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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00651
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Published on Nov. 6, 1988 as: Sunday news-sun
Alternate title: News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun
Place of Publication: Sebring, Fla
Creation Date: February 27, 2009
Publication Date: 1988-
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States of America -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States of America -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each days's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29858590
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:00651
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

Full Text







www.newssun





NEWS Sl c
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927


Dragons fall
to Clewiston

SPORTS, PAGE 1 B


Photos of the 2009 County Chamber gets
Fair Livestock Auction hypnotic,


START ON PAGE 10A


PAGE 5A


Friday-Saturday, February 27-28, 2009


www.newssun.com


Volume 90/Number 25 I 50 cents


Sam's Club buys local shopping center


Sunny most of the day
with pleasant temps
High Low

80 61
Complete Forecast
PAGE 9A





S VOICE

Question: Should the
Avon Park City Council
cut back to one
meeting per month?


Yes








53.6%


Total votes: 28
Next question: Are you
happy that a Sam's
Club may be coming to
Sebring one day?
Make your voice heard at
www.newssun


Mary Adkins
Age 82, of Avon Park
Rod Bostic Sr.
Age 77, of Avon Park
Joel Godinez
Age 38, of Lake Placid
Thomas Johnson
Age 54, of Sebring
Mark Smedley
Age 54, of Lake Placid
Ignacio Soler
Age 59, of Sebring
Obituaries, Page 6A

Classifieds 5B
Community Briefs 6A
Crossword Puzzle 13B
Dear Abby 15B
Lottery Numbers 2A
Movie Reviews 15A
Movie Times 15A
Police Blotter 7A
Religion 8B




Good Morning To
News-Sun subscriber
William S. Coon
Sebring



09o 994 0101 711


Nothing planned before 2011 at earliest


By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
christopher.tuffley@newssun.com
SEBRING - Michelle Belaire, who works
in Wal-Mart's division of public affairs and
government relations, has confirmed to the
News-Sun that the company has purchased
property on which to build a Sam's Club in
the Sebring Plaza.
However, she also said, "It's incredibly far
out (in the time line) to be specific about
plans. It definitely is not happening tomor-


row, probably more like 2011 or 2012."
Belaire added that the nation's economic
situation could impact plans, causing a
changes or even cancellation.
Unconfirmed reports say out parcel build-
ings would be constructed first with current
tenants in the plaza given the choice of mov-
ing into them. Second and third phases would
involve replacing the main mall structure -
Continued on page 3A


News-Sun photo by TREY CHRISTY
Riders cross US 27 from State Road 66 Wednesday morning during the Annual Florida Cracker Trail ride across the
state. "Once you come, you're hooked. There's no missing it," said Merrily Mundy, who lives in Parish, just 10 miles
from the rides starting point. "It's kind of like a big family."

Cracker Trail riders, young and


old, caravan through county


By TREY CHRISTY
trey.christy@newssun.com
SEBRING - Horses by the hun-
dred crossed U.S. 27 headed east-
bound Wednesday during the annual
Cracker Trail ride.
Riders drew a crowd of people at.
the intersection anticipating the rid-
ers, now halfway through their 120-
mile journey from Bradenton to Ft.
Pierce.-
"That's quite a trip they take. I
don't know if anyone else does this
these days," said Tim Gbehring, a
Wisconsin native living in Lake
Placid. "I didn't realize what a cattle
industry they had down here."
The annual event commemorates. a
cattle drive across Florida from the
east coast to the markets on the west
coast.
Reba Shultis took in the sight of
the riders from the parking lot of a
local gas station. The Ontario native
said she's a farmer at heart and loves
horses.
"I've been coming for a few
Continued on page 3A


9--I
I .


News-Sun. photo by TREY CHRISTY
Merrill Mundy crosses US 27 and heads east on US 98 after spending the
morning riding during one of the longer days of the Florida Cracker Trail ride
across Florida. At age 6, Mundy was the youngest rider to participate in the
120 mile ride. "She's loving it," said Merrily Mundy, her mother. "She rode
around camp for two hours last night"


Park Elementary students jump

to show they have heart


News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE
Gadarian Valentine displays his skills
at jumping rope while Park Elementary
classmate Dalton Stimson watches.


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
AVON PARK - Showing how big
their hearts really are, the children at
Park Elementary in Avon Park are tak-
ing time out of their busy day to jump
rope and raise money for a worthy
cause.
The school is participating in the
Jump Rope for Heart Program and,
according to physical education
teacher Ross Richards, the school
should raise close to $1,000 for
research and prevention.
Park has about 530 kids jumping
every day, starting Monday and end-
ing today, during their physical educa-
tion class.


'This is fun. And we
are raising money,
don't you know, for
people's hearts.'

LOGAN STROM
first-grader
"The kids have been working hard
for this, and I think we will make our
goal of $1,000 for the American Heart
Association. They are having a good
time doing this, and this promotes a
healthy lifestyle," Richards said.
"This is fun," said first-grader
Continued on page 3A


News-Sun photo by
KATARA SIMMONS
Sam's Club offi-
cials have con-
firmed that the
company has pur-
chased the
Sebring Plaza,
which once held a
Scotty's, with
plans to put a
Sam's Club store
on the property
within the next
few years.


Meth lab

busted in

Sebring

Illegal trash
dumping led
to discovery
By TREY CHRISTY
trey.christy@newssun.com
SEBRING - An illegal
trash dumping complaint led
to the uncovering. of a
methamphetamine lab
Wednesday and the arrest of
four suspects.
Items in t rash disposed
of at Little , Froggies
Convenience Store were:
items used-in the' production
of methamphetamine, said
Capt. Randy Labelle of the
Highlands County Sheriff's
Office.
The investi-
gation led to
1108 Denise
Ave. where
numerous sub-
jects occupied
the residence
and suspicious
activity was
noted by the
responding offi-
cers, said a
press release
from the
HCSO. Chaidez
When offi- Chaidez
cers from the
Sebring Police
Department, a
who initially
uncovered the
operation, were
granted access Nicklaus
to the resi- da
dence, "numer-
ous items con-
sistent with a
methampheta-
mine cook were
observed in
plain view," the
press release Townsend
said.
The SPD and HCSO were
joined by the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement and the Drug
Enforcement Administration
and served a search warrant
on the residence that led to
the arrest of the four sus-
pects.
Tracee Brown, 18, of
Sebring; Joseph Nicklaus,
24, of Lake Placid; Fernando
Chaidez, 29, of Fort Meade;
and Edwin Townsend, 31, of
Avon Park were all charged
with manufacturing metham-

Continued on page 3A

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Wauchula State Bank
Member FDIC I Equal Housing Lender�


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AP Council grants free use of hangar to EAA and CAP


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
-AVON PARK - The Avon Park
City Council granted the Civil Air
Patrol and the Experimental
Aviation Association local chapter
the free use of an unused T-hangar
at the Executive Airport during their
meeting on Monday.
George V. von Eschenbach,
chairman of the local CAP and EAA
spoke to the council about the vari-


ous positive programs offered to the
city through his organizations dur-
ing the meeting.
"We currently have an agreement
with Sebring's Airport Authority
similar to this, and we bring pro-
grams like the Young Eagles and we
volunteer for the fly-in breakfasts,"
von Eschenbach said.
The Young Eagles program was
launched to give interested young
people, ages 8-17, an opportunity to


go flying in a general aviation air-
plane.
These flights are offered free of
charge and are made possible
through the generosity of EAA
member volunteers.
EAA and CAP also have volun-
teered to provide future assistance
with any events or functions at the
airport, said von Eschenbach.
According to von Eschenbach,
the EAA and CAP is planning on


using the hanger to help train Avon
Park High School ROTC members
in search and rescue.
The proposal presented gave the
EAA a one-year lease with a 90-day
option to pay market value if the
hangar was needed.
Council voted 5-0 to support the
free hangar, but only with the stipu-
lation that the hangar be given on a
month-to-month ,basis, not a year
lease.


"I think we are going in the
wrong direction with this," said
councilman George Hall.
"We need to match the Sebring
Airport on this and give them the
month-by-month option, not a
year's lease."
The next scheduled fly-In break-
fast will be held at March 8 in the
new Flight Based Operations build-
ing.


News-Sun photo by TREY CHRISTY
Gary Hyre; whose wife owns Creative Hair Designs,
describes the damage left after a bus carrying migrant
workers slammed into the front of the business Wednesday
at 6:30 a.m. After cleaning up and boarding the windows,
the shop opened 15 minutes late, thanks to the help of
other local business owners. '


Bus rams into hair


salon in Lake Placid

Driver apparently suffered

heart attack while at wheel


By TREY CHRISTY
trey.christy@newssun.com
LAKE PLACID - A'driv-
er taking migrant workers to
their jobs for the day died
Wednesday morning and the
bus he was driving rammed
into a local business.
"By the grace of God it
wasn't later when he was
driving on the highway," said
Gary Hyre, who said the man
died of a heart attack. "It
could have been a lot worse."
Hyre's wife Sonja owns
Creative Hair Designs at the
corner of Main Street and
Bellview Street in Lake
Placid.
"Witnesses stated (driver
Joel Godinez) slumped over
the steering wheel and accel-
erated through the intersec-
tion ... and into the building,"
said Sgt. Mark Schneider of
the Lake Placid Police
Department. "He was still
breathing when I started


CPR. He did not have a pulse
and his breathing was very
shallow."
He was pronounced dead
just before 6:50 a.m.
The medical examiner's
office is looking into the
cause of death.
The vehicle struck the
building at about 6:30 a.m.
after picking up the workers
at Bellview Street and
Service Street Alley.
"We are not sure exactly
how many were on the bus,",
Schneider said. "Most of
them fled the scene right
after the crash."
Speaking with people who
later gathered on scene,
Schneider said about $20,000
in damage was done to 'the
building and roughly $3,000
to the 1989 Ford Bus.
"The overhang of the roof
stopped him," Hyre said. "Its
steel frame caught the top of
the bus."


News-Sun photo by TREY CHRISTY
The windows for Creativt Hair Design are boarded up after
a bus carrying migrant N Ikers slammed through them
Wednesday morning afteThe, driver suffered an apparent
heart attack, said Gary Hyre, whose wife owns the
business.


Sitting inside eating lunch,
Hyre had his back to what
had been glass windows.
They had been boarded up
and his wife was busy work-
ing with one of her appoint-
ments.
"The wheel was right here
where I'm sitting," Hyre
said. "He came right through
the front window."
"It was like walking into
Universal (Studios)," his
wife chimed in before going
back to work on .a woman's
hair.
Hyre woke up to the call


from other business owners
in the community, who all
pulled together so the shop
could open for its first
appointment at 9:30 a.m. It
was all cleaned up and ready
to go by 9:45. -
"It was amazing," he said.
"Within 2 hours and 45 min-
utes it was cleaned up, board-
ed up and she opened."
No businesses in the com-
plex were open when the
accident took place.
Aside from the death of the
bus driver, there were no
reported injuries.


AP Council takes its

first look at E-Verify


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
AVON PARK - The
Avon Park City Council
heard a presentation at their
Monday meeting about the
E-Verify Program.
Tom, Macklin, Avon
Park's ex-mayor; Bill
Landis, chairman of the
Florida Minutemen; and
Bill Youngman, representa-
tive of the American Party,
were on hand to encourage
the city to implement the E-
Verify program.
Avon Park City manager
Sarah Adelt informed the
council that an affidavit
already goes out in the bid
packets that requires con-
tractors to confirm
they are not using 7I t
illegal immigrants as
labor. this
Most of the coun- pro(
cil received the pres- th
entation from the
Youngman with pos- nee
itive affirmation, but
wanted to wait until GEC
congressional fund- H
ing is assured in
March before pro- co
ceeding. me
"I think this is a
program the city needs,"
councilman George Hall
said. "We should go ahead
with the program for our
own new hires."
"I know this is coming,
but the U.S. Chamber of'
Commerce has joined with
union labor, and .they still
have a few issues with this.
But I would not be opposed
to seeing this move for-
ward," said councilman Joe
Wright.
After a lengthy presenta-
tion, city council directed
staff to research using E-
Verify for new hires, but
held dome reservations
about requiring vendors to
use it as' well.
According to Youngman,
E-Verify is a voluntary sys-
tem that employers, or in
this case the city, can dou-
ble check the eligibility of
someone applying for a job


to ensure that the employer
is compliant with state and
federal hiring regulations.
Currently, all employers
must use the form 1-9 to
document an employee's
status.
Federal agencies 'were
ordered by President
George W. Bush to use E-
Verify in 2008, and federal
contractors and sub-con-
tractors are encouraged to
comply with and use the E-
Verify system, and May 21
is the deadline for contrac-
tors to sign-up.
Over 100,000 employers
currently use the system,
Youngman said, including
many in central Florida.


hink
is a
gram
city

eds.'

)RGE
ALL
uncil
mber


"Emabrq, Cohan
Radio, Polk County,
the Highlands
County Sheriff's
Office, Lee County
and the city of
Sebring use this pro-
gram, and I see no
reason why Avon
park should not join
in this movement,"
said Youngman.
Youngman also
read a letter from
Sheriff Susan


Benton, who encouraged
other governments to move
forward with the program.
One of the most criticized
problems with the system is
when a woman gets married
and changes her last name,
but has not notified the
Social Security administra-
tion before being processed,
E-Verify will show a dis-
crepancy in her documents.
Helms raised some conr
cerns as to if the program
would continue to be fund-
ed by the US government.
"Legal immigration is a
help and a positive impact
on our economy, but illegal
immigrants present a huge
tax burden on the govern-
ments in which they reside
in," said Youngman. "Who
do we care more for, the
illegal alien and illegal con-
tractors, or honest taxpay-
ers?"


Sign-up deadline today


for Hairpin Spin sponsors


News-Sun staff report
SEBRING - Today is the
final day to sponsor the 2009
Hairpin Spin, the kickoff to
the 12 Hours of Sebring. This
year's event is slated for 12-2
p.m. Wednesday, March 18 at
the Four Points by Sheraton,
Chateau Elan near the
Sebring International
Raceway.
There will be an Italian
dinner, wine tasting,


CSX closing, opening
roads in Avon Park
AVON PARK - As of 6
p.m. Wednesday, Lake
Damon Drive will be closed
from Lake Damon Drive to
U.S. 27 while CSX continues
work on railroad crossings in
the area.
A detour has been posted.
In the meantime, the Truck
Route (C-17A) from Central
Avenue to Lake Avenue is
now open to the traveling
public.
For further information,
contact the Highlands County
Engineering Department at
402-6877.


mimosas and gourmet
desserts. Spin to win thou-
sands in prizes, including
trips to privately owned get-
aways. There will also be an
autograph session with
world-famous drivers and
plenty of food and drink.
Admission is $25 per per-
son and another $25 for 10
Hairpin chips.
Contact Lisa Celentano,
386-0505 or by e-mail at


hairpinspin@yahoo.com, for
tickets or sponsorship infor-
mation.
Proceeds benefit The
Humane Society of
Highlands " County,
Highlands Art League,
Children's Services,
Foundation and Sebring
Sportscar Hall of Fame
Museum, all 501(c) 3 organi-
zations.


NEWS-SUN

Standard of Accuracy
The goal of the News-Sun is to do things the right way in everything
we do. Of course, that does not always happen.
If this occurs in a news report, the News-Sun will correct all errors
of fact as soon as possible. Readers who find factual errors are
encouraged to contact the newsroom so we can correct the mistake.
Readers who wish to comment on our coverage rather than a factual
error dre encouraged to write a letter to the editor.
The standard of accuracy applies to all our operations. Readers with
concerns about delivery or subscription payments should call the circu-
lation department-
We strive to provide the best customer service in all facets of our
operation. Those who are unable to resolve their problems through the
usual channels are invited to call my office directly.

Clarrisa Williams, Publisher
863-385-6155, ext. 515


Lottery

Center
FIsrmM Lsu1wu


LORIDA
to=


Feb.25 11 19 43 44 47 53
No winner Nextjackpotest $19 million
Feb.21 18 25 31 41 44 47
Feb.18 8 10 11 14 23 36


Feb. 25 3 4 11 16 321 Feb.25 (n) 8 3 3 2
kWm*, Feb.24 2 6 11 16 28 Feb.25 (d) 3 4 8 5
emnatchi. Feb.23 13 14 25 29 33 aw Feb.24 (n) 0 1 3 6
-, Feb.22 3 17 21 26 30 ' Feb.24 (d) 0 4 1 1

Feb.24 8 15 26 36 0 11 Feb.25 (n) 2 8 4
. Feb.20 16 23 41 43 17 Feb.25 (d) 4 8 4
Feb. 17 14 35 41 43 0 11 Feb.24 (n) 9 7 6
Feb. 13 6 18 33 43 1 Feb.24 (d) 1 8 9


Feb.25 17 32 42 49 56 PB: 11 PP:4
No winner Next jakpotest $150 million
Feb.21 13 31 41 45 46 PB:21 PP:4
Feb. 18 2 15 39 44 56 PB:15 PP:3


Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawings
are twice per day: (d) is the
daytime drawing, (n) is the
nighttime drawing.
PB: Power Ball PP: Power Play


www.newssun.com
Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South * Sebring, Florida 33870
A HarborPoint Media Company


OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870
OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday
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Page 2A


News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


www.newssun.com








News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


Obama says budget keeps promise to American people


By BEN FELLER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Talk-
ing in terms distressed home-
owners could understand,
President Barack Obama
compared his $3,55 trillion
spending plan to a family
budget pinched by hard
times.
"You know, there are times
where you can afford to
redecorate your house and
there are times where you
need to focus on rebuilding
its foundation," the president
said Thursday as he proposed
his first budget. "Today, we
have to focus on founda-
tions."
Obama promised to slash
federal spending by $2 tril-
lion over 10 years by elimi-
nating waste and shifting
spending priorities. He said
every American will have to
"compromise on certain
things we care about, but
which we simply cannot
afford right now" in his oft-
repeated message of shared
sacrifice.
At the same time, the
Obama administration has
invested large sums of money
to revive the faltering econo-
my, including the $787 bil-
lion stimulus package that
went into effect this month.
Obama's budget would
move the nation toward
health care for all, expand
bank rescues, roll up bigger
debt and slap higher costs on
the wealthy to help pay for it
all. The projected yearly


'Today, we have
to focus on
foundations.'

BARACK OBAMA
US president

deficit would hit $1.75 tril-
lion, reflecting the massive
spending being undertaken to
battle a severe recession.
The president said the gov-
ernment "must add to our
deficits in the short term to
provide immediate relief to
families and get our economy
moving." But he said his
budget plan would begin to
restore fiscal discipline over
the long run and invest in
improving his big priorities:
better health care, energy and
education.
Obama spoke of $2 trillion
in potential savings over the
next 10 years by closing
loopholes, eliminating waste
and shifting spending priori-
ties. But that kind of long-
term projection is looser than
it sounds; budgets change
each year, and Obama only
has a real say on spending
during his first term, unless
he wins re-election.
Obama's budget amounts
to his first signature on feder-
al spending, outlining the
most fundamental and impor-
tant of daily issues: Where all
the money goes.
But it is only a proposal.
,Congress, working with the
administration, makes the


MCT photo
President Barack Obama outlines his budget plan during a speech to congress Tuesday
night.


final decisions on spending,
and Obama's blueprint is
already setting off intense
debate among lawmakers.
What follows now is a leg-
islative process of hashing
over the right priorities, how
to pay for them and how to
cobble together the votes.
Obama's budget would
boost taxes on the wealthy
and curtail Medicare pay-


ments to insurance compa-
nies and hospitals to make
way for a $634 billion down
payment on universal health
care. That is a little more than
half the money it would take
to extend insurance to 48
million uninsured Americans.
"We must make it a priori-
ty to give every single'
American quality, affordable
health care," Obama said.


The president said that prom-
ise, one of the most ambi-
tious and costly of his presi-
dential campaign, is the key
to both a healthier population
and a more solid economic
picture in the long term.
His budget is a 140-page
outline, with the complete
details scheduled to come in
mid- to late-April. The new
budget year begins Oct. 1.


www.newssun.com


Four jailed for


running meth lab
Continued from page 1A Numerous items used
phetamine, possession of manufacture methamphet
methamphetamine and pos- mine were seized as ei
session of drug parapherna- dence. Drain cleaner, light
ia. fluid, tubing, lithium batt(


Labelle said the type of
operation they uncovered is
typical.
"It's what we are starting
to see more and more," he
said.
It is called a one-cook or
one-pot method and is more
basic than methamphetamine
production methods that have
been used in the past.
"You don't need all the
items the traditional meth lab
would see," he said. "It's
pretty simple."


to
ta-
vi-
ter
er-


ies and coffee filters are just
a few of the items used to
produce the drug that were
found in the discarded trash
and inside the residence.
LaBelle said it appeared
that the operation had made
previous batches of the drug.
While Labelle said the
HCSO is not actively looking
for anyone specifically, he
said the investigation contin-
ues.
"There is, for the lack of a
better word, other people on
the radar," he said.


Cracker Trail riders make annual trek through county


Continued from page 1A
years," she said about watching the
riders cross through the county. "It's
quite a sight."
Also acting like a spectator on the
side of the road was Merrily Mundy,
but she was there taking photos of her
6-year-old daughter Merril, the
youngest in the group who planned on
riding the whole way.
"She said 'I want to ride every
mile, mom,'" Mundy said. "I think
she could do this the whole ye'r."
The Mundys live roughly 10 miles


from the start of the coast-to-coast
ride, but "just recently got into hors-
es."
Then some good friends who have
done the Cracker Trail ride in years
past invited them out on the ride last
year.
Mundy recalls visiting with cow-
boys and cowgirls from across the
United States.
"Last year we had people from
Michigan, Tennessee, Texas, North
Carolina," she said. " People came
from all over and a lot of the same


people come back. Once you come
you're hooked, there's no missing it."
Wearing a pink helmet, Merril
Mundy passed by her mom, waving,
wearing an ear-to-ear grin.
"I'm so proud of her. This is in her
blood," her mother said. "She's not
happy unless she's on that horse."
About a minute later Mundy saw
her husband, who told her their
daughter was doifig fine up front all
alone.
She smiled as her husband rode off
into the distance.


Students jump rope to


raise money
Continued from page 1A
Logan Strom. "And we are
raising money, don't you
know, for people's hearts."
Jump Rope For Heart is a
national educational
fundraising program that is
sponsored by the American
Heart Association and the
American Alliance for
Health, Physical Education,
Recreation and Dance.
The program engages ele-
mentary students in jumping
rope while raising funds to
support life-saving heart and
stroke research.


for research
The students ask friends
and family for donations and
receive thank you gifts based
on the dollars they raise.
Gifts range in size from a
water bottle to a Nintendo
Wii gaming console. All par-
ticipants get a certificate, and
the top fundraiser gets a
medal.
The class with the most
participants gets an ice cream
party as appreciation for their
efforts and the satisfaction of
knowing that they are helping
others.


Sam's Club eyes Sebring


Continued from page 1A
first from Office Max south,
then from Winn Dixie north.
Several businesses in the
plaza report having been con-
tacted by a new marketing
representative selling mem-
berships for Sam's Club.
Lew Carter, who owns and
operates the Subway


Restaurant, was told a meet-
ing with mall management
would be held in mid to late
February, at which time, he
said, "we'd hear it all from
the horse's mouth."
But, given the lack of defi-
nite information he also said,
"I won't believe (a Sam's
Club is coming) until I see
it."


Find what


you are looking for I



NEWS-SUN
Classified Ads * 385-6155


4 . ..


Page 3A


GM lost

$9.6 billion

in late '08
Associated Press
DETROIT - General
Motors Corp. posted a
$9.6 billion fourth-quarter
loss and said it burned
through $6.2 billion of
cash in the last three
months of 2008 as it
fought the worst U.S. auto
sales climate since 1982
and sought government
loans to keep the century-
old company running.
The nation's biggest
domestic automaker said
Thursday it lost $30.9 bil-
lion for the. full year and
expects to state in its
upcoming annual report
whether its auditors
believe the company
remains a "going con-
cern."
GM and its auditors
must determine whether
there is substantial doubt
about the automaker's
ability to continue it oper-
ations.
Chief Financial Officer
*Ray Young said the deter-
mination will depend a lot
on whether GM gets fur-
ther government loans and
whether it can accomplish
its restructuring goals.
Young said that auditors
are studying the future of
the company because
"there's uncertainty with
how the Treasury will
view our viability plan."









Page 4A

EDITORIAL & OPINION


TODAY'S EDITORIAL


NASA makes the

NASA managers continue hud-
dling...on when to launch
Discovery on the first of five
scheduled shuttle missions this year.
The delays - the ship was set to fly
Feb. 12 but might not get off the
ground until April - are frustrating.
But they also reflect a good thing.


Shuttle managers, con-
; cerned about newly found
7 problems with fuel line
valves, are playing it safe
7 until engineers are confident
it's OK to light the engines.
. That's exactly what they
should do, showing the com-
mitment to flight safety they
promised after the shuttle
Columbia disaster six years
ago this month.
The trouble arose when
experts learned a small piece
of valve broke off during
shuttle Endeavour's liftoff in
November and inspections
found small cracks in other
such valves across the fleet.
Endeavour escaped dam-
age, but it could happen
again, possibly involving a
bigger chunk of valve.
The result could be a cata-
strophic main-engine shut-
down or explosion that could
kill the crew.
Managers held a marathon
meeting Friday and decided
to give engineers more


"breathing room" to analyze
information and come up
with answers, including a
valve redesign, before con-
sidering another launch date.
Shuttle program manager
John Shannon summed up the
situation this way:
"There was just a sense of
unease that we did not quite
have the rigor that we typi-
cally expect for a question
like this."
Others who wisely said no-
go were former astronaut and
current Johnson Space Center
director Bob Coats, along
with senior engineering offi-
cials at Johnson and the
Marshall Space Flight
Center.
In doing so, the managers
refused to bow to the kind of
launch pressure that con-
tributed to the 1986 shuttle
Challenger disaster and
Columbia's loss in 2003.
In both cases, managers
long knew the ships had fatal
defects the infamous O-rings


Blessing of Marketplace
takes place Monday
Editor:
March 2 will be the second annual
Blessing of the Marketplace in
Highlands County. This is a day when
government, education and business
come together with members of the
. clergy to.ask God's blessing on the
houses we build, the products we sell,
the decisions we make as educators and
government leaders, the things we pro-
duce with our hands.
We are living in uncertain economic
'v times with business failures, budget
cuts and unemployment on the rise.
. This creates tremendous stress on us all
.and no one seems to have answers to
lead us out of the mess that we are in.
One congressman was quoted "It's like
. being in the middle of the Atlantic
Ocean and not knowing which shore to
. swim to."
,4, But, the Bible says: If my people
:will humbly pray, and turn back to me
^and stop sinning, then I will answer
them from heaven. I will forgive them
,and make their land fertile once again.
Would you or a representative of
,.'your office join us on Saturday, March
Z 14 for the 2009 Blessing of the Market
Place Breakfast, at 8 a.m., at Homer's
.Smorgasbord, 1000 Sebring Square,
Sebring?
SSpeakers will, be, co-founder of the
I Week of Blessing,in Destin, Mel
Ponder and Sebritig Mayor George
; Hensley. Members of our local clergy
willil be on hand for the blessing.
For additional information, call 385-
0200. We would be very honored if you
could join us.
Steve Slaybaugh
", Sebring

The writer is Marketplace coordinator.

SEarly fans don't feel much
appreciation
Editor:
Sebring Raceway fans are being mis-
treated. Every year people from all
over come to Sebring for the races. The
one thing that is the most enjoyed is
waiting to get in.
For the past years a lot of us come
around the middle of February. Even:
though they do say March 1, but they
always welcomed us before. This year
one man, Jessie McClelland, has been
treating the fans very rudely. He has
threatened everyone that arrives early
to move their vehicles or else they will
be towed away. They even spent all
that money to make a huge sign that
, says no campers or drop off until
March 1.
Anyone that has approached this, man
has been rudely treated. Tres
Stephenson is the president of the com-
pany; Jessie is nothing more than direc-
tor of operations. These past years,
Tres has never came out to the field
and threatened to tow us away. Being
out in the field in Seeing gives us all
the chance to see old friends and meet
new ones.


News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


right call
in Challenger's solid rocket
boosters and shedding foam
insulation on Columbia's
external fuel tank but flew
anyway.
The results were the funer-
als of 14 astronauts.
NASA should continue its
prudent approach as it trou-
bleshoots the valve issue and
other problems that may arise
in the remaining nine flights
to finish building the
International Space Station
before the fleet retires next
year. ,
Which brings us to another
point:
If necessary, the Obama
administration should extend
the fleet's life to allow for all
nine missions to be complet-
ed because of safety-spawned
delays such as Discovery's.
Another fatal accident
would be a mortal political
wound for NASA and its
moon exploration program,
meaning safety must remain
paramount.
Shuttle managers know
that, too, and it has undoubt-
edly been on their minds as
they've wrestled with
Discovery's problem.
And taken the right course
to solve it.

An editorial from the Florida
Today in Melbourne.


NEWS-SUN
2227 U S. 27 South
Sebnng, Fla. 33870
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CLARISSA WILLLkAIS
Publisher
Ext 515
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NEWSROOM
ROMONA WASHINGTON
E.vecuri' Editor
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editori-'4newssuni .com
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Sports Editori
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BUSINESS OFFICE
JANET EMERSON
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iancr.etnersonl'e:iwvss4nl corn


The law of reward


In 2006 Highlands
Country commissioners
instituted impact fees -
$5,070 for a 1,500-square-
foot house, $15,280 for a
10,000-square-foot church -
and expected to rake in $17
million. The opponents of
this move argued that such
fees would destroy the con-
struction industry in
Highlands County. The
opponents were, of course,
correct. The fees have
brought in only $2.16 mil-
lion.
The commissioners forgot
the basic rule of government
action: What you punish you
.get less of. What you reward
you get more of.
Impact fees punish those
who would build new build-
ings for homes or businesses
in Highlands County. It is
not surprising that we saw
less new construction. There
are places in the country,
which are overbuilt and
where the citizens decide
they don't want growth. In
such communities and
impact fees serve a good
purpose. They stop growth.
Highlands County is not
such a place.
Buildings that weren't
built are not paying real
estate taxes. The construc-
tion workers who did not
work on the projects did not
get paid and did not buy
supplies from Highlands
County merchants. The peo-
ple who did not move to
Highlands County to live in
those houses do not shop in
our stores or eat at our
restaurants. I could go on.
The same principle applies
to raising taxes on the feder-
al level. When the govern-
ment wants to spend money
on a project, legislators often
think that the way to get
more money is to increase
taxes. They look around for
things they can tax and raise
the rate on things they are
already taxing. They calcu-
late the amount they expect
to receive based on current
revenue from that source.
The problem with this is:
What you punish you get
less of.
For example, every time
there is an increase in the
tax on cigarettes, a certain
percentage of people decide
to give up smoking. In some
cases the amount of revenue
generated by the tax has
actually decreased. The post
office raises the cost of a


From' The
Right Side
Dale OZ'eary

stamp and less people mail
first class letters.
On the other hand, large
decreases in taxes on
income, capital gains, and'
business profits have actual-
ly brought in more revenue
because income and profits
have increased.
So, when politicians say
they have to raise tax rates,
ask them to prove that their
schemes will actually
increase revenue.
. The same principle applies
to almost every social pro-
gram. If we reward bad
behavior - for example, like
bailing out banks who gave
out bad loans, businesses
that didn't cut costs, and
people who bought homes
they couldn't afford - we are
going to get more bad
behavior.
But the worst behavior of
all comes from Congressmen
who bribe us with our own
money. They brag about
bringing home the bacon for
their district, but borrow
money to pay for the pork
and we will have to pay back
those loans with interest,
long after the Congressmen
are living in retirement, gen-
erously funded by our tax
dollars.
We have to stop rewarding
pork barreling, earmarking
politicians by electing them
to multiple terms. The multi-
term Congressmen claim that
because they have seniority
they can add earmarks to
legislation for their state.
They don't mention how in
order to get earmarks for
their own state they have to
approve earmarks for every
other state, creating spend-
ing bills that boggle the
imagination.
So the next time a Senator
or Representative claims to
have brought money to our
state, ask him if is was his
personal money, money he
raised through charitable
contribution or our own
money, recycled through
Washington, with a hefty.,,
share for bureaucracy
deducted and costly ,strings
attached.

Dale O'Leary lives in Avon Park
and is the author of 'One Man,
One Woman,'and The Gender
Agenda: Redefining Equality.'


EDITORIAL PAGE POLICY

Make sure to sign your letter and include your address
and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automati-
cally rejected.
Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words.
We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local
concern take priority.
Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL
33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or
e-mail editor@newssun.com.
To make sure the editorial pages aren't dominated by
the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and
a guest column can be submitted once every three
months.
Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the
opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion of
the staff or editors of the News-Sun.


I LUMPOGTRIUjoNARE I


The race doesn't start when the gates
open up; it starts when we get there on
the field. Once we all get in the track,
we go our separate ways. I think if
you're going to drop at least over a
grand a year and that's just in the track
($500 goes just to get in for me and my
family), also not to, mention the money
spent when a lot of us go into town,
they should at least give us some lee-
way. We have let the track know time
and again if we do get there before
March 1 that we have no problem sign-
ing a waiver stating that if anything
happens we will not hold the track
responsible; we know that we are tak-
ing a risk with our trailers there early.
You know that one saying one bad
apple spoils the whole bunch and that
is our own Jesse McClelland.
Jessica Colon
Fort Lauderdale
Bouquets

Several support Adelines
Show Chorus
Editor:
The Heart of Highland Sweet
Adeline Show Chorus would like to
thank the News-Sun and the Cohan
Radio Group for their support in spon-
soring our show on Feb. 8.
We would also like to thank those
merchants who placed advertisements
in our program. We are grateful for
their assistance in making our show a
success.
We encourage the community to sup-
port these merchants who make a spe-
cial effort to provide good, clean enter-
tainment in our community: the Great
Atlantic & Pacific T-Shirt Company,
Alan Jay Automotive Network,
Allaire's Hair & Nail Designs, Dr. Ted
Baker, Big T Tire, Blue Crab,
Blueberry Patch, Bulb Bin, Dr. Roy
Cavalcant, Compton Century 21 Realty,
Chen Eye Clinic, Cindy's Hallmark
Shop, Crystal Nails, Dot's Restaurant,


Dutcher's Diner, Edible Arrangements,
Ellavations Hair and Nails, Elliott
Optical, Florida Hospital, Florida Heart
Group, Goin' Postal, Griffin Carpet,
Habitat for Humanity, Halo's Hair
Designs, Heartland Harmonizers,
Heartland Internal Medicine, Heartland
Pharmacy, Highlands Independent
Bank, Home & Office Essentials,
Indigo Builders, Bill Jarrett Ford, JZ
Woodworking, Katie Baumer Hair
Stylist, LaGrow Irrigation, Lake Placid
Mural Society, Lakeside Dermatology,
Lampe & Keifer Hearing Aid Center,
Michael Fitch Citigroup, Moody Air
Conditioning & Refrigeration, Newsom
Eye Clinic, Nicholas G. Schommer
P.A., Olive Garden, Princess Dianne
Tours, Ram Jack Foundation Systems,
Rezults Fitness, Rivergreens Golf
Course, Robbins Nursery, Sandy's
Circle Cafe, Sebring Duplicate Bridge
-Club, Sevigny/Johnson Eye Care,
Simply Trish Catering, South Florida
Community College, Southern Lifestyle
Assisted Living Facility, Stephenson-
Nelson Funeral Home, Sun 'N Lake
Medical Group, Sunny Hills ALF,
Tropical Harbor, Turner Furniture and
Yianni's Restaurant. We would also
like to thank those who provided door
prizes: Classic Treats, the Foliage
Tower, Tiles by Fran, Natalie's
Boutique, Ann Mys, Ideal Golf and the
Depot Restaurant.
Each year, the Heart of Highland
Chorus awards at least one scholarship
to a Highlands County female high
school graduate, who will be attending
college and has a music-based class
included in her curriculum.
Since the programs inception we
have awarded scholarships to 16 young
women. Profits from our show go
towards funding these scholarships.
Thank you to all our audience sup-
porters. Without you, there would be no
show .*
The Heart of Highland Sweet Adeline
Show Chorus


TODAY'S LETTERS


www.newssun.com










www.newssun.com


News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


Page 5A


A hypnotic, hilarious



night at Sebring Chamber



of Commerce banquet

Members of the Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce gathered Tuesday for the 92nd
annual banquet. On the serious side of things,. eight individuals were recognized for
exceptional contributions to the city and county. On the lighter side, Dr. Holiday, a
hypnotist, provided the evening's entertainment using volunteer audience members for
the show. Chamber CEO and President Sarah Pallone said the event included
entertainment for the first time to provide some fun after a year filled with turmoil.


