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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00699
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Published on Nov. 6, 1988 as: Sunday news-sun
Alternate title: News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun
Place of Publication: Sebring, Fla
Creation Date: June 19, 2009
Publication Date: 1988-
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States of America -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States of America -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each days's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29858590
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:00699
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

Full Text


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NEWS - SUN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927


Things to do on
Father's Day,

PAGE 16B


Keep your old Hospice patients
car looking good can record history


PAGE #A


PAGE 2A


Friday-Saturday, June 19-20, 2009


J1



Nothing new: Sun, then
thunderstorms roll in
High Low

96 71
Complete Forecast
PAGE 16A


Question: Is the
dramatic increase in
auto registration fees
an unfair way for the
state to raise money?

Yes





No

11.2%

Total votes: 98
Next question: Do the
2009 FCAT grades
indicate, on the whole,
that local schools are
doing a good job?
Make your voice heard at
www.newssun ;


Jorge Gonzalez
Age 52, of Sebring
Jessie Harrison
Age 84, of Venus
Mary Johnson
Age 81, of Sebring
Ann Krubsack
Age 76, of Lake Placid
Virginia Williams
Age 69, of Sebring
Obituaries, Page 5A

Classifieds 13A
Community Briefs 9A
Dear Abby 15B
Editorial & Opinion 4A
Fashion 10B
Lottery Numbers 2A
Movie Reviews 15B
Police Blotter D10A
Politics 7A
Real Estate 14B
Religion 5B




Good Morning To
News-Sun subscriber
Sam Bliss
Lake Placid


II Ill01l II0
o 90994 01001 7


www.newssun.com


3 schools go up, 2 go



down in FCAT grades

Avon Elementary makes biggest jump;

all three high schools now at D level
By TREY CHRISTY
trey.christy@newssun.com
SEBRING - Thursday marked
the day schools across Florida
learned their school grade, and in
Highlands' County there were little
changes.
School grades are a combination
of Florida's ,Comprehensive
Assessment Test scores in reading,
math, writing and science, and var-
ious factors to gauge improvement.
In Highlands County three
schools improved at least one letter
grade while two dropped at least
one. \
The largest improvement came
from Avon Elementary School,
earning an A grade after last year's
disappointing C. They made news
that year by falling from an A.
The school didn't have scores in
any subject that were phenomenal-
ly high, but they were consistently
strong across all subject areas.
While Avon Park middle and
high schools suffered - APHS
unable to shake a D grade and
falling from a numerical store of
424 to 411, and APMS improving
15 points but not enough to
improve on a C - the city's ele-
mentary schools are shining.
Park Elementary, was able to
keep its A grade after moving from
a C two years ago.
"Our faculty is ecstatic." said
principal Brenda Longshore. "'We
are thrilled we are able to continue
to move forward and we are also
making great gains in all sub-
groups."
Continued on page 3A


Volume 90/Number 73150 cents

Affidavit


accuses four


officials of

misconduct

Maxcy, Cool, Macbeth'
and Polatty accused
of conspiring on
2005 zoning issue
By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
SEBRING- Ex-Highlands County
Code Enforcement Officer Gary Lower
signed,an affidavit last Tuesday stating
that County Commissioner Guy Maxcy,
County Attorney Ross Macbeth, former
County Administrator Carl Cool, and
former County Project Manager. Jim
Polatty conspired to change staff rec-
ommendations on a zoning issue in
2005.
In the affidavit,, Lower concedes that
when he asked Polatty why the original
recommendation of approval was
changed for a parcel of land along
Sparta Road, "Mr. Polatty told me that
Mr. Carl Cool, Mr. Guy Maxcy, and
Board Attorney Macbeth told him to
change, the recommendation for
'approval' to a recommendation for
'denial'. Mr. Polatty told me that he
made the change as instructed," the
affadaVit read.
Lower ,also testified that "I am aware
that Mr. Polatty has unilaterally
changed such recommendations in the
past and destroyed the signed recom-
mendations of the staff."
.Maxcy asserts that such a meeting
never happened.
"I don't.know Where his is coming
from. I don't know what to say about
that accusation. I have never huddled
up with anyone over changing a recom-
mendation. I don't know what all this is
Continued on page 3A


Anthrax hoax suspect Moffitt gets new attorney, continuance


By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
christopher.tufley@newssun.com
SEBRING - Jerron Mario
Moffitt, 20, the individual accused of
terrorizing the community on April 2
by putting envelopes referring to
anthrax and filled with white powder
underneath numerous automobile
windshield wipers and in mailboxes
around the area, appeared in court
Wednesday morning.
Moffitt's hired attorney, Robert
Gray asked the court to remove him


from the case as
Moffitt's family, and
Moffitt himself,
could no longer
afford to fund a
defense.
Moffitt gave sworn
testimony to the court Moffitt
that he has no present
income or assets, at which point
Judge Peter Estrada declared him
indigent, allowing him access to the
public defenders office.


Avon Park fined by DEP for

water issues in Sebring Ridge


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
AVON PARK - In March 2008
drinking water at Sebring Ridge
Utilities, owned and operated by the
city of Avon Park, tested positive for
coliform bacteria, and " a sfow
response to the incident gave cause
for the Department of Environmental
Protection to levy a fine.
In a public notice dated June 20,
2008 ,the city admits to not following
through with the required testing and
states that "we cannot be sure of the
quality of your drinking water during
that time."
Additionally, in a Sanitation
Survey conducted at that same time,
several other deficiencies were noted


including excessive algae growth and
three leaking concrete tanks.
According to the DEP, coliform
bacteria, or fecal bacteria, are the
commonly-used indicator of the sani-
tary quality of foods and water.
Coliforms are abundant in the
feces of warm-blooded animals, but
can also be found in the aquatic envi-
ronment, in soil and on vegetation.
In most instances, coliforms them-
selves are not the cause of sickness,
but they are easy to culture and their
presence is used to indicate that other
pathogenic organisms of fecal' origin
may be present such as pathogens,
viruses, or parasites including
Continued on page 3A


However, public
defender Bruce Carter
informed the court he
would not be able to
take Moffitt's case as
he is already the
attorney of record for
Carmona Cele Pete Carmona,
20, Moffitt's alleged
accomplice.
Moffitt was then referred to the
Regional Conflict Counsel Ginger
Cooper, who will take over his


defense.
.The state's regional conflict coun-
sel position was created to handle
public defender cases with more than
one defendant, and which therefore
had potential conflicts of interest.
Moffitt's actions, which he is
reported to say were only a joke, led
to a day-long lockdown of Florida
Hospital, Heartland Division, when
an employee brought one of the
Continued on page 3A


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Signs at the Grouper Pumping Station points out Avon Park's ownership of
the drinking water storage that services Sebring Ridge. Both the Grouper
and the Shad Pumping Stations are currently under investigation by the
Department of Environment Protection Agency for compliance issues.


6 IiII.


Wouchuta State aink

Member oIC I E-QaI i"ag Lewl-dRr
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.- - - - - - - - - - -

Yod jihir Bank on

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News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


Page 2A


www.newssun.com


FWC proposes new way to list threatened wildlife species


MCT
The manatee is on the federal list of endangered.or threat-
ened species.


Special to the News-Sun
CRYSTAL RIVER - The Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission is proposing a revision of
the imperiled species management and
listing process.
"Florida is on the edge of leadership
in the management of imperiled
species," said Kenneth Wright, Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) commissioner at
the Commission meeting in Crystal
River on Wednesday after hearing an
update from staff.
"This proposal for revising the
process puts the focus on management
without getting wrapped around termi-
nology."
Dr. Elsa Haubold, leader of the


FWC's imperiled species team, present-
ed the update. The update included a
proposal for an improved listing
process, species protections, manage-
ment plans and coordination with the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to
streamline permitting functions between.
the regulatory agencies.
-The team's proposal for the listing
process suggests that Florida use one
imperiled species list, which would
include two designations for imperiled
species in Florida.
The first designation would contain
those species that are listed as threat-
ened or endangered under the federal
Endangered Species Act.
Federally listed species include ani-
mals such as the Florida manatee, red-


cockaded woodpecker, Florida panther,
American crocodile, all five species of
sea turtles, several beach mice and coral
species, Florida scrub jays, key deer,
North Atlantic right whale and sturgeon.
The second designation would
include Florida species that are at risk of
extinction, but are not listed federally,
such as the gopher tortoise, key blenny,
Eustis pupfish, short-tailed snake,
Homosassa shrew and white-crowned
pigeon. The Florida designated species
would be a single category. ,
Six speakers from various stakeholder
groups, including the Ocean
Conservancy, Audubon of Florida, Save
the Manatee Club, the Humane Society
of the United States and Defenders of
Continued on page 8A


Sebring

Chamber

job hotly

contested

Applications

pouring in

from around

the nation
By TREY CHRISTY
trey.christy@rfewssun.com
SEBRING - When
Sebring Chamber of
Commerce President
Sarah Pallone announced
she was leaving the cham-
ber to take a job at the
local Habitat for
Humanity, the idea was to
fill her job quickly.
Board members
thought they would start
with a hire to fill the post
on an interim basis as
they searched around the
state for someone to fill
the role permanently, but
applications have already
poured in.
Within days, 32 appli-
cations were being
reviewed while even
more that didn't hit the
deadline were put aside.
"I had hoped to have
this done by today but we
had a larger response than
any of us expected,"
David Noel, chairman of
the chamber board, said
during a Wednesday'
evening interview. "It's
going to take a few more
days to get this in place."
Noel said the applica-
tions came from as far as
Washington State, Ohio
and South Carolina, but
there were a few appli-
cants from "right next
door."
"Most of them are
superb applications," he
said. "That's the fun
part."
Hopes are that the
selection committee will
meet with some of the
applicants early next
week and name someone
to fill the interim position
some time that week.
"We are rapidly work-
ing to close this out
because we want someone
in place before Sarah is
gone," Noel said.
The plan is to take
more time to find a per-
manent replacement by
conducting a more thor-
ough search after the
interim president is in
place.
"We want to do this
right," Noel said.


, Metro Services
Patients in hospice care now have a way to make their life stories live on in a DVD presen-
tation.


Recording history, one


life story at a time


By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
christopher.tuffley@newssun.com
SEBRING - Technology
is being put to good use by
the Hope and Good
Shepherd hospices. With the
help of their supportive
services, patients can now
create professional quality
videos on DVD that memo-
rialize their lives.
"Many patients want their
images and words to live on.
For that, volunteers create
life review videos and audio
tapes where patients tell
their life stories or leave
heart-felt messages for their
loved ones," said Patty
Klein, a, spokeswoman for
Good Shepherd.
Selwyn Fidelman's auto-
biographical DVD is a good
example of what can be cre-
ated.
Fidelman, 79, who battles
with Parkinson's and throat
cancer, used family photo-
graphs and poetry he wrote
over the years to tell the "
story of his life. He talks
about his parents and
upbringing so his grandchil-
dren and great-grandchildren
can have a sense of their
history.
He remembers the Bronx
of his boyhood, how he and
his friends amused them-
selves when they weren't in
school, as well as is his
work in Korea with the


Hospice programs
offer service that
lets patients tell
their story on DVD

Army.
. He touches on the highs
and lows of his life -
speaking of his love for his
children as well as the
break-up of his 33-year mar-
riage.
Fidelman, who was a clin-
ical psychologist, also
recorded the great achieve-
ment of his life, creating an
alternative care program for
schizophrenics within the
Michigan state hospital sys-
tem.
By explaining his work in
detail, and what made it suc-
cessful, he leaves a a record
that goes beyond family
interest and could of use to
someone studying treatment
techniques.
But what his life review
does best is bring him alive,
so. even people who never
met him know him by the
end.
There are clips of him
dancing, in particular, that
bring out his zest and love
of life.
He did all this using just
what was tucked away for
safekeeping. In the end he


Correction
Wednesday's story regarding the Florida Hospital,
Heartland Division's 15th Annual Gala listed an incorrect
telephone number. To make a reservation or donate items for
raffles and the silent auction please call the hospital's founda-
tion at 402-5525.


-NEWS-SUN

Standard of Accuracy
The goal of the News-Sun is to do things the right way in everything
we do. Of course, that does not always happen.
If this occurs in a news report, the News-Sun will correct all errors
of fact as soon as possible. Readers who find factual errors are
encouraged to contact the newsroom so we can correct the mistake.
Readers who wish to comment on our coverage rather than a factual
error are encouraged to write a letter to the editor.
The standard of accuracy applies to all our operations. Readers with
concerns about delivery or subscription payments should call the circu-
lation department.
We strive to provide the best customer service in all facets of our
operation. Those who are unable to resolve their problems through the
usual channels are invited to call my office directly.

Clarrisa Williams, Publisher
863-385-6155, ext. 515


had enough material to make
a video that lasts an hour
and a half.
He-insisted that Mitra
Gobin and Jennifer Dumpert
be recognized for their tech-
nical contributions. The
workmanship is first class,
with professional fade-outs
and interesting transitions.
The joy of such reviews is
that each is meant to be tai-
lored to each life and per-
sonality.
When the time comes
these videos may be used in
addition to a eulogy, letting
the individual speak for him
or herself.
As pieces of family histo-
ry they are invaluable, and
in DVD form can last for
centuries.
For more information call
Jennifer Dumpert at 382-
0312, ext. 80506, or Mitra
Gobin at (863) 688-4715.


LOCAL NEWS SNAPSHOTS


'Space Odysseys'
available at area
museums
SEBRING - Gerald
Pleau has spent the last
three years compiling
information from across
the NASA Web site that is
now available in one place.
He calls it "Space
Odysseys: An illustrated
History of the first 28 mis-
sions to Outer Space."
Pleau wrote.a small
introduction, but all of the
book is taken straight from
the NASA Web site.
"It's hard to get anything
better than the actual stuff
done by NASA," he said.
It details the first 28
missions to space from
1961-72, with pictures of
the rockets and other
equipment used, as well as
biographies of the astro-
nauts themselves.
The information comes
on a CD and includes a
color poster of a Saturn
rocket and the various
patches worn by the astro-
nauts for $15.
The CD is available. at
the Avon Park Historical
Museum at 3 N. Museum
Ave.; Sebring's Military


I was at the library (recent-
ly) and I had to sign up to use
the computer. The man in
front of me had his two kids
with him, and they all three of
them got a computer. When
they sat down to use the
computers they started play-
ing games. That's not what
the computers are there for.
This is not an area for the
kids to come in and play.
They weren't even using the
computers and a lot of adults
were just waiting around for
these kids to use up their
hour.
Now, the man Mr. Carlson,
has the right idea. I mean, if
you are going to use the com-


Services Museum, 1402
Roseland Ave. off
Kenilworth Boulevard; and
the Lake Placid Historical
Society Museum, 12 Park
Ave.
Pleau can be contacted
via e-mail at
gjbpleau@aol.com.

Michele Avenue is
re-opened
LAKE PLACID - As of
5 p.m. Thursday the
Highlands County Road
and Bridge Department re-
opened Michele Avenue
from Wildflower Street to
Bond Street in Lake Placid
to the public.
For further information,
call the Road and Bridge
Department at 402-6529.

Sebring observes
July 4 holiday
SEBRING - Sebring
City Hall Public Works &
Utilities Department will
be closed Friday, July 3 to
observe Independence Day.
The departments will re-
open Monday, July 6. The
Solid Waste Department
will run regular all week.
There will be no changes
in garbage collection.


ToVent
puters for the kids, assign two
or three of them for them, not
all 15. Come on, give us a �
break.

Got something to say? Call
the News-Sun's Sound Off
Line at 385-6155, ext 267
and ha ve your say anony-
mously. Just keep it clean
and legal


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www.newssun.com
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Affidavit

alleges

collusion

by county

officials
Continued from page 1A
about, but we will get to
the bottom of it eventual-
ly," he said on Thursday.
The recent affidavit in
the lawsuit filed in 2009
by Preston H. Colby
against the Highlands
County Board of County
Commissioners, is just
one of several twists that
have developed as the
case progresses over
access to public records.
Additionally, the
actions by the four offi-
cials were, according to
Colby, "official miscon-
duct and misuse of public
office," and now carry a
possible criminal charge.
Maxcy is currently
under investigation about
possible ethics violations
by the State of Florida.
Investigations into the
depth of that one incident
by Colby's attorney, Jim
McCollum, revealed that
additional public records
were withheld from Colby
about contract negotia-
tions with the NCT Group
and the county over-
charges for county audits.
A lack of proper minute
keeping during the con-
tract negotiations with
NCT were discovered -
they were in the form of
hand-written notes held
by County Office of
Budget and Management
Director Bernis Gainer.
The notes were then
submitted as official min-.
utes at two different times
over two years after the
meetings.,
The two different set of
"official" notes revealed
that Julie Fowler, the rep-
resentative for NCT, was
present at those meetings
that, according to Colby
were not held in the
Sunshine as described by
Florida Statute.
On Thursday, Judge
Olin W. Shinholser
excused himself from the
case because Fowler is his
daughter, i
Additionally, Colby
said he fired McCollum
for "telling Shinholser
there was no need for him
to excuse himself from
the case despite having
full knowledge that
Shinholser was related to
Fowler, even though
McCollum was directed
by Colby to draft a motion
to that effect.
"I am just trying to get
the county to release pub-
lic records," Colby said.
"Their intentional behav-
ior to withhold the records
is a violation of Florida
Statute 119."
Colby has recently
come under fire from
some for costing the tax-
payer money and for
suing the county over
public records.
"You should see what
the county is spending on
these under-the-table con-
tracts," Colby said. "All I
want is the access to pub-
lic recordsthat is guaran-
teed under state law. I -am
trying to discover why the
taxpayers are paying $75
per hour at NCT."
A phone message left at
Macbeth's office was not
returned and the News-
Sun was unable to contact
Cool or Polatty prior to
press time on Thursday.


'I don't know
where this is
coming from. I
have never
huddled up with
anyone over
changing a
recommendation.'

GUY MAXCY
county commissioner


News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


- -... -~ -

.


] ".4 ,


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
The three concrete water storage tanks at the Shad. Drive Water Pumping Station show visible signs of leakage, and are not
in compliance with the Department of Environmental Protection's requirements to ensure the safety of drinking water.
These tanks are part of the drinking water system for the Sebring Ridge Area and tested positive for excessive amounts of
fecal coliform bacteria back in 2008.


AP fined over water plant issues


Continued from page 1A
Escherichia coli, or E. coli, which is the
major .species in the fecal coliform
group
The presence of these organisms that
can be harmful to humans in contami-
nated drinking water supplies are rare,,
but water pollution caused by fecal con-
tamination is a .serious problem due to
the potential for contracting diseases
from pathogens.
Anytime there is a water line break,
or the presence of coliforms are deter-
mined to be too high, the DEP and
Health Department recommends a boil
water warning, and suggests using bot-
tled water for drinking and cooking.
After testing positive in March 2008,
Avon Park was required by law to sub-
mit five microbiological samples in
April that would indicate the extent of
the water quality and to notify the pub-
lic that the drinking water might be
unsafe immediately so that the water
could be boiled.
E-mails from Ted Long, Public Works
supervisor in 2008, showed that he was
seeking direction from City Manager


Sarah Adelt concerning the deficiencies
noted by the DEP, but no action was
taken until May.
The public was not notified until
June.
A .letter from the DEP to Mayor
Sharon Schuler informed the city that it
was in violation of the law regarding the
testing and notices, and Avon Park w.as
assessed a fine of $2,000, but the city
took no action to notify the public until
after the DEP fine.
Records from the DEP also show that
Avon Park hand delivered notices to res-
idents almost two months after the inci-
dent, on June 13, 16, and 17, 2008, too
late for water customers to take any pre-
cautions, but at least one resident in the
Sebring Ridge area never received a
notice.
"I had no idea that there were prob-
lems with the water supply," said J.R.
Gonzalas, a resident of Sebring Ridge
during that time period.
"I never got a hand-delivered notice,
and I don't remember seeing anything in
"the newspapers," Gonzalas said..
The documents submitted by Avon


FCAT grades released


Continued from page 1A
She said the grade was a
team effort between students,
parents and faculty, but she
won't rest on her laurels.
"We are looking forward to
analyzing the data further so
we can keep things moving at
Park Elementary," she said.
Keeping track of how stu-
dents are performing during
and throughout the year is
how new Fred Wild
Elementary Principal Laura
Waldron moved her school
from two years of C grades to
a B this year.
"We have been paying very
close attention to our data so
we can serve our students,"
she said. "The students could
not have put forth a better
effort and the teachers were
dedicated - working indi-
vidually, as teams, and as an
entire staff."
Waldron won't take it easy
after this year either, already
talking about analyzing' the
new data to address specific
student groups in a meeting
prior to the start of the school
year.
"We still have some areas
we can focus on, but we have
fresh information," she said.
The other school that
improved its grade was Lake
Placid Middle School, mov-
ing to an A from last years B.
"We knew our score
looked pretty good when they


released individual student
scores, so we were quite
hopeful," Assistant Principal
Julia Burnett said.
Burnett is in her second
year as LPMS assistant prin-
cipal after spending a few
years prior at the school as a
reading coach.
"We got our first A (in
2005-06) due to some hard
work with our subgroups,"
she said. "Those student
gains helped us get those A's,
so we have been working on
getting our students to make
that progress."
Across the state of Florida,
62 percent of schools earned
a grade of A this year, up
eight percent.
The two schools that
dropped their grades were
Woodlawn /.Elementary,
falling from an A to a C, and
Sebring High School, falling
from years of C grades to a
D.
All three high schools now
have D grades, but their
struggles are not unique
throughout the state.
"We do have improve-
ments to make in our high
schools," Education
Commissioner Dr. Eric J.
Smith said in a press release.
Smith said he was confi-
dent the state is making the
types of changes to prepare
students for competition it an
increasingly global economy.


Anthrax hoax suspect

getting new lawyer


Continued from page 1A
envelopes inside the build-
ing.
The envelopes were later
found to have contained corn
starch.
Moffitt faces 79 counts of
placing a hoax weapon of
mass destruction - each
count carrying a potential
sentence of 15 years, or a


total of 1,185 years.
Moffitt was arrested on
April 3, less than two days
after the incident.
Cooper asked for a contin-
uance in order to review the
case and look into a compe-
tency hearing for Moffitt.
Moffitt's next scheduled
court hearing is Sept. 24.
He remains incarcerated on
a $760,000 bond.


Park to the DEP show that no notices
went out to local newspapers for the
incident.
According to a June 9, 2009 report
from DEP, most of the other deficien-
cies, including the leaking tanks, have.
not been brought into compliance, put-
ting Avon Park in line for more possible
fines.
Leaking tanks become a water source
for birds and small animals. The ani-
mals often defecate in the same area,
and the leak allows the bacteria to enter
the drinking. water source.
The total amount paid in fines and
administrative costs by the city to date
for that incident has only been $1,850.
According to DEP records, the original
fine of $2,000 was reduced to $1,600
because of a lack of prior history, and an
additional $250 to reimburse DEP for
the investigation was added to the set-
tlement.
Members of the' Avon Park City
Council contacted stated they were not
fully aware of the problems, declined to
comment, or did not return phone calls
on this issue.


Page 3A


Pilot dies

mid-flight;

plane lands

safely in NJ
Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - The
pilot of a Continental
Airlines flight from
Brussels to Newark died
over the Atlantic Ocean
on Thursday, but the jet
landed safely with two co-
pilots at the controls.
Flight 61 touched down
on-time just before noon
at Newark Liberty
International Airport,
authorities said.
The Boeing 777 was
carrying 247 passengers,
said Kelly Cripe, a
spokeswoman for the
Houston-based airline.
Passengers weren't told
of the pilot's death in
flight. During the flight,
an announcement was
made asking if any doc-
tors were aboard and sev-
eral passengers
approached the cockpit.
The 61-year-old
Newark-based pilot, with
more than 20 years of
service to the airline, is
believed to have died of
natural causes, Cripe said.
A relief pilot was on
board during the flight
and took the place of the
deceased pilot, she said.
"The flight continued
safely with two pilots at
the controls," she said in.a
statement.
Martha Love, a passen-
ger from Greenwich, N.J.,
who was sitting in the
first row of the plane, said
passengers, weren't told
exactly what was going
on in the cockpit.
"No one knew," she
said.
She only became con-
cerned "when after the
plane landed, she saw fire
trucks and emergency
vehicles lined up along
the runway.


Tough Times Call For


Tough Measures.


Our luxuries take a back seat

to our necessities in life.



Protecting Our Familie%

Takes Priority.


LIMITED TIME OFFER!
















Mail to:
LAKEVIEW 854 Memorial Drive

-Memorial , Avon Park, FL 33825
Gardens (863) 385-4942

www.LakeviewMemorialGardens.com

You owe it to your family to get the facts!

Call 385-4942 for more information.


Name

Address

City ____State Zip


Day Phone

Veteran DE Yes


Eve. Phone

D] No Branch of Service










Page 4A

EDITORIAL & OPINION


News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


TODAY'S EDITORIAL


Be careful in the heat this summer


With searing heat and high humidity already
making life an ordeal - and it isn't even offi-
cially summer yet - we thought we'd remind
everyone of ways to stay healthy over the next several
months.


These tips come from the Center for
Disease Control.
Stay indoors, if at all possible in an
air-conditioned place. Even a few hours
in air-conditioning can help your body
stay cooler when you go back into the
heat. Visit a shopping mall, or go to the
library if you don't have air-condition-
ing in your home.
Electric fans may provide comfort,
but when the temperature is in the high
90s, fans will not prevent heat-related
illness. Taking a cool shower or bath is
a better way to cool off.
Drink more fluids, and don't wait
until you feel thirsty - that is an early
sign of de-hydration. But, don't drink
liquids with large amounts of sugar, caf-
feine, or alcohol because these actually'
cause you to lose body fluid. Also avoid
very cold drinks because they can cause
stomach cramps.


Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose
fitting clothing.
Never leave anyone or any animal in
a closed, parked vehicle.
'Limit your outdoor activity to morn-
ing and evening hours.
Cut down on" your exercise. If you
must .exercise, drink two to four glasses
of cool, nonalcoholic drinks each hour.
If you are on a low-salt diet, or are
taking water pills be sure to consult yoiiu
doctor regarding how much fluid todi
drink, and if sports beverages are safe
for you.
Try to rest in shady areas.
Protect yourself from the sun with a
wide-brimmed hat - which also keeps
you cooler - sunglasses.and using sun-
screen of SBF15 or higher, The most
effective products say "broad spectrum"
or "UVA/UVB" on their labels.
According to the Survival Expert Web


site, the most common heat-related ill-
ness is heat exhaustion, which is caused
by the loss of body water and salt. The
symptoms include headache, profuse
sweating, weakness, dizziness, irritabil-
ity, cramps, and even mental confusion.
Heat stroke is the result of the same
loss of water and salt,,.but is more
severe. Its symptoms include the same
conditions as heat exhaustion but nausea
and vomiting as well.
In both cases, it is important to seek
shade, and're-hydrate by drinking small
amounts of liquid every three minutes.
Heat cramps are caused by the loss of
salt through excessive sweating, They
typically occur in the arms, legs and
abdomen. Again, seek shade and drink
cool nonalcoholic fluids.
Keep an eye on your urine. Dark col-
ored urine means you you're running the
risk of dehydration, so you need to drink
more, and then you'll need to drink
more in extreme heat to make up for the
fluid lost in sweat.
Enjoy the summer fun, but be smart
while doing it. Take care of yourself and
watch closely those who aren't able to
fend for themselves.


TODAY'S LETTERS


Town handles public
records request with'
integrity
Editor:
At a time when we are seeing.our
county 'government restrict access
and increase coits to exercise the
Constitutional Right (Section 24, Art
I) of inspection, examination and
copying of public records, I had a
recent experience with the Town of
Lake Placid that bucks the trend the
county is setting.
As you may remember the Town
of Lake Placid and the board of:
county commissioners established a
committee of prominent citizens to
hold hearings, take public comment
and evidence, then offer recommen-
dations on future land use for the
Lake Placid area. This committee
held meetings over an extended peri-
od of time and met for 70 sessions.
They gave constitutional and statuto-
ry notice of their meetings and took
minutes as required by Florida
Constitution and Chapter 286,
Florida Statutes. They. also recorded
the sessions on a variety of audio
media (micro-cassette, cassette, and
digital media)..
Unfortunately, they media used is
not compatible with each other I,
asked for a copy of the minutes and
was informed that they were posted
on the Town's Web page. The audio
recordings could be copied to a com-
mon format, but 70 meetings would
take some time.
" I was concerned that I would see a
bill looking like the national debt, so
I asked for a time and cost quote.
This happened just before Memorial
Day weekend. Tle town attorney,
Bert'Harris 11, was leaving town for
California so I thought the matter
would remain dormant for a while.
The fact is, that the town police
chief, Phil Williams, took it upon
himself to, copy the various audio .
recordings down to a common for-"
mat and placed all 70 meeting, es-
sions on two CD's. '
About two weeks later when I
asked Jim Fulton about his knowl-
edge of the status of my request for


a time and cost quote, Town Clerk
Arlene Tuck e-mailed me later that
day that the recordings were com-
pleted arid the cost to me was 80
cents (40 cents per CD). '
I was pleasantly surprised and-
when considering this town's ,
response to this public records
request, I thought to myself that they
certainly went "over the top" to meet
any constitutional and statutory duty
imposed upon them to make public
records available for inspection,
examination and copying. Lake'
Placid is certainly an agency who
takes their duty seriously and should
be commended for following the let-
ter and. spirit of Florida Constitution
Section 24,'Article I and Florida
Statutes Chapter 119.
Too bad the county can't learn
from Lake Placid's example. A seri-
ous thank you to the mayorkitown
council, town clerk, police chief and
town attorney.
Preston H. Colby
Sebring

The voice and will of the
American people
Editor:
A government of the people, for
the people and by the people. We.are
no longer a democratic.government.
Somewhere, along the line we have a
dictator type of rule, where those \%%e
have elected, "our employees,' have
taken control. This cannot stand.
The purchase of Spring Lake Golf
Course without the voice anid will 'of
the Spring Lake home and property
owners. These are the people in and
out of uniform, who have fought
World War II, the Korean War,
Vietnam, The Gulf War, Iraqand
many wars not named. Our employ-
ees plan on purchasing this property
of the golf course without our voice.
At a recent Spring Lake
Improvement District meeting I
asked if there would be a democratic
vote b. the home owners and prop-
erty owners. SLID responded with
their lawyer Was preseit, that they
had the power to complete this pur-
chase without our voice, the home
owners and property owners.


This purchase, if allowed, will
cost every person in Highlands
County. The privately-owned golf
course taxes of $91,671.52 would
come off the tax rolls, leaving all
county taxpayers to pick up the loss
to the county.
What are the tax assessment impli-
cations to SLID and Highlands
County if the purchase, of course, is
completed? If there is a loss, how
-much and to which agency? How
will that loss of revenue be recov-
ered or made up? Will SLID be
liable for any taxes, assessments,
fees or any other government body
cost? If so. how much? What is the
legal authority that SLID is claiming
it has to complete this purchase?
What will be the exact as to the 1
property owners for the purchase of
the golf course? This should include
all ancillary expenses incurred prior
to, during and after sale. What will
SLID do about the fact that village 1
will not be paying any assessment
for the course purchase or its ongo-
ing operational cost? Will they still
be assessed and if so, quote legal
authority for that assessment.
Exactly what agency violations
(Listeach) are currently outstanding
against the golf course arid its ancil-
lary structures, etc.? (DER, EPA,
County, Health Department, etc.).
Considering the current state of
both the local and national
economies, how does the SLID
board justify this proposed pur-
chase? There are hundreds of unan-
swered questions and the entire
county of Highlands, which will
surely be affected, is watching with
great interest. Carefully watch those
who would steal "your" tax dollars.
Our right to being a "free" people is
being questioned.
Billie E. Jewett
Sebring

Hedge funds are like those
who prefer chocolate bars
Editor:
Hedge funds, the hit and run vehi-
cles of the very wealthy have with-
held their cooperation and sabotaged


A Heart's
Journey
Janelle Dennison

N s-SU Hope lies

2227 U.S. 27 South in our
Sebring, Fla. 33870
863-385-6155
CLARISSA WILLIAMS recent
Publisher
Ex wssn.co 515
clarissa .wdlliams@newssmfn.com graduates


NEWSROOM
ROMONA WASHINGTON
Executive Editor
Ext. 516
editor@newssun.com
SCOTT DRESSEL
Assistant Editor
Ext. 541
scott.dressel@newssin .com
DAN HOEHNE
Sports Editor
Ext. 528
dan Joehie@ newssun.comr
ADVERTISING
VICKIE JONES
Ext. 518
vickie .jones@newssun .com
CIRCULATION
-DAVID MASON
Ext. 533
davidjiason@ newssun .com
PRE-PRESS
KEN BAREFIELD
Production Coordinator
Ext. 594
prepress@newssun.com
BUSINESS OFFICE
JANET EMERSON
Ext. 596
janer.emerson@newssun.comr

EXPRESSIONS OF
FREE SPEECH

'When government,
in words and deeds,
seeks to shield its
actions from public
view and wave off
the media, the
public should be
forewarned - and


suspicious.

TONY MAURO
correspondent, Legal Times,
Incisive Media, 2001



a settlement and forced Chrysler into
Chapter 11 bankruptcy in hopes of
securing a bigger bite of the addi-
tional federal funding being provid-
ed to the auto maker. Never a long-
term investor in Chrysler, the hedge
funds bought in hope of a quick hit,
a profitable in and out, without any
concern for the survivability of
Chrysler nor its importance to the
American economy. Their heavy
ability to leverage situations to their
sole advantage is proof that regula-
tion of these funds is long past due.
In trying to understand the hedge
funds and financial services seg-
ment of the U.S. economy with its
credit default swaps, and the like, it
is useful to reexamine the metaphor
of the three survivors in a lifeboat
who upon inventorying their sup-
plies, discover that only one survivor
has a chocolate bar. After a period of
time, the second survivor buys the
chocolate bar from the first one for
$5. More time passes and the third
survivor buys the bar from the sec-
ond for $25. Night descends and in
the morning the first survivor offers
the third survivor $100 but is
advised by the third survivor "I got
hungry during the night so I ate it."
The first survivor comments "Gee
and we were making such a good
living with it. "
. Hedge funds are the guys who eat
the chocolate bar.
Randy Ludacer
Lake Placid
Bouquets

VFW 3880 offers many
thanks
Editor:
On behalf of the VFW Post 3880
in Lake Placid I wish to say a spe-
cial thank you to all the generous
persons out there who gave willingly
to help the less fortunate veteran.
Your generosity will not be forgotten
and you may be blessed for your
thoughtfulness. Our Buddy Poppy
drive was May 22 and 23.
An extra special thank you to the
businesses who allowed us to stand
Continued on page 5A


First I'd like to say con-
gratulations. What an accom-
plishment in this day and
age. There are many opportu-
nities in the work place,
many options from which to
choose ...,the sky is the limit.
Sadly, quite a few teens
have opted to "drop out" of
school, leaving them without
a sense of direction in life.
" When I was 15,1 I went to
live with my aunt and uncle
in Orlando due to difficulties
at home. It was my first time
away from my family. It was
hard on me emotionally. My
aunt had all kinds of ideas to,
help me get going towards
my education and career
options, etc. to think about.
The only problem ... I was
still too emotionally attached
to my family (too immature)
to "stick it out" and "get
somewhere." How I wish
now that I had. Let me
encourage you young folks to
pay attention to what your
elders recommend. They just
might know what they're ,
talking about.
Too often I hear some say,
"oh don't be a doctor, or
lawyer or whatever ... can
you imagine eight to 10 years
of college?" When you're
young, eight to 10 years fly
by. You wake up one day and
you're 25. Go to college, go
for the gold now while
you're young, healthy and
energetic. By the time you're
25 you may be on your way
to establishing a lifelong
career and then settled by the
time you're 35. Those years
really do go fast.
Maybe you're saying, "I
want to have some fun now
before I get bogged down,
with a full-time job/career."
Why can't you have some
fun now, yet be responsible
about it. Learn to juggle fun
time with studying, working,
etc. Nine times out of 10
some of the friends you're
having fun with now end up
getting stuck in the "party"
rut, waking up at 25 with no
building blocks, having to
start at ground zero. Stay out
of the party/drugs/alcohol
scene, it,, dead end. I've
watched people I love get
stuck over and Over and over
again ..' caught in a vicious
trap (it's heartbreaking). Life
is simply too short to mess
up a good mind and healthy
body.,
The world is in need of ,
fresh, young. minds to take us
into the future. Some of the
old ways of thinking don't
work anymore.-It's a chal-
lenge but I believe today's
young adults have what it
takes. My pastor keeps say-
ing God had a reason for
bringing you to this earth in
these last days. Jesus said
"occupy until I come."
There's plenty to do in this
great big world.
So, celebrate your grand
accomplishment, find out
why you're on this earth and
enjoy the journey, using the
talents and gifts God has
given you.
Congratulations to all the
graduates of Highlands
County.

Janelle Dennison is the news
clerk for the News-Sun. She can
be reached at 385-6155 ext.
539.


SUBMISSIONS

Make sure to sign your
letter (400 words maxi-
mum) and include your
address and phone num-
ber. Send your letter to
2227 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring, FL 33870; drop it
off at the same address;
fax 385-1954; or e-mail
editor@newssun.com.


www.newssun.com








Page 5A


www.newssun.com News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


EDITORIAL & OPINION

Edgardo Sosa had a colorful past


I think it's time someone
who actually knew Edgardo
Sosa (the subject of the
recent "A Grave Situation"
mystery series published
June 5, 7 and 10 in the
News-Sun) said some kind
and truthful words about
him.
He was born in a small
town in Uruguay about 100
miles west of Buenos Aires,
Argentina. He wrote two
beautiful stories five or six
years ago about his early life
in Uruguay. My husband had
told Edgardo that I had writ-
ten a book and a couple of
booklets and had taught
English, so Edgardo asked
me to correct his work as
English was'not his native
tongue. I found they were
both well written and very
descriptive of life at that
time and place. (The boys
knew nothing about World
War II at that time).
His third story about the
camera was not like the first
two which was "real life"
and I really felt he was a
better writer when he didn't
try to make up situations. He
started a novel about an
immigrant in Boston, which
'frankly, was very amateur-
ish.
He became discouraged
and I suggested to write in
Spanish. I do not read or
speak Spanish so I have no
idea about, the book. He took
it to Tampa to a Spanish
magazine and then to Miami
(I remember in Miami they
charged him $400 just to
read the book. Evidently
they thought it was a couple
of hundred words too short
and they would be glad to
lengthen it for pay of course.
Several months later he went
to Buenos Aires and was
very pleased with their
reception of his book. He
died before he heard any-
thing further.
He did have a sister, 10
years older than he, who
gave piano lessons and a
nephew who-worked at the
local bank. Edgardo had not
heard from them in several
years. I asked him when he
was in Buenos Aires last
year if he contacted them but
he said no, he had not.
(Edgardo was not without
faults).
There was evidently some
kind of music school in his
hometown and when he was


Guest Column
Joyce Long
in his teens working at the
local bank, his friend who
had heard him sing urged,
him to try out for a music
scholarship. He soon gradu-
ated and determined that his
career goal would be as a
professional singer. He
decided the United States
was the place to go and off
he went to California.
He found a part-time job
as a soloist in local churches
or in night clubs. At that
time, some may recall there
was a radio show called
"Metropolitan Auditions on
the Air." Edgardo won and
went to New York City. He
sang many different roles at
the Met, including second
lead to Pavarotti. His
favorite role was as Don
Giovanni.
While singing in New
York, a friend suggested to
Edgardo (who frankly had
become discouraged at not
being the lead singer at the
Met) was offered a job as an
entertainer on a Norwegian
ship. Talk about perfect job.
He and a female singer (who
turned out to be Rosemary,
who had a wonderful voice)
entertained one night a
week, ate in the guest dining
room and Edgardo danced
with women without part-
ners. They traveled twice
around the world. ''
Meanwhile, Edgardo was
starting to pine for his oper-
atic career. He was
approached by the head of
'the Israeli Opera House to
go to Israel as their lead
singer. He accepted and his
opera career was re-born and
he sang all over Europe.
When he was in Berlin he
developed a deviated septum
in his nose and had an oper-
ation. The following day he
boarded a plane for an
engagement at the beautiful
opera house in Sydney,
-Australia. When he arrived
in Sydney (a long, flight) he
had lost his voice completely
and never sang again.
He and Rosemary kept in
touch. She went to Miami
and became,the chief caterer
for one of the big hotel
chains. Edgardo followed
her to Miami and took a job
for 10 years as a quick card
later in charge for American
Express for tourists to


TODAY'S
Continued from page 4A
at their premises with our cans of poppies.
They were Publix, Winn-Dixie,-SweetBay,
Circle K on State Road 70 and Gates in Lake
Placid. We appreciate your kindness and
cooperation in our Buddy Poppy Drive.
The poppy is made by disabled veterans as
a tribute to the veterans who did not come
back home and those crippled or scarred for
life. The donations received are given to
help those veterans and their families that
are in need. We take great pride in able to
help our veterans less fortunate than you and
I..
Let us not forget to thank a veteran when
we see them. They fought for our freedom
that we enjoy daily. They are still fighting
today for you and me to be able to live in
this land of the free and plenty.
Thanks to Larry Bugg, chairman of the
drive and those persons that took the time to
stand at these businesses and receive your
generous donations.
God bless our veterans wherever they may
be and God bless America.
Suzanne Krueger
Lake Placid


America. I'm sure at one
time or another he was in
every South American coun-
try.
If you have cruised you
know the,your guide takes
you to a store where you can
buy a souvenir of your trip
to wherever. I know this has
happened to me and as you
don't know one store from
another, you do your shop-
ping at the guide's recom-
mended store. The guide
accepts a gratuity from the
shopkeeper and this is how
Edgardo came by many of
his small "statues." He kept '
them out on display in his
living room. They actually
moved into Crystal Lake
about 1996. I know they
rented the house for the
Florida season to a
Tennessee couple.
We took Edgardo to the
hospital twice when he
called us with a problem. I
did not hesitate to call him
at 1 a.m. when I had a gall
bladder problem. I always
took Edgardo to the train
when he traveled and I
picked him up when he came
back. He always took me to
the Red Lobster (his favorite
dining spot) in payment for
my time and I.always felt I
got the better of the deal.
Three years ago he told
me he was going to
Washington, D.C. to give his
"collection" to the
Smithsonian Institute. He did
this and the Smithsonian told
him that they would not
accept anything that was not
properly authenticated. They
estimated a proper authenti-
cation would cost $100,00.
I I never knew if that was
for the entire collection or
just one piece. At any rate,
he did not have $100,000.
He was living on his Social
Security benefits. Rosemary
had died unexpectedly with-
in a short time of their mov-
ing to Crystal Lake.
I have heard many stories
about Edgardo's 'shbrt tem-
per when he played tennis
and I believe them. He
thought he was smarter than
most people and maybe he
was. He was a character but
he did not deserve the bad
publicity he has received.

