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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00900
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: February 13, 2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
sobekcm - UF00028423_00900
System ID: UF00028423:00900
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

Full Text




www.newssun





EWSighlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927


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Romance is tough, even in
the animal kingdom
PAGE 1C

Sunday, February 13, 2011


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Business
Chalk Talk
Classifieds
Community Briefs
Community Calend
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Editorial & Opinion
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Movie Times
School Menus
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Rhoads seeking
another term

PAGE 2A


Regionals
tough for SHS

PAGE 1D -


www.newssun.coln


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Excavation Point laborer Sonny Pottle and machine operator Toot Walker level out the grade Friday at North'
Central Heights, a new low-income housing development in Avon Park.


Local homes equal local jobs


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
AVON PARK A low-income
housing development in Avon Park
on North Central Avenue is not
only adding 72 new housing units,
it is creating jobs.
And that is good news for many
in the community.
According to North Central
Heights project superintendent Jim
Steelman, a lot of the $9 million
spent on the project is being spent
locally.
Steelman works for Arnco
Construction form Kissimmee, the
group that won the bid for the Avon
Park project.
"Most of the work is being done
by local contractors. We have the


North Central
Heights project
mostly using

local contractors

framing, the electrical, the land-
scaping, the site work, all of that
was done by local sub-contractors,"
Steelman said.
"It makes sense really, as long as
the local guys are competitive, then
you save on the travel time. Using
the local sub-contractors is sniart
business," Steelman said.
From start to finish, according to
Steelman, local companies have


Twenties roar in Sebring


News-Sun photo by ROBYN BAKALUS
People enjoy a walk through downtown Sebring at the 27th annual Roaring
Twenties Art Festival on Saturday. The festival has offered jewerly, sculp-
ture, paintings, music and more since 1984. Organizers said 130 vendors
were present this year.


supplied materials and locals have
been hired to work on the only
project of this size Avon Park has
had in a long time.
"Excavation Point turned the
dirt, and the local guy right over
there is doing the landscaping,"
Steelman said, pointing at the land-
scaping and irrigation company
across the road.
"This project has kept 60 to 75
people employed in a very tough
economy. That is definitely good
news," Steelman said.
Larry Shoeman, executive direc-
tor of the Avon Park Housing
Authority, agrees with Steelman's
assessment.
See PROJECT, page 7A


Volume 92/Number 19 I 75 cents

Gov. removes 5

Wauchula city

commissioners

from office.

Were involved in
Sunshine Law
violations
By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
WAUCHULA Wauchula City
Clerk Holly Collins confirmed that
five city commissioners were removed
from office by Gov. Rick Scott on
Friday.
Collins could not confirm any
details other than Russel Graylin
Smith and John Freeman remain in
office, and that the outgoing commis-
sioners were given until- 5 p.m. on
Friday to remove their personal
belongs from city hall offices.
According to the city's Web site,
Mayor David Royal, along with
Commissioners Valentine Patarini III,
Daniel Graham, Jerry Conerly and
Clarence Bolin were removed from
office for violations of the
Government in Sunshine Law.
In May, the State Attorney's Office
charged the commissioners with
breaking the law by having private
meetings on Sept. 14, 2009, and
March 1,2010.
The complaints state that the com-
missioners' actions showed "a pur-
poseful intent to keep sensitive subject
matter regarding city employees away
from the public."
At the private meetings, the com-
missioners discussed issues facing the
city, including the possible termina-
tions of the police chief and city man-
See FIVE, page 7A


Teen faces 25 charges for

Sun 'N Lake crime spree


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.comn
SEBRING A 15-year-old
eighth grader from Hill-Gustat
Middle School was turned over to
the Bartow Juvenile Facility on
Wednesday with 25 charges rang-
ing from petit theft to grand theft of
a firearm.
Shawn Edward Elk, of Sebring,
will face felony charges of grand
larceny and assault, despite the fact
that he is a juvenile. Elk was
charged with 11 counts of burglary,
two counts of grand theft for stolen
golf carts, grand theft of a firearm,
eight counts of petit theft, two
counts of criminal mischief and


assault.
On Jan. 24, Highlands County
Sheriff Deputies were called to Sun
'N Lake where they discovered the
locks on 13 golf cart storage units
had been damaged.
According to arrest reports, one
of the golf carts was spray painted
black and had the side curtains and
top removed before it was recov-
ered in a wooded area and returned
to the victim. Another golf cart had
items removed and a sale arranged
for it.
On Jan. 25, deputies responded
to calls of car fishing in the Sun 'N
See TEEN, page 4A


4-H provide smiles, love to

Kenilworth Care residents


By SAMANTHA GHOLAR
sgholar@newssun.com
SEBRING Members of the 4H
Sunnyhop group took a trip to the
Kenilworth Care and Rehab Center on
Thursday afternoon, delivering Valentines,
cookies, and candies to the residents' of the
center.
The center's Director of Quality of Life,
Luis Rodriquez, was excited to see the resi-
dents interacting and enjoying the day with
the kids.
"It's all about bridging the gap, trying to
bring the old and the young closer together,"
said Rodriquez. Around 20 senior residents


gathered in the commons to meet local 4H
students.
Laura Vanfleet is one of the parents the
head the Sunnyhop 4H group. She, along
with a handful of 4H members and dedicat-
ed parents, handed out cookies and treats to
the residents and offered them a different
afternoon.
Before the day ended, 12-year-olds Julia
Vanfleet and Megan Sowards both had spe-
cial presentations for the residents.
Sowards is a three-year member of 4H
and brought in a bunny rabbit to show to the
residents.
See 4H, page 7A


4H Sunnyhop
member
Elizabeth
Vanfleet (8)
watches as
Kenilworth
Care and
Rehab Center
resident Leah
Stanfield pets
a Schnauzer
Thursday.


Avon Park
800 West Main St.
863.453.6000
National Bank FbiC


.r..munity minded

Lake Placid Sebring Sun 'n Lake North
600 U.S. Hwy 27 N. 327 U.S. Hwy 27 N. 5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.
863.699.1300 863.386.1300 863.386.1322
www.heartlandnb.com 1
__ _ ~ ~ ~ _ __ __ ,.;' __


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Page 2A


Wildfire danger still

very high in area


By CHRISTOPHER
TUFFLEY
christopher.tuffley@newssun.comn
LAKE PLACID -
Melissa Yunas, wildfire
mitigation specialist with
the state Department of
Forestry, told the News-Sun
Friday the two wildfires
brought under control
Monday at the Grand
Concourse and Paso Fino
Drive east of Henscratch
Road are for the most part
extinguished.
There has been a little
activity as flare-ups have
occurred within the con-
tainment boundaries. These
have been handled easily
and personnel remain site
keeping a watch.
"Make sure not to get
complacent," Yunas said
Friday. "While it has


rained, it's only been two-
tenths of an inch, and low
humidity is expected
Saturday."
She said that means con-
ditions are still ideal for
brush fires, which can
spread rapidly.
"Use caution," she said.
"Don't use anything outside
that might spark. If you do
accidentally start a fire
please call 911 immediate-
ly, so we can have a quick
response."
Yunas said people who
live surrounded by brush
should keep their yards free
of dead debris and piled
leaves to be a little safer.
House gutters should also
be kept clear, and the lawn
kept watered, within
restrictions.


Teen drivers encouraged

to take the challenge


Special to the News-Sun
Parents of teen drivers
know the apprehension that
comes with letting their
teens take the wheel. This is
especially true considering
the staggering fact that auto-
mobile accidents are the
leading cause of death
among teenagers. Florida
rates highest in fatal crashes
of those age 15-19 in the
nation.
Sheriff Susan Benton and
the Florida Sheriff's
Association are proud to
present Teen Driver


Challenge in an effort to
save lives. There is no cost
for participation.
Teen Driver Challenge
will be held Thursday and
Saturday, Feb. 24 and 26.
The classroom portion will
be from 5:30-9:30 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 24 in
Conference Room 2 of the
Bert J. Harris Jr. Agriculture
Civic Center, 4509 George
Blvd. The practical portion
will be held from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25 at the
See DRIVING, page 4A


News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


www. newssun.corn


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Sebring City Councilwoman Margie Rhoades is also assistant principal at Hill-Gustat
Middle School in Sebring.


Longtime council member


Rhoades seeks re-election


* Editor's Note: With early voting set to
begin Monday, Feb. 21, and election day
itself set for March 8, the News-Sun begins
a series of interviews with the candidates
running for Sebring City Council. Three of
the five council member seats are in con-
tention. All three sitting council members
are seeking re-election John Clark,
Margie Rhoades and Bud Whitlock. Andrew
Fells is running for the council for the first
time. The top three vote getters win the
seats.

By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
christopher.tuffley@newssun.com
SEBRING Margie Rhoades, who is
running for re-election to the Sebring City
Council, grew up in Miami Beach, graduat-
ed from the University of Florida and been
a teacher all her working life, mostly in ele-
mentary schools here in Highlands County.


Currently she is the assistant principal at
Hill-Gustat Middle School.
She moved to Highlands County in 1980
and raised three children here, becoming
interested in local issues as time passed.
Rhoades sees herself more as an involved
neighbor than a politician.
"I don't think I'm political," she said.
"I'm doing this to represent people."
She said one reason she continues to run
for city council she served off and on
from 1993 to 1998 and continuously since
1999 is because people have told her she
is good at research, following through on
. things and seeing the big picture.
While very proud of the work the city
council has accomplished, Rhoades is con-
cerned about the future.
"The country and the county have a seri-

See RHOADES, page 7A


Workshop on Monday to inform public about biofuel crops


By SAMANTHA GHOLAR
sgholar@newssun.com
LORIDA Several government
groups have put together a workshop
that will be held Monday involving a
interesting crop that grows in the
state of Florida.
The Florida Feedstock Growers
Association, United States
Department of Agriculture,
IFAS/UF, and the Florida Farm
Bureau invites farmers as well as the
public to the USCJO Farm located at
6727 County Road 721 in Lorida


from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on
Monday.
U.S. Navy Director of Operational
Energy Chris Tindal will be one of
the many guest speakers at this
event. The workshop is taking place
to discuss the idea of growing
renewable energy corps and biofuel
crops in Lorida.
"This crop, camelina, is drought
resistant and freeze resistant. It can
withstand freezing temperatures as
well as weeks without rain," said
Vice President of USCJO Amelia


Lyons.
Lyons is excited to work with the
Florida Farm Bureau as well as the
other associations during the work-
shop to inform about the camelina
plant as well as the kenaf plant.
The workshop also includes a live
demonstration of the kenaf plant as
well as a guided tour through the
USCJO farm.
Attendees will learn how the
camelina, the oilseed plant, is used
for jet fuel and how the farm is
beginning to work with the U.S. mil-


itary.
According to Lyons, the company
is currently farming close to 10,000
acres in Florida.
"We hope this workshop will
show farmers how growing this crop
is beneficial to us all. We want them
to learn what it is all about," said
Lyons.
The workshop is open to the pub-
lic. Lunch will also be served.
Attendees are asked to RSVP to
Katie Duncan at 402-6540 or visit
www.FloridaFeedstockgrowers.com.


COMMUNITY BRIEFS


Lake Clay boat ramp
closed for repairs
LAKE PLACID
- Highlands County Parks
and Recreation Department
will close the Lake Clay
boat ramp (east side 1650
Lake Clay Drive) for repair
and maintenance from
Monday through March 10.
It is schedule to reopen
Friday, March 11.
For further information on
boat ramp closings, contact
the Highlands County Parks
and Recreation Department
at 402-6812.

Highlands
Homeowners meet
Monday
SEBRING Monthly
meetings of the Highlands
County Homeowners
Association are held the sec-
ond Monday of each month
at the Sebring Country
Estates Clubhouse, 3240
Grand Prix Ave. The
February meeting is open to
the public and will be held
from 9-11 a.m. Free coffee,
hot tea and donuts will be
provided.
Dan Murphy, executive
director, Highlands County
Economic Development
Commission and Industrial
Development Authority, and
Chris Benson, County
Engineering Department,
will give a PowerPoint pres-
entation on the proposed
Highlands County Tax
Abatement Program.
Highlands County Tax
Collector Eric T. Zwayer
will give a PowerPoint pres-
entation on the tax collector
office's services and the new
management and operation
of the county license branch-
es beginning this summer.


Call Chairman Rick Ingler
for any additional informa-
tion at 273-5182.

SALT presents a
Senior Forum
SEBRING The
Highlands County S.A.L.T.
Council (Seniors and Law
Enforcement Together) will
present a Senior Forum rom
10 a.m. to noon Tuesday.
Florida Hospital Heartland
Medical Center in Sebring
will host the forum in con-
ference room one and will
provide a complimentary
continental breakfast.
Seniors are encouraged to
bring their questions or con-
cerns and join in the panel
discussion on crime, fraud,
ID theft, care and services
available to older adults.
Seating is limited. RSVP
to Grace Plants at 402-5433.,

EHEAP funds
available
SEBRING Nu-Hope
Elder Care Services Inc.
announces availability of
funds for assistance through
the Emergency Home Energy


Assistance for the Elderly
Program. Through EHEAP,
an applicant may receive
assistance with paying past
due energy bills, obtaining
adequate cooling or heating
equipment or resolving other
cooling-related energy crisis.
For assistance, contact
Nu-Hope Elder Care
Services Inc. at 382-2134
for an appointment.
Applicants must bring a
copy of their past due power
bill, identification and proof
of income for all household
members to their appoint-
ment.

Raffle to benefit
Humane Society
SEBRING The Humane
Society invites the public to
visit The Blue Lagoon
Saloon, 4120 U.S. 27 North,
for a raffle of a 1988
Yamaha Classic Venture
Cruiser. Raffle tickets are $5
each.
The drawing will be held
at 5:30 p.m. today. Buy raf-
fle tickets at the event or at
The Humane Society.

Continued on page 6A


SAVE 50% OFF
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Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawings
are twice per day: (d) is the
daytime drawing, (n) is the
nighttime drawing.
PB: Power Ball PP: Power Play


Newt C Bwww.newssu f82


NEWS-SUN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927

Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, Florida 33870
A Harbor Point Media Company


OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870
OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday
PHONE: 863-385-6155
MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954
NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453

CIRCULATION
SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not
receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation
department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before
11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to
you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their
account. Please call 385-6155.


POSTMASTER: Send address change to:
News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870
USPS ISSN 0163-3988
Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL
and additional entry offices)


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
HOME DELIVERY
IN FLORIDA MAIL
OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL


12 mo.
$60.46
92.23
105.99


7% FL tax
$4.23
6.46


Total
$64.69
98.69
105.99


Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on
Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.
Romona Washington Publisher and Executive Editor
863-385-6155, ext. 515


POLICE
BLOTTER

The News-Sun would like to
remind the readers that the
names listed below reflect
those who have been charged
with a crime, but they are all
innocent until proven guilty by
a court of law. If anyone listed
here is acquitted or has charges
dropped, they can bring in
proof of such decision or mail a
copy to the paper and the
News-Sun will be happy to
report that information. The
News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27
South, Sebring, FL 33870.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on Thursday, Feb.
10:
* Brian Keith Aeschliman, 24,
of Avon Park, was arrested on
an out-of-county warrant refer-
ence DUI.
* Jayson Richard Burdick, 23,
was charged with three counts
of violation of probation refer-
ence forgery, grand theft and
utter forged instrument.
* Ejaj Ahmed Chowdhury, 40,
of Sebring, was charged with
criminal mischief and burglary
of an unoccupied dwelling.
* Richard Levi Hargrove, 49,
of Avon Park, was charged with
fraud-swindle, and grand theft.
* Abraham Moreno, 28, of
Arcadia, was charged with driv-
ing while license suspended.
+ Joseph Edward Nicklaus,
26, of Lake Placid, was charged
with possession of a controlled
substance without a prescrip-
tion, possession of a listed
chemical and possession and
or use of drug equipment.
* Ralph Salvatore Surace, 35,
of Lake Placid, was charged
with two counts of sell marijua-
na, two counts of possession of
marijuana with intent to
sell/manufacture or deliver, two
counts of possession and or
use of drug equipment.
+ Tina Renee Venning, 28, of
Avon Park, was charged with
violation of probation reference
trafficking oxycodone.
* Ederick James Walker, 41,
of Avon Park, was arrested on
two out-of-county warrants ref-
erence driving with license sus-
pended or revoked and writ of
bodily attach.
* Michael Thomas Westbrook,
32, of Sebring, was charged
with violation of probation ref-
erence battery.










www.newssun.com


News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


EDITORIAL & OPINION


ow that
Florida's
new gover-
nor is unveiling his
policy agenda, and
legislators are get-
ting ready to take a
crack at it in their
annual session, it
might be easy to
forget there's a
third, and equal,
branch of state gov-
ernment: the court
system.
Like other parts of state
government, the courts have
been hit hard by budget cuts
in recent years as state rev-
enues have dropped. Courts
actually reached their peak in
annual funding four years
ago, at $491 million. This
year, their budget is $462
million about 0.7 percent
of the total state budget.
Unlike other parts of state
government say, the
departments of health, educa-
tion or transportation the
courts are an independent


branch of government. And
their mission is critical to
every Florida citizen and
business: to uphold and inter-
pret the law, protect free-
doms, and peacefully resolve
disputes. Last year, they han-
dled 4.5 million cases.
Yet the budget squeeze that
legislators have applied to
courts in recent years has not
only stressed their opera-
tions, forcing them to cut
nearly 300 staff and to freeze
the number of judges, despite
caseloads swollen with fore-
closures. It also has put
judges in a vulnerable posi-
tion as they carry out their
constitutional responsibility
to check the power of legisla-
tors.
That vulnerability was
apparent last year after a
majority of the state Supreme
Court's justices removed
from the ballot three poorly
drafted constitutional amend-
ments proposed by the
Legislature. Incoming Senate
President Mike Haridopolos
accused the justices of "try-
ing to legislate from the
bench," a familiar refrain
from court-bashers, every-


NEWF-SUN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927
2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155


NEWSROOM


ROMONA WASHINGTON
Publisher/Executive Editor
Ext.-515



SCOTT DRESSEL
Ed itor
Ext. 516
0 ci,, i l.- 'q i c iit n t t o Ci i iw

DAN HOEHNE
Sports Editor
Ext. 528
daniel. hoehne@newssun. corn


where. House Speaker Dean
Cannon called the court's rul-
ings on the amendments
"threats to freedom." He then
called for a "dialogue"
between legislators and the
justices.
Such a dialogue could be
one-sided when legislators
are holding the purse strings
and justices are teetering atop
a system already knocked off
balance by budget cuts. Do
the justices dare push back
against even misguided pro-
posals to curb court authority
when they're hoping legisla-


ADVERTISING


VICKIE JONES
Ext. 518

CIRCULATION
TONY MCCOWAN
Ext 522

PRE-PRESS
KEN BAREFIELD
P odaction C i.ordirnto.:i
Ext. 594
p.,JVlvJic'*'.3' l. ?t'jc' I M'ill)
BUSINESS OFFICE
JANET EMERSON
Ext. 596 *


tors won't take another
whack at the system's budg-
et? ...
Some in Tallahassee,
including Cannon, have
talked about reforms that
could help courts better han-
dle their caseloads. The cli-
mate for considering -such
reforms would improve if
legislators would take steps
to lower the temperature
between these two separate
but equal branches of govern-
ment.

An editorial from the Orlando,
Sentinel.


TODAY'S LETTERS


Be cautious when
dealing in precious
metals, coins
Editor:
As you watch TV, read the
News-Sun or drive down
U.S. 27 it is difficult to miss
the ads for buying gold. The
reason is very simple, gold
and silver prices have been
at or near record levels
recently, heightening interest
in buying and selling gold
and silver coins.
The precious metals com-
munity has not. seen such
interest since the Hunt broth-
er's passion for gold and sil-
ver some 31 years ago.
Common sense would tell
you to be wary of cold-call
solicitations or mobile
offices, set up in temporary
locations such as motels,
offering instant cash for gold
or silver coins. Be patient,
be informed and don't let
anyone pressure you into
making impulsive decisions.
Let me give you, as a
reader of the News-Sun,
some recommendations. The
reputation and expertise of
your "gold buyer" dealer or
professional numismatists is
important. This person or
firm needs to be a respective
name in the industry with
experience buying or selling
bullion in fluctuating mar-
kets. You should know the
actual cost per ounce of pre-
cious metals. If you are sell-
ing jewelry you need to
know the number of karats;
if you are selling coins you
need to know the percentage
of the coin that is a precious
metal to determine melt
value. You need to be aware
of any additional numismatic
value, based upon the coin's
rarity, demand, condition
and mintage, to a collector
for coins that you might sell.
Established professional
numismatists are available


for appraisals and
you on how best
coins that have nu
value.
As a side note,
throw caution to
when you have ai
ty to purchase "li
tion," colorized o
ed coins or paper
highly promoted
cially from private
foreign countries
cases these "hipp
have low demand
value in the secoi
ket.



Firefighters
job with Mon
Editor:
We want to tha
hard working fire
police officers, fo
sonnel, and other
who fought so ha
trol the brush fire
S- 1.__.-A -, 1__- ,


I can advise concern is saving people and
to sell your not animals, but it was hard
umismatic for me to leave not knowing
if they would be safe.
do not Fortunately, they were all
the wind safe when I did get back
n opportuni- onto the property.
mited edi- The EMS people all made
)r gold plat- sure that I was not having
money, or any health problems.
items espe- I especially want to thank
te mints or the one fireman who made a
. In most point of letting us know that
ed" items our house was saved, even
! and related though we were not allowed
ndary mar- back in yet. Also, special
thanks to Deputy Monica
Gary Lewis Sauls who came by the next
Sebring morning to check to see that
we were all right.
did good Another big thank you to
iday fire Glades Electric for resetting
all the utility poles leading
to our home and getting our
nk all the power back so quickly that
fighters, night.
irestry per- We are all truly blessed to
responders have so many dedicated peo-
ird to con- ple protecting us in
2 that threat- Highlands County.


eneu many iiomes on
Monday afternoon and
evening along Paso Fino and
Northern Boulevard.
We live on Northern next
door to the one house that
was completely destroyed
and we were so fortunate
that our home was spared.
The fire came right up to
within 30 feet of our home
and went around it and
burned more. Our house
was not damaged in any way
and we feel so blessed that
we were watched over by
someone above, who had
help from all the responders
on the ground.
Every one of the officers
and others who were fighting
this disastrous fire were so
dedicated and courteous.
They had to force me to
leave my home even though
I had not been able to get
my clogs into my truck and
to safety. I know their first


Joe Snoll
Lake Placid


Hard work put into
reducing spending
Editor:
I was disappointed by
today's (Feb. 9) letter to the
editor. During my four years
in office I worked very hard
to reduce spending and to be
a good steward of the peo-
ple's money.
During the four years I
served as lieutenant gover-
nor, my office reduced staff
and cut salaries and other
expenses by 33 percent.
When the budget started to
get tight in 2008 we started
driving rather than flying.
According to a Gannett
study in 2009 I used the
state planes less than any
other statewide elected offi-
cial. We drove over 100,000
miles in four years and in


the process saved the tax-
payers thousands of dollars.
For the record, I absolute-
ly did not "ask" that security
be provided to me for the
trip. Security is already pro-
vided to the lieutenant gov-
ernor by law.
I paid for the trip out of
my own pocket, even so, and
I had some very productive
meetings with government
and business leaders in Italy
to promote economic devel-
opment in our state.
As for the claim that the
state spent $1.1 million for
security, that is grossly
inflated. Security is provided
to the governor and lieu-
tenant governor by law. The
one hard working and dedi-
cated FHP trooper assigned
to me earned less than
$100,000 per year and did
not get overtime despite
working many long days.
Jeff Kottkamp
Fort Myers

People should hit
streets of Capitol
Editor:
Our government is asking
our war widows to get mar-
ried so they don't have to
pay them veterans pay, while
supporting millions on mil-
lions of illegals and inviting
more of them that get 100
percent of every thing for
free?!
One more Congressman
(scum bag) resigned today
for sexual misconduct.
Where are the GOP and
Dems getting these scum
bags? And why are we elect-
ing them when some of them
we know have a shaded
past?
It is past time for U.S.A.
people to hit the streets of
the Capitol in protest.
C.F. Neeley
Sebring


The First Lady wants us to
change our eating habits.
She would like us to cut
back on salt, fats, and other
things that are bad for us.
Legislation passed in
December will change
school lunch menus to more
healthier fare. There is talk
of taxes on the foods that are
bad for us.
All this meant that when
the White House's Super
Bowl party menu came out
the First Lady had some
explaining to do.
According to an article
found on www.nationaljour-
nal.com, the President and
his guests dined on things
like deep dish pizza, potato
chips, and buffalo wings. A
New York Times blog "The
Caucus" added cheeseburg-
ers, ice cream, and twice-
baked potatoes to the menu.
When asked about this,
Michelle Obama laughed
and pointed out that she has
always talked about balance
in a diet. She said that she
wanted people to understand
that to eat healthy, a person
didn't have to change every-
thing -just some things.
Well, I admit that I could
be eating more vegetables.
My diet is definitely light in
that particular area. While
there are vegetables I do like
eating (carrots come to
mind) I have to admit I like
chocolate more.
And exercise? One of the
problems of being a writer is
that it involves a lot of sit-
ting. I wish typing counted
as exercise, because then I'm
sure I'd be burning up a
large number of calories.
Alas, it doesn't work that
way.
I'm not a fan of taxing
"bad" foods. While the First
Lady's advice has merit, I'm
uneasy about the government
trying to force us to eat the
way they think is best for us.
Granted, I could be doing a
better job in my dietary
habits. But is it the govern-
ment's job to twist my arm
about it?
Having said that, I don't
think the First Lady was
hypocritical in her Super
Bowl menu. She simply rec-
ognized the fact that some-


Laura's
Look
Laura Ware

times it's fun to blow up the
rules and eat what you like.
She understands reality.
I do like the fact that she
won't let her girls on
Facebook. According to an
AP report, security issues
restrict the girls' Internet
doings. But even if they did-
n't, Michelle Obama doesn't
think the girls, aged 9 and
12, are old enough to be part
of the Facebook community.
Of course, this may mean
the girls will have trouble
understanding their peers. It
seems that acronyms that are
popular in Twitter and tex-
ting are finding their way
into our everyday language.
According to an article on
apnews.myway.com,
acronyms like LOL .(laugh-
ing out loud) and OMG (oh
my God) are now part of our
language. While the use of
acronyms in English isn't
new, the recent transition
from the texted to the talking
fascinates linguists, in spite
of the lack of research in the
area.
Even adults are getting
into the act. Both Sarah
Palin and Anderson Cooper
recently used the acronym
WTF which means what
you think it does. It strikes
me as a sneaky way to cuss.
Before we adults get all
huffy about the youth of
America destroying the lan-
guage, let's remember we
played our own part when
we were young. Anyone my
age remember the word
"groovy?"
Might as well relax about
the silly things our kids are
coming up with. Patience
will bring our revenge.
Someday, they will have
kids of their own. And those
kids will do things that will
shock their parents down to
their shoes.
And all of us can sit back
and LOL about the whole
thing.

Laura Ware is a Sebring resi-
dent. She can he contacted by
e-mail at bookwormlady@
embarqmail.com


TODAY'S EDITORIAL


Other viewpoints


Page 3A


Of eating habits and


online oddness


www.cagleca,toons.comrn "er /'


a I lb-'
II *p


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Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the
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News-Sun has a long history of encouraging public dis-
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Response questionnaires.








Page 4A


Driving challenge

for teens set Feb. 25


Continued from page 2A
Highlands County Sheriff's
Office driving track at the
Sebring Airport.
Students will use their
personal vehicles to famil-
iarize themselves with the
nuances of the vehicle they
operate on a daily basis. The
course is administered by
specially certified law
enforcement officers. Each
student will receive a certifi-
cate of completion, and may
be eligible for a possible


reduction in insurance pre-
miums. Additional classes
will be available throughout
the year.
For more information or
to register, contact then
training coordinator, Deputy
Sheriff Joe Noto, at the
Highlands County Sheriff's
Office at 402-7350. Early
registration is encouraged,
as class size is limited. A
video on the Teen Driver
Challenger is also available
to view at www.fsateendriv-
er.com.


Courtesy photo
At rehearsal for Tanglewood's upcoming production of
Michael Parker's 'The Sensuous Senator,' Theresa
Reynolds, Howard Johnson, Darwin Liverance mand
Marcie Taylor have to get used to 'performing' with four
in a bed. The show will be March 2-4.
Tanglewood presents

'The Sensuous Senator'


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING Tickets are
now on sale for the
Tanglewood Actors Guild
performances of "The
Sensuous Senator" by
Michael Walker.
"The Sensuous Senator"
will be performed at 7 p.m.
each evening March 2-4.
Weeks before a presiden-
tial election, Senator Harry
Douglas, a smooth-talking
candidate who has based
his entire campaign on the
issues of morality and fam-
ily values, arranges for his
wife, Lois, to be away for
the weekend. Once his wife
is on her way, he invites his
voluptuous secretary to


spend the night, but she is
unavailable. He then con-
tacts an escort agency and
arranges an "escort" for the
evening.
Finally, a reporter from
the National Intruder, hav-
ing heard the rumor that the
senator's office staff is
known as "Harry's Harem,"
drops by with her camera to
investigate. Needless to
say, chaos ensues.
Reserved seats are $10.
They are on sale from 9:30-
10 a.m. Monday and from
3-4 p.m. Thursday at the
Tanglewood clubhouse (a
half mile north of
Walmart).


News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
Julio Moralas strikes a pose that makes the ladies applaud.

Strutting their stuff at Visions


Fashion, talent show
lets clients bloom
By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
christopher.tuffiey@newssun.com
SEBRING Friday, Visions Adult Day
Training Center held its second annual
Valentine's Day Fashion Show, which
includes a talent portion,:
The brain child of Visions' Latrelle Morris,
the event allows clients who overcome
physical cli.hllenges d.,l) to strut their
stuff and perform in front of friends and fam-
ily.
"I had a drejm Morris said. "I wanted
them to know the, cin achie .se anything they
put their minds to."
Barbara Cook, the pr.atec pay center's
founder, is proud of Morris, but even more so
of the clients.
"They've been practkinj since just after
Christmas," Cook said. "They each decided
what they would do during the talent show."
The center was packed with an audience
delighted to show its support for the 20
clients who took part.
Each contestant took his or her turn walk-
ing down the rose petal-strewn runway in for-
mal ensembles loaned for the occasion by
Kathy's Consignment Boutique.
Kathy Doherty, the boutique's owner, said
the clients "are a very gracious people, a lot
of fun. I enjoy working with them."
As judges Sally MacDougal, Avon Park
High School teachers Reggie Knighton and
coach Buddy Hunter, and Visions' own Keith
Banning had the difficult task of selecting a


News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
Meet Heather Paeplow and Brian Harrison.
They dazzled the judges at the second annu-
al Visions ADT Valentine Fashi6n Show, and
were named Queen and King of the show.

King and Queen.
After all, everyone had been elegant.
And everyone had shown talent Tony
Bock, Danny Navarro, and Annie McHale
sang; Billy Martin and Henry Broxton read
poetry they'd written; Heather Paeplow
demonstrated judo moves, Kelly Gilmore
played the drums, Brian Harrison did an
impression of Michael Jackson, and Antonio
Bostic pulled a rabbit out of a hat.
As for dancing, these contestants had tap-
ping toes: Jerry Cram, Norman Delpiano,
Todd Gatbercoal, Chad Harding, Erian
Hardwijk, Samantha Martin, Julio Moralas,
Robert Reese, Mickey Toepper, Kristin
Whidden and Carrie Winager.
Everyone, of course, was a winner, but
only Heather Paeplow, selected queen, and
Brian Harrison, selected king, got to wear a
crown.


www.newssun.corn


Teen faces

list of

charges
Continued from page 1A
Lake area where over 20
unlocked vehicles had
had items removed.
During the investiga-
tion, a call came into the
HCSO about an individ-
ual identified as Elks
breaking to a house on
4113 Navarre Ave. in
Sebring and attempting to
assault the residents.
Elk had allegedly
kicked in the door and
threatened the two young
victims with violence and
bodily harm.
Once the residents
called the Sheriff's
department, Elk fled on
foot and was captured
later.
Elk was also linked to
the theft of a Taurus 9mm
from a vehicle in the same
area that occurred on Dec.
10, 2010.
During the investiga-
tion, deputies say they
learned that Elk had bur-
glarized at least 20 vehi-
cles over a period of two
months in the Sun 'N
Lake area.
Since Elk remains a
juvenile, information
about his trial and case
progress will not be avail-
able as public record.

Fruit flies found
in Broward Co.
TALLAHASSEE -
Two Mediterranean fruit
flies have been found dur-
ing routine monitoring in
South Florida.
The Florida
Department of
Agriculture and
Consumer Services
reported Friday that the
flies were found in a resi-
dential area of Pompano
Beach in Broward
County.


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News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


www.newssun.com


GENERAL

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$6.00

CHILDREN 10

& UNDER FREE

ARM BAND RIDE

TO CLOSING

$20.00


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5pm-12 Midnight
5-10ppm
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5-10pm
7pm
7pm, 9pm
6pm, 8pm
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Midway
Independent Midway
Pavilion
Small Animal Barn
Convention Center
Stage
Expo Stage
Exhibit Stage


Reithoffer Snows Arm Band $20
Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
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Poultry & Rabbit Display
Jr. Miss Highlands County 2011 Beauty Pageani
Master Hypnotist Show
Tommy Brandt and Band
The Caboodlestoppers


ST DYFi. 1mIIh' o S t'sIDay


1pm- 12 Midnight
1-lOpm
1-10Opm .
1-lOpm
1-11ppm
4pm
7pm
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5pm. 7pm, 9pm
3pm. 6pm, 8pm
2pm, 6pm. 8pm


. Midway
Independent Midway
Small Animal Barn
Livestock Barn
Pavilion
Small Animal Barn
Convention Center
Expo Pavilion
Stage
Expo Stage.
Exhibit Stage


Senior Citizen Day Admitted for $3.00 wl ID
1-9pm Midway
1-9pm Independent Midway
1-9pm Livestock Barn
1-9pm Small Animal Barn
1-10pm Pavilion
3pm Livestock Pavilion
5pm. 7pm Stage
2pm, 4pm, 6pm Exhibit Stage
3pm. 6pm, 8pm Expo Stage


5-11pm
5-10pm
5-10pm
5-10pm
5-10pm
5-11pm
7pm. 9pm
7pm
6pm
6pm, 8pm
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Midway
Independent Midway
Livestock Barn
Small Animal Barn
Independent Midway
Pavilion
Stage
Expo Pavilion
Livestock Pavilion
Exhibit Stage
Expo Stage


Reithoffer Shows Arm Band $20
Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
Poultry & Rabbit Display
Steer & Commercial Heifer Display
Hospitality Area
Poultry Judging & Showmanship
Rabbit Judging & Showmanship
Miss Highlands County 2011 Beauty Pageant
Master Hypnotist Show
Tommy Brandt and Band
The Caboodlestoppers


Reithoffer Shows Arm Band $20
Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
Swine, Steers & Commercial Heifer Display
Poultry & Rabbit Display
Hospitality Area
Market Swine Show & Showmanship
Master Hypnotist Show
The Caboodlestoppers
The Florida Blue Grass Express


Reithoffer Shows ~ Arm Band $20
Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
Swine. Steers & Commercial Heiler Display
Poultry & Rabbit Display
Chainsaw Carving Show
Hospitality Area
Master Hypnotist Show
Little Miss Highlands County 2011 Beauty Pageant
Rabbit Judging & Showmanship
The Caboodlestoppers
The Florida Blue Grass Express


I' I I


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5-11pm Midway Reilhoffer Shows Arm Band $20
5-1 Opm Independent Midway Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
5-10pm Livestock Barn Swine, Steers & Commercial Heifer Display
5-10pm Small Animal Barn Poultry & Rabbit Display


5-10pm
5-11pm
7pm, 9pm
5pm
6pm
6pm
5:30pm, 8.30pm
6pm. 8pm


5-11pm
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5-11 pm
7pm, 9pm
6pm, 8pm
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5pm, 8pm
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5-11pm
5-10Opm
5-1 0pm
5-10pm
7pm, 9pm
6pm, 8pm
6pm. 8pm
6:30pm


5pm-12 Midnignt
5-10pm
5-10pm
5-1Opm
5-10pm
8-11ppm
7pm, 9pm
6pm, 8 pm
6pm, 8pm


Independent Midway
Pavilion
Stage
Livestock Pavilion
Livestock Pavilion
Highlands Today Stage
Exhibit Stage
Expo Stage


Midway
Independent Midway
Livestock Barn
Small Animal Barn .
Independent Midway
Pavilion
Stage
Exhibit Stage
Expo Stage
Expo Pavilion
Livestock Pavilion


Midway
Independent Midway
Small Animal Barn
Independent Midway
Stage
Exhibit Stage
Expo Stage
Livestock Pavilion


Midway
Independent Midway
Livestock Barn
Small Animal Barn
Independent Midway
Pavilion
Stage
Expo Stage
Exhibit Stage


Chainsaw Carving Show
Hospitality Area
Master Hypnotist Snow
Pee Wee Show
Market Sleer Show & Showmanship
Cindy's Girl Scout Contest
Tne Caboodlestoppers
Avon Park High School Choir


Reithoffer Shows ~ Arm Band $20
Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
Swine, Steers & Commercial Heifer Display
Poultry & Rabbit Display
Chainsaw Carving Show
Hospitality Area
Master Hypnotist Show
The Caboodlestoppers
The Martin Family
Cooking Contest
Commercial Heifer Show & Showmanship


Reithoffer Shows Arm Band $20
Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
Poultry & Rabbit Display
Chainsaw Carving Show
Master Hypnotist Show "
The Caboodlestoppers
Tony Stockton
Jr. Livestock Auction


Reitnoffer Shows ~ Arm Band $20
Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
Swine, Steers & Commercial Heifer Display
Poultry & Rabbit Display
Chainsaw Carving Show
Hospitality Area
Master Hypnotist Show
Groovus
The Caboodlestoppers


1pm-12 Midnight Midway Reithoffer Shows Arm Band $20
1-10pm Independent Midway Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
1-7pm Small Animal Barn Poultry & Rabbit Display
1-10pm Livestock Barn Commercial Heifer Display
1-10pm Independent Midway Chainsaw Carving Show
1-11 pm Pavilion Hospitality Area
5pm, 7pm, 9pm Stage Master Hypnotist Show
2pm, 6pm, 8 pm Exhibit Stage The Caboodlestoppers
2nm 4nmn8pm Expo Stage Groovus


REVISED: 2/1/2011


Page 5A


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News-Sun + Sunday, February 13, 2011


www. newssun.com


Continued from page 2A
Sebring Hills
Association holds
meeting
SEBRING The Sebring
Hills Association will hold
its regular business meeting
at 7:30 p.m. Monday at 200
Lark Ave. A discussion on
the street lighting will take
place. All homeowners of
Sebring Hills are encouraged
to attend.
Officers will be collecting
annual dues for the associa-
tion membership for 2011.
They are $15 for a single, or
$25 for a household.