Dusty Johnson, of Heacock Insurance, gets
into the role of a rock and roll musician while
under hypnosis. Along with the other brave
souls who relaxed and got into the swing of the
fun, he also rode a race horse, walked the cat-
walk as a high fashion model, danced the
Funky Chicken and Twist, posed as muscle
builders do, was a credible Chippendale
dancer and even an out and out stripper as the
audience roared with laughter.


After a tough year that included betrayal and financial crisis, Sarah
Pallone, CEO and president of the chamber, enjoys a good laugh
during the evening's entertainment - Dr. Holiday, the 'Hilarious
Hypnotist,' whose show was based on audience participation.
Despite the recent disappointments and frustrations, Pallone told
the audience of about 250 people 'I truly feel I have the best job in
Highlands County.' *


Andrew Hughes (above), branch manager with
Wauchula State Bank, enjoys the show along with
the rest of the audience. Wauchula State Bank
celebrates its 80th anniversary this year. Two
other businesses were recognized for their
longevity - Florida Hospital Heartland Division
celebrates its 60th anniversary this year, and The
Palms of Sebring is 50.


Paul Valladares' Paul's Plantscapes, which has been operat-
ing for 17 years, was recognized as Small Business of the
Year. Susan Jones presented him with the award. Also rec-
ognized was the The Palms of Sebring, with the Business
Beautification Award, in recognition of the major renova-
tions currently under way. The Olive Garden was honored
with the New Business Award, and thanked for providing
the ingredients for the Heartland Triathalon's Pasta Bash.


Diana Albritton was honored as Business Woman
of the Year by the chamber. She was recognized for
her work founding the Wednesday Lunch Club in
2006. The lunches create opportunities for women
to network and brainstorm and are increasingly
popular. Currently there are 344 members. Here
Susan Jones, outgoing chair of the chamber's board
of directors, presents Albritton with her plaque.


Thirty-one businesses and non-profit organizations helped make
the 93rd Annual Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce Banquet
a magical night Tuesday by each decorating a dining table. From
tiered cakes to wooden toy houses to elaborate floral displays,
each table was unique. Here Jan Grove (left) and Mary Rand take
the time to check out the different displays before dinner. Grove
and Rand are with the Genealogical Society, which has an office
in the former chamber site on the Historic Circle.








News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


COMMUNITY BRIEFS


Groups host music
Several fraternal organiza-
tions in the county will host
musical activities this week-
end:
* The American Legion
Post 69 in Avon Park will
host karaoke by Ron Rahl on
today, and music by Mike
Claxton on Saturday.
Call 453-4553.
* The Sebring Moose
Lodge 2259 will host music
by Southern Ridge Band from
7-11 p.m. today, by Country
Cajuns from 7-11 p.m.
Saturday.
Call 655-3920.
* The Lake Placid Moose
2374 will host music by Bob
Weed from 6-10 p.m. today,
and by Loose Change from 6-
10 p.m. Saturday.
Call 465-0131.
* The Sebring Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post 4300 will
host music by Fancy Free
from 6-9 p.m. today, and by
Gary and Shirley from 6-9
p.m. Saturday.
Call 385-8902.
* The Lake Placid
Veterans of Foreign Wars
3880 will host music by RIP
today.
Call 699-5444.
* The Lake Placid Elks
Lodge 2661 will host music
with Don and Allen from 6-8
p.m. today.
Call 465-2661

Library shows film
LAKE PLACID - The
Lake Placid Memorial
Library will show "Jesus
Christ, Superstar" at 2 p.m.
Saturday.
Call 699-3705.

Skylarks play for
dance club
SEBRING - The
Highlands Social Dance Club
hosts ballroom dancing from
.7-9:30 p.m. today at the
Sebring Lions Club on
Sebring Parkway.
Music will be provided by
the Big Band Sound of The
Skylarks.


Free ballroom dance
instruction from Walt and Sue
is available at 6:30 p.m.
Dance the night away to
waltzes, cha-chas, foxtrots,
rumbas, jitterbug and other
ballroom favorites.
All club dances are open to
the public. Appropriate dress
required.
Admission is $5 for mem-
bers and $7 for non-members.
Call 471-0559.

Groups have
rummage sales
* Francis 2 Mobile Home
Park will hold its annual rum-
mage /yard sale from 8 a.m to
2 p.m. Saturday at the club-
house on Real Mcoy Drive.
The park is immediately
behind Ace Hardware/WW
Lumber in Sebring.
* The Ladies Auxiliary of
Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 in Sebring are
holding its annual rummage,
bake and vendor sale from 8
a.m. to 1 p.m. today and
Saturday.
* The Sun and Lakes
Recreation District of Lake
Placid will hold its annual
rummage sale today and
Saturday at the clubhouse on
Sun 'N Lakes Blvd. near
Lake Placid. The clubhouse is
located next to the fire sta-
tion. The doors will be open
at 8 a.m. each day and will
close at 1 p.m. Call 699-
5679.

Sebring Hills has
spaghetti dinner
SEBRING - On Saturday,
Sebring Hills will have a
spaghetti dinner at the club-
house, 200 Lark Ave. Cost is
$7 and sodas are 50 cents.
This dinner will be from
3:30-6:30 p.m. Call Doris
Steele at 314-8905 or 314-
0028 for tickets. If you live in
Sebring Hills, delivery is
available.

TJ and The Cruisers
play Saturday
AVON PARK - Rockin' at


the Rock from 7:30-11 p.m.
Saturday for one night only.
TJ and the Cruisers will play
music from the '50s-70s 'at
Union Congregation Church,
106 N. Butler Ave. There will
be a $2 cover charge.
Childcare is available. An
alcohol free event.

FFA hosts Swamp
Cabbage & Chicken
Barbecue
AVON PARK - On
Saturday, the Sebring FFA
Alumni Swamp Cabbage &
Chicken BBQ will be held at
Bill Jarrett Ford-Mercury
dealership in Avon Park. The
meals consisting of famous
swamp cabbage, half barbe-
cue chicken,.green beans, a
roll and beverage costs $7.
Tickets may be purchased
from FFA members at Hill-
Gustat Middle, Sebring
Middle or Sebring High
Schools.
For tickets contact Gary
Lee (214-6748), or e-mail
leeg@highlands.kl2.fl.us.

D.A.R. chapter plans
fashion show
SEBRING - The local
chapter of the Daughters of
the American Revolution will
host its annual "Stepping Into
Spring" Luncheon and
Fashion Show at 11 a.m.
Saturday at First United
Methodist Church on Pine
Street.
This fundraiser benefits the
high school scholarships to
three Highlands seniors and
one Hardee County senior.
Guests will have the
chance to browse the oppor-
tunity table and register for
gifts. Door prizes will also be
awarded to ticket holders.
Fashions will be provided
by Tosheba Fashions on N.
Ridgewood, Sue's Cubby
Hole in Sebring Square, Bon
Worth in the Lakeshore Mall
and Lake Placid Feed and
Western Wear.
Tickets are $20. For infor-
Continued on page 8A


OBITUARIES


Mary Adkins
Mary Margaret Adkins,
82, of Avon Park, died Feb.
23, 2009. Born in
Scottsburg, Ind., she had
been a resident of Avon
Park since 1999. She was a
missionary for 40 years,
serving in Kenya and
Tanzania. She was a mem-
ber of Community Bible
Church in Avon Park.
Survivors' include her
husband of 60 years,
Richard; sons, Doug and
Michael; daughter, Judi
Braunschweiger; and 12
grandchildren.
A funeral service was
held Feb. 25. at Community
Bible Church with Pastor
Don Seymore officiating.
Interment was in
Bougainvillea Cemetery in
Avon Park. In lieu of flow-
ers, the family has request-
ed that memorial contribu-
tions be made to the World
Gospel Mission, P.O. Box
948, Marion, IN 46952.
Arrangements were han-
dled by Stephenson-Nelson
Funeral Home, Avon Park.

Rod Bostic Sr.
Rod Bostic Sr., 77, of
Avon Park died Feb. 20,
2009. Born in Fairfax,
S.C., he was a truck driver
and member of Church of
God in Christ in Avon
Park.
He is survived by his
,son, Rod Jr.; daughters,
Jacqueline Bostic, Octavia
Williams and Brenda
Haggins; 37 grandchildren
and 29 great-grandchil-
dren.
Visitation will be from
6-8 p.m. today at New Life
Assembly Church in Lake
Placid. Funeral will be at
3:30 p.m. Saturday at New
Life Assembly Church.
Interment will be in Oak
Hill Cemetery in Lake
Placid. Swann's Mortuary,
Sebring, is in charge of
arrangements.


Joel Godinez
Joel Godinez, 38, of
Lake Placid died Feb. 25,
2009. Born in Mexico City,
Mexico he moved to Lake
Placid in 1988. He was a
crew leader for the citrus
industry. He attended
Centro Catolico Hispana
Church in Lake Placid.
He is survived by his
grandmother, Elena
Alvarez; father, Rosendo
Godinez Ramos; mother,
Ana Maria Herrera; son,
Jorge; daughter,
Amenaneli; brothers, Jorge
A. and Rosendo; and sis-
ters, Yolanda Godinez and
Maria .E. Barajas.
A visitation will be held
from 7-9 p.m. today at
Chandler Funeral Home
Chapel, Lake Placid. A
funeral mass will be held at
11 a.m. Saturday in the
Centro Catolico Hispana
Church. Burial to follow at
Oak Hill Cemetery in Lake
Placid.

Thomas Johnson
Thomas Russell (Rusty)
Johnson, 54, of Sebring
died Feb. 21, 2009 in
Woodland Hills, Calif. He
was an elementary school
teacher.
He is survived by his
parents, Tom and Eunice
Johnson; sisters, Karen
Franklin and April Jenkins.
Contributions may be
made to the American
Cancer Society for
esophageal cancer
research. Interment in a
family plot in a private cer-
emony is to follow crema-
tion.

Mark Smedley
Mark Allen
Smedley, 54, of
Lake Placid
died Feb. 22,
2009. Born in Crane, Ind,,
he moved to Lake Placid in
1991. He was a veteran of
the U.S. Air Force and


worked for W.W. Lumber
and Don's T.V. in Lake
Placid. He was a member
of First Baptist Church of
Lake Josephine.
He is survived by his
father, John; sons, Mark
Smedley Jr., Jason
Smedley, Curtis Campbell,
and Devon Smedley;
brother, John Smedley Jr.;
four grandchildren; and
fiancee, Bea Maxwell.
A memorial service was
held Feb. 26 at First
Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine with Rev. Kevin
Ahrens officiating. Morris
Funeral Chapel, Sebring,
was in charge of arrange-
ments.

Ignacio Soler
SIgnacio "Igy"
Soler, 59, of
Sebring died
Feb. 25, 2009.
He moved to Sebring in
1992 from
Miami
Spr ings.
He was
retired
from the
U.S. Air
F o rocve Soler
Reserves Soler
and owner of Soler
Pressure Cleaning and a
partner with Signs Now.
He was a member of Grace
Bible Church of Sebring.
He is survived by his
wife, Pamela; stepson,
Glenn Zeiss; and Val Soler.
Visitation will be from
6-8 p.m. Monday at Grace
Bible Church in Sebring.
Funeral service will be 11
a.m: Tuesday at Lakeview
Memorial Gardens in the
Chapel of Peace with inter-
ment to follow. The family
has requested all flowers
be directed to .Lakeview
Memorial Gardens. On line
condolence may be left at
www.bankspagetheus.com.
Arrangements entrusted to
Banks/Page-Theus Funeral
Home, Wildwood.


We are


U


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FUNERAL CHAPEL
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Our funeral home offers preplanned

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when services or questions arise.


It is important for us to always consider

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the benefits of choosing a locally

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Sebring, Florida 33870


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* transfer for burial in other

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* offering local service with

burial or cremation

* located in downtown Sebring

* serving Highlands County

since 1950 at the same location


Page 6A


All


here for you...


IN TIME


www.newssun.com


B.p,. . , " ' " ' .' ,! , .
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I A








www.newssun.corn


News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


The News-Sun would like
to remind the readers that the
names listed below reflect
those who have been charged
with a crime, but they are all
innocent until proven guilty
by a court of law. If anyone
listed here is acquitted or has
charges dropped, they can
bring in proof of such deci-
sion or mail a copy to the
paper and the News-Sun will
be happy to report that infor-
mation. The News-Sun is at
2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring,
FL 33870.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on Monday, Feb.
23:
* Sean Horatio Bell, 22, of
Kissimmee, was charged
with possession of marijuana
and possession of narcotic
equipment.
* Tracee Ann Brown, 18, of
Sebring, was charged with
possession of drugs, pro-
ducine methamphetamine,
possession of narcotic equip-
ment.
* Fernando Chaidez, 29, of
Fort Meade, was charged
with producing methamphet-
amine, possession of drugs
and possession of narcotic
equipment.
* Eddie Dandron, 26, of
Sebring, was charged with
refusing to submit to a DUI
test, driving while license
suspended, and DUI.
* Sandra Lynn Marie
Frazier, 18, of Lake Placid
was charged with petit larce-
ny.
* Casey Lynn
Henderscheid, 22, of
Sebring, was charged with
criminal registration for pos-
session of cocaine.
* Crystal Lynn Holton, 30,
of Sebring, was charged with
violation of protation refer-
ence DUI.
* Donald Earl Millerd, 45,
of Venus, was charged with
criminal registration for lewd
and lascivious battery.
* Jose Leon Moreno, 38, of
Zolfo Springs, was charged
with driving while license
suspended.
* Joseph Edward Nicklaus,
24, of Lake Placid, was
charged with possession of
narcotic equipment, posses-
sion of drugs, producing
methamphetamine.
* Deborah Kay Peterman,
50, of Okeechobee, was
charged with driving while
license suspended.
* Marcus Latroy Rockmore,
32, of Sebring, was charged
with possession of narcotic
equipment, possession of
cocaine.
* Akua Travon Samuels, 21,
of Lake Placid, was charged
with aggravated assault with a
deadly weapon, intimidat-
ing/threatening a witness.
+ Heather Luanne Stone, 38,
of Lakeland, was charged
with probation of violation
reference possession of
cocaine.
* Ciara Shante Sturdivant,
20, of Homestead, was
charged with possession of
marijuana.
* Benjamin Lee Sweat, 18,
of Sebring, was charged with
burglary of unoccupied con-
veyance.
* Edwin Paul Townsend, 31,
of Avon Park, was charged
with possession of drugs,
producing methampheta-
mine, possession of narcotic
eqiupment.
* Jaime Lee Wood, 24, of
Lorida, was charged with
order revoking bond.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on Monday, Feb.
23:
* James Erick Canales, 30,
of Sebring, was charged with
criminal registration for pos-


session of cocaine with intent
to sell.
* Robert George
Cappelletti, 55, of Lake
Placid, was charged with pos-
session of marijuana and pos-
session of cocaine.
* Jeanine Chapman, 42, of
Thousand Oaks, Calif., was
charged with violation of
probation reference giving
false name to a law enforce-
ment officer.
* Justin Allen Cranfield, 25,


of Sebring, was charged with
fruad using credit card to
obtain goods of $300 or
more, fraud-swindle for
obtaining property under
$20,000, and larceny of $300
or more.
* Justin Lee Cullum, 23, of,
Lakeland, was charged with
probation of violation refer-
ence obtaining property with
a worthless check.
* Michael Craig Darge, 33,
of Port Richie, was charged
with failure to appear for
possession of cannabis, pos-
session of oxydocone and
possession of drug para-
phenalia.
* Alex James Davis, 49, of
Avon Park, was charged with
possession of narcotic equip-
ment and possession of
cocaine.
* Darcel Latoya Dennis, 24,
of Orlando, was charged with
aggravated assault with a
weapon.
* Joseph Lawrence Heston,
21, of Sebring, was charged
with criminal registration for
burglary of a conveyance,
grand theft.
* Precious Latisha Hill, 18,
of Lake Placid, was charged
with battery.
* Shelia Kaye Hill, 51, of
Lake Placid, was charged
with battery.
* Gamalier Melendez, 26,
of Sebring, was charged with
battery, damage of property
and burglary.
* James Pappa, 45, of
Sebring, was charged with an
out-of-county warrant refer-
ence grand larceny.
* Lucas Wayne Paulson, 27,
of Glendale, Ariz., was
charged with violation of
probation reference simple
battery.
* Akua Travon Samuels, 21,
of Lake Placid, was charged
with battery.
* George Vassilakopoulos,
48, of Sebring, was charged
with fraud-insuffienct funds
for issuing a check.
* Toyondra Lashe Willis,
19, of Lake Placid, was
charged with battery.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on Monday, Feb.
23:
* Melissa Lynn Andress, 27,
of Sebring, was registered as
a criminal for grand theft.
* Tracy Joy Carol Bryant,
21, of Sebring, affidavit of
non-compliance, failure to
appear for knowingly driving
while license suspended or
revoked.
* Charity A. Garcia, 29, of
Avon Park, awaiting trial,
warrant, failure to appear
expired driver license, for
more than four months.
* Nicholas Joy Grinage, 35,
of Sebring, was charged on
an Orange County warrant
for possession of controlled
substance.
* Richard Joe Kelting, 36,
of Okeechobee, awaiting trial
for burglary with assault or
battery; family offense, inter-
fering with custody of
minor; and crimes against
person, abuse of elderly or
disabled adult.
* Jennifer Lea Purser, 36, of
Wauchula, was recommitted
for possession of metham-
phetamine.
* Tommy Lee Richardson,
51, of Avon Park, was
charged with failure to
appear, warrant issued by
U.S. Marshall's Services for
possession of cocaine.
* Jordan Eli Shapiro, 29, of
Sebring, awaiting trial for
driving while license sus-
pended, first offense.
* Marcus Charlie
Thompson, 23, of Avon Park,
was charged with probation
violation, misdemeanor or
community control, warrant
for reckless driving with con-


tributing factor.
* Robin Dante Thompson,
43, of Avon Park, was regis-
tered as a criminal for aggra-
vated fleeing or eluding
police officer; and leaving
scene of accident with prop-
erty damage.
* Daryl Matthew Tomblin,
26, of Sebring, awaiting trial,
warrant, failure to appear,
pre-trial conference for
knowingly driving while
license suspended or


revoked, first offense; and
warrant, failure to appear,
pre-trial conference for leav-
ing scene of accident without
giving information.
* James Alexander Trice,
21, of Sebring, awaiting trial
for false identification given
to law enforcement officer;
and warrant for possession of
cannabis.
* Vincent Gerard Verderosa,
36, of Boynton Beach, await-
ing trial for driving while
license suspended, first
offense; resisting officer,
obstruction by disguised per-
son; and St. Lucie County
warrant for withholding sup-
port, non-support of children
or spouse.
* James Brian Williams, 23,
of Sebring, was registered as
a criminal, Polk County, for
sexual battery, victim 12
years of age or older, special
conditions.
* Joshua Lee Young, 21, of
Sebring, awaiting trial for
possession of narcotic equip-
ment and/or use; and posses-
sion of marijuana, not more
than 20 grams.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on Sunday, Feb.
22:,
* Cesar Montalvo Asuncion,
29, of Sebring, awaiting trial
for driving while license sus-
pended, second offense.
* Mary Ann Brown, 46, of
Sebring, awaiting trial for
possession of marijuana, not
more than 20 grams.
* Lorisma William DeSilus,
20, of Avon Park, was regis-
tered as a criminal for pos-
session of marijuana, within
1,000 feet of school, church
or business.
* Ronald Dean Eggen, 36,
of Sebring, awaiting trial,'
warrant, failure to appear for
pre-trial conference for pos-
session of cannabis; warrant,
failure to appear at pre-trial
conference for refusing to
submit; warrant, failure to
appear at pre-trial conference
for using or possessing drug
paraphernalia; warrant, fail-
ure to appear at pre-trial con-
ference for knowingly driv-
ing while license suspended
or revoked, second offense;
and warrant, failure to appear
at pre-trial conference for
driving under the influence
of alcohol or drugs, second or
third offense. *
* Ronald Leslie Hope, 18,
of Lake Placid, awaiting trial
for possession of harmful
new-legend drug without pre-
scription.
* Boysie Demters Jones, 27,
of Avon Park, awaiting trial
for selling marijuana within
1,000 feet of worship or busi-
ness, Schedule I; and posses-
sion of narcotic equipment
and/or use.
* Ralph Gordon Oakley, 47,
of Sebring, awaiting trial for
domestic violence, contempt
of court, violation injunction
protection domestic violence.
* Ginger Maria Paul, 20, of
Sebring, awaiting trial for
possession of narcotic equip-
ment and/or use; and selling
marijuana within 1,000 feet
of worship or business,
Schedule I.
* Luis Antenio Rangel, 33,
of Mt. Dora, awaiting trial
for larceny, petit, first
offense.
* Ricky Hershel Tyler, 24,
of Lake Placid, was charged
with probation violation,
felony warrant for simple
battery.

The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on Saturday, Feb.
21:
* Rebecka Diane Bell, 34,
of Sebring, awaiting trial,
warrant, failure to appear for
arraignment for no valid


driver license.
* David Andrew Bellamy,
50, of Sebring, awaiting trial
for possession of marijuana,


not more than 20 grams; pos-
session of cocaine; posses-
sion of narcotic equipment
and/or use; contempt of
court, child support; and two
counts of withholding sup-
port, non-support of children
or spouse.
* Ester Laverne Brown, 47,
of Tampa, awaiting trial for
possession of narcotic equip-
ment and/or use; possession
of marijuana, not more than
20 grams; and was committed
for order on plaintiff's
motion for sanctions and
warrant of commitment.
* Rico Antone Davis, 26, of
Lake Placid, awaiting trial
for battery, touch or strike.
* Matthew Robert
McIntyre, 25, of Sebring,
awaiting trial, warrant, fail-
ure to appear, failed pre-pay-
ment plan for driving under
the influence of alcohol or
drugs, personal property
damage program.
* Michael Jared Rose, 22, of
Sebring, awaiting trial for
trafficking opium. or deriva-,
tive, four grams to under 30
kilograms.
* Arnold David Smith, 45,
of Miami, awaiting trial for
driving while license sus-
pended, habitual offender.
* Timothy Lee Snyder, 48,'
of Avon Paik, awaiting trial
for driving under the influ-
ence of alcohol or drugs, first
offense.
* Wiley Streater, 53, of
Tampa, awaiting trial, com-
mitted for order on plaintiff's
motion for sanctions and
warrant of commitment, con-
tempt of court.
* James Horace Tucker, 23,
of Sebring, awaiting trial for
possession of marijuana, over
20 grams.
* Thomas Albert Turner, 22,
of St. Petersburg, awaiting
trial for possession of narcot-
ic equipment and/or use.
* Reginald Maurice
Wooden, 40, of Sebring,
awaiting trial for possession
of narcotic equipment and/or
use; possession of marijuana,
not more than 20 grams; and
battery, causing bodily harm.


The following people were
booked into the Highlands
County Jail on Friday, Feb.
20:
* Christopher Scott
Bateman, 20, of Avon Park,
awaiting trial for larceny,
petit, first offense. .
* Jerry Wayne Cardwell, 52,
of Winter Garden, was
charged on an Orange County
warrant for petit theft, third
conviction.
* Selina Diane Carroll, 47,
of Winter Haven, awaiting
trial for driving under the
influence of alcohol or drugs,
first offense; and refusing to
submit to DUI test after
license suspended.
* Matthew Clifford, 19, of
Sebring, awaiting trial for
resisting officer, obstruction
without violence.
* Nialah Takarah Deveaux,
29, of Lake Placid, was
charged with probation viola-
tion, felony warrant for
obstructing crime investiga-
tion; warrant for selling,
manufacturing or delivering
marijuana; warrant for sell-
ing, manufacturing or deliv-
ering cocaine; and in-house,
domestic violence or battery,
touch or strike.
* Samuel Etheredge, 20, of
Lake City, motion to trans-
port prisoner for municipal
ordinance violation.
* Trent DeAngelo Ford, 21,
of Orlando, awaiting trial,
warrant, failure to appear at
status conference for child
abuse; and warrant, failure to
appear at status conference
for felony battery with great
harm.
* Kenneth Lee Horn, 41, of
Sebring, awaiting trial for
tampering with, fabricating
or destroying physical evi-
dence; and awaiting trial for
domestic violence or aggra-
vated battery, person using a
deadly weapon.
* Christopher Allen Horton,
27, of Lorida, awaiting trial,
warrant for larceny or grand
theft; warrant for fraudulent
use of credit card more than
twice in six months to obtain


goods or money; warrant,
scheme to defraud to obtain
property.
* Quentin Leevon Howard,
21, of Avon Park, was regis-
tered as a criminal for smug-
gling contraband into a
detention facility; and pos-
session of cannabis with
intent to sell or deliver.
* Jimmy Carter Lamar, 56,
of Belle Glade, awaiting trial
for vehicle grand theft, third
degree; and driving while
license suspended or
revoked, second offense.
* Michael Angelo Loffa, 43,
of Sebring, awaiting trial for
driving while license sus-
pended, second offense.
* Charles Joseph Lomnicki,
24, of Sebring, awaiting trial
for possession of narcotic
equipment and/or use; and
possession of marijuana, not
more than 20 grams.
* Theresa Lewandowski
Reed, 40, was registered as a
criminal for possession of
cocaine with intent to sell or
deliver; and possession of
cannabis with intent to sell or
deliver.
* Rosendo Ortiz Romero,
27, of Sebring, awaiting trial
for withholding support, non-
sipport of children or spouse.
* Reshaard Issa-Omari
Samuels, 22, of Lake Placid,
awaiting trial for domestic
violence or battery, touch or
strike.
* Michael Joseph Smarsh,
43, of Sebring, awaiting trial
for driving while license sus-
pended, habitual offender.
* Paul Alexander Tapper,
41, of Lakeland, awaiting
trial, warrant, failure to
appear at pre-trial conference
for possession of cannabis;
and warrant, failure to appear
at pre-trial conference for use
and possession of drug para-
phernalia.
* Andrew Adam Tarlowe,
34, of Fort Pierce, awaiting
trial for withholding support,
non-support of children oir
spouse.
* Elizabeth Diane Young,
43, of Sebring, was recom-
mitted for grand theft.


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Page 7A


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Page 8A


News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


News-Sun photo by BRIANA WASHINGTON
Avon Park High School Junior ROTC Cadet Captain
Giovanni Vanetti was one of the top performers during the
unit inspection conducted by Col. John R. Vick (right), rep- News-Sun photo by BRIANA WASHINGTON
resenting Headquarters Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Avon Park High School Principal Stu Guthrie and Col. John
Training Corps (AFJROTC). Also shown is APHS Principal R. Vick, representing Headquarters Air Force Junior
Stu Guthrie. Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFJROTC), flank Junior
ROTC Cadet Tech Sergeant Angel Perez, who was recently
A. 7* ,r ' ,., < named a Top Performer for his unit.


Air Force Junior ROUI'

units exceed standards

in evaluations


Special to the News-Sun
Avon Park and Sebring
high schools recently hosted a
visit from Col. John R. Vick,
representing Headquarters Air
Force Junior Reserve Officer
Training Corps (AFJROTC).
During the visit, the
AFJROTC Units (FL934 &
FL935) underwent a Unit
Evaluation on how effective-
ly, efficiently and safely they
accomplished their mission.
Both units earned an overall
unit assessment score of
"Exceeds Standards," the
highest rating attainable.
In a letter to both principals
(Stu Guthrie, APHS and Toni
Stivender, SHS), Col. Richard
J. Ragaller, director, Air Force
JROTC, stated, "The superb


support you have provided
greatly contributes to
AFJROTC success. The
instructors [Col. William
Hutchison, Col. Robert Smith,
CMSgt. Dennis Green and
SMSgt. Larry Fergerson] are
extremely talented, dedicated
and create a dynamic and sup-
portive learning environment
in and out of the classroom."
Ragaller added, "Cadets
display exemplary pride and
their extensive participation
in numerous community serv-
ice projects is very impres-
sive. As a result, both
AFJROTC Programs [FL934
& FL935] are making a posi-
tive impact on their high
school, the school district and
surrounding community."


Courtesy photo
Outstanding Performers during preparation for Sebring
High School's HQ /AFJROTC Inspection were Cadet Jodie
Williams (left) and Cadet Aaron Haidle. SHS Principal Toni
Stivender took part in the awards presentation.


www.newssun.com


COMMUNITY BRIEFS


Continued from page 6A
mation, call Pat Leidel at
386-4474.

Ladiex host bazaar
SEBRING - A bazaar,
sponsored by the Craft and
Ladies Club of Sun 'N
Lake North, will be from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at
Sun 'N Lake Community
Center, 3500 Edgewater
Drive in Sebring.

Poppy dinner set
AVON PARK -, On
Saturday, the American
Legion Auxiliary, Unit 69
-will have its annual Poppy
dinner. Roast pork loin and
all the fixings. Donation is
$7. Dinner from 5-6 p.m.
Music for your listening
and dancing pleasure by
Mike Claxton.

Step Up Florida at
state park
SEBRING - Highlands
Hammock State Park will
be the scene for Step Up
Florida at 8 a.m. Saturday,
8 a.m.
Come walk, run and be
healthy with other
Floridians during this
statewide initiative towards
healthy living. Registration
begins at 7 a.m. and all
ages are welcome to partic-
ipate in the free 5-K
run/walk or 1K (about 1/2
mile) walk. Free T-shirts
while they last.
Park admission waived
for all participants. The
event is sponsored by the
Highlands County Health
Department. Contact Derek
Carlton at 382-7221 for
/rn . .- . -


more information.

Black History Rally
set for Saturday
SEBRING - A Black
History Rally with the
theme "Togethernesss, Yes
We Can" will be from 1-4
p.m. Saturday in the
Bountiful Blessings
Church parking lot, 820
Martin Luther King Jr.
Blvd.
There will be acctiinieu
and information for adults
and children. Exciting
guest speakers, music,
health screenings, job
training information, and
much more. Bring the
entire family.
Sponsored by The Rosa
Parks Political Action
Coalition.

Woodcarvers host
first show
SEBRING - The
Highlands Woodcarvers
will host its first wood
carving show, "Artistry in
Wood," from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Saturday.
There will be a carving
competition, vendors, carv-
ing demonstrations, door
prizes, raffle, carousel
horse display and refresh-
ments.
Leah Goddard, a well-
known carver who recently
had a show on the DIY
Network, will be the fea-
tured carver.
The show will be held at
the Sebring Civic Center
(behind the Sebring
Library). A $3 donation
will be charged.


. 10am-6pm
o lOam-3pm



340 B. Interlake Blvd,
Lake Placid FL 33882
863-699-5577
Hotdogs - Chicago, NY Coney, Kraut,
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Old Fashioned Mllkshakes,
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Private Parties & Events 10 or more


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SERVING BREAKFAST ALL DAY

Sebring Square Plaza 382-2333
Mon-Sat 6:30am-2pm * Sun 7am-2pm


,CHARLIE S)




113 South Commerce Ave.
Sebring, Florida 33870
Tel. (863) 382-2983
Open: Tue. thru Thurs. * 4:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Early Bird (Tues. thru Thurs.) from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Fri. & Sat.* 4:00 pm to 9:30 pm
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Serving Carved Meats Daily
* Two Salad Bars * Soup & Bread Bar
* Two Hot Bars - 10 to 12 Entrees
Assortment of Side Dishes
* Dessert Bar * Beverage Bar
100 Sebring Square, US 27
in the Winn Dixie Shopping Center
Plenty of Seating
OPEN DAILY 11AM - 8PM
FRIDAY & SATURDAY OPEN TiL 8:30
DINNER ALL DAY SUNDAY


DINING QUOTES

""Ponder well on this

point: the pleasant hours

of our life are all con-

nected by a more or less

tangible link, with some

memory of the table."
- Charles Pierre Monseler,
French author (1825-1888)


Wake up with one of Dot's great breakfast specials and a hot cup of Folgers coffee,
served up at Dot's since 1989. Dot's has a variety of daily specials that are sure to give your
wallet a break and your taste buds just what they need to get your day started just right.

Stop by for lunch and check out all of our homemade, delicious sandwiches. We've got
it all, from hamburger and cheeseburger combos, our own Indiana-style tenderloin, the best
tuna melt you've ever had, a turkey, ham and cheese club, or even hot open-faced turkey or
roast beef sandwiches. All these are served up with hot French fries, just the way you like
them! And when's the last time you have a homemade meatloaf lunch with real mashed pota-
toes, your choice of vegetable, and beverage for only for $5.99? If you're looking for something
new, try the newest addition to our menu, our new Minnie Hamburgers, garnished with fried
onions and pickle along with a side of French fries and a beverage all for $4.79.

With all the choices that Dot's has to offer, you are sure to be pleased, and we'd never
have it any other way! We pride ourselves on fast and courteous service and we treat you like
a e treated. And as always, don't forget we serve breakfast all day Hope to
see you all of my Dot's! .


" Restaurant

& Coffee Shop


Mon-Sat 6:30am-2pm
Sunday 7am-2pm
Sunday 7am-2pm




wIqW


www.newssun.corn


News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


ACCU WAMR


Page 9A
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. v2009
AccuWeather.com


Fijve Day forecast for Highlands County


TODAY




Sunny most of the day


High 80/Low 51
Winds: SE at 6-12 mph.


SATURDAY




Mostly sunny and
pleasantly warm

High 83/Low 54
Winds: S at 7-14 mph.


Chan
.


SUNDAY




ice for a couple
of showers


High 73/Low 41
Winds WNW at 15-25 mph


. a s ,.- . _ .nville


Shown Is today's
weather. Temperatures
are today's highs and
tonight's lows


Regional summary: Sunny most of the day today. Mainly clear and mild
tonight. Mostly sunny and pleasantly warm tomorrow Sunday: intervals of
clouds and sun: chance for a couple of showers, breezy and not as warm.
Monday and Tuesday: a full day of sunshine.


MONDAY


Sunny a


TUESDAY


nd pleasant Mostly sunny and
. ; ,. -~ e


High 72/Low 42 High 74/Low 46
Winds. WNW at 8-16 mph Winds NNW at 7-14 mph


For 3 p.m. today
Relative humidity ................... 39%
Expected air temperature ........ 790
Makes it feel like ...................... 790


On Feb. 27, 1717, the first in a
series of storms to hit New England
struck Boston, The city was snow-
bound for three weeks with a total
of 36 inches from the great snow.


ISunny most of the day
today. Winds southeast 6-
12 mph. Expect 6-10 hours of sun-
shine with average relative humidity
55% and good drying conditions.
Mainly clear tonight.


m Today
Miimm-K.P FA "N-w


If your address (house number) ends in...
.,0 or 1, water only on Monday
...2 or 3, water only on Tuesday
.,.4 or 5, water only on Wednesday
*...6 or 7, water only on Thursday
-...8 or 9*, water only on Friday
Sand locations without a
discernible address

For today
9 am. 11am. 1 j3,ip ,5.p.ro.

TIne nigr.er irei uV inax nuitiner, tne greater
the need for eye and skin priection
0-2, Low; 3-5 Moderate. 6-7 High:
8-10, Very High; 11+ Extreme


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are
highs for the day. Forecast high and low temperatures are given for selected cities.
4773 , .."

Showers
/ COLD __
e. a"g, or T-storm
, ie, ork
XsoM I Rain
S818 iahlngton
6fSan rancisco ,/ Dqnye
. 114P , 0 /1 B REEZ Y) Snow

,LosAngele s SIce
HU I- A . "a.t"- I i c e
68152%"~ A1A:" ,


FRONTS
A-ft Cold
AA Warm
aiw Stationary


National summary: A storm system will cause rain to stretch from the Northeast to the Arklatex tomorrow. Mild air
preceding the rain will pour over the East and Gulf coasts. The warm air will combine with moisture flowing north-
ward to help severe thunderstorms ignite over the central Gulf Coast states. The rain will bypass the drought-strick-
en southern High Plains. Many of these places, however, will welcome the arrival of cooler air. Noticeably colder air
will blast into the Midwest in the wake of the storm.