Joyce Long of Sebring lived next
dbor to Edgardo Sosa in Crystal
Lake. Guest columns are the
opinion of the writer, not neces-
sarily that of the News-Sun.


LETTERS'
Florida Hospital Lake Placid
gives good service
Editor:
I recently spent several days in Florida
Hospital Lake Placid. This was my first
experience in 69 years as a patient; the other
hospital experiences that I had were as a
pastor/chaplain, quite a difference.
I would like to thank the staff (especially
the medical staff) and Dr. Atalla for the
good, compassionate care that I received.
These folks are super.
Thank% also to Florida Hospital Home
Care Services for the excellent home visits
(especially Diesta), they are tops and she is
tops.
Lastly but surely, very important, to my
family and friends for the visits, cards,
phone calls, food and prayers, all of these
are priceless.
Should you ever receive a hospital stay, I
strongly recommend Florida Hospital Lake
Placid.
Rev. Jack White
Sebring


Father




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Page 6A

OES gives scholarship


Courtesy photo
Lake Placid Chapter 260 Order of the Eastern Star scholar-
ship winners Evan Chaput (from left) and Maria Diaz
receive certificates from Eastern Star member Suzanna
Krueger at the Lake Placid High School Awards Ceremony ,
on May 14.


News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


www.newssun.com


Supreme Court upholds


settlement in asbestos lawsuits


Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP) -
The Supreme Court on
Thursday agreed to let an
insurance company settle
some asbestos lawsuits 'in
exchange for blocking any
future litigation resulting
from its long relationship
with Johns Manville Corp.,
once the world's largest pro-
ducer of asbestos.
Travelers Companies Inc.
had been named in lawsuits
alleging that it tried to hide
dangerous health effects of
asbestos. ,The company
argued that asbestos claims
must be paid out of a trust
created by Johns Manville


in the 1980s and approved
by a federal bankruptcy
judge.
Asbestos is a mineral that
was commonly used until
the mid-1970s in insulation
and fireproofing material.
,Exposure can increase the
risk of lung cancer, mesothe-
lioma and other ailments,
according to federal health
agencies.
Travelers settled with sev-
eral groups of plaintiffs in
2004 with the caveat that
federal courts make clear the
company would not have to
face any new similar law-
suits.' The 2nd U.S Circuit
Court of Appeals overturned


lower-court approval of the
settlement, saying a bank-
ruptcy judge lacked the
authority to act so broadly.
The high court on
Thursday overturned that
decision and sent the case
back to the New York-based
federal appeals court.
"So long, as respondents
or those in privity with them
were parties to the Manville
bankruptcy proceedings, and
were given a fair chance to
challenge the bankruptcy
court's subject matter juris-
diction, they cannot chal-
lenge it now by resisting
enforcement of the 1986
orders," said Justice David
Souter, writing the court's 7-
2 opinion.
The court made clear that
the decision applies only in


this case. The high court
also did not decide whether
all of the people who want to
challenge the Travelers set-
tlement are bound by the
Manville Trust agreement.
"On remand, the Court of
Appeals can take up this
objection," Souter said.
Justices John Paul Stevens
and Ruth Bader Ginsburg
dissented.
The 1986 order by the
bankruptcy judge "bars only
those claims against
Manville's insurers seeking
to recover from the bank-
ruptcy estate for Manville's
misconduct, not those
claims seeking to recover
against the insurers for their
own misconduct," Stevens
said.


Jorge Gonzalez
Jorge A. Gonzalez, 52, of
Sebring died June 14, 2009.
Born in Puerto Rico, he had
been a' resident of Sebring
since 1993. He worked in
maintenance for Lakeview
Memorial Gardens.
He is survived by his wife,
Margarita Taboada-
Gonzalez; daughters, Marisol
Gonzalez ! and Wanda
Gonzalez; sons, Jorge A.
Gonzalez Jr., Jose' Gonzalez,
Gabriel Gonzalez, and Jose
Torres; and three grandchil-
dren.
The family will receive
friends from 9-11 a.m.
Friday, June 19 at Lakeview
Memorial Gardens Chapel.
The funeral service will
begin at 11 a.m. with Pastor
Tito Ramos - officiating.
Arrangements entrusted to
Stephenson-Nelson Funeral
Home, Sebring.

Jessie Harrison
Jessie Mercer Harrison,
84, of Venus died June 18,


2009. Born in Elba, Ala., his
family moved to Lorida in
1939. He was a farmer and a
member of Venus Baptist
Church.
He is survived by his
daughters, Judy H. Tate,
Cathy H. Harris and Lawanna,
L. Linder; son, Jesse M.;
brothers, Paul, David, Ralph,
and Robey; sisters, Vesta
Rhodes and Shirley Cauley;
seven grandchildren' and 13
great-grandchildren.
The visitation will be from
6-8 p.m. Friday, June 19 at
New Life Holiness Church in
Lake Placid. Funeral service
will be at 11 a.m. Saturday,
June 20 in New Life Holiness
Church with Pastors Rufus
Caraway and Wayne Godwin
officiating. Interment will
follow at Oak Hill Cemetery.
Arrangements entrusted to
Chandler Funeral Home,
Lake Placid.

Mary Johnson
Mary L. Johnson, 81, of
Sebring died June 15, 2009.


Born in Wauchula, she was a
lifetime resident of
Highlands County. She
worked in food service for
the Palms of Sebring.
She is surived by her
brother,,Gene Moon; and sis-
ters, Sue Gillman, Dorothy
Billington and Pauline
Hughes.
Services were held at
Dowden Funeral Home
Chapel on June 18 with the
Revs. Walter Mier and Tim
Bullington officiating. Burial
was in Pinecrest Cemetery,
Sebring. Dowden Funeral
Home, Sebring, was in'
charge of arrangements.

Ann Krubsack
Ann G. Krubsack , 76, of
Lake Placid died June 16,
2009. Born in Providence,
R.I., she came to Lake Placid
in 1996. She was a medical
secretary and attended St.
James Catholic Church .of
Lake Placid.
She is survived by her
daughter, Rosemarie Shiver;


son, William; sister, Marie
Grosgi; and three grandchil-
dren. A graveside service
will be held at, 11 a.m. Friday,
June 19 in Oak Hill Cemetery
in Lake Placid. Arrangements
entrusted to Chandler Funeral
Home, Lake Placid.

Virginia Williams
Virginia M. Sharp-
Williams, 69, of Sebring died
June 16, 2009. Born in
Milford, Del. she moved to
Florida in 1992. She was a
registered nurse in the home
health profession.
She is survived by daugh-
ters, Paula R. King-Perez and
Sandra M. Rice-Liebel; two
granddaughters and one
great-granddaughter.
A gathering of family and
friends will be held from 2-4
p.m. Saturday, June 27 at
Stephenson-Nelson Funeral
Home, Sebring. Memorial
contributions may be given to
the American Diabetes
Association, P.O. Box 2680,
North Canton, OH, 44720.


Saturday * June 27 * 9:00 am - Noon






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Humane Society, Attn. B. Clark * 7321 HaywoodTaylor Blvd. Sebring, FL 33876
(Make checks payable to Humane Society)
PLEASE NOTE: All mail-in entries must be received by June 20th.


Name:


Dog's Name: L i ___ Age: ___ _____


(please write In additional dogs on the back of this form)

_____________ Walk ___________ Contests (list which ones)


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OBITUARIES


HAZEL TUCKER
JENKINS
Hazel Tucker Jenkins, 87, of Lake
Alfred, FL, passed away Tuesday,
.June 16, 2009. She was born July 18,
1921 to Brinkley and Olga (Williams)
Tucker in Suwannee County, Florida.
She moved to Sebring from
,. V^ Wauchula,, FL in 1954 and was
currently living in Lake Alfred, FL. She attended the Nazarene
Church in Sebring, FL.
She is survived by her daughters, Helen McDaniel (Bobby) -
Bushnell, FL; Elizabeth Arbuthnot (Donald) - Lake Alfred,
FL; sons, Robert F. Jenkins, Jr. - Sebring, FL; Kenneth
Jenkins (Rebecca) - Avon Park, FL; sister, Elizabeth Burton
- Melbourne, FL;. 11 Grandchildren and 23 Great
Grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband of
60 years, Robert Jenkins and son, Roger E. Jenkins.
Family will receive friends Sunday, June 21, 2009 from 2:00pm
- 4:00pm at Stephenson-Nelson .Funeral Home. Funeral
services will be held Monday, June 22, 2009 at 11l00am at First
Christian Church of Sebring, with Rev. Ron Norton officiating,
followed by the burial at Lakeview Memorial Gardens.
Arrangements entrusted to:
Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home
Sebring, Florida
863-385-0125














































































Iran hardline President
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad ges-
tures during a press confer-,
ence in Tehran, Iran,,
Sunday. Ahmadinejad
defended his victory at a
mass rally in the Iranian
capital, saying the election
was not "distorted" as
claimed by his defeated
rivals. Men and women wav-
ing Iranian flags and por-
traits of Ahmadinejad
packed central Tehran to lis-
ten to the president who
won a second four-year term
on June 12.

to the temptation to raise the
temperature of the U.S.
response.
Obama knows that Iran
has the power to make the
U.S. withdrawal from Iraq
far more difficult should it
boost support for Shiite
Muslim radicals. It also can
play a significant role in eas-
ing the task of the United
States as it fights Islamic
radicals in Afghanistan.
Then there is Iranian sup-
port for the militant
Hezbollah organization in
Lebanon, on Israel's north,
and Hamas, which runs
Gaza, the Palestinian territo-
ry on Israel's southern flank.


News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


www.newssun.com


By dialing back U.S. rhet-
oric, Obama appears to have
decided he stands a better
chance of encouraging
Iranian moderation on those,
issues. Beyond that, and
most central to Obama's
Iranian policy, is his push to
engage Tehran in hopes of
blunting its perceived ambi-
tion to build a nuclear
weapon.
What's more, Obama is
trying to overcome a very
difficult historical relation-
ship between the United
States and Iran, where even
the strongest opponents of
the Islamic regime still are
deeply suspicious of
Washington.
Iranians have long blamed
the CIA for helping topple
the elected government of ,
Mohammad Mosaddeq in
1953 and replacing him with
the late Shah Mohammad,
Reza Pahlavi.
Washington unsuccessful-
ly sought to sustain the shah
even as he was swept from
power in the 1979 Islamic
revolution, setting in motion
a three-decade estrangement
that only grew deeper during
the administration of former
President George W. Bush,
who labeled Iran a part of
the "Axis of Evil," along
with Iraq under Saddam
Hussein, and North Korea.
While at pains to empha-
size that finding a solution
to the turmoil inside the
country was "ultimately for
the Iranian people to
decide," Obama did notch up
his support Tuesday for
Mousavi backers, whose ral-
lies were punctuated by gun-
fire that reportedly killed at
least seven demonstrators.
Obama declared that their
opposition to Ahmadinejad
represented "a questioning
of the kinds of antagonistic


Page 7A


POLITICS

- I Some say GM, Chrysler

- should stop lobbying


:. Photos by Farzaneh Khademian/Abaca Press/MCT
Iranian supporters of defeated presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi take part in a rally in Tehran, Iran, on
Monday. Tens of thousands opposition supporters defied a ban to stage a mass rally in Tehran, in protest of President
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's landslide election win, as Iran faced a growing international backlash over the validity of the
election and the subsequent crackdown on opposition protests.


Iranian election crisis presents


President Obama with policy dilemma


By STEVEN R. HURST
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama is
in a box over Iran, caught
between affinity for embold-
ened reformists and caution
about further alienating a,
hard-line Islamic regime he
wants to dissuade from seek-
ing nuclear weapons.
The president's dilemma
showed clearly on Tuesday,
when he said he shared the
world's "deep concerns
about the election" but
asserted that it was "not pro-
ductive, given the history of
U.S.-Iranian relations, to be
seen as meddling."
Compounding his foreign
policy conundrum, some
conservative Republicans
have begun challenging the
president to take a tougher
rhetorical stand behind sup-
porters of reformist presi-
dential challenger Mir
Hossein Mousavi. The
reform candidate's defiant
backers poured into Tehran
streets for a second day,
protesting that Mousavi was
cheated in Friday's election.
'Iran's Supreme leader
Ayatollah Ali Khameni has
ordered an unspecified
recount of some ballots, but
it appears unlikely he would
annul the victory of incum-
bent President Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad and order a
new vote, as the opposition
demands.
While Khameni mnay have
been knocked a bit off bal-
ance by the size of the street
demonstrations in support of
Mousavi, the clerical leader-
ship in Iran does not yet
seem in danger. /
"This is an uprising, not a
revolution," said Manochehr
Dorraj, political science pro-
fessor at Texas Christian
University.
. Despite Obama's limited
options, Dorraj said the new .
president is "clever and on
target" for not succumbing


postures towards the interna-
tional community that have
taken place in the past, and
that there are people who
want to see greater openness
and greater debate and want
to see greater democracy."
I But the language was
carefully drawn, suggesting
greater public sympathy for
the opposition while careful-
ly avoiding the kind of sharp
rhetoric that could have
deepened the insecurity of a
regime whose legitimacy is
under increasing challenge
from its people.

Steven R. Hurst reports from
White House for the Associated
Press and has covered interna-
tional relations for 30 years.


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - If the
government is 'your boss,
you shouldn't be lobbying
it.
That's the argument crit-
ics are using against
General Motors Corp. and
Chrysler LLC, which have
continued lobbying while
being kept alive, in, part,
with $80 billion in federal
aid.
GM is under bankruptcy
protection and is expected
to be 60 percent owned by
taxpayers when it emerges.
Chrysler left bankruptcy last
- week under a plan that was
giving federal taxpayers an
8 percent ownership share;
"Given the government's
ownership, the lobbyists are
in essence working for the
government," said Clarence
Ditlow, executive director
of the Center for Auto
Safety, a consumer group.
"The government ought to
be able to tell them, 'Do
what we say because we are
you."' -
Sheila Krumholz, execu-
tive director of the Center
for Responsive Politics,
cited the recent experiences
of Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac. Both huge mortgage
companies have been func-
tioning with federal aid
since almost collapsing last
autumn after agreeing to
stop all lobbying.
If administration officials
are "not going to be consis-
tent in applying these rules
across the board, they
should have to explain how
this is different," Krumholz
said.
Norm Eisen, the White
House ethics counselor who
has advised President
Barack Obama during his
efforts to curb lobbyists'
influence,' did not respond
to several requests for cornm-


'We believe we
have an
obligation to
remain engaged
... and have our
voice heard in
the policy-making
process.'

STATEMENT FROM GM

ment.
GM' and Chrysler have
reduced their lobbying
expenditures this year. GM
terminated contracts with all
15 private lobbying firms it
has been using while retain-
ing its in-house lobbyists.
Ford Motor Co., which has
not accepted federal bailout
funds, has slightly trimmed
its lobbying budget this
year.
"We believe we have an
obligation to remain
engaged at the federal and
state levels and to have our
voice heard in the policy-
making process," GM said
in a statement, citing health
care, environment and other
issues.
Chrysler issued a similar
statement, saying, d'There
continues to be significant
demand for education and
information regarding
Chrysler from legislators
and government officials."
The two automakers got
support for their continued
lobbying from an unlikely
source: Longtime antagonist
Joan Claybrook, the recently
retired' head of the consumer
group Public Citizen.
"I do believe in the First
Amendment and speaking
your mind," she said. "I�
they don't have lobbyists
expressing their point of
view,;who does it?"


All-American Winning!


Ensign quits Senate GOP leadership post


*Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Republican Sen. John Ensign
of Nevada has stepped down
from his leadership post one
day after admitting he carried
on an extramarital affair with
a woman who was on his
campaign staff.
Ensign conveyed his deci-
sion .in a phone call with
Senate Republican Leader
Mitch McConnell, who said
he had accepted the resigna-
tion. Ensign was chairman of
the Republican Policy
Committee, the fourth-rank-
ing spot in the leadership.
He remained away from
the Capitol during the day,
and aides declined to answer
additional questions about
the affair.
Ensign, a rising star in
conservative circles and


Nevada's most popular
Republican, disclosed the
affair at a hastily arranged
news conference Tuesday,
shattering- his prospects for
heading his party's ticket
three years from now.
"Last year I had an affair. I
violated the vows of my mar-
riage," Ensign told reporters,
refusing to take any ques-
tions. "It is the worst thing I
have ever done in my life. If
there was ever anything in
my life that I could take back,
this would be it."
Ensign, 51, belongs to the
men's Christian. ministry
Promise Keepers, and has
championed causes pushed
'by the Republican's conser-
vative religious base.
'Earlier this month, he went
to Iowa, home to the nation's
first presidential precinct


caucuses, to speak as part of
a conservative lecture series
designed to define the
Republican Party after its
defeat in last year's elections.


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News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


Page 8A


Orlando attorney building national

chamber for disabled entrepreneurs


By SARA K. CLARKE
The Orlando Sentinel/MCT
ORLANDO - Pete
Schoemann wants to build a
bridge between the business
and disabled communities.
The Orlando attorney is
part of both worlds: A, partner
in the law firm Broad and
Cassel, he has two sons with
autism.
He founded the Chamber
of Commerce for .Persons
with Disabilities Inc. two
years ago and is now looking
to expand the organization's
regional focus to a national
one.
The Chamber hopes to be
an umbrella organization for
groups across the U.S. that
promote the disability com-
munity and help disabled
entrepreneurs get businesses
off the ground.
"Instead of pulling in all
different directions, we're
deciding to just pull togeth-
er," Schoemann said'.
Like more traditional
chambers, the group wants to
create a place to network. But
it will also deal with issues
that affect disabled entrepre-
neurs - such as changing
federal contracting programs
to include disability busi-
nesses.
To help local businesses,
the Chamber of Commerce
teamed up with the Center for
Independent Living in
Central Florida Inc. to create
a locally focused chapter.
The result of that effort, the
Central Florida Disability
Chamber, will promote local
economic development as the
Chamber of Commerce for
Persons with Disabilities
goes national.
* While being self-employed
- and working on their own
terms - can be a, perfect
option for someone with a
disability, entrepreneurs face


Ricardo Ramirez Buxeda/Orlando Sentinel/MCT
Rogue Gallart, left, president of the Central Florida Disability Chamber, meets with Robert
"Robby" Sedlak to create a business plan for his cement company, June 10. Central
Florida's disability community is gaining steam, and local organizers are trying to create a
national disability chamber of commerce that serves as an umbrella organization for dis-
abled businesses across the country.


'Having this as an option ... helps
people with a disability achieve that
all-important word to us, which is
inclusion.'

CHERYL STONE
Center for Independent Living


the issue of preserving their
disability benefits while get-
ting their business off the
ground.
"The end result is to get off
(Social Security) disability,"
said Rogue Gallart, president
of the Central Florida
Disability Chamber. "But
while they're building their
business, they may need
services."
Robby Sedlak, who started


a concrete-pumping business
eight years ago, is working
with the chamber to create a
business plan that will map
out his company's 'strategy
for growth. ' ,
"It's somethingg that I want
to do for myself," said
Sedlak, 39, who has a spinal
cord injury and uses a wheel-
chair. "There's so many other
open opportunities out there,
and I just don't know how to


get to them."
The chamber is already
gaining attention: Last week,
when it cut the ribbon on its
new home at the Disney
Entrepreneur Center, about
120 people showed up in sup-
port. It's a sign that the group
is getting noticed, by every-
one from the Florida
Department of Education to
the governor's office.
, Cheryl Stone, board presi-
dent for the Center for
Independent Living in
Central Florida, said she
expects Orlando's efforts will
be a model for other cities.
"Having this as an option
... helps people with a dis-
ability achieve that all-
important word to us, which
is inclusion," Stone said.


www.newssun.com


FWC eyes new listing

process for species


Continued from page 2A
Wildlife, expressed con-
cerns about what imperiled
species will be called if the
FWC doesn't use the term
"endangered."
However, all of the
stakeholders stressed they
are looking forward to
working with the FWC as
the imperiled species team
moves forward with the
revision process.
After discussion, the
Commission directed staff
to bring back a draft rule at
the Sept. 2009 meeting to
revise the imperiled species
listing process and other
tools for managing imper-
iled species.
"We ask staff to continue
working with the stake-
holders as they draft the
new rule," said Rodney
Barreto, FWC chairman.
"It's all about protecting
species."
The imperiled species
team has been working on
improving, the management
system and listing process
for Florida's imperiled
species after the
Commission directed them
in December 2007 to evalu-
ate the current practice.
The team concentrated on
developing a process that
includes a comprehensive
and cohesive approach to
managing species so they
will thrive, rather than
become extinct.
For more than a decade,
the FWC focused its atten-
tion for imperiled species
just on the listing process
because of concerns and a
lack of understanding of
the current imperiled
species listing process.
Confusion also occurred
in understanding the differ-
ence between the federal
list for endangered and
threatened species and
Florida's own imperiled


'We are focusing
on how we
manage the
species to reduce
and hopefully
eliminate the risk
of extinction for
these rare
species.'

DR. ELSA HAUBOLD
leader of FWC imperiled
species team

species list, which con-
tained some federal
species, but not all, and not
always in the same listing
category.
The FWC team is devel-
oping a listing process with
a goal that it be understood
and supported by the pub-
lic, which will enable staff
to focus on conserving
imperiled species rather
than focusing on the listing
designation of a particular
species.
"We will be creating a
management system for
imperiled species, which
will require a revision of
the current listing process
and the way we manage
imperiled species,"
Haubold said.
"As the team evaluates
how we list imperiled
species in Florida, we -are
focusing on how we man-
age the species to reduce
and hopefully eliminate the
risk of extinction, for these
rare species."
The FWC will conduct
public and stakeholder
meetings to solicit input on
the new imperiled species
listing process proposal
prior to presenting a draft
rule at the September meet-
ing in Howey-in-the-Hills.


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WWW. newssun.corn News-Sun o Friday, June 19, 2009


COMMUNITY BRIEFS


Father's Day blood
drive under way
Florida Blood Centers-
Highlands blood mobile will
be at the Elks Lodge in Lake
Placid from 1-3 p.m. today.
All blood donors will
receive a T-shirt and mini
physical. Every three sec-,
onds someone needs a life-
saving blood transfusion.
Donate blood today to save a
life tomorrow.
A Father's Day branch
promotion will give donors
free range time at Jim's
Pistolarrow to those donat-
ing from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday at the branch loca-
tion, 6550 US 27 North.
Donors will receive a
coupon for two free shoots
(range times) from Jim's
Pistolarrow while supplies
last. This is a $20 value and
the coupon is transferable. It
does not include rental of
Protective gear.
All branch donors will
also receive by. mail a $10
Wal-Mart gift card.
Call Florida's Blood
Centers at 382-4499 with
questions.

Legion 74 closes
lodge for remodeling
SEBRING - The
American Legion 74 Lodge
will be closed for remodel-
ing from June 20-27, tenta-
tively. If it takes longer to
complete the remodeling,
further notice will be given.

VFW 9853 Men's
Auxiliary hosts
spaghetti dinner
AVON PARK - The
Men's Auxiliary of Combat
Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 9853, at 75 N. Olivia
Drive, will host a dinner of
spaghetti and meatballs for a
$6 donation today.
Music will be played from
5-7 p.m.

Southern Ridge
plays at Moose lodge
SEBRING - Sebring
Moose Lodge 2259 w ill
serve fish or-chicken from 5-
7 p.m. today for $7. Music
will follow from 7-11 p.m.
with Southern Ridge.
Music by Country Cajuns
will play from 7-11 p.m.
Saturday.
For information, call 655-
3920.

Fireman, Southern
Starz play at lodge
LAKE PLACID - The
Lake Placid Moose Lodge
2374 will host karaoke with
Fireman from 6-9 p.m.
Friday. Wings, burgers and
fish will be served at 6 p.m.
Karaoke with Southern
Starz will be from 6-9 p.m.
Saturday
For details, call 465-0131.

Legion Post 69 hosts
Father's Day dinner
AVON PARK - The
American Legion Post 69
will serve fish and chips
from 4:30-6 p.m. Friday with
music by Bud Cutright. A
Father's Day dinner will be
served Saturday. All fathers
eat free; all others are $6.
For more information, call
453-4553.

Friday nights
hopping in LP
LAKE PLACID - A gift
basket raffle and 50/50
drawings are part of Friday
nights on North Main
Avenue (every third Friday
of the month) in Lake
Placid. Hear DJ "Party Dog"
Rick, see classic car contest,
try the hula hoop and partici-
pate in a best dressed '50s
contest from 5-8 p.m. today.
Great food and treats are


available. Book signing and
Wings of Eagles, Cathee
Poulson "Thresholds and
Passages," and kids face
painting.
July 17 is carnival night.

Sebring Elks host
buffet dinner
SEBRING - Sebring
Elks Lodge 1529 will serve a


buffet dinner from 5-7 p.m.
today for $10. The menu
includes choice of turkey
breast with stuffing or roast
pork with apples.
Live music is from 7-10
p.m. with Gary and Shirley.

Drum Circle marks
weekend events
SEBRING - The Primal
Connection and Highlands
Hammock State Park pres-
ents a Father's Day/Summer
Solstice Community Drum


Circle in the Park from 3-5
p.m. Sunday at Highlands
Hammock State Park (in the
Circle by the museum).
Everybody is welcome.
Bring a chair, or blanket.:
.Bring an instrument if you
have one. Bring a snack.
Bring something to drink.
Bring a friend. All ages.
Normal park entrance fee
applies ($4 per vehicle).
Primal Connection members
enter free, just show the card
or wear ihe Primal T-shirt.
Join the Primal


Connection and make a joy-
ous sound. No experience
necessary. Play along, dance
or just enjoy the music.
Some percussion instruments
will be available for the pub-
lic to use. This is a fun event
for the whole family.
For information call
Highlands Hammock State
Park at 386-6094, or Fred
Leavitt, Primal Connection,
at 402-8238. E-mail fred-
inc@tnni.net.
For more information on
the Primal Connection, go to


their web site at www.pri
malconnection.org.
The Primal Connection is
an ethnically diverse, world
rhythm, percussion ensem-
ble. It is also a not-for-profit
organization dedicated to
using the .drum in the heal-
ing arts, as well as, a way of
enhancing cross-disciplinary
education. The organization
is also dedicated to improv-
ing cultural relations by
using the universal language
of percussion to illustrate
our oneness of origin and


unity of spirit.

Tanglewood hosts
summer dance
SEBRING - Tanglewood
will have a summer dance
from 7-10 p.m. Saturday.
Music will be provided by
Buddy Canova.
The cost is $3 for resi-
dents with a name badge and
$5 for all others.
Those planning to attend
should bring their own
Continued on page 12A


Details on our policies and services: Prices may vary after 6/21/09 if there are market variations. "Was" prices fi this advertisement were in effect on 6/11/09 and may vary based on Lowe's Everyday Low Price policy.
See store for details regarding product warranties. We reserve the right to limit quantities. "Ask for 10% off your first single-receipt In-store purchase charged to your new Lowe's Consumer Credit Card Account when
you open your new account in any Lowe's store and make your first purchase between 6/11/09 - 6/21/09. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase and cannot be used in conjunction with any other coupon or
discount This coupon is good for a single-receipt purchase of any in-stock or Special Order merchandise only up to $5000 (maximum discount $500). Coupon is not redeemable for cash, is nontransferable and cannot be
replaced f lost or stolen. Void f altered, copied, transferred, or sold through any on-line auction. mit one coupon per household. Not valid on sales via Lowes.com, previous sales, purchase of services or gift cards. Offer
must be requested at the time of purchase. Offer is subject to credit ap val.Coupon valid for one-time use only. Offer is not valid for accounts opened prior to 6/11/09. Excludes Lowe's* Business Credit Accounts,
Low's Project Card Accounts and all Lowe's VISA Accounts. While Lowe's strives to be accurate, unintentional errors may occur. We reserve the right to correct, any error Prices and promotions apply to US
locations only. �2009 by Lowe's�. All rights reserved. Lowe's and the gable design are registered trademarks of LF, LLU.C. (090692)
001/090692/016,017.021,033,075.088.115


Page 9A


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llM~lBitt ^^ I 11


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Page 10A


News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


www.newssun.corn


The News-Sun would like
to remind the readers that the
names listed below reflect
those who have been charged
with a crime, but they are all
innocent until proven guilty
by a court of law. If anyone
listed here is acquitted or has
charges dropped, they can
bring in proof of such deci-
sion or mail a copy to the
paper and the News-Sun will
be happy to report that infor-
mation. The News-Sun is at
2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring,
FL 33870.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on June 15:
+ Rosetta Dawn Chawla, 33,
of Wauchula, awaiting trial
for forgery to obtain con-
trolled substance; trafficking
drugs, four grams or -less of
controlled. substance; and.
fraud, possessing blank pre-
scription form.
* Henry Goldsmith, 56, of
Lake Placid, was charged for
withholding support, non-
support of children or spouse.
* Dustin Heath Green, 24,
awaiting trial, warrant for
falsely impersonating officer.
* Ronald Eugene Grizzard,
19, of Fort Meade, awaiting
trial for possession of liquor
by person under 21 years of
age, first offense; and battery.
+ Michael Paul Julian Karl,
18, of Sebring, awaiting trial
for trespassing property, not
structure or conveyance; and
battery, touch or strike.
* Jeri Jonelle Nichol, 24, of
Lake Placid, awaiting trial,
warrant for contributing to
the delinquency of a child;
warrant for child abuse, with-
out great harm; warrant for
selling or giving alcohol to a
person under 21 years of age;.
and warrant for neglect of
child, without great harm.
* Aaron Casey Raulerson,
20, of Bowling Green, await-
ing "trial for possession of
marijuana, not more than 20
grams.
* Julian Cornelious
Smallwood, 26, of Sebring,
awaiting trial for contempt of
court, violation injunction


protection domestic violence.
* Wayne Cecil Smith, 55, of
Avon Park, was registered as
a criminal, Polk .County case,
sex offender failed to report
address change.
* Bryan Edward Todd, 37,
of Sebring, was charged with
attempted possession of
cocaine.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on June 14:
* , Abimael Flores
Betancourt, 28, of Lake
Placid, awaiting trial for bat-
tery, touch or strike.
* Len Lenard Cotney, 38, of
Tampa, was charged on a
Hillsborough County warrant
for failure to pay child sup-
port.
* Chadwick Levon Myers,
35, of Sebring, awaiting trial
for robbery by sudden,
snatching without firearm;
and battery, touch or strike.
* Doris Emily Tarr, 72, of
Lake Placid, awaiting trial,
felony warrant for domestic
violence or burglary of unoc-
cupied dwelling, unarmed;
domestic violence or aggra-
vated battery, person using a
deadly weapon; domestic
violence or aggravated
assault with .deadly weapon
. without intent to kill; and
domestic violence or damag-
ing property, criminal mis-
chief.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on June 13:
* Brian Anthony Bonilla,
21, of Avon Park, awaiting
trial for aggravated stalking,
following, harassing, cyber-
stalking of another; and war-
rant for stalking, following,
harassing, cyberstalking of


another.
Abraham C. Fernandez,
Immigration detainer for
municipal ordinance viola-
tion.
* Curtis Hendricks, 56, of
Lake Placid, awaiting trial,
warrant for withholding sup-
port, non-support of children
or spouse.
* William ' Bryan
Hollingsworth, 23, of
Sebring, awaiting trial for
possession of marijuana, not
more than 20 grams; posses-
sion of narcotic equipment
and/or use; using, possessing
identification of another
without consent; larceny of
credit card; illegal use of
credit cards, used more than
twice to obtain goods or
money; and larceny or theft.
* Courtney Robert Holtz,
31, of St. Petersburg, await-
ing trial for withholding sup-
port, non-support of children
or spouse.
* Joshua Jordan.Ibanez, 20,
of Lake Placid, awaiting trial
for driving while license sus-
pended, first offense.
* Jerry Lee Redd, 45, of
Sebring, awaiting trial for
larceny, petit, first offense;
and burglary of unoccupied
dwelling or conveyance,
unarmed.'
* Tyrone Edward Riley, 31,
of Sebring, was charged with
probation violation, misde-
meanor warrant for knowing-
ly driving while license sus-
pended or revoked.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on June 12:
* Tameka Terrell Baldwin,
24, of Avon Park, awaiting
trial for possession of narcot-
ic equipment and/or use; and
possession of marijuana, not
more than 20 grams.
* Brenda Lee Barnes, 19, of
Avon Park, awaiting trial,
felony warrant for three
counts of criminal use of per-
sonal identification; larceny
or grand theft; using credit
cards two fewer times in six
months to obtain goods or
money; and disturbing peace
or disorderly conduct.


* Rico Antone Davis, 26, of
Lake Placid, awaiting trial
for firing weapon, discharg-
ing firearm in public; crimes
against person, other felony
committing act could cause
harm; and missile into
dwelling, vehicle or building.
* Marsha Lynn Gordon, 46,
of Frostproof, awaiting trial
for larceny or theft; using or
possessing identification of
another person without con-
sent; illegal use of credit
cards, using more than two
times in six months to obtain
goods or money; damage
property or criminal mis-
.chief; and larceny of credit
card'.
* Thomas Salvalas Hall, 35,
of Avon Park, awaiting trial,
misdemeanor warrant for bat-
tery, touch or strike..
* James Arthur Hill, 32, of
Sebring, awaiting trial for
driving while license sus-
pended, habitual offender.
* Sammie Antwan Jamison,
20, of Sebring, awaiting trial,
warrant, failure to appear,
failing pre-payment plan for
possession of cannabis; and
warrant, failure to appear,
failing pre-payment plan for
knowingly driving while
license suspended or
revoked.
* Stacey Michelle Jasenski,
34, of Sebring, awaiting trial,
felony warrant for possession
of narcotic equipment and/or
use; possession of marijuana
with intent to sell, etc., with-
in 1,000 feet of specified
area.
* Gregory Michael Jumper,
21, of Hollywood, awaiting
trial, warrant, failure to
appear, pre-trial release for
domestic violence or battery.
* Pedro Matos, 25, of
Sebring, awaiting trial for
tampering with, fabricating
or destroying. evidence;
resisting officer, obstruction
without violence; possession
of narcotic equipment and/or
use; possession of marijuana,
not more than 20 grams; and
warrantless for possession of
cocaine.
# Wendy McSwain, 29, of
Sebring, awaiting'trial, war-


rant, violation of injunction
against repeated sexual or
dating violence.
+ Angel Alfredo Ortega, 30.
of Sebring, awaiting trial for
driving while license sus-
pended. first offense; and
resisting officer, fleeing or
eluding law enforcement
officer with lights and sirens
active.
* Scott Adrian Waldron, 46,
of Sebring, awaiting trial for
trafficking amphetamine or
methamphetamine, 14 grams
or more; possession of mari-
juana, not more than 20
grams; possession of narcotic
equipment and/or use; and
warrantless for burglary of
structure.
* Sean Patrick Whelan, 41,
of Naples, was charged with
probation violation, felony
warrant for possession of
marijuana; and warrant for
possession of drug parapher-
nalia.

The following people were
placed in the Highlands
County Jail on June 11:
* Javier Antwain Anderson,
23, of, Haines City, was
charged with violation of
probation reference culpable
negligence.
+ Thomas Robert Blahnik,
56, of Sebring, was charged
with resisting an officer with-
out violence, and contempt of
court forviolating an injunc-
tion for protection..
*' Raul Relix Casarubias, 22,
of Lorida, was charged with
operating a motor vehicle
without a valid license.
* Jessica Leighann.
Crenshaw, 27, was charged
with interference with cus-
tody of a minor, concealing a
child contrary to court
orders, falsifying information
Sto a law enforcement officer
reference a missing person.
* Elias Ameen Douglas, 20,
of Sebring, was charged with
failure to appear reference no
motor vehicle registration.
+ Brice Ashley Duboice, 22,
of Sebring, was arrested on
an out-of-state warrant refer-
ence non-support.
+ Alfred Dunbar, 50, of


Sebring, registered as a crim-
inal reference battery on a'
law enforcement officer,
resisting an officer with vio-
lence, possession of cocaine,
possession of drug parapher-
nalia, destroying evidence,
smuggling contraband into a
detention facility.
* Elijah Derek Hill, 20, of
Mulberry, was arrested on
two out-of-county warrants
'reference failure to appear
for weekend work release
and possession of cannabis.
* Akosua Montoya Jackson,
33, of Sebring, was charged
with two counts of violation
of probation reference pos-
session of marijuana with
intent to sell.
* Brock Michael Jarvis, 19,
of Sebring, was charged with
larceny, altering an instru-
ment, altering a public record
certificate.
* Michael Anthony Johns,
31, of Avon Park,' was
charged with false imprison-
ment, battery and larceny.
* Christopher James Lyons,
34, of Sebring, was charged
with possession and or use of
narcotic equipment, posses-
sion of a controlled substance
without a prescription, and
possession of marijuana.
* Kevin Martinez Orozco,
19, of Rocky Mountain, N.C.,
was charged with robbery,
with a weapon, attempted.
felony murder, and two:
counts of failure to appear.
reference possession of drug,
paraphernalia and possession-
of cannabis.
* Joseph Douglas Ridener;
24, of Sebring, was charged.
with four counts of failure to,
appear .reference possession"
of cannabis, possession of-
drug paraphernalia, no valid-
driver license, and resistering.
an officer.Stephanie Michelle'
Sanchez, 21, of Sebring, was-
charged with larceny, fraud
to obtain property under
$20,000, possession/use of
an another person's identifi-:
cation without consent, ille-'
gal use of credit, card.
* Mitchell Allan Williams,
47, of Sebring, was charged'
with battery.


