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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00899
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: February 11, 2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
sobekcm - UF00028423_00899
System ID: UF00028423:00899
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

Full Text



www.newssun





NEWS -SpIN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927


New column tells Fire damages two
soldiers' stories apartments in AP


PAGE 2A


PAGE 2A


LP advances to
district semifinal

PAGE 1 B


Friday-Saturday, February 11-12, 2011


www.newssun.com


Volume 92/Number 18 I 50 cents


Carlson challenging blood alcohol test results


18 have applied to fill commission seat; no
word on when replacement will be named


Mostly c
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001 7


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
SEBRING After seven months of
legal wrangling, ex-Highlands
County Commissioner Jeff Carlson's
case is still in the discovery phase.
according to the Indian River Clerk
of Courts.


Carlson was arrested. on charges of
boating under the influence and
manslaughter when the 22-foot center
console boat he was driving hit a
channel marker in Indian River and
resulted in the death of his wife, Julie
Carlson, in July 2010.
Carlson's blood alcohol level was


recorded as .076 three
hours after the acci-
dent and the Florida
:_ -. Department of Law
-. Enforcement calculat-
ed his blood-alcohol
level between 0.110
Carlson and 0.150 when the
accident occurred.
The legal limit in Florida is .08.
Records show that Carlson's attor-
ney, Kirk Connell, filed a motion to


Highlands County Fair starts today


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Ride operator Charles Gouker makes sure his ride is working correctly Thursday in Sebring. The Highlands
County Fair opens today at 5:00 p.m.

Sebring is first stop of fair season


By SAMANTHA GHOLAR
sgholar@ginail.con
SEBRING High-
lands County is the first
stop of the 43-week fair
season for Reithoffer
Shows Inc. The company
has been going strong
since 1896 with genera-
tions of men and women
working hard to provide
safe, affordable and fun
experiences for all.
Former general manag-
er Mike Bronchik was
busy Thursday morning
assisting manager Gary
Alberry in the inspection
checklists and various
other details.
The Highlands County
Fair will open today with
tons of rides, food, and
games for all to enjoy.
"We have 27 rides and
about 50 staff members
who work them,"
Bronchik said. "This year
we have a new piece, the


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Ernest Feaster checks light bulbs Thursday morning in preparation for opening
day of the Highlands County Fair in Sebring.


Dutch Wheel."
The Dutch Wheel is
one of the highest
portable Ferris wheels. At
120 feet, the Dutch
Wheel is sure to be a
great addition to the tra-


ditional thrills at the fair.
Bronchik explained the
hard work and labor it
takes to stay in the carni-
val business generation
after generation. He him-
self was born into the


business. Both
Bronchik's father and
grandfather worked in the
carnival business, and
Bronchik as well as his

See FAIR, page 7A


Drug Free Highlands seeks

more community involvement


By SAMANTHA GHOLAR
sgholar@newssun.com
SEBRING The board members
and supporters of the Drug Free
Highlands organization spent
Wednesday morning discussing upcom-
ing projects and action plans for the
better part of their monthly meeting.
Chairperson Jackie Rawlings was
open about the idea of spreading more
information around the community


about what DFH will be doing in order
to keep the youth away from drugs and
alcohol and the parents informed.
"We want to promote collaboration
with faith-based businesses and minor-
ity members within the community. We
also need to network more. When we
sponsored the YMCA basketball tour-
naments we had our names on the uni-
forms. I would like to continue pro-
See DRUG, page 7A


suppress the 'FDLE blood alcohol
records on Jan. 20.
Gov. Charlie Crist suspended
Carlson from the Highlands County
Board of County Commission in
December, and no replacement has
been selected by incoming Gov. Rick
Scott. Eighteen individuals have
applied for that seat on the commis-
sion.
See CARLSON, page 8A


2 arrested in


Lake Country


Elementary


molestation

HCSO trying to

find out if there

are more victims
By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
LAKE PLACID Although two
arrests have been made, the investiga-
tion continues into allegations of chil-
dren being inappropriately touched at
Lake Country Elementary School,
according to Lt. Tim Lethbridge of the
Highlands County Sheriff's
Department.
"I understand that bail has been set
by a judge today, and we are still
investigating the inci-
dent to see if there are
any other victims,"
Lethbridge said on .
Thursday.
Orestes Gonzalez,
78, of Lake Placid,
was arrested Tuesday 0. Gonzalez
on a warrant charging
him with three counts
of lewd and lascivious
molestation on a child
under 12 years of age.
Orestes Gonzalez
was not an employee
of the school, howev-
er, the investigation M. Gonzalez
revealed he frequently
visited the after-school program where
his wife, Maria Elena Gonzalez, 47,
was employed.
According to an HCSO press
release, three elementary-aged child
victims disclosed having been touched
by Orestes Gonzalez in an inappropri-
ate fashion while at the after-school
program.
Orestes Gonzalez was booked into
the Highlands County jail Tuesday,
and is still being held under a
$400,000 bond.
Maria Elena Gonzalez, also of Lake

See ARRESTS, page 8A


News-Sun photo by
SAMANTHA GHOLAR
Lake Placid SADD
members presented
their "X the TEXT" cam-
paign to the Drug Free
Highlands members
during their monthly
meeting. (from left)
Everett Icao, Ciara
Bishop, Brianna Shaw,
and Emily Lundy hold
one of their campaign
signs that are on display
throughout the high
school discouraging fel-
low classmates from tex-
ting while driving.


T, -








News-Sun Friday, February 11. 2011


Page 2A


www.newssun.comrn


Closer


to you

Editor's note: This is a
new feature of the News-
Sun. The Unknown Soldiers
column tells stories of our
fighting men and women
that don't always make
headlines. Look for it each
Friday.
Horrific news from Iraq's
Al Anbar province was still
sinking in when the Manion
family's phone rang in
Doylestown, Pa. On the line
was Brendan Looney, calling
in the middle of grueling
Navy SEAL training. The
strong, aspiring warrior was
bawling hysterically.
Earlier on that Sunday,
April 29, 2007, Looney's
Naval Academy roommate
and dear friend, 1st Lt.
Travis Manion, was killed
by a sniper's bullet as he
drew enemy fire away from
wounded Marines. Manion,
26, was posthumously
awarded the Silver Star and
Bronze Star with Valor for
heroism and gallantry dis-
played in combat.
Before Manion left for
what would be his final
combat tour, someone asked
him why he had to go back
to Iraq. The Marine's
response was simple, but
direct: "If not me, then
who?"
Looney asked himself the
same difficult, poignant
question as he contemplated
quitting SEAL training to
- mourn his friend.
"(Brendan) just wanted to
come back, but he couldn't
leave," Travis' older sister,
Ryan Manion Borek, told
the Unknown Soldiers. "My
parents said 'Brendan, you
can't quit. Travis would
never want you to quit.'"
Looney went all in on Navy
SEAL training, perhaps the
most physically demanding
30-week program known to
man.
"He dedicated the rest of
his training to Travis,"
Brendan's sister, Erin
Looney, told me. "He would
never give less anyway, but
he was going to give that
much more for Travis -
that extra little edge."
On June 22, 2008, Lt.
Brendan Looney graduated
as "Honoi Man" of his class.
With his wedding and a
deployment to Iraq just three
weeks away, Looney made
an emotional journey to
Pennsylvania his top priori-
ty.
"When he graduated from
SEAL school, the first thing
he did was visit my par-
ents," Ryan, 31, said.
Looney made it home
safely from his first combat
deployment and would fight
overseas three more times,
with "if not me, then who?"
always in the back of his
mind.
"Brendan never wanted us
to worry or think about him
being in danger," his
younger.sister, 23, said. "He
was always going to protect
us even protect us from
worrying and stressing about
him being over there."
On Sept. 21,2010 in
southern Afghanistan,
Looney, 29, boarded a Black
Hawk helicopter with three
fellow SEALs and five sol-
diers. The chopper crashed
in Zabul province, killing all
nine American service mem-
bers aboard.
Erin, one of Brendan's
five siblings, was sitting at
work on that tragic
September day, half a world
from the crash site. She still
mourned Travis, who "was
like another older brother,"
See SOLDIERS, page 8A


Helms hired to be full-time county administrator


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridcge@ newssion.coi
SEBRING County
Commissioners reached an agree-
ment with Ricky Helms on Tuesday
to become the new county adminis-
trator.
The board decided 3-1 on a two-
year contract with a salary of
$135,000, which a jump from his
$116,000 current salary, and two
payments into his retirement fund -
a $5,000 payment in the first year
and $10,000 in the second year plus
a car allowance.


Chairwoman Barbara Stewart
voted no on the contract based on the
financial restraints of the county, she
stated.
"This is a financial decision for
me. I do have confidence in you,"
Stewart added after Helms asked for
a second vote of confidence from the
board.
Additionally, Helms is to receive
$44,383.56 in severance pay along
with 120 days of prepaid insurance if
he is terminated without cause.
Helms' contract will take effect on
Feb. 14, the date of a new pay peri-
0


od for the county.
Members of the public questioned
the jump in salary for Helms. He
currently receives $116,000 as inter-
im county administrator, and was
offered $129,000 to take the job, but
he countered with $135,000, or
$11,250 per month.
"He can bring a sustainable budg-
et, that is huge. I don't want to go
the next two years without him at the
helm, sorry, pun," Commissioner
Greg Harris said.
"We have set before him a great
list of goals, and this is a commis-


News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE
Firefighters investigate the rafters between two apartments in Avon Park to make sure
that the structure fire is completely extinguished on Tuesday.


Cooking fire damages


apartment complex in AP


No injuries, but $45,000 in damage

By ED BALDRIDGE Lancaster Utilities Inc. from started when cooking oil
ed.baldridge@inewssniiii.coim Palmetto. ignited and spread to the
AVON PARK A struc- The fire spread through ceiling of the apartment.
ture fire caused by a pot left the rafters of the older com- Once in the rafters, the
on stove too long heavily plex to affect the adjoining fire was able to spread to the
damages two apartments in apartment at 8 W. Orange adjoining apartment, but
Avon Park on Tuesday after- St.. belonging to German was extinguished before it
noon. and Clara Soto. could spread to the other
Firefighters from Avon The Sotos, according to three apartments in the com-
Park, Highlands Lakes family members, had just plex.
Volunteer Fire and Rescue purchased the apartment at No injures were reported,
Station and Sun 'N Lake 8 W. Orange, but had, not according to Avon Park's
responded at 5:17 p.m. to a finished moving from Interim Fire Chief David
fire that had started in an Puerto Rico and were stay- Cloud.
apartment on 6 W. Orange ing with family in the neigh- The damage was listed as
St., listed on the Highlands borhood. $30,000 to the property and
County Tax Appraiser's Web The report from the $15,000 for the contents,
site as being owned by APFD stated that the fire according to the report.


POLICE BLOTTER


The News-Sun would like
to remind the readers that
the names listed below
reflect those who have been
charged with a crime, but
they are all innocent until
proven guilty by a court of
law. If anyone listed here is
acquitted or has charges
dropped, they can bring in
proof of such decision or
mail a copy to the paper and
the News-Sun will be happy
to report that information.
The News-Sun is at 2227
U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL
33870.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on Wednesday,
Feb. 9
* Jeremy Thomas Blair, 25,
of Maitland, was charged
with DUI.
* Randolph Edward
Brown, 29, of Avon Park,
was charged with posses-
sion/use of drug equipment,
possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana, grand
theft of a motor vehicle and
burglary of an unoccupied
structure.
* Patricia Lyndell Chandler,
31, of Avon Park, was
charged with operating a
vehicle without a valid
license.
* Frederick Ryan Fox, 22,
of Avon Park, was charged
with possession/use of drug
equipment, possession of
less than 20 grams of mari-
juana, probation violation
reference DWLSR and two
counts of failure to appear.
* James Paul Griswold, 20,
of Sebring, was charged


with probation violation.
* Seth Michael Haywood,
21, of Sebring, was charged
with first degree petit theft,
second degree petit theft,
two counts of dealing in
stolen property, and two
counts of fraud.
+ Glenn Monroe Hines, 38,
of Newberry, was charged
with dealing in stolen prop-
erty.
* Jose Perez-lslas, 47, of
Avon Park, was booked on
an immigration detainer.
* Daniel Dennis Langman,
18, of Lake Placid, was
charged with burglary, grand
theft and possession of a
harmful new legend drug
without a prescription.
* Thomas Charles
Lindbloom, 20, of Avon
Park, was charged with pos-
session/use of drug equip-
ment, possession of less
than 20 grams of marijuana.
* Juan Martinez, 50, of
Avon Park, was charged
with resisting an officer with-
out violence.
* William Sweet Phillips,
38, of Avon Park, was
charged with two counts of
failure to appear.
* Jennifer Ann Powers, 40,
of Avon Park, was charged
with possession/use of drug
equipment, possession of
cocaine.
* Robert Powers, 44, of
Avon Park was charged with
possession/use of drug
equipment, possession of
cocaine and DUI.
* Edilma Maritza Taylor, 51,
of Sebring, was booked on
Continued on page 8A


sion that cannot be called low main-
tenance or go-along-to-get-along. I
hope you understand that we have
spent a great deal of time saving this
county money where we could. That
is first and foremost. We need to
make sure that we get the right per-
son in there with the right compensa-
tion. That money needs to get spent
here more than anywhere else. He is
going to be held to a high standard
for that money," Commissioner Don
Elwell explained.


COMMUNITY BRIEFS


Photo of historic
painting of
Pinecrest Hotel to
be donated
AVON PARK A photo
of an historic painting of
Pinecrest Hotel will be
presented to the Depot
Museum Saturday at the
annual banquet of the
Historical Society of Avon
Park. The hotel, along with
an 18-hole golf course,
was built in 1925 by a
group of northerners who
spent winters in Highlands
County.
The hotel was built as a
private club and later
became a resort open to
the public. The course was
the site of many profes-
sional golf tournaments.
Tales of the hotel and golf
tourneys will be told by
Wendell Smith, formerly of
Avon Park, now of
Wauchula. His wife,
Wilma, will tell some sto-
ries about the Avon Park
Women's Club and it pro-
duction of a Broadway-
style show called "The
Follies."
The Smiths are donating
the photo of the hotel
painting to the museum.
Tickets are still available
for the banquet, set for
6:30 p.m. Saturday at the
Hotel Jacaranda. For infor-
mation, call Jean Jordan at
453-6957. Besides the
Smiths. members of the
audience are invited to
share their Avon Park sto-
ries.

Aeromodelers plan
Fun Fly
LAKE PLACID Lake
Placid Aeromodelers
model airplane flying club
wants the public to come
and share the fun of model


airplanes at their Fun Fly
on Saturday. Gates open at
7:30 a.m.; airplanes are
scheduled to fly through-
out the day.
At the show, guests will
have the opportunity to try
hands-on flying, co-pilot-
ing with a club instructor.
There will be aerobatics,
flying demonstrations of
many types of aircraft,
Beannie Loops competi-
tion, static model airplane
displays, and presentations
on how radio control air-
planes work.
Club members will
answer any questions dur-
ing the event.
Air show and parking
are free. Food and drinks
will be available. There
will also be free door
prizes.
The flying field is west
of U.S. 27 on Placid Lakes
Boulevard, one milq north
of State Road 70.
For more information
call Jon Draper at 840-
0440.

Heartland Pops
Concert pays
tribute to
Valentine's Day
AVON PARK The
Heartland Pops Concert
Band, the premier concert
band in the Heartland, will
present a Music In Our
Hearts concert at 7:3U p.m.
today at the S>outh Flor'id
Community College's
Theatre for the Performing
Arts.
This tribute to
Valentine's Day will fea-
ture vocalists Daniel Burke
and Laura Wade, recent
performers in the
Highlands Little Theater
production of "Oklahoma"
Continued on page 5A


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NEWS-SUN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927

Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, Florida 33870
A Harbor Point Media Company


OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870
OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday
PHONE: 863-385-6155
MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954
NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453

CIRCULATION
SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not
receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation
department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before
11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to
you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their
account. Please call 385-6155.


POSTMASTER: Send address change to:
News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870
USPS ISSN 0163-3988
Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL
and additional entry offices)


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
HOME DELIVERY
IN FLORIDA MAIL
OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL


12 mo.
$60.46
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Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on
Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.
Ramona Washington Publisher and Executive Editor
863-385-6155, ext. 515






News-Sun Friday, February 11. 2011


www.newssun.corn


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Page 4A


EDITORIAL & OPINION


News-Sun Friday, February 11, 2011


www.ne wssun.corn


TODAY'S EDITORIAL


So important, it's


worth the risk


Like it or not,
Floridians
face difficult
choices ahead,
many of which will
require sacrifice on
our parts.
Among the most painful
general issues are how we
will use the land not yet
developed, and how we will
protect our water supply for
future generations.
Already a specific land use
plan involving parts of
Highlands, Indian River,
Okeechobee, Osceola, and
Polk counties the pro-
posed Everglades
Headwaters National
Wildlife Refuge and
Conservation Area has
individuals upset to the point
of outspoken rage.
-Some of those individuals
loathe the idea of limiting
development. Others have no
faith in the federal govern-
ment or its agencies; they
fear the government's inten-
tions, and expect a land grab
is in the offing.
While we are not opposed
to development per se, we
strongly oppose development
for its own sake. Too much
concrete has already been
poured, and too many build-
ings stand empty.
And we understand the
reluctance to take any gov-
ernment bureaucracy at its
word electoral changes,
local shifts in personnel and
occasional incompetence
sometimes mean goals and
methods are changed in mid-
project; and there is the addi-


tional truth that many indi-
viduals in government tend to
be defensive first and honest
only under pressure.
However, although we our-
selves 'have been disappoint-
ed in the past, we worry
excessive cynicism is corrod-
ing the very bonds that hold
us together as a nation, mak-
ing it more difficult to find
useful solutions to very real
problems.
The proposed 150,000-
plus-acre refuge and conser-
vation area is meant to help
preserve the aquifer, help
heal damage to the
Everglades and conserve
native habitat.
Two major objectives,
according to the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service, which
is coordinating the effort, are
to preserve rural working
ranch landscapes and protect
wildlife migration corridors.
We have to agree with
those intentions and goals.
Any Florida native has
already seen open country
disappear.
We believe the time has
come to conserve our
resources, so our grandchil-
dren can fish in a creek, not a
stocked artificial tank, and
hunt freely in the woods, not
in a private, fenced-in, pre-
serve.
Having spoken with indi-
viduals in the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, we believe
there is an honest effort
under way to listen to and act
on what people think and
want.
We believe the true goal is
to create a partnership
between officials and civil-


NEWS- SUN
Highlands County's Hometon Newspaper Since 1927
2227 U.S. 27 South
Sebring, FL 33870
863-385-6155

NEWSROOM
ROMONA WASHINGTON
Publisher/Executive Editor
Ext. 515
editor@newssun.com

SCOTT DRESSEL
Editor
Ext. 516
scott.dressel@newssun.cown
DAN HOEHNE
Sports Editor
Ext. 528
daniel. hoehne@newssun.com
ADVERTISING
VICKIE JONES
Ext. 518
t id [i i.,a tl o,'s S. m!: On,,

CIRCULATION
TONY MCCOWAN
Ext. 522


PRE-PRESS
KEN BAREFIELD

Oth

BUSINESS OFFICE
JANET EMERSON
Ext. 596


ians today that will ensure
the entire state doesn't
become a giant parking lot
and mall tomorrow.
Now, maybe we are naive
to trust what we've been told,
but we think President
Ronald Reagan was right-
when he said, "Trust, but ver-
ify." We. will be watching
carefully.
The stakes are tremendous.
We can only save what we
have by working together.


Obama policies ensure the


GOP never has to defend Bush


This year the 40th
President of the United
States' 100th birthday was
on February 6th. There was a
weeklong celebration of
adoring tributes to Ronald
Wilson Reagan. The Grand
Old Party went all out -
using the occasion to give a
platform to their party's
2012 presidential hopefuls.
Every potential GOP candi-
date from the obscure
Senator John Thune to the
reality show mainstay Sarah
Palin spoke at the Illinois
Republican Party celebra-
tion. Plus there were festivi-
ties at the Reagan Ranch
Center in Santa Barbara and
the Reagan Library in Simi
Valley.
It was a parade of current
conservatives claiming that
everything they are for,
Reagan would naturally
cosign. According to them,
the man who gave amnesty
to millions of illegal immi-
grants is now against it. He
raised taxes nearly a dozen
times but he'd now be
against it. He, of course,
increased the national deficit
when he was in office, but
now he'd be against that too.
Everything conservatives
agree with, Reagan now is.
It was a jellybean induced
sugar coma of neo-con sweet
nothings. Much like a movie
based on a true story, it was
nicely polished for viewing
pleasure.
Reagan is conservative
sacrosanct. Even Mitt
Romney and Newt Gingrich,
who've disagreed with
Reagan in obscure YouTube
clips, would never disagreed
with him now.
There was notably a lack
of veneration and participa-
tion from the most recent
Republican president, one
George W. Bush. Who knew
that a president who spent
499 days of his tenure clear-


ing brush
,- would
ALSO do
-i. so little
S'. after leav-
ing office.
Yes,the
current
GOP
doesn't
Guest mention
Column his name.
TinaDupuy To them
Bush is a
four-letter word, unless
you're talking about Jdb.
Then maybe only when you
hit your thumb' with a ham-
mer.
When recently asked what
he plans to do in the future
Bush said, "Being out of the
press... is somewhat liberat-
ing-, frankly." The GOP does-
n't hate him for his free-
doms.
This omission was strate-
gic a great idea on the part
of the GOP. The week the
Great Communicator turned
100 was the same week the
Decider giving the go ahead
to torture detainees turned
nine.
Now that Bush is in our
rearview, he's also nestled
into our blind spot. While
Americans no longer discuss
the far-reaching implications
of "enhanced interrogation
techniques" the rest of the
world still does. Mr. Bush
announced he had to cancel
his first trip to Europe since
he published his memoir and
admitted to authorizing
waterboarding. There were
calls for large protests and
threats of investigations, so
Mr. Bush opted (as always)
to stay in Texas.
So, we ignore him. The
GOP doesn't mention him.
And the rest of the world
wants to lob a giant shoe at
him.
To make this all worse,
the only person who seems


to be toeing the line for
Bush is...Barack Obama.
Yes, Obama, who within
hours of being sworn in
signed an order to close the
black eye of a legal grey
area, Guantanamo Bay. One.
of his first acts as President
was to try and stop this
blight on our human rights
rep. But so far, the strict no
torture policy of the Obama
Administration, has been by
some accounts not adhered '
to. And Guantanamo Bay,
the prison camp with indefi-
nite detention of suspects
without trials, is still open
and operational.
This week, Wikileaks
founder Julian Assange's
lawyers used Guantanamo as,
an argument against their
client being extradited. We
used to be a leader in human,
rights... now we have a
gulag.
Why hasn't this changed i
with a new administration?
There was an attempt. The
right wing had a circus freak
field day claiming Obama
was a peacenik terrorist
appeaser. In that way the
GOP won the battle to nor-
malize what used to be
called war crimes.
So as long as Obama con-
tinues quietly with Bush's
War on Terror policies, the
GOP can quietly never men-
tion the existence of another
Republican president besides
Reagan, Eisenhower and
Lincoln.
Now that is a shellacking.,

Tina Dupuy is an award-win-
ning writer and fill-in host at
The Young Turks. Tina can be
reached at
tinadupuy@yahoo.com. This col-
umn has been edited by the
author Representations offact
and opinions are solely those of
the author
*I


TODAY'S LETTERS


Term limits will break the cycle
Editor:
Senator Jim DeMint has introduced legis-
lation to limit congressional terms, arid many
newly elected fiscal conservatives also sup-
port term limits. Though some people think
Congress would never pass legislation to
limit their own terms, the good news for us
is our Founders provided a way for citizens
to force them to.
Article Five of our Constitution says if
Congress fails to pass the amendment, two-
thirds of the states can call a constitutional
convention to force them to do so. And just
like the 22nd amendment limiting presiden-
tial terms, the congressional term limits
amendment, when ratified by three-fourths
of the states, would become law no matter
how many career politicians in Washington
fight it.
This gift our Founders left for us in the
Constitution, to regain control runaway
politicians, is something we, The American
People, can do and must utilize if we are
going to stop these career politicians from
destroying our great nation from within.
Over the past 20 years, Washington politi-
cians have been re-elected about 90 percent
of the time because the system is heavily
tilted in favor of incumbents. If we really
want to put an end to business as usual,
we've got to have new leaders coming to
Washington instead of rearranging the deck
chairs as the ship goes down.
The best way to ensure we are truly a gov-
ernment of the people and by the people is to
replace the career politician'in Washington
with citizen legislators who care more about
the next generation than their next election.
The power of incumbency has created an
almost insurmountable advantage for
Washington politicians.


Incumbency allows politicians to raise
millions of dollars in campaign funds in
exchange for earmarks. Incumbency gives
Congress the power to raise money for itself.
Congress just approved itself an increase of
$250 million from the U.S. Treasury that
members will spend to promote themselves.
Finally, with re-districting, incumbents can
choose their votes rather than voters choos-
ing their representatives. Term limits is the
best way to break this cycle.
Term limits should apply to local, state
and federal government.
A small Jewish carpenter is watching to
see if America is truly a Christian nation
with a Christian government, claiming to be
a democracy and a shining light to the rest
of the world.
Billie E. Jewett
Sebring

Mentors, like Bob Rader, are
special people
Editor:
It's not very often that you have the privi-
lege of meeting someone like Bob Rader. I
met this extraordinary gentleman about three
years ago when he began mentoring students
in my classroom.
Mentors are special people, without a
doubt. Mr. Rader was more than special,
though. He lived a full life, had several real-
ly interesting careers, raised a family, was
married for a really long time. By all
accounts he could have just retired and
played golf or something, but he didn't. He
gave himself and his time to my students. He
chose to invest in children. In the case of my
classroom, he mentored kids with autism.
He was such a giving and patient fellow.
He let the children' interests drive his activ-
ities with them. If a student was interested in


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A student writes a note about his mentor, Bob Rader, and draws pictures showing the com-
passionate relationship between this mentor and the pupils he works with.


the Titanic, for example, he helped them col-
lect resources and learn all they could about
the ship and its journey. He used a globe to
show the student where the Titanic met its
fate. If a student was interested in space, Mr.
Rader filled them with information and
again, shared many resources' to help the stu-
dent solidify his learning and interest.
He made every student feel valuable,
important and special. To him they were
"good enough" just the way they were. My
students loved him for that.
Another thing I really loved about Mr.
Rader was his sincere appreciation for my
students. He enjoyed discovering the kids'
strengths and weaknesses. Sometimes he


would bring a student back to my classroom
and say excitedly, "did you know he could
do this ?" He was so excited to discover
whatever it was.
I often wish there were more people in the
world like Mr. Rader. People that saw the
hope and promise of children and wanted to
invest in that. I am so sad to have to say
goodbye to this precious man. But I am so
blessed by his contribution to my classroom,
my school, and my community. He made our
lives a little sweeter.
Thank you Mr. Rader, for making a differ-'
ence.
Mary Campbell
Lake Country Elementary








www. newssun.com


News-Sun Friday, February 11, 2011


Page 5A


Continued from page 2A
singing selections from
"'Oklahoma."
The Music In Our Hearts
concert will showcase a vari-
ety of music selections by
Puke Ellington, Billy Joel,
Hollywood film favorites
hnd a medley of show tunes.
: Each lady attending will
receive a red rose to com-
memorate the evening.
Ticket donations are only
K8 and can be obtained from
any Heartland Pops member
pr at the door. Children
Pnder the age of 12 are
admitted free.
Call 314-8877.

Ridge Coin Club
have annual show
SEBRING The Ridge
Coin Club of Sebring will
have its Annual Coin Show
at the Highlands Senior
Center (formerly the Lion's
Club), 3400 Sebring
Parkway, from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday. There will be
many dealers available to
see and buy coins along with
free appraisals.
Free admission, plus a raf-
fle and 50/50 drawing will
be at 2:30 p.m. Lunch can be
purchased.

Orchid Societ plans
annual auction
SEBRING The Orchid
Society of Highlands County
will host its 11th annual auc-
tion at 10 a.m. Saturday at
the Woman's Club of
Sebring, 4260 Lakeview
Drive.
There will be blooming
and non-blooming orchid
plants of all varieties auc-
tioned. All plants will be.
from quality growers in
Florida and Hawaii. The top
two buyers will receive
bonus plants. The society
will accept cash and local
checks only. A raffle also
will be held.
This is the society's main
fundraise.
The society meets the
fourth Monday of each
month at the Bert J. Harris
Jr. Agricultural Center, 4509
George Blvd. Guests are
always welcome and you
don't have to be knowledge-
able of orchids to attend. For
information about the auc-
tion, contact Bill Ross at
699-2061 or awesome-
orchids@embarqmail.com.
or visit the Web site at
orchidsocietyhighlands.org/.

Reflections host
Friday dance
AVON PARK Reflec-
tions on Silver Lake will
host a dance featuring Joe
and Jackie from 7:30-10:30
p.m. Friday. Cost is $5.
Take your own drinks and
snacks; ice will be provided.
The public is'welcome. Call
,52-5037.

pebring Elks open to
ihe public
f SEBRING The Sebring
lks is open to the public
today and Saturday for spe-
rial events. Bring your
friends and neighbors.
i Today will be a buffet din-
er of steamship round or
beef or herb roasted chicken
from 5-7 p.m. Cost is $10.
arry Musgrave will play
usic for dancing from 7-10
.m. If attending the dance
'nly, cost of admission is $3.
SSaturday will be the
sweetheart Ball with pork
enderloin or chicken breast
in white served at 6 p.m.
The Skylarks will play
music for dancing from 7-10
p.m. Reserved seating.
Tickets are $15 for a single,
$29 for a couple.

Queens of


Abundance meet
Feb. 21
SEBRING The Queens
of Abundance of South
Central Florida Red Hatters
will meet at Dot's Restaurant
in the meeting room at 11:30
a.m. Monday, Feb. 21. The
change of date is due to
Valentine's Day celebrations.
Tickets for the Green Fling
at Brighton in the Bingo
Hall will be available at this


luncheon. The Spring Fling,
which is a post-St. Paddy's
Day celebration will open at
10:30 a.m. Thursday, March
24 with a hat parade and
judging. Everyone is urged
to decorate their hat in a hol-
iday theme of choice. Prizes
will be awarded.
Luncheon tickets are $
9.95 and must be purchased
prior to March 10. Basic
Bingo Pak is $ 13 and the
money will be collected by
the Bingo Crew during
lunch. Bingo for red hatters
and their guests only will
close out the event.
Men are invited and wel-
come to join us for this spe-
cial day.
For more information call
465-0161; write 3
Cherrywood Way, Lake
Placid, FL 33852; or e-mail
beckshel@embarqmail.com.

Events planned at
lodges, posts
AVON PARK
The American Legion Post
69 will have a Legion E-
Board meeting at 2 p.m.
today. Music will be by L.T.
(call for time). Valentine's
dinner will be from 5-6 p.m.
Saturday with music by Joe
and Jackie from 5:30-8:30
p.m. Call 453-4553.
LAKE PLACID
The Lake Placid Moose
Lodge 2374 will have music
with Tom McGannon from
6-10 p.m. today. Bingo-
bango will be played at 2
p.m. Saturday. Music with
Steve and Peggy will be
from 6-10 p.m. Call 465-
0131.
The VFW 3880 in Lake
Placid will have bingo
games at 2 p.m. and music
with L&L Duo today. The
Men's Auxiliary will meet
Saturday. Bingo will be at 2
p.m. and horse races set for
5:30 p.m. Call 699-5444.

Recreation Club
plans activities
'SEBRING The Sebring
Recreation Club, 333
Pomegranate Ave., will host
the following events this
week:
Today Mini-shuffle-
board tournament, 1:15 p.m.
Saturday Ice cream
shuffleboard, 1:15 p.m-.;
Ping-pong, 3 p.m.
For details, call 385-2966.

Blue Harmony in
concert at Under the
Oaks
SEBRING Blue Brass
Mountain Music by Blue
Harmony is in concert at
Under the Oaks, 3414 Beck
Ave., at 6 p.m. every Friday.
Cost is a $5 donation, asked
at the door. Food and drink
will-be available.

Social Dance Club
features Skylarks
SEBRING The
Highlands Social Dance
Club hosts Big Band ball-
room dancing from 7-9:30
p.m. Friday at 3400 Sebring
Parkway.
Dance the night away to
waltzes, cha-chas, foxtrots,
rumbas, jitterbug and other
favorites to the 10-piece
Skylarks Band.
Admission is $5 for mem-
bers and $7 for non-mem-
bers. Appropriate dress
required.
The snack bar opens at 6
p.m. Call 385-6671.

First United
Methodist offers
breakfast
AVON PARK Pancake
and sausage breakfast will
be offered at First United
Methodist Church, 200 S.
Lake Ave., from 8-11 a.m.


Saturday. A $5 donation is
requested at the door.
This is an all-you-can-eat
event.

Southern Lifestyle
sponsors health fair
LAKE PLACID ,
Southern Lifestyle Assisted
Living Facility would like to
invite the public to do some-
thing for yourself and some-
one you" love this Valentine's


Day.
A "Heart to Heart" health
fair will be held today at the
facility, 1297 U.S. 27 N.
Highlands Regional Medical
Center will be on hand along
with some other health care
professionals. There will be
cholesterol screenings (for a
small fee), blood pressure
checks, oxygen saturation
screening and weights.
Leann Curry will be giving a
Thai Chi demo and lots
more. The blood mobile will
be on site and Highlands
Medical Group will have a
couple of physicians on site
to answer questions.
There will be lots of food
and door prizes, so come on
out and have a "Heart to
Heart." For more informa-
tion, call 465-0568.

Kiwanis host Meet,
Greet and Grow
LAKE PLACID Lake
Placid Kiwanis Club will
host a "Meet, Greet and
Grow" wine and cheese
party at 6 p.m. Saturday. It
will take place at the
Holiday Inn Express in Lake
Placid.
The goal is to recruit new
members. Open to the public
there will be a silent auction
with gift baskets and many
great items for Valentine's
Day.

Knights offer
spaghetti dinner
SEBRING There will be
a spaghetti dinner, sponsored
by Knights of Columbus, at
St. Catherine Parish Hall
from 4:15-7 p.m. Saturday.
The hall is at 827 Hickory
St.
The meal consists of
salad, spaghetti w/meat
sauce, meatballs, bread stick,
desert, and beverages at a
cost of $8 for adults and $4
for children.

Elvis Wade performs
at Sebring Civic
Center
SEBRING The fourth
annual Elvis Wade Show
will be held at the Sebring
Civic Center, 355 W. Center
Ave., on Saturday, March 12.
The show will be from 7-10
p.m. Doors will open at 6:30
p.m.
Cost is $12 per person.
Advanced ticket sales only.
Call 382-8296 for tickets.
Any groups of eight or more
will have reserved seating.
Otherwise first come, first
serve.
There will be dancing.
Bring your own beverage
and snacks; ice and cups will
be provided.

