in the Classroom: Breakfast
frittata, grape juice, chocolate
milk, whole grain pop-tarts,
apple juice, chocolate milk.
Lunch Cheeseburger,
dill stack, Uncrustable PBJ
sandwich, ham chef salad,
potato puffs, carrots and dip,
fruited Jell-O, very berry juice
bar, assorted juice, assorted
milk.
Friday
Breakfast Maple waffle
stick, assorted cereal, string
cheese, strawberry cup,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, assorted milk. Breakfast
in the Classroom: Whole grain
pop-tarts, apple juice, choco-
late milk, breakfast frittata,
grape juice, chocolate milk.
Lunch Turkey and gravy,
egg noodles, dinner roll,
Uncrustable PBJ sandwich,
turkey chef salad, mixed veg-
etables, ice cream sandwich,
peach cup, fresh apple slices,
assorted juice, assorted milk.

KINDERGARTEN LEARNING
CENTER
Monday
Lunch Homestyle pork
roast, dinner roll, Uncrustable
Peanut Butter and Jelly
Sandwich, mashed potatoes,
brown gravy, green beans,
apple crisp, assorted milk.
Tuesday
Lunch Baked chicken,
dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ
sandwich, scalloped potatoes,
corn cobbettes, rosy apple-
sauce, assorted milk.
Wednesday
Lunch Beefaroni, garlic
breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ
sandwich, orange glazed car-
rots, cocoa clodhoppers,
fresh apple slices, assorted
milk.


Thursday
Lunch Cheeseburger,
Uncrustable PBJ sandwich,
potato puffs, carrots and dip,
fruited Jell-O, assorted milk.
Friday
Lunch Turkey and gravy,
egg noodles, dinner roll,
Uncrustable PBJ sandwich,
mixed vegetables, ice cream
sandwich, peach cup, assort-
ed milk.


Change of Command at APHS


---
News-Sun photo b5 BRI \NA WASHINGTON
The Avon Park High School Junior ROTC had its Change of Command ceremony on
Wednesday. Cadet/Major Angel Perez (from left) was promoted to Squadron Commander by
Cadet/Colonel Eric Steed, while Cadet/Major Jorge Vicens was promoted to Deputy
Commander by Cadet/Lt. Colonel Travis Hall.



SFCC offers spring classes in. LP


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID South
Florida Community
College's Community
Education Department is
offering a variety of classes
this spring at the SFCC Lake
Placid Center.
The Cardio-Fitness class
consists of aerobic and floor
exercises. The class is held
from 8-9 a.m. Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday.
Pilates and Stretch Combo
class consists of a 30-minute
Pilates workout and 30 min-
utes of stretching and exer-
cises. The class meets 9-10
a.m. Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday.
Interval Training targets
toning and flexible fitness.
The class consists of a 20-
minute aerobic workout, a
20-minute step workout and
a 20-minute weight training
workout. The class is held
4:30-5:30 p.m. Monday.
Tuesday, and Thursday.
The Pilates and Muscle
Movement class consists of
an aerobic workout, step
workout, interval training,
and Pilates. Class is held
5:30-6:30 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday, and Thursday.
The Cardio-Fitness,
Pilates and Stretch Combo,
Interval Training, and Pilates
and Muscle Movement class-
es run on a continuing
monthly basis, and these ses-
sions will be held March 1-
25. These classes are taught


by Kathy Rouse and offer a
high intensity, low-impact
aerobic workout with a car-
diovascular workout at a con-
trolled level. All classes
include the use of stability
bars, resistance bands, hand
weights, balls, gliders, heavy
hoops, and mats. The regis-
tration fee for a four-week
morning session is $30.25.
The registration fee for a
four-week afternoon session
is $30.25.
Tai Chi is a high intensity
strengthening and stretching
exercise that improves flexi-


ability and balance. The class
meets with instructor Karin
Grunden from 8-9 a.m. and
9-10 a.m. Tuesday and
Thursday, March 1 to April
28. The cost is $44.
The SFCC Lake Placid
Center is also offering clog-
ging classes with instructor
Patricia Kules on Mondays,
April 4 to June 13. Beginning
Clogging meets 6:30-7:30
p.m., and Intermediate
Clogging -meets 5:30-6:30
p.m. The cost is $44.
Call 465-3003 or 465-
5300, ext. 7082.


CROSSWORD SOLUTION
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O CULAR WILLIE AOSCOT T
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RULING CLASS NONASSET

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GOODBYEMRCH IPS OTT
AN NA L E A SE T 0 OSH CIT
ION STACKUP ALONE
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SGTS INCHES OCHS AGE
B E .STACTOROSCARS H RU S
I N ASPOT ATTEND TOTERS
AlL ORE PU ENTER AORTAE
N EE PE R PETER OTOOLE


Page 5C


I .......










News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


www.newssun.com


CHALK TALK


Snapshots

DSAC meets March 7
SEBRING The
Highlands County District
School Advisory Council
(DSAC) will meet Monday,
March 7 in the Garland
Boggus Board Room at the
School Board of Highlands
County, 426 School St., from
6-7:30 p.m. The primary
agenda item for this meeting
is Positive Behavior Support
and Code of Conduct.
If you are a person with a
disability who requires rea-
sonable accommodations in
order to attend a District
School Advisory Council
meeting, call 471-5608 three
days prior to the scheduled
meeting date and time.

12-Hour Advanced
Basic Driver
Improvement Course
set
AVON PARK South
Florida Community
College's Community
Education Department is
offering a 12-hour Advanced
Driver Improvement Course
for drivers who wish to have
their driver's license rein-
stated or those that were
ordered by the court to do
so.
The course will be held
from 5:30-9:30 p.m.
Tuesday-Thursday, March


Career


Connection at SFCC


Courtesy photo
More than 70 careers were featured during South Florida
Community College's Career Connection on Feb. 24. High
school and college students attended the event to learn
more about career options and the skills needed to suc-
ceed. Drafting professor Tana Markel informs SFCC student
Silvino Guillen of the variety of jobs and options available in
the drafting and design career field.


15-17 at the SFCC
Highlands Campus, 600 W.
College Drive.
Pre-registration is required
and the fee is $124. Contact
the Community Education
office at 453-6661, 465-
5300, 773-2252. or 382-
6900, ext. 7388.
SFCC Community
Education offers
ADAPT courses
South Florida Community
College's Community
Education Department is
offering a series of Alcohol


Drug Accident Prevention
Training (ADAPT) courses
for first-time driver's license
applicants.
The four-hour courses will
be held 8:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Saturday, Mhrch 5 at
the SFCC DeSoto Campus,
2252 N.E. Turner Ave.,
Arcadia; 8:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Saturday, March 12 at
the SFCC Highlands
Campus, 600 W. College
Drive, Avon Park; and 8:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday,
March 19 at the SFCC
Hardee Campus, 2968 U.S.


Student of the Month


17 N., Bowling Green.
Pre-registration is
required. The fee is $32 and
may be paid by cash, check,
or credit card. Participants
may register in Building B
on the Highlands Campus or
at any SFCC campus or cen-
ter. For more information,
contact the Community
Education Department at
453-6661, 465-5300, 494-
7500, 773-2252, or 382-
6900, ext. 7388.

SFCC Community
Education offers
Safe Driving
Accident Prevention
Program

South Florida Community
College's Community
Education Department is
offering a series of Safe
Driving Accident Prevention
Program (SPAPP) courses
for drivers who have
received a traffic citation.
The four-hour courses will
be held from 5:30-9:30 p.m.
Wednesday, March 9 at the
SFCC DeSoto Campus, 2252
N.E. Turner Ave., Arcadia,
and from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Saturday, March 19 at
the SFCC Hardee Campus,
2968 U.S. 17 N. Bowling
Green.
Pre-registration is
required. The fee is $37 and
may be paid by cash, check,
or credit card. For more


information, contact the
Community Education
Department at 453-6661,


465-5300, 494-7500, 773-
2252, or 382-6900, ext.
7388.


PLACES To


WORSHIP


Places to Worship is a paid
advertisement in the News-Sun
that is published Friday and
Sunday. To find out more infor-
mation on how to place a listing
in this directory, call the News-
Sun at 385-6155, ext. 502.


APOSTOLIC

* Greater Faith Apostolic
Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. invites you to
come worship with us in spirit and
truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday. For information con-
tact 840-0152. Pastor Larry
Carmody.


ASSEMBLY OF GOD

* Christ Fellowship Church
(Assembly of God), 2935 New
Life Way. Bearing His Name;
Preaching His Doctrine; and
Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping
God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship,
10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m.
Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-
0924.
* First Assembly of God, 4301
Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev.
Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday
School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship
and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.;
Evening Worship, 7 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night, (Adult
Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group,
Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-6431.


BAPTIST

* Avon Park Lakes Baptist
Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd.,
Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall,
Pastor. Christ centered and bibli-
cally based. Sunday worship serv-
ices, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Nursery facilities are available.
Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday
and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer
Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible
classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered
for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m.
Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556.
* Bethany Baptist Church
(GARBC) We are located at the
corner of SR1,7 and C-17A (truck
route) in Avon Park. Join us
Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for cof-
fee and doughnuts, followed with
Sunday School for all ages at 9:30.
Sunday morning worship service
begins at 10:30 a.m., and evening
worship service is at 6 p.m. On
Wednesday, the Word of Life teen
ministry and the Catylist class
(20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult.
Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7
p.m. For more information go to
www.bethanybaptistap.com or call
the church office at 863-:452-1136.
* Faith Missionary Baptist
Church, off State Road 17 North of
Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave.
Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday
Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation
available. Ken Lambert, Pastor.
Phone 386-5055.
* Fellowship Baptist Church,
1000 Maxwell St., Avon Park, FL


33825. Sunday: Sunday School,
9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; Wednesday: Evening
Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7
p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax:
453-6986. E-mail: office@apfe/llow
ship.org, Web site, wwwapfellow.
ship. org.
* First Baptist Church of Avon
Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park.
Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared
Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy
Loomis, music director. Regular
Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m.
Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library
open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11
a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m.
Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening
Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10
a.m., basic computer
class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m.
conversational English and citizen-
ship classes/Sonshine House.
Regular Wednesday schedule:
5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6
p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m.
Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. chil-
dren's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. chil-
dren's mission groups. Call 453-
6681 for details. Primera Mision
Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon
Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor.
Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m.,
Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship
Service. Wednesday schedule: 7
p.m.; Bible study.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine
Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 mid-
way between Sebring and Lake
.Placid). Your place for family,
friends and faith. Sunday morning
worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery
is provided for both services with
Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life
changing Bible Study for all ages
starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor
Allen Altvater leads the youth in
their quest to become more like
Christ. Sunday night worship at 6
p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and
Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with
youth worship in the youth facility,
and missions training for all chil-
dren. Call the church at 655-1524.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Placid, -Knowing God's Heart and
Sharing God's Hope, 1.19 E. Royal
Palm Street. (2 blocks south of
Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL
33852 (863) 465-3721, Email:
www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett
Morey, senior pastor. Sunday serv-
ices Traditional Service 9 a.m.,
Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m.
Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m.,
Senior Sunday Night and Sunday
Evening Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Activities: Family din-
ner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reser-
vations required). Adult-LifeSource
classes, prayer meeting, Youth
Intersections, and Kids K-5-
MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15
p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every
Tuesday for prayer breakfast and
women's prayer breakfast is at 8
a.m. every Wednesday, both at the
Family Restaurant.
* First Baptist Church of Lorida
located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida.
Sunday School begirls at 9:45 a.m.
for all ages. Sunday worship serv-
ices are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Preschool care is provided at the
11 a.m. worship service.
Wednesday evening Bible Study
and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m.,
followed by adult choir rehearsal.


From September to May our youth
group meets. First Lorida is the
"Place to discover God's love." For
more information about the church
or the ministries offered, call 655-
1878. .
* First Baptist Church, Sebring,
200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL
33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr.
David E. Richardson, senior pas-
tor; Rev: Joe Delph, minister of
youth and activities. Contemporary
Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible
Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional
Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista
Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night
programs at the ROC begin 5:30
p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m.
Preschool and Mother's Day Out
for children age 6 weeks to 5 years
old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call
385-4704.
* Florida Avenue Baptist
Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon
Park. Mailing address is 710 W.
Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825.
Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D.
Girdley, pastor. Sunday School,
9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11
a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church;
Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday night programs for
children, youth and adults.at 7 p.m.
* Independent Baptist Church,
5704 County Road 17 South,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday
School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship,
10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m.
Wednesday service, 7 p.m.
Fundamental, soul-winning, 'mis-
sion-minded, King James Bible
Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone
655-1899. Bus transportation.
* Leisure Lakes Baptist Church,
808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just
off of Miller at the west end of Lake
June) "Where the old fashion
gospel is preached." Sunday
School begins at 9:45 a.m.;
Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.;
Sunday Evening Service is at 6
p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the
church at 699-0671 for more infor-
mation.
* Maranatha Baptist Church
(GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east
of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle
Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9
a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.;
Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week
service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily
Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m.,
Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald
Webber and Associate Pastors
Don Messenger and Ted Ertle.
Phone 382-4301.
* Parkway Free Will Baptist
Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the
church where the "Son" always
shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and
Wednesday Evening Worship, 7
p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6
p.m. on the last Sunday of each
month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pas-
tor. Church phone: 382-3552.
Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated
with the National Association of
Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn.
* Sparta Road Baptist Church,
(SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev.
Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday
school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening


Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday:
Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery
provided. For information, call 382-
0869.
* Southside Baptist Church
(GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave.,
Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor;
Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor.
Sunday School for all ages, 9:30
a.m.; Morning Worship Service,
10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten
through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.;
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30
p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and
Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for
under age 3 is available at all serv-
ices. Provisions for handicapped
and hard-of-hearing. Office phone,
385-0752.
* Sunrldge Baptist Church,
(SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27
and Valerie, across from Florida
Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pas-
tor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.;
Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service,
6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible
Study, and Youth, 6:30
p.m.Nursery provided. For informa-
tion, call 382-3695.


CATHOLIC

* Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church, 595 East Main St., Avon
Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas
McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil
Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7
p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8
and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m.,
Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at
8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30
p.m. Saturday. Religious Education
Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday
for grades K through 8th.
Confirmation class is from 6:30-8
p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights
grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m.
Wednesday.
* St. Catherine Catholic Church,
820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing
address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL
33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe.
com. Very Rev. Jos6 Gonzalez,
V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30
and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30
a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday
Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family
and Youth Center). Daily Masses 8
a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9
a.m. Saturday. Confession: 2:30-
3:15 p.m. Saturday, 7:15-7:45
a.m. first Friday, 9-10 a..m.
Sunday, or by appointment. Enroll
your students today for Catholic
School grades Pre-K3 through 5th
grade.
* St. James Catholic Church,
3380 Placidview Drive, Lake
Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael
J. Cannon. Mass schedule:
Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) -
Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8
a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9
a.m. December thru Easter -
Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m.,
9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9
a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30
a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9
a.m.


CHRISTIAN

* Eastside Christian Church,
101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL
33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27
on County Road 621), 465-7065.


