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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00645
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Published on Nov. 6, 1988 as: Sunday news-sun
Alternate title: News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun
Place of Publication: Sebring, Fla
Creation Date: February 13, 2009
Publication Date: 1988-
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States of America -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States of America -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each days's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29858590
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:00645
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

Full Text







www.newssun





NEWS S IN
Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927
�1 Blu Streks.ge


Glade Runner
Guide chases trophies
near Chokoloskee
PAGE 11 A

Friday-Saturday, February 13-14, 2009


. Blue Streaks get
district victory

SPORTS, PAGE 1 B


www.newssun.com


Van plows

through garage

PAGE 2A


Volume 90/Number 19 150 cents


Some sun, showers
possible in afternoon
High Low

81 56
Complete Forecast
PAGE 16A



T Li
VOICE

Question: Should
companies who do
contracted work for
Highlands County be
required to use the
E-Verify system?

Yes

1H 75.6



No

24.4%


Total votes: 45
Next question:
Should South Carolina
authorities try to arrest
Michael Phelps?
Make your voice heard at
www.newssunm. ,,.


Patricia Hahs
Age 62, of Sebring
Byron Hanson
Age 84, of Sebring
George Janowiak
Age 52, of Sebring
Ralph Plott
Age 80, of Sebring and
Mechanicsburg, Va.
Elise Sperry
Age 94, of Sebring
Shirley Warnick
Age 78, of Lake Placid
Obituaries, Page 6A

Community Briefs 6A
Community Calendar 15A
Dear Abby 158
Local Golf News 4B
Movie Reviews 15B
Real Estate Source 14A
Soduku Puzzle 15B




Good Morning To
News-Sun subscriber
Donald Langdon
Sebring



S90994 01001 7


Privacy? Not



if you're in



the courtroom


PLEASE BEAD6 6ISED THATALL.

CONVERSATIONS]ETHERON T 1E
RECORD - OR OlFFTHERECORDI

IN TIS [1-l fl !LOAION ARE[ BoEING~lq


Backup system records conversations even

when lawyers turn off primary microphone


Conversations
could be on
public record
By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
SEBRING - The First
Amendment Foundation of
Florida was not completely
surprised to hear that court-
rooms in Highlands, Hardee
and Polk counties have both
main recording systems and
backup recording systems in
their courtrooms, but they
did question why they were
there.
Adria Harper, director of
the First Amendment
Fountain in Tallahassee,
also recently learned that
some confidential conversa-
tions between attorneys and
clients may have been
recorded, even if the main
system was not active, but
could not comment on if
those recordings are appro-
priate or if they are now
public record.
"Some attorneys will be
concerned when they learn
that they are being recorded,
especially off the record,
and.that recording could be
public record. This creates a
lot of issues that the court is
not prepared to answer and
doesn't want. Our questions
here are: For what purpose
are these systems installed,


News-Sun photos by KATARA SIMMONS
People walk through the central rotunda of the Highlands County Courthouse Thursday
morning. (Top photo) Signs advice that all conversations in the courtrooms are being
recorded.


what are the ramifications,
and what exemption under
current statute can they
claim an exemption for pub-
lic records," Harper said.
"A video camera for secu-
rity is one thing, but audio
recordings when you have a
reasonable expectation of
privacy is another," Harper
added.
Although none would
speak on the record, several
local attorneys contacted by
the News-Sun expressed sur-


iprise thpt the backup system
could record the conversa-
tions they have with their
clients in the courtroom. For
security reasons in some
instances, courthouse rules
prohibit clients and their
attorneys from leaving their
table in the courtroom, eveh
when court is in recess.
According to Gabrella
Birnie, an ex-employee of
the District 10 court system,
the backup system is on a
timer and runs when court is


; Ha0P|LY 'VSLDNTIIfr*'k Ujtr v **

'First date' motorcycle more than

just a fond memory for couple


By TREY CHRISTY
trey.christy@newssun.com
SEBRING - A 30-plus
year.marriage all started with
a cup of coffee and a motor-
cycle.
"We met when I was work-
ing at a restaurant between
college one summer," Karen
Howard said about her hus-
band, Leo. "He got a cup of
coffee and it cost a quarter
back in 1969, and he left a
dollar tip."
After Leo came in for
breakfast a few times, this
led to a first date - linked to
a 1965 BMW motorcycle.
"He came to my house in
his motorcycle and-my father
said 'You aren't going any-
where on that,'" Karen said.
"I thought it was cool; I was
all for it."
But her father wouldn't
budge.
"I was embarrassed," she


News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS
Sebring's Leo Howard tried to pick up his wife for their
first date on this 1965 BMW motorcycle, but his future
father-in-law wouldn't let his daughter ride on it. "'The rest
of the story is he went back and got a vehicle and we went
on that date," said his wife Karen.


said. "I remember saying
'Daddy this is so embarrass-
ing.' He could have cared
less."


Leo recalled her father's
reaction.

Continued on page 7A


in and out of session.
Although there aresjgns
outside each courtroom that
clearly state that conversa-
tions on and off the record
are recorded, Birnie feels
that the general public has
no idea there are two sys-
'tems running.
Birnie explained that the
main court recording system
has a blue indicator light sit-
uated in the front of the
courtroom.
Continued on page 7A


Stewart

balks at

proposed

park on

Istokpoga
By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
SEBRING - County
Commissioner Barbara
Stewart balked at the man-
agement contract offered to
the county for the Istokpoga
Canal Park on Tuesday.
Plans call for the park to be
built on the northeast side of
the lake, almost six miles
from Lorida.
The agreement was offered
by the South Florida Water
Management District
(SFWMD), and includes the
area in the Istokpoga Marsh
Watershed
Improvement .
District cre-
ated by coun-
ty ordinance
in 1980.
SFWMD
would con-
struct the thwart
park and then, according to
the agreement, turn the man-
agement and maintenance of
the park over to county Parks
and Recreation Department.
"Our -thoughts were that
we could construct it, permit
it, and then hand everything
to the county; that was our
intention," said Paul Whalen,
a representative from
SFWMD.
Allowing for a second boat
ramp access to , the
Kissimmee - River in
Highlands County, as well as
lake access, the park would
include several amenities like
public rest rooms, ramps for
boat access and picnic areas.
But, according to Stewart,
the proposed lease pushed

Continued on page 7A


Tanglewood hopes to

top 2008 Relay for

Life donation amount


By CHRISTOPHER
TUFFLEY
christopher.tffley@newssun.com
TANGLEWOOD -
Residents of Tanglewood
are gearing up for the final
two major events in their
Relay for Life fundraising
program.
This is the 10th year the
folks of Tanglewood have
taken on the challenge of
raising money for cancer
research.
Their drive began mod-
estly in 1999 as a tribute to
a particular person who had
died of cancer that year.
Three hundred dollars was
raised in Bob
Stotlemeyer's name.
Nine years later, in 2008,
the Tanglewood communi-
ty raised $49,000 for can-
cer research, breaking
records and outdistancing
every other Highlands
County Relay for Life
team.


Actually, the residents of
Tanglewood don't have a
walking relay event.
Instead groups within the
community hold - small
fundraisers all season long,
while the Relay for Life
team puts on four major
events - an Italian dinner
(which raised almost
$5.000), a concert featur-
ing Paul Todd, a luminere
program and a picnic. In
addition, the Theater Guild
puts on a fashion show, and
the golf association puts on
two tournaments.
Tom McKeever and Tom
DiGrazia, or "the Two
Toms" (as they are com-
monly known). are the
acknowledged organizers
of the Relay for Life pro-
gram, although both men
speak of teamwork and
community participation.
They want to remind
Tanglewood residents the
Continued on page 8A


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News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


Page 2A


News-Sun photo by TREY CHRISTY
Nobody was injured when this minivan plowed through the garage of a house on Home Avenue just off the Sebring
:Parkway Tuesday afternoon.


'Woman cited for careless driving after


her minivan plows through garage


Nobody injured in

:Tuesday accident at

intersection of

Parkway and Home
By TREY CHRISTY
trey.christy@ newssun .com
SEBRING -.A woman was cited for
careless driving after her minivan
careened off the road and struck a stand
alone garage,
There were no injuries reported in the
Tuesday afternoon accident that resulted
in significant damage to the garage off
of Home Avenue.
Kimberly Doty, 44. of Sebring, lost
.control of her 2006 Kia minivan prior to
-attempting the right hand turn from the
,Sebring Parkway onto Home Avenue,
,she said, because her tire "blew out,"
according to a report from the Sebring
Police Department.
Officer Daniel Cordero of the SPD
said there was no tire blowout and


This Story Was first
Reported Online At
www.newssun @

noticed an absence of skid marks which
would have been "indicative of braking
hard."
Damage to the garage was estimated
at $8,000.
According to witnesses, the driver of
the van was weaving in and out of traf-
fic recklessly at speeds up to 90 mph,
headed north on the SebringParkway.
"They passed us like we were stand-
ing still," said Sebring resident Eldridge
Brown, adding that he was traveling at
about 50 mph on the Parkway when he
was passed by the minivan.
The SPD report makes the same alle-
gations about the swerving vehicle, and
estimated it was traveling at "over 70
mph."
When the vehicle attempted to make
the right hand turn onto Home Avenue,
it didn't appear to slow down, said
Brown, who witnessed the accident.


He said the car also came from the
left lane to try and make the right turn.
This was verified by the SPD report.
"There was a lot of weaving," said
Mika Brown, who was in the car with
her husband.
The only visible skid marks at the
scene were in the grass area after the
curb, leading straight into the garage.
The garage didn't hold any cars that
could have been damaged, but is home
to a lawnmower, tools, a generator and
some collectibles.
"My brother's comic books and base-
ball card collection is in there," said
Kathy Collier, whose mother owns the
garage. "Hopefully that's OK."
It stored chemicals such as pesticides
near the collision point, but there did
not appear to be any spills.
"It's a drive-through," joked Collier.
"I hated that door, it was so hard to
unlock.
"I guess it wont be a problem any
more


more.
Damage
at $3,600.


to the vehicle was estimated


www.newssun.com


Obama looks to Lincoln

while launching presidency


BY CHRISTOPHER WILLS
Associated Press
When Barack Obama
launched his presidential
campaign, he did it in
Abraham Lincoln's home-
town. When he arrived in
Washington, he followed
the train route Lincoln used
in 1861. When he needed a
Bible for his swearing-in,
Obama picked Lincoln's.
Heck, even Obama's
lunch on Inauguration Day
was modeled after Lincoln's
favorites, right down to the
seafood stew.
Wednesday, Obama stood
beneath the flag-draped box
where Abraham Lincoln
was shot inside Ford's
Theatre, honoring the "hal-
lowed space" on the eve of
the 16th president's 200th
birthday.
Hollywood stars and
Washington power brokers
celebrated the theater's
reopening, hearing Obama
praise one of his favorite
presidents for Lincoln's
conviction that a divided
nation could be made
whole.
"For despite all that
divided us - North and
South, black and white -
he had an unyielding belief
that we were, at heart, one
nation, and one people,"
Obama said. "And because
of Abraham Lincoln, and all


Swho've carried on his work
in the generations since, that
is what we remain today."
Clearly, the 44th presi-
dent wants Americans to
know how much he admires
the 16th.
Presidential historian
Doris Kearns Goodwin
thinks that reflects Obama's
genuine affinity with
Lincoln - for his willing-
ness to learn and grow, his
ability to communicate with
the nation, his insistence on
having strong-willed, inde-
pendent advisers.
"Somehow Lincoln has
worked himself into
; Obama's heart and mind,
and it's a good thing to have
Lincoln as your mentor,"
said Goodwin, Pulitzer
Prize-winning author of
"Team of Rivals," a Lincoln
book that Obama says has
influenced his thinking on
how to govern.
But for a new president
trying to reassure people
during another time of cri-
sis, highlighting Lincoln
can also be a signal to the
nation: If one skinny Illinois
lawyer could' guide the
country through the Civil
War, then maybe another
one can handle today's
problems.
In a sense, Obama has
Continued on page 7A


Scott Strazzante/Chicag6 Tribune/MCT
President Barack Obama delivers a speech a the Obama
Inauguration Celebration at the Lincoln Memorial in
Washington two days before his inauguration.


plan Youth
Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK - The
Heartland Workforce and
South Florida Community
College Panther Youth
Partners Program will hold a
Youth Partnership Conference
from 9-11 a.m. Friday, Feb.
,27 in the Citrus Center
Auditorium, SFCC Highlands
Campus.
SThe conference is an oppor-
tunity for youth service
,providers in the tri-county
area to build partnerships and
'focus on providing continuing
educational and vocational
training for at-risk youth, as
wVell as preparing them to
center the workforce. The con-
ference will also include a
round-table discussion and
presentation, "Be the Wall:
Using Social Marketing to
,Reduce Underage Drinking in
the Tri-County Area," by
bebbie Lees of the Highlands
County Sheriff's Office.
' The Panther Youth Partners
Program, a collaborative
effort between SFCC and
heartland Workforce, pro-
4


Last we knew
Amy had successful-
ly prepared a heifer,
a sow, around a
dozen chickens, and
a rabbit; completed
an essay, a wood
working project, and
two board displays;
grown a citrus tree,
a hibiscus plant, and
a dish garden and
entered them all into
competition.
Judging had not yet
occurred.


The latest
Amy's heifer was weight class winner and
reserve grand champion for both show-
manship and grooming. Her pig placed fifth
in weight class, but was awarded the blue
ribbon for first in class and she was one of
the five finalists for senior
showmanship.Amy's chickens and rabbit
won blue ribbons, her rooster a red ribbon
and she was named grand champion senior
showmanship for her presentation of both
the chickens and rabbits. Her citrus tree
won third place. Her dish garden won first
in class, as did her citrus display board.
Her essay, her woodworking project, her
hibiscus plant and beef display board all
won grand champion. In other words, Amy
placed in every category she entered.


Partnership Conference


vides at-risk youth in
Highlands, DeSoto and
Hardee counties, with training
and employability skills that
allow them to be successful in
obtaining and retaining long-
term employment.
The conference is open. to
all youth service providers


and is free of charge. A conti-
nental breakfast will be pro-
vided at 8:30 a.m. For more
information contact Eddie
Cuencas, SFCC program spe-
cialist, Youth Services, at
784-7161. Contact SFCC
Registration at 784-7134 or
784-7416 before Feb. 24.


NEWS-SUN

Standard of Accuracy
The goal of the News-Sun is to do things the right way in everything
we do. Of course, that does not always happen.
If this occurs in a news report, the News-Sun will correct all errors
of fact as soon as possible. Readers who find factual errors are
encouraged to contact the newsroom so we can correct the mistake.
Readers who wish to comment on our coverage rather than a factual
error are encouraged to write a letter to the editor.
The standard of accuracy applies to all our operations. Readers with
concerns about delivery or subscription payments should call the circu-
lation department.
We strive to provide the best customer service in all facets of our
operation. Those who are unable to resolve their problems through the
usual channels are invited to call my office directly.

Clarrisa Williams, Publisher
- 863-385-6155, ext. 515


Lawyers: Arrests made in Phelps case


By EVAN BERLAND
Associated Press
COLUMBIA, S.C. - Authorities in the
South Carolina county where Michael Phelps
was photographed smoking from a marijuana
pipe have been arresting people as they seek
to make a case against the superstar swim-
mer, lawyers for two arrested people said
Thursday.
Attorneys Joseph McCulloch and Dick
Harpootlian told The Associated Press they
each represent a client charged with posses-
sion of marijuana who were questioned about
the party Phelps attended near the University
of South Carolina campus in November.
The lawyers said the two clients were


renters at the house where the party appar-
ently took place. Harpootlian said his client
was at the party, but didn't see Phelps smoke
marijuana, while McCulloch said his client
wasn't there. The two have since moved and
were arrested after police executed a search
warrant at their new home and accused them
of having a small amount of marijuana there.
"After they arrested him, they didn't ask
him, 'Where did you get the marijuana?' or
'Who sold it to you?' Almost all the ques-
tions they asked him were about Michael
Phelps," Harpootlian said.
The lawyers would not name their clients,
who each face up to 30 days in jail and a
$200 fine if convicted.


L ttery Feb.11 4 8 13 36 37 39
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Feb. 10 22 25 38 42 4 11 Feb. 11 (n) 2 0 2
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daytime drawing, (n) is the
nighttime drawing.
PB: Power Ball PP: Power Play


www.newssun.com
Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South * Sebring, Florida 33870
A HarborPoint Media Company


OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870
OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday
PHONE: 863-385-6155
MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954
NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453

CIRCULATION
SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not receive
your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation department
before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days and before 11 a.m. on
Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers
who notify us after the times mentioned, will receive credit to their account. Please
call 385-6155, 452-1009, or 465-0426.


POSTMASTER: Send address change to:
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USPS - ISSN 0163-3988
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES
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Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition and noon on Friday
for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.


The issue
Sebring High
,School senior
'Amy Whack
sets a goal of
entering every
possible com-
petition at the
,Highlands
'County Fair


SFCC and Heartland Workforce










www.newssun. com News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


'Artists on the Sidewalk' featured during tonight's Gallery Walk


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING - Gallery/
Downtown Walk presents
"Artists on the Sidewalk"
from 5-8 p.m. today.
JoAnn Wedge from
Oceanside, Calif., is showing
her crystal and fused glass
silver and gold jewelry.
Photographers Burke and
Carter Evans from Lake
Placid are displaying their
local original photography
and pictures. Gemstone jew-
elry by Nancy and Reesa
Boyce will be on display in
front of Wild Artist on North
Ridgewood Drive. Harvey Le
Blanc will have some unusu-
al one-of-a-kind fused glass
creations.
"There is a major focus on
gifts Friday night because
Valentine's Day is the very
next day," one of the organiz-
ers said.
"It's a perfect evening to
stroll the elegant shops of
historic downtown Sebring
and find a symbol of appreci-
ation and affection for a spe-
cial person in your life."
Most venues will be serv-
ing wine and snacks.
On North Ridgewood
Drive: Janet King's Painting
Studio, 215 N. Ridgewood
Drive, will have more than
50 original paintings offered
at a 50 percent discount for
the first time ever. Greeting


cards made from her original
masterpieces will also be
available.
King, along with fellow
watercolor artist Alice
Hansen, will have new works
on display too. They are serv-
ing refreshments and
"Grandma's Famous Toffee."
Shoppers at Happy Owl are
surprised and delighted as
they wander from room to
room in this spacious and
fully stocked showroom for
art and fun realizing that they
no longer have to go out of
town for anything.
This month, children who
stop to play at the Children's
Museum of the Highlands
will get a chance to be a side-
walk artist.
They will create their own
works of spin art and display
it on the front window of the
museum. In this cluster of
shops is Linda's Books,
always serving chocolates
and a helpful smile.
Further up Ridgewood
towards the Circle is
Tosheba's Fashions. Unusual
designer clothes that fit most
ladies and unique, handmade
handbags. Next door to her,
Wild Artist Jewelry cele-
brates Valentine's Day with
lots of hearts to choose from.
Mike's Photography is across
the street.
On Center Avenue: The


Courtesy art
A watercolor original courtesy of Janet King. Her studio is
having a sale during Friday's Gallery Walk.


Friends of the Library Used
Book Store (East Center
Avenue) is featuring a collec-
tion of sci-fi and fantasy
books for Friday the 13th.
On the other side of the
Circle on West Center
Avenue is a new venue: Liz
and Co. Hair and Tanning
Salon. Meet and welcome the
dynamic stylist/owner Liz
Ronk and enjoy some wine
and cheese.
On the Circle: Experience
the Circle Salon with art and
antiques. Relax and enjoy the
view from the balcony over-
looking Circle Park (elevator
provided).
Come to Le Attique and
experience a grand evening


filled with food, drink and
socializing.
Brenner Pottery & Craft
Gallery is showing new work
by their artists, plus work of
new artisans who have just
arrived.
Their own award winning
pottery is also on display.
This month's featured
artist is Mary Seigfreid, a
resident of Sebring since
1980. Siegreid has an interest
in varied medias and has
designed projects for maga-
zines, written 10 " How To"
books and traveled extensive-
ly for Delta Paint Co.
She is well known
throughout Florida and other
areas for her creative rendi-


Courtesy photo
This sparkley Swarovski crystal set was made by local artist
Adam Ray.


tions on Cypress knees. View
a sampling of a new direc-
tion, of mixed media and fun
fantasy pieces, some explor-
ing the use of "found"
objects. Her imagination has
no boundaries.


Other circle venues are
Steve and Company and
Golden Pineapple; Don't for-
get Charlie's Steakhouse and
Habitat for Humanity Re-sale
Store on South Commerce
Drive.


Legion post holds service to honor Four Chaplains


By MARY MARGARET STAIK
Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID - The
American Legion Post 25 was
host for the 66th anniversary of
the sinking of the USAT
Dorchester. A ceremony honor-
ing the Four Chaplains was
held during the regular Post
meeting Feb. 9.
Roger Perkins gave a brief
biography of each of the four
chaplains, along with a slide
show depicting the Dorchester
and photos of the rescue scene,


The stained
glass at the
Chapel of the
Four
Chaplains in
Philadelphia,
Pa.


including the life rafts full of
survivors, and soldiers in the
water, bringing images of the
tragic frigid night to life for the
Legion members and their
guests.
Of the 230 survivors, two
lived for a time in Lake Placid:
Edward J. Dionne and Dan
O'Keefe.
Joseph A: Dionne, county
Veteran Services Officer and
Edward's on, followed with a
history of the Four Chaplains
Chapel and its famous stained


glass window depicting the
four chaplains, as well as the
other stained glass windows
throughout the country depict-
ing the sinking of the
Dorchester.

Four Chaplains
memorials
An interfaith memorial
chapel vas dedicated in
February 1951 in Philadelphia
to memory' of the Four
Chaplains, and hence is called


the Chapel of the Four
Chaplains. Mounted in the wall
is a stained glass depicting the
sinking of the Dorchester. The
chapel is currently at the old
Philadelphia Navy Yard.
Other stained glass windows
depicting the sinking of the
USAT Dorchester are at the
U.S. Army Sergeants Major
Academy Chaplain Corps
Classroom in Fort Bliss Texas;
the Chapel of Immortal
Continued on page 8A


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Page 4A

EDITORIAL & OPINION


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


TODAY'S EDITORIAL


Keep the jail near the courthouse


We have to differ with the critics of the down-
town jail. Unlike them we feel keeping the jail
downtown is the practical, sound choice.
There are three primary reason we believe this.


Expanding the current building will
be less expensive than constructing a
new one from scratch.
Keeping the jail and the courts in
close proximity make transporting pris-
oners easier, safer and less costly.
The jail, with its stream of visitors
every day, acts as a significant econom-
ic engine for the downtown area.
Sebring City Councilman John
Griffin has said a jail is not in the city's
long-term plans for Sebring, that an
expanded jail increases the risk to its
neighbors, and that the size of the
expansion - three more pods, each two
or three.stories tall - would loom over
the immediate area.
We agree that jails in general are ugly,
problematic places, hardly the kind of
facility one wants to build a downtown
around. But, steps can be taken to create
a street-friendly facade, and the jail's
location is already hidden behind the
courthouse, in an area that will most
likely become more professional and
less residential.
Regarding the element of risk, one
exists of course, but the sheriff's office


has an admirable record, going back
many years, of keeping the community
safe.
According to jail staff, except for one
trustee walking off, the fall of 1992 was
the last time there was a prisoner
escape. No one can guarantee perfect
safety, but that 17-year record is good
enough for us to have faith in the work
the correction officers are doing.
Where to put a new sheriff's office
administration building is a separate
question. Ideally it too should stay
downtown, in order to be close to the
jail and courthouse and, more impor-
tantly, to the public.
We hope planners will look closely
into alternatives different from the pro-
posed George Boulevard location.
We feel a high visibility sheriff's
office helps stabilize its surrounding
community, and there is no community
to speak of around George Boulevard,
which makes it remote, despite being off
U.S. 27.
There are alternatives, although the
suggestion of the city hall site we are
less excited about, simply because then


city hall will have to be relocated and
that can only make things more expen-
sive, not less.
Looking creatively at the current site,
going for multiple stories and building
over parking, for example, still might
produce a solution.
Then there is the SunTrust building
on Center Avenue that has 27,820 square
feet of space in three floors. It is near
the courthouse and jail, and would not
be too difficult to reach coming in from
South Lakeview Drive and North
Franklin Street. Typically the sheriff's
administration offices don't see a great
deal of visitors, so traffic shouldn't be a
problem. The bank already has a sizable
parking lot.
Finally, the city has suggested a six-
acre site between Pear Street and the
railroad tracks, one block off the
Sebring Parkway. While the property
would have to be purchased, as would
the SunTrust Building, the cost of pro-
viding utilities to the George Boulevard
site is likely to be equal or greater.
. In the end, the only way to get this
right is to take the time to do the
research and consider all the implica-
tions. We feel the city, county and sher-
iff have made an excellent start toward a
difficult decision, but there is more to
consider than just dollars and cents -
and everyone has to be included.