NATURAL GAS PRICES CONTINUE TO DROP

FOR LOCAL RESIDENCES AND BUSINESSES
For the fourth month in a row, Sebring Gas System, Inc. has
reduced the commodity cost of natural gas that will be passed
along to its customers in Sebring.
Effective with the bills rendered for gas usage in April 2009,
Sebring Gas customers will see a rate reduction for the commodity
cost of about 12% from the previous month.
Since the month of December 2008, the commodity of natural gas
has dropped, over 39%. Sebring Gas makes no profit on the price of
the commodity and the reductions are passed straight to its cus-
tomers.
Jerry Melendy, General Manager of Sebring Gas System, Inc. says
that the reduction in the price of natural gas is due mostly to the
increase in inventories. Natural gas is an all American product,
coming from, gas wells located in and around the Gulf of Mexico,
from Florida to Texas,
In addition to the lower natural gas prices to. its customers,
Sebring Gas also offers cash incentives to all new and existing nat-
ural gas customers of Sebring Gas. The incentives are for the home-
owner to use more natural gas. The incentives are as follows:
RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCE REPLACEMENT RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCE REPLACEMENT
(REPLACE ELECTRIC WITH GAS) (REPLACE OLD GAS WITH NEW GAS)
Cash Allowance Cash Allowance
Gas storage tank water heating... $525 Gas storage tank water heating.. . $350
Gas tankless water heating....... $525 Gas tankless water heating....... $450
Gas heating....................$625 Gas heating..................... $625
Gas cooking ............ ....... $100 Gas cooking ................... $100
Gas clothes drying.............. $100 Gas clothes drying.............. $100
RESIDENTIAL NEW CONSTRUCTION
'Cash Allowance
Gas storage tank water heating... $350
Gas tankless water heating....... $450
Gas heating.................... $350
Gas cooking .................... $100
Gas clothes drying.............. $100
The cash incentives have been approved by the Florida Public
Service Commission. The commission realizes that the use of natural
gas is the best use of our natural resources in Florida. By the
increased use of natural gas, not only will customers save money on
their energy bills, but the need to construct additional power plants
will be lessened.
Sebring Gas is a natural gas utility located in Sebring, with around 40
miles of underground gas pipeline.





SEMGING GAS SYSTEM INC.

3515 US Hwy 27 S. * Sebring

(863) 385-0194


. -cv- - -










News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


The Community Calendar pro-
vides a brief listing of local
clubs and organizations who
meet on a regular basis. It is
the responsibility of the group
to update the News-Sun on
any changes in this listing by
calling 385-6155, ext. 516;
send any changes by e-mail to
editor@newssun.com,; or mail
them to News-Sun Community
Calendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring, FL 33870.

TODAY
* Alcoholics Anonymous
One Day At A Time group
meets for a closed discussion
at 9:30 a.m. Monday and
Friday at Covenant
Presbyterian Church, 4500
Sun 'N Lakes Blvd., Sebring.
For details, call 314-0891. .
* American Legion Post 25
hosts a fish fry from 5-7 p.m.
at the post, 1490 U.S. 27,
Lake Placid. Cost is $6.
Shrimp also is available for
same price. Open to the pub-
lic. Tickets in the lounge on
Friday night. Lounge hours are
from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For
details, call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 74
has karaoke from 7 p.m. until
final call at the post, 526 N.
Pine St., Sebring. Post open at
noon. Happy Hour from 4-6
p.m. Members and guests
only. For details, call 471-
1448.
* AmVets Post 21 plays darts
from 5-8 p.m. for members
and guests. For details, call
385-0234.
* Avon Park Breakfast
Rotary Club meets 7 a.m.,
Rotary Club building.
* Bridge Club of Sebring
(American Contract Bridge
Club) plays duplicate games at
12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf
Ave., Sebring. For details, call
385-8118.
. Buttonwood Bay Squares
meets first and third Friday in
recreation hall, Sebring' Early
rounds are from 7-7:30 p.m.,
alternate
mainstream/plus/rounds are
from 7:30-9:30 p.m. Everyone
is welcome to attend. For'
details, call Larry Gow at 382-
6995.
* Harmony Hoedowners
Square Dance Club offers a
class in Lake Placid at the
Sunshine RV Resort from 9-11
a.m. Friday. For more informa-
tion, call Sam Dunn at 382-
6792 or e-mail him at sam-
dunn @samdunn.net.
* Highlands Social Dance
Club hosts ballroom dancing
every Friday, September
through April from 7-9:30 p.m.
at the Sebring Lions Club on
Sebring Parkway. Free ball-
room dance instruction is
available at 6:30 p.m. Dance
the .
night away to the music of the
Big Bands. All club dances are
open to the public. Appropriate
dress required. Admission is
$5 for members and $7 for .
non-memb.ers.
Call 471-0559.
* Italian-American Social
Club of Highlands County's
Social Night with games and
snacks every first and third
Friday of each month from
6:30-9 p.m. For more informa-


tion, call Jeanne.at 382-1945..
* Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 has lounge hours from 2
p.m.. to 12 a.m. There is a fish
fry from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Cost is
$8.50 per person. Live music
is from 6:30-10:30 p.m. The
lodge is open to members and
their guests. For details, call
465-2661.
* Lake Placid Moose serves
wings, fish and burgers at 6
p.m. Music provided from 7-11
p.m. Pool tournament is at 8
p.m. Open to members and
qualified guests only.
* Loyal Order of Moose,
Highlands County Lodge No.
2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon
Park. Karaoke fr6m 7-10 'p.m.
Lodge phone number 452-
0579:
* Narcotics Anonymous
New Day Group meets at 6
p.m. at First Presbyterian
Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave,
Sebring. For information call
Heartland area helpline (863)
683-0630. More information on
other meetings and events at
www.naflheartland.org.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240,
serves chicken or fish baskets
from 5-7 p.m. at the club,
12921 U.S. 98, Sebring, for a
$4 donation. Blind darts is
played at 7 p.m. For details,
call 655-4007.
* Sebring Elks Lodge 1529
serving buffet dinner at 5-7
p.m. Elks and guests invited.
Dance music in ballroom at 7
p.m. Dinner and dance is $10
donation. For reservations, call
385-8647 or 471-3557.
Lounge is open from 3-10 p.m.
* Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 serves beef franks and
Italian sausages served from 1
p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S.
98, Sebring. For details, call
655-3920.
* Sebring Recreation Club
plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and
table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333
Pomegranate Ave. For details,
call 385-2966 or leave a
name, number and message.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880, 1224 County Road
621 E., Lake Placid. Texas.
Hold 'em lessons, 2 p.m. For
more details, call 699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 serves pizza from
5:30-7 p.m. and music is from
6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE
Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For
details, call 385-8902.
* Volunteers of America of
Florida is a nonprofit organi-
zation in Sebring that special-
izes in assisting person's with
mentalillness. We are
pleased to announce our Drop
in Center is open to individuals
with a mental illness 6 days a
week from 11am to 3 pm. The
center offers a welcoming .
environment where individuals
are accepted and feel comfort-
able. For more information
please contact Wendy at 863-
382-2022.

SATURDAY
* American Association of
University Women meets at,
10 a.m. third Saturday at vari-
ous locations. For details, call
465-2581 or 452-2493.
* American Legion Post 25
serves sirloin burgers from
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the


post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake
Placid. Jam session is from 2-
4 p.m. The lounge hours are
11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Members
and guests invited. For details,
call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 69
in Avon Park serves dinner at
5 p.m. and music is from 6-9
p.m.
* American Legion Post 74
open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs
served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.
Call 471-1448.
* Avon Park Public Library
has a free Adult Film Series at
noon. For details, call 452-
3803.
* Heartland Avian Society
meets at 2 p.m: third Saturday.
For details, call 385-3367.
* Heartland Horses &
Handicapped Inc. provides
free assisted riding sessions
for adults and children with
special needs from 9-11 a.m.
Wednesday, Thursday and
Saturday at 118 W. College
Drive, Avon Park. For details
or to volunteer, call Mary
McClelland, coordinator, 452-
0006.
* Highlands Shrine Club,
2606 State Road 17 South,
Avon Park (between Avon
Park and Sebring) has a flea
market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
country store open from 8 a.m.
to noon and pancake breakfast
served from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30
a.m. Vendors are welcome. No
setup fee is charged for the
summer months. Plenty of off
road parking. For details, call
382-2208.
* Highlands Woodcarvers
meet at Thunderbird Hill South'
Community Center from 9 a.m.
to noon Saturdays. Call Bob at
471-6077.
* Historical Society of
Greater Lake Placid meets
at noon quarterly on the third
Saturday of March, June,
September, and December at
the Masonic Hall, 106 N. Main
for a potluck luncheon.
* Hot Rod Nights Cruise In,
meets from 5-8 p.m. every
third Saturday at the Home
Depot parking lot in Sebring.
For details, call 441-3051 or
441-3086.
A Lake Placid Art League
has a class in Pastels/Acrylics
taught by' Llewellyn Rinald
from from 9 a.m. to noon at-
the Cultural Center, 127 Dal
Hall Blvd. For information call
Dan Daszek at 465-7730.
* Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 opens the lounge at 1
p.m. Card games are played
from 1-4 p.m. The lodge is
open to members'and their
guests. For details, call 465-
2661.
m Narcotics Anonymous
New Day Group meets at 7
p.m. at First Presbyterian
Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave,
Sebring. For information call
Heartland area helpline (863)
683-0630. More information on
other meetings and events at
www.naflheartland.org.,
* Overeaters Anonymous
meets at 10:30 a.m. at First
Presbyterian Church, Oak
Street, Lake Placid. For more
details, call 382-1821.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves dinner from 5-7 p.m. at
the club, 12921 U.S. 98,


Sebring. Music is from 7-10
p.m. For details, call 655-4007.
* Sebring Moose Club 2259
offers line dancing lessons at 2
p.m. the first and third
Saturday for members and
guests at 11675 U.S. 98,
Sebring. For details, call 655-
3920..
* Twelve Step Study Group
for Adult Children of
Alcoholics meets at 11 a.m.
first and third Saturday, at first
building south of Union
Congregational Church, 105
N. Forest Ave., Avon Park.
Parking available south of old
church.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880, 1224 County Road
621 E., Lake Placid. Spaghetti
dinner and karaoke at 5:30
p.m. on the third Saturday of
each month. For more details,
call 699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 serves a meal for
$6 from 5:30-7 p.m. and music
is from 6-9 p.m. at the post,
2011 SE Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. For details, call 385-
8902.

SUNDAY
* American Legion Post 25
Lake Placid has lounge hours
from 1-9 p.m. Live music is
from 5-8 p.m. For details, call
465-7940.
* American Legion Post 74
open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6
p.m. Members and guests
only. Post is at 528 N; Pine
St., Sebring. Call 471-1448.
* Heartland Interfaith
Alliance meets 1:30 p.m., first
Friday, St. Frances of Assisi
Episcopal Church, 43 Lake
June Road, Lake Placid, For
details, call 465-0051.
* Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 opens the lounge from 2-
8 p.m. Card games start at ,
2:30 p.m. The lodge is open to
members and their guests. For
details, call 465-2661.
* Lake Placid Moose has
karaoke in the pavilion.
Horseshoes played at 9:30
a.m. Food available at 4 p.m.
Open to members and quali-
fied guests only.
* Lions Club will have
Country and bluegrass music.
from 2-4 p.m. Sunday,
instead of at the Shriners.
Bands featured on alternate
Sunday will be Just Country
and Memory Makers. For.
information, call 471-2288.
* Loyal Order of Moose,
Highlands County Lodge No.
2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon
Park. Cards start at 4'p.m.
Music outside Tiki Hut at 3
p.m. Lodge phone number
452-0579.
* Overeaters Anonymous,
meets from 4-5 p.m. in second
floor conference room No. 3 at
Florida Hospital Heartland
Medical Center, 4200 Sun 'N
Lake Blvd., Sebring. For
details, call 385-4277. No
dues, fees or weigh-ins. For
details on the organization, go
to www.oa.org.
* Ridge - Area Missionary
Soldiers Avon Park
Pathfinder Club meets from 9
a.m. to noon every first and
third Sunday at 58 E. Sixth St.,
Avon Park. For details, call
471-2143.


* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the
club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring.
For details, call 655-4007.
* Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 offers NASCAR racing in
the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar
open and kitchen open from 2-
5 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S.
98, Sebring. For details, call
655-3920.
* Society for Creative
Anachronism (Local
Chapter: Shire of Stagridge)
meets at 2 p.m. first and third
Sunday at Brewster's Coffee
House on U.S. 27 in Sebring.
For details, call 214-5522.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880 serves hamburgers
from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays
poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post,
1224 County Road 621 East,
Lake Placid. For details, call
699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 plays euchre at
1:30 p.m. and E&J Karaoke is
from 4:30-7:30 p.m. at the
post, 2011, SE Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. For details, call 385-
8902.

MONDAY
* Alcoholics Anonymous
meeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal
Church, Lakeshore Drive,
Sebring. For more details, call
385-8807.
* Alcoholics Anonymous
One Day At A Time group
meets for a closed discussion
at 9:30 a.m. Monday and
Friday at Covenant
Presbyterian Church, 4500
Sun 'N Lakes Blvd., Sebring.
For details, call 314-0891.
* Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at
St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
660 NW Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. For details, call (863)
687-3800.
* Alzheimer's Association
Support Group meets at 2
p.m. at the Oaks of Avon,
1010 U.S. 27 North, Avon
Park. Call 385-3444.
* American Legion Placid
Post 25 Lake Placid has
shuffleboard at 1 p.m. Lounge
hours are 12-9 p.m. For
details, call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 74
open noon to 8 p.m. Happy
hour from 4-6 p.m. Call 471-
1448.
* Bridge Club of Sebring
(American Contract Bridge,
Club) plays duplicate games at
12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf
Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118.
* Civil Air Patrol (U.S. Air
Force Auxiliary) meets at,
6:30 p.m. at the Knights of
Columbus Hall, east of U.S. 27
across from Lakeshore Mall in
Sebring. Civilian volunteers,
both adults and youth from
ages 12-21, are welcome. For
details, call 385-1234 or e-mail
2capers@earthlink.net.
* Corvette Cruisers meets at
6:30 p.m. first and third
Monday at the Dairy Queen in
front of The Home Depot,
Sebring. Call 655-2092.
* Garden Club of Sebring
meets noon, Sebring Civic
. Center, Call 385-2044 or 382-
2063 for details.
* Harmony Hoedowners
Square Dance Club meets
from 7:30-9:30 p.m. the first
and third Monday at Sebring


Civic Center from December
through April. There will be
alternating mainstream and
plus dancing with rounds.
Casual dress or square dance
attire is acceptable. For more
information, call Sam Dunn at
382-6792 or e-mail him at
samdunn l@samdunn. net.
* Heartland Horses &
Handicapped Inc. is offering
pony rides every Monday and
Wednesday from 4:30-6:30
p.m., weather permitting. $5
donation per child. Call 452-
0006 for more information. All
proceeds raised support our
free equine assisted riding pro-
gram for adults and children
with special needs, which
resumes in September,
* Highlands County
Amateur Radio Club meets at
7:30 p.m. third Monday in con-
ference room .3 at the
'Highlands County Agri-Civic
Center, Sebring. For details,
call 402-0554 or 471-0226.
M Highlands County Concert
Band rehearses 7-9 p.m.
every Monday at Sebring High
School band room.
Experienced musicians are
welcome. Vic Anderson and
Colorado Paniagua conduct-
ing. Call 314-8877.
* Highlands County Rotary
Club meets at 6 p.m. at
Charlie's Restaurant,
Commerce Street, Sebring.
M Highlands County Sewing
Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at
the Highlands County Agri-
Civic Center in the 4-H labora-
tory, Sebring. Call 402-6540.
* Highlands Delta Chorale
rehearses 7 p.m., Sebring
Church of the Brethren, 700 S.,
Pine St., Sebring (September
through May). No auditions are
required to join and all ages
are welcome. Call Cheryl
Cometta at 699-2663.
* Highlands Sertoma Club
meets noon, Takis Family
Restaurant, Sebring.
* Hope Hospice free grief
support group meets at 2 p.m.
at. Union Congregational
Church, 106 N. Butler Ave.,
Avon Park.
* La Leche League, breast-
feeding support for Highlands
and southern Polk counties,
meets at 7 p.m. every third
Monday at the Florida Hospital
Heartland conference rooms.
Pregnant and nursing mothers
and their babies are welcome.
Call .655-6617 or 638-3954.
* Lake Placid American
Legion Post 25 meets 8 p.m.,
Legion Hall.
* Lake Placid Art League will
have classes in Drawing apd
Painting, conducted by Anne
Watson, from from 9:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural
Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd.
From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart
will teach Fabric Painting at
the center. For information call
Dan Daszek at 465-7730.
* Lake Placid Elks 2661
opens its lounge from 2-9.p.m.
at the lodge. Euchre is at 1
p.m. Ladies crafts is at 2 p.m.
Burgers and wings served
from 5-7 p.m. Live music is
from 4-7 p.m. Darts is at 7
p.m. with sign up at 6:30 p.m.
It is open to members and
their guests. For details, call
465-2661.


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www.newssun.com


Page 11A


I!









News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


COMMUNITY BRIEFS


Continued from page 9A
snacks and drinks; ice will
be provided.
Tanglewood is just north-
of Walmart on U.S. 27 in
Sebring.
The next dance will be a
hot summer dance with
Frank E. on July 18.
Placid Lakes owners
meet for jam session
LAKE PLACID - Come
out to the Platid Lakes
Home and Property' Owners
Association on Saturday for
another fun-filled jam ses-
sion from 4:30-7:30 p.m.
If you have a instrument,
bring it along. Any type of
entertainment, even a good
loud voice or a bad loud
voice, happy spirit, comedy
act, skit, dancing, juggling
act, spoons or anything else
to entertain. Big laughs and
fun will be had by all.
The event will be at the
Placid Lakes Town Hall at
2010 Placid Lakes Blvd.
Once a month, the group
will have a variety of qctivi-
ties for entertainment and
pleasure. Look for the date
on next month's ice cream
social. Refreshments-will be
served.
As with most functions,
there is no cost to partici-
pants, but a donation would
be appreciated. Watch for
future announcements.
VFW 3380 hosts
karaoke night
LAKE PLACID - The
Lake Placid Veterans of
Foreign Wars 3380 will host
karaoke with Tony and
Diana on Saturday. Earlier in
the day there wil-be bingo
and a spaghetti dinner.
For details, call 699-5444.
'The Mummy' will
play at LP Library
LAKE PLACID - The
June presentation of
Saturday 2 p.m. Matinee


films at the Lake Placid
Memorial Library is as fol-
lows: "The Mummy" (June
20) and "Hotel for Dogs"
(June 27). All films are all
rated PG 13. The public is
invited to attend.
Seating is limited.
Admission and lemonade
provided by the Friends of
the Library are free. Free
popcorn is provided by
MidFlorida Credit Union.
Class on proper
landscape watering
LAKE PLACID -
Planting a personal view of
scenery in the backyard
without addressing different
watering needs can be chal-
lenging at best and down-
right disappointing if done
incorrectly. Make life easier
by learning just how to
address the watering needs
of the landscape.
Attend the second install-
ment in Environmental
Horticulturist Dee Dee
Jacobson's summer plant
cultivating series at Lake
Placid Memorial Library..
The seminar entitled "Water,
Water Everywhere" will take
place at 10 a.m. Saturday.
Seating is limited. If you
have questions or would like
to make a reservation, call
Kathleen Mills Montgomery
at 699-3705.
Small businesses
learn to prepare for
disasters
A disaster preparedness
training for small business
owners Will take place from
8-9 a.m. today at the South
Florida Community College
DeSoto Campus, Room 118
in Arcadia, and from 11:45
a.m. to 12:45 p.m. today at
the SFCC Hardee Campus,
Room 110, in Bowling
Green.
Training in Highlands
County will take place from
8-9 a.m. Thursday, June 25
at the Heartland Workforce


One-Stop Career Center,
2730 U.S. 27 North.
Breakfast will be included.
Reservations for this training
must be made by noon
Tuesday by calling Mary
Freeman at 385-4900.
Breakfast and lunch is
included, respectively. This
event is hosted by Florida's
Heartland REDI Inc. in part-
nershp with the Small.
Business Development
Center, Hardee County
Economic Development
Council, and Heartland
Workforce One-Stop Career
Center.
Queens of
Abundance ready for
Halloween
SEBRING - The next
regularly scheduled luncheon
for Queens of Abundance
will be held at Dot's
Restaurant meeting room at
11:30 a.m. Monday, Aug. 10.
At that time, tickets will
be available for the Oct. 29
Halloween Fling for the
South Central Florida Red
Hatters. It will be held on
Thursday and will open with
a parade of all Red Hatters
wishing to dress in
Halloween costume.
Following the parade and
judging with awarding of
prizes will be the luncheon.
The cost per ticket is $
9.95 and is payable to:
Becky Williams at 3
Cherrywood Way, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. The bingo
packets at $ 13 will be paid
at the door on the Oct. 29.
A special invitation is
extended.to the men of the
Red Hatters and hope that
they will attend as special
guests.
There will be a 50/50 tick-
et sales both on Aug. 10 and
Oct. 29.
For reservations for the
Halloween Fling and/or
more information about
either event, call 465-0161
or e-mail beckshel@embarq
mail.com.


Presents
Ken Ludwig's

Shakespeare in Hollywood





"Comedy is hard an these actors got
it right."
Leland Flocke, Lake Placid

S"[Shakespeare in Hollywood was]
Great!"
SBetty & Sonny Stalls, Lake Placid
"Will absolutely recommend it to
friends."
Felice Johnson, Sebring



NOW OPEN! Get Your Tickets Now
"Mischief, Mayhem and Laughter abound"
The New York Times ,
"In Ludwig's fantastical farce, every time the play veers toward seriousness,
he throws a verbal banana peel, a pun or a double entendre on the path...Side
splitting humor."
The Boston Globe
"Shakespeare In Hollywood is deliciously inventive, poignant and funny,
sophisticated and silly, high brow and low brow...a hilarious delight." The
Baltimore Sun
"A fast, funny, entertaining night" NBC
"Shakespeare In Hollywood will charm your socks off'
The Wall Street Journal


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Page 12A


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News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


Page 13A


CLASSIFIED


CLASSIFIED
INFORMATION

HOURS
SLobby: Monday-Friday 8a.m.-5p.m.
Classified Line Ads may be placed by
telephone Monday-Friday 8a.m.-5p.m.

OFFICE LOCATION
2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring

PHONE NUMBERS


Avon ParK'(863) 452-10uu9
Sebring (863) 385-6155
Lake Placid (863) 465-0426
Fax (863) 385-1954


DEADLINE INFORMA-
TION


LINE AD HEADLINES: Monday, 4 p.m.
(for Wednesday edition); Wednesday,
4 p.m. (for Friday edition); Friday, 4
p.m. (for Sunday edition). All FAX
deadlines are 1 hour earlier.

GENERAL IMPORTANT INFORMATION
'The publisher reserves the right O
.ensor, reclassify, revise edit, or
reject any classified advertisement not
meetingg our standards. We accept
only standard abbreviations and
required proper punctuation.
i 'ERRORS
We make every effort to avoid errors in
advertisements. Please check your ad
.he first day it appears. We cannot be
,responsible for incorrect ads beyond
ahe first business day of an advertising
schedule . If you find 'an error, report it.
to the Classified: Advertising
department immediately. See tele-
phone numbers listed in this directory.
he publisher assumes no financial
responsibilityy for errors or omissions.
abilityy for errors shall not exceed the
cost of that portion of space occupied
fy such error.
CANCELLATIONS: When a. cancellation
is called in a KILL number will be given
fo you. THIS NUMBER IS VERY
JMPORTANT and must be used if ad
failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior
Jo scheduled expiration date will be
billed for complete run unless a KiLL
number has been 'ssued. Claims for
adjustments to billing of advertising
should be made upon receipt of billing
by telephoning 385-6155, 452-1009, or
.,65-0426.

CLASSIFICATION HEADINGS
1000 Announcements
T05W Legals -
.1070 Valentine Love Linies
, 100 Announcements
ft50 Personals; - "-
1200 Lost & Found
1250 Card Of Thanks
1300 In Memoriam
1350 Paid Political
1400 Health Care Services
1450 Babysitters
1500 Child Care Services
1550 Professional Services
1600 Internet & Computer Services
2000 Employment
2050 Job Opportunities
2100. Help Wanted
2150 Part-time Employment
2200 Preparation For Employment
2250 Schools & Instruction.
2300 Work Wanted
3000 Financial!'
3050 Business Opportunities,
3100 Business Opportunities Wanted
3150i Mortgages'
3200 Investments
3250 Loans & Savings
3300. Insurance
4000 Real Estate
4020 Builders & Contractors ,
4040 Homes For Sale
4060 Homes For Sale - Avon Park
4080 Homes For Sale - Sebring
4100 Homes For Sale - Lake Placid
4120 Villas & Condos For Sale
4140 Retirement Facilities
4160 Commercial Property For Sale
�4170 Lakefront Property For Sale
4180 Duplexes For Sale
4190 Property Exchange
4200 Income & Investment Property
4220 Lots For Sale ..
4240 Farms For Sale'
4260 Acreage For Sale
4280 Cemetery Lots
4300 Out-Of-Town Property
4320 Real Estate Wanted
5000 Mobile Homes
5050 Mobile Homes For Sale
5100 Mobile Home Lots For Sale
5150 Mobile Homes For Rent
5200 Mobile Home Lots For Rent
5000 Rentals
6050 Duplexes For Rent.
6100 Villas & Condos For Rent
6150 Furnished Apartments For Rent
6200 Unfurnished Apartments For
Rent
6250 Furnished Houses For Rent
6300. Unfurnished Houses For Rent
6350 Cottages For Rent
6400 Rooms For Rent
6450 Roommates Wanted
6500 Miscellaneous Rentals
6550 Warehouses For Rent
6600 Business & Offices For Rent
6650 Wanted To Rent
6700i Seasondl Property For Rent
7000 Merchandise
7020 Auctions
7030 Estate Sales
7040- Appliances
7060 Antiques - Collectibles
7080 Stamps & Coins
7100' T.V.; Radio & Stereo .
7120 Video Recorders & Equipment
7140 Computers & Supplies
7160 Cameras & Supplies
7180 Furniture
7200 Apparel & Household Goods
7220 Citizen Band & Amateur Radio
7240 Jewelry - Personal Items
7260 Musical Merchandise
7280 Office & Business Equipment
7300 Miscellaneous
7320 Garage & Yard Sales


7340 Wanted To Buy
7360 Wanted To Trade
7380 Machinery & Tools'
7400 Lawn & Garden
7420 Heating & Air Conditioning
7440 Building Supplies
746 0. Crafts & Bazaars
7480 Nursery, Gardening & Supplies
7490 Farm Equipment
7500 Livestock & Supplies
7520 Pets & Supplies
7540 Fresh Fruits & Vegetables
7550 Meat & Poultry Products
7560 Medical Supplies & Equipment
7580 Toys
8000 Recreation
BU50 Boats & Motors
8100 Marine Equipment
8150 Fitness & Exercise Equipment
8200 Bikes & Cycle Equipment.
*8250 Hunting & Fishing Supplies
8270 Firearms
8300 Pools & Supplies
8350 Sporting Goods
8400 Recreational Vehicles
8450 Motor Homes
8500 Golf Carts
9000 Transportation
Man. AAN-_


yuou
9100
9150
9200
9220
9250
9300
9320
9340
9350
'9400
9420
9440
9450


Aviation
Motorcycles & ATV's
Four Wheel Drive Vehicles
Trucks
Utility Trailers
Vans
Automotive Services /
Automobile Financing
Automobile Insurance
Automotive Parts & Accessories
Automotive Wanted
Antiques - Classics
Sport Utility Vehicles
Automotive For Sale


1000
Announcements



1050 ,Lg,,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 09-222
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
JO ELLEN FERRYMAN
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DE-
MANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of.
Summary, Administration has been entered in
the estate of Jo Ellen Ferryman, deceased, File
Number PC 09-222, by the Circuit Court for
Highlands County;' Florida, Probate Division,
the address'of which Is 590 South Commerce
Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870; that the dece-
dent's date of death was January 15th, 2009;'
that the total value of the estate is $39,060.00
and that the names and addresses of those to
whom it has been assigned by such order are:
Melody Ennis
6200 Oak Lane
Sebring, FL 33876
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT:
All.creditors of the estate of the decedent
and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than
-those for whom provision for full payment.
was made in the Order of Summary Adminis-
tration must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE IS JUNE 12TH; 2009. .
Person Giving Notice:
Melody Ennis
6200 Oak Lane
Sebring, FL 33876
BREED & NUNNALLEE, P.A.
Attorneys for Person Giving Notice
325 NORTH COMMERCE AVENUE
SEBRING,FL 33870
Telephone: (863) 382-3154
By: /s/ Thomas L. Nunnallee
Florida Bar No. 0062162
S ' . June 12,19,2009
', IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-000716
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A
-COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING
LP,
v5
'LUIS ROBERTO A/K/A LUIS R. ROBERTO
A/K/A GOMEZ LUIS ROBERTO, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DAVID L. MARSH
Last Address Unknown
Other Address: P.O. Box 581, Lake Placid, FL
33862
Current Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclo-
sure of Mortgage on the following described
property:
LOT 8 AND THE NORTH 1/2 OF LOT 9, BLOCK
1, PALM GARDEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,
AT PAGE 75, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens- -
es, if any, to It, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A.,
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800.
NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDER-,
'DALE, FL 33309 on or before July 6, 2009, a
date which is within thirty (30) days after'the
first publication of this Notice In the News-
Sun and file the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plaintiff's attor-
ney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
In accordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled per-
sons who,, because of their disabilities, .need
special accommodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA. Coordina-
tor at 590 S, Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL
33870 or Telephone (863) 471-5313 not later
than five business days prior to such proceed-
ing.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court this 4th day of June, 2009.
Robert W. Germalne
As Clerk of the Court
By:'/s/ Toni Kopp
As Deputy Clerk
June 12,19, 2009


1050 Lega
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 09-225
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JAYLA KEYJANA LEE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Jayla
Keyjana Lee, deceased, whose date of death
was January 4th, 2009, and whose social se-
curity number is -......., is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which Is 590
South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870.
The names and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this no-
tice is, required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All 'other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE,
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE IS: JUNE 19TH, 20.09.
Personal Representative:
Nicole Pounds
1223 Citrus Terrace Drive
Sebring, FL 33870
/s/ E. Mark Breed III
BREED & NUNNALLEE, P.A.
Attorneys for Personal Representative '
,325 NORTH COMMERCE AVENUE
SEBRING, FL 33870
Telephone: (863) 382-3154
Florida Bar No. 338702
June 19, 26, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 09-234
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MATTIE MAE MONTERROSO
a.k.a. MATTIE M. MONTERROSO
a.k.a. MATTIE SEGARS MONTERROSO
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MAT-
TIE MAE MONTERROSO a.k.a. MATTIE M.
MONTERROSO a.k.a. MATTIE.SEGARS MON-
TERROSO, deceased whose dale of death
was April 22. 2009. and whose Social Security
Number Is XXX-XX-2762. is pending in irne
Circuit Courn lor Hignianas Counry Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 590
S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870.
The names and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this no-
tice is required to be served must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OIFTHIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with thls'court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. '
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECE.
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice
is: June,12,2009.; '
...' 2. ' Personal Representative:
/s/ Barbara J. Hill
'1238 Seamans Street
Avon Park. Florida 33825
Attorney lor Personal Representaitve
/s/ David F Lanier
DAVID F. LANIER
Florida Bar No. 045399 .
P.O. Box400
Avon Park, Florida 33826-0400
Telephone: (863) 453-4457
June 12,19,2009


1050 Lels
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. PC09-223
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SHIRLEY D. WARNICK,
Deceased.
. NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL. PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DE-
MANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that a Petition for
Summary Administration, Petition to Deter-
mine Homestead Status of Real Property and
Petition to Determine Exempt Property have
been filed in the estate of SHIRLEY D. WAR-
NICK deceased, File Number PC09-223; by the
Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida,
Probate Division, thp address of which is 590
South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870;
that the decedent's date of death was February
9, 2009; that the,total value of the estate
claimed to be subject to creditors' is $0.00 and
that the names and addresses of those to
whom it has been assigned by such order are:
Name Address
Creditors'
'Florida Hospital of Orlando
c/o Kevin B. Wilson Law Offices
1 P.O. Box 24103
Chattanooga, TN 37422
Beneficiaries
Karen van Vonno
2083 Indian Summer Lane
Vero. Beach, FL 32963
Christine Nelson
a/k/a Christine Summerfield
' 1719 Buck Street
Lake Placid, FL 33852
Richard Dobson
1 Blackfield Drive, #334
Tiburon, CA 94920
Donald Dobson
2292 Lune Court
W. Melbourne, FL 32904
John Warnick
511 Combs-Dixon Road
Sugargrove, NC 28679
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent
and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS. SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLI-
CABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice
is June 19, 2009.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ Karen van Vonno
2083 Indian Summer Lane
Vero Beach, FL 32963
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
/s/ Erik P. Shuman, Esquire
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 990681
GrayRobinson, P.A.
P.O. Box 1870.
Melbourne, FL 32902-1870
Telephone: (321) 727-8100
June 19, 26, 2009.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDSCOUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO~C-0 9-414
BANK OFAAMERICA,,NATIONAL "
ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR'BY MERGER
TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL'ASSOCIATION,
AS TRUSTE FOR Fi ST FRANKLIN
MORTGAGE'LOAN TRUST, MORTGAGE LOAN
ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2007-FF2,
Plaintiff,
-vs-
TERENCE 0. ROURKE A/K/A TERENCE
O'ROURKE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TERENCE
0. ROURKE A/K/A TERENCE O'ROURKE;
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST
FRANKLIN FINANCIAL CORP., AN OP. SUB.
OF MLB&T CO., FSB, and any unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, and other
unknown persons or unknown spouses
claiming by, through and under any of the
above-named Defendants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE Is hereby given 'that the under-
signed Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands
County, Florida, will on the 7th day of July,
2009, at 11:00 o'clock A.M. in the Jury As-
sembly Room In the basement of the High-
lands County Courthouse located at 430
South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida,
,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the
highest and best bidder for cash, the follow-
ing-described property situate In Highlands
County, Florida:
The West 1/2 of Lot 6 and all of Lot 7,


EQUAL HOUSINMO
OPPORTUNITY

FAIRHOUSING/EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


HIGHLANDS COUNTY NOTICE TO PUBLIC

It is illegal to discriminate based on the race, color, religion, sex,
National origin, age, disability, or familial status when renting,
Selling or financing a home or property.


You Have Rightsll If you feel you have been discriminated against when
Buying or renting a home please contact Teresa Hofer at the Highlands County
Teresa Hofer
S , Housing Coordination Specialist
Highlands County
S(863) 402-6917
501 S. Commerce Ave. Annex
Sebring, FI 33871-1926
thofer(ahcbcc.omr
The Highlands County is a Fair Housing Advocate as explained in
the Hiahlands County Fair Housing Ordinance which outlines
the steps that can be taken locally to report housing discriminatioA..
A cpy of-this Ordinance can be obtained 't he City Hall
In addition to information on Fair Housing and Fair Housing Law can be obtained
by contacting the Housing Discrimination Hotline at, 1-800-669-9777
(Voice)1-800-927-9275(TTY) or on the World Wide Web at:
http://www.hud.gov/offices/fheo/index.cfm


1050 -Lega
Block 99, SHEET 1 OF LAKEWOOD TERRA-
CES, according to the Plat thereof recorded In
Plat Book 2, at Page 50, of the Public Records
of Highlands County, Florida.
pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in
a case pending in said. Court, the style of
which is indicated above.
Any person or entity claiming an interest
in the surplus, if any, resulting from the fore-
closure sale, other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a
claim on same with the Clerk of Court within
60 days after the foreclosure sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of
said Court this 9th day of June, 2009.
If you are a person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the Office of the Court
Administrator, (941) 534-4690, within two (2)
working days of your receipt of this notice; if
you are hearing or voice impaired, call (TDD)
(941) 534-7777, or Florida Relay Service 800-
955-8770.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
June 19, 26, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 28-2009-CA-000032
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON
FORMERLY KNOWN AS THE BANK OF NEW
YORK ON BEHALF OF CIT MORTGAGE LOAN.
TRUST 2007-1,
PLAINTIFF
-VS-
ESTHER CARBONELL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF ESTHER CARBONELL; ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 IN
POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2 IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY;
DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 8,
2009, and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-
000032, of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County,
Florida. THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON,
FORMERLY KNOWN AS THE BANK OF NEW
YORK ON BEHALF OF CIT MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-1, is Plaintiff and ESTHER CAR-
BONELL; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY N/K/A
FRED DUBOWSKI, are defendants. I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash in the JU-
RY ASSEMBLY ROOM, BASEMENT, 430
South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870,
at 11:00 a.m. on the 6th day of July, 2009, the
following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 8, BLOCK 176, WOODLAWN TER-
RACE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE 96, AS RECORDED IN THE
PUBLIC REiO)RDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,;
FLORIDA; SAID LAND SITUATE, LYING AND
BEING IN HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
IMPORTANT: In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a
person with a disability who needs any ac-
commodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you,
to provision of certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Court Administrator at 590 SOUTH
COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870.
Phone No. 863-402-6591 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this notice or pleading.
DATED this 9th day of June, 2009.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK
. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
As Deputy Clerk
June 19, 26, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA,
CASE NO. GC-09-372
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING,
L.P.
Plaiptiff,
-vs-
-VS-
OFELIA Z. LEZA A/K/A OFELIA LEZA; OLEG
A. LEZA; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN
TENANT II; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS
NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB;
WOODS' N IRONS PHASE II OWNERS.


1050 ,,
ASSOCIATION, INC., A DISSOLVED
CORPORATION, and any unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, and other
unknown persons or unknown spouses
claiming by, through and under any of the
above-named Defendants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that the under-
signed Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands
County, Florida, will on the 7th day of July,
2009, at 11:00 o'clock A.M. in the Jury As-
sembly Room in, the basement of the High-
lands County Courthouse located at 430
South Commerce Avenue, 'Sebring, Florida,
offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the
highest and best bidder for cash, the follow-
ing-described property situate in Highlands
County, Florida:
Lot 22 Block 258 of SUN 'N LAKE ES-
TATES OF SEBRING, UNIT 16, according to
the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 10,
Page 4, of the Public Records of Highlands
County, Florida. '
pursuant to the Final Judgment entered In
a case pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above.
Any person or entity claiming an interest
in the surplus, if any, resulting'from the fore-
closure sale, other than the property owner as
of 'the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a
claim on same with the Clerk of Court within
60 days after the foreclosure sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of
said Court this 9th day of June, 2009.
If you are a person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the Office of the Court
Administrator, (941) 534-4690, within two (2)
working days of your receipt of this notice; if
you are hearing or voice impaired, call (TOO)
(941) 534-7777, or Florida Relay Service 800-
955-8770.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
June 19, 26,2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2008 CA 001437
HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR THE
REGISTERED NOTEHOLDERS OF
RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST
2006-4,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARCY J. NOWELL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
MARCY J. NOWELL; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN
INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
(Published in the NEWS SUN)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GiVEN pursuant to a
Final Summary Judgment dated March 16,
2009, entered in Civil Case No.: 2008 CA
001437, of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judi-
cial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Flori-
da, wherein HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL AS-
SOCIATION, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR
THE REGISTERED NOTEHOLDERS OF REN-
AISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST
2006-4, is Plaintiff, and MARCY J. NOWELL,
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARCY J. NOWELL,
are Defendants.
I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at
11:00 a.m. in the Jury Assembly Room in the
basement of the Highlands County Court-
house, located at 430 South Commerce Ave-
nue, Sebring, Florida, 33870 on the 7th day of
July, 2009 the following described real prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Summary Judg-
ment, to wit:
Lot 16, Block 82, Eighth Addition to the
Town of Sebring, according to the map or plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 3, of
the Public Records of Highlands County, Rori-
da. '
This property is located at the street ad-
dress of: 460 Oak Avenue, Sebring, Florida
33870
If you are a person claiming a right to
funds remaining after the sale, you must file a
claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after
the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not
be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60
days, only the owner of record as of the date
of the lis pendens may claim the surplus.
WITNESS my hand and the seat of the Court
on June 10,2009.
Robert W. Germaine
As Clerk of the Court


QUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


VIVIENDA EQUITATIVA7 IGUALDAD DE
OPORTUNIDADES PARA TODOS

Aviso al Publico del CONDADO DE HIGHLANDS
Es Legal y esta prohibldo discriminar por concept de raza, color, religl6n, g6nero (sexo)
Origen naclonal, edad, Impedimento fisico o estado familiar al moment do rentar
comprar o financier una propledad.
liUsted tone Derechosll Si used entiende que han discriminado en su contra al moment de
� comprar o rentar una propledad comuniquese con Teresa Hf del Condado de Highlands

Teresa Hofer
Especialista de Vivienda
Condado de Highlands
(863) 402-6917
501 S. Commerce Ave. Annex
Sebring, Fl 33871-1926
ihoferhcc.om

El Condado de Highlands es defensor de la Vivienda Equitativa, como se explican en las leyes
de Vivienda Equitativa del Condado de Highlands Is cual define los pass a seguir
para reporter discriminaci6n.
Copla de las leyes soe pueden obtener en el Ayuntamienro a Alcaldla de la diudad.
Le Informnacin sobre Vivienda Equitative y la ley de Viviends Equiativa tambi6n se puede
obtener
Comunicandose a travel de to line de Ditecrminac6n. 1-800-669-9777
(Voice) 1-800-927-9275 (TTY) o via Red de la Internet:
http://www.hud.aovloffices/fheojndex.cfm


.