Sunrise .... 6:51 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:26 p.m.
Moonrise .. 8:08 a.m.
Moonset .... 9:06 p.m.


Saturday Sunrise .... 6:50 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:27 p.m.
Moonrise .. 8:41 a.m.
Moonset ..10:06 p.m.





First Full Last New
Mar4 Mar 10 Mar18 Mar26


Temperature
(Readings at Archbold Biological Station
In Lake Placid)
,High Tuesday ....................... 75
Low Tuesday ....................... 48
High Wednesday ................... 78
Low Wednesday ................... 42
High Thursday ..................... 74
Low Thursday ...................... 48
Precipitation
Tuesday ........... ...... 0.00"
Wednesday .................... 0.00"
Thursday .......................... 0.00"
Month to date ................... 0.38"
Year to date .................. 1.11"
Barometer
Tuesday ........................... 30.35
Wednesday ..... ....... 30.39


Thursday ......................... 30.36
Tides
(Readings at St. Petersburg)
High .................... 3:03 a.m,
Low ............................. 9:03 a.m .
High ........................ . 3:01 p.m.
Low ... .................... 9:41 p.m.
(Readings at Palm Beach)
High ................... 9:59 am.
Low ........................ 3:31 a.m.
High .........................- 10:28 p.m .
Low ................. ..... 3:48 p.m .
Lake Levels
Lake Jackson ................. 78.36'
Lake Okeechobee ........... 12.86'
Normal ........................... 14.51'


Today Tomorrow Sunday
City HI Lo W HI Lo W Hi Lo W
Daytona Beach 75 55 s 79 56 s 63 40 pc
Ft Laiu.s id h . -. . 4i : -. 6, ; . .1" 4 r,
Fort Myers 8058 s 80 61 s 67 47 sh
Gainesville 77 53 s 78 52 c 56 33 p.
Homestead AFB 77 63 s 79 60 s 78 46 sh
.li. 4. ,rfilwI'. p: 5.1 Ar pi K? pr *St. j3. rc
Key West 77 67 s 76 68 73 58 sh
Miami 78 63 s 81 65 s 80 49 ish
Ordando 79 56 s 82 58 s 62 42 sh
P-r.iacola 71 ?l p.: -j 4 i 5c-3C rpc
Sarasft ' 77 55 s * 78 59 s 62 44 sh
Tallahabsee 73 54 pc 76 49 c 55 32 pc
Tampa 78 60 s 78 62 s 67 43 sh
W. PalmBch 77 64. s 81 63 s 75 46 sh,


ufs.
iF~lr-I. 0,-t --


City
Albuquerque
Atlanta
Baltimore
Burnirnghair
Boston
,Charlotte
Cheyenne
.Chirago
Cleveland
Columbus
D.allas
Dcrner
Detroif
Harnsburg


Today
HI Lo W
66 37 s
68 49 sh
58 42 r
65 -19 1
51 37 r
65 48 Sh
36 16 sn
32 16 3
48 20 r
52 27
6,3 35
1I 16
38 18
54 30


Tomorrow
HI Lo W
62 36 s
63 34 r
44 34 r
57 32 1
44 29 pc
55 38 r
50 25 s
33 16 c
33 19 pc
40 20 pa
58 31 s
50 25 5
35 17 pa
42 29 pc


Sunday
Hi Lo W
67 40 pc
41 29 sn
38 26 sn
48 26 pc
37 24 sn
46 24 sn
59 33 c
31 17 ,
30 16 pc
35 16 pc
58 37 ;
63 34 c
32 13 c
40 21 sn


City
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jacisonyvoie
Kansas City
Lexington
Little Rock
Los Angiles
Louisville
Memphis
Miam.
MNnneapolls
Nawhillens
NewOrleans


Today
HI LO W
79 66 pc
82 56 pc
42 22 0c
75 52 t.
38 2 C0
54 31 r
56 36 r
68 52 I.c
51 32 r
58 39 r
'8 63 s
14 3 c
78 81 b


Tomorrow
HI Lo W
78 67 eh
67 43 c
38 17 pc,
81 52 pc
33 1 c
40 22 r
47 28 c
.2 51 pC
42 24 pe
42 29 r
81 65 S
20 ? pc
4125 r
69-391 I'


Sunday
HI Lo W
80 06 pc
60 40 s
39 19 pc
56 3'4 pa
42 Sa 6
36 20 pe
50 29 s
66 52 1
40 23 pc
48 29-pc
80 49 sh
25 13 s
42 29' p
56 A4 s


Today Tomorrow Sunday
City HI Lo W HI Lo. W HI Lo W
Now York Cly SO 496 r -, - * t t r
Norfdli 6S sh 12 9 r - 4p4 31 r
Oklahoma City 52 30 pc 46 24 s 54 34 s
PrIiaaalphia 57 38 rl 43 .14 p 38 2 sa
Phoelix 79 65 pc -84,.54S .,a8$ p.M .
Pitsburgh 5 228 "420 'poc '96 1 *pac
Portland 42 33 r 44 23 pc 35 18 sn
Rallgr 68 4.8 s n 4 ,36 44 4 ;' r1
Rochester 6 $8 15 r-,- _-l.'e -, . 13 _c
St Loust 492? 4 clg .
San Francisco 61 47 pC 63 53 r 60 52 r
Sama , 47 35.pc 48 .40 I 5,41 r
Twamps - -01, ,76 6 -' . j,, -w
Washington DC0061 31' 8'"4-1 . t Q at


Today
City . HI Lo W
Acapulco 90 71 sa
Berin, 41 30 sh
C9', ,4 a
Dubli - S. A3
Edmonton 1;' 7 P-

Hoinge 3 77 S c
Jerusalem 48 47 t
Kiev 34 30 sn


Today
City HI Lo W
London 55 43 pc
Mcrnii.:,l 11 :" I
1t , - , 1, 9 4.-
itiawe' 4. 47 19
Qdebec 41 5 r
IlI a , ,l6 |lO 9l'l ,'. p'.
lbrbnfo- *'. M4 *4
Vancouver 46 30 pc
Winnipeg 2 -8 pc


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy,
sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, as-snow,flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice.


flflNftNPeNPtPtr.a... ~-------------


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a


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~"~~dJJeidJdIdJsJ4ueJdaadJaasGewcaa


R.IHDa/, Hso, TA A he Heartland Harmon


'izers jS

a
Mf -l^^ a~
BIIBI^a


Proudly Present

**The Cccu Old Iays*"





The Heartland Harmonizers

Barbershop Chorus

With
SOUNDS OF SEBRING


Special Guest Quartet:

"Perfect Timing"
(One of the Top S International Senior Quartets)
Plus Chapter Quartets:
'he Old Smoothies","Harmony Classic", "What Are We Here Four" and "Twilig


FI


4WO76


Saturday, March 7,2009
South Florida Community College Auditorii
Avon Park, Florida
2:00 PM and 7:00PM Shows
SRh.II All Tickets $12.00 available at:
BARBERSHOP Kenilworth Lodge, Sebring; Home & Es
HARMONY Lake Placid; and Hotel Jacaranda, Avo
SO-CIETY Or Call 386-5098 or 471-2494


Iht Zone"




um




ssentials,
)n Park.


Aj
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a
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a7
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ddJddddddddddJ


Avon Park
80/52
* .... '
Sebring * -
80151 4
S* '
Lake Placid Lorida
79./55 80/51

Venus
*., 79/55
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. . III 111 0 -11dAMIAMMA . d"d


40ft= - -", -, I


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News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


Page 10A


HiVg eanS




i vest oc


oun Ty

A dle .l


MARKET STEER


Hunter Martinez Katie Bryan
Lykes Bros Ranch $3,705 Abbott & Cobb $3,465


Riley McKenna
Heartland National Bank $2,012


Jimmy Frazier III
Riverside National Bank $1,052


Paige Giller
Glades Electric Cooperative $2,172


Jake Bryan Isabella Caraballo
Graham Farms Melon Sales $3,546 Marlie Westervelt $2,688


Jerry Lee Wright Bailey Gornto
Publix Super Markets $1,102 Marlie Westervelt $1,998


Tori Stephenson
Highlands Independent Bank $1,986


Kelly Yarbrough
Pathology Assoc. of Sebring $1,310


Elizabeth Tauchen
Publix Super Markets $2,370


Mark Hettich
Heartland Real Estate $2,105 .


Laurent Lollis Blaine Albritton
Glisson Animal Supply $1,030 Smoak Groves Inc. $1,998


Meghan Lollis
Lextron $2,134


Wesley Jones Ian Munro
Canter Cattle Co. $3,705 Sebring Heart Center $1,925


Cole Bronson /
Okeechobee Livestock Market $2,031


Garrett Martinez
Glisson Animal Supply $1,807


= Cross
= Country,
.' --AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES


MILLER'S
CENTRAL AIR, INC.


I Highians
BM e IW IR^l. Tt a'l


__ RGA Services, Inc.


www.newssun.com








www.newssun.corn


News-Sun * Friday, February 27; 2009


Page 11A


SCross
=- s Country
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES


MILLER'S

CENTRAL AIR, INC.


I R^


!=3 RGA Services, Inc.


Jesse Manesp
South Ridge Abstract $1,897


Casey Dougal
Crews Groves Inc. $1,743


James Buice Jarrett Reed
Perry Cattle $2,389 Lykes Bros Ranch $1,678


Dewey Sebring Victoria Caraballo
McKenna & Assoc. Citrus $1,797 Lykes Bros Ranch $2,528


Blake Vickers
Gadsden Management Inc. $2,007


Jayme Faircloth
Yarbrough Tire Service $1,599


Alex Stephenson Bailey Vickers
Swaine & Harris PA $1,713 Lextron $1,737


Amery Bass Jarrett Prescott
Lextron $2,722 Dressel Groves $2,084


Kendall Prescott Matthew Pettit
Westby Corp - Ranch $2,009 Andy Jackson $1,965


Raney Sebring
McKenna & Assoc. Citrus $2,428


Brianna Hood
Central FL Glass & Mirror $2,044


Brandon Cooper
W.A. Williams Citrus Nursery Svc $2,975


Chelsey Hughes
C Bar C Ranch & Cattle $1,698


Amy Wack
Heartland Real Estate $2,387


Justin Brown
Mark Palmer Electric $2,100


0 09 ; . .1 %. RN'7 Y FA " ." " ':
JR 1!I.'SiiuciRStHovr Liu;!^


Shelby Hill Logan Palmer
Farm Credit Services $2,038 S&T Storage $2,194


Jimmy Frazier III Shelby Dressel
Heartland National Bank $2,150 Dressel Groves $2,059










News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


Page 12A


-= Cross
,Country,
'uvm AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES


MILLER'S
CENTRAL AIR, INC.


K *n
onI


S RGA Services, Inc.


Andrew Sedlock Rebecca Perry Riley McKenna
Dennis Coulter $1,482 Dennis Coulter $1,260 Masterpiece Cattle Co. $2,048


MARKET HOG


Dylan Feickert Jamie Wirries Kiara Slade
Alan Jay Automotive Network $1,675 The Group $931 Heartland Harvesting $649


Josiah Berry
Riverside National Bank $434


Megan Stein
Supersweet Farms $567


Amber Tindell
Publix Super Markets $635


Susan Brumfield
Marlie Westervelt $388


Kara Fairclbth '
Oak Creek Builders $675


' Stanley Perry
Heartland National Bank $840


Cale Payne
Central FL Glass & Mirror $919


Maggie Brumfield
Alan Jay Automotive Network $578


Justin Hough-Graham
Riverside National Bank $690


Brittany Murphy
Big T Tire $625


Dustyn Whitmire
Loyd Shirley Trust Fund $851


RGA Servic4
B98000140


w.


Winners Serving Winners


Megan Stein
S* Grand Champion Reserve
Rabbit - Doe
* Blue Ribbon
* Showmanship


race I

I Gran4


.Th~
I


4, . . 4


4,;,


RGA... securing the Heartland since 1991
Providing professional services in
Aviation - Marine -Agriculture protection
Serving the Heartland for 18 years.
(863) 386-0333

457 South Commerce Ave. * Sebring, FL 33870


www.newssun.com


TInc


Pe









www.newssun.com


News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


Page 13A


..Cross
S[Country.
- AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES


MILLER'S

CENTRAL AIR, INC.


Highands
I In.' o


Bonnie Lee Cheyenne Slade
Warren & Linda Daum $616 Heartland Harvesting $770


Jackson Rushlo
Andrew & Alex Fells $472


Race Caldwell Hannah Farr
McKenna & Assoc Citrus $796 Farr Groves $896


Chelsea Whitmire
Florida Grove Hedgers $625


Justin Bickman
Marlie Westervelt $645


Stephanie Halliday
Everglades Farm Equipment $526


Ashleigh Barben Savannah Eldridge
Lephew Inc. $1,273 Jeff Reed $619


Dakota Slade
The Group $560


Rachel Caldwell Andrew Dean
The Group $777 Smoak Groves Inc. $806


Michael Bickman Chris Marin
Riverside National Bank $687 Barben Fruit $516


Scott Hamilton Grayson Caldwell
Heartland National Bank $647 McKenna ^ Assoc. Citrus $795


Kyle Jahna
Big T Tire $1,027


Zack Farr
Hardee Petroleum $910


Warren Giller
HHH Farms $555


Brittany Ware
Southern Clenaing $980


Cheyenne Mills
Publix Super Markets $569


Jordan Myers
Jeff Reed $516


Mary Crosson
Laye's Tire Service $780


Celeste Breylinger
John Palmer Electric $598


DO. 'JN-.Y FAIR 09 '
d l C, ,ct W JRI'll T


Amy Wack
Crews Groves Inc. $822


Brittany Palmerton
Highlands Independent Bank $630


Tia Goss
Alan Jay Automotive Network $468


Sarah Hunnicutt
E.O. Koch Construction $735


Amanda Killmon
The Group $500


SRGA Services, Inc.








News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


Page 14A


- Cross
r =Country
- AUTOMOTIVESERVICES


MILLER'S
CENTRAL AIR, INC.


RHi glnds


S RGA Services, Inc.


Charles Hamilton Chelsey Hughes
HHH Farms $551 Hillbilly's Loader Service $747


Pamela Spurlock Emily Waldron
Publix Super Markets $544 Farm Credit Services $764


Serena Rushlo Ashley Potts
Andrew & Alex Fells $516 Alan Jay Auto Network $1,113


Brittany Gates Tyleir Langston
Publix Super Markets $484 Laye's Tire Service $750


Miranda McPhail
Highlands Independent Bank $598


Mackenzie Myers
ME Stephens & Son Fruit $640


mL-7.,g-i EIa-


Patricia Wantuck Cash Jackson
Baby Dean Inc. $715 Steve Brorison $737


Kyle Helms
Family Tree Learning Center $789


Cara Worth
Dressel Groves $742


- Teresa Ware
Southern Cleaning $765


Alexis Pontius Seth Hamilton
Supersweet Farms $825 SOS Materials & Hauling $615


Amy Brumfield
Publix Super Markets $530


Zachary Smith
Woody's Trucking $556


Thomas Bunton
In the Field Magazine and C&C
Plumbing
$556


Makayla Patterson
Jones Oil & Tire $498


As a Custorier Service Associate, you will be
responsible for answering incoming calls and
dispatching assistance to customers in need of
emergency roadside assistance. We will train
you in our products and programs.


Comprehensive
Benefit Package
* Tuition Reimbursement
* Life Insurance
* Vacation Time
* Holiday Pay
* Medical
* Dental


We have...

* Full and Part-Time

Positions Available


Cross

mCountry,,
m AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES
3310 Hwy. 27 South 0
EOE Sebring, FL 33870 O63-4'0-27/86


E-mail: resumesebring @crosscountry-auto.com


www.newssun.com







News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


www.newssun.com


- Cross
S=- Country,
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES


MILLER'S
CENTRAL AIR, INC.


M~ft�Hylands
Is onal a*


Katie Wheeler
Farm Credit Services $758


Jennifer Swain Justin Faust
Glisson Animal Supply $612 Subway $632


Taylor Brown Maura Hopkins
George Brown $928 Laye's Tire Service $526


Brittani Stopko Kenny McGrath
Sterling Custon Construction $531 Crews Groves Inc. $723


Brett Hargaden Kelsey Tucker
Heartland National Bank $630 Sebring FFA Aslumni $655


Krystal Dombroski
Pathology Assoc. of Sebring $861


Jacob Hamilton
SOS Materials & Hauling $662


Koy McGrath1 Calyton Waldron
Heartland National Bank $552 Publix Super Markets $597


Mekenzie Hargaden Brandon Bennett
Glisson Animal Supply $676 Marlow Trading Company $822


Cody Beatty
U & Me Activity & Learning Center Reece O'Conner
$657 Subway $1,060


Wyatt Bennett
Marlow Trading Company $815


Mariah Brewington
Publix Super Markets $657


Jenna Tomblin
Graham Farms Melon Sales $874


NEWS-SUN



congratulates all FFA & 4-H



participants in the



Highlands County Fair



Livestock Auction.


k A


RGA Services, Inc.


Page 15A






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85-6101


www.highlandsregional.com


Page 16A


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News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


wwwnewssun.com


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SECTION P




SPORTS


News-Sun

Monetary perception


Not that what former
PGA great Greg Norman
said was wrong, just don't
think that he'd have volun-
teered for it himself.
He suggested, the other
day, that perhaps the pro-
fessional golf prize money
be cut, considering the
global economic crisis.
The intent is fine, I just
wonder at what level that
could be done.
The prize money, I'm
guessing, comes from the
excess of cash being shov-
eled in from the corporate
sponsors as well as the
ticket and merchandise-
buying spectators.
They could cut it down a
little and put some of those
monies toward charitable
causes, but I don't think
the players have much say
in it.
Other than Tiger, Phil
and a host of the top
money winners, a larger
contingent of the tour pros
are just going out to try to
win what they can each
week so they don't have to
fall back into the real
working world.
My wonder is, with so
many companies in finan-
cial trouble around the
country, as well as the
world, where's the spon-
sorship money coming
from?
If the winning amounts
haven't dropped already,
should'we be looking into
these companies to see
how it is that the golf
sponsorship slush fund
hasn't been diminished in
this deepening recession?
Which brings us to two
other sports, one where
one more big-time free


And Another
Thing...
Dan Hoehne
agent is contemplating an
offer, and the other were a
whole slew of free agents
are about to sift through
offers.
In baseball, Manny
Ramirez just received an
expanded offer from the
Dodgers of two years at
$45 million.
That's $25 million for
, the upcoming season and a
player-only option for $20
million next season.
In the NFL, the free
agency period is about to
get under way, with a bevy
of teams ready to bid on
talent to fill out their ros-
ters.
But haven't we been
reading and hearing about
how so many teams are
laying off dozens, if not
hundreds, of their office
staffs?
If they're so strapped'
that they have to put peo-
ple on unemployment, how
is it that they can make
multi-million dollar offers
to multiple players?
And is this not some-
thing that weighs on the
players minds at all?
Gee, they're offering me
three years at $7 million

Continued on page 4B


PAGE


LIVING


Friday, February 27, 2009


Streaks tough on


defense, but drop


one to Lake Wales


News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE
Though Sebring lost 5-0 Tuesday night, freshman hurler
Haley Pack pitched a strong game against a loaded Lake
Wales squad. Below: Jamie Hershkowitz got a good swing
on this pitch, but Division I recruit Hannah Rogers was a
bit too much for the Lady Blue Streaks Tuesday night

",x - - .- . s- t


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
LAKE WALES - Softball
games are won or lost by the
score, but the 5-0 loss
Sebring Lady Streaks
dropped to Lake Wales soft-
ball team at Joe Ramsey
Field last Tuesday night did-
n't tell the whole story.
"Defensively, that's the
best we have ever played,"
head coach Joe Sinness said.
"We held probably the best
team we will see all year to
just five runs, I am happy
about that."
The Lady Streaks held
tough, giving up just seven
hits against Lake Wales, who
is a strong contender this
year for state.
Freshman Haley Pack held
the line for the Lady Streaks
on the mound for -the entire
game, and gave up just three
base on balls against Lake
Wales veteran sluggers, but
her defensive play brought
praises from Sinness.
"Haley pitched a heck of a
game'against one -of the best
teams out there," he said.
"Haley is not going to blow it
by you, but she has great
pitch placement."
Sebring's Kayla Clemons
showed how much heart a true
Streak has after suffering a
potentially devastating blow
to the head by a wild throw
during warm-ups between the
third and fourth inning.
The field was cleared
while coaches and trainers


'Haley pitched a

heck of a game
against one of the
best teams out

there.'

JOE SINNESS
Sebring head coach

checked Clemons out for a
serious injury, but the stern
Streak showed how tough she
was when she regained her
feet and kept playing, lump
and all, and helped hold the
line for Sebring at shortstop
for the rest of the game.
Sebring's one weak spot
was standing up to Lake
Wales ace Hannah Rogers, a
Division I college recruit
who knocked the Sebring
-ladies down one after the
other for most of the game
with a blinding fast ball.
"She's good," Sinness said
referring to Rogers. "She is
the best we will see all year.
We just need to swing some
bats. Their pitcher was tough
tonight, but we really need to
get our bats going this sea-
son. When that happens, we
will really step out."
They'll have a chance to
do that, with their sharpness
heightened after facing such
a tough team, when they wel-
come Booker for a contest
tonight before a cross-county
matchup at Avon Park
Tuesday.


Youth Streaks on "Fire" in Winter Haven


Courtesy photo
The Sebring Streaks AAU 14-and-Under baseball team traveled to Winter Haven, Feb. 21-22, to participate in the annual.
Presidents' Day Baseball Tournament. The team won the Championship in the "Fire" division. Front row, left to right:'
Brad Doty, Tyler Sapp, Ryan McNew, Rick Miller, Josh Gomez, Gus Garcia. Back row, left to right: Coach Cesar Martinez,
Wyatt Johnson, Cody Cook, Jake Bryan, Coach Mark Bryan, Garrett DeRoss, Garrett Martinez, CJ Payne, Coach Kelly
Payne, Dane Maddox.


News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE
Ashley Paeplow's bases-clearing triple in the first launched
Lake Pacid to a 5-1 lead over Clewiston Tuesday night. But
it wouldn't be nearly enough as defensive let-downs paved
the way for a 21-6 Tiger win.


Clewiston cruises


past Lady
By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newssun.com
LAKE PLACID - As they
sometimes say, this wasn't
one to write home about.
In fact, after Lake Placid's
21-6 softball loss to visiting
Clewiston Tuesday night, at
least one Lady Dragon didn't
want much writing done at
all.
"Don't make this a real big
story," catcher Ashley
Paeplow said.
There were three big
innings in the game, but the
Lady Tigers had two of them
to spell the difference.
"It was just a horrible, hor-
rible fifth and sixth inning,"
head coach Marilyn Jones
said. "Defensive mistakes,
not knowing where to go


Dragons
with the ball. We quit count-
ing the errors because the
calculator blew up."
Though the game started
out looking real good for
Lake Placid (2-4) as, after
giving up one first-inning run
to Clewiston, they broke out
for their big inning in the bot-
tom of the frame with
Paeplow's bases-loaded
triple bringing in three of the
five runs.
The defense shined in the
second when, with one on,
left-fielder Ashley Wells
raced in to snare a sinking
liner and firing to first to
double the runner off.
The lead was expanded to
6-1 when Amanda Wood was
Continue on page 3B


Tiger is back, and it's

as if he never left


MARANA, Ariz. -
Tiger Woods had seven
minutes to kill, which for a
player who plans his rou-
tine to the very second,
might have been unsettling.
. Eight months away had
taught him something
about patience, though, and
he peeled -a banana and
calmly munched it as he
waited for his turn on the
first tee.
There were a few butter-
flies, but only because
there always are. The day
they go away, Woods says,
is probably the day he will
finally quit.
But the knee was fine,
and the shots on the driv-
ing range felt good. An
Aussie named Brendan
Jones awaited, and Woods
knew his opponent's stom-
ach had to be churning
even more.
There couldn't have
been a better day to begin
the task of restoring order
to the world of golf.
"It felt like nothing had


TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press
changed," Woods said. "It
was business as usual."
The official time was
12:09 p.m. Mountain
Standard when Woods
stood on mended knee with
a 3-wood in his hand and
the first fairway in front of
him. It had been 253 days '
since he was last seen
limping his way to a U.S.
Open title, and the brown
Arizona desert was a stark
contrast to the cliffs over-
looking the blue Pacific at
Torrey Pines.
That was the final round
of a major championship,

Continued on page 4B


MCT photo
Not seen since last June in the U.S. Open, Tiger Woods
is back in action after winning his first match in the
WGC Accenture Match Play event Wednesday.










Page 2B

T



EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 46 13 .780 -
Philadelphia 28 28 .500 16%2
New Jersey 26 32 .44819%
New York 24 33.421 21
Toronto 23 36 .390 23
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Orlando 42 15 .737 -
Atlanta 32 25 .561 10
Miami 30 26 .53611Y2
Charlotte 23 35 .39719%2
Washington 13 44 .228 29
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 44 11 .800 -
Detroit 27 29 .482 17%
Milwaukee 28 32 .46718V%
Chicago 26 32 .448 19%
Indiana 25 35 .41721Y2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 39 17 .696 -
Houston 36 21 .632 3%/
New Orleans 34 22 .607 5
Dallas 34 23 .596 5Y2
Memphis 15 42 .26324
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Denver 38 20 .655 -
Portland 35 22 .614 2Y2
Utah 35 23 .603 3
Minnesota 18 39 .31619%
Oklahoma City 13 44 .228 24%
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 47 10 .825 -
Phoenix 32 24 .571 14Y%
Golden State 20 37 .351 27
L.A. Clippers 15 43 .25932Y2
Sacramento 12 47 .203 36
Wednesday's Games
Indiana 104, Memphis 99
Philadelphia 106, Washington 98
New Jersey 111, Chicago 99
Orlando 114, New York 109
Utah 120, Minnesota 103
New Orleans 90, Detroit 87
Dallas 116, Milwaukee 96
San Antonio 99, Portland 84
Denver 110, Atlanta 109
Charlotte 98, Sacramento 91
L.A. Clippers 93, Boston 91
Thursday's Games
Cleveland at Houston, late
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, late
Friday's Games
Detroit at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Washington, 7 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Portland at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Denver, 9 p.m.
Cleveland at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Charlotte at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
New Jersey 38 19 3 79182151
Philadelphia 33 17 9 75 195 171
N.Y. Rangers 31 23 8 70152172
Pittsburgh 30 26 6 66186191
N.Y. Islanders 18 36 6 42144 199
Northeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Boston 41 12 8 90206 138
Montreal 32 22 7 71 187184
Buffalo 31 24 6 68181 171
Toronto 23 26 12 58182220
Ottawa 23 27 9' 55148170
Southeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Washington 38 18 5 81 203176
Florida 30 22 8 68 167 165
Carolina 31 26 5 67164180
Tampa Bay 2029 12 52155196
Atlanta 22 33 6 50180214
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Detroit 40 13 8 88232 178
Chicago 34 17 8 76197148
Columbus 30 25 6 66166173
Nashville 29 28 4 62 147 171
St. Louis 26 26 8 60167179
Northwest Division
W L OT Pts GF GA


Calgary
Vancouver
Minnesota
Edmonton
Colorado


36 18 6 78191 174
30 22 8 68181 173
30 24 5 65152137
30 25 5 65170185
28 32 1 57168190
Pacific Division
W L OTPtsGF GA


144
180
179
173
186


San Jose 41 9 9 91 201
Dallas 29 23 7 65 174
Anaheim 30 27 5 65 176
Los Angeles 26 25 9 61 157
Phoenix 27 29 5 59157
Two points for a win, one point for
overtime loss or shootout loss.

Wednesday's Games
Philadelphia 2, Los Angeles 0
Detroit 4, San Jose 1
Pittsburgh 1, N.Y. Islanders 0
Toronto 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, SO
Thursday's Games
Anaheim at Boston, late
Buffalo at Carolina, late
Atlanta at Washington, late
Colorado at New Jersey, late
Florida at N.Y. Rangers, late
Toronto at N.Y. Islanders, late
San Jose at Ottawa, late
Phoenix at Nashville, late
St. Louis at Dallas, late
Columbus at Edmonton, late
Friday's Games
Montreal at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Vancouver, 10 p.m.


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Detroit
Los Angeles
Minnesota
New York
Texas
Oakland
Seattle
Baltimore
Boston
Chicago


1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000


News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


HE SCOREBOARD


LIVE

SPORTS

ON TV




. . . . . . . . ESPN2


AUTO RACING
SATURDAY
4:30 p.m. NASCAR - Sam's Town 300.


BOXING
FRIDAY
9 p.m. Glen Johnson vs. Daniel Judah....... ESPN2
11 p.m. Tomasz Adamek vs. Johnathon Banks... SHO
SATURDAY
10p.m. Juan Diaz vs. Juan Manuel Marquez ..... HBO


COLLEGE BASEBALL
SATURDAY
2p.m. Miami at Florida.. . ................ SUN


12 p.m.
12 p.m.
12 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
6p.m.
6 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
9 p.m.


10:30 a.m.
2 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m.

10 a.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
6:30 p.m.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL
SATURDAY
Georgia Tech at North Carolina......... CBS
Georgetown at Villanova ............ ESPN
Teams TBA...................... ESPN2
Notre Dame at Connecticut............ CBS
Clemson at Florida St.................. 44
Teams TBA.. .................... ESPN2
Teams TBA ................. . . . . . . . . ABC
LSU at Kentucky .................... CBS
Alabama at Mississippi................ 38
Teams TBA ....................... ESPN
Texas at Oklahoma ................. ESPN
Auburn at Mississippi St ............. SUN
Gonzaga at San Diego ............. ESPN2
UCLA at California .................. ESPN


GOLF
FRIDAY
EuroPGA - Indonesia Open .......... GOLF
PGA - WGC Match Play Championship . GOLF
PGA - Mayakoba Classic ............ GOLF
PGA - WGC Match Play Championship . GOLF
SATURDAY
PGA - WGC Match Play Championship . GOLF
PGA - WGC Match-Play Championship . GOLF
Wendy's Skins Game ............... ESPN
EuroPGA - Indonesia Open .......... GOLF
PGA - Mayakoba Classic ............ GOLF


NBA
FRIDAY
7 p.m. Detroit at Orlando ................. .ESPN
9:30 p.m. Cleveland at San Antonio ............ ESPN
SATURDAY
8:30 p.m. Houston at Chicago................. WGN
Times, games, channels all subject to change


Cleveland 0 1 .000
Kansas City 0 1 .000
Tampa Bay 0 1 .000
Toronto 0 1 .000
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
Arizona 1 0 1.000
Chicago 1 0 1.000
Cincinnati 1 0 1.000
Houston 1 0 1.000
New York 1 0 1.000
Pittsburgh 1 0 1.000
San Francisco 1 0 1.000
Florida 0 0 .000
Milwaukee 0 0 .000
San Diego 0 0 .000
St. Louis 0 0 .000
Atlanta 0 1 .000
Colorado 0 1 .000
Los Angeles 0 1 .000
Philadelphia 0 1 .000
Washington 0 1 .000
JNOTE: Split-squad games count in the
standings; games against non-major
league teams do not.
Wednesday's Games
Detroit 5, Atlanta 4
Florida 5, St. Louis 5, tie, 10 innings
N.Y. Yankees 6, Toronto 1
Houston 6, Washington 3
N.Y. Mets 9, Baltimore 3
Cincinnati 7, Tampa Bay 0
Pittsburgh 8, Philadelphia 2
Oakland 3, Milwaukee 3, tie, 10 innings
Texas 12, Kansas City 7
Chicago Cubs 5, L.A. Dodgers 3
San Francisco 10, Cleveland 7
L.A. Angels 12, Chicago White Sox 3
Arizona 5, Colorado 3
Minnesota 5, Boston 2
Thursday's Games
Houston vs. Atlanta, late
Detroit vs. Washington, late
Pittsburgh vs. Boston, late
Minnesota vs. Cincinnati, late
Toronto vs. Philadelphia, late
St. Louis vs. Baltimore, late
Florida vs. N.Y. Mets, late
Tampa Bay vs. N.Y. Yankees, late
Seattle vs. San Diego, late
Oakland vs. L.A. Angels, late
Texas vs. Kansas City, late
Milwaukee vs. Chicago Cubs, late
Arizona vs. Cleveland, late
L.A. Dodgers vs. San Francisco, late
Chicago White Sox vs. Colorado, late
Friday's Games
Baltimore vs. Florida at Jupiter, 1:05
p.m.
Detroit vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1:05
p.m.
Boston vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte,
1:05 p.m.
Houston vs. Washington at Viera, 1:05
p.m.
Atlanta vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees vs. Minnesota at Fort
Myers, 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati at Sarasota,
1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St.
Lucie, 1:10 p.m.


Milwaukee vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05
p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Texas at Surprise,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
San Diego vs. Cleveland at Goodyear,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Arizona at
Tucson, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. San Francisco at
Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.


BASEBALL
American League'
CHICAGO WHITE SOX-Agreed to
terms with RHP Lance Broadway, RHP
D.J. Carrasco, LHP John Danks, RHP
Jack Egbert, RHP Gavin Floyd, RHP
Lucas Harrell, RHP Kelvin Jimenez,
RHP Jon Link, RHP Jeff Marquez, RHP
Jhonny Nunez, LHP Clayton Richard,
RHP Adam Russell, RHP Clevelan
Santeliz, RHP Ehren Wassermann, C
Cole Armstrong, INF Brandon Allen, INF
Josh Fields, INF Chris Getz, INF Brent
Lillibridge, OF Brian Anderson, OF Jerry
Owens and OF Carlos Quentin on one-
year contracts.
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Assigned INF
Andy Marte outright to Columbus (IL).
TAMPA BAY RAYS-Agreed to terms
with INF Reid Brignac, RHP Wade
Davis, RHP Jason Hammel, LHP James
Houser, LHP J.P. Howell, C John Jaso,
INF Elliot Johnson, OF Matt Joyce, LHP
Jake McGee, OF Fernando Perez, C
Shawn Riggans, OF Justin Ruggiano,
RHP Mitch Talbot and RHP Dale Thayer
on one-year contracts. Renewed the
one-year contracts of RHP Matt Garza,
RHP Andy Sonnanstine and OF B.J.
Upton.
TEXAS RANGERS-Agreed to terms
with INF Chris Davis, RHP Thomas
Diamond, INF German Duran, OF Josh
'Hamilton, RHP Eric Hurley, RHP Warner
Madrigal, INF Travis Metcalf, RHP
Guillermo Moscoso, C Max Ramirez
and C Taylor Teagarden on one-year
contracts.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS-Named Mike
Bordick roving minor league infield
instructor.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS-Agreed to terms with
RHP Jose Ascanio, RHP Mitch Atkins,
RHP Justin Berg, RHP Angel Guzman,
RHP Kevin Hart, RHP Carlos Marmol,
RHP Marcos Mateo, RHP David Patton,
RHP Jeff Stevens, RHP Randy Wells,
LHP Sean Marshall, C Koyie Hill, C
Geovany Soto, INF Mike Fontenot, INF
Micah Hoffpauir, INF Ryan Theriot, OF
Jake Fox, OF Sam Fuld, OF Richie
Robnett and OF Brad Snyder on one-
year contracts.
CINCINNATI REDS-Agreed to terms
with LHP Bill Bray, C-INF-OF Wilkin
Castillo and INF Paul Janish on one-
year contracts.


LOCAL SCHEDULE


Avon Park


TODAY: Baseball at Hardee, 7 p.m.; JV Baseball at Hardee, 4 p.m.; Softball at
Mulberry, 5:30/7:30 p.m.
MONDAY: JV Baseball vs. Lake Placid, 6 p.m.; Softball at Hardee, 5:30/7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY: Baseball vs. Braden River, 7 p.m.; Softball vs. Sebring, 5/7 p.m.; Boys
Weight Lifting hosts meet, 5:30 p.m.; Boys/GirlsTennis vs. Hardee, 4 p.m.;Track at Lake
Placid, 4:30 p.m.


TODAY: Baseball vs. Mulberry, 7 p.m.; Softball at Frostproof, 5:30/7:30 p.m.
MONDAY: JV Baseball at Avon Park, 6 p.m.
TUESDAY: Baseball at Frostproof, 7 p.m.; JV Baseball vs. Frostproof, 6 p.m.; BoysTennis
at LaBelle, 4 p.m.; GirlsTennis vs. LaBelle, 3:30 p.m.;Track vs. Sebring, LaBelle, Avon :
Lake Placid Park, 4:30 p.m.


