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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00896
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: February 4, 2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
sobekcm - UF00028423_00896
System ID: UF00028423:00896
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

Full Text




www.newssun





NEWS-SUINn
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927


Lady Panthers
split opener

PAGE 1 B


Friday-Saturday, February 4-5, 2011


Foreclosure
workshop set
for Feb. 12
PAGE 2A


1," - D



Mostly cloudy
High Low

79 56
Complete Forecast
PAGE 12A







Question:
Should Medicaid be
more privatized to
save tax money?

Yes

33.9%




No

66.1%


Total votes: 65
Next question: Should
state employees have
to pay to fund their
pension plan?
Make your voice heard at
www.newssun


May Paedae
Age 82, of Sebring

Thomas Taylor.
Age 83, of Lake Placid
Obituaries, Page 5A

Classifieds 9A
Community Briefs 2A
Community Calendar 7B
Dear Abby 11B
Editorial & Opinion 4A
Healthy Living__ 5B
Lottery Numbers 2A
Movie Reviews 11B
Religion 8B
Sports On TV 2B
Sudoku Puzzle 11B

Follow the
News-Sun on


www.twitter.com/thenewssun
and


www.facebook.com/newssun


o 90i 4I i 0III
o 9 0994 0 1001 7


Fells running for
Sebring council

PAGE 2A


www.newssun.com


Remembering
Ronald Reagan

PAGE 12B


Volume 92/Number 15 I 50 cents


Fumes cause building to be evacuated

Carbon monoxide sickens 3 employees |


By SAMANTHA GHOLAR
sgholar@newssun.com
SEBRING The Florida
Hospital Center for Wound
Healing and Hyperbaric Medicine
was evacuated a little after 11:30
a.m. on Thursday morning after
three staff members had com-
plaints of dizziness, shortness of
breath, headaches and nausea
according to Nurse Manager
Jerilyn Stamps.
Stamps was one of the members
who had become symptomatic due


to the suspicious fumes. Stamps
and the rest of the office staff were
standing in the parking lot of the
center awaiting information from
emergency management.
"It's the symptoms of carbon
monoxide," said Stamps. "The
best thing for us to do is what we
are doing get fresh oxygen."
Stamps reported that there was
no odor, but a vague haze along
with gas-like fumes could be seen.
See BUILDING, page 7A


-', :- "v'MV -.
News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Highlands County Hazmat responds to the Florida Hospital Wound Care Center
on Thursday morning to investigate suspicious fumes employees noticed through-
out the building.


Flu season flaring up


Outbreak is

'widespread'
By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
SEBRING The flu season is under
way, and local officials are already see-
ing a rise in those treated for symptoms
this year.
"The season has started earlier than
last year, and the numbers are up
around the state," said Leona
Braithwaite, epidemiologist for the
Highlands County Health Department.
Flu levels for Highlands County have
been upgraded to "widespread" accord-
ing to Braithwaite, which means higher
than normal activity has been noticed at
more than one monitoring location.
"Even though we think we are more
than halfway through this season, I still
recommend getting a flu shot,"
Braithwaite added.
Braithwaite did note that in addition
to the regular influenza A or H3 virus
that is common, there are still some
notices of 2009 HIN1, or "swine flu,"
being reported.
"There are some reports of H1N1
from the labs, but nothing out of the
ordinary so far this year," Braithwaite
said.
The 2009 H1N1 pandemic accounted
for 230 deaths in Florida.:
The CDC reports that the flu puts
about 200,000 people in the hospital
each year, and more than 36,000 people
in the United States die because of
complications from the flu most are
65 or older.
More people die 'from flu than from
any other vaccine-preventable disease.
Flu seasons are unpredictable in a
number of ways. Although epidemics of
flu happen every year, the timing,
severity, and length of the epidemic
depends on many factors, including
what influenza viruses are spreading
and whether they match the viruses in
the vaccine.
The difference between a cold and
the flu is usually noticable. In adults, if
you have a fever and body aches along
with exhaustion, you most likely have
the flu. Runny noses, sore throats and
mild coughs are common in both the
cold and the flu.


Metro services
County health officials say the flu season started early this year.
'


Tips to prevent the flu
* Wash your hands often with
soap and water
* Keep your hands away from
your face
* Avoid contact with sick people
* Stay home if you are sick
* Cover your mouth and nose
with a tissue when sneezing and
coughing
* You can still spread germs up
to seven days after getting sick

What to do if you get it
Follow these simple steps if you
do get the flu to feel better faster.
* Drink plenty of fluids


* Get plenty of rest
* Sleep and take it easy
+ Take acetaminophen (such as
Tylenol) or ibuprofen (such as
Advil or Motrin) to relieve your
fever and aches
* Over-the-counter cold or
cough medicines may also relieve
some flu symptoms, check with
your doctor
* Do not take aspirin products
without approval from your
physician
* Consider layered apparel for
body temperature changes
+ Wash your hands frequently
+ Don't share cups and eating
utensils


Council upset

Majestic Cove

condos being

used as resort
By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
christopher.tuffley@newssun.com
SEBRING Tuesday night's reg-
ular city council meeting started
with fireworks as council member
John Griffin angrily raised concerns
about Majestic Cove, the new con-
dominium complex at 2351
Lakeshore Drive.
Griffirl said several local hotel
owners got in touch with him during
the week, complaining that Majestic
Cove is operating
as a resort condo-
minium and host-
ing daily guests,
taking business
away from them.
The city had
provided a permit
to the developer,
Arthur Marrero 'This is
of Oakwood pretty
Valley Homes in blatant.
Davie, only
allowing for the They
construction of a violated the
residential con- development
dominium.
However, at agreement.
least one Web
site is currently MARGIE
marketing Majes- RHOADES
tic Cove as a council
resort, advertis- member
ing 69 guest
rooms, which also happens to be the
same number of apartments original-
ly for sale.
Council member Margie Rhoades
is even more upset than Griffin.
City staff contacted the developer
in June, after the developer's new
marketing campaign came to their
attention.
According to City Attorney
Robert Swaine, the developer never
responded in writing to the city's
first letter.
During a follow-up phone call, "A
staffer (of the developer) said it was
just a resident's idea that it's not

See MAJESTIC, page 7A


SElwell finds $88K in useless purchase orders


Elwell


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
SEBRING At the prompt-
ing of County Commissioner
Don Elwell, county staff found
more than $88.000 in unneces-
sary purchase orders that were
closed and rolled back into the
general fund.
Bemis Gainer, director of the
county's Office of Management


and Budget, informed the com-
mission at its meeting Tuesday
that his review of open pur-
chase orders revealed several
that needed to be closed.
"Routinely, the purchase
orders that are rolled over from
fiscal year to fiscal year, are
presented via budget amend-
ment to be re-appropriated
from the prior fiscal year to the


current fiscal year. At the
board's request, the budget
office examined each and every
one of those purchase orders
and made a determination
whether or not they could be
closed or remain open," Gainer
explained to the commission-
ers.
After the review, Gainer fur-
ther explained that his office


determined that several of the
open purchase orders were no
longer needed and could be
closed.
Gainer stated that his review
found 81 items that amounted
to about 2 percent of the overall
open purchase orders.
"The amounts varied from

See ELWELL, page 8A


. - .


F ''.,: :, -:- -- ....,.,.









:Page 2A


News-Sun Friday, February 4. 2011


www.newssun.corn


Fells a fifth-generation Sebring native


* Editor's Note:With early voting set to
begin Monday, Feb. 21, and election day
itself set for March 8, the News-Sun
begins a series of interviews with the
candidates running for Sebring City
Council. Three of the five council mem-
ber seats are in contention. All three sit-
ting council members are seeking re-
election John Clark, Margie Rhoades
and Bud Whitlock. Andrew Fells is run-
ning for the council for the first time. The
top three vote getters win the seats.

By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
christopher.tuffley@newssun.com
SEBRING Andrew Fells looks
young. If he tried to buy a beer, he would
be carded.
He is actually 24 years old, however,
and been married to his wife Julie for two
years.
He graduated from Sebring High
School in 2005, and the University of
Florida in 2009. He now manages
Glisson's Animal Supply and serves on
the city's code enforcement board.
When asked why he chose this election
to run, Fells said, "There's never as good
a time as now. The longer you wait, the
more likely you are to not do something."
While Fells emphasized he is not run-
ning against anyone specific, he did think
fresh blood is a good idea.
"New candidates help bring new plans,
ideas and perspectives," he said. "New
people are a very good thing for govern-
ment."
Fells said he grew up in a politically
active household with deep roots in
Highlands County.


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Fifth generation Sebring native Andrew Fells is running for city council for the
first time. A 2009 University of Florida graduate, Fells currently manages
Glisson Animal Supply in Sebring.


His father, Charlie Cullins, was the
first county administrator and his great,
great grandfather, William Cason, was
hired by George Sebring in 1911 to clear
what is now Circle Park.
Being part of a family living here since
Sebring was founded, Fells said he has a
strong desire to give back to the commu-
nity which raised him.
He said he grew iup in the world of
agriculture and had the advantage of an
entire woods to play in freely.
It also meant he was a member of FFA
for years, making him an expert in parlia-


mentary procedure.
"I cannot tell you how often I'm sitting
in a meeting thinking, 'You can't do
that,'" he said, smiling ruefully.
In describing his philosophical point
of view, Fells said, "We have to go out of
our way for the.citizen, not make the cit-
izen go out of their way. Fees and taxes
have to be set at a rate that is justified,
and put io good use, with as little waste
as possible.
"When I am elected I have every inten-

See FELLS, page 7A


EHEAP funds
available
SEBRING Nu-Hope
Elder Care Services Inc.
announces availability of
funds for assistance through
the Emergency Home Energy
Assistance for the Elderly
Program. Through EHEAP,
an applicant may receive
assistance with paying past
due energy bills, obtaining
adequate cooling or heating
equipment or resolving other
cooling-related energy crisis.
To qualify for this pro-
gram, the household must:
Contain a person aged
60 years of age or older. ,,
Be responsible'for pay-
ing their cooling/heating
costs.
Have an income not
exceeding 150 percent of the
federal poverty guidelines.
Have a past due power
bill or lack of access to an
adequate means of heating or
cooling.
For assistance, contact
Nu-Hope Elder Care
Services Inc. at 382-2134 for
an appointment. Applicants
must bring a copy of their


past due power bill, identifi-
cation and proof of income
for all household members to
their appointment.

Sen. Harry Douglas
to visit Sebring
SEBRING Senator
Harry Douglas, who has
built his career on uncom-
promising morality and
strong family values, will be
visiting Sebring March 2-4.
It is rumoured that Douglas
will be a candidate for
President in the next election
and local residents will want
S.to hear what he has to say.
He will be appearing at the
Tanglewood Clubhouse at 7
p.m. each of the three nights,
accompanied by some of his
closest associates.
The Tanglewood Actors
Guild is proud to present the
hilarious comedy, "The
Sensuous Senator", by
Michael Walker, featuring
Senator Harry Douglas and
Congressmen Jack Maguire
and Clyde Salt.
Tickets are $10 and will
be available at the
Tanglewood clubhouse (a


half mile north of the
'Sebring Walmart) on
Monday from 9:30-10 a.m.
and Thursdays from 3-4 p.m.
starting Monday.
Dessert will be provided
at intermission each night
compliments of Heartland
National Bank, Florida
Hospital, Heartland Division
and Edward Jones/Alan J.
Holmes. '

Lion's annual veggie
sale is this weekend
LAKE PLACID On
Saturday and Sunday, the
Lake Placid Lion' sClub will
again open its annual "Farm
Fresh Vegetable Booth" at
the Country Fair in Lake
Placid. This year the booth
will be at the corner of the
Lake Placid Circle and
Green Dragon Drive (in
front of the Lake Placid
High School). The booth
will be set up from 8 a.m. to
4 p.m.
As usual, all funds raised
will be used to help the visu-
al and hearing impaired here
in Highlands County. The
group is always looking for


Foreclosure prevention workshop

reaches Highlands County


By SAMANTHA GHOLAR
sgholar@newssun.comn
SEBRING Florida Chief
Financial Advisor Jeff
Atwater and the Florida
Department of Financial
Services invites the
Highlands County communi-
ty to a Foreclosure
Prevention Workshop.
The workshop is sponsored
by the Highlands County
government and will be held
on Saturday, Feb.12 at
Church of the Nazarene of
Sebring, 420 S. Pine St.
Terry Cerullo, community
outreach coordinator,
explained the mission behind
the Florida Housing Help
Workshop is to educate fami-
lies on options regarding
foreclosure.
The Florida Housing work-
shop has taken place recently
in Manatee County, however
with the persistence of
Highlands County residents
the workshop has been
brought to this community.
More than 100 workshops
in the last two years have
helped countless families
from losing their homes.
Cerullo is confident that the
workshops will continue to
provide prevention and
options for many more fami-
lies.
"Lenders will be on site to
meet their home mortgage


borrowers Bank of America,
Chase, which included
Washington Mutual, Sun
Trust, GMAC, US Bank and
Freddie Mac. There will be
nonprofit U.S. HUD
approved housing counselors
there to help others. The U.S.
IRS will also be on site,"
Cerullo said.
Families are advised to
bring the following items to
the workshop: recent
paystubs and bank statement,
driver license/picture ID and


Social Security card, tax
returns and W-2 forms, hard-
ship letter (explanation of
delinquency of mortgage
payments or gaps in employ-
ment), property tax bill and
homeowner's insurance,
household expenses docu-
mentation, and last mortgage
statement.
The workshop will provide
free opportunities to meet
with lenders, counselors,
legal assistance and credit
services.


DO YOU HATE YOUR
LOWER DENTURE?


a If you have a Lower Denture
S '; and are having difficulties
:-. trying to master its use, Dental
Implants may be the answer to
your problem. A Dental Implant supported Denture snaps
into place and stays in place during the normal chewing
cycle, minimizes the resorption of the Lower Jaw, and
allows you to sit down and enjoy a meal without having to
struggle. We are here to help you with your Dental Implant
needs. We place them and restore them. For more
information, visit www.designerdentallp.com, then click
on "Dental Implants", then call for your complimentary
Dental Implant consultation. (D0140, D0330)

Yours for a healthier life,
Dr. Oliver "Chip" Kinnunen, DN14875


eager new members who are
willing to help with this
very worthy cause.
The club meets every sec-
ond and fourth Tuesday at
Heron's Garden Restaurant,
across from Publix in Lake
Placid. For more informa-
tion, or to help the Lions in
any way call 699-0743 or
441-1207.

Commodities to be
distributed
SEBRING February
2011 Commodities will be
distributed from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursday and Friday,
Feb. 10-11 at The Salvation
Army, 3135 Kenilworth
Blvd., Sebring. (An error
was made on the handout
given last month).
If you don't have a 2011
Commodities card, register
in the office and receive
commodities to take with
you.
Call the commodities hot-
line at 385-7548.

Continued on page 5A


OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870
OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday
PHONE: 863-385-6155
MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954
NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453

CIRCULATION
SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do noi
receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation
department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before
11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to
you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their
account. Please call 385-6155.


POLICE BLOTTER


The News-Sun would like
to remind the readers that
the names listed below
reflect those who have been
charged with a crime, but
they are all innocent until
proven guilty by a court of
law. If anyone listed here is
acquitted or has charges
dropped, they can bring in
proof of such decision or
mail a copy to the paper and
the News-Sun will be happy
to report that information.
The News-Sun is at 2227
U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL
33870.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on Wednesday,
Feb. 2:
* Victor Sanchez Diaz, 22,
of Avon Park, was charged
with operating a motor vehi-
cle without a valid license.
* Oscar Damian Gonzalez,
19, of Lake Placid, was
arrested on three out-of-
county warrants reference
failure to appear no valid
driver license, failure to
appear DUI, and failure to
appear no. registration certi-
fication.
* Iva Dayhira Guardado,
44, of Lake Placid, was
charged with operating a
motor vehicle without a
valid driver license.
* Matthew Eugene Haas,
34, of New Port Richey, was
charged with two counts of
contempt of court reference
failed to pay child support.
* Terry Lee Jones, 39, of
Avon Park, was charged
with two counts of violation
of probation reference pos-
session of drug parapherna-
lia and possession of
cannabis.
* Gipson Lapointe, 24, of
Avon Park, was charged
with assault of an
officer/firefighter/EMT, etc.,
use two-way device to facil-
itate felony, and harassing
communication.
* Tony Glen McMillan, 39,
of Sebring, was charged
with violation of probation
reference refusal to submit
to BAL test as required.
* Jesus Nolasco, 30, of
Avon park, was charged
with criminal mischief :' "
* Jason Thomas Phillips,
34, of Palmetto, was
charged with driving while
license suspended.
* Shayna Anna Reasebeck,
20, of Lake Placid, was
charged with possession of_
a controlled substance with-
out a prescription, posses-
sion of a harmful new leg-
end drug without a prescrip-


tion, and possession and or
use of drug equipment.
* Claudio Zachary Sadens,
23, of Lakeland, was
charged with two counts of
violation of probation refer-
ence burglary of an unoccu-
pied structure.
* Jerry Lee Sullivan, 38, of
Lake Placid, was charged
with simple assault and bat-
tery.
* Galyn Oakley Turnbull,
24, of Sebring, was charged
with resisting an officer with
violence and battery on an
officer/firefighter/EMT, etc.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on Tuesday, Feb.
1:
Donald James Busch, 42, of
Lake Placid, was charged
with battery.
* Deshone Shanny
Coleman, 44, of Lake Placid,
was charged with violation
of probation reference petit
theft.
* Jared Joseph Delsignore,
23, of Sebring, was charged
with possession of marijua-
na.
* Shari Lynn Dobrick, 50,
of Sebring, was charged
with trespassing, burglary
of an unoccupied dwelling,
and criminal mischief.
* James William Etheridge,
19, of Avon Park, was
charged with fraud-imper-
sonate/false identification to
a secondhand dealer, deal-
ing in stolen property and
resisting an officer without
violence.
* Frank Laws, 31, of
Sebring, was charged with
possession of cocaine with
intent to sell/manufacture/
deliver, and possession of
marijuana with intent to
sell/manufacture/deliver.
* Cheryl Lynn Porter, 54,
of Lake Placid, was charged
with battery.
* Felix Garcia Silva, 39, of
Sebring, was charged with
burglary of an unoccupied
structure.
* Joseph Glenn Stone, 29,
of Sebring, was charged
with kidnap false imprison-
ment of an adult, battery
and battery on an
officer/firefighter/EMT.
* Marquell Daishawn
Williams, 19, of Sebring,
was charged with failure to
appear reference no valid
driver license.
* Christopher Clay Wyche,
45, of Lake .Placid, was
charged with criminal mis-
chief, trespassing and larce-
ny.


POSTMASTER: Send address change to:
News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870
USPS ISSN 0163-3988
Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL
and additional entry offices)


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
HOME DELIVERY
IN FLORIDA MAIL
OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL


12 mo.
$60.46
92.23
105.99


7% FL tax
S4.23
6.46


Total
S64.69
98.69
105.99


Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on
Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.
Romona Washington Publisher and Executive Editor
863-385-6155, ext. 515


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NEWS-SUN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927

Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, Florida 33870
A Harbor Point Media Company








www.newssun.com


Nevws-Sun Friday. February 4, 2011


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MARTIN GUITARS
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PEN SETS


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SILVER FLATWARE
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TIFFANY ITEMS
TOYS- ANTIQUE
TOY TRAINS ANTIQUE
VANCLEEF -ARPELS
WATCHES GOLD
BROKEN


4

S..


WANTED Oriental Art
Bronze Sculptures
Clocks. Paintings &
Prints. Porcelain
Furniture Arts &
Crafts. Lladro
Lalique. Hummels
Stamps & much more!


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NEW USED BROKEN
SALL TYPES OF JEWELRY


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Page 3A


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Page 4A


EDITORIAL & OPINION


News-Sun Friday. February 4. 2011


TODAY'S EDITORIAL


Digital books the future for schools


There are two basic ways to deal with major change -
resist it, or go with the flow. Regarding the Florida State
Board of Education's proposal to transfer over to digital
textbooks by 2014, we strongly feel The School Board of
Highlands County should go with the flow.


We feel this, even though a
few individuals among us
treasure books and will
always live surrounded by
them.
For some of us, books will
always be living things,
something to hold, with
pages to turn.
But, we live in a new
world, a place of rapid move-
.ment, changing facts, and
multiple obligations. Sadly,
the time has come to go with
the flow and let go at least
in the classroom of books.
It just simply makes too
much sense to switch over to
e-books tools capable of


containing digital texts for
many subjects.
For one thing, elementary
student backpacks become
heavier every year, and high
school students already stag-
ger under their loads.
And while we joke about
how much more students
have to learn today more
complicated sciences, for
example, and more years of
history to understand it is
true. Students have to read
more material than students a
generation ago did.
And e-books will make it
less expensive than ever
before; many of the classics


on reading lists, for example,
can be downloaded for free.
In addition, e-books have
the potential for other broad,
interactive uses in the class-
room.
Most important, students
gain access to books they
never would have before.
Finally, being electronic,
and therefore intriguing,
young people might become
more interested in reading,
and learning.
There are, however some
questions that need to be
answered.
The first and foremost of
which is how students will


acquire an e-book in the first
place and who pays for the
material downloaded?
Would adopting the use of
e-books affect the way text
books are chosen?
Would all fifth-grade
teachers in a district, for
example, continue to use the
same textbook if other
textbooks are easily available
from elsewhere?
Think about it. Producing
textbooks not the text part,
but the bound paper, printed
words and color illustrations
part -is a cumbersome,
expensive business.
If authors submit work
electronically, however, and
their finished work is distrib-
uted. electronically, why
shouldn't classroom teachers
themselves gain the freedom
to choose which digital text-
books to use?
Like with so many new


www.newssun.corn


NEWSROOM
ROMONA WASHINGTON
Publisher/Executive Editor
Ext. 515
editor@newssun. corn


SCOTT DRESSEL
Editor
Ext. 516
scott. dressel@newssun. corn
DAN HOEHNE
Sports Editor
Ext. 528
danietl.hoehne@newssun.com


ideas and inventions, there
are often unintended conse-
quences concerning issues no
one foresaw, or could fore-
see.
The transition will be an
expensive one, but well
worth the investment and
effort as long as we do our
homework and base our deci-


ADVERTISING
VICKIE JONES
Ext. 518
vickie.jones@newssun.com
CIRCULATION
TONY MCCOWAN
Ext 522
anthny. mccmoan@newssun.com
PRE-PRESS
KEN BAREFIELD
Production Coordinator
Ext. 594
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BUSINESS OFFICE
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Ext. 596
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sions on thoughtful research
as opposed to over-excit-
ment.
A new world is dawning.
By going with the flow and
providing e-books in the
classroom, we make it easier
for our students to dive into
the river of knowledge and
swim.


CAGLECARTOONS.COM


TODAY'S LETTERS


;Why pay a fee to park on
-public property?
-Editor:
The wife and I attended the
opening day of the U.S. Sport
Aviation Expo. I had attended four
of the preceding shows and still
cannot understand why people pay
good money to get into an area to
look at airplanes. To me it is like
Walmart charging a parking fee
and an entrance fee to get into their
store to shop. However, it is an
opportunity to see all the latest in
lightsport aircraft. If you are an
aviation buff like me you will for-
sake the slots for one trip and pay
the price and go to the show and
drool over the exhibits.
We saw the descendants of the
first airplane that I ever soloed, the
J-3 Cub. It has come a long way
baby. They, the new manufacturer,
not Piper, have added many new
features to the ship. One outfit has
put in a much larger engine, put on
bigger wheels and made a wonder-
ful bush plane of the old cub;
course the price went up with the
improvements.
I got to see the German Storck, a
plane that was used in the war by
the Nazis. Brought back memories.
The last one that I saw was in a
junk pile on a field in North Africa
during one of my trips there. There
were some wierdos and some beau-
tiful items but none of them that I
could even afford the down pay-
ment on. That accounts for the
aforementioned drooling.
After attending the first expo
years ago, I wrote a letter to the
editor saying that I didn't think the
show would get off the ground. In
subsequent years I have been
forced to eat my words. The show
has gotten to be one of the ones to
see.
I don't know if the exhibitors at
the show sold any planes or prod-
ucts but they got their names and
products before the eyes of a lot of
people. The company's buying
space here got a week in the


Florida sunshine and a big wad to
charge off to advertising and pro-
motion on their income taxes. The
local businesses, hotels, restau-
rants, gas stations and the like gar-
nered business from the expo.
To my mind, the price you pay,
$5, to park your car in an area that
you are paying taxes to keep up
and then another $10 to get into
the exhibits in another area your
taxes cover is kind of galling. But I
guess that is the way of things, so I
pay up but I won't shut up.
Woodie Jackson
Sebring

Self serving must stop
Editor:
An open letter to Governor
Scott. I am composing this letter so
that you may consider to join in
the fight with 38 states to repeal
laws that the Congress has made
against the citizens of these United
States. For too long we have been
too complacent about the workings
of Congress. Many do not know
that members of Congress could
retire with the same pay after only
one term. They specifically
exempted themselves from many of
the laws they have passed (such as
being exempt from any fear of
prosecution for sexual harassment),
while citizens must live under
those laws. The latest is to exempt
themselves from the Healthcare
Reform, in all of its forms. That
does not seem logical.
We do not have an elite that is
above the law. I truly don't care if
Democrat, Republican,
Independent or what ever. The self
serving must stop. The staffers of
Congress Family members are
exempt from having to pay back
student loans. I ask that you and
your staff take a stand with us all,
to stop and to repeal these laws.
Proposed 28th Amendment to the
United States of America
Constitution: "Congress shall make
no law that applies to the citizens
of the United States that does not
equally apply to the senators


and/or representatives, and,
Congress shall make no law that
applies to the senators and/or rep-
resentatives that does not apply
equally to the citizens of the
United States."
Thank you for your input.
Note: $123 million was sent out
by the IRS to prisoners for false
tax claims while in prison. Where
and when does it stop?
C.F. Neeley
Lake Placid

Problems created by
mankind can only be
solved by mankind
Editor:
To Billie Jewett and all of you
that believe Jesus Christ or
Mohammed or God or some other
Supernatural Being will solve
everything if only we'd all pray. It
"ain't gonna" (sic) happen. Where
is your common sense and reason-
able, I don't say educated, but


rational thinking? The problems in
the world today were and are creat-
ed by mankind and only mankind
can solve them.
I also find it amazing that all
you want to do is return all the ille-
gals to their homelands. How can
we send back 12 million or howev-
er many? Just think. Just the trans-
portation or logistics would be
astronomical problems, let alone
the legal issues and/or, for people
like you (I would hope but doubt),
the Christian or Judaic concerns,
etc. Who would cut grass, pick
oranges, clean sewers and do all
the jobs Americans and Christians
like you have and will refuse to
do? And, of yes, forget about
"their" children born in America.
Why not have a "modest proposal"
solution for all of them?
Who were your parents or theirs
or theirs? I assume they must have
been American Indians or all of
them came here legally and not


ever, not one of them, came here
without permission although grant-
ed the opportunities that that Lady
in the New York Harbor addresses.
I agree that everyone who comes
here should come legally but, as a
Christian and an American who
believes in the meaning of
America, I can't understand how
you can just say "get rid of those"
people.
I apologize if I have offended
you but lately all I hear is that
Jesus is the solution (or the only
way) and to."get ride of those ille-
gals." Neither will happen so
stop pleading about something you
know little or nothing about (in
depth) and pray that God or Jesus
lets you win the lottery, which is
more realistic than that either
"One" will solve any earthly prob-
lems.
Paul D. Molle'
Sebring


NEWS-SUN
Hghld Comty 's Honcown Ncwspap Since 1927
2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155


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www.newssun.com


News-Sun Friday. February 4. 2011


Page 5A


Grant helps Poly professor improve early childhood education


Special to the News-Sun
LAKELAND "When you
put a face on the issue and
get out of the ivory tower,
that's when you can really
make a difference," says Dr.
Smita Mathur.
Thanks to the Helios
Education Foundation and
the Redlands Christian
Migrant Association
(RCMA), Mathur now has a
$1.2 million budget with
which to make a difference in
early childhood education in
Florida's migrant and low
income communities.
An assistant professor in
the Division of Education at
the University of South
Florida Polytechnic, Mathur
specializes in early childhood
learning and has conducted
extensive research in
Florida's migrant communi-
ties. She also serves on the


board of RCMA.
which provides child
care and early educa-
tion for children of
migrant farm work-
ers and rural.' low-
income families in --
counties in Florida. Mai
including Highlands.
Mathur developed a
teacher training program
called Scaffold the Scholar,
for which she helped secure a
$771,000 grant from the
Helios Education
Foundation. The total project
budget will exceed $1.2 mil-
lion thanks to in-kind support
from RCMA. Dr. Rebecca
Burns, an assistant professor
of ESOL (English for speak-
ers of other languages), USF
Sarasota-Manatee, is co-prin-
cipal investigator on this
project. That collaboration is
one of the benefits of USF


th


Poly and USF
Sarasota-Manatee
being part of the USF
system.
"'Creating highly-
effective early learn-
ing environments for
bur children ages birth to
five means surround-
ing those children with high-
quality teachers." said Helios
Education Foundation's vice
president and director of
Early Childhood Education.
Karen Ortiz. "And, that is
what's so promising about
our partnership with USF
Polytechnic and the Redlands
Christian Migrant
Association. We're reaching
teachers, most for whom
English is not their primary
language, in rural areas and
helping them earn their cre-
dentials and degrees in early
childhood education. Those


COMMUNITY BRIEFS


Continued from page 2A

Museum of the Arts
honors Black History
Month
SEBRING The
Highlands Museum of the
Arts will honor Black
History Month with a special
exhibit featuring the work of
Owen Jolly, Sharon Hardy,
and the late Clem Gouveia
represented by Essie
Gouveia.
In addition, a private col-
lection of art and artifacts
owned by Betty Ford Smith
will be on exhibit as well.
The exhibit will run from
Feb. 4-28. A reception will
be held from 5-7 p.m. today,
opening the exhibit.
Admission to the public is
free.
Call 385-6682 for addi-
tional information.