Page 14A

1050 Legal
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
June 19, 26, 2009


THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 28-2008-CA-000617
U.S. BANK NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR
J.P. MORGAN MORTGAGE
ACQUISITION TRUST 2006-WF1,
Plaintiff,
vs.
EDWARD WATERS, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
June 9, 2009 and entered in Case No. 28-
2008-CA-000617 of the Circuit Court of the
TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS
County, Florida wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR J.P. MOR-
GAN MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST 2006-
WF1, is the Plaintiff, and EDWARD WATERS;
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EDWARD WA-"
TERS; are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and t st bidder forcash at JURY AS-
SEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE
HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430
SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on
the 7th day of July, 2009, the following de-
scribed property as set. fortthin.sad ..Final-
Judgment:
A STRIP OF LAND 50 FEET IN WIDTH.OFF
OF THE EAST SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DE-
SCRIBED -TRACT OF LAND:- COMMENCE AT -
THE NORTHEAST CORNER (2 1/2 INCH PIPE)
OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 15,
TOWNSHIP 36 SOUTH,. RANGE 29 EAST;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 2 DEGREES WEST
ALONG THE LAND-LINE -388 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE SOUTH SIDE OE-A. ROAD;
THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 15 MINUTES
WEST 502 1/2 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE SOUTH 7 DEGREES PLUS
OR MINUS EAST 246 FEET PLUS OR MINUS
TO A POINT ON THE NORMAL WATERS EDGE
.OF LAKE FRANCIS; THENCE SOUTH 61 DE-
GREES 45 MINUTES WEST 196.6 FEET TO
THE OLD CORNER (2 1/2 INCH PIPE) AT
NORMAL WATERS EDGE OF. LAKE FRANCIS;
THENCE TRUE NORTH 257 FEET TO A POINT
ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE ROAD; THENCE
NORTH 59 DEGREES 15 MINUTES EAST 167
1/2 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING, ALL LY-
ING AND BEING IN THE NORTHEAST QUAR-
TER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SEC-
TION 15, TOWNSHIP 36 SOUTH, RANGE 29
EAST, HIGHLANDS COUNTY,_.FLORIDA, LESS
AND EXCEPT ROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY.
AK/A 484 LAKE FRANCIS ROAD, LAKE
PLACID, FL 33852
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, 'if .any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the.Lis Pen-
dens must file a claim within sixty (60) days
after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on June 11, 2009.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F08037655 NMNC-CONV-R-khartmaier;
**Spe Americans with Disabilities Act
In accordance with the Americans Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceed-
ing should contact the individual or agency
sending the noticeat Echevarria & Associates,
P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018,
telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than sev-
en (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing
impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via.Florida Relay Service.
June 19,26,2.009


-News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


1050 Leg
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 28-2008-CA-000918
CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR
CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF STRUCTURED
ASSET MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2007-AR6, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-AR6,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LAURA MAPPE, et. al.,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No.
28-2008-CA-000918 of the Circuit Court of
the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGH-
LANDS County, Florida, wherein, CITIBANK,
N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR CERTIFICATEHOLD-
ERS OF STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE IN-
VESTMENTS II TRUST 2007-AR6, MORT-
GAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SER-
IES 2007-AR6, Plaintiff, and, LAURA MAPPE,
et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest
bidder for.cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN
THE BASEMENT AT COURTHOUSE, 430 COM-
MERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870, Flori-
da, at the hour of 1fl:00 a.m., on the 7th day
of July, 2009, the following described proper-
ty:
LOT 26, BLOCK 270, SUN 'N LAKE ES-
TATES OFSEBRING UNIT-T3, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK.9, PAGE 71, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
-plus.fromtthe sale, iLany, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the lis pe'dens
must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
DATED this 12th day of June, 2009.
- - ROBERT W.-GERMAINE
Clerk Circuit Court
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
June 19, 26, 2009
.-.... -IN-THE-GIRCUIT-COUBT.. _
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION .
CASE NO. 2009-458-GCS
CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs .
DEBBIE L. MARASIGAN; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF DEBBIE L. MARASIGAN;
BAYANI H. MARASIGAN; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF BAYANI H. MARASIGAN;
IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER
OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS;
PALISADES COLLECTION LLC, ASSIGNEE OF
PROVIDIAN; ALL AMERICAN FINANCIAL
ASSOCIATES INC.; SEBRING RIDGE
PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION INC;
WHETHER DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY
EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR
TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANTS) AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANTSS;
UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a
'Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure en-
tered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit
Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell
' the property situate in Highlands County, Flor-
ida, described as:
Lot 842, SEBRING RIDGE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION D, according to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 14, of the Pub-
lic Records of Highlands County, Florida.
A/K/A
4918/4920 Salmon Drive
Sebring, FL 33870
ji public .3ale, to the highest and best bid-


1050 Legal
der, for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in
the basement of the Highlands County Court-
house located at 430 South Commerce Ave-
nue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 AM, on July 7,
2009.
DATED THIS 9TH DAY OF JUNE, 2009.
Any person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this
court on the 9th day of June, 2009.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra l
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Attorneys for Plaintiff
In accordance with the American with Disabili-
ties Act of 1990, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceed-
ing should contact the ASA Coordinator no
later than seven (7) days prior to the proceed-
ings. If hearing impaired, please call (800)
955-9771 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.
June 19, 26, 2009

IN-THE CIRCUIT COURT -
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 2009-451-GCS
HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CLARI ALFONSO A/K/A CARl ALFONSO; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CLARI ALFONSO
A/K/A CARI ALFONSO; RICHARD VENEGAS;
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RICHARD
VENEGAS; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS,
IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE .. ....
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER
OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS;
UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a
Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure en-
tered in, the above-styled cause, in the Circuit
Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell
the property situate in Highlands County, Flor-
ida, described as:
Lot 7, Block V, SPRING LAKE VILLAGE V,
according to the plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 10, Page 23, of the Public Records
of Highlands County, Florida.
A/K/A
6925 Parkwood Street
Sebring; FL 33876
at public sale, to the highest and best bid-
der, for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in
the basement of the Highlands County Court-
house located at.430 South Comjnerce Ave-
nue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 AM, on July 7,
2009.
DATED THIS 9TTH DAY OF JUNE, 2009.
Any person claiming an interest in the
surplus, from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this
court on the 9th day of June, 2009.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Attorneys for Plaintiff
In accordance with the American with Disabili-
ties Act of 1990, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceed-


GARAGE SALE


(6 lines of copy - additional lines $1 each)

2 Day Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11.5(

3 Day Rate . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . ... $14.0(



MISC. MERCHANDISE OVER $500


)

)


2 WEEK SPECIAL (6 PUBS) . m..... $15.50

(5 lines of copy - additional lines $3 each)



REAL ESTATE - EMPLOYMENT


TRANSPORTATION - ETC


2 WEEK SPECIAL (6 PUBS) ....... $29.50

1 MONTH SPECIAL (14 PUBS)..... $67.00

(5 lines of copy - additional lines $3 each)


ADD A BORDER - ATTENTION GETTER - LOGO

For Just A Little More And Make

Your Ad Pop!!!

BARGAIN BUYS

PRIVATE INDIVIDUALS, may place (5) ads per
month for items under $500 at no charge. Ads
will be limited to 3 lines (approx. 20 words). NO
PHONE CALLS PLEASE. **Items not accepted
in the Bargain Buys: Live animals or plants.


1050 --,
ing should contact the ASA Coordinator no
later than seven (7) days prior to the proceed-
ings. If hearing impaired, please call (800)
955-9771 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.
* June 19, 26, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 09-003-GCS
TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE
CORP.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CELIA VEGA AK/A CELIA F. VEGA; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF CELIA VEGA A/K/A CEL-
IA F.
VEGA; LISVANYS SORMELLER; UNKNOWN.
SPOUSE OF LISVANYS SORMELLER; IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED,
AND. IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN.HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHERPERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR


1050 Legal
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS;
UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a
Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure en-
tered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit
Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell
the property situate in Highlands County, Flor-
ida, described as:
Lot 9, Block 60, 'of Sebring Country Es-
tates, Section Three, according to the plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 9, Page 6, of
the Public Records of Highlands County, Flori-
da.
A/K/A
4701 Shamrock Street
Sebring, FL 33872
at public sale, to the highest and best bid-
der, for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in
the basement of the Highlands County Court-
house located at 430 South Commerce Ave-
nue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 AM, on June
26, 2009.
DATED THIS 29TH DAY OF MAY, 2009. -
Clerk of the Circuit Court
ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak


HANDYMAN BOB
Install doors, windows,
flooring, minor electric &
plumbing and more!
Licensed & Insured ,
Call 863-452-5201
or
863-449-1744

CAMPBELL'S COLLISION
CENTERINC
,, JIM CMPBELL - Owner

,. ,<0


Phone t8631 382-7551
FAX 1.863) 382-2750


1-405 LS 27 North
Sebnng. FL 33870


- Paw-per's Choice
Dog Grooming
yal Groomrq 4 PawoEr Car, Affora

(863) 449-4444
Taragayle Mitchell
Hours by Appointment Only


S Advertise

Your Business

Here!

NewsSun,
Call 385-615


TAX SERVICES
Semi-retired Certified Public
Accountant available for
tax and accounting services.
Reasonable fees.
Expert services.

863-465-1124


TRACTOR SERVICES

* Bush Hogging

* Box Blading

* Light Land Clearing

863-449-0114

NOBODY BEATS OUR PRICES AND QUALITY

0 Floors Cpt* T.e Lamuutne W

And - -y- - Mr

Blinds
"WE HAVE YOU COVERED-
DANIEL EPLEY 1114 Lakeview Dr
863-385-1500 Sebring, FL 33870

The Key to your Security
is who has a key to your
home or office.
Re-key now.

Call Bryan @ AHM Door & Lock




LOSE WEIGHT/
GET HEALTHIER
New Classes Every Monday
10:00 am OR 6:00 pm
I lost 155 lbs. in 12 months!
Will teach you how.
CALL ME: 863-414-4066
F s -'_________- - -


0.


www.newssun.com

1050 - ~
Deputy Clerk
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Attorneys for Plaintiff
In accordance with the American with Disabili-
ties Act of 1990, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceed-
ing should contact the ASA Coordinator no
later than seven (7) days prior to the proceed-
ings. It hearing impaired, please call (800)
955-9771 (TODD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.
June 12,19, 2009
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS hereby given that Downtown Mini
Storage LLC will sell at public auction at 195
S.- Railroad Ave., Avon Park, FL at 1:00p.m.
Saturday, June 20, 2009 to the highest bidder.
Items held for Altus Lee; microwave, 2 tv's,
bedroom set, linens & a radio. Items held for
Frances Vassall Miranda; tools, ladder, win-
dows, furniture, books & bedding. Items helf
for Bryana Roper; mirror, oriental rug, enter-
tainment center, full-size mattress & box
spring, sofa & love seat, end tables, chairs .&
dresser.
. .. June 17,19, 2009


JExterminating, Inc.
? . 863 385-0404
Now Offering:

.f f -Nuisance
Control and
L Removal


7 Advertise
Your Business

Here!

NewsSimn

Call 385-615


Is your front door
leaking?
Does it stick?
Maybe it is rotten?
Call Bryan @ AHM Door & Lock

863-452-1108

DAVE'S HOME
" NTENANCE
q' 1 Interior/Exterior
Basic Home Repairs, Handyman
Kitchen/Bath Remodels
Mobile Home Repairs
Licensed and Insured
Call 863-441-5135

FREEDOM LAWN CARE
Senior Discount
Professional Service
Low Prices
Landscaping
Free Estimate
Licensed and Insured
CALL 863-655-2526


Pampered


, !* * Pet Grooming
* Animal Training
* Animal Photography


863-253-0838


PRIVATE DUTY CARE
For Elderly or Companionship
In Your Own Home.
Excellent References i13tears I lobi
Please Call

863-873-1215

TTOPSOIL - Fill - Lakes
Backhoe, Loader
Trash Trucks & Dump Trucks

Demolition & Land
Clearing, Inc.
Chris Adkins - Owner
384-15 Taylor Rd Tel. 941-322-0514
Myakka City, FL 34251 Cell: 941-809-2798

a



ftmerica FirsfM
Air Conditioning & Heating
Residential & Commercial
Santiago Gomez
(863) 453-4741
Licensed & Insured
Lic. No. CAC058656


p ROFEkSINAL TPERL CEECTORY











www.newssun.com


1050 .Legs
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 08-1365-GCS
TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE
CORP.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RICK BENNETT; THE'UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
RICK BENNETT; MICHELLE R. LAPLANTE;
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHELLE R.
'LAPLANTE; THOMAS A. LAPLANTE; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF THOMAS A.
LAPLANTE; RANDY A. BEAN; IF LIVING,
INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND IF
-DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS;
UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a
-Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure en-
,tered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit
Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell
.the property situate In Highlands County, Flor-
ida, described as:
Lot 9, Block 36, of DESOTO CITY SEC-
0ND SUBDIVISION; according to the plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39,
of the Public Records of Highlands County,
florida.
A/K/A
6808 County Road 17 South
Sebring, FL 33876
at public sale, to the highest and best bid-
der, for cash, In the Jury Assembly Room in
the basement of the Highlands County Court-
'house located at 430 South Commerce Ave-
,nue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 AM, on June
26, 2009.
" DATED THIS 29TH DAY OF MAY, 2009.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
.Tampa, FL 33619-1328
-Attorneys for Plaintiff
3n accordance with the American with Disabili-
ties Act of 1990, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceed-
ing should contact the ASA Coordinator no
later than seven (7) days prior to the proceed-
ings. If hearing impaired, please call (800)
955-9771 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
,via Florida Relay Service.
June 12,19, 2009
Te ~ NOTICE OF SALE
The following vehicles will be sold at pub-
lic sale or auction to satisty lien pursuant to
,Chapter 713.78(2) of the Florida statutes at
'10:00 a.m. on 7/2/2009 At 1118 WEIGLE
'AVE., Sebring, FL 33870.
'1993 CHEVY " 2GBEG25K7P4138613
S SALE DATE 7/5/09
1984 OLDS 1 G3AR69A7EM388756
SALE DATE 7/13/09
1989 FORD 1 FABP50U9KA291346
SALE DATE 7/17/09
,1996 ACUR JH4UA3655TC012178
SALE DATE 7/24/09
2001 UTILITY 1UYVS25371C524603
June 19, 2009


NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT
bF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS
'COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER AMEND-
)IENT'OF-SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 7.70 AND
,NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board
of Highlands County is developing an amend-
, nent to School Board Rule 7.70, Purchasing
Manual. The Board will discuss/approve future
;tlans to amend the purchasing manual at a
regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, Ju-
ly 7, 2009, at 9:00 a.m. in the Board Meeting
Room, George Douglass Administration Build-
ing, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If re-
:quested by an affected person In writing with-
in 14 days of the date of.this notice, a rule de-
'velopment workshop will be. noticed in a local
,newspaper. The request must be submitted to
Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street,
'Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of
'the proposed amendment is to modify the
:adopted purchasing, manual pursuant to re-
.cent legislative guidelines. A summary of the
'proposed rule or amendment Includes
,changes to the policy as follows: Florida Stat-
'utes, State Board of Education rules, School
.Board rules and administrative procedures
,shall be carefully observed when making any
purchases. The District shall recognize pur-
,chasing terms as defined by law and rule.
'Competitive solicitations shall be requested
'for all purchases that exceed the monetary
'threshold unless exempted, bylaw or rule.
Further, the local vendor preference policy is
4o be modified to allow any local vendor that
Js within 5% of the lowest bid submitted to
,match the lowest bid and-be awarded the con-
tract. The remainder of said policy shall re-
dmain the same. The specific legal authority in-
cludes Sections 337.11(5)(a) and 1001.42,
'lorida Statutes. The School District believes
'that the proposed rule or amendment will
'have no effect on small business. The School
'District believes that the proposed rule or
amendment will not 'result In substantial in-
,crease in costs or prices paid by consumers,
'individual industries or state or local govern-
Mrent agencies, and will not result in signifi-
cant adverse effects on competition, employ-
bnent, investment, productivity, Innovation or
International trade and/or alternative ap-
proaches to the regulatory objective either do
;not exist and/or are precluded by law. The
,ost to the School District of promulgating the
proposed rule or amendment Is estimated to
'e $150. The estimated annual cost of imple-
imenting and enforcing the'"proposed rule or
amendment Is $0. The 'text of the proposed
5ule or amendment can be obtained at the Su-
'perintendent's office, George Douglass Ad-
'ninistration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey),
.426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between
1he hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday
through Friday.
'THESCHOOL BOARD
3OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,
'BY: Wally Cox


News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


1050 Legals
Superintendent & ex officio secretary
June 19, 2009



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-001285
GREAT FLORIDA BANK
Plaintiff
vs.
SAMUEL CASASNOVAS, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice Is hereby given that, pursuant to a
Final Judgment of Foreclosure or Order dated
May 28th, 2009, entered in Civil Case Number
28-2008-CA-001285, in the Circuit Court for
HIGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein GREAT
FLORIDA BANK is the Plaintiff, and SAMUEL.
CASASNOVAS, et al., are the Defendants,. I will
sell the. property situated In HIGHLANDS
County, Florida, described as:
Lots 17 & 18, Block 6, HIGHLANDS PARK
ESTATES Section G, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded In Plat Book 4, Page 96,
of the Public Records of Highlands County,
Florida. "
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder,
for cash, at Jury Assembly Room, in Base-
ment of Highlands County Courthouse, 430
South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33871,
at 11:00 a.m. on the 26th day of June, 2009.
Dated: May 29, 2009.
. Robert W. Germaine
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak,
Deputy Clerk
June 12,19, 2009,

1055 Highlands
I1055 County Legals
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
LEGAL NOTICES
The following legal notices are from the Highlands
County Boeard of County Commissioners and are be-
specifications

1100 Announcements


CHECK


YOUR AD
Please check your ad on the first day
it rurrs to make sure it is correct.
Sometimes instructions over the
phone are misunderstood and an er-
ror can occur. If this happens to you,
please call us the first day your ad
appears and we will be happy to fix
it as soon as we can.
If We can assist you, please call us:
385-6155--452-1009
465-0426
News-Sun Classified


1500 Child Care Services
SUMMER SPECIAL After School Daycamp
H & M Learning Center. Mon-Fri, 7 am - 5pm.
$45 per week; includes breakfast, 2 snacks &
lunch. Activities include trip to Summer Mati-
nee & Bowling Center. 863-201-9200


2000
Employment


2100 Help Wanted
15 PEOPLE WANTED to lose up to 30 lbs. in
30 Days! 100% Guaranteed!
- Dr. Recommended!
337-463-9306 or 1-800-218-6905
Toll Freel www .rlbestlifenow.com


* General Labor - Construction
* CDL-A w/Hazmat
* Light Industrial -All Shifts
* Carpenters w/Tools
*Equipment Operators

Daily Work, Daily Pay
Report Ready To Work
6:00 A.M. Daily
Office Hours 6:00 A.M. - 6 P.M.

3735 Kenilworth Blvd.
471-2774
EOE/Drug Free Workplace


CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES
LIFESTYLE. a growing company with brand
new offices, seeks 55 Customer Service
Reps to fill a crucial role in our company.
The-successful candidates will be ambitious,
hard working, friendly, outgoing and a team
player. Please contact via email with your
resume to: employment@llfestyles.com
for consideration. Benefits also available.


2100 HelpWanted
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for Receptionist
position at small animal clinic. Experience
preferred but will train the right person.
Apply at: 11751 Twitty Road, Sebring.
No phone calls please.
FULL TIME OFFICE HELP NEEDED
Job still open. Computer skills..
863-465-2303
LPN FOR top-rated intermediate care facility
serving developmentally disabled adults.
Family-centered, casual work environment.
Second and third shift slots available.
Paid training. Call 863-452-5141. EOE.





MAINTENANCE PERSON needed for
apartment complex, must be skilled and have
experience in electrical, plumbing,
and HVAC, certification a plus.
Please fax your resume to 561-258-0188
MYSTERY SHOPPERS earn up to $100 per
day, undercover shoppers needed to judge
retail and dining establishments.
Experience not required, Call 888-534-5004
NOW HIRING Account Manager for RENT
KING, must be able to lift 50 pounds,
applicants must be at least 21 years old and
possess a clean FL drivers license with no
more than 6 pts. Spanish is a plus.
RENT KING, 810 U.S. 27 S., Avorr Park.
Please appolv in person. 863-453-2400
OPHTHALMIC ASSISTANT and Receptionist.
Full Time / Part Time for busy
eye clinic. Send resume to:
211 U.S. 27 South
Lake Placid, FL 33852
PROPERTY MANAGER needed for 38 unit US-
DA property, must be experienced, have good
people & computer skills, fax resume to 561-
258-0188
RN WANTED for fast-paced medical
oncology/hematology office and treatment
center. Full time, Monday-Friday,
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Competitive benefits "
and salary. Must be a self-starter and
able to multi-task. Fax resume to the office
of Amit I. Shah, M.D., P.A. @ 863-385-6086.

RN, second shift charge nurse for top-rated
Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility serving
developmentally disabled adults.
Family-centered, casual work environment.
Previous supervisory experience a must.
Developmental Disabilities experience
preferred. Paid training, generous PTO,
majpr, medical, dental, 401(k) and more!
Call 863-452-5141 today! EOE


~w


Salon seeking self-motivated, enthusiastic,
responsible individuals. Full-time hair stylist,
barber, and nail technician positions available.
Call 863-385-1429 or 305-781-3487.
SELF-STORAGE RELIEF MANAGER - Century
Storage seeking motivated individual with
great customer service and computer skills.
Part-time, 1 day a week and vacation
coverage, Apply at century-storage.com or
fax to 863-648-0190


3000
Finiancial


3200 Investments
REPUTABLE, local, long-time real.estate
buyer looking for private financing. Will pay
7% for 5 years, secured by a 1st mortgage
and will personally sign promissory note.
Local attorney will handle paperwork.
References will be provided from other
private lenders. Call 863-381-1848


4040 Homes For Sale
NEVER MISS KNOWING about another new
foreclosure listing or Highlands Counties Best
Deals!! To sign up to receive these daily in
your email inbox, contact me and I'll
personally see to it! Call me at 863-381-0400
or send me an email immediately at
dawndelll@omail.com. Country Club Realty
4080 Homes for Sale
4080 Sebring
SEBRING 4 Units for sale. 2-story Town-
homes, 3BR, 2.5BA, 1944 sq ft per unit. Fully
Rented! $495,000. 863-655-0311.
1A Homes for Sale
4100 Lake Placid
NEW MODEL
REDUCED BY $81K. Split Plan
3BR, 2BA, 2CG, Lg. Screened Porch,
Cathedral Ceilings, Plant Shelves, Very
Large Rooms: Walking distance to
Placid Lakes Park and Boat Ramp.
Deeded Lake June access.
NOW $199,000
',620 CATFISH CREEK ROAD
PLACID LAKES SUBDIVISION
Meyer Homes, Inc.
863-414-4075 or 863-465-7338

4 1 7O Lakefront Property
41 0 J For Sale


417 For Sale
AVON PARK HISTORIC LAKE BYRD
100 ft Lakefront; Lake View & Lake Access.
Ready to build, startling @$59,000.
Financing available. Only 2 miles N.
of Downtown Avon Park. on US 27.
Call David @ 863-452-2536.


5000
Mobile Homes

5050 Mobile Homes
For Sale
1 & 2 BEDROOM homes avail. in Senior Adult
rental park, friendly park, planned activities,
close to shopping and hospital, reasonable lot
rent, SWG incl. Call for info 863-385-7034
AVON PARK - Villa Del Sol Adult Community,
2BR'2BA fully furnished, $17,500, golf cart in-
cluded for an additional $1,300, call 863-453-
4234 or 501-253-1962
Foreclosures, Dealer Repo's, & Short Sales
Singles, Doubles, Modulars
On Your Lot
LOW Interest Rates
1-800-622-2832
Palm Harbor 3/2 Singlewide
Introductory Model $299/mo wac
On Your Lot
10 models to choose from .
Call 1-80-622-2832 ext. 210





SEBRING - Your chance to retire in your own
retreat on one of the purest lakes in Central
Florida. Fisherman's paradise, handyman's
dream, we have a mobile home waiting for
your love and creative genius at a 55+ park.
Call Tim and Coral at 863-382-1914


SO Mobile Homes
5150 For Rent
SEBRING - 55+ community, Whispering Pines
Village, 2BR, 1 A, fully furnished, use of pool
and all facilities. $500 mo. + security-
Small pet OK. Call 863-385-8806


6000
Rentals


6050 Duplexes for Rent
Lake Placid - Waterfront 2BR/2BA duplex
on canal to Lake Grassy. W/D, dishwasher,
covered dock, lawn. service & water included.
No pets, no smokers. $600/mo. +sec.
al 954-661-6117 or 954-661-6118
SEBRING - 2BR 1 BA Large Duplea w/den or
office room, very clean, just remodeled 2
Years ago. Will be available June 15.
$600/mo w/$500 security.
Please call for appointment 954-410-8844



SEBRING- SPRING LAKE
, SPACIOUS 2/BR .2/BA. Adults
preferrednon-smoking, no pets.
1st, last & sec. $600/mo. 863-655-0451

Unfurnished i
6200 Apartments
$500, AND $300 SECURITY MOVES YOU IN!
Duplex, 2 br/1ba, near Sebring High
School/Fred Wild Elementary. Washer/dryer
hookup, back porch. 1 year lease..385-8209.

*** Key Lake Villas***
Sebring- Orange Blossom Estates
2/1 townhouses on Lake.
Clean, quiet, screened in porch,
outside patio, W/D hookup. $585.
1st month & sec. (863) 465-2740
AVON PARK - Apartment with balcony
overlooking Lake Verona and City Park
Laundry Facilities, $365/mo.
100 E. Main St:
863-453-8598
BEAUTIFUL APTS
2BR 1 BA, till floors, air conditioned, screen
back porch, beautiful landscaping $695 mo.
Pets OK, 3106 Medical Way. (6i34E6822


HOPE VILLAS NOW RENTING
2 & 3 Bedroom Apts. Monthly rent
beginning at $519 plus utilities. Applicants
must be employed in Farm/Grove Labor
receiving minimum annual gross income
$3998. Rental Assistance Available to
Qualified Applicants. Handicap units available.
Rental Info & Applications. Hope Villas, 2300
Hope Circle, Sebring, FL- Call'863-382-3144;
(TOODD 1-800-955-8771) Mon - Fri, 9 am 5
pm. Equal Opportunity Provider & Employer.

saia ~


LAKE PLACID. Large 2-Story 2BR 1.5BA
Townhome: Close to shopping & town.
Excellent condition. City water. $650.
Reference a must. 863-465-1758


'MOVE-IN
SPECIAL
$499.00
LEMON TREE APTS.
Single story 1 bedrooms w/private patio, re-
frig, stove, microwave, washer/dryer, WS(
Incl. Pets OK, quiet friendly Avon Park Com-
.munty Call 386-503-8953


Unfurnished
6200 Apartments
DINNER LAKE AREA, Sebring. 1 & 2 bedroom
apartments. $495 - $600/mo. Includes water,
large rooms, fresh paint & tile floors.
Call Gary, Johnson
@ 863-381-1861
SEBRING - 1BR, $125 weekly + sec. Includes
electric, cable & water. 863-414-0539 or 863-
414-1287
SEBRING Small 2BR, 1BA; $395/mo. 1BR,
1BA; $275/mo. 1BR, 1BA $345/mo. Lawn
maintenance included. Maintenance free. Kids
& Pet OK. Nice safe, family neighborhood
w/oaks & palms. 941-224-9756.

6300 unfurnished Houses
AVON PARK - Private Lake Front Estate, very
nice 2BR 1 BA home. Includes white sand
swimming beach, total lawn care, city water,
washer and dryer, Central Heat & Air,
Only $600/month. Call 863-452-2299
LAKE PLACID - Immaculate 3BR 2BA,
new carpeting, paint and appliances,
minutes from Lake June, lawn service
included, no smoke or pets, $750 month
+ security. Call 954-661-6118 or 6117
LAKE PLACID - Newer, Clean 3BR 2BA
Garage, Nice Location, Non-Smokers,
Call 863-441-2844 or
863-465-3838
LAKE PLACID- 997 Washington Blvd NW.
Lake Placid, Fl. 33852. Spacious 3BR, 2BA,
2CG, ready to movein: Screened In back
patio. $785/mo. Call 305-233-4622
SEBRING
2BR, 1BA, 1CG
3437 Sparta Circle,
$650/mo + $600 sec.
Call Steve, 863-385-3101.
SEBRING - 2BR 1BA home, Lake Josephine
Heights, ideal for retiree, like new
condition, fenced yard, $550 mo.
104 Leona Drive, 863-465-4328
SEBRING - 3BR 1 BA 1CG with extra lot,
120x100 fenced, 1 block from hospital and
Walmart, close to SFCC, $900 month,
863-458-0551

SEBRING - American Properties. We have
multiple houses for rent. New and remodeled.
2/BR 2BA and 3BR 2BA, from $690 and up.
In Sun 'n Lake area, close to Florida Hospital.
Call 863-382-2239 or 863-441-5637
SEBRING - CUTE 2BR. 1BA near
Fireman's Field. Carport, screened patio,
large back yard.....GREAT LOCATIONI
$650/mo., lease Opton, security required.
863-446-1861
SEBRING - Newly remodeled 2BR 2BA
4221 Elson Ave., $675 mo. + $600 sec., quiet
neighborhood, nice yard, off Golfview
Call Steve, 863-385-3101
SEBRING 3BR, 2BA, 1CG.
:$900 month, + 1st, last & security.
AVON PARK 3BR, 2BA. $650 month, + 1st,
last & security.
Call 863-385-2606, ask for Andres
SEBRING: LAKE JOSEPHINE HEIGHTS
LARGE 4BR. 2BA. family room,, dining
room, new tile floors, large yard.
$7 50/mo. 1st and last. 863-446-1861

L6AA Business & Offices
6600U For Rent
Downtown Sebring -1 Month Free Rentl!!
Limited time offer! Office space as low as
$199/mo. plus tai. Single & double room
suites. A/C, electric included. Full sized
elevator, access to conference room. Low
cost DSL available. 863-385-1705
www.halnzcenter.com

6750 Commercial Rental
DOWNTOWN SEBRING huge retail bay, 2,400
sq. ft., $995/mo., separate utlities,,12 ft.. ceil-
ings, office and storage included, 25 ft. front-
age near Dee's Place and Kids Museum, 863-
385-1705


7000

Merchandise


7030 EstateSales
PICADILLY LA. ANTIQUES. Estate Sale Prices!
Monday-Saturday, lOam-?, Lake.Brentwood
I Plaza just N. of Stryker Rd.
in Avon Park, 863-452-0859
SEBRING HILLS - 6 Generation MOVING
SALE! 238 Quail Ave., Antique trunks, turn,
vintage frames, linens, hhold goods, almond
appls., clothes, kids toys, videos & much
more! June 18, 19, 20, Thurs-Sat, 7am-2pm


7180 Fur-ure


CONSIGNMENTS ON SALE
MATTRESS SETS: Twin size, $135;
Full size, $165; Queen size, $195:
Recliner, $50; Leather adjustable
Recliner, $$295; Beautiful Sectional,
$395; 3-Pc End Table set, $95; 5-Pc
Bedroom set, $295; Rattan Bedroom
set, $295; Queen size Bedroom set,
$295; Queen Sleeper, $95; China
hutch, $85; Large Entertainment
Center, $150; Large Computer Desk,
$125; Florida style Sofa & Chair
(must be seen), $250; Florida print
Sofa, $95; Pair/Rattan trim Loveseats,
$150/Pr; Adjustable Electric Bed, $295.
These and many more
Consignments on Sale!


Page 15A


7300 Miscellaneous
FIREWOOD - FREE
American Legion Post #25,
Lake Placid, FL 33852.
863-699-6630
TREE TRIMMING EQUIPMENT
Make Reasonable Offer
863-655-0881


7310 BaJrin Buys
4 TON central air conditioner unit, new motor,
$400, 863-655-0881
50 HP outboard with controls, $250 obo, 863-
452-5201
BASEBALL CARDS, full case, unopened, 18
yrs. old, $20, 863-453-4234
BEDSIDE AND over toilet commode, new,
$50, 863-465-0747
BLUE WILLOW English China by Churchill. 42
pieces, $85, 863-655-3552
COMMERCIAL FREEZER, upright, 21 cu. ft.,
very good freezer, $150, 863-699-9961
DESK - Old Steel, $25, 863-441-2805
DIRT DEVIL upright vac, bagless w/powered
hand tool, like new, very nice, $25, 863-402-
2285
FILE CABINET - Old Steel, $25, 863-441-2805


FINE CHINA dishes, very old, pattern Tien-
shan, full set, no breaks or cracks, gold edge,
service for 8, $150, 863-453-4234


FOLDING TRANSPORT chairs, new light
weight, $125, 863-465-0747
FOOS BALL table & basketball game, $75 for
both OBO, 863-452-5201
FOSTORIA AMERICAN 14" Punch Bowl w/low
base, 12 cups and ladle. $350, 863-655-3552
KENMORE Bagless/Beltless upright vac with
powered hand tool, like new, very nice, $30,
863-402-2285
KITCHEN TABLE & 4 CHAIRS, MICA TOP,
$50, 863-441-2805
LIFT CHAIR platform & motor $100, 863-465-
0747
MICROWAVE, 'excellent condition, white,
above stove, $125, 863-441-2805
PARKER BUCKSHOT COMPOUND BOW,
$150, 863-385-8584
ROTOTILLER - $100 - 863-441-2805
TRAILER HITCH.and chrome pipe, running
boards, 1998 Ford F150, $100 obo, 863-452-
5201
TWO BLUE LAMPS, $8 EACH, 863-382-9774
WALKER ON wheels, seat & basket, $25, 863-
465-0747
WHEEL CHAIR - Like brand new, onlyIlZ7!
Please call 863-4713504 '
WHITE METAL daybed, used once, perfect
condition, $125,863-382-9774

7320 Gamge&YardSales
AVON 'PARK - 2401 W. Greenlawn Rd., Fri,
June 19, 8am-2pm, daybed w/trundle & bed-
ding, glider, silk trees. & plant shelf decor, la-
dies clothes XL, 20" TV, lots of great misc.
AVON PARK - Huge 2 family yard sale!!! 3104
N. Bowden Rd., Fri-Sat-Sun, June 19, 20, 21,
also Fri-Sat-Sun June 26, 27, 28, 8am-3pm,
Everything from kids clothes to toys to
furniture, etc. Something for everyone!
COLLINS ESTATE SALES: Fri, June 19, & Sat;
June 20,8am-4pm; Sun, June 21, 9m-2pm.
US 27, So. toUS 29 (at Sweetbay) to S. Sun
'n Lakes Blvad. to Autumn, to' 105 Autumn
Terr. Depression, Art, Mirrors, Clocks, Milita-
ry, Blue, Tools, Radial Arm & Band Saws,
Patio, Beds, Linens, Lingerie chests, Roll-Top
Desk, W/D, New Sofa. NO EARLY SALES!
SEBRING - 305 Stewart Dr., Sat, June 20,
8am-3pm, hold, furniture, lots of great
miscellaneous! No early birds!
SEBRING- 3338 Hope Street, Sat. June 20,
7am-5pm, men's, women's and kids clothes,
weight lifting equip., truck tool box, hhold,
'lots of miscellaneous. No early birds.
SEBRING -4060 Commercial Dr. behind Blue
Lagoon, Sat. June 20, 8am-2pm, electronics,
kitchenware, clothes,
Lots of great items for everyone!
SEBRING - HUGE ESTATE/GARAGE SALE,
Everything Must Go! Rain or Shine! 1719
Sunrise Place, (at the corner of Sunrise Place
& Beach)-Lake Jackson Heights, Fri-Sat,
June 19-20, 7am-4pm


7520 Pe&Swi
3 little kittens FREE to loving homes, 9 wks.
old, immunizations, 863-382-9111


8000
Recreation


8050 Boats & Moors
1991 REGAL 17 ft. inboard/outboard, 135 hp
good condition, asking $3,700 OBO
Please call 863-245-8576


Private, wooded
homesite w/great
access to 2 lakes!
Ready to build.
Owner will
finance.
SAVE
THOUSANDS!
Only One! Call Now!
1-866-352-2249


TANGLEWOOD - MUST SELL
Furniture & household Items, 36" TV,
Dining Room & Living Room Sets, Dishes
& Glassware. Most new & never used.
Best offer gets deal. 863-382-6514.
WEST COAST FURNITURE
now accepting quality
consignment items.
CALL 863-382-7666


7260 Musical Merchandise
HILL-GUSTAT MIDDLE SCHOOL NEEDS
DONATIONS OF YOUR ATTIC INSTRUMENTS!
Instruments will be cleaned, repaired, and put
In the hands of students who otherwise would
not be able to participate in band. Donors will
be offered a tax deduction letter for the esti-
mated value of the instrument. Thanks!!!!

7300 Miscellaneous
DEPENDABLE TRANSPORTATION needed for
shopping and Dr. Appts. 853-471-2302


8450 MoorHomes
1978 TITAN MOTORHOME
Good Air, $700 OBO, 863-381-9900

8500 car
CLUB CAR - 2000
Gas, excellent condition,
$1,850.
863-471.1238


9000

Transportation


9450 Automotive for Sale
1994 JEEP Wagon, 4-wheel drive, runs good,
$1,200, 863-273-0006 or 863-382-7760
1999 WHITE 4-door Alero, cold AC. new tires.
new battery, new tune-up, runs good and
looks good! $2,600 863-453-7218
2000 PONTIAC GRAND AM, Red with gray
cloth interior, sunroof, power windows, power
locks, 44K miles, fully maintained, $4,995
OBO, Call 863-452-6459


- . --i










Page 16A


Partly sunny, a t-storm
.y-'istNlliB;gs >


High9&Low71
Winds:W at 44 mph.