EXPRESSIONS OF FREE SPEECH

'Those who deny freedom to to others deserve it not for themselves; and, under
the just rule of God, cannot long retain it.'

ABRAHAM LINCOLN
16th U.S. president, 1859


A new holiday to pay


homage to leaders


For far too long, our nation
has blithely accepted
Presidents Day, a hybridized
holiday commemorating the
birthdays of George
Washington and Abraham
S Lincoln.
SOn Monday, we should rise
p- late, long after the alarm
Flock would ordinarily go off
-and holler, "No more!"
SOh, I understand the
rationale for the consolidated
celebration.
It suits our schedules better
f we all pretend that
george's and Abe's mommas
Conveniently went into labor
tn the third Monday in
february and bestowed upon
grateful nation an opportu-
ity for a three-day weekend,
lus two pretty good presi-
ents.
But it is an abomination
nonetheless, an insult to Nos.
and 16 and all those after
Snd between.
It's impossible, of course,
o return to the tradition of
honoring just Washington's
actuall birthday, like we did
S hen I was a lad. Doing so
would wreak all manner of
avoc.
These days, major retailers
vould have to take a break
rrom their Chapter 11 bank-
uptcy proceedings to hold
iot one but two big sale-a-
frations on linens, cherry
pies, stovepipe hats and the
ike.
SAnd the federal govern-
ment would have to give its
employees yet another paid
day off in February, on top of
Groundhog Day, Valentine's
bay, Fat Tuesday,'Flag Day
JMexico), International Dog
iscuit Appreciation Day,
lag Day (Canada) and - am
$ forgetting anything? -
4ational Gum Drop Day.
2 Now, before I start receiv-
%ng hate mail written in the
Digital equivalent of crayon
Oubs, let me hasten to add
at I am quite aware the feds
Till officially regard the
Upcoming holiday as
Vashington's Birthday.
0 State governments are the
Pnes that decided, formally
Ind informally, to scooch a
Hair to the table for Abe,
trap a cone-shaped party hat
dn his head and dub the fes-
tivities Presidents Day.
Well, most states, anyway.
Alabama, apparently still
nursing a grudge over the
Late Unpleasantness a centu-


Another
Opinion
DarrylLease

ry and a half ago, chooses to
celebrate Washington and
Jefferson Day each year at
this time - even though
Tom's momma quite sensibly
went into labor in April,
when Virginia's climate is
more hospitable.
But while it is too late to
turn back the clock, except
maybe in Alabama, it's not
too late for all Americans to
stop living the lie that is
Presidents Day, the falsehood
that it is a day that we honor
all of the presidents of this
great land.
We're doing no such thing.
The lesser lights and the dim-
,mer bulbs in our pantheon of
presidents garner no mention
at all.
Surely, Lincoln - who once
walked 12 miles in the snow,
uphill both ways, to return
the keys to some lady's Town
Car, or something freakishly
honest like that - wouldn't
want us to live this deceit.
And Washington, immortal-
ized in that apocryphal story
about his not lying about
chopping down a cherry tree
he didn't really chop down,
definitely wouldn't want us
to further this falsehood,
either.
On this Presidents Day, I'd
like us all to say a few words
in honor of the achievements
- make 'em up if you have to
- of Franklin Pierce, James
K. Polk, William Henry
"Achoo" Harrison and
Chester A. Arthur.
Let us sing the praises of
James Buchanan, Warren G.
Harding, Dick Cheney and
Martin Van Buren. And give
a shout out, won't you
please, to John Tyler, Al
Gore, Calvin Coolidge,
William Howard Taft and
Zachary Taylor.
For many of us, this year's
Presidents Day will coincide
with a delightful new holiday,
National Furlough Day. This
offers us even more free time
to pay homage to our leaders.
I plan to commemorate the
occasion by building a tiny
replica of Hooverville, and
then taking a nice long nap.

Daryl Lease is an editorial
writer for The Virginian-Pilot
in Norfolk,Va.


NEWS-SUN
2227 U.S. 27 South
Sebring Fla 33870
863-385-6155
CLARISSA WILLIAMS
Publisher
E'l. 515
clarissa.willianis@(newssun com
N ESROOM
ROMONA WASHINGTON
Executive Editor
Ext. 516
editor@ newssun.com
SCOTT DRESSEL
Assistant Editor
Ext. 541
scott.Jressel@newissiui.comit
DAN HOEHNE
Sports Editor
Ext. 528
don .hoelnue@newssun.coin
ADVERTISING
VICKIE JONES
Exi. 518
vickie.jones@iiewssun.com
CIRCUS LTION
DAVID MASON
Ext. 533
daid.nmason@newi.sun .omn
PRE-PRESS
KEN BAREFIELD
Production Coordinator
Ext. 594
prepressn' rcissit .corn
BUSINESS OFFICE
JANET ENIERSON
Ext. 596
iane.emr.erson@newssun.com


TODAY'S LETTERS


Sauls needs to return to DARE
Editor:
Sergeant Monica Sauls has done an out-
standing job as the head of the Highlands
County DARE program. As a parent of a
high school senior, I have been involved in
many school projects in the Lake Placid
schools and witnessed Monica."work her
magic" with the children first-hand.
There really was no magic to it; she gen-
uinely loves the children and is concerned
about each and every one of them. Her rap-
port with the students is tremendous.
Children flock to her and confide in her and
that is exactly what the children need in a
DARE leader, and the sheriff's office needs
from a DARE leader. Monica has definitely
implanted a friendly, caring reputation for
police in the minds of countless children.
So why, after 15 years of running DARE
and 37 years into her career, would you take
this nationally recognized professional out of
a beautifully run program and move her to
road patrol in the name of "career develop-
ment?" Sergeant Sauls should continue to
run DARE in this county until her retire-
ment. She has earned that right and she
would serve the sheriff's office and county
the best in this role.
I support Sheriff Benton and understand
that she has a lot of tough decisions to make
every day - and like everyone, may make a
mistake every now and then. DARE teaches
children to make good choices. Please use
that philosophy in this instance and return
Sgt. Sauls to DARE.
Barbara Shrewsbury
Lake Placid

Resthaven closing its doors
Editor:
We should all be aware after 50-plus
years, Resthaven Assisted Living (Hardee
County) will close its doors. It is a shame a
community will allow its elderly to have to


leave the only home they know.
Resthaven has been a haven for those
unable to afford assisted living, and have
been spared the alternative of living in a
nursing home. Residents of Resthaven have
enjoyed southern-style family living with
caring staff, who have been able to provide
one-on-one interaction with residents.
There will be many tears at Resthaven on
March 1. Are there any caring community
members who can do anything to stop the
closing doors of this wonderful facility?
Judith Hutchens
Homosassa

Full spending ahead
Editor:
I have been listening to conservative talk-
ers for some time and I am a little disap-
pointed. It is not the talk the talk, but the
walk the walk that is insufficient. A while
back I wrote to Judge Bork and asked this
question, "Where in our constitution does it
give the government the right to take from
one and give to another who does nothing to
earn it." The answer was "you have to take it
to court."
If the courts declared this unconstitutional,
what effect would this have? Politicians and
despots could not use the frailty of humans
(the promise of bread and circus) to propel
themselves to positions of power.
Capitalism will be back in vogue.
Competitive free-enterprise is the backbone
of capitalism. Welfare and subsidies distorts
the operation of the marketplace. When
wages or prices go above what the market-
place will bear, then the demand for welfare
and subsidies to uphold the high prices and
wages are given (subsidize housing, unem-
ployment compensation, etc.).
Russell Errett
Sebring

More letters on page 5A


View From
The Van
Teresa Stein

From battle

grounds to a

sterile office

My daughter drove the
van this morning and took
me to Dr. Sameh Atalla's
office for a follow-up visit.
And I have thought about the
experience all day.
The doctor sat on his stool
working on the leg of his
patient in a comfortable,
sterile office in Lake Placid.
He was removing stitches
from a surgery that he had
performed to remove a pre-
cancerous lesion.
He was very intent on his
work and did not speak to
the patient, hardly at all. But
she watched his face intently
as he performed what was a,
more or less, menial task in
his profession. But the sur-
gery that he had performed
and that he did for the peo-
ple who filled his waiting
room was not menial, nor
was his serious manner of
work. And it prompted the
curios patient to ask, "What
led you into surgery, doc-
tor?"
It was as if she had asked,
"When did you win the lot-
tery, doctor?" For his head
jerked up from his work, his
face lit up with a huge smile
and he answered, "That is a
very good question!" He fin-
ished the stitch on which he
was workftg, scooted his
stool back a few feet and
said, "But not early as good
as the answer."
Then, with enthusiasm, he
told her about a time when
he was in his third year of
medical school in his home-
land of Egypt.
It was during the war
between Egypt and Israel in
1973. "There had been a
horrible battle with many
casualties, most requiring
serious surgery. But there
were not nearly enough sur-
geons to take care of the
patients. There were amputa-
tions which needed to be
done, patients bleeding from
serious wounds - patients
who would die without
immediate attention.
"Those in charge began to
call upon anyone who had
any medical experience,
most medical students, some
even'in their first year of
medical school. Even though
I was not one of those, I had
had no surgical training yet
and was shaking with fright
when I was called to perform
my first surgery.
"We all did our best," he
continued. "But there were
times when we had to read
up on a procedure that we
knew we were going to have
to do. The first kidney I
removed, for instance, I had
to go home and read how to
do it before starting. But, as
I held the removed, damaged
kidney in my hand and
looked at the man who I
knew would have died with-
out the surgery, I felt an
overwhelming sense of use-
fulness."
"Did the soldier live?"
asked the lady. "Yes and I
knew then that that's what I
wanted to do with my life.
That surgery, which often
saves people's lives, was a
purpose worth living for."
He has spent the rest of his
life studying, learning and
working in his chosen pro-
fession.
The story was fascinating.
The doctor inspiring. And
the joy of sharing his story
with the patient evident upon
his face really "made the


lady's day."
Aren't we fortunate to live
in a country with good hos-
pitals, sterile comfortable
physician offices, competent
staff and such dedicated
physicians?

Teresa Stein is a Lake Placid
resident, a retired journalist and
a frequent columnist of the
News-Sun.


www.newssun.com









www. newssun.corn


EDITORIAL & OPINION


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


Opinion on sheriff's
decision out of bounds
Editor:
I don't have a dog in this
fight, as they say. I was no
supporter of Susan Benton in
her re-election bid, but she is
now duly re-elected and
should be accorded the same
support (and the same level
of scrutiny) as any other pub-
lic service official.
In this instance; your edito-
rial is highly critical of a
decision that on the surface
you see as misguided.
However, there may be con-
siderations in this personnel
decision by the sheriff that
are not an open book to be
shared with the world.
Executives make decisions
all the time that others may
not like, but that alone does
not mean they are bad deci-
sions. I saw no factual infor-
mation that suggests anything
improper. Without some fac-
tual support, it appears to me
your editorial is a little out of
bounds.
Forrest Steele
Lake Placid

Recovery &
Reinvestment Act
shouldn't be allowed
Editor:
We were recently notified
that our politicians have
voted against funding for
"museums, theaters, and arts
centers" in the new
American Recovery &
Reinvestment Act.
This not only affects the
art communities across our
nation, but "according to the
Americans for the Arts, a
$50 million investment to
the National Endowment for
the Arts will provide critical
funding to save 14,422 jobs
from being lost in the U.S.
economy."
Our notice went on to
elaborate with, "In a report
released in mid-January, the
National Governor's
Association stated, 'Arts and
culture are important to state


economies. Arts and culture-
related industries, also
known as "creative indus-
tries," provide direct eco-
nomic benefits to states and
communities: They create
jobs, attract investments,
generate tax revenues, and
stimulate local economies
through tourism and con-
sumer purchases.'" I was not
aware of this, but $63.1 bil-
lion is spent each year by the
non-profit arts organizations.
This alone should be an
excellent reason why this
amendment should not be
allowed to stand.
Interested parties can
write to our Senators (Bill
Nelson and Bob Martinez)
and ask them to vote against
this legislation. It is official-
ly called: S.Amdt.309
offered by Sen. Tom Coburn
(Roll Call #51). On behalf of
any and all interested
Highlands County residents,
I offer thanks for any who
will write or e-mail these
gentlemen.
Judith Hinkle
Sebring

Obama's transparency
on abortion
Editor:
In 1984 while President
Ronald Reagan was in
Mexico City he signed an
executive order (Mexico City.
Policy) prohibiting any feder-
al and private U.S. non-gov-
ernmental companies from
funding any international
planning groups and clinics
that provide abortions. This
policy essentially barred any
U.S. foreign aid for promot-
ing abortion as a method of
family planning. Only three
days in office and President
Obama signed an executive
order reversing this 'Mexico
City Policy'.
The Partial-Birth Abortion
Ban Act was enacted on,
Nov. 5, 2003, by the U.S.
Supreme Court, 18U.S.C. SS
1531 (1) PBA Ban. This law
prohibits a form of late-term
abortion, which is also called


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partial-birth abortion. In 2007
this law was again upheld by
the U.S. Supreme Court, in
the case of Gonzales v
Carhart. The law itself con-
tains no reference to gesta-
tional age or viability of the
child (fetus). The present
statute is directed only at a
method of a partial birth
abortion procedure, rather
than at preventing any
woman from obtaining an
abortion.
A partial-birth abortion
procedure can be used after
20 weeks (4.5months) of
pregnancy, often to six
months, seven months or
even later. Guided by ultra-
sound, the doctor grabs the
baby's legs with forceps. The
baby's legs are pulled out
into the birth canal. The doc-
tor delivers the baby's entire
body, except for the.head.
The doctor then jams scissors
into the baby's skull. The
scissors are then opened to
enlarge the hole. The scissors
are removed and a suction
catheter in inserted. The


child's brains are sucked out,
causing the skull to collapse.
The dead baby is then
removed.
Our current U.S. Congress
has agreed to bring to the
table in a few weeks a vote
on a bill called 'Freedom of
Choice Act'. This bill would
enshrine abortion into federal
law. Parental notification now
upheld in 44 states and virtu-
ally all other restrictions on
abortion at the state level
would be eliminated.
Congress will have no limits
of how much they can spend
as grants to support the abor-
tion business here in the
United States and abroad.
Under this 'FOCA' it has
been estimated that as many
as 125,000 more babies will
be killed every year, that is
343 every day, or about 14
babies killed every hour.
President Obama has already
reversed the 'Mexico City
Policy' and he promised
while he was campaigning to
sign the 'FOCA' into law
once it was placed on his


desk.
How can we cry out in
rage against the death of
5,125 (as of Jan 09) U.S. mil-
itary men and women in Iraq
and Afghanistan and yet have
an absolute enthusiasm to
spend taxpayer funds to pro,
mote the death of hundreds
of thousands of innocent
humans each year by the bru-
'tal, inhumane method of
abortions ? We need to sound
off, stand up, and fight this
battle for those who have no
voice.
Exercise your commitment
to life by contacting your
federal congressman and sen-
ators and tell them to kill this
dangerous legislation.
Wendy Griffin
Sebring
The rich just keep
getting richer
Editor:
The root cause of our cur-
rent economic disaster is
very rich people continually
getting much richer at the
expense of nearly everyone


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Page 5A


else. While some of this is
attributable to recognizing
and exploiting legitimate
opportunities, much is a
result of stacking the deck.
Years of deregulation crip-
pled government oversight
while Congress rewarded the
rich with generous tax cuts
while the deficit and the debt
soared.
Hedge funds, totally
unregulated leveraged mar-
kets providing astronomic
profits for their investors.
Wall Streeters and CEO's
rewarded themselves with
multimillion salaries and
bonuses while the rest of us
lost ground.
Privatizing and the Iraq
war created opportunities for
lavishing government funds
on favored private entities,
all accomplished under the
aegis of the Republican
Congress and the Bush
White house.
In crisis mode, billions
were lavished on Wall Street
and the banks, without over-
sight or accountability.
Now however, with a
Democratic president sworn
in and Republican power
reduced to threats of fili-
buster in the Senate, the
Neocoris, led by Senator
McConnell, have morphed
into champions of fiscal
responsibility and trans-
parency, questioning every
Democratic program to
repair the economy and
threatening scorched earth
(unless some advantages for
the wealthy are sandwiched
into the proposal.)
Disowning their share of
the responsibility for our
financial morass, they now
stand proudly as the rear
guard of fiscal responsibility,
the thin red line (pardon the
color) dedicated to saving
the country from dangerous
liberal excesses likely in
their attempts to repair the
economy.
You may laugh if it feels
appropriate.
Randy Ludacer
Lake Placid











COMMUNITY BRIEFS


Reflections hosts
Casino Night
AVON PARK - From
6:30-9 p.m. today,
Reflections on Silver Lake is
hosting a Casino Night.
Tickets are $5 for $2,000 in
chips. Games include poker,
craps, roulette, blackjack,
and the big wheel.
At 9 p.m., trade chips for
chances to win prizes
(restaurant gift cards, oil
changes, golf, bowling, car
wash, teeth whitening, and
more). All proceeds go to
charity.
Call 452-5037 for more
information.

Skylarks play for
Dance Club
SEBRING - The
Highlands Social Dance
Club hosts ballroom dancing
from 7-9:30 p.m. Friday at
the Sebring Lions Club on
Sebring Parkway. Music will
be provided by the Big Band
Sound of The Skylarks.
Free ballroom dance
instruction from Walt and
Sue is available at 6:30 p.m.
Dance the night away to
waltzes, cha-chas, foxtrots,
rumbas, jitterbug and other
ballroom favorites.
All club dances are open
to the public. Appropriate
dress required.
Admission is $5 for mem-
bers and $7 for non-mem-
bers.
For more information, call
471-0559.

Sebring Elks host
Sweetheart events
SEBRING - Sebring
Elks Lodge 1529 will serve a
buffet dinner from 5-7 p.m.
today for $10. The menu
will be London broil chicken
breast with the trimmings.
Live music from 7-10 p.m.
by Doin' It Right.
On Saturday is the
Sweetheart Valentine Day
Dance. Bar opens at 6 p.m.
Dance is 7-10 p.m. There
will be hot hors d'oeuvres.
Music by Gary and Shirley,
all. for $7.

Coons perform today
SEBRING - Dave and
Dottie Coon, gospel singers,
will provide music, inspira-


tion and entertainment at 7
p.m. today at Parkway Free
Will Baptist Church, 3413
Sebring Parkway.

Winery Ride slated
for weekend
LAKE PLACID - The
second annual Winery Ride
at Henscratch Farms in Lake
Placid is slated from today
through Sunday to benefit
Heartland Horses &
Handicapped, Inc. Camping
is available all weekend (no
facilities), pancake and
sausage breakfast, three-hour
guided ride through conser-
vation property, auction,
door prizes, wine and cheese
social, and rib-eye steak din-
ner.
Reservations required for
this ride. Cost is $60 per
person for riders, $30 per
person for non-riders.
Contact HHH at 452-0006 or
heartlandhorses@embarq-
mail.com for more informa-
tion.
Tickets are available for
people who would like to
enjoy the evening activities,
but who are not horse own-
ers. The Saturday evening
activities include: Wine and
cheese social, door prizes,
auction and raffle items, rib-
eye steak dinner, and enter-
tainment. Cost is $30 per
person.

Coin show to be held
SEBRING - The annual
coin show of the Ridge Coin
Club takes place from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Saturday at the
Lion's Club, 3400 Sebring
Parkway.
The event is open'to the
public and refreshments will
be served. Admission is free.
Several coins, including a
gold coin, will be raffled off,
beginning at 2:30 p.m.
Call Ron Deehr, president,
at 873-3372.

Eastern Star hosts
fashion show, lunch
SEBRING - The Sebring
Chapter of the Order of the
Eastern Star will host a
luncheon and fashion show
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday. The fun event will
be held at the Masonic
Lodge, 1809 Home Ave.
Models will be wearing the


latest fashions from Endless
Summer Fashions. The dona-
tion is $10. Call 385-1942
for reservations.

Legion family hosts
dinner dance
LAKE PLACID - The
American Legion family will
host its annual Valentine's
Dinner Dance on Saturday at
the American Legion Post
home, 1490 U.S. 27 N., Lake
Placid.
Social hour is from 5-6
p.m.; dinner from 6-7 p.m.,
prime rib with all the trim-
mings. Music from 7-10 p.m.
by Larry Musgrave.
Tickets are $17 for single,
$30 for couple and $5 for
music only.
Tickets available at the
American Legion Post home.
Get tickets early.
Call 465-0975 or 465-
7940 for more information.

Elvis Wade coming
to Sebring
SEBRING - Elvis Wade
Show comes to Sun 'N Lake
Community Center at 7 p.m.
Saturday, March 7. Dancing
and table seating available.
BYOB and snacks. Cups and
ice provided.
Only $10 per person to
see this internationally
acclaimed performer. Call
382-8296 for tickets/reserva-
tions.

Lake Placid Elks
have Valentine's Ball
LAKE PLACID - The
Lake Placid Elks Lodge will
host a Valentine's
Sweetheart Ball on Saturday.
Social hour is at 5:30 p.m.,
dinner at 6:30 p.m., dancing
at 8 p.m. Menu includes
choice of shrimp cocktail,
prime rib dinner, complete .
with dessert.
Elegant evening dress
attire. Heartland entertain-
ment for dancing pleasure.
All in attendance will be
voting for a "Valentine's
King and Queen" to preside
over the evening's activities.
Open to the public.
Proceeds for Elks' children's
charities.
Tables will be sold by four
seats ($100), six seats
($150), eight seats ($200).
No refunds. One person will


buy the table and will sell
the seats to their guest.
Ladies will be responsible
for decorating the table.
White table cloths and red
napkins will be furnished.
The rest is.up to you, so use
your imagination.
Remember, it's Valentine's
Day. A surprise will be given
to the best decorated table.
Any questions, call Ruth
Lagrow at 465-4791.

Specialized Kare for
Youngsters offered
SEBRING - A program
sponsored by the Bo Alvarez
Children's Foundation offers
assistance to families who
have children with disabili-
ties from ages 5-15. Care is
offered at two locations in
Highlands County for par-
ents or caregivers who need
a break from the day-to-day
care of their school-aged
child who has a disability.
The cost is $10 for a four-
hour service that includes
care provided by well-
trained staff who can handle
emergency and behavioral
issues. The fee must be paid
one week in advance.
Checks should be made out
to the Bo Alvarez Children's
Foundation.
Contact one of the follow-
ing centers for enrollment
forms and details:
* Ridge Area Arc, 120
W. College Drive, Avon
Park, 452-1295, ext. 124.
The program will be from 1-
5 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month.
* New Concepts by
Visions, 155 U.S. 27 N.,
Sebring, 402-0048. The pro-
gram will be from 5-9 p.m.,
the third Friday of the
month.

Tanglewood hosts
Valentine's Dance
SEBRING - Tanglewood
will be having a Valentine's
Day dance from 7-10 p.m.
Saturday at the clubhouse.
Music will be provided by
Sunshine Edition. The cost is


$3 for residents with a name
badge and $5 for all others.
Those planning to attend
should bring their own
snacks and drinks; only ice
will be provided.
Tanglewood is just north
of Walmart on U.S. 27 in
Sebring. The next dance will
be a line dance on Friday,
Feb. 20.

Sun 'N Lakes of Lake
Placid plan
Valentine's dinner
LAKE PLACID - The
Sun 'N Lakes of Lake Placid
will hold its annual
Valentine's Day dinner at 6
p.m. Saturday. The dinner
will consist of Swiss-steak,
potato medley green beans
and mushrooms, green salad
and a black forest desert.
There will be lots of conver-
sation along with music and
dancing. Cost of the dinner
will be $6 with no charge for
children under 12.
Reservations must be made
in advance.
The dinner will be held at
the Sun 'N Lakes
Community Center behind
the fire station on Sun 'N
Lakes Blvd. near Lake
Placid. For further informa-
tion or reservations, call
465-0336, (239) 597-6304 or
465 2850.

Groups serve free
hamburgers
AVON PARK -
American Legion Post 25
and Forty and Eight will
serve free hamburgers and
hot dogs in the parking lot of
Bill Jarrett Ford from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. The
location is 1305 U.S.' 27 N.
in Avon Park.