SpitFire Band
performs Saturday
SEBRING The SpitFire
Band will play at Duffer's
Sports Grille from 9 p.m. to
1 a.m. Saturday.
The four-piece band plays
a variety of rock, blues and
'Top 40 hits that keep every-
one dancing. There is no
cover charge.
Lee'Allcorn, Dave
McDonald and Tayler
Allcorn will be at playing
from 6-9 p.m. today during
dinner hour. They play a
variety of country and origi-
nal music. Billy "Griff"
Griffis will be doing karaoke
and dance music from 9 p.m.
to 1 a.m. later that evening.
All musical entertainment is
free.
Duffer's is at 6940 U.S.
27 North, Sebring. Call 382-
6339 for details.

Illinois Day planned
SEBRING The annual
gathering of Illinois resi-
dents, former and current,
will be held Saturday, Feb.
12 at Homer's Buffet.
Registration and fellowship
begins at 11 a.m. Lunch is at
noon, followed by activities,
games and door prizes.
Come join the fun and the
opportunity to meet new
friends or renew old friend-
ships.
RSVP or for more infor-
mation, call 314-0176 or
(217) 791-2136.

Auxiliary plans
Valentine's dance
LAKE PLACID The
Ameri.can Legion Auxiliary,
Lake Placid, will be cele-
brating Valentine's Day with
a dinner/dance on Sunday,
Feb. 13. Social hour is from
3-4 p.m.; followed by dinner
at 4 p.m., which includes
one-quarter baked chicken.
baked potato, vegetable and
fruit.
Purchase your tickets by
Wednesday, Feb. 9 for $8.
After Feb. 9, tickets will be
$10 until sold out.
Music to follow dinner by
Steve and Peggy. If you
want to listen and dance to
music only (no dinner), the
cost is $5.
For more information, all
475-0975.


Racing 4 Rights
plans garage sale
AVON PARK Racing 4
Rights, The Troy Bostick
Foundation is planning a
garage sale and is looking
for donations. Give the
organization a call and
they'll pick up donations.
Items need to be picked
up no later than March 4 for
the March 12 garage sale.
To schedule a pick up or for
more information call 873-
1548.

Events planned at
lodges, posts
AVON PARK
The American Legion Post
69 will host karaoke by
BilDi today. Call for time.
Auxiliary Poppy Day will be
Saturday and members will
be at Bill Jarrett Ford. For
details and menu selection,
call 453-4553.
LAKE PLACID
The Lake Placid Moose
Lodge 2374 will host music
with Larry Musgrave from
6-10 p.m. today. Bingo-
bango is set for 2 p.m.
Saturday with music by Big
Freddie set for 6-10 p.m. For
details and menu selection,
call 465-0131.
The VFW 3880 will host
Texas Hold-em at 1 p.m.
today. Music with Mike
Claxton will take place later
in the evening. Bingo is set
for 2 p.m. Saturday with
early bird at 1:30 p.m. For
details and menu selection,
call 699-5444.

Highlands Social
Dance Club hosts
Golden Era Big Band
SEBRING The
Highlands Social Dance
Club hosts Big Band ball-
room dancing from 7-9:30
p.m. Friday at 3400 Sebring
Parkway (former Lion's club
house).
Dance the night away to
waltzes, cha-chas, foxtrots,
rumbas, jitterbug and other
favorites to the 16-piece
Golden Era Big Band.
Admission is $5 for mem-
bers and $7 for non-mem-
bers. Appropriate dress
required.
I The snack bar opens at 6
p.m.
For more information, call
385-6671.

Woman's Club
accepts flea market
donations
SEBRING The GFWC


Woman's Club of Sebring,
4260 Lakeview Drive, is
accepting donations from 9-
11 a.m. Friday through
Saturday, and again from 9-
11 a.m. Friday, Feb. 11 for a
flea market set for Friday
and Saturday, March 4-5.
Call 382-0706 for additional
details.

Square Dance set at
Buttonwood Bay
SEBRING There will be
a square dance from 7;30-
9:30 p.m. today with early
rounds at 7 p.m. Carl
Brewer will be the caller.
All levels of square dancing
will be called.
For information call
Roger McElfresh, 655-4243

Southern Indiana
annual gathering set
SEBRING Many
Indiana people plant them-
selves in Florida for the
winter months. Often called
snowbirds, the name really
doesn't bother them, as they
are basking on the sunny
beaches while Indiana is
blanketed in snow.
The annual gathering for
lunch and fellowship will be
at 11 a.m. Saturday at
Homer's Restaurant. The
group will meet and have
fellowship before and after
the' noon meal. Drawings
will be made for prizes and
hopefully many new stories
and jokes will be shared this
year.
Pay at the door, be direct-
ed to the correct room and a
collection will be made for
the waitress' tip. No reserva-
tions are required.
Any questions, call (812)
686-0542.

Sebring Village
plans Trash,
Treasure Sale
SEBRING Sebring
Village will host a Trash and
Treasure Sale at 4343
Schumacher Road (one mile
west of Walmart) from 7:30-
11:30 p.m. Saturday in the
Clubhouse. Coffee and
doughnuts will also be for
sale.

Second Blessings
Garage Sale is
Saturday
AVON PARK First
United Methodist Church of
Avon Park's Second
Blessings garage sale is from
8:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday at
200 S. Lake Ave.


same teachers will also
acquire the kinds of knowl-
edge and skills they need to
better prepare children to
succeed during their kinder-
garten year. We're really
excited about that."
"USF has stepped outside
the box in this grant." said
Barbara Mainster. RCMA's
executive director. "They've
recognized that education has
to adapt to meet demographic
changes and respect students'
contributions. And the Helios
Education Foundation has
recognized that such innova-
tions need to be funded.
We're excited and pleased."
RCMA operates 80 child-
care centers in farm commu-
nities, targeting the rural
poor. RCMA recruits its
teachers from the fields to
insure they can relate to cul-
tures of the families they will
be serving. More than 80
percent of RCMA teach-
ers are from Hispanic
immigrant-farmworker
families.
According to Mathur,
"RCMA teachers under-
stand migrant children,
the culture and lifestyle,
but they often need help
with Eriglish language
acquisition and literacy.
Scaffold the Scholar pro-
vides those missing ingre-


Florida AG se

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida Attorney General
Pam Bondi is seeking
tougher penalties as part of
a four-pronged attack on
"pill mills" that supply pre-
scription medications to
drug dealers and addicts.
Bondi on Thursday also
announced Gov. Rick Scott
has signed off on new rules
designed to crack down on
pill mill doctors. But they
are still awaiting approval

Death notice
Thomas Elton Taylor,
83, of Lake Placid died
Feb. 2,2011.
Stephenson-Nelson
Funeral Home, Sebring,
is in charge of arrange-
ments.


dients."
New teachers at RCMA
immediately acquire a future
of education, some required
and more encouraged. By the
time they pursue college
degrees. many have achieved
GEDs and literacy in two lan-
guages all while working as
preschool teachers.
Starting April 1, 108
RCMA teachers will begin
the 40-week Scaffold the
Scholar program, which will
run parallel to credit-bearing
education courses at USF
Poly. Objectives include pro-
moting language and literacy,
ensuring college success, and
enhancing self-esteem and
personal empowerment.
Students meet literacy
experts weekly, alternating
between individual and group
sessions. The literacy expert,
academic advisor and teacher
together make an individual
plan for literacy development
and academic success.
Teachers will pay 10 percent
of their tuition in small incre-
ments. The rest is covered by
the Helios Education
Foundation grant and in-kind
support from RCMA.
"The initiative is strength-
based, evidence-based and
culturally responsive," says
Mathur. "All courses feature
hands-on applied learning,


which aligns with the poly-
technic vision. That vision
also aligns with a need in the
community. I learned what
these teachers needed and
developed a program around
those needs."
While Scaffold the Scholar
will benefit teachers. Mathur
says it also has direct and
positive academic and social
outcomes for preschool aged
children and their families.
"The first five years of a
child's life are key to later
success.. That's when the
brain develops the most. If
you make a difference now it
will carry them forward. A
qualified teacher who is also
culturally competent can
meet the children's academic,
social and emotional needs
and create a pathway to
school readiness."
Founded in 1965, RCMA
serves 8,000 children. With a
$61 million budget, it's th'e
largest nonprofit early-child-
hood organization in Floridai.
Mathur received her MA in
child development from
Sophia College, Rajasthan
University, India and her
PhD from Syracuse
University. In 2007 she
received USFP's inaugural
Outstanding Faculty Award.
She lives in Lakeland.


;eks more pill mill legislationi

from the Legislature, which includes more aggressive
isn't expected to act for at administrative enforcement
least another month, and criminal prosecutions
Besides additional legis- under existing laws anp
lation, Bondi's initiative long-term prevention efforts'


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MARY M. PAEDAE

Mary M. Paedae, 82, of Sebring, died, Tuesday,
.? February 1, 2011, after a lengthy illness. Mary'
was born in Sebring, FL and was owner of,
Hobby Hill Florist, working together with her;
family for over 35 years. Mary's great love, Bill
Paedae, her husband of 49 years and best,
friend, preceded her in death in 2003. She was,
.. a fearless warrior in his battle with cancer and
"- -- remained positive -and strong in her own.
c 'kfreL battle. She loved her husband, children and'
, ^ family and tirelessly helped them.
An artist, she was a floral designer, drew, painted and sewed; and loved to dance with Bill. She was a
former Girl Scout Troop Leader and former member of the Salvation Army Board. She once sewed 22
dresses for less fortunate children for Easter, lovingly stitched by hand, adding gloves and socks so
they would have the perfect Easter outfit.
Mary was preceded in death by her parents, husband and brother, James H. Wyandt. She will always
be loved and missed by her children and their spouses, Catherine A. McLeod, Tampa, FL, Ladonna,
(Hector) Paedae-Rodriguez and William H. (Maggie) Paedae, all of Sebring; brother, Stanley (Barbara)'
Wyandt, Seffner, FL; sisters-in-law, Lazette Paedae, Brooksville, FL; Loretta Wyandt, Oldsmar, FL,
Juanita, Tampa and Delores Pierce, GA; grandchildren, Warren McLeod, Jose A. Ruiz and Veronica M."
Ruiz; great grandson, Julian Ruiz; numerous nieces and nephews; special friend, Susie Carter and
Margaret Handley, all of whom she loved dearly. PeOui is now with Dear.
The family will receive friends, 5-7 pm, Friday at Morris Funeral Chapel. A mass will be celebrated,,
10:00 am, Saturday at St. Catherine Catholic Church. Memorial contributions may be made to Shriners
Cripple Childrens Hospital. Condolences may be expressed at www.morrisfuneralchapel. com.
MORRIS FUNERAL CHAPEL
Sebring, Florida 33870
863-385-0101
1


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Valentine
flower
imports
checked for
bugs, drugs
Associated Pre s
MIAMI Amid the
peak Valentine's Day
flower season, U.S.
agents are working over-
time to make sure pretty
love bouquets are not
used as transportation by
exotic South American
plant pests or cocaine
traffickers.
More than eight out of
every 10 cut flowers
imported to the U.S. dur-
ing Valentine season pass
through Miami
International Airport,
with Colombia and
Ecuador by far the largest
sources of roses, chrysan-
themums, gerbera daisies,
Peruvian lillies and
dozens of other varieties
popular every Feb. 14.
Those countries are
also sources for insects
that could wreak havoc on
American crops and gar-
dens and for cocaine
and other drugs sold on
American streets. More
than 272 million individ-
ual cut flowers passed
through the Miami airport
between Jan. 1 and Feb.
14 last year, a number
officials say is certain to
be surpassed in 2011.
"Right now is our peak
season," said Rolando
Suliveras, port director
for U.S. Customs and
Border Protection at the
Miami airport. "Our
workload has increased
tenfold."
At a chilly refrigerated
warehouse Thursday, fed-
eral agents and agricultur-
al specialists spot-
checked 'hundreds of
boxes of flowers, shaking
them down for insects and
using X-rays and other
methods.


Nevs-Sun Friday. February 4. 2011


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Members of Highlands County Emergency Operations Center try to figure out the source of
sickening fumes Thursday at the Wound Care Center in Sebring. The building, which was
under construction, was temporarily evacuated.

Building evacuated after workers

notice carbon monoxide fumes


Continued from page 1A
The office immediately con-
tacted emergency services.
About half an hour later,
Highlands County
Emergency Management
Coordinator Ben Henley con-
firmed that the fumes were
indeed carbon monoxide.
According to Henley, the
upstairs building is currently
going through some con-
struction and a normal proce-
dure caused the fumes.
"There was a gas powered
saw in use ... some metal
being cut, and the carbon
monoxide leaked from
upstairs into the office,"
Henley said.
The three staff members
were not admitted to the hos-
pital.
Stamps, along with Florida
Hospital's Director of
Marketing and Community
Relations Cathy Albritton,


'It could have
been a very
dangerous
situation'

CATHY ALBRITTON
Florida Hospital
spokesperson

were pleased that the staff as
well as the two patients that
were in the center on
Thursday were unharmed.
"It could have been a very
dangerous situation,"
explained Albritton. Stamps
continued explaining what
the nurses had to do in order
to evacuate the patients.
"The patients were 'div-
ing' like they are in a subma-
rine. They are under different
oxygen levels and to bring
them back to atmospheric


pressure takes about seven
minutes. We have to get them
safely and quickly back up
and out of the chambers,"
said Stamps.
The nursing staff are
trained for situations just as
the one that took place on
Thursday and Stamps felt
proud that the staff could
deliver.
"If we bring them up too
quickly it could be danger-
ous. We could give them the
bends, collapse a lung, it
could even be fatal," Stamps
continued. "We had a physi-
cian, Dr. Roquiz, here at their
sides when we brought them
out of the chambers to make
sure they were safe.".
The 15 staff members were
unable to re-enter the office,
but Henley cleared the neigh-
boring offices and the occu-
pants were able to return to
work.


Page 7A


Majestic Cove being

used as a resort,

council members say


Continued from page 1A
true," Swaine told the
council.
"They know already,"
Rhoades said. "This is pret-
ty blatant. They violated
the development agree-
ment."
She added that not only
had the developer furnished
all 69 apartments, there
have been no declarations
of sale. "Not one," she said.
Council member Scott
Stanley brought a different,
pragmatic perspective.
Neither he nor council pres-
ident John Clark were on
the council at the time the
development agreement
was signed, and so were
unaware of the details.
"Is it causing a problem
?" Stanley asked. There are
several new hotels open
along U. S. 27, he said, and
they may have more to do
with the drop in business at
other hotels, than Majestic


Cove itself.
He did not see the advan-
tage in pressing the devel-
oper legally, especially
because he didn't think the
city could win.
Clark, however, was
angry with the developer's
lack of response. "It galls
me," he said.
.Council decided to send
a second letter to the devel-
oper, making it clear
Majestic Cove should cease
and desist functioning as a
resort, and that the develop-
er must meet with city staff
within a week of the letter's
receipt.
By a 4-1 vote, Stanley
voting no, council agreed to
threaten the developer with
a lawsuit if he did not sit
down and talk with them by
the date specified.
There is a complicating
factor. The Majestic Cove
is in an area zoned for
hotels and motels.


Father of slain teens:

Remember how they lived


Associated Press
TEMPLE TERRACE -
The father of two slain
Tampa teenagers says he is
humbled by the support
he's received since his son
and daughter were found
fatally shot last week,
allegedly by their mother.
Army Col. Parker
Schenecker thanked those
who attended a 90-minute
"celebration of life" service
Wednesday night in honor
of his children, 13-year-old
Beau and 16-year-old
Calyx. Police have alleged
that his wife, 50-year-old
Julie Powers Schenecker,
fatally shot the pair last
week for being "mouthy."


There was no mention of
her at the service.
Parker Schenecker, who
is stationed at the head-
quarters of U.S. Central
Command at MacDill Air
Force Base in Tampa, was
in Qatar at the time of the
killings, police said.
During the service,
friends and teachers
stepped to the podium to
share memories of the
Schenecker children.
Outside, in the church
lobby, a long line formed to
write messages to the sib-
lings, whose photos were
perched on a table.
The grieving father sat in
the front row.


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Nev'.s-Sun Frida,. February 4. 2011


www.newssun.com


LP Historical Society hosts

first Hometown History Fair


Special to the Newis-S-un
LAKE PLACID -The Lake Placid
Historical Society will hold its first
Hometown History Fair from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. on Saturday. Several new displays
include one of a small collection of
Valentines from the 1920's that were found
among the museum's historical holdings.
The second new display honors the 400th
anniversary of the King James Version of the
Bible. Since the museum holds an impressive
example of an 1877 Bible from Germany that
was donated by Jay and Isabelle Ogden in
2005. Several other historically interesting
Bibles are included in the developing display.
In the next few weeks the society hopes to
add a Bible to represent each of the historical
churches in Lake Placid, then preserve the


display for the remainder of the year.
The Melvil Dewey display is also being
updated in preparation for the 85th anniver-
sary of his founding of Lake Placid in
Florida. Pictures of this famous man x ill be
posted to initiate Phase One of the Melvil
Dewey Look Alike Contest.
There will be information booths on the
front and rear verandas of the museum.
Openings are available by phoning the muse-
um and leaving a contact name and number.
Parking in the side lot of the museum will
also be allowed by donation only.
The caboose will also be open for inspec-
tion as well as the jailhouse. The museum is
at 12 Park Ave. and the phone number is 465-
1771.


Fells running for city council


Continued from page 2A
tion of looking at every
department, making sure tax
money is well spent."
Fells wants to bring curb-
side. recycling to the city. His
father, Fells said. used to own
Reliable Sanitation, so he has
some background knowledge.
He said curbside recycling
would extend the life of the
landfill, improve the environ-
ment "and in certain ways will
save money."
Regarding the main work
of the council, creating poli-
cies and rules he said, "I think
the idea of an ordinance is to
keep a safe environment.
There has to be very careful
consideration given on how to
word one."
Regarding the specific
issue of residential fencing,
he said that personal taste
should have nothing to do
with public decisions.
Regarding the economic


challenges Sebring faces,
Fells spoke to two main
issues: How to pay for recre-
ation facilities without taking
advantage of Sebring taxpay-
ers, and what to do about
police and fire fighter pen-
sions a highly charged
issue invoking sharp emotions
on all sides.
"In times where everybody
needs to tighten their belts
significantly, recreation is
usually one of the first areas
to get cut," he said, but adding
that recreation had a hidden
importance. "TV and video
games and the Internet don't
teach you about life, like play-
ing with other kids does.
Little things, like a kid meet-
ing his new best friend, 'or a
future tennis star getting their
start on a tennis court here."
Fells said several times that
he saw a learning curve in
front of him. "You can't know
every detail until you get
there," he said.


Which is why he made no
specific statements regarding
first-responder pensions.
"I have given some thought
to it," he said. "But, it's hard
to pinpoint without all the
data. I'll be looking at effi-
ciency. I want to ensure our
emergency personnel have
their retirement taken care of,
but it's not sustainable for the
city it has to looked at."
Fells said he is committed
to reaching out to citizens and
interesting young people in
the idea of government. He
pledged to make himself
available outside of council
meetings and maintain a
Facebook page.
As for encouraging busi-
nesses to relocate to
Highlands County, and espe-
cially Sebring, Fells said the
best way is to be proactive
and address issues.
"Take care of essentials,"
he said, "and business will
come."


Elwell finds useless purchase orders


Continued from page 1A
$39 upwards toward
$25,000," Gainer said.
Overall, the total amount of
the money returned to the
general fund was $88,548.88,
according to Gainer.
Gainer did not explain why
those purchase orders were
left open, but board chair-
woman Barbara Stewart
stressed that looking into the
matter will change the way.
department heads hedge their
budgets.
"I think the departments
now know that they need to be
more diligent and forthcom-
ing in their budgeting,"
Stewart said.
"Can we do this every
year," Commissioner Greg
'Harris asked.
"Absolutely," Gainer
answered.
No explanation was given
as to why the purchase order

www.newssuri.com


audit has not been done in -son.
years past, but Stewart com- "Well, Commissioner
plimented Elwell on his Elwell, you have earned your
request for it this budget sea- salary," Stewart said.







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Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927


Page 8A


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News-Sun Friday. February 4. 2011


Page 9A


ANA
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l AD RATES"


-GARAGE

SALE

s i l lI 6 lines 2 days

$1150


Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2
ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if it's the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under 3 days
the "Bargain Buys" discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is $4 A
allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating "Each," the
ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the "Open Rate" pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed under our A (additional lines $1 each)
"Bargain Buys" specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating "Free to Good Home," are allowed to be placed under
the "Bargain Buy" category. ,. .-, I ,A ,..,


Index

1000 Announcements

2000 Employment

3000 Financial

4000 Real Estate

5000 Mobile Homes

6000 Rentals

7000 Merchandise

8000 Recreation

9000 Transportation


MISCELLANEOUS
merchandise over $100
5 lines 6 pubs
1750


ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO (additional lines $3 each)


DEADLINES


Publication Place by:
Wednesday. .............. 4 p.m. Monday
Friday .................. 4 p.m. Wednesday
Sunday .................. 4 p.m. Friday
All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier.

Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor,
reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified
advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept
only standard abbreviations and required proper
punctuation.


ADJUSTMENTS

* Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since
the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the
first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified
department immediately at 385-6155.
* The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or
for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that
portion of space occupied by such error.

Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number
will be given to you. This number is very important and must be
used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled
expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL
number can be provided.


REAL ESTATE

EMPLOYMENT

TRANSPORTATION

5 lines 6 pubs

$3 50

6 lines 14 pubs

$71



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1000
Announcements


1050 Legs
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
iN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO 28-2010-CA-001006
WELLS FARGO BANK N A,
Plantiff.
vs.
DANIEL K KUIPER. et al
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO
DANIEL K KUIPER
Current Residence: 9249 Buttonhill Ct.. Littleton
CO 80130
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclo-
sure of Mortgage on the following described prop-
erty:
LOT 27, BLOCK 331, SUN 'N LAKES ESTATES OF
SEBRING UNIT 16, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 4,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS
COUNTY, FLORIDA
has been flied against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on Marshall C. Wason. PA. Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 1800 NW 497H STREET. SUITE
'120, FT. LAUDEROALE FL 33309 on or before
March 4, 2011 a date which is within thirty (30)


1050 Legls
days after the first publication of this Notice in THE
NEWS SUN and file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attor-
ney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you' for the relief de-
manded in the complaint.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N.
Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863)
534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled
'court appearance, or immediately upon receiving
this notification if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 711.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this
21st day of January, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ Toni Kopp
As Deputy Clerk
January 4, 11,2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000273
HSBC BANK, USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR SG MORTGAGE SECURITIES
TRUST 2005-OPT1, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-0OPT1
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARIAN GRASS; FRANCISCO GRASS; SAND CAN-
YON CORPORATION F/K/A OPTION ONE MORT-
GAGE CORPORATION.
Defendantss.
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
rescheduling Foreclosure sale dated January 24,
2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000273
of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in
and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein HSBC
BANK, USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUS-
TEE FOR SG MORTGAGE SECURITIES TRUST
2005-OPT1, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SE-
RIES 2005-OPT1, Plaintiff and MARIAN GRASS
are defendantss, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash, AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM
IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COM-
MERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA AT 11:00
A.M., February 16, 2011, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment,
to-wit:
PARCEL 1: THE SOUTH 41.21. FEET OF THE
WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST
QUARTER AND THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTH-
WEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER
OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 4,
TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EAST, LESS
THE SOUTH 50 FEET OF THE SOUTHEAST QUAR-
TER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH,
RANGE 29 EAST, LING WEST OF STATE ROAD
NO. 64, HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
PARCEL 2: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SEC-
TION 4, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH, RANG E 29 EAST,
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN
EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH-
EAST QUARTER OF SECTION 4, A DISTANCE OF
110.0 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES
05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG A LINE
PARALLEL WITH THE WEST LINE OF SAID'
SOUTHEAST QUARTER, A DISTANCE OF 50,07
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF A PARCEL
OF LAND HEREINAFTER DESCRIBED; THENCE
CONTINUE NORTH 03 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 396.6 FEET;
THENCE EAST 110.0 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 03
DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 396 6 FEET.T HENCE WEST 110.0
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS THE
SOUTH 50 FEE7 OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER
OF SECTION .- TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH, RANGE
29 EAST LYING WEST OF STATE ROAD NO. 64,
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, fF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE
LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE
DATED at SEBRING, Florida, this 24th day of
January, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Highlands County, Florida
By:/s/AnnetteE.Daff
Deputy Clerk
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN. LLP
4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd.
Suite 100
Tampa FL 33614
(813)88018888
February 4, 11, 2011


1050 Lels
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 11-35
Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SHIRLEY M. BURT
a.k.a. SHIRLEY BURT
a.k.a, SHIRLEY BURT McDONALD
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Sum-
mary Administration has been entered in the es-
tate of SHIRLEY M. BURT a.k.a. SHIRLEY BURT
a.k.a, SHIRLEY BURT McDONALD, deceased, File
Number PC 11-35, by the Circuit Court for HIGH-
LANDS County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Se-
bring, Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of
death was November 29, 2010; that the total
value of the estate is $20,000.00 and that the
names and addresses of those to whom it has
been assigned by such order are:
Name Address
Jack McDonald 116 S. Winter Circle
Avon Park, Florida 33825
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
,,ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
February 4, 2011.
Persons Giving Notice:
/s/ Carol Schoenfeld
46 Tule Court
Clayton,.California 94517
/s/ Jack McDonald
116 S. Winter Circle
Avon Park, Florida 33825
Attorney for Persons Giving Notice:
/s/ David F, Lanier
E-Mail Address: lanier30@embarqmail.com
Florida Bar No. 045399
DAVID F, LANIER
P.O. Box 400
Avon Park, Florida 33826-0400
Telephone: (863)453-4457
February 4,11,2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 08-1316-GCS
CITIMORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JENNIFER D. ROBINSON; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF JENNIFER D. ROBINSON; IF LIVING, INCLUD-
ING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFEN-
DANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PER-
SONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2:
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of High-
lands County, Florida, I will sell the property situ-
ate in Highlands County. Florida, described as
The North half of the East 100 feet of Lot 8
and the West 20 feet of the North half of Lot 9. in
Block 8. of Town of Avon Park, according to the
plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 58,
Public Records of Desoto County, of which High-
lands County was formerly a part, lying in Section
22, Township 33 South, Range 28 East, High-
lands County, Florida.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement
of Highlands County Courtnouse located at 430
South Commerce Avenue, Sebnng, Florida at
11:00 A.M., on February 14, 2011
DATED THIS 10th DAY of January 2011
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any. other than the property
owner as of the date of the is pendents, must fl!e
a claim within 60 days after the sale
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the
10Oth day of January. 2011


1050 ,es,
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
January 28; February 4, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. PC 11-25
Division Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN RE: ESTATE OFKATHERINE A. MYETTE
Deceased.
The administration of the estate of KATHERINE A.
MYETTE, deceased, whose date of death was
January 1, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court
for HIGHLANDS County, Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is Clerk of the Court, High-
lands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce
Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870.. The names and
addresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE. ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is February 4, 2011.
Personal Representative:
Ernest Myette
10304 Broadway St.
Indianapolis, Indiana 46280
Attorney for Personal Representative:
John K. McClure
Attorney for Ernest Myette
Florida Bar Number: 286958
MCCLURE & LOBOZZO
211 S. Ridgewood Drive
Sebring, Florida 33870
Telephone: (863) 402-1888
Fax:(863) 402-0751
E-Mail: kelly@mllaw.net
February 4, 11, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 11-37
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARY ANN MARINE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MARY ANN
MARINE, deceased, whose date of death was De-
cember 14, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
of HIGHLANDS County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Ave.,
Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM
All other creditors of the deceaent and other
persons having claims or oemands against dece-
dent's estate must file their r claims witn this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AcTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733 702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WiLL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO i2
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED
The date of first publication of this Notice is
February 4. 20111.
Personal Representative'
/s/ William J. TIeander
172 E Interiake ,u.eardi
Lake Placio. Fl rida 33852
Attrne;.' for Personal Represent ate
a.ILLLAM J IIELAIIDER
Florida Bar Number 0286014
172 E riterlake Boulevard
Lake Piacid, FL 33852


1050 .Legls
Telephone: (863) 465-8181
Fax: (863) 465-5614
E-Mail: wjn@nielander.com
February 4, 11,2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No.: 28-2009-CA-001288
HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
REGISTERED HOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME
EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1
Plaintiff,
V.
RAYMOND A. WAGONER; DANIELLE GRIFFITH;
MICHAEL J. GRIFFITH; DIANE M. OLIVADOTI;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL J. GRIFFITH;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RAYMOND A. WAGONER;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DIANE M. OLIVADOTI;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DANIELLE GRIFFITH;
NATIONAL CREDIT ADJUSTERS, LLC; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS,. DEVISEES. GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIM-
ANTS,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
(To be Published in The News-Sun)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment dated January 24, 2011, en-
tered in Civil Case No.: 28-2009-CA-001288, of
the Circuit Court of the -Tenth Judicial Circuit in
and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein
HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
REGISTERED HOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME
EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1 is Plaintiff, and
RAYMOND A. WAGONER; DANIELLE GRIFFITH;
MICHAEL J. GRIFFITH; DIANE M. OLIVADOTI;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL J. GRIFFITH
N/K/A TANYA GRIFFITH AND NATIONAL CREDIT
ADJUSTERS, LLC, are Defendants.
I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at
11:00 a.m., in the Jury Assembly Room in the
basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, lo-
cated at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring,
Florida, 33870 on the 16th day of February,
2011, the following described real property as set
forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit:
LOT 496, SYLVAN SHORES ESTATES SECTION.D,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 13, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
This property is located at the Street address of:
1583 Buck Street, Lake Placid, FL 33852.
If you are a person claiming a right to funds
remaining after the sale, you must file a claim


1050 Legls
with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale.
If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to
any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the
owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens
may claim the surplus.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on
January 16, 2011'.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
CLERK OF THE COURT
By: /s/ Annette E. Daff (COURT SEAL)
Deputy Clerk
February 4, 11, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2009-1819-GCS
VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC.,
etc.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DARRIN MCCRAY, et al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO
SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to the Fi-
nal Judgment entered on January 27, 2011, in
Case No: 2009-1819-GCS of the Circuit Court,
Highlands County, Florida, in which Vanderbilt
Mortgage and Finance, Inc., etc., is Platiniff and
Darrin McCray, et al. are the defendants, the Clerk
of this court will sell at public sale the following
described real property:
Lot 38, Block 345, SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF
SEBRING UNIT 16, according to the map or plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 4, Public
Records of Highlands County, Florida.
The sale will be held on February 16, 2011, at
11:00 a.m. to the highest and best bidder for
cash, in the Jury Assembly Room, basement floor
of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South
Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida, in accordance
with Section 45.031 of the Florida Stautes.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE
LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA
Coordinator, 430 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL
33870 (863)534-4686 at least 7 days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon
receiving this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you
are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Dated this 27th day of January, 2011.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
CLERK OF SAID COURT
By: /s/ Annette E. Daft
As Deputy Clerk
February 4, 11, 2011


.Highlands County Board of

County Commissioners



The following position closes on 2/08/2011

Code Enforcement Official 766 PG 17

$14.46/hour $23.69/hour.



