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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00902
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: February 18, 2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
sobekcm - UF00028423_00902
System ID: UF00028423:00902
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

Full Text




"R www.newssun





EWSSo N
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927


Streaks rip
Lake Placid

PAGE 1 B


City Council votes Majestic Understanding

Cove to be left alone sponsorship


PAGE 6A


PAGE 12B '


Friday-Saturday, February


18-19, 2011


www.newssun.com


Volume 92/Number 21 I 50 cents


Fog in the morning,
then mostly sunny
High Low

80 53
Complete Forecast
PAGE 7A







Question: Will you
attend the Highlands
County Fair this year?








No
81.9%



Total votes: 83

Next question:
Was it a good decision
to turn down the bullet
train project?

Make your voice heard at
www.newssun


Frances R. Goff
Age 97, of Lake Placid
Aletha Thompson
Age 84, of Sebring
Virginia D. Thorne
Age 93, of Sebring
Obituaries, Page 5A

Classifieds 9A
Community Briefs 2A
Community Calendar 6A
Dear Abby 11 B
Editorial & Opinion 4A
Healthy Living _B
Lottery Numbers 2A
Movie Times 11B
Religion 7B
Sports On TV 2B
Unknown Soldiers 2A
Sudoku Puzzle 11B
Follow the
News-Sun on


www.twitter.com/thenewssun
and


www.facebook.com/newssun


o 9I 11 114 01 I 1
o 909 94 0 1001 7


U.S. Air Force photo
Noise produced by the new F-35 fight-
er will be used as a guideline for a
study being conducted around the
Avon Park Bombing Range.

County to


study noise


near Range

Grants to fund look
at development of
surrounding area
By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssuin.co(n
SEBRING The board of commis-
sioners approved a $500,000 grant to
study development encroachment around
the Avon Park Air Force Range, and pos!
sibly purchase property to keep develop-
ment from happening.
"Encroachment cannot be taken for
granted," said Lt. Col. Charles
MacLaughlin, commander of the
Bombing Range.
'The The money comes
trees from the state and is to
be used to allow the
don't Central Florida
Regional Planning
complain Council and the Air
about the Force the opportunity
to identify atea'; of
noise. encroachment and set
aside $405,000 of the
LT. COL. money to buy land.
CHARLES A Joint Land Use
McLAUGHLIN Study (JLUS) was
Range recently completed by
commander the Air Force and other
groups in the commu-
nity, and there are concerns about the
noise levels and flight paths surrounding
the base.
The problem could arise that develop-
ment in the area, and complaints arising
from that development, could create
problems in the future for the Air Force.
"The trees don't complain about the
noise," MacLaughlin said.
MacLaughlin explained that in the
past, several communities around the
county developed housing around bases,
and that development caused the closure
of those bases.

See COUNTY, page 6A


Fencing

ordinance to

be decided

March 1
By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
i ; ', .' i,, , ,, ." 1i 1
SEBRING Just when it
appeared the city council had set-
tled on the specifics of a fence
ordinance, new issues were raised
by a contractor Tuesday night.
Rick Whidden told the council
that as the city annexes areas con-
taining larger lots of five or 10
acres, the question of allowing 8-
foot-tall fences or walls will have
to be addressed.
He said the developers of Wolf
See FENCE, page 6A


Recycling complicated in Highlands


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssuni.co>in
SEBRING County
Commissioners took a look at the
different routes they could take for
recycling at their meeting on
Tuesday, but decided that they did
not have enough information to
move forward with any decisions.
What they did decide was that
the issue is just a little more com-
plicated than anyone expected.
Currently, the county is below
100,000 population and only has to


provide a voluntary program and
education to the public, according
to County Engineer Ramon
Gavarrete.


The county provides those serv-
ices, Gavarrete says, but according
to Chairwoman Barbara Stewart,
the county loses money on the recy-
cling enterprise.
If the county grows above
100,000 in population, Florida stat-
ue requires that 40 percent of all
garbage is recycled by 2012,
Gavarrete said.
Commissioner Don Elwell stated
that the only way to reach the state
See RECYCLING, page 8A


'Not up to par'

New surface on Circle to be replaced


News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
City council members are not the only ones disappointed with the resurfacing job on Circle Drive.
Roadway Management, the contractor, is embarrassed and will redo the work at its own expense.

Contractor will pay to repave road around city hub


By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
SEBRING Members of the
city council expressed disap-
pointment Tuesday night at the
completed resurfacing job on
Circle Drive.
"The paving is not up to par,"
said council member John
Griffin. "It looks like a first
coat. It's pretty bad. I found a
Coke bottle embedded in the
black top on Center Avenue."
Rob Miller, director of utili-
ties, told the council that


Roadway Management, the con-'
tractor, had already arranged to
meet with him Wednesday to
discuss the issues.
Thursday morning, Miller told
the News-Sun that Roadway
Management is "totally on
board" with the need for remedi-
al work on the street. There will
be no charge to the city for the
repairs.
Part of the problem, the con-
tractor told Miller, had been
working on a continuous curve
around the park using machines


' .. ;
}[.,


1~.
~'. t' "'


News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
Sebring city attorney, Robert Swaine reacts during the regular city
council meeting Tuesday when a citizen asked if it would be difficult
to make one more change to the proposed fence ordinance. The ordi-
nance has already had two first readings and was later tabled to the
March 1 meeting.


designed to work in straight
lines.
Miller said the contractor is
looking at alternative methods.
The city's engineer, CivilSurv
Design Inc., will have to
approve whatever method the
contractor chooses, so there will
be a waiting period before work
begins.
Roadway Management is as
upset about the final product as
the city, Miller said. The new
See CIRCLE, page 6A


Hairpin Spin

deadline

approaches
By BARRY FOSTER
Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING The sixth annual Hairpin
Spin again will be held as one of the hearld-
ing events of Race Week for this year's
Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring and creator
Lisa Celentano is out looking for both
prizes and sponsors.
"Our sponsorship deadline will be
Friday, Feb. 25," said Celentano.
"Those that miss deadline will not have
their name on any advertisements and can-
not be guaranteed any chips."
She said that the event already is jam-
packed with prizes, and now is in search of
sponsorship dollars, which in turn will be
See HAIRPIN, page 8A


) I!) ~ (J.
r


~ *


ItIII -w









News-Sun Friday, February 18, 2011


Page 2A


www.newssun.com


Badge of


honor

After six hours of driving
to and from Jordan's border
with Iraq, an exhausted Maj.
Gen. David Blackledge
wrapped up an early dinner
with fellow U.S. Army offi-
cers at Amman's Grand
Hyatt on Nov. 9, 2005.
As Blackledge's group
walked past the hotel bar, a
man sat down and ordered
an orange juice. Moments
later, as the soldiers walked
toward the elevators, he
blew himself up.
"It was pandemonium,"
Blackledge told the
Unknown Soldiers.
"Between people trying to
get in and out, and the emer-
gency workers, it was full of
gridlock."
Flashing back to a har-
rowing 2004 ambush he
barely survived during his
prior Iraq war deployment,
Blackledge knew the enemy
too well to believe danger
had passed.
"I told my fellow officers:
'We need to get out of
here,'" Blackledge said,
The general's racing heart
was met by the pounding
pressure of another nearby
explosion, which everyone

chests as
they raced
through
Amman's
chaotic
streets.
Despite neck
Blackledge and shoulder
injuries,
Blackledge guided his group
to an Italian restaurant.
where officers were-prompt-
ly x hisked away 0to a safe
house.
"The pain didn't really)
manifest itself until the next
day because of adrenaline,"
the general said.
When Blackledge was
blindsided by this terrorist
attack on three hotels, which
killed 60 and injured more
than 100, he was still haunt-
ed by images of the ambush
in Iraq 14 months earlier,
which left him in a body
cast. The general was head-
ing to a tribal meeting near
Iskandariya when heavy
machine-gun fire blasted his
convoy.
"My translator, who was
sitting behind me, had been
shot in the head,'"
Blackledge recalled in a
quiet, subdued tone. "As
bullets flew through the
windows, I was convinced
that it was all over, and the
next round was going to hit
me, but I was going to go
down shooting."
After narrowly escaping
the flipped-over SUV and
diving into a nearby ditch,
the general ran back toward
another one of three convoy
vehicles, which had burst
into flames.
"I tried opening the back
door, got it open and saw it
was just tangled bodies and
blood," Blackledge said.
"Then the captain said,- 'Get
me out of here,' because a
translator was on top of
him."
When Blackledge bent
down to help his comrade,
he felt a crippling shot of
pain through his lower back.
As the general later learned,
his L3 vertebrae had been
crushed in the SUV rollover.
He was one of five injured
in the enemy ambush, which
killed one Iraqi translator.
While confined to a body
cast for 11 months,
Blackledge realized his
injuries went far beyond his
shattered back.


See BADGE, page 8A


White powder mailed to RV park


Lr &

News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
Ben Henley, director of the Emergency Management Office (second from left), gets help
taping his wrists from fire fighter Robby Viera while Jeff Fennell, of the Highlands
County Sheriff's Office (right), waits. The men were investigating an envelope with mys-
terious white powder left at the Adelaide Shores R.V. Park's office. The powder tested
negative for weapons of mass destruction. The incident is under investigation. Those
with information should call Mike Huften of the Sheriff's office at 402-7250, or call
Crime Stoppers at 1(800) 780-TIPS if they wish to remain anonymous.



Regional Science Fair is in


Sebring, but no local students


By SAMANTHA GHOLAR
sgholar@newssuin.comn
SEBRING The
Heartland Regional Science
and Engineering Fair took
over the Bert J. Harris Jr.
Agricultural Center on
Thursday. Hundreds of stu-
dents from the surrounding
school districts of DeSoto
County, Glades County,
Hardee County, Henry
County and Okeechobee
County were all busy
explaining their projects
and experiments to judges
and their peers.
But none of the students
were from Highlands
County, a fact that bothers
organizers.
The Director of the
Heartland Regional Science
and Engineering Fair, Dan
Thomas, is also a science
instructor at Okeechobee
High School. Thomas
explained that the sIudenis
in the center were"all
exceptional and that
Highlands County students
were no different.
"There are great students
here in Highlands County
and there are instructors
and people interested in
getting Highlands County
back into the regional fair,"
Thomas said.
Highlands County has


ii


. .. .rt --- 1,



News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Megan Price talks to a judge Thursday morning about her
science project, 'Do siblings have the same fingerprint
patterns?' during the Heartland Regional Science and
Engineering Fair at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural
Center in Sebring. Price, who has a twin brother, deter-
mined that they do not share the same patterns.


not participated in the sci-
ence fair for the last five
\ e lr. '"" ;' ",". :.
"These school districts
here today all approach the
science curriculum from a
very similar stance.
Highlands County doesn't
address the sciencee curricu-
lum in this way," explained
Thomas.
Though Thomas is not
fully sure the entire reason
that Highlands County
School District has not par-
ticipated in the fair in


recent years,, he is not rul-
ing the district out.
"One of the reasons we
held it here is because it's
central, but mainly because
we want to draw Highlands
County back into the pro-
gram. There are volunteers
here from the county that
are interested in science
and the education of the
children," Thomas stated.
Dee Dee Jacobson is one
of the local volunteers

See SCIENCE, page 6A


Music in the Park
Concert at
Hammock
SEBRING An out-
door evening concert is
planned for Highlands
Hammock State Park's pic-
nic area featuring the old-
time string band music of
Back Porch Revival.
Concert admission is just
$5 per person (accompa-
nied children 12 and under
admitted free of charge).
Picnic baskets/coolers are
welcome. Bring lawn
chairs or blankets, flash-
light and bug spray.
All ticket proceeds ben-
efit park improvements via
the Friends of Highlands
Hammock.
Concert performances
are scheduled from 7-9
p.m. Saturday.
Normal park entrance
fee of $6 per car is waived
after 6 p.m. on concert
nights. Call 386-6094 for
more information.

Poker run,
barbecue benefit
Relay for Life
AVON PARK Ride for
the Cure Poker Run and
Barbecue is set for 10 a.m.
Saturday, March 5. Last
bike out at 11 a.m. Cost is
$10 donation per hand.
Start at the Tap Room, 205
W. Main St. in Avon Park
and end at Wild Turkey
Tavern on U.S. 27 South.
Last bike in at 2 p.m.
Enter for chances to win


gift cards and four-day
passes to the 12 Hours of
Sebring Race plus barbe-
cue and refreshments will
be available for donation
to benefit the American
Cancer Society Relay for
Life.
Live entertainment by
radio D.J. Rooter Rush.
For more details, call 452-
5284.
This event is presented
by the members of teams
The Wild Turkey Great
Apes Team and Awesome
Brenda and Team
Extraordinaire. Supported
by ABATE Inerstate
Chapter.

YMCA offers dog
obedience class
SEBRING Highlands
County YMCA (100
YMCA Lane, Sebring) will
offer a winter dog obedi-
ence and behavioral modi-
fication course titled
"Good Dog." The course is
being offered to all citi-
zens of Highlands County.
One does not have to be a
member of the YMCA to
participate.
This is a six-week
course, which will begin at
4 p.m. Saturday. The class
meets each Saturday for
approximately one hour.
The classes are held under .
cover at the basketball
courts for shade and possi-
ble rain.
"Good Dog" is geared
towards dogs of all ages
Continued on page 5A


POLICE BLOTTER


The News-Sun would like
to remind the readers that
the names listed below
reflect those who have been
charged with a crime, but
they are all innocent until
proven guilty by a court of
law. If anyone listed here is
acquitted or has charges
dropped, they can bring in
proof of such decision or
mail a copy to the paper and
the News-Sun will be happy
to report that information.
The News-Sun is at 2227
U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL
33870.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on Wednesday,
Feb. 16:
* Jessica Lynn Davis, 27,
of 'Lake Placid, was charged
with larceny, dealing in
stolen property and
fraud/false owner informa-
tion on pawned items.
* Michael Dale Erb, 25, of
Avon Park, was charged
with two counts of violation
of probation reference petit
'theft and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
* Mykel Dwayne Freeman,
20, of Sebring, was charged
with three counts of burgla-
ry of an unoccupied struc-
ture, petit theft, criminal
mischief, and grand theft.
* Undra Curtnell Greene,
26, of Avon Park, was
charged with failure to reg-
ister a motor vehicle, driving
while license suspended
habitual offender, flee/elude
police officer, and attach
registration license plate.
* Timothy Vancura
Messing, 35, of Sebring,
was charged with criminal


mischief and battery,
* Louis Pagain;; 52, of
Sebring, was charged with
three counts of possession
of a controlled substance
without a prescriptions and
possession and or ,ae of
drug equipment.
* Marvin Richard Ritenour,
56, of Avon Park, was
charged with petil theft,
dealing in stolen property
and trespassing.
* Ronald James Shaw, 52,
of Sebring, was charged
with sex offender
violation/failing to report
name or residence.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on Tuesday, Feb.
15:
* Shaniqua Devondra
Blake, 22, of Avon Park, was
charged with burglary.
* Andres Benjamin
Brotons, 32, of Sebring, was
charged with possession of
cocaine.
* Lateshia Renee Coker,
20, of Tallahassee, was
charged with battery.
* Shawn William Finigan,
42, of Avon Park, was
charged with possession of.
amphetamine with intent to
sell/manufacture/deliver,
and possession of hallu-
cinogen with intent to
sell/manufacture/deliver.
* Eric Charles Goelz, 35, of
Lake Placid, was arrested on
an out-of-county and out-of-
state warrant reference
threats.
* Brent Dudley Hammons,
39, of Sebring, was charged
with two counts of violation
Continued on page 8A


Sebring honors FFA'
;..:" ; : '-1 -- ,.-w.W^a,.^ ^^ ^ ^
.

'71,


S. .. ., -; ..


News-sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
Sebring Mayor George Hensley welcomes Kelby
Mahoney to the city council chambers where she accept-
ed the city's proclamation on behalf of the Sebring High
School's chapter of the FFA. 'The FFA promotes premier
leadership, personal growth and career success among
it's members,' Hensley said.


Feb. 15 8 16 17 26 45 47 x:5
Lot y LFL 0., !O A Nextjackpot $15mil/ion

Center &GiD Feb.12 1 13 18 24 40 53 x:3
raid. Lettu-U Feb. 9 3 11 24 29 35 51 x:4

Feb. 16 3 10 17 18 32 Feb. 16 (n) 5 1 0 1
.a4-,, Feb. 15 7 8 14 25 33 ... Feb. 16 (d) 8 3 6 0
evnaltch. Feb. 14 3 5 10 17 33 Feb. 15 (n) 6 9 2 3
.. Feb. 13 3 27 31 32 33 Feb. 15 (d) 6 6 6 8

Feb. 15 3 20 31 39 0 10 Feb. 16 (n) 8 0 6
J Feb.11 19 23 35 42 0 17 'A Feb.16 (d) 6 6 8
SFeb. 8 12 14 15 18 Q 11 )- 'Feb. 15 (n) 9 0 5
'. Feb. 4 11 22 30 44 0 11 Feb. 15 (d) 9 6 3

,, Feb. 16 9 13 21 23 48 PB: 24 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawings
._-A8,-'.*' $126 o are twice pert day: (d) is the
41daytitne drawing, (n) is the
Feb. 12 11 32 36 48 52 PB: 19 PP: 4 nighttime drawing.
Feb. 9 7 11 39 42 51 PB: 30 PP: 4 PB: Power Ball PP: Power Play





NEWS-SUN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927

Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, Florida 33870
A Harbor Point Media Company


OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870
OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday
PHONE: 863-385-6155
MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954
NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453

CIRCULATION
SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not
receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation
department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before
11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to
you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their
account. Please call 385-6155.


POSTMASTER: Send address change to:
News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870
USPS ISSN 0163-3988
Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL
and additional entry offices)


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
HOME DELIVERY
IN FLORIDA MAIL
OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL


12 mo.
S60.46
92.23
105.99


7% FL tax
$4.23
6.46


$64.69
98.69
105.99


Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on
Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.
Romona Washington.- Publisher and Executive Editor
863-385-6155, ext. 515


COMMUNITY BRIEFS


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Page 4A


EDITORIAL & OPINION


News-Sun *' Friday, February 18, 2011


www.newssun.com


TODAY'S EDITORIAL.

No cloud cover in Helms' contract


T he county
commission
decided to
negotiate with
interim county
administrator, and
now county admin-
istrator, Rick
Helms last week
during one of its
regular meetings.
You may not agree with
the salary, benefits, or hours
he is to work, but you have
to admire that the final nego-
tiations for his contract were
done in an open meeting.
The commission original-
ly put chairwoman Barbara
Stewart in charge of the
negotiations, and she held a
meeting with Helms and
County Attorney Ross
Macbeth to hash out a rough
draft.


EDITORIAL PAGE

POLICY

Make sure to sign your
letter and include your
address and phone num-
ber. Anonymous letters
will be automatically
rejected.
Please keep your let-
ters to a maximum of 400
words. We have to make
room for everybody.
Letters of local concern
take priority.
Send your letter to
2227 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring, FL 33870; drop it
off at the same address;
fax 385-1954; or e-mail
editor @newssun. com.
To make sure the edito-
rial pages aren't dominat-
ed by the same writers,
letters are limited to two
per month and a guest
column can be submitted
once every three months.
Opinions expressed in
letters or columns are
solely the opinion of that
author and not necessari-
ly the opinion of the staff
or editors of the News-
Sun.
All items will run on a
first-come basis as space
permits, although more
timely ones could be
moved up.
We believe your view-
points are just as impor-
tant as any community
leader or government offi-
cial, so consider this a
personal invitation to get
your two cents in. The
News-Sun has a long his-
tory of encouraging public
discussion through let-
ters, guest columns, and
Reader's Response ques-
tionnaires. Providing this
forum for our readers is a
pleasure, not an obliga-
tion.


EXPRESSIONS OF
FREE SPEECH

'Freedom of

religion, speech,

assembly and

the press. Due

process. Equal

protection of the

law. That's the

stuff that makes

us Americans.

Not whether or


how we choose

to worship'


OLIVER 'BUZZ'
THOMAS
religous-liberty


Wisely, the final details
were left to the entire com-
mission to discuss and
counter on the following
Tuesday.
The board and Helms hag-
gled back and forth for the
exact amount of pay during
the meeting, and members of.
the public were allowed to
voice their concerns about
those amounts and the budg-
et during those discussions.
Many views were aired
out and both opponents and
supporters of Helms were
given a chance to speak and
ask questions. Explanations
were offered for each step of
the commissioners decisions
by the commissioners them-
selves. Candid talks were
held about the compensa-'
tion, and even one commis-
sioner, Stewart, voted
against the final draft of the
contract because she did not
agree with the compensa-
tion.


Many items have come
into light recently about
Government in the Sunshine,
including the Governor's
Office having a private din-
ner with senators, commis-
sioners in Wauchula being
removed by the governor
and local council members
in Lake Placid having ques-
tionable meetings.
Granted, a newspaper has
a dog in the fight concerning
open government, but the
discussion about how we
pick those we hire to head
our governments should jus-
tifiably be in a public venue,
nt behind closed doors.
Hiring a city manager, a
county attorney, a fire or
police chief should all hap-
pen in the public venue, and
with the public's input,
because these are the people
that we need to rely on when
the budget is in trouble or
your house is on fire.
Knowing that public input


NEW-SSuN
Highlnds Coumt'h Hymetown NL 3 0pap Since 19--r
2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155


NEWSROOM
ROMONA WASHINGTON
Publisher/Executive Editor
Ext. 515
editor@newssun. corn


SCOTT DRESSEL
Editor
Ext. 516
scott.dressel@newssun.com
DAN HOEHNE
Sports Editor
Ext. 528
daniel.hoehne@newssun. corn


was both listened to and
accepted as part of legiti-
mate discussions goes a long
way towards trust and
accountability. In this case,
asking Helms to justify in
the public eye why his salary
request was more than the
commission offered was the
right thing to do, and it
helped to ease the pain of


ADVERTISING
VICKIE JONES
Ext. 518
vickie.jones@newssun.com
CIRCULATION
TONY MCCOWAN
Ext. 522
anthony. mccowan@newssun. com
PRE-PRESS
KEN BAREFIELD
Production Coordinator
Ext. 594
prepress@newssun.com
BUSINESS OFFICE
JANET EMERSON
Ext. 596
legals@newssun. corn


those who feel all govern-
ment officials are paid too
much.
When adults discuss mat-
ters in a rational, mature
fashion, no feelings are hurt,
and we all learn it is OK to
disagree in the decision-
making process. Especially
when there is no cloud cover
blocking the sunshine.


Democracy spreading in the Middle East


I ,This has been the
winter of the Middle
Eastern discontent.
First the people of
Tunisia rose up as a
i group and demand-
i ed the right to deter-
mine their future
and then right
Guest behind them came
the citizens of Egypt
Column who shrugged off 30
Martha years of a military
Ranlph Cr ruler who was rob-
ar bing their coffers of
billions of dollars for his own private
pleasures.
Other countries in the Middle East
such as Jordan, Yemen and Syria that
have autocratic rule or even outright
dictatorships, whether it's through the
military, royalty or a faux religious
rule, are becoming increasingly
alarmed that the jig is up.
They're right; it is over, because
once a group of citizens has experi-
enced self-rule it takes bloodshed to go
back to any other system. Its one thing
to wonder what it would be like to
choose what life will look like but not
really know if even the act of trying
would make things worse. It's another
to try it out and see that democracy is
viable and has unexpected rewards.
Citizens even begin to dream of what
life may become for the next genera-
tion.
The old rule dictated that a lot
would be done to benefit a few, which
meant that the majority were going to
be out of luck for an entire lifetime.
The new style of leadership says that
with some hard work and some will-
ingness anything is possible. We
become the instruments of our own


change.
In the past though democratic revo-
lution generally took some bloodshed
and a couple of times, a world war but
even that has changed due to new tech-
nology and has left the rest of us to
marvel at what might come next.
Social networking that was started
as a means to meet girls or sell widg-
ets has become something unexpected
and has transmitted to others who have
a similar background but can't travel
across borders a viable model of
democracy. Even now, young protest-
ers in Egypt are sending messages to
people they've never met in nearby
countries to give them tips on how to
pull off the same peaceful overthrow
of some distant ruler.
The recipients are getting a unique
blueprint that fits the region of how
they can create a democratic state and
rule themselves. That may not have
been something that a western country
could have created and may finally be
a way the US can peacefully pull out
of the region without leaving a giant
mess in our wake.
The new wave of democracy, Middle
Eastern style, started with young peo-
ple who had witnessed a form of
democracy somewhere else and wanted
some version of it for their own peo-
ple. They spread the idea through
social media and set up meetings and
protests to figure out how it could
work for them.
It's the 2011 version of Ben Franklin
secretly running a small ink press and
anonymously distributing pamphlets in
the run-up to the American Revolution.
The intoxicating idea of democracy
is finally spreading on a grand scale to
a region of the world that has never
really had the experience in all of its


thousands of years of history. Each
person, hopefully both men and
women, will have a chance to be heard
and the majority of those who choose
to vote will decide.
However, there are still a few more
tricky steps to take so that the philoso-
phy can get some real traction. The
first elected officials have to be willing
to step down if they aren't reelected
and the citizens have to be willing to
go and vote. George Washington
refused to keep running and recog-
nized that people had to become used
to choosing, over and over again, a
new official who worked for the peo-
ple.
Dictators operate off the opposite
belief of entitlement that the majority
supports the few.
There's also something in this new
season for those of us who've only
known a democratic lifestyle. The
Middle Eastern experience is our
opportunity to remember how a
democracy survives and change a lazy
habit that has become entrenched in
this country. In the US during a presi-
dential election year just over half of
the citizens that are eligible to vote
even bother such as in 2008 when it
was 56.8 percent. During the mid-term
elections the numbers sink abysmally
like they did in 2006 to 37.1 percent.
Instead of just patting ourselves on
the back for preserving a form of
democracy so that others may discover
its fruits maybe its time we renewed
our commitment to the fragile ideal
and get out the vote. Imagine the pos-
sibilities.

Martha's latest book is the memoir. A Place
to Call Home. Free eBook at
www.MarthaRandolphCarr.com. E-mail
Martha at: Martha@caglecartoons.com.


Loving care given at
Royal Care
Editor:
May we share the loving
care given to my husband,
Russ, at Royal Care. The spe-
cial therapists, nurses and
nurses' aides showed love and
kindness, never to be forgot-
ten.
Thank you all who work
there. God bless each of you.
Joyce Gardner and Family


TODAY'S

LETTERS
Technology
Committee work is
impressive
Editor:
I am a retired educator.
During my tenure as an educa-
tor I served as a teacher and
administrator at both the ele-
mentary, secondary and univer-
sity levels. Recently, I was
asked to serve on the
Highlands County School
Board's Technology
Committee. This committee is
composed of teachers and prin-
cipals from the elementary,
middle and high schools,
school technology specialists,
district administrators, MIS
staff and citizens. It is the job
of this group to update the dis-
trict's Technology Plan each
year.
I wish to share with the pub-
lic how impressed I have been
with the professionalism,
knowledge, competency, cre-
ativity and industriousness of
the members of the group. At
each meeting I have attended
they have demonstrated their
willingness to remedy present
problems, sort out what works
from what does not seem to be
working and plan for both the
short- and long-term future.
We frequently hear of the
problems in education. We
hear infrequently of the com-
petence and industriousness of
teachers, administrators and
aides. Therefore I thought it
important to share with the
readers how fortunate I feel to
have had the chance to work
with this group of professional
educators on a task that is of
the utmost importance to the
education of all school district
students.
James E. (Jim) Smith
Sebring

County continues to
squander money
Editor:
A couple of weeks ago I
read that the county commis-
sion was concerned about the
decline of future tax revenue
because of the present econo-
my. Evidently they were not
too concerned as they capitu-
lated to the demands of Mr.
(Rick) Helms on taking the
country administrator job.
Then I wondered just how
big a job is the administrator
job. I don't recall ever seeing
in print the duties of this posi-
tion. According to Mr. Helms
he would need an assistant as
he was losing sleep over the
job as the interim administra-
tor. This led me to ponder ,was
the commission passing too
much of their work on to the
administrator? If this was not
the case, I then thought the job
was more than Mr. Helms
could handle, therefore his
request for an assistant.
I recall some 20-plus years
ago, Carl Cool was appointed
to this new position of county
administrator. In the 20-plus
years he held this position, I
don't recall him having an
assistant, nor did he complain
of losing sleep because of the
work load.
After all, Highlands County
is not a huge industrial county.
I perceive it as an agricultural
county with two primary
industries, cattle raising and
citrus growing. A county where
tax revenues are not too abun-
dant. Yet the county commis-
sion squanders money as if it
grew on trees, as in the cases
of firing Mr. (Michael) Wright
(former county administrator)
and hiring Mr. Helms.
Dick Ford
Sebring

Bouquet










www.fnewssun.com


News-Sun + Friday, February 18, 2011


Tangelwood raises $67,500 in Residents' Cancer Benefit


Courtesy photos
At the Tanglewood Residents' Cancer Benefit, the most prized possessions are those who have battled cancer. Here are
some of the community's many survivors. The Tanglewood Residents' Cancer Benefit raised $67,500 this year. This sur-
passes the previous high of $55,600 and brings the 12-year total for cancer research to $315,000.


Shirley Frazier and Cindy Gorman organize 36 door prizes,
mainly gift certificates from local businesses. More than
100 prizes were given away at Tanglewood on Feb. 15.
There were three 50/50 winners who took home $657,
$678 and $718 respectively.


Michelle Coleman sits behind the wheel of her new golf
cart, the grand prize at The Tanglewood Residents' Cancer
Benefit. The cart was donated by Tom and Linda Moeller
(pictured) of Sebring Custom Golf Carts.