Illinois Day planned
SEBRING - The annual
gathering of Illinois resi-
dents, former and current,
will have an "Illinois Day"
event at 11 a.m. Saturday at
Homer's Smorgasbord.
Registration and fellowship


begins at 11 a.m. Lunch at
noon followed by activities,
games and door prizes.
Come join the fun and the
opportunity to meet new
friends or renew old friend-
ships.
To RSVP or for more
information, call 385-7215
or 314-0176.

Did you know?
SEBRING - Little
known facts of the U.S.
Naval Service that occurred
during a month of February::
Feb. 1, 1942: The first
USN carrier raids of World
War II (Marshalls and
Gilberts).
Feb. 3, 1801: Quasi-War
with France ends.
Feb. 3, 1917: U.S. severs
relations with Germany.
Feb. 4, 1919: Congress
creates Navy Cross and
Navy Distinguished Service
Medal.
Feb. 9, 1943: Organized
Japanese resistance on
Guadalcanal ends.
Feb. 13, 1943: Women
Marines Birthday. Happy
Birthday!
The Military Sea Services
Museum is at the corner of
Kenilworth Blvd. Roseland
Ave., Sebring. It is open
every Wednesday through
Saturday, from noon to 4
p.m. Also, find out about the
opportunity to purchase a
brick to be included in our
Memory Walk at the
Museum. Call 382-4047 or
471-2386.

Eagles host day trip
to casino
SEBRING - Sebring
Eagles will host a day trip to
Hard Rock Casino in Tampa
on Monday, March 9. Cost is
$30 per person. The casino
will give back $25 in free
play and $5 food coupon.
The group will leave at 8
a.m. and return approximate-
ly 5 p.m. Coffee and dough-
nuts before departure.
Call the Aerie at 655-
4007.


OBITUARIES


Patricia Hahs
Patricia A. Hahs, 62, of
Sebring died Feb. 12, 2009.
Born in Murphysboro, Ill. she
moved to Sebring in 1992.
She was a beautician at The
Palms of Sebringr. She was a
member of the Assembly of
God.
She is survived by parents,
Oris and Mary Turner; son,
Anthony Glodo; and daugh-
ter, Lori Arena; brothers,
Michael Turner and Bruce
Turner; sister, Pam Burden;
four grandsons and one great-
grandchild.
The family will receive
friends from 1-3 p.m.
Saturday at Morris Funeral
Chapel, Sebring. Further
services and burial will be in
Illinois. Memorials are
requested to Brookport
Church of God', 4th and
George Street, Brookport, IL
62910 - McKenzee's Youth
Camp Fund, this is in memo-
ry of Patricia's niece.

Byron Hanson
SByron L.
Hanson, 84, of
Sebring died Feb.
2, 2009. Born in Thief River
Falls, Minn., he moved to
Sebring in 1995. He served in
the U.S. Navy and then the
U.S. Air Force during World
War II. He retired from the
Air Force and began working
at McDonnell Douglas
Aircraft in the space program
for NASA.
He is survived by his sis-
ters, Dorothy Sammons,
Jeanne Rockwell and
Elizabeth D. Hanson.
His cremains will be
spread on the Gulf Stream at
a later date. Dowden Funeral
Home, Sebring, is in charge
of arrangements.


George Janowiak
George William Janowiak,
52, of Sebring died Feb. 9,
2009. Born in Chicago, he
moved to Sebring in 2000. A
reservation clerk in Sebring,
he was also a member of First
Christian Church Disciples
of Christ in Sebring.
He is survived by his
mother, May Moore; broth-
ers, James, Thomas and
Edward.
Memorial services will be
held at a later date in Homer
Glen, IL. Arrangements by
Yates Funeral Home &
Crematory, Port Saint Lucie.

Ralph Plott
Ralph Plott, 80,,
01^^ a winter resident
of Sebring died
Feb. 9, 2009. Born in
Norfolk, Va. he made his
summer home in Virginia. He
served' in the U.S. Navy dur-
ing World War II. He was a
teletype operator for Verizon
before his retirement.
He is survived by his wife,
Jean, and a sister, Mary
Pollay.
Services will be held in
Pulaski, Va. at a later date.
Dowden Funeral Home,
Sebring, is in charge of
arrangements.

Elise Sperry
Elise Ida Elizabeth
Frotscher Sperry, 94, of
Sebring died Feb. 8, 2009.
Born in New Orleans, she
moved to Sebring in 1966.
She was a registered nurse
during her whole working
career, which included many
years at Highlands Regional
Medical Center and as a
member of the Medical
Department at the Highlands


County Sheriff's Office. She
was a member of
Resurrection Lutheran
Church in Avon Park.
She is survived by her
sons, Robert A., R. David,
and John L.; daughter,
Deborah L. Wetzel; brother,
H. David Frotscher; eight.
grandchildren and three
great-grandchildren.
SGraveside service will be
held at 10 a.m. today at
Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, Avon Park, with
Pastor John Grodzinski offi-
ciating. Memorial contribu-
tions can be made in her
name to the Avon Park
Garden Club. Arrangements
entrusted to Stephenson-
Nelson Funeral Home,
Sebring.

Shirley Warnick
Shirley D. Warnick, 78, of
Lake Placid died Feb. 9,
2009. Born in Long Island,
N.Y. she moved to Lake
Placid in 2004. She was -a
retired secretary with Berry
University in Miami and was
of the Christian faith.
She is survived by her
daughters, Christine
Summerfield Nelson and
Karen Van Vonno; sons,
William Dobson, Donald
Dobson, Richard Dobson and
John Warnick; sister, Joanne
Joseph; seven grandchildren
and two great-grandchildren.
The family will receive
friends from 2-3 p.m.
Saturday with services cele-
brating her life following at 3
p.m. at Scott Funeral Home,
Lake Placid, with the Rev.
Andrew Conyer celebrating.
The family suggest donations
in lieu of flowers be made in
her memory to your favorite
charity.


Dr. Frank Ferretti, a Board

Certified Gastroenterologist,

has been serving Highlands

County since 1992. Trained

at the University of Maryland

and University of Florida,


his practice

disorders of


is limited to

the digestive


Strict such as:


+ Heartburn

* Difficulty swallowing

* Nausea and vomiting

* Abdominal pain

* Constipation

" Diarrhea

* Gastrointestinal bleeding

* Hemorrhoids

* Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

+ Disorders of the pancreas

* Capsular endoscopy (camera pill)

* For a family history of colon cancer or a

personal history of colon polyps, Colorectal

cancer screening.


103 MEDICAL CENTER AVENUE

SEBRING, FL 33870

(863) 385-8777


Our office is located behind

Highlands Regional Medical Center.

New Patients Welcome, No referral Needed!

Call 863-385-8777 for an appointment.


Page 6A


Fransico Feretti, ID, P


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


www.newssun.com










www.newssun. com


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


Semi rear-ends car intersection

.^ .. --i-. -. " . .:. l


Courtroom recordings raise concerns


Continued from page 1A
When the main system is
running, there is a blue light
that indicates when the main
audio recording is in process.
When the blue light is off,
most people can assume that
there are no other recordings.
But that is not true, Birnie
said.
"That backup system is on
a timer and starts automati-
cally. It runs and records
activities in the courtroom
even when court is not in ses-
sion and during court recess-
es," Birnie said.
And Birnie should know,
she was the one of the IT
people responsible for repair-
ing the equipment in the
courtroom.
She was recorded one day
when court was out of ses-
sion discussing personal
items and talking on a cell
phone, and then the transcript
of the recording was used to
justify her termination.
"I was hurt that they would
use that to terminate me. I did
not give them permission to
record me. I was not aware
that, they would use that
against me," Birnie said.


That transcript, and the
audio CD of her conversa-
tions, are now public record.'
Birnie became aware that
the recording of her conver-
sations were used as part of
her termination process when
she discovered it in her per-
sonnel file.
She requested the file
based on advice from an
attorney, and when she
received, the paperwork she
was stunned to see the tran-
script taken from the backup
recording.
"I knew the main system
was off, but I never thought
they would use the backup
recording like that. I had no
reason to even suspect that
they were taping me. They
had no permission to tape
me," Birnie said.
Additionally, Birnie raised
questions about these backup
recordings working when
attorneys and clients have the
assumption that the audio is
off when they discuss their
cases.
"Most attorneys are proba-
bly not aware that the taping
keeps going even when court
is in recess," she said.


"The judges all know
about the backup system, but
few others do. I know that
attorneys and their clients
were recorded. The system
runs all the time," she added.
Those issues have the First
Amendment Foundation
wanting more information.
"This is an issue, and we
would like to know why
there are two separate
recordings, and for what pur-
pose," Harper said.
"What you say to your
attorney in confidence
should not be recorded for
any reason," she concluded.'


Motorcycle link to couple's first date


Continued from page 1A
"'Honey, you're not going
on that thing,'" he joked.
Luckily for Leo, he
crossed paths with a co-
worker who switched vehi-
cles with him and the date
went on without a hitch.
He laughed when recalling
the date, saying he didn't
know her too well, but still
came with the motorcycle.
"I went in there and had
breakfast two or three
times," he said, and that was
well as he saw her.
As they dated over the
next year, the motorcycle
played only a minor role in
the relationship.
"I didn't ride it a lot when
we were dating," she said. "I
figured my father would
somehow find out."
After they were married, it
became a different story.
"My dad pulls in the
driveway and sees it and he
can't say anything any
more," Karen said.
"After we got married we
did a fair amount of riding,"
Leo added. "We enjoyed it."
About three years later


Leo gave up the bike to one
of his co-workers and the
bike was thought to be gone
forever.
But it wasn't.
An accident, three owners
and a sidecar later the bike
crossed his path again,
thanks to a picture of it seen
by the Howard's' 15 year-old
son.
He wanted it to be his first
vehicle when he turned 16,
but they .hadn't owned it for
25 years.
"I really wasn't looking
for it at all," Leo said about
the bike ending up in his
hands again.
After easily tracking down
the new owner, another for-
mer co-worker, they received
some disappointing news.
The man who rebuilt the
bike after the accident want-
ed the first opportunity to
buy it.
"Being an old dad with a
15-year-old I felt sad for him
but wasn't sure if I wanted.
him on it," Leo admitted.
Tack on another three
years, and Leo ran, into the
bike owner while his son was
at a cross country race.


Continued from page 2A
associated himself with one of the most pop-
ular political brands in Illinois, says Bruce
Newman, an expert on political marketing at
DePaul University. Evoking Lincoln reas-
sures voters that Obama shares their values
and will try to emulate their hero.
Obama spent Wednesday evening at a per-
formance saluting the renovation of Ford's
Theatre, where Lincoln was assassinated in
1865. He reminded the crowd that even in
the middle of the war, Lincoln insisted on
devoting scarce resources to finishing the
Capitol as a symbol that the nation would
emerge united.
"For despite all that divided us - North
and South, black and white - he had an
unyielding belief that we were, at heart, one
nation and one people," Obama said.
Historian Richard Norton Smith said
admiring Lincoln is practically routine for
presidents, particularly-embattled ones. "I'm
not sure how much it matters to voters. I sup-
pose it's better to associate yourself with
Lincoln than Millard Fillmore," he said.


But no other president can match the emo-
tional connection of a black man following
in the footsteps of the president who ended
slavery. It helps complete what Smith called
"the unfinished part of the Lincoln agenda"
- bringing America closer to real racial
equality.
Then there are the more mundane links.
Both Lincoln and Obama were lawyers
who served in the Illinois Legislature. Both
had brief Washington careers before running
for president. Both started out as relative
unknowns who were criticized as inexperi-
enced, yet managed to win the White House.
Obama has highlighted his interest in
Lincoln at key moments.
He launched his presidential campaign in
at the 'Old State Capitol in Springfield, Ill.,
where Lincoln served. He returned there to
reveal his pick for vice president. He quoted
Lincoln in his campaign speeches and in his
victory speech on election night.
He has kept up the Lincoln emphasis since
then, even making an unannounced night-
time visit to the Lincoln Memorial with his
family a few days before.his inauguration.


County wants to take


second look
Continued from page IA
everything back on the coun-
ty instead of a being coopera-
;tive effort, and that was a just
,a bit more than the county
was willing to take on.
"It's a great project, but I.
,question weather we have the
-funds or the expertise to do
this lease," Stewart said.
"I Wish we could go back
:and re-look at this so that
:everything is not on the
:county shoulders. I am not
'sure we even have the expert-
:ise to handle some of the
things going on, like firearms
,access for hunters. We cur-
rently do not handle that at
any park now," Stewart said.
County Administrator
Michael Wright was con-
cerned about maintenance
and that vandalism may be a
problem.
"That's a long way out
there, and vandalism could
be an issue. I would suggest
'an out clause in this so that
'we can review this on a regu-
lar basis," Wright said.
But Stewart raised con-
cerns over the estimate of


at new park
$26,603 yearly cost to main-
tain the park.
"Take another hard look at
this. Our people already pay
a lot of taxes to your water
management district,"
Stewart said.
Other commissioners
urged the water district to
return with something more
workable.
"I think this is a good proj-
ect, and we should look at
this again," said commission-
er Edgar Stokes.
"I feel that we in the coun-
ty have the expertise to man-
age parks, and this is a park.
I think we have the people to
do this, and I think we man-
age this," Stokes said.
Commissioner Jeff Carlson
also stated that he would not
mind the project, and asked
to take another look at it after
some changes.
"I would not have a prob-
lem with adding something in
there that would limit our
management, but I would not
mind having some language
in there corrected as well,
especially about the 'plant
control," Carlson said.


he ne ws sjut click aay!

w .Onewjs n.com


Page 7A


Obama makes ties to Lincoln


t


"The first thing out of his
mouth was 'Do you want the
bike back?'" he said. "I was-
n't even thinking about the
bike."
Within two days the bike
was theirs again and has
been for the past 12 years.
His son was no longer inter-
ested in it because a shoulder
injury made it difficult to
ride, so Leo and Karen are
free to ride whenever they
please - when her job
teaching at the Kindergarten
Learning Center doesn't
interfere.
"Being the teacher she is
she's concentrating on
school work," Leo said.
They still enjoy the occa-
sional trip or Sunday ride,
and have taken a trip to Fort
Pierce, although Karen
prefers sticking near town.
She likes to be close to
nature, she said.
"It's different than being
in a car and closed in," she
said. "It's nice that you can
see everything up close and
personal."















Heroic story of the Four Chaplains recounted at memorial service


Page 8A


Continued from page 3A
Chaplains at Fort Snelling,
St. Paul, Minn.: the Base
Family Housing, U.S.
Military Academy at West
Point: and in the A-Ring, 3rd
Floor Hall of Heroes in the
Pentagon.

The Four Chaplains
Chaplain George L Fox
was the oldest of the four
chaplains aboard the
Dorchester. He was called the
"Little Minister" as he only
stood. about five and half
feet. In 1917. he lied about
his age to enlist in the
Marines as' a medic. At the
end of World War I, he
returned home and returned
to school to become an
accountant. Unfulfilled, he
returned to school to become
a Methodist minister. When
war broke out again, he told
his wife he needed to re-
enlist. He enlisted in World
War II on Aug. 8, 1942.
A high school scholar,
Alexander Goode also
medaled in track and swim-
ming. His goal was to follow
his father and become a
Rabbi. Goode married his
childhood sweetheart.
Although he was assigned to
a synagogue as a Rabbi, he
wanted to do more. He
entered John Hopkins
University and received his
medical degree. His enlist-
ment date is recorded as Aug.
9, 1942.
Johnny Washington, from
Newark, N.J., was born into a
large Irish family. His love of
music allowed him a chair in
the church choir. He was a
scrappy kid and a member of
the South 12th Street Gang
when he received the call to
the priesthood. On May 9,
1942, when some of the
neighborhood boys left to
join the Army, he enlisted
along side them.
The youngest of the Four
Chaplains, Clark Poling, was
the seventh generation in an
unbroken line of. Dutch
Reform ministers. His enlist-
ment date is June 10, 1942.

The USAT
Dorchester
Joseph Dionne reflected on
his father's rescue and tale of
the fateful evening of the
sinking of the Dorchester
while those in the audience
sat in somber silence.
Dionne's recollection of
his father's story is that the



Tanglewood has
big plans for
Relay for Life
Continued from page 1A
final two events in the
fundraising season are fast
approaching.
They apologize to the larg-
er community, but these
events are closed to the gener-
al public.
The reason, both men said
with emphasis, was not to be
elite or secretive. Instead it is
meant to protect other Relay
fo'r Life programs' pools of
contributors by only accept-
ing Tanglewood resident
donations.
Sunday night is the
luminere program. The mood
will be set by the 150
luminere bags circling the
clubhouse. There will be a
brief memorial service. Bob
Gibbs will be a guest speaker.
Gibbs is a brain cancer sur-
vivor who now participates in
50- and 10- mile bike rides,
called "Miles for Hope," to
raise money for research.
Tuesday, the Two Toms
said, is the premier gathering
of the season. DiGrazia has
duped it "The Bash".
It's a three-hour party with


over 30 raffles of baskets
filled with donations from
local merchants each worth
$50, 20 craft items created by
Tanglewood resident and a
50/50 every hour. Meatball
subs will be available for $5,
and that includes a bag of
chips and a soda. Beer will be
available, and tie Red Hat
Ladies will serve desserts.
Entertainment will be provid-
ed by Bob Weed.


bell on the USAT Dorchester
rang twice at 12:30 a.m. on
Feb. 3, 1943 never to be
heard again. The former lux-
ury coastal steamship turned
troopship was torpedoed by
an enemy submarine in an
area of the Northern Atlantic
Sea known as Torpedo
Junction, sinking in under 15
minutes. Rescue began over
an hour later and lasted more
than 12 hours. Statistics show
that the frigid waters can take
the life of an individual in


under 3 minutes.
Many on board died
instantly, while some were
trapped below deck. Others,
startled, awakened from their
bunks, made their way to the
decks of the already listing
vessel. The ship took on
water rapidly through the
massive breach. The added
weight of ice on the decks
hastened the ship's sinking.
Survivors gave testimony
that the only fragment of
hope came from the four


Army chaplains who were
able to calmly guide men to
their lifeboat stations. They
opened a storage locker for
lifejackets and began to hand
them out.
The Chaplains prayed with
the soldiers and linked their
arms as the ship's slant
became severe. With their
heads bowed in prayer, arms
linked, they sank beneath the
waves. Two Protestant chap-
lains, one Catholic, and one
Rabbi, in one heroic act


saved the lives of dozens of
young soldiers. The story of
the Sinking of the Dorchester
and the Four Chaplains repre-
sents interfaith cooperation
and selfish service.
Ed Dionne often told that
he survived the icy cold
waters only because he was
covered in oil, which served
to insulate him from the cold.
Dionne, raised in Wisconsin,
was an avid swimmer in high
school sports. The Escanaba
rescued Dionne from the icy


waters after an extended time
in the water. Partially frozen,
Dionne spent several months
in the military hospitals in
Greenland and Washington,
D.C., learning to walk again.
Upon moving to Lake
Placid with his family,
Dionne set up an accounting
practice. He served as
District 8 commander of the
American Legion, state com-
mander of the 40 et 8, and
was quartermaster for Post
25.


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www. newssun. comr News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


TECHNOLOGY


Apple's restriction-free music

downloads create pause Pho


By ERIC BENDEROFF
Chicago Tribune/MCT
When Apple Inc. announced in January that
it would sell restriction-free music files, that
was supposed to mean consumers could buy
songs and play them.on the portable gadget of
their choice.
Finally, music buyers would have in digital
music what they had with vinyl, 8-track and
CDs: interoperability, meaning the music
could play on any device. If your record or
CD player broke, you'd buy a new one.
Well, that's not the case with digital music.
If your iPod breaks, replacing it with a
Creative Zen may not work for you if you
want to hear all your music.
There have been strides to improve this
interoperability issue, and Apple's move to
sell digital-rights-free music was a big step in
the right direction.
But those "unprotected" songs from
iTunes, dubbed iTunes Plus, won't play on
every music player. That's because there are
different types of unprotected music files.
Let me illustrate with the albums I down-
loaded recently from three online sellers of
digital music _ eMusic, Amazon and iTunes _
using software from iTunes and Microsoft
Corp.'s Windows Media Player and Zune.
From eMusic: I downloaded new albums
from A.C. Newman, Andrew Bird and Wee
Hairy Beasties. I was able to move the files
into the music-playing software from
Windows Media, Zune and iTunes with little
trouble.
I then burned CDs of those three albums.
When I tried to rip them into iTunes software
on a different computer, song titles from two
albums did not appear. (Few things are more
tedious than keying in song titles.)
From Amazon: I downloaded an album
from hip-hop band The Knux and a classic
recording by Thelonious Monk with John
Coltrane. The Knux easily went into iTunes
without prompting, but Monk did not. But
both albums moved successfully into
Windows Media Player and the Zune soft-


ware.
From iTunes: I bought Charlie Haden's
"Rambling Boy." I was able to move the
album into the Zune software, but not
Windows Media. That means I can't play the
Haden album on the nifty Zen X-Fi music
player I used for this test.
One would think that album would play on
both Microsoft products.
Well, the problem is that Apple's "unpro-
tected files" are in the AAC format, which
Windows Media player does not support. But
the Zune software does. Unprotected AAC
files are not the same as unprotected MP3
files, which eMusic pointed out when it
retracted a statement applauding Apple's
decision to sell music without digital-rights-
management software.
Unprotected MP3 files, sold by Amazon
and eMusic, will play on any music soft-
ware or any portable device. But not all
software plays unprotected AAC files. ;
It would be easy to overlook this
fact if you read what Apple says on its
Web site:
"With iTunes Plus, you get high-quality,
256 Kbps AAC encoding. All free of burn
limits and digital rights management. So
iTunes Plus music will play on iPod, Apple
TV, all Mac and Windows computers, and
many other digital music players."
Yes, iTunes Plus songs play on Windows
computers, just not with Windows Media,
software. Which music players work with
iTunes Plus and which don't? Apple won't
say.
Does, this really matter? Yes, if you want
options.
There are a lot of fine music players that
cost less than similar size iPods.
As much as I like iPods, I'm also fond of
the Zune (the 16GB model is $45 less than the
16GB iPod Nano). And there's a lot to like
about the 16GB Creative Zen X-Fi ($170 at
Amazon, $30 less than the Nano.) Another
fine player is the 4GB Sansa Clip, spotted
recently for $50 at Best Buy. A 1GB iPod


r
a


Shuffle sells for $50.
When I test music players from Creative,
Sansa and others, I use Windows Media to put
music, videos and photos onto those devices.
The important software provides choice by
allowing any gadgetmaker to produce a music
player. So it's pretty frustrating that an album
I buy at iTunes can't play using Windows
Media.
Does this really matter?
The Charlie Haden album I bought at
iTunes includes a bonus track. If I want to
hear the bonus song, I need the right combi-
nation of software,and player.
Not even the CD will help. Does that mat-
ter to you?

Eric Benderoff writes about technology for the
Chicago Tribune. Contact him at
ebenderoff@tribune.com or at the Chicago
Tribune, 435 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago IL
60611.


Time to get ready for
digital TV is still now
By TROY WOLVERTON
San Jose Mercury News/MCT
The digital television transition may have
been delayed, but there's no better time than
the present to prepare for it.
That's because despite the deadline's
postponement, some local stations plan to
switch off their analog transmissions later
this month anyway. Meanwhile, consumers
who need converter boxes to receive the
new signals could face holdups in getting
them. And even once they have them, they
may face setup issues.
Congress passed a law last week that
would postpone until June 12 the deadline
for broadcast stations to turn off thalog sig-
nals and broadcast only digital ones.
Previously, most stations were supposed to
move to all-digital broadcasts Feb. 17.
The government has already sold off
some of the bandwidth currently used by
analog television to wireless phone and
Internet services. It also plans to make some
of the airwaves available for use by emer-
gency responders.
President Barack Obama, many members
of Congress and an assortment of industry;
and consumer groups pushed for a delay,
worrying that too many consumers were
still unprepared for the end of analog TV.
Most U.S. households watch television
through cable or satellite TV services, and
they generally won't be affected by the cut-
off of analog signals. But that still leaves
millions of households that have one or,
more televisions that get only the old, ana-
log over-the-air signals.
To continue watching television after the
digital transition, those consumers will have:
to use a pay-TV service, buy a new televi-
sion with a digital tuner or purchase a
device to convert the new digital signals so
that they can be viewed on older televisions.'
According to a Nielsen report late last
month, 5.7 .percent of U.S. households --
about 6.5 million homes - weren't pre-
pared for the move to digital television,
meaning that they rely on over-the-air sig-
nals and don't yet have a converter box.