Gospel singers
perform at
Reflections
AVON PARK Les
Snyder and Sons of The
Father, gospel singers from
West Frankfort, Ill., will be
singing at Reflections on
Silver Lake at 6:30 p.m.
today.
Reflections invites the
public to attend; a love
offering will be taken. Call
452-5037.

Recreation Club
plans Valentine's
Party
SEBRING Valentine's
Party at Sebring Recreation
Club, 333 Pomegranate Ave.,
from 2-4 p.m. today, Feb.
13, from 2-4 p.m. Free
admission. "So Loved" with
Bill and Judy Williams will
provide the music. A love
offering will be received.

Fabulous Four Aces
perform at
Tanglewood
SEBRING Tanglewood
announces today's perform-
ance of "The Fabulous Four
Aces," recording Stars of the
1950s through 1960s. Their
harmony is, as it was so
many years ago, very enjoy-
able to listen to. When peo-
ple hear the name "The Four
Aces," most think of the
American singing quartet,
which was inducted into the
Vocal Group Hall of Fame in
2001. Opening for The Four
Aces is a multi-talented lady,
Mikki Taylor.
Also, in the parking lot
will be an Antique Car Show
from 4-6:45 p.m.
Doors and snack bar opens
at 6 p.m.; show is at 7 p.m.
Tickets are $12 and may be
purchased at the Tanglewood
Activities Office or at the
door on show night.

Legion Auxiliary
celebrates
Valentine's Day
LAKE PLACID The
American Legion Auxiliary
will be celebrating
Valentine's Day with a din-
ner/dance today. Social hour
is 3-4 p.m.; followed by din-
ner at 4 p.m., which includes
one-quarter baked chicken,
baked potato, vegetable and
fruit.
Tickets are $10 until .sold
out.
Music to follow dinner by
Steve and Peggy. If you
want to listen and dance to
music only (no dinner), the
cost is $5. Call 475-0975.


LOIS J. McAULIFF
Lois J. McAuliff, age 83,
passed away on February 10,
2011, peacefully at home.
She was born in Joliet,
Illinois on October 5, 1927 to
George C. and Carrie
(Holmes) Petersen.
She is survived by her lov-
ing spouse of 63 years,
Frank; her daughter,
Kathleen and her husband
John Krause of Chicago, IL;
her son, Frank AcAuliff, Jr.
and his wife, Iris of Texas; 2
grandchildren, Ivan and Max
McAuliff.
Lois resided in Chicago, IL
until 1984 when she and
Frank sailed to their new
home in Key Largo, FL to
retire. In 1994 they moved to
Sebring. Lois was a
Homemaker who enjoyed


Snowbird Luncheon
set for Feb. 21
SEBRING Hancock
County Indiana Snowbird
Luncheon will be at 11 a.m.,
Monday, Feb. 21 at Homer's
Restaurant, 1000 Sebring
Square. Reservations are not
necessary.
Additional information,
call 385-4457 or (317) 443-
1008.

Co-op plans pancake
breakfast
LAKE PLACID -
Support art in your commu-
nity. Eat at the Pancake
Breakfast from 8 a.m. to 1
p.m. today. The breakfast
menu is two sausages served
with all-you-can-eat pan-
cakes and a choice of coffee
or tea. Orange juice is also
served. A veggie-egg casse-
role can also be ordered.
Adults pay $5 and chil-
dren under 12 pay $3.
The Caladium Co-op is a
membership driven, 501c
non-profit organization at
132 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake
Placid. Visit www.caladiu-
marts.org or call 699-5940.

Clermont County
plans reunion
SEBRING The
Clermont County 54th
Annual Reunion will be
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today
at Sebring Civic Center, 355
W. Center Ave.
This will be the fourth
reunion in Sebring.
No alcoholic beverages
allowed. Potluck dinner will
be at noon. Each family
needs to bring their favorite
covered dish and the
Reunion Committee will
provide fried chicken, meat
tray, cheese, bread and
condiments. Place settings,
coffee and iced tea will be
provided also.

Highlands Tea Party
meets Tuesday
SEBRING The
Highlands Tea Party will
meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at
the Quality Inn. A dinner
buffet will be served at 6
p.m. for $8 each.
Roger Kirk will speak on
the Constitution. He is an
expert on the Constitution.
He will give an intense edu-
cation of the Constitution
and all the Amendments.
Guests are encouraged to
bring their children. They
will learn about the
Constitution in a way they
will never be taught in
schools today.

Recreation Club
plans several events
SEBRING The Sebring
Recreation Club, 333
Pomegranate Ave., will host
the following events this
week:
Today "So Loved" with
Bill and Judy Williams. 2-4
p.m.; Valentines Party, 2-4
p.m.
Monday Ladies Social
Club, 1 p.m.; Shuffleboard
Scrambles, 1:15 p.m.
Tuesday County tour-
nament in Avon Park, 9 a.m.
Thursday Hosscollar,
9:30 a.m.
Friday Mini-
Shuffleboard Tournament,


reading, sewing, sailing,
square dancing and golf. She
attended St. John United
Methodist Church and was a
member of the Golf
Hammock Women's Club.
Memorial services will
be held Thursday, February
17, 2011 at 2:00 PM, with
Rev. Ron Degenaro officiat-
ing, at St. John United
Methodist Church, 3214
Grand Prix Drive, (Behind
Wal-Mart), Sebring, FL,
Phone (863) 382-1736.
Friends may contribute to St.
John 'United Methodist
Church in her memory.
Cremation arrangements
entrusted to:
Stephenson-Nelson
Funeral Home
Sebring, Florida
www.stephensonnelsonflh.com


1:15 p.m.
Saturday Ice Cream
Shuffleboard. 1:15 p.m.
Call 385-2966.

Events planned at
lodges, posts
AVON PARK
SThe American Legion Post
69 in Avon Park will have
karaoke by Naomi at 4 p.m.
today. The Auxiliary and
Legion meet at 7 p.m.
Monday. Bingo is set for
1:30 p.m. Tuesday. For
details, call 453-4553.
LAKE PLACID
The Lake Placid Moose
Lodge 2374 will have music
with Wild Bill (call for time)
today. Call 465-0131.

Divorce and Beyond
begins Monday
LAKE PLACID Divorce
and Beyond, a 10-week pro-
gram, will address issues one
faces as a divorced adult. It
will help you mourn your
loss, move beyond the grief
and adjust to your new
lifestyle.
As you build a network of
friends who experience simi-
lar feelings and who accept
you where you are at this
point of your life, you will
become a stronger and hap-
pier person'. The program,
which starts at 7 p.m.
Monday and runs consecui-
tive Mondays through April
18, will be held at St. James
Catholic Church, 3380
Placid View Drive. The cost
will be $15 (stipends avail-
able).

Woman's Club to
hear about
conservation
SEBRING The GFWC
Woman's Club of Sebring
will meet at noon Monday at
4260 Lakeview Drive. The
Conservation Department
will host the event. The co-
chairwomen will be Betty
Podmore and Rusty
Sherman.
Members are asked to
bring a covered dish food
item for the luncheon. Diane
Jacobson, environmental
horticulturist agent, will be
the speaker.
Bring twin size sheets for
the Safe House endeavor.
Members only will be
allowed to bring their flea
market items to the club-
house before the general
meeting. "-
Call 385-7268.

Stepping Into Spring
show is Feb. 26
SEBRING Patriots
Chapter DAR (Daughters of
the American Revolution)
will present its annual lunch-
eon and fashion show,
Stepping Into Spring, at 11
a.m. Saturday, Feb. 26 at
First United Methodist
Church. 126 S. Pine St.
Models are members of
the Patriots Chapter and
their families, with catering
by MaeLee's and fashions by
Sue's, Dress Barn and Bon
Worth.
Proceeds from this event
help fund youth programs of


the DAR. Tickets are $25
and are available from mem-
bers of Patriots Chapter or
by calling 386-4474, 382-
9061, or 465-5667.

Indiana Marshall
County Day set
SEBRING The annual
2011 Hoosier Marshall
County Day will begin with
registration from 10-11 a.m.
and the program will start at
11 a.m. Friday, March 4 at
the usual location in the
Manatee Room in Homer's
Restaurant, one block east of
Walmart in Sebring.
All Marshall County resi-
dents and guests welcome.

Placid Lake
Homeowners meet
Monday
LAKE PLACID A gen-
eral membership meeting of
the Placid Lakes Home and
Property Owners
Association will be held
Monday to include the annu-
al board election from 7-9
p.m. at Town Hall, Placid
Lakes Boulevard.
Persons living in the
Placid Lakes subdivision are
welcome to attend. Only
members who have paid
their dues may vote.
The agenda will be posted
on the association's Web site
.at placidlakesonline.com.

Washington Co.
reunion is Tuesday
SEBRING The annual
Washington County,
Pennsylvania Reunion will
be on Tuesday, Feb. 15 at
Homer's Original
Smorgasbord in Plaza
Square.
The Manatee room will be,
open at 10:30 a.m. for fel-
lowship, with lunch at 11
a.m. The cost for lunch for
seniors is $7 including tax.
Bring a stamped, self-
addressed legal size enve-
lope for the 2012 mailing.
Contact Jean Bannister at
(239) 693-1538.

Model Railroad Club
meets Tuesday
SEBRING All Se.bring
Model Railroad Club meets
at 7:30 p.m. on the third
Tuesday of each month (Feb.
15) at the Church of Christ,
3800 Sebring Parkway,
unless otherwise directed.
Members build and run an
"HO" Gauge model railroad
layout. Rail-buffs interested
in other model railroad
gauges are welcomed.
For information or updates
on meeting locations, call
Gene Archer at 452-0334 or
Curtis Petersen at 382-6967.

Uptown Country
plays for Social
Singles
SEBRING The
Highlands County Social
Singles are sponsoring
monthly dances at The
Sebring Woman's Club on
Lakeview Drive. Uptown
Country will play at 7 p.m.
Tuesday.


John Charles to

perform during

SFCC Matinee Series


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK South
Florida Community
College presents one of the
most versatile entertainers
in the industry today when
John Charles takes the
stage at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 22 in the SFCC
Theatre for the Performing
Arts, Highlands Campus.
Charles has delighted
audiences worldwide with
his unique blend of music
and comedy. By allowing
his audience to become a
part of his show, Charles is
able to create a unique and
exciting experience that is
tailored especially for that
audience; no two shows are
ever alike. He opens his
show with a quick introduc-
tion and a song, then imme-
diately begins to build a
rapport with his audience.
With just his guitar, a
piano, and his incredible
singing voice, he amazes
his audience with his abili-
ty to combine music, come-
dy, improvisation, and
audience interaction.
He has performed in the
United States, Canada, and
Europe for most of his pro-
fessional life, and he has
written, produced, and
hosted the openings of
almost every Walt Disney
Resort in the United States
and Europe. Charles is pop-
ular as a corporate enter-
tainer as well, having per-
formed for most of the for-
tune 500 companies.
including AT&T, IBM,
Kodak, Time Warner, Coca-


Courtesy photo
John Charles will delight
his audience at South
Florida Community
College on Feb. 22 with
his unique blend of music
and comedy.

Cola, and more.
The 2011 Matinee Series
is sponsored by Jean
Moyer, Dr. and Mrs.
Placido M. Roquiz Jr., and
Drs. Abe and Carmelita
Lim.
Tickets range,-from $13
to $18 and may be pur-
chased online 24 hours a
day, seven days a week, at
performances.southflori-
da.edu. Tickets may also be
purchased by calling the
SFCC Box Office at 784-
7178 or by visiting the
SFCC Box Office in the
front of the SFCC Theatre
for the Performing Arts,
600 W. College Drive from
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Monday-Friday.


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Page 6A


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www.newssun.com


North Central Heights is a $9 million project and will have 72 homes.


News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS


Project putting locals to work


Continued from page 1A
Shoeman stated that local Avon Park
residents were to get the first shot at
the new housing when it is completed,
but local businesses got their shot at
the construction.
"This job has been a booh for local
businesses," Shoeman said.
"Our organization has encouraged
that the contractor, which is out of St.
Cloud, use local talent as much as pos-
sible, and they have done that when the
local folks were competitive," Shoeman
explained.
"I would estimate that between 30 to
50 percent of the total money will be
spent locally when this is all done. And
I am guessing that it is closer to 50 per-
cent," Shoeman said.
But, according to Ken Payette, the
project is close to the finishing stage,
and the number is currently higher than
50 percent.


"With all labor and suppliers
involved in the construction of North
Central Heights we are at approximate-
ly 75 percent local participation,"
Payette said in an e-mail on Monday.
"We held a pre-construction meeting
and over 40 local subs and suppliers
attended that meeting," said Shoeman.
"We provided a list of local sub-con-
tractors to the contractor, and they have
taken advantage of that. This project
equals jobs for the local economy,"
Shoeman said.
The 1,200-square-foot homes are
nearly completed, according to
Steelman, and when they are done they
will continue to add to the economy in
Avon Park.
"I know that these are not bringing
the city a lot of tax money, but every
one of the folks that live here will buy
groceries, buy gas, buy insurance and
have their car worked on at some point.


That brings a lot to a community in the
long run," Steelman said.
City Manager Bruce Behrens echoed
Steelman's predictions.
"This is adding-money into Avon
Park. When the houses are occupied,
there will be some coming back to the
city in the way of payments from the
Housing Authority and for fire assess-
ments and utilities, but the big payback
is in the inflow of other money to the
local businesses. Everyone living here
will have to eat," Behrens said.
"And some have criticized the
homes, but they are better than the first
home my wife and I had. These are
spacious in the inside, and each one
includes a washer and dryer hook-up as
well as central air and heat. This is
going to be a nice community. There is
plenty of spacing between the homes,
the rooms are spacious and there will
even be a clubhouse," Behrens said.


Rhoades running for another term l what


Continued from page 2A
ous economic situation," she
said.
"The city runs on ad val-
orem taxes, but property val-
ues have gone down, which
has lowered revenues. The
big question is how to pro-
vide services with those
reduced revenues. We have to
continue to find ways to be
good stewards of tax dol-
lars."
Rhoades is very proud of
how different city councils
have lowered the millage rate
for Sebring residents through
the years.
She showed the News-Sun
a history of those rates.
In 1993 when she joined
the council for the first time,
the millage rate was 8.3. That
was up from a rate of 5.6 in
1986.
The rate remained the
same until 1997 when it was
lowered, and then lowered
again in 1998 to 6.5.
That rate remained the
same until 2007, when again
the council lowered it each of
the next three years.
In 2010, the millage rate
was 5.4, the lowest it has
been in 24 years. "I am so
proud of that," Rhoades said.
She is even prouder of
what the city accomplished
while keeping its tax rate


down. "We enlarged the size
of the city, annexing proper-
ties," she said. "We grew the
city and grew water (distribu-
tion) with fewer taxes. More
people in the system helps
break the costs down. We
spent money but got a good
return in the long run."
She is also proud that in
September of 2010 the city
had $6 million in non-desig-
nated reserve funds.
"We've been very conser-
vative," she said, we do not
commit every (incoming)
penny.
"If we can do this in this
economy, when things pick
up I could see reducing the
tax millage again. That
would be my hope that as
development comes back, we
could lower the millage
again."
In terms of creating ordi-
nances, Rhoades referred to
the recent fence rules discus-
sion. She wouldn't want a
chain link fence herself, she
said, but when citizens
protested the proposed ban
on chain link fences she re-
considered. "Anytime we
think our idea is the only idea
it's dangerous," she said.
As for future challenges,
Rhoades feels the fire assess-
ment fee issue may heat up
again when the minimal fee
charged now, has to be


raised.
Rhoades quickly added
that if the assessment fee was
raised, the ad valorem tax
would be lowered propor-
tionately.
She referred to the grow-
ing cost of fire and police
pensions. "It's a huge con-
cern, nationally too all
pension commitments are a
concern.
"We can't raise taxes, but
we have to be fair to the peo-
ple who have earned what
they have. We have to find a
good middle ground and
restructure things somehow."
Rhoades agrees with every
other municipal official in
the county regarding the way
public parks are funded.
"Recreation facilities are
very important for our resi-
dents," she said. But, as
county residents are the
majority users of city facili-
ties, she feels the county has
to help pay more of the costs.
Rhoades feels her years of
experience are beneficial.
"We work together as a
council," Rhoades said,
referring to her fellow coun-
cil members. "It takes all
five to make a decision. I
never go in with my mind
made up, not until I hear my
colleagues and constituents.
"I'm there for the people. I
like my job."


4H members deliver smiles


Continued from page 1A
"I've been taking care of
him for a couple months now.
I'm going to show him at the
livestock show next week,"
Sowards explained.
The bunny was a hit. Many
of the residents loved holding
the baby rabbit and Sowards
continued to show it through-
out the afternoon.
Vanfleet presented the res-
idents with her hog board.
Vanfleet has also been raising
an animal in order to show it
in the Highlands Livestock
show.
"Right now she is. about
250 pounds, so she's at a
good weight," Vanfleet said.
The residents continued to
ask questions about the hog
and how Vanfleet feels about
showing it at the fair.
The residents and the 4H


News-Sun photo by SAMANTHA GHOLAR
Second year 4H member Julia Vanfleet (12) shows resi-
dents at the Kenilworth Rehab Center her show hog board.
Vanfleet along with her fellow 4H members visited the cen-
ter on Thursday.


members all enjoyed a day of
giving back and entertain-
ment and they each look for-
ward to many more.
Anyone interested in


becoming a member of the
4H organization should con-
tact Kelly Duke at the Bert J.
Harris Jr. Agricultural Center
at 402-6540.


Page 7A


Five removed from

Wauchula commission'


Continued from page 1A
ager as well as perceived
leadership problems with
the city manager, according
to the complaints.
Four of the commission-
ers faced two counts of vio-
lating Florida's Sunshine
Law.
Clarence Bolin faced just
one count because he was
accused of attending one of
the two meetings.
The five had pled no con-
test and each were ordered
to pay $325 for fines and
court costs. Royal was
ordered to pay $500 for the
cost of prosecution, and the
other six commissioners are
required to pay $300 apiece
for the prosecution.
Circuit Court Judge J.
David Langford withheld
adjudication, a formal find-
ing of guilt.


The Governor's press
office was slow in respond-
ing to public records
requests, and calls to
Wauchula City Attorney
Clifford Ables went unan-
swered.
A public records request
to both the city and the gov-
ernor's office for the exact
letter or letters concerning
the removals also went
unanswered by the close of
business on Friday.
Collins stated that only
Ables had a copy of the let-
ter.
It was unclear how the
business of the city is sup-
posed to progress without a
quorum, and spokespersons
for the governor's office
were not able to clarify if a
special election needed to be
held or if the governor
would appoint replace-
ments.


Mother arrested after leaving
baby in car while she went to tan


Associated Press
ST. PETERSBURG -
An officer used a stun gun
on a woman who resisted
arrest after leaving her 7-
month-old daughter in the
car while she went into a
tanning salon.
Police say 19-year-old


Ashley Agerenza first took
the child inside the salon,
but was told she could not
leave the baby in the salon.
while she tanned.
She took the child to the
car, placed her in a car seat
and turned on the engine.
A witness called 911.


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News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


ACCU, Er ffW


www. newssun.corn

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. @2011

AccuWeather.com


Five-Day forecast for Highlands County


TODAY





Sunny and pleasant


High 69/Low 39
Winds: NNE at 4-8 mph.


MONDAY


Sunny and pleasant


High 73/Low 46
Winds: WNW at 4-8 mph.


TUESDAY





Mostly sunny and nice


High 73/Low 50
Winds: NE at 7-14 mph.


Regional forecast

",:" Tallahassee-- ..
-, 65/34 ,
,,, Jacksonville
.--6336,


Avon Park
69/40

Sebring
69/39


Lake Placid
70/36
*
.i- Venus
70/36
I


St. Petersburg
65/45




MiaAii
71/5!




.. ,
Lorida
70/37

Shown is today's
weather. Temperatures
are today's highs and
tonight's lows


Regional summary: Sunny and pleasant today. Clear and chilly tonight.
Sunny and pleasant tomorrow and Tuesday. Wednesday: partly sunny and
pleasant. Thursday: sunny to partly cloudy and beautiful.


WEDNESDAY





Partly sunny and
pleasant

High 76/Low 52
Winds: E at 7-14 mph.


THURSDAY


National Forecast for February 13

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are
highs for the day. Forecast high and low temperatures are given for selected cities.


Mostly sunny and
tLeauilul


High 77
Winds: E at 7


Heat index
F.-.r p m :,.,.
Relative humidity .........
Expected air temperature
Makes it feel like ..........


7/Low 52
7-14 mph. .,San Francisco,
,59146

Los Angeles l
........... 20% 74650'.
e ........ 690
............ 65


Weather History ......
A gale-whipped blizzard on Feb. 13,
1899, dumped up to 3 feet of snow
from Massachusetts to Delaware.
The mercury at Tallahassee, Fla.,
dropped to 2 degrees below zero.


Farm report_ ....
':.u.i' ar -and plei : in ar.
today. Winds north-north-
east 4-8 mph. Expect a full day of
sunshine with average relative
humidity 35% and good drying con-
ditions. Clear and chilly tonight.

Water restrictions
* Even addresses may water on
Thursday and Sunday.
* Odd addresses may water on
Wednesday and Saturday.
* All watering should take place before
10a.m. and after 4 p.m.
AccuWeather UV IndexWm
For today
9 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 3p.m. 5 p.m.
1 5 7 5 1
The higher the UV index number, the greater
the need for eye and skin protection.
0-2, Low; 3-5, Moderate; 6-7, High;
8-10, Very High; 11+ Extreme


Denver
57/29
i


+ +

+ 4 - .. - % #

W 114 D I : f3 '
S 38129 . -...
Chicago
1 .. . ,- 36125
.. ..- 36/25 '. ." "


Kansas Cily.
J828 -


El Paso -

' 6
Houston
\ 68/49'


Washinglon
51W35


- Allanla
62/38 ,
(PLEASANT)
-4-


liH K I,


SMiami
. 71/56


Showers

T-storm

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice


FRONTS
__*__ Cold

S Warm

SStationary


-10s -Os Os 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 8Qa
National summary: A series of weak systems grazing the Northeast will bring snow showers to the Great Lakes
into New England today. Light accumulations in cities and towns along this zone could make roads slippery and
treacherous at times. A rain or snow shower could even sneak southward towards New York City. High pressure will
dominate over the nation's midsection. Warm air will surge northward across the Plains, with temperatures continu-


ing to rebound in the Southeast as wel
Sun and moon
Today Sunrise .... 7:03 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:17 p.m.
Moonrise .. 1:36 p.m.
Moonset .... 2:51 a.m.
Monday Sunrise .... 7:03 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:18 p.m.
Moonrise .. 2:36 p.m.
Moonset .... 3:46 a.m.

Moon _phases
: o' !



Full Last New First
Feb 18 Feb 24 Mar 4 Mar 12


I1.


Almanac


Temperature
(Readings at Archbold Biological Station
in Lake Placid)
High Tuesday .......................... 67
Low Tuesday ......................... 37
High Wednesday ...... ........ 78
Low Wednesday ....... ......... 48
"High Thursday ..................... 81
Low Thursday ....................... 54
Precipitation
Tuesday ........................... 0.00"
Wednesday ..................... 0.00"
Thursday ........................ 0.18"
Month to date ................... 0.. 20"
Year to date ..................... 2.85"
Barometer
Tuesday ........................... 30.17
Wednesday ..................... 29.93


Thursday ......................... 30.07
Tides
(Readings at St. Petersburg)
High ........................... 9:06 p.m .
Low ........................... 4:47 a.m .
H igh ................................. none
Low .................................. none
(Readings at Palm Beach)
High ........................... 4:00 a.m .
Low ........................... 9:49 a.m .
High ........................... 4:02 p.m .
Low ......................... 10:16 p.m .
Lake Levels
Lake Jackson ................. 78.36'
Lake Okeechobee ........... 12.40'
Norm al ........................... 14.51'


U.S. cities


Tomorrow
Hi Lo W
68 46 s
75 56 s
72 48 s
71 39 s
71 51 s
70 40 s
70 59 s
75 55 s
71 46 s
66 46 s
67 49 s
70 38 s
70 52 s
72 50 s


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
67 52 s
76 63 s
75 54 s
70 44 s
73 60 s
66 43 s
71 64 -s
75 62 s
72 51 s
66 47 s
72 51 s
69 38 s
73 54 s
73 61 s


City
Albuquerque
Atlanta
Baltimore
Birmingham
Boston"
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cleveland
Columbus
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Harrisburg ,.


Today
Hi Lo W
57 30 s
62 38 s
50 34 pc
62 39 s
35 31 sft
62 36 s
54 28 pc
36 25 pc
38 31 sf
42 33 pc
66 43 s
57 29 pc
38 29 c
45 30 pc


Tomorrow Tuesday Today
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City HI Lo W
60 34 s 60 33 s Honolulu 79 68 sh
61 37 s 61 40 s Houston 68 49 s
54 28 pc 46 27 s Indianapolis 40 29 pc
62 36 s 63 40 s Jacksonville 63 36 s
42 24 c 32 17 s Kansas City 48 28 s
67 30 pc 58 32 s Lexington 48 35 pc
57 35 s 56 31 s Little Rock 60 35 s
36 21 pc 35 28 pc Los Angeles 74 50 s
39 23 sf 34 27 s Louisville 48 35 pc
45 25 c 42 30. s Memphis 58 37 s
71 49 pc 69 53 c Miami 71 56 s
60 34 s 63 30 s Minneapolis 36 24 pc
39 21 c 33 25 s Nashville $ 37 s
54 27 pc 43 24 s New Orleans 62 44 s


Tomorrow Tuesday Today
HI Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W
81 68 sh 80 69 sh New York City 41 36 c
70 53 s 71 52 pc Norfolk 60 39 s
42 22 pc 42 33 s Oklahoma City 62 34 s
70 40 s 66 43 s Philadelphia 47 34 pc
51 27 s 50 35 sh Phoenix 77 46 s
46 26 pc 47 34 s Pittsburgh 40 34 sn
61 35 s 62 46 pc Portland 28 26 sn
73 51 pc 69 52 pc Raleigh 64 35 s
49 30 pc 50 37 s Rochester 38 31 sn
57 36 s 61 47 pc St. Louis 52 31 s
75 55 s 75 62 s San Francisco 59 46 pc
35 22 pc 36 27 c Seattle 50 40 sh
54 31 pc 57 36 s Tampa 66 45 s
67 48 s 66 49 pc Washington, DC51 35 pc


Tomorrow
Hi Lo W
49 30 pc
63 37 s
61 40 s
52 30 pc
72 50 s
41 26 c
34 15 sn
69 33 pc
39 20 sf
53 30 pc
59 49 r
53 40 r
70 52 s
55 32 pc


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
38 27 s
48 32 s
64 42 pc
43 28 s
77 52 s
36 26 s
25 4 s
57 31 s
31 20 pc
52 39 pc
58 48 r
48 36 r
73 54 s
46 31 s


World cities


City
Acapulco
Berlin
Calgary
Dublin
Edmonton
Freeport
Geneva
Hong Kong
Jerusalem
Kiev


Today
Hi Lo W
88 73 s
35 25 c
38 24 c
45 36 pc
34 17 pc
69 52 s
51 41 c
58 52 sh
51 45 sh
19 8 pc


City
London
Montreal
Nice
Ottawa
Quebec
Rio de Janeiro
Sydney
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


Today
Hi Lo W
48 37 r
27 19 sn
*.1 44 p.-:
16 10 sn
94 78 s
77. I.:'
45 42 sh
34 24 sn


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy,
sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice.


TOTAL Supported by:
qmwr.0 V ^American Heart
U *OM E Association



EALT Learn and Live





"LIFE AFTER STROKE"


A Stroke Support Group






A Support Group for anyone who's had a

stroke or anyone who has a family member

who's had a stroke.

Guest Speaker:

Dr. Bridglale Ramkissoon, M.D. (Neurologist)

Meet with Physical & Occupational

Therapists, Neurologists, Social Workers,

Nurses, Medical Doctors and other

Professionals involved in

Stroke Rehabilitation.






Tuesday, February 15th



3:00 pm to 4:00 pm


at


Total Home Health

126 East Center Avenue

Sebring, FL 33870


lli ,


WH 0 CAN SAY A REFRIGERATE OR

MAG N EIT S AVE D TH E 1 R. L 1 F E?

GLORIA CAN.


"It seemed as if there
were thousands of th em...
so in control, so kind, so
COM oITpassionate...
like angels around me,
and Dr. Wittrum was
dithe head angel!"

L,.h r Gloria Coffev
. . Lunj I 1 1, i .l tiesdav M enber & Survivor


1. unclh (- lub Wednesday meets
r1ont l dy arnd enjoys stimulating
spe.deii. \ Florida Hospital nurse
as p i esenting during Heart
Moi nt I offering information
oiin symptomss of a heart attack,
Sinfoimuing them about die new
Heart & Vascular Center, and
providing a reminder magnet for
the fridge. Early one morning,
Gloria felt the symptoms she had
seen so often on that magnet.
She followed the instructions
to call 9-1-1 and told them she
was having a heart attack.
Fortunately for Gloria, Florida
Hospital performed an angioplasty
and was able to treat her
right there, right then,




Sw w I NH ) h l ; )l(:o ( NrIgi
| \vww.FFHI e~utrlaiitd.ors;


Page 8A


Florida cities
Today
City Hi Lo W
Daytona Beach 63 39 s
Ft. Laud. Bch 71 56 s
-::., .l,e.: 70 45 s
Gainesville 63 35 s
Homestead AFB 70 51 s
Jacksonville 63 36 s
'cvi '.. 68 60 pc
la.,-,, 71 56 -s
Orlando 66 42 s
Pensacola 63 44 s
:Ea,,li 65 41 s
ialiiia, s.-re 65 34 S
Tampa 66 45 s
W. Palm Bch 70 49 s


A


%


I
I








SECTION



U LSINE SS


Inside This Section
Chalk Talk 4B
School Menus 5B
Community Calendar 6B


News-Sun


Pit bulls
Man's best friend,
or worst enemy?
PAGE 7B

Sunday, February 13, 2011


Lake

Placid

Realtors

hand out

awards
Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID On
Feb. 2, the Lake Placid
Board of Realtors held
their annual awards ban-
quet at the Lake Placid
Elk's Lodge 2661. Janelle
Pruitt, 2011 Florida
Realtors District 10 vice
president, was the
keynote speaker. Pruitt
gave an update to the
membership of the 2011
goals of Florida Realtors
and encouraged members
to actively participate in
their Realtor associations
at the local, state and
national levels.
Pruitt also performed
the official Induction
Ceremony of the 2011
Lake Placid Board of
Realtors and the Multiple
Listing Service of Lake
Placid's officers and
directors. 2011 LPBOR
officers are: president.
Rita Youngman; presi-
dent-elect, Anita Zahn;
vice president, Sue Clark;
treasurer, Carol Heausler;
secretary, Desiree
Wiggins; and immediate
past president, Jeanne
Warner. Directors are
Bethany Rojas, Pete
McDevitt, Mary McCoy
and Darrin Mills.
Alternate directors are
Jason Roulette and Iva
See REALTORS, page 2B


ARA Content
There are several things you need to do if you want to create a successful small business.

Turning your hobby into a small


business requires planning


ARA Content
Have you ever dreamed of
getting paid for something
you love to do? Like turning
those cookies that your
friends rave about into a
cookie store? Expanding the
sales of the jewelry that you
make for the local arts and
crafts fair to others? Selling
used golf equipment that
you clean and fix up on
eBay? Or getting paid to
help people install and
maintain their complicated
home electronics'?
Each year, thousands of
Americans take the leap and
start a business, leveraging
their expertise and passion
for a particular interest or
hobby. In fact, more than
600,000 new businesses are
launched every year in the
United States, according to


the U.S. Small Business
Administration.
If you're ready to turn
your hobby into a business,
it's essential, according to
FindLaw.com, the world's
leading online source for
legal information, to do your
research, build a business
plan, tap the expertise of
outside professionals such as
an accountant and attorney,
and keep good records to
avoid the ire of the Internal
Revenue Service.
Through careful research
and planning, you'll discover
what the potential is for your
business idea, and what pit-
falls to avoid that may other-
wise derail you from realiz-
ing your dream.
Here are some tips for
turning your hobby into a
business from FindLaw.com:


Research your idea
The very first step in turn-
ing your hobby into a busi-
ness is to find out who will
buy your product or service,
how much they're willing to
pay for it, how many of
these people there are, and
where they're located. It's
critical to understand your
"topline" the sales poten-
tial for your product or serv-
ice.

Get free help
Trial and error is an essen-
tial part of the entrepreneur-
ial experience. But making
big, costly mistakes that
have the potential of killing
your business is something
to be avoided. Tapping the
Se# SMALL, page 3B


If you've tried to take
out a loan or open a new
credit account recently, you
know that the days of easy
credit are long gone.
Lenders, insurers, landlords
and even some employers
are more diligently scruti-
nizing your credit history to
see if you're a worthwhile
risk.
A low credit score can
cost a small fortune over
the course of a lifetime.
What often happens to peo-
ple with poor, or even fair,
credit scores is:
It's harder to qualify for
a mortgage, you'll need a
bigger down payment and
you'll pay a higher interest
rate, which adds up over
time. Someone with poor
credit might pay an extra
$100,000 in interest over
the life of a typical 30-year,
$300,000 mortgage.
Similarly, someone with
a poor score might pay an
additional $10,500 in inter-
est on a 60-month, $25,000
auto loan.
Credit card interest rates
can be 10 or more percent-
age points higher and credit
limits are typically much
smaller.
Although credit scores
aren't factored into federal
student loan interest rates,
they are with private stu-
dent loans, often resulting
in rates several percentage
points higher.
Here are a few key con-
cepts:
Credit bureaus. Each
major credit bureau -
Equifax


NEWFOR201


NEW FOR 2011

INVENTORY ARRIVING DAILY




OW ELLS

M TRo COMPANY

Since 1931


Personal
Finance
Jason Alderman
(www.equifax.com),
Experian (www.experian.
corn) and TransUnion
(www.transunion.com) -
compiles information from
lenders who've extended
you credit, tracking the
number and types of credit
accounts you use, how long
they've been open and
whether you've paid your
bills on time.
Credit report. Upon
request from you or a
potential lender (and,
increasingly, employers and
landlords), bureaus assem-
ble a report showing your
credit history to date.
Among other things, it con-
tains a summary of open
and closed accounts, out-
standing balances, recent
inquiries and negative items
(late/missed payments,
bankruptcy, tax liens, etc.)
+ Credit scores. When
you apply for new credit,
the lender will ask a credit
bureau to compile a three-
digit credit score, based on
information in your credit
report essentially a snap-
See CREDIT, page 3B


0
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Understanding


credit scores









www.newssun.com


News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


Page 2B


BUSINESS


K !~ Realtors hand out awards


While it can be fun to use social networking sites, it's best for job seekers to be careful
as well.