Ray Culpepper, senior pastor.
Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.;
Worship Celebration with the
Lord's Supper each week 10:15
a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat
Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise
and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building
God's Kingdom for Everyone:"
"Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and
Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!"
* Sebring Christian Church,
4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher;
Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor.
Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening
service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday
night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by
classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours,
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Phone 382-6676.
* First Christian Church, 1016
W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL
33825; (863) 453-5334; on the
Web at www.firstchristianap.com.
Our motto is "Jesus is First at Ffrst
Christian Church." Greg Ratliff,
Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper,
Family Life Minister; Jon Carter,
Music Director. Bible School 9
a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study,
6 p.m.; Wednesday studies for all
ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for
all events.
* First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ), 510
Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of
Poinsettia and Eucalyptus),
Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-
0358 or 385-3435. The Rev.
Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast,
10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30
a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, Praise and Worship,
6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15
p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15
p.m.


CHRISTIAN &
MISSIONARY
ALLIANCE

* The Alliance Church of
Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road,
Sebring, FL 33875. Call 382-1343.
Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday
services: Sunday School meets at
9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship Service meets at 10:30
a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study
meets at 6 p.m. (off site);
Wednesday Prayer Gathering
meets at 6 p.m.


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

* Christian Science Church, 146
N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m.
morning worship and Sunday
school. Testimonial meetings at
4 p.m. each second and fourth
Wednesday. A free public reading
room/bookstore, located in the
church, is open before and after
church services. The Bible and the
Christian Science textbook,
'Science and Health with Key to
the Scriptures' by Mary Baker Eddy
are our only preachers. All are wel-
come to come and partake of the
comfort, guidance, support and
healing found in the lesson-ser-
mons.


CHURCH OF
BRETHREN

* Church of the Brethren, 700 S.
Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-1597.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

* Avon Park Church of Christ,
200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Minister: Larry Roberts.
Sunday Worship Services, 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities
are available at every service. Bible
Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered
classes for all ages. Church phone:
453-4692.
* Sebring Parkway Church of
Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443. We
would like to extend an invitation
for you and your family to visit with
us here at Sebring Parkway. Our
hours of service are: Sunday
Worship Service, 9 a.m.; Sunday
Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Service, 6 p.m.;
Wednesday Service, 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF
NAZARENE

* First Church of the Nazarene
of Avon Park, P.O. Box 1118.,
Avon Park, FL 33825-1118. 707 W.
Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor.
Sunday: Sunday school, begins at
9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wor-
ship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening
service at 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening service is at 7 p.m. with
special services for children and
adults. Special services once a
month for seniors (Prime Time) and
Ladies ministries. If you need any
more information, call 453-4851.
* First Church of the Nazarene
of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake
Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852.
Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning
worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7
p.m. Classes for adult children and
youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim
Taylor.


CHURCHES OF
CHRIST IN
CHRISTIAN UNION

* Community Bible Church -
Churches of Christ in Christian
Union, (Orange Blossom
Conference Center) 1400 C-17A
North (truck route), Avon Park.
Presenting Jesus Christ as the
answer for time and eternity.
Sunday morning worship service,
10:30 a.m. Nursery provided.
Junior Church activities at same
time for K-6 grade. Sunday School
Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m.
(Transportation available.) Sunday
evening praise and worship serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening
prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and
youth activities at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Everyone is welcome,
please come worship with us. Don
Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone
452-0088.


Page 6C


Courtesy photo
Heartland Christian School senior Brittany Jackson was
recently honored by the Sebring Chamber of Commerce as
one its area 'Students of the Month.' Brittany maintains a
GPA close to 4.0 and is planning to attend South Florida
Community College and study business and nutrition this
coming fall.












WWW. newsu1n.COn77 News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


Connecting corridors: What they mean to wildlife


As more and more people move to
-Florida. many of the natural and agri-
cultural areas are being converted into
urban development. As a result, the
land that once housed many species of
wildlife is now paved or developed in
some way and the wildlife can no
longer exist in those places.
If you think about the needs of
wildlife, you can well imagine that they
would rather be in a wooded area of
fairly large size.
Also, most wild animals will move
from one area to another throughout
their lives in search of water, food or
mates. Animals would prefer to move
through protective cover, hidden from
predators. That is were connecting cor-
ridors come in to play.
Connecting corridors are the strips of
grass and/or shrubs and trees that con-,
nect larger habitat areas- whether they
are wetlands, native grasses, wood-
lands, or other habitat.
In recent years, interest in connect-
ing corridors has grown because
wildlife corridors are seen as ways to
allow wildlife and plants to spread
across natural landscapes that have
been cut into pieces by roads, develop-
ment, logging or other land distur-
bances.
This "cutting into pieces" is referred
to as fragmentation. The dangers to
wildlife are plentiful when this occurs.
One of the negative effects of fragmen-


station is that it dra-
matically decreases
,. the diversity of
wildlife.
It is critical to
.. many species to have
large areas of habitat
for a variety of rea-
sons such as migra-
tion patterns, species
News From dispersion and gene
The flow. (National
Watershed Wildlife Federation)
The corridors
Corine B1rgess allow animals to find
new resources and prevent isolation of
species. Studies have shown that wild
areas connected by corridors have more
wildlife or greater biodiversity than'
disconnected fragments.
There is some concern about corri-
dors entrapping some wildlife species,
since predators can more easily find
their prey in a narrow strip of habitat.
For that reason, the wider the corridor,
the better.
In most situations, landowners creat-
ing corridors may want to consider a
design that is edge feathered, which
includes zones of grasses, shrubs and
trees all in the same corridor.
The center of the corridor would be
planted with trees, with strips of shrubs
on each side, bordered on the outside
by zones of grasses and legumes. This
combination offers habitat for wildlife


that may use all three types for food
and cover, as well as wildlife that
needs only one of the habitat types.
Many species have either disap-
peared or been drastically reduced in
number because of habitat fragmenta-
tion.
It is important to look to the future
for the purposes of including these
wildlife corridors in land management
planning.
If we want to enable wildlife to
exist along side of development, it is
essential that future planning include
these areas in an effort to allow wild
animals and vegetation a place to travel
and exist.
It is critical that species are allowed
to move to new areas and travel to pro-
vide for their needs regarding diet,
reproduction and protection. Their sur-
vival depends on it.
For more information on wildlife
habitat, check the Web at
http://www.whmi.nrcs.usda.gov/ani-
mals.html or to learn more about envi-
ronmental issues please visit our Web
site at www.highlandsswcd.org.

Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources
Specialist for the Highlands County Natural
Resources Department assisting the
Highlands Soil & Water Conservation
District (www.highlandsswcd.org).


Courtesy photo
Connecting wildlife corridors are the strips of grass and/or
shrubs and trees that connect larger habitat areas- whether
they are wetlands, native grasses, woodlands, or other habi-
tat. Interest in connecting corridors has grown because
wildlife corridors are seen as ways to allow wildlife and
plants to spread across natural landscapes that have been
cut into pieces by roads, development, logging or other land
disturbances.


PLACES To WORSHIP


EPISCOPAL

* The Episcopal Church of the
Redeemer.Service time is 9:30
with Holy Communion. Coffee hour
following services. Newcomers
welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail
redeemer1895@ao!.com Web site:
redeemeravon.com. The church is
at 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park
(two miles north of Sun 'N Lake
Boulevard, across from Wells
Dodge.)
* St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL
33870. Sunday Services: Holy
.Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy
Eucharist Rite 11 10 a.m. Midweek
service on Wednesday at 6 p.m.
Sunday School for. all ages at 9
a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m.
until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m.
service ends. Wednesday: Adult
Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are
always welcome. The Rev. Jim
Kurtz, rector. Church office 385-
7649, for more information.
* St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal
Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-
0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers,
Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m.,
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening: Holy Communion with
Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child
care available at the 8 a.m. and
10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come
see what makes us different.


GRACE BRETHREN

* Grace Brethren Church, 3626
Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-
0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior
pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m.,
10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday
services at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid
City" Children's Ministry throughout
all services, and there are variosu
other classes for teens, married
couples, "prime-timers," and Bible
studies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day
Care, Preschool and After-School
Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For
registration call: 385-3111). Check
us out on the Web at wwwsebrn7g-
grace.org.


INTERDENOMINATIONAL

* World Harvest and Restoration
Ministries, (non-denominational)
2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-
3771. Sunday service: Sunday
School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11
a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m.
prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor:
W.H. Rogers.


LUTHERAN

* Atonement Lutheran Church
(ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview
Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen,
Deacon, Spiritual Leader. Jim
Helwig, organist/choir director.
Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy
Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee
hour on the first and third Sunday
of each month. Council meeting on
the first Monday of month; Ladies
Group WELCA meets at noon sec-
ond Monday of month with lunch.
Bring a dish to pass. Church
Vegetable Garden Club meets as
needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden
open seven days a week to congre-
tation and community. Like to sing?
Come join the choir. Visitors always
welcome. Come grow with us.
Phone 385-0797.
* Christ Lutheran Church Avon
J


Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2
mile east of Avon Park High
School. Sunday Divine Worship is
at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is cel-
ebrated every week with traditional
Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs
of praise. Fellowship time with cof-
fee and refreshments follows wor-
ship. Come worship and fellowship
with us. For information call Pastor
Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see
christlutheranavonpark. org.
* Faith Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 2740 Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848,
Faith Child Development Center,
385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea
Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship
services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday
school for children and adult Bible
classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise
worship service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Communion is served the
first and third and fifth Sunday of
the month. Sunday worship service
is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8
a.m. each Sunday. Educational
opportunities include weekly adult
Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift
Store (385-2782) is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through
Friday and 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday. All are warmly welcome
in the Family of Faith.
* Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church (AALC) American
Association of Lutheran
Churches, 4348 Schumacher
Road, Sebring, one mile west of
Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor.
Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday.
Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery pro-
vided. Social activities: Choir,
Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-
1163.
* New Life Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a
Congregation of the Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship
with the Wisconsin Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday
Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9
a.m. For more information, call
Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or
visit the Web site at wwwnewlife
sebring.com.
* Resurrection Lutheran Church
- ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon
Park. Pastor: Rev. John C.
Grodzinski. Early Sunday service,
8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m.
and the second service at 10:30
a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour fol-
low the service. Midweek
Fragrance Free Wednesday wor-
ship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office
phone number is 453-6858.
* Trinity Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake
Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The
Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and
Noel Johnson, youth and family life.
Worship schedule for December
through Easter: Worship service 8
and 11 a.m.; Communion services,
first and third Sundays; (Children's
Church,' 11 a.m. onl}); and
Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship
schedule for summer through fall:
Worship service, 9 a.m.;
Communion services, first and third
Sunday; Education Hour 10:30
a.m. Additional services: Lent and
Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy
Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.;
Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.;
Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas
Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve,
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship
activities: Youth Group, Senior
Citizens, Younger Side Adults,
Ladies Missionary League, Ladies
Guild, Small group studies as
scheduled. Music: Choir and hand
chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5
years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday. License:


C14H10020: Susan Norris, direc-
tor. Visit us online at: www. vchurch-
es. com/trin/tylutheran/p.


NON-DENOMINATIONAL

* Bible Fellowship Church, 3750
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Sunday: American Sign
Language: First Worship sermon,
songs signed first and second
Worship services. First Worship
service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship
service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to
2 years old) and Sunday school
classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6
p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday: Children, ages 4
years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth,
6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m.
Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy
McQuaid, associate pastor. Church
office 385-1024.
* Calvary Church, 1825
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872; 386-4900. An independent
community church. Sunday morn-
ing worship, 8:15 and 10 a.m.;
Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.;
Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m.
Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small
friendly church waiting for your
visit.
* Christian Training Ministries
Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off
County Road 17 on Simpson
Avenue. Sunday service is at 10
a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7
p.m. A nursery and children's,
church are provided. The church is
part of Christian International
Ministries Network, a full gospel,
non-denominational ministry. Linda
M. Downing, minister: Phone, 314-
0482, lindadowning@live.com.
Casey L. Downing, associate min-
ister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown
ing@hotmal.com. Web site is
www. christiantrainingministries.net
* Grace Bible Church, 4541
Thunderbird Road, (second church
on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone,
'382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior
pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30
p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m.
Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible
Academy Adult Investigating Truth;
first and third Tuesday, Prayer
Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday,
Children's & Youth Programs, 6
p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m.,
College Ministry.
www GBCconnected. org
* Highlands Community Church,
a casual contemporary church,
meets at 3005 New Life Way.
Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10
a.m. Nursery and Kid's World.
classes. Small groups meet
throughout the week. Church
phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A.
Linhart.
* Union Congregational Church,
106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday worship services
are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15
a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m.
(contemporary) in the main sanctu-
ary. Sunday school for all ages is at
9:15 a.m. We also offer
Wednesday and Saturday services
at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respective-
ly. Nursery/child care is available
for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill
Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web
page at www.weareunion.org. All
teachings are taken from the
Manufacturer's Handbook The
Holy Bible. Come join us.
* Unity Life Enrichment Centre,
new location, 10417 Orange
Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL
33875; 471-1122; e-mail
unity@vistanet.net. Web site,
ww,w.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Celebration Service,


Nursery and Children's Church.
Weekly Classes, Christian
Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer
Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups.
Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior
minister transforming lives from
ordinary to extraordinary.
* The Way Church, 1005 N.
Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday
school and worship service at 9
a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activi-
ties, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. The
Way is a church family who gathers
for contemporary worship, teaching
of God's Word, prayer and fellow-
ship. Come early and stay after for
fellowship time. Child care and chil-
dren's church are provided.
Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The
Way A place for you. Office
Phone:471-6140, Church Cell
Phone:381-6190. Email: theway
church hotmail.com. Web site:
www The WayChurch. org


PRESBYTERIAN

* Covenant Presbyterian Church
(PCA), 4500 Sun 'N Lake Blvd.,
Sebring, 33872-2113. A
Congregation of the Presbyterian
Church in America. Worship servic-
es: Sunday morning worship, infor-
mal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday
evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday
evening Prayer' Meeting, 6 p.m.;
Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:30-
7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m.
Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759;
e-mail: covpres@strato.net, Web
site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W.
Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours:
8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through
Thursday.
* First Presbyterian Church
ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two
entrances on LaGrande), Avon
Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242.
The Rev. Robert Johnson is the
pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.;
Sunday Worship, 10N45 a.m.;
Wednesday Bible study, 10:30
a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third
Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30
p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle
business meeting, 1 p.m. second
Wednesday; Sarah Circle business
meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday;
Women's Ministries Combined
Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday.
Be a part of a warm, caring church
family with traditional services, fol-
lowing biblical truth.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring,
FL 33870. 385-0107. Sunday
School, adult and college age, 9:30
a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.;
Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 11-
18), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult
Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir
rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery avail-
able for Sunday worship. Call the
church office for more information
and other classes. Rev. Darrell A.
Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director
of youth ministry.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, www.fpc/p.com, 118 N. Oak
Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The
Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor;
the Rev. Drew Severance, associ-
ate pastor. Sunday morning tradi-
tional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30
a.m.; and contemporary worship is
at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avari-
ety of Sunday school classes for
adults and children are at 9:45 and
11 a.m. in the educational building.
Call the church office for more
information about the classes
offered. Nursery is provided for
babies and toddlers; while young
children up to second grade have a
special Children's Church offered


during the worship service to help
them grow in their spiritual knowl-
edge.
* Spring Lake Presbyterian
Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School,
9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m.
Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the
second Thursday of the month,
September through June. Board of
Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first
Monday of the month. Choir
rehearses at 7 p.m. each
Wednesday, September through
April. Presbyterian Women meet at
10 a.m. the third Thursday of the
month. Organist: Richard Wedig.
Choir Director: Suzan Wedig.
Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,
spring/akepc @&mbarqma//. com,
Web site, http://s/pc.embarq
space., com.


SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST

* Avon Park Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 1410 West
Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone:
453-6641 or e-mail: avonparks-
da@embarqmail.com, Sabbath
School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church
Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday.
Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m.
Community Service hours on
Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00
a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place
the first Sunday of each month.
Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and
Associate Pastor Kameron
DeVasher. Walker Memorial
Academy Christian School offering
education for kindergarten through
12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME.
Website is www.discoverjesus.org
* Sebring Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, 2106 N. State
Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438.
Worship Services: 9:15 a.m.
Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meet-
ing, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m.
Community service: every Monday
9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr.
Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m.
Pastor Amado Luzbet.


THE CHURCH OF
LATTER DAY SAINTS

* The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand
Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863)
382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop;
Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del
Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family
History Center (863) 382-1822.
Sunday Services: Sacrament
Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel
Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon;
Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-
1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15
a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities:
Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts:
first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20
p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys
and Girls, second and fourth
Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m.


THE SALVATION
ARMY

* The Salvation Army Center
for Worship. Sunday: Sunday
School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meet-
ing, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting
and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible
study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's
Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday:
Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meet-
ings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave.,
Sebring. For more information, visit
the Web site wwwsalvationarmy-
sebring.com or call Major Bruce


Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110.


UNITED METHODIST

* First United Methodist Church,
105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor.
Traditional Worship Service at 8:10
and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary,
Contemporary Worship in the FLC
at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30
and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth
Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday
with Rick Heilig, youth director.
The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship
service is broadcast over WITS
1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery
available at all services.
* First United Methodist Church,
200 South Lake Avenue, Avon
Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, R.
James Weiss, Pastor, Sunday
School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30
a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of
every month, at 6 p.m. Prayer
Shawl Ministry on the second and
fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m.
for women who love God and cro-
cheting. Visit us at our church Web
site: www.fumcap.org.
* Memorial United Methodist
Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlook-
ing Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL,
33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pastor.
Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral
assistant. Sunday schedule:
Heritage Worship Service, 8:30
a.m. (October-May only);. School
School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.;
Celebration Worship Service at
10:45 a.m.; New Song worship
service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nurs-
ery care provided every Sunday
morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m.
Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m.
(October-May only). We offer
Christ-centered Sunday school
classes, youth programs, Bible
studies, book studies and Christian
fellowship. We are a congregation
that want to know Christ and make
Him known. Call the church office
at 465-2422 or check out our
church Web site at www.memori-
a/umc.com.
* St. John United Methodist
Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive,
Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev.
Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor.
Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all
services. Phone 382-1736.
www.stjohnsebring.org
* Spring Lake United Methodist
Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane,
(Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde
Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship serv-
ice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study
meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday.
Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on
Thursday. Church office phone:
655-0040.


UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST

* Emmanuel United Church of
Christ, where God is still speak-
ing. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL
33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27
and Hammock Road). Sunday wor-
ship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with
worship first Sunday of month;
Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all
other Sundays. All are welcome to
receive the sacrament. For more
information, call the church office at
471-1999 or e-mail eucc@earth
link.net or check the Web site
sebringemmanuelucc. com. No
matter who you are or where you
are on life's journey, you're wel-
come here.


Page 7C









News-Sun + Sunday, February 27, 2011


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SECTION




SPORTS

News-Sun


SFCC walk-off 4D

Sunday, February 27, 2011


Dragons light up Sonrise

for fifth in a row


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoelme@lnewssun.comi
LAKE PLACID Since
taking one on the chin in a
loss to Sebring at the Bill
Jarrett Ford Early Bird
Tournament,' the Green
Dragons of the baseball dia-
mond have been winning
ever since.
That streak continued
with Friday's 23-0
pasting of an over- Lake
matched Sonrise
Catholic squad at 2
Roger Scarborough
Memorial Stadium. SoE
After topping
DeSoto and Sante
Fe Catholic to finish
the tournament in third
place, Lake Placid picked
up road wins at Clewiston
and Tenoroc to get the reg-
ular season started.
And while Friday's win
was big, it wasn't exactly
beneficial'.
"It didn't help us much,"
head coach Dan Coomes
said. "What it does do is it
gets a bunch of guys play-
ing. Those guys sitting on
the bench ready to play, it
gives them a chance to get
in, get some time on the
field and give everyone a


better attitude."
It was a heavy-hitting
attitude that carried the day
as the Dragons plated two
in the first and five more in
the second.
Kyle Barber had a sacri-
fice fly RBI in the first and
Ricky Miller, Terry Coyne
added run-scoring hits in
the second as some
Seminole errors
Placid afield benefited the
cause as well.
Clayton Mason,
nrise meanwhile, was
cruising, through the
S Sonrise batting order,
getting a double play
to end the first before
striking out two each in
both the second and third
innings.
Lake Placid really broke
it open in the bottom of the
third, scoring 10 runs to
make it a 17-0 game.
Mason helped his own
cause with an RBI double
before Tyler Carr and
Miller each drove one home
with singles.
Brandon Wells then
brought two in on a double
to right, Nevada Weaver

See LP, page 4D


Sebring I(eeps rolling


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newssun.coin
Another day, another
mercy-rule win for the hot-
hitting, Blue Streak batsmen
with Friday's 11-1 win at
Ridge being the latest.
And while
Sebring the offense
Might get a lot
of the
deserved
Ridge attention for
the runs it has
been piling up
on a regular
basis, the other side of what
makes the lopsided wins pos-
sible is seeing Sebring's
other strength, pitching and
defense.
Sebring flashed some
fancy leather in committing
no errors to back up a domi-
nating performance by
Corbin Hoffner as the hard-
throwing senior only allowed
two hits and one walk in five
shutout innings.
He also racked up eight
strike outs to put an exclama-

See STREAKS, page 4D


News-Sun photo by KIM GAUGER
Seth Abeln fell a triple short of hitting for the cycle in Sebring's 11-1 win at Ridge
Friday night.


Track season starts with Sebring win


By DAN HOEHNE
dcaniel.hoehne@newssuni.coin
SEBRING The Early
Bird track meet at Firemen's
Field Thursday gave a look at
what could be a strong track
and field season for the Blue
Streaks as they won both the
boys and girls side of the
meet.
The Lady Streaks totaled
126 points to topple Bartow,
93.5, and Lakeland, 32.5.
The boys had a closer con-
test, edging out Lakeland 89-
87, with Bartow at 70 and
Vanguard at 11.
Sophomore Taylor Tubbs
took three wins on the day,
finishing first in the 800 and
1,600-meter runs and anchor-
ing the winning 4X800 relay
team that included Emily
Smith, Cassandra Marentes
and Hannah Schroeder.
Smith also picked up a win
in the 3,200 with Chritina
Gourley and Marentes taking
second and third for a
Sebring sweep.
Destiny McCartney then
picked up wins in both the
100- and 300-meter hurdles
with Kristina Williams,


Amaia Unanue and Emily
Helterhoff taking the next
three spots in the latter race
to add to the Lady Streaks
point total.
Justus Martin topped an
impressive 7-feet, 6-inches in
the pole vault for a win with
freshman Alexandra
Blackman going 6-fect-6 for
second and Rachel Smit 6-
feet-even for third.
Shalantay Rose picked up
a win in the triple jump,
going 30-feet, 5-inches with
Helterhoff taking second at
26-feet, 3-inches.
The girls also picked up
some big points as Rose, Tara
O'Berry, McCartney and
Helterhoff went second
through fifth, respectively, in
the high jump and
McCartney, Williams, Rose
and Aaliyah Mathis did the
same in the long jump.
Another point was added
by Keabndra Bowens for tak-
ing fifth in the shot put and
Ivy Pintor got another by
placing fifth in the discus
with a throw of 72 feel.
See TRACK, page 21)
1


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHINE
Taylor Tubbs rounds the turn as the anchor for the Lady
Streaks winning 4X800 run in Thursday's track and
field meet.


News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHNE
Nisha Patel stepped up to No. 2 singles Thursday and took
care of business as Sebring moved to 7-0 on the season.


Lady Streaks



still unbeaten


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.lhoechne@newssiiun.comi
With the Heartland
Conference Tournament
looming just around the cor-
ner, the Sebring girls tennis
team continued its' winning
ways with a dominating
sweep of visiting Mulberry
Thursday.
Not only did the Lady
Streaks sweep all seven
matches, a grand total of just
eight games were lost.
And half of those were in
the No. I singles match
where Kaley Walter cruised
to a 6-1 opening-set win
before getting a little more
resistance in the 6-3 second-
set victory.
From there, only two more
games were lost among the
singles matches as Nisha
Patel stepped up to No. 2 and
went 6-0, 6-0 while Kelly
Broen moved up to No. 3 and
showed she belonged with a
6-1, 6-0 win.
Morgan Heston scored a 6-
0, 6-0 win at No. 4 singles
and Micaela DeVane went 6-
0, 6-1 at No. 5.
Walter and Patel then
teamed up to take a pro-set
points match 8-1 at No. 1
doubles before Broen and
DeVane won No. 2 with a
two-set win, 6-0, 6-1.


"The girls are staying
focused this year and practic-
ing hard for every match,"
head coach Janie Hollinger
said. "We are halfway
through the season and look-
ing forward to the Heartland
Conference tournament next
weekend."
The girls travel to Lake
Wales for a match Thursday
and then host the Heartland
Tournament Friday and
Saturday at the Sebring
courts.

Lake Placid falls at
DeSoto
The recent run of wins that
the Lady Dragons had been
on came to an end Thursday
as the Lady Bulldogs of
DeSoto tok a 5-2 win.
Kayla Muse took the No. 1
singles match over Lake
Placid's Jalitza Serrano, 6-2.
6-2 and Deta Waller lost the
first set of her No. 2 match by
the same score.
Waller then came back
strong and forced a tie-break-
er in the second set before
falling to Alejandra Plymale.
Stephanie Rodriguez simi-
larly put up a strong fight at
No. 3 before being bested by
Carolina Garcia before
See TENNIS, page 2D


:44


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News-Sun file photo by DAN I I(OliNIN
Though the Lady Dragons, as a team, fell to leSoto
Thursday, Hannah Waller had a hand in both Laike Placid
wins.


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a ,


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Brandon Wells rips into this pitch Friday night for one of
many hits as the Dragons overwhelmed Sonrise Catholic,
23-0.


, I


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3
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News-Sun + Sunday, February 27, 2011


www. newssuili.CO


Sebring Senior softball season winding down


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING Thursday,
Feb. 24, the Silent Salesman
and Rebels engaged in their
usual tooth-and-nail battle
with the Salesmen coming
out winners 12-10 in 10
innings.I
The lead changed hands
several times with the
Salesman team tying the
game in the eighth inning to
start the overtime.
In the top of the tenth with
two out, the 12th and 13th
batters in the Salesman's bat-
ting order knocked base hits
and scored on a hit by Jim
Longman to go up 12-10.
Again pitcher Bob Roth
was up to the task in the bot-
tom of the inning and retired
the side in order.
Doing most of the damage
at bat for the Salesman were
Jim Longman 3-for-5 with
the winning RBI.
Bob Roth went 4-for-4,
including a home run and
another home run was credit-
ed to "Spider" McMinn.
Les Smith had 2-for-4 with
a triple, Bob Fahnestock 3-
for-4 and leadoff man Al
Taratuta 2-for-2 with two
walks.


Rebels Elwood Black went
4-for-4 with a homer.
Having 3-for-4 were Don
Purdy, Jim Strietzel and Jim
Munroe.
The Rebels handled a nice
double play in the infield -
they also had the most
friends cheering them on in
the bleacher and chairs.
The Highlands Merchants
and the Blue Jays had an
active game with the
Merchants victors 26-19.
Some of the leading hitters
were Mike Jurmu 5-for-6,
including a triple, and
John Schmidt 4-for-5 with a
triple.
Eddie Carroll was 5-flor-6
and having 4-for-6 were Cal
Bready, Glenn Minic and
Bob Burley.
Harold Dinel and Shawn
Kildoff each went 3-lor-5.
The Elue lJays did a lot of
hitting, but it just didn't add
up for the final tall\.
Doran Quiop was leader
with 5-for-6 with a double.
John Penna was 4-for-4
including a double plus
a base on balls.
Leo Lypps and Bob Wilson
each had 4-for-5.
Richard Godfrey had 4-6


with a double and Dale
DeMar went 4-for-6.
Others having a three hit
game were Jimmy Johnson,
Harley Smith, Earl
Richardson and Hugh Mason.
All Blue Jay batters had at
least three hits which should
have been enough to win the
game. but leaving eighteen
men on base really hurt.
Millers Heating and Air
Conditioning had a 14-7 win
over the Allstate Insurance
team.
Kyle Saunders was 3-4
including a double.
Another double was
smacked out by Jerry
Kauffman in his I-for-3
which brought in 3 RBI.
Tom Royal was 3-for-3 and
Jim Hensley was 3-for-4.
The winning pitcher was
Dick Harmic.
Allstate Insurance's Bob
MacCarrick had 4-for-4.
A threesome having 2-for-
4 were Don Day, Bob lott and
Galo Gonzales.
After 14 games, Highlands
Merchants lead the standings
at 12-2. followed by Allstate
Insurance at 8-6, Silent
Salesman 7-7, Millers
Heating and Air Conditioning


7-7, Rebels 5-9 and Blue Jays
3-11.
The season runs for anoth-
er three weeks.
The Complex is in a con-
venient location behind the
train station on Sheriff's
Tower Road.
It is situated so that you
are able to go from one game
to another in a matter of sev-
eral minutes and it is all con-
crete.
Three games are going on
at the same time starting at
10:00 a.m. on Tuesdays and
Thursday.
These older gents are an
inspiration to all of us.
Tuesday, Feb. 21, was
another lovely day for Senior
Softball at the Highlands
County Sports Complex in
Sebring.
There were many specta-
tors who took advantage of
the covered bleachers while
enjoying the games
The Silent Salesman team
came to play the Blue Jays
determined not to lose three
straight gaines to them.
They were not only deter-
mined but brought their hot
bats to prove it.
With Bob Roth pitching an


excellent game the Salesman
came out on top 21-6.
All thirteen Salesman bat-
ters had at least one hit and
scored at least once.
Leading the hit parade
were Russ Moody 4-for-4
with a home run and Bob
Roth 3-for-4 including a
home run.
Ross "Spider" McMinn
went 4-for-4 with a double,
Les Smith a triple in his 3-
for-3, and Bob Fahnestock 3-
for-4 with a double.
Gerry Murphy went 2-for-
3 including a double and Jim
Longman 3-for-4 with a dou-
ble.
Those collecting two hits
each were the teams' almost
80-year old and 80-plus' play-
ers, Stu Hayner and Ken
Filppula.
The Blue Jays were just
going through a dry spell but
kept trying with Dale
Baughman having 4-for-4
including a homer.
All going 2-for-4 were
Jimmy Johnson, Richard
Godfrey and Bob Wilson.
The Rebels and Allstate
Insurance had a much closer
scoring game with the Rebels
final 13-10.