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Page 10A


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


www.newssun.com


THE POLITICIAN
P.B.S. Pinchback, 1837 -1921
Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback
was the free-born son of a white
planter and a woman the planter
owned and later freed. In 1862, he
was assigned the duty of recruiting
African-American volunteers for the Union
Army forces, but resigned his captain's commis-
sion in protest of the discriminatory treatment of
his men. During Reconstruction, he was a leader
in the founding of the Louisiana Republican Par-
ty and was elected president pro tempore of the
state Senate in 1871. Pinchback became lieu-
tenant governor when the incumbent died. Then,
the governor was suspended during impeach-
ment proceedings, and Pinchback succeeded
him, too, serving as acting governor of Louisiana
from December 1872 to January 1873. He was
the first African-American governor in history
and, until L. Douglas Wilder became chief exec-
utive of Virginia in 1989, the only one.


THE ENTREPRENEUR
Madame C.J.Walker, 1867 -1919
he was born Sarah Breedlove, daugh-
terof a poor farm couple who died
while she was still a little girl. She was
married at 14; when her husband died,
she supported herself as a washer-
woman. In 1905, Walker perfected a formula
for straightening the hair of black women; it was
the beginning of a cosmetics empire that, by the
time of her death would make her a millionaire
- one of, if not the first black Americans to
achieve that status. Walker denied herself no
luxury - her mansion at Irvington-on-Hudson,
N.Y., is said to have been a regal showplace. But
the hair-care magnate was also a generous con-
tributor to good causes; she funded scholarships
and gave to the indigent and the needy.


THE ACTIVIST
A. Philip Randolph, 1889-1979
Iis courtly, Sphinx-like demeanor
belied the soul of a fighter. Ran-
dolph, a leader of the "New Ne-
gro" movement of the early 20th
century, was tapped by black rail-
road workers to lead their fledgling union, the
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, in 1925. It
would take years for the union to even get the
Pullman Co. to recognize them, years more be-
fore an agreement was hammered out, but when
it was over, Randolph and his union had won
workplace concessions once unthinkable for
black employees. In later years, Randolph was
instrumental in pushing President Franklin Roo-
sevelt to do away with segregation in the defense
industry. He was also an organizer of the 1963
March on Washington.











THE SINGER
Mamle Smith, 1883 - 1946

Mamie got there first. Her hit,
"Crazy Blues," recorded in 1920,
was the first blues vocal ever record-
ed and also the first recording by an
African-American woman. Despite that distinc-
tion, Smith did not think of herself primarily as a
blues singer - she was a vaudevillian who sang
many different styles. The Cincinnati-born vo-
calist spent the '20s and '30s barnstorming
across the United States with her Jazz Hounds, a
band that included such luminaries as James
"Bubber" Miley and Willie "The Lion" Smith.


10





WHO


From politics to exploration,


Leonard Pitts Jr. profiles 10


influential African Americans


you might not have heard of


sometimes, history forgets.


Sometimes,


the big names


everyone knows crowd out the

smaller ones fewer people recall.

Sometimes, when it is time to

apportion honor and assign recognition, men

and women who ought to be singled out are not.

And so, those who inspired the dreams,

fanned the flames and stood in the thick of

revolutionary change can find themselves left out

of the books, short-changed in the reminiscences.

In this annual season of black history's

celebration, much will be said, and deservedly

so, about giants like Martin Luther King Jr.,

Malcolm X, Frederick Douglass and W.E.B.

DuBois. But here, in 10 fields of American

endeavor, are 10 other names, lesser-known

women and men whose contributions and

heroism we should remember, always.


THE JOURNALIST ,
John Russwurm, 1799 -1851
A hough he was technically born a
slave in Jamaica, Russwurm enjoyed
many privileges of freedom because
his father was a white American
bachelor. His father, also named
John Russwurm, provided a quality education for
his son at Bowdoin College in Maine (he graduated
in 1826, the third African American to graduate
from an American college). When the elder Russ-
wurm relocated to Massachusetts, he took the boy
with him. In 1827, this child of privilege tdok up
the plight of the American slave. With his partner,
Samuel Cornish, he founded Freedom's Journal, the
first black newspaper published in the United
States. The paper's then-controversial credo: com-
plete freedom and equality for African slaves. As
the editors put it in their first editorial, it was time
for black people to plead "our own cause."


THE FILMMAKER
Oscar Micheaux, 1884 -1951
scar Micheaux came of age during
the days when filmmakers rou-
tinely ignored African Americans
or confined them to subservient,
demeaning roles. This was, para-
doxically, the key to his success. During the '20s
and '30s, Micheaux, wrote, directed and pro-
duced about 30 films keyed to black audiences.
Micheaux operated on a budget of next to noth-
ing, raising money directly from his audiences.
Thus, there was no such thing as "Take two" in a
Micheaux movie - not even when an actor
blew his lines. Not surprisingly, the movies were
usually awful. Also not surprisingly, an audience
starving to see itself reflected on screen flocked
to his films. Micheaux, a consummate promoter,
would travel from town to town, screening his
current movie while raising funds for the next.


THE SOLDIER
Henry Johnson, 1897* - 1929
arly on the morning of May 14,
1918, Henry Johnson and Needham
Roberts were standing sentry on a
bridge near the Aisne River in
France when, without warning, they
were attacked by a force of 32 Germans. Cut off
from their regimental headquarters and armed
only with pistols, knives and a few hand
grenades, the two black soldiers somehow stood
off the much larger force, pressing the fight even
though Johnson was wounded three times and
Roberts twice. At one point, the Germans rushed
the pair and took Roberts prisoner. By now re-
duced to using only a bolo knife and the butt of
his empty pistol,Johnson nevertheless charged
the Germans. He managed to wound as many as
10 of them and to kill at least four more. The
startled Germans dropped their prisoner and ran.
Johnson and Roberts were both awarded
France's highest military honor, the Croix de
Guerre.
* Approxiamate year of birth.











THE FIGHTER
Jack Johnson, 1878 -1946
Before there was Muhammad Ali,
Joe Louis or Jackie Robinson, there
was John Arthur Johnson, a boxer
who became history's first black
heavyweight champion in 1908
with a victory over Tommy Bums. Johnson spent
15 rounds whipping Bums, carrying on a run-
ning dialogue with him as he did so. Finally po-
lice stopped the bout. The victory was all the
more impressive in light of the fact that Burs'
manager served as referee - a concession John-
son had to make in order to get Bums to agree to
the fight. Johnson's victory polarized the nation
- a state of tension made worse by the fact that
he was a swaggering, boastful champion given to
publicly romancing and marrying white women.
Proponents of white supremacy seized upon for-
mer champion Jim Jeffries as their "great white
hope" for snatching the title back from this un-
ruly black man. But the overweight Jeffries, who
returned from retirement for the bout, was no
match for Johnson, who toyed with him for 15
rounds before knocking him out.


THE PREACHER
Adam Clayton Powell Sr., 1865 -1953
He was the grandson of slaves, the
father of a flamboyant namesake
congressman and a towering fig-
ure in his own right. As a boy,
Powell, a Virginia native, is said
to have learned the alphabet in a day. A year lat-
er, he was reading from the Bible, A grandfather
nudged Powell toward the ministry and he even-
tually served as pastor of churches in Connecti-
cut and Pennsylvania. The pastorate that made
him famous, however, was atAbyssinian Baptist
Church in New York City. Under Powell's lead-
ership,Abyssinian practiced a social gospel that
did not limit itself the pulpit and pews; the
church operated a facility for the aged, helped
feed the poor, and agitated for racial and eco-
nomic justice. By the mid-1930s,Abyssinian
claimed 14,000 members, making it the largest
Protestant congregation in the United States.


THE EXPLORER
Matthew Alexander Henson, 1866 - 1955
n the day in 1887 that he first met
Robert Peary, Henson, though
only about 21 years old, already
had experience as a stevedore,
seaman, bellhop and coachman.
Peary thought Henson might make a valuable
valet on Henson's attempt to become the first
man to reach the North Pole. But Peary soon dis-
covered that Henson's abilities and experiences
made him even more valuable as a colleague. As
Peary once put it, "I couldn't get along without
him." The men mounted seven expeditions to
the Arctic, including the last, in 1908 and 1909,
when they finally stood together at the top of the
world, the first explorers to do so.


PHOTO CREDITS: P.B.S. PINCHBACKCOURTESY OF THE OHIO HISTORICAL SOCIETY; A. PHILIP RANDOLPH COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES; MADAME C J WALKER COURTESY OF THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE. PHOTO OF OSCAR MICHEAUX COUTESY OF SOUTH DAKOTA STATE ARCHIVES. JOHN RUdSWURM
COURTESY OF BOWDOIN COLLEGE; JACK JOHNSON COURTESY OF MIKE DELISA; HENRY JOHNSON COURTESY OF THE HENRY JOHNSON MEMORIAL; PHOTO OF MAMIE SMITH COURTESY OF FRANK DRIGGS; MATTHEW ALEXANDER HENSON COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES






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NEWS-SU








www.newssun.com


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


Page 11A


Glade Runner: Guide searches for



trophy fish near Chokoloskee


By BRENT FRAZEE
McClatchy Newspapers
CHOKOLOSKEE
R odney Raffield was
taking the scenic
route to some of
Florida's best
back-country fishing.
As he motored across a
bay off the Gulf of Mexico,
he guided his flats boat into
a small opening in the man-
groves that many fishermen
wouldn't have even noticed.
Seconds later, he was
weaving his way through a
mangrove tunnel - a narrow
creek that was covered over-
head by a canopy of tree
Slimbs.
The saltwater creek was
no more than 10 feet wide,
but the water was five to six
feet deep. That was plenty
deep enough to get a boat
through -anrd to hold fish.
"Most people either don't
know about this creek or
wouldn't want to come back
in here," Raffield said as he
ducked tree limbs and spider
webs. "It's a little intimidat-
ing if you don't know much
about it. It goes back a long
ways.
"But I've lived here my
whole life and I've been
poking around this back
country since I was a kid.
"I know that this little
creek can hold some big
fish. And once you get to the
end of it, it empties into a
big flat that also holds fish.
"It takes a good half-hour
to get back here, but it's
worth it."
So Raffield, a charter cap-
tain who runs the Captain
Rodney's Back Country
Experience guide service,
pressed on, skillfully weav-
ing his boat through the
maze of overhanging tree
limbs so that he hardly ever
got slapped in the face.
Once he reached a deeper
stretch of water, he put his
motor in neutral and got out
his fishing rods.
"When we have a cold


Photo by Brent Frazee/Kansas City Star/MCT
Rodney Raffield, a guide in the Everglades, displays a big redfish caught by one of his
clients.


front come through like this,
the fish will sit in these
holes," he said. "Let's try
it."
With that, he baited hooks
with cut bait and instructed
his guide clients - Dave
Perkins of Eden Prairie,
Minn., and me - to toss the
lines to the edge of a
dropoff.
Not long after, Perkins felt
a tap and set the hook. Then
he watched as a large redfish
splashed to the surface. The.
fish dug hard for the bottom,
then strained to reach the
mangrove roots at the edge
of the water.
But seconds later, the fish
was in'the net and Raffield
was admiring another
Everglades trophy.
"That redfish could go
close to 10 pounds," he said
as he released the fish.
"That's what we're looking
for."
There were others where
that one came from - other
redfish that were landed and
big snook that hit with a fury
and zipped into the man-


grove roots, breaking the
line.
No, the action wasn't fast
and furious. But in'the midst
of a cold front, it still gave
an idea of why the
Chokoloskee area in south-
west Florida has always been
famous for its back-country
fishing.
"We'll find snook, redfish
and trout back in here," said
Raffield, 42. "Sometimes
we'll even hook some small
tarpon, but they're hard to
get in. They'll just tear these
mangroves up."
Raffield laughed and
paused to soak in the
scenery.
Birds flitted from branch
to branch in the mangroves,
breaking the silence with
their loud squawks. A mana-
tee slowly swam under the
boat. And the water roiled
with fish chasing minnows.
This is Raffield's world.
He speaks with pride when
he says that four generations
of his family have lived in
the Chokoloskee area.
"My granddaddy was a


guide out of the Rod and
Gun Club in the 1940s,"
Raffield said, referring to a
famous resort in Everglades
City. "Back then, it was an
exclusive fishing spot. You
couldn't drive in, you had to
boat in.
"And the fishing was
unbelievable. They'd troll
and catch 50 to 100 snook a
day, lot of them 10 pounds
or bigger."
It isn't that way anymore.
But the fishing still can be
eye-opening at times. Big
snook, redfish, trout, tarpon,
goliath groupers and snap-
pers still roam these waters,
which are part of Everglades
National Park.
And Raffield.carries on
the family tradition, going
out weekly in search of
them.
"My family has always
been in the stone crab busi-
ness," he said. "My dad has
caught more stone crabs than


Photo by Brent Frazee/Kansas City Star/MCT
Rodney Raffield trolls Everglades National Park hoping to
catch redfish or snook.


anyone else down here.
Newspapers have done arti-
cles on him and they call
him 'the King of the Stone
Crabbers.'
"We run crab traps and
sell the crabs commercially.
That's how I started out
down here.
"But we'd also take our
crab boat and go fishing
once the work was done, and
my family showed me a lot
of hidden spots where the
fish would be."
Raffield is reminded of
Florida's rich past almost
daily. Much the same as in
the past, the stone crab
industry is still alive and
well in this part of the state
and Raffield's family is still
involved.
The Everglades City Rod
and Gun Club.is still in


operation, proudly boasting
about a guest list that includ-
ed President Harry S.
Truman, actors John Wayne,
Burt Reynolds, Sally Field
and Sean Connery, rock and
roll legend Mick Jagger, and
novelist Ernest
Hemmingway.
And fishermen still flock
to the area to cast for abun-
dant fish.
"The fish are in this back
country year-round,"
Raffield said. "You have to
pay attention to the tides,
and you have to know where
to go. And cold fronts in the
winter can really hurt the
fishing.
"But when conditions are
right, you can usually catch
something. There are just a
lot of fish living in this
area."


Who gets what: Stimulus


to pad pockets of jobless


By DEB RIECHMANN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - More jobless workers
would get fatter unemployment checks longer
in the massive economic recovery package
moving forward in Congress.
Helping the nation's jobless has not been a
controversial part of the stimulus package.
Both the House and Senate versions 'offer an
extra $25 a week in jobless benefits to mil-
lions of workers through the end of the year.
The current average weekly benefit is rough-
ly $300.
It also would keep unemployment checks
coming through the end of 2009 for more than
3 million people whose state benefits will run
out after March.
The nation lost nearly 600,000 jobs last
month, the worst showing in a third of a cen-
tury, as a vicious cycle of cutbacks by con-
sumers forced ever more layoffs by belea-
guered employers. The unemployment rate
catapulted to 7.6 percent, the highest in 16
years, and seemed headed for double digits.
The stimulus would give states $500 mil-
lion to help process the flood of unemploy-
ment applications. There's been such a crush
that some states are running out of money,
forcing them to tap federal coffers to keep
sending out unemployment checks. Computer
systems in New York, North Carolina and
Ohio have been shut down by technical
glitches and heavy volume, and labor officials
in other states are reporting higher-than-nor-
mal use.
The Senate bill also includes a provision
that would suspend federal income tax on the
first $2,400 that jobless workers receive in
unemployment benefits.


"It goes a long way to fill the gaps in the
unemployment program, but this,is going to
be a long recession, so more may' be needed
down the road," said Maurice Emsellem, pol-
icy co-director of the National Employment
Law Project in New York.
The stimulus package also would give $7
billion to states that adopt reforms that make
it easier for part-time workers, low-wage
earners and women qualify for benefits.
Moreover, lawmakers are considering pro-
viding health care to unemployed workers,
but it's unclear whether the House and Senate
can reconcile their differences on this idea.
"Extending Medicaid to these workers
would be a huge boost," said Elise Gould, an
economist with the liberal Economic Policy
Institute. "If they get sick, or someone in their
family gets sick, they're going to go totally
broke. Medicaid is what they really need."
Lawmakers also are thinking about changes
to COBRA - a law that allows jobless work-
ers to pay to keep health insurance from their
old jobs for up to 18 months. It's expensive
for people to buy that insurance, so Congress
is considering whether to offer subsidies to
help the unemployed stay insured.
While the stimulus would cushion the blow
for unemployed workers, employment
prospects are grim. Tens of thousands of lay-
offs are being announced every week by well-
known companies such as General Motors
Corp., Pfizer Inc., Estee Lauder Cos.,
Caterpillar, Microsoft Corp. and Home Depot
Inc. Besides job cuts, companies are impos-
ing hiring freezes.
And economists say the worst is yet to
come.


Will Smith tops Forbes.com's bankable stars list


Associated Press
NEW YORK - Will
Smith has been voted the
most bankable star in
Hollywood in a survey of
industry professionals by
Forbes.com.
The Web site gives the
actor a score of 10 out of 10
for his bankability. It's
Forbes' first "star currency"


list, compiled by surveying
more than 150 industry pro-
fessionals.
Following Smith on the
list: Angelina Jolie, Brad Pitt,
Johnny Depp and Leonardo
DiCaprio, who all tied for
second with a score of 9.89.
Tom Hanks, George Clooney,
Denzel Washington, Matt


Damon and Jack Nicholson
round out the top 10.
Smith's superior box-
office clout has been long
established. He's known for
"owning" the July Fourth
weekend box office with
films such as "Independence
Day" and "Men in Black,"
and has had few flops.









Page 12A


Desire to reconnect rekindles interest in Vodou


among younger Haitian-Americans in South Florida


By GEORGIA EAST
Sun Sentinel/MCT
FORT LAUDERDALE -
Ricardo Petit-Homme left
Haiti when he was 4, and was
raised a staunch Catholic.
"From christening to
penance and then confirma-
tion, I did it all," the 30-year-
old interior decorator said.
But not that long ago, he
felt spiritually disconnected.
He had dreams that needed to
be interpreted, questions
about his purpose and a burn-
ing desire to connect more
deeply with his roots.
He turned to Vodou.
"I like that, with Vodou,
the spirituality comes from
within," Petit-Homme said,
as he joined in a Vodou cere-
mony in North Miami Beach
"I feel like I'm piecing
together a puzzle."
Vodou, often spelled
Voodoo, is witnessing a
resurgence among younger
Haitian-Americans. In South
Florida, where the Haitian
community is estimated to be
close to 300,000, scholars
and Vodou priests say more
people in their 20s and 30s
are finding the religion.
Vodou blends African reli-
gions with Catholic saints.
Followers believe there is
one God and deities who
manifest to serve different
purposes, such as healing and
protecting. The religion
shares West African roots
with Santeria practiced in
Cuba, Obeah in Jamaica and
Macumba of Brazil. Experts
estimate that about 60 mil-
lion people worldwide prac-
tice some form of Vodou.
It is hard to quantify the
religion's growth since
Vodou is often practiced in
one's home, explained
Elizabeth McAlister, a pro-
fessor of religion at Wesleyan
University, who has written
extensively about Vodou. But


Photo by Carey Wagner/Sun-Sentinel/MCT
Lucy Coma (left) and Erol Josue hold Raymonde Baptise along with Joel Henry (right) as a spirit visits through her body
during a January cleansing ceremony in North Miami.


research shows the religion is
becoming more prevalent
among well-heeled first and
second generation Haitians,
as well as people of various
backgrounds, she said.
Ruby LaCroix, 39, of West
Palm Beach, became
intrigued by Vodou when she
began to study Haiti's history
in college. She left Haiti
when she was 8 years old and
had questions about some of
the traditions she grew up
watching her grandmother
practice.
"I was looking to find out
more about myself, about
being Haitian and what that
means," she said.
Gone, for most, is the
shame that used to be associ-
ated with the stigmatized
religion. Unlike some of their
parents who practiced Vodou


in secrecy, the newcomers to
the religion invite friends to
Vodou ceremonies, have
altars in their homes and
work to shatter the stereo-
types.
Followers say Hollywood
gave the religion a bad rap
with representations of zom-
bies, spells and dolls. They_
say those calling on spirits to
do harm are practicing sor-
cery, not Vodou.
"A lot of people think
Vodou is devilish. They think
it's a doll with spirits but it's
not that," said Vodou priest
Erol Josue. "Vodou is a way
of life. Vodou is dignity, it's a
celebration."
Referred to as a houngan,
Josue, 38, does not fit the
stereotypical image of a
Vodou priest.
He's a musician raised in


Vodou, with a MySpace page
and a CD called "Regleman,"
featuring Vodou music to a
global beat. His CD was fea-
tured on The World's music
segment on Public Radio
International.
"We're not asking people
to convert," he said. "But
young people need to know
where they came from."
On a recent Saturday,
Josue hosted a Vodou cleans-
ing ceremony at his house on
a quiet street in North Miami,
Fla., not far from Aventura
Mall. The ceremony, held at
the beginning of every year,
attracted people from West
Palm Beach to Homestead
and lasted eight hours.
Participants danced, sang and
fell into trances.
Everyone began by dip-
ping their hands in a white


enamel basin filled with fra-
grant leaves, oils and water
for good luck and protection.
The gathering of about 25
men and women ranged from
teenagers to seniors, and
included teachers, college
students and artists.
Sherline Fontus, a 31-year-
old mother who lives in Fort
Lauderdale said rediscover-
ing the religion has filled her
with a sense of freedom.
"You feel like you're home."
The ceremony lasted
through the night into the
early morning, with the par-
ticipants singing in call and
response style, as Josue and
others led them through rich-
ly textured songs in Creole.
"Ouve barye pou nou,"
they chanted - "open the
gates for us."
Amid the singing and


chanting, men drink beer as
women hand out small cups
of a Haitian soup with
spinach, dumplings and meat.
The mood is relaxed, with
bouts of intensity as people
start to act out the character-
istics of an invoked spirit.
One woman, feeling moved
by the spirit of the seas,
sways like the tides of an
ocean.
A table against the wall in
the living room is filled with
offerings for the spirits: eggs
for Damballah, the fertile
snake god of the waters;
roses for Erzulie, the female
spirit of love; a machete with
a red handkerchief, for the'
warrior spirit Ogou - and
bottles upon bottles of rum.
"Once upon a time every-
thing connected to Africa was
shameful, including skin
color and hair texture," said
Dr. Patrick Bellegarde-
Smith, a professor of
Africology at the University
of Wisconsin. "But now you
have a number of American
scholars who are into
Vodou."
Jacqueline Manigat, a 28-
year-old kindergarten teacher
from -Miami, was always
curious about Vodou. When
she was young, her mom had
a "secret room" where she
communicated with Vodou
spirits. At the beginning of
the school year, her mom
would pray over a white pot
of water - calling for the
ancestors to guide her chil-
dren and make their year a
success.
Six years ago, Manigat
became a Vodou priestess.
Now she consults the same
spirits for guidance she
watched her mother call
upon.
"I like that there is toler-
ance," she said. "No matter
who you are in Vodou, you
are welcome."


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News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


Page 13A


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


The Community Calendar pro-
vides a brief listing of local
clubs and organizations who
meet on a regular basis. It is
the responsibility of the group
to update the News-Sun on
any changes in this listing by
calling 385-6155, ext. 516;
send any changes by e-mail to
editor@nowssun. comn or mail
them to News-Sun Community
Calendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring, FL 33870.

TODAY
i Alcoholics Anonymous
One Day At A Time group
meets for a closed discussion
at 9:30 a.m. Monday and
Friday at Covenant
Presbyterian Church, 4500
Sun 'N Lakes Blvd., Sebring.
For details, call 314-0891.
* Alzhelmer's Association
Support Group meets at 6
p.m. second Friday at the
Oaks of Avon in Avon Park.
For details, call 385-3444.
* American Legion Post 25
hosts a fish fry from 5-7 p.m.
at the post, 1490 U.S. 27,
Lake Placid. Cost is $6.
Shrimp also is available for
same price. Open to the pub-
lic. Tickets in the lounge on
Friday night. Lounge hours are
from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For
details, call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 74
has karaoke from 7 p.m. until
final call at the post, 528 N.
Pine St., Sebring. Post open at
hoon. Happy Hour from 4-6
p.m. Members and guests
bnly. For details, call 471-
'1448.
'm AmVets Post 21 plays darts
from 5-8 p.m. for members
and guests. For details, call
385-0234.
* Avon Park Breakfast
Rotary Club meets 7 a.m.,
Rotary Club building.
* Bridge Club of Sebring
(American Contract Bridge
Club) plays duplicate games at
,12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf
Ave., Sebring. For details, call
385-8118.
* Harmony Hoedowners
Square Dance Club offers a
class in Lake Placid at the
Sunshine RV Resort from 9-11
a.m. Friday. For more informa-
tion, call Sam Dunn at 382-
,6792 or e-mail him at sam-
;dunn@samdunn.net.
' Heartland AIDS Network
meets 9 a.m., second Friday,
Heartland Professional Plaza
Learning Center, Sebring.
* Heartland Clubs meet at
3:30 p.m. on the second
Friday of each month at
Placid Lakes Town Hall
Building, 2010 Placid Lakes
Blvd. Call 699-6773.
* Highlands County
Democratic Party 13th
Precinct meets at 3:30 p.m.
second Friday at Placid Lakes
Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes
Blvd., Lake Placid. For details,
call Bill Sayles at 699-6773.
* Highlands Social Dance
Club hosts ballroom dancing
every Friday, September
through April from 7-9:30 p.m.
at the Sebring Lions Club on
Sebring Parkway, Free ball-
room dance instruction is
available at 6:30 p.m. Dance
the
night away to the music of the
Big Bands, All club dances are
Open to the public. Appropriate
dress required. Admission is
$5 for members and $7 for
non-members.
Call 471-0559.
* Lake Country Cruisers has
a car show from 5-8 p.m. sec-
ond Friday at Woody's Bar-B-
Q parking lot, Lake Placid.
There is a live disc jockey and
door prizes.
* Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 has lounge hours from 2
p.m. to 12 a.m. There is a fish
fry from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Cost is
$8.50 per person. Live music
is from 6:30-10:30 p.m. The
lodge is open to members and
their guests. Call 465-2661.
* Lake Placid Moose serves
wings, fish and burgers at 6
p.m. Music provided from 7-11
p.m. Pool tournament is at 8
p.m. Open to members and
qualified guests only.
* Loyal Order of Moose,
Highlands County Lodge No.


