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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00905
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: February 25, 2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
sobekcm - UF00028423_00905
System ID: UF00028423:00905
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

Full Text




www.newssun





EWS- UN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927

another a Granata honored Streak
to cope as top EMT WinterI

AGE 2A PAGE 2A PAGE


s top
Haven

S1B


Friday-Saturday, February 25-26, 2011


Low clouds and fog,
then some sun
High Low

79 59
Complete Forecast
PAGE 7A





S VOICE

Question: Do you have
expired medications in
your home?








No

42%


Total votes: 69
Next question:
Is cutting back on
state government the
best way to trim the
state's budget deficit?
Make your voice heard at
www.newssun


Diann E. Devero
Age 61, of Avon Park
Lynford Fyne
Age 77, of Sebring
Ernest Hansel
Age 95, of Sebring
Ellie 0. Ross
Age 76, of Lake Placid
Eddie Sisk
Age 51, of Avon Park
Obituaries, Page 5A


Classifieds
Community Briefs
Community Calendar
Dear Abby_
Editorial & Opinion
Healthy Living
Lottery Numbers
Movie Review/Times


Follow-the
News-Sun on


www.twitter.com/thenewssun
and


www.facebook.com/newssun




o 90994 01001 7


Audit: County

overspent in

2010, but

lowered debt
By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@ newssun.com
SEBRING The County's Audited
Financial Report showed that revenues
were up slightly in 2010 but so were
expenses, Julie Fowler, a representative
from The NCT Group told the county com-
mission Tuesday night.
Known as the CAFR, the actual report
was not finished by the time that NCT was
required by contract to make a presentation
to the commission by the fourth Tuesday in
February, but Tasha Morgan, auditor for
the Clerk of Courts, said that the numbers
.should be close.
"I would not make any long-term deci-
sions on these preliminary numbers yet,
but they look to be pretty solid," a cautious
Morgan said Tuesday morning.
Fowler also said that the final report
was not actually finished, but would be
wrapped up within the next two weeks and
should be sent to the printers in the early
part of March.
The CAFR showed that overall revenues
that came into county coffers in 2010
totaled $96.3 million, up from the $91.2
million collected in 2009.
The increase in revenues was due to
more grant money coming into the county
last year, and the increase was despite the
fact that tax revenues were down $3.5 mil-
lion from $55.9 million in 2009 to $52.4 in
2010, Fowler explained.
County spending was also up, according
to the CAFR, showing that the county
overspent its income by a total of $1.7 mil-
lion in 2010.
See AUDIT, page 6A


They don't

build fire

engines like

they used to

West Sebring gets
state-of-the-art rig
By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
christopher.tuffley@newssun.com
SEBRING The men couldn't
contain their excitement as the
2011 Typhoon, class-A engine
with a state-of-the-art CAFS sys-
tem rolled into the Highlands
County's Emergency Operations
Center parking lot Wednesday.
"It's here!" said one excited
voice, as the impressive fire
engine, built by Hall-Mark with a
450 Cummins engine and Allison
transmission, smoothly pulled to a
stop.
Bought by the West Sebring
Volunteer Fire Department, the
engine's arrival culminated two
years of work and preparation.
A committee of firefighters
designed the truck paying atten-
tion to detail.
For example, the inside seat
backs are designed so air tanks fit
into them. This means the fire
fighters gear up getting into the
truck and are that much quicker
getting out at the fire site.
Other little things, all designed
for safety and efficiency, stand out
- revolving lights on the hood, so
the truck is easily seen by oncom-
ing traffic, hydraulic ladder lifters,


www.newssun.com


Volume 92/Number 24 I 50 cents


News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE
Avon Park's Assistant City Manager Maria Sutherland asked the county commissioners for more funding
for recreation Tuesday night. The county cut its own recreation budget by $60,000 and granted all the
municipalities $500,000 to split.


County cuts rec funding

Communities to have $60,000 less


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
SEBRING Commissioners
voted 3-1 to divide $500,000
between the municipalities for
recreation funding Tuesday night,
and none of the cities voiced their
opinions about the funding.
The county actually budgeted
$560,000 to the municipalities for
the 2010-11 fiscal year, but had
received requests eaboe c and
beyond that amn-,int. according to
June Fisher, the county's
Community Services Division
Director.


In January, the county decided
to shift gears and pay out three
equal base payments of $100,000
to Avon Park, Sebriftg and Lake
Placid, and told each community
that there would be a different
formula in the future rather than
the traditional 50 percent of each
overall budget.
The communities requested
$708,856 based on that 50 per-
cent as per the old interlocal
agreement with the county. -i
Avon Park said it needed
$224,091 in 2010-11, Lake Placid
requested $129,242 and Sebring


News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
Ladamian Keitt (right) examines the control panel of the West Sebring
Volunteer Fire Department's brand new, state of the art, fire engine.


and an outside control panel with
clear lines of sight.
The truck was not cheap.
In fact, the station saved money
for two years in order to buy it
without borrowing money.
The engine's final cost of
$515,000 came out of non-adval-


orem taxes, said Joe Romanik,
who chaired the selection com-
mittee.
He said one of the most excit-
ing things about the truck's poten-
tial is the CAFS system which

See WEST, page 7A


wanted $207,343, according to a
Powerpoint display developed by
county staff.
What the county handed out
was $180,000 for Avon Park,
$130,000 for Lake Placid and
$190,000 for Sebring.
County staff suggested options
of sticking to the budgeted
$560,000 or returning to the
2009-10,actual expenditures of
$471,182.
Commissioners Don Elwell and
Jack Richie agreed with the lower
See COUNTY, page 7A


.Gov. Scott asks

Legislature to

cut government
By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida's legislative
session set to start March 8 could be one of
the most explosive in years, with thou-
sands of state jobs on the line as new Gov.
Rick Scott presses to cut back on the size
and cost of state government.
Whittling down state government was
one of former Gov.
Jeb Bush's goals and
it's been attempted
by other governors
across the country,
too, although not
often successfully.
But with Florida's
economy in the dol- 'Government
drums, a budget
shortfall of at least has to get back
$3.6 billion and a to its core
desire to cut taxes, functions, but
Scott and a conser- only its core
vative Republican only its core
Legislature see a functions.'
chance to eliminate
or curtail programs RICK SCOTT
they see as unneed- governor
ed or wasteful.
Rank-and-file state employees, who
haven't seen a pay raise in five years, will
lose ground again with changes in their
pension and health benefits. Key govern-
ment services also face cuts.
Scott and legislators are taking dead aim
at education, social services and even law
enforcement, with police agencies con-
cerned that they'll have to release some

See SCOTT, page 6A


An
tries

PA


5/>- '









Newvs-Sun Friday. February 25. 2011


www.newssun.com


Room at

the top

As Lona Parten stared
into a sunrise atop the
world's tallest freestand-
ing mountain, she
reflected upon the dark-
est year of her life. The
last 3,000 feet of her
August climb to Mount
Kilimanjaro's summit
took seven hours,
through frigid, pitch-
black conditions. Yet she
was determined to equal
a feat that her sons, 1st
Lt. Tyler Parten and 2nd
Lt. Daniel Parten, once
fulfilled together.
"Come hell or high
water, I was going to do
it myself," Lona, 48, told
The Unknown Soldiers.
On Sept. 10, 2009, her
eldest son's life ended on
a mountain in
Afghanistan's Kunar
province. Tyler, 24, was
leading a platoon of the
Army's 3rd Squadron,
61st Cavalry Reg-iment
toward a Taliban strong-
hold when he was struck
by enemy sniper fire.
On that terrible day, a
life devoted to faith,
music-and concern for
children ended brutally.
Lona said Tyler's body
remained on the hill for
nearly 10 hours after his
death, with enemy bul-
lets repeatedly striking
her son as fellow troops
were pinned down by
sniper fire.
"It is true pain ... inde-
scribable," a tearful Lona
said after recounting the
dreadful details. Her
voice shook throughout
our conversation, on the
day after what would
have been Tyler's 26th
birthday.
"Every fiber of your
body hurts and some-
times you can't even
breathe," she added.
Her surviving son,
Daniel, 24; daughter
Anna Laura, 20; and ex-
husband Dave, 55, all
wear memorial bracelets
identical to the one I
noticed on Lona's right
wrist in a Birmingham,
Ala. restaurant. The
bracelets are never
removed, nor. are haunt-
ing images described by
still-grieving members of
Tyler's platoon. Yet
despite his deployment's
tragic ending, fellow sol-
diers said:Tyler
embraced his time in
Afghanistan.
"They said he came
into his own there and
truly loved it," Lona
said, briefly perking up.
"He was full of compas-
sion, music and love."
Tyler's private jour-
nals, which Lona treas-
ures and has spared no
expense to copyright and
possibly publish, reveal
that the warrior's heart
was constantly aching for
Afghan children savaged
by terrorism, hate and
war.
"When reading his
journal entries, you see
the pain and anguish, but
then his words would
end on a. positive note,"
she said.
The words Lona used
to describe what tran-
spired in the hours and
days after her family
learned of Tyler's death
- anger, blame, depres-
sion, screaming, crying
- pierced my heart. But
like his journals, the fall-
en warrior's Marianna,
Ark., memorial service
ended on a positive note.


"My children sang,
played guitar and did

See MOTHER, page 8A


Granata named paramedic of


the year by VFW Post 4300


By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
chr ; .. ; a lr,.. rl.r om n
SEBRING John Vawter.
commander of VFW Post
4300, presented county para-
medic Troy Granata \ ith an
award honoring him as the
paramedic of the year.
"We are here today to
honor Troy Granata," said
Vawter, during a ceremony at
the county's Emergency
Medical Services office at


George Boulevard.
'His dedication to duty
and professional skills reflect
the highest standards of the
department, and distinguish
him from all others in excel-
lence." Vawter said.
Every year the -Sebring
based VFW Post 4300 honors
one outstanding member
each from the police depart-
ment. fire department, sher-
iff's office and the county


emergency medical service.
Paramedics provide
advanced life support for
patients who are in medical
crisis or the victims of trau-
ma. at the scene and in tran-
sit.
In order to become a para-
medic an individual has to
first attend a year and a half
of school, then serve for at
least a year in the field, and
-See GRANATA, page 8A


News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
Robert Tebow, an Eagle Scout, evangelist and father of Tim Tebow, spoke at the Highlands
Friends of Scouting Distinguished Citizen Dinner Tuesday.

Lenihan honored; Tim Tebow's


dad delivers a message


By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
christopher.tuffley@fnewssun.com
SEBRING From Eagle
Scouts to Cub Scout leaders
to the friends and family of
local Boy Scouts in general,
a large audience of a least
200 hundred gathered for the
Highlands Friends Of
Scouting Dinner Tuesday.
The occasion is a major
fundraiser for local Scout
troops and an opportunity to
honor a Distinguished
Citizen of the Year.
This year Tom W. Lenihan
was. recognized for his years
of support, both to the
Scouting program and
Highlands County youth.
"Tom has made a practice
to be 'helpful' to others," his
citation read. "In his volun-
teer role in the Scouting
movement, Tom has helped
in many ways. Through
training new adult leaders,
maintaining the area Web site
and running monthly district
mee-tings for adult volun-
teers, Tomr keeps the district
running smoothly.
"Tom represents the true
values .otf Scouting in his
everydiy'life, with his family
and 'through his service to
God and others."
The guest speaker was Bob
Tebow, a distinguished evan-
gelical missionary with a


ministry in the Philippines -
who now is better known as
Tim Tebow's father.
He spoke of ow Scouting
had prepared hiin early in life
by instilling the importance
of persistence. "It's probably
the most important character
trait," Tebow said.
He explained to the audi-
ence that it took persistence
to build up his ministry and
reach out program.
From nothing, to creating
an organization which
includes.49 Filipinos on the
staff; from years of high
points to low back to high,
Tebow said he believed in
hard work and not giving up.
"You just can't quit," he said.
He added that those quali-
ties were a direct result of his
Scouting training, and that he
was proud to have passed
those qualities on to his chil-
dren he has five -includ-
ing Tim.
"All you have to do is look
at Timmy's motivation, sense
of duty, and enthusiasm and
know he was a Scout,"
Tebow said.
He did take one gentle shot
at Seminole fans when he
teased they must be glad his
son has graduated from the
University of Florida.
He told the audience
investing in the future is


COMMUNITY BRIEFS


Benton to discuss
County Behavioral
Health Court
SEBRING Highlands
County Sheriff Susan Benton
will discuss the progress
toward developing a
Behavioral Health Court for
Highlands County i n the
Tenth Judicial Circuit. The
court is to serve court-
involved individuals with
mental illness and co-occur-
ring disorders and ultimately
reduce recidivism among
those individuals.
Benton will speak at the
meeting of the Florida
Partners in Crisis for Circuit
10 (Highlands, Hardee and
Polk counties). The public is
welcome and the meeting
will be held from 9-11 a.m.
today at Florida Hospital
Heartland Medical Center,
4200 Sun 'N Lake Blvd.,
second floor.
Meeting attendees will
also hear about programs
offered in Highlands County
by mental health and sub-
stance, abuse treatment
providers: Tri-County


Human Services, Volunteers
of America, Florida Hospital
and the group "Balance -
Lives in Transition."
Call Adam O'Connor at
701-7373, ext. 30.

West Sebring VFD
plans barbecue
SEBRING The West
Sebring Volunteer Fire
Department will hold its
36th annual barbecue from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.
Cost per dinner is $7.
Dinners include a half chick-
en, beans,' coleslaw, roll and
beverage.
The barbecue will be at
Station 9 at 2300 Longview
Court off of Sebring
Parkway. Delivery service is
available for orders of 25 or
more. Call 386-6052.

Pizza party marks
Donor Appreciation
Join Florida's Blood
Centers from 12-2 p.m.
Friday for a pizza party
when you donate blood.
Continued on page 5A


essential especially in
young people even if it
means one doesn't see the
results for years.
Fred Keiber, chairman of
the event, said money raised
at the event is spent locally..
A portion goes to subsidiz-
ing Scouts who would other-
wise not be able to afford the
program, while other funds
go to maintaining local Scout
camps, buying equipment,
training adult volunteers and
keeping a communications
network, including a Web
site
www.boyscouting.com.
Currently Scouting serves
seven percent of the avail-
able boys in Highlands,
Citrus, Hardee, Hernando,
Hillsborough, Pasco, Polk
and Sumter counties.
The goal is to serve 12 per-
cent by 2015.


News-Sunphotoby
S*. CHRISTOPHER
GTUFFLEY
.-* .Troy Granata,
with the
....' "' V Highlands
'. e County
Emergency
Medical Services,
is named para-
medic of the year
2010 by VFW
Post 4300. Here
he is surrounded
by his family,
(from left) son T.
J., Granata,
daughter Taylor,
wife Stephanie,
and son Tyler.


POLICE BLOTTER


The News-Sun would like
to remind the readers that
the names listed below
reflect those who have been
charged with a crime, but
they are all innocent until
proven guilty by a court of
law. If anyone listed here is
acquitted or has charges
dropped, they can bring in
proof of such decision or
mail a copy to the paper and
the News-Sun will be happy
to report that information.
The News-Sun is at 2227
U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL
33870.

The following people
were booked into the
Highlands County Jail on
Wednesday, Feb. 23:
Paula Antonia Babich,
41, of Sebring, was charged
with battery.
+ Michael Anthony
Barefield, 20, of Sebring,
was charged with posses-
sion and or use of drug
equipment, possession of a
controlled substance with-
out a prescription, and pos-
session of marijuana.
Robert Alexander
Coulter, 40, of Highland
City, was charged with pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance without a prescrip-
tion.
Jorge Carlos Franco,
23, of Miami, was charged
with possession and or use
of drug equipment, larceny
of utility service, producing
marijuana, larceny, and traf-
ficking marijuana.
Angel Diaz Hernandez,
36, of Wauchula, was
charged with violation of
probation reference no valid
driver license.
Ralph Hulon, 76, of
Lorida, was charged with
torment/deprive/mutilate/kil
I animals, and kill/wound
protected species.
Jayson Dan


Kalinowski, 28, of Lake
Placid, was charged with
resisting an officer, two
counts of possession of a
weapon or ammunition by a
convicted Florida felon, two
counts of dealing in stolen
property, grand theft of
firearm.
Miguel Angel Leon,
23, of Miami, was charged
with larceny of utility serv-
ice, possession and or use
of drug equipment, traffick-
ing marijuana, larceny and
producing marijuana.
Julie Pierre, 24, of
Sebring, was charged with
failure to appear reference
pre-trial conference for bat-
tery.
David Anthony Rivera,
21, of Avon Park, was
charged with possession of
a controlled substance with-
out a prescription.
Linda Denise Stock,
40, of Lake Placid, was
charged with grand theft
and fraud-swindle to obtain
property under $20,000.

The following people
were booked into the
Highlands County Jail on
Tuesday, Feb. 22:
Tyrone Luciano
Arocho, 23, of Avon Park,
was charged with posses-
sion and or use of drug
equipment.
Darlene Bender, 39, of
Sebring, was arrested on an
out-of-county warrant refer-
ence non-support.
Lawrence Ted Conroy,
26, of Shadey Valley, Tenn.,
was arrested on an out-of-
county warrant reference
battery.
Ricardo Lopez
Coronado, 55, of Avon Park,
was charged with interfer-
ence with custody.
Melissa. Ashley

Continued on page 8A


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NEWS- SUN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927

Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, Florida 33870
A Harbor Point Media Company


OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870
OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday
PHONE: 863-385-6155
MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954
NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453

CIRCULATION
SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not
receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation
department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before
11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to
you. Subscribers who notify us after the'times mentioned will receive credit to their
account. Please call 385-6155.


POSTMASTER: Send address change to:
News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870
USPS ISSN 0163-3988
Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL
and additional entry offices)


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
HOME DELIVERY
IN FLORIDA MAIL
OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL


12 mo.
S60.46
92.23
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7% FL tax
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6.46


Total
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98.69
105.99


Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on
Friday for the Sunday.edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.
Romona Washington Publisher and Executive Editor
863-385-6155, ext. 515


Page 2A







News-Sun Friday. February 25. 2011


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Page 4A


EDITORIAL & OPINION


News-Sun Friday. February 25. 2011


www.newssun.com


N body
expected the
claims
process for the BP
oil spill to go
smoothly, least of
all Kenneth
Feinberg, the man
hired to oversee it.
He surely knew that when
you have 500,000 requests
for compensation for numer-
ous and dissimilar economic
activities across several
states, determining legitimate
claims from the leeches is
like trying to segregate nee-
dles from haystacks.
But the public has every
right to expect a transparent
process. That has not materi-
alized, and it has fueled much
of the anger and frustration
toward Feinberg and the Gulf
Coast Claims Facility.
Feinberg recently spent
two days meeting with
Florida officials to discuss


Why would Gov.
Rick Scott just
say no to $2 bil-
lion in federal funding for
a bullet train already
approved by that the GOP-
led Legislature a proj-
ect that would create thou-
sands of jobs for Florida?
Many people are asking that question
after the governor canceled plans for a
high-speed train line between Tampa
and Orlando, which eventually would
extend to Miami's inter-modal center
near the airport. Many of those caught
by surprise, in fact, are from the gover-
nor's own party.
U.S. Rep. John Mica, who chairs the
U.S. House and Infrastructure
Committee, said: "I have urged the gov-
ernor to reconsider going forward and
allow the private sector to assume the


ways to improve the claims
process. He received an ear-
ful, with legislators com-
plaining that their con-
stituents aren't being paid
and can't get answers from
the GCCF. Some wondered.
why claims with similar cir-
cumstances have been treated
differently. Others groused
about picayune paperwork
becoming an obstacle to
relief.
On the surface it appeared
to be a productive trip, with
both sides clearing the air
and Feinberg pledging to
make substantial changes.
Attorney General Pam Bondi
met with the claims czar and
proposed these sensible
reforms:
Allow claims adjusters
to resolve claims onsite in
their offices.
Appoint an independent
auditor to review past and
future decisions of the GCCF.
Make claims procedures
public.
Provide clear explana-


NEW, SUN

2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155


NEWSROOM
ROMONA WASHINGTON
Publisher/Executive Editor
Ext. 515
editor@newssu n. corn


SCOTT DRESSEL
Editor
Ext. 516
scott. dressel@newssun. corn
DAN HOEHNE
Sports Editor
Ext. 528
daniel.hoehne@newssun. cam


tion to each claimant as to
why payments were reduced
or denied.
Feinberg appeared recep-
tive to these ideas and agreed
with lawmakers that the cur-
rent process has not been up
to snuff. He admitted that a
lack of transparency about
why claims are being denied
and delayed has been his
"Achilles heel."
Saying it is one thing..


risk and any future costs for the proj-
ect."
State Sen. Paula Dockery, an early
supporter of Scott's "Let's get to work"
campaign, noted, "It would be more pru-
dent" for him to allow private compa-
nies to bid for the project and show how
they would pay operating costs and any
cost overruns before turning down the
deal. ...
Dockery is right. It was imprudent for
the governor to unilaterally turn down
an initial $300 million in federal stimu-
lus dollars already appropriated by the
Legislature in fact, he has no consti-
tutional authority to do so: Florida
Senate Budget Committee Chair J.D.
Alexander and Senate Transportation
Committee Chair Jack Latvala won-
dered as much, too.
This is a case of the governor putting
his ideology before common sense -
even if it means turning down 14,000
jobs and eventually as many as 25,000


ADVERTISING
VICKIE JONES
Ext. 518
vickie.jonesl@newssun.corn
CIRCULATION
TONY MCCOWAN
Ext. 522
anthony. mccowan@newssun.com
PRE-PRESS
KEN BAREFIELD
Production Coordinator
Ext. 594
prepress@newssun. com
BUSINESS OFFICE
JANET EMERSON
Ext. 596
legals@newssun.com


Fixing it is another.
Claimants should expect to
see results. ...
GCCF's opaqueness has
eroded public trust in the
process. Claimants can't be
sure they're getting a fair
shake or a raw deal. Feinberg
must clarify the rules,
explain decisions and make
for better appeals.

An editorial from the Panama
City News-Herald.


by the time the Miami leg would be
completed.
Scott says the project would put
Florida taxpayers at risk because of
potential cost overruns and that rider-
ship figures are too rosy. Those are good
reasons to question the project's viabili-
ty except U.S. Transportation
Secretary Ray LaHood and Chairman
Mica worked hard in bipartisan fashion
to ensure that Florida would not risk a
penny because private companies bid-
ding on the project would assume all
cost overruns and operating expenses ...
Sen. Bill Nelson and others in
Congress will try to save the train for
Florida even without the governor's
nod. How unfortunate that one man's
political tunnel vision has sought to
bury a project that just a few months ago
won bipartisan support arid would get
Floridians to work.


A, editorial from the Miami Herald.


TODAY'S EDITORIAL


Other viewpoints


n1


r,


Shortly after 2
p.m. on Presidents
Day, when govern-
ment offices were
closed. I dropped a
Netflix envelope in
the box outside our
local post office.
Fifteen hours later I Cai
was notified via e-
mail that a Netflix ThoI
branch, about 85 Pete,
miles away, had
received the DVD.
I mention this because it
underscores several truths
about the U.S. Postal
Service. The first, cited by
critics and budget-cutters, is
that the government provides
levels of mail service that
may be too expensive in
today's deficit-plagued envi-
ronment. The second, on
which I prefer to focus, is
that the nation's mail system
works remarkably well and
is something worth preserv-
ing at least for now.
The Postal Service lost
$8.5 billion in its last fiscal
year, a lot of money even in
today's upside down econo-
my. It operates over 35,000
post offices and support
facilities and employs over a
half-million Americans,
despite cutting a third of its
work force in the last
decade. Plus, almost taken
for granted in the financial
debate, last year it delivered
170 billion pieces of mail.
In the next few weeks the
government will begin clos-
ing nearly 2,500 post offices.
It will also give greater con-
sideration to the possibility
of halting Saturday deliver-
ies.
Every use of tax money is
under intense scrutiny these
days from health care, to
education, to repairing high-
ways and bridges.
Technically the Postal
Service doesn't use tax dol-
lars; however, it borrows
from the Treasury, so it is
very much a part of the
nation's financial headache.
One thing that separates
the Postal Service from most
other government services is
that it actually works proper-
ly. With basically the lowest
first-class postage rate of
any nation on the globe, the
U.S. Mail gets delivered on
time or, in many cases
faster than promised with
incredible consistency.
But there are other consid-
erations to be reviewed with
care before closing any more
post offices. The real value
of a U.S. Post Office branch


TODAY'S LETTERS


America, it's your
call
Editor:
Unions and collective bar-
gaining: In early 1900s the
system of unions worked to
raise the wage scale of
workers. Also they improved
safety in the work place. But
by the time of the 75th
Congress, the Pinkerton
Detective Agency had infil-
trated the unions to the point
that unions were considered
company unions, controlled
by the companies.
This was put before the
75th Congress and they
decided that the company
was indeed sitting on both
sides of the bargaining table.
They voted to correct this
problem. The problem was
never corrected and by the
1960s, the problem caused a
huge problem for America's
work force, raising prices


and a flat wage scale.
Also about this time local,
state and federal employees
decided to unionize. The
problem with these unions
was that the payer of their
wages and benefits was the
American taxpayer. There
was no incentive to control
cost and their wages and
benefits, $123,000 on the
average, soon surpassed the
average industrial worker by
many thousands of dollars
per year. A no-win situation
for cost containment for
local, state and the federal
government, causing a col-
lapse of the whole system of
government. Also, the local,
state and federal government
entities.
All states, nationwide,
have to look at state entities
and small communities or
villages that they have
allowed to duplicate county
government and bankrupting


these small villages or com-
munities. Only 12 percent of
our nation is unionized,
mostly the public sector.
The American tax system
is not a lush fund for career
politicians or career public
work force.
Billie E. Jewett
Sebring

What in the world is
going on?
Editor:
The revelation that our
president has sent to
Congress a budget for the
running of our country for
the next year is almost 54
trillion is mind boggling in
itself.
However, another item
revealed is almost as unbe-
lievable. General Motors
Corporation, the company
that our government spent
many billions of dollars to
keep from bankruptcy and is


now their biggest stockhold-
ers, is giving to all the thou-
sands of employers a bonus
of $4,000 each (that's of
hourly employees). The
salaried people will get from
40-50 percent of their yearly
salary as a bonus.
Get out your computers
and start figuring what the
cost of this is going to be.
Then figure where the
money is going to come
from.
Doesn't take a brain to get
the answer. You are going to
pay for the bonus with big-
ger taxes next year and by
paying more for the purchase
of their cars.
I have been pitching the
"Buy American" axiom for
years, but our country does-
n't seem to want help.
Maybe if our representa-
tives in the government get
enough response to this out-
rage they will wake up and


start representing the people
who sent them to
Washington in the first
place. Write or call your rep-
resentative and give him
your views. I intend to send
a copy of this note to my
representatives.
Highlands County is just a
small part of the United
States, but we are all
Americans and should have
a say in our government. Get
out your pens and let your
voice be heard before it is
too late.
Woodie Jackson
Sebring

Bouquet
Community support
is a blessing
Editor:
The Florida Hospital
Volunteers Lake Placid. held
its annual tent sale Feb. 9 and
10. Without the generous


contributions of the follow-
ing businesses, it would not
have been the huge success
that it was.
Thank you: Publix,
Sweetbay, CVS Pharmacy,
WalGreens, U-Lock-It
Storage, Blueberry Patch,
Kelley's Florist, SeWv Biz,
Outback Steakhouse, Red
Lobster, Peppercorns, IHOP,
Interlake Blvd. Cafe,
Cowboy's Bar B-Q Steak,
Hungry Howies, D&D Nails,
Domino's Pizza, Main Street
America, Pizza Hut, Golden
Corral, Heron's Garden
Restaurant. Chili's, Hong
Kong, Happiness Farms,
Badcock Home Furniture,
Roserios's Pizzeria, Burger
King and No Frills Grill.
The support of our com-
munity is greatly appreciated.
Florida Hospital
Heartland Medical Center
Volunteers, Lake Placid
Bobbie Kelly, President


is often measured in
inverse proportion
to the facility's bal-
ance sheet. Small
offices in the most
rural corners of
America are fre-
quently the only
did places where citi-
zens can be in con-
ghts tact with their gov-
Funt ernment.
Like the cop on
the corner, whose job I'd
also argue is worth preserv-
ing, the mail carrier is for
many Americans an anchor
in a stormy world.
Perhaps it's logic of con-
venience to relate every
domestic budget problem to
the expense of conducting
the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan, but here are the
facts: the entire annual
deficit for the Postal Service
is less than the cost of three
weeks of war.
Early in my career, before
there was such a thing as e-
mail, I did a story for the
New York News Sunday
magazine about the smallest
post offices in New England;
even back then several were
threatened with closure.
What I found, at every stop,
was that the smaller the
office the more important it
was to the residents' sense of
community.
One post office, no bigger
than a medium-size closet,
was run by a woman who
explained that on some days
she handled no mail whatso-
ever.
"Isn't that a valid reason
for closing you down?" I
asked. "People here count on
me," she replied, "whether
there's mail or not. Like the
flag hanging outside, I repre-
sent our country. People like
knowing that."
That particular post office
in northern Connecticut is
long gone. But the point is
still valid, maybe more than
ever.
President Obama has spo-
ken wisely about using a
scalpel for delicate cuts in
the nation's spending. Small
post offices and the services
they provide are part of the
fabric of America that
should be trimmed with only
the greatest care.

Peter Funt is a writer and public
speaker; he may be reached at
www.CandidCamera.com, he's
also the long-time host of
"Candid Camera." A collection
of his DVDs is available at
www. candidcamera. com.


It's in the mail


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the staff or editors of the News-Sun.














Continued from page 2A
Donors will also receive a
mini physical and a T-shirt
when they donate.
Blood donors are needed
everyday to help supply the
hospitals in Highlands and
Hardee County.
The blood center is at
6550 U.S. 27 North, across
the street from the Quality
Inn. There is no upper age
limit to donate blood. Call
382-4499 with questions.

Yard sale benefits
Relay for Life
AVON PARK A Yard
Sale-Block Party-Fundraiser
is set from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
today and Saturday at 12 W.
Lagrande St. off North Lake
Avenue
Proceeds to support
American Cancer Society's
Relay For Life Festival in
Avon Park, May 7-8.

Events planned at
posts, lodges
AVON PARK
The American Legion Post
69 will have music by Lora
Patton today (call for time).
Poppy dinner is from 5-6
p.m. Saturday with music by
Mike Claxton from 5:30-
8:30 p.m. For details, call
453-4553.
LAKE PLACID
The Lake Placid Moose
Lodge 2374 will have music
with Larry Musgrave from
6-10 p.m. today. Bingo-
bango is set for 2 p.m.
Saturday. Music with Jimmy
Black to follow from 6-10
p.m. For details, call 465-
0131.
The VFW 3880 will have
music with Jimmy Black
today. Bingo' is set for 2 p.m.
Saturday with horse races at
5:30 p.m. For details, call
699-5444.