COMMUNITY BRIEFS


Continued from page 2A
and levels. The course will
focus on good manners, obe-
dience and behavioral modi-
fications. Upon completion
of this course, you will have
learned how to communicate
better with your dog and
have fun doing it. Many
techniques are utilized
including positive reinforce-
ment to help motivate both
you and your dog.
Some of the exercises you
will be instructed in include:
Sit, down, stand, stay, come,
heel/walking on a loose lead
and more. Topics to be
addressed are geared towards
each individual student, i.e.,
calm greetings, jumping,
barking, biting and other
problem-solving techniques.
The AKC Canine Good
Citizen Test will be available
for those wishing to obtain
said certification at the end
of the course.
The instructor will be
Monica with 30-plus years
of experience in dog training
and behavior modifications.
She has titled dogs in AKC,
Search and Rescue, Cadaver
Dogs, Narcotics, Tracking
and Evidence Indication,
Personal Protection, Therapy
Dogs and Registered Service
Dogs.
Puppies and dogs must be
current on their vaccinations.
Cost is $50. Space is limited.
To pre-register, call 655-
9080.

Edgeukaters Band
plays at Duffer's
SEBRING The
Edgeukaters Band will be.
playing at Duffer's Sports
Grille from 9 p.m. to 1:30
a.m. Saturday.
This popular four-piece
band plays a variety of rock,
southern rock, blues and Top
40 tunes that keep everyone
on the dance floor. There is
no cover charge. Bar closes
at 2 a.m. Must be 21 years
old to enter after 9 p.m.
Duffer's is at 6940 U.S.
27 North. Call 382-6339 for
more details.

Home Safety Class
offered today
SEBRING Jim's
Pistolarrow is having anoth-
er Home Safety Class. Class
starts at 6 p.m. today.
This class teaches gun
safety, as well as the hows
and hows not. Firing time on
the range is mandated.
The permit is good for
seven years, but a criminal
background check is still


required, but no waiting.
If interested, call the range
at 655-4505 for details. In
order to take this class, you
must be able to shoot.

Events planned at
lodges, posts
AVON PARK
The American Legion Post
69 will host music by Mike
Claxton from 5-8 p.m. today.
Nearly Newlywed game is
set for 4:30 p.m. Saturday.
For details and menu selec-
tion, call 453-4553.
LAKE PLACID
The Lake Placid Moose
Lodge 2374 will host a game
of Texas Hold-em at 2 p.m.
today. Music with Patsy and
Johnny will be from 6-10
p.m. On Saturday, Bingo-
bango is set at 2 p.m. and
music with BobKat from 6-
10 p.m. For details and menu
selection, call 465-0131.
The VFW 3880 will host
Texas Hold-em at 1 p.m.
today. On Saturday, early
bird bingo is set from 1:30
p.m., bingo is at 2 p.m.
Music with Now and Then.
For details and menu selec-
tion, call 699-5444.

Woman's Club plans
rummage sale
LAKE PLACID The
GFWC Lake Placid
Woman's Club will have a
rummage and bake sale from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at
10 N. Main Ave.

'Just Country' at
Whisper Lake
SEBRING "Just
Country" show will be at 7
p.m. Saturday at Whisper
Lake Mobile Home Park.
Public welcome and it is
free.
Call 382-0298 for direc-
tions or more information.

Woman's Club
accepts flea market
donations
SEBRING The GFWC
Woman's Club of Sebring at
4260 Lakeview Drive is
accepting donations from 9-
11 a.m. today and Saturday.
The flea market will be held
on Friday and Saturday,
March 4-5. Call 382-0706
for additional details.

Social Dance Club
features The Peter
Graves Orchestra
SEBRING The
Highlands Social Dance
Club hosts Big Band ball-


room dancing on from 7-
9:30 p.m. today at 3400
Sebring Parkway .
Dance the night away to
waltzes, cha-chas, foxtrots,
rumbas, jitterbug and other
favorites to the 10-piece
Peter Graves Orchestra.
Admission is $5 for mem-
bers and $7 for non-mem-
bers. Appropriate dress
required.
The snack bar opens at 6
p.m. For more information
call 863-385-6671

Placid Lakes
Homeowners plan
rummage sale
LAKE PLACID Placid
Lakes Homeowners
Association Annual
Rummage Sale will be from
8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
No early birds. The sale will
be at 2010 Placid Lakes
Blvd. Snacks available.

'Senior Prom' is
Saturday
SEBRING An elegant
evening is planned for
Saturday's Senior "Senior.
Prom" at the Sebring Elks
with dinner at 6 p.m. and
dancing from 7-10 p.m. The
event will feature live music
by one of the area's favorite
bands, The Skylarks, playing
favorites from the 'Big
Band' era.
This is an annual fundrais-
er for Handicapped
Americans Love of Life
Organization and proceeds
from the event will help with
the continuing rehab pro-
gram and support groups.
The purchase of tickets will
ensure the program's
longevity. Tickets are avail-
able for $30 at the Sebring
Chamber of Commerce; at
H.A.L.L.O., 112 Medical
Center Ave., Sebring
(Monday, Wednesday or
Friday) 385-1196; or by call-
ing 655-5241.
Singles are most welcome;
this is not only for couples.
Come and enjoy an elegant
evening of fine food, music
and fun. There will be a
Prom King and Queen cho-
sen, cash bar, semi formal
attire (tuxedo not required).
For more information, call
385-1196, or e-mail hal-
loinc@embarqmail.com.

Avon Park Lakes
Association plans
breakfast
AVON PARK The
Avon Park Lakes
Association will have their


second winter breakfast
from 8-9:30 a.m. Saturday at
the clubhouse, 2714
Nautilus Drive. Menu will
be sausage gravy over
homemade biscuits, or pan-
cakes, sausage links and
scrambled eggs, with coffee
and Maxwell's orange juice.
The public is invited and
the price is $4 for adults and
$2 for children.

Whispering Pines
plans annual bazaar
SEBRING Whispering
Pines Village annual bazaar
and flea market will be from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at
2323 Brunns Road (off
Hammock Road).

Caladium Co-op
'plans pulled pork
dinner
LAKE PLACID The
Caladium Arts and Crafts
Cooperative is planning its
first pulled pork dinner from
4-7 p.m. Saturday. The menu
consists of pulled pork, pota-
to salad, baked beans, cole
slaw, dessert, and a drink.
Each pulled pork dinner also
includes two chances on a
chocolate basket.
The cost for this dinner
including two chances on the
chocolate basket is $10 each.
Tickets may be purchased at
the Caladium Co-op or from
a member of the Co-op.
Call 699-5940 or visit the
Web site www.caladiu-
marts.org for more informa-
tion.

Buttonwood Hobby
Shop auction is
Wednesday
SEBRING Hobby Shop
auction will be at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Preview crafts at
6:30 p.m., including wood-
crafts and stained glass at
the recreation building of
Buttonwood Bay (one and
one-half mile south of U.S.
98 and State Road 66 on
U.S. 27.

Reflections has
square dance
AVON PARK -
Reflections on Silver Lake,
1850 U.S. 27 South, will
have a square dance with
caller Sam Dunn and round
dance cuer Phyllis Hathaway
on Saturday. A workshop
will be held from 7-7:30
p.m. and the dance will be
from 7:30-9:30 p.m.


'Scouting For Food'

drive strives to

provide 100,000 meals


Special to the News-Sun
Local Scouts will deliver
their annual "Scouting For
Food" bags in neighbor-
hoods across eight counties
to collect donations for the
hungry.
They'll return Saturday
to gather any non-perish-
able food items left on
doorsteps for pick up.
About 350,000 bags were
produced for this year's
"Good Turn" effort, and the
Gulf Ridge Council Scouts
hopes to collect enough
food to provide 100,000
meals. Residents receiving
the bags are asked to gener-
ously contribute essential
foodstuffs such as canned
meats, tuna, macaroni and
cheese, cereal, canned veg-
etables and fruits. Personal
care items are also needed.
The food will be distrib-
uted through Feeding
America Tampa Bay and its
network of partner non-
profit feeding programs.
The Food Bank will also
give these agencies a pound
of fresh meat, produce, or


dairy items to distribute for
every pound of food col-
lected by the Scouts.
"We hope the pound-for-
pound match gives resi-
dents a further incentive to
donate to Scouting For
Food, and inspires the
Scouts too", said Feeding
.America Tampa Bay's
executive director Pat
Rogers.
Rogers explained that
most supermarkets now
donate excess fresh prod-
ucts almost daily, providing
a substantial supply of
highly valued nutritious
produce and protein items.
But canned and boxed dry
goods donations are harder
to come by and these foods
are the traditional staple of
most emergency pantries
the Food Bank supports.
The annual food drive
also enables Council mem-
bers to fulfill their "Good
Turn" commitment.
Residents who do not
receive a bag can get one by
calling Julie Diaz Nichols
at (863) 370-7608.


OBITUARIES


ALETHA CURRY
THOMPSON
Aletha Curry Thompson,
age 84, passed away Feb. 6,
2011 at the Palms of
Sebring. She was born in
Avon Park, Fla., and later
moved to Fort Lauderdale
before returning to Sebring.
She was a housekeeper and
was of the Methodist faith.
Survivors include her
son, John Wesley Curry,
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.;
daughters, Lowanda M.
Thompson, Sebring, Fla.,
and Sabrina K. Curry,
Warner Robins, Ga.; broth-
ers, James M. Curry,
Lehigh Acres, Fla.,
Rudolph V. Curry, Boynton
Beach, Fla., and Willie J.
Curry, Sunrise, Fla.; sister,
Queen Ester Curry, Atlanta,
Ga.; 16 grands and eight
great-grands.
Visitation will be held
Friday, Feb. 18, 6-8 p.m. at


Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church,
Sebring, Fla. A funeral
service will be held
Saturday, Feb. 19, 2011, 11
a.m., at Mt. Zion A.M.E.
Church, Sebring, Fla.
Interment will follow at
Pinecrest Cemetery,
Sebring, Fla. Arrangements
are entrusted to:
Swann's Mortuary Inc.
Sebring, FL 33870
863-382-0737

Death notices
Frances R. Goff, 97, of
Lake Placid, Fla., died Feb.
15, 2011. Arrangements are
being handled by Morris
Funeral Chapel, Sebring.

Virginia Dean Thorne,
93, of Sebring died Feb. 15,
2011 in Sebring.
Arrangements are being
handled by Stephenson-
Nelson Funeral Home,
Sebring.


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Page 5A


Descuentos telef6nicos disponibles
para clients de CenturyLink

Con los programs Link-Up America y Lifeline Assistance, los clients
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dinero en los cargos de instalaci6n y el precio mensual para el servicio
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distancia, Servicios de emergencia, Servicios de operadora, Asistencia
de directorio y Bloqueo de Ilamadas interurbanas.

Link-Up America es un program patrocinado por el gobietno fodoral
que ofrece descuentos en los cargos de instalaci6n del seivicio a
chentes de bajos ingresos que reinan los requisites Propoiciona ur
desduento del 50%, hasta un maximo de $30, en los cargos poa nuevas
instalaciones residenciales para servicio telef6nico. El said do los
cargos de instalacion puede pagarse, sin interns, durante un peiiodo de
12 mess Ademas, se anulara el cargo mensual por el servicio para la
restricci6n de Ilamadas interurbanas para los clients que lo soliciten 0
que requieran el servicio.

Lifeline Assistance es otro program patrocinado por el gobierno federal
para los clients de bajos ingresos. Proporciona un descuento en el
cargo mensual para e! servicio telefonico residential basic. Se han
reducido los precious del program Lifeline Assistance y se modificaron
sus pautas para permitir su uso por parte de mas cliantes de bajos
ingrosos.

Para reunir los requisitos para ambos pIogramas, los clients pueden
insciibirse en el program CenturyLink Lifeline, para 10 cual deberan
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elegibilidad de bajos ingiesus del estado. Ademas, est6i disponible
I[tbal Telephone Assistance para aquellas personas que viven en tierras
tribales de los indios americanos reconocidas por el gobterno federal.

Si vive en un area de servicio de CenturyLink y tiene preguntas o desea
solicitar los programs Lifeline/Link-Up, Ilame al 800.366.8201 o visit
centurylink.com/Iifeline.



CenturyLink-
lifeline NON-SAU Mejor Conectado'








News-Sun Friday, February 18, 2011


www.newssun.com


Training for the worst
.. -I. .:.-I


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Highlands County Fire Service Supervisor Charles Andrews talks outside the old
Leisure Lakes Volunteer Fire Department on Thursday, while firefighters and emergency
operation workers take part in a structural collapse rescue training exercise in Lake
Placid. Participants learned advanced search and rescue techniques through hands-on
training that will aid them in finding and saving a life in the event of a building collapse.
Earlier this week, members trained on rope rescue.



Majestic Cove to be left alone


By CHRISTOPHER
TUFFLEY
christopher.tuffley@newssun.com
SEBRING City coun-
cil members discussed what
to do about the situation
with Majestic Cove, the res-
idential condominium com-
plex on Lakeview Drive
which is how marketing
itself as a short-stay resort
condominium.
Council member Margie
Rhoades said she is angry
enough to sue the developer
of the project. At the least,
she said, the developer mis-
led the city. At the worst, he
lied outright.
The developer is Arthur
Marrero, president of
Oakwood Valley Homes in
Davie.
"People in the community
are very upset," Rhoades
said. "It was supposed to be
a 55-plus residential com-
munity. This is a huge mis-
representation. I can't
believe anything they say."


Council president John
Clark, while not as angry as
Rhoades, agreed that the
developer probably said
whatever he needed to say
in order to make the project
happen.
Council member Scott
Stanley, along with Clark,
was not on the council at the
time the development agree-
ment was signed. He said he
didn't understand the fuss.
"You resort to a suit in
order to remediate a prob-
lem," he said, "but I don't
see a problem. Why are we
hassling them?"
Rhoades said she is con-
cerned groups will rent the
condos, and each individual
within the group will bring
their own car, crowding
traffic on Lakeview Drive.
She is also worried about
excessive noise when
groups of people get togeth-
er for a good time.
Council member Buddy
Whitlock reminded the


council that at the time of
negotiations the focus had
been on the number of units
that could be built per acre.
The developer had wanted
48, the city wanted only 12,
and both parties compro-
mised at 24 units per acre.
Regarding a possible glut
of traffic, Whitlock said he
had seen only three cars in
the parking lot the last time
he had driven by the com-
plex. "And one was getting
ready to leave," he said.
Complicating the issue is
the fact that the city has
rezoned the area to allow
motels, hotels and day care
centers.
"They had the legal right
to do it (become a resort
condominium)," Stanley
said. "You're beating a dead
horse."
Stanley then made a
motion to do nothing about
Majestic Cove at this time.
With Rhoades dissenting,
the motion passed 4-1.


Continued from page 2A
interested in bringing
Highlands County back into
the program on the regional
level. Jacobson is an urban
horticulturist and works at
the University of Florida
extension office and has
volunteered for the fair for
the past four years.
"Highlands County does
have local science fairs and


they do participate at the
state level. I'm not sure
why the district doesn't
participate in this regional
program. Maybe it's fund-
ing or a financial issue,"
Jacobson said.
Jacobson, Thomas, and
many other instructors and
avid science lovers all hope
that .the question will soon
be addressed. Jacobson


thinks that students should
have the opportunity to be a
part of the program and is
positive much work will
have to be done in order for
students to get it.
For more information
about the Heartland
Regional Science and
Engineering Fair, contact
Thomas at
thomasde@okee.kl2.fl.us


Fence ordinance passage delayed


Continued from page 1A
Creek, out by Cracker Trail
Elementary School, were
already interested in
installing higher walls.
The current proposed leg-
islation does not allow 8-
foot-tall barriers except to
separate side-by-side com-
mercial and residential
properties.


"How hard is it to add one
more thing?" asked
Whidden, as groans and
tired laughter met his ques-
tion.
,"The never-ending fence
ordinance," council member
Margie Rhoades said.
As it happens, the ordi-
nance had not been properly
noticed for Tuesday's regu-
lar meeting. It was tabled


for action until the next
council meeting, March 1.
The ordinance has already
been tweaked extensively. It
received two first hearings
because of the number of
changes to it. March 1 will
be its second reading.
While discussion may
continue, the ordinance' is
expected to pass at that
time.


Learning about citizenship


News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
Sebring Mayor George Hensley is joined by Zach Campbell in pledging allegiance before
the Sebring City Council meting Tuesday evening. Zach is a member of Boy Scout Troop
846, which was observing the council to learn about citizenship.


Continued from page 1A
Commissioners asked sev-
eral questions about the
grant, including if purchasing
lands would take them off the
tax roles.
"Loss of ad valorem is
unacceptable," said commis-
sioner Jack Richie.
MacLaughlin and county
staff explained that the lands
would be set aside for con-
servancy or that the purchase
might just be for the develop-


Continued from page 1A
streetscape won a recent
award for the company, and
the condition of Circle Drive
detracts from the overall
effect, reflecting poorly on
the project. Pictures are
often taken of award-win-
ning projects for trade mag-
azines and such, a company
spokesman told Miller, and
it is in their own best inter-
est to finish the job properly.
The contractor also "real-
izes how important the
Historic Circle is to



Don't forget

Saturday in

Sebring
News-Sun staff
SEBRING- City council
members John Griffin and
Buddy Whitlock hope every-
one remembers the activities
scheduled at the Historic
Circle Saturday from 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
In addition to classic cars,
artists will set up displays,
and Police Chief Tom
Dettman will act as DJ, pro-
viding music.
Food vendors will be on
hand too.
Come on down, Griffin
and Whitlock say, and join
the fun.
Whitlock said the shows
are helping re-introduce peo-
ple to the historic downtown.
"It looked like 1965
again," he said, "with people
walking everywhere and traf-
fic on ihe streets. Come on
down and have some fun."
9 )INN" ,,-
*0 IM

IIL


FAMIL


ment rights, and not an actual
land purchase.
The commission also
approved a grant for
$165,000 to do a noise study
to determine the decibel lev-
els and distance that noise
pollution from the range
could create problems.
MacLaughlin explained
that the introduction of the F-
35 joint strike fighter created
issues with the noise levels
around Jacksonville, and the
second grant could help to


Sebring," Miller said.
Work on Streetscape IX
began in July 2010. Weather
issues, unexpected problems
and last-minute changes


"prepare the community for
that now."
"The F-35 is the worst case
or bad actor in that coIld
train at this base. Doing it
now, and incorporating the F-
35 data, gives a pretty good
over the 15- to 20-year
range," MacLaughlin said.
Although the county may
have to use funding from
their own conservation funds
to accomplish the mission of
JLUS, it would be reim-
bursed by the state.


pushed the timeline back.
The project was supposed to
be complete by October
2010 in plenty of time for
the winter guest season.


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Page 6A


County to study encroachment

around AP Bombing Range


Circle to be repaved, again


Science fair has no local students


E










News-Sun Friday, February 18. 2011


www.newssUn.com


Five-Day forecast for Highlands County
TODAY SATURDAY SUNDAY


Fog in the morning; mostly Mostly sunny and pleasant Mostly sunny and nice
sunny
800/530 810/540 820/560
Winds: E at 6-12 mph Winds: ENE at 6-12 mph Winds: ESE at 7-14 mph


MONDAY


Sunny and pleasant


TUESDAY


Nice with plenty of sun


830/600 820/580
Winds: S at 7-14 mph Winds: WSW at 6-12 mph


National Forecast for February 18
Showv are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.




/ ~/ ^ n- Billings /

S' Minneapolis I -, / r
S- 33'18- ..NYork


Pensacola
4 71/54 ,-

Almanac
Temperature
Readings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake Placid
High Sunday ...................................... 70'
Low Sunday ................................ ....... 320
High Monday ..................................... 74
Low M onday ...................... .................. 350
High Tuesday ........................................ 76
Low Tuesday ................... ............... 43
High Wednesday .................................... 790
Low W wednesday .................................... 48
Heat Index
For 3 p.m. today
Relative humidity .............................. 39%
Expected air temperature ................... 79
Makes it feel like ................................ 79
Barometer
M onday ........................................... 30.26
Tuesday .......................................... 30.24
W wednesday ......................................... 30.20
Precipitation
Monday .... ........................ 0.00"
Tuesday ........................................ 0.00"
Wednesday ............................... 0.00"
M onth to date ................................. 0.22"
Year to date ..................................... 2.87"
Tides
Readings at St. Petersburg
High ........................................ .. 1:14 a.m .
Low .................................... ....... 8:19 a.m .
High .............................................. 2:34 p.m .
Low .......................................... 7:52 p.m .
Readings at Palm Beach
High ...................................... ... 8:27 a.m .
Low .......................................... 1:50 a.m .
High .......................................... 8:49 p.m .
Low ............................................... 2:16 p.m .
Lake Levels
Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterday
Lake Jackson ................................. 78.36'
Lake Okeechobee ....................... 12.34'
Norm al ............................................. 14.51'
UV Index Today
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index" number,
the greater the need for eye and skin protection.


S7..
-5 5.- -, 5-



10a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High;
8-10' r, Hir, 11+ Extreme
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. @2011
- Accu We .th com


Tallahassee
80/46


Apalachicola
073/50


Regional Summary
Mostly sunny today; patchy fog in the morning, tl
pleasant in the afternoon. Clear tonight. Mostly st
pleasant tomorrow, Sunday and Monday. Tuesday
with plenty of sun.




" Avon Park
%* 1/53
Sebring
0 80/53
1Lorida
'" 80/53
Lake Placid
81/53
Brighton
'' 8054 (


' "

Venus
81/54



Farm Report
Mostly sunny today; fog in the morning,
then pleasant. Winds east 6-12 mph. Expect
6-10 hours of sunshine with average relative
humidity 55% and good drying conditions.

Weather History
Severe thunderstorms roared across north-
eastern Indiana and northwestern Ohio late in
the day on Feb. 18, 1992. The storm produced
hail and funnel clouds.

Sun and Moon
Today Saturday
Sunrise 7:00 a.m. 6:59 a.m.
Sunset 6:21 p.m. 6:21 p.m.
Moohrise 7:02 p.m. 8:08 p.m.
Moonset 6:55 a.m. 7:36 a.m.
Full Last New First

Feb18 Feb24 ar Mar12
Feb18 Feb24 Mar 4 Mar 12


Jacksonville
80/51
W"^


-El Paso
76/-47


Gainesville
80/50

%Ocala
-.' "81/51



4 ./


Clearwater Tampa
79/57 78/58
*1 Winter
Q 80/56
St. Petersburg
79/57
-Sarasota
*78/55


Fort Mye
81/57
-' a


Shown is today's
weather. Temperatures
are today's highs and
tonight's lows.


Daytona Beach Cold Warm Stationary ;. "i Miami
78/53 vy ..a~ :s80166
T-Storms Rain Showers Snow Flurries Ice -


Orlan do 10 o s ls 20S 3i 40O 5 0S- 60s 70s 80H Is
80/55 National Summary
; Today will prove to be the warmest day of this week across the East Coast. Many places will challenge record highs,
mainly across the Carolinas and mid-Atlantic. The warming will occur ahead of a cold front, which will deliver
spotty showers from New England to northeastern Texas. Ice threatens to start the day across northern Maine.
In the wake of the front, iu. i. 1,l: ll usher cooler air across the Midwest, Even the central Plains and Texas
,' Panhandle will experience a cooldown from today's unseasonable warmth.


Haven






rs

.


Naples
81/57


Water Restrictions
* Even addresses may water on Thursday ari
Sunday.


* Odd addresses may water on Wednesday
and Saturday.
* All watering should take place before 10
a.m. and after 4 p.m.

Florida Cities


Today
City Hi/Lo/W
Cape Coral 79/57/s
Clearwater 79/57/s
.rll Spii; 78/64/pc
Daytona Beach 78/53/s
Ft. Laud. Bch 78/66/s
Fort Myers 81/57/s
Gainesville 80/50/s
Hollywood 79/62/s
Homestead AFB 77/63/s
Jacksonville 80/51/s
Key West 77/67/s


Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
79/56/s
79/60/pc
79/65/s
75/55/s
78/66/s
81/57/s
77/52/s
79/62/s
77/64/s
73/52/s
76/68/s


Sun."
Hi/Lo/W
79/58/s
79/60/pc
78/67/s
76/58/s
78/68/s
81/61/s
76/51/s
79/65/s
77/65/s
76/52/s
77/69/s


U.S. Cities


Okeechobee
80/54


West Pa
78/63
A *

Fort Laude
78/66 q

,
Miam
S 80/66


Ke -West
77B67


Today
City Hi/Lo/W
Miami 80/66/s
Okeechobee 80/54/s
Orlando 80/55/s
Pembroke Pines 79/62/s
St. Augustine 76/54/s
St. Petersburg 79/57/s
Sarasota 78/55/s
Tallahassee 80/46/s
Tampa 78/58/s
W. Palm Bch 78/63/s
Winter Haven 80/56/s


City
Albuquerque
Atlanta
Baltimore
Im Beach Birmingham
a Boston
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
erdale Cleveland
Columbus
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
i .1111 0 JI'1
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Lexington
Little Rock


Today
Hi/Lo/W
61/38/pc
74/48/pc
72/41/pc
70/49/pc.
54/33/c
75/44/pc
54/26/pc
48/24/s
54/27/pc
59/34/pc
75/56/pc
58/27/pc
49/24/pc
68/37/pc
81/69/sh
74/57/c
57/31/pc
70/56/c
57/37/s
65/35/pc
70/52/pc


Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
66/37/c
70/54/s
54/28/s
71/51/pc
40/21/pc
70/39/s
'49/21/pc
40/34/pc
36/30/pc
46/37/pc
73/56/c
55/27/pc
40/30/s
48/26/pc
80/69/c
73/57/c
53/44/s
72/53/pc
61/49/pc
55/43/s
69/53/pc


World Cities


Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
80/66/s
80/57/s
81/56/s
79/62/s
71/56/s
79/60/pc
76/55/s
77/49/s
78/59/pc
77/63/s
81/57/s


Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
78/66/s
78/58/s
79/59/s
79/65/s
73/56/s
78/60/pc
75/59/s
75/50/s
75/58/pc
79/65/s
78/59/s


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow
flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


City
Acapulco
Athens
Beirut
Berlin
Bermuda
Calgary
Dublin
Edmonton
Freeport
Geneva
Havana
Hong Kong
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kiev


Today
Hi/Lo/W
90/70/s
63/50/r
68/62/s
35/21/c
66/61/s
6/-5/pc
45/39/r
0/-23/s
76/60/s
47/33/pc
82/58/s
66/63/sh
63/49/s
71/56/r
23/21/sn


Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
90/70/s
57/48/sh
73/56/pc
29/17/c
70/56/sh
31/14/pc
48/41/pc
15/5/s
76/61/s
50/38/c
80/60/pc
68/61/sh
69/43/s
72/55/t
22/14/c


Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
54/27/c
69/52/pc
48/37/r
73/54/pc
37/27/pc
68/46/pc
30/14/sn
37/18/r
45/20/i
56/28/r
75/55/c
37/16/r
40/18/i
45/34/r
81/69/pc
76/59/c
58/29/r
73/54/pc
62/27/r
64/46/pc
71/53/pc


Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
88/70/s
57/46/c
62/54/r
29/17/pc
63/59/s
36/15/c
50/39/r
25/3/pc
77/63/pc
40/34/r
83/63/pc
67/61/c
56/47/r
80/56/pc
20/15/c


City
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis '
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
Oklahoma City
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Raleigh
Rochester
St. Louis
San Francisco
Seattle
Wash., DC



City
London
Montreal
Moscow
Nice
Ottawa
Quebec
Rio de Janeiro
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Toronto
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg


Today
Hi/Lo/W
64/50/r
66/39/pc
69/53/pc
47/23/s
33/18/pc
68/40/pc
74/56/pc
65/37/pc
75/48/pc
70/45/s
67/41/pc
70/51/c
59/34/c
48/28/c
47/30/pe
75/46/pc
58/27/c
64/36/pc
49/41/sh
45/30/pc
76/43/pc


Today
Hi/Lo/W
48/40/pc
45/22/r
1/-13/s
56/50/s
52/22/sh
42/21/r
90/75/pc
46/23/s
86/77/sh
82/69/c
54/21/pc
42/28/c
38/36/c
28/23/sn
6/-8/c


Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
60/46/sh
59/48/s
69/56/pc
35/28/pc
38/16/pc
69/50/s
72/56/pc
45/30/pc
64/36/s
71/53/c
49/29/pc
67/47/r
41/26/pc
35/13/pc
49/30/s
69/38/s
27/24/sf
57/48/pc
49/40/c
45/28/s
56/34/s


Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
50/41/r
24/6/sf
7/-11/s
62/48/pc
25/5/sf
21/6/sn
88/77/pc
48/27/pc
85/75/t
91/72/pc
28/23/c'
42/32/pc
42/30/sf
24/17/c
4/-8/sn


Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
59/46/pc
65/46/r
68/55/pc
33/15/sn
21/7/sn
68/53/pc
72/57/s
42/28/pc
62/49/pc
70/40/c
43/34/r
60/41/sh
47/32/r
31/21/pc
47/35/c
66/48/pc
39/20/sn
65/34/r
51/42/pc
44/35/r
53/42/r


Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
52/46/pc
20/12/pc
8/-1/pc
61/47/pc
15/-3/pc
24/1/pc
90/77/s
57/29/c
83/76/t
90/67/pc
25/10/sn
40/33/r
37/26/s
19/11/pc
13/8/pc


)flnlty



.2


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everything




your way.



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Page 7A


.. ^. -.. 'p --









News-Sun Friday, February 18, 2011


Page 8A


www.newssun.corn


Tanglewood raises big bucks to fight cancer


Courtesy photo
When Tanglewood residents meet, they eat. Pulled pork sandwiches were served up for
lunch at the Tanglewood Residents' Cancer Benefit on Feb. 15. Throughout their weeks-
long efforts, the community raised more than $67,000 for cancer benefit See more photos
on page 5A.