2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon
Park. Karaoke from 7-10 p.m.
Lodge phone number 452-
0579.
i Narcotics Anonymous
New Day Group meets at 6
p.m. at First Presbyterian
Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave,
Sebring. For information call
Heartland area helpline (863)
683-0630. More information on
other meetings and events at
iOww.naflheartland.org.


* S.A.L.T. Council (Seniors
and Law Enforcement
Together) meets the second
Friday each month at 10 a.m.
in the conference room of
Florida Hospital Home Care
Services located at 4005 Sun
'n Lake Blvd. For more infor-
mation contact Grace Plants at
273-1421.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves chicken or fish baskets
from 5-7 p.m. at the club,
12921 U.S. 98, Sebring, for a
$4 donation. Blind darts is
played at 7 p.m. For details,
call 655-4007.
0 Sebring Elks Lodge 1529
serving buffet dinner at 5-7
p.m. Elks and guests invited.
Dance music in ballroom at 7
p.m. Dinner and dance is $10
donation. For reservations, call
385-8647 or 471-3557.
Lounge is open from 3-10 p.m.
* Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 serves beef franks and
Italian sausages served from 1
p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S.
98, Sebring. For details, call
655-3920.
* Sebring Recreation Club
plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and
table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333
Pomegranate Ave. For details,
call 385-2966 or leave a
name, number and message.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3800 serves steak by the
ounce from 5:30-7 p.m. every
fourth Friday at the post, 1224
County Road 621 East, Lake
Placid. Texas Hold 'em les-
sons, 2 p.m. For more details,
call 699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 serves pizza from
5:30-7 p.m. and music is from
6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE
Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For
details, call 385-8902.

SATURDAY
8 American Legion Post 25
serves sirloin burgers from
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake
Placid. Jam session is from 2-
4 p.m. The lounge hours are
11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Members
and guests invited. For details,
call 465-7940.
* American Legion Post 69
in Avon Park serves dinner at
5 p.m. and music is from 6-9
p.m.
8 American Legion Post 74
open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs
served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.
Call 471-1448.
a Avon Park Public Library
has a free Adult Film Series at
noon. For details, call 452-
3803.
* Buttonwood Bay hosts
country round dance lessons
every Saturday, unless men-
tioned in this paper. Level 2
and above begin at 1 p.m. and
beginner's begin at 2:30 p.m.
in their rec center. For more
information call Vern Wright at
655-2634.
i Heartland Horses &
Handicapped Inc. provides
free assisted riding sessions
for adults and children with
special needs from 9-11 a.m.
Wednesday, Thursday and
Saturday at 118 W. College
Drive, Avon Park. For details
or to volunteer, call 452-0006.
1 Highlands Shrine Club,
2606 State Road 17 South,
Avon Park (between Avon
Park and Sebring) has a flea
market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
country store open from 8 a.m.
to noon and pancake break-
fast served from 7:30 a.m. to
10:30 a.m. Vendors are wel-
come. No setup fee is charged
for the summer months. Plenty
of off road parking. A monthly
social is planned at 6:30 p.m.
* on the second Saturday at the
club. There will be dinner and
music provided for dancing.
Reservations are required by
calling 382-2208.
B Lake Placid Art League
has a class in Pastels/Acrylics
taught by Llewellyn Rinald
from from 9 a.m. to noon at
the Cultural Center, 127 Dal
Hall Blvd. Call 465-7730.
* Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 opens the lounge at 1
p.m. Card games are played
from 1-4 p.m. The lodge is
open to members and their
guests. Call 465-2661.


* Narcotics Anonymous
New Day Group meets at 7
p.m. at First Presbyterian
Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave,
Sebring. For information call
Heartland area helpline (863)
683-0630. More information on
other meetings and events at
www.naflheartland.org.
m Overeaters Anonymous
meets at 10:30 a.m. at First
Presbyterian Church, Oak
Street, Lake Placid. For more


details, call 382-1821.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves dinner from 5-7 p.m. at
the club, 12921 U.S. 98,
Sebring. Music is from 7-10
p.m. For details, call 655-
4007.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3800 serves breakfast
from 8-11 a.m. and horse rac-
ing at 5:30 p.m. every second
and fourth Saturday at the
post, 1224 County Road 621
East, Lake Placid. For more
details, call 699-5444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 serves a meal for
$6 from 5:30-7 p.m. and music
is from 6-9 p.m. at the post,
2011 SE Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. For details, call 385-
8902.

SUNDAY
* American Legion Post 25
Lake Placid has lounge hours
from 1-9 p.m. Live music is
from 5-8 p.m. For details, call
465-7940.
* American Legion Post 74
open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6
p.m. Members and guests
only. Post is at 528 N. Pine
St., Sebring. Call 471-1448.
* Lake Placid Elks Lodge
2661 opens the lounge from 2-
8 p.m. Card games start at
2:30 p.m. The lodge is open to
members and their guests. For
details, call 465-2661.
* Lake Placid Moose has
karaoke in the pavilion.
Horseshoes played at 9:30
a.m. Food available at 4 p.m.
Open to members and quali-
fied guests only.
* Lions Club will have
country and bluegrass music
from 2-4 p.m. Sunday,
instead of at the Shriners.
Bands featured on alternate
Sunday will be Just Country
and Memory Makers. For
information, call 471-2288.
* Overeaters Anonymous,
meets from 4-5 p.m. in second
floor conference room No. 3 at
Florida Hospital Heartland
Medical Center, 4200 Sun 'N
Lake Blvd., Sebring. For
details, call 385-4277. No
dues, fees or weigh-ins. For
details on the organization, go
to www.oa.org.
* Sebring Eagles Club 4240
serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the
club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring.
For details, call 655-4007.
* Sebring Moose Lodge
2259 offers NASCAR racing in
the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar
open and kitchen open from 2-
5 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S.
9,8, Sebring. For details, call
655-3920.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3880 serves hamburgers
from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays
poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post,
1224 County Road 621 East,
Lake Placid. For details, call
69915444.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 4300 plays euchre at
1:30 p.m. and E&J Karaoke is
from 4:30-7:30 p.m. at the
post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. For details, call 385-
8902.

MONDAY
* Alcoholics Anonymous
meeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal
Church, Lakeshore Drive,
Sebring. Call 385-8807.
0 Alcoholics Anonymous
One Day At A Time group
meets for a closed discussion
at 9:30 a.m. Monday and
Friday at Covenant
Presbyterian Church, 4500
Sun 'N Lakes Blvd., Sebring.
For details, call 314-0891.
II Alzhelmer's Association
Support Group meets at 2
p.m. at the Oaks of Avon,
1010 U.S. 27 North, Avon
Park. Call 385-3444.
*] Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at
St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
660 NW Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Call (863) 687-3800.
* American Legion Post 74
Sons of Legion meet at 6
p.m. Executive board meets at
7 p.m. on second Monday at
the post, 528 N. Pine St.,
Sebring. Happy hour from 4-6
p.m. Post open noon-8 p.m.
Call 471-1448.
I AmVets Bruce L. Simpson
Post 21 meets 7 p.m. second


Monday, at the post, 2027
U.S. 27 South, Sebring,
behind the Allstate building.
For details, call 385-0234.
* Boy Scout Troop 482
meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave.,
Lake Placid.
* Bridge Club of Sebring
(American Contract Bridge
Club) plays duplicate games at
12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf
Ave., Sebring. For details, call
385-8118.


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Page 14A

REAL ESTATE SOURCE


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


www.newssun.com

Information provided by area Brokers


Real Estate Tips
Aeri il.ason/ Hoth/
Foreclosed
properties can
be a real value if
you know what
you are doing
In these uncertain
financial times, one thing
is certain there are
tremendous bargains
available to buyers with
financial resources. This
is especially true in hous-
ing, where banks are anx-
ious to rid themselves of
foreclosed properties.
But you have to know
what you are doing.
There are three ways
to buy foreclosed proper-
ty. Each has advantages
and disadvantages, as
outlined below.

Buying at auction
You can locate fore-
closed properties that
will be auctioned on auc-
tion companies Web
sites. Some goods ones
are www.ushoneaiuc
tion .com, www.hudso
nandmarshall.com and
www.williamsauc
tion.conm.
Advantages:
Buying at auction can
save you a lot.
Sometimes 60 to 70 cents
on the dollar.
You don't have to
worry about title issues,
past homeowners associ-
ation payments or back
taxes. The buyer is not
responsible for unpaid
back taxes and fees on
the property, only taxes
from closing day for-
ward.
You can find attractive
properties - many homes
up for bid were well
cared for.
Disadvantages:
Continued on page 15A


Lake Placid Realtors honored


at awards presentation


Special to the News-Sunl
LAKE PLACID - The
Lake Placid Board of
Realtors honored several of
its members during a special
awards luncheon recently at
the Lake Placid Camp and
Conference Center.
The keynote speaker was
Anthony Haney, executive
director of the Lake Placid
Camp and Conference
Center.
Susan Compton, Century
21 Compton Realty, was the
number one top producer in
sales with over $8 million
sold. James Hill of Florida
Scenic Realty was the top
seller in units with 209 sold.
Melissa DeBono of All
About Realty ranked second
in sales with more than $7
million.
Debbie McCullough of
Century 21 Compton Realty
came in third with more than
$5 million.
Brenda Siegle of Century
21 Compton Realty was the
fourth ranked top producer
with more than $4 million.
Hoz Compton of Century
21 Compton Realty was fifth
with more than $4 million.
Eve. Fay of MidFlorida
Real Estate Sales presented
Toni Tucker of MidFlorida
Real Estate Sales with the
Rookie of the Year Award.
Mary McCoy of
MidFlorida Real Estate Sales
presented Jeanne Warner of
Coldwell Banker Highlands
Properties with the
Congeniality Award.
Carol Heausler of MC
2000 Realty was presented
with the Board Member
Achiever Award by Sheila
Richards, association execu-
tive.
Carole Polk of MidFlorida


Courtesy photos
Carol Heausler of MC 2000 Realty was presented with the
Board Member Achiever Award during the Lake Placid
Realtors awards banquet recently.


Real Estate Sales presented
the Hall of Fame Award to
Sue Clark of MidFlorida Real
Estate Sales.
Sue Clark of MidFlorida
Real Estate Sales was award-
ed the Humanitarian Award
and it was presented by Carol
Heausler of MC 2000 Realty.
The coveted Realtor(r) of
the Year Award was present-
ed by Sue Clark .of
MidFlorida Real Estate Sales
to Debbie McCullough of
Century 21 Compton Realty.
Certificates of
Achievement were given to
Sheri Hutchins (Premier
Realty), Carol Edwards
(MidFlorida Real Estate
Sales) and Cheryl Brantley


Davis (Brantley Properties)
for achieving more than $3
million in sales.
With over $2 million in
sales, Valita Harvell (Century
21 Compton Realty), Marie
Claire Hoy (MC 2000
Realty), Jeanne Warner
(Coldwell Banker Highlands
Properties), Jean Deuth (MC
2000 Realty) and Monica
Montgomery (MidFlorida
Real Estate Sales) were also
presented with Certificates of
Achievement.
The $1 million producers
were also recognized for
their achievements. Sharon
Dougan (Coldwell Banker
Highlands Properties),
Continued on page 15A


Spanish-speaking agent Maribel
Ayala joins Heartland Real Estate


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING - Maribel
Ayala recently joined the
residential real estate divi-
sion at Heartland Real
Estate Corporation. She is
the agency's first Spanish-
speaking agent and brings
four years of real estate
sales experience to the
company.
"With HREC's primary
residential clientele in
Highlands and Hardee
counties and the growing
population of Spanish-
speaking home buyers and
sellers, it was important to
HREC to meet the needs of
our customers by bringing
someone of Maribel's capa-
bilities and experience to
our team," said James M.
Wohl, owner/broker of
HREC.
Recent statistics show
that Hardee and Highlands
counties Spanish-speaking
population on the rise with


nearly 25 percent of Hardee
County's population being
Hispanic/Latino and more
than 12 percent
Hispanic/Latino in
Highlands County.
Ayala is originally from
Honduras and lived in
Miami for 14 years. In
2003, she moved to
Sebring. She loves living in
Highlands County and
wants to share this wonder-
ful area with others. Ayala
is married and has one 6-
year-old son.
Heartland Real Estate
Corporation is a real estate
brokerage and development
firm located in Sebring fdr
more than 20 years. With
extensive knowledge in all
areas of real estate invest'-
ment, HREC specializes in
development, agricultural,
commercial and residential
properties. For more infor-
mation, visit www.heart
landre.net or call 382-3887.


ERA Advantage Realty sponsors:
with Ask This Old House


SEBRING - ERA
Advantage Realty is now
part of a yearlong national
sponsorship campaign with
"do-it-yourself," home
improvement icon, Ask
This Old House. This spon-
sorship gives ERA
Advantage Realty in
Sebring the ability to pro-
vide their consumers with
information to guide them
through all the stages of
homeownership, from buy-
ing and maintaining to sell-
ing.
"This sponsorship brings
two powerful brands
together to provide con-
sumers with the most trust-
ed home improvement
information out there," said
Greg Karlson, local ERA
representative. "We are


proud to be'associated with
such a respected, well'-
known name in the home
improvement industry, and
we believe this relationship
will help raise awareness of
both ERA real estate and
Ask This Old House as
trustworthy, dependable
resources for homebuyers,
homesellers and homeown-
ers. ERA Advantage Realty
in Sebring is in a unique
position to use this rela-
tionship to benefit our com-
munity with special initia-
tives throughout the year."
Through this sponsor-
ship, ERA Advantage
Realty in Sebring will help
support the national broadL
cast portion of Ask This
Old House programming
on PBS.


'S *


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Weekend Specials















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1500 SF LA, 3/2 with new roof and A/C. Located on corner
lot with shed, rear porch and privacy. All new appliances 8/08
and new exterior paint. Immediate occupancy. Easy to show.

$36AQ0 $109,000 MLS#199019


MOTIVATED SELLER
HAS REDUCED PRICE BY 20K
This 2/2 is in a convenient area of Sun 'n Lakes and only min-
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I - ---7










www.newssun.com News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


Page 15A


Advanced

All Service

recognizes

top sales
associate
Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING - David
Reasoner, real estate con-
sultant with Century 21
Advanced All Service
Realty Inc., was named
the office's top listing
sales associate in the
month of December, with
quality listings.
"Century 21 Advanced
All Service Realty is
pleased to recognize
David with this honor. He
is a leader and innovator,
empowering local home-
buyers and sellers with
valuable information,
helping them to make
informed real estate deci-
sions," Broker/owner
Ronnie T. Carter said.
Reasoner is an experi-
enced realtor with 11
years of exceptional serv-
ice to his customers and
has been with the Century
21 system for all 11 years.
Reasoner is the top
agent at the Sebring loca-
tion and has always been
one of the top agents in
the area, earning C21
Centurion Top Awards.
Located at 1843 U.S.
27 North, Century 21
Advanced All Service
Realty Inc. is a full serv-
ice brokerage specializ-
ing in residential, com-
mercial, recreational, lux-
ury properties, also prop-
erty manage-Century 21
System. The system is
comprised of more than
8,300 independently
owned and operated fran-
chised broker offices in
56 countries and territo-
ries worldwide.
If you would like more
information on how to
join the award-winning
team, contact Ronnie
Carter, Broker, or Donald
Elliot, sales manager, at
385-1181.


Courtesy photos
Jeanne Warner of Coldwell Banker Highlands Properties
was presented with the Congeniality Award.


LP

Realtors

honored

Continued from page 14A
Carole Polk (MidFlorida
Real Estate Sales), Adela
Casey (Premier Realty), Pete
McDevitt (Coldwell Banker
Highlands Properties),
Beverly Glaspey (Coldwell
Banker Highlands
Properties) Lorraine Grifo (
Remax Realty Plus 2),
Michael Sanders (Prudential
Sanders Realty), CB Brewer
(All About Realty), Jerry
Sochacki (Tomoka Heights
Realty), Stacey White
(Brantley Properties), James
Hill (Florida Scenic Realty),
William Brantley (Brantley
Properties), Ralph Musall
(Century 21 Compton
Realty) and Greg Karlson
(ERA Advantage Realty)
were also given certificates.


ClarK


lucKer


2,665 Hardee citrus acres


recently sold


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING - On Dec. 5, Heartland Real
Estate Corporation closed a deal of 2,665
acres of Hardee County citrus groves, which
were purchased by a Delaware-based limited
liability company. The grove will be leased
back to the seller for five years.
"We are thrilled to complete this win-win
deal for both companies," said HREC
owner/broker James M. Wohl. "Our agents
pride themselves on listening to their clients'
needs and connecting the best buyers with the


right properties."
HREC real estate agent Martin M. Wohl
represented the seller. The acreage sold for
approximately $34.3 million.
Located in Sebring for more than 20 years,
Heartland Real Estate Corporation is a real
estate brokerage and development firm with
extensive knowledge in all areas of real estate
investment, including development, agricul-
tural, commercial and residential properties.
For more information, visit www.heart-
landre.net or call 382-3887.


Foreclosed properties can be a real

value if you know what you are doing


Continued from page 14A
Buying process may take
longer. The bank usually has
about two weeks to accept or
deny your winning bid at the
auction and the closing typi-
cally occurs 30 days after
the bid is accepted.
Requires more individual
work by the buyer. You
should take time to visit the
property and find out addi-
tional information, such as
property and tax records,
through the county and auc-
tion company.
Not all properties are
desirable. Some properties at
auction may need intensive
repairs or be in a bad loca-
tion.

Buying through a
real estate agent
A real estate agent who is
experienced in selling fore-
closed property is often the
best resource and guide for
navigating this often time-
consuming process.
SAdvantages:
A real estate agent can
guide you through the


process. This means less
work for the buyer.
Buying through a real
estate agent is more conven-
tional and, therefore, more
comfortable for buyers.
Financing the purchase
doesn't involve any special
requirements.
Disadvantages:
Buyers may not find as
much equity-value in new
foreclosed listings as they
find in aged, distressed list-
ings that are on the verge of
having to be liquidated at
auction.

Buying on the
courthouse steps
Many foreclosed proper-
ties are auctioned off on the
courthouse steps. You can
find these properties listed in
the newspaper.
Advantages:
You can usually purchase
the property for the lowest
price.
Disadvantages:
You might have to pay
back taxes or liens on the
property. Although the value


of property might be there,
you might end up paying a
considerable amount of out-
standing back taxes that the
previous owner did not. It is
often the case that if a home-
owner was not paying his
mortgage, then he may not
have kept up with other
financial obligations, such as
paying property taxes or
paying contractors who
worked on the house.
The property might be in
bad shape. If'the previous
owner has been unable to
pay their mortgage, chances
are they also haven't been
able to afford upkeep. And
most of the time, potential
buyers on the courthouse
steps do not have the oppor-
tunity to inspect the property
prior to the auction.
You must have cash in full
at the sale.

Keri Mason Roth is a partner in
Atlanta-based
MorrislHardwicklSchneider, one
of the nation's largest real estate
closing law firms. She is also
president of the National REO
Division ofLandCastle Title, the
firm's title company.


Richards is new association

executive for LP board


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID - The
Lake Placid Board of
Realtors is announces their
new association executive
is Sheila Richards. Richards
is a native Floridian and has
been a resident of Lake
Placid since 1993. She has
been a member of the Lake
Placid Board of Realtors
and a licensed real estate
agent since 2005.
In 2006, Richards was
awarded the Rookie of the
Year Award and was a
multi-million dollar pro-
ducer. In 2007, she was the
Board Member Achiever
Award recipient.


"I love, to volunteer and
serve my community, which
made a career in real estate
such a natural choice to me,
as helping sellers and buyers
meet their needs fit with my
philosophy on helping peo-
ple. The Code of Ethics set
forth by the National
Association of Realtors also
appealed to me. I found real
estate was challenging and
very rewarding," Richards
said.
Richards became the act-
irg association executive in
October 2008, and officially
became the association
executive in January 2009.
She can be reached at 465-


Richards


3444 or by e-mail at
Executive @LakePlacidRealt
ors.org.


Re/Max associates honored


Courtesy photo
Re/Max associates were award recipients recognized recently at the Heartland
Association of Realtors Annual Banquet. The associates are (top row, from left) Gayle
Labanowitz, Hall of Fame; Sherrie Abraham, Association Achiever; Jan Farantino,
Presidents Award; (seated from left) Sue Dean, Congeniality and Kris Harrington,
Rookie of the Year.







MRI

Open or Closed

it's your choice with us

because we offer both.


We. would like


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Tina is a local resident and has her ARRT

Registration as well as being certified in

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to welcome Tina Nelson












Page 16A


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. .2009
AccuWeather.com


Pgy foat for Highlands County
TODAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY


f. o,.

Some sun, a shower Mostly sunny


High 81/Low '6 High 82/Low 56
Winds: SSE at 4-8 niph Winds SSW at 8-16 m


Times of sun and
olouos

High 81/Low 54


ph Winds: SW at 8-16 mph.


4-cr


SAvon Park
80/58
0*


'1.


Sebring
81/56
*


Lake Placid
81/59

Venus
81/59
0


.4


Shown Is today's
weather. Temperatures
are today's highs and
tonight's lows


Regional summary: Sun and some clouds loday with a shower in places
during the afternoon. Patchy clouds lonight. Mostly sunny tomorrow and
Sunday Monday and Tuesday, mostly sunn/ and pleasant


TUESDAY




Mostly sunny and nice


High 77/Low 49


Winds: NNW at 10-20 mph. Winds. E at 8-16 mph


For 3 p m today
Relative humidity .................... 51%
Expected air temperature ....... 780
Makes it.feel like ..................... 760

Weathert History
A gale-whipped blizzard on Feb. 13,
1899, dumped up to 3 feet of snow
from Massachusetts to Delaware.
The mercury at Tallahassee, Fla.,
dropped to 2 degrees below zero.


Some sun today with a
shower during the after-
noon. Winds south 4-8 mph. Expect
4-8 hours of sunshine with a 55%,
chance of precipitation and average
relative humidity 65%.


II your address (house number) ens in.
S0 1, water only on Monday
, or 3 waier only on Tuesday
1, - or 5. water only on Wednesday
, 6 or 7, water only on Thursday
S8 or 9', watei only on Friday
* and locations without a '
discernible address

For today
9 am. 11am. 1 p.m.3 pm, 5 p.m,
[1 .5. -. 4 1
The higher the UV index number, the greater
the need for eye and skin protection.
0-2, Low; 3-5, Moderate; 6-7, High;
8-10, Very High; 11+ Extreme


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are
highs for the day. Forecast high and low temperatures are given for selected cities.


(I


42/2 t
lnglon


Showers
T-storm
Rain
Flurries
Snow
Ice


FRONTS
S Cold
a Warm,
A , Stationary


-10s Io -j * so 106 io ' S l, 40S -' J 6Os 1 70 . .... .
National summary: Steady snow will create slippery travel over the central Plains today as a storm emerges from
the Rockies. At the same time, thunderstorms will rumble over the Gulf Coast states. The unsettled weather will not
overspread central Oklahoma, where Tuesday's devastating tornadoes touched down. Ahead of the storm, high
pressure will promote a dry day over the Ohio Valley and Carolinas. Most of the Northeast will also be dry, but
blustery winds will continue to chill the region.,


Today Sunrise .... 7:03 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:18 p.m'.
Moonrise 10:39 p.m.
Moonset .... 9:23 a.m.
Saturday Sunrise .... 7:02 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:18 p.m.
Moonrise 11:37 p.m.
Moonset .... 9:58 a.m.