Snitker speaks Tea
Party Freedom
Friday
SEBRING Dr. Michael
Santos will sign his book,
"2076-Reagan's Last Word,"
during the Tea Party
Freedom Friday event at
Caddy Shack Bar & Grill,
3122 Golfview Road, at 6
p.m. today.
An inspiring and powerful
orator who is a promising
political opponent,
Libertarian Alex Snitker, is
scheduled as the guest
speaker.
For more information, call
Ginger Carlisle at 471-0345.

Iowa luncheon set
for today
SEBRING The annual
,gathering of Iowa residents,
:present and past, will be
'held today at Homer's
:Restaurant. Registration and
fellowship at 11 a.m., fol-
lowed by lunch.
For more information, call
(863) 735-0038.

Don & Allen play at
Reflections
AVON PARK -
Reflections on Silver Lake
will host a dance featuring
Don & Allen from 7:30-
10:30 p.m. today. Cost is $5.
Bring your own drinks and
snacks; ice will be provided.
The public is welcome.
For more information call
452-5037.

Dance Club features
Skylarks
SEBRING The
Highlands Social Dance
Club hosts Big Band ball-
room dancing from 7-9:30
p.m. today at 3400 Sebring
Parkway.
Dance the night away to
waltzes, cha-chas, foxtrots,
rumbas, jitterbug and other


News-Sun Friday, February 25, 2011


COMMUNITY BRIEFS


SEBRING Tickets are
being sold for the
Democratic Women's Club
of Highlands County's annu-
al fashion show at 11:30
a.m. Saturday at the Twin
Oaks Tea Room, 246 N.
Commerce Ave. Fashions
will be provided by Steve
and Company. Classical
Guitar will be provided by
Kenny Summers.
There will be drawings
and door prizes. Desserts
will be provided by
Cupcakes Royale.
For tickets costing $20 per
person, call214-4680.
Seating is limited.

Woodcarvers Show is
Saturday
SEBRING Highlands
Woodcarvers Show at the
Sebring Civic Center (off
Sebring Circle near library)
will be from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Saturday. Donation for
admission.
For information,'call Bob
Seybolt at 471-6077.

Billy Glades plays for
Adelaide Shores
dance
AVON PARK Billy
Glades,
singer/songwriter/musician,
will be at Adelaide Shores


favorites to the 10-piece
Skylarks Band.
Admission is $5 for mem-
bers and $7 for non-mem-
bers. Appropriate dress
required.
The snack bar opens at 6
p.m.
For more information call
385-6671

Crawford County,
Pa., residents gather
SEBRING Crawford
County, Pa. residents
reunion, including Linesville
Day, formerly Talon, Viscose
and Channellock reunion
will be on Thursday, March
3 at Homer's Smorgasbord,
1000 Sebring Square, right
across U.S. 27 from
Sebring's Walmart.
Homers opens at 11 a.m.
The price of the "all-you-
can-eat" buffet is $8 total
(seniors). A basket will be
passed for the tip.
All Crawford County resi-
dents are welcome.
For questions, call Nancy
Wiltrout at (814) 282-4223.

Woman's Club
accepts flea market
donations
SEBRING The GFWC
Woman's Club of Sebring,
4260 Lakeview Drive, is
accepting donations from 9-
11 a.m. today through
Saturday. The flea market
will be held on March 4-5.
Call 382-0706 for details.

, Istokpoga Shores
plans community
yard sale
LORIDA Multiple fami-
lies have gathered some
goods for a community yard
sale in Istokpoga Shores. Go
east on U.S. 98 from U.S. 27
to Cowhouse Road, right on
Cowhouse, two miles to
right on Fish Tail Lane. The
sale will start at 8 a.m. today
and Saturday.

Recreation Club
plans yard sale
SEBRING Sebring
Recreation Club is having its
annual yard sale from 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m. today and fropm 8
a.m. to noon Saturday at 333
Pomegranate Ave.
Baked goods and lunch on
Friday.


RV Resort clubhouse from
7-10 p.m. Saturday, provid-
ing an evening of live music
for listening or dancing
pleasure.
He plays a variety of
music from rock 'n roll to
country and much more.
Tickets are on sale now in
the Adelaide Shores office
for $5. For information, call
453-2226.

Stepping Into Spring
Luncheon and
Fashion Show set
SEBRING Patriots
Chapter DAR (Daughters of
the American Revolution)
will present their annual
luncheon and fashion show,
Stepping Into Spring, at 11
a.m. Saturdayat First United
Methodist Church, 126 S.
Pine St.
Models are members of
the Patriots Chapter and
their families, with catering
by MaeLee's and fashions
by Sue's, Dress Bam and
Bon Worth.
Proceeds from this event
help fund youth programs of
the DAR. Tickets are $25
and are available from mem-
bers of Patriots Chapter or
by calling 386-4474, 382-
9061, or 465-5667.

Jimmy Travis Show
comes to Sebring
Village
SEBRING Sebring
Village presents The Jimmy
Travis Show at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday.
Jimmy Travis is a multi-
talented performer who con-
stantly proves that you can
be funny, informative and
entertaining without being
offensive.
He has more than 50
national television appear-
ances to his credit and has
taken his hilarious comedy
and upbeat music to the
main show rooms of Las
Vegas, Tahoe, Reno and
Branson.
He's funny, creative,
spontaneous, energetic and
since he frequently interacts
with the audience, no two
shows are ever the same.
Simply put, Jimmy Travis is
unique.
Tickets are $10 each. For
more information or to pur-
chase tickets, call 386-0045
or 273-0875.


dance
SEBRING Sebring
Village will host a dance
from 7:30-10:30 p.m.
Saturday at their clubhouse
(one mile behind Walmart).
Music will be by Jay Smith.
The cost is $3.50 for
members and $5 for non-
members.
Ice and coffee will be pro-
vided.
Call 386-0045 or 273-
0875 for more information.


Page 5A


OBITUARIES


DIANN E. DEVERO
Diann E. Devero. 61, of
Avon Park, Fla. passed
away Feb. 20, 2011, in Avon
Park, Fla. She retired from
United Telephone Company
of Florida and was a correc-
tional officer for the Avon
Park Correctional Institute.
She was a stewardess and
member of the Usher Board
of New Mt. Olive A.M.E.
Church.
She is survived by her
husband, Charles H.
Devero, Avon Park; son,
Otis Asbury Jr., Fort Myers,
Fla.; daughter, Debra
Knght, Cape Coral, Fla.;
mother, Ellen Rich, Avon
Park; brothers, John Rich
Jr., Avon Park, Bennie J.
Rich, Willingboro, N.J.,
Henry Lee Rich, East
Winsor, N.J.; sisters, Ruth
Lee Cosby, Mary Kirkland,
Hatie Gilbert, all of Avon
Park; grandchildren,
Roshoada L. Knight, Tonda
L, Knight, Darrell R.
Knight, Jaquasia L. Asbury.
Visitation will be fromll
a.m. to 1 p.m. and funeral
service will be at 1 p.m.
Sat., Feb. 26, 2011 at New
Mt. Olive A.M.E. Church,
818 S. Delaney Ave. Avon
Park, Fla. Rev. Larry Keys
will officiate. Interment at
Lakeview Memorial
Gardens.
Arrangements have been
entrusted to:
Marion's Community
Funeral Chapel
Avon Park, Fla. 33825
863-4525272

LYNFORD A. FYNE
Lynford A. Fyne, age 77,
passed away on Feb. 18,
2011 in Sebring, Fla. Mr.
Fyne came from Jamaica
and has been a resident of
Sebring since 1955. He was
employed as a citrus worker.
He is survived by his
wife, Elizabeth Fyne; sons,
Alexis Fyne Sr., David
Hampton Sr., Avery
Hampton Sr.; 12 grandchil-
dren; and seven great-
grandchildren.
Visitation will be held at
the Bountiful Blessings


Wanted man
jumps from bridge

Associated Press
ST. PETERSBURG -
A man wanted for viola-
tion of probation jumped
into Tampa Bay after
vehicle he was riding in
was involved in a minor
accident on the Howard
Franklin bridge.
Authorities say 27-
year-old Matthew
Clifford Rushing was in
the water for about 20
minutes Thursday morn-
ing. Responders from
several law enforcement
agencies rescued the
man, who was treated at a
hospital for cuts and
hypothermia.


Church of God at 6 p.m.
Friday. Feb. 25, 2011.
Funeral Service will be held
at the church on Saturday.
Feb. 26, 2011, with
Pastor/Bishop Timothy
McGahee officiating.
Interment will follow at
Pinecrest Cemetery,
Sebring, Fla. Arrangements
entrusted to:
Swann's Mortuary Inc.
Sebring, Florida 33870
863-382-0737

ERNEST E. HANSEL
Mr. Ernest E. Hansel, 95,
of Sebring, died Monday
afternoon, Feb. 21, 2011 at
his residence. A-native of
Medford, Wis., he had lived
here since 1972 coming
from Two Rivers, Wis.
He had attended both Our
Lady of Grace and St.
Catherine's Catholic
Church. He was a lifetime
member of the Knights of
Columbus. He was a mem-
ber of the River Greens
Country Club. He was an
avid golfer and loved gar-
dening.
He was preceded in death
by his wives, Ada, Beatrice
and Frances. He is survived
by his children and grand-
children. Arrangements by:
Fountain Funeral Home
Avon Park, FL 33825
863-453-3134

ELLIE 0. ROSS
Ellie O. Ross, 76, of Lake
Placid went to be with her
Lord on Tuesday afternoon,
Feb. 22, 2011 at the
HealthSouth Ridge Lake
Hospital in Sarasota. She
was born on Dec. 3, 1934 in
Spartanburg, S.C. to parents
Joseph and Pearl (Cathcart)
O'Shields. She was a gradu-
ate of Converse College in
Spartanburg with a teaching
degree, moving to Lake
Placid 55 years ago from
Spartanburg. Mrs. Ross was
an elementary teacher with
the Highlands County
School System for 30 years.
Mrs. Ross loved spending
time with her family espe-
cially her grandchildren,


enjoyed making quilts, an
avid reader and a member of
the First Baptist Church of
Lake Placid.
Mrs. Ross is preceded in
death by her late husband of
52 years, Malcolm W. Ross
III, and is survived by her
loving children, Linda C.
Ross, Nancy Rarden and
Malcolm W. "Bill" Ross IV;
grandchildren Dylan and
Cathy; a sister, Florence
Moody; and brother. Ed
O'Shields.
A service to celebrate
Mrs. Ross's life will be held
at 3 p.m. Friday, Feb. 25,
2011 at First Baptist Church
of Lake Placid, 119 E.
Royal Palm St., with Dr.
Rick Nations celebrating.
The family suggest dona-
tions be made in Mrs.
Ross's memory to the First
Baptist Church of Lake
Placid Youth Ministries
Program. Words of comfort
to the family can be made
by visiting www.scottfuner-
alservices.com.
Arrangements entrusted
to the;
Scott Funeral Home
Lake Placid, 465-4134

EDDIE SISK
Eddie Sisk, 51, of Avon
Park, died Wednesday
morning, Feb. 23, 2011 at
Florida Hospital Medical
Center.
A native of Scotsboro,
Ala., he had lived in this
area since he was a teenag-
er. He had worked as a
grove foreman. He was a
member of the Whispering
Pines Baptist Church.
He is survived by his
wife, Carla Ann Sisk, Avon
Park; two daughters, Flecia
Sisk, Avon Park and Tonya
Dagda, Sebring; brother,
Clyde Sisk, Ga.; two sisters,
Ruby Frasier, Ala. and
Fannie Mae Kirkland, Ga.;
four grandchildren, Halea,
Dalton, Ciarah and Trever.
Arrangements by:
Fountain Funeral Home
Avon Park, Florida
33825
863-453-3134


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Descuentos telefonicos disponibles
para clients de CenturyLink

Con los prograrnas Link-Up America y Lifeline Assistance, los clients
de telefono de bajos ingresos que reOnan los requisites pueden aiorrar
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restriccion de Ilamadas interurbanas para los clientes que lo soliciten o
que requieran el servicio.

Lifeline Assistance es otro prograrna patrocinado por el gob:erno federal
para los clients de bajos ingresos. Proporciona un descuento en el
cargo mensual para el servicio telefo6nico residential basic. Se nan
reducido los orecios del program Lifeline Assistance y se modificaron
sus pautas para permitir su uso por parte de mas clients de bajos
ingre'os.

Para reunir los requisites para ambos programs, los clients pueden
inscribirse en el prograrna CenturyLink Lifeline, para lo cual deberAn
proporcionar verificaci6n de que cumnpln con !os requositos do
elegibilidad de bajos ingresos del estado. Ademas, esta disponible
Tribal Telephone Assistance paia aquellas personas que vive' en lieiras
tribales de nos indios ameficanos reconocidas oor e! goberno fid'eraa

Si vive en un area de servicio de CenturyLink y tiene preguntas o desea
solicitar los programs Lifeline/Link-Up, Ilame al 800.366.8201 o visit
centu rylink.com/lifeline.



CenturyLink"
lifeline NON-SAU Mejor Coneciados


'\ I-I


www.newssun.com


Democratic Women Jay Smith plays at
host fashion show Sebring Village


Phone Discounts Available to CenturyLink customers


The Florida Public Service Commission designated CenturyLink
as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier or ETC within its service
area for universal service purposes. The goal of universal service is
to provide all Florida citizens access to essefitial telecommunica-
tions services.


CenturyLink provides single party residential and business services
for rates from $16.40 to $17.00 per month for residential custom-
ers and $24.00 to $31.00 per month for business customers. This
includes access to long distance carriers, Emergency Services,
Operator Services, Directory Assistance and Toll Blocking. Use of
these services may result in added charges. Specific rates for your
areas will be provided upon request.


CenturyLink offers qualified customers Lifeline and Link-Up
Service if they meet certain low-income eligibility requirements.
Lifeline Service includes a monthly discount up to $8.25 for basic
phone charges (including a waiver of the Federal Subscriber
Line Charge), as well as toll blocking at no charge and a waiver
of the deposit if toll blocking is selected by qualifying customers.
Link-Up Service provides a discount on installation charges and
charges to move service.

If you live in a CenturyLink service area, please call CenturyLink at
1-800-201-4099 or visit www.centurylink.com/lifeline with questions
or to request an application for the Lifeline/Link-Up programs.






CenturyLinkT

lifeline NON-SAU www.centurylink.com








News-Sun Friday. February 25. 2011


www.newssun.com


Lake Country Elementary awarded hefty grand prize


Won Sweetbay

Supports

Local Schools

Program

contest
By SAMANTHA GHOLAR
sgholar@'newssun.comn
LAKE PLACID Lake
Country Elementary received
a check for $10,000
Wednesday afternoon as the
winner of the 2010 Sweetbay
Supports Local Schools
Program.
The Dairy Council of
Florida, along with Sweetbay
Supermarkets, initiated the
program to encourage
healthy food choices and
consumption for surrounding
communities and families.
The idea behind the program
is to give students a larger
intake of healthier foods and
to work to improve school


Courtesy photo
Lake Country Elementary reeieved $10,000 for the
Sweetbay Supports Local Schools Program on Wednesday.
(from left to right) Majel Bowerman, Principal; Ron Myers,
Lake Placid Sweetbay Manager; Judy Dyer, Assistant
Principal; Jennifer Sills, Director of School Marketing for
the Dairy Council of Florida and Maria Chillura, Corporate
Sweetbay Marketing Manager


initiatives.
The families were provid-
ed the chance to purchase the


healthy foods and a portion
of the costs were given back
to the school. The families


Scott wants to cut government


Continued from page 1A
inmates to save housing and
feeding costs.
"I'm focused on building
private sector jobs," said
Scott, who promised during
his campaign that he'd create
700,000 new jobs in Florida
over the next seven years.
"That's going to be the key."
During his inaugural
speech after being re-elected
in 2002, Bush said he'd like
to empty the buildings sur-
rounding the Capitol that
housed thousands of state
employees. And now Scott
comes to town the third
straight Republican governor
- with a similar philosophy
to Bush that the private sec-
tor fuels America's economy.
"Government has to get
back to its core functions, but


only its core functions," an
unapologetic Scott said. And
he's borrowing from some of
the strategies he used in
building HCA/Columbia, the
company he founded, into
one of the largest hospital
chains in the world. "All of
the citizens in our state have
had to tighten their belts."
Scott was elected in part
on a campaign message of
"Let's Get to Work," and his
first mission is to do some-
thing about Florida's bleak
unemployment situation
where one of every eight
workers are jobless. He has
proposed cutting the current
budget from $70.4 billion to
$65.9 billion for the next fis-
cal year, which starts July 1.
In his Feb. 7 budget mes-
sage, Scott outlined major
cuts in services to balance the


budget. Privatization and
consolidation are being
closely examined as means of
meeting that requirement and
at the same time putting the
brakes on government
growth.
Scott proposed cutting
pension benefits for state
workers, teachers and some
local government employees
and requiring' them con-
tribute 5 percent of their
salaries to their retirement
plan. He wants to cut educa-
tion spending by $3.3 billion
or $700 per student and save
$1 billion by reducing
Medicaid reimbursements to
hospitals and nursing homes,
but not to doctors.
He has proposed cutting
the state's work force by
8,645 positions, or nearly 7
percent.


that took part in the program
earned money for Lake
Country by doing one or
more of the aspects of the ini-
tiative.
Families could buy spe-
cially marked products that
stated "'Support Local
Schools Featured Product."
earn "school dollars" when
checking out at the register
with the purchase of three or
more specially marked prod-
ucts. and submit the school
dollars to the school of their
choice in the store's collec-
tion box. ,
In attendance at
Wednesday's assembly were
Jennifer Sills, director of
school marketing for the
Dairy Council of Florida;
Ron Myers, Lake Placid
Sweetbay manager: Maria
Chillura, corporate Sweetbay
Marketing Manager. The
assembly was also supposed
include Tampa Bay
Buccaneers linebacker
Barrett Ruud.


Fin i3GI$ what
you are looking for!

Sf NEWS-SUN
Classified Ads 385-6155


However. due to a schedul-
ing conflict Ruud was not
able to attend.
"The students are still
excited and proud of their
accomplishments, we all are.
Of course they are a little
bummed about not meeting
(Ruud) but we hope to have
another opportunity for him
or someone else to come
visit." said assistant principal
Judy Dyer.
Students from Lake
Country aren't entirely
bummed about not getting
their professional athlete at
the assembly because they


will be getting something a
little more special very soon.
Thirty students along with
their families were invited
for a full day of bowling.
pizza and fun to the "Bowl
with a Pro" event.
The students and their
families will be bused to
Tampa on Saturday to spend,
the day bowling with celebri-
ty athletes.
"The agency promised that
they would send more foot-
ball players to make up for
the assembly, so the students
are really excited about that,"
Dyer said.


Audit details county spending


Continued from page 1 A
Additional revenues listed outiide of tradi-
tional income funds leN-ened the total loss by
$400,000.
Expenditures clocked in-at $9.-4 million in
2010, up from the $96.3 million in 20119
The county also mcrspent revenues in
2009, racking up a by $4.1 million deficit
that year, the report also .tied ::
An analysis over a 10-.ear period shows
that county revenues started at $60 1 million
in 2001, peaked at $107.7 million in 2007,
during the height of the housing boom, and
have shown a dowv naid ire~nd o.erjll since
then.
In the same time frame. c6nty expenses
** 'h .1.i, r


rose steadily from the $61.4 million expended
in 2001 to peak at $101.6 million in 2008.
Despite the overspending, the county was
able to decrease its debt. Fowler told commis-
sioners that in 2009 the long-term debt stood
at $24.1 million, and that it was $21.6 million
in 2010, a decrease of $2.5 million.
Total liabilities for the county decreased
from $46.6 million in 2009 to $43.6 million.
The commission made no motion to accept
the report and chose to review the final docu-
ment when it was available from NCT in
March.
After the final report is given to the county
board, they have 30 days to respond to any
issues or management questions they may
have.


SThe Heartland Harmonizers Choruse

"J7. Presents 1

Barbershop Show Time 1












SSaturday March 12, 2011
South Florida Community College Theatre

4 2 Great Shows 1:59 pm & 6:59 pm g
J2 All tickets $15.

SFeaturing

S"On Demand"
Sounds of Sebring Heartland Harmonizers *
J7 Sebring High School Chorus 2

STickets Available from any member
SJacaranda Hotel AP
Kenilworth Lodge Sebring

J ARBRSHOP Home & Office Essentials LP/ea -
S t B i 863.471.0706 f--/lI
S3 *v HAR MONY^


a ,io:- ~" .,
Being this coupon o.r a qannd;gq,
Or 1 Adult $2 off Am.d.mos.si:
Sunday-O .l '= ..-


Page 6A









www. newssun.corn


News-Sun Friday, February 25. 2011


Five-Day forecast for Highlands County
TODAY SATURDAY SUNDAY


MONDAY


TUESDAY


Low clouds and fog, then Low clouds and fog, then Fog in the morning; mostly Mostly sunny and breezy Chance for a couple of
some sun some sun sunny showers
790 / 590 820/580 830/610 830/620 760/530
Winds: SSW at 8-16 mph Winds: SSW at 4-8 mph Winds: SSE at 8-16 mph Winds: S at 10-20 mph Winds: N at 10-20 mph


--Pesacola


Almanac -%-'..
Temperature -
Readings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake Placid
High Sunday ...... .......................... 80
Low Sunday ................... ............ 470
High Monday ........ ............................. 84 Region
Low M onday ...................................... 50 '1
High Tuesday ....... ........................ 85 Low clouds an
Low Tuesday .......................................... 50- cloudy this evw
High Wednesday ............................... .... 84 Low clouds an
Low Wednesday ................. S.........unday: patch
Heat Index
For 3 n m. today
Relative humidity ........................... ... 51%
Expected air temperature ................... 79 ,
Makes it feel like ................................ 76 ,
Barometer
M onday ....................... ............... 30.07
Tuesday ................. 30.11
Wednesday ....................... .....30.13
Precipitation
M onday .................. ........................ 0.00",
Tuesday ........... .......................... 0.00"
Wednesday ....... ......................... 0 I
Month to date .. .............. 0.22"
Year to date ............................. .. 2.87"
Tides ..
Readings at St. Petersburg
High ................ ......................... 6:50 p.m .
Low ...................................... 2:39 a.m .
H ig h ..................................................... no ne
Low ............................ .......... none
. Readings at Palm Beach
High ............................ ... .......... 2:17 a.m .
Low ............................................... 8 :12 a .m .
High .......................................... 2:28 p.m. F a rm R
Low ................... ...................... 8:44 p.m Low clouds an
Lake Levels ,10 today. Winds s
2-4 hours of si
Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterday humidity 65%
Lake Jackson ................................. 78.36'
Lake Okeechobee ......................... ...... 12.26'
Normal ............................ ............ 14.51' W e a th e
S On Feb. 25, 19
UV Index Today Carolinas brou
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index' number, and Alabama v
the greater the need for eye and skin protection. of snow from I
Pa.


0 ~ ~ il~


-" llaassee
.75/50


17Z/54--


al Summary
d fog breaking for some sun today. Partly
ening followed by low clouds and fog late.
id fog breaking for some sun tomorrow.
y morning fog; otherwise, mostly sunny.




* Vn Par ,
09/58 "
Sebring
7, /59
*Lo
791/57-
Lake Placid .
79/55 *
Brighton

62 55 .
, ,


82/55


report
d fog breaking for some sun
southwest 8-16 mph. Expect
sunshine with average relative
and fair drying conditions.

er History
34, a storm centered in the
ght killer tornadoes to Georgia
while dumping up to 9 inches
Richmond, Va., to Philadelphia,


Sun and M.oon
Today
Sunrise 6 54 am r
Sunset 6:25 p.m.
Moonrise 1 30 .3 m


Saturday
653 m
6:26,p.m.
2 26 j m


10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. Moonset 12:ia p.m. :0o p.m.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High;
8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme Last New First Full
Forecasts and graphics provided by '
AccuWeather, Inc. @2011
AccuWeather.com Feb24 Mar4 Mar12 Mar 19


r


Clearwater
78/61.


JacksOnville ;-_ \ ---- ',
79/57L" '' .----,. '
SLs Angeles 4 //
60/48, f : l-.. a A', / //
S----- ,lanta //
N '-El -Pa i 68/39 "
,.-.S %69/41

$ Gainesville '. 1. ,. ....
78/58 I'l Hou-ston /
W Davna Beach c, War Stationary \.-' 75/52
OCl 7959 W .,. --'. am81/65
Oca l a f iomrni, : ,," i rowers Snow Flurries ,c "'-- '
80/58:K iI______

' OrlaDdo | 11 a io
80/6 National Summary. .. -
:. system will disrupt travel across the Eastern Seaboard today. Showers and thunderstorms across the
'. :uir vill depart all but coastal areas from the Carolinas to New Jersey by midday, while rain will drench the
Tamna "1 .'..' or from Philadelphia to Boston most of the day. Farther inland, several inches of snow will pile up from
7a .,, -, Pennsylvania to Maine. Cooler air will invade the southern Plains behind the storm, while the arctic chill
7W 62 W t'e- H eLn ii, ':-,tinue for the northern Plains.
Winter Haven "


78/61
St. Peersburg /ll
79/61 ,
': .'Sarasota Okeechobie
,74/57 81/56


,~ .. Fert Myrs' -'. West Palm Beach
2 21/59 82/61 *
*' ':
.'. '


SShown' ii, FoLaudedilale
Shown iT :.N,:, 79/61 .
weather. Te pi:iiijn .: aNlosS 7
nra i-n-..', t- .i' .-I Awe r Ia~


yaie iuuay t', i jIru
tonight : ....


Water Restrictions
* Even addresses may '. eifr aon Thur di, 1ndi
Sunday.
* Odd addresses may v..ip, ori W1,1, :id,
and Saturday.
* All watering should tad p[i.i,: b-oi'- ii
a.m. and after 4 p.m.


Florida Cities


Today
City Hi/Lo/W
Cape Coral 8'158.p c
Clearwater 78/61/pc
Coral Springs 80i62r:
Daytona Beach 79/59/pc
Fl Laud 61 r, '9.-6...
Fort Myers 82/59/pc
Gainesville ;8 5"8,
Hollywood 80/61/s
i,',esie d AFB 81i'62.-s
Jacksonville 79/57/c
'., f I WE l 7,,0.'i


80/ ....


*


Sat. Sun.
Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W
8 :.59 p:. 8 ,.62':
80/60/pc 82/64/s
82/66/pc 81 7 s
77/58/pc 81/62/s
8i'68'p 807. 0
83/60/pc 84/63/s
78/52/pc 81/57/s
83/65/pc 82/67/s
78/66/pc 79/69/s
74/55/s 79/55/s
: .,7l.. 7' 71.


Ke West


City

Okeechobee
Orlando
Pembroke Pines
St. Augustine
St. Petersburg
Sarasota
Tallahassee
W. Palm Bch


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers,
flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


Today
Hi/Lo/W
81/65/s
81/56/pc
80/60/pc
80/61/s
76/60/c
79/61/pc
.-4 .. p
75/50/sh
-I -r2 p:
82/61/pc
tC. pi.rn:


Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
81/67/pc
81/60/pc
82/58/pc
83/65/pc
72/56/pc
80/61/pc
77/59/pc
75/54/s
80/65/pc
82/60/pc


Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
82/70/s
81/63/s
82/60/s
82/67/s
77/60/s
82/64/s
80/63/s
79/53/s
80i64 .
80/70/s
82/61/s


t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow


U.S. Cities


City
Albuquerque
Atlanta
Baltimore
Birmingham
Boston
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cleveland
Columbus
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
HarrisqJurg
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Lexington
Little Rock
World

City
Acapulco
Athens
Beirut
Berlin
Bermuda
Calgary
Dublin
Edmonton
Freeport
Geneva
Havana
H,,n,}) ,,i,,n
.tru 'j'm u 1
Johannesburg
Kiev


Today Sat.
Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W
56/32/pc 60/33/pc
68/39/sh 66/51/s
59/34/r 46/29/pc
62/38/pc 70/55/s
48/19/r 29/18/pc
69/35/r 60/42/s
24/10/sn 36/23/pc
28/16/c 30/24/sn
34/15/sn 28/25/sn
38/22/sf 39/33/pc
60/47/pc '; 60'p,:
34/21/c 44/23/pc
28..13:. 26/20/sn
48/22/r 39/29/pc
,fi-i-A 'i 80/66/pc
75/52/pc 74/60/sh
36.25." : 42. 34'p!:
62/39/pc 72/59/s
.,2lu'.- 38/28/pc
48/28/c 52/42/pc
52/35/pc (.5 p.':
Cities
Today Sat.
Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W
90/70/s 90/70/s
55/46/r 52/44/r
68/53/sh 61/54/r
35/24/s 41/33/sf
64. (I;pc: 70/63/sh
8/1/s 33/15/c
.52/39/ 48/36/sh
9/-3/s 29/8/pc
79/64/s 9.
52/40/c 45/40/r
86/62/s 8.?3 .:i ,
73/67/s 74/68/pc
,.4',. 55/43/s
70/53/t 68/52/t
27/13/c 19-i pto.


Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
45/24/c
70/54/pc
52/40/c
74/56/c
31/27/sn
69/52/pc
39/21/c
39/32/c
39/36/c
52/47/c
74/46/r
44/23/c
36/33/c
47/35/c
8 '68 :
76/47/c
54/45/r
74/61/sh
46/29/r
60/52/r
72/54/r


Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
88/71/s
51/45/r
62/54/r
40/27/sh
72/65/s
27/-8/sn
45/34/pc
11/-15/pc
80/65/s
45/35/r
76/70/pc
56/44/s
73/56/sh
- l.3 ,..