SATURDAY SUNDAY


MONDAY


News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


TUESDAY


A thunderstorm In the n afternoon thunder- Chance for an after- Some sun with a
""am9q . r , n.mw..-'-, ' - .... -P-SOW) .stoinmpos siIp


High 96/Low 76
Winds: SWat 4-84 mph.


ligh 95Low 78
Wlnds:W at 7-14 mph.


High 93/Low 7$
Winds: W at 8-16 mph.


ig "


High 89/Low 76
Winds: W at 10-20 mph.


.rM p.m.ioay
Relative humidity . . . ... 440%
Expected air temperature ...... 934.
Makes it feel like ... ... .. ....... 990
flitfstd lttv


A tornado struck New Brunswick.
N J., June 19, 1835, killing five peo-
ple and laying waste to a 17 5-mile-
long swath that ended at lower New
: York Bay.


Avon Park
;96fl2 ^
Sebring
ow9l1


Lake Placid Lorida b ,
94/73 96/71

f. .
S Venue s


Shown Is today's
father. Temperatures
e today's highs and
tonight's lows


Regional summary: Partly sunny today with a thunderstorm In the after-
noo , A thunderstorm in the evening; otherwise, mainly clear tonight Clouds
and sun tomorrow with a thunderstorm in the afternoon. Sunday: chance for


City . Hi Lo W HI Lo W HI Lo W
Daytona Beach 94 74 pc 94 76 t 94 74 pc
Ft. Laud Bch 88 78 pc 90 77 1 90 76 pc
Fon Myers -94 75 t 93 7t I 98 70 1 .
Ganeavlte 96 1pc 95 74 1 96 75po
Homestead APB 89 76 pc 89 76 i 89 76 pc
Jacksonville 98 75 t 97 77 s 99 75 pc
KeyWest . 80 t 88801 88 80t
Miai .9178pc 91 77 t 91,78 pc.,
Orlando 0 96 74 t �5 76 i 95 76 t
Ppnsacola 97 78 s 97 78 pc 93 76 8
pSare .. 91 79 1 90756 1 D 77
hitiassi ,O,10 P 7 *. 0" 74 89 97868
Tampa 93 78 i 92 77 I 92 76 I
W Paim Bcn 90 76 pc 91 77 I 90 76 pc


A ihunderstrn this after '-
noon. Winds west 4-8 mph.
Expect 6-10 hours of sunshine with
a 55% chance of precipitation and
average relative humidity 60%.


i your address house number) ends in
*-.,0 or 1, water only on Monday
S..2 or 3, water only on Tuesday
S..4 or 5, water only on Wednesday
S,.6 or 7, water only on Thursday
* .8 or 9*, water only on Friday
* and locations without a
discernible address


For oday
9a.m. 11 am. 1 p.m. 3p.m. 5p,m.
2 S 10 10 5
Trie ngner the Uv index number the greaser
the need for eye and skin protection..
0-k, Low; 3-5, Moderate; 6-7, High;
8-10, Very High; 11+ Extreme


www.newssun.com


SiM,


FRONTS
Cold
Warm
4", Stationary


National summary: Severe thunderstorms will spread across the Midwest today, bringing damaging winds, hail
and tornadoes from Missouri through to Indiana. Strong thunderstorms are also possible across Ohio into West
Virginia and southwestern Pennsylvania. Wet and cool weather will continue across much of New England, with
showers and thunderstorms across much of the mid-Atlantic. Showers and thunderstorms will also pop up across
the Upper Midwest. Some spotty showers will move Into the Pacific Northwest In the afternoon.


0000, - - - --" " -'
Today Sunrise ... 6:34 a.m.
Sunset ...... 8:21 p.m.
Moonrise .. 3:18 a.m.
Moonset .... 5:14 p.m.
Saturday Sunrise ... 6:34 a.m.
Sunset ...... 8:21 p.m.
Moonrise .. 4:07 a.m.
Moonset .... 6:23 p.m.





New First Full Last
June 22 June 29 July 7 July 15


. remperature
(Readings at Archbold ieologicl0 Station
In Lake Placd)
High Tuesday ........................ 97
Low Tuesday ....:.................... .. 69
High Wednesday .................. 94
Low Wednesday ................... 68
High Thursday ...................... 94
Low Thursday ....................... 68
Precipitation
Tuesday ...................... 0.12"
Wednesday ..................... 0.28"
Thursday ...... .................. 0.31"
Month to date ........... 2.96"
Year to date ........ ....... .... 11.55"
Barometer
Tuesday .............. ..... 29.91
Wednesday ...............; ....... 29.96


"-. f-"- " *" l-. -:"' -- ' - - ';'. ' . .Y- - -: W ! -1-5b8 IM
T-y ... morriow unday Today Tomorrow Sunday Today Tomorrow Sunday
City HI Lo W HI Lo W HI Lo W City HI Lo W HI Lo W HI Lo W City HI Lo W HI Lo W HI Lo W
Albuqueque 87 62 1 89 64 t 93 65 po Honoluilu 88 76 6 87 76 8 ..88 75 p ewtYorkiOy 78 6 c, 74 65 1t 7565 pc
AdIha t . & .874a.a 6 7 pc 93 72 per Houston 96 77P B77 , 95 77 a- Nork 86731 97 1t-- 87 1 pc
Baltimore 84 68 c 87 67 1 82 63pc Inadianapolie 93 72 t 85 67 t 84 68 pc OPklanomB C.ty 94 71 i 93 73 pc 95 72 s
Birmingham 98 72 s 92 73 pc 93 73 s Jacksonville 98 75 I 97 77 s 99 75 pc Pr.hvdelpnia 83 66 c 83 66 t 83 66 pc
Bo"n7 72 62 r 71 60 r 71 82 c KansO City 92 69 89 70 t1 9P 73 t Phoan 102 78s 103 1678 a 103 80 a
Charotte' 66 71 s 95 89 po 91 83.1 Leaongton 95 72 pc 92 69 t 84 67 1 Pittlbrgh 82 60 1 8062 t 808s0 ce
Cheyenne 77 52 s 77 52 I 8 '54 pc Litle Rock 97 75 S 98 76 pc 96 73 s Portland 65 58 r 68 57 r 76 58 c
Chicago 87 67 t 80 62 sn 83 62 pc Los Angeles 79 6 dpc 76 62 pc 76 62 pc PRle;gh 94 71 1 99 72 pc 92 70 pc
Cleveland 8270 1 79-21 se 79 63 pc Luisville 87 77 p 93 73 t 88 71 t Rochester' 73 60 69 62 sh 0 5 pPC
COlumbium ' i f 1 8,f 4 64 sh .1 65 pc Memphis oA 77 s 97 76 pc 95 78 s SI. LoLs 97 75 1 88.22 t 90 74-t
Dallas 97 75 s 99 77 pc 96 77 s Miami 91 78 pc 91 77 t 91 78 pc San Francisco 72 54 s 69 53 pc 70 53 s
Denver 81 55 s 83 55 t 91 57 pc Minneapolis 84 64 t 84 66 s 85 67 pc Seattle 67 52 pc 64 52 c 66 51 c
Detavit 8 8268 t 78 D M 8464 p4 c INaslidle 97 74 s 95 71 t 91 72 pc Tampa 93 76 t 92 77t. 92 761.
Hoisbur' 6 83.? ,c . S 6OS t 82 iI pa New rOeans 9677s 94 77 8 .9 78 ' Washington, 8 75 . 92 70 t 84 69 pc


Thursday ....... . . 2992
Tides
(Readings at St Petersburg)
High ...................... 1:06 a.m.
Low ........................4:15 a.m.
High ............................ 10:53 a.m.
Low ....................... 7:04 p.m.
(Readlngs at Palm Beach)
High .......................... 5:45 a.m.
Low .......................... 11:56 a.m.
High ..................... 6:45 p.m.
Low ................................. none
Lake Levels
Lake Jackson .................... 78.36'
Lake Okeechobee ...... 1.90'
Normal .......................... 14.51'


City HI LoDW City HI Lo W
Acapulco 90 75 t .London 70 50 pc
Berlin 65 48 sh Montreal 72 61 C
Calgary I. Q 46 pc Nace 80 83 a
Dublin * g ap 0S awb 3 ,
Edmonton 73 41 1 Quebec 68 55 sh
Freeport 88 75 t Rio ae Janero 77 66
Qenew a 4 449 r f 61 50 s
HoogKtif r w$ t TOo - 71 1ti#
Jerusalem 84 61 s Vancouvei 74 56 pc
Kiev 78 61 pc Winnipeg 79 62 t
Weather (W): a-sunny; pc-partly cloudy, e-cloudy,
shshhowers, t-tunderstorms, r-rain, at-snow flurries, -
an-snow, I-ice.


Dad's earned it, every chocoa e-covered bit of it.


MN any mamste apiAl with EdibloAmogema
OW awMeBite weemt pmiwA -m ItI M gwm % (A

-8Q7-IoqWWt ( 868-78489 t *i $ gle anYMWtsWcow
14?77.Do.Ru4(1.87.363.7848) '- hlftunpmoonts-com


.
*w


dclible
ARRANGEMENTS


Fountain Plaza
; 229 US, Hwy 27 N,

SSobrlngFL

St L(86)3812800

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SECTION -




SPORTS

News-Sun


PAGE


LIVING



Friday, June 19, 2009


Early risers work through summer break


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newssun.com
SEBRING - Summer
break for high school stu-
dents is often thought of as
'time off.'
Time off from the alarm
clock signaling another early
awakening, time off from
responsibilities and a strict
schedule.
It's often thought of as a
time to take in the summer
sun in a relaxing manner, not
soaking one's shirt with
sweat while training under it.
But for Sebring athletes,
the summer break is a signal
to start doing just that - and
while it's not always easy to
get up for a 7:30 a.m. work-
out, the Sebring High School
Girls' Summer Conditioning
program is booming.
"Conditioning started the
first Monday of summer
break and is every Monday,
Tuesday and Thursday,"


Lady Blue Streak volleyball
player Jaye Whitehead said.
"The turnout, so far, has been
awesome. Much better than
last year."
That's because in years'
past, it was more a matter of
having a.few volleyball play-
ers here, a few basketball
players there, but that has
changed.
"Pretty much girls from all
the different sports have
come out for it," training
leader and girls basketball
coach Mike Lee said. "What
we do here is something that
benefits all sports with help-
ing agility, strength and
stamina."
The . training schedule
bears out the diverse and
beneficial nature of the pro-
gram.
"Monday we do long-dis-
tance running' and intervals,
Tuesday's we do agility
drills, plyometric workouts


INews-sun photo oy LAIN nuEniLH
The SHS Girls' Summer Conditioning has seen it's number of participants growing as Lady Blue Streaks from all sports
seek to better themselves for the coming seasons.


(jump training), speed drills
and also weightlifting and on
Thursday's we run sprints
and bleachers," Whitehead
said. "It's always challenging


and at the end of every day
we record our progress so by
the time it ends at the begin-
ning of school, we can see
how dedicated we really


were."
More than 30 Lady Blue
Streaks were out in the early
morning sunshine Thursday,
and that wasn't even the full


roster of participants.
The reasons for each
young lady taking part may

Continued on page 3B


Red Devils honored on


"Sports


Talk"


Courtesy photo
Avon Park High School wrestling coaches Ed Brown, left, and Lee Elder, right, were hon-
ored on the June 13 "Sports Talk" show as the 2008-09 Highlands County Co-Coaches of
the Year. James Bland, center, and Jace Grimmett, not pictured, were named the
Highlands County Co-Athletes of the Year. Bland and Grimmett each won individual state
championships this past season and have received scholarships to wrestle for Newberry
College next year. The "Sports Talk" show airs Saturday's immediately following the Noon
News on WWTK-730 AM.





Peregrine falcon delisted as an

endangered species


myFWC.com
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC)
approved removal of the
peregrine falcon from the
state's list of endangered
species on Wednesday.
"Today is a time to cele-
brate peregrine falcons," said
Rodney Barreto, FWC chair-
man. "This is a tremendous
success story."
Through the efforts of
wildlife managers and indi-
viduals, the peregrine falcon
has become one of the best
examples of how wise con-
servation practices can assist
a species to come back from
the brink of extinction.
Usage of the insecticide
DDT in the United States
nearly wiped out entire popu-
lations of birds decades ago,
including the peregrine fal-
con.
Fortunately, before the
peregrine falcon became
extinct,' the use of DDT was
eliminated.
As a result of pesticide
regulations and captive
breeding-and-release efforts,
the peregrine falcon made a
dramatic comeback from pre-
cipitously low numbers in the
1970s.
Peregrine populations
dropped from about 20,000
birds prior to the 1940s to
650 birds in 1965.
Of the two populations of
peregrine falcon that pass
through Florida, there are
now at least 3,100 breeding
pairs.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service delisted the species
in 1999.
Whenever the FWC delists


I-
MCT photo
The peregrine falcon was removed from the list of endan-
gered species Wednesday by the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conversation Commission.


a species, a management plan
must be in place, with guide-
lines to ensure the continued
conservation of the species.
The Commission also
approved the final Peregrine
Falcon Management Plan on
Wednesday.
The peregrine will still be
protected by the federal
Migratory Bird Treaty Act.
"The peregrine falcon is a
success story showing what
well-coordinated conserva-
tion can accomplish for a
species," said Robin
Boughton, the FWC's pere-
grine falcon management
plan leader. "The manage-
ment plan ensures the contin-
ued success of peregrine fal-
cons."
The approved plan
acknowledges that pesticide
contamination is an ongoing
threat throughout much of the
wintering range of the
species because many South
and Central American coun-


tries lack the pesticide regu-
lations that have been enact-
ed in the United States.
While peregrines do not
breed in Florida, they are
commonly seen in the state.
Many peregrines migrate
through in the fall and some
may stay here during the
winter.
The plan's objectives
stress the need to ensure
coastal habitats, particularly
those in the middle Keys, are
preserved.
The Commission will con-
sider allowing peregrines to
be used for falconry when it
meets again in September in
Howey-in-the-Hills.
The peregrine falcon is
known as the world's fastest
bird, averaging 25-34 mph
during normal flight and
reaching speeds in excess of
150 mph during dives for
prey, which include doves
and ducks.


Another slugger bites the dust


OK, now this one hit
close to home.
Regarding the story you
see below, when the news
broke Tuesday that Sammy
Sosa was one of the names
on the list of 104 that test-
ed positive for a perform-
ance enhancing substance
in 2003, I wasn't sure quite
what I was feeling.
Surprise was certainly
not one of the reactions.
While I always kind of
knew, I never wanted to
come out and declare it.
He was, after all, one of
'my guys,' one of the long
list of Cubs players I grew
up watching and taking the
El to see live every chance
I could - and for a time
there from the mid-'90s to
early 2000s, the single
biggest attraction at Clark
and Addison, other than
Wrigley Field itself.
It can rightly be said that
he saved the game during
that magical summer of
'98.
Yes, Mark McGwire
,played a pait in that, but in


A,


!


And Another
Thing...
Dan Hoehne
the early going, when it
was just McGwire in the
spotlight, his utter lack of
media savvy and personali-
ty would have made it a
groundbreaking story, but
as dull as a groundbreaking
story can be.
. It was when Sosa blasted
20 home runs in the month
of June, he joined the fray,
allowed McGwire to loosen
up and the rest of the sum-
mer was one big party for
the baseball world.
Suspicions were flying
around even back then, but
with the party in full swing,
with ticket sales picking up


steam (after the cancella-
tion of the World Series in ,
'94 had staggered the game
to its' core), of course
everyone from the commis-
sioner to the players union
to team owners were much
more able to turn a blind
eye.
Some say that summer is
less magical now, and in a
way it is - but looking
back, you can at least
remember how much fun it
was.
But that was then and
this is now and I have one
question - did these players
that are on that increasingly
more infamous 'list' know
that they're on it?
I mean, it was just two
Weeks ago that Sosa decid-
ed to announce, again, that
he had never cheated and
that he'd calmly await his
induction into the Hall of
Fame.
If he did know he was on
it, and felt protected by the
fact that the list was sup-
posed to be under lock and

Continued on page 4B


Report: Ex-Cubs star Sosa


failed drug test in 2003

Associated Prt.,
NEW YORK - Sammy
Sosa became the latest in a
string of baseball stars
implicated in the port's
steroids scandal of the past
decade when The Ne o York
Times reported that he test-
ed positive for a perform-
ance-enhancing drug in
2003.
The Times said Sosa is
one of 104 players 'ho lest-
ed positive in baseball's /
anonymous 2003 sursc).
which has been the subject
of a protracted court fight.
The paper did not identify
the drug. 4
It cited lawyers with
knowledge of the 2003
drug-testing result,, and .'
reported they spoke on con-
dition of anonymity because
they did not want to pub-
licly discuss material under
court seal.
Sosa is sixth on baseball ,s
career home runs list with
609, all but 64 [or the ..MCI photo
Chicago Cubs. Blowing a kiss after a home run was a Sammy Sosa trade-
He has not played in themark. Revelation that he tested positive for a performance
majors since 2007 withenhancing drug in 2003 looks to kiss Sammy good-bye.
Texas.
In 2003, baseball did not he had no comment on the Major League Baseball did-
have penalties for the first- report. n't have a copy of the test
time use of performance- Commissioner's . office results.
enhancing drugs. spokesman Rich Levin also Michael Weiner, the
Sosa's agent, Adam Katz, had no comment, saying
told The Associated Press Continued on page 4B










News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


Page 2B


THE SCOREBOARD


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pet GB
Boston 40 25 .615 -
New York 37 28 .569 3
Toronto 36 31 .537 5
Tampa Bay 35 32 .522 6
Baltimore '28 37 .431 12
Central Division
W L Pet GB
Detroit 34 31 .523 -
Minnesota 33 34 .493 2
Chicago 31 34 .477 3,
Kansas City 29 35 .453 4%
Cleveland 29 39 .426 6%Y
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 37 27 .578 -
Los Angeles 35 29 .547 2
Seattle 32 33 .492 5Y%
Oakland 28 36 .438. 9
Wednesday's Games
Chicago White Sox 4, Chicago Cubs 1
L.A. Angels 4, San Francisco 3
Milwaukee 9, Cleveland 8, 11 innings
Baltimore 6, N.Y. Mets 4
Toronto 7, Philadelphia 1
Washington 3, N.Y. Yankees 2
Boston 6, Florida 1
Texas 5, Houston 4, 10 innings
Arizona 12, Kansas City 5
Pittsburgh 8, Minnesota 2
St. Louis 4, Detroit 3
Colorado 5, Tampa Bay 3
Seattle 4, San Diego 3.
Oakland 5, L:A. Dodgers 4
Thursday's Games
Toronto at Philadelphia, late
Washington at N.Y. Yankees, late
Pittsburgh at Minnesota, late
Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs,
late
Tampa Bay at Colorado, late
Seattle at San Diego, late
N.Y. Mets at Baltimore, late
Florida at Boston, late
Houston at Texas, late
Arizona at Kansas City, late
Detroit at St. Louis, late
Oakland at L.A. Dodgers, late
Friday's Games
Cleveland at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Baltimore at ,Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Cincinnati, 7:10
p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Oakland at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Texas at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 36 27 .571 -
New York 33 30.524 3
Florida 32 35 .478 6
Atlanta 30 34 .469 6%2
Washington 17 46 .270 19
Central Division
W L Pet GB
Milwaukee 37 29 .561 -
St, Louis 36 30 .545 1
Cincinnati 33 31 .516 3
Chicago 30 31 .492 4Y2
Pittsburgh 31 34 .477 5Y%
Houston 29 34.460 6%Y2
West Division
W L Pct'GB
Los Angeles 43 23 .652 -
San Francisco 34 31 .523 8%Y
Colorado 32 33 .49210%D
San Diego 28 36 .438 14
Arizona 28 38 .424 15
Wednesday's Games
Chicago White Sox 4, Chicago Cubs 1
L.A. Angels 4, San Francisco 3
Milwaukee 9, Cleveland 8, 11 innings
Baltimore 6, N.Y. Mets 4
Toronto 7, Philadelphia 1
Washington 3, N.Y. Yankees 2
Cincinnati 4, Atlanta 3
Boston 6, Florida 1
Texas 5, Houston 4, 10 innings
Arizona 12, Kansas City 5
Pittsburgh 8, Minnesota 2
St. Louis 4, Detroit 3
Colorado 5, Tampa Bay 3
Seattle 4, San Diego 3
Oakland 5, LA. Dodgers 4
Thursday's Games
Atlanta at Cincinnati, late
Toronto at Philadelphia, late v
Washington at N.Y. Yankees, late
Pittsburgh at Minnesota, late
Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs,
late
Tampa Bay at Colorado, late
Seattle at San Diego,.late
N.Y. Mets at Baltimore, late
Florida at Boston, late
Houston at Texas, late
Arizona at Kansas City, late
Detroit at St. Louis, late
Oakland at L:A. Dodgers, late
Friday's Games , .
Cleveland at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Cincinnati, 7:10
p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Houston.at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
, St. Louis at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Colorado, 9:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at LA. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Oakland at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Texas at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.


EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T PtsGF GA
SD.C. 5 2 7 22 22 18
Chicago 5 3 6 21 21 19
KansasCity 5 5 4 19 19 17


Columbus 4 2 7 19 19 18
Toronto FC , 5 5 4 19 19 22
New England 4 4 4 16 15 20
New York' 2,10 3 9 13 24
WESTERN CONFERENCE,
W L T PtsGF GA
Houston 8 2 3 27 19 8
Chivas USA 8 4 3 27 19 12
Seattle FC 5 3 5 20 17 11
Colorado 4 2 5 17 17 14
Real Salt Lake 4 6 3 15 18 16
Los Angeles 2 2 9 15 15 16
FCDallas 2 7 4 10 15 22
San Jose 2 8 3 9 15 26


LIVE

SPORTS

ON TV

AUTO RACING
SATURDAY
6:30 p.m. NASCAR - NorthernTool.cotn 250, Qua.ESPN2
8:30 p.m. NASCAR - NorthernTool.com 250 .... ESPN2
.............................................. ............... ...................................................
/
BOXING
FRIDAY
10 p.m. Fernando Beltran vs. Monty Meza. . . . ESPN2
'SATURDAY
4:45 p.m. David Haye vs. Wladimir Klitschko...... HBO
10 p.m. . David Haye vs. Wladimir Klitschko...... HBO


COLLEGE BASEBALL
FRIDAY
2 p.m. NCAA World Series, Game 11........ ESPN2
7 p.m. NCAA World Series, Game 12.. ...... ESPN2
SATURDAY
2 p.m. NCAA World Series, Game 13......... ESPN
7 p.m. NCAA Wortd Series, Game 14......... ESPN


GOLF
FRIDAY
10 a.m. PGA - U.S. Open................... ESPN
3 p.m. PGA - U.S. Open................... . NBC
5 p.m. PGA - U.S. Open................... ESPN
SATURDAY
2 p.m. PGA - U.S. Open.................... NBC


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
FRIDAY
7 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Florida. ................ SUN
SATURDAY
1 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago Cubs............. WGN
4 p.m. Regional - Milwaukee at Detroit, St. Louis at ...
Kansas City or Tampa Bay at N.Y. Mets .... FOX


SOCCER.
SATURDAY
2:25 p.m. - FIFA - Spain vs. South Africa........ ESPN2
4:30 p.m. MLS - L.A. Galaxy vs. San Jose ...... ESPN2
Times, games, channels all subject to change


NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie. '
Wednesday's Game
D.C. United at Seattle FC, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Los Angeles at San Jose, 4 p.m.
Seattle FC at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
D.C. United at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday, June 24
New York at Toronto FC, 7:30 p.m.
FC Dallas at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday, June 27
New York at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at Real Salt Lake, 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, June 28
Colorado at Seattle, 4 p.m.
Houston at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.


EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
Washington 3 0 1.000-
.'Chicago 3 1 .750 Y2
Atlanta 2 2 .500 1%
Indiana 2 2 .500 1i%
Detroit 1 2 .333 2
Connecticut 1 3 .250 2Y%
New York 0 3 .000 3
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pet GB
Minnesota. 4 1 .800 -
Phoenix 3 1 .750 Y2
Seattle 3 2 .600. 1
San Antonio 1 1 .500 1/Y
'Los Angeles 1 3 .250 2Y2
Sacramento 1 4 .200 3
-Tuesday's Games
Chicago 78, Connecticut 75
Minnesota 86, Sacramento 83
Wednesday's Game
Minnesota at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
No games scheduled


BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Agreed to
terms with RHP Austin Adams, RHP
Cory Burns, RHP Preston Guilmet, RHP
Dale Dickerson and RHP Tyler
Sterdevant.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS-Agreed to
terms with RHP Mathiew White, LHP
George Baumann, RHP Dusty
Odenback, C Benjamin Theriot, 1B
Geoffrey Baldwin, SS Ryan Wood, RHP
Nicholas Wooley, LHP Eric Diaz, LHP
Brendan Lafferty, 3B Ryan Stovall, RHP,
Patrick Keating, OF Marvin Cooper, LHP`
Ryan Dennick, RHP Scott Kelley, RHP
Richard Folmer, OF Gabriel MacDougall,
RHP Josh Worrell and LHP Claudio
Bavera.
MINNESOTA TWINS-Recalled OF
Jason Pridie from Rochester (IL).
SEATTLE MARINERS-Placed LHP Erik
Bedard on the 15-day DL. Recalled 1B
Mike Carp from Tacoma (PCL). ,
TAMPA BAY RAYS-Agreed to terms
with CF Brett Nommensen, RHP
Andrew Bellatti, RHP Hunter Hill, RHP
Zachary Quate, 2B Tyler Bortnick, LHP
Jake Sullivan, SS Daniel Rhault, LF
Gabe Cohen, LHP Aaron Dott, SS Kyle
Spraker, LHP Daniel April, 3B Bennett
Davis, OF Jason Patton and C David
Wendt.
TEXAS RANGERS-Activated LHP Matt
Harrison from the 15-day DL. Optioned
RHP Warner Madrigal to Oklahoma City
(PCL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS-Placed RHP


Casey Janssen on the 15-day DL,
retroactive to June 14. Purchased the,
contract of LHP Brad Mills from Las
Vegas (PCL).
National League
CINCINNATI REDS-Placed RHP Mike
Lincoln on the 15-day. DL, retroactive to
June.6. Recalled RHP Josh Roenicke
from Louisville (IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS-Placed LHP Mike
Hampton on the 15-day DL. Recalled
LHP Wesley Wright from Round "Rock
(PCL). ,
NEW YORK METS-Agreed to terms
with LHP Darin Gorski, C John
Freeman, 1B Samuel Honeck, OF
Ronald Harris, OF Alexander Gregory,
OF Cody Holliday, OF Joseph August,
3B Joseph Bonfe, RHP Zachary Von
Tersch, RHP John Church, RHP Michael
Johnson, OF Kurt Steinhauer, RHP
Brian Needham, OF ZeErika Hall, LHP
Thomas Chism, 3B James Schroeder,
RHP Wesley Wrenn, LHP Lance Hoge,
LHP Brandon Sage, OF William Cherry,
1B Travis Ozga and 2B Ryan Mollica.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES-Agreed to
terms with OF Jose Hernandez, RHP
Jason. Erickson, SS Ty Summerlin, OF
Patrick Irvine and RHP Marc Baca.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS-Agreed to
terms with C Robert Stock, RHP Joseph
Kelly and SS Ryan Jackson.
American Association
EL PASO DIABLOS-Released RHP
Josh Neitz.
GRAND PRAIRIE AIRHOGS-Released
RHP John Wesley.
LINCOLN SALTDOGS-Released RHP
David Humen.
ST. PAUL SAINTS-Sold the contract of
INF Ole Sheldon to Cleveland (A'L).
Signed INF Steve Butler.
Can-Am League
BROCKTON ROX-Signed OF Ervin
Alcantara.
QUEBEC CAPITALES-Released RHP
Brad Purcell.
Golden Baseball League
CALGARY VIPERS-Agreed to terms
with C Dillon O'Krane. Released RHP
Cody Cillo.
ORANGE COUNTY FLYERS-Agreed to
terms with OF Juan Senreiso. Released
OF Shane Buschini.
TUCSON TOROS-Released INF
Franklin Gonzalez.
VICTORIA SEALS-Agreed to terms
with OF Trevor Davidson.
BASKETBALL
NBA '
MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES-
Announced the contract of coach Kevin
McHale will not be renewed.
WNBA .
INDIANA FEVER-Signed C Jessica
Davenport.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DENVER BRONCOS-Released LB Boss
Bailey. Signed C Casey Wiegrnann to a
contract extension through 2010.
HOUSTON TEXANS-Signed TE
Anthony Hill.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
WASHINGTON CAPITALS-Re-signed
LW Quintin Laing to a one-year con-
tract.
American Hockey League
MANITOBA MOOSE-Announced the
contract of assistant coach Jay Wells
will not be renewed.
READING ROYALS-Signed D Dinos
Stamoulis.
LACROSSE
NLL-Announced the San Jose Stealth
franchise Is relocating to Everett,
Washington.


Dragon Basketball Camp
LAKE PLACID - Varsity head coach
David Veley will be leading the Green
Dragon Basketball Camp June 25-27 for
boys and girls aged 1st through 8th
grades.
The first two days, Thursday and
Friday, the camp will get underway at
8:30 a.m. in the Lake Placid High School
gymnasium when players will spend tie
going through drills focused on building
sound fundamentals both offensively and
defensively, until 4:30 p.m.
Saturday, action starts at 9 a.m. with
the players divided up into age groups
and teams where they can show off their
skills in full court games in a tournament
format - parents are welcome to come
watch the games.
Cost of the camp is $40, which
includes a camp T-shirt. Campers can
bring lunch or purchase lunch items at
camp concessions each day at reasonable
cost.
To register, or for more information,
call coach Veley at 381-4202, or email
veley 31@comcast.net.

Basketball Fundraiser
AVON PARK .- The Red Devil basket-
ball program will be holding a fundraiser
game, pitting the varsity squad against
Avon Park alumni Saturday, July 4 in the
high school gymliasium.
The event starts at 4 p.m. and includes
a live DJ, food and great basketball
action.
For more information and tickets, con-
tact Padrika Sheppard at 873-6315, Carla
Miller at 257-1659.or Lisa Pough at 449-
0904.

Hammock Junior Golf
SEBRING - Golf Hammock C.C. will
hold a Junior Golf Camp June 22-26
from 9 a.m. to noon.
This will cover golf ettiquette, basics
and intermediate play in all phases of
golf strokes, and lunch.
Pick-up will be at noon.
Cost will be $95 and another sibling
at $80
- The camp will be lead by a golf pro-
fessional who has worked with juniors
for over 15 years.
He will also be holding adult clinics
in the afternoon that week for all skill
levels.
Call the pro shop at 382-2151 to regis-
ter and for reservations.

SFCC Volleyball Camp
AVON PARK - The South Flo'rida
Lady Panthers will be holding their
annual Volleyball Camp July 27-30 for
girls from grades 6-12.
The four-day camp will begin with
registration from 7:30-8 a.m. on the first
day, with drills and instruction from 8-11
a.m. and activities in the pool and on the
sand court from 11 a.m.-Noon.
Cost for the camp is $100 per partici-
pant and will be limited to the first 30
applicants, so register early to reserve a
spot.
To register, to to
www.southflorida.edu, and select the vol-
leyball site.
Click on "volleyball camp," print out
Admissions Application and Emergency
Treatment Forms.
Mail Admissions Application and
Emergency Treatment Forms as indicated
on forms or bring to the cashier's office
in Building B.
To register by phone, call one of the
Panther Volleyball Camp lines at ext.
7037: Avon Park/Sebring-784-7037; Lak
e Placid-465-5300; DeSoto-494-7500;
Hardee- 773-2252.

Heartland Kid's Golf Camp
AVON PARK - River Greens is
pleased to partner with the Heartland
Kid's Golf Camp.
It will begin at River Greens on June 9
and end on July 3.
We will have two sessions; the first is
from June 9-19. The second session run-
ning from June 23 to July 3.
The sessions will be on Tuesday,
Wednesday and Fridays and the cost will
be $50 per week.
Each day will run from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m.
Golf clubs, practice balls, golf instruc-
tion and prizes will be included in this
fee;-an optional lunch will be available
at $5 per day per child, plus drink if
needed.
We plan on having a different learning
experience each day, which includes
other outdoor sports to keep the kids'
interest up.
If you're looking for something for


your child to do this summer, this camp
will not disappoint.
Call 453-5210 to reserve your child's



ta Call


glip


spot as they may fill up quickly.
See additional camp information at
Rivet Greens website at
www.rgreens.com.

July 4th Firecracker 5K
SEBRING - The 15th Annual
Firecracker 5K Run/Walk is scheduled
for Saturday, July 4 at 7:30 a.m. in
Highlands Hammock State Park.
The annual celebration of our nation's
birthday always draws a large field of
runners in the race that benefits the Avon
Park High School boys and girls' cross
country programs.
Early entry fee is $17 and after June
29 thru race day registration the fee is
$25.
Checks should be made payable to
Central Florida Striders and mailed to *
Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Road, Sebring, FL
33872.
Entrants not using an entry form
should include their age(s), Tee-shirt
size, and run or walk participant infor-
mation along with their check. Tee shirt
sizes can be guaranteed for pre-registered
participants only.
"This year's race will feature dri-fit
Tee-shirts, plaques for overall, master
and'grand master male and female win-
ners, trophies to the first in each five-
year age division and medals to second-
and third-place finishers."
"We want to urge all participants to
wear Red, White and Blue to help us cel-
ebrate our country's birthday," said race
director Chet Brojek. Anyone with ques-
tions may call Chet at 385-4736 or email
him at cbrojek@comcast.net.

L.P. Wee Cheer Summer Clinic
LAKE PLACID - Lake Placid High
School's Wee Cheer Summer Clinic will
be held during the week of June 22-26 in
the LPHS Commons area from 10 a.m. to
noon each day.
Varsity and Junior Varsity
Cheerleaders for the 2009-2010 school
year will be instructing campers ages 3
through eighth grade in various team-
building and cheerleading activities
including cheers, chants, jumps and
dances.
A performance will be held on Friday,
June 26 in the LPHS gym at noon and
will be open to friends and family mem-
bers of the clinic attendees.
There is a $35 registration fee which
covers clinic attendance, snacks and a t-
shirt.
Wee Cheerleaders also will be invited
to cheer at an LPHS home football game
in the fall.
Funds raised at the clinic will help off-
set expenses for the Varsity and Junior
Varsity Cheerleading Squads.
Registration forms may be obtained
from any LPHS Cheerleader.
Registration forms are also available
in the front office at Lake Placid High
School.
Participants are encouraged to sign up
by June 19, however registrations will
also be taken on the first day of camp.
Additional information may be direct-
ed to Ashley Massey at Lake Placid High
School at 699-5010.

Sertoma sets date
SEBRING - Golfers mark your cal-
endars!
The Highlands Sertoma Club is
pleased to announce that they will be
hosting their 32nd annual Highlands
Independent Bank/Sertoma Golf
Tournament on August 22-23 at the Sun
'N Lake Country Club in Sebring, utiliz-
ing both the Deer and Turtle Run courses
and sporting a new island green on Deer
Run No. 9.
This year's tournament will continue
to sport Sertoma's unique format of a
two-man team best ball on Saturday and
a two-man team scramble on Sunday
with Highlands Independent Bank's con-
tinued title sponsor support, entry fees
and flexible player options for this year's
tournament have been ever so slightly
reduced.
The individual player fee is now $144
while the entry fee for the golfer who
wants to attend (with a guest) Saturday
night's Sertoma Luau is only $194.
The 12th Annual Luau will feature live
entertainment from Sertoma's own Vince
Liles and the Backstage Pass Band, open
bar, heavy hors d'oeuvres, lots of fun,
dancing and fellowship for all.
If you don't receive a personal invita-
tion by mail, registration forms will be
available at local golf pro shops or can
be mailed or faxed to you by calling
Scott Albritton at 402-1819.
Business/player sponsorships are also
available.


Ask Scotto about special team sponsor
packages.



the News-Sun

W5-6155 -Avon Park 45-1009

Lake Placid 465-016


SPORTS SNAPSHOTS


www.newssun.com










www.newssun.com News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


Highlands Ridge
The ladies association played a Low
Net event on Wednesday, June 10.
The winners were: First Flight -
Tying for first/second places were Mitzi
Norris and Connie Carter with 66 each.
Second Flight - First place, Deb
Martens with 61. Third Flight - First
place, Judy Hoopterp with 68. Fourth*
Flight - First place, Dolores Horvath
with 66.

River Greens
The men's association played a
Men's Day event on Saturday, June 13.
Tying for first/second places were
Vince' Boever and John Van Slooten;
Jim Cercy and Gil Heieprwith 58 each.
Closest to the pin: No. 3, Don
McDonald, 2-feet-9-inches; No.. 5,
Vince Boever, 10-feet-3-inches; No.
12, Fred Evans, 3-feet-3-inches; and
No. 17, Paul Johnson, 15-feet. '
Closest to the line: Vince Boever, 4-
feet-3-inches.
A morning scramble was played on
Friday, June. 12.
Winning first place was the team of
Don and Babe McDonald, Fred and
Diane Evans.
The Friday afternoon scramble was
played on June 12.
Winning first place was the team of
Tim Thomas, Joanne Merkle, Tom
Stewart, Joe Graf and Al Farrell with
12-under.
The ladies association played a pro
am tournament on Thursday, June 11.
Winning first place was the team of-
Babe McDonald, Betty Wallace, Anne


Purcell and Carol
McClay with minus-2.
Individual winners
were: . Tying for
first/second places
were Anne Purcell and
Carol McClay with
plus-2 each.
The Morrison Group
played a game on
Thursday, June 11.
Winning first place
were Lefty St. Pierre
and Harold Plagens
with minus-12; second
place, Bob Biever and
Vince Boever with
minus-11; and third
place, Ed Koster. and
Terry Dray with minus-
10.
The men's associa-
tion. played a pro am
tournament on
Wednesday, June 10.


A Grain Of Truth
On many putting surfaces, particularly Bermuda greens in warm climates, the
grass leans in one direction. This type of grass is said to have a "grain," and grain is
a big factor in your overall read of the putt. Here's a tip to help you read the grain.
Look directly down at the cup, taking note of dithe edges. If on one side of the cup
the grass looks ruffled, while the opposite side is neat and clean, the grain is grow-
ing from the ruffled side toward the clean side.
S, if you're putting with the ruffled side at
thI ri:.r ,1 the cup, ith pur I "i nii' with - -
thie ar in, :ud .i must Atr, ,ke m. 'i ,grain
lumlu If th l.in icJe L .it e d'
r.r. ,oi .iri' piirumn "nih" th
2m.ir,, .nd rthe ball n ill roll i .
f.,rlier than nnral 11 die rut-
11]d i 1I', ,i F Itd-'i Lh rc nn The
iup. plain ktr hie putt to. rc d
l,. , tr, tm iali . little -
~.m ii, 'd dt-ink.


Winning first place MASTERSTROh
was the team of Terry Jn M Nlamn, Kcii
Lewis, Joe Graf, Dick n,,a RaJer Top i
Long and Jim Cercy araed bN GOLF
with even; and second
place, Tim Thomas, Romy Febre, Lefty
St. Pierre and Peter March with minus-'
1/2.
Individual winners were: A Flight -
First place, Romy Febre with plus-5;
and second place, Russ Rudd with
plus-4 1/2. B Flight.- First place, G.L.
Heier with plus-3; and second place,'
Jim Cercy with plus-1 1/2. C Flight -
First place, Dick Seifart with minus-
1/2; and second place, Harold Kline


E' Cuntributor,:
i L , rdJ,
00 Teaiheri.
MAGAZINE


..'against
1` _grain_--
' ' ^i .- .


with minus-1. D Flight - First place,
Terry Lewis with plus-5 1/2; and sec-
ond place, Dave Knoblauch with plus-
1./2.
The Golfettes played a game on
Tuesday, June 9.
Winning first place was the team -of
Babe McDonald,- Fran Neil, Carole
McClay and Pat Gower with minus-26.
The Morrison Group played a game
on Tuesday, June 9.


Winning first place
was the team of Terry
Dray, Ed Koster, Jim
Cercy and Larry Roy
with minus-24.