Sebring


SFCC


TODAY: Baseball vs. DeSoto, 7 p.m.; JV Baseball at DeSoto, 6 p.m.; Softball vs. Booker,
6:30 p.m.
TUESDAY: Baseball vs. Booker, 7 p.m.; Softball at Avon Park, 5/7 p.m.; BoysTennis vs
Booker, 4 p.m.; GirlsTennis at Booker, 4 p.m.;Track at Lake Placid, 4:30 p.m.


TODAY: Baseball vs. Dundalk/Maryland, 6 p.m.; Softball at Lake Sumter, 2 p.m.
SATURDAY:Baseball vs. U ofTampa BTeam, Double-Header, 1 p.m.; Softball at
Seminole, 1 p.m.
MONDAY: Baseball at U ofTampa BTeam, 6 p.m.
TUESDAY: Baseball vs. Siena Heights/Michigan, 6 p.m.


SPORTS SNAPSHOTS


WIN 5K
SEBRING - Get out your running
shoes and dress out for the third annual
Wellness Is N (WIN) 5K Run.
The annual event gives people the
chance to raise funds for their Highlands
County American Red Cross while
stretching their endurance and running
speed. Registration starts at 7 a.m.
Saturday, March 28, 2009, at Highlands
Hammock State Park, with a shotgun
start at 7:30 a.m.
Runners may preregister for $15 or
register the day of the event for $20. If
they raise $50 or more in pledges from
their community, however, the run is
free.
Last year's field had more than 80 par-
ticipants, thanks in part to holding the
run early in the day and earlier in the
year, when more people could partici-
pate. The local Red Cross decided to
keep the same tradition this year.
Red Cross volunteers will man an aid
station for thirsty or hungry runners at
the start/finish line. Bananas are courtesy
of L&D Produce in Sebring.
The run starts on Hammock Road in
the park near the CCC Museum area, fol-
lowing the paved drive-around path in
Highlands Hammock State Park, past the
old homestead, the Charlie Creek Trail,
and the amphitheater, before heading
back to the CCC Museum area.
Participants may run, jog, trot, or walk
finishing the course in a fast time or a
comfortable pace, as long as they get out
for some fun and exercise.
To register, download a form at polk-
countyfl.redcross.org or contact the
Highlands Red Cross at (863) 386-4440
or hcarc@vistanet.net.
Send your form with fee or pledges to
Highlands Red Cross, 106 Medical
Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870.
Sponsorships are still available for the
Run. Come forward and support your
local American Red Cross.
Tough economic times have reduced
financial support for the Red Cross, but
disaster responses continue. Local home
fires remain the most common Red Cross
disaster response.
Between July 1, 2007, and June 30,
2008, the Red Cross assisted 37 families
affected by local disasters in Highlands
County - almost all home fires. The
local Red Cross has helped another 14
Highlands County families since then.
Red Cross volunteers urge all families
to take precautions to prevent home
fires, check and maintain smoke detec-
tors, and to practice escape plans to
ensure all loved ones get out of a fire
safely.
In addition, the local office provides a
location to learn life-saving skills, which
we used often last year.
On two occasions in 2008, staff at
Avon Park Middle School saved students
from choking using skills they learned
from the Red Cross.
You never know when an emergency
may occur, but knowing what to do can
save a life.

Snowbird Golf Tourney
AVON PARK - Michigan Moose
Association 17th annual Snowbird Golf
Tournament, Mixed Scramble will be
Sunday, March 8 at the River Greens
Golf Course in Avon Park. Shotgun start
will be at 8:30 a.m.
Cost is $55 per person and includes 18
holes of golf, one-half cart and dinner
prizes.
It's open to men and women, couples
or singles (please note if you wish to
golf with your wife).
Deadline to register is Monday, March
2.


Call Don Novick at (941) 794-0161 or
Bruce Cook at (941) 778-4776.

Vets Golf Tourney
LAKE PLACID - Everglades Tractor
Supply, the John Deere dealer in
Okeechobee became the first major spon-
sor for the 3rd Annual Vets Golf
Tourney.
Being run by Voiture 863, 40 and 8
from Placid Post 25 of the American
Legion in Lake Placid, this four-person
fun scramble will be hosted by Placid
Lakes Country Club on Saturday, April
11 with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start.
This tournament has raised thousands
of dollars for needy veterans in
Highlands County, as well as youth
sports and other community projects.
Others wishing to become either a
major sponsor or hole sponsor, or con-
tribute a door prize are requested to call
Ray Ploughe at 441-4119, or Commander
J.P. Plunkett at 441-4103.
Hole-in-one and closest-to-the-pin
prizes will be given on all fourn Par 3s,
with the $10,000 cash prize being offered
on hole #6.
Many golfers have already signed up
and others interested should contact the
pro shop at Placid Lakes or pick up
applications at the Post 25 Lounge on US
27N or call 465-7940.
The $60 dollar entry fee includes golf,
course refreshments and lunch at the
Legion Post at 2 p.m.

Sebring Youth Soccer
SEBRING - Soccer registration are
currently open at the Highlands County
Family YMCA through March 9, for ages
3 to 14 - ages are as of September 1,
2009.

Nu Hope Golf Tournament
AVON PARK - The Mid-Florida
Federal Credit Union proudly presents its
12th Annual Nu-Hope Elder Care
Services, Inc. golf tournament at
Pinecrest on Lotela Golf Course in Avon
Park on April 11.
The tournament will utilize a two-per-
son scramble format and teams will be
flighted by total handicap.
Entry fee will be $60 per person ($120
per team) which includes after-play meal
and refreshments during the day.
Registration forms are available at the
participating golf pro shop or can be
mailed or faxed to you by calling Sandy
Foster at 382-2134, ext. 325.
Business sponsorships are also avail-
able.
Previous five event have resulted in a
full field of players, so early registration
is encouraged.

McFarling Memorial Golf
SEBRING - The 3rd Annual Jim
McFarling Memorial Tournament will be
held Saturday, February 28, at the Spring
Lake Golf Resort.
The format will be a flighted four-per-
son scramble, mandatory two drives by
each player. There will be a 50/50 draw-
ing, men's and ladies closest to pin
prizes; play Hole No. 17 from 150 yards
for donation to fund; mulligans available
for purchase; and great raffle prizes from
area merchants.
All proceeds will benefit a scholarship
fund for junior golfers involved in the
Highlands County Sertoma Junior Golf
Tour.
Shotgun start is at 8:30 a.m. on
Panther Creek. Entry fee is $50 per per-
son or $200 per team includes Lunch and
prizes immediately following golf.
Play in Jimmy's tourney and support
junior golf.


4


www.newssun.com








News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


Country Club of Sebring
. The men's association played a Two
Best Balls of Four event on Monday,
February 23.
Winning first place was the team of
Bobby Ore, Ray Plagens, Bob Hancz
and Oliver Stoeckle with 107; second
place, Jerry Moser, Ned Willey, Bob
Whitacre and Oliver Stoeckle with 108;
and third place, Lew Stryker, Earl
Sheldon and Dennis Jacobs with 115.
The Monday Couples played a four-
some game, forty balls on February 16.
Winning first place was the team of
Sandy White and C.V. Weddle, Mary
and Carroll Dukes with 119; second
place, Arlene and Tom Cook, Bev and
Greg Bagshaw with 120; and third
place, Sue and Larry Manlove, Onnalee
and Ted Schmalzried with 121.

Harder Hall
The ladies league played a Best Ball
with handicap event on Monday,
February 23.
Winning first place was the team of
Joyce Himler, Doris Herrick, Mary Lou
Balser and Elaine Hettinger.
Chip-in: No. 10, Shirley Holt; and
No'. 12, Doris Herrick.
The ladies league played an Odd
Holes with one-half handicap event on
Thursday, February 19.
The winners were: First place, Pat
Rowbotham with 32; second place,
Elaine Hettinger with 34; and third
place, Mary Hayes with 34.5.

Highland Ridge
The ladies association played a
Round Robin 3-day event (February
.16, 18 and 21).
The winners were: First Flight -
Louise Henrich and Sheila Chiarandini
with 68. Second Flight - Carol Cardwell
and Rosemary West with 61. Third
Flight - Lucille Ferrigan and Joan
Hyslop with 65. Fourth Flight - Evelyn
Seely and Peggy Sharpe with 61. Fifth
Flight - Monique Murdock and Marcy
Keiwan with 56. Sixth Flight - Marlene
Mangold and Rosemary Dias with 55.

Lake June West Golf Club
A mixed scramble was played on
Thursday, February 19.
Winning first place was the team of
John and Virginia ,Simmons, George
and Barbara Dean, Betty Billau and
Jane Roush with 47. Tying for
second/third places were the teams of
Ken Rowen, Doyan and Donna Eades,
Mike and Nola Ayres and Helene
Mellon; Andy and Karen Ames, Dick
and Nancy Reaney, Wanda Jones, Art
Smeltz and Pat Houlihan with 49 each.
Closest to the pin: (Ladies), No. 2,
Virginia Simmons, 5-feet-8-inches;
and No. 8, Maxine Wegner, 13-feet-2-
inches. (Men), No. 4, Doyan Eades, 6-
feet-3-inches.
The men's association played a
Men's League event on Wednesday,
February 18.
Winning first place was the team of
Orville Huffman, Ken Colyer, Dennis
Nickless, Sonny Shelton, Gene Joosten
and Pat Houlihan with 38. Tying for


Defense

dooms

Dragons
Continued from 1B
hit by a pitch, moved to sec-
ond and then came in when
an error was made on a
Christina Wells ground ball.
But the Tigers fought back
with some strong hitting in
the third as Katie Whidden
ripped a two-run double into
the left-center field gap and
Sarah Howell and Whitney
Irey each had an RBI to make
it 6-5.
The fourth inning went by
quietly enough, but the
wheels came off in the fifth
with Clewiston plating 10
runs to take a 15-6 lead.
Six more came around in
the sixth to spell for the final,
mercy-rule margin.
"It seems Clewiston
always beats us, but I thought
we had a shot at them if we'd
have kept playing like we
were," Jones said. "But we
just shut down. We'll work
on some things, move some
people around to different
positions and try different
scenarios. We'll recover."
Two chances to bounce
back were upcoming with a
home date against DeSoto
Thursday night and a contest
at district-rival Frostproof
Friday night.


second/third places
were Tony Notaro, Rich
Loomis, John Byron,
Tom Schultz, Del Block
and Ken Raub; John
Huggett, Vince
Mathews, John Givens,
Don Bradley, Ward
Shaw and Fred Neer j
with 40 each.
Closest to the pin: Your approi
No. 2, John Simmons, greenin the rou
O-feet-5-inches; No. 4, one club lengsay th
Ward Shaw, 4-feet-I1- closer to the b
inch; and No. 8, movetothispoi
Charles Goins, 9-feet- allowyoutodro
11-inches. of the green, wh
The ladies associa- the ball. Your c
tion played a Best Ball must drop your l
event on Monday, No. The ru
February 16. rough" and the
these areas are
Tying for first/sec- green." As long
ond places were the vides the near
teams of Wanda Jones, your stance and
Doris Cunningham, clase-cut grass r
Kay Kalusnink and
Jann Mann; Kavon MASTERSTROI
Ames, Patty Mancuso, Jim McLean, Keit
Barbara Dean and Pat Top 100 Teacher
Asmus with. 35 each.
Third place, Annie Hall, Verna Knishka,
Sylvia West and Karen Glas with 36.
Closest to the pin: No. 2, Verna
Knishka, 7-feet-4-inches; No. 4, Joyce
Swartz, 19-feet-3-inches; and No. 8,
Barbara Dean, 9-feet-7-inches.


River Greens
The men's association played a
Men's Day event on Saturday, February
21.
The winners were: First place, J.R.
Messier and Leo Persails with 49; and
second place, John D'Amanda and
Elton Cate with 53. Tying for
third/fourth places were Cliff Steele
and John Van Slooten; Bill Gast and
Sol Petruzzi with 55 each.
Closest to the pin: No. 3, J.R.
Messier, 2-feet-6 1/2-inches; No. 5,
Dick Sherman, 12-feet-7-inches; No.
12, Jay Procarione, 6-feet-5-inches;
No. 17, Harold Plagens, 13-feet-1-
inch.
Closest to Line No. 18, Elton Cate.
A morning scramble was played on
Friday, February 20.
Winning first place were M/M
Brunswick and M/M Kelly with 57.
The Lake Damon South was played
Thursday, February 19.
Winning first place was the team of
T.H. Lewis, Jerry Himminger and
Gordon Clauws.
The ladies association played a pro
am tournament on Thursday, February
19.
Winning first place was the team of
Janet Regan, Fran Smith, Lucy Carlin
and Jo Sherman with plus-3 1/2; and
second place, Anne Kelly, Bev Rudd,
Betty Leblanc and Fran Neil with
minus-1/2.
Individual winners were: Tying for
first/second places were Lucy Carlin
and Pat Kincer with plus-3 1/2 each.
The Morrison Group played a game
on Thursday, February 19.
Winning first place was the team of
Wayne Carlin, Fred Evans, Ed Mosser


tough Relief?'
ach shot landed a few feet off the
gh and came to rest on a sprinkler
you're entided ".,, . Ir.c dr, rp v in
Sof the neare-t p r,,,ti , t rhlicl. i.
hole. Your opplinet .-_grrc.c 'II'Ia
nt of relief and find rthtr hL n.:'oIld
op your ball or. the ic.. acut jrprun 1
oich would then .All, , .'-u ' putun
opponent is upr .int id iLrLm v..u
ball in the roueh 1, thi' c irr-r'
iles do not dinrerriti.ii, I-.'.n n
Stairway or t.he ;.cren' pr.n All |
simply considered "dr.ugh the
as you drop at ith- .-pot tht i.ro-
st relief from thie -h. rjijLi.in tor
swing, the ball .n, b: ,lrp-d-, .
either than in the. r.iuh . -
Ji-.----" - *'


ont Utributor ,
ih Lyford, Dai RaJer 1 r
s as rated by GOLF MNAGAZ1NE


and Russ Rudd with minus-30; and
second place, Jim Cercy, Romy Febre,
Ed Koster and Dave Kelly with minus-
28.
The men's association played a pro
am tournament on Wednesday,
February 18.
Winning first place was the team of
B. Stevens, C. Lemans, F. Conroy and
E. Mosser with plus-9; second place,
E. Cate, D. McDonald,'R. Rudd and C.
Steele with plus-8 1/2; and third place,
G. Nelson, L. Westdale and V. Boever
with plus-7.
Individual winners were: Flight A -
First place, L. Westdale with plus-4;
and second place, R. Rudd with plus-
2. Flight B - First place, E. Mosser with
plus-10 1/2; and second place, D.
Petty with plus 4. Flight C - First place,
F. Conroy with plus-4 1/2; and second
place, J. Wehunt with plus-3. Flight D -
First place, R. Knauf with plus-5 1/2;
and second place, E. Cate with plus-3
1/2.
The Golfettes, played a game on
Tuesday, February 17.
Winning first place was the team of
G. Brode, C. McClay, W: Carlin and H.
Ochala with
minus-34. Tying
fnr connrd/third


places were D.
McDonald, D.
McClay, Neil and
L. Carlin; B.
Leblanc, G. Heier,
F. Smith and J.
Sherman with
minus-30 each.
The Casa event
was played on
Monday, February
16.
Winning first
place was the
team of D.
Duncan, C.
Lemons, L.
Hartsell and J.


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comfortably behind your ear
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Wearing Delta is to gain an edge to help you hear with dramatic new
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CLINIC


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1397Whisper Circle
Sebring, FL 33870
863-382-4800
Thomas Bunn Aud, FAAA,
C.C.C.,A.
Doctor of Audiology


'$,
I- " . -;4 y *..,


Procarione with minus-


14.
The Morrison
played, a gar
Monday, Februa
Winning firs
was the team
Knauf, J. Van S
J. Wallace a
Austin with mir
second placid
Steele, T. Dray,
Pierre and J.
with minus-21
third place, L. P
B. Streeter, F.
and B. Mountfo
minus-20.
The Limited rN
event was pla,
Monday, Februa
Winning firs
was the team
Orrange, C. 0
W. Melanson
Shaw with plus
and second pl
Ward, J. Wa
Krawcyzk an


Simon with plus
Individual winners were: Firs
S. Shaw with plus-7 1/2; and
place, C. Orrange with plus-4 1/

Sebring Municipal
The Mezza group played inc
golf at the Sebring Municip
course using pro-am point
Monday.
The winners are: A group fir
Jack Perrin plus 4, second plac
Borgia plus 1.
B group first place Larry Ho
plus 3,Tony Frances, Paul Brov
Clyde Ressler tied at minus 1.
C group first place David M
and Doug Haire tied at plus 1.
D group first place Shorty
second place Cliff Hall at even.
E group first place. Janet
plus 5, second place Roy Allen
F group first place Lennie 1
minus 1, second place Jerry Ei
minus 4.
G group first place Bob Kir
Rudy Pribble tied at plus 4.
H group first place Les Layto
3,-second place Johnnie Labar
Doc Thomas tied at minus 3.


i Group
me on
iry 16.
t place
of R.
Slooten,
ind C.
nus-25;
e, C.
L. St.
Cercy
I; and


I group first placeBob Fidlin plus 7,
second place Jean terrell minus 2.
J group first place Terry Yandle and
Vince Johnston tied at plus 5.
K group first place Emil Crivicich
and Karl Mellor tied at plus 3, second
place Richard Flis at plus 1.
Next Monday will be a shotgun start
beginning at 7:30 at the Sebring
Municipal golf course. Please arrive
early to register.
For more information call Pete at
414 2110.


'ersails, SpringLake
Conroy On Thursday, February 12, The
)rd with Men's Golf Association played two
MAember man teams for points.
yed on The team of Edd Vowels and Ken
ry 16. Willey won. first place with 87 net
t place points.
of Cp. They were followed by: the second
rrange place team of Paul Marchand and Joe
and S. Smith, with 83; the third place team of
-7 .1/2: Bill Lawens and a blind draw, with 77;
ace, j'. and the fourth place team of Bill
rd, F. Schauwecker and a blind draw, with
1rd, F. 76.
d R 76.
-2 1/2. On Tuesday, February 17, the men
t place, played four man teams for two best
second balls.
/2. First place was won by the team of
Ron Chitwood, Dale Stevens, Ken Poe
and Bill Schauwecker with a net 118.
They were followed by; the second
dividual place team of Bob Hinde, Pat Shatney,
al golf Red Bohanon and Jim Foote, at 120;
s Last the third place team of John Starks,
Vern Baxter, Ben Seekman and Dorwin-
st place Van Gundy, at 124; and the fourth
e Frank place team of Charles Keniston, John
Bozynski, Bob Berg and a blind draw,
Izwarth at 124.
wn and Closest to the pin on Panther # 2
were: Dale Stevens, 16 feet,11 inches;
mulligan and Larry Colclasure, 28 feet 3 inches.
On Thursday, February 19, the men
plus 3, played for individual points, flighted.
In A flight, Red Bohanon won first
Regan place with 50 net points, followed by:
plus 2. Joe Austin, second with 42; Bart Rath,
Tayman third with 41; and Vern Hoffman fourth
dwards with 38.
Dorwin Van Gundy won first place in
ng and B flight with 63 points, followed by:
Mike Rose, second with 59; Howard
on plus Weekley, third with 49; and Bill
ge and Schauwecker fourth with 46.


Page 3B


you are invited to



Celebrate a Dayo







Wellness



Complimentaiy


Brunch &



Lecture Series

Saturday,

February 28, 2009

at the

DeSoto Mobile Home Park

Desoto Rd., Sebring

in the Clubhouse

starting at 8:30 a.m.


TOPICS:
* Tai Chi
* Pilates
* How to Stay Healthy
Please RSVP to: Trough
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112 Medical Center Ave. System
Sebring, FL 33870 * Wellness Habits That
halloinc@embarqmail.com Can Save your life
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I


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I


. .. ...........








News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


Birdie, eagle on first holes back


Continued from 1B
and this was just the first
round of what could be. a
very long week.
But Woods was right.
Nothing much had changed.
Yes, the knee was better.
It had to be because the
doctors did their job in
repairing his anterior cruci-'
.,ate ligament, and Woods did
his in hundreds of sometimes
painful hours of rehabbing
it.
But the swing was the
same, and so were.the shots.
Unfortunately f6r Jones,
so was the overwhelming
will to win that Woods has
always brought to the golf
course.
- He birdied the first hole
from 5 feet, much to the
*delight of the large crowd
that cheered his every move.
But it was on the second
hole, a 574-yard expanse of
green in between towering
saguaro cactuses, where any
doubt either Woods or his
-fans had was eliminated in a
single shot.
The 3-iron soared majesti-
cally toward the pin, track-
ing the entire way, before
settling on an upper ledge of
"the undulating green, just 4
feet short of the hole.
"Gawd, look at that!"
someone behind Woods


screamed.
Look they did, and Woods
looked along with them.
Leaning forward on his sur-
gically repaired left knee as
he tracked the ball through
the air, Woods gave an
abbreviated pump of his fist.
The putt was conceded for
eagle, and Jones might have
just conceded the match
along with it.
Two holes into his come-
back, Woods was dominating
once again.
"As I walked off the first
hole, there was just mayhem
- media, and everyone was
just running," Jones said. "I
was walking in amongst
everybody, and I heard one
of the media there say, 'All
right, only another nine
holes to go for a 10-and-8.'
And I gave him a bit of a
spray. And then (Woods)
eagled the second and I
thought, 'Well, maybe he's
right.' ,"
It wasn't nearly that bad,
with Jones making it all the
way to the 16th hole before
losing.
But it might have been
had Woods not showed a bit
of rust on some early iron
shots.
He made three bogeys on
the front nine, one of them
coming on the fifth hole


when he hit his drive into
the rough and then dumped
his second shot into a green-
side bunker.
Staring at the offending
ball after it left his club,
Woods shouted an expletive.
For the record, it was 59
minutes into the round.
The will to compete was
very much alive.
"I don't go to an event
that I don't think I can win,"
Woods said. "Why go? It
doesn't make any sense to
me. So I entered this event
with the same intention I do
every event since I was a lit-
tle boy, and that's to win."
Woods, of course, now has
his own little boy, but any-
one who thought the recent
birth of Charlie Axel might
soften him on the course
should now be thinking
again.
Woods talked after the
round about how watching
the birth of his son and
teaching his daughter new
words is more important
than anything he does in
golf, but he plays with the
same intensity and fire that
he did a decade ago.
Fans love every minute of
it, and it's easy to see why
television ratings for tourna-
ments featuring Woods are
double the ones he misses.


On this day, they had eyes
for only him and basically
ignored the fact 31 other
matches were taking place
on the same course.
"They weren't screaming
on any other matches, but
you could hear them scream-
ing out there on his match,
and that's what we needed,"
Davis Love III said.
Indeed, the eight-month
absence seemed to make his
fellow pros realize even
more than they did before
how their fortunes are so
closely aligned with those of
Woods.
He carries the sport to a
new level, and when he's
not playing, there's not
much interest.
That doesn't mean they
particularly want to be next
in line to take a beating, like
the one awaiting Tim Clark
going into the next round.
Clark is the 32nd-seeded
player in the world, but he
knows there's a big gap
between No. 1 and anyone
else.
"I live in Scottsdale so
I'm prepared to get in a car
and go home if I need to,"
Clark said,

Tim Dahlberg is a national
sports columnist for The
Associated Press. Write to him at
tdahlbergap.org


Series well represented at LeMans


From alms.com
The entry list for this
-year's running of the 24
Hours of Le Mans is official-
ly released with teams. from
the American Le Mans Series
in prime positions to once
again bring class champi-
onships back to the United
States.
The GT classes see the
heaviest concentration of
American Le Mans Series
content.
As expected, Corvette
Racing is the early favorite to
capture its sixth GT1 champi-
'onship with two Corvette
C6.Rs.
Le Mans will be the final
race for GM's factory road-
racing team in the class with
,a move to GT2 coming in
-August at Mid-Ohio.
The team announced its
driver pairings earlier this
year - Antonio Garcia will
join defending Series GTI
"champions Johnny O'Connell
and Jan Magnussen in one
car with Marcel Fissler
alongside Olivier Beretta and
"Oliver Gavin in the other
Corvette.
In GT2, defending Le
Mans class winner Risi


Competizione will enter two against Peugeot and Aston
Ferrari F430.GTs, two of nine Martin's new prototype.
in the class for the Italian Last year's Series LMP1
marque. . champions Lucas Luhr and
Jaime Melo, Mika Salo and Marco Werner will play a
Gianmaria Bruni posted an leading role in the Audi fac-
eight-lap victory in 2008, a tory effort alongside former
year after the trio of Nic Series champions and
Jonsson, Colin Braun and defending Le Mans winners
Tracy Krohn placed second -Dndo. Capello, Tom
in GT2. Kristensen and Allan
Flying Lizard Motorsports, McNish.
last year's GT2 champion in The world will see a pre-
the American Le Mans view of the diesel battle
Series, will race at Le Mans when Audi debuts its new
for the fifth consecutive year R15 TDI against Peugeot and
with a Porsche 911 GT3 P1 newcomer Acura with its
RSR. ARX-02a at the 57th Mobil 1
In addition, the Dale Twelve Hours of Sebring pre-
White-managed Drayson sented by Fresh from Florida
Racing Aston Martin Vantage on March 21.
GT2, which will compete at . Speaking of Acura, Patr6n
Sebring, Petit Le Mans and Highcroft Racing's David
the Monterey Sports Car Brabham is part of Peugeot's
Championships, received its Le Mans lineup in one of the
first Ie Mans entry. i factory's three 908 HDi pro-
UK Minister of Science totype coupes.
and Innovation Paul Drayson North Carolina-based
will contest with Jonny Creation Autosportif
Cocker and a yet-to-be- received a berth in LMP1.
named third driver. The Creation-Judd will carry
The LMP1 ranks, of the American flag as a US
course, will see the battle entrant.
between long-time American Dyson Racing's Guy Smith
Le Mans Series force' Audi also has a secured a Le Mans


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S(863) 385-8649


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ride with Quifel-ASM in
LMP2 for the second straight
season but first with a new
Ginetta-Zytek 09S.
The American Le Mans
Series will open its llth sea-
son with the 57th Mobil 1
.Twelve Hours of Sebring
presented by Fresh from
Florida on Saturday, March
21.
SPEED will televise the
race live from 10 a.m. to
noon and 2-11 p.m. ET.


www.newssun.com


Around the County


Streaks open district
slate with win
The Sebring baseball
Blue Streaks got off to a
good start in their district
schedule with a 6-2 win at
Palmetto Tuesday night.
Cody. Higgins had two
hits, including a two-run
homer to pace the Streak
(3-1, 1-0) offense, while
Dustin Lang and Josh
Chavis combined to hold
the Tigers down.
Sebring began a three-
game homestand with a
contest with Bartow
Thursday night before
District 10-4A action con-
tinues with DeSoto and
Booker coming to
Firemen.'s Field Friday and
Tuesday, respectively.


Panthers put down
in Palm Beach
After a hot start to the
season which has the team
at #6 in the state rankings,
the South Florida
Community College base-
ball Panthers (14-6) are bat-
tling through the middle
part of their schedule.
The struggles continued
as the team fell, 12-2, to
Palm Beach Community
College Thursday.
The usually potent
Panther offense was held in
check by sophomore starter
Ronhie Oelerich who
moved his record to 3-0 for
the 8-7 Panthers of Lake
Worth.


Choosing between

secretary and

defensive ends


Continued from 1B
per year, but they've just
fired a whole bunch of
people making a fraction
of that.
Maybe if I took just $6
million per season, maybe
they could put the extra
toward keeping those other
people on the payroll.
I don't begrudge players
from making what they
can, given they are the best
at what they do, are our
entertainment and have
short shelf lives.


But in this time of jobs
being lost left and right,
where people who work for
the teams offering up mil-
lions of dollars to players
are being sent packing -
refusing a multi-million
dollar offer, or sitting back
and just waiting for the
next best offer, just doesn't
look good.

Dan Hoehne is the Sports
Editor of the News-Sun. He
can be reached at
daniel.hoehne@newssun.com.


eanlle News-Sun

siomiq Avo. I t 6 PArt45t1IQO9
w Rai 051-016 1
.WV


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News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


CLASSIFIED


CLASSIFIED
INFORMATION

HOURS
Lobby: Monday-Friday 8a.m.-5p.m.
Classified Line Ads may be placed by
telephone Monday-Friday 8a.m.-5p.m.
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1050 ..,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
-TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: GC 08-1555
DAVID L. MARSH
Plaintiffs)
vs.
HECTOR SANTANA, LOURDES RIVERA,
ASSET ACCEPTANCE CORP,
INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, Department
of Treasury, and STATE OF FLORIDA,
Department of Revenue, et al
Defendants)
NOTICE OF ACTION-PROPERTY
TO: Hector Santana
1411 Wray St.
Avon Park, FL 33825
Last known residence & address

Lourdes Rivera
1411 Wray St.
Avon Park, FL 33825
Last known residence & address
or if any of the aforesaid persons is dead,
then his or her unknown heirs, devisees, lega-
tees or grantees; and any and all other per-
sons or parties claiming by, through, under or
against them; and all claimants, persons or
parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact
legal status, if known, claiming under any of
the above named or described Defendant(s)
or parties or claiming to have any right, title or
interest in and to the lands hereinafter descri-
bed as Defendant(s).
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an Ac-
tion to foreclose a Mortgage for the following
described property in Highlands County, Flori-
da, to wit:
Unit 7-E, THE MANORS: Commence at the
point at the intersection of the South line of
Lot 1, Block 7, Section 15, Township 33,
Range 28 East and the West Right-of-Way line.
of Lake Avenue (said point being 25 feet West
of the centerline of Lake Avenue); thence run
West along the South line of Lot 1, Block 7,
for a distance of 105.00 feet; thence run North
0 degrees 02 minutes East for a distance of
250 feet for POINT OF BEGINNING; thence
continue North 0 degrees 02 minutes East for
a distance of 35.00 feet; thence West for a
distance of 85.00 feet; thence South 0 degrees
02 minutes West for a distance of 35.00 feet;
thence East for a distance of 85.00 feet to
POINT OF BEGINNING. All lying and being in
Lot 1, Block 7, Section 15, Township 33
South, Range 28 East, Highlands County, Flor-
ida.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any to it, on the Plaintiff(s) attorney,
whose name and address is: David F. Lanier,
Esq., P.O. Box 400, Avon Park, Florida
33826-0400, and file the original with the
Clerk of the above styled Court on or before
March 24, 2009, otherwise a judgment may
be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of said
Court on February 18th, 2009.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo
February 20, 27; March 6,13, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT *
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-001632
FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
PLAINTIFF,
-VS-
TU HAl TRAN, ET AL,
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: TU HAl TRAN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
TU HAI TRAN
whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be
living; and if he/she/they be dead, the un-
known defendants who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, Ilenors,
creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an
interest by, through, under or against the De-
fendants, who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or interest in the property
described in the mortgage being foreclosed
herein.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the following proper-
ty:
LOT 5, BLOCK 232, EAST PALMHURST, AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 72,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to it on DAVID J. STERN, ESQ.
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 900
South Pine Island Road #400, Plantation, Flor-
ida 33324-3920 on or before March 9, 2009
(no later than 30 days from the date of the
first publication of this notice of action) and
file the original with the clerk of this court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition filed here-
in.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court at HIGHLANDS County, Florida, this
10th day of February, 2009.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: /s/ Ann Kopp


DEPUTY CLERK
LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J. STERN, P.A.
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
801 S. UNIVERSITY DRIVE, SUITE 500
PLANTATION, FL 33324
(954) 233-8000


1050, Lea
08-06424(FM)(NATB)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with disa-
bilities needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT ADMINISTRATION, at
the HIGHLANDS County Courthouse at 863-
471-5313, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-
955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
February 20, 27, 2009

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2008-CA-001267
LITTON LOAN SERVICING LP, AS
SERVICE FOR GSAA HOME EQUITY
TRUST 2006-17,
PLAINTIFF,
-VS-
JESUS GARCIA, ET AL.,
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: JESUS GARCIA AND UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF JESUS GARCIA AND LAZARO AGARA-
MONTE AND UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LAZARO
AGARAMONTE
whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be
living; and if he/she/they be dead, the un-
known defendants who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an
interest by, through, under or against the De-
fendants, who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or interest in the property
described in the mortgage being foreclosed
herein.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the following proper-
ty:
TRACT 14, FOOTMAN'S TRAIL PHASE TWO,
AN UNPLATTED SUBDIVISION AS SHOWN
ON THAT CERTAIN DECLARATION OF RE-
STRICTIONS AND MAP RECORDED IN O.R.
BOOK 1435, PAGE 814, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID TRACT
14 BEING A PORTION OF SECTION 32,
TOWNSHIP 36 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EAST,
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST
CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID
SECTION 32; THENCE SOUTH 02o 45' 14"
EAST ALONG THE EAST LINE OF THE NORTH-
WEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 32, A DISTANCE
OF 380.15 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 020 45'
14" EAST ALONG THE EAST LINE A DIS-
TANCE OF 330.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89�
16' 25" WEST A DISTANCE OF 1356.02 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 020. 45'14" WEST A DIS-
TANCE OF 330.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 890
16' 25" EAST A DISTANCE OF 1356.02 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, If any, to it on DAVID J. STERN, ESQ.
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 900
South Pine Island Road #400, Plantation, Flor-
ida 33324-3920 on or before March 16, 2009
(no later than 30 days from the date of the
first publication of this notice of action) and
file the original with the clerk of this court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition filed here-
in.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court at HIGHLANDS County, Florida, this
18th day of February, 2009.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: /s/ Ann Kopp
DEPUTY CLERK
LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J. STERN, P.A.
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
801 S. UNIVERSITY DRIVE, SUITE 500
PLANTATION, FL 33324
(954) 233-8000
08-95997(LITNW)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with disa-
bilities needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT ADMINISTRATION, at
the HIGHLANDS County Courthouse at 863-
471-5313, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-
955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
February 27; March 6, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-1663GCS
MOHAMMED T. CHOWDHURY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANGEL VICENTE TRIGO PARDO, dead or
alive, and the unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, or other parties claiming
by, through, under, or against ANGEL
VICENTE TRIGO PARDO,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION-PROPERTY
TO: ANGEL VICENTE TRIGO PARDO
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
CALLE MATURIN, ESQ
CARIPITO, QTA JARDIN
SECTOR SANTA CLARA
EL CAFETAL, CARACUS 106 VENEZUELA
or if any of the aforesaid persons is dead, then
Ills or her unknown heirs, devisees, legatees
or grantees; and any and all other persons or
parties claiming by, through, under or against
them; and all claimants, persons or parties,
natural or corporate, or whose exact legal sta-
tus, if known, claiming under any of the above
named or interest in and to the lands hereafter
described.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
to quiet title for the following described prop-
erty in Highlands County, Florida, to wit:
LOT 11, BLOCK 211, SUN 'N LAKE ES-
TATES, SECTION 18, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 8, PAGE 87, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any to it, on the Plaintiff's attorney,
whose name and address is:
Pamela T. Karlson, P.A.
301 Dal Hall Boulevard
Lake Placid, Florida 33852
and file the original with the Clerk of the above
styled Court on or before March 10, 2009,
otherwise a judgment may be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of said
Court on January 27, 2009.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: /s/ Rose M. Dilling
Deputy Clerk
February 6,13, 20, 27, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
Case No: 07001090GCS
Division:
SUNTRUST BANK,
Plaintiff,


-vs-
IOANNIS STRATIS, et al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ANNA STRATIS A/K/A ANA STRATIS