City
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
Oklahoma City
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Raleigh
Rochester
St. Louis
San Francisco
Seattle
Wash., DC


Today
Hi/Lo/W
60/48/r
44/30/c
48/36/pc
24/13/c
14/-5/sn
50/31/pc
74/54/pc
50/28/r
70/38/r
46/36/pc
56/27/r
68/49/pc
38/19/r
34/12/sn
33/18/pc
69/34/r
38/28/c
46,36 sh
32/20/pc
i.'31'r


Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
52/40/A
53/43/pc
61/57/s
27/20/sn
15/3/sn
61/50/s
71/62/s
38/29/pc
47/41/pc
68/51/pc
39/29/pc
66/43/r
39/28/pc
24/8/pc
36'32'
58/42/s
24/20/sn
46/36/pc
50/37/pc
36/33/s
45/36/pc


; ':. .'s.' :.". ''.
Today Sat.
City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W
London 54'43'r 48/36/sh
Montreal 29/6/sn 22/4/pc
Moscow 16/9/c 16/7/c
Nice 58/45/s 56/47/pc
Ottawa 30/5/sn 24/14/c
Quebec 27/1/sn 16/-1/pc
Rio de Janeiro 84/76/pc 86/75/pc
Seoul 47/24/pc 50/41/c
Singapore 86/77/t 87/75/sh
Sydney 84/66/c 87/67/pc
LiruaSi., 34/14/sf "31/24/sn
Vancouver 30/21/pc 37/35/pc
Vienna 36/26/s 43/36/s
Warsaw 26/16/pc 27/21/c
Wiipqrg 2,-15p, 11/5/pc


Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
56/42/pc
63/55/r
71/57/r
37/28/c
28/18/pc
67/56/r
75/64/sh
44/37/c
62/49/c
69/36/c
46/35/c
54/40/pc
44/38/c
29/19/sn
49/38/r
68/54/pc
34/29/pc
61/43/r
55/40/pc
45/35/r
58/44/c


Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
46/34/pc
27/18/s
20/14/c
56/46/r
31/12/s
21/6/s
48/32/r
88/75/c
88/66/c
45/33/r
47/39/pc
32/21/s
20, 3T'


County trims recreation


funding level by $60,000


Continued from page 1A
number originally, and that's
when the haggling started.
Avon Park Assistant City
Manager Maria Sutherland
explained that her city had
held off on replacing staff
because of the delay of fund-
ing, but could not defend her
position of being frugal
financially to Commissioner
Elwell's satisfaction.
"You say you are being
frugal, but your budget
increased from roughly
$300,000 last year to over
$500,000 this year. How is
that frugal?" Elwell asked.
Lake Placid's Councilman
Ray Royce argued that his
town serviced more
Highlands County citizens,
based on the county's estab-
lished impact fee distribution
districts, and that the funds
should be divided based on
those serviced.
Sebring's City


'I would rather

have a kid out

there stealing

second base than

out there stealing

your car

CLAY GOOCH
Avon Park citizen

Administrator Scott
Noethlich just asked for the
amount budgeted, and stated
that his city would not spend
more than that.
Several folks from around
the county objected to the
cuts, especially those from
the Avon Park community.
"Recreation funding is
important to our community.
I would rather have a kid out
there stealing second base
than out there stealing your
car," said Avon Park citizen


Clay Gooch.
Although Barbara Stewart
stated she thought the county
should stick to the approved
budget, she voted for the
$60,000 cut.
"At the last minute, the
commission decided 'Well,
we'll take a look at changing
it' after the cities already
had their budgets made up,
and to me that is not fair for
this year," Stewart said.
Richie stuck to his guns
about fiscal cuts for every-
one, and voted no on the
motion of $500,000..
"I can't agree to that, what
I suggest is something that is
more fair to all municipali-
ties," Richie said.
The results of the funds
cut will be the municipalities
charging users, according to
Elwell.
"We know that user fees
are likely going to be a big
topic of discussion next year,


News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE
Several citizens from Avon Park turned out to show support for their city's recreational
funding, but county commissioners still trimmed the amount budgeted by $60,000.


but I am trying to find a bal-
ance here," he said.
The commissioners also
voted to remove the restric-
tions in their agreements


with the municipalities that
prohibited the charging of
fees in order to get county
funds, which clears the way
for a "pay to play" system.


Staff was also directed to
work with the municipalities
to come up with a new recre-
ation funding formula for the
next fiscal year.


West Sebring VFD gets

top-of-the-line fire engine


Continued from page 1A
stands for Compressed Air
Foam Suppression.
Lloyd Turner, a captain
with West Sebring, explained
that the foam can be used on
any type structure and is
excellent for fighting car
fires.
He said it was better than
water because it adheres to
surfaces and lowers their
temperatures.
It is also easier on the fire-
fighters he said, being much
lighter than water.


The committee gave
thought to the lack of water
lines and hydrants in much of
their area. The foam system
helps dealing with that, too.
The truck carries 1,000
gallons of water.
"One thousand gallons is
usually gone in seven or
eight minutes," Turner said.
"But with foam there is a
ration of 3:1 over water;
instead of only about 10 min-
utes of water, the foam lasts a
half hour. It can make the dif-
ference in saving a struc-
ture."


News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
Emergency Operations Center staff members turn out to
take a look at the West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department's
new truck. The station saved for two years in order to pay
for the fire engine without borrowing money.


National Forecast for February 25
Show,'n are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.


Page 7A


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News-Sun Friday. February 25, 2011


www.newssun.corn


Page 8A


News-Sun photo by
CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
VFW Post 4300
Commander John Vawter
congratulates Troy
Granata as he is named
paramedic of the year
2010 by the VFW.

VFW taps

Granata

as top

EMT for

2010
Continued from page 2A
finally go back to school
for another year of train-
ing.
According to Steven
Coltharp, EMS director,
the county has 54 emer-
gency medical techni-
cians and paramedics,
including supervisors.
When the VFW asked
him for a candidate,
Coltharp said he turned to
his three supervisors and
asked for nominations.
"All three chose Troy,"'
said Coltharp, "so it was-
n't a long list."
Granata is both a
hands-on first responder
and a training officer.
Born in up-state New
York, he has worked for
the people of Highlands
County since 1996.
One emergency call
sticks out in Granata's
memory the mass
casualty tour bus rollover
in 2010 that injured
dozens and killed five.
Granata was the on
scene commander. He
described a scene of ini-
tial chaos, that was
brought under control.
"There were so many
critical patients, every
available emergency
vehicle in the county was
involved," he said.
Granata described how
ordinary people helped.
"Bystanders stopped by, I
was handing out bandag-
es," he said, "glad for any
extra help."
Granata is married to
Stephanie and they have
four children Joshua,
Tyler, Taylor, and T.J..
Two are out of school;
Tyler attends Hill-Gustat
Middle School and T.J. is
at Heartland Christian.


Continued from page 2A
everything that Tyler would
have loved," Lona recalled.
reminding me that her son
loved to play music for kids
in Afghan villages.
Few American moms face
a second son deploying to
war after losing their first
born in combat. Lona said
Daniel and his wife. 2nd Lt.
Tara Parten, will eventually
head to Afghanistan after
they complete training. Like
Tyler, both are West Point
graduates full of bravery,
patriotism and purpose. But
that doesn't make it any eas-
ier for a mother to bear.
"It is so hard to even think
about him going into com-
bat," Lona replied after I


Continued from page 2A
Crawford, 27, of Fort Meade,
was charged with violation of
probation reference petit
theft.
Jason Edward Daniels, 22,
of Avon park, was charged
with three counts of violation
of probation reference pos-
session of cannabis, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia
and knowingly driving with
license suspended or
revoked.
John Leon Forgette, 28, of
Avon Park, was charged with
possession and or use of drug
equipment, and possession of
marijuana.
Leidier Franceda, 30, of
Miami, was charged with
harassing communication and
extortion or threats.
Nora Kristene Gammill, 41,
of Sebring, was charged with
battery.
Juan Carlos Garcia-Abrego,
23, of Avon Park, was
charged with operating a
motor vehicle without a valid
license.
Barbara Ann Haynes, 58, of
Lake Placid, was charged with


asked about Daniel. "How
will I sleep? How will I deal
with the phone ringing or
knocks at the door?"
The light at-the end of the
Kilimanjaro darkness has
helped Lona cope with her
constant fears and deep emo-
tional scars. She may have
lost her eldest son on a
mountain in southwest Asia,
but she rediscovered his
spirit at Africa's peak.
"When the sun came out.
it all seemed better." Lona
remembered. "It's not, but
you have to come to peace
with it."
"Something snapped: I
can't continue to be sad all
the time," she continued.
"I'm not going to lose Tyler
or forget Tyler just because

POLICE BLOTTER


contempt of court reference
non-support.
Angel Diaz Hernandez, 36,
of Wauchula, was charged
with failure to appear refer-
ence knowingly driving while
license suspended.
Roy Allen Hill, 28, of Lake
Placid, was charged with
resisting an officer.
Christopher Perry Hillier,
37, of Lake Placid, was
charged with contempt of
court reference non-support.
Brock Michael Jarvis, 21, of
Sebring, was charged with
grand theft.
Lazurus Kinsey, 29, of
Sebring, was charged with
two counts of contempt of
court reference child support.
Brittany Elizabeth Likens,
18, of Avon Park, was
charged with resisting an offi-
cer without violence.
Kevin Allen Lynn, 44, of
Poinciana, was charged with
driving while license sus-
pended.
Daniel Parnell McGee, 55,
of Sebring, registered as a sex
offender.
Ivonne Duarte Montes, 49,
of Laurinburg, N.C., was


iTiIIT5


I'm happy.'"
Perhaps the poignant clos-
ing sentence of 1st Lt.
Parten's journal can comfort
the loved ones of more than
4.600 American troops killed
in action since Sept. 1',
2001.
"If there is anything I've
learned, though, it's that the
future is in God's hands."
For the families of
America's fallen heroes,
there is still room at the top
of the mountain where one
mom found hope.
To find out more about Tom
Sileo, or to read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate website at www.cre-
ators.com.


charged with DUI.
Rachel Alene Robinson, 46,
of Plant City, was charged
with violation of probation
reference improper exhibit of
a firearm or dangerous
weapon.
Melissa April Savage, 32, of
Sebring, was charged with
two counts of failure to
appear reference possession
of cannabis and use or pos-
session of drug parapherna-
lia.
Andres Cervantes Serna,
24, of Sebring, was charged
with violation of a municipal
ordinance.
Nanette Michelle Simpkins,
42, of Sebring, was charged
with DUI.
Brandi Artika Thomas, 23,
of Avon Park, was charged
with burglary of an unoccu-
pied dwelling.
Johanz Enrique Tovar, 32,
of Sebring, was charged with
driving while license sus-
pended.
Jose Luis Valdovinos, 19,
of Lake Placid, was charged
with contributing to the delin-
quency of a minor.


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Prices effective Thursday, February 24
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v..,t pubh, ,om/store to find the store nearest you.
L, .j.:r aTen.s are only available at Publix Liquors.
Quantity Rights Reserved.


Mother tries to cope with

son's loss on a mountaintop


i









www. newssun.com


N


News-Sun Friday. February 25, 2011


'N


U


Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2
ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if it's the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under
the "Bargain Buys" discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is
allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating "Each," the
ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the "Open Rate" pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed under our
"Bargain Buys" specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating "Free to Good Home," are allowed to be placed under
the "Bargain Buy" category.


Index

1000 Announcements

2000 Employment

3000 Financial

4000 Real Estate

5000 Mobile Homes

6000 Rentals

7000 Merchandise

8000 Recreation

9000 Transportation


DEADLINES

Publication Place by:
Wednesday ............... 4 p.m. Monday.
Friday .................. 4 p.m. Wednesday
Sunday ................... 4 p.m. Friday
All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier.

Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor,
reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified
advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept
only standard abbreviations and required proper
punctuation.


ADJUSTMENTS

* Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since
the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the
first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified
department immediately at 385-6155.
* The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or
for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that
portion of space occupied by such error.

Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number
will be given to you. This number is very important and must be
used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled
expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL
number can be provided.


AD RATES


GARAGE

SALE

6 lines 2 days

$1150

3 days

$14

(additional lines $1 each) 4


tMISCELLANEOUSj
merchandise over $100
5 lines 6 pubs .j

$1750o
(additional lines $3 each)


REAL ESTATE

EMPLOYMENT

TRANSPORTATION

5 lines 6 pubs 4
* l$3150

6 lines 14 pubs

$71



VISA
40 s..im-1


1000
Announcements


1050 Legals
IV IHM UIhUUII UUUHsi
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000618
CITIMORTGAGE, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
EUGENIA WRITERS A/K/A EUGINIA WRITERS; AND
BROINISLAVA OTZELNAIS A/K/A BRONIASLAVA
OTZELNAIS.
Defendant(s).
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der rescheduling foreclosure sale dated February
3, 2011 entered in Civil Case No.
2010-CA-000618 of the Circuit Court of the 10th
Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Flor-
ida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff and
EUGENIA, WRITERS A/K/A EUGINIA WRITERS; AND
BROINISLAVA OTZELNAIS A/K/A BRONIASLAVA
OTZELNAIS are defendantss, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash,. AT THE JURY AS-
SEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGH-
LANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430
SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA
AT 11:00 A.M., March 10, 2011, the following
described property as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment,'to-wit:
LOT 7, OF EDGEWATER POINT SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 13, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE
LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE,
DATED at SEBRING, Florida, this 3rd day of Febru-
ary, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Highlands County, Florida
By: /s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP
4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd.
Suite 100
Tampa, FL 33614
(813)880-8888
February 18, 25, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 11-04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RYAN M: DRURY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Sum-
mary Administration has been entered in the es-
tate of RYAN M. DRURY, deceased, File Number
PC 11-04, by the Circuit Court for Highlands
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 430 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL
33870; that the decedent's date of death was
October 27, 2010; that the total value of the es-
tate is $38,793.78 and that the names and ad-
dress of those to whom it has been assigned by
such order are:
Michael and Janice Drury
3427 Monza Drive
Sebring, FL 33872
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate other than those for whom provision for
full payment was made in the Order of Summary
Administration must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED
,WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING
,ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
February 25, 2011
Person Giving Notice:
Michael Drury
GOSSETT LAW OFFICES, P.A
Gary R.Gossett, Jr.
Florida Bar No 0801194
Christopher L Cober
Florida Bar No. 74718
2221 US 27 South
Sebring, FL 33870
Telephone (863)47i 1-t19
,Attorneys for Personal Representative
February 25, March 4, 2011


1050 Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000019
RESIDENTIAL CREDIT SOLUTIONS, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
SEBASTIAN CORTES; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR
SECURITY ATLANTIC MORTGAGE CO., INC.; PRAI-
RIE OAKS COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC.;
COUNTRY CLUB DOWNS OWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC.
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure sale
dated February 8, 2011 entered in Civil Case No.
2010-CA-000019 of the Circuit Court of the 10th
Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Flor-
ida, wherein RESIDENTIAL CREDIT SOLUTIONS,
INC., Plaintiff and are SEBASTIAN CORTES are
defendantss, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash, AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM
IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COM-
MERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA AT 11:00
A.M., March 10, 2011, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment,
to-wit:
UNIT D, BUILDING 2, COUNTRY CLUB DOWNS,
AS PER THE DECLARATION OF COVENANTS AND
RESTRICTIONS RECORDED IN O.R. BOOK 1838,
PAGE 136, AS AMENDED, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
A PORTION OF PARCEL E AS DESCRIBED AND
RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1795,
PAGE 266, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGH-
LANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COM-
MENCE AT THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER OF
SAID PARCEL; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES
04'43" WEST ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF HAW BRANCH ROAD, A DISTANCE OF
266.24 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES
55'17" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 25.21 FEET FOR
THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57'40" EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 82.40 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00
DEGREES 02'40" WEST, A DISTANCE OF 14.00
FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57'40"
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 2.00 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 02'20" WEST, A DISTANCE
OF .14.70 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES
57'40" WEST, A DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 02'20" WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 5.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 57'40" WEST, A DISTANCE OF 10.40
FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 02'20"
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 5.00 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 57'40" WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 19.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES
02'20" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 7.30 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57'40" WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 20.90 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00
DEGREES 02'20" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 21.40
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE
LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at 430 S. Commerce Ave-
nue, Sebring, Florida 33870, telephone
(863)534-4690, within two (2) working days of
receipt of this Notice; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Highlands County, Florida
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk of Court
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP
4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd.
Suite 100
Tampa, FL 33614
(813)880-8888
February 25; March 4,2011



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S1050 Lgals
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
FOR A SPECIAL EXCEPTION REQUEST
HEARING NO. 1689
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a PUBLIC
HEARING will be held before the HIGHLANDS
COUNTY Board of Adjustment on the 8th day of
March, 2011, beginning at 3:00 p.m., or as soon
thereafter as possible, in the County Commis-
sioners' Board Room, Highlands County Govern-
ment Center Building, 600 South Commerce
Ave., Sebring, Florida, to consider a special ex-
ception to allow for church and church uses,
within the area described as follows: approxi-
mately 1/2 acre located on the east side of Cor-
vette Avenue, just north of Grand Prix Drive, and
legally described as follows: Lots 10 and 11,
Block 1, Sebring Country Estates, according to the
plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 49,
of the Public Records of. Highlands County, Flor-
ida,
Any person or persons interested or affected by
this change are invited to attend this hearing, You
may submit comments in writing to the attention
of Linda Conrad, Zoning Supervisor, P.O. Box
1926, Sebring, Florida 33871-1926, or you may
call (863)402-6638, for further information.
Please reference the above hearing number when
calling or writing.
ANY PERSON WHO MIGHT WISH TO APPEAL ANY
DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD OF ADJUST-
MENT IN PUBLIC HEARING OR MEETING IS
HEREBY ADVISED THAT THEY WILL NEED A RE-
CORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH
PURPOSE, THEY MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A
VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS
MADE WHICH WILL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY
. AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS
TO BE BASED.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as
provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act
or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact
Mr. John A. Minor, ADA Coordinator at:
863-402-6510 (Voice), 863-402-6508 (TTY), or
via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: jmi-
nor@hcbcc.org. Request for CART or interpreter
services should be made at least 24 hours in ad-
vance to permit coordination of the service.
ONE OR MORE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MAY
BE PRESENT AT THE MEETING.
Jim Brooks, Chairman
February 20, 25, 2011
NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION
BY THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA
WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
Notice is given that the District's Final Agency Ac-
tion is approval of the water use permit on 80
acres to serve a citrus grove known as AL-80. The
project is located in Highlands County, Section(s)
30. Township 33 South, Range 29 East. The per-
mit applicant is Macbeth Associates, Ltd. whose
address is 2543 US 27 S., Sebring, FL. The per-
mit No. is 20 005630.006.
The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to
above is available for inspection Monday through
Friday except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m., at the Southwest Florida Water Management
District (District) Bartow Service Office, 170 Cen-
tury Blvd., Bartow, FL 33830.
NOTICE OF RIGHTS
Any person whose substantial interests are af-
fected by the District's action regarding this' per-
mit may request an administrative hearing in ac-
cordance with Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
Florida Statutes (F.S,), and Chapter 28-106,. Flor-
ida Administrative Code (F.A.C,), of the Uniform
Rules of Procedure. A request for hearing must (1)
explain how the substantial interests of each per-
son requesting the hearing will be affected by the
District's action, or final action; (2) state all mate-
rial facts disputed by each person requesting the
hearing or state that there are no disputed facts;
and (3) otherwise comply with Chapter 28-106,
F.A.C. A request for hearing must be filed with
and received by the Agency Clerk of the District at
the District's Brooksville address, 2379 Broad
Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21
days of publication of this notice (or within 14
days for an Environmental Resource Permit with
Proprietary Authorization for the use of Sovereign
Submerged Lands). Failure to file a request for
hearing within this time period shall constitute a
waiver of any right such person may have to re-
quest a hearing under Sections 120.569 and
120.57, F.S.
Because the administrative hearing process is de-
signed to formulate final agency action, the filing
of a petition means that the District's final action
may be different from the position taken by it in
this notice of final agency action. Persons whose
substantial interests will be affected by any such
final decision of the District on the application
have the right to petition to become a party to the
proceeding, in accordance with the requirements
set forth above
Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., to
settle an administrative dispute regarding the Dis-
trict's final action in this matter is not available
prior to the filing of a request for hearing.
February 25, 2011


1050 Legals
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Pursuant to Section 715.109, notice is hereby
given that the following property will be offered for
public sale and will sell at public outcry to the
highest and best bidder for cash:
A 1965 HILL DUMP TRAILER House Trailer,
VIN Number HK111, and the contents therein, if
any, abandoned by previous owner, SHELA LOU-
ISE THORTON
Villa del Sol Mobile Home Park, 911 S. Anglim
Avenue, Lot 13, Avon Park, Florida 33825 on
March 11,2011 at 9:00 a.m:
THE EDWARDS LAW FIRM PL
1901 Morrill Street
Sarasota, Florida 34236
Tel. (941)363-0110
By: /s/ Sheryl A. EdwardsFlorida Bar No.
0057495
February 23; March 4, 2011

1055 Highlands
1055J County Legals
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
LEGAL NOTICES
The following legal notices are from the
Highlands
County Board of County Commissioners and are
be-
ing published in the font, size, and leading as per
their specifications.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC10-21
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SHIRLEY K. HAYWOOD
Deceased
NOTICE OF DISPOSITION OF UNCLAIMED FUNDS
TO: SUSAN LLAMA
Unknown Address
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that there is now deposit with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Highlands County, Florida
$1,560.32. To claim these funds, it would be necessary
for you to present your claim to The Probate Office, Room
102, before September 23, 2011. Unclaimed funds shall
be deposited with the State Treasurer of the State of Flor-
ida as provided by Section 733.816 of the Florida Stautes.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have set my hand and official
seal Sebring, Florida, on February 17, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Highlands County, Florida
BY: /s/ KathyWhitlock
DEPUTY CLERK
February 25; March 25, 2011


1 100 Announcements



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make sure it is correct.
Sometimes instructions
over the phone are
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News-Sun

Classified


1050 s
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No.: 10-1123-GCS
HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MOHAMMED AKTHER,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the
"Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure" en-
tered in the above-styled action, the property de-
scribed below Will be sold by the Clerk of this
Court at public sale, 11:00 a.m. on March 14,
2011, to the highest bidder, for cash at 430
South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida
33870-3867:
Commencing at the Southeast corner of Block
4, of SUNSET BEACH SUBDIVISION, as recorded in
Plat Book 1, Page 20, Public Records of High-
lands County, Florida, thence South 88 degrees
12' West a distance of 250 feet to a point: thence
North 02 degrees 36' East a distance of 123.28
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 82
degrees 18'39" West a distance of 196.24 feet
to a point; thence North 03 degrees 19' East a
distance of 165.89 feet to a point on the South-
erly right-of-way line U.S. Highway No. 27 (also
known as State Road No. 25); thence in a South-
easterly direction following the Southerly
right-of-way line of U.S. Highway No. 27 along a
curve to the right having a radius of 3,087.12 feet
an arc distance of 200 feet to a point; thence
South 02 degrees 36' West a distance of 123.28
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Bob Germaine
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Highlands County, Florida
/s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
February 25; March 4, 2011


2000
Employment


21 00 Help Wanted

CAREGIVERS

NOW


HIRING
For caring, compassionate
caregivers. You must be 21 yrs old
with a HS Diploma/GED, pass a
criminal & driving record check.
Call HR between 9am and 4 pm
M-F. 863-385-8558 or visit:
ck381 .erso.biz/emplovment

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
(FPC) of Lake Placid, Florida has two
part-time staff position openings ---
Director of High School Youth Ministry
--- Director of Middle School Youth
Ministry. FPC is a Bible teaching,
Christ-centered, growing congregation.
Interested applicants should call
863-465-2742 www.foclp.com



Classified

ads

get fast results


Highlands County Board

of County Commissioners


The following position closes on 02/22/2011

Emergency Medical Technician 825

PG 38 $9.52/hour $16.15/hour.


The following position closes on 02/25/2011

Carpenter 972 PG 13

$12.06/hour $19.49/hour.


For minimum qualifications and a full job. description
visit us on our website at www.hcbcc.net.
You must complete our electronic job application or sub-
mit a completed paper application in order to be consid-
ered for employment with Highlands County BCC.







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Page 10A

2 1 00 Help Wanted
FURNITURE SALES Position Available.
Must be self motivated & enjoy being
around people. 5 days per week; hourly
+ commission. Must apply in person,
Badcock & More, 607 US 27, N., Avon
Park, FL 33825.
MEDICAL OFFICE seeks experienced
Insurance Biller. PT/FT.
Fax resume to 863-465-6385.
PERSONAL CARE ASSISTANTS Full
time positions available for In-Home
services to frail, elderly persons.
Competitive rate of pay and vehicle
allotment, reliable transportation is
required. Apply at NU-HOPE Elder care
Services, 6414 U.S. 27 South, Sebring.
EOE DFWP
SEEKING WELL EXPERIENCED
MEDICAL OFFICE HELP. Excellent
billing/collection, communication,
typing, computer skills & medical
terminology are A MUST. Fax resume
to: 863-471-3206 or email to:
medicalofficebillino@vahoo.com
STANLEY STEEMER Carpet Cleaners
Now Accepting Applications for
CARPET CLEANING TECHS
Call 863-655-2158.
TRUCK DRIVER Over-the-Road. Must
be able to stay out 3+ weeks at a time.
Verifiable experience necessary. Clean
driving record a must! Mechanical
knowledge a plus. For information
contact Linda @ 863-452-5959.

3000
Financial


4000
Real Estate

4040 Homes For Sale
SPRING LAKE 3BR, 2BA, bonus
room, new roof, ceramic tile floors,
screened porch, double car garage,
1/4 acre lot landscaped for nature
w/ drought tolerant plants &
man-made goldfish pond, 5' chain
link fence around back yard.
863-446-6924

408 0 Homes for Sale
408 Sebring
SEBRING BY OWNER, Pristine 2BR,
2BA, 1CG. Clean, safe, quite, well
maint. area. Many retirees. Perfect
cond. w/almost new roof & plush lawn.
Interior in exc. cond. Golf course
across street. For appt. 937-367-5518.
SEBRING Edgewater Village Lakeview
Dr. 2BR, 2BA, 1CG Villa. Beautifully
furnished. New kitchen, laundry, TV.
Low Maintenance fee includes Cable
TV, Clubhouse, heated pool. Private
street. Avail Immed. 863-402-9138
1 7O Lakefront Prop.
4170 For Sale
WOW!
LAKE PLACID Lake Front Condo fully
furnished, 2BR, 1BA, covered parking.
Bring your toothbrush. Only $54,500.
Deb Worley Realtor. 863-465-0123

4220 Lots for sale
LAKE PLACID Florida Vacant
Residential Land, 603 Archje Summers
Rd, MUST SELL! Lot is'.26 acre
(11,454 sq ft) with 83' Frontage & 138'
Depth. Paved road access, with
access to electricity at property line.
Well water & septic tank are used in the
neighborhood. It has sandy ground and
a few trees. Perfect location for a home
near Lake June-in-Winter Florida State
Park where there is access to sailing,
hiking, fishing & bird watching. If
interested contact Margaret Hughes @
888-878-8918, leave message.
300 Out-of-Town
Property
NC MOUNTAINS ASHVILLE AREA
Spotless, Fully Furnished, 3BR, 2BA
Doublewide MH on beautiful tree lined
1/2 acre. Cable, FP, W/D, Dishes,
Linens, Gas Grill.....just bring your
toothbrush! Cool nights, 2300'
elevation. $950/mo. 863-381-0611

4320 Real Estate Wanted
ATTENTION: CASH 'or your Home,
Duplex, Apartment, Commercial
Property. Rapid Closing,
As Is" Condition. 863-441-2689.
STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL



5000
Mobile Homes

5050 Mobile Homes
O50V For Sale
SEBRING MH in 55+ community.
Comletely turn 1BR, Large BA, kitchen
& D.R, L.R. & Dressing Rm. Lakefront,
Boat Ramp w/gazebo. Pets Welcome.
2900 St Rd 17, N., Lot 20.
863-402-0037, no calls before 1 prm.
SEBRING Mobile Home in Family
Park. Needs TLC, but OK for
occupancy. Great Starter Home!
PRICED TO SELL! $1,800.
863-253-1014
SINGLE WIDE fully furnished, 2/BR,
1/BA, carport, closed patio, ceramic tile


kitchen bath patio Fla. room. Very
clean! Washer / dryer, lawn irrigation.
Owned land. $31,000. For info call
765-516-0204 or 765-482-3710

6000
Rentals

S1 Villas & Condos
S6100For Rent
SEBRING 2BR, 2BA, tile floors
throughout, screened porch, conven-
ient location to US 27 and Hospital,
(Not 55+) gated Community, Clubhouse
& pool, vaulted ceilings. Lawn Maint. in-
cluded. $800 monthly. 863-840-1083
SEBRING Newer Community, gated
(not 55+), 2BA, 2BA, screened porch,
tiled floors throughout, convenient loca-
tion to US 27 & Hospital. Clubhouse &
pool, lawn maintenance included.
$750 Monthlly 954-812-2069


News-Sun Friday. February 25. 2011


Ltii\LKfrL Ln1 D


Lawn Maintenance
& More since 1991 -




Truck / Trailer / Labor FOR HIRE
Marc (863) 655-9579


HANDYMAN BOB
Install doors, windows,
flooring, plumbing & more!
Licensed & Insured
Lic# HM0096
Call 863-452-5201
or
863-449-1744

POOL2 PARADISE
Pool Service $ Mobile Retail
Service Repair Supplies Equipment
Delivered Right to your Door
Brad $ Julie Kur-tz
(663) 362-7726
Fax ('53) 402-2200



P JACKSON HEWITT
INE P mEND^ENTLY TOAX SEDICE
INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED


Avon Park (863) 453-2525
Lake Placid (863) 699-2525
Lake Wales (863) 679-9200


Sebring (863) 382-1515
Wauchula (863) 767-1515
Sebring Fax (863) 382-9939


Wal-Mart Locations:
Lake Wales (863) 676-0569
Sebring (863) 385-5371
Avon Park (863) 452-7010


S&D TREE SERVICE

S"MoreAA

For Your

Si Buck"'

Tree Trimming Stump Grinding
Tree Removal Lot Clearing

Will beat any quote

Free Stump Grinding
with any Tree Removal
Licensed & Insured / ISA Certified
863-441-5154


Advertise

Your Business

Here!

News Sun
Call 385-615


Repairs 4,.
Upgrades
Training
Installations
Wi-fi Setup
Call Rauiil at:
863-633-9232


Serving All OT I-orioaa ree Esimaies
"Enjoy the Satisfaction of Safety"
with the
ROBBINS "FLAME SYSTEM"
LIGHTr JING PROTECTION
THE WORLD'S FINEST
Aluminum Lightning protection
Underwriter's Laboratories Inspected and Approved


.L* G I R. TO

61 W Cp rPk

"LIVE BLOOD ANALYSIS"
WANDA KLINE
WEIGHT LOSS
& WELLNESS
See what one drop of your blood indicates as
to YOUR nutritional health and well-being.
By appointment only
863-414-4066


* Fully Insured Free Estimates
* Tree Removal Tree Topping
* Tree Trimming Stump Grinding
Serving All Central Florida Area

Joe Johnson's

ALL AMERICAN
TREE SERVICE, INC.
TRIMMING REMOVAL
SOD INSTALLATION STUMP GRINDING
LOT CLEARING PRESSURE CLEANING
Will Beat Any Written Estimate!
Peoples Choice OA 7A Free Estimates
Award O863-4657491 Licensed & Insured

Roger's Handyman Services

l': S-.t 'J, r/ / rlm_.ip,_d I i
No Ib is too, s ll. s \\.e g -
i:.r ,ik >. re -.l ill your F i
I n:imf .-i:;ir ;in i
rijirireiff il.-r i .-.-ci i f*r'T'
* a1 UL. !.1,*n lurr ibr,,
863-381-6677 .: .


Nest Egg Bookeeping, Inc.
863-385-0888
NESTEGGBOOK@YAHOO.COM
Specializing in individuals
Why pay accounting fees for bookkeeping?
Monthly Bill Pay Bank Reconciliations
Correspondence
Insurance/Medicare Assistance
Call to see how we can help you...


