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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00897
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: February 6, 2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
sobekcm - UF00028423_00897
System ID: UF00028423:00897
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

Full Text















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EWSW-SSUN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927

t fit for State champs Blue St
game again bash Bu

GE 1C PAGE 8B PAGE


reaks
illdogs

1D


Sunday, February 6, 2011


www.newssun.com


Volume 92/Number 16 I 75 cents


Mostly cloudy with
spotty showers
High Low

75 53
Complete Forecast
PAGE 8A





VOICE

Question: Should state
employees have to pay
to their pension plan?




73.3,,




No

26.7%



Total votes: 101

Next question:
Should The School
Board of Highlands
County consider
e-readers for its
students?

Make your voice heard at
www.newssun ..



Joline Ellison
Age 85, of Sebring
Charles Ziegler
Age 87, of Sebring
Obituaries, Page 6A


Business 1B
Dear Abby 2C
Chalk Talk 5B
Classifieds 5D
Community Briefs 2A
Community Calendar 3B
Crossword Puzzle 2C
Dear Abby 2C
Editorial & Opinion 3A
Lottery Numbers 2A
Pause and Consider 2C
School Menus 4B
Sports On TV 30
Traditional Parenting 2C

Follow the
News-Sun on


www.twitter.com/thenewssun
and


www.facebook.com/newssun


0 90994 0100 9


Nutrition at



your fingertips

Local farm offer hydroponic

fruits, veggies for you to pick


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
AVON PARK Local
residents and snowbirds
alike know about the small
hydroponic farm located
just off C.R. 17 between
Avon Park and Sebring, and
they come for the freshness,
uniqueness and lower
prices, according to owner
Mike McCracken.
"Everyone should grow
their own food. This is
about family, about nature
and about being healthy,"
said McCracken while he
was walking between rows
of hydroponicaly grown
plants.
The quiet, well-kept area
gives you plenty of time to
wind down from the hustle
and bustle of everyday life
as you wonder throughout
the U-pick rows stacked in
unique pots bursting with
greenery.
Cars came and went
about every five minutes as
Lois, Mike's mom, handed
out the produce, smiles and
advice about cooking for
growing.
"A lot of folks come over
from Highlands Ridge to
get the fresh stuff. You
can't golf all the time, so
many of them play a round
and stop by," McCracken
said.
McCracken farms started
in 1985 with U-pick
oranges. John, Mike's
father, moved the family
from Minnesota in 1982,
and after 15 years of just
citrus, the family decided to
install potted blueberries.
"It all started with U-pick
oranges at $3 per bucket,"
said McCracken. "Then we
went to blueberries, and


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Anita Lamberton of Lake Wales picks strawberries recently at McCracken Farms in
Sebring. Lamberton and her family made a trip to Sebring specifically to pick strawber-
ries on the farm.


I .. .A
News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
McCracken Farms offers a variety of hyrdopinically grown
produce.


now we are trying new
technology."
But, it was just in the last
four years that the family


Sebring fence oi

first reading; fir
By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
christopher.tuffley@newssun.com
SEBRING When the Sebring City
Council passed its proposed fence ordinance
by a vote of 4-1 Tuesday night, during its sec-
ond first reading, there was a sense of anti-
climax rather than celebration or accomplish-
ment.
The issues affecting the building of fences
or walls have been the subject of intense
debate for months, with the proposed ordi-
nance 'returned to the city attorney several
times for revision.


expanded to hydroponic
farming.
Hydroponic farming
includes the way the plants


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I. ).^ Prom anod

.... ,* jun. ,'," .' ', *

unp oana IS n ure
go-laol IGthalo



'dinance passes

ial vote Feb. 15
The final result includes a simplified base
line from which to determine all setbacks -
that is from the front plane of a home.
Different heights are permitted at different
setbacks.
All types of fence and wall are allowed
between the front lot line and the front plane
of a house, provided they are only 4 feet high.
Between a 25-foot set back from the front
property line and the front plane of a home,
owners may build walls or fences up to 6 feet

See FENCE, page 5A


are tended, not just the typ-
ical idea of growing with-
out soil, McCracken paid.
"It's about using the
water in a, certain way, and
in this case using less
water," he added as he
walked by giant broccoli
plants.
The smaller plants are
stacked in quad-planters
from about 2 feett off the
ground up to about 5 feet.
The top plants receive the
water first, and then the
water trickles down in
about fifteen minutes to the
plants stacked below.
The method allows the
same water to be filtered
down into about 20 plants

See FARM, page 7A


LP police:

Girl faked

her own

abduction
By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
LAKE PLACID -
Reports of a kidnapping of a
15-year-old girl in Lake
Placid turned out to be a
hoax, according to Lake
Placid Police Lt. James
Fansler.
In a press release on
Friday, Fansler stated that on
Feb. 1, the LPPD received a
report of a child abduction.
A young Hispanic girl was
reportedly being held for a
$900 ransom, Fansler said,
and the suspects were
described as two white males
driving a gray car by the
alleged victim's sister.
Through a series of phone
calls by the LPPD, it was
determined that the juvenile
in question was being held in
Okeechobee County and that
if the money was not handed
over, the girl would be killed.
Since the crime had
crossed county lines, the
Okeechobee County Sheriff's
Department, the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement's Child
Abduction Response Team
and the Okeechobee Sheriff's
SWAT were included in the
investigation.
But Fansler stated that
after everyone was mobi-
lized,and plans for the girl's
return were under way, it
determined that the whole
affair was a hoax conducted
by the female who was sup-
posedly abducted.
"Several calls were made
between the victim and the
victim's sister," Fansler said.
"During' one of the last
calls, the victim informed her
sister the suspect had a gun
and had threatened to kill her.
This enhanced the severity of
the recovery for the
See GIRL, page 5A


Building for sale, but

'News-Sun' is here to stay


SEBRING As some of
you may have heard or
seen, the building where
the News-Sun has generated
news stories and advertis-
ing opportunities for the
past 30-plus years is for
sale. .
However, it is important
for our readers and our
advertisers to understand
that Highlands County's
hometown newspaper since
1927 is here to stay.
HarborPoint Media, the
owner of the News-Sun, is
committed to Highlands
County, those who have
businesses here and the
readers who subscribe to
our newspaper.
Since the printing opera-
tions of the newspaper were
transferred to Leesburg two
years ago, much of the
building is no longer being
utilitized.
If and when the building
sells, the News-Sun staff


will move to a new location
in Sebring.
We will continue to work
at 2227 U.S. 27 South until
the building is sold and we
make that move.
We are excited about the
opportunities 'that this
brings to Highlands
County.
In selling our building, it
will allow another business
to come in, or an existing
business to expand its oper-
ations. On the flip side, it
will give us an opportunity
to move into an existing
building that is sitting
vacant.
HarborPoint Media owns
the News-Sun in Sebring,
the Daily Commercial in
Leesburg, Commercial
Press in Leesburg and
South Lake Press in
Clermont.
Romona D. Washington
Publisher/ Executive
Editor, News-Sun


Heartland
National Bank


Avon Park
800 West Main St.
863.453.6000
MFDI


Lake Placid
600 U.S. Hwy 27 N.


Sebring
327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.


863.699.1300 863.386.1300
www.heartlandnb.com


Sun 'n Lake North
5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.
863.386.1322
(2
LfJ. -. . .


--.-.~ j-


--- -


.,.








Page 2A

COMMUNITY
BRIEFS

Heart health is
topic of chamber
luncheon
LAKE PLACID
Greater Lake Placid
Chamber Membership
Luncheon will be held at
noon Wednesday, Feb. 9
at the Lake Placid Elks
Lodge. The luncheon is
sponsored by Florida
Hospital Heartland
Division.
The guest speaker is
Deb Vaughn, Florida
Hospital Heartland
administrative nursing
director. Her topic will
be "Heart Health".
Menu selection is
chicken. Cost is $8 per
person.
RSVP the chamber at
chamber@lpfla.com or
call 465-4331. Remember
to bring business cards.
Members are also wel-
come to bring door prizes
to the luncheon for the
attendees.

Seniors and Law
Enforcement
celebrates 13-year
anniversary
SEBRING The
Highlands County
S.A.L.T. Council
(Seniors and Law
Enforcement Together)
will celebrate its 13th
anniversary by holding a
forum from 10 a.m. to
noon Tuesday, Feb. 15 in
Conference Room I at
Florida Hospital
Heartland Medical
Center.
A panel of profession-
als from the Highlands
County Sheriff's Office,
all three municipal police
departments, AARP, West
Central Florida Area
Agency on Aging, Inc.
and a representative from
Chief Financial Officer
Jeff Atwater office will
be present to answer
questions from senior cit-
izens, caregivers, church
leaders or anyone inter-
ested in crimes and fraud
against seniors.
The purpose of the
forum is to provide an
opportunity to improve
the quality of life for
seniors by providing an
active exchange of infor-
mation between local law
enforcement and seniors.
The four Highlands
County law enforcement
Continued on page 6A


The News-Sun would like to
remind the readers that the
names listed below reflect
those who have been charged
with a crime, but they are all
innocent until proven guilty
by a court of law. If anyone
listed here is acquitted or has
charges dropped, they can
bring in proof of such deci-
sion or mail a copy to the
paper and the News-Sun will
be happy to report that infor-
mation. The News-Sun is at
2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring,
FL 33870.

The following people were
booked into'the Highlands
County Jail on Thursday, Feb.
3:
* Esperanza Landero Castro,
26, of Arcadia, was arrested
on three out-of-county war-
rants reference contempt of
court, driving with license
suspended or revoked and
possession of cannabis.
* Gregory Leon Correll, 51,
of Avon Park, was charged
with fraud-swindle, and larce-
ny.
* David Allen Crawford, 31,
of Sebring, was charged with
contempt of court reference
Injunctions against repeat vio-
lence.
* Julia Ann Drayton, 52, of
Lake Placid, was charged with
three violations of probation
reference aggravated battery
with a deadly weapon, sudden
snatch, and burglary of a
dwelling.
* Barbara Cambell Gamble,
55, of Lake Placid, was


charged with DUI.
+ Wanda Matrice Gray, 38, of
Sebring, was charged with
violation of probation refer-
ence petit theft.
* Fernando Hernandez, 30,
of Eufalia, was charged with
violation of municipal ordi-
nance.
* Cindy Rachel Hunter, 41,
of Sebring, was charged with
burglary, flee/elude police,
driving while license sus-
pended, and grand theft of a
motor vehicle.
* Tucker Stephen Kenner,
24, of Sebring, was charged
with battery.
* Walter Hoyt Kempton, 56,
of Avon Park, was charged
with contributing to the delin-
quency of a minor, and petit
theft.
* Daniel Charles Kuhn, 23,
of Sebring, was arrested on
an out-of-county and out-of-


id


News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


News-Sun photos by KATARA SIMMONS
The 45th Annual Lake Placid Arts & Crafts Country Fair attracts a large crowd Saturday
morning in Lake Placid. The fair, which started back in 1966, features of variety of arts
and crafts vendors, activities for kids and live musical entertainment.



Thousands show up to enjoy the

first day of LP Country Fair


By SAMANTHA GHOLARK
sgholar@newsson.coin
LAKE PLACID The first
day of the 45th annual Lake
Placid Art and Crafts
Country Fair was more than
what the chair could have
hoped for. The early morning
yuck and clouds cleared out
and made for a gorgeous
mid-day leaving residents
and visitors no choice but to
get out and take a stroll
around the fair.
The fair-goers had plenty
to look at, eat, and purchase
as they walked Interlake and
Green Dragon Drive. Vann
Peeples, president of the
event, estimated that nearly
10,000 people were in atten-
dance on yesterday.
"I'm beyond happy with
the turn out. We are thrilled,"
Peeples said. The fair houses
125 vendors and each tent
was filled with curious and
eager customers. "Some of
the tents earlier had about
four rows back into the street
with people trying to get a
peak," Peeples explained.
Just across the street on
the entertainment stage a
local band filled the air with
bluegrass tunes for the hun-
dreds of visitors eating and
taking a break beneath the
tents. If the sounds didn't
catch peoples attention the
smells certainly did.
The food vendors were up
and running pushing out
plates, cups, and bowls of
everything from burgers to
the famous strawberry short-


Matti Moore, 2, plays with her new puppy puppet Saturday
morning during the Lake Placid Country Fair. Moore
attended the fair with her grandparents Shirley Mason (seat-
ed) and Orville Mason (not pictured).


cake. Little faces, as well as
bigger ones, were seen with
strawberry smudges up and
down the street.
Lake Placid Elementary
School was beginning to fill
up as people begin to migrate
into the art exhibit to check
out local talent.
"This is what the fair orig-
inally was," Peeples
explained. "It was just the art
exhibit, but after a few years
the fair part, this out here,
was added on to fund the
art."
Families and friends can
continue their love of arts


and crafts throughout the day
today. The Arts and Crafts
Country Fair is on Green
Dragon Drive. Visitors
should park at the high
school; parking is also avail-
able along Main and '
Interlake for various prices.
The fair will open today at 9
a.m.


Colby, Macbeth


spar over copies


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.coom
SEBRING The billing
procedures of County
Attorney J. Ross Macbeth
were under scrutiny again
on Tuesday; this time his
miscellaneous charges and
copies were questioned.
Macbeth's billings have
come into question before,
and to date he has returned
more than $20,000 in
billing mistakes to the
county.
During the Tuesday citi-
zens-not-on-the-agenda
portion of the board meet-
ing, Preston Colby
asked the commis-
sioners to get clari-
fication on what
county taxpayers
were being billed
for under miscella-
neous items on Co
Macbeth's invoices.
"I have, over the
last couple of
weeks, been looking --
at Mr. Macbeth's
bills and Mr.
Helms' approval
process. I have
asked for certain Ma
records from Mr.
Macbeth that substantiate
the miscellaneous expenses
that are being charged to
the board," Colby said.
According to Colby, mis-
cellaneous expenses are
being charged in a lump
sum, while litigation
charges are detailed, but he
said that Macbeth could not
produce the originals to
what was copied under the
miscellaneous section.
Colby also asked if the
commissioners were aware
of a motion to return a tes-
timony excerpt that
Macbeth initiated in the
Colby vs. Board case, and
if the commissioners had
given permission for
Macbeth to follow up with
that motion.
"Depositions and testi-
mony are usually not public
record. Mr. Macbeth's testi-
mony was that he had to
hang his head in shame
about his billing, and I
think you are going to want
that testimony down the


road," Colby told the com-
mission.
Additionally, Colby
asserted that Macbeth could
not identify exactly what
all the copies charged to the
county were about.
"Mr. Macbeth sent an e-
mail to me saying he does
not know what was
copied," Colby said.
"Mr. Helms is saying he
is approving this for pay-
ment pending review by
board departments. I take
that to mean that Mr. Helms
does not know what is
being charged. If Mr.
Macbeth does not
know and Mr.
Helms doesn't
" '*: know, how can the
board departments
know?" Colby
-asked the commis-
)lby sion.
"I have done a
rough estimate of
what these copying
costs are and it runs
about $20.0 per
month with no item-
ization, that's
$2.400 per year
cbeth times 21 years,
that's over $51,000.
In this county, that's seri-
ous money," Colby assert-
ed. "My suggestion is to
have this audited. In fact,
go back five years since the
clerk's audit was random,
and that turned up $20,000
in over charges. Have a
complete audit done. Go
back five years.
"You don't know what
mistakes have been made,
and I am not accusing Mr.
Macbeth of bad faith, we
know there have been mis-
takes made."
Macbeth disputed
Colby's assertions, and
explained how his copying
procedures worked.
"Well, Mr. Colby lied to
you about what is in my
transcript ... he filed a tran-
script in that case from
another case that I was
involved in, and that's a
violation of the rules of
civil procedure, and I
moved to strike it because

See COPIES, page 5A


Feb. 2 14 24 29 30 51 52 x:2
Lottery ,. extjackpot $7mi//on

A Center Jan.29 12 17 19 20 33 37 x:4
Fl'.. Lu Jan. 26 7 18 19 2.3 35 52 x:2

Feb. 4 15 20 26 29 36 Feb. 4(n) 2 7 8 2
'. Feb. 3 10 16 28 30 36 4> Feb. 4(d) 1 1 1 0
emnat'ii. Feb.2- 4 11 16 23 '30 4 Feb. 3 (n) 2 9 7 1
Feb. 1 24 26 27 28 30 Feb. 3 (d) 5 9 1 7

Feb. 4 11 22 30 44 11 Feb. 4(n) 6 6 5
I Feb.1 1 24 25 30 4 4- Feb. 4 (d) 9 3 7
Jan. 28 1 16 30 34 & I 1 J3 Feb. 3(n) 3 3 1
Jan. 25 26 28 30 36 0 22 Feb. 3(d) 6 7 0

Feb. 2 3 14 33 53 57 PB: 36 PP: 4 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 driawings
""'. -" jackpot $50 i//o~ ae twice per day: (d) is the
/Vext ckpot$50min daytime drawing,(i) is t he
Jan. 29 24 28 45 49 52 PB: 2 PP: 4 nighitime drawing.
Jan. 26 4 5 36 47 58 PB: 6 PP: 6 PB: Power Ball PP: Power Play










NEWS- SUN


Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927

Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, Florida 33870
A Harbor Point Media Company


OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870
OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday
PHONE: 863-385-6155
MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954
NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453

CIRCULATION
SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not
receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation
department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before
11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to
you. Subscribers who notify us after th times mentioned will receive credit to their
account. Please call 385-6155.


POSTMASTER: Send address change to:
News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870
USPS fSSN 0163-3988
Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL
and additional entry offices)


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
HOME DELIVERY
IN FLORIDA MAIL
OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL


12 mo.
$60.46
92.23
105.99


7% FL tax
$4.23
6.46


Total
$64.69
98.69
105.99


Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on
Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.
Romona Washington Publisher and Executive Editor
863-385-6155, ext. 515


state warrant reference failing
to register as a sex offender.
* Larry William Langman,
20, of Lake Placid, was
charged with cruelty toward a
child and contributing to the
delinquency of a minor.
+ Simon Martinez, 30, of an
unknown address, was
charged with operating a
motor vehicle without a valid
license.
* Dara Janice Massaline, 51,
of Sebring, was charged with
failure. to appear reference
issue/obtain property with a
check.
* Akeem Olajuwon Reed, 24,
of Sebring, was charged with
violation of municipal ordi-
nance.
+ Cara Rene Skeens, 25, of
Lake Placid, was arrested on
an out-of-county warrant ref-
erence burglary of an unoccu-
pied structure.


- .


The Best Part of Waking Up
is Folger's coffee at Dot's!
Bottomless Cup *'1
.- -' Sebring Square
5 Restaurant 382-2333
0 Coffee Mon-Sat 6:30am-2pm
v.1 & Coffee Shop Sunday 7am-2pm

BREAKFAST SPECIAL
Monday through Saturday


2 eggs, ham, home fries or
grits and toast! ONLY-
,i" th plfrchq- f roffep t oq nr rind
Reg. Price $5
f* M K \ t.L .. W 4 l _


POLICE BLOTTER


www.newssun.corn


I









www.newssun.com


News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


EDITORIAL & OPINION


TODAY'S EDITORIAL


Scott off to good start on spending control


To close a $3.5 billion budget deficit,
Gov. Rick Scott has no choice but to ask
Floridians to sacrifice either by pay-
ing higher taxes or, more likely, to
accept substantial cuts in state services.
And, as the governor surely knows.
the first step toward getting public buy-
in is for his administration to make sac-
rifices with public money at least
compared to the previous administra-
tion.
That shouldn't be difficult.
The Associated Press reports Jeff
Kottkamp spent $1.1 million of the tax-
payers' money on travel and security
during his four years as lieutenant gov-
ernor.
Most of it $856,000 went for
salaries to Highway Patrol troopers
who, by law, must provide security.
Other expenses: $72,000 airfare for
troopers during his trips; $52,000 for
gasoline used by his state-provided
vehicle; $44,000, hotel rooms; $5,000,
rental cars: and $11,000 for charter
flights when state planes weren't avail-
able.
Those travel expenses seem extrava-
gant. particularly for a state having trou-
ble paying its bills.
How is it even possible to use an
average of $35 a day on gasoline, every
day, for four years?


February 6 is Florida
Alzheimer's Awareness Day
Editor:
Feb. 6 is "Florida Alzheimer's
Awareness Day." This designation is to
raise public awareness about the dis-
ease, and to honor persons and families
living with Alzheimer's.
Florida has more than 523,000 with
Alzheimer's including 5,438 residing in
Highlands County. That number is sky-
rocketing because of the enormous
number of baby boomers reaching at-
risk age, and an increasing number of
younger people being diagnosed.
Meanwhile, there is no cure for
Alzheimer's disease.
The threat to so many Floridians
should be enough to urge action. The
Alzheimer's Association recommends
the implementation of a state plan of
action to address Alzheimer's disease
and cognitive impairment in Florida.
The Legislature must continue funding
the Memory Mobile which provides
support to families in rural areas, and
increase funding for caregiver respite
services.
As the Florida Legislature begins
their annual Legislative Session in
March, write your legislator and tell
them to REMEMBER persons and fam-
ilies living with Alzheimer's.
Gloria J. T. Smith
President and CEO
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
Alzheimer's Association

Be careful of efile sites
Editor:
This letter is about the income tax
forms due soon, but I feel the frustra-
tion I have had is worth the effort to try
to warn your readers about. (It is
impossible to find the instruction book-


Other Viewpoints


And late last year, Kottkamp asked
that a state trooper be assigned to
accompany him on a two-week personal
family vacation to Italy.
That was outrageous.
The Scott administration must do bet-
ter a lot better.
The governor says he won't accept a
paycheck from the state.
And, immediately after taking office,
he sought to sell both state airplanes.
They cost $2.4 million a year to oper-
ate, he said, and there are less expensive
ways to travel.
That indicates he doesn't plan for his
administration to live lavishly at the tax-
payers' expense while cutting other peo-
ple's programs.
Let's hope so, anyway.

An editorial from the Florida Times-Union
in Jacksonville.

The Financial Crisis Inquiry
Commission issued its long-awaited
report, concluding that the debacle that
nearly sank the global economy was
fully avoidable, the result of lax regula-
tion, corporate mismanagement and
risky practices fueled by Wall Street's
greed. You think? The Commission's


report performs a valuable service by
providing a mountain of evidence to dis-
pel the myth that financial crises are an
integral part of the business cycle.
Only a year ago, in January of 2010,
Jamie Dimon of JP Morgan Chase told
the Commission that, hey, these things
are just part of life. A financial crisis, he
said, "happens every five to seven years.
We shouldn't be surprised."
Dimon still believes his industry mer-
its sympathy, telling the financial con-
ference in Davos, Switzerland, that
bankers are tired of everyone beating up
on them.
He still doesn't get it. Americans
were surprised and unprepared for the
economic downfall because they placed
their trust in Wall Street's wizards and
the regulators who oversee them. And
they're still sore, because they were
made to pay the tab for the financial
malpractice of others. Reading the
Commission's findings won't make tax-
payers feel any better.
Some in Congress interpret the recent
elections as a mandate for less govern-
ment regulation. They're wrong. Before
taking any actions that would weaken
regulation of financial markets, they
should read the Commission's 576-page
report and absorb its lessons.

An editorial from the Miami Herald.


TODAY'S LETTERS


EDITORIAL PAGE POLICY

Make sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number.
Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a
maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local
concern take priority.
Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the
same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com.
To make sure the editorial pages aren't dominated by the same writers, let-
ters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once
every three months.
Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author
and not necessarily the opinion of the staff or editors of the News-Sun.
All items will run on a first-come basis as space permits, although more time-
ly ones could be moved up.
We believe your viewpoints are just as important as any community leader
or government official, so consider this a personal invitation to get your two
cents in. The News-Sun has a long history of encouraging public discussion
through letters, guest columns, and Reader's Response questionnaires.
Providing this forum for our readers is a pleasure, not an obligation.


lets for 1040 of 1040A so you are being
forced to do your taxes online.yourself
or pay someone else to do it online for
you. It may be more convenient for
IRS, but is a pain in the backside for us
folks who have never done them
online. I refuse to give anyone else part
of my refund. My husband worked way
too hard .earning this money).
I filed by using taxact.com and fil-
ing the taxes was great. IRS has accept-
ed my return already. Problem: printing
the return for my records. The technical
support page (support@taxact.com) I
printed says "for the safety of your per-
sonal data, a printed copy of your
return is only available by signing into
your account and printing the return
yourself."
I have spent many hours doing
everything they told me to do over and
over and not getting anywhere. I can


see my return on TaxAct Online.
Before writing this letter I reviewed
everything once again to make sure all
my facts were correct and that I had not
missed anything.
My temporary solution was to down-
load the Schedule M (Making Work
Pay) and the 1040A forms from IRS
forms and copying the information
from the forms on the screen and we
both signed it.
Taxpayers with wages only will lose
extra money back by using the 1040EZ
form. Schedule M gave us an extra
$469 in our refund. That is over twice
what he paid in during 2010. I'd like to
save them my frustration. Maybe one
of the other free efile companies will
allow one to print easier.
Ida Search
Avon park


NEWS':SUN
Hlighlinds County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927
2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155


ADVERTISING
VICKIE JONES
Ext. 518
vickie.jones@newssun.com
CIRCULATION
TONY MCCOWAN
Ext. 522
anthony. mccowvan@newssun.com
PRE-PRESS
KEN BAREFIELD
Production Coordinator
Ext. 594
prepress@newssu n.com
BUSINESS OFFICE
JANET EMERSON
Ext. 596
legals@newssun. corn


Strange animal stories


If you hang around ani-
mals long enough you'll find
you collect some strange
animal stories. At least that's
been my experience.
Right now our home is
populated with two insane
birds and two dogs. We have
our resident dog, Perky, and
then we have Midnight, who
belongs to a young man cur-
rently living with us.
Midnight is a black
Labrador, around two years
old, and full of energy. He
also has a tailthat will clear
off a low table in a powerful
sweep. This tail should be
registered as a weapon.
Both Perky and Midnight
serve as my auxiliary door-
bells. When someone comes
to the door, or anywhere
near the door for that matter,
Perky and Midnight immedi-
ately swing into Notification
Mode. Which entails bark-
ing, howling, and a high
state of agitation until one of
us goes to the doot and
opens it. Then they want to
see for themselves who is
out there and, more impor-
tantly, if they have food.
Sometimes no one is out
there, which leads me to
believe Midnight and Perky
are either barking at certain
air molecules that drift too
close to the door or they just
like messing with my mind.
Knowing them, it's probably
the latter.
Though they do annoy me
sometimes, I love them both
dearly and almost never day-
dream about shipping them
off to the ends of the earth.
And if I did, I certainly
wouldn't try to ship them via
the U.S. Postal Service.,
unlike a Minnesota woman
who attempted to mail a dog
to Georgia.
I am not kidding.
According to the news story
that I read on foxnews.com,
a 39-year-old woman was
trying to send the 4-month-
old poodle mix as a gift. She
put.it in a box with no air
holes, no food, no water, and
no indication anything alive
was inside. Postal workers
saw the box moving and res-
cued the puppy, which was
doing fine in the custody of
animal control.
The woman was charged'
with a misdemeanor animal


Laura's
Look
Laura Ware


cruelty. It's possible that she
could also be charged with a
felony, since shipping live
animals via the U.S. mail is
apparently against the law.
Thinking about this puppy
reminds me of Perky as a
puppy. He was a chewer.
Midnight has chewed a book
of mine I left on the couch
once. Perky actually chewed
part of the kitchen wall,
which still bears his teeth
marks.
However, both dogs know
better then to mess with any
of my electronics. My
Blackberry and Ipod have
both been spared the feel of
dog teeth. Of course, I'm
careful not to wave these
items in front of their faces.
Perhaps Rimma Golovko
should have considered that
before trying to take a pic-
ture of Gena the crocodile in
Kiev. According to an AP
story I read online, Golovko
was trying to get a picture of
the animal opening its
mouth. Instead, the phone
slipped from her fingers and
the croc got a high-tech
snack.
When Golovko told work-
ers at the aquarium what had
happened, they didn't
believe her at first. Then the
phone started ringing from
inside the crocodile.
The phone hasn't sat well
with Gena. Apparently he's
lost his appetite and
appeared to be in pain. The
article said that the veteri-
narian was considering tak-
ing Gena in for an x-ray to
see where the phone was
lodged. Surgery was consid-
ered a last resort, citing the
risk to both Gena and her
doctors.
I have been unable to find
out Gena's current condition.
Hopefully all will have come
to pass and he will have
learned a valuable lesson
about what to consume. I'd
go on, but the dogs are
telling me a stray air mole-
cule is at the door.

Laura Ware is a Sebring resi-
dent. She can be contacted by
e-mail at bookwormlady@
embarqmail.com


Page 3A


NEWSROOM
ROMONA WASHINGTON
Publisher/Executive Editor
Ext. 515
editor r@newssun.corn


SCOTT DRESSEL
Editor
Ext. 516
scott. dressel@newssun. corn
DAN HOEHNE
Sports Editor
Ext. 528
daniel. hoehne@newssun.com








Page 4A


News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


McCollum Stage


Jim McCullom was one of the founding fathers of the
Highlands Little Theatre. He was active as a director, actor,
and dedicated supporter. He appeared in the HLT's first
show in 1974, helped find its permanent home, was instru-
mental in creating the first season of phlys, and advocated
the concept of seasonal tickets. 'There isn't a lot here that
Jim wasn't a part of,' Jennifer Westergom said. She was
part of the committee that built the new stage.


News-Sun photos by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
Jim McCollum's wife Sue, and their two daughters, Amy Sullivan and Audra Bowes, were on hand for the ribbon cutting
ceremony opening the McCollum Stage. The venue will be used for smaller productions and more intimate projects like
concerts. One goal is to provide more entertainment to the community and expand the theater company's repertoire.


Members and special friends of the Highlands Little Theater gathered Friday night to dedi-
cate its new intimate stage in the memory of one of its founding, and most original, mem-
bers Jim McCollum. McCollum died unexpectedly of a heart attack in 2010.


Jennifer Westergom (third from left) thanks the Highlands Little Theatre's volunteers who
helped turn its new pavilion space into a theater. The stage is designed to provide seating
on it three, quarters of the way around. This will allow directors to experiment and audi-
ence members to feel they are a part of the production. (From left) Melanie Boulay, Greg
Johnson, Kristin Taylor, and HLT board president Art Harriman.


www.newssun.com







www.newssun.com


Fence law has


one step left


Continued from page IA
high but may not use
chain link.
Side and backyard walls
and fences located between
the front plane of the house
and the rear lot line may
reach 6 feet in height; chain
link is allowed.
Only walls or fences built
to separate residentially
zoned property from com-
mercial property. along the
shared property line, may be
up to 8 feet in height.
All chain link fences.
regardless of height. must be
built with a top rail.
There was significant
opposition to the proposed
ordinance, especially when
the council initially banned
chain link fencing in the front
of homes.
Residents argued that
chain link fences were
affordable, and that in any
case. owners should be
allowed to do as they wished
on their property.
Loretta Thompson,
appearing before the council
as a private citizen, echoed
many individuals when she
said a city government has
legitimate concerns regard-
ing a fence or wall's safety -
it should be in good repair
and not interfere with a
motorist's line of sight, for
example but that these
concerns are all code
enforcement issues and
should be left to code
enforcement officers.
"Otherwise, the council


Girl faked

abduction
Continued from page 1A
Okeechobee County Sheriff's
SWAT team," Fansler stated.
Once the girl was located
that day. Fansler said, she
admitted to having produced
the entire story to elude
school work and what she
described as a bad home life.
"The juvenile victim, now
suspect in her own abduction
investigation, admitted to
changing her voice while
making the ransom demand.
She stated she had no inten-
tion of following through and
she planned to return home.
The investigation concluded
that no other person was
involved and that the juvenile
acted alone. The juvenile was
in no danger at anytime,"
Fansler said.
"The juvenile was turned
over to her parents with crim-
inal charges pending,"
Fansler added.
Even though the kidnap-
ping turned out to be a hoax,
Fansler complimented the
departments involved in the
investigation.
"I personally would like to
commend the coordinated
efforts of the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement, the
Okeechobee Sheriff's Office
and the Lake Placid Police
Department. The level of pro-
fessionalism exhibited by the
,three agencies was phenome-
nal," Fansler stated.
The name of the individual
and her sister were not
released because of a crime
possibly involving a juvenile.







The 1eWS

is jUSt


click away!

www.newssun.com


18SB3


News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


becomes a home owners
association." Thompson said.
Despite resident objec-
tions, the only opposing vote
was cast by council president
John Clark.
"As a municipality we
have 8-foot fences," he said.
"My hang up is not allowing
residents to have them, too."
The ordinance will be
brought up for a final public
hearing and second reading
Feb. 15 at the council's regu-
lar meeting. It does not take
effect until it passes the sec-
ond reading.






Run and get

tampabayrun.com


New

surface

for the

Circle
News-Sun photo by
KATARA SIMMONS,
Re-surfacing Sebring's
Circle Drive concludes this
week with several overnight
sessions. Tuesday night the
surface was milled. Since
then crews have been pour-
ing and rolling asphalt. The
new road surface completes
the major objectives of
Circle Park's renovation.
Work on the multi-step proj-
ect began in July 2010.


Save


on your race event
late entry fee.

Purchase any 3 of the products
below and bring your receipt to
the 8 On Your Side Health and
Fitness Expo on Feb. 25 from 10
am-8 pm or Feb. 26 from 6 am-5 pm.

Race Weekend is Feb. 26-27



Kleenex Cottonelle
Toilet Paper 9.99
Double Rolls: Regular or Ultra,
18-roll pkg. Save up to 2.00


Pirate's Booty Rice
and Corn Puffs 2/5.00
Or Corn Sticks, Assorted Varieties,
3.5 to 6-oz bag Surprisingly Low Price L9


Pirate's Booty Rice
and Corn Puffs .99
Or Corn Sticks, Assorted Varieties, ..
1 to 2-oz bag Surprisingly Low Price


Egg Beaters 3/5.00 te
Assorted Varieties, 15 or 16-oz ctn.
Save up to 3.37 on 3


Healthy Choice
Fresh Mixers 2/5.00
'Or Marie Callender's Home-Style Creations,
Assorted Varieties, 6.49 to 7.95-oz bowl
Save up to .98 on 2 ..


Hunt's 100% Natural
Tomatoes 5/5.00
Assorted Varieties, 14.5-oz can
Save up to 1.45 on 5


Kellogg's Special K
Cereal 2/5.00


I


11.4 to 14-oz box or Cereal Bars,
4.4 to 4.86-oz. box,. Assorted Varieties
Save up to .98 on 2

Wyler's Light Soft
Drink Mix 2/4.00
Assorted Varieties, Sugar Free,
12-qt cnstr. Surprisingly Low Price


Zephyrhills Spring
Water 2/4.00
12-pk. 8-oz bot. or Natural, Sport Pack Bottles,
6-pk. 700-ml bot. Save up to 1.98 on 2


U by Kotex Liners 2/7.00
60-ct. box, orPads or Tampons,
14 or 18-ct. box Save up to 2.58 on 2


U by Kotex Tampons 6.99
Assorted Varieties, 36-ct. box. Save up to 2.00


Schick Hydro 5 Razor 6.99
Each pkg. Save up to 3.00


Schick Hydro 3 Razor 5.99
Each pkg. Save up to 3.00


$ The Purchase of One (1)
Huggies Diapers
Snug & Dry or Supreme,
Assorted Varieties, 48 to 156-ct. box
Limit one deal per coupon per customer. Customer is responsible '
for all applicable taxes. Reproduction or transfer of this coupon
constitutes fraud. Coupon effective Feb. 3 through Feb. 9, 2011. LU# 9720

Prices eff:'ci.'e Thursday, February 3 through Wednesday, February 9, 2011. Only in
Hill boriouigh Pa-cco. Pinellas, Highlands. Hernando, Citrus, Manatee, Sarasota, and
Polk Counutes Any item carried by Publix GreenWise Market will be at the Publix .
advertised sale price Prices nc.t effective at Publix Sabor. Quantity rights reserved.


Page 5A


discount.
il A A


- I


-S


'-q








News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


www. newssun. com


Swimmers warned about

man-of-war stings off South Florida


Associated Press
FORT LAUDERDALE Lifeguards are
warning swimmers to stay out of the waters
off South Florida because Portuguese man-of-
wair.
Bcachside cities in Broward and Palm
Beach counties have reported the neon purple
and blue sea creatures in their waters.


The man-of-war tentacles can deliver pow-
erful stings that sometimes cause swelling
and shortness of breath.
More than 20 people were treated for man-
of-war stings near the Pompano Beach Pier
on Thursday. Delray Beach Ocean Rescue has
treated about 90 people for the stings since
Wednesday.


Ride for a Cure


Courtesy photo
On Jan. 22, 56 Tanglewood residents climbed on their bikes and braved strong winds as
they rode around Lake Jackson for the Tanglewood Residents' Cancer Benefit. While these
folks rode outside the park, 30 cyclists and 40 walkers followed a route inside
Tanglewood. More than 160 gathered for lunch provided by Alan J. Holmes, Hometown
America and the folks in the Whistlestop neighborhood.



COMMUNITY BRIEFS


Continued from page 2A
agencies. AARP and oth<
senior organizations will
also be signing a
TRIAD/S.A.L.T. agreement
to promote senior safety an
to reduce the unwarranted
fear of crime that seniors
- often experience.
TRIAD is a three-way
commitment between the
Sheriff's Office, the police
chiefs, AARP and senior ci
izens who work together to
reduce the criminal victim-
ization of our older citizens
It is here that law enforce-
ment and senior citizens pu
their talents together to cre
ate and implement prograrr
to meet the needs of
Highlands County's older
residents.
Florida Hospital Heartlai
Medical Center is hosting
the event and will provide
continental breakfast.
Seating is very limited.
R.S.V.P. by Tuesday to
Grace Plants at 402-5433.

Low Vision
Information Group
meets Monday
SEBRING A special
meeting has been arranged
for the Low Vision
Information Group to meet
at noon Monday at St. Johr
United Methodist Church c
Grand Prix Drive in their
education building.
Featured speaker is Dr.
Sonya Braudway, a low
vision specialist from the
Center for Retina and
Macular Diseases.
Braudway's topic will be
"Macular Degeneration
Updates". Time for question
and answers after the lec-
ture.
For information, call
H.A.L.L.O. at 385-1196, e-
mail
halloinc@embarqmail.com
or write H.A.L.L.O., P.O.
Box 7082, Sebring, FL
33872.