Be careful of social networking

when looking for work


Metro Services
Perhaps nothing in the last
decade has more revolution-
ized how people interact
than the advent of social net-
working media. Be it
through Facebook or Twitter
or their respective counter-
parts, nowadays more and
more people are using the
Internet to interact with
friends, family and even
strangers.
As convenient as such
means of communication can
be, they can also be risky,
particularly for job seekers.
In a June 2009 survey, online
employment resource
CareerBuilder found that 45
percent of employers report-
ed using social media for
screening job applicants.
Those results came a year
after a similar CareerBuilder
survey of 31,000 employers
found that one-third of appli-
cants considered for jobs
were rejected because of
information discovered via
social media.

Some of the Do's
In many ways, social net-
working sites can help job
seekers as they look for
work.
Do be active. Social
networking sites like
Facebook aren't just for indi-
viduals. In fact, member
groups and even university
alumni groups have their


own Facebook pages. These
groups provide valuable
means for job seekers to be
active, be it with profession-
al groups in their field or
among their fellow alumni,
which can make for a valu-
able networking opportunity.
What's more, prospective
employers who visit an
applicant's page are likely to
be encouraged by their
involvement in local profes-
sional groups.
Do post pertinent infor-
mation. Job seekers can
show their interest in a
desired field in other ways as
well. Post links to stories
about relevant industry top-
ics, just be careful to avoid
comments that appear too
flippant or critical of the
industry or any industry pro-
fessionals.
Do be careful. While
job seekers can use social
networking sites as a means
to display their knowledge of
their desired industry, it's
important to be careful about
how that knowledge is
shared. When posting mes-
sages, post rational, careful-
ly considered thoughts or
opinions.
Some of the Don'ts
Ignoring the don't of
social networking could
greatly reduce an applicant's
ability to land a job.
Don't swear like a sailor.
Many people avoid swearing


in public and it's a good rule
of thumb to consider all
social networking sites, be it
Facebook, LinkedIn or
Twitter, a public place.
Regardless of where the foul
language stems from, it's
best to avoid it entirely on
social networking sites.
Most people would not
swear in a job interview, and
many of today's job inter-
views begin with prospective
employers researching an
applicant online.
Don't share inappropri-
ate photos. Many a famous
person has been caught in
scandals surrounding inap-
propriate photos posted
online. While it's OK to
horse around with friends,
it's best to avoid document-
ing such times online for all
the world, including poten-
tial employers, to see.
Don't get things off
your chest with regards to a
former employer.
Disparaging remarks about a
former employer make for a
very visible red flag with
prospective employers. *
Don't get too personal.
Sharing too much personal
information online is another
way job seekers can reduce
their chances of finding
work. While some informa-
tion, like family photos, is
acceptable, getting overly
personal could scare away
prospective employers.


Getting a replacement


SSA-1099 is easy


Continued from page 1B
Lou Eldon.
2011 MLS officers are:
president Ann Pollard; vice
president, Carol Edwards;
treasurer, Gene Reese; secre-
tary, Melissa Russell; imme-
diate past president, James
Hill. MLS directors are
Susan Compton, Ireland
Sanders, Greg Karlson and
Jeanne Warner.
Service milestone recogni-
tion pins were given to
attending Realtors: 5-year
pins were presented to Julie
Temple, Dennis Rutledge,
Robert "Carl" Purvis, Ralph
Musall, Mary McCoy, Linda
Lee, Pamela Jessiman, Linda
Harrell, Kristina King and
Sharon Dougan; 10-year pins
were presented to Desiree
Wiggins, Monica
Montgomery, Debbie
McCullough, George
Kelleher and Jean Deuth; M.
Lynn Jensen received her 15-
year service pin; Jim Turvey,
Carol Mulloy and Greg
Karlson were presented with
their 20-year pins; Ruth
Cornwell received her 25-
year pin; and Shelagh Byatt
received her 30-year pin.
Selected by popular vote
of her peers, Evelyn Rossi
was awarded the 2010
Congeniality Award. The
Lake Placid Board Member
Achiever award was given to
Carol Heausler. 2010 Hall of
Fame honors were given to
Clarence "CB" Brewer. The
2010 Realtor of the Year
award was presented to
Bethany Rojas. Jeanne
Warner, 2010 Lake Placid
Board of Realtors president,
presented Gene Reese with




Is .ijust

www-n ws iruo m


the Outgoing President's
Award.
With more than $4 million
in closed sales, Top Producer
Sales Awards went to: No. 1
Top Producer, Melisssa
DeBono; No. 2, Susan
Compton; No. 3, Greg
Karlson: No. 4, Sue Clark;
No. 5, C. Sheri Hutchins. In
addition to No. 2 Top
Producer, Susan Compton
won the award for No. 1 Top
Producer, Most Units Sold.
1 Million Producer Club
winners were Anita Zahn,
Stacey White, Andy Tuck,
Brenda Siegle, Tabitha
Kramer, Darrell Kramer,
Sandy Hughes, Linda
Harrell, Eve Fay, Sharon
Dougan and CB Brewer.
2 Million Producer Club
winners were Wes Tanner,
Jerry Sochacki, Debbie
McCullough, Cheryl
Brantley Davis and Hoz
Compton.
3 Million Producer Club
winners were Jeanne Warner,
Marie Claire Hoy, Jean Deuth
and George Cheshier.
4 Million Producer Club
winner was Carol Edwards.


The Lake Placid Board of
Realtors gratefully acknowl-
edges the time and efforts of
the members of the awards
committee, chaired by Carol
Heausler, and affiliate mem-
bers who so generously spon-
sored awards and donated
door prizes. Award sponsors
were Wells & Associates -
2010 Outgoing MLS
President Award; Wauchula
State Bank 2010 Outgoing
LPBOR President Award;
South Ridge Abstract and
Title Hall of Fame Award;
Sheehan & Celaya, P.A. -
Congeniality Award;
Seacoast National Bank -,
Realtor of the Year Award;
Pamela T. Karlson, P.A Top
Producer Awards; Heartland
National Bank Board
Member Achiever Award and'
Program Sponsor. SunTrust
Mortgage, Sunshine
Inspections, Lake Placid
Chamber of Commerce,
Interstate Moving & Storage,
Highlands Independent Bank,
TD Bank NA and Heartland
National Bank donated door
prizes.


Avon Park Pediatrics, RA. .
z & Sebring Pediatrics, LLC
Newborns Children Adolescents
OFFICE HOURS:


AVON PARK: MON. & WED. 8:30AM 7:00PM
TUES., THURS., & FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PM


SEBRING: MON. FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PM
SATURDAY 8:30AM 12:00 NOON SEBRING ONLY


Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., EA.A.P.
Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., EA.A.P.
Anoop Palta, M.D., EA.A.P.
Vishakha Nakhate, M.D., F.A.A.P.


David Kleczek, P.A.C.
Amy Grimes, P.A.C.
Mercy L. Seralde, M.D.
Maria C. Perez, M.D.
Maria B. Asis, M.D., EA.A.P.
Megan Neff, ARNP


SEBRING LAKE PLACID AVON PARK
382-0770 699-1414 453-7337
We accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid


By ESTHER HARRIS
Social Security District Manager
Millions of taxpayers are busy gathering all
the forms and documents they need to file
their federal, state, and local tax returns. If
you receive Social Security benefits, one of
those items may be your SSA-1099 from
Social Security.
Some people who receive Social Security
may have to pay taxes on a portion of their
benefits. If you're one of these individuals, a
Social Security Benefit Statement (Form
SSA-1099) is an important tax document for
you to have.
Social Security mailed the SSA-1099s for
tax year 2010 to all beneficiaries in January.
If you receive Social Security and need a
replacement SSA-1099 for 2010 in order to
file a tax return, you can request it online at
www.socialsecurity.gov/i 1099.
The SSA-1099 shows the total amount of
benefits received in the previous year and is


used to find out if any Social Security bene-
fits are subject to taxation. The federal tax
laws about Social Security benefits provide
that:
Up to 50 percent of Social Security bene-
fits may be subject to federal income tax for
individuals with a combined income between
$25,000 and $34,000, or for couples with a
combined income between $32,000 and
$44,000; and
Up to 85 percent of Social Security bene-
fits may be subject to federal income tax for
individuals with a combined income above
$34,000, or for couples with a combined
income above $44,000. (Note: "Combined
income" means adjusted gross income, plus
nontaxable interest, plus one-half of Social
Security benefits.)
For more information on taxation of Social
Security benefits, visit the IRS website at
www.irs.gov. To request a replacement SSA-
1099, visit www.socialsecurity.gov/i1099.


FE.O. Koch Construction
1417 Swank Avenue Sebring, FL 33870

(863) 385-8649.


COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION
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build your dream home, or do your remodeling.


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This is a campaign against Melanoma. One in 72 people will contract
the disease. You must elect yourself to lead against it. It is a potential
matter of life and death.

Melanoma
*Usually a non-symptomatic growth on the skin with multiple colors and irregular edges.

We can protect you against this silent killer.


We are your skin police.


Call now, elect a proactive preventative skin
team.


American Institute of Dermatology, P.A.


Darrin A. Rotman, M.D.
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Medicare and all major insurances accepted in
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*individual must call for verification of benefits. This is not a guarantee.


Specializing ill the treatment of'
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Email: kochcon@strato.net


State Certified License #CGC1515338








www. newssun.corn


News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


BUSINESS


Royal recognition
W' ,L.


Courtesy photo
Pamela Matheis, administrator at Royal Care of Avon
Park, shows off her appreciation certificate and Edible
Arrangements she received at a surprise event hosted
recently at the facility. Members of the staff showed off
their culinary skills by cooking a number of scrump-
tious dishes. On responding to the recognition given to
her by the staff, Matheis was honored that her staff
thought so highly of her.



Credit scores

require monitoring


Continued from page 1B
shot of your credit profile
at that moment. The lender
uses your credit score to
supplement its own selec-
tion criteria to determine
whether you are a worthy
credit risk.
Five factors are used to
determine your credit score:
payment history (usually
around 35 percent of your
score), amount owed (30
percent), length of credit
history (15 percent), newly
opened credit accounts (10
percent), and types of credit
used (10 percent).
You can order one free
credit report a year from
each bureau. (Order
through the government-
authorized www.annual-
creditreport.com; otherwise
you'll pay a small fee.)
This helps you identify bad
credit behavior and spot
fraudulent activity or errors
before they damage your
credit.
A good strategy is to
rotate ordering a free report
from one bureau every four
months; that way, you'll
keep year-round tabs on
what's being reported about
you. You can also order
individual credit scores for
around $15. Many good
resources share what you
can do to protect or repair
- your credit scores, includ-


ing the Credit Education
center at www.myfico.com,
the Federal Trade
Commission's Credit &
Loans page under
"Consumer Protection" at
wvww.ftc.gov, and What's
My Score, a financial liter-
acy program run by Visa
Inc.. which also features a
free FICO Score Estimator
that can help you approxi-
mate your score
(www.whatsmyscore.org).
Jason Alderman directs Visa's
financial education pro-
grams. To participate in a
free, online Financial
Literacy and Education
Summit on April 4 go to
www.practicai-
moneyskillscom/summit2011.


Small business success requires planning


"2 " "::' "
Aff" .

NP. S


A'

~


Gift certificates available

FOUR\1POINTS
BY SHERATON
(863) 655-6252 ext. 109


I MM#10347


Continued from page 1B
experience of seasoned busi-
ness professionals can help
you avoid such mistakes,
and provide you perspective
in times of great stress. One
piece of advice: find a men-
tor. If you're not comfort-
able finding one yourself,
check out the Small
Business Administration's
SCORE program, a 12,000-
strong, nationwide group of
retired executives who vol-
unteer their expertise to help
small business owners grow
and succeed.

Write a business
plan
Put your ideas on paper to
test their viability and
improve your chances for
success. A business plan is a
very useful tool it gives
you and others, such as your
accountant, banker or attor-
ney, a clear idea of your
goals, the processes you'll
implement to achieve those
goals and how you'll meas-
ure your success.

Have a clear plan
for funding.
Whether you're financing
your efforts out of your own
pocket, or require capital
from others to expand, you
need to know where your
start-up capital will come
from (if you need it),
whether you will be servic-
ing a debt and what
resources you can call upon
in the future. Many entrepre-
neurs start with friends,
family and people in their
community to fund their ini-
tial efforts.

Know how you're
going to bring in
revenue
What you make, after all
of your expenses and taxes
have been paid, is your prof-
it. It's the ultimate measure

Follow the
News-Sun on



www.twitter.com/thenewssun
and



www.facebook.com/newssun


of your business' success.
Before you decide to start a
business, you need to project
whether the revenues (sales
of your product or services)
will exceed your expenses.
This will give you a clear
idea of whether you should
consider turning your hobby
into a business.

Set up your business
structure
Contact an attorney who
specializes in working with
small businesses to get
advice on the proper legal
structure under which you
should incorporate your
business, or first visit
FindLaw.com's Do-It-
Yourself Legal Forms to
learn more about how to
incorporate your business.
Incorporating your business
can help protect your per-
sonal assets from liabilities
like creditors or lawsuits.

Make it real
One of the advantages of
starting a small business is
that you can deduct losses
such as your expenses and
depreciation on assets you
purchase to offset taxable
income. It's best to consult
an accountant who special-


izes in small business to
obtain advice on preventa-
tive measures you can take
to avoid being audited. Some
basic steps to take to clearly
demonstrate you're in busi-
ness, versus treating your
efforts as a hobby, are to
obtain federal and state tax
identification numbers, print
up business cards and letter-
head, maintain a set of books
to record sales and expenses,
set up a separate bank
account for your business
and keep a logbook in your
vehicle to record mileage.

Get the proper
licenses and permits
Depending upon the type
of business you start, you
may need to get a permits)
or occupational license from
your city or state. Many
cities and counties require
every business even sin-
gle-owner, home-based oper-
ations to get a business
license (tax registration cer-
tificate). You also may have
to get a sales tax permit
from your state.

Protect your idea
In the course of pursuing
your hobby, you may create
a new process for doing


something, a product or a
creative brand name. If you
think it has any potential,
run don't walk to an
attorney who specializes in
intellectual property to seek
a trademark or patent on
your idea. Be very cautious
about sharing your idea with
anyone, who, in the future,
could claim that he or she
helped you with developing
that idea and therefore
deserves a cut of your rev-
enues.

Invest in a Web site
If you want people to
know about your new busi-
ness, you must have a Web
site. Most people now imme-
diately turn to the Internet to
find products and services to
meet their needs, as well as
to find information such as
directions and contact infor-
mation. Nearly equally as
important, invest time to set
up a Facebook and LinkedIn
page for your business,
advertise your services
online through Google, and
consider banner ads on other
Web sites.

Create a workspace
What are the space needs
for your new business? Do
you require storage space?
Industrial strength refrigera-
tion? Extra power? Two
sewing machines? A quiet
place to make uninterrupted
phone calls? According to
the Small Business
Administration, more than
half of America's small busi-
nesses are operated from a
home, which offers impor-
tant tax advantages.
However, it's important to
carefully follow IRS rules
and clearly designate space
for your business from per-
sonal, space.
To learn more about how
to start a new business, visit
FindLaw.com.


HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS

WASTE AND ELECTRONICS

WASTE COLLECTION


The following is a
list of commonly
used household
materials which
will be accepted
at the Household
Hazardous Waste
Collection:
* Solvents
* Muriatic Acid
*'Cleaning Supplies
* Brake Fluid
* Hearing Aid
Batteries
* Used Oil
* Rechargeable
Batteries
* Clothing Spot
Cleaner
* All Paints
* Automotive
Cleaners
* White Out/Liquid
Paper
" Paint Remover
* Antifreeze
* Liquid Auto
Polishers
* Wood
Preservatives
* Auto Batteries
* Pool Chemicals
* Carpet Cleaner
* Water Sealers
* Unknown
Chemicals
* Liquid Furniture
Polish
* Paint Thinner
* Carburetor
Cleaners
* De-Greasers


Saturday


March 5, 2011

8:30am

till

2:30pm

Barkley

Street


Driving Directions from Sebring:
Highway 27 South to Skipper Road
Left onto Skipper Road
Left onto Twitty Road
Right onto Barkley Street

For more information,
call

(863) 655-6400


HOUSEHOLDS



ONLY

Small businesses

please contact the

Recycling Dept.

for proper

disposal of

hazardous

materials.

Oil and Batteries

accepted in

unlimited

quantities during

this scheduled

collection and also

during normal

operating hours at

the Recycling

Dept.

7a.m.-3 p.m.


ACCEPTED ELECTRONICS
END OF LIFE ELECTRONICS: Computer, Monitors, Keyboards,
Terminals, Televisions, Stereos, Printers, Fax Machines, VCRs, DVD
Players, Video Cameras, Video Game Consoles, Wireless Devices.


Page 3B


*Cities are competing to attract promis-
ing new businesses; and 'international
studies show that the winners will be
communities that offer an abundance of
arts and culture opportunities."


----- Means Business
*www.heartlandculturalalliance.org


Valentine's Day Special
Two I-Hour Massages for,'.-
$9900
ge is the perfect gift i ir'
"Massa &tve, o.
everyone you love, J


Metro Creative
Meeting with an attorney who specializes in business is a
good idea when starting a new small business.









Page 4B

CHALK TALK


News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


FDOC challenges

local students to

get creative

juices flowing
Special to the News-Sun
BARTOW The Florida Department of
Citrus (FDOC) launched the Creative Juices
Challenge, a contest for children ages 5-11
attending school in Highlands, Hardee and
Polk counties. Students can submit .a poster,
painting, poem, story, song or video featur-
ing oranges and orange juice to win a $500
American Express gift card.
Contest details are available at www.cap-
taincitrus.com. Entries can be submitted
through April 15. One grand prize winner
will receive a $500 American Express Card.
Four runners-up will receive a $200
American Express gift card and 15 semi-
finalists receive a $100 American Express
gift card.
The Creative Juices Challenge is part of a
multi-faceted school program called "The
Adventures of Captain Citrus" for kinder-
garten through fifth grades in Highlands,
Hardee and Polk counties. Teachers receive
educational curriculum to incorporate infor-
mation about citrus into lesson plans and
can schedule a classroom visit from a local
citrus grower. For more 'information, visit
www.captaincitrus.com.



SFCC offers

Workplace Spanish
Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK South Florida
Community College's Corporate and
Continuing Education department is offer-
ing Workplace Spanish from 6-8 p.m.
Monday, March 7-May 30, at the SFCC
Highlands Campus. Participants will learn
key terms and expressions important for
communicating in a workplace environ-
ment.
The cost is $195 and each participant will
receive a manual with Spanish phrases, a
companion audio CD, and a companion
Click It CD-ROM for PC use.
Call Lorrie Key, CCE program coordina-
tor, at 784-7033 or e-mail keyl@southflori-
da.edu To register for this class, call SFCC
Registration at 784-7405.


Studying sprouts

IFI-pM


Courtesy photo
Linda Hay's kindergarten class at Heartland Christian School has
been studying how plants grow in their recent science lessons. Here, Ivy
Guevara, Caleb Hess, Andrew Ayala, Mrs. Hay and Isabel Guerra plant
flower seeds and bean sprouts. They are hoping to see great results come
this spring.


Studying spouts


Courtesy photo
Litisha Pyles' third-grade class at Heartland Christian School recently
studied and worked with volcanoes in science class. Building a miniature
version, students studied the chemical reaction between baking soda and
vinegar and how the mixture will 'spew' out of the volcano. Students
(from left) Alex Lobozzo, Roberto Tagui, Sean Hall, Arianna Bullington
and Brennan Arnold work on their volcano.


'Mathletes' compete in

regional competition


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID A
five-member team from
Lake Placid Christian
School has returned from
Fort Pierce, where they
placed third in the 28th
Annual Regional
Mathcounts Contest spon-
sered by the National
Engineering Society of
America.
Captian Matthew
Thompson finished in fifth
place, Hayden Nielander in
eighth and Rachel Shattler
10th. Ami Bertram and
Brooke Sanders also com-
peted and helped the team
to a second place finish in
the oral competition.
"It makes a big differ-
ence sitting in front of all
the coaches, parents and
media to work a difficult
math problem in less than
45 seconds," Nielander
said.
Lake Placid Christian
-was the highest-ranking
team from Highlands
County.
"I am extremely pleased
with the results. We are one
of the smallest middle
schools competing in


Mathcounts. A lot of these
schools have upwards of
1,800 students," Mathlete
coach Dennis Griffin said.
Matthew Thompson and
Hayden Nielander qualified
to compete in the State
Mathcounts Competition
held on March 25 in
Orlando. One of the awards
will be they are recognized
at halftime of the Orlando
Magic game on March 25.
The mission of the
Mathcounts Foundation is
to inspire excellence, con-
fiedence and curiosity in
the United States Middle
School students through fun
and challenging math pro-
grams. The Mathcounts
foundation provides guid-
ance and resources for this
first-of-its-kind effort to
reach out to urban public
and private school students,
get them excited about
math, raise test scores and
provide them with role
models.
Lake Placid Christian
School will represent this
area, later this month, in the
Florida Math League
Contest, sponsored by the
University of Florida.


Courtesy photo
This group of Lake Placid Christian School students
placed third in the 28th annual Regional Mathcounts
Contest.


Heart of High(and


<^ 'Show Chorus
,Akffiliated with Sw.ect AWlitnes Internationaf

Presents:


GOOD( ) TIME PARPPfPSIUP


AND VARIETY SH-lOW

Saturday, February 26, 2011
1:00 PM (Doors open 12:15 PM)
Union Congregational Church Millennium Sanctuary
106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, Fl, 33825
Tickets: $12.00


At test Q a-tet

B Bling!

81 l I'e, 11 CIe d I cll Cll 'tI ii 111 l\ oII ci




For advance tickets call:
Avon Park: (863) 452-1927
Lake Placid: (863) 699-0743
Sebring: (863) 382-6632
Polk County: (863) 638-1598


r~I -

cM1'


~ .~ [~I I


/23' .~


RESOLUTION 2011-1

A RESOLUTION OF THE CENTRAL FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING
COUNCIL IN SUPPORT OF FEBRUARY 13th THROUGH 19th, 2011,
SHALL BE KNOWN AS "FLORIDA HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
AWARENESS WEEK"

WHEREAS, the Federal Emergency Planning and Community-
Right-to-Know Act was passed by Congress in October, 1986, and the
Florida Hazardous Materials Emergency Response and Community Right-
to Know Act was passed by the Florida Legislature in 1988; and

WHEREAS, the Federal Accidental Release Prevention
Program became effective in July 1999, and the Florida Accidental Release
Prevention and Risk Management Planning Act was passed by the Florida
Legislature in 1998; and

WHEREAS, those laws, implemented by the Federal
Environmental Protection Agency and the Florida State Emergency
Response Commission for Hazardous Materials, protect the safety and
well-being of all Floridians; and

WHEREAS, more than 10,000 businesses and government
facilities in Florida have reported the use of hazardous material, and more
than 2,000 hazardous materials incidents are reported in Florida annually;
and

WHEREAS, the Emergency Planning and Community-Right-
to-Know Act requires businesses and government facilities with certain
quantities of covered substances to develop plans to prevent accidental
releases and have a coordinated emergency response program; and

WHEREAS, right-to-know provisions in the state and federal
law help communities become aware of the substances utilized by local
facilities.

NOW, THEREFORE, LET IT BE RESOLVED by the Central
Florida Regional Planning Council that February 13th 19th, 2011, shall be
known as Florida Hazardous Materials Awareness Week and urges the
general public to recognize the importance of this effort.

DULY PASSED AND ADOPTED THIS 12T` DAY OF JANUARY, 2011

CENTRAL FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL


Pat Huffi Chairman

Si ature of airper/ov


ATTEST: A --
Signaturi


www.newssun.com








www.newssun.com


News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


SCHOOL MENUS


Breakfasts and lunches
being served in the
Highlands County School
District for the upcoming
week of Jan. 14-18 (no
school on Friday) include:

HIGH SCHOOLS
Monday
Breakfast Egg and
Cheese Daybreaker,
Cheerios, Trix cereal,
Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon
Toast Crunch, cheese
filled breadstick, pear fruit
cup, assorted fresh fruit,
assorted juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawber-
ry milk.
Lunch Penne pasta,
meat sauce, garlic bread-
stick, burger, cheeseburg-
er, chicken patty on bun,
Mama Sofia's cheese
pizza, Mama Sofia's pep-
peroni pizza, ham sub
meal, turkey sub meal, dill
stack, Peanut Butter and
Jelly sandwich meal, chef
salad meal, baked french
fries, orange glazed car-
rots, cheddar cheese stick,
tossed salad, applesauce
snacking cake, strawberry
cup, assorted fresh fruit,
assorted juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawber-
ry milk.
Tuesday
Breakfast Chicken
biscuit, Cheerios, Trix
cereal, Frosted Flakes,
Cinnamon Toast Crunch,
cheese filled breadstick,
strawberry cup, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.
Lunch Baked chick-
en, dinner roll, burger,
cheeseburger, chicken
patty on bun, Mama
Sofia's cheese pizza,
Mama Sofia's pepperoni
pizza, ham sub meal,
turkey sub meal, dill stack,
PBJ sandwich meal, chef
salad meal, mashed pota-
toes, chicken gravy, green
beans, carrots and dip,
cocoa clodhoppers, cut
fresh fruit, assorted fresh
fruit, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.
Wednesday
Breakfast Breakfast
pizza, hash brown patty,
Cheerios, Trix cereal,
Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon
Toast Crunch, cheese
filled breadstick, apricot
cup, assorted fresh fruit,
assorted juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawber-
ry milk.
Lunch Turkey enchi-
ladas, salsa, yellow rice,
burger, cheeseburger, hot
and spicy chicken sand-
wich, grilled chicken sand-
wich, Mama Sofia's
cheese pizza, Mama


Sofia's pepperoni pizza,
ham sub meal, turkey sub
meal, dill stack, PBJ sand-
wich meal, chef salad
meal, baked buffalo chips,
carrots and dip, great
northern beans, diced
pears, dried blueberries,
assorted fresh fruit,
assorted juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawber-
ry milk.
Thursday
Breakfast Breakfast
burrito, salsa, hash brown
patty, Cheerios, Trix cere-
al, Frosted Flakes,
Cinnamon Toast Crunch,
cheese filled breadstick,
peach cup, assorted fresh
fruit, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.
Lunch Corn dog,
Mama Sofia's cheese
pizza, Mama Sofia's pep-
peroni pizza, hot and spicy
chicken sandwich, ham
sub meal, PBJ sandwich
meal, chef salad meal,
baked beans, dill stack,
carrots and dip, string
.cheese, assorted juice,
assorted fresh fruit, cocoa
clodhoppers, potato chips,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.

ACADEMY SCHOOLS
Monday
Lunch Penne pasta,
meat sauce, garlic bread-
stick, carrots and dip,
applesauce snacking
cake, strawberry cup,
assorted juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawber-
ry milk.
Tuesday
Lunch Baked chick-
en, dinner roll, mashed
potatoes, green beans,
cocoa clodhoppers,
assorted juice, assorted
fresh fruit, chocolate milk,
white milk, strawberry
milk.
Wednesday
Lunch Turkey enchi-
ladas, salsa, yellow rice,
baked buffalo chips, car-
rots and dip, dried blue-
berries, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.
Thursday
Lunch Corn dog,
baked beans, carrots and
dip, assorted juice, cocoa
clodhoppers, potato chips,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.

MIDDLE SCHOOLS
Monday
Breakfast Egg and
Cheese Daybreaker,
Cheerios, Trix cereal,
Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon
Toast Crunch, cheese
filled breadsticks, pear
fruit cup, assorted fresh


fruit, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk. Breakfast
on the Patio: Sausage bis-
'cuit, assorted juice, choco-
late milk, white milk, straw-
berry milk.
Lunch Penne pasta,
meat sauce, garlic bread-
stick, burger, cheeseburg-
er, chicken patty on bun,
ham sub meal, turkey sub
meal, dill stack, Peanut
Butter and Jelly sandwich
meal, chef salad meal,
orange glazed carrots,
cheddar cheese stick,
tossed salad, applesauce
snacking cake, strawberry
cup, assorted fresh fruit,
assorted juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawber-
ry milk.
Tuesday
Breakfast Chicken
biscuit, Cheerios, Trix
cereal, Frosted Flakes,
Cinnamon Toast Crunch,
cheese filled breadstick,
strawberry cup, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk. Breakfast
on the Patio: Chicken bis-
cuit, assorted juice, choco-
late milk, white milk, straw-
berry milk.
- Lunch Baked chick-
en, dinner roll, burger,
cheeseburger, chicken
patty on bun, ham sub
meal, turkey sub meal, dill
stack, PBJ sandwich meal,,
chef salad meal, mashed
potatoes, chicken gravy,
green beans, carrots and
dip, cocoa clodhoppers,
cut fresh fruit, assorted
fresh fruit, .assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.
Wednesday
Breakfast Breakfast
pizza, Cheerios, Trix cere-
al, Frosted Flakes,
Cinnamon Toast Crunch,
cheese filled breadstick,
apricot cup, assorted fresh
fruit, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk. Breakfast
on the Patio: Breakfast
pizza, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.
Lunch Turkey enchi-
ladas, salsa, yellow rice,
burger, cheeseburger, hot
arid spicy chicken sand-
wich, grilled chicken sand-
wich, ham sub meal,
turkey sub meal, dill stack,
PBJ sandwich meal, chef
salad meal, baked buffalo
chips, carrots and dip,
great northern beans,
diced pears, dried blueber-
ries, assorted fresh fruit,
assorted juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawber-
ry milk.
Thursday
Breakfast Breakfast


Attend the Church of Your Choice!


SIn tional Thoughts
!) Patricia Valentine

St. Luke 5:5-6, "And Simon
S answering said unto him,
irMaster. w\e have toiled all
the night, and have taken
Nothing: nevertheless at thy
word I will let down the net.
And when they had this done. they inclosed a
great multitude of fishes: and their net
brake." In the abo\e scriptures, Peter chose
to obey Jesus and as a result he experienced
a stunning display of divine power. In our
obedience to God and His word it may
sometime require doing some things that
appear to be unreasonable. Our obedience to
God should ne\er be based on whether
something seerns fitting to our \\a\ of
thinking. That is not to sa\ God al\kIas
bypasses common sense, but oftentimes \hat
He requires of us may not appear
reasonable or match our preconcei\ ed ideas.
Disobedience \\ill cause-us to miss out on
what God has in stored for us. NothinW
pleases a parent more than to ha\e their
children walking in obedience. God is e'en
more pleased \\hen His children are \alking
in obedience. Be Blessed!
.. .'


Stephensan-- e(son funera- Home



4001 Sebring Parkway Chris T. Nelson
Sebring, 385-0125 Craig M. Nelson
111 E. Circle St
Avon Park, 453-3101 Darin S. MacNeil
W.W. LUMBER CO.
"We're More Than
Just Lumber"
COMPLETE
Building Supplies



WELLS
DOD8E CHRYSLER
'Established 1931
1600 US 27 South Avon Park

NEWS-SUN

Hfighlanits (Count ', lnn'oiaeo N v.ew eppier Smnce 192
THIS SPACE AVAILABLE
CALL 385-6155, Ext. 502


Wayne Whitmire
Air Conditioning and Electric, Inc. I
Residential Commercial Mobile Homes
"Small Enough to Know You...
Large Enough to Serve You"
500 South, E~ x
11 Lake Avenue


NEWS-'SUN
llighlinds Comou'(,tlonitown Newspaper Since 1927
THIS SPACE AVAILABLE
CALL 385-6155, Ext. 502


Please support the above businesses. They have made this page possible.,


burrito, salsa, hash brown
patty, Cheerios, Trix cere-
al, Frosted Flakes,
Cinnamon Toast Crunch,
cheese filled breadstick,
peach cup, assorted fresh
fruit, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk. Breakfast
on the Patio: Chicken bis-
cuit, assorted juice, choco-
late milk, white milk, straw-
berry milk.
Lunch Corn dog,
cheeseburger, hot and
spicy chicken sandwich,
ham sub meal, dill stack,
chef salad meal, PBJ
sandwich meal, baked
beans, carrots and dip,
string cheese, assorted
juice, assorted fresh fruit,
cocoa clodhoppers, potato
chips, chocolate milk,
white milk, strawberry
milk.

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Monday
Breakfast Egg and
Cheese Daybreaker,
Cheerios, Trix cereal,
Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon
Toast Crunch, cheese
filled breadstick, pear fruit
cup, assorted fresh fruit,
apple juice, grape juice,
orange juice, fruit blend
juice, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.
Breakfast in the
Classroom: Cinnamon
Toast Crisp, string cheese,
pear fruit cup, chocolate
milk.
Lunch Homestyle
pork roast, dinner roll,
Uncrustable Peanut Butter
and Jelly sandwich, turkey
chef salad, mashed pota-
toes, brown gravy, green
beans, apple crisp, very
berry juice bar, apple
juice, grape juice, orange
juice, fruit blend juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.
Tuesday
Breakfast Breakfast
burrito, salsa, hash brown
patty, Cheerios, Trix cere-


al, Frosted Flakes,
Cinnamon Toast Crunch,
cheese filled breadstick,
strawberry cup, assorted
fresh fruit, apple juice,
grape juice, orange juice,
fruit blend juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawber-
ry milk. Breakfast in the
C l a s s r o o m :
Blueberry/sausage pan-
cake, strawberry cup,
chocolate milk,
Uncrustable Peanut Butter
and Jelly sandwich, peach
cup.
Lunch Baked chick-
en, dinner roll,
Uncrustable PBJ sand-
wich, ham chef salad,
scalloped potatoes, corn
cobbettes, rosy apple-
sauce, very berry juice
bar, apple juice, grape
juice, orange juice, fruit
blend juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawber-
ry milk.
Wednesday
Breakfast Chicken
biscuit, Cheerios, Trix
cereal, Frosted Flakes,
Cinnamon Toast Crunch,
cheese filled breadstick,
apricot cup, assorted fresh
fruit, apple juice, grape
juice, orange juice, fruit
blend juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawber-
ry milk. Breakfast in the
Classroom: Uncrustable
PBJ sandwich, peach cup,
chocolate milk,
blueberry/sausage pan-
cake, strawberry cup.
Lunch Beefaroni, gar-
lic breadstick, Uncrustable
PBJ sandwich, turkey chef
salad, orange glazed car-
rots, tossed salad, cocoa
clodhoppers, fresh apple
slices, apple juice, grape
juice, orange juice, fruit
blend juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawber-
ry milk.
Thursday
Breakfast Breakfast
pizza, Cheerios, Trix cere-
al, Frosted Flakes,
Cinnamon Toast Crunch,


cheese filled breadstick,
peach cup, assorted fresh
fruit, apple juice, grape
juice, orange juice, fruit
blend juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawber-
ry milk. Breakfast in the
Classroom: Breakfast frit-
tata, grape juice, choco-
late milk,
blueberry/banana yogurt,
honey bear crackers,
apple juice.
Lunch Uncrustable
PBJ sandwich, turkey chef
salad, corn dog, potato
puffs, carrots and dip,
diced peaches, cinnamon
bears, apple juice, choco-
late milk, white milk, straw-
berry milk.

KINDERGARTEN
LEARNING CENTER
Monday
Lunch Homestyle
pork roast, dinner roll,.
Uncrustable Peanut Butter
and Jelly sandwich,
mashed potatoes, brown
gravy, green beans, apple
crisp, chocolate milk,
white milk, strawberry
milk.
Tuesday
Lunch Baked chick-
en, dinner roll,
Uncrustable PBJ sand-
wich, scalloped potatoes,
corn cobbettes, rosy
applesauce, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawber-
ry milk.
Wednesday
Lunch Beefaroni, gar-
lic breadstick, Uncrustable
PBJ sandwich, orange
glazed carrots, cocoa
clodhoppers, fresh apple
slices, chocolate milk,
white milk, strawberry
milk.
Thursday
Lunch Uncrustable
PBJ sandwich, corn dog,
potato puffs, carrots and
dip, diced peaches,
Goldfish crackers, apple-,
sauce cup, chocolate milk,
white milk, strawberry
milk.