LIt .


Last New First Full
Feb16 Feb24 Mar4 Mar 10


N W...... . .....


ThurSday ..................... 30.25
Tides
(Readings at St. Petersburg)
High ..................... . 4:16 a.m.
Low ................... 10:02 a.m.
High ....... ................ 4:11 p.m.
Low ........................ 11:07 p.m.
(Readings at Palm Beach)
High ... ....................... 11:11 a.m.
Low ............................ 4:52 a.m.
High ............ ..... 11:45 p.m.
Low ...... .................... 5:15 p.m.
Lake Levels
Lake Jackson ................. *78.36'
Lake Okeechobee ............ 13.18'
Normal ......................... 14.51'


Temperature
(Readings at Archbold Biological Station
in Lake Placid)
High Tuesday .......................... 76
Low Tufsr5i, ..................... 43
High Wednesday ................... 79
Low Wednesday .................... 48
High Thursday ...................... 86
Low Thursday ..................:.... 54
Precipitation
Tuesday ............................. 0.00"
Wednesday .................... 0. 00"
Thursday ............... . .... 0.00"
Month to date .................... 0.36"
Year to date ..................... 1,09"
Barometer
Tuesday ., .................. .....30.35.
Wednesday ........................ 30.29


Today Tomorrow Sunday
City HI Lo W HI Lo W HI Lo W
Daytona Beach 74 61 pc 81 60 pc 73 51 pc
Fi L u.i B.:h ,n i " ,,: q1 'rS s5 t 6. i
ForrMvrs 81 62 pc 81 62 s 79 62 pc
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Miami 61 66 pc 82 e5 8.3 65 S
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Penr, .::. -y r. A - ; - r. - i F.i 4' sh
Sarasota 78 !) 1 pr 78 61 pc 74 59 pc
Tartahawase 66 54 sni 71 52 r e8 41 Sh
Tampa 76 62 pc 76 60 pc 74 58 pc
W. Palm Bch 81 65 pc 82 63 s 83 63 pc


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Today Tomorrow Sunday Today Tomorrow Sunday Today Tomorrow Sunday
Cny HI Lo W Hi Lo W HI Lo W City HI Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Mi L.., W
Albuquerque 50 27 s 48 25 c 51 27 p onoiulu 81 70 s 81 70 pc 0 69 pc New Yorl Clly 42 E s 41 1 .: ; 42 30 pc
Atlanta 66 49 pc 62 44 r 58 38 pc Houston 73 53 '68 51 c 68 45sn Norfolk 566 36 45 35 r 46 37 ocC
B.jhI',..,. V. 3 3.1 4.1 30 c 42 t2 pc Ira3napolls 46 31 pC .1 25 C J'. .3 c 'H'i.'rm3 i l " . . i .1 - I
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Bo-lon 37 23 s 39 26 pc 37 25 pc KansasCity 40 22c 34 21 pc 34 19 sn Phoen;x ,64. 456 60 Q4 pc; 68 49 pc
Cnaotlte 66 43 s 50 38 r 56 34 pc Lexington 52 38 po 48 30 c .42 26 c Pittsburah 40 24 pc 38 .4 sn 36 r c
Cheyenne 30 12 sn 25 9 sn 30 17 pc Little Rock 60 41 sh 57 37 s 48 32 pc Portland 32 13 pc 36 17 pc 31 18 pc
ln:ri.,9.:. 12 24 pc 33 3 5n .34 20 .: LO.s Ang.3eis 60 44 r 60 46 p. E .. 6 - r Riliegn ,r:. j : -1 I r :. :i i ..
Cleveland 36 23 pc 34 25 sn 34 22 pc Lousville 56 38 pc . 46..33 c 44 27 c Fionester 32 18 :f 29 i.e.- l pC
Columbus 44 29 pc 40 25 sn 37 22 pc Memphis 62 47 ?h .54 37 s 50 33 pc St Louis 52 5 c 38 26 oc 35 2' sn
Djail: r 3j FPC 59 4S1 r 35 pc Mi.am . 81 66 p 82 65 s 8j i 5 Sjr. FriE.:..:. '. '3 ., I i : 1
Denver 32 15 sn 30 13 c 36 15 sn MInrejapoiis 30 14 pe 27 13 c 23 13 pS: S,.rri 1, 3'. 1- :.
Delroti 38 27 pc 38 25 sn 35 19 pc Nashville 62 42 pc 55 30 c 47 29 c Tampa 76 62. p I .I 60 p:. 74 58 c.
M'rr.sburg 46 27 s 41 29 sn 42 6 pc New Orleans 71 62 t 71 56 t 69 49 s Washimgaqn o.53 r 32 44 31 r 4- .I30


Today Today '
City Hi LoW City H Lo W
Acapulco 89 71 s London 41 34 pc
Bertin 32 23 sf Montreal : 25 9 c
'..'lgni 15 l Nice 47 34 s
Dit0in 46 39 p.o Citawa 23 10 c
F :.. , , ;.' ,; ' ".. '.'. L-... 2.3 1i r
Freeport. 76 64 pc Rio de Janeiro 81 72 r
3eineva 3? 29 sr Syorey 67 64 sh
iora lona N i7 70 pi Toronto 32 1f pc
.I.-r..: -i -., r ." p;I- . p . 1 1 3 73 ? ."
Kiev 37 34 sn. Winnipeg 20 -2 c
Weather {W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy,
sh-showers. t-thundertorms, r-rain. sf-snow flunies.
sn-snow. i-ice.


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SECTION T



SPORTS


News-Sun

Lady Panthers split


INe' -Sun rile pnoio oy v)AI nuI.M~ni
Shortstop Casey McIntosh and the Lady Panthers split
with Brevard Tuesday, falling 4-2 in the opener before
roaring back with a 9-2 win in the nightcap.


PAGE


SLIVIN


Friday, February 13, 2009


Lady Red Devils a bit


on the green side


By ED BALDRIDGE
ed.baldridge@newssun.com
The Avon Park Lady
Devils took some lumps
in DeSoto last Tuesday
night, but the 8-1 loss for
the young team is not as
big a setback as it
appears.
Rebuilding after a suc-
cessful season last year,
the Devils start up, to six
sophomores on a regular
basis.
"We ate a young team,"
said Avon Park head coach


Wade "The Hammer"
Jackson. "There are times
when we made some really
good plays, but there are
also times when it is clear
that we need some more
time out there."
"We have some good
hitters," he continued.
"Bre (Brearnna Tate) is
back, and she just needs
to get into her groove, but
we need a little more
experience."
Tate was able to get on
base twice and had one hit


for the evening.
- Ashley Carr certainly
has the speed on the
mound, but needs to work
on the strike zone a bit.
"Ashley is a battler, but
we had a few errors
behind her with two outs
that made it an 8-1,
instead of a 2-1, game,"
Jackson said.
The Lady Devils will
gain some more experi-
ence tonight as they host
district rival Booker at
6:30 p.m.


INc.'\ --lin pphOO t3) .-N MuHtLl- Ni
Favianette Cotte comes flashing into the
scene in front of Paige Timmons to
snare this pop-up Tuesday night.
Despite the sparkling play and improve-
ment from the young Lady Devil squad,
Avon Park came up short, 8-1, at
DeSoto.


Blue Streaks escape


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newssun.com
ARCADIA - While trying
to avoid the fate of Avon
Park a night before, Sebring
out it awfully close but rode
a late run to a 67-55 win
over upset-minded Booker
on the second day of the
District 10-4A Tournament
Tuesday night.
"We let down," head
coach Princeton Harris said.
"We. got the lead early and
then stopped doing what we
were supposed to be doing,
we got away from what we
need to do."
That would be in regards
Sebr to the quick
S 6-0 lead the
S6 Streaks dart-
61 ed out to
Booker within the
first minute,
55 8-0 just 30
55 seconds after
that.
But they would score just
one more hoop the rest of
the opening quarter as the
Tornadoes whirled back to
take an 11-10 lead.
Sebring came back with
three Jake Trussell scores in
the second, but Booker
wouldn't go away and was
still within 25-22 at the half.
"They hit some shots,"
Harris said. "We'd drop off
a bit and they'd get the
looks, but they' also had
some banked threes and.
there's not much you can do
about those."
Nip-and-tuck it stayed
and as the game went on, the
danger was in letting the
underdog stick around too
long - and gaining the con-
fidence to pull off a miracle.
The scene was playing out
just like that as Sebring


News-Sun photo by DAN HUJtOiN
Sebring's Jake Trussell momentarily loses the handle on the ball after being fouled on a
drive. But the Blue Streak regained control, scored the bucket and converted the three-
point play to cap off a 15-5, fourth-quarter run that pushed Sebring to a 67-55 win over
Booker in the District 10-4A Tournament Tuesday night


went into the final eight
minutes clinging to a 42-41
lead.
"Stay focused, play hard,


don't quit," were Harris's
'words to his team before
they hit the court.
And they seemed to do


the trick as a 15-5 run,
capped by a Trussell drive

Continued on page 3B


A-Rod's new math


Whatever your opinion of
A-Rod's confession to using
'banned substances' earlier
this week - whether you see
him as a great person who
owned up to his mistakes, or
a coward who only came
clean when he was forced to
do so, or something along
the broad spectrum in
between, there is one wrin-
kle that his admission creat-
ed - a benchmark.
Oft asked was the ques-
tion, just how much do
steroids help?
General answers are that
they help recovery time after
physical exercise, activity
- thereby allowing a player
to remain stronger, fresher,
even as the dog days of
summer bear down od the
daily schedule that is Major
League Baseball.
SThey also increase
strength gains'through work-
ing out, making someone
stronger, faster and more
readily.
They don't help one hit a
baseball, but for those that
can already hit a baseball, it
sure allows them to hit it
with more force, thus hitting
said baseball farther.
But for so long, there was
no way to calculate just how
many more home runs they
would allow a player to hit -
because we had no definitive
time-framed sample.
Now we do.
With Rodriguez admitting
that he was on performance
enhancers though the 2001-
03 seasons, we have our
sample.
Statistics gathered from
those years, as compared to
all his other years of play-
ing, show an increase in his
home run average per year
of over 12.
Sure, it isn't likely to be
exact, or consistent for all


And Another
Thing...
Dan Hoehne
players on the juice, but it's
something.
But let's apply this basic
bit of info to the most infa-
mous of those alleged.
We don't know for sure
when Barry Bonds started
his run on the cream and the
clear, allegedly, or any other
various substances, again
allegedly, but an educated
guess could be. '99.
It has been said that it was
the home run chase between
McGwire and Sosa, and the
adoration and attention those
two received, that burned
Bonds' britches and brought
him 'to the point of doing
what it took to reclaim his
spotlight.
During that season, in 156
games, he hit 37 home runs.
In the '99 season, he hit
34 - but he hit those in 102
games.
Three fewer home runs in
54 fewer games.
From there, his home run
totals went, 49, 73, 46, 45
and 45.
Those were from ages 35-
39 'in an average of 143
games per season - 51.6
HRs per year.
'Reaching back to include
the '99 season, let's just take
12 home runs off of Bonds
season totals.
That's six years, at 12

Continued on page 3B


Sicking honored,

SFCC ranked


Itews-oun ile pnoto oy cEv anL MIunL
The FCCAA announced Feb. 10 that SFCC freshman short-
stop Tom Sicking was it's Baseball Player of the Week. The
Bradenton native batted .580 through the first seven games
of his college career, batting in three runs and scoring 10.
He hit safely in all seven games, all of them multi-hit
games, including four 3-hit games. Sicking also scored at
least one run in each game, helping the Panthers off to a,
then, 6-1 start. And with that hot start, South Florida finds
itself breaking into the state rankings, moving up to number
six after the first week of the season.

i ' .


Seminole Tire blasts Schooni's


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID - The
Seminole Tire team put tire
tracks all over the Schooni's
Family Resturant team by a
score of 20-5 in Lake Placid
Senior Softball League play
on Wednesday, Feb. 11 at
the Lake June ball fields.
The Tiremen
scored four runs in Sen
the first inning and
kept their foot on the
throttle for the rest of
Seh
the game.
The Tiremen put
on a hitting and field-
ing clinic with Tom
Walsh going 5-for-5, Gary
Vann 4-for-5 with a home
run and Cluff Brumel, Max
Hehn, Fred Moore, Gary
Steeves and Glen Minnick
going 3-for-4.
Minnick, a 69-year old
Pennsylvania native, 7-year
Marine Corp veteran, former
baseball player in the
Dodgers organization and


the Waterbury, Connecticut
Continental Baking
Company (Wonder Bread)
retiree who could barely
walk from 1991 to 1995 due
to numerous knee opera-
tions, had two home runs


among
tors.

oinole


ooni's

5


his hits for the vic-

The crafty man-
ager of the Seminole
Tire team, Carol
Walsh, shifted her
defense to take
away the strong left
handed hitting of the
Schooni's team.
With the defen-


sive setup, it appeared that
almost every time the
Schooni's players hit line
shots, they were right at a
fielder while many of the
Seminole Tire teams hits
were just barely out of reach
of the Schooni's fielders.
Brumel, in particular,
made several outstanding
catches in right field on well


hit balls that would normally
go for doubles and triples.
He was not alone in his
fielding prowess as team-
mates Hehn, Moore, Harley
Smith and Jeff Stanley also
made excellent fielding
plays for the Seminole team.
This fielding and excel-
lent pitching by
Smithlimited times L.P. M
at bat for the
Schooni's team.
Ten of the
Yates
Schoonis batters
managed one hit 1|
each in their three
times at bat with
only Mike Jurmu getting
two hits in the less than stel-
lar offensive effort.
Play on the other field,
saw the Lake Placid Marine
team beat out a 27-15 win
over the Michelle Yates
Insurance team.
The high-powered offense
of the Mariners was led by


:a

1
I


5


Duke Hensley with three
doubles, a triple and a home
run, Larry Lane with two
singles, a double and a home
run, Moe Pier with three sin-
gles and a triple, Paul Smith
with four singles and Bert
Rologg with two singles and
a double.
Fred Cooper was 3-
rine for-4 with two four
S baggers, and Ray
Heissenberg, Harlan
Newby and Ray
ns. Wilson had three hits
each and Dusty
Hensley and George
Lavoie had inside-the-
park home runs for the
Insurance team.
As the mid- point of the
season approaches,
Schoonis and the idle
Central Security team lead
the league with records of 5-
3. followed by Lake Placid
Marine at 5-4. Seminole Tire
at 4-5 and Yates Insurance at
3-7.











,Page 2B


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


THE SCOREBOARD


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 43 11 .796 -
Philadelphia 27 24 .52914 1/2
New Jersey 24 29.453181/2
New York 21 31 .404 21
Toronto 21 34 .38222 1/2
Southeast Division
W L Pet GB
Orlando 38 13 .745 -
Atlanta 31 21 .5967 1/2
Miami 27 24 .529 11
Charlotte 21 31 .404171/2
Washington 11 42 .208 28
Central Division
W L Pet GB
Cleveland 40 11 .784 -
Detroit 27 24 .529 13
Milwaukee 26' 29 .473 16
Chicago 23 29 .44217 1/2
Indiana 21 33 .389201/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antoniq 35 16 .686 -
Dallas 31 20.608 4
Houston 32 21 .604 4
New Orleans 30 20 .6004 1/2
Memphis 15 37.288201/2
Northwest Division
W L Pet GB
Denver 36 17 .679 -
Portland 32 19.627 3
Utah 30 23 .566 6
Minnesota 17 34 .333 18
Oklahoma City 13 40.245 23
Pacific Division
W L Pet GB
L.A. Lakers 42 10.808.-
Phoenix '28 23 .54913 1/2
Golden State 18 35 .34024 1/2
L.A. Clippers 13 40.245291/2
Sacramento 11 43 .204 32
Wednesday's Games
Denver 82, Orlando 73
Cleveland 109, Phoenix 92
Toronto 91, San Antonio 89
Philadelphia 91, Memphis 87
Charlotte 101, Washington 89
Atlanta 99, Detroit 95
Milwaukee 122, Indiana 110
Boston 89, New Orleans 77
Houston 94, Sacramento 82
Utah 113, L.A. Lakers 109
Portland 106, Oklahoma City 92
L.A. Clippers 128, New York 124, OT
Thursday's Games
Miami at Chicago, late
Boston at Dallas, late
Portland at Golden State, late
Friday's Games
No games scheduled


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
New Jersey 35 17 3 73172136
N.Y. Rangers 30 20 5 65140153
Philadelphia 28 15 9 65167153
Pittsburgh 27 24 5 59169169
N.Y. Islanders 16 32 6 38133182
Northeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Boston 39 9 7 85190126
Montreal 29 20 6 64 166 166
Buffalo 28 21 6 62162151
-Toronto 20 24 10 50161 198
Ottawa 19 25 8 46125150
Southeast Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Washington 34 16 5 73182160
Florida 26 19 8 60151150
Carolina 27 22 5 59142156
ampa Bay 18 25 11 47135167
Atlanta 19 32 5 43157194
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
'Detroit 36 11 7 79204157
Lhicago 30 14 8 68175134
Columbus 26 23 5 57145152
ashville 25 26 3 53 131 153
St. Louis 22 25 6 50154167
Northwest Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
Calgary 31 18 5 67169160
Minnesota 28 22 3 59137120
Edmonton 27 23 4 58153168
Vancouver 25 20 8 58160156
Colorado 25 29 1 51 148 169
Pacific Division
W L OTPtsGF GA
$an Jose 37 7 8 82178123
Anaheim 28 24 5 61 159158
ballas 26 20 7 59162165
Phoenix 25 25 5 55137164
Los Angeles 24 21 7 55138145
Swo points for a win, one point for
overtime loss or shootout loss.
Wednesday's Games
fhicago 3, Atlanta 1
tlew Jersey 4, N.Y. Islanders 2
I.Y. Rangers 5, Washington 4, SO
Ottawa 3, Buffalo 1
Pittsburgh 2, San Jose 1, SO
xinnesota 3, Colorado 2
Phoenix 1, Dallas 0
Anaheim 3, Calgary 2, OT
Edmonton 7, Montreal 2
Thursday's Games
Florida at Carolina, late
Dttawa at Philadelphia, late
Minnesota at Detroit, late
Troronto at Tampa Bay, late
. ,St. Louis at Nashville, late
Vancouver at Phoenix, late
)'algary at Los Angeles, late
* Friday's Games
boston at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Oetroit at Columbus, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
SI.Y. Rangers at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at St. Louis, 8:30 p.m.
lancouver at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Montreal at Colorado, 9 p.m.


Wednesday's College Basketball
Major Scores


EAST
American U. 52, Bucknell 50
Colgate 71, Lafayette 54
Connecticut 63, Syracuse 49
prexel 62, Northeastern 58
Holy Cross 62, Army 59
1a Salle 68, George Washington 57
Lehigh 70, Navy 59
'Maine 68, Hartford 63
Massachusetts 91, Fordham 68
'Rhode Island 87, St. Bonaventure 80
Towson 82, Georgia St. 72, OT
Vermont 75, Boston U. 47
: SOUTH
Auburn 75, Arkansas 62


LIVE

SPORTS

ON TV


AUTo RACING
FRIDAY
3 p.m NASCAR - Camping World 300, Qual.... ESPN2
SATURDAY
1:15 p.m. NASCAR - Camping World 300 ...... ESPN2


COLLEGE BASKETBALL
FRIDAY
9 p.m. Villanova at West Virginia ........... ESPN
SATURDAY
12 p.m. Georgetown at Syracuse ............. ESPN
1 p.m. Regional - Kentucky at Arkansas or UCLA at
Arizona ........................... CBS
2 p.m. Texas at Colorado ................. ESPN
3 p.m. Teams TBA ......................... 38
3:30 p.m. Teams TBA.........................ABC
4 p.m. Florida St at Wake Forest ............ SUN
4 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh ............. ESPN
5 p.m. Creighton at Southern Illinois ....... ESPN2
5 p.m. Mississippi St at Auburn ............. SUN
7 p.m. Tennessee St at Austin Peay......... ESPN2
9 p.m. Ohio St at Wisconsin ............... ESPN
9 p.m. Niagara at Fairfield ............... ESPN2


9:30 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
3 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m.

9:30 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
3 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m.


GOLF
FRIDAY
EuroPGA - Maybank Malaysian Open .. GOLF
PGA - Allianz Championship ......... GOLF
PGA - AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am .... GOLF
LPGA - SBS Open.................. GOLF
PGA - AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am .... GOLF
SATURDAY
EuroPGA - Maybank Malaysian Open .. GOLF
PGA - Allianz Championship ......... GOLF
PGA - AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am .... GOLF
LPGA - SBS Open.................. GOLF
PGA - AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am .... GOLF


HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
FRIDAY
7 p.m. Lincoln (N.Y.) vs. St. Patrick (N.J.) .... ESPN2

NBA
FRIDAY.
7 p.m. All-Star Celebrity Game ............. ESPN
9 p.m. Rookie Challenge and Youth Jam....... TNT
SATURDAY
7 p.m. Slam Dunk Special .................. TNT
8:30 p.m. All-Star Skills Competition ............ TNT

WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
FRIDAY
6:30 p.m. North Carolina at Florida St ............. SUN
8:30 p.m. Clemson at Duke ................... SUN'
11 p.m. Mississippi St at Mississippi. ............ SUN
Times, games, channels all subject o change


Coll. of Charleston 78, W. Carolina 67
High Point 63, Winthrop 56
LSU 97, Mississippi St. 94, 20T
Longwood 77, Texas-Pan American 61
Memphis 63, Tulsa 37
N.C. State 82, Wake Forest 76
North Carolina 101, Duke 87
Richmond 71, Duquesne 67
Stephen FAustin 59, Northwstern St. 51
Tennessee 79, Georgia 48
Tulane 73, East Carolina 64
UNC Ashville 87, Gardner-Webb 78, OT
Va. Comm 76, James Madison 71, OT
Virginia Tech 76, Georgia Tech 71
William & Mary 69, UNC Wilmington 40
MIDWEST
Akron 63, Ball St. 55
Bowling Green 59, Toledo 54
Cincinnati 71, St. John's 61
Creighton 79, Bradley 65
Dayton 71, Xavier 58
Illinois St. 70, Evansville 68
Indiana St. 69, Drake 57
Iowa St. 70, Colorado 42
Kansas St. 85, Texas Tech 73
N. Iowa 81, S. Illinois 55
Purdue 61, Penn St. 47
Saint Louis 69, Charlotte 61
W. Michigan 76, Ohio 62
Wisconsin 69, Iowa 52
SOUTHWEST
Houston 69, SMU 56
McNeese St. 78, Texas-Arlington 59
Nicholls St. 60, Sam Houston St. 59
Oklahoma 78, Baylor 63
Rice 88, Southern Miss. 72
Tex, A&M-Corp Christi 70, Texas St. 59
Texas-San Antonio 88, Cent. Ark. 79
UTEP 73, UCF 68
FAR WEST
BYU 94, Colorado St. 60
CS Northridge 67, Cal Poly 55
New Mexico 76, Air Force 66
Utah 67, San Diego St. 55


Wednesday's Women's Basketball
Major Scores
EAST
American U; 71, Bucknell 63
Army 63, Holy Cross 62
Boston U. 89, Stony Brook 71
Colgate 62, Lafayette 61
Connecticut 77, St. John's 64
Delaware 62, William & Mary 51
Duquesne 84, Saint Louis 66
Georgetown 69, Cincinnati 61
Hartford 74, Binghamton 54
Lehigh 66, Navy 48
Massachusetts 71, Temple 60
Saint Joseph's 59, La Salle 42
Vermont 73, UMBC 49
SOUTH
Appalachian St. 72, Wofford 68
Florida Atlantic 66, Denver 58
Georgia Tech 89, Savannah.St. 34
LA-Monroe 82, LA-Lafayette 53
Middle Tennessee 75, Troy 60
N.C. Central 68, Winston-Salem 66
Nicholls St. 76, Sam Houston St. 74
North Texas 62, New Orleans 52


South Alabama 66, Fla. International 52
Texas-Arlington 73, McNeese St. 47
MIDWEST
Ball St. 77, Kent St. 70
Cent. Michigan 78, Akron 57
DePaul 80, Seton Hall 39
E. Michigan 69, Buffalo 58
Louisville 71, Notre Dame 66
N. Illinois 80, Miami (Ohio) 66
W. Michigan 74, Ohio 56
XavieF 82, George'Washington 62
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas St. 56, Ark.-Little Rock 55
Baylor 64, Oklahoma St. 62, OT
Oklahoma 58, Iowa St. 49
Stephen F.Austin 82, Northwestrn St. 64
Texas 74, Kansas 66
Texas St. 66, Texas A&M-Corp Chrst 62
Texas Tech 60, Texas A&M 53
Texas-San Antonio 97, Cent. Ark 89, OT
FAR WEST
BYU 53, Colorado St. 51
Long Beach St. 63, CS Northridge 50
New Mexico 79, Air Force 33
San Diego St. 55, Utah 49
UC Riverside 79, CS Bakersfield 69


BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS--Named Frank
Viola assistant spring training pitching
coach.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS-Agreed to
terms with INF Kevin Millar on a minor
league contract.
National League
MILWAUKEE BREWERS-Agreed to
terms with RHP Eduardo Morlan and
RHP Cody Scarpetta on one-year con-
tracts.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CLEVELAND BROWNS-Named George
McDonald offensive quality control
coach.
DENVER BRONCOS-Released RB
Anthony Alridge, RB Alex Haynes, RB
P.J. Pope, TE Chad Mustard and WR
Cliff Russell.
DETROIT LIONS-Retained wide
receivers coach Shawn Jefferson and
running backs coach Sam Gash. Named
Matt Burke linebackers coach, Jeff
Horton quarterbacks coach, Bob
Karmelowicz defensive line coach, Tim
Walton secondary coach, George Yarno
offensive line coach, Stan Kwan special
teams coordinator, Jason Arapoff coor-
dinator of physical development,
Bradford Banta special teams assistant
coach, Malcolm Blacken strength and
conditioning coach, Don Clemons
defensive quality control coach, Todd
Downing offensive quality control
coach, Kris Kocurek assistant defensive
line coach, Tim Lappano tight ends
coach and Daron Roberts assistant sec-
ondary coach.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS-Released
WR Jerry Porter and CB Drayton'
Florence.


www.newssun.com


LOCAL SCHEDULE


Avon Park


TODAY: Baseball hosts First Pitch Classic, vs. Clewiston, 7:30 p.m.; Softball vs. Booker,
6:30 p.m.; Wrestling at Regionals, Matanzas High School, Palm Coast, Noon.
SATURDAY: Baseball hosts First Pitch Classice, vs. Pasco, Noon; Wrestling at Regionals,
Matanzas High School, Palm Coast, 12:30 p.m.