1050 Lels
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 6494 PLACID
LAKES BOULEVARD
LAKE PLACID, FL 33852
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFEND-
ANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS '
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property in
HIGHLANDS County, Florida:
THE NORTH 80 FEET OF LOT 3, BLOCK
245, PLACID LAKES SECTION TWENTY, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 31, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es within 30 days after the first publication, if
any, on Florida Default Law Group, P.L., plain-
tiff's attorney, whose address is 9119 Corpo-
rate Lake Drive, Suite 300, Tampa, Florida
33634, and file the original with this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once each
week for two consecutive weeks in the The
News- Sun.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on this 17th day of February, 2009.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK
Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ Ann Kopp
As Deputy Clerk
February 27; March 6, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-001525-GCS
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
HERBERT JAHR, et ux., et al.,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JEFFERY JAHR AND UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF JEFFERY JAHR if alive, and/or dead his
(their) unknown heirs, devisees, legatees or
grantees and all persons claiming by, through,
under or against him (them).
Residence is unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Action for fore-
closure of a mortgage on the following prop-
erty in HIGHLANDS County, Florida:
LOT 2, BLOCK D, AVON LAKES, ACCORD-
ING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 94,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to it on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN,
P.A., Attorneys, whose address is 9700 South
Dixie Highway, Suite 610, Miami, Florida
33156, (305) 670-2299, within 30 days after
the first publication of the notice, and to file
the original with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN,
P.A., attorneys or immediately thereafter; oth-
erwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint or Peti-
tion.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court
on this 23rd day of FEBRUARY, 2009.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ Sara Turnbull
As Deputy Clerk
February 27; March 6, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 09-158-GCS
TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE
CORP.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JUAN J. DEJESUS; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF JUAN J. DEJESUS; AIXA DEJESUS; THE
UNKNOWN,SPOUSE OF AIXA DEJESUS;
IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,'CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER
OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS;
HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK; WHETHER
DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY EXISTING,
TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR
TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANTS) AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANTSS;
UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JUAN J. DEJESUS; AIXA DEJESUS; IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED,
AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UN-
KNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, AS-
SIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS;
Whose residence are/Is unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your an-
swer or written defenses, if any, In the above
proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to
serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiff's attor-
ney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204
King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328, tele-
phone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-
0559, within thirty days of the first publication
of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding
being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage
against the following described property, to
wit:
LOT 20 AND LOT 21, IN BLOCK 104, OF
PLACID LAKES SECTION FIFTEEN, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 17, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
A/K/A
1637 WASHINGTON BLVD NW
LAKE PLACID, FL 33852
If you fail to file your answer or written de-
fenses in the above proceeding, on plaintiff's
attorney, a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Complaint or
Petition.
DATED at Highlands County this 18th day
of FEBRUARY, 2009.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Sara Turnbull
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans with Disa-
bilities Act of 1990, persons needing a special


accommodation to participate in this proceed-
ing should contact the ASA Coordinator no
later than seven (7) days prior to the proceed-
ings. If hearing impaired, please call (800)
955-8771 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice),


1050 Lgals
via Florida Relay Service.
February 27; March 6, 2009




IN THE COUNTY COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-1422-GCS
ANTHEL REALTY NO. 1, LLC,
a New Jersey limited liability company,
Plaintiff,.
vs.
CHARLES ALLEN KEMPTON and
WALTER HOYT KEMPTON, etc., et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF CLERK'S SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and
by virtue of that certain Final Judgment of
Foreclosure and sale made and entered in the
Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida in
the above entitled cause on February 25,
2009, Case No. 08-1422-GCS wherein AN-
THEL REALTY NO. 1, LLC, a New Jersey limit-
ed liability company, is Plaintiff and CHARLES
ALLEN KEMPTON and WALTER HOYT KEMP-
TON and all unknown parties claiming by,
through or under them, are Defendants, ROB-
ERT GERMAINE, Clerk of the above Court, will
between and during'the legal hours of sale, to-
wit, on the 17th day of March, 2009, at 11:00
a.m. the same being the day set by said Final
Judgment, offer for sale and sell at public out-
cry for cash in hand to the highest and best
bidder in the Jury Assembly Room, Basement,
Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South
Commerce Avenue, in Sebring, Highlands
County, Florida, that certain property more
particularly described as follows:
The North 1/2 of Lot 5, in Block 29, TOWN
OF AVON PARK, according to the plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 58, of the
Public Records of DeSoto of which Highlands
was formerly a part, lying in Section 22,
Township 33 South, Range 28 East, Highlands
County, Florida.
Said property will be sold to satisfy the Final
Judgment above referred to and all sums
mentioned therein.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT
TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, IF
ANY, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH 'THE
CLERK NO LATER THAN SIXTY (60) DAYS
AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A
CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY
REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER SIXTY (60)
DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM
THE SURPLUS.
In'accordance with the Americans With Disa-
bilities Act of 1990, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceed-
ing should contact Court Administration no
lather than seven (7) days prior to the pro-
ceeding and within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this Notice. If you are hearing
impaired call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired call 1-800-955-8770.
DATED at Sebring, Florida this 25th day of
February, 2009.
ROBERT GERMAINE
Clerk, Circuit Court
By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo
Deputy Clerk
February 27; March 6, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION,
FILE NO.: 09-37
Division: CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LAVERNE L. GEORGE,
Deceased.
Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(ANCILLARY ADMINISTRATION)
The administration of the estate of LAVERNE
L. GEORGE, deceased, whose date of death
was April 16, 2007, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 590 South
Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870.
The names and addresses of the ancillary per-
sonal representative and the ancillary personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a
copy of this notice is served must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
' All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including unma-
tured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET FOURTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS
SET FOURTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice
is: February 20, 2009.
/s/ Jeffrey S. George
Ancillary Personal Representative
of the Estate of LAVERNE GEORGE,
deceased.
2573 Stearns Lake Road
Lac Du Flambeau, WI 54538
/s/ Larry M. Stewart
LARRY M. STEWART, ESQ.
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 184586
73 SW Flagler Avenue
Stuart, FL 34994
Telephone: (772) 283-8191
February 20, 27, 2009
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration and
Determination of Homestead Status)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 09-86
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARTHA W. PROKSON
Deceased.
You are hereby notified that an Order of Sum-
mary Administration has been entered and a
Petition to Determine Homestead Status is
pending in the estate of Martha W. Prokson,
deceased, whose date of death was December
13, 2008, in the Circuit Court for HIGHLANDS
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring,
FL 33870. The estate has no value other than
the value of the real property that Is the dece-
dent's homestead, which is $90,000.00, the
estate's total value. The names and addresses
of those to whom it has been assigned by
such order are:
Mary Kay Sloan
a/k/a Kay Delaney Sloan
1444 Drew St.


Clearwater, FL 33755
and
Robert W. Delaney, III
2835 NE 11th Lane
Okeechobee, FL 34972


1050 Legals
The names and addresses of the Persons giv-
ing Notice/Petitioners for Determination of
Homestead Status are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is
required to be served must file their claims
with this 6ourt WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL .BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
February 27, 2009.
Petitioner/Person giving Notice,
/s/ Mary Kay Sloan
a/k/a Kay Delaney Sloan
1444 Drew St.
Clearwater, FL 33755
Telephone: 727-443-7493
Petitioner/Person giving Notice,
/s/Robert W. Delaney, III
2835 NE 11th Lane
Okeechobee, FL 34972
Telephone: 863-801-1156
February 27; March 6, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 08-852-GCS
FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MICHAEL SOBOCAN; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF MICHAEL SOBOCAN; IF LIVING,
INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR
PRESENTLY EXISTING,
TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR
TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANTS) AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANTSS;
UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a
Final Summary Judgment.of Foreclosure en-
tered in the' above-styled cause, in the Circuit
Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell
the property situate in Highlands County, Flor-
ida, described as:
LOT 13, BLOCK 33, PLACID LAKES SEC-
TION NINETEEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9,
PAGE 14, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A
744 Kingfisher Ave.
Lake Placid, FL 33852
at public sale, to the highest and best bid-
der, for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in
the -basement of the Highlands County Court-
house located at 430 South Commerce Ave-
nue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 AM, on March
10, 2009.
DATED THIS 11TH DAY OF FEBRUARY,
2009.
Any person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court
on the 11th day of February, 2009.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Attorneys for Plaintiff
In accordance with the American with Disabili-
ties Act of 1990, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate In this proceed-
ing should contact the ASA Coordinator no
later than seven (7) days prior to the proceed-
ings. If hearing impaired, please call (800)
955-9771 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.
February 20, 27, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 08-1167-GCS
TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE
CORP.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAN E. HUDGENS; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF JAN E. HUDGENS; IF LIVING,
INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a
Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure en-
tered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit
Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell
the property situate in Highlands County, Flor-
ida, described as:
LOT 25, BLOCK 55, SUN 'N LAKE ES-
TATES OF SEBRING UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 9, PAGE 51, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A
4011 Cantoria Avenue
Sebring, FL 33872
at public sale, to the highest and best bid-
der, for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in
the basement of the Highlands County Court-
house located at 430 South Commerce Ave-
nue, Sebring, Floridp at 11:00 AM, on March
10, 2009.
DATED THIS 11TH DAY OF FEBRUARY,
2009.
Any person claiming an interest in the


surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court
on the 11th day of February, 2009.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT


www.newssun.com


Page 5B










AGE




6B


DRIVE


By ANN M. JOB
For The Associated Press
Now that every American
taxpayer is an investor in the
parent company of the
Chevrolet Corvette, maybe
the American sports car icon
will rebound from its worst
sales in 11 years.
The Corvette, which dates
to 1953 and is the only
remaining V-8 powered two-
seater built in the United
States, offers a lower-priced
convertible this year, new
standard features as well as a
fiew ZR1 model that's the
fastest and most powerful
production car ever from
General Motors Corp.
Starting manufacturer's
,suggested retail price, includ-
ing destination charge, is
$49,415 for the base 2009
Corvette Coupe with 430
-horsepower, LS3 V-8, while
the 2009 Corvette
Convertible is $54,070, or
$1,355 less than the compa-
rable 2008 model. The con-
vertible has the same 430
horsepower V-8 of the base
coupe.
The top and much antici-
pated 2009 Corvette is the
ZR1 Coupe with 638 horse-
power, supercharged, 6.2-
liter V-8 and $104,820 price
.tag, while the mid-range
Corvette is the Z06, starting
at $74,775, with a 7-liter V-8
putting out 505 horsepower.
The rear-wheel drive
Corvette has a niche all its
own these days. The other
'American sports car with a
V-8 and a convertible version
- the Ford Mustang - has
more than two seats and a
$28,005 starting retail price
with V-8. The two-seat



1050 Legal
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra .
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Attorneys for Plaintiff
In accordance with the American with Disabili-
ties Act of 1990, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceed-
ing should contact the ASA Coordinator no
later than seven (7) days prior to the proceed-
ings. If hearing impaired, please call (800)
b55-9771 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.
February 20, 27, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. GC 08-969
THUNDERBIRD MANOR, INC.,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff
.vs-
ALMA 0. SMITH
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE
. Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a fi-
nal decree of foreclosure entered in the above
entitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands
County, Florida, I will sell the property situate
in Highlands County, Florida, described as:
Unit No. A-101 of THUNDERBIRD HILL
�MANOR, a Condominium, according to The
Declaration of Condominium recorded in O.R.
Book 969, Page 225, and all exhibits and
amendments thereof, Public Records of High-
lands County, Florida, together with an undi-
vided 1/54 interest in the common elements
appurtenant thereto.
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in
the basement of the Highlands County Court-
house located at 430 South Commerce Ave-
nue, Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the
16th day of March, A.D., 2009.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
Clerk Circuit Court
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
February 20, 27, 2009
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
FOR A VARIANCE REQUEST
HEARING NO. 1655
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a PUBLIC
HEARING will be held before the HIGHLANDS
COUNTY Board of Adlustment on the 10th day
of March. 2009. beginning at ;O m. or as
soon thereafter as possible, in the County
Commissioners Board Room, Highlands
County Government Center Building, 600
South Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida, to
consider a variance request to allow a 15 foot
rear yard setback instead of the required 25
feet to construct a glass enclosed porch on an
existing patio/slab, within the area described
as follows: an approximate 6,000 square foot
lot located in Vantage Polnte Subdivision,
South of Thunderbird Road, the lot being lo-
cated at 4526 Vantage Circle, Sebring, FL
33872, and legally described as follows: Lot
65A, Vantage Pointe, Phase II, as recorded in
?lat Book 15, Page 86, of the Public Records
4f Highlands County, Florida.
"Any person or persons interested or affected
by this change are invited to attend this hear-
ing. You may submit comments in writing to
the attention of Linda Conrad, Zoning Supervi-
sor, P.O. Box 1926, Sebring, Florida 33871-
1926, or you may call (863) 402-6638, for
further information. Please reference the
above hearing number when calling or writing.
ANY PERSON WHO MIGHT WISH TO APPEAL
ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD OF AD-
JUSTMENT IN PUBLIC HEARING OR MEET-


Dodge Viper is powered by a
600-horsepower V-10 and
starts at $88,271.
Imported sports cars with
convertible versions
and prices
under $100,000
include the i
2009 Porsche
B o x s t e r ,
starting at
$46,660, and
the Nissan
350Z roadster
and 370Z coupe,
with starting
prices in the
$30,000s. But these vehi-
cles have six-cylinder
engines providing less than
340 horsepower.
No one can argue that the
Corvette is one of the most
instantly recognizable cars
around. Its styling hasn't
changed much over the past
decade, with tweaks here and
there for the large, round tail-
lamps, short, tall rear decklid
and long hood.
Indeed on my test drive,
the 2009 Corvette
Convertible drew attention
from boys and young men,
and the reason wasn't just
because of the bright,
Jetstream Blue metallic paint.
Driving a Corvette is a
curious mix of old-school
flavor and new, modern
sophistication.
The raw engine power is
palpable as the V-8 roars to
life when a driver touches the
ignition button. Yes, the
Corvette has a start button
now, not an ignition key
switch. Tap the accelerator
and the car bolts from the
garage and down the drive-
way.




1050 Legls
TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF
THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE WHICH WILL
INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE
UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE
BASED.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation
as provided for in the Americans with Disabili-
ties Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes
should contact Mr. John A. Minor, ADA Coor-
dinator at; 863-402-6510 (Voice), 863-402-
6508 (TTY), or via Florida Relay Service 711,
or by e-mail: jminor@hcbcc.org Requests for
CART or interpreter services should be made
at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordi-
nation of the service.
ONE OR MORE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
MAY BE PRESENT AT THE MEETING.
MR. JIM BROOKS, CHAIRMAN
February 22, 27, 2009

10 5 Highlands
10 5 County Legals
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
LEGAL NOTICES.
The following legal notices are from the Highlands
County Board of County Commissioners and are be-
ing published in the font, size,and leading as per their
specifications.


Mday, Februat7 Z7, ZUU~


News-Sun


After 56 years, Chevy's Corvette Convertible still iconic


* Base price: $53,220.
e Price as tested: $71,000.
* Type: Front-engine, rear-wheel
drive, two-passenger convertible.
* Engine: 6.2-liter, overhead
valve, LS3 V-8.
* Mileage: 15 mpg (city), 25 mpg
(highway).
* Top speed: NA.
* Length: 174.6 inches.
* Wheelbase: 105.7 inches.
* Curb weight: 3,222 pounds.

frequent, and the engine
sounds became stronger and
louder.
The tester.was a base con-
vertible with optional less-
restrictive exhaust system, so
it had the base 6.2-liter, over-
head valve, LS3 V-8 generat-
ing a forceful 428 foot-
pounds of torque at 4,600
rpm.
At 3,222 pounds, the two-
seat Corvette felt a bit like a
rocket ship when I'd push the
accelerator down and merge
swiftly into highway traffic.
There was no lag, no hesita-
tion - just my head going


ING IS HEREBY ADVISED THAT THEY WILL
NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS,
AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, THEY MAY NEED


* Built at Bowling Green, Ky.
* Options: 4LT premium equip-
ment group (includes heated seats,
head-up display, Bose premium
audio system, Bluetooth phone
system, side impact air bags,
power adjustable passenger seat)
$10,050; magnetic ride control
suspension $1,995; forged, pol-
ished aluminum wheels $1,295;
six-speed automatic transmission
with paddle levers $1,250; dual-
mode exhaust $1,195; Jetstream
Blue metallic paint $750; 2.73
axle ratio $395.
* Destination chage: $850.

back into the head restraint as
the, car zoomed ahead.
I won't call it awesome
because that's the word now
used for the top ZR1
Corvette. But the get up and
go, even in a base Corvette,
is ample for all real-world
road conditions.
And my experience came
in a Corvette with an option-
al six-speed automatic trans-
mission. A six-speed manual
is the standard tranny.
The suspension and tires
on a sports car like this can
convey a lot of road bumps
and vibrations to driver and



2100 Help Wanted
NIGHT RECEPTIONIST/AUDITOR
Must be willing to work 11 pm to 7 am.Apply
in person, 2165 US 27, South, Lake Placid, FL
ianhd.CIA wanted for fast paced medical
oncology/hematology office. Full time,
Monday-Friday, 8AM-5PM. Good benefits
and competitive salary: Chemotherapy
experience a plus but not required.
Must be a self starter and able to multi task.
Fax resume to 863-385-6086.
Royal Care of Avon Park
Due to recent promotions we have the
following positions available.
NURSES
Full Time
7a to 7p
C.N.A.
Full Time and Part Time
7-3 Shift
3-11 Shift .
11-7 Shift
REHAB DEPARTMENT
Full Time
OTR and COTA
Come and be part of an experienced and
dynamic team! SNF experience a plus.
Competitive salaries and benefits.
Apply in person or contact
Maria Perez, HR Director
OR
Todd Bobo, Rehab Director
(863) 453-6674
EOE/MF/DFWP


This is one car where it
pays to have an optional
head-up display, like I did. on
the tester. The display proj-
ects pertinent driver informa-
tion - like speed - onto the
lower part of the windshield
in front of the driver, so he
doesn't have to take his eyes
off the road to check the
speedometer and other
gauges that are lower down
in the instrument cluster.
Indeed, the head-up dis-
play can even show g-force
as a driver accelerates or
rounds a curve. G-force is a
unit of acceleration measure-
ment, such as what's meas-
ured on rollercoasters and
space rockets.
The large blue-green num-
bers on the windshield glass
helped me keep my speeds
down to the legal residential
street limits, though the low-
to-the-pavement Convertible
often felt like it was merely
crawling at these times. The
car and I were much happier
on highways and country
roads, where speeds were
higher, straightaways were


1550 rofessional Services 2 100 Help Wanted


INCOME TAX RETURNS: Form 1040 / 1040A /
1040EZ - $25. Each additional schedule,$25.
For more information call 863-385-3388.
Tax Services
Semi-retired Certified Public
Accountant available for tax and
accounting services. Reasonable fees.
Expert services. 863-465-1124
TOM'S MAINTENANCE
Auto detailing, gutter cleaning, pressure
cleaning, window & screen cleaning,
etc.. Call 863- 471-9297


2000
Employment


2050 Job Opportunities
MOMS HELPING MOMS
Work from home. No selling. PT/FT.
www.workathomeunited.com/sherrie
or call 309-255-3684.


1100 Announcements 21 00 Help Wanted


CHECK


YOUR AD
Please check your ad on the first day
it runs to make sure it is correct.
Sometimes instructions over the
phone are misunderstood and an er-
ror can occur. If this happens to you,
please call us the first day your ad
appears and we will be happy to fix
it as soon as we can.
If We can assist you, please call us:
385-6155--452-1009
465-0426
News-Sun Classified


1550 Professional Services

BINGER BROTHERS PAINTING
* Family run, home town business in
Highlands County 20 yrs. Commercial,
residential, pressure washing.
No job too great or too small!
Call Gary for free estimates
@ 863-471-2444, leave message.

Dave's Home Maintenance
Interior/Exterior. Basic home repairs,
handyman, kitchen/bath remodels, mobile
home repairs. Call 863-441-5135
Licensed & Insured - Quality Guaranteed!

HANDYMAN BOB
Install doors, windows, flooring, minor
electric & plumbing and more.
Lic. & Ins. Call 863-452-5201 or
863-449-1744.
RODRIGUEZ LAWN CARE
Mowing, trimming, mulch, landscaping. Free
estimates. Expert work at a fair price. Excel-
lent references. Licen. and insured. 863- 314-
0969


CDL DRIVER. CLASS A
airbrakee endorsement)
Must have 2 years minimum exp,
clean driving record. Local driving.
Drug-free workplace * (863)385-6709
COMCAST SALES REPS
We are authorized to sell for Comcast Cable
and we need Residential Sales Reps
Immediatelyl! You'll be responsible for new
customer acquisition through door-to-door
sales activity. Flexible full-time positions
available, $900+ weekly earning potential.
Call now for an interview today:
(866) 323-9416
Experienced Medical Secretary wanted for
fast paced dncology/hematology office.
Must be a self-starter and multi-tasking is
required. Monday-Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Good benefits and competitive salary.
Fax resume to 863-385-6086.
Florida Mentor Inc. is seeking a Live-In Home
Manager for it's 6-Bed facility.(DD/MR)
located in Mulberry, Fl. Group Home
experience, supervisory skills and knowledge
of Behavioral Concepts is highly desired. We
offer a competitive salary, full benefit package
and a friendly atmosphere. H.S. diploma,
clean criminal background and a valid Fl.
Drivers license are required. Please Call Scofftt


Florida Mentor Inc. is seeking a Home
Manager for it's 6-bed facility (DD/MR) in
Mulberry, Fl. Group Home experience,
supervisory skills and knowledge of behavior
concepts preferred. H.S. diploma, valid Fl.
Drivers License and clean criminal back-
ground are required. Please contact Scott at
863-452-5141 or fax resume to
863-452-6514.

LITIGATION ASSISTANT/SECRETARY
needed for Law Office in Lake Placid.
Must be experienced. Part-time to start,
with afternoon hours.
Please fax your Resume to:
863-465-5614

LUBE MANAGER. Fast paced quick lube center
looking for experienced Tech Manager. Good
working environment, salary based on experi-
ence. Please Fax resume to: 863-326-9702.












* General Labor - Construction
* CDL-A w/Hazmat
* Light Industrial - All Shifts
* Carpenters w/Tools
*Equipment Operators

Daily Work, Daily Pay
Report Ready To Work
6:00 A.M. Daily
Office Hours 6:00 A.M. - 6 P.M.

3735 Kenilworth Blvd.
471-2774
EOE/Drug Free Workplace

NEED EXTRA MONEY?? Now Hiring PRN
CNA's for evenings and weekends. Good
Rates. Apply in person at The Oaks of Avon,
1010 Hwy 27, North, Avon Park, FL 33825.
NOW HIRING part-time graphic artist for
hometown newspaper. Pick up application at


passenger. The seats are low
to the floor and sculpted, and
I honestly never saw
the front of the hood
from the driver's
seat.
Some older riders
may find they need
to scramble a bit tc
get up and out of the
seats.
They also may find
S they need some flexibil-
ity as they lower them-
selves inside.
There's a plentiful 43 inch-
es of legroom in the Corvette.
which makes it comfortable
for 6-footers.
Surprisingly, the trunk
space is exceptional for a
convertible like this, too.
with 11 cubic feet available
with the fabric roof up and
7.5 cubic feet available when
the roof is down and stored.
Just be aware that items have
to be lifted. up quite high
above the rear body before
they come to rest in the carge
area.
The base convertible top is
manually operated but can be
optioned up for power opera-
tion.
The ride is loud - not jusl
because of the engine sound
but the road noise from the
tires. This is definitely not a
retiring kind of ride.
Standard safety equipment
includes traction control and
electronic stability control.
But side-impact air bags were
an option, not standard, in the
base convertible.
Corvettes .are built in
Bowling Green, Ky., and
U,S. sales last year fell tc
26,971 - the lowest since
1997.



21.00 Help Wanted
Sebring- Legal Assistant 3 yrs exp. Est. plan.,
probate, lit., RE. Exp. req. Proficient
/Microsoft Office. Please send resume to
bou@macbethlaw.com. Law office of J. Ross
Macbethi, 2543 US HWY 27 S., Sebring, Fl.
33870. 863-385-7600, fax: 863-385-7911.
SUNSHINE PAYDAY LOANS looking for store
clerk. Willing to travel in Highlands &
surrounding counties. Self -motivated, quick
'learner & hard worker, will train. Travel a
must, fax resume to 863-453-6138.
TEMPORARY FOOD SERVICE working with
Food Vendor at local annual car race. March
18-21. 863-232-7796




Subscribe to

the News-Sun

Call

385-6155

452-1009

465-0426


Highlands County Board of

County Commissioners

The following position closes on 2/20/2009
Road Supervisor Sebring - 992 PG-24 $20.31 - $33.42 hourly.
The following position closes on 2/27/2009
Landfill Tech I - 947 PG-15 $13.12 - $21.19 hourly.
The following position Open Until Filled
Housing Director - 752 PG-26 $22.33 - $36.88 hourly.
For application, minimum qualifications and full job descriptions visit
us on our website at www.hcbcc.net, or call our job line at 402-6750, or
apply at 600 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870.


at 863-452-5141 or fax resume to The News-Sun, 2227 US 27 S., Sebring. No
863-452-6514. )phone calls please.



P i IJ Ii



ALL STAR TILE, LLC advertise advertise
*u * Complete Bathroom Remodeling V]a D.;, r tV.' n SS
Yon /?'inOSS FOvNT ar usineSiS


* Change Bathtub to Shower
, Installation Ceramic Floor Tile
*, i Shower door sales & Installation
{ pF ~ r1 - - Call Robert for Your
FREE Estimate
W *"- (863) 465-6683
. ., L.kn Placld


Here!

News-Sun
Call 385-6155,


2009 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible


Here!

News-Sun
Call 385-6155A.


Friday, February 2z, zuu9


Ek










www. newssun.corn


4080 Homes for Sale

OWNER wILL FINANCE - 207 Iozier St.
anr Hail Golf Course in front & back.
New 3/2/2. Beautiful kitchen, granite tops,
beautiful tile work. Open House Sunday
$219,000. Cell 561-452-1112 or
561-254-0124 or 561-622-4242.

0O80 Homes for Sale
4080 Sebring

SEBRING: LAKEFRONT: EXCEPTIONAL
2BR, 2.5BA, 2CG Home on Lake Josephine.
(Over 2500 sq ft living area). 507 Lake
Josephine Shores Rd., 130 ft catwalk to
boathouse, back patio, marble foyer
entrance, tile baths & lots more!
Adjacent lot on lake also available.
$425K. Call 863-655-2235.
SEE TO APPRECIATEII


4100


Homes for Sale
Lake Placid


$10,000 OFF
Mention This Ad
HOMES BY GEORGE
New Build. 3/2/2 Split Plan.
Energy Efficient Upgrades.
Nestled in Natural FL Setting.
104 Captive Court on Cul De Sac
Island Parkway Estates, Placid Lakes.
863-464-0836
or www.earthfriendlyhomes.net

BY BUILDER
Now for sale. REDUCED BY 80K. 38R, 2BA,
full 2CG. Cathedral ceilings, plant shelves, all
large rooms, close to Placid Lakes park &
boat ramp. Deeded Lake June access. NOW
$199,000. 620 Catfish Creek Rd in Placid
Lakes. Meyer Homes, INC. 863-414-4075,
cell or 863-465-7338 after 3pm.
4120 Villas & Condos
41 For Sale
Sebring- Beautiful 2BR/2BA/2 carport
condo. New appliances, new A/C.
Excellent condition. $83,000.
321 Manor Circle, off Thunderbird Rd.
Call 863-471-3106.
S417 Lakefront Property
4'7O For Sale
AVON PARK HISTORIC LAKE BYRD
100ft lakefront, lake view,
& lake access lots. Ready to build, starting
@ $59,000. Financing available. Only
2 miles N. of downtown Avon Park, on US 27
Call David @ 863-452-2536.,

4260 Acreage for Sale
30 acres, cleared, except for12 acres woods.
Older single wide MH w/addition. CHA, all
appi, w/d. Fenced/some cross fence.
$180,000. Between Avon Park & Wauchula.,
off HWY 64. Call 863-245-9464.


5000
Mobile Homes

0 50 Mobile Homes
5 5 For Sale
INVENTORY CLEARANCE ** AVON PARK
56' HOM 2BR, 2BA on lake,
2 years FREE RENT! $29,000.
40' HOM, 18 months FREE RENT! $19,000.
39' Pre-Owned Newmark,
1 year FREE RENT! $9,000.
All have CHA & Carport. Holiday Ranch,
1995 W. County Line Rd. Near new Super
Wal-Mart. Call 863-453-4468 / 941-639-3583
or 941-286-7983.
NEW 14 & 16 WIDES
Delivered-Set-A/C-Skirting &'Steps.
Low as 2BR $26,850. 3BR $29,850.
1 BR $22,850. Banks Mobile Homes,
Lakeland, 863-688-4635
Banksmobilehomes.com
SELECTION of 1 & 2 Bedroom units for sale,
friendly/active 55+ park, located near shop-
ping, banks, hospital, reasonable lot rent incl.
S/W/G and lawn mowing. Call for more info.
or to see units. No pets please.
Call (863)385-7034
S515 Mobile Homes
O | For Rent
SEBRING 2008 2BR, 2BA, W/D hookup, CHA,
City water, carport, close to shopping. No
Pets. 863-840-0494.


6000
Rentals


6050 Duplexes for Rent
1405 HIGHLAND DR. SEBRING
2BR/1BA, no pets, no kids. Walk to shopping.
$550/mo., 1st, last & $500 security.
Call 863-465-0075.
SEBRING 2004 Decatur St, 2BR, 1 BA, close to
mall, tile throughout unit, range, refrigerator,
large eat-in kitchen, screened back porch,
W/D hookups, nice yard, quiet neighborhood,
CHA, $575 mo/ $300 sec. dep. Avail March
15, 2009. No application fee. To view, call
863-471-0840 or 863-446-7274.
Sebring- Stop Looking! 2 duplex units avail.
now. Close to everything. 2BR/1 BA, w/central
air/ heat. Freshly painted, exc. cond. Both
have until. rms. No pets. 1 has w/d. $560/mo.
+ sec. 1 has all new carpet. $565/mo + sec.
863-763-1759 or 863-381-2810.
SEBRING-N E W Construction 2
story Town Home for rent.
3BR/ 2.5BA /1CG.,$800/mo
No smoking, no pets.
PH: 863-655-0311

6)A0 Unfurnished
6 Apartments
*** Key Lake Villas***
Sebring- Orange Blossom Estates
2/1 & 3/2, townhouses on Lake.
Clean, quiet, screened in porch, outside
patio, W/D hookup. $575 & $765
1st month & sec. (863) 465-2740
1 AND 2 BEDROOM GARDEN APARTMENTS
Rental Assistance Available
, Thornburv Apartments
S Tues., Wed. and Fri.
8 to 4:30, (863)465-4526 -SS,
HUD Vouchers Accepted;
Foreclosures welcome.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY
AVON PARK - studio with balcony
overlooking Lake Verona and City Park,
laundry facilities, $365/mo.
i00 E. Main St.
863-453-8598


6200 Unfurnished
620 Apartments
BAYSIDE APARTMENTS - Special Rates Now
Available. Now Renting
1 & 2 BR Studio Apartments.,
Security deposit required.
729 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring,
863-385-2063.
BEAUTIFUL APTS
2/1 tile floors, central air., screen back porch,
beautiful landscaping, $695 mo. Pet friendly
HWY 27 S. behind Dunkin Donuts, up the hill,
turn left, 3106 Medical Way,
(8631446-1822
DINNER LAKE area, Sebring. 1 & 2
bedroom apartments. $495 - $600/mo.
Includes water, large rooms, fresh
paint & tile floors. Call Gary Johnson
@ 863-381-1861.

LEMON TREE APTS.
Single story 1 bedrooms w/private patio
N E w refig, stove, washer/dryer.WSG incl.
Pets OK, quiet friendly Avon Park Communty
Call 386-503-8953

6250 Furnished Houses
Avon Park, near Wal-Mart. 1 BR/1 BA Cottage,
completely furnished. Cable, computer
access & utilities included. Avail. from weekly
to annually. No smoking or pets. Country
setting. Newly furnished. For details call:
863-453-6469 or 863-368-0427.

6300 Unfurnished Houses
LAKE PLACID -NEWER, CLEAN
3br, 2ba, 2cg in nice area of
Placid Lakes. Non-Smoke, CALL:
863-441-2844 or 863-465-3838.
SEBRING
(1).Newly Remodeled 2BR, 2BA,
4221 Elson Ave, $700/mo + $600 sec.
(2) 2BR, 1BA, 1CG, 3437 Sparta Circle, $650
mo/ + $600 sec. Call Steve, 863-385-3101.
SEBRING HOUSE FOR RENT. Please call 931-
510-0487

6350 Cottages for Rent
LAKE PLACID LAKE HOUSE on beautiful Lake
Placid. Unfurn 2BR, 1.58A; all new appliances
included. Reduced to $750/mo. + 1st & secur-
ity. For more information or to schedule an
appointment to view, call 561-313-0574.
6600 Business& Offices
60 For Rent
DOWNTOWN SEBRING- High rent draining
your bottom line? Office Space as low as
$249 Per Month plus tax. 200-14005q ft avail-
able. A/C, Electric included. Full sized elevator,
access to conference room. Low cost DSL
avail. (863)-385-1705 www.halnzcenter.com

7000
Merchandise


7030 Estate Sales

SEBRING - SPRING LAKE BLVD
(FOLLOW OUR SIGNS OFF HWY 98)
FRIDAY, FEB 27. 9AM- ?
SAT., FEB 28. 9AM -?
GIANT ESTATE SALE
TWO Las Vegas Style Slot Machines
w/Base Stands. COINS, GUNS,
STERLING SILVER (sets & serving
pieces), JEWELRY (DIAMONDS, GOLD
& SILVER); PORCELAIN (sets & pieces),
CARNIVAL GLASS (LARGE Collection);
Crystal Stemware, ANTIQUE FURNITURE
(Bkcs, Dressers, Desks, Tables, Chairs)
PAINTINGS & PRINTS (Wyland Ocean)
TOOLS, SOFAS, LAMPS, BDRM SETS,
HAND SEWN LINENS & CROCHET;
KITCHENWARE; BOOKS (Old and New)
MUCH, MUCH MORE!!!
BY: THE FURNITURE DOCTORS
SERVING HIGHLANDS COUNTY FOR
28 YEARS
SEBRING, FLORIDA


7180 Furniture

CONSIGNMENTS ON SALE
MATTRESS SETS: Twin size, $135;
Full size, $165; Queen size, $195:
Recliner, $50; Leather adjustable
Recliner, $$295; Beautiful Sectional,
$395; 3-Pc End Table set, $95; 5-Pc
Bedroom set, $295; Rattan Bedroom
set, $295; Queen size Bedroom set,
$295; Queen Sleeper, $95; China
hutch, $85; Large Entertainment
Center, $150; Large Computer Desk,
$125; Florida style Sofa & Chair
(must be seen), $250; Florida print
Sofa, $95; Pair/Rattan trim Loveseats,
$150/Pr; Adjustable Electric Bed, $295.
These and many more
Consignments on Salel
West Coast Furniture
5535 US Hwy 27, South
Sebring, FL 33870
863-382-7666

WEST COAST FURNITURE
now accepting quality
consignment items.
CALL 863-382-7666


7260 Musical Merchandise
HILL-GUSTAT MIDDLE SCHOOL NEEDS
DONATIONS OF YOUR ATTIC INSTRUMENTS!
Instruments will be cleaned, repaired, and put
in the hands of students who otherwise would
not be able to participate in band. Donors will
be offered a tax deduction letter for the esti-


mated value of the instrument. Thanks!!!!!

7310 Bargain Buys
2 yr old 54" round oak table & chairs. $225.
Call 863-253-2165.
32" Sylvania TV w/2 shelf stand,. $200. Only
used twice. Call 863-465-9470.
9 X 12 Oriental area rug. Call for details. $200.
Call 863-253-2165.
AREA RUG 9'X12', Cream/floral design, $150.
Please call 863-386-0873.
ASR 630 Nordic Trac Ellipotical Trainer w/plug
N Play MP3 Sound System. 1 touch program,
1 touch resistance. Like new. $385.
Call 863-214-4545 for more details.


News-bun * -rlaay, -eDruary z/, z2UU


7310 Bargain Buys
BIRD CAGE, large, with stand, $50. Please call
863-386-0873.
BLOCK ICE TONGS (2) $35 for both. Please
call 863-381-1161.
BOOK "9 STEPS to FINANCIAL FREEDOM" by
Susie Orman, $10. Please call 863-385-1615.
BOOK SELF MATTERS by Dr. Phil McGraw,
$12. Please call 863-385-1615.
BOOK "Your Sacred Self" by Dr. Wayne Dyer,
$10. Please call 863-385-1615.
C.B. Radios hand-held pair; both for $45.
Please call 863-381-1161

CANE - Medical Cane, 4 legs/10 settings. Reg-
ular $98; Sell, $45. Please call 863-385-1615.
DESK CHARI Turquoise, $150. Call Pat, 863-
381-7405.