Page 5B


When It Comes To


Orthopedic Surgery


Experience Counts!















Tahir Chaudhri M.D.
Accepting New Patients
3315 Medical Hill Rd
Sebring, Florida
863-314-9308



Over 30 Years Experience

Coney Island Hospital, Brooklyn, NY
Saint Mary's Hospital & Covenant Health Care System
Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn NY
Royal National Orthopedic Hospital,
Stanmore Middlesex England
Edgeware General Hospital London England
Orthopedic Clinic, University of Vienna, Austria

Now Serving Highlands County

.* /' /G /



MEDICAL GROUP


I










News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


The Community Calendar pro-
vides a brief listing of local
clubs and organizations who
meet on a regular basis. It is
the responsibility of the group
to update the News-Sun on
any changes in this listing by
calling 385-6155, ext. 516;
send any changes by e-mail to
editor@newssun.com; or mail
them to News-Sun Community
Calendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring, FL 33870.

SUNDAY
* American Legion Post 25
Lake Placid has lounge hours
from 1-9 p.m. Live music is
from 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 74
open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6
p.m. Members and guests
only. Post is at 528 N. Pine
St., Sebring. Call 471-1448.
* Highlands Shrine Club,
2604 State Road 17 South, at
2-4 p.m. has country music
played by Just Country.
Donation $3 for single, and $5
for couple. Refreshments
available. Everyone welcome.
* Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 lounge is open from 1-7
p.m. Card games start at 1:30
p.m. The lodge is open to
members and their guests.
Call 465-2661.
* Lake Placid Moose has
karaoke in the pavilion.
Horseshoes played at 9:30
a.m. Food available at 4 p.m.
Open to members and quali-
fied guests only.
* Overeaters Anonymous,
meets from 4-5 p.m. in second
floor conference room No. 3 at
Florida Hospital Heartland
Medical Center, 4200 Sun 'N
Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 382-
7731. No dues, fees or weigh-
ins. For details on the organi-
zation, go to www.oa.org.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the
club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring.
Call 655-4007.
* Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 offers NASCAR racing in
the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar
open and kitchen open from 2-
5 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S.
98, Sebring. Call 655-3920.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880 serves hamburgers
from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays
poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post,
1224 County Road 621 East,
Lake Placid. Call 699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 plays euchre at
1:30 p.m. and E&J Karaoke is
from 4:30-7:30 p.m. at the
post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Call 385-8902.

MONDAY
* Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN
WITH ME family group meets
at 10:30 a.m. every Monday at
the Heartland Christian Church
on Alt. 27 in Sebring. The
church is behind Southgate
Shopping Center where Publix
is.
For more information call 385-
5714.
* Alcoholics Anonymous
meeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal
Church, Lakeshore Drive,
Sebring. For more details, call
385-8807.
* Alcoholics Anonymous
One Day At A Time group
meets for a closed discussion
at 9:30 a.m: Monday and
Friday at Covenant
Presbyterian Church, 4500 -
Sun 'N Lakes Blvd., Sebring.
Call 314-0891.
* Alcoholics Anonymous
meeting, 6:30 p.m. at'
Rosewood Center, 517 U.S.
27 South, Lake Placid.
* Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at
St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring.
Call 202-0647..
* American Legion Post 74
Sons of Legion meet at 6
p.m. Executive board meets at
7 p.m. on second Monday at
the post, 528 N. Pine St.,
Sebring. Happy hour from 4-6
p.m. Post open noon-8 p.m.
Call 471-1448.
* AmVets Post 21 meets 6
p.m. second Monday, at the
post, 2029 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring. All members wel-
come.
* AmVets Post 21 plays darts
at 7:30 p.m. for members and
guests. Call 385-0234.


* Avon Park Lakes
Association has shuffleboard
at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m.
The clubhouse is at 2714
Nautilus Drive in Avon Park.
* Boy Scout Troop 482
meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave.,
Lake Placid.
* Bridge Club of Sebring
(American Contract Bridge
Club) plays duplicate games at
12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf
Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118.


* Diabetes Insulin Pump
Support Group meets the
second Monday from 3-4:30
p.m. in the Florida Hospital
Heartland Division Diabetes
Center, 4023 Sun 'N Lake. Call
402-0177 for more information.
* Diabetes Support Group
meets the second and fourth
Monday from 1-2:30 p.m. in
Florida Hospital Conference
Room 3 in Sebring. Call 402-
0177 for guest speaker list.
* Fairmount Mobile Estates
Lunch Bunch meets at noon
second Monday at Homer's
Smorgasbord in Sebring. Call
382-0481.
* Florida Association Home
and Community Education
meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly
on Monday at The Agri-
Center. The group of sewers
and crafters make items for
residents of adult congregate
living facilities. Call Penny
Bucher at 385-0949.
* Grand Prix Cloggers EZ
Intermediate and Intermediate
Clogging class are held at 9
a.m. every Monday at
Reflections on Silver Lake,
Avon Park. Call Julie for fur-
ther information at 386-0434:.
* Harmony Hoedowners
Square Dance Club meets
the second and fourth Monday
at the Sebring Country Estates
Civic Association clubhouse,
3240 Grand Prix Drive (down
the street from Wal-Mart).
Dancing will be held every
month until April 2008. Classes
are being started now in the
Sebring -and Lake Placid area.
For more information, call Sam
Dunn at 382-6792 or visit the
Web site at wwwsamdun.net.
* Heartland Horses &
Handicapped Inc. is offering
pony rides every Monday and
Wednesday from 4:30-6:30
p.m., weather permitting. $5
donation per child. Call 452-
0006 for more information. All
proceeds raised support our
free equine assisted riding pro-
gram for adults and children
with special needs, which
resumes in September.
* Heartland Pops rehearses
at 7 p.m. Monday at Avon
Park High School Band Room,
700 E. Main St., under the
direction of Anthony Jones.
Musicians of all ages are wel-
come. For information, call
314-8877.
* Heartland Riders
Association meets at 6 p.m.
second Monday at the Sebring
Chamber of Commerce
Welcome Center in Village
Plaza (across from Sebring
Gate Station). Call 402-1165.
* Highlands County Concert
Band rehearses 7-9 p.m.
every Monday at Sebring High
School band room. All musi-
cians are welcome. Vic
Anderson, musical director.
Call Bill Varner at 386-0855.
* Highlands County
Homeowners Association
meets the second Monday of
each month at 9 a.m. at the
Sebring Country Estates
Clubhouse at 3240 Grand Prix
Drive in Sebring.
* Highlands County
Parkinson's Support Group
meets at 1 p.m. second
Monday at the Alliance Church
of Sebring, 4451 Sparta
Road, Sebring. Call 453-6589
or 452-2053.
* Highlands County Rotary
Club meets at 6 p.m. at
Charlie's Restaurant,
Commerce Street, Sebring.
* Highlands County Sewing
Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at
the Highlands County Agri-
Civic Center in the 4-H labora-
tory, Sebring. Call 402-6540.
* Highlands Sertoma Club
meets at noon, Takis Family
Restaurant, Sebring.
* Highlands County Senior
Squadron, Civil Air Patrol the
U.S. Air Force Auxiliary meets
the second and fourth Monday
nights at the Sebring Airport
Terminal Building. All are wel-
come. For further information,
call 471-1433 between 4 and 7
p.m.
* Highlands Woodcarvers
Club meets at 6 p.m. second
Monday at Highlands Art
League, 351 W. Center Ave.,
Sebring. For more details, call
Sandy Kohan at 414-1363 or


Norm Pelland at 465-5510.
* Insulin Pump Support
Group meets from 3-4:30 p.m.
the second Monday of every
month in conference Room 3
of Florida Hospital. This group
is open to all insulin pump
wearers, their families and
anyone who is interested in
knowing more about insulin
pumps. Pre-registration is not
required. For information, call
402-0177.


* Lake Placid Art League will
have classes in Drawing and
Painting, conducted by Anne
Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. at the Cultural
Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd.
From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart
will teach Fabric Painting at
the center. For information call
Dan Daszek at 465-7730.
* Lake Placid Elks 2661
opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at
the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2
p.m. Sign up for darts is at
6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m.
It is open to members and
their guests. Call 465-2661.
* Lake Placid Library has
storytime at 10 a.m. for ages
3-5 except during holidays.
* Lake Placid Moose plays
cards at 2 p.m. Open to mem-
bers and qualified guests only.
Lodge closes at 6 p.m.
* Let It Begin With Me
Alanon Group meets from
10:30 a.m. to noon every
Monday at Heartland Christian
Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South,
Sebring. For details about
Alanon, a self-help group for
families and friends of alco-
holics, call 385-5714.
* Loyal Order of Moose,
Highlands County Lodge No.
2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon
Park. Cards start at 4 p.m.
Music outside Tiki Hut at 3
p.m. Lodge phone number
452-0579.
* Narcotics Anonymous
Never Alone Candlelight
meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N.
Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near
the First Congregational
Church. For information call
Heartland area helpline (863)
683-0630. More information
on other meetings and events
at www.naflheartland.org.
* Placid Lakes Bridge Club
meets 12-4:30 p.m. second
and fourth Monday in Placid
Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid
Lakes Blvd. No meetings from
end of May to October. Call
465-4888.
* Rotary Club of Highlands
County meets at 6:15 p.m. at
Beef '0 Brady's, Sebring.
* Sebring Bridge Club has
Bridge, ACBL Duplicate at the
clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf,
Sebring at 12:30 Mondays. For
details or info on lessons, call
385-8118.
* Sebring Elks Lodge 1529
has the lounge open from 12-7
p.m. Smoke-free environment.
For more details, call 471-
3557.
* Sebring Historical Society
open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday-Friday. Located in
back side of Sebring Public
Library building on Lake
Jackson. For information, call
471-2522.
* Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 plays Texas Hold 'em at
7 p.m. the second and fourth
Monday at 11675 U.S. 98,
Sebring. Beef franks and
Italian sausages served from 1
p.m. to closing. Call 655-3920.
* Take Off Pounds Sensibly
FL 632, Sebring meets at
3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall
at the First Baptist Church of
Lake Josephine, Sebring. Call
Judy O'Boyle at 260-0831.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m.,
1224 County Road 621 East,
Lake Placid. For more details,
call 699-5444.
* Woman's Club of Sebring
meets at noon on the second
Monday for lunch, from
October through May, at the
clubhouse, 4260 Lakeview
Drive, Sebring. Call 385-7268.

TUESDAY
* Al-Anon Family Groups
meet for discussion and
Twelve Step study at noon,
Union Congregational Church,
105 N. Forest Ave., Avon Park.
Parking available south of old
church.
* American Legion Placid
Post 25 Lake Placid has shuf-
fleboard and euchre, both at 1
p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m.


to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 74
open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs
served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.
Call 471-1448.
* Avon Park Boy Scout
Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30
p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202
Robert Britt St., Avon Park.
Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to
join. Call 452-2385.
* Avon Park Library has sto-
rytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5
except during holidays.
* Avon Park Lions Club
meets 6:45 p.m., in the Lions
Club, 1218 W. Bell St.
* Brown Bag Book Bunch
book reader's group meets at
noon on the third Tuesday of
the month at Emmanuel
United Church of Christ, 3115
Hope St., Sebring. Read the
selected book, bring your bag
lunch, and join in the lively and
interesting discussions. For
information on each month's
book, call 471-1999.
* Busy Bee Craft Club
meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway
Pines, Sun 'N Lakes
Boulevard, Sebring. Everyone
is welcome. For more details,
call 382-8431.
* Celebrate Recovery meets
every Tuesday night at "The
Rock," Union Congregational
Church, 28 N. Butler Ave.,
Avon Park. A barbecue meal is
served at 6 p.m. for a dona-
tion. At 6:45 p.m., members
meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group
breaks up into small groups for
men and women. The program
is designed for drug and alco-
hol addiction, divorce, death or
illness grief, low or lost self-
esteem or identity due to dys-
functional relationships,
depression/anxiety, or any
other need for healing. For
details, contact Celebrate
Recovery coordinator Pam
Sim by calling 453-3345, ext.
106.
* Fletcher Music Club meets
every Thursday and Tuesday
at Fletcher Music Center in
Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For
more details, call 385-3288.
* Friends of Highlands
Hammock meets at 6:30 p.m.
third Tuesday, Highlands
Hammock State Park, Sebring.
For more details, call 386-
6099.
* Heartland Avian Society
meets every fourth Tuesday,
7:30 p.m., at Huntington
National Bank, 126 Center
Ave., Sebring. For more
details, call 465-9358.
* Heartland Dolittle
Miniature Build meets 7 p.m.,
third Tuesday, St. Johns
Methodist Church social hall,
3214 Grand Prix Drive,
Sebring. Call 382- 3553.
* Heartland Harmonizers
Barbershop Chorus meets
from 7-9:30 p.m. in the
Sebring High School Music
Room, Sebring. All men who
enjoy singing are invited.
Reading music is not required.
Call 471-2294 or 386-5098.
* Heartland Symphony
Orchestra rehearsals from
5:30-7 p.m. Tuesday in the
Green Room in the South
Florida Community College
auditorium building. Bring -
music and instruments. New
members welcome. Call con-
ductor Bryan Johnson at 800-
949-7248, ext. 7231.
* Highlands County
Community Orchestra
rehearses each Tuesday in the
Green Room of the South
Florida Community College
Performing Arts Theater, 5:30-
7:30 p.m. Entrance is at the
rear of the building. String
players especially needed.
Strings call Eugene Longo at
699-1975; winds call Kim
Houser at 453-6049 for more
information.
* Highlands County Quilt
Guild meets on the first and
third Tuesday of each month at
the Women's Club of Sebring,
4260 Lakeview Drive, across
from Veterans' Beach, from 10


a.m. to 2 p.m. For information,
call 471-0694 or e-mail
sbringquilter@embarqmaiZ corn
* Highlands Tea Party has
an educational and informa-
tional meeting at 6:30 p.m. the
first and third Tuesday 'of each
month at the Quality Inn, 6525
U.S. 27 in Sebring. Call 699-
0743 or e-mail thehighland-
steaparty @ yahoo.com.
* Highlands County
Veterans Council meets 7
p.m., third Tuesday in the con-
ference room at the Veterans
Services Office. The meeting
is for the appointed delegate
from each veteran organization
in the county to meet to dis-
cuss current issues regarding
veterans and veterans activi-
ties.
* Hope Hospice grief support
group meets at 11 a.m. at 319
W. Center Ave., Sebring; and
4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle
ALF, across U.S. 27 from
Florida Hospital Lake Placid.
Call 382-0312.
* Lake Haven Homeowners
Association meets the third
Tuesday of the month, 5400
N. Lake Huckleberry Drive,
Sebring. Covered dish dinner
is at 6:30 p.m. and meeting is
at 7:30 p.m. For more details,
call 382-4858.
* Lake Placid Art League
has classes in Parchment
Embossing from 8 a.m. to
noon and 1-4 p.m. at the
Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall
Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant.
For information, call Dan
Daszek at 465-7730.
* Lake Placid Elks 2661
opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at
the lodge. Happy hour is from
2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30
p.m. The lodge is open to
members and their guests.
Call 465-2661.
* Lake Placid Grief Support
(Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30
p.m. every Tuesday at
Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S.
27 North, Lake Placid, with
Charlie Stroup. Refreshments
served. Door prize given. Call
465-0568.
* Lake Placid Jaycees meet
7:30 p.m., first and third
Tuesday, Jaxson's. Board
meetings at 6:30 p.m., second
Tuesday. Call Joe Collins, 655-
5545.
* Lake Placid Moose has an
officers meeting at 7:30 p.m.
the third Tuesday at the lodge.
* Lake Placid Toastmasters
meet the first and third
Tuesday at 6 p.m. at First
Baptist Church, 101 S. Oak
Ave. in Lake Placid. The web
address is
www.toastmasters.org. For
information call Cathy
Schreima at 382-3574 or Linda
Udall at 386-6495.
* Lorida Community Club
meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at
the Lorida Community Center
to plan events.
* Masonic Lodge meets 8
p.m., 106 N. Main St., Lake
Placid.
* Nar-Anon Support Group
for family members or friends
of someone with a drug prob-
lem or addiction. Nar-Anon
helps attain serenity and a
more normal life for those
affected by the addictions of
loved ones, regardless of
whether or not he/she has
stopped using. 6 p.m. every
Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch
of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake
Josephine Drive, Sebring.
* Overeaters Anonymous
meets from 9-10 a.m. every
Tuesday at Avon Park
Seventh-day Adventist Church,
1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues,
fees or weigh-ins. Visit
www.FloridaRidgelntergroup.c
om. Call 382-7731. Visit
www.oa.org for more informa-


tion on OA.
* Placid Lakes Bridge Club
meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
every Tuesday and has blood
pressure screening from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. first and third
Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town
Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd.
Call 465-4888.
* Rotary Club of Sebring
(Noon) meets at noon at the
Sebring Civic Center, near the
library in downtown Sebring.
For information, call 385-3829
or 471-9900.
* Sebring Bridge Club will
have Duplicate Bridge games
every Tuesday evening. If
interested in playing Duplicate
Bridge, call 385-8118.
* Sebring Elks Lodge 1529
plays darts, beginning with
sign in at 6 p.m. Games start
at 6:30 p.m. No experience
necessary. Cost is $2. Smoke-
free environment. For more
details, call 471-3557.
* Sebring Lions Club meets
at noon at Dot's Restaurant,
950 Sebring Square. For infor-
mation call 382-2333.
* Sebring Lodge 249 F&AM
meets 7:30 p.m., 1809 Home
Ave., Sebring.
* Sebring Meals on Wheels
Inc. hosts board of directors
meeting at 1:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday each month at the
Sebring Hills Association
Clubhouse, 200 Lark Ave.,
Sebring. Call Jim Smith at
382-8453.
* Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 serves soft shell tacos 5-
7 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98,
Sebring. Beef franks and
Italian sausages served from 1
p.m. to closing.Euchre is
played at 6:30 p.m. Call 655-
3920.
* Sebring Model Railroad
Club meets at 7:30 p.m. third
Tuesday each month at the
Sebring Parkway Church of
Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway.
Members build and run "HO"
Guage model railroads. All rail
buffs are welcomed. For confir-
mation call Keith Williams at
385-1332.
* Sebring Recreation Club
plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and
table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333
Pomegranate Ave., Sebring.
Call 385-2966 or leave a
name, number and message.
* Sertoma Club meets at 7
a.m. at Dee's Restaurant,
Sebring. Call Scott Albritton at
402-1819.
* "Souper" Book Group
meets the third Tuesday of
each month at noon at
Emmanuel United Church of
Christ to discuss the monthly
book selection and enjoy a
soup, salad and dessert lunch.
All book lovers are welcome.
The church is at 3115 Hope
St., Sebring (1.8 miles west
from corner of Highway 27 and
Hammock Rd.) For informa-
tion about the book of the
month and reservations, call
the church office 471-1999 or
452-2697.
* Take Off Pounds Sensibly
Chapter FL 99 meets from 6-7
p.m. at the Atonement
Lutheran Church, 1744
Lakeview Drive, Sebring.
* Take Off Pounds Sensibly
Chapter FL 618 has weigh in
from 4-430 p.m. at Community
Bible Church, 1400 CR-17A
N., Avon Park. Meeting is at
4:45 p.m. Call 452-1093.
* U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday,
Sebrinrg Jaycees building. Call
471-0393 or 385-2459.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880, plays darts 6:30
p.m., 1224 County Road 621
E., Lake Placid. House
Committee meets at 5:30 p.m.
For more details, call 699-
5444.


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Page 6B


www.newssun.com









www. newssun.com


News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


Pit bulls: Man's best friend or worst enemy?


By SUE MANNING
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Pit
bulls are the most abused,
reviled, abandoned and euth-
anized dogs in the United
States.
More than 500 cities ban
the breed or require steriliza-
tion, muzzles in public or
insurance. Some regulate the
size of fences that keep pit
bulls enclosed, or the weight
of leashes that keep them
restrained.
Even the Army and the
Marines ban pit bulls in base
housing.
In an Associated Press-
Petside.com poll, 53 percent
of American pet owners said
they believed it was safe to
have pit bulls in residential
neighborhoods, but 43 per-
cent said the dogs were too
dangerous.
Of 60 percent who support
breed bans, most put-pit
bulls at the top of the list,
according to the poll con-
ducted by GfK Roper Public
Affairs and Corporate
Communications.
Only one state, Ohio, has
a statewide pit bull law,
requiring owners to confine
them as "vicious dogs" and
carry at least $100,000 in
liability insurance.
Is the breed predisposed to
be dangerous, or is man to
blame? The divide between
advocates and detractors is
wide.
"Dogs are products of
their environment.
Dangerous dogs are not
born, they are created," said
Adam Goldfarb, director of
the pets at risk program for
the Humane Society of the
United States in Washington,
D.C.
More than 250,000 pit
bulls are maimed or killed in
dog fights every year, he
said. Up to 75 percent of
dogs in many shelters are pit
bulls.
"When you hear about a
dog being set on fire or -
attacked by an ax, it usually
involves a pit bull and it's


MCT photo
Some insist that pit bulls make great pets. But more than 500 cities ban the breed or
require sterilization, muzzles or insurance.


not their fault. In some com-
munities, there is a percep-
tion that pit bulls have less
worth than other dogs,"
Goldfarb said.
Colleen Lynn of Austin,
Texas, isn't convinced. She
was jogging in Seattle on
June 17. 2007, when she was
attacked by a pit bull that
knocked her to the ground
and grabbed her arm. The
dog was being walked on a
leash and was pulled away.
but not before Lynn's arm
was broken, she said.
Last year. 33 people were
mauled to death and two-
thirds of the dogs were pit
bulls, Lynn said. California
reported the most fatal maul-
ings with seven.
Under most laws covering
the dogs, pit bulls are
defined as American pit bull


'Dogs are products of their
environment. Dangerous dogs are not
born, they are created.'

ADAM GOLDFARB
Humane Society


terriers, American
Staffordshire terriers,
Staffordshire bull terriers, or
any dog displaying the phys-
ical traits of one of those
three.
Lynn, through her
DogsBite.org, encourages
breed bans. "A ban saves the
most human lives by pre-
venting attacks before they
occur," she said.
Jennifer Walsh of Los
Angeles doesn't consider her
7-year-old pit bull TC a
threat.


"I have a dog a lot of peo-
ple might be really scared of
and think he might be ready
to attack at any moment. But
he's like a little bundle of
love. I can pick him up, I
can roll him over, 1 can do
anything I want to him and
he doesn't care," she said.
A pit bull traditionally
loves people, play and atten-
tion, Goldfarb said. They are
smart and athletic, and own-
ers have to nurture those
qualities, he said. "A misbe-
having dog might be a dog


whose needs are not being
met."
Lynn doesn't believe pit
bulls are born vicious. "We
believe pit bulls are born
dangerous. They are born
with a dangerous tool set.
They can use it or not use
it," she said.
In 2007, pit bulls and dog-
fighting became synonymous
with Michael Vick, an NFL
quarterback who served 18
months in prison over a dog-
fighting operation based on
his property in Surry County,
Va.
Fifteen of the dogs seized
in Vick's case are rehabilitat-
ing at the Best Friends
Animal Society in Kanab,
Utah, far from the basements
where they were chained and
forced to fight. Their recov-
eries have included disease,
injuries and skittishness.
Lynn said Vick's dogs
hadn't been bred for genera-
tions like those in so many
illegal fighting rings. But,
she said, all fighting dogs
should be euthanized
because they are too unsta-
ble.
Despite temperament tests
given by some shelters, Lynn
" said ai dog that has been
trained to fight will always
be a risk to people and their
pets.
Goldfarb disagrees.
"If genetics were as strong
a factor as they're suggest-
ing then every dog fighter
could easily breed lots of
super aggressive dogs. Every
dog in every fighter's litter
would be unmanageably
aggressive and that's just not
the case," he said.
Pit bulls bite, hold and
shake, ripping your skin like
a shark, Lynn said. "They
don't let go. They shake
back and forth," because
that's what owners of fight-
ing dogs want and have bred
into the animals, she said.
There is no science sup-
porting a correlation
between dog breed and bite
style, Goldfarb said.
Across the country, 4.7


million people are bitten by
dogs every year, the
American Veterinary
Medical Association said.
Children and seniors are the
most common victims.
Municipal breed bans
aren't allowed in 10 states,
including California, but
cities or counties can enact
laws short of that. Few peo-
ple object to spay and neuter
legislation but many believe
it should apply to all dogs,
not just pit bulls.
In New York City, where
the vast majority of dogs in
shelters are pit bulls, more
than 260 healthy pure breed
pit bulls or mixes have been
spayed or neutered, vaccinat-
ed" and microchipped since
July. That's when the
American Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals launched Operation.
Pit.
After a 12-year-old boy
was killed by his family's pit
bulls in June 2005, San .
Francisco passed a steriliza-
tion law,
Comparing the five years
before the law went into
effect in January 2006 to the
five years since: "We have
seen approximately 26 per-
cent fewer impounds of pit
bulls and pit bull mixes and
a decrease in euthanasia by
about 40 percent," said
Rebecca Katz, director of the
Department of Animal Care
& Control for the city and
county of San Francisco.
The drop is especially
notable, she said, because
the number of dogs taken in
has not changed due to the
economy. "We consider this
law a measured approach
that has been extremely 'suc-
cessful both in terms of pub-
lic safety and in terms of
animal welfare."

Online:
http://www.dogsbite.org
http://www.humanesociety.org
http://www.aspca.org
http://www.avnma. org
http://www.sfgov2.org


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Sunday, February 13, 2011


cor ships


Romance is tough, even in the
animal kingdom. If males are lucky,
,i a seductive dance or a swish of a tail
will set their girl's heart in motion.
Researched by Lindsay Dubois, Karsten Ivey, Renee Kwok,
Belinda Long-lvey, Kwency Norman, Cindy Jones-Hulfachor
Sun Sentinel/MCT

Scenf o a woman -
Somni .iniakl h.ie a unique way of showing their
allettion. \\iWhcn a leniale porcupine is interested, a '.
male -dhioers her % ith urine for days or weeks
hMotn all. ing the nc\t tep.
The time until a female
shows interest; she will-
make high-pitched. "
sounds and urine markings


Girls, girls, girls
Lions may have a dozen mates to choose from,
although it's usually the female that initiates con-
versation with lots of headrubs or seductive dis-
plays.


.- Number of possible
.. -. females in a pride


ReVersed roles
MN.le seahorses carn their babies to tenrm. True love
i- round jiAte i d, of holding each other's tail
I,.llow ed b\ a courtship dance. After they mate, the
temiale dpoits her eggs into the male's pouch. The
male fertilize and c.ries the eggs for up to 4 weeks.

Length of
courtship dance


She's
While it's tr
their mates,
time. Howe
order to mal


Spreadi3I love


A imlle hippopotamus takes a different approach
to a'.oe .inr t eimile. He sprays urine and waste with .
his tail to attract that special someone. Once he
strikes a lf'eialc's' l.inc, they'll wade into the water
lior the real funl

Normal mating interval for
hippopotamus females -




Alligators ar
to finding a in
more loyal to
,years. Male g







Dance o K li\efime
' I)%- The nmal, Australian Red Back Spider dances on
, ,I a Ik.ni.le', web to impress her. If he tires quickly or
Ile mie'-0c ) up, he's eaten. No wonder male spiders live
1 g.: I [,-i "i' months, while females live up to 3 years.

Lengnh of the courtship
dance of an Australian
Red Back Spider


a maneater
ue that praying mantis females do eat
it doesn't happen 100 percent of the
ver, one type does behead her man in
te properly.


Males that are
eaten by the female
praying mantis





-yAe










e not on the same page when it comes
mate. Recent studies show females are
their man, choosing the same guy for
;ators will mate with many females.


Female alligators that
choose one mate


TIne Irie inil e-mpr',-roi periquir,
pr.ile, .: ti, e q q. aIrd I e, p is l I Wvarm
He d:oesin'I a r .leae, ri;kinq his1
o:.n ,.h1ath


PHILADELPHIA ZOO, SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL
ZOOLOGICAL PARK, PENGUINFACTS NET,
PENGUINS-WORLD COM;
NATIONALGEOGRAPHIC.COM, "BONOBO SEX
AND SOCIETY" BY FRANS B.M DEWAAL,
SERENDIP. BRYN MAWR COLLEGE,
BENEFICIALINSECTS101.COM, UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA U S FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICE,
AMERICAN ALLIGATOR; SAVANNA RIVER
ECOLOGY LABORATORY


Make love, nof war
Bonobos substitute aggression with sex, and lots
of it any time, and with all members. Contact is
usually brief unless the entire group gets excited,
such as when finding a fig tree.


Average length
of sexual contact


SECTION



LIVING


News-Sun


A real amily i


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L'e II1N Illlll |I ''. i ll o-,+ m [he
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hLiii[ h. "r h ,. i









News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


Page 2C


DIVERSIONS


ENGLISH LESSONS WE NEVER LEARNED


ACROSS
1 Bojangles specialty
4 Gets into
8 Plains tribe
13 If all goes well
19 mode
20 CINN-A-STACK seller
21 Unskilled work
22 Combat mission
23 Legal dispute over
personal property?
26trew and golf
27 Map of Hawaii, often
28 Film feline
29'Sports car quality
31 Rod's associate
32, Liquid-Plumr maker
35 Aspiring atty.'s chal-
lenge
36 Generic pooch
39 Oratorical elements?
45 Wyo. neighbor
48 What the fourth little
piggy had
50 Some avant-garde art
51 Playground response
to 111-Down
52 Santa's minor chil-
dren?
58 Cause trouble to
59 Skipped over
60 U.S. currency
61 As one might expect
64 Flight segment
65 Equip with weapons,
old-style
68 "Hamlet," e.g:: Abbr.
69 Settlement negotiat-
ed by one's ancestors?
76 Lugs
77 Smooth move
78 God-fearing
80 Bourbon with a floral
logo
85 Follower of Samson?
86 He overthrew Batista
in 1959
87 James's creator
88 Part of a broken-up
prison term?
92 Online recruiting site
95 Stand up to
96 Bold Ruler, to
Secretariat
97 Reptilian warning
98 Rosy answer in a
seer's crystal ball?


103 Beer holder
105 Detective Wolfe
106 "Tristram Shandy"
author
108 Not Seen the
Sun": Dickinson poem
112 Committed
117 Hurt badly
118 Peacock and rooster
119 Real estate hires
120 Philatelist or numis-
matist?
124 Walk, softly
125 Euripides play in
which the title heroine
never goes to Troy
126 Lamb alias
127 Sgt., for one
128 Fur fortune family
129 Heavenly path
130 Prog. listing
131 a life!"

DOWN
1 Piglike forest dweller
2 How the cheese
stands?
3 So last week
4 Japanese lawmaking
body
5 Sounds of surprise
6 Rocket section with a
heat shield
7 Tell, slangily
8 1998 Masters champi-
on
9 Turn-of-the-century
year
10 1977 Steely Dan
album
11 Cartwright son
12 Genesis shepherd
13 Evaluate
14 Palace of the
Ottoman sultans
15 19th-century literary
sisters
16 Raison d'
17 Is sidelined
18 Hardy heroine
24 Righteous begin.-
ning?
25 Cognac initialism
30 Yule aide
33 Like some surgery
34 More, in adspeak
37 Bony labyrinth


38 Longtime publisher
, Mead and Company
40 Twisted into thread
41 Mount south of
Olympus
42 Series ender
43 Curl up
44 Word with cats or
cow
45 Bad day for Caesar
46 Mouth formation
47 Beelike
49 Put a stop to
53 Time management
figure
54 Ring_
55 Highland families
56 Major addition?
57 Unfailing
62 Mob activities
63 Senioritis?
66 GPS suggestion
67 What Muggles can't
do, in Harry Potter
books


By MARYELLEN UTHLAUT


Solution on page 5B


70 Money-managing
execs
71 Latin being
72 Nacht"
73 Perils at sea
74 Staff additions?
75 They might be left on
the road
79 Ones sitting tight?
80 Feudal estate
81 Interstate H-1 locale
82 Army detachment
83 "Momo" author
Michael
84 Joke ending?
86 Siena sweetie
89 Pair of officers?
90 Medvedev's denial
91 Vegan beverage
93 Meet by chance
94 Builder
99 Undoes
100 Proverbial kettle
critic
101 Builder's material


102 Ford Explorer Sport

104 Top Tatar
107 Dark times, infor-
mally
109 How a noted spider
came?
110 Tennis tie
111 Playground
response to 51-Across
112 Bank deposits?
113 Sponsorship: Var.
114 Part of LAPD: Abbr.
115 Return from the
canyon?
116 One who walks the
walk
118 Subject of an annual
Colorado brewing festi-
val
121 Legal deg.
122 Wreath of welcome
123 "No mortal could _
with Zeus": Homer


Celebrate diversity this Valentine's Day


Every Feb. 14, we celebrate the day
of love, Valentine's Day, by exchanging
gifts or greetings. These valentines often
contain a message of love or affection
for the receiver. Valentine's Day is a
time for remembering one's vows of
love to one another, and it is a day for
those who are desperate to win the
affection of another, often enticing them
with fattening gifts like chocolate.
How do we celebrate love on
Valentine's Day in a diverse multicultur-
al society? Canada and the United States
are the most culturally diverse countries
on Earth. As thousands of people from
virtually every nation and ethnic group
arrive on our shores, our cities have
truly become a multicultural mosaic.
Such diversity can enrich the lives of
those who welcome it, but not everyone
is quick to embrace cultures different
from their own. Many are initially igno-
rant of new traditions, appearances and
religions and communities can quickly
become tainted with stereotypes, racism,
bullying and intolerance.
In celebration of our rich diversity,
add new meaning to this year's


Guest Column
David acCilauren


Valentine's Day in our North American
cities by doing more than exchanging
chocolates and roses.
Love with forgiveness: Intolerance of
other cultures can stem from a bad expe-
rience in the past. Use this Valentine's
Day to reflect on whether you need to
forgive anyone this season. Open your
heart so you may accept new experi-
ences and relationships.
Love with generosity: Why stop at
close friends and family when sharing
Cupid's arrows? Take a look outside
your close-knit circle for someone in
need of a little extra care. Know a lone-
ly neighbor or an isolated senior? Add
special meaning to this year's
Valentine's Day by showering them with
an unexpected dose of cheer.
Love with charity,: Do you know that
North Americans are viewed as the most
generous people in the world?
Generosity does not have to'mean writ-
ing a check to a needy person or a chari-


ty. It can also mean giving of ourselves
and our time to make a positive differ-
ence. Take Valentine's Day a step fur-
ther by volunteering at a food bank or
serving at a soup kitchen.
Love with sympathy: Each night, we
see images of people suffering on the
nightly news. Take their suffering to
heart and let your sympathy inspire you
to action. Show your love for humanity
by actively working to alleviate some-
one else's suffering, whether it's from
poverty, disease or injustice.
Love with foresight: This Valentine's
Day, take a moment to remember that
while we may speak different languages
and enjoy different food, we are all con-
nected by our dependence on the Earth.
Loving your neighbors means caring
enough to protect the land we share.
Make your home greener by only using
products whose production and disposal
do not harm natural resources.

David McLauren, Ph.D., is a diversity spe-
cialist who speaks five languages and helps
companies increase their profits and pro-
ductivity through diversity.


Love without strings attached


When my husband takes
the time to plan a special
day or evening together
where we can have.one on
one time to talk and share
our hopes and dreams, he is
expressing love to me in the
way I best receive it. If he
couples that with flowers, I
am happily wooed.
Valentine's Day reminds
us again about the impor-
tance of expressing love in
ways in which our loved one
will best receive it meaning-
fully. We've all probably
heard of the five love lan-
guages of quality time,
words of affirmation, acts of
kindness, touch and giving.
And when we look to the
Bible for affirmation, we
find that 1 Corinthians 13 is
the place where we learn
how true love behaves.
Have you ever had to
cover your ears because of
the clashing of symbols or
the clanging of a gong over
and over again? If not, can
you imagine it? That is how
our feeble attempts'at kind-
ness and affection come
across when love is not at
the heart ol' it all.


Have
you tried
.to wow
someone
With your
knowl-
edge and
ij ' under-
Pause And standing
of great '
Consider truths
Jan Merop only to
find them
yawning? Perhaps selfish
adoration accompanied the
monologue. Love for the
other wasn't included in the
desire to share thoughts.
For example, when my
husband, Ken, or I learn
something new, we are eager
to find each other and share
what we've learned. Our
hearts are moved to help the
other grasp the great truth
we ourselves have discov-
ered because we love each
other.
What about faith? Isn't a
"display of faith something
that should really grab some-
one's attention? After all, it
will give them hope, won't
it?
Once again, even if I


moved a mountain because
of it, the Bible says I'm
nothing without love. What
else does the Bible say?
1 Corinthians 13: 4-8 in
The Message talks about
love this way:
"Love never gives up.
Love cares more for others
than for self. Love doesn't
want what it doesn't have.
Love doesn't strut, doesn't
have a swelled head, doesn't
force itself on others, isn't
always 'me first,' doesn't fly
off the handle, doesn't keep
score of the sins of others,
doesn't revel when others
grovel, takes pleasure in the
flowering of truth, puts up
with anything, trusts God
always, always looks for the
best, never looks back, but.
keeps going to the end. Love
never dies."
This is how to express
love without any strings
attached. Happy Valentine's
Day. Selah.