SpringLake
For their Tuesday,
June 9, game, the
Men's Golf Association
played three best balls
with four-man teams.
The team of Gene
Hearn, Charles
Keniston, Jim Foote
and a blind draw won
first place with a com-
bined net score of 185.
The team of Don
Ray, Red Bohanon,
Bob Hinde and Dave
Docherty finished sec-
ond at 192.

Placid Lakes
The Men's
Association played a
One Best Ball Front,
Two Best Balls Back
event Wednesday, June


17.
Taking first with a -17 was the quar-
tet of Cody Coates, Taft Green, Bill
Lockwood and Al Verhage while the
trio of Jim McQuigg, Jack Marceau and
Al .LaMura were one shot back at -16.
Jim Ways, Chuck Wallin and Jack
Bond finished third with a -12 with
Hays having gotten closest to the pin
on #2 at 6-feet, 2-inches.


Pinecrest
The Men's Association played Team
and Individual Pro Am Points
Wednesday, June 17.
Bob Luttrell, Claude Cash and Harry
Hicks teamed up to score 11 points for
the win while Luttrell and Joe Hyzny
tied for the A Division lead at +4.
Larry Lamparski took B Division
honors with +2 as Hicks and Wayne
Courson each scored +6 to top C
Division.

Sun 'N Lake
The Women's Association played an
Even holes minus 1/2 handicap,
Individual event Wednesday, June 17.
Topping Flight 1 was Denise Stegall
with 29 as Mickie Edwards finished
with 33 for second.
Donna Anderson's 30 was good'
enough to top Flight 2 with Nancy
Wolff taking second with 32.5 and
Shirley Young third with 35.5.
In Flight 3, Olivia Sliwicki scored a
29.5 for first, Judy Ross 31.5 for sec-
ond, Carole Winters 32.5 for third and
Nancy. Monroe a 33 for fourth.
The Men's Association played a Two
Best Balls Pro Am Points event
Thursday, June 11.
Taking first with +25 were Dick
Beebe, Pat Holmes, Jerry Huff and Curt
Peterson with Jim Perry, Jack Comer,
Joe Blanchard and John Clark taking
second with +23.
Third place went to Bill Norcross,
Gene Gangemi, Wayne Benson and
Bob Harpster when their +22 came out
on top of a match-of-cards.


Reasons vary,


benefits for all


Continued from 1B
be varied, depending on
their chosen sport, but the
common thread is the
benefits each hope to
achieve.
"(Sebring softball)
Coach (Joe) Sinness said it
would be a good idea and
told me to look into doing
it," ;Sebring sophomore
pitcher Haley Pack said. "I
did and I liked it. I felt like
I had reached a point
where, I couldn't really,
progress anymore in the
shape I was in, so I felt if I
worked out more, got
more stamina and got a bit
stronger, I would be 'able
to take myself farther.
"It's really helping me
go longer on the mound at
travel-ball tournaments in
the hot sun all day long,"
she continued. "Colleges
are starting to look at me
and we lost Kayla
(Clemens) and Niki


(Helms), so I need to get
stronger and go longer
without burning out."
It's still early, with'
many more sweltering
summer morning's ahead
for this dedicated bunch,
but the blopsoming num-
ber, the smiles on their
faces as they all work
together shows the dedi-
cation and enjoyment of
the girls and the choice
they have made for them-
selves.
* "Not everyone out here
is a superstar in the sport
they play," Whitehead
said. "But everyone dedi-
cates herself to the work-
outs without complaining.
Everyone can feel the
heat,'we all know it's hot
and humid, but the real
leaders perform under all
conditions."
Which will help in
many regards in their
futures.


Above: Coach Mike Lee leads his charges through some walking lunges to get the muscles
both stretched and revved up for the workout to come. Right: Tangie McCullors is all
smiles as the girls do some plyometric (jump) training in the Firemen's Field bleachers.


News-Sun photos by
DAN HOEHNE
Blue Streak volleyball player
Abigail Bone runs quickly
around the cones during an
agility drill Thursday morn-
ing.


-~


REMEMBER......IF YOU ARE A FIRST TIME HOMEOWNER, OR HAVE NOT
OWNED A HOME FOR MORE THAN 3 YEARS; YOU CAN QUALIFY FOR UP TO
$8,000 FEDERAL TAX CREDIT. CALL FOR INFORMATION.


Page 3B


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............ ""!









News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


www. newssun.corn


Sosa latest 'big name' outed


Continued from 1B
union general counsel, also.
declined comment.
The union, while fighting
to get the list back from the
government, has mostly
refused to discuss reports
about the list because it does
not want to confirm or deny
who is on it.
Several of the game's
biggest stars, including
home-run king Barry Bonds,
Roger Clemens, Mark
McGwire and Jose Canseco,
have been implicated in
steroids use.
Miguel Tejada was sen-
tenced to one year of proba-
tion for misleading Congress
after he pleaded guilty and
admitted he withheld infor-
,mation about an ex-team-
mate's use of performance-
enhancing drugs.
LOs Angeles Dodgers slug-
ger Manny Ramirez is serv-
ing a 50-game suspension for
violating baseball's drug pol-
icy.
New York Yankees star
Alex Rodriguez in February
admitted using steroids from
2001-03 with Texas follow-
ing -a report by Sports
Illustrated that he was among
the 104 players on the list.
, Sosa sat alongside Rafael
Palmeiro, Canseco and
McGwire at a 2005 hearing
before Congress and testi-
fied: "To be clear, I have
never taken illegal perform-
ance-enhancing drugs."
"I have never injected
myself or had anyone inject
me with anything," he told
the House Government
Reform Committee on March
17, 2005. "I have not broken
the laws of the United States
or the laws of the Dominican
Republic. I have been tested
as recently as 2004, and I am
clean."
That left open the possibil-
ity he used a substance legal-
ly in the Dominican Republic
that would have been illegal
to use in the United States
without a prescription.
Former Rep. Tom Davis, a
Virginia Republican who was
chairman of the Government
Reform Committee at the
time of the 2005 hearing, said
he wasn't surprised about the
report that Sosa tested posi-
tive for a performance-


enhancing drug.
"In his testimony before
us, he was very careful,"
Davis told the Associated
Press in a telephone inter-
view Wednesday. "He said he
never did illegal drugs.
Steroids were legal in the
Dominican Republic."
Davis added that the goal
of the hearing was not to put
people behind bars.-- -- ..
"We were just trying to
change policy, which we
did," he said. "It was rampant
during those times. These
players - they were going
40 mph in a 30 mph zone,
and nobody was stopping
them. We came in and started
enforcing the speed limit."
Palmeiro, like Sosa, denied
using performance-enhanc-
ing drugs but not even two
months later he tested posi-
tive for the anabolic steroid
stanozolol, leading to a 10-
day ban from MLB.
Bonds is under federal
indictment, and Clemens is
being investigated by a feder-
al grand jury to determine
* whether he lied when he told
Congress he never used
steroids or human growth
hormone.
Canseco has written two
books discussing his use of
drugs.
"To just speculate from an
era of how many years it was
of who did and didn't do
what, it's impossible," Cubs
general manager Jim Hendry
said before Tuesday night's
game against the Chicago
White Sox was rained out.
"It's just time to put that
whole era behind us and
move on."
Former pitcher Pedro
Martinez played against Sosa
for many years.
"This news would make
me feel terrible if it is proven
.that Sammy tested positive,"
Martinez said in the
Doininican Republic.
"This is a problem of all of
baseball, not just Dominican
baseball. But in reality, this is
a problem of education that
has to be attacked," he said.
Sosa, now 40, and
McGwire engaged in a race
in 1998 to break Roger
Maris' season record of 61
homers, a chase that captivat-


ed the country. McGwire set
the mark while Sosa, with a
big smile and a trademark
hop out of the batter's box,
finished with 66.
Sosa followed up by hit-
ting 63, 50, 64, and 49
homers in his next four
.years.
He hit 40 more in 2003, a
season in which he was
caught using a corked bat in
front of his home crowd at
Wrigley Field.
Baseball management's
drug policy has prohibited
steroid use without a pre-
scription since 1991, but the
enforceability was repeatedly
questioned by the union,
which did not reach a drug
agreement until August 2002.
There were no penalties
for a positive test in 2003 -
those tests determine if it was necessary
to impose mandatory random
drug testing across the major
leagues in 2004.
As part of the drug agree-
ment, the results of the test-
ing of 1,198 players in 2003
were meant to be anony-
mous.
Penalties began in 2004,
and. suspensions for a first
positive test started in 2005.
Government agents initial-
ly obtained search warrants
in 2004 for the drug-testing
records of 10 players as part
of the BALCO investigation
that led to Bonds' indictment
but they found the more
expansive list on a spread-
sheet, obtained additional
warrants and seized the larg-
er group of records.
The union went to court,
arguing the search was ille-
. gal, and three U.S. District
Judges agreed.
The government appealed, -
and a panel of the 9th U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals
ruled for the government, but
the entire 9th Circuit threw
out the reversal and decided
to hear the case itself.
The hearing was in
December, and the decision
is pending.
The losing side could
appeal to the Supreme Court.

AP Writers Dionisio Soldevila in
the Dominican Republic and
Fred Frommer in Washington
contributed to this.report.


Protecting the cheats at the


expense of the innocent
Continued from 1B Ozzie Guillen has come I guess that would be the
key, that still means he around to that way of think- case, and be logical in a
looked someone dead in the ing as well. legalistic sense.
eye and flat out lied. I hear the defenders say it But common sense, to me,
And it was before that that shouldn't because the play- goes the other way.
Alex Rodriguez got found ers took it under the assump- Now that 'my guy' has
out from the list, so a lesson tion it would remain anony- been outed, a certain aspect
should have been learned, mous and that should be pro- of the era is now closed for
Some are now saying that tected. me.
the rest of the list should be So, virtually every major But there are 102 more
released, get it all out in the league baseball playerfrom namesthat could help close
a lot more of it.
open and over and done the past 20 years is'under the
with. suspicion of cheating in Dan Hoehne is the Sports Editor
Frank Thomas. has been order to protect the rights of of the News-Sun. He can be
saying that for a while, and those who actually did reached at daniel.hoehne@news-
now White'Sox manager cheat? sun.com.


.EN YOUSL ,SL

MIMA ".
i 4~~2AI 4



-PS654 32-009 46&M62


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Linebacker Derrick Brooks

says he'll play in '09


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE - Free
agent Derrick Brooks said
Wednesday he plans to play
in the NFL this fall and pos-
sibly even return to the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers, a
team he led to a Super Bowl.
victory.
The NFL Defensive
Player of the Year when
Tampa Bay won the Super
Bowl after the 2002 season,
Brooks was among five
players the Bucs cut in a
February purge that includ-
ed his former Florida State
teammate, Warrick Dunn.
"I could still be a
Buccaneer," Brooks said.
"Stranger things that have
happened. Teams are talking
to me so I'm going to make
sure I continue to stay in
shape."
Although he turned 36 in
April, Brooks said he's still
in top physical condition.
One of only four players
voted to 10 consecutive Pro
Bowls, Brooks also has
been a standout off the field.
He was the co-winner of
the 2000 NFL Man of the
Year award, given to the
player who combines skill
on the field with good work
off it.
A member of the board of
trustees at Florida State, the
Pensacola native was in
Tallahassee on Wednesday
for a meeting on a three-
year budget for the school.
And while he looked
more the pait of a business-
man, his desire to get back
into pads and a helmet was
evident.
"My play speaks fpr
itself," said Brooks, who
hiad 73 tackles, last season
with a season high 10,- a.
midseason min over the


MCT photo
Cut by Tampa Bay in February, Derrick Brooks doesn't
rule out a return to the Bucs this coming season.


Kansas City Chiefs. "I've
always taken that
approach."
Brooks, who is two tack-
les short of 1,700 in his
NFL career, believes he's
still among the most pro-
ductive linebackers in the
league.
And if that call from the
NFL doesn't come?
"I'll do the best to pre-
pare for that," -Brooks said.
"My plan is to play but if
God plans for me not to


'I could still be
a Buccaneer.

Stranger things
that have
happened.'

DERRICK BROOKS
NFL linebacker
play, then I'm ready to
accept that too."


Page 4B


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www.newssun.com


News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


RELIGION


Avon Park Church of
Christ
AVON PARK - "The
Loving Father," taken from
Luke 15: 11-24, will be the
message Sunday morning,
Father's Day, presented by
Minister Larry Roberts. The
Lord's Supper is served
every Sunday.
The Sunday evening serv-
ice will be a devotional with
a fingerfood fellowship to
follow.
Avon Park Church of.
Christ is at 200 S. Forest.
Ave. For information, call
453-4692.

Avon Park Church of
the Nazarene
AVON PARK - Pastor
Randy Rupert's sermon on
Sunday will be 'From One
Dad to Another' using Luke
15: 11-32 as the text.
The church is at 707 W.
Main St. Call 452-4851 for
more information.

Bethany Baptist
Church
AVON PARK - Pastor
Charles Pausley will contin-
ue with the Colossians series
on Sunday morning at
- Bethany Baptist Church.
Pastor Ben Kurz will
preach on Father's Day. The
evening service will be dedi-
cated to "Honor Our Men."
On Sunday, June 28 at 6
p.m. The Mitchum Brothers
Quartet will be in concert.
There is no cost for this con-
cert.
On Tuesday, June 30 the
Young at Heart group will
meet at 11:30 a.m. for lunch
at Bob Evans.
If you have any questions,
call the office at 452-1136,
go to the Web page at
www.bethanybaptistap.com
or e-mail is bethanybap-
tistap@gmail.com.
Bethany Baptist Church is
on the corner of State Road
17 and C-17A South (truck
route)..

Christian Science
Church,
SEBRING - The lesson
sermon on Sunday morning
is titled "Is the Universe,
Including Man, Evolved by
Atomic Force?" The keynote
is from Psalms 21:13, "Be
thou exalted, Lord, in thine
own strength; so will we
sing and praise thy power."
The church is at 146 N.
Franklin St.


Christian Training
Church
SEBRING - The Rey.
Linda M. Downing will
bring the. message, "Reject
Deception," this week at the
Sunday morning service. The
Wednesday night Bible study
will continue in the book of
Romans.

Eastside Christian
Church
LAKE PLACID - This
Wednesday the kindergarten
through fifth-graders will,
kick off the summer with a
Kids Bowling Outing.
Everyone will leave the
church at 6:30 p.m. and
return around 7:45 p.m. All
summer long the Wednesday
evening youth will be enjoy-
ing fun activities and outings
such as bowling, swimming,
and ice cream trips to
Scoops. The children's pro-
gram is for ages 5- to 13-
year-olds. Snacks, crafts and
activities are provided each
week. For more information
about the youth program,
contact the church office at
465-7065.
Thursday at 11:30 a.m. is
the monthly Lunch Bunch
Outing. Everyone will meet
at the No Frills Grill in Lake
Placid for lunch and fellow-
ship. If anyone needs a ride,
contact the church office at
465-7065.
This Sunday the pastor is
beginning a new sermon
series titled "Second
Guessing God - Hanging on
When You Can't See His
Plan." If you have been
.wondering how you are
going to make it through
these troubled times, come
and hear how Jesus always
makes a way when there
seems to be no way.
The church is at 101
Peace Ave., located on
County Road 621 on the left
hand side just before the cal-
adium fields.

Emmanuel United
Church of Christ
SEBRING - The Rev.
Jim Langdoc will deliver the
Sunday morning sermon,
"Decisions Aren't Always
Simple." Scripture is
Galatians 6:1-16 and Luke
6:17-19, 37-42.
The church is 1.7 miles
west of U.S. 27 on County
Road 634 (Hammocc Road).
Call 471-7999 or visit
sebringemmanuelucc.com.


Church News

Faith Lutheran
Church
SEBRING - The title for
Sunday should read Youth
Led Services "Operation
Space. A Close Encounter
with God's Word."

First Baptist of
Placid Lakes
LAKE PLACID - On
Sunday morning Pastor
Darryl George will preach
the sermon " K.J.H. - The
Man In the Glory - The
Beginning" with regards to
John 1:1-5. There will be no
evening service to celebrate
Father's Day.
The church library is open
every Sunday from 9-9:30
a.m. and Wednesday from 6-
7 p.m.
Wednesday Bible study,
prayer and praise time starts
at 7 p.m. The youth will
have a Youth Worship Hour
in the Youth Worship Center.
Programs for the children


and youth include Bible
study, puppet practice, choir
practice and drama team
practice.
The church is on the cor-
ner of Washington and
Kemper avenues in Placid
Lakes. For more informa-
tion, call 465-5126 from 8
a.m. to noon Monday
through Thursday or e-mail
the church at
placidlakes@hotmail.com

First Christian
Church
AVON PARK - What
kind of life are you living?
What kind of reputation do
you have? That is the title to
the pastor's sermon this
week, "Reputation - Living
a Life of.Christian Values."
Come and be challenged just
as we have been to put down
the luggage that weighs us
down throughout life, like
being worried and over-
whelmed.
Sunday evening Bible
Study will be led by Family
Life Minister Ray
Culpepper.


First Christian Church of
Avon Park is at 1016 W.
Camphor (behind the
Wachovia Bank). Call 453-
5334 or e-mail firstchris-
tianap@embarqmail.com
with any questions or to
request information. The
church Web site is
www.firstchristianap.com.

First Christian
Church (Disciples of
Christ)
SEBRING - At the
Lord's Table this Sunday
morning will be Anna Coley
and Linda Correll.
Communion will be served
by David Van Diver,
Gretchen Ames, Clara Moore
and Carol Baker.
Greeting the congregation
will be Clara Moore. Dick
Asmussen will lead the Call
to Worship. For the month of
June, the acolyte will be
Sevan Van Diver and Heidi
McClary will lead Children's
Church.
The pastor will bring the
Sunday morning message
titled "A Father's Love"


from Luke 15:31-32. Special
music will be provided by
"Ding N Ling."
For more information, call
the church office at 385-
0352.

First Presbyterian
Church - A.R.P.
AVON PARK - On
Sunday, Pastor Bob
Johnson's sermon will be
"The Boundaries of Liberty"
based on Romans 14:1-13.
Special music will be pro-
vided by Gene McEndree
singing "A Christian Home."
The adult class.will meet
in the Sunday School wing
to continue the video series
begun last summer entitled
"That the World May
Know."
Junior high youth will be
attending Camp Quest' at
Bonclarken Conference
Center in Flat Rock, N.C.
from July 22-26. Only the
senior youth will meet with
Youth Leader Rene
Blackmon at her home on
Thursday evening.
Continued on page 6B


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www.newssun.corn


News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


Page 6B
Church News


Continued from page 5B
Deadline for articles for the
combined July/August newsletter is
Thursday, June 25.
The church is at 215 E. Circle
St. (with two entrances on
Lagrande Street). For questions,
call 453-3242.

First Presbyterian
Church
SEBRING - "The Love of the
Father" is the title of the Sunday
morning sermon given by the Rev.
Darrell A. Peer.
Monday, Home Bible study is at
9 a.m. (call for meeting place).

First United Methodist
Church of Sebring
SEBRING - This Sunday morn-
g, the Rev. A.C. Bryant's sermon
tie is "What Is God Looking For
in A Man" with Scripture reading
from Numbers 14:20-24.
For more church information,
call the church office at 385-5184.

Heartland Christian
Church
SEBRING - Sunday at the
Praise and Worship Service,
Damon Hadwin will provide the
opening prayer. Bill Wyse and Ty
Little will provide special readings.
for Fathers' Day. Terry Little will
also do the special reading entitled


RELIGION GUIDELINES: The News-Sun publishes religion news on Fridays.
The submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday to be considered for publication in the follow-
ing Friday's paper.
Submit items to the News-Sun's from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays; fax to 385-2453; send
e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or mail to Lifestyle Editor, News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring, FL 33870. For information, call 385-6155, ext. 516.


"Father's Day." George Kelly will
sing the special hymn "God Loves
To Talk To Boys While They're
Fishin'." Roland Bates will also
sing the special hymn "Thanks To
Calvary I Am Not the Man I Used
To Be."
Dr. Vernon Murphy and son
Aaron will be this week's readers.
Father's Day Awards will be given
out. The Little Heartland Christian
Church Singers will present
coupons to their "Daddies."
Pastor Ted Moore's sermon this
week will be "The Family" with
Scripture from the book of
Colossians 3:1-17. Dick Swenson
will provide the closing prayer.
Tuesday Senior Adult Bible con-
tinues starting at 6 p.m. with cof-
fee, snacks and fellowship and will
continue through June and then
will dismiss for July and August.
. Wednesday Young Adult and
Children's Bible Study has stopped
for the summer. It will resume in
September.
Sunday morning Sunday school
is taught by Fran VanHooreweghe.
The church is at 2705 Alternate


Route 17 South in Sebring (behind
Publix).

Memorial United
Methodist Church
LAKE PLACID - Father's Day
will be celebrated at the Worship
Services on Sunday. At the Union
Worship Service in the sanctuary,
Claude Burnett, pastoral assistant,
will preach on the subject "Be: A
Perfect Father," using the text of
Romans 8:31-39.
At the New Song Contemporary
Service in Rob Reynolds Hall, the
Rev. Jerry R. McCauley will
preach on the subject "Honor Your
Father," with the Scripture text
from Ephesians 6:1-3.
The church is at 500 Kent Ave.
For more information, call 465-
2422.

Parkway Free Will
Baptist Church
SEBRING - The Scripture for
the Sunday morning Bible lesson,,
"Recognizing True Authority," is
taken from Exodus 5. Pastor Jim


Scaggs will bring the Sunday
morning and evening services.
Next Sunday, June 28, will be
the end-of-the-month-sing and fel-
lowship time. On Sunday, July 5,
the church will host a special guest
with a message "God and
America."
/,
Resurrection Lutheran
Church
AVON PARK - On the Third
Sunday after Pentecost, the pas-
tor's sermon will be based on the
fourth chapter of Mark. The wor-
ship and Communion assistant will
be Paul Willcox, the lector will be
Jan Lindahl and the acolyte will be
Marcus McGinnis.
On Monday, the Busy Bodies
meet at 9 a.m., the Mid-week
Fragrance Free Service will begin
at 7 p.m. and the J.O.Y. Meeting is
at 2 p.m. on Thursday.

St. John United
Methodist Church
SEBRING - Pastor Ronald De
Genaro Jr. will bring the message


PLACES To WORSHIP


Places to Worship is a paid
advertisement in the News-Sun
that is published Friday and
Sunday. To find out more infor-
mation on how to place a listing
in this directory, call the News-
Sun at 385-6155, 465-0426 or
452-1009, ext. 502.


APOSTOLIC"'

* Greater Faith Apostolic
Church, 24 Rainer Drive," Lake
Placid, FL 33852. invites you to
come Worship with us in spirit and
truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday. For information con-
tact 840-0152. Pastor Larry
Carmody.


ASSEMBLY OF GOD

* Christ Fellowship Church
(Assembly of God), 2935 New
Life Way. Bearing His Name;
Preaching His Doctrine; and
Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping
God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship,
10 a.m.; EVening Worship, 6:30
p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m.
Pastor Eugene Haag. Phone 471-
0924.
* Crossroads Community
Church, 114 South Central Ave.,
Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-
4453. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship: 10:45 a.m. and 6
p.m.. Sunday Children's Church:
10:45 a.m. Wednesday Adult Bible
Study and Youth/Royal Explorers,
7 p.m. Pastor: John E. Dumas.
* First Assembly of God, 4301
Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev.
Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday
School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship
and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.;
Evening Worship, 7 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night, (Adult
Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group,
Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-6431.


BAPTIST

* Avon Park Lakes Baptist
Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd.,
Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall,
Pastor. Christ centered and bibli-
cally based. Sunday worship serv-
ices, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Nursery facilities are available.
Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday
and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer
Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible
classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered
for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m.
Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556.
* Bethany Baptist Church
(GARBC) We are located at the,
corner of SR17 and C-17A (truck
route) in Avon Park. Join us
Sundaymorning at 9:00 AM for cof-
fee and doughnuts, followed with
Bible Study Classes at 9:30.
Sunday morning worship service
begins at 10:30 a.m., and an
evening worship service is at 6
p.m.. On Wednesdays, the
AWANA program and the 'Word of
Life teen ministry begin at 6:30 PM.
The adult Bible and Prayer Time
begins at 7 p.m.. For more informa-
tion go to www.bethanybap
tistap.com or call the church office
at 863-452-1136.
* Faith Missionary Baptist
Church, off State Road 17 North of
Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave.
Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening
Worship,' 6 p.m. Wednesday


Service, 7 p.m: Deaf interpretation
available. Ken Lambert, Pastor.
Phone 386-5055.
* Fellowship Baptist Church,
1000 Maxwell St., Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday: Sunday School,
9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Evening Service, 7
p.m.; Children/Youth/Young Adult
Ministries,, 7 p.m. Rev. James
Weatherly, Pastor. Telephone: 453-
4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: apfe/-
lowship@tnninet.
* First Baptist Church of Avon
Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park.
Dr. Vemon Harkey, pastor; Jared
Hewitt, interim youth minister; and
Joy Loomis, interim music director.
Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30
a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m.
Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship;
11 a.m. Children's Church; 4:30-7
p.m. Youth activities; 6 p.m. Vesper
Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10
a.m., . basic computer
class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m.'
conversational English, basic com-
puter and citizenship
classes/Sonshine House. Regular
Wednesday schedule: 4:45 p.m.
Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. chil-
dren's choir rehearsals, youth
activities and prayer meeting; 6:30
p.m. adult choir rehearsal; 7 p.m.
children's mission groups.
Thursday schedule: 7-8:30 p.m.
adult reading and writing classes.
Nursery provided for all services,
except .Sonshine House.
LifeGroups (Bible studies) are
offered on various days and times.
Call 453-6681 for details. The 24/7
prayer line is (863) 452-1957.
Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N.
Lake Ave., Avon Park. Johnattan
Solotero, Pastor. Regular Sunday
schedule: 10 a.m., Bible study; 11
a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday
schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study.
Friday schedule: 7 p.m., activities
for adults, youth and children.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine
Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 mid-
way between Sebring and Lake
Placid). Your place for family,
friends and faith. Sunday morning
worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery
is provided for both services with
Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life
changing Bible Study for all ages
starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor
Allen Altvater leads the, youth in
their quest to become more like
Christ. Sunday night worship at 6
p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and
Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with
youth worship in the youth facility,
and missions training for all chil-'
dren. Call the church at 655-1524.
* First 'Baptist Church of Lake
Placid, Knowing God's Heart and
Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal
Palm Street. .(2 blocks south of
Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL
33852 (863) 465-3721, Email:
www.fbclp.com. Contemporary
9:00 a.m., Traditional Blended
10:45 a.m., Link Groups 9:00 a.m.
& 10:45 a..m., Sunday Evening
6:00 p.m., Wed. Evening Activities
for all 6:15 p.m.
* First Baptist Church of Lorida
located.right on U.S. 98 in Lorida.
Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.
for all ages. Sunday worship serv-
ices are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Preschool care is provided at the
11 a.m. worship service.
Wednesday evening Bible Study
and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m.,
followed by adult choir rehearsal.
From September to May our youth
group meets. First Lorida is the


"Place to discover God's love."
Jonathan Booher is the Senior
Pastor. For more information about
the church or the ministries offered,
call 655-1878.
* First Baptist Church, Sebring,
200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL.
33870. Telephone: 385-5154. A.R.
Fugan, interim pastor; Rev. David
-Thomas, associate pastor music -
and senior adults; Rev. Joe Delph,
minister of youth and activities.
Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.;
Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.;
Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.;
Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.;
Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday night programs for
children, youth and adults from
5:30-7:30 p.m. Preschool and
Mother's Day Out for children age
6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky
Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704.
* Florida Avenue Baptist
Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon
Park. Mailing address is 710 W.
Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825.
Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D.
Girdley,- pastor.. Sunday School,
9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11
a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church;
Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday night programs for
children, youth and adults at 7 p.m.
* Independent Baptist Church,
5704 County Road 17 South,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday
School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship,
10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m.
Wednesday service, 7 p.m.
Fundamental, soul-winning, mis-
sion-minded, King James Bible
Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone
655-1899. Bus transportation.
* Leisure Lakes Baptist Church,
808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just
off of Miller at the west end of Lake
June) "Where the old fashion
gospel is preached." Sunday
School 'begins at 9:45 a.m.;
Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.;
Sunday Evening Service is at 6
p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the
church at 699-0671 for more infor-
mation.
* Maranatha Baptist Church
(GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east
of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle
Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9
a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.;
Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week
service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily
Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m.,
Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald
Webber and Associate Pastor Stan
Mohr. Phone 382-4301.
* Parkway Free Will Baptist
,Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the
church where the "Son" always
shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and
Wednesday Evening Worship, 7
p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6
p.m. on the last Sunday of each
month. The Rev. John D. Cave,
pastor. Church phone: 382-3552.
Home phone: 452-5868. Affiliated
with the National Association of
Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn.
* Sparta Road Baptist Church,
(SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev.
.Winfred White, interim pastor.
Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 7
p.m.; 'Choir practice, 6 p.m.
Nursery provided. For Information,
call 382-0869.
* Southside Baptist Church
(GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave.,
Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor;


Chuck Pausley, Youth Pastor;
Ralph 0. Burns, Assistant to the
Pastor. Sunday School for all ages,
9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship
Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening
Worship, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday:'
Awana kindergarten through fifth
grade, 6:30 p.m.; Youth Meeting for
Teens, 6:30 p.m. Adult Midweek:
Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p:m. A
nursery for under age 3 is available
at all services. Provisions for hand-
icapped and hard-of-hearing.
Office phone, 385-0752.
* Sunridge Baptist Church,
(SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27
and Valerie, across from Florida
Hospital), Sebring. Ed Howell,' tran-
sitional pastor. Sunday School,
9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Wdrship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday
Evening Service, 6 p.m.
Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study,
and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery pro-
vided. For information, call 382-
3695.


CATHOLIC

* Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church, 595 East Main St., Avon
Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas
McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil
Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7
p.m. in Spanish; 8 and 10:30 a.m.
in English. Weekdays at 8 a.m.
Confessions are at .3:30 p.m.
Saturday. Religious Education
Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday
for grades K through 7th.
Confirmation class is at 7:15 p.m.
Sunday.
m St. Catherine Catholic Church,
820-Hickory St., Sebring (mailing
address:. Parish Office, 882 Bay
St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049.
Very Rev. Jose Gonzalez, Pastor.
Masses - Saturday Vigil: 4 p.m.
Sunday: 8 and 10:30 a.m. and
noon Spanish Mass. Confessions:
4-4:45 p.m. Saturday and 7:15-
7:45 a.m. on First Friday or by
appointment. Daily Masses, 8 a.m.
and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m.
Saturday. Enrollment for Catholic
School grades K3 through third
now being accepted; Faith
Formation Classes for grades
kindergarten through fifth resume
September 2009; Edge and Life
Teen programs on summer sched-
ule.
* St. James Catholic Church,
3380 Placidview Drive, Lake
Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael
J. Cannon. Mass schedule:
Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) -
Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8
a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9
a.m. December thru, Easter -
Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m.,
9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9
a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30
a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9
a.m.


CHRISTIAN

* Eastside Christian Church,
101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL
33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27
on. County Road 621), 465-7065.
Stephen Bishop, pastor. Sunday:
Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship
Celebration with the Lord's Supper
each week 10:15 a.m. Youth
Church with Martha Crosbie, direc-
tor at 10:40 a.m. Sophia.Bishop,
secretary; Thelma Hall, organist;
and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday:
Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.;
"Building God's Kingdom for
Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way,
Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth


the Drive!"
* Sebring Christian Church,
4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher;
David Etherton, Youth Pastor.
Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Youth Service, 6 p.m; Wednesday
night meals, 5 p.m.; and
Wednesday Bible Study, 6 p.m.
Phone 382-6676..
* First Christian Church, 1016
W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL
33825. "Where truth is taught and
love abounds. "Greg Ratliff, Senior
Minister; Tammy Johns, Secretary
and Children's Director; Bart
Culpepper, Youth Director; Jon
Carter, ' Music Director. Bible
School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.;
Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesday
Choir Practice & - Children's
Classes, 5:15 p.m.; Study Groups
for all ages and Children's Choir,
6:15 p.m. Nursery provided for all
events.
* First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ), 510
Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of
Poinsettia and Eucalyptus),
Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-
0358 or 385-3435. The Rev.
Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast,
10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30
a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, Praise and Worship,
6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15
p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15
p.m.


CHRISTIAN &
MISSIONARY
ALLIANCE

* The Alliance Church of
Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road,
Sebring, FL 33875. Call 382-1343.
Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday
services: Sunday School meets at
9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship Service meets at 10:30
a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study
meets at 6 p.m. (off site);
Wednesday Prayer Gathering
meets at 6 p.m.


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

* Christian Science Church, 146
N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m.
Morning Worship and Sunday
School. Testimonial meetings at 4
p.m. each second and fourth
Wednesday. A free public Reading
Room, located at the church, is
open before and after church serv-
ices on Sunday and Wednesdays
and by appointment. The Bible and
the Christian Science textbook,
"Science and Health with Key to
the Scriptures" by Mary Baker
Eddy are our only preachers. All
are welcome to come and partake
of the comfort, guidance, support
and healing found in the lesson-
sermons.


CHURCH OF
BRETHREN

* Church of the Brethren, 700 S.
Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-1597.
* Lorida Church of the Brethren
332 Palms Estates Road, Lorida
(three blocks south of U.S. 98)
Mailing address is P.O. Box 149,
Lorida, FL 33857. Phone 655-


1466. Sunday School classes for
children, youth and adults at 9:30
a.m. Christian worship at 10:30
a.m. Pastor, Rev. Jim Baker.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

* Avon Park Church of Christ,
200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Minister: Larry Roberts.
Sunday Worship Services, 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities
are available at every service. Bible
Study:. Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered
classes for all ages. Church phone:
453-4692.
* Sebring Parkway Church of
Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443. We
would like to extend an invitation
for you and your family to visit with,
us here at Sebring Parkway. Our
hours of service are: Sunday Bible
Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship
Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening
Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible
Class, 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF
NAZARENE

* Church of the Nazarene of
Sebrlng, 420 Pine St., Sebring.
Sunday: Sunday School begins at
9:45 a.m. for all ages; Morning
Worship at 10:45 a.m.; Service at 6
p.m. Wednesday evening service
at 7 p.m. with special services for
children, youth and adults. Special
services once a month for seniors
(Prime Timers), and young adults
and families. Call for details at 385-
0400. Pastor Emmett Garrison.
* First Church of the Nazarene
of Avon Park, P.O. Box 1118.,
Avon Park, FL 33825-1118. 707 W.
Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor.
Sunday: Sunday school begins at
9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wor-
ship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening
service at 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening service is at 7 p.m. with
special services for children and
adults. Special services once a
month for seniors (Prime Time) and
Ladies ministries. If you need any'
more information, call 453-4851.
* First Church of the Nazarene
of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake
Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852.
Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning
worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7
p.m. Classes for adult children and
youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim
Taylor.


CHURCHES OF
CHRIST IN
CHRISTIAN UNION

* Community Bible Church -
Churches of Christ in Christian
Union, (Orange Blossom
Conference Center) 1400 C-17A
North (truck route), Avon Park.
Presenting Jesus Christ as the
answer for time and eternity.
Sunday morning worship service,
10:30 a.m. Nursery provided.
Junior Church activities at same
time for K-6 grade. Sunday School
Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m.
(Transportation available.) Sunday
evening praise and worship serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening
prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and
youth activities at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Everyone is welcome,
please come worship with us. Don
Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone
452-0088.


"He Stills the Storms" with
Scripture from Mark 4:35-41 at the
services this Sunday.
Watch for information on
Vacation Bible School to be held
the week of July 20.

Sebring Christian Church
SEBRING - "Heaven Help the
Home," six messages that focus on
God's instructions to families,
begins Sunday.
Also beginning Sunday is "J/K,"
an exciting new worship service
designed Just for Kids starts at
9:30 a.m.
Watch for details on Vacation
Bible School. This year the theme
includes a "trip down to the bayou"
at Crocadile Dock. Call the church
office for more information.
Office hours are from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Monday-Friday. For informa-
tion on any of the programs, call
the church office at 382-6676.
The church is at 4514 Hammock
Road in Sebring.

Sebring Church of the
Brethren
SEBRING - Sunday worship
service, Father's, Day, will find
Pastor Keith Simmons preach on
"Father or Dad?" The'Scripture
reading will be from Matthew
23:8-12.
Sunday school will be led by the

Continued on.page 7B











www. newssun.corm News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009



Mitchum Brothers perform June 28 at Bethany

Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK - The Mitchum Brothers, a
trio organized in 1980, will perform at 6 p.m.
Sunday, June 28 at Bethany Baptist Church.
The original group consisted of brothers
David, Dean and Paul. Over the years, other
family members joined the group 4nd, during
the late '80s and early '90s, they were known
as The Mitchum Family..
In June 2000, David, Paul and nephew Troy
once again sang as The Mitchum Brothers.
When Troy married and moved from Central
Florida in 2002, David and Paul joined with
tenor Junior Combs and changed the name to
The Coastalmen. Junior left in December 2003
and was replaced by Tim Webster.
The new group released their first single,
"God Is," in late 2004 with DJ Man
Productions and received national airplay in
major Christian markets around the country. In
October 2005, the decision was made to change
the name back to The Mitchum Brothers.
Bass singer Chad Johns was added in early
2009, making the transition from trio to quar-
tet.
They have performed with well-known
Christian groups and.soloists, as well as in Courtesy photc
numerous churches and concert stages around The Mitchum Brothers, a trio organized in 1980, will perform at 6 p.m.
thnumer counts churches and concert stages aroSunday, June 28 at Bethany Baptist Church in Avon Park.
the country.


Page 7B

Church News
Continued from page 6B
Rev. Wendell Bohrer and will meet in the Garst
Chapel. They will be studying "Servants Together."
They will also be looking at I Corinthians 3:1-15.

Southside Baptist Church
SEBRING - In the worship service Sunday, the
Rev. David Altman will continue in the Faith in
Practice series in the book of James. At 6:30 p.m.,
Chuck Pausley will speak frbm the book of I Peter
in the Our Wonderful Savior series.
The church is at 379 S. Commerce Ave. Call 385-
0752 or visit www.southsidebaptistsebring.com.

Spring Lake United Methodist Church
SEBRING - The pastor's sermon on Sunday is
"Honor Parents; No Murder; No Adultery." Men of
the church will be honored for Father's Day. A -
potluck dinner will.follow the service.
The church is at 8170 Cozumel Lane.

The Way Church
SEBRING - Pastor Reinhold Buxbaum will
bring a Father's Day message this Sunday morning.
The family meeting has been postponed to June
28 following the worship service.
The church is at 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive. The
office phone is 471-6140; the pastor's cell phone is
381-6190. Church information and the pastor's
messages can be viewed at www.thewaychurch.org.


PLACES To WORSHIP


EPISCOPAL

* The Episcopal Church of the
Redeemer.Service times are 8:30
and 10 a.m. with Holy Communion.
Coffee hour following services.
Newcomers welcome. Rector is the
Rev. Joyce Holmes. Call 453-5664
or e-mail redeemer18954@aol.comrn
Web site: redeemeravon.com. The
church is at 839 Howe's Way, Avon
Park (two miles north of Sun 'N
Lake Boulevard, across from Wells
Dodge.)
* St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL
33870. Sunday Services; Holy
Eucharist Rite I - 7:45 a.m., Holy
Eucharist Rite II - 10 a.m. Midweek
service on Wednesday at 6 p.m.
Sunday 'School for all-ages at 9
a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m.
,until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m.
service ends. Wednesday: Adult
Bible study 9:30 a.im. Visitors are
always welcome. The Rev. Jim
Kurtz, rector. Church office 385-
*7649, for more information.
* St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal
Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-
0051. Rev. 'Elizabeth L. Myers,
Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m.,
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening: Holy Communion with
Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child
care available at the 8 a.m. and
10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come
and join us.