DINING ROOM TABLE, round, w/leaf, mica
top, + 4 padded chairs, $100 obo. Please call
863-385-2733.
DINING TABLE oval, w/leaf, 2 tone wood, + 4
padded chairs, $150 obo. Please call 863-
385-2733.
FABRIC Organic Cotton, light cream color jer-
sey, 60 wide, 6 yards $35. More Available.
Please call 863-385-3388.
FORD 1992 Tempest, white.
TERIFFIC TRANSPORTATION! $500.
863-414-5131
Golds Gym Olympic style w/weights, new,
$175 OBO. Call 863-414-2755.
Harley Fatboy wheels w/new tires. $350 OBO.
Harley parts, misc. $75. Call 863-414-2755.
I-POD, 250 sngs, $80 obo. MP3, new, $25.
Sony Walkman CD Player, $20. Please call
863-382-9863.
LAWN EDGER Good Condition., $75. Please
call 863-464-0531.
LOCKERS - metal, in good shape, approxi-
mately 10x24, group of 16. $300. Please call
Christian, 863-382-4126.
MASSAGER Dr. Scholl's 2-speed Vibrator,
$10. Please call 863-385-1615.
MOTORCYCLE 'SISSY BAR, new, $49. Please
call 863-214-1965.
PLAYBOY MAGAZINES 1960-70, approxi-
mately 100, all for $40. 863-381-1161.
PODIUM Wooden, walnut, BEAUTIFUL! $499.
Call Pat for more details.
REFRIGERATOR Whirlpool, 18 cu ft, almond
color,VERY CLEAN! $225. 863-214-1313.
RODS & REELS - 50 Pcs, All to go...$250.
Please call 863-446-1400.
SCOOTER - STARLITE - motorized, new bat-
teries. $250 or make an offer. 863-382-6799.
SEEWING MACHINE Singer Featherweight.
NICE! $350. Please call 863-446-1400.
SHED 10x10 (full); Older Glassware; Tools; 2
Color TV's; Antique Rocker; Bike Rack; Fishing
Equip. $450 Takes All! 863-446-1400.


731 0 Bargain Buys
HITCH for Pickup Truck, $100. 863-214-1965.
Shed 6' X 8', $225 OBO. Call 863-414-2755.
VACUUM - HOOVER WIND TUNNEL UPRIGHT
$20. Excellent condition; new belt & bag. Call
863-402-2285.
WATKINS GLEN Reloadable Card, $100. Call
Pat, 863-381-7405.
WHEELCHAIR CARRIER motorized, for vehi-
cles, $125. 863-214-1965.
WINDSHIELD for motorcycle, like new, $100.
863-214-1965.

7320 Garage & Yard Sales
AVON MOBILE HOME PARK
GARAGE SALE
1350 N. Lake Ave. Sat., Feb. 28, 2009.
7AM-NOON. Being held @ Clubhouse.
Bake Sale, Coffee and Donuts. Also,
vintage jewelry & collectible glass.
AVON PARK 404 Malcolm St, Sat, Feb 28, &
Sun, Mar 1,8-? Furniture, collectibles, house-
hold items & MUCH MORE!
AVON PARK ADELAIDE SHORES
RVRESORT ANNUAL
FleA Market/Garage Sale, @ CLUBHOUSE
2881 US 27 N., on Highlands Blvd near
SIERRA'S Lounge. Sat. 2/28, 8-11:30am.
COME AND ENJOY!
AVON PARK Corner of Emmanual Way & Pal-
metto Ave, 4 blks behind Oak of Avon Nursing
Home, Sat, Feb 28, 8am-5pm. Men's & Wms
Jackets, men's suits & Clothes, fax machine,
TV, Christmas items, Baskets, sweeper, porta-
ble tub spa, binoculars, bedding & MORE!
AVON PARK Lake Bonnet Village off SR 17,
CRAFTS - GARAGE - BAKE SALE. Coffee, Do-
nuts & funnel cakes also available for sale.
Sat, Feb 28th, 8 am -12 Noon.
AVON PARK LAKE GLENADA ANNUAL CRAFT
SHOW. Feb 28th, 8 am - Noon, 2525 US Hwy
27, S. @ Clubhouse (next to Wild Turkey)
Bake Sale & Rummage Sale outside.
BAZAAR
SPONSORED BY THE CRAFT &
LADIES CLUB OF SUN -N-LAKE
**SAT., February 28th** 8am-2pm
**Sun N Lake Community Center**
3500 Edgewater Drive, Sebring
Crafts - Bake Sale - Refreshments
Raffle - Trash/Treasure
Vendor Tables available for $5.00
Contact: June Gates @ 863-314-9005
OR Ann Carlisle @ 863-471-0734.
LAKE PLACID - Oollectible Sale.
1010 Tennyson St. Take 621 E. to Hallmark, to
Breckenridge, right on Flamingo. Follow signs.
Fri-Sat., Feb. 27th & 28th. 8AM-4PM. Toys,
tools, beer signs, Lionel engine #33 & more.
LAKE PLACID 7 Private Dr, 11/10 mile west
of 27on Lake June Rd, Friday,.Feb 27, 9am-
3pm. Dresser, Black & Decker portable work-
bench, household items, & LOTS OF MISC!


7320 Garage&YardSales 7520


LAKE PLACID Annual Sun 'n Lakes
Clubhouse Rummage Sale, 440 Sun 'n
Lakes Blvd, Feb 27-28, 8 am - 1pm.
$1.00 Bag @ Noon, SAT ONLY.
Lake Placid- 2 Family Sale
45 Venetian Parkway in Covered Bridge.
Fri-Sat., Feb. 27th & 28th.
Fri, 8AM-5PM. Sat, 8AM-12PM
Something for everyone!!!
SEBRING 211 Lakeside Rd, by Veterans
Beach, Fri-Sat-Sun, Feb 27-28; Mar 1st, 9-?
Household items, small appliances, lawn &
garden equipment, tools, Pair of Adirondack
chairs, & LOTS OF MISC!!
SEBRING HUGE SALE Collectibles, Tools, &
LOTS OF MISC. 21 Jay Ave, (Sebring Hills)
Fri-Sat, Feb 27-28, 7:30-12 noon.
SEBRING MULTI-FAMILY SALE
3208 Golfview Rd, (Harder Hall area)
Saturday, Feb 28,7 am until ?
LOTS & LOTS & LOTS OF GREAT STUFF!!
SEBRING MULTI-FAMILY SALE! 4528 Hester
Ave, corner of Dozier & Hester, Sat, Feb 28,
8am-? Some Furniture, household items,
home decor, & LOTS OF MISC!
SEBRING MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE
1721 Rainbow Ave, just off Kenilworth Blvd
past Sebring High School, Fri-Sat-Sun, Feb.
27-29, 8am-2pm. EVERYTHING FROM A-Z!!
SEBRING YARD & BAKE SALE 2213 Rainbow
Ave, corner Youth Care Ln & Rainbow, Sat,
Feb 28, 8-12. Proceeds to benefit Youth
Group @ Raiinbow Apostolic Church.
Sebring- 3332 Hope St.
off Hammock Rd.
Fri-Sat., Feb. 27th & 28th.
8AM-4PM. All proceeds go to
Relay For Life!!
Sebring- Francis 2 MHP
2800 Real McCoy Dr. Annual Park Sale
PLUS Crafts, Baked Goods &
Concession Food. Located @
Clubhouse. Sat. Feb. 28th. 8AM-2PM.


Page 7B

Pets & Supplies


GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES
2 male, 3 female. Ready March 12th.
Shots & Wormed, parents on premises.
$525. 863-452-1777


7560 A Medical Supplies
7 0 & Equipment
POWER CHAIR 3 yrs old, very good
condition, only used approx. 10
times. $1,000. 863-202-5133. .


8000
Recreation


84 0 0 Recreational Vehicles
1995, 23ft "Born Free" motor home (Cadillac
of motor homes). 98,000 miles, engine in ex-
cellent condition. This unit has an extensive
list of adjustments, repairs and replacements,
such as: complete brake job, including master '
cylinder, new air shocks, alternator, good
tires, engine tuned. Must see to appreciate.
Owned by a mechanic and was conditioned
for extensive travel. $1,000's spent on condi-
tioning. Was asking $18,500, price reduced
to $15,500. Includes RV cover, etc. Call 863- -
385-7400 or 863-414-3754.

8450 Motor Homes
1995 23' "BORN FREE" Motor Home, excel-
lent condition. Asking $15,500, or best offer.
For more information please call 863-385-
7400 or 863-414-3754.


9000
Transportation


7520 Pets & Supplies 9100 Motorcycles &ATVs


31b, 3 month old blue/cream, long haired
Chihuahua. Vet certified w/shots. Only serious
pet owner should inquire. Her name is
Daisy. Very lovable. $700.
Call 863-453-8384, '


NOTICE
Florida statute 585.195 states that
all dogs and cats sold in Florida
must be at least eight weeks old,
have an official health certificate
and proper shots and be free of in-
testinal and external parasites.


SCOOTERS-GAS. 80 to 120 MPG high
power 4 cycle motor, with CVT automatic
transmission. Guaranteed for 2 years.
Financing, 90 days. Visa, MC or Discover. ,
$895. READY TO RIDE! 5535 US 27 South,
Sebring, FL. Call 863-382-7666.

9450 Automotive for Sale
1998 Pontiac Tranrs Spot Florida Mini Van V6.
Dual air/heat, power, tinted windows. Stereo,
roof rack, hitch. Clean vehicle. Reduced price.
$3400. Lake Placid. 863-465-7755.
NEED A HELPING HAND?
CALL NEWS-SUN CLASSIFIED
THEY GET RESULTS (863)385-6155 .


WUTHA


CLASSIFIED AD!


385-6155


465-0426


AND THE






GOWD EU


IN YOUR


WHEN YOU SILL


452-1009









Page 8B

RELIGION


News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


www.newssun.com


Alliance Church of
Sebring
SEBRING - On Sunday.
the church will celebrate
communion together as pas-
tor Steve Hagen continues
the series "C&MA DNA:
Alliance Distinctives'" and
preach about "Jesus Christ
the Coming King."

Avon Park Church of
Christ
AVON PARK - "Doing
the Work of The Lord!"
(John 17: 4), will be the
message presented by minis-
ter Larry Roberts on Sunday.
There will be a dinner in
the multi-purpose room
immediately following the
morning worship.
Avon Park Church of
Christ is at 200 S. Forest.
Call 453-4692.

Avon Park Lakes
Baptist Church
AVON PARK - Pastor
George Hall will deliver the
message "The Ten
Commandments" at both
services on Sunday. Nursery
child cre is available for
both services.

Christ Lutheran
Church
AVON PARK - Pastor
Scott McLean will preach a
series of sermons of Sunday
entitled "God's Prescriptions
for Happiness." The second
sermon in this series is
"God's Antidote to
Busyness."
A potluck supper will be
served at 6 p.m. Wednesday
followed with worship serv-
ice. The Lenten Mid-week
services will follow themes
from the hymn, "0 Sacred'
Head. Now Wounded."
The church is at 1320
County Road 64, east of the
Avon Park High School. Call
471-2663 or visit christ-
lutheranavonpark.org.

Christian Science
Church
SEBRING - The lesson
sermon on Sunday morning
is titled "Christ Jesus." The
keynote is from I John 5:20,
"...we know that the Son of
God is come. and hath given
us an understanding, that we
may know him that is true,


Church News

and we are in him that is
true, even in his Son Jesus
Christ."
The church is at 146 N.
Franklin St.

Christian Training
Church
SEBRING - Associate
Minister Casey L. Downing
will bring the message titled
"Deliberate Destiny: Part 3"
this week at the Sunday
morning service. The
Wednesday night Bible study
will continue in the book of
Romans.

Eastside Christian
Church
LAKE PLACID - This
Sunday the pastor will start a
new sermon series called
"You Are My Neighbor" and
the title of the sermon will
be "Have You Heard the One
About..." The series will
focus on how to distinguish
ourselves as Jesus' people by
showing kindness and love
to all those we come into
contact with, even those who
would wish us harm. Jesus
died for us therefore we
need to make sure we are
living for Him.

Emmanuel United
Church of Christ
SEBRING - The Rev.
Jim Langdoc will deliver the
sermon "Habits of Faith and
Joy" on Sunday morning.
Scripture is Luke 5:1-11.
Communion is offered
during the second worship
service the first Sunday of
each month. On all other.
Sunday a smaller more inti-
mate Communion service is
available earlier in the
chapel.
The church is 1.7 miles
west of U.S. 27 on Country
Road 634 (Hammock Road).
Call 471-7999 or visit
sebringemmanuelucc.com.

Faith Lutheran
Church
SEBRING - Pastor Gary
Kindle's sermon title for
Sunday morning is entitled
"Thankfully We Have A
Compassionate God," based
on Psalm 103:1-13.
Paul Todd, the pianist,.


will come to the church
Sunday. His concert begins
at 4 p.m. Advance ticket
sales are available at the
church office now through
today from 9 a.m. to noon;
and tickets will also be
available at the door Sunday.
The price is $10 per person
(children under 10 free).

First Christian
Church
AVON PARK - Scripture
says "If one falls down, his
friend can help him up. But
pity the man who falls and
has no one to help him up."
Ecclesiastes 4:10 (NIV) Who
can you help up? Bring your
friends to Friend Day 2009
at First Christian Church this
Sunday.
The Voices of Praise from
Florida Christian College
will be at the church at the
10 a.m. worship service to
minister to the congregation
in song. A potluck dinner
will be held following the
worship service in the fel-
lowship hall.
On March 18 at 6 p.m.,
the church will host the
annual Chili Cook-Off. If
you would like to bring your
chili sign up in the church
office (participants please
sign up no later than Sunday,
March 15).
On March 28 will the
Ladies Mother/Daughter
Brunch.
First Christian Church of
Avon Park is at 1016W.
Camphor (behind the
Wachovia Bank). Call 453-
5334.or e-mail firstchris-
tianap@embarqmail.com.
The church Web site is
www.firstchristianap.com.

First Christian
Church (Disciples of
Christ)
SEBRING - At the
Lord's Table on Sunday will
be Walter and Anna Coley.
Communion will be served
by Carol Baker, Daniel
Fritzpactrick, David
VanDiver and Peggy
Cousins. Greeting the con-
gregation will be Ernest and
Nancy Strosnider. Call -to
Worship will be led by the
Rev. Juanita Roberts.
The pastor's sermon is
titled "Who is the Real
Continued on page 9B


Process for healing takes time


Let us pray: Father God,
we come to you this day
with highest honor and
praise. We ask in Jesus'
name that our ears will open
to hear you and our eyes will
see more clearly. Your word
says that we are blessed
going in and blessed coming
out and we stand on your
word. We thank you Father
that you blessed us with the
ability to discern the spirits
and we abide in you and you
only. You are our peace.
Give us strength to do your
will, Lord. Amen.
My friends, there is a
process in healing and heal-
ing is done in a certain
order. It's not always auto-
matic. Many times the
process takes time and in
that time a lot of you
become angry. You feel that
God is not moving fast
enough or God should never
have allowed this to happen.
Well, allow me to step out
on a limb here and say that
much of this happened
because of disobedience
(yours). Some of you made
wrong choices and now
you're mad at God.
You know. more often
than not when we use our
own hurts, our own pain to
comfort others, it gives
meaning to our own hurt and
pain. Sometimes, the only
way to understand the trade-
gy in our own lives is to
bless the lives of others. If,
by chance, you haven't
solved most of your own
stuff, at least 70-80 percent
of your stuff, you should not
become deeply involved in
the problems of others. You
will only mask your own


Sista
Speaks
Edith Jebbinson

pain by taking on someone
else's problems and pain.
Your pain will return time
and again because you really
haven't dealt with it. You are
not ready to bless somebody
else with your help. Until
you forgive those whom you
feel hurt you, until you can
forgive yourself for sins
you've committed ('fess up),
until you're willing to let go
of the harsh realities of sepa-
ration, divorce, rejection,
death, etc., and begin to
thank God for deliverance
and for forgiving you of you
own misgivings and mis-
judgements, you are not
ready for your healing.
Ask God to show you how
to help those that need helpl)
using your pain of past expe-
riences. He said, "Ask and it
shall be given unto you."
Ask for wisdom. James 1:5
says, "If any of you lack
wisdom, let him ask of God,
that giveth to all men liber-
ally and ungrudingly; and it
shall be given him."
Let me share with you a
prayer that I ran across by
St. Francis of Assisi, words
you should pray about daily:
Lord, make me an instru-
ment of your peace. Where
there is hatred, let me sow
love; ...where there is injury,
pardon: ...where there is
doubt, faith; ..where there is
despair. hope; ...where there
is darkness, light; ...where
there is sadness, joy; Oh,
Divine Master, grant that I
may not so much seek to be


consoled as to console; ...to
be understood as to under-
stand; ...to be loved as to
love. For it is in giving that
we receive; ...It is in par-
doning that we are pardoned;
...and it is in dying that we
are born to eternal life.
People of God, as God
heals you through forgive-
ness and thanksgiving, don't
begin to think that you now
have spiritual superiority
over others 'cause you ain't
got it like that. You don't
have the awesome Bible
knowledge that swollen head
is making you think (I know
a few alcoholics that can
recite Scripture).
Because you've been
healed, you should set an
example of how much God
loves you and express that
God will do for them like-
wise. Our Father is no
respecter of persons.
Showing compassion to peo-
ple who are hurting means
getting our minds off of our-
selves and focusing on oth-
ers.
Jesus said in Matthew
10:42, "And if anyone gives
even a cup of cold water to
one of these little ones
because he is my disciple. 1
tell you the truth, he will
certainly not lose his
reward." Jesus' message'?
When we take care of others
we are, in fact, taking care
of ourselves.
Care enough to give of
yourselves.
Selah.

Edie DorseyJebbinson is a
native of Avon Park. She is a
contributing columnist to the
News-Sun.


Courtesy photo
Kingdom Heirs Southern Gospel Singers will perform Saturday, March 7 at Avon Park
First Presbyterian Church A.LRP.


Kingdom Heirs concert set for

March 7 at AP First Presbyterian


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK - A fantastic singing group,
the Kingdom Heirs, will perform at Avon
Park First Presbyterian Church A.R.P. on
Saturday. March 7.
From the mountains of East Tennessee,
southern gospel music fills the air and is the
home of The Kingdom Heirs, one of south-
ern gospel music's top male quartets. The
group sang in local churches and concert
halls in 1981, and as their music and mes-
sage spread to a wider audience, so did their
popularity and demand. Later in 1981 they
began singing at the Silver Dollar City theme
park, i which. is now Dollywood. In 1986
when the theme park took on their new
name, The Kingdom Heirs were asked to
become the resident gospel group and now,
entering into their 23rd year, not only are
they one of Dollywood's favorites, but a
favorite to millions everywhere.
The Kingdom Heirs have been nominated
many times for industry awards such as The
SGMA Awards, Dove Awards and The
Singing News Fan Awards. Winning
Newcomer Group of the Year in 1989, the
group has been a constant favorite. The latest
award was 2006 Band of the Year, which the
band also won in 2002, 2004 and 2005.
They have also had many top 10 songs,
and currently have had 12 top five songs in a
row, including their big number No. 1 songs,
"I Know I'm Going There and Forever
Changed." Over the past years they have had


18 songs nominated for Song of the Year.
Their latest recordings include "True To
The Call, Off The Record, Give Me The
Mountain and White Christmas CD. They
also have a new DVD, "Live at The Palace."
The group's manager is Steve French. He
and his brother Kreis are the owners and are
-each in their 28th year with the group. Steve
is thebaritone as well as the group's emcee
ard statesman. Kreis plays the bass guitar.
He and Steve are the comic relief in the
group.
Dennis Murphy has been with the group
for 18 years and is the drummer. He has been
nominated for Instrumentalist of the Year the
past 6 years. Arthur Rice is, without ques-
tion, one of the most talented men to ever
come through gospel music. He is in his 13th
year with the group and is nominated year
after year for Favorite Lead Singer and Male
Vocalist.
Now in his fourth year is tenor Billy
Hodges. Jeff Chapman sings all those great
low notes. The newest addition and youngest
member is 22-year-old Andy Stringfield.
The concert will take place in the sanctu-
ary of the Avon Park First Presbyterian
Church A.R.P. at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 7
and the public is invited. There will be a $10
donation received at the door, there is limit-
ed seating and no reservations will be taken.
The church is on the shore of Lake Verona at
215 E. Circle St. with two entries 'on La
Grande Street.


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5033 US HWY 27 N.
Sebing 33870
(863) 386-1322
Fax (863) 386-0891

Member FDIC


News-Sun * Friday, Feb


www. newssun. coin

Church News continued


Continued from page 8B
God?" I Kings 18:36-38.
On Saturday, March 7, the
annual rummage and bake
sale is from 7 a.m. to noon.
Please bring some "goodies"
for the bake sale. March is
"Souper Sundays."
Remember to bring dona-
tions to fill the kitchen
pantry for those who need
help. March has also been
noted as Blanket Month.
Kindly bring your donation
to help buy blankets for
those in need.

First Presbyterian
Church - A. R. P.
AVON PARK - Pastor
Bob Johnson's Sunday ser-
mon is entitled "Eternal
Love" based on Romans
8:31-39.
The choir's introit will be
"In the Quiet" and the
anthem "God's Love Never
Changes."
The adult Sunday school
class led by Tom Christoph
will continue its study of
Colossians 2 (living in
Christ versus man's here-
sies). Classes are available
for all ages.
Members are reminded to
bring non-perishable items
for the Church Service
Center.
At 7 p.m. Saturday, March
7, the Kingdom Heirs, direct
from "Dollywood," will
present a gospel concert.
Suggested donation is $10.
The public is welcome.
The church is at 215 E.
Circle St. (with two
entrances on LaGrande
Street). Call the church
office at 453-3242.

First Presbyterian
Church
SEBRING - "Committed
to God" is the title of the
Sunday morning sermon
Given by the Rev. Darrell A.
Peer.
On Monday will be Home
Bible study (call for meeting
place).
The Ruth Circle meets


Chef Buddy's Italian American Deli
Subs * Cold Cuts
Fresh Cut Meat * Cheeses
Pastries * Italian Specialties
Party Platters
204 N.. Main Avenue
Lake Placid, FL 33852
863-465-6800


Heartland
National Bank
Locally Owned,
Community Minded


Avon Park
800 West Main Street
33825-3608
(863) 453-6000
Fax (863) 453-8500

LENDER


Lake Placid
600 US Hwy 27 N
33852-7939
(863)699-1300
Fax (863)633-9709


Sebring
320 US Hwy 27 N.
33870-2147
(863) 386-1300
Fax (863) 386-1302


www.heartlandnb.com


Lake Placid Chamber

Calendar of Events

March 2009


3/8-12 12th Annual Bass
Tournament over
Lake June


3/11


3/13-14 American Cancer Society
Relay for Life


3/18-21 21st 57 Mobile 1 Twelve
Hours of Sebring


3/25 Junior Achievement
Breakfast at the Four
Points Sheraton


Tuesday morning at Marilyn
McKay's home. The
Rebekah Circle meets at the
church.
On Thursday, the Miriam
Circle meets at Mary King's
home.

First United
Methodist Church of
Sebring
SEBRING - The Rev.
A.C. Bryant's sermon title
will be "The Call of Simon
Peter" with Scripture from
John 1:35-42. Holy
Communion will also be
served Sunday.
The Fine Food and
Fellowship Dinner is on
Sunday. Tickets are $10 for
adults and $6 for children.
A Trustees Workday will
begin at 8 a.m. Tuesday and
all are asked to come and
help spruce up the grounds.
Lunch will be served.
Tickets are on sale for the
Praise Band Cook-Out and
Entertainment being held
Friday, March 6 to help fund
the Music Camp this sum-
mer.
Visit the Web page at
www.sebringfirstumc.com
for more church information
or call 385-5184.

Heartland Christian
Church
SEBRING - At the
Praise and Worship Service
this Sunday, the Heartland
Singers will sing "It's Still
the Cross." Duane
Blackwell, Mary
VanHooreweghe and Flossi
Moore will sing the special
hymn, "Why Should He
Love Me So?" Roland Bates
will sing the hymn, "Come
Home It's Supper Time."
Walt and Louise Malinowski
will be this week's greeters.'
Sandi Bernardo and Estelle
Whitmer will be this week's
scripture readers.
Pastor Ted Moore's ser-
mon this week will be
"James, The Brother of
Jesus" with Scripture from
the book of Acts 15:12-35.


The church is at 2705
Alternate Route 17 South in
Sebring (behind Publix).
Look for the lighthouse.

Memorial United
Methodist Church
LAKE PLACID - Holy
Communion will be
observed at all the worship
services Sunday. At the
Celebration Worship Service,
the Rev. Doug Pareti will be
preaching on the subject, "A
Change of Heart" from the
Scripture text of Acts 9:1-19.
At the contemporary New
Song Worship Service in
Rob Reynolds Hall, Claude
Burnett, pastoral assistant,
will preach on the subject,
"God's Storage Closet."
The church is at 500 Kent
Ave. Call 465-2422.

Parkway Free Will
Baptist Church
SEBRING - The new
series of lessons for the
Sunday Bible study begins
with the old prophet,
Ezekiel. Pastor John Cave
will bring the message for
Sunday morning and evening
services.
At 7 p.m. Tuesday there
will be a special worship
service at Parkway with
guest ministers from the
Central Association of Free
Will Baptists. There will not
be a service.on Wednesday.

Placid Lakes Baptist
Church
LAKE PLACID - On
Sunday, Pastor Darryl
George will preach the ser-
mon entitled "Purposeful
Correction Unto
Restoration!" with regards to
II Corinthians 2:1-11.
Wednesday, the youth will
have a Youth Worship Hour
in the Youth Worship Center.
Programs for the children
and youth include Bible ,
study, puppet practice, choir
practice and drama team
practice.

Continued on page 10B


!~ 7~fr


247 h,-; Bi !

.-!.5 : .. . ;
,-w ':'4 [,-t;r-(pL'.L.. t',1 > r : :i^...:^ , ".,c !


iruary 27, 2009 Page 9B

RELIGION NEWS SNAPSHOTS


Sebring Aglow
meeting canceled
SEBRING - The
Sebring Aglow meeting has
been canceled for March,
but the group will meet
again Saturday, April 4 at
the Sebring Lions Club on
the Sebring Parkway.

First Baptist
sponsoring blood
drive Sunday
LAKE PLACID - A
blood drive will be held
from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Sunday at First Baptist
Church of Lake Placid, 119
E. Royal Palm St. Sign up
in the church office or the
Source, call 465-3721.
Also, a Starting Point
Luncheon will be held at
noon Sunday for new mem-
bers or those interested in
joining the church. Call the
church office at 465-3721
to RSVP.

The Singing Flecks
to be in concert
SEBRING - Come on
over to Church of the
Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., at
6 p.m. Sunday at 6 p.m. to
hear The Singing Flecks in
concert.
Traveling from Canada,
Muriel and Fred Fleck will
be providing wonderful
gospel music by singing,
playing the piano and the
violin. Fred has a personal
miracle story for all to hear.
For further information
call Pastor Keith Simmons
at 385-1597. A social will
follow in Blough Hall
where attendees can meet
Fred and Muriel. A dona-
tion of $2 can be given at
the door.

Bauder is speaker
at Bible Conference
SEBRING - Dr. Kevin
Bauder will be the guest
speaker for the March Bible
Conference at Maranatha
Baptist Church starting


Sunday. Meetings will be at
6 p.m. each evening
through Wednesday and
Sunday at 9 a.m. and 10:15
a.m.
Bauder is president of
Central Baptist Seminary in
Plymouth, Minn. Before
coming to Central
Seminary, he was engaged
in pastoral ministry and
church planting in
Colorado, Iowa, and Texas.
He taught at Denver Baptist
Bible College (now Faith
Baptist Bible College),
where he also served as
dean of men. For five years
he edited Ruminations, a
journal designed to help
pastors do the work of the
mind. He writes a weekly
electronic newsletter, In the
Nick of Time, addressing
current issues in
Christianity. He is a chap-
lain with the Civil Air
Patrol. He and his wife,
Debbie, have two children.
The Maranatha congrega-
tion extends a cordial wel-
come to friends from the
community to share in this
opportunity. The church is
in Maranatha Village off
Arbuckle Road, 12 miles
east of State Road 17 north
of Sebring.

Church Women
United plans World
Day of Prayer
celebration
SEBRING - Church
Women United of Area 6,
the Sebring Area, will hold
a World Day of Prayer
Celebration at the First
Presbyterian Church of
Sebring, 319 Poinsettia.
The doors will open at 10
a.m. today and the program
will begin at .10:30 a.m.
The public is invited. For
more information, contact
Alice Koster at 314-2841.

Rummage, bake
sale set for March 7
SEBRING - Again this
year, the annual


winter/spring rummage sale
and bake sale of First
Christian Church (Disciples
of Christ) will be held on
Saturday, March 7. The
church is at 410 Poinsettia
Ave., corner of Eucalyptus.
Doors will open at 7 a.m.,
closing at noon.
This event is sponsored
by the Disciples Women of
the church. During the past
few weeks, many items
have been sorted, prepared
:for sale and priced, includ-
ing household items, cloth-
ing and accessories, books,
puzzles, toys and jewelry.
There will also be a bake
sale table with baked goods
provided by the members.
The public is invited to
come in and browse
through the many good bar-
gains available. This is one
of the fundraisers for the
church's outreach efforts.

'Soft Gospel Sounds'
Concert planned
SEBRING - The very
popular "Soft Gospel
Sounds" of Carol and
George Kline will be in
concert at St. John United
Methodist Church at 6 p.m.
Sunday, March 8. Fresh
from their third Carnival
show cruise, the Klines will
provide one of their highly
acclaimed "Coming Home"
gospel concerts at the
church and the public is
cordially invited to attend.
The church is at 3214
Grand Prix Drive in
Sebring (just behind
Walmart).
Carol and George Kline
started performing in 1982
with a gospel/prison min-
istry group out of
SHarrisburg, Pa. and have
continued to greatly expand
their gospel music reper-
toire since then. Carol
recorded a CD of old-time
church favorites in 1999,
and re-recorded that same
album during the summer

Continued on page. 10B





Restaurant & Bar
3100 Golfview Rd., Sebring, Florida
" Located inside
0 Inn on the Lakes


863-314-0348


209 US 27 South
Lake Placid, FL 33852


The HINi - Group is compnpied of
three main entities: HLM Financial
Services, Inc , A.mencaOne Finance,
Inc ,andI-lanna,Lemar&NMoms.,CPAs,
PA, with client, nationwide set' ed from
their Floiida ,,lices
Michael Noel is a partner and his
main charge is financial ser hceb,
personal managing the investment.
in.rurance and te ending named olf the
irms clients -\\e Cdo c teillc cash l1on
and rinsk management, and, long term
invesitmnt and legacy planning, ate are
not I-lot Stock' picker,"
\\e thought these businesses. together in orde; to provide a
comprLeheno tfe financial serx ces firm that is able 1t- see the big
picture All too w olken oi er the e ar�. I'te seen indis yduals and
basincsses make a decision in one area that haad .n impact on their
a0 ing.s, o debt. ci takes that their didn t fr e comninm because they
had difltrent ad�isors that normally lust don't communicate with
each uths...
Most people will have three different advisors looking at just one
piece of the picture. I think that's my greatest strength- being able
to see the whole picture and having all the tools at my di'p,,sal. It
really simplifies things for the client. It has also helped the real c ,tait.
agents that refer me to their clients for loans because it represents
a whole different experience for their clients and that reflects well
on them."
He has been a part time resident of the community since 1984
when he married Christi McDonald, (daughter of "Jeri" McDonald
and the late Tom McDonald, a former dentist and "Morning Club"
Rotarian) at the First Presbyterian Church of Lake Placid.
"Since then, we have circumnavigated the State, living in
Orlando, Tampa, St. Pete & Miami- but the common thread for us
has always been Highlands County. Over the last year, I have spent


S S Colley
RFinancial
Services, Inc.


James A. Colley, CFP
Certified Financial Planner
Registered Investment Advisor


Financial Planning
Tax Preparation & Planming
Accounting & Bookkeeping
Investment Advisory Services


Ph: 863-465-6473
Fx: 863-465-9300
www.collcyfiancial.com
Email: colleyfinancial@iembarqmail.com


a good amount of time dcJel'iping iN, turiMncss there, and we are
excited to ,a_\ 'e I,. in ith. pi,.Icn:: 'f huildmng in Lake Placid in
order to make a pcrmanintn m.',: this nci umrnmer "
The irnmi specialized in planning f. -i individuals and small
businesses "\\e haie the resources to pi' ide any size business
%\nh gieat options for qualhioed ietlnement plann, but, I most enjoy
evoking \ ith the indinidu..dal busins o,_''0n1i that wants someone
to help clarify their goals for ietirernt:cn and tlien family legacy, and
conic up iith a plan t'_. rach those goals. I know I've succeeded
Sheen I gel the call announcing a new grandchild, or to hear how( that
once-in-a-lil.rim, ,.acati.n turned out. Then I know I'm not just a
planner- not quite lamil\ - but, more than just a friend. "
'it's great hbing in the area more often and seeing folks that my
wife ient to school with here in high school. It's pretty special
being married to a former Miss Lake Placid! We've also made a
lot of Ilrend- hFire through my mother-in-law, Jeri McDonald, and
people w ho knes Tomn, ho practiced dentistry here for years before
he became famous as a runner. We are honored that the Caladium
Festival saw fit to name the 5K run after him. I also visit Tom's
Rotary Club regularly, and look forward to being able to get more
involved with them. "
Michael offers comprehensive Investment services through H.D.
Vest Investment Servicessm; Fee Advisory services, through H.D.
Vest Advisory Servicessm, and Insurance services through H.D.
Vest Insurance Servicessm, non-bank subsidiaries of Wells Fargo &
Company. He also provides residential and small commercial loans
through AmericaOne Finance, Inc., an equal opportunity lender.
Michael Noel has been in the financial services industry for over
22 years. He has a Master's degree in Business Administration from
Georgia State University, in Atlanta, GA; and a Bachelor's degree
from Wake Forest University, In Winston-Salem, N.C. He is, a
Registered investmentAdvisor with Series 7 & 66 securities licenses;
216,218,219, & 240 Insurance licenses; a Florida mortgage broker's
license, and is both a Certified Mortgage Planning Specialist and a
NAMB Certified Mortgage.Consultant.


Thank You to the following businesses for supporting the

Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce.


SPOTLIGHT MEMBER OF THE MONTH

Michael Noel, The HLM Group


Greater Lake Placid
Chamber of Commerce
Membership Luncheon









News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


Page 10B
Church News continued


Continued from page 9B
The church is at the cor-
ner of Washington and
Kemper Avenues in Placid
Lakes. Call 465-5126 from 8
a.m. to noon Monday
through Thursday or e-mail
the church at
placidlakes@hotmail.com.

Resurrection
Lutheran Church
AVON PARK - On the
First Sunday of Lent, the
pastor's sermon at the early
service will be based on the.
first chapter of Mark.
Sunday school follows the
service in Burke Hall.
The worship assistant at
the second service will be
Penne Manar. Coffee and
fellowship follows the serv-
ice in Burke Hall.

Sebring Church of
the Brethren
SEBRING - Pastor Keith
Simmons will preach
"Shouting Stones." This is
the first Sunday of Lent. The
scripture will be taken from
Luke 18:38-44.
Sunday school will be led
by the Rev. Wendell Bohrer


RELIGION GUIDELINES: The News-Sun publishes reli-
gion news on Fridays. The submission deadline rs 5
p.m. Monday to be considered for publication in the
following Friday's paper. Submit items to the News-
Sun's from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays; fax to 385-
2453; send e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or mail to
Lifestyle Editor, News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring, FL 33870. For information, call 385-6155,
ext. 516.


and will meet in the Fidelis
Room. The class will be
studying "Just As God's
Son." It will also be looking
at Hebrews 11:1-4 and 8-12.

Spring Lake United
Methodist Church
SEBRING - The Rev.
Clyde Weaver's sermon title
on Sunday will be "They
Understood Not." Holy
Communion will be cele-
brated. Fellowship follows
the service.
Spring Lake United
Methodist Church is at 8170
Cozumel Lane.