Recycling a complex issue


Continued from page 1A
goals was to combine all the
recycling into one bucket, or
in this case a 65-gallon con-
tainer, and have a processing
center sort it out.
"I think it is the only option
in order for us to reach the 40
percent," Elwell said.
The process is called "sin-
gle streaming" instead of sep-
arate sorting, where paper is'
in a different container than
glass or aluminum.
Currently, Choice
Environmental has a contract
with the county to haul both
the regular garbage and any
future recycling.
By Florida statute, the
commission has to negotiate
first with Choice for any
hauling.
"When we bid this propos-
al, we were including the
numbers for recycling
already," said Jim Wheatley,
regional sales manager for
Choice.
"I am willing to supply 65-
gallon carts to every resident
today at no charge. What
would be the problem with
giving you free carts? That's
for free. If the homeowner
wants another cart, we could
supply another size cart. I
will commit to you right now,
and be in service in 90 days.
"When we signed the con-
tract I promised you new
trucks, new cans, same
employees and a new build-
ing. So far we have not let
you down," Wheatley said. "I
am interested in the hauling. I
am offering free hauling, and
I will respond to anything that
you guys want."
Choice, out of Ft.
Lauderdale, is being pur-
chased by a North Carolina
company, Swisher Hygiene,
Inc., for $50.1 million,

POLICE
BLOTTER
Continued from page 2A
of probation reference grand
theft and burglary of a struc-
ture.
* Latoya Catrease King, 24,
of Avon Park, was charged
with battery and operating a
motor vehicle without a valid
license.
* Kevin Erich Lowie,.24, of
Sebring, was charged with
simple assault and resisting
an officer without violence.
* Natanael Jose Osorio, 20,
of Avon Park, was charged
with violation of a municipal
ordinance.
* Dustin James Taylor, 27, of
Lake Placid, was charged with
battery.


according to The Business
Journal in Greensboro in a
Feb. 11 article.
Add to the mix Republic
Sanitation, the company that
had the garbage contract
before Choice, offered
Tuesday to negotiate to
process the recycling and
even re-bid on hauling.
"What do you have to
lose?" Mark Talbot, general
manager of Republic
Sanitation for Polk and
Highlands County. "We are
primarily interested in the
processing. But we will bid
anything you want, I can tell
ya that."
Then arose the question of
the current contract and the
tipping fees paid by Choice.
If residents separate their
garbage, and less goes to the
landfill, Stewart pointed out,
then Choice would pay less in
tipping fees when their trucks
crossed the scales. In other
words, the county would lose
money on the fees.
To further cloud the issue,
County Attorney Ross
Macbeth suggested moving
everything to the current
landfill.
"I am a little puzzled on the
tipping fee, because I never
thought that we would be los-
ing that money," Macbeth
said. "Activity should be
focused at your landfill no


matter what happens."
Gavarrete informed the
commissioners that the cur-
rent recycling facility in
DeSoto City did not have the.
capacity nor does it meet the
county's own landscaping
ordinances.
Gavarrete estimated that it
would take between $1.5 to
$2 million to upgrade the cur-
rent facility to handle the
amount of recycling needed
to meet potential legal
requirements, but had no
numbers on moving every-
thing to the county landfill.
"You don't have a facility
at the landfill, you have a
facility at DeSoto City,"
Gavarrete pointed out.
Without all the options on
the table, and a study of the
different number of scenar-
ios, commissioners decided
to seek further information.
"I wouldn't want to do any-
thing that took money away
from this county at any time.
We don't know the numbers.
Right now we are just playing
in the dark. I don't see how
you can possibly make a deci-
sion without the numbers,"
said Commissioner Jack
Richie.
"What we are trying to do
is make sure that we avoid
raising garbage rates next
year," Stewart said.


Hairpin Spin deadline nears


Continued from page 1A
donated to local charities
and service organizations
here in Highlands County
Over the past five years
the event has raised some
$100,000 for the Highlands
Art League Scholarship
Program, the Champion for
Children Foundation of
Highlands County, the
Sebring Hall of Fame and
the Highlands County
Humane Society.
The casino-themed lunch-
eon is held the Wednesday
of Race Week in the ball-
room at the Chateau Elan
Hotel and Spa, just hours
after the gates officially
open to the fans.
The hotel is located right
along the famous Hairpin
Turn at the Sebring
.International Raceway,
which gives the event the
first part of its name.
The second half, the


"spin," comes from the
giant roulette wheel that
hopeful patrons bet on in an
attempt to win prizes rang-
ing from tickets to
America's premier sports
car endurance race to a
vacation at a luxurious
mountain retreat or a deluxe
fishing trip.
Last year, Positive
Medical Services Public
Information Officer Rob
Bullock donated one of the
grand prizes, a four-day,
three night package for six
at Jimmy Johnson's
Fisherman's Cove in in the
Florida Keys to Samaritan's
Touch Care Center in
Sebring, which is valued at
$4,000.
The event is peppered
with racing celebrities,
including the reigning Miss
12 Hours and drivers from
various teams, many of
which take a moment out to
hold an impromptu auto-


graph session.
"The guys from Corvette
and Audi always have been
great," she said.
There's also a luncheon,
buffet catered by Esparante
at the Chateau. Wine is pro-
vided by Henscratch Farms
and mimosas featuring
Fresh from Florida orange
juice. Gourmet deserts come
from Sweet Street.
"It's a great package.
For.$50 you get a ticket to
the luncheon and 10 Hairpin
Spin chips to bet on the
prizes you like and a chance
to meet some world-class
drivers up close and person-
al," Celentano said. "You
really can't beat it."
Those wishing to get tick-,
ets or purchase a sponsor-.
ship can call Celentano at
Sebring International,
Raceway at 655-1442 ext.'
213 or e-mail;
lcelentano@6sebringrace-'
way.com.


General still haunted by

memories of ambush in Iraq


Continued from page 2A
"I was constantly reliving
the ambush," the general
said. "It was nonstop and
kept rolling in my mind."
Blackledge, who now
commands the Army's Civil
Affairs & Psychological
Operations Command
(Airborne), admits that he
returned to duty too quickly
after being wounded the
first time. The subsequent
Amman bombings, coupled
with the stress of leading
men and women into battle,
pushed him close to the
edge.
"The thing driving me
crazy the most was the
short attention span and
difficulty concentrating,"
he explained. "My wife is
an Air Force nurse with


three combat deployments,
and she had concerns about
me."
After some initial coax-
ing, this battle-tested mili-
tary leader, who has
received the Legion of
Merit, five Bronze Stars
and two Purple Hearts since
1975, set the bar for a new,
unofficial badge of honor.
He asked for help.
"It was like a weight
coming off my shoulders,"
the general said.
Blackledge, who still
struggles with post-traumat-
ic stress disorder but has
benefited greatly from
treatment/has an order for
active duty service mem-
bers and veterans. If you're
hurting inside, or know
someone who is, it's time


to speak up.
"It's just like helping out
a soldier who has a physi-
cal wound," Blackledge
said. "We wouldn't stop or
hesitate at that, but some-
times we're too reluctant
when it comes to injuries
we can't see."
While a general's night-
mares about a terrorist
ordering orange juice and
enemy bullets piercing his
SUV may never cease, the
stigma attached to post-
traumatic stress disorder, at
long last, is beginning to
fade.

To find out more about Tom
Sileo, or to read features by
other Creators Syndicate writ-
ers and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web site at
www.creators.com.


This is an international event bringing cyclists, their
teams and families to Highlands County from all
around the world and all over North America. This
event is well recognized as one of the premier
cycling events held in the world, being one of
the most popular qualifier events for the Ultra 4
Cycling/RAAM (Race Across America).

With the money raised from this fundraiser, /
our club will be able to help with many /
worthwhile community projects. Our
sincere thanks to the following sponsors
who make this event possible.











a
SPONS01





INTAIERN/





S FLORIDA

HOSPITAL

BROWNSr
GROVES


Ridge Florist
&
Water Systems, Inc.





A"I lndldq rt'nl F-rm


/Affinity
Health
Professionab


GREEK

GRILL


iS
2011




NATIONAL
EWAY


L
-J

HIGHLANDS
VISITOR & CONVENTION BUREAU
www.ViilHlIghlandsCounty.com


SUNSHINE HOMES


Mark Andrews
Insurance Agency


ENDURANCE FUELS
& SUPPLEMENTS


The Bulb B:n Inc.

l(NEW '-SS


Caset (W IKI .


CAMP'SBS COLLISION
J N 1' CENTIR, INC.



UN
1-M, tl


THE ROTARY CLUB OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY

Is Proud to Host The

11 th Annual

BIKE SEBRING 12/24

Feb. 1 8th & 1 9th at Sebring Raceway


Phone Discounts Available to CenturyLink customers


The Florida Public Service Commission designated CenturyLink
as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier or ETC within its service
area for universal service purposes. The goal of universal service is
to provide all Florida citizens access to essential telecommunica-
tions services.

CenturyLink provides single party residential and business services
for rates from $16.40 to $17.00 per month for residential custom-
ers and $24.00 to $31.00 per month for business customers. This
includes access to long distance carriers, Emergency Services,
Operator Services, Directory Assistance and Toll Blocking. Use of
these services may result in added charges. Specific rates for your
areas will be provided upon request.

CenturyLink offers qualified customers Lifeline and Link-Up
Service if they meet certain low-income eligibility requirements.
Lifeline Service includes a monthly discount up to $8.25 for basic
phone charges (including a waiver of the Federal Subscriber
Line Charge), as well as toll blocking at no charge and a waiver
of the deposit if toll blocking is selected by qualifying customers.
Link-Up Service provides a discount on installation charges and
charges to move service.

If you live in a CenturyLink service area, please call CenturyLink at
1-800-201-4099 or visit www.centurylink.com/lifeline with questions
or to request an application for the Lifeline/Link-Up programs.





CenturyLink-

lifene NON-SAU www.centurylink.com


FOUR POINTS
BY SHERATON









































































1050 Lega

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 11-47
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JUDITH LEE PAGE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS .
The administration of the estate of JUDITH LEE
PAGE, deceased, whose date of death was July
17, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for High-
lands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which Is 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL
33870. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is served must
file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
February 11, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Charles Michael Page
2312 CANYON VALLEY TRAIL
PLANO, Texas 75023
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Clifford M. Ables
CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III
Attorney for CHARLES MICHAEL PAGE
Florida Bar Number: 178379
551 S. COMMERCE AVE.
SEBRING, FLORIDA 33870
Telephone: (863) 385-0112
Fax: (863)385-1284
E-Mail: cmables@cmablespa.net
February 11, 18, 2011



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 282010CA001309
SEACOAST NATIONAL BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ERMELINDA RAMOS, et. al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 1, 2011,
entered in Case No. 10-CA-1309 in the Circuit
Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for High-
lands County, Florida wherein Seacoast National
Bank is Plaintiff and Ermelinda Ramos and High-
lands County, a political subdivision of the State of
Florida, acting through the Board of County Com-
missioners are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at the Jury As-
sembly Room, Highlands County Courthouse, 430
S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 at
11:00 am on the 24th day of February, 2011, the
following described property Highlands County,
Florida:
Lot 24, Block 5, of SEBRING COUNTRY ESTATES,
SECTION ONE, according to the Plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 6, at Page 49, of the Public
Records of Highlands County, Florida,
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 4th day of February 2011.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
DEPUTY CLERK
February 11, 18, 2011

WANT NEW

FURNITURE?

Need to sell the old

furniture first?

Call News-Sun

classified,

385-6155.

Then shop

till you drop!


News-Sun Friday, February 18, 2011


1050 --
STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT

The Flforida Department of Environmental Pro-
tection (FDEP) gives notice of its intent to issue a
permit for Bishop Brothers Dairy, to be issued to
Bishop Brothers Dairy, Inc. The proposed permit
authorizes the operation of the waste manage-
ment system'in accordance with the approved Nu-
trient Management Plan, which also limits the
herd size and management practices. The permit
will also provide coverage under the National Pol-
lutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), as
delegated to the state by the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency. The dairy is located at 2300
Bishop Dairy Road, Sebring, Highlands County,
Florida 33870. The Department has assigned per-
mit application file number
FLA136565-003-1W4A to the project.
The intent to issue and applicationfile are
available for public inspection during normal
business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday, except legal holidays, at the FDEP
Southeast District Office located at 400 N. Con-
gress Ave., Suite 200, West Palm Beach, FL,
33401.
The Department will Issue the permit with the
attached conditions unless a timely petition for an
administrative hearing is filed under Sections
120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, within
fourteen days of receipt of notice, The procedures
for petitioning for a hearing are set forth below.

A person whose substantial interests are af-
fected by the Department's proposed permitting
decision may petition for an administrative pro-
ceeding (hearing) under sections 120.569 and
120.57, Florida Statutes. The petition must con-
tain the information set forth below and must be
filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General
Counsel of the Department at 3900 Comlmon-
wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-3000.

Under Rule 62-110.106(4), Florida Administra-
tive Code, a person may request enlargement of
the time for filing a petition for an administrative
hearing. The request must be filed (received by
the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel before
the end of the time period for filing a petition for
an administrative hearing.

Petitions filed by any persons other than those
entitled to written notice under section 120.60(3),
Florida Statutes, must be filed within fourteen
days of publication of the notice or within four-
teen days of receipt of the written notice, which-
ever occurs first. Under section 120.60(3) of the
Florida Statutes, however, any person who has
asked the Department for notice of agency action
may file a petition within fourteen days of receipt
of such notice, regardless of the date of publica-
tion.

The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition
to the applicant at the address indicated above at
the time of filing. The failure of any person to file
a petition within fourteen days of receipt of notice
shall constitute a waiver of that person's right to
request an administrative determination (hearing)
under sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida
Statutes. Any subsequent intervention (in a pro-
ceeding initiated by another party) will be only at
the discretion of the presiding officer upon the fil-
ing of a motion in compliance with rule
28-106.205, Florida Administrative Code.

A petition that disputes the material facts on
which the Department's action is based must
contain the following information:
(a) The name, address and telephone number of
each petitioner; the name, address, and telephone
number of the petitioner's representative, if any;
the Department permit identification number and
the county in which the subject matter or activity
is located;
(b) A statement of how and when each peti-
tioner received notice of the Department action;
(c) A statement of how each petitioner's sub-
stantial interests are affected by the Department
action;
(d) A statement of all disputed issues of mate-
rial fact. If there are none, the petition must so in-
dicate;
(e) A statement of facts that the petitioner con-
tends warrant reversal or modification of the De-
partment action;
(f) A concise statement of the ultimate facts
alleged, as well as the rules and statutes which
entitle the petitioner to relief; and
(g) A statement of the relief sought by the pe-
titioner, stating precisely the action that the peti-
tioner wants the Department to take.
Because the administrative hearing process is
designed to formulate final agency action, the fil-
ing of a petition means that the Department's fi-
nal action may be.different from the position taken
by it in this notice. Persons whose substantial in-
terests will be affected by any such final decision
of the Department have the right to petition to be-
come a party to the proceeding, in accordance
with the requirements set forth above.

Mediation under Section 120.573, Florida
Statutes, is not available for this proceeding.
February 18, 2011


1050 Leg.ls
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 282009CA001229
SEACOAST NATIONAL BANK, SUCCESSOR BY
* MERGER TO BIG LAKE NATIONAL BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TANYA D. COLDREN, et. al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 1, 2011,
entered in Case No. 09-CA-1229 in the. Circuit
Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for High-
lands County, Florida wherein Seacoast National
Bank is Plaintiff and Tanya D. Coldren and Kevin
Coldren are the Defendants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at the Jury Assembly
Room, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S.
Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 at
11:00 am on the 24th day of February, 2011, the
following described property Highlands County,
Florida:
Lot 30, Block 165, of LEISURE LAKES SECTION
FOUR, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 6, at Page 29, of the Public Records of
Highlands County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 2nd day of February 2011.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
DEPUTY CLERK
February 11, 18, 2011



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 282009CA001230
SEACOAST NATIONAL BANK, SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO BIG LAKE NATIONAL BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TANYA D. COLDREN AND KEVIN F. COLDREN,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 1, 2011,
entered in Case No. 09-CA-1230 in the Circuit
Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for High-
lands County, Florida wherein Seacoast National
Bank is Plaintiff and Tanya D. Coldren and Kevin
F. Coldren are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at the Jury As-
sembly Room, Highlands County Courthouse, 430
S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 at
11:00 am on the 24th day of February, 2011, the
following described property Highlands County,
Florida:
Lot 9, in Block 165, of LEISURE LAKES SECTION
FOUR, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 6, at Page 29, of the Public Records of
Highlands County, Florida.
Any person. claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 3rd day of February 2011.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
DEPUTY CLERK
February 11, 18, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10OTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
Case#: GC10-175
Divisionf:
CARLA RENEE BENNETT, Personal Representative
ESTATE OF DAVID L. MARSH, deceased
Plaintiffss,
vs.
AMY BROWN, a/k/a Amy A. Brown,
FRANKLIN BROWN, CAPITAL ONE BANK
and CREDIT ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION, et al
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final de-
cree of foreclosure entered in the above entitled
cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County,
Florida, I will sell the property situate in Highlands
County, Florida, described as:
Lot 22, MORNING SUN MANOR, according to the
plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 46,
of the Public Records of Highlands County, Flor-
ida.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for
cash, at the Commerce Street Entrance of the
Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida,
at 11:00 a.m. on the 3rd day of March, A.D.
2011.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of this
Honorable Court, this 3rd day of February, A.D.
2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
As Clerk of said Circuit Court
By: /s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
February 11, 18, 2011


1050 Legls
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 28-2010-CA-000763
SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JONATHAN P. COOPER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JONATHAN P. COOPER; SHAWNA C. COOPER
A/K/A SHAWNA C. KILGORE; IF LIVING, INCLUD-
ING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFEN-
DANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS,
AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS). UNKNOWN TENANT
#1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of High-
lands County, Florida, I will sell the property situ-
ate in Highlands County, Florida, described as:
LOT 24, IN BLOCK 201, OF SUN 'N LAKES ES-
TATES, SECTION 18, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE
87, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement
of Highlands County Courthouse located at 430
South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at
11:00 A.M., on March 1, 2011.
DATED THIS 1st DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2011.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendents, must file
a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the
1st day of February, 2011.
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
February 11, 18,2011


Page 9A


VIITOU


:Wii] IE A e[Ti-a


~t' p-.' ~





C


AD RATES


GARAGE

SALE

6 lines 2 days j
$1150


Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2
ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if it's the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under 3 days
the "Bargain Buys" discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is $*14
allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating "Each," the
ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the "Open Rate" pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed under our (additional lines $1 each)
"Bargain Buys" specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating "Free to Good Home," are allowed to be placed under
the "Bargain Buy" category. iLm,- m AI


Index

1000 Announcements

2000 Employment

3000 Financial

4000 Real Estate

5000 Mobile Homes

6000 Rentals

7000 Merchandise

8000 Recreation

9000 Transportation


1000
Announcements


1050 Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000618
CITIMORTGAGE, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
EUGENIA WRITERS A/K/A EUGINIA WRITERS; AND
BROINISLAVA OTZELNAIS A/K/A BRONIASLAVA
OTZELNAIS.
Defendant(s).
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der rescheduling foreclosure sale dated February
3, 2011 entered in Civil Case No.
2010-CA-000618 of the Circuit Court of the 10th
Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Flor-
ida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff and
EUGENIA WRITERS A/K/A EUGINIA WRITERS; AND
BROINISLAVA, DTZELNAIS.. A/K/A BRONIASLAVA
OTZELNAIS are defendantss, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for, cash, AT THE JURY AS-
SEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGH-
LANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430
SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA
AT 11:00 A.M., March 10, 2011, the following
described property as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:
LOT 7, OF EDGEWATER POINT SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 13, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE
LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
DATED at SEBRING, Florida, this 3rd day of Febru-
ary, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Highlands County, Florida
By: /s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO &FISHMAN, LLP
4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd.
Suite 100
Tampa, FL 33614
(813)880-8888
February 18, 25, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 11-33
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOROTHY BELL MAURER
a/k/a DOROTHY B. MAURER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS-
The administration of the estate of DOROTHY
BELL MAURER a/k/a DOROTHY B. MAURER, de-
ceased, whose date of death was May 14, 2010,
is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands
Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring,
Florida 33870-3867. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is served must
file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claim with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
February 11, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Ernest Jacobs
6227 N. Litchfield Road, Sp 68
Litchfield, AZ 85340
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ John Paul Parks
Fla. Bar No. 0331309
Suite 1000
14362 N. Frank Lloyd Wright Boulevard
Scottsdale, AZ 85260-8847
Telephone: (480)477-6626
Telecopier: (480)477-6646
E-Mail: AirzCalFlaLaw@msn.com
February 11, 18, 2011


MIVI ELLANU I/- II !
merchandise over $100
5 lines 6 pubs

$17 50

(additional lines $3 each)


REAL ESTATE

EMPLOYMENT

TRANSPORTATION

5 lines 6 pubs
$ 150

6 lines 14 pubs

$71


h- i -
(VISA)j^ hi pB


1050 s..
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 09000087GCS
SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANTHONY T. BOLANOS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
ANTHONY T. BOLANOS; LACY N. BOLANOS; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF LACY N. BOLANOS; IF LIV-
ING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PER-
SONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final
Summary'Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of High-
lands County, Florida, I will sell the property situ-
ate in Highlands County, Florida, described as:
LOT 8, HILLSIDE LAKE ANNEX, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 11, PAGE 13, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement
of Highlands County Courthouse located at 430
South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at
11:00 A.M., on March 1, 2011.
DATED THIS 1st DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2011.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendents, must file
a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the
1st day of February, 2011.
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
February 11, 18, 2011


Highlands County Board

of County Commissioners


The following position closes on 02/22/2011

Emergency Medical Technician 825

PG 38 $9.52/hour $16.15/hour.


The following position closes on 02/25/2011

Carpenter 972 PG 13

$12.06/hour $19.49/hour.


For minimum qualifications and a full job description
visit us on our website at www.hcbcc.net.

You must complete our electronic job application or sub-

mit a completed paper application in order to be consid-
ered for employment with Highlands County BCC.







Subscribe



to the



News-Sun



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385-6155


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Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor,
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Page 10A


1050 Legls
NOTICE OF SALE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO:
Virginia Welcher that on February 24, 2011 at
11am at Dwight's Mini Storage 1112 Persimmon
Ave. Sebring, FL 33870. The personal property in
Unit #3 of Virginia Welcher will be sold or dis-
posed of PURSUANT TO F.S. 83.806(4)
February 11, 18, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.282010CA001159
SEACOAST NATIONAL BANK, SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO BIG LAKE NATIONAL BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE A. CABRERA, et. al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 1, 2011,
entered in Case No. 10-CA-1159 in the Circuit
Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for High-
lands County, Florida wherein Seacoast National
Bank is Plaintiff and Jose A. Cabrera and The Un-
known Spouse of Jose A. Cabrera are the Defen-
dants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the Jury Assembly Room, Highlands
County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Avenue,
Sebring, Florida 33870 at 11:00 am on the 24th
day of February, 2011, the following described
property Highlands County, Florida:
Lot 24, in Block 2, of SEBRING ACRES, according
to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 9,
Page 56, of the Public Records of Highlands
County, Florida.
TOGETHER WITH a 1993 SKYLINE Mobile Home,
I.D. #0361011 OF, Title #63314624
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 2nd day of February 2011.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
DEPUTY CLERK
February 11, 18, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
Case#: GCS 10-1215
Division#:
CARLA RENEE BENNETT, Personal Representative
ESTATE OF DAVID L. MARSH, deceased
Plaintiff(s),
vs.
TINA M. CHAMBERLAND, a/k/a TINA CHAMBER-
LAND and PETER CLAUS JUISTEN,
her husband
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final de-
cree of foreclosure entered in the above entitled
cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County,
Florida, I will sell the property situate in Highlands
County, Florida, described as:
Lot 10, in Block 66, TOWN OF AVON PARK, ac-
cording to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 1, Page 58, Public Records of DeSoto
County, of which Highlands County was formerly a
part, lying in Section 22, Township 33 South,
Range 28 East, Highlands County, Florida.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for
cash, at the Commerce Street Entrance of the
Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida,
at 11:00 a.m. on the 3rd day of March, A.D.
2011.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of this
Honorable Court, this 3rd day of February, A.D.
2011.
ROBERT W.GERMAINE
As Clerk of said Circuit Court
By: /s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
February 11, 18, 2011

NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT ORDINANCE
Please take notice that Ordinance No. 1320 will be
presented to theCity Council for adoption upon its second
and final reading at the City Council Chambers, 368 South
Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 on the 1st day
of March, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. A copy of the proposed Or-
dinance can be obtained from the office of the City Clerk.
Any person may appear and be heard with respect to the
proposed Ordinance. The proposed Ordinance is entitled
as follows:
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 26 OF THE
CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF SEBRING TO DE-
FINE "DECORATIVE FENCE", "FRONT PLANE OF THE
HOUSE" AND "POST"; TO INCREASE THE HEIGHT OF
CERTAIN FENCES OR WALLS FORWARD OF THE FRONT
PLANE OF THE HOUSE; PROVIDING FOR STANDARDS FOR
CHAIN LINK FENCING; PROVIDING THE CALCULATION
METHODOLOGY FOR FENCE OR WALL HEIGHT; PROVID-
ING FOR RESIDENTIAL SUBDIVISION PERIMETER FENCES
OR WALLS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABIUTY; PROVIDING
FOR CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Pursuant to Section 286.0105 of the Florida Statutes,
as amended, the City Council hereby advises that if any in-
terested person decides to appeal any decision made by
the City Council with respect to any matter considered at
the proceedings, he will need a record of the proceeding
and that, for such purpose, he may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the ap-
peal is to be based.
This notice shall be published on February 18, 2011.
/s/ Kathy Haley
Kathy Haley, City Clerk
City of Sebdng.Flodda
Robert S. Swaine
Swaine & Hams, P.A.
425 South Commerce Ave.
Sebring, FL 33870
City Attorney
February 18, 2011


1100 Announcements
CHECK
YOUR AD
Please check your ad on the first
day it runs to make sure it is cor-
rect. Sometimes instructions over
the phone are misunderstood and
an error can occur. If this happens
to you, please call us the first day
your ad appears and we will be
happy to fix it as soon as we can.
If We can assist you, please call us:
385-6155
News-Sun Classified


1200 Lost & Found
LOST Downtown Lake Placid. Yorkie
silver/brown long hair. Purple collar.
51bs. 863-465-251 or 863-464-0815


2000
Employment


2 1 00 Help Wanted
ACCOUNTING DEPT. BA / BS in


business w/ emphasis in accounting.
Must have strong experience with
Quick Books, payroll, Microsoft Excel,
Access and Word. Strong verbal and
written communication skills. Strong
inter-personal, supervisory and cus-
tomer service skills required. Ability to
multi task, work under pressure and
meet deadlines required. Email resume
to: Icelentano@sebringraceway.com
COMCAST OUTSIDE SALES
Contractor for COMCAST needs
OUTSIDE SALES REPS to sell cable to
homeowners. Earn $600+ weekly, will
train. Call Chris @ 863-381-6007.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
(FPC) of Lake Placid, Florida has two
part-time staff position openings ---
Director of High School Youth Ministry
--- Director of Middle School Youth
Ministry. FPC is a Bible teaching,
Christ-centered, growing congregation.
Interested applicants should call
863-465-2742 www.fpclp.com


News-Sun Friday, February 18, 2011


2100 Help Wanted
NURSES AND THERAPISTS needed
for local home care visits in Highlands
County. Good Salary/per diem rates.
Excellent benefits, immediate need.
Call 863-401-3550 or fax resume to:
863-401-8199
PERSONAL CARE ASSISTANTS Full
- time positions available for In-Home
services to frail, elderly persons.
Competitive rate of pay and vehicle
allotment, reliable transportation is
required. Apply at NU-HOPE Elder care
Services, 6414 U.S. 27 South, Sebring.
EOE DFWP
RESTAURANT HIRING Servers,
Cooks, Dishwashers, Beverage Cart
Attendents @ Springlake Golf Resort.
Apply in person Tues. thru Sat. 2pm -
5pm. directions only, Please call
863-655-0909 ext 3.
SEEKING WELL EXPERIENCED
MEDICAL OFFICE HELP. Excellent
billing/collection, communication,
typing, computer skills & medical
terminology are A MUST. Fax resume
to: 863-471-3206 or e-mail to:
medicalofficebillina@vahoo.com


2 100 Help Wanted
STANLEY STEEMER Carpet Cleaners
Now Accepting Applications for
CARPET CLEANING TECHS
Call 863-655-2158.


3000
Financial*


4000
Real Estate

4 O80 Homes for Sale
4080 Sebring
SEBRING Edgewater Village Lakeview
Dr. 2BR, 2BA, 1CG Villa. Beautifully
furnished. New kitchen, laundry, TV.
Low Maintenance fee includes Cable
TV, Clubhouse, heated pool. Private
street. Avail Immed. 863-402-9138


4 1Villas & Condos
4 120 ndoFor Sale
WOW!
LAKE PLACID Lake Front Condo fully
furnished, 2BR, 1BA, covered parking.
Bring your toothbrush. Only $54.500.
Deb Worley Realtor. 863-465-0123


4220 Lots for Sale
LAKE PLACID Florida Vacant
Residential Land, 603 Archie Summers
Rd, MUST SELL! Lot is .26 acre
(11,454 sq ft) with 83' Frontage & 138'
Depth. Paved road access, with
access to electricity at property line.
Well water & septic tank are used in the
neighborhood. It has sandy ground and
a few trees. Perfect location for a home
near Lake June-in-Winter Florida State
Park where there is access to sailing,
hiking, fishing & bird watching. If
interested contact Margaret Hughes @
888-878-8918, leave message.


www.newssun.com


4320 Real Estate Wanted

ATTENTION: CASH for your Home,
Duplex, Apartment, Commercial
Property. Rapid Closing,
"As Is" Condition. 863-441-2689.
STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL



5000
Mobile Homes

5050 Mobile Homes
505 For Sale
SBRING Park Model 2BR, 1BA,
screen room with windows, Lots of new
up dates. Close to Lakeshore Mall. Lg.
patio in back, 2 sheds. Asking Mid
$20's. 863-382-9437


6000
Rentals


6050 Duplexes for Rent
SEBRING GREAT LOCATION!
Beautiful 2BR, 1 BA, 2CP Duplex; close
to mall & US 27. W/D, screen porch,
new carpet Appl's incl., ceiling fans.
A/C, no moke.CALL 305-490-5399

SEBRING -" MH in 55+ community.
Comletely furn 1BR, Large BA, kitchen
& D.R, L.R. & Dressing Rm. Lakefront,
Boat Ramp w/gazebo. Pets Welcome.
2900 St Rd 17, N., Lot 20.
863-402-0037, no calls before 1 pm.