WILLIAMS JANITORIAL

CARPET CLEANING

'10' Per Room
3 Room Min imun
Upholstery Cleaning
AUl Types of Flooring
Free Estimates
Li.: B.-.nd.r In.
(863) 214-1940


NO JOB TOO SMALL
WE DO IT ALL
HOME REPAIRS MAINTENANCE YARD
We Will Beat Anyone's Price
Call For Free Estimate


S. A. LONG CLEANING perho
20 Years experience
S Excellent References
~.A Daily Weekly Biweekly- Monthly
A/ jJ Janitorial Service Recently
j7/ ', Relocated to Lake Placid Sebring
S'!-4joking To Build New Clientele
863-243-1801 / Shelly A long



Indoor Flea MarketY,

5aad 4 Dollar Store
jed'4 Avon 863-449-1298




CAMPBELL'S COLLISION
S CENTER, INC.
S1' JIM ( \IPBEL Owner




Phone (863) 382-7551 1405 US 27 North
FAX (863) 382-2750 Sebring, FL 33870




Service Available 7 Days A Week
Website: extraordinaireairconditioning. corn
All Service Calls $40
FEBRUARY ONLY!
New & Repeat Customers
$10
of Every $40 Service Call
Will be Donated in Your Name
(or A Name You Choose)
to the American Cancer Society
Relay for Life
Mike & Kandy Sheldone
SW CEO/Owner
Lic# CAC 1816569
863-451-2399


K(i Kimberly Brancdau
dCare & Conc/erge

Are You or a Loved One
Living Alone?
Safety/Wellness Visitations
Life Management Assistance
Nursing Home Visitation & Reporting
Errand/Concierge Services

Personal Concierge Services
item pick-up/delivery grocery shopping
courier/delivery petsitting
* pet transport to vet or groomer home security checks
meal pick-up/delivery plus much, much more!!!
(863)082-82
www bcaeanconcerg co


www.newssun.com


DID YOU KNOW?


THE NEWS SUN
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY
IS ONE OF THE MOST ECONOMICAL &
EFFECTIVE MEANS OF ADVERTISING TODAY?


CALL JOYCE @ 863-385-6155
OR EMAIL:
joyce.fettinger@newssun.com
FOR DETAILS!!










Swww.newssun.com

6 O0 Furnished
5 |Apartments
LAKE PLACID Fully Furnished,
' Remodeled Studio Apt. Utilities paid
:, except cable & telephone. Starting at
' $425-$475. No Pets/No Smoke. $400
' security deposit. 863-243-4580
SEBRING Downtown on the Circle.
I.' Weekly. or Monthy, starting at $150
, wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets.
306 circle. 863-386-9100 or
{954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask
Sfor John. 863-414-7535
S62 0A Unfurnished
62O 0 Apartments


CASTLE HILL
Apartments
of Avon Park
Accepting Applications for 1 & 2
Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals
62 years or older, handicap/disabled,
regardless of age. For rental informa-
tion & applications please call:
863-452-6565
TDD: 711
THIS INSTITUTION IS AN
Equal Opportunity Provider
and Employer

Los Apt. de
Castle Hill
de Avon Park
Estan aceptando aplicaciones para
Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras.
Disponible a personas de 62
ancs o mas, incapacidad fisica/mental,
no import la edad.
Para mas information favor de Ilamar
863-452-6565. TDD: 711
Esta Institucion Es De
Igualdad De Oportunidad Al
Proveedor, Y Empleador


RELAX AT Lake Isis Villas
Luxurious 2BR Apartment.
Clean & Quiet Setting.
Call 863-453-2669
AVON PARK "** Highlands Apartments
1680 North Delaware
1 BR, 1 BA & 2BR, 2BA Available.
Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation.
1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195
AVON PARK Apartment with balcony
overlooking Lake Verona and City Park.
100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities.
SPECIAL: $325/mo.
863-453-8598
AVON PARK Clean, Quiet; Studios /
1BR. 1BA/2BR, 2BA Apts., from
$375/mo. New tile & appliances,
screened patios & W/D hook ups.
Students/Seniors Discount
Call 863-452-0469.
AVON PARK LEMONTREE APTS:
1 BR, 1 BA $495/mo +$200 security;
Washer/Dryer, Microwave,
WSG included. Pets Wlcome.
Call Alan, 386-503-8953

KEY LAKE VILLAS
LAKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING
2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean &
quiet, Screen porch, Outside patio,
Central air, Washer/Dryer hookup,
$585/mo., first & security. No Pets.
863-465-2740


News-Sun Friday. February 25. 2011
1


6250 Furnished Houses
LAKE PLACID Newer 3BR, 2BA,
seasonal or monthly. Excellent furniture
& appliances, near lake & boat ramp,
No smoking or dogs. $1300/mo. After
season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119
LAKE PLACID Seasonal Furnished
House 2BR / 1BA, no smoking, no
oets. Call for info if no answer
leave message. 863-465-9735

6300 unfurnished Houses
HOUSES / MOBILE HOMES
Call for Availability
NO Security NO Last NO Dogs
863-381-4410 or 863-381-5174
LAKE PLACID 125 Pine Tree Dr, 3BR,
2BA on 2 acres. $850/mo. + $1150
security deposit. Pets OK.
423-802-6036.
LAKE PLACID 2BR, 1 BA, new
floors/paint, fenced yard. close to boat
ramp, nice landscape, quiet area, no
smoke/dogs, $550/mo. 863-699-1119
LAKE PLACID Sun 'n Lake, 2BR, 1BA,
1CG, large scrn'd porch on back. New
paint & carpet. $575/mo, + lst/last/sec.
Or For Sale By Owner, Owner Financ-
ing. 863-464-8555 or 863-465-6091
SEBRING 2BR with fenced yard &
concrete shed/laundry. Will consider
pets. $550/Imo + $400 security deposit.
Extra pet deposit. 863-243-4580
SEBRING Harder Hall area, 2BR, 2BA,
1CG, screened porch. $750/mo.
plus & security deposit. View by
appointment. Call '863-381-6747,
leave message.
SEBRING- 2BR, 2BA, New kitchen &
bath. 1026 Lake Sebring Dr.. Large
yard, boat docking. Furniture available.
$675 / $725. 863-386-9100 or
954-295-7194
SEBRING 3 or 4 BR, 1BA block home
near YMCA, fresh paint, new flooring in
kit/bath, large yard, 4 A/C units, eat-in
kit, pets considered. $750/mo + $750
security. Call 863-875-5897.
SEBRING RENT TO OWN! Open House
Sunday, 1 4 pm, 207 Dozier St,
Harder Hall. Golf Course front & back.
New 3BR, 2BA, 2CG. Beautiful kitchen,
nice tile work. $900/mo. ($199,900)
561-254-0124 or 561-622-4242
SEBRING 3BR,2BA1CG,CBS Home
303 Virginia PI. $119,00 or 2BR, 2BA,
MH 5151 Barnum St. $42,500 10%
Down Owner Financing Call
863-835-1445

6400 Rooms for Rent
SEBRING 1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn,
W/D, Satellite, full use of home.
$400/mo. or $100/wk + dep.
863-304-2849
550 Warehouses
655 for Rent
SEBRING 20'X40' Warehouse,
12' overhead door, on busy Highway
27 across from Lakeshore Mall.
863-385-3474

6750 Commercial Rental
SEBRING (2) Available. 3926
Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo:
A/C, office, BA, Ig overhead door, near
Sebring High School. 640 Park St,
6400 sq ft, $2500/mo: A/C, office, BA,
8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric,
fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway.
941-416-2813
WANT NEW
FURNITURE?
Need to sell the old
furniture first?
Call News-Sun
classified,
385-6155.
Then shop
till you drop!


7000
Merchandise


7200 Household Goods
SHOES FOR SALE! All are almost
brand new! Approximately 20 pair incl
riding boots, dress shoes, athletic
shoes, etc. Sizes 6 1/2 7. Will sell 1
pair or all. Make offer' 863-385-4610

7300 Miscellaneous
AQUARIUM, HUGE, 5' long x 26" high,
18" wide. Approx 120 gals, including
pump, filter & wooden stand. Will
deliver within Highlands County. S220.
863-382-4222
DRILL PRESS 34" bench radial Crafts-
man incl. HD bench on wheels $150
obo / LAWN MOWER Craftsman 195cc
22" self propelled mulcher 6.75hp excl.
$200 obo 863-414-5038
FILING CABINETS: 2-Drawer, $10,
3-Drawer, $15; LAMP: Stained Glass,
Very Pretty!, $50; CURIO CABINETS:
$100 for 1, $75 for the other; CUCKOO
CLOCK: $100. 863-471-3504.
HURRICANE SHUTTERS Aluminum 15'
wide. Total of 65 in varying lengths from
33" to 87", $10 each or take all for
$350. 863-385-0759.
SHOPSMITH MARK 5, with
woodworking tools $500 Cash!
8636550342

73 10 Bargain Buys
BED EXTENDER for Chevy Colorado
truck. $75 863-243-1633
BOAT ANCHOR (2) 251bs, $65, cash
only please. 863-699-1119
DELL XP COMPUTER. Like New
Condition. $80. Call 863-873-8201 or
863-414-0448.
DINETTE TABLE 40" round, 1 leaf
formica wood grain, 2 roller chairs.
*$99 obo 863-465-7242
LEATHER CHAIR beige color $30
863-471-2502
LOCKING GAS CAP Chevy Colorado
truck. $10 8632431633
OFFICE CHAIR Leather, rolls, tilts, 6
ways adjustment, regular $225, excel.
condition $50 obo 863-465-7242
ORGAN, GEM MK10. Moving....Must
Sell! Excellent Condition. Quick Sale,
$100. 863-471-3636
RECLINER / ROCKER, mauve in colors
good condition. $95. 863-604-5695
ROCKER / RECLINER lazy-Z-Boy blue.
$20 863-655-0342
TYPEWRITER SHARP electric $30
863-471-2502
WEED EATER ECHO 48" curved shaft
starts & runs great! $100 obo
863-414-5038
WHEEL & TIRE (1) Large, LT 265/70
R17. $65, cash only please.
863-699-1119

7320 Garage&
7320 Yard Sales

13TH ANNUAL
Spring Garage
Sale
TANGLEWOOD
RV RESORT
Saturday February 26th, 2010
Doors open 8 a.m. 11 a.m.
100 + tables of garage, house-
hold, & R.V. needs. Plus furniture,
books, many duplicate items
when downsizing from 2 homes
to 1, Crafts, sporting goods,
clothing, golf, fishing, and tools.
Sale held indoors, & in front
of the Main Hall.
Coffee & Donuts available.
Tanglewood Resort, 1/2 mile N.
of Wal-Mart on US 27.

AVON PARK 2447 N. Orangewood St,
Hwy 27 N., W. @ Citgo (Orangewood
Acres), Fri-Sat, Feb. 25th & 26th,
7:30am-3pm. Queen sz Bedspreads/
Quilts/Sheets, Glasses, RV Acces.,
Ladies sz 10-12 clothes, Misc.
AVON PARK YARD SALE/ BLOCK
PARTY/ FUND RAISER, 12 W.
LaGrande St., off N. Lake Ave, Fri-Sat,
Feb 25-26. Assorted household items,
pictures, mirrors, Christmas, crafts,
knick-knacks, & MORE! Hot Dogs &
drinks available. Proceeds support
American Cancer Society's Avon Park
Relay for Life.
AVON PARK GARAGE / BAKE SALE!
Avon Mobile Home Park (Clubhouse)
1350 N. Lake Ave. Sat Feb. 26th, 7AM -
12 PM. Something For Everyone!
AVON PARK LAKES MULTI-FAMILY
SALE! 2202 N. Torrington Rd, Sat, Feb
26th, 7am-1pm. Lots of Home Decor,
Clothing, Baby & Kids Items
& LOTS OF MISC.
FROSTPROOF Huge Yard Sale 481
Palmetta Ave. Fri & Sat Feb 25 & 26
8am to 5pm. Collectibles, antiques,
blacksmith anvil, dinner bell.
Too Much To List!
LAKE PLACID "MOVING SALE" 609
Catfish Creek Rd, ( bldg. behind house)
Sat. Feb 26th, 8 am ? Absolute Low
Prices! Everything Must Go!!
LORIDA Community Yard Sale.
Istokpoga Shores, Multi Family
Sale! Go east on 98 from US27 to
Cowhouse Rd., right on Cowhouse,
2 miles to right on Fish Tail Ln.
Fri-Sat. Feb. 25&26, 8AM ?


SEBRING 107 Tortoise Rd, off Hwy 98
to CR 17, follow signs. Sat, Feb 26th,
8am-? Dishes, Sm Appliances, Jewelry,
Books, Dog Carrier, Kids/Adult Cloth-
ing, Printer, Christmas, Lots of Misc.


732 Garage &
732 Yard Sales
AVON PARK 1720 N. Homeric Rd, off
Stryker, Fri-Sat, Feb 25-26. Harley,
Bicycle, LOTS & LOTS OF MISC!
SEBRING 1615 Hawthorne Dr. Fri &
Sat 2/25 & 2/26, 7AM -? Collectibles,
fum., glassware, tools. Much More!
SEBRING 2230 Woods and Water Ct..
Tanglewood, Sat, Feb 26th, 7am -
2pm. Large & Small Hand & Power
Tools, Household Items, & Misc.
SEBRING 228 Kite Ave. (Sebring Hills)
Fri & Sat Feb. 25 & 26, 8am 4pm. Of-
fice chair, Dyson vac w/ access., card
table & 4 chairs, Queen spread curtains
ect. complete, clothes. Much More!
SEBRING 5318 Oak Rd. (Lakewood to
Gardemia to Oak) Sat. Feb 26, 7am -
2pm Like new items, genuine Crystal
vases, dishes, books, videos, water
skis, child's jeep, pic frames, Easter
items. Free coffee.
SEBRING Multi Family Sale 137
Quiver Leaf St. & Twitty Rd. Sat Feb
26th, 8am 2pm. Something For
Everyone Too Much To List!
SEBRING CHURCH YARD SALE
Saturday, February 26th
7:00 am 12:30 pm
Ernmanuel United Church of Christ
1.8 miles west of US 27
On Hammock Road
A Bargain Bonanza!
Donuts, Coffee, Sodas, Hot Dogs.
Information call 863-471-1999


7340 Wanted to Buy
CAR WANTED: I need a very good
used car with rather low mileage.
Do you have one for sale?
Call 863-465-0978

7400 Lawn & Garden
LESCO COMMERCIAL MOWER
Kawasaki Motor / Runs Good! $1,000
or best offer. Please call Robbie for
information 863-452-5141

7460 Crafts & Bazaars
CRAFT SALE Highlands County
Convention Center @ Fireman's
Field, Sat. Mar 5th, 10am-5pm &
Sun Mar 5th, 10am-4pm. Hand-
made creations, Unique items &
gifts, Liquor lamps, Eyeball jewelry.
visit www.bucklercraftfair.com for
coupons / info 386-860-0092


7520 Pets & Supplies
NOTICE
Florida statute 585.195 states that
all dogs and cats sold in Florida
must be at least eight weeks old,
have an official health certificate
and proper shots and be free of in-
testinal and external parasites.

7560 Medical Supplies
S 0 & Equipment
MOTORIZED SCOOTER,
Excellent Condition. $475.00.
863-465-1678

8000
Recreation


8050 Boats & Motors
20' PONTOON BOAT 2004 WEERES.
New carpet, seats & bimini top.
Includes fish finder and large live well.
50hp Mercury w/power tilt. Boat &
motor less than 50 hrs operation.
Galvanized trailer. $6,500. Please call
863-465-2364 or 863-699-0307

2011 BASS BOAT PRO 1615, 40 hp
Mercury motor, all accessories on
trailer. Never Wet! $10,000 Firm.
863-633-8574.

8350 Sporting Goods


Page 11A





Contact Us,,,


By Phone

(863) 385-6155


By Mail

2227 US Hwy 27S

Sebring, FL 33870


By E-Mail

www, newssun,corn/contact/


BIG GUN SHOW
Highlands County Fair Grounds
Sebring, FL
FEB. 26TH & 27TH
SAT. 9-5; SUN. 9-4
Concealed Course At Show!
Call 321-777-7455


8400 ARecreational
840 Vehicles
2007 36' ELITE TRAVEL TRAILER Fully
loaded w/all options incl, 2 power slide
out rooms, 2 central AC's, W/D, D/W &
micro. Non-smoke, no pets. Brand new
condition. $21,500. 863-838-3825
RV WILDWOOD 2006 33ft, 2 slide outs,
2BR, Sleeps 7, like new, non smoker,
no pets. All options & will deliver.
$11,000 OBO. 630-301-1553


9000
Transportation

90 0 A Motorcycles
9i1V &ATVs
1973 NORTON 850 COMMANDO
New professional restoration, very low
miles, includes Owner's Manuel.
One Owner Rare Find Great Price
863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100


S d t H twww.newssun p





NEWS-SLN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927


Classified ads
get fast results


LOVELY, QUIET, AFFORDABLE

Briarwood of Sebring

Apartments
1335 Spinks Lane Sebring, Florida 33870

Accepting Applications for 1 & 2 BR Apartments.
Available to individuals 62 yrs and older,
Handicapped/disabled, regardless of age.

For rental information and applications please call:
863-385-4078: TDD 771
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer



Having something to


sell and not


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one else does.


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classified today


385-6155.


Multi-Family Yard Sale
Friday, February 25th from 8-4
Many items to choose from, plus furniture.
Drop by for a cup of coffee!!!

S Crown Pointe Assisted Living
S& Memory Care Residence
cRW004 MI E 5005 Sun N Lake Blvd.
Z Sebring, FL


ONWMNNEMMMMNNMMMMM"








Page 12A


Ne'.,s-Sun Friday. February 25. 2011


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SECTION




SPORTS


News-Sun


Streaks staying ahead


. ... .



News-Sun photo by KIM GAUGER
Aaron Hart went five strong innings Tuesday, striking out
seven, in Sebring's 11-6 win at Liberty.


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehnel@newssun.com
Sebring baseball coach
Hoppy Rewis' worried earlier
in this young season about
teams' catching up to the
Blue Streaks, as far as prepa-
ration, after his squad rolled
to the pre-season tour-
nament win at the Bill Sel
Jarrett Ford Early Bird
Classic last week. t
And though the
Liberty Chargers did Lit
do a little catching up
in Tuesday's game, the |
Streaks showed they
. are still well ahead of
their foes in offensive ability.
It was another heavy-hit-
ting night for Sebring with
two home runs and a double
among their 10 hits in the 11-
6 win on the road.
And it was Jesse Baker
hauling the heavy lumber


rb


I
be


6


again as his early-season hit-
ting rampage continued.
A first-inning double plat-
ed Seth Abeln as Sebring
went up 2-0.
Liberty cut into the lead
with one in the bottom of the
frame, but a Johnny Knight
ground out in the third
ing brought a run in
S before Nate Greene
took one over the
fence for a three-run
rty shot to highlight a
h five-run frame.
Baker then went
yard as well, a two-
run blast in the fourth with
Matt Randall on making
this the fourth game in a row
that Baker has gone yard with
a man on.
Blue Streak. starter Aaron
Hart, meanwhile, was cruis-
ing through the Charger
order, putting up zeroes on


the scoreboard in the second,
third and fourth innings to
have Sebring up 9-1 after
Baker's bomb.
Liberty scratched for one
in the fifth, though Sebring
got it right back in the sixth
for a 10-2 lead.
After giving up a run and
not retiring anyone in the
sixth, Hart gave way to Kyle
Cunningham, who had some
control problems and gave
up two Charger runs before
Greene came on to finish up
the final inning and a third.
Having won five in a row
in preseason tournaments,
the Streaks pick up their first
regular season and district
win and look to add to it
tonight at Ridge before fac-
ing the Red Devils in Avon
Park Tuesday in a non-dis-
trict contest.


Lady Streaks get



win, good news


By DAN HOEHNE
cdiiniel.hoehne@newssun.comn
SEBRING With staff ace
Haley Pack previously
thought to be out indefinitely
with a long-time foot malady
flaring up again earlier this
season, the Sebring softball
pitching staff knew it needed
to step up.
The team found itself in
good hands Tuesday night as
southpaw Kaitlyn
Ostrander handcuffed Se
Winter Haven for a 3-
2 win. |
"She pitched a Winte
heck of a game," head
coach Joe Sinness
said. "She missed a
couple locations near
the end, which had my heart
beating a little bit."
But up until those some-
what harrowing missed loca-
tions, Ostrander had been
mowing through the Blue
Devils like so many blades of
grass.
She was perfect through
the first three innings before
giving up lone singles in the
fourth and fifth.
After the single with two
out in the fifth, Tayla DaSilva
made a diving stop at third,
recovered and fired to first to
retire the side without any
damage done.
But as effective as
Ostrander was, the Sebring
offense was doing her no
favors as they had yet to dent


the scoreboard.
And so it was in the top of
the sixth that those missed
locations caused those palpi-
tations as two run-scoring
singles put Winter Haven up
2-0.
Further scoring was avoid-
ed as Amanda Grimaldo
made a nice pickup on a hard
shot to short for the inning-
ending force play at second.
bring Backs now to the
wall, the Lady
Streaks responded as
Taryn O'Bannon laid
r Haven down a bunt that had
her destined for first.
And when the
2 throw to first got
away, she soon found
herself all the way around to
third.
She was still perched there
two outs later, but Lauren
Eures blooped one into right
to halve the score at 2-1
before Dino Lower alertly
reached first on a dropped
third strike.
Grimaldo then ripped one
up the middle to bring Eures
in with the tying run and
Ostrander herself broke the
tie with a dying quail over
short to score Lower.
Things looked to get a lit-
tle dicey as the Lady Devils
got a lead-off double to start
the seventh with a sacrifice
bunt then putting the tying
run on third.

See SEBRING, page 4B


A


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Kat Ostrander cruised through the Winter Haven line-up for most of Tuesday night and
helped stave off a late rally for a 3-2 Sebring win.


Friday, February 25, 2011

Lady Dragons,

Streaks serve

up tennis wins
By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newssun.com
The Lake Placid girls
tennis team made it two in
a row to go 3-1 on the
season with Tuesday's
sweep at Avon Park.
Headed up by wins from
their experienced leaders,
Jalitza Serrano and Deta
Waller, the Lady Dragons
are turning things around
after a sweep by Sebring
on Feb. 10.
Serrano went 6-0, 6-1
in her No. 1 singles match
before Waller went 6-0, 6-
1 at No. 2.
Lake Placid's younger
girls worked their way to
wins as well, though not
quite as dominantly.
Stephanie Rodriguez
was strong at No. 3 with a
6-1, 6-2 win, and Hannah
Waller was resilient in
holding off Ashley Harris
in a 7-5, 6-2 win at No. 4.
Claire LeBlanc was
tested at No. 5 by Kathryn
Welch but came out victo-
rious 6-4, 6-3.
Serrano and Deta
Waller then continued in
dominant fashion, taking
No. 1 doubles 8-0 and
Rodriguez and Hannah
Waller made a strong
showing at No. 2 with an
8-3 win.
"Claire, Stephanie and
Hannah are natural tal-
ents," head coach Joanne
Bostanche said. "With
Jalitza and Deta blazing
the trail, the depth and tal-
ent of this team will be
exciting to follow as they
improve with every pass-
ing week."
The Lady Blue Streaks
kept their season rolling
and stayed unbeaten with a
6-1 win at DeSoto Tuesday,
though Kaley Walter took
her first loss of the year, 6-
3, 6-1 to Kayla Muse.
Joy Donglasan, howev-
,er, picked her up with a 6-
3, 6-1 win at No. 2 before
Nisha Patel rolled to a 6-
0, 6-0 win at No. 3.
Kelly Broen went 6-1
in the first set of her
match with Nancy Gamez
at No. 4 and then held off
a late charge to win 7-5 in
the second set.
Morgan Heston then
picked up a 6-2, 6-3 win
at No. 5 to clinch the team
win.
Donglasan and Patel
cruised at No. 1 doubles
with an 8-0 pro-set points
win while Broen and
DeVane teamed up for a
7-6 (7-2), 6-3 win at No.
2.


Reflections pairs up to


help special athletes

Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK Residents .
at Reflections on Silver Lake '
spent the past three weeks .
helping athletes with disabil- -
ities compete in horseshoes,
shuffleboard and bocce.i -'
The volunteers in the local
mobile home park worked
two weeks in training and
then hosted the Special
STARS Senior Games com- .
petition on Monday, Feb, 7.
Approximately 50 senior '
athletes with disabilities
competed for ribbons in
horseshoes, bocce and shuf- rT. .. ...-
fleboard at the local mobile "
home park. B --
John and Debra Ketelhut
volunteer on the two bocce
courts.
The Ketelhuts have been
helping special athletes com- "
pete at their park for more
than six years. Courtesy
Dale and Mary Culp. who Special STARS athlete Minnie Sue Reid takes aim vwi
headed up the shuffleboard the bocce ball during competition Monday, Feb. 7, at
Reflections on Silver Lake in Avon Park.
See STARS, page 4B


photo
th
it


Panthers bite Palm Beach back


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newssun.com
AVON PARK Since last
Friday's 9-2 loss at Palm
Beach State, the South
Florida Panthers had reeled
off three straight wins and
were mindful of some
vengeance Wednesday night
- for it was those Palm
Beach Panthers that were in
town for a rematch.
And whereas the big
inning that had doomed
SFCC the last time around, it
was their own big couple of
innings that marked the dif-
ference in the 11-2 win.
"Those innings we had, we
just kept getting the next guy
to the plate." head coach
Rick Hitt said. "And we've
been doing that a lot these
last few games."
The first of those innings
was a six-run third with Brett
Clements belting a two-run
single and Brandon Kirby,
Kyle Jackson, David
Harrison and David Samperi
each singling home runs.
Four more came across in
the fourth with Clements


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Brett Clements had four hits and four RBI in SFCC's 11-2
rout over visiting Palm Beach State Wednesday.


short-hopping the left-center
field fence for a two-run dou-
ble before Sam Morgan sin-
gled home a run and Harrison
lifted a sacrifice fly.
Jared Hine went six and


one-third innings, surrender-
ing his only run in the sev-
enth, before giving way to
Richard Whiteleather who

See SFCC, page 4B


Page 3B


P)Wy
-' *y
.


13










Page 2B


News-Sun Friday. February 25. 2011


THE SCOREBOARD


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 41 14 .745 -
New York 29 26 .527 12
Philadelphia 28 29 .491 14
New Jersey 17 40 .298 25
Toronto 16 42 .276 262
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 42 15 .737 -
Orlando 36 22 .621 6/2
Atlanta 34 23 .596 8
Charlotte 25 32 .439 17
Washington 15 41 .268 262
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 38 17 .691 -
Indiana 26 30 .464 12X2
Milwaukee 22 35 .386 17
Detroit 21 38 .356 19
Cleveland 10 47 .175 29
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 47 10 .825 -
Dallas 41 16 .719 6
New Orleans 34 25 .576 14
Memphis 32 27 .542 16
Houston 28 31 .475 20
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 36 20 .643 -
Portland 32 25 .561 4X2
Denver 33 25 .569 4
Utah 31 27 .534 6
Minnesota 13 45 .224 24
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 40 19 .678 -
Phoenix 28 27 .509 10
Golden State 26 30 .46412X2
L.A. Clippers 21 37 .36218V2
Sacramento 14 41 .255 24

Tuesday's Games
Charlotte 114, Toronto 101
Indiana 113, Washington 96
Houston 108, Detroit 100
Miami 117, Sacramento 97
Milwaukee 94, Minnesota 88
Oklahoma City 111, L.A. Clippers 88
Denver 120, Memphis 107
Boston 115, Golden State 93
L.A. Lakers 104, Atlanta 80
Wednesday's Games
San Antonio 109, Oklahoma City 105
Houston 124, Cleveland 119
Indiana 102, Detroit 101
Sacramento 111, Orlando 105
Philadelphia 117, Washington 94
Toronto 118, Chicago 113
New York 114, Milwaukee 108
Memphis 104, Minnesota 95
Dallas 118, Utah 99
Phoenix 105, Atlanta 97
New Orleans 98, L.A. Clippers 87
L.A. Lakers 106, Portland 101, OT
Thursday's Games
Miami at Chicago, late
Boston at Denver, late
Friday's Games
Sacramento at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Utah at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Toronto, 7 p.m.
New York at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Orlando, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Denver at Portland, 10:30 p.m.


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Philadelphia 39 15 6 84198152
Pittsburgh 36 20 6 78 180 150
N.Y. Rangers 32 26 4 68 172155
New Jersey 26 30 4 56129161
N.Y. Islanders 23 31 7 53167 198
Northeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Boston 34 19 7 75188145
Montreal 32 22 7 71 157 156
Buffalo 28 25 6 62170172
Toronto 26 27 7 59152180
Ottawa 20 31 9 49137195
Southeast Division
W L. OTPtsGF GA
Tampa Bay 35 18 7 77 187 188
Washington 32 19 10 74 165 153
Carolina 28 24 9 65177188
Atlanta 25 26 10 60174201
Florida 25 28 7 57156168
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Detroit 37 17 6 80 202 173
Nashville 31 21 8 70 156 143
Chicago 31 23 6 68191 168
Columbus 3023 6 66163175
St. Louis 27 23 9 63166.176
Northwest Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Vancouver 38 14 9 85 204 145
Minnesota 32 22 6.70158156
Calgary 31 23 8 70186178
Colorado 26 28 7 59 178 210
Edmonton 20 33 8 48156203
Pacific Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
San Jose 35 21 6 76174159
Phoenix 33 20 9 75178177
Los Angeles 33 23 4 70166144
Dallas 31 23 6 68164172
Anaheim 32 25 4 68171 181
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
for overtime loss.
Tuesday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 4, Carolina 3, SO
Toronto 2, N.Y. Islanders 1
Phoenix 3, Philadelphia 2, OT
Columbus 4, Nashville 0
San Jose 4, Detroit 3
Minnesota 4, Edmonton 1
Colorado 4, St. Louis 3
New Jersey 1, Dallas 0


Boston 3, Calgary 1
Montreal 3, Vancouver 2
Wednesday's Games
Buffalo 4, Atlanta 1
Ottawa 5, Florida 1
San Jose 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT
Tampa Bay 8, Phoenix 3
Edmonton 5, Colorado 1
Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2
Thursday's Games
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, late
Dallas at Detroit, late
Toronto at Montreal, late
Chicago at Nashville, late
St. Louis at Vancouver, late
Minnesota at Los Angeles, late
Friday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 7 p.m.


N




~ Qf~~


LIVE

SPORTS

ON TV


AUTO RACING
SATURDAY
5:30 p.m. NASCAR Bashas' Supermarkets 200. ESPN2
11 p.m. NHRA O'Reilly Winternationals, Qual ESPN2


BOXING
FRIDAY
9 p.m. Juan Carlos Burgos vs. Cristobal Cruz ESPN2
SATURDAY
10 p.m. Miguel Acosta vs. Brandon Rios ...... SHOW


COLLEGE BASKETBALL
FRIDAY
7 p.m. Siena at Fairfield ................. ESPN2
SATURDAY
Noon Syracuse at Georgetown .............. CBS
Noon Missouri at Kansas State ............ ESPN
1 p.m. Wichita State at Missouri State ...... ESPN2
1:30 p.m. Arkansas at Auburn .................. 38
2 p.m. BYU at San Diego State .............. CBS
2 p.m. South Florida at DePaul ............... 28
2 p.m. Miami at Florida State ................ . 44
2 p.m. St. John's at Villanova .............. ESPN
3 p.m. Memphis at UTEP' ................ ESPN2
4 p.m. Florida at Kentucky ................. CBS
4 p.m. Alabama at Mississippi ............... 38
4 p.m. Kansas at Oklahoma................ ESPN
6 p.m. Mississippi State at Tennessee ........ ESPN
8 p.m. UCSB at Long Beach State ........... ESPN2
9 p.m. Duke at Virginia .............. ..... ESPN


11 a.m.
2 p.m.
6:30 p.m.