The following position closes on 2/08/2011

Equipment Operator I 912 PG 10

$10.49/hour $16.93/hour.



For application, minimum qualifications and a full
job description visit us on our website at
www.hcbcc.net. You must complete our electronic
job application or submit a completed paper
application in order to be considered'for employment
with Highlands County BCC.


For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop!
m 2.


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Page 10A

1050 Lega
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09,
FLORIDA STATUTES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN tna! the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business under the fictitious
name of HDM MANAGEMENT located at 8130 CR
17, in the County of Highlands, in the City of Se-
bring, Florida 33870 intends to register the said
name with the Division of Corporations of the
Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Flonda.
Dated at Sebring, Florida, this 4th day of Febru-
ary, 2011.
Alyssa Hathaway
February 4, 2011
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09,
FLORIDA STATUTES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business under the fictitious
name of J&JF HOLDINGS, INC., D/B/A
PINCH-A-PENNY #73, located at 1429 US 27
HWY N., in the County of Highlands, in the City of
Sebrng, Florida 33875 intends to register the
said name with the Division of Corporations of
the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Flor-
ida.
Dated at Sebring, Florida, this 1st day of February,
2011.
James Ferrell
February 4, 2011
1055 Highlands
County legals
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
LEGAL NOTICES
The following legal notices are from the
Highlands County Board of County
Commissioners and are being published in the
font, size, and leading as per
their specifications.
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT ORDINANCE
Please take notice that Ordinance No. 1319 will be
presented to the City Council for adoption upon its second
and final reading at the City Council Chambers, 368 South
Commerce Avenue, Sebrlng, Florida 33870 on the 15th
day of February, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. A copy of the pro-
posed Ordinance can be obtained from the office of the
City Clerk. Any person may appear and be heard with re-
spect to the proposed Ordinance, The proposed Ordinance
is entitled as follows: ,
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 7 OF THE CODE
OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF SEBRING TO PROVIDE
FOR CEMETERY LOT TRANSFER FEES, PERMIT FEES AND
OTHER FEES BY RESOLUTION: INCREASE THE TIME RE-
QUIREMENT FOR BURIAL NOTIFICATION; RESTRICT TYPES
OF CONTAINERS FOR BURIAL OF REMAINS; RESTRICT
ITEMS PERMISSIBLE ON BURIAL SPACES; ALLOW MO-
TORCYCLES AND BICYCLES IN CEMETERIES; PROVIDE
FOR SEVERABIUTY; PROVIDE FOR CONFUCT; AND PRO-
VDE AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Pursuant to Section 286,0105 of the Florida Statutes,
as amended, the City Council hereby advises that It any In-
terested person decides to appeal any decision made by
the City Council with respect to any matter considered at
the proceedings, he will need a record of the proceeding
and that, for such purpose, he may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings Is, made, which record
Includes the testimony and evidence upon which the ap-
peal Is to be based.
This notice shall be published on February 4, 2011.
/s/ Kathy Haley
Kathy Haley, City Clerk
City of Sebdng,Florlda
Robert S. Swalne
Swalne & Harrs, P.A.
425 South Commerce Ave.
Sebring, FL 33870
City Attorney
February 4,2011

1100 Announcements

CHECK

YOUR AD
Please check your ad on the first
day it runs to make sure it is cor-
rect. Sometimes instructions over
the phone are misunderstood and
an error can occur. If this happens
to you, please call us the first day
your ad appears and we will be
happy to fix it as soon as we can.
If We can assist you, please call us:
385-6155
News-Sun Classified
1400 Health Care
14 00 Services
CAREGIVERS NEEDED
Must be mature and experienced.
Must have clean background and
license. 863-812-4752
NEED SOMEONE to take care of your
loved one? In their OWN HOME?
Excellent references...25 years exp.
Call Joanie at 863-471-9726,

1450 ,.
BABYSITTER NEEDED F/T position for
4 months. Must have Infant CPR
Certification. Background check.
863-446-3826


2000
Employment

2 100 Help Wanted

LPN'S WANTED
Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility
serving disabled adults is seeking
nurses for PRN shifts. Casual work...
environment, benefit package and
paid training. Call Nina t'
863-452-5141 or complete am. :
application at 55 E. College Dr.,
Avon Park, FL 33825.
DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS
wanted for Avon Park Intermediate
Care Facility serving disabled adults.
HS diploma or 1 year associated
experience, valid FL Drivers License
and clean criminal background req.
Please complete application at 55 E.
College Dr., Avon Park, FL 33825.


2 100 Help Wanted
SUNSHINE PAYDAY LOANS
Clerks needed in Highlands County 4
LaBelle area, must be willing to travel.
Fax Resume to 863-678-2170


News-Sun *Friday. February 4. 2011

2100 Help Wanted
THE CITY OF AVON PARK has closed
the Fire Chief Position and will not
accept any more applications at this
time. The City of Avon Park is a
Smoke and Drug-Free workplace.
E.O.E.


FIND A SWEETHEART OF A DEAL!
Search the News-Sun classified every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday.


www. newssun.com


Subscribe


to the News-Sun


Cal


385-6155


SW r ZDEIP EWL 4 I P


WILLIAMS JANITORIAL

CARPET CLEANING

'10 Per Room
3 Rooms Minimum
Upholstery Cleaning
All Types of Flooring
Free Estimates
Lic Bonded Ins
(863) 214-1940


K-


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LL AMERICA
TREE SERVICE, INC.
TRIMMING REMOVAL
SOD INSTALLATION STUMP GRINDING
LOT CLEARING PRESSURE CLEANING
Will Beat Any Written Estimate!
Peoples Choice O O7A Free Estimates
Award o863-465-7491 Licensed & Insured

SPOOL PARADISE
Pool Service $ Mobile Retail
Service epalr- Supplies Squipment
Delivered Rlgh to your Moor
Brad $ Julie Kurtzz
(663) 362-7726
Fax ('ar3) 402-2200
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INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED
Avon Park (863) 453-2525 Sebring (863) 382-1515
Lake Placid (863) 699-2525 Wauchula (863) 767-1515
Lake Wales (863) 679-9200 Sebring Fax (863) 382-9939
Wal-Mart Locations:
Lake Wales (863) 676-0569
Sebring (863) 385-5371
Avon Park (863) 452-7010


* Fully Insured Free Estimates
* Tree Removal Tree Topping
* Tree Trimmirng Stump Grtr-tring
Serving AU Central Florida Area.


Cindy Divietro
Communinr Ualon
Cdl 941 -518-2178
so800-518-0403
V We Elderly Care, Inc.
.',-,rid, : r, t:' ,. , h, t, 3r 17-,r ). -u L J .-',. .
214 E Stuart .rr .e Ljak Vals FL J '3 5j
'r t-7c. -11 'i F 'a\ .e 7,.7291
In Hlnme i Are
%.n:,F PF rk .ebring La.E Placid
F'rl,1 ae F:a', L.,ng Trnrm In- ur.r,.ce
.. -*lder I',. ,:.,rre o:,m



HOUSE

FLORIDA PRESSURE WASH*
CLEANING LLC.
Call For Details
863-381-9013
'Single Story Homes under 1500 total sq. ft.
Roofs Driveways Walks Additional Services

A&E
LAWN MOWER REPAIR
Belts... Blades
New & Used Parts

12 S. Forest Ave.
Avon Park, FL 33825
863-452-0389


HANDYMAN BOB
Install doors, windows,
flooring, plumbing & more!
Licensed & Insured
Lic# HM0096
Call 863-452-5201
or I
863-449-1744


-Exterminating, Inc.
863 385-0404
'- Now Offering:
Animal
'.. Nuisance
X... Control and
Removal


oUIvi y Mll UI riuid n a rcu i-re iitCai
"Enjoy the Satisfaction of Safety"
with the
ROBBINS "FLAME SYSTEM"
LIGHTNING PROTECTION
THE WORLD'S FINEST
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Underwriter's Laboratories Inspected and Approved





"LIVE BLOOD ANALYSIS"
WANDA KLINE
WEIGHT LOSS
& WELLNESS
See ,- at one dro, Of j Our t.-:,,:,,3 ,r, te. a:
t,.. 1oUR nutrton /al ir,_ .1an1,3 n o 1i.. n,
By appointment only
863-414-4066


r'oAudvertise

Your Business
Here!

NewsSimui
Call 385-6175j


Indoor Flea Market ,


"5a4 dollar Store
Beckie's Avon 863-449-1298



CAMPBELL'S COLLISION
CENTERINC.
In IM CPBE LL Owner




Phone (863) 382-7551 1405 US 27 North
FAX (863) 382-2750 Sebring, FL 33870


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available. Made in the USA, inLife and it's partners ad-
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City of f////


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
The City of Sebring is recruiting for the following positionss:
School Crossing Guard Closes: 2/4/11
For an application contact City of Sebring Police Department,
307 N Ridgewood Dr., Sebring, FL 33870 (863) 471-5108 or visit
us on our website at www.mysebring.com.
Drug Free Work place, EOE, Vet. Pref.


Classified

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Service Available 7 Days A Week
Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.corn
All Service Calls $40
Mike & Kandy Sheldone
Sl CEO/Owner
Lic# CAC 1816569
863-451-2399


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www.newssun.corn

2 5O Part-time
2 150 Employment
TUTOR I am seeking a tutor for a 14
year old girl, well behaved and shy.
Instruction will take place in my home
three days a week. hours are flexible,
to begin. between 8 am 8 pm and
lessons should last about 60 mins..
Subjects: Math, Science, Reading &
English. $60 per hour. Interested reply
by email "michaelbrooks646@aol.com"


3000
Financial


4000
Real Estate


4040 Homes For Sale
LAKE PLACID 2000 Sq. Ft., 3BR,
2BA, fireplace, new A/C, new roof, all
tile floors. Overlooks Golf course, over
sized 2/CG, stainless steel appl.
$157,900 863-699-2232 or Cell
239-229-4655

4060 Homes for Sale
406 Avon Park
AVON PARK 3BR, 1BA, CHA, natural
gas, newer roof & windows, city
water/sewer. Lg wkshop in back, needs
some work. Priced reduced to $37,500.
863-453-7764 or 863-257-4095.


4080


Homes for Sale
Sebring


SEBRING Edgewater Village Lakeview
Dr. 2BR, 2BA, 1CG Villa. Beautifully
furnished. New kitchen, laundry, TV.
Low Maintenance fee includes Cable
TV, Clubhouse, heated pool. Private
street. Avail Immed. 863-402-9138
SEBRING NEWLY REMODELED 3BR
Home, one block from Woodlawn Elem.
School. Nice, quiet neighborhood.
1243 Fernvale Ave. Possible Owner
Financing. Call 863-675-3387 TODAY!


4220


Lots for Sale


LAKE PLACID Sun 'n Lake.
2 Lots, side-by-side, 80'x125' each,
cleared, surveyed. Warrenty Deed,
Title Insurance. $6,000 for both.
8'63-386-4556R


News-Sun Friday. February 4. 2011


6200 Unfurnished
620 Apartments
KEY LAKE VILLAS
LAKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING
2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean &
quiet. Screen porch, Outside patio.
Central air, Washer/Dryer hookup,
S585;mo.. first & security. No Pets.
863-465-2740
LAKE PLACID 2BR, 2BA.
Washer/Dryer. screened patio, water
included. Excellent Condition.
S525 monthly plus 1 mo. security.
954-695-8348
SEBRING / LAKE PLACID Beautiful
1BR, 1BA Apt. on prize lake with dock.
Avail. Furn/Unfurn. Seasonal or Yearly.
W/D Util. included. No smoke/ No
pets. For more info call 863-381-7415.

6250 Furnished Houses
LAKE PLACID Newer 3BR, 2BA,
seasonal or monthly. Excellent furniture
& appliances, near lake & boat ramp,
No smoking or dogs. $1300/mo. After
season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119


6300 Unfurnished Houses
HOUSES / MOBILE HOMES
Call for Availability
NO Security NO Last *NO Dogs
863-381-4410 or 863-381-5174
LAKE PLACID 2BR, 1BA, new
floors/paint, fenced yard, close to boat
ramp, nice landscape, quiet area, no
smoke/dogs, $550/mo. 863-699-1119
LAKE PLACID 3BR, 2BA, 2000 sq ft,
on 3 lots, enclosed outbuilding
(could be mother-in-law quarters),
conveniently located to shopping,
1.5 mi. from town. $850/mo. + 1st &
security. No smoking. 863-441-9248
SEBRING Harder Hall area, 2BR, 2BA,
1CG, screened porch. $750/mo.
plus last month & security deposit.
View by appointment. Call
863-381-6747, leave message.
SEBRING 3BR, 2BA 1CG, CBS Home
303 Virginia PI. $119,00 or 2BR, 2BA,
MH 5151 Barnum St. $42,500 10%
Down Owner Financing Call
863-835-1445


7000
Merchandise


Acreage for Sale 7030 Estate Sales
SEBRING 4523 DeSoto Rd Fri


FROSTPROOF 7 1/2 Acres on Dawes
Road. You must see! No lower price!
$39,900. Call Lucy with Exit Realty
863-382-4705


-Sat-Sun Feb 4-5-6-, 8AM ? Genera-
tor, tools, outdoor equip., TV's, stereos,
dining room table seats 10, new utility
trailer, furn., Too Much To List!


4320 Real Estate Wanted 7160 Cameras&Supplies


ATTENTION: CASH for your Home,
Duplex, Apartment, Commercial
Property. Rapid Closing,
"As Is" Condition. 863-441-2689.
STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL



5000
Mobile Homes

O5050 Mobile Homes
0505 For Sale


AVON PARK Don't Want to Pay Lot
Rent? This Single Wide Mobile Home
has 2 add-on rooms & carport. It's on a
private lot and includes additional lot
with nice shade & citrus trees. All for
$26,000! 863-385-3913


SEBRING Doublewide Mobile Home
with lot, 3619 St. Rd 17, S. 2BR, 2BA,
excellent condition. $20,000.
305-597-8339 or 305-885-1621


SELECTION OF 1 & 2 Bedroom Units
For Sale in friendly/active 55+ Park,
located near shopping, banks, &
hospital. Reasonable lot rent incl.
S/W/G & Lawn mowing. Call for more
info. or to view units. No pets please.-
863-385-7034


6000
Rentals


6050 Duplexes for Rent
LAKE PLACID Placid Lakes,
Unfurnished 2BR, 2BA.
$375/mo. + security?
863-699-0897 or 863-840-2013
SEBRING Cute 2BR, 1 BA, tile floors,
fenced yard, most pets OK.
$550 + $300 security deposit.
4909 Manatee Dr. 863-446-7274

001 f Villas & Condos
S6100For Rent
SEBRING 2BR, 2BA, tile floors
throughout, screened porch, conven-
ient location to US 27 and Hospital,
(Not 55+) gated Community, Clubhouse
& pool, vaulted ceilings. Lawn Maint. in-
cluded. $800 monthly. 863-840-1083
UNFURNISHED MODERN VILLA CC
of Sebring. 3BR. 2BA, on Golf Course.
All amenities. Lease $1050 monthly
828-260-2120

O2 0 Unfurnished
620 Apartments

RELAX AT Lake Isis Villas
Luxurious 2BR Apartment.
Clean & Quiet Setting.
Call 863-453-2669
AVON PARK Highlands Apartments
1680 North Delaware
1 BR. 1 BA & 2BR, 2BA Available.
Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation.
1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195
AVON PARK Apartment with balcony
overlooking Lake Verona and City Park.
100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities.
SPECIAL: $325/mo.
863-453-8598
AVON PARK Clean, Quiet; Studios /
1BR. 1BA/2BR, 2BA Apts., from
$375/mo. New tile & appliances,
screened patios & W/D hook ups.
Students/Seniors Discount
Call 863-452-0469.
AVON PARK LEMONTREE APTS:
1 BR, 1 BA $495/mo +S200 security;
2BR, 1BA $645/mo +$500 security.
W/D, Microwave, WSG included.
Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953


CAMERA EQUIPMENT, Professional.
Also, Collector Cameras &
Equipment. Call 863-382-7469
for details & pricing.


7300 Miscellaneous
BLACK DIAMOND tool box for
pick-ups $125. Stainless steel grill
guards $125. Utility trailer 7' X 12' w/
loading ramp $750. Refrigerator $125.
Call 863-655-2166.
HUSOVARNA MEGA quilter & Inspira
frame; frame adj. 5' to 10'; sewing
machine includes the add'lI speed con-
trol for even stitches & laser light w /
templates for flexibility in stitch design.
$1700 863-446-6924
RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT Cooler,
freezer, pizza ovens & holding cabinet,
soft serve machine, sandwich prep
cooler. Much More! 863-781-4402


7310 Bargain Buys


A/C UNIT 4 Ton Coleman central unit,
fan motor replaced, serviced yearly,
attch to air handle. $100 863-655-0881
ALADIN LAMP converted to electric.
could be restored, beautiful as is $12
863-214-6697
BOOKCASE light color 36 X 33 $10
863-314-0030
CAPODIMONTE basket of fruit. My
best one, $12.50 863-214-6697
CHAIR- RECLINER, LazyBoy, with golf
print material. $45 863-471-3456
CHESS SET 12" X 12", drawer with
chess pieces.$25 obo
863-699-0049
COMFORTER SET Queen size, with
shower curtain, valences & rugs. Good
Condition. $30 863-452-6798
COMPUTER DELL Dim 2400 WSP
W/XP. $150 obo. 863-381-3103 or
863-381-3104
DESK: 54"X18", gray formica, 5-
drawers including 2 deep file drawers.
$35. 863-414-1714
DISHWASHER Never Used.
$99 obo.
863-655-1473

DOUBLE ROCKER all wood, white -
real nice $50 863-402-2285
EDGER, ECHO, Portable. In very good
condition. $50. 863-453-7027
EUREKA CARPET STEAM CLEANER.
New-in-Box. Cost $189....Selling for
$90. 863-386-0096
EVENING GOWN like new, small size
$10 863-699-0049
GAS GRILL fair condition. $50
863-314-0030
GOLF CARRY BAG, Ogio, like new.
$45. 863-382-6006
GOLFBAG CARRIER for Motorcycle.
Fits on any receiver type hitch. Stain-
less steel. $100. 863-382-6006
HEDGE TRIMMER Craftsman 18"
blade, in very good condition. $40.
863-453-7027
KITCHEN CABINET White, like new,
$50 obo. 863-381-3103 or
863-381-3104
LAMP WITH SHADE. $10
863-471-3456
MAN'S COAT Beige London Fog 3/4
length with warm lining. Size 38R, like
new. $20 Call 863-471-1435
QUEEN SIZE Mattress & box springs,
bed frame and h-brd, 2 night stands w/
lamps $100. 451-1097 OR 414-4823
TABLE SAW Includes 4 extra
blades. Only used for picture frames.
Exc cond. $85. 863-382-7469
TV & STAND stand oak colored with
storage; TV 20" & silver in color. Both
$75.00. 863-414-2131
TV SANYO 27", 5yrs ole from guest
room very little used. Excell.cond. $50
863-3824137
WATER FILTRATION Reverse
Osmosis system. A must for your
home. $50 obo 863-873-3801
WICKER ROCKER white real nice.
$25 863-402-2285


7320 Yard Sales
AVON PARK 1206 Seamans St. (be-
hind Checkers on Hvwy 27, Fn-Sat. Feb
4-5. TV's Bike. & Lots of Misc.
AVON PARK 2151 E. Claradge Ave.
off St. Rd 17. next to Red Barn,
Thurs-Fri-Sun Feb 3-4-6. Tools. Knick
Knacks, Kitchen Appliances. Dinette
Set, Kids Toys, & MORE!
AVON PARK Bonnet Lake RV Camp-
ground 2825 SR 17S. Sat. Feb. 5th,
8AM 11AM. Crafts & More! donuts &
Coffee will be for sale.
AVON PARK Huge Sale! 3203 Sawmill
Tr. Sat & Sun Feb 5th & 6th. 7AM ?
Too Much To List For directions call
863-368-1364
AVON PARK Large Sale! 3145 Glacier
Ave (off Old Hwy 17) Sat Feb 5th,
8AM ? Lg glass 3pc. lighted display
unit, Carnival ware, tiller & cabinet
hardware, quality wm's clothes
(Sm-X-LG) Too Much To List!
AVON PARK Multi Family Sale Sat Feb
5th, 9AM 2PM, 712 w. Oak Lane St.
(1 blk N of Avon Elementary) No Early
Sales! Fum., household items & plus
size clothing. Too Much To List!
AVON PARK- HUGE SALE! 201 E
Canfield St., Fri 8:30 AM-5PM, Sat
8:30AM 2PM Feb 4-5. All Proceeds
go for Mission Trip to Africa.
LAKE PLACID Alpine Village,
Rummage & Bake Sale, RAIN or SHINE!
(mostly enclosed), 18 Center St. US 27
S. to 70 E., 1/4 mi on left, Fri, Feb 11,
7am-3pm; Sat, Feb 12, 7am-Noon.
Furniture, Major & Minor appliances,
Microwaves, CD's, Gas Grill, Many
Household items, Camping & Fishing
Equip, Garden Tools, Lg Flat-Bed
Trailer, Plants, Flowers, Produce,
& Refreshments.
SEBRING 225 Swallow Ave. (behind
Lake Shore Mall) Thur., Fri. Feb 3-4
7AM 1PM, and Sat Feb. 5, 7AM ?.
Tools, toys, clothes, household items.
Much More!
SEBRING Braswell Heritage Estates
MHP Annual Park Sale on DeSoto Rd.,
Fri. Feb 4th, 8AM 1PM. Bake sale,
Crafts and Many Treasures! Lunch
items are available, call 863-402-0385
SEBRING FRI FEB 5TH 8AM 12PM
1855 US HWY 27 N, Corner of 27 and
Thunderbird Road. Something For
Everyone !
SEBRING Moving Sale! 3913 Ferrari
Dr. Fri & Sat Feb 4 & 5, 8AM 3Pm.
Furniture, Kirby vacuum and household
items. Too Much To List!
SEBRING MULTI-FAMILY SALE!
6504 Hancock Rd (Sparta to Bassage
to Hancock), Fri-Sat, Feb 4-5,
8am-1pm. Jet Ski, Furn, Computer,
Printer, Kitchen, Lawn & Garden,
Something for Everyone!
SEBRING Two Family Sale, 318 Pine
Tree Lane off Thunderbird Rd, Thurs -
Fri Sat Feb 3-4-5, 8AM ? Household
items, table & chairs, wheel chair, bath
chair, lamps & MISC.
SEBRING WHOLE HOUSE SALE! 304
Vanwall Terr, off Thunderbird Rd,
Fri-Sat, Feb 4-5, 8am-2pm.
TOOLS...TOOLS...TOOLS Furniture,
Household Items, & MORE!
Something for Everyone!
SEBRING WILLOW GATE Annual Sale
Sat. Feb. 5th, 8AM.- 12PM. Many
participants! Cookies & Coffee for sale
at Clubhouse. Location at end of
Thunderbird Rd.
SEBRING FRANCIS II MHP ANNUAL
GARAGE SALE, 2800 Real McCoy Dr,
Sat, Feb 5th, 8am-lpm. Crafts, Bake
Sale, Raffle, Snack Bar also available.

SEBRING VILLAGE
Trash & Treasure Sale.
4343 Schumacher Rd. 1 mile west
of Wal Mart Sat. Feb 5th,
7;30AM- 11:30AM., in the Club
House. Coffee & Donuts for sale.



7340 Wanted to Buy

HELP! WIFE NEEDS A
VERY GOOD
DEPENDABLE CAR
NOW!
Please help me find her onel
863-465-0978

7400 Lawn & Garden
STRING TRIMMER, HUSQVARNA,
124L, less than 4 hours. $140.
863-453-7027
E PAA


Page 11A


Contact Us.


I I


By Phone

(863) 385-6155


By Mail

2227 US Hwy 27S

Sebring, FL 33870




LI ;


By E-Mail

www. newssun, cornm/contact/


/32U Pets & Supplies .- ., *


NOTICE .

Florida statute 585.195 states that
all dogs and cats sold in Florida "
must be at least eight weeks old, v "
have an official health certificate.
and proper shots and be free of in- ..
testinal and external parasites.

2000-


Recreation

8400 Recreational
8V40 Vehicles
PUMA TRAVEL TRAILER 2010 32', two
slide outs, air, awning, King ISLAND
bed, $18,900 Must sell! Non smoker.
Will deliver. Lakeland, Fla.
863-660-8539
R.V. COVER, NEW ADCO, for Travel
Trailers. 28'7" to 31'6", 1/2 price, $200.
863-453-7027
RV 38' 2010 5TH Wheel. EAGLE RIDGE
by HEARTLAND, 2BR, 1BA, 2 slides,
fiberglass, W/D, awning. All options.
$30,000 obo. Immediate Sale!
321-437-5887
RV WILDWOOD 2007 34 ft, 2 slide
outs, 2BR, Sleeps 7, like new, non
smoker, no pets. All options &
will deliver. $12,500 OBO.
630-301-1553
VU QUBE SATELLITE SYSTEM with
remote. Enjoy your favorite TV
programs wherever you go!
Available at Whispering Pines RV
Village, Sebring. 270-556-6847.


9000
Transportation


9200 Trucks
TOOL CHEST, all aluminum diamond
plate, 48" long, with locking lid,. $120.
863-453-7027


kn


a

-. .. :'


WWW.ne wsWSSUn e





HNEWS-SUN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927


rw~



.4g.


F
c









News-Sun Friday. February 4, 2011


SATURDAY





Partly sunny with
showers around

High 76/Low 49
Winds:WNW at 8-16 mph.


Regional forecast

..u... : hs ....--.
-. fA, ..-a6 .. ,
*'V~~~ fc '


Sunshine and patchy Mostly cloudy, chance
clouds for rain


High 73/Low 57
Winds: NNE at 6-12 mph.


c4ksnville


TUESDAY


Heat index-
For 3 p.m. today
Relative humidity .......
Expected air temperate
Makes it feel like ........

Weather Histo
Pacific winds usually re
Francisco's climate. On
1887, however, 4 inche
accumulated. Excited r


wj


www. newssun.com


fIR


Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather. Inc. 2011

AccuWeather.com


National Forecast for February 4

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are
highs for the day. Forecast high and low temperatures are given for selected cities.


53/42 .',. ... . *[.


... --... ;* * * * "'pj i -'i -_' i * .'
unny windy .- M a i -
d cooler -- on
-BREEZYJ ert----
1/ow3 --*----ro < wYork
61A.OW 35 ... 219 35/28
at 2-25 mph. SanF'rancisco "-- Chicago i .-c.'?' ,,
I -.Denver.. -----, 20/13 W, " H )
,61,44-.. 0 Wash ington
** -. ~ Kansas City '
Los Angee ---s.-%56 '-26/19
S63% 70, -.8,, 1* ,> "-'N'
ure ........ 78 N a . * 4
.... ..... 0



igulate San L Houst on
Feb. 4, 38\ 5 ''.am,
s of snow 81/66
residents


SShowers

ST-storm

4 A Rain

j Flurries

SSnow

r~ Ice


FRONTS
Cold

SWarm

Stationary


Avon Park
79/57


Sebring
79/56
0


Lake Placid
80/60
*0


Venus
80/60


-, "... . ,,i /I i
.v. -.. ;;. ., ..
I',

/ l, 4.....-

Lorida
80/57


Shown Is today's
V/ weather, Temperatures


....-- are today's highs and
tonight's lows




Regional summary: Mostly cloudy today. Partly cloudy tonight. Sunshine
and some clouds tomorrow with a couple of showers. Sunday: sunshine and
patchy clouds. Monday: a chance for rain and a thunderstorm. Tuesday:
partly sunny, windy and cooler.


staged a massive snowball fight.