Henry County
residents gather
Saturday
SEBRING Henry
County, Ohio residents will
meet at 11 a.m. Saturday for
luncheon at Homer's
Smorgasbord in Sebring.

Eastern Star hosts
fashion show and
luncheon
SEBRING The Sebring
Chapter No. 126 of the
Order of the Eastern Star
will host a luncheon and
fashion show from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday. The fun
event will be held at the
Masonic Lodge, 1809 Home
Ave.
Models and members of
the Young Men of the
DeMolay will show the lat-
est fashions from local
department stores.
The donation is $10. Call
385-3170 or 471-2078 for
reservations.


Illinois Day planned
Saturday
SEBRING The annual
gathering of Illinois resi-
dents, former and current,
will be held Saturday, Feb.
12 at Homer's Buffet in
Sebring. Registration and
fellowship begins at 11 a.m.
Lunch is at noon, followed
by activities, games and
door prizes.
RSVP at 314-0176 or
(217) 791-2136.


Democratic Women
meet Saturday
SEBRING The
Democratic Women's Club
of Highlands County will
have their general meeting
from 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday
at Democratic Headquarters,
4216 Sebring Parkway (next
to Ruby Tuesdays)..
Following a political action
discussion and continental
breakfast, a presentation will
be given by Davette
Thompson, Democratic
Executive Committee chair-
woman.
To begin the business
meeting, the Wings of Faith
Christian Center Praise
Team will perform in honor
of Black History Month.
Tickets ($20) will also be
sold for the Saturday, Feb.
26 Fashion Show at Twin
Oaks Tea Room with Steve
and Company fashions and
contemporary guitarist
Kenny Summers.
Call 214-4680.

Woman's Club
accepts flea market
donations
SEBRING The GFWC
Woman's Club of Sebring at
4260 Lakeview Drive is
accepting donations from 9-
11 today for its flea market,
which will be held on Friday
and Saturday, March 4-5.
Call 382-0706.

Sebring Hills offer
pancake breakfast
SEBRING A pancake
breakfast will'be held at the
Sebring Hills Clubhouse
from 8-10 a.m. Saturday at
200 Lark Ave.
Breakfast will be all-you-
can-eat pancakes, sausage,
orange juice, coffee or tea.
Cost is $3 for members and
$3.50 for non-members.
The group will be collect-
ing annual dues for the
membership for 2011. The
dues are $15 for a single or
$25 for a household.


OBITUARIES


SHIRLEY MARIE
ELSIE O'BRIEN
Shirley O'Brien was
called to heaven by our
Lord, Jesus Christ, on
Friday, Feb. 4, 2011 from
her home at The Palms of
Sebring Health Care.
Born Nov. 9, 1921 in
Chicago, Ill. to Curt &
Gertrude Boehme, she was
preceded in death by her
husband, Thomas O'Brien,
her parents and a brother.
She is survived by three
children, Michael O'Brien
(Maria) of Irvine, Calif.,
Christine Gunderson of
Lakeland, Fla. and William
O'Brien (Cynthia) of Lake
Placid, Fla,; eight grand-
children and several great-
grandchildren.
Memorial service will be


at The Palms of Sebring in
the Sun Room, Sunday,
Feb. 13 at 3 p.m. Memorial
contributions may be sent
to Good Shepherd Hospice,
1110 Hammock Road,
Sebring, FL 33872.

Death notices
Cecile Connatser
Hannah, 90, of Avon Park,
died Feb. 7, 2011.
Arrangements are being
handled by Stephenson-
Nelson Funeral Home,
Sebring.

Doris E. Wetherby, age
92, of Sebring, died
Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011.
Arrangements are being
handled by Stephenson-
Nelson Funeral Home in
Sebring.


Suspect in Florida murder

arrested in Missouri


Associated Press
GRAVOIS MILLS, Mo.
- Authorities say a man
suspected of killing his
wife in Florida in 2008 is
jailed in Missouri.
Morgan County authori-
ties arrested Robert Taylor
on Tuesday on an outstand-
ing warrant from Manatee
County, Fla., for second-
degree murder. He is a sus-
pect in the Sept. 11, 2008,


death of Pamela Taylor.
The Lake Sun Leader
reports that Taylor was
arrested after the Missouri
State Highway Patrol noti-
fied the sheriff's office that
he was living in Gravois
Mills.
The sheriff's office says
in a news release that
Taylor is currently held in
the Morgan County Adult
Detention Center.


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News-Sun + Friday, February 11, 2011


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News-Sun Friday, February 11, 2011


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
David Vaughn and Kesha Scott ready a ride to be inspected before opening day.

Fair opens today at Firemen's Field


Continued from page 1A
own son continue the tradition today.
"We got here last Saturday. We are
taking our time setting up. It can all
be put up in a day, but we spread it
out over five days so we get it right
and so the inspections go smoothly,"
explained Bronchik.
One of the most tedious inspections
belongs to the popular ride Starship
2000. The ride completely encloses
standing patrons up against padded'
panels. Riders then. experience pres-
sure three times the force of gravity as
the machine spins to maximum speeds
up to 24 rpm.
"Starship is inspected twice." said
Bronchik. "Once when he get here,
then again at the finish once it's put
together. It's added safety precaution
for this ride because there are so many
components to it."
Reithoffer Shows is also taking a
step into the future by becoming a
"green" fair. Bobby Hepburn, one of
the show's maintenance workers, stat-


'We got here last
Saturday. We are taking
our time setting up. It
can all be put up in a
day, but we spread it
over five days so we get
it right and so the
inspections go smoothly.'
MIKE BRONCHIK
Riethoffer Shows Inc.

ed that the company has a five-year
Green Plan and is about halfway
through the process.
"It's a $3 million project to change
all the lights in the rides to LED bulbs
and that's what we are doing," said
Hepburn. "Each of these LED bulbs
cost around $2.66 each and several of
the rides the Himalaya, Pharaoh's


Fury, the Dutch Wheel they're all
totally LED now," Hepburn explained.
Hepburn also stated that the sister
Ferris wheel that is in use at the
Florida State Fair in Tampa owned by
Reithoffer Shows cost $390,000 to
make it a "green" ride.
"When we complete this, it'll lower
so much costs. We can use less elec-
tricity in the trailers, then that lets us
use less generators, less diesel for the
generators, so it makes a big differ-
ence," Hepburn said.
The Highlands County Fair is locat-
ed at Firemen's Field in Sebring and
will open doors today at 5 p.m.
Various livestock shows, entertain-
ment, displays and exhibits will take
place throughout the week at the con-
vention center adjacent to the fair-
grounds. Reithoffer armbands are $20
each day of the fair and various dis-
counts will be available for students,
military and seniors.
For more information visit
www.hcfair.net or call 382-2255.


www.newssun.comrn


Continued from page 1A
grams like that." said
Rawlings.
Not only does DFH plan to
expand the community
involvement, the organiza-
tion has made plans to part-
ner with the Department of
Children and Families along
with neighboring counties to
discuss future prevention ini-
tiatives and share ideas.
The Polk, Hardee and
Highlands county coalition
will meet next month to dis-
cuss what each county is
doing to prevent youth and
teen drug/alcohol usage.
Rawlings, and Project
Coordinator Amanda Sherley
were extremely excited about
the idea.
At the closing of the meet-
ing, members of Avon Park
High School and Lake Placid
High School Students
Against Drunk Driving
(SADD) group presented
ideas and events that they are
currently working on at their
schools to show fellow class-
mates the dangers of alcohol
and drugs.
APHS is in the beginning
stages of a social norms cam-
paign. According to the
SADD representative, the
students create posters and
flyers discouraging alcohol
and drug use and display
them thi oughoLit the campus.
SADD then plans to reach
out to local businesses to
sponsor the club as they
spread the posters and flyers
throughout the community to'
reach all the individuals pos-
sible.
Lake Placid: SADD club
went beyond t-e obvious
alcohol ,and drug use >and
campaigned :for something.
students and adults likee dbo
unconsciously everyday. The
LP students presented "X tihe
TEXT," a campaign created


to bring awareness about the
risky behavior students often
do while driving.
Everett Icao, Emily Lundy,
Brianna Shaw and Ciara
Bishop were committed to
keeping their fellow class-
mates from texting while
driving.
."We set up a driving
course for the students with
driver's license during first
period study hall. Each stu-
dent put on "drunk goggles"
and were told to drive
through the course,"
explained Lundy. "Then each
student was told to text as
they drove through the
course."
"A lot of cones were run
over," they all said with a
laugh.
The four students also
hung up banners and posters
around school with statistics
about reckless driving behav-
ior, distracted driving- and
fatality rates.
"Students signed a pledge
not to text during their lunch
hour and those students were
given a green thumb ring,
well because everyone texts
with their thumb," explained
Bishop.
"When they start to text
they will look at the ring and
hopefully put the phone
down," Shaw said. The
thumb rings had the slogan
"X the TEXT" on them.
The LP SADD organiza-
tion have several events and
campaigns in line to continue
the positive reinforcement of
safe driving behavior. The
students will also be cam-
paigning against alcohol use,
marijuana use, and bullying.
DFH meets every second
Tuesday of the month at
Florida Hospital conference
room from 9:30- 10:45 a.m.
For more information call
382-2138.


:~


,% .-.: t .. ..
" ' '
J"


SUBSCRIBE TODAY!





863-385.6155


S0




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Page 7A


Drug Free Highlands

wants to involve

community in efforts


I iff., I








News-Sun Friday, February 11, 2011


www.newssun.com


Two seriously injured when motorcycle collides with car


By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
christopher.tuffley@newssun.coin
LAKE PLACID Two visitors
from Canada, Yves Dupras and
Louise Campeau, were seriously
injured when the motorcycle they
were riding collided with 1998
Buick driven by Wanda Bryant
Holden on U. S. 27 and South Sun


'N Lake Boulevard just after noon
on Tuesday.
According to the Florida
Highway Patrol, Holden was travel-
ing south on 27 in the left turn lane.
Dupras. 61. and his 56-year-old
passenger were traveling north on
27 in the outside lane.


. Holden. 47. attempted to cross and passenger, both wearing hel- South Sun 'N Lake Bo
both northbound lanes' onto South mets, were thrown off, ending up on Dupras and Campe
Sun 'N Lake Boulevard. As the the east shoulder of the highway. by helicopter to Ta
Buick entered the outside lane, the The motorcycle continued to Hospital. Dupras was
motorcycle crashed into the right slide north, also coming to a final cal condition and Car
front of the car. Inertia vaulted the rest on the east shoulder. ous condition on Thui
motorcycle over its hood. It landed The Buick continued east where Holden, who was \
on the roadway where the driver it came to a stop in the middle of belt, was not injured.


boulevard.
au were taken
mpa General
listed in criti-
mpeau in seri-
rsday.
wearing a seat


Legion donates to Special STARS


Courtesy photo
Special STARS Recreation Club President Ralph Meyers (right) accepts a $200 donation on
Feb. 7 from Johnny Belcher, second vice president of the Sons of the American Legion
Squadron 69 in Avon Park. The Legion made the donation to assist Special STARS in all
the sports and recreational activities for people with disabilities in Highlands County.



Arrests made in molestation case


Continued from page 1A
Placid, was served with an arrest warrant
Tuesday charging one count of witness tam-
pering and was released on Wednesday on a
$40,000 bond.
Lethbridge confirmed that Maria Elena
Gonzalez was employed by the Highlands
County Health Department as a health aide at
the school and that the Highlands County
School Board employed her as the manager of
the after-school program.
The HCSO press release stated that the
mother of one of the victims reported that
Maria Elena Gonzalez had contacted her and
instructed the mother in things to say and not
to say if she was contacted by law enforce-
ment.
After the investigation revealed informa-
tion to support this allegation, Lethbridge


stated that a warrant was obtained for the
arrest of Maria Elena Gonzalez.
Sheriff Susan Benton said this investiga-
tion was especially difficult due to the num-
ber of parents and children contacted by lead
detective Melanie Kelly.
Throughout the investigation, the HCSO
worked closely with the Child Protection
Team of the Children's Home Society, which
assisted by providing specialized child foren-
sic interviews.
Benton complimented the efforts of detec-
tives and staff during the difficult investiga-
tion.
"Detective Melanie Kelly and the oversight
by Lt. Tim Lethbridge with the help of the
Child Protection Team has allowed these
young victims a sense of safety while pro-
ceeding to arrest those who would harm their
innocence," Benton said.


Carlson case proceeding slowly


Continued frompage 1A
Carlson was arrested in November 2010,
and pleaded not guilty to the felony and
misdemeanor charges.
In January, Carlson waived his rights to a
speedy trial, and the February docket call
was canceled to allow more time for dis-
covery.
Carlson's case is scheduled to be back in
front of Judge Robert L. Pegg at 9 a.m.
March 17 for a private attorney docket call.
Ryan Butler, State Attorney for the 19th
Judicial Circuit, stated in an earlier inter-
view that the maximum penalty could be up
to 15 years in prison and a $10,000 fine in
this case.


Those applying to the governor's office
for Carlson's position include: Ronnie T.
Carter, Suzette P. Rhodes, William Ronald
Handley, Alan W. Kent, Andrew B. Jackson,
Anthony Vaccarino, Jr., Bruce G. Borkosky,
C. Guy Maxcy, Douglas A. Walz, George
Davis Leidel, Jr., Jeri Canale, John D.
Hawthorne, Jr., Larry D. Murphy, Mark E.
Gose, May Jane 0' Brien, Nadine E.
Tedstone, Peter H. Pollard and Robert E.
Rapp.
At press time, Jenn Meale from the
Communications Office for Governor Scott
had not responded to e-mail questions about'
why the governor has not yet appointed
someone from the applications.


Continued from page 2A
out-of-county warrants for
aggravated stalking and vio-
lation of a domestic violence
injunction.
* Robert Earl Turner, 48, of
Lake Placid, was charged
with trespassing, battery on
an officer/firefighter/EMT and
petit theft.
* Gina Ann Vancoevering,
22, of Avon Park, was
charged with resisting an offi-
cer without violence.
* Steven Lenn Williams, 26,
of Avon Park, was charged
with resisting an officer with-
out violence and probation
violation.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on Tuesday, Feb.
8:
* Robert George
Cappelletti, 57, of Lake
Placid, was charged with vio-
lation of probation reference
possession of cocaine.


* Kyle Andrew Davis, 20, of
Sebring, was charged with
burglary of a dwelling, grand
theft and grand theft of
firearm.
* Jaime D. Garcia, 20, of
Lake Placid, was charged
with violation of probation
reference DUI.
* Maria Elena Gonzalez,
47, of Lake Placid, was
charged with tampering with
a witness (capital felony or
life felony investigation). '
* Orestes Gonzalez, 78, of
Lake Placid, was charged
with lewd/lascivious behav-
ior.
* Amber Marjoriemay
Hatchett, 23, of Avon Park,
was charged with violation of
probation reference posses-
sion of methamphetamine.
* Simon Castillo
Hernandez, 23, of Sebring,
was arrested on an out-of-
county warrant reference
violation of probation for no
valid driver license.
* Brandi Rae Hutchinson,


31, was arrested on an out-
of-county and out-of-state
warrant reference non-sup-
port.
* Akosua Montoya
Jackson, 35, of Sebring, was
charged with violation of pro-
bation reference sale/manu-
facture/deliver marijuana.
* Joseph Paul Lannom, 34,
of Hollywood, was charged
with contempt of court refer-
ence child support.
* Alonzo Donnell Luther,
42, of Lake Placid, was
charged with violation of pro-
bation reference driving with
license suspended or
revoked.
* Norman Douglas Nelson,
35, of Frostproof, was
charged with two counts of
violation of probation refer-
ence criminal mischief and
petit theft.
* Leonard Edward
Treadwell, 27, of Lake
Placid, was charged with
driving while license sus-
pended.


Soldiers reunited


Continued from page 2A
when she lost Brendan.
"Our family is really
close, and seeing everyone
else upset is what upsets you
the most," Erin said.
"The Looneys are an
amazing family," Ryan, the
executive director of the
Travis Manion Foundation,
emphasized. "They are. very
tightknit, like we are."
Amid dual tragedies that
could tear any family apart,
the Looneys and Manions
came together. After
Brendan's wife, Amy, said
she wanted her husband rest-
ing close to his best friend,
Travis' parents agreed to
move their son's grave from
Pennsylvania to Virginia.
The heroes now rest side by
side at Arlington National
Cemetery.
"The ceremony was amaz-
ing, beautiful and heart-
breaking," Ryan, who wit-
nessed her only brother's
burial for a second time,
said.
Erin said that as kids, she
and her siblings, three of
whom went on to serve in
the military, always wanted
to hang out in Brendan's
room "the cool room" of
the house. Today, she spends


hours sitting in the Arlington
grass, next to her big broth-
ers in arms.
"We were so lucky to get
to know them and be a part
of their lives," Erin said,
bringing tears to my eyes.
"One is rare enough, but to
have two, both brothers to
you, is on a whole other
level."
I This new column's mis-
sion is to introduce you to
the men and women who
defend our freedom. As
these stories arrive on your
kitchen table every week, I
hope you will feel as close
to the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan as I did on
Christmas morning, while
bowing my head at the
graves of 1st Lt. Travis
Manion and Lt. Brendan
Looney. Surrounded by fel-
low Americans, they will
never be divided.

An award-winning blogger and
journalist who worked in news-
rooms for eight years, Tom Sileo
is a Phillips Foundation
Journalism Fellow. To find out
more about Tom Sileo's
Unknown Soldiers column, or to
read features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and cartoon-
ists, visit the Creators Syndicate
website at www.creators.com.


C Dr. Keatley Waldron
SChiropractor





ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS


(863) 382-4445
13 Ryant Blvd.
Sebring
Westshore Plaza


www.waldronchiropractic.com


Page 8A


POLICE BLOTTER


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CHIROPRACTIC HEALTH CENTER, P.A.








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Page 9A


News-Sun Friday, February 11, 2011


www.newssun.com


^BETTER HEARING IS OUR #1 CONCERN










Page 1OA


Five-Day focast

TODAY SATURDAY





Mostly cloudy Intervals of clouc
sunshine


f1


Y





ds and Sunr


High 71/Low 48 High 69/Low 39
Winds: NNW at 6-12 mph. Winds. NNE at 7-14 mpn.


News-Sun Friday, February 11, 2011


ACCU W I4R


www.newssun.corm


Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. C2011

AccuWeather.com


in eca.JLFebruarFa 11 ,

SUND "iESAY Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are
S' -. -highs for the day. Forecast high and low temperatures are given for selected cities.
......' *; ,.'..l.2'1,n,-S'N .' iii. .. ..vo *_*
5.-.*i V ,.'......-... ,,.f...e...e +. .'.*.+.. .

'** 'E ^WBREE E ZY ^------- Showers


iy and pleasant Sunny and pleasant


High 69/Low 44.
Winds NNE alt6-12 mpn


High 72/Low 46
Winds. NW at 7.14 mph


Sunny and nice


High 75/Low 53
Winds NNE alt 6-12 mph


'" T Relative humidity ........56%
v 57130 ( '6 .. Expected air temperature ........ 681
S.. ille Makes it feel like .............. 670


The blizzard of Feb 11 1 ?3
buried areas from Washington,
D.C., to New York under 2 feet of
snow. Philadelphia received an esti-
mated 32 billion pounds of snow.


5528
.r- .A V.42, 28








Houston A \ ,\1


"'"A A


T-storm

jRain

SFlurries

SSnow

SIce


FRONTS

qP Cold
&I, Warm

#, Stationary


SL t
65/5




Avon Park
71/47 "


71/48 ... .
S brdng -*4. /
I //e

Lake Placid Lorida
70/49 72/48

Venus
70/49
^ ^ ^ 1 *
0.. -.... .


Mostly cjudv !!""%W"
Winds northwest 6-12
mph. Expect less than 2 hours of
sunshine with average relative
humidity 70% and fair drying condi-
tions. Partly cloudy tonight.


Shown is today's
weather. Temperatures
are today's highs and
tonight's lows


Regional summary: Mostly cloudy today Partly cloudy tonight. Intervals of
clouds and sunshine tomorrow Sunday. Monday and Tuesday sunny and
pleasant


* Even addresses may water on
Thursday and Sunday.
* Odd addresses may water on
Wednesday and Saturday.
* All watering should take place before
10 a.m. and after 4 p.m.



9 am. 11 am. 1p.m. 3 p.m. 5p.m.
0 i 2 2 1
The r.ngher tit 1 u '.. 1v rsJ< u. r .tnj tfrC.- i i
the need for eye and skin protection.
0-2, Low; 3-5, Moderate; 6-7, High;
8-10, Very High; 11+ Extreme


-10S -Os - s -409 50I I60s 70s 9
National summary: As an area of high pressure promotes dry weather, the recent cold will ease slightly over the
South and mid-Atlantic today. There will be a couple of exceptions to the dry conditions. Light rain accompanying
an offshore storm system will graze the Carolina coastline, while thunderstorms rumble over South Florida.
Meanwhile, more noticeable warming will take place from the Ohio Valley to the southern Plains as a weak storm
system dots the Great Lakes with light snow.


Today Sunrise .... 7:05 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:16 p.m.
Moonrise 11:51 a.m.
Moonset .. 12:59 a.m.
Saturday Sunrise .... 7:04 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:17 p.m.
Moonrise 12:40 p.m,
Moonset .... 1:55 a.m.


!.-.- ill


"- . .
First Full Last New
Feb11 Feb18 Feb24 Mar 4


?Wmani ,:L.-........
Temperature
(Readings at Archbold Biological Station
In Lake Placid)
High Monday ....................... 86
Low Monday ..................... 45
High Tuesday ....................... 67
Low Tuesday ........................ 37
High Wednesday .................. 78
Low Wednesday ................... 48
Precipitation
Monday ....................... 0.01"
Tuesday ........................... 0.00"
Wednesday ....................... 0,00"
Month to date ....................0.02"
Year to date ................... 2.67"
Barometer
Monday ........................... 30.14
Tuesday .......................... 30.17


'44, 4 'A


Tomorrow
HI Lo W
c 62 39 s
72 57 pc
71 45 pc
C 64 33 8
72 55 p.:
oc 64 35 s
70 60 pc
73 57 pc
S 66 41 pC
5936 s
66 42 pc
C 61 29 a
c 65 42 s
70 52 pc


Sunday
HI LoW
65 42 s
73 56 s
71 47 s
67 37 s
72 E53
66 38 s
70 60 pc
74 56 s
69 45 s
63 44 s
68 45 S
67 34 8
68 47 5
72 49 s


-,,c.'Ir -.I-l-lf iV~~f1 711


city
Albuquerque
Atlanta
Ballnirm r.
Birmingham
Boston
Charlotte
C nerynne
Chicago
Cleveland
Columbus
Dae as
Denver
Detroit
Harrisburg


loaay
HI Lo W
46 22 s
5029 8
4,) ?4 S
46 28 s
26 25 a
51 25 s
40 26 s
24 17 c
28 19 c
30 23 c
44 -' Es
42 22 s
24 19 sn
34 19 a


tomorrow
HI Lo W
51 29 s
53 34 s
36 ?5i k:
55 30 s
38 26 pC
58 28 s
52 34 s
33 26 pc
35 26 sf
36 28 pc
67' 37 -
56 32 s
31 26 st
39 23 pc


sunday
HI Lo W
58 32 s
60 37 s
50 '.4 p,:
62 36 s
38 31 sn
62 36 a
55 28 p.:
39 23 pc
40 29 c
4S 31 pC
6s 40 c
62 29 pc
38 29 c
48 30 pc


City
Honoliulu
Houston
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Lexinglon
Liii. H-,CS
Los Angeles
Louisviill
Memphis
f.1,.,3n
Minneapolis
Nashville
Nrew Orleans


Today
HI Lo W
78 68 sh
55 28 s
60 34 pc
34 21 pc
34 23 pc
78 50 s
36 28 pc
35 24 s
-6. 'L i
28 17 c
36 27 s
52 34 s


Tomorrow
HI Lo W
8068 .sh
62 38 s
64 35 s
38 26 a
37 27 pc
78 50 s
43 3l s
46 35 s
34 26 c
42 29 s
5' 36 5


Sunday
HI Lo W
79 66 sn
68 51 s
66 38 s
47 26 a
46 53 pc
72 50 s
49 35 pc
58 35 s
36 22 pc
54 37 s
64 44 S


Today
City HI Lo W
New York COy 33 26 s
NorloKi 45 29 pc
C ,l Onc l ,j ,il., .l0 6 i
Philadelphia 37 26 s
Pnoens 69 43 s
Pittsburgh 28 20 pc
P,'.,riira, 2 ;1, p,:
Raleigh 48 26 pc
Rochester 26 19 sl
SI Lous 34 21 pC
In run ,:. r.. >. 12
Seattle 50 42 c
Tampa 64 47 pc
Washington, DC0042 28 s


Tomorrow
Hi Lo W
40 29 pc
49 30 s
5,2 .30 5
43 27 pc
75 45 6
34 24 st
33 1 7 .
54 30 S
33 27 sf
41 JO s
61 4J :.,:
48 40 r
65 42 6
44 30 s


~unaay


Sunday
HI Lo W
34 pc
59 39 s
6..' 28 *
47 34 pc
74 46 S
42 32 sn
60 38 s
39 27 sn
47 31 s
4.- 4 p.:
50 40 sh
68 47 s
53 35 pc


Wednesday ................. 29.93
Tides
(Readings at St. Petersburg)
High ..... ............... 6:46 p.m.
Low ....................... 2:16 a.m.
High ......................... ....... none
Low ................................... none
(Readings at Palm Beach)
High .......................... 1:51 a.m .
Low ...........................-. 7:37 a.m.
High ........... ............... 1:50 p.m .
Low .................. 8:09 p.m.
Lake Levels
Lake Jackson ................. 78.36'
Lake Okeechobee ............. 12.43'
Normal ....................... 14,51'


Today
City HI Lo W City
Acapulco 90 70 s London
Berlin 42 24 c Montreal
Calgary 45 29 c Nice
Dublin 50 37 r Otawa
EdiTi:nicn 38 17 Oje.e!e,:
Freeport 76 65 t Rio de Janeiro
Geneva 64 40 c Sydney
Hong Kong 63 55 pc Toronto ,
Jerusalem i'r. 3' .n var..,-,:,uer
Kiev 31 30 c Winnipeg


Today
HI Lo W
50 41 sh
20 15 sn
58 45 pc
18 14 sn
17 2 sn
94 80 S
90 73 po
20 17 sn
45 42 f
30 17 sn


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy,
sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, af-snow flurries,
an-snow, i-ice.


U U


o ebrig On D iss 28Ik Annua


Apfs and Copfts Festival

All merchandise created by the Arts & Crafts Vendors

Clothing, Jeweluy, Woodlcrfts, Soy Candles, Music Boxes, Ph otogrcaphu,

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Scatupdau Fcle uaCIr 12, 2011



9cim until 4pm


HISTORIC


DOWHTOWr SEBIRING


Crafts Vendors Food


C


City
Daytona Beach
Ft. Laud. Bch
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Honmesieead FB
Jacksonville
Key West
Miami
Ordando
Pensacola
Sarasoa
Tallarassee
Tampa
W. Palm Bch


HI LoW
69 43 p
76 58 t
70 53 c
64 36 p
76 58 I
60 34 p
74 63 t
76 69 1
70 47 p
54 33 S
6750 c
57 30 p
64 47 p
76 60 t


- P l',l i "ltl l .. q ,t ,i


gebriST,










www.newssun.corn


News-Sun Friday. February 11, 2011









,7


Pa l11A


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Index


1000 Announcements


2000 Employment


3000 Financial


4000 Real Estate


5000 Mobile Homes


6000 Rentals


7000 Merchandise


8000 Recreation


9000 Transportation


DEADLINES

Publication Place by:
Wednesday ............... 4 p.m. Monday
Friday .................. 4 p.m. Wednesday
Sunday ................ 4 p.m. Friday
All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier.

Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor,
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1050 ,e,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 11-35
Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SHIRLEY M. BURT
a.k.a. SHIRLEY BURT
a.k.a. SHIRLEY BURT McDONALD
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Sum-
mary Administration has been entered in the es-
tate of SHIRLEY M. BURT a.k.a. SHIRLEY BURT
a.k.a. SHIRLEY BURT McDONALD, deceased, File
Number PC 11-35, by the Circuit Court for HIGH-
LANDS County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Se-
bring, Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of
death was November 29, 2010; that the total
value of the estate is $20,000.00 and that the
names and addresses of those to whom it has
been assigned by such order are:
Name Address
Jack McDonald 116 S. Winter Circle
Avon Park, Florida 33825
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD. ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
February 4, 2011.
Persons Giving Notice:
/s/ Carol Schoenfeld
46 Tule Court
Clayton, California 94517
/s/ Jack McDonald
116 S. Winter Circle
Avon Park, Florida 33825
Attorney for Persons Giving Notice:
/s/ David F. Lanier
E-Mail Address: lanier30@embarqmail.com
Florida Bar No. 045399
DAVID F. LANIER
P.O. Box 400
Avon Park, Florida 33826-0400
Telephone: (863)453-4457
February 4, 11, 2010



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-001006
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,
Plantiff,
vs.
DANIEL K. KUIPER, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
DANIEL K. KUIPER
Current Residence: 9249 Buttonhill Ct., Littleton
CO 80130
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclo-
sure of Mortgage on the following described prop-
erty:
LOT 27, BLOCK 331, SUN 'N LAKES ESTATES OF
SEBRING UNIT 16, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 4,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS
COUNTY, FLORIDA
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET SUITE
120, FT. LAUDEHDALE FL 33309 on or before
March 4. 2011 a date which is within thirty (30)
days after the first publication of this Notice in THE
NEWS SUN and file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attor-
ney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N.
Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863)
534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately upon receiving
this notification if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than 7 days: if you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 711.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of thfe Court this
21st day of January, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE


1050 Legs
As Clerk of the Court
By: is/Toni Kopp
As Deputy Clerk
February 4. 11, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CASE NO: 2010-CA-000273
HSBC BANK, USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR SG MORTGAGE SECURITIES
TRUST 2005-OPT1, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-OPT1
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARIAN GRASS; FRANCISCO GRASS; SAND CAN-
YON CORPORATION F/K/A OPTION ONE MORT-
GAGE CORPORATION.
Defendants)
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
rescheduling Foreclosure sale dated January 24,
2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000273
of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in
and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein HSBC
BANK, USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUS-
TEE FOR SG MORTGAGE SECURITIES TRUST
2005-0OPT1, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SE-
RIES 2005-OPT1, Plaintiff and MARIAN GRASS
are defendantss, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash, AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM
IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COM-
MERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA AT 11:00
A.M., February 16, 2011, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment,
to-wit:
PARCEL 1: THE SOUTH 41.21. FEET OF THE
WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST
QUARTER AND THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTH-
WEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER
OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 4,
TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EAST, LESS
THE SOUTH 50 FEET OF THE SOUTHEAST QUAR-
TER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH,
RANGE 29 EAST, LING WEST OF STATE ROAD
NO. 64, HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
PARCEL 2: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SEC-
TION 4, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH, RANG E 29 EAST,
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN
EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH-
EAST QUARTER OF SECTION 4, A DISTANCE OF
110.0 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES
05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG A LINE
PARALLEL WITH THE WEST LINE OF SAID
SOUTHEAST QUARTER, A DISTANCE OF 50,07
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF A PARCEL
OF LAND HEREINAFTER DESCRIBED; THENCE
CONTINUE NORTH 03 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 396.6 FEET;
THENCE EAST 110.0 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 03
DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 396.6 FEET:T HENCE WEST 110.0
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS THE
SOUTH 50 FEET OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER
OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH, RANGE
29 EAST, LYING WEST OF STATE ROAD NO. 64,
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE
LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
DATED at SEBRING, Florida, this 24th day of
January, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Highlands County, Floiida
By. /s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP
4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd.
Suite 100
Tampa. FL 33614
(813)880-8888
February 4, 11, 2011

IN HE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO PC 11-33
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOROTHY BELL MAURER
a/k/a DOROTHY B MAURER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DOROTHY
BELL MAURER a/k/a DOROTHY B. MAURER, de-
ceased, whose date of death was May 14, 2010,
is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands
Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring,
Florida 33870-3867. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es
tate on whom a copy of this notice is served must
file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER


1050 Legals
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE. FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claim with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
February 11, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Ernest Jacobs
6227 N Litchfield Road, Sp 68
Litchfield, AZ 85340
Attorney for Personal Representative.
/s/ John Paul Parks
Fla. Bar No. 0331309
Suite 1000
14362 N. Frank Lloyd Wright Boulevard
Scottsdale, AZ 85260-8847
Telephone: (480)477-6626
Telecopier: (480)477-6646
E-Mail: AirzCalFlaLaw@msn.conm
February 11, 18 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 11-37
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARY ANN MARINE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MARY ANN
MARINE, deceased, whose date of death was De-
cember 14, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
of HIGHLANDS County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Ave.,
Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of thie decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
February 4, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ William J. Nielander
172 E. Interlake Boulevard
Lake Placid, Florida 33852
Attorney for Personal Representative:
WILLIAM J. NIELANDER
Florida Bar Number: 0386014
172 E. Interlake Boulevard
Lake Placid, FL 33852
Telephone: (863) 465-8181
Fax: (863) 465-5614
E-Mail: wjn@nielander.com
February, 11, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. PC 11-25
Division Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN RE: ESTATE OF
KATHERINE A. MYETTE
Deceased.
The administration of the estate of KATHERINE A.
MYETTE, deceased, whose (late of death was
January 1, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court
for HIGHLANDS County. Florida Probate Division.
the address of which is Cleik of the Court, High-
lands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce
Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and
addresses of the personal representative and tlhe
personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICAlION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.