Jan Merop of Sebring is a News-
Sun correspondent and an
award-winning writer


Boy seen abusing cat is

in desperate need of help


Dear Abby: A
friend told me
something recently
that was so disturb-
ing I'm having
trouble sleeping.
"Marie" was at a
mini-mall when a
man parked his car H
next to hers and ID
walked into one of
the stores, leaving a boy


J


eaur Abb^


about 8 years old in the back
seat with a cat. Marie saw
the boy abuse and torture the
animal. She said she could
hear the cat howling through
the closed vehicle. When the
man returned to the car, my
friend approached him and
told him what she'd seen.
Abby, the man did not say
one word. He climbed into
his car and drove off. I
haven't been able to get the
image out of my head. That
child learned his behavior
somewhere, and his father
condones it! If Marie hadn't
been so shocked, she would
have scribbled down the
man's license number and
reported the incident to the
police or the SPCA.
Horrified in Wisconsion
Dear Horrified: What
your friend witnessed was a
child in dire need of emo-
tional help, and a parent
with his head in the sand.
Emotionally healthy children
do not abuse animals. For
the father to have ignored
what your friend told him is
very sad. Of most concern to
me is the fact that children
who abuse animals become
increasingly aggressive, and
sometimes go on to abuse
other children. I hope the
father reads my column and
recognizes the fact that this
son desperately needs coun-
seling now!

Dear Abby: I just turned
28. I have a full-time job
and am also pursuing a
career as an actress, which
takes up a lot of my spare
time. I have good friends
and I'm a people person. I'm
attractive, have a good per-
sonality and consider myself
to be intelligent.
I'm pretty good at putting
myself out there. I talk to
guys I see in the grocery
store, in my office building,
anywhere I can. I try to
smile at everyone when I'm
out and about. I ask friends
to set me up, but haven't met
any nice single men who are
interested in dating. Almost
all my close friends are mar-
ried or in long-term relation-
ships. At parties it's usually
a bunch of couples and me. I
feel like the token single
friend.
I have a busy life, and the
theater hasn't exactly been a
great place to meet straight
guys, but where IS a good


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and singles events
to no avail. Why
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I'm starting to lose
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Looking Foir
Love in California
Dear Looking: Please
don't lose hope. But let's
review the venues in which
you have been searching.
I'm struck by the fact that
all of those you mentioned
require you to make a "quick
sale."
With speed dating you
establish that you're both
available and there's a super-
ficial attraction, but not
much else. Bars are the
worst places I can think of to
look for a serious relation-
ship. No one's at their best
after downing a couple of
shots, and the noise level
isn't conducive to meaning-
ful conversation. The
Internet has been known to
bring results, but many peo-
ple of both sexes are
wary because so many users
fudge the facts on dating
sites.
Singles events are better,
but you might have more
luck meeting men if you go
places that nice people go,
where there's less pressure.
How about volunteering
some time in your communi-
ty the library, a hospital,
the police department, a
shelter? I recommend places
like these because they offer
the chance to form relation-
ships with more depth. Even
if you don't find Mr. Right,
you may meet someone who
can introduce you to some-
one eligible.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail
Van Buren, also known as
Jeanne Phillips, and was found-
ed by her mother, Pauline
Phillips. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069..









GNOMEO & JULIET 2D G
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2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15
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(Adam Sandier, Jennifer Anniston)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
THE EAGLE PGI3
(Channing Tatum)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
THE RITE PG13
(Anthony Hopkins)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
THE KING'S SPEECH R
(Geoffrey Rush, Colin Firth)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
NO STRINGS ATTACHED R
(Ashton Kutcher, Natalie Portman)
2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15









www. newssun. com


News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT


Yacoboni is

featured artist at

Caladium Co-op
Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID The Caladium Arts and
Crafts Cooperative is pleased to announce
that Kathy Yacoboni, a floral designer, has
been chosen as the Artist/Crafter for
February.
Yacoboni was born in Fond du Lac, Wis.,
and moved to Lake Placid when she was 9
years old. She enjoyed 30 years of designing
at the Foliage Tower Silks before closing the
store in September 2010. She misses her
many customers and those that just popped in
to say "Hi," but enjoys seeing a lot of them
at the Co-op.
Yacoboni has many hobbies including trav-
eling, sports and games. Her "Bunch of
Grapes" book club is a high point in her life.
but not as glorious as spending time with her
19-month-old granddaughter, Maya. She also
loves grilling out and watching sunsets with
her husband Ty.
Kathy can create custom pieces. Just fill
out the Co-op's Special Order form. Fabric
swatches and pictures can be helpful or she
can do an in home consultation. You may also
provide your own container.
The Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative
is located at 132 E. Interlake Blvd. in Lake


Courtesy photo
Kathy Yacoboni's floral designs are on dis-
play at the Caladium Arts and Crafts,
Cooperative in Lake Placid.

Placid. Call 699-5940 or visit the Web site
www.caladiumarts.org for further informa-,
tion.


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK South
Florida Community
College's Jazz Series pres-
ents a tribute to the trom-
bone greats at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 19 in the
SFCC University Center
Auditorium, Highlands
Campus, when the Bill
Allred Quintet takes the
stage.
In a performance titled "A
Tribute to Kai, J.J. and
More" the quintet plays trib-
ute to Kai Winding, J.J.
Johnson, and other trombone
greats. The quintet is led by
trombonists Bill Allred and
David Steinmeyer, along
with Jeff Phillips on piano,
Charlie Silva on bass, and
Ed Metz Jr. on drums.
Allred is one of the most
sought after trombonists on
the jazz scene today. He
spent numerous years as a
Walt Disney World musician
and an additional 15 years at


Rosie O'Gradys in Orlando.
Steinmeyer is truly a
musician's musician. His
reputation was forged during
his 28 years as a musician in
the United States Air Force.
Pianist Phillips has played
keyboard in seven different
Disney groups, including the
Rhythm Rascals with Bill
Allred and the Hollywood
Hit Men with Bob
Pickwood. He has performed
with many of the nation's
leading jazz artists and
bands ever since.
Metz has become the
drummer of choice for many
jazz performers. A short list
includes such names as the
Woody Herman Orchestra,
Clark Terry, Arturo
Sandoval, Scott Hamilton,
Bill Allred, the Tommy
Dorsey Orchestra, and many
more.
Bassist Silva has devel-
oped into one of the top
working bass players in the


state. He currently works full
time at the Grand Floridian
Hotel at Walt Disney World
but makes room in his sched-
ule to play with the many
jazz groups that call.
The 2011 Jazz Series is
sponsored by John and
Evelyn Mills, Tom and
Nancy Mitchell. The per-
formance sponsors are
Charles and Anne Reynolds.
Tickets range from $21 to
$24 and may be purchased
online 24 hours a day, seven
days a week, at performanc-
es.southflorida.edu.
Tickets may also be pur-
chased by calling the SFCC
Box Office at 784-7178 or
by visiting the SFCC Box
Office in the front of the
SFCC Theatre for the
Performing Arts, 600 W.
College Drive from 11:30
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday-
Friday.


Courtesy photo
About 40 Highlands County artists exhibited original work
in the inaugural opening of the Heartland Cultural
Alliance Art & Music Gallery at the Kenilworth Lodge on
Feb. 5. The gallery will be open to the public and the cur-
rent exhibit will remain in place for the month of
February.

New art/music gallery

opens at Kenilworth


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING Some 40
Highlands County artists
exhibited original work in
the inaugural opening of the
Heartland Cultural Alliance
Art & Music Gallery at the.
Kenilworth Lodge in
Sebring on Feb. 5. The event
drew in excess of 150 people
and several pieces of art
were purchased. The cele-
bration was capped off by
dancing to the driving music
of the Golden Era Big Band.
The event was a fund rais-
er for HCA. The gallery will
be open to the public and the
current exhibit will remain
in place for the month of
February.
The gallery is unique to
the county in its use of spe-
cially designed and built six
walls that are seven-foot


tall, carpeted, and moveable.
The walls turn the
Kenilworth's Cabaret Room
into a museum quality art
gallery.
The HCA, in partnership
with the Kenilworth Lodge,
created this venue to show-
case the quality of local tal-
ent to visitors and residents
of Highlands County. The
gallery will have an opening
event featuring new art and
music every first Saturday
of the month.
For more information
and/or sponsorship opportu-
nities contact Fred Leavitt at
402-8238 or e-mail
info@ heartlandculturalal-
liance.org. For information
on the Heartland Cultural
Alliance visit www.heart-
landculturalalliance.org.


SFCC Matinee Series

presents Jimmy Travis


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK South
Florida Community College
presents one of the most ver-
satile entertainers in the
industry today when Jimmy
Travis takes the stage at 1:30
p.m. Tuesday in the SFCC
Theatre for the Performing
Arts, Highlands Campus.
This multi-talented per-
former has more than 50
national television appear-
ances to his credit and has
taken his hilarious comedy
and upbeat music to' the
main showrooms of Las
Vegas, Tahoe, Reno, and
Branson. He has toured with
some of the biggest names in
show business Grammy
award-winning Wynonna
Judd, rock' n' roll icons the
Righteous Brothers, song
and dance man Gregory
Hines, Barbara Mandrell,
the Smothers Brothers, and
the list goes on.
Travis' special blend of
humor and music have led to
more than 50 national televi-
sion appearances on such
networks as Odyssey, the


Family Channel, TNN, the
Inspirational Network, and
on NBC as part of the Jerry
Lewis Parade of Stars.
More than 150 of his
songs have been recorded
and performed by choirs
both in the United States and
Internationally.
Attempting to describe a
Jimmy Travis show is a lot
like trying to herd cats. He's
funny, creative, sponta-
neous, energetic, and since
he frequently interacts with
the audience, no two shows
are ever Lhe same. Simply
put. Jimmy Travis is unique.
The 2011 Matinee Series
is sponsored by Jean Moyer,
Dr. and Mrs. Placido M.
Roquiz Jr., and Drs. Abe and
Carmelita Lim.
Tickets range from $ 11 to
$16 and may be purchased
online 24 hours-a-day, seven
days-a-week, at performanc-
es.southflorida.edu. Tickets
may also be purchased by
calling the SFCC Box Office
at 784-7178 or by visiting
the SFCC Box Office in the
front of the Theatre.


SFCC Upper Level Gallery showcases new artist


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK Stunning
landscapes and colorful
beaches justly describe the
collection of artwork by
Rose Besch featured in the
South Florida Community
College Theatre for the
Performing Arts, in the
upper level gallery,
Highlands Campus. The art-
work is on display for the
public now through April 15.
The upper level gallery is
designated as a community
artist gallery and showcases
exceptional artists from our
surrounding area.
Besch's collection, fea-
tures her unique style of
using "collage watercolors,"
which incorporates textures
from various papers that she
glues onto her base water-
colors, and then paints again.
When asked what she liked
to focus on during painting,
Besch said, "There are still



Speaker

to discuss

Native

American

medicinal

plants
Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK -
Michelle Williams, Ph.D.,
registered public archaeol-
ogist, will present "Native
American Medicinal
Plants" during the next
meeting of the Kissimmee
Valley Archaeological and
Historical Conservancy
(KVAHC) at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 17 in
Building G, Room 101, at
the South Florida
Community College
Highlands Campus.
Medicinal plants have a
long history of use and are
still the most commonly
used medicine in the world
today. Come and learn
about these medicinal
plants used by Native
Americans.
These plants are also an
interesting and beautiful
addition to landscaping.
Williams is the director
of the Southeast Region of
Florida Public
Archaeology Network
(FPAN) at Florida Atlantic
University.
She has participated in
excavations throughout the
southeastern United States
for the past 20 years, and
her specialty is the use of
plants by prehistoric
Native Americans.
The public is invited at
no cost. For more informa-
tion, call Anne Reynolds at
441-4803.


Courtesy photo
The work of Rose Besch will
be featured in the upper
level gallery of the South
Florida Community College
Theatre for the Performing
Arts through April 15.

places and wide open spaces
that nourish the soul. I grew
up around many beautiful
areas and draw on those awe-
some memories to seek out


and share those experiences
with others. I just want to
make a small statement for
the need to protect and
restore respect for nature's
scenic wonders." Her gallery
exhibition showcases paint-
ings of nature from Florida,
Lake Ontario, and Long
Island Beach.
She continues to expand
her artistic talents by explor-
ing other mixed media.
During her art career, she has
taught all levels and medi-
ums of art, including classes
at SFCC and in Oswego,
N.Y. According to Cathy
Futral, SFCC professor, art
and close friend, "Besch has
inspired my students at
SFCC to creatively explore


the world of art and discover
different mediums such as
her style of using watercolor
collage. She is truly an inspi-
ration." Besch is also a stu-
dio artist at the Highlands
Art League in Sebring and
loves to paint with close
friends.
The upper level gallery is
open to the public before and
after all theatre performanc-
es or by appointment with
the Art Department. Contact
the SFCC Art Department at
784-7195. The SFCC
Museum of Florida Art aind
Culture (MOFAC) is open
from 12:30-4:30 p.m.
Wednesday through Friday
for additional public view-
ings of the gallery.


F


Highlands


Page 3C


SFCC Jazz Series presents


stellar quintet Feb. 19


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I







Page 4C

SENIOR SCENE


News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


A lucky

senior

citizen
Several




kiweeds kset
heard of th field
an experi-



aeronautioncs. Since I am a
associa-
tion pro-
gram to Woody's
help Wisdom
ying for au n good way toac speon
kids get
indoctrinated into the field of
aeronautics. Since I am a
very senior citizen with back-
ground in flying started attend airway
traffic control and was look-
ing for a good way to spend
my oodles of spare time, I
figured that was it.
Answerin one of the
advertisements in Flying
Magazine, I joined the EAA
and started attending their
meetingsit Complex at the local Sebring
Airport (Hendricks Field).
At the last meeting we had
asBeing a guest speak, I spoker Lt.



up and told the colonel tharlt Ies
MacLaughlin, commander of
the 23rd Wing, diDeployed
Unit Complex at the Avone
Park Bombing Range. After a
very informative presentati ook on
the colonel was having a con-
versation wi t the bunch and
mentioned that he was
expecting a change of station
order in the near future.
Being a smart aleck, I spoke
up and told the colonel that I
hoped his transfer from the
ran2e would turn out better
than mine did back in 1942.
He looked at me with a very
surprised and critical look on
his face and asked if I had
been on the base then and
what was my story.
I told him that our group,
20 students who had been
See LUCKY, page 5C


Special day for special dad


Courtesy photo
Dick Noel (seated), long-time resident and business owner in Sebring, recently celebrat-
ed his 80th birthday at the home of one of his son's, Steve, on Lakeview Drive. Family
and friends attended from Colorado, California, Massachusetts, Ohio, Maryland, North
Carolina, Virginia, Georgia and all over Florida. It was a long four-day weekend starting
with dinner at daughter Kim's in Bradenton, grandparents home on Friday and party on
Saturday. 'Bed and breakfasts' were provided by Steve's two homes, camper and two
borrowed motor homes. Steve cooked all day on the grill, ladies kept a buffet supplied,
Kim came with a unique birthday cake. Gifts and cards were in abundance and Cindy
put together a lengthy DVD of Dick's last 80 years with wife Sally and eight children.
The Noel family includes Dick and Sally (seated), Dan (from left, standing), Steve,
Cindy, Greg, Doug Kim and Jeff.


Part 3: How to be a consultant


This article is written for those
who have skills and want to turn
their expertise into entrepreneur-
ship. It is written for those who
have specialized knowledge talents
and ambitions so that "you will
never have, to say your sorry; if
only...; I should have ..."
In the first article in January we
talked about creating your own
job; in the second in February
about the pitfalls. But this article is


Pearl's Pearls
Pear/ Carter


for people who have already been success-
ful in their own endeavors but for reason of
age or downsizing or who just want to be
their own boss find themselves looking for
another career.
There is one caveat ... you have to be
good at what you did that you are offering
advice on. Assuming this is a given how-to
information abounds on the net many with
fees required to access information but as in


the previous article South Florida
Community College's Small
Business Development Center
(David Noel, 784-7378 or david-
noel@usf.edu) is still the best
resource for you to make the tran-
sition and for coaching.
Definition of a consultant: "An
individual who receives any form
of remuneration from another
party in exchange for advice and
expert opinion. Primary research


(interviewing people) and secondary
research (analyzing company records and
all other necessary data and sources) pro-
vide the factual basis for a consultant's
expert opinion. The final result is usually a
written or oral presentation made to the
client. At this time specific recommenda-
tions are offered to remedy the problem sit-
uation."
See PEARL's page 5C


Medicare: General enrollment
and general information


By ESTHER HARRIS
Social Security District
Manager
Need Medicare Part B? If
you're eligible, now is the
time to sign up. The general
enrollment period for
Medicare Part B runs from
through March 31. Before
you make a decision about
general enrollment, let us
fill you in on some general


information.
Medicare is a medical
insurance program for
retired and disabled people.
Some people are covered
only by one type of
Medicare; others opt to pay
extra for more coverage.
Understanding Medicare
can save you money; here
See MEDICARE page 5C


gn


e


C to


f-i" your 'fe .

No matter where you are or what you're doing,
Wi Series is designed to make listening easier,
It's the ideal hearing aid for people who are
active and on the go, enjoy spending relaxing


time at home


or both.


Set it and forget it. A'
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streamer, our set-and-forget wireless transmitter,.
With SurfLink, there's no manual pairing involved,
Once you plug it into your TV or stereo, you're done!
It automatically streams sound directly to your hearing
aids when your in range.
You can transition from one device to another simply by
moving from room to room.
It lets other in the room listen to the TV or stereo at the
volume they prefer.


l~ ~:\/ to


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d"'


SHighlands County's Oldest Established Hearing Aid Office
D1A[,Po 130 S. Commerce Ave.
P3 K II[R Sebring, Florida

RING AID CENTE, INC. 863-385-3497
Mon. Fri. 9am 4pm.
"OuA , Ch A&oke,' Closed Wednesdays


Highlands County
55 Member
Concert Band
Director Vic Anderson
Assoc. Director Bob Williams
PRESENTS

eSeBIG BAND SOUv0

GLNN TO

I ViG Es
V GuIGI OB
9u4L8 Row,
Featuring
Dixieland Sound of the DIXIE CUPS
Special Vocalist BECKY MCINTYRE
Thursday, February 17, 2011 7:30 pm
JSouth Florida Community College
SOUTH FLORIDA Theatre for the Performing Arts
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Donation $6.00 ~ Students $3.00
Tickets Available from Band Members or At the Door
The Highlands County Concert Band is pleased to recognize South
Florida Community College as the sponsor for this performance.


D


e


S


Mo M i A 4aA
wkA2 & nmw


I
MVwfs


--I


www.newssun.com









www. ne wssunr corn


News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


SENIOR SCENE


Lucky senior citizen relives early military days


Continued from page 4C
graduated from gunnery and
bombarder schools and given
ranks of staff sergeants, were
not wanted anywhere else so
they sent us to Avon Park to
help clear jungle for the pro-
posed bombing range. Since
first three grades were per-
mitted by Army regulations'
to live off government hous-
ing, we started agitating the
C.O. to live off the post.
After about three weeks of
our nagging, the C.O. got
tired of hearing us and told us
to go ahead.
We all sped to a telephone
and started our wives on the
way to Avon Park. We found
housing for them by the time
they got here. We were clear-
ing jungle during the day and
spending nights with our
wives.
After about three weeks,
the C.O. informed our group
that we were to be in front of
our barracks ready to travel
the next morning at 8 a.m. He
had pulled strings and got us
all transfers. of all places, to
Sioux Falls, S.D. This was
February and weather here
was up in the 70s and 80s.
Three days later when we
arrived in Sioux Falls, the
temperature was 30 below
zero.
The colonel got a big kick
out of my story and as I
turned to leave, he reached in
his pocket and pulled out his
business card, gave it to me
and invited me to come to see
him at the base and take a trip
around the area and note the
changes.
Two days later I called and
took him up on the invitation.
He told me he was available
at 1300 hours (1 p.m.) the
same day and to come to the
gate of the base and check in.
It wasn't 10 minutes after the
guard made the call to the
colonel's office that he
showed up at the gate, took
me to his office and intro-
duced me to his office staff.
We toured the office com-
plex with a running commen-
tary by the colonel and then
returned to the parking lot
and boarded his car for the
most wonderful two hours
that I have ever spent.
The colonel, for all his
rank and past service, treated
me, a lowly at best first lieu-
tenant of some far distant
service group, as my son.
would treat me on a visit to
his home. To me, he is the
best example of what a com-
mander of men and a servant
of his country should be. He
has been added to my list of
noted people that .1I have been
fortunate enough to meet in
my travels.
After leaving the office
complex, he started a tour of
the facility the Avon Park
Bombing Range. In addition,
the field is the headquarters
of Avon Park Air Force
Range Joint Land Use Study
(JLUS).
The JLUS is studying the
planned land uses in the areas
that surround the range and
the military training needs of
the armed forces, to deter-
mine tth', comn-,,pbiiillt',. The
study i- designed I l" protect
public ..imlh. ,.irety anl wel-
fare while safeguarding the
ability of the armed services
and homeland security agen-
cies to provide needed train-
ing.
Also, there is an ongoing
archaeological study being
conducted under the direction
of Kathy Couturier, cultural
resource manager. I don't
know and I am sure that
many of our readers are
unaware, that there is a fan-
tastic treasure laying under
and above the surface of your
land here in Highlands
County. Many Indian and
possibly even earlier cultures


lay there waiting to be
revealed by Kathy's people.
After a thorough inspec-


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News-Sun on



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tion of the inner works of the
range, the colonel took me to
his personal SUV and started
a tour of the base.
My memory of the place
was very limited since when I
was stationed here our only
duties were standing night
guard on the B-26S that were
stationed at Hendricks Field
(now Sebring Airport). We
would either spend a day
clearing jungle to expand
usable space on the growing
facility or being handed a
Springfield rifle with five
rounds and carted in trucks to
Sebring to guard the planes
through the night. We never
dreamed that the jungle we
were clearing would eventu-
ally evolve into what is now
Avon Park Bombing Range.
The car tour started with a
road trip through the new
buildings -housing the offices
of the various organizations
using the field and then pro-
ceeded to the part that I was
most interested in, the flying
area. As we left the building
area. we first passed what
reminded me of a junk pile of
wrecked planes that I had
seen on a South Pacific
island airfield shortly after
the island had been secured.
an air strip laid out and vic-
tims of enemy fire were mak-
ing emergency landings.
Anything that could not be
repaired in four hours was
consigned to the junk pile. It
was unbelievable.
However, this pile was the
remains of tanks, trucks and
old aircraft that had been
used as targets for the
bombers and ground force
personnel who were training
here. Many had been the yvic-
tims of direct hits by bombs
dropped from high altitudes
and some from ground fired
weapons. I have flown over
the range many times and
observed the scattered bomb
craters left by the falling
objects but this was the first
time I had seen the results of
the hits on the targets. The
accuracy of these bombarders
is amazing. To score a direct
on a target as -small as they
were aiming at is, to my
mind. fantastic.
After the junk yard. we
approached an area where the
proposed targets were pre-
pared for use. For safety
sake. all glass and other
material that could cause per-
sonal damage in the clean-up
process is removed from the
proposed targets. Yes, the


range is cleaned up periodi-
cally and the junk stored for
later disposal.
The spotting towers that
record where the bombs hit
are dispersed at safe posi-
tions around the area and
record the hits electronically.
(Quite 'a difference from
when we used to lay in the
back of a bomber and photo-
graph the hits on a movie
camera hand held and shot
through a hole in the fuselage
of the bomber).
The ground activities also
include the training of police
officers and homeland secu-
rity forces in live round fir-
ing and combat tactics in safe
areas of the base.
There are water treatment
and sewage disposal units
throughout the base. Truly. it
is a little city with its own
fire departments. police and
utility departments.
In addition to all the
ground activities here, there
is also a working airport.
While we were making our
tour, there was an Air Force
C-130 making touch and go
landings on the concrete run-
way and a little later another
C-130 made two separate
trips across the field and
dropped three parachuters. I
imagine these guys were
making their first jumps as
they were not loaded with
any equipment but their
chutes. It brought back a lot
of memories.
It's amazing that all that I
am seeing now started with
our bunch of GIs wielding
machetes and axes and clear-
ing space for what was to
come. Had I had the foresight
to see the current result of1
our puny efforts, I think I
would have put a little more
power in my swing of the ax
and machete.
I can't sign off without a
bit more praise for Colonel
MacLaughlin. He is a native
of the state of Colorado and
their loss was the Air Force's
great gain. He is one of a
kind and a fit officer to com-
mand your Avon Park
Bombing Range!
Yes, I am a very lucky sen-
ior citizen. I got to meet a
great individual, had a per-
sonal tour of an installation
that I helped in its infancy
and had the greatest boost to
my ego that I have ever had.

Woody Jackson is a Sebring resi-
dent who enjoys writing stories of
days gone by.


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Medicare enrollment goes through March 31


Continued from page 4C
are the facts.
There are four parts to Medicare: Parts A,
B, C and D. Part A helps pay for inpatient
hospital care. skilled nursing care. hospice
care, and other services. Part B helps pay
for doctors' fees, outpatient hospital visits,
and other medical services and supplies not
covered by Part A. Part C allows you to
choose to receive all of your health care
services through a provider organization.
These plans, known as Medicare Advantage
Plans. may help lower your costs of receiv-
ing medical services, or ,ou may get extra
benefits for an additional monthly fee. You


must have both Parts A and B to enroll in
Part C. And. Part D is the Medicare
Prescription Drug Program.
Most people first become eligible for
Medicare at age 65, and there is a monthly
premium for Medicare Part B. In 2011. the
standard premium is $115.40. Some high-
income individuals pay more than the stan-
dard premium. Your Part B premium also
can be higher if you do not enroll during
your initial enrollment period, or when you
first become eligible.
There are exceptions. For more about
Medicare. visit www.medicare.gov or
www.socialsecurity.go i/pubs/10043.


Pearl's advice on how to be a consultant


Continued from page 4C
Simply put: An independ-
ent contractor offering skills
expertise and knowledge to
solve other peoples business
problems for a fee,.
Much of business learn-
ing ... or any other field ...
is "unlearning" doing away
with old methods and obso-
lete information which we
all store. The pain is not so
much in assisting a client to
accept the new ideas but in
coming to terms with letting
go of the old preconceptions
and misconceptions. This
requires tact and your up to
date information in your
field. This last part is essen-
tial. You can't ride on your
old reputation and success it
has to be the now whether it-
be technology academics or
medicine or child care etc.
In the preface to "Adult
Psychology" by Ledord
Bischof, he says. "the in for-
mation explosion is so vast
and rapidly expanding that
one person will be totally
unable to assimilate or even
collate but a portion of it."
The reference is from 1977.
Consider the advance since
then. This heralds lthe era of
the specialist i.e. the con-
sultant ... a specialist who


has the current know-how.
Besides having the neces-
sary expertise it is very
much a people oriented pro-
fession and as such you
need a personality that can
express empathy ... a term
not often used in a business
setting. People who will
respond to you are in need
of help in their businesses
and resort to a consultant to
correct their problems.
You may have the expert-
ise in.your field but there is
another skill you must have
to be a consultant the ability
to write a contract set up a
fee structure. You must be
able to write a proposal out-
lining exactly what you will
do for the client what your
fee will be the time frame
for delivering the informa-
tion. You may in fact need a
consultant for this portion if
you do not have that skill.
When you have
researched the advisability
of your choice then the work
of getting clients is the same
as in any field of practice
building. Exposure. Every
week there is another lec-
ture by a doctor in the field
of ophthalmology on how to
take care of your eyes or a
lawyer on pitfalls of a will


or on the benefits of chiro-
practics etc. This provides
the opportunity for exposure
before prospective clients.
Usually good prospects can
be found in two categories
cross-disciplinary groups
like the Kiwanis, Elks,
Lions and specialized
groups like trade associa-
tions.
References as to your past
history. even a resume, is
essential that your skill can
be showcased to the
prospective client.
Particular attention should
be given here even to the
extent of upgrading your
resume. Here is another area
in which you may need a
consultant. Because of the
multidimensional aspects
involved often you will find
people who have known
each other in some previous
activity or profession join-
ing together to complement
each others skills.
This is not to discourage
you but to encourage you to
check the water before you
swim then take the plunge
and go for it.

Pearl Carter is writer, poet and
a Lake Placid resident. E-mail
her at timely87@comcast.het.


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Page 5C










News-Sun + Sunday, February 13, 2011


Page 6C


www.newssun.com


Why would anyone want
to attract noisy, wood drum-
ming, flying creatures to
their backyard?
Even though they may
have a bad reputation for
pecking holes in inconven-
ient places, woodpeckers are
among the most colorful and
interesting birds to watch.
Their toes are designed
differently from most other
birds with two toes point
forward and two point back,
enabling the bird to walk
upside down on trees and
perch where other birds can-
not.
Most species of wood-
peckers eat insects as a large
part of their diet, and usually
people are willing to share
their backyard insects with
the birds.
Some woodpecker species
are becoming rare and need
help to avoid extinction.
Woodpeckers can be found
just about anywhere there
are trees. If you have large,
old trees in your yard or live
near a park or woodlot, you
may have one or more
species of woodpeckers in
the neighborhood.
To supplement existing
vegetation, you may want to
plant a few native fruit trees
and bushes. Sapsuckers and
redheaded woodpeckers
enjoy eating berries as well
as insects.


News From

The Watershed

Corine Burgess
Snags are great for attract-
ing woodpeckers. What's a
snag, you ask? It is a dead
tree.
Woodpeckers seek out the
insects in the decaying mate-
rial and, since woodpeckers
are cavity nesters, they will
use the holes in trees to raise
their brood.
As long as dead or dying
trees do not pose a hazard,
you may want to leave them
in your yard for the birds to
use.
The pileated woodpecker
- a large, striking bird with
a dashing crest has -a taste
for carpenter ants. Leave a
snag in your yard and you
may find the characteristic
rectangular holes left by this
uncommon bird digging for
ants.
Suet attracts a variety of
birds. Suet feeders are avail-
able at most stores that sell


birdseed. Some feeders look
like wire cages, which hold
the pre-formed suet cakes. A
simple, effective feeder can
be made from an 18-inch
long, 2-inch diameter log.
Drill 1-inch holes, alternat-
ing on opposite sides along
the length. Put an eye screw
in one end, fill the holes
with suet, and hang it out-
side.
The following recipe for
homemade suet has proved
successful in the Midwest
for attracting woodpeckers
and other birds, such as tuft-
ed titmouse, nuthatch, and
chickadee.
Knead together one part
vegetable shortening, one
part peanut butter (crunchy
or smooth), one part flour,
and four parts cornmeal.
Children enjoy mixing up a
batch of this concoction.
If you have a problem
with woodpeckers drilling
holes in your home, there are
measures you can take to
reduce the problem.
The woodpeckers are for-
aging for insects that live in
the cracks of the siding. If
you caulk the cracks and
repaint the surface, it will
reduce the number of insects
living in your siding. Then,
use other methods to feed
those flying beauties and
you can enjoy their antics in
your backyard.


Wild about woodpeckers


Courtesy photo
The pileated woodpecker-a
large, striking bird with a
dashing crest-has a taste for
carpenter ants.

For more information on
wildlife habitat and other
Backyard Conservation
practices, visit the Natural'
Resources Conservation
Service online at
www.nrcs.usda.gov. Or call
1-888-LANDCARE (toll
free) for a free colorful
Backyard Conservation
booklet and tip sheets.


Corine Burgess is the Natural
Resources Specialist for the
Highlands County Natural
Resources Department assisting
the Highlands Soil & Water
Conservation District
(www. highlandsswcd. org).


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT


Cape Town Philharmonic

Orchestra performs at

SFCC on Monday


,




f::

. ^




.
L^


PLACES To WORSHIP


Places to Worship is a paid
advertisement in the News-Sun
that is published Friday and
Sunday. To find out more infor-
mation on how to place a listing
in this directory, call ,the News-
Sun at 385-6155, ext. 502.


APOSTOLIC

* Greater Faith Apostolic
Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. invites you to
come worship with us in spirit and
truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday. For information con-
tact 840-0152. Pastor Larry
Carmody.


ASSEMBLY OF GOD

* Christ Fellowship Church
(Assembly of God), 2935 New
Life Way. Bearing His Name;
Preaching His Doctrine; and
Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping
God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship,
10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m.
Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-
0924.
* First Assembly of God, 4301
Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev.
Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday
School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship
and KIDS Church, 1,1 a.m.;
Evening Worship, 7 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night, (Adult
Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group,
Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-6431.


BAPTIST

* Avon Park Lakes Baptist
Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd.,
Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall,
Pastor. Christ centered and bibli-
cally based. Sunday worship serv-
ices, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Nursery facilities are available.
Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday
and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer
Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible
classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered
for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m.
Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556.
* Bethany Baptist Church
(GARBC) We are located at the
corner of SR17 and C-17A (truck
route) in Avon Park. Join us
Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for cof-
fee and doughnuts, followed with
Sunday School for all ages at 9:30.
Sunday morning worship service
begins at 10:30 a.m., and evening
worship service is at 6 p.m. On
Wednesday, the Word of Life teen
ministry and the Catylist class
(20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult
Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7
p.m. For more information go to
www.bethanybaptistap.com or call
the church office at 863-452-1136.
* Faith Missionary Baptist
Church, off State Road 17 North of
Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave.
Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday
Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation
available. Ken Lambert, Pastor.
Phone 386-5055.
* Fellowship Baptist Church,
1000 Maxwell St., Avon Park, FL


33825. Sunday: Sunday School,
9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; Wednesday: Evening
Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7
p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax:
453-6986. E-mail: office@apfe//ow
ship.org; Web site, www.apfe/low
ship.org.
* First Baptist Church of Avon
,Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park.
Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared
Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy
Loomis, music director. Regular
Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m.
Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library
open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11
a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m.
Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening
Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10
a.m., basic computer
class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m.
conversational English and citizen-
ship classes/Sonshine House.
Regular Wednesday schedule:
5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6
p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m.
Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. chil-
dren's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. chil-
dren's mission groups. Call 453-
6681 for details. Primera Mision
Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon
Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor.
Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m.,
Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship
Service. Wednesday schedule: 7
p.m., Bible study.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine
Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 mid-
way between Sebring and Lake
Placid). Your place for family,
friends and faith. Sunday morning
worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery
is provided for both services with
Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life
changing Bible Study for all ages
starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor
Allen Altvater leads the youth in
their quest to become more like
Christ. Sunday night worship at 6
p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and
Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with
youth worship in the youth facility,
and missions training for all chil-
dren. Call the church at 655-1524.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Placid, Knowing God's Heart and
Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal
Palm Street. (2 blocks south of
Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL
33852 (863) 465-3721, Email:
www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett
Morey, senior pastor. Sunday serv-
ices Traditional Service 9 a.m.,
Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m.
Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m.,
Senior Sunday Night and Sunday
Evening Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Activities: Family din-
ner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reser-
vations required). Adult-LifeSource
classes, prayer meeting, Youth
Intersections, and Kids K-5-
MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15
p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every
Tuesday for prayer breakfast and
women's prayer breakfast is at 8
a.m. every Wednesday, both at the
Family Restaurant.
* First Baptist Church of Lorida
located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida.
Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.
for all ages. Sunday worship serv-
ices are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Preschool care is provided at the
11 a.m. worship service.
Wednesday evening Bible Study
and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m.,
followed by adult choir rehearsal.