SINGLE WIDE fully furnished, 2/BR,
1/BA, carport, closed patio, ceramic tile
kitchen bath patio Fla. room. Very
clean! Washer / dryer, lawn irrigation.
Owned land. $31,000. For info call
765-516-0204 or 765-482-3710


IZDLWI


POOLt PARADISE
Pool S service $ Mobile Retail
Se -e ep Supples Eqiwipme"
Delivered Sighw ro souw Dec;=
Erad E Jule K.ur-r=
(663) 362-7726
Pa-, (CSSa) .-02-2.




PIJACKSON HEWITT
:., am" a-TAX SERVICE
INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED
Avon Park b. ,532525 S btriro i8t.3t ?-1.1':.
Lahe Plaid t8'3) 6,9.-252. Waucrula i*H8 3J 37. 6.1',1,t
Lake Walen, 186'i 679-9'20i S,-brtinia F. i, i.3,i .82-9.3.9
Wald Marl L,, 'i r,
La3E Wale-. 18631 676 01..69
Sebring 1863i 5-.53 1
Avon rPark 863 452-701


S&D TREE SERVICE


* Tree Trimn
* Tree Remi


Ming
oval


"More

For Your

Buck"
S.5-.. .


* Stump Grinding
* Lot Clearing


Will beat any quote

Free Stump Grinding
with any Tree Removal
Licensed & Insured / ISA Certified

863-441-5154


Lawn Maintenance
& More since 1991![


Truck / Trailer / Labor FOR HIRE
Marc (863) 655-9579


WILLIAMS JANITORIAL

CARPET CLEANING

'10'9 Per Room
3 Rooms Minimum
Upholstery Cleaning
All Types of Flooring
Free Estimates
Lic Bonded Ins

(863) 214-1940



4


NO JOB TOO SMALL
WE DO IT ALL
HOME REPAIRS MAINTENANCE YARD
We Will Beat Anyone's Price
Call For Free Estimate
I *77192,


Serving All of Florida Free Estimates
"Enjoy the Satisfaction of Safety"
with the
ROBBINS "FLAME SYSTEM"
LIGHTNING PROTECTION
THE WORLD'S FINEST
Aluminum Lightning protection
Underwriter's Laboratories Inspected and Approved







"LIVE BLOOD ANALYSIS"
WANDA KLINE

WEIGHT LOSS

& WELLNESS
See what one drop of your blood indicates as
to YOUR nutritional health and well-being.
By appointment only
863-414-4066


MCind) Dinietro
HH HCommuni, Uaison
Cell 911 5[A 217?
V 800-518-0403
We Elderly Care, Inc.

211E s iuazri 4. Lak., L..,: FL ? .'
sr.3- ...1. l .'i Fa_, -*i:. .':., .-; 'l
In H.:. '. r-
A.'.,n Fdr ;-unor L-.e. F'jLd
'Pr, arI- f",, ,_-L.rra .' T .ri inr ,Jir.i,
r.H ,' L ,-lilzrl.,; ire .|m

. -4. L O CLEANIN per hour
20 Years experience
4 Excellent References
V,,jDaily Weekly Biweekly- Monthly
1 Janitorial Service Recently
,7 \ l Relocated to Lake Placid Sebring
,f _---Looking To Build New Clientele
863-243-1801 / Shelly A long


Freedom Lawn Careiq ,
Get the freedom you deserve .
Carl Horton owner
Vet. & Sr. Discount
* Lawn Maintenance
* Landscaping
* Small Tree Work
* Clean Ups
* Free Estimales
863-655-2526

ki

Indoor Flea Market",


o11lar Store
Beckie's Avon 863-449-1298




CAMPBELL'S COLLISION
4- CENTER, INC.
Jii JI CMPs n-i. Owner


Phone (863) 382-7551
FAX (863) 382-2750


1405 US 27 North
Sebring, FL 33870


Service Available 7 Days A Week
Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com
All Service Calls $40

FEBRUARY ONLY!
New & Repeat Customers
$10
of Every $40 Service Call
Will be Donated in Your Name
(or A Name You Choose)
to the American Cancer Society
Relay for Life

Mike & Kandv 5/-lh',done
(E( Ou lner

863-451-2399


Handyman Services]
^.,^^Bi-,].. 0"


No. ob is to small \e
can take crCe ,I JIll \.iiiiu
hoiime r-cpair. ;.indl
mlainteiujince Ieired
* "n l// i/ ,. .',ri riL, t..

863-381-6677
Fr-., Estini,.r='-,


HANDYMAN BOB
Install doors, windows,
flooring, plumbing & more!
Licensed & Insured
LiC# HM0096

Call 863-452-5201
or
863-449-1744


Joe Johnson's

ALL AMERICAN
TREE SERVICE, INC. "
TRIMMING REMOVAL
SOD INSTALLATION STUMP GRINDING
LOT CLEARING PRESSURE CLEANING
SItl &.e- a Ans r. A en Esirnm tei
Peoples Clihoaice OC A "7 Free EEstimates
Avjrd UU84J5-It41I Licensed & insured


MY
COMPUTER


Roger's











www.Wnewssun.com News-Sun Friday, February 18, 2011


2006 Unfurnished
6 0 Apartments


CASTLE HILL
Apartments
of Avon Park
Accepting Applications for 1 & 2
Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals
62 years or older, handicap/disabled,
regardless of age. For rental informa-
tion & applications please call:
863-452-6565
TDD: 711
THIS INSTITUTION IS AN
,Equal Opportunity Provider
and Employer

Los Apt. de
Castle Hill
de Avon Park
Estan aceptando aplicaciones para
Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras.
Disponible a personas de 62
ancs o mas, incapacidad fisica/mental,
no import la edad.
Para mas information favor de Ilamar
863-452-6565. TDD: 711
Esta Institucion Es De
Igualdad De Oportunidad Al
Proveedor, Y Empleador


RELAX AT Lake Isis Villas
Luxurious 2BR Apartment.
Clean & Quiet Setting.
Call 863-453-2669
AVON PARK Highlands Apartments
1680 North Delaware
1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available.
Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation.
1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195
AVON PARK Apartment with balcony
overlooking Lake Verona and City Park.
100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities.
SPECIAL: $325/mo.
863-453-8598
AVON PARK Clean, Quiet; Studios /
1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from
$375/mo. New tile & appliances,
screened patios & W/D hook ups.
Students/Seniors Discount
Call 863-452-0469.
AVON PARK LEMONTREE APTS:
1BR, 1BA'$495/mo +$200 security;
2BR, 1 BA $645/mo +$500 security.
W/D, Microwave, WSG included.
Pets WIcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953



KEY LAKE VILLAS
LAKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING
2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean &
quiet, Screen porch, Outside patio,
Central air, Washer/Dryer hookup,
$585/mo., first & security. No Pets.
863-465-2740


AVON PARK
AFFORDABLE RENT
Ridgedale Apartments
1, 2, 3 & 4 Br Apts
Central Location,
water & trash included
Rent subsidized -
Based on household
income.
No Application Fee
Call 863-452-4432
TTY 800-955-8771



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

6250 Furnished Houses
LAKE PLACID Newer 3BR, 2BA,
seasonal or monthly. Excellent furniture
& appliances, near lake & boat ramp,
No smoking or dogs. $1300/mo. After
season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119
LAKE PLACID Seasonal Furnished
House 2BR / 1BA, no smoking, no
pets. Call for info if no answer
leave message. 863-465-9735

6300 Unfurnished Houses
HOUSES / MOBILE HOMES
Call for Availability ,
NO Security NO Last NO Dogs
863-381-4410 or 863-381-5174
SEBRING 3 or 4 BR, 1BA block home
near YMCA, fresh paint, new flooring in
kit/bath, large yard, 4 A/C units, eat-in
kit, pets considered. $750/mo + $750
security. Call 863-875-5897.
SEBRING RENT TO OWN! Open House
Sunday. 1 4 pm. 207 Dozier St,
Harder Hall. Golf Course front & back.
New 3BR, 2BA, 2CG. Beautiful kitchen,
nice tile work. $900/mo. ($199,900)
561-254-0124 or 561-622-4242

LOVELY, QUIE-

Briarwood

Apart
1335 Spinks Lane *

Accepting Applications
Available to individi
Handicapped/disabl

For rental information an
863-385-4C
This insti
Equal Opportunity F


"U


6300 Unfurnished Houses


LAKE PLACID 2BR, 1BA, new
, floors/paint, fenced yard, close to boat
, ramp, nice landscape, quiet area, no
smoke/dogs, $550/mo. 863-699-1119


SEBRING 3BR, 2BA 1CG, CBS Home
303 Virginia PI. $119,00 or 2BR, 2BA,
MH 5151 Barnum St. $42,500 10%
Down Owner Financing Call
863-835-1445
SPRING LAKE 3BR, 2BA, bonus
room, new roof, ceramic tile floors,
screened porch, double car garage,
1/4 acre lot landscaped for nature w/
drought tolerant plants & man-made
goldfish "pond, 5' chain link fence
around back yard. 863-446-6924


6400 Rooms for Rent
SEBRING 1BR w/bath, fum/unfurn,
W/D, Satellite, full use of home.
$400/mo. or $100/wk + dep.
863-304-2849

655O Warehouses
6 5 for Rent
SEBRING 20'X40' Warehouse,
12' overhead door, on busy Highway
27 across from Lakeshore Mall.
863-385-3474


7000
Merchandise


7300 Miscellaneous
ANTIQUES! SMALL writing desk, table,
rocker & loveseat. Assorted area rugs.
863-385-1925
AQUARIUM, HUGE, 5' long x 26" high,
18" wide. Approx 120 gals, including
pump, filter & wooden stand. Will
deliver within Highlands County. $220.
863-382-4222

7310 Bargain Buys
BARBIE DOLL HOUSE, 3-story
with furniture. Asking $90 obo.
863-381-1839
DRESSER & MIRROR Walnut,
6-drawers, with beautiful embossed
shell design, woodgrain formica top.
$100. 863-385-6691
DRYER KENMORE electric, Works
Great! $65. 863-386-0726
EDGER, ECHO, Portable. In very good
condition. $50. 863-453-7027 '
FERTILIZER / SPREADER, tow behind.
$25 863-386-0726
GOLF CARRY BAG, Ogio, like new.
$45. 863-382-6006
GOLF DRIVER, PING G5, 12" 460 CC,
$70. 863-386-5445
GOLFBAG CARRIER for Motorcycle.
Fits on any receiver type hitch. Stain-
less steel. $100. 863-382-6006
HEDGE TRIMMER Craftsman, Gas,
18" blade, in very good condition. $40.
863-453-7027
HITATCHI 60" rear projection TV, good
picture. You haul. $100 obo
207-229-7479 Sun n Lake area.
SCOOTER for ages 6-12 yrs. Good
Condition. $15. 863-873-3801
WATER FILTRATION Reverse
Osmosis system. Good Condition. $50
obo 863-873-3801
7 Garage &
7320 Yard Sales

ANNUAL
COMMUNITY
SALE!!
"ESTATES OF SEBRING PARK"
Multi-Family Sale! (20 Homes!!)
Fri-Sat, Feb 18th & 19th,
8am-4pm. Furniture, Household,
Tools, Fishing, Crafts, & MUCH
MORE!! Go East on Hwy 98 from
US 27, approx. 9 miles.

ANNUAL RUMMAGE SALE
Placid Lakes Home Owners Associa-
tion 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Sat.
Feb. 19th, 8 AM 3 PM. Wide vari-
ety of great items & bake sale.
Snacks available.

AVON PARK Large Tool Sale!
10 Forest Hill Dr. Thur Fri Feb. 17, &
18, 7am-? Manual / Power tools &
miscellaneous items.
AVON PARK Multi Family Sale 198 E.
Canfield St. Fri & Sat Feb. 18-19, 8AM -
5PM. Tools, Kid's toys'& clothing,
household items. Too Mush To List!
AVON PARK Multi-Family Sale! 403 N.
Delaney Ave, Fri-Sat, Feb 18th & 19th,
8am 2pm. Tools, Baby Items, Toys,
Furniture, & MUCH MORE!
AVON PARK ADELAIDE SHORES
RV RESORT ANNUAL
Flea Market/Garage Sale, @ CLUB-
HOUSE 2881 US 27 N. on highlands
Blvd near SIERRA'S Lounge Sat 2/19,
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L.P. COVERED BRIDGE Annual
Fair. Sat. 2/19, 8AM 2PM. White
Elephant, Bake Sale, Food, Plants,
Clothing, Jewelry, Furn., Drawing
for Handmade Quilt, Cash Prizes,
Basket of "Cheer" & Many More!
Hwy. 27 to Lk. Francis Rd. follow
signs.

LAKE PLACID 1010 Tennyson St, 621
E. to Hallmark, follow signs, Fri-Sat,
Feb 18th & 19th, 8am-4pm. Household
Items, Tools, Tool Boxes, Tackle,
Lawnmower, RC Plane Accessories,
Fish Tank, & Misc.
LAKE PLACID ANNUAL LAKE PLACID
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(In Clubhouse)

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I of Sebring

ments


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9000
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9 10 Motorcycles
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Contact Us.


I I


LAKE PLACID VFW Huge Annual Sale!
Held at Lake Placid Storage, 1461 Lake
Groves Rd, NW, Fri-Sat, Feb 18-19,
8am-2pm. Sat, Hot Dogs & Hamburg-
ers for sale. Proceeds benefit veterans.
LAKE PLACID Family Sale 134 Deanna
Dr. "Oak Island" off Catfish Creek
Road. Sat 2 /19, 8am 12pm. Patio
misc., household items, clothing &
toys. Something For Everyone!
SEBRING 2924 Haddock Dr
(off Memorial), Fri-Sat, Feb 18th &
19th, 8am-2pm. Jewelry,
Crystal/Glassware, Linens, Clocks,
Knives, Tools, Collectibles,
Artwork/Prints/Lithos, Misc. Household
Items.
SEBRING 4216 Sebring Ave, Fri & Sat
Feb. 18 & 19, 8am ? Tools, chest of
drawers, large size women's clothes,
means pants sizes 30 34, dishes and
Much Much More!
SEBRING 4470 Lakeview Dr. Fri & Sat
Feb 18 & 19, 8am 3pm. Household
items, bedding, Lots of Great Things.
Something for Everyone!
SEBRING 527 Von Maxcy Rd. (behind
Village Inn Restaurant) Francis One
MHP, Fri & Sat Feb 18 & 19, 7AM -
5PM. Something For Everyone!
SEBRING Multi Family Sale Thur-
Fri-Sat Feb 17-18-19 8AM 4PM.
South Corvette Ave.
SEBRING MULTI-FAMILY SALE! 520
Volvo Ave, Sat Only, Feb 19th,
8am-2pm. Dolls, Jewelry, Tools, Lots of
Misc. No Early Birds!
SEBRING Village 3 of Spring Lake,
8409 Pine Glen Rd. Sat. Feb 19th,
8AM-? Collectibles, furniture, fabrics,
kitchen .wares & Much More!
SEBRING Whispering Pines Village
Annual Bazarr & Flea Market, Sat Feb
19th, 8AM-1PM 2323 Brunns Rd. off
Hammock Rd. Sausage/muffins/hot-
dogs/funnel cakes, bake sale, dog
show Entertainment- Quilt raffle & Door
Prizes.
SEBRING 4017 Elson Ave. Fri & Sat,
Feb 18 & 19, 7am 4pm. Clothing,
household items, small appliances.
Much More!
SEBRING 3 FAMILY SALE 4118 Dunn
Ave, Sat Feb 18th, 7AM 2PM. Chil-
dren's clothing & toys, antique rocker
w/ foot stool, household / Misc. items.
SEBRING ESTATE SALE Spring Lake
7409 Rolling Hills Rd. Fri 2/18,12PM -
6PM, Sat 2/19 9AM 5PM. Antiques,
Children's toys & clothing, household
items. Too Much To List!
SEBRING GARDENS RV PARK 1920
Brunns Rd. off Hammock Rd. Annual
Yard & Bake Sale, Fri 2/18, 8-1 at Club-
house., other locations in park. House-
hold/misc. items. Coffee, donuts, hot-
dogs, sloppy joe's & drinks. Homemade
Baked Goods 4 sale!
SEBRING- SHAMROCK Drive Neigh-
borhood Sale. Thur- Fri- Sat Feb 17 -
18-19 8Am- ? Too Much To ListI

7340 Wanted to Buy
CAR WANTED: I need a very good
used car with rather low mileage.
Do you have one for sale?
Call 863-465-0978


7400 Lawn & Garden
LESCO COMMERCIAL MOWER
Kawasaki Motor / Runs Good! $1,000
or best offer. Please call Robble for
information 863-452-5141

7520 Pets & Supplies


NOTICE

Florida statute 585.195 states that
all dogs and cats sold in Florida
must be at least eight weeks old,
have an official health certificate
.and proper shots and be free of in-
testinal and external parasites.
YORKIES ADORABLE PUPPIES!
AKC registered, health certs, 1 male,
1 female. $700-$800. 11 weeks old,
READY TO GO!!
863-655-2124 or 863-414-6335

7560 Medical Supplies
5 0 & Equipment
MOTORIZED SCOOTER,
Excellent Condition. $475.00.
863-465-1678


8000
Recreation


8050 Boats & Mot
20' PONTOON BOAT 2004 WEERES.
New carpet, seats & bimini top.
Includes fish finder and large live well.
50hp Mercury w/power tilt. Boat &
motor less than 50 hrs operation.
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0A 0 Recreational
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,1


By E-Mail

www.newssun.com/contact/


.
. :


www.newssun





HNEWSSitUN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927


Page 11A


Sebring, Florida 33870

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ed, regardless of age.

d applications please call:
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SECTION




SPORTS

News-Sun


Page 3B


Friday, February 18, 2011


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Matt Randall hurdles Seth Abeln while making this throw to first for an out in Tuesday's win at the Bill Jarrett Ford Early
Bird Tournament.



Streaks top Dragons at Early Bird


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newssun.com
AVON PARK Familiarity
was not a good thing, as far
as Lake Placid was con-
cerned, in Tuesday's 11-1
loss to Sebring on the
second day of the Bill Sel
Jarrett Ford Early Bird
Tournament at Charles
R. Head Field in Avon
Park. Lake
"Dylan (Webber-
Callahan) is a real
good pitcher," Blue
Streak head coach
Hoppy Rewis said. "But we
see him so much, our guys
know him so well, that they
were able to get to him."
That, and some early con-


trol problems, lead to a four-
run first for Sebring.
The Dragons were able to
cut into the lead in the bot-
tom of the third when a Kyle
Barber single brought Tyler


bring

11
Placid

1


Carr plateward, but
the Streaks answered
right back in the top of
the fourth.
Seth Abein ripped a
shot into the right-
center field gap to
lead off the inning
with a triple before
Matt Randall lofted a


fly out deep enough to bring
Abeln home.
Evan Lewis then lined a
shot that just tipped off the
outstretched glove of Lake


Placid third baseman Colby
Delaney for a single and
Jesse Baker followed with a
blast down the left-field line
for his second two-run homer
in as many days, for a 7-1
Scbring lead.
Aaron Hart, the Blue
Streak southpaw, settled in
and got through the fourth
with two strikeouts before:
the offense put it away ;n the
top of the fifth.
With Clayton Yl..i n on III
relief, Randall dieh a one-
out walk and aftei Le'.'. i lei'.
out to right for the second out
of the inning, an error set up
a two-run double down the
right field line off the bat of
Corbin Hoffner.


Johnny Knight then took
one for the team, getting hit
by a pitch and the runners
moved up a base on a wild
pitch.
Nate Greene then plated
the 10th and 11th runs with a
single before Hart worked
around a Rick Miller single
to retire the side in the bot-
tom of the fifth to end it early
on the mercy-rule.
"We're a lot better team
than this but did not come out
and demonstrate that today,"
Dragon head coach Dan
Coomes said. "They started
off with some seeing-eye
hits, they get some runners
See SEBRING, page 4B


Devils power past Hawks


News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE
Drew Reeves ripped a lead-off home run in Avon Park's
four-run sixth inning to help the Red Devils to an 11-7 win
over Sante Fe Catholic Tuesday in the Bill Jarrett Ford
Early Bird Tournament at Charles R. Head Field.


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoelme@newssun.con
Playing as the visitor on
their own home field may
have been something new'to
the Red Devils of the base-
ball diamond Tuesday night,
but then, with a young roster,
a lot may seem new for the
2011 season.
"We're young over-
all so it's hard to say at Avon
this point how things
are going to go," head 1
coach Whit Cornell
said prior to the match- Sani
up with Sante Fe
Catholic in the Bill
Jarrett Ford Early Bird
Tournament at Charles R.
Head Field.
But things.went well with a.
few wily veterans doing
some damage as Avon Park
got Past the Hawks 11-7 after
Sante Fe had looked impres-
sive in a 7-4 win over Lake
Region Monday.
Junior Brad Torres was on
the mound for the Devils, and
though, according to Cornell,
he didn't have his best stuff.


he battled his wan through.
The offense, meanwhile,
put together a pair of four-
run innings with Torres start-
ing things off with a double
to help his own cause.
Lane Crossen and Anthony
Carruthers came through
with run-scoring hits in the
first of the big innings. while


Park

1
te Fe

1


Drew Reeves and Ty
Jackson both went
yard in the sixth to
put the Devils up 8-2.
The Hawks would
battle back, adding
two in their half of
the sixth, but three
more runs were put


up for insurance.
Insurance that looked like
it might come in handy as
Sante Fe cut into the lead and
had the bases loaded with
one out in the final frame
before Reeves came in and
ended any further threat.
Avon Park was back in
action Thursday against Lake
Region before the tourna-
ment continues Friday with
seeding match-ups.


Late rally earns split for Lady Panthers





News-Sun photo by DAI


. . -: ._ -. .


HOUEHNE
Laura Lovell stretches for
the bag to beat out this
infield hit in Tuesday's
home twin-bill with Palm
Beach State. Some late
pitching woes derailed the
first-game, 7-4 loss, but a
six-run fifth inning in the
second game earned the
Lady Panthers the split with
a 12-4 win. SFCC was on
the road Thursday at
Brevard Community College
in Melbourne before travel-
ing to Gainesville for a
Saturday matchup with
Sante Fe College.


Lady Dragons



bounce back


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newssun .com
After Monday's sweep at
the hands of Sebring, the
Lake Placid girls tennis
team got right back on the
winning track with a deci-
cive, 6-1 win over the
Cowgirls at LaBellc
Jalitza Serrano and Deta
Waller got things off on the
right foot at No.1
and No. 2 singles, Lake
respectively.
Serrano took a 6-
2, 6-0 win over
Kellie Martinez La]
while Waller went 6-
0, 6-3 over Alex
Pena.
Stephanie Rodriguez
looked to continue the
trend with a 6-2 win over
C6co Ruiz in their first set
at No. 3 singles, but she
couldn't hold the momen-
tum as Ruiz bounced back
with a 6-3, 6-3 wins to take
the match.
But then Hannah Waller
and Claire LeBlanc took
Nos 4 and 5, respectively,


P


Be

1


with 6-3, 6-2 wins.
Serrano and Waller then
teamed up for a tough, 8-6
win at No. I doubles while
Rodriguez and Hannah
Waller took an 8-5 win at
No. 2.
"The freshmen girls are
playing exceptionally well.
They all have a natural
ability and athletisism for
the sport, and are
lacid working hard on
the basics of form
and technique,"
head coach Joanne
Bostanche said.
"Our two veteran
players, Jalitza and
Deta, are great role
models for our beginner
players and lead the team
by exhibiting strong leader-
ship and excellent sports-
manship qualities. We
expect to have a very suc-
cessful, productive season
this year."
The team will continue
on that path Tuesday, Feb.
22 with match at Avon
Park.
ftlf .4 < '..
t


News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHNE
Deta Waller won her No. 2 singles match Tuesday to
help Lake Placid to a 6-1 win at LaBelle.


Lady Blue Streaks


stay perfect


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newssun.conm
At home or on the road,
it doesn't seem to matter
much to the Sebring girls
tennis team as they racked
up their fourth win in a row


to start the season at
Mulberry Tuesday.
Actually, thus far
the Lady Blue
Streaks have been
road warriors, hav-
ing played three of
those matches away
from home.


outlasted her 6-3, 6-3 in
two sets.
The rest of the singles
matches were relatively
breezed through as Nisha
Patel went 6-0, 6-0 over Mi
Nguyen at No. 3 and Kelly


Sebring



Mulberry
0


Kaley Walter bounced
back from a well-contested
first set at No. I singles, a
6-4 win over Ashley Scott,
to shut Scott down 6-0 for
the straight-set win.
Joy Donglasan also
found some strong
resistance from Olivia
Schuh at No. 2 singles, but


Broen and Morgan
Heston each won
their matches, at No
4 and 5 respectively,
by 6-1, 6-1 scores.
Both doubles
matches also put the
Sebring dominance
on display as the


number one team of Walter
and Donglasan won 8-2 and
Patel and Broen went 8-0 at
No. 2.
The girls returned home
Thursday for a match with
Lake Wales, hoping to keep
the win-streak intact
See Sunday's News-Sun
for the result of the match.


News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHNE
Kaley Walter kept her and the Lady Blue Streaks record
perfect for the season with a win Tuesday at Mulberry.


N










Page 2B


News-Sun Friday, February 18, 2011


THE SCOREBOARD


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 40 14 .741 -
New York 28 26.519 12
Philadelphia 27 29 .482 14
New Jersey 17 40 .298 242%
Toronto 15 41 .268 26
*Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 41 15 .732 -
Orlando 36 21 .632 5%2
Atlanta 34 21 .618 62
Charlotte 24 32 .429 17
Washington 15 39 .278 25
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 37 16 .698 -
Indiana 24 30 .44413%2
Milwaukee 21 34 .382 17
Detroit 21 36 .368 18
Cleveland 10 46 .17928%2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 46 9 .836 -
Dallas 39 16 .709 7
New Orleans 33 25 .56914%
Memphis 31 26 .544 16
Houston 26 31 .456 21
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 35 19 .648 -
Portland 32 24 .571 4
Denver 32 25 .561 4%
Utah 31 26 .544 5%
Minnesota 13 43 .232 23
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 38 19 .667 -
Phoenix 27 26 .509 9
Golden State 26 29 .473 11
L.A. Clippers 21 35 .37516X%
Sacramento 13 40 .245 23
Tuesday's Games
Miami 110, Indiana 103
Chicago 106, Charlotte 94
Memphis 102, Philadelphia 91.
Oklahoma City 126, Sacramento 96
Phoenix 102, Utah 101
Golden State 102, New Orleans 89
Wednesday's Games
Orlando 101, Washington 76
Miami 103, Toronto 95
Boston 94, New Jersey 80
Cleveland 104, L.A. Lakers 99
Detroit 115, Indiana 109, OT
New York 102, Atlanta 90
L.A. Clippers 98, Minnesota 90
Dallas 116, Sacramento 100
Philadelphia 114, Houston 105
Golden State at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at Milwaukee, 9 p.m.
New Orleans at Portland, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
San Antonio at Chicago, late
Dallas at Phoenix, late
Friday's Games
Rookie, Sophomore Challenge


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Philadelphia 38 14 5 81190144
Pittsburgh 36 19 4 76176143
N.Y. Rangers 30 24 4 64 162 144
New Jersey' 23 30 4 50123160
N.Y. Islanders 21 29 7 49155189
Northeast Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 31 19 7 69175139
Montreal 31 20 7 69153146
Buffalo 27 23 6 60165166
Toronto 25 27 6 56150178
Ottawa 18 30 9 45129190
Southeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Tampa Bay 34 17 6 74175176
Washington 30 18 10 70160149
Carolina 27 23 8 62170178
Atlanta 25 23 10 60167188
Florida 24 25 7 55148152
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Detroit 34 16 6 74187163
Nashville 30 19 8 68151135
Chicago. 29 22 6 64180159
Columbus 28 23 6 62155172
St. Louis 25 21 9 59148164
Northwest Division
W L OTPtsGF GA


Vancouver
Calgary
Minnesota
Colorado
Edmonton


37 12 9 83196137
30 22 8 68181175
30 22 5 65148152
25 26 7 57173198
17 32 8 42141 194
Pacific Division
W L OTPtsGF GA


Phoenix 30 19 9 69165162
Anaheim 32 22 4 68165164
Dallas 31 21 6 68162166
San Jose 31 21 6 68160152
Los Angeles .32 22 3 67160135
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
for overtime loss.
Wednesday's Games
Los Angeles 4, Columbus 3, SO
Toronto 2, Buffalo 1
New .Jersey 3, Carolina 2
Philadelphia 4, Florida 2
Chicago 3, Minnesota 1
Pittsburgh 3, Colorado 2, OT
Calgary 4, Dallas 2
Washington 7, Anaheim 6
Thursday's Games
Boston at N.Y. Islanders, late
Los Angeles at N.Y. Rangers, late
Detroit at Tampa Bay late
Vancouver at Nashvile, late
Montreal at Edmonton, late
Atlanta at Phoenix, late
Washington at San Jose, late
Friday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.


Wednesday's Scores
EAST
American U. 65, Army 59
Bentley 81, Mass.-Lowell 61
Binghamton 77, Hartford 47
Bridgewater, Va. 81, Emory & Henry 77
Brooklyn 87, Yeshiva 80
Bucknell 74, Lafayette 69, OT
Capital 91, Marietta 82
Colgate 94, Lehigh 90, OT
Connecticut 78, Georgetown 70
,Defiance 66, Bluffton 62, OT


LIVE

SPORTS

ON TV


AUTo RACING
FRIDAY
4 p.m. NASCAR Daytona, Qualifying . .
SATURDAY
1:15 p.m. NASCAR Daytona. ............