1050 Legals
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this,
notice is February 4, 2011.
Personal Representative:
Ernest Myette1 0304
Bioadway St.lndianapolis, Indiana 46280
Attorney for Personal Representative:
John K McClure
Attorney for Ernest Myette
Florida Bar Number: 286858.
MCCLURE & LOBOZZO
211 S. Ridgewood DriveSebring, Florida 33870
Telephone: (863) 402-1888
Fax. (863) 402-0751
E-Mail. kelly@mllaw.net
February 4, 11, 2011




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385-6155



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No:. 28-2009-CA-001288
HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
REGISTERED HOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME
EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1
Plaintiff,

RAYMOND At WAGONER; DANIELLE GRIFFITH;
MICHAEL J. GRIFFITH; DIANE M. OLIVADOTI;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL J. GRIFFITH;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RAYMOND A. WAGONER;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DIANE M. OLIVADOTI;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DANIELLE GRIFFITH;
NATIONAL CREDIT ADJUSTERS, LLC; UNKNOWN
TENANT l1; UNKNOWN] ENANT #2; ALL OTHER
UNKNOWN PAR1 ES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIM-
ANTS,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
(To be Published in The News-Sun)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment dated January- 24, 2011, en-
tered in Civil Case No.: 28-2009-CA-001288, of
the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in
and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein
I SBC BANK USA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
REGISTERED HOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME
EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1 is Plaintiff, and
RAYMOND A. WAGONER; DANIELLE GRIFFITH:
MICHAEL J. GRIFFITH; DIANE M. OLIVADOTI;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL J. GRIFFITH
N/K/A TANYA GRIFFITH AND NATIONAL CREDIT
ADJUSTERS, LLC, are Defendants.
I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at
11:00 a.m., in the Jury Assembly Room in the
basement of the 1 ,', .... County Courthouse, lo-
cated at 430 South Ccmimeice Avenue, Sebring,
Florida, 33870 oni tie 16th day of February,
2011, the following described real property as set
forth in said Final Summaiy Judgment, to wit:
LOT 496, SYLVAN SHORES ESTAIES SECTION D,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 13, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY. FLORIDA.
riis property is located at th Street address of.
1583 Buck Street, Lake Placid, FL 33852.
If you are a person claiming a eight to funds
remaining afiel thl I sale, you must file a claim
with tlie clerk no later than 60 days after the sale.
If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to
any remaining funds After 60 days, only the
owner of record as of tie date ofl the us pendens
may claim the surplus.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of tie court on
January 16, 2011
ROBERI W. GERMAINE
CLERK OF TIHE COURT
By: /s/ Annetlle E. Dalf. (COURT SEAL)
Deputy Cleilk
February 4 11, 2011


1050 .Legas
IN THECIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 11-47
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JUDITH LEE PAGE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JUDITH LEE
PAGE, deceased, whose date of death was July
17, 2010. is pending in the Circuit Court for High-
lands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL
33870. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is served must
file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
February 11, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Charles Michael Page
2312 CANYON VALLEY TRAIL
PLANO, Texas 75023
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Clifford M. Ables
CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III
Attorney for CHARLES MICHAEL PAGE
Florida Bar Number: 178379
551 S. COMMERCE AVE.
SEBRING, FLORIDA 33870
Telephone: (863) 385-0112
Fax: (863)385-1284
E-Mail cmables@cmablespa.net
February 11, 18, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 28201 OCA001309
SEACOAST NATIONAL BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ERMELINDA RAMOS, et, al,,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 1, 2011,,
entered in Case No. 10-CA-1309 in the Circuit
Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for High-
lands County, Florida wherein Seacoast National
Bank is Plaintiff and Errmelinda Ramos and High-
lands County, a political subdivision of the State of
Florida, acting through the Board of County Com-
missioners are the Defendants, I, will sell to the
highest and best bidder for 'casi at tie Jury As-
sembly Room, Highlands Coufty Cburthouse, 430
S. Commerce Avenue,.Sebrin, Florida 33870 at
11:00 am on the 24th day of Fetruary, 2011, the
following described property Highlands County,
Florida:
Lot 24, Block 5, of SEBRING COUNTRY ESTATES,
SECTION ONE, according to the Plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 6, at Page 49, of thle Public
Records of Highlands County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 4th day of February 2011
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: is/ Priscilla Michalak
DEPUTY CLERK
February 11, 18,2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 28201 CA001159
SEACOAST NATIONAL BANK, SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO BIG LAKE NATIONAL BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE A. CABRERA, et. al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 1, 2011,
entered in Case No. 10-CA-1159 in the Circuit
Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for High-
lands County, Florida wherein Seacoast National
Bank is Plaintiff and Jose A Cabrera and The Urn-
known Spouse of Jose A Cabreia are thie Defen .
dants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the Jury Assembly Room, Highlands
County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Avenue,


1050 Legals
Sebring, -n. 1 7 '- .' 1- .*, n I1t ii
day of -i.,,,'j. _,,' the i. ii 1 .. oi-.n .,., :,d
property Highlands County, Florida:
Lot 24, in Block 2, of SEBRING ACRES, according
to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 9,
Page 56, of the Public Records of Highlands
County, Florida.
*TOGETHER WITH a 1993 SKYLINE Mobile Home,
I.D. #0361011OF, Title #63314624
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 2nd day of February 2011.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
DEPUTY CLERK
February 11,18, 2011 -
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 282009CA001229
SEACOAST NATIONAL BANK, SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO BIG LAKE NATIONAL BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TANYA D. COLDREN, et. al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 1,. 2011,
entered in Case No. 09-CA-1229 in the Circuit
Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for High-
lands County, Florida wherein Seacoast National
Bank is Plaintiff and Tanya D. Coldren and Kevin
Coldren are the Defendants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at the Jury Assembly
Room, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S.
Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 at
11:00 am on the 24th day of February, 2011, the
following described property Highlands County,
Florida:
Lot 30, Block 165, of LEISURE LAKES SECTION
FOUR, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 6, at Page 29, of the Public Records of
Highlands County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the his pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 2nd day of February 2011.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
DEPUTY CLERK
February 11, 18, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 282009CA001230
SEACOAST NATIONAL BANK, SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO BIG LAKE NATIONAL BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TANYA D. COLOREN AND KEVIN F. COLDREN,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
.NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Final
I,,i,),,,- of Foreclosure dated February 1, 2011,
entered in Case No. 09-CA-1230 in the Circuit
Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for High-
lands County, Florida wherein Seacoast National
Bank is Plaintiff and Tanya D. Coldren and Kevin
,F. Coldien are thie Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at the Jury As-
sembly Room, Highlands County Courthouse, 430
S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 at
11:00 am on the 24th day of February, 2011, the
following described property Highlands County,
Florida:
Lot 9, in Block 165, of LEISURE LAKES SECTION
FOUR, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 6, at Page 29, of the Public Records of
Highlands County. Florida. '
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 3rd day of February 2011.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
DEPUTY CLERK
February 11, 18, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
Case #: GC10-175
Division#:i
CARLA RENEE BENNETT, Personal Representative
ESTATE OF DAVID L. MARSH, deceased
Plaintiffss,
vs.
AMY BROWN, a/k/a Amy A. Brown,
FRANKLIN BROWN, CAPITAL ONE BANK
and CREDIT ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION, et al
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final de-
cree of foieclosuie entered in tle above entitled
cause in the Circuit Court of i,..,i,., County,
Florida, I will sell thle property situate in Highlands
County, Florida, described as.
Lot 22, MORNING SUN MANOR, according to the
plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 46,


ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO

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Page 12A


1050 Legals
of the Public Records of Highlands County, Flor-
ida
at public sale to the highest and best bidder for
cash. at the Commerce Street Entrance of the
Highlands County Courthouse in Sebnrng, Florida,
at 11:00 a.m. on the 3rd day of March, AD
2010.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of this
Honorable Court, this 3rd day of February A D.
2010
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
As Clerk of said Circuit Coui
By !s/ AnnetteE Daft
Deputy Clerk
February 11,18,2011
Excell Communications, Inc proposes to collocate
on an existing 150-fo t tall after r tower located at
222 SW Lakeside Drve in Seing Fonrida
127-29-51 44 N, 81-28-42 9 W). Existing wire-
less telecommunications antennas will be re-
placed and on e electronic cabinet will be added ;o
those already present at the base, on an existing
concrete slab. In accordance with Section 106 of
the National Historic Preservation Act, Excell Com-
municalions hereby solicits public comments con-
cerning its proposal. In order for your comments
to receive f'll and timely consideration, they
should be received at the address below within 30
days of the date of this notice' Zachary D. Hall,
Excell Communications, 6247 Amber Hills Rd,
Trussville. AL, 35173. Ph. 205-956-0198 (x210),
zhall@excellcommunicationscom
February 11, 13, 16, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
Case #: GCS 10-1215
Division#:
CARLA RENEE BENNETT, Personal Representative
ESTATE OF DAVID L MARSH, deceased
Plaintiffss,
Vs.
TINA M. CHAMBERLAND, a/k/a TINA CHAMBER-
LAND and PETER CLAUS JUISTEN,
her husband
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final de-
cree of foreclosure entered in the above entitled
cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County,
Flonda, I will sell the property situate in Highlands
County, Florida, described as:
Lot 10, in Block 66, TOWN OF AVON PARK, ac-
cording to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 1, Page 58, Public Records of DeSoto
County, of which Highlands County was formerly a
part, lying in Section 22, Township 33 South,
Range 28 East, Highlands County, Florida.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for
cash, at the Commerce Street Entrance of the
Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida,
at 11:00 a.m. on the 3rd day of March, A.D.
2010.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of this
Honorable Court. this 3rd day of February, A.D.
2010.
ROBERT W, GERMAINE
As Clerk of said Circuit Court
By: /s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
February 11, 18, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 28-2010-CA-000763
SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JONATHAN P. COOPER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JONATHAN P. COOPER; SHAWNA C. COOPER
A/K/A SHAWNA C. KILGORE; IF LIVING, INCLUD-
ING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFEN-
DANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS,
AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT
#1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendrant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of High-
lands County, Florida, I will sell the property situ-
ate in Highlands County, Florida, described as:
LOT 24, IN BLOCK 201, OF SUN 'N LAKES ES-
TATES. SECTION 18, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE
87, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS
COUNTY, FLORIDA,
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement
of Highlands County Courthouse located at 430
South Commerce Avenue, Sebnng, Florida at
11:00 A.M., on March 1, 2011.
DATED THIS 1st DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2011.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendents, must file
a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the
1st day of February, 2011.
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
February 11,18, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 09000087GCS
SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC.,
PlaRioiff,
VS.
ANTHONY T. BOLANOS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
ANTHONY T. BOLANOS; LACY N, BOLANOS; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF LACY N. BOLANOS; IF LIV-
ING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND 'IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS.
LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES. AND ALL OTHER PER-
SONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in tilhe
above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of High-
lands County, Florida, I will sell the property situ-
' ate in Highlands County. Florida, described as:
LOT 8, HILLSIDE LAKE ANNEX, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 11, PAGE 13, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY FLORIDA.
at public sale, to the highest end best bidder, for
cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement
of Highlands County Courthouse located at 430
South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at
11:00 AM, on March 1,.2011.
DATED THIS 1 st DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2011.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any. other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendents, must file


a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the
1st day of February, 2011.
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
February 11, 18, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2009-1819-GCS
VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC.,
etc.,
Plaintiff,
VS.
DARRIN MCCRAY, et al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO
SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to the Fi-
nal Judgment entered on January 27, 2011, in
Case No: 2009-1819-GCS of the Circuit Court,
Highlands County, Florida, in which Vanderbilt
Mortgage and Finance, Inc., etc is Platiniff and
Darrin McCray, et al are the defendants, the Clerk
of this court will sell at public sale the following


News-Sun Friday. February 11. 2010


1050 Legas
described real property
Lot 38, Block 345. SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF
SEBRING UNIT 16, according to the map or plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 10. Page 4. Public
Records of Highlands County. Florida
The sale will be held on February 16, 2011, at
11.00 a.m. to the highest and best bidder for
cash. in the Jury Assembly Room, basement floor
of the H ghlands County Courthouse, 430 South
Commerce Ave.. Sebring. Florida, in accordance
with Section 45.031 of the Florinda Stautes.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING ANl INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE
LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
if you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA
Coordinator, 430 S. Commerce Ave., Sebnring. FL
33870 (863)534-4686 at least 7 days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon
receiving this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you
are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Dated this 271th day of January, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE


1050 Legals
CLERK OF SAID COURT
By. is/ Annette E. Daff
As Deputy Clerk
February 11 2011




NOTICE OF SALE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO
Virginia Welcher ;at on February 24, 2011' at
11am at Dwght's MLni Storage 1112 Persimmon
Ave. Sebring, FL 33870. The personal property in
Unit #3 of VLrginia ,.'elcher will be sold cr dis-
posed of PURSUANT TO F S. 83.80614)
February 11. 18, 2011


1100 Announcements

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Please check your ad on the first
day it runs to make sure it is cor-
rect. Sometimes instructions over
the phone are misunderstood and
an error can occur. If this happens
to you, please call us the first day
your ad appears and we will be
happy to fix it as soon as we can.
If We can assist you, please call us:
385-6155
News-Sun Classified


WANT NEW FURNITURE?
Need to sell the old
furniture first?
Call News-Sun
classified,
385-6155.
Then shop till you drop!


1400 Health Care
140 Services
CAREGIVERS NEEDED
Must be mature and experienced.
Must have clean background and
license. 863-812-4752

1450 Babysitters
BABYSITTER NEEDED F/T position for
4 months. Must have Infant CPR
Certification. Background check.
863-446-3826


Subscribe

to the

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2J W


Joe Johnson's

ALL AMERICAN
TREE SERVICE, INC.
TRIMMING REMOVAL
SOD INSTALLATION STUMP GRINDING
LOT CLEARING PRESSURE CLEANING
Will Beat Any Written Estimate!
Peoples Choice OC)A 7Al4Q Free Estimates
Award 863-465-7491 Licensed & Insured


SPOOL PARADISE
Pool Service $ Mobile Retail
Service Repair- Supplies Equipmerit-
Delivered Right to your cor
Brad $ Julie Kur'tz
(653) 362-7726
Fax (663) 402-2200




JIACKSON HEWIlTT
.55 summ TAX SERVICE
INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED
Avon Park (863) 453-2525 Sebring (863) 382-1515
Lake Placid (863) 699-2525 Wauchula (863) 767-1515
Lake Wales (863) 679-9200 Sebring Fax (863) 382-9939
Wal-Mart Locations:
Lake Wales (863) 676-0569
Sebring (863) 385-5371
Avon Park (863) 452-7010


S&D TREE SERVICE


S"More

S ,For Your

Buck'


Tree Trimming Stump Grinding
Tree Removal Lot Clearing

Will beat any quote

Free Stump Grinding
with any Tree Removal
Licensed & Insured / ISA Certified

863-441-5154


Lawn Maintenance
& More since 1991!





Truck / Trailer / Labor FOR HIRE
Marc (863) 655-9579


WILLIAMS JANITORIAL

CARPET CLEANING


10"9 Per Room
3 Rooms Minimum
Upholstery Cleaning
All Types of Flooring
Free Estimates
Lic Bonded Ins

(863) 214-1940


A&E
LAWN MOWER REPAIR
Belts... Blades .
New & Used Parts ;;'..,-:'

12 S. Forest Ave.
Avon Park, FL 33825
863-452-0389


HANDYMAN BOB
Install doors, windows,
flooring, plumbing & more!
Licensed & Insured
Lic# HM0096

Call 863-452-5201,
or
863-449-1744



rAdvertise
r Your Business

Here!


News- Stun

Call 385-6155



". :'. t : ,.'. I "; ,J

; .-



Serving All of Florida Free Estimates
"Enjoy the Satisfaction of Safety"
with the
ROBBINS "FLAME SYSTEM"











"LIVE BLOOD ANALYSIS"

WANDA KLINE

WEIGHT LOSS
& WELLNESS

See what one drop of your blood indicates as
to YOUR nutritional health and well-being.
By appointment only
863-414-4066




















Fully Insured Free Estimates
Tree Removal Tree Topping
Tree Trimming Stump Grinding
Serving All Central Florida Area


yroAdvertise

Your Business

Here!


News Sun,

Call 385- 61

t ~Cindy Divietro
yCommunity Liaison
S'Cell: 941-518-2478
800-518-0403
We Elderly Care, Inc.
Compassionate, Professional Health Care For Your Loed Ones
214 E. Stuart Ave. Lake Wales, FL 33853
863-767-1120 Fax 863-676-7291
In Home Care
Avon Park Sebring Lake Placid
Private Pay Long Term Insurance
www.weelderiycare.com

S. -A. LONG CLEANING e1000
20 Years experience
.) Excellent References
,/ .Daily Weekly Biweekly- Monthly
'A 4 Janitorial Service Recently
/ "/7 Relocated to Lake Placid Sebring
----,.Lqooking To Build New Clientele
863-243-1801 / Shelly A long


Freedom Lawn Care '
Get the freedom \ ou deserve
Carl Horton owner S
Vet. & Sr. Discount


Indoor Flea Market,


a~i dollar Store
Beckie's Avon 863-449-1298




CAMPBELL'S COLLISION
1! CENTER, INC
,/ JINr CANIPIFI.I M Owner



: ,

Phone (863) 382-7551 1405 US 27 North
FAX (863) 382-2750 Sebring. FL 33870




Service Available 7 Days A Week
Website: extraordinair'eairconditioning.com
All Service Calls $40
Mike & Kandy Sheldone
EW CEO/Owner
Lic# C'AC 1816569
863-451-2399

Roger's Handyman Services

licensed an!d intsinvtl t i p
IIIN, n. I.. il l '
I.. .. . ... . ,11;'i .



M -i;-:{ .lili77 .
I ,- i i..f t n -


www. newssun.COl


Classified ads
get fast results


* Lawn Maintenance
* Landscaping
* Small Tree Work
* Clean Ups
* Free Estimates
863-655-2526


'1~4


mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmw










www.newssun.com

DOES MAKING
MONEY
MAKE YOU HAPPY?
Sell your used
appliance with a
News-Sun classified
ad. Call today,
gone tomorrow!
385-6155



20000
Employment


2 1 00 Help Wanted


LPN'S WANTED
Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility
serving disabled adults is seeking
nurses for PRN shifts. Casual work
environment, benefit package and
paid training. Call Nina at
863-452-5141 or complete an
application at 55 E. College Dr.,
Avon Park, FL 33825.

ACCOUNTING DEPT. BA / BS in
business w/ emphasis in accounting.
Must have strong experience with
Quick Books, payroll, Microsoft Excel,
Access and Word. Strong verbal and
written communication skills. Strong
inter-personal, supervisory and cus-
tomer service skills required. Ability to
multi task, work under pressure and
meet deadlines required. Email resume
to: Icelentano@sebringraceway.com


COMCAST OUTSIDE SALES
Contractor for COMCAST needs
OUTSIDE SALES REPS to sell cable to
homeowners. Earn $600+ weekly, will
train. Call Chris @ 863-381-6007.


DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS
wanted for Avon Park Intermediate
Care Facility serving disabled adults.
HS diploma or 1 year associated
experience, valid FL Drivers License
and clean criminal background req.
Please complete application at 55 E.
College Dr., Avon Park, FL 33825.
NURSES AND THERAPISTS needed
for local home care visits in Highlands
County. Good Salary/per diem rates.
Excellent benefits, immediate need.
Call 863-401-3550 or fax resume to:
863-401-8199
RESTAURANT HIRING Servers,
Cooks, Dishwashers, Beverage Cart
Attendents @ Springlake Golf Resort.
Apply in person Tues. thru Sat. 2pm -
5pm. directions only, Please call
863-655-0909 ext 3.
SUNSHINE PAYDAY LOANS
Clerks needed in Highlands County &
LaBelle area, must be willing to travel.
Fax Resume to 863-678-2170

O15 Part-time
2 | JEmployment
TUTOR I am seeking a tutor for a 14
year old girl, well behaved and shy.
Instruction will take place in my home
three days a week, hours are flexible,
to begin, between 8 am 8 pm and
lessons should last about 60 mins..
Subjects: Math, Science, Reading &
English. $60 per hour. Interested reply
by email "michaelbrooks646@aol.com"


3000
Financial


4000
Real Estate

O 60 Homes for Sale
4 6 Avon Park


News-Sun Friday, February 11, 2011


6000
Rentals


6050 Duplexes for Rent
LAKE PLACID Placid Lakes,
Unfurnished 2BR, 2BA.
S375/mo. + security?
863-699-0897 or 863-840-2013
SEBRING Cute 2BR, 1 BA, tile floors,
fenced yard, most pets OK.
$550 + $300 security deposit.
4909 Manatee Dr. 863-446,7274
SEBRING GREAT LOCATION!
Beautiful 2BR, 1BA, 2CP Duplex; close
to mall & US 27. W/D, screen porch,
new carpet Appl's incl., ceiling fans.
A/C, no moke.CALL 305-490-5399

6200 Unfurnished
620 Apartments

RELAX AT Lake Isis Villas
Luxurious 2BR Apartment.
Clean & Quiet Setting.
Call 863-453-2669
AVON PARK Highlands Apartments
1680 North Delaware
1 BR, 1 BA & 2BR, 2BA Available.
Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation.
1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195
AVON PARK Apartment with balcony
overlooking Lake Verona and City Park.
100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities.
SPECIAL: $325/mo.
863-453-8598
AVON PARK Clean, Quiet; Studios/
1BR. 1BA/2BR, 2BA Apts., from
$375/mo. New tile & appliances,
screened patios & W/D hook ups.
Students/Seniors Discount
Call 863-452-0469.
AVON PARK LEMONTREE APTS:
1 BR, 1 BA $495/mo +$200 security;
2BR, 1BA $645/mo +$500 security.
W/D, Microwave, WSG included.
Pets Wicome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953




KEY LAKE VILLAS
LAKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING
2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean &
quiet, Screen porch, Outside patio,
Central air, Washer/Dryer hookup,
$585/mo., first & security. No Pets.
863-465-2740
LAKE PLACID 2BR, 2BA,
Washer/Dryer, screened patio, water
included. Excellent Condition.
$525 monthly plus 1 mo. security.
954-695-8348
SEBRING / LAKE PLACID Beautiful
1BR, 1BA Apt. on private lake w/dock.
Avail. Furn/Unfurn. Yearly or Seasonal.
W/D + Util's. included. No smoke/ No
pets. For more info call 863-381-7415.

6250 Furnished Houses
LAKE PLACID Newer 3BR, 2BA,
seasonal or monthly. Excellent furniture
& appliances, near lake & boat ramp,
No smoking or dogs. $1300/mo. After
season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119


6300 Unfurnished Houses
HOUSES / MOBILE HOMES
Call for Availability
NO Security NO Last NO Dogs
863-381-4410 or 863-381-5174
SEBRING Harder Hall area, 2BR, 2BA,
1CG, screened porch. $750/mo.
plus last month & security deposit.
View by appointment. Call
863-381-6747, leave message.
SEBRING 3BR, 2BA 1CG, CBS Home
303 Virginia PI. $119,00 or 2BR, 2BA,
MH 5151 Barnum St. $42,500 10%
Down Owner Financing Call
863-835-1445
SPRING LAKE 3BR, 2BA, bonus
room, new roof, ceramic tile floors,
screened porch, double car garage,
1/4 acre lot landscaped for nature w/
drought tolerant plants & man-made


AVON PARK 3BR, 1BA, CHA, natural goldfish pond
gas, newer roof & windows, city around back ya
water/sewer. Lg wkshop in back, needs
some work. Priced reduced to $37.500.
863-453-7764 or 863-257-4095. 6400

0804 Homes for Sale
4 0 Sebring SEBRING -1 I


SEBRING Edgewater Village Lakeview
Dr. 2BR, 2BA, 1CG Villa. Beautifully
furnished. New kitchen, laundry, TV.
Low Maintenance fee includes Cable
TV, Clubhouse, heated pool. Private
street. Avail Immed. 863-402-9138
SEBRING NEWLY REMODELED 3BR
Home, one block from Woodlawn Elem.
School. Nice, quiet neighborhood.
1243 Fernvale Ave. Possible Owner
Financing. Call 863-675-3387 TODAY!


4260 Acreage for Sale
FROSTPROOF 7 1/2 Acres on Dawes
Road. You must see! No lower price!
$39,900. Call Lucy with Exit Realty
863-382-4705


W/D, Satell
$400/mo.
86


5, chain link fence
ird.


Rooms for Rent

BR w/bath, furn/unfurn,
ite, full use of home.
or $100/wk + dep.
3-304-2849


731 0 Bargain Buys
DOG CRATE Plastic Large.
$25. 863-453-4234
GOLF CLUBS Powerbilts. $25.
863-385-2605
HEDGE TRIMMER 17" Black &
Decker. $12. 863-699-0352
JIGSAW PUZZLES (25) for $6.25.
863-699-0352
MINI REFRIGERATOR $40
863-385-7669
REFRIGERATOR small 1.7 cu ft,
white, new condition $40 717-389-6232
SHARPER IMAGE LOVE HANDLER
exerciser. New S200, like new nw $60
obo 941-347-7020

7320 Garage&
7320 Yard Sales
AVON PARK 206 E. Thomas St,
Fn-Sat, Feb 11th & 12, 8am till ????
Lots of Glassware, Linens, & MORE! To
Much To List...Something for Everyone.
AVON PARK Moving Sale! Fri-Sat Feb.
11-12. 1715 Orangewood PI. (Orange-
wood Acres). 5550 WATT TROY BUILT
generator. Rainbow sweeper, antique
glassware, dishes, raggedy dolls,
crocks and many misc. items & tools.
Everything in excellent condition.
AVON PARK Multi Family Sale Sat. Feb.
12th, 24 Jim Rodger Ave (Wells bldg)
8AM-1PM. Household items, children
clothes & toys, electronics, DVD's,
seasonal misc, Too Much To List!
AVON PARK MULTI-FAMILY SALE!
45 N. Central Ave, Sat-Sun, Feb 12th &
13th, 7am 2pm. Furniture, Household
Items, Clothes, & MORE!
LAKE PLACID HUGE INDOOR
RUMMAGE SALE!
Camp & Conference Cnt, 2665
Placid View Dr, Fri-Sat, Feb 11 &
12, 8am-4pm. Furniture, Antiques,
Clothing, Household Items, Golf
Carts, Boats, Trucks, Camping
Gear, Tools, & MUCH MORE!


7 2 XYard Sales
LAKE PLACID 126 Melody Ct, Fri-Sat,
Feb 11-12, 8am-2pm, Christmas items,
stereo, airdyne, shelving, sm hand-
painted cabinet, quality clothing used &
new w/tags, household, fishing gear.
SEBRING 2301 Cleveland Rd. Sat.
Feb. 12th, 8AM 4PM. DOWN SIZING!
TOO MUCH TO LIST!
SEBRING 6429 Bridgeview Dr. Fri &
Sat Feb. 11 & 12 8AM ? Tools, cloth-
ing, recliner chair, music equip., micro-
phone, keyboard, books, CDs & house-
hold items. Much More!
SEBRING Annual Sale American
Red Cross Sat. Feb 12 106 Medical
Center Ave ( behind Highlands Regional
Hospital) 7AM -1 PM
SEBRING GINORMOUS-Huge Sale!
3511 Hwy 27 S (behind tj's Leather)
Feb.10-11-12, Thur- Fri, 10AM-3PM,
Sat 10AM-1PM, Household items,
clothes, hand & electric tools, decor.
Too Much to List!
SEBRING Highlands Oaks RV Resort
Annual Yard Sale 7001 Old Plantation
Ave., Sat Feb 12th, 7:30 AM 2PM.
SEBRING Huge Sale 211 Wren Ave,
Thur, Fri. Sat. Feb. 10-11-12. 8AM 7
Refrig. & household items. Something
For Everyone!
SEBRING Huge Sale! All proceeds for
Korean Mission Trip. 544 N Ridgewood
Dr. near Post Office. Fri-Sat Feb. 11-12,
7Am-? Everything priced low! Clothing
for all. Homemade baked goods.
SEBRING Huge Sale! Sat. Feb.12th,
723 Summitt Dr, All proceeds to High-
lands Youth football program. Baked
goods, hot dogs & drinks for sale. Furn.
kids stuff, electronics & Much Morel.
SEBRING Multi Family Early Spring
Cleaning! 210 Dove Ave. (Sebring Hills
Area) Sat. Feb. 12th 8AM 3PM.
SEBRING Sunny Pines RV Park
Annual Club House yard & bake
sale1200 US Hwy 27 North. Fri Feb
11th, 8AM 11AM. Coffee / Donuts on
sale. Sales also at lots 23, 1711, 1928
Pye Dr. & 1620 Sunny Pines Dr.


7320 Garage &
732 Yard Sales
SEBRING Yard / Bake Sale Highland
Wheels RV Park 1004 Hammock Rd.
Sat Feb 12th 8am 1pm. 50 / 50 Raffle.
SEBRING HILLS Multi-Family Sale!
901 S. Egret St, Sat, Feb 12, 8am -
2pm. Household, Clothes, Books,
Costume Jewelry, Kids Items, Coins,
Tools, Furn, Vintage Seb Race Posters,
Coca-Cola Collectibles & MORE!

SEBRING HILLS South, 331 Tern Ave,
Sat, Feb 12th, 8am-lpm. Sofas, table,
TV, AB Lounger, & LOTS OF MISC!
SEBRING SUN N LAKE 5548 Castania
Dr. Sat. Feb. 12th, 8 AM 1 PM. Tools,
appliances, clothes, books & household
items. Too Much To List!


7400 Lawn & Garden
STRING TRIMMER, HUSQVARNA,
124L, less than 4 hours. $140.
863-453-7027


7520 Pets & Supplies


NOTICE

Florida statute 585.195 states that
all dogs and cats sold in Florida
must be at least eight weeks old,
have an official health certificate
and proper shots and be free of in-
testinal and external parasites.
YORKIES ADORABLE PUPPIES!
AKC registered, health certs, 1 male,
1 female. $700-$800. 11 weeks old,
READY TO GO!!
863-655-2124 or 863-414-6335


8000
Recrentinn


SEBRING 127 Madrid Dr. off 98, Fri & SEBRING Thunderbird Hill Village II & __...__ ...___
Sat Fed 11-12, 7:30 AM- 4PM. Dining Ill Annual Sale. Sat. Feb. 12th 8AM.
room set, coffee table, kids clothes & Food & Treasures in the Club House. AA Recreational
toys, woman's clothes & shoes, dvd / SEBRING Woody's RV Park 4414 US Vehicles
vhs player, dvds, xbox games. Party Hwy 27 S. Sat. Feb 12th 8AM 1PM.
Lite Global Fusion candle holders & Furniture, appliances, dishes & clothing. 2 KAWASAKI JET SKIS with Trailer
Much more! Bake Sale & Food. $800 863-464-0531


6550 A Warehouses
655 for Rent
SEBRING 20'X40' Warehouse,
12' overhead door, on busy Highway
27 across from Lakeshore Mall.
863-385-3474




7000
Merchandise


4320 Real Estate Wanted 7160 Cameras & Supplies


ATTENTION: CASH for your Home,
Duplex, Apartment, Commercial
Property. Rapid Closing,
"As Is" Condition. 863-441-2689.
STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL




5000
Mobile Homes

5 AMobile Homes
5050 For Sale
AVON PARK Don't Want to Pay Lot
Rent? This Single Wide Mobile Home
has 2 add-on rooms & carport. It's on a
private lot and includes additional lot
with nice shade & citrus trees. All for
$26,000! 863-385-3913
SBRING Park Model 2BR, 1BA,
screen room with windows, Lots of new
up dates. Close to Lakeshore Mall. Lg.
patio in back, 2 sheds. Asking Mid
$20's. 863-382-9437
SEBRING MH in 55+ community.
Comletely furn 1BR, Large .BA, kitchen
& D.R, L.R. & Dressing Rm. Lakefront,
Boat Ramp w/gazebo. Pets Welcome.
2900 St Rd 17, N., Lot 20.
863-402-0037, no calls before 1 pm.
SELECTION OF 1 & 2 Bedroom Units
For Sale in friendly/active 55+ Park,
located near shopping, banks, &
hospital. Reasonable lot rent incl.
S/W/G & Lawn mowing. Call for more
info. or to view units. No pets please.
863-385-7034


CAMERA EQUIPMENT, Professional.
Also, Collector Cameras &
Equipment. Call 863-382-7469
for details & pricing.

7300 Miscellaneous
ANTIQUES! SMALL writing desk, table,
rocker & loveseat. Assorted area rugs.
863-385-1925
HUSOVARNA MEGA quilter & Inspira
frame; frame adj. 5' to 10'; sewing
rnachine includes the add'l speed con-
trol for even stitches & laser light w /
templates for flexibility in stitch design.
$1700 863-446-6924

7310 Bargain Buys
AIR PURIFIER, OREK.
$50. 863-453-3104
ALADIN LAMP converted to electric,
beautiful. $12 863-214-6697 Thunder-
bird Hills Village 3733 Camry Ct
BOOKS Hardback & Softbacks, Best
Sellers. 85 for $18. 863-385-2605
CAPODIMONTE basket of fruit.
$12.50. Thunderbird Hills Village 3733
camry Ct. 863-214-6697
COUCH & OTTOMAN, three seater,
vinyl covered, tan. $95. 863-453-3104
DESK: 54"X18", gray formica, 5-
drawers including 2 deep file drawers.
$35. 863-414-1714
DOG CAGE, metal, very large
accommodatee 100 lb dog). $40.
863-453-4234


Page 13A

8400 Recreational
840 Vehicles
2011 39 FT. Monte Carlo 2 slides, 2BR.
sleeps 8, CHA, washer / dryer, self con-
tained, microwave and awning. Every
option. Limited Edition. $23,500.
941-448-3817
PUMA TRAVEL TRAILER 2010 32', two
slide outs, air, awning, King ISLAND
bed, $18,900 Must sell! Non smoker.
Will deliver. Lakeland, Fla.
863-660-8539
R.V. COVER, NEW ADCO, for Travel
Trailers. 28'7" to 31'6", 1/2 price, $200.
863-453-7027
RV 38' 2010 5TH Wheel. EAGLE RIDGE
by HEARTLAND, 2BR, 1BA, 2 slides,
fiberglass, W/D, awning. All options.
$30,000 obo. Immediate Sale!
321-437-5887
RV WILDWOOD 2007 34 ft, 2 slide
outs, 2BR, Sleeps 7, like new, non
smoker, no pets. All options &
will deliver. $12,500 OBO.
630-301-1553
VU QUBE SATELLITE SYSTEM with
remote. Enjoy your favorite TV
programs wherever you go!
Available at Whispering Pines RV
Village, Sebring. 270-556-6847.


9000
Transportation

S1 Motorcycles
S9.100 & ATVs
1973 NORTON 850 COMMANDO
New professional restoration, very low
miles, includes Owner's Manuel.
One Owner Rare Find Great Price
863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100

9200 Trucks
TOOL CHEST, all aluminum diamond
plate, 48" long, with locking lid,. $120.
863-453-7027
LOOKING FOR AN
APARTMENT?
Search the News-Sun
Classifieds every Sunday,
Wednesday and Friday.







Page 14A


www.newssun.com


News-Sun + Friday. February 11, 2011

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SECTION




SPORTS


News-Sun


South Florida Slam-O-Rama


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Ashlee Quigley blasted this solo home run to right and later
hit a three-run tater to center in SFCC's double-header
sweep of Central Florida Tuesday.