Farm report

Mostlyv cloudy today
Winds south 7-14 mph.
Expect less than 2 hours of sun-
shine with average relative humidity
75% and poor drying conditions.
Partly cloudy tonight.

Water restrictions

* Even addresses may water on
Thursday and Sunday.
* Odd addresses may water on
Wednesday and Saturday.
* All watering should take place before
10 a.m. and after 4 p.m.


-10s -0. [9 -q 108 20 30 40s SOs 60s | 70s ,I.B
National summary: A chilly but beneficial rain will fall across much of the Southeast today It will be cold enough
for snow to spread along the northwestern edge of the storm from eastern Texas to southern Missouri and western
Tennessee. Between the zone of rain and snow, an icy mix will develop from southwestern Louisiana to the central
Appalachians. Travel could become extremely treacherous in areas receiving the rare wintry weather. The
Northeast will be dry and cold. Motorists should watch for black ice areas early in the day.


Sun and moon

Today Sunrise .... 7:09 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:11 p.m.
Moonrise .. 7:49 a.m.
Moonset .... 7:46 p.m.
Saturday Sunrise .... 7:08 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:12 p.m.
Moonrise .. 8:21 a.m.
Moonset .... 8:37 p.m.


AccuWeather UV Index" Moon phases .. ..


For today
9 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 3 p.m. 5 p.m.
0 1 2 2 1
The higher the UV index number, the greater
the need for eye and skin protection.
0-2, Low; 3-5, Moderate; 6-7, High;
8-10, Very High; 11+ Extreme


First Full Last New
Feb11 Feb18 Feb24 Mar 4


Almanac
Temperature
(Readings at Archbold Biological Station
in Lake Placid)
High Monday .................. 77
Low Monday ......................... 52
High Tuesday ......................... 82
Low Tuesday .................... 60
High Wednesday .... ......... 88
Low Wednesday .................... 60
Precipitation
Monday .... ................. 0.00"
Tuesday .......................... 0.00"
Wednesday ..................... 0.00"
Month to date ............2..... 2.65"
Year to date ... ........ 2.65"
Barometer
Monday ........................... 30.09
Tuesday ......................... 30.08


Wednesday .................. 30.12
Tides
(Readings at St. Petersburg)
High ........................... 1:57 a.m.
Low .......................... 8:57 a.m.
High ........................... 3:18 p.m .
Low .......................... 8:36 p.m .
(Readings at Palm Beach)
High ............................ 9:22 a.m .
Low ........................... 2:55 a.m .
High .................. .......... 9:37 p.m .
Low ................ .......... 3:17 p.m .
Lake Levels
Lake Jackson ................... 78.36'
Lake Okeechobee ........... 12.49'
Normal .......................... 14,51'


Florida cities


U.S. cities


World cities


Today Tomorrow Sunday
HI Lo W HI Lo W Hi Lo W
75 62 c 69 44 sh 69 50 s
80 66 pc 79 60 pc 77 67 pc
80 64 c 74 51 sh 74 62 pc
72 57 c 64 37 sh 61 43 s
78 66 pc 78 58 pc 76 66 pc
64 56 c 64 35 sh 62 43 s
- 77 69 pc 75 63 pc 7467 pc
81 66 pc 79 61 pc 78 67 pc
79 62 c 71 46 sh 72 51 s
50 39 r 51 34 pc 60 50 s
76 64 c 68 50 sh 6955 s
56 46 c 58 30 pc 62 43 s
74 64 c 66 48 sh 68 53 s
80 67 pc 79 55 sh 77 65 pc


City
Albuquerque
Atlanta'
Baltimore

Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
le*..eland
Dallas
Denver
l4v r,


Today
Hi Lo W
36 18
40 34 r
40 32 pc
44 29 r
30 22 ?
38 24I,
44 30 sf
20 13 pc
2? 23 S
:4" 26 s
34 22 sn
50 28 pc
'2 1i s
i. 26 s


Tomorrow
HI LoW
4? 24 s2
.16 30 p..
40 29 sn
47 29 pc
35 2;9 n
QS) 1 1
43.17 c
i1 ?5 it
32 ?3 vn
3S6 2d nr
46 31 s
50 18 r
30 22 t
37 25 -..


Sunday
Hi LoW
40' 20 c
55 39 s
44 28 s
56 zO p.
38 2F pc
56 32 ,
25 8 sn
31 ?'1 .:
.31 27 .'
38 31 p;
46 29 pc
32 11 sn
35 25c
39 27 r


City
HonAlu
Hc.ucin
Indianapolis
j1 ...r ,n illl,
Yvr ra. Cary
Le,,gtor,
Little Rock
L ,-." r., lc. .-
LouSvilleS
Mempht,
Miami
Minneapolis
1ra 6ns,1a


Today
HI Lo W
81 6.7 -
38 25 Tn
30 21 pc

40 27 pr
34 21 sn
38 .9 p.:
40 25 Cr,.
81 66 pc
30 23 sn
40 28 rin


Tomorrow
HI Lo W
83 69 pc
54 35 1s
33 24 c
r:4 .i' n
36 2' pN
39 26 snr
48 30 s
40 28 c
13 3_2 p:,
79 61 pc
33 16 pc
41 ?9 pPL
47 37 s


Sunday Today
HI LoW City HI Lo W
81 *e r Nea t')rk CUy 35 28 s
61 35 pc Norfolk 4? 36 r
37 27 c Oklahoma City 32 22 pc
_. -: s Prnia lpha t, 5 2 -
32 11 sn Prier.,x 58 40 s
43 30 pc Paisrurqh 35 26 s
44 30 c Portland 28 10 s
Kl,: 5: Panigh 37 '.1 r
44 34 p,: Rocheter 28 22 s
48 36 rc St Loui 30 16 pc
78 67 pc San Francisco 61 44 s
24 -1 sn Seattle 53 42 r
48 36 Pc Tampa 74 64 c
62 46 p,; WasMinrton LC42 33 pC


Tomorrow
Hi Lo W
34 28 srn
62 35 1
50 29 pc
-I, .-' n
68 44 s
36 29 sn
33 20 sn
37 25 sn
37 ?Q7 c
64 47 s
53 43 r
66 48 hr.
ad 30 r


Sunday
HI LoW
1' 26 p..
51 36 S
33 22 sn
68 47 5
36 26 c
38 19 pc
'S5 3;,7
36 24 c
37 25 sn
64 48 s
50 42 r
45 33 s
.1,' 33 s


City
Acapulco
Berlin
f: lgqary
Dublmn
Edmonton
Freeport
Geneva
Hrnq K,:ng
Jerusalem
Kiev


Today
HI Lo W
90 72 s
43 38 sh
44 26 p,:
. 3 4
40 28 s
80 62 pc
46 37 pc,:
73 61 s
60 51 r
37 31 pc


city
London
Montreal
Ons.a
Quebec
Rio de Janeiro
Toronim
Vancouver
Winnipeg


Today
HI Lo W
50 43 sh
22 14 sf
56 49
20 14 st
20 10 sf
94 78 pc
93 7' pc
20 17 S
45 42 r
32 21 sn


Weather (W): s-sunny. pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy,
sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice.


Page 12A


ACCU


Five-Day forecast for Highlands County


SUNDAY


TODAY





Mostly cloudy



High 79/Low 56
Winds: S at 7-14 mph.


MONDAY


SParty s
and

High
Winds: NW


High 72/Low 51
Winds: SW at 10-20 mph.


city
Daytona Beach
Ft. Laud. Bch
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead AFB
Jacksonville
KeyWest
Miami
Orlando
Pensacola
barasou
Tallar,,a.seet
Tampa
W. Palm Bch


I1


IN,% olE-anS 44 3 "r










SECTION




SPORTS


News-Sun

Clarke signs to JUCO power Butler

B. DAN HOEHNE 'It's an Florida. .4 .J
ielhoehineCu-tiewnes ni m l It .as the BuRll whn rec-


Page 3B

Friday, February 4, 2011


SEBRING National sign-
ing day saw local standout
Devin Clarke take a big step
toward his college football
career Wednesday as the
lightning-quick wideout
accepted a scholarship to
play at Butler Community
College in El Dorado, KS.
Perhaps not as known to
the casual fan. Butler is a
junior college power and vir-
tual football factory that has
a jaw-dropping 138-15
record over the past 13 sea-
sons, taking five national
titles while playing in seven.
The school has also seen a
slew of players not only take
their games to Division I pro-
grams, but to the NFL as
well.


opportunity for

me to go out and

do what I do.'

DEVIN CLARKE

"It's a great opportunity
for him," Sebring head coach
Jared Hamlin said. "(Butler)
is a great junior college and
they'll take care of him.
That's important because
he'll be so far away. It's a
great situation and I think
he's going to make the most
of it."
And as long as he does,
Clarke has a deal in place to
then come back home to play
for the University of South


ommended Butler to Clarke
as a means of getting his
grades up and get better pre-
pared to take the next step.
"'I just have to go there.
work hard and take care of
what I have to take care of,"
he said. 'It's an opportunity
for me to go out and do what
I do."
The state's leading receiv-
er his junior year. Clarke was
also brought into the back-
field some his senior year as
a means of getting the ball in
his hands more often.
An electrifying, open-field
runner, Clarke received four
out of five stars by Scouts
Inc. on the ESPN College

See CLARKE, page 4B


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEI
Devin Clarke is all smiles as he signs on the dotted line to play football at Butler
Community College in El Dorado, KS, his first step toward eventually joining the South
Florida Bulls.


Parity powers

LP Seniors

Special to the News-Sun
In the Lake Placid Senior
Softball Association, every
player is a free agent.
League officials assign
players to the six teams at the
start of the season in the
hopes of maintaining com-
petitive balance and parity
throughout the season.
In 2011, it looks like they
got it right.
After four weeks, five teams
have three or four wins, and all
six have three or four losses.
In Wednesday, Feb. 2,
action, Yates Insurance (4-3)
swept a doubleheader from
Lake Placid Marine (3-3) 12-
11 and 16-13.
Yates came from behind
late in both games with man-
ager Dusty Hensley smashing
round-trippers in each.
The Mariners strategy of
walking Hensley four straight
times backfired when Harold
Welbaum and Emory Graves
delivered key hits in the
wins.
Victor Rodriguez and
Barry Hurlbut (home run,
triple) had four hits each.
Slugger Ken Morgan
smashed three home runs into
the Lake Placid orange
groves for the Mariners.
Gary Tankersley had five
hits and Richard Rivera had
four, including two doubles.
Schooni's (4-3) staged
their third last-inning rally of
the season to upend Central
Security (1-4) 15-11.
Bob Poulin led Schooni's
with two doubles and a homer.
Gary Steeves, Ed Engler
(double) and Bob Roth had
three hits each in the win.
Gallo Gonzalez had four
hits (two doubles) and Duke
Hensley three (triple) for the
Securitymen.
Streaking Seminole Tire
(4-4) won its third straight
after dropping its first three
games by dumping Lockhart
(4-3) 16-11.
"We're red hot now!"
boasted 'Noles infielder Gary
Van.
Bobby Richards led the
assault with four hits (dou-
ble. home run).
Kyle Saunders, Pete
Mathews. Tom Walsh and
John Kloet each had three
hits for the victors.
For Lockhart, losers of
three straight after winning
their first four games, the
Three Hit Club included Dave
Reed (two doubles), Cliff
Bluml and Doug Hammond.
On Monday. Central
Security won its first game
by defeating Lockhart
Service Center 26-19.
Manager Duke Hensley
homered, and Gallo Gonzalez
hit two triples and speared a
missile off the bat of Dave
Reed to secure the win.
Dick Cook, Harvey Jones.
and Ray Wilson had four hits
each for Lockhart, while
Mike Kratt and Reed (home
See LP, page 4B


a Lady Panthers split opener


1w


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Christina Luciano goes into the hole to backhand this
chopper and would come up with a big hit Tuesday
night as the Lady Panthers split their season opening
double header with Seminole State.


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newssun.com
AVON PARK One big
inning couldn't carry one
game, but a group effort took
care of the other as the Lady
Panthers salvaged a split with
visiting Seminole to open the
2011 softball season.
Ashlee Quigley worked
through a scoreless first two
innings of the opener from
the mound while a two-out,


bases-loaded walk to
Jamie Ross in the bot-
tom of the first plated
Laura Lovell with a
run for a 1-0 lead.
But the Lady
Raiders got on the
board and took the
lead in the third on


SF(


I,
Semi

12


RBI singles from Kristie
Hoeffer and Kalee Tabor.
Quigley rocketed a shot off
the left-field fence in the bot-
tom of the inning, but was
left stranded before Seminole
extended the lead in the top
of the fourth on a two-run
single up the middle by
Lauren Vinson.
A Tabor home run in the
fifth edged the lead up to 5-1.
But the Panthers were


48 Hours of Sebring this weekend


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING There will
be a lot of competition this
weekend at the Sebring
International Raceway and
it's guaranteed that
Porsche will sweep the
field.
That's because Porsche
will be the field.
It's the annual 48-Hours
of Sebring, a combined
effort of the Suncoast and
Gold Cost Regions of the


Porsche Club of America.
It is the largest club race
in North America with
drivers coming in from
Canada, Mexico and all
over the United States.
"We even have one guy
who is flying in from
Dubai, Saudi Arabia for
this one," said. Dan
Smithyman who co-chairs
the event with Dave
Herndon.
Organizers and competi-


tors from California to
Connecticut are represent-
ed during the four-day
event, with some teams
who have raced at the 12
Hours of Sebring, as well
as many other Pro Series
races.
Teams such as Kelly-
Moss, The Racers Group,
Farnbacher/Loles and
Orbit and Synergy Racing

See PORSCHE, page 4B


Homer's takes fall title


Courtesy photo
Homer's Buffet used a steady balance of heavy hitting and stingy defense to win the
Tuesday night Fall Softball League B Division with an unblemished record of 10-0
during the season and 3-0 in the playoffs. Back row, left to right, Ken Fincher,
David Reed, Jim Kahn, Pete Anderson, Matt Martel, Less Osbeck, Bob Roth,
Larmar Gillard and Manager Harry Bell. Front row, left to right, Bill Todd, Harold
Smith, Harold Baucom, Kyle Weed, Able Hernandez, Brend Gillard and Todd
Martin.


about to claw their way back.
Three straight walks were
drawn by Lovell, Morgan
Huhn and Elizabet Rodriguez
to load the bases and an out
later, Meghan Heiser roped
one just over the leaping
glove of Tabor at third for an
RBI.
With two out and the bags
still packed, shortstop
Christina Luciano stepped to
the plate and started working
the count.
CC Taking pitches off
S the plate and fouling
off those too close to
take, Luciano saw 11
hnole pitches before rifling
S the 12th one into the
1 left-center field gap
for a two-run double.
It didn't take Alexandria
Herring quite as long, as she
soon bounced one off the left
field fence for another two-
RBI two-bagger.
An error in right off a
Joselyn Egana fly ball plated
one more and South Florida
was now up 7-5.
The celebration of the big
inning, however, wouldn't
last long as the Raiders
answered with a big frame of


their own, bringing home
seven runs in the top of the
sixth to regain the lead and
put a little distance on it.
The Lady Panthers would
threaten, loading the bases
with two outs in the bottom
of the sixth, but no more runs
would come across as
Seminole held on for the 12-
7 win.
"We have to get better with
situational hitting," head
coach Carlos.Falla said of the
first game. "We left 14 run-
ners on base, so we had our
chances. If even half those
runners score, we're either
still playing or we get the
win."
Things got better in the
second game with Kim
Martin turning in a strong
pitching performance, going
five innings and giving up
just five hits and three runs,
with only one of those
earned.
Sebring grad Nikki Helms
then came on in relief, strik-
ing out four and surrendering
just one hit in her two innings
of work.

See PANTHERS, page 4B


Lady Devils singe Frostproof


By KATE ROWLAND
Special to the News-Sun
FORT MEADE Avon
Park had no problem advanc-
ing to Friday's semifinal
game against Tenoroc in the
District 9-3A girls basketball
tournament hosted by Fort
Meade High School after an
easy 85-10 victory over
Frostproof in first round play
Tuesday.
The No. 1-ranked team,
Fort Meade, had a first-round
bye and will play No. 4
McKeel Academy on Friday
at 7:30 p.m., directly after
No. 3 Avon Park plays
Tenoroc at 6 p.m. No. 2
Tenoroc defeated No. 7
Mulberry on Monday
The Red Devils defeated
Frostproof 88-13 the first
time the two teams met dur-
ing the regular season and
took the rematch 88-8.
Red Devil sophomore Tay
Perry had a game-high 19
points, senior Markida
Hawthorne scored 14 points,
senior Favi Cotte scored 13
points and Brekayla English
scored 10 points.
Avon Park took a 52-38
loss to Tenoroc on Nov. 30
but won 51-37 the second
time the two teams met on
Jan. 7.
"The beginning of the sea-
son we hadn't gelled yet."
said Avon Park coach
Paulette Daley. "We were try-
ing identify ourselves and the
girls were learning their
roles. Now they see the big-
ger picture and our seniors
have become good leaders.
"'Nonetheless, it will be an


interesting game. The girls
are focused. We've been get-
ting ready for Tenoroc and
the girls know what they
have to do."
What the Red Devils have
to do is fine tune some of the
things they didn't do in the
loss to Tenoroc, Daley said.
"They have some shooters
and we,will have to contain
their point guard," she said.
"She can penetrate and draw
fouls.
"We're going to have to
play the game from begin-
ning to end. Tenoroc's
preparing for us, too. They're
going to put up a fight. If we
lose, there will be no more
tomorrows."
Friday's two winning
teams automatically advance
to regional play, but face off
Saturday at 7 p.m. for the dis-
trict championship game.
"Going from Frostproof to
Tenoroc isn't easy, but the
girls have to be ready," Daley
said. "To get to the champi-
onship game, we have to get
past Tenoroc."
The winner of Saturday's
championship game will
have home court advantage
in the first game of regionals.
while the loser will be on the
road.
"I hope more fans come
out for the game." Daley
said. "The girls have worked
hard this year."

Chargers roll over
Lady Streaks
Sebring center Shannon

See HOOPS, page 4B









News-Sun Friday. February 4. 2011


www.newssun.comr


THE SCOREBOARD


WILD-CARD PLAYOFFS
Saturday, Jan. 8
Seattle 41, New Orleans 36
N.Y. Jets 17, Indianapolis 16
Sunday,Jan. 9
Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7
Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16
DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS
Saturday, Jan. 15
Pittsburgh 31, Baltimore 24
Green Bay 48, Atlanta 21
Sunday, Jan. 16
Chicago 35, Seattle 24
N.Y. Jets 28, New England 21
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
Sunday, Jan. 23
Green Bay 21, Chicago 14
Pittsburgh 24, N.Y. Jets 19
PRO BOWL
Sunday, Jan. 30
NFC 55, AFC 41
SUPER BOWL
Sunday, Feb. 6
At Arlington, Texas
Pittsburgh vs. Green Bay, 6:30 p.m.


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 37 11 .771 -
New York 25 23 .521 12
Philadelphia. 22 26 .458 15
New Jersey 15 35 .300 23
Toronto 13 37 .260 25
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 34 14 .708 -
Atlanta 31 18 .633 3/2
Orlando 31 18 .633 3%
Charlotte 21 27 .438 13
Washington 13 35 .271 21
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 34 14 .708 -
Indiana 19 27 .413 14
Milwaukee 19 28 .40414%2
Detroit 17 32 .347 17%
Cleveland 8 41 .16326%
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 40 8 .833 -
Dallas 33 15 .688 7
New Orleans 32 19 .627 9%
Memphis 26 24 .520 15
Houston 23 28 .451 18%
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 31 17 .646 -
Denver 29 20 .592 2%
Utah 29 21 .580 3
Portland 26 23 .531 5%
Minnesota 11 37 .229 20
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 34 15 .694 -
Phoenix 23 24 .489 10
Golden State 20 27 .426 13
L.A. Clippers 19 29 .39614%
Sacramento 12 34 .26120%V

Tuesday's Games
New Orleans 97, Washington 89
Portland 99, San Antonio 86
Boston 95, Sacramento 90
L.A. Lakers 114, Houston 106, OT
Wednesday's Games
Atlanta 100, Toronto 87
Indiana 117, Cleveland 112
, Philadelphia 106, New Jersey 92
. Charlotte 97, Detroit 87
, Dallas 113, New York 97
.* Memphis 102, Minnesota 84
Oklahoma City 104, New Orleans 93
Denver 109, Portland 90
Phoenix 92, Milwaukee 77
- Houston 97, Utah 96
Chicago 106, L.A. Clippers 88
Thursday's Games
, Miami at Orlando, late
Milwaukee at Golden State, late
San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, late
,* Friday's Games
Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
, Portland at Indiana, 7 p.m.
New York at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Toronto, 7 p.m.
: Orlando at Washington, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
* New Jersey at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
. Cleveland at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Boston, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
San Antonio at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Utah at Denver, 10:30 p.m.


: fl~~i:i


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Philadelphia 33 13 5 71 174 134
: Pittsburgh 33 15 4 70161 117
N.Y. Rangers 29 20 4 62 151 130
N.Y. Islanders 16 28 7 39123166
New Jersey 17 30 3 37103147
Northeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Boston 29 15 7 65155114
Montreal 29 18 5 63136127
Buffalo 23 21 5 51 137 144
Toronto 20 25 5 45128156
Ottawa 17 27 8 42114169
Southeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Tampa Bay 32'15 5 69158154
Washington 27 15 10 64142132
Atlanta 24 20 9 57153170
Carolina 25 20 6 56 155158
Florida 22 23 6 50136138
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
D tri W L OTPtsGF GA
Detroit 31 13 6 68 173 148
Nashville 27 17 7 61 136122
Chicago 27 20 4 58 164 143
St. Louis 22 20 7 51 130146
: Columbus 23 22 5 51 134159
Northwest Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 33 10 9 75 175 122
Minnesota 26 19 5 57 131 134
Colorado 25 19 6 56161 165
Calgary 25 21 6 56147154
Edmonton 15 27 8 38 123171
Pacific Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Dallas 30 16 5 65 148141
San Jose 27 19 6 60 148 144
Anaheim 28 21 4 60 143 150
Phoenix 25 19 9 59 152 156
Los Angeles 28 22 2 58146126
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
Sfor overtime loss.
Tuesday's Games
Toronto 4, Florida 3, SO


LIVE


SPORTS

ON TV


BOXING
FRIDAY
9 p.m. Sergio Mora vs. Bryan Vera ......... ESPN2
11 p.m. Luis Franco vs. Leonila Miranda ..... SHOW


Noon
Noon
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
6 p.m.
6 p.m.
8 p.m.
9 p.m.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL
SATURDAY
West Virginia at Villanova ........... ESPN
Butler at Cleveland State ........... ESPN2
Illinois at Northwestern .............. CBS
Clemson at Georgia Tech . . . . . 44
Auburn at Georgia ...................38
Baylor at Texas A&M ...............ESPN
Rhode Island at Temple ............ ESPN2
Syracuse at South Florida .............. 28
Memphis vs. Gonzaga .............. ESPN
Iowa at Indiana .................. ESPN2
Mississippi State at LSU ............... 38
North Carolina State at Duke ......... ESPN
Mississippi at Arkansas ............ ESPN2
Loyola Marymount at St. Mary's ..... ESPN2
Kentucky at Florida ................ ESPN


GOLF
FRIDAY
9:30 a.m. EuroPGA Qatar Masters ........... GOLF
4 p.m. PGA Phoenix Open ............... GOLF
SATURDAY
1 p.m. PGA Phoenix Open ............... GOLF
3 p.m. PGA Phoenix Open ................. CBS


10 p.m.


HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
SATURDAY
Bishop Gorman vs. Long Beach Poly . ESPN2


NBA
FRIDAY
8 p.m. Dallas at Boston ................... ESPN
10:30 p.m. Utah at Denver .................... ESPN
SATURDAY
10:30 p.m. Chicago at Golden State ............. WGN


SKATING
SATURDAY
2:30 p.m. U.S. Championships ........... . ... NBC


SKIING
SATURDAY
4:30 p.m. Freestyle World Championships........ NBC
Times, games, channels all subject to change


Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Rangers 3, SO
Montreal 3, Washington 2, SO
Calgary 3, Nashville 2, SO
Minnesota 1, Los Angeles 0, SO
New Jersey 2, Ottawa 1
Boston 3, Carolina 2
N.Y. Islanders 4, Atlanta 1
Chicago 7, Columbus 4
Tampa Bay 4, Philadelphia 0
Vancouver 4, Dallas 1
San Jose 5, Phoenix 3
Colorado at St. Louis, ppd., snow
Wednesday's Games
Detroit 7, Ottawa 5
Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Islanders 0
Montreal 3, Florida 2
Vancouver 6, Phoenix 0
Los Angeles 3, Edmonton 1
San Jose 4, Anaheim 3
Thursday's Games
Dallas at Boston, late
Carolina at Toronto, late
New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers, late
Nashville at Philadelphia, late
Calgary at Atlanta, late
Minnesota at Colorado, late
Friday's Games
Florida at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Vancouver, 10 p.m.


Wednesday's Scores
EAST
Adelphi 58, Pace 53
Albright 75,.Widener 72
Colgate 97, Longwood 86
Drexel 65, Towson 59
Duquesne 84, George Washington 59
Franklin & Marshall 69, Ursinus 61
Haverford 78, Washington, Md. 75
Johns Hopkins 65, Gettysburg 46
Kean 71, College of N.J. 55
Kings, Pa. 76, Eastern 62
Lebanon Valley 78, Lycoming 70
Medgar Evers 83, Brooklyn 76
Montclair St. 50, William Paterson 47
New Hampshire 62, Albany, N.Y. 59, OT
Northeastern 91, Va. Commonwealth 80
Providence 68, South Florida 63
Rhode Island 72, Fordham 52
Richard Stockton 68, Rutgers-Camden
49
St. John's 58, Rutgers 56
Syracuse 66, Connecticut 58
Temple 71, La Salle 67
Toledo at Buffalo, ppd.
Villanova 75, Marquette 70
West Virginia 56, Seton Hall 44
Westminster, Pa. 86, Waynesburg 61
York, N.Y. 87, NYCCT 73
SOUTH
Alabama 75, Mississippi St. 61
Anderson, S.C. 69, Lenoir-Rhyne 61
Appalachian St. 80, UNC Greensboro
78, OT
Barton 72, Mount Olive 56
Carson-Newman 81, Brevard 72
Charlotte 66, Xavier 62
Duke 80, Maryland 62


E. Mennonite 88, Lynchburg 79
Geneva 65, Thomas More 63
George Mason 87, Hofstra 68
Georgia College 66, North Georgia 58
Georgia St. 63, UNC Wilmington 58, OT
Guilford 72, Roanoke 70, OT
Lincoln Memorial 64, Tusculum 47
Northwestern St. 85, Cent. Arkansas 78
Old Dominion 67, Delaware 59
Pfeiffer 105, Lees-McRae 89
Reinhardt 85, Union, Ky. 69
Rice 71, Tulane 61
Richmond 62, Saint Joseph's 52
S.C.-Aiken 74, Augusta St. 62
Seton Hill 70, Wheeling Jesuit 68
South Carolina 64, LSU 56
Southern Miss. 75, UAB 71
Tenn. Wesleyan 67, Montreat 63
Tulsa 68, Memphis 65
UNC Pembroke 90, Francis Marion 81
Va. Intermont 65, Bryan 61
Valdosta St. 83, West Alabama 66
Virginia 49, Clemson 47
Virginia Tech 77, N.C. State 69
W. Carolina 74, Elon 58
William & Mary 73, James Madison 67
Wingate 79, Catawba 64
Xavier, NO 71, Belhaven 52
MIDWEST
Beloit 99, Carroll, Wis. 78
Bowling Green 73, N. Illinois 70, OT
Carleton 59, St. John's, Minn. 54
Carthage at Wheaton, Ill., ppd.
SCent. Michigan 91, Ohio 85
Concordia, Moor. 89, Macalester 52
Dayton 63, St. Bonaventure 61
Drake 65, S. Illinois 44
E. Michigan 60, Akron 56
Evansville 77, Missouri St. 65
Hamline 86, Gustavus 74
Indiana 60, Minnesota 57
Iowa 72, Michigan St. 52
Kansas St. 69, Nebraska 53
N. Iowa 53, Illinois St. 51
Saint Louis 69, Massachusetts 53
St. Olaf 78, Augsburg 69
St. Thomas, Minn. 75, St. Mary's,
Minn. 65
Wis.-River Falls 76, Wis.-Eau Claire 70
Wis.-Stevens Pt. 101, Wis.-Stout 50
SOUTHWEST
Georgia 60, Arkansas 59
Nicholls St. 72, Texas A&M-Corpus
Christi 52
Oklahoma 73, Baylor 66
Oklahoma St. 76, Missouri 70
SE Louisiana 89, Lamar 87
SMU 46, East Carolina 41
Texas St. 66, Stephen F.Austin 61
UCF at UTEP, ppd.
UTSA 70, Texas-Arlington 62
W. Texas A&M 70, Texas A&M-
Kingsville 56
FAR WEST
BYU 69, Wyoming 62
S. Utah 63, CS Bakersfield 59
San Diego St. 56, Colorado St. 54
UCLA 64, Southern Cal 50
UNLV 67. Utah 54
Utah St. 67. Nevada 45
EXHIBITION
Georgia Southwestern 78, Clayton St.
67
St. Mary's, Md. 82, York 75


LOCAL SCHEDULE


TODAY: Girls Basketball at DistrictTournament, Ft. Meade, vs.Tenoroc, 6 p.m.; Wrestling
at District Meet.TBA
TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at DistrictTournament, Lake Placid,TBA


Avon Park








Lake Placid


Sebring


TUESDAY: Boys Basketball hosts DistrictToumament,TBA; Baseball at Preseason Clssic,
DeSoto, TBA
WEDNESDAY: Baseball at Preseason Clssic, DeSoto,TBA
THURSDAY: Boys Basketball hosts DistrictTournament,TBA


TODAY: Wrestling at District Meet,TBA
MONDAY: Boys Basketball at District Tournament, Ridge, vs. Ridge, 7 p.m.; BoysTennis
vs. Avon Park, 4 p.m.
TUESDAY: Softball at Frostproof, 5:30/7:30 p.m.; BoysTennis vs. Hardee, 4 p.m.