Highlands Gem and
Mineral Club meets
Tuesday
SEBRING The
Highlands Gem and Miner.
Club will meet at 7 p.m.
Tuesday at Church of Chri:
3800 Sebring Parkway, rea
fellowship hall. There are i
fees or dues, and the public
is welcome.
Don Rhodes will enlight
members with his present
tion on the History of


Millstones and Milling
Around the World.
er Also available for new-
comers and rockhounds will
be the beautiful rocks and
t ores from Jack Parson's col-
lections, and the lovely wire-
wrapped stones by Anita
Wohlwend.
Amethyst is the birthstone
for February. It is one of the
most attractive forms of
quartz, varying in color from
t-
pale mauve to deep violet.
For more information, call
453-7054.
S.
Events planned at
lodges, posts
is AVON PARK
The American Legion Post
69 will host karaoke by
Naomi at 4 p.m. today. Chili
nd cook-off begins at 2 p.m.
Sons of the American Legion
a meet at 6 p.m. Monday.
Bingo is set for 1:30 p.m.
Tuesday with an Auxiliary
bake sale taking place during
the games. For details and
menu selection, call 453-
4553.
LAKE PLACID
The Lake Placid Moose
Lodge 2374 will host a
Super Bowl party starting at
5 p.m. today. Lodge is pro-
viding appetizers. Bring a
dish to share. The Legion
S meets at 5:30 p.m. Monday.
)n Loyal Order of Moose offi-
cers meet at 6:30 p.m.,
House Committee at 6:30
p.m., Women of the Moose
meet at 7 p.m. and Loyal
Order of the Moose general
meeting is at 7:30 p.m. For
details and menu selections,
call 465-0131.
The VFW 3880 will host a
"s Super Bowl party at 5:30
p.m. today with hamburgers
and wings served. Ladies
Auxiliary will meet at 10
a.m. Tuesday. For details and
menu selections, call 699-
5444.

The Van-Dells Show
at Sebring Village
SEBRING The Van-
Dells Show will be presented
at Sebring Village at 7:30
p.m. today.'
The Van-Dells, along with
al a five-piece band, offer a
variety show filled with
st,- comedy, choreography and
r tight harmonies. This fun.
no fast-paced show begins with
c songs in the '50s and runs
through the '60s. They are
en billed as the Nation's No. I
- Rock and Roll Review.
Tickets are $10. For more


information or to purchase
tickets, call 386-0045 or
273-0875.

Recreation Club
hosts events
SEBRING The Sebring
Recreation Club, 333 '
Pomegranate Ave., will host
the following events:
Monday Ladies Social
Club meets at I p.m.
Shuffleboard Scrambles at
1:15 p.m. Carry-in at 6 p.m.
Membership meeting at 7
p.m.
Thursday Shuffleboard
tournament, Pro Draw
Doubles in Avon Park at 9
a.m.
Friday Shuffleboard
tournament, Pro Draw
Doubles in Avon Park at 9
a.m. Mini-Shuffleboard
Tournament at 1:15 p.m.
Saturday 1:15 p.m., Ice
Cream Shuffleboard. Ping
pong at 3 p.m.
For more information, call
385-2966.

DeMolay serves
spaghetti lunch
SEBRING The young
men of the DeMolay will
host an all-you-can-eat
spaghetti lunch today at the
Sebring Masonic Lodge,
1809 Home Ave., from 11
a.m. until 1:30 p.m. for the
donation of $7. Menu '
includes salad, spaghetti
with meat sauce, dessert and
beverage. Tickets available
at the door.

Spaghetti dinner at
St. John UMC
SEBRING St. John
United Methodist Church
will have a spaghetti dinner
Tuesday with serving times
of 4, 5 and 6 p.m. The cost
is $7 per person. Take-outs
and walk-ins are welcome.
The church is at 3214 Grand
Prix Drive. Call 382-1736
for information.

MARSP meets
Tuesday
SEBRING The
Michigan Association of
Retired School Personnel
(MARSP) will meet at 10:30
a.m. Tuesday at the Sebring
Public Library in the confer-
ence room. The speaker will
be from Archbold Biological
Station on their resources.
Attendance is appreciated
to keep up-to-date-on your
retirement benefits. Any
questions, call 655-6825.


8 Miami-Dade County nurses

prison-bound for fraud


Associated Press
MIAMI Eight Miami-
Dade County nurses have
been sentenced to prison
and ordered to pay restitu-
tion for helping two agen-
.cies fleece millions from
Medicare.
The nurses worked for
two home health care agen-


cies, ABC Home Health and
Florida Home Health Care
Provider.
According to the Justice
Department, each of the
eight nurses pleaded guilty
last year to one count of
conspiracy to commit health
care fraud. The nurses
admitted falsifying patient


records for Medicare bene-
ficiaries to make it seem
like they qualified for serv-
ices from the two agencies.
The nurses' prison sen-
tences range from five
months to 2 1/2 years. Each
has been ordered to pay
restitution from roughly
$66,000 up to $699,000.


OBITUARIES


JOLINE M. ELLISON
Joline M. Ellison, 85, of
Sebring, Fla., passed away
.on Monday, Jan. 31, 2011 in
Sebring. She was born Jan.
25, 1926 to Joseph and Elsie
(O'Keefe) Donovan in New
York City, N.Y., and had
been a resident of Sebring
since 2003, coming from
Plantation, Fla.
She was an educator and
along with her husband
started the Kenilworth
School in Sebring, the
Jacaranda School in
Plantation and Riverside
Private School in Fort
Lauderdale, serving as prin-
cipal of each. She was a
board member of the
Association of Independent
Schools of Florida; a mem-
ber of the Red Hat Society;
the Business and
Professional Women Club;
the Women Club of Sebring;
the Pilot Club; past presi-
dent of Zonta Club and
attended St. Catherine
Catholic Church in Sebring.
She enjoyed fishing in the
Keys, making miniatures
and spending time with her
daughters and Buddy, her
toy poodle.
Mrs. Ellison is survived
by her daughters, Linda
Ellison and Donna Ellison,
both of Sebring. She was
preceded in death by her
husband of 53 years, Bert
Ellison in 2007.
A funeral service will
take place at 7 p.m. on


Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011 at
Stephenson-Nelson Funeral
Home, Sebring, with Father
Leo Frechette officiating.
The family will receive
friends the hour preceding
the service, beginning at 6
p.m. Memorial donations
may be made in her memory
to Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church, 595 E.
Main St., Avon Park, FL
33825. Arrangements have
been entrusted to:
Stephenson-Nelson
Funeral Home
Sebring, Florida 33870
863-385-0125
www.stephensonnelsonfh.com,

CHARLES H. ZIEGLER
Charles H. Ziegler, 87, of
SSebring, Fla..
died peacefully
Thursday, Feb. 3,
2011 at his
Sebring residence. Charles
was born in Lebanon, Pa.,
son of the late Paul H. and
Nettie (Hibshman) Ziegler.
Following high school, he
worked for Bethlehem Steel
prior to joining the U.S.
States Marine Corps, during
World War II. Following the
,war he returned to
Bethlehem Steel. In 1952 he
purchased Ziegler Ice
Cream from his father, retir-
ing in 1974 and moved to
Sebring. He worked for
Spofford Stage for several
years where he enjoyed
operating a bulldozer. A 50-
year member of Masonic


Dare


Lodge 226, a past com-
mander of Knights Templar
24 and York Rite Bodies, all
of Lebanon, Pa. His hobby
was classic automobiles.
Charles was a member of
Sebring Church of the
Brethren.
He was preceded in death
by a son, Randy Ziegler;
brother, Caleb Ziegler; and
sisters, Pauline Shuey,.Erma
Rohrer, Loretta Ziegler. He
is survived by his loving
wife, Miriam M. Ziegler,
Sebring; children and their
spouses, Charlene (Richard)
Truex of Yardley, Pa., Gary
Ziegler of Orlando, Fla.,
Charles (Jean) Ziegler of
North Wales, Pa., Loretta
(Dr. Philip) Grossman of
Coral Gables, Fla. and Jane
Ziegler of Elizabethtown,
Pa.; sisters, Anna Dourte of
Lebanon, Pa. and Barbara
Dennis of Texas; grandchil-
dren, Laura Ziegler, Bryan
Ziegler, Eric Grossman,
Lanny Grossman and Todd
Truex; and two great-grand-
children.
Memorials may be made
to American Heart
Association. A graveside
service will be held at a
later date in Lebanon, Pa..
Condolences may be
expressed at: www.morrisfu-
neralchapel.com.
Morris Funeral Chapel
Sebring, Florida 33870
863-385-0101


to


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Page 6A














Continued from page 1A
at one watering, not just the
one plant traditionally
watered in a typical farm
set-up.
"This type of farming can
be set up anywhere. It does-
n't take a lot of space. We
are currently growing about
16,000 strawberry plants in a
quarter acre of land,"
McCracken said.
Many of the plants are
watered three times a day,
but with the hydroponics
setup where the water trick-
les down from the top to the
bottom, McCracken gets bet-
ter results with less water
than traditional farming.
"If you water just once per
day and you skip a day, you
can stress the plants, and
that can stunt the growth.
We water them often but
water them less. We put less
than a quart of water on 20
plants. The micro jets run for
less than two minutes per
row.
It is not only the growing
methods, but the family
atmosphere that keeps folks
coming to the farm.
"We are set up for U-pick,
not for mass production,"
said McCracken.
"We like to keep it simple.
All of our business is driven
by word of mouth. We don't
want a big show on U.S. 27.
We are off the beaten path,
and want to stay that way.
"It's like finding those
hidden restaurants here in
Florida. You know, the ones
that only the locals know
about that are hidden around
a lake or back in the unde-
veloped areas. That's where
the best food can be found,"
McCracken said as handed
out homemade pineapple and
vanilla ice cream samples.
"This is a new product,
but we make it with 10 per-
cent milk instead of the 5
percent found in stores.
Makes it creamier,"
McCracken pointed out.
Along with tomatoes, pep-
pers, green beans, broccoli,
cauliflower and collard
greens, McCracken farms
also offers unique vegetables
like kale, kohlrabi and other


News-Sun + Sunday, February 6, 2011


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Ingrid Markland frequently shops at the McCracken Farm Store in Sebring. Markland
raved about the quality of the products, the low prices and the outstanding customer serv-
ice.


cabbages and lettuces.
"There is a lot of cultural
diversity in Highlands
County, and with that diver-
sity comes different tastes,"
McCracken explained as he
pulled up an alien-looking
kohlrabi.
The taste and texture of
kohlrabi are similar to those
of a broccoli stem or cab-
bage heart, but milder and
sweeter, McCracken said.
The freshness, family and
variety are certainly a plus,
but McCracken also boasted
that the prices are what is
driving a lot of business.
"The prices for fresh veg-
etables are less than those in
your traditional grocery sec-
tion.
"Where you would pay
about $2.50 for 5 ounces of
lettuce in the grocery store,
we give you half a pound for
$2," he said.
"And this is healthier for
you. For the first three days
after being picked, lettuce
gives you 100 percent nutri-
tional value. So imagine how
little nutrients are left in
grocery store lettuce, which
is kept for several clays
before it hits the shelf,"
McCracken asserted.
Even though the farm


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
John Schoonover and his wife Joan make weekly visits to
McCracken's mostly for the ice cream, but also enjoy pick-
ing their own fruits and vegetables on the farm in Sebring.


boasts 15-20 different vari-
eties of lettuce, there is no
milk, no cheese and no
meats.
"We tried seafood for .
awhile, but that didn't work
out. But we do have free-
range chicken eggs. We can't
keep the eggs in stock even
overnight. As soon as we
gather those, they are gone."
The farm even boasts a
discount aisle.
"Well, there are those that
need a bit of a break on even
our prices. We set this up to
help out with the cost
aspect," McCracken said.
"This is a place where you
can come and get your


greens without a lot of spray,
and you can pick your own.
It's really a simple process
really. You supply plenty of
sunlight, consistent water,
and very little fertilizer and
you get healthy plants. And
healthy vegetables leads to
-healthy people."
To visit McCracken'
Farms, travel C.R. 17 to
Powerline Road and turn to
the east. Go a quarter of a
mile to Harnage Road and
turn to the north, then travel
to the end and the barn is on
the right.
If you get lost, give Mike
a call at 38 1-6147 or call the
farm at 382-4348.


Page 7A


Large crowd gathers to

debate land use issues

and saving the Everglades


By CHRISTOPHER
TUFFLEY

SEBRING The
Sebring Civic Center was
filled to overflowing Friday
night as sportsmen, ranch-
ers, conservationists, and
other interested parties
gathered for the first series
of meetings regarding the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service's proposed Greater
Everglades Partnership
Initiative which includes
the proposed Everglades
-Headwaters Refuge and
Conservation Area
National Wildlife Refuge.
According to the service,
the greater Everglades
landscape covers a 4.5 mil-
lion-acre region of working
ranches and wilderness. It
extends from the outskirts
of Orlando south through
the Kissimmee River valley
to Lake Okeechobee and
southwest to Florida
Panther National Wild
Refuge and the Big Cypress
Preserve.
The goals of the initia-
tive are to help conserve
rural working ranches; pro-
tect and restore habitat;
protect, improve and
restore water quality and
wetlands; and connect a
network of existing conser-
vation lands and wild life
corridors, supporting the
Everglades restoration
efforts.
The refuge itself will
encompass 150,000 acres
when complete. Some of
the land will be bought out-
right, but other instruments
will be used too. For exam-
ple, conservation ease-
ments, leases, landowner
assistance grants and agree-
ments as well as fee titles
acquisition and wetland,
conservation and mitiga-
tion banks.
According to the service,
it will accomplish its objec-
tives using a partnership
approach in the planning.
Ranchers and land hold-
ers will be a part of the dis-


cussions, as will federal
agencies, Florida state
agencies, the Seminole and
Miccosukee Tribal govern-
ments, and county govern-
ment.
Non-government organi-
zations are included, like
the Nature Conservancy,
Florida Farm Bureau, the
Cattleman's Association,
ranchers, local conserva-
tion groups and key com-
munity leaders.
The large crowd Friday
night included people from
a variety of perspectives.
Some individuals were all
in favor of the proposal,
others totally opposed.
Among those opposed
were two main groups who
showed a marked distrust
of the federal government
- those who worried they
would not be able to use
their airboats, swamp bug-
gies or ATVs as they have
in the past; and land owners
who worried their property
would be bought out from
under them.
There was an exchange
between a member of the
audience and a representa-
tive of Fish & Wild Life.
"Can you guarantee we
won't have to sell?" the
man asked.
"We approach with an
offer of an appraisal," the
representative said. "If you
don't want an appraisal, we
won't make an offer."
"But do you guarantee
it?"
"That is our policy."
"Is it guaranteed?"
"That's our current poli-
cy."
The exchange drew loud
cat calls of derision.
On the other hand, many
people rose in support of
creating a refuge, one indi-
vidual saying "We should
have had this before."
This was the only meet-
ing scheduled for
Highlands County. Go to
EvergladesHeadwatersProp
osal@fws.gov for a listing
of other meetings.


Local artist project open to all those interested


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge @ newssun .comn
SEBRING The
Highlands Arts League is
holding free workshops on
Tuesday, and they are open
to everyone, according to
artist John Lasco.
"They are not really class-
es; they are more like work-
shops and lectures," Lasco
said. "It.is very hands on, and
the series will include ideas
for artists to help sell their
works."
The series, called Arts'
Sparks at the Yellow House,
will be conducted from 6-
7:30 p.m. every Tuesday at
198 Lakeview Drive, and will
have free refreshments along
with the instruction and prac-
tice, Lasco said.
The workshops are free to
the public.
"There is a a mixed bag of
the arts involved in the proj-


ect, and we are looking to
-promote local artists through
community outreach;" said
Lasco, who works in colored
pencil.
One of the local artists
involved, Phyllis Jones-
Behrens, will hold a work-
shop on collages this
Tuesday, working with color,
old magazines and glue.
"Anyone can do it,"
Behrens said. "It's all about
color. In a collage, you tear
strips of magazine and apply
them to a canvas in such a
way as to make a picture.
What picture you make is up
to you, but this involves no
drawing, no painting and is
very simple."
Behrens' main focus is
painting in acrylic, she said,
and her focus is on female
subjects.
"I have to paint. To me, art
validates me, and when oth-


ers see it and appreciate what
you have done, it validates
your work," Behrens said.
But to Behrens, the work is
not so much about "what it
is," as to what others per-
ceive.
"It's about expression, and
what others read into your
work. I have lupus, and the
painting helps with the pain
and living with the disease,
but when others look at my
paintings and put their own
interpretations into it, it
makes it worthwhile," she
said.
"I am 64, and I have been
painting since I was 11 years
old, and when someone buys
your work, that really vali-
dates your efforts," she
added.
"This area has so many
good artists, and art is for
everybody, that is why I am
helping out on the project.


My next goal in life is to suc-
ceed as an artist, but we are
doing this to show that art is
for everyone. What would the
world be without art?"
Behrens asked.
The project already has
Tuesday booked into April.
and will continue as long as
there is interest, according to
Lasco.
Those who would like
more information are encour-
aged to call the Art League at
385-5312 or to contact the
project's organizer, Loretta
Dewitt. at 385-4474.


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Continued from page 2A
it is a violation of the rules," Macbeth said.
On explaining his copying procedures,
Macbeth said that he had several copiers in
his office, one which was used just for family
business and two were used for clients, like
the county.
One copier has a function that allows the
user to key in the client's code before making
copies so that they are billed properly, the
other copier is tracked by a manual log.
"It's been this way for 20 some years, and
it has always been this way. If there's to be a
change, then that's fine," Macbeth said.
"Mr. Colby asked me what had been


copied. Well, I don't keep a spare copy of
what I have copied so that I can turn them in
with my invoice at the end of the month so
that you will know what I copied," Macbeth
explained. "What you are getting is a count
that is part manual on one, and Autotron on
the other one."
The commissioners remained silent during
the exchange, but Chairwoman Barbara
Stewart did inform the public that there
would be a future workshop to discuss the
county attorney position.
An e-mail to Macbeth to clarify his state-
ments was not returned.


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51









News-Sun + Sunday, February 6, 2011


ACCU ip."rRN


www.newssun.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. .,2011

AccuWeather.com


National Forecast for February 6


TODAY


Mostly cloudy with
spotty showers

High.75/Low 53
Winds: E at 4-8 mph.


MONDAY


TUESDAY


WEDNESDAY


THURSDAY


Breezy with rain and a Plenty of sun More sun than clouds Mostly cloudy, chance
thunderstorm for rain


High 75/Low 45
Winds: SW at 12-25 mph.


High 65/Low 45
Winds: NNW at 6-12 mph.


Regional forecast _

Tallahdssoe-.... ,"-,
64/48
SJacks nville
-' 60/50,.


Avon Park
75/53
*
Sebring
75,53
S",


Lake Placid
75/62

Venus
75/62'


. --.:
St. Petersburg
67/57'




Miai

8


Lorida
76/54


/ I

Shown is today's
weather. Temperatures
are today's highs and
tonight's lows


Regional summary: Mostly cloudy today with a couple of showers. Patchy
clouds tonight. Breezy tomorrow with rain and a thunderstorm. Tuesday:
plenty of sun. Wednesday: more sun than clouds. Thursday: rain and a thun-
derstorm possible.


High 72/Low 54
Winds: ENE at 7-14 mph.


High 74/Low 51
Winds: SW at 8-16 mph.


Heat index /
For 3 p.m. today
Relative humidity .................... 60%
Expected air temperature ........ 73"
Makes it feel like .................... 730

Weather History
The "Blizzard of '78" was in its early
stages on this date in 1978. It
dumped 14 inches in Baltimore, 16
inches in Philadelphia and 18 inch-
es in New York City.

Farm report t.
A couple ct showers
today. Winds east-north-
east 4-8 mph. Expect less than 2
hours of sunshine with a 60%
chance of precipitation and average
relative humidity 70%.

Water restrictions
* Even addresses may water on
Thursday and Sunday.
* Odd addresses may water on
Wednesday and Saturday.
* All watering should take place before
10 a.m. and after 4 p.m.
AccuWeather UV Index"
For l.:.0 a
9 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 3 p.m. 5 p.m.
0 2 2 2 0
The higher the UV index number, the greater
the need for eye and skin protection.
0-2, }.ow; 3-5, Moderate; 6-7, High;
8-10, Very h.4' 11+ Extreme


8ilnd s '.
f2 ,'* .
6 .Dn


S.an Francisco 34/
,4. 67.16




L Angeles .
79j54..' -
SElPas
S-- 49n25
CPLE SANJ -"--,.TN


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are
highs for the day. Forecast high and low temperatures are given for selected cities.


*~,'' 4 & 4 -* '* .'
-''V '. . .. Showers
S *,., :,. i nn.I_. T-storm

-. "' Detroit 'New York
40Rain
M-qhClca *gR
ltainssas i .4 33 36 W3 shingtn
CLD) -Snow
:. ,% i ....L i .. ,' *i Ice

_*," ,i .Atlanta .'
o I t FRONTS

Cold
,Houston
64135 .,, ,'. Warm
M-am 80/67 =. Stationary
80167


-10s -05 10s 20a 40s 506 60s 708
National summary: Dry weather will return to the majority of the Eastern Seaboard today. A bit of snow from a
departing storm system will linger in Maine for the first part of the day. An area of high pressure edging Into the
Southeast will pump milder air into the region. Meanwhile, a storm system diving across the middle of the country
will spread snow over much of the northern and central Plains and Midwest. A few inches of snow could pile up
from Iowa to Michigan. Cold air will once again invade the northern Plains in the wake of this system.


Sun and moon

Today Sunrise .... 7:08 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:13 p.m.
Moonrise .. 8:51 a.m.
Moonset .... 9:28 p.m.
Monday Sunrise .... 7:07 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:13 p.m.
Moonrise .. 9:22 a.m.
Moonset .. 10:19 p.m.


Moon phases


First Full Last New
Feb11 Feb18 Feb24 Mar4


Almanac
Temperature
(Readings at Archbold Biological Station
In Lake Placid)
High Tuesday ...................82
Low Tuesday .. 60
High Wednesday ............. 88
Low Wednesday ................... 60
High Thursday ................... 82
Low Thursday .......................... 65
Precipitation
Tuesday ........................... 0.00"
Wednesday ...................... 0.00"
Thursday ............................ 0.00"
Month to date ................... 2.65"
Year to date .....................2.65"
Barometer
Tuesday ........................... 30.08
Wednesday ................. 30.12


Thursday . 30 09
Tides
(Readings at St. Petersburg)
High ............... ......... 3:13 a.m.
Low ....................... 9:39 a.m.
High .................... 3:49 p.m.
Low .................,.... 10:04 p.m.
(Readings at Palm Beach)
High ........................ 10:29 a.m.
Low ........................... 4:07 a.m .
High ............................ 10:51 p.m.
Low ......................... 4:27 p.m.
Lake Levels
Lake Jackson ................. 78.36'
Lake Okeechobee ........... 12.48'
Normal .......................... 14.51'


Florida cities


city
Daytona Beach
Ft. Laud. Bch
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead AFB
Jacksonville
Key West
Miami
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
W Palm Bch


Today
HI Lo W
62 55 sh
79 67 pc
76 62 c
61 51 pc
78 66 pc
60 50 pc
76 69 pc
80 67 pc
68 57 sh
62 46 s
69 57 sh
64 48 pc
64 57 sh
77 65 pc


U.S. cities


Tomorrow Tuesday
HI Lo W Hi Lo W
69 44 r 60 42 s
82 53 pc 71 56 s
77 52 t 68 48 s
68 36 r 58 34 s
80 54 pc 70 54 s
67 36 r 57 36 s
* 77 62 pc 67 60 s
80 57 pc 72 56 s
73 45 r 65 46 s
61 31 sh 54 36 s
74 49 r 66 46 s
63 31 sh 58 31 s
67 44 r 63 47 s
81 50 pc 68 52 s


City
Albuquerque
Atlanta
Baltimore
Birmingham
Boston
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cleveland
Columbus
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Harrisburg


Today
HI Lo W
37 15 c
54 39 s
44 28 s
56 39 s
39 26 pc
56 32 s
30 18 sn
33 16 sn
36 28 c
40 31 c
44 29 c
34 16 sn
33 25 sn
40 26 pc


World cities


Tomorrow
HI Lo W
43 24 c
53 29 sh
49 33 pc
49 25 sh
39 29 po
53 31 sh
40 3 sn
22 3 c
32 12 sn
36 16 sn
45 37 pc
44 5 c
31 7 sf
41 27 c


Tuesday
HI Lo W
46 19 PC
50 32 pc
38 18 pc
50 29 pc
32 13 sn
48 29 pc
18 -1 sn
7 .9 c
17 5 c
22 6 c
47 23 pc
27 -3 sn
18 5 c
32 16 pc


City
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Lexington
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans


Today
Hi Lo W
81 68 r
64 35 s
38 25 c
60 50 pc
34 11 an
48 33 pc
46 30 C
79 54 s
46 34 c
50 33 pc
80 67 pc
26 1 c
50 36 pc
64 43 s


Tomorrow
Hi Lo W
78 68 sh
55 37 .
30 8 sn
67 36 r
25 5 c
39 19 sn
42 24 pc
72 52 s
39 20 sf
37 26 c
80 57 pc
8 -13 c
43 25 sn
51 34 pc


Tuesday
HI Lo W
80 68 sh
55 40 p.:
16 -2 c
57 36 s
11 -5 C
28 11 c
44 26 pc
67 49 pc
28 13 pc
36 26 pc
72 56 s
2 -9 pc
36 22 pc
54 40 S


Today
City Hi Lo W
rJ 'rflorf "'ly 410 30 .0 C
riNOm k 50 36 s
Oklahoma City 38 24 sn
Philadelphia 42 30 s
Phoenix 68 45 i
Pitnururn 38 29 c
Portland 39 14 sn
i;i.:..n 54 33 s
R,.'che'nar 34 26 o
Ft L'urS 37 22 sn
San Francisco 67 46 s
Seattle 54 42 r
Tampa 64 5, 7r,
Washington, DC48 33 s


Tomorrow
HI Lo W
43 32 pc
55 39 Ip.
42 ;5 p.:
44 32 pc
72 45 s
39 21 sn
37 28 pc
57 34 pc
35 16 sn
30 14 ls
62 45 s
49 35 r
67 44 r
48 33 pc


Tuesday
HI LoW
35 19 pc
48 26 pc
30 11 sn
37 20 pc
71 45 --
24 sn
31 1 sn
45 26 pc
19 10 vn
21 8 pC
62 42 s
46 32 s
63 47 s
42 23 pc


city
Acapulco
Berlin
Calgary
Dublin
Edmonton
Freeport
Geneva
Hong Kong
Jerusalem
Kiev


Today
HI Lo W
88 72 S
43 38 r
16 3c
SO 39 r -
11-12 pc
79 64 po
59 40 s
73 63 pc
59 48 s
42 23 pc


City
London
Montreal
Nice
Ottawa
Quebec
Rio de Janeiro
Sydney
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy,
sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sl-snow flurries,
an-snow, I-ice.


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Page 8A


Five-Day forecast for Highlands County.


Today
HI LOW
51 47 sh
27 19 c
70 53 a
30 17 an
23 14 c
95 78 8
89 69 t
34 24 an
45 41 r
14-11 an


(


i


-lowylCp



OAL








SECTION



SSUSINESS

News-Sun


Sunday, February 6, 2011


Personal
Finance
Jason Alderman

Don't let

a layoff

catch you

off guard
Chances are you or
someone you know have
been laid off recently.
Being unemployed is dif-
ficult enough, but in a
cruel twist, the longer
you're out of work, the
harder it can be to find a
job. And, when work
does finally materialize,
it's often a lower-paying
position. This double
whammy can damage
your finances for years to
come.
If you've recently been
laid off or worry your job
may be in jeopardy, there
are several steps you
should take immediately
to protect yourself finan-
cially:
Investigate severance
benefits. Employers
aren't obligated to pro-
vide severance unless it's
part of an employment
agreement, but it doesn't
hurt to ask. Use knowl-
edge of your company's
See LAYOFF, page 2B


MCT photo


Estimates of Verizon's iPhone sales this year range from 5 million to 13 million.

Verizon sees 'record' first-

day sales with iPhone


By PETER SVENSSON
AP Technology Writer
NEW YORK Verizon Wireless on
Friday said its first day of taking online
orders for the iPhone produced record sales,
and it's stopped taking orders until
Wednesday.
The cell phone carrier said that in just two
hours Thursday morning, between 3 a.m. and
5 a.m., more customers had ordered the
phone than in the full day of any previous
phone launch.
The company didn't specify how many
iPhones had been ordered. It halted orders at
8:10 p.m. Thursday, and said it will resume
taking orders at 3 a.m. on Wednesday.
It's only taking orders from current
Verizon subscribers. The phone will be avail-
able in stores for the general public next
Thursday, but supplies are likely to be tight.
AT&T Inc. has so far been the exclusive
carrier of Apple Inc.'s popular phone in the


Which



doesn't n







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U.S. It activated 15.2 million of them last
year. Analyst estimates for Verizon iPhone
sales this year vary widely, from 5 million to
13 million. Analysts expect the sales to
Verizon subscribers will be strong, but the
big question is how many iPhone buyers will
be jumping ship from other carriers.
Barclays Capital analyst James Ratcliffe
wrote in a research note Friday that he had
been expecting that AT&T would still be able
to add a net 250,000 subscribers on contract-
based plans in the first quarter, but news of
the strong iPhone pre-orders on Verizon
prompted him to lower that forecast to zero.
Verizon shares fell 23 cents to $36.15 in
morning trading. AT&T shares fell 6 cents to
$27.93. Both stocks are close to their two-
year highs.
Verizon is'offering trade-in rebates for new
customers, which can help offset the cost of
See VERIZON, page 2B


Seminars teach steps

for building better

business Web sites


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK In the
electronic age, Web sites
are a standard tool for busi-
nesses to use in marketing
their products and services
and communicating with
customers. South Florida
Community College's
Corporate and Continuing
Education Department is
teaching business owners
how to develop, design, and
manage. effective websites
through a seminar series,
Go Global from the
Heartland, at the SFCC
Highlands Campus.
A two-part introduction
to e-commerce (CRN
21601) meets Thursday,
Feb. 10. A two-part inter-
mediate series (CRN
21602) meets Friday, Feb.
11. Tuition is $149 for each
day, or $249 for all four
classes.


The introductory semi-
nars are "Introduction to E-
Commerce," 9-11 a.m., and
"Designing Your First
Website," 1-5 p.m.
Participants will learn how
to register a domain name,
select a host provider, use
templates to design basic
Web sites, and understand
technical terms such as
HTML, CSS, Flash, and
bandwidth.
Intermediate seminars
cover "Website Marketing,"
9-11 a.m., and "Advanced
E-Commerce," 1-5 p.m.
These seminars explain
how to use various tools to
determine a website's pop-
ularity and how to reach
new customers through
Web-based advertising.
A professional will eval-
uate local Web sites for
See SEMINAR, page 2B


New realty company open
for business in Sebring


By SAMANTHA GHOLAR
sgholar@newssun.com
SEBRING An experi-
enced Realtor has recently
stepped away from one
company and started her
very own. Jo-Ann Atchley
is a 30-year veteran in the
real estate business. She's
worked throughout the state
of Florida as well as others.
Jo-Ann Atchley Realty is
Atchley's way of better
serving the community and
her customers.


Atchley has 25 years of
sales and management. She
is also a multi-million dol-
lar producer. Atchley
received her GRI and CRS
designations as well.
Atchley has assisted hun-
dreds of families in pur-
chasing the dream homes
and fulfilling the American
dream of homeownership.
For more information or
if interested in real estate
Atchley can be reached at
655-2308.


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of these



Ced tuning?


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www.newssun.com


News-Sun Sunday. February 6, 2011


Page 2B

Rl tINTFS


Sebring Edward Jones branch team recognized for outstanding client service


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING Alan J. Holmes. a
financial advisor with Edward
Jones in Sebring, and Stacy M.
Smith, the branch office administra-
tor, recently were honored by the
firm for their performance and
client service excellence.
Holmes and Smith were one of
only 50 branch teams out of the
firm's 12,000 selected to attend
Edward Jones' first Drucker 100
Conference at the firm's headquar-


ters in St. Louis.
The two-day meeting pools
Edward Jones' financial advisors
and branch office administrators for
discussions with the firm's manage-
ment about issues from simplifying
and serving complex client solu-
tions to achieving work/life bal-
ance.
The Drucker 100 Conference is
named after the late Peter Drucker,
perhaps the greatest management
thinker of the 20th century. The


author of several influential books
including. "The Effective Executive
and The Practice of Management,"
Drucker worked as a consultant to
Edward Jones from the 1980s until
his death in 2005.
Edward Jones provides financial
services for individual investors in
the United States and, through its
affiliate, in Canada. Every aspect of
the firm's business, from the types
of investment options offered to the
location of branch offices, is


designed to cater to individual
investors in the communities in
which they live and work.
The firm's 12,000-plus financial
advisors work directly with nearly 7
million clients to understand their
personal goals from college sav-
ings to retirement and create
long-term investment solutions that
emphasize a well-balanced portfo-
lio and a buy-and-hold strategy.
Edward Jones embraces the impor-
tance of building long-term, face-


to-face relationships with clients,
helping them to understand and
make sense of the investment
options available today.
Edward Jones, which ranked No.
11 on Fortune magazine's "100 Best
Companies to Work For" in 2011, is
headquartered in St. Louis. The
Edward Jones web site is located at
www.edwardjones.com, and its
recruiting web site is
www.careers.edwardjones.com.
Member SIPC.


Metro Services
At one point in the 2008
Oscar-nominated film
"Frost/Nixon," former
President Richard Nixon,
played by Frank Langella,
says, "Retired people are the
most bored people in the
world."
While some retirees
might scoff at that remark,
others no doubt agree
there's an element of truth
to it.
Perhaps boredom is one
reason many seniors contin-
ue to work past retirement
age. According to the
Congressional Research
Service (CRS), 47 percent
of male seniors and 34 per-
cent of female seniors were
employed in 2007.
That those figures were
from 2007 is significant, as
it indicates this was before
the economic downturn of
2008-09, a consequence of
which was more seniors
returning to the workforce.
For many seniors, though,
working isn't simply a
means to earn money. In
fact, seniors who continued
working past the age of 70
earned an average of just
$20,000 in 2007. Seniors
also tend to work to have
something to do.
For seniors looking to do
just that, there are a host of
employment or even volun-
teer opportunities that can
help seniors stay busy and
possibly put a little extra
money in their pockets.
Local park service.
Many local park services
hire seniors to help keep the
parks clean. These are often
seasonal opportunities,
making them ideal for sen-
iors who live in different
cities depending on the sea-
sons.
Golf course. Golf
courses are other seasonal
businesses, at least in much
of the country, that also
boast lots of part-time
opportunities for seniors.



Seminar

to help

local biz

go global
Continued from page 1A
their strengths and weak-
ness. Participants may
submit their own Web
sites for evaluations by e-
mailing the domain
names to .keyl@south-
florida.edu or calling
Lorrie Key, CCE program
coordinator, at 784-7033.
For more information
about Go Global from the
Heartland, contact Key.
Register at any SFCC
campus or center, or call
453-6661,465-3003,494-
7500, or 773-2252, ext.
7139.


Get the paper
"ei v- .-u

:. f



delivered to qoul
NIi K ; IN ~if1-385-61


Metro Services
Seniors looking to work or volunteer should consider
working at the local library.


For example, golf courses
need rangers, who ensure all
golfers play by the rules and
respect the course, and even
maintenance staff, who do
everything from cut the
grass to maintaining gar-
dens. These can also pull
double duty, providing sen-
iors with daily exercise to
help them stay healthy.
Volunteer. Many pro-
grams that help indigent cit-
izens get by every day wel-
come seniors as volunteers.
Meal delivery services and
other programs that cater to
the sick are often in need of
a helping hand.
School systems. Local
school districts also have
volunteer opportunities that
can be ideal for seniors.
Positions such as crossing
guard or even helping out
with the local athletic teams
don't require much of a
commitment and can be
rewarding and fun for sen-


iors.
Consultant work.
Seniors who miss the thrill
of business don't have to
give it up completely simply
because they're retired.
Many seniors earn a hand-
some amount of money by
working as consultants,
using their vast experience
to help the next generation.
What's more, consultants
often work on their own
schedule, an ideal situation
for seniors with a passion
for business but an equal
passion for the positives of
retirement.
Library. Libraries
might not be as popular as
they, once were, but many
are still going strong, and
some even use volunteers
and part-time employees to
keep their operations run-
ning smoothly. Many
libraries prefer hiring sen-
iors thanks to their reliabili-
ty and good attitude.


Verizon sets records

with iPhone sales


Continued from page 1A
breaking a contract with
AT&T. For instance, it's
offering $212 for a 16-giga-
byte iPhone 4 in good condi-
tion. AT&T's fee for break-
ing an iPhone 4 contract
early is $325, but that's pro-
rated by $10 per month.
On Thursday, Verizon
revealed that it will slow
down traffic for heavy data
users on unlimited plans if
they're hogging the local cell


tower. This only applies to
subscribers signing up for a
new data plan, or renewing a
contract. Since the unlimited
data plan is required for the
iPhone, Verizon is reserving
the right to throttle all iPhone
traffic.
It also said it will conserve
data capacity by recoding all
online video requested by
data subscribers. It said the
effect on image quality
should be minimal.


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Layoff can affect your credit for

years if you're not prepared


Continued from page 1B
severance policies and
what others have gotten to
negotiate a better package.
Common severance bene-
fits include:
Severance pay, usually
based on annual wages and
years of service.
Extended health care
insurance and assistance
paying premiums.
Temporary use of com-
pany resources, such as
office space or equipment.
Outplacement counsel-
ing.
Apply for unemployment.
Depending on your length of
employment and other fac-
tors, you may qualify for
unemployment insurance
payments. The waiting peri-
od is based on the date you
file, not when you lose your
job, so apply immediately.
Rein in expenses. Even if
you've built up a consider-
able emergency war chest,
long-term unemployment
can devastate your savings.
Analyze your budget care-
fully and track all expenses,
looking for non-essentials to
trim (unnecessary vehicles,
eating out, cable TV, new
clothes, etc.)
Manage your bills.