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@ newssnm.com
AVON PARK It wasn't
just the long ball, but the
fence clearer's of the bases-
loaded variety, that high-
lighted the Lady Panther
softball sweep over the
College of Central Florida
Tuesday evening.
In a slam-bang
opener, the Patriots 1l0
opened a 3-0 lead in IU
the second on a three- CO
run Jessica Knight
blast before a solo
shot from SFCC's
Ashlee Quigley cut
into it.
Samantha Stewart upped
it to 4-1 with an RBI single
up the middle in the top of
the third, but in the bottom
of the frame, it was Quigley
again going yard, this time
with two on, to tie it up at 4-
4.
With Jessica, Griffin in to


0(
i


relieve starter Nikki Helms,
Central Florida would take
the lead back, going up 8-4.
But soon enough, Meghan
Heiser stepped to the plate
with the sacks packed and
unloaded a game-tying
grand slam.
In the tie-breaking
Cc session, the Lady
Patriots were able to
1 plate one, but the
Sl Panthers did them
2C one better, scoring
twice for the 10-9
win.
Buoyed by the
offensive surge, after
last Saturday's batting woes
in 9-4 and 8-0 losses at
Indian River, Heiser added
another home run, this one a
solo shot and Shaneque
"Red" Simmons tattooed
another blast with the bases
loaded in the fifth to help
SFCC score 11 runs in the


nightcap.
Kim Martin pitched a
gem from the mound, hold-
ing Central to a lone run for
the 11-1 rout.
Pleased with the turn of
fortune and heavy hitting
that has his team at 5-3 on
the young season, head
coach Carlos Falla, never-
theless, was always looking
for improvement.
"Patience and plate disci-
pline is still a problem for
us," he said. "Too often
we're not going to the plate
with a plan. But we are get-
ting better."
The Panthers looked to
continue their offensive
improvement Thursday
night with a twin-bill
against visiting Brevard
before hitting the road
Saturday for an afternoon
matinee at Seminole State
College in Orlando.


Dragons reach



District Semis


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newssun.com
LAKE PLACID Save
for McKeel's early lead
Tuesday night, Lake Placid
was primarily in control of
their 72-61 District 9-3A
Tournament win Tuesday
night.
And yet, the Wildcats
seemed on the brink at any
point of charging back into
it.
"They shoot a lot of
threes," Dragon head Lake
coach David Veley
said. "And they've 5
got guys who can Mc
make them, so you
never know when
they might sink a few 1
in a row and get
things close."
And though things looked
a little different when the
two teams took the floor,
considering the recent trio of
transfers that McKeel had
brought in since the last
meeting, the result wasn't
too much different.
After a shaky start saw the
'Cats take a 6-2 lead off
steals and drives, Lake
Placid went on a 10-0 run for
a six-point lead they would
also hold at the end of the
first, 19-13.
Those ever-present threes,
however, arose early in the


I

I
i


second as 6-foot-5 eighth
grader Dwayne Bacon sand-
wiched a Heath Harris trey
with two of his own.
Bacon would drain anoth-
er before the half and add a
reverse lay-up, McKeel
couldn't muster much more.
The Dragons, meanwhile,
were getting scoring from
many sources.
Andre Wilson scored
inside, Harris hit his three
Placid and Kirk Veley broke
out for eight points in
2 the frame.
Devontray Fleming
Keel then closed out the
half with a three-
1 point play and four
more free throws for
a 39-28 lead.
The second half began
with Lake Placid threatening
to blow it open and duplicate
its' 23-point win just a few
weeks ago.
But Mitchell Gullifer and
'Corey Sanders each hit
three's to keep the Dragons
from getting too far out in
front.
Even so, Nevada Weaver
snuck into the lane on an
inbounds pass for an easy
score Wilson worked inside
for two and, after a Sanders
floater, connected on two
from the line.
Consecutive drives from


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Devontray Fleming came up with a big night, notching 26 points and 13 rebounds, while
going 8-8 at the free throw line in Lake Placid's District Tournament win Tuesday.


Fleming soon had the lead at
54-36 but Sanders got hot,
hitting another floater, sink-
ing two at the line and fin-
ishing the period with a steal
and score to cut the lead to


54-42 at the final break.
And from there, the lead
would never get to more
than 14 points, and never
under eight.
But with Sanders still hot,


scoring seven in the final
eight minutes, and the threat
of the three, things didn't
quite seem secure.
That was until, after a
See LP, page 4B


Friday, February 11, 2011

Strong start for
Lady Streaks
The Lady Blue Streaks of
the tennis courts have their
season off to an unblemished
start, sweeping their first two
opponents by 7-0 scores.
The latest sweep came
over. Hardee Tuesday- at
home on the year-old Sebring
High School courts.
Kaley Walter took her No.
1 singles match 6-3, 6-0 over
Sumer Palmer and Joy
Donglasan had a similarly
strong performance in her
No. 2 win over Kate Krause,
6-1, 6-0.
At No. 3 singles, Nisha
Patel went 6-2, 6-4 over
Taylor Pohl and Kelly Broen
and Morgan Heston took
their No.s 4 and 5 matches,
6-0, 6-1 and 6-1, 6-0, respec-
tively.
Walter and Donglasan then
teamed up at No. 1 doubles
and survived a first-set tie-
breaker to win 7-6 (7-3)
before cruising in the second
set 6-0.
No such drama unfolded at
No. 2 doubles with Patel and
Broen having little trouble in
a 6-0, 6-1 win.
The victory came on the
heels of Monday's sweep at
Avon Park as of the top three
singles matches, only Patel
lost even one game.
Walter and Donglasan won
in straight-set, 6-0 fashion
while- Patel went 6-0, 6-1.
Red Devil Ashley Harris
bounced back from a 6-1
opening set loss to Broen at
No. 4 singles to make things
interesting in the second set
- but Broen held on for the 7-
5 win.
Heston then concluded
singles play with a 6-1, 6-0
win before Walter and
Donglasan swept No. 1 dou-
bles without a game lost and
Micalea DeVane and Teaoni
Coker won the No. 2 doubles
match 6-2, 6-2.
Sebring was on the road
Thursday at Lake Placid.

Sebring's Rough
Wrestling Regional
When the five Blue Streak
grapplers who advanced to
the Class 2A Wrestling
Regionals take to the mat at
SFCC today, they will get the
equivalent of, State experi-
ence at least from a talent
level.
"What is unique is that the
three best teams in the state
(among Class 2A programs)
will all be in our region,"
Sebring coach Josh Miller
said of Oviedo, Springstead
and Lake Gibson. "This
means that the Saturday
night finals will be a preview
of the state finals."


Lady Dragons muzzle Terriers


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newssun.comn
LAKE PLACID Back
when Marilyn Jones was
pulling double duty as the
Lady Dragons volleyball and
softball coach, she developed
a package deal in her teams'
games with Moore Haven.
"It's a mutual trade-off,"
Jones said with a smirk back
then. "They let us beat them
in volleyball so then we let
them beat us in softball."
Not that anyone was "let-
ting" themselves be beaten,
but such were the states of
the respective programs.
But if Tuesday night's
result tells us anything, it's
that the times could well be
changing as Lake Placid tore
through the Terriers in a 10-0
mercy-rule win.
Laine Weber-Callahan
turned in a strong pitching
performance and was backed
up by an improving defense
that saw at least one gem of a
play by Ashley Wells.
The catcher-turned center
fielder took an initial step in
on a rising liner that seemed


- --




News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Laine Weber-Callahan ripped this first-inning double and pitched a shutout in the Lady
Dragons 10-0 win over Moore Haven Tuesday.
destined for extra bases, took over with Weber- highlight the win.
But she quickly turned, Callahan helping her own With this perhaps a turn
darted back two steps and cause with two triples and for the better, the team will
made a leaping snare to two RBI while freshman have time to revel in the vic-
record the out. shortstop Breauna Corely tory before facing McKeel at
From there, the offense belted a two-run home run to home Thursday, Feb. 15.


ALMS.com photo
The Aston Martin-powered Lola turned in the fastest
times during Wednesday's Winter Testing at Sebring
International Raceway for Muscle Milk Aston Martin
Racing.

Sebring Winter Test

Wednesday wrap-up


ALMS.comn
SEBRING Muscle
Milk Aston Martin Racing
opened the Sebring Winter
Test in strong style
Wednesday with the fastest
times in both sessions with
its Aston Martin-powered
Lola.
The exotic closed-top
prototype turned in a best
lap of 1:50.530 (120.510
mph) with team owner


Greg Pickett, Klaus Graf
and Lucas Luhr sharing
driving duties.
The Muscle Milk squad
will race its new coupe for
the first time in the
American Le Mans Series
presented by Tequila Patr6n
next month as part of a 59-
car field for the 59th Mobil
1 Twelve Hours of Sebring

See TEST, page 4B


Page 3B










News-Sun Friday, February 11, 2011


Page 2B


THE SCOREBOARD


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 38 13 .745 -
New York 26 25 .510 12
Philadelphia 24 28 .46214/%
New Jersey 16 37 .302 23
Toronto 14 39 .264 25
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 38 14 .731 -
Atlanta 33 19 .635 5
Orlando 34 20 .630 5
Charlotte 22 30 .423 16
Washington 14 37 .275 23%
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 35 16 .686 -
Indiana 22 28 .44012%X
Milwaukee 20 31 .392 15
Detroit 20 33 .377 16
Cleveland 8 45 .151 28
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division


San Anton
Dallas
New Orlea
Memphis
Houston

Oklahoma
Utah
Denver
Portland
Minnesota

L.A. Laker
Phoenix
Golden St
L.A. Clippi
Sacramen


W L Pct GB
nio 44 8 .846 -
37 15 .712 7
.ns 32 22 .593 13
28 26 .519 17
25 29 .463 20
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
City 33 18 .647 -
31 23 .574 3%2
30 23 .566 4
28 24 .538 5Y%
13 39 .250 20X2


rs

at
er
to


Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
36 16 .692 -
24 25 .49010Y2
te 23 28 .451 12Y%
rs 20 32 .385 16
o 12 37 .24522Y,


Wednesday's Games
Detroit 103, Cleveland 94
Indiana 104, Charlotte 103
New Jersey 103, New Orleans 101, OT
Orlando 99, Philadelphia 95
San Antonio 111, Toronto 100
Washington 100, Milwaukee 85
L.A. Clippers 116, New York 108
Chicago 91, Utah 86
Dallas 102, Sacramento 100
Golden State 116, Denver 114
Thursday's Games
L.A. Lakers at Boston, late
Golden State at Phoenix, late
Dallas at Denver, late
Friday's Games
New Jersey at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Indiana, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Orlando, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Portland at Toronto, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Memphis, 8 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at New York, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Utah, 10:30 p.m.


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Philadelphia 35 13 5 75 180 137
Pittsburgh 34 17 4 72 165 126
N.Y. Rangers 29 23 4 62 155 138
New Jersey 20 30 4 44116156
N.Y. Islanders 17 29 7 41 131 174
Northeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Boston 31 16 7 69169125
Montreal 30 20 5 65145139
Buffalo 25 22 5 55152153
Toronto 23 26 5 51 143169
Ottawa 17 30 8 42121 183
Southeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Tampa Bay 33 17 5 71 168169
Washington 29 16 10 68 150 136
Carolina 26 21 7 59 161'167
Atlanta 24 22 10 58162183
Florida 23 24 6 52141143
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Detroit 32 16 6 70177160
Nashville 29 19 7 65145130
Chicago 28 22 4 60172151
Columbus 26 23 5 57147166
St. Louis 24 20 8 56140154
Northwest Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 35 11 9 79186131
Calgary 28 21 7 63162163
Minnesota 28 20 5 61 138 140
Colorado 25 23 6 56166178
Edmonton 16 30 8 40134184
Pacific Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Dallas 30 18 6 66 154 153
San Jose 30 19 6 66155146
Phoenix 28 19 9 65159158
Anaheim 30 21 4 64150153
Los Angeles 29 22 2 60 150 129
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
for overtime loss.

Wednesday's Games
Boston 8, Montreal 6
San Jose 3, Columbus 2
Nashville 4, Detroit 1
Minnesota 3, Colorado 2
Phoenix 3, Dallas 2, OT
Calgary 5, Ottawa 2
Chicago 4, Edmonton 1
Anaheim 4, Vancouver 3
Thursday's Games
New Jersey at Toronto, late
Carolina at Philadelphia, late
Los Angeles at Pittsburgh, late
N.Y. Islanders at Montreal, late
Buffalo at Florida, late
Friday's Games
Detroit at Boston, 7 p.m.
San Jose at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Columbus, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Calgary, 9 p.m.
-4- %-19gfT- 1Ji'


Wednesday's Scores
EAST
Albright 62, Arcadia 58
Brooklyn 78, York, N.Y. 71, OT
Bucknell 66, American U. 60
C.W. Post 75, Dowling 63
Cent. Connecticut St. 71, Bryant 55
Chestnut Hill 80, Goldey Beacom 79
DeSales 75, Misericordia 73
Defiance 78, Earlham 50
Dickinson 70, Muhlenberg 69, OT
Dominican, N.Y. 89, Caldwell 51


LIVE

SPORTS

ON TV


AUTO RACING
SATURDAY
8 p.m. NASCAR Budweiser Shootout ........ FOX


BOWLING
FRIDAY
11 p.m. Rico Ramos vs. Alejandro Valdez ..... SHOW


COLLEGE BASKETBALL
SATURDAY
Noon Syracuse at Louisville............... ESPN
Noon St. Louis at Richmond .............. ESPN2
Noon Notre Dame at South Florida ........... 28
1 p.m. Kentucky at Vanderbilt ............... CBS
1 p.m. North Carolina at Clemson ............. 44
1:30 p.m. LSU at Arkansas ..................... 38
2 p.m. Ohio State at Wisconsin ............. ESPN
2 p.m. Old Dominion at Virg. Commonwealth. ESPN2
4 p.m. Baylor at Texas .................... ESPN
4 p.m. North Texas at North Kentucky ...... ESPN2
4 p.m. Georgia at South Carolina. ............. 38
6 p.m. Tennessee at Florida ............... ESPN
6 p.m. Southern Mississippi at Memphis ..... ESPN2
8 p.m. Detroit Mercy at Butler. ............ ESPN2
9 p.m. Pittsburgh at Villanova ............ .. ESPN
10 p.m. Wichita State at Northern Iowa ...... ESPN2


12:30 p.m.
3 p.m.
6:30 p.m.

1 p.m.
3 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m.


GOLF
FRIDAY
PGA Allianz Championship ......... GOLF
PGA Pebble Beach Pro-Am ......... GOLF
EuroPGA Dubai Desert Classic ...... GOLF
SATURDAY
PGA Pebble Beach Pro-Am ......... GOLF
PGA Pebble Beach Pro-Am .......... CBS
EuroPGA Dubai Desert Classic ...... GOLF
PGA Allianz Championship ......... GOLF


HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
FRIDAY
7:30 p.m. Oak Hill Academy at Christ School. . ESPN2


NBA
FRIDAY
8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at N.Y. Knicks ........... ESPN
10:30 p.m. Phoenix at Utah ................... ESPN
SATURDAY
8 p.m. Chicago at New Orleans ............. WGN


PREMIER LEAGUE SOCCER
SATURDAY
9:55 a.m. Arsenal vs. Wolverhampton .......... ESPN2


RUGBY
SATURDAY
3:30 p.m. USA Sevens World Series............. NBC


SKIING
SATURDAY
1 p.m. Alpine World Championships ........... 20
Times, games, channels all subject to change


Franklin & Marshall 68, Gettysburg 46
Georgetown 64, Syracuse 56
Holy Cross 85, Army 75
Indiana, Pa. 80, California, Pa. 52
James Madison 68, Drexel 54
John Carroll 78, Baldwin-Wallace 62
Kings, Pa. 77, Delaware Valley 70
Lafayette 80, Colgate 65
Lehigh 87, Navy 72
Long Island U. 87, St. Francis, NY 76
Manchester 81, Bluffton 67
Mercyhurst 61, Clarion 60
Monmouth 68, Fairleigh Dickinson 57
Mount St. Mary's, Md. 71, Wagner 57
N.J. City 63, William Paterson 47
Northeastern 82, Towson 78
Otterbein 82, Capital 58
Penn St.-Harrisburg 108, Penn St.-
Abington 92
Penn Tech 79, Penn St.-Scranton 60
Quinnipiac 59, Sacred Heart 54
Rhode Island 67, Dayton 53
Richard Stockton 72, College of N.J. 46
Richmond 69, George Washington 65
Robert Morris 78, St. Francis, Pa. 68
Rutgers 77, Villanova 76
Rutgers-Camden 84, Rowan 75
St. Rose 75, Adelphi 62
Stony Brook 63, New Hampshire 56
Temple 77, Fordham 66
Ursinus 87, Haverford 84
Va. Comonwealth 84, Delaware 74, 20T
Vermont 80, UMBC 67
Washington & Jefferson 64,
Westminster, Pa. 56
Wittenberg 76, Ohio Wesleyan 70
York, Pa. 91, Stevenson 52
SOUTH
Bryan 82, Reinhardt 63
Coll. of Charleston 85, Elon 67
Davidson 67, Wofford 58
Duke 79, North Carolina 73
E. Mennonite 81, Bridgewater, Va. 64
Florida 79, South Carolina 60
Florida Tech 69, Nova Southeastern 61
Francis Marion 74, North Georgia 67
Guilford 68, Washington & Lee 57
Hofstra 79, Georgia St. 68
Lamar at Northwestern St., ppd.
Marquette 59, South Florida 58
Maryland 106, Longwood 52
Memphis 63, UCF 62
Miami 74, Wake Forest 73
Milligan 79, Va. Intermont 69
Mississippi 66, LSU 60
Mississippi St. 67, Arkansas 56
Montreat 76, Union, Ky. 71
N.C. Wesleyan 73, Greensboro 70
Old Dominion 69, William & Mary 53


1 Roanoke 75, Emory & Henry 74
Rose-Hulman 68, Anderson, Ind. 62
SE Louisiana 79, UTSA 73
St. Andrew's 103, Barton 88
Stephen FAustin 64, Nicholls St. 57
Thomas More 105, Waynesburg 82
Transylvania 87, Mount St. Joseph 72
Tusculum 78, Carson-Newman 72
UAB 64, Marshall 48
Va. Wesleyan 53, Randolph-Macon 50
Washington, Md. 78, Swarthmore 72
Wingate 67, Lenoir-Rhyne 58
MIDWEST
Adrian 75, Calvin 63
Akron 83, W. Michigan 71
Beloit 57, St. Norbert 52
Bowling Green 65, Ball St. 64
Carleton 67, St. Thomas, Minn. 61
Carroll, Wis. 89, Ripon 88
Carthage 82, Elmhurst 63
Concordia, Mich. 75, Northwestern
Ohio 74
Concordia, Moor. 81, Augsburg 68
Concordia: Wis. 79, Lakeland 75
Cornerstone 99, Michigan-Dearborn55
Davenport 56, Madonna 45
Grinnell 73, Monmouth, III. 67
Hamline 91, Bethel, Minn. 79
Hope 65, Olivet 60
Indiana St. 56, Illinois St. 46
Indiana Tech 55, Marygrove 52
Kalamazoo 76, Alma 56
Kent St. 80, E. Michigan 70
La Salle 78, Saint Louis 77
Miami (Ohio) 84, N. Illinois 72
Michigan 75, Northwestern 66
Missouri St. 77, Bradley 69
North Central 71, North Park 60
I Notre Dame 89, Louisville 79, OT
Ohio 71, Toledo 58
Saginaw Valley St. 86, Nrthwd, Mich 76
Siena Heights 66, Aquinas 51
St. John's, Minn. 81, Macalester 79
St. Olaf 83, St. Mary's, Minn. 65
Trine 72, Albion 68
Wis. Lutheran 80, Marian, Ind. 60
Wis.-La Crosse 71, Wis.-Oshkosh 66
Wis.-Platteville 65, Wis.-Whitewater 59
Wis.-Stevens Pt. 83, Wis.-Eau Claire 70
Wis.-Superior 75, Wis.-Stout 69
Wisconsin 62, Iowa 59, OT
SOUTHWEST
Baylor 74, Nebraska 70
SMU 66, Tulane 61
Sam Houston St. 78, Texas-Arlngton 74
Texas 68, Oklahoma 52
Texas St. 85. Cent. Arkansas 61
Texas-Pan Am 76, Houston Baptist 60
UNLV 94, TCU 79


www. ne wssun. corn


LOCAL SCHEDULE


Avon Park








Lake Placid








Sebring


SFCC


TODAY: Basketball at DistrictTournament, Lake Placid, vs. Mulberry, 7:30 p.m.;
Baseball hosts Pre-Season Classic,TBA
SATURDAY: Basketball at DistrictTournament, Lake Placid vs.TBD, 7 p.m., if necessary
TUESDAY: Baseball hosts Early BirdTourney,TBD


TODAY: Boys Basketball hosts DistrictTournament, vs. Avon Park, 7:30 p.m., if neces-
sary; Baseball at Preseason Classic, DeSoto,TBA
TUESDAY: Baseball at Early BirdTourney, Avon Park, vs. Sebring, 5 p.m.; Softball vs.
McKeel, 5:30/7:30 p.m.; BoysTennis vs. LaBelle, 4:30 p.m.; GirlsTennis at LaBelle,
4:30 p.m.;Track and Field hosts Meet, 4 p.m.


TODAY: Baseball at Pre-Season Classic, Avon Park,TBA; Softball vs. DeSoto, 5:30/7:30
p.m.; Wrestling at Regional Meet, SFCC, 2 p.m.
SATURDAY: Wrestling at Regional Meet, SFCC, 10 a.m.
MONDAY: BoysTennis at LaBelle, 4 p.m.


FRIDAY: Baseball at College of Central Florida, 3 p.m.
SATURDAY: Softball at Seminole State, 1 p.m.
SUNDAY: Baseball vs. Miami Dade, doubleheader, 1 p.m.
TUESDAY: Softball vs. Palm Beach State, 5 p.m.
WEDNESDAY: Baseball vs. Indian River, 6 p.m.




SPORTS SNAPSHOTS


McFarling Golf
SPRINGLAKE The 5th Annual James
McFarling Golf Tournament will be held
Saturday, March 5 at the SpringLake Golf
Resort.
The flighted, four-person scramble will
tee off with a 9 a.m. shotgun start.
For $50 per person, golfers get flight
prizes, CTP for men and women, goodie
bags and lunch at Michael's restaurant.
Proceeds will be awarded to scholar-
ship recipients from the Highlands
County Sertoma Junior Golf Tour.
For more information, call John
Delaney at 655-3686.
AP Girls Softball
AVON PARK Avon Park Girls
Softball will be holding registration for
ages 4-15 on Saturday, Feb. 12 from 10
a.m.-l p.m. at Lucy Derkman Field.
Bring a copy of child's birth certificate.
Registration fee is $50.
For more information or any questions,
call Amanda at 257-2428.
Woman's Club Benefit
SEBRING The Woman's Club of
Sebring will be holding a golf tournament
to benefit its' scholarship fund Saturday,
Feb. 19 at the Harder Hall Golf Course.
The four-person scramble will check-in
at 7 a.m. with an 8 a.m. shotgun start.
Cost is $55 per player or $220 per team
and includes golf, cart, lunch and prizes.
There is a Putting and Chipping contest
available and a $2,000 Hole-In-One prize
sponsored b'y the Cohan Radio Group.
Entry forms are available at local pro
shops and are to be sent to The Woman's
Club of Sebring, P.O. Box 8174, Sebring,
FL, 33872.
Registration deadline is February 14.
For an entry form or for more informa-
tion, call Johnell West at 382-0824.
Panther 5K
AVON PARK The second annual
South Florida Community College
Panther 5K Run/Walk will take place
Saturday, Feb. 26 at the SFCC Campus.
The SFCC Foundation, Inc. and Bill
Jarrett Ford Mercury are sponsoring the
event, and proceeds benefit the college's
intercollegiate athletics programs.
The entry fee is $20 through Feb. 16
and $25 from Feb. 17 through race day.
Students with I.D. may register for $15.
Every participant receives a Dri-Fit
long-sleeve shirt sizes cannot be guar-
anteed for those who enter after Feb. 17.
Registration is 7-7:45 a.m. on race day
in the parking lot in front of the SFCC
University Center race starts at 8 a.m.
Entry forms are available online at
www.southflorida .edu/panther5k.
Participants can mail their copies and
entry fees to the SFCC Foundation, Inc.,
13 East Main Street, Avon Park, FL
33825; or fax forms to 453-8023 and call
453-3133 with credit card information.
For more information call the SFCC
Foundation at 863-453-3133.
5th Annual L.O.S.T. 118-Mile
Endurance Run
OKEECHOBEE The fifth annual
L.O.S.T. (Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail)
118-Mile Endurance Run will take place
the weekend of February 26-27.
This footrace consists of one circum-
navigation of Lake Okeechobee by run-
ning along the top of the Herbert Hoover
Dike, a distance of 118 miles.
The race begins 6:30 a.m. at the Okie-
Tantie Campground located just west of
the town of Okeechobee, and runners have
34 hours to complete their loop of the lake.
The run precedes counterclockwise
around the lake, so runners pass the towns
of Lakeport, Moore Haven, Clewiston,
Pakohee and Port Mayaca before they
return to Okie-Tantie.


A total of 12 solo runners are entered so
far, and three 2-person relay teams are
also running the course.
Runners will receive aid at various
access points located around the lake, and
there will be manned aid stations at
Lakeport, Moore Haven, Clewiston, Paul
Rardin Park, Pahokee, Port Mayaca and
Nubbins Slough.
The race website is www.lostll8mile-
endurancerun.com. -
For more information, contact Mike
Melton at 772-349-1704
Wings of Faith Golf
SEBRING Wings of Faith Worship
Center presents the First Annual Golf
Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at
Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is
from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start
at 8:30 a.m.
Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one
team of four golfers, one tee sign and two
green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes
one team of four golfers, one green sign;
Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green
sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100
includes one green sign.
Individual player $60 includes green
fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26).
Team of Four Golfers $240 includes
green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after
March 26).
Make checks payable to: Wings of
Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL
33871, or register online at wingsof-
faithchristianworshipcenter.com.
Proceeds to be donated to scholarship
program for graduates attending Wings of
Faith Christian Worship.,Center.
For more information, call Jason
Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhanker-
son@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at
381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com.
Our Lady of Grace events
AVON PARK Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church has two benefit events
coming up.
Tuesday, Feb. 22 they will host the
Todd Allen Show.
Allen will perform a variety of styles
including Rock 'n Roll, Country and his
award-winning Elvis impersonations.
The show will be held at the Our Lady
of Grace Catholic Church Grogan Center,
at 595 E. Main St. in Avon Park, at 7 p.m.
For a donation of $10, tickets can be
purchased at the Highlands Independent
Bank and Heartland National Bank Avon
Park locations, Warren's Auto Sales and
the Avon Park Chamber of Commerce.
The next event will be the First Annual
Golf Tournament at River Greens
Saturday, March 12 at 8 a.m.
The cost of $60 per player includes
golf, cart, golf shirt and lunch, while
River Greens members pay just $35.
Sponsorships are available, starting
with a $100 hole sponsor for a sign only.
A Hole Sponsor with Sign, plus a free
foursome, is $300, a Co-Sponsor Sign,
plus free foursome, with perogative to fly
their banner is $400 and a Major Sponsor
is $1,500.
Seminole Club Trail Run
SEBRING The Highlands Seminole
Club presents the first Seminole Trail Run
5K on Saturday, March 5, at the Sun-N-
Lake Preserve in Sebring.
The cost is $15 per participant if regis-
tered by Tuesday, Feb. 15 and $20 after
that day or on the day of race.
Registration on race day begins at 7
a.m. and the race will begin at 8 a.m.
Awards will be presented for top finish-
ers in major age groups.
This is the first event.of its kind for the
trails at the Preserve.
Registration forms can be found at
Ihighlandsseminoles.org.
Call 386-9194 or mail miantarayEM@earth-
link.ner for more information.


0.".U

".. .








www. newssun.comrn


News-Sun Friday. February 11. 2011


Golf Hammock
A Valentine's Day Tournament was
played by the Golf Hammock Ladies on
Wednesday, Feb. 9.
The Play was a Step Aside Scramble
First-place winners were Dottie
Boyd, Trudy Stowe, Wanda Hastie and
Jean Stevenson with 58.6
Taking second place were Marian
Passafume, Shirley Enochs, Audrey
Walther and Joan Webb with 58.7
Finishing third were Eleanor Short,
Leslie McKenzie, Ginette Runco and
Mary Cripps with 62.7
On Monday, March 7, the Mezza
group played individual golf at Golf
Hammock Country club using Pro-Am
Points.
Frank Borgia and Jim Gulick tied for
first in A group at plus 1.
Mike Lajiness took first place with
plus 3 in B group and Fred Lashaw
had a plus 2 for second place.
C group saw Pat Dell in first place
.with plus 7 while Paul Brown took sec-
ond with plus 2.
Joe Martini had a plus 6 for first
place in D ji':up. Joe Hyzny was even
for second place while Curt Matterson
and Danny Geirer took third place with
minus 2.
Bobby Culbert took first place with
plus 6 and Bob Hughe:, had a plus 5
for second place and Jerry Patterson at
third place
with a plus 1.
In F group Janet Regan had a plus 6
for first place, Lee Stark in second
place with minus 1.
There was a tie in third place
between Paul Skidmore and Larry
Giangreco with minus 4.
Roy Allen had a plus 4 four for first
place and Dennis Latshaw had a plus 1
for second place in G group.
In H group Jean Terrell had a plus 5
to take first place and i'm, Reed' with
plus 4 for second place.
Frank Branca took first place with a
plus 7 and Tom [lilirinr with plus 3 for
second place.
Next Monday will be a :hltuij
beginning at 8:30 a.m. at Golf
Hammock Ccountry Club.
Please arrive early to register.
For more information, call Pete at
382-1280


Harder Hall
The ladies league
played a pro am points
tournament on
Monday, Feb. 7.
The winners were:
First place. Lorraine
Forrier with plus-4; and
second place, Mary
Hayes with plus-3.
The ladies league
played a "Guess Your
Score" event on
Thursday, Feb. 3.
Tying for first/sec-
ond places were Carol
Grimm and Pat Forest.
Third place, Kay Maher.


Balancing
Act


Lake June
West Golf Clvb
A scramble was
played on Thursday,
Feb. 3.
Winning first place
was the team of Bill
Hintz, Rob and Vern
Knishka, Ken Rowen,
Bill Brouhle and Gloria Huggett with
46; second place, Or Hlle and Eva.
Huffman, Joe and Joyce Swartz, Ken
and Norma Colyer with 49; and third
place, Ron Hesson, Ott and Maxine
i,,",:, ,,:I Wayne Eads, Wanda Jones
and John Howartz'vith 50.
Closest to the pin: (Ladies), No. 2,
Barbara Dean, 2-feet-l-inch: and No.
8. Kim Fiers. 4-feet-4-inches. (Men),
No. 4, Ken Rowen, 9-feet-3-inches.
The Men's Association played a
Men's Best Ball on Wednesday, Feb. 2.
Winning first place was the team of
Pete Otway, Charlie Goins, Joe Swartz,
Don Boulton and Fred Neer with 36;
second place, John Byron, Sonny
Shelton, Art Schmeltz, Ben Tarr and
Ken Raub with 37; and third place,
Claude Cash, Mario Cappelletti, Bob
Knishka and Bob Williams with 38.
Ch:.-:1 to the pin: No. 2, Orville
Huffman, 2-feet-11-inches; No. 4, Jim
Lynch, 5-feet-4-inches; and No. 8,
Howard Linil -nr, 1-foot-4-inches.
The Ladies Association played a
league event on Monday, Jan. 31.
Winning first place was the team of
Mary McNamee, Elaine Orr, Louise
Lorig and Clara Wiseman with 35; sec-


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ond place, Kim Fiers, Doris Weeks and
Lynn Martin with 36; and third place,
Barbara Dean, Wanda Jones and Kay
Kaluisniak with 37.
Closest to the pin: No. 2, Theresa
Fowler, 7-feet-8-inches; No. 4, Nancy
Reaney, 5-feet-l-inch; and No. 8, Vera
Knishka, 10-feet.

Pinecrest
The Men's Association played a
Team and Individual Pro-Am Points
event Wednesday, Feb. 9.
Mike ,li,:n, iiii John O'Neill, Ted
Turmel and Gordon Outman teamed up
to total 11 points for the team win,
ahead of the +8 posted by Gary
'.Viii-r:, Ray Smith, Frank McGowan
and Wayne Courson.
Roger Culbertson topped A Division
with +7 while Jim Underwood, Bob
'W.itminE. and Gary Wilkins tied for sec-
ond at +3.
O'Neill won B Division with his +8,
three up on Keith Strickland's +5.
C Division went to F. Hocott's +5
while Larry Lamparski and Carl
Sachetti tied for second with +4 apiece.
Bob Wimmers tallied 8 points to
take D Division.


Placid Lakes
The Men's Golf
Association played a
One Best Ball pluss all
W Net Birdies event
Wednesday, Feb. 9.
b, The foursome of Ray
b. .,d bal:di- Deryckere, Bud Snyder,
>ir. ,! iml, c j.,i,-,. Bruce M iseno and
acli ',. ,.1.> e rini tl Gene Ransom took a
b, hi'i ;r;ub narrow win with -29,
-n "! up, ., one ahead of the -28
i:. o. ris brought in by Cody
it .' 10ho .A ri Coates, Bob McMillian
..,or,,. i;>(,,;ii and two blind draws as
>,. .e. Sik Russ Isaac started but
trdr n m'. vln" took ill and could not
1 h. ti hit lilt ,
Sii o,; ^ finish.
,..: i ) vi,,',r, Taking third was the
whI>i~ u .uo i team of Darrell
:,,bi to hi! ,0,- ( Gardner, John
N,; ill bi t l l Rosettis, Chuck
v oni Wl Fortunato and Cliff
iBy. imr McLi.en, Moore with -26.
.an (If6f School, For closest to the
estIell1ing book pin, John Goble got to
I Phil Franke' 16-feet, 6-inches on
#13.