Rebels Tom "Moose"
Morrisette had a good game
hitting 4-for-4, including two
triples and a double.
Diz Jones was 3-for-4 and
Dave Hudson was 2-for-3.
The Rebels shut Allstate
down for four innings.
Allstate's pack of 2-for-4
hitters were Jim Quartier,
Bob lott, Ken Crandall,
Marvin Knutilla and Bob
Kearns.
Moe Pier had 2-for-3.
Highlands Merchants kept
ahead of Millers Heating and
Air Conditioning with a final
score of 16 to 9.
To start the first inning for
the Merchants, Mike Jurmu
hit a homer.
Harold Dinel homered
going 3-for-3.
Cal Bready was 4-for-4
and Shawn Kildoff 3-for-3.
Charlie Quinn had 3-for-4
and Bob Burley 2-for-3.
Millers Bob Fox had two
doubles and Kyle Saunders
3-for-3 included a double.
All going 3-for-4 were
Don Sheets, Dale DeMar
and Ed Lindberg.


Tennis to see Heartland

Conference Tourney next weekend


Continued from 1D
Hannah Waller picked up
the Dragons first win of the
day at No. 4, topping Nancy
Gamez 6-3, 6-0.
Claire LeBlanc came
close to another win at No.
5, pushing Entrinity Packett
to the limit in the 4-6, 5-7
loss.
Playing pro sets for both
doubles matches, Muse and
Plymale won 8-4 over
Serrano and Deta Waller,
but Rodriguez and Hannah
Waller teamed up to take the


No. 2 match 8-3.
And though the loss was
disappointing, the was cer-
tainly no dissapointmeht in
the effort put forth.
"It was a touch loss,"
head coach Joanne
Bostanche said of Deta
Waller's singles match.
"She played the best match
of her tennis career. The
match lasted close to two
hours with some long and
beautiful rallies."
The younger Waller drew
praise as well.


"(Hannah) is fearless
when attacking the ball at
the net and she easily won
both her singles and doubles
matches," Bostanche said.
"Her and Stephanie
(Rodriguez) are a great team
and communicate very well
on the court."
The Lady Dragons host
Clewiston in hopes of get-
ting back on the winning
track Thursday before head-
ing to Sebring for the five-
team Heartland
Tolurname nt.


Track and Field getting underway


Continued from 1D
For the Sebring boys, their
first win came from Donovan
White in the 400-meter dash.
Warren Giller then got a
win in the 300-meter hurdles
while finishing second in the
110-meter length of the
event.
Cameron Cobb and Steven
Sanchez took third and fourth
in the 110-meter :iiI.l .. to
earn valuable points for the
Streaks.
The foursome of Brendan
Bivens. Elias Salgado, David
Scheck and Evan Wilburn
nearly made a miraculous
comeback in the 4X400 relay,


but fell five seconds short of
Lakeland's winning team to
settle for second.
Salgado and Scheck were
joined by Renee Marin and
Grant Lawrence to take sec-
ond in the 4X800 as well.
Devin Clarke then got the
field events going with a win
in the high jump, clearing 6-
feet, 3-inches, and Sebring
took second through fourth in
the pole vault with Colton
Dillon and Adrion Khan both
clearing ll-fcet-6 and Carl
Dassinger topping 10-feet-
even.
White then got another win
in the long jump. going 18-


feet, 7.5-inches, with
Dassinger tying for third at
I18-feet-4 and Daniel
Crawford taking fifth at 18-
feet- 1.
White, Crawford and Tim
Blackman then went first,
-third and fourth, respectively,
in the triple jump and Patric
Morris took second in both
the shot put and discus.
Cody Cook took third in
the discus, earning three
points that ultimately put the
Streaks over the top.
Sebring hosts another meet
Thursday, with Haines City,
Hardee and Lake Placid com-
ing to compete.


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good thru
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Incl. Tax &
(art


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7am-8am... 27""
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After 2pm ... 20o0
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TO


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CALL ANGI


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Page 2D













THE SCOREBOARD


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 41 15 .732 -
New York 29 27 .518 12
Philadelphia 29 29 .500 13
New Jersey 17 41 .293 25
Toronto 16 43 .271 262
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 43 16 .729 -
Orlando 37 22 .627 6
Atlanta 35 23 .603 7%2
Charlotte 26 32 .44816/2
Washington 15 42 .263 27
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 39 17 .696 -
Indiana 26 31 .456 13%
Milwaukee 22 35 .38617%2
Detroit 21 39 .350 20
Cleveland 11 47 .190 29
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB


San Anton
Dallas
New Orle,
Memphis
Houston

Oklahoma
Portland
Denver
Utah
Minnesota

L.A. Lake
Phoenix
Golden St
L.A. Clipp
Sacramer


nio 48 10 .828 -
41 16 .719 6V,
ans 35 25 .583 14
32 27 .54216%2
28 31 .47520%
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
City 36 21 .632 -
33 25 .569 3V
34 26 .567 3%2
32 27 .542 5
a 13 46 .220 24
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
rs 41 19 .683 -
29 27 .518 10
:ate 26 31 .456 132
ers 21 38.35619%
nto 14 42 .250 25


Thursday's Games
Chicago 93, Miami 89
Denver 89, Boston 75
Friday's Games
Charlotte 110, Sacramento 98
Utah 95, Indiana 84
Philadelphia 110, Detroit 94
Phoenix 110, Toronto 92
Cleveland 115, New York 109
Miami 121, Washington 113
New Orleans 95, Minnesota 81
Orlando 111, Oklahoma City 88
-San Antonio 106, New Jersey 96
Atlanta 95, Golden State 79
L.A. Lakers 108, L.A. Clippers 95
Portland 107, Denver 106, OT
Saturday's Games
Utah at Detroit, late
Sacramento at Memphis, late
Dallas at Washington, late
New Jersey at Houston, late
Chicago at Milwaukee, late
Boston at L.A. Clippers, late
Sunday's Games
Phoenix at Indiana, 12 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 2:30 p.m.
Golden State at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cleveland, 5 p.m.
Charlotte at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Dallas at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Houston at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
Memphis at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
New York at Miami, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Portland, 10:30 p.m.


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Philadelphia 40 15 6 86202 155
Pittsburgh 36 21 6 78 181 154
N.Y. Rangers 33 26 4 70178155
New Jersey 26 31 4 56130163
N.Y. Islanders 23 31 8 54 170 202
Northeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Boston 34 19 7 75s188 145
Montreal 32 23 7 71 161 161
Buffalo 29 25 6 64174174
Toronto' 27 27 7 61 157184
Ottawa 20 32 9 49139199
Southeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Tampa Bay 36 18 7 79189189
Washington 32 20 10 74 165 159
Carolina 29 24 9 67 181 189
Atlanta 25 26 11 61 175203
Florida 26 28 7 59158169
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Detroit 37 18 6 80203177
Chicago 32 23 6 70194168
Nashville 31 22 8 70 156 146
Columbus 31 23 6 68168178
St. Louis 28 24 9 65173179.
Northwest Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Vancouver 39 14 9 87207 147
Minnesota 33 23 6 72163162
Calgary 31 23 9 71 189182
Colorado 26 28 7 59 178210
Edmonton 20 34 8 48156208
Pacific Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
San Jose 36 21 6 78 178 162
Phoenix 33 21 9 75 181 182
Los Angeles 34 23 4 72 170146
Dallas 32 23 6 70168 173
Anaheim 32 25 5 69173184
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
for overtime loss.

Thursday's Games
Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Islanders 3, OT
Dallas 4, Detroit 1
Toronto 5, Montreal 4
Chicago 3, Nashville 0
Vancouver 3, St. Louis 2
Los Angeles 4, Minnesota 2
Friday's Games
Florida 2, Atlanta 1, SO
San Jose 4, Calgary 3, SO
N.Y. Rangers 6, Washington 0
Carolina 4, Pittsburgh 1
Columbus 5, Phoenix 3
Buffalo 4, Ottawa 2
Tampa Bay 2, New Jersey 1
St. Louis 5, Edmonton 0
Minnesota 3, Anaheim 2, OT
Saturday's Games
Nashville at Dallas, late
Colorado at Los Angeles, late
Detroit at Buffalo, late
Pittsburgh at Toronto, late
Carolina at Montreal, late
Philadelphia at Ottawa, late
Washington at N.Y. Islanders, late
Boston at Vancouver, late
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay at N.Y..Rangers, 1 p.m.
Columbus at Nashville, 3 p.m.
Toronto at Atlanta, 5 p.m.
New Jersey at Florida, 5 p.m.


LIVE

.: -SPORTS

"'" ON TV


AUTo RACING
SUNDAY
2:30 p.m. NASCAR Subway Fresh Fit 500. ...... FOX
7 p.m. NHRA O'Reilly Winternationals ..... ESPN2


COLLEGE BASKETBALL
SUNDAY
Noon West Virginia at Rutgers ............... 28
1 p.m. Purdue at Michigan State ............ ESPN
1 p.m. Xavier at Dayton ................ ESPN2
2 p.m. Pittsburgh at Louisville.......... . . CBS
4 p.m. Indiana at Ohio State ................ CBS
MONDAY
7 p.m. Villanova at Notre Dame ............ ESPN
9 p.m. Kansas State at Texas............... ESPN
TUESDAY
7 p.m. Illinois at Purdue .................. ESPN
7 p.m. Baylor at Oklahoma ............... ESPN2
9 p.m. Vanderbilt at Kentucky.............. ESPN


9 a.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
7 p.m.


GOLF
SUNDAY
PGA WGC Accenture Match Play ..... GOLF
PGA WGC Accenture Match Play ...... NBC
LPGA HSBC Women's Championship GOLF
PGA Mayakoba Classic ............ GOLF


NBA
SUNDAY
2:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City. ......... ABC
6 p.m. Charlotte at Orlando ................. SUN
8 p.m. N.Y. Knicks at Miami ............... ESPN
10:30 p.m. Atlanta at Portland ............... ESPN
TUESDAY
7 p.m. N.Y, Knicks at Orlando ............... . SUN


1 p.m.


NHL
SUNDAY
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers ........... SUN


PREMIER LEAGUE SOCCER
MONDAY
2:55 p.m. Manchester City vs. Fulham. ........ ESPN2


9 p.m.


TENNIS
MONDAY
BNP Showdown Agassi vs. Sampras ESPN2


WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
SUNDAY
2 p.m. Kentucky at Auburn .................. 38
4 p.m. Texas A&M at Texas. ................ SUN
5 p.m. Baylor at Oklahoma ............... ESPN2
MONDAY
7 p.m. St. John's at West Virginia .......... ESPN2
Times, games, channels all subject to change


Phoenix at Chicago, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Calgary, 8 p.m.
Boston at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Anaheim, 8 p.m.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Baltimore 0 0 .000
Boston 0 0 .000
Chicago 0 0 .000
Cleveland 0 0 .000
Detroit 0 0 .000
Kansas City 0 0 .000
Los Angeles 0 0 .000
Minnesota 0 0 .000
New York 0 0 .000
Oakland 0 0 .000
Seattle 0 0 .000
Tampa Bay 0 0 .000
Texas 0 0 .000
Toronto 0 0 .000
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
San Francisco 1 0 1.000
Atlanta 0 0 .000
Chicago 0 0 .000
Cincinnati 0 0 .000
Colorado 0 0 .000
Florida 0 0 .000
Houston 0 0 .000
Los Angeles 0 0 .000
Milwaukee 0 0 .000
New York 0 0 .000
Philadelphia 0 0 .000
Pittsburgh 0 0 .000
San Diego 0 0 .000
St. Louis 0 0 .000
Washington 0 0 .000
Arizona 0 1 .000
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the
standings; games against non-major
league teams do not.

Friday's Games
San Francisco 7, Arizona 6
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia vs N.Y. Yankees, late
Detroit vs Toronto at Dunedin, late
Pittsburgh vs Tampa Bay, late
Atlanta vs N.Y. Mets, late
L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs L.A. Angels, late
L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs San Francisco, late
Colorado vs Arizona, late
Sunday's Games
Toronto vs Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05
p.m.
Tampa Bay vs Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees vs Philadelphia at
Clearwater, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05
p.m.
Oakland vs Chicago Cubs at Mesa,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs L.A. Dodgers at
Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.


Cincinnati vs Cleveland at Goodyear,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
San Diego vs Seattle at Peoria, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Kansas City ys Texas at Surprise, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
San Francisco vs Arizona at Salt River
Community, Ariz., 3:10 p.m.
Boston vs Minnesota at Fort Myers,
7:05 p.m.
EAST
Cabrini 92, Gwynedd-Mercy 70
Caldwell 74, Chestnut Hill 72, 20T
Canisius 72, Manhattan 63
Dominican, N.Y. 83, Goldey Beacom 73
Fairfield 68, Siena 55


Felician 79, Holy Family 71
Gallaudet 80, Morrisville St. 69
Harvard 74, Brown 68
lona 73, St. Peter's 59
Loyola, Md. 75, Niagara 63
N.J. City 72, Montclair St. 67
Penn 64, Columbia 54
Princeton 84, Cornell 66
Rider 80, Marist 64
Wells 85, Cobleskill 78
Wittenberg 65, Wabash 63
Yale 79, Dartmouth 75, OT
SOUTH
E. Mennonite 76, Hampden-Sydney 75
MIDWEST
Bemidji St. 63, Upper Iowa 61
Detroit 77, Wright St. 67
Minn. St., Moorhead 77,
Augustana,S.D. 72
N. Dakota St. 84, S. Dakota St. 61
Wayne, Neb. 63, Minn.-Crookston 62
Winona St. 90, Minn. Duluth 57
FAR WEST
Carroll, Mont. 52, Montana Tech 48
Montana St.-Northern 64, Westminster,
Utah 58
Montana Western 78, Rocky Mountain
67
TOURNAMENT
MIAA Conference Tounament
Semifinals
Calvin 68, Albion 53
Hope 63, Adrian 45
MIAC Conference Tournament
Semifinals
Gustavus 70, Carleton 64
St. Thomas, Minn. 78, Hamline 70
Midwest Conference Tournament
Semifinals
Grinnell 93, Illinois College 91
St. Norbert 75, Ripon 52
NAC Conference Tournament
Semifinals
Benedictine,111. 71, Aurora 60
Edgewood 95, Concordia, Wis. 89
North Atlantic Conference
Semifinals
Husson 75, Castleton St. 73


Avon Park








Lake Placid


Seeing


SFCC


MONDAY: BoysTennis vs.Tenoroc, 4 p.m.
TUESDAY: Baseball vs. Sebring, 7 p.m.; Softball vs. Frostproof, 6/7:30 p.m.
THURSDAY: BoysTennis vs. Lake Wales, 4 p.m.
FRIDAY: Baseball at Mulberry, 7 p.m.; BoysTennis at Heartland Conference Tournament,
1 pim.; GirlsTennis at Heartland Conference Tournament, Sebring, 1 p.m.