From September to May our youth
group meets. First Lorida is the
"Place to discover God's love." For
more information about the church
or the ministries offered, call 655-
1878.
* First Baptist Church, Sebring,
200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL
33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr.
David E. Richardson, senior pas-
tor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of
youth and activities. Contemporary
Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible
Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional
Worship, 11 a.m.; Misidh Buatista
Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night
programs at the ROC begin 5:30
p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m.
Preschool and Mother's Day Out
for children age 6 weeks to 5 years
old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call
385-4704.
* Florida Avenue Baptist
Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon
Park. Mailing address is 710 W.
Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825.
Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D.
Girdley, pastor. Sunday School,
9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11
a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church;
Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday night programs for
children, youth and adults at 7 p.m.
* Independent Baptist Church,
5704 County Road 17 South,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday
School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship,
10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m.
Wednesday service, 7 p.m.
Fundamental, soul-winning, mis-
sion-minded, King James Bible
Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone
655-1899. Bus transportation.
* Leisure Lakes Baptist Church,
808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just
off of Miller at the west end of Lake
June) "Where the old fashion
gospel is preached." Sunday
School begins at 9:45 a.m.;
Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.;
Sunday Evening Service is at 6
p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the
church at 699-0671 for more infor-
mation.
* Maranatha Baptist Church
(GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east
of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle
Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9
a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.;
Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week
service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily
Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m.,
Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald
Webber and Associate Pastors
Don Messenger and Ted Ertle.
Phone 382-4301".
* Parkway Free Will Baptist
Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the
church where the "Son" always
shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and
Wednesday Evening Worship, 7
p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6
p.m. on the last Sunday of each
month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pas-
tor. Church phone: 382-3552.
Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated
with the National Association of
Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn.
N Sparta Road Baptist Church,
(SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev.
Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday
school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening


Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday:
Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery
provided. For information, call 382-
0869.
* Southside Baptist Church
(GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave.,
Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor;
Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor.
Sunday School for all ages, 9:30
a.m.; Morning Worship Service,
10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten
through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.;
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30
p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and
Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for
under age 3 is available at all serv-
ices. Provisions for handicapped
and hard-of-hearing. Office phone,
385-0752.
* Sunridge Baptist Church,
(SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27
and Valerie, across from Florida
Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pas-
tor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.;
Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service,
6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible
Study, and Youth, 6:30
p.m.Nursery provided. For informa-
tion, call 382-3695.


CATHOLIC

* Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church, 595 East Main St., Avon
Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas
McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil
Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7
p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8
and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m.,
Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at
8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30
p.m. Saturday. Religious Education
Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday
for grades K through 8th.
Confirmation class is from 6:30-8
p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights
grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m.
Wednesday.
* St. Catherine Catholic Church,
820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing
address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL
33870, 385-0049. www.s/cathe.
corn. Very Rev. Jose Gonzalez,
V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30
and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 9 and 10:30
a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday
Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family
and Youth Center). Daily Masses 8
a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9
a.m. Saturday. Confessions: 3-3:45
p.m. Saturday, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first
Friday, or by appointment. Enroll
your students today for Catholic
School grades Pre-K3 through 5th
grade.
* St. James Catholic Church,
3380 Placidview Drive, Lake
Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael
J. Cannon. Mass schedule:
Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) -
Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8
a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9
a.m. December thru Easter -
Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m.,
9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9
a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30
a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9
a.m.


CHRISTIAN

* Eastside Christian Church,
101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL
33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27
on County Road 621), 465-7065.
Ray Culpepper, senior pastor.


Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.;
Worship Celebration with the
Lord's Supper each week 10:15
a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat
Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise
and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building
God's Kingdom for Everyone."
"Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and
Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!"
* Sebring Christian Church,
4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher;
Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor.
Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening
service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday
night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by
classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours,
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Phone 382-6676.
* First Christian Church, 1016
W. Camphor St.,' Avon Park, FL
33825; (863) 453-5334; on the
Web at www.firstchristianap.com.
Our motto is "Jesus is First at First
Christian Church." Greg Ratliff,
Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper,
Family Life Minister; Jon Carter,
Music Director. Bible School 9
a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study,
6 p.m.; Wednesday studies for all
ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for
all events.
* First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ), 510
Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of
Poinsettia and Eucalyptus),
Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-
0358 or 385-3435. The Rev.
Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast,
10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30
a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, Praise and Worship,
6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15
p.m.; Midweek' Bible Study, 7:15
p.m.


CHRISTIAN &
MISSIONARY
ALLIANCE

* The Alliance Church of
Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road,
Sebring, FL 33875. Call 382-1343.
Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday
services: Sunday School meets at
9:30 a.m.; .Sunday Morning
Worship Service meets at 10:30
a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study
meets at 6 p.m. (off site);
Wednesday Prayer Gathering
meets at 6 p.m.


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

* Christian Science Church, 146
N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m.
morning worship and Sunday
school. Testimonial meetings at
4 p.m. each second and fourth
Wednesday. A free public reading
room/bookstore, located in the
church, is open before and after
church services. The Bible and the
Christian Science textbook,
'Science and Health with Key to
the Scriptures' by Mary Baker Eddy
are our only preachers. All are wel-
come to come and partake of the
comfort, guidance, support and
healing found in the lesson-ser-
mons.


CHURCH OF


BRETHREN

* Church of the Brethren, 700 S.
Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-1597.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

* Avon Park Church of Christ,
200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Minister: Larry Roberts.
Sunday Worship Services, 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities
are available at every service. Bible
Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered
classes for all ages. Church phone:
453-4692.
* Sebring Parkway Church of
Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443. We
would like to extend an invitation
for you and your family to visit with
us here at Sebring Parkway. Our
hours of service are: Sunday
Worship Service, 9 a.m.; Sunday
Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Service, 6 p.m.;
Wednesday Service, 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF
NAZARENE

* First Church of the Nazarene
of Avon Park, P.O. Box 1118.,
Avon Park, FL 33825-1118. 707 W.
Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor.
Sunday: Sunday school begins at
9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wor-
ship at 10:45 a.mr.; and evening
service at 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening service is at 7 p.m. with
special services for children and
adults. Special services once a
month for seniors (Prime Time) and
Ladies ministries. If you need any
more information, call 453-4851.
* First Church of the Nazarene
of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake
Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852.
Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning
worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7
p.m. Classes for adult children and
youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim
Taylor. *


CHURCHES OF
CHRIST IN
CHRISTIAN UNION

* Community Bible Church -
Churches of Christ in Christian
Union, (Orange Blossom
Conference Center) 1400 C-17A
North (truck route), Avon Park.
Presenting Jesus Christ as the
answer for time and eternity.
Sunday morning worship service,
10:30 a.m. Nursery provided.
Junior Church activities at same
time for K-6 grade. Sunday School
Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m.
(Transportation available.) Sunday
evening praise and worship serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening
prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and
youth activities at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Everyone is welcome,
please come worship with us. Don
Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone
452-0088.


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK The Cape
Town Philharmonic
Orchestra led by conductor
Martin Panteleev and vio-
linist Philippe Quint per-
forms during the South
Florida Community
College Artist Series at
7:30 p.m. Monday in the
SFCC Theatre for the
Performing Arts, Highlands
Campus.
The Cape Town
Philharmonic Orchestra is
one of only three full-time
professional symphony
orchestras in South Africa
and continues a long and
proud history of symphonic
music since Cape Town's
first symphony orchestra
was formed in 1914. It will
perform Barber's "Adagio
for Strings," Tchaikovsky's
"Concerto for Violin," and
Rimsky-Korsakov's
"Sheherazade."
Considered one of the
most exciting rising stars of
a new generation of
European conductors,
Panteleev was born in 1976
into a family of musicians.
He began his violin studies
at age four and soon


entered the Bulgarian State
Academy of Music. At age
18, he was awarded top
prizes in the Brahms
Chamber Music
Competition and was
awarded the Bela Bartok
Prize in Sofia.
Twd-time Grammy
award nominee violinist
Quint has emerged in recent
years as one of the few
young soloists to combine a
remarkable degree of lyri-
cism, poetry, and impecca-
ble virtuosity.
The performance is spon-
sored by Mary Ellen Ward
and Marcia Ward, SFCC
Foundation Inc., and CF
Industries.
Tickets range from $33
to $39 and may be pur-
chased online 24 hours a
day, seven days a week, at
performances.southflori-
da.edu. Tickets may also be
purchased by calling the
SFCC Box Office at 784-
7178 or by visiting the
SFCC Box Office in the
front of the SFCC Theatre
for the Performing Arts,
600 W. College Drive from
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Monday-Friday.












www.newssun.com News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011



Gemini will be surprised with a visitor from


the past; time for a change of scenery, Scorpio


Special to the News-Sun
Aries (March 21-April 20) Aries,
time is of the essence when a situation
presents itself this week. Keep your
eyes focused on the goal to make the
most of what comes your way.
Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus,
be careful who you rely on this week.
You will quickly learn which people you
can depend on and which you should
avoid.
Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini,
there are happy moments in store for
you when a friend from your past pops
in for a visit. This is a surprise and
something that presents the perfect
social engagement.
Cancer (June 22-July 22) Cancer,
weekend plans get changed in an instant
when a different opportunity comes
your way. This one has even better
opportunities for fun and excitement.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, a lack-
luster start to the week gives way to
more exciting events as the days
progress. Just be sure to take a few
moments for a little quiet time for your-
self.
Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo, a


HOROSCOPE


missed opportunity foils your plans but
another option will be right behind it.
Wait a few days and see what the new
scenario might be. Then take action.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Libra,
romantic plans may have to be post-
poned for a work event that simply can-
not be missed. Because a paycheck is
essential in this economy, save social
things for later.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) It defi-
nitely could be time for a change of
scenery, Scorpio. You can use some time
to simply recharge your batteries. At the
end of the week, take a break.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
Sagittarius, it's time to start taking your
social life more seriously. Get out there
and meet some new people or reconnect
with old friends you haven't seen in
awhile.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) -
Capricorn, "all's well that ends well"


may certainly be the saying, but you
need to help the situation along to real-
ize that positive end. Pisces may be
trouble this week.
Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) -
Aquarius, extra stress has you at odds
with whomever crosses your path.
Thankfully this phase will be short-lived
when you are able to calm down.
Pisces (Feb: 19-March 20) Pisces,
you have a particular goal that you want
to complete, but can't seem to find the
time to tackle the steps to get there.



NOTABLE

BIR THDA Y5



Feb. 13 Peter Gabriel, singer, 61;
Feb. 14 Michael Bloomberg, NYC
mayor, 69; Feb. 15 Matt Groening,
Simpsons creator, 57; Feb. 16 John
McEnroe, athlete, 52; Feb. 17 Jerry
O'Connell, actor, 37; Feb. 18 Jillian
Michaels, trainer, 37; Feb. 19 Haylie
Duff, actress, 26.


Page 7C



CROSSWORD SOLUTION

T AP D NS OA ATBEIST
ALA I0HOP MCJOB SORTIE




IDA NONE ARPS STOOD


DEPENDENTCLAUSES A L

STA R ENARM TRAG
ANTECEDENTAGREEMENT

FOU ROSES E CASTRO



D EDDE0R M ASLSSE



TI PTOE HELEN EL A NCO
ASTORS OR BIT SKED G ET










NIEWS-SuirE 385-6155


PLACES To WORSHIP


EPISCOPAL

* The Episcopal Church of the
Redeemer.Service time is 9:30
with Holy Communion. Coffee hour
following services. Newcomers
welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail
redeemer1895@aol.com Web site:
redeemeravon.com. The church is
at 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park
(two miles north of Sun 'N Lake
Boulevard, across from Wells
Dodge.)
* St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL
33870. Sunday Services: Holy
Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy
Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek
* service on Wednesday at 6 p.m.
Sunday School for all ages at 9
a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m.
until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m.
service ends. Wednesday: Adult
Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are
always welcome. The Rev. Jim
Kurtz, rector. Church office 385-
7649, for more information.
* St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal
Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-
0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers,
Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m.,
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening: Holy Communion with
Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child
care available at the 8 a.m. and
10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come
see what makes us different.


GRACE BRETHREN

* Grace Brethren Church, 3626
Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-
0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior
pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m.,
10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday
services at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid
City" Children's Ministry throughout
all services, and there are variosu
other classes for teens, married
couples, "prime-timers," and Bible
studies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day
Care, Preschool and After-School
Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For
registration call: 385-3111). Check
us out on the Web at www.sebring-
grace. org.


INTERDENOMINATIONAL

* World Harvest and Restoration
Ministries, (non-denominational)
2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-
3771. Sunday service: Sunday
School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11
a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m.
prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor:
W.H. Rogers.
*

JEWISH

Temple Israel of Highlands
County, 382-7744. Rabbi Lorraine
Rudenberg; www.templeis-
rae/ofhcf/.org. Temple Israel is a
Reform Temple that promotes the
enduring and fundamental princi-
ples of Judaism. Through prayer,
study and friendship we strive to
enrich our lives and insure Jewish
continuity in Highlands County.
Friday Evening Shabbat Services,
7:30 p.m.; Saturday afternoon intro
to Hebrew, 12:30 p.m.; Saturday
intro to Judaism, 2 p.m.; Saturday
afternoon Torah Study, 3:30 p.m.;
Havdallah, 5 p.m. Jan. 7-8; Jan. 21;
Feb. 4; Feb. 18-19; March 4-5;
March 18-19 Purim; April 1-2; April
15-16; April 18, 6 p.m., Pesach 1st
Night Seder; April 29-30 Yom
Hashoah; May 13-14; May 27-28.
Every Thursday will be Hebrew and
Bible classes with Howard Salles,
12:30-4:30 p.m.


LUTHERAN

* Atonement Lutheran Church
(ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview
Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen,
Deacon, Spiritual Leader. Jim
Helwig, organist/choir director.
Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy
Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee
hour on the first and third Sunday
of each month. Council meeting on
the first Monday of month; Ladies
Group WELCA meets at noon sec-
ond Monday of month with lunch.
Bring a dish to pass. Church
Vegetable Garden Club meets as
needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden
open seven days a week to congre-
tation and community. Like to sing?
Come join the choir. Visitors always
welcome. Come grow with us.
Phone 385-0797.
* Christ Lutheran Church Avon
Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2
mile east of Avon Park High
School. Sunday Divine Worship is
at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is cel-
ebrated every week with traditional
Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs
of praise. Fellowship time with cof-
fee and refreshments follows wor-
ship. Come worship and fellowship
with us. For information call Pastor
Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see
chrlstlutheranavonpark. org.
* Faith Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 2740 Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848,
Faith Child Development Center,
385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea
Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship
services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday
school for children and adult Bible
classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise
worship service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Communion is served the
first and third and fifth Sunday of
the month. Sunday worship service
is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8
a.m. each Sunday. Educational
opportunities include weekly adult
Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift
Store (385-2782) is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through
Friday and 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday. All are warmly welcome
in the Family of Faith.
* Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church (AALC) American
Association of Lutheran
Churches, 4348 Schumacher
Road, Sebring, one mile west of
Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor.
Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday.
Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery pro-
vided. Social activities: Choir,
Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-
1163.
* New Life Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a
Congregation of the Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship
with the Wisconsin Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday
Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9
a.m. For more information, call
Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or
visit the Web site at wwwnewlife
sebring. com.
* Resurrection Lutheran Church
- ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon
Park. Pastor: Rev. John C.
Grodzinski. Early Sunday service,
8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m.
and the second service at 10:30
a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour fol-
low the service. Midweek
Fragrance Free Wednesday wor-
ship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office
phone number is 453-6858.
* Trinity Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake
Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The
Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and
Noel.Johnson, youth and family life.
Worship schedule for December
through Easter: Worship service 8
and 11 a.m.; Communion services,
first and third Sundays; (Children's
Church, 11 a.m. only); and
Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship


schedule for summer through fall:
Worship service, 9 a.m.;
Communion services, first and third
Sunday; Education Hour 10:30
a.m. Additional services: Lent and
Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy
Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.;
Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.;
Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas
Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve,
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship
activities: Youth Group, Senior
Citizens, Younger Side Adults,
Ladies Missionary League, Ladies
Guild, Small group studies as
scheduled. Music: Choir and hand
chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5
years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday. License:
C14H10020: Susan Norris, direc-
tor. Visit us online at: www. vchurch-
es. com/trnity/uthe ran/p.


NON-DENOMINATIONAL

* Bible Fellowship Church, 3750
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Sunday: American Sign
Language: First Worship sermon,
songs signed first and second
Worship services. First Worship
service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship
service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to
2 years old) and Sunday school
classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6
p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday; Children, ages 4
years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth,
6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m.
Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy
McQuaid, associate pastor. Church
office 385-1024.
* Calvary Church, 1825
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872; 386-4900. An independent
community church. Sunday morn-
ing worship, 8:15 and 10 a.m.;
Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.;
Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m.
Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small
friendly church waiting for your
visit.
* Christian Training Ministries
Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off
County Road 17 on Simpson
Avenue. Sunday service is at 10
a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7
p.m. A nursery and children's
church are provided. The church is
part of Christian International
Ministries Network, a full gospel,
non-denominational ministry. Linda
M. Downing, minister: Phone, 314-
0482, lindadowning@live.com.
Casey L. Downing, associate min-
ister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown
ing@hotmail.com. Web site is
w ww.christiantraintingministries.net
* Grace Bible Church, 4541
Thunderbird Road, (second church
on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone,
382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior
pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30
p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m.
Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible
Academy Adult Investigating Truth;
first and third Tuesday, Prayer
Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday,
Children's & Youth Programs, 6
p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m.,
College Ministry.
www GBCconnected. org
* Highlands Community Church,
a casual contemporary church,
meets at 3005 New Life Way.
Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10
a.m. Nursery and Kid's World
classes. Small groups meet
throughout the week. Church
phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A.
Linhart.
* Union Congregational Church,
106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday worship services
are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15
a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m.
(contemporary) in the main sanctu-
ary. Sunday school for all ages is at
9:15 a.m. We also offer
Wednesday and Saturday services
at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respective-


ly. Nursery/child care is available
for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill
Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web
page at www.weareunion.org. All
teachings are taken from the
Manufacturer's Handbook The
Holy Bible. Come join us.
* Unity Life Enrichment Centre,
new location, 10417 Orange
Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL
33875; 471-1122; e-mail
unity@vistanet.net. Web site,
www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Celebration Service,
Nursery and Children's Church.
Weekly Classes, Christian
Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer
Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups.
Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior
minister transforming lives from
ordinary to extraordinary.
* The Way Church, 1005 N.
Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday
school and worship service at 9
a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activi-
ties, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. The
Way is a qpurch family who gathers
for contemporary worship, teaching
of God's Word, prayer and fellow-
ship. Come early and stay after for
fellowship time. Child care and chil-
dren's church are provided.
Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The
Way A place for you. Office
Phone:471-6140, Church Cell
Phone:381-6190. Email: theway
church@hotmai/.com. Web site:
www The WayChurch.org


PRESBYTERIAN

* Covenant Presbyterian Church
(PCA), 4500 Sun 'N Lake Blvd.,
Sebring, 33872-2113. A
Congregation of the Presbyterian
Church in America. Worship servic-
es: Sunday morning worship, infor-
mal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday
evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday
evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.;
Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:30-
7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m.
Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759;
e-mail: covpres@strato.net, Web
site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W.
Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours:
8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through
Thursday.
* First Presbyterian Church
ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two
entrances on LaGrande), Avon
Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242.
The Rev. Robert Johnson is the
pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.;
Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.;
Wednesday Bible study, 10:30
a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third
Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30
p.m. each Wednesday; Esther and
Mary Circles business meeting,
3:30 p.m. third Thursday; Sarah
Circle business meeting, 7 p.m.
second Tuesday; Women's
Ministries Combined Bible study, 4
p.m. third Thursday; Family Movie,
4 p.m. third Sunday. Be a part of a
warm, caring church family with tra-
ditional services, following biblical
truth.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring,
FL 33870. 385-0107. Sunday
School, adult and college age, 9:30
a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.;
Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 11-
18), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult
Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir
rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery avail-
able for Sunday worship. Call the
church office for more information
and other classes. Rev. Darrell A.
Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director
of youth ministry.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, www.fpclp.com, 118 N. Oak
Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The
Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor;
the Rev. Drew Severance, associ-
ate pastor. Sunday morning tradi-
tional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30


a.m.; and contemporary worship is
at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avari-
ety of Sunday school classes for
adults and children are at 9:45 and
11 a.m. in the educational building.
Call the church office for more
information about the classes
offered. Nursery is provided for
babies and toddlers; while young
children up to second grade have a
special Children's Church offered
during the worship service to help
them grow in their spiritual knowl-
edge.
* Spring Lake Presbyterian
Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School,
9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m.
Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the
second Thursday of the month,
September through June. Board of
Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first
Monday of the month. Choir
rehearses at 7 p.m. each
Wednesday, September through
April. Presbyterian Women meet at
10 a.m. the third Thursday of the
month. Organist: Richard Wedig.
Choir Director: Suzan Wedig.
Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,
spring/akepc @embarqmai//. com,
Web site, http.//s/pc.presby-
church.org.


SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST

* Avon Park Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 1410 West
Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone:
453-6641 or e-mail: avonparks-
da @embarqmal. com, Sabbath
School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church
Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday.
Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m.
Community Service hours on
Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00
a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place
the first Sunday of each month.
Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and
Associate Pastor Kameron
DeVasher. Walker Memorial
Academy Christian School offering
education for kindergarten through
12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME.
Website is www.discoverjesus.org
* Sebring Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, 2106 N. State
Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438.
Worship Services: 9:15 a.m.
Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meet-
ing, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m.
Community service: every Monday
9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr.
Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m.
Pastor Amado Luzbet.


THE CHURCH OF
LATTER DAY SAINTS

* The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand
Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863)
382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop;
Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del
Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family
History Center (863) 382-1822.
Sunday Services: Sacrament
Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel
Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon;
Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-
1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15
a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities:
Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts:
first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20
p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys
and Girls, second and fourth
Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m.


THE SALVATION
ARMY

N The Salvation Army Center
for Worship. Sunday: Sunday
School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meet-
ing, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting
and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible
study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's


Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday:
Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meet-
ings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave.,
Sebring. For more information, visit
the Web site wwwsalvationarmy-
sebring.com or call Major Bruce
Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. .110.


UNITED METHODIST

* First United Methodist Church,
105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor.
Traditional Worship Service at 8:10
and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary,
Contemporary Worship in the FLC
at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30
and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth
Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday
with Rick Heilig, youth director.
The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship
service is broadcast over WITS
1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery
available at all services.
* First United Methodist Church,
200 South Lake Avenue, Avon
Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, R.
James Weiss, Pastor, Sunday
School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30
a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of
every month at 6 p.m. Prayer
Shawl Ministry on the second and
fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m.
for women who love God and cro-
cheting. Visit us at our church Web
site: www.fumcap.org.
* Memorial United Methodist
Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlook-
ing Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL,
33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pastor.
Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral
assistant. Sunday schedule:
Heritage Worship Service, 8:30
a.m. (October-May only); School
School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.;
Celebration Worship Service at
10:45 a.m.; New Song worship
service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nurs-
ery care provided every Sunday
morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m.
Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m.
(October-May only). We offer
Christ-centered Sunday school
classes, youth programs, Bible
studies, book studies and Christian
fellowship. We are a congregation
that want to know Christ and make
Him known. Call the church office
at 465-2422 or check out our
church Web site at wwwmemori-
alumc.com.
* St. John United Methodist
Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive,
Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev.
Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor.
Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all
services. Phone 382-1736.
www.stjohnsebring.org
* Spring Lake United Methodist
Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane,
(Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde
Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship serv-
ice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study
meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday.
Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on
Thursday. Church office phone:
655-0040.


UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST

* Emmanuel United Church of
Christ, where God is still speak-
ing. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL
33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27
and Hammock Road). Sunday wor-
ship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with
worship first Sunday of month;
Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all
other Sundays. All are welcome to
receive the sacrament. For more
information, call the church office at
471-1999 or e-mail eucc@earthi
/ink.net or check the Web site
sebringemmanuelucc. corn. No
matter who you are or where you
are on life's journey, you're wel-
come here.






News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Highlands Art League

offers Stained Glass class


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING A Stained
Glass class is being offered at
Highlands Art League from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m., starting on
Saturday, Feb. 26.
Betty Francisco, the
instructor, has been doing
stained glass since 1992 and
she will be sharing her love
of this medium in a series of
classes that meets on
Saturday for four weeks.
This workshop will be fun
and will move along quickly
to complete a beautiful
stained glass art piece.
All supplies and patterns
are provided. Students will
be free to select the theme
they are interested in the
most.
This is a fun class that
needs no previous art experi-
ence. "Jut bring enthusiasm
and wear closed shoes.
Classes are held at the
Highlands Art League, 1989
Lakeview Drive (orange


Courtesy photo
Betty Francisco will be teaching a class in Stained Glass at
the Highlands Art League.


building) on Lake Jackson
(behind the yellow house in
downtown Sebring. The fee
for the class is $110.
In addition, there is also a
fee for the supplies of $30.
. All class fees are to be paid
to the instructor the first day


of the class.
For more information, or
to register, call Francisco at
471-1452 or the Highlands
Art League at 385-5312.
These classes are very limit-
ed due to individual attention
given.


Student Nurses Association presents
'The Heart of the Arts' at SFCC


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK The South Florida
Community College (SFCC) Student Nurses
Association (SNA) will present "The Heart of
the Arts" by the Florida Dance Theatre troupe
at 7:30 p.m. Friday in the SFCC Theatre, for
the Performing Arts, Highlands Campus. The
troupe will perform classical and modern bal-
let and modern dance.
"The Heart of the Arts dance performance
will be an evening of professional dance to
entertain and enrich the lives of our commu-
nity Our heart and compassion is at the core
of everything we do through the SFCC
Student Nurses Association. We hope that the
community will open its heart to our cause
and enjoy this performance," said Amy


Wuthrich, president of SFCC SNA.
Founded in 1993 by artistic director Carol
Krajacic Erkes and formerly known as the
Lakeland Ballet, Florida Dance Theatre is
committed to bringing high quality dance to
the community through education, outreach,
and performances.
Tickets are $15 for general admission and
$10 for students, children, and groups of 10
or more. All proceeds will benefit the SFCC
Student Nurses Association. Tickets can be
purchased through the SFCC Box Office,
784-7178. For more information about the
ballet, contact the SFCC Nursing Department
at 453-6661, 465-5300, 494-7500, 773-2252,
ext. 7225.


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SECTION SPORTS
PORT


News-Sun photo by BETH BALDRIDGE
With the Devils well out in front, young players like Alfred Brown got some court time dur-
ing Friday's District 9-3A semifinal win over Mulberry.


Sunday, February 13, 2011


Devils a step from District crown


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.coin
LAKE PLACID The Red
Devils advanced to the title
game of the District 9-3A
playoffs on Friday night with
their 68-42 win over
Mulberry in Lake Placid.
"Our real test is tomor-
row," said Avon Park head
coach Luther
Clemons. "They had a Avox
great week of practice,
but the real test will be 1
tomorrow night."
The Devils imple- Mu
mented their game
plan early, which con- 4
centrated around


n



lb

IA


Mulberry's Frank Gonzalez,
according to Clemons.
"Our plan was to know
where number 10 was, and to
keep their penetration down.
We had a good week of prac-
tice, and when we have a
good practice, we have a
good game," Clemons said.
Avon Park's keyed defen-
sive play kept Gonzalez to


just 10 points, forcing him to
pepper away from the outside
under pressure.
But it was Panthers' Oliver
Green and Kevin Simmons
who led the Mulberry scoring
with 11 points each.
The Devils jumped out in
front early, using the lay-up
pressure of Reggie Baker to
lead the offen-
Park sive onslaught. Tel
Baker scored
seven points in
the first period,
erry mostly from Lake
the inside, and E
ended the night
with a game


no



P


high 24 points.
Avon Park's Alonzo
Robertson, who was also in
double figures with
rebounds, followed Baker
with 18 points.
Mulberry never recovered
from the first half deficit of
33-17, and only picked up an
addition four points by the
end of the third while the


Devils were able to capture'
13 for a 46-22 lead at the
start of the fourth.
Way out front, Clemons
pulled his starters with three
minutes left in the game, and
Mulberry was able to rally
some. for the 68-42 final.
Avon Park faced Teneroc
Saturday night, who downed
Lake Placid in the
)roc semi-final game.
"Teneroc is
Teneroc," said
Clemons, predicting-
lacid the outcome of the
S Lake Placid versus
Teneroc game before
it began.
"We don't play that well
on Saturday, and I am wor-
ried about it," Clemons
added.

Tenoroc topples
Green Dragons
Early foul trouble,
turnovers and rebounding

See DRAGONS, page 2D


Stacked Regional a bit too much for young Streaks


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newssun.com
AVON PARK In getting
some state-level wrestling
competition, 'the Sebring
grapplers didn't have to
advance to the State Meet in
Lakeland they got the expe-
rience at their own Regional
Meet Friday and Saturday in
the Panther Gym at SFCC.
The field, with more than
two dozen schools represent-
ed, was stacked with state
powers that will see many
wrestlers posing on the medal
stand at the Lakeland Center
Saturday, Feb. 19.
Five-time and defending
Class 2A state champion
Oviedo topped the list of the
Region 2 field, but that was-
n't all.
Springstead, second in
state last year, was also on
hand, as was last year's third
place state finisher, Lake
Gibson.; .
Add in the likes of
Dunedin, 9th last year, St.


'Put us in any of

the other regions

and we'd have at

least a couple

kids making it to

state.'

JOSH MILLER
Sebring head coach

Cloud, 12th, Citrus, 16th and
Liberty, 17th, and you get a
fuller understanding of the
talent taking to the mats.
The fact that just one of the
five Sebring wrestlers who
made it from Districts to the
Regional, was still vying for
a trip to state as Saturday's
final rounds got set to go
might not be too big of a sur-
prise, all things considered -
but it was still disappointing
to a degree.
"It is unfortunate," Blue


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Vicente Moore is all smiles as he is about to get a pin in a consolation bracket match at Friday's Class 2A Regional Meet at.
SFCC.


Streak head coach Josh
Miller said amid Friday's
action. "Put us in any of the
other regions and we'd have


at least a couple kids making
it to State."
Friday's opening round
showed how tough things


would be as Jeremy Quails
earned the only Sebring win
to keep himself in the cham-
pionship bracket, while Chris


DeJesus, Vicente Moore and
Josh Figur each took losses
to fall into the consolation

See SEBRING, page 2D


Slugfests spotlight


of Sebring Seniors


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING On Thursday,
Feb. 8, the 4-4 Silent
Salesman met the undefeated
Merchants in a real slugfest.
The lead changed sides
several times until the last
two innings when the
Salesman unloaded .with two
long balls for a 26-19 win.
In the seventh inning, Les
Smith hit a bopmlng three-
run triple thit put the
Salesman -head 2Q0-,. ,
In the top of the eighth
Bob Fahestock sealed the win
with a three-run homer.
All 14 Salesman batters
had at least one hit and
scored one run or more for
the best team effort of the.
season.
Doing most of the damage
at bat were Bob Fahenstock,
5-for-5 with a homer, Les
Smith 3-for-4 including a
triple and Russ Moody 3-for-
4 with a double.
Also, Jim Longman and
Bob Roth had 3-for-5.
Going 3-for-4 were Bob
Brooks and "Spider"
McMinn.
Al Taratuta only had two
hits but scored four times to
lead in the run scoring.
The Highlands Merchants
Glenn Minic went 4-for-4
with a home run and Don
Ward was 3-for-4 including a
homer.
Kyle Bready had 4-for-4
with Ron Lewis, Charlie


Quinn and Harry Bell all
ringing up 3-for-4.
Millers Heating and Air
Conditioning went one better
than the Rebels with a 21-20
victory in another high-scor-
ing affair.
Millers' Kyle Saunders
was 4-for-4, including two
doubles and a triple.
Ed Lindberg had a triple in
his 3-for-5 times up.
Dennis Birkholz and Jerry
Kauffman each had 2-for-5
with a triple while Bob Fox
and Pete Mathews each had
4-for-5 singles.
Dale DeMar was 4-for-4.
The Rebels having 4-for-4
were 'Jack Grosso and Tony
Caristo and John Degnen,
including a triple.
Home runs were hit by
Glenn Minic, going 4-for-4,
and Don Ward having 3-for-
4.
Each connecting 3-for-4
were Ron Lewis, Charlie
Quinn, Larry Ambuel and
Harry Bell.
Tuesday, Feb. 8 was an
unusual scoring day for the
Sebring Seventy and Over
Softball League with five out
of six teams having between
20 and 30 runs for a final
score.
Highlands Merchants
trampled over the Blue Jays
with a final score of 31-8.
Merchants' Ron Lewis was
See SENIORS, page 2D


Tampa Catholic too much for Lady Devils


News-Sun photo by KATE ROWLAND
Avon Park's Chantel Hughley defends the ball with her body
as she drives the baseline in the Red Devils 85-44 loss to
Tampa Catholic on Thursday.


By KATE ROWLAND
Special to the News-Sun
TAMPA The Lady Red
Devils never gave up and
never stopped working in
Thursday's 85-44 Class 3A
region quarterfinal against
Tampa Catholic.
Avon Park left it all on
the court and conducted
themselves with the pride,
class and dignity that would
be expected from any repre-
sentative of the Florida
Heartlands.
Especially since the
Highlands County team was
up against more
than any public Tampi
school should have
to contend with. 8
The instruction
the defending state Avor
champion Tampa
Catholic Crusaders 4
condescended to
teach their rural guests may
not have been as noble as
the school would prefer it
to be perceived.
The private school's cav-
alier treatment of a com-
mendable opponent should
have taught Florida High
School Athletic Association
officials that there is a
clear-cut need for a class
realignment that is at least
somewhat equitable.
"I expected them to have
shooters and rebounders,
coming from a big school
like this," said Avon Park
sophomore Tay Perry, who
scored 12 points for the Red
Devils.


"They're used to winning
state championships so we
just came out here to play
our all. Win or lose, I just
wanted to go hard. We were
district runner up and we
can be proud of that." '
The Crusaders (24-4)
girls' basketball team has
won 22 consecutive games
and three straight district
titles.
The team's coach, Nancy
Kroll, was the head
women's basketball coach
at Farleigh Dickinson
University for seven years
and Hillsborough
a Cath. Community College
15 for three.
The boy's basket-
ball team advanced
to regional's this
year after earning a
14 place in Friday's
championship
game.
Since 2005, Tampa
Catholic's football program
has won four consecutive
district titles. The volley-
ball team's coach joined the
Tampa Catholic staff after
coaching under a former
Olympian.
The boy's soccer pro-
gram has won nine district
championships. Girl's soc-
cer advanced to the region-
al semifinals this year.
The Crusaders' baseball
team has won nine state
championships, added a
district title in 2009 and

See AP, page 4D


1









News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


www.newssun.corn


News-Sun photo by BETH BALDRIDGE
With superior size and Andre Wilson in early foul trouble, Tenoroc controlled the boards
on their way to Friday's District Semifinal win over Lake Placid.


Dragons see season end


Continued from 1D
cost Lake Placid a 69-58 loss
on Friday night in the District
'9-3A tournament semifinal
against Tenoroc.
YCL fought back, but
A'e.. Wilson) being in foul
trpu le cost us the first half."
said Lake Placid head coach
Davyi Veley.
'"Turnovers. yeah turnovers
and rebounds too. We were
weatl onthe backside, and we
preached that all week. When
you do that, they come in and
get those second shots, espe-
cialli when they are bigger
than you are." Veley added.


Down just two buckets at
the end of the first period,
Lake Placid stayed within 10
before the half.
But the press by Tenoroc in
the third, who was able to
turn almost every defensive
rebound and turnover into
two points, put them in a hole
too deep to climb out of
despite the return of Wilson
late in the game.
Devontray Fleming carried
the weight of the Green
Dragon offense all night.
scoring a respectable 20
points.
When he fouled out early


in the fourth, Wilson was
able to get ball time for his
12 points, scored all in the
second half.
Teneroc's Karlos Odum
and Trey Brown took turns
with the turnovers and pass-
ing to both net 15 points.
Tenoroc moved on to the
final game -with Avon Park
on Saturday night for the dis-
trict championship game.
The final gafie was played
at 7 p.m. Saturday night in
Lake Placid and was too late
for press time.
Check www.newssun .coin
for the outcome of the game.


Sebring gains valuable


Continued from 1D
bracket.
Nathan Franklin, at 112
pounds, got the benefit of a
first-round bye, but soon
also found himself dropping
into the consolation bracket
and then out altogether with
consecutive losses.
Figur rebounded from his
opening loss in the 160-
pound weight class with a 3-
2 win over Travis Carr of
Mitchell before taking a 5-1
loss to Jariel Rivera of
Kathleen to end his tourna-
ment run.
Similarly, Moore, at 171,
bounced back from his loss
to get a second-period pin to
move up a step in the conso-
lation bracket.
But a 14-7 loss in the next
round to Freddy Ruiz of
Liberty halted his path
toward Lakeland.
That same trend was fol-


lowed by DeJesus in the
152-pound weight class,
getting a consolation round
win to stay alive a little
longer before taking a loss
to Jarret Frisbie of Mitchell.
Qualls went another
route, after taking his 140-
pound, round-one win,
Qualls was stopped by a pin
in his next match by defend-
ing state champion Cody
Ross of Springstead.
Now in consolation,
Quails took a 6-3 win over
Reynaldo Torres of
Ridgewood to reach
Saturday's schedule.
Two more wins would
have Quails in the third-
place match.
"I just wish a few more of
our wrestlers made it a little
farther," Quall said. "I feel
like I'm the one that has to
represent Sebring now. It


experience
adds to the pressure."
Even so, what he's
accomplished already is
something to be proud of.
"His weight class was the
hardest one here," Miller
said. "And he's already
made it to the top eight."
Results were not yet
available at press time.
Go to www.newssun.com
to get Saturday's outcome.
Regardless of how things
turned out Saturday, consid-
ering each of the Sebring
grapplers who made it this
far are underclassmen, the
experience gained is invalu-
able.
At least five wins against
some of the top talent in the
state can provide the confi-
dence and knowledge of
what it takes as these
wrestlers and this team
move forward.