River Greens
The Morrison Group played a game
Monday, Feb. 7.
Winning first place was the team of
Bob Wolf (guest), Bob Wolf, Bob
Stevens and Al Farrell with minus-26;
second place, Vince Boever, Leo
Persails, Tim Thomas and Wayne
Carlin with minus-25.
A Limited Member event was played
on Monday, Feb. 7.
Winning first place was the team of
Judy and Ed Ward, Roy Bassett and
Tom Shaver with minus-4.
Individual winners were: First place,
Roy Bassett with plus-2. Tying for sec-
ond/third places were Bern Koster and
Ed Ward with plus-1 each.
The Men's Association played a
Men's Day event on Saturday, Feb. 5.
Winning first place was the team of
Cliff Aubin, Frank Conroy, Ed Mosser
and John Van Slooten with minus-37;
second place, Russ Rudd, Cecil
Lemons, John Hierholzer and Glenn
Nelson with minus-34; and third place,
Peter Bridge, Bob Streeter, Donald
McDonald and Harold Kline with


minus-28.
Closest to the pin: No. 3, Tim
Thomas, 9-feet-8-inches; No. 5, Bob
Wolf, 8-feet-l-inch; No. 12, Bob
Streeter, 5-feet-5.5-inches; and No. 17,
Cecil Lemons.
A morning scramble was played on
Friday, Feb. 4.
Winning first place was the team of
Bob Streeter, Cliff Steele, Terry Lewis
and Romy Febre.
An afternoon scramble was played
Friday, Feb. 4.
Winning first place was the team of
Don and Jody Ethun, Danny and Mary
Pelfrey, Fran Neil and Dave Petty with
15-under; and second place, Len and
Rhonda Westdale, Tony Lankford,
John Heirholzer, Peggy Wehunt and
Anne Kozak with 14-under.
The Morrison Group played a game
on Thursday, Feb. 3.
Tying for first/second places were
the teams of Romy Febre, Ray
Delsasso, Don McDonald and Wayne
Carlin; Butch Smith, Tim Thomas, Bob
Stevens and Bill Mountford with
minus-31. Third place, Hank
Wunderlich, Frank. Conroy, Ken
Brunswick and Joe Graf with minus-
23.
The Men's Association played a pro
am tournament on Wednesday, Feb. 2.
Winning first place was the team of
Terry Lewis, Ed Mosser, Frank Conroy
and Cliff Steele with plus-10.5; second
place, Leo Persails, Dick Long, Butch
Smith and Jim Anderson with plus-10;
and third place, Harold Kline, Johnny
Wehunt, Cliff Aubin and Gerry Page
with plus-9.5.
Individual winners were: A Flight
(25-over): First place, Cecil Lemons
with plus-6; and second place, Jim
Anderson with plus-5.5. B Flight (21-
24): Tying for first/second/third places
were Ed Mosser, Dave Petty and Paul
Johnson with plus-5 each. C Flight
(18-20): First place, Gerry Page with
plus-8.5; and second place, Keith
Kincer with plus-4.5. D Flight (17-
under): First place, Dale Mundt with
plus-3.5; and second place, Leo
Persails with plus-2.
The Morrison Group played an event
on Tuesday, Feb. 1.
Winning first place was.the team of
See GOLF, page 4B


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Page 3B


402-2222


.11 h i.l. l- .


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I,








News-Sun Friday, February 11, 2011


www.newssun.com


LP to tip off with Titans tonight
Continued from 1B final scores of the night. well and played as a team." here," Veley said. "We just
Richard Henderson drive cut "We just did a real nice job Next up is the district didn't show up for that game
it to 64-56, Veley scored the after some real early opening semifinal game, a matchup and they are a big, athletic
next six, four from the line, jitters," coach Veley said. with Tenoroc tonight at 7:30 team. But if we play like
for a 70-56 lead with just "We did real well on the p.m. we've been playing the last
over one minute to play. boards, which limited their "We lost to them by five at couple weeks and play under
It was then that the bench- second-chance opportunities, their place earlier, but they control, it should be a good
es cleared and provided the and we really passed the ball beat us by a pretty big margin game."


Test sees a record 31 cars taking part


Continued from 1B
presented by Fresh from
Florida.
In last year's race, the
Aston Martin factory team
drove the car to a third-place
overall finish.
Dyson Racing's Mazda-
powered Lola B09/86, -anoth-
er prototype coupe, was sec-
ond quickest at 1:51.042
(119.955 mph).
Chris Dyson, Guy Smith
and Jay Cochran each drove
Wednesday.
A collection of drivers,
teams and officials from the
American Le Mans Series
presented by Tequila Patr6n
visited with media members
at Sebring.


A record 31 cars are partic-
ipating in the annual Winter
Test, only one of many pieces
of noteworthy news making
the rounds in the Series.
Of all the motivating fac-
tors driving Greg Pickett to
get back behind the wheel of
a race car, one simply took
the cake.
"I didn't want my career to
end upside down in a
Porsche!"
The annual Sebring Winter
Test is the first time Muscle
Milk Aston Martin Racing's
owner/driver has been in the
cockpit since a horrific crash
that left Pickett on top of a
tire barrier at Mid-Ohio in
August.


Wednesday, Pickett got his
first lap in his team's new
Aston Martin-powered Lola
coupe on the first day of the
two-day test for the American
Le Mans Series presented by
Tequila Patr6n.
"It's a pretty little car,"
Pickett said. "We were bro-
kenhearted to close the door
on the RS Spyder, and
Porsche was sad about it as
well. The Lola really does
feel different, and you can
feel the extra weight (around
75 kilograms). It's nice to be
able to squeeze through the
GT cars easier than we did
last year. For an old guy like
me, it's more fun!"
The 59th Mobil 1 Twelve


Hours of Sebring presented
by Fresh from Florida is set
for 10:30 a.m. ET on
Saturday, March 19.
The race will be shown
live and in its entirety on
ESPN3.com and americanle-
mans.com starting at 10 a.m.
ET.
ABC will provide cover-
age from 12:30 to 2 p.m. ET
on Sunday, March 20.
Visit the American Le
Mans Series' schedule page
for information on tickets
and area accommodations.
You can follow the Series
on Twitter (almsnotes), on
our Facebook page and the
official YouTube channel.


Veterans Assist Team Sebring
with Cooperstown trip


i


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING American
Legion Post 74, located at
528 N. Pine Street in down-
town Sebring, is helping to
send the Little League
"Team Sebring" to
Cooperstown, NY, home of
the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Post 74 Commander
Harry Marsh presented the
team with a check for
$1,000.
The team will travel to
Cooperstown in August
2011.
Dean Frazier and
Andrew Bible are coaching
the team comprised of 12-
year olds, seven of whom
were on the 2010 Dixie
Youth World Series
Championship team.
Team Sebring has won
five tournaments and are


LIQUORS


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING Riding on the
momentum of a record winter
test turnout and an increased
involvement with the
Intercontinental Le Mans
Cup, officials of the
American Le Mans Series
Wednesday released the ten-
tative grid for this year's
Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring
presented by Fresh From
Florida.
"You'd have to go back to
- 2002, Sebring's 50th anniver-
sary year to see a car count
like this," ALMS President
and CEO Scott Atherton told
a gathering of journalists in
the Panoz Suite at the
Sebring International
Raceway.
Indeed, the preliminary
line-up sheet shows a total of
59 cars 24 prototypes and
35 GT cars are planning to
make the trek to this years
edition of America's premier
sports car endurance race.
Part of the draw this year
will be the fact that Sebring
will be the kickoff to the
seven race 2011
Intercontinental Le Mans
Cup.
"Some of the teams will
not be ready," Atherton
allowed. "But there are oth-
ers who are working hard and
still could make the grid."
The initial entry form
reads like a Who's Who of
prototype racing, with Audi
Sport Team Joest fielding a
pair of R15+ cars, and last
year's winner Peugeot Sport
Total with two all new 908s.
Other teams in the ILMC
mix will be Hope Racing
with their Swiss Tech
Hybrid, Team Oreca
Matmut's Peugeot 908 HDi
FAP, Rebellion Racing who
will field a Toyota Lola and
Henri Pescokaro's Oak


ALMS.com photo
A crowded field is expected as 59 cars 24 prototypes and 35 GT cars are scheduled to
be on the grid at this year's running of the 12 Hours of Sebring presented by Fresh From
Florida.


Racing.
That ambitious effort will
put a pair of LMPls and an
LMP2 on the grid all pow-
ered by Judd.
They will be joined by
ALMS prototype stalwarts
Highcroft's new Honda
Performance Development
LMP, the Intersport
AER/Lola, Dyson with their
Lola/Mazda and the
AMR/Lola sponsored by
Muscle Milk.
The defending champion
Muscle Milk team has
switched from Porsche to
Aston Martin.
Meanwhile, 2010 Sebring
LMP winners, Level 5
Motorsports, have moved up
to LMP2 fielding a Honda
Lola and the LMPs will be
joined by a bevy of GT cars.
Fans will have a chance to


see the new Ferrari 458s in
competition for the first time
with Extreme Speed
Motorsports, AF Corsa, Risi
Competizione and Luxury
Motorsports all slated to put
those cars on the track.
Corvette will be represent-
ed by the factory Team
Corvette and Larbre
Competition.
Porsche is the car of choice
of defending champions
Black Swan Racing, the
Flying Lizards, Proton
Competition and Paul Miller
Racing.
Other marques include the
two BMW Motorsport
entries, the West Racing
Lamborghini, two Doran
Ford GTs of Robertson
Racing, Paul Gentilozi's
Jaguar RSRs and the on-track
introduction of 'the Panoz


Abruzi of Panoz Racing.
In talking with the press,
Atherton remained bullish on
the outlook for the entire
.2011 season.
He pointed to the champi'-
onship battles that came
down to the last race of the
season with grids of between
35 and 37 cars for each race.
"All four class champi-
onships went down to the
final race in one instance, it
was the last lap of the final
race to decide the GT cham-
pionship," he said. "It was an
incredible level of competi-
tion and mix of winners that
we've never had."
The green flag will wave
on the 59th running of the
Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring
presented by Fresh from
Florida on Saturday, March
19.


21.99,A
Disaronno
Amaretto





11.993
Popov
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1 -5L


5.99
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Vodka


Selected Varieties,
1.75 L


2799 ',
Johnnie Walker ,m
Black Label .
Scotch
750 ml


25.99,
Nuvo -
Sparkling
Liqueur




22.99.
Three Olives
Vodka


18.99,
Camarena -
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750 ml


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Gilbey's
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19.99 19.99
Mount Gay l Appleton q
Eclipse Rum Gold Rum
1.75 L 1.75 L


9.99
Korbel
Brut
Champagne
Or Extra Dry or Rose,
750 ml


8.49
Cupcake A
Vineyards
Prosecco Wine
Or Red Velvet, Cabernet
Sauvignon, Chardonnay,
Merlot, or Sauvignon Blanc,
750 ml


Golf Scores around Highlands County


Continued from 3B
Jim Cercy, Butch Smith, Clark
Austin and Bob Stevens with
minus-35; and second place,
Cliff Steele, Leo Persails, Hank
Wunderlich and Keith Kincer
with minus-31. Tying for
third/fourth places were the
teams of Tim Thomas, David
Kelly, Paul Johnson and Frank
Conroy; Ken Koon, Ray
Delsasso, Bob Wolf .and Don
McDonald with minus-30 each.

SpringLake
On Wednesday, Feb. 9, the
SpringLake Women's Golf
Association held their annual
Breast Cancer Awareness Day
Tournament.
This was a Pro-Am points,


Flighted event with a twist.
Each member was given a
pink-ribbon logo golf ball and
everyone who successfully
played the entire round, without
losing the ball, received 5
points added to their score.
Maggie Robb, who had a
plus 8 and the additional 5
points for a total of plus 13,
won first place in Flight A.
Marsi Benson was second
with plus 1, and the bonus 5
points for a plus 6, while Gail
Whiting was third with a plus 4.
Flight B was won by Linda
Pfleger with plus 3 and bonus 5
points for a plus 8.
Debbie Delaney won second
place in a tie breaker over Carol
Rath with a plus 5, leaving Carol
with third place.


In Flight C none of the win-
ners returned with their logo
balls.
Dottie Williams won first
place with plus 4; Sharon
Warner took second with plus 2
and Rosie Foote was third with
a plus 1.
Kay Gorham won the D Flight
with plus 9, Joan Gann was
second with plus 8 and Ann
McWilliams was third with a
plus 7.
On Tuesday, Feb. 8, the
Spring Lake Men's Golf
Association held a 4 Man Team,
3 Best Balls competition on the
par 72 Panther Trail course.
Each team included an A, B,
C and D rated player.
The winning team, at an even
200 strokes, starred Vern


Baxter, Gene Hearn, Bill
Schauwecker, and was
anchored by Superman himself,
88-year old Bill Robbins, who
shot a net 72 from the short
tees.
Mr. Robbins, for those who
do not remember, got a hole-in-
one on Panther 14 a few weeks
ago.
The second place team
included Pat Jaskowski, Bart
Rath, Ken Willey, and Jim
Foote and came in with a 202.
The team of Dave Kamish,
Dale Stevens, Jack Hoerner and
Chips Ryan used 205 strokes
to get third place.
Fourth place was taken by
the team of Bill Lawens, Leon
Van, Bob Berg and Bob Pollard
with a 207.


8.49 12.49
Bogle 12-Pack
Merlot Wine Assorted
Or Chardonnay, Heineken Beer
Pinot Noir, or Cabernet, Or Amstel Light,
750-ml bot. 12-oz can or bot.


12-Pack -
Assorted M.
Michelob
Beer
12-oz can and/or bot.


13.99.
12-Pack
Stella
Artois
Premium Lager
Imported,
11.2-oz bot.


Prices effective Thursday, February 10
through Wednesday, February 16, 2011.
Visit publix.com/store to find the store nearest you,
Liquor items are only available at Publix Liquors.


Page 4B


59th 12 Hours of Sebring



to have a record grid


12.99 1799
Canadian Jack Daniel's
LTD Whiskey
1.75 L 750 ml


approximately 25-6 with
travel ball.
The cost per, player to
play at Cooperstown is
$745, which does not
include the transportation
costs from here to New
York, or the cost of trans-
portation while in New
York.
Accommodations are
provided in the fee.
For more information
regarding donations for the
trip' contact Coach Dean
Frazier at '381-9583.
American Legion Post 74
is a member of the Veterans
Council of Highlands
County Inc.
The veterans of
Highlands County are
known for their community
spirit and since of pride in
their community.,
I'


I


46


I









www.newssun.com


News-Sun Friday, February 11, 2011


HEALTHY LIVING


Amplified
telephone
distribution
SEBRING Hearing
Impaired Persons will dis-
tribute amplified tele-
phones to Florida residents
who have a hearing or
'speech loss, in the confer-
ence room at Nu-Hope
Elder Care Services, 6414
U.S. 27 South in Sebring,
Trom 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 24.
By appointment only.
Call (941) 743-8347.

Community
outreach events set
i Ace Homecare commu-
nity outreach events
include:
n Today 7 a.m., Health
Fair, Arc residence,
Pleasant Street, Avon Park;
9 a.m., Health Fair, Avon
Park Meal Site, Main
Street.
Monday 8 a.m.,
Health Fair, Hammock
Estates, Hammock Road,
Sebring; 1 p.m.;
Caregivers Support Group,
Crown Pointe Assisted
Living Community, Sun 'N
Lake Blvd., Sebring
Tuesday 8 a.m.,
Health Fair, Sebring
Bluffs, U.S. 27, Sebring;
10:30 a.m., Health Fair,
Fair Havens, Apartments,
Spinks Road, Sebring; 1
p.m., Health Fair, Groves,
behind Sebring Diner, U.S.
27 Sebring
Wednesday 9 a.m.,
Health Fair, Avon Park
Meal Site, Main Street,


Snapshots

Avon Park;
Thursday 9 a.m.,
Health Fair, Maranatha
Village, Arbuckle Creek
Road, Sebring; 10:30 a.m.,
Caregivers Support Group,
Balmoral Assisted Living
Facility 93 Balmoral Road,
RT 621, Lake Placid.

Parkinson's
support group
meets Monday
SEBRING The
Parkinson's disease sup-
port group for the
Highlands County area
will meet at 10 a.m.
Monday at First Baptist
Church of Sebring (corner
of Pine and Lemon Street).
The program this month
will be speaker Dennis
Mungall, Ph.D., Florida
Hospital pharmacist.
All persons with
Parkinson's disease and
their families are welcome
to attend. There is no
charge.
For more information,
call 453-6589 or 453-6419.
The Highlands County
Parkinson's Support Group
is part of the national net-
work of support groups
affiliated with the
American Parkinson's
Disease Association. More
than one million
Americans have
Parkinson's disease. Today
people with Parkinson's
disease and their families
can find help and informa-
tion from their local sup-
port group.


Enrollment event helps

Medicare beneficiaries


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID An
enrollment event to help
Medicare beneficiaries save
on their Medicare costs will
be held from 10 a.m. to
noon Friday, Feb. 18 at
Lake Placid Memorial
Library, 205 W. Interlake
Blvd. in Lake Placid.
Medicare Beneficiary
Outreach and Assistance
representatives from the
West Central Florida Area
Agency on Aging, Inc. will
be available to help
Medicare beneficiaries
learn if they qualify for
additional benefits, and if
eligible, will provide appli-
cation assistance. If you or
someone you know needs
help with your Medicare
costs, don't miss out on this
opportunity to see if the
MBOA program can assist.
More than 90,000
Medicare beneficiaries in
Florida are likely eligible
for, but not enrolled in a
program called Extra Help.
This program offers quali-


fied beneficiaries assistance
with their Part D (prescrip-
tion drug plan) costs. In
addition, many individuals
may qualify for assistance
in paying their Part B pre-
miums. Many of those who
need help the most don't
know about these valuable
benefits, and the MBOA
program can help.
MBOA, as a joint federal
and state effort, offers free
education and confidential
application assistance for
Medicare beneficiaries who
may be eligible for pro-
grams that assist them in
paying for their Part D or
Part B premiums. The
MBOA program is operated
by the Florida Department
of Elder Affairs and the
state's 11 Area Agencies on
Aging. Locally, it is operat-
ed by the West Central
Florida Area Agency on
Aging, Inc.
For more information or
application assistance, call
the toll-free Elder Helpline
at 1-800-963-5337.


Building a I

ARA Content
Getting a good start to
your day takes a lot more
than the alarm going off at
the right time and avoiding
traffic. What you eat in the
morning can have an effect
on your whole day and
your health.
"Choosing whole grain at
breakfast is a great first step
in starting your day off on the
right track," says Dr. Travis
Stork, author and host of the
Emmy Award-winning day-
time talk show "The
Doctors." "When grocery
shopping, look for foods that
list whole grain at the top of
the ingredients list."
Plenty of nutritious break-
fast options will please any
palate and pack a whole-
grain punch, such as oatmeal
and whole grain cereal, toast,
waffles and pancakes.
Only 5 percent of
Americans get the recom-
mended three full daily serv-
ings of whole grain, accord-
ing to the 2010 Dietary
Guidelines Advisory
Committee. In fact, the aver-
age person gets little more
than half a serving of whole
grain each day.
"It's concerning that
Americans aren't getting
enough whole grain, a key
component of a healthy diet,"
says Stork. "Eating the rec-


setter breakfast: Start with whole grains


ommended amount of whole
grain can help with diabetes
and weight management as
well as reduce the risk of
heart disease."
Stork is partnering with
General Mills to educate
Americans about the impor-
tance of whole grain and how
it's easy to eat a diet rich in
whole grain by making the
right choices beginning
with breakfast.
Only whole grain provides
vital nutrients found in the
complete grain including
the bran, the germ and the
endosperm and the health
benefits come from these
three components working
together naturally. In addi-
tion to fiber, whole grain
contains antioxidants, vita-
mins, minerals and other
important nutrients for a
healthy diet.
One of the simplest break-
fast solutions for families
with busy schedules is ready-
to-eat cereal but it's also
one of the healthiest break-
fast choices you can make.
Cereal is the leading whole
grain source for Americans as
well as the top source of
whole grain in children's
diets. In fact, General Mills
guarantees every Big G cere-
al such as Cheerios, Lucky
Charms and Chex contains
at least 8 grams of whole


President has stopped

smoking, but will it last?


Associated Press
WASHINGTON A large
majority of smokers who try
to kick the habit are back
puffing away within six
months, so President Barack
Obama is ahead of the game.
He hasn't had a cigarette
in almost a year, first lady
Michelle Obama said
Tuesday.
Asked whether he had con-
quered a nicotine habit he
picked up as a teenager, she
said: "Yes, he has. It's been
almost a year." Mrs. Obama
offered no details on exactly
when or how he did it.
She said her husband
received encouragement
from friends and pressure
from family to stop.
"From all of the women in
my husband's life, we want
him to be healthy. He's
worked hard at it," Mrs.
Obama said during an inter-
view Wednesday on NBC's
"Today Show."
But is his relationship with
nicotine really over?
About 46 million people,
or one in five adults, smoke,
and brain research shows that
nicotine is powerfully addic-
tive. Three-fourths of smok-
ers who try to stop fall off
the wagon within six months,
according to the National


Scott proposing repeal of drug tracking law


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott wants to repeal
the state's yet-to-be-imple-
mented prescription drug
tracking law that's designed
to crack down on "pill mills"
supplying drug dealers and
addicts who flock to Florida
from states already operating
such systems.
Scott spokesman Brian
Hughes said Tuesday that the
electronic monitoring
delayed by contract chal-
lenges, may not be as effec-
tive as advocates claim. The
governor also was worried it
might infringe on patients'
privacy, he said.
"Is that a function of gov-
ernment to track the activities
of law-abiding people in
order to track a smaller sub-
set of criminal behavior?"
Hughes asked in an interview
with The Associated Press.
The proposed repeal,
though, drew sharp opposi-
tion from the Florida
Academy of Pain Medicine.
The doctors' group issued a
statement saying such a sys-
tem would be "the single
most effective weapon in the


battle to shut down Florida's
so-called "pill mills.'"
The state added that
Florida's pill mill crisis is
hampering access to legiti-
mate pain care, but without a
monitoring system the state
"is fighting a losing proposi-
tion."
Law enforcement officials
say one 'reason Florida has
become the nation's epicenter
for prescription drug abuse is
that most other states already
have prescription monitoring


systems.
Sen. Mike Fasano, a New
Port Richey Republican who
championed the database,
said he'll fight the repeal. He
said the system would help
authorities determine if peo-
ple are "doctor shopping" to
get drugs so they can feed
their addictions or resell
them at a profit.
"Without this important
program Florida will take a
step back 10 years or more
into the past," Fasano said.


Institute on Drug Abuse.
Smokers will tell you it often
takes repeated attempts to
quit long term.
Obama has walked this
tobacco road before. He
announced in February 2008,
during his presidential cam-
paign, that he was quitting
smoking again.
"He"s always wanted to
stop," Mrs. Obama said.


ARA Content


~Lakeshore

Car Wash


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Page 5B


--









Page 6B


HEALTHY LIVING


News-Sun Friday, February 11, 2011


www. newssun.com


Dear Pharmacist
Suzy Co/ten
Dear Pharmacist: Both my father
and brother have suffered a heart
attack. I'm worried because I'm 52
years old and my blood pressure is
slightly elevated, but other than that, I
am pretty healthy. All my tests are OK,
but I am scared. Any suggestions?
P.A. Denver, Colo.

Answer: Just because your relatives
have suffered a heart attack, doesn't
mean you will so realize that in this
moment, you are still healthy. Positive
thoughts reduce stress hormones like
cortisol, which damage the heart.
Because you have a family history of
heart disease, remain vigilant eating a
healthy, well-balanced diet, doing aero-
bic exercise and taking essential nutri-
ents that help maintain normal blood
pressure and cholesterol.
Most Americans take blood pressure
drugs. Pharmaceutically-speaking, there
are more than 100 different pills to
tackle high blood pressure. In some
instances, these are helpful, but they
relax blood vessels temporarily, while
the disease process continues. Many
drugs used to lower blood pressure just
so happen to be drug muggers of mag-
nesium, zinc, calcium and iron so tak-
ing a multi-mineral supplement, or a
trace mineral supplement a few hours
after you take your medicine can miti-
gate side effects.
While blood pressure or cholesterol
medications, beta blockers, calcium
channel blockers and digoxin may be
prescribed by your physician, it's
important to realize that their effect on
your body is only temporary. The
underlying disease and inflammation
will continue to destroy the delicate
pipeline, your-blood vessels, arteries
and capillaries. This is why vitamin C,
lysine and proline help, because they
keep our blood vessels flexible and
h,.l)p reduce plaquing.
I Wrote a whole chapter on heart
disease in my diabetes book, and right
now, I'd like to share some of the most
important supplements that could help
a person reduce their risk of heart
attack. Obviously, ask your physician
which suppleirhent(s) are rightfor your
individual condition:
Arginine It's an amino acid that
the body makes on its own. You can
buy it too. In 2009, researchers at the
University of Virginia found that it
could help people with heart failure.


Metro Services
There are several natural ways to help control your blood pressure.


Ribose It's a naturally-occurring
sugar that the body uses to make ATP.
your energy molecule. Ribose improves
blood flow and provides much-needed
oxygen to the heart.
Hawthorn It's an herb that
increases the amount of blood your
heart pumps, and it lowers blood pres-
sure over time. Hawthorne turns on an
anti-aging switch in your body (a gene
called PGC-1 alpha) that helps you
burn fat more efficiently.
Fish Oils They improve choles-
terol ratios and reduce risk of blood
clot formation.
Taurine It's an amino acid that
helps regulate heart rhythm, regulate
blood pressure and lower blood pres-
sure.


Sometimes potassium deficiency
contributes to heart problems. If your
doctor has told you that you're low in
this mineral, check in your medicine
cabinet because some. medications are
drug muggers and can actually reduce
potassium levels.

Did you know?
Certain antidepressants, deconges-
tants and pain-relieving narcotics can
alter heart rhythm.

Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and
the author of 'The 24-Hour Pharmacist' and
'Real Solutions.' For more information, visit
www. DearPharmacist. com. This informa-
tion is not intended to treat, diagnose or
cure your condition.


FDA aims to


accelerate medical


device reviews


By MATTHEW PERRONE
AP Health Writer
WASHINGTON
Federal health officials are
proposing a plan that would
speed up the approval of
innovative medical devices
that have the potential to
dramatically improve
patients' lives.
The so-called Innovation
Pathway, announced
Tuesday by the Food and
Drug Administration, would
aim to review first-of-a-kind
devices in five months,
which is half the time cur-
rently spent reviewing most
new devices. Under the pro-
gram, the FDA would begin
corresponding with device
scientists in the early stages
of development, helping
them design studies to show
the safety and effectiveness
of their devices.
The initiative comes amid
complaints from medical
device manufacturers that
U.S. review times lag
behind other countries.
Medical device execu-
tives say it takes the FDA
about twice as long to
review new devices as their
counterparts in the
European Union, according
to an industry survey
released last month by
PriceWaterhouseCoopers.
Executives ranked the U.S.
as the seventh slowest
nation in terms of device
approvals, behind India,
Israel and European coun-
tries like France and
Germany.
"European countries will
continue to provide more
supportive regulatory
processes that encourage
innovation yet ensure safety
and effectiveness on a time-
ly basis," the report con-
cluded.
Medical devices represent
a $350 billion global busi-
ness, with most of the major
companies based in the
U.S., including Medtronic
Inc., St. Jude Medical Inc.
and Baxter International
Inc.
The FDA said an innova-
tive prosthetic arm devel-
oped by the Department of
Defense would be the first
device to use the new sys-
tem. The device is remotely
linked to a microchip in the
brain that gives patients
near-natural coordination of
the prosthetic hand and fin-


gers. It is intended for
patients who have suffered
spinal cord injury, stroke or
amputation.
Makers of devices accept-
ed into the new program
will receive a written agree-
ment from the agency with a
target approval date and a
roadmap for the reviewing
the product. The devices
will be reviewed by a spe-
cial committee within the
FDA mady up of experi-
enced scientists and man-
agers.
The agency will hold a
public meeting on the pro-
gram March 15 to gather
comments from the public.
Tuesday's announcement
comes as the FDA pushes
ahead with a multiyear
effort to overhaul its 35-
year-old system for approv-
ing medical devices, which
has been subject to increas-
ing criticism by public safe-
ty advocates.
Last month the agency
announced; a series of
changes to the program.
including streamlining the
review process for some
low-risk devices. But many
significant changes favored
by public safety advocates
- including specifying
when the agency can revoke
a device's approval were
not included in the
announcement. Those
changes have been aggres-
sively opposed by the med-
ical device industry's lobby-
ing arm, AdvaMed. which
represents most of the
largest device firms, includ-
ing Boston Scientific Corp.
and Johnson & Johnson.
Those companies and sever-
al others have been forced to
recall faulty products in
recent years, attracting
scrutiny from Congress.
The Medical Device
Manufacturers Association,
which represents smaller
medical device companies,
commended the FDA's
innovation plan and urged
the agency to continue
addressing delays in device
approval.
"Unnecessary and unrea-
sonable delays for safe and
effective products not only
hurt innovation, they unfair-
ly punish patients who are
relying on America's med-
tech entrepreneurs for help,"
said Mark Leahey, the
group's president.


More candor by doctors urged in care of dying cancer patients


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON -
Patients don't want to hear
that they're dying and doc-
tors don't want to tell them.
But new guidance for the
nation's cancer specialists
says they should be upfront
and do it far sooner.
The American Society of
Clinical Oncology says too
often, patients aren't told
about options like comfort
care or even that their chemo
has become futile until the
bitter end.
To help families broach the
topic, too, the group devel-
oped an easy-to-read booklet
about those choices, from
standard care to symptom
relief, and advice about what
to ask to maximize remaining
time.
"This is not a 15-minute
conversation, and it should
not happen in the back of the
ambulance on the way to the
ICU at 3 in the morning,"
says ASCO chief executive
Dr. Allen Lichter.
"'When everyone is well
and .has iteir wits about
them, it's time to start the
process."
The guidance and booklet
available at
http-./www.cancer.net -
niirk 'an unusually strong
push for planning end-of-life
care, in a profession that


earns more from attacking
tumors than from lengthy,
emotional discussions about
when it's time to stop.
"This is a clarion call for
oncologists to take the lead
in curtailing the use of inef-
fective therapy and ensuring
a focus on palliative care and
relief of symptoms through-
out the course of illness," the
guidance stresses.
But it's part of a slowly
growing movement to deal
with a subject so taboo that
Congress' attempt to give
such planning a nudge in
2009 degenerated into
charges of "death panels."
Now consider a program in
Pittsburgh named Closure. In
so-called "community con-
versations," the program
teaches families how to talk
with each other and their
doctors about what they want
- and want to avoid in
their final days. Created by
the Jewish Healthcare
Foundation, sessions have
spread to hospitals, religious
centers and neighborhoods
around the city, and a website
opened last month at
http://www.closure.org.
The sessions are frank.
Doctors tell of entering hos-
pital rooms late at night ask-
ing for resuscitation prefer-
ences should a very ill patient
worsen only to find relatives
didn't know their loved one


was that sick.
"There is going to be, over
the next few years, a
groundswell of people telling
physicians, 'I don't want to
go out in excruciating pain,
short of breath, alone, sur-
rounded by lights and sirens
and people pounding on my
chest,'" predicts Dr. Jonathan
Weinkle, a primary care
physician who advises the
program.
"Everybody wants a good
death but not a moment too
soon, but they don't have the
language to ask for it."
Closure participant Pearl
Moore, a retired Pittsburgh
oncology nurse, urges people
to start planning before
they're ever sick, when it's








1.1

., -, .


easier to discuss.
Moore's mother died of
stomach cancer without
health workers or family ever
discussing the inevitable.
Haunted, she returned to col-
lege to specialize in cancer
nursing. She helped her
patients discuss quality of
life, "to be able to live until
they died, is the way I put it,"
Moore says.
And years ago she pre-
pared her own living will and
other health care directives,
giving copies to her daughter,
Cheryl, as soon as she was
grown.
"Remembering my mother,
we had the discussion," says
Moore.
It's not clear how often the


still healthy like Moore do
that kind of advance plan-
ning.
But the oncology society
says it isn't happening
enough with the very sick.
Fewer than 40 percent of
advanced cancer patients
have what it calls a "realistic
conversation" with their doc-
tors about what to expect and
their choices of care.
The consequences:
Patients increasingly are
receiving aggressive
chemotherapy in the last two
weeks of life. They're spend-
ing more of their last months
hospitalized. They're not told
that a lot of expensive, side
effect-prone therapies buy at
best a few more months.


They think palliative care
- specialized care for pain,
nausea, shortness of breath
- means giving up when it
should be offered with stan-
dard anti-tumor care.
And they're not referred to
hospice until their final days.
Lichter tells of a lung cancer
patient who spent his last
days on a ventilator, unable
to say goodbye and incurring
$25,000 in hospital bills.
because his family called 911
when he became short of
breath. Hospice care could
have eased that symptom at
home.
The society plans by sum-
mer to issue detailed guide-
lines to help doctors conduct
those tough conversations.


Nutrients to help reduce blood



pressure and cholesterol








www.newssun.corn


News-Sun + Friday, February 11, 2011


HEALTHY LIVING


Is First Lady's anti-obesity program working? Too soon to say


By DARLENE SUPERVILLE
Associated Press.
WASHINGTON -
Michelle Obama had doubts
about making a campaign
against childhood obesity
one of her signature issues.
"I wondered to myself
whether we could really
make a difference, because
when you take on a problem
this big and this complicat-
ed, at times it can be a little
overwhelming," she said in a
recent speech.
The anti-obesity campaign
Mrs. Obama calls "Let's
Move!" celebrates its first
anniversary Wednesday. Is it
making a difference?
In some ways, yes. In oth-
ers, it's much too soon to
tell.
Advocates who have
worked on the issue for a
long time say the first lady's
involvement is raising
awareness about the poten-
tial future of the U.S. as a
nation of fat. unhealthy peo-
ple unless the trend is
reversed, and that Mrs.
Obama has been doing it in
ways that they can't. "She
has been a spark plug," said
Nancy Brown, chief execu-
tive of the American Heart
Association.
Mrs. Obama has addressed
governors, mayors, school
groups, food makers and
other constituencies, urging
them to build more bike
paths and playgrounds, to
serve healthier school lunch-
es and to make and sell more
food that's better for you.
She has visited schools
across the country to see
what changes they are mak-
ing, from planting fruit and
vegetable gardens modeled
after her own celebrated
White House plot to opening


Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun/MCT
First Lady Michelle Obama talks about her Let's Move! campaign to fight childhood obesity
at Oriole Park at Camden Yards in July 20, 2010 in Baltimore, Md.


salad bars in their lunch-
rooms. And she's worked
herself into a sweat at exer-
cise clinics with kids,
including on the White
House South Lawn.
Her year of effort has led
to promises of change from
beverage makers, food man-
ufacturers and most recently,
and perhaps notably,
Walmart, the country's
largest retailer, to cut the
levels of salt, fat and sugar
in their products.
Lasting change will take
years of effort, though, and
some doubt it will happen at
all.
"I've been through so
many of these enormous


announcements by food
companies about how
they're going to profoundly
change the way they're
doing business and they
don't,' said food expert and
New York University nutri-
tion professor Marion
Nestle. "So it remains to be
seen."
Mrs. Obama said when
she launched the campaign.
that it will benefit future
generations by helping chil-
dren born today become
adults at a healthy weight.
The issue is picking up
momentum, she said.
"We are seeing a funda-
mental shift in our national
conversation about how we


Don't let diabetes get a foothold on you


Latin Americans and
African-Americans are at a
greater risk for developing
diabetes according to the
Centers for Disease Control.
In fact. Latin Americans
are nearly twice as likely to
get diabetes and five times
less likely to visit a doctor
for medical problems than
Caucasians.
The disease can impact
many parts of the body
including nerve and vascular
damage, which can result in
a loss of sensation in the
feet. Poor circulation can
lead to hard-to-heal foot
ulcers. If not treated in time,
the American Podiatric
Medical Association warns
these complications can
result in lower-limb amputa-
tions for people with dia-
betes.
A podiatrist plays an
important role in the dia-
betes management team.
, Regular visits to an APMA
member podiatrist as part of
a comprehensive foot care
plan can help reduce the rate
of lower-limb amputation by
45-85 percent.
Follow these simple at-
home tips to make sure your
feet are as healthy as possi-
ble:


Check
your feet
every day


S" Especially
.. .: if you
M- have a
loss of
Foot sensation,
visually
Care inspecting
Dr. Ioni Jones your feet
daily will
help you notice any cuts,
sores, blisters or changes in
the skin or toenails. You can
use a hand mirror to help
you check the bottoms of
your feet. If you notice a
change in your feet, see your
podiatrist immediately.
Clean your feet daily -
Washing your feet will help
avoid the buildup of bacte-
ria. Be sure to wash in warm
water, rather than hot.
Completely dry your feet
after washing and pay spe-
cial attention to drying
between the toes.
+ Keep skin healthy By
lightly applying lotion, or
moisturizer to your feet, you
can help prevent against dry,
flaky or cracked skin. Use
lotions on the tops and bot-
toms of yotir feet, but never


jm

* lhe news i just click away!

www:newssun.coni


between the toes. Excess
moisture between the toes
can lead to infection.
Always wear shoes and
socks Soft, lightly padded
socks will help you avoid
blisters and sores. Socks
with no seams are best. Also,
examine inside your shoes to
be sure there is nothing
harmful that will injure your
feet.
Choose shoes that fit
well and protect your feet -
One of the best ways to
avoid injuries to your feet is
to wear sturdy and support-
ive shoes at all times. For
more information, visit
www.apma.org.