TUESDAY: Baseball vs. McKeel, 7 p.m.; Softball vs. Pemayetv Emahakv, 5:30 p.m.;
Boys Tennis vs. Clewiston, 4 p.m.;Track and Field at Sebring, 4 p.m.
THURSDAY: Track and Field at Avon Park, 4 p.m.
FRIDAY: Baseball vs. Fort Meade, 7 p.m.; Softball at Mulberry, 5:30/7:30 p.m.; Boys
Tennis at Heartland Conference Tournament, 1 p.m.; GirlsTennis at Heartland Conference
Tournament, Sebring, 1 p.m.


MONDAY: Softball vs. Hardee, 5:30/7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY: Baseball at Avon Park, 7 p.m.;Track and Field hbsts meet, 4 p.m.
THURSDAY: Baseball vs. Hardee, 7 p.m.; GirlsTennis at Lake Wales, 4 p.m.
FRIDAY: Baseball at Osceola, 7 p.m.; Softball at Osceola, 7 p.m.; BoysTennis at
Heartland Conference Tournament, 1 p.m.; GirlsTennis hosts Heartland Conference
Tournament, 1 p.m.


SUNDAY: Softball at Polk State CollegeTournament,TBD
MONDAY: Basebal vs. College of Central Florida, 5 p.m.
TUESDAY: Softball at Palm Beach State, 5 p.m.
FRIDAY: Baseball vs. St. Petersburg, 6 p.m.
SATURDAY: Baseball at St. Petersburg, 5 p.m.; Softball at College of Central Florida, 1
p.m.


SPORTS SNAPSHOTS


McFarling Golf
SPRINGLAKE The 5th Annual James
McFarling Golf Tournament will be held
Saturday, March 5 at the SpringLake Golf
Resort.
The flighted, four-person scramble will
tee off with a 9 a.m. shotgun start.
For $50 per person, golfers get flight
prizes, CTP for men and women, goodie
bags and lunch at Michael's restaurant.
Proceeds will be awarded to scholar-
ship recipients from the Highlands
County Sertoma Junior Golf Tour.
For more information, call John
Delaney at 655-3686.

5th Annual L.O.S.T. Run
OKEECHOBEE The fifth annual
L.O.S.T. (Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail)
118-Mile Endurance Run will take place
the weekend of February 26-27.
This footrace consists of one circum-
navigation of Lake Okeechobee by run-
ning along the top of the Herbert Hoover
Dike, a distance of 118 miles.
The race begins 6:30 a.m. at the Okie-
Tantie Campground located just west of
the town of Okeechobee, and runners have
34 hours to complete their loop of the lake.
The run precedes counterclockwise
around the lake, so runners pass the towns
of Lakeport, Moore Haven, Clewiston,
Pakohee and Port Mayaca before they
return to Okie-Tantie.
Runners will receive aid at various
access points located around the lake, and
there will be manned aid stations at
Lakeport, Moore Haven, Clewiston, Paul
Rardin Park, Pahokee. Port Mayaca and
Nubbins Slough.
The race website is www.lostll8mile-
endurancerun.com.
For more information, contact Mike
Melton at 772-349-1704

Wings of Faith Golf
SEBRING Wings of Faith Worship
Center presents the First Annual Golf
Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at
Country Club of Sebring.
Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a
Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m.
Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one
team of four golfers, one tee sign and two
green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes
one team of four golfers, one green sign:
Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green
sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100
includes one green sign.
Individual player $60 includes green
fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26).
Team of Four Golfers $240 includes
green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after
March 26).
Make checks payable to: Wings of
Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL
33871, or register online at wingsof-
faithchristianworshipcenter.com.
Proceeds to be donated to scholarship
program for graduates attending Wings of
Faith Christian Worship Center.
For more information, call Jason
Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhanker-
son@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at
381-5706, alvinwatlterssr@yahoo.com.

Our Lady of Grace event
AVON PARK Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church has a benefit evetit com-
ing up, the First Annual Golf Tournament
at River Greens Saturday, March 12 at 8
a.m.
The cost of $60 per player includes
golf, cart, golf shirt and lunch, while
River Greens members pay just $35.
Sponsorships are available, starting
with a $100 hole sponsor for a sign only.
A Hole Sponsor with Sign, plus a free
foursome, is $300, a Co-Sponsor Sign,
plus free foursome, with prerogative to fly
their banner is $400 and a Major Sponsor


is $1,500.

Seminole Club Trail Run
SEBRING The Highlands Seminole
Club presents the first Seminole Trail Run
5K on Saturday, March 5, at the Sun-N-
Lake Preserve in Sebring.
The cost is $15 per participant if regis-
tered by Tuesday, Feb. 15 and $20 after
that day or on the day of race.
Registration on race day begins at 7
a.m. and the race will begin at 8 a.m.
Awards will be presented for top finish-
ers in major age groups.
This is the first event of its kind for the
trails at the Preserve.
Registration forms can be found at
highlandsseminoles.org.
Call 386-9194 or email mantaravEM@earth-
link.net for more information.

"Doc Owen" Golf Tourney
AVON PARK The Avon Park Noon
Rotary Club will host its Second Annual
David "Doc Owen" Golf tournament on
Saturday, April 16 at Highlands Ridge
North.
The two-person scramble-format entry
fee is $60 per person with prizes in flight
groups, lunch, goodie bag and refresh-
ments on the course. Registration starts at
7:30 a.m. with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun tee
time.
Entry information and check payable to
Avon Park Noon Rotary mailed to Chet
Brojek, 3310 Par Rd, Sebring, FL 33872.
Golfers should include their names and
handicaps along with their check.
Those needing a form may email
Brojek at cbrojek@comcast.net or call at
385-4736.
Business entry of two-persons plus a
hole sign for a total of $200 is available
for the first time this year.
All Rotary club members, are urged to
support participate in the event that bene-
fits local Rotary charity projects.
Business hole signs for $100 are also
available by contacting Chet via email or
phone.

SHS Basketball Camp
SEBRING The SHS basketball pro-
gram will be hosting a basketball camp
for boys and girls; in 2nd-6th grade, on
Monday, March 28, and Tuesday, March
29, from 8 a.m.- 4 p.m.
The cost of the camp is $20 and is
appropriate for players of all skill levels
and experience.
Current and former Streaks will be on
hand to help with the camp, which will also
feature contests, competitions and prizes.
Campers can either bring their own
lunch or purchase lunch there for a rea-
sonable price.
Please contact Coach Lee at 441-1221.
or by email at leem@highlands.kl2.fl.is.

Pickelball League
Championship
SEBRING On Saturday, March 5 at
10 a.m., the first ever South Central
Florida Pickelball League Championship
will take place at the courts in Highlands
Ridge.
The league is made up of five commu-
nities in central Florida; Highlands Ridge,
Tanglewood, Solivita, Lake Ashton, and
Rainbow Resort.
Several of the finest pickleball players
in Florida will be competing and two of
the best teams will do battle Solivita and
Tanglewood.
Anyone who is interested in learning
about the "fastest growing sport in adult
communities across the country" should
make their way to Highlands Ridge.
Matches will run from 10 a.m. to the
finals at approximately Ilp.m.


Page 3D


www. newssun.com


News-Sun Wednesday, February 27, 2011


LOCAL SCHEDULE









News-Sun + Sunday, February 27, 2011


~V,


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Shortstop Ricky Miller evades this Sonrise Catholic runner as he fires to first to complete a
double play in Friday's win for Lake Placid.

LP sees big district tests this week


Continued from 1D
short-hopped the. left-center
field fence for a run-scoring
double and Carr came up
again and ripped a two-run
triple and then came in him-
self when the throw to third
got away.
From there, it was just six
outs to go before the mercy-
rul win could be wrapped up,
but the Dragons weren't quite
done yet.
Six more runs came across


in the fourth with Dylan
Weber-Callahan, Taylor
Townsend and Weaver each
picking up an RBI.
"I didn't see any curve
balls, I didn't see any
change-ups. so you better be
swinging," Coomes said of
the pitching Lake Placid
faced. "Sometimes. that's the
hardest pitcher to hit. but we
did swing the bats and I'm
happy with that.


"I feel we have a nice
team," he continued. "We
haven't gotten into the meat
of the season yet, but we've
played well enough to win
five in a row. McKeel and
Fort Meade should be real
strong and we see them both
next week."
The Dragons host both of
those key district matchups
with McKeel on Tuesday and
the Miners on Friday.


Streaks stay hot, unbeaten


p


Ne\ws-Sun photo by KIM GAUGER
Corbin I loffner blew through the Bolts line-up, totaling
eight strikeouts in five innings while giving up just two hits,
one walk and no runs.


Continued from 1D
tion point on his outing.
And after the Bolts
scratched for a run off
young Gunner Westergom
in the sixth, Nate Greene
promptly came in and
shut the door by striking
out the side to end it early.
But back to the offense.
Sebring pounded out 14
hits, eight for extra bases,
and were patient enough
at the plate to draw six
walks.
And while slugger
Jesse Baker saw his four-
game, two-run homer
streak stopped, other
Streaks picked him up.
Seth Abeln had the big
clay from the lead-off
spot, going 3-for-4 and,
drawing a walk, with
three RBI, two runs
scored and a home run.
The'junior also added a
single and double to leave
him just a triple shy of
hitting for the cycle.
Matt Randall also
notched three hits and
Jonathan Knight had two
hits and two RBI.
Also knocking in a run
each were Evan Lewis,
Baker and Greene, with
Lewis picking up that
triple that Abeln was
missing.
The win puts Sebring at
2-0 on the regular season
and in district play, 7-0
including all preseason,
tournament contests with
a 5-2 win over DeSoto
being the only game the
Streaks didn't score in
double figures.
The team stays busy
with three games this
week as they face Avon
Park on the road Tuesday
and host Hardee Thursday
in non-district match-ups
before traveling to
Osceola Friday in search
of the third district win.


News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEINIE
Kyle Jackson lifted SFCC to an extra-inning win with a walk-off home run Friday.


Panthers walk away with win


By DAN HOEHNE
dl/llii(', eli( lc(I'@iei('\rr ('() co/il
A nip and tuck affair saw
the South Florida baseball


Panthers rally late for
a 4-3, extra-inning win
over visiting Dundalk
Community College
from Baltimore.
The Lions tacked up
a first-inning run and
would hold the narrow
lead until the sixth.


SF(


Dund
a


It was then that Karson
Kravec lied things up with an
RBI single to score Brandon
Kirby.
B3ut Dundalk would regain
the lead. going up 3-1 before
SFCC could whittle away at


it one run at a time.
Cody Higgins drove Sam
Morgan home in the bottom
of the seventh and after
Colby Fairfax threw a
CC one, two, three top of
lhe ninth', a Logan
Hullnter single to right
brought Morgan
dalk
around to knot things
at 3-3 and send it to
extra innings.
A scoreless top of'
the tenth then lead to Avon
Park graduate Kyle Jackson
ending things with one
swing, sending a fastball over
thle fence fIor the walk-olff
win, extending the Panther
winning e streak to five.


"We had had 22 games in
27 days and I gave the guys a
day off Thursday," head
coach Rick Hitt said. "'But
then we came out and looked
relatively Hlat, especially on
offense. But Ihey got the job
done and that's all that nitl-
ters. I give them credit for
that."
The Pantlhers were hack at
it Saturday with a double-
header against the University
of Tampa B Team Ibeflore
hosting the College of
Central Florida Monday at 5
p.m.

Amanda Kennedy contributedd to
this storv.


-m


Li~~w~L


I .- ,

...1jx
ARM- .'


pi. ". .'


CTWl


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We are your skin police.

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Darrin A. Rotman, M.D.
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Medicare and all major insurances accepted in
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New Patients Welcome

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*individual must call for verification of benefits. This is not a guarantee.


the news is just a click away!
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News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


S -' -a^ '*'Ks''- r ^


_... ., 0*
., ...jm!',a, . .' ** 9
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WESIEAT

newssunll ol


Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2
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All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that
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Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor,
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I


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1000
Announcements


1050 Legals
,IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 1 ENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-001302
US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR SASCO 2005-WF4,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RAUL E. MARRERO, SR., et al,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO JESSICA R. MARRERO
A/K/A JESSICA RAMIREZ PEREZ
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
4515 Starfish Avenue
Sebrmig, FL 33870
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDAN TS) WHO ARE
NO I KNOWN 10 BI_ DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARIIFS MAY CLAIM AN IN-
TIlE I AS SPOUSEi, I IIRS, 0 EVISLES, GRAN EES,
011OR0ITlElLG IAIMANiIS
I AKIIKNOWN AIJd1HI1 ; UNKNOWN


1050 Lega
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose
a mortgage on the following property in HIGH-
LANDS County. Florida:
LOT 322, SEBRING RIDGE, SECTION E, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 53, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses within 30
days after the first publication, if any, on Florida
Default Law Group, P.L. Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is 9119 Corporate Lake Drive,
Suite 300, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the
original with this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; oth-
erwise a default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once each week for
two consecutive weeks in the News-Sun.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on
this 10th day of February, 2011
Robert W. Germaine
Clerk of the Court
By /s/ Annette E Daft
As Deputy Clerk
February 20, 27, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT',
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2008-CA-001528
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST
COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER NOVASTAR
MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST. SERIES 2006-4.
Plaintiff,
vs.
EDUARDO VAZQUEZ. ET AL.
Defendants,
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Sum-
mary Final Judgment in Foreclosure dated Janu-
ary 20, 2011 and entered in Case No.
2008-CA-001528 of the Circuit Court of the 10TH
Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County,
Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER NOVAS-
TARMORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST, SERIES
2006-4, is Plaintiff and EDUARDO VAZQUEZ;
_ UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EDUARDO VAZQUEZ,
IF ANY; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC.; NOVASTAR MORTGAGE, INC.
CORPORATION; HIGHLANDS COUNTY CODE EN-
FORCEMENT; JOHN DOE OR ANY OTHER PERSON
IN POSSESSION; all unknown parties claiming by,
through, under or against the named
Defendantss, whether living or not, and whether
said unknown parties claims as heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees,
or in any other capacity, claiming by, through, un-
der or against the named Defendant(s) are thlie De-
fendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash at the Jury Assembly Room in the base-
ment of the Highlands County Courthouse located
at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida
at 11:00 a.m., on the 15th day of MARCH, 2011,
the following described property as set forth in
said Order or Final Judgment, to wit:
S LOT 3, BLOCK 172, OF PLACID LAKES, A RE-
PLAT OF BLOCKS 115-116-169-171-172-173
AND PORTIONS OF BLOCKS 170 AND 175,
PLACID LAKES, SECTION SIXTEEN, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 8 AT PAGE 98, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA'
Street Address: 114 BARBARA AVE NW,
LAKE PLACID, FLORIDA 33852
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of tie lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the sale,
WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this
17th day of February, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
As Deputy Clerk
February 27: March 6, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO, PC 11 -53
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELIZABETH CANALE,
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate ol ELIZABETH
CANALE, deceased, whose date of death was
January 25, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 590 South Commerce Ave-
nue, Sebring, Florida 33870. rie names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy o f this notice is served must
file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF 1HE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM
All other creditors of the decedent and persons
having claims or demands against decadent's es-
tate must file their claim witl this court WITHIN 3