TODAY: Boys Basketball vs. Moore Haven, Senior Night, Homecoming Court 6/7:30
Heartland p.m.
Christian


MONDAY: Boys Basketball at DistrictTournament, All Saints Academy,TBD


Walker


SATURDAY: Baseball vs. Santa Fe, doubleheader, 5 p.m.; Softball at Indian River, 1
p.m.
'. SUNDAY: Baseball at Seminole State, 1 p.m.
MONDAY: Baseball vs. Lake Sumter, 5 p.m.
SFCC TUESDAY: Softball vs. College of Central Florida, 5 p.m.


SPORTS SNAPSHOTS


Rotary Fundraiser at SFCC
AVON PARK On Saturday, Feb. 5,
from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. the Rotary Club of
Sebring will have a fundraiser for the
South Florida Community College
Baseball team at Panther Field during the
double-header against Sante Fe College.
The meal of pulled pork, green beans,
cole slaw, a roll and ice tea will be $8.
Tickets can be purchased at the Athletic
Office ahead of time or at the event.
For further information, or to purchase
tickets, please call 784-7037.

AP Girls Softball
AVON PARK Avon Park Girls
Softball will be holding registration for
ages 4-15 on Saturday's Feb. 5 and 12'
from 10 a.m.-l p.m. at Lucy Derkman
Field on North Anoka Ave.
Bring a copy of child's birth certificate.
Registration fee is $50.
For more information or any questions,
call Amanda at 257-2428.
Elks Golf Tournament
SEBRING The monthly Elks golf
tournament will be held on Monday Feb.
7 at Harder Hall Country Club.
Cost for the 8 a.m. shotgun start is $32
per player.
To register either your team or as an
individual player, contact Jack
McLaughlin at 471-3295 or by email at
jacknjudy33872 @gmail.com.
Check in not later than 7:40 a.m. in the
Harder Hall Golf Course restaurant area.
Woman's Club Benefit
SEBRING The Woman's Club of
Sebring will be holding a golf tournament
to benefit its' scholarship fund Saturday,
Feb. 19 at the Harder Hall Golf Course.
The four-person scramble will check-in
at 7 a.m. with an 8 a.m. shotgun start.
Cost is $55 per player or $220 per team
and includes golf, cart, lunch and prizes.
There is a Putting and Chipping contest
available and a $2,000 Hole-In-One prize
sponsored by the Cohan Radio Group.
Entry forms are available at local pro
shops and are to be sent to The Woman's
Club of Sebring, P.O. Box 8174, Sebring,
FL, 33872.
Registration deadline is February 14.
For an entry form or for more informa-
tion, call Johnell West at 382-0824.
Panther 5K
AVON PARK The second annual
South Florida Community College
Panther 5K Run/Walk will take place
Saturday, Feb. 26 at the SFCC Campus.
The SFCC Foundation, Inc. and Bill
Jarrett Ford Mercury are sponsoring the
event, and proceeds benefit the college's
intercollegiate athletics programs.
The entry fee for the SFCC Panther 5K
Run/Walk is $20 through Feb. 16 and $25
from Feb. 17 through the day of the race.
Students with I.D. may register for $15.
Every participant receives a Dri-Fit
long-sleeve shirt sizes cannot be guar-
anteed for those who enter after Feb. 17.
Registration is 7-7:45 a.m. on race day


in the parking lot in front of the SFCC
University Center race starts at 8 a.m.
Entry forms are available online, at
www.southflorida.edu/panther5k.
Participants can mail their copies and
entry fees to the SFCC Foundation, Inc.,
13 East Main Street, Avon Park, FL
33825; or fax forms to 453-8023 and call
453-3133 with credit card information.
'For more information about the SFCC
Panther 5K, call the SFCC Foundation at
863-453-3133.
Wings of Faith Golf
SEBRING Wings of Faith Worship.
Center presents the First Annual Golf
Tournament on Saturday, April-16 at
Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is
from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start
at 8:30 a.m.
Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one
team of four golfers, one tee sign arid two
green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes
one team of four golfers, one green sign;
Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green
sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100
includes one green sign.
Individual player $60 includes green
fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26).
Team of Four Golfers $240 includes
green fees, cart and lunch ($280 .after
March 26).
Make checks payable to: Wings of
Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL
33871, or register online at wingsof-
faithchristianworshipcenter.com.
Proceeds to be donated to scholarship
program for graduates attending Wings of
Faith Christian Worship Center.
For more information, call Jason
Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhanker-
son@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at
381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com.
Our Lady of Grace events
AVON PARK Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church has two benefit events
coming up in the next two months.
Tuesday, Feb. 22 they will host the
Todd Allen Show, Classic Branson and
Las Vegas-style entertainment at it's best.
Allen will perform a variety of styles
including Rock 'n Roll, Country and his
award-winning Elvis impersonations.
The show will be held at the Otir Lady
of Grace Catholic Church Grogan Center,
at 595 E. Main St. in Avon Park, at 7 p.m.
For a donation of $10, tickets can be
purchased at the Highlands Independent
Bank and Heartland National Bank Avon
Park locations, Warren's Auto Sales and
the Avon Park Chamber of Commerce.
The next event will be the First Annual
Golf Tournament at River Greens
Saturday, March 12 at 8 a.m.
The cost of $60 per player includes
golf. cart, golf shirt and lunch, while
River Greens members pay just $35.
Sponsorships are available, starting
with a $100 hole sponsor for a sign only.
A Hole Sponsor with Sign, plus a free
foursome, is $300. a Co-Sponsor Sign,
plus free foursome, with perogative to fly
their banner is $400 and a Major Sponsor
is $1,500.


.Page 28


IL I


1 e,..
e "










www.newssun.com


Nevws-Sun Friday. February 4, 2011


Golf Hammock
Golf Hammock Ladiep, finished a
three-day tournament Wednesday.
Feb. 2, for The President's Cup and the
overall winner was Betty Clarke with a
196.
The First Flight saw Ruth Kirk come
out on top with a 203, three shots
ahead of Carol Troupe's 206 and five
ahead of Florence Towell's 208.
A two-way tie for first in the Second
Flight had Joyce Stanley and Wanda
Hastie both coming in with 202s while
Mary Cripps took third with a 214.
Nancy Senior topped the Third Flight
with a 211 and Jo Thornburg and Joan
Armbruster each carded a 219.
On Monday, Jan. 31, the Mezza
group played a scramble at Golf
Hammock Country Club.
Taking first place with a minus 10
was the team of Joe Martini, Curt
Matterson, Bill Alesi and Bob Fidlin.
Second place with minus 7 went to
Pat Dell, Danny Geirer, Bob Topel and
Jean Terrell.
Third place was the team of Harvey
Kecskes, Doc Thomas, Roy Allen and
Karl Mellor with minus 6.
Fourth place was the team of Frank
Borgia, Jerry Patterson, Larry
Giangreco and Vince Johnston with a
minus 5.
Five teams tied at minus 3.
A draw was done and the team of
Bob Ahl, Sal Sboto, Janet Regan and
Frank Branca took fifth place.
Next Monday the Mezza group will
play at Golf Hammock beginning at
8:30 a.m.
This will be a shotgun start, please
arrive early to register.
For more information, call Pete at
382-1280.
Harder Hall
The ladies league played a pro am
points event on Sunday, Jan. 30.
The winners were: Tying for
first/second places were Jackie
Christopher and Carol Grimm with
plus-8 each. Tying for third/fourth
places were Elaine Hettinga and Mary
Ryan with plus-7 each.
Chip-in: No. 1, Pat Rowbotham and
Mary Ryan. No. 2, Helen Sayre.
On Thursday, Jan. 27, the ladies
league played Least Number of Putts
event.


"Wirnninrg first place was
Joyce Fleming with 30.
Tying for second/third
places were Phyllis Colby
and Elaine Heinigai with
28 each.
Chip-in: No. 14, Joyce
Fleming. Se
The ladies league '. .n-.
played a pro points on ^"" '""
Monday, Nov. 24. ,,,
Tying for first/second !. y r,
places were Mary Hayes P,, f,
and Shirley Holt with plus- ."pJ
7 each. Third place, Sue ii, .
Harriman with plus-4. ru ,i'.a f I!-
iar niiK i'llo
Lake June West '
Golf Club wl,',i,,
A scramble was played ,.. Tv'
on Thursday, Jan. 27. ,
Tying for first/second fi.i,,, mN .
places were the teams of owner, limN
Ron Hesson, Pete and ntlwhr of 1th
Mary McNamee, Rob and ,"'n ,S ts
Elaine Orr and Dodie
Babillis; Andy and Karen
Ames, Art Schmeltz, Betty Billau, Walt
and Vera Nagel with 49 each. Third
place, Cal Billingsley, Ken Rowen; Ken
and Norma Colyer and Wade Eades
with 51.
Closest to the pin: (Ladies), No. 8,
Maxine Wegner, 5-feet. (Men), No. 2,
John Howarth, 6-feet-8-inches; and
No. 4, Al Onstad, 3-feet-5-inches.
The men's association played a
Men's Best Ball event on Wednesday,
Jan. 26.
Winning first place was the team of
Ron Hesson, Joe Swartz, Orville
Huffman, John Ruffo and Angelo
loriano with 38; second place, John
Byron, John Simmons, Art Schmeltz
and Ott Wegner with 41; and third
place, Bill Hintz, Pete McNamee,
Howard Langston and Bud York with
42.
Closest to the pin: No. 2, Walt Nagel,
4-feet-5-inches; No. 4, Art Schmeltz,
3-feet-5-inches; and No. 8, Claude
Cash, 9-feet-5-inches.
The ladies association played a
Ladies League event on Monday, Jan.
24.
Tying for first/second places were
the teams of Joyce Swartz, Norma
Colyer and Clara Wiseman; Helen
Mellon, Elaine Orr, Helen Hunter and


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) Phil Frank '


Jim Hays, David Raciti,
Darrell Horney and Bill
S" -, Lockwood teamed up to
..' shoot a -21 for the win
while Tom Lacy, Ray
Deryckere and Gene
Ransom finished one shot
eze On Your Grip behind at -20.
Taking third were Roger
Thompson, David Moiles,
Dick McArdle and Cody
Coates with a -14..
Closest to the pin was
Horney as he got to within
S5-feet, 1-inch from #2.
The Men's Association
played a Four-Round
Event of Match Play in
January on Wednesday,
S/. Jan. 19, Saturday, Jan. 22,
Wednesday, Jan. 26 and
Saturday, Jan. 29.
Sixteen players entered
the competition. First
round eliminated eight
.. ...- players.
. ...T ..i. Quarter Finals consist-


janice Barringer witn 36 each. i niru
place, Mary McNamee, Jan Mann, Vera
Knishka and Sylvia West with 37.
Closest to the pin: No. 2, Lynn
Martin, 11-feet-5-inches; No. 4, Jane
Roush, 7-feet-5-inches; and No. 8,
Helene Mellon, 10-feet-2-inches.
Pinecrest
The Men's Association played Team
and Individual Pro-Am Points
Wednesday, Feb. 2 and saw Tom
Rockola, Keith Strickland, Ted Turmel
and F. Hocott take the team win with
+16 points.
Leigh Furnal, Lynn Fredrick, Jerry
Linsley and Carl Sachetti were second
with +14.
Individually, a three-way tie for first
took place in A Division with Mike
McCarville, Murray Campbell and Paul
Brown each totaling +4.
Dick Bouchard won B Division with
+9 ahead of Earl Plemmons +6 and
Rex Smolek scored +8 to win C
Division over Bud Kammerman's +5.
In D Division, Sachetti totaled +10 to
edge the +9 brought in by Bob
Colandrea.
Placid Lakes
The, Men's Association played a 3, 2,
1 event Wednesday, Feb. 2.


ed of eight players:
Results: Bruce Miseno vs. Ed
Bartusch Bartusch won 2 and 1 (up 2
with one hole to play).
David Moiles vs. Jim Hays- Hays
won with a 3 and 2.
John Rosettis vs. Bud Snyder -
Snyder won in a play off.
John Goble vs. Chuck Fortunato -
Fortunato won in a play off.
Semi Finals consisted of four play-
ers:
Ed Bartusch vs. Jim Hays Ed
Bartusch won two and one.
Bud Snyder vs. Chuck Fortunato -
Chuck Fortunato won six and four.
Finals consisted of two players:
Ed Bartusch vs. Chuck Fortunato -
Chuck Fortunato won two and one (up
two holes with one hole to play).
The PLCC MGA 2011 President's
Cup Champion is Chuck Fortunato.
River Greens
The Morrison Group played an event
on Monday, Jan. 31.
Winning first place was the team of
Ken Brunswick, Bob Stevens, Lefty St.
Pierre and Len Westdale with minus-
36; and second place, Bob Streeter,
Peter March, Fred Evans and Butch
Smith with minus-30.
A Limited Member event was played


on Monday, Jan. 31.
Winning first place was the team of
Sharon and Bern Koster, Kay and John
Lemek with plus-11.5.
Individual winners were: First place,
Tom Brouwer with plus-8.5; and sec-
ond place, Sharon Koster with plus-
7.5.
The men's association played a
Men's Day event on Saturday, Jan. 29.
Winning first place was the team of
Vince Boever, Ken Brunswick, Bill
Mountford and Freg Evans with 244.
Tying for second/third places were the
teams of Tom Morway, Ken Koon,
Keith Kincer and Lefty St. Pierre; J.R.
Messier, Tim Thomas, Leo Persails and
Joe Graf with 257 each.
Closest to the pin: No. 3, Neil
Purcell, 13-feet-5-inches. No. 5, Bill
Mountford, 7-feet-11-inches. No. 12,
Harold Kline, 2-feet-9-inches. No. 17,
Leo Persails, 4-feet.
A Friday afternoon scramble was
played Friday, Jan. 28.
Winning first place was the team of
Ken Brunswick, Tony Lankford, Jeff
Davies, Tom Stewart, Peggy Wehunt
and Bev Rudd with 16-under.
The ladies association played a pro
am tournament on Thursday, Jan. 27.
Winning first place was the team of
Carol Morse, Dianne Stoddart,
Charlotte Walter and Janelle Beckman
with plus-2; second place, Kay Conkle,
Anne Kelly,. Penny Anderson and
Nancy Long with plus-1.5; and third
place, Marge McDonald, Pat Gower,
Karen Speaker and Carol Roy with
minus-3.5.
Individual winners were: First place,
Gerri Leslie with plus-5; second place,
Penny Anderson with plus-4; and third
place, Ann Purdy with plus-3.5.
The Morrison Group played an event
on Thursday, Jan. 27.
Winning .first place was the team of
Ken Brunswick, Hank Wunderlich,
Barb Stevens and Leo Persails with
minus-29; and second place,.Bob
Wolf, Gil Heier, Jim Cercy and Lefty St.
Pierre with minus-23.
The men's association played a pro
am tournament on Wednesday, Jan.
26.
Winning first place was the team of
Peter March, Glenn Nelson, Russ Rudd
and Johnny Wehunt with plus-7.5.
See GOLF, page 4B


.., J 2 .


Monday & Tuesday


,K 16" Large One
01/ Topping Pizza
~O Not valid with any other offer.
Q na Pi"( Expires 02/28/11
SERVING HIGHBANDS FOR MORE Th 25 YEARS


Page 3B








Page 4B


Neivs-Sun Friday. February 4. 2011


www.newssun.com


r .. -
U- .. .- -
~"2'-~~$~-e.. ~ - ....i~K -
~ ,.A~L


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Morgan Huhn gets a good look at this pitch as she ,pulls back from her bunt attempt.
The Lady Panthers showed patience at the plate, drawing a slew of walks in Tuesday's
season-opening split with Seminole.

Panthers pull out nightcap
Continued from 1B for a 6-3 win. SFCC was scheduled to
The offense, meanwhile, "We got one and gave be back at it Thursday, wel-
got those situational hits ourselves chances to win the coming Lake Sumter to
when they needed them with
Rodriguez driving in two other," Falla said. "Overall, town before traveling to Ft.
and Heiser and Egana I'm happy with what we Pierce Saturday for a twin-
breaking out with big games did." bill against Indian River.



:-Porsche presents an additional 36 hours
Continued from 1B
regularly show up for the. "
48-Hours. ...
In 2008, there were over .... ..
100 factory-prepared racers a -',
at the time it represented
the single largest collection. *
of Porsche Cup cars in the 0 "
world.
As of Thursday, 350 -
entrants competing in a
wide array of different skill
Level races both against
each other and against the Courtesy photo
clock. Porsche GT cars from all over the United States are at the
Th th lar ri Sebring International Raceway for the 48-Hours of
There are the large grid Sebring. It is the first Porsche Club of America event
races around the 3.72 mile each year and the largest in the world.
circuit as well as an
"autocross" single-car corn- International Raceway. see the action from the mid-
'petition to be run as part of The Porsche marque way area, stretching from
weekend action, holds more single records at the famous Hairpin Turn all
A Friday night race is also the track than any other the way back up to the esses
planned. manufacturer, at turns three, four and five.
It's no surprise that the The event is open to the The 48-Hours of Sebring
group has chosen to hold public Smithyman said will have events running
Iheir event at the Sebring spectators will be able to through Sunday afternoon.


Golf scores around the county


Continued from 3B
Tying for second/third places
were the teams of Terry Lewis.
Keith Kincer. John Smutnick
and Frank Conroy: Vince
Boever, Dick McClay and Dave
Pelfrey with plus-2 each.
Individual winners: A Flight:
Russ Rudd with plus-6.5. B
Flight: Vince. Boever with plus-
5.5. C Flight: Keith Kincer with
plus-2.5. D Flight: Peter March
with plus-3.5.
The Morrison Group played
an event on Tuesday, Jan. 25.
Winning first place was the
team of Peter Bridge, Ken
Koon, Ray Delsasso and Joe
Graf with minus-34. Tying for
second/third places were the
teams of David Kelly, Hank
Wunderlich, Bob Stevens and
Bill Mountford; Russ Rudd, Ken
Brunswick, Jim Cercy and
Harold Kline with minus-28
each.
The Morrison Group played
an event on Monday, Jan. 24.
The winners were: First
place, Ken Brunswick and John
Hierholzer with plus-22; second
place, Dale Duncan and Gil
Heier with plus-19; and third
place, Harold Kline and Fred
Evans with plus-15.
A Limited Member event was
played Monday, Jan. 24.
Winning first place was the
team of John and Kay Lemek,
Bern and Sharon Koster with
plus-10; second place, Ed and
Judy Ward, Ken and Diane Hill
with Even.
Individual winners were:
Tying for first/second places
were Ken Hill and Don Sherman
with plus-6.5 each.
The ladies association played
a Front/Back event Monday,
Jan. 24.
The winners were: Front -
Bridge, Jabison, Karen Speaker
and Fran Neil with 132. Back -
Anne Kelly, Sally Dworak,
Peggy Wehunt and Mary Beth
Carby with 145.
Individual Front First place,
Karen Speaker with 29; tying
for second/third places were
Jeanine Persails and Fran Neil
with 31 each.
Back First place, Peggy
Wehunt with 32; and second
place, Laura Smutnick with 33.
SpringLake
On Wednesday, Feb. 2, the
SpringLake Women's Golf
Association played a 4 Person
Team Total Net Score
Tournament on the Cougar Trail
Course.
The teams were matched up
fairly evenly since the spread
between first (283) and last
(291) was only eight points.
Winners of first place, with a
net score of 283, was the team
of Dotti Blackwell, Debbie
Delaney, Joann Deweese and


Hoops season ends for Sebring, Lake Placid gals


Continued from 1B
;:Williams left it all on the,
court during the first round of
'the District 5-5A'girls basket-
ball tournament hosted by
:Haines City, but the Blue
Streaks' lone senior couldn't
do it all.
Sebring wound up with a
32-27 loss to Liberty, ending
the Blue Streaks season on
Tuesday.
Williams was the only
player on the team to score in
double figures, notching 16
points on the night.
The Blue Streaks split a
pair of games with the
Chargers during the regular
season, winning 47-42 on
Dec. 3 and taking a 45-29


loss on Jan. 7.
Sebring finished the sea-
son 9-14 overall.
McKeel sinks LP
The Green Dragons held
their own for three quarters,
but foul trouble in the final
quarter put McKeel
Academy in position to take-
a 60-36 victory over Lake
Placid in the first round of
the District 9-3A girls
basketball tournament hosted
by Fort Meade High School
on Tuesday.
The Green Dragon's main
inside player. Jamacia Gayle,
scored a team-high 12 points,
but had to sit out the entire


fourth quarter after getting
into foul trouble in the sec-
ond half.
Bria Wilson also scored in
double figures for Lake
Placid, sinking a couple of 3-
pointers for a total of 10
points for the Green Dragons.
"We got into foul trouble at
the end," said Lake Placid
coach Shonda Legree.
"Jamacia had to sit out a
whole quarter.
"We played three good
quarters with them and then
we lost it in the fourth quar-
ter."
Lake Placid took two clos-
er losses, 52-28 and 56-31, to
McKeel during the season.
Legree said the team did a


good job this year and added
that she is looking forward to
next season.
The Green Dragons will
lose four seniors to gradua-
tion, but one starter, guard
Stephanie- Smith, will leave
the biggest hole in the team
defensively.
"We're looking pretty
good for next year," Legree
said. "We've got girls coming
back and some younger girls
coming up. We may have two
girls who can go straight onto
the varsity team from middle
school.
"We had a pretty good sea-
son. We batted .500 which is
a step up from last year, so
we're happy."


Carolyn Irvine.
For second place, there was a
three-way tie at 285, which
included the teams of Terrie
Austin, Marsi Benson, Jean
Donahue and Linda Pfleger;
Kay Baxter, Eleanor Demitz,
Joan Gann and Shirley Reeb;
and Margaret Mazzola, Jan
Nelson, Carol Rath and Sharon
Warner.
On Tuesday, Feb. 1, the
Spring Lake Men's Golf
Association played the first day
of a two day Pick-Your-Partner
Best Ball tournament in which
Day 1 was 1 Best Ball Net and
Day 2 will include both balls.
Day 1 was played on Panther
Creek course.
Day 2 will be played on
Thursday on Cougar Trail and
reported in next week's golf
scores.
At the halfway point, the win-
ners for the A Flight are Ray
Albert and Dwight Demitz with a
net 60.


Tied at second are Vern
Baxter / Edd Vowels and Bob
Hinde / Ed Beauchemin at net
61.
Ken Kirby and Charlie Scoven
are at 64; John Starks / Larry
Miesner and the team of Gary
Behrendt and Jack Hoerner are
tied at 67.
In the B Flight, Jay Payne and
Red Bohanon are at 60, Ron
Brochu and Dan Porter at 61
and Bob Rogers and Bo
Bohanon are at 62.
Dave Docherty and Jim Foote
posted a 63 and a three team tie
at 64 included the teams of Ken
Willey and Richie Eastep, Ed
Clay and John Schroeder, and
John Delaney and John
Bozynski.
Due to reporting deadlines,
the final scores will be reported
next week.
At this point, however, just
about any two teams can win -
with consistent shots and a lit-
tle luck.


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LP Seniors

: keeping

things close


Continued from 1B
run) had three hits.
Seminole Tire triumphed
over Yates Insurance 22-17.
Jess Hathaway had five
hits (double, triple) and was
ably supported by Ken
Morgan (two doubles, triple)


Clarke looking forward


Continued from 1B
Football Recruiting page.
As part of his evaluation,
ihe site notes, Changes
ilirections smoothly,
explodes out of cuts and can
run crisp short-to-intermedi-
ate routes. Reads defenses
well and locates seams work-
ing against zone coverage.
Shows quick, soft hands. Has
excellent body control and
can make the tough catch in
traffic."
Aspects that his former
coach knows well.


"The skill set is there."
Hamlin said. "And the scary
thing is, he can get better.
You'll see him at USF in a
couple years, doing great
things."
It's also the perspective
that helps Clarke once the
ball is in his hands keeping
his eyes downfield that will
keep him progressing as he
eagerly takes this next step.
"'It'll be a change, but you
have to change to get better,"
he said. "I'm looking for-
ward. You can't look back."


and Pete Mathews (triple)
with four hits each.
Don Cunningham chipped
in with three hits (triple).
Lake Placid Marine defeat-
ed Schooni's 12-9.
Manager Jim Guild had


four hits and Richard Rivera
(double, triple) and Larry
Lane had three hits each.
John Buja had three hits for
Schooni's while Bob Roth
played stellar defense at short-
stop for the Restauranteurs.


Dr. Keatley Waldron
Chiropractor


ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS


(863) 382-4445
13 Ryant3Blvd.
Sebring
Westshore Plaza


WALDRON
CHIROPRACTIC HEALTH CENTER, P.A.


www.waldronchiropractic.com


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Prices effective Thursday, February 3
through Wednesday, February 9, 2011.
Visit publix.com/store to find the store nearest you.
Liquor items are only available at Publix Liquors.
,-, Y,









www.newssun.com News-Sun Friday. February 4, 2011


HEALTHY LIVING


Is it cardiac arrest or a heart attack?


Metro Services
Many people mistakenly
assume cardiac arrest and
heart attack are the same
thing. However, sudden car-
diac arrest is not a heart
attack. In fact, there are dis-
tinguishable differences
between the two that are best
explained by detailing what is
actually happening when
someone is suffering from
either one.

What happens
during a heart
attack?
During a heart attack,
blockage occurs in one or
more of the heart's arteries.
That blockage subsequently
prevents the heart from
receiving enough oxygen-rich
blood. Research indicates that
many people with symptoms
of a heart attack actually
delay seeking treatment for
more than two hours.
In a 2010 study published
in the Archives of Internal
Medicine, researchers found
the average delay in arriving
at the hospital after the start
of a heart attack was roughly
two and a half hours. Eleven
percent of the more than
100,000 cases examined in
the study waited more than 12
hours from the start of symp-
toms before seeking treat-


Free diabetes
management classes
SEBRING The
Highlands County Health
Department (HCHD) is
offering Diabetes Self-
Management Education
(DSME) classes as part of its
Wellness and Diabetes
Education Program. This
program serves Highlands
County residents of all ages,
especially those with dia-
betes or at risk for develop-
ing diabetes. These classes
are free of charge and pro-
vided by a Certified
Diabetes Educator.
Classes in English are
scheduled in Sebring from
8:30-11:30 a.m. Feb. 14-16
at the Bert J. Harris, Jr.
Agricultural Center (located


ment. Those symptoms can
include chest discomfort,
shortness of breath and dis-
comfort in other areas of the
body that do not improve
after five minutes.

What happens
during cardiac
arrest?
When a person is experi-
encing cardiac arrest, their
heart's electrical system is
malfunctioning and suddenly
becomes irregular. The heart
begins to beat very fast while
the ventricles may flutter or
quiver. Blood is not being
delivered to the body during
cardiac arrest, and a genuine
fear is that blood flow to the
brain will be reduced so dras-
tically that a person may lose
consciousness.
Unlike a heart attack, car-
diac arrest requires immedi-
ate treatment. It's best to seek
treatment promptly for both a
heart attack and cardiac
arrest, but those experiencing
cardiac arrest are at much
greater risk of death if treat-
ment is not sought immedi-
ately. Men and women, young
and old, should also keep in
mind that heart attack can
sometimes lead into cardiac
arrest, highlighting the
importance of seeking treat-
ment as soon as any symp-


Snapshots

at 4509 George Blvd. con-
ference room 1) and from
5:30-8:30 p.m. Feb. 22-24 at
the Highlands County Health
Department (located at 7205
S. George Blvd.).
Enrollment is limited and
registration is required.
To register and for more
information, contact the
HCHD Wellness and
Diabetes Education Program,
at 382-7294.

Amplified telephones
distribution
SEBRING Hearing
Impaired Persons will dis-
tribute amplified telephones
to Florida residents who
have a hearing or speech


toms of heart attack begin to
appear.

How are heart
attack and cardiac
arrest prevented?
The goal is to keep blood
flowing through the body as
smoothly as possible. This
means avoiding blood clots
and the build-up of plaque in
the arteries. That might sound
simple enough, but plaque
build-up and the process of
coronary artery disease has
been shown to begin as far
back as childhood, when diets
are not typically tailored to
avoid heart disease.
While it's impossible to go
back in time and change cer-
tain lifestyle habits, including
diet and exercise routines and
regimens, there are ways
adults can reduce the build-up
of plaque, which can help
them avoid falling victim to
heart attack and cardiac
arrest.
Exercise regularly. At
least 30 minutes of daily
exercise is recommended.
Eat a healthy diet. A diet
low in saturated fat, which
almost always equates to eat-
ing less red meat, and high in
fruits and vegetables is ideal.
Stop smoking. For those
who have never smoked or
have quit smoking, keep it up.


loss, in the Conference
Room at Nu-Hope Elder
Care Services, 6414 U.S. 27
South, Sebring, on Thursday,
Feb. 17, from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. By appointment only.
Call (941) 743-8347.

Community outreach
schedule
Ace Homecare will offer
the following community
outreach events this week:
Today: 8 a.m. Health
Fair, Sebring Village,
Schumacher Road, Sebring;
10 a.m. Health Fair,
Highland Village, Villa
Road, Sebring
Monday: 8 a.m. Health
Fair, Brookside Bluffs, S.R.
17, Zolfo Springs; 10:30
a.m. Health Fair, NuHope


It's never too early for
adults to start taking steps,
including daily exercise, to
prevent heart attack and
cardiac arrest.