Seniors in high-scoring mode


Continued from 1D
4-for-4 including a double
and a home run.
Harry Bell was 4-for-4
with two doubles.
Others having 4-for-4
were Don Boyd, Mike
Jurmu,Charlie Quinn, Bob
Burley, and Larry Ambuel.
Glenn Minic hit 3 for 4.
The Blue Jays Richard
Godfrey had 3-for-4,
including a home run.
Dale Baughman, Jim
Johnson and Bob Wilson
each went 3-for-4.
The Rebels and Silent
Salesman played an unusual
game with the first seven
innings being of the ho-hum
variety.
The excitement started in
the eighth inning with the
Rebels trailing 17-11.
Before the smoke had
cleared the Rebels had
blasted their way to a 22-17
lead, scoring 11 runs on a
variety of long balls and


infield squibblers.
However, the Salesman
weren't done yet.
The bottom of the batting
order scored three times and
left the tying runs on base
for a final lose of 22-20.
Top guns for the
Salesman were Bob Brooks
4-for-4, Ray Concepcion 3-
for-3, Al Taratuta 3-for-5
and Russ Moody 2-for-4
with a triple. Going 3-for-4
were Bob Roth, "Spider"
McMinn and Gene Hanford.
Also, perfect at the plate
was Ken Filppula with one
hit and three walks in four
times up.
The Rebels Don Purdy
had 3-for-5 with a home run
and Elwood Black had a
triple in his 3-for-4 times at
bat.
Other contributors were
Fred Boyd and Rollie
Carlson with 4-for-4.
All hitting 3-for-4 were
Jim Strietzel, Diz Jones. Jim


Munroe, John Degnen, Rick
Vancuren and Ray Farmer.
Millers Heating and Air
Conditioning held fairly
strong onto a close game,
coming up two runs short,
24-22, in favor of Allstate
Insurance. Allstate's Galo
Gonzales had 4-for-4
including a double and
triple and Don Day was 4-
for-4 including a triple.
Jim Quartier had 5-for-5.
Rudy Pribble was 3-for-5
with a triple.
Moe Pier was 3-for-
5.
Millers' Bob Fox was
credited with two home runs
and a double.
Kyle Saunders was 3-for-
4 including two triples and
Dennis Berkholz and Jerry
Kauffman each hit a triple.
Jim Hensley and Don
Sheets each had a double
with their 4-for-5 times at
bat.


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Sebring (Pubhx Shopping Center) ". I m
Mon 3 9 Tues-Thurs 11 -9 Fri 11-10 'Tues -Thur 3 -9 Fri Sat I'
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News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


THE SCOREBOARD


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 38 14 .731 -
New York 26 26 .500 12
Philadelphia 25 28 .47213V:
New Jersey 17 37 .315 22
Toronto 14 40 .259 25
Southeast Division
W L Pet GB
Miami 39 14 .736 -
Atlanta 33 19 .635 5%V
Orlando 34 21 .618 6
Charlotte 22 31 .415 17
Washington 14 37 .275 24
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 35 16 .686 -
Indiana 23 28 .451 12
Milwaukee 20 32 .385 15V
Detroit 20 34 .370 16%.
Cleveland 9 45 .16727X%
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pet GB
San Antonio 44 9 .830 -
Dallas 37 16 .698 7
New Orleans 33 22 .600 12
Memphis 29 26 .527 16
Houston 25 29 ,46319V
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 33 18 .647 --
Denver 31 23 .574 3V
Utah 31 24 .564 4
Portland 29 24 .547 5
Minnesota 13 40 .245 21
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 38 16 .704 -
Phoenix 26 25 .51010X
Golden State 23 29 .442 14
L.A. Clippers 20 33 .377 17%
Sacramento 12 37 .245 23%
Thursday's Games
L.A. Lakers 92, Boston 86
Phoenix 112, Golden State 88
Denver 121, Dallas 120
Friday's Games
New Jersey 94, Charlotte 89
Indiana 116, Minnesota 105
New Orleans 99, Orlando 93
Philadelphia 77, San Antonio 71
Portland 102, Toronto 96
Cleveland 126, L.A. Clippers 119, OT
Miami 106, Detroit 92
Memphis 89, Milwaukee 86
L.A. Lakers 113, New York 96
Phoenix 95, Utah 83
Saturday's Games
Charlotte at Atlanta, late
New York at New Jersey, late
Philadelphia at Minnesota, late
Chicago at New Orleans, late
San Antonio at Washington, late
Dallas at Houston, late
Indiana at Milwaukee, late
Oklahoma City at Sacramento, late
Sunday's Games
Miami at Boston, 1 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Orlando, 3:30 p.m.
Denver at Memphis. 6 p.m.
Washington at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Portland at Detroit, 6 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Golden State, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Phoenix, 8 p.m.


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Philadelphia 36 13 5 77182 138
Pitteburgh 35 18 4 74 170 136
N.Y. Rangers 29 24 4 62 157 141
New Jersey 22 30 4 48120158
N.Y. Islanders 19 29 7 45 144 180
Northeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Boston 31 17 7 69170131
Montreal 30 20 6 66148143
Buffalo 26 22 5 57155155
Toronto 23 26 6 52144171
Ottawa 17 30 8 42121 183
Southeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Tampa Bay 33 17. 5 71 168169
Washington 29 16 10 68 150136
Atlanta 25 22 10 60165185
Carolina 26 22 7 59162169
Florida 23 24 7 53143146
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OT Pts-GF GA
Detroit 33 16 6 72 183 161
Nashville 29 19 7 65 145 130
Chicago 28 22 5 61 175155
Columbus 27 23 5 59150167
St. Louis 24 20 9 57144159
Northwest Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Vancouver 35 11 9 79186131
Calgary 28 21 8 64166168
Minnesota 29 20 5 63 143 144
Colorado 25 24 6 56167181
Edmonton 1630 8 40134184
Pacific Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Dallas 31 18 6 68158156
Anaheim 31 21 4 66155157
San Jose 3020 6 66156148
Phoenix 28 19 9 65159158
Los Angeles 29 22 3 61 151 131
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
for overtime loss.

Thursday's Games
N.Y. Islanders 4, Montreal 3, SO
New Jersey 2, Toronto 1, OT
Philadelphia 2, Carolina 1
Pittsburgh 2, Los Angeles 1, OT
Buffalo 3, Florida 2, OT
Friday's Games
Minnesota 5, St. Louis 4, SO
Dallas 4, Chicago 3, SO
Detroit 6, Boston 1
New Jersey 2, San Jose 1
N.Y. Islanders 9, Pittsburgh 3
Columbus 3, Colorado 1
Atlanta 3, N.Y. Rangers 2
Anaheim 5, Calgary 4, OT
Saturday's Games


Los Angeles at Washington, late
Ottawa at Edmonton, late
Toronto at Montreal, late
Carolina at Tampa Bay, late
Colorado at Nashville, late
Chicago at Phoenix, late
St. Louis at Minnesota, late
Calgary at Vancouver, late
Sunday's Games
Boston at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo, 3 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 3 p.m.
Columbus at Dallas, 3 p.m.
Los Angeles at Philadelphia, 3 p.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, 5 p.m.
San Jose at Florida, 5 p.m.


D ia.


LIVE

SPORTS

ON TV


AUTo RACING
SUNDAY
1 p.m. NASCAR Daytona 500, Qualifying ..... FOX


BOWLING
SUNDAY
3 p.m. USBC Masters ..................... ESPN


BOXING
MONDAY
10 p.m. Guadalupe DeLeon vs. Gary Russell. .... SUN


COLLEGE BASKETBALL
SUNDAY
1 p.m. Purdue at Illinois ................. CBS
1 p.m. Georgia Tech at Virginia Tech........... 44
1 p.m. Marquette at Georgetown. ........... ESPN
6:30 p.m. Duke at Miami ..................... SUN
MONDAY
7 p.m. West Virginia at Syracuse............ ESPN
9 p.m. Kansas at Kansas State ............. ESPN
TUESDAY
7 p.m. Mississippi State at Kentucky ......... ESPN
7 p.m. Texas Tech at Missouri. ............ ESPN2
9 p.m. Michigan State at Ohio State ......... ESPN


DOGS
MONDAY
8 p.m. Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show .... USA
TUESDAY
8 p.m. Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show .... USA


1 p.m.
3 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m.


1 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
8 p.m.


GOLF
SUNDAY
PGA Pebble Beach Pro-Am ......... GOLF
PGA Pebble Beach Pro-Am .......... CBS
EuroPGA Dubai.Desert Classic ...... GOLF
PGA Allianz Championship ......... GOLF


NBA
SUNDAY
Miami at Boston .................... ABC
L.A. Lakers at Orlando ............... ABC
Oklahoma City at Golden State........ ESPN


NHL
SUNDAY
12:30 p.m. Regional Boston at Detroit, Pittsburgh at N.Y.
Rangers or L.A. Kings at Philadelphia. .. NBC
TUESDAY
7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Tampa Bay ........... SUN


PREMIER LEAGUE SOCCER
MONDAY
2:55 p.m. Fulham vs. Chelsea ............... ESPN2


WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
SUNDAY
2pmn. South Carolina at Mississippi State....... 38
2 p.m. Florida at Alabama ................. .SUN
2:30 p.m. Michigan at Michigan State ......... ESPN2
4 p.m. Arizona State at Arizona ............. SUN
5 p.m. West Virginia at Louisville .......... ESPN2
MONDAY
7 p.m. Oklahoma at Connecticut ........... ESPN2
9 p.m. Texas A&M at Baylor .............. ESPN2
Times, games, channels all subject to change


Anaheim at Edmonton, 8 p.m.


Friday's Scores
EAST
Baruch 68, Hunter 61
Brown 75, Dartmouth 66
Canisius 67, Rider 65
Castleton St. 84, Maine Maritime 73 ,
Cornell 82, Penn 71, OT
Fairfield 65, Manhattan 56
Hartwick 90, Rochester Tech 83
Harvard 78, Yale 75
Iona 69, Siena 65
Ithaca 85, St. John Fisher 71
NYU 73, Case Reserve 63
Niagara 59, Loyola, Md. 57
Princeton 76, Columbia 46
Rochester 65, Chicago 53
St. Peter's 66, Marist 54
Stevens Tech 73, Nazareth, N.Y. 72
Union, N.Y. 79, Vassar 66
SOUTH
Barton 75, Coker 58
Centre 70, Sewanee 35
ETSU 80, Jacksonville 64
Grambling St. 64, Prairie View 33
North Florida 63, S.C.-Upstate 55
W. Carolina 69, Chattanooga 68
MIDWEST
Augustana,S.D. 78, Northern St., S.D.
73, OT
Bemidji St. 85, Minn.-Crookston 78
Bethany Lutheran 72, Northland 43
Crown, Minn. 84, Minn.-Morris 72
Martin Luther 92, St. Scholastica 85,
OT
Mary 62, Wayne, Neb. 59
Minn. St., Mankato 80, St. Cloud St. 69
Minn. St., Moorhead 93, Minn. Duluth
72
Northwestern, Minn. 76, Presentation
57
SW Minnesota St. 89, Concordia, St.P.
86, 20T
FAR WEST
Adams St. 83, Colo.-Colo. Springs 69
i Coll. of Idaho 73, NW Christian 56
E. Oregon 88, Corban 83
Northwest College 99, Concordia, Ore.


69
Warner Pacific 86, Evergreen St. 63


Friday's Scores
EAST
Baruch 80, Hunter 61
Brown 56, Dartmouth 48
Case Reserve 77, NYU 69
Chicago 66, Rochester 56
Ithaca 61, St. John Fisher 46
Marist 56, lona 45
Penn 51, Cornell 33 '
Princeton 57, Columbia 35
Rochester Tech 74, Hartwick 67
Stevens Tech 65, Nazareth, N.Y. 50
Union, N.Y. 69, Vassar 64
Yale 82, Harvard 71
SOUTH
Barton 71, Coker 55
Centre 78, Sewanee 63
Duke 82, Wake Forest 39
Florida St. 73, Georgia Tech 60
Goucher 56, Merchant Marine 44
Prairie View 46, Grambling St. 40
MIDWEST
Concordia, St.P. 58, SW Minnesota St.
56
Lake Forest 78, Beloit 62
Martin Luther 73, St. Scholastica 62
Minn. St., Moorhead 67, Minn. Duluth
65
Minn.-Crookston 84, Bemidji St. 63
Minn.-Morris 81, Crown, Minn, 31
Northern St., S.D. 67, Augustana,S.D.
54
Northland 79, Bethany Lutheran 70
Northwestern, Minn. 64, Presentation
46
Wayne, Neb. 79, Mary 67
FAR WEST
Adams St. 59, Colo.-Colo. Springs 58
Coll. of Idaho 67, NW Christian 44
Concordia, Ore. 66, Northwest College
54
Corban 82, E. Oregon 80
Montana Tech 70, Great Falls 59
Montana Western 72, Montana St.-
Northern 69
Warner Pacific 64, Evergreen St. 51


Page 3D


LOCAL SCHEDULE


Avon Park






Lake Placid

Lake Placid


Sebring


SFCC


TUESDAY: Baseball hosts Bill Jarrett Early Bird Tournament, vs. Santa Fe Catholic, 7:30
p.m.; Softball atTenoroc, 6/7:30 p.m.; BoysTennis vs. Hardee, 4 p.m.; GirlsTennis vs.
Hardee, 4 p.m.
THURSDAY: Softball vs. DeSoto, 6/7:30 p.m.
FRIDAY: Baseball hosts Bill Jarrett Early BirdTournament, vs. Sebring, 6:30 p.m.;
Softball vs. Lake Placid, 5:30/7:30 p.m.


TUESDAY: Baseball at Bill Jarrett Ford Early Bird Tournament, Avon Park, vs. Sebring, 5
p.m.; Softball vs. McKeel, 5:30/7:30 p.m.; BoysTennis vs. LaBelle, 4:30 p.m.; Girls
Tennis at LaBelle, 4:30 p.m.; Track and Field hosts Meet, 4 p.m.
THURSDAY: Baseball at Bill Jarrett Ford Early BirdTournament, vs. DeSoto, 5 p.m.;
BoysTennis vs. Sebring, 2 p.m.
FRIDAY: Softball at Avon Park, 5:30/7:30 p.m.


MONDAY: BoysTennis at LaBelle, 4 p.m.
TUESDAY: Baseball at Bill Jarrett Ford Early Bird Tournament, Avon Park, vs. Lake
Placid, 5 p.m.; Softball vs. Lake Wales, 6/7:30 p.m.; BoysTennis vs. Mulberry, 4 p.m.Gi;
GirlsTennis at Mulberry, 4 p.m.
THURSDAY: Baseball at Bill Jarrett Ford Early BirdTournament,TBD; BoysTennis at
Lake Placid, 2 p.m.; GirlsTennis vs. Lake Wales, 4 p.m.


TODAY: Baseball vs. Miami Dade, doubleheader, 1 p.m.
TUESDAY: Softball vs. Palm Beach State, 5 p.m.
WEDNESDAY: Baseball vs. Indian River, 6 p.m.
THURSDAY: Softball at Brevard, 4 p.m.
FRIDAY: Baseball at Palm Beach State, 4 p.m.




SPORTS SNAPSHOTS


McFarling Golf
SPRINGLAKE The 5th Annual
James McFarling Golf Tournament will
be held Saturday, March 5 at the
SpringLake Golf Resort.
The flighted, four-person scramble will
tee off with a 9 a.m. shotgun start.
For $50 per person, golfers get flight
prizes, CTP for men and women. goodie
bags and lunch at Michael's restaurant.
Proceeds will be awarded to scholar-
ship recipients from the Highlands
County Sertoma Junior Golf Tour.
For more information, call John
Delaney at 655-3686.
Woman's Club Benefit
SEBRING The Woman's Club of
Sebring will be holding a golf tournament
to benefit its' scholarship fund Saturday,
Feb. 19 at the Harder Hall Golf Course.
The four-person scramble will check-in
at 7 a.m. with an 8 a.m. shotgun start.
Cost is $55 per player or $220 per team
and includes golf, cart, lunch and prizes.
There is a Putting and Chipping contest
available and a $2,000 Hole-In-One prize
sponsored by the Cohan Radio Group.
Entry forms are available at local pro
shops and are to be sent to The Woman's
Club of Sebring, P.O. Box 8174, Sebring,
FL, 33872.
Registration deadline is February 14.
For an entry form or for more informa-
tion, call Johnell West at 382-0824.
Panther 5K
AVON PARK The second annual
South Florida Community College
Panther 5K Run/Walk will take place
Saturday, Feb. 26 at the SFCC Campus.
The SFCC Foundation, Inc. and Bill
Jarrett Ford Mercury are sponsoring the
event, and proceeds benefit the college's
intercollegiate athletics programs.
The entry fee is $20 through Feb. 16
and $25 from Feb. 17 through race day.
Students with I.D. may register for $15.
Every participant receives a Dri-Fit
long-sleeve shirt sizes cannot be guar-
anteed for those who enter after Feb. 17.
Registration is 7-7:45 a.m. on race day
Sin the parking lot in front of the SFCC
University Center race starts at 8 a.m.
Entry forms are available online at
www.southflorida.edu/panther5k.
Participants can mail their copies and
entry fees to the SFCC Foundation, Inc.,
13 East Main Street, Avon Park, FL
33825; or fax forms to 453-8023 and call
453-3133 with credit card information.
For more information call the SFCC
Foundation at 863-453-3133.
5th Annual L.O.S.T. 118-Mile
Endurance Run
OKEECHOBEE The fifth annual
L.O.S.T. (Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail)
118-Mile Endurance Run will take place


there will be manned aid stations at
Lakeport, Moore Haven, Clewiston, Paul
Rardin Park, Pahokee, Port Mayaca and
Nubbins Slough.
The race website is www.lostll8mile-
endurancerun.com.
For more information, contact Mike
Melton at 772-349-1704
Wings of Faith Golf
SEBRING Wings of Faith Worship
Center presents the First Annual Golf
Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at
Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is
from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start
at 8:30 a.m.
Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one
team of four golfers, one tee sign and two
green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes
one team of four golfers, one green sign;
Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green
sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100
includes one green sign.
Individual player $60 includes green
fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26).
Team of Four Golfers $240 includes
green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after
March 26).
Make checks payable to: Wings of
Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL
33871, or register online at wingsof-
faithchristianworshipcenter.com.
Proceeds to be donated to scholarship
program for graduates attending Wings of
Faith Christian Worship Center.
For more information, call Jason
Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhanker-
son@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at
381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com.
Our Lady of Grace events
AVON PARK Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church has two benefit events
coming up.
Tuesday, Feb. 22 they will host the
Todd Allen Show.
Allen will perform a variety of styles
including Rock 'n Roll, Country and his
award-winning Elvis impersonations.
The show will be held at the Our Lady
of Grace Catholic Church Grogan Center,
at 595 E. Main St. in Avon Park, at 7 p.m.
For a donation of $10, tickets can be
purchased at the Highlands Independent
Bank and Heartland National Bank Avon
Park locations, Warren's Auto Sales and
the Avon Park Chamber of Commerce.
The next event will be the First Annual
Golf Tournament at River Greens
Saturday, March 12 at 8 a.m.
The cost of $60 per player includes
golf, cart, golf shirt and lunch, while
River Greens members pay just $35.
Sponsorships are available, starting
with a $100 hole sponsor for a sign only.
A Hole Sponsor with Sign, plus a free
foursome, is $300, a Co-Sponsor Sign,
plus free foursome, with perogative to fly
their banner is $400 and a Major Sponsor
is $1,500.


the weekend of February 26-27. Seminole Club Trail Run
This footrace consists of one circum-
navigation of Lake Okeechobee by run- SEBRING The Highlands Semi
ning along the top of the Herbert Hoover Club presents the first Seminole Trail.
Dike, a distance of 118 miles. 5K on Saturday, March 5. at the S.ui
The race begins 6:30 a.m. at the Okie- Lake Preserve in Sebring.
Tantie Campground located just west of The cost is $15 per participant if re
the town of Okeechobee, and runners have tered by Tuesday, Feb. 15 and $20
34 hours to complete their loop of the lake. that day or on the day of race.
The run precedes counterclockwise Registration on race day begins
around the lake, so runners pass the towns a.m. and the race will begin at 8 a.m.
of Lakeport, Moore Haven. Clewiston, Awards will be presented for top fin
Pakohee and Port Mayaca before they ers in major age groups.
return to Okie-Tantie. This is the first event of its kind foi
A total of 12 solo runners are entered so trails at the Preserve.
far, and three 2-person relay teams are Registration forms can be found
also running the course. highlandsseminioles.oirg.
Runners will receive aid at various Call 386-9194 oremail iantarayEM@e,
access points located around the lake, and linkniet for more information.


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News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


Page 4D


www.newssun.corn


Avon Park stands tall, proud in defeat


Continued from 1D
made it to the 2010 state
semifinals.
Tampa Catholic's softball
team has won two state
championships and finished
in the top four twice more.
The school's entire tennis
team advanced to regionals in
2010. Individual players have
won a number of state cham-
pionships.
The list of the school's
state track champions cannot
fit in a newspaper article and
the same holds true for
Tampa Catholic's golf and
swim teams.
It's admirable that Tampa
Catholic manages to excel in
nearly every sport the school
sponsors.
Its student-athletes are for-
tunate to have coaches who
trained under Olympic ath-
letes and have decades of
college coaching on their
resumes.
There are probably many
other schools with similar
resources that rival Tampa
Catholic's.
Whether Avon Park, even
with its own proud tradition
of past state championships,
is one of them is arguable.
The Lady Devils did their
best Thur:day from begin-
ning to end.
Their long shots weren't
falling for every player, but
senior Markida Hawthorne
had the honor of scoring a
game-high 20 points not
just the team-high, but the
came high that included
five 3-point bombs, despite
being double-teamed much
of the night.
Tampa Catholic's height
and positioning smarts gave
the team primary access to
rebounds, ample shot block-
ing opportunities and pushed
Avon Park into too many
turnovers.
The Crusaders primarily


played a full court press, han-
dling the Red Devils with a
man-to-man defense that kept
Avon Park's ball handlers
and shooters tied up in knots.
Hawthorne was the only
Lady Devil to sink long
shots. Other than Perry's 12
points, junior Brekayla
English added 10 pts and sen-
ior Chantel Hughley chipped
in two.
When Tampa Catholic car-
ried the ball near Avon Park's
basket, it was rare when the
Crusaders didn't score.
If not from the corner, then
from the first shot, put back
or third rebound opportunity.
T h e
Crusaders led 'We w
31-8 after the
first quarter, there pit
b u t
Hawthorne's hardest.
heroic 14-point we had
second quarter
brought the with no
Red Devils to
within 46-35 at and we
halftime.
"We knew there an
they had some
great shooters OUT
and they're a
great team so it CHANTELI
wasn't like we Avon Pc
didn't know
what to expect," said Avon
Park coach Paulette Daley.
"It's a new atmosphere for us
and I'm very proud of my
girls.
"They didn't give up even
when the score kind of got
out of proportion in that first
quarter."
A 27-9 advantage for
Tampa Catholic in the third
quarter put the game out of
reach for Avon Park.
The Red Devils and
Crusaders traded baskets at
the start of the quarter, but a
10-point Tampa Catholic run,
ended by Perry's layup, put
an end to any comeback


-e








L
lr


hopes.
With three minutes left in
the quarter, the Crusaders
pulled ahead 71-35 to trigger
the running clock. Two field
goals by English helped but it
was too little, too late for the
Lady Devils.
"This was our first year
playing them," Hughley said.
"We knew they had some
shooters and some rebound-
ers but we prepared all week
with our shooting and
rebounding.
"We were out there playing
our hardest. We tried to keep
up with them. We knew we
had to do it with no attitude
and we went
ere out out there and
gave it our
ying our all."
T a in p a
We knew Catholic sank a
to do it total of 10 3-
tO. do it pointers.
attitude Starting sen-
ior Meghan
vent out Keough scored
,16 points; jun-
i gave it ior Micah
Kroll scored 19
all' points with six
3 pointers,
HUGHLEY junior Kai
k player Jones scored
17 points, jun-
ior Kai Jones, scored nine
points with three 3-pointers;
and Kelsey Brown shot one
3-pointer for three points.
"We've been in other
tough games and when you
get to this game you're trying
to do things that you should-
n't do and you get a little ten-
tative," Daley said. "In the
beginning, the girls were a
little tight.
"This is a game just like
any other game. It just means
a little more. Maybe it was an
eye-opener for them. We just
slipped on a lot of defensive
assignments and they were
making shots like crazy.


Nonetheless we had our-
selves a great season."
Off the bench, the
Crusaders got offense from
Gabi Reina, who scored
seven with one 3-pointer and
Kelsey Brown nailed one 3-
pointer for three points.
"I'm proud of my team-
mates," said Hughley "We
left it all on the floor. We
played a real good game.
Three full years on varsity,
I'm going to miss Avon Park.
Sophomore Toy Perry
added, "With the Lord's will
I'll come back next year and
do the same thing over. I'd
like to go further.
"The seniors had a good
season this year. I wish them
the best of luck in the future.
We gave them our all and our
hard work paid off."
Fort Meade will have the
pleasure of playing Tampa
Catholic next.
The Miners, the District 9-
3A champions who defeated
Avon Park fof the title, put
back an offensive rebound
with 15 seconds remaining in
the game to take the Class 3A
region quarterfinal 47-44
over St. Petersburg Catholic
in Fort Meade on Thursday.
While Daley will miss her
seniors, she's looking ahead
to the start of next season
already.
"I'm very proud of my sen-
iors," she said. "I'm going to
miss them. We're six deep
with seniors, so now we're
back to a rebuilding stage.
We're going to get back in
the gym and do what we need
to do.
"We brought up a few JV
players so hopefully seeing
how the atmosphere and the
game are different from JV
games will teach them some-
thing. Hopefully they'll see
how tough it is and see what
they need to do."


4Aj. r
d '.s .. .


News-Sun photo by KATE ROWLAND
Lady Devil Markida Hawthorne lofts this drive to the hoop
Thursday. Hawthorne would also sink five 3-pointers for a
game-high 20 points, but it wasn't enough against the
defending state champion Lady Crusaders of Tampa
Catholic.


Norris signs with Polk State College


L.! Ji /1 '-47 *' ^ A. -
I


Courtesy photo
Frostproof High School senior Trey Norris (center, seated) prepares to sign a letter of com-
mitment to Polk State College this fall, where he will pitch for the college baseball team.
With him are mother Debbie and sister Kaylee; as well as (standing from left) grandparents
Betty and Edward Jackson, father Ricky, and grandparents Betty and Homer Wilson. Rick
Norris is a graduate of Avon Park High School. Ed and Betty Jackson are Avon Park resi-
dents. Polk State plays in the same conference as South Florida Community College. Trey
carries a GPA of over 4.3 and was 2-0 in 15 innings pitched last year with an ERA of just
1.87. He also played in the field.




Thursday softball gets soggy


Special to the News-Sun
The steady, though never
heavy, day of rain Thursday
allowed for some soft-
ball to be played, just Sel
not in the best condi-
tions. I
At least one area
team came out victori- Avor
ous, though all a little
muddy, as Sebring


powered past Avon
Park 12-1 in five innings.
Paced by Caitlyn
Ostrander's three RBI and a
strong pitching performance
from Carley Hoffner, the
Lady Streaks were able to
notch the win after falling in
close games twice during
their preseason schedule.
Both teams are back in
action Tuesday as Avon Park
is on the road at Tenoroc
while Sebring welcomes a
visit from Lake Wales.

Find a6l what
you are looking for I
A NEWS-SUN
C.> Classified Ads 385-6155


br



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I


At SFCC, the offe
breakthrough in Tues
sweep of College of C
Florida didn't
ing carry over.
S The Lady
Panther bats
were held in
Park check by Alex
Ryan as the
Lady Titans


ensive
sday's
centrall


rolled to a 5-0 win.
The second game of the
twin bill was cancelled due to


the continuing rainy
Brevard conditions.
South Florida was
on the road at
Seminole Saturday
SFCC and return home
Tuesday to face Palmn
Beach State.


2011 Heartland Horses & Handicapped

Denim & Diamonds Gala

On behalf of the Heartland Horses & Handicapped Board of Direc-
tors, Volunteers and clients, we want to say THANK YOU to each and
every one of you who made our event successful! Your generosity
will allow us to continue providing physical interaction, exercise and
education through the use of horses to children and adults who are
physically, emotionally or developmentally challenged.
These services are completely FREE to our clients!

DIAMOND SPONSORS
Florida Hospital
Highlands Independent Bank
Kiwanis Club of Sebring

GOLD SPONSORS
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News Sun

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Gary and Kay Benson
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1050 Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 10-497
Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CAROL HARRELL
a/k/a CAROL E. HARRELL
a/k/a CAROL J. GROVE HARRELL
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Sum-
mary Administration has been entered in the es-
tate of CAROL HARRELL a/k/a CAROL E. HARRELL
a/k/a CAROL J. GROVE HARRELL, deceased, File
Number PC 10-497, by the Circuit Court for
HIGHLANDS County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 590 South Commerce Ave-
nue, Sebring, FL 33870: that the decedent's date
of death was November 19, 2010; that the total
value of the estate is exempt real property and
that the names and addresses of those to whom
it has been assigned by such order are:
Name Address
Vicki L. Basham 2704 Nautilus Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
Cindy L. Watkins 7522 West 50 North
Angola, IN 46703
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
February 6, 2011.
Person Giving Notice:
Vicki L. Basham
2704 Nautilus Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
Cindy L. Watkins
7522 West 50 North
Angola, IN 46703
BREED & NUNNALLEE, P.A.
Attorneys for Personal Representative:
325 NORTH COMMERCE AVENUE
SEBRING, FL 33870
Telephone: (863) 382-3154
By: /s/ Thomas L. Nuinnallee
Florida Bar No. 0062162
E-mail Address: tnunnallee@bnpalaw.com
February 6, 13, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. PC11-30
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARGARET SHARITS
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Margaret
Sharits, deceased, whose date of death was No-
vember 30, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is Clerk of the Court, High-
lands County Courthouse, 530 South Commerce
Avenue, Sebring, Florida. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THiS NOTICE,
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOT WITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is February 13, 2011.
Personal Representative:
Cassandra L. Kincaid77 West Lee St., Suite
102Warrenton, VA 20186


1050 Lega
Attorney for Personal Representative:
John K. McClure
Attorney for Cassandra L. Kincaid
Florida Bar Number: 286958MCCLURE & LOBOZZO
211 S. Ridgewood DriveSebnng, Florida 33870Tele-
phone: (863) 402-1888Fax. (863)
402-0751E-Mail: kelly@mllaw.net
February 13, 20, 2011

STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRON-
MENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT

The Department of Environmental Protection
gives notice of its intent to issue an Environmental
Resource Permit (File No. 47-0272794-002-EI) to
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the Kissim-
mee River Restoration S-69 U-Shaped Weir Pro-
ject, Contract 12A. The project involves installing
a U- shaped weir that crosses the C-38 Canal ap-
proximately 2,000 feet north of the existing CSX
railroad, constructing two earthen levees, and
backfilling nearly 3,600 feet or the C-38 Canal.
Earthen material from two nearby spoil mounds
will be used to construct the two levees and back-
fill the C-38 Canal. The proposed project will im-
pact approximately 57.8 acres of wetlands or
other surface waters and restore over 134 acres
of Kissimmee River floodplain.
The activities are located along and in the vi-
cinity of the C-38 Canal immediately north of the
existing CSX railroad-crossing in Okeechobee and
Highlands Counties (Sections 9, 15, 16, 17, 20,
21, and 22; Township 36 South; and Range 33
East). The designated beneficial use classification
of surface waters in the existing wetlands and the
C-38 Canal is Class Ill Waters of the State pursu-
ant to Section 62-302.400, F.A.C.
The application is available for public inspec-
tion during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal
holidays, at the Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection, Southeast District Office, 400
North Congress Avenue, Suite 200, West Palm
Beach, Florida, 33401, telephone (561)
681-6759.
The Department will issue the permit with at-
tached conditions unless a timely petition for an
administrative hearing is filed under sections
120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes, be-
fore the deadline for filing a petition. The proce-
dures for petitioning for a hearing are set forth be-
low.
A person whose substantial interests are af-
fected by the Department's proposed permitting
decision may petition for an administrative pro-
ceeding (hearing) under sections 120.569 and
120.57 of the Florida Statutes. The petition must
contain the information set forth below and must
be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of
General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Com-
monwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahas-
see, Florida 32399-3000.
Petitions by the applicant or any of the parties
listed below must be filed within 21 days of re-
ceipt of this written notice. Petitions filed by any
persons other than those entitled to written notice
under section 120.60(3) of the Florida Statutes
must be filed within 21 days of publication of the
notice or receipt of the written notice, whichever
occurs first. Under section 120.60(3) of the Flor-
ida Statutes, however, any person who has asked
the Department for notice of agency action may
file a petition within 21 days of receipt of such no-
tice, regardless of the date of publication.
The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition
to the applicant at the address indicated above at
the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a
petition or request for mediation within the appro-
priate time period shall constitute a waiver of that
person's right to request an administrative deter-
mination (hearing) under sections 120.569 and
120.57 of the Florida Statutes. Any subsequent
intervention (in a proceeding initiated by another
party) will be only at the discretion of the presiding
officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance
with rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative
Code.
A petition that disputes the material facts on
which the Department's action is based must con-
tain the following information: (a) The name and
address of each agency affected and each agen-
cy's file or identification number, if known; (b)
The name, address, and telephone number of the
petitioner; the name, address, and telephone
number of the petitioner's representative, if any,
which shall be the address for service purposes
during the course of the proceeding; and an ex-
planation of how the petitioner's substantialinter-
ests will be affected by the agency determination;
(c) A statement of how and when each petitioner
received notice of the agency decision;
(d) A statement of all disputed issues of material
fact. If there are none, the petition must so indi-
cate; *
(e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts al-
leged, as well as the rules or statutes which enti-
tle thepetilioner to relief; and
(f) A demand for relief.
A petition that does not dispute the material
facts on which the Department's action is based
shall state that no such facts are in dispute and


1050 Le
otherwise shall contain the same information as
set forth above, as required by rule 28-106.301..
Because the administrative hearing process is
designed to formulate final agency action, the fil-
ing of a petition means that the Department's final
action may be different from the position taken by
it in this notice. Persons whose substantial inter-
ests will be affected by any such final decision of
the Department have the' right to petition to be-
come a party to the proceeding, in accordance
with the requirements set forth above.
Mediation is not available in this proceeding.
Any party to this order has the right to seek ju-
dicial review of it under section 120.68 of the
Florida Statutes, by filing a notice of appeal under
rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Proce-
dure with the clerk of thile Department in tlhe Office
of General Counsel, Mail Station 35, 3900 Com-
monwealth Boulevaid, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3000, and by filing a copy of tile notice of
appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees
with the appropriate district court of appeal. Tlhe
notice of appeal must be filed within thirty days
after this order is filed with the clerk of the De-
partment.
February 13, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: FC 11-121
GAIL GOMEZ,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
LUIS GOMEZ,
Respondent/Husband
NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: Luis Gomez
Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been
filed against you and that you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on Steven D. Miller, Esq., whose address is 817
South University Drive, Suite 122, Plantation, Flor-
ida 33324 on or before March 15, 2011, and file
the original with thie clerk of this Court at High-
lands County Courthouse, 590 South Commerce
Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870-3867 before
service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If
you fail to do so, a default may be entered against
you for thie relief demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case, in-
cluding orders, are available at thie Clerk of tihe
Circuit Court's office. You may review these docu-
irrents upon request
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office notified of your current address, (You may
file Notice of Current Address, Floridn Siupreme
Court Apprioved Family Law Foirn t.12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12,285, Florida Faunily Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanctions, including dis-
missal or striking of pleadings.
Dated: February 3, 2011.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
February 6, 13, 20, 27, 2011
Excell Communications, Inc. proposes to collocate
on an existing 150-foot tall water tower located at
222 SW Lakeside Drive in Sebrig, Florida
(27-29-51.44 N, 81-28-42.9 W). Existing wire-
less telecommunications antennas will be re-
placed and one electronic cabinet will be added to
those already present at t11he base, on an existing
concrete slab. In accordance with Section 106 of
the National Historic Preservation Act, Excell Coim-
munications hereby solicits public comments con-
cerning its proposal. In order for your comments
to receive full and timely consideration, they
should be received at thie address below within 30
days of the date of this notice: Zachary D. Hall,
Excell Communications, 6247 Amber Hills Rd,
Trussville, AL, 35173, Ph. 205-956-0198 (x210);
zhlall@excellconi municationis.conl.
February 11,13, 16, 2011
Notice of Public AvailabilityStatement of Basis En-
vironmental Restoration Program Site OT-59Cattle
Dip Vats A, C and DAvon Park Air Force Ran-
geAvon Park, FloridaThe public is encouraged to
review and comment on the corrective measures
alternative presented in the Statement of Basis
during the Public Review Period February 13 -
March 30, 2011 Tie Statement of Basis is avail-
able at the Avon Park Air Force Range Headquar
lers, Building 29For further information
contactl:Mike StevensAir Force Environmental Res-
toratron ProgramOL A, DET 1, 23 WG/CEVR29
South BlvdAvon Park Air Force Range, FL
33825 9381
(863) 452-4247 HYPERLINK "mailto.Michael.Ste-
venils.9@us.af.mil"
Michael Stevens,9@us.af.milPlease submit writ-
ten comments to:John WintersFlorida Dept. of En
vironmental Protection2600 Blair Stone Road, MS
4535Tallahassee, FL 32399-2400850-245-8999
HYPERLINK 'mailto:John.Winteis@dep state.fl.us"
Joihn.Winters@rldepi.state.fl.us
February 13, 20, 2011


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AD RATES


GARAGE

SALE

6 lines 2 days


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For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop!