Dr Joni Jones is a podiatrist in
Sebring who can be reached at
382-3228, stop by her office at
206 West Center Avenue,
Sebring or mail to P.O. Box
1719, Sebring, FL 33871-1719.










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make and sell food," the first
lady said at an appearance in
Washington with Walmart
executives for their
announcement last month.
"That's something that was-
n't happening just a year
ago."
Walmart promised to
reformulate thousands of its
store-brand products to
reduce sodium, sugar and
fat, and push its suppliers to
do the same. The company
also pledged to cut fresh
fruit and vegetable prices,
build stores in areas without
grocers and develop a logo
for products that meet its
health criteria. Walmart's
grocery business accounts

Classified ads get
results!
Call 385-6155


for about 15 percent of the
U.S. grocery industry.
"All this will take some
time," Leslie Dach, an exec-
utive vice president at
Walmart, said in an inter-
view. He said Walmart
worked with Mrs. Obama's
office for about a year to
win her approval.
A new child nutrition law
aims to make all school food
more nutritious by letting
Washington decide what
kinds of foods may be sold
during the school day,
including in vending
machines and at fundraisers.
The law also increases by 6
cents the amount of money
the government reimburses
schools for providing free
lunches, although some
advocates say that's hardly
enough.
Agriculture Secretary Tom
Vilsack recently unveiled
guidelines for putting the
changes into place. In the
case of sodium, the amount
in meals would be gradually
reduced over .10 years, with
an eventual goal of cutting
levels by more than half.
Mrs. Obama called for
"clear, consistent" nutrition
labels on the front of pack-
aged foods to help harried
shoppers make informed
choices. The Grocery


Manufacturers Association,
which represents large food
and beverage companies, is
working on a label it hopes
to begin rolling out later this
year. The Food and Drug
Administration is also
exploring "front-of-pack"
labeling.
The beverage industry has
started putting labels with
calorie counts on the front of
its bottles, cans and pack-
ages of soft drinks, juices,
teas and waters. The goal is
to have a label on all non-
alcoholic drinks by next
year, said Kevin Keane, a
senior vice president of the
American Beverage
Association. The group is
following up on the commit-
ment it made when Mrs.
Obama launched "Let's
Move!" last February.
Keane did not say how
much companies are spend-
ing, except that it's "a great
deal."
The new health care law
also requires restaurants with
20 or more locations operat-
ing under the same name to
list nutrition and calorie
information on their menus
or menu boards. FDA guid-
ance on that is due soon,
said Sue Hensley, a spokes-
woman for the National
Restaurant Association.


LIVING BRINGS IT IN. WE TAKE IT OUT.


<.a


STANLEY STEEMER


Call for

Our

Weekly


ASpecials.

AVON PARK 452-5800
SEBRING 382-3363
LAKE PLACID 465-1530

STANLEY STEEMER.


Page 7B


I










Page 8B


News-Sun + Friday, February 11, 2011


www.newssun.com


RELIGION


Atonement Lutheran
Church ELCA
SEBRING This is the Sixth
Sunday after Epiphany worship
service will be led by the Rev.
Jefferson Cox.
Birthday celebrations Feb. 20
following morning worship service.
Agape Fellowship meets at 4
p.m. Feb. 27.

Avon Park Church of
Christ
AVON PARK "The Things
which God Has Prepared for Those
Who Love Him" (I Corinthians
2:9-12) will be the Sunday morn-
ing message presented by Larry
Roberts, minister.
There will be a dinner and get-
together for the Youth Group on
Sunday night.
Avon Park Church of Christ is at
200. S. Forest Ave. For information,
call 453-4692.

Christ Lutheran Church
AVON PARK Sixth Sunday
after Epiphany Pastor Scott
McLean will preach a sermon titled
" Of the Heart."
The church is at 1320 County
Road 64, east of the Avon Park
High School. For more informa-
tion, call 471-2663 or visit christ-
lutheranavonpark.org.

Christian Science Church
SEBRING The lesson sermon
on Sunday morning is titled
"Soul." The keynote is from Isaiah


25:1, "Lord, you are my God; I
will honor you And praise your
name. You have done amazing
things;"
The church is at 146 N. Franklin
St.

Christian Training
Church
SEBRING Associate Minister
Casey L. Downing will bring the
message titled "More Life: Part II"
at the Sunday morning service. The
Wednesday night Bible study will
continue the book of Hebrews.

Emmanuel United Church
of Christ
SEBRING The Rev. George
Miller will deliver the Sunday
morning sermon, "Standing Before
Moses," taken from Deuteronomy
30:15-20.
The church is 1.7 miles west of
U.S. 27 on County Road 634
(hammock Road). Call 471-1999
or visit sebringemmanuelucc.com.

First Baptist Church of
Avon Park
AVON PARK Rev. Jon Beck
will be speaking on "God's Appeal
for His Church" with scripture
from Philippians 1:27-2:18, at the
Sunday morning service.
He will be speaking on "Digging
Deeper... Being in the World with-
out being of the World" at the
evening service. Nursery is avail-
able for both services.
The church is located at 100 N.
Lake Ave. For more information


Church News

call 453-6681 or email
info@fbcap.net.

First Baptist Church of
Placid Lakes
LAKE PLACID On Sunday
Pastor Darryl George will preach
the sermon titled "The Certainty
Series! The Certainty of Fiery
Doubts!" with regards to Luke
1:18-25.
The church is at the corner of
Washington and.Kemper avenues
in Placid Lakes. For more informa-
tion, call 405-5126 from 8 a.m. to
noon Monday through Thursday, or
e-mail the church at
placidlakes@hotmail.com.

First Baptist Church of
Sebring
SEBRING Dr. David
Richardson is continuing his morn-
ing series "The Talk," on the
Lord's Prayer, on Sunday morning.
Hispanic Mission worship meets
Sunday at 2 p.m. and Fridays at 7
p.m. in the fellowship hall.

First Christian Church
AVON PARK Have you real-
ized that God made you for a spe-
cific purpose? The pastor will visit
this topic in this week's sermon
titled "What Is God's Will for My
Life in 2011 ?" God made you for a
reason, see what God's word will
show through song and Scripture,
Romans 12.
First Christian Church of Avon


Park is at 1016 W. Camphor
(behind the Wachovia Bank). Call
453-5334 or e-mail firstchris-
tianap@embarqmail.com with any
questions or to request information.
The church Web site is
www.firstchristianap.com.

First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ)
SEBRING At the Lord's
Table this Sunday morning will be
Walter and Anna Coley.
Communion will be served by
Carol Chandler, Carol Graves,
Gretchen Ames and Jayne Weldy.
Greeting the congregation will
be Dee Timmons and Sharron
Campbell. Noel and Juanita
Roberts will work with children's
church. Lighting the candles during
the month of February will be Nina
Kunsak. Joyce Winstel will be with
the children in the nursery this
month.
The whole month of February
has been set aside as
"Stewardship" month and programs
will focus on how to use time,
health, talents, relationships, pros-
perity and the gospel in a partner-
ship with God. The pastor's ser-
mon is titled "The Widow's Mite"
from Luke 21:1-4.
The church is at 510 Poinsettia
Ave. Call 385-0352 for informa-
tion.

First Presbyterian
Church, ARP
AVON PARK On Sunday, the
pastor's sermon is titled "Proper
Mindset" based on Mark 10:35-45.


The choir's introit will be "Holy
Ground" and the anthem "Unseen
Blessings."
Maxine Johnson, adult Sunday
school teacher, continues the study
of David in II Samuel chapter 9,
which tells of David's kindness to
Mephibosheth.
Youth Band meets at 5 p.m.
Youth Group meets at 6 p.m.
On Monday, the Crafty Ladies
will meet from 10 a.m. to noon.
Choir practice will be at 6:30 p.m.
On Tuesday, the Session will
meet at 6 p.m.
On Wednesday, the family
potluck will be at 6 p.m. The
emphasis will be missions, and the
Women's Ministries/Witness and
Outreach chairman are in charge.
This annual "Jubilee Birthday"
party, which collects funds for
women missionaries, is celebrated
with a birthday cake for dessert.
On Thursday, Men's Fellowship
will meet at The Depot for break-
fast at 7 a.m. followed by a short
Bible study at the church.
Afterwards, the men will do a serv-
ice project at a member's home.
The church is at 215 E. Circle
St. (with two entrances on Lagrand
Street). For more information, call
the church office at 453-3242.

Grace Pointe Ministries
SEBRING Grace Pointe
Ministries is at 200 Lark Ave.,
Sebring Hills Association
Clubhouse.
Home Bible study The Future

Continued on page 9B


PLACES To WORSHIP


Places to Worship is a paid
advertisement in the News-Sun
that is published Friday and
Sunday. To find out more infor-
mation on how to place a listing
in this directory, call the News-
Sun at 385-6155, ext. 502.


APOSTOLIC

Greater Faith Apostolic
- Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. invites you to
come worship with us in spirit and
truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday. For information con-
tact 840-0152. Pastor Larry
Carmody.


ASSEMBLY OF GOD

Christ Fellowship Church
(Assembly of God), 2935 New
Life Way. Bearing His Name;
Preaching His Doctrine; and
Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping
God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship,
10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m.
Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-
0924.
First Assembly of God, 4301
Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev.
Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday
School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship
and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.;
Evening Worship, 7 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night, (Adult
Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group,
Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-6431.


BAPTIST

Avon Park Lakes Baptist
Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd.,
Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall,
Pastor. Christ centered and bibli-
cally based. Sunday worship serv-
ices, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Nursery facilities are available.
Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday
and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer
Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible
classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered
for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m.
Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556.
Bethany Baptist Church
(GARBC) We are located at the
corner of SR17 and C-17A (truck
route) in Avon Park. Join us
Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for cof-
fee and doughnuts, followed with
Sunday School for all ages at 9:30.
Sunday morning worship service
begins at 10:30 a.m., and evening
worship service is at 6 -p.m. On
Wednesday, the Word of Life teen
ministry and the Catylist class
(20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult
Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7
p.m. For more information go to
www.bethanybaptistap.com or call
the church office at 863-452-1136.
Faith Missionary Baptist
Church, off State Road 17 North of
Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave.
Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday
Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation
available. Ken Lambert, Pastor.
Phone 386-5055.
Fellowship Baptist Church,
1000 Maxwell St., Avon Park, FL


33825. Sunday: Sunday School,
9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; Wednesday: Evening
Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth,. 7
p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax:
453-6986. E-mail: office apfe//ow
ship.org; Web site, wwwapfellow
ship.org.
* First Baptist Church of Avon
Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park.
Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared
Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy
Loomis, music director. Regular
'Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m.
Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library
open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11
a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m.
Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening
Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10
a.m., basic computer
class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m.
conversational English and citizen-
ship classes/Sonshine House.
Regular Wednesday schedule:
5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6
p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m.
Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. chil-
dren's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. chil-
dren's mission groups. Call 453-
6681 for details. Primera Mision
Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon
Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor.
Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m.,
Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship
Service. Wednesday schedule: 7
p.m., Bible study.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine
Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 mid-
way between Sebring and Lake
Placid). Your place for family,
friends and faith. Sunday morning
worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery
is provided for both services with
Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life
changing Bible Study for all ages
starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor
Allen Altvater leads the youth in
their quest to become more like
Christ. Sunday night worship at 6
p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and
Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with
youth worship in the youth facility,
and missions training for all chil-
dren. Call the church at 655-1524.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Placid, Knowing God's Heart and
Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal
Palm Street. (2 blocks south of
Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL
33852 (863) 465-3721, Email:
www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett
Morey, senior pastor. Sunday serv-
ices Traditional Service 9 a.m.,
Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m.
,Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m.,
Senior Sunday Night and Sunday
Evening Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Activities: Family din-
ner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reser-
vations required). Adult-LifeSource
classes, prayer meeting, Youth
Intersections, and Kids K-5-
MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15
p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every
Tuesday for prayer breakfast and
women's prayer breakfast is at 8
a.m. every Wednesday, both at the
Family Restaurant.
* First Baptist Church of Lorida
located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida.
Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.
for all ages. Sunday worship serv-
ices are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Preschool care is provided at the
11 a.m. worship service.
Wednesday evening Bible Study
and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m.,
followed by adult choir rehearsal.


From September to May our youth
group meets. First Lorida is the
"Place to discover God's love." For
more information about the church
or the ministries offered, call 655-
1878.
* First Baptist Church, Sebring,
200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL
33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr.
David E. Richardson, senior pas-
tor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of
youth and activities. Contemporary
Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible
Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional
Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista
Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night
programs at the ROC begin 5:30
p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m.
Preschool and Mother's Day Out
for children age 6 weeks to 5 years
old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call
385-4704.
* Florida Avenue Baptist
Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon
Park. Mailing address is 710 W.
Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825.
Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D.
Girdley, pastor. Sunday School,
9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11
a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church;
Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday night programs for
children, youth and adults at 7 p.m.
* Independent Baptist Church,
5704 County Road 17 South,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday
School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship,
*10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m.
Wednesday service, 7 p.m.
Fundamental, soul-winning, mis-
sion-minded, King James Bible
Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone
655-1899. Bus transportation.
* Leisure Lakes Baptist Church,
808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just
off of Miller at the west end of Lake
June) "Where the old fashion
gospel is preached." Sunday
School begins at 9:45 a.m.;
Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.;
Sunday Evening Service is at 6
p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the
church at 699-0671 for more infor-
mation.
* Maranatha Baptist Church
(GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east
of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle
Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9
a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.;
Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week
service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily
Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m.,
Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald
Webber and Associate Pastors
Don Messenger and Ted Ertle.
Phone 382-4301.
* Parkway Free Will Baptist
Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the
church where the "Son" always
shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and
Wednesday Evening Worship, 7
p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6
p.m. on the last Sunday of each
month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pas-
tor. Church phone: 382-3552.
Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated
with the National Association of
Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn.
* Sparta Road Baptist Church,
(SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev.
Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday
school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening


Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday:
Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery
provided. For information, call 382-
0869.
* Southside Baptist Church
(GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave.,
Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor;
Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor.
Sunday School for all ages, 9:30
a.m.; Morning Worship Service,
1.0:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten
through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.;
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30
p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and
Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for
under age 3 is available at all serv-
ices. Provisions for handicapped
and hard-of-hearing. Office phone,
385-0752.
* Sunridge Baptist Church,
(SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27
and Valerie, across from Florida
Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pas-
tor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.;
Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service,
6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible
Study, and Youth, 6:30
p.m.Nursery provided. For informa-
tion, call 382-3695.


CATHOLIC

* Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church, 595 East Main St., Avon
Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas
McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil
Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7
p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8
and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m.,
Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at
8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30
p.m. Saturday. Religious Education
Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday
for grades K through 8th.
Confirmation class is from 6:30-8
p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights
grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m.
Wednesday.
* St. Catherine Catholic Church,
820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing
address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL
33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe.
com. Very Rev. Jos6 Gonzalez,
V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30
and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 9 and 10:30
a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday
Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family
and Youth Center). Daily Masses 8
a.m. and noon Monday-Friday;, 9
a.m. Saturday. Confessions: 3-3:45
p.m. Saturday, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first
Friday, or by appointment. Enroll
your students today for Catholic
School grades Pre-K3 through 5th
grade.
* St. James Catholic Church,
3380 Placidview Drive, Lake
Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael
J. Cannon. Mass schedule:
Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) -
Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8
a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9
a.m. December thru Easter -
Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m.,
9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9
a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30
a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9
a.m.


CHRISTIAN

* Eastside Christian Church,
101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL
33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27
on County Road 621), 465-7065.
Ray Culpepper, senior pastor.


Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.;
Worship Celebration with the
Lord's Supper each week 10:15
a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat
Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise
and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building
.God's Kingdom for Everyone."
"Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and
Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!"
* Sebring Christian Church,
4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher;
Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor.
Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening
service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday
night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by
classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours,
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Phone 382-6676.
* First Christian Church, 1016
W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL
33825; (863) 453-5334; on the
Web at www.firstchristianap.com.
Our motto is "Jesus is First at First
Christian Church." Greg Ratliff,
Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper,
Family Life Minister; Jon Carter,
Music Director. Bible School 9
a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study,
6 p.m.; Wednesday studies for all
ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for
all events.
* First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ), 510
Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of
Poinsettia and Eucalyptus),
Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-
0358 or 385-3435. The Rev.
Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast,
10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30
a.m.; Ohildren's Church, 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, Praise and Worship,
6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15
p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15
p.m.


CHRISTIAN &
MISSIONARY
ALLIANCE

* The Alliance Church of
Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road,
Sebring, FL 33875. Call 382-1343.
Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday
services: Sunday School meets at
9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship Service meets at 10:30
a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study
meets at 6 p.m. (off site);
Wednesday Prayer Gathering
meets at 6 p.m.


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

* Christian Science Church, 146
N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m.
morning worship and Sunday
school. Testimonial meetings at
4 p.m. each second and fourth
Wednesday. A free public reading
room/bookstore, located in the
church, is open before and after
church services. The Bible and the
Christian Science textbook,
'Science and Health with Key to
the Scriptures' by Mary Baker Eddy
are our only preachers. All are wel-
come to come and partake of the
comfort, guidance, support and
healing found in the lesson-ser-
mons.


CHURCH OF


BRETHREN

* Church of the Brethren, 700 S.
Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-1597.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

* Avon Park Church of Christ,
200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Minister: Larry Roberts.
Sunday Worship Services, 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities
are available at every service. Bible
Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered
classes for all ages. Church phone:
453-4692.
* Sebring Parkway Church of
Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443. We
would like to extend an invitation
for you and your family to visit with
us here at Sebring Parkway. Our
hours of service are: Sunday
Worship Service, 9 a.m.; Sunday
Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Service, 6 p.m.;
Wednesday Service, 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF
NAZARENE

* First Church of the Nazarene
of Avon Park, P.O. Box 1118.,
Avon Park, FL 33825-1118. 707 W.
Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor.
Sunday: Sunday school begins at
9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wor-
ship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening
service at 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening service is at 7 p.m. with
special services for children and
adults. Special services once a
month for seniors (Prime Time) and
Ladies ministries. If you need any
more information, call 453-4851.
* First Church of the Nazarene
of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake
Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852.
Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning
worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7
p.m. Classes for adult children and
youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim
Taylor.


CHURCHES OF
CHRIST IN
CHRISTIAN UNION

* Community Bible Church -
Churches of Christ in Christian
Union, (Orange Blossom
Conference Center) 1400 C-17A
North (truck route), Avon Park.
Presenting Jesus Christ as the
answer for time and eternity.
Sunday morning worship service,
10:30 a.m. Nursery provided.
Junior Church activities at same
time for K-6 grade. Sunday School
Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m.
(Transportation available.) Sunday
evening praise and worship serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening
prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and
youth activities at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Everyone is welcome,
please come worship with us. Don
Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone
452-0088.










www.newssun.com


News-Sun + Friday, February 11, 2011


Page 9B


RELIGION


Church News

Continued from page 8B
Revealed will study the crowns
this week. What kind are they?
What are they made of? Who wears
them? Will you get one? The chil-
dren's class is currently in the
books of history.
Pastor Ron Zimmer continues
"It's Question Time!" on Sunday
morning.
Freedom is now airing on WIPC,
1280 AM in Lake Wales at 7:30
a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Live stream now
available at ustream.tv and then
enter gracepointetv in the search
box.
California Conference is the
week of April 11.

Heartland Christian
Church
SEBRING Pastor Ted
Moore's sermon for both Sunday
services will be "A Love Story"
with Scripture from Ruth 1:16-22.
Services will include George
Kelly singing "Love of God," Eric
Scheeres singing "His Grace Still
Amazes Me" and Roland Bates


singing "They Baptized Jesse
Taylor."
The Heartland Singers will sing
"His Grace is Still Sufficient" in
the mid-morning service.
The church is at 2705 Alternate
Route 17 South in Sebring (behind
Publix).
Look for the lighthouse.
Call 314-9693 for more informa-
tion.

Memorial United
Methodist Church
LAKE PLACID This Sunday
is Lay Witness Sunday. A Lay
Witness Team from all over Florida
and even as far away as South
Carolina will visit Memorial this
weekend to share their faith and
how the Lord is working in their
lives at the Heritage Worship
Service and the Celebration
Worship Service in the Sanctuary.
The New Song Contemporary
Service in Rob Reynolds Hall will
also feature a Lay Witness Team
member.
A Celebration Service of the Lay
Witness event will be at 6 p.m.
The church is at 500 Kent Ave.
Call 465-2422 for information.


RELIGION GUIDELINES: The News-
Sun publishes religion news on
Friday. The submission deadline
is 5 p.m. Monday to be considered
for publication in the following
Friday's paper. Submit items to the
News-Sun's from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
weekdays; fax to 385-2453; send
e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or
mail to Lifestyle Editor, News-Sun,
2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL
33870. For information, call 385-
6155, ext. 516.

Parkway Free Will
Baptist Church

SEBRING The Sunday morn-
ing Bible lesson, "This Is My
Beloved," is taken from Mark 9.
Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the
Sunday morning and evening serv-
ices. The Wednesday evening serv-
ice will be a praise, prayer and
Bible study time.

Resurrection Lutheran
Church

AVON PARK On the Sixth
Sunday of Epiphany, the sermon
will be based on the fifth chapter


of Matthew. The Busy Bodies meet
at 9 a.m. Monday in Burke Hall,
the Healing/Shawl group meets at
1 p.m. Tuesday. The Midweek
Worship Service is at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. The J.O.Y. Bible Study
starts at 2 p.m. Thursday followed
by Choir Practice at 3:30 p.m.

St. John United
Methodist Church

SEBRING On Sunday, the
Rev. Ronald De Genaro's sermon
topic will be What Delights God"
taken from Proverbs 11:.1-3.
Boy Scouts meet Monday at 7
p.m.
Men's Fellowship and Prayer
Breakfast is Wednesday at 7:45
a.m.
Sunshine Circle meets
Wednesday at 1:30 p.m.
St. John Youth meet at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday.
Pit Crew is at 8 a.m. Saturday.

Sebring Church of the
Brethren

SEBRING Pastor Keith
Simmons will preach Sunday on
"Revive Us Again" and the gospel


reading will be on Psalm 85.
Sunday school will be led by the
Rev. Wendell Bohrer and will meet
in the Fidelis Room. They will be
studying "This Is My Beloved,"
looking at the Scripture Mark 9:2-
13.

Spring Lake Presbyterian
Church
SEBRING "Relating,by the
Power of Love" is the title of
Sunday morning's sermon given by
Dr. Desmond Walker from
Matthew 5:38-48.

The Way Church
SEBRING "Living for God"
is the title of Pastor Reinhold
Buxbaum's message with Scripture
from I Peter 4.
Prayer meeting will be Sunday at
6:30 p.m.
The annual Church Yard Sale is
scheduled for Friday and Saturday,
Feb. 18 and 19.
The Way Church is at 1005 N.
Ridgewood Drive. The church
phone is 471-6140; pastor's cell is
214-6190. For church information
and the pastor's messages go to
www.thewaychurch.org.


PLACES To WORSHIP


EPISCOPAL

* The Episcopal Church of the
Redeemer.Service time is 9:30
with Holy Communion. Coffee hour
following services. Newcomers
welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail
redeemer1895@aol.com Web site:
redeemeravon.corn. The church is
at 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park
(two miles north of Sun 'N Lake
Boulevard, across from Wells
Dodge.) I
* St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL
33870. Sunday Services: Holy
Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy
Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek
service on Wednesday at 6 p.m.
Sunday School for all ages at 9
a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m.
until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m.
service ends. Wednesday: Adult
Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are
always welcome. The Rev. Jim
Kurtz, rector. Church office 385-
7649, for more information.
* St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal
Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-
0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers,
Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m.,
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening: Holy Communion with
Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child
care available at the 8 a.m. and
10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come
see what makes us different.


GRACE BRETHREN

N Grace Brethren Church, 3626
Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-
0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior
pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m.,
10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday
services at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid
City" Children's Ministry throughout
all services, and there are variosu
other classes for teens, married
couples, "prime-timers," and Bible
studies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day
Care, Preschool and After-School
Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For
registration call: 385-3111). Check
us out on the Web at www.sebring-
grace. org.


INTERDENOMINATIONAL

* World Harvest and Restoration
Ministries, (non-denominational)
2200'1^. Avon-Blvd., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-
3771. Sunday service: Sunday
School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11
a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m.
prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor:
W.H. Rogers.


JEWISH

* Temple Israel of Highlands
County, 382-7744. Rabbi Lorraine
Rudenberg; www.temple/s-
raelofhcf.org. Temple Israel is a
Reform Temple that promotes the
enduring and fundamental princi-
ples of Judaism. Through prayer,
study and friendship we strive to
enrich our lives and insure Jewish
continuity in Highlands County.
Friday Evening Shabbat Services,
7:30 p.m.; Saturday afternoon intro
to Hebrew, 12:30 p.m.; Saturday
intro to Judaism, 2 p.m.; Saturday
afternoon Torah Study, 3:30 p.m.;
Havdallah, 5 p.m. Jan. 7-8; Jan. 21;
Feb. 4; Feb. 18-19; March 4-5;
March 18-19 Purim; April 1-2; April
15-16; April 18, 6 p.m., Pesach 1st
Night Seder; April 29-30 Yom
Hashoah; May 13-14; May 27-28.
Every Thursday will be Hebrew and
Bible classes with Howard Salles,
12:30-4:30 p.m.


LUTHERAN

* Atonement Lutheran Church
(ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview
Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen,
Deacon, Spiritual Leader. Jim
Helwig, organist/choir director.
Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy
Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee
hour on the first and third Sunday
of each month. Council meeting on
the first Monday of month; Ladies
Group WELCA meets at noon sec-
ond Monday of month with lunch.
Bring a. dish to pass. Church
Vegetable Garden Club meets as
needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden
open seven days a week to congre-
tation and community. Like to sing?
Come join the choir. Visitors always
welcome. Come grow with us.
Phone 385-0797.
* Christ Lutheran Church Avon
Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2
mile east of Avon Park High
School. Sunday Divine Worship is
at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is cel-
ebrated every week with traditional
Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs
of praise. Fellowship time with cof-
fee and refreshments follows wor-
ship. Come worship and fellowship
with us. For information call Pastor
Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see
christ/utheranavonpark org
* Faith Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 2740 Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848,
Faith Child Development Center,
385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea
Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship
services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday
school for children and adult Bible
classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise
worship service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Communion is served the
first and third and fifth Sunday of
the month. Sunday worship service
is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8
a.m. each Sunday. Educational
opportunities include weekly adult
Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift
Store (385-2782) is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through
Friday and 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday. All are warmly welcome
in the Family of Faith.
* Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church (AALC) American
Association of Lutheran
Churches, 4348 Schumacher
Road, Sebring, one mile west of
Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor.
Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday.
Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery pro-
vided. Social activities: Choir,
Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-
1163.
* New Life Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a
Congregation of the Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship
with the Wisconsin Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday
Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9
a.m. For more information, call
Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or
visit the Web site at wwwnewlife
sebring.com.
* Resurrection Lutheran Church
- ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon
Park. Pastor: Rev. John C.
Grodzinski. Early Sunday service,
8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m.
and the second service at 10:30
a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour fol-
low the service. Midweek
Fragrance Free Wednesday wor-
ship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office
phone number is 453-6858.
* Trinity Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake
Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The
Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and
Noel Johnson, youth and family life.
Worship schedule for December
through Easter: Worship service 8
and 11 a.m.; Communion services,
first and third Sundays; (Children's
Church, 11 a.m. only); and
Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship


schedule for summer through fall:
Worship service, 9 a.m.;
Communion services, first and third
Sunday; Education Hour 10:30
a.m. Additional services: Lent and
Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy
Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.;
Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.;
Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas
Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve,
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship
activities: Youth Group, Senior
Citizens, Younger Side Adults,
Ladies Missionary League, Ladies
Guild, Small group studies as
scheduled. Music: Choir and hand
chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5
years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday. License:
C14H10020: Susan Norris, direc-
tor. Visit us online at: www. vchurch-
es. com/trinitylutheran/p.


NON-DENOMINATIONAL

* Bible Fellowship Church, 3750
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Sunday: American Sign
Language: First Worship sermon,,
songs signed first and second
Worship services. First Worship
service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship
service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to
2 years old) and Sunday school
classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6
p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday: Children, ages 4
years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth,
6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m.
Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy
McQuaid, associate pastor. Church
office 385-1024.
* Calvary Church, 1825
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872; 386-4900. An independent
community church. Sunday morn-
ing worship, 8:15 and 10 a.m.;
Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.;
Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m.
Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small
friendly church waiting for your
visit.
* Christian Training Ministries
Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off
County Road 17 on Simpson
Avenue. Sunday service is at 10
a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7
p.m. A nursery and children's
church are provided. The church is
part of Christian International
Ministries Network, a full gospel,
non-denominational ministry. Linda
M. Downing, minister: Phone, 314-
0482, //ndadowning@/ive.com.
Casey L. Downing, associate min-
ister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown
ing@hotmail.corn. Web site is
www. christiantrainingm nistries. net
* Grace Bible Church, 4541
Thunderbird Road, (second church
on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone,
382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior
pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30
p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m.
Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible
Academy Adult Investigating Truth;
first and third Tuesday, Prayer
Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday,
Children's & Youth Programs, 6
p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m.,
College Ministry.
www. GBCconnected. org
* Highlands Community Church,
a casual contemporary church,
meets at 3005 New Life Way.
Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10
a.m. Nursery and Kid's World
classes. Small groups meet
throughout the week. Church
phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A.
Linhart.
* Union Congregational Church,
106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday worship services
are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15
a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m.
(contemporary) in the main sanctu-
ary. Sunday school for all ages is at
9:15 a.m. We also offer
Wednesday and Saturday services
at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respective-


ly. Nursery/child, care is available
for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill
Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web
page at www.weareunion.org. All
teachings are taken from the
Manufacturer's Handbook The
Holy Bible. Come join us.
* Unity Life Enrichment Centre,
new location, 10417 Orange
Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL
33875; 471-1122; e-mail
unity@vistanet.net. Web site,
www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Celebration Service,
Nursery and Children's Church.
Weekly Classes, Christian
Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer
Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups.
Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior
minister transforming lives from
ordinary to extraordinary.
* The Way Church, 1005 N.
Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday
school and worship service at 9
a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activi-
ties, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. The
Way is a church family who gathers
for contemporary worship, teaching
of God's Word, prayer and fellow-
ship. Come early and stay after for
fellowship time. Child care and chil-
dren's church are provided.
Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The
Way A place for you. Office
Phone:471-6140, Church Cell
Phone:381-6190. 'Email: theway
church@hotmal.com. Web site:
www. TheWayChurch.org


PRESBYTERIAN

* Covenant Presbyterian Church
(PCA), 4500 Sun 'N Lake Blvd.,
Sebring, 33872-2113. A
Congregation of the Presbyterian
Church in America. Worship servic-
es: Sunday morning worship, infor-
mal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday
evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday
evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.;
Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:30-
7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m.
Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759;
e-mail: covpres@strato.net, Web
site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W.
Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours:
8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through
Thursday.
* First Presbyterian Church
ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two
entrances on LaGrande), Avon
Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242.
The Rev. Robert Johnson is the
pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.;
Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.;
Wednesday Bible study, 10:30
a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third
Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30
p.m. each Wednesday; Esther and
Mary Circles business meeting,
3:30 p.m. third Thursday; Sarah
Circle business meeting, 7 p.m.
second Tuesday; Women's
Ministries Combined Bible study, 4
p.m. third Thursday; Family Movie,
4 p.m. third Sunday. Be a part of a
warm, caring church family with tra-
ditional services, following biblical
truth.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring,
FL 33870. 385-0107. Sunday
School, adult and college age, 9:30
a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.;
Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 11-
18), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult
Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir
rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery avail-
able for Sunday worship. Call the
church office for more information
and other classes. Rev. Darrell A.
Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director
of youth ministry.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, www.fpclp.com, 118 N. Oak
Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The
Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor;
the Rev. Drew Severance, associ-
ate pastor. Sunday morning tradi-
tional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30


a.m.; and contemporary worship is
at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. A vari-
ety of Sunday school classes for
adults and children are at 9:45 and
11 a.m. in the educational building.
Call the church office for more
information about the classes
offered. Nursery is provided for
babies and toddlers; while young
children up to second grade have a
special Children's Church offered
during the worship service to help
them grow in their spiritual knowl-
edge.
* Spring Lake Presbyterian
Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School,
9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m.
Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the
second Thursday of the month,
September through June. Board of
Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first
Monday of the month. Choir
rehearses at 7 p.m. each
Wednesday, September through
April. Presbyterian Women meet at
10 a.m. the third Thursday of the
month. Organist: Richard Wedig.
Choir Director: Suzan Wedig..
Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,
springlakepc @embarqmail. corn,
Web site, http.//s/pc.presby-
church.org.


SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST

* Avon Park Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 1410 West
Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone:
453-6641 or e-mail: avonparks-
da @embarqmal.com, Sabbath
School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church
Service 10:45 a.m., Saturday.
Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m.
Community Service hours on
Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00
a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place
the first Sunday of each month.
Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and
Associate Pastor Kameron
DeVasher. Walker Memorial
Academy Christian School offering
education for kindergarten through
12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME.
Website is www.discoverjesus.org
* Sebring Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, 2106 N. State
Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438.
Worship Services: 9:15 a.m.
Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meet-
ing, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m.
Community service: every Monday
9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr.
Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m.
Pastor Amado Luzbet.