The Way Church
SEBRING - "Esther -
Part 5" will be Pastor
Reinhold Buxbaum's mes-
sage this Sunday morning.
Men's Breakfast is


Saturday in the fellowship
hall.
Sunday evening, the pas-
tor will speak about what is
happening in Israel and in
the world as it relates to
prophecy. This will be fol-
lowed by a prayer meeting.
Friday and Saturday,
March 13-14 will be the
yard sale. Start bringing in
your donations.
The church is at 1005 N.
Ridgewood Drive. The
office phone 471-6140. The
pastor's cell phone is 381-
6190. Church information -
and the pastor's messages
can be viewed at www.the-
waychurch.org.

Trinity Lutheran
Church

LAKE PLACID - Pastor
Richard Norris will speak at
both Communion services.


There will be an education
hour for all ages following
the first service. A nursery
will be available at the sec-
ond service. Lenten services
will continue on Wednesday
evening. There will be a fel-
lowship hour before the
service. Soup and beverage
will be provided. Bring a
sandwich and join us before
the evening service.
Norris will hold Bible
studies on Wednesday at the
Youth House and Thursday
at Tropical Harbor. Anyone
is welcome to attend. They
are currently discussing the
book "The Shack" by
William Young.
A talented group from the
congregation will present an
"Oldies but Goodies" con-
cert from 7-8 p.m. Friday,
March 6. There will be a
freewill offering to benefit
the sound system. The com-
munity is invited to come
and listen to "Jan and the
Boys" as they provide an
hour of fun and toe-tapping
music.
The church is at 25
Lakeview St. Call the office
at 465-5253 or visit the
church Web site at www.
trinitylutheranlp.com.


www.newssun.com


Religion News Snapshots continued


Continued from page 9B
of 2008, adding more
songs as well as several
duets with her husband,
George. One of her later
recordings ("Love Songs
and Praise") features treas
ured love songs and anoth
er selections of gospel
greats, which also includes
two songs written by Caro
herself.
In addition to a variety
of old-time and southern
gospel concerts, the couple
travel throughout the
United States and on cruis
ships, performing at dinner
shows, RV resorts, country
clubs and civic organiza-
tions. Because of so many
requests, Carol has put
together a special Cabaret
Show, which includes
everything from big band
to Broadway, from country
to gospel, from patriotic t
'50s and more. She also
performs a well-received
Tribute to Patsy Cline
Show, in addition to a
Country Classics Show an
a Christmas Special. The
Klines will be on tour
again during the summer
months throughout the
north. An updated calenda


is posted on their website
at: www.carolkline.net.
Being firmly rooted in
gospel music and having a
desire to share God's love
with audiences and congre-
gations everywhere, their
testimony and tight harmo-
ny will surely bless all
s who attend this gospel
l concert.A love offering
will be taken.
Call Sue Lewis, music
director, at the church
e office at 382-1736.

e Spaghetti served at

r Solid Grounds

AVON PARK - A
spaghetti dinner will be
served from 4-6 p.m.
Friday, March 20 at Solid
Grounds building of Union
Congregational Church,
Y 106 N. Butler Ave. The
menu includes tossed
salad, spaghetti, garlic
bread, dessert and bever-
age. The cost: Children,
d age 5 and under,. are free;
adults, $6.50; and ages 6-
12, $3.25. Advanced tick-
ets recommended.
Call 453-3345, ext. 127
r for more information.


PLACES To WORSHIP


Places to Worship is a paid
advertisement in the News-Sun
that is published, Friday and
Sunday. To find out more infor-
mation on how to place a listing
in this directory, call the News-
Sun at 385-6155, 465-0426 or
452-1009, ext. 502.


APOSTOLIC

* Greater Faith Apostolic
Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. invites you to
come worship with us in spirit and
truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday. For information con-
tact 840-0152. Pastor Larry
Carmody.


ASSEMBLY OF GOD

* Christ Fellowship Church
(Assembly of God), 2935 New
Life Way. Bearing His Name;
Preaching His Doctrine; and
Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping
God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship,
10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6:30
p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m.
Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-
0924.
* Crossroads Community
Church, 114 South Central Ave.,
Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-
4453. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship: 10:45 a.m. and 6
p.m. Sunday Children's Church:
10:45 a.m. Wednesday Adult Bible
Study and Youth/Royal Explorers,
7 p.m. Pastor: John E. Dumas.
* First Assembly of God, 4301
Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev.
Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday
School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship
and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.;
Evening Worship, 7 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night, (Adult
Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group,
Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-6431.


BAPTIST

* Avon Park Lakes Baptist
Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd.,
Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall,
Pastor. Christ centered and bibli-
cally based. Sunday worship serv-
ices, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Nursery facilities are available.
Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday
and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer
Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible
classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered
for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m.
Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556.
* Bethany Baptist Church
(GARBC) We are located at the
corner of SR17 and C-17A (truck
route) in Avon Park. Join us
Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for cof-
fee and doughnuts, followed with
Bible Study Classes at 9:30.
Sunday * morning worship service
begins at 10:30 a.m., and an
evening worship service is at 6
p.m.. On Wednesdays, the
AWANA program and the Word of
Life teen ministry begin at 6:30 PM.
The adult Bible and Prayer Time
begins at 7 p.m.. For more informa-
tion go to www.bethanybap
tistap.com or call the church office
at 863-452-1136.
* Faith Missionary Baptist
Church, off State Road 17 North of
Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave.
Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday
Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation
available. Ken Lambert, Pastor.
Phone 386-5055.
* Fellowship Baptist Church,


1000 Maxwell St., Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday: Sunday School,
9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Evening Service, 7
p.m.; Children/Youth/Young Adult
Ministries, 7 p.m. Rev. James-
Weatherly, Pastor. Telephone: 453-
4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: apfel-
lowship @tnninet.
* First Baptist Church of Avon
Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park.
Dr. Vernon Harkey, pastor; Jared
Hewitt, interim youth minister; and
Joy Loomis, interim music director.
Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30
a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m.
Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 9:30 a.m. Library open; 11
a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m.
Children's Church; 4:30-5 p.m.
Youth activities; 6 p.m. Vesper
Service. Monday schedule: The
Gutter Service, 7 p.m. Tuesday
schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic comput-
er class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m.
conversational English, basic com-
puter and citizenship
classes/Sonshine House. Regular
Wednesday schedule: 4:45 p.m.
Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. chil-
dren's choir rehearsals, youth
activities and prayer meeting; 6:30
p.m. ,adult choir rehearsal; 7 p.m.
children's- mission groups.
Thursday schedule: 7-8:30 p.m.
adult reading and writing classes.
Nursery provided for all services,
except Sonshine House.
LifeGroups (Bible studies) are
offered on various days and times.
Call 453-6681 for details. The 24/7
prayer line is (863) 452-1957.
Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N.
Lake Ave., Avon Park. Johnattan
Solotero, Pastor. Regular Sunday
schedule: 9:30 a.m., Bible study;
11 a.m., Worship Service.
Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible
study. Friday schedule: 7 p.m.,
activities for adults, youth and chil-
dren.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine
Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 mid-
way between Sebring and Lake
Placid). Your place for family, .
friends and faith. Sunday morning
worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery
is provided for both services with
Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life
changing Bible Study for all ages
starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor
Allen Altvater leads the youth in
their quest to become more like
Christ. Sunday night worship at 6
p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and
Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with
youth worship in the youth facility,
and missions training for all chil-
dren. Call the church at 655-1524.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Placid, Knowing God's Heart and
Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal
Palm Street. (2 blocks south of
Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL
33852 (863) 465-3721, Email:
www.fbclp.com. Contemporary
9:00 a.m., Traditional Blended
10:45 a.m., Link Groups 9:00 a.m.
& 10:45 a..m., Sunday Evening
6:00 p.m.. Wed. Evening Activities
for all 6:15 p.m.
* First Baptist Church of Lorida
located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida.
Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.
for all ages. Sunday worship serv-
ices are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Preschool care is provided at the
11 a.mrn worship service.
Wednesday evening (September to
May), a youth group meets at 6:20
p.m. and is for ages 3 through 12th
grade. Middle and high school
meet year-round. Also at 6:30 p.m.,
is a prayer service followed by
adult choir rehearsal . First Lorida
is the "Place to discover God's
love." Jonathan Booher, Senior


Pastor, Toby Cribbs,
Youth/Children Ministries; Bus
rides to Sunday School and 11 a.m.
worship service are provided for
children grades first through adults
by calling 655-1878. For informa-
tion about the church or the min-
istries offered, call 655-1878.
* First Baptist Church, Sebring,
200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL
33870. Telephone: 385-5154. A.R.
Fugan, interim pastor; Rev. David
Thomas, associate pastor music
and senior adults; Rev. Joe Delph,-
minister of youth and activities.
Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday
Worship, 10:30, a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday night programs for
children, youth and adults from
5:30-7:30 p.m. Preschool and
Mother's Day Out for children age
6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky
Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704.
* Florida Avenue Baptist
Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon
Park. Mailing address is 710 W.
Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825.
Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D.
Girdley, pastor. Sunday School,
9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11
a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church;
Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday night programs for
children, youth and adults at 7 p.m.
* Independent Baptist Church,
5704 County Road 17 South,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday
School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship,
10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m.
Wednesday service, 7 p.m.
Fundamental, soul-winning, mis-
sion-minded, King James Bible
Church. Dr. John Hankins, pastor.
Larry Ruse, youth pastor. Phone
655-1899. Bus transportation.
* Leisure Lakes Baptist Church,
808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just
off of Miller at the west end of Lake
June) "Where the old fashion
gospel is preached." Sunday
School begins at 9:45 a.m.;
Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.;
Sunday Evening Service is at 6
p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the
church at 699-0671 for more infor-
mation.
* Maranatha Baptist Church
(GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east
of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle
Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9
a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.;
Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week
service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily
Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m.,
Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald
Webber and Associate Pastor Stan
Mohr. Phone 382-4301.
* Parkway Free Will Baptist
Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the
church where the "Son" always
shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and
Wednesday Evening Worship, 7
p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6
p.m. on the last Sunday of each
month. The Rev. John D. Cave,
pastor. Church phone: 382-3552.
Home phone: 452-5868. Affiliated
with the National Association of
Free Will Baptists,'Nashville, Tenn.
* Sparta Road Baptist Church,
(SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev.
Winfred White, interim pastor.
Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 7
p.m.; Choir practice, 6 p.m.
Nursery provided. For information,
call 382-0869.
* Southside Baptist Church
(GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave.,
Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor;
Chuck Pausley, Youth Pastor;


Ralph 0. Burns, Assistant to the
Pastor. Sunday School for all ages,
9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship
Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening
Worship, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday:
Awana kindergarten through fifth
grade, 6:30 p.m.; Youth Meeting for
Teens, 6:30 p.m. Adult Midweek
Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. A
nursery for under age 3 is available
at all services. Provisions for hand-
icapped and hard-of-hearing.
Office phone, 385-0752.
* Sunridge Baptist Church,
.(SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27
and Valerie, across from Florida
Hospital), Sebring. Ed Howell, tran-
sitional pastor. Sunday School,
9;30 'a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday
Evening Service, 6 p.m.
Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study,
and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery pro-
vided. For information, call 382-
3695.


CATHOLIC

* Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church, 595 East Main St., Avon
Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas
McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil
Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7
p.m. in Spanish; 8 and 10:30 a.m.
in English and 6 p.m. Teen Mass.
Weekdays at 8 a.m. Confessions
are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday.
Religious Education Classes are 9-
10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K
through 7th. Confirmation class is
at 7:15 p.m. Sunday.
* St. Catherine Catholic Church,
820 Hickory St., Sebring (mailing
address: Parish Office, 882 Bay
St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049.
Rev. Jose GonzAlez, Pastor.
Masses - Saturday Vigil: 4 p.m.
Sunday: 7:30, 9, abd 10:30 a.m.
and noon Spanish Mass.
Confessions: 3-3:45 p.m.
Saturday arid 7:15-7:45 a.m. on
First Friday, or on request. Daily
Masses, 8 a.m. and noon Monday-
Friday. Enroll your students grades
K3 through second grade in
Catholic School. Faith Formation
Classes for grades kindergarten
through fifth, from 9-10:15 Sundays
in the Parish Hall. The Edge
Program for grades sixth through
eighth, from 6-7:30 p.m
Wednesday in the Youth Center.
Life Teen for high school students
from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Sunday in
the Youth Center. Adult Faith
Formation classes from 7-9 p.m.
Thursday in the Youth Center.
Choir rehearsal from 7-9 p.m.
Wednesday in church. Robert
Gillmore, Director of Music.
* St. James Catholic Church,
3380 Placidview Drive, Lake
Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael
J. Cannon. Mass schedule:
Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) -
Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8
a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9
a.m. December thru Easter -
Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m.,
9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9
a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30
a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9
a.m.


CHRISTIAN

* Eastside Christian Church,
101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL
33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27
on County Road 621), 465-7065.
Stephen Bishop, pastor. Sunday:
Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship
Celebration with the Lord's Supper
each week 10:15 a.m. Youth
Church with Martha Crosbie, direc-
tor at 10:40 a.m. Sophia Bishop,
secretary; Thelma Hall, organist;
and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday:


Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.;
"Building God's Kingdom for
Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way,
Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth
the Drive!"
* Sebring Christian Church,
4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher;
David Etherton, Youth Pastor.
Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Youth Service, 6 p.m; Wednesday
night meals, 5 p.m.; and
Wednesday Bible Study, 6 p.m.
Phone 382-6676.
* First Christian Church, 1016
W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL
33825. "Where truth is taught and
love abounds. "Greg Ratliff, Senior
Minister; Tammy Johns, Secretary
and Children's Director; Bart
Culpepper, Youth Director; Jon
Carter, Music Director. Bible
School 9 a.m:; Worship 10 a.m.;
Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesday
Choir Practice & Children's
Classes, 5:15 p.m.; Study Groups
for all ages and Children's Choir,
6:15 p.m. Nursery provided for all
events.
* First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ), 510
Poinsettia Avenue, (corner .of
Poinsettia and Eucalyptus),
Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-
0358 or 385-3435. The Rev.
Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast,
10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30
a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, Praise and Worship,
6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15
p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15
p.m.


CHRISTIAN &
MISSIONARY
ALLIANCE

* The Alliance Church of
Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road,
Sebring, FL 33875. Call 382-1343.
Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday
services: Sunday School meets at
9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship Service meets at 10:30
a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study
meets at '6 p.m. (off site);
Wednesday Prayer Gathering
meets at 6 p.m.


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

* Christian Science Church, 146
N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m.
Morning Worship and Sunday
School. Testimonial meetings at 5
p.m. each second and. fourth
Wednesday. A free public Reading
Room, located at the church, is
open before and after church serv-
ices on Sunday and Wednesdays
and by appointment. Thursday. The
Bible and the Christian Science
textbook, "Science and Health with
Key to the Scriptures" by Mary
Baker Eddy are our only preachers.
All are welcome to come .and par-
take of the comfort, guidance, sup-
port and healing found in the les-
son-sermons.


CHURCH OF
BRETHREN

* Church of the Brethren, 700 S.
Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-1597.
* Lorida Church of the Brethren
332 Palms Estates Road, Lorida
(three blocks south of U.S. 98)
Mailing address is P.O. Box 149,


Lorida, FL 33857. Phone 655-
1466. Sunday School classes for
children, youth and adults at 9:30
a.m. Christian worship at 10:30
a.m. Pastor, Rev. Jim Baker.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

* Avon Park Church of Christ,
200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Minister: Larry Roberts.
Sunday Worship Services, 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities
are available at every service. Bible
Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered
classes for all ages. Church phone:
453-4692.
* Sebring Parkway Church of
Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443. We
would like to extend an invitation
for you and your family to visit with
us here at Sebring Parkway. Our
hours of service are: Sunday Bible
Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship
Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening
Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible
Class, 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF
NAZARENE

* Church of the Nazarene of
Sebring, 420 Pine St., Sebring.
Sunday: Sunday School begins at
9:45 a.m. for all ages; Morning
Worship at 10:45 a.m.; Service at 6
p.m. Wednesday evening service
at 7 p.m. with special services fqr
children, youth and adults. Special
services once a month for seniors
(Prime Timers), and young adults
and families. Call for details at 385-
0400. Pastor Emmett Garrison.
* First Church of the Nazarene
of Avon Park, P.O. Box 1118,,
Avon Park, FL 33825-1118. 707 W.
Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor.
Sunday: Sunday school begins at
9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wor-
ship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening
service at 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening service is at 7 p.m. with
special services for children and
adults. Special services once a
month for seniors (Prime Time) and
Ladies ministries. If you need any
more information, call 453-4851.
* First Church of the Nazarene
of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake
Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852.
Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning
worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7
p.m. Classes for adult children and
youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim
Taylor.


CHURCHES OF
CHRIST IN
CHRISTIAN UNION

* Community Bible Church -
Churches of Christ in Christian
Union, (Orange Blossom
Conference Center) 1400 C-17A
North (truck route), Avon Park.
Presenting Jesus Christ as the
answer for time and eternity.
Sunday morning worship service,
10:30 a.m. Nursery provided.
Junior Church activities at same
time for K-6 grade. Sunday School
Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m.
(Transportation available.) Sunday
evening praise and worship serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening
prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and
youth ' activities at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Everyone is welcome,
please come worship with us. Don
Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone
452-0088.










www.newssun.com News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


Page 11B


NATIONAL RELIGION NEWS SNAPSHOTS


Church yearbook:
Catholics, Southern
Baptists lose members
NEW YORK (AP) - Member-
ship in the nation's two largest
Christian church bodies, the
Roman Catholic Church and
Southern Baptist Convention,
declined slightly in 2007, accord-
ing to the latest edition of the
Yearbook of American and
Canadian Churches.
The Catholic church remains the
largest body of believers in the
U.S., with 67 million members, the
yearbook said. But from 2006 to
2007 the church shed 398,000
members in the U.S. - a 0.59 per-
cent drop. Southern Baptists
reported 16.2 million members for
a decline of 0.24 percent, or a loss
of nearly 40,000 members.
Although the declines are rela-
tively small, both churches histori-
cally have reported growth. The
yearbook is published by the
National Council of Churches, an
ecumenical group based in New
York.
Among the 25 largest churches
in the U.S., four are growing, the
yearbook found: the Church of


Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints,
or the Mormon church (up 1.6 per-
cent), the Assemblies of God (up
nearly 1 percent), Jehovah's
Witnesses (up 2 percent), and the
Church of God of Cleveland, Tenn.
(up 2 percent).
Mainline Protestant denomina-
tions lost members, but were not
alone in suffering declines. Those
churches in the yearbook experi-
encing the highest rate of member-
ship loss include predominantly
white, mainline denominations the
United Church of Christ (down 6
percent), the Presbyterian Church
(USA) (down nearly 3 percent) and
the Evangelical Lutheran Church in
America (down more than 1 per-
cent).
A more conservative Lutheran
denomination, the Lutheran
Church-Missouri Synod, reported a
decline of nearly 1.5 percent. The
African Methodist Episcopal Zion
Church suffered a 3 percent drop.

Conservative Lutheran
church leader criticizes
gay clergy proposal
ST. LOUIS (AP) - The presi-
dent of the Lutheran Church-


Missouri Synod expressed "great
disappointment and deep sadness"
over a proposal that would allow
gays and lesbians in committed
relationships to serve as clergy in
the larger and more liberal
Evangelical Lutheran Church in
America.
Gerald B. Kieschnick, in a letter
to his 2.5 million-member denomi-
nation, said the change "would
constitute a radical departure from
the 2,000-year-long teaching of the
Christian tradition that homosexual
activity, whether inside or outside
of a committed relationship, is con-
trary to Holy Scripture."
In 2001, the Lutheran Church-
Missouri Synod adopted a resolu-
tion saying it does not consider the
Chicago-based Evangelical
Lutheran Church in America to be
"an orthodox Lutheran church
body" but recognizes that many
members of the larger denomina-
tion "remain faithful" to the
Christian Gospel.
Last week, a task force of the
4.7 million-member Evangelical
Lutheran Church in America issued
a series of, recommendations that
could lead to lifting a ban on non-
celibate gay clergy.


The task force acknowledged a
lack of consensus on the issue and
proposed that congregations and
synods, or regional church bodies,
be given "structured flexibility" to
decide whether to hire people in
"lifelong, monogamous, same-gen-
der committed relationships" as
clergy.
The recommendations, which
may be revised in the coming
months, will be considered at the
denomination's biannual conven-
tion in Minneapolis this August.

Washington archbishop
takes to YouTube to
reach lapsed Catholics
WASHINGTON (AP) - To
mark the beginning of Lent, the
Roman Catholic Archdiocese of
Washington is launching a $75,000
marketing blitz using YouTube, a
blog and advertising to reach
lapsed Catholics.
"We wanted people to be able to
ask questions," said Susan Gibbs,
spokeswoman for the 580,000-
member archdiocese. "Sometimes
they're not ready to walk in a
church door ... or they might be
embarrassed to ask a question, or


they might be worried that they
won't be welcome."
The campaign's slogan is
"Longing for something? Maybe
it's God?" Only about one.quarter
of archdiocese's Catholics attend
weekly Mass, Gibbs said, and the
goal is to improve those figures.
For the past two years, the
Washington archdiocese has used
Lent to encourage Catholics to go
to confession more regularly.
This year's campaign will
include conventional advertising
such as signs in subway cars and
buses, radio and newspaper ads and
a billboard, Gibbs said.
Taking to the Internet is a new
approach. A clip of Archbishop
Donald W. Wuerl has been posted
on YouTube, the video sharing site,
inviting Catholics who have "drift-
ed away" to "think about coming
back ..." The archdiocese also is
launching an interactive blog
staffed by several priests and
laypeople.
Lent is a 40-day period of
penance and fasting that begins
this week with Ash Wednesday and
culminates with Easter, the
Christian celebration of Jesus' res-
urrection from the dead.


PLACES To WORSHIP


EPISCOPAL

* The Episcopal Church of the
Redeemer.Service times are 7:30,
8:30 and 10 a.m. with Holy
Communion. Coffee hour following
services. Newcomers welcome.
Rector is the Rev. Joyce Holmes.
Call 453-5664 or e-mail,
redeemer1895@aol.com Web site:
redeemeravon com. The church is
at 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park
(two miles north of Sun 'N Lake
Boulevard, across from Wells
Dodge.)
* St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL
33870. Sunday Services: Holy
Eucharist Rite I - 7:45 a.m., Holy
Eucharist Rite II - 10 a.m. Midweek
service on Wednesday at 6 p.m.
Sunday School for all ages at 9
a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m.
until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m.
service ends. Wednesday: Adult
Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are
always welcome. The Rev. Jim
Kurtz, rector. Church office 385-
7649, for more information.
* St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal
Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-
0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers,
Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m.,
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening: Holy Communion with
Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child
care available at the 8 a.m. and
10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come
and join us.


GRACE BRETHREN

* Grace Brethren Church, 3626
Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-
0869. Dr. Randall Smith, Senior
Pastor, Rev. David Ogden,
Associate Pastor, Matt Wheelock,
Assistant to the Pastor, and Aaron
Michaud, Youth Director. "Kid City"
Children's Ministries: 9 a.m.-12
noon, First Service: 9 a.m.-10:15
a.m., Drinks, Donuts and
Fellowship: 10:15 a.m.-10:45 a.m.,
Second Service: 10:45 a.m.-12
noon. Sunday Evening Service: 6
p.m.-7 p.m., Wednesday Evening
Service: 7 p.m.-8 p.m. "Crave"
Youth Doings, Christian Life:
Application, Bible Study and
Prayer, and "Kid City" Children's
Activities. "Kid City" Pre-School/
Day Care: Nursery Age Through
5th Grade. Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-
6 p.m. (By Registration Call: 385-
3111).


INTERDENOMINATIONAL

* World Harvest and Restoration
Ministries, (non-denominational)
2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-
3771. Sunday service: Sunday
School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11
a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m.
prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor:
W.H. Rogers.


JEWISH

* Temple Israel of Highlands
County, 1305 Temple Israel Drive,
Sebring, FL 33870. Everyone is
always welcome. Hebrew
Language Class from 12:30-2 p.m.,
March 5, 12, 19 and 26; Torah
Study with Howard Salles from
2:30-4 p.m. March 5, 12, 19 and
26; Shabbat Service Rabbi Singer
followed by Oneg at 7:30 p.m.
March 6 and 20. Open to anyone
who cares to attend. Summer
hours may vary. For further infor-
mation, call the Temple office at
382-7744.

LUTHERAN

* Atonement Lutheran Church


(ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview
Drive., Sebring. The Rev. Felice A.
Johnson, pastor. Jim Helwig,
organist/choir director. Holy
Eucharist at 9:30 a.m,; Parish Choir
at 6:45 p.m. Wednesday; and
Mary/Martha Circle meets at noon
first Tuesday for lunch. Phone 385-
0797.
* Christ Lutheran Church Avon
Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2
mile east of Avon Park High
School. Sunday Divine Worship is
at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is cel-
ebrated every week with traditional
lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs
of praise. Fellowship time with cof-
fee and refreshments follows wor-
ship. Come worship and fellowship
with us. For information, call Pastor
Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see
christ/utheranavonpark.org.
* Faith Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 2740 Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848,
Faith's Closet phone: 385-2782.
Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann
Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship serv-
ices: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday
School for children and adult Bible
classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise
worship service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Communion is served the
first and third and fifth Sunday of
the month. Sunday worship service
is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8
a.m. each Sunday. Educational
opportunities include weekly adult
Bible studies. Special worship serv-
ices are on Thanksgiving Eve,
Christmas Eve, New Year's Eve
and Easter. Midweek services are
during Advent and Lent. Faith's
Closet Resale Shop is open to the
community from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m.
to noon Saturday. The Closet is
closed Mondays. All are warmly
welcome in the family of faith.
* Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church (AALC) American
Association of Lutheran
Churches, 4348 Schumacher
Road, Sebring, one mile west of
Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor.
Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Bible Study, 9 a.m.
Nursery provided. Social activities:
Choir, Missions, Evangelism.
Phone 385-1163.
* New Life Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a
Congregation of the Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship
with the Wisconsin Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday
Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9
a.m. For more information, call
Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or
visit the Web site at wwwnewlife
sebring. com.
* Resurrection Lutheran Church
- ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon
Park. Pastor: Rev. John C.
Grodzinski. Holy Eucharist, 8 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; Sunday
School (adult and youth, 9:15 a.m.
Sunday. Coffee and fellowship hour
follow the service. Midweek
Frangrance Free Wednesday wor-
ship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office
phone number is 453-6858.
* Trinity Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake
Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The
Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and
Noel Johnson, youth and family life.
Worship schedule for December
through Easter: Worship service 8
and 11 a.m.; Communion services,
first and third Sundays; (Children's
Church, 11 a.m. only); and
Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship
schedule for summer through fall:
Worship service, 9 a.m.;
Communion services, first and third
Sunday; Education Hour 10:30
a.m. Additional services: Lent and
Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy.
Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.;
Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.;
Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas
Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve,
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship


activities: Youth Group, Senior
Citizens, Younger Side Adults,
Ladies Missionary League, Ladies
Guild, Small group studies as
scheduled. Music: Choir and hand
chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5
years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday. License:
C14H10020: Susan Norris, direc-
tor. Visit us online at: www. vchurch-
es. com/trinity/lutheranp.


NON-DENOMINATIONAL

* Bible Fellowship Church, 3750
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Sunday: First Worship serv-
ice and Sunday school, 9 a.m.;
Second Worship service and
Sunday school, 10:45 a.m. A nurs-
ery is provided for children up to 2
years old. Evening: Junior and
Senior Youth, 6 p.m. and evening
service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday:
Youth, 5-8 p.m. Children (3 years to
fifth grade), 5:50-7:30 p.m. Adult
classes, 6:30 p.m.; Prayer time,
6:30 p.m. Dr. Eugene Bengtson,
pastor; Todd Patterson, associate
pastor. Church office 385-1024.
* Calvary Church, - 1825
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872; 386-4900. An independent
community church. Sunday morn-
ing worship, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday
School, 11 a.m.; Wednesday Bible
studies, 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small
friendly church waiting for your
visit.
* Christian Training Ministries
Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off
County Road 17 on Simpson
Avenue. Sunday service is at 10
a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7
p.m. A nursery and children's
church are provided. The church is
part of. Christian International
Ministries Network, a full gospel,
non-denominational ministry. Linda
M. Downing, minister: Phone, 314-
9195, /indadowning@hotmalloom.n
Casey L. Downing, associate min-
ister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown
ing@hotmail.com. Web site is
www. chrlstiantrainingministries.net
* Grace Bible Church, 4541
Thunderbird Road, (second church
on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone,
382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior
pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30
p.m.
Sunday, 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m. (ASL),
11:30 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace
Bible Academy'Adult Investigating
Truth; first and third Tuesday,
Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.;
Wednesday, Children's & Youth
Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday,
8:30 p.m., College Ministry.
w w w . G B C c o n
nected org
* Highlands Community Church
is meeting at the Community
Christian Church at 3005 New Life
Way. Highlands Community
Church features a casual contem-
porary church. Our Celebration
Service is at 10 AM and includes a
quality nursery and Kid's world for
ages through elementary age.
Church phone is 471-1236, or
Pastor Bruce Linhart's cell is 402-
1684. Web site: hIghlandscommu-
nity.com e-mail: pastor@highland-
scommunity, corn
* Unity Life Enrichment Centre,
new location, 10417 Orange
Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL
33875; 471-1122; e-mail
unity@vistanet.net. Web site,
www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Celebration Service,
Nursery and Children's Church.
Weekly. Classes, Christian
Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer
Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups.
Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior
minister transforming lives from
ordinary to extraordinary.
* Visions Christian Community
Church, 105 Jim Rodgers Ave.,
Avon Park (in the historical build-


ing). Pastor is Alvin Conner..
Sunday worship, 11:15 a.m.
Wednesday - Youth Cultural Arts
Ministry, 5:30 p.m.; Youth Bible
Study, 7 p.m.; and Adult Bible
Study, 7 p.m. Holy Communion is
first Sunday of each month. Youth
ministry is fourth Sunday. Women's
Ministry is fifth Sunday. "Where
there is no vision my people per-
ish."
* The Way Church, 1005 N.
Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday
school and worship service at 9
a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Youth activi-
ties, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. The
Way is a church family who gathers
for contemporary worship, teaching
of God's Word, prayer and fellow-
ship. Come early and stay after for
fellowship time. Child care and chil-
dren's church are provided.
Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The
Way - A place for you. Office
Phone:471-6140, Church Cell
Phone:381-6190. Email: theway
church@hotmal.com. Web site:
www. The WayChurch.org


PRESBYTERIAN

* Covenant Presbyterian Church
(PCA), 4500 Sun 'N Lake Blvd.,
Sebring, 33872-2113. A
Congregation of the Presbyterian
Church in America. Worship servic-
es: Sunday morning worship, infor-
mal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday
evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday
evening Prayer Meeting,. 6 p.m.;
Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:30-
7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m.
Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759;
e-mail: covpres@strato.net, Web
site: www.cpcsebr/ng.org. Rev. W.
Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours:
8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through
Thursday.
* First Presbyterian Church
ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two
entrances on LaGrande), Avon
Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242.
The Rev. Robert Johnson is the
pastor. Fellowship time, 9 a.m.;
Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Adult
Bible Study, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Children's
Church, 10:45 a.m.; and Women's
Bible Study, 6:30 p.m. Other week-
ly activities: Wednesday Prayer,
9:30 a.m.; Pastor's Bible study,
10:30 a.m.; First Wednesday lunch,
11:30 a.m.; Circles: Second
Tuesday, 1 and 7:30 p.m. and sec-
ond Wednesday, 1 p.m.; Potluck
dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday;
and choir practice, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Be a part of a warm,
caring church family with traditional
services, following biblical truth.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring,
FL 33870. 385-0107. Sunday
School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.;
Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday:
"KFC" Kids for Christ Youth Group,
3:15-4:15 p.m.; Senior High Youth
Group, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Wednesday:
Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir
rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery avail-
able for Sunday worship. Call the
church office for more information
and other classes. Rev. Darrell A.
Peer, pastor. Richard Hart, director
of youth ministry.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP 118 North Oak Ave., Lake
Placid, 465-2742. E-mail:
fpclp@earthlink.net. The Rev. Ray
Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev.
Drew Severance, associate pastor.
Sunday morning worship is at 8:30
and 11 a.m.; and contemporary
worship is at 10:45 a.m. in
Friendship Hall. A variety of Sunday
school classes for adults and chil-
dren are at 9:30 a.m. Call the
church office for more information
about the classes offered. Nursery
is provided for babies and toddlers;
while young children up to second
grade have a special Children's


Church offered during the worship
service to help them grow in their
spiritual knowledge.
* Spring Lake Presbyterian
Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School,
9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m.
Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the
second Thursday of the month,
September through June. Board of
Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first
Monday of the month. Choir
rehearses at 7 p.m. each
Wednesday, September through
April. Presbyterian Women meet at
10 a.m. the third Thursday of the
month. Pastor: The Rev. Kathryn
Treadway. Organist: Richard
Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan
Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713;
e-mail, spr/ng/akepc@embarq-
mai/.com, Web site,
http.//s/pc.presbychurch.org.


SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST

* Avon Park Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 1410 West
Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone:
453-6641 or e-mail: avonparks-
da@embarqmal.com, Saturday
early morning worship service is at
8:30 a.m..; Saturday, Sabbath
School, 9:30 a.m Saturday.;
Vespers at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.
Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m.
Church Service 10:45 a.m.
Saturday. Community Service
hours on Tuesday and Thursday is
from 9:00 a.m. till Noon. Senior
Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate
Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker
Memorial Academy Christian
School offering education for
kindergarten through 12th grades.
ALL ARE WELCOME. Website is
www.discoverjesus. org
* Sebring Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, 2106 N. State
Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438.
Worship Services: 9:15 a.m.
,Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meet-
ing, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m.
Community service: every Monday
9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr.
Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m.
Pastor Amado Luzbet.


THE CHURCH OF
LATTER DAY SAINTS

* The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand
Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33870.
Phone: 382-9092. Dale Bargar,
bishop; Butler Tyler,.first counselor;
and James Parker, second coun-
selor. Family History Center: 382-
1822. Sunday services: Sacrament.
meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel
Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; and
Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-1 *
p.m. Youth activities from 7-8:20
p.m. Wednesday: 11-year-odid
Scouts, 7-8:20 p.m. first and third
Wednesday; and activity days for
8-11 year old girls from 7-8:20 p.m.
second and fourth Wednesday.


THE SALVATION
ARMY

* The Salvation Army - Center
for Worship. Sunday: Sunday
School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meet-
ing, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting
and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Prayer,
6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries,
7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth
Ministries, 5 p.m. Every fourth
Thursday is Men's Fellowship, 6:30
p.m. All meetings are at 120 N.
Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For
more information, visit the Web site
www.salvatlonarmrnysebring.comr or
call Captain Mary Holmes at 385-
7548, ext. 110.


UNITED METHODIST

* First United Methodist Church,
105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor.
Traditional Worship Service at 8:15
and 10:55 a.m. in the sanctuary,
Contemporary Worship in the FLC
at 9:40 a.m. Sunday School at 9:40
and 10:50 a.m. for all ages, Youth
Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday
with, Rich Heilig, youth director.
The 11:00 a.m. Sunday worship
service is broadcast over WITS
1340 on AM dial, There is a nursery
available at all services.
* First United Methodist Church,
200 South Lake Avenue, Avon
Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759,
Reverend Gary Pendrak, Pastor,
Summer Schedule, Sunday School
- 9:00 a.m., Worship - 10:30 a.m.
* Memorial United Methodist
Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlook-
ing lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL,
33852. The Rev. Douglas S. Pareti,
senior pastor. Claude H.L. Burnett,
pastoral assistant. Sunday sched-
ule: Heritage worship service at
8:30 a.m.; Sunday Bible classes for
all ages at 9:30 a.m.; Celebration
worship service at 10:45 a.m.; New
Song worship service at 10:45
a.m.; Youth fellowship for 6th
through 12th graders at 5 p.m.;
Loving nursery care provided every
Sunday morning. Bible fellowship
class 6:00 p.m. We offer Christ-
centered Sunday school classes,
youth programs, Bible studies,
book studies and Christian fellow-
ship. We are a congregation that
want to know Christ and make Him
known. Call the church office at
465-2422 or check out our church
Web site at
wwwmemoria/umc. com.
* St. John United Methodist
Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive,
Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev.
Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor.
Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. Life Connections
meets at 5:30 p.m. each
Wednesday in the fellowship hall
from September to May for dinner
and age appropriate studies.
Nursery provided for all services.
Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnse-
bring.org
* Spring Lake United Methodist
Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane,
(Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. 'Clyde
Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship serv-
ice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study
meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday.
Choir, Practice at 4:00 p.m. on
Thursday. Church office phone:
655-0040.


UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST

* Emmanuel United Church of
Christ, 3115 Hope Street, Sebring,
FL 33875. Sunday worship, 9:30
a.m. Children's Christian
Education, 9:30 a.m. Everyone is
welcome at Emmanuel. We are
located 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27
on Hammock Road. For more infor-
mation, call the church office at
471-1999 or e-mail to eucc@stra-
to.net or check our webs ie
sebringemmanuelucc. com.


VINEYARD

* Heartland Vineyard, 2523 U.S.
27 South, (just past the Wild Turkey
Tavern) Avon Park. Contemporary
Worship is at 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Children's Church and
Preschool/Nursery provided
Sunday. Pastor, Gerry Woltman.
Telephone: 453-9800. Casual, con-
temporary and Christ-centered.













Catholic parish in Rhode Island starts religious education for autistic


By RAY HENRY
Associated Press Writer
WARWICK, R.I. - Two autistic
boys sat inside a parochial school
classroom this month. In a setting
stripped of unnecessary furniture
and toys to avoid distraction, they
studied pictograms of a bearded
Jesus in a red sash and images of
their family members and people
helping each other.
"P.J. helps - P.J. can help who?"
Jennifer Aldrich, a volunteer
teacher, asked 7-year-old P.J.
Letizia Jr.
"Daddy and mommy," he said.
"Yeah," Aldrich said, "and when
P.J. helps daddy and mommy he can
be ..."
"Like Jesus," he said.
The program at St. Peter's Roman


Catholic Church is among a handful
of programs at Catholic churches
exclusively for autistic children and
the first in Rhode Island. It is part
of a broader effort by dioceses to
accommodate children with a wide
range of developmental disorders or
handicaps.
Dioceses in at least 31 states
offer specialized religious instruc-
tion for students suffering from
conditions including autism, mental
retardation, emotional and learning
disabilities and brain injuries,
according to a 2007-2008 survey by
the U.S. Conference of Catholic
Bishops.
"To not find ways of welcoming
all the people whose families want
them to be part of the church com-
munity, would be not really living


out our faith, I think," said Marie
Powell, executive director of the
conference's Secretariat of Catholic
Education.
Religious groups have long
offered classes to instruct the young
in their faith but some have strug-
gled to include and teach the autis-
tic, who can have difficulty commu-
nicating and extremely short atten-
tion spans.
In one high-profile case last year,
a Catholic priest- in Minnesota
sought a restraining order against an
autistic teenager who allegedly
caused distractions by wetting him-
self and allegedly assaulted a child
during Mass.
The program at St. Peter's offers
a nurturing and inclusive classroom
setting every two weeks for chil


dren with special needs. It also
helps students practice their reli-
gion by preparing them to partici-
pate in the sacraments, or ritual
acts, that normally serve as mile-
stones on the journey to young
adulthood for Catholics.
Those sacraments include con-
fessing sins to a priest and seeking
absolution, receiving the Eucharist,
or bread and wine that Catholics
believe- is changed into the body
and blood of Jesus Christ, and being
publicly confirmed into the church
by a bishop.
"The whole point is Jesus is total-
ly inclusive," said the Rev. Roger
Gagne, the pastor of St. Peter's who
celebrated Mass for the students
and their families by condensing an
hour-long liturgy to about 15 min-


utes, skipping the music, -optional
prayers and making a very brief
homily.
"He directs his followers to do
the same."
Margaret Andreozzi, the faith
coordinator for elementary students
at St. Peter's, said she first realized
that autistic children were being left
behind when she saw the siblings of
an autistic child receive their sacra-
ments while .their autistic brother
did not.
Other families with autistic chil-
dren were wary of taking them to
weekly Mass because they some-
times cry out, have verbal tics or
difficulty being in large crowds.
"People are feeling that they're
being cut off from the church,"
Andreozzi said.


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Fax (863) 453-8500

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320 US Hwy 27 N.
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Phone: (863) 452-2906
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INDEPENDENT
BANK





Heartland
National Bank


MAIN STREET CRA


WM .MoRM,004 ,took l000M4 OM0
HIGHLANDS TODAY
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March 27 & 28, 2009
Avon Park Chamber of Commerce
2B East Main Street
Avon Park, Florida 33825
(83) 453-3350 Fax: (863)4533473 E-mail: apcc@apfla.com
1. Thee photos mst be subiedt for eachaetagoa yentermd, a with one photo of he Asply sraY . Prnt
malctlearly on the back of each pholo . Photos will be returned to you. The photos must reasonably
represent the quality of the work to be exhibited Indicate average selling price of Iems being submitted for
review. as well as complete range of prices for Items to be displayed. Booth space is limited to 12'x12'
maximum. If additional space Ies ndad, the purcb of two booth spaces wil be required.
2 A vendor may exhibit only in the categoy(fe) in which helshe is cceptod.
3 OnCly vendors displaying their own work may participate, No agent or proxy eaxhvttor 0wi be allowed to
rep-ean]t an artist ANS sales wil be handled by the artist
4. Exhibitor must provide own display materials. Exhibitors ae also evnouraged to da0play their own signs. Rain
sheets and sandbags are recommended Show wil go on, rain or shime.
S. Cratt demonstratins are encouraged.
6. The committee reserves te right to remove anye 0 or 0work of d t 0 con soideredinp o r tewhihdoes
not meal 10sa10 stblalda.'
7. A confirmed application 0s a commitment to show. N1 aNJDSWLL.BEADE FOMCA5U0ATIOI
. Sek i se5:00 am.o a FridaynA. auto ls la tobe Wmovfrom thexhit eea by 800 a. MA vendors
must be ready to se by 98.0 a.m. and exhilb may no be removed until 5:00 p.m. (400 p.m. Saturday) on
any evolt day. Absolutely no partdng on iiy 010areas.
I. AS vendorswi lo 1e0u0ired1to1Partcipate both1ft0ldays of the show, during scha utod or. 0dunless approved
by WestIval committee pro to1 the how,
10. Food Vendom amr qoi 1d to pa tll t.n pr oes Invisible placf
11. Food Vendoresand Vendor with open ftem MUST hab approved firelinguliher
11. Exhibitors ape reminded of the following:
(a)N Alccholic beoNeagas
(b) toe armals in Ex1hibit are
(c) Parking In smpfid rm only oParking attendants wl ssi st " odo
(d) Veronr Parking on Main Street is prohtbWd
<<< For the safety of everyone. festival rdes wn l be enforced at all times >>


Grow Your Business
Advertise Here with


NEWS-SUN

For Information, call
Alice Roepstorff
385-6155. ext 510





rY Ba e - pye

All Card Packs $3

Pokemon * Yu-Gi-Oh

Magic * World of Warcraft

Naruto

12 S. Forest Avenue

Avon Park, FL

863.453.9663


Page 12B


Grow Your Business
Advertise Here with


NEWS-SUN

For Information, call
Alice Roepstorff
385-6155. ext. 510


Thank You to the following businesses for supporting the

Avon Park Chamber of Commerce.



AV RN
PA RK
'Nt 11.


Restaurant & Bar
3100 Golfview Rd., Sebring, Florida
- ' Located inside
j ^Inn on the Lakes


863-314-0348


A
Warren's Auto Sales
"A Good Car At A Fair Price"
SINCE 1977
811 U.S. Hwy. 27 South * Avon Park, FL
(863) 452-2931 * FAX (863) 453-7698
E-mail: warrens@strato.net
www.warrensautosales.comr


Royal


of Avon Park

"Where you're treated as ROYALTY"
Services Provided
+ 24 Hour Skilled Nursing Services
+ Physical, Occupational & Speech Therapy Seven Daysa week
* Highly Qualified Wound Care Specialist+ Activities Program
+ Medical Director local to community
ROYAL CARE OF AVON PARK
Our Name, Our Mission, Our Conmitment
For information or tour
863-453-6674
1213 W Stratford Road * Avon Park, Florida 33825


News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


www.newssun.com


Member FDIC








News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


Page 13B


Note to cell phone junkies: Txtng + date


:(


By MARTHA IRVINE
Associated Press
CHICAGO - So you're
on a first date and you notice
your potential love interest
looking down and fiddling
with a cell phone under the
table. Or maybe he or she
isn't even attempting to hide
it.
Call it a sign of the times.
Or maybe just a sign that he
or she is just not that into
you.
Whichever, many people
who play the love scene have
a story - usually a gripe -
about texting while dating.
"Oh, the fun of pretending
to be interested in what
someone else is typing to
someone you don't know,"
says an exasperated Tyler
Barnett, a 25-year-old busi-
nessman in Los Angeles who
calls himself a "textaholic"
but says he rarely does it on a
date.
Not so for some of the
women he has gone out with.
He recalls one double date
where the women he and his
friend were with were both
texting right at the table.


Barnett suspected they were
typing messages to one
another, so he casually asked
to see one of the women's
new iPhones, and immediate-
ly checked her text message
inbox.
He was right. "And they
were not singing our prais-
es," Barnett says. "How ugly
is his shirt!" read one text
about his friend. "Who the
hell does this guy think he
is!?"
Texting can, of course,
have its advantages in a rela-
tionship, for flirting, con-


necting, even'"text sex."
But often, it just gets in the
way. Betsey Usher broke up
with a boyfriend because of
his constant cell phone usage
with friends and ex-girl-
friends during movies and
dinners out.
"I don't think he ever got
the message in spite of the
fact that we talked about it
many, many times," says the
39-year-old, who works at
the nursing school at
Vanderbilt University in
Nashville, Tenn. "I think he's
just addicted!"


Since 2001, the number of
text messages sent in this
country has risen from about
a million a month to 75 bil-
lion, according to Alex
Campbell, chief executive of
Vibes Media, a Chicago com-
pany that helps businesses
market themselves via text
message. A survey done in
December for the Pew
Internet & American Life
Project found that half of
adults 18 and older have a
cell phone and use it to send
or receive text messages.
In other words, while it
might be a red flag if a date
would rather text than talk,
we are a nation that expects
to be in constant contact,
Campbell says.
"People understand it's not
right, but they still do it any-
way," he says. "The informa-
tion they're getting back is
worth the risk."
Liz Nelson, 25, managed
to text her way out of a bad
date. She was sitting in a
steakhouse with a guy who
couldn't stop talking about
himself. She quietly texted a


Penny stocks? Small change for big-name companies


By MARK WILLIAMS
AP Business Writer
What costs more - a spark plug or a
share of General Motors? A Sunday
New York Times or a share of the news-
paper company? A General Electric
toaster or a share of GE?
In the surest sign of the depth of the
recession, the products associated with
these high-profile companies now cost
more than buying a piece of the busi-
ness.
Shares of some of the most renowned
companies have come under assault as
the worst recession in decades saps
investor confidence and drags major
stock indexes to their lowest levels
since 1997.
When the housing bubble began to
burst, share prices began to cascade first
in the homebuilding industry, but it
spread quickly to almost every sector of


the economy.
Today, a share of Hovnanian, one of
the nation's largest builders, can be had
for 96 cents, less than it costs for a set of
spare house keys.
Banks, stung by -plummeting mort-
gage values, followed. A share of
Citigroup Inc. which cost $55.66 at the
beginning of 2007, now costs $2.60.
ATM fees can total $3 or more for using
an out-of-network bank card.
Since the start of 2007, shares in com-
panies from every sector have been hit.
* General Motors shares have fallen
from $30.30 to $2.22, less than the cost
of a standard automobile spark plug
(about $3.79).
* New York Times Co. shares have
fallen from $24.27 to $3.95, cheaper
than the $4 cost of its Sunday edition.
* General Electric Co. shares fell
from $30.30 to $9.08, cheaper than a GE


two-slice bagel toaster at Wal-Mart,
selling Tuesday on the clearance rack
for $12.
* Office Depot is down from $38.27
to $1.26, less than a 12-pack of medium
point Papermate BallPoint Stick Pens
which runs $1.89.
* US Airways has fallen from
$53.89 to $3.66, less than the current $4
cost of two in-flight coffees.
The bargain-basement stock prices of
America's best known companies pres-
ent either the greatest opportunity of a
lifetime - or the biggest money pit this
side of the Great Depression.
Of course, many didn't survive then
- and many won't survive now.
Someone who bought shares of Circuit
City, which cost $5.75 before the one-
time retailing bellwether announced it
would close, would have been better off
buying a four-pack of AA batteries.


friend and asked her to call
and rescue her.
"This might be bad or rude
on my part, but I told him my
friend had an emergency and
needed me," says Nels6n,
who lives in Santa Clara,
Calif. He later confronted her
- "Totally called me out -
whoops!"
Michael Volpatt, a 37-year-
old San Franciscan, has
found his own way to deal
with texting while dating, a
habit he has grown to hate


since the last five guys he
went out with did it. One of
his dates went outside to use
his phone.
"So after 15 minutes I got
up, told the bartender that my
friend would take care of the
bill and walked out," Volpatt
says.
On the Net: Vibes Media:
http://vibesmedia.com
Martha Irvine is an AP national
writer She can be reached at
mirvine@ap.org or via
http://myspace.com/irvineap


R5.
~


Avon Park Pediatrics


Dr. Raji Sonni, MD EA.A.P


Celebrating over 25 years of


practice...and Amy Grimes,


P.R A.C. wish to announce the


Grand Opening of their new office.


Friday, February 27th

from 4:00 to 6:00 PM

1571 U.S. 27 North

ZLocated at the intersection ofU. S. 27 and Stryker Road

Patient appointments start in Avon Park Monday, March 2nd

24 Hour Telephone:

1 (863) 453-PEDS * (863) 453-7337

SEBRING LAKE PLACID LAKE WALES

863-382-077 0 863-699414 8678


www.newssun.com


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News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009 wwwnewssun.com


Page 14B


BY STEPHANIE DUNNEWIND
The Seattle Times
rank-. imtable. .oerl sen-itive - if that describes both you and
your child. the problem might be that no one's getting enough sleep.
A National Sleep Foundation poll found that the average child
does not meet even mimrmum sleep recommendations.
PareniN alo sleep slightly less than the adult average (6.8 vs. 7
hours),-with half awakened by a child at night in a given week.
Sleep is vital if parents and kids want to function at their best.
Lack of sleep can leoae people lethargic, forgetful and more likely
to make mistakes. It's also linked to behavioral and attention
problems in kids.
Sometimes it can be hard to tell if kids are sleep deprived
because they adapt, said Rebecca Huntley, the author of "The
Sleep Book for Tired Parents." "But once parents work on sleep
issues, they realize their child was overly tired. Then they see a
different kid, one who's not whiny and grumpy."
Here are some tips to help you make sure everyone is well rested.




* Keep a consistent bedtime. The National Sleep Foundation
poll found most children went to bed between 8 and 9 p.m.,
bumping to around 9:30 p.m. for 9- and 10-year-olds.
* Parents should block out a period before a child's bedtime
for one-on-one rituals. A bedtime routine signals sleep to children,
who don't watch clocks..It also "helps ease the transition between
being with.parents and being alone," Huntley said. "It lets them
physically and emotionally wind down."
* Keep TVs and computers out of bedrooms. Children with a
TV in their room (four out of 10 school-age children and nearly a
third of preschoolers) tend to get less sleep and go to bed later.
* Make the hour before bed quiet time but do not include TV
or video games. Though kids might seem to veg, research has
found that the tube is stimulating.
* Learn your child's sleepy signals. "Children who are overly
tired have a harder time getting to sleep and a harder time staying
asleep," Huntley said.
U Don't punish with early bedtimes or reward with late nights.
It's common for anxiety - new school, divorce, toilet training
- to show up at bedtime with difficulty separating from parents,
trouble falling asleep or nightmares.
If your child is diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity
disorder, you might consult a sleep specialist. Symptoms of sleep
deprivation are similar to. those ofADHD: difficulty staying
focused and completing tasks, impulsive behavior.
Watch for disorders such as sleep apnea, which is more com-
mon now with childhood obesity on the rise. Doctors also see
more children with anxiety and mood disorders, which present as
sleeping problems, noted Dr. Ralph Pascualy, medical director of
the Swedish Sleep Medicine Institute.




For babies over 4 months, pick a sleep technique that fits your
values and your child's temperament. "A lot of different methods
will work if you as a parent are comfortable with it," Huntley said.
* Be consistent. "The reason
most techniques fail is because par-
ents don't apply them every single
night," Pascualy said. Stick with it
/ for four to six weeks.
SPut infants and toddlers to bed
i Idrowsy but not asleep. Children
who are put to bed asleep average an
Sour less of sleep a night than those
, �i 1i ^who go to bed awake, according to
@,/ the sleep poll. Children put to bed
asleep arealso much more likely
to wake up at night.
* Don't ditch naps. Even if toddlers seem to want to give
them up, keep a quiet rest time in the afternoon.
* Drop the words "nap" or "sleep'." Instead, tell toddlers they
need to rest their bodies or give their muscles a break.
* Avoid short-term solutions that turn into bad habits. If your
goal is independent sleeping, don't-let your toddler crawl in bed
with you for just one night.
* Don't reward night-time waking with attention. Be unemo- .
tional - don't scold, don't play.
* To encourage kids to sleep in, put them to bed half an hour
earlier. "Sleep begets sleep," writes Dr. Marc Weissbluth in
"Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child"' "This is not logical, but it
is biological."


- t-. . , g t. .- , . .
S' ,, . , , . . . - ,.
More than any other age group, preschoolers stall and resist
going to bed. Keep an extremely consis-
tent bedtime routine, such as reading
three books and singing two songs
Never vary or they'll keep pushing lor . .- ,
more. Make a poster with pictures ,
outlining the routine. "Then the
poster becomes the bad guy," I
Huntley said.
A child who races around or
seems hyper is not getting a
"second wind"; he's overly tired.
U Be boring. If a child keeps getting up, don't give him any
attention. Read instead of watching TV.


ILLUSTRATIONS BY MICHELLE KUMATA/KRT


Set a bedtime routine and stick



to it so everyone in the family


can get a goo(


N Serve a snack such as a muffin or fresh fruit an hour or two
before bedtime.
M Let children listen to stories on tape or music to encourage
them to stay in bed. "If you can keep them horizontal, they will
go to sleep," Huntley said.
I Make sure they get regular exercise, but avoid physical
activity near bedtime.
* Cut back on TV time or extracurricular activities if these
make it impossible for children to finish homework and get to bed
in time to get nine to 10 hours'sleep. "It's a common misconcep-
tion that school-age children only need eight hours of sleep -
many need 10," Pascualy said.




B Set a realistic bedtime. Teens J
starting as young as 13 are biological I
inclined to fall asleep most easily "
about 11 p.m. Try 9:45 to 10 p.m. as a
compromise. Expecting teens to be n - 7
bed too early can actually con- .
tribute to insomnia.
* Advocate for high schools to , .
delay start times to better fit with
adolescents'physiological clocks.
* Suggest teens rearrange their evening so they end with
calming activities. Shower at night, which also frees up more
morning time.
N Cut off contact with friends an hour before bed. This
means no phones, no instant messaging, no e-mail.
Fragmented sleep from teens waking up to cell phone text
messages is a new concern.
N Encourage short power naps. Half an hour is OK; two or
three hours will affect nighttime sleep.
M Enforce a curfew so teens don't mess up their sleep rhythms
with too-late nights. Likewise, don't let them sleep in more than
two hours. Creating an irregular sleep pattern makes it more diffi-
cult to snooze. Also, experts say "catching up" on sleep over the
weekend doesn't work.


ght's sleep


* Encourage teens to keep beds for sleeping only, not home-
work or chatting with friends.
I Watch the coffee and Coke. Teens tend to overmedicate with
caffeine to counteract their sleepiness. Try bright light as a natural
pick-me-up.


* Don't sacrifice sleep, especially for moms. "Women are
usually the first ones-to get up in the morning and the last
ones to go to bed," said Dr. Meir Kryger, author of "A
Woman's Guide to Sleep Disorders." When kids wake at
night, it's nearly always Mom who goes to them, the sleep
poll found.
M Pregnancy can bring such sleep-related problems as
sleep apnea (often because of weight gain) and restless
leg syndrome (which has been linked to iron deficiency),
Kryger said.
* Know how you won't let your toddler drink before bed? You'
shouldn't either. As people get older, waking up to go to the bath-
room is a common sleep disturbance.
* Don't underestimate your lack
of sleep. "One hour a day for a
week adds up to a whole night
of sleep lost," noted nurse
practitioner Joseph Zelk,
who works with the Eastside
Sleeping Disorders Clinic at
Overlake Hospital Medical
Center in Bellevue, Wash.
* Use a fan or other type of white noise. Don't worry you
won't hear nighttime kid noises: "I know of nothing more
arousing, particularly for women, than children's calling,"
Pascualy said.


Additional sources: "Caring for Your Baby and Young
Child," American Academy of Pediatrics: "The Mom Book," by
Stacy DeBroff; "Healthy Teens, Body and Soul: A Parent's
Complete Guide'" by Dr. Andrea Marks and Betty Rothbart.


News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


www.newssun.com


Ow to


p









News-Sun * Friday, February 27, 2009


www.newssun.com


DIVERSIONS


Moving story of 'Two Lovers' creates a


mood that will hang over you for days


By COLIN COVERT
Minneapolis Star TribunelMCT
Before he became a talk-
show punch line in a tum-
bleweed beard, Joaquin
Phoenix was a fine character
actor. The evidence is on
display in "Two Lovers," a
quietly moving romantic
drama as evocative as a
Philip Roth short story.
Phoenix is solid as
Leonard, only child of a dot-
ing immigrant couple, still
living in their Brooklyn
apartment and delivering
orders for the family dry
cleaning business. Deep in
an emotional funk after los-
ing his fiancee, Leonard
unexpectedly finds himself
with two attractive women
tapping at his cocoon.
Warm, brunette Sandra
(Vinessa Shaw), the daugh-
ter of a prospective business
partner, offers a stable, if
mundane, future. Blonde,
troubled Michelle (Gwyneth
Paltrow) promises adven-
ture. Leonard, uncertain and
a touch unstable, bounces
between the two.
There's more at stake here
than in many love stories.
We meet Leonard during an
abortive suicide attempt,
and whenever he's near a
whizzing ,subway train or
near the ocean at Brighton
Beach, worry for his safety
is near the surface. Phoenix
doesn't pander for sympa-
thy.
He makes Leonard a
superficially charming char-
acter with a cold core and a
tight, tiny smile.
He also shows us this
immature outsider's anxiety
over making the wrong
choice. With Michelle, he
loosens up and dances, and
glows when she encourages


1"~~


Photo by Magnolia Pictures
Gwyneth Paltrow stars as Michelle Rausch and Joaquin Phoenix stars as Leonard
Kraditor in Magnolia Pictures' 'Two Lovers.'


him to pursue his passion for
photography. (Director
James Gray wisely allows us
to see Leonard's snaps, and
they're mediocre.) *
Sandra doesn't have her
rival's neuroses nor her drug
habit, and she could step
directly into the role of
Leonard's hovering mother
(Isabella Rossellini).
Each woman has her own
allure and Leonard knows
he won't have many more
options. But he's too aimless
to be truly searching. He's
waiting for his destiny to be
delivered.
Phoenix bravely shows us
Leonard's slight capacity for
remorse, and Gray keeps the
tone chilly.
Leonard is manipulative,
yet Sandra and Michelle use
him as a means to their own
ends as well. Nobody is a
villain, exactly, and neither
do they get off easy.


Movie Review
'Two Lovers'
Rating: R (language,
some sexuality and brief
drug use)
Duration: 110 minutes
Review:* * (of 4)

Paltrow makes her char-
acter deeper than the stan-
dard crazy-trainwreck shik-
sa.
She offers Leonard honest
friendship and when


Leonard demonstrates that
sex is his sole means of con-
tact with women, you can
feel her relief: she under-
stands .the terms of barter.
Shaw's Sandra is crushing
on Leonard because she
wants a good-looking
provider.
She doesn't notice, or
doesn't care, that this 30-ish
guy acts like a misunder-
stood teenager in a 1950s
generation gap movie.
There are no big dramatic
conflicts, and story points
are undeveloped or left dan-
gling, but in its ragged, non-
linear way, "Two Lovers"
has more going on than most
movies.
These are people reaching
out to each other to break
their solitude, but finding
only solitude once again.
The film is all about creat-
ing a mood, and it hangs
over you for days.


,. ,










Photo by Alfeo Dixon/Lionsgate Films
Tyler Perry stars as Madea in Lionsgate Films' 'Madea
Goes to Jail.'


somebody needs help, you
try to help them out."
The movie's huge laughs
suggest that as over-exposed
as Perry is, with TV shows
and two films a year coming
out of his studio, "Madea
Goes to Jail" will be a mon-


ster hit. Maybe that means he
can let the lady (younger
looking with every film)
retire a winner. He's not


growing; the
improving;
wants to see
Dame Edna in


movies aren't
and nobody
Perry become
his dotage.


Movie Review

'Madea Goes
To Jail'
Rating: PG-13 (mature
thematic material, drug
content, some violence
and sexual situations)
Duration: 113 minutes
Review: * * (of 5)

By ROGER MOORE
The Orlando Sentinel/MCT
Is that Oscar nominee
Viola Davis playing a
straight-talking prison
preacher in Tyler Perry's lat-
est, "Tyler Perry's Madea
Goes to Jail"?
And Dr. Phil? And Tom
Joyner? Steve Harvey? Judge
Mathis? The cast of "The
View"?
Perry, the Atlanta-based
comedy factory,. pulls out all
the stops to stimulate his box
office (it's been sliding in
recent years) with this
"Madea" farce. His growing,
savvy as a movie-maker runs
smack dab into his need to
pander in this, his broadest
farce to star his cross-dressed
alter ego, the auntie the
world knows as Madea.
The formula hasn't
changed, not much. There's
still a broad, lowdown pot-
smoking, law-breaking, tem-
per-losing romp with Madea
as the "po po" (police) final-
ly catch up to her and toss
her in the DeKalb County
lock-up. And there's the
uplifting life-lesson story,
this one about an assistant
district attorney (Derek


Luke) out to save a street-
walker he once knew
because he feels responsible
for the life she now leads.
A casting note - the
hooker is played by Keshia
Pulliam Knight. Yes, "The
Cosby Show" was a long
time ago. And no, she's not a
very convincing prostitute.
"Goes to Jail" is Perry's
latest play-to-video-to-big-
screen adaptation. But that
doesn't make him lazy. He's
"re-purposing content." He's
always been a better self-pro-
moter than dramatist or film-
maker. As lovely as the
actors always are in his
movies (his camera and
lighting crew and makeup
people should do every film
starring black actors), this
one gets pretty sloppy. Mr.
Multi-tasking is careless
with his own characters'
makeup. His recurring play-
ers (David and Tamela J.
Mann) just go through the
motions. And the shifts in
tone from farce to violent
melodrama with a hint of
self'-help are as jarring as
ever.
Unlike every other film in
the Perry repertoire, "Goes to
Jail" plays the race card.
From nasty white drivers and
lecherous white employers to
white prison guards, white
bullies in prison and white
pimps, this is the first Madea
film that didn't feel all-
embracing. At least' he gave
one nasty Georgia white lady
the best put-down of the big
and beefy Mad Black
Woman. "Jemima the Hutt"
hits her where she lives.
Assistant DA Joshua has
fiancee troubles because of
his attempts to help the hook-
er. Madea struggles with
anger management sessions
(Dr. Phil in a funny tongue-
twisting scene). A prison
throw-down is coming.
And in the end, all the sto-
ries come together and we've
all learned so so much -
"Where I come from, if


Donations from


friends put couple


under a microscope


Dear Abby: My
husband, "Dwight,"
was very ill a few .
years ago. Some
wonderful folks held ..
a fundraiser to help .-"
us with bills and
unpaid leave. We
paid all of the out-
standing medical Dear
bills and living
expenses with a large portion
of the money; the remainder
has been set aside for an
organ transplant Dwight will
need in a few years.
We are extremely grateful
to everyone who put forth
the time and effort, as well as
those who donated money.
Dwight is now in remission,
and we are both back to our
full-time jobs.
Over the last three years,
the only time we have taken
for ourselves is a couple of
long weekends. Our home is
old and we've had to replace
some windows and do some
minor repairs. Our car is 10
years old and still runs fine,
but eventually we will have
to buy another one.
I'm afraid that people -who
helped us may think we are
squandering their gift if we
take a vacation or buy a car.
Even when we repaired our
home, we felt guilty.
My husband is healthy
right now, and we would like
to enjoy ourselves before
things change again. The last
thing we want to do is hurt
anyone's feelings or jeopard-
ize our friendships. Would
you please share your
thoughts on this?
- Living in a Glass House
Dear Living: In a situa-
tion like yours, appearances
do matter. People are
extremely sensitive.these
days about money that is
intended for one purpose
being spent on another.
If you haven't already
done so, to avoid any misun-
derstandings, put what
remains of the donated
monies into a separate inter-
est-bearing account ear-
marked for your husband's
transplant. This will enable *
you to live your lives.
Should anyone second-
guess you, explain that you
are taking the vacation or
buying the next car with 'your
earnings, and that the funds
that were donated will even-
tually be used for the pur-
pose for which they were
intended.








FROST-NIXON R
1:00 7:15
FIRED UP PG13
12:45 3:00 5:15 7:30 9:45
JONAS BROTHERS 3D G
1:00 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00
FRIDAY THE 13TH R
1:30 4:00 7:45 9:45
MALL COP PG
1:15 4:30 7:30 9:45
CORALINE PG
1:30 4:00 7:00 9:30
JONAS BROTHERS 3D G
12:00 1:55 3:50 5:45 7:40 9:35
THE WRESTLER R
1:00 4:00 7:00 10:00
PUSH PG13
4:00 10:00
BI I Ik i'. /lL'l$,llw . h}. i m t- l l I uI , :'ll I' ,: tl II U['s


Dear Abby: My
wife is suffering
from Alzheimer's
disease. I can no
longer trust her
- using restrooms
unaccompanied
when we are away
from home.
Abby She has locked
the stall door and
sometimes just sits in there
and won't respond.-
Should I be using the
men's or women's facility
when I have to help her?
- Robert J.
Dear Robert: Caring for
someone with a progressive
brain disease like
Alzheimer's can present
many challenges. Helping a
spouse use a public restroom
is one of the most difficult
tasks for many of the 10 mil-
lion American caregivers -
and I am sure many of them
will appreciate not only your
question but also your chal-
lenge.
Because using the restroom
is difficult for your wife, be
sure to take that into consid-
eration when planning all her
activities. By calling the
establishments ahead of time,
you can determine which
restaurant, mall, etc. offers
unisex or family restrooms. If
you find yourself somewhere
with only a men's or
women's bathroom, ask an
employee for assistance. He
or she should be able to clear
the women's restroom for a
few minutes so you can help
your wife while respecting
everyone's privacy.
In addition to caring for
your wife, I cannot stress
enough how important it is to
take care of yourself. For
more caregiver tips and sup-
port, call the Alzheimer's
Association's toll-free, 24-
hour helpline at (800) 272-
3900 anytime day or night, of
visit the Web site at
www.alz.org.

Write Dear Abby at www.Dear
Abby.com.





New Dolby Digital Sound
All Seats S5.00 for Matinee



SLIMDOG MIUIONAIRE R
(Dev Patei. Freiao Pintol
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
MADEAGOESTOJAIL PG13
i Tyler Perry. Tyler Perry)
2:15 5:15 8:15
THE INTERNATIONAL R
iChve Owen Naomi Watts)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
HE'S JUST NOT THAT
INTO YOU PGI3
(Sc:arlen Jlnanson, Justin Long)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
TAKEN PG13
(Liam Neeson. Maggie Grace)
2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15
GRAN TORINO R
iCint Eashtood)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30


Page 15B


'Madea' funny, but

offers nothing new


SUADOKUA
Fun By The
4 8 Numbers

7 9 5 Like puzzles?
Then you'll love
3 7 6 4 sudoku. This
mind-bending
4 5 3 puzzle will have
S _ -_ you hooked from
6 9 the moment you
S - _ square off, so
1 6 9 sharpen your
S- pencil and put
7 your sudoku
savvy to the test
1 3 8

4 1 6 5
Level: Intermediate
Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each
row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
9 9 k.. ~ L 8 E 6
9 LC L 6 9 Z 9
6 .Z 9 V 89 L 9 L
V 6 9 L S;9 L 8
E 9 9 6 L1 9 L E
E L. L 89 9 9 V 6,
1. 9 6 9 L ZE 9
9 9S ~8 96 L V L
L 8 t'9 1. 6 Z 9
:U3MSNV
















LIVING


PAGE


CLASSIFIED


Bedtime blues
PAGE 14B
Friday, February 27, 2009


*~'A*~*


how to survive and thrive

with


FAMILY FEATURES

New moms know - taking care of one baby is hard work. But what about twins - or triplets?
How can you manage two (or more) babies with only two hands? Is it possible to not just �
survive the daily frenzy of feedings, diaperings and tears, but to thrive?
There are more multiples than ever these days. The multiples birth rate has risen steadily over the
last two decades, and the trend isn't slowing. By 2010, it's estimated that there will be 1.3 million sets
of twins in America.
When Christina Boyle and Cathleen Stahl discovered they were both having twins, they found out
that there were surprisingly few resources geared toward parenting multiples.
"No one understands what a mom of multiples goes through better than other moms of twins," said
Boyle. "But even with the twin birth rate soaring, it can be hard to find experts who get it."
So they put their heads together, consulted pediatricians and surveyed hundreds of moms of multi-
ples and put their tips together in a new book, "Twin Set" (Three Rivers Press, 2008).
"Both of us have older 'singleton' children so we've seen first-hand how raising our own twin sets is
markedly different, but at the same time, most of the tips in our book are actually good for all moms,
not
just moms of multiples. Twins provide a great road test for products and techniques - if it works well
with two, then it will be even better
for one!"
With that in mind, the authors created a resource that offers ideas,
"real world" advice, support, and laughs, covering everything from
feeding to diapering to bonding. In addition to the book, they are also
partnering with Pampers to offer parenting tips and products at
Pampers .com.


Some basic advice for moms of multiples?
Establishing a routine is essential! Having a routine in place gives
you some semblance of control and it's a huge sanity saver. You may
need to do things at unusual times, such as giving baby twins their
baths in the middle of the day, rather than at nighttime. As long as it
works for your family dynamic, go for it.
Do things that make life easier. There is no shame in
ordering groceries online and having them delivered, or in
pulling clean laundry off the top of the laundry basket and
wearing it without folding it and putting it away.
Get rid of the guilt. All moms of twins feel overwhelmed
at some point. No matter how much help you have, how support-
ive your partner is or how much you prepare for the challenge,
there will be days when you feel you cannot give enough to each
child. It's normal to feel guilty, but you're probably doing a better
job than you realize.



The blessings and the challenges of multiples are unique, and
these parents need all the help they can get. Having some strategies
in place and the right tools on hand can make it a little easier to go
beyond merely surviving to truly thriving.
For more tips, information on "Twin Set," and special offers for
moms of twins, visit Pampers.com/twins.


.'


One of the many challenges of multiples
is dealing with diapers.
Boyle and Stahl say that they were stunned by how many diapers they used in a
24-hour period. They offer some tips on eliminating some diapering frustrations
and making the job a little more efficient.
m Take advantage of technological advances in the baby care field.
"New products like Pampers Swaddlers Sensitive diapers," say the authors,
"make it easy to know exactly when the baby needs to be changed. Some-
times it's hard to tell why twins are upset if they're crying simultaneously,
and it could be for different reasons. The indicator line on the outside of the
diaper turns from yellow to blue when the baby is wet - so it removes the
guesswork."
* Create multiple diaper-changing
stations. Sixty three percent of the
moms surveyed for the book said that
setting up more than one diaper-chang-
ing station at home was a top mommy
secret. Put stations wherever it makes
the most sense for you.
n Assembly lines. With small babies,
the authors recommend the assembly-
line approach. If the babies are fed at or
- -. around the same time, burp as needed,
play with each one a little bit, then
e .change one by one. "You'll quickly fig-
ure out who should get changed first (we
say go for the messier, stinkier or cranki-
.. . er one)."


PAGE





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