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NEWS-SUN 385-6155


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Page 6D


1050 Lega.
PUBLIC NOTICE
Avon Park Air Force RangeResloration Advisory
BoardMeeting Notice

The next Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) meet-
ing for the Avon Park Air Force Range (AFR) Envi-
ronmental Restoration Program (ERP) will be held
at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 22, 2011. a'
the Jacaranda Hotel on Main Street in downtown
Avon Park, Florida The purpose of the RAB is to
update the public on the environmental cleanup
progress at the Range and allow the public the
opportunity to provide input for the Program. Ad
ditional information may be obtained by contacting
Mike Stevens at HYPERLINK "mailto:Michael Ste-
vens.9@us.af.mil" Mtchael.Stevens.9@us.af.min
or 863-452-4247.
February 13, 20, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION
Case No.2010-CA-001269
HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs
SONIA REID-SMALL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SONIA REID-SMALL; MICHAEL SMALL; and UN-
KNOWN OCCUPANTS, TENANTS, OWNERS, AND
OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, including, if a named
defendant is deceased, the personal representa-
tives, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grant-
ees, creditors, and all other parties claiming by,
through, under or against that defendant, and all
claimants, persons or parties, natural or corpo-
rate. or whose exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under any of the above named or de-
scribed defendants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT- PROPERTY
TO. UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SONIA REID-SMALL
MICHAEL SMALL
UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS, TENANTS, OWN-
ERS
AND OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES
Residence: Unknown
Mailing Address: Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the following property in
Highlands County, Florida:
LOT 5, IN BLOCK 16, OF SEBRING COUNTRY
ESTATES SECTION ONE, ACCORDING TO THE
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 6, PAGE 49, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA,
has been file against you, UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF SONIA REID-SMALL; MICHAEL SMALL; and
UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS. TENANTS, OWNERS,
AND OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any to it, on the Plaintiff's attorney, whose name
and address is ENRICO G. GONZALEZ, P.A., 6255
East Fowler Avenue, Temple Terrace, Florida
33617, and file the original with the clerk of the
above-styled Court no later than 30 days from the
date of the first publication of this notice of action,
otherwise a judgment may be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Peti-
tion.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court
on February 1, 2011.
Robert W. Germaine
Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, personsneeding a special accommodation to
participation this Hearing should contact the
A.D.A. Coordinator not later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceeding at tire Florida Relay Service
at 1-800-955-8770.
February 13, 20, 2011
HIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERSiHCBCC)
GENERAL SERVICES PURCHASING
INVITATION TO BID (ITB)
The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands
County, Sebnng, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the
County Purchasing Departmit for the following Annual
Bids: ITB 11-025 ADVANCED LIFE SUPPORT DRUGS
NIGP CODE #269
ITB 11-026 TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES MATERIALS &
HARDWARE
NiGP CODE #550
ITB 11-027 BASE ROCK MATERIAL (SHELLROCK -
LIMEROCK)
NIGP CODE #750
ITB 11-028 BASIC LIFE SUPPORT SUPPLIES NIGP
CODE i475
ITB 11-029 CONCRETE CULVERTS NIGP
CODE 1210
ITB 11-030 DITCH CLEANING ISTOKPOGA WATERSHED
DISTRICT
NIGP CODE #912
ITB 11-031 HEAVY EQUIPMENT RENTAL NIGP
CODE 4975
ITB 11 032 POLYETHYLENE PIPE & COUPLERS
NIGP CODE #658
Specificatons may be obtained by down-
loadina from our websile. HYPERLINK
"http f\'wi vwhcbcc net" www.hcbcc net or by contacting
Danielle Gilbert, CPPB, Acting Director !'Highlands County
General Services/Purchasing Department 4320 George
Bivd., Sebnng, Florida 33875-5803 Phone
863-402-6524, Fax: 863-402-6735, or E-Mail: HYPER-
LINK "mailto'dgilberI@hcbc.crg" dgilbert@hcbcc.org
BiG envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid num
ber and name so as to identify the enclosed bids. Bids
must be delivered to the Highlands County Purchasing De-
partment, 4320 George Blvd, Sebring, FL 33875-5803,
so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P M, Thurs-
day, March i1, 2011, at which time they will be opened
Bids received later than the date and time as specified will
be rejected. Tihe Board will not be responsible for the late
deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered
in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service
One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at
the above bid openings Hghlands County Local Prefer-
ence Policy wil apply to the award of 'his ifB The High
lands County Board of County Commissioners reserves the
right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof,
and the award, if an award is made, wil be made to the
most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and
qualifications indicate that thIe award will be In the best in-
terest of Highlands Coun0y. Toe Board reserves the rnght
to waive irregularies in the bid Tie Board of County
Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not dis+
criminate upon tie basis of any individual's disability
status. This non-discnrimination policy involves every as-
pect .of the Board's functions, including one's access to,
participation, employment or treatments in its programs or
activities Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as
provided lor in 1he Americans with Disabilihes Act or Sec-
ion 286 26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John A
Minor, ADA Coordinator at 863-0'02-6O09 (Voicef,
863-402-6508 (FF), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or
by e-mail: HYPERLINK "maillo Jminor@hcbcc.org" Jmi-
nor@hchbcc.org Requests for CART or interpreter services
should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit co-
ordination of the service
Board of County Commisstoners
Purchasing Department; Highlands County Florida
Website HYPERLINK"http l/www.hcbccrlet" vAw' hIbcc nel
February 13,20,2011
HIGHLANDS COUNTYBOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GENERAL SERVI CES & PURCHASING
INVITATION TO BID |ITB)
The Board of County Commisoners (BCC), Highlands
County, Sebring, Florda, will receaie sealed bids in lhe
County Purchasing Department for
:ITB No. 11-033 SPAR-ROW AVENUE AND U.S 27
INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT No 09043 NIGP
COMMODITY/SERVCES CODE: 913-27
Specifications may be obtained by downloading from cur


website' w,v ncbcc.net or by contacting Danielle Gilbert,
Acting Director, Highlands County General
Services/Purcasing Department 4320 George
Blvd., Sebring, FL 5365-5803 Te4ev hon,
863-102 6524, E-Mail dgilbert@hcocc.org
A NON-MANDATORY Pre-Bid meeting vwil be held at 10 00
AM on Wednesday. February 16, 2011 in the Engineering
Conference Room, 505 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring,
Florida 33870 All potential bidders are encouraged attend
this meeting.Submit one (1) originals and three (3) copies
of your bid form, bid security and other required data in a
sealed envelope and marked with the bid number and
name so as to identify the enclosed bid submittal Bids
must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Depart-
ment, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 so as
to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday,
March 3, 2011 at which time they will be opened. Bids re
ceived later than the dae and time as specified will be re-
jected The Board wll not be responsible for the late deliv-
eries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in
person, by mail or any other type of delivery service One
or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at
either or both of ie above meetings. Highlands Counry
Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this
bid.
Vendors submitting responses must submit bids on all
work to receive consideration A Bid Bond or Cashie's
Check in an amount of five percent (5%) ol the b id must
be included on bids over $100,00000 If lhe successful
biid is greater than $200,00000, a FPubli Csru(,eron
Bond will be required Bid ITmul be accoIpalnid by OvI


News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


10 5 S Highlands
S1055 County Legals
dence of bidder s qualifications to do lrus '!oss in th.1 State
u I F .rida. in accordance t S 489
ha crInclpa; teatLi s of lthI Proecl a'e,
LUfP SUM PRICE DID
"o provide ail labor materials arid eqL0lipmrT1 ;t to construct an
adio al lan1 e a n SDanov,' Avenue p fOviding dual lE -trinI
eires onto U S l7 'This p io(.i aso inluAdes i fonstructln
af concrete Iefilic repafor. cn rate er cmb and putter.
rain )age levocvFnerns, resurfaurng and ght-o :.ray res-
IstatCIo SI'ci the '.ork of this projeul is at tie intersec-
tion of Sparifj;. Avenues anda U S 27 eManilnnaicl of Traf
; Vi;l be especially important All workmianshp and ma-
teralas snall meet tie re uiirement of lei Hloinda Depart-
en lof Transpoilation Standard Specilhcal ils for Road
anr Bridge Construcllon (dated 010). Highlands County
Engirienng Standards and be in CnphTance with all per-
mits issued
ihe Hoighlands CoUnly Boar o of County Coi-
nissioners (HCBCC;COUNTY) reserves te right to accept
or reject any or al bids or any parts thereof, and [he
award, if an avi'ar is made, T'o.! be mad to the most re-
spons-re and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifica-
ions indicate that the a,.'.ard i,ll be in the best interest of
Highlands County the Board reserves the Inght to wailve
irregLuarilies inthe bid
The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County,
Florida, does not discriminate upon I he basis 01l any
individual's disability status This non-dscnminat on policy
involves every aspect of thieBoard's functions, including one's
access to. participation, employment or treatment in its
programs or activities. Highlands County is an equal
opportunity employer, a fair housing advocate and a handicap
accessibe jurisdiction. Anyone requiring reasonable


1055 Highlands
I1055 County Legals


ccommodai0on as prowded fc! in
Disabil lies Act (ADA) of Secton 28
should conarl cMr John Min', ADA
,102-6509 Vo!cel or via Honda Pelay
mail jininor'@iLccorg Reouests fo
servc'es should be nlade at least 24
permit coirdinatoi ,,f Cip service
Boatd of Couni, Cormm,,sioners
Purchasing DepartmontHighilands Couni
VWehsile HYPERLINK
v. lI, hch l net


DOES MAKING
MAKE YOU H
Sell your used a
with a News
classified
Call today
gone tomor
385-615


10 5 5 CoHighlands
10 5 5 County Legals


The Americans aih HIGHLANDS COUNTYBOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION-
8626 Florida Slatu!es ERSGENERALSERVICES 8 PURCHASING
SCoorinator at 862- The Board of County Commissioners (BCC, Highlanos
Service 711. or by e- Ccunv, Sebring Florida, will reeve sealed bids in tile
or CARl or interr--r' Conrty Purchasing Deparmen! fcrfITB 11 034 ON-SITE
4 hours in advance o0 OR REMOTE SHREDDING OF WASTE TIRES FOR HIGH-
LANDS COUNTY LANDFILL NGP CODE No 962-84Specifi-
cations may be obtained by dowloading from our w'ebsite
ty, Florida HYPERLINK "ttp'/v...' hbcc ne!" l';.mw hcbcc net or by
'hltp .V'A .hbcc 'Iet" ccntacing Doanielle Gilcben, CPPB, Acling Director/High-
lalds County General Services/Purchasing Department
February 6, 13 11 4320i George Blvd. Sebrnng, Florida 33875-5803 Phone:
863-402-6524 Fax 8e3-402-67,35. or E Mail. HYPER-
LINK "malto dgilber@hlicbaccorg" 'gibert@hchcc orgBid
envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid num-
MONEY ber and name so as to identify the enclosed bids. Bids
must be delivered to the Highlands CounLy Purchasing De-
APPY? p e 4320 George Blvd. Sebnng, FL 33875-5803
' A r I so as 1o reach said office no later than 2 00 P.M Thurs-
S day March 3, 2011 at which time they will be opened
appliance B'ids rece,,ed later than the date and tlme as speclhed wil.
ne rejected The Board will not be responsible for the late
~-Sun deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, deelveild
in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service,
ad One OF more County Commissioners may be in attendance
a at the above bid opening Highlands County Local Prefer-
ence Policy will apply to ahe award of this ITB. The High-
y, lands County Board o Count. Commissioners (HCBCC) re-
serves the eight to accept or reject any or all bids or any
row! parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made will be
made to the most responsible bidder whose bid and quali
5 licatlons indicate that the award will be in the best interest
ol Highlands County The Board reserves thes right to


1055 Highlands
1055 County Legals
waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Cor -
miss!oners of Highlands County, Flonda. does not discrimln-
nate upon cie basis of any individual's disability status
This on-discrimination policy involves every aspect ofl the
Board's functions, including one's access to, participation,
employment or treatment in its programs or activities Any-
one requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26
Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John A. Minor, ADA
Coordinator at 863-402-6509 (Voice), 863-402-6508
(TTY), or via Flonda Relay Service 711, or by e-mai: HY-
PERLINK "mallto:Jmnnor@hcbcc org" Jminor@hcbcc.org.
Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made
at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the
service
Board of County Commissioners Purchasing Department;
Highlands County, Florida
Website: HYPERLINK "http://wvw.vhcbcc.net"
fwAl hcbcc net


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Classifieds every Sunday,
Wednesday and Friday.


385-6155
News-Sun Classified


EWrT IWZ i ITW IFE ZZL ZI


SPOOL PARAbISE
Pool Service $ Mobile Retail
service Repair Supply es Equipment
Delivered Right to your Door
Brad a Julie Kurtz

(663) 362-7726
Fax (Ss3) 402-2200





SJACKSON HEWITT
INDEPEN T O TAX SERVICE
INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED


Avon Park (863) 453-2525
Lake Placid (863) 699-2525
Lake Wales (863) 679-9200


Sebring (863) 382-1515
Wauchula (863) 767-1515
Sebring Fax (863) 382-9939


Wal-Mart Locations:
Lake Wales (863) 676-0569
Sebring (863) 385-5371
Avon Park (863) 452-7010


Truck / Trailer / Labor FOR HIRE

Marc (863) 655-9579


WILLIAMS JANITORIAL

CARPET CLEANING


10"9 Per Room
3 Rooms Minimum

Upholstery Cleaning
All Types of Flooring
Free Estimates
Lic Bonded Ins
(863) 214-1940
















NO JOB TOO SMALL
WE DO IT ALL
HOME REPAIRS MAINTENANCE YARD
We Will Beat Anyone's Price
Call For Free Estimate
3 057714


HANDYMAN BOB
Install doors, windows,
flooring, plumbing & more!
Licensed & Insured
Lic# HM0096

Call 863-452-5201
or
863-449-1744



Repairs L .
Upgrades
Training
Installations .
Wi-fi Setup

-Call Ratil al:

863-633-9232


OUIVIIIgy Mll UI FlUlld Elu I Dle cai
"Enjoy the Satisfaction of Safety"
with the
ROBBINS "FLAME SYSTEM"
LIGHTNING PROTECTION
THE WORLD'S FINEST
Aluminum Lightning protection
Underwriter's Laboratories Inspected and Approved








"LIVE BLOOD ANALYSIS"

WANDA KLINE

WEIGHT LOSS

& WELLNESS
See what one drop of your blood indicates as
to YOUR nutritional health and well-being.
By appointment only
863-414-4066


~I ., ~i. Cindy Divietro
lCommunity Liaison
E Cell: 941-518-2478
V 800-518-0403
V We Elderly Care, Inc.
Compassionate, Professional Health Care For Your Loved Ones
214 E. Stuart Ave. Lake Wales, FL 33853
863-767-1120 Fax 863-676-7291
In Home Care
Avon Park Sebring Lake Placid
Private Pay Long Term Insurance
www.weelderlycare.com


S. A. LONG CLEANING $per
20 Years experience
>. Excellent References
; Daily Weekly- Biweekly- Monthly
i 4 Janitorial Service Recently
Relocated to Lake Placid Sebring
S---,Looking To Build New Clientele

863-243-1801 / Shelly A long


Freedom Lawn Care
!.Get the freedom you deserve '1
Carl Horton ouner ,
Vet. & Sr. Discount
" Lawnr tilainternnce
* Landscaping
Small Tree Work.
Clean Ups
Free Esmrnates,

863-655-2526


--- -----. -

Indoor Flea Market-'



5 dollar Store
Beckie's Avon 863-449-1298





CAMPBELL'S COLLISION
/ CENTER, INC.
1 i~..I. IM C'\MPBr i. Owner


A"


Phone (863) 382-7551
FAX (863) 382-2750


1405 US 27 North
Sebring, FL 33870


Service Available 7 Days A Week
Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com
All Service Calls $40

FEBRUARY ONLY!
New & Repeat Customers
$10
of Every $40 Service Call
Will be Donated in Your Name
(or A Name You Choose)
to the American Cancer Society

Relay for Life

Mike & Kandy Sheldone
S CEO/Owner
Lic# CAC 1816569

863-451-2399


Roger's Handyman Services




- l, i . .,,,.- ., I,, ,- ,, ,1,
\I'I lit,:" .'ln Ill. -4 II ll( I



863-381((6677
I Ir E -t[lll1.[__. .


S&D TREE SERVICE




o^For Your





Tree Trimming Stump Grinding
Tree Removal Lot Clearing

Will beat any quote


Free Stump Grinding

with any Tree Removal

Licensed & Insured / ISA Certified

863-441-5154


Joe Johnson's


ALL AMERICAN
TREE SERVICE, INC.
TRIMMING REMOVAL
SOD INSTALLATION STUMP GRINDING
LOT CLEARING PRESSURE CLEANING

Will Beat Any Written Estimate!
Peoples Choice Q A86 "57491 Free Estimates
Award 8UUJ'tU 'l53I Licensed & Insured









www.newssun.corn
WANT NEW
FURNITURE?
Need to sell the old
furniture first?
Call News-Sun
classified,
385-6155.
Then shop
till you drop!


Subscribe


to the


News-Sun


Call


385-6155


'1200 Lost&Found
LOST Downtown Lake Placid. Yorkie
silver/brown long hair. Purple collar.
51bs. 863-465-251 or 863-464-0815

| AA 1 Health Care
I IVV Services
CAREGIVERS NEEDED
Must be mature and experienced.
Must have clean background and
license. 863-812-4752


2000
Employment


100 Help Wanted
ACCOUNTING DEPT. BA / BS in
business w/ emphasis in accounting.
Must have strong experience with
Quick Books, payroll, Microsoft Excel,
Access and Word. Strong verbal and
written communication skills. Strong
inter-personal, supervisory and cus-
tomer service skills required. Ability to
multi task, work under pressure and
meet deadlines required. Email resume
to: lcelentano@sebringraceway.com
COMCAST OUTSIDE SALES
Contractor for COMCAST needs
OUTSIDE SALES REPS to sell cable to
homeowners. Earn $600+ weekly, will
train. Call Chris @ 863-381-6007.
NURSES AND THERAPISTS needed
for local home care visits in Highlands
County. Good Salary/per diem rates.
Excellent benefits, immediate need.
Call 863-401-3550 or fax resume to:
863-401-8199
RESTAURANT HIRING Servers,
Cooks, Dishwashers, Beverage Cart
Attendents @ Springlake Golf Resort.
Apply in person Tues. thru Sat. 2pm -
5pm. directions only, Please call
863-655-0909 ext 3.
SEEKING WELL EXPERIENCED
MEDICAL OFFICE HELP. Excellent
billing/collection, communication,
typing, computer skills & medical
terminology are A MUST. Fax resur'ne
to: 863-471-3206 or email to:
medicalofficebilling@yvahoo.com


News-Sun Sunday, February 13, 2011


2 100 Help Wanted
STANLEY STEEMER Carpet Cleaners
Now Accepting Applications for
CARPET CLEANING TECHS
Call 863-655-2158.

STREETS/SANITATION
OPERATIONS SUPERVISOR
City of Avon Park is accepting
applications for a full-tfme
Streets /Sanitation Operations
Supervisor. This position is a field
supervisory position which directs
and coordinates daily activities of
workers engaged in maintenance
and repair activities of storm-
water/drainage, streets, buildings,
and solid waste. Minimum qualifi-
cation: High school diploma or
GED equivalency, supplemented
by three years progressively
knowledgeable experience in the
field applicable to the assigned
divisions (e.g., Stormwater,
Streets, Buildings, Solid Waste),
with experience in a lead worker
capacity and demonstrated techni-
cal skills in the more complex
aspects of the work; or an
equivalent combination of educa-
tion, training and/or experience,
and must hold a valid State of
Florida driver's license. Additional
certifications may be required
where applicable to the assigned
divisions, (e.g., Turf & Ornamental
Spray Technician, Stormwater
Technician). Incumbent shall have
sixteen (16) months to obtain a
mosquito control license. This
position may be required to be
on call, including nights, holidays,
and weekends. Starting salary:
$30,000.00 to $44,000.00 depend-
ing on qualifications, with an
excellent benefit package. The City
of Avon Park is a Smoke and
Drug-Free workplace. E.O.E.
Applications are available at
City Hall,
Human Resources Office,
110 E. Main Street,
Avon Park, FL 33825.
Applications close Friday
February 18, 2011 at 4:30 p.m.

SUNSHINE PAYDAY LOANS
Clerks needed in Highlands County &
LaBelle area, must be willing to travel.
Fax Resume to 863-678-2170


3000
Financial


4000
Real Estate

4 0L0 Homes for Sale
4060 Avon Park
AVON PARK 3BR, 1BA, CHA, natural
gas, newer roof & windows, city
water/sewer. Lg wkshop in back, needs
some work. Priced reduced to $37.500.
863-453-7764 or 863-257-4095.

4080 Homes for Sale
4Sebring
SEBRING Edgewater Villag6 Lakeview
Dr. 2BR, 2BA, 1CG Villa. Beautifully
furnished. New kitchen, laundry, TV.
Low Maintenance fee includes Cable
TV, Clubhouse, heated pool. Private
street. A(vail Immed. 863-402-9138
SEBRING NEWLY REMODELED 3BR
Home, one block from Woodlawn Elem.
School. Nice, quiet neighborhood.
1243 Fernvale Ave. Possible Owner
Financing. Call 863-675-3387 TODAY!

4 120 Villas & Condos
4 120 For Sale
SEBRING FOR SALE BY OWNER
2BR, 2BA Condo at the beautiful Bluffs
of Sebring, a 55+ gated community.
First Floor with Carport & Storage
Room. Furnished with several
upgrades; clubhouse, pool,
tennis & other activities.
Great view of Lake Mary Jane.
Call 863-385-0552 or 863-873-1426

WOW!
LAKE PLACID Lake Front Condo fully
furnished, 2BR, 1BA, covered parking.
Bring your toothbrush. Only $54,500.
Deb Worley Realtor. 863-465-0123


,.- \ Highlands County Board of

County Commissioners


The following position closes on 02/25/2011

Carpenter 972 PG 13
$12.06/hour $19.49/hour.

For minimum qualifications and a full job description visit us
on our website at www.hcbcc.net.
You must complete our electronic job application or submit a
completed paper application in order to be considered for
employment with Highlands County BCC.




OFFICIAL NOTIFICATION

You are hereby notified that the public Logic and Accuracy (L &
A) testing of the voting and tabulation equipment to be used for
the March 8, 2011 City of Sebring election will begin at 9:00 a.m.
on Thursday, February 17, 2011 at 4500 Kenilworth Blvd. Suite
102, Sebring FL. After testing at the warehouse is completed, the
remainder of the testing will be at the Supervisor of Elections
Office, located at 580 South Commerce Ave., Room 201A, Sebring,
FL on the same day.

If you have any questions, please call the Supervisor of Elections
office at 402-6655.

Note: Any person who might wish to appeal any decision made
at this meeting is hereby advised that he will need a record of
the proceedings and for such purpose may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made which will include the
testimony and evidence upon which such appeal is to be based per
Section 286.0105.



Kathy Haley, CMC, City Clerk City of Sebring


4220 Lots for Sale
LAKE PLACID Florida Vacant
Residential Land, 603 Archie Summers
Rd, MUST SELL! Lot is .26 acre
(11,454 sq ft) with 83' Frontage & 138'
Depth. Paved road access, with
access to electricity at property line.
Well water & septic tank are used in the
neighborhood. It has sandy ground and
a few trees. Perfect location for a home
near Lake June-in-Winter Florida State
Park where there is access to sailing,
hiking, fishing & bird watching. If
interested contact Margaret Hughes @
888-878-8918, leave message.

4320 Real Estate Wanted








5000

Mobile Homes

5 O50 Mobile Homes
5V0 V For Sale
AVON PARK Don't Want to Pay Lot
Rent? This Single Wide Mobile Home
has 2 add-on rooms & carport. It's on a
private lot and includes additional lot
with nice shade & citrus trees. All for
$26,000! 863-385-3913
SBRING Park Model 2BR, 1BA,
screen room with windows, Lots of new
up dates. Close to Lakeshore Mall. Lg.
patio in back, 2 sheds. Asking Mid
$20's. 863-382-9437
SEBRING MH in 55+ community.
Comletely furn 1BR, Large BA, kitchen
& D.R, L.R. & Dressing Rm. Lakefront,
Boat Ramp w/gazebo. Pets Welcome.
2900 St Rd 17, N., Lot 20.
863-402-0037, no calls before 1 pm.


6000
Rentals


6250 Furnished Houses 7320


LAKE PLACID Newer 3BR, 2BA, .
seasonal or monthly. Excellent furniture
& appliances, near lake & boat ramp,
No smoking or dogs. $1300/mo. After
season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119

6300 Unfurnished Houses
HOUSES / MOBILE HOMES
Call for Availability
NO Security NO Last NO Dogs
863-381-4410 or 863-381-5174
SEBRING Harder Hall area, 2BR, 2BA,
1CG, screened porch. $750/mo.
plus last month & security deposit.
View by appointment. Call
863-381-6747, leave message.
SEBRING 3 or 4 BR, 1BA block home
near YMCA, fresh paint, new flooring in
kit/bath, large yard, 4 A/C units, eat-in
kit, pets considered. $750/mo + $750
security. Call 863-875-5897.
SEBRING RENT TO OWN! Open House
Sunday, 1 4 pm. 207 Dozier St,
Harder Hall. Golf Course front & back.
New 3BR, 2BA, 2CG. Beautiful kitchen,
nice tile work. $900/mo. *($199,900)
561-254-0124 or 561-622-4242
SEBRING 3BR,2BA 1CG, CBS Home
303 Virginia PI. $119,00 or 2BR, 2BA,
MH 5151 Barnum St. $42,500 10%
Down Owner Financing Call
863-835-1445
I SPRING LAKE 3BR, 2BA, bonus
room, new roof, ceramic tile floors,
screened porch, double car garage,
1/4 acre lot landscaped for nature w/
drought tolerant plants & man-made
goldfish pond, 5' chain link fence
around back yard.


6320 Seasonal Property
SEBRING Weekly/Multi-Week Condo
Rentals Avail. Now. Located on Little
Lake Jackson across from Harder Hall
Golf Club. Lots of amenities. Starting
@ $500/wk. 863-385-5005. ext. 0.

6400 Rooms for Rent
SEBRING 1BFfw/bath, furn/unfurn,
W/D, Satellite, full use of home.
$400/mo. or $100/wk + dep.
863-304-2849


6050 Duplexes for Rent 6550


LAKE PLACID Placid Lakes,
Unfurnished 2BR, 2BA.
$375/mo. + security?
863-699-0897 or 863-840-2013
SEBRING Cute 2BR, 1 BA, tile floors,
fenced yard, most pets OK.
$550 + $300 security deposit.
4909 Manatee Dr. 863-446-7274
SEBRING GREAT LOCATION!
Beautiful 2BR, 1BA, 2CP Duplex; close
to mall & US 27. W/D, screen porch,
new carpet Appl's incl., ceiling fans.
A/C, no moke.CALL 305-490-5399

6200 Unfurnished
6 0 Apartments


CASTLE HILL
Apartments
of Avon Park
Accepting Applications for 1 & 2
Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals
62 years or older, handicap/disabled,
regardless of age. For rental informa-
tion & applications please call:
863-452-6565
TDD: 711
THIS INSTITUTION IS AN
Equal Opportunity Provider
and Employer

Los Apt. de
Castle Hill
de Avon Park
Estan aceptando aplicaciones para
Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras.
Disponible a personas de 62
ancs o mas, incapacidad fisica/mental,
no import la edad.
Para mas information favor de Ilamar
863-452-6565. TDD: 711
Esta Institucion Es De
Igualdad De Oportunidad Al
Proveedor, Y Empleador


RELAX AT Lake Isis Villas
Luxurious 2BR Apartment.
Clean & Quiet Setting.
Call 863-453-2669
AVON PARK Highlands Apartments
1680 North Delaware
1 BR, 1 BA & 2BR, 2BA Available.
Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation.
1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195
AVON PARK Apartment with balcony
overlooking Lake Verona and City Park.
100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities.
SPECIAL: $325/mo.
863-453-8598
AVON PARK Clean, Quiet; Studios /
1BR. 1BA/2BR, 2BA Apts., from
$375/mo. New tile & appliances,
screened patios & W/D hook ups.
Students/Seniors Discount
Call 863-452-0469.
AVON PARK LEMONTREE APTS:
1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security;
2BR, 1BA $645/mo +$500 security.
W/D, Microwave, WSG included.
Pets WIcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953


KEY LAKE VILLAS
LAKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING
2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean &
quiet, Screen porch, Outside patio,
Central air, Washer/Dryer hookup,
$585/mo., first & security. No Pets.
863-465-2740
SEBRING / LAKE PLACID Beautiful
1BR, 1BA Apt. on private lake w/dock.
Avail. Furn/Unfurn. Yearly or Seasonal.
W/D + Util's. included. No smoke/ No
pets. For more info call 863-381-7415.


Warehouses
for Rent
i AO) seiu


SBSRING 20X 0U vvarenouse,
12' overhead door, on busy Highway
27 across from Lakeshore Mall.
863-385-3474


7000
Merchandise


7 160 Cameras & Supplies
CAMERA EQUIPMENT, Professional.
Also, Collector Cameras &
Equipment. Call 863-382-7469
for details & pricing.

7 180 Furniture
NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS!
Lamps $17, 100-Barstools
$39up, 50-Desks $97up,
3Pc Dropleaf dinette $197,
50-Dining Set $397up,
200-Recliners $297up,
50-2 Pc Sofa & Loveseat
sets $687up, 50-TV Ent.
Centers $167up, 2 Pc
Queen'Bed Set $297up,
50-4Pc bedroom sets
$387up, 3Pc Living room
tables $97up,
100-Headboards $79up.
HIGHPOINT FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRING
North of Lowes & across from
Home Depot

7300 Miscellaneous
ANTIQUES! SMALL writing desk, table,
rocker & loveseat. Assorted area rugs.
863-385-1925

7310 Bargain Buys
AIR PURIFIER, OREK.
$50. 863-453-3104
ALADIN LAMP converted to electric,
beautiful. $12 863-214-6697 Thunder-
bird Hills Village 3733 Camry Ct
BOOKS Hardback & Softbacks, Best
Sellers. 85 for $18. 863-385-2605
CAPODIMONTE basket of fruit.
$12.50. Thunderbird Hills Village 3733
camry Ct. 863-214-6697
COUCH & OTTOMAN, three seater,
vinyl covered, tan. $95. 863-453-3104
DRESSER & MIRROR Walnut,
6-drawers, with beautiful embossed
shell design, woodgrain formica top.
$100. 863-385-6691
GOLF CARRY BAG, Ogio, like new.
$45. 863-382-6006
GOLF CLUBS Powerbilts. $25.
863-385-2605
GOLFBAG CARRIER for Motorcycle.
Fits on any receiver type hitch. Stain-
less steel. $100. 863-382-6006
HEDGE TRIMMER 17" Black &
Decker. $12. 863-699-0352
HITATCHI 60" rear projection TV, good
picture. You haul. $100 obo
207-229-7479 Sun n Lake area.
JIGSAW PUZZLES (25) for $6.25.
863-699-0352
MINI REFRIGERATOR $40
863-385-7669
REFRIGERATOR small 1.7 cu ft,
white, new condition $40 717-389-6232
SHARPER IMAGE LOVE HANDLER
exerciser. New $200, like new nw $60
obo 941-347-7020
O2 Garage &
7320 Yard Sales

ANNUAL
COMMUNITY
SALE"!
"ESTATES OF SEBRING PARK"
Multi-Family Sale! 209_Hmelll
Fri-Sat, Feb 18th & 19th,
8am-4pm. Furniture, Household,
Tools, Fishing, Crafts, & MUCH
MORE!! Go East on Hwy 98|from
US 27, approx. 9 miles.


Garage &
Yard Sales


SEBRING 2301 Cleveland Rd. Sat.
Feb. 12th, 8AM 4PM. DOWN SIZING!
TOO MUCH TO LIST!


7340 Wanted to Buy
CAR WANTED: I need a very good
used car with rather low mileage.
Do you have one for sale?
Call 863-465-0978

7400 Lawn & Garden
LESCO COMMERCIAL MOWER
Kawasaki Motor / Runs Good! $1,000
or best offer. Please call Robbie for
information 863-452-5141
STRING TRIMMER, HUSQVARNA,
124L, less than 4 hours. $140.
863-453-7027

7520 Pets & Supplies


NOTICE

Florida statute 585.195 states that
all dogs and cats sold in Florida
must be at least eight weeks old,
have an official health certificate
and proper shots and be free of in-
testinal and external parasites.
YORKIES ADORABLE PUPPIES!
AKC registered, health certs, 1 male,
1 female. $700-$800. 11 weeks old,
READY TO GO!!
863-655-2124 or 863-414-6335


8000
Recreation


8050 Boats & Motors
20' PONTOON BOAT 2004 WEERES.
New carpet, seats & bimini top.
Includes fish finder and large live well.
50hp Mercury w/power tilt. Boat &
motor less than 50 hrs operation.
Galvanized trailer. $6,500. Please call
863-465-2364 or 863-699-0307


Contact Us...






By Phone
863- (863) 385-6155
385-
6155



















By Mail
2227 US Hwy 27S
Sebring, FL 33870


By E-Mail
www. newssun, corn/contact/


NEWS- SUN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927


Page 7D

8400 Recreational
840 Vehicles
2 KAWASAKI JET SKIS with Trailer
$800 863-464-0531
2011 39 FT. Monte Carlo 2 slides, 2BR,
sleeps 8, CHA, washer / dryer, self con-
tained, microwave and awning. Every
option. Limited Edition. $23,500.
1 941-448-3817
R.V. COVER, NEW ADCO, for Travel
Trailers. 287" to 31'6", 1/2 price, $200.
863-453-7027
RV 38' 2010 5TH Wheel. EAGLE RIDGE
by HEARTLAND, 2BR, 1BA, 2 slides,
fiberglass, W/D, awning. All options.
$30,000 obo. Immediate Sale!
321-437-5887
RV WILDWOOD 2007 34 ft, 2 slide
outs, 2BR, Sleeps 7, like new, non
smoker, no pets. All options &
will deliver. $12,500 OBO.
630-301-1553
VU QUBE SATELLITE SYSTEM with
remote. Enjoy your favorite TV
programs wherever you go!
Available at Whispering Pines RV
Village, Sebring. 270-556-6847.


9000
Transportation

Motorcycles
9100 & ATVs
1973 NORTON 850 COMMANDO
New professional restoration, very low
miles, includes Owner's Manuel.
One Owner Rare Find Great Price
863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100

9200 Trucks
TOOL CHEST, all aluminum diamond
plate, 48" long, with locking lid,. $120.
863-453-7027

9450 Automotive for Sale
1998 BUICK LeSABRE LIMITED. Well
serviced, good condition. $1700 obo.
See @ Reflections on Silver Lake, Lot
0-30, Avon Park, FL 33825 or call
937-681-2311.

Classified ads
get fast results


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