10 a.m.
Noon
2 p.m.
6:30 p.m.


GOLF
FRIDAY
LPGA HSBC Women's Champions .... GOLF
PGA WGC Accenture Match Play .... GOLF
PGA Mayakoba Classic ............. GOLF,
SATURDAY
LPGA HSBC Women's Champions .... GOLF
PGA WGC Accenture Match Play ..... GOLF
PGA WGC Accenture Match Play. ..... NBC
PGA Mayakoba Classic ............ GOLF


NBA
FRIDAY
8 p.m. Oklahoma City at Orlando ........... ESPN
10:30 p.m. Denver at Portland................. ESPN
SATURDAY
8:30 p.m. Chicago at Milwaukee............... WGN
Times, games, channels all subject to change


Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7 p.m
Phoenix at Columbus, 7 p.m
Ottawa at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Florida at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Tampa Bay, 7:
San Jose at Calgary, 9 p.m.
St. Louis at Edmonton, 9 p.m
Minnesota at Anaheim, 10 p.

4Mw- 77 ;1 T
Wednesday's Score
EAST
Albany, N.Y. 83, UMBC 67
American U. 69, Navy 58
Bucknell 72, Lehigh 55
California, Pa. 89, Clarion 77
Cincinnati 58, Georgetown 41
DeSales 78, Misericordia 69
Delaware 80, Towson 70
Delaware Valley 69, Wilkes 6
Dominican, N.Y. 76, Nyack 54
Drexel 64, Va. Commonwealt
Gannon 62, Slippery Rock 59
George Washington 74, Char
Holy Cross 77, Colgate 75
Indiana, Pa. 88, Lock Haven .
Lafayette 67, Army 46
Massachusetts 69, Saint Jose
Mercyhurst 80, Edinboro 77
Miami 73, Boston College 64
Notre Dame 94. Providence 9
Rhode Island 77, Duquesne
Scranton 74, Merchant Marir
Shippensburg 75, Millersville
St. Bonaventure 82, Fordhamrr
St. John's 76, DePaul 51
Stony Brook 79, Hartford 73,
W. Va. Wesleyan 98, Pitt.-Joh
Washington Adv. 80, Chestnu
SOUTH
Alabama 51, Auburn 49
Anderson, S.C. 87, Wingate 8
Duke 78, Temple 61
East Carolina 83, UTEP 76
Hofstra 71, UNC Wilmington
King, Tenn. 123, Hiwassee 51
LSU 84, Mississippi St. 82
Lincoln Mem. 83, Carson-Nev
Lynn 86, Nova Southeastern
Marshall 79, Tulsa 61
Maryland 78, Florida St. 62
Montevallo 76, Georgia Colleg
I Morgan St. 42, Delaware St.
Newberry 81, Brevard 72
North Carolina 75, N.C. State
Shepherd 78, Davis & Elkins
UNC Pembroke 89, Armstron
Virginia 62, Georgia Tech 56
Virginia Union 68, Elizabeth C
William & Mary 69, Georgia
Wofford 97, Chattanooga 58
MIDWEST
Akrori 72, Miami (Ohio) 55
Ball St. 64, E. Michigan 49
Cent. Michigan 64, N. Illinois
Drake 87, Evansville 69
Emporia St. 73, Washburn 68
Fort Hays St. 70, Pittsburg St
Kansas St. 61, Nebraska 57
Missouri 77, Baylor 59
Missouri Sthrn 92, Nebraska-
Missouri St. 76, S. Illinois 58
Missouri West 95, Cent. Miss
NW Missouri St. 87, SW Bap
Ohio 70, Bowling Green 60
Purdue 72, Indiana 61
St. Xavier 102, St. Francis, III
Truman St. 77, Lincoln, Mo. 6


1. W. Michigan 68, Toledo 56
Wichita St. 67, Creighton 65
Wisconsin 53, Michigan 52
SOUTHWEST
30 p.m. Arkansas 77, Kentucky 76, OT
Colorado 71, Texas Tech 68
n. McNeese St. 81, Texas-Arlington 72
m. Nicholls St. 70, Cent. Arkansas 48
Northwstrn St. 64, Sam Houston St. 63
SMU 76, Rice 66, OT
Stephen FAustin 60, Lamar 55
es Texas A&M 61, Oklahoma 47
Texas St. 82, SE Louisiana 69
UTSA 71, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 62
FAR WEST
BYU 84, Colorado St. 76
Corban 66, Warner Pacific 59
6 E. Oregon 53, S. Oregon 43
Oregon Tech 69, Concordia, Ore. 51
San Jose St. 72, New Mexico St. 70, OT
6 UNLV 77, New Mexico 74, OT
4 Wyoming 63, Air Force 61
h 60 TOURNAMENTS
Appalachian Athletic Tournament
lotte 57 First Round
Milligan 101, Montreat 80
49 Reinhardt 77, Va. Interment 66
i T#nn. Wesleyan 63, Bryan 56
eph's 51 Union, Ky. 79, Bluefield 71
CUNYAC Tournament
Semifinals
93 Medgar Evers 61, Hunter 53
76 Staten Island 73, Brooklyn 70, OT
ie 71, OT Commonwealth Conference
69 Semifinals
1 63 Alvernia 51, Messiah 49
Lebanon Valley 58, Widener 56
OT MIAA Conference Tounament
instown 94 Adrian 67, Olivet 64, 20T
it Hill 71 Albion 76, Kalamazoo 66, 20T
Calvin 72, Trine 65
Hope 102, Alma 77
81 MIAC Conference Tournament
Quarterfinals
Gustavus 90, St. Olaf 71
64 Hamline 86, Concordia, Moor. 75
NAC Conference Tournament
Quarterfinals
wman 78 Aurora 72, Milwaukee Engineering 67
73 Benedictine, Il. 91, Rockford 76
Concordia, Wis. 90, Wis. Lutheran 58
Edgewood 84, Lakeland 72
ge 66 UMAC Conference Tournament
39 Semifinals
Minn.-Morris 74, Bethany Lutheran 66
63 Northwstrn, Minn. 81, Martin Luther 58


53
g Atl. 65

;ity St. 60
St. 65



58

t. 63


-Omaha 78

ou 91, OT
tist 77


. 97, OT
65


BASEBALL
National League
Houston Astros Agreed to terms with
RHP Cesar Carrillo, INF Matt Downs
and RHP Lance Pendleton on one-year
contracts.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
Atlanta Hawks Acquired G Kirk
Hinrich and F Hilton Armstrong from
Washington Wizards for G Mike Bibby,
G Jordan Crawford, G/F Maurice Evans
and 2011 first-round draft pick.
Sacramento Kings Traded F Carl
Landry to New Orleans for G Marcus
Thornton and cash considerations.
Utah Jazz Traded G Deron Williams to
New Jersey for G Devin Harris, F
Derrick Favors and first-round draft
picks in 2011 and 2012.


www.newssun. coin


LOCAL SCHEDULE


Avon Park








Lake Placid


Sebring


SFCC


TODAY: Baseball at Fort Meade, 7 p.m.; Softball at Okeechobee, 6:30 p.m.
MONDAY: BoysTennis vs.Tenoroc, 4 p.m.
TUESDAY: Baseball vs. Sebring, 7 p.m.; Softball vs. Frostproof, 6/7:30 p.m.
THURSDAY: BoysTennis vs. Lake Wales, 4 p.m.


TODAY: Baseball vs. Sonrise Christian, 7 p.m.; Softball at Fort Meade, 5:30/7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY: Baseball vs. McKeel, 7 p.m.; Softball vs. Pemayetv Emahakv, 5:30 p.m.;
Boys Tennis vs. Clewiston, 4 p.m.;Track and Field at Sebring, 4 p.m.


TODAY: Baseball at Ridge, 7 p.m.; Softball at Haines City, 5:30/7:30 p.m.
MONDAY: Softball vs. Hardee, 5:30/7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY: Baseball at Avon Park, 7 p.m.; Track and Field hosts meet, 4 p.m.


TODAY: Baseball vs. Dundalk, Md., 6 p.m.
SATURDAY: Baseball vs. University ofTampa, doubleheader, 1 p.m.; Softball at Polk
State CollegeTournament,TBD
SUNDAY: Softball at Polk State CollegeTournament,TBD
MONDAY: Basebal vs. College of Central Florida, 5 p.m.


SPORTS SNAPSHOTS


McFarling Golf
SPRINGLAKE The 5th Annual James
McFarling Golf Tournament will be held
Saturday, March 5 at the SpringLake Golf
Resort.
The flighted, four-person scramble will
tee off with a 9 a.m. shotgun start.
For $50 per person, golfers get flight
prizes, CTP for men and women, goodie
bags and lunch at Michael's restaurant.
Proceeds will be awarded to scholar-
ship recipients from the Highlands
County Sertoma Junior Golf Tour.
For more information, call John
Delaney at 655-3686.
Panther 5K
AVON PARK The second annual
South Florida Community College
Panther 5K Run/Walk will take place
Saturday, Feb..26 at the SFCC Campus.
The SFCC Foundation, Inc. and Bill
Jarrett Ford Mercury are sponsoring the
event, and proceeds benefit the college's
intercollegiate athletics programs.
The entry fee is $20 through Feb. 16
and $25 from Feb. 17 through race day.
Students with I.D. may register for $15.
Every participant receives a Dri-Fit
long-sleeve shirt sizes cannot be guar-
anteed for those who enter after Feb. 17.
Registration is 7-7:45 a.m. on race day
in the parking lot in front of the SFCC
University Center race starts at 8 a.m.
Entry forms are available online at
www.southflorida.edu/panther5k.
Participants can mail their copies and
entry fees to the SFCC Foundation, Inc.,
13 East Main Street, Avon Park, FL
33825; or fax forms to 453-8023 and call
453-3133 with credit card information.
For more information call the SFCC
Foundation at 863-453-3133.
5th Annual L.O.S.T. Run
OKEECHOBEE The fifth annual
L.O.S.T. (Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail)
118-Mile Endurance Run will take place
the weekend of February 26-27.
This footrace consists of one circum-
navigation of Lake Okeechobee by run-
ning along the top of the Herbert Hoover
Dike, a distance of 118 miles.
The race begins 6:30 a.m. at the Okie-
Tantie Campground located just west of
the town of Okeechobee, and runners have
34 hours to complete their loop of the lake.
The run precedes counterclockwise
around the lake, so runners pass the towns
of Lakeport, Moore Haven, Clewiston,
Pakohee and Port Mayaca before they
return to Okie-Tantie.
Runners will receive aid at various
access points located around the lake, and
there will be manned aid stations at
Lakeport, Moore Haven, Clewiston. Paul
Rardin Park, Pahokee, Port Mayaca and
Nubbins Slough.
The race website is www.lostll8mile-
endurancerun.com.
For more information, contact Mike
Melton at 772-349-1704
Wings of Faith Golf
SEBRING Wings of Faith Worship
Center presents the First Annual Golf
Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at
Country Club of Sebring.
Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a
Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m.
Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one
team of four golfers. one tee sign and two
green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes
one team of four golfers, one green sign;
Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green
sign, one tee sign: Bronze Sponsor $100
includes one green sign.
Individual player $60 includes green
fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26).
Team of Four Golfers $240 includes
green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after
March 26).
Make checks payable to: Wings of


Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL
33871, or register online at wingsof-
faithchristianworshipcenter.com.
Proceeds to be donated to scholarship
program for graduates attending Wings of
Faith Christian Worship Center.
For more information, call Jason
Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhanker-
son@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at
381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com.
Our Lady of Grace event
AVON PARK Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church has a benefit event com-
ing up, the First Annual Golf Tournament
at River Greens Saturday, March 12 at 8
a.m.
The cost of $60 per player includes
golf, cart, golf shirt and lunch, while
River Greens members pay just $35.
Sponsorships are available, starting
with a $100 hole sponsor for a sign only.
A Hole Sponsor with Sign, plus a free
foursome, is $300, a Co-Sponsor Sign,
plus free foursome, with perogative to fly
their banner is $400 and a Major Sponsor
is $1,500.
Seminole Club Trail Run
SEBRING The Highlands Seminole
Club presents the first Seminole TraiFRun
5K on Saturday, March 5, at the ,Sun-N-
Lake Preserve in Sebring.
The cost is $15 per participant if regis-
tered by Tuesday, Feb. 15 and' $20 after
that day or on the day of race.
Registration on race day begins at 7
a.m. and the race will begin at 8 a.m.
Awards will be presented for top finish-
ers in major age groups.
This is the first event of its kind for the
trails at the Preserve.
Registration forms can be found at
highlandsseminoles.org.
Call 386-9194 or email mantarayEM@earth-
link.net for more information.
"Doe Owen" Golf Tourney
AVON PARK The Avon Park Noon
Rotary Club will host its Second Annual
David "Doc Owen" Golf tournament on
Saturday, April 16 at Highlands Ridge
North.
I The two-person scramble-format entry
fee is $60 per person with prizes in flight
groups, lunch,' goodie bag and refresh-
ments on the course. Registration starts at
7:30 a.m. with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun tee
time.
Entry information and check payable to
Avon Park Noon Rotary mailed to Chet
Brojek, 3310 Par Rd, Sebring, FL 33872.
Golfers should include their names and
handicaps along with their check.
Those needing a form may e-mail
Brojek at cbrojek@comncast.net or call at
385-4736.
Business entry of two-persons plus a
hole sign for a total of $200 is available
for the first time this year.
All Rotary club members are urged to
support participate in the event that bene-
fits local Rotary charity projects.
Business hole signs for $100 are also
available by contacting Chet via email or
phone.
SHS Basketball Camp
SEBRING The SHS basketball pro-
gram will be hosting a basketball camp
for boys and girls, in 2nd-6th grade, on
Monday. March 28, and Tuesday, March
29, from 8 a.m.- 4 p.m.
The cost of the camp is $20 and is
appropriate for players of all skill levels
and experience.
Current and former Streaks will be on
hand to help with the camp, which will also
feature contests, competitions and prizes.
Campers can either bring their own
lunch or purchase lunch there for a rea-
sonable price.
Please contact Coach Lee at 441-1221,
or by email at leem@highlands.kl2fl.us.









www.newssun.com News-Sun Friday, February 25,.2011


Page 3B


Golf Hammock
The Golf Hammock Ladies
Association played a Team Points
event Wednesday, Feb. 23 and saw
Marian Passafume, Jo Thornburg and
Eleanor Short atop First Flight ..'iiti +21
Jean Hair, Joyce Stanley, Wanda
Hastie and Alma Barefoot won Second
Flight with +16 and Florence Towell,
Marge Pederson and Cindy Dall took
Third Flight with +14.
Monday, Feb. 22, the Mezza group
played Individual Pro-Am Points at
Golf Hammock Country Club.
Mike Anselm took first place in A
group with a plus 6 and Jim Gulick
and Mike Lajiness tied for second with
plus 4.
Joe Martini had a plus 7 to take first
place in B group wile David Mulligan
had a plus 5 for second place.
In C group Harvey Kecskes scored a
plus 8 for first place, Bobby Culbert
with a plus 4 for second place and Joe
Hyzny plus 2 for third place.
In D group, taking first place was
Doug Haire with plus 4 and Billy Parr
was in second place with plus 2.
Taking first place in E group was
Bob Topel scoring with a plus 8 and
Wayne Meyer at even for second place
Robin Geier made a plus 4 to take
first place in F Group and Ken Spencer
was at even for second place.
Bob King made a plus 5 to take first
place in G Group and Dick Botelho was
at even for second place.
H Group saw Johnnie Labarge made
a plus 8 to take first place second place
went to Jim reed with plus 4.
Rudy Pribble had a plus 11 to take
first place in J Group and Don Harper
with a plus 5 for second place.
Janet Howland had a plus 3 for first
place in K Grroup while Don Tiemens
had a minus 2 for second place.
Next Monday will be a shotgun start
beginning at 8:30 a.m. at Golf
Hammock.
Please arrive early to register. There
will not be a scramble until further
notice. For more information, call Pete
at 382-1280.

Harder Hall
The Ladies League played a pro am
points event on Monday, Feb. 21.
The winners were: First place, Sue


Herriman with plus-9;
Shirley Holt with plus-
7; and third place,
Carol Grimm with plus-
6.
The Ladies League
played a Low Putts
event on Thursday,
Feb. 17. ^ pr
The winners were: '*', i'a
First place, Billy "', ';s ,
Aydelotte with 26 .,..<
putts; second place, an ..
Jackie Christopher with ,who d,
27 putts; and third mr,. :
place, Lorraine Saucier i,,lik
with 28 putts. ,,i.t .,i
ras-s. T
Lake June ir :,'
West Golf Club ,
A Scramble was
played on Thursday,
Feb. 17.
Winning first place
was the team of John
and Shelly Byron, Art ,
Schmeltz, Betty Billau, -
Kim Fiers and Del and
Dee Block with 47; second place,
Hesson, Ted Carteaux, Bob and V
Knishka and Charlotte Mathew with
and third place, Ott Wegner, Ma
Wegner, Pete and Mary McNar
Tom and Bonnie Peadsford with 49
Closest to the pin: (Ladies), Nc
Doris Weeks, 8-feet-5-inches; and
8, Joyce Swartz, 9-feet-5-inch
(Men), No. John Goins, 5-feet-1-in
The Men's Association played a B
Ball event on Wednesday, Feb. 16.
Winning first place was the tear
Ron Hesson, Ward Shaw, Dave Co
Bud York and Dick Denhart with
Tying for second/third places v
Frank Gallagher, Ken Colyer, Del BI
Larry Angell and Walt Nagel; J
Byron, Cal Billingsley, Pat Houli
Ron Van Maater and George Dean
38 each.
Closest to the pin: No. 2, Walt N
4-feet-7-inches; No. 4, Ron Van M
5-feet-lO-inches; and No. 8, V
Shaw with 3-feet.
The Ladies Association played
Ladies League event on Monday,
14.
Winning first place was the tear
Helene Mellon, Kim Givens and Ja


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Barringer with 36. Tying for
second/third places were Sylvia West,
Norma Colyer and Mary Malone;
Barbara Dean, Kay Kalusnick and Dee
Block with 37 each.
Closest to the pin: No. 2, Margaret
Shultz, 10-feet-l-inch; No. 4, Sylvia
West, 6-feet-5-inches; and No. 8, Kay
Kalusnick, 5-feet-7-inches.

Placid Lakes
The Men's Association played a Two
Best Balls Front, One Best Ball Back
event Wednesday, Feb. 23.
Darrell Gardner, Bob McMillian, Bud
Snyder and Howard Ticknor won the
event with a -26, one ahead of the -25
brought in by Roger Thompson, John
Rosettis, Chuck Fortunato and David
Raciti.
Taking third, with a -23, were Frank
Fisher, Russ Isaacs and David Moiles.
Getting closest to the cup was
Darrell Homey at 20-feet, 1-inch from
hole #6.
The Men's Association played a
team, quota points event.
Winning first place was the team of
Russ Isaacs, David Raciti, Darrell
Gardner and Darrell Homey with plus-


13; second place,
Roger Thompson,
John Goble, Marvin
Snyder and Ed
Bartusch with plus-5;
a and third place, Cody
Coates, Frank Fisher
and Bruce Miseno with
( t~hI minus-1.
I h- Closest to the pin:
.,.ad,"* No. 11, Bill Lockwood,
tr 4-feet-6-inches.
your
uay .p River Greens
in The Men's
t,, Association played a
w-r<." Men's Day event on
Saturday, Feb. 19.
By Front 9 Winning
oIinn. first place was the
Mcwean team of Peter March,
,Shoul. Tom Morway, John
r rofth Hierholzer and Bill
1; )xok Mountford with minus-
Sradwin 22; and second place,
Franke' Cliff Aubin, Vince
Boever, Ray Knauf and
Lefty St. Pierre' with
minus-14. Back First


place, Cliff Aubin, Vince Boever, Ray
Knauf and Lefty St. Pierre with minus-
22. Tying for second/third places were
Peter March, Tom Morway, John
Hierholzer and Bill Mountford; Butch
Smith, Bob Streeter, Cliff Steele and
Bob Biever with minus-13 each.
A morning Scramble was played
Friday, Feb. 18.
Winning first place was the team of
Terry and Louise Lewis, Kenny and
Carolyn Brunswick.
The Friday afternoon Scramble was
played Feb. 18.
Winning first place, Jerry Lewis, Jim
Sizemore, Joe Graf, Tony Lankford,
Carole McClay and Dale Duncan with
15-under; and second place, Jeff
Davies, Ed Mosser, Peggy Wehunt,
Melba Bradshaw, Pat Graf, Lucy
Roberts, Boots Mosser with 14-under.
The Ladies Association played a pro
am tournament on Thursday, Feb. 17.
Tying for first/second places were
the teams of Kay Conkle, Penny
Anderson, Janet Regan and Linda
Therrien; Michele Koon, Fran Neil,
Gerry Leslie and Jan Stevens with
plus-6.5. Third place, Bev Rudd, Pat
Kincer, Donna Johnson and Anne


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Purcell with plus-4.5.
Individual winners were: First place,
Fran Neil with plus-8; and second
place, Betty Leblanc with plus-4.5.
Tying for third/fourth places were
Laura Smutnick and Carol Long with
plus-4 each.
The Morrison Group played a game
on Thursday, Feb. 17.
Winning first place was the team of
Johnny Wehunt, Ray Delsasso, Frank
Conroy and Romy Febre with minus-
36; second place, Ken Koon, Vince
Boever, Don McDonald and Bill
Mountford with minus-34; and third
place, Russ Rudd, Cliff Aubin, Jim
Cercy and Joe Graf with minus-31.
The Men's Association played a Pro
Am tournament on Wednesday, Feb.
16.
Winning first place was the team of
Dale Duncan, Bob Stevens, Frank
Conroy and Romy Febre with plus-10;
second place, Peter March, Dick Long,
Cecil Lemons and Tom Morway with
plus-9; and third place, Leo Persails,
Harold Kline and Cliff Aubin with plus-
7.5.
Individual winners: A Flight (25-
over): First place, Peter Bridge with
plus-7; and second place, Tom
Morway with plus-6.5. B Flight (21-
24): First place, Bob Streeter with plus-
5; and second place, Jim Cercy, with
plus-3.5. C Flight (16-20): Tying for
first/second places were Tim Thomas
and Bob Wolf with plus-6 each. D
Flight (15-under): First place, Dale
Duncan with plus-6.5; and second
place, Peter March with plus-4.
A Sadie Hawkins event was played
Tuesday, Feb. 15.
Winning first place were Tim
Thomas and Helen O'Chala with 54.
Tying for second/third places were Don
McDonald and Pat Graf; Paul Nelson
and Nancy Long with 55 each.

SpringLake
The Springlake Women's Golf
Association is now in full swing with
special tournaments being held.
A two day Eclectic Tournament was
held on the Cougar Trail Course on
Feb. 21 and 23.
Each golfer had the opportunity to
improve on the hole played the previ-
See GOLF, page 4B









Page 4B



Sebring wins, Pack


to come back


Continued from 1B
But Ostrander ,came up
with a big strike out before
inducing a game-ending
grounder to short.
"That was probably the
best defense we've played so
far this season," Sinness said.
"Offensively, we're putting
the ball in play, but just
catching it either on the
inside or outside of the bat.
I've got strong hitters all the
way around, they're just not
clicking right now."
The extra good news was
that Pack's foot was quite as


bad as first feared.
Thought to be potentially
career ending after years of
X-rays hadn't turned up any-
thing, an MRI revealed two
old broken bones with jagged
ends that were creating the
excess pain.
A relatively quick and sim-
ple procedure now has Pack
on track to return in the com-
ing weeks.
The Streaks look to build
upon the big district win
tonight at Haines City before
returning home to host
Hardee on Monday.


Continued from 1B
courts, are thrilled to watch
the special athletes work so
hard to win a ribbon.
The Culps have been
working with the local spe-
cial athletes for approximate-
ly 11 years at Reflections.
Mary Culp worked in spe-
cial education for 21 years in
Wisconsin before retiring.
Irv Swihart heads up the
volunteers at the horseshoe
pits.
All athletes received
awards for their accomplish-
ments at the Senior Games
during a ceremony in the
clubhouse after enjoying a
pizza party.
Winning first place ribbons
)in shuffleboard were Hormel
Biggs, Tamara Anna, Debbie
Weisgerber, Penny Holder,
Maria Rivera and Terry
Richardson.
Second place winners were
Brian Harrison, Carlita
Hawkins, Amelia Titus,
Maricel Moreno, Frances


Goff, Tim Johnson and
Christine Frank.
Third place winners were
Rene Herrera, Kenny
Roberts, Jim Kentfield, and
Eva Monk.
Winning fourth place rib-
bons were Josh Croston and
Timmy Cypress.
In bocce the first place
winners were Minnie Sue
Reid, Sandra Harper and
Alex Lopez.
Second place winners
were Sharon Carpenter, Rob
Ward, Helena Spies and
Lorraine Steeves.
First place winners in
horseshoes were Robert
Collier, Mac Smith and
Emily Harrison.
Second place winners
were John Smith, Tim
Dowdy and Amy Matthews.
Third place winners were
Billy Owens, Raymond
Jackson and Hugh Sims.
Fourth place winners were
Jimmy Jensen and Bobby
Brewington.


News-Sun Friday. February 25. 2011


www.newssun.com


Central Security turning things


around in LP Senior League


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID In
Wednesday action of the
Lake Placid Senior Softball
League. Central Security (5-
8) made it three in a row by
defeating Seminole Tire (8-
6) 18-11.
Manager Duke Hensley
had two doubles and a
homer and Dave Reed also
homered in a substitute role.
For Seminole Tire, Kyle
Saunders (double), Mike
Jurmu (triple) and John
Kloet each had three hits.
George Quay, an 86 year
old World War II vet,
smashed a single as the
crowd applauded his efforts.
Yates Insurance (9-5)
moved into sole possession
of first place by defeating
Schooni's (6-8) 20-18.
With two out and the
score tied in the last inning,
Jim Morgan and Bill
Gallagher hit back-to-back
home runs to secure the
win.
George Lavoie hit a
bases-loaded' double, and
Victor "V-Rod" Rodriguez
had four hits and pitched the
victory.
For Schooni's, which lost
its fourth straight game,


Gary Steeves (two doubles)
had five hits. T
he Three Hit Club includ-
ed John Buja (double). Jeff
Stanley (double) and manag-
er Darrell Richards.
Lockhart Service Center
(6-8) toppled Lake Placid
Marine (7-6) 29-15.
The score was not the
main story of the game as
Hall of Famer Dave Reed
had five hits, including four
home runs, all of them over
the fence and into the Lake
June orange groves.
George Quay, the league
clairvoyant, exclaimed "I
don't think that has ever
happened here before."
No one else could recall
such an accomplishment.
Paul Stephenson support-
ed Reed's historic efforts
with five hits of his own.
Dick Cook, Cliff Bluml,
and Doug Hammond had
four hits, while Ray Wilson
and Harvey Jones added
three each in the 36-hit
Lockhart assault. .
Jim Hensley led Lake
Placid Marine with four
hits.
The Three Hit Club
included Jim Radcliff (home
run), Andy Timermanis,


Frank Hedges and Dick
Harmick.
At the mid-point of the
Lake Placid Senior Softball
season, Central Security
must have been wondering
what it would take to get a
win streak going.
With a 2-8 record, they
were mired in the league.
basement, a position they
had occupied since the first
pitch of the year.
Their doubleheader on
Monday with Schooni's pro-
vided them with the perfect
storm to right their ship.
The Restauranteurs were
missing three of their top
players and their absence
proved critical as The
Securitymen swept the twin-
bill by scores of 20-9 and
17-8.
Leading the charge were
Jim "Laser" Louzan (two
doubles, triple) and Duke
Hensley (six doubles) with
six hits each in the combined
stats. Barry Hurlbut had
three doubles and a home
run, Brian Pluta had five hits
and Gallo Gonzalez had
three triples.
Company owner and
sponsor Dana Hurlbut
smashed a round-tripper as


County golf scores


Continued from 3B
ous round.
This proved quite a chal-
lenge and the results were
quite close.
The A Flight was won by
Pearl Bradford with a net 57.
Terrie Austin, 58, claimed
second place and Marsi
Benson was a close third
with a 59.
Debbie Delaney had a 55
for first place in B Flight with
Mary Cebula coming in sec-
ond, 58, and Dotti Blackwell's
61 placed her in third.


C and D Flights were really
close. Roberta Briggs, 56,
won first in C Flight with
Sharon Warner winning a tie
over Joanne Koller with a 57
for second place.
Carolyn Irvine won a
tiebreaker over Julia Starr in
D Flight with a 56, leaving
Sharon Hubbard to take third
with her 57.
On Tuesday, Feb. 22, the
SpringLake Mens' Golf
Association held a 4-Man
Team 3 Best Ball competi-
tion on the Panther Trail


course.
Leading the charge with
191 strokes was the team of
Joe Austin, Gale Monda, Ron
Brochu and Bill
Schauwecker.
Coming in second with a
score of 197 was Bob Hinde,
Jay Reeb, Wiley Ferguson
and Ed Clay.
The third place team
included Gary Graves, Dale
Stevens, Bo Bohanon and
Joe Smith; a team that fin-
ished with 204 strokes.


his team doubled their win
total for the year.
Seminole Tire squeezed
past Lockhart Service
Center 16-15.
Manager Charlie Quinn
led by example with four
hits (two doubles, triple).
Chipping in with three
hits each were Mike Jurmu,
Tom Gaiownik and Kyle
Saufiders (triple).
For Lockhart, Hall of
Famer Dave Reed had five
hits.
The Four Hit Club includ-
ed Dick Cook (triple) and
Billy Todd.
Cliff Bluml had three hits
in the losing effort.
Yates Insurance disposed
of Lake Placid Marine 25-
21.
Jim Radcliff paced the
attack for Yates with five
hits (three doubles, home
run).
George Lavoie (double,
home run) also had five and
manager Dusty Hensley had
four, including a home run.
Manager Jim Guild and
Jim Hensley each had five
hits for the Mariners while
Gary Tankersley, Howard
Carney, JC Brown and Dick
Harmick had four hits each.


SFCC wins

fourth in row
Continued from 1B
struck out four in his one and
two-thirds innings of work.
Eric Bailey pitched a
scoreless ninth to secure the
win and give South Florida a
four-game win streak.
"(Iine) was just filling up
the strike zone like he does
and our bullpen came in and
did their jobs," Hitt said.
The Panthers host Dundalk
from Maryland tonight
before welcoming the
University of Tampa B team
to town Saturday for a dou-
bleheader.