Ordinarily, making extra
mortgage, loan and credit
card payments is.a great
financial strategy, but if
you're facing unemploy-
ment, it may make sense to
scale back payments to boost
your available savings to pay
bills. Just be sure to always
make at least minimum pay-
ments on time; otherwise,
you risk facing higher inter-
est-rates and damaging your
credit score.
Also, this may bethe one
time it makes sense to sus-
pend 401(k) contributions to
accumulate more cash. If
you later determine your job
is safe, ask whether your
employer will allow a year-
end catch-up contribution.
Protect your 401(k). After
being laid off, you have sev-
eral options for your 401(k)
balance:
If allowed, leave it in
your former employer's
plan, (Although, if it's less
than $5,000, you may be
required to close the
account.)
Roll it over into a new
employer's plan, if it has
one.
Roll it over into a regu-
lar or Roth IRA. (With a
Roth, you'll pay income tax


I F.' ________________
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on the amount when filing
this year's taxes; however,
you won't be taxed on sub-
sequent earnings at retire-
ment).
Take a lump-sum cash
payout. (Rarely a good idea.
It significantly reduces your
retirement savings and you'll
owe income tax on the
amount plus a 10 percent
early withdrawal penalty
unless you're over age 55 or
disabled.)
Also note that outstanding
401(k) loans must be repaid,
usually within 30 days of
leaving your job, or you'll
owe taxes and an early dis-
tribution penalty if you're
under age 59 1/2. Consult a
financial professional to
learn more about the finan-
cial consequences of 401(k)
distributions.
Being laid off can be very
stressful and expensive, but
if you're prepared with a
good game plan, you can
minimize the damage to your
financial well being.

Jason Alderman directs Visa's
financial education programs.
To participate in a free, online
Financial Literacy and
Education Summit on April 4,
go to www.practicalmoneyskills.
com/summit2011.


IjI


liii L "



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the disease. You must elect yourself to lead against it. It is a potential
matter of life and death.

Melanoma
*Usually a non-symptomatic growth on the skin with multiple colors and irregular edges.

We can protect you against this silent killer.


We are your skin police.


Call now, elect a proactive preventative skin
team.


American Institute of Dermatology, P.A.


Darrin A. Rotman, M.D.
Julie lellimo, P.A.-C
Jennifer Wolf, P.A.-C


Medicare and all major insurances accepted in
network*


New Patients Welcome


863-386-0786
*individual must call for verification of benefits. This is not a guarantee.


Job opportunities



abound for seniors









www.newssun. com


News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


The Community Calendar pro-
vides a brief listing of local
clubs and organizations who
meet on a regular basis. It is
the responsibility of the group
to update the News-Sun on
any changes in this listing by
calling 385-6155, ext. 516;
send any changes by e-mail to
editor@newssun.com,; or mail
them to News-Sun Community
Calendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring, FL 33870.

SUNDAY
American Legion Post 25
Lake Placid has lounge hours
from 1-9 p.m. Live music is
from 5-8 p.m. For details, call
465-7940.
American Legion Post 74
open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6
p.m. Members and guests
only. Post is at 528 N. Pine
St., Sebring. Call 471-1448.
Highlands Shrine Club,
2604 State Road 17 South, at
2-4 p.m. has country music
played by Just Country.
Donation $3 for single, and $5
for couple. Refreshments
available. Everyone welcome.
Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 lounge is open from 1-7
p.m. Card games start at 1:30
p.m. The lodge is open to
members and their guests. For
details, call 465-2661.
Lake Placid Moose has
karaoke in the pavilion.
Horseshoes played at 9:30
a.m. Food available at 4 p.m.
Open to members and quali-
fied guests only.
Loyal Order of Moose,
Highlands County Lodge No.
2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon
Park. Cards start at 4 p.m.
Music outside Tiki Hut at 3
p.m. Lodge phone number
452-0579.
Overeaters Anonymous,
meets from 4-5 p.m. in second
floor conference room No. 3 at
Florida Hospital Heartland
Medical Center, 4200 Sun 'N
Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 382-
7731. No dues, fees or weigh-
ins. For details on the organi-
zation, go to www.oa.org.
Ridge Area Missionary
Soldiers Avon Park
Pathfinder Club meets from 9
a.m. to noon every first and
third Sunday at 58 E. Sixth St.,
Avon Park. Call 471-2143.
Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the
club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring.
Call 655-4007.
Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 offers NASCAR racing in
the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar
open and kitchen open from 2-
5 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S.
98, Sebring. Call 655-3920.
Society for Creative
Anachronism (Local
Chapter: Shire of Stagridge)
meets at 2 p.m. first and third
Sunday at Brewster's Coffee
House on U.S. 27 in Sebring.
Call 214-5522.
The Artists' Group at South
Florida Community College will
hold a critique clinic the first
Sunday of every month, 2-4
p.m., at the Hotel Jacaranda,
Avon Park. Professional local
.artists will discuss and evalu-
ate participants' paintings. The
fee is $5 with a two painting
limit. For more information, call
784-7346.
* U.S. Military Vets
Motorcycle Club meets at 1
p.m. on the first Sunday of
each month at VFW Post
9853, State Road 64 West and
North Oliva Drive. For informa-
tion call Hocky at (954) 592-
4847
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880 serves hamburgers
from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays
poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post,
1224 County Road 621 East,
Lake Placid. Call 699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 plays euchre at
1:30 p.m. and E&J Karaoke is
'from 4:30-7:30 p.m. at the
post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Call 385-8902.

MONDAY
* AI-Anon LET IT BEGIN
WITH ME family group meets
at 10:30 a.m. every Monday at
the Heartland Christian Church


on Alt. 27 in Sebring. The
church is behind Southgate
Shopping Center where Publix
is.
For more information call 385-
5714.
* Alcoholics Anonymous
meeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal
Church, Lakeshore Drive,
Sebring. For more details, call
385-8807.
* Alcoholics Anonymous
One Day At A Time group
meets for a closed discussion


at 9:30 a.m. Monday and
Friday at Covenant
Presbyterian Church, 4500
Sun 'N Lakes Blvd., Sebring.
Call 314-0891.
* Alcoholics Anonymous
meeting, 6:30 p.m. at
Rosewood Center, 517. U.S.
27 South, Lake Placid.
* Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at
St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring.
Call .202-0647.
* Ambucs, a local charity that
assists people with disabilities,
meets at noon every first
Monday at R.J. Gator's Sea
Grill and Bar, Sebring. The
meeting is open to the public.
Call 386-4387.
* American Legion Placid
Post 25 Lake Placid has shuf-
fleboard at 1 p.m. Lounge
hours are 12-9 p.m. Legion
and auxiliary boards meet at 6
p.m.' General meeting at 7
p.m. Call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 74
open noon to 8 p.m. Happy
hour from 4-6 p.m. Call 471-
1448.
* AmVets Post 21 plays darts
at 7:30 p.m. for members and
guests. Call 385-0234.
* Avon Park Lakes
Association has shuffleboard
at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m.
The clubhouse is at 2714
Nautilus Drive in Avon Park.
* Avon Park Veterans Honor
Guard meets first Monday at
the American Legion Post 69,
Avon Park. Call 382-0315.
* Boy Scout Troop 482
meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave.,
Lake Placid.
* Bridge Club of Sebring
(American Contract Bridge
Club) plays duplicate games at
12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf
Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118.
* Corvette Cruisers meets at
6:30 p.m. first and third
Monday at the Dairy Queen in
front of The Home Depot,
Sebring. Call Ed Robson at
655-2092.
* Florida Association Home
and Community Education
meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly
on Monday at The Agri-
Center. The group of sewers
and crafters make items for
residents of adult congregate
living facilities. Call Penny
Bucher at 385-0949.
* Grand Prix Cloggers EZ
Intermediate and Intermediate
Clogging class are held at 9
a.m. every Monday at
Reflections on Silver Lake,
Avon Park. Call Julle for fur-
ther information at 386-0434.
* Harmony Hoedowners
Square Dance Club meets
from 7:30-9:30 p.m. the first
and third Monday at Sebring
Civic Center from December
through April. There will be
alternating mainstream and
plus dancing with rounds.
Casual dress or square dance
attire is acceptable. For more
information, call Sam Dunn at
382-6792 or e-mail him at
samdunn @samdunn. net.
* Heartland Horses &
Handicapped Inc. is offering
pony rides every Monday and
Wednesday from 4:30-6:30
p.m., weather permitting. $5
donation per child. Call 452-
0006 for more information. All
proceeds raised support our
free equine assisted riding pro-,
gram for adults and children
with special needs, which
resumes in September.
* Heartland Pops rehearses
at 7 p.m. Monday at Avon
Park High School Band Room,
700 E. Main St., under the
direction of Anthony Jones.
Musicians of all ages are wel-
come. For information, call
314-8877.
* Highlands County Concert
Band rehearses 7-9 p.m.
every Monday at Sebring High
School band room. All musi-
cians are welcome. Vic
Anderson, musical director.
Call Bill Varner at 386-0855.
* Highlands County Sewing
Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at
the Highlands County Agri-
Civic Center in the 4-H labora-
tory, Sebring. Call 402-6540.
* Highlands County Rotary
Club meets at 6 p.m. at


Charlie's Restaurant,
Commerce Street, Sebring.
* Highlands Stamp Club
meets the first Monday. Talk
and swap at St. John's United
Methodist Church, 3214 Grand
Prix Drive. Call Bob Gleisner
at 471-6526 or Budd Steinke
at 382-9373.
* Lake Placid Art League will
have classes in Drawing and
Painting, conducted by Anne
Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. at the Cultural


Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd.
From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart
will teach Fabric Painting at
the center. For information call
Dan Daszek at 465-7730.
* Lake Placid Democratic
Club meets at 6 p.m. first
Monday at Placid Lakes Town
Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd.
Call Bill Sayles at 699-6773 for
details.
* Lake Placid Elks 2661
opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at
the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2
p.m. Sign up for darts is at
6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m.
It is open to members and
their guests. Call 465-2661.
* Lake Placid Library has
storytime at 10 a.m. for ages
3-5 except during holidays.
* Lake Placid Moose plays
cards at 2 p.m. Open to mem-
bers and qualified guests only.
Lodge closes at 6 p.m.
* Let It Begin With Me
Alanon Group meets from
10:30 a.m. to noon every
Monday at Heartland Christian
Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South,
Sebring. For details about
Alanon, a self-help group for
families and friends of alco-
holics, call 385-5714.
* Loyal Order of Moose,
Highlands County Lodge No.
2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon
Park. Meetings held first and
third Mondays at 8 p.m. Lodge
phone number 452-0579.
* Narcotics Anonymous
Never Alone Candlelight
meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N.
Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near
the First Congregational
Church. For information call
Heartland area helpline (863)
683-0630. More information
on other meetings and events
at www.naflheartland.org.
* National Association for
Advancement of Colored
People, Highlands County
Branch meets 7:30 p.m., 401
Tulane, Avon Park.
* Patriots Chapter, Daughter
of the American Revolution
meets at 1:30 p.m. on the first
Monday of each month
September through May at the
Church of the Redeemer
Parish Hall on U.S. 27 directly
across from Wells Motor
Company, three-tenths of a
mile north of the South Florida
Community College stoplight.
Call 471-2096.
* Rotary Club of Highlands
County meets at 6:15 p.m. at
Beef '0 Brady's, Sebring.
* Sebring AARP meets 1:30
p.m., The Palms, Pine Street,
Sebring.
* Sebring Bridge Club has
Bridge, ACBL Duplicate at the
clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf,
Sebring at 12:30 Mondays. For
details or info on lessons, call
385-8118.
* Sebring Historical Society
open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday-Friday. Located in
back side of Sebring Public
Library building on Lake
Jackson. For information, call
471-2522.
* Sebring Optimist Club
meets at 6:15 p.m. first and
third Mondays at Jim's house.
Call Jim Harrison at 381-9767
or Gabriel Read at 453-2859.
* Sebring Women of the
Moose has chapter meeting at
7 p.m. Monday at the lodge,
11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call
382-8782.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
has a joint officers meeting on
the first Monday of each month
at the club, 12921 U.S. 98,
Sebring. Call 655-4007.
* Sebring Elks Lodge 1529
has the lounge open from 12-7
p.m. Smoke-free environment.
For more details, call 471-
3557.
* Sebring Moose Club 2259
serves beef franks'and Italian
sausages from 1 p.m. to clos-
ing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring.
The Women of the Moose
meets at 7 p.m. the first
Monday for chapter enroll-
ment, refreshments and trivia
pursuit. Call 655-3920.
* Take Off Pounds Sensibly
FL 632, Sebring meets at
3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall
at the First Baptist Church of
Lake Josephine, Sebring. Call


Judy O'Boyle at 260-0831.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m.,
1224 County Road 621 East,
Lake Placid. For more details,
call 699-5444.

TUESDAY
* Aging Advocacy Council
meets the 2nd Tuesday of
each month in the Nu-Hope
Conference Room at 11:30
a.m. for a brown bag lunch
with the meeting starting at


noon. Contact Debbie Slade at
382-2134
* Al-Anon Family Groups
meet for discussion and
Twelve Step study at noon,
Union Congregational Church,
105 N. Forest Ave., Avon Park.
Parking available south of old
church.
* American Ex-POW
Highlands County Chapter,
meets 6 p.m. Call Ted Biever,
382-3285, for meeting place.
* American Legion Placid
Post 25 Lake Placid has shuf-
fleboard and euchre, both at 1
p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m.
to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 74
open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs
served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.
Call 471-1448.
* Avon Park Boy Scout
Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30
p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202
Robert Britt St., Avon Park.
Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to
join. Call 452-2385.
* Avon Park Lakes
Association has Women's
Salad Bar at noon on the sec-
ond Tuesday of each month.
The clubhouse is at 2714
Nautilus Drive in Avon Park.
* Avon Park Library has sto-
rytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5
except during holidays.
* Avon Park Lions Club
meets 6:45 p.m., dinner, Lions
Club, 1218 W. Bell St., Avon
Park.
* Beta Sigma Phi, Xi Nu
Sigma Chapter of Avon Park,
meets the second and fourth
Tuesday each month in the
members home. Call presi-
dent Mary Joinerr at 382-4488
or vice president Linda
Webster at 385-1124.
* Busy Bee Craft Club meets
9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun
'N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring.
Everyone is welcome. For
more details, call 382-8431.
* Celebrate Recovery meets
every Tuesday night at "The
Rock," Union Congregational
Church, 28 N. Butler Ave.,
Avon Park. A barbecue meal is
served at 6 p.m. for a dona-
tion. At 6:45 p.m., members
meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group
breaks up into small groups for
men and women. The program
is designed for drug and alco-
hol addiction, divorce, death or'
illness grief, low or lost self-
esteem or identity due to dys-
functional relationships,
depression/anxiety, or any
other need for healing. For
details, contact Celebrate
Recovery coordinator Pam
Sim by calling 453-3345, ext.
106.
* The Computer Club at
Buttonwood Bay meets the
second and fourth Tuesday of
each month November through
March. We invite anyone inter-
ested in expanding their com-
puter knowledge to attend the
Buttonwood Bay Bytes
Computer Club meeting.
* Fletcher Music Club meets
every Thursday and Tuesday
at Fletcher Music Center in
Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For
more details, call 385-3288.
* Happy Paws Dog
Obedience Club Inc. meets at
7 p.m. second Tuesday at the
First Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, 111 Lake
Josephine Drive, Sebring.
Obedience classes are avail-
able. All welcome. Call 471-
9778.
* Heartland Dog Club Inc. of
Florida meets at 6:30 p.m.
second Tuesday at Homer's
Buffet, Sebring. Obedience
classes (all breeds) are held
on Wednesday evenings at
Sun 'N Lake Elementary
School. Canine Good Citizen
and Therapy Dog testing avail-
able. AKC-pointect shows held
annually in April. Call 385-
7474 or 385-7803 or visit
www.Hearta/lndDogC/ubF/orida
.org.
* Heartland Harmonizers
Barbershop Chorus meets


from 7-9:30 p.m. in the
Sebring High School Music
Room, Sebring. All men who
enjoy singing are invited.
Reading music is not required.
Call 471-2294 or 386-5098.
* Heartland Symphony
Orchestra rehearsals from
5:30-7 p.m. Tuesday in the
Green Room in the South
Florida Community College
auditorium building. Bring
music and instruments. New
members welcome. Call con-
ductor Bryan Johnson at 800-
949-7248, ext. 7231.
* Highlands County
Community Orchestra
rehearses each Tuesday in the
Green Room of the South
Florida Community College
Performing Arts Theater, 5:30-
7:30 p.m. Entrance is at the
rear of the building. String
players especially needed.
Strings call Eugene Longo at
699-1975; winds call Kim
Houser at 453-6049 for more
information.
* Highlands County
Parkinson's Support Group
meets at 1 p.m. second
Tuesday at the Alliance
Church of Sebring, 4451
Sparta Road, Sebring. For
details, 453-6589 or 452-2053.
* Highlands Gem and
Mineral Club meets 7 p.m.,
second Tuesday, Church of
Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring. Club does not meet in
July, August or September.
Call 453-7054.
* Hope Hospice grief support
group meets at 11 a.m. at 319
W. Center Ave., Sebring; and
4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle
ALF, across U.S. 27 from
Florida Hospital Lake Placid.
Call 382-0312.
* Insulin Pump Support
Group meets from 2-4:30 p.m.
second Tuesday at Nu-Hope
of Highlands County, 6414
U.S. 27 South, Sebring.
Optional education/refresher
session from 2-3 p.m. Support
group meets from 3-4:30 p.m.
This is a free support group fro
all patients with insulin
pumps, or for those who want
to know more about them. Call
414-6444 for information.
* Knights of Columbus
Council 5441 meets 8 p.m.
every second and fourth
Tuesday at Knights of
Columbus Hall, 900 U.S. 27
N., Sebring. Call 385-0987.
* Knights of Columbus
Council 5441 Auxiliary meets
8 p.m. every second Tuesday
at Knights of Columbus Hall,
900 U.S. 27 N., Sebring. Call
385-0987.
i Lake Placid Art League
has classes in Parchment
Embossing from 8 a.m. to
noon and 1-4 p.m. at the
Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall
Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant.
For information, call Dan
Daszek at 465-7730.
* Lake Placid Elks 2661
opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at
the lodge. Happy hour is from
2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30
p.m. The lodge is open to
members and their guests.
Call 465-2661.
* Lake Placid Grief Support
(Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30
p.m. every Tuesday at
Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S.
27 North, Lake Placid, with
Charlie Stroup. Refreshments
served. Door prize given. Call
465-0568.
* LAKE PLACID LIONS Club
meets at 7 p.m. (6 p.m. for din-
ner) the second Tuesday each
month at Herons Garden, 501
US 27 North, Lake Placid. Call
Jeanne at 699-0743.
* Lake Placid Moose has a
general meeting and a Moose
Legion meeting at 7:30 p.m.
the second Tuesday at the
lodge.
* Lake Placid Veterans of
Foreign Wars Ladies
Auxiliary 3880 meets 10 a.m.
second Tuesday at 1224
County Road 621 East, Lake


Placid. Call 699-5444 for
details.
* Lorida Community Club
meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at
the Lorida Community Center
to plan events.
* Multiple Sclerosis Support
Group meets at 7 p.m. second
Tuesday at Highlands
Regional Medical Center sec-
ond floor class room. Friends
and family are welcome. Call
Janet Turvey at 465-3138.
* Nar-Anon Support Group
for family members or friends
of someone with a drug prob-
lem or addiction. Nar-Anon
helps attain serenity and a
more normal life for those
affected by the addictions of
loved ones, regardless of
whether or not he/she has
stopped using. 6 p.m. every
Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch
of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake
Josephine Drive, Sebring.
* Overeaters Anonymous
meets from 9-10 a.m. every
Tuesday at Avon Park
Seventh-day Adventist Church,
1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues,
fees or weigh-ins. Visit
www.FloridaRidgelntergroup.c
om. Call 382-7731. Visit
www.oa.org for more informa-
tion on OA.
* Placid Lakes Bridge Club
meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
every Tuesday at Placid Lakes
Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes
Blvd. Call 465-4888.
* Rotary Club of Sebring
(Noon) meets at noon at the
Sebring Civic Center, near the
library in downtown Sebring.
For information, call 385-3829
or 471-9900.
* Sebring Bridge Club will
have Duplicate Bridge games
every Tuesday evening. If
interested in playing Duplicate
Bridge, call 385-8118.
* Sebring Elks Lodge 1529
plays darts, beginning with
sign in at 6 p.m. Games start
at 6:30 p.m. No experience
necessary. Cost is $2. Smoke-
free environment. For more
details, call 471-3557.
* Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 serves soft shell tacos 5-
7 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98,
Sebring. Beef franks and
Italian sausages served from 1
p.m. to closing. Euchre is
played at 6:30 p.m. Call 655-
3920.
* Sebring Recreation Club
plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and
table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333
Pomegranate Ave., Sebring.
Call 385-2966 or leave a
name, number and message.
* Sertoma Club meets at 7
a.m. at Dee's Restaurant,
Sebring. Call Scott Albritton at
402-1819.
* The Sons of AMVETS
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Tuesday of every month at the
Post, 2029 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring.
* Toby's Clown Alley has its
regular monthly meeting at 7
p.m. the second Tuesday at
the Clown Foundation, 109 W.
Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid.
* Take Off Pounds Sensibly
Chapter FL 99 meets from 6-7
p.m. at the Atonement
Lutheran Church, 1744
Lakeview Drive, Sebring.
* Take Off Pounds Sensibly
Chapter FL 618 has weigh in
from 4-430 p.m. at Community
Bible Church, 1400 CR-17A
N., Avon Park. Meeting is at
4:45 p.m. Call 452-1093.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880, plays darts 6:30
p.m., 1224 County Road 621
E., Lake Placid. The ladies
auxiliary meets at 10 a.m.
every second Tuesday. For
more details, call 699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 has a card tourna-
ment at 2 p.m. at the post,
2011 SE Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Call 385-8902.


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Page 4B


SCHOOL MENUS


News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


Breakfasts and lunches
being served in the-Highlands
County School District for the
upcoming week of Feb. 7-11
include:

HIGH SCHOOLS
Monday
Breakfast French toast
sticks, sausage patty,
Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted
Flakes, Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, cheese filled bread-
stick, pear fruit cup, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.
Lunch Chili, saltine
crackers, burger, cheeseburg-
er, chicken patty on bun,
Mama Sofia's cheese pizza,
Mama Sofia's pepperoni
pizza, ham sub meal, turkey
sub meal, dill stack, Peanut
Butter and Jelly sandwich
meal, chef salad meal, baked
french fries, corn cobbettes,
tossed salad, Colby Jack
cheese stick, cherry berry
fruit bar, strawberry cup,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.
Tuesday
Breakfast Chicken bis-
cuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal,
Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon
Toast Crunch, cheese filled
breadstick, strawberry cup,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.
Lunch Baked chicken,.
dinner roll, burger, cheese-
burger, chicken patty on bun,
Mama Sofia's cheese pizza,
Mama Sofia's pepperoni
pizza, ham sub meal, turkey
sub meal, dill stack, PBJ
sandwich meal, chef salad
meal, mashed potatoes,
chicken gravy, green beans,
carrots and dip, dried blue-
berries, cut fresh fruit, assort-
ed fresh fruit, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.
Wednesday
Breakfast Breakfast
pizza, hash brown patty,
Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted
Flakes, Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, cheese filled bread-
stick, apricot cup, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.
Lunch Grilled cheese
sandwich, cheeseburger, hot
and spicy chicken sandwich,
ham sub meal, dill stack, chef
salad meal, PBJ sandwich
meal, baked beans, carrots
and dip, string cheese,
assorted juice, assorted fresh
fruit, potato chips, cocoa
clodhoppers, chocolate milk,
white milk, strawberry milk.
Thursday
Breakfast Breakfast frit-
tata, breakfast pizza, hash
brown patty, Cheerios, Trix
cereal, Frosted Flakes,
Cinnamon Toast Crunch,
cheese .filled breadstick,
peach cup, assorted fresh
fruit, assorted juice, choco-
late milk, white milk, straw-
berry milk.
Lunch Tacos, taco top-
pers, salsa, yellow rice, burg-
er, cheeseburger, chicken
patty on bun, Mama Sofia's
cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's
pepperoni pizza, ham sub
meal, turkey sub meal, dill
stack, PBJ sandwich meal,
chef salad meal, great north-
ern beans, cheddar cheese
stick, rosy applesauce, cut
fresh fruit, assorted fresh
fruit, assorted juice, choco-
late milk, white milk; straw-
berry milk.
Friday
Breakfast Sausage bis-
cuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal,
Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon
Toast Crunch, string cheese,
strawberry cup, assorted
juice, assorted fresh fruit,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.
Lunch Asian chicken
nuggets, salsa, dinner roll,
burger, cheeseburger, chicken
patty on bun, Mama Sofia's


cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's
pepperoni pizza, ham sub
meal, turkey sub meal, dill
stack, PBJ sandwich meal,
chef salad meal, baked french
fries, corn, carrots and dip,
tossed salad, chocolate chip
cookie, peach cup, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk. '


ACADEMY SCHOOLS
Monday
Lunch Chili, saltine
crackers, corn cobbettes,
tossed salad, cherry berry
fruit bar, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.
Tuesday
Lunch Baked chicken,
dinner roll, mashed potatoes,
green beans, dried blueber-
ries, assorted juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawberry
milk.
Wednesday
Lunch Grilled cheese
sandwich, baked beans, car-
rots and dip, assorted juice,
cocoa clodhoppers, potato
chips, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.
Thursday
Lunch Tacos, salsa, taco
toppers, yellow rice, great
northern beans, rosy apple-
sauce, cut fresh fruit, assort-
ed juice, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.
Friday
Lunch Chicken tenders,
dinner roll, Sun Chips, tossed
salad, peach cup, assorted
juice, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.

MIDDLE SCHOOLS
Monday
Breakfast French toast
sticks, sausage patty,
Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted
Flakes, Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, cheese filled bread-
stick, pear fruit .cup, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk. Breakfast on
the Patio: Sausage biscuit,
assorted juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawberry
milk.
Lunch Chili, saltine
crackers, burger, cheeseburg-
er, chicken patty on bun, ham
sub meal, turkey sub meal,
dill stack, Peanut Butter and
Jelly sandwich meal, chef
salad meal, corn cobbettes,
tossed salad, Colby Jack
cheese stick, cherry berry
fruit bar, strawberry cup,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.
Tuesday
Breakfast Chicken bis-
cuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal,
Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon
Toast Crunch, cheese filled
breadstick, strawberry cup,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.
Breakfast on the Patio:
Chicken biscuit, assorted
juice, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.
Lunch Baked chicken,
dinner roll, burger, cheese-
burger, chicken patty on bun,
ham sub meal, turkey sub
meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich
meal, chef salad meal
mashed potatoes, chicken
gravy, green beans, carrots
and dip, dried blueberries, cut
fresh fruit, assorted fresh
fruit, assorted juice, choco-
late milk, white milk, straw-
berry milk.
Wednesday
Breakfast Breakfast
pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal,
Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon
Toast Crunch, cheese filled
breadstick, apricot cup,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.
Breakfast on the Patio:
Breakfast pizza, assorted
juice, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.
Lunch -- Grilled cheese
sandwich, burger, cheese-
burger, hot and spicy chicken
sandwich, ham sub meal,
turkey sub meal, dill stack,
chef salad meal, PBJ sand-
wich meal, baked beans, car-
rots and dip, string cheese,
assorted juice, assorted fresh
fruit, potato chips, cocoa
clodhoppers, chocolate milk,
white milk, strawberry milk.
Thursday
Breakfast Breakfast frit-


tata, hash brown patty,
Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted
Flakes, Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, cheese filled bread-
stick, peach cup, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk. Breakfast on
the Patio: Chicken biscuit,
assorted juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawberry
milk.


Lunch Tacos, taco top-
pers, salsa, yellow rice, burg-
er, cheeseburger, chicken
patty on bun, ham sub meal,
turkey sub meal, dill stack,
PBJ sandwich meal, chef
salad meal, great northern
beans, cheddar cheese stick,
rosy applesauce, cut fresh
fruit, assorted fresh fruit,
assorted juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawberry
milk.
Friday
-Breakfast Sausage bis-
cuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal,
Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon
Toast Crunch, string cheese,'
strawberry cup, assorted
juice, assorted fresh fruit,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk. Breakfast on
the Patio: Sausage biscuit,
assorted juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawberry
milk.
Lunch Mama Sofia's
cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's
pepperoni pizza, burger,
cheeseburger, chicken ten-
ders, salsa, dinner roll, ham
sub meal, turkey sub meal,
dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal,
chef salad meal, corn, carrots
and dip, tossed salad, choco-
late chip cookie, peach cup,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
juice, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.


HunterDouglas


SMART


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Monday
Breakfast French toast
sticks, sausage patty,
Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted
Flakes, Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, cheese filled bread-
stick, pear fruit cup, assorted
fresh fruit, apple juice, grape
juice, orange juice, fruit blend
juice, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry rhilk.
Breakfast in the Classroom:
Maple waffle stick, string
cheese, pear fruit cup, choco-
late milk.
Lunch Chicken nuggets,
dinner roll, Uncrustable
Peanut Butter and Jelly sand-
wich, turkey chef salad,
mashed potatoes, chicken
gravy, carrots and dip, straw-
berry cup, very berry juice
bar, apple juice, grape juice,
orange juice, fruit blend juice,
chocolate milk, white milk,
strawberry milk.
Tuesday
Breakfast Chicken bis-
cuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal,
Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon
Toast Crunch, cheese filled
breadstick, strawberry cup,
assorted fresh fruit, apple.
juice, grape juice, orange
juice, fruit blend juice, choco-
late milk, white milk, straw-
berry milk. Breakfast in the


Classroom: Chicken biscuit,
grape juice, chocolate milk,
hard cooked egg, giant gra-
ham, apple juice.
Lunch Spaghetti, meat
sauce, garlic breadstick,
Uncrustable PBJ sandwich,
ham chef salad, green beans,
vanilla clodhoppers, cut fresh
fruit, fresh apple slices, apple
juice, grape juice, orange
juice, fruit blend juice, choco-
late milk, white milk, straw-
berry milk.
Wednesday
Breakfast Breakfast
pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal,
Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon
Toast Crunch, cheese filled
breadstick, apricot cup,
assorted fresh fruit, apple
juice, grape juice, orange
juice, fruit blend juice, choco-
late milk, white milk, straw-
berry milk. Breakfast in the
Classroom: Hard cooked egg,
giant graham, apple juice,
chocolate milk, chicken bis-
cuit, grape juice.
Lunch Uncrustable PBJ
sandwich, turkey chef salad,
grilled cheese sandwich, Sun
Chips, diced pears, carrots
and dip, apple juice, chocolate
milk, white milk, strawberry
milk.
Thursday
Breakfast Breakfast frit-
tata, hash brown patty,
Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted
Flakes, Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, cheese filled bread-
stick, peach cup, assorted
fresh fruit, apple juice, grape
juice, orange juice, fruit blend
juice, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.
Breakfast in the Classroom:
Sausage biscuit, apricot cup,
chocolate milk, Ultimate
Breakfast Round, orange
juice.
Lunch Tacos, taco top-
pers, salsa, yellow rice,
Uncrustable PBJ sandwich,
ham chef salad, corn, great
northern beans, fruit cocktail
cup, very berry juice bar,
apple juice, grape juice,
orange juice, fruit blend juice,
chocolate milk, strawberry
milk, white milk.
Friday
Breakfast Sausage bis-
cuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal,


Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon
Toast Crunch, string cheese,
strawberry cup, assorted
fresh fruit, apple juice, grape
juice, orange juice, fruit blend
juice, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.
Breakfast in the Classroom:
Ultimate Breakfast Round,
orange juice, chocolate milk,
sausage biscuit, apricot cup.
Lunch Mama Sofia's
pepperoni pizza, Mama
Sofia's cheese pizza,
Uncrustable PBJ sandwich,
turkey chef salad, mixed veg-
etables, salsa, chocolate chip
cookie, peach cup, fresh
apple slices, apple juice,
grape juice, orange juice, fruit
blend juice, chocolate milk,
white milk, strawberry milk.

KINDERGARTEN LEARNING
CENTER
Monday
Lunch Chicken nuggets,
dinner roll, Uncrustable
Peanut Butter and Jelly sand-
wich, mashed potatoes,
chicken gravy, carrots and
dip, strawberry cup, choco-
late milk, white'milk, straw-
berry milk.
Tuesday
Lunch Spaghetti, meat
sauce,' garlic breadstick,
Uncrustable PBJ sandwich,
green beans, vanilla clodhop-
pers, cut fresh fruit, chocolate
milk, white milk, .strawberry
milk.
Wednesday
Lunch Uncrustable PBJ
sandwich, grilled cheese
sandwich, Sun Chips, diced
pears, carrots and dip,
Goldfish crackers, applesauce
cup, chocolate milk, white
milk, strawberry milk.
Thursday
Lunch Tacos, taco top-
pers, salsa, yellow rice,
Uncrustable PBJ sandwich,
great northern beans, fruit
cocktail cup, chocolate milk,
white milk, strawberry milk.
Friday
Lunch Mama Sofia's
cheese pizza, Uncrustable
PBJ sandwich, mixed vegeta-
bles, chocolate chip cookie,
peach cup, chocolate milk,
white milk, strawberry milk.


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www. newssun.com


News-Sun + Sunday, February 6. 2011


CHALK TALK


Courtesy photo
Winners at the Jan. 20th District 11 FFA competition at South Florida Community College
include (bottom row, from left) Brittany Baker (representing Josey Pearce at Yearling),
Krystal Dombroski at Sebring Middle, Jessica Belcher at Hill Gustat Middle, and Brooks
Whidden at Avon Park Middle; (top row, from left) Brandon McKee at Okeechobee Junior,
Ashley Hassan (representing Josh Lea at Okeechobee Brahman), Megan Stein at Sebring
High, and Charlie Brown and Zack Farr, both at Avon Park High School.


Highlands County FFA


members advance to State


Special to the News-Sun
On Jan. 20 the District 11
Contest was held in the
University Center at South
Florida Community College.
Charlie Brown. district presi-
dent, emceed the event that
consisted of middle school
and high school competi-
tions. The winner in each
event advances to state com-
petition June 13-17, in con-
junction with the 83rd State
FFA Convention to be held at
the Caribe Royale in
Orlando.
Winners at the middle
school level were:
Opening & Closing
Ceremonies First place,
Hill-Gustat Middle students
Jessica Belcher, Alex
Hornick, Teresa Ware, Zack
Smith, John Tantillo, Renz
Torres, and Victoria Sawicki:


second place, Okeechobee
Yearling.
Creed Second place,
Jessica Belcher, HGMS.
Extemporaneous Speaking
- First place, Josey Pearce.
Yearling; and second place,
Mariah Alvarez, HGMS.
Prepared Speaking First
place, Krystal Dombroski,
Sebring Middle School; and
second place, Seth Yates,
Yearling.
Parliamentary Procedure -
First place, Avon Park
Middle students Brooks
Whidden, Hannah Farr, Alex
Bilbrey, Haley Richardson,
Kelsey Cole and Julianna
Jackson; second place -
Yearling.
Winners at the high school
level were:
Prepared Speaking First
place, Megan Stein, Sebring


High School; and second
place, Curtis Evans,
Okeechobee Jr.
Extemporaneous Speaking
- First place, Charlie Brown,
Avon Park High School; and
second place, Karyna
Villapande- Okeechobee Jr.
Tractor Operations First
place, Josh Lea, Okeechobee
Brahman: and second place,
Matthew Pettit, SHS.
Creed First place,
Brandon McKee,
Okeechobee Jr.; and third
place. Taylor Crutchfield,
SHS.
Parliamentary Procedure -
First place, APHS students
Zack Farr, Emily Whitman,
Charlie Brown, Calago
Hipps, Kyle Jahna and
Mitchell Guerndt; and second
place. Okeechobee Jr.


SFCC welcomes Suzanne Demers


Special to the News-Sun
ARCADIA SFCC wel-
comed the new director of
the South Florida
Community College DeSoto
Center. Suzanne Demers.
with an open house held
prior to the Jan. 27 District
Board of Trustees Meeting,
Demers previously
worked at Florida State
College at Jacksonville
where she was the Open
Campus Learning
Technologies coordinator
for Distance Learning. Prior
to Florida State College at
Jacksonville she held a
position with Embry-Riddle
Aeronautical University as
the associate director and
interim director of the
Jacksonville Campus which
encompassed the Cecil
Commerce Center, Craig
Airfield, Naval Air Station
Jacksonville, and Saint
Augustine sites.
"Suzanne brings with her
experience as a campus
director, and she is knowl-
edgeable about technical
aspects of student learning,"
said Dr. Leana Revell, vice
president, educational and
student services. "She is
enthusiastic about working
with students and staff and
has already become engaged
in improving our programs
and services at the college."
Demers earned her bache-
lor of science in workforce
education, training and cur-
riculum development from
Southern Illinois University
and her masters of science
in management degree from
Embry Riddle Aeronautical
University. She served the
United States Navy where
she worked on the Strike
Fighter Attack Jet, the F/A
18 Hornet.
Demers became interest-
ed in SFCC after she saw an
ad in the Chronicle of
Higher Education. "I wasn't
looking for a new position
at the time, but I saw the ad
and believed it would be an


Courtesy photo
Dr. Norm Stephens, president, South Florida Community
College welcomes Suzanne Demers, director, DeSoto
Center, to SFCC during an open house at the SFCC
DeSoto Campus.


opportunity to give back to
and become involved in a
community similar to the
one where I grew up in
Virginia," she said.
Coming from a university
as well as community col-
lege in a large city, Demers
brings with her knowledge
of what is expected of stu-
dents and understands the
programs and possibilities
for students. "I can guide
students through the steps
they need to take when they
move on to higher education
at larger colleges and uni-
versities after they receive
their associates degrees."
The first thing Demers
has focused on working
with DeSoto High School to
reorganize the dual enroll-
ment process to make it
more efficient. She also
hopes to offer more business
and management programs
at the DeSoto Center.
"These programs would not
only be beneficial for our
community, but they would
be an advantage for our stu-
dents to transfer into higher
level programs."
Demers. is a member of


the Association of Florida
Colleges (AFC), the Sloan-
C consortium, EDUCAUSE,
and EduCalm. She is also an
online adjunct instructor for
student success cources at
Florida State College at
Jacksonville.
"This is an important
leadership position for our
college and for our DeSoto
Campus, and we were very
pleased with the tremendous
response to the vacancy
announcement," said Dr.
Norm Stephens, SFCC pres-
ident. "We received many
applications from highly
qualified applicants.
Suzanne Demers brings
knowledge, experience, and
strong leadership abilities to
the position. She embraces
community involvement
and promises to strengthen
our partnership relation-
ships with the school dis-
trict and other organiza-
tions. We are delighted that
she has agreed to join our
leadership team as we work
to provide the highest quali-
ty higher educational oppor-
tunities for the people of
DeSoto County."