Those who have or continue
to smoke, stop.
Don't procrastinate.
These changes can't wait
until tomorrow. As mentioned
above, the .process or coro-
nary artery disease doesn't
wait for adulthood, and adults
who need to make changes
cannot afford to drag their
feet. The good news is studies
have indicated that even those
with heart disease can expect
to live longer if they simply
commit to the necessary
lifestyle changes.
For more information, visit
www.heart.org.


Elder Services, 310 N. 8th
Ave., Wauchula; 11 a.m. -
Health Fair, Forest Glades,
Townsend St., Wauchula; 1
p.m. Caregivers Support
Group, Crown Pointe
Assisted Living Community,
Sun 'n Lake Blvd., Sebring.
. Tuesday: 7:30 a.m. -
Health Fair, Lakeside
Gardens, C.R. 621, Lake
Placid; 9 a.m. Health Fair,
Heron's Landing, Lake
Placid; Health Fair, Lake
Placid Meal Site, Interlake
Blvd., Lake Placid; 1 p.m. -
Health Fair, Groves, behind
Sebring Diner, U.S. 27,
Sebring.
Wednesday: 8 a.m. -
Health Fair, Neibert's, U.S.
98, Lake Placid; 9 a.m. -
Health Fair, Palm Estates,
U.S. 98, Lorida.


"Care You Can Trust, Service You Deserve"


Seure .mr
Car Unit*


CROWNPOINTE


863-386-1060


5005 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, FL 33872'


Sports shoes and your child


As kids explore different
sports, parents buy bats,
gloves, helmets and jerseys.
But new sports should mean
new shoes, too.Buying a
generic athletic shoe no
longer makes the grade.
Sport-specific shoes, which
are designed for the exact
sport in which a child will
participate, boost perform-
ance and protect against foot
and ankle injuries.The
American Podiatric Medical
Association (APMA), the
country's leading health
resource representing 80 per-
cent of podiatric physicians
nationally, recently surveyed
patents. According to the
survey, 48 percent of chil-
dren under the age of 17
have experienced a sports-
related foot disorder.With so
many children falling victim
to foot injuries caused by
playing sports, parents
should be reminded that the
proper sports footwear can
make the difference between
fun and serious injury. These
guidelines are offered for


. parents looking to
keep their children
running, dribbling
and sprinting strong
- and injury-free.

Dribbles and
dunks
Many kids play
ba all as their
organized sport of
choice. But with so
many feet running


Foot
Care
Dr. Joni Jones


around a court, kids' basket-
ball shoes should have a
thick, stiff sole to support
running and jumping.
Basketball players also make
sharp direction changes, so
shoes must feature high
ankle constructions. The best
basketball shoes offer strong,
support on either side of a
child's ankle.

Making a racket
Court shoes designed for
tennis and racquetball might
look like other sneakers, but
they feature invisible support
for lateral moves.


Children's court
shoes should sup-
port both sides of
the foot, since chil-
dren must make
quick movements
and weight shifts as
they chase after
tennis balls.
Flexible soles help
children change
directions quickly.


Sprinting


toward the finish
Every runner, no matter
their age, requires a shoe fit-
ted to their style and speed.
Good running shoes provide
maximum shock protection
to avoid leg and knee
injuries. They make sure that
feet hit the ground correctly.
Parents should look for
the.APMA Seal of Approval
on footwear, which guaran-
tees that shoes meet guide-
lines for stability and safety.
They also shouldn't forget to
buy synthetic-blended socks
without large seams, which


work away moisture and
help prevent odor.
Don't forget to check your
child's shoes to make certain
they still fit. A child's feet
grow at an amazing pace
until their growth plates are
closed.
The shoe should be a
thumb's width longer than
the end of the longest toe,
after walking around in the
shoe store.
All feet will move forward
in shoes with any activity.
Shoes should have a padded
tongue, good laces, a place
on the back for the Achilles
tendon and plenty of shock
absorption.
Some shoe fitting knowl-
edge and a few precautions
will lead to happy feet for
all ages.

Dr Joni Jones is a podiatrist in
Sebring who can be reached at
382-3228, stop by her office at
206 West Center Avenue,
Sebring or mail to P.O. Box
1719, Sebring, FL 33871-1719.


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Page 5B


1


J


Hope Hospice

receives national

recognition for

honoring veterans

Special to the News-Sun enabled Hope to fulfill
For the first time since stringent requirements
the end of World War II, a become eligible for p
veteran is given a sharp nership in the national
salute from fellow soldiers. Honor Veterans .progr,
From his bed. he proudly established by the NHP(
and tearfully responds. The National Hospice
ceremony is part of the Palliative C
Hope Hospice VALOR pro- Or animation, in collab
gram Veterans' Access to t
Life Opportunities0 and tion with the Departmen
Resources. Veterans Affairs.

Nearly 25 percent of We Honor Veterans p
those served by Hope are vides additional resour
military veterans; the num- for meeting veterans' ne
ber continues to grow. "We related to military serv
understand the special care combat experience t.
needs of the men and matic events or ot
women who served in all issues.
wars and in peacetime. The "We Honor Veter
VALOR program was complements the work
developed to provide the have done for so long in
support and respect they VALOR program
deserve," according to Beckwith said. "We are
Hope President and CEO deeply grateful for the
Samira K. Beckwith.
erans' service to our cc
"We express our grati- try, and we are honored
tude with a special ceremo- t a
ny and the presentation of a be able to meet their n
Certificate of Appreciation. in partnership M
Even more importantly, we NHPCO. Our resource
help them with access to and our commitment --
VA benefits while meeting unparalleled."
all of their healthcare For more informant.
needs," Beckwith added. visit http://www.hopel
The VALOR program has org/HospiceVeterans/.


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Ne,.vs-Sun Frida February 4. 2011


Dear Pharmacist: You've
mentioned that cayenne pep-
per is very healing for the
stomach and can prevent
ulcers. How can that be? I
thought chili pepper would
burn a hole in your gut faster
than you could say, "hot
chili pepper." Not so?
Answer: Not so. While
capsaicin-the heat-causing
compound found in varying
degrees in all chilies -
would most likely light up
an existing ulcer, it's never-
theless been shown to
destroy the ulcer-causing H.
pylori bacteria while also
helping certain cells squirt
out juices that buffer the
gastrointestinal tract's lining
and prevent lesions from
forming in the first place.
Pathogenic tummy bugs
aren't the only bad boys cap-
saicin likesto burn. In a
recent study headed by Dr.
Phillip Koeffler at Cedars-
Sinai Hospital, it was dis-
covered that capsaicin
seduces prostate cancer cells
into committing suicide-
figuratively speaking, makes
them blow their DNA brains
out. More specifically, the
research team found that in
mice, prostate tumors treated
with capsaicin wound up
one-fifth the size of similar
untreated tumors.
A Korean study showed
that even the cells of the
deadly skin cancer,
melanoma, are likewise vul-
nerable to capsaicin's deadly
charms. So even though our
little Ms. Capsaicin isn't a
very discriminating seduc-
tress, she's apparently a real-


Dear Pharmacist
5Suzy Cohen

ly hot one!
The pepper's heat doesn't
come from the seeds, as is
commonly assumed. It
comes from the placenta, the
white-colored strips lining
the inside of the pod. The
tiny sacs containing the hot
stuff are produced there
along with the seeds.
These sacs (or vesicles)
tend to burst easily, spewing
their hell-raising elixir onto
the totally innocent seeds. In
the body, the heat-causing
capsaicin numbs your sense
of pain by blunting the
effects of "Substance P," a
pain-causing chemical in the
body.
Commercial capsaicin
products are sold nationwide
in patch form, gel, cream
and roll-on. Even the pow-
dered spice makes a great
home remedy. I learned
about it-,the hard way, after I
cut my finger while chop-
ping onions. I bled for
hours! To stop bleeding, all
you need is pure cayenne
powder, look in your spice
rack. Just sprinkle a tiny
amount of it, onto a bandage
or gauze and apply it to the
bleeding cut. Bleeding
should stop within a minute.


www.newssun.com.


Is your child eating enough?


Metro Services
Peppers can offer a lot of health benefits.


Also cool (or I guess I
should say, hot) is that eat-
ing fresh peppers helps you
lose weight. The non-exer-
cise thermogenesis (heat
production) caused by
ingesting peppers can cause
a moderately active 38 year-
old man to burn up to 600
extra calories a day.
That's nearly twice the
number of calories the same
man would burn during an
hour-long bout of lovemak-
ing! So next time you're
looking to add a little spice
to your life, make a date
with a chili pepper.


Did you know?
Laughing sparks weight
loss.
One to two hundred belly
laughs a day is the equiva-
lent of a high impact work-
out and burns off up to 500
calories.

Suzy Cohen is a registered phar-
macist and the author of 'The
24-Hour Pharmacist' and 'Real
Solutions.' For more informa-
tion, visit www.
DearPharmacist. com. This
information is not intended to
treat, diagnose or cure your con-
dition.


Make a date



with chili pepper


Metro Services
W ith ,. hiJh..... J obesity
epidemics on the rise. many
parents and healthcare
providers are concerned
about the dietary habits of
children. However, many
parents to toddlers or even
school-aged children may
wonder if their children are
eating enough.
Children often go through
periods of finicky eating or
disinterest in food. It is not
uncommon to have a child
who eats a wide variety of
foods when he is younger
only to dislike the same
foods a year or two later.
Most doctors say that if a
child is growing and active,
chances are that he is
healthy and getting enough
food. If the opposite is true,
there may be some cause for
concern. Parents should
consult the child's pediatri-
cian if eating habits seem to
be compromising their
child's growth or energy
levels.
There are estimates that a
young child should eat
about a tablespoon of food
for each year of the child's
age. Therefore, a 3-year-old
should be getting at least 3
tablespoons of food. If the
child is interested in more
food, certainly offer it. If he
pushes food away after eat-
ing, don't force more on
him. Most children should


Diabetes in pregnancy a

risk for mom years later


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON A type
of diabetes that strikes during
pregnancy may disappear at
birth, but it remains a big red
flag for moms' future health
- one that too many seem to
be missing.
Roughly half of women
who've had gestational dia-
betes the pregnancy kind
- go on to develop full-
fledged Type 2 diabetes in the
months to years after their
child's birth.
Yet new research shows
fewer than one in five of those
women returns for a crucial
diabetes test within six
months of-delivery. That's the
first of the checkups they're
supposed to have every few
years to guard against dia-
betes' return, but no one
knows how many do.
The research, by testing-lab
giant Quest Diagnostics, is
sobering because if they only
knew, many of these new
mothers could take steps to
reduce their chances of later-
in-life diabetes that can bring
with it such complications as
heart disease and kidney dam-
age.
"It's almost as if you got a
preview a window to the
future," says Dr. Ann
Albright, a diabetes specialist
with the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention. "This
is a population that really
should be targeted for inter-
vention."
And more mothers-to-be


soon may join the ranks. The
American Diabetes
Association is recommending
a change in how pregnant
women are tested that will
identify more mild cases than
today, based on some recent
studies that found treating
even those mothers leads to
easier deliveries. If obstetri-
cians eventually sign on, it
has the potential to double
diagnoses although most
mild cases would need only
better nutrition and exercise,
not diabetes medications, the
association cautions.
New CDC estimates show
nearly 26 million Americans
have some form of diabetes,
the vast majority of them the
Type 2 kind that's linked to
being -overweight. Tens of
millions more have high
enough blood sugar to be clas-
sified as pre-diabetic.
Women can have either
Type 2 diabetes or the insulin-
dependent Type 1 variety at
the time they become preg-
nant. That's a separate issue,
and those women are urged to
have their diabetes tightly
controlled to avoid a range of
risks to baby and mother.
But according to the CDC,
somewhere between 2 percent
and 10 percent of pregnant
women develop diabetes for
the first time during pregnan-
cy, the gestational type. If
untreated, the mother's high
blood sugar can make the
fetus grow too large, leading
to C-sections and early deliv-
eries.


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6 5 3,22 *A


Page 6B


HEALTHY LIVING


have 3 meals and 2 snacks
per day. Toddlers may not
eat enough in one meal to
remain full until the next
meal. Small, healthy' snacks
of vegetables, whole-grain
crackers or low-fat dairy
products can help take the
edge off of hunger.
Health experts say that it
can take several introduc-
tions to a new food before
the child becomes accus-
tomed to its taste and tex-
ture. It may be a good idea
to offer a variety of new
foods together with some-
thing he already enjoys eat-
ing.
It's also common for kids
to only eat one type of food
over and over again. Don't
worry that the child is not
getting enough nutrition.
Chances are he will grow
out of this stage and soon
enjoy a variety of foods.
Threats or punishments to
eat will only serve to cause a
poor relationship with food,
advise childhood experts.
Also, don't bribe a child to
eat with the reward of a
snack or dessert later on.
Many children develop
finicky eating habits.
However, as long as a
youngster is growing regu-
larly and has plenty of ener-
gy for daily activities,
there's a good chance that
the foods being eaten are not
interfering with health.


Follow the News-Sun on



_. .i 'e .. ww f,ce o k o. n w
www.twitter.tom/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun









www.newssun.comrn


Ne'vs-Sun Friday. Februar,'4 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


The Community Calendar pro-
vides a brief listing of local clubs
and orgqara'.:''r,z who meet on
a regular basis. It is the respon-
sibility of the group to update the
News-Sun on any changes in
this listing by .a'linr. 385-6155.
ext. 516; send any changes by
e-mail to edior@newssun.com,;
or mail them to News-Sun
Community Calendar, 2227 U.S.
27 South, Sebring, FL 33870.

FRIDAY
* Alcoholics Anonymous One
Day At A Time group meets for a
closed discussion at 9:30 a.m.
Monday and Friday at Covenant
Presbyterian Church, 4500 Sun
'N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. Call
314-0891.
* American Legion Post 25
hosts a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. at
the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake
Placid. Cost is $6. Shrimp also
is available for same price.
Open to the public. Tickets in
the lounge on Friday night.
Lounge hours are from 11 a.m.
to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 74
has karaoke from 7 p.m. until
final call at the post, 528 N. Pine
St., Sebring. Post open at noon.
Happy Hour from 4-6 p.m.
Members and guests only. Call
471-1448.
* Avon Park Breakfast Rotary
Club meets 7 a.m., Rotary Club
building.
* Bridge Club of Sebring
(American Contract Bridge Club)
plays duplicate games at 12:30
p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave.,
Sebring. Call 385-8118.
* Grand Prix Cloggers
Beginner classes are at 9 a.m.,
EZ Intermediate classes are at
10 a.m., and Intermediate class-
es are at 11 a.m. every Friday at
Reflection on Silver Lake, Avon
Park. Call Julieat 386-0434.
* Harmony Hoedowners
Square Dance Club offers a
class in Lake Placid at the
Sunshine RV Resort from 9-11
a.m. Friday. For more informa-
tion, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792
or e-mail him at
samdunn @samdunn.net.
* Highlands Social Dance
Club hosts ballroom dancing
every Friday, October through
March from 7-9:30 p.m. at the


Senior Center on Sebring
Parkway. Dance the night away
to the music of the area's Big
Bands. All club dances are open
to the public. Appropriate dress
required. Admission is S5 for
members and S7 for non-mem-
bers. Call 385-6671.
* Italian-American Social
Club of Highlands County's
Social Night with games and
snacks every first and third
Friday of each month from 6:30-
9 p.m. A potluck dinner also on
the first Friday of each month at
6:30 p.m. with social hour fol-
lowing. Call Jeanne at 382-
1945.
* Lake Placid Democratic
Club meets at 6 p.m. first
Monday at Placid Lakes Town
Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd.,
Lake Placid. Call Bill Sayles at
699-6773.
* Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 has lounge hours begin-
ning at 1 p.m. There is a fish fry
from 5-7 p.m. Cost is $8.50 per
person. The lodge is open to
members and their guests. Call
465-2661.
* Lake Placid Moose serves
wings, fish and burgers at 6
p.m. Music provided from 7-11
p.m. Pool tournament is at 8
p.m. Open to members and
qualified guests only.
* Loyal Order of Moose,
Highlands County Lodge No.
2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon
Park. Karaoke from 7-10 p.m.
Call 452-0579.
* MOM's Club meets at 10:30
a.m. first Friday at the First
United Methodist Church on
Pine Street in Sebring.
* Narcotics Anonymous New
Day Group meets at 6 p.m. at
First Presbyterian Church, 319
Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For
information call Heartland area
helpline (863) 683-0630.
www.naflheartland.org.
* Sebring Bridge Club has
Bridge, ACBL Duplicate at the
clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf,
Sebring at 12:30 Fridays. For
details or info on lessons, call
385-8118.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves chicken or fish baskets
from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921
U.S. 98, Sebring, for a $4 dona-
tion. Blind darts is played at 7
p.m. Call 655-4007.


* Sebring Elks Lodge 1529
serving buffet dinner at 5-7 p.m.
Elks and guests invited. Dance
music in ballroom at 7 p.m.
Dinner and dance is S10 dona-
tion.Smoke-free environment.
For reservations, call 385-8647
or 471-3557. Lounge is open
from 3-10 p.m.
* Sebring Moose Lodge 2259
serves beef franks and Italian
sausages served from 1 p.m. to
closing at 11675 U.S. 98,
Sebring. Call 655-3920.
* Sebring Recreation Club
plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and
table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333
Pomegranate Ave. Call 385-
2966.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880, 1224 County Road
621 E., Lake Placid. Texas Hold
'em lessons, 2 p.m. For more
details, call 699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 serves pizza from
5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-
9 p.m. at the post, 2011 S.E.
Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call
385-8902.

SATURDAY
* Airborne (Paratrooper)
Breakfast Club meets at 9 a.m.
every first Saturday at Bob
Evans Restaurant, Sebring. All
paratroopers and their guests
are invited. Call Joe Noto at
452-0106.
* American Legion Post 25
serves sirloin burgers from 11:30
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the post,
1490 U.S. 27, Lake Placid. Jam
session is from 2-4 p.m. The
lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9


p.m. Members and guests invit-
ed. Call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 69 in
Avon Park serves dinner at 5
p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m.
* American Legion Post 74
open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs
served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.
Call 471-1448.
* Avon Park Public Library
has a free Adult Film Series at
noon. Call 452-3803.
* Car Show from 5-8 p.m. on
the first Saturday of each month
at Woody's BBQ. Proceeds ben-
efit Hope Hospice.
* Heartland Horses &
Handicapped Inc. provides free
assisted riding sessions for
adults and children with special
needs from 9-11 a.m.
Wednesday, Thursday and
Saturday at 118 W. College
Drive, Avon Park. Call Mary
McClelland, 452-0006.
* Highlands Chapter 601
meets at Golf Hammock
Restaurant in the Golf
Hammock Country Club at
noon. Any service person who
was awarded the Purple Heart
is invited to attend and bring
their wife or husband.
* Highlands Shrine Club,
2606 State Road 17 South,
Avon Park (between Avon Park
and Sebring) has a flea market
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., country
store open from 8 a.m. to noon
and pancake breakfast served
from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
Vendors are welcome. No setup
fee is charged for the summer
months. Plenty of off road park-
ing. Call 382-2208.


I


I ~,,.,, 1.1.I


J I


(863) 386-9859
-- 2521 US 27 N.
. "-'-. Sebring


* Highlands Woodcarvers
meet from 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday at 825 Sunbird Terr.
(Community Center off
Thunderbird Road). Call Bob
Seybolt at 471-6077.
* Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 opens the lounge at 1 p.m.
Card games are played at 1
p.m., and Bar Bingo is at 1:30
p.m. The lodge is open to mem-
bers and their guests. Call 465-
2661.
* Lake Placid Art League has
a class in Pastels/Acrylics taught
by Llewellyn Rinald from from 9
a.m. to noon at the Cultural
Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. Call
Dan Daszek at 465-7730.
* Military Officers
Association of America
(MOAA) South Central Florida
Chapter Board meets at 9:30
a.m. on the first Saturday at the
Military Sea Services Museum
on Kenilworth and Roseland.
The monthly members luncheon
is on the third Saturday of each
month at noon (except holi-
days). Location is at Kenilworth
Lodge. For further information
call Roy Whitton at 465-7048.
* Military Order of the Purple
Heart Chapter 601 meets at
noon on the first Saturday at
Sunrise Restaurant. All recipi-
ents and wives of the Purple
Heart are welcome. Call 471 -
9190 or 465-7074 for details.
* Narcotics Anonymous New
Day Group meets at 7 p.m. at
First Presbyterian Church, 319
Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For
information call Heartland area
helpline (863) 683-0630.


www.naflheartland.org.
* Overeaters Anonymous
meets at 10:30 a.m. at First
Presbyterian Church, Oak
Street, Lake Placid. 382-1821.
*Paratrooper breakfast every
first Saturday of the month at 9
a.m. at Bob Evans. Call John
Schumacher at 382-8648.
* Scleroderma Support
Group meets from 9:30-10:30
a.m. second Saturday of each
month at Avon Park Library, 100
N. Museum Road.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves dinner from 5-7 p.m. at
the club, 12921 U.S. 98,
Sebring. Music is from 7-10 p.m.
Call 655-4007.
* Sebring Moose Club 2259
offers line dancing lessons at 2
p.m. the first and third Saturday
for members and guests at
11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call
655-3920.
* Twelve Step Study Group
for Adult Children of
Alcoholics meets at 11 a.m.
first and third Saturday, at first
building south of Union
Congregational Church, 105 N.
Forest Ave., Avon Park. Parking
available south of old church.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880, 1224 County Road
621 E., Lake Placid. Laides aux-
iliary dinner from 5:30-7 p.m. on
the first Saturday of each month.
For more details, call 699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 serves a meal for $6
from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is
from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011
SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring.
Call 385-8902.


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Ne,,'s-Sun -ida: Febo'uary 4 201


www.newssun.com


RELIGION


Atonement Lutheran
Church
SEBRING On Sunda% morn-
ing. the Fifth Sunday after
Epiphany. the worship service w, ill
be led by the Revx. Jefferson Cox.
Men's group will be hosting and
ser ing a free pancake breakfast
following morning worship.
Monday will be a Council meet-
ing at 6 p.m. in fellowship hall.
Weekly Bible study Thursdays in
fellowship hall.

Avon Park Church of
Christ
AVON PARK "Wait on The
Lord to Renew Your Strength"
(Isaiah 40:29-31). will be the
Sunday morning message presented
by Larry Roberts, minister.
The Sojourners, a group of
retired Christians who travel in
RVs across the nation, arrived last
weekend. They will be helping the
members of this church in beauti-
fying the church building and
grounds.
Avon Park Church of Christ is at
200 S. Forest Ave. Call 453-4692.

Christ Lutheran Church
AVON PARK Fifth Sunday
after Epiphany, Pastor Scott
McLean will preach a sermon titled
"All or Nothing."
The church is at 1320 County
Road 64, east of the Avon Park
High School. Visitors are welcome
to worship and fellowship.Call
471-2663 or search the Web for
christlutheranavonpark.org.


Christian Science Church
SEBRING The lesson sermon
on Sunday morning is titled
"Spirit." The keynote is from Joel
2:228. "....I will pour out my spirit
upon all flesh."
The church is at 146 N. Franklin
St.

Christian Training
Church
SEBRING Associate Minister
Casey L. Downing will bring the
message titled "More Life" at the
Sunday morning service. The
Wednesday night Bible study will
continue the book of Hebrews.

Eastside Christian
Church
LAKE PLACID At 2 p.m.
Tuesday, Eastside Christian Church
will host a seminar on avoiding
crimes against the elderly.
Presented by Nell Hays, crime spe-
cialist with the Highlands County
Sheriff's Department, this will be a
summary of common crimes in the
senior population such as telemar-
keting and Medicare fraud. All are
invited to this free and informative
seminar.
All are invited to join for fellow-
ship and refreshments before wor-
ship services.

First Baptist Church of
Placid Lakes
LAKE PLACID On Sunday
Pastor Darryl George will preach
the sermon titled "Dr. Luke: The


Church N\eu's


Certainty Serie The Certainty of
God's Greater Plan' w ith regards
to Luke 1:1-4. There x\ill be a spe-
cial Sunday School Celebration
Breakfast at 9 a.m. kicking off this
nexw series.
The church is at the corner of
Washington and Kemper Avenues
in Placid Lake,. Call 465-5126
from 8 a.m. to noon Mondax
through Thursday or e-mail placid-
lakes@ hotmail.com.

First Baptist Church of
Sebring
SEBRING Traditional service
on Sunday will find Dr. David
Richardson continuing his morning
series "The Talk." on the Lord's
Prayer, found in Matthew 6.
A special offering will be taken
Feb. 6 and 13. for the Shepherd's
Pantry. Its director is snow-bound:
Mission Service Corp worker.
Pauline White, formerly of
Sebring, serving in Lynch, Ky.
Weather conditions have severely
limited school days in her area and
there is a great need for food and
health supplies.
Hispanic Mission worshipers
meet Sundays at 2 p.m. and
Friday at 7 p.m. in the fellowship
hall.
The church is at 200 E. Center
Ave., Sebring.

First Christian Church
AVON PARK "How Does
God See Me?" This is a question


that that many people ask them-
selves at some time in their lives.
That is the focus this week in the
pastor's sermon titled
"Understanding How God Sees Me
in 2011." God wants His people to
shine in this world of darkness.
join us as sxe explore the idea of
how God says we are to shine for
Him.
Monda\. Feb, 14 will be the
annual Valentine dinner at 5:30
p.m. Tickets are available at the
church for S13. There will be
games and lots of fun. Sweethearts
are welcome, but not required.
First Christian Church of Avon
Park is at 1016 W. Camphor. Call
453-5334 or e-mail firstchris-
tianap@embarqmail.com. The
church Web site is www.firstchris-
tianap.com.

First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ)
SEBRING At the Lord's-
Table this Sunday morning will be
Howard Lewis and Linda Correll.
Communion will be served by
Sandra Laufer, Carol Chandler,
Gretchen Ames and Jayne Weldy.
Greeting the congregation will
be Ernie and Nancy Strosnider.
Noel and Juanita Roberts will work
with children's church. Lighting
the candles during the month of
February will be Nina Kunsak.
Joyce Winstel will be with the chil-
dren in the nursery this month.
The whole month of February
has been set aside as
"Stewardship" month and the pro-
grams will focus on how to use


time, health, talents, relationships,
prosperity and the Gospel in a part-
nership with God. The pastor's ser-
mon is titled "Five Loaves, Two
Fish" taken from Matthew 14:16-
20. Come and hear the miracle of
how Jesus took a small amount of
food and fed thousands with it.
The church is at 510 Poinsettia
Ave. Call 385-0352 for more infor-
mation.

First Presbyterian
Church, ARP
SEBRING "Grace and Peace
II" is the title of Sunday morning's
sermon given by the Rev. Darrell
A. Peer.
Monday the Miriam Circle meets
at 10 a.m.
Tuesday will be Dorcas Sewing
Circle at 9:30.a.m., grief support
group at 3 p.m., and youth group
(ages 11-18) from 4-7 p.m.
Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. is choir
rehearsal.
Confirmation Class is from 3:45-
4:45 p.m. Thursday.

First United Methodist
Church of Sebring
SEBRING The Rev. A.C.
Bryant will bring the message "The
Blinded Eye" with Scripture from
John 12:37-41 and the service of
Holy Communion will be observed.
Wednesday at 5:30 p.m., the
"Growing with God" family night
continues in the Family Life
Center.
The Methodist Men's group will

Continued on page 9B


PLACES To


WORSHIP


Places to 'Worship is a paid
advertisement in the News-Sun
that is published Friday and
Sunday. To find out more infor-
mation on how to place a listing
in this directory, call the News-
Sun at 385-6155, ext. 502.


APOSTOLIC

* Greater Faith Apostolic
Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. invites you to
come worship with us in spirit and
truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday. For information con-
tact 840-0152. Pastor Larry
Carmody.


ASSEMBLY OF GOD

* Christ Fellowship Church
(Assembly of God), 2935 New
Life Way. Bearing His Name;
Preaching His Doctrine, and
Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping
God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship,
10 a.m.: Evening Worship, 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m.
Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-
0924.
* First Assembly of God, 4301
Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev.
Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday
School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship
and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.;
Evening Worship, 7 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night, (Adult
Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group,
Royal Rangers, Missioiettes, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-6431.