1050 Legals
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS. NOTICE,
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SEC110N 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE, TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
February 20, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Jeri Canale
3104 Sunnrse Drive
Sebring, FL 33872
Attorney for Personal Representative.
CLIFFORD M. ABLES, P.A.
551 SOUTH COMMERCE AVE.
SEBRING, FL 33870
(863) 385-0112
/s/ Clifford M. Ables
Florida Bar Number: 178379
February 20, 2/,2011
IN FIHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 11-51
Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOHN THOMAS MURPHY
A/K/A JOHN T. MURPHY
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of John Tho-
mas Murphy A/K/A John T. Murphy, deceased,
whose date of death was August 19, 2010, and
whose social secunty number is XXX-XX-9385, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands
County, Florida, Probate Division, thle address of
which is 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring,
Florida 33870-3867. The names of the Petitioner
and the Petitioner's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims on whom a copy of this notice
is served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFIER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NO riCE.
ALl CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SEI
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED 1WO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AF1ER THE DECEDENI'S DA1E
OF DEATH IS BARRED,
The date of first publication of this Notice Is
February 20, 2011.
Pelilioner:
Tom D. Muiphy
237 Silver Avenue
Lake Placid, FL 33852
Attorney for Petitioner:
Tanya Bell
Florida Bar No. 0052924
UAW Legal Services Plan
2454 McMullen Booth Road
Bldg. B-Suite 425
Clearwater, Fl 33759
(727)669-5319 or (877)309-1787
February 20, 27, 2011
IN IHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 11-63
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PETER SCHEMM
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Peter
Schemin, deceased, whose date of death was
January 8, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 590 South Commerce Ave
nue, Sebring, FL 33870, The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative andtiole
personal representative's attorney are sel forth
below.
All creditors of thlie decedent and ollhei persons
having claims io demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of ihis notice is requiredlo
be served must file their claims wihll this coi l
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONIIIS AFTER I HlE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICAlION OF THIS NO
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER 1HE DAFE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate must tile their claim with this court WHII N 3
MONTHS AFTER THlE DATE OF THE FIRSI PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN 3HE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
1HE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE 11ME PERIOD SET
FORIII ABOVF, ANY CLAIM l-LLD IWO (2)


1050 Lels
YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S'DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED,
The date of first publication of this Notice is
February 27, 2011
Personal Representative.
Allia Schemmr
57 Primrose Road
Hardwick, NJ 07825
BREED & NUNNALLEE, P.A.
Attorneys for Personal Representative:
325 NORTH COMMERCE AVENUE
SEBRING, FL 33870
Telephone. (863) 382-3154
By. /s/E. Mark Breed III
Florida Bar No 338702
E-mail Address: breednunn@bnpalaw.com
February 27; March 6, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.- FC 11-121
GAIL GOMEZ,
Petiboner/Wile,
and
LUIS GOMEZ,
RespondentHusband
NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR DISSOLU ION OF MARRIAGE
TO: LUs Gomriez
Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been
filed against you and that you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on Steven D. Miller, Esq., whose address is 817
South University Drive, Suite 122, Plantation, Flor-
ida 33324 on or before March 15, 2011, and file
the original with the clerk of this Court at High-
lands County Courthouse, 590 South Commerce
Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870-3867 before
service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If
you fail to do so, a default may be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case, in-
cluding orders, are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office notified ol your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme
Court Approved Family Law Form 12.9151 Future
papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanctions, including dis-
missal or striking of pleadings.
Dated: February 3, 2011.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ PriscillaMichalak
Deputy Clerk
February 6, 13, 20, 27. 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF TI IE 1TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR IHlGIILANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001360
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS
OF THE ASSET BACKED SECURITIES
CORPORATION HOME EQUITY LOAN
TRUST, SERIES MO 2006-HE6 ASSET
BACKED PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES,
SERIES MO 2006-HE6,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MICHAEL A. SINGLETARY; AVON PARK.
LAKES ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN TENANTS(S);
IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 14th day of
February, 2011, and entered in Case No.
28-2009-CA-001360, of the Circuit Court of the
10TH Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,
Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION, AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLD-
ERS OF THE ASSET BACKED SECURITIES CORPO-
RATION HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUS1, SERIES MO
2006-HE6 ASSET BACKED PASS THROUGH CER-
TIFICATES, SERIES MO 2006-HE6, is the Plaintill
and MICHAEL A. SINGLE1ARY; AVON PARK LAKES
ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN TENANTS(S): IN POS-
SESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, ar delen-
dants. I will sell to ie Ohighest and best bidder for
cash at tihe HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL
33870 at the IHighlands County Courthouse in Se
bring, Floiida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 15th day of
March, 2011, the following described property as
set fortl in sai final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 92-93, AVON PARK LAKES UNII NO. 1,
ACCORDING 10 IH[E PLAT THEREOF AS RE
CORDED IN PLAI BOOK 4, PAGE 88, OF e1111
PUBLIC RECORDS OF H ilGHLANDS COUNTY,
Fl ORIDA.
ANY PERSON ClAIMING AN IN1ERESI IN 1111
SURPLUS FROM 11Il SAI E, IF ANY, OI IHR IlIAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF 1HE
LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WilHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact


1050 Legal
the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N.
Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863)
534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately upon receiving
this notification if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 711.
Dated this 15th day of February, 2011.
Robert W. Germaine
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By: /s/ Toni Kopp.
Deputy Clerk
February 27; March 6, 2011
Spring Lake Imiprovement District
Notice of Board Meetings
The Board of Supervisors of the Spring Lake Im-
provement District has established Board meeting
dates for the remainder of fiscal year 2011. The
meetings will take place at the District Office, 115
Spring Lake Blvd., Sebring,Florida 33876. The
Board meetings will begin at 10:00 a.m. and are
open to the Public. Tile dates are as follows:
March 9, Apil 13, May 11, June 8, July 13,
Augiust 10, and September 14.
EACH PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY
DECISION BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY
MAItER CONSIDERED AT THE MEETING IS AD-
VISED THAT PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE
THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEED-
INGS IS MADE, INCLUDING THE TESTIMONY AND
EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE
BASED.
Joe DeCerbo
Distrct Manager
February 23, 27, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL
DIVISIONCASE NO. 09000217GCS
BANKUNITEDPlaintiff,vs.NGRID K. MARKLAND, if
living and if deceased,
any unknown party whomay claim as heir, devi-
see, grantee, assignee, lienor, creditor, trustee
and other claimant, by, through under or against
INGRID K. MARKLAND: HEARTLAND NATIONAL
BANK; BANK OF AMERICA, NA.; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF INGRID K. MARKLAND; JOHN DOE;
MARY DOE AND/OR ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY
CONCERN;Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated January
27, 2011, and entered in Case No.
09000217GCS, of the Circuit Court of the 10th
Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County,
Florida. BANKUNITED is Plaintiff and INGRID K.
MARKLAND, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF INGRID K.
MARKLAND; JOHN DOE; MARY DOE AND/OR ALL
OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN; HEARTLAND
NATIONALBANK; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A, are de-
fendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash aItlN THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM, IN THE
BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE
AVENUE, SEBRING, FL, IN HIGHLANDS COUNTY,
FLORIDA, at 11:00 a.nm., on the 4th day of April,
2011, the following described property as set
forth In said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 759,
OF SEBRING HILLS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, AT
PAGE 2, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGH-
LANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.A person claiming an
interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the
sale. Dated this 28th day of January, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of said CourtBy:
/s/ Ton KoppAs Deputy ClerkFebruary 27; March
6, 2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that on 3/25/11 at 10:30 am
the following vehicles will be sold
for towing & storage charges pursuant to
F.S.713.78. 1996 ford pk#1FTEF15H9TLB29625
ALL Sales to be held at Alan Jay Automotive
Network 441 US 27N Sebring, Fl 33870 863 402
4210
February 27, 2011

Insight Auctioneer s
5000 State Rd 66 Sebring, FL 33875
Surplus A/uction Vehicles, Misc Equip-
lent Including City of Avon Park, School
Board of Highlrnds Counly Satluiday,
March 12th al 9:00an
Feblinary 271; March 6, 2011


1050 Legals
Spring Lake Improvement District
Financial Policies Workshop
The Board of Supervisors of the Spring Lake Im-
provement District will conduct a Financial Policies
workshop on Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 12:30
p.m. at the District Office, 115 Spring Lake Blvd.,
Sebring, Florida 33876 and will be attended by
Supervisors, Management Personnel, and District
Advisors; it is open to the Public. The purpose of
the workshop is to review and update financial
policies and procedures.
EACH PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY
DECISION BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY
MATTER CONSIDERED AT THE MEETING IS AD-
VISED THAT PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE
THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEED-
INGS IS MADE, INCLUDING THE TESTIMONY AND
EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE
BASED.
Joe DeCerbo
District Manager
February 27. 2011

NOTICE OF SALE
The following vehicles will be soled at public sale
or auction to satisfy lien pursuant to Clhapter
713.78(2) of the Florida Statutes at 10:00 a.m. on
3/23/11 at 1118 WEIGLE AVE. Sebring, FL 33870
1990 FORD 2FTJW35HOLCB31994
SALE DATE 3/21/11
1994 TOYT JT3VN29V6R0036245
1996 HYUN KMHJF34MOTU275636
1997 FORD 1FALP51U2VA177759
February 27, 2011
IN THE COUNTY CIVIL COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-00039
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS
TRUSTEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN
-TRUST 2006-FF11
Plaintiff,
vs.
PATRICIA L TALLEY, ET AL
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in
this cause on, in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS
County, Florida described as:
A PART OF THE W 1/2 OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE SE
1/4 OF THE NW 1/4 OF SEC. 27, TOWNSHIP 34
SOUTH, RANGE 28 EAST DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
SAID PARCEL AND GO NORTH ALONG THE WEST
BOUNDARY THEREOF A DISTANCE OF 264 FEET;
THENCE GO EAST AND PARALLEL TO THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY THEREOF A DISTANCE OF 165 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CON-
TINUE EAST AND PARALLEL TO THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY TO A POINT ON THE EAST BOUND-
ARY OF SAID PARCEL; THENCE SOUTH ALONG
THE EAST BOUNDARY TO THE SOUTHEAST COR-
NER OF SAID PARCEL; THENCE WEST ALONG
THE SOUTH BOUNDARY 166.21 FEET: THENCE
NORTH AND PARALLEL TO THE WEST BOUNDARY
OF SAID POINT OF BEGINNING LESS DEDICATED
ROAD RIGHT OF WAY ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF
PROPERTY,
and commonly known as: 1218 CAMARO DR.,
SEBRING, FL 33872; including the building, ap-
purtenances, and fixtures located therein, at pub-
lic sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash,
Sales are held in the Jury Assembly Room in tIhe
basement of the Highlands County Courmhouse lo-
cated at 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Flor-
ida 33870, on MARCH 15, 2011 at 11 a.m.
Any persons claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from thle sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file
a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 22nd day of February, 2011.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Tom Kopp
Deputy Clerk
February 27; March 6, 2011

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News-Sun classified ad.
Call today, gone tomorrow!
385-6155


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Page 6D

1050 Leg0ls
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NUMBER: 09-1547-GCS
HEARTLAND NATIONAL BANK, a national banking
association,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN S. HALE, Individually and JOHN S. HALE
AS TRUSTEE OF THE JOHN S. HALE REVOCABLE
LIVING TRUST DATED JULY 18, 1991 a/k/a the
JOHN S. HAILE REVOCABLE TRUST UTD 7/18/91,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final
decree of foreclosure entered in the above-enti-
tied cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands
County, Florida, I will sell the properly situated in
Highlands County, Florida, described as:
Lot 8, Block 1, PLACID PLAZA, according to
the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book
7, Page 23. Public Records of Highlands County,
Florida.
at public sale, to e highest and best bidder for
cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement
of the Highlands County Courthouse located at
430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida, in
accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes
(2004), at 11:00 a.m., on the 14th day of March,
2011.
NOTICE: Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
SIGNED this February 9, 2011.
(SEAL)
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
February 27; March 6, 2C11
1055 Highlands
1055 County Legals
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
LEGAL NOTICES
The following legal notices are from the
Highlands County Board of County
Commissioners and are being published in the
font, size, and leading as per
their specifications.
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GENERAL SERVICES / PURCHASING
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP)
The Board of County Commissioners, Highlands County,
Sebring, Florida, wi receive sealed proposals in the
County Purchasing Department for
RFP 11 035 INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM (ITS)
MASTER PLAN AND DESIGN-BUILD CRITERIA PACKAGE
Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our
website HYPERLINK "http//Awmw.hcbcc net"
www hcbcc net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, Acting
Director, Highlands County General Services/Purchasing
Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebnring, FL 33875-5803
Telephone: 863-402-6524, Fax 863-402-6735, or by E-
Mail HYPERLINK "mailto dgilbert@hcbcc.org"
dgilbert@hcbcc org
Proposal submissions must be sealed
and marked wth the name of the Proposer, and the RFP
number and title "RFP 11-035 ITS MASTER PLAN AND
DESIGN-BUILD CRITERIA PACKAGE" so as to identify the
enclosed proposal. Each submittal shall include (1) one
original and (6) six copies of the proposal Proposals must
be delivered o Highlands County Purchasing Departmenti
4320 George Blvd Sebring. FL 33875-5803, so as to
reach said-offlice no later than 200 PM., Thursday,
March, 31, 2011, at which time they will be opened
Proposals received later than the date and time as speci-
fied wil be rejected Tihe Board vil not be responsible for
the late deliveries of proposals that are incorrectly ad-
dressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of
delivery service.One or more County Commissioners may
be in attendance at the above referenced proposal open-
ing.
The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners
reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals
or any parts thereof The award, if an award is made, will
be made to the most responsible Proposer whose pro-
posal and qualifications indicate liatl tihe award wil be in
the best interes t f the County, The Board reserves the
right to waive irregularities in tie proposal
The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners of
Highlands County, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status This non
discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's
functions, including one's access to, particip ion,
employment or treatment in its programs or activities
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADAi or Section
286 26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John A Minor,
ADA Coordinaor at 863-402-6509 (Voice, or via Hornda
Relay Service 711, or by e mal: HYPERLINK "mail to
jmnmor@hcbcc org" jminor@hcbcc org Requests for
CART or interpretersrervices should be made at least 24
hours in advance to oennit coordination ofl the
service,
Board of County Commissioners
Purchasing Department
Highlands County, Flonda
HYPERUNK httpi//wm vhcbcc.nel" wwvw hcbcc net
February 27 March 6, 2011
DOES MAKING
MONEY
MAKE YOU HAPPY?
Sell your used
appliance with a
News-Sun
classified ad.
Call today,
gone tomorrow!
385-6155


1100 Announcements


CHECK


YOUR


AD
Please check your ad on the
first day it runs to make sure it
iscorrect.Sometimesinstruction'
s over the phone are
misunderstood and an error
can occur. If this happens
to you, please call us the first
day your ad appears and we


will be happy to fix it as soon
as we can.
If We can assist you, please
call us:

385-6155

News-Sun

Classified



1200 Lost& Found
FOUND: CAT, off Hwy 17, Avon Park.
Black/White, short hair, approximately
1 yr old, declawed. Call 863-453-6469.