SYF&C Camps


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING The Sebring
Youth Football and Cheer
Association announces its'
Spring Conditioning Camps
for football players and
cheerleaders.
The six-week camp for the
football players is $25 and
begins Monday, April 4 with
practice 2-3 nights a week.
The players will have the
chance to show off their tal-
ents in an exhibition game
Saturday, May 14.
The $10 cheerleader camp
runs for two weeks and
begins Monday, May 2, when
they will learn a new routine
and several new cheers that
they will perform at the exhi-


bition game.
Registrations will be held
Saturday, Feb. 19 and
March 12 from 9 a.m.-Noon
at the Highlands County
Sports Complex at 200
Sheriff Tower Rd.
The first 50 participants
who come to register on each
date will also get a free door
prize.
Each participant who reg-
isters will also get a free raf-
fle ticket to win a bicycle.
Free drinks and snacks will
also be provided.
For more information, call
Kim Anderson at 381-5047,
Melissa Lane at 381-9325, or
Amy at 381-4801.


South Central Florida Pickelball League
Championship at Highlands Ridge


SEBRING On Saturday,
March 5 at 10 a.m., the first
ever South Central Florida
Pickelball League
Championship will take place
at the courts in Highlands
Ridge.
The league is made up of
five communities in central
Florida; Highlands Ridge,
Tanglewood, Solivita, Lake
Ashton, and Rainbow Resort.
Several of the finest pick-


leball players in Florida will
be competing and two of the
best teams will do battle -
Solivita and Tanglewood.
Anyone who is interested
in learning about the "fastest
growing sport in adult com-
munities across the country"
should make their way to
Highlands Ridge.
Matches will run from 10
a.m. to the finals at approxi-
mately 1p.m.


CHIROPRACTIC HEALTH CENTER, P.A.
13 Ryant Blvd. (863) 382-4445
Sebring ACCEPTING
Westshore Plaza NEW PATIENTS
www.waldronchirooractic.com


STARS shine at


Senior Games








www.newssun.com


News-Sun Friday, February 25, 2011


Page 5B


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


The Community Calendar pro-
vides a brief listing of local
clubs and organizations who
meet on a regular basis. It is
the responsibility of the group
to update the News-Sun on
any changes in this listing by
calling 385-6155, ext. 516;
send any changes by e-mail
to editor@newssun.com; or
mail them to News-Sun
Community Calendar, 2227
U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL
33870.

FRIDAY
* Alcoholics Anonymous
One Day At A Time group
meets for a closed discussion
at 9:30 a.m. Monday and
Friday at Covenant
Presbyterian Church, 4500
Sun 'N Lakes Blvd., Sebring.
Call 314-0891.
* American Legion Post 25
hosts a fish fry from 5-7 p.m.
at the post, 1490 U.S. 27,
Lake Placid. Cost is $6.
Shrimp also is available for
same price. Open to the pub-
lic. Tickets in the lounge on
Friday night. Lounge hours
are from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call
465-7940.
* American Legion Post 74
has karaoke from 7 p.m. until
final call at the post, 528 N.
Pine St., Sebring. Post open
at noon. Happy Hour from 4-6
p.m. Members and guests
only. Call 471-1448.
* Avon Park Breakfast
Rotary Club meets 7 a.m.,
Rotary Club building.
* Better Breathers Club
Support Group. This
American Lung Association
affiliated group meets the last
Friday of each month, at
12:00 pm in Conference
Room 3 at Florida Hospital
Heartland Medical Center,
4200 Sun 'n Lake Blvd.
Contact Mike Napper, RRT at
(863)402-3450 for more infor-
mation.
* Bridge Club of Sebring
(American Contract Bridge
Club) plays duplicate games
at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf
Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118.
* Grand Prix Cloggers
Beginner classes are at 9
a.m., EZ Intermediate classes
are at 10 a.m., and
Intermediate classes are at 11
a.m. every Friday at Reflection
on Silver Lake, Avon Park.
Gall Julie for further informa-
tion at 386-0434.
* Harmony Hoedowners
Square Dance Club offers a
class in Lake Placid at the
Sunshine RV Resort from 9-11
a.m. Friday. For more informa-
tion, call Sam Dunn at 382-
6792 or e-mail him at sam-
dunn @samdunn.net.
* Highlands Social Dance
Club hosts ballroom dancing
every Friday, October through
March from 7-9:30 p.m. at the
Senior Center on Sebring
Parkway. Dance the night
away to the music of the
area's Big Bands. All club
dances are open to the public.
Appropriate dress required.
Admission is $5 for members
and $7 for non-members. Call
385-6671.
i Lake Placid Elks Lodge
'2661 has lounge hours begin-
ning at 1 p.m. There is a fish
fry from 5-7 p.m. Cost is $8.50
per person. The lodge is open
to members and their guests.
Call ,465-2661.
* Lake Placid Hi-12 Club
meets at noon on the fourth
Friday at the Lake Placid Elks,
except in June, July and
August. All Masons and their
ladies are welcome. For reser-
vations or information, call
465-3038.
* Lake Placid Moose serves
wings, fish and burgers at 6
p.m. Music provided from 7-11
p.m. Pool tournament is at 8
p.m. Open to members and
qualified guests only.
* Loyal Order of Moose,
Highlands County Lodge No.
2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon
Park. Karaoke from 7-10 p.m.
Call452-0579.
* Narcotics Anonymous
New Day Group meets at 6
p.m. at First Presbyterian


Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave,
Sebring. For information call
Heartland area helpline (863)
683-0630. More information
on other meetings and events
at www.naflheartland.org.
* Sebring Bridge Club has
Bridge, ACBL Duplicate at the
clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf,
Sebring at 12:30 Fridays. Call
385-8118.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves chicken or fish baskets
from 5-7 p.m. at the club,


12921 U.S. 98, Sebring, for a
$4 donation. Blind darts is
played at 7 p.m. Call 655-
4007.
* Sebring Elks Lodge 1529
serving buffet dinner at 5-7
p.m. Elks and guests invited.
Dance music in ballroom at 7
p.m. Dinner and dance is $10
donation. For reservations,
call 385-8647 or 471-3557.
Lounge is open from 3-10
p.m.
* Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 serves beef franks and
Italian sausages served from
1 p.m. to closing at 11675
U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-
3920.
* Sebring Recreation Club
plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and
table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333
Pomegranate Ave. Call 385-
2966 or leave a name, num-
ber and message.
* Teamster Retirees meet at
the Teamster's Local 444
Union Hall at 211 Potontoc
St., Auburndale at 11 a.m. on
the last Friday of the month
(except June, July and
August). Call Paul Thomas at
471-9684.
* U.S. Military Vets
Motorcycle Club serves a
steak dinner on the fourth
Friday of every month for $7
at VFW Post 9853, State
Road 64 West and North
Oliva Drive. Call Hocky at
(954) 592-4847
M Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3800 serves steak by
the ounce from 5:30-7 p.m.
every fourth Friday at the post,
1224 County Road 621 East,
Lake Placid. Texas Hold 'em
lessons, 2 p.m. For more
details, call 699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 serves pizza from
5:30-7 p.m. and music is from
6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE
Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call
385-8902.

SATURDAY
* American Legion Post 25
serves sirloin burgers from
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake
Placid. Jam session is from 2-
4 p.m. The lounge hours are
11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Members
and guests invited. Call 465-
7940.
* American Legion Post 69
in Avon Park serves dinner at
5 p.m. and music is from 6-9
p.m.
* American Legion Post 74
open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs
served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.
Call 471-1448.
* Avon Park Public Library
has a free Adult Film Series at
noon. Call 452-3803.
* Citrus Ridge Decorative
Artists is a chapter of the
Society of Decorative
Painters. The chapter meets
the fourth Saturday of the
month at Waters Edge of Lake
Wales, 10 Grove Ave. West in
Lake Wales. Doors open at 9
a.m. and meeting begins at 10
a.m. Bring a bagged lunch
with painting to follow. Guests
are welcome to come and join
the fun, meet the members
and fellowship with the chap-
ter. Call Vickie Alley, Frotproof
area at (863) 632-1472, or
Judy Nicewicz, Highlands
County area at 273-1339.
* Heartland Horses &
Handicapped Inc. provides
free assisted riding sessions
for adults and children with
special needs from 9-11 a.m.
Wednesday, Thursday and
Saturday at 118 W. College
Drive, Avon Park. For details
or to volunteer, call Mary
McClelland, coordinator, 452-
0006.
* Highlands County
Democratic Women's Club
typically meets the fourth
Saturday of each month
unless there is a DWC event
planned. Call 214-4680 to
confirm the next meeting date.
Meetings are from 9-11:30
a.m. at Democratic
Headquarters, 4216 Sebring
Parkway (beside Ruby
Tuesdays. The morning
includes a continental break-
fast, a speaker, a political


action discussion and the reg-
ular business meeting. Like-
minded guests are welcome.
* Highlands County
Housing Authority meets 7
p.m., 3909 Kenilworth Blvd.,
Sebring.
* Highlands Shrine Club,
2606 State Road 17 South,
Avon Park (between Avon
Park and Sebring) has a flea
market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
country store open from 8
a.m. to noon and pancake
breakfast served from 7:30


a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Vendors
are welcome. No setup fee is
charged for the summer
months. Plenty of off road
parking. Call 382-2208.
* Highlands Woodcarvers
meet from 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday at 825 Sunbird Terr.
(Community Center off
Thunderbird Road). Call Bob
Seybolt at 471-6077.
* Lake Placid Art League
has a class in Pastels/Acrylics
taught by Llewellyn Rinald
from from 9 a.m. to noon at
the Cultural Center, 127 Dal
Hall Blvd. For information call
Dan Daszek at 465-7730.
* Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 opens the lounge at 1
p.m. Card games are played
at 1 p.m., and Bar Bingo is at
1:30 p.m. The lodge is open
to members and their guests.
Call 465-2661.
* Narcotics Anonymous
New Day Group meets at 7
p.m. at First Presbyterian
Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave,
Sebring. For information call
Heartland area helpline (863)
683-0630. More information
on other meetings and events
at www.naflheartland.org.
* Overeaters Anonymous
meets at 10:30 a.m. at First
Presbyterian Church, Oak
Street, Lake Placid. For more
details, call 382-1821.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves dinner from 5-7 p.m. at
the club, 12921 U.S. 98,
Sebring. Music is from 7-10
p.m. Call 655-4007.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3800 serves breakfast
from 8-11 a.m. and horse raic-
ing at 5:30 p.m. every second
and fourth Saturday at the
post, 1224 County Road 621
East, Lake Placid. For more
details, call 699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 serves a meal for
$6 from 5:30-7 p.m. and
music is from 6-9 p.m. at the
post, 2011 SE Lakeview
Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902.

SUNDAY
* American Legion Post 25
Lake Placid has lounge hours
from 1-9 p.m. Live music is
from 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 74
open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-
6 p.m. Members and guests
only. Post is at 528 N. Pine
St., Sebring. Call 471-1448.
* Highlands Shrine Club,
2604 State Road 17 South, at
2-4 p.m. has a new country
music group, the Twi-Lites,
along with Dianne Thompson
who sings music from the '40s
and '50s. Donation $3 for sin-
gle, and $5 for couple.
Refreshments available.
Everyone welcome.
* Inerstate chapter of
A.B.A.T.E. meets the last
Sunday of every month at The
Blue Crab, 825 Ridgewood
Dr., Sebring at 11 a.m.
* Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 lounge is open from 1-7
p.m. Card games start at 1:30
p.m. The lodge is open to
members and their guests.
Call 465-2661.
* Lake Placid Moose has
karaoke in the pavilion.
Horseshoes played at 9:30
a.m. Food available at 4 p.m.
Open to members and quali-
fied guests only.
* Loyal Order of Moose,
Highlands County Lodge No.
2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon
Park. Cards start at 4 p.m.
Music outside Tiki Hut at 3
p.m. Lodge phone number
452-0579.
* Overeaters Anonymous,
meets from 4-5 p.m. in sec-
ond floor conference room No.
3 at Florida Hospital Heartland
Medical Center, 4200 Sun 'N
Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 382-
7731. No dues, fees or weigh-
ins. For details on the organi-
zation, go to wwwoa.org.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the
club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring.
Call 655-4007.
* Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 offers NASCAR racing in
the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar
open and kitchen open from


2-5 p.m. Lodge is at 11675
U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-
3920.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880 serves hamburgers
from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays
poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post,
1224 County Road 621 East,
Lake Placid. Call 699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 plays euchre at
1:30 p.m. and E&J Karaoke is
from 4:30-7:30 p.m. at the
post, 2011 SE Lakeview
Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902.


HEALTHY LIVING


Regular foot care can


prevent diabetic amputation


Many Americans know to
associate fever with illness.
However, healthcare profes-
sionals know that, when it
comes to diabetes, some
parts of a patient's body,
from their hair to their toes,
can aid in diagnosis.
Eight percent of the U.S.
population has diabetes, but
nearly 6 million people are
undiagnosed. According to
the American Podiatric
Medical Association, some
foot problems can help doc-
tors discover diabetes.
Diabetes can cause nerve
damage in people's feet,
which can easily lead to
amputation.
In the United States, more
than 60 percent of the
patients who receive non-
traumatic lower-limb ampu-
tations have diabetes. In
2004, almost 71,000
Americans with diabetes
needed amputations. Luckily,
most diabetic amputations
can be prevented through
vigilant foot care.
Diabetes can cause
patients to lose sensation in
their extremities; therefore, a
patient with diabetes might


not notice
injuries to
their feet
until seri-
ous infec-
tion
occurs. In
most
cases,
Foot patients
can avoid
Care amputa-
Dr. Joni Jones tion by
working
regularly with a podiatrist.
Once diagnosed, patients
with diabetes can prevent
amputation by creating a
foot care plan. Plans should
include check-ups with a
podiatrist and daily foot
inspections. Those with the
disease need to be especially
careful about foot care and
should always work with a
podiatrist to determine the
best preventative treatments.
Early diagnosis can help
prevent severe nerve dam-
age. For patients at risk for
developing diabetes, some
foot conditions can be an
early warning sign. Patients
should see a podiatrist if
they notice the following


conditions:
Calluses, blisters, or
dry and cracked skin any-
where on the foot can imply
poor circulation or foot
health; especially if you
don't feel them or they take
two or more weeks to heal.
Look for this: Fragile,
shiny, or hairless skin. which
can denote decreased circu-
lation to the foot.
Check shoes for torn
linings or foreign objects. If
they don't irritate you when
you walk, you might have
nerve damage. Other warn-
ing signs include foot defor-
mities like hammertoes, a
past history of foot ulcers, or
lower leg or thigh pain when
walking.
All diabetics. Type I
and Type II, should see a
foot doctor. They are espe-
cially trained in diagnosing
problems and educating dia-
betic patients.

Dr Joni Jones is a podiatrist in
Sebring who can be reached at
382-3228, stop by her office at
206 West Center Avenue,
Sebring or mail to P.O. Box
1719, Sebring, FL 33871-1719.


Parents lose high court


appeal in vaccine case


By MARK SHERMAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
Supreme Court closed the
courthouse door Tuesday to
parents who want to sue drug
makers over claims that their
children developed autism
and other serious health
problems from vaccines. The
ruling was a stinging defeat
for families dissatisfied with
how they fared before a spe-
cial no-fault vaccine court.
The court voted 6-2
against the parents of a child
who sued the drug maker
Wyeth in Pennsylvania state
court for the health problems
they say their daughter, now
19, suffered from a vaccine
she received in infancy.
Justice Antonin Scalia,
writing for the court, said
Congress set up a special
vaccine court in 1986 to han-
dle such claims as a way to
provide compensation to
injured children without
driving drug manufacturers
from the vaccine market. The
idea, he said, was to create a
system that spares the drug
companies the costs of
defending against parents'
lawsuits.
Justices Ruth Bader
Ginsburg and Sonia
Sotomayor dissented.
Nothing in the 1986 law
"remotely suggests that
Congress intended such a
result," Sotomayor wrote,
taking issue with Scalia.
Scalia's opinion was the
latest legal setback for par-
ents who felt they got too lit-
tle from the vaccine court or
failed to collect at all.
Such was the case for
Robalee and Russell
Bruesewitz of Pittsburgh,
who filed their lawsuit after
the vaccine court rejected
their claims for compensa-
tion. According to the law-
suit, their daughter, Hannah,
was a healthy infant until she
received the diphtheria,
tetanus and pertussis vaccine
in April 1992. The vaccine
was made by Wyeth, now
owned by Pfizer, Inc.
Within hours of getting the
DPT shot, the third in a
series of five, the baby suf-
fered a series of debilitating
seizures. Hannah continues
to suffer from residual
seizure disorder, the lawsuit
said.
A federal trial judge and
the Philadelphia-based 3rd
U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals ruled in favor of
Wyeth. Indeed, state and fed-
eral appeals courts have
almost always sided with the


vaccine manufacturer in pre-
venting the lawsuits from
going forward.
Scalia confirmed that out-
come Tuesday. He said that
when a vaccine is properly
prepared and is accompanied
by proper directions and
warnings, lawsuits over its
side effects are not allowed
under the 1986 law.
"Vaccine manufacturers
fund from their sales an
informal, efficient compensa-
tion program for vaccine
injuries," Scalia said.
"In exchange they avoid
costly tort litigation and the
occasional disproportionate


jury verdict."
The American Academy of
Pediatrics, representing more
than 60,000 doctors, praised
the decision. "Childhood
vaccines are among the great-
est medical breakthroughs of
the last century," said Dr.
Marion Burton, the group's
president. "Today's Supreme
Court decision protects chil-
dren by strengthening our
national immunization sys-
tem and ensuring that vac-
cines will continue to prevent
the spread of infectious dis-
eases in this country."
Pfizer also applauded the
decision.


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Page 6B


HEALTHY LIVING


Ne-vs-Sun Friday. February 25. 2011


www. newssun.com


Small dietary


changes can make


a big difference


ARA Content
Are you one of the mil-
lions of middle-aged
Americans who resolved to
improve your health this
year, through diet, exercise
or other lifestyle changes?
If so, you know that it's not
easy to change old habits -
especially the salty, sugary
and fatty ones that taste so
good.
Unfortunately, poor diet
is a vital problem for a
growing majority of the
nation's population, partic-
ularly the baby boomer
generation. Obesity is the
nation's top health concern
and poor diet is a major
contributing factor, accord-
ing to the U.S. Department
of Agriculture (USDA) and
Department of Health and
Human Services (HHS) as
reported in the Dietary
Guidelines for Americans.
The report cites data indi-
cating 72 percent of men
and 64 percent of women
are overweight or obese,
with about one-third of
adults being obese.
Not only does a diet high
in calories and low in nutri-
ent density lead to weight
gain, but neglecting the
vital nutrients found in
whole grains, milk, fruits
and vegetables may
increase your risk of can-
cer, heart disease and other
chronic health problems.
But even if you never grew
out of your childhood dis-
like of spinach, you can
make healthier choices in
.the kitchen without sacri-
ficing taste.
The latest Dietary
Guidelines highlight sever-
al tactics to improve
adults' health and lengthen
life expectancy.
Recommendations for
slight but effective diet
adjustments include:

Increase vegetable
and fruit intake
You know fruits and veg-
gies are good for you, but
not everyone enjoys the
crunch of a celery or carrot
stick. The nutrients found
in fruits and vegetables are
extremely important to
maintaining a healthy
lifestyle. The antioxidants
in these nutrient-rich whole
foods have been shown to
decrease risk of chronic
health problems, including
a number of cancers. The
USDA suggests adults
should consume five serv-
ings of fruits and vegeta-
bles each day, but many
people don't reach this goal
and instead reach for
unhealthy snacks because
of time, convenience and


availability.
You can get your daily
servings in a tasty, on-the-
go treat. With the help of a
high-powered Vitamix
5200 machine, you can
transform less-than-appeal-
ing produce into a smooth,
sweet, yet nutrient-packed
smoothie. For example, the
Vitamix Going Green
recipe combines pineapple,
banana, ice and spinach -
yes, spinach into a deli-
cious smoothie that even
kids enjoy. The 5200's
powerful blades pulverize
the cell walls of whole
fruits and vegetables,
releasing the full nutrients
found in the seeds and skin.
Your favorite fruity flavors
will overpower the less
appealing, and your tongue
won't even know it's tast-
ing better health.

Increase whole
grain intake
Nutrition experts agree
Americans consume too
many refined grains, and
the new Dietary Guidelines
suggest one half of all
grains consumed in a day
should be whole grains.
Choosing whole wheat
bread and pasta rather than
the nutrition-lacking white
versions is a small change
that can make a big differ-
ence. Some high-powered
blending machines can
even grind whole grains for
making your own healthy
bread, pancake and other
dough-based recipes. Just
make sure not to combat
your positive move toward
whole grains with a nega-
tive overload of spreads or
sauces full of trans fat.

Individuals 50 and
older
The 2010 Dietary
Guidelines recommend
those aged 50 years and
older consume foods forti-
fied with vitamin B12, or
take dietary supplements
for healthy aging. This
nutrient is key to maintain-
ing normal function of the
brain and nervous system
and affects energy produc-
tion. Many breakfast cere-
als and other processed
foods are fortified with
vitamin B12 and you may
also find the vitamin in pill
form. Vitamin B12 is vital
to red blood cell and DNA
production, and increasing
intake has additional bene-
fits including higher energy
levels. Studies show
absorption of vitamin B12
decreases while aging, so
adding this nutrient to a
healthy daily diet is impor-
tant for those over 50.


ARA Content
Whip up nutrient-rich and appealing snacks with the
help of a high-powered blender.


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Dear Pharmacist: My
eyes are so sensitive to light
that I have to reach for my
sunglasses as soon as I step
out the door. Can you offer
any help with this problem?
E.R., Silver Springs

Answer: If sunglasses are
desired for normal outdoor
light, your eyes are overly
sensitive to glare. Another
symptom would be excessive
sensitivity to light from
computer screens, which I
can vouch for personally
since my job requires
lengthy stays in front of a
computer. If you have this
problem, you likely squint
against the glare of oncom-
ing traffic at night. You
know who you are.
I can recommend a couple
of nutrients, lutein and zeax-
anthin. They're so powerful
at improving the eyes' sensi-
tivity to glare that they've
actually been dubbed "natu-
ral sunglasses." These nutri-
ents should be perfectly safe
to take if you also use any
type of prescribed eye drops
such as timolol, Xalatan,
Restasis, Zaditor, Acular,
etc. Eye-nourishing nutrients
are also beneficial for people
who take over-the-counter
allergy eye drops or "artifi-
cial tears." See, the dietary
supplement nourish the reti-
na and optic nerve inside
your body, while the drops
address outward symptoms.
When an eye doctor shines
that light into your eyes, he
sees your retina, which
appears bright yellow. It's
yellow for a reason. The
cells of your retina pick up
and incorporate yellow nutri-
ents known as carotenoids
into their cell structure.
Guess what two nutrients are
yellow? Zeaxanthin and
lutein. This is why the
carotenoids like zeaxanthin,
lutein (and natural beta
carotene) are so important
for vision. In a 2008 study,
researchers at the University
of Georgia found that these
two nutrients significantly


Dear Pharmacist
Suzy Cohen

increased the carotenoid
content in the study partici-
pants' retinas. They also
experienced relief from glare
sensitivity. Participants took
2 milligrams of zeaxanthin
and 10 milligrams of lutein a
day. It helps if you consume
healthy foods like tomatoes,
peppers, spinach, carrots and
other leafy greens.
There are many natural
nutrients that can prevent or
relieve hundreds of diseases
and conditions. One of my
favorite books and a great
resource for natural symp-
tom relief is NutriCures:
Foods and Supplements That
Work with Your Body to
Relieve Symptoms and
Speed Healing by Alice
Feinstein. The author pro-
vides scientific basis for her
recommendations and I
appreciate knowing that
there is science to back up
the claims. It's an easy read.
Speaking of vision, I
would be remiss if I didn't
mention the king of the
carotenoids, "astaxanthin"
which has been the buzz
word lately. The dietary sup-
plement is sold by several
high-quality makers such as
NOW foods, Vitamin Shoppe
and NSI brands. "BioAstin,"
the best-selling dietary sup-
plement in all of Hawaii,
just became available to
health food stores nation-
wide on the mainland.
Emerging studies for this
nutrient are super exciting,
because astaxanthin can pro-
tect our vision, ease arthritis,
fibromyalgia pain, and
improve cholesterol and
fatigue.


"Care You Can Trust, Service You Deserve"


Care Unit

NowAccptn


CROWNpOINTE


863-386-1060


5005 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, FL 33872







- s ve is TodaT.
* "'E ~ .... "


Did you know?
Estrogen-containing drugs
are drug muggers' of iodine,
which you need for breast
health, proper weight loss
and thyroid hormone.

Suzy Cohen is a registered phar-
macist and the author of 'The
24-Hour Pharmacist' and 'Real
Solutions.' For more informa-
tion, visit www.
DearPharmacist. com. This
information is not intended to
treat, diagnose or cure your con-
dition.


- I ..


7200 S. George Blvd.. Sebring Florida
(863) 382-2032


863-385-3497
or.. -r. .. 4p
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LIVING BRINGS IT IN. WE TAKE IT OUT.


STANLEY STEEMRE-





AVON PARK


Call for

Our

Weekly

Specials.

452-5800


SEBRING 382-3363
LAKE PLACID 465-1530

STANLEY STEEMER.


. .... ....... . ... . ..


Some supplements are



natural sunglasses


Snapshots

Telephones to be
distributed
SEBRING Hearing
Impaired Persons will dis-
tribute amplified tele-
phones to Florida residents
who have a hearing or
speech loss, in the confer-
ence room at Nu-Hope of
Elder Care Services. 6414
U.S. 27 South, from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday,
March 3.
By appointment only.
Call (941) 743-8347.

Outreach events
planned
Ace Homecare commu-
nity outreach events for the
coming week include:
Monday 1 p.m..
Caregivers Support Group.
Crown Pointe Assisted
Living Community, Sun 'N
Lake Boulevard, Sebring.
Tuesday 10:30 a.m..
Health Fair, Fair Havens
Apartments. Spinks Road,
Sebring; 1 p.m., Health
Fair, Groves, behind
Sebring Diner, U.S. 27,
Sebring.
Wednesday 8 a.m.,
Health Fair, Villa Del Sol,
behind Winn Dixie, U.S.
27, Avon Park; 9 a.m.,
Health Fair, AP Meals site,
Main Street, Avon Park.
Thursday 9 a.m..
Caregiver training,,
Balmoral Assisted Living
Facility, 93 Balmoral
Road, RT 621, Lake
Placid; 10:30 a.m.,
Caregivers support group.
Balmoral Assisted Living
Facility.


. 'lf\ 1jmi di v








www. newssun.comrn


News-Sun Friday. February 25. 2011


RELIGION


Church News


Atonement
Lutheran Church
SEBRING The
Eighth Sunday after
Epiphany worship service
will be led by the Rev.
Jefferson Cox with Holy
Eucharist. Guest soloist
Martha Buckta will sing
"Be Thou My Vision."
Sunday's Agape
Fellowship dinner meeting
will be hosted by Tom and
Lisa Portz and Bonnie
Lipinjki at 4 p.m. in the
fellow ship hall.

Avon Park Church
of Christ
AVON PARK "Take
Up Your Cross Daily"
(Luke 9:23). will be the
message presented by
Larry Roberts, minister.
The Sunday evening
service will be a Bible
study from the book of
Psalms.
Avon Park Church of
Christ is at 200 S. Forest
Ave. For information, call
453-4692.

Christ Lutheran
Church
AVON PARK Eighth
Sunday after Epiphany
Pastor Scott McLean will
preach a sermon titled
"Seeking God's Kingdom
in this Life." The church is
at 1320 County Road 64,
east of the Avon Park High
School.
Visitors are welcome to
worship and fellowship.
For more information call
471-2663 or search the
, Web for christluther-
anavonpark.org.

Christian Science
?: Church
SEBRING The lesson
,f sermon on Sunday morn-
ing is titled "Christ Jesus."
;, The keynote is from I John'
4, "In this was manifested
the love of God toward us,
because that God sent his
onl) begotten Son into the
World, that we might live
through him."
The church is at 146 N.
Franklin St.

Christian Training
Church
SEBRING Rev.
Linda M. Downing will
bring the message titled
"The White Horse of
Deception" at the Sunday
morning service. The
Wednesday night Bible
study will continue the
book of Hebrews.

Emmanuel United
Church of Christ
SEBRING The Rev.
George Miller will deliver
the Sunday morning ser-
mon, "Oroering A la
Carte," with Scripture
taken from Matthew 6:24-
134.
The church is 1.7 miles
West of U.S. 27 on County
SRoad 634 (Hammock
- Road). Call 471-1999 or
visit sebringem-
manuelucc.com.

First Baptist
Church of Avon
Park
AVON PARK Sunday
morning. Rev. Jon Beck,
senior pastor, will speak on
Philippians 2:12-18. He
will speak on "The sover-


RELIGION GUIDELINES:
The News-Sun .publish-
es religion news on
Friday.
The submission dead-
line is 5 p.m. Monday to
be considered for publi-
cation in the following
Friday's paper.
Submit items to the
News-Sun's from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. weekdays; fax
to 385-2453; send e-
mail to editor@news-
sun.com; or mail to
Lifestyle Editor, News-
Sun, 2227 U.S. 27
South, Sebring, FL
33870. For information,
call 385-6155, ext.
516.

eignty of God and free
will" at the evening serv-
ice.
The church is at 100 N.
Lake Ave. For more infor-
mation call 453-6681 or e-
mail infor@fbcap.net.

First Baptist
Church of Placid
Lakes
LAKE PLACID On
Sunday, Pastor Darryl
George will continue
preaching The Certainty
Series with the sermon
titled "The Anointing of
The Servant!" with regards
to Luke 1:39-45. There
will be no Sunday evening
service. The Hands of
Christ Food Ministry will
distribute food to the
needy at 5 p.m.
The church is at the cor-
ner of Washington and
Kemper avenues in Placid
Lakes. For more informa-
tion, call 465-5126 from 8
a.m. to noon Monday
through Thursday or e-mail
the church at placid-
lakes@hotmail.com.

First Christian
Church
AVON PARK Special
guest speaker this week
will be from Christian
Financial Resources. The
speaker will share about
the mission that he serves
with, supporting the
churches in Florida finan-'
cially. Then as an added
blessing he will bring the
message through Scripture.
First Christian Church of
Avon Park is at 1016 W.
Camphor St. (behind the
Wachovia Bank). Call 453-
5334 or e-mail firstchris-
tianap@embarqmail.com
with any questions or to
request information. The
church Web site is
www.firstchristianap.com.

First Christian
Church (Disciples
of Christ)
SEBRING At the
Lord's Table this Sunday
morning will be Dick and
Sharron Campbell.
Communion will be served
by Sandi Laufer, Carol
Graves, Gretchen Ames
and Jayne Weldy.
Greeting the congrega-
tion will be Dick
Asmussen. Noel and
Juanita Roberts will work
with children's church.
Lighting the candles will
be Nina Kunsak. Joyce
Winstel will be with the
children in the nursery this
month.
The whole month of
February was set aside as

Continued on page 8B


What are two things that last forever?