THE CHURCH OF
LATTER DAY SAINTS

* The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand
Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863)
382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop;
Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del
Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family
History Center (863) 382-1822.
Sunday Services: Sacrament
Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel
Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon;
Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-
1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15
a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities:
Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts:
first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20
p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys
and Girls, second and fourth
Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m.


THE SALVATION
ARMY

N The Salvation Army Center
for Worship. Sunday: Sunday
School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meet-
ing, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting
and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible
study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's


Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday:
Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meet-
ings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave.,
Sebring. For more information, visit
the Web site wwwsa/vationarmy-
sebrng.com or call Major Bruce
Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110.


UNITED METHODIST


* First United Methodist Church,
105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor.
Traditional Worship Service at 8:1,0
. and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary,
Contemporary Worship in the FLC
at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30
and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth
Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday
with Rick Heilig, youth director.
The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship
service is broadcast over WITS
1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery
available at all services.
* First United Methodist Church,
200 South Lake Avenue, Avon
Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, R.
James Weiss, Pastor, Sunday
.School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30
a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of
every month at 6 p.m. Prayer
Shawl Ministry on the second and
fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m.
for women who love God and cro-
cheting. Visit us at our church Web
site: www.fumcap.org.
* Memorial United Methodist
Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlook-
ing Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL,
33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pastor.
Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral
assistant. Sunday schedule:
Heritage Worship Service, 8:30
a.m. (October-May only); School
School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.;
Celebration Worship Service at
10:45 a.m.; New Song worship
service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nurs-
ery care provided every Sunday
morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.rm.
Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m.
(October-May only). We offer
Christ-centered Sunday school
classes, youth programs, Bible
studies, book studies and Christian
fellowship. We are a congregation
that want to know Christ and make
Him known. Call the church office
at 465-2422 or check out our
church Web site at www.memori-
alumc. com.
* St. John United Methodist
Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive,
Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev.
Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor.
Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all
services. Phone 382-1736.
www.stjohnsebring.org
* Spring Lake United Methodist
Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane,
(Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde
Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship serv-
ice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study
meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday.
Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on
Thursday. Church office phone:
655-0040.


UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST

* Emmanuel United Church of
Christ, where God is still speak-
ing. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL
33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27
and Hammock Road). Sunday wor-
ship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with
worship first Sunday of month;
Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all
other Sundays. All are welcome to
receive the sacrament. For more
information, call the church office at
471-1999 or e-mail eucc@earth
/ink.net or check the Web site
sebringemmanuelucc. com. No
matter who you are or where you
are on life's journey, you're wel-
come here.









www.newssun.corn


News-Sun Friday, February 11, 2011


Page 10B


RELIGION


Sebring Christian
hosts concert
SEBRING Sebring
Christian Church will host
The Wine Family Singers in
concert at 6:30 p.m. Sunday,
Feb. 20. The group is thank-
fully accepting a love offer-
ing.
The church is at 4514
Hammock Road. Office hours
are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-
Friday. Call for information
on at 382-6676.

A live 3ABN event
set Feb. 10 and 12
AVON PARK Pillars of
Faith will be at the Avon
Park Seventh-day Adventist
Church. Saturday Sabbath
School with CA Murray and
Sabbath Worship Service
with Danny Shelton and Jim
Gilley; and 5 p.m., a concert
with Reggie and Ladye Love
Smith, Yvonne Lewis, David
Huntsinger and Kris
Wilkinson.
Avon Park Seventh-day
Adventist Church is at 1410
W. Avon Blvd. The phone is
453-6641; e-mail is pastor-
paul@embarqmail.com

Calvary Kids Club
meets today
SEBRING Kids Club
(Youth ages 5-11) will meet
today at Calvary Church,
Hammock Road in Sebring,
in front of YMCA, for a
Valentine's Party with games,
snacks and Bible stories.

Bishop speaks
Sunday at Haitian
Church in Sebring
SEBRING Bishop Josue
Octeus, president of the
Evangelical Church of Haiti,
will speak Sunday at the
Haitian United Methodist
Church, meeting at the Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church at
4348 Schumaker Road.
Octeus will also visit the
Avon Park Holiness Camp
Meeting this weekend.
Octeus is the administra-
tive leader of 64 ECH con-
gregations located in Cap
Haitian and the Capital City
of Port-au-Prince. He will
share-his first-hand account
of surviving the devastation
of the earthquake last year
which included the destruc-
tion of three residents includ-
ing his home. He and his
wife, Rosie and their two
children, Rose Camah
Mitchelle and Jose Micah
Rachelle, were spared.
Octeus also started an
orphanage ministry with
more than 50 children who
lost their parents and families
in the earthquake, providing
tutors and helpers. His vision
is to build an-orphanage to
house these children, looking
for one acre of land to build
an orphanage to provide
school, clinic, and referrals to
homes where they can even-
tually live.
Pastor Luc Joseph, Vern
Birkey, president of The
Eleventh Hour Workers
Missionary Group Inc., and
David L.' Cowles in Avon
Park are providing support
with visits, providing cloth-
ing and other supplies along
with teaching and training of
pastors. For more information
as to how to help Octeus and
his relief mission in Haiti,
contact Birkey at 414-0291
or birkeyvl@yahoo.com.
Octeus can be reached via e-
mail at
jocteusl 1972@yahoo.fr.

Lay Witness Team
at Memorial United
Methodist Church
LAKE PLACID -
Through Sunday a Lay
Witness Team comprised of


22 people from all over
Florida and as far away as
South Carolina are coming to
Memorial United Methodist
Church to share their faith in
Jesus Christ and how the
Lord is working in their
lives. The church is at 500
Kent Ave.
The first general session
will be in Rob Reynolds Hall
at 7:30 p.m. today. This will
be a time of singing, testi-
monies, and sharing. The sec-


Snapshots

ond general session will be in
Rob Reynolds Hall at 7 p.m.
Saturday.
Several small group ses-
sions will be at 10 a.m.
Saturday in homes in the
community and will feature
sharing about Christ and
include coffee and refresh-
ments.
On Sunday the Lay
Witness Team members will
share their testimonies for
Christ at the Heritage
Worship Service and the
Celebration Service in the
Sanctuary and the New Song
Contemporary Service in Rob
Reynolds Hall.
The public is invited to
this very special event. Call
465-2422.

1st United
Methodist serves
breakfast
AVON PARK Pancake
and sausage breakfast will be
offered at First United
Methodist Church, 200 S.
Lake Ave., from 8-11 a.m.
Saturday. Cost is a $5 dona-
tion requested at door. All-
you-can-eat.

Bible Fellowship
offers An Evening
with C.S. Lewis
SEBRING Bible
Fellowship Church presents
An Evening With C.S. Lewis
at 7:30 p.m. Sunday.
Acclaimed British actor
David Payne gives a stunning
portrayal of C.S. Lewis, the
famous British author of such
classics as "The Screwtape
Letters" and "Mere
Christianity." Payne captures
the essence of the man who
created "The Chronicles of
Narnia" in an enthralling,
laughter-filled and poignant
one-man performance.
Tickets are $10 for adults,
$8 for students. Bible
Fellowship Church is at 3750
Hammock Road in Sebring.
Call 381-6831.

Highlands
Community Church
answers the 'God
Questions'
SEBRING Got a tough
question about God that's
stumped you for years? Like,
"Why does a good God allow
suffering?" Or "Do all reli-
gions lead to God?"
Beginning on Sunday, Pastor
Bruce Linhart at Highlands
Community Church is going
to begin a special series
called "The God Questions"
using careful research to
explore life's greatest spiritu-
al questions that people ask.
"This special series pro-
vides a unique opportunity
for our community to ask
their questions in a safe, lov-
ing atmosphere where truth
will prevail," Linhart said.
"Ovef the years I've found
that both churchgoers and
those who usually don't go to
church have lots of questions.
So I've dedicated these next
few weeks to invite people
with their questions to church
where we can talk about them
together and who knows? A
few lives may be changed
along the way."
"The God Questions" is a
spiritual journey that explores
such difficult questions as: Is
God real? Is the Bible true?
Do all Roads Lead to
Heaven? How does a good
God allow suffering? What
happens when I die?
In addition to the Sunday


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service there will be several
small groups meeting
throughout the county to dis-
cuss these questions in a
more in-depth and less for-
mal setting.
Church begins at 10 a.m.
Highlands Community
Church is at 3005 New Life
Way, just west of the new
Aldi's grocery store. Call
402-1684 or go online to
highlandscommunity.com.

Missions Festival at
Covenant
Presbyterian Church
SEBRING Covenant
Presbyterian Church of
Sebring will celebrate its
annual Missions Festival on
Sunday, Tuesday and
Wednesday.
On Sunday, Dennis
Bennett, former missionary
and coordinator of training
for Christian Education and
Publications for the
Presbyterian Church in
America, will speak at the
informal service and the tra-
ditional service. He will con-
duct a joint Sunday school
class for the youth and all
adult classes. Esaie Etienne,
missionary to Haiti, will
speak in the evening service.
David Breed, of Campus
Otureach, will speak at a fel-
lowship breakfast at 7:30
a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 15.
The festival will conclude
with an international dinner
on Wednesday at 5:45 p.m.
The speaker will be Marty
Baas, missionary to Mexico.
Covenant Presbyterian
Church is at 4500 Sun 'N
Lake Blvd. in Sebring.

Primetimers host
luncheon
LAKE PLACID The
Primetimers of First Baptist
Church of Lake Placid, 119
E. Royal Palm St., will host a
covered dish luncheon at
noon Monday in the fellow-
ship hall. Bring a covered
dish and a friend. Valentine
cake and ice cream will be
provided.

SOUPer Saturday is
coming up
AVON PARK A twice a
month.Free SOUPer
Saturday program to feed the
hungry and community will
begin Saturday, Feb. 19 at
Resurrection Lutheran
Church in Avon Park.
The outreach program will
be on the first and third
Saturday from 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. in the Resurrection fel-
lowship hall behind the
church, 324 E. Main St. at
the corner of Main and
Memorial in Avon Park.
Free SOUPer Saturdays
are made possible, in part,
with proceeds from a recent
yard sale.

Hymnfest is set for
Feb. 20
LAKE PLACID -
Hymnfest is the next event in
the Second. Sunday suites
winter concert series at First
Presbyterian Church in Lake
Placid. This concert will be
held at 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb.
20.
Sweets will be served in
the garden beginning at 3:15
p.m. There will be solos,
small ensemble singing,
choral works, and hymns
sung by all mixed in with
short readings.
Congregational hymns will
be accompanied on the
church's beautiful Reuter
pipe organ.


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Courtesy photo
Diane Osborne will be in concert at 6 p.m. Sunday at
Community Church of God.


Diane Osbourne in

concert Sunday


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID On
Sunday evening experience
the beautiful and inspira-
tional sound of the violin as
played by Diane Osborne.
Along with her husband,
Bob, Diane traveled full
time all over the United
States and Alaska.
She has traveled to the
Ukraine to teach and to
play, and now lives in Lake
Placid.
Diane is the founder and
conductor of the Young
Artists String Orchestra


(YASO) in Highlands
County, and the concert
master of the Heartland
Community Orchestra. She
also carries a full schedule,
teaching at her violin stu-
dio.
Osborne will be in con-
cert at Community Church
of God at 6 p.m. Sunday.
Be prepared for an exqui-
site evening of outstanding
music.
A love-offering will be
taken to support Osborne's
ministry.


Donovan in Maranatha

Winter Concert Series


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING Baritone
soloist Todd Donovan' will
be featured in the second
concert of the Winter
Concert Series at
Maranatha Baptist Church
at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 18.
Donovan is the Worship
and Fine Arts pastor at
Northside Baptist Church
in St. Petersburg and an
adjunct professor of voice
at Clearwater Christian
College.
Donovan has experience
in singing in operas and
operettas all over the world
He has shown his vocal ver-
satility by winning the first
place Oxnard $12,000 Gold
Medal Award and the
Johnny Mercer Award in
the American Traditions
Competition at the 2009
Savannah Music Festival.
He has been featured
soloist in the Classical
Music Festival in
Eisenstadt, Austria in both
2009 and 2010.
The third concert in the
series will feature the ladies


Todd Donovan


quartet "Forever Be Sure"
on Friday, March 18 and
the final concert will be on
Saturday, April 2 featuring
the Matthews Brothers.
The Maranatha congre-
gation extends a cordial
welcome to friends from
the community to share in
these concerts.
The church is in
Maranatha Village off
Arbuckle Road, two miles
east of SR-17N in Sebring.
For more information, call
382-4301 or 382-8594.


RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
Each Lady Will Receive Complimentary
Homemade Dessert With Meal Purchase.'


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it "JERRY LEE LEWIS"
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COMING SOON





2451 US 27 South A%,on Park On Lake Glenado
453-3331 *Open 7 Days
Reservations Accepted
New Ownership & Newly Renovated
Large Groups Welcome
Visit Our Lakeside Tiki Bar


Judge tosses

atheist's

lawsuit over

cross grant
By JIM SUHR
Associated Press
ST. LOUIS A feder-
al judge on Tuesday
tossed a Chicago-area
atheist's lawsuit that
sought to force the return
of a state grant that
helped pay for restoration
of an 11-story cross that
is considered a landmark
in southern Illinois.
The ruling by U.S.
District Court Judge
Michael McCuskey, cen-
tral Illinois' chief federal
jurist, sided with the state
and the caretakers of the
Bald Knob Cross of Peace
near Alto Pass. He upheld
the recommendation of
federal magistrate David
Bernthal, who last week
rejected Rob Sherman's
argument that the $20,000
grant was unconstitution-
al.
Bernthal ruled that the
grant was made by the
state's executive branch
and was not a designated
legislative "earmark" as
Sherman had alleged.
Bernthal also found that
the state's economic-
development agency has
discretion in how it doles
out its money.
Bernthal first made his
recommendation in
December, then reaf-
firmed the decision late
last week after consider-
ing additional arguments
from Sherman.
Sherman, whose
exploits have included
successfully suing to
overturn an Illinois law
requiring a daily
"moment of silence" in
that state's public
schools, pledged to take
the matter to the Chicago-
based 7th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals.
"The. decision by (the
two federal judges)
reminds me of an old
'Three Stooges' movie
where one of the stooges
says, 'I can't see, I can't
see.' Another stooge says,
'Why not?,' and the other
replies, 'I've got my eyes
closed,'" Sherman said
after learning of
McCuskey's ruling.
Sherman said he wasn't
surprised that McCuskey
didn't detail his decision
in the ruling, saying "the
facts of the case com-
pletely contradict what
the magistrate judge and
the district judge are say-
ing."


YOU Us BE TICKETED FOR FAILING TO PULL
OVER IVMDSTOP WHEN "NMvBLC POLIC
FIRE OR OTHER EMERGENCY VEHICLE IS
TRAVELLING TO MEET AN EMERGENCY,
BELOW IS THE FLORIDA Li%'


EMERGENCY VEHICLES
Upon the iumediate approach ofan authorized emergency
vehicle, while en route to meet an existing emergenthe
driver of even other vehicle shall, when such emergency
vehicle is giving audible signals by siren, exhaust whistle,
or other adequate device, or visible signals by the use of
displayed blue or red lights, yield the right-f.wav to the
emergency vehicle and shall immediately proceed to a
position palnlel to and as close as reasonable to the closest
edge of the curb of the roadway clear of any intersection
and shall stop and remain in position until the authorized
,Ii i,, ii, h',, It I t unless otherwise directed
bv any law enforcement officer


She news cs jt lick away!
www.newss n.com


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.AL W, A-J J" JL '%-A JL '%-X A. IN











www. newssun.corn


News-Sun Friday. February 11, 2011


Page 11B


RELIGION


A tale of two women


This is the story of two
different kinds of wives.
We'll call the first one
Nagena. She loved her hus-
band very much but didn't
like herself. Her hair
seemed to never look the
way she wanted it to, and
most of the other things in
her life just seemed to go
wrong.
Her children were unruly
and seemed to turn a deaf
ear whenever she yelled at
them.
Something as little as
burning the toast or cook-
ing the eggs too long at
breakfast would ruin her
whole day.
By the time her husband
got home from work she
would be yelling at the
kids. Usually the first
words out of her mouth
when he walked in were,
"You wouldn't believe how
bad this day has been!" All
he wanted was a little
peace and quiet. After all,


The Marriage
Mentor
Aleta Kay

his day hadn't been a walk
on the beach either, but
Nagena didn't ask.
The second wife (we'll
call her Amy) came home
from work, put on some
happy music and started
supper. She asked the kids
how their days were and if
they needed help with
homework. She started sup-
per and put a load of laun-
dry in to wash. She sang
along with the music as she
worked.
When her husband
walked in the door he
enjoyed the aroma of sup-
per cooking and the sound
happiness. The troubles of
his day began to melt away.
The kids teased each other
while doing their home-
work.
Amy poured him a glass


of iced tea as he got com-
fortable and asked how his
day was. Later, when the
kids were settled for the
night, she would tell him
about her day.
Maybe you think Amy is
too good to be true. but I
have known many women
like her. I have also known
many women like Nagena.
I used to be one. Which of
those wives most resembles
you? Which husband do
you think is happiest to be
home?
Proverbs 31:10, 27, 28
says, "Who can find a vir-
tuous woman? for her price
is far above rubies. She
looks well to the ways of
her household and eats not
the bread of idleness. Her
children arise up and call
her blessed; her husband
also and he praises her."
What do you want your
family to say about you?

Aleta Kay can be reached at
themarriagementor@yahoo. corn


Make room for the new


The New Year is here.
Now's the time to turn over
a new leaf, to break the
cycles that have been
breaking us, to let go of
what's been holding us cap-
tive. Are you ready?.
We all desire to be rid of
the "old" and jump into the
"new," but we have to
make room for the new.
This could mean doing
spring cleaning, emptying
our full closets of clothes
we know we'll never wear
again. Give away the
Christmas gifts you
received last year that you
will never use; someone
else may be wanting exact-
ly that.
Let go of those one-sided
relationships (takes two to
tango and some people just
don't click together, sad but
true). So, give each other
the gift of freedom from
having to live up to one
another's expectations. Life
is too short to be so hung
up. I'm not saying those
people aren't valuable, they
are. And you are too. You
can still care for them, pray


A Heart's
Journey
Janelle Dennison

for them and be there with-
out having to be held cap-.
tive.
The thought hit me the
other day, "Get rid of the
leaven in 2011." The "leav-
en" in our lives is what
holds us down. I believe in
the Bible it was equivalent
to sin. There are sins of
omission as well as com-
mission. And yes, there is
still such a thing called sin,
as far as God' is concerned.
Sin is deliberately doing or
behaving in a way we know
God is against.
So that's something we
will individually have to go
over with the Lord in our
prayer closets. I remember
one day standing in my
kitchen and asking the
Lord, "So Lord, how's my
heart?" I ended up crying,
repenting for myself and
praying for others who
were not displaying the
Christian heart attitudes


(with emphasis on my
own).
Wouldn't hurt to get a
heart check-up with the
Lord often. After all, the
issues of life spring from
the heart.
I know this sounds
heavy, the first month of
the year, but it kind've goes
along with our resolutions.
We make resolutions to do
better every year and only
we can determine if we are
actually getting better or
worse.
I pray 2011 finds each of
us getting better, growing
stronger in our faith and in
love for one another. Jesus
said they would know us by
our love for one another.
He also said when we do
something for the least of
them, we've done it unto
Him.
Have a blessed 2011 and
keep the faith that keeps
you going and going and
going.

Janelle Dennison is the news
clerk for the News-Sun. She can
be reached at 385-6155, ext.
539


Avon Park Holiness Camp


Meeting in progress


"Be Ye Holy"
Nelson Perdue
In the early years of the
Roman Empire the roads
were built like spokes in a
wheel with each spoke
leading to the hub of the
wheel, as all roads led to
the city of Rome.
The Apostle Peter wrote
these words, a passage that
has been called "the Rome
of the Bible." "But just as
He (JesUs Christ) who
called you in holy, so be
holy in all you do; for it is
written: 'Be holy, because I
am holy.'" (I Peter 1:15-16,
Leviticus 11:44,45) The
Apostle lifts this scripture
out of Leviticus and pres-
ents it as God's standard
for His people. All truth
leads us to holiness as
God's one and only stan-
dard for His children.
In the beginning man
was created in the image
and likeness of God. This
enabled man to have sweet
communion with his
Creator.
Through man's disobedi-
ence in the garden man lost
that moral image and made
him unfit for communion.
The Apostle Paul tells us in
Romans 5:19 that "by one
man's disobedience all
were made sinners." Sin
was introduced into the
world but God had a plan
to reconcile and restore
man's lost estate.
Jesus Christ was the
"Lamb of God that takes
away the sin of the world."


Guest
Column
DavidL. Cowles

Not only did He provide
forgiveness for man's trans-
gressions but a deep cleans-
ing from sin in the depth of
his moral nature, a condi-
tion which pardon was not
designed to deal with.
Through the sacrifice of
Calvary, Jesus provided for
our justification and entire
sanctification which brings
about the restoration of the
moral image and enables
man to once again enjoy
communion with God that
was lost in the fall.
It is through His redeem-
ing grace that man can real-
ize the possibility of his
being. Man was so consti-
tuted in creation that true
happiness and rest can
occur only when he is
restored to the image of
Christ. That rest comes by
being "re-created in right-
eousness and true holiness"
- Ephesians 4:24. Samuel
Chadwick reminded us that,
'the more a sinner a man is,
the less a man that sinner
is.' As the bird was made
for the air and the fish for
the sea, man was made for
God and will never find
rest apart from the reconcil-
iation and restoration that
was provided for him in the
great plan of salvation.
Let us seek Him who is
not only the model and
motive for why we should


be holy, but He also
through the death and res-
urrection of His Son is the
means whereby we can
once again be made holy
and realize the purpose and
possibility of our being.
"Because it is written, Be
ye holy; for I am holy."
Note: Nelson Purdue is
the author of Holiness
Horizons (Country Pines
Printing, Inc. 11013 '
Country Pines Road Shoals,
IN). He is preaching this
weekend at the concluding
services at the Avon Park
Camp Meeting, across from
Walmart on Lake Isis Road.
The 72-nd Annual Avon
Park Holiness Camp
Meeting, now in progress,
continues daily through
Sunday. Dr. Eldred Kelley
is camp president and pre-
sides at the services.
Evangelists include Rev.
David Engbrecht,
Nappanee, Ind.; Dr. Nelson
Perdue, Urbana, Ohio; and
Rev. Jack French,
Greenwood, Mich. Bible
teacher is Dr. Ron Smith,
Jackson, Miss. Musicians
are Leon Wion, music
evangelist;. George
Maddrell, organist; and
Linda Boyette, pianist.
For more information
call the camp office at 453-
6831 or visit www.avon-
parkcamp.org on the Web.

David L. Cowles is a freelance
writer and directs Pacer
Ministries in Avon Park
(www.pacerministries.org).


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


The Community Calendar pro-
vides a brief listing of local
clubs and organizations who
meet on a regular basis. It is
the responsibility of the group
to update the News-Sun on
any changes in this listing by
calling 385-6155, ext. 516;
send any changes by e-mail to
editor@newssun.com; or mail
them to News-Sun Community
Calendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring, FL 33870.

FRIDAY
* Alcoholics Anonymous
One Day At A Time group
meets for a closed discussion
at 9:30 a.m. Monday and
Friday at Covenant
Presbyterian Church, 4500
Sun 'N Lakes Blvd., Sebring.
For details, call 314-0891.
* Alzheimer's Association
Support Group meets at 6
p.m. second Friday at the
Oaks of Avon in Avon Park.
For details, call 385-3444.
* American Legion Post 25
hosts a fish fry from 5-7 p.m.
at the post, 1490 U.S. 27,
Lake Placid. Cost is $6.
Shrimp also is available for
same price. Open to the pub-
lic. Tickets in the lounge on
Friday night. Lounge hours are
from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For
details, call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 74
has karaoke from 7 p.m. until
final call at the post, 528 N.
Pine St., Sebring. Post open at
noon. Happy Hour from 4-6
p.m. Members and guests
only. For details, call 471-
1448.
* Avon Park Breakfast
Rotary Club meets 7 a.m.,
Rotary Club building.
* Bridge Club of Sebring
(American Contract Bridge
Club) plays duplicate games at
12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf
Ave., Sebring. For details, call
385-8118.
* Grand Prix Cloggers
Beginner classes are at 9
a.m., EZ Intermediate classes
are at 10 a.m,, and
Intermediate classes are at 11
a.m. every Friday at Reflection
on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call
Julie for further information at
386-0434.
* Harmony Hoedowners
Square Dance Club offers a
class in Lake Placid at the
Sunshine RV Resort from 9-11
a.m. Friday. For more informa-
tion, call Sam Dunn at 382-
6792 or e-mail him at sam-
dunn @samdunn. net.
* Heartland AIDS Network
meets 9 a.m., second Friday,
Heartland Professional Plaza
Learning Center, Sebring.
* Heartland Clubs meet at
3:30 p.m. on the second
Friday of each month at
Placid Lakes Town Hall
Building, 2010 Placid Lakes
Blvd. Call 699-6773.
* Highlands County
Democratic Party 13th
Precinct meets at 3:30 p.m.
second Friday at Placid Lakes
Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes
Blvd., Lake Placid. For details,
call Bill Sayles at 699-6773.
* Highlands Social Dance
Club hosts ballroom dancing
every Friday, October through
March from 7-9:30 p.m. at the
Senior Center on Sebring
Parkway. Dance the
night away to the music of the
area's Big Bands. All club
dances are open to the public.
Appropriate dress required.
Admission is $5 for members
and $7 for non-members.
Call 385-6671.
* Lake Country Cruisers has
a car show from 5-8 p.m. sec-
ond Friday at Woody's Bar-B-
Q parking lot, Lake Placid.
There is a live disc jockey and


door prizes.
* Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 has lounge hours begin-'
ning at 1 p.m. There is a fish
fry from 5-7 p.m. Cost is $8.50
per person. The lodge is open
to members and their guests.
For details, call 465-2661.
* Lake Placid Moose serves
wings, fish and burgers at 6
p.m. Music provided from 7-11
p.m. Pool tournament is at 8
p.m. Open to members and
qualified guests only.
* Loyal Order of Moose,
Highlands County Lodge No.
2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon
Park. Karaoke from 7-10 p.m.
Lodge phone number 452-
0579.
* Narcotics Anonymous
New Day Group meets at 6
p.m. at First Presbyterian
Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave,
Sebring. For information call
Heartland area helpline (863)
683-0630. More information on
other meetings and events at
www.naflheartland.org.
* S.A.L.T. Council (Seniors
and Law Enforcement
Together) meets the second
Friday each month at 10 a.m.
in the conference room of
Florida Hospital Home Care
Services located at 4005 Sun
'n Lake Blvd. For more infor-
mation contact Grace Plants at
273-1421.
* Sebring Bridge Club has
Bridge, ACBL Duplicate at the
clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf,
Sebring at 12:30 Fridays. For
details or info on lessons, call
385-8118.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves chicken or fish baskets
from 5-7 p.m. at the club,
12921 U.S. 98, Sebring, for a
$4 donation. Blind darts is
played at 7 p.m. For details,
call 655-4007.
* Sebring Elks Lodge 1529
serving buffet dinner at 5-7
p.m. Elks and guests invited.
Dance music in ballroom at 7
p.m. Dinner and dance is $10
donation. For reservations, call
385-8647 or 471-3557.
Smoke-free environment.
Lounge is open from 3-10 p.m.
* Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 serves beef franks and
Italian sausages served from 1
p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S.
98, Sebring. For details, call
655-3920.
* Sebring Recreation Club
plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and
table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333
Pomegranate Ave. For details,
call 385-2966 or leave a name,
number and message.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3800 serves steak by the
ounce from 5:30-7 p.m. every
fourth Friday at the post, 1224
County Road 621 East, Lake
Placid. Texas Hold 'em les-
sons, 2 p.m. For more details,
call 699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 serves pizza from
5:30-7 p.m. and music is from
6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE
Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For
details, call 385-8902.

SATURDAY
* American Legion Post 25
serves sirloin burgers from
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake
Placid. Jam session is from 2-
4 p.m. The lounge hours are
11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Members
and guests invited. For details,
call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 69
in Avon Park serves dinner at
5 p.m. and music is from 6-9
p.m.
* American Legion Post 74
open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs
served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.
Call 471-1448.
* Avon Park Public Library


has a free Adult Film Series at
noon. For details, call 452-
3803.
* Cancer Support Group
meets from 10-11:30 a.m. at
Christ Fellowship Church,
2935 New Life Way, Sebring,
hosted by Sue and Kristi
Olsen. Call 446-1284 or 385-
2974.
* Heartland Horses &
Handicapped Inc. provides
free assisted riding sessions
for adults and children with
special needs from 9-11 a.m.
Wednesday, Thursday and
Saturday at 118 W. College
Drive, Avon Park. For details
or to volunteer, call Mary
McClelland, coordinator, 452-
0006.
* Highlands Shrine Club,
2606 State Road 17 South,
Avon Park (between Avon
Park and Sebring) has a flea
market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
country store open from 8 a.m.
to noon and pancake breakfast
served from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30
a.m. Vendors are welcome. No
setup fee is charged for the
summer months. Plenty of off
road parking. A monthly social
is planned at 6:30 p.m. on the
second Saturday at the club.
There will be dinner and music
provided for dancing.
Reservations are required by
calling 382-2208.
* Highlands Woodcarvers
meet from 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday at 825 Sunbird Terr.
(Community Center off
Thunderbird Road). Call Bob
Seybolt at 471-6077.
* Lake Placid Art League
has a class in Pastels/Acrylics
taught by Llewellyn Rinald
from from 9 a.m. to noon at
the Cultural Center, 127 Dal
Hall Blvd. For information call
Dan .Daszek at 465-7730.
* Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 opens the lounge at 1
p.m. Card games are played at
1 p.m., and Bar Bingo is at
1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to
members and their guests. For
details, call 465-2661.
* Narcotics Anonymous
New Day Group meets at 7
p.m. at First Presbyterian
Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave,
Sebring. For information call
Heartland area helpline (863)
683-0630. More information on
other meetings and events at
www.naflheartland.org.
* Overeaters Anonymous
meets at 10:30 a.m. at First
Presbyterian Church, Oak
Street, Lake Placid. For more
details, call 382-1821.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves dinner from 5-7 p.m. at
the club, 12921 U.S. 98,
Sebring. Music is from 7-10
p.m. For details, call 655-4007.
* Sebring Hills Association
has a pancake breakfast from
8-10 a.m. the second Saturday
of each month at the club-
house, 200 Lark Ave. All the
pancakes, sausage, OJ, coffee
or tea you can eat or drink for
$3 for members and $3.50 for
non-members.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3800 serves breakfast
from 8-11 a.m. and horse rac-
ing at 5:30 p.m. every second
and fourth Saturday at the
post, 1224 County Road 621
East, Lake Placid. For more
details, call 699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 serves a meal for
$6 from 5:30-7 p.m. and music
is from 6-9 p.m. at the post,
2011 SE Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. For details, call 385-
8902.


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Page 12B


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


News-Sun Friday. February 11, 2011


Dec. 1, 2010
Raymond A. Williams to
Alexandra K. Roman,
L142 Sebring Hills,
$80,000.
Jennifer Narkier to
George Nicholas
Kokinakis, L4 BIk 257 Sun
'N Lake Est. Sec. 20,
$131,000.
Gordon P. McArdle to
Thomas S. Birtch, L109B
Vantage Pointe Phase II,
$127,000.
Adela DeJesus to Pedro
Reyes, L32 BIk 27 Sun 'N
Lake Est. Sebring Unit 2,
$6,600.
Heartland National Bank
to Kahn Grove Service
Co., PT Sec. 3-35-29,
$235,000.
Eugene F. Hatton to
Ronald E. Reed, L13 Blk F
Tomoka Heights Sec. IX,
$160,000.
Jack W. Haneline to
Mary Elaine White, L45
Edgewater Village,
$87,000.
Karen J. Anspaugh to
Barbara J. Bennett, Unit
305 Bldg. 2 Hammock
Falls Unrec, $125,000.
Foster Family to Keith E.
Foster, L58-60 BIk 3 Erin
Park Sub, $87,900.
Robert E. Kajfasz to
Allen D. Ratzlaff, L65
Hickory Ridge Est.,
$150,000.

Dec. 2
Vera Dawson to Ralph Y.
Demers, L1 PT L2 BIk 159
Sebring Highlands Sub,
$56,000.
Jeffrey Levitan to
Gregory J. Kapp,
L226/288/299/301 Blue
Heron Golf & Country
Club, $4,000.
Mary Grace Parker to
Claude J. Wanger Jr., L21
BIk 1 Sebring Villas 1st
Add, $49,000.
Brian T. Regan to
Margaret Hughes,
L7501/7502 Avon Park
Lakes Unit 23, $1,500.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust Co. to Marshall Alan
Harnack, L9 BIk AA Spring
Lake Village V, $75,000.
Terry Lee Johnson to
James M. Barnhart, L143
Fairmount Mobile Est.,
$14,900.
DFC Funding Co. to
Leroy Alleyne, L28 BIk 163
Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sebring
Unit 10, $12,900.
DFC Funding Co. to
Rudy Regis, L22 BIk 199
Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring
Unit 11, $19,400.
Frank Hartzell to Marian
N. Chambers, L10 BIk C
Meadowlake Sub,
$150,000.
Consolidated Circle H
Inc. to Greg Sapp, L6 BIk 1
Lake Sirena Shores
Resub, $100,000.
John A. Detota to Bruce
Roberts, L4 BIk D Lake
Jackson Heights,
$162,000.
DFC Funding Co. to
Jose Genao, L8 BIk 199
Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sebring
Unit 11, $12,900.
Bank of America to Ryan
Cherniausky, PT L3/4 BIk
195 Woodlawn Terrace,
$70,000.
Louie M. Roberts to Mal
L. Lightsey,
L3982/3983/3994/3995
Avon Park Lakes Unit 13,
$72,000.
Lucinda K. McGee to
Steven A. Williams,
L4463-4465 Avon Park
Lakes Unit 14, $85,000.
Joseph L. Kenney to
Gerald R. Hollon, L55-B
Vantage Pointe, $90,000.

Dec. 3
Gregory T. Hoffman to
Maria E. Munoz, L200
Sylvan Shores Est. Sec.
D, $105,000.