Grant Writing Seminar at SFCC explains


steps for creating winning grants


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK South Florida
Community College's Corporate and
Continuing Education Department (CCE)
is offering two grant writing seminars
that simplify what can be a daunting
process and thoroughly explain each step
for creating successful grant proposals.
Grant Writing I meets Thursday, Feb.
17. Grant Writing II meets Thursday,
Feb. 24. Both run from 8 a.m. to noon in
Building T, Room 20, at the SFCC
Highlands Campus. Tuition is $39.95 for
each seminar.


Grant Writing I (CRN 21407) covers
the fundamentals of creating a successful
grant proposal. It gives an overview of
federal, state, and private foundation
grants and explains how to craft a budg-
et, determine what deliverables the grant
will fund, and show how specific objec-
tives will be measured. It also covers the
best practices for evaluating grant-fund-
ed projects.
Grant Writing II (CRN21406) takes
participants through the steps of writing a
grant proposal. It includes hands-on
practice in addressing questions, creating


a budget, and writing measurable objec-
tives. Students may bring a grant applica-
tion they wish to complete or work
through a sample project.
The instructor is Lindsay Lynch, the
college's director of grants development.
She possesses extensive experience and
insight into writing successful grants.
For more information about the semi-
nars, call Lorrie Key, CCE program coor-
dinator, at 784-7033, or e-mail
keyl@southflorida.edu. Register at any
SFCC campus or center, or call 453-
6661, ext. 7139.


Busy Kids offers free summer preschool


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING Registration
is under way for Busy Kids
Creative Learning Center
Inc. 2011 free Summer
Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten
Program.
VPK is a free program to
prepare every Florida 4-year-
old for kindergarten.
Children must be 5 years old
on or before Sept. 1, 2011
and have not previously com-
pleted a VPK program.
VPK Summer Program
dates are June 15 to Aug. 10.
VPK Summer time is
from 7:45 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday-Friday.
VPK Summer takes place
at Busy Kids Creative
Learning Center Inc., 1000
Persimmon Ave., Sebring.
All children attending
Busy Kids' summer VPK
program can attend extended
childcare from 7:30 a.m. to
5:30 p.m. absolutely free.
For registration
parents/guardians will need
to bring:
Verification of child's
age. One of the following
will be acceptable: birth cer-
tificate, certificate of
Baptism (original or certified
copy), religious record of,
birth accompanied by an affi-


davit from child's parent,
insurance policy for the child
(must have been in effect for
at least two years), or valid
military dependent identifi-
cation card.
Verification of Florida
residence (No P.O. Box
addresses will be accepted).
One of the following will be
acceptable: utility bill, dri-
ver's license, pay stubs, gov-


ernment documents (pass-
ports) or residential
rental/lease agreement.
Parents will need to con-
tact their local Early
Learning Coalition Office to
set up an appointment.
Breakfast, lunch and
snacks will be provided at no
cost to you; however, trans-
portation will not be provid-


Avon Park Pediatrics, RPA.
& Sebring Pediatrics, LLC O
Newborns Children Adolescents
OFFICE HOURS:
AVON PARK: MON. & WED. 8:30AM 7:00PM
TUES., THURS., & FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PM
SEBRING: MON. FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PM
SATURDAY 8:30AM 12:00 NOON SEBRING ONLY

speiaiznginthetraten0 o


Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., EA.A.P.
Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., EA.A.P.
Anoop Palta, M.D., EA.A.P.
Vishakha Nakhate, M.D., EA.A.P.


David Kleczek, P.A.C.
Amy Grimes, P.A.C.
Mercy L. Seralde, M.D.
Maria C. Perez, M.D.
Maria B. Asis, M.D., EA.A.P.
Megan Neff, ARNP


SEBRING LAKE PLACID AVON PARK
382-0770 699-1414 453-7337
We accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid


Contact the Early Learning
Coalition of Florida's
Heartland 314-9213 or Anne
Lahg with Busy Kids at 386-
0808 or 382-4164.


HCS 'spirit week'


Courtesy photo
Heartland Christian School celebrated 'spirit week' dur-
ing the week of Jan. 31 with class games and dress up
days, along with basketball games and
homecoming night Feb. 4. Preparing for special events
throughout the week, the senior class also decided to
overfill the headmaster's office with balloons as a prank.
As HCS gets ready to celebrate its 20th graduating
class, some seniors include (from left) Brittany Jackson,
Kayla Kaszubowski, Rebekah Watts, Missy Moody,
Carolyn Cwalinski (seated), Lydia Ford, Lauren Harvey,
Matthew Arnold and Matthew Henry.


* '^


,fa-


ToI-If


Gift certificates available

FOUR\.POINTS
BY SHERATON
(863) 655-6252 ext. 109


MM#10347


Page 5B


I








News-Sun Sunday. February 6, 2011


www.newssun. com


*IaJ=1


Iu1-:1=


. 1110i 11


" U GOLF HAMMOCK I


j aG OL ahjAiM Tf"IC


WATERFRONT BEAUTY! Lg. corner cul-de-sac lot on water
w/seawall, mature landscaping, painted circular drive,
insulated detached hobby room w/AC, garage w/AC & shop
area, bright kitchen w/pass-thru to lanai, newer tile, carpet,
appliances & roof.
4208 DUFFER LOOP $199,900
US 27 to Hammock Rd to (R) into Golf Hammock (Golf Hammock Dr)
around club house to (R) on Mulligan Rd to end of Mulligan (L) on
Duffer Loop. Home is on corner of Duffer Loop & Putter Court. 213478


SPACIOUS COUNTRY CLUB VILLA 4 BD, 2 BA 2 CG Villa, large
kitchen open to spacious dining/living room, 3 expansive bedrooms + spa-
cious master, 14x27 tiled Florida room, carpet & wood flooring, freshly
painted interior w/brand new stainless steel appliances, new interior
doors & new fixtures. Roof new in 2004. Great Country Club value!
3811 Rodeo Dr. $117,900
U.S. 27 to Hammock Rd., (L) on 635 to (R) into Country Club
of Sebring (Haw Branch Rd), (R) on Rodeo Dr. to villa on (R).
216300

Trk,." '' NTo C U


FENCED FAMILY FUN Gorgeous custom home! NEW hard-
wood floors, vaulted ceilings, new roof in 2006, stainless steel
appliances & tankless water heater. Oversized island kitchen.
Romantic master w/ glass block and corner whirlpool tub.
Affordable luxury! Come by today!
2701 Cheyenne Rd. $239,900
US 27 to west on Hammock Rd to left on CR635 to right into
The Country Club (Haw Branch Rd) to right on Cheyenne Rd
to home on left. 215774

rs ,'H COUSi sSNTRY SC.LUB


POOL WITH VIEW Lovely 3/3 executive POOL home w/
oversized garage, golf cart door, cathedral ceilings, kitchen
w/large pantry & built-in desk, breakfast nook w/view of pool
& hole #1. Master has double sinks & jetted tub. Furniture
package available.
3238 Wynstone Ct. $269,900
US 27 to Hammock Rd., to (L) on 635, to (R) into Country Club
of Sebring (Haw Branch Rd.), To (L) on Wynstone Dr., To (L)
on Wynstone Ct., To home on left. 213715


4A rMn lil.
^9 4J-y


A &er


BEAUTIFUL LOT! Gorgeous and inviting! Come awe at the
volume ceilings the spacious light & bright kitchen w/eat-in
area overlooking majestic trees and private backyard! Open +
modern floor plan, large master + beautiful spacious lanai all
perfect for luxurious entertainment in style. Come see it today!
3269 Angler's Stream, E. $239,900
Sebring Parkway to (L) on Home Ave (L) on 17N (R) on
Powerline Rd. (L) into Highlands Ridge (R) on Fairway Vista
(L) on Anglers Stream to house on (R). 216270


A POOL JEWEL! Spacious on the golf course w/pool! 4
bed 3 bath w/wet-bar is perfect for luxury + entertainment.
Kitchen overlooks the pool and wood burning fireplace too!
Master bath new in 2009, metal roof and so much more!
2912 Par Rd. $248,355

US 27 to Hammock Rd, (R) into Golf Hammock, 1st (R) onto
Par Rd. then slight left to follow Par Rd. to home on (L).
214517








NOTHING COMPARES! Awesome villa w/10' ceilings, crown
molding, kitchen w/wood cabinets, solid surface countertops,
stainless appliances, stepped ceilings & skylight. Exceptional
details, fine cabinetry, warm and romantic. Fall in love with
this magnificent home.
3045 Royal Oaks Ct. $219,325
US 27 to Hammock Rd, (L) on CR635, (R) at entrance to The Country
Club (Haw Branch Rd), follow past clubhouse and tennis courts to
(R) on Strafford Oaks to (R) into Royal Oaks to villa on (R). 215759








HEATED POOL Relax in the heated pool! Easy to love the
great room which opens to the screened lanai. Newer tile and
carpeting; spacious master suite, private guest bedroom plus
office/3rd bedroom. Quality oak cabinetry + stainless steel
appliances.
2816 Boulder Ct. $189,900
US 27 to Hammock Rd to (L) on 635 to (R) into the Country
Club of Sebring to (L) on Boulder Ct. to home on (L).
216185








STUNNING & SPACIOUS! 3 bed, 2.5 bath + office. Kitchen
w/wood cabinetry, granite & wine cooler, breakfast nook, great
room w/ wood burning fireplace & bamboo flooring. Custom
window treatments, Jack & Jill bedroom & bath & paver drive
& walks, 2.5 car garage-all on an oversized golf course lot.
6044 Strafford Oaks Dr. $279,900
US 27 to (R) on Hammock Road, to (L) on 635, to (R) into
Country Club of Sebring, (Haw Branch Rd.) To (R) on
Strafford Oaks Dr., to home on(L). 215891




4 ": .



SEE THE SCENERY! 2/2/2 + den w/high ceilings large eat-
in kitchen w/ bay window private master suite open plan.
Enclosed lanai with glass sliders almost new appliances,
new A/C, new upgrades, includes washer & dryer too!
3352 Pebble Creek Dr., E. $239,900
Sebring Pkwy to (L) on Home Ave to stop sign then (L) on SR
17 N to (R) on Powerline Rd and (L) into Highlands Ridge
entrance to (R) at stop sign to (L) on Angler's Stream to (R)
on E. Pebble Creek 215639


SEVENTH HEAVEN! Perfect and on the fairway of #7!
Spacious 2 bed 2 bath; this villa is tastefully updated w/new
interior paint & carpeting, new light fixtures, fans & brand
new stainless steel appliances! Bright kitchen w/breakfast
bar too! Awesome Florida room view! See it today!
3863 Rodeo Dr. $109,900
US 27 to Hammock Rd to (L) on 635 to (R) into Country.Club
of Sebring (Haw Branch Rd) to (R) on Rodeo to home on (R).
215263

" :. C _. .,B


GOLF COURSE BEAUTY 3/2 w/awesome Florida room &
great view of #8 green. Impeccably maintained & move-in
ready. Beautiful quartz counter tops & luxurious master bath
w/cherry cabinets & soaker tub. MUST SEE today!
2937 Wynstone Dr. $229,900

US 27 to Hammock Rd to (L) on 635 to (R) into the Country
Club of Sebring to (L) on Wynstone Dr to home on (R).
211608








STATELY ELEGANCE This gorgeous custom home with
crown molding and high stepped ceilings, upgraded flooring,
plumbing & light fixtures with its 2 elegant master suites is
situated on a gorgeous lot with a great view of #15 fairway.
2731 Treasure Cay Ln. $269,900

US 27 to Hammock Rd to (L) on 635 to (R) into Country Club of Se-
bring (Haw Branch Rd) to (R) on Strafford Oaks to (L) on Briarwood
Ln (Sterling Oaks) to (R) on Treasure Cay to home on (R). 211091


THE CONR CLUB


BARGAIN LUXURY! 3 bed + office + gorgeous too! EXUDES
luxury w/10' ceilings, crown molding, granite, and rich cabi-
netry. Custom features throughout. Relax in the sparkling
pool w/waterfall, wet bar with very special golf course views.
7099 Strafford Oaks Dr. $284,900

US 27 to West on Hammock Rd to (L) on CR 635 to (R) on Haw
Branch Rd to (R) on Strafford Oaks to home on the (L)
216106

r .. l^^l '-l'm r






FALL IN LOVE AGAIN! Gorgeous fully treed homesite w/
open floor plan + modern colors too! Love the private master
suite w/ sliders to the large, fully enclosed lanai w/ tiled floor
+ sliding glass windows. This might be the one!
3128 Pebble Creek Dr., E. $249,900
US 27 to Sebring Parkway, (L) on Home Ave to stop sign, (L)
on 17 N. to the 1st Highlands Ridge sign, turn (R) on Power-
line Rd to Highlands Ridge south entrance, (R) on Fairway
Vista, (L) on 216280


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WRIt
Ar


r b^'4


BETTER THAN NEW! Golf course living at its best! Lovely
golf & water views. Great split plan w/neutral colors, up-
grades galore w/plantati.on shutters. Large master suite and
3rd bedroom has built-in Murphy bed! See this beauty today!
4013 Carter Creek Dr. $284,900
Sebring Pkwy to (L) on Home Ave to stop sign and (L) on 17N
to (R) at Powerline Rd to (L) into Highlands Ridge (Clubhouse
Dr) to (R) at Fairway Vista to (L) on Carter Creek Dr to home
on (L). 212424








THE BEST DEAL AROUND! Well-built & affordable with
private backyard, metal roof & pool in a great convenient
location. Gorgeous oaks for lots of shade fantastic home at
a low low price.
310 Corvette $124,782

US 27 west on Thunderbird Rd to (R) on Corvette to home on
(R). 215198


-N/aiI^ -^M3


FURNITURE INCLUDED! Furnished 2 bed, 2 bath manufac-
tured home in great location on well landscaped lawn! Large
family room, eat-in kitchen, carport w/ shed. Utility room w/
washer & dryer, new roof, small office / craft room too!
1830 Robin Ct. $54,900

US 27 North to (R) after Safari Motel & Sweety Pie's, then (L)
at Robin Ct. to home on (L). 214905



'At s


BAY WINDOW BEAUTY 3/2/2 open floor plan kitchen has
a bay window with a built-in booth. Private master with
walk-in closet large enclosed lanai, large fenced yard new
carpet and new interior paint. Come see it today!
6915 Matanzas Dr. $149,900

US 27 to Sun N Lake Blvd to three-way stop and (L) on Sunrise
Blvd to (L) on Edgewater Dr to (L) on Matanzas to home on
(R). 211567


rt


DSB UT CITY,


MOVE-IN READY! Cute and fully furnished 2/2/2, w/ new
kitchen. Fully tiled, on lovely lot w/view of Red Beach lake
& many granddaddy oaks! New kitchen, appliances & tile!
.459 acre.
6803 CR 17 S $99,900

27 to East on 98 to North on CR 17 Home on the left hand side
of the road facing Red Beach lake. 215054


CANAL TO CHARLOTTE! Practically like NEW 3 bed 2 bath 2
car garage home on a canal leading to lovely Lake Charlotte.
Open floor plan with an abundance of natural light. Glass
enclosed lanai & lake views too! See it today!
1310 Indian Dr. $160,000

US 27 to Sparta Rd to (R) on Bassage to (L) on Ma Tee to (R)
on Indian to home at end on (R). From SR 66 to Sparta to (L)
on Bassage, etc. 211330


RY CLUB


:i .:AKt t16


Page 6B


RY CLI


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www.newssun.com News-Sun Sunday. February 6. 2011


5 Americans: How health care law affects them


By CARLA K. JOHNSON
AP Medical Writer
CHICAGO A couple on
Medicare got a rebate check
to help with prescription
drug costs. A Chicago man
with diabetes got health
insurance through a new
government program. And a
Philadelphia businessman is
hoping his company will
qualify for a tax credit.
At a critical time for the
nation's new health care leg-
islation, The Associated
Press revisited several
Americans who first shared
their health stories a year
ago. Reporters asked: How
has the law affected their
lives, and how do they see
the health care debate now
roiling Washington?
Many insured Americans
have noticed no substantive
difference in their lives
under the new law. But
health care has changed in
subtle, and dramatic, ways
for others.
This week, a federal judge
declared unconstitutional the
law signed by President
Barack Obama last March
23. The move sets the stage
for the U.S. Supreme Court
to decide the issue, while
Republicans and Democrats
continue to fight over repeal
in Congress. Opponents of
the law assert easier solu-
tions to the nation's health
care problems are available,
and that the new health law
will cripple the economy.
Supporters say the country
can't live without it, from
either a health or economic
standpoint.
Here are the cases of five
Americans, a year later:

Name: David W. Brown
Home: Philadelphia
Age: 48
Employment: General
manager of WURD radio,
president of BrownPartners,
an advertising and marketing
agency. He pays in $150,000
in annual wages.
Household income:
$100,000 including wife's
earnings.
Coverage: Provides
health, dental and vision
coverage to employees of ad
agency, but he and his wife
get health coverage through
his second job at the radio
station.
In the past two years,


Brown had to lay off three of
his seven employees and get
a second job. He still pro-
vides health insurance as a
benefit for the remaining
employees at his ad agency.
For his own family's health
insurance, he now relies on
Philadelphia's WURD radio,
where he took a job as gen-
eral manager.
His daughters, ages 18 and
21, are on the family health
plan, and will be able to stay
on it if they need to through
age 26 because of the
Affordable Care Act. "That's
very helpful," Brown said.
He doesn't know yet
whether his business will
qualify for a tax credit worth
up to 35 percent of the com-
pany's health insurance pre-
mium costs, but he hopes it
will. His tax preparer is
looking into it. A qualifying
employer must pay average
annual wages below $50,000
per employee, so his busi-
ness may indeed qualify.
Brown feels frustrated by
the continued battle in
Congress over the health law
and worries that it will hurt
"people who are vulnerable."
As a businessman, he's look-
ing for stability.
"This kind of political
wrangling doesn't help us in
business." Brown said. "If
you're waiting to see if
something will happen, you
can't plan."


Name: Glenn Nishimura
Home: Little Rock, Ark.
Age: 61
Employment: Consultant
to nonprofit groups.
Household income:
$55,000, including wife's
earnings.
Coverage: Uninsured
since COBRA coverage from
a previous job expired in
May of 2009.
Nishimura, a self-
employed consultant, has
been without health coverage
for almost two years. A pro-
vision in the national health
care law gave his state $46
million to insure people like
him who've been denied
coverage because of pre-
existing conditions. He has
high blood pressure and high
blood sugar levels.
Nishimura considered the
state program's coverage,
but it was too expensive, he


said. He would have paid
$7.500 a year in premiums
and there was a $1.000
deductible. meaning he
would have had to pay the
first $1,000 out of his own
pocket before benefits
kicked in.
"It's just not affordable,"
he said. "It didn't suit my
circumstance. I'm happy
about the health law and I'm
sure it's doing great things
for some people, but it didn't
fit me."
Nishimura is generally
healthy and has low health
care costs. He's not yet old
enough for Medicare. He'd
like to buy catastrophic cov-
erage that would protect him
from going bankrupt if he
had a serious illness or acci-
dent.
"My view is that there are
a wide range of health situa-
tions out here," he said.
"The health reform bill
immediately addresses those
that are sick now and need
coverage now." He has no
problem with that.
"As more features of the
legislation kick in and we
look to improve the bill,
maybe we'll get around to
designing more health care
alternatives that are afford-
able and give folks the flexi-
bility to make life choices ,
without concerns about los-
ing health insurance cover-
age or jeopardizing their
financial security,"
Nishimura said.

Name: Robert Hansen
Home: His pickup truck
or a Seattle homeless shelter
Deceased: At age 58
Employment: Vendor,
Real Change street newspa-
per
Household income:
$12,000, including tips
Coverage: Uninsured.
Before he died, Hansen
was making $12,000 a year
selling Real Change, a street
newspaper. His regular
clients loved his bad jokes
and cheerful nature.
They may not have known
that he was uninsured and
found care in community
clinics and emergency
rooms. Or that he was wor-
ried about the tingling in his
feet and the occasional pur-
plish color of his hands and
whether his symptoms could
.mean a serious health prob-


lem.
Hansen died April 28.
2010. He recently had been
hospitalized for internal
bleeding. A homeless shelter
had a bed for him, but
Hansen "was an independent
kind of guy," said Tim
Harris, executive director of
Real Change, the nonprofit
organization that publishes
the newspaper of the same
name. He died where he
sometimes spent the night, in
his pickup truck.
Hansen, like most poor
adults without young chil-
dren. didn't qualify for
Medicaid, the state-federal
program that helps low-
income families with health
care. The Affordable Care
Act expands Medicaid to
cover people like Hansen,
but not until 2014.
Would Medicaid have kept
Hansen alive? That's not
clear, said Harris.
"Whether he had Medicaid
or not, he still would have
received poor people's
health care," Harris said.
"It's anybody's guess
whether things would have
unfolded any differently. I'm
afraid if he had Medicaid,
the scenario would have
been very similar."
Hansen had been a Real
Change vendor for 15 years.
His regular sidewalk sales
spot became a shrine of
flowers and written tributes
in the days after his death.
"People were standing
there on the sidewalk where
he used to sell his paper in
tears," Harris said. "It didn't
matter how terrible his cir-
cumstances were, he was
somebody who just seemed
thrilled to be alive."

Name: Carol McKenna
Home: Pembroke Pines
Age: 69
Employment: Retired
payroll coordinator
Household income: About
$39,000 from Social
Security and some earnings
by husband as mattress
salesman.
Coverage: Medicare
Advantage policy adminis-
tered by AvMed Health
Plans.
A year ago. McKenna said
she had faith that the health
overhaul would work out
fine, even though some
Republicans were telling


Pump prices likely to rise with Egypt unrest


By SANDY SHORE and
CHRIS KAHN
AP Business Writers
Retail gasoline prices are
likely to creep higher as anti-
government protests continue
in Egypt and concerns remain
about the stability of the
Middle East.
The national average for a
gallon of regular gasoline
was $3.124 on Friday,
according to AAA, Wright
Express and the Oil Price
Information Service. That's
up 2.4 cents in the past week.
Analysts expect prices to stay
at $3 a gallon or higher -
perhaps rising as much as 8
cents over the next two
weeks until the conflict in
Egypt is resolved and ten-
sions ease in neighboring
countries.
The pump increases come
at a time when U.S. gasoline
inventories are at an 18-year
high of 236.2 million barrels.
Crude oil imports are up, too,
averaging 9.1 million barrels
a day in the past four weeks,
which is 641,000 barrels a
day more than the four-week
period in 2009.
At the same time,
motorists are staying off the
roads, with demand up less

Follow the
News-Sun on



www.twitter.com/thenewssu n
and




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than 1 percent in the past
month, as winter storms hit
many parts of the country.
"We will continue to have
an amply supplied gasoline
market all the way up
through the spring and sum-
mer," energy analyst Jim
Ritterbusch said. "But it's a
market that remains subject
to the vagaries of geopoli-
tics."
Without the uncertainty
about the Middle East push-
ing up oil prices, retail gas
prices probably would have
fallen between five and 10
cents recently, PFGBest ana-
lyst Phil Flynn said.
Egypt controls the Suez
Canal and a nearby pipeline
that together carry about 2
million barrels of day from
the Middle East to customers
I


in Europe and America.
That's a relatively small
amount, compared with the
87 million barrels consumed
worldwide every day.
Petroleum continues to move
through the canal and the
pipeline, but traders fear
protests could spread to near-
by OPEC countries and dis-
rupt supplies.
It was a volatile week for
oil prices. Crude started just
below $89 a barrel on
Monday and shot up to
almost $93 the same day. The
rest of the week, prices
stayed between $92 and $90
a barrel' before dropping
again on Friday, back to
Monday's level.
Oil prices fell after the
government reported a sharp
drop in the January unem-


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ployment rate, which helped
the dollar strengthen against
other currencies.
Commodities like oil are
priced in dollars, so a
stronger dollar makes oil less
attractive to buyers with for-
eign currency.
Benchmark West Texas
Intermediate crude for March
delivery fell $1.30 to $89.24
per barrel on the New York
Mercantile Exchange. In
London, Brent crude lost $2
at $99.76 per barrel on the
ICE Futures exchange.
In other Nymex trading for
March contracts, heating oil
fell 5 cents to $2.7161 per
gallon and gasoline futures
dropped 6 cents to $2.4401
per gallon. Natural gas lost a
penny at $4.324 per 1,000
cubic feet.


seniors they had a lot to
lose.
McKenna has seen
improvements in her
Medicare Advantage plan
that are unrelated to the new
law. It now offers dental
coverage, and drug costs are
lower. She still takes part in
a Silver Sneakers fitness
program that's a benefit of
her plan.
Winston Lonsdale, chief
Medicare executive of
AvMed, the nonprofit organ-
ization that administers
McKenna's plan, says the
new health care law phases
in cuts to Medicare
Advantage and that's a rea-
son for concern. For now,
AvMed has been able to
improve benefits for mem-
bers, despite the cuts on the
horizon, he said.
Nearly 1 in 4 seniors is
covered by Medicare
Advantage, an alternative
that pays insurance compa-
nies to run their own ver-
sions of the government pro-
gram. The plans have cost
more per patient than regular
Medicare, which is the rea-
son behind the cuts in the
new law.
McKenna's husband,
Morty McKenna, 79, falls in
the coverage gap in
Medicare's prescription drug
program the "doughnut
hole" that the Affordable
Care Act promises to close.
That meant he received a
$250 rebate check provided
by the new law.
"It paid for one month of
his medications," McKenna
said. "We were home free
for a month."
McKenna said she's frus-
trated that some in Congress
have used the health care
law as "the scapegoat for
everything."
"They are adults and they
need to grow up and stop
playing the games and actu-
ally listen to their con-
stituents," she said. "Instead
of playing politics, listen to
the people who put you
there."


* Board Certified in
Internal edicine

* Board Certified in
Geriatric Medicine
^^^^^^


Name:.David Zoltan
Home: Chicago
Age: 33
Employment: Student in
retraining program for laid-
off white-collar workers.
Household income:
$24,000 in unemployment
benefits, stipend from
retraining program.
Coverage: Federally fund-
ed health plan for people
with pre-existing conditions.
Laid off from his sales job
during the recession, David
Zoltan also lost his health
insurance, a dire situation
for a diabetic. His health
care became charity care
from his doctors and assis-
tance programs from several
pharmaceutical companies.
He had three emergency
room visits when he ran out
of insulin during the two
years he was uninsured.
The Affordable Care Act
set aside $196 million for
the state of Illinois to start a
new health insurance pro-
gram for people with pre-
existing conditions. Zoltan
was one of the first to sign
up. He lives frugally so he
can pay the $250 a month
fdr the program, which has a
$2,000 deductible.
"It's life to me. I can get
my medicine now," he said.
"I can stop worrying about
what's going to happen if I
can't get my medicine. I can
concentrate on. living a nice,
long, healthy lifeinstead of
going day to day."
He's getting back on his
feet financially with help
from a retraining program
designed for laid off Chicago
professionals. He's learning
to use social media, which
he hopes to put to use in a
career as a fund-raiser for
arts organizations.
His message for
Congress?
"Don't take my
Obamacare away because I
need it."


Ike Lee, M.D.
Internal Medicine

* Former Director of Geriatrics at Mt.
Sinai Hospital
* Graduate of Northwestern Medical
School of Geriatric Fellowship
* Graduate of University of Illinois
Medical School


Accepting
New Patients

402-0909


Page 7B


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-I


POIDER


11








News-Sun- Sunday, February 6. 2011


Page 8B


www.newssun.com


Special to the News-Sun
WAUCHULA The board
of directors of Operation
Round Up, Peace River
Electric Cooperative's
(PRECO) charitable founda-
tion, recently earmarked
$30,000 to provide college
scholarships to as many as 10
college-bound students. Up
for grabs are five four-year
scholarships of $4,000 and
five two-year scholarships
worth $1,000.
Scholarships are available
not only to graduating high
school seniors, but also to
adults desiring to further
their education. To be eligi-
ble, students must reside at a
permanent residence which
receives power from PRECO.
Peace River Electric, head-
quartered in Wauchula serves


10 central Florida counties.
including part of Highlands
County and all of Hardee
County.
"Since 2006, Operation
Round Up has provided over
$200,000 in college scholar-
ships. through the voluntary
contributions of Peace River
Electric members," shares
Julian 'Tip' Tharp, Operation
Round Up's board president.
"Rising educational costs and
the state of our nation's econ-
omy are placing a big burden
on college students, so we're
pleased to make these funds
available."
Students who wish to
apply should contact their
high school's guidance office
for application assistance.
The deadline for completed


applications is March 1.
2011.
Operation Round Up col-
lects voluntary donations
from its members for com-
munity charitable uses.
Participating consumers have
their electric bills 'rounded
up' to the next dollar to pro-
vide charitable funds in the
areas of food, shelter, cloth-
ing, medical, environmental,
and education.
To learn more about
Operation Round Up or to
download a scholarship
application, visit
www.preco.coop.
Through almost 4,000
miles of power lines, PRECO
has been in business since
1940 as a member-owned,
not-for-profit organization.


SHS cheerleaders win fourth state title


News-Sun photo by BECKY KELLY
Sebring High School's cheerleaders have done it again been named state champions at
the Florida High School Athletic Association Competitive Cheer Competition in Orlando on
Friday. Coach Carolyn Shoemaker was all smiles Saturday as she bragged on the team's
fourth title, one for each year that cheerleading has been recognized as a high school sport.
This year, SHS competed with 10 other large co-ed teams. There were SHS 26 students on
the mat for competition. This is real exciting. The kids are really thrilled,' Shoemaker said.
Some of the students have competed for all four titles. The team's competitive season runs
from December through February. It wraps up next weekend when 20 of the cheerleaders
will take the mat at the High School Nationals to be televised on ESPN.


176 verses memorized


Courtesy Photo
Jodi Antley, of Christ Fellowship Church, recently
recited the 119th Psalm by memory. It took her
approximately 35 minutes to quote the 176 verses of
the longest chapter in the Bible. One could hear a
pin drop across the congregation, as everyone fol-
lowed along in their Bibles, wondering if her memo-
ry was greater than the obvious case of nerves that
literally had her body shaking. Antley who is shy,
soft spoken, and not one to get up in front of people
- promised the Lord that if He helped her learn it,
she would say it for the church. That was 10 months
ago. Pastor Eugene Haas gladly invited her to quote
it when he heard that she had indeed learned it. On
Nov. 7 Haas presented her with a trophy.

Florida adds 64 new nursing
programs in 18 months


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida has added 64 new
nursing education pro-
grams of all types in the
18 months since a new
law went into effect eas-
ing the approval process.
A legislative report
Friday said the Board of
Nursing approved pro-
grams at triple the rate for
the previous 18 months.
The Legislature revised
the process in response to
a nursing shortage.
The Office of Program


Policy Analysis &
G o v e r n m e n t
Accountability reported
the new programs have
increased student seats by
20 percent and enrollment
by 13 percent. It's too
early, though, to tell now
the changes have affected
graduation and retention
rates or employment out-
comes.
Florida had 185 pro-
grams in 2009-10 that
graduated 26,188 students
- an 11.7 percent
increase from the previ-
ous year.


PRECO makes college


scholarships available


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Special to the News-Sun
South Florida Community
College's Community
Education Department iA
offering a series of Alcohol
Drug Accident Prevention
Training (ADAPT) courses
for first-time driver's license
applicants.
The four-hour courses will
be held from 8:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 12
at the SFCC Highlands
Campus, 600 W. College
Drive, Avon Park; and 8:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 19 at the SFCC Hardee
Campus, 2968 U.S. 17 N.,
Bowling Green.
Pre-registration is
required. The fee is $32.
The department is also
offering a series of Safe
Driving Accident Prevention
Program (SPAPP) courses for
drivers who have received a
traffic citation.
The four-hour courses will
be held from 5:30-9:30 p.m'
Wednesday at the SFCC
DeSoto Campus, 2252 N.E;,
Turner Ave., Arcadia; 8:3q
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday.
Feb. 12 at the SFCC
Highlands Campus, 600 W.
College' Drive, Avon Park;
and from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 19 at the:
SFCC Hardee Campus, 2968
U.S. 17 N. Bowling Green.
Pre-registration is
required. The fee is $37.
All fees may be paid by:
cash, check, or credit card.
For more information, con-
tact the Community
Education Department at
453-6661, 465-5300, 494-
7500, 773-2252, or 382-
6900, ext. 7388.


YEA








SECTION



LIVING


News-Sun


Sunday, February 6, 2011


The $1.2 billion home of Super Bowl XLV is a monument to sports, architecture and technology. Cowboys Stadium is the world's largest indoor football
stadium and can host about 100,000 fans. The building from one end zone to the other is as long as the Empire State Building is tall.
Two steel arches, each weighing 3,255 tons, span the almost quarter-mile long stadium and are twice the length of St. Louis' Gateway arch. Massive structural abut-
ments, 25 feet tall, anchor each arch.


Artwork is prominent throughout
Cowboys Stadium, with 19 original pieces by
established and emerging contemporary
artists on display.


End zone party plazas feature the
cheapest ticket, $29 standing-room-only party
passes. Fans also can view the game from
stairwells.


The retractable glass panels
in the end zones are the tallest in the
world. The glass doors open to allow specta-
tors to enter on to "party platforms." Both end
zones have space behind seats on three levels
that are standing room only, and fans have
access to the platforms and outdoor plazas.
The exterior "party" plazas are unique in NFL
stadiums.

The $40 million video board -
also the largest in the world features four
high-definition displays facing the sidelines
and end zones. The display stretches from the
23-yard line to the 23-yard line.
The stadium has shattered
attendance marks. The Dallas
Cowboys played the New York Giants on Sept.
20, 2009, in the first regular season game at
Cowboys Stadium and drew an NFL-record


___ _________ ~il~ *'~ ~- ____









News-Sun Sunday, February 6. 2011


www.newssun.com


DIVERSIONS


SUBTRACTION
ACROSS
1 Hale
7 Powerful Chevys, for
short
13 Fall bloomers
19 Newtonian concern
21 Unrestricted
22 1939 retiree who said
"Today I consider myself
the luckiest man on the
face of the earth"
23 "Most Difficult
Woman" pageant win-
ner's title?
25 Establish a new
foothold
26 Weasel cousin
27 Nashville-to-
Louisville dir.
28 Laced
29 Stacks like
Tupperware
30 Alberta native
32 Playground retort
34 Middle x or o
35 What Nadia
Comaneci gave her
Olympic opponents?
41 Paparazzi, briefly
45 Too violent, maybe
46 Baby in blue
47 Final Four org.
49 Eliza's mentor, to
Eliza
50 Urged (on)
51 Nite times
53 Compete
54 Soup legume
56 Former Cub slugger
57 Batch of itch reliever?
60 Sales _
61 Angry with
64 Sm., med. or Ige.
65 T-man or G-man
66 _Kosh B'Gosji
67 3 Musketeers relative
70 Old photo tone
72 Anglican church offi-
cials
74 Zeta follower
75 Likely
76 In bed, maybe
77 Parson's house
78 Thrice due
79 Native American
Washington baseballer?
83 Hall of Famer


Recently, a friend and I
visited over lunch. After a
time, she leaned back in her
chair with a contemplative -
yet joyful look on her face.
She began saying what an
extraordinary man her hus-
band was. She was so thank-
ful to have him to share her
life and the everyday little
things that come along.
As she sang his praises,
she spoke in a soft and very
appreciative manner. I lis-
tened with my ears and my
heart.
Before I knew it, I could-
n't keep silent. And we
shared how very fortunate
we are to have such hus-
bands who care for us. who
are calm and reassuring; who
have strong faith and make
us want to be more like
them.
When our wedding
anniversary comes along, we
love to celebrate in a special
way. It doesn't mean any-
thing particularly expensive;
but, time together perhaps
to walk the beach or to
spend time alone reminisc-


P


to


ing; or, a


S quiet din-
ner at a
restaurant
or even at
home.
'4 But. as
.. the years
ause And go by and
I reflect
Consider on the 29
Jan, Merop years God
has given
Ken and me. I realize cel-


ebrating always includes
thanksgiving.
The years have flown by,
but the memories are as real
as if it was yesterday.
We were two single par-
ents struggling alone to raise
our sons and. praying that
God would bring a spouse to
us and another parent to our
children.
Both of us prayed that
somehow God would let us
know when that right person
came along because nei-
ther of us trusted ourselves
to make the right choice.
How he would let us know,
we weren't certain. But, we


trusted he' would.
When we met, there was a
knowing we couldn't
describe except to be certain
it had come from God and
ihe he was our matchmaker.
A new family was born as
we married and brought our
two families into one. Three
boys became brothers and
we embarked on quite an
adventure.
Thanksgiving! Yes, that is
my response to the many
years we have had and look-
ing forward to many more.'
Our sons are grown and have
wives and children of their
own. And, so, we have even
more to be thankful for.
Our life verse still
describes God's marvelous
gift to us 29 years ago and
counting, where it says in I
Corinthians 2: 9. NKJV,
"Eye has not seen. nor ear
heard, nor have entered into
the heart of man the things
which God has prepared for
those who love Him."
Happy Anniversary,
Honey. Selah


By MIKE PELUSO


Sandberg
87 Luther contemporary
89 Hall & Oates, e.g.
90 Fail to take the heat?
91 Smudge
92 "... forgive those
who trespass ..."
93 Large-screen format
95 Part of una semana
96 Egotist's array
97 Like buffalo, red
meatwise
99 Timeless witticism?
102 Golf hole meas.
103 Verbally insistent
106 Royal display
107 Speed, for a running
back
109 Actress Petty
110 White wine aperitif
111 "The Thorn Birds"
and others
116 Conspicuous terrain
features
118 Deal between
thugs?
121 Thrilled
122 2,000 pounds
123 1962 World's Fair
site
124 Kobe mat
125 Walk in the park
126 A player might be
cut after one

DOWN
1 Tire holders
2 Taking care of busi-
ness
3 Cancun kiss
4 Bear up there
5 Sutured
6 "Tool Man" Taylor of
TV
7 Ming artifact
8 Aliens, for short *
9 Acting like one has
something to hide
10 Shinbones
11 2010 panelist with
Kara, Randy and Simon
12 Luges, e.g.
13 Cabinet dept.
14 Handled.
15 What black clouds do
16 Restrictions on
Cupid?