S TODAY: Boys Basketball at DistrictToumament, McKeel Academy,TBA; Softball vs.
S Immokalee, 5:30/7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY: Baseball at Bill Jarrett Ford Early BirdTourmament, Avon Park, vs. Lake
Region, 5 p.m.; JV Baseball vs. Sebring, 6 p.m.; Softball at Avon Park, 5:30/7:30 p.m.;
Lake Placid BoysTennis vs. LaBelle, 3:30 p.m.; GirlsTennis at LaBelle, 4 p.m.


STODAY: Boys Basketball at DistrictToumament, DeSoto, vs. Hardee, 6 p.m.; Baseball at
First Pitch Classic, Avon Park, vs. Pasco, 5 p.m.; Softball vs. Moore Haven, 5/7 p.m.;
VWrestling at Regionals, Matanzas High School, Palm Coast, Noon.
SATURDAY: Wrestling at Regionals, Matanzas High School, Palm Coast, 12:30 p.m.
MONDAY: Baseball at Bill Jarrett Ford Early BirdToumament, Avon Park, vs. Lake
Sebring Region, 7:30 p.m.; BoysTennis vs. Hardee, 2 p.m.; GirlsTennis vs. Hardee, 2 p.m.
.....................................................................................................................................................................................

O 1" TODAY: Baseball at Seminole C.C., 12 p.m.
SSATURDAY: Baseball vs. South Carolina Sumter, Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
S SUNDAY: Baseball at Florida C.C., Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
MONDAY: Baseball atWebber International, 6 p.m.
SFCC TUESDAY: Softball vs. Central Florida C.C., 5 p.m.

............. .... . ... . ... . .. .. .. .. ................ . .. ... ..... . .... . .... ... ... .... ..... ....... ... .... ....................................................... .


SPORTS SNAPSHOTS


Hill-Gustat B-Ball Car Wash
SEBRING - The area middle school
basketball champion Hill-Gustat boys
basketball team, coming off an 11-0 sea-
son, will be holding a fund-raising car
was Saturday, Feb. 14, beginning at 8 a..
at Advance Auto Parts, across from Wal-
Mart.
Donations for each was start at $7, and
coach Billy Shannon can be contacted at
214-6420 for further information and/or
donations.
All proceeds go toward a trip for the
kids to see an Orlando Magic game.

SFCC Barbecue
AVON PARK - Mark your calender
for Saturday Feb. 21, as the Panther
Athletic Dept. will host our annual chick-
en BBQ.
The BBQ will coincide this year with a
doubleheader of Baseball as the Panthers
will take on Clearwater Christian College
at 1:00.
Serving time for the BBQ, eat-in or
take-out, will be from noon until 4 p.m.
that day.
We are making it even easier this year
to purchase a meal.
Just contact the athletic office between
now and Feb. 18 to reserve the amount of
.dinners you would like to purchase.
, No ticket necessary, we will have your
name and order at the window and you
can pay that day, pick it up or sit and eat
and catch the Panthers in action.
The menu is chicken, potato salad,
baked beans, roll, and water or tea to
drink $7 donation.
If you would like to place an order just
contact the athletic dept. at 784-7036 and
we will put you on the list for that day.

Sebring Youth Soccer
SEBRING - Soccer registration are
currently open at the Highlands County
Family YMCA through March 9, for ages
3 to 14 - ages are as of September 1,
2009.

A.P. Chamber Golf Tourney
AVON PARK - The Avon Park
Chamber of Commerce 12th Annual Golf
Tournament will be held Saturday,
February 14, 2009 at River Greens Golf
Course sponsored by Florida Hospital,
Progress Energy, Embarq, Avon Pak
Main Street CRA, Highlands
Independent Bank, Heartland National
Bank and Highlands Today.
This two-person scramble format will
start with a 7 a.m. registration and 8 a.m.
shotgun start with teams flighted by
handicap.
The $60.00 per person entry fee
includes golf, range balls, lunch, tourna-
ment prizes, refreshments on the course
and The Cohan Radio Group will spon-
sor the $2,000.00 Hole-In-One prize.
Hole Sponsorships are available for
$100.00 for a professional sign on a
hole.
The event is open to all golfers and we
welcome couples to participate in this
Valentines Day Tournament.
For an entry form and information
please contact the Avon Park Chamber of
Commerce at 453-3350.

Nu Hope Golf Tournament
AVON PARK - The Mid-Florida
Federal Credit Union proudly presents its


rota Call

W Sebring 3

lip?


12th Annual Nu-Hope Elder Care
� Services, Inc. golf tournament at
Pinecrest on Lotela Golf Course in Avon
Park on April 4.
The tournament will utilize a two-per-
son scramble format and teams will be
flighted by total handicap.
Entry fee will be $60 per person ($120
per team) which includes after-play meal
and refreshments during the day.
Registration forms are available at the
participating golf pro shop or can be
mailed.or.faxed to you by calling Sandy.
'Foster at 382-2134, ext. 325.
Business sponsorships are also avail-
able.
Previous five event have resulted in a
full field of players, so early registration
is encouraged.

McFarling Memorial Golf
SEBRING - The 3rd Annual Jim
McFarling Memorial-Tournament will be
held Saturday, February 28, at the Spring
Lake Golf Resort.
The format will be a flighted four-per-
son scramble, mandatory two drives by
each player. There will be a 50/50 draw-
ing, men's and ladies closest to pin
prizes; play Hole No. 17 from 150 yards
for donation to fund; mulligans available
for purchase; and great raffle prizes from
area merchants.
All proceeds will benefit a scholarship
fund for junior golfers involved in the
Highlands County Sertoma Junior Golf
Tour.
Shotgun start is at 8:30 a.m. on
Panther Creek. Entry fee is $50 per per-
son or $200 per team includes Lunch and
prizes immediately following golf.
Play in Jimmy's tourney and support
junior golf.

Lake Placid Chamber 5k
LAKE.PLACID - Mark your calendars
for the second annual Greater Lake
Placid Chamber of Commerce 5k
Run/Walk, which will be held on
Saturday, Feb. 21 in DeVane Park.
Exclusive Dri fit shirt sponsors are
Atlantic Blue Group, Inc., Florida
Hospital Lake Placid, Holiday Inn
Express Hotel & Suites, and Mid Florida
Credit Union.
Other sponsorship opportunities are
available.
This is a great way to promote your
business, our community and good
health.
Sponsorship and Entry Forms are
available on the Chamber Web site at
www.visitlakeplacidflorida.com.

Royal Palms Youth Bowling
LAKE PLACID - Royal Palms (Lake
Placid) Youth Bowling League for ages
7-and-up started the spring season on
Saturday, Jan. 10, at 9 a.m.
New bowler sign-up is $20 and
includes shirt.
Bowling continues through April 25.
Cost weekly is $11 and includes games
of bowling, shoes and prize fund.
All youth league bowlers are eligible
for reduced rate open bowling (some
restrictions apply) and free bowling with
instruction on Fridays from 3-5 p.m.,
must be accompanied by an adult.
Come out for instruction and a good
time.
Call Donna Stanley at 441-4897 or
Frank Peterson at 382-9541 for more
information.



the News-Sun

85-6155 - Avon Park 451-1009

Lake Pladcd 485-0416













Streaks now face Cinderella Wildcats


Continued from 1B
where the ball came out of
his hands as he was fouled.
but he was able to regain con-
trol and lay it in for what
would become a three-point
play.
Booker made one more
charge, getting to within
eight at 60-52, but Sebring
answered back down the
stretch to fend it off and
move to the tournament
semifinals for a match-up
with the Cinderalla Wildcats
of Hardee.
"The two times we played
them, they weren't really
close," Harris said. "And


that's what is scary. They're
playing with nothing to lose.
They're already the
Cinderella team. They've got
one upset so now they'll be
looking for another one."
But if they didn't learn
from the Devil's example,
they sure got a dose of it this
night to take forward the
knowledge to not take any-
thing for granted.
Trussell led all scorers
with 22, with Joe Young
adding 11, Devin Clarke 10
and J.C. Howard eight.
Jamal Gaines topped
Booker with 21 before foul-
ing out in the fourth.


News-Sun photos by DAN HOEHNE
Above: J.C. Howard leaps to save this ball from going out of bounds but, while in mid-
air, spots an open Spencer Caton for an assist in Sebring's first-round win over Booker
in the District 10-4A Tournament. Left: Joe Young looks for a referee after trying to
call time-out before falling out of bounds early in Tuesday's 67-55 win over Booker.


Hill-Gustat goes 11-0


By DAN HOEHNE
daniel.hoehne@newssun.com
The Eagles of Hill-
Gustat Middle School
were aptly named this
year as the boys basket-
ball team soared to an
undefeated, 11-0 record.
In compiling the record,
the Eagles flew past
Sebring, Avon Park, Lake
Placid, Wauchula and
Arcadia middle school's
twice each, with one win
over Okeechobee.
"It was a great season,"
head coach Billy Shannon


said. "Special thanks goes
to our captains, Davaris
Faulk and Marcus 'Dr.J'
Dewberry. They were great
players for us, but more
importantly, they were
great leaders. They really
brought the team together,
helped the other players out
when it was needed. They.
brought everyone in and
brought them up."
But while the athletic
accomplishment is
impressive, Shannon
knows that isn't the
important aspect.


"My purpose is to
make sure it's about more
than the physical - the
dribbling and the shoot-
ing," he said. "It's about
the lessons learned,
understanding teamwork,
respect and sportsman- ,
ship. Most importantly,
it's about academics,
being students first, ath- . i .- - ' " !

An undefeated season
sets a good example that Couesy photo
Courtesy photo
those lessons are being The Hill-Gustat Middle School boys basketball team celebrates.with a
learned. banner signifying their undefeated season.


A-Rod

helps tally

Bonds

numbers
Continued from 1B
home runs per year, the sim-
ple math shows 72 home
runs off his career total of
762.
Brings him down to 690,
third on the all-time list.
That is including his final'
three years, an injury short-
ened '05 (only 14 games, 5
home runs) and '06 and '07
numbers which look a little
more in pace with his early
career numbers, 26 and 28
home runs in 130 and 126
games, respectively.
Which is what makes it so
maddening.
A player with the talent
and ability that if he had just
played clean, likely would
have finished at least in the
top five of home run hitters
of all time.
But the attitude that
wouldn't let him settle for
taking a back seat to
McGwire and Sosa is what
also wouldn't let him settle
for taking a back seat to
anyone - allegedly.
Dan Hoehne is the Sports Editor
of the News-Sun. He can be
reached at daniel.hoehne@news-
sun.com.


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Top 10
February 10, 2009

1. Miami Dade
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Page 3B


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


www. newssun.com










Page 4B


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


www.newssun.com


Country Club of Sebring
, The men's association played a 2
Best Balls on Par 4s and 5s and 1 Best
,all on Par 3s Tuesday, Feb. 10.
Taking first with a 101 was the team
of Lew Stryker, Ned Willey, Bob
Whitacre and Dick Martin.
Z Shooting a 104 for second were Ray
Brown, Jerry Moser, Dennis Jacobs
and Oliver Stoeckle, while Bobby Ore,
Cecil Watts, Bob Hancz and Cliff Bea
shot a 108 for third.
,' The Friday Couples played a scram-
ible on February 6.
, Winning first place was the team of
MIlt Drake, Dennis Jacobs, Karen
dacobs and Myrtle Moser with 67; sec-
Znd place, Bill McMullin, Dick Ortt,
Onnalee Schmalzried and Ellen Barnes
,tvith 68; and third place, Ted
Schmalzried, Oliver Stockel, Nelda
iprake and Jackie Sheldon with 69.
The men's association played a two
est balls of four net event on
iThursday, February 5.
Winning first place was the team of
obby Ore, Ray Plagens, Cecil Watts
nd Dick Martin with 125; second
flace, 'Lew Stryker, George Fanady,
Pennis Jacobs and Oliver Stoeckle
With 126; and third place, Ray Brown,
;Ned Wiley, Bob Whitacre and Rob
(Douds with 127.
S The Monday Couples played a
'Couples Tournament on January 26
with a team points format.
, Tying for first/second places were
,the teams of George and Mary Fanady,
!Ray and Merry Brown; C.V. Weddle
land Sandy White, Pat Kragt and Alice
Rebec with 96 each. And third place,
jJerry and Paula Brennan, Ron and
Jean Poore with 99.

iHarder Hall
Jack Hayes made a Hole-in-One on
No. 16 at 129 yards using a 9-iron club
ion Monday, February 9. It was wit-
nessed by Pat and Pauline Robbins.
The ladies league played a pro am
points event.on Monday, February 9.
The winners were: First place, Pat
:Rice with plus-10; and second place,
,Shirley Holt with plus-8. Tying for
ithird/fourth places were Patty Maxcy
;and Joyce Himler with plus-6 each.

'Lake June West Golf Club
S A mixed scramble was played on
Thursday, February 5.
Winning first place was the team of
John and Virginia Simmons, John and
Kim Givens and Wanda Jones with 49.
Closest to the pin: (Ladies), No. 4,
Joe Swartz, 15-feet-3-inches; and No.
18, Joyce Swartz, 9-feet.
: The men's association played a
Men's Best Ball event on Wednesday,
February 4.
SWinning first place was the team of
Iohn Simmons, Pete McNamee,
tharles Allen and Larry Dorobiala with
38; and second place, Claude Cash,
aohn Byron, Sonny Shelton, Boyd York
gnd Gene Joosten with 39.
Closest to the pin: No. 2, Joe
twartz, 12-feet-7-inches; No. 4, Doyan
tades, 10-feet-10-inches; and No. 8,
Claude Cash, 8-feet-2-inches.

Placid Lakes
SThe men's association played an
individual low gross, low net event on
Wednesday, February 11.
S Finishing first in the Low Gross was
Bill Lockwood with a 79, while Frank
Fisher was just one back with an 80.
' A two-way tie for first in the Low Net
saw Chuck Fortunato and David Moiles
each card an 86.


The men's associa-
tion played an individ-
ual low gross, low net
event on Wednesday,
February 4.
The winners were:
Low Gross - First
place, John Rosettis
with 86; and second
place, Tom Lacy with
88. Low Net - First
place, John Goble with
76; and second place,
Chuck Fortunato with
77.

River Greens
The men's associa-
tion played a Men's
Day event on Saturday,
February 7.
The winners were:
White Flight 1 - Tying !r
for first/second places
were Jim Anderson
and Russ Rudd with 66 *
each. Third place, John *.
Smutnick with 68. .
White Flight 2 - First
place, Cliff Aubin with
64. Tying for seqond/third places were
George Brode and Tim Thomas with 66
each. White Flight 3 - Frank Conroy
with 63; second place, Johnny Wehunt
with 66; and third place, Gerry Page
with 67. Gold Flight 1 - First place, Cliff
Steele with 65. Tying for
second/third/fourth places were Bill
Mountford, Harold Plagens and Len
Westdale with 66 each. Gold Flight 2 -
First place, Gordon Clauws with 62;
and second place, Glenn Nelson with
63. Tying for third/fourth places were
Peter March aid Wayne Carlin with 68
each.
Closest to the pin: No. 3, Don
McDonald, Hole-in-One; No. 5., Dick
Sherman, 6-feet-6-inches; No. 12, Cliff
Steele, 12-feet-3-inches; and No. 17,
Russ Rudd, 10-feet-2-inches.
The Friday afternoon scramble was
played on February 6.
Winning first place was the team of
Dave Petty, Ed Mosser, John Brode,
Betty Wallace, Al Farrell and Ray Read
with 14-under.
The men's association played a pro
am tournament on Wednesday,
February 4.
Winning first place was the team of
Larry Roy, Cecil Lemons, Wayne Carlin
and Pete March with plus-16 1/2; sec-
ond place, Russ Rudd, John Van
Slooten and Clark Austin with plus-7;
and Jim Anderson, Bob Stevens, John
Smutnick and George Vickers with
plus-2 1/2.
Individual winners were: A Flight
(25-over): First place, Larry Roy with
plus-1 1/2; and second place, Jim
Anderson with even. B Flight (21-24):
First place, Clark Austin; and second
place, Keith Kincer. C Flight (17-20):
First place, Bob Stevens'with plus-12
1/2; and second place, Gordon Clauws.
D Flight (16-under): First place, Wayne
Carlin with plus-7 1/2; and second
place, Dale Duncan with plus-5 1/2.
The Golfettes played a Holly Bee -
First Round event on Tuesday,
February 3.
The winners were: Gross - First
place, Anne Kelly with 41; second
place, Marilyn Clauws with 45; and
third place, Pat Gower with 46. Net -
First place, Donna Johnson with 27;
second place, Gale Garceau with 30;
and third place, Bev Rudd with 32.
The Morrison Group played the 2 on
3, 3 on 5, 4 on 4 game on Tuesday,
February 3.


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Hey senior, rioJuiing .. ' DJi ',.-u 1 hr the ball a -,hlid-
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St.. help ;hir[-n \,ur ;..irdin.m in Tke \nur dn\er
nd a b.all. H ., d e dclub iout uin lnr t y \ou, faceup Ln


g p. .u . ,u.n
a[ ri-p. Yl>u t,-,n


- .our kit h.inJ ,Ib.utr I0 inche up
S 1 tr'm IhL hI,:l DrpI the b:1ill ,in
[he cluhlac and try to vt 'bourinc It
Lip .nd dorm like a juggler 3s
inlan timnlc n \,u can. Tlii h ill
be rricky I[ IL - , tbut 5ta\ w ith it
([t ti, k Tigr \ood.'.'J quite
" hj t ,',l . t, .. .,ild , ) A, \ ,u
' imp'r. '.,c the number tf tilmrs ,'ou
S c,.n t.ip [ h.,ll, , rmdu:ill', mo \e
oiur hindi up die dlial, I.minlr
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V c.in d.. this ihile h,.lding the acru-
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NLASTERSTROKES Contributors:
Jim MLc,,n. I Klth LlorJ, Dana Rader
STop 100 Teacherss raised by GOLF MAGAZLNI


Winning first pla
Clark Austin, Ken K
and Don McDona
second place, C
Nelson, Russ Ri
Clauws with minus-
Jerry Wallace, Da
Carlin and William G

Sebring Muni
The Mezza grou
pro-am points at the
golf course. The
group first place
minus 1, second p
minus 3.
B group first plac
plus 6, second place
4.
C group first pl
and Virg Crandall ti
D group first pi
and Virg Crandall t
E group first pla
second place Sal Sl
F group first pla
plus 4, second plac
Shorty Crocker a
tied at plus 2.
G group first
place Janet Regan
plus 2, second
place Roger Eicher
plus 1.
H group first
place Jerry
Edwards plus 1,
second place
Doc Thomas even.
I group first
place Larry
Giangreco plus 3,
Johnnie Labarge
plus 3, third place
Vince Johnston
and Karl Mellor
tied at minus 2.
J group first
place Richard Flis
plus 6, second
place . Doug
Ingraham plus 3.
Next Monday
the Mezza group
will have a shot-
gun start at the
Sebring Municipal
golf course begin-
ning at 7:45 a.m.
Please arrive
early to register.
For more informa-


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Need to find a nel
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and on the World Wide Web.
SWe've been helping people
turn their 'trash' into cash
Since 1927.


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In e vbrs-ng Sll I s-ein _
In Avon Pork call 451- 009
In Lak. Placld call 465-0426


ce was the team of
:oon, Jim Anderson
Id with minus-26;
liff Aubin, Glenn
udd and Gordon
-18; and third place,
avid Kelly, Wayne
Sast with minus-17.

icipal
p played individual
e Sebring Municipal
e winners were: A
Mike Winchester
place Jim Barnhart

,e Murray Campbell
ce Jack Perrin plus

ace Bobby Culbert
ed at plus 4.
lace Clyde Ressler
ied at plus 4.
ice Bill Alesi even,
boto minus 1.
ice Curt Matterson
e Paul Brown,
and Lennis Tayman

I.


tion call 414 2110.

Pinecrest
The men's associa-
tion played a team and
individual pro-am
points event
Wednesday, Feb. 11
The team of Adam
Truax, Ray Smith, Earl
Plemmons and Dorrell
Herron took first with
+24 points while Joe
Martini, Joe Hyzny, Art
Demers and Gerry
Geouque were second
with +21.
Truax won the A
Division with +8 with
Gene Blevins second
with +7.
B Division went' to
Jim Elliot with +8 with
Larry Holzworth and
Bud Kammerman tied
for second with +6.
Demers took the C
Division with a +10
with Bill Ringo's +6
good for second.


Herron had +14 to win the D
Division with Geouque's +13 finishing
second.

SpringLake
The Men's Golf Association played
the first round of their monthly two day
event on Tuesday, Feb. 3, with two-
man teams, for best ball, in two
flights.
Then, because of the freeze, they
played the second round, for net
score, on Tuesday, Feb. 10.
The team of Bo Bohanon and Bob
Rogers won first place in A flight with
a aggregate net score of 191.
They were followed by: the second
place team of Gerard Burge and Martin
Francoeur, at 195; the third place team
of Mike Ryan and Bud Kammerman, at
198; the fourth place team of Don
Cunning and Vern Hoffman, 199; and
the fifth place team of Gordon Robb
and Jerry Ables, at 202.
First place in B flight was won by the
team of Ken Willey and Joe Smith with
a net 193.
They were followed by: the second


place team of Dave Kamish and Bob
Berg, at 202; the third place team of
Leon Van and Bob Frederick, at 203;
the fourth place team of Bill
Schauwecker and blind draw, at 205;
and fifth place team of Jay Payne and
Bart Rath, at 209.
Closest to the pin on Cougar # 9
were: Jay Reeb, 25 feet 6 inches: and
Leon Van; 42 feet and 3 inches.

Sun 'N Lake
The Sun 'N Lake Women's Golf
Association played a Pro-Am Points,
Individual Net, Flighted event
Wednesday, Feb. 11.
Winning the First Flight with a 38-
point total was Joan Winslow followed
by Jan Draper with 36, Nela Hodge
with 35 and Helen Umphress with 34.
Second-Flight honors went to Betty
Otto and her 42 points while Glenda
Rosendahl's 37 were good for second,
Sharon Blankenship's 36 took third
and Angie Zablocki's 35 finished
fourth.
Pat Steele scored 35 to win the
Third Flight with Betty Cruickshank,
Dottie Mettling and Charlotte Wall all
coming in with 34s.
In the Fourth Flight, Gladys
Winterton scored 38 to win with Mary
Coe three behind with a 35.
Eleanor O'Neal and Trish Bowen
each totaled 33 to tie for third.
Rosalie Gatto scored 40 points to
win the Fifth Flight while Neata Manent
and Josette DeVore tied for second
with 39s.
Carolyn Halkyer was fourth with 38
and Jean Hewlett fifth with 36.