News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


LiLXWL {fr Lu LiDLaj


Lawn Maintenance KF x
& More since 1991!




Truck / Trailer / Labor FOR HIRE
Marc (863) 655-9579


HANDYMAN BOB
Install doors, windows,
flooring, plumbing & more!
Licensed & Insured
Lic# HM0096
Call 863-452-5201
Sor
863-449-1744

POOL" PARAL)ISE
Pool Service $ Mobile Retail
Service Repair Supplies Equipmeint
Delivered Right +t your =cor
Brad Julie Kurtz
(663) 362-7726

poolparadiseld01@ol.com



* JACKSON HEWIT,
I eNmammEmNDE OWTAN SERVICE
INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED


S&D TREE SERVICE

I"More
For Your

I Buck
\/\ --f-' *^- UC)4


* Tree Trimming
* Tree Removal


* Stump Grinding
* Lot Clearing


Will beat any quote

Free Stump Grinding
with any Tree Removal
Licensed & Insured / ISA Certified

863-441-5154

Freedom Lawn Care
Get the freedom you deserve
Carl Horton owner
Vet. & Sr. Discount
Lawn Maintenance
Landscaping
Small Tree Work
Clean Ups
Free Estimates
863-655-2526


Repairs
Upgrades

Installations -
Wi-fi Setup

tall for appointment:
t 863-633-9232


WILLIAMS JANITORIAL

CARPET CLEANING

-10" Per Room
3 Rooms Minimum
Upholstery Cleaning
All Types of Flooring
Free Estimates
Lic Bonded Ins
(863) 214-1940


oueVIIIg m411 UI riUllUd r u rirt lIIIIW
"Enjoy the Satisfaction of Safety"
with the
ROBBINS "FLAME SYSTEM"
LIGHTNING PROTECTION
THE WORLD'S FINEST
1Aluminum Lightning protection
Underwriter's Laboratories Inspected and Approved






"LIVE BLOOD ANALYSIS"
WANDA KLINE
WEIGHT LOSS
& WELLNESS
See what one drop of your blood indicates as
to YOUR nutritional health and well-being.
By appointment only
863-414-4066


Phone (863) 382-7551
FAX (863) 382-2750


1405 US 27 North
Sebring, FL 33870


Service Available 7 Days A Week
Website: extraordinaireairconditioning com
All Service Calls $40
FEBRUARY ONLY!
New & Repeat Customers
$10
of Every $40 Service Call
Will be Donated in Your Name
(or A Name You Choose)
to the American Cancer Society
Relay for Life
Mike & Kandy Sheldone
CEO/Owner
Lic# CAC 1816569
863-451-2399


Kae .tnony Brwiedai
Care & Coanciere


Are You or a Loved One
Living Alone?
Safety/Wellness Visitations
Life Management Assistance
Nursing Home Visitation & Reporting
Errand/Concierge Services

Personal Concierge Services
item pick-up/delivery grocery shopping
courier/delivery petsitting
* pet transport to vet or groomer home security checks
meal pick-up/delivery plus much, much moree!!

(863 382882
wwwkbarendoncirci co
TrswotyIsure & --pri-ce


www. newssun.com


Avon Park (863) 453-2525 Sebring 8
Lake Placid (863) 699-2525 Wauchula 8
Lake Wales (863) 679-9200 Sebring Fax i
Wal-Mart Locations:
Lake Wales (863) 676-0569
Sebring (863) 385-5371
Avon Park (863) 452-7010


NO JOB TOO SMALL
WE DO IT ALL
HOME REPAIRS MAINTENANCE YARD
We Will Beat Anyone's Price
Call For Free Estimate



S. A. LONG CLEANING perho
20 Years experience
A Excellent References
''. Daily Weekly Biweekly- Monthly
Janitorial Service Recently
Relocated to Lake Placid Sebring
J! ,~Lp cookingg To Build New Clientele
863-243-1801 / Shelly A long




Indoor Flea Market<'

54ae4 Dollar Store
S'e I Avon 863-449-1298




CAMPBELL'S COLLISION
Vi cENTER, INC.
-' "u' JIM (.CIPHR LL Owner


* Fully Insured Free Estimates
* Tree Removal Tree Topping.
* Tree Trimming Stump Grinding
Serving All-Central Florida Area

Joe Johnson's
ALL AMERICAN
TREE SERVICE, INC.
TRIMMING REMOVAL
SOD INSTALLATION STUMP GRINDING
LOT CLEARING PRESSURE CLEANING
Will Beat Any Written Estimate!
Peoples Choice A l Free Estimates
Award 863-465-7491 Licensed & Insured

Roger's Handyman Services


Nt jobi it o smSi ll We .
lI' iibc i,.p,.irs .ind
Hi dl lriJ ..l e I?,- rd A 1,1l

863-:18 16677 .
irr- l.s ,ilim.it-, ,, .. ..

Nest Egg Bookeeping, Inc.
863-385-0888
NESTEGGBOOK@YAHOO.COM
Specializing in individuals
Why pay accounting fees for bookkeeping?
Monthly Bill Pay Bank Reconciliations
Correspondence
Insurance/Medicare Assistance
Call to see how we can help you...


DID YOU KNOW?


THE NEWS SUN
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY
IS ONE OF THE MOST ECONOMICAL &
EFFECTIVE MEANS OF ADVERTISING TODAY?


CALL JOYCE @ 863-385-6155
OR EMAIL:
joyce.fettinger@newssun.com
FOR DETAILS!!


ls,


(863) 382-1515
(863)767-1515
(863) 382-9939











www.newssun.com


2000
Employment

2 100 Help Wanted
REGISTERED NURSE part time
(20 hrs. per week). Dependable trans-
portation is required. Home Health
experience preferred in order to train
and, monitor, Personal Care Workers
doing in-home services. Good oral and
written communication skills are
necessary. A non-clinical position.
Apply in person at NU-HOPE ELDER
CARE SERVICES, 6414 US HWY 27
South, Sebring. EOE DFWP
ARE YOUR A HIGHLANDS COUNTY
PREMIERE HAIRSTYLIST, LOOKING
FOR AS SECURE, PROFESSIONAL
WORK PLACE? CALL DIANE
863-532-9440

CAREGIVERS

NOW

HIRING
For caring, compassionate
caregivers. You must be 21 yrs old
with a HS Diploma/GED, pass a
criminal & driving record check.
Call HR between 9am and 4 pm
M-F. 863-385-8558 or visit:
ck381 .ersp.biz/emplovment


News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


Classified

ads

get fast

results


2100 Help Wanted



F_


HOME CARE
RN, OT,PT, CNA/HHA
needed for local visits in Highlands.
Good Salary/Per Diem Rates
Excellent Benefits
Immediate Need !!!
Call (863) 401-3550 or
Fax Resume to (863)401-8199
COMCAST OUTSIDE SALES
Contractor for COMCAST needs
OUTSIDE SALES REPS to sell cable to
homeowners. Earn $600+ weekly, will
train. Must pass background check.
Call Chris @ 863-381-6007.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
(FPC) of Lake Placid, Florida has two
part-time staff position openings ---
Director of High School Youth Ministry
--- Director of Middle School Youth
Ministry. FPC is a Bible teaching,
Christ-centered, growing congregation.
Interested applicants should call
863-465-2742 www.foclp.com
FURNITURE SALES Position Available.
Must be self motivated & enjoy being
around people. 5 days per week; hourly
+ commission. Must apply in person,
Badcock & More, 607 US 27, N., Avon
Park, FL 33825.
MEDICAL OFFICE seeks experienced
Insurance Biller. PT/FT.
Fax resume to 863-465-6385.
PERSONAL CARE ASSISTANTS Full
- time positions available for In-Home
services to frail, elderly persons.
Competitive rate of pay and vehicle
allotment, reliable transportation is
required. Apply at NU-HOPE Elder care
Services, 6414 U.S. 27 South, Sebring.
EOE DFWP
TRUCK DRIVER Over-the-Road. Must
be able to stay out 3+ weeks at a time.
Verifiable experience necessary. Clean
driving record a must! Mechanical
knowledge a plus. For information
contact Linda @ 863-452-5959.
WAITRESSES EXPERIENCED
needed for high volume restaurant at
950 Sebring Square. Only experienced
individuals need to apply!
863-382-2333


HIRING



SUPERVISORS







Come Join


Our

Winning Team!


IA


For employment

opportunities call...






863-402-2786





863-402-2786


Cross


-l Country, '

^ AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES

OE 3310 Hwy. 27 South
Sebring, FL 33870 :
E-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.coln :


3000
Financial



Real Estate


4040 Homes For Sale
SPRING LAKE 3BR, 2BA, bonus
room, new roof, ceramic tile floors,
screened porch, double car garage,
1/4 acre lot landscaped for nature
w/ drought tolerant plants &
man-made goldfish pond, 5' chain
link fence around back yard.
863-446-6924

4080 Homes for Sale
408 Sebring
SEBRING BY OWNER, Pristine 2BR,
2BA, 1CG. Clean, safe, quite, well
maint. area. Many retirees. Perfect
cond. w/almost new roof & plush lawn.
Interior in exc. cond. Golf course
across street. For appt. 937-367-5518.
SEBRING 3BR, 2BA 1CG, CBS Home
303 Virginia PI. $119,00 or 2BR, 2BA,
MH 5151 Barnum St. $42,500 10%
Down Owner Financing Call
863-835-1445
6 1Commercial Prop.
4160 For Sale


MUST

SELL!!!!!

4 Acres Cleared
Commercial
US 27 Near
Hwy 98
700 Ft. Frontage
w/Turn Out
595K OBO
ALL OFFERS
CONSIDERED!
Call John,
561-385-4099


4 7 1 Lakefront Prop.
4'70 For Sale
WOW!
LAKE PLACID Lake Front Condo fully
furnished, 2BR, 1BA, covered parking.
Bring your toothbrush. Only $54.500.
Deb Worley Realtor. 863-465-0123
WANT NEW FURNITURE?
Need to sell the old furniture first?
Call News-Sun classified, 385-6155.
Then shop till you drop!


4220 Lots for Sale
LAKE PLACID Florida Vacant
Residential Land, 603 Archie Summers
Rd, MUST SELLI Lot Is .26 acre
(11,454 sq ft) with 83' Frontage & 138'
Depth. Paved road access, with access
to electricity at property line. Well
water & septic tank are used in the
neighborhood. It has sandy ground and
a few trees. Perfect location for a home
near Lake June-in-Winter Florida State
Park where there Is access to sailing,
hiking, fishing & bird watching.
If interested contact Margaret Hughes
@ 888-878-8918, leave message.
O QOut-of-Town
4300 Property
NC MOUNTAINS ASHVILLE AREA
Spotless, Fully Furnished, 3BR, 2BA
Doublewide MH on beautiful tree lined
1/2 acre. Cable, FP, W/D, Dishes,
Linens, Gas Grill.....just bring your
toothbrusfil Cool nights, 2300'
elevation. $950/mo. 863-381-0611

4320 Real Estate Wanted

ATTENTION: CASH for your Home,
Duplex, Apartment, Commercial
Property. Rapid Closing,
"As a" Condition. 863-441-2689.
STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL



5000
Mobile Homes

505 Mobile Homes
5 5 For Sale
SEBRING MH In 55+ community.
Completely furn 1BR, Large BA, kitchen
& D.R, L.R. & Dressing Rm. Lakefront,
Boat Ramp w/gazebo. Pets Welcome.
2900 St Rd 17, N., Lot 20.
863-402-0037, no calls before 1 pm.
SEBRING Mobile Home in Family
Park. Needs TLC, but OK for
occupancy. Great Starter Home!
PRICED TO SELL $1,800.
863-253-1014
SINGLE WIDE fully furnished, 2/BR,
1/BA, carport, closed patio, ceramic tile
kitchen bath patio Fla. room. Very
clean! Washer / dryer, lawn irrigation.
Owned land. $31,000. For info call
765-516-0204 or 765-482-3710


6000
Rentals

6 1 Villas & Condos
6 A1 0For Rent
SEBRING 2BR, 2BA, tile floors
throughout, screened porch, conven-
ient location to US 27 and Hospital,
(Not 55+) gated Community, Clubhouse
& pool, vaulted ceilings. Lawn Maint. in-
cluded. $800 monthly. 863-840-1083
SEBRING Newer Community, gated
(not 55+), 2BA, 2BA, screened porch,
tiled floors throughout, convenient loca-
tion to US 27 & Hospital. Clubhouse &
pool, lawn maintenance included.
$750 Monthlly 954-812-2069
6 150 Furnished
6 15 Apartments
LAKE PLACID Fully Fumrnished,
Remodeled Studio Apt. Utilities paid
except cable & telephone. Starting at
$425-$475. No Pets/No Smoke. $400
security deposit. 863-243-4580
SEBRING Downtown on the Circle.
Weekly. or Monthy, starting at $150
wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets.
306 circle. 863-386-9100 or
954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask
for John. 863-414-7535

6200 Unfurnished
6200 1Apartments


62O0 Unfurnished
6200 Apartments

RELAX AT Lake Isis Villas
Luxurious 2BR Apartment.
Clean & Quiet Setting.
Call 863-453-2669
AVON PARK "" Highlands Apartments
1680 North Delaware.
1 BR, 1 BA & 2BR, 2BA Available.
Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation.
1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195
AVON PARK Apartment with balcony
overlooking Lake Verona and City Park.
100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities.
SPECIAL: $325/mo.
863-453-8598
AVON PARK Clean, Quiet; Studios /
1BR. 1BA/2BR, 2BA Apts., from
$375/mo. New tile & appliances,
screened patios & W/D hook ups.
Students/Seniors Discount
Call 863-452-0469.
AVON PARK LEMONTREE APTS:
1 BR, 1 BA $495/mo +$200 security;
Washer/Dryer, Microwave,
WSG included. Pets Wlcome.
Call Alan, 386-503-8953