17 Funny one
18 PD ranks
20 Sleep ailment
24 Linear, briefly
31 Claret, e.g.
33 German grandpa
35 -:,en '
36 Sum preceder?
37 Bothers
38 Cooks, in a way
39 Genesis victim
40 N_ ostra
42 Chlorine or iodine
43 Starting ',.iaini quar-
terback in three straight
'70s Super Bowls
44 Graceful women
47 One of a reptilian
comics quartet
48 2.0 GPA component,
probably
51 French card game
52 Wine holder
53 Middle of a boast
55 James and Jones


Solution on page 7C


58 Syrup source
59 Molson competitor
62 Eastern counters
63 Chloe's love
67 Maguey plant liquor
68 Order to relax
69 Number in an Amtrak
report?
70 Iowa's City
71 NE Nevada county or
its seat
73 Skin-related
77 Adjusted opening?
80 Old vitamin bottle
abbr.
81 Islamic leader
82 Semimonthly tide
84 Polite backwoods
response
85 Alliance formed
under HST
86 Once, once
88 Subject of a
"Rigoletto" duet
91 Afternoon TV idol


94 "Jersey Shore" airer
95 Flagrante _: in the
act of committing the
offense
96 Rear in Liverpool
98 Look up to
99 Grammar student, at
times
100 DeMille specialty
'101 Pamplona runners
104 "Stand and Deliver"
star
105 Mean something
107 Create a distraction
during, maybe
108 Toni Morrison novel
110 Ration: dog food
112 Culturally affected
113 Castilian cat
114 Anti-Patriot Act org.
115 Ignore a Time
change?
117 Reagan era prog.
119 AOL guffaw
120 It's less than gross


Waiting room reading could be unhealthy


Dear Abby: May I make a plea to all
physicians? Please remove the maga-
zines and children's books from your
waiting rooms. Again and again, 1 see
patients sneezing and coughing over
and around these materials without
covering their mouths, and handling
them with contaminated hands.
The next patient who innocently
touches one of those items puts him or
herself at risk of infection. The same
applies to children's toys, if they are
provided in waiting rooms.
My advice to patients. and to parents
of children with appointments, is to
bring their own reading materials,
iPads, laptops or needlework to pass
the time waiting for their doctor's
appointment. Parents should bring a
favorite toy for this purpose.
Let's all work together to keep our
germs to ourselves. Thank you for get-
ting the word out, Abby.
Edythe in Tennessee
Dear Edythe: That's excellent
advice, and something people rarely
think of. Children frequently put their
hands in their mouths and adults who


-- touch the furniture
and doorknobs in
S doctor's offices
should wash their
S hands before touch-
"* = .' ing their faces. An
SA ounce of prevention
is worth a pound of
S- cure and it's less
Dear Abby expensive.
Dear Abby: Your columns about the
kindness of strangers impel me to relate
a recent experience. As an 80-year-old
retired general contractor, I stay busy
by making custom furniture. Recently, I
picked up a full load of hardwood
planks.
Because some of the pieces were,
very long, I had to keep the tailgate of
my pickup truck down. All went well
until I reached the first stop sign. When
I started to pull away, mny truck went
forward. but the load stayed put.
Halfway across the busy intersection
with traffic going all directions, I pan-
icked. I knew I couldn't lift those 46
planks by myself.


Out of nowhere, two gentlemen
rushed through the traffic, and without
a word, began loading the planks, two
at a time, into my truck. When they
were all loaded. I offered each young
man my heartfelt thanks. My proffered
reward was brushed aside with a short,
"That's not necessary. Have a good
day!" People are great in Southern
California.
Grateful in Garden Grove, Calif.
Dear Grateful: Actually, people are
great all over. But as another resident
of Southern California, I second the
motion.

DearAbby is written by Abigail Van Buren,
also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips.
Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or
PO. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To
receive a collection ofAbby's most memorable
- and most frequently requested poems and
essays, send a business-sized, self-addressed
envelope, plus check or money order for $6
(U.S. finds) to: Dear Abby Keepers
Booklet, PO. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Postage is included in the
price.)


From Draconian


to Western


Parenting Wuss


Over the years, I
have been called*
every name in the _
book, all related to
my admittedly tradi- 9'
tional parenting phi- 4
losophy. Draconian
is a favorite slur. I
am confident that
these epithets are
tossed by folks who Liv
have turned their I
children into golden Chil
calves, so I have no
problem with harsh J
or evil or "parenting Rose
Hitler" or any of the
rest.
But my reputation may be
in store for rehabilitation,
because according to Amy
Chua. writing in The Wall
Street Journal (Jan. 11), my
parenting malevolence is
nothing compared to that of
the Chinese Tiger Mother, of
which she is one.,Consider
that the CTM does not allow
her children to attend sleep-
overs, have playdates, partic-
ipate in school plays, watch
television, play computer
games, choose their own
extracurricular activities, be
less than the very best in
every subject save drama
and gym, attend sleepover
camp, and play any instru-
ment other than the piano or
violin, of which they will
play one or the other.
I conclude that future
Chinese orchestras will be
bereft of horn and percus-
sion sections. I also ponder
the competitive chaos that
must result if several chil-
dren of CTMs wind up in the
same classroom. Ms. Chua
believes that one does not
become proficient to the
point of superior at a skill
without hours and hours of
forced practice. Practice
must, in fact, be forced
because as she admits. "the
child will resist." Left to
their own devices, she
claims. children never want
to work, which is why it is
crucial for responsible (pre-
sumab)y) parents "to over-
ride their preferences."
Ms. Chua overrides her
two daughters' preferences
by calling them names like
"garbage" and threatening to
throw away a favorite doll-
house unless the child in
question learns a particularly
difficult piano piece within
24 hours. If one of her
daughters ever came home
with a B (something she says
would never happen), there
would be a "screaming, hair-
tearing explosion." From
her. mind you, not the child.
The CTM believes her
child is in debt to her


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because of the inor-
dinate time and-
energy she devotes
to making sure the
child achieves total,
S* unequivocal success
in life. If the child
L J does not repay the
debt by being the
best at everything,
ving it is the CTM's
ith right and perhaps
1dren even duty to.
demonstrate, pre-
ohn sumably by launch-
e'mond ing ballistic mis-
siles at the child's
psyche, that she is ashamed
of the child.
This all seems like unmiti-
gated, indefensible emotion-
al blackmail to me, but then
I am' a Westerner and there-
fore an unmitigated parent-
ing wuss. I do not under-
stand what it takes for a
child to achieve success in
life. Is this cultural chauvin-
ism or what? Ms. Chua
describes her parenting style
as if she is being totally
unselfish, but I suggest that
she is all about her. This
CTM stuff is more about Ms.
Chua's ego than it is her
kids' success. She lives
through her children, She
even freely admits that she
and her American husband
do not agree on how to raise
the kids, but when he
objects, she simply argues
him into submission. The
Chinese Tiger Mother is also
a Tiger Wife.

At the crux of my dis-
agreement with Ms. Chua is
her definition of success. -
She's fixated on grades and
other material accomplish-
ments (one of her daughters
played Carnegie Hall in
2007). I want a child to pret-
ty much-with some coaching
and correcting of course -
find his or her own way in
life. I'm all for the child
learning through trial-and-
error what path is right for
her. Ms. Chua is about
choosing the child's path and
keeping her on it no matter
what. I think character is
more important than material
success. Ms. Chua believes
character is forged in the
struggle for material success.
We agree on nothing.
In any case, I am indebted
to Ms. Chua for inadvertent-
ly improving my public
image. I am now a Western
Parenting Wuss and proud of
it.


Family psychologist John
Rosemond answers parents' ques-
tions on his website at www.rose-
mond. com.





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www. newssun.com


News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT


Area

author

offers up

new book

Special to the News-Sun
Chip Ballard introduces a
collection of short stories
that offers an insightful view
into the lives of small town
living in his new book, "The
Snapshot & Other Stories:
Tales of Flowing Wells." The
release of this collection
delves into the rough and
rugged life set in the ficti-
tious town in the rural county
of Pinewood in central
Florida.
In "Waiting for God," a
young boy's faith is tested
when a bully takes his BB
gun and kills a redbird. It's
his belief that God will come
for the bird and take it to
Heaven.
"Moonlight is .Forever"
deals with the bittersweet
love affair between a young
woman and the boy she
loves. Promises are made but
a heart is broken when one of
therm walks away.
With "Snapshot," we see a
young boy longing for his
father and runs away from
home with just a snapshot for
company.
"Johnny's Angel" brings us
a guitar-picker whose inten-
tions may be in the right
place but when the truth is
told ends up on the wrong
end of a pair of fists.
"Endless Summer" gives
us the Bahamas, two young
lovers whose father has close


- r.'.-. .. -.-: .. .




S..... .. . -
T o -'2 m


I . J o.. .. .. .. ._...:.e.



Chip Ballard's latest book is available in book stores and
online.


ties to the Mafia and a sum-
mer that won't be forgotten.
Many more tales such as
*these are woven with humor,
emotion and even some that
will make you stop and think.
You will laugh and cry and
shake your head. But whatev-
er the case. you will keep
reading until the very end.
Chip Ballard is a feature


writer and columnist for var-
ious newspapers in the state
of Florida and has won many
local, state and national
awards and has been pub-
lished in numerous maga-
zines.
For more information
about this author and his
other works, visit author Web
site at www.chipballard.com.


Grand to be Irish at SFCC with

Cahal Dunne and George Casey


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK South
Florida Community College
presents legendary Branson
entertainers Cahal Dunne and
George Casey at 1:30 p.m.
Tuesday in the SFCC Theatre
for the Performing Arts.
Enjoy big laughs from begin-
ning to end as you embark on
a musical journey through
Ireland.
Cahal Dunne, "Ireland's
Happy Man," possesses that
certain magical quality
known in show business as.
"it." He is among Ireland's'
finest composers, pianists,
comedians, storytellers, and
television personalities.
Dunn is the nephew of the
former Prime Minister of
Ireland, Jack Lynch. He has
appeared with Bob Hope,
Wayne Newton, Al Martino,
Tony Orlando and performed
for several presidents.
His new video, "Thank
You America," is shown on
PBS Television throughout
the United States. His style is
rich and.deep, reflecting the
many strands in his distin-
guished career.
George Casey has been
entertaining audiences for
more than 30 years with his
self-deprecating humor, clean
jokes, and stories. Some of
the acts Casey has opened for
and toured with include
Rosemary Clooney, Bobby
Vinton, The Osmond
Brothers, Ray Price, Three
Dog Night, Brooklyn Bridge,
'and Donald O'Connor.
He has performed at
Caesar's Palace, the Sahara,
and is a regular act at the
Riviera Hotel and Casino in
Las Vegas. He calls Branson,
Mo. home.
The 2011 Matinee Series is
sponsored by Jean Moyer, Dr.
and Mrs. Placido M. Roquiz
Jr., and Drs. Abe and
Carmelita Lim.
Tickets range from $16 to
$21 and may be purchased


Courtesy photo
Cahal Dunne, 'Ireland's Happy Man,' will perform Tuesday
at South Florida Community College.


Courtesy photo
Appearing with Cahal Dunne on Tuesday will be George
Casey, who has been entertaining audiences for more than
30 years with his self-deprecating humor and clean jokes.


online 24 hours a day, seven
days a week, at http://per-
formances.southflorida.edu.
Tickets may also be pur-
chased by calling the SFCC
Box Office at 784-7178 or by


visiting the SFCC Box Office
in the front of the SFCC
Theatre for the Performing
Arts, 600 West College
Drive, rrom 11:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.


, he news s just click away!

ww news n.com


I


Winners named for Lake


Placid Art League's Art Show


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID -
Artists from many areas of
Florida and several from out
of state participated in the
24th Annual Art Show on
Jan. 29 at the Bert J. Harris
Jr. Agricultural Center in
Sebring sponsored by the
Lake Placid Art League.
Awards were presented to
the professional artists and
the Lake Placid High School
students. In addition, donat-
ed art pieces were awarded
to donating guests.
Congratulations to the fol-
lowing winners:
Awards for the Lake
Placid Art League 24th Art
Show and Sale were:
Best of Show Award,
Fawn McNeill Barr, acrylic
painting; and Parrish
Environmental Award,
Jacque Palomaki, painting.
First place awards:
Tom Freeman, painting;
Donald Nedobeck, painting;
Marsha Penn, watercolors;
Maria Lorant, parchment
creations; Burke and Carter
Even, photography; Don.
Kah, mixed media; arid Ed
King, jewelry.
Second place awards:
Lemuel North, painting; J.
Harry Canfield, photogra-


phy; Alice Hansen, painting;
Cindy Mills, craft; Alberto
Sanchez, painting; and
Agnes Laiosa, painting.
Third place awards:
Lori Malhoit, glass; Serge
Hung, jewelry; Tracy
Fenwick, jewelry; and
Robert Broughton, crafts.
Honorable Mention:
Mary Seigfreig, mixed
media; Cindy Rose, photog-
raphy; Richard and Linda
Marino, pottery; Barbara
Wade, painting; Deborah
Christian, jewelry; and
Delores Coleman, crafts.

Student Awards
Lake Placid High School
- Best of Show: Laura
Cardeletta, Charcoal.
First places: Kassie
Canevari, charcoal;
Shannon Viox, scratch-
board; and Megan
Leatherman, cut paper.
Second places: Brandi
Pasquino, pastel and card-
board; Hubert Wade, char-
coal; and Shannon
Cummings, pencil drawing.
Third places: Dawn
Barnett, charcoal;
Amananely Godinze,
scratchboard; and Lara
Shupling, stippling.
Honorable Mention:


Josh Montero, Lindsey
Bennett, Elizabeth
Severance, Nancy Viveros,
Nigeshema Sholtz and
Shelbi Bertram.

Winners of the art for the
drawing at the Lake Placid
Art League Art Show and
Sale on Jan. 29 at the Bert J.
Harris Agricultural Center
in Sebring.
Orlando Kelch won
Bill Snyder's mare and foal
framed giclee.
Betty Stephens won
Christine Yarbour's painting
of squirrels in a tree.
Grace Keene won
Maria Lorant's parchment
creation.
Linda Kinder won
Revi Guszauskas' ballerina
painting.
Carol Schlind won
Joan Swanson's painting of
bougainvilleas.
Nancy Rathjen won
Marsha Penn's watercolor
painting of leaves.
Barb Herman won Don
Kah's mixed media.
Joan Carrow won
Dorothy Quay's forest
scene.
Janene Smith won
Tom Freeman's eagle nest
painting.


Clowns superstars on the high seas


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID On Jan.
23 a group of 53 clowns,
including many from Toby's
Clown Alley and other clown
groups across the United
States, boarded the MSC
cruise ship "Poesia" for a
seven-day cruise to the
Caribbean.
The ship welcomed the
group and allowed them full
use of the disco lounge for
three sea days. Classes were
led by Toby, Big Al, Giggles,
Bunky, Blondi and Clyde D
Scope.
The crew of the "Poesia"
(which means Poem of the
Sea in Italian) invited the
clown group to perform in
the main showroom, after
attending some of the classes
with the clowns. The invita-
tion was to perform in the
Carlo Felice theater, a world
class stage on international
Sweaters. Very intensive
rehearsal began for the show
on Friday morning and the
"Poesia" advertised the
clown show in the daily
newsletter on board and over
the loudspeakers. All pas-


Courtesy photo
On Jan. 23 a group of 53 clowns, including many from
Toby's Clown Alley in Lake Placid, boarded the MSC
cruise ship 'Poesia' for a seven-day cruise to the
Caribbean.


sengers were invited to
attend the show. Seats filled
up and overflowed into the
balcony seats.
. It was quite a show.
People laughed and clapped.
The energy and joy was con-
tagious: A photo shoot was
held, following the produc-
tion, for the passengers and
especially the children.
Everyone was invited to
have their pictures taken
with Toby the Clown and his
clown friends. So many peo-
ple participated that the ships


Attend the Church of Y

Inspirational Thoughts
by Patricia Valentine

... St. Luke 5:5-6, "And Simon
.. a answering said unto him,
M master, we have toiled all
the night, and have taken
nothing: nevertheless at thy
word I will let down the net.
And when they had this done, they inclosed a
great multitude of fishes: and their net
brake." In the above scriptures. Peter chose.
to obey Jesus and as a result he experienced
a stunning display of divine power. In our
obedience to God and His word it may
sometime require doing some things that
appear to be unreasonable. Our obedience to
God should ne\er be based on whether
something seems fitting to our \\a\ of
thinking. That is not to sa\ God always
bypasses common sense, but oftentimes what
He requires of us may not appear
reasonable or match our preconcei\ed ideas.
Disobedience \\ ill cause us to miss out on
what God has in stored.for us. Nothing
pleases a parent mneitan to ha\c their
children walking in obedience. God is even
more pleased \\ hen His children are walking
in obedience. Be Blessed!


Please support the above businesses. They have mad


photographers were very
busy.
The excitement lingered
as the clowns went to lunch.
They received a standing
ovation from the passengers
as they entered the dining
room still dressed in clown
and in make-up. Toby and all
the clowns have been invited
back by MSC Cruise Lines
and Toby hopes to make this
an annual event. To join the
group on the next cruise con-
tact Tobysclowns@embarq-
mail.com for information.


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Page 3C


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Page 4C


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT


News-Sun Sunday, February 6. 2011


www. newssun.com


Art Sparks! turns out i -4:"

splattered paint fun .V ,O ,r 4 ,


Special to the News-Siiun
SEBRING Art sparked
and the paint flew ... and
dripped and dribbled and
spattered Tuesday night at
the Highlands Art League's
Yellow House Gallery as
Loretta Dewitt and friends
explored the possibilities in
paint, a la Jackson Pollack.
The first of a new weekly
series of demonstrations, dis-
cussions, workshops and
more, hosted by the Artists
Marketing Group, Dewitt
used the Pollack Project to
introduce her hands-on, non-
objective art experience to
artists and visitors present.
The Darder Family mom
Noris, and children Nicole,
14, and Fernando, 11 were
selected to take turns pour-


ing. spilling, dripping and
tipping primary colors onto
the 4-by-4-foot surface cul-
minating in a very lively and
rich abstract painting as
Dewitt and the audience dis-
cussed Pollack and free
expressive painting. The
demonstration was the first in
a series of videos that Dewitt
and partner Bernie Preblick
are preparing for YouTube
presentation.
After the necessary edit-
ing, the video will be avail-
able on YouTube and at her
Web site, www.berletta.com,
and on the Art League Web
site. www.highland-
sartleague.org.
On Tuesday, Feb. 8 artist
-Phyllis Jones Behrens will
present a collage project for


Courtesy photo
Loretta DeWitt and The Darder Family look over their paint-
ing during last week's Art Sparks! event at Highlands Art
League's Yellow House Gallery.


group participation ... prom-
ising another lively art expe-
rience. HAL members and
the public are invited to take
part. While this event is at no


charge, a small donation to
HAL by attendees is appreci-
ated. Art Sparks! events
begin each Tuesday promptly
at 6 p.m.


Courtesy photo
The finished piece of art using the Pollack Project.


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK Author
Gary Mormino continues the
South Florida Community
College Humanities Reading
Series, at 7 p.m. Thursday.
Feb 10 in Building H, Room
112, SFCC Highlands
Campus.
Mormino. holds the Frank
E. Duckwall Professorship in
History at the University of
South Florida, St. Petersburg
and directs the Florida
Studies Program.
His subjects range across
continents and time periods
with books including
"Immigrants on the Hill,"
"The Immigrant World of


Ybor City," and "Spanish
Pathways in Florida, 1492-
1992."
His latest book, "Land of
Sunshine, State of Dreams,"
examines the social, cultural,
and economic forces that
drove- Florida from the
500,000 residents at the out-
set of the 20th century to 16
million at the end.
In 2007, "The Florida
Dream," an Emmy-winning
documentary based on the
book, appeared on PBS.
The Humanities
Department Reading Series
features fiction and nonfic-
tion writers who focus on
regional themes. Future read-


ing series authors include
non-fiction writer Les
Standiford on April 5.
An open mic night will be
held April 14. The series is
free and open to the public. It
is funded by a grant from
Anne Reynolds.
For more information, call
Dr. Charlotte Pressler, pro-
fessor, English/Humanities at
784-7247.


Gessford is featured guest


artist at Yellow House Gallery


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING Florida artist Gary Gessford
will be the guest Artist of the Month at the
Yellow House Gallery from Feb. 11 through
March 11.
The Highlands Art League will celebrate
his work at a reception during Gallery Walk
from 5- 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 11. Gessford has
been featured in many shows and exhibits in
Florida, Georgia, and Washington D.C. and
his teaching and lecturing experience is
well known throughout Florida.
Gessford states his growth as an artist,
has been influenced by the early classical
painters as well as artists from the 20th cen-
tury Abstract Expressionist movement such
as France Kline, Helen Frankenthaler and
surrealist Dali. He suggests his style is more
realistic imagery but sometimes with a sur-
real twist. In 1993 he received an "Artist in
Residency" fellowship in Germany, which
also included an exhibition at the'Otto Flath
Museum.
Through the years his work as an artist
has evolved very successfully in portraiture,


Courtesy photo
Gary Gessford will be the guest Artist of
the Month at the Highlands Art League
Yellow House Gallery from Feb. 11
through March 11.

architectural paintings, landscape paintings
and floral subjects.
Gessford will also be teaching a three-
day workshop in floral painting from Feb.
18-20 at the Highlands Art League Visual
Arts Building. His versatility enables him to
teach the class in oil, watercolor and pastel.
To reserve a place in his class and for more
information call the Highlands Art League,
385-6682.


Reading Series


continues with


Florida author








www.newssun. com


News-Sun Sunday, February 6. 2011


Page 5C


ARTS & LEISURE


Friends are offering up music and art at Highlands Hammock


.> On Saturday,
Feb. 19, begin-

IN the Friends of
Highlands
Hammock will
welcome the
return of great
mountain bal-
Guest lads and tradi-
tional tunes
Column from the Back
Dorothy Porch Revival's
Harris Old Time String
Band. Their
sweet and sassy old time music is
loaded with bounce and humor.
Playing both traditional tunes and
some of their own creations, they'll
have your toes tapping with their
wide array of instruments, includ-
ing a banjo, mandolin, autoharp,
fiddle, harmonica, bass and a cou-
ple of guitars.
Back Porch Revival has per-
formed together for 20 years. In
1995, they were honored by the
folk music community as the top
vocal group at the Pioneer Florida
Old Time Music Championship. In
1996, they took honors again as the
top Old Time Band in yearly com-
petition held in Dade City. In 2004,
they were featured as part of a spe-
cial "Florida Heritage" program at
the Florida Folk Festival.
The band features Jim Robertson
on the fiddle, guitar and lead
vocals. Jim's wife, Melanie, plays
an old-time trailing banjo. She
learned this unique style as an
apprentice to a master artist under
the sponsorship of the Florida
Bureau of Folklife and has been
featured at the Florida Folk
Festival and on National Public
Radio.
Melanie's brother, John
McClure, plays the mandolin,
occasional autoharp, harmonica,
and provides backup and lead
vocals. John's wife, Ginger, plays


Courtesy photo
The Back Porch Revival's Old Time String Band will perform at
Highlands Hammock State Park on Saturday, Feb. 19, beginning at 7
p.m.


the Appalachian lap dulcimer,
penny whistle and recorder. Joining
his aunts and uncles on fiddle and
mandolin will be nephew Matthew
Coltharp. James Dion will be pro-
viding solid rhythm on the bass.
This will be a wonderful night of
old-time string band music under
the stars.
We encourage you to load up
some lawn chairs and blankets,
grab a flashlight and pack a picnic
basket of goodies.
The Friends of Highlands
Hammock will offer light snacks
and hot drinks for sale. Admission
to the concert is just $5 per person,,
with accompanied children age 12
and under admitted free of charge.
All concert proceeds benefit park
improvement projects and provide
a wonderful way to relax and enjoy
the arts. We hope that you will join
us for this unique musical experi-
ence, out here in the Real Florida.


A unique opportunity
The Friends of Highlands
Hammock are pleased to offer the
community an opportunity to be
the owner of an original acrylic
painting by impressionistic painter
Barbara Wade. Wade, a seasonal
resident of our area, is a member
of the Highlands Art League and
also one of eight Yellow House
studio artists in Sebring.
Wade has taught workshops and
classes over the past 25 years and
considers herself a multimedia and
water media specialist. Her paint-
ings were featured at the South
Florida Community College
Theatre for the Performing Arts in
the upper level gallery on the
Highlands Campus during
September, October and November
of 2010.
Her acrylic rendition of the
park's "Big Oak" will be on dis-


Courtesy photo
The Friends of Highlands Hammock will offer the community an oppor-
tunity to be the owner of an original acrylic painting by impressionistic
painter Barbara Wade. Her acrylic rendition of the park's 'Big Oak' will
be on display during the Feb. 19 concert of Back Porch Revival's Old
Time String Band.


play during the concert.
Wade has graciously donated
this painting to further the fund
raising efforts of the Friends of
Highlands Hammock. A donation
of $5 offers donators an opportuni-
ty to win this painting at the close


of the concert season. Visit the
Friends tent for more information
or to enter the drawing.
Dorothy Harris is a park services spe-
cialist at Highlands Hammock State
Park.


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News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


www.newssun.com


Water Conservation is important to us and our future generations


j i





News From
The
Watershed
Corine Burgess


Water is
life.
At
home, at
school,
every-
where, it is
needed.
To keep
it around,
we need to
keep it
clean.
Even
those nasty


sewers.
Reading a book won't
keep it clean.
Conserving it and purify-
ing it, will keep it around.
Only the people can con-
serve it.
Never give up. If we try,
we will succeed.
So give it a try. Keep it
alive!
Everyone needs water.
Rely on it. Yes, but not for
long.
Various amounts are
cleaned.
Any way or any how, we
need to keep it around.
Together we can try to
conserve our water.
In any landmark, water is
there.


Only if we care.
Night or day. We will con-
serve life.
Tandy James

This fifth-grader knows
the value of our precious
water. Tandy speaks of water
as a living thing, something
that.can be saved only by
conservation. At times, we,
as adults can learn much
from our children.
In order to have a healthy
planet, we all depend on
water. The environment is a
delicate balance and when
that balance is upset, bad
things begin to happen.
Initially, there was plenty of
water to supply all the needs
of the plants, animals and
humans that reside on this
planet. Rain, melting ice and
snow, water bodies, and
springs provided all the fresh
water necessary to replenish
the surface water along with
the aquifer. Swamps, marsh-
es, estuaries and forests fil-
tered the water keeping it
pure and healthy.
Mankind has been alter-
ing this delicate balance for
thousands of years. These
alterations have affected the
plants and animals that are


Courtesy photo
In order to have a healthy planet, we all depend on water.
The environment is a delicate'balance and when that bal-
ance is upset, bad things begin to happen.


dependant on that balance. Every year, 14 billions
Unfortunately, many of these pounds of sewage, sludge,
life forms have not been able and garbage are dumped into
to adjust or adapt to the world's oceans; 19 tril-
mankind's interruptions and lion gallons of waste also
they have become extinct, enter the water annually.
Natural areas continue to be Although water pollution is
degraded and the cycle con- a huge concern, keeping the
tinues. waters clean is only part of .


the solution to a monumental
problem.
The most cost-effective
and environmentally sound
way to reduce our demand
for water is conservation.
Saving water also saves
energy by reducing the need
for pumping and treating it.
There are steps that each one
of us can take to conserve
and protect our water.
If you wash dishes by
hand and that's the best
way don't leave the water
running for rinsing. If you
have two sinks, fill one with
rinse water. If you only have
one sink, use a spray device
or short blasts instead of let-
ting the water run. Saves 200
to 500 gallons a month.
When washing dishes
by hand, use the least
amount of detergent possi-
ble. This minimizes rinse
water needed. Saves 50 to
150 gallons a month.
Use the garbage dis-
posal less and the garbage
more (even better com-
post!). Saves 50 to 150 gal-
lons a month.
Put a layer of mulch
around trees and plants.
Chunks of bark, peat moss
or gravel slows down evapo-


ration. Saves 750 to 1,500
gallons a month.
Don't water the lawn
on windy days. There's too
much evaporation. Can
waste up to 300 gallons in
one watering.
Set lawn mower blades
one notch higher. Longer
grass means less evapora-
tion. Saves 500 to 1,500 gal-
lons each month.
Dispose of hazardous
materials properly! One
quart of oil can contaminate
over 1 million gallons of
water, effectively eliminat-
ing that much water from
our water supply.
These suggestions are just
a few of the ways that water
can be saved. Each person
can and will make a differ-
ence. By cutting down on
water usage and keeping the
water we do have clean, we
are making a better world
for future generations to live
in.

Corine Burgess is the Natural
Resources Specialist for the
Highlands County Natural
Resources Department assisting
the Highlands Soil & Water
Conservation District
(www.highlandsswcd. org)..


PLACES To


WORSHIP


Places to Worship is a paid
advertisement in the News-Sun
that is published Friday and
Sunday. To find out more infor-
mation on how to place a listing
in this directory, call the News-
Sun at 385-6155, ext. 502.


APOSTOLIC

* Greater Faith Apostolic
Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. invites you to
come worship with us in spirit and
truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday. For information con-
tact 840-0152. Pastor Larry
Carmody.


ASSEMBLY OF GOD

* Christ Fellowship Church
(Assembly of God), 2935 New
Life Way. Bearing His. Name;
Preaching His Doctrine; and
Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping
God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship,
10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m.
Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-
0924.
* First Assembly of God, 4301
Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev.
Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday
School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship
and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.;
Evening Worship, 7 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night,. (Adult
Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group,
Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-6431.


BAPTIST

* Avon Park Lakes Baptist
Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd.,
Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall,
Pastor. Christ centered and bibli-
cally based. Sunday worship serv-
ices, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Nursery facilities are available.
Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday
and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer
Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible
classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered
for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m.
Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556.
* Bethany Baptist Church
(GARBC) We are located at the
corner of SR17 and C-17A (truck
route) in Avon Park. Join us
Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for cof-
fee and doughnuts, followed with
Sunday School for all ages at 9:30.
Sunday morning worship service
begins at 10:30 a.m., and evening
worship service is at 6 p.m. On
Wednesday, the Word of Life teen
ministry and the Catylist class
(20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult
Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7
p.m. For more information go to
www.bethanybaptistap.com or call
(he church office at 863-452-1136.
* Faith Missionary Baptist
Church, off State Road 17 North of
Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave.
Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday
Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation
available. Ken Lambert, Pastor.
Phone 386-5055.
* Fellowship Baptist Church,
1000 Maxwell St., Avon Park, FL


33825. Sunday: Sunday School,
9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; Wednesday: Evening
Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7
p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax:
453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow
ship.org; Web site, wwwapfellow
ship.org.
* First Baptist Church of Avon
Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park.
Rev. Jon Beck, pastor: Jared
Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy
Loomis, music director. Regular
Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m.
Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library
open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11
a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m.
Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening
Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10
a.m., basic computer
class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m.
conversational English and citizen-
ship classes/Sonshine House.
Regular Wednesday schedule:
5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6
p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m.
Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. chil-
dren's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. chil-
dren's mission groups. Call 453-
6681 for details. Primera Mision
Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon
Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor.
Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m.,
Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship
Service. Wednesday schedule: 7
p.m., Bible study.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine
Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 mid-
way between Sebring and Lake
Placid). Your place for family,
friends and faith. Sunday morning
worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery
is provided for both services with
Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life
changing Bible Study for all ages
starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor
Allen Altvater leads the youth in
their quest to become more like
Christ. Sunday night worship at 6
p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and
Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with
youth worship in the youth facility,
and missions training for all chil-
dren. Call the church at 655-1524.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Placid, Knowing God's Heart and
Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal
Palm Street. (2 blocks south of
Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL
33852 (863) 465-3721, Email:
www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett
Morey, senior pastor. Sunday serv-
ices Traditional Service 9 a.m.,
Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m.
Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m.,
Senior Sunday Night and Sunday
Evening Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Activities: Family din-
ner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reser-
vations required). Adult-LifeSource
classes, prayer meeting, Youth
Intersections, and Kids K-5-
MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15
p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every
Tuesday for prayer breakfast and
women's prayer breakfast is at 8
a.m. every Wednesday, both at the
Family Restaurant.
* First Baptist Church of Lorida
located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida.
Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.
for all ages. Sunday worship serv-
ices are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Preschool care is provided at the
11 a.m. worship service.
Wednesday evening Bible Study
and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m.,
followed by adult choir rehearsal.


From September to May our youth
group meets. First Lorida is the
"Place to discover God's love." For
more information about the church
or the ministries offered, call 655-
1878.
* First Baptist Church, Sebring,
200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL
33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr.
David E. Richardson, senior, pas-
tor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of
youth and activities. Contemporary
Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible
Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional
Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista
Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night
programs at the ROC begin 5:30
p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m.
Preschool and Mother's Day Out
for children age 6 weeks to 5 years
old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call
385-4704.
* Florida Avenue Baptist
Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon
Park. Mailing address is 710 W.
Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825.
Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D.
Girdley, pastor. Sunday School,
9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11
a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church;
Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday night programs for
children, youth and adults at 7 p.m.
* Independent Baptist Church,
5704 County Road 17. South,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday
School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship,
10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m.
Wednesday service, 7 p.m.
Fundamental, soul-winning, mis-
sion-minded, King James Bible
Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone
655-1899. Bus transportation.
* Leisure Lakes Baptist Church,
808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just
off of Miller at the west end of Lake
June) "Where the old fashion
gospel is preached." Sunday
School begins at 9:45 a.m.;
Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.;
Sunday Evening Service is at 6
p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the
church at 699-0671 for more infor-
mation.
* Maranatha Baptist Church
(GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east
of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle
Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9
a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.;
Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week
service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily
Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m.,
Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald
Webber and Associate Pastors
Don Messenger and Ted Ertle.
Phone 382-4301.
* Parkway Free Will Baptist
Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the
church where the "Son" always
shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and
Wednesday Evening Worship, 7
p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6
p.m. on the last Sunday of each
month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pas-
tor. Church phone: 382-3552.
Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated
with the National Association of
Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn.
E Sparta Road Baptist Church,
(SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev.
Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday
school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening


Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday:
Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery
provided. For information, call 382-
0869.
* Southside Baptist Church
(GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave.,
Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor;
Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor.
Sunday School for all ages, 9:30
a.m.; Morning Worship Service,
10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten
through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.;
Evening Worship, 6 -p.m.
Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30
p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and
Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for
under age 3 is available at all serv-
ices. Provisions for handicapped
and hard-of-hearing. Office phone,
385-0752.
* Sunridge Baptist Church,
(SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27
and Valerie, across from Florida
Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pas-
tor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.;
Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service,
6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible
Study, and Youth, 6:30
p.m.Nursery provided. For informa-
tion, call 382-3695.


CATHOLIC

* Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church, 595 East Main St., Avon
Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas
McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil
Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7
p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8
and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m.,
Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at
8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30
p.m. Saturday. Religious Education
Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday
for grades K through 8th.
Confirmation class is from 6:30-8
p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights
grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m.
Wednesday.
* St. Catherine Catholic Church,
820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing
address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL
33870, 385-0049. wwwstcathe.
com. Very Rev. Jos6 Gonzalez,
V.F. Masses -.Saturday Vigil, 3:30
and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 9 and 10:30
a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday
Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family
and Youth Center). Daily Masses 8
a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9
a.m. Saturday. Confessions: 3-3:45
p.m. Saturday, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first
Friday, or by appointment. Enroll
your students today for Catholic
School grades Pre-K3 through 5th
grade.
* St. James Catholic Church,
3380 Placidview Drive, Lake
Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael
J. Cannon. Mass schedule:
Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) -
Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8
a.m. and 9:30 a.m.: Weekdays, 9
a.m. December thru Easter -
Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m.,
9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9
a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30
a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9
a.m.


CHRISTIAN

* Eastside Christian Church,
101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL
33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27
on County Road 621), 465-7065.
Ray Culpepper, senior pastor.


Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.;
Worship Celebration with the
Lord's Supper each week 10:15
a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat
Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise
and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building
God's Kingdom for Everyone."
"Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and
Life!'' "Alive and Worth the Drive!"
* Sebring Christian Church,
4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher;
Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor.
Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday School, 11 a:m.; Sunday
Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening
service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday
night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by
classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours,
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Phone 382-6676.
* First Christian Church, 1016
W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL
33825; (863) 453-5334; on the
Web at www.firstchristianap.com.
Our motto is "Jesus is First at First
Christian Church." Greg Ratliff,
Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper,
Family Life Minister; Jon Carter,
Music Director. Bible School 9
a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study,
6 p.m.; Wednesday studies for all
ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for
all events.
* First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ), 510
Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of
Poinsettia and Eucalyptus),
Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-
0358 or 385-3435. The Rev.
Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast,
10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30
a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, Praise and Worship,
6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15
p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15
p.m.


CHRISTIAN &
MISSIONARY
ALLIANCE

* The Alliance Church of
Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road,
Sebring, FL 33875. Call 382-1343.
Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday
services: Sunday School meets at
9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship Service meets at 10:30
a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study
meets at 6 p.m. (off site);
Wednesday Prayer Gathering
meets at 6 p.m.


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

* Christian Science Church, 146
N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m.
morning worship and Sunday
school. Testimonial meetings at -
4 p.m. each second and fourth
Wednesday. A free public reading
room/bookstore, located in the
church, is open before and after
church services. The Bible and the
Christian Science textbook,
'Science and Health with Key to
the Scriptures' by Mary Baker Eddy
are our only preachers. All are wel-
come to come and partake of the
comfort, guidance, support and
healing found in the lesson-ser-
mons.


CHURCH OF


BRETHREN

* Church of the Brethren, 700 S.
Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-1597.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

* Avon Park Church of Christ,
200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Minister: Larry Roberts.
Sunday Worship Services, 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities
are available at every service. Bible
Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered
classes for all ages. Church phone:
453-4692.
* Sebring Parkway Church of
Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443. We
would like to extend an invitation
for you and your family to visit with
us here at Sebring Parkway. Our
hours of service are: Sunday
Worship Service, 9 a.m.; Sunday
Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Service, 6 p.m.;
Wednesday Service, 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF
NAZARENE

* First Church of the Nazarene
of Avon Park, P.O. Box 1118.,
Avon Park, FL 33825-1118. 707 W.
Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor.
Sunday: Sunday school begins at
9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wor-
ship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening
service at 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening service is at 7 p.m. with
special services for children and
adults. Special services once a
month for seniors (Prime Time) and
Ladies ministries. If you need any
more information, call 453-4851.
* First Church of the Nazarene
of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake
Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852.
Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning
worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7
p.m. Classes for adult children and
youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim
Taylor.


CHURCHES OF
CHRIST IN
CHRISTIAN UNION

* Community Bible Church -
Churches of Christ in Christian
Union, (Orange Blossom
Conference Center) 1400 C-17A
North (truck route), Avon Park.
Presenting Jesus Christ as the
answer for time and eternity.
Sunday morning worship service,
10:30 a.m. Nursery provided.
Junior Church activities at same
time for K-6 grade. Sunday School
Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m.
(Transportation available.) Sunday
evening praise and worship serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening
prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and
youth activities at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Everyone is welcome,
please come worship with us. Don
Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone
452-0088.