... ESPN2

... ESPN2


BOXING
FRIDAY
9 p.m. Friday Night Fights ............... ESPN2
SATURDAY
9:45 p.m. Nonito Donaire vs. Fernando Montiel ... HBO


COLLEGE BASKETBALL
FRIDAY
7 p.m. Virginia Comm. at Wichita State. .... ESPN2
9 p.m. Connecticut at Louisville............ ESPN2
SATURDAY
Noon Pittsburgh at St. John's ............. ESPN
1 p.m. Georgia at Tennessee ................ CBS
1 p.m. Florida State at Wake Forest............ 44
1:30 p.m. Mississippi at Mississippi State .......... 38
2 p.m. 'Colorado at Kansas ................ ESPN
4 p.m. South Carolina at Kentucky............. 38
4 p.m. Boston College at North Carolina ...... ESPN
5 p.m. Missouri State at Valparaiso......... ESPN2
6 p.m. Washington at Arizona.............. ESPN
7 p.m. George Mason at Northern Iowa ..... ESPN2
9 p.m. Illinois at Michigan State ............ ESPN
9 p.m. Utah State at St. Mary's ............ ESPN2
11 p.m. Montana at Long Beach State........ ESPN2


9:30 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
3 p.m.
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1 p.m.
3 p.m.
3 p.m.
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GOLF
FRIDAY
EuroPGA Avantha Masters .
LPGA Honda LPGA Thailand.
PGA Northern Trust Open ..
PGA Ace Group Classic .....
SATURDAY
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PGA Northern Trust Open ...


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PGA Northern Trust Open ........... CBS,
LPGA Honda LPGA Thailand. ....... GOLF
PGA Ace Group Classic ............ GOLF


NBA
FRIDAY
7 p.m. All-Star Celebrity Game ............. ESPN
9 p.m. Rookie Challenge and Youth Jam....... TNT
SATURDAY
8:30 p.m. All-Star Saturday Night .............. TNT
............................................................... ..............................................................

NHL
SATURDAY
7:30 p.m. Florida at Tampa Bay. ............... SUN


5 p.m.


TENNIS
FRIDAY
Outback Champions Series Arizona ... SUN
Times, games, channels all subject to change


Duquesne 81, Massachusetts 63
Fairfield 61, Marist 54
Farmingdale 98, St. Joseph's, L.I. 97
Franklin & Marshall 72, Johns Hopkins
60
Gannon 79, Mercyhurst 71
Haverford 84, Muhlenberg 72
Heidelberg 65, Otterbein 60
Holy Cross 72, Navy 61
Indipna, Pa. 73, Edinboro 72
lona 102, Manhattan 65
-Mansfield 81, Bloomsburg 73
Montclair St. 62, N.J. City 53
Niagara 67, Canisius 65
Ohio Wesleyan 75, Denison 67
Old Westbury 79, N.Y. Maritime 47
Pittsburgh 67, South Florida 55
Purchase 72, Mount St. Mary, N.Y. 68
Ramapo 64, William Paterson 59
Rider 82, Loyola, Md. 70
Rowan 72, College of N.J. 69
Sage 87, Bard 77
St. Bonaventure 83, Saint Louis 73
St. Peter's 67, Siena 57
St. Rose 84, New Haven 73
Urbana 76, Ohio Dominican 70
Ursinus 93, Washington, Md. 86
Vermont 73, Maine 57
Xavier 74, Saint Joseph's 54
SOUTH
Augusta St. 68, Flagler 54
Bryan 52, Bluefield 45
Carson-Newman 106, Mars Hill 86
Davidson 83, Georgia Southern 56
Dayton 69, Charlotte 51
Duke 56, Virginia 41
E. Mennonite 94, Washington & Lee 82
Fayetteville St. 91, Johnson, & Wales,
N.C. 47
Georgia Tech 62, Chattanooga 53
Hampden-Sydney 73, Guilford 61
King, Tenn. 72, Campbellsville 63
Lamar 57, SE Louisiana 52
Lenoir-Rhyne 65, Catawba 59
Longwood 99, S. Virginia 64
Marshall 72, Rice 61
Memphis 62, UAB 58
Miles 60, Clark Atlanta 58
Milligan 103, Montreat 83
Mississippi 90, Auburn 59
Montevallo 59, North Georgia 56
Morehead St. 76, E. Kentucky 68, OT
Reinhardt 95, Va. Interment 64
Roanoke 66, Randolph 65
Southern Miss. 64, UTEP 51
Tennessee 73, South Carolina 67
Thiel 86, Thomas More 85
UCF 65, Tulane 62
Union, Ky. 87, Tenn. Wesleyan 76
Vanderbilt 64,' Georgia 56
Wingate 83, Newberry 78
Wofford 81, Samford 68
MIDWEST
Albion 78, Hope 76


Alma 54, Adrian 53
Augsburg 68, Gustavus 61
Cardinal Stritch 74; Trinity, Ill. 62
Carleton 72, Macalester 68
Carroll, Wis. 71, Beloit 57
Cent. Michigan 66, E. Michigan 60
Cincinnati 63, Louisville 54
Cleveland St. 74, Wright St. 72
Cornerstone 93, Concordia, Mich. 76
Creighton 75, Illinois St. 59
Davenport 45, Aquinas 43
Detroit 91, Youngstown St. 79
Greenville 76, Fontbonne 70
Hanover 69, Rose-Hulman 66
Illinois 54, Michigan 52
Indiana St. 77, S. Illinois 72
Loyola of Chicago 67, Ill.-Chicago 66,
OT
Luther 72, Coe 58
Madonna 66, Northwestern Ohio 61
Miami (Ohio) 86, Kent St. 80, OT
North Dakota 76, Louisiana Tech 73
Olivet 81, Kalamazoo 77
Purdue 70, Wisconsin 62
SE Missouri 64, Murray St. 57
Saginaw Valley St. 85, Northwood,
Mich. 80, OT
Siena Heights 70, Indiana Tech 68
St. Ambrose 74, Viterbo 65
St. John's, Minn. 74, St. Mary's, Minn.
67
St: Olaf 66, Bethel, Minn. 58
Wis.-La Crosse 93, Wis.-River Falls 78
Wis.-Milwaukee 79, Valparaiso 76
Wis.-Stevens Pt. 82, Wis.-Platteville 54
Wis.-Superior 65, Wis.-Eau Claire 53
Wis.-Whitewater 73, Wis.-Oshkosh 62
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas 94, Florida A&M 55
Colorado St. 69, TCU 55
Nebraska 59, Oklahoma 58
SMU 65, Houston 51
Texas 73, Oklahoma St. 55
Texas A&M 71, Iowa St. 66
Texas-Arlington 66, Stephen F.Austin
65, OT
Tulsa 86, East Carolina 67
UTSA 65, McNeese St. 61
FAR WEST
Cal Poly 72, CS Northridge 49
Fresno St. 73, CS Bakersfield 55
Long Beach St. 68, UC Riverside 55
Loyola Marymount 82, Pepperdine 79
Montana 71, Idaho St. 52
N. Arizona 83, E. Washington 74
Pacific 75, UC Irvine 51
San Diego 74, Saint Mary's, Calif. 66
San Diego St. 68, New Mexico 62
UC Santa Barbara 86, Cal St.-Fullerton
71
Utah 80, Wyoming 70
Utah St. 100, Montana Western 66
Weber St. 80, Portland St. 58


Avon Park




a /;
-


Lake Placid


Sebring
Sebring


SFCC


www.newssun.corn


LOCAL SCHEDULE


TODAY: Baseball hosts Bill Jarrett Early Bird Tournament, vs. Sebring, 6:30 p.m.;
Softball vs. Lake Placid, 5:30/7:30 p.m.; Wrestling at State Tournament, Lakeland
Center, 10 a.m.
SATURDAY: Wrestling at State Meet, Lakeland Center, 10 a.m.
TUESDAY: Softball vs. McKeel, 5/7:30 p.m.; BoysTennis at Lake Placid, 4 p.m.; Girls
Tennis vs. Lake Placid, 4 p.m.



FRIDAY: Softball at Avon Park, 5:30/7:30 p.m.
MONDAY: Baseball at Clewiston, 7 p.m.; Softball vs. All Saints, 6 p.m.
TUESDAY: Baseball atTenoroc, 7 p.m.; Softball vs. Frostproof, 5:30/7:30 p.m.; Boys
Tennis vs. Avon Park, 4 p.m.; GirlsTennis at Avon Park, 4 p.m.


FRIDAY: Baseball at Bill Jarrett Ford Early Bird Tournament, vs. Avon Park, 6:30 p.m.;
Softball at Ridge, 5:30/7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY: Baseball at Liberty, 7 p.m.; Softball vs. Winter Haven, 6/7:30 p.m.; Girls
Tennis at DeSoto, 4 p.m.


FRIDAY: Baseball at Palm Beach State, 4 p.m.
SATURDAY: Baseball at Broward, doubleheader, Noon; Softball at Santa Fe, 1 p.m.
MONDAY: Baseball vs. Catonsville, Md., 6 p.m.
TUESDAY: Softball vs. Indian River, 4 p.m.
WEDNESDAY: Baseball vs. Palm Beach State, 5 p.m.


SPORTS SNAPSHOTS


McFarling Golf
SPRINGLAKE The 5th Annual
James McFarling Golf Tournament will
be held Saturday, March 5 at the
SpringLake Golf Resort.
The flighted, four-person scramble will
tee off with a 9 a.m. shotgun start.
For $50 per person, golfers get flight
prizes, CTP for men and women, goodie
bags and lunch at Michael's restaurant.
Proceeds will be awarded to scholar-
ship recipients from the Highlands
County Sertoma Junior Golf Tour.
For more information, call John
Delaney at 655-3686.
Panther 5K
AVON PARK The second annual
South Florida Community College
Panther 5K Run/Walk will take place
Saturday, Feb. 26 at the SFCC Campus.
The SFCC Foundation, Inc. and Bill
Jarrett Ford Mercury are sponsoring the
event, and proceeds benefit the college's
intercollegiate athletics programs.
The entry fee is $20 through Feb. 16
and $25 from Feb. 17 through race day.
Students with I.D. may register for $15.
Every participant receives a Dri-Fit
long-sleeve shirt sizes cannot be guar-
anteed for those who enter after Feb. 17.
Registration is 7-7:45 a.m. on race day
in the parking lot in front of the SFCC
University Center race starts at 8 a.m.
Entry forms are available online at
www.southflorida.edu/panther5k.
Participants can mail their copies and
entry fees to the SFCC Foundation, Inc.,
13 East Main Street, Avon Park, FL
33825; or fax forms to 453-8023 and call
453-3133 with credit card information.
For more information call the SFCC
Foundation at 863-453-3133.
5th Annual L.O.S.T. Run
OKEECHOBEE The fifth annual
L.O.S.T. (Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail)
118-Mile Endurance Run will take place
the weekend of February 26-27.
This footrace consists of one circum-
navigation of Lake Okeechobee by run-
ning along the top of the Herbert Hoover
Dike, a distance of 118 miles.
The race begins 6:30 a.m. at the Okie-,
Tantie Campground located just west of
the town of Okeechobee, and runners have
34 hours to complete their loop of the lake.
The run precedes counterclockwise
around the lake, so runners pass the towns
of Lakeport, Moore Haven, Clewiston,
Pakohee and Port Mayaca before they
return to Okie-Tantie.
A total of 12 solo runners are entered so
far, and three 2-person relay teams are
also running the course.
Runners will receive aid at various
access points located around the lake, and
there will be manned aid stations at
Lakeport, Moore Haven, Clewiston, Paul
Rardin Park, Pahokee, Port Mayaca and
Nubbins Slough.
The race website is www.lostll8mile-
endurancerun.com.
For more information, contact Mike
Melton at 772-349-1704
Wings of Faith Golf
SEBRING Wings of Faith Worship
Center presents the First Annual Golf
Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at
Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is
from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start
at 8:30 a.m.
Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one
team of four golfers, one tee sign and two
green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes
one team of four golfers, one green sign:
Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green
sign, one tee sign: Bronze Sponsor $100
includes one green sign.
Individual player $60 includes green
fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26).
Team of Four Golfers $240 includes


green fees, cart and .lunch ($280 after
March 26).
Make checks payable to: Wings of
Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL
33871, or register online at wingsof-
faithchristianworshipcenter.com.
Proceeds to be donated to scholarship
program for graduates attending Wings of
Faith Christian Worship Center.
For more information, call Jason
Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhanker-
son@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at
381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com.
Our Lady of Grace events
AVON PARK Our Lady of Grace
Catholic' Church has two benefit events
coming up.
Tuesday, Feb. 22 they will host the
Todd Allen Show.
Allen will perform a variety of styles
including Rock 'n Roll, Country and his
award-winning Elvis impersonations.
The show will be held at the Our Lady
of Grace Catholic Church Grogan Center,
at 595 E. Main St. in Avon Park, at 7 p.m.
For a donation of $10, tickets can be
purchased at the Highlands Independent
Bank and Heartland National Bank Avon
Park locations, Warren's Auto Sales' ;nd
the Avon Park Chamber of Commerce.
The next event will be the First Annual
Golf Tournament at River Greens
Saturday, March 12 at 8 a.m.
The cost of $60 per player includes
golf, cart, golf shirt and lunch, while
River Greens members pay just $35.
Sponsorships are. available, starting
with a $10,0 hole sponsor for a sign only.
A Hole Sponsor with Sign, plus a free
foursome, is $300, a Co-Sponsor Sign,
plus free foursome, with perogative to fly
their banner is $400 and a Major Sponsor
is $1,500.
Seminole Club Trail Run
SEBRING The Highlands Seminole
Club presents the first Seminole Trail Run
5K on Saturday, March 5, at the Sun-N-
Lake Preserve in Sebring.
The cost is $15 per participant if regis-
tered by Tuesday, Feb. 15 and $20 after
that day or on the day of race.
Registration on race day begins at 7
a.m. and the race will begin at 8 a.m.
Awards will be presented for top finish-
ers in major age groups.
This is the first event of its kind for the
trails at the Preserve.
Registration forms can be found at
highlandsseminoles.org.
Call 386-9194 or email mantarayEM@earth-
link.net for more information.
"Doc Owen" Golf Tourney
AVON PARK The Avon Park Noon
Rotary Club will host its Second Annual
David "Doc Owen" Golf tournament on
Saturday, April 16 at Highlands Ridge
North.
The two-person scramble-format entry
fee is $60 per person with prizes in flight
groups, lunch, goodie bag, and refresh-
ments on the course. Registration starts at
7:30 a.m. with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun tee
time.
Entry information and check payable to
Avon Park Noon Rotary mailed to Chet
Brojek, 3310 Par Road, Sebring, Florida
33872.
Golfers should include their names and
handicaps along with their check.
Those needing a form may email tour-
ney director Chet Brojek at
cbrojek@conicast.net or call at 385-4736.
Business entry of two-persons plus a
hole sign for a total of $200 is available
for the first time this year.
All Rotary club members are urged to
support participate in the event that bene-
fits local Rotary charity projects.
Business hole signs for $100 are also
available by contacting Chet via email or
phone.









www.newssun.com


News-Sun + Friday, February 18, 2011


Page 3B


Golf Hammock
The Golf Hammock Ladies played a
Partners Best Ball event Wednesday,
Feb. 16, with the duo of Shirley Enochs
and Alma Barefoot taking first place
with a 54.
Mary Cripps and Eleanor Short were
a shot behind at 55 for second while
Trudy Stowe and Joyce Stanley came
in third with a 56.
Taking fourth were Cindy Dall and
Mary Lindsay at 57 and Ruth Kirk and
Betty Clarke scored a 58 for fifth.
Last Monday the Mezza group
played individual pro-am points at the
Golf Hammock Country Club.
Mike Anselm took first place at plus
6 and second place went to Frank
Borgia at even in A group.
B group saw Fred Latsaw take first
place with plus 3 and Joe Martini with
plus 2 for second place.
There was a tie for first place in C
group between Stan Griffis and Bobby
Culbet with plus 2 and second place
went to David Mulligan with minus 1.
Joe Hyzny took first place with plus
2 in D group while Danny Geirer took
second with plus 3 and third place at
plus 1 went to Ken Spencer.
There was a tie for first place in E
group between Sal Sboto and Bob
Topel with plus 4 and Janet Regan had
minus 1 for second place.
First place in F group went to Bill
Alesi with plus 11 and second place
went to Roy Allen with plus 4.
Doc Thomas had a plus 12 to take
first place in G group and Frank Branca
had a plus 2 for second place.
H group saw Dick Botelho win first
place with plus 5 and Bob King with
plus 3 for second place.
Les Layton won first place with a
plus 5 in I group while Bob Fiddlin took
second place with plus 2.
Karl Mellor won first place in J
group with a plus 5 and Don Tiemens
had a plus 3 for second place.
Next Monday will be a shotgun start
beginning at 8:30 a.m. at Golf
Hammock.
Please arrive early to register. For
more information, call Pete at 382-
1280.

Harder Hall


The Ladies League
played a Pro-Am
Points event Monday,
Feb. 14 and saw Kay
Maher take top honors
with a +6.
-Mary Ryan and
Joyce Flemming tied
for second with +4 and
Mary Hayes and Ronna
Mason each came in at
+3.
Nancy Jankovic,
Patty Forrest and
Elaine Hettinger each
totaled +2 and Sue
Heriman and Larraine
Forcier both had +1.
Getting chip-ins
were Jankovic on #17,
Liz Reinhardt on #10
and #17, Doris
Cunningham on #4 and
Forrest.
The Ladies League
played 9 holes begin-
ning with T's and F's.
Tying for first/sec-
,ond/third/fourth places
were Patty Maxcy, Elaine H
Forrest and Dori Landrum.


ettinga, Pat


Lake June West Golf Club
A Scramble was played on
Thursday, Feb. 10.
Winning first place was the team of
Ron Hesson, Rex Simmons, Rob and
Elaine Orr, Walt and Velma Nagel with
50. Tying for second/third places were
the teams of John and Shelly Byron,
Rick and Wendy Freeman and Jane
Roush; Doyan and Donna Eades, Tam
and Ronnie Pondsford, Art Schmeltz
and Betty Billau with 52 each.
The Men's Association played a Best
Ball event on Wednesday, Feb. 9.
Winning first place was the team of
Rich Loomis, Charlie Goins, Art
Schmeltz, Ernie Hall and Fred Neer
with 37; second place, Ron Hesson,
Joe Swartz, Dick Denhart, Don Boulton
and Rod Martin with 38; and third
place, Ron West, Cal Billingsly, Bud,
Pat Houlihan and Angelo loriano with
40.
Closest to the pin: No. 2, Rich
Loomis, 5-feet-2-inches; No. 4, Joe
Swartz, 2-feet-1-inch; and No. 8, Ken


\




~-. V
I-


*~ ~ ~

J


Si.Nio)l li'
Join The Arm-y?
ilrc"- a sia mpk- little swing, thou hll that
will hclp senior m mor ,''li(';( I clu'i l' iad
sp (I1d lllrol'l llOw imi|;lpact zonI'. A, you
ilasrt your ilIown';vin Iny 1, mloak< yViOr i
right or rciur forearmi ailch up 1to nud
louch tin insid(- Of your -Ifl ortm iiIIn.
YiU %kill lkvvr ai itC'ltilly ;iiottii'i )li h !'
llis. btheil tli c dl l lit> caltic-h p will
C('nisl \ ll o spi'd )'up yir ontlire i
rihl silc t hiolin.l te )ill i;s quickl t
ais you pousili y can.'Ihi h ctiotl will
S|H cd. Il'actit'r 1i lhi X ihlty'.l tlioug.h
imiagt( with ftill.7 siii "oh You'll
Iand yo rl' pu'llinling a lot mor it, Zip
into your shol:.
By .lim Mclctian,
inr.mr, JnA M't1 ian Golf School,
author of the best-selling book
'"'h(' Slot swing,"
illustrated by i'Phil lrmnke'


Colyer, 2-feet-9-inches.
The Ladies Association played a
Ladies League event on Monday, Feb.
7.
Winning first place was the team of
Kim Fiers, Wanda Jones, Dee Block
and Laurie Lorig with 37. Tying for sec-
ond/third places were the teams of
Annie Hall, Margaret Schultz, Lyn
Martin and Doris Weeks; Karen Ames,
Sylvia West, Janice Barringer and Clara
Wiseman with 40 each.
Closest to the pin: No. 2, Laurie
Lorig, 3-feet-3-inches; No. 4, Kim
Fiers, 8-feet-4-inches; and No. 8,
Wanda Jones, 10-feet-5-inches.

Pinecrest
The Men's Association played Team
and Individual Pro-Am Points
Wednesday, Feb. 16, with a two-way
tie for first in the team competition.
Bob Watkins, Keith Strickland, Bill
Ulrich and Bob Chapman came in with
a +17 total, only to see it matched by
Joe Bunk, Rex Smolek, Everett Lee and
Gordon Outman.
Watkins won A Division in the indi-
vidual competition with +6 over Bunk's


j ~..
t
~ 'I



'I


+5, while Fred
Latshaw and Strickland
tied for B Division hon-
ors at +6.
Norm Demina, Bob
Lee and Larry
Holzworth each totaled
+5 in C Division and
Bob Colandrea and
Outman came in with
that same total in D
Division.

Placid Lakes
A Valentine Day
Scramble was played
on Saturday, Feb. 12.
Winning first place
was the team of Mark
Ponsler, David Raciti,
Barb Moriarity and Sue
Mackey with minus-10;
and second place,
Frank Fisher, Floyd
Beers, Alice Bitzer and
Evelyn Bellas with
minus-8. Tying for
third/fourth places
were the teams of Stan


Yonke, Dick McArdie and Pat Haas;
Ken Burnette, Barb Lockwood, Carol
Olsen and Ray Deryckere with minus-6
each.
Closest to the pin: No. 2, Women's,
Carol Olsen, 3-feet-1-inch (she also
made a Hole-in-One on No. 13). No.
13, Men's, Jim Pellas, 13-feet-8-inch-
es.

River Greens
A Limited Member event was played
on Monday, Feb. 14.
Winning first place was the team of
Bern and Shana Koster, Roy Bassett
and Dick Herndon with plus-4.5.
Individual winners were: First place,
Dick Herndon with plus-5.5.
The Morrison Group played an event
on Monday, Feb. 14.
Winning first place was the team of
Peter March, Paul Nelson, Bob Streeter
and Romy Febre with minus-27. Tying
for second/third places were the teams
of Bob Wolf, Jim Cercy and Bob
Streeter; Tim Thomas, Leo Persails,
Bill Mountford and Frank Conroy with
minus-25 each.


A Valentine's Couples event was
played on Sunday, Feb. 13.
The winners were: First place, Dan
and Jody Ethan with 53; and second
place, Tim Thomas and Kay Conkle
with 57. Tying for third/fourth/fifth
places were April and Tom Stewart;
B.C. and Lucy Roberts; Leo and
Jeannine Persails with 59 each.
The -Men's Association played a
Men's Day event on Saturday, Feb. 12.
Winning first place was the team of
Ed Mosser, Hank Wunderlich, Vince
Boever and Al Farrell with minus-21;
and second place, Bob Wolf, Wayne
Carlin, Bob Streeter and Dale Duncan
with minus-19. Tying for third/fourth
places were the teams of Gerry Page,
Keith Kincer, Harold Plagens and Tim
Thomas; and Ken Koon, Larry Roy,
Butch Smith and Harold Kline with
minus-16 each.
Closest to the pin: No. 3, Ed Mosser,
12-feet-4-inches; No. 5, Cecil Lemons,
15-feet-10-inches; No. 12, Johnny
Wehunt, 2-feet-6.5-inches; and No. 17,
Keith Kincer, 3-feet-9-inches.
A morning Scramble was played on
Friday, Feb. 11.
Winning first place was the team of
Kenny and Carolyn Brunswick, Leo and
Jeannine Persails and Bob Streeter.
. The Ladies Association played a pro
am tournament on Thursday, Feb. 10.
Winning first place was the team of
Jeannine Persails, Carol Long and
Anne Kelly with plus-8.5; second
place, Pat Graf, Penny Anderson, Joan
Brode and Laura Smutnick with plus-8;
and third place, Pat Gower, Anne
Purcell, Michele Koon and Diane
Stoddart with plus-7.5.
Individual winners were: First place,
Pat Gower with plus-7; second place,
Anne Kelly with plus-6; and third place,
Diane Stoddart with plus-5.5.
The Morrison Group played an event
on Thursday, Feb. 10.
Tying for first/second places were
Leo Persails and Romey Febre; Bob
Stearns and Jim Cercy with 59 each.
Third place, Paul Johnson and Tim
Thomas with 60.
The Men's Association played a pro
am tournament on Wednesday, Feb. 9.
Winning first place was the team of
Keith Kincer, Jim Cercy and Tom
See GOLF, page 4B


EN T


GOLF SEBRING'S FRIENDLIEST GOLF COURSE
VOTED #1 LOCAL COURSE 2010
1 -,# M W+Tt. ..


471-ZENO (9366) 402-2222
13255 _un N Lkke BIld 23-1 UL S 27 S
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M..n 9 Tue.-Thurs I -I ri I1I I Tues- Thur 3- Fri- SSat 3- 10
3. .11 8Ii* C-Ieo l unda. l>:,se.1 5unda% & Mondav


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**









Page 4B


Okeechobee Annual

Spring PRCA Rodeos


Special to the News-Sun
OKEECHOBEE The
Okeechobee County
Cattlemen's Association
will hold their Annual
Spring PRCA rodeos at
the Agri Civic Center.
The events start
Saturday, March 12 at 2
p.m.
The Okeechobee
County Cattleman's rodeo
will show contestants
competing to win cash
prizes and points toward a
circuit championship.
The Okeechobee rodeo
has a well-deserved repu-
tation of being the
"wildest rodeo east of the
Mississippi!"
Visitors from many
areas of South Florida are
expected in attendance to
observe traditional rodeo
events such as; calf rop-
ing, saddle bronc, bare-
back riding, team roping,
bull doggin, barrel racing
and the favorite of all,
bull riding.
This year's rodeo will
bring some of the nations
top cowboys to show their
talents and compete.
Participants come from
all over the United States


and Canada to compete
for their titles.
Mutton Bustin' for the
cowkids will begin at 2:00
pm on Saturday, March 12
and Sunday, March 13.
All cowkids from ages 3-
5 can enter to win. Winner
receives a shiny western
belt buckle.
Advance registration
required.
Please call the
Okeechobee Livestock
Market at 863-763-3127
to register.
Rodeo tickets include
entrance to the
Okeechobee County Fair
and may be purchased in
advance at Eli's Western
Wear, 907 NW Park Street
or at the gate.
Premier tickets are $12
in advance and $15 at the
gate. Children under 12
are $6 in advance and $8
at the gate.
General admission tick-
ets are $8 adults and $2
children.
For ticket information,
call Eli's Western Wear @
863-763-2984 or visit
www.okeechobeecattle-
mansassociation.com.


News-Sun Friday, February 18, 2011


7-


"

,.-.... . ....-t

News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Jesse Baker got on top of this pitch, but would later square
one up for his second two-run homer in as many days in
Tuesday's win over Lake Placid.

Sebring gets second tourney win


Continued from 1B
on base and someone hits a
good one. Then you make a
couple mistakes and it just
snowballed and took off."
And while happy with the
win, Rewis is chalking it
more up to the preparation.
"We told the kids to come


in here ready to play and not
just use this to prepare," he
said. "I don't know that
we're better than everyone
else, we're just a little ahead
of teams as far as prepara-
tion. I just hope they don't
catch up."


Tight race for Lake Placid Seniors


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID At the
halfway mark of the season
in Lake Placid Senior
Softball, only one game sep-
arates the top four teams.
On Wednesday, Feb. 16,
Lake Placid Marine (7-4)
wrestled first place from
Yates by defeating
Schooni's (6-5) 21-13.
Larry Oser and Manager
Jim Guild (double, triple)
paced the Mariners with four
hits. '
Three hit games were
recorded by. Gary
Tankersley, Duke Hensley
(two doubles, homerun),
Larry Lane (triple), Dana
Hurlbut and Mike Kratt.
For Schooni's, three hit
games were registered by
Gallo Gonzalez, Ed Engler
(double), Manager Darrell
Richards (two doubles),
Cliff Bluml and Gary
Steeves.
Yates Insurance (7-5) fell
into a second place tie with
Seminole Tire (7-5) by los-
ing to the 'Noles 13-12.
Seminole rallied from a
10-1 deficit to snatch victory
from the jaws of defeat.
Manager Dusty Hensley
led Yates with four hits,


including a round-tripper.
The mercurial Don
Cunningham (double,
triple), Mike Jurmu and Tom
Walsh had three hits for
Seminole Tire.
Cunningham, Bob
Richards and Gary Van
made numerous defensive
gems in the 'Noles outfield
to secure the win.
Lockhart (5-7) ended its
seven-game slide and took
out some frustration in the
process by hammering
Central Security (2-8) 34-
13.
The Lockharts pounded
out 48 hits in the one-sided
contest as they buried The
Securitymen deeper in the
Lake Placid league cellar.
Six hit games belonged to
Cliff Bluml and Dave Reed.
Doran Quigg, Casey
Carlson, Paul Stephenson,
and Billy Todd each collect-
ed five hits, with Doug
Hammond and Don Thomas,
the winning pitcher, chip-
ping in with four hits each.
Stephenson and Carlson
each had eight RBI.
For Central Security, their
only cause for celebration
was a titanic blast of
Ruthian proportions over the


centerfield' fence by Jim
Louzan
In Monday, Feb. 14
action, Yates Insurance took
over the top spot with a dou-
bleheader win over Lockhart
Service Center by scores of
19-18 and 17-8.
Bill Gallagher had four
hits and Dusty Hensley
homered in the opener for
Yates, while Barry Hurlbut
had four hits, including two
homers, and Jim Radcliff hit
for the cycle in the nightcap
for the winning squad.
For Lockhart, whose los-
ing streak reached seven,
four hits were registered by
Billy Todd (double, triple)
and Dave Reed in the open-
er.
Reed (home run), Dick
Cook and Doran Quigg had
three hits each in the second
game.
In another doubleheader,
Lake Placid Marine swept
Central Security 13-8 and
25-8.
In the combined stats,
Gary Tankersley, Jim Guild,
and Jim Hensley each had
five hits, while Larry Lane
and Larry Oser each chipped
in with four.
Barry Hurlbut had four in


the second game, including
a double and a homer.
Dick Harmick pitched
both wins and helped his
own cause with three hits in
the nightcap.
Schooni's cooled off red-
hot Seminole Tire 24-20.
Fred Moore led the
offense with five hits and
the defense with two fine
catches in the outfield.
Darrell Richards, Bob
Poulin (two doubles), and
Gary Steeves (double, triple)
contributed four hits each.
Dave Hoffman (triple)
and Jeff Stanley (double)
had three hits each.
Ed Engler homered and
Don Ward had a double and
a triple while Ian McCuaig
made several exemplary
stops at third base on
defense for the victors.
For Seminole Tire, the
Four Hit Club included Jess
Hathaway (double, two
triples) and Mike Jurmu
(two doubles, triple).
Three hit games belonged
to Bob Richards (double),
Kyle Saunders (two dou-
bles), Mo Pier, Tom Walsh,
John Kloet, and Gary Van.