BAPTIST

* Avon Park Lakes Baptist
Church, 2600 .N. Highlands Blvd.,
Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall.
Pastor. Christ centered and bibli-
cally based. Sunday worship serv-
ices, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Nursery facilities are available.
Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday
and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer
Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible
classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered
for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m.
Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556.
* Bethany Baptist Church
(GARBC) We are located at the
corner of SR17 and C-17A (truck
route) in Avon Park. Join us
Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for cof-
fee and doughnuts, followed with
Sunday School for all ages at 9:30.
Sunday morning worship service
begins at 10:30 a.m.. and evening
worship service is at 6 p.m. On
Wednesday, the Word of Life teen
ministry and the Catylist class
(20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult
Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7
p.m. For more information go to
www.bethanybaptistap.com or call
the church office at 863-452-1136.
* Faith Missionary Baptist
Church, off State Road 17 North of
Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave.
Sunday School. 10 a.m.; Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday
Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation
available. Ken Lambert, Pastor.
Phone 386-5055.
* Fellowship Baptist Church,
1000 Maxwell St., Avon Park, FL


33825. Sunday: Sunday School,
9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; Wednesday: Evening.
Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7
p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax:
453-6986. E-mail: office @apfellow
ship.org,; Web site, www.apfellow
ship.org.
* First Baptist Church of Avon
Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park.
Rev. Jorn Beck, pastor; Jared
Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy
Loomis, music director. Regular
Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m.
Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library
open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11
a.m. 'Morning Worship; 11 a.m.
Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening
Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10
a.m., basic computer
class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m.
conversational English and citizen-
ship classes/Sonshine House.
Regular Wednesday schedule:
5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6
p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m.
Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. chil-
dren's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. chil-
dren's mission groups. Call 453-
6681 for details. Primera Mision
Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon
Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor.
Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m.,
Bible Study; 11. a.m., Worship
Service. Wednesday schedule: 7
p.m., Bible study.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine
Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 mid-
way between Sebring and Lake
Placid). Your place for family,
friends and faith. Sunday morning
worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery
is provided for both services with
Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life
changing Bible Study for all ages
starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor
Allen Altvater leads the youth in
their quest to become more like
Christ. Sunday night worship at 6
p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and
Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with
youth worship in the youth facility,
and missions training for all chil-
dren. Call the church at 655-1524.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Placid, Knowing God's Heart and
Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal
Palm Street. (2 blocks south of
Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL
33852 (863) 465-3721, Email:
www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett
Morey, senior pastor. Sunday serv-
ices Traditional Service 9 a.m.,
Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m.
Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m.,
Senior Sunday Night and Sunday
Evening Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Activities: Family din-
ner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reser-
vations required). Adult-LifeSource
classes, prayer meeting, Youth
Intersections, and Kids K-5-
MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15
p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every
Tuesday for prayer breakfast and
women's prayer breakfast is at 8
a.m. every Wednesday, both at the
Family Restaurant.
* First Baptist Church of Lorida
located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida.
Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.
for all ages. Sunday worship serv-
ices are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Preschool care is provided at the
11 a.m. worship service.
Wednesday evening Bible Study
and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m.,
followed by adult choir rehearsal.


From September to May our youth
group meets. First Lorida is the
"Place to discover God's love." For
more information about the church
or the ministries offered, call 655-
1878.
* First Baptist Church, Sebring,
200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL
33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr.
David E. Richardson, senior pas-
tor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of
youth and activities. Contemporary
Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible
Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional
Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista
Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday .Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night
programs at the ROC begin 5:30
p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m.
Preschool and Mother's Day Out
for children age 6 weeks to 5 years
old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call
385-4704.
* Florida Avenue Baptist
Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon
Park. Mailing address is 710 W.
Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825.
Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D.
Girdley, pastor. Sunday School,
9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11
a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church;
Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday night programs for
children, youth and adults at 7 p.m.
* Independent Baptist Church,
5704 County Road 17 South,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday
School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship,
10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m.
Wednesday service, 7 p.m.
Fundamental, soul-winning, mis-
sion-minded, King James Bible
Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone
655-1899. Bus transportation.
* Leisure Lakes Baptist Church,
808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just
off of Miller at the west end of Lake
June) "Where the old fashion
gospel is preached." Sunday
School begins at 9:45 a.m.;
Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.;
Sunday Evening Service is at 6
p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the
church at 699-0671 for more infor-
mation.
* Maranatha Baptist Church
(GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east
of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle
Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9
a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.;
Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week
service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily
Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m.,
Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald
Webber and Associate Pastors
Don Messenger and Ted Ertle.
Phone 382-4301.
* Parkway Free Will Baptist
Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway.
Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the
church where the "Son" always
shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and
Wednesday Evening Worship. 7
p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6
p.m. on the last Sunday of each
month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs,.pas-
tor. Church phone: 382-3552.
Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated
with the National Association of
Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn.
* Sparta Road Baptist Church,
(SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev.
Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday
school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.: Sunday Evening


Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday:
Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery
provided. For information, call 382-
0869.
* Southside Baptist Church
(GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave.,
Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor;
Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor.
Sunday School for all ages, 9:30
a.m.; Morning Worship Service,
10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten
through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.;
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30
p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and
Bible Study,.7 p.m. A nursery for
under age 3 is available at all serv-
ices. Provisions ,for handicapped
and hard-of-hearing. Office phone,
385-0752.
* Sunridge Baptist Church,
(SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27
and Valerie, across from Florida
Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pas-
tor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.;
Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service,,
6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible
Study, and Youth, 6:30
.p.m.Nursery provided.,For informa-
tion, call 382-3695.


CATHOLIC

* Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church, 595 East Main St., Avon
Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas
McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil
'Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7
p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8
and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m.,
Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at
8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30
p.m. Saturday. Religious Education
Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday
for grades K through 8th.
Confirmation class is from 6:30-8
p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights
grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m.
Wednesday.
* St. Catherine Catholic Church,
820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing
address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL
33870, 385-0049. wwwstcathe.
com. Very Rev. Jose Gonzalez,
V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30
and 5 p.m.: Sunday, 9 and 10:30
a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday
Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family
and Youth Center). Daily Masses 8
a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9
a.m. Saturday. Confessions: 3-3:45
p.m. Saturday, 7:15-7:45 a.m. first
Friday, or by appointment. Enroll
your students today for Catholic
School grades Pre-K3 through 5th
grade.
0 St. James Catholic Church,
3380 Placidview Drive, Lake
Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael
J. Cannon. Mass schedule:
Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) -
Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8
a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9
a.m. December thru Easter -
Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m.,
9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9
a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30
a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9
a.m.


CHRISTIAN

* Eastside Christian Church,
101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid. FL
33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27
on County Road 621), 465-7065.
Ray Culpepper, senior pastor.


Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.;
Worship Celebration with the
Lord's Supper each week 10:15
a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat
Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise
and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building
God's Kingdom for Everyone."
"Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and
Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!"
* Sebring Christian Church,
4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher;
Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor.
Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening
service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday
night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by
classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours,
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Phone 382-6676.
* First Christian Church, 1016
W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL
33825; (863) 453-5334; on the
Web at www.firstchristianap.com.
Our motto is "Jesus is First at First
Christian Church." Greg Ratliff,
Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper,
Family Life Minister; Jon Carter,
Music Director. Bible School 9
a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study,
6 p.m.; Wednesday studies for all
ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for
all events.
* First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ), 510
Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of
Poinsettia and Eucalyptus),
Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-
0358 or 385-3435. The Rev.
Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast,
10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30
a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, Praise and Worship,
6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15
p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15
p.m.


CHRISTIAN &
MISSIONARY
ALLIANCE

* The Alliance Church of
Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road,
Sebring, FL 33875. Call 382-1343.
Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday
services: Sunday School meets at
9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship Service meets at 10:30
a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study
meets at 6 p.m. (off site);
Wednesday Prayer Gathering
meets at 6 p.m.


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

* Christian Science Church, 146
N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m.
morning worship and Sunday
school. Testimonial meetings at
4 p.m. each second and fourth
Wednesday. A free public reading
room/bookstore, located in the
church, is open before and after
church services. The Bible and the
Christian Science textbook,
'Science and Health with Key to
the Scriptures' by Mary Baker Eddy
are our only preachers. All are wel-
come to come and partake of the
comfort, guidance, support and
healing found in the lesson-ser-
mons.


CHURCH OF


BRETHREN

* Church of the Brethren, 700 S.
Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-1597.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

* Avon Park Church of Christ,
200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825: Minister: Larry Roberts.
Sunday Worship Services, 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities
are available at every service. Bible
Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered
classes for all ages. Church phone:
453-4692.
* Sebring Parkway. Church of
Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443. We
would like to extend an invitation
for you and your family to visit with
us here at Sebring Parkway. Our
hours of service are! Sunday
Worship Service, 9 a.m.; Sunday
Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Service, 6 p.m.;
Wednesday Service, 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF
NAZARENE

* First Church of the Nazarene
of Avon Park, P.O. Box 1118.,
Avon Park, FL 33825-1118. 707 W.
Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor.
Sunday: Sunday school begins at
9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wor-
ship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening
service at 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening service is at 7 p.m. with
special services for children and
adults. Special services once a
month for seniors (Prime Time) and
Ladies ministries. If you need any
more information, call 453-4851.
* First Church of the Nazarene
of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake
Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852.
Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning
worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7
p.m. Classes for adult children and
youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim
Taylor.


CHURCHES OF
CHRIST IN
CHRISTIAN UNION

* Community Bible Church -
Churches of Christ in Christian
Union, (Orange Blossom
Conference Center) 1400 C-17A
North (truck route), Avon Park.
Presenting Jesus Christ as the
answer for time and eternity.
Sunday morning worship service,
10:30 a.m. Nursery provided.
Junior Church activities at same
time for K-6 grade. Sunday School
Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m.
(Transportation available.) Sunday
evening praise and worship serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening
prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and
youth activities at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Everyone is welcome,
please come worship with us. Don
Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone
452-0088.










www. newssun.com


Ne,,'s-Sun Friday, February 4. 2011


RELIGION


Snapshots

Continued from page 8B
host a Valentine Banquet at 6
p.m. Friday. Feb. I I in the
Family Life Center.
Fine Food and Fellowship
"Chinese" Dinner is planned
on Feb. 13 after the church
services. Tickets are avail-
able for sale now.
Listen Live on WITS-AM
1340 each Sunday to hear
the 10:50 a.m. worship serv-
ice. The church is at 126 S.
Pine St. Visit the Web site at
www.sebringfirstumc.com.
Call 385-5184.

Heartland Christian
Church
SEBRING Pastor Ted
Moore's sermon for both
services this week will be
"Daniel and the Lion's Den"
with Scripture from Daniel
6:16-28. Services will
include Stan Skidmore
singing "Get Ready" and
Wally Woodworth singing
"God Will Take Care Of
You."


The Heartland Singers
x ill sing "'Come Thou
Fount" during the mid-morn-
ing service.
Heartland Singers practice
at 4:30 p.m. on Tuesdays.
The Adult Bible Study,
taught by Pastor Ted Moore
will be "What the Muslims
teach" on Tuesday night.
The church is at 2705
Alternate Route 17 South in
Sebring (behind Publix).
Call 314-9693 for more
information.

Memorial United
Methodist Church
LAKE PLACID Rev.
Fred Ball will preach at the
Heritage Worship Service
and the Celebration Service
on the first of a series of ser-
mons on "Love." Claude
Burnett will preach at the
New Song' Contemporary
Service in Rob Reynolds
Hall on the subject of
"Love."
The church will have a
booth for children at the
Country Fair, near the High


School. on Saturday and
Sunday -
Youth Group will meet at
the Lighthouse at 6 p.m. for
a Super Bowl party.
Bible fellowship will meet
at the chapel with Pastor
Fred Ball at 6 p.m. where
they will be doing a study on
the gospel of Mark.
The church is at 500 Kent
Ave. Call 465-2422

Parkway Free Will
Baptist Church
SEBRING The Sunday
morning Bible lesson, "Jesus
is the Messiah." is taken
from Mark 8. Pastor Jim
Scaggs will bring the Sunday
morning and evening mes-
sages. The Wednesday
evening service will be a
praise, prayer and Bible
study time.

Resurrection
Lutheran Church

AVON PARK On the
Fifth Sunday of Epiphany,
the sermon will be based on


the fifth chapter of Matthew.
The Busy Bodies meet at
9 a.m. Monday in Burke
Hall. The Stewardship Team
meets at 10 a.m. Tuesday
and the Church Council
meets at 7 p.m. The
Midweek Worship Fragrance
Free Service begins at 7 p.m.
Wednesday.

St. John United
Methodist Church

SEBRING Rev. Ronald
De Genaro's sermon topic on
Sunday will be "Blessing
and the Life of Community"
taken from Proverbs 10:6-
21. Boy Scouts meet
Monday at 7 p.m.
Men's Fellowship and
Prayer Breakfast is
.Wednesday at 7:45 a.m. St.
John Youth meet at 6:30
p.m. Wednesday.
Hope Circle meets
Thursday at 9 a.m.

Sebring Church of
the Brethren
SEBRING On Sunday


morning. Pastor Keith
Simmons will preach on
-Looking Back. Looking
Forward" and the gospel
reading will be on Acts 7:44-
60.
Sunday school will be led
by the Rev. Wendell Bohrer
and will meet in the Fidelis
Room. They will study'
"Jesus Is The Messiah."
They will look at the
Scripture Mark 8:27
through 9:1.

Spring Lake
Presbyterian Church

SEBRING Communion
Sunday service will be at 10
a.m. "Worry!" is the title of
the sermon given by the Rev.
Barbara Laucks. Scripture
will be Matthew 6:24-34.
Saturday, Feb. 12 is
Family Fun Night with an
ice cream social. Call 655-
0713.

Spring Lake United
Methodist Church

SEBRING Spring Lake


United Methodist Church is
at 8170 Cozumel Lane. The
Rev. Clyde Weaver's sermon
Sunday will be "Born of
Water and the Spirit." Holy
Communion will be celebrat-
ed.

The Way Church

SEBRING "The
Conduct of a Believer" is the
title of Pastor Reinhold
Buxbaum's message with
Scripture from I Peter 3.
Monday at 6:30 p.m. will
be another Night of
Prophecy at Homer's
Restaurant with the subject
"Who is the anti-Christ and
what will he do?"
The annual church yard
sale is scheduled for Friday
and Saturday, Feb. 18-19.
The Way Church is at
1005 N. Ridgewood Drive.
The church phone is 471-
6140; the pastor's cell is
214-6190. For church infor-
mation and the pastor's mes-
sages go to www.theway-
church.org.


PLACES To WORSHIP


EPISCOPAL

* The Episcopal Church of the
Redeemer.Service time is 9:30
with Holy Communion. Coffee hour
following services. Newcomers
welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail
redeemert895@aolcom Web site:
redeemeravon.com. The church is
at 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park
(two miles north of Sun 'N Lake
Boulevard, across from Wells
Dodge.)
* St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL
33870. Sunday Services: Holy
Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy
Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek
service on Wednesday at 6 p.m.
Sunday School for all ages at 9
a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m.
until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m.
service' ends. Wednesday: Adult
Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are
always welcome. The Rev. Jim
KuHrz rector. Church office 385-
7649, for more information.
* St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal
Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-
0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers,
Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m.,
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening: Holy Communion with
Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child
care available at the 8 a.m. and
10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come
see what makes us different.


GRACE BRETHREN

* Grace Brethren Church, 3626
Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-
0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior
pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m.,
10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday
services at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid
City" Children's Ministry throughout
all services, and there are variosu
other classes for teens, married
couples, "prime-timers," and Bible
studies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day
Care, Preschool and After-School
Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For
registration call: 385-3111). Check
us out on the Web at wwwsebrn'g-
grace.org.


INTERDENOMINATIONAL

* World Harvest and Restoration
Ministries, (non-denominational)
2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-
3771. Sunday service: Sunday
School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11
a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m.
prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor:
W.H. Rogers.


JEWISH

* Temple Israel of Highlands
County, 382-7744. Rabbi Lorraine
Rudenberg; www. temple/s-
rae/ofhcf/lorg. Temple Israel is a
Reform Temple that promotes the
enduring and fundamental princi-
ples of Judaism. Through prayer,
study and friendship we strive to
enrich our lives and insure Jewish
continuity in Highlands County.
Friday Evening Shabbat Services,
7:30 p.m.; Saturday afternoon intro
to Hebrew, 12:30 p.m.; Saturday
intro to Judaism, 2 p.m.; Saturday
afternoon Torah Study, 3:30 p.m.;
Havdallah, 5 p.m. Jan. 7-8; Jan. 21;
Feb. 4; Feb. 18-19; March 4-5;
March 18-19 Purim; April 1-2; April
15-16; April 18, 6 p.m., Pesach 1st
Night Seder; April 29-30 Yom
Hashoah; May 13-14; May 27-28.
Every Thursday will be Hebrew and
Bible classes with Howard Salles,
12:30-4:30 p.m.


LUTHERAN

* Atonement Lutheran Church
(ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview
Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen,
Deacon, Spiritual Leader. Jim
Helwig, organist/choir director.
Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy
Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee
hour on the first and third Sunday
of each month. Council meeting on
the first Monday of month; Ladies
Group WELCA meets at noon sec-
ond Monday of month with lunch.
Bring a dish to pass. Church
Vegetable Garden Club meets as
needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden
open seven days a week to congre-
tation and community. Like to sing?
Come join the choir. Visitors always
welcome. Come grow with us.
Phone 385-0797.
* Christ Lutheran Church Avon
Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2
mile east of Avon Park High
School. Sunday Divine Worship is
at 10 a.m. Holy Commnunion is cel-
ebrated every week with traditional
Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs
of praise. Fellowship time with cof-
fee and refreshments follows wor-
ship. Come worship and fellowship
with us. For information call Pastor
Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see
christlutheranavonpark org.
* Faith Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 2740 Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848,
Faith Child Development Center,
385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea
Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship
services: 8 a.m. Sunday;. Sunday
school for children and adult Bible
classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise
worship service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Communion is served the
first and third and fifth Sunday of
the month. Sunday worship service
is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8
a.m. each Sunday. Educational
opportunities include weekly adult
Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift
Store (385-2782) is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through
Friday and 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday. All are warmly welcome
in the Family of Faith.
* Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church (AALC) American
Association of Lutheran
Churches, 4348 Schumacher
Road, Sebring, one mile west of
Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor.
Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday.
Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery pro-
vided. Social activities: Choir,
Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-
1163.
* New Life Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a
Congregation of the Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship
with the Wisconsin Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday
Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9
a.m. For more information, call
Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or
visit the Web site at wwwnew/lfe
sebring.com.
* Resurrection Lutheran Church
- ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon
Park. Pastor: Rev. John C.
Grodzinski. Early Sunday service,
8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m.
and the second service at 10:30
a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour fol-
low the service. Midweek
Fragrance Free Wednesday wor-
ship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office
phone number is 453-6858.
* Trinity Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake
Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The
Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and
Noel Johnson, youth and family life.
Worship schedule for December
through Easter: Worship service 8
and 11 a.m.; Communion services,
first and third Sundays; (Children's
Church, 11 a.m. only); and


Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship
schedule for summer through fall:
Worship service, 9 a.m.;
Communion services, first and third
Sunday; Education Hour 10:30
a.m. Additional services: Lent and
Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy
Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.;
Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.;
Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas
Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve,
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship
activities: Youth Group, Senior
Citizens, Younger Side Adults,
Ladies Missionary League, Ladies
Guild, Small group studies as
scheduled. Music: Choir and hand
chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5
years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday. License:
C14H10020: Susan Norris, direc-
tor. Visit us online at: www. vchurch-
es. com/trinity/utheran/p.


NON-DENOMINATIONAL

* Bible Fellowship Church, 3750
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Sunday: American Sign
Language: First Worship sermon,
songs signed first and second
Worship services. First Worship
service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship
service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to
2 years old) and Sunday school
classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6
,p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday: Children, ages 4
years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth,
6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m.
Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy
McQuaid, associate pastor. Church
office 385-1024.
* Calvary Church, 1825
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872; 386-4900. An independent
community church. Sunday morn-
ing worship, 8:15 and 10 a,m.;
Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.;
Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m.
Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small
friendly church waiting for your
visit.
* Christian Training Ministries
Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off
County Road 17 on Simpson
Avenue. Sunday service is at 10
a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7
p.m. A nursery and children's
church are provided. The church is
part of Christian International
Ministries Network, a full gospel,
non-denominational ministry. Linda
M. Downing, minister: Phone, 314-
0482, lindadowning@live. com.
Casey L. Downing, associate min-
ister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown
ing@hotmail.com. Web site is
www. chrlsteantrathningministries.net
* Grace Bible Church, 4541
Thunderbird Road, (second church
on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone,
382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior
pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30
p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m.
Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible
Academy Adult Investigating Truth;
first and third Tuesday, Prayer
Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday,
Children's & Youth Programs, 6
p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m.,
College Ministry.
www. GBCconnected. org
* Highlands Community Church,
a casual contemporary church,
meets at 3005 New Life Way.
Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10
a.m. Nursery and Kid's World
classes. Small groups meet
throughout the week. Church
phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A.
Linhart.
* Union Congregational Church,
106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday worship services
are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15
a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m.
(contemporary) in the main sanctu-
ary. Sunday school for all ages is at
9:15 a.m. We also offer


Wednesday and Saturday services
at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respective-
ly. Nursery/child care is available
for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill
Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web
page at www.weareunion.org. All
teachings are taken from the
Manufacturer's Handbook The
Holy Bible. Come join us.
. Unity Life Enrichment Centre,
new location, 10417 Orange
Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL
33875; 471-1122; e-mail
unity@vistanet.net. Web site,
www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday- Celebration Service,
Nursery and Children's Church.
Weekly Classes, Christian
Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer
Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups.
Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior
minister transforming lives from
ordinary to extraordinary.
* The Way Church, 1005 N.
Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday
school and worship service at 9
a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activi-
ties, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. The
Way is a church family who gathers
for contemporary worship, teaching
of God's Word, prayer and fellow-
ship. Come early and stay after for
fellowship time. Child care and chil-
dren's church are provided.
Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The
Way A place for you. Office
Phone:471-6140, Church Cell
Phone:381-6190. Email: theway
church@hotmal.com. Web site:
www. TheWayChurch. org


PRESBYTERIAN

* Covenant Presbyterian Church
(PCA), 4500 Sun 'N Lake Blvd.,
Sebring, 33872-2113. A
Congregation of the Presbyterian
Church in America. Worship servic-
es: Sunday morning worship, infor-
mal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday
evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday
evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.;
Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:30-
7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m.
Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759;
e-mail: covpres@strato.net, Web
site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W.
Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours:
8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through
Thursday.
* First Presbyterian Church
ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two
entrances on LaGrande), Avon
Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242.
The Rev. Robert Johnson is the
pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.;
Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.;
Wednesday Bible study, 10:30
a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third
Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30
p.m. each Wednesday; Esther and
Mary Circles business meeting,
3:30 p.m. third Thursday; Sarah
Circle business meeting, 7 p.m.
second Tuesday; Women's
Ministries Combined Bible study, 4
p.m. third Thursday; Family Movie,
4 p.m. third Sunday. Be a part of a
warm, caring church family with tra-
ditional services, following biblical
truth.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring,
FL 33870. 385-0107. Sunday
School, adult and college age, 9:30
a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.;
Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 11-
18), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult
Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir
rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery avail-
able for Sunday worship. Call the
church office for more information
and other classes. Rev. Darrell A.
Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks. director
of youth ministry.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, wwwfpclp.com, 118 N. Oak
Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The
Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor;


the Rev. Drew Severance, associ-
ate pastor. Sunday morning tradi-
tional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30
a.m.; and contemporary worship is
at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avari-
ety of Sunday school classes for
adults and children are at 9:45 and
11 a.m. in the educational building.
Call the church office for more
information about the classes
offered. Nursery is provided for
babies and toddlers; while young
children up to second grade have a
special Children's Church offered
during the worship service to help
them grow in their spiritual knowl-
edge.
* Spring Lake Presbyterian
Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School,
9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m.
Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the
second Thursday of the month,
September through June. Board of
Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first
Monday of the month. Choir
rehearses at 7 p.m. each
Wednesday, September through
April. Presbyterian Women meet at
10 a.m. the third Thursday of the
month. Organist: Richard Wedig.
Choir Director: Suzan Wedig.
Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,
spring/akepc @embarqmail. corn,
Web site, http.//s/pc.presby-
church.org.


SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST

* Avon Park Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 1410 West
Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone:
453-6641 or e-mail: avonparks-
da @embarqmai/. corn, Sabbath
School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church
Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday.
Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m.
Community Service hours on
Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00
a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place
the first Sunday of each month.
Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and
Associate Pastor Kameron
DeVasher. Walker Memorial
Academy Christian School offering
education for kindergarten through
12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME.
Website is www.discoverjesus.org
* Sebring Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, 2106 N. State
Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438.
Worship Services: 9:15 a.m.
Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meet-
ing, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m.
Community service: every Monday
9-11 a:m. Health Seminar with Dr.
Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m.
Pastor Amado Luzbet.


THE CHURCH OF
LATTER DAY SAINTS

* The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand
Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863)
382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop;
Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del
Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family
History Center (863) 382-1822.
Sunday Services: Sacrament
Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel
Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon;
Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-
1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15
a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities:
Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts:
first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20
p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys
and Girls, second and fourth
Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m.


THE SALVATION
ARMY

* The Salvation Army Center
for Worship. Sunday: Sunday
School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meet-


ing, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting
and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible
study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's
Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday:
Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meet-
ings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave.,
Sebring. For more information, visit
the Web site Www.salvationarmy-
sebring.com or call Major Bruce
Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110.


UNITED METHODIST

* First United Methodist Church,
105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor.
Traditional Worship Service at 8:10
and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary,
Contemporary Worship in the FLC
at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30
and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth
Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday
with Rick Heilig, youth director.
The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship
service is broadcast over WITS
1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery
available at all services.
* First United Methodist Church,
200 South Lake Avenue, Avon,
Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, R.
James Weiss, Pastor, Summer
Schedule, Sunday School 9:00
a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m.
* Memorial United Methodist
Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlook-
ing Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL,
33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pastor.
Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral
assistant. Sunday schedule:
Heritage Worship Service, 8:30
a.m. (October-May only); School
School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.;
Celebration Worship Service at
10:45 a.m.; New Song worship
service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nurs-
ery care provided every Sunday
morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m.
Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m.
(October-May only). We offer
Christ-centered Sunday school
classes, youth programs, Bible
studies, book studies and Christian
fellowship. We are a congregation
that want to know Christ and make
Him known. Call the church office
at 465-2422 or check out our
church Web site at wwwmemori-
a/umc.com.
* St. John United Methodist
Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive,
Sebring, FL 33872. .The Rev.
Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor.
Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all
services. Phone 382-1736.
www.stjohnsebring.org
* Spring Lake United Methodist
Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane,
(Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde
Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship serv-
ice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study
meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday.
Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on
Thursday. Church office phone:
655-0040.


UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST

* Emmanuel United Church of
Christ, where God is still speak-
ing. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL
33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27
and Hammock Road). Sunday wor-
ship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with
worship first Sunday of month;
Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all
other Sundays. All are welcome to
receive the sacrament. For more
information, call the church office at
471-1999 or e-mail eucc@earth
/ink.net or check the Web site
sebringemmanuelucc.com. No
matter who you are or where you
are on life's journey, you're wel-
come here.


Page 9B









News-Sun Friday. February 4. 2011


Page 10B


www.newssun.com


RELIGION


Herring is new
youth pastor
LAKE PLACID First
Assembly of God of Lake
Placid is happy to announce
that Kyle Herring is the
new youth pastor. Herring
is coming from Gulf Coast
Assembly of God where he
has been the assistant youth
leader for the past two
years.
He has a tremendous
devotion toward God in
serving Him, reading God's
Word and has a passion for
discipleship. He has been a
vital part of many
Assemblies of God youth
camps and has participated
in mission outreaches. He is
currently active in obtaining
his second level of creden-
tials with the Assemblies of
God through Global
University and District
School of Ministry in
Clewiston.
Herring's main goal is
reaching out to the youth of
the Lake Placid community,
to encourage and to share
Christ.

72nd Annual Avon
Park Holiness Camp
Meeting set
AVON PARK The
72nd Annual Avon Park
Holiness Camp Meeting,
now in progress, continues
daily through Sunday. Bible
Study is at 9:15 a.m. and
services are 10:30 a.m. and
2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Dr.
Eldred Kelley is camp pres-
ident and presides at the
services.
Evangelists include Rev.
David Engbrecht,
Nappanee, Ind.; Dr. Nelson
Perdue, Urbana, Ohio; and
Rev. Jack French,
Greenwood, Mich. Bible
teacher is Dr. Ron Smith,
Jackson, Miss. Musicians
are Leon Wion, Music
evangelist; George
Maddrell, organist; and
Linda Boyette, pianist.
Missionaries sharing on
Missionary Day, Monday,
include Jonathan and Lisa
Mayo, WGM Uganda;
Bill and Beth Ryan, WGM
Honduras; Doug and Cindy
Tankersley, OMS -
Ecuador; and Dave and Ann
Dedrick, OMS -
Mozambique.
The camp is at 1001 W.
Lake Isis Road, (across
from Walmart). For more
information call the camp
office at 453-6831 or visit
the Web at www.avonpark-
camp.org.

Happening this
week at Sebring
Christian Church
SEBRING Lowell
Mason will be in concert at
6:30 p.m. Sunday at
Sebring Christian Church.
A love offering will be
accepted.
Valentine Banquet is at
6:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 13.
Cost is only $10 per person;
your choice of steak oi
chicken. Call 382-6676 to
make reservations
The Wine Family will be
in concert at 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 20. A love
offering will be accepted.
The Alzheimer's
Caregivers Support Group
and The Men's Grief
Support group both contin-
ue to meet each Thursday
from 1-2 p.m.
Call 382-6676.

Tommy Brandt in
concert at Bible
Fellowship
SEBRING Bible
Fellowship Church wel-
comes Tommy Brandt in


concert at 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 6.
Tommy Brandt is an
award winning singer/song-
writer that many say is the
heart and voice of today's
Christian Country Music.
This Sebring native has had
his share of success in the
radio industry with his first
five radio releases topping
the Christian Country
Charts. Tommy has shared
the stage with such artists
f,


Snapshots

as Del Way, Melanie
Walker, The Fox Brothers.
Porter Wagner, The Oak
Ridge Boys, Clifton Jansky,
Charlie Daniels, Lonestar
and Josh Turner, to name a
few.
This is a free concert. A
love offering will be
accepted. Bible Fellowship
is at 3750 Hammock Road.
Call 381-6831.

Night of Prophecy
continues Monday
SEBRING On
Monday at 6:30 p.m. will
be another Night of
Prophecy at Homer's
Restaurant with the subject
"Who is the anti-Christ and
what will he do?" Enter the
right side door. Beverages
will be available.

Primetimers meet
for lunch
LAKE PLACID The
First Baptist Church of
Lake Placid, 119 E. Royal
Palm St., will host the fol-
lowing events this week:
Monday Primetimer's
covered dish luncheon will
be at noon in fellowship
hall. Bring a covered dish
and a friend. Valentine cake
and ice cream will be pro-
vided.
Tuesday Confection
Connection, Women's
Ministry, will be at 6:30
p.m. in church sanctuary.