Forever ... now that's a long time. In
fact, time becomes irrelevant when you
are dealing with eternity. This life we
now live is as a vapor: It is here for a
few passing moments and it's gone. But
have you ever thought about what hap-
pens after this life is over?
Recently I came up with the follow-
ing riddle ... "What two things last for-
ever one is God's and the other is
man's?" Hint: They both came by the
breath of God. Answer: God's Word
and man's soul. The only way God can
classify these as eternal entities is
because He too is eternal. The Bible
says, "The Lord is King forever. Thy
throne 0 God is forever." God has
communicated with-mankind through-
out the ages and has chosen to preserve
His Words forever. The Bible says.
"Forever, 0 Lord, thy word is settled in
heaven. The grass withereth, the flower
fadeth: but the word of our God shall
stand for ever. (Psalm 119:89 and
Isaiah 40:8)
God esteems His Word above His
own name. Psalm 138:2 says, "... thou
hast magnified thy word above all thy
name." Since God's Word is eternal and
of such supreme value, should it not


E.



Timeless
Treasure
Luke
Knickerbocker


also carry the utmost
importance with you
and me? The eternal
Word of God has a
direct connection
with man's eternal
soul. I Peter 1:23
says. "Being born
again, not of corrupt-
ible seed, but of
incorruptible, by the
word of God, which
liveth and abideth


for ever." Everybody wants to live for-
ever, but you must meet God's criteria
to have eternal life. We must be born
again ... but how? The eternal Word of
God has the answer.
In Genesis 1:26, we learn that we
are made in the image of God. This
makes mankind superior to animals and
the rest of God's creation. We have an
eternal soul and spirit that will exist
forever in Heaven or Hell. In
Revelation, the condemned sinner will
be tormented in the Lake of fire with
the devil for ever and ever. However, in
Revelation 22:5, we find the forgiven
sinner (saint) will reign forever. In
which category are you?


We all have an appointment with the
Just Judge. Will you admit that accord-
ing to the law of God. you are guilty of
breaking His commands? The penalty
is death, separation from God, and eter-
nal torment. The Bible tells us good
news though. "But God commendeth
(demonstrated) his love toward us. in
that, while we were yet sinners, Christ
died for us." (Romans 5:8) Jesus ful-
filled the law, proving he was pure and
righteous. He willingly died in your
place to pay for your sin debt. He rose
again providing victory for all who
receive his gift of eternal life. Christ
did this for your eternal soul.
Will you believe the eternal Word of
God? What will you do about your
eternal soul? It really depends on what
you do with Jesus. Mark 8:36 says,
"For what shall it profit a man, if he
shall gain the whole world, and lose his
own soul?

Luke Knickerbocker is the pastor of Bethel
Baptist Church in Lake Placid, 216 E. Pdrk
St. E-mail him at knickprint@yahoo.com.
Their church Web site is
visitbethelbaptist.com.


Don't be afraid to step out of your comfort zone


Valentine's Day has come
and gone. For the true
romantic, it lasts all year
long.
We are told "beauty is in
the eye of the beholder."
We've seen the 6-foot model
with the 5-foot-2 fellow,
looking so in love. We can't
believe it because they look
so out of sync. Truth is
stranger than fiction.
When we're young
teenagers, we imagine the
mate we'd want to end up
with ... someone like the
"star" on the posters in our
bedrooms knowing that's
not gonna happen, but we
dream on anyway. Then
after dating for awhile, we
realize that "dreamy" guy or
gal doesn't exist: Sure
there's a lot of cuties out
there, but we just don't find
that match for ourselves.
Then we find the ones
with "a lot of potential." We
figure we can fix them up, if
only he or she would do
this, be that, etc., we could
really go places. But we can
no more change them, than
we can ourselves. And most
people don't wish to change.
So what if we changed the
whole approach and just
started looking closer at that
guy or gal friend, the one
whom we confide in, who
has seen our good, bad and
ugly side, yet remains our
friend. Could there be a
potential mate there? Do we
reach for the "unreachable"
because we're not quite
ready to get serious and
know we won't obtain them;
so there's no risk of getting
hurt again?







DidYou




KNOW,


In Florida, the bicycle is
legally defined as a vehicle.

Bicyclists using a public
roadway are considered
operators of motor vehicles
and are responsible for
observing all traffic laws.

With few exceptions, there
is only one road and it
is up to motorists and
bicyclists to treat each
other with care and respect.

Adherence to the law is the
foundation of respect.


A fictitious example
would be: A young lady has
a picture of Mr. Right in her
head. He's sophisticated,
suave, smooth, prosperous
and only has eyes for her.
His life revolves around her.
She is his world. This is
what she thinks she wants.
Dreaming and reality are two
different worlds. The new
wears off pretty fast and the
next thing you know she's
got a stalker on her hands.
Talk about a Lifetime movie.
Instead of meeting this
Don Juan fellow, she meets a
"Joe the handy-man" kind of
guy. He's funny, smart on a
practical level (like how to
unstop your sink) and is sen-
sitive to your mood swings.
His presence just seems to


A Heart's
Journey
Janelle Dennison

perk you up and the more
you get to know him, the
more you confide in him
about every day life. He
encourages you to hang out
with your friends, offers to
clean out your garage, just
really helpful.
But then the unthinkable
happens. He asks you out on
a date. What would your
friends think? What would,
your parents think? He does
not match your dream guy at
all. But you like him. He's
funny, honest and easy to
hang out with. So you give
him a try.


A year later you're marry-
.ing this Handyman Joe guy,
happier than you ever
thought you'd be. He's a
perfect fit.
Sometimes it takes step-
ping out of our comfort
zone, try new things, maybe
you don't know "you" as
well as you think? Life is
short ... don't let another
Valentine's Day go by with-
out someone special in your
life. We all need to love and
be loved; it makes the world
go around.
God is the perfect
Romantic. He created love.
He is love. Ask for His guid-
ance and see what happens.

Janelle Dennison can be reached
at 385-6155 ext. 539.


Heart of Higffiand


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Tickets: $12.00


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Lake Placid: (863) 699-0743
Sebring: (863) 382-6632
Polk County: (863) 638-1598


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www.newssun.corn


News-Sun + Friday. February 25, 2011


Page 8B


RELIGION


Church News
Continued from page 7B
"Stewardship" month and the pro-
grams focus on how to use time.
health, talents, relationships. pros-
perity and the Gospel in a partner-
ship with God. The pastor's ser-
mon is titled "What Type of Giver
Should We Be?" taken from II
Corinthians 9:6-11.
When we give to the Lord, do
we give with a loving, generous
heart or do we give simply out of
obligation? Come and hear how we
can worship the Lord with giving.
The church is at 510 Poinsettia
Ave. Call 385-0352 for more infor-
mation.

First Presbyterian
Church of Sebring
SEBRING "Does Paul Need
an Alibi?" is the title of Sunday
morning's sermon given by the
Rev. Darrell A. Peer.
Monday, Feb. 28 Session meet-
ing, 2 p.m. Deacons meeting, 4
p.m., in the conference room.
Tuesday, March 1 Ruth Circle
from 9:30-10 a.m. (call for meeting
place). Grief Support Group, 3
p.m., in the adult classroom. Youth
Group (ages 11-18) from 4-7 p.m.,
in fellowship hall. Homework time,
Bible study and dinner included.
Newcomers wanted.
Wednesday, March 2 Choir
rehearsal 5:30 p.m., in the adult
classroom.
Thursday, March 3 -
Confirmation Class, 3:45-4:45
p.m., in the teen classroom.


First Presbyterian
Church of Avon Park
AVON PARK -- On Sunday
morning, the pastor's sermon is
titled "Blood Relatives" based on
Matthew 13:46-50.
The choir's introit will be "Holy
Ground' and the anthem "When
We Worship God Through Music."
Maxine Johnson, adult Bible
study teacher, continues the study
of David in II Samuel Chapter 10,
which tells of the defeat of the
Ammonites and Syrians. Wendy
Garcia teaches the youth class and
discusses issues of today.
On Monday, the Crafty Ladies
meet from 10 a.m. until noon.
On Wednesday, the pastor will
continue the study of Revelation
for Bible study.
On Saturday, March 5, the
Women's Ministries will hold its
quarterly luncheon at noon. Sarah
Circle is hostess. The emphasis is
missions and an offering will be
taken.
The church is at 215 E. Circle
St. (with two entrances on
Lagrande Street). For more infor-
mation, call the church office at
453-3242.

First United Methodist
Church of Sebring
SEBRING The Rev. A.C.
Bryant will bring the message "A
Heart Not Troubled" with Scripture
from John 14:1-31 on Sunday.
Wednesday, the "Growing with
God" family night continues in the


Family Life Center.
Family Movie Night on
Saturday. Feb. 26 in the Family
Life Center will be from 6-8 p.m.
"'Upside" will be shown.
Fine Food and Fellowship
Chicken Dinner is being held
Sunday, March 6 following the
church services. This will benefit
the youth fund for music camp this
summer.
The church is at 126 S. Pine St.
Call the church office for informa-
tion at 385-5184.

Heartland Christian
Church
SEBRING Pastor Ted
Moore's sermon for both services
this week will be "Strength in
Weakness: Gideon" with Scripture
from Judges 6:1-7:25.
Services will also include
George Kelly singing "0 What A
Savior" during the early service,
and Mary VanHoorweghe and
Flossi Moore singing "Holy is He"
in the mid-morning service.
Melanie Winegardner will sing a
special selection. The Heartland
Singers will sing "Known Only to
Him."
The church is at 2705 Alternate
Route 17 South in Sebring (behind
Publix), phone number 314-9693.

Memorial United
Methodist Church
LAKE PLACID At the
Heritage Worship Service and the
Celebration Worship Service on
Sunday, Claude Burnett, pastoral


assistant, will preach the third in a
series of sermons on "Love."
Rev. Fred Ball, senior pastor,
will preach at the New Song
Contemporary Service in Rob
Reynolds Hall at on "Crazy Love."
Mary Courtney will be in con-
cert in the Sanctuary at 6 p.m.
The church is at 500 Kent Ave.
For information, call 465-2422.

Parkway Free Will
Baptist Church
SEBRING The Sunday morn-
ing Bible lesson, "Coming of the
Son of Man," is taken from Mark
13. Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring
the message in the Sunday morning
service. The Sunday evening serv-
ice will be the end-of-the-month-
sing and fellowship time.

Resurrection Lutheran
Church
AVON PARK On the Eighth
Sunday of Epiphany, the sermon
will be based on the sixth chapter
of Matthew.
The Busy Bodies meet at 9 a.m.
Monday in Burke Hall. The Mid-
week Fragrance Free Service
begins at 7 p.m. Wednesday. JOY
Gathering meets at 2 p.m.
Thursday followed by choir prac-
tice at 3:30 p.m.

St. John United
Methodist Church
SEBRING On Sunday, Rev.
Ronald De Genaro's sermon topic
will be "What? Me Worry?" taken


from Matthew 6:24-34.

Southside Baptist Church
SEBRING The Rev. David
Altman will speak from the series,
"It's All About Jesus," in the study
of the book of Colossians.
Children's church and a nursery are
available. The Awana clubs meet at
5:30 p.m. In the 6 p.m. worship
service the pastor will continue in
the series "House of Prayer."
The church is at 379 S.
Commerce Ave. For information
call 385-0752.

Sebring Church of the
Brethren
SEBRING Pastor Keith
Simmons will be preaching on
"Who Leads?" and the gospel read-
ing will be on Psalm 23.
Sunday school will be led by the
Rev. Wendell Bohrer and will meet
in the Fidelis Room. They will be
studying "Coming of the Son of
Man." They will also be looking at
the Scripture Mark 13:14-27.
Children's Sunday school, "The
Kids' Zone." There is also a nurs-
ery available.
Don't forget "The Kids Zone" on
Wednesday evenings at 6:30 p.m.
after the meal.

Spring Lake Presbyterian,
Church
SEBRING Sunday morning,
Barbara Rose Walker will be the
guest speaker at the worship serv-

Continued on page 9B


PLACES To


WORSHIP


Places to Worship is a paid
advertisement in the News-Sun
that is published Friday and
Sunday. To find out more infor-
mation on how to place a listing
in this directory, call the News-
Sun at 385-6155, ext. 502.


APOSTOLIC

* Greater Faith Apostolic
Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. invites you to
come worship with us in spirit and
truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday. For information con-
tact 840-0152. Pastor Larry
Carmody.


ASSEMBLY OF GOD

* Christ Fellowship Church
(Assembly of God), 2935 New
Life Way. Bearing .His Name;
Preaching His Doctrine; and
Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping
God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship,
10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m.
Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-
0924.
* First Assembly of God, 4301
Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev.
Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday
School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship
and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.;
Evening Worship, 7 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night, (Adult
Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group,
Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-6431.


BAPTIST

* Avon Park Lakes Baptist
Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd.,
Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall,
Pastor. Christ centered and bibli-
cally based. Sunday worship serv-
ices, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Nursery facilities are available.
Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday
and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer
Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible
classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered
for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m.
Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556.
* Bethany Baptist Church
(GARBC) We are located at the
corner of SR17 and C-17A (truck
route) in Avon Park. Join us
Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for cof-
fee and doughnuts, followed with
Sunday School for all ages at 9:30.
Sunday morning worship service
begins at 10:30 a.m., and evening
worship service is at 6 p.m. On
Wednesday, the Word of Life teen
ministry and the Catylist class
(20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult
Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7
p.m. For more information go to
www.bethanybaptistap.com or call
the church office at 863-452-1136.
* Faith Missionary Baptist
Church, off State Road 17 North of
Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave.
Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday
Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation
available. Ken Lambert, Pastor.
Phone 386-5055.
* Fellowship Baptist Church,
1000 Maxwell St., Avon Park, FL


33825. Sunday: Sunday School,
9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; Wednesday: Evening
Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7
p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax:
453-6986. E-mail: offce@apfe//ow
ship.org; Web site, wwwapfellow
shoi. org.
* First Baptist Church of Avon
Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park.
Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared
Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy
Loomis, music director. Regular
Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m.
Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library
open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11
a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m.
Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening
Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10
a.m., basic computer
class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m.
conversational English and citizen-
,ship classes/Sonshine House.
Regular Wednesday schedule:
5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6
p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m.
Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. chil-
dren's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. chil-
dren's mission groups. Call 453-
6681 for details. Primera Mision
Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon
Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor.
Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m.,
Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship
Service. Wednesday schedule: 7
p.m., Bible study.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine
Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 mid-
way between Sebring and Lake
Placid). Your place for family,
friends and faith. Sunday morning
worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery
is provided for both services with
Children's Church at 1.1 a.m. Life
changing Bible Study for all ages
starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor
Allen Altvater leads the youth in
their quest to become more like
Christ. Sunday night worship at 6
p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and
Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with
youth worship in the youth facility,
and missions training for all chil-
dren. Call the church at 655-1524.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Placid, Knowing God's Heart and
Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal
Palm Street. (2 blocks south of
Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL
33852 (863) 465-3721, Email:
www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett
Morey, senior pastor. Sunday serv-
ices Traditional Service 9 a.m.,
Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m.
Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m.,
Senior Sunday Night and Sunday
Evening Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Activities: Family din-
ner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reser-
vations required). Adult-LifeSource
classes, prayer meeting, Youth
Intersections, and Kids K-5-
MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15
p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every
Tuesday for prayer breakfast and
women's prayer breakfast is at 8
a.m. every Wednesday, both at the
Family Restaurant.
N First Baptist Church of Lorida
located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida.
Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.
for all ages. Sunday worship serv-
ices are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Preschool care is provided at the
11 a.m. worship service.
Wednesday evening Bible Study
and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m.,
followed by adult choir rehearsal.


From September to May our youth
group meets. First Lorida is the
"Place to discover God's love." For
more information about the church
or the ministries offered, call 655-
1878.
* First Baptist Church, Sebring,
200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL
33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr.
David E. Richardson, senior pas-
tor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of
youth and activities. Contemporary
Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible
Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional
Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista
Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night
programs at the ROC begin 5:30
p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m.
Preschool and Mother's Day Out
for children age 6 weeks to 5 years
old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call
385-4704.
* Florida Avenue Baptist
Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon
Park. Mailing address is 710 W.
Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825.
Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D.
Girdley, pastor. Sunday School,
9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11
a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church;
Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday night programs for
children, youth and adults at 7 p.m.
* Independent Baptist Church,
5704 County Road 17 South,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday
School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship,
10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m.
Wednesday service, 7 p.m.
Fundamental, soul-winning, mis-
sion-minded, King James Bible
Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone
655-1899. Bus transportation.
* Leisure Lakes Baptist Church,
808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just
off of Miller at the west end of Lake
June) "Where the old fashion
gospel is preached." Sunday
School begins at 9:45 a.m.;
Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.;
Sunday Evening Service is at 6
p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the
church at 699-0671 for more infor-
mation.
* Maranatha Baptist Church
(GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east
of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle
Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9
a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.;
Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week
service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily
Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m.,
Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald
Webber and Associate Pastors
Don Messenger and Ted Ertle.
Phone 382-4301.
* Parkway Free Will Baptist
Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the
church where the "Son" always
shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and
Wednesday Evening Worship, 7
p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6
p.m. on the last Sunday of each
month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pas-
tor. Church phone: 382-3552.
Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated
with the National Association of
Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn.
* Sparta Road Baptist Church,
(SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev.
Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday
school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening


Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday:,
Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery
provided. For information, call 382-
0869.
* Southside Baptist Church
(GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave.,
Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor;
Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor.
Sunday School for all ages, 9:30
a.m.; Morning Worship Service,
10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten
through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.;
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30
p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and
Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for
under age 3 is available at all serv-
ices. Provisions for handicapped
and hard-of-hearing. Office phone,
385-0752.
* Sunridge Baptist Church,
(SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27
and Valerie, across from Florida
Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pas-
tor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.;
Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service,
6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible
Study, and Youth, 6:30
p.m.Nursery provided. For informa-
tion, call 382-3695.


CATHOLIC

* Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church, 595 East Main St., Avon
Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas
McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil
Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7
p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8
and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m.,
Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at
8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30
p.m. Saturday. Religious Education
Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday
for grades K through 8th.
Confirmation class is from 6:30-8
p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights
grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m.
Wednesday.
* St. Catherine Catholic Church,
820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing
address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL
33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe.
com. Very Rev. Jos6 Gonzalez,
V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30
and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 9 and 10:30
a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday
Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family
and Youth Center). Daily Masses 8
a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9
a.m. Saturday. Confessions: 3-3:45
p.m. Saturday, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first
Friday, or by appointment. Enroll
your students today for Catholic
School grades Pre-K3 through 5th
grade.
* St. James Catholic Church,
3380 Placidview Drive, Lake
Placid. 465-3215. Father Michael
J. Cannon. Mass schedule:
Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) -
Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8
a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9
a.m. December thru Easter -
Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m.,
9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9
a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30
a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9
a.m.


CHRISTIAN

* Eastside Christian Church,
101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL
33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27
on County Road 621), 465-7065.
Ray Culpepper, senior pastor.


Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.;
Worship Celebration with the
Lord's Supper each week 10:15
a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat
Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise
and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building
God's Kingdom for Everyone."
"Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and
Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!"
* Sebring Christian Church,
4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher;
Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor.
-Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening
service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday
night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by
classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours,
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Phone 382-6676.
* First Christian Church, 1016
W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL
33825; (863) 453-5334; on the
Web at www.firstchristianap.com.
Our motto is "Jesus is First at First
Christian Church." Greg Ratliff,
Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper,
Family Life Minister; Jon Carter,
Music Director. Bible School 9
a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study,
6 p.m.; Wednesday studies for all
ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for
all events.
* First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ), 510
Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of
Poinsettia and Eucalyptus),
Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-
0358 or 385-3435. The Rev.
Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast,
10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30
a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, Praise and Worship,
6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15
p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15
p.m.


CHRISTIAN &
MISSIONARY
ALLIANCE

* The Alliance Church of
Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road,
Sebring, FL 33875. Call 382-1343.
Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday
services: Sunday School meets at
9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship Service meets at 10:30
a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study
meets at 6 p.m. (off site);
Wednesday Prayer Gathering
meets at 6 p.m.


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

* Christian Science Church, 146
N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m.
morning worship and Sunday
school. Testimonial meetings at
4 p.m. each second and fourth
Wednesday. A free public reading
room/bookstore, located in the
church, is open before and after
church services. The Bible and the
Christian Science textbook,
'Science and Health with Key to
the Scriptures' by Mary Baker Eddy
are our only preachers. All are wel-
come to come and partake of the
comfort, guidance, support and
healing found in the lesson-ser-
mons.


CHURCH OF
BRETHREN

* Church of the Brethren, 700 S.
Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-1597.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

* Avon Park Church of Christ,
200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Minister: Larry Roberts.
Sunday Worship Services, 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities
are available at every service. Bible
Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered
classes for all ages. Church phone:
453-4692.
* Sebring Parkway Church of
Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443. We
would like to extend an invitation
for you and your family to visit with
us here at Sebring Parkway. Our
hours of service are: Sunday
Worship Service, 9 a.m.; Sunday
Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Service, 6 p.m.;
Wednesday Service, 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF
NAZARENE

* First Church of the Nazarene
of Avon Park, P.O. Box 1118.,
Avon Park, FL 33825-1118. 707 W.
Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor.
Sunday: Sunday school begins at
9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wor-
ship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening
service at 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening service is at 7 p.m. with
special services for children and
adults. Special services once a
month for seniors (Prime Time) and
Ladies ministries. If you need any
more information, call 453-4851.
* First Church of the Nazarene
of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake
Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852.
Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning
worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv-,
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7.
p.m. Classes for adult children and
youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim
Taylor.


CHURCHES OF
CHRIST IN
CHRISTIAN UNION

* Community Bible Church -
Churches of Christ in Christian
Union, (Orange Blossom
Conference Center) 1400 C-17A
North (truck route), Avon Park.
Presenting Jesus Christ as the
answer for time and eternity.
Sunday morning worship service,
10:30 a.m. Nursery provided.
Junior Church activities at same
time for K-6 grade. Sunday School
Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m.
(Transportation available.) Sunday
evening praise and worship serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening
prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and
youth activities at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Everyone is welcome,
please come worship with us. Don
Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone
452-0088.


A& NIL, JM-A JR-A AL '%-M AL %-W A. 'M










www. newssun.com


News-Sun Friday. February 25. 2011


Page 9B


RELIGION


Church of Brethren
plan auction, food cafe
SEBRING Sebring Church
of the Brethren will hold its
annual auction and food cafe on
Saturday. The church is at 700
S. Pine St. (in fellowship hall).
The auction will feature two
new homemade quilts, pies,
bread, sports cards and much
more.
The food cafe opens at 11
a.m., serving homemade soups,
sandwiches, desserts and
drinks. There will also be a
silent auction from 11 a.m. to 1
p.m., featuring new items,
antiques, etc.
Proceeds will benefit church
outreach.
Contact Bev Hann (382-
4684) or the church (385-1597).

Sunday evening
concert at Memorial
United Methodist
LAKE PLACID The pub-
lic is cordially invited to a
musical concert featuring Mary
Courtney at Memorial United
Methodist Church Sanctuary at
6 p.m. Sunday.
Courtney was awarded
female Vocalist of the Year. Her
testimony reflects how her love
of Christ has turned all the pain


Snapshots

in her life for good.
There is no admission charge.
A love offering will be received
to cover her ministry expenses.
The church is at 500 Kent
Ave. Call 465-2422.

Georges perform at
Leisure Lakes Sunday
LAKE PLACID Gospel
music with a Nashville style,
featuring Julian and Bonnie
George, will be performed dur-
ing the 11 a.m. Sunday service
at Leisure Lakes Baptist Church
of Lake Placid, during the con-
tinuation of the winter concert
series.
The husband and wife musi-
cal duo from Nashville, Tenn.
will be making their first
appearance in Highlands
County. Their songs are played
throughout the United States
and the world via radio. Several
of their songs have been in the
top 10, with "Destination
Heaven" reaching number two.
Their music and humor appeal
to adults with a variety of musi-
cal tastes.
Following the morning serv-
ice there will be dinner on the
grounds served in the church
fellowship hall. All are wel-


come.
The church is at the western
end of Lake June. From U.S. 27
take Lake June Road to Miller,
turning north on Wildflower.
Call 699-0671.

GriefShare offered at
First Presbyterian
Church
LAKE PLACID -
GriefShare is a wonderful pro-
gram that gives special help to
those who are dealing with the
difficult process of grief. It is
often a hard and lonely path,
especially after things "settle"
down and things go "back to
normal." However, when we
lose a loved one, nothing is
normal and indeed it will never
be the same again.
GriefShare helps those who
are in this place. GriefShare
goes through 13 weekly ses-
sions. Included in this program
is a workbook, a 30-minute
DVD that helps with the griev-
ing process and a time to share
one another's heartaches in a
small group setting. Christ is at
the center of every class and
discussion. He is our ultimate
"burden-bearer," so we learn
much about Him.
The Spring 13-week cycle
will begin Sunday, March 6 at


First Presbyterian Church in the
church library from 9:30-11
a.m. This will be the final
group until August.
This program is open to the
community and anyone can
come at any time. Call 699-
0132 or the church office at
465-2742.

'Life in the Spirit'
seminar set
LAKE PLACID The
Prayer Community of St. James
Catholic Church, 3380 Placid
View Drive, will host a "Life In
The Spirit Seminar" for all
parishioners of St. James and
any interested people from
other faith denominations. The
seminar will be on six consecu-
tive Tuesdays starting on March
8 and ending on April 12. The
sessions will be in the Social
Hall from 7-8:30 p.m.
The seminar helps partici-
pants realize the fire, the
breath, the gifts, the fruit and
the gifts of the Spirit. It invites
the participants to gather and
prepare for a very personal
revitalization of the Spirit's
presence in our lives.
Through each session we will
be able to deepen our relation-

Continued on page 10B


Church News

Continued from page 8B
ice. She has more than 45 years of experi-
ence in health delivery and medical mission.
A registered nurse, she has certification in
midwifery and psychiatric nursing.
Walker served in nursing in Jamaica,
Africa, the United States and at the King
Fahad Hospital in Saudi Arabia, where she
organized and opened the OB/GYN unit.
She and her husband, the Rev. Dr.
Desmond Walker, live in Sebring.
The church is observing "Celebrating the
Gifts of Women." A potluck meal will follow
the worship service.

Spring Lake United Methodist
Church

SEBRING Spring Lake United
Methodist Church is at 8170 Cozumel Lane.
The pastor's sermon on Sunday will be
"Here Am I, Send Me".

The Way Church

SEBRING The worship service will be
led by the Wine Family Singers from Lake
Wales. John Wine, the father of the family,
will bring the message.
Sunday at 6:30 p.m. a film will be shown.
The Way Church is at 1005 N. Ridgewood
Drive, Sebring. The church phone is 471-
6140; the pastor's cell is 214-6190. For
church information and the pastor's mes-
sages go to www.thewaychurch.org.


PLACES To WORSHIP


EPISCOPAL

* The Episcopal Church of the
Redeemer.Service time is 9:30
with Holy Communion. Coffee hour
following services. Newcomers
welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail
redeemer1895@aol.com Web site:
redeemeravon.com. The church is
at 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park
(two miles north of Sun 'N Lake
Boulevard, across from Wells
Dodge.)
* St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL
33870. Sunday Services: Holy
Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy
Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek
service on Wednesday at 6 p.m.
Sunday School for all ages at 9
a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m.
until,15 minutes after the 10 a.m.
service ends. Wednesday: Adult
Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are
always welcome. The Rev. Jim
Kurtz, rector. Church office 385-
7649, for more information.
* St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal
Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-
0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers,
Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m.,
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening: Holy Communion with
Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child
care available at the 8 a.m. and
10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come
see what makes us different.


GRACE BRETHREN

* Grace Brethren Church, 3626
Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-
0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior
pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m.,
10:45 a.m. and 6 p,m.; Wednesday
services at 7 p.m. We offer 'Kid
City" Children's Ministry throughout
all services, and there are variosu
other classes for teens, married
couples, "prime-timers," and Bible
studies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day
Care, Preschool and After-School
Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For
registration call: 385-3111). Check
us out on the Web at wwwsebring-
grace. org.


INTERDENOMINATIONAL

* World Harvest and Restoration
Ministries, (non-denominational)
2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-
3771. Sunday service: Sunday
School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11
a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m.
prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor:
W.H. Rogers.


LUTHERAN

* Atonement Lutheran Church
(ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview
Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen,
Deacon, Spiritual Leader. Jim
Helwig, organist/choir director.
Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy
Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee
hour on the first and third Sunday
of each month. Council meeting on
the first Monday of month; Ladies
Group WELCA meets at noon sec-
ond Monday of month with lunch.
Bring a dish to pass.. Church
Vegetable Garden Club meets as
needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden
open seven days a week to congre-
tation and community. Like to sing?
Come join the choir. Visitors always
welcome. Come grow with us.
Phone 385-0797.
* Christ Lutheran Church Avon


Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2
mile east of Avon Park High
School. Sunday Divine Worship is
at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is cel-
ebrated every week with traditional
Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs
of praise. Fellowship time with cof-
fee and refreshments follows wor-
ship. Come worship and fellowship
with us. For information call Pa'stor
Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see
christlutheranavonpark. org.
* Faith Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 2740 Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848,
Faith Child Development Center,
385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea
Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship
services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday
school for children and adult Bible
classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise
worship service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Communion is served the
first and third and fifth Sunday of
the month. Sunday worship service
is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8
a.m. each Sunday. Educational
opportunities include weekly adult
Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift
Store (385-2782) is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through
Friday and 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday. All are warmly welcome
in the Family of Faith.
* Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church (AALC) American
Association of Lutheran
Churches, 4348 Schumacher
Road, Sebring, one mile west of
Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor.
Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday.
Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery pro-
vided. Social activities: Choir,
Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-
1163.
* New Life Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a
Congregation of the Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship
with the Wisconsin Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday
Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9
a.m. For more information, call
Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or
visit the Web site at wwwnewlife
sebring.corm.
* Resurrection Lutheran Church
- ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon
Park. Pastor: Rev. John C.
Grodzinski. Early Sunday service,
8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m.
and the second service at 10:30
a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour fol-
low the service. Midweek
Fragrance Free Wednesday wor-
ship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office
phone number is 453-6858.
* Trinity Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake
Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The
Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and
Noel Johnson, youth and family life.
Worship schedule for December
through Easter: Worship service 8
and 11 a.m.; Communion services,
first and third Sundays; (Children's
Church, 11 a.m. only); and
,Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship
schedule for summer through fall:
Worship service, 9 a.m.;
Communion services, first and third
Sunday; Education Hour 10:30
a.m. Additional services: Lent and
Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy
Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.;
Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.;
Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas
Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve,
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship
activities: Youth Group, Senior
Citizens, Younger Side Adults,
Ladies Missionary League, Ladies
Guild, Small group studies as
scheduled. Music: Choir and hand
chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5
years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday. License:


C14H10020: Susan Norris, direc-
tor. Visit us online at: www. vchurch-
es. com/trinity/utheran/p.