Golf Scores from around the county


Continued from 3B
Morway with plus-10; second
place, Dave Petty, Dick McClay,
Peter Bridge and Len Westdale
with plus-8; and third place,
Leo Persails, Dan Pelfrey, Gil
Heier and Jim Anderson with
plus-7.
Individual winners: A Flight
(28-over): First place, Tom
Morway with plus-6; and sec-
ond place, Jim Anderson with
plus-5.5. B Flight (23-27): First
place, Peter Bridge with plus-
5.5; and second place, Dave
Petty with plus-3.5. C Flight
(19-22): First place, Paul
Nelson with plus-9.5; and sec-
ond place, Johnny Wehunt
with plus-4.5. D Flight (18-
under): First place, Leo
Persails with plus-5; and sec-
ond place, Dick Seifart with
plus-4.5.
On Tuesday, Feb.. 8, the
Morrison Group played an
event.
Winning first place was the
team of Jim Anderson, Ken
Koon, Jim Cercy and Joe Graf
with minus-33; and second
place, Cliff Aubin, Len
Westdale, Bob Stevens and
Leo Persails with minus-30.
Tying for third/fourth places


were the teams of David Kelly,
Bob Thomas, Frank Conroy
and Cliff Steele; Romy Febre,
Butch Smith, Don McDonald
and Tom Morway with minus-
29 each.
The Golfettes played a game
on Tuesday, Feb. 8.
The winners were: Gross -
First place, Anne Kelly with 66;
second place, Betty Leblanc
with 71; and third place, Laura
Smutnick with 73. Net First
place, Fran Neil with 54; and
second place, Penny Anderson
with 55. Tying for
third/fourth/fifth/sixth places
were Diane Stoddart, Kay
Conkle, Mary Beth Carby and
Jeannine Persails with 57
each.

SpringLake
The SpringLake Women's
Golf Association held a 3 Best
Balls of Foursome Tournament
on the Cougar Trail course on
Wednesday, Feb. 16.
Jan Nelson shot an 80, the
best round of her career, to
lead the team of Mary Cebula,
Judy Dunn and Joann
Deweese to a first place win
with 184 net strokes.


Second place at 191, was
won by the team of Gail
Whiting, Linda Pfleger, Rosie
Foote and Kay Gorham.
The team of Marilyn
Redenbarger, Carol Rath, Kay
Baxter and Jean Donahue tied
with Pearl Bradford, Shirley
OInhausen, Sharon Hubbard
and Eleanor Demitz for third
place with 192 strokes.
.The winnings for the week
were donated, along with indi-
vidual contributions, to our
designated cancer drive recipi-
ent, Samaritan's Touch Care
Center, in the amount of
$518.00.
On Tuesday, Feb. 15, the
Spring Lake Men's Golf
Association held the first day
of a two day Pick Your Partner
event.
The game format included a
two man scramble on the front
nine and alternate shots on the
back nine of the Cougar Trail
course.
Day two on Thursday on the
Panther course will be scored
on the One Best Ball format to
determine the overall winners.
At the end of the first day,
the A Flight was lead by Bart
Rath and Ron Brochu at 59,


with second held by Ken Kirby
and Wayne Nelson at 61.
In third was Dale Stevens
and Karl Olnhausen at 62 and
in fourth was Bo Bohanon and
Bob Rogers at 63.
There was a two way tie for
fifth at 66 between the duo of
Jaskowski and Hennen and
Lawens and Miesner with the
rest of the A Flight at-67 and
68.
The B Flight winners of day
one were Gale Monda and
Charlie Keniston at 56.
John Delaney and John
Bozynski took second with a
net 59.
There was a tie for third at
60 between Dan Porter and
Ken Willey and the team of
Jack Hoerner and Jim Foote.
Tied at fifth place were the
teams of Edd Vowels and Red
Bohanon and Ed Clay and John
Schroeder.
The other three teams in the
B Flight came in at 63 (2) and
66.
With such a small range
between winners and also-rans
on Day 1, it leaves the field
open for good (read lucky)
teams to win some Gold on
Thursday.


e news S ju t click away!
wwavniewssu n.cormm


www.newssun.com


Two more Devils at State


News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHNE
Johnny Baldridge will be one of two Avon Park wrestlers
wrestling at the State Championships at the Lakeland
Center today along with teammate Jose Torres. This marks
the sixth consecutive year that the Red Devil wrestling pro-
gram has qualified wrestlers for the state competition.
Baldridge will be competing in the 103-pound weight class
with Torres in the 112-pound class. Preliminary rounds
take place today with wrestlebacks and finals Saturday. See
Sunday's News-Sun for the Avon Park duo's results.


Eighth-inning explosion


4


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Cody Higgins gets in front of this bouncer to second base to
record an out for SFCC in what was mostly a tight game
with visiting Indian River Wednesday night. But an eight-
run eighth inning for the Pioneers broke open a 4-3 contest
to provide for the final 12-3 margin. The Panthers are on
the road this weekend with a 4 p.m. game today at Palm
Beach State and a Noon doubleheader at Broward College
in Davie Saturday.






SYF&C Camps


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING The Sebring
Youth Football and Cheer
Association announces its'
Spring Conditioning Camps
for football players and
cheerleaders.
The six-week camp for the
football players is $25 and
begins Monday, April 4 with
practice 2-3 nights a week.
The players will have the
chance to show off their tal-
ents in an exhibition game
Saturday, May 14.
The $10 cheerleader camp
runs for two weeks and
begins Monday, May 2, when.
they will learn a new routine
and several new cheers that
they will perform at the exhi-


bition game.
Registrations will be held
Saturday, Feb. 19 and
March 12 from 9 a.m.-Noon
at the Highlands County
Sports Complex at 200
Sheriff Tower Rd.
The first 50 participants
who come to register on each
date will also get a free door
prize.
Each participant who reg-
isters will also get a free raf-
fle ticket to win a bicycle.
Free drinks and snacks will
also be provided.
For more information, call
Kim Anderson at 381-5047,
Melissa Lane at 381-9325, or
Amy at 381-4801.


SHS Basketball Camp


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING The SHS bas-
ketball program will be host-
ing a basketball camp for
boys and girls, in 2nd
through 6th grade.
The camp dates are
Monday, March 28, and
Tuesday, March 29, from 8
a.m.- 4p.m.
The cost of the camp is
$20 and is appropriate for
players of all skill levels and


experience.
Current and former Streaks
will be on hand to help with
the camp, which will also
feature contests, competi-
tions and prizes.
Campers can either bring
their own lunch or purchase
lunch there for a reasonable
price.
Please contact Coach Lee
at 441-1221, or by email at
leem@highlands.kl2.fl.us.


Dr. Keatley Waldron
Chiropractor


ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS


(863) 382-4445
13 Ryant Blvd.
Sebring
Westshore Plaza


WALDRON
CHIROPRACTIC HEALTH CENTER, P.A.


www.waldronchiropractic.com


7


---9









www.newssun.com


News-Sun Friday, February 18, 2011


HEALTHY LIVING


Glaucoma affects


millions in U.S.


Approximately
2 million
Americans have
been diagnosed
with glaucoma,
and another 2 mil-
lion have it but are
unaware.
Glaucoma consists
of a group of dis-
eases character-
ized by increased
pressure within the
eye resulting in
damage to the


Focal
Point
Va/erie
Moulds


optic nerve and retinal
nerve fibers. As nerve dam-
age progresses, the patient's
side vision will begin to
fail.
Most people do not real-
ize that there are no early
warning signs with this dis-
ease. Glaucoma progresses
slowly and the visual fields
of each eye overlap signifi-
cantly; therefore early field
defects are hidden from the
patient. Patients with early
symptoms may notice that
parts of a page .are missing;
however, the classic symp-
tom of "tunnel vision" only
occurs when both visual
fields are severely dam-
aged.
Central visual acuity is
preserved until the late
stages of the disease. This
is why some patients may
retain good vision and
unknowingly be on the
verge of blindness at the
same time. Glaucoma can
be detected easily through a
dilated eye examination
with vision loss being pre-
ventable in the majority of
cases.
According to the
September 2009 issue of
Primary Care Optometry
News, the most efficient
way to detect primary open-
angle glaucoma may be by
screening first-degree rela-
tives with the disease.
Screening of high risk
groups may yield better
results for detecting glauco-
ma than by screening the
population in general.
Patients with family histo-
ries of glaucoma should be
evaluated for this condition
on a yearly basis, as up to
26 percent of these patients
will have glaucoma com-
pared with only 6 percent
of patients who have no
family history of this dis-
ease.
The most common type
of glaucoma, primary open
angle glaucoma, represents
60-70 percent of patients
with the disease. These
patients have a higher than
normal intraocular pressure,
and the eye doctor may
note thinning of the optic
nerve rim upon examina-
tion. Bleeding within the
nerve fiber layer may be
seen, as well as an absence
of nerve fiber within the
retinal tissue. Visual field
defects may be observed on
visual field examination.
Normal pressure glauco-
ma represents 30-40 percent
of patients and does not
present with a high intraoc-
ular pressure. This type of
glaucoma is not as obvious
on initial examination since
an abnormal pressure read-
ing is not observed. The
doctor will still note thin-
ning of the optic nerve,
visual field abnormality, or
both.


Your eye doctor
must determine
the appropriate
treatment for each
individual case
because not all
three elements of
increased intraocu-
lar pressure, optic
nerve damage, and
visual field loss
may be present in
every case.
Treatment is based
on the patient's


overall physical health.
Your eye doctor has to con-
sider the amount of damage
already present, the appar-
ent rate of damage progres-
sion, and the estimated life
expectancy of the patient.
The goal of treatment is
to at least maintain the
patient's health.
Optic nerve damage must
be stopped without causing
other health problems for
the patient. The only
proven method of halting or
slowing optic nerve damage
is by reducing the intraocu-
lar pressure, preferably by
about 30 percent to have
the best outcome.
Three main treatment
options exist for reducing
intraocular pressure in glau-
coma medications, laser
treatment, and filtration
surgery. For many patients,
medications are the first-
line therapy used, although
laser treatment (specifically
SLT) is now considered to
be just as safe and effica-
cious as glaucoma drops.
More advanced surgical
techniques are reserved for
intraocular pressure uncon-
trolled by other methods.
Patients need to be reex-
amined about three weeks
after starting a new medica-
tion to determine its effica-
cy. Once the intraocular
pressure has been adequate-
ly reduced, the doctor will
reevaluate the patient every
three to six months,
depending on the severity
of the disease to ensure the
treatment continues to
work.
Those with a high risk
for glaucoma should under-
go a comprehensive dilated
eye examination on a year-
ly basis. This high risk
group consists of blacks
over 40; everyone older
than 60, especially
Mexican-Americans; and
those with a family history
of glaucoma (as mentioned
previously). Other risk fac-
tors for glaucoma include
high blood pressure, age,
and near-sightedness. If a
patient has had a previous
history of high intraocular
pressure or chronic steroid
use, they may be at a higher
risk for the disease.
Medical conditions also
associated with glaucoma
include asthma, congestive
heart failure, heart block,
renal stones, and allergies.

Valerie Moulds is a board cer-
tified optometric physician
practicing in Sebring and is
Arizona and Florida certified
in diagnostics and therapeu-
tics. She is a member of the
American Optometric
Association, Arizona
Optometric Association and
Florida Optometric
Association. This information
is not intended to diagnose,
treat or cure your condition.


"Care You Can Trust, Service You Deserve"


Se lie Mmr
CaeUi t
Now Aceping
Meici Dieso


SepiteCr
Ineedn Liin


CROWNpOINTE


863-386-1060


5005 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, FL 33872


They
are the
latest
footwear
craze a
S .- new way
to get in
shape
simply by
Footprints walking
or run-
Olga Garcia ning.
Luepschen Currently
there are
many styles and brands of
shoes called "toning shoes"
available that feature "rock-
er bottoms" and "pods." It
all began in the 1990's when
Swiss engineer Karl Muller
found that back pain and
arthritis were practically
non-existent in the Masai
tribe in Africa. Muller
developed a totally different
shoe. He based the shoe on
walking barefoot on an
uneven, soft ground such as
sand.
In 1996 the MBT shoe
was born. MBT shoe stands
for Masai Barefoot
Technology, also known as
the "anti-shoe."
Most toning shoes have a
thicker-than-usual sole. This
sole is also often curved.
The insoles are additionally
designed to mold to your
individual foot and provide
extra cushion.
They increase the use of
certain muscle groups that
may not be challenged in
typical running or walking
shoe. Increasing the use of
these specific muscles may
result in increased muscle
tone over time resulting in
toner abs, thighs and but-
tocks.
"It's important for people
to realize that so-called 'ton-


MCT photo
MBT shoes simulate walking barefoot in sand.


ing' or 'fitness' footwear is
not a cure-all that will tone
the entire body," said
American Podiatric Medical
Association president Dr.
Kathleen Stone. "Toning
shoes should be utilized sim-
ilar to any other piece of
athletic training equipment.
This type of footwear should
be viewed as an addition to
an exercise program, to
strengthen and tone certain
targeted muscle groups."
Certain types of toning
footwear, such as Reebok's
EasyTone Reeinspire
(above), have been given the
APMA's Seal of Acceptance.
Proper safety should
always be considered.
Excessive exercise in toning
shoes such as walking for
very long periods of time
.without a break-in period,
could lead to overuse
injuries including sprains,


Achilles tendinitis, and shin
splints. A person with tight
posterior calf muscles or
Achilles tendons may not be
able to tolerate toning shoes,
due to increased strain on
these areas.
Before lacing up your first
pair follow these helpful
hints :
Ease into wear. Wear
the shoes for short periods of
time in order to adjust to the
new style of walking. If you
have balance or stability.
problems, avoid wearing


Local podiatrist Dr Olga Garcia
Luepschen and the Gentle
FootCare Center are at 2 Ryant
Blvd. (on U.S. 27). For ques-
tions call 314-9255 or visit
www. Gentlefootcarecenter.com.

Rescreen Your
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or
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(Reg. $1.10)I
WALLS
750 per sq. ft.
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Phifer Screen

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Page 5B


Toning shoes: Do they really work?


Find EAU lGy what

you are looking for I

SNEWS- S UN
~.. Classified Ads 385-6155


toning footwear. People with
neuropathy (numbnes in the
feet) should speak to their
podiatrist before buying a
pair.
Look for the APMA
seal. Several toning footwear
products, such as Reebok's
EasyTone and those made by
Grasshoppers, Avia and
Ryka, have been evaluated
by the APMA and found to
be foot-friendly and carry
the APMA seal of accept-
ance.
Find the right design
for you. There are numerous
types and brands of toning
footwear currently on the
market. They differ in their
construction. Find a pair that
fits your foot comfortably
and does not cause you to
feel too unstable. Read prod-
uct packaging .
Remember to stretch.
Always remember to stretch,
especially when preparing to
wear toning footwear.
Be wary of claims.
APMA has evaluated certain
toning products and con-
firmed that they are benefi-
cial to foot health when
paired with good footcare.


r








News-Sun Friday, February 18. 2011


HEALTHY LIVING


Dear Pharmacist
Suzy Cohen

Dear Pharmacist: My
wife made a resolution this
year to eat healthy, but she
loves candy and chocolate.
Is there any compromise
because I want to surprise
her with something deli-
cious without sabotaging
her diet?
S.H., Dallas
Answer: Ah, February,
when women's fancy turns
to thoughts of ... chocolate.
And for that matter, men
also shop for those scrump-
tious treats. After all, once
a man splurges on a big,
beautiful red box of choco-
lates, he often gets to sam-
ple the goodies. (The ones
in the box too.)
I'll bet you think I'm
going to tell you not to
indulge, or to eat carob
"chocolates" instead. Nope.
Fact is, I love chocolate. I
will work for chocolate.
And your body benefits
from it. This is news to
many, but chocolate is seri-
ously good for you. It's so
good for you that (provided
you limit yourself to a
piece 'or two of the healthy
sort) you could definitely
consider it a guilt-free
indulgence.
Chocolate is made from
the beans of the cacao tree,
which contain hefty
amounts of antioxidants
that protect against heart
disease and cancer. Studies
show compounds in choco-
late can boost good choles-
terol, lower blood pressure
and help prevent blood
clots. Theobromine, found
in chocolate, improves
blood flow to the heart.
In 2006, Harvard
University researchers
reviewed a number of sci-
entific studies and found
multiple health benefits of
dark chocolate giving this
yummy treat a big thumbs
up. I'm betting their other


Metro Services
Chocolate has many health benefits.


four fingers were wrapped
around a truffle.
Why did they concentrate
their queries on dark choco-
late'? The rule is, the darker
the chocolate, the higher
the percent cacao it con-
tains. Cacao is the antioxi-
dant-rich powdery sub-
stance that results when
cacao beans are dried. I
always want you to choose
bars that contain 65-85 per-
cent cacao. Milk chocolate
contains fewer, if any of
these powerful antioxi-
dants. And white chocolate?
Forget about it, it doesn't
even rank.
Chocolate is a love drug.
It increases psychoactive
feel-good compounds, the
very same ones that your
brain makes when you fall
in love, have an orgasm or
use cannabis. Chocolate
really does have good
chemistry going for it. Oh
la la! And if you get addict-
ed, it's perfectly legal. Why
wait for Valentine's when
you could enjoy this every
night?
Candy bars merely coat-


ed with chocolate and jam-
packed with sugar, artificial
flavors and partially hydro-
genated oils are fake to me.
Avoid or minimize truffles
stuffed with maple, raspber-
ry and vanilla "cream."
Those are usually sugar-
laden caloric bombs.
If you want to do your
honey a real favor on
Valentine's Day, forgo the
fake chocolate and instead
splurge on a small box or
bar of high-quality dark
chocolate. It'll cost about
the same, but it will say "I
love you" in a sweeter way.
Another healthy alternative
is to buy an edible bouquet
of strawberries or make
your own edible arrange-
ment of fresh fruits, and
then fondue dark chocolate
for dipping.

Suzy Cohen is a registered
pharmacist and the author of
'The 24-Hour Pharmacist' and
'Real Solutions.' For more
information, visit www.
DearPharmacist. com. This
information is not intended to
treat, diagnose or cure your
condition.


Obama starts drive for medical

malpractice reform policy


Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Putting his own stamp on a
long-standing Republican
priority, President Barack
Obama is launching a arive
to overhaul state medical
malpractice laws and cut
down on wasteful tests doc-
tors perform because they
fear lawsuits.
Obama's budget calls for
$250 million in Justice
Department grants to help
states rewrite their malprac-
tice laws in line with recom-
mendations that his biparti-
san debt reduction commis-
sion issued last year.
"I think the president is
very serious about following
up on this," Health and
Human Services Secretary
Kathleen Sebelius told the
Senate Finance Committee
on Tuesday. Her agency
would advise the Justice


Department on,awarding the
grants.
Specific reforms the
money could be used for
exclude caps on jury awards
that the American Medical
Association and GOP law-
makers have pursued for
years without success. But
they do include measures
unacceptable to trial
lawyers, an interest group
that contributes heavily to
Democratic candidates.
Topping the list of ideas
in an Obama administration
summary of the proposal are
health courts. Specially
trained judges not juries
- would decide malprac-
tice cases, awarding com-
pensation from a set sched-
ule. Plaintiffs' lawyers say
that would undermine the
constitutional right to trial
by jury.
But proponents say it


would bring predictability,
resulting in lower malprac-
tice insurance rates for doc-
tors.
"Health courts offer much
more protection for fearful
physicians than caps
because you are unlikely to
get a crazy verdict when you
have an expert judge," said
lawyer Philip Howard,
founder of Common Good, a
nonprofit group that advo-
cates for changes in the
legal system.
The money Obama seeks
could go far, he added, esti-
mating it would cost $5 mil-
lion to $7 million for a mid-
size state to set up health
courts.
Speaking for trial
lawyers, Gibson Vance,
president of the American
Association for Justice,
called the idea "bad policy
and bad for patients."

I J


Chocolate is a love drug


Snapshots


Ace Homecare plans
outreach events
Ace Homecare community
outreach events for next
week are:
Monday 9 a.m., Health
Fair, Highland Village, Villa
Road. Sebring; 1 p.m.,
Caregivers Support Group,
Crown Pointe Assisted
Living Community. Sun 'N
Lake Boulevard, Sebring
Tuesday 9 a.m., Health
Fair, Groves, behind Sebring
Diner, U.S. 27, Sebring.
Wednesday 9 a.m.,
Health Fair, Avon Park Meal
Site, Main Street, Avon
Park; 10:30 a.m., Health
Fair, Lake Placid Meal Site,
Interlake Boulevard, Lake
Placid.
Thursday 8 a.m.,


managing and coping with
your disease, and more. The
meeting is facilitated by
Carol Watson, RRT.
The next meeting is at
noon Friday, Feb. 25 in
Conference Room 3, second
floor at Florida Hospital
Heartland Medical Center in
Sebring, on Sun 'N Lake
Boulevard. This month's
speakers are Rhodie Imperio,
R.D. and Britnee DePriest,
R.D., dieticians at Florida
Hospital Heartland Medical
Center. Th6y will be speak-
ing on the importance of
nutrition and proper diets for
people with COPD.
A healthy snack and bev-
erage will be provided. For
more information about the
support group call Mike
Napper at 402-3450.


Kenilworth Care participates


in recognition program


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING- Kenilworth
Care & Rehabilitation
Center, one of 72 nursing
communities operated by
Louisville, Ky.-based
Signature HealthCARE, is
proud to announce its partici-
pation in a program that
gives volunteers an opportu-
nity to be recognized by the
U.S. President.
.The President's Volunteer
Service Award program was
launched after the President's
Council on Service and Civic
Participation was established
in 2003. The program honors
Americans who inspire oth-



Senate may

cut optional

Medicaid

services

Associated Press
TALLAHASSE State
senate leaders say they will
not put Medicaid patients
with developmental disabili-
ties and those in nursing
homes into managed care.
Sen. Joe Negron said
Tuesday those populations
will be given an "I budget,"
allowing more flexibility in
their medical care.
The emerging Senate bill
also proposes raising the
reimbursement rate for pri-
mary care doctors up to 100
percent of Medicare rates.
Senate leaders say they
will likely cut some optional
services for the state's nearly
3 million Medicaid patients.
Senators will release what
services they want cut on
Thursday.
Sen. Nan Rich said
Medicaid patients make $799
or less a month and can't "go
out and get a policy and
afford dentures and glasses."
Lawmakers said the state's
Medicaid budget is expected
to reach $21 billion next
year.

Follow the
News-Sun on
r( ,., r


www.twitter.com/thenewssun
and



www.facebook.com/newssun


I i


ers to engage in volunteer
service by serving as an
example.
The award recognizes indi-
viduals ages 5 and up, fami-
lies and groups that have
accumulated a certain num-
ber of volunteer hours, either
during a 12-month period or
the course of a lifetime.
Honorees can receive a lapel
pin, a personalized certificate
and a congratulatory letter
from the President.
Signature relies on volun-
teers at its homes each day to
improve the lives of resi-
dents.
"We're humbled by the


graciousness and generosity
shown by the volunteers in
our nursing communities,"
said E. Joseph Steier III,
Signature's president and
CEO. "This is just a small
gesture to thank them for
what they do."
For more information
about volunteering at a
Signature home in your com-
munity, contact Kenilworth
Care & Rehabilitation
Center, at 382-2153, ext. 331.
For more information about
The President's Volunteer
Service Award, visit
www.presidentialser-
viceawards.gov.


7200 S. George Blvd.* Sebring Florida
(863) 38-2032


CaLIVING BRINGS IT IN. WE TAKE IT OUT.sh













LIVING BRINGS IT IN. WE TAKE IT OUT.


STANLEY STEEMER,.


-- Specials.

AVON PARK 452-5800
SEBRING 382-3363
LAKE PLACID 465-1530

STANLEY STEEMER.


Page 6B


Doctor's Panel, Tanglewood,
U.S. 27. Sebring

Better Breathers
meet Feb. 25
SEBRING The
American Lung
Association's Better
Breathers Club is a Lung
Health Support Club for
adults with lung disease, and
their families and friends.
The club offers educational
information on COPD,
chronic bronchitis, emphyse-
ma, asthma, sleep apnea, and
other lung diseases. The club
features different speakers
each meeting on topics rang-
ing from living with lung
diseases, equipment use,


www. newssun.com


Call for

Our

Weekly


2-A_-- l_ -









www.newssun.comrn


News-Sun Friday. February 18. 2011


Page 7B


RELIGION

ME m 1 Church Women's Ministries meet


Courtesy photo
Grammy-nominated Ernie Haase & Signature Sound (EHSS) will be touring the state of
Florida in March and is planning a concert on March 17 at Union Congregational
Church, 106 N. Butler Ave.

Ernie Haas & Signature Sound

prepare for March concert


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK
- Combining 21st century
ideas with the timeless qual-
ity of great quartets from the
1950s, Grammy-nominated
Ernie Haase & Signature
Sound (EHSS) has broken
the traditional mold of
gospel quartets. Their
unconventional approach to
communicating the Good
News with groundbreaking
originality has blazed a trail
that will go down in gospel
music history.
The group will be touring
the state of Florida in March
and is planning a concert on
March 17 at Union
Congregational Church, 106
N. Butler Ave.


Tickets for the 7:30 p.m.
concert are $13 for groups
of 10 or more people, $16
advance general admission,
$20 at door general admis-
sion, $25 for artist circle
seating. Tickets are on sale
by visiting
www.TrinityCommunicatio
ns.org or by calling 800-
430-1049.
The group's founder and
leader, Ernie Haase, was a
long-time member of the
famous Cathedral Quartet,
headed by the late George
Younce. His roots are
deeply planted in the rich
legacy of music that is both
meaningful and thoroughly
entertaining. After the
Cathedrals bid farewell to


their five-decade run in the
music industry, Haase's pas-
sion for gospel music led
him to a new beginning.
EHSS' success continues
with each new release, but
perhaps. their most reward-
ing achievement is the new
generation of gospel music
lovers emerging across the
globe. The group's conta-
gious energy spreads
through entertaining per-
formances packed with truth
and overflowing with a joy-
ful spirit of gratitude ...
bringing listeners around
the world their refreshing
approach to gospel classics
and, new material that is
uniquely Signature Sound.


'To love Him is to serve Him


L.G. LeTourneau, the
original designer and devel-
oper of much of today's
large earth moving equip-
ment, was a devout
Christian. When in his mid-
dle years, his company
began to make a lot of
money, he decided to
become a "reverse tither."
He gave 90 percent of his
,income to the Lord's work
and kept 10 percent for
himself.
He was not a preacher,
but he often spoke in
churches about serving the
Lord. In one of his speech-
es, he made the following
statement: "If you are not
serving the Lord, it proves
,you don't love Him. If you
don't love Him, it proves
you don't know Him,
because to know Him is to
;love Him and to love Him
'is to serve Him."
One Sunday after speak-
ing in a church, he and his
family were headed back
across the state to their
-home. On a long open
stretch of road, they came
-up behind a man and
-woman and two children
walking along the road.


Guest
Column
FloydRide;r

Mr. LeTourneau asked
his driver to stop so he
could speak to the folks.
The man soon explained
their house had burned dur-
ing the night and that they
had lost almost everything.
Even their old pickup truck
had been destroyed, so they
were walking to town.
Mr. LeTourneau now
pulled out his wallet and
handed the man a couple
large bills. The man
expressed his thanks, Mr.
LeTourneau spoke to his
driver and they headed on
up the road.
The LeTourneau family
now began to talk about the
impoverished family and
wondered what would
become of them. Suddenly
Mr. LeTourneau signaled
their driver to stop, turn
around and go back. As
they drove back toward the
folks, he asked everyone in
the family, plus the driver,
to empty their wallets,


pockets and purses of every
cent they had on them and
hand it to him.
As they approached the
family on the road, he low-
ered his window and asked
the man to hold out his hat.
The man took off his hat
and held it upside down
toward Mr. LeTourneau,
who poured a big double
handful of bills and coins
into the hat.
He then threw open the
doors of the big car and
asked the family to crowd
in with them. As they
entered the town, the driver
pulled up and let the family
out in front of a restaurant.
For many years I handed
out business cards to pro-
mote my business. On the
reverse side of the card, it
read: Be of Good Cheer;
God loves you. And I'm
trying!"
This brought many a
smile and a chuckle and it
was a way to "break the
ice" to talk about serving
the Lord.

Floyd Rider is a Lake Placid
resident and longtime Sunday
school teacher.


RELIGION GUIDELINES: The News-Sun publishes religion news on
Friday.
The submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday to be considered for
publication in the following Friday's paper.
Submit items to the News-Sun's from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays;
fax to 385-2453; send e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or mail to
Lifestyle Editor, News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870.
:For information, call 385-6155, ext. 516.


Last Generation to perform

March 6 in Brighton

Special to the News-Sun
BRIGHTON Mike and Karen
Matieszyn from Somerset, Pa. make up the
musical group "Last Generation." Formed in ,
1982, Mike and Karen travel full time across S
the United States and do approximately 200
appearances a year in churches, fairs, camp-
grounds, etc. '
The Matieszyns have made numerous
recordings to date, with several of their .
songs having made the national music
charts. Singing "Bill Gaither" style music,
their ministry has been well received MIMSS &";.-
throughout the country. Wf fft,,
First Baptist Church of Brighton will host
their concert at 11 a.m. Sunday, March 6. 'a
The church is at Brighton Seminole ian e
Reservation on Highway 721 South, seven
miles south of State Road 70 (16 miles west. i t
of Okeechobee). Courtesy
Pastor Matt Tiger and his congregation Mike and Karen Matieszyn, making u
invites everyone to attend, musical group 'Last Generation,' will
The church phone is (863) 357-0013 for form March 6 at First Baptist Churcl
more information. Brighton.