GRACE BRETHREN

* Grace Brethren Church, 3626
Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-
0869. Dr. Randall Smith, Senior-
Pastor, Rev. David Ogden,
Associate Pastor, Matt Wheelock,
Assistant to the Pastor, and Aaron
Michaud, Youth Director. "Kid City"
Children's Ministries: 9 a.m.-12
noon, First Service: 9 a.m.-10:15
a.m., Drinks, Donuts and
Fellowship: 10:15 a.m.-10:45 a.m.,
Second Service: 1.0:45 a.m.-12
noon. Sunday Evening Service: 6
p.m.-7 p.m., Wednesday .Evening
Service: 7 p.m.,8 p.m. "Crave"
Youth Doings, Christian Life:
Application, Bible Study and
Prayer, and "Kid City" Children's
Activities. "Kid City" Pre-School/
Day Care: Nursery Age Through
5th Grade. Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-
6 p.m. (By Registration Call: 385-
3111).


INTERDENOMINATIONAL

* World Harvest and Restoration
Ministries, (non-denominational)
2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-
3771. Sunday service: Sunday
School, 10 a.m. and worship, '11
a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m.
prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor:
W.H. Rogers.


JEWISH

* Temple Israel of Highlands
County, ,1305 Temple Israel Drive,
Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome
Rabbi Lorraine Rudenberg.
Hebrew Language Class- from
12:30-2 p.m., June 11 and 18;
Torah Study with Rabbi Lorraine
Rudenberg at 3 p.m. June 6 and
20, and with Howard Salles from
2:30-4 p.m. June 11 and 18;
Shabbat Service with Rabbi
Rudenberg followed by Oneg at 6
p.m. June 5 and 19; Havdallah
Service at 5 p.m. June 6 and 20.
Howard Salles' Torah Study will
resume in September. Open to
anyone who cares to attend.
Summer hours may vary. For fur-
ther' information, call the Temple
office at 382-7744.


LUTHERAN

* Atonement Lutheran Church
(ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview
Drive., Sebring. The Rev. Felice A.
Johnson, pastor. Jim Helwig,
organist/choir director. Holy
Eucharist at 9:30 a.m.; Parish Choir
at 6:45 p.m. Wednesday; and
Mary/Martha Circle meets at noon
first Tuesday for lunch. Phone 385-
0797.
* Christ Lutheran Church Avon
Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2
mile east of. Avon Park. High
School. Sunday Divine Worship is
at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is cel-
ebrated every week with traditional
Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs
of praise. Fellowship time.with cof-
.fee and refreshments follows wor-
ship. Come worship and fellowship
with us. For information, call Pastor
Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see
christlutheranavonpark. org.
* Faith Luthdran Church -
LCMS, 2740 Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848,
Faith's .Closet phone: 385-2782.
Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann
Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship serv-
ices: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday
School for children and adult Bible
classes is 9:15. a.m.; and Praise
.worship service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Communion is served the
first and third'and fifth Sunday of
the month. Sunday worship service
is broadcast on WLTS 1340 AM at 8
a.m. each Sunday. Educational
opportunities include weekly adult
Bible studies. Special worship serv-
ices.are on Thanksgiving Eve,
Christmas Eve, New Year's Eve
and Easter. Midweek services are
� during Advent and Lent. Faith's
Closet Resale Shop is open to the
community from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m.
to noon Saturday. The Closet is
closed Mondays. All are warmly
welcome in trie family of faith.
* . Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church (AALC) American
Association of Lutheran
Churches, 4348 Schumacher
Road, Sebring, one mile west of
Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor.
Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Bible Study, 9 a.m.
Nursery provided. Social activities:
Choir, Missions, Evangelism.
Phone 385-1163.
li New Life Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a
Congregation of the Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship
/with the Wisconsin Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday
Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9
a.m.' For more information, call.
Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or
visit the Web site at wwwnew/lfe
sebring.com.
* Resurrection Lutheran Church
- ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon
Park. Pastor: Rev. John C.
Grodzinski. Holy Eucharist, 9:30
a.m. Sunday; Coffee and fellowship
hour follow the service. Midweek
Frangrance Free Wednesday wor-
ship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office
phone number is 453-6858.
* Trinity Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake
Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The
Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and
Noel Johnsonri, youth and family life.
Worship schedule for December
through Easter: Worship service 8
and 11 a.m.; Communion services,
first and third.Sundays; (Children's
Church, 11 a.m. only); and
Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship
schedule for summer through fall:
Worship service, 9 a.m.;
Communion services, first and third
Sunday; Education Hour 10:30
a.m. Additional services: Lent and
Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy
Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.;
Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.;
Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas
Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve,
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship


activities: Youth Group, Senior
Citizens, Younger Side Adults,
Ladies Missionary League, Ladies
Guild, Small group studies as
scheduled. Music: Choir and hand
chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5
years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday. License:
C14H10020: Susan Norris, direc-
tor. Visit us online at: www.vhchurch-
es.comr/tinity/utheran/p.


NON-DENOMINATIONAL

* Bible Fellowship Church, 3750
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Sunday: First Worship serv-
ice and Sunday school, 9 a.m.;
Second Worship service and
Sunday school, 10:45 a.m. A nurs-
ery is provided for children up to 2
years old. Evening: Junior and
Senior Youth, 6 p.m. and evening
service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday:
Youth, 5-8 p.m. Children (3 years to
fifth grade), 5:50-7:30 p.m. Adult
classes, 6:30 p.m.; Prayer time,
6:30 p,rnm. Dr. Eugene Bengtson,
pastor; Todd Patterson, associate
pastor. Church office 385-1024. .
* Calvary Church, 1825
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872; 386-4900. An independent
community church. Sunday mom-
ing worship, 9:30 a.m.; Bible study,
10:45 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6 p.m.
Wednesday Bible studies, 6:30
a.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small
friendly church waiting for your
visit.
* Christian Training Ministries
Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off
County Road 17 on Simpson
Avenue. Sunday, service is at 10
a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7
p.m. A nursery and children's
church are provided. The church is
part of Christian International
Ministries Network, a full gospel,
non-denominational ministry. Linda
M. Downing, minister: Phone, 314-
9195, llndad ownivg@hotmail com.
Casey L. Downing, associate min-
ister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown
ing@hotmai/.com, Web site is
www. christiantraninhgministies.net
* Grace Bible Church, 4541
Thunderbird Road, (second church
on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone,
382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior
pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30
p.m. Sunday, 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m.
(ASL), 11:30 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m.
Grace Bible Academy Adult
Investigating Truth; first and third
Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15
p.m.; Wednesday, Children's &
Youth - Programs, 6 p.m.;
Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College
Ministry. www.GBCconnected.org
* Highlands Community Church,
a casual contemporary church,
meets at 3005 New Life Way.
Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10
a.m. Nursery and Kid's World
classes. Small groups meet
throughout the week. Church
phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A.
Linhart.
* Union Congregational Church,
106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday worship services
are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15
a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m.
(contemporary) in the main sanctu-
ary. Sunday school for all ages is at
9:15 a.m. We .also offer
Wednesday and Saturday services
at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respective-
ly. Nursery/child care is available
for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill
Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web
page at wwwweareunlon.org. All
teachings are taken from the
Manufacturer's Handbook - The
Holy Bible. Come join us.
. Unity Life Enrichment Centre,
new location, 10417 Orange
Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL
33875; 471.-1122; e-mail
unity@vistanet.net. Web site,
www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Celebration Service,
Nursery and Children's Church.
Weekly Classes, Christian


Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer
Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups.
Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior
minister transforming lives from
ordinary to extraordinary.
` Visions Christian Community
Church, 105 Jim Rodgers Ave.,
Avon Park (in the historical build-
ing). Pastor is Alvin Conner.
Sunday worship, 11:15 a.m.
Wednesday - Youth Cultural Arts
Ministry, 5:30 p.m.; Youth Bible
Study, 7 p.m.; and Adult Bible
'Study, 7 p.m. Holy Communion is
first Sunday of each month. Youth
ministry is fourth Sunday. Women's
Ministry is. fifth Sunday. "Where
there is. no vision my people per-
ish."
* The Way Church, 1005 N.
Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday
school and worship service at 9
a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activi-
ties, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. The
Way is a churcji family who gathers
for contemporary worship, teaching
of God's Word, prayer and fellow-
ship. Come early and stay after for
fellowship time. Child care and chil-
dren's church are provided.
Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The
Way - A place for you. Office
Phone:471-6140, Church Cell
Phone:381-6190. Email:. theway
church @hotmai. com. Web site:
www TheWayChurch.org


PRESBYTERIAN

* Covenant Presbyterian Church
(PCA), 4500 Sun 'N Lake Blvd.,
Sebring, . 33872-2113. A
Congregation of the Presbyterian
Church in America. Worship servic-
es: Sunday morning worship, infor-
mal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday
evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday
evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.;
Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:30-
7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m.
Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759;
e-mail: covpres@strato.net Web
site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W.
Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours:
8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through
Thursday.
* First Presbyterian Church
ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two
entrances on LaGrande), Avon
Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242.
The Rev. Robert Johnson is the
pastor. Fellowship time, 9 a.m.;
Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Adult
Bible Study, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Children's
Church, 10:45 a.m.; and Women's
Bible Study, 6:30 p.m. Other week-
ly activities: Wednesday Prayer,
9:30 a.m.; Pastor's Bible study,
10:30 a.m.; First Wednesday lunch,
11:30 a.m.; Circles: Second
Tuesday, 1 and 7:30 p.m. and sec-
ond Wednesday, 1 p.m.; Potluck
dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday;
and choir "practice, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Be a part of a warm,
caring church family with traditional
services, following biblical truth.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring,
FL' 33870. 385-0107. Sunday
School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.;
Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday:
"KFC" Kids for Christ Youth Group,
3:15-4:15 p.m.; Senior High Youth
Group, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Wednesday:
Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir
rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery avail-
able for Sunday worship. Call the
church office for more information
and other classes. Rev. Darrell A.
Peer, pastor. Richard Hart, director
of youth ministry.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, www.fpcp.com, 118 N. Oak
Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. E-
mail: fpc/p@earthlink.net The Rev.
Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the
Rev. Drew Severance, associate
pastor. Sunday morning worship is
at 8:30 and 11 a.m.; and contempo-
rary worship is at 10:45 a.m. in
Friendship Hall. A variety 6f Sunday
school classes for adults and chil-


dren are at 9:30 a.m. Call the
church office for more information
about the classes offered. Nursery
is provided for babies and toddlers;
while young children up to second
grade have a special Children's
Church offered during the worship
service to help them grow in their
spiritual knowledge.
* Spring Lake Presbyterian
Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School,
9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m.
Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the
second Thursday of the month,
September through June. Board of
Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. -first
Monday of the month. Choir
rehearses at 7 p.m. each
Wednesday, September through
April. Presbyterian Women meet at
10 a.m. the third Thursday of the
month. Pastor: The Rev. Kathryn
Treadway. Organist: Richard
Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan
Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713;
e-mail, springlakepc@embarq-
mail.com, Web site,
http.//s/lp.presbychurch. org.


SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST

* Avon Park Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 1410 West
Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone:
453-6641 -or e-mail: avonparks-
da@embarqmail/com, Saturday
early morning worship service is at
8:30 a.m..; Saturday, Sabbath
School, 9:30 a.m Saturday.;
Vespers at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.
Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m.
Church Service ' 10:45 a.m.
Saturday. Community Service
hours on Tuesday and Thursday is
from 9:00 a.m. till Noon. Senior
Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate
Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker
Memorial Academy Christian
School offering education for
kindergarten through 12th grades.
ALL ARE WELCOME. Website is
ww discoveresus. org
M Sebring Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, 2106 N. State
Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438.
Worship Services: 9:15 a.m.
Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meet-
ing, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m.
Community service: every Monday
9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr.
Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m.
Pastor Amado Luzbet.


THE CHURCH OF
LATTER DAY SAINTS

* The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand
Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33870.
Phone: 382-9092. Dale Bargar,
bishop; Butler-Tyler, first counselor;
and James Parker, second coun-
selor. Family History Center: 382-
1822. Sunday services: Sacrament
meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel
Doctrine, 11:20Ya.m. to noon; and
Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-1
p.m. Youth activities from 7-8:20
p.m. Wednesday: 11-year-old
Scouts, 7-8:20 p.m. first and third
Wednesday; and activity days for
8-11 year old girls from 7-8:20 p.m.
second and fourth Wednesday.


THE SALVATION
ARMY

* The Salvation Army - Center
for Worship. Sunday: Sunday
School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meet-
ing, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting
and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Prayer,
6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries,
7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth
Ministries, 5 p.m. Every fourth
Thursday is Men's Fellowship, 6:30
p.m. 'All meetings are at 120 N.
Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For
more information, visit the Web site
www.salvationarmyseblnng.com or
*


call Captain Mary Holmes at 385-
7548, ext. 110.


UNITED METHODIST

* First United Methodist Church,
105 S. Pine St., Sebring; FL 33870.
The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor.
Traditional Worship Service at
10:55 a.m. in the sanctuary,
Contemporary Worship in the FLC
at 9:40 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30
and 10:40 a.m. for all ages, Youth
Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday
with Rick Heilig, youth director.
The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship
service is broadcast over WITS
1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery
available at all services.
* First United Methodist Church,
200 South Lake Avenue, Avon
Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759,
Reverend Gary Pendrak, Pastor,
Summer Schedule, Sunday School
- 9:00 a.m., Worship - 10:30 a.m.
* Memorial United Methodist
Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlook-
ing Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL,
33852. The Rev. Douglas S. Pareti,
senior pastor. Claude H.L. Bumett,
pastoral assistant. Sunday sched-
ule: Union Worship Service at 9:30
a.m.; New Song worship service at
9:30 a.m.; Sunday School for all
ages at 10:45 a.m.; Loving nursery
care provided every Sunday mom-
ing. We offer Christ-centered
Sunday school classes, youth pro-
grams, Bible studies, book studies.
and Christian fellowship. We are a
congregation that want to know
Christ and make Him known. Call
the church office at 465-2422 or
check out our church Web site at
www.memorialumc.corn.
* St. John United Methodist
Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive,
Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev.
Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor.
Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. Life Connections
meets at 5:30 p.m. each
Wednesday in the fellowship hall
from September to May for dinner
and age .appropriate studies.
Nursery provided for all services.
Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnse-
bring.org
* Spring Lake United Methodist
Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane,
(Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde
Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship serv-
ice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study
meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday.
Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m; on
Thursday. Church office phone:
655-0040.


UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST

* Emmanuel United Church of
Christ, where God is still speak-
ing. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL
33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27
and Hammock Road). Sunday wor-
ship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with
worship first Sunday of -month;
Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all
other Sundays. All are welcome to
receive the sacrament. For more
information, call the church office at
471-1999 or e-mail euccdearth
link.net or check the Web site
sebringemmanuelucc.com. \ No
matter who you are or where you
are on life's journey, you're wel-
come here.


VINEYARD

* Heartland Vineyard, 2523 U.S.
27 South, (just past the Wild Turkey
Tavern) Avon Park. Contemporary
Worship is at 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Children's Church and
Preschool/Nursery provided
Sunday. Pastor, Gerry Woltman.
Telephone: 453-9800. Casual, con-
temporary and Christ-centered.


I








News-Suri Friday, June 19, 2009


www.newssun.com


LDS growth forces r .

boundary change ..


By EDITH ALEXANDER
Special to the News-Sun
Rapid growth of The
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints in this area,
due largely to convert bap-
tismsi, i s caused a boundary
change for local members.
In the interest of fostering
a family feeling among mem-
bers ind allowing everyone
to par cipate in the operation
of tb,- church, congregations
are kept to a manageable
size. When "membership
increases beyond that size,
new wkrds and stakes are cre-
ated'by changing boundaries
and building new buildings to
accommodate this increase.
Recently this has occurred
in the Fort Myers Stake. A
stake is a larger geographical
area in the church that con-
tains smaller local units,
called wards. The Fort
Myers, Brandon, and
Lakeland Stakes have now
had ,,boundary changes that
have created a new stake, The
Bradenton Stake. This Stake
includes wards in North Port,
Port Charlotte, Venice,
Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch,
Bradenton, Wauchula,
Palmetto, Peace River,
Arcadia and Sebring.
. The new Stake President is
Robert W. Clover Sr. Clover
resides in Port Charlotte with
his wife, Betty. They are the
parents of two children and
five 'grandchildren. He has
previously served in many
positions in the church
including Counselor in the
Fort Myers Stake Presidency,,
Bishop, High Councilor and
working with the scouts.
There is no paid ministry
in the church; as a result all
leaders . have full-time
employment outside the
church. Clover is a retired
executive of UPS. He is the
presiding authority) over the
new Stake.


Leaders are called by reve-
lation and serve until they are
released.
, Assisting Clover will 'be
his First Counselor, H. Cal
Squires of Sarasota, and
Second Counselor, Gregory
H. Egan of Lakewood Ranch.
This local growth is com-
parable to the world-wide
growth of this Christian
church.


Courtesy photo
H. Cal Squires (from left),
as First Counselor, will
assist new Stake
President Robert W.
Clover Sr. Also assisting
will be Second Counselor
Gregory H. Egan. The
Sebring area falls under
the newly formed
Bradenton Stake of The
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints.


SNAPSHOTS


Church has ongoing
thrift shop sales
AVON PARK - Church
of the Redeemer, located on
U.S. 27 South in Avon Park
(across from Wells Motors),
is continuing its Thrift Shop
sale every Saturday from 8
a.m. to noon. A new addition
is a bag sale, where you can
fill a bag with selected ,
clothing items for $1. There
is a good variety of clothing
and household items to
choose from.

Church youth plan
car wash
LAKE PLACID - The
youth of First Baptist
Church of Lake Placid are
holding a fundraiser car -
wash from 9-11 a.m.
Saturday at the church.

'Truth Trek' is
theme of VBS
SEBRING - "Truth Trek"
Vacation Bible School will
begin Monday and continue
through Friday, Junie 26 from
9'11:30 a.m. at Spring Lake
Presbyterian Church.
The program is open to all
children ages 3 through com-
pletion of fifth grade.
The church is at 5887 U..S.
98 in Spring Lake. For more
information, call the church
office at 655-0713.


pitew


Smoked Gusto $ 49
* Center Cut Ham Steak Ib.
While Supplies Last SAVE $1.90 per lb.


Mini Seedless
Watermelons


SAVE $0.98 on 2


Call the

News-Sun

7-856155

45Z-1009
465-0426


Tombstone Pizza 4/$ 0
20.5 - 27.7 oz. - All Varieties
12 inch Frozen
Limit 4 SAVE $6.76 on 4


12 Pack Michelob
12 oz. - Bottles or Cans
Michelob Ultra, Michelob Light
Limit 4 SAVE $1.00
\ I I I___ ___ _ . ..... _ L .... ..... I_[ I I . -.. . . -. I L I......


Page 8B


Visit www.SweetbaySupermarket.com for a location near you.








www.newssun.com


News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


FASHION


Keep your L 1

summer Ai J


clothes

looking new
ARA Content
Summer fashion always
calls for bright, fun colors
that are a welcome relief
after a long winter of black
and gray. However, those
bright summer clothes
come at a cost - more
maintenance and tricky
summertime stains. There
are tricks you can use to
keep your favorite summer
clothes looking as fresh and
bright in September as they
did in May.
Style expert Sam
Saboura, from TLC's "Real
Simple. Real Life" and
author of "Real Style," has
a few tips on how to not
only add the hottest new
trends for summer to your
wardrobe, but also extend
the life of your clothes:
This season, it's all about
shopping your closet. You
can easily get the look you
want by taking a pair of
dark denim jeans from your
closet, cuffing the bottoms
and pairing them with
embellished sandals and a
bright top. No matter the
month, a pair of dark jeans
is one of the most versatile
pieces of clothing you can
own. To keep your denim
looking darker and brighter
longer, turn jeans inside out
before you wash them, use
cold water, add a color
booster and stain remover
and line-dry,
One of the best ways to
stay cool and stylish this


season is to layer sheer,
lightweight tops. Layers
add dimension and levels,
and make you look ,put
together and in the know
with little to no effort. Keep
the palette soft and neutral
for a light, airy style. You'll
love 'the ease and comfort
of this simple trend.
Two of this summer's hot
colors are red and green,
but it's important to find a
color that looks great on
you. You can easily 'slim
down your look by combin-,
ing bright colors with con-,
trasting dark colors. Draw
attention to areas you want
to play up by wearing
bright hues like pinks and
yellows, and use darker col-
ors to play down areas
you'd prefer not to high-
light. It's an instant
makeover at no cost.
Moms and dads can let
kids get creative when
picking out clothes from
their closet. Mixing and
matching colors, patterns
and prints is a great style
for kids this season. Parents
can feel comfortable know-
ing their kids' creative pair-
ing of clothing is right on
trend.


Preserve your style by solving summer stains


ARA Content
From the barbecue sauce
dripped on your favorite
blouse to the cherry popsicle
the kids smeared on the patio
furniture cushions, summer
is the season of stains. But
stained clothes and uphol-
stery probably don't make
the kind of style statement
you'd like as you entertain
this summer.
"Stains can ruin.an other-
wise flawless outfit or beau-
tiful home," says Clinton
Kelly, fashion consultant and
co-host of TLC's "What Not
to.Wear." "With all the back-
yard parties, summer outings
and entertaining that take
place during the summer,
stains . and spills- are
inevitable. But you don't
have to sacrifice your per-
sonal or your home's style
because of stains."
Kelly offers some tips on
maintaining your warm-
weather style, and keeping
your, home in tip-top 'shape
and stain-free this summer:

Learn how to layer
Layering is a summer
essential, especially if you
live in a region with signifi-
cant temperature differences
from day to night. Layering'
lets you put on or take off as
much as you need to be com-
fortable. TQ layer well, look
for lightweight, items that fit
close to the body so that you
don't add extra bulk. For
example, layer a tank, top
under a button-down shirt,
add a lightweight sweater or
vest and top with a structured
jacket.


Stains are the enemy
of good style
Keeping your summer
whites white and .your sum-/
mer get-togethers stain free
can be'a challenge. Keep an
eye out for stains and pre-
treat them before tossing gar-
ments into the wash.
A laundry pre-treater like
-OxiClean Max Force will
help break up tough stains
including food, grease and
grass, before they become set
in.

Extend your style
secrets to the home'
Your home should be a
reflection of you at your best
and a way to express your
personal style. So don't over-
look household fabrics and


upholstery while you're
fighting summer stains. To
keep patio cushions, carpets
and upholstered furniture
:looking their best, make sure
to have a color-safe stain
remover on hand for food
spills and pet messes.

Upgrade your
entertaining,
When entertaining this
summer, think about .simple,
inexpensive ways to upgrade
your décor. Using
white or off-white cloth nap-
kins are a chic and eco-
friendly alternative to buying
paper napkins. It's a good
idea to create a summer stain
emergency kitthat consists of
a multipurpose cleaner like
OxiClean Versatile Stain
Remover to tackle barbecue.


wine or food stains on linens
after party guests have left.
Or, use it to scrub down the
deck and clean patio furni-
ture before and after back-
yard entertaining.
"Your fashion and style
arsenal should not only con-
sist of clothes and fabrics that
make you and your home
look great, 'but should also
include powerful stain
removers that keep' items
looking their best," Clinton
says.
"After all, style isn't just
about the clothes you choose
or how you personalize your
home, it's also about taking
care of your clothes and
keeping them free of stains."
To learn more about stain
removal, visit www.
OxiClean.com.


"A'


GRILLED
LOIN
KEY WEST ShRIMP
ALMOND CHICKEN-.


z oo 1 Summer Hours:
11am-4pm

S1am-3pm

340 B. Intertke Blvd.
Lake PlatId FL 33652
863.699.5577
Hotdogs - Chicago. NY Coney, Kraut,
& many others,
Old Fashioned Milkshakes,
Fries, Slaw, Baked Beans
NY Style Cheesecake, Key Lime Pie,
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Private Parties & Events 10 or more


Restaurant

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DOT'S SPECIALTY
Everyday 'L-QP 49#*
2 big eggs, homefries or"
grits & bacon or sausage.
Toast or biscuit.

SERVING BREAKFAST ALL DAY

Sebring Square Plaza 382-2333
Mon-Sat 6:30am-2pm * Sun 7am-2pm


Serving Carved Meats Daily
* Two Salad Bars * Soup & Bread Bar
* Two Hot Bars - 10 to 12 Entrees
Assortment of Side Dishes
* Dessert Bar * Beverage Bar
100 Sebring Square, US 27
in the Winn Dixie Shopping Center
Plenty of Seating
OPEN DAILY 1AM - SPM
FRIDAY & SATURDAY OPEN TIL 8:30
DINNER ALL DAY SUNDAY








eta nt ad 1A7i , t

ea/izy a/one L4 lea.e� y




Epiciirus quotes (Greek philoso-
pher, BC 341-2,70)


: ''W'le ' -w SO emme r t rW..



4 tsf New Summer Bistro


B j^ SERVED WITH A GARLIC BREAD STICK. ENJOY A COMPLIMENTARY GLASS OF
0]9pIA!,. ONAY, WHITE ZINFANDEL, CA0ERNETI BUDWEISSER O WD fI7T SERVED 4.00PM
. -, , .TILL : PM M tON, .A .i_, NI TILL.,:.00

. -' plSfAT L7Fic,4ALMON WrH D~P7 h 4j7i#AND ARTICHOKES WITH "-?.
'MIIPWP& YVL_ t(N POTATOLS FIND;S90E A. _AINi MUSTARD SAUCE- ,A
,'' . ' ' '1 I "t w... --."-.

MARINATED GRILLED CHICKEN BREASTrERVED WITH FBESH ARUJLA, GOAT CHEESE,
OVEN bRIEOI T.AT eStAS'.,AND LEMON AIOLI '- -;


* APPLE CIDER MARINATED GRI"DP Lt'WL SbVED WITH WHIPPED YUKON POTATOES,. -
GREEN M AN$ AND FUJI APPPLES . -


GARLIC SAUTEED KEY WEST PINK SHRIMP TOSSED IN LINGUINE AND BROCOLINI


ALMON CHICKEN
ALMOND ENCRUSTED CHICKEN BREAST WITH POLENTA CAKE, SAUTEED SPINAitW -2
PARMESAN AND BASIL OIL


/ BISrTRO ANCUUS
APPLEWOOD SMOKED BACON WRAPPED 4 OZ BEEF
MEDALLION GRILLED WITH ROASTED ASPARAGUS, HERB
WEDGE POTATOES AND BALSAMIC REDUCTION


TURKEY, APPLE, BRIE CROISSANT
BOAR'S HEAD TURKEY BREAST AGED BRIE, FUJI APPLES, AND
RASPBERRY COULIS.ON.A WARM CROISSANT WITHCURRY POTATO

S-. fNEl VEiETABL -PENNE" --
ZUCCHINI. Y LOWS SH, ASPARAGUS, SWEE PEPPERS ANDT;A~MO '
- 04- . .'.M( PENNeFAND FENNEL SEED 0'

."-"'" . SH 'I AND CHIPS
" - .E"' "- fl .ATLANTIC WHITE FISH SERVED WITH HOUSE
* ,., 0COKED CHIPS AND TARTAR SAUCE

Prices starting at $7.99

Who Said There's Not a Silver Lfnivng.t a Down MarkE

S '- 3100. Golfview Rd. Sebring
.. Located In Inn on the Lakes
W314-0348


Page 9B


CHAJRLIEVS)

7AFOO"


113 South Commerce Ave.
Sebring, Florida 33870
Tel. (863) 382-2983
Open: Tue. thru Thurs. * 4:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Early Bird (Thes. thru Thurs.) from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Fri. & Sat. * 4:00 pm to 9:30 pm
Located on Commerce Ave Behind Sandy's Circle Cafe


,.1' ~jj


* ' f ' ., ',


�*�' ; '.. ,.
~ - . fr


,








Page 10B

LAwN & GARDEN


News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


www.newssun.com


Create memorable outdoor parties for less


ARA Content
The backyard will be the
summer entertainment hot
spot as Americans seek
affordable ways to spend
time with family and friends.
But your outdoor party can
be spoiled quickly if unwel-
come insects show up.
More than half of back-
yard revelers have moved a
party indoors due to mosqui-
toes, and 46 percent have left
a party to escape the pests,
according to a new survey
from the makers of OFF!
PowerPad Lamp and Lantern.
Create an unforgettable
party within a tight budget
. with these five tips from
Natalie Ermann Russell,


author of "The Outdoor
Entertaining Idea Book:"
1. Keep decor simple:
Save money on decorations
by making the most of the
greenery and foliage that sur-
round you. Simple potted
plants as center pieces create
an elegant setting at little
cost, and they'll last much
longer than cut flowers.
2. Set a realistic menu:
Give yourself a break by cre-
ating a menu that is realistic
for your budget and your
schedule. To get the best
prices, focus on foods that
are in season and check out
your local farmers' market
for deals. Using produce


from the farmers' market also
makes for less work - the
flavors of these foods are so
intense and beautiful, they're
at their best when prepared
simply. For example, a pasta
primavera with blanched
farmers' market veggies can
be assembled quickly, and is
super colorful and so deli-
cious.
3. Invite guests to pitch in:
The beloved potluck is mak-
ing a comeback. Your friends
and family will enjoy con-
tributing to the event, but be
sure to be specific about what
you need so \that you end up
with a good variety of foods.
And establishing a theme can


make it even more fun. For
instance, call it the Fresh
from the Farmers' Market
Potluck, where each person
brings a dish to highlight a
different fruit or vegetable
that's in season.
4. Keep away mosquitoes
for less: OFF! PowerPad
Lamp can repel mosquitoes
from an area of up to 15 by
15 feet - the size of an
entire patio - for less than
$10. It would take 15 cit-
ronella candles at a cost of up
.to $60 to protect this same
area.
5. Plan right: The fear of
running out of food often
drives hosts to prepare twice


as much food as they need - steak, fish, chicken) and one
at twice the cost. Know your to two ounces of a side dish


head count beforehand and
shop accordingly. A general
rule of thumb is to plan for
six to eight ounces per person
of the main protein (e.g.,


like rice or pasta.
Use these simple and
affordable tips to entice your
guests to linger at your next
outdoor party.


Expert tips for creating a backyard habitat for colorful summer birds
Exer -isfrcetn, akadhbia o ooflsme id


ARA Content
Whether city or country, bird
watching is fun and you can create
an environment for it in your own
backyard in less time than you
think. Summer is a great time to get
started because the most colorful
birds with beautiful songs are
around to enhance your outdoor
environment.
"Late May, June and July are
great times to bird watch because
lots of birds are nesting," says John
Robinson, chief ornithologist and
manager of Scotts Birding Center of
Excellence. He goes on to explain
that the colorful males are display-
ing their plumage to attract the
females so you can see plenty of
beautiful species. Ip addition, once
the baby. birds are old enough to
leave the nest, the mother will show
them where food is, making your
backyard feeder a much-appreciated
resource.
Robinson says there are three
components to making your back-
yard an oasis for feathered friends:

Vegetation provides
shelter
Having a variety of shrubs and


trees in your yard makes it bird
friendly. Birds use trees, shrubs and
plants to hide from both the ele-
ments and their natural predators, as
well as to roost or nest in.
Additionally, the right types of veg-
etation also provide fruit or seeds
for the birds to eat.
White pine, arborvitae, spruce,
juniper, cedar, holly and other
broadleaf and needle evergreens
provide essential protection all year
as well as food. Hedges of service-
berry or viburnum provide food,
shelter and nesting spots. Flowers
like columbine and trumpet vine
attract hummingbirds with their
sweet nectar.

Quality food nourishes
Not all bird food is created equal.
Look for blends that were
researched in the field and created
to attract the types of birds you
want to see in your backyard. Avoid
filler material like milo, wheat or
cracked corn.
To attract colorful birds,
Robinson recommends Scotts
Songbird Selections Colorful Bird
Blend, which was developed by
ornithologists. This mix is made


from 10 high-quality ingredients
that are blended in a specific ratio
designed to attract more colorful
birds. Results may vary by region
and/or season, but Colorful Bird
Blend has been proven to attract up
to twice as many than with ordinary
wild bird food. The mix is also less


-.t \




attractive to blackbirds, grackles
and cowbirds, which are often con-,
sidered a nuisance.
Another good option is Scotts
Songbird Selections Wild Finch &
Small Songbird Blend, which was
.scientifically mixed to attract
goldfinches'. Field research done


across the country by Robinson, his
team, and university partners,
shows that. while results may vary
by region -and/or season, this mix
can attract up to two times the
amount of finches as other types of
ordinary wild bird food.
Additionally, it also attracts other
interesting small birds such as
nuthatches, chickadees and native
sparrows.

* Water quenches thirst
Putting out a birdbath, especially
one with a trickle or fountain,
makes your garden a very popular
spot. Whether you put a decorative.
birdbath in your backyard or simply
place a large, clay saucer on the
ground or on top of a tree stump,
make sure it has a rough surface and'
a shallow bowl. If you have a pond,
or stream, place flat rocks in them
for bird perches.
Birds require fresh water, so
clean birdbaths often and replace
water every couple of days.
For more information and addi-
tional ideas'on how to create a bird
habitat in your own backyard, visit
www.scottswildbirdfood.com.


E www.newssunv




EWS
Highlands County's Hometown Ne


cwspaper Since 1927


ANNIVERSARY



SPECIAL'







82 A WEEK
For One Year - Plus Tax

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Either complete & mail the coupon below, including your payment
OR
Call us at (863) 385-6155
And we'll do the rest!
Start Reading What Your Neighbors Are Reading!


SE I ' START MY HOME DELIVERY ASAPI DELIVER THE LOCAL PAPER
FOR ONLY $42.64 INCLUDING TAX EVERY WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY
i "* AND SUNDAY FOR THE NEXT 52 WEEKS

Name Phone

Address

City ____State Zip_

Check Box: E Check El M/C or Visa # Exp. Date
SOffer valid only for nongSubscribers. Offer ends July 31, 2009.


JUDGE CLIFTON M. KELLY


The purpose of this award is to recognize outstanding service
by an individual who has improved the quality of life for
children and youth in Highlands County.


Criteria for Champion for Children Award
* Resides in Highlands County.
* Demonstrateds a deep, caring desire to help children.
* Has taken action to address a problem facing children and youth.
* Has provided five (5) years of service directly affecting the well-being of children.
* Past.nominess for this award may be renominated.
* Current members of Chilren's Services Council and Foundation are not eligible.

Nomination Form - please print
Nominee Name

Street Address

City/State/Zip

Phone #

1. Where does nominee work or volunteer (past or present)?


2. What kind of service to children does the nominee provide?




3. Why do you think the nominee deserves the award?






Sponsor Name Phone #

Street Address City/State/Zip

Sponsor's signature verifying accuracy of data
Please answer each question as completely as possible and submit the form to:
Children's Services Foundation, P.O. Box 7125, Sebring, FL 33872-0103 by July 7,2009
You may include additional material to support your nominee.
All nominees will be screened by a selection committee.


Adakk


I










www. newssun.corn


News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


Page 11B


CAR CARE

. Tires low on air a safety hazard


Thousands of aftermarket products can change the appearance of a vehicle, whether the
goal is to create a one-of-a-kind master piece, or simply to give a vehicle a fresh, new look.

Give your old car a new look


ARA Content
You don't have to buy a
new car or truck to get a new
look. Through the ute of spe-
cial products and accessories-,
drivers can transform . the
appearance of their vehicles
quickly, easily and affordably.
According to the Specialty
Equipment Market
Association (SEMA), there
are literally thousands of spe-
cialty parts that can give an
older vehicle a completely
new, appearance. Whether the
goal is to create a one-of-a-
kind masterpiece, or simply to
give a vehicle a fresh. new
look, a few simple steps is all
it may take.
Start with the interior.
There are countless products
available to update the inside
of a vehicle, including after-
market control knobs and
steering wheels, seat covers,
wood grain or carbon fiber
instrument panels and dash
kits. It's easy and inexpensive
to get a new cover for a steer-
ing wheel, or you can spend a
bit more to replace it entirely
with .a more sporty or luxuri-
qus one. Custom steering
Wheels come in a variety of
shapes and styles, and ate
available in different materi-
als such as wood, leather or
ligh-tech plastics:
Similarly, seat covers are
relatively inexpensive, easy to
install and are one of the most
dramatic ways to impact the
interior. Best of all, they come
in thousands of colors and
fabric combinations. Like
floor mats, seat covers can be
ordered with emblems or


If your vehicle is a
few years old, you
may want to
'modernize with new
mobile electronics.

logos on them, giving, con-
sumers the ability to show off
their team spirit or school
pride.
For those who want a new
look for the outside of their
car or truck, consider a new
grille, taillight surround,
bumper, hitch, ground effects
kit or other exterior product.
Wheels and tires, both of
which are among the most
popular vehicle accessories,
instantly update the look of a
car or truck. Prices, styles and
finishes vary greatly, so your
options really are unlimited.,
If your vehicle is a few'
years old, you may want to
consider modernizing with
new mobile electronics.
Bluetooth integration, naviga-
tion systems, video monitors
and DVD players can all be
installed in just about 'any car
or truck, regardless of its age.
Don't underestimate the
impact that a good cleaning
can have as well. Wax and
car-care science has' pro-
gressed to the point that there
is a restoring program for
almost any type of finish. Car-
care companies have even
designed power polishing
tools that :attach to any
portable drill, so it takes less
elbow-grease than ever to get
professional results.
. If your paint is damaged


beyond hope, automotive
paint companies offer a color
palette far beyond the bland
metallic treatments manufac-
turers usually use. Another
option rapidly becoming pop-
ular is vinyl wrap, which
looks like paint and applies
like vinyl: It comes on rolls in
a variety of colors and pat-
terns, and when properly
applied, does not damage the
original surface. If you decide
you want a change later on,
simply peel it off and lay on a
different wrap. It costs less
than a custom paint job and
the possibilities are endless.
SInstalling many types of,
restyling parts is designed to
be simple, and can often be
handled by anyone who
approaches the job with rea-
sonable care. But for best
results, more involved
makeovers - such as those
that require paint or body-
work, or replacement of com-
ponents that have safety-relat-
ed features, such as seat
assemblies - should be done
by professionals who have the
tools and experience for that
kind of work.
To locate products or pro-
fessional installers in your
area, .check
www.enjoythedrive.com, a
consumer site produced by
SEMA. The site contains
information about specific
automotive. specialty equip-
ment and the latest products,
as well as information about
how to connect with qualified
expert installers.


Get longer life out of your truck or SUV


ARA Content
In this economy, not many people are in the
market for a new truck. While fewer trucks
are being sold, millions are still on the road.
Your truck is a big investment and if you can
improve its handling, safety and ride you can
extend the life of your vehicle.
* Clean the air filter regularly. The air fil-
ter in your truck removes, particulates before
they can enter the engine. Replacing a
clogged air filter can improve fuel efficiency
by up to 10 percent, according to the U.S.
Department of Energy.
* Don't wait until there's a service light
on; take your truck in for regularly scheduled
maintenance. A poorly maintained vehicle
can negate the warranty, reduce fuel mileage


and cut thousands of dollars off the, resale
price, so skipping your scheduled mainte-
nance can end up costing you much more.
S* Change your tires.There are two types
of truck tires - all-terrain and all-season.
All-terrain tires handle better in the mud, but
ride poorly on road and have a short tread
life. All-season tires are the most popular
choice for trucks. They're much quieter, have
.better dry traction and last between 50,000 to
70,000 miles. .
* Don't idle your truck for long periods of
time. Low idling causes oil pressure to drop
which is bad for engine life.
* The larger your truck is and the more
weight you carry, the more frequently you.
should change your oil.


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ARA Content
Are your tires full of it?
Full of air, .that is. If not,.
you are wasting gas, causing
premature tire wear and
increasing your safety risk
on the road.
Fewer than 8 percent of
vehicles have four properly
inflated tires, according to a
Rubber Manufacturers
Association sponsored
national tire pressure sur-
vey.
Worse, at least 20 percent
of vehicles were found to
have at least one tire thunder
inflated by at least 8 pounds
per square inch, also
referred to as PSI.
Driving on under-inflated
tires can significantly affect
fuel economy and safety.
The U.S. Department of
Energy says that properly-
inflated tires can improve
fuel economy by 3.3 per-
cent. The National Highway
Traffic Safety Association
estimates that under-inflated
tires contribute to more than
600 fatihities and 33,000
injuries a year.
The RMA offers tips that
will not only help motorists
stay safe, but will also help
them save money. Drivers
can save 6 cents per gallon
at the pump and keep tires
rolling longer with simple,
monthly maintenance.
Regular care helps tires
get the most potential wear
so they don't need to be
replaced as often.
Practicing good driving
habits also keeps tires in
good condition (avoid fast
starts, stops, potholes and
curbs).
To help keep tires road-
worthy, RMA recommends
that motorists take five min-
utes a month to check their
tires. Be Tire Smart - Play
Your PART - Pressure,
Alignment, Rotation and
Tread.