LE7 V~~LLF~ AL ~ AL A~EWS~ ~ 7W4 ,1,f 7


Page 6C











WWW.lneWSSUi7.Cuim News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011



Brace for what lies ahead, Aries, regardless


of outcome; don't mope around, Capricorn


Special to the New -S' S
Aries (March 21-April 20) Aries. a
change is coming and right now it is dif-
ficult to tell if it will end up being a pos-
itive. Brace for what lies ahead regard-
less of the outcome.
Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus.
saying goodbye to someone you love
will be difficult. but somehow you will
manage it. Make a plan to visit this per-
son soon to take the edge off the feel-
ings.
Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini,
steer clear of stores because you simply
do not have the finances to purchase
anything extravagant right now. Stick to
your budget.
Cancer (June 22-July 22) Have
patience with someone you deal with on
a daily basis. Cancer. This person has a
lot on his or her plate and could use
some wiggle room in the next few days.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, col-
leagues are questioning whether or not
you're the right person for the tasks at
hand. They underestimate your abilities.
Show them differently this week.


HOROSCOPE


Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo,
look at a situation through someone
else's eyes and it could shed new light
on the situation you're in. Things may
not be as bad as you thought.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Libra. you
are looking for an adventure and it's just
around the corner. Take Cancer on this
trip of a lifetime when you do depart.
You will want the company.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Scorpio,
there's much to be clone, but the only
place to begin is at the beginning. Begin
with one task and move on from there.
Soon the to-do list will be finished.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
Sagittarius, it's easy to make assump-
tions when you don't have all of the
facts. But this can easily get you into
trouble. Verify the information first.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20)


- Capricorn, you should be happy this
week, but all you feel like doing is mop-
ing around. This somber mood can be
transformed with a visit from a friend.
Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) -
Aquarius, although it doesn't seem like
things are getting accomplished, there
are really many items getting finished
that may be behind the'scenes.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) A night
out at the movies could be just what you
need to unwind, Pisces. Make it a
friendly get-together instead of romantic
night out.



NOTABLE

B IR THDA Y5


Feb. 6 Natalie Cole, singer, 61; Feb.
7 Ashton Kutcher, actor, 33; Feb. 8 -
Seth Green, actor, 37; Feb. 9 Joe Pesci,
actor, 68; Feb. 10 Emma Roberts,
actress, 20; Feb. 11 Brandy, singer, 32;
Feb. 12 Michael McDonald, singer, 59.


Page 7C


CROSSWORD SOLUTION

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A ASE A ADJI AR OSA f

BAR SEEP I A B EA TLE
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PLACES To WORSHIP


EPISCOPAL

* The Episcopal Church of the
Redeemer.Service time is 9:30
with Holy Communion. Coffee hour
following services. Newcomers
welcome. Call 453-5664' or e-mail
redeemer1895@aol.com Web site:
redeemeravon.com. The church is
at 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park
(two miles north of Sun 'N Lake
Boulevard, across from Wells
Dodge.)
* St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL
33870. Sunday Services: Holy
Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy
Eucharist Rite 11 10 a.m. Midweek
service on Wednesday at 6 p.m.
Sunday School for all ages at 9
a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m.
until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m.
service ends. Wednesday: Adult
Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are
always welcome. The Rev. Jim
Kurtz, rector. Church office 385-
7649, for more information.
* St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal
Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-
0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers,
Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m.,
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening: Holy Communion with
Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child
care available at the 8 a.m. and
10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come
see what makes us different.


GRACE BRETHREN

* Grace Brethren Church, 3626
Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-
0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior*
pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m.,
10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday
services at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid
City" Children's Ministry throughout
all services, and there are variosu
other classes for teens, married
couples, "prime-timers," and Bible
studies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day
Care. Preschool and After-School
Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For
registration call: 385-3111). Check
us out on the Web at wwwsebrlmg-
grace.org.


INTERDENOMINATIONAL

* World Harvest and Restoration
Ministries, (non-denominational)
2200 N. Avon -Blvd., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-
3771. Sunday service: Sunday
School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11
a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m.
prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor:
W.H. Rogers.


JEWISH

* Temple Israel of Highlands
County, 382-7744. Rabbi Lorraine
Rudenberg; www.templeis-
raelofhcflorg. Temple Israel is a
Reform Temple that promotes the
enduring and fundamental princi-
ples of Judaism. Through prayer,
study and friendship we strive to
enrich our lives and insure Jewish
continuity in Highlands County.
Friday Evening Shabbat Services,
7:30 p.m.; Saturday afternoon intro
to Hebrew, 12:30 p.m.; Saturday
intro to Judaism, 2 p.m.; Saturday
afternoon Torah Study, 3:30 p.m.;
Havdallah, 5 p.m. Jan. 7-8; Jan. 21;
Feb. 4; Feb. 18-19; March 4-5;
March 18-19 Purim; April 1-2; April
15-16; April 18, 6 p.m., Pesach 1st
Night Seder; April 29-30 Yom
Hashoah; May 13-14; May 27-28.
Every Thursday will be Hebrew and
Bible classes with Howard Salles,
12:30-4:30 p.m.


LUTHERAN

* Atonement Lutheran Church
(ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview
Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen,
Deacon, Spiritual Leader. Jim
Helwig, organist/choir director.
Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy
Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee
hour on the first and third Sunday
of each month. Council meeting on
the first Monday of month: Ladies
Group WELCA meets at noon sec-
ond Monday of month with lunch.
Bring a dish to pass. Church
Vegetable Garden Club meets as
needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden
open seven days a week to congre-
tation and community. Like to sing?
Come join the choir. Visitors always
welcome. Come grow with us.
Phone 385-0797.
* Christ Lutheran Church Avon
Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2
mile east of Avon Park High
School. Sunday Divine Worship is
at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is cel-
ebrated every week with traditional
Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs
of praise. Fellowship time with cof-
fee and refreshments follows wor-
ship. Come worship and fellowship
with us. For information call Pastor
Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see
christlutheranavonpark org.
* Faith Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 2740 Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848,
Faith Child Development Center,
385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea
Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship
services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday
school for children and adult Bible
classes is 9:15 a.m.: and Praise
worship service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Communion is served the
first and third and fifth Sunday of
the month. Sunday worship service
is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8
a.m. each Sunday. Educational
opportunities include weekly adult
Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift
Store (385-2782) is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through
Friday and 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday. All are warmly welcome
in the Family of Faith.
* Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church (AALC) American
Association of Lutheran
Churches, 4348 Schumacher
Road, Sebring, one mile west of
Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor.
Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday.
Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery pro-
vided. Social activities: Choir,
Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-
1163.
* New Life Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a
Congregation of the Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship
with the Wisconsin Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday
Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9
a.m. For more information, call
Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or
visit the Web site at wwwnew/ife
sebr/ng. com.
* Resurrection Lutheran Church
- ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon
Park. Pastor: Rev. John C.
Grodzinski. Early Sunday service,
8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m.
and the second service at 10:30
a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour fol-
low the service. Midweek
Fragrance Free Wednesday wor-
ship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office
phone number is 453-6858.
* Trinity Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake
Placid, FL 33852: 465-5253. The
Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and
Noel Johnson, youth and family life.
Worship schedule for December
through Easter: Worship service 8
and 11 a.m.; Communion services,
first and third Sundays; (Children's
Church, 11 a.m. only); and


Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship
schedule for summer through fall:
Worship service, 9 a.m.;
Communion services, first and third
Sunday; Education Hour 10:30
a.m. Additional services: Lent and
Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy
Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.;
Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.;
Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas
Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve,
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship
activities: Youth Group, Senior
Citizens, Younger Side Adults,
Ladies Missionary League, Ladies
Guild, Small group studies as
scheduled. Music: Choir and hand
chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5
years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday. License:
C14H10020: Susan Norris, direc-
tor. Visit us online at: www. vchurch-
es. com/trnity/utheran/p.


NON-DENOMINATIONAL

* Bible Fellowship Church, 3750
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Sunday: American Sign
Language: First Worship sermon,
songs signed first and second
Worship services. First Worship
service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship
service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to
2 years old) and Sunday school
classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6
p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday: Children, ages 4
years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth,
6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m.
Todd Pat'terson, pastor; Andy
McQuaid, associate pastor. Church
office 385-1024.
* Calvary Church, 1825
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872; 386-4900. An independent
community church. Sunday morn-
ing worship, 8:15 and 10 a.m.;
Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.;
Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m.
Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small
friendly church waiting for your
visit.
* Christian Training Ministries
Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off
County Road 17 on Simpson
Avenue. Sunday service is at 10
* a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7
p.m. A nursery and children's
church are provided. The church is
part of Christian International
Ministries Network, a full gospel,
non-denominational ministry. Linda
M. Downing, minister: Phone, 314-
0482, indadownhg@//live. com.
Casey L. Downing, associate min-
ister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown
ing@hotmal.com. Web site is
www. chrlstiantrainhngministries.net
* Grace Bible Church, 4541
Thunderbird Road, (second church
on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone,
382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior
pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30
p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m.
Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible
Academy Adult Investigating Truth;
first and third Tuesday, Prayer
Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday,
Children's & Youth Programs, 6
p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m.,
College Ministry.
www GBCconnected. org
* Highlands Community Church,
a casual contemporary church,
meets at 3005 New Life Way.
Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10
a.m. Nursery and Kid's World
classes. Small groups meet
throughout the week. Church
phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A.
Linhart.
* Union Congregational Church,
106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday worship services
are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15
a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m.
(contemporary) in'the main sanctu-
ary. Sunday school for all ages is at
9:15 a.m. We also offer


Wednesday and Saturday services
at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respective-
ly. Nursery/child care is available
for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill
Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web
page at www.weareunion.org. All
teachings are taken from the
Manufacturer's Handbook The
Holy Bible. Come join us.
* Unity Life Enrichment Centre,
new location, 10417 Orange
Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL
33875; 471-1122; e-mail
unity@vistanet.net. Web site,
www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Celebration Service,
Nursery and Children's Church.
Weekly Classes, Christian
Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer
Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups.
Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior
minister transforming lives from
ordinary to extraordinary.
* The Way Church, 1005 N.
Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday
school and worship service at 9
a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activi-
ties, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. The
Way is a church family who gathers
for contemporary worship, teaching
of God's Word, prayer and fellow-
ship. Come early and stay after for
fellowship time. Child care and chil-
dren's church are provided.
Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The
Way A place for you. Office
Phone:471-6140, Church Cell
Phone:381-6190. Email: theway
church @hotmail.cornm. Web site:
www. TheWayChurch. org


PRESBYTERIAN

* Covenant Presbyterian Church
(PCA), 4500 Sun 'N Lake Blvd.,
Sebring, 33872-2113. A
Congregation of the Presbyterian
Church in America. Worship servic-
es: Sunday morning worship, infor-
mal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday
evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday
evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.;
Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:30-
7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m.
Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759;
e-mail: covpres@strato.net, Web
site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W.
Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours:
8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through
Thursday.
* First Presbyterian Church
ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two
entrances on LaGrande), Avon
Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242.
The Rev. Robert Johnson is the
pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.;
Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.;
Wednesday Bible study, 10:30
a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third
Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30
p.m. each Wednesday; Esther and
Mary Circles business meeting,
3:30 p.m. third Thursday; Sarah
Circle business meeting, 7 p.m.
second Tuesday; Women's
Ministries Combined Bible study, 4
p.m. third Thursday; Family Movie,
4 p.m. third Sunday. Be a part of a
warm, caring church family with tra-
ditional services, following biblical
truth.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring,'
FL 33870. 385-0107. Sunday
School, adult and college age, 9:30
a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.;
Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 11-
18), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult
Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir
rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery avail-
able for Sunday worship. Call the
church office for more information
and other classes. Rev. Darrell A.
Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director
of youth ministry.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, www.fpc/p.com, 118 N. Oak
Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The
Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor;


the Rev. Drew Severance, associ-
ate pastor. Sunday morning tradi-
tional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30
a.m.; and contemporary worship is
at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. A vari-
ety .of Sunday school classes for
adults and children are at 9:45 and
11 a.m. in the educational building.
Call the church office for more
information about the classes
offered. Nursery is provided for
babies and toddlers; while young
children up to second grade have a
special Children's Church offered
during the worship service to help
them grow in their spiritual knowl-
edge.
* Spring Lake Presbyterian
Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School,
9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m.
Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the
second Thursday of the month,
September through June. Board of
Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first
Monday of the month. Choir
rehearses at 7 p.m. each
Wednesday, September through
April. Presbyterian Women meet at
10 a.m. the third Thursday of the
month. Organist: Richard Wedig.
Choir Director: Suzan Wedig.
Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,
springlakepc @embarqmail. corn,
Web site, http://s/pc.presby-
church.org.


SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST

* Avon Park Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 1410 West
Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone:
453-6641 or e-mail: avonparks-
da @embarqmal.com, Sabbath
School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church
Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday.
Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m.
Community Service hours on
Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00
a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place
the first Sunday of each month.
Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and
Associate Pastor Kameron
DeVasher. Walker Memorial
Academy Christian School offering
education for kindergarten through
12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME.
Website is www.discoverfesus.org
* Sebring Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, 2106 N. State
Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438.
Worship Services: 9:15 a.m.
Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meet-
ing, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m.,
Community service: every Monday
9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr.
Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m.
Pastor Amado Luzbet.


THE CHURCH OF
LATTER DAY SAINTS

* The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand
Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863)
382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop;
Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del
Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family
History Center (863) 382-1822.
Sunday Services: Sacrament
Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel
Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon;
Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-
1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15
a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities:
Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts:
first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20
p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys
and Girls, second and fourth
Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m.


THE SALVATION
ARMY

* The Salvation Army Center
for Worship. Sunday: Sunday


School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meet-
ing, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting
and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible
study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's
Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday:
Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meet-
ings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave.,
Sebring. For more information, visit
the Web site wwwsalvationarmy-
sebring.com or call Major Bruce
Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110.


UNITED METHODIST

* First United Methodist Church,
105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor.
Traditional Worship Service at 8:10
and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary,
Contemporary Worship in the FLC
at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30
and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth
Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday
with Rick Heilig, youth director.
The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship
service is broadcast over WITS
1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery
available at all services.
* First United Methodist Church,
200 South Lake Avenue, Avon
Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, R.
James Weiss, Pastor, Summer
Schedule, Sunday School 9:00
a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m.
* Memorial United Methodist
Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlook-
ing Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL,
33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pastor.
Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral
assistant. Sunday schedule:
Heritage Worship Service, 8:30
a.m. (October-May only); School
School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.;
Celebration Worship Service at
10:45 a.m.; New Song worship
service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nurs-
ery care provided every Sunday
morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m.
Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m.
(October-May only). We offer
Christ-centered Sunday school
classes, youth programs, Bible
studies, book studies and Christian
fellowship. We are a congregation
that want to know Christ and make
Him known. Call the church office
at 465-2422 or check out our
church Web site at wwwmemori-
alumc.com.
* St. John United Methodist
Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive,
Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev.
Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor.
Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all
services. Phone 382-1736.
www.stjohnsebring.org
* Spring Lake United Methodist
Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane,
(Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde
Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship serv-
ice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study
meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday.
Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on
Thursday. Church office phone:
655-0040.


UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST

* Emmanuel United Church of
Christ, where God is still speak-
ing. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL
33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27
and Hammock Road). Sunday wor-"
ship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with
worship first Sunday of month;
Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all
other Sundays. All are welcome to
receive the sacrament. For more
information, call the church office at
471-1999 or e-mail eucc@earth
link.net or check the Web site
sebringemmanuelucc. com. No
matter who you are or where you
are on life's journey, you're wel-
come here.


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5pm-12 Midnight
5-10Opm
5-11pm
5-1Opm
7pm
7pm, 9pm
6pm, 8pm
6pm, 8pm


Midway
Independent Midway
Pavilion
Small Animal Barn
Convention Center
Stage
Expo Stage
Exhibit Stage


Reithoffer Shows Arm Band $20
Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
Hospitality Area
Poultry & Rabbit Display
Jr. Miss Highlands County 2011 Beauty Pageant
Master Hypnotist Show
Tommy Brandt and Band
The Caboodlestoppers


'IA ~ g A *A A A~ g I.


1pm- 12 Midnight
1-1Opm
1-1Opm
1-10pm
1-11pm
4pm
7pm
7pm
5pm, ?pm, 9pm
3pm, 6pm, 8pm
2pm, 6pm, 8pm


Midway
Independent Midway
Small Animal Barn
Livestock Barn
Pavilion
Small Animal Barn
Convention Center
Expo Pavilion
Stage
Expo Stage
Exhibit Stage


Reithoffer Shows Arm Band $20
Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
Poultry & Rabbit Display
Steer & Commercial Heifer Display
Hospitality Area
Poultry Judging & Showmanship
Rabbit Judging & Showmanship
Miss Highlands County 2011 Beauty Pageant
Master Hypnotist Show
Tommy Brandt and Band
The Caboodlestoppers


5-10pm
5-11pm
7pm, 9pm
5pm
6pm
6pm
5:30pm, 8:30pm
6pm, 8pm


5-11lpm
5-1 Opm
5-1Opm
5-1 Opm
5-1 Opm
5-11pm
7pm, 9pm
6pm, 8pm
6pm, 8pm
5pm, 8pm
6pm


Independent Midway
Pavilion
Stage
Livestock Pavilion
Livestock Pavilion
Highlands Today Stage
Exhibit Stage
Expo Stage


Midway
Independent Midway
Livestock Barn
Small Animal Barn
Independent Midway
Pavilion
Stage
Exhibit Stage
Expo Stage
Expo Pavilion
Livestock Pavilion


Chainsaw Carving Show
Hospitality Area
Master Hypnotist Show
Pee Wee Show
Market Steer Show & Showmanship
Cindy's Girl Scout.Contest
The Caboodlestoppers
Avon Park High School Choir


)pen
play








lip


Reithoffer Shows ~ Arm Band $20
Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center 0
Swine, Steers & Commercial Heifer Disp
Poultry & Rabbit Display
Chainsaw Carving Show
Hospitality Area
Master Hypnotist Show
The Caboodlestoppers
The Martin Family
Cooking Contest
Commercial Heifer Show & Showmansh


Senior Citizen Day Admitted for $3.00 wl ID
1-9pm Midway
1-9pm Independent Midway
1-9pm Livestock Barn
1-9pm Small Animal Barn
1-1 Opm Pavilion
3pm Livestock Pavilion
5pm, 7pm Stage
2pm, 4pm, 6pm Exhibit Stage
3pm, 6pm, 8pm Expo Stage


5-11pm Midway


Reithoffer Shows ~ Arm Band $20
Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
Swine, Steers & Commercial Heifer Display
Poultry & Rabbit Display
Hospitality Area
Market Swine Show & Showmanship
Master Hypnotist Show
The Caboodlestoppers
The Florida Blue Grass Express


ii ______Itn u ~


Midway
Independent Midway
Livestock Barn
Small Animal Barn
Independent Midway
Pavilion
Stage
Expo Pavilion
Livestock Pavilion
Exhibit Stage
Expo Stage


Reithoffer Shows ~ Arm Band $20
Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
Swine, Steers & Commercial Heifer Display
Poultry & Rabbit Display
Chainsaw Carving Show
Hospitality Area
Master Hypnotist Show
Little Miss Highlands County 2011 Beauty Pageant
Rabbit Judging & Showmanship
The Caboodlestoppers
The Florida Blue Grass Express


Students Day Admitted with empty Coke Can from 5-7pm
5-11pm Midway Reithoffer Shows ~ Arm Band $20
5-1 Opm Independent Midway Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
5-10pm Livestock Barn Swine, Steers & Commercial Heifer Display
5-10pm Small Animal Barn Poultry & Rabbit Display


5-10pm
5-10pm
5-10pm
7pm, 9pm
6pm, 8pm
6pm, 8pm.
6:30pm


5pm-12 Midnight
5-1Opm
5-1 Opm
5-1Opm
5-10 Opm
8-11pm
7pm, 9pm
6pm, 8 pm
6pm, 8pm


lpm-12 Midnight
1-1Opm
1-7pm
1-1 Opm
1-l10pm
1-11pm
5pm, 7pm, 9pm
2pm, 6pm, 8 pm
2pm, 4pni, 8pm
REVISED: 2/1/2011


Independent Midwa
Small Animal Barn
Independent Midwa
Stage
Exhibit Stage
Expo Stage
Livestock Pavilion


Midway
Independent Midwa
Livestock Barn
Small Animal Barn
Independent Midwa
Pavilion
Stage
Expo Stage
Exhibit Stage


Midway
Independent Midwa
Small Animal Barn
Livestock Barn .
Independent Midwa
Pavilion
Stage
Exhibit Stage
Expo Stage


Reithoffer Shows ~ Arm Band $20
ay Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
Poultry & Rabbit Display
ay Chainsaw Carving Show
Master Hypnotist Show
The Caboodlestoppers
Tony Stockton
Jr. Livestock Auction


Reithoffer Shows ~ Arm Band $20
ay Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
Swine, Steers & Commercial Heifer Display
Poultry & Rabbit Display
ay Chainsaw Carving Show
Hospitality Area
Master Hypnotist Show
Groovus
The Caboodlestoppers


Reithoffer Shows ~ Arm Band $20
ay Exhibit Buildings & Convention Center Open
Poultry & Rabbit Display
Commercial Heifer Display
ay Chainsaw Carving Show
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SECTION




SPORTS


News-Sun


Inside This Section
Lady Devils reach Final .......
Five Streaks to Wrestle Regional..
Super Bowl Matchups .......
LP Elks Hoop Shoot .......


News-Sun photo by BETH BALDRIDGE
Avierre Conner went for 18 points Thursday in
helping Avon Park outlast visiting Auburndale.


Devils thump Bloodhounds


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridgeC@newssii n.coin
AVON PARK With a turn-
around in intensity. Avon Park
thumped Auburndale 76-65
Thursday at home.
"We played our game. We have
been up and down, and tonight we
were up," head coach Luther
Clemons said. "We played Avo
down in Clewiston and
tonight we played up."
The Bloodhounds pressed
Avon Park early in the first,
matching the Devils basket
for basket, and led 17-15 6
heading into the second peri-
od.
But as the game progressed it was
clear that the Devils wanted the
game more than Auburndale.
The Devils jumped out 10 points
ahead with three minutes left in the
half and kept that lead throughout
the rest of the game, despite the


Bloodhound attempts to rally.
The Devils seemed to be in good
form after the previous Saturday's
54-48 loss to the Clewiston Tigers
on the road.
"We really played flat down in
Clewiston, but we played up
tonight," Clemons said."We cut out


n Park

'6
urndale

i5


the turnovers and really, this
is the only team that we can
replay after a loss earlier in
the year."
He hopes that the team
can keep their intensity
through the upcoming dis-
tricts.
"The schedule was tough


on purpose. We were supposed to
lose some," Clemons said. "I set the
schedule up to test us, and this
game was a good test. \\e now have
a week of practice before we start in
the districts, and this is what. we

See AP, page 2D


ALMS Winter Test to begin



Monday at Sebring International


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING The annual
American LeMans Series
Winter Test gets underway
Monday at the Sebring
International Raceway.
Each year since the pro-
gram was offered, more and
more teams have taken
advantage of the early oppor-
tunity to test and tune on the
historic 3.72 mile circuit.
The week begins with two
days of testing for support
series cars including
the Cooper Tire
Prototype Lites as well as
competitors in the
GT3 Challenge by
Yokohama.
Wednesday and Thursday
will be the the competitors
for the Mobil 1 12 Hours of
Sebring presented by Fresh
from Florida with LMP and
GT cars, as well as those in
the LMP and GT challenge
series.
That represents a record


,j

Photo courtesy of Audi Press
The Audi R-18 and R-15 plus did some private testing a the Sebring International Raceway
in January. Reportedly, nine different drivers had an opportunity to get behind the wheel of
the state-of-the-art prototypes. Head of Audi Motorsport Dr. Wolfgang Ullrich 'said the team
opted for the Sebring track because of the high demands it makes on the mechanical sys-
tems of the cars. He also noted that the temperatures were better than in Europe and that
the dry weather provided assurance that they were able to conduct the endurance runs as
planned.


entry list with 31 different
cars ready to hit the 17-turn
raceway in preparation for
the March classic.
Coming on board since the


primary entrants list was
released last month are Paul
Gentilozzi's Jaguar RSR
XKR's, as well as the Ferrari
430GTs of both Krohn


Racing and CRS Racing.
The GTC division register
for the test days is up to

See TESTING, page 4D


Green Dragons finish on a roll


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newsstun.coni
Getting their final licks in
before hosting the District 9-
3A Tournament this coming
week, Lake Placid went 3-0
this past week to close out
the regular season.
After Monday's win
against 5A Okeechobee, the
Dragons downed a top-flight
IA Vanguard squad Tuesday
and edged the always tough
Hardee Thursday.
Spoiling the Wildcats
Senior Night with a 59-55
win, Lake Placid overcame a


Lake I


5
Hare


5


sluggish first quarter,
. which saw the team
Muster just four
points, to make it a
three-point game by
h. a halftime.
Hardee came out of
their zone in the sec-
ond half, seemingly


.. .



News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHNE
Brody Carr's four first-period three pointers keyed
Tuesday's win over Vanguard as Lake Placid went for three
wins this week to close out the regular season.


daring the Dragons to drive -
and drive they did.
"We were able to get some
transition baskets and some
drives to the basket in our
half-court offense," head
coach David Veley said.
With the lead down to one
entering the fourth, Lake
Placid laid it on the line and
wound up clinching it at the
line.
"We pickup up the intensi-
ty and forced some bad shots
from them," Veley said. "And
then we got some big free
throws down the stretch."
Andre Wilson, who netted
13 points in the final period,
sealed the deal with two big
free throws with just under
six seconds left.


Wilson would total 24
points and collect eight
rebounds while Devontray
Fleming went for 16 points,
nine boards and four assists.
Also filling up the stat
sheet was Kirk Veley, with 11
points, 10 rebounds and six
assists.
Tuesday's contest played
out nearly the opposite as a
strong start on their own
Senior Night saw the
Dragons hanging on at the
end against the Vanguard
Panthers.
"It was the next night after
Placid a tough game versus
Okeechobee Monday.
so we were pretty dead
legged," Veley said.
dee And yet Lake Placid
jumped out to a 28-14
first-quarter lead on
the strength of four
Brody Carr three's.
But behind Mike Garcia
and Dedrik Brinson, the
Panthers clawed their way
back to just a 42-37 deficit at
halftime.
"They say (Garcia) is
going to St. Leo College to
play," Veley said. "He is a
quick guard who does a nice
job handling the ball and
penetrating to the rim."
That played out to Garcia
going for a game-high 33
points and kept things close
during the final two quarters,
with Vanguard briefly tying it
in the fourth.
But some key scores and
just enough defensive stops
allowed the Dragons to hold

See LP, page 2D


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Josh Heflin lays one in during Sebring's rout of DeSoto
Friday night.


Blue Streaks



bash Bulldogs


By DAN HOEHNE
caniel.hoehne@newssun.conm
SEBRING It wasn't
what anyone familiar with
the DeSoto, Sebring history
would have expected.
A regular season
finale pitting the Sebr
Bulldogs and Blue
Streaks would nor- 6
mally have been one
final knock-down, DeSo
drag-out contest
between the two. 3
But with a deplet-
ed DeSoto squad and
Sebring continuing its'
tenacious play of late, it
was no contest at all as the
Streaks rolled to a. 67-32
win that wasn't even that
close.
Jared Cannon himself
outscored the 'Dogs 11-7 in


the opening quarter, while
his teammates added 13 for
a 24-7 lead after one.
A trapping Sebring
defense created turnovers
and a number of breakaway
scores in the second
ing and kept DeSoto
S scoreless for the
entire eight minutes,
boosting the lead to
42-7 at the half.
S A 10-10 tilt in the
third, with the clock
now running contin-
uously due to the 35-point
lead mercy rule, made it
52-17 after three.
The Bulldogs, however,
got hot from the outside
late with Kavauris Polk
draining four fourth-quarter

See SEBRING, page 2D


SFCC sweeps Lady Lakers


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
The Lady Panthers didn't exactly bash their way past
Lake Sumter Thursday, but behind the pitching of Nicole
Helms, above, and Jessica Griffin, SFCC swept the visit-
ing Lakers by 2-0 and 4-3 scores. Helms pitched the
complete game shutout in the opener, giving up four
hits, three walks and striking out 10. "My curve was not
wanting to work so I mostly stuck with my fastball and
screwball," Helms said. "I think I could have done bet-
ter, but we have a great team and I see great things
going for the season. The wins moved the Panthers to 3-
1 in the early going. The team was on the road to play
Indian River Saturday before home games Tuesday and
Thursday this week against College of Central Florida
and Brevard, respectively.


~1

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'of


S'. .


Sunday, February 6, 2011


2 ~-; '


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*,,A" '.
eT ..









News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


Page 2D


www. newssun.corn


AP off until Friday semifinal


Continued from 1D
needed."
The Devils ended the regu-
lar season 18-6 overall,
respectable but not the per-
fect season they played last
year.
"Everyone talks about last
year. We are a different team,
but we can play with anyone
out there, and we showed that
tonight. They (Auburndale)
are a tough ball club,"
Clemons said.
The return of big man
Alonzo "Sticky" Robertson a
week ago has helped to put
the Devils back on the up-
swing, according to Clemons.
"Sticky is back, and he
worked hard tonight. But we
are healthy, and ready to go,"
Clemons said. "If we contin-
ue to play our game, like we
did tonight, we will win dis-
tricts."
Devil Reggie Baker led the
scoring for Avon Park with
23 points, Avierre Conner
scored 18 and TK Miller hit
for 16 points.
As the top seed in the
District 9-3A Tournament at
Lake Placid this week, the
Red Devils have until Friday
to get ready for their semifi-
nal match-up against the win-
ner of Tuesday's Mulberry
versus Frostproof game.


News-Sun photo by BETH BALDRIDGE
Reggie Bakers goes for two of his 23 points Thursday.


LP sets for tournament Tuesday


Continued from 1D
on for the 67-63 win.
"I was proud how hard
they fought to get the job
done," coach Veley said.
They played together and
fought through it mentally
to get the win and give the
Seniors a win on their
night."
Fleming lead Lake
Placid with 22 points, with
Wilson adding 18 and nine
rebounds.
Carr finished with 12


'It was a great

way to finish the

season.I

DAVID VELEY
Lake Placid head coach

points, seven rebounds and
two steals while Veley
went for eight points, nine
rebounds and eight assists.
"It was a great way to
finish the season with three


wins this week," coach
Veley said. "It's been a
while since we've won at
Hardee and it gives us
some momentum going
into Districts. We'll get
ready these next few days
for McKeel and see what
we can get done."
Lake Placid faces
McKeel Academy Tuesday
at 7:30 p.m. in the Green
Dragon Gym.


Streaks send five to wrestling Regional


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoelmhe@ newssun .con
With next weekend's
Regional Wrestling Meet
being held at nearby South,
Florida Community College, a
handful of Blue Streaks will
make the short trip after tak-
ing a tough road at Thursday's
district meet at Lake Gibson.


In the nine-team district
tournament, the top four fin-
ishes in each weight class
qualified to move on to
Regionals.
Both Josh Figur, at 160
pounds, and Nathan Franklin.
at 112, took fourth-place fin-
ishes to stamp their respective
tickets, while Vicente Moore,


171. and Chris DeJesus each
finished third.
Jeremy Quails had the high-
est finish of the day. taking
second in the 140-pound
weight class.
The Regional starts Friday,
Feb. 11 in the SFCC gym at 2
p.m. and continues Saturday.
Feb. 12 at 10 a.m.


Avon Park outguns Tenoroc


News-Sun photo by KATE ROWLAND
Avon Park junior Brekayla
English was a powerful presence
on the court in the Red Devils'
64-52 victory over Tenoroc in the
district tournament semifinal
game Friday.


By KATE ROWLAND
Special to the News-Sun
FORT MEADE The Red
Devils may have felt a few
butterflies during the first
half of Friday's 64-52 victo-
ry over Tenoroc in the semi-
final round of the girls bas-
ketball district tournament
hosted by Fort Meade, but a
big crowd of vocal Avon
Park supporters in the stands
chased the jitters away in a
hurry. *
"I think nerves kind of got
to us but we shook it off
toward the second half," said
Avon Park coach Paulette
Daley. "I don't want to take
anything away from
Tenoroc, they played a great
game, but we definitely
weren't disciplined in that
first half.


-"I do want to thank the
fans who came out and sup-
ported us. It truly, truly
helped. It truly did."
Avon Park is headed for
the regional tournament no
matter what, but the Red
Devils earned a place in the
championship game at 7
p.m. Saturday against No. 1-
seed Fort Meade.
The Miners earned a first-
round bye and defeated
McKeel Academy 46-42
Friday.
The winner of the champi-
onship gaffie will play at
home in the opening round
of regionals while the loser
will play an away game.
Go to www.newssun.com
Sports for the fuller ver-
sion of this story.


Sebring heads to Ridge Monday


Continued from 1D
threes to provide for the final
margin.
"This isn't the same team
that we played down there a
few weeks ago," Sebring head
coach Princeton Harris said of
the five-point Blue Streak win
on Jan. 13. "We played well,
in some ways, but a game like
this doesn't do a lot for us.
"We just wanted to make
sure the kids continued to play
aggressive and get after it and
they did that."
Cannon lead four players in
double figures with 17 while


Decaris Jones, Matt Taylor
and Toby Solebello each
added 11.
The rout came off a com-
paratively tougher test
Thursday with a 65-40 win
over visiting Frostproof on the
strength of strong first and
third quarters.
A 19-5 opening period set
the tone and a 23-10 tilt in the
third blew it open.
Solebello scored 19,
Cannon 14 and Devin Clarke
13.
Up next is the District 5-5A


Tournament for the Streaks
with a 7 p.m. Monday
matchup with Ridge on the
Bolts home court.
"They beat us by five here
and on a last-second put-back
from their 6-foot-11 kid,"
Harris said. "That was earlier
in the year and we missed 18
free throws in- that game and
about a dozen lay-ups.
"We know we can play with
them, we know we can beat
them," he continued. "Itk just a
matter of keeping things togeth-
er and playing our game."


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WILD-CARD PLAYOFFS
Saturday, Jan. 8
Seattle 41, New Orleans 36
NY. Jets 17, Indianapolis 16
Sunday, Jan. 9
Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7
Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16
DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS
Saturday, Jan. 15
Pittsburgh 31, Baltimore 24
Green Bay 48, Atlanta 21
Sunday, Jan. 16
Chicago 35, Seattle 24
N.Y. Jets 28, New England 21
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
Sunday, Jan. 23
Green Bay 21, Chicago 14
Pittsburgh 24, N.Y. Jets 19
PRO BOWL
Sunday, Jan. 30
NFC 55, AFC 41
SUPER BOWL
Sunday, Feb. 6
At Arlington, Texas
Pittsburgh vs. Green Bay, 6:30 p.m.


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 37 12 .755 -
New York 25 24 .510 12
Philadelphia 23 26 .469 14
New Jersey 15 36 .294 23
Toronto 14 37 .275 24
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 36 14 .720 -
Atlanta 32 18 .640 4
Orlando 32 19 .627 4%
Charlotte 21 28 .42914%2
Washington 13 36 .265 22%2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 34 14 .708 -
Indiana 20 27 .42613%
Milwaukee 19 29 .396 15
Detroit 18 32 .360 17
Cleveland 8 42 .160 27
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 42 8 .840 -
Dallas 34 15 .694 7%
New Orleans 32 19 .62710%
Memphis 27 24 .52915%V
Houston 23 28 .451 19%Y2
Northwest Division
W L Pot GB
Oklahoma City 32 17 .653 -
Utah 30 21 .588 3
Denver 29 21 .580 3%2
Portland 26 24 .520 6%
Minnesota 11 38 .224 21
-Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 34 16 .680 -
Phoenix 23 25 .479 fO
Golden State 21 27 .438 12
L.A. Clippers 19 30 .38814%2
Sacramento 12 35 .25520%2


Thursday's Games
Miami 104, Orlando 100
Golden State 100, Milwaukee 94
San Antonio 89, L.A. Lakers 88
Friday's Games
Miami 109, Charlotte 97
Indiana 100, Portland 87
Philadelphia 100, New York 98
Toronto 111, Minnesota 100
Orlando 110, Washington 92-
Atlanta 101, L.A. Clippers 100
Detroit 92, New Jersey 82
Memphis 112, Cleveland 105
Dallas 101, Boston 97
Oklahoma City 111, Phoenix 107
San Antonio 113, Sacramento 100
Utah 113, Denver 106
Saturday's Games
Dallas at Charlotte, late
Atlanta at Washington, late
Portland at Cleveland, late
L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, late
Memphis at Houston, late
Detroit at Milwaukee, late
Denver at Minnesota, late
Oklahoma City at Utah, late
Chicago at Golden State, late
Sunday's Games
L.A. Clippers at Miami, 12 p.m.
Indiana at New.Jersey, 12 p.m.
Philadelphia at New York, 12 p.m.
Orlando at Boston, 2:30 p.m.


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Philadelphia 34 13 5 73177136
Pittsburgh 34 15 4 72164 119
N.Y. Rangers 29 21 4 62 153 133
New Jersey 18 30 4 40109153
N.Y. Islanders 16 28 7 39 123 166
Northeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Boston 30 15 7 67161 117
Montreal 29 18 5 63136127
Buffalo 23 22 5 51 139147
Toronto 21 25 5 47131 156
Ottawa 17 27 8 42 114 169
Southeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Tampa Bay 32 16 5 69160159
Washington 28 15 10 66147134
Atlanta 24 21 9 57155174
Carolina 25 21 6 56155161
Florida 23 23 6 52140141
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Detroit 31 14 6 68173151
Nashville 27 18 7 61 138125
Chicago 27 21 4 58167147
St. Louis 23 20 7 53135149
Columbus 24 22 5 53137159
Northwest Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Vancouver 34 10 9 77179125
Minnesota 27 19 5 59 135 137
Calgary 26 21 6 58151 156
Colorado 25 20 6 56164169
Edmonton 15 28 8 38 126 176
Pacific Division
W L OT Pts GF GA.
Dallas 30 17 5 65151 147
San Jose 27 19 6 60148144
Anaheim 28 21 4 60 143 150
Phoenix 25 19 9 59152156
Los Angeles 28 22 2 58 146126
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
for overtime loss.