NON-DENOMINATIONAL

* Bible Fellowship Church, 3750
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Sunday: American Sign
Language: First Worship sermon,
songs signed first and second
Worship services. First Worship
service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship
service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to
2 years old) and Sunday school
classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6
p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday: Children, ages 4
years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth,
6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m.
Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy
McQuaid, associate pastor. Church
office 385-1024.
* Calvary Church, 1825
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872; 386-4900. An. independent
community church. Sunday morn-
ing worship, 8:15 and 10 a.m.;
Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.;
Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m.
Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small
friendly church waiting for your
visit.
* Christian Training Ministries
Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off
County Road 17 on Simpson
Avenue. Sunday service is at 10
a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7
p.m. A nursery and children's
church are provided. The church is
part of Christian International
Ministries Network, a full gospel,
non-denominational ministry. Linda
M. Downing, minister: Phone, 314-
0482, /indadowning@llve.com.
Casey L. Downing, associate min-
ister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown
ing@hotmal.com. Web site is
www. christiantrainingministries.net
* Grace Bible Church, 4541
Thunderbird Road, (second church
on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone,
382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior
pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30
p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m.
Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible
Academy Adult Investigating Truth;
first and third Tuesday, Prayer
Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday,
Children's & Youth Programs, 6
p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m.,
College Ministry.
www. GBCconnected. org
* Highlands Community Church,
a casual contemporary church,
meets at 3005 New Life Way.
Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10
a.m. Nursery and Kid's World
classes. Small groups meet
throughout the week. Church
phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A.
Linhart.
* Union Congregational Church,
106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday worship services
are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15
a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m.
(contemporary) in the main sanctu-
ary. Sunday school for all ages is at
9:15 a.m. We also offer
Wednesday and Saturday services
at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respective-
ly. Nursery/child care is available
for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill
Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web
page at www.weareunion.org. All
teachings are taken from the
Manufacturer's Handbook The
Holy Bible. Come join us.
* Unity Life Enrichment Centre,
new location, 10417 Orange
Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL
33875; 471-1122; e-mail
unity@vistanet.net. Web site,
www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Celebration Service,


Nursery and Children's Church.
Weekly Classes, Christian
Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer
Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups.
Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior
minister transforming lives from
ordinary to extraordinary.
* The Way Church, 1005 N.
Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday
school and worship service at 9
a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activi-
ties, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. The
Way is a church family who gathers
for contemporary worship, teaching
of God's Word, prayer and fellow-
ship..Come early and stay after for
fellowship time. Child care.and chil-
dren's church are provided.
Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The
Way A place for you. Office
Phone:471-6140, Church Cell
Phone:381-6190. Email: theway
church@hotmail.com. Web site:
www. TheWayChurch. org


PRESBYTERIAN

* Covenant Presbyterian Church
(PCA), 4500 Sun 'N Lake Blvd.,
Sebring, 33872-2113. A
Congregation of the Presbyterian
Church in America. Worship servic-
es: Sunday morning worship, infor-
mal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday
evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday
evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.;
Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:30-
7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m.
Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759;
e-mail: covpres@strato.net, Web
site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W.
Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours:
8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through
Thursday.
* First Presbyterian Church
ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two
entrances on LaGrande), Avon
Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242.
The Rev. Robert Johnson is the
pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.;
Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.;
Wednesday Bible study, 10:30
a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third
Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30
p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle
business meeting, 1 p.m. second
Wednesday; Sarah Circle business
meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday;
Women's Ministries Combined
Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday.
Be a part of a warm, caring church
family with traditional services, fol-
lowing biblical truth.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring,
FL 33870. 385-0107. Sunday
School, adult and college age, 9:30
a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.;
Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 11-
18), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult
Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir
rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery avail-
able for Sunday worship. Call the
church office for more information
and other classes. Rev. Darrell A.
Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director
of youth ministry.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, www.fpc/p.com, 118 N. Oak
Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The
Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor;
the Rev. Drew Severance, associ-
ate pastor. Sunday morning tradi-
tional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30
a.m.; and contemporary worship is
at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avari-
ety of Sunday school classes for
adults and children are at 9:45 and
11 a.m. in the educational building.
Call the church office for more
information about the classes
offered. Nursery is provided for
babies and toddlers; while young
children up to second grade have a
special Children's Church offered


during the worship service to help
them grow in their spiritual knowl-
edge.
* Spring Lake Presbyterian
Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School,
9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m.
Session meets -at 6:30 p.m. the
second Thursday of the month,
September through June. Board of
Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first
Monday of the month. Choir
rehearses at 7 p.m. each
Wednesday, September through
April. Presbyterian Women meet at
10 a.m. the third Thursday of the
month. Organist: Richard Wedig.
Choir Director: Suzan Wedig.
Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,
spring/akepc @9embarqmal., corn,
Web site, http.//s/pc.embarq
space. com.


SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST

* Avon Park Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 1410 West
Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone:
453-6641 or e-mail: avonparks-
da@embarqma/l.com, Sabbath
School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church
Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday.
Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m.
Community Service hours on
Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00
a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place
the first Sunday of each month.
Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and
Associate Pastor Kameron
DeVasher. Walker Memorial
Academy Christian School offering
education for kindergarten through
12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME.
Website is www.discoverjesus.org
* Sebring Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, 2106 N. State
Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438.
Worship Services: 9:15 am.
Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meet-
ing, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m.
Community service: every Monday
9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr.
Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m.
Pastor Amado Luzbet.


THE CHURCH OF
LATTER DAY SAINTS

* The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand
Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863)
382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop;
Mark Swift, 1st-Counselor; Del
Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family
History Center (863) 382-1822.
Sunday Services: Sacrament
Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel
Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon;
Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-
1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15
a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities:
Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts:
first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20
p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys
and Girls, second and fourth
Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m.


THE SALVATION
ARMY

* The Salvation Army Center
for Worship. Sunday: Sunday
School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meet-
ing, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting
and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible
study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's
Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday:
Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meet-
ings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave.,
Sebring. For more information, visit
the Web site www.salvationarmy-
sebring.com or call Major Bruce


Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110.


UNITED METHODIST

* First United Methodist Church,
105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor.
Traditional Worship Service at 8:10
and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary,
Contemporary Worship in the FLC
at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30
and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth
Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday
with Rick Heilig, youth director.
The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship
service is broadcast over WITS
1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery
available at all services.
* First United Methodist Church,
200 South Lake Avenue, Avon
Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, R.
James Weiss, Pastor, Sunday
School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30
a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of
every month at 6 p.m. Prayer
Shawl Ministry on the second and
fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m.
for women who love God and cro-
cheting. Visit us at our church Web
site: www.fumcap.org.
* Memorial United Methodist
Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlook-
ing Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL,
33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pastor.
Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral
assistant. Sunday schedule:
Heritage Worship Service, 8:30
a.m. (October-May only); School
School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.;
Celebration Worship Service at
10:45 a.m.; New Song worship
service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nurs-
ery care provided every Sunday
morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m.
Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m.
(October-May only), We offer
Christ-centered Sunday school
classes, youth programs, Bible
studies, book studies and Christian
fellowship. We are a congregation
that want to know Christ and make
Him known. Call the church office
at 465-2422 or check out our
church Web site at www.memori-
a/umc.com.
* St. John United Methodist
Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive,
Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev.
Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor.
Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all
services. Phone 382-1736.
www.stjohnsebring.org
* Spring Lake United Methodist
Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane,
(Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde
Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship serv-
ice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study
meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday.
Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on
Thursday. Church office phone:
655-0040.


UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST

* Emmanuel United Church of
Christ, where God is still speak-
ing. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL
33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27
and Hammock Road). Sunday wor-
ship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with
worship first Sunday of month;
Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all
other Sundays. All are welcome to
receive the sacrament. For more
information, call the church office at
471-1999 or e-mail eucc@earth
/ink.net or check the Web site
sebringemmanuelucc.comrn. No
matter who you are or where you
are on life's journey, you're wel-
come here.










www.newssun.com


News-Sun Friday. February 25. 2011


Page 10B


RELIGION


The problems with promiscuity: Part 1


The Bible tells us that
God has an order, a hierar-
chy, for families. The hus-
band is to be the head of the
household, the one responsi-
ble for keeping order. He's
the one responsible for see-
ing to it that the family is
taken care of financially. He
is responsible for making
sure there is always enough
money for food, clothing and
shelter. He is also supposed
to be the chief protector.
What happens in a single-
mom household? What hap-
pens when young girls and
women are not careful about
who they choose to have
children with?


The Marriage
Mentor
Aleta Kay

As a single mom you
carry the entire burden for
the family. You are solely
responsible for the finances,
the discipline, food, clothing
and shelter. You are respon-
sible for answering to credi-
tors, bill collectors, teachers.
You have no one to ask for
guidance or protection from
anyone who would do you
harm. You have no one to
back you up in discipline, no
one to protect you from your


children's sass. belligerence
and attitude.
Once. when our daughter
was about 16 or 17. we were
arguing (she had pushed my
buttons and before I knew it
we were in a shouting
match) she drew her hand
back as if she was going to
hit me. Rage tore through
me and I told her to pack her
bags; she wasn't staying
with us any more. I spent the
next two hours making
phone calls trying to find a
place that would take her.
My husband, however, at
the time she drew her hand
back, told her if she ever
raised a hand to me again


she wouldn't live to talk
about it. Things calmed
down and we didn't need to
send her away. But it felt
good to know I had a hus-
band to back me up.
If you are merely living
with someone or if you are
re-married, will that man
back you up when your chil-
dren disrespect you? Don't
you think it would be wise
to choose someone who
loves and respects you, and
is willing to teach your chil-
dren the same?

Aleta Kay can be reached at the-
marriagementor@yahoo.com -


To live by faith, not by sight


In my final article of the
three-part series I have pre-
viously written, titled "No
Ordinary Baby: Part 3," I
concluded by pointing out
the importance of placing
our trust in what Jesus Christ
has done for us on the cross.
Continuing from placing our
trust in Jesus Christ as our
Savior, we must continue
from that point on a daily
basis to exercise our faith in
our.daily walk with Christ.
God's word greatly empha-
sizes the importance of trust-
ing Him.
II Corinthians 5:7 says,
"For we walk by faith, not
by sight." This can be diffi-
cult for us as human beings
because we naturally feel the
need to see, touch, smell,
etc. in order to believe that
something is really true. We
naturally have a tendency to
want to feel, see, and touch
in order to believe that
something is true or real.
In No Ordinary Baby: Part
3, I mentioned the fact that
Jesus had reappeared to His
disciples after his resurrec-
tion. Could you imagine

Snapshots
Continued from page 9B
ship with Jesus Christ
and come to a deeper
awareness of the Holy
Spirit. Call 465-4027.

Richardson to
address 'Where
Are We Headed?'
SEBRING Dr.
David Richardson is pre-
senting a series of
Sunday messages at First
Baptist Sebring's servic-
es titled "Where Are We
Headed?"
The messages will'
expound on the choice of
words from the new First
Baptist logo: Connect,
Grow, Serve.
The church's annual
ladies tea will be held at
1 p.m. Saturday, March
12 in the fellowship hall.
This year's theme is
Southern Hospitality,
with some 12 table host-
esses decorating their
tables using that theme.
Tickets are available in
the church office for this
exciting dress-up tea,
with its special program
and music.


what the disciples.
might have been
feeling or thinking
after His death and
burial? Even though
Jesus had told them
prior to His death
and burial that He
would return, they
still had to wait on
His return and
believe what He


Come To
The River
Leslie Deese


said was true.
God understands the diffi-
culties we have of simply
walking by faith and not by
sight on a continual basis.
What a great example of
what it means to live by
faith, not by sight. God
showed his understanding
and proved that He keeps.
promises by having Jesus
show the disciples His scars
on His hands and in His
side. They knew without a
doubt they had seen the Lord
(John 20:20).
What about Thomas, who
was a twin brother of one of
the disciples? His response
was probably similar to
many of us today pertaining
to our ability to believe even


when we can't see.
When Jesus had
made His appear-
ance to the disci-
ples, Thomas was
not with them.
When the disciples
told him that they
had seen Jesus,
Thomas did not
believe initially. He
said to the disciples


in John 20:25, "Unless I see
in His hands the print of the
nails, and put my finger into
the print of the nails, and put
my hand into His side, I will
not believe." Jesus.gave
Thomas the same privilege
later by allowing Him to
touch Him and even put his
hand into Jesus' side. He did
tell Thomas that he was to
cease in his unbelief. At this
point, Thomas was able to
address Him as God. In John
20:29, Jesus responds by
saying to him, "Thomas,
because you have seen Me,
you have believed. Blessed
are those who have not seen
and yet have believed."
John 20:29 still applies to
us today in our daily walk


with the Lord. When we start
wondering where God is,
especially in the midst of
crisis, He wants us to trust
Him no matter how big or
small our problems may be.
In Mark 11:22-24, as Jesus
emphasized to His disciples
there need to trust God by
saying, "Have faith in God.
For assuredly, I say to you,
whoever says to this moun-
tain, 'Be removed and be
cast into the sea,' and does
not doubt in his heart, but
believes that those things he
says will be done, he will
have whatever he says.
Therefore I say to you, what-
ever things you ask when
you pray, believe that you
receive them, and you will
have them." If you have
placed your trust in what
Jesus Christ has done for
you, I encourage you as a
believer to continue to trust
that God is working on your
behalf even when you can't
see or feel Him working.

Leslie Deese is a Sebring resi-
dent. She can be reached at
ljb_628@yahoo.com.


Southern Bible Institute in Dallas

marches on after 84 years


By SCOTT K. PARKS
Dallas Morning News
DALLAS The Ku Klux
Klan's power in Dallas was
waning by 1927, but it was
still a dangerous time to be
black in North Texas.
The city refused to hire
any black police officers, and
a segregation ordinance offi-
cially reinforced the custom-
ary racial separation of the
times.
The Rev. L.G. Foster, a
black preacher, was walking
down Elm Street in down-
town Dallas one day and
stopped to listen to some
white street preachers.
Greatly impressed with their
oratory, he asked them to
teach him and his fellow
black preachers the word of
God.
The white preachers were
students at Evangelical
Theological College, which
later became Dallas
Theological Seminary.
At the time, blacks were
not allowed to attend the


seminary. But the white
preachers, filled with mis-
sionary zeal, accepted the
challenge.
So began the Southern
Bible Institute, a place where
black Christians could study
the Bible, learn to preach and
become better stewards of
their churches.
Now, 84 years later, the
institute is struggling to
remain relevant in the 21st
century.
Dr. Martin Hawkins, the
institute's president, is guid-
ing programs to recruit more
Hispanic students, upgrade
faculty, create more course
offerings and eventually
improve the value of its
diplomas in the college mar-
ketplace.
At the same time, Hawkins
said, it's important for the
institute to honor its history
and the men, who labored to
improve Christian education
for blacks in Dallas at a time
when any endeavor that
mixed the races was consid-


ered risky business.
"The men who took on this
task were content to say,
'We'll do the best we can
under a bad situation.'
Despite the rigorous segrega-
tion, they wanted to train
these black men to be preach-
ers," Hawkins said.
In 1927, a fundraising
brochure illuminated
Edmond Ironside's quest to
educate black preachers in
Dallas. Ironside would
become the institute's first
president. His tenure lasted
until 1942.
"A lot of white Christians
feel this is a call from God,
and are ready to help in such
an undertaking," the
brochure said.
"This is a story that
remains largely untold,"
Hawkins said.


Friends mourn 4 US

yachters killed by

Somali pirates


Associated Press
SANTA MONICA, Calif.
- An adventurous quartet
of yacht enthusiasts from
California and Washington
were living their dreams,
friends say, retiring and
sailing around the world
until they were shot and
killed by Somali pirates on
Tuesday.
The yacht's owners, Jean
and Scott Adam of Marina
del Rey near Los Angeles,
along with Bob Riggle and
Phyllis Macay of Seattle
were taken hostage on
Friday several hundred
miles south of Oman. The
pirates fired a rocket-pro-
pelled grenade at a U.S.
warship following the
hijacked vessel Tuesday,
then gunfire erupted and
the Americans were fatally
wounded.
"We are heartbroken.
They were an extraordinary
couple," Monsignor Lloyd
Torgerson said of the
Adams during morning
Mass at St. Monica
Catholic Church in Santa
Monica.
Friends, family and fel-
low sailors said that despite
an adventurous spirit, the
four were meticulous plan-
ners who knew the dangers
they faced. The Adams had
been sailing around the
world since December
2004 with a 58-foot yacht
full of Bibles to distribute
to remote regions, and were
joined by Riggle and
Macay, who left Seattle
nine or 10 months ago.
The four had traveled
with a large flotilla to stay
safe from pirates earlier in
the trip, but had left the
group when the attack
occurred, Macay's niece,
Nina Crossland, told
reporters in South San
Francisco.
Visibly shaken and hold-
ing back tears, Crossland
said her 59-year-old aunt
was shot but alive when
Navy Seals boarded the
Quest. She died later.
"My aunt is a very smart
and avid sailor," Crossland
told reporters in South San
Francisco on Tuesday
morning. "I think she was
smart enough and planned
ahead and prepared to not
be in this type of situation."
Mariners were warned
about traveling through the
area because of the dangers
of pirate attacks, but
friends and fellow sailors
said danger is part of the
reality of sailing.
Riggle "would never do
anything to jeopardize
Phyllis," Hank Curci, a
friend and fellow member
of the Seattle Singles Yacht
Club.
Joe Grande, of the yacht
club, said the deaths were
like losing a member of the
family to those who knew


'They were just
passing out
Bibles, trying to
do a good thing.'

BARBARA HERRED
mass attendee
the pair.
"Great sailors, good peo-
ple. They were doing what
they wanted to do, but
that's small comfort in the
face of this," Grande said.
The U.S. flag flew at
half-staff Tuesday at the
Del Rey Yacht Club in
Marina del Rey, a commu-
nity of more than 8,000 sur-
rounding a huge man-made
small boat harbor on the
Los Angeles County coast.
Gary Deitsch, com-
modore of the club, said
that the membership was
devastated by the killings.
"We are deeply sad-
dened," he said at a press
conference. "We hope their
deaths will bring about the
world's focus to eliminate
this violence."
The Adams had been
club members since 2001
and had sailed full-time for
the past seven years, many
times with other club mem-
bers.
"They were just wonder-
ful people to be with," said
Club secretary DeDe Allen,
who had sailed with the
couple. "Their personal
mission was enjoying life."
Riggle had worked ag a
relief veterinarian for the
Seattle Animal Shelter for
the past seven to eight
years, providing spay and
neutering services for
adopted animals and
through a city program,
said director Don Jordan.
"He wasn't a man of
many words but he was a
kind-hearted individual
with a great passion for ani-
mals and animal welfare,"
Jordan said. "He treated
our staff with dignity and
respect."
Jordan recalled that
Riggle once took a col-
league's family sailing
when their daughter was
diagnosed with cancer to
get their mind off their
troubles. "That was just a
small indicator about how
he treated people," he said.
Scott Adam, who is in his
mid-60s, had been an asso-
ciate producer in
Hollywood when he turned
in a spiritual direction and
enrolled in Fuller
Theological Seminary in
Pasadena a decade ago,
said Robert K. Johnston, a
professor at the seminary.
"They were just passing
out Bibles, trying to do a
good thing," said Barbara
Herred, who attended the
Mass in Santa Monica. "It's
just so sad."


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News-Sun Friday, February 25, 2011


Page 11B


DIVERSIONS


Staying in class more fun than 'Hall Pass'


By CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP Movie Critic
The Farrelly brothers con-
tinue to strain desperately for
their gross-out glory days
with "Hall Pass," their latest
"comedy" and. yes. that
word is in quotes for a rea-
son.
Think about it. What was
the last truly, deeply, funny
movie they made ... "There's
Something About Mary"?
And that was back in 1998.
With "Stuck on You"
(2003), they came close to
achieving that desired mix of
:, humor and heart, and they
i had a great cast in Matt
'Damon and Greg Kinnear.
But their version of "Fever
Pitch" (2005) never worked
.up any real heat and that
criticism comes from a
',Boston Red Sox fan.
:, So here are brothers Peter
'and Bobby Farrelly once
'again, collaborating as writ-
ers and directors, trying to
mine suburbia for its latent
horniness and untapped bodi-
ly fluids with singularly
uninspired results. (Pete
:Jones and Kevin Barnett
;''share screenwriting credit.)
Owen Wilson and Jason
S'Sudeikis co-star as longtime
'friends Rick and Fred, who
are trapped in stereotypically
' 'stagnant marriages.
Jenna Fischer and
Christina Applegate play
their wives, Maggie and
Grace, who are such cliched,
spiteful nags, they pretend to
be asleep in order to withhold
sex from their husbands as a
means of gaining control.
Are you laughing yet? It's
'a frustrating waste of Fischer
and Applegate, two hugely
likable actresses who .happen
-to have a knack for raunchy
,comedy when it's well-


New Line Cinema
(From left) Larry Joe Campbell, Owen Wilson, Stephen Merchant, Jason Sudeikis and J.B.
Smoove in 'Hall Pass.'


written, that is. Then again,
"Hall Pass" doesn't make
particularly good use of its
male stars' talents, either; the
off-kilter charisma that
marks Wilson's best work has
been obliterated. So at least
it's equal opportunity.
Anyway, Maggie and
Grace get some advice one
day from their psychologist
friend (a weirdly miscast Joy
Behar) to give their husbands
a "hall pass": a week off from
marriage to allow them to
pursue all the hotties they've
been surreptitiously ogling
(or so they think they're
not too stealthy).
Rick, in particular, has had
his eye on the gorgeous
Australian barista at his local
coffeehouse (Nicky Whelan),
who seems to be sending him
signals.
But of course, these guys
have no idea what to do -
because the Farrellys have no
idea what to do with them.
Being garden-variety, mid-
dle-aged geeks, they head to
Applebee's with their


Movie Review
'Hall Pass'
Rating: R (crude and sexu-
al humor, language, graphic
nudity and drug use)
Running time: 105 minutes
Review: (of 4)

makeshift posse of garden-
variety, middle-aged geek
friends including one
who's obsessed with poop
AND is the obligatory wacky
fat guy. So he's a twofer.
The way this dude relieves
himself on a golf course,
using the sand trap as a kitty-
litter box, isn't even the most


obnoxious scatological gag
in "Hall Pass." No, that
would belong to a young lady
Fred picks up at a club and
brings back to his hotel room.
Let's just say the hardwork-
ing women of the housekeep-
ing crew have their work cut
out for them and the
moment doesn't bven earn
the laugh it seeks.
The wives, meanwhile, are
enjoying their week off by
flirting with minor-league
baseball players on Cape
Cod.
A series of missed phone
calls and misunderstandings
later, and both marriages are
in contrived dire straits.
Here's how bad "Hall
Pass" gets: Even Richard
Jenkins, with all his formida-
ble skills and versatility, can-
not save this thing.
He shows up in an unex-
pected bit of casting as Rick
and Fred's wealthy, superstud
friend. But then he's stuck
with the same lame dialogue
as everyone else.


5 or 10 most bizarre Oscar moments


By CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP Movie Critic
LOS ANGELES The
Academy Awards are, for the
most part, an elegant and
I tightly controlled affair. But
wacky things can and do hap-
pen sometimes and those
are the moments viewers
remember the most.
Since the Oscars are on
Sunday and since there are
now 10 best-picture nomi-
nees, we've decided to dou-
ble the weekly Five Most list
with a look at the 10 most
bizarre moments in the
show's history. So here they
-'are, in no particular order -
r, because really, it's an honor
just to be nominated:
The streaker (1974):
Just as host David Niven was
about to introduce Elizabeth
Taylor, a naked man came
running across the stage
behind himr, flashing a peace
_.-'sign. (It was the '70s.) The
Whole place naturally went
"wild with laughter,, but
Niven deadpanned: "Well,
'ladies and gentlemen, that
was almost bound to happen.
But isn't it fascinating to
'think that probably the only
laugh that man will ever get
in his life is by stripping off
and showing his shortcom-
.. ;ings?"
': Marlon Brando sends
Sacheen Littlefeather on
stage (1973): Brando won
best actor for his iconic por-
trayal of Don Corleone in
"The Godfather." But he
refused to accept the award,
and instead sent a woman
who said she was an Apache
named Sacheen Littlefeather
to speak on his behalf.
Brando was protesting what
he believed to be stereotypi-
cal treatment of Native
Americans in the film indus-
try. Littlefeather's speech
drew a mixture of applause
and boos, as well as ques-
tions about whether she was
truly a Native American her-
' self.
Rob Lowe's duet with
Snow White (1989): Allan
Carr injected an element of
!;,high camp when he took over
as producer of the Academy


Awards. He was, after all, the
man behind such splashy
movie musicals as "Grease"
and "Can't Stop the Music,"
and he won a Tony for the
Broadway hit "La Cage aux
Folles." But his Oscar cere-
mony is considered one of
the biggest flops in the
show's history.
Bjork's swan dress
(2001): Being notoriously
daring and different as she is,
Bjork dazzled and bedeviled
. everyone when she showed
up at the planet's most-
watched red carpet in a
white, fluffy gown with a
swan's head draped around
her neck. (The Icelandic
singer and actress was nomi-
nated for best original song
for "I've Seen It All" from
Lars von Trier's "Dancer in
the Dark.") It is arguably the
most famous outfit ever worn
to the Oscars. It inspired
many a Halloween costume.
Jack Palance's one-
armed push-ups (1992):
Palance already had been
nominated for an Oscar twice
before, both for best support-
ing actor, for 1952's "Sudden
Fear" and 1953's "Shane."
Four decades later, when he
finally won the award for the
comedy "City Slickers," he
proved he was just as virile
as ever at 72. In the middle of
a raunchy acceptance speech,
in which he was explaining
how reluctant producers can
be to cast older actors,
Palance stepped away from
the podium, dropped to the
stage and did a series of one-
armed push-ups. Who would-
n't hire him?
Robert Benigni's seat
climbing (1999): Speaking of
acrobatics, there's Benigni.
Ever the clown, the Italian
actor and director couldn't
just walk up on stage and
give humble, teary-eyed
thanks when his "Life Is
Beautiful" won the Oscar for
best 'foreign-language film.
Instead, he leaped from one
seat back to another, whip-
ping the audience into a fren-
zy. before hopping up the
steps and giving presenter
Sophia Loren a long, tight


bear hug. ("Life Is Beautiful"
also earned a best-actor
Oscar for Benigni and one for
its original score.)
"Ordinary People"
beats "Raging Bull" for best
picture (1981): Not so much
a wacky moment but a befud-
dling one. How could the
Academy get this one so
wrong? In retrospect, Martin
Scorsese's "Raging Bull"
emerges as a small master-
piece, intimately powerful in
black and white, gorgeous -
even its brutal violence.
"Ordinary People," Robert
Redford's directing debut,
feels like a respectable and
well-made if austere family
drama. But that's not as bad
as ...
"Dances With Wolves"
beats "Goodfellas" for best
picture (1991): Ten years
later, the Academy gets it
wrong again, and Scorsese is
on the losing end again. Sure,
Kevin Costner's "Dances
With Wolves" is a sweeping
epic, visually impressive in
its enormity, but looking
back it feels condescending
and a little corny.
"Goodfellas," meanwhile, is
an example of Scorsese's vir-
tuoso filmmaking at its finest
- funny, brash, evocative
and always riveting. Scorsese
eventually got his due,
though, with Oscars for best
picture and director for
2006's "The Departed."
You like Sally Field
(1985): "Places in the Heart"
earned Field her second best-
actress Oscar the first
came for 1979's "Norma
Rae" but this one meant
more to her, she said in her
acceptance speech as she
clutched the golden statue,
giddy and beaming. This
time, she said she finally felt
the respect of her peers: "I
can't deny the fact that you
like me. Right now, you like
me!" It's a line that would be
endlessly parodied and
misquoted.
The "South Park" guys
show up in drag (2000): Trey
Parker and Matt Stone
arrived to support the feature
film version of their animat-


ed series, "South Park:
Bigger, Longer & Uncut,"
which earned Parker and
Marc Shaiman an original-
song nomination for the
jaunty "Blame Canada." But
they couldn't just wear tuxes
like everyone else. Since
they've made a career out of
skewering celebrities, Stone
donned a replica of the pink
gown Gwyneth Paltrow wore
a year earlier when she won
best actress for "Shakespeare
in Love," while Parker wore
a knock-off of the plunging
green Versace number
Jennifer Lopez famously
filled out at the Grammys.
So much chest hair ... and
so hilarious.


Pregnant teen needs

worried friend's

support, not a lecture


Dear Abby: I'm con-
cerned about my friend
"Nyla." She's 15 and preg-
nant. Nyla and her family
are happy about it. As her
friend, I'm not. I think she
should have waited.
I keep telling her that
her life is ruined and she'll
regret having a baby this
early, but she doesn't lis-
ten. It would be better if
she had help, but she does-
n't. Nyla's family is poor.
Now she is angry with
me because of what I keep
telling her. What can I do
to help her understand me,
and not get mad when I tell
her something?
Virginia Teen
Dear Virginia Teen: If
you want Nyla to "under-
stand" you, quit lecturing
her because it's only mak-
ing her defensive.
Defensive people don't lis-
ten. How any family, rich
or poor, could be "happy"
about the pregnancy of an
unwed 15-year-old is
beyond me. But your
friend is pregnant and
she's keeping the baby.
So be,a real friend and
encourage her to finish
high school so she can pre-
pare herself for a job that
will enable her to support
her little one. If she com-
pletes her education, the,_
chances are better that her
child will, too. But if she
doesn't, the reverse is also
true, and the repercussions
will go on for another gen-
eration.

Dear Abby: I need help.
When we started dating,
my (now) husband told me
he didn't care about past
relationships because "the
past is the past and it's
over." Now he has begun
grilling me about every
boyfriend I've ever had,
demanding details about
every aspect of the rela-
tionships, physical, emo-
tional whatever.
He makes snide remarks
and asks if I would like
him to track them down
and if I'd like to sleep with
them again. At first, I
thought he was joking, but
it has escalated to text
messages and threats of
divorce if I don't tell him
everything he wants to
know. I have been sick to
my stomach the last few
days, and I think this fits
the definition of emotional
abuse. I don't know


Dear Abby
whether to suggest coun-
seling or just tell him to
go.
He was wonderful when
we first got together, but
now he says marrying me
*was just a ruse to get sex.
What can I do? I miss the
person he used to be. He
has always seemed con-
cerned that I would eventu-
ally cheat on him, although
I have given him no reason
to think so and have
assured him repeatedly that
I want only him. Why is
this happening?
Sick to My Stomach in
Ohio
Dear Sick to Your
Stomach: It's because you
didn't really know the man
you married. The way he
presented himself was, in
his words, "all a ruse" to
convince you to marry him
"to get sex." He appears to
have increasing anxiety
about how he measures up
to your past lovers.
Harassing you for details
and threatening to contact
them is, frankly, sick
behavior. He needs coun-
seling, and unless he seeks
it immediately you should
get out of there. If you
stay, the emotional abuse
could escalate to physical
abuse. To ensure your safe-
ty, contact the National
Domestic Violence Hotline
(800) 799-7233 and dis-
cuss this with a trained
counselor.

Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips, and
was founded by her mother,
Pauline Phillips. Write Dear
Abby at www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069. Abby shares more
than 100 of her favorite recipes
in two booklets: Abby's
Favorite Recipes' and 'More
Favorite Recipes by Dear
Abby.' Send a business-size,
self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $12
(U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby -
Cookbooklet Set, P.O. Box 447,
Mount Morris, IL 61054-
0447. (Postage is included in
price.)


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