'Y 1t
sy photo
ip the
per-
h of


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID A new
slate of officers for 2011 wel-
comed the members of the
Lake Placid ARP Women's
Ministries at a general meet-
ing on Jan. 20. President
Alayne Busch presided.
Other officers are Abby
Lopez, first vice president;
Maxine Bolyea, secretary;
Joan Powers, treasurer;
Ginny Blackwell, assistant
treasurer; Jean Parrish, histo-
rian. Cause chairmen are
Louise Pick, Spiritual Life:
Donna Mingus, Christian
Higher Education; Judy
M i s k a n i c ,
Kitchen/Hospitality: Wanda
Isaacs, Advisor. Circle chair-
men for the year are Lois
Schenck, Huey Watson
Circle; Joan Powers, Ethel
Seaverns Circle; Patsy
Peters, Mattie Pope Circle.
The speaker for the day
was Starla Shattler, who cur-
rently serves as the Spritual
Life chairman of the Florida
Presbyterial, which repre-
sents all the Associate
Reformed Presbyterian
churches in the state of
Florida. Shattler began by
noting that we use different


Courtesy photo
Gifted speaker Starla Shattler prepares to lead the gathering
of the Lake Placid ARP Church Women's Ministries in a spir-
ited look at how we go about measuring ourselves in spiritu-
al matters.


measuring implements when
measuring liquids or solids in
the kitchen. She noted the
importance of accurate meas-
urements in baking and the
more relaxed method of
adding ingredients to recipes
for tried and true staples like
meatload.
Her analogy then went to
how we measure ourselves
against sometimes impossi-
ble standards. Obsessing


over weight, lack of.youthful
beauty, even hair color may
be a means for displeasure;
but God sees us in a different
light.
Luncheon was prepared
and served by the board of
directors. The next meeting
will be at 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, March 17 with the
speaker to be announced.
The meetings are open to
all who would like to come.


Church News


Atonement Lutheran
Church
SEBRING The Seventh
Sunday After Epiphany wor-
ship service will be led by
Deacon David Thoresen
with Holy Eucharist. New
members will be received
into the church. Following
morning worship, February
birthdays will be celebrated
as well as the reception of
new members.
Agape Fellowship meets
at 4 p.m. Feb. 27

Avon Park Church of
Christ
AVON PARK "The
Only Way to Go: God's
Will" (John 6: 38), will be
the Sunday morning mes-
sage presented by Larry
Roberts, minister.
The Youth Group will
have a cook-out at
Highlands Hammock State
Park on Sunday afternoon.
The Sunday evening serv-
ice will be a devotional with
a fingerfood fellowship to
follow.
Avon Park Church of
Christ is at 200 S. Forest
Ave. For information, call
453-4692.

Christ Lutheran
Church
AVON PARK Seventh
Sunday after Epiphany
Pastor Scott McLean will
preach a sermon titled
"Getting Even through
Love." The church is at
1320 County Road 64, east
of the Avon Park High
School.
Visitors are welcome to
worship and fellowship. For
more information, call 471-
2663 or search the Web for
christlutheranavonpark.org.

Christian Science
Church
SEBRING The lesson
sermon on Sunday morning


is titled "Mind." The
keynote is from Romans
11:34, "...who hath known
the mind of the Lord? For of
him, and through him, and to
him. are all things: to whom
be glory for ever."
The church is at 146 N.
Franklin St.

Christian Training
Church
SEBRING Associate
Minister Casey L. Downing
will bring the message titled
"More Life: Part III" at the
Sunday morning service. The
Wednesday night Bible study
will continue the book of
Hebrews.

Emmanuel United
Church of Christ
SEBRING The Rev.
George Miller will deliver
the sermon, "Welcoming,"
with Scripture taken from
Matthew 5:38-48.
The church is 1.7 miles
west of U.S. 27 on County
Road 634 (Hammock Road).
Call 471-1999 or visit
sebringemmanuelucc.com.

First Baptist Church
of Placid Lakes
LAKE PLACID On
Sunday, Pastor Darryl
George will preach the ser-


SOW3BOY

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mon titled "The Certainty
Series! The Lord's Servant!"
with regards to Luke 1:26-
38.
The church is at the corner
of Washington and Kemper
avenues in Placid Lakes. For
more information, call 465-
5126 from 8 a.m. to noon
Monday through Thursday or
e-mail the church at placid-
lakes @hotmail.corn.

First Baptist Church
of Sebring
SEBRING Dr. David
Richardson is continuing his
morning series "The Talk,"
on the Lord's Prayer.
Hispanic Mission worship
meets at 2 p.m. Sunday and
7 p.m. Friday in the fellow-
ship hall.
Upward Basketball and
Cheerleading continues at
the ROC, with games every
Saturday. Contact Joe Delph
for more information at 385-
5154
The church is at 200 E.
Center Ave., Sebring.

First Christian
Church
AVON PARK From
self help books to motiva-
tional speakers there is a
desire to know how you can
live your life to the fullest.
Continued on page 8B


STY

THIU.RSDAV ....

FRIDAY i

SATliRDAY
\11 U F.,n 1r,1i i 'l
S & SU N
SAT & Sl'.r -"
,

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1417 Swank Avenue Sebring, FL 33870


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www.newssun.com


News-Sun Friday, February 18, 2011


Page 8B


RFli mION


Church News

Continued from page 7B
Tabloid and TV shows give an
insight as to how others live their
lives, but are those the examples of
how you really want to live your
life? The pastor's sermon. "Live
Your Life in the Footsteps of The
Lord," will be used to show
through Scripture how to allow
God's love to be the leader in your
life.
First Christian Church of Avon
Park is at 1016 W. Camphor
(behind the Wachovia Bank). Call
453-5334 or e-mail us at firstchris-
tianap@embarqmail.com. The
church Web site is www.firstchris-
tianap.com.

First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ)
SEBRING At the Lord's
Table this Sunday morning will be
Howard Lewis and Diane Beidler.
Communion will be served by
Carol Chandler, Michael Graves,
Gretchen Ames and Jayne Weldy.
Greeting the congregation will
be Charles and Mary Ann Thomas.
Noel and Juanita Roberts will work
with Children's Church. Lighting
the candles during the month of
February will be Nina Kunsak.
Joyce Winstel will be with the chil-
dren in the nursery this month.
The whole month of February
has been set aside as
"Stewardship" month and programs
will focus on how to use time,
health, talents, relationships, pros-


perity and the gospel in a partner-
ship with God. The pastor's ser-
mon is titled "Give to the Lord"
with Scripture taken from Luke
6:38.
The church is at 510 Poinsettia
Ave. Call 385-0352.

First Presbyterian
Church A. R. P.
AVON PARK On Sunday
morning, the pastor's sermon is
titled "Those Who are Near" based
on Luke 10:29-37.
The choir's introit will be "Holy
Ground" and the anthem "Heart for
the Nations."
Maxine Johnson, adult Sunday
school teacher, continues the study
of David in II Samuel chapter 9,
which tells of David's kindness to
Mephibosheth. Wendy Garcia
teaches the youth class and dis-
cusses issues of today and how the
Bible instructs.
On Monday, the church office
will be closed. Crafty Ladies will
meet from 10 a.m. until noon.
The pastor will continue the
study of Revelations in Wednesday
night Bible study.
On Thursday, the Men's
Fellowship will meet at The Depot
for breakfast at 7 a.m., followed by
a short Bible study at the church.
Afterwards, the men will do a serv-
ice project at a member's home.
On Saturday, Feb. 26 the church
will host the Kingdom Heirs. The
concert begins at 7 p.m. Cost is
$10 and a love offering will be
taken. There are no reserved seats.


The church is at 215 E. Circle
St. (with two entrances on
Lagrande Street). Call the church
office at 453-3242.

First United Methodist
Church of Sebring
SEBRING The Rev. A.C.
Bryant will bring the message "The
Spirit of the Lord Troubled" with
Scripture from John 13:18-38.
Wednesday at 5:30 p.m., the
"Growing with God" family night
continues in the Family Life
Center.
This Sunday remember to bring
non-perishable goods for the Boy
Scout project "Scouting for Food."
Listen Live on WITS-AM 1340
each Sunday to hear the 10:50 a.m.
worship service.
Visit the Web site at
www.sebringfirstumc.com. The
church is downtown at 126 S. Pine
St. Call 385-5184.

Grace Pointe Ministries
SEBRING Grace Pointe
Ministries is at 200 Lark Ave.
Home Bible study is on The
Future Revealed and is at 7 p.m.
Tuesday. A new point has been
reached on the time line the mar-
riage supper of the lamb. Class
provided for the children. Call
(863) 447-3431 for directions.
Pastor Ron Zimmer continues
"Questions Jesus Asked" on
Sunday mornings.
Family Fellowship Dinner,
Jewish Deli Special, is planned for
Sunday, Feb. 27. There will be


good deli sandwiches with the
trimmings, and cheesecake for
dessert. Sign-up sheet is on the
Ministry Table.
California Conference the week
of April 11.

Heartland Christian
Church
SEBRING Pastor Ted
Moore's sermon for both services
this week will be "Millennialism"
with Scripture from Revelation 20.
Services will include Taryn
Little and Alyssa Jordan singing
"We Fall Down," Mina West
singing "Just A Closer Walk With
Thee," Vic Anderson playing coro-
net solo "You Are My All In All
with I Surrender All," and Gail
Brockett singing "Watch! And
Wait!" Heartland Singers will sing
"His Grace is Sufficient For Me"
during the mid-morning service.
The church is at 2705 Alternate
Route 17 South in Sebring (behind
Publix); phone number 314-9693.

Memorial United
Methodist Church
LAKE PLACID This Sunday
is Boy Scout Sunday.
The Rev. Fred Ball, senior pas-
tor, will preach at the Heritage
Worship Service and the
Celebration Worship Service on the
theme "Inspired by Crazy Love."
The Sanctuary Choir will present
the anthem.
Claude Burnett, pastoral assis-
tant, will bring the second in a


series of messages on "Love" at
the New Song Contemporary
Service in Rob Reynolds Hall.
The church is at 500 Kent Ave.
For information, call 465-2422.

Parkway Free Will
Baptist Church
SEBRING The Sunday morn-
ing Bible lesson, "Jesus Came to
Serve," is taken from Mark 10.
Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the
message. The Wednesday evening
service will be a praise, prayer and
Bible study time. Next Sunday
evening, Feb. 2.7 will be the end-
of-the-month-sing.

Resurrection Lutheran
Church
AVON PARK On the Seventh
Sunday of Epiphany, the sermon
will be based on the fifth chapter
of Matthew.

St. John United
Methodist Church
SEBRING On Sunday, the
Rev. Ronald De Genaro's sermon
topic will be "Taming Our
Tongues," taken from Proverbs
11:9-14.

Sebring Church of the
Brethren
SEBRING Pastor Keith
Simmons will preach on "Listening
to Each Other" and the gospel
reading will be on James 1:19-27.
Continued on page 9B


PLACES To WORSHIP


Places to Worship is a paid
advertisement in the News-Sun
that is published Friday and
Sunday. To find out more infor-
mation on how to place a listing
in this directory, call the News-
Sun at 385-6155, ext. 502.


APOSTOLIC

* Greater Faith Apostolic
Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. invites you to
come worship with us in spirit and
truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday. For information con-
tact 840-0152. Pastor Larry
Carmody.


ASSEMBLY OF GOD

* Christ Fellowship Church
(Assembly of God), 2935 New
Life Way. Bearing His Name;
Preaching His Doctrine; and
Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping
God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship,
10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m.
Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-
0924.
* First Assembly of God, 4301
Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev.
Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday
School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship
and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.;
Evening' Worship, 7 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night, (Adult
Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group,
Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-6431.


BAPTIST

* Avon Park Lakes Baptist
Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd.,
Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall,
Pastor. Christ centered and bibli-
cally based. Sunday worship serv-
ices, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Nursery facilities are available.
Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday
and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer
Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible
classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered
for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m.
Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556.
* Bethany Baptist Church
(GARBC) We are located at the
corner of SR17 and C-17A (truck
route) in Avon Park. Join us
Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for cof-
fee and doughnuts, followed with
Sunday School for all ages at 9:30.
Sunday morning worship service
begins at 10:30 a.m., and evening
worship service is at 6 p.m. On
Wednesday, the Word of Life teen
ministry and the Catylist class
(20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult
Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7
p.m. For more information go to
www.bethanybaptistap.com or call
the church office at 863-452-1136.
* Faith Missionary Baptist
Church, off State Road 17 North of
Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave.
Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday
Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation
available. Ken Lambert, Pastor.
Phone 386-5055.
Fellowship Baptist Church,
1000 Maxwell St., Avon Park, FL


33825. Sunday: Sunday School;
9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; Wednesday: Evening
Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7
p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax:
453-6986. E-mail: office@apfe//ow
ship.org; Web site, www.apfe//ow
ship. org
* First Baptist Church of Avon
Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park.
Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared
Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy
Loomis, music director. Regular
Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m.
Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library
open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11
a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m.
Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening
Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10
a.m., basic computer
class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m.
conversational English and citizen-
ship classes/Sonshine House.
Regular Wednesday schedule:
5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6
p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m.
Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. chil-
dren's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. chil-
dren's mission groups. Call 453-
6681 for details. Primera Mision
Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon
Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor.
Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m.,
Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship
Service. Wednesday schedule: 7
p.m., Bible study.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine
Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 mid-
way between Sebring and Lake
Placid). Your 'place for family,
friends and faith. Sunday morning
worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery
is provided for both services with
Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life
changing Bible Study for all ages
starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor
Allen Altvater leads the youth in
their quest to become more like
Christ. Sunday night worship at 6
p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and
Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with
youth worship in the youth facility,
and missions training for all chil-
dren. Call the church at 655-1524.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Placid, Knowing God's Heart and
Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal
Palm Street. (2 blocks south of
Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL
33852 (863) 465-3721, Email:
www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett
Morey, senior pastor. Sunday serv-
ices Traditiohfal Service 9 a.m.,
Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m.
Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m.,
Senior Sunday Night and Sunday
Evening Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Activities: Family din-
ner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reser-
vations required). Adult-LifeSource
classes, prayer meeting, Youth
Intersections, and Kids K-5-
MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15
p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every
Tuesday for prayer breakfast and
women's prayer breakfast is at 8
a.m. every Wednesday, both at the
Family Restaurant.
* First Baptist Church of Lorida
located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida.
Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.
for all ages. Sunday worship serv-
ices are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Preschool care is provided at the
11 a.m. worship service.
Wednesday evening Bible Study
and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m.,
followed by adult choir rehearsal.


From September to May our youth
group meets. First Lorida is the
"Place to discover God's love." For
more information about the church
or the ministries offered, call 655-
1878.
* First Baptist Church, Sebring,
200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL
33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr.
David E. Richardson, senior pas-
tor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of
youth and activities. Contemporary
Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible
Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional
Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista
Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night
programs at the ROC begin 5:30
p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m.
Preschool and Mother's Day Out
for children age 6 weeks to 5 years
old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call
385-4704.
* Florida Avenue Baptist
Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon
Park. Mailing address is 710 W.
Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825.
Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D.
Girdley, pastor. Sunday School,
9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11
a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church;
Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday night programs for
children, youth and adults at 7 p.m.
* Independent Baptist Church,
5704 County Road 17 South,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday
School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship,
10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m.
Wednesday service, 7 p.m.
Fundamental, soul-winning, mis-
sion-minded, King James Bible
Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone
655-1899. Bus transportation.
* Leisure Lakes Baptist Church,
808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just
off of Miller at the west end of Lake
June) "Where the old fashion
gospel is preached." Sunday
School begins at 9:45 a.m.;
Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.;
Sunday Evening Service is at 6
p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the
church at 699-0671 for more infor-
mation.
* Maranatha Baptist Church
(GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east
of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle
Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9
a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.;
Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week
service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily
Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m.,
Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald
Webber and Associate Pastors
Don Messenger and Ted Ertle.
Phone 382-4301.
* Parkway Free Will Baptist
Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the
church where the "Son" always
shines. Sunday School, .10 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and
Wednesday Evening Worship, 7
p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6
p.m. on the last Sunday of each
month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pas-
tor. Church phone: 382-3552.
Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated
with the National Association of
Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn.
Sparta Road Baptist Church,
(SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev.
Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday
school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening


Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday:
Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery
provided. For information, call 382-
0869.
* Southside Baptist Church
(GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave.,
Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor;
Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor.
Sunday School for all ages, 9:30
a.m.; Morning Worship Service,
10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten
through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.;
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30
p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and
Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for
under age 3 is available at all serv-
ices. Provisions for handicapped
and hard-of-hearing. Office phone,
385-0752.
* Sunridge Baptist Church,
(SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27
and Valerie, across from Florida
Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pas-
tor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.;
Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service,
6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible
Study, and Youth, 6:30
p.m.Nursery provided. For informa-
tion, call 382-3695.


CATHOLIC

* Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church, 595 East Main St., Avon
Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas
McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil
Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7
p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8
and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m.,
Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at
8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30
p.m. Saturday. Religious Education
Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday
for grades K through 8th.
Confirmation class is from 6:30-8
p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights
grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m.
Wednesday.
* St. Catherine Catholic Church,
820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing
address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL
33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe.
corn. Very Rev. Jos6 Gonzalez,
V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30
and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 9 and 10:30
a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday
Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family
and Youth Center). Daily Masses 8
a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9
a.m. Saturday. Confessions: 3-3:45
p.m. Saturday, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first
Friday, or by appointment. Enroll
your students today for Catholic
School grades Pre-K3 through 5th
grade.
E St. James Catholic Church,
3380 Placidview Drive, Lake
Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael
J. Cannon. Mass schedule:
Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) -
Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8
a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9
a.m. December thru Easter -
Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m.,
9:30 a.m. and 11 .m.; Weekdays 9
a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30
a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9
a.m.


CHRISTIAN

* Eastside Christian Church,
101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL
33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27
on County Road 621), 465-7065.
Ray Culpepper, senior pastor.


Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.;
Worship Celebration with the
Lord's Supper each week 10:15
a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat
Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise
and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building
God's Kingdom for Everyone."
"Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and
Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!"
Sebring Christian Church,
* 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher;
Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor.
Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening
service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday
night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by
classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours,
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Phone 382-6676.
First Christian Church, 1016
W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL
33825; (863) 453-5334; on the
Web at www.firstchristianap.com.
Our motto is "Jesus is First at First
Christian Church." Greg Ratliff,
Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper,
Family Life Minister; Jon Carter,
Music Director. Bible School 9
a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study,
6 p.m.; Wednesday studies for all
ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for
all events.
First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ), 510
Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of
Poinsettia and Eucalyptus),
Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-
0358 or 385-3435. The Rev.
Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast,
10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30
a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, Praise and Worship,
6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15
p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15
p.m.


CHRISTIAN &
MISSIONARY
ALLIANCE

* The Alliance Church of
Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road,
Sebring, FL 33875. Call 382-1343.
Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday
services: Sunday School meets at
9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship Service meets at 10:30
a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study
meets at 6 p.m. (off site);
Wednesday Prayer Gathering
meets at 6 p.m.


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

* Christian Science Church, 146
N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m.
morning worship and Sunday
school. Testimonial meetings at
4 p.m. each second and fourth
Wednesday. A free public reading
room/bookstore, located in the
church, is open before and after
church services. The Bible and the
Christian Science textbook,
'Science and Health with Key to
the Scriptures' by Mary Baker Eddy
are our only preachers. All are wel-
come to come and partake of the
comfort, guidance, support and
healing found in the lesson-ser-
mons.


CHURCH OF


BRETHREN

* Church of the Brethren, 700 S.
Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-1597.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

* Avon Park Church of Christ,
200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Minister: Larry Roberts.
Sunday Worship Services, 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities
are available at every service. Bible
Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered
classes for all ages. Church phone:
453-4692..
* Sebring Parkway Church of
Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443. We
would like to extend an invitation
for you and your family to visit with
us here at Sebring Parkway. Our
hours of service are: Sunday
Worship Service, 9 a.m.; Sunday
Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Service, 6 p.m.;
Wednesday Service, 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF
NAZARENE

* First Church of the Nazarene
of Avon Park, P.O. Box 1118.,
Avon Park, FL 33825-1118. 707 W.
Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor.
Sunday: Sunday school begins at
9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wor-
ship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening
service at 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening service is at 7 p.m. with
special services for children and
adults. Special services once a
month for seniors (Prime Time) and
Ladies ministries. If you need any
more information, call 453-4851.
* First Church of the Nazarene
of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake
Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852.
Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning
worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7
p.m. Classes for adult children and
youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim
Taylor.


CHURCHES OF
CHRIST IN
CHRISTIAN UNION

* Community Bible Church -
Churches of Christ in Christian
Union, (Orange Blossom
Conference Center) 1400 C-17A
North (truck route), Avon Park.'
Presenting Jesus Christ as the
answer for time and eternity.
Sunday morning worship service,
10:30 a.m. Nursery provided.
Junior Church activities at same
time for K-6 grade. Sunday School
Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m.'
(Transportation available.) Sunday
evening praise and worship serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening
prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and
youth activities at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Everyone is welcome,
please come worship with us. Don
Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone
452-0088.










www.newssun.com


News-Sun Friday, February 18, 2011


RELIGION


Snapshots

Continued from page 8B
Sunday school, led by the Rev.
Wendell Bohrer, will study "Jesus
Came to Serve."

Southside Baptist
Church
SEBRING Sunday, the Rev.
David Altman will continue in the
series "It's All About Jesus" from
the book of Colossians. The pastor
will continue in the series "House
of Prayer" in the Sunday evening
service.
Monday at 1 p.m. Women for
Missions will meet. Wednesday
services, Don Hall will begin a
study of the life of Barnabas.
The church is at 379 S.
Commerce Ave. For information,
call 385-0752.

Spring Lake
Presbyterian Church
SEBRING "Good News in
the Midst of Bad" is the title of
Sunday morning's sermon given
by the Rev. Don Swope. The


Scripture will be from II Kings
7:3-16.
The Web site for the church is
www.sipc.embarqspace.com.

Spring Lake United
Methodist Church
SEBRING Spring Lake
United Methodist Church is at
8170 Cozumel Lane. This is
United Methodist Women's
Sunday. Guest speaker will be
Shelley Davidson. Scripture read-
ing is I Corinthian 12:4-14.
Potluck will follow the service.

The Way Church
SEBRING "Shepherding in
Troubled Times" is the title of
Pastor Reinhold Buxbaum's mes-
sage with Scripture from I Peter 5.
The annual church yard sale is
scheduled for Feb. 18 and 19.
On Feb. 27, the Wine Family
will be present.
The Way Church is at 1005 N.
Ridgewood Drive. The church
phone is 471-6140; the pastor's
cell is 214-6190. For church infor-
mation and the pastor's messages
go to www.thewaychurch.org.


Saturday night hoedown
at Leisure Lakes
LAKE PLACID A bluegrass
Gospel and country hoedown will
take place Saturday at Leisure
Lakes Baptist Church. Many excit-
ing groups from across the area
will performing, including the
Indiana Sweethearts, who winter in
the Arcadia area; Brandy and
Nancy, who perform regularly at
the Henscratch Winery; and A2J
(addited 2 Jesus) from Frostproof,
to name just a few.
Those coming early will be treat-
ed to a chili dinner in the church's
fellowship hall beginning at 5 p.m.
KMusic will get under way starting
at 6 p.m. in the auditorium, with
A2J performing from 7-8 p.m.
"Everyone is welcome to come
out for a good time of fellowship
and great music," said Don
Roberts, pastor of the church.
This is the third annual event at
Leisure Lakes. There is no charge.
The church is at the western end
of Lake June.. From U.S. 27 take
Lake June Road to Miller, turning
north on Wildflower.
Call 699-0671.


Snapshots

International evangelist
visits Crossroads
SEBRING International evan-
gelist Jim Jorgensen, from Sound
The Trumpet Ministries
International, will be at Crossroads
Fellowship on Sunday. Jorgensen
ministers to everyone and every-
where God sends him.
Currently ministering between
the United States and the
Dominican Republic, his ministry
has been expanded to Puerto Rico,
as well as to the nations of Spain,
Bolivia, Mexico, Columbia, and
Haiti.
He will speak at 10 a.m. Sunday
at Crossroads, 605 State Road 66.

The Way plans for yard
sale today, Saturday
SEBRING The Way Church
annual yard sale will be today and
Saturday.
"Beyond Humungous" say the
workers. If there is anything you
are looking for you will find it
here.


Recording artists
perform at Homer's
SEBRING Gospel concert
featuring "Nashville recording
artists" on Saturday at Homer's
Buffet, 1000 Sebring Square.
The concert will be given by
Tommy Brandt, 2010 ICM Male
Vocalist of the Year; Chip
Willmore, 2010 ICM New Artist of
the Year nominee; and "So Loved"
- Bill and Judy Williams.
Dinner is at 5 p.m. and concert is
at 6 p.m. Cost is $15 per person
and includes dinner.

Forresters in concert
Sunday
SEBRING A concert by the
Forresters will be on Sunday at
Calvary Church on Hammock
Road.
The Forresters will present the
8:15 a.m. and 10 a.m. service.
Mark and Andrea sing southern
and traditional Gospel music. They -
play a large variety of instruments.
They write much of the material
they sing. They also sing many of

Continued on page 10B


PLACES To


WORSHIP


EPISCOPAL

* The Episcopal Church of the
Redeemer.Service time is 9:30
with Holy Communion. Coffee hour
following services. Newcomers
welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail
redeemer1895@aol.com Web site:
redeemeravon.com. The church is
at 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park
(two miles north of Sun 'N Lake
Boulevard, across from Wells
Dodge.)
* St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL
33870. Sunday Services: Holy.
Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy
Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek
service on Wednesday at 6 p.m.
Sunday School for all ages at 9
a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m.
until 15 minutes'after the 10 a.m.
service ends. Wednesday: Adult
Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are
always welcome. The Rev. Jim
Kurtz, rector. Church office 385-
7649, for more information.
* St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal
Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-
0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers,
Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m.,
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening: Holy Communion with
Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child
care available at the 8 a.m. and
10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come
see what makes us different.


GRACE BRETHREN

* Grace Brethren Church, 3626
Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-
0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior
pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m.,
10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday
services at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid
City" Children's Ministry throughout
all services, and there are variosu
other classes for teens, married
couples, "prime-timers," and Bible
studies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day
Care, Preschool and After-School
Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For
registration call: 385-3111). Check
us out on the Web at www.sebring-
grace. org.


INTERDENOMINATIONAL

* World Harvest and Restoration
Ministries, (non-denominational)
2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-
3771. Sunday service: Sunday
School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11
a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m.
prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor:
W.H. Rogers.


JEWISH

* Temple Israel of Highlands
County, 382-7744. Rabbi Lorraine
Rudenberg; www.templeis-
rae/ofhcf/.org. Temple Israel is a
Reform Temple that promotes the
enduring and fundamental princi-
ples of Judaism. Through prayer,
study and friendship we strive to
enrich our lives and insure Jewish
continuity in Highlands County.
Friday Evening Shabbat Services,
7:30 p.m.; Saturday afternoon intro
to Hebrew, 12:30 p.m.; Saturday
intro to Judaism, 2 p.m.; Saturday
afternoon Torah Study, 3:30 p.m.;
Havdallah, 5 p.m. Jan. 7-8; Jan. 21;
Feb. 4; Feb. 18-19; March 4-5;
March 18-19 Purim; April 1-2; April
15-16; April 18, 6 p.m., Pesach 1st
Night Seder; April 29-30 Yom
Hashoah; May 13-14; May 27-28.
Every Thursday will be Hebrew and
Bible classes with Howard Salles,
12:30-4:30 p.m.


LUTHERAN

* Atonement Lutheran Church
(ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview
Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen,
Deacon, Spiritual Leader. Jim
Helwig, organist/choir director.
Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy
Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee
hour on the first and third Sunday
of each month. Council meeting on
the first Monday of month; Ladies
Group WELCA meets at noon sec-
ond Monday of month with lunch.
Bring a dish to pass. Church
Vegetable Garden Club meets as
needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden
open seven days a week to congre-
tation and community. Like to sing?
Come join the choir. Visitors always
welcome. Come grow with us.
Phone 385-0797.
* Christ Lutheran Church Avon
Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2
mile east of Avon Park High
School. Sunday Divine Worship is
at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is cel-
ebrated every week with traditional
Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs
of praise. Fellowship time with cof-
fee and refreshments follows wor-
ship. Come worship -and fellowship
with us. For information call Pastor
Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see
christlutheranavonpark. org.
* Faith Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 2740 Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848,
Faith Child Development Center,
385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea
Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship
services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday
school for children and adult Bible
classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise
worship service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Communion is served the
first and third and fifth Sunday of
the month. Sunday worship service
is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8
a.m. each Sunday. Educational
opportunities include weekly adult
Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift
Store (385-2782) is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through
Friday and 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday. All are warmly welcome
in the Family of Faith.
* Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church (AALC) American
Association of Lutheran
Churches, 4348 Schumacher
Road, Sebring, one mile west of
Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor.
Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday.
Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery pro-
vided. Social activities: Choir,
Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-
1163.
* New Life Evangelical Lutheran
'Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a
Congregation of the Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship
with the Wisconsin Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday
Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9
a.m. For more information, call
Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or
visit the Web site at wwwnewlife
sebring. com.
* Resurrection Lutheran Church
- ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon
Park. Pastor: Rev. John C.
Grodzinski. Early Sunday service,
8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m.
and the second service at 10:30
a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour fol-
low the service. Midweek
Fragrance Free Wednesday wor-
ship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office
phone number is 453-6858.
* Trinity Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake
Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The
Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and
Noel Johnson, youth and family life.
Worship schedule for December
through Easter: Worship service 8
and 11 a.m.; Communion services,
first and third Sundays; (Children's
Church, 11 a.m. only); and
Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship


schedule for summer through fall:
Worship service, 9 a.m.;
Communion services, first and third
Sunday; Education Hour 10:30
a.m. Additional services: Lent and
Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy
Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.;
Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.;
Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas
Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve,
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship
activities: Youth Group, Senior
Citizens, Younger Side Adults,
Ladies Missionary League, Ladies
Guild, Small group studies as
scheduled. Music: Choir and hand
chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5
years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday. License:
C14H10020: Susan Norris, direc-
tor. Visit us online at: www.vchurch-
es. com/trInitylutheranlp.