To stay safe and save money at the pump, take five min-
utes a month to check your tires.


Pressure
Check tire pressure
monthly -with a tire gauge
and inflate to vehicle manu-
facturer's recommended
pressure.

Alignment
Misalignment of wheels
can cause uneven and rapid
tread-wear.

Rotation
Rotate tires every 5,000
to 8,000 miles to help you


achieve more uniform wear.

Tread
Advanced and unusual
wear can reduce the ability
of tread to grip the road in
adverse conditions.
Regular tire maintenance
of your vehicle can save you
money at the pump and
keeps you and your family
safe .on the road.
For more information
visit RMA's Web site at
www.betiresmart.org.


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News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


Page 12B

MONEY


More tax breaks available for

homeowners in 2009 and beyond


ARA Content
Homeownership and green
improvements will be more
affordable for more
Ahiericans in 2009, thanks to
several provisions in the
American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act. The
changes will put more money
in taxpayers' pockets and
allow homeowners to save
thousands of dollars over the
next several years.
The First-time Homebuyer
Credit has been extended and
increased to qualifying indi-
viduals who purchase a home
in 2009 before Dec. 1. First-
time homebuyers are defined
as those who have never
owned a principal residence
or who have not owned a
principal residence at any
time during the three years
prior to the date of purchase.
For 2008 and 2009 tax
returns, the credit is equal to
10. percent of the home pur-
chase price, up to $8,000. It
phases out when modified
adjusted gross income is
$75,000 for an individual or
$150,000 for joint filers.
Married taxpayers must both
qualify as "first-time home-
buyers" in order to receive
the full credit.
Taxpayers who claimed the
full $8,000 First-time
Homebuyer Credit on their
2008 federal return cannot
claim it on their 2009 return.
Those who have not claimed
the credit should determine
which year to use it based on
your income. If you expect
your income to decrease in
2009, it will likely make
more sense to claim the cred-
it on your 2009 return rather
than your 2008 return.
The only scenario in which
the credit must be paid back
is if the home ceases to be the


The First-time
Homebuyer
Credit has been
extended and
increased to
qualifying indi-
viduals who
purchase a
home in 2009
before Dec. 1

owners' principal residence
within 36 months of the pur-
chase date. Then the full
credit amount must be repaid
on the federal return for that
tax year.
The credit was initially
created to be claimed after a
home is purchased, but the
Obama administration is now
allowing qualifying taxpay-
ers to use it to cover certain
purchasing costs.
Homebuyers with mort-
gages backed by the Federal
Housing. Administration may
be eligible to receive
advances on the credit, which
could be used for closing
costs, fees and additional
money for a down payment
beyond the FHA's required
3.5 percent minimum.
Anyone can apply for an
FHA-backed mortgage,
regardless of income.
However, there are limits on
the size of the mortgage, and
lenders may charge a fee for
the credit. Some states are
also offering similar pro-
grams.'


� The new stimulus plan
also includes tax credits
equal to 30 percent, up to
$1,500, for certain energy-
efficient improvements to
residential properties. The
Residential Energy Property
Credit can be claimed on
2009 and 2010 returns for
improvements such as adding
insulation or installing ener-
gy-efficient windows, doors,
or heating and air condition-
ing systems. Bigger improve-
ments involving alternative
energy equipment such as
solar hot water headers, geot-
hermal heat pumps and wind
turbines may be claimed on
2009 to 2016 returns under
the Residential Energy
Efficient Property Credit.
In addition to homeowner
tax breaks, the 2009 act
includes several new or
increased credits and deduc-
tions. You can easily learn
which provisions you may
qualify for on your 2009
taxes by answering simple
questions in TaxACT.
Preview versions of TaxACT
2009 software will be avail-
able in October, allowing you
to plan ahead and get a head
start on your return. When
you're ready to prepare and
file your 2009 return,
TaxACT will help you com-
plete the correct forms for the
credits in a matter of min-
utes.
Read the details of the
American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act of 2009 at
www.IRS.gov and learn more
about TaxACT at
www.TaxACT.com.


NEWS-SUN


a ..W.'


MaE I CAL C E N T E R


www.newssun.com








News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


www.newssun.corn
4


Page 13B


HOME DECOR

flow to create a home \U

fit for humans and

four-legged friends


ARA Content .- '
Americans love their pets
ahd there are certainly lots of
them to love. Sixty three per-
cent of U.S. households .owi
ai pet and the most popular
animals - dogs'and cats -
make up 82 percent of all
pets, according. to the
American Pet Products
Association.
. With' all those furrm
friends,, it's no surprise that
pet-friendly design is one of'
thie fastest growing interior
decorating trends. From
high-end home items to the
basics, decorating is literally
going to the dogs ... and cats.'
Beyond pet-proofing a home
f0r safety, pet-friendly, deco-
rating has an increasing num-'.
ber of animal lovers choosing
and incorporating pet-friend-
ly fabrics and building 'mate-
rials into their homes' decor.
A number of cost-effective
ways to maintain. a fabulous--
l9oking home are also practi-
cal and comfortable for both
you and your pet. Here. are
five tricks of the trade:

common sense color,
'I It's one of the simplest


interior design tricks -
matching your furniture fab-
ric to your pet's fur color to
help conceal dog and cat hair.
For example, if you have a
multi-colored pet, opt for a
.small pattern that closely
matches your pet's coloring.
If you have a white poodle or
feline, skip the all-black sofa
arid choose a lighter fabric
color. If your heart is still set
on black, accessorize with
black, pillows or a throw
blanket. The same holds true
if you own a pet with darker
fur - the darker your fabric
choices, the easier it will be
to hide pet fur.

Skip the slipcover
Thanks to recent advances
made in the manufacturing of
furniture fabric, there's no
need to hide your. couch
under an unsightly slipcover
in order to protect it from the'
wear-and-tear of your pet.
Look into purchasing furni-
ture made with Crypton, a'
synthetic textile that's easy to
clean and highly resistant to
stains, water, and even bacte-'
-ria'. A less expensive option is
ultrasuede microfiber. If


either of thesd choices is still
out of your price range, make
sure your furniture is protect-
ed with Scoichgard.
However,' if you4 go this
route, know that there are
still some fabrics to avoid,
such as denim, flannel, cor-
duroy and velvet. Each of
them has a tendency to hold
pet fur.

Pet-friendly paint
Keeping your walls clean
and free of dirt marks can be
a feat if you have a pet.
Choosing a high-quality,
durable paint. really does,
make: a difference. -Dutch
Boy's Refresh paint, a new
paint formulated with, exclu-,.
sive Arm & Hammer odor-
eliminating technology, is
ideal for pet owners. It pro-
vides a beautiful finish that's


also extremely durable, so
cleanup of dirt and marks is
easy. Plus, it actually
removes odors, including pet
smells, from the air.' You'll
not only have great-looking
walls, but a fresh-smelling
home, too.

Fitting floors
Flooring options for pet
owners can be tricky because
carpet holds stains and odors,
and hardwood scratches easi-
ly., If you'-re looking at
replacing obur carpeting,
there are choicess specifically
designed for pet owners. One
of them, Pet Agree Carpet,
claims that it withstands any
damage made by a pet. It's
made from a material that
traps liquids, such as pet
urine, and stops them from
soaking through to the carpet


padding and floor below.
If you prefer hardwood
floors, but don't want to deal
with scratches that can be
made by your four-legged
friends, think laminate.
Today's laminate flooring,.
like the new North American
collection from Tarkett
Residential, is far more
durable, and scratch- and
indentation-resistant than
softer real wood flooring.
These surfaces also install
faster, are about half the price
and still offer a vast choice in
unique wood finishes.

Less is more
Another smart, design tip:
keep knickknacks and accent
pieces, to a minimum.,
Today's trend in creating
clean, streamlined spaces is
not only aesthetically appeal-


ing, but is ideal for pet own-
ers. A well-thought-out
design means you'll enjoy
the benefits of a clutter-free
environment while keeping
unnecessary, decorative
items out of reach of pets'
sweeping tails and curious
jaws.
Ensuring you, Fido and
Fluffy live harmoniously
doesn't mean you need to
spend a 'bundle, or sacrifice
your sense of style. By doing
your research, formulating a
decorating plan and choosing
your materials carefully, you
can easily create a home/
that's fit for man and beast.
For more information
about Refresh paint, visit
www.dutchboy.com/refresh,
or call,(800) 828-5669.


Steps for safely mounting your flat-screen TV to protect your family and your home


- ARA Content.
Your new 46-inch flat-screen TV
riay be your pride and joy, but did
you know it can also be a safety risk
t' something'else precious in your
life? Like other types of heavy fur,-
niture, improperly ' secured flat-'
screen TVs 'can tip over, crushing,
injuring and even killing small chil-'
dyen.
: Between 2000 and 2006. the most
recent data .'available, 180
Americans'died beneath fallen fur-
riture, and 80 percent of the deaths


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involved children younger than 10,
according to the Consumer Product
Safety Commission.
So how do you ensure your flat-
screen TV stays put - and your
children stay safe? The experts at
Sanus Systems, makers of furniture
and mounts for TVs and other elec-
tronic accessories, offer some basic
advice:.
* Don't Underestimate - The
sleek, thin build of a flat-screen TV
may lull you into a false sense of
security about its overall size and


heft. Keep in mind that thes
sions can pack 100 pounds
into their compact design
need to be well secured with
specifically designed to ho
safely.,
* Wall Mount Well
mounting a flat screen has
ous advantages, including a
appeal and. keeping your ex
investment out of reach
hands. When done properly
high-quality device, mount
screen on the wall is muc















ege




ege,












F.edu


UNIVERSITY OF
SOUTH FLORIDA
POLYTECHNIC


e televi-
or more
n. They
1 mounts'
ld them

- Wall
numer-
testhetic
Pensive
of little
y with a
ng a flat
ch safer


than placing it atop furniture.
Look for a product, like Sanus'
VisionMount series, which incorpo-
rates a wall plate that secures into
the studs behind' the wall, and
attaches to the TV with mounting.
brackets. All mounts within the
Sanus offering lock securely to the
wall and all are rated by
Underwriters Laboratories, an inde-
pendent organization that subjects
.products to rigorous safety testing.
* Stand Can Deliver - While
wall mounting is the safest way to
* 1


display your flat-screen TV, some
situations might make it impossible
to do so - if you're renting with
strict rules' about what you can put
on the walls, or simply don't have
enough open, secure wall space. If
you must place a TV on furniture,
keep in mind both the TV and the
furniture piece tend to be top heavy.
'You should secure the top edge of
the TV to the back of the furniture,
and the furniture itself should be
secured to the wall, following the
manufacturer's guidelines.


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Page 14B

REAL ESTATE


News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


www.newssun.corn


Reverse mortgages can help seniors


More and more
seniors unable to
keep up with esca-
latinig living
expenses have
begun exploring
reverse mortgages,
where they draw
equity from their
paid-off homes and.
continue living
there with no
monthly payments.
Although reverse


mortgages make
sense for some people -
especially those on fixed
incomes who want to remain
in their homes as long as
possible - they have com-
plex rules and hefty upfront
costs, so look carefully
before you feap.
Keep these considerations
in mind:
You may qualify for a
reverse mortgage at age 62 if
you've-paid off your home
and it's your primary resi-
dence. The loan amount is
determined by a formula
based on your home'-s-- -
appraised value, your age,
current interest rates, mort-
gage insurance and applica-
ble fees. Generally, the older
you are and the more valu-
able your home, the greater
the available loan.
Unlike regular home equi-
ty loans/lines of credit,
where you make monthly
payments to repay the
money you've borrowed,
with reverse mortgages you
don't need to repay until you
move out permanently,, sell
the property or die. You or
your heirs must then repay
the borrowed amount or sell
the house. Any leftover
money goes to you or your
estate.


Other key differ-
ences from regular
home equity
loans/lines of cred-
it: Reverse mort-
gages have no mini-
mum income
requirements; the
repayment amount
never exceeds the
home's sale value,
so you're never
liable for more than
you originally bor-
rowed as with a tra-


ditional mortgage when the
home's value decreases.
You can take the money
as a lump sum, a line of
credit, fixed monthly pay-
ments or any combination.
And because it's a loan, it's
not considered taxable
income so Social Security
and Medicare benefits usual-
ly arenfi't impacted. .
Observe these cautions,
- however:
* Reverse mortgage fees
are quite high (up to 5 per-
cent of the loan's value), so
-also consider other-alternra-
tives such as a home equity
loan or line of credit, down-
sizing homes or selling your
home and renting.
* Reverse mortgages are
a better deal over a longer
period of time, so if you
plan to move in a few years
they're probably not your
best solution.
# Because you continue
to own the home, you're
responsible for any home-
owner's fees, property taxes,
insurance and repairs.
Failure to meet those obliga-
tions could ultimately result
in loan cancellation or even
foreclosure.
* The longer you carry a


reverse mortgage, the more
it will decrease your home
equity, so the.inheritance
you leave behind will be
smaller. However, weigh that
and living in your own home
against the expense and pos-'
sible inconvenience of mov-
ing into assisted living.
Be sure to consult a finan-
cial professional,before
applying for a reverse mort-
gage; if you don't know one,
www.plannersearch.org is a
good place to start your
search. Note that federally
insured reverse mortgages
require you to meet with an
approved independent coun-
selor before applying for
one.
AARP provides a compre-
hensive overview of reverse
mortgages, including a free
online seminar and a loan
calculator (www.aarp.org/
money/revmort). Also, visit
the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban
Development's site and enter
"reverse mortgage" in the
search box. (ww..hud.gov).
Another good information
source for issues retirees.
often face is Visa's free per-
sonal financial management
site, Practical Money Skills
for Life (www.practical
moneyskills.com/elder).
Reverse mortgages aren't.
for everyone, but if staying
in your home as long as pos-
sible is a goal, this kind of
loan could be a good choice.

Jason Alderman directs Visa's
financial education programs.
To participate in a free, online
Financial Literacy and
Education Summit, go to
www.practicalmoneyskills.com/s
ummit2008.


Is your house built to last?


'Top Agent of Month'


Courtesy photo
Country Club Realty is proud to announce Dawn Dell as their 'Top Agent of the
Month". Kim Reed, Broker Owner of Country Club Realty, was extremely excited about-
giving this award to Dell, especially since she closed $813,400 in the month of April. -
Dell, just recently joined Country Club Realty, by merging her company Dell Realty. ,
Dawn said, "Now I am back to doing what I love most, working with buyers and sellers,
instead of managing an office, this is what I am made for." Country Club Realty has ,-
closed 54 transactions so far this year totaling $5,554,500 for 2009! '"We have a great
team and really pride ourselves on our customer service" said Kim Reed.



Coldwell Banker Highlands

offers Home Buyer Seminar
Special to the News-Sun the $8,000 tax credit, down The W S
SEBRING - Coldwell payment assistance pro-
Banker Highlands grams, and learning the . IS JUSt
Properties would like to process to buying a home. e- S
announce an upcoming The seminar will be held CliCJcYL
Home, Buyer Seminar. at the Sebring office at
www.newssu momt
There is no charge for this 2521 US 27 at 7 p.m.


informative event and it
will cover such topics as


Thursday, June 25. Call
382-3157 to reserve a seat.


By JAMES and MORRIS CAREY
For The Associated Press
How long will your roof last? When will.
your kitchen appliances need to be replaced?
Will your furnace make it through another
heating season?
Knowing the life expectancy of your
home's building components can help you
determine how to deal with the inevitable.
The National Association of Home
Builders together with Bank of America
Home. Equity recently created a "Life
Expectancy of Home Components" study that
outlines the - longevity of -housing. compo-
nents. What follows are some of the report's
findings and tips for prolonging all. your
home's parts:

Appliances
According to the NAHB study you can
expect your gas range to last 15 years; clothes
dryers andrefrigerators should last about 13;
microwave ovens and dishwashers 9; and
trash compactors about 6 years.
Keeping appliances, clean will help them
operate more efficiently. Keeping your refrig-
erator's coils and.door gasket.clean will make
for a better seal, cut down on energy loss and
prevent wear and tear on the motor. When it
comes to the dishwasher, the more you use it,
the longer it is likely to operate. Infrequent
use causes gaskets to dry out and results in
leaks.

Concrete and Masonry
Masonry is one-ofthe nio-rdurable-compo--
nents of a home. Chimneys, fireplaces and'
brick veneers can last a lifetime, and brick
walls have an average life expectancy of
more than 100 years,
You can extend the life of your fireplace
and chimney by burning only seasoned, dry
hardwood. Have a chimneysweep inspect it
once annually or after burning a cord of
wood, whichever comes first. Seal brick, con-
crete and masonry with a high quality con-
crete and masonry sealer.

Decks
The life expectancy of a wooden deck can
vary dramatically depending upon many fac-
tors such as climate, sun exposure, deck con-
struction and finish. According to the NAHB
study, a deck has a life expectancy of about
20 years under ideal conditions. We have yet
to find "ideal" conditions.
There are a few very common mistakes that
people make when it comes to building and
maintaining a deck that are sure to hasten its
demise. First, the lowest portion of the deck
framing should be no less than 8 inches from
the soil to prevent rot and pest damage. Deck
boards should never be face hailed or screwed
to the framing as this tears the wood fiber and
acts as an entrance source for water to dam-


age both the decking and framing. Using a
hidden deck fastener from below will prevent
this condition. Keep the deck clean and add a
new coat of finish every three to five years.

Doors
Although the NAHB study finds that exte-
rior fiberglass, steeA and wood doors will last
as long as the house, fiberglass is the most
stable and won't expand and contract like
steel or crack like wood.
Whatever the material, the best step that
you can take to maintain an exterior door is to
keep it clean and give it a fresh coat of paint
from time to time.

Flooring
Wood, marble,. granite and slate are the
most durable floor finishes with projected life
expectancy of 100 years or more. Although
the NAHB study finds that vinyl and linoleum
floors will last about 50 and 25 years respec-
tively, we believe that you will grow tired of
their appearance and rip them out well before.
Average quality carpet is rated to have a
life of 8 to 10 years, according to the study.
When purchasing carpet keep in mind that the
better the grade the longer it will last. It is not
unusual for good carpet to last 20 to 30 years.

Heating and Air Conditioning
Heating and air conditioning systems typi-
cally last 15 to 25 years. Truth is, advance-
ments in efficiency can make replacement
after 10 to 15 years a smart decision.
Until you're ready for a-high-efficiency-
upgrade, you can keep your heating and cool-
ing system in peak. operating condition by
regularly changing filters (every, one to three
months), cleaning and adjusting burners and
by keeping shrubbery trimmed surrounding
the air conditioner's condensing unit.

Roofing
If you have a slate, copper, clay or concrete
roof, chances are good that it will last 50 to
100.years. However, if you are among the 70
percent of American homeowners that have a
roof made of asphalt shingles, be prepared to
replace the roof after about 20 years, more or
less.
Cleanliness is again the key to longevity.
Trim overhanging trees and keep valleys free
of debris. Equally important is good attic ven-
tilation. Aside from helping lower your utili-
ty bill it can prevent roofing material from
sustaining damage due to extreme heat in
summer and prevent ice dams in winter.

For more home improvement tips and information
and an opportunity to win a $10,000 deck and
backyard makeover, visit our web site at
www.onthehouse.com or call our listener hot line
24/7 at 1-800-737-2474 (ext 59).


HIGHLANDS

COUNTY

FAMILY YMCA
� SUMMER CAMP 2009,

WEEK 1 JUNE 8-12 A '1
Rockin' Retro * Bowling at Kegel: Sebring .
WEEK 2 JUNE 15-19
Great Outdoors * Guest: Smokey the Bear: YMCA .
WEEK 3 JUNE 22-26
Beach Blast* Veteran's Beach: Sebring
WEEK 4 JUNE 29-JULY 3
Superheroes e S.R.O., McGruff, Fire Dept.: YMCA
WEEK 5 JULY 6-10
Spaced Out * Lakeshore Mall Movies
WEEK 6 JULY 13-17
Camp Olympics * Teams Compete: YMCA
WEEK 7 JULY 20-24
Ahoy "Mates" * Pirate Bottle Regatta: YMCA
_ WEEK JULY 27-31
Hollywood Nights * Highlands Little Theatre
WEEK 9 AUGUST 3-7
* Barnyard' Buddies * TBA YMCA
WEEK 10 AUGUST 10-14
Jungle Jive * Highlands Hammock
WEEK 11 AUGUST 17-21
Big Top Farewell to Friends *Magician & Carnival: YMCA

Camp is for ages 5-12. 5 Year olds must have completed
Kindergarten
Registration begins April 18, 2009
FEES: Registration, '25", Nonrefundable
Reserve A Spot, '201 per week, Nonrefundable/nontransferable
Weekly Cost, '95" YMCA members, '125"& Non-members
'l"10 Discount off weekly rate for second Child
Does not apply to Financial Assistance applicants.
CAMP HOURS: 9am-4pm
Before & After Care Hours are available at no extra cost,
7am-6pm
INCLUDES: T-Shirt, Arts & Crafts, Field Trips, Swimming
Sports, Games, Lunch & Snacks


Highlands County Family YMCA
100 YMCA Lane, Sebring, FL 33875 * (863) 382-9622
www.highlandsymca.com


Personal
Finance
Jason
Alderman


I NWS-SBJNI











Page 15B

DIVERSIONS


News-Sun * Friday, June 19, 2009


www. newssun.com


'Proposal' says yes to rom-com cliches


By CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP Movie Critic
All the romantic comedy
,conventions are shamelessly
:on parade in "The Proposal,"
Trampling on our brains and
turning them into mush.
They include an uptight
,character who literally lets
her hair down to show she's
loosening up, a spontaneous
sing-along, wacky relatives,
a shocking mid-wedding rev-
elation, a mad dash to the air-
port and, finally, some very.
public I-love-yous.
Where is the creativity,
people? By definition, this,is
a predictable genre - a guy
and a girl who are clearly
meant for each other eventu-
ally end up together, despite
the many madcap obstacles
!and misunderstandings that
come their way. We know the
. destination before we even
park the cat at the multiplex;
:it's how we get there that
*matters.
"The Proposal" seemed to
be getting there with some
spark and ingenuity, led by a
'couple of actors with, solid
atomic chops. Sandra Bullock
and Ryan Reynolds are both
well suited for snappy banter
and they" play off each other
with some' nice friction off
the top.. Bullock has always
shown a flair for physical
humor, but here she gets a
chance to play a .scheming,
tyrannical New York book
editor, which is a refreshing
change from her frequently
;daffy winsomeness..
; But Anne Fleteher (who
,also directed the by-the-num-
bers "27 Dresses") and
screenwriter Peter Chiarelli
obliterate' any good will
they'd generated when "The
Proposal" turns gushy, piles
on the contrivances and goes
precipitously downhill in' the
'firal act.
Bullock stars as'Margaret
Tate, a rigid Canadian who's


Kerry Hayes/Touchstone Pictures
Ryan Reynolds stars as Andrew Paxton and Sandra Bullock stars as Margaret Tate in 'The
Proposal.'


on the verge of being deport-
ed. She blackmails her put-
upon assistant, aspiring edi-
tor Andrew Paxton
(Reynolds), into marrying
her to stay in the country.
Think they'll fall in love for
real? In three days, no less?
Perhaps" in Sitka, Alaska,
anything is possible.
That's where Andrew
drags Margaret to meet his
family to convince a persist-
ent immigration official that
they're a real couple. Some
typical fish-out-of-water
antics ensue. Margaret wears
four-inch Christian
Louboutin pumps and
schleps her matching Louis
Vuitton luggage for the
weekend. She samples the
local cuisine with horror. For
her bachelorette party,
Andrew's mom (Mary'
Steenburgen), grandmother
(Betty White) and other fam-
ily friends drag her to a bar
for a little entertainment from
a male stripper (Oscar


Movie Review
'The Proposal'
Rating: PG-13 (sexual con-
tent, nudityand language)
Running time: 104 minutes
Review: * (of 4)

Nunez, who has multiple
functions on the island, none
of which is terribly amusing).'
White also gets repeatedly
stranded here with awkward
gags that don't even come
close to making the most of
her comic talents. She's more
than capable of raunchy


humor, which has always
provided an: endearing con-
trast with her prim looks;
here, she's merely asked to
look silly.
But we know these folksy
folks will wear down
Margaret's defenses, and in
no time she lets down her
uptight ponytail anderealizes
maybe there's . more to
Andrew than she'd previous-
ly realized. Seeing him naked
probably also helped - it
sure doesn't hurt - in a
scene in which both actors
strip down to basically noth-
ing. Both have been to the
gym, it seems.-
As bickering co-workers,
they're a great fit. As poten-
tial romantic partners, not so
much - and the 12-year age
difference is only part of
what makes their connection
seem implausible. There's
also the small problem of
Margaret abandoning every-
thing that defined her faster
than you can say "I do."





Eli


Sony Pictures Classics
Evan Rachel Wood stars as Melodie St. Ann Celestine and
Larry David stars as Boris Yellnikoff in 'Whatever Works.'


religious fundamentalists who
shed their conservatism and
adopt wild new lives at the
flip of a switch.
Allen creates stereotypes
on one extreme only to turn
them into stereotypes on the
other extreme. The transfor-
mations are funny, and Wood,
Begley and especially
Clarkson bring depth and
credibility to their characters


SULADOKLA


that David's Boris lacks.
'But the changes they
undergo are gimmicky, the
stuff of cheap laughs.
Allen says he originally
wrote the screenplay in the
1970s with Zero Mostel in
mind to play Boris: That
almost certainly would have
been a richer performance,
but the discussion is academ-
ic. So whatever.


--J-.L-----
8 5 4 1
6 2
9 7 5


---JL -^- -J--
8 5 ' 9
5 6

1 " 5

Lee9 1 6d
Level: Intermedlate


Fun By The
Numbers
Like puzzles?
Then you'll love
sudoku. This
mind-bending
puzzle will have
you hooked from
the moment you
square off, so
sharpen your
pencil and put
your sudoku
savvy to the test


Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each
row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out herder in which the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle
9 L 6 119L V Z8
Z 9 9 6 V L 9 8 L
_ V6 89 9 69 L
V 6 I L 9 9 g8 L S
StL L 986 - 9
9 9 89 L C V "L 6
9 8 9 9 L Z L 6
6 L 9 86 L 9
S9 6 : 83SNV
:U MSMNV


By DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer
The title of Woody Allen's
new comedy, "Whatever
.Works," might define what
the filmmaker has been up to
the last few years.
-: Allen churns out a movie a
year like clockwork, some
OK, some mediocre, none
very memorable. Sure, last
year's "Vicky Cristina
Barcelona" drew 'solid audi-
ences, won Penelope Cruz an
Academy Award and was a
step or two above other recent
Allen flicks.
But the movie was emblem-
atic of his output of. late -
slight plots, slighter charac-
ters, lackadaisical storytelling
that recycles enough of the
neuroses-fueled charm of his
earlier films to keep the
Woody Allen machine in busi-
ness.
In other words, whatever
works, emphasis bn the word
"whatever," delivered with a
shrug.
"Whatever Works" upholds
that uninspired standard,
Allen returning to New York
City after four films in Europe
and falling back on familiar
themes he examined more
thoughtfully decades ago (the
May-December romance is
somehow less believable now
that it's Larry David scoring a
young babe rather than Allen).
With David as Allen's rant-
ing, curmudgeonly stand-in,
"Whatever Works" manages
the funniest stream of one-
line zingers the filmmaker has
offered in a long while.
It's a lazy story, though,
told lazily, starting with the
casting of David himself.
With their lovably grouchy
and cynical demeanors, Allen
and David - 'co-creator of
"Seirifeld" and star of-"Curb'
Your Enthusiasm" - certain-
ly are kindred spirits.
Yet while Allen' is not a
great actor, he has the great
gift of pathos, the' rare ability,
a la Charles Chaplin or Buster
keaton, to be not only a funny
little man., but also a deeply


Movie Review
'Whatever Works'
Rating: PG-13 (sexual situ-
ations including dialogue,
brief nude images and the-
matic material)
Running time: 92 minutes
Review: * (of 4)

sad little man.,
David gets the laughs with
his raving turn as misanthrope
Boris Yellnikoff, a suicidal
retired physicist who never
met a person with whom he
couldn't find extreme fault.
But smirking his way through
the movie, David never quite
captures the melancholy and
self-loathing underlying
Boris' bluster.'
Allen also has David's
Boris spouting long-winded
monologues right into the
camera. A small dose of these
self-conscious ramblngs
might have worked, but here
they turn into protracted and
awkward stump speeches for
the unworthiness of humanity.
David's contrived perform-
ance is mafthed by the con-
trivances of Allen's story as a
circle of kooks and oddballs
come into Boris' orbit despite.
his off-putting manfier.
First comes Evan Rachel
Wood as naive, big-hearted
Southern runaway Melody,
whom Boris rescues off the
New York streets. Despite
Boris' savage put-downs (and
some of the insults truly are
hilarious), Melody falls for
her benefactor.
Next comes Melody's
mother (Patricia Clarkson),
then her dad (Ed Begley Jr.),


Family objects to

woman's plunge into

Internet romance


Dear Abby: I
met "Paul"
through an ad I .
placed on an
Internet dating
service. We have
been out in person
and have also
been cyber-dating
for nearly a year. Dear
Paul used to live
close by, but he got an
offer on his place, so he
sold it and moved to his
second home in another
state. He invited me to
come along, but because I
had college-aged children
still residing with me, I
didn't move.'
My kids have now
moved into places of their
own, and Paul has asked
that we buy our own house
in the state where my kids
live. I agreed. The problem
is my extended family.
Except for my sister,
everyone thinks I'm being
taken advantage of. Paul
has more money than I will
ever have in my life. I trust
and love him. My children
approve of our relation-
ship.
Does it matter that most
of our relationship thus far
has been spent on the
Internet? We talk on the
phone, chat online and
probably spend more time
together than couples liv-
ing together do.
How do I politely tell
my family to back off? If I
get hurt, I get hurt - but
it's a chance I'm willing.to'
take.
- Happy and Hoping in
Michigan
Dear Happy and
Hoping: I have a sugges-
tion. While in some areas
the real estate market is
beginning to recover, it
should become even better
as the economy improves -
so why don't you and Paul
rent out your houses for
now, and rent an apartment
for a year in the area in
which you are considering
buying?
That way, you won't be
rushing into a purchase in
an area you're not familiar
with, and you and Paul can
decide if you're as compat-
ible in person as you are
on the phone and Internet.
Please understand I am
not implying that there is
anything wrong with Paul,
only that you should not
rush into making a hefty
financial investment while
in the heat of passion.







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. k1in ' . 1 E[AIII ll.['jH i !i iim jj tI 1 i � a i .imiqglwi i~l Em B


Abby


Dear Abby: My
husband was laid
.off in 2008 and
has searched
everywhere, even
out of state; for a
job and found
nothing. I feel bad
for him because
he is home 24/7. 1
try to get him out


of the house to no avail,
and when I ask him to tell
me how he really feels, he
says he's fine and that he
will. be OK.
I want him to express
the way he feels because
he is keeping all of his
pain and stress to himself.
How can I help him?
- Worried Wife in
Englewood, NJ.
Dear Worried Wife:
Men and women do not
always express their inner-
most feelings in the same
way, so please stop trying
to pry the pain and stress
out of your husband or you
may add to it.
What concerns me more
than your husband's
unwillingness to "dump" is
the fact that he is staying
in the house 24/7.
Cocooning is no way to
find another job. However,
volunteering some of the
time he has on his hands
could be. And that's what
you should insist he do.

Dear Abby: r have can-
cer and my family and
friends are hosting a fund-
raiser with dinner and a
silent auction. My question
is, what do I do with the
. things that are not pur-
chased? Should I return
them to the donors or
what? Thank you.
' 2- J.C. in Illinois
Dear J.C.: Offer to
return the items to the
donors, and if they refuse,
donate them to the
American Cancer Society.
at one of its thrift stores.

Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips, and
was founded by her mother,
Pauline Phillips. Write Dear
Abby.at www.DearAbby.com or
PO. Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069. To order 'How to
Write Letters for All
Occasions,'send a business-
sized, self-addressed envelope,
plus check or money order for
$6 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby
-Letter Booklet, P.O. Box 447,
Mount Morris, IL 61054-
0447. (Postage is included in
the price.)




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2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
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2:004:30 7:00 9:30
X-MEN ORIGINS:
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2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30


AlIen's 'Whatever Works'

not quite working


n�SC E N ECM I TAKE


__am#Iif


'










PAGE


, i -


LIVING


News-Sun
-? i-


traditions


dads Iova

BY JODI BUTLER ,
FamilyFun magazine
How do you show Dad how much you care?
Discover some favorite gifts, celebrations,
outings and more.


HOLD AN ICE-CREAM'TASTING
If celebrating Father's Day were a competition, the Parsons fam-
ily would win the prize for sweetest tradition. Every year, the
Landrum, S.C., clan holds a tasting contest in honoriof dad Terry,
who has a special fondness for ice cream. Mom
Susan buys eight varieties and wraps the,
'' pints in paper towels to hide the flavors.
After lunch, Mom, Dad and kids -
Cheston, 20, Riley, 17, Samuel, 12, and
Ellis, 4 - gather in the kitchen. Susan serves
small scoops from each pint and hands out
homemade ballots, and then the rest of the fami-
ly gets to work. "Everyone has to guess the fla-
vor or at least some of the ingredients of each,"
Susan says. "It's a lot of fun. And the winner gets
to keep the Daddy's Big Scoop trophy (left) until
the following year."


4E DA Oi A SVURPSE
. AD ET E
. Eight-year-old Truth Muller of
10ock Hill, N.Y., likes to take his
dad on a mystery road trip for
Father's Day. "We pick a
spot, give my husband a few e h ar-.
clues, like 'pack a bathing suit ,
or 'wear your hiking boots,' " "
en head off," says mom o
Mau ra. Two of their most
successful trips so far have
been to the Houdini Museum in
Scranton, Pa., and to the Land of Make d
Believe amusement and water park in
Hope, NJ.' The Houdini Museum was
actually an accident," Maura says. "We hopped in the car for our
2005 Father's Day trip to theLackawanna Coal Mine,Tour in
Scranton, but as we neared the exit on the highway, we passed a bill-
board for the Houdini Museum. My husband got so excited he nearly
jumped out of his seat while driving. 'I've always -wanted to go to the
Houdini Museum!' he shouted. What could we do? My son and I just
looked at each other and shrugged. We went to the Houdini Museum
and had a spectacularday."


Myad








S ** BUILD

A FATHER'S DAY LIBRARY,
The Moraw kids of Holland, Mich., love having their dad, Mike,
read to them. So every year for.Father's Day, Matthew, 7, and
Sarah, 4, give him a book inscribed with the date and a short mes-
sage. "My husband reads the book to them right away - and
many, many, many, many more times," jokes mom Elizabeth. Some
of their favorites so far: "My Dad," by Anthony Browne; "A
Perfect Fatlier's Day," by Eve Bunting; and "You Are My I Love
You," by Maryann Cusimano.







MAKE A
TAKE- A-NYW *ERE TOKEN
Alex Thornton of Trophy Club. Texas. knows that big sen-
timents can come in small packages. Each year. the 7-year-old
gives his dad an original work of art for his wallet. "My hus-
band works a lot and travels a bit too. so we wanted him to
have something that would remind him that we love him,'
says mom Heather. "Alex draws a picture for Father's Day, I
then I scan it into the computer. shrink it to business-card
S size, print it on card stock
Sand laminate it. Presto!
My husband has a token
of our love that he can
carry in his wallet with
his credit eardq and busi-
ness cards.


GIVE DAD A
Many families told us they give Dad homemade coupon
books (good for yard work, car washes, hugs
and kisses, and more) for Father's Day. One
of the more unusual coupon themes comes
from the Reynolds family of Kenmore,
Wash. "My husband loves pizza," says
mom Wendy. "So last year, our kids gave
him a pizza-of-the-month club." To
make the coupons, they printed.logos
off the Internet for 12 restaurants' they


j


YEAR OF PIZZA .
had never tried. Then they put them in a homemade booklet.
"The rule is, when Dad pulls off his coupon, we have to drop
...... everything and-go out for pizza," says
Wendy. As a bonus, the coupons also are
[., - 'ix.f' helping the recently relocated family get
f , -to know their new hometown. "It's been
r.-" ,!; . fun to try different places," says
' ' Wendy.
S,.. "And we've even found a new
favorite!"


S* PLAN A DAY AROUND DAD


For these families, celebrating Dad's
interests is the key to a happy Father's
Day. ,
g The Keklak kids of Toms River,
N.J.. treat their dad to a day filled with his
favorite activities. "Two years ago, my
children and I were racking our brains
about what to give Daddy as a present,"
says mom Beth. "They thought of the
things he enjoys - runningand baseball
- and planned out a whole day." The
morning usually starts with breakfast in


bed, followed by a run for Dad, and then
a family outing to a minor-league baseball
game. "My husband really enjoys spend-
ing a fun day as a family," Beth says,
"and the baseball game is the bonus!"
I Instead of celebrating Father's Day,
the Thomas girls - Stella, 9, and
Madeline. 6 - of East New Market, Md.,
celebrate "Happy Father Goes Fishing
Day" with an annual father-daughters fish-
ing trip. "The girls love being with their
dad,'" says mom Melissa, "and he gets to


BRING DAD BREAKFAST IN BEO
Father's Day gets off to a sweet start for the Cannons of Bethesda,
Md.. Every year, Katie, 7, and Sarah, 5, get up early to bake their dad
his favorite breakfast treat, cinnamon buns. While they bake, they put
together a tray with coffee, fruit salad and homemade cards. "The
girls absolutely love doing this," says mom Johleen. 'They've even
started baking the buns for Mother's Day and their own special holi-
day, Sister's Day." (For great Father's Day treat ideas, such as the
French Breakfast Muffins pictured here, go to FamilyFun.com/maga-
Tin<�


spend quality time with them doing some-
thing he loves."
i For the Barretts of Etters, Pa.,
Father's Day marks the beginning of an
annual three-day camping trip with
friends. "We go with six other families
and a total of 20 kids," says mom Faith.
"The dads always tease that they have to
work more on Father's Day.
"But it's a great time, and they get to
have fun with their kids and their
friends."


TAKE A MEMORAtLE PH OTO
Annual portraits of kids taken just before Father's Day
make great gifts - and are sentimental reminders of how
quickly children grow.
M Sandi Arthur of Torrance, Calif., snaps pictures of her
two kids in their dad's clothing. "We have one dress as
Weekend Dad and the other as Working Dad," Sandi says.
"My husband loves the photos. They go straight to work with
him, and he gets a lot of compliments - and comments about
the apples not falling far from the tree."
K Kymberly Kempiak of Gilbert, Ariz., takes an annual
photo of each of her children wearing the shirt their dad had
on in the hospital the
day they were born.
"The kids just swim in
these shirts, and they
get really silly taking the
photos," Kymberly says.
"But it doesn't matter. It's
the delight of my
husband to see his 'loves'
grow before his eyes."


Friday, June 19, 2009


CREATE AN ANNUAL WORK OF ART
Since she was a baby. Isabella Fogg. 3. has given her dad a painting created especially for Father's Day. "The first lime she madly
one, my husband couldn't believe it." says mom Elecia. "I had to show him the photographs to prove she did it." For each project,
Elecia first helps her daughter pick out a color scheme. Then she paints a 9- by 12-inch canvas with a base color and gi'es it to
Isabella along with paintbrushes, sponges and small squeeze bottles of craft acrylics. When the painting is dry. Elecia seals the
design with a clear varnish. "My husband has a nice collection hanging in his office," Elecia says. "They are very inexpensive and
look professional, and Isabella feels oh so proud."

O"