KEY LAKE VILLAS
LAKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING
2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean &
quiet, Screen porch, Outside patio,
Central air, Washer/Dryer hookup,
$585/mo., first & security. No Pets.
863-465-2740
SEBEING FREE 1/2 mo rent, free
cable, Ig clean 1/1 tile floors, quiet /
safe. No dogs 863-385-1999


6250 Furnished Houses
LAKE PLACID Newer 3BR, 2BA, 7310
s.ao. a or m.....liiy. cx.--iiei-- iur__iitur.


seasonal or monthly. Excellent Turniture
& appliances, near lake & boat ramp,
No smoking or dogs. $1300/mo. After
season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119
LAKE PLACID Seasonal Furnished
House 2BR /1 BA, no smoking, no
pets. Call for info if no answer
leave message. 863-465-9735

6300 unfurnished Houses
HOUSES / MOBILE HOMES
Call for Availability
NO Security* NO Last* NO Dogs
863-381-4410 or 863-381-5174
LAKE PLACID 125 Pine Tree Dr, 3BR,
2BA on 2 acres. $850/mo. + $1150
security deposit. Pets OK.
423-802-6036.
LAKE PLACID 2BR, 1BA, new
floors/paint, fenced yard, close to boat
ramp, nice landscape, quiet area, no
smoke/dogs, $550/mo. 863-699-1119
LAKE PLACID Sun 'n Lake, 2BR, 1BA,
1CG, large scm'd porch on back. New
paint & carpet. $575/mo, + lst/last/sec.
Qr For Sale By Owner, Owner Financ-
ing. 863-464-8555 or 863-465-6091
SEBRING 2BR with fenced yard &
concrete shed/laundry. Will consider
pets. $550/Imo + $400 security deposit.
Extra pet deposit. 863-243-4580
SEBRING Harder Hall area, 2BR, 2BA,
1CG, screened porch. $750/mo.
plus & security deposit. View by
appointment. Call 863-381-6747,
leave message.
SEBRING 2BR, 2BA, New kitchen &
bath. 1026 Lake Sebring Dr.. Large
yard, boat docking. Furniture available.
$675 / $725. 863-386-9100 or
954-295-7194


635030U342

Bargain Buys


DINETTE TABLE 40" round, 1 leaf
formica wood grain, 2 roller chairs.
$99 obo 863-465-7242
JENNY LIND CRIB (mattress & linens
included). Like New! $70. 863-382-6360
OFFICE CHAIR Leather, rolls, tilts, 6
ways adjustment, regular $225, excel.
condition $50 obo 863-465-7242
RECLINER / ROCKER, mauve in color,
good condition. $95. 863-604-5695
WEED EATER ECHO 48" curved shaft
starts & runs great! $100 obo
863-414-5038
7320 Garage &
732 Yard Sales
SEB.- YARD SALE, Rainbow Apostolic
Church, 2203 Rainbow Ave., Sat.
March 5, 7am-12pm. Clothes, shoes,
dishes, misc. Variety of items. Proceeds
to benefit church.
SEBRING 1535 Benz Terrace (several
blocks behind Walmart) Tues, Mar 1st,
Wed, Mar 2nd, & Sat, Mar 5th,
8am-1pm. Lots of Items.....
Something for everyone.
SEBRING RECREATION CLUB HUGE
ANNUAL YARD SALE. 333 Pomegran-
ate Ave., behind Sebring Police station.
Fri-Sat, Mar 4-5, Fri 8AM-5PM, Sat
8AM-3PM. Clothing, decor, furniture,
hardware, electronics, something for
everyone. This is an exceptional sale!

7340 Wanted to Buy
CAR WANTED: I need a very good
used car with rather low mileage.
Do you have one for sale?
Call 863-465-0978


6320 Seasonal Property 7460 Crafts & Bazaars


SEBRING Weekly/Multi-Week Condo
Rentals Avail. Now. Located on Little
Lake Jackson across from Harder Hall
Golf Club. Lots of amenities. Starting
@ $500/wk. 863-385-5005. ext. 0.
6550 Warehouses
6 5 for Rent
SEBRING 20'X40' Warehouse,
12' overhead door, on busy Highway
27 across from Lakeshore Mall.
863-385-3474


6750 Commercial Rental
SEBRING (2) Available. 3926
Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo:
A/C, office, BA, Ig overhead door, near
Sebring High School. 640 Park St,
6400 sq ft, $2500/mo: A/C, office, BA,
8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric,


CASTLE HILL
Apartments
of Avon Park
Accepting Applications for 1 & 2
Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals
62 years or older, handicap/disabled,
regardless of age. For rental informa-
tion & applications please call:
863-452-6565
TDD: 711
THIS INSTITUTION IS AN
Equal Opportunity Provider
and Employer

Los Apt. de
Castle Hill
de Avon Park
Estan aceptando aplicaclones pare
Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras.
Disponible a personas de 62
ancs o mas, Incapacidad fisica/mental,
no import la edad.
Para mas informaclon favor de Ilamar
863-452-6565. TDD: 711
Esta Institucion Es De
Igualdad De Oportunldad Al
Proveedor, Y Empleador


fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway.
941-416-2813


7000
Merchandise

7180 Furniture

NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS!
Lamps $17, 100-Barstools
$39up, 50-Desks $97up,
3Pc Dropleaf dinette $197,
50-Dining Set $397up,
200-Recliners $297up,
50-2 Pc Sofa & Loveseat
sets $687up, 50-TV Ent.
Centers $167up, 2 Pc
Queen Bed Set $297up,
50-4Pc bedroom sets
$387up, 3Pc Living room
tables $97up,
100-Headboards $79up.
HIGHPOINT FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRING
North of Lowes & across from
Home Depot


CRAFT SALE Highlands County
Convention Center @ Fireman's
Field, Sat. Mar 5th, 10am-5pm &
Sun Mar 5th, 10am-4pm. Hand-
made creations, Unique items &
gifts, Liquor lamps, Eyeball jewelry.
visit www.bucklercraftfair.com for
coupons / info 386-860-0092

SEBRING: SPRING FAIR
Woodhaven Estates
(off Brunns Rd)
Sat., March 5th, 8am-12noon.
Raffles Rummage* Bake Sale
Food Crafts
Don't Miss This One!


7520 Pets & Supplies
CHOCOLATE LAB 10 months old
MALE, AKC registered, health certifi-
cate, all shots. $100 863-382-8237
or 863-214-4451


NOTICE
Florida statute 585.195 states that
all dogs and cats sold in Florida
must be at least eight weeks old,
have an official health certificate
and proper shots and be free of in-
testinal and external parasites.
7560 Medical Supplies
7560 & Equipment
MOTORIZED SCOOTER,
Excellent Condition. $475.00.
863-465-1678


8000
Recreation

8050 Boats & Motors
2011 BASS BOAT PRO 1615, 40 hp
Mercury motor, all accessories on
trailer. Never Wet! $10,000 Firm.
863-633-8574.
8400 Recreational
840 Vehicles
2007 36' ELITE TRAVEL TRAILER Fully
loaded w/all options incl, 2 power slide
out rooms, 2 central AC's, W/D, D/W &
micro. Non-smoke, nio pets. Brand new
condition. $21,500. 863838-3825 -
RV WILDWOOD 2006 33ft, 2 slide outs,
2BR, Sleeps 7, like new, non smoker,
no pets. All options & will deliver.
$11,000 OBO. 630-301-1553


9000
Transportation

9 100 Motorcycles
9100 & ATVs
1973 NORTON 850 COMMANDO
New professional restoration, very low
mol, includes Owner's Manuil.
One Owner Rare Find Great Price
863-382 or 63_-65-910QQ


Page 7D

7180 Furniture
DAYBED TWIN Size, White and Gold
frame. $200 / KITCHEN SET table w/ 4
chairs, 2 leaves, white wash finish.
$150. Both in excellent cond.
863-471-2863

Apparel,&
7 2 0 Household Goods
SHOES FOR SALE! All are almost
brand new! Approximately 20 pair incl
riding boots, dress shoes, athletic
shoes, etc. Sizes 6 1/2 7. Will sell 1
pair or all. Make offer! 863-385-4610

7300 Miscellaneous
AQUARIUM, HUGE, 5' long x 26" high,
18" wide. Approx 120 gals, including
pump, filter & wooden stand. Will
deliver within Highlands County. $220.
863-382-4222
DRILL PRESS 34" bench radial Crafts-
man incl. HD bench on wheels $150
obo / LAWN MOWER Craftsman 195cc
22" self propelled mulcher 6.75hp excl.
$200 obo 863-414-5038
FILING CABINETS: 2-Drawer, $10;
3-Drawer, $15; LAMP: Stained Glass,
Very Pretty!, $50; CURIO CABINETS:
$100 for 1, $75 for the other; CUCKOO
CLOCK: $100. 863-471-3504.
HURRICANE SHUTTERS Aluminum 15"
wide. Total of 65 in varying lengths from
33" to 87", $10 each or take all for
$350. 863-385-0759.
SHOPSMITH MARK 5, with
woodworking tools $500 Cash!
Dna-intOOS


ROYAL CARE OF AVON PARK
currently has FT and PT positions available
for C.N.A. 7-3 and 11-7 shifts. We are looking
for C.N.A.'s that take pride in their work.
We are striving for a workplace where
C.N.A.'s receive the appreciation for what
they do and top-notch training by our
exceptional workforce.
Come see what we are all about.

Apply in person at: Royal Care of Avon Park
1213 W. Stratford Rd., Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 453-6674
EOE, M/F, DFWP


U


LOVELY, QUIET, AFFORDABLE

Briarwood of Sebring

Apartments
1335 Spinks Lane Sebring, Florida 33870

Accepting Applications for 1 & 2 BR Apartments.
Available to individuals 62 yrs and older,
Handicapped/disabled, regardless of age.

For rental information and applications please call:
863-385-4078: TDD 771
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer


E(







News-Sun Sunday, February 27, 2011


Page 8D


By KEN MCINTOSH
STAFF' AFTER
ICCA will be placing ads in newspapers,
radio and running television spots this week
asking people to bring in any old silver and
gold coins made before 1965. Those that
bring in their coins will be able to speak
with collectors one on one and have their
coins looked at with an expert set of eyes.
With the help of these ICCA members,
offers' ,!I be made to those that have coins
made before 1965. Offers will be made
based on silver or gold content and the
rarity of the coins. All coins made before
1965 will be examined and purchased
including gold coins, silver coins, silver
cd:hors, all types of nickels and pennies.
Those that decide to sell their coins ,Il be
paid on the spot.
If you are like a lot of people you might
have a few old coins or even a coffee
can fuI lying around. If you have ever
wondered what they are worth now might
be your chance to find out and even sell
h,-m if you choose. They could be worth
a lot according to the International Coin
Collectors Association also known as ICCA.
Collectors will pay a fortune for some coins
and currency for their collections. If it is
rare enough, one coin could be worth over
$100,000 according to Eric Helms, coin
co. !- :tor and ICCA member. One ultra rare
dime, an 1 894S Barber, sold for a record
$ 1.9. nriiion to a c ..llctor in July of 2007.
Vv' i' that is an extreme example, many
rare and valuable coins are stashed away
in dresser drawers or lock boxes around the
country. The ICCA and its collector members
have organized a traveling event in search
of all types of coins and currency. Even
common coins can be worth a significant
amount due to the high price of silver and
gold, says Helms. Washington .quarters
and Roosevelt dimes can be worth many
times their face value. Recent silver markets
have driven the price up on common coins
made of silver. Helms explains that all hoif
dollars, quarters and dimes made before
1965 contain 90% silver and are sought
after any time silver prices rise. Right now





COINS
-Any and all coins made before 1965, rare
coins, entire c::'-. ii...-,, Silver Dollars,
Half C:'-irs, Quarters, Dimes, Half Dimes,
Nickels, Three Cent Pieces, Two Cent Pieces,
Cents, Large Cents, Half Cents and all others.
PAPER MONEY
All denominations made before 1934.
GOLD COINS
Including $20, $10, $5, $4, $3, $2.5,
$1, Private Gold, Gold Bars, etc.
INVESTMENT GOLD
Kruggerands, Canadian Maple Leafs,
Pandas, Gold Bars, U.S. Eagles and
Buffalos, etc.


GOLD
IS TRADING AT ALL TIME HIGH$.
NOW IS THE TIME TO CASH INI

SCRAP GOLD
Broken and unused jewelry, dental gold.
JEWELRY
Diamond rings, bracelets, earrings, loose
diamonds, ci gem stones, etc.
PLATINUM
Ar,1 i. made of p atinum.
SILVER


it's a ..-I!- market he said.
The rarest coins these collectors are
looking for include $20, $10, $5 and
$2 1/2 gold coins and any coin made
before 1 850. These coins always bring
big premiums according to the ICCA.
Silver dollars are also very sought after
nowadays.
Other types of items the ICCA will be
purchasing during this event include U.S.
currency, gold ui.ilion, investment gold,
silver bars, silver rounds, proof sets, etc.
Even foreign coins are sought after and will
be purchased.
Also at this event anyone can sell their
gold jewelry, dental gold or ar, thrij made
of gbld on the spot. Gold is currently
trading at over $1,100.00 per ounce
near an all time high. Bring anything you
*rl.;ri might be gold crnd the collectors will
examine, test and price it for free. If you
decide to sell, you will be paid on the spot
- it has been an unknown fact that coin
dealers have always paid more for jewelry
and scrap gold than other jewelers and
pawn brokers.
So whether,you have one coin you think
might be valuable or a large collection you
recently inherited, you can talk to these
collectors for free. If your lucky you may
.have a rarity worth thousands. Either way
there is nothing to lose and it sounds like
fun!
For more information on this event visit
the ICCA website at
WWW.INTERNATIONALCOINCOLLECTORS.COM












MA H j-S






0 6 0M6P


RecSeinds:,


1.'


.4,


a'


* Gather items of interest from your
attic, safe deposit box, garage,
basement, etc. There is no limit to
the amount of items you can bring
* No appointment necessary
* If interested in selling, we will
consult our collector's database to
see if a buyer exists. 90% of all
items have offers in our database
* The offer is made on the spot on
behalf of our collectors making
the offer
* If you decide to accept the offer,
we will pay you on the spot!
* You get 100% of the offer
with no hidden fees


A
1

\- /j


MILLIONS

SPENT!

1000 NATIONAL,
EVENTS!


PAID $1,800


..*-' ,' .....


PAID $2,800


1.
V.. ~
~ I'".


PAID $8,500


I atc, ten r sets, goblets, jewelry, etc. and
onirtlir nq ik d s linUg.


PAID $250


PAID $14,000


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


This Week Only INTERNATIONAL COIN


COLLECTORS ASSOCIATION is in Sebring!


WWW.newssun.com


. I, .