NON-DENOMINATIONAL

* Bible Fellowship Church, 3750
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Sunday: American Sign
Language: First Worship sermon,
songs signed first and second
Worship services. First Worship
service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship,
service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to
2 years old) and Sunday school
classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6
p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday: Children, ages 4
years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth,
6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m.
Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy
McQuaid, associate pastor. Church
office 385-1024.
* Calvary Church, 1825
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872; 386-4900. An independent
community church. Sunday morn-
ing worship, 8:15 and 10 a.m.;
Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.;
Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m.
Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small
friendly church waiting for your
visit.
* Christian Training Ministries
Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off
County Road 17 on Simpson
Avenue. Sunday service is at 10
a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7
p.m. A nursery and children's
church are provided. The church is
part of Christian International
Ministries Network, a full gospel,
non-denominational ministry. Linda
M. Downing, minister: Phone, 314-
0482, Iindadowning@live.com.
Casey L. Downing, associate min-
ister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown
ing@hotmail.com. Web site is
www. chrIstlantrainingministries.net
* Grace Bible Church, 4541
Thunderbird Road, (second church
on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone,
382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior
pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30
p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m.
Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible
Academy Adult Investigating Truth;
first and third Tuesday, Prayer
Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday,
Children's & Youth Programs, 6
p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m.,
College Ministry.
www. GBCconnected. org
* Highlands Community Church,
a casual contemporary church,
meets at 3005 New Life Way.
Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10
a.m. Nursery and Kid's World
classes. Small groups meet
throughout the week. Church
phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A.
Linhart.
* Union Congregational Church,
106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday worship services
are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15
a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m.
(contemporary) in the main sanctu-
ary. Sunday school for all ages is at
9:15 a.m. We also offer
Wednesday and Saturday services
at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respective-


ly. Nursery/child care is available
for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill
Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web
page at www.weareunion.org. All
teachings are taken from the
Manufacturer's Handbook The
Holy Bible. Come join us.
* Unity Life Enrichment Centre,
new location, 10417 Orange
Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL
33875; 471-1122; e-mail
unity@vistanet.net. Web site,
www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Celebration Service,
Nursery and Children's Church.
Weekly Classes, Christian
Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer
Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups.
Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior
minister transforming lives from
ordinary to extraordinary.
* The Way Church, 1005 N.
Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday
school and worship service at 9
a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activi-
ties, 6:30 p.m.. Wednesday. The
Way is a church family who gathers
for contemporary worship, teaching
of God's Word, prayer and fellow-
ship. Come early and stay after for
fellowship time. Child care and chil-
dren's church are provided.
Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The
Way A place for you. Office
Phone:471-6140, Church Cell
Phone:381-6190. Email: theway
church@hotmail.com. Web site:
www. TheWayChurch. org


PRESBYTERIAN

* Covenant Presbyterian Church
(PCA), 4500 Sun 'N Lake Blvd.,
Sebring, 33872-2113. A
Congregation of the Presbyterian
Church in America. Worship servic-
es: Sunday morning worship, infor-
mal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday
evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday
evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.;
Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:30-
7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m.
Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759;
e-mail: covpres@strato.net, Web
site: www.cpcsebr'ng.org. Rev. W.
Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours:
8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through
Thursday.
* First Presbyterian Church
ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two
entrances on LaGrande), Avon
Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242.
The Rev. Robert Johnson is the
pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.;
Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.;
Wednesday Bible study, 10:30
a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third
Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30
p.m. each Wednesday; Esther and
Mary Circles business meeting,
3:30 p.m. third Thursday; Sarah
Circle business meeting, 7 p.m.
second Tuesday; Women's
Ministries Combined Bible study, 4
p.m. third Thursday; Family Movie,
4 p.m. third Sunday. Be a part of a
warm, caring church family with tra-
ditional services, following biblical
truth.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring,
FL 33870. 385-0107. Sunday
School, adult and college age, 9:30
a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.;
Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 11-
18), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult
Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir
rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery avail-
able for Sunday worship. Call the
church office for more information
and other classes. Rev. Darrell A.
Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director
of youth ministry.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, www.fpclp.com, 118 N. Oak
Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The
Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor;
the Rev. Drew Severance, associ-
ate pastor. Sunday morning tradi-
tional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30


a.m.; and contemporary worship is
at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avari-
ety of Sunday school classes for
adults and children are at 9:45 and
11 a.m. in the educational building.
Call the church office for more
information about the classes
offered. Nursery is provided for
babies and toddlers; while young
children up to second grade have a
special Children's Church offered
during the worship service to help
them grow in their spiritual knowl-
edge.
* Spring Lake Presbyterian
Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School,
9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m.
Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the
second Thursday of the month,
September through June. Board of
Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first
Monday of the month. Choir
rehearses at 7 p.m. each
Wednesday, September through
April. Presbyterian Women meet at
10 a.m. the third Thursday of the
month. Organist: Richard Wedig.
Choir Director: Suzan Wedig.
Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,
spring/akepc @embarqmail. corn,
Web site, http.//s/pc. embarq
space.com.


SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST

* Avon Park Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 1410 West
Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone:
453-6641 or e-mail: avonparks-
da@embarqmail.com, Sabbath
School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church
Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday.
Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m.
Community Service hours on
Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00
a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place
the first Sunday of each month.
Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and
Associate Pastor Kameron
DeVasher. Walker Memorial
Academy Christian School offering
education for kindergarten through
12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME.
Website is www.discoverjesus.org.
* Sebring Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, 2106 N. State
Road .17, Sebring; 385-2438.
Worship Services: 9:15 a.m.
Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meet-
ing, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m.
Community service: every Monday
9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr.
Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m.
Pastor Amado Luzbet.


THE CHURCH OF
LATTER DAY SAINTS

* The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand
Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863)
382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop;
Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del
Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family
History Center (863) 382-1822.
Sunday Services: Sacrament
Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel
Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon;
Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-
1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15
a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities:
Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts:
first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20
p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys
and Girls, second and fourth
Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m.


THE SALVATION
ARMY

* The Salvation Army Center
for Worship. Sunday: Sunday
School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meet-
ing, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting
and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible
study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's


Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday:
Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meet-
ings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave.,
Sebring. For more information, visit
the Web site wwwsalvationarmy-
sebring.com or call Major Bruce
Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110.


UNITED METHODIST

* First United Methodist Church,
105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor.
Traditional Worship Service at 8:10
and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary,
Contemporary Worship in the FLC
at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30
and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth
Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday
with Rick Heilig, youth director.
The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship
service is broadcast over WITS
1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery
available at all services.
* First United Methodist Church,
200 South Lake Avenue, Avon
Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, R.
James Weiss, Pastor, Sunday
School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30
a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of
every month at 6 p.m. Prayer
Shawl Ministry on the second and
fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m.
for women who love God and cro-
cheting. Visit us at our church Web
site: www.fumcap.org.
* Memorial United Methodist
Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlook-
ing Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL,
33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pastor.
Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral
assistant. Sunday schedule:
Heritage Worship Service, 8:30
a.m. (October-May only); School
School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.;
Celebration Worship Service at
10:45 a.m.; New Song worship
service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nurs-
ery care provided every Sunday
morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m.
Bible Fellowship Class, 6' p.m.
(October-May only). We offer
Christ-centered Sunday school
classes, youth programs, Bible
studies, book studies and Christian
fellowship. We are a congregation
that want to know Christ and make
Him known. Call the church office
at 465-2422 or check out our
church Web site at wwwmemori-
a/umc. corn.
* St. John United Methodist
Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive,
Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev.
Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor.
Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all
services. Phone 382-1736.
www.stjohnsebring.org
* Spring Lake United Methodist
Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane,
(Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde
Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship serv-
ice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study
meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday.
Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on
Thursday. Church office phone:
655-0040.


UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST

* Emmanuel United Church of
Christ, where God is still speak-
ing. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL
33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27
and Hammock Road). Sunday wor-
ship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with
worship first Sunday of month;
Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all
other Sundays. All are welcome to
receive the sacrament. For more
information, call the church office at
471-1999 or e-mail eucc@earth
//link.net or check the Web site
sebringemmanue/ucc. com. No
matter who you are or where you
are on life's journey, you're wel-
come here.


Page 9B









Page 10B


News-Sun Friday, February 18, 2011


www.newssun.com


RELIGION


Old-time Southern Gospel

comes to St. John UMC Feb. 27


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING "The Soft Gospel Sounds"
of Carol and George Kline will be in con-
cert once again at 6 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 27 at
St. John United Methodist Church, 3214
Grand Prix Drive (behind Walmart), just off
U.S. 27. This will be a return visit after two
years for the Klines, with their last concert
filling the church sanctuary.
The public is cordially invited to attend
this year's programs, which will be a selec-
tion of favorite old-time Gospel songs so
many of us remember and love to sing.
The Klines have been sharing God's
Word in testimony and song with audiences
and congregations everywhere for more
than 25 years. They make their home here
in Sebring and perform throughout the state
in winter months, but travel all across the
United States during the summer. In addi-
tion to several shows in Branson, Mo., as
well as numerous shows on several Carnival
cruise ships, the Klines have performed in
many states across the country. They will
add the state of Arizona for the first time in
the fall of 2011, when they will be perform-
ing at two resorts in the Phoenix area.
In addition to a variety of old-time and
southern gospel concerts, Carol has put
together a variety of shows, which include


Guest

speaker


Courtesy photo
Pastor and Mrs. Luis
Hernandez of Bethel
Temple in Miami will be
the featured guest speak-
er at First Assembly of
God in Lake Placid, 327
Plumosa St., at 10:45
a.m. Sunday. Hernandez
and his congregation has
a heart for missions with-
in Cuba. They assist in
building churches, help-
ing with food and printed
materials for local pas-
tors. Pastor Johnny
Bryant would like to give
a special invitation to join
First Assembly for this
special service.


Courtesy photo
George and Carol Kline will be in concert
Sunday, Feb. 27 at St. John United
Methodist Church in Sebring.

some of country music's best, Big Band and
popular oldies, as well as their highly
acclaimed Tribute to Patsy Cline Show.
Being firmly rooted in gospel music,
however and having had a desire to share
God's Word through their music, their testi-
mony and deep, tight harmony will surely
bless all who attend this special Sunday
evening concert. Come let your spirit be
renewed by the Soft Gospel Sounds of
Carol and George Kline. Call the church
office at 382-1736 for more information.
A love offering will be taken.


Snapshots
Continued from page 9B
the great old hymns and
gospel songs of the church.
Concert is free. A love
offering will be taken.

Brandt in concert
Sunday
SEBRING Tommy
Brandt, an award-winning
singer/songwriter in
Christian country music, will
be presenting a free concert
at Sebring First Baptist
Church at 6 p.m. Sunday.
This central Florida native
has had a number of success-
ful releases topping the
Christian Country charts,
each having the upbeat
sounds he is known for, with
lyrics encouraging Christian
family values.
First Baptist adult Sunday


School curriculum will begin
a six-week series, on Feb. 20,
"Connect, Grow, Serve."
The church fair booth, fea-
turing flags of the nations,
won first place for booth
presentation at the Highlands
County Fair.

Emmanuel United
Church of Christ
parking lot sale
SEBRING A parking lot
sale from 7 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 26 is
being held at Emmanuel
United Church of Christ,
3115 Hope St., 1.8 miles west
of corner of U.S. 27 on
Hammock Road. This is an
annual bargain-hunter's
bonanza.
Coffee and doughnuts are
available for early arrivals,
hot dogs and sodas served


later. For further information,
call 471-1999.

World Day of Prayer
will be March 4
SEBRING The World
Day of Prayer will be cele-
brated in the area on Friday,
March 4. It will be held at
United Church of Christ,
3115 Hope St. (just off
Hammock Road).
The program will begin at
10:30 a.m. and the doors will
open at 10 a.m. Light refresh-
ments will be offered. The
celebration is open to the
public.
The program has been
written by the women of
Chile and is titled "How
many loaves have you?" For
more information, call Alice
Koster at 382-2819.


The role of sex in marriage


I'll start by saying I hate
mind games and we women
are good at playing them.
You know how it goes.
You're mad at him for some-
thing he did or didn't do, or
something he forgot. You
give him the silent treat-
ment. He asks what's wrong
and you say, "Nothing."
The look on your face and
the tone of your voice tell
him he'd better figure it out,
and quick if he wants any
peace in the home. The line
that really hurts me is, "If
you can't figure it out, I'll
just close my legs until you
do."
Sex is not supposed to be
used as a weapon. It is a giv-
ing of yourself and every-
thing you are. It is an offer-
ing, a gift. It is meant to
bring supreme pleasure.
When it is kept within the
marriage it is something spe-
cial that no one else can


The Marriage
Mentor
Aleta Kay

have from you. It tells your
husband that you are totally
his. It's a symbol of commit-
ment, of putting his needs
ahead of yours. It is the most
special thing you can do for
your husband.
When used outside of
marriage, it is just a cheap
thrill and dampens the
capacity for commitment to
any relationship.
The Bible in I Corinthians
chapter 7 tells us that mar-
ried folks are not to withhold
sex from each other. When
you don't feel like it, it is an
opportunity to give yourself
unselfishly to your husband
and will strengthen your
marriage. The Bible com-
pares our marriage here with
God's relationship to the


church: It is intimate. God
knows each of His children
intimately and wants us to
know Him intimately, with
complete childlike trust.
One of the Ten
Commandments tells us not
to commit adultery. These
are not God's Ten
Suggestions. God will not
wink at them and excuse us
because this is the 21st cen-
tury. God goes on to say that
if a man looks on a woman
with lust he has already
committed adultery with her
in his heart.
Do you think you have the
right to cause a man to lust
because of the way you
choose to dress? God will
not hold you guiltless. You
will stand before Him one
day and account for the dam-
age you have caused by your
lack of modesty.

Aleta Kay can be reached at the-
marriagementor@yahoo. corn


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This is a campaign against Melanoma. One in 72 people will contract
the disease. You must elect yourself to lead against it. It is a potential
matter of life and death.

Melanoma
*Usually a non-symptomatic growth on the skin with multiple colors and irregular edges.

We can protect you against this silent killer.


We are your skin police.


Call now, elect a proactive preventative skin
team.


American Institute of Dermatology, P.A.


Darrin A. Rotman, M.D.
Julie lellimo, P.A.-C
Jennifer Wolf, P.A.-C


Medicare and all major insurances accepted in
network*


New Patients Welcome


863-386-0786
*individual must call for verification of benefits. This is not a guarantee.


1-1-9









; www.newssun.com


News-Sun Friday, February 18, 2011


Page 11B


DIVERSIONS


Conservative woman needs


to find like-minded friends


Columbia Pictures
- Jennifer Aniston stars as Katherine Murphy and Adam Sandler stars as Danny
Maccabee in 'Just Go with It.'


Just run from Sandler,


Aniston's romance


By DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer
The poster asks, "What if
.a little lie kept getting big-
ger?" More like, "What if
the people telling the little
lie kept getting dumber?"
Adam Sandler and
Jennifer Aniston's romantic
comedy "Just Go With It,"
idiotic even by their usually
low big-screen standards, is
stuffed with unpleasant nar-
cissists saying and doing
the stupidest, often cruelest
things in hope of cheap
laughs.
They fail. There's barely
a titter's worth of humor in
this bloated mess that
drones on for nearly two
hours.
Director Dennis Dugan,
whose many collaborations
with Sandler include "Big
Daddy" and "Grown Ups,"
lets scene after unfunny
scene linger painfully as
- the characters blather drea-
-,ry nonsense for minutes on
end.
Based on Walter
*Matthau, Ingrid Bergman
and Goldie Hawn's 1969
comedy "Cactus Flower,"
the movie casts Sandler as
Danny Maccabee, an
unmarried, well-off plastic
surgeon and supposedly
nice guy who has spent two
decades pretending to be a
Mistreated husband so he
can score with sympathetic
women (yeah, real nice
"guy).
, Then Danny falls for
'schoolteacher Palmer
'Dodge (Sports Illustrated
:swimsuit goddess Brooklyn
' Decker). Rather than doing
;something silly, like telling
SPalmer the simple truth that
She's interested and avail-
,.able, Danny enlists his
assistant and longtime pla-
;tonic pal, Katherine
,(Aniston), to pose as the
',wife he's divorcing so he
;can woo his new woman.
And the lame-b;ained
lies build from there.
Single mom Katherine's
kids (Bailee Madison and
Griffin Gluck) are drawn
into the charade, along with
Danny's randy cousin (Nick
" Swardson).
All three are annoying
enough as their regular
characters, but Madison
and Swardson yammer in
grating European accents
much of the time as part of
this shabby plot to con
sweet and trusting Palmer
into falling for a creep.
Sandler, also a producer
on the movie, truly does
come off as a creep here.
His characters usually are
crass but good-hearted, and
while Danny utters the
occasional nicety, he's just
a big, nasty jerk.
Compounding things, the
44-year-old Sandler's boy-
ish looks are really starting
to erode, so Danny seems a
bit like a pathetic old lech-
er pursuing 23-year-old
Decker's Palmer (Allan
Loeb and Timothy
Dowling's screenplay also
provides no clues why the
impossibly hot Palmer
might fall, almost at first
sight, for a middle-aged
liar).
As the fibs pile up. char-
acters keep uttering "just
go with it," and it feels like


Movie Review
'Just Go With It'
Rating: R (frequent crude
and sexual content, partial
nudity, brief drug references
and language)
Running time: 116 minutes
Review: -I (of 4)

a plea from the actors and
filmmakers, hoping the
audience will play along no
matter how dumb things
get.
The filmmakers contrive
to send the whole gang on a
weird, extended-family trip
to Hawaii so they can show
off some exotic scenery and
.-sneak in shots of Decker
glistening as she steps out
of the ocean in a skimpy
bikini.
In Hawaii, Katherine also
encounters old college rival
Devlin (Nicole Kidman), a
pompous windbag who
happens to be vacationing
there with her equally
insufferable husband (musi-
cian Dave Matthews).
Among the movie's many
clumsy gags-is a hula
smackdown between
Aniston and Kidman that,
even though it offers grand
views of their taut midriffs
in action, manages to be
really, really boring.
Kevin Nealon also has a
sad little cameo as a plas-
tic-surgery addict, but his
makeup's so heavy, he's
,almost unrecognizable, so
he has plausible deniability
that he was ever in the
movie.
How Kidman got roped
into this dreadful affair is a
mystery, but don't you
make the same mistake.
Just run from it.

'The Eagle'
The gladiatorial thumbs-
up or thumbs-down is a key
plot point in this ancient
Roman adventure. The
movie itself merits more of
a thumb wriggling horizon-
tally, nudging upward for
its precise detail and gor-
geous landscapes but down-
ward for its somewhat hol-
low characters and their
admirable but monotonous
sense of honor.
Channing Tatum and
Jamie Bell deliver solid
though unremarkable per-
formances as a former
Roman soldier and a British
slave on a quest beyond the
edge of the known world to
retrieve the standard of a
lost legion that vanished in
the wilds of 2nd- century
Scotland. Director Kevin
Macdonald ("The Last King
of Scotland") crafts a tech-
nically sumptuous epic,
glorious to the eye though
often dry and uninvolving
to the ear.
The movie is based on
Rosemary Sutcliff's 1954
novel, "The Eagle of the


Ninth," a tale written for
young readers that simply
does not ripen well for the
modern grown-up audience
at which the film is aimed.
The intense skirmishes and
images are suited for adult
crowds, yet the ideals and
emotions that bond the
main characters are boyish
and stunted, leaving the
movie caught between
mature action and shallow
characterizations.
Rated PG-13 for battle
sequences and some dis-
turbing images. 114 min-
utes. Two and a half stars
out of four.
David Germain, AP
Movie Writer

'Gnomeo & Juliet'
This animated riff on
"Romeo and Juliet," with
yard gnomes standing in for
our star-crossed lovers,
doesn't have a single origi-
nal idea in its pointy,
ceramic head.
Spirited and brisk as this
family film can be, its ener-
gy cannot disguise the fact
that it's an awkward mash-
up of Shakespeare puns,
hackneyed pop culture ref-
erences and familiar Elton
John songs, with one of
those everything-but-the-
kitchen-sink scripts cobbled
together by committee.
The concept is clever
enough I mean, come
on, who doesn't like yard
gnomes? but that's pret-
ty much all this film from
director Kelly Asbury
("Shrek 2") is. Like
"Snakes on a Plane," the
title is the gag, and it tells
you all you need to know.
And of course, "Gnomeo &
Juliet" is in 3-D. While
adding a third dimension
can provide an inspired
sense of perspective and
makes some of the details
pop in a tactile way the
chips in the gnomes' paint,
the smudges of dirt on their
faces it is, as always,
unnecessary.
"Gnomeo & Juliet" does
feature a strong voice cast,
though, led by James
McAvoy, Emily Blunt,
Michael Caine and Maggie
Smith, with cameos from
the likes of Dolly Parton,
Hulk Hogan and Ozzy
Osbourne. Some of the one-
liners and visual bits hit
their targets, but for the
most part, reheated gags
and sequences that recall
earlier, better animated
films are the norm.
Rated G. 84 minutes.
Two stars out of four.
Christy Lemire, AP
Movie Critic


Dear Abby: I am a very
conservative woman. I don't
drink, dance, wear makeup
or pants. I enjoy the compa-
ny of friends despite our dif-
ferences and thought they
enjoyed mine.
On our most recent outing,
however, they mocked my
religious jewelry, comment-
ed on my "lack of fashion,"
and made me feel guilty for
not wanting to stay out late.
Despite this, they are great
friends and would help me at
the drop of a hat. I don't
bring up their being over-
weight, or that I think some
of the clothes they wear are
ugly. I don't criticize them
for sleeping around. I wish
they would accept me for
who I am.
I am considering not
going out with them the next
time they ask, but I don't
really want it to come to
that. Any suggestions?
Just an Old-Fashioned
Girl
Dear Old-Fashioned: Just,
this: It's time for you to start
cultivating relationships with
people whose values are
more like your own. The
friends you have described
may be lovely, but their
comments were out of line
and folks are known by the
company they keep. If you
spend a lot of time with the
women you have described,
people will begin to make
assumptions about you.

Dear Abby: Two of my
children, ages 28 and 30 and
college-educated, have what
they call "bill paying anxi-
ety." It doesn't matter if they
have the money or not, they
find it difficult to pay their
bills. They have both lost
their licenses for not paying
traffic tickets, but that hasn't
taught either one of them a
lesson. Any advice on how
to help them? Anxious
Mom in Washington
Dear Mom: How long
have those two been out
from under your roof? Did
you pay all their expenses
until recently? Your "chil-



Anna Nicole

Smith subject

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LONDON (AP) It's a
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drugs, vast wealth and family
tragedy. Perfect material for
an opera.
-Still, Britain's venerable
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sensational life of Playboy
Playmate-turned-tabloid-
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Smith was just 39 when
she died of an accidental
drug overdose in February
2007, after a life documented
in magazines and tabloids, on
reality TV and in testimony
from a series of court cases.
The company bills the
show as "provocative in its
themes, exciting in its bravu-
ra style and thrilling with its
sheer contemporary nerve."


Dear Abby
dren" aren't children any-
more. They have reached an
age when they must now
learn from their mistakes.
When they're ready to
assume responsibility for
their actions, they'll do what
other adults who are in this
kind of hot water do: They
will seek financial or psy-
chological counseling and
recognize that acting like
ostriches will not fix their
problems, and neither will
Mama.

Dear Abby: My 24-year-
old daughter, "Evy," is
falling to the rocky bottom.
She has taken advantage of
everyone in our family. She
thinks she's the victim
instead of realizing she is
the problem.
" She's planning to marry
"Dave," a man she has
known for only six months.
She refuses to consider his
past criminal record of
domestic abuse. Abby, this
man has several children,
one of whom he does not
acknowledge.
Am I wrong to be
involved in this wedding? I


feel it would be a mistake to
be "supportive" when I'm
totally against it. Dave has
pushed her already, and I
know what lies ahead for her
if she goes through with this
marriage. Also, her behavior
has changed drastically since
she has been involved with
him.
To Be or Not To Be ...
the Mother of the Bride
Dear T.B. or N.T.B.: You
will always be your daugh-
ter's mother, but you don't
have to bless this marriage
with your presence. Some
people have to learn their
lessons the hard way, and
your daughter appears to be
one of them. She needs to
understand that while you do
not approve of Dave, you
love her. Keep the lines of
communication open
because she is going to need
you in the future.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail
Van Buren, also known as
Jeanne Phillips, and was found-
ed by her mother, Pauline
Phillips. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.
Good advice for everyone teens
to seniors is in 'The Anger in
All of Us and How to Deal With
It.' To order, send a business-size,
self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $6
(U.S. funds only) to: Dear Abby
- Anger Booklet, P.O. Box 447,
Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447.
(Postage is included in the
price.)


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LIVING


Most people have heard stories or seen images depicting
the dire conditions faced by families living in poverty
in developing countries. These stories can make people
feel compelled to get involved, but often they are left
with questions about the best way to help families in


need.
Bob Hentzen, president and co-founder of the
Christian Foundation for Children and Aging
(CFCA), believes that child sponsorship is one of
the best ways to connect with and assist families
throughout the world trying to survive in extreme
poverty often on less than $2 per day.
"'Sponsorship benefits are designed to meet criti-
cal needs and help families build a path out
of poverty," Hentzen said. "Sponsorship says,
'We are equal and we need each other. We are inter-
dependent.'"
To shed light on global poverty and the benefits
of sponsorship, Hentzen, who is 74, is currently
on an 8,000-mile walk through 12 countries. (See
sidebar story for more about Walk2gether.)

Basic Sponsorship Models
Child ,p,.ins.., hip prigr.,i,. !,i e the one offered
by CFCA ,;ive people the ,ipp'on unity to impact
global poverty through recurring, monthly contri-
butions. Sponsorship donations are then used to
provide families in need with basic resources like
food, education and health care benefits. There are
three basic models, although some organizations
combine two or more of the basic sponsorship mod-
els to carry out their mission.
Community Projects Some organizations
pool the funds from individual sponsorships to
help support larger community projects like the
development of new schools or hospitals. These
organizations also might distribute general goods
like food or clothing to entire communities.


-nderstanding


















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"Sponsorship offers a lot more than financial support," Hentzen said.
"What the child and family really are hearing from you is, 'You are not
alone and I believe in you.'"'
Unlike other charitable options, child sponsorship requires a personal, -
long-term commitment from sponsors. This is why it's not only impor-
tant to understand how sponsorship works, but
M :i also how to find the right partner organization.


"Sponsorship bene-
fits are
designed to meet
critical needs
and help families
build a path
out of poverty."

- CFCA President Bob Hentzen


Direct Support Organizations such as
CFCA connect individual sponsors with children in need, providing
them and their families with resources such as food, education, voca-
tional training and micro-loans.
Third-Party Support A few organizations use the sponsorship
dollars they collect to support local groups or organizations that
already provide resources for people living in poverty, including
schools, churches, shelters and food banks.
In addition to financial support, some sponsorship organizations pro-
vide a way to create a personal connection with sponsored children
through letters. These letters allow sponsors to witness the impact of
their contributions and provide a way to offer words of encouragement.


Narrowing the Field
* Research the organization's finances. A recent
study by Hope Consulting showed that 65 per-
cent of donors don't research an organization
before making a donation. Form 990 is an IRS
document available to the public that provides
detailed information on an organization's opera-
tional activities, including what percentage of
financial contributions are used for program
support.
* Review third-party ratings and comments.
Organizations like the American Institute of
Philanthropy and Charity Navigator rate chari-
ties
to ensure they meet financial and accountability
standards. In addition, pay special attention to
the comments made by other sponsors regarding
their overall experience with the organization.
* Evaluate for impact. Program ratios don't tell
the whole story. Look for specific evidence of
meaningful impact. Go through each organiza-
tion's website and literature carefully. Look for
testimonials and program specifics provided by
sponsored families, donors, volunteers and staff.
* Ensure the organization's values and mission
align with yours. The values and mission of
sponsorship organizations can be very different
and impact how the organizations operate as
well
as the services they offer. Don't judge a spon-
sorship organization by its name. Instead, focus
on how the organization carries out its mission.


Christian Foundation for Children and Aging is an international spon-
sorship organization serving people of all faiths in 22 developing coun-
tries. CFCA's Hope for a Family sponsorship program connects individ-
ual sponsors with a child, youth or elderly person in need to provide
them with the basic resources and support needed to create
a path out of poverty. More than 94 percent of CFCA's expenses go
toward program support.
Visit www.hopeforafamily.org, or call (800) 875-6564 for more infor-
Ination.


Sponsorship assists with basic needs to help children
and their families break the cycle of poverty seen in
many developing countries.


Sponsorship- provides people with a unique way to bond
with children in different parts of the world and see the
impact of their contributions.


74-year-old man walks 8,000 miles for kids


On Dec., 29, 2009, Bob Hentzen embarked on
Walk2gether, an 8,000-mile walk through 12
countries from Guatemala to Chile.
The trip, which spans about a year and a half, is
Henizen's unique way of helping counteract the isolation
of people Il i ng in poverty, and showing them that some-
one cares.
"B) talking \ i people living in poverty, we are say-
ing, 'You are not alone,"' Hentzen said. "We are listening
to you and learning from you."
Hentzen's day begins around 2:30 a.m., when he
wakes up in an old Toyota camper. He covers an average
of 20 to 25 mile. daily as he makes his way through vast
terrains.
Despite the mental and physical demands required
to complete each day, Hentzen, 74, finds the time and
energy to visit with families CFCA serves many of


whom make their way to Hentzen to support and encour-
age him in the same way that he does for them.
Hentzen hopes that his efforts will inspire people in
the U.S. to sponsor at least one child for each of the
8,000 miles he is walking during Walk2gether.
As a CFCA sponsor, a tax-deductible contribution of
$30 per month provides a child and family with:
m Basic resources such as food, clothing and health care.
* Educational benefits such as school supplies, uniforms,
tuition and other school fees.
* Recreational activities such as Christmas and birthday
celebrations.
m Literacy training and livelihood programs for parents.
To follow Hentzen's journey or help him reach his
goal, visit www.hopeforafamily.org/kids.


PAGE


News-Sun


Friday, February 18, 2011