Thursday's Games
Boston 6, Dallas 3
Toronto 3, Carolina 0
New Jersey 3, N.Y. Rangers 2


News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


THE SCOREBOARD


LIVE

SPORTS

" ON TV


BOWLING
SUNDAY
4 p.m. Chris Paul Celebrity Invitational. ...... ESPN


COLLEGE BASKETBALL
SUNDAY
1 p.m. Michigan State at Wisconsin........... CBS
2 p.m. Ohio State at Minnesota ............. ESPN
MONDAY
7 p.m. Pittsburgh at West Virginia .......... ESPN
9 p.m. Missouri at Kansas ................. ESPN
TUESDAY
7 p.m. Indiana at Purdue ................ ESPN
7 p.m. Cincinnati at DePaul ........... . ESPN2
9 p.m. Tennessee at Kentucky.............. ESPN


GOLF
SUNDAY
1 p.m. PGA Phoenix Open .............. GOLF
3 p.m.. PGA Phoenix Open ................. CBS


NBA
SUNDAY
2:30 p.m. Orlando at Boston .................. ABC


NFL
SUNDAY
6 p.m. Super Bowl XLV, Pittsburgh vs. Green BayFOX


NHL
SUNDAY
12:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Washington. ............ NBC


3 p.m.


2 p.m.


2 p.m.

7 p.m.
9 p.m.


SKIING
SUNDAY
Freestyle World Championships. ....... NBC


TRACK AND FIELD
SUNDAY
Boston Indoor Games .............. ESPN2


WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
SUNDAY
LSU at Mississippi . . ...... . . . 38
MONDAY
Duke at North Carolina ............ ESPN2
Tennessee at Kentucky ............. ESPN2
Times, games, channels all subject to change


Philadelphia 3, Nashville 2
Calgary 4, Atlanta 2
Minnesota 4, Colorado 3
Friday's Games
Florida 4, New Jersey 3, OT
Pittsburgh 3, Buffalo 2
Columbus 3, Detroit 0
Washington 5, Tampa Bay 2
St. Louis 5, Edmonton 3
Vancouver 4, Chicago 3
Saturday's Games
San Jose at Boston, late
N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, late
Anaheim at Colorado, late
Toronto at Buffalo, late
Ottawa at N.Y. Islanders, late
Dallas at Philadelphia, late
Atlanta at Carolina, late
Edmonton at Columbus, late
Detroit at Nashville, late
Minnesota at Phoenix, late
Los Angeles at Calgary, late
Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Montreal, 3 p.m.
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 3 p.m.


Friday's Scores
EAST
Baruch 64, Lehman 50
Boston U. 62, Stony Brook 49
Brockport 93, Plattsburgh 77
Brown 87, Columbia 79
Canisius 75, Marist 60
Fairfield 75, lona 71
Hartwick 68, St. John Fisher 64
Merchant Marine 60, Susquehanna 58
Penn 78, Dartmouth 47
Princeton 65, Harvard 61
Rider 61, Loyola, Md. 60
Rochester 78, NYU 70
Scranton 73, Goucher 64
Siena 64, Manhattan 57
St. Peter's 70, Niagara 47
Yale 71, Cornell 70
SOUTH
Birmingham-Southern 78, Sewanee 66
ETSU 66, Florida Gulf Coast 59
S.C.-Upstate 72, Stetson 59
MIDWEST '
Bethany Lutheran 85, Presentation 68
Cbncordia, St.P. 69, Upper Iowa 59
Crown, Minn. 58, Northland 55
Drury 87, Indianapolis 72
Mary 62, Minn.-Crookston 60
Mn. St., Mnkato 92, Augustana,S.D. 79
Mn.-Morris 79, Martin Luther 72
Northern St., S.D. 86, Mn. St., Mrhd 80
Nthwestern, Mn. 81, St. Scholastica 58
St. Norbert 62, Monmouth, III. 42
Wayne, NE. 74, SW Minn. St. 69, OT
Winona St. 88, St. Cloud St. 67
FAR WEST
Concordia, Ore. 82, Corban 67
E. Oregon 83, Coll. of Idaho 80
Montana Tech 62, Lewis-Clark St. 61
Montana Western 81, Westminster,
Utah 74
Oregon Tech 65, Evergreen St. 63
~awp~rw m


Canisius 69, St. Peter's 50
Columbia 72, Brown 49
Dartmouth 68, Penn 65
Fairfield 67, lona 63, OT
Harvard 73, Princeton 67
Loyola, Md. 55, Rider 43
Manhattan 48, Siena 45
Marist 61, Niagara 35
Rochester 64, NYU 46
Scranton 91, Goucher 38
Susquehanna 53, Merchant Marine 51
Wittenberg 61, Kenyon 51
Yale 57, Cornell 49
SOUTH
Birmingham-Southern 60, Sewanee 58
Roanoke 55, Washington & Lee 41
MIDWEST
Bradley 73, Missouri St. 68
Concordia, St.P. 66, Upper Iowa 47
Indianapolis 95, Drury 80
Minn.-Crookston 70, Mary 65
Minn.-Morris 77, Martin Luther 70
N. Iowa 77, Wichita St. 57
Northern St., S.D. 67, Minn. St,,
Moorhead 64
Northland 61, Crown, Minn. 23
Northwestern, Minn. 62, St. Scholastica
54
Presentation 65, Bethany Lutheran 61
Quincy 87, St. Joseph's, Ind. 7.2
S. Indiana 62, Rockhurst 49
St. Norbert 61, Monmouth, III. 56
Wayne, Neb. 69, SW Minnesota St. 47
Winona St. 79, St. Cloud St. 63
FAR WEST
Concordia, Ore. 70, Corban 59
E. Oregon 69, Idaho College 57
Evergreen St. 72, Oregon Tech 53
Gonzaga 87, Portland 67
Lewis-Clark St. 79, Montana Tech 57
Mesa, Colo. 73, Nebraska-Kearney 70
Regis 72, Colorado Mines 71
Rocky Mountain 72, Carroll, Mont. 68
Seattle 73, Long Beach St. 54
Warner Pacific 70, NW Christian 67
Westminster, Utah 83, Montana
Western 76
EXHIBITION
Augustana,S.D. 68, Minn. St., Mankato
65


BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES-Agreed to terms
with RHP Justin Duchscherer on one-
year contract.
NEW YORK YANKEES-Announced the
retirement of LHP Andy' Pettitte.
National League
MILWAUKEE BREWERS-Agreed to
terms with 1B/OF Mark Kotsay, RHP Pat
Egan and RHP Mike McClendon on
one-year contracts. Designated RHP
Roque Mercedes for assignment.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS-Exercised
their options on senior vice president
and general manager Brian Sabean and
manger Bruce Bochy through 2012.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS-Agreed to
terms with OF Jim Edmonds on a minor
league contract.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Agreed to
terms with RHP J.D. Martin, C Carlos
Maldonado, 1B Kevin Barker on minor
league contracts.


Avon Park








Lake Placid


Page 3D


LOCAL SCHEDULE


TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at DistrictTournament, Lake Placid,TBA; BoysTennis vs.
Lake Placid, 4 p.m.; GirlsTennis at Lake Placid, 4 p.m.
THURSDAY: Baseball hosts Preseason Classic,TBA; Softball vs. Sebring, 5:30/7:30
p.m.


TUESDAY: Boys Basketball hosts DistrictTournament,TBA; Baseball at Preseason Clssic,
DeSoto,TBA; Softball vs. Moore Haven, 5/7 p.m.; BoysTennis at Avon Park, 4 p.m.; Girls
Tennis vs. Avon Park, 4 p.m.
WEDNESDAY: Baseball at Preseason Clssic, DeSoto,TBA
THURSDAY: Boys Basketball hosts DistrictToumament,TBA


MONDAY: Boys Basketball at DistrictTournament, Ridge, vs. Ridge, 7 p.m.; BoysTennis
vs. Avon Park, 4 p.m.
TUESDAY: Softball at Frostproof, 5:30/7:30 p.m.; BoysTennis vs. Hardee, 4 p.m.
THURSDAY: Baseball at Preseason Classic, Avon Park,TBA; Softball at Avon Park,
Sebring 5:30/7:30 p.m.; BoysTennis at DeSoto, 4 p.m.


SFCC


SUNDAY: Baseball at Seminole State, 1 p.m.
MONDAY: Baseball vs. Lake Sumter, 5 p.m.
TUESDAY: Softball vs. College of Central Florida, 5 p.m.
WEDNESDAY: Baseball at Indian River, 3 p.m.
THURSDAY: Softball vs. Brevard, 5 p.m.


MONDAY: Boys Basketball at DistrictTournament, All Saints Academy,TBD


Walker


SPORTS SNAPSHOTS


Rotary Fundraiser at SFCC
AVON PARK On Saturday, Feb. 5,
from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. the Rotary Club of
Sebring will have a fundraiser for the
South Florida Community College
Baseball team at Panther Field during the
double-header against Sante Fe College.
The meal of pulled pork, green beans,
cole slaw, a roll and ice tea will be $8.
Tickets can be purchased at the Athletic
Office ahead of time or at the event.
For further information, or to purchase
tickets, please call 784-7037.
AP Girls Softball
AVON PARK Avon Park Girls
Softball will be holding registration for
ages 4-15 on Saturday, Feb. 12 from 10
a.m.-l p.m. at Lucy Derkman Field.
Bring a copy of child's birth certificate.
Registration fee is $50.
For more information or any questions,
call Amanda at 257-2428.
Elks Golf Tournament
SEBRING The monthly Elks golf
tournament will be held on Monday Feb.
7 at Harder Hall Country Club.
Cost for the 8 a.m. shotgun start is $32
per player.
To register either your team or as an
individual player, contact Jack
McLaughlin at 471-3295 or by email at
jacknjudy33872@gmail.com.
Check in no later than 7:40 a.m. in the
Harder Hall Golf Course restaurant area.

Woman's Club Benefit
SEBRING The Woman's Club of
Sebring will be holding a golf tournament
to benefit its' scholarship fund Saturday,
Feb. 19 at the Harder Hall Golf Course.
The four-person scramble will check-in
at 7 a.m. with an 8 a.m. shotgun start.
Cost is $55 per player or $220 per team
and includes golf, cart, lunch and prizes.
There is a Putting and Chipping contest
available and a $2,000 Hole-In-One prize
sponsored by the Cohan Radio Group.
Entry forms are available at local pro
shops and are to be sent to The Woman's
Club of Sebring, P.O. Box 8174, Sebring,
FL, 33872.
Registration deadline is February 14.
For an entry form or for more informa-
tion, call Johnell West at 382-0824.
Panther 5K
AVON PARK The second annual
South Florida Community. College
Panther 5K Run/Walk will take place
Saturday, Feb. 26 at the SFCC Campus.
The SFCC Foundation, Inc. and Bill
Jarrett Ford Mercury are sponsoring the
event, and proceeds benefit the college's
intercollegiate athletics programs.
The entry fee for the SFCC Panther 5K
Run/Walk is $20 through Feb. 16 and $25
from Feb. 17 through the day of the race.
Students with I.D. may register for $15.
Every participant receives a Dri-Fit
long-sleeve shirt sizes cannot be guar-
anteed for those who enter after Feb. 17.
Registration is 7-7:45 a.m. on race day
in the parking lot in front of the SFCC
University Center race starts at 8 a.m.
Entry forms are available online at
www.southflorida.edu/panther5k.
Participants can mail their copies and
entry fees to the SFCC Foundation, Inc.,
13 East Main Street, Avon Park, FE
33825; or fax forms to 453-8023 and call
453-3133 with credit card information.
For more information about the SFCC
Panther 5K, call the SFCC Foundation at


863-453-3133.
Wings of Faith Golf
SEBRING Wings of Faith Worship
Center presents the First Annual Golf
Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at
Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is
from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start
at 8:30 a.m.
Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one
team of four golfers, one tee sign and two
green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes
one team of four golfers, one green sign;
Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green
sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100
includes one green sign.
Individual player $60 includes green
fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26).
Team of Four Golfers $240 includes
green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after
March 26).
Make checks payable to: Wings, of
Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL
33871, or register online at wingsof-
faithchristianworshipcenter.com. ,
Proceeds to be donated to scholarship
program for graduates attending Wings of
Faith Christian Worship Center.
For more information, call Jason
Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhanker-
son@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. 'at
381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com.

Our Lady of Grace events
AVON PARK Our' Lady of Grace
Catholic Church has two benefit events
coming up in the next two months.
Tuesday, Feb. 22 they will host the
Todd Allen Show, Classic Branson and
Las Vegas-style entertainment at it's best.
Allen will perform a variety of styles
including Rock 'n Roll, Country and his
award-winning Elvis impersonations.
The show will be held at the Our Lady
of Grace Catholic Church Grogan Center,
at 595 E. Main St. in Avon Park, at 7 p.m.
For a donation of $10, tickets can, be
purchased at the Highlands Independent
Bank and Heartland National Bank Avon
Park locations, Warren's Auto Sales and
the Avon Park Chamber of Commerce.
The next event will be the First Annual
Golf Tournament at River Greens
Saturday, March 12 at 8 a.m.
The cost of $60 per player includes
golf, cart, golf shirt and lunch, while
River Greens members pay just $35.
Sponsorships are available, starting
with a $100 hole sponsor for a sign only.
A Hole Sponsor with Sign, plus a free
foursome, is $300, a Co-Sponsor Sign,
plus free foursome, with perogative to fly
their banner is $400 and a Major Sponsor
is $1,500.
Seminole Club Trail Run
SEBRING If you're looking for a new
5K challenge at a new location, the
Highlands Seminole Club presents the
first Seminole Trail Run 5K on Saturday,
March 5, at the Sun-N-Lake Preserve in
Sebring.
The cost is $15 per participant if regis-
tered by Tuesday, Feb. 15 and $20 after
that day or on the day of race.
Registration on race day begins at 7
a.m. and the race will begin at 8 a.m.
Awards will be presented for top finish-
ers in major age groups.
This is the first event of its kind for the
trails at the Preserve.
Registration forms can be found at
highlandsseminoles.org.
Call 386-9194 or email mantarayEM@earth-
link.net for more information.


www.newssun.com


Friday's Scores
EAST
Brockport 67, Plattsburgh 59









News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


www.newssun.com


Steelers vs. Packers: the Iey matchups


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press
Matchups for the Super
Bowl between the Pittsburgh
Steelers and Green Bay
Packers.

When the Steelers
have the ball
Pittsburgh typically wants
to do exactly what it did in
the first half of the AFC
championship game: ram the
ball down an opponent's
throat. Actually, RB Rashard
Mendenhall (34) showed
plenty of speed and some
moves, too, against the Jets,
and that's what the Steelers
need to see against Green
Bay's 18th-ranked rushing
defense.
Of course, the Packers'
defense isn't likely to consis-
tently miss tackles and be out
of position the way the Jets
were for 30 decisive minutes.
LBs Clay Matthews, A.J.
Hawk and Desmond Bishop
are major reasons Green Bay
(13-6) has been stingy
against the run in the play-
offs, and defensive backs
Charles Woodson, Tramon
Williams, arid Nick Collins
are solid in support.
They also excel in pass
coverage, along with nickel
back Sam Shields, a rookie
who had two interceptions in
the NFC title game.
If Mendenhall can find
room to roam behind a
depleted offensive line that
still has been steady it
desperately needs standout
rookie C Maurkice Pouncey
to recover from a left ankle
sprain and be in the lineup -
the Steelers will keep pound-
ing.
But there's vulnerability in
their blocking unit, particu-
larly declining RT Flozell


Adams. and the Packers have
been getting production from
NT B.J. Raji and DE Cullen
Jenkins in all areas.
Raji even had a pick for a
touchdown against the Bears.
If Pittsburgh (14-4) isn't
effective with the run early
on, it will keep trying.
But there are excellent
options in the passing game,
which will need to deal with
a fair share of blitzing.
QB Ben Roethlisberger has
won two Super Bowls in his
seven pro seasons.
Despite a four-game sus-
pension at the outset of this
season for violating the

league's personal conduct
po l l. C
g u I d .
e cl


Steelers to
the NFC North title, a first-
round bye, then to a come-
back victory over divisional
rival Baltimore in the play-
offs.
Roethlisberger hurt the
Jets more with his feet than
his arm, yet the Packers are
very aware how dangerous he
can be as a passer.
His targets, from longtime
team leader Hines Ward to
speedy Mike Wallace to solid
tight end Heath Miller to ris-
ing wideouts Antonio Brown
and Emmanuel Sanders, are
formidable.


Wallace is the game-break-
er and will see -lots of
Williams or Woodson in cov-
erage.
Ward might operate a lot in
the slot, which could make
him Shields' responsibility.
Roethlisberger has rising
confidence in the youngsters,
and Ward and Miller provide
comfort zones for him.
Two things the Packers
must do if they get pressure
on Roethlisberger: keep him
from escaping for damaging
scrambles, and bring him
down when they get their
hands on him.
Both proved too difficult
for the Jets.

When the Packers
haI e (he ball
L . ...


LUil, l RB .lames Starks
lieme,_cd in the playoffs,
v"i ,c [i. P-2l I,, I't llrP_ .gam e.
Stark.,. Brandon
L.,ct, and John
Kuhn aren't
MI cl. to get far
a-' list the
Ila.iue's top-
ri:d run
- delIclse, but


the Packers
certainly should try to find a
ground game.
Green Bay's offensive line
doesn't get deserved credit.
Anchored by RG Josh
Sitton and C Scott Wells, it's
far more suited for pass pro-
tection, but has opened
enough holes for Starks to
break out, and for the other
running backs to contribute.
They haven't faced a
defense like this in the play-
offs, though, and Pittsburgh
will try to set an early, physi-
cal -- some say over-the-top
dirty tone with LBs James


Harrison. LaMarr Woodley
and James Farrior, All-Pro S
Troy Polamalu, and DE Brett
Keisel.
The Steelers will send
defenders from everywhere
at QB Aaron Rodgers: CB'Ike
Taylor made a huge hit on
Mark Sanchez that caused a
fumble leading to the win-
ning points in the AFC title
game.
Rodgers has been spectac-
ular for more than a month
now after a strong regular
season, and he uses his legs
nearly as well as
Roethlisberger not as
powerful, but quicker.
Without question, though,
Green Bay will need to pass


Special teams
Steelers PK Shaun
Suisham, who replaced veter-
an Jeff Reed in midseason,
has been superb, making 16
of 18 field goals; Pittsburgh
is a difficult place to kick.
So is Lambeau Field,
though, and Mason Crosby
has made 24 of 31, including
a 56-yarder.
Neither has kicked under
the glaring spotlight of a
Super Bowl.
The rest of the Steelers'
special teams are adequate.
Brown had one kickoff run-
back for a score during the
season.
P Jeremy Kapinos doesn't
S1 w a v


successfully to win its tirst
Super Bowl since the 1996
season.
The Packers like to.,
empty their backfield, a '
dangerous .iamibit
against Pittsbtiurgh', r nit
seven and bliaer'
But they cdii
get some g,-.d S
matchups i ir
those situations,,
whether it's WR;
Greg Jennings on -
Taylor or Donald'
Driver on Bryant McFadden. accompanying
Driver excels over the mid- First-year
die, but that's where Masthay for
Polamalu and Ryan Clark been efficient
lurk, and there aren't two
more punishing safeties He had an
around. title game, k
Rodgers has gotten a lot of away from A
mileage out of James Jones Devin Hester
and Jordy Nelson and both Green Bay
will have key roles at Dallas yards than it
Cowboys Stadium. and kickoff th
If Rodgers can spread the
ball around and keep the
Steelers' pass rush off-bal- A Pittsburg
ance, Green Bay has an give Mike T(
excellent chance. in his first i
head coach, t


g e t


. rre.,t
co ve i a ge
g his kicks.
punter Tim
Green Bay has
t if not spectacu-

excellent NFC
keeping the ball
All-Pro returned

gave up more
gained per punt
his season.

ching
h victory would
omlin two titles
four seasons as
ying Joe Gibbs'


achievement with
Washington. Tomlin, only the
third Steelers coach since
1969, is a master motivator
who also gives his coordina-
tors Hall of Famer Dick
LeBeau on defense, Bruce
Arians on offense lots of
say.
Tomlin needed to guide the
Steelers through some early
difficulties and did so mas-
terfully.
Roethlisberger's four-
game suspension could have
put the team in a deep hole.
Instead, with a trio of
replacements at quarterback,
Pittsburgh started 3-1.
The Steelers lost key
defensive end Aaron Smith
for a big chunk of the season.
In 2009, that sent them into
a spiral. Not this time.
Tomlin also got the team
back on track in the division-
al playoff game against
Baltimore after it fell behind
21-7 at halftime.
Mike McCarthy might
have had an even tougher
chore because the Packers
placed 15 players on injured
reserve this season, an absurd
number.
That included starting RB
Ryan Grant, playmaking TE
Jermichael Finley and LB
Nick Barnett.
Thanks to the depth the
Pack built at so many posi-
tions, though, they not only
survived, but prospered.
Still, McCarthy and his
staff, particularly defensive
coordinator Dom Capers,
deserve tremendous credit for
rapidly developing backups
and having faith in them.
McCarthy also has a strong
relationship with Rodgers
that has been critical in the
QB's development since the
Brett Favre purge in 2008.


Testing takes off tomorrow


Continued from 1D
seven cars -with NGT,
Magnus and GMG Racing
added to the list.
The week starts with
Monday and Tuesday ses-
sions for the Cooper Tires
Prototype Lites and the GT3
Challenge by Yokahama sup-
port series.
There are 13 teams signed
up for the Lites division with
23 cars in the GT class.
Those support series have
become feeder classes to the
ALMS schedule with teams
like Performance Tech and
Inspire Motorsports which


now is known as CORE,
moving up from the Lites
division to field an LMPC
car.
In the GT3 division, sever-
al drivers are on the move.
Brian Wong moves to Alex
Job Racing if GTC, while
last year's GT3 Gold Cup
champ Henrique C.isneros
and NGT teammate Carlos
Eduardo have purchased
2011 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
cars and moved up to
Platinum Cup class.
The 2010 Platinum Cup
GT3 champ Ross Smith also
is working on a deal to put a


GTC car on the track for the
ALMS as well.
Even though the official
winter test is held in
February, a number of the
teams already have been test-
ing at Sebring.
Among those holding pri-
vate sessions at the Sebring
International Raceway were
the Flying Lizard Porsches,
the Lamborghinis of West
Racing, Team Corvette,
Robertson Racing's Ford
entries, as well as Audi who
tested both the R-15+ and the
hot new R-18 prototype.


Courtesy photo
Photo of all the competing Central National Free Throw Hoop Shoot players (front row left
to right): Kierra Crane of Kissimmee, Kaitlin Zoucha of West Citrus, Sara Pereiavalle of
Tampa, Angelina Zoucha of West Citrus, Crisdel Sanchez of Viera/Melbourne, Samantha
Robers of Ormond Beach, Elexa Crips of S. Hillsborough, Joel Roberts of Sebastian,
Anthony Gomez of Lakewood Ranch (bending), Paul Stafford of Winter Haven and James
Stafford of Winter Haven. (Back row left to right): Hector Benitz of Kissimmee, Julie
Ingram of Dunedin/Clearwater, Isabel Elder of Titusville, John Stewart of
Viera/Melbourne, Anna Albers of Bradenton, Ben Chitiko of Merritt Island, Adam Smolker
of S. Hillsborough, Brandon Francis of Sebastrian and Sebastrian Spada of Ormond Beach.
In rear, Eric Smoker of S. Hillsborough, Deshon Walker of Winter Springs and TreVaughan
Sanders Drake of Daytona Beach.


Lake Placid Elks Hoop Shoot a hit


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID The
Lake Placid Elks Lodge host-
ed the National Free Throw
Hoop Shoot on Saturday, Jan.
22 at the Lake Placid High
School.
Each player in photo threw
25 free throws for score and
the winners of the six age
divisions will advance to the
State Elks Hoop Shoot
Championships in Umatilla,


FL where they will compete
for the 2011 State Elks Hoop
Shoot Free Throw
Championship.
State winners will then
advance to the Regional in
Valdosta, GA, with the win-
ners going on to the Elks
National Finals in
Springfield, Mass. in April.
The following are the first
place winners by age group
who will be advancing to


State:
Girls 8-9, Samantha Roberts
of Ormond Beach #2193 Lodge;
Boys 8-9, James Stafford of
Winter Haven #1672 Lodge;
Girls 10-11, Crisdel Sanichez of
Viera #2817/Melbourne #1744
Lodges; Boys 10-11, Joel Rogers
of Sebastian Lodge #2714; Girls
12-13, Kierra Crane of
Kissimmee #1873 Lodge; Boys
12-13, Deshon Walker of Winter
Haven #1672 Lodge.


Golf Tournament

Rnver Greens Golf Coiurse





turday, February 12, 2011
....7: a $ am-Sign In


BOO- am Shotgun Start


$2,00000oeInOne Pize


Sponsored by Cohan Radio Group


To-Person Scra ble


$60.0@ per person



so h TurnameItw *ri s RrashmeRa Bl



Hole Sponsorship Available $100.00
For more I rmation call the Avon Park Chamber
(863) 453-3350


Sponsors


Heartland
National Bank


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COUPLES WELCOME


Golfer #1
Address
Handicap
Phone# _
Contact Name

Make Check Payable to:


Golfer #2
Address
Handicap
Phone #


Avon Park Chamber of Commerce
28 East Main Street
Avon Park, Florida 33825


Page 4D


---i












www.newssun.com


News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


Page 5D


CLASSIFIED S


DOES MAKING


MONEY


MAKE YOU


HAPPY?


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3.85-6155




1000
Announcements



1050
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION,
FILE NO. PC 10-497
Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CAROL HARRELL
a/k/a CAROL E. HARRELL
a/k/a CAROL J. GROVE HARRELL
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Sum-
mary Administration has been entered in the es-
tate of CAROL HARRELL a/k/a CAROL E. HARRELL
a/k/a CAROL J. GROVE HARRELL, deceased, File
Number PC 10-497, by the Circuit Court for
HIGHLANDS County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 590 South Commerce Ave-
nue, Sebring, FL 33870; that the decedent's date
of death was November 19, 2010; that the total
value of the estate is exempt real property and
that the names and addresses of those to whom
it has been assigned by such order are:
Name Address
Vicki L. Basham 2704 Nautilus Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
Cindy L. Watkins 7522 West 50 North
Angola, IN 46703
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
February 6, 2011.
Person Giving Notice:
Vicki L. Basham
2704 Nautilus Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
Cindy L. Watkins
7522 West 50 North
Angola, IN 46703
BREED & NUNNALLEE, P.A.
Attorneys for Personal Representative:
325 NORTH COMMERCE AVENUE
SEBRING, FL 33870
Telephone: (863) 382-3154
By: /s/ Thomas L. Nunnallee
Florida Bar No. 0062162
E-mail Address: tnunnallee@bnpalaw.com
February 6, 13, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 28-2010-CA-001364
NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Plaintiff,
vs.
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, AS-
SIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OF
BENJAMIN C. NEELY, DECEASED, ET AL
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OF
BENJAMIN C. NEELY, DECEASED, ET AL
CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS


Subscribe


to


the


News-Sun


Call


385-6155


February 6, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: FC 11-121
GAIL GOMEZ,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
LUIS GOMEZ,
Respondent/Husband
NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: Luis Gomez
Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been
filed against you and that you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on Steven D. Miller, Esq., whose address is 817
South University Drive, Suite 122, Plantation, Flor-
ida 33324 on or before March 15, 2011, and file
the original with the clerk of this Court at High-
lands County Courthouse, '590 South Commerce
Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870-3867 before
service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If
you fail to do so, a default may be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case, in-
cluding orders, are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's.office. You may review these docu-


MENEEMMMMMMOMMOMMMMM


1050 Legls
You are notified that an action to foreclosure a
mortgage on the following property in Highlands
County. Florida:
LOTS 986 AND 987, AVON PARK LAKES, UNIT
3, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 90, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
commonly known as 2120 WEST HIBISCUS RD,
AVON PARK, FL 33825 has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Ashley L. Simon of
Kass, Shuler, Solomon, Spector, Foyle & Singer,
P.A., plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O.
Box 800, Tampa, Florida 33601, (813)229-0900,
on or before March 1, 2011, (or 30 days from the
first date of publication, whichever is later) and file
the original with the Clerk of this Court either be-
fore service on the Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
Dated: January 18, 2011.
CLERK OF THE COURT
Honorable ROBERT W. GERMAINE
590 S. Commerce Avenue
Sebring, Florida 33870-3701
/s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
(COURT SEAL)
January 30; February 6, 2011
STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT
The Department of Environmental Protection
gives notice of its intent to issue a permit to Town
of Lake Placid, Gary Freeman, 311 W Interlake
Blvd., Lake Placid, Florida 33852 to construct and
operate a public-access, slow-rate reuse system
to irrigate the medians and rights of way of US
Highway 27, from Dasher Road to Lake June
Road in Lake Placid, Florida in Highlands County.
The application number of this project is
FLA281484-007.
The intent to issue and appli-
cation file are available for public inspection dur-
ing normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holi-
days, at the Department's South District Office,
2295 Victoria Ave, Suite 364, Ft. Myers, Florida
33901-3881, at phone number (239)344-5600.
The Department will issue the permit with the at-
tached conditions unless a timely petition for an
administrative heading is filed under Sections
120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, within
fourteen days of receipt of notice. The procedures
for petitioning for a hearing are set forth below.
A person whose substantial interests are affected
by the Department's proposed permitting decision
may petition for an administrative proceeding
(hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
Florida Statutes. The petition must contain the in-
formation set forth below and must be filed (re-
Sceived by the Clerk) in the Office of General Coun-
sel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth
Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3000.
Under Rule 62-110.106(4), Flor-
ida Administrative Code, a person may request an
extension of the time for filing a petition for an ad-
ministrative hearing. The request must be filed
(received by the Clerk) in the Office of General
Counsel before the end of the time period for filing
a petition for an administrative hearing.
Petitions filed by any persons other than those
entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3),
Florida Statutes, must be filed within fourteen days
of publication of the notice or within fourteen days of
receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs
first. Section 120.60(3), Florida Statutes, how-
ever, also allows that any person who has asked
the Department for notice of agency action may
file a petition within fourteen days of receipt of
such notice, regardless of the date of publication,
The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to
the applicant at the address indicated above at
the time of filing. The failure of any person to file
a petition or request for an extension of time
within fourteen days of receipt of notice shall con-
stitute a waiver of that person's right to request an
administrative determination (hearing) under Sec-
tions 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes. Any
subsequent intervention (in a proceeding initiated
by another party) will be only at the discretion of
the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in
compliance with Rule 28-106.205, Florida Admin-
istrative Code.
A petition that disputes the mate-
rial facts on which the Department's action is
based must contain the following information, as
indicated in Rule 28-106.201, Florida Administra-
tive Code:
*The name and address of
each agency affected and each agency's file or
identification number, if known;
*The name, address, and telephone number of
the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone
number of the petitioner's representative, if any,
which shall be the address for service purposes
during the course of the proceeding; and an
explanationof how the petitioner's substantial
interests will be affected by the determination;
A statement of when and how the petitioner
received notice of the Department's decision;
A statement of all disputed issues of material
fact. If there are none, the petition must so Indicate;
A concise statement of the ultimate facts
alleged, including the specific facts the petitioner
contends warrant reversal or modification of the
Department's proposed action;
*A statement of the specific rules or statutes the
petitioner contends require reversal or modification
of the Department's proposed action; and
*A statement of the relief sought by the
petitioner, stating precisely the action petitioner
wishes the Department to take with respect to the
Department's proposed action.
Because the administrative hearing process is
designed to formulate final agency action, the filing
of a petition means that the Department's final
action may be different from the position taken by it
in this notice. Persons whose substantial interests
will be affected by any such final decision of the
Department have the right to petition to become a
party to the proceeding, in accordance with the
requirements set forth above.
Mediation under Section 120.573,
Florida Statutes, is not available for this proceed-
ing.


1050 Legals
ments upon request.

You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office notified of your current address. (You may file
Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers
in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on
record at the clerk's office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Failure to
comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
Dated: February 3, 2011.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
February 6, 13, 20, 27, 2011


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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 10000265GCS
SHAWN JONES,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARTY REED,
Defendant,
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated January
11th, 2011 and, entered in Case No.:
10000265GCS.of the Circuit court of the TENTH
Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Flor-
ida wherein, SHAWN JONES, is the Plaintiff and
MARTY REED is the Defendant, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at: Highlands
County Courthouse located at: 430 S. Commerce
Ave., Sebring, Florida 33870 at 11:00 AM on the
11th day of February, 2011, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment:
TEMPLE TERRACE SUB PB 6-PG 36 LOT 23
BLK 6 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file
a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on
January 26, 2011, as Clerk of the Circuit Court.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
January 30; February 6, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001297
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHARLES C, VANDERHOFF, JR. A/K/A CHARLES
CARL VANDERHOFF, JR.; MICHELLE L. VANDER-
HOFF A/K/A MICHELLE LYNN VANDERHOFF; UN-
KNOWN .TENANTS(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 10th day of
January, 2011, and entered in Case No.
28-2009-CA-001297, of the Circuit Court of the
10TH Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,
Florida, wherein SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., is
the Plaintiff and CHARLES C. VANDERHOFF, JR.
A/K/A CHARLES CARL VANDERHOFF, JR.; MI-
CHELLE L. VANDERHOFF A/K/A MICHELLE LYNN
VANDERHOFF UNKNOWN TENANTS(S) IN POS-
SESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, are defen-
dants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL
33870 at the Highlands County Courthouse in Se-
bring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 14th day of
February, 2011, the following described property
as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 30, BLOCK 187, WOODLAWN TERRACE
SUBDIVISION, LESS A 10 FOOT STRIP FOR AL-
LEYWAY EASEMENT AT THE REAR OF SAID LOT,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 96, PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE
LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost,to you, to
the provision of certain' assistance. Please contact
the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N.
Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863)
534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately upon receiving
this notification if the time before the -scheduled
appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing
or voice Impaired, call 711.
Dated this 10th day of January, 2011.
Robert W. Germaine
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
SDeputy Clerk
f January 30; February 6, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-000053
SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TERRY D. LOWDER II, etal,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated January
10, 2011 and entered in Case No.
28-2010-CA-000053 of the Circuit Court of the
TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS
County, Florida wherein SAXON MORTGAGE
SERVICES, INC., is the Plaintiff and TERRY D.
LOWDER II; ALISHA M. LOWDER; MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS
NOMINEE FOR HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES;
SAVE-THE-MOMENT PLAZA PROPERTY ASSOCIA-
TION, INC.; are the Defendants. The Clerk of the
Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASE-
MENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at
11:00 AM, on the 14th day of January, 2011, the
following described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment:
LOT 11, BLOCK 24, SU N 'N LAKES ESTATES
SECTION 6, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8,
PAGE(S) 61, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 320 MOON GLOW AVENUE, LAKE PLACID,
FL 33852
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus


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from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the LiUs Pendens must file
a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale,
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court
on January 10, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE


1050 egals
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F10001204 SAXONFID-SPECFHLMC-
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act,
persons with disabilities needing a special accom-
modation to participate in this proceeding should
contact the individual or agency sending the no-
tice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box
25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813)
251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service,
January 30; February 6, 2011





IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-001274
US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS
TRUSTEE FOR BAFC2006-8T2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHRISTOPHER L. FARQUHAR, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated January
25, 2011 and entered in Case No.
28-2008-CA-001274 of the Circuit Court of the
TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for US BANK NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR
BAFC2006-8T2, is the Plaintiff and CHRISTOPHER
L. FARQUHAR; LOREN A. FAROUHAR; MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INCOR-
PORATED, AS NOMINEE FOR PHH MORTGAGE
CORPORATION; are the Defendants, The Clerk of
the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASE-
MENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at
11:00 AM, on the 16th day of February, 2011,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
LOT 12, BLOCK 10, LAKE HAVEN ESTATES,
SECTION ONE, ACCORDING TO THE MAD OR
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7,
PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGH-
LANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 4627 LAFAYETTE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL
33875
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file
a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court
on January 25, 2011.
ROBERT W.GERMAINE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018


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1050 .oo.,
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F08081153-CENDANT-CONV-Team I
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act,
persons with disabilities needing a special accom-
modation to participate in this proceeding should
contact the individual or agency sending the no-
tice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box
25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813)
251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
January 30; February 6, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
GENERAL.CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 2010-CA-000581
HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III
Plaintiff
vs
DANIEL L. KING; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DANIEL
L.
KING; STACEY KING; WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL
NATIONAL BANK; and UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS,
TENANTS, OWNERS, and OTHER UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES, including, if a named defendant is de-
ceased, the personal representatives, the surviv-
ing spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors,
and all othre parties claiming by, through, under
or against that defendant, and the several and re-
spective unknown assigns, successors in interest,
trustees or other persons claiming by, through,
under or against any corporation or other legal en-
tity named as a defendant, and all claimants, per-
sons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose ex,
act legal status is unknown, claiming under any of
the above named or described defendants
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Or-
der of Final Judgment entered in this cause, in the
Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will
sell the property situated in Highlands County,
Florida, described as:
THE NORTH 15 FEET OF LOT 23 AND ALL OF
LOT 24, BLOCK 54, OF UNIT ONE OR LAKE LL-
LIAN SECTION, HIGHLAND LAKES SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 77, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
Property Address: 2616 N. Mulberry Road
Avon Park, Florida 33825
Parcel I.D.: C-09-33-28-010-0540-0230
at public sale, to the highest and t bidder, for
cash, at the Jury Assembly Room in the basement
of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Com-
merce Street, Sebring, Florida 33870 at 11:00
a.m. on February 14th, 2011.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE
LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE
CLERK OF COURT WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
DATED this 11 th day of January, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
January 30; February 6, 2011


1050 Legals
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that ON
2/23/11 at 10:30 am the following
vehicles will be sold for towing & storage
charges pursuant to F.S. 713.78.
1998 MERC #1MEFM50U7WA643297
ALL Sales to be held at Alan Jay
Automotive Network 441 US
27N Sebring, FI 33870 863 402
4210
February 6, 2011

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE

Notice is hereby given that ON 2/28/11 at
10:30 am the following vehicles will be
sold for towing & storage charges
pursuant to F.S. 713.78.
2007 CHRY # 1C3LC46K17N592367
ALL Sales to be held at Alan Jay
Automotive Network 441 US 27N
Sebring, Fl 33870 863 402 4210
February 6, 2011






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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 10000586GCS
BANKUNITED
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERT P. HACKLEMAN, II; ET AL;
Defendants,
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 14 2011,
and entered in Case No.. 10000586GCS, of the
Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for
HIGHLANDS County, Florida. BANKUNITED is
Plaintiff and ROBERT P. HACKLEMAN, II; JACQUE-
LINE K. HACKLEMAN; UNKNOWN PERSONS) IN
POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; SUN
N LAKE OF SEBRING IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT;
SUN 'N LAKE OF SEBRING PROPERTY OWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.; are defendants. I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash in the JURY
ASSEMBLY ROOM, IN THE BASEMENT OF- THE
HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT
430F SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL,
at 11:00 a.m., on the 16th day of February, 2011,
the following described property as set forth ins
aid Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 88, BLOCK 342, SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES
OF SEBRING UNIT 16, ACCORDING TO THE MAP
OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
10, PAGE(S) 4, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as