Maria D. Baque to Pedro
Baque, PT L3/4 BIk 1
Stump Sub, $9,000.
John H. McCracken to
Center Ridge Caretaking
Inc., PT Farms
22/44/47/48 Lake View
Park Tract, $125,000.
John H. McCracken to
LuBear Futures
Partnership, PT Sec. 2-35-
29/Other, $100,000.
John H. McCracken to
LuBear Futures
Partnership, PT Sec. 34-
35-29, $22,500.
Meghan A. Dwyer to
Judith L. La Plante, L33
Ashley Oaks, $120,000.
Centerstate Bank of
Florida to Patricia C.
Anderson, L30 BIk 58 Sun
'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit
5, $74,000.

Dec. 6
Frank Martinez Santiago
to Edwin Santana Cedeno,
L368 Sebring Ranchettes
1st Replat, $2,800.
Elizabeth A. Barina to
Linda K. Thomas, L6 BIk
16 Highlands Park Est.
Sec. K, $22,000.
Tina M. Majka to Linda
K. Thomas, L6 BIk 16
Highlands Park Est. Sec.
K, $23,000.
James N. Wyant to
James B. Saunders, PT
L1-4 BIk 4 In Sec. 16-36-
31, $30,000.
Lawrence Wilson
Williams to Joel Guzman,
L4 BIk 4 Hoffman's Grove
Add to Lake Stearns
Florida 2nd Resub,
$25,000.
Howard Chad Pritchett
to Rosa Iris Gainza Matos,
PT Sec. 4/9-33-29,
$35,000.
Kristin Wheelock to
Sedlock-Heston Inc., L1
BIk 1 S & H Homesites,
$105,000.
Daniel C. Pemble to
Roscoe B. Reams,
L10568-10570 Avon Park
Lakes Unit 33, $95,000.
Highlands Independent
Bank to Patricia B. Long,
L6 BIk 261 Sun 'N Lake
Est. Sebring Unit 13,
$167,500.

Dec. 7
JMAM Investment
Group to Kevin Bone, L23
BIk 25 Sebring Hills South
Unit 2, $3,000..
Fannie Mae. to Boris
Neely, L442/443 PT L441
Avon Park Lakes Unit 1,
$125,000.
John A. Peterson to
Jose Luis Perez, L1097
Sebring Hills, $80,000.
Aravilla Groves Ltd. to
Charles J. Wilson III, PT
L1 BIk 106 Orange
Blossom Country Club
Community Unit
19/Easement, $292,500.
Eliseo Perez to Belen
Corral, L21 BIk 9 Sebring
Ridge Sec. G, $113,000.
J.E. Futch Custom
Homes Inc. to Michael W.
Winslow, L1011 Sebring
Hills/Other, $117,500.
Danial P. Yusz to Bobby
L. Hussey, L6 PT L16/17
BIk 6 Venetian Village
Revised, $67,000.
Bryan P. Gilde to Amy M.
Ellis, L5 BIk 9 Highlands
Park Est. Sec. E, $3,000.
Fernando Cedeno to
Leighann Giacin, L24 BIk 9
Placid Lakes, $5,000.
Alexis Garcia to
Beneficial Florida Inc.,
L569 Sebring Ridge Sub
Sec. B, $164,900.
Charles G. Beyer to
Terence P. Chambers, PT
L17 Tomoka Heights Sec.
VII, $125,000.
Virginia A. Henderson to
Curtis H. Taylor, PT L6 BIk
21 Town of Avon Park,
$42,000.
Wauchula State Bank to


Scott A. Elsenheimer,
L24/25 Sebring Oaks,
$115,000.
Jeanette F. Reynolds to
Richard W. Carrier, L21
BIk 1 Lake June Hills,
$5,000.
Alex R. Garland Sr. to
Paul A. Warner, L62 PT
L61 BIk A Lake Shore,
$440,000.
Louis A. Velasquez to
Alan Derry Dobbins, L4
Blk 54 Placid Lakes Sec.
6, $130,000.

Dec. 8
Bryan P. Gilde to Amy M.
Ellis, L6 BIk 9 Highlands
Park Est. Sec. E, $65,400.
Suntrust Bank to
Pauline Hutchins, PT L5
BIk 40 Palmhurst Sub,.
$15,000.
Bobby Boyd Lynch to
Clarence L. Smith, L13 BIk
2 Lake Letta Est.,
$20,000.
Glenn E. Race to Krista
J. Fredrikson, L8/9 PT L10
BIk 20 Lake Haven Est.
Sec. 2, $60,000.
GBMP Investment Corp.
to Tamirah Suckrajh, L9
BIk 73 Sun 'N Lakes Est.
Sec. 8, $1,000.
GBMP Investment Corp.
to Eileen A. Campbell,
L2213/2214 Avon Park
Lakes Unit 7, $1,000.
GBMP Investment Corp.
to Osmond Powell,
L5161/5162 Avon Park
Lakes Unit 16, $1,500.
Bridget C. Baxley to
Joseph C. Ramos', Unit 9
Everglades Villas Condo
Phase II/Other, $33,000.
Dipesh Batra to Frank C.
Schwartz, L2 BIk 345 Sun
'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit
16, $142,000.
Hamilton Commercial
Properties to Gregory
Horton, Cluster 19 Unit E
Country Club Villas I,
$52,500.
Fannie Mae to Jeffrey L.
Downing, L8 BIk 271 Sun
'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit
13, $130,300.
Phil 0. Burgan to
Thomas Urbanski, Unit
14B The Terraces,
$89,000.
Robert P. Binegar to
Wesley F. Massey, L5 J
Jordan Est., $139,900.
Sebring Land Ltd. Ptn.
to S.P. Ryan, L38 BIk 1
Villages of Highlands
Ridge-Phase V, $20,000.
Maria Rivera Brown to
Kenneth R. Lewis, L6
Fairmount Mobile Est.,
$15,000.

Dec. 9
GBMP Investment Corp.
to Albertha Mignott, L10
BIk 162 Sun 'N Lake Est.
Sec. 16, $1,000.
CFD Incorporated to
Ivan Pezer, L24 BIk .417
Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring
Unit 20, $8,000.
CFD Incorporated to
Ivan Pezer, L6 BIk 456
Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring
Unit 21, $8,000.
Charles W. Walker to
Robert J. Walker, L10-12
BIk 539 Colored School
Add In Town Of Sebring,
$55,500.
J.E. Futch Custom
Homes Inc. to Deborah
Lulay, L1012 Sebring Hills,
$125,000.
John L. Sedlock to
Pedro L. Pesquera, L1 BIk
1 S & H Homesites,
$82,500.

Dec. 10
Richard Elleson to David
P. Sprague, L77 Grayces
Mobile Est., $37,000.


Samuel P. Gutridge 111 to
James W. Brown, L34 Golf
Hammock Unit II,
$220,000.
Ann Wilm Wood to
Russell Grove South Inc.,
PT Sec. 32-38-30/Other,
$290,600.
Suntrust Mortgage Inc.
to David G'. Mahaffey, L12
BIk 2 J 0 Younce, $8,700.
Fred Morris Jr. to
Richard E. Edwards Sr.,
L48 PT L49 BIk 5 Erin
Park, $67,000.
Paul A. Storm to Janet T.
Capite, L5346 PT
L5347/5348 Avon Park
Lakes Unit 17, $75,000.
DFC Funding Co. to
Christopher Francis, L20
BIk 208 Sun 'N Lake Est.
Sebring Unit 11, $20,900.
Fannie Mae to Harbour
Portfolio LP, L13/14 BIk
203 Leisure Lakes Sec. 3,
$9,700.
Bernard Onze to
Ernesto Torres, PT L14 BIk
255 Sun 'N Lakes Est.
Sebring Unit 13,' $55,000.
U.S. Dep't. of Housing
and Urban Development to
Armilyn E. Dizon, L9737-
9739 Avon Park Lakes
Unit 30, $75,000
Aresky Garcia to Robert
Gomez, PT Sec. 19/20-39-
30/Other, $150,000.

Dec. 13
Thomas A. Clark to
Eucario Vidal-Morales, L4
BIk 37 Sun 'N Lakes Est.
Sec. 2, $33,000.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust Co. to Juan A.
Figueroa, L818/819 Avon
Park Lakes Unit 3,
$26,000.
University of Miami to
George A. Tibedo, L1-4
BIk 1 Lake Huntley Cove,
$28,000.
DFC Funding Co. to
Trovel A. Williams, L16/17
BIk 191 Sun 'N Lakes Est.
Sebring Unit 11, $25,800.
U.S. Bank to Chad
Anderson, L37 BIk 336
Leisure Lakes Sec. 9,
$105,000.
GBMP Investment Corp.
to Dernia Dameus
LaGuerre, L6 BIk 11 Sun
'N Lakes Est. Sec. 3,
$1,000.
Federal Home Loan
Mortgage Corp. to Milton
D. Curtis, L2 BIk 18 Sun 'N-
Lakes Est. Sec. 4,
$73,100.
Heartland Creative
Instruments to Zane
Chappy, L85 BIk 143
Placid Lakes Sec. 11
Revised, $65,000.
Michael Shannon Elkins
to Harold G. Upole, L10
Golfside at Sun 'N Lakes,
$43,500.

Dec. 14
Duckwood Holding to
Jose Alvarez, L17 BIk 42
Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sec. 1,
$3,000.
Aileen A. Goff to Calvin
Dean Hewer Wheeler, L40
BIk 2 Martha Est.,
$79,000.
GMIC Properties to
Russell E. Winebarger Jr.,
L5 BIk 1 Lake Josephine
Heights, $42,600.
GMIC Properties to
Russell E. Winebarger Jr.,
L6 BIk 1 Lake Josephine
Heights, $42,600.
FVC Land Trust to John
B. Biehle, Villa 17-A The
Bluffs of Sebring Condo
Phase II, $110,000.

Dec. 15
James N. Wright II to
Albert DeBono, PT Sec.
15-36-29, $85,000.


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Lake Partners to
Highlands Cove Phase I,
PT Sec. 31-36-30,
$550,000.
Lake Partners to Town
of Lake Placid, PT Sec.
31-36-30, $1,000.
Highlands Independent
Bank to Raul R. Tlraieso,
L5/20 BIk 17 Avocado
Park, $42,000.
Jeffrey K. Justus to Paul
A. Stingo, L1 BIk 259 Sun
'N Lakes Est. Sec. 20,
$150,000.
James P. Patton to
Shane Stoddart, L11 BIk B
Silver Fox Ranch,
$35,000.
George M. Kershner to
Danny G. Dalton, PT'L1i
BIk 13 In Sec. 21-33-28,
$18,000.
James E. Somers to
Scott A. Hale, PT L3 BIk 2
Somervale Downs,
$180,000.
Wauchula State Bank to
Ernel Graham, L1/2
Westmont Place, $30.000.
Joyce L. Leer to Ronald
W. Zachary, L3160/3161
PT L3162 Avon Park
Lakes Unit 11, $9,000.

Dec. 16
Romilio Perez to
Charles S. Conner, PT L7
BIk 242 Placid Lakes Sec.
20, $15,000.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust Co. to Charles
Huggins Jr., L33 Sunset
Pointe On Dinner
Lake/Easement, $114,000.
Greg Nobles to Alan
Rowley, L9 BIk 196 Sun 'N
Lake Est. Sebring Unit 11,.
$2,000.
Robert Altman to Harold
Green, L3 BIk 25 Sebring
Country Est. Sec. 3,
$1,100.
Gloria Dean Mango to
Cahill Diane Mango, L33
Sebring Hills, $53,000.
Eagle Properties to Jo
Ann Murphy, Unit 112
North Villas 'at Placid
Lakes Communities,
$22,500.
Bank of America to
Ruben Flores, PT L3/4 BIk
22 River Ridge Ranches
Unrec, $73,900.

Dec. 17
HSBC Bank USA to
Richard Paul Klocko, L5
BIk 16 Highlands Park Est.
Sec. K, $28,000.
Clifford M. Ables III to
Clova E. Walters, Unit
5144 Schumacher Road
Business 'Park Condo,
$75,000.
James R. Stansbury to
John Hoffman, PT L90 BIk
275 Sun 'N Lake Est.
Sebring Unit 13, $80,000.
Richard M. Haas to
Ronald E. Voelker, L25 BIk
22 Orange Blossom Est.
Unit 12, $110,000.
GBMP Investment Corp.
to Venise Vincentie
Simpson, L16 BIk 49 .Sun
'N Lakes Sec. 5, $1,000.


Lotsource Inc. tc
Gregory Collymore, L9/lu
Blk 412 Leisure Lakes
Sec. 17, $12,000.
Karlyn Guirand to
Norman McLarty, L45 BIk
3 Orange Blossom Est.
unt. i., $5 500.
Humescles Inc. OT
Delaware to Taneika
Francis, L19 BIk 63
Sebring Country Est. Sec.
3, $75,000.

Dec. 20
James R. Caves to
Arthur E. LaFary, L15/16
BIk 69 Placid Lakes Sec.
6/8 Resub, $96,900.
Wauchula State Bank to
Dirk A. Riley, L60 Bik 10
Orange Blossom Est. Unit
6, $235.000.
Timothy A. McDonald to
John D. Purcell, L32 BIk
45 Leisure Lakes Sec. 16,
$35,000.
David Keatley Waldron
to David J. Hogue, L44/45
BIk 12 Orange Blossom
Est. Unit 6, $135,000.
GBMP Investment Corp.
to Michelle Powell, L11 BIk
107 Sun 'N Lakes Est.
Sec. 12, $1,000.
Lori C. Helms to Edward
Baldridge, PT Sec. 3-33-
29, $122,000.
Palmetto Sebring I to
Dollar Safran, PT Sec. 9-
35-29/Easements.
1,530,000,
Michael Mendez to Carl
Viscomi, Parcel 9 Rolling
Oaks Est. Unrecorded,
$35,000.
Amos Kyle Register to
Robert J Moore, L30 BIk
52 Placid Lakes Sec. 6,
$125,000.
Consolidated Circle H
Inc- to Thomas C.
Dedricks, L2/5-8 BIk 2
Lake Sirena Shores
Resub, $54,000.
ABC Properties Ltd.- to
ABC Liquors Inc., PT Sec.
5-35-29, $550,000.
Doris M. Gentry
Hawthorne to William C.
Ulrich, L10 BIk 12
Pinecrest Lakes 1st
Resub, $155,000.
Willis C. Hand to James
J. Jedierowski, L385
Sebring Ridge Sec. A,
$90,000.
Dean A. Butterfield to
Henry D. Grasley, L230
Grayce's Mobile Est. Unit
2, $20,000.
'Frank Micheo to
Gustavo A. Ortegon, L63
Denise Heights Add,
$38,000.
Toni Sorice to Raymond
A. Knauf, L11 Village
Green Sub, $120,000.
DFC Funding Company
to Jean Tales, L38 BIk 166
Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring
Unil 10. $18,400.
Kathryn L. Johnson to
Edward C. Andrews, Unit
12-C Casa Del Lagc
Condo Phase 12, $69,000
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News-Sun Friday, February 11, 2011


Page 13B


DIVERSIONS


Snapshots

5 film studios sue
Hotfile for
copyright violation
NEW YORK Five
major film studios have
filed a copyright infringe-
ment suit against Hotfile
Corp.. a website that lets
its subscribers download
from a library of thou-
sands of movies and TV
shows.
In the suit filed in fed-
eral court in Miami, the
studios describe Hotfile's
service as "unabashed
theft" of copyrighted
material.
The studios allege that
Hotfile encourages peo-
ple to download content
illegally. and sometimes
pays people to upload
copyrighted material and
"promote" or disseminate
links to a website where
others can access it.
The plaintiffs in the
case include Disney
Enterprises. Inc.,
Twentieth Century Fox
Film Corp., Universal
City Studios Productions
LLP, Columbia Pictures
Industries Inc. and
Warner Bros.
Entertainment Inc.
They're seeking
unspecified damages and
an injunction to shut
down the service.
An e-mail sent to
Hotfile for comment did
not get an immediate
reply.

Comedy Central
picks up Norm
Macdonald series
NEW YORK Norm
Macdonald is returning to
the news, specifically
sports news.
The former "Saturday
Night Live" comedian
and "Weekend Update"
anchor will star in
"Sports Show with Norm
Macdonald." Comedy
Central announced
Wednesday that it's pick-
ing up the series and
ordering eight episodes.
The network said the
show will feature
Macdonald's "comedic
take on the most topical
and controversial stories
from the sports world."
It's set to premiere in
April.

Golden-voiced
Ohio man moves
to sober house
COLUMBUS, Ohio -
An Ohio homeless man
whose deep voice made
him a web phenomenon
has left rehab and says
he's still fielding job
offers.
Ted Williams said on
CBS' "Early Show" on
Wednesday that he's "try-
ing to keep a level head
and possibly come to one
decision."
He says he felt that
going to rehab was a
"rushed decision" and he
left after two weeks.


By JAKE COYLE
AP Entertainment Writer
"Cedar Rapids" begins
very much like an Alexander
Payne Midwestern comedy
is expected to: with an after-
noon sex romp and
Sigourney Weaver exhorting
her companion to "Bring it!"
Her caller is the woefully
earnest Tim Lippe (Ed
Helms) who when Weaver's
character Macy Tim's for-
mer 7th grade teacher -
tells him that they're just
"having a good time," he
sincerely corrects her: "No,
we're having the best time."
Tim is a 34-year-old
Brown Star Insurance sales-
man in Brown Valley, Wis.
He has somehow managed to
get through life experiencing
almost nothing. When the
company's star salesman
(Thomas Lennon) unexpect-
edly dies, boss Bill Krogstad
(Stephen Root) sends Tim to
the annual insurance conven-
tion in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
Though such a trip may
not sound like the stuff of
heart-stopping cinema, the
trip proves a late coming-of-
age for Tim, who befriends
partying colleagues, experi-
ments with drugs and has a
moral crisis.
For Tim. Cedar Rapids
might as well be Las Vegas,
(where Helms went in "The
Hangover")
But "Cedar Rapids" is not
an Alexander Payne
("Election," "About
Schmidt") picture. He's the
film's executive producer. It
was directed by Miguel
Arteta ("Youth in Revolt,"
"The Good Girl") and writ-
ten by Phil Johnston.
"Cedar Rapids" lacks the
darkness that Payne would
have surely injected, and the
film instead unfolds conven-
tionally as a charming, belat-
ed coming-of-age comedy.
When Tim is dispatched to
Cedar Rapids, he's charged
with two objectives:
Continue the company's
winning streak of taking the
prestigious Two Diamonds


Movie Review

'Cedar Rapids'
Rating: R (crude and sexu-
al content, language and
drug use).
Running time: 87 minutes
Review: ** -* (of 4)

prize, and stay clear of Dean
Ziegler, Of course, he quick-
ly falls in with "Deanzie"
(John C. Reilly), a brash,
joke-spewing, recently
divorced insurance veteran
and hotel bar hero.
For Reilly, this is enor-
mously fun. He's something
like the living embodiment
of the "Saturday Night Live"
character Bill Brasky, a
mythic, hard-drinking sales-
man. "Welcome to the jun-
gle," he tells Tim.
The gifted Reilly is now
almost principally a comedic
actor and with good rea-
son. He's the most lovable of
goof balls, with his eyes
rolling around his sockets
crazily and a voice that
sounds drunk even when it's
sober.
Tim is also befriended by
two other veteran insurance
salesmen: the nearly equally
hedonistic Joan Ostrowski-
Fox (the reliably excellent
Anne Heche) and the button-
down Ronald Wilkes (Isiah
Whitlock, Jr.).
They quickly realize that
the sweater-clad, Sherry-
drinking Tim is in need of
some life exposure. The trio
faithfully swarm around
their protagonist, giving him
an awakening amid wood
paneled walls and drab hotel
.interiors.


Cowell courts groups, maybe Abdul for 'X Factor'


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Simon
Cowell wants his new Fox
talent series "The X Factor"
to include controversy, vocal
groups and, maybe, Paula
Abdul on the judging panel.
"We've spoken to her, she
knows I'm a big fan," Cowell
said of his former fellow
"American Idol" judge. "I've
always said at some point we
are going to be working
together."
But, he added, "I have to
take everyone's opinions into
account," including the
show's other producers and
the network.
A decision about who will
join Cowell on the four-
member panel has yet to be
made and won't be
announced for another month
or so, he said during an inter-
view and teleconference
about "The X Factor."


The show debuts this fall.
Cowell exited Fox's
"American Idol" last season
in part to focus on the new
series, which has been a suc-
cessful format in several
countries since its debut in
Britain in 2004. Abdul quit
"Idol" in 2009 over a salary
dispute.
The winner of the U.S. ver-
sion of "X Factor" will nab a
$5 million recording contract
with Syco, a joint venture
between Cowell and Sony
Music. Cowell said that's not
a "dressed up" sum: It repre-
sents $1 million a year pay-
ment for five years, separate
from the costs of recording
and promotion.
Cowell, known for his
sharp-tongued critiques,
unsurprisingly said he favors
shows on which "anything
can happen."
"I rip up the rule that


everybody pretends to be
friends and they're all going
to be pen pals for the rest of
their lives, which is. complete
and utter nonsense," he said.
"I like people who are ambi-
tious, and with that comes
controversy."
One unwelcome flap last
season on the U.K. version of
"X Factor" involved the rev-
elation that the pitch-correct-
ing software Auto-Tune was
used on at least one contes-
tant's taped audition.
Cowell said Monday it was
the work of sound techni-
cians and done without his
knowledge.
"Once we found out what
was going on it was stopped
immediately. ... The most
important part was once the
show went live and (viewers)
could see that everyone was
singing live and it was a
proper, fair competition."


Those cheery
Midwesterners, it's suggest-
ed, are just as depraved as
the rest of us.
"Cedar Rapids" is popu-
lated by so many actors
chiefly recognized by their
TV work, it's a kind of
amalgamation of characters
plucked from across the
dial: "The Office" (Helms),
"The Wire" (Whitlock) "The
State" (Lennon), "That '70s
Show" (Kurtwood Smith, as
the insurance league presi-
dent), "News Radio" (Root),
"Arrested Development"
(Alia Shawkat as a lurking
prostitute) and "The Daily
Show" (Rob Corddry, as a
rough local).
Whitlock, who played a
dirty politician with a catch
phrase on "The Wire," adds
further to the linkage to tele-
vision by doing an impres-
sion of another character
from the great HBO drama:
the lone gunman Omar.
This is how meta we have
gotten. Next James
Gandolfini will be doing his
best Silvio.
But it's an unspoken com-
parison that's impossible to
avoid: Helms' "Office" co-
star Steve Carell, whose
"40-Year-Old Virgin"
plumbed similar territory.
Helms exudes an inno-
cence and sweetness similar
to Carell, adding a touch of
Ivy league nerdiness. As
leading man in "Cedar
Rapids," he holds the screen
well, buoyed by the strong
supporting cast. Utterly
guileless, he marvels at
banal things like a rental car
("Sweet!") and airline
peanuts.
It's getting to be a famil-
iar gag, but it's still hard to
resist especially when
Reilly and Heche are in your
corner.


SLADOKLA


Friends rally to


support boy after his


attempted suicide


Dear Abby: I'm 13, and
one of my best friends
attempted suicide. "Greg"
always seemed so happy
that this has come as a
shock to all of us. We're
thankful he is alive, but we
don't know how to behave
around him.
When Greg returns to
school, what should we
talk about and how can we
(his friends) support him?
Given a Second
Chance
Dear Given: Greg is
lucky to have such caring
friends as you. When you
see him, tell him you're
glad to see him and were
concerned about him. Do
not pump him for details.
If he wants to talk about
what happened, let him do
it in his own time.
As to what to talk about
with him, talk about the
things you always have
and include him in all the
activities you have in the
past. Knowing his friends
care about him is very
important.
If you have further con-
cerns, discuss them with a
guidance counselor at
school or contact the
National Suicide
Prevention Lifeline. Its
phone number is (800)
273-8255 and its Web site
is www.suicideprevention-
lifeline.org.

Dear Abby: Before I
married my wife, I told her
I didn't want a housewife
and she agreed she would
never be out of work. Two
months after tying the
knot, she said she got fired
from her job, but I think
she quit.
She's asking me for
money to do things I
thought were dumb when
we were dating. We dated
for three years before get-
ting married and she had
the same job the whole
time. She has now been
out of work for a year.
I feel like I have been
tricked. I have never seen
her look in the newspaper
or search online for work. I
think she was a better girl-
friend than she is a wife.
How do I fix this situa-
tion?
Unhappily Married
Dear Unhappily
Married: Remind your
wife of the agreement you
had before you were mar-
ried that you would be a
working couple. Because
you feel you are being
taken advantage of, offer
your wife the option of
marriage counseling.
However, if that doesn't


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Numbers
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Dear Abby
heal the breach in your
relationship, talk to a
lawyer.

Dear Abby: I have a
question regarding grocery
store self-scan checkouts.
Many grocery stores and
supermarkets usually have
four machines in one lane,
two on each side. If they
are all being used, are cus-
tomers supposed to form
one line and the cus-
tomer in front goes when-
ever a machine opens up?
Or does each machine have
its own individual line?
I, along with most other
people, wait in the middle
in one lane. But many
times someone will walk
right past and stand behind
someone checking out.
I never see signs posted
and no employees ever say
anything. Hopefully, you
could clear this up for us.
Frustrated Shopper in
Tennessee
Dear Frustrated: This
is a question that should be
addressed to the manager
of the grocery store where
you are shopping. If most
of the customers are form-
ing a single line and some-
one cuts in, the folks in
line usually have no hesita-
tion telling the offender,
"The line starts here!" But
because there is some con-
fusion, and the self-check-
out technology is still new,
it makes sense that the
management of the store
would post a sign telling
customers what is pre-
ferred.

Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips, and
was founded by her mother,
Pauline Phillips. Write Dear
Abby at www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069. For an excellent
guide to becoming a better con-
versationalist and a more
sociable person, order 'How to
Be Popular'Send a business-
sized, self-addressed envelope,
plus check or money order for
$6 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby
- Popularity Booklet, PO. Box
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0447. (Postage is included in
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THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU


Suc Cie a


Fox Searchlight Pictures
(From left) John C. Reilly stars as Dean Ziegler, Ed Helms stars as Tim Lippe and Isiah
Whitlock Jr. stars as Ronald Wilkes in 'Cedar Rapids.'


Ed Helms comes of age


in quirky 'Cedar Rapids'


-- -- ___--_
28 4

3

9 4 8

8 51

5 4 2

711




31 6
Level: Intermediate


Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
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appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle

9 S 9 1 I. CL/ 6
L V 61 8 9 l 9
F, 6 9 CL Z 9 V 8
1l71 9 9 6 Z ZL C_
9 9 Z tLV C 61 91
6 CL 1. 9?, 9 9 t
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LIVING


PAGE







News-Sun


SCairo .


= EGYPT '


--n




6 \\Ocober Bridge
60cobe Brdg


Q- How did Hosni Mubarak
and Egypt become so impor-
tant in U.S. foreign policy?
A: President Hosni Mubarak
came to rule in Egypt 30 years ago
after an act of violence radical
Islamist members of the Egyptian
army, angry at Egypt's peace treaty "
with Israel. opened fire on President
Anwar Sadat in 1981 during a mili-
tary parade.
Mubarak was
Sadat's vice pres-
ident and has
been Egypt's
president ever
Since. Until vio-
CHUCK KENNEDY MCT lent riots on
Mubarak Friday, Jan. 28,
Mubarak had
never appointed a vice president or
successor.
During those three decades,
Egypt, once an ally of the Soviet
Union, has become one of the United
States' closest allies in the Arab
world. The United States provides
the Egyptian military with $1.3 bil-
lion in aid annually, making Egypt
the No. 2 recipient of U.S. foreign
aid in the world, after Israel.
In spite of Sadat's assassination,
Mubarak has maintained diplomatic
relations with Israel. Egypt has
played a key role in helping Israel
isolate the Gaza Strip, where the rad-
ical group Hamas rules. Egypt also
played a controversial role in the
U.S. war on terror and has been
accused of torturing terrorism sus-
pects that were sent there during the
administration of George W. Bush.
As the most populous of the Arab
countries, Egypt is considered a
major influence on developments in
the Arab world.

Q What's the background on
the unrest there?
A: During his 30-year rule,
Mubtarak has kept firm control of
I -it's political process. An emer-
Cgency law that allows him to rule by
decree has been in effect throughout
that time. The principal opposition
movement, the Muslim Brotherhood,
is banned, though some of the
Muslim Brotherhood's members hold
seats in parliament.
Before each election, it's become
routine for Egyptian police to arrest
opposition political figures and jour-
nalists. Before parliamentary elec-
Stions in November, for example, the
police jailed Mubarak's opponents,


R going a es
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Museum

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Detailed map of area surrounding Tahrir Square, focal point of
protests in Cairo, Egypt.


blocked rallies, clamped down on
independent news media and angrily
rejected calls by the United States
and others to allow international
observers to monitor the vote. An
estimated 1,400 members of the
Muslim Brotherhood were detained,
oneof the country's most outspoken
reporters was fired as the editor in
chief of the independent daily news-
paper Al Dustour after the paper was
bought by new owners. A popular
talk show. "Cairo Today," was
abruptly shut down after an episode
criticized Egyptian state media for
being soft on Gamal Mubarak, the
president's son, who at one time was
thought likely to be his successor.
Even the United States has found
the political control distressing over
the years. Last year, U.S. Sens. Russ
Feingold, D-Wis., and John McCain,
R-Ariz., drafted a resolution that
called on Mubarak to repeal the
emergency law. Cables released
recently by the website WikiLeaks
show that American diplomats were
often critical of Mubarak's hold on
power.

Q-' What set off the current
unrest?
A: The trigger for the unrest in
Egypt were protests that had toppled
the government of Tunisia, which
had long been ruled by an autocratic
dictator, Zine El Abidine Ben Ali,
who'd been in power 23 years and
whose regime had been accused of
massive personal corruption. That
corruption received new publicity
starting Dec. 7 when cables by the
U.S. ambassador to Tunisia were
published by the WikiLeaks website.
Those cables described in detail the
ostentatious wealth displayed by Ben
Ali's family. Tensions grew worse
when on Dec. 17 a Tunisian vendor
set himself on fire after police confis-
cated his goods because he did not
have a license. After a month of esca-
lating protests, Ben Ali fled to Saudi
Arabia on Jan. 14.
Inspired by Tunisia, Egyptian
opposition groups called for protests
against Mubarak. Those began on
Jan. 25, which was called the Day of
Rage and whose date. #jan25, has
-become a familiar tag for posters
using Twitter to comment on events
in Egypt. The demonstrations began
peacefully, but turned violent when
police used tear gas and water hoses
to disperse crowds in Cairo's Tahrir
Square.
Sporadic clashes continued until


Jan. 28, when massive crowds over-
whelmed police, set fire to police sta-
tions in Cairo, Alexandria and Suez
and freed prisoners. The Cairo head-
quarters of the ruling National
Democratic Party was looted and
burned. In a speech after midnight,
Mubarak appointed a new cabinet
and named a vice president, Omar
Suleiman.

Q What has happened
since?
A: Protesters continued to rally in
Tahrir Square, demanding that
Mubarak resign. Police vanished
from the streets, and there were
reports of looting throughout Cairo.
The army was deployed in Tahrir
Square, and military officials vowed
they would not attack the demonstra-
tors, who complained that Mubarak's
new cabinet was made up primarily
of the same old faces. On Tuesday,
Feb. 1, hundreds of thousands of pro-
testers flooded into Tahrir Square for
the bi._-e'. rally of the week. That
night Mubarak announced he would
not seek reelection in balloting
scheduled for September'but would
remain in office until his term ends.
The next day, pro-Mubarak mobs
attacked anti-government demonstra-
tors in Tahrir Square, where there
were pitched battles for more than 24
hours. At least 13 people were killed
and hundreds injured in the fighting.

Q: What's likely to happen
now?
A: No one can predict. The
Obama administration has called on
Egyptian authorities to begin the


"transition" now, but both Mubarak
and his vice president, former intelli-
gence chief Omar Suleiman, rebuffed
requests by Obama envoy Frank
Wisner that Mubarak step down
before the elections. Mubarak also
has remained adamant that he will
not go into exile like Tunisian
President Ben Ali.
U.S. officials say they believe the
Egyptian army will serve as a peace-
keeper in the confrontations and will
not try to push Mubarak out.
Meanwhile, the leaders of some
other Arab states have taken actions


they hope will fend off pressures on
their governments. Jordan's King
Abdullah II fired his prime minister
and appointed a new one, and
Yemeni President Ali Abdullah
Saleh, who's been in office since
.1978, announced he won't seek
reelection in 2013.

Q- Who will be the key peo-
ple involved in the events?
A: Aside from Mubarak, the key
players in Egypt are likely to include
Mubarak's vice president, Omar
Suleiman, and opposition figures
Mohamed ElBaradei and Ayman
Nour.
Suleiman, 75, who's fluent in
English, is close to the United States
and has been a key go-between in the
Israel-Palestinian peace talks. He is
also a close confidant of Mubarak,
who came to rely on him after
Suleiman insisted in 1995 that an
armored car be flown to Ethiopia for
Mubarak's visit there. The vehicle
saved the pair from an ambush by
Egyptian Islamic Jihad in the
Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa.
ElBaradei, 69, is perhaps the
world's best-known Egyptian. He
served as the head of the
International Atomic Energy Agency,
the U.N.'s nuclear monitoring
agency, and won the Nobel Peace
prize for his work there in 2005. He
openly opposed the Bush administra-
tion.'s plans to invade Iraq and con-
tested claims that Saddam Hussein
had weapons of mass destruction.
The United States was the only coun-
try to oppose his appointment to a
third term as head of the IAEA in
2005. Still, he's viewed by many in
Egypt as too Westernized to lead that
country, though he was recently
endorsed by the Muslim Brotherhood
as the head of the opposition move-
ment.
Nour, a lawyer and a former mem-
ber of Parliament, is the founder of
the opposition al Ghad (Tomorrow)
Party. He ran a distant second to
Mubarak in the country's first multi-
candidate presidential election in
2006. The following year, Nour was
jailed and spent more than three
years behind bars on disputed
charges that he used forged signa-
tures to start his party. After his
release, Nour resumed his opposition
activities. He is a founder of the
National Association for Change, the
movement of secular and Islamic
opposition groups pressing for con-
stitutional changes that would allow
ElBaradei to run for president this
year.

McClatchy correspondents
Hannah A/lain, Miret El Naggar;
Shashank Bengali. Wari-ren P.
Strobe/ and J,oithalin S. lmtdov
tcotli/'il'ld to this rcpol'i.


CAROLYN COLE/LOS ANGELES TIMES/MCT
Anti-Hosni Mubarak protesters, hiding behind makeshift shields,
throw rocks at a rival group, where they clashed for a second day in
Cairo, Egypt, on Feb. 3.


Protesters call for the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, in downtown Cairo, Egypt, on Jan. 30.


Friday, February 11, 2011






turmoill


Egypt in 1



As unrest continues in this Arab country, we look at the

background of the situation and some key players
McClatchy 1i t'ui.', Bureau


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