Nell Hays to speak
at church seminar
LAKE PLACID -
Tuesday at 2 p.m. Eastside
Christian Church will host a
seminar on avoiding crimes
against the elderly.
Presented by Nell Hays,
crime specialist with the
Highlands County Sheriffs
Department, this will be a
summary of common
crimes in the senior popula-
tion such as telemarketing
and Medicare fraud.

Alderman preaches
at revival
SEBRING Independent
Baptist Church, 5704
County Road 17 South, is
having a revival from Feb.
6-11. Special music with be
by Don and Carol Merritt.
The revival speaker will
be Brother Max Alderman
from Satesboro, Ga. He was
a pastor for more than 30
years and is now in evan-
gelism.
Sunday services will be
from 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.,
and from 7 p.m. Monday-
Friday. Call 655-1899.

Spring Lake hosts
Family Fun Night
SEBRING Family Fun
Night will be at 5 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 12 at Spring
Lake Presbyterian Church.
It will feature card games
and an ice cream social.
Everyone is welcome.
Call 655-0713.

Tropical Sensations
to appear in Indian
Lake Estates
INDIAN LAKE
ESTATES The steel
drum band known as
"Tropical Sensations" will
appear at the United
Methodist Church at Indian
Lake Estates on Sunday,
Feb. 20.
The band's performance
will start at approximately
12:30 p.m.
This group, which hails
from Troy, N.H., is under
the direction of Elaine
Merrifield and plays a vari-


ety of musical styles includ-
ing Caribbean, Reggae,
Blues, Rumbas even
polkas. They have. been per-
forming in cities and small
towns in New Hampshire,
Massachusetts, Connecticut
and Florida since 2004.
Everyone's invited to
attend the performance as
well as the church service
and luncheon. The cost of
the luncheon is $5.
Indian Lakes is off


Highway 60. about 17 miles
east of Lake Wales. Turn
and stay on DeLand Drive.
The Methodist church is on
the right side of DeLand.

Temple Israel
sponsors a comedy
show
SEBRING Temple
Israel of Highlands County
is sponsoring a wonderful
comedy show at the syna-
gogue, 1305 Temple Israel
Drive, at 3 p.m. Sunday,
Feb. 27 featuring Keith
Barany, who has enter-
tained U.S. troops overseas
many times and appears in
Las Vegas and Atlantic City
with many top performers.
This afternoon of fun is
open to all the Highlands
County community and
promises to be very funny
and a good deal at only $18
per person. Refreshments
will be available. For more
information and for tickets,
call 382-7744.

Lake Placid ARP
Church Women's
Ministries elect
officers
LAKE PLACID A
new slate of officers for
2011 welcomed the mem-
bers of the ARP Women's
Ministries at a general
meeting on Jan. 20.
President Alayne Busch
presided. Other officers are
Abby Lopez, first vice-
president; Maxine Bolyea,
secretary; Joan Powers,
treasurer; Ginny Blackwell,
assistant treasurer; and Jean
Parrish, historian. Cause
chairmen are Louise Pick,
Spiritual Life; Donna
Mingus, Christian Higher
Education; Judy Miskanic,
Kitchen Hospitality; Wanda
Isaacs, Advisor. Circle
Chairmen for the year are
Lois Schenck, Huey Watson
Circle; Joan Powers, Ethel
Seaverns Circle; and Patsy
Peters, Mattie Pope Circle.
The speaker for the day
was Starla Shattler, who
currently serves as the
Spiritual Life chairman of
the Florida Presbyterial,
which represents all the
Associate Reformed
Presbyterian churches in
the state of Florida. Shattler
began by noting that we use
different measuring imple-
ments when measuring liq-
uids or solids in the
kitchen. She noted the
importance of accurate
measurements in baking
and the more relaxed
method of adding ingredi-
ents to recipes for tried and
true staples like meatloaf.
Her analogy then went to
how we measure ourselves
against sometimes impossi-
ble standards. Obsessing
over our weight, our lack of
youthful beauty, even our
hair color may be a means
for displeasure, but God
sees us in a different light.
Her message was well
received.
Luncheon was prepared
and served by the board of
directors. The next meeting
will be at 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, March 17 with
the speaker to be
announced. The meetings
are open to all.

Camp Volunteer
Choir presents
musical
AVON PARK Avon
Park Camp Volunteer Choir
will present a special musi-
cal at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb.
25 in the Tabernacle, 1001
W. Lake Isis Ave., across
from Walmart.
Titled "How About Some
Good News," this musical


combines five vignettes
with gospel music to
remind us Who is in con-
trol..
There is no admission
cost. A freewill offering
will be taken. For more
information, contact the
office at 453-6831. or visit
the Web site, avonpark-
camp.org and click on the
Events button.
Everybody is invited to
attend.


Whitley to be featured in Bible Conference


Special to the \ev.s-Sun
SEBRING Doug Whitley will be fea-
tured in a series of Biblical and historical
dramatizations in the February Bible
Conference at Maranatha Baptist Church
from Feb. 6-9. In period makeup and cos-
tume. he will preach. teach and quote
Scripture representing Biblical and historical
characters such as D.L. Moody. Hudson
Taylor. and the Apostle Paul. making their
lives come alive.
Meetings will be at 6 p.m. each evening
and Sunday at 9 and 10:15 a.m.
Whitley's love of Christian drama began in
.high school when he traveled for three years
with a Christian drama team. During this time


he saw how drama could touch hearts as he
witnessed its effect on congregations. He
holds a bachelor's degree in speech and an
master's degree in dramatic productions, and
has appeared in three Christian films and var-
ious TV and radio programs. He is author of
eight plays and co-author of an Easter
Cantata.
The Maranatha congregation extends a cor-
dial welcome to friends from the community
to share in this opportunity. The church is in
Maranatha Village off Arbuckle Creek Road,
two miles east of State Road 17N in Sebring.
For more information call 382-4301 or 471-
1414.


Part 1 of "No Ordinary
Baby" observed the signifi-
cance of Jesus Christ's birth
and how His birth was
unlike the birth of any other
child. Part 2 of "No
Ordinary Baby," gave a brief
description of the life of
Christ in how He suffered
through most of His life all
for God's glory on our
behalf out of sacrificial love.
Part 3 will reveal the beauty
behind all that Jesus Christ
went through and how this
correlates with our lives
today.
Isaiah 53 (NKJV) gave a
brief idea of what Jesus
Christ experienced during
His life on earth and what
His response was to what He
went through leading up to
His death on the cross. In
Part 2, I mentioned how
some might look at Jesus as
a victim who would not
defend himself. Phillipians
2:8 shows how He was a
willing participant in God's
eternal plan. "And being
found in appearance as a
man, He humbled Himself
and became obedient to the
point of death, even the
death on the cross."
Consider what your
response would be if you
could know everything
about your life ahead of
time, most especially the
difficult things you would
have to go through. Would
you volunteer yourself for
it? Could you imagine expe-
riencing everything that the
human race would ever
experience all at one time as
Jesus did on the cross? God,
Jesus' father loved Him, but
He could not stand the sin.
Even his own father had
turned Hi's face from Him.
While Jesus was on the
cross going through this, He
cried out to His Father.
Matthew 27:45, 46 says,


This is such a hard subject
for me to write about
because I watched my father
and mother have knock-
down, drag-out fights when
I was little and it terrified
me. I would hide under the
kitchen table and close my
eyes, then open them again,
hoping it would soon stop.
My mother eventually left
my father and things were
better most of the time.
Did you know he was
abusive when you married
him? Did you think you
could change him? You
can't. The only person you
can change is yourself. We
respond to each other.
Women often need to feel
that if the man just has the
right kind of love or enough
love, he will change.
Unfortunately, no matter
how much you love that guy,
you can't change what made
him so filled with rage in
the first place. He has to
come to grips with all of
that pent up rage and find a
way to deal with it rational-
ly. He needs help you can't
give him. And you can't
make him get it. The courts
can make him go for coun-
seling but they can't make
him accept what they try to
teach him.
I cannot tell you that you
should stay with him, nor


"Now
from the
sixth hour
until the
ninth hour
there was
darkness
over all
the land.
Come To And about
S the ninth
The River hour Jesus
Leslie Deese cried out
with a
loud voice, saying, 'Eli, Eli,
lama sabachthani?' that is,
"My God, My God, why
have You forsaken Me?"
God would soon reveal
Himself after His death and
burial.
The beauty behind Jesus
Christ's death and burial was
actually what took place
after He had risen from the
grave. Jesus reappeared to
His disciples and reminded
them'of what was prophesied
in the Old Testament and
what He had told the disci-
ples before He was crucified
with the intention that they
would recall Scriptures as
shown in Luke 24:36-45.
Jesus then quoted to the dis-
ciples in Luke 24:46, 47,
"Thus it is written, and thus
it was necessary for the
Christ to suffer and to rise
from the dead the third day,
and that repentance and
remission of sins should be
preached in His name to all
nations beginning in
Jerusalem."
Jesus' final appearance on
earth showed that Jesus was
truth, and so is God's word.
Also, prophesy, such as
Isaiah 53 has been fulfilled
and is continuing to be ful-
filled. Following Christ's
final appearance to mankind,
He ascended into Heaven
(Luke 24:51) for eternity to
sit at the right hand of the
father, where He holds His


The Marriage
Mentor
Aleta Kay

can I tell you to leave him. I
can tell you what the Bible,
God's word, says.
I Corinthians 7:10-16
says, "And unto the married
I (Paul) command, yet not I,
but the Lord: let not the wife
depart from her husband:
but, and if she depart, let her
remain unmarried, or else be
reconciled to her husband:
and let not the husband put
away his wife. But to the
rest speak I, not the Lord:
...and the woman that hath
an husband that believeth
not, if he be pleased to dwell


title as "Wonderful,
Counselor, Mighty God,
Everlasting Father, Prince of
Prince (Isaiah 9:6).
Because of all that Christ
went through on earth, his
death and resurrection, we
now have the same privilege
of spending our life in eter-
nity after our own time on
earth is finished. I hope that
you have made a decision to
place your trust in what the
Lord has done for you. If it
were not for this perfect sac-
rifice that Jesus made on our
behalf, we would not be able
to spend our lives in eternity
with Him.
When we are born, we
have a sin nature. "For all
have sinned and fall short of
the glory of God" (Romans
3:23). We are physically
alive, but spiritually dead,
and without Jesus paying the
price for all of our sins, we
would not have a way out.
However, God has paid the
price for our sins and He has
offered us a free gift that we
cannot lose once we choose
to accept it. "For the wages
of sin is death, but the gift
of God is eternal life in
Christ Jesus our Lord"
(Romans 6:23). Because this
gift has already been paid
for, there is nothing we can
do through our good works
to earn it.
"For by grace you have
been saved through faith,
and that not of yourselves; it
is the gift of God, not of
works, lest anyone should
boast" (Ephesians 2:8, 9).
My prayer for you is that if
you do not know the Lord as
your personal savior at this
point that you will choose to
make this decision now. This
gift is the greatest gift we
could ever choose to receive.

Leslie Deese is a Sebring resi-
dent. She can be reached at
ljb_628@yahoo.com


with her, let her not leave
him.
"For the unbelieving hus-
band is sanctified by the
wife.... But if the unbeliev-
ing depart, let him depart. A
brother or a sister is not
under bondage in such cases,
but God hath called us to
peace. For what knowest
thou, 0 wife, if thou shalt
save thy husband..."
For the sake of space I left
out the part about the hus-
band.
Read it for yourself and
pray for God's guidance.
Maybe speak to your pastor.
God bless.

Aleta Kay can be reached at the-
marriagementor@yahoo. corn


ts R Sebring Square
V$ Restaurant 382-2333
Mon-Sat 6:30am-2pm
& Coffee Shop Sunday 7am-2pm

BREAKFAST SPECIAL
Monday through Saturday
2 eggs, ham, home fries or $ 0
S ts and toast! ONLY $ 00
with purchase of coffee, tea or soda.


No ordinary baby: Part 3


What if I'm being abused?


m The
r is









News-Sun Friday. February 4. 2011


DIVERSIONS


By JAKE COYLE
AP Entertainment Writer
In the low-budget 3-D
cave-diving adventure
"Sanctum." a little bit of rain
causes a lot of death by
accident, murder and a
bizarre amount of assisted
suicide.
Who needs those chipper
Chilean miners, anyway'?
Eschewing such heart-
warming tales, "Sanctum,"
directed by Australian Alister
Grierson and produced by 3-
D guru James Cameron, is
more interested in the savage
realities of survival.
A large expedition headed
by grizzled Aussie explorer
Frank McGuire (Richard
Roxburgh) is knee-deep in
mapping the mile-deep
Esa'ala Caves of Papua New
Guinea. Frank's less ambi-
tious 17-year-old son, Josh
(Rhys Wakefield), along with
the team's financier daredevil
Carl (loan Gruffudd) and his
equally gung-ho girlfriend,
Victoria (Alice Parkinson),
have just arrived.
Set deep in the jungle, the
mouth of the expansive cave
system (actually shot in
Australia) is enormous and
cylindrical. You half expect
the Millennium Falcon of
"Star Wars" to come shooting
out with a giant worm in
close pursuit.
In the complex labyrinth of
cavernous chambers and
underground rivers beneath
the surface, the danger is less
alien. Maneuvering by scuba
through underwater crevices
as tight as those of "127
Hours," Frank's mantra is
that "panic is the enemy."
A storm is known to be
approaching, but deep under-
ground, they're somehow still
caught unprepared when the
storm develops into a
cyclone,.thus promising a
life-threatening deluge in the
caves.
Taking charge is Frank, a,
cold fish, indeed. "There's no


Universal Pictures
Richard Roxburgh stars as Frank McGuire in 'Sanctum .'


God down here," he snaps at
one moment with face hard-
ened. Elsewhere, there's:
"There are no rescue mis-
sions down here, only body
recoveries!"
Everyone questions his
harsh leadership (particularly
his more kindhearted son),
but Frank is gradually borne
out.
He may be gruff, but he
knows caves and the limita-
tions of what can be accom-
plished.
Those locked underground
follow him, looking for the
exit to the sea. The survivors
are winnowed until true to
the tradition of so many such
films women and non-
whites are gradually dis-
patched. Some exit like
"Willy Wonka" characters,
neatly ruined by their fool-
hardiness.
A claustrophobia takes
hold as they make their way
from one chamber to the
next, squeaking through the
rock and water. Many of the
set pieces in the cave system


Portman an ill fit as


'The Other Woman'


By CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP Movie Critic
Playing the other woman
in "The Other Woman" is an
uncomfortable fit for Natalie
Portman.
Sure, she did crazy beauti-
fully in "Black Swan," earn-
ing an Oscar nomination for
her performance as a balleri-
na pirouetting into madness.
But playing a home wrecker
and the stepmother to a
young boy seems incongruent
with her innately girlish lika-


ability.
Writer-
director Don
Roos leaves
holes in logic
and emotional
resonance.
For exam-
ple, does
Portman's
character,
Emilia, feel
the slightest
bit guilty
about breaking
up the mar-
riage of an
older, wealthy
Manhattan
lawyer named
Jack (Scott
Cohen)? Does


nebulous that it's awfully
hard to root for her, but,
ostensibly, that's what we're
supposed to be doing in
watching "The Other
Woman."
When we first meet Emilia
and Jack, they're getting over
the loss of their baby after
only three days of life. At the
same time, Emilia is trying to
forge her own bond with
William, but it's tough. He's
one of those precocious, neu-


rotic kids you


Movie Review
'The Other Woman'
Rating: R (sexual content

and language)

Running *- : xxx minutes


Jack have any remorse about
the way his affair has dam-
aged the lives of his ex-wife.
Carolyn (Lisa Kudrow), and
his sensitive son, William
(Charlie Tahan)? These are
just some of the many ques-
tions begging to be answered.
But even more fundamen-
tally: What does Emilia see
in Jack? If he were sexy,
funny and warm or pos-
sessed even one of those
traits it might make some
sense. Cohen plays him as
standoffish and scolding. And
suggesting that Emilia is
drawn to him because she has
daddy issues plays like facile
pop psychology.
Emilia's motivations are so


only see in the
movies -
the kind who
are obses-
sive-compul-
sive about
germs, insist
on wearing a
helmet while
ice skating
and only eat
pudding
made from
soy.
Emilia's
interactions
with William
represent the
only
moments that
vaguely
resemble real


human relations. She teases
him and tries to get him to
have fun, he remains uptight,
and their banter can be lively
and charming. Still, despite
her efforts, Jack strangely
accuses Emilia of being cold
to his son.
Flashbacks reveal how
their affair began. Emilia was
a new associate at Jack's law
firm; the daughter of a judge,
she was fresh out of Harvard
Law School. Jack was more
established at the firm and
had a comfortable life with
his status-hungry wife, one of
the city's superstar pediatri-
cians.
Arbitrarily, Emilia finds
herself smitten by Jack. But
when the two go off on a


Movie Review

'Sanctum'
Rating: R (language, some
violence and disturbing
images)
Running time: 109 minutes
Review: (of 4)

and the underwater shots are,
beautiful, but the lack of
variation begins to feel like
the recent film "Buried,"
which takes place entirely in
a coffin.
"Sanctum" is clearly in
line with Cameron's adora-
tion of subsurface explo-
ration, a love affair at least


since "The Abyss."
"Sanctum" is meant to prove
that the 3-D technology
developed for his "Avatar"
can be inexpensively adapted
to simple genre films.
As a showcase for 3-D,
"Sanctum" is a failure. The
depth of the images adds lit-
tle to the experience, and for
most of the middle of the
film, is entirely forgotten.
The darkness of the caves, at
least, suits the darkened
image of 3-D.
Written by John Garvin
and caver Andrew Wight,
"Sanctum" claims to be
"inspired by a true story."
The basis, though, is a cave
trip by Wight where a per-
ilous storm nevertheless
ended in all 15 surviving.
The film at least avoids
that romantic lie of so many
survivalist movies, that you
can make it against all odds.
"Sanctum" allows that hero-
ism has its limits and that
death must be accepted.
Jack Kevorkian would love
it.


IFC Films
Scott Cohen and Natalie Portman star in 'The Other
Woman.'


business trip together, and
Jack follows Emilia down the
hall to her hotel room after a
night of flirting, the moment
should be fraught with sexual
tension. Instead, jaunty music
jarringly depletes the scene
of its drama. In no time, she's
pregnant with their child and
the two are married.


At other moments, though,
the exchanges feel realistic
because they're awkward,
such as the conversation
Emilia has with a good friend
who has suffered a miscar-
riage. Roos does find ele-
ments of truth here and there;
frustratingly, there are too
few of them.


Colleagues suspect


forgetful co-worker


is battling dementia


Dear Abby:
Everyone knows
the economy has
hit hard times
and, as a result,
more people are
working past the
age of retirement.
This means some
in the workplace Dear
are beginning to
deal with Alzheimer's and
other dementia-related ill-
nesses.
"Anita" is in her late 60s
and we are certain she is
showing symptoms of
dementia. She has worked
in our office about three
years, after working in this
field for more than 30
years elsewhere. But if you
saw her in our office today,
you would think it was her
first week if not her first
day.
Anita makes multiple
mistakes every day, then
sits at her desk and cries
her eyes out. Our supervi-
sor insists there is nothing
he or HR can do in regards
to talking (gently) to her
because she could sue the
company.
I'm sorry Anita is suffer-
ing, but must we let her
deteriorate for three more
years in our office? That's
how long she is planning
on staying, even though
she's eligible for retire-
ment. Her family lives
elsewhere in the state and
may not realize she is ill.
Were she my mother, I
would want someone to do
something. What's the
right thing to do for every-
one involved?
Stumped in California
Dear Stumped: I dis-
cussed your question with
Nancy Bertrando, d
respected California
employment law specialist,
who told me: "If a person
is unable to perform the
essential functions of her
job regardless of the rea-
son an employer does not
have the obligation to keep
the person in that position.
However, regardless of
whether your supervisor or
HR thinks it is futile, Anita
should be counseled and
given the opportunity to
fix the problem if,
indeed, it is fixable."

Dear Abby: My hus-
band runs an auto body
shop and has always
warned me to be extra
careful in parking lots -
"People don't pay atten-
tion. They drive too fast.
Everyone's always in a
hurry," etc. Well, tomorrow
I am going to the memorial












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service for a dear
friend, "Mara."
She was only 46.
While Mara
was putting her
granddaughter
into a stroller.
they were hit. A
woman driving
r Abby too fast hit a car
backing out of a
parking space, careened off
that car and ran over Mara.
Mara was pinned under-
neath the car until the fire
department arrived and
lifted it off her. Mara's
daughter saw it all. The 3-
year-old is still in the hos-
pital, but will survive.
I realize my friend died
over a parking spot. I hope
people reading this will see
that we all need to slow
down and pay attention. A
car can be as lethal as a
gun. I didn't "get it"
before, but now I do.
Because of the reckless
actions of a complete
stranger, you can kiss your
husband goodbye, go shop-
ping and never return. I
hope this nightmare can
help others.
Missing the Sister of
My Heart
Dear Missing: Please
know how sorry I am
about the tragic death of
your friend. I cannot stress
enough how important it is
to remain fully present
while behind the wheel of
a vehicle. Our streets and
highways are filled with
distractions, as are our cars
billboards, cell phones,
stereo buttons, the GPS,
etc. I am sure the woman
who struck Mara and her
grandchild will never get
over the fact that she took
one life and could have
taken another.
Readers, I hope you will
review this woman's letter
and remember it the next
time you're "in a hurry." It
could save a life.
t
Thought for the Day:
"How wonderful it is that
nobody need wait a single
moment before starting to
improve the world." -
Anne Frank

Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069. To order 'How to Write
Letters for All Occasions,'send
a business-sized, self-addressed
envelope, plus check or money
order for $6 (U.S. funds) to:
Dear Abby Letter Booklet,
SP.O. Box 447, Mount Morris,
IL 61054-0447.






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Spelunkers dive (and die) in 'Sanctum'


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PAGE


LIVING


News-Sun





Ronald Reagan


100TH BIRTHDAY

Celebrations across the country mark the centennial of conservative icon


Ronald Reagan would have turned
100 on Feb. 6. The most influential
politician of the last quarter of the
20th century died in 2004. But places con-
nected with his life as a lifeguard, radio
announcer, movie star and politician will
mark the milestone nonetheless.
Reagan's legacy stretches across the
country. He grew up in Illinois, which has
created a "Reagan Trail" of towns that
played big and small roles in his life. He
worked in Des Moines, Iowa, as a radio
announcer covering the Chicago Cubs. It


was a trip to the Cubs' then-spring training
home on Santa Catalina Island, Calif.. that
brought Reagan to the West, where a
screen test led to a contract with Warner
Bros. Studios.
After a long Hollywood and TV career,
Reagan rose from conservative spokesman
to California governor, and then the 40th
president of the United States. He spent
much of his later years at his beloved ranch
in Santa Barbara, Calif. His memory is pre-
served at the presidential museum and
library in Simi Valley, Calif.


It's impossible to overestimate the
Reagan legacy, especially in the
Republican Party. Reagan left the White
House in January 1989. His battle with
Alzheimer's disease forced him to leave
public life 10 years before his death.
Yet during the debate this month to
choose a new Republican Party national
chairman, moderator Grover Nordquist ',k as
forced to add a caveat when he asked each
candidate to name the person who most
inspired them, "besides Ronald Reagan."
Gary A. War n '.
The Orange County (Calif.) Regrpr


Presidential library and museum 4
It opened in 1991 at a cost of $60 million and the dedication ceremony was the first time five U.S. presidents gathered in the same
place. One of the most visited presidential libraries, it attracts about 400,000 visitors annually. Permanent displays include a re-creation
of the Oval Office and several galleries on Reagan's life. Much of the museum is closed until Feb. 7 while new exhibits are being pre-
pared for the centennial celebration.
Air Force One White
Pavilion House rose Oval
Houses not only the garden Office
Boeing 707 used by I / and
s.eve r, rrA-dents from g .. J / galleries


,4~w

I


Where Reagan lived and worked in California
San .
Fernando


Simi
Valley


VENTURA CCUNTr '


Thousand
Oaks


LOS ANGELES COUNTY


4. Century Plaza Hotel (now the
Hyatt Regency Century Plaza) A
favorite for political parties in
Southern California, it was
the site of Reagan's 1984
re-election celebration.


7. Star on Hollywood Walk of Fame
Reagan is the only president with
a star, although the Walk of Fame
also has stars for former U.S.
Sen. George Murphy of California
and former California Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger.


5, Reagan-Wyman
home West
Hollywood home of
the newlyweds in
the early 1940s.


a. TV studio From 1965 to
1966, Reagan hosted the
TV show "Death Valley Days"
shot at this studio. He quit
when he was elected
governor.


Little Brown Church in
the Valley Reagan
married Nancy Davis,
who was first lady in
Sacramento and
Washington.


? Post-presidential home The
Reagans lived here after he left
the White House. It's next door
to the house used as the
exterior for Jed Clampett s
mansion in "The Beverly
Hillbillies."


2 Reagan's post-White
House office Its
exterior was used in
the original "Die Hard"
film starring Bruce
Willis.


Burbank


Woodland Hills

,27


Encino


; The Gipper's bachelor pad
Reagan's apartment during
his early Hollywood days.


Santa
Monica

S. Wee Kirk o' the
Heather Church He
married Jane Wyman in this
chapel in 1940, surrounded
by Forest Lawn Memorial
Park. They divorced in 1949.


'1 I know in my
heart that man
is good, that what is
right will always
eventually triumph
and that there is
purpose and worth
to each and every
life."
- Reagan's words inscribed
on tomb, 2004


Van Nuys


Sherman Studio
Oaks -' City


Air Hollywood 0
Westwood
Century
0.) f , city


'.j 5 Glendale


Silver
Lake


Los
Angeles


Culver 170s
City 0
The Ronald Reagan Trail
Reagan's childhood took him across much
of northern and central Illinois. The Ronald
Reagan Trail is an association of about a
dozen towns that have a connection with
the former president. Probably the most
important is Dixon, where his boyhood
home is a museum. To learn more about
the participating towns shown below, go to
www.ronaldreagantrail.net.


DIXON Chicag(
Ceo

0e Area
detail

Chicago to Dixon is
about a two-hour drive,
or about 100 miles.

ILLINOIS


SOURCES RONALD REAGAN PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. RONALD REAGAN TRAIL, NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO
PHOTOS BY THE RONALD REAOGAN PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY
iGrap/ici/ y 'cott iBrwn / Tihe Ora0ng County (ICalij.i) Rgi.sit'Ir/IMCT


0 DIXON


0 TAMPICO
WALNUT O COHIO

PRINCETON*
BUREAU 0

HENRY 0.z

CHILLICOTHE 04'

PEORIA 0 EUREKA
HEIGHTS 0
WASHINGTON


Feb. 6, 1911: Ronald Wilson Reagan born in
Tampico, III.
1920: Family settles in Dixon, Ill., which he
always considers his hometown.
1926: Works as a lifeguard at Lowell Park,
near Dixon. Credited with saving 77 lives
during seven summers.
1928: Graduates from Dixon High School,
serves as student body president and
involved in football, basketball, track and
school plays.
1928-32: Attends
Eureka (Illinois)
College. Serves as stu-
dent body president.
1932: Gets temporary
sports broadcasting job
at small radio station in
Iowa.
1937: Enlists in Army Reserve. While in
L.A., Warner Bros. gives him seven-year
contract.
1940: Portrays football legend George Gipp
in film "Knute Rockne All American," earning
nickname "the Gipper."
Jan. 24, 1940: Marries actress Jane
Wyman.
1942: Assigned to Army Air Force 1st Motion
Picture Unit in Culver City, Calif., where he
helps make training films.
1945-65: Resumes acting career, making 53
films.
1947: Elected president of the Screen Actors
Guild for the first of five terms.
1949: Reagan and Wyman divorce.
March 4, 1952: Reagan and movie actress
Nancy Davis wed.
1962: Reagan officially changes his party
registration to Republican.
1966: Reagan defeats
Calif. incumbent Gov.
Edmund G. Brown in a
landslide. ,
1969: Sends in National ,
Guard to stop protests at i
University of California,
Berkeley.
1970: Re-elected California governor.
1976: Loses presidential nomination to
Gerald Ford, but enjoys strong showing.,
Nov. 4, 1980: Elected president by defeating
incumbent Jimmy Carter.
Jan. 20, 1981: Sworn in as 40th president
on day Iran releases 52 U.S. hostages.
March 30, 1981: Shot in the chest, survives
assassination attempt by John Hinckley Jr.
1981: Fires striking air traffic controllers.
1983: Orders invasion of Grenada.
March 8, 1983: Warns against ignoring"the
aggressive impulses of an evil empire."
March 23, 1983: Proposes Strategic
Defense Initiative, later dubbed "Star Wars."
Nov. 1986: Iran-contra scandal reveals ille-
gal arm sales to Iran and profits sent to
Nicaraguan rebels. Admits "mistakes" were
made.
June 12, 1987: At Berlin's Brandenburg
Gate, demands USSR General Secretary
Mikhail Gorbachev to "tear down this wall."
Jan. 11, 1989: Gives farewell address to
nation, saying the "Reagan revolution" had
made a difference.
Nov. 5, 1994: Discloses he has Alzheimer's
disease. "I now begin the journey that will
lead me into the sunset of my life."
June 5, 2004: Dies in California at 93.


Friday, February 4, 2011


7".(
313


Malibu


Point
Dumen


RONALD REAGAN PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY
President Ronald Reagan works at
his Oval Office desk on Jan. 26, 1982