Page 6D


1050 L-goals
of the'date of the lis pendens must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 14th day of January, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
As Clerk of said Court
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
As Deputy Clerk
January 30; February 6. 2011
PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE
Heartland Workforce will hold a teleconference
meeting of their Board of Directors on Wednes-
day, Feb. 9, 2011 at 1:30 p.m. The teleconfer-
ence will originate at the Heartland Workforce Ad-
ministrative office, 5901 US Hwy 2T S., Sebring,
Florida 33870 Interested persons should arrive
no later than 1:25 p.m. Purpose of the meeting is
to consider entering into an Employed Worker
Training Agreement with DeSoto Memorial Hospi-
tal. For more information see agenda posted on
the Heartland Workforce website at wwwhwib.org
February 6, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO, 28-2010-CA-000190
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A, AS SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSO-
CIATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
CLINTON FOX AKA CLINTON S. FOX
AKA CLINTON SCOTT FOX, ET AL
Defendants,
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Sum-
mary Final Judgment in Foreclosure dated Janu-
ary 10, 2011 and entered in Case No.
28-2010-CA-000190 of the Circuit Court of the
10TH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS
County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,
N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA
BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and
CLINTON FOX AKA CLINTON S. FOX AKA CLINTON
SCOTT FOX; JEANA GIGLIO AKA JEANA M. GI-
GLIO; AKA JEANA MARIE GIGLIO AKA JEANA
MARIE FOX; _, AS THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JEANA GIGLIO AKA JEANA M. GIGLIO; AKA JEANA
MARIE GIGLIO AKA JEANA MARIE FOX, IF ANY;
JOHN DOE OR ANY OTHER PERSON IN POSSES-
SION; all unknown parties claiming by, through,
under or against the named Defendant(s), whether
living or not, and whether said unknown parties
claims as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees, or in any other capac-
ity, claiming by, through, under or against the
named Defendant(s) are the Defendant(s), I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the
Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the High-
lands County Courthouse located at 430 South
Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00
a.m., on the 14th day of February, 2011, the fol-
lowing described property as set forth in said Or-
der or Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 14, BLOCK 11, REPLAT HOLIDAY LAKE
ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 11,
PAGE 22, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGH-
LANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
2006 GENERAL MOBILE HOME
VIN# GMHGA40633283A TITLE# 97588932
VIN# GMHGA40633283B TITLE. 97589012
Street Address: 401 FAIRVIEW LANE, LORIDA,
FLORIDA 33857
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this
11th day of January, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
As Deputy Clerk
January 30; February 6, 2011

105 Highlands
1055 County Legals
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
BOARDOF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS (HCBCC)
GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING
INVITATION TO BID (ITB)
The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands
County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the
County Purchasing Departmentlor:
ITB 11-023 ADVERTISING "2010" DELINQUENT TANGI-
BLE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES NIGP
COMMODITY/SERVICES CODE 915-71
IITB 11-024 ADVERTISING "2010" DELINQUENT REAL
ESTATE TAXES NIGP COMMODITY/ SERVICES CODE: 915-
71
Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our
website" HYPERLINK "http://waw.hcbcc.net"
www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, CPPB,
Acting Director /Highlands County General Services/Pur-
chasing Department 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, Florida
33875-5803 Phone: 863-402-6524 Fax: 863-402-6735;
or E-Mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:dgilbert@hcbcc.org" dgil-
bert@hcbcc.org
Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked
with the bid number and name so as to identify the en-
closed bid submittal. Bids must be delivered to Highlands
County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Se-
bring, FL 33875-5803 so as to reach said office'no later
than 2:00 P.M., Thursday, February 17, 2011, at which
time they wil! be opened. Bids received later than the date
and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will not be
responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly
addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of
delivery service.
One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at
the above bid opening.Highands County Local Preference
Policy will apply to the award of this ITB.
The Highlands Codnty Board of County Commissioners
(HCBCC/County) reserves the right to accept or reject any or
all bids or any parts. thereof, and the
award, if an award is made, will be made to the most re-
sponsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifica-
tions indicate that the award will be in the best interest of
Highlands County. The Board reserves the right to waive
irregularities in the bid The Board of County Commission-
ers of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate
upon Ihe basis of any individual's disability status. This
non-dscnmrnation policy involves every -spect of Ihe
Board's functions, including one's access to, paricipation,
employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Any-
one requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for
in the Amercans with Disoebilties Act or Section 286 26
Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John A. M nor, ADA
Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), or via Florida Relay
Service 711, or by e-mail: HYPERLINK
"mailho:Jminor@hcbcc.org" Jminor@hcbcc.org. Requests
for CART or Interpreter services should be made at least
24 hours in advance to permit coordreatron of the
service.Board of County Co'mmissionesPurchasing De
partment/Highlands County, Florida Website: HYPERLINK
"htlp://wwvw hcbcc net" wwwm hcbcc.net
January30; February 6,2011
HIGHLANDS COUNTYBOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GENERAL SERVICES O PURCHASING
INVITATION TO BID (ITB)
The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands
County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the
County Purchasing Department for:
ITB .No. 11-033 SPARROW AVENUE AND U.S. 27
INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT No. 09043 NIGP
COMMODoIY/SERVICES CODE: 913-27
Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our
website: vww.hcbcc.net or by con-
tacting: Danielle Gilbert, Acting Director, Highlands Coontly
General Services/Purchasing Department, 4320 George
Blvd., Sebnng, FL 33875-5803 Telephone:
863-402-6524, E-Mail: dgilbert@hcbcc.org
A NON-MANDATORY Pre-Bid meeting will be held at 10:00
A.M. on Wednesday, February 16, 2011 in the Engineering
Conference Room, 505 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring,
Florida 33870. All potential bidders are encouraged attend
this meeting
Submit one (1) originals and three (3) copies
of your bid form, bid security and other required data in a


sealed envelope and marked with the bid number and
name so as to identify the enclosed bid submittal. Bids
must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Deparl
ment, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 so as
to reach said office no later than 2'00 P.M., Thuisday,
March 3, 2011 at which lime they will be opened. Bids re-
ceived later than the date and time as speclied will be re-
jected. The Board will not be responsible for the late deliv-
enes of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in
person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One
or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at
either or both of' bhe above meetings. Highlands County
Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this
bid.
Vendors submitting responses must submit bids on all
work to receive consideration. A Bid Bond or Cashier's
Check in an amount of five percent (15%) of the bid must
be included on bids over $100,000.00. If the successful
bid is greater than $200,000.00, a Public Construction
Bond will be required. Bid must be accompanied by evi-
dence ol bidder's qualifications to do business in the State
of Florida, in accordance with F S 489
The principal features of the Project are.
LUMP SUM PRICE BID:
To provide all labor, materials and equipment to construct an
additional lane on Sparrow Avenue providing dual left-turn
lanes onto U S. 27, This project also includes construction
of concrete traffic separator, concrete curb and gutter,
drainage improvements, resurfacing and right-of-way rcs-


News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


1 0 5 CHighlands
1055 County Legals
'tralion Since the woik of this project is at the intersec
lon of Sparrow Aen'ue and US. 27. Maintenance of Traf-
fc wrl be especially important All workmanship and ma-
eral shal meet the requirement of the Florionda Depart
ment of Transponration Standard Specfications for Road
and Bridge Coistrui:con (dated 2010), Highlands Countr
Engineeng Standards and be in compliance with all per-
mits issue
The H;ghlands Cointy Board of County Corn
m;ss-oners nHCBCC/COUNIY) reserves the night to accept
or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and ine
award, If an award is made, will be made to the most re-
sponsive and responsible bidder whose bid and quailifca-
tlons indicate that the award will be in the best interest of
Highlands County The Bodrd reserves the ghtl to waive
irregularities in the bid rhe Board of County Commission-
ers or Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate
upon the basis of any individual's disability status This
non discrimination policy involves every aspect of thlie
Board's functions, including one's access to, participation,
employment or treatment in its programs or activities,
Highlands County is an equal opportunity employer, a fair
housing advocate and a handicap accessible jurisdiction,
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided
for in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or Section
286 26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John Minor,
ADA Coordinator at 863-402-6509 (Voice), or via Florida
Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: iminor@hcbccorg Re-
quests for CARF or interpreter services should be made at
leas! 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the
service.Board of County CommissionersPurchasing De-
partmentHighlands County, Florida
Website. HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net"
vwwv hcbcc net


105 5 C Highlands
1055 County Legals
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING
The Board of County .Commissioners (BCC) Hich'ais
County, Sebnng, Florida, ,ll receive sealed bids in ie
County Purchasing Department !or
ITB 11 034 ON-SITE OR REMOTE SHREDDING OF WASTE
TIRES FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY LANDFILL NIGP CODE C No
962-84
Specifications mnay be obtained by downloading from our
website' HYPERLINK I"hllp'//w'.vl hcbcc net" wvw hcbcc net
or by contacting Danielle Gilbert, CPP. Acting Director/High-
lands County General Se.ces.'Purchasing Depariment
1320 George Blvd., Sebnng, Fionda 33875-5803 Phone
863-402 6524 Fax 863 -02-6735 or E-Mail HYPER-
LINK "mailto dgilbert@hcbcc.org' dglhbert@lcbcc.org
Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid num-
ber and name so as to identify tne enclosed bids. Bids
mus! be delivered to the Highlands County Purchasing De-
partment, 4320 George Blvd Sebnng, FL. 33875-5803
so as to reach said office no later than 200 PM., Thurs-
day, March 3, 2011 at which time they will be opened
Bids received later than the date and time as specified will
be rejected The Board will not be responsible for the late
deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered
In person, by mail or any other type of delivery service
One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance
at the above bid opening.Highlands County Local Prefer-
ence Policy will apply to tIhe award of this ITB The High-
lands County Board of County Commissioners (HCBCC) re-
selves the right to accept or reject.any or all bids or any
pails thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be
made to the most responsible bidder whose bid and quali-
fications indicate that the award will be in the best interest


1055 County Legals
of H.ghlanrs Cournt The Board reserves the night to
v.a.'e rregular.'Les in tie bid The Board of Couniy Com-
nissconers of Hegnlancs County. Flonda, does no: discrimi
na-e upon me basis of any individual's disacblty status
This non-asc inalinon pela y in ,lves every aspect of the
PBard's functions including one's access to. participation,
e mplo,mert or treatment in its programs cr activities Any-
one rejinng reasonable acconmmodarion as provided for
In me Americans witn Disablities Act or Section 286 26
Florda Statutes should contact Mr John A. Minor, ADA
Coordinator at 863-402-6509 (Voice). 863-402-6508
(FTY), or va Flondra Relay Service 711, or by e-mail HY-
PERLINK "mato Jminor@hcbecc or" JminornhcbLc org
Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made
at !east 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the
service
Board of County Commissioners Purchasing Department,
Highlands County, Florida
Website HYPERLINK "http://.wrev hcicc ne'"
A.vw hcbcc net
SFebruary 6, 13. 2011


LOOKING FOR THAT
SPECIAL HOME?
Search the News-Sun
Classifieds every Sunday,
Wednesday and Friday.


www.newssun.com


Having something to


sell and not advertising


is like winking in the


dark. You know what


you're doing, but no


one else does. Call


News-Sun classified


today! 385-6155


^ftinU Lfl xnfyd~W


Joe Johnson's


ALL AMERICAN
TREE SERVICE. INC. -
TRIMMING REMOVAL
SOD INSTALLATION STUMP GRINDING
LOT CLEARING PRESSURE CLEANING
W ll f at An % ritnen Estlensate'
Peoples Choice 1 Free Estimates
Award 863-465-7491 Licensed & Insured


SPOOL" PARADISE
Pool service $ Mobile etail
Service* Repair Supplies Equipmernt
Delivered Right to your Door
Brad $ Julie Kurtz

(63) 362-7726
Fx (a3) 402-2200
poolparadiselO@aol.-om
www.poolparddiseenline.eom


iJACKSON HEWITT@
v-, ..e--t s TAX SERVICE
INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED
Avon Park (863) 453-2525 Sebring (863) 382-1515
Lake Placid (863) 699-2525 Wauchula (863) 767-1515
Lake Wales (863) 679-9200 Sebring Fax (863) 382-9939
Wal-Mart Locations:
Lake Wales (863) 676-0569
Sebring (863) 385-5371
Avon Park (863) 452-70101


S&D TREE SERVICE


\X M"ore

SFor Your





Tree Trimming Stump Grinding
Tree Removal Lot Clearing

Will beat any quote

Free Stump Grinding

with any Tree Removal

Licensed & Insured / ISA Certified

863-441-5154


Lawn Maintenance F

& More since I99I!





Truck/Trailer / Labor FOR HIRE

Marc (863) 655-9579


WILLIAMS JANITORIAL

CARPET CLEANING


'10' Per Room
3 Rooms Minimum
Upholstery Cleaning
All Types of Flooring
Free Estimates
Lic Bonded Ins
(863)214-1940


A&E
LAWN MOWER REPAIR

Belts... Blades
New & Used Parts ^. l -,

12 S. Forest Ave.
Avon Park, FL 33825
863-452-0389



HANDYMAN BOB
Install doors, windows,
flooring, plumbing & more!
Licensed & Insured
Lic# HM0096

Call 863-452-5201
or
863-449-1744




.JExterminating, Inc.
863 385-0404
Now Offering:

Nuisance
^ Control and
'T. n* t-- -1' Removal


Serving All of Florida Free Estimates
"Enjoy the Satisfaction of Safety"
with the
ROBBINS "FLAME SYSTEM"
LIGHTNING PROTECTION
THE WORLD'S FINEST
Aluminum Lightning protection
Underwriter's Laboratories Inspected and Approved








"LIVE BLOOD ANALYSIS"

WANDA KLINE

WEIGHT LOSS

& WELLNESS
See what one drop of your blood indicates as
to YOUR nutritional health and well-being.
By appointment only
863-414-4066


* Fully Insured Free Estimates
* Tree Removal Tree Topping
* Tree Trimming Stump Grinding
Serving All Central Florida Area


S s99


HOUSE

FLORIDA PRESSURE WASH*
CLEANING LLC
Call For Details
863-381-9013
'Single Story Homes under 1500 total sq. ft.
Roofs Driveways Walks Additional Services

Sll Cindy Divietro
yCommunity Liaison
H Cell: 941-518-2478
800-518-0403
q We Elderly Care, Inc.
Compassionate, Professional Health Care For Your Loved Ones
214 E. Stuart Ave. Lake Wales, FL 33853
863-767-1120 Fax 863-676-7291
In Home Care
Avon Park Sebring Lake Placid
Private Pay Long Term Insurance
www.weelderlycare.com


S. A. LONG CLEANING perhour
20 Years experience
Excellent References
Daily Weekly Biweekly- Monthly
Janitorial Service Recently
.J? Relocated to Lake Placid Sebring
i J king To Build New Clientele

863-243-1801 / Shelly A long


Indoor Flea Market-



"dfollar Store
Beckie's Avon 863-449-1298




CAMPBELL'S COLLISION
( 4CENPTER, INC
,7./'S JIMC'\MPBLLI -Ownler





Phone (863) 382-7551 1405 US 27 North
FAX (863) 382-2750 Sebring, FL 33870





Service Available 7 Days A Week
Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com
All Service Calls $40
Mike & Kandy Sheldone
CEO/Owner
Lic# CAC 1816569
863-451-2399

Roger's Handyman ServicesI

It .r,1 J ,1tJ /rnsute ,
NO ICA) Is tb.So mall ,
c n r take ::ire o l all iito r
[-ior-n i r- pair. and
1ml1 inte-rime I needs
* 'H ,it/ I l'... r T . I
* h..,.t I i t. .x, I 'Ilirn l's.
863-381-6677
Free n -- Ii.ites AE 0
n










www.newssun. corn
-.


1100 Announcements


CHECK



YOUR



AD

Please check your ad on
the first day it runs to
make sure it is correct.
Sometimes instructions
over the phone are
misunderstood and an
error can occur. If this
happens to you, please
call us the first day
your ad appears and we
will be happy to fix it as
soon as we can.
If We can assist you,
please call us:

385-6155

News-Sun

Classified


1400 Healthare
I1400 Services
CAREGIVERS NEEDED
Must be mature and experienced.
Must have clean background and
license. 863-812-4752

1450 Babysitters
BABYSITTER NEEDED F T position for
4 months. Must have Infant CPR
Certification. Background check.
863-446-3826


2000
Employment


2100 Help Wanted

LPN'S WANTED
Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility
serving disabled adults is seeking
nurses for PRN shifts. Casual work
environment, benefit package and
paid training. Call Nina at
863-452-5141 or complete an
application at 55 E. College Dr.,
Avon Park, FL 33825.
DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS
wanted for Avon Park Intermediate
Care Facility serving disabled adults.
HS diploma or 1 y'ar associated
experience, valid FL Drivers License
and clean criminal background req.
Please complete application at 55 E.
College Dr., Avon Park, FL 33825.

STREETS/SANITATION
OPERATIONS SUPERVISOR
City of Avon Park is accepting
applications for a full-time
Streets /Sanitation Operations
Supervisor. This position is a field
supervisory position which directs
and coordinates daily activities of
workers engaged in maintenance
and repair activities of storm-
water/drainage, streets, buildings,
and solid waste. Minimum qualifi-
cation: High school diploma or
GED equivalency, supplemented
by three years progressively
knowledgeable experience in the
field applicable to the assigned
divisions (e.g., Stormwater,
Streets, Buildings, Solid Waste),
with experience in a lead worker
capacity and demonstrated techni.
cal skills in the more complex
aspects of the work; or an
equivalent combination of educa-
tion, training and/or experience,
and must hold a valid State of
Florida driver's license. Additional
certifications may be required
where applicable to the assigned
divisions, (e.g, frtf & Ornamental
Spray Technician, Stormwater
Technician). Incumbent shall have
sixteen (16) months to obtain a
mosquito control license. This
position may be required to be
on call, including nights, holidays,
and weekends. Starting salary:
$30,000.00 to $44,000.00 depend-
ing on qualifications, with an
excellent benefit package. The City
of Avon Park is a Smoke and
Drug-Free workplace. E.O.E.
Applications are available at
City Hall,
Human Resources Office,
110 E. Main Street,
Avon Park, FL 33825.
Applications Alose Friday_
February 18. 2011 at 4:30 p.m.


News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


2 100 Help Wanted
DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY?
Sell youi used appliance with a News-Sun
classified ad. Call today. gone tomorrow!
385-6155


SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE


2 100 Help Wanted
RESTAURANT HIRING Servers.
Cooks. Dishwashers, Beverage Cart
Attendents @ Springlake Golf Resort.
Apply in person Tues. thru Sat. 2pm -
5pm. directions only, Please call
863-655-0909 ext 3.


600 West College Drive
Avon Park. FL 33825
(863)784-7132 FAX (863) 784-7497
E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu
vvw.southflorida.edu/hr


Classified

ads

get fast

results


5005 Sun


Apply in person at
N Lake Blvd. Mon., Tues., Wed.


$ Highlands County Board of

County Commissioners



The following position closes on 2/08/2011

Code Enforcement Official 766 PG 17
$14.46/hour $23.69/hour.



The following position closes on 2/08/2011

Equipment Operator I 912 PG 10
$10.49/hour $16.93/hour.


For application, minimum qualifications and a full
job description visit us on our website at
www.hcbcc.net. You must complete our electronic
job application or submit a completed paper
application in order to be considered for employment
with Highlands County BCC.







Sears

Home Services

NOW HIRING-Sebring, FL
Residential Cooking, Laundry or
Refrigeration Appliance Repair

Technicians


Join us for on-the-spot interviews
Sears Home Services Job Fair
Thurs, 2/10, 10 am to 4 pm
Please See Human Resource Dept.
901 US 27 N, Sebring, FL 33870

Min. 1 yr exp (plus EPA cert. for Refrig)
req'd. Competitive pay based on your
experience plus sales commissions,
comprehensive benefit pkg, Company
vehicle, computer & specialized tools.


Apply on-line at
www.searsholdings.com/careers-
search "Hourly and Entry Level Jobs",
"Home Services Jobs", search for Req
#89719. Call Barb Morris, Staffing
Manager, (469)222-0021 or Joe Booth,
Technical Manager (941)544-5556.
EOE/AA


2100 Help Wanted
SUNSHINE PAYDAY LOANS
Clerks needed in Highlands County &
LaBelle area, must be willing to travel.
Fax Resume to 863-678-2170
THE CITY OF AVON PARK has closed
the Fire Chief Position and will not
accept any more applications at this
time. The City of Avon Park is a
Smoke and Drug-Free workplace.
E.O.E.

Part-time
2 1 50 Employment
TUTOR I am seeking a tutor for a 14
year old girl, well behaved and shy.
Instruction will take place in my home
three days a week, hours are flexible,
to begin, between 8 am 8 pm and
lessons should last about 60 mins..
Subjects: Math, Science, Reading &
English. $60 per hour. Interested reply
by email 'michaelbrooks646@aol.com"


3000
Financial


4000
Real Estate


4040 Homes For Sale
LAKE PLACID 2000 Sq. Ft., 3BR,
2BA, fireplace, new A/C, new roof, all
tile floors. Overlooks Golf course, over
sized 2/CG, stainless steel appl.
$157,900 863-699-2232 or Cell
239-229-4655
O6 Homes for Sale
4060 Avon Poark
AVON PARK 3BR, 1BA. CHA, natural
.gas, newer roof & windows, city
water/sewer. Lg wkshop in back, needs
some work.'Priced reduced to $37,500.
863-453-7764 or 863-257-4095.


DIRECTOR, PLANNED AND MAJOR GIVING
Full-time, year-round, grant-funded position responsible for cultivat-
ing and promoting the College's annual and planned giving campaigns.
Bachelor's degree and five years of experience in financial and/or estate
planning is required. A professional degree in Law (J.D.) or Master's de-
gree in financial management, accounting or a related field is preferred.
Strong written and verbal communication skills as well as knowledge of
trust law, estate planning, and financial giving regulations are required.
Ability to work in a fast-paced, collaborative environment is required.
Successful candidates must be able to interact well with external stake-
holders. Extensive :''i iiir -ir ii'.'1ienit will be expected. Must exhibit
professional appearance and demeanor and have reliable transportation
ior extensive travel within the service district. Annual salary $75,000
plus a comprehensive benefits package, including retirement, health/life
insurance, and vacation/sick leave. Application review begins: 2/22/11.
Please visit our website for detailed requirements.
EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/VETERAN'S PREFERENCE



ADMISSIONS/MARKETING

DIRECTOR

For ALF in Sebring. Marketing
experience a plus. Knowledge in
payroll, billing, admitting process
for ALFs helpful. Team player and
trustworthy a must. Must be able to
multi task and be flexible, good public'
relations skills and be able to market
the community in a positive manner.



CROWNpOINTE
aM EW409Wme


Homes for Sale
Sebring


SEBRING Edgewater Village Lakeview
Dr. 2BR, 2BA, 1CG Villa. Beautifully
furnished. New kitchen, laundry, TV,
Low Maintenance fee includes Cable
TV, Clubhouse, heated pool. Private
street. Avail Immed. 863-402-9138
SEBRING NEWLY REMODELED 3BR
Home, one block from Woodlawn Elem.
School. Nice, quiet neighborhood.
1243 Fernvale Ave. Possible Owner
Financing. Call 863-675-3387 TODAY!
A 1 A Villas & Condos
4120 For Sale
SEBRING FOR SALE BY OWNER
2BR, 2BA Condo at the beautiful Bluffs
of Sebring, a 55+ gated community.
First Floor with Carport & Storage
Room. Furnished with several
upgrades; clubhouse, pool,
tennis & other activities.
Great view of Lake Mary Jane.
Call 863-3555 3-873-1426

4220 LotsfSale
LAKE PLACID Sun 'n Lake,
2 Lots, side-by-side, 80'x125' each,
cleared, surveyed. Warranty Deed,
Title Insurance. $6,000 for both.
863-386-4556


6200 Unfumished
620 Apartments

RELAX AT Lake Isis Villas
Luxurious 2BR Apartment.
Clean & Quiet Setting.
Call 83-453-2669
AVON PARK Highlands Apartments
1680 North Delaware
1 BR, 1 BA & 2BR, 2BA Available.
Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation.
1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195
AVON PARK Apartment with balcony.
overlooking Lake Verona and City Park.
100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities.
SPECIAL: $325/mo.
863-453-8598
AVON PARK Clean, Quiet; Studios /
1 BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from
$375/mo. New tile & appliances,
screened patios & W/D hook ups.
Students/Seniors Discount
Call 863-452-0469.
AVON PARK LEMONTREE APTS:
1 BR, 1 BA $495/mo +$200 security;
2BR, 1 BA $645/mo +$500 security.
W/D, Microwave, WSG included.
Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953


KEY LAKE VILLAS
LAKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING
2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean &
quiet, Screen porch, Outside patio,
Central air, Washer/Dryer hookup,
$585/mo., first & security. No Pets.
863-465-2740
LAKE PLACID 28R, 2BA,
Washer/Dryer, screened patio, water
included. Excellent Condition.
$525 monthly plus 1 mo. security.
954-695-8348
SEBRING / LAKE PLACID Beautiful
1BR, 1BA Apt. on private lake w/dock.
Avail. Furn/Unfum. Yearly or Seasonal.
W/D + Util's. included. No smoke/ No
pets. For more info call 863-381-7415,

6250 Furnished Houses
LAKE PLACID Newer 3BR, 2BA,
seasonal or monthly. Excellent furniture
& appliances, near lake & boat ramp,
No smoking or dogs. $1300/mo. After
season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119

6300 Unfurnished Houses
HOUSES / MOBILE HOMES
Call for Availability
NO Security* NO Last NO Dogs
863-381-4410 or 863-381-5174
LAKE PLACID 2BR, 1BA, new
floors/paint, fenced yard, close to boat
ramp, nice landscape, quiet area, no
smoke/dogs, $550/mo. 863-699-1119
LAKE PLACID 3BR, 2BA, 2000 sq ift,
on 3 lots, enclosed outbuilding
(could be mother-in-law quarters),
conveniently located to shopping,
1.5 mi. from town. $850/mo. + 1st &
security. No smoking. 863-441-9248
SEBRING Harder Hall area, 2BR, 2BA,
1CG, screened porch. $750/mo.
plus last month & security deposit.
View by appointment. Call
863-381-6747, leave message.
SEBRING 3BR,2BA 1CG, CBS Home
303 Virginia P. $119,00 or 2BR, 2BA,
MH 5151 Barnum St. $42,500 10%
Down Owner Financing Call
863-835-1445


Page 7D


73 10 Bargain Buys
CHAIR- RECLINER, LazyBoy, with golf
print material. $45 863-471-3456
COMPUTER DELL Dim 2400 WSP
W/XP. $150 obo. 863-381-3103 or
863-381-3104
DESK: 54"X18", gray formica, 5-
drawers including 2 deep file drawers.
$35. 863-414-1714
DISHWASHER Never Used.
$99 obo.
863-655-1473


DOG CAGE, metal, very large
accommodatee 100 Ib dog). $40.
863-453-4234


DOG CRATE Plastic Large.
$25. 863-453-4234
DOUBLE ROCKER all wood, white -
real nice $50 863-402-2285
EDGER, ECHO, Portable. In very good
condition. $50. 863-453-7027
EVENING GOWN like new, small size
$10 863-699-0049
GAS GRILL fair condition. $50
863-314-0030
GOLF CARRY BAG, Ogio, like new.
$45. 863-382-6006
GOLFBAG CARRIER for Motorcycle.
Fits on any receiver type hitch. Stain-
less steel. $100. 863-382-6006
HEDGE TRIMMER Craftsman 18"
blade, in very good condition. $40.
863-453-7027
KITCHEN CABINET White, like new,
$50 obo. 863-381-3103 or
863-381-3104
LAMP WITH SHADE. $10
863-471-3456
MAN'S COAT Beige London Fog 3/4
length with warm lining. Size 38R, like
new. $20 Call 863-471-1435
QUEEN SIZE Mattress & box springs,
bed frame and h-brd, 2 night stands w/
lamps $100. 451-1097 OR 414-4823
TABLE SAW Includes 4 extra
blades. Only used for picture frames.
Exc cond. $85.863-382-7469
TV & STAND stand oak colored with
storage; TV 20" & silver in color. Both
$75.00. 863-414-2131
TV SANYO 27", 5yrs ole from guest
room very little used. Excell.cond. $50
863-3824137
WATER FILTRATION Reverse
Osmosis system. A must for your
home. $50 obo 863-873-3801
WICKER ROCKER white real nice.
$25 863-402-2285
S Garage &
7320V Yard Sales
AVON PARK 2151 E. Claradge Ave,
off St. Rd 17, next to Red Barn,
Thurs-Fri-Sun Feb 3-4-6. Tools, Knick
Knacks, Kitchen Appliances, Dinette
Set, Kids Toys, & MORE!


AVON PARK Large Sale! 3145 Glacier
Ave (off Old Hwy 17) Sat Feb 5th,
8AM ? Lg glass 3pc. lighted display
unit, Carnival ware, tiller & cabinet
hardware, quality wm's clothes
(Sm-X-LG) Too Much To Ust!


LAKE PLACID Alpine Village,
Rummage & Bake Sale, RAIN or SHINE!
(mostly enclosed), 18 Center St, US 27
S. to 70 E., 1/4 mi on left, Fri, Feb 11,
7am-3pm; Sat, Feb 12, 7am-Noon.
Furniture, Major & Minor appliances,
Microwaves, CD's, Gas Grill, Many
Household items, Camping & Fishing
Equip, Garden Tools, Lg Flat-Bed
Trailer, Plants, Flowers, Produce,
& Refreshments.
SEBRING Yard / Bake Sale Highland


4260 63 0 Wheels RV -'ark 1004 Hammock d.
AcregeforSale 6320 Seson Sat Feb 12th 8am-1pm. 50/50 Raffle.
FROSTPROOF 7 1/2 Acres on Dawes 7340
Road. You must see! No lower price! SEBRING -Weekly/ Multi-Week Condo Wanted to Buy
0 nnkAvn Nnw I nr.AA ,,nn IN... W


$39,900. Call Lucy with Exit Realty
863-382-4705

4320 Real Estate Wanted

ATTENTION: CASH for your Home,
Duplex, Apartment, Commercial
Property. Rapid Closing,
"A.*sl" Condition. 863-441-2689.
STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL



5000
Mobile Homes

5050 Mobile Homes
5050 HFor Sale
AVON PARK Don't Want to Pay Lot
Rent? This Single Wide Mobile Home
has 2 add-on rooms & carport, It's on a
private lot and includes additional lot
with nice shade & citrus trees. All for
$26,0001 863-385-3913
SEBRING Doublewide Mobile Home
with lot, 3619 St. Rd 17, S. 2BR, 2BA,
excellent condition. $20,000.
305-597-8339 or 305-885-1621
SEBRING MH in 55+ community.
Comletely turn 1BR, Large BA, kitchen
& D.R, L.R. & Dressing Rm. Lakefront,
Boat Ramp w/gazebo. Pets Welcome.
2900 St Rd 17, N., Lot 20.
863-402-0037, no calls before 1 pm.
SELECTION OF 1 & 2 Bedroom Units
For Sale in friendly/active 55+ Park,
located near shopping, banks, &
hospital. Reasonable lot rent incl.
S/W/G & Lawn mowing. Call for more
info. or to view units. No pets please.
863-385-7034


6000
Rentals


6050 Duplexes for Rent
LAKE PLACID Placid Lakes,
Unfurnished 2BR, 2BA.
$375/mo. + security?
863-699-0897 or 863-840-2013
SEBRING Cute 2BR, 1BA, tile floors,
fenced yard, most pets OK.
$550 + $300 security deposit.
4909 Manatee Dr. 863-4A-724

S 1 f ~ Villas & Condos
6100 For Rent
SEBRING 2BR, 2BA, tile floors
throughout, screened porch, conven-
ient location to US 27 and Hospital,
(Not 55+) gated Community, Clubhouse
& pool, vaulted ceilings. Lawn Maint. in-
cluded. $800 monthly. 863-840-1083


UNFURNISHED MODERN VILLA CC
of Sebring. 3BR. 2BA, on Golf Course.
All amenities. Lease $1050 monthly
828-260-2120


ntal Avaii i r ,m uw. L.UNow. Locat J d ll LILeII
Lake Jackson across from Harder Hall
Golf Club. Lots of amenities. Starting
@ $500/wk. 863-385-5005. ext. 0.


7000
Merchandise


HELP! WIFE NEEDS A
VERY GOOD
DEPENDABLE CAR
NOW!
Please help me find her ona!
863-465-0978


7160 *s & "ppies 7400 L&wn&Garden


CAMERA EQUIPMENT, Professional.
Also, Collector Cameras &
Equipment. Call 863-382-7469
for details & pricing.

7180 Furniture
NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS!
Lamps $17, 100-Barstools
$39up, 50-Desks $97up,
3Pc Dropleaf dinette $197,
50-Dining Set $397up,
200-Recliners $297up,
50-2 Pc Sofa & Loveseat
sets $687up, 50-TV Ent.
Centers $167up, 2 Pc
Queen Bed Set $297up,
50-4Pc bedroom sets
$387up, 3Pc Living room
tables $97up,
100-Headboards $79up.
HIGHPOINT FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRING
North of Lowes & across from
home Depot

7300 Miscellaneous
HUSQVARNA MEGA quilter & Inspira
frame; frame adj. 5' to 10'; sewing
machine includes the add'I speed con-
trol for even stitches & laser light w /
templates for flexibility in stitch design.
$1700 863-446-6924
RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT Cooler,
freezer, pizza ovens & holding cabinet,
soft serve machine, sandwich prep
cooler. Much More! 863-781-4402

73 10 Bargain Buys
A/C UNIT 4 Ton Coleman central unit,
fan motor replaced, serviced yearly,
attch to air handle. $100 863-655-0881
ALADIN LAMP converted to electric.
could be restored, beautiful as is $12
863-214-6697
BOOKCASE light color 36 X 33 $10
863-314-0030
CAPODIMONTE basket of fruit. My
best one, $12.50 863-214-6697
CHESS SET 12" X 12", drawer with
chess pieces.$25 obo
863-699-0049
COMFORTER SET Queen size, with
shower curtain, valences & rugs. Good
Condition. $30 863-452-6798


STRING TRIMMER, HUSQVARNA,
124L, less than 4 hours. $140.
863-453-7027

7520 Pets & Supplies


NOTICE

Florida statute 585.195 states that
all dogs and cats sold in Florida
must be at least eight weeks old,
have an official health certificate
and proper shots and be free of in-
testinal and external parasites.
YORKIES ADORABLE PUPPIES!
AKC registered, health certs, 1 male,
1 female. $700-$800. 11 weeks old,
READY TO GO!!
863-655-2124 or 863-414-6335


8000
Recreation

Recreational
8400 ....
840 Vehicles
2011 39 FT. Monte Carlo 2 slides, 2BR,
sleeps 8, CHA, washer / dryer, self con-
tained, microwave and awning. Every
option. Limited Edition. $23,500.
941-448-3817
PUMA TRAVEL TRAILER 2010 32', two
slide outs, air, awning, King ISLAND
bed, $18,900 Must sell! Non smoker.
Will deliver. Lakeland, Fla.
863-660-8539
R.V. COVER, NEW ADCO, for Travel
Trailers. 28'7" to 31'6", 1/2 pnce, $200.
863-453-7027
RV WILDWOOD 2007 34 ft, 2 slide
outs, 2BR, Sleeps 7, like new, non
smoker, no pets. All options &
will deliver. $12,500 OBO.
630-301-1553
VU QUBE SATELLITE SYSTEM with
remote. Enjoy your favorite TV
programs wherever you go!
Available at Whispering Pines RV
Village, Sebring. 270-556-6847.


9000
Transportation


9200 Trucks
TOOL CHEST, all aluminum diamond
plate, 48" long, with locking lid,. $120.
863-453-7027


4080


I


k I ,






News-Sun Sunday, February 6, 2011


Page 8D


i~ .fl&P~t4.~' tfl...A2. .... rt- J L~JL.i'~ A -


1-i




I


I Anthony Jones, Conductor
" Premier Concert Band in the H1 a, ti,.i!"


ill


Presents

/ Off


jje{ /t


A Musical Tribute to Vafentine's Day.

Featuring Performers & Vocalists
Daniel Burke & Laura Wade
Sfromn The Highlands Little Theater production of and
Singing Selections from "OKLAHOMA",


Friday February 11,2011 7:30

South Florida Community College
Theatre for the Performing Arts


pm

e


4 For information, please call 314-8877 f -
' Visit our web site: www.heartlandpops.org ,
Donation S8 Advance Sale, at the Door or any POPS Member


The Motor Center
9045 US 98
Sebring. FL 33870
863-655-9636


-Auiomoluve Networ


'~ .et.
.4 **~7 *~


,e ll 14t a ,. ;
59th Annual

VHourHs of
Presented by


Wed. March 16, 2011
12 2 pm
Chateau Elan'


Pro c-vcy to Bnelit:


HIGHLANDS COUNT (
HUMAflE SOr.ET (


HiGCi.Al US AP
LEAGUE_


CH/ P. f. FOP
CH,. PL. P :r F_.i


SEEiING HALL OF F/./.E
Esparane' Buffet Gourmet Desserts
Miimosa Driver .ppearances


Sponsorships include A\VES(M I Race Packages
$200 io $750
Indi' idual Tickets: $25 each
Hairpin Spin Poker Chips (10) for $25
For more information, lo reserve tickets, or to become a sponsor.
Contact Lisa CClenMano
865. 655.1442 x213
lcelentano,@sebringracevay.c orr-


'1'
Ii


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RK"^-H.V ''..'.*r -.
: .+.-:_ :: ,;.'. .. -:


--DINNER SPECIALFOR -


Treat you and that special someone with

two delicious Steak and Shrimp dinners

and two FREE slices of pie.

SATURDAY 2/12,- MONDAY 2/14






! ll i'('4 ?-I.i ;' ', ,' ,,


b010 iS 2
Sebring


863-385-3939


Villagelnn.com


Valid al participating restaurants Dine-in only on Saturday. February 12 through Monday, February 14, 2011. Not valid with other offers, promotions or disciruInts Tax and gratuity not included
Adiir_ r.Ircj:iP for 1 r:rranl
.V; s, I F ." I : 20 1 1 . i ,. I r, h I .1


1 4


mumoop,


www.newssun.col7


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