Golf Hammock
The Ladies Golf Association played a
Valentine's Day Tournament
Wednesday, Feb. 11.
The format was a 4-person, 18-hole,
step-aside scramble with handicaps.
Taking first, with a 64.6, was the
team of M. Passafume, R. McMillon, B.
Clarke and A. Walther.
With a 65.2, M.Grime, C. Troup, N.
Senior and C. Dall took second, while
G. Archey, M. Pedersen, N. Harris and
E. Short were third with a 65.6
Taking fourth, with a 65.7, was the
team of S. Enochs, F. Vitale, W. Hastie
and J. Armbruster.


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News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


Page 5B


It's back: Miami at Florida State on Labor Day


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press
After a two-year hiatus, the
annual Miami-Florida State
game is back in prime time.
The Hurricanes visit the
Seminoles in Tallahassee,
Fla. on Sept. 7 - Labor Day
night - this season, giving
the Atlantic Coast
Conference a marquee
matchup to open the 2009
campaign.
The new ACC schedule
came out Thursday.
Miami and Florida State
played the college version of
Monday Night Football to
start the 2005 and 2006 sea-
sons, with the Seminoles
winning each by three points.
The game. was back in its
customary October slot the


past two years.
Miami leads the all-time
series, 30-23, with Florida
State winning a wild 41-39
affair last season at Dolphin
Stadium.
Moving the game back to
Week 1 has been expected for
some time. The Hurricanes
jostled their non-conference
schedule around several
weeks ago to free up the date,
and Florida State also had to
make some moves to accom-
modate the switch.
The Seminoles were sup-
posed to open with Maine,
not Miami.
Both coaches - Florida
State's Bobby Bowden and
Miami's Randy Shannon -
have indicated in the past that


if they had the choice, they
would rather see their in-
state ACC rival later in the
year.
At the same time, both
also freely acknowledge that
the notion of playing in
prime time, almost certainly
as the only major college
game in the nation that night,
is a lure too strong to ignore,
especially as a selling-point
to recruits.
There also won't be any
butting-heads with the NFL
that night, either: The pros
won't open their season until
Thursday, Sept. 10, almost
certainly with the Pittsburgh
Steelers opening defense of
their Super Bowl title at
home.


Time for honest players to


demand juicers be outed


Miguel Tejada had a few
drinks the night before he
appeared in court to confess
his sins.
Really, who could blame
him? Truth is, he didn't
admit to much when he
copped his plea in federal
court.
Sure, he bought human
growth hormone while doing
the kind of things shortstops
don't normally do for the
Oakland A's. And, yes, he
lied to investigators about it.
But use the stuff? That's
almost as preposterous as
thinking that Alex Rodriguez
was shooting up in places
other than Texas.
We may never know the
real truth about A-Rod, who,
like Mark McGwire, seems
to have selective memory
about the past.
The same goes for Tejada,
though at some point com-
mon sense has to win out
and some assumptions have
to be made.
What we do know is we'll
never look at either player
again without wondering
how much was real and how
much was the work of a mad
chemist.
Our suspicions will rise
every time they go to the
plate or hit a home run.
Come to think of it, we'll
feel that way about every
player.
With the game's biggest
stars roped.in, everybody's
suspect now.
These are nervous times in
baseball, where every week
seems to bring a new allega-
tion about the greatest play-
ers of our time.
Two decades of ignoring
the use of steroids by both
management and the players'
union has shaken the game
to its core and stripped it of
many of its fans.
Pitchers and catchers
report this week, and some
of them should be nervous,
too.
There's a list floating
around of 104 players who
tested positive for steroids in
2003, and 103 of them have
to be laying awake at night
wondering if they will be the
next one to be outed.
If the list doesn't get
them, their fellow players
might. Tejada didn't get a
plea bargain without agree-
ing to at least some level of
cooperation with investiga-
tors, and who knows how
much he'll have to say to
stay out of prison and avoid
deportation.
For years, players
assumed the clubhouse code
of saying nothing bad about
a teammate would keep their


fOLDBUlUE 4/ S,
IN YOUR I
WIN YOU S0L ,U
THAT OLD STUJ
WITH A
ASSMMID AD!





.385-6155 4521009 465-0426


Lsr~;it


TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press
secrets safe, and for years
they were right.
But then investigators
started searching, suppliers
started turning, and names
began surfacing.
Now, everyone except
scrawny David Eckstein is
suspect, and the way things
are going he might start
looking over his shoulder,
too.
That, of course, is not fair
to Eckstein or the hundreds
of other major leaguers who
wouldn't think of abusing
their bodies with steroids to
gain a competitive edge.
They've been mostly quiet
so far, but some of them are
beginning to understand that
they are paying a price with
their silence.-
"Those of us that have
never taken anything like
steroids or HGH or anything
like that, I'd like to know
who has," Lance Berkman
told the Houston Chronicle.
Berkman could ask
Tejada, his teammate on the
Astros. Tejada has played on
three different teams, bought
HGH, and, if you believe
Rafael Palmeiro, was good
at giving B-12 shots.
Or he can wait until 11
appeals court judges in
California study the question


of "the list" and decide
whether to allow prosecutors
to use it to go after other
players.
In the meantime, there
inevitably will be some
names leaked that will give
iim an idea of who might
have been juicing.
But if Berkman and other
players really want to know,
they don't have to go any
further than their own union,
which fought steroid testing
for yearsbefore finally cav-
ing in to political pressure
and agreeing to the 2003
tests that started it all.
Stand up together and tell
the union to stop fighting in
court over the test results.
Demand that the list of
names be made public so
that your name can be
cleared.
That may seem unfair to
the guilty players, who were
promised the tests would be
anonymous.
But it's even more unfair
to any player who is clean.
Besides, with A-Rod's
outing, all bets are now off.
There will undoubtedly be
some temporary pain, surely
some hard feelings, but the
names must be released to
remove the cloud over base-
ball.
Players will grow old
before Bud Selig and union
chief Donald Fehr do any-
thing to protect the integrity
of baseball.
It's time the clean players
stand up and do what's right
for themselves and the game.

Tim Dahlberg is a national
sports columnistfor The
Associated Press. Write to him at
tdahlbergap.org


keeping


kids


he


Salty


Fight unwanted illnesses this
school year with these
simple precautions:


- * Keep antibacterial wipes or gel in the family car.
* Wash toys exposed to sneezing 6r coughing
with soap and warm water.
* Provide each family member with his or
her own towel.
* Get kids in the habit of washing their hands
with soap and warm water, especially before
eating and after coughing, sneezing, or
blowing their noses.



Publix.
WHERE SHOPPING IS A PLEASURE.-


Almirola has fastest time during

Daytona practice


By WILL GRAVES
Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH -
Aric Almirola set the pace
during Sprint Cup practice
at Daytona International
Speedway on Wednesday,
while defending Daytona
500 champion Ryan
Newman and two-time 500
winner Michael Waltrip ran
into a bit of trouble on the
2.5-mile tri-oval.
Almirola posted a lap of
191.436 mph in his No. 8
Chevrolet during the after-
noon session, the fastest
lap in either of the hour-
long practice runs the day
before final qualifying for
Sunday's race.
Matt Kenseth (191.347),
Jeff Gordon (191.335) and
Kyle Busch (191.054) also
topped 191 mph during the
afternoon session.
-All four times were
faster than the best laps
turned during the morning
session, when Kasey
Kahne led the way with a
lap at 190.994 mph.
Waltrip and Jamie
McMurray will both have
to go to a backup car for
Thursday's 150-mile qual-
ifiers after colliding dur-
ing afternoon practice.
The two were in a group
coming out of turn four
when Waltrip got a little
too close to Kasey Kahne.
Waltrip's No. 55 Toyota
dipped inside, collecting
McMurray's No. 26 Ford
and sending them both
spinning onto the grass.
McMurray, who fin-
ished second in the
Budweiser Shootout last
Saturday, said it looked
like Kahne and Waltrip
were bump-drafting just
before the wreck.
"When the 55 hit me it
didn't really tear up a lot,
it just left a tire flat and
then most of the damage
was hitting the dirt,"


McMurray said.
Newman had a bumpy
morning session, blowing
the engine on his No. 39
Stewart-Haas Chevrolet.
He returned for the after-
noon run but ran 40th best
with a top lap of 187.036.
Sprint Cup rookie Joey
Logano's tough week con-
tinued during the morning
session when his No. 20
Toyota scraped the wall,
sending him to the garage
six laps in.


Logano was unhurt and
the car was in good enough
shape to return for the after-
noon.
The 18-year-old escaped
his 20-lap stint unscathed
with a best of 188.320 mplr.
Still, it wasn't the best of
days for the youngest driver
ever to start a 500.
He finished second during
the ARCA race on Saturday
but lasted just three laps
during the Shootout later
Saturday night.


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Page 6B News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009








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1050 egals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-1663GCS
MOHAMMED T. OHOWDHURY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANGEL VICENTE TRIGO PARDO, dead or
alive, and the unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, or other parties claiming
by, through, under, or against ANGEL
VICENTE TRIGO PARDO,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION-PROPERTY
TO: ANGEL VICENTE TRIGO PARDO
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
CALLE MATURIN, ESQ
CARIPITO, QTA JARDIN
SECTOR SANTA CLARA
EL CAFETAL, CARACUS 106 VENEZUELA
or if any of the aforesaid persons is dead, then.
his or her unknown heirs, devisees, legatees
or grantees; and any and all other persons or
parties claiming by, through, under or against
them; and all claimants, persons or parties,
natural or corporate, or whose exact legal sta-
tus, if known, claiming under any of the above
named or interest in and to the lands hereafter
described.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
to quiet title for the following described prop-
erty in Highlands County, Florida, to wit:
LOT 11, BLOCK 211, SUN 'N LAKE ES-
TATES, SECTION 18, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 8, PAGE 87, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any to it, on the Plaintiff's attorney,
whose name and address is:
Pamela T. Karlson, P.A.
301 Dal Hall Boulevard
Lake Placid, Florida 33852
and file the original with the Clerk of the above
styled Court on or before March 10, 2009,
otherwise a judgment may be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of said
Court on January 27, 2009.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: /s/ Rose M. Dilling
Deputy Clerk
February 6, 13, 20, 27, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-001198
NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE CO.,
PLAINTIFF,
-VS-
DOMINIC DEPOFE, ET AL.,
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: DOMINIC DEPOFE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF DOMINIC DEPOFE
whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be
living; and if he/she/they be dead, the un-
known defendants who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an
interest by, through, under or against the De-
fendants, who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or interest in the property
described in the mortgage being foreclosed
herein.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the following proper-
ty:
THE SOUTH QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST
QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF
THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE NORTH
THREE-FOURTHS OF THE NORTHEAST
QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF
THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 23,
TOWNSHIP 35 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EAST,
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to it on DAVID J. STERN, ESQ.
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 900
South Pine Island Road #400, Plantation, Flor-
ida 33324-3920 on or before March 6, 2009
(no later than 30 days from the date of the
first publication of this notice of action) and
file the original with the clerk of this court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition filed here-
in.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court at HIGHLANDS County, Florida, this 4th
day of February, 2009.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: /s/ Sara Turnbull
DEPUTY CLERK
LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J. STERN, P.A.
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
801 S. UNIVERSITY DRIVE, SUITE 500
PLANTATION, FL 33324
(954) 233-8000
08-90975 NCM
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS


WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with disa-
bilities needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT ADMINISTRATION, at
the HIGHLANDS County Courthouse at 863-
471-5313, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-
955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
February 13, 20, 2009


1050 Legal
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL COURT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CASE NO.08001641GCS
NOTICE OF ACTION
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JESUS ERNESTO GARCIA, ET AL,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JESUS ERNESTO GARCIA
Whose residence is: 16402 SW 78TH
TER, MIAMI, FL 33193
TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JESUS ERNESTO
GARCIA
Whose residence is: 16402 SW 78TH
TER, MIAMI, FL 33193
and who is/are evading services of process
and the unknown defendants) JESUS ERNES-
TO GARCIA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JESUS
ERNESTO GARCIA who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, Ilenors,
creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an
interest by, through, under or against the De-
fendant(s), who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or Interest in the property
described in the mortgage being foreclose
herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to Fore-
closure a Mortgage on the following described
property:
LOT 8, GRAN-LORE RANCHETTES, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 12, PAGE 13, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
a/k/a 20 GLENSIDE AVE., LAKE PLACID, FL
33852
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to it, on Nwabufo Umunna, Attorney
for Plaintiff, whose address is 2901 Stirling
Road, Suite 300, Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312 on or before March 6, 2009, and file
the original with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's attorney or imme-
-diately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal 'of this
Court this 27th day Of January, 2009.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ Annette E. Daff
As Deputy Clerk
'February 6,13, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL COURT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CASE NO. 08001481GCS
NOTICE OF ACTION
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ASHAJOHNSON, ETAL,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MARY MADATHIL & UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF MARY MADATHIL
Whose residence is: 4980 W JOSEPHINE
ROAD A/K/A PARCEL 10 SOMVERVALE
DOWNS, SEBRING, FL 33875 & 8960 SW 52
ST., FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33328
If alive, and if dead, all parties claiming inter-
est by, through, under or against MARY MA-
DATHIL & UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARY MA-
DATHIL and all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or interest in the property
described herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Fore-
closure of Mortgage on the following descri-
bed property:
A portion of Tract "A", SOMERVALE
DOWNS, according to the plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 12, Page 35, of the Public
Records of Highlands County, Florida, being
more particularly described as follows: Begin
at the Southwest corner of said Tract "A";
thence North 00020'41" West along the West
line of said Tract "A", a distance of 441.75
feet; thence North 89�48'25" East, a distance
of 985.83 feet; thence South 00*24'41" East,
a distance of 441.75 feet to a point lying on
the North right of way line of West Josephine
Road; thence South 89048'25" West along the
North right of way line of said West Josephine
Road, a distance of 986.34 feet to the Point of
Beginning. Containing 435,600 square feet or
10.00 acres, more or less.
Subject to and together with a 50 foot nonex-
clusive Ingress and egress easement descri-
bed as follows: A portion of Tract "A", SOM-
ERVALE DOWNS, according to the Plat there-
of as recorded in Plat Book 12, Page 35, of
the Public Records of Highlands County, Flori-
da, being more particularly described as fol-
lows: Commence at the Southwest corner of
said Tract "A"; thence North 89o48'25" East
along the North right of way line of West Jo-
sephine Road and the South line of Section
35, Township 35 South, Range 28 East, a dis-
tance of 961.34 feet for the Point of Begin-
ning; thence North 00024'41" West, a dis-
tance of 1,743.38 feet; thence South
89�48'25" West, a distance of 542.16 feet;
thence North 00022'41" West, a distance of
50.00 feet; thence North 89048'25" East, a
distance of 1,134.26 feet; thence South
00�26'40" East, a distance of 50.00 feet;
thence South 89048'25" West, a distance of
542.16 feet; thence South 00024'41" East, a
distance of 1,743.38 feet to a point lying on
the North right of way line of said West Jose-
phine Road and the South line of said Section
35, Township 35 South, Range 28 East;
thence South 89048'25" West, along said
South line, a distance of 50.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning. Containing 143,879
square feet or 3.30 acres, more or less.
a/k/a 4980 W. JOSEPHINE ROAD A/K/A PAR-
CEL 10 SOMERVALE DOWNS, SEBRING, FL .
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to it, on Nwabufo Umunna, Attorney
for Plaintiff, whose address is 2901 Stirling
Road, Suite 300, Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312 on or before March 6, 2009, and file
the original with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court this 27th day of January, 2009.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ Annette E. Daff
As Deputy Clerk
February 13, 20, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASEN0.20-2008-CA-001203
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR ABFC 2007-WMC1 TRUST,
Plaintiff
vs.
DANNY RIVERA, et al.,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION


TO: DANNY RIVERA and KAREN RIVERA
RESIDENCE: UNKNOWN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: PO BOX 728 CO-
LOGNE, FL 08213
4205 LAKE HAVEN BOULEVARD SEBRING


1050 Legls
FLORIDA 33875
AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by,
through, under, or against the aforesaid De-
fendant(s).
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the following de-
scribed property located in Highlands County,
Florida:
LOT 19, IN BLOCK 4, OF LAKE HAVEN ES-
TATES SECTION ONE, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 7, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you, and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to this action, on Greenspoon Mard-
er, P.A. Default Department, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is Trade Centre
South, Suite 700, 100 West Cypress Creek
Road, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file
original with the Clerk within 30 days after the
first publication of this notice, or on or before
March 6, 2009; otherwise a default and a
judgment may be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL OF SAID
COURT on this 27th day of January, 2009.
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
As Clerk of said Court
By: /s/ Annette E. Daff
As Deputy Clerk
January 6, 13, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY
CASE NO.: 28 2007 CA 000744 A00 XX
CIVIL DIVISION
EVERHOME MORTGAGE COMPANY,
PLAINTIFF,
-VS-
JEFFRY LOPEZ AK/A JEFFREY LOPEZ
MORALES; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS
NOMINEE FOR OPTEUM FINANCIAL
SERVICES, LLC; PRIME ACCEPTANCE CORP.;
UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION #1;
UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION #2; IF
LIVING, AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND
AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS
DEFENDANTS.
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
January 30, 2009, entered in Civil Case No. 28
2007 CA 000744 A00 XX of the Circuit Court
of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGH-
LANDS County, Florida, wherein EVERHOME
MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff and JEFFRY
LOPEZ A/K/A JEFFREY LOPEZ MORALES are
defendantss, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash, JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN
THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUN-
TY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH
COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA AT
11:00 A.M. on February 26, 2009, the follow-
ing described property as set forth in said Fi-
nal Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 4, BLOCK 7, FRANSVILLA, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 35, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE
A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
IF YOU ARE PERSON WITH A DISABILITY
WHO NEED ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING,
YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CONTACT COURT ADMINIS-
TRATION AT 430 S. COMMERCE AVENUE,
SEBRING, FLORIDA 33870, TELEPHONE
(941) 386-6617, WITHIN TWO (2) WORKING
DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE; IF
YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED CALL: 1-800-
955-8771; IF YOU ARE VOICE IMPAIRED,
CALL: 1-800-955-8770.
DATED at SEBRING, Florida, this 30th day
of January, 2009. -
L.E. "LUKE" BROKER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
HIGHLANDS County, Florida
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP
10004 North Dale Mabry Hwy, Suite 112
Tampa, Florida 33618
07-81125B
February 13,20,2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 09-47
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOROTHY WANAMAKER aka
DOROTHY V. WANAMAKER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DORO-
THY WANAMAKER aka DOROTHY V. WANA-
MAKER, deceased, whose date of death was
November 23, 2008, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 590 S. Com-
merce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The
names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of -the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this no-
tice is served must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against
the decedent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE


1050 Legals
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this
Notice is February 6, 2009.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Janet Dorothy Orbine
63 Fox Lane Road
Waymart, PA 18472
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Clifford M. Ables III
FLORIDA BAR NO. 178379
CLIFFORD M. ABLES, P.A.
551 SOUTH COMMERCE AVE.
SEBRING, FL 33870
TELEPHONE: (863) 385-0112
February 6, 13, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. PC 09-39
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARGARET D. LESH
a/k/a MARGARET D. SAWYER
a/k/a MARGARET SAWYER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Mar-
garet D. Lesh a/k/a Margaret D. Sawyer a/k/a
Margaret Sawyer, deceased, whose date of
death was November 25th, 2008, and whose
social security number is -------, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Flori-
da, Probate Division, the address of which is
590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL
33870. The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth' below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this no-
tice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE IS: FEBRUARY 6TH, 2009.
Personal Representative:
Peggy Douberley
3211 Snyder Road
Sebring, FL 33870
/s/ Thomas L. Nunnallee
BREED & NUNNALLEE, P.A.
Attorneys for Personal Representative
325 NORTH COMMERCE AVENUE
SEBRING, FL 33870
Telephone: (863) 382-3154
Florida Bar No. 0062162
February 6, 13, 2009


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice of Public Sale of the contents of self-
storage unit(s) in default of contract per F.S.
83:801-809. Units will be sold by sealed bid at
10:00 AM on FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, at
Highlands Self Storage Inc., 7825 S George
Blvd., Sebring FL 33872. All units contain
household goods unless otherwise noted. Any
vehicles within units sold for parts only.
JONATHAN STUBBS UNIT #12
February 6, 13, 2009

NOTICE OF SALE
T Simmons & Co., Inc. dba AA Storage of
Highlands County @ 3214 Spinks Road, Sebr-
ing, will hold a sale of your personal belong-
ings for non-payment of rent after February
20,2009.
Names and unit numbers are as follows:
ANNE HOLLOWAY Unit #0001
CHARLES BROOKS Unit #86
February 13, 20, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NUMBER: GC 08-552
ELOISE C. LEE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SEAN F. SOTAK and MARIA C. SOTAK, a/k/a
MARIA DULCE C. SOTAK, husband and wife,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a fi-
nal decree of foreclosure entered in the above-
titled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands
County, Florida, I will sell the property situated
in Highlands County, Florida, described as:
Lut 2, Block 1, Lake Regency Woods, ac-
cording to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 16, Page 66, of the Public Records of
Highlands County, Florida.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder
for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the
'basement of the Highlands County Court-
house located at 430 South Commerce Ave-
nue, in Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on the
5th Day of MARCH, 2009.
SIGNED this 10th day of February, 2009.
(SEAL)
ROBERT W. GERMAINE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the Office of the Court Admin-
istrator, (941) 534-4690, within two (2) work-
ing days of publication of this Notice of Sale;
if you are hearing or voice impaired, call TDD
(941) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service (800)
955-8770.
February 13, 20, 2009


1055 .Highlands
1055 County Legals

HIGHLANDS COUNTY
LEGAL NOTICES
The following legal notices are from the Highlands
County Board of County Commissioners and are be-
ing published in the font. size, and leading as per their
specifications.


INVITATION TO BID
CITY OF SEBRING
SEBRING, FLORIDA
The City of Sebring will receive sealed bids in the City
Purchasing Department for:
ITB # 09-0028: Commercial Printing for Citywide
Forms
Specifications may be obtained from the City Pur-
chasing office by contacting Kirk Zimmerman at 368
South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870
Phone 863-471-5110, Fax 863-471-5168, or visit my-
sebring.com & click bid announcements. If obtaining
documents via the web site, it shall be the bidders re-
sponsibility to notify the purchasing department to
assure the bidder receives all future changes, addi-
tions, or amendments.
Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the
bid number and name as to identify the enclosed bid.
Bids must be delivered to the City Of Sebring Pur.
chasing Office Attn. Kirk Zimmerman so as to reach
the said office no later than 2.00 PM, Thursday, Feb-
ruary 26. 2009, of the official time clock in the pur-
chasing office. Proposals received later than the date
and time specified will be rejected. The City will not be
responsible for the late delivery of any bids that are
incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail, of
any other type of delivery service
The Sebring City Council reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all bids or any parts Thereof; and the
award; if an award is made, will be made to the most
responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indi:
cate that the award will be in the best interest of the
City of Sebring. The council reserves the right to
waive irregularitiesin the bid.
Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB
Purchasing Agent
Sebrng,Florida February 13,20, 2009
INVITATION TO 810
CITY OF SEBRING
SEBRING, FLORIDA
The City of Sebring will receive sealed bids in the City
Purchasing Department for:
ITB # 09-022: 4WD Pickup Truck (6 cylinder engine),
Specifications may be obtained from the City Purl
chasing office by contacting Kirk Zimmerman at 368
South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870
Phone 863-471-5110, Fax 863-471-5168, or visit my'
sebring com. On left click city departments, purchas-
ing, then bid announcements. If obtaining documents
via the web site, it shall be the bidders responsibility
to notify the purchasing department to assure the bid-
der receives all future changes, additions, or amend-
ments.
Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the
bid number and name as to identify the enclosed bid,
Bids must be delivered'to the City Of Sebring Pur-
chasing Office Attn: Kirk Zimmerman so as to reach
the said office no later than 2,00 PM, Thursday, Feb-
ruary 26, 2009, of the official time clock in the pur-
chasing office. Proposals received later than the date
and time specified will be rejected. The City will not be '
responsible for the late delivery of any bids that are
incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail, of
any other type of delivery service.
The Sebring City Council reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all bids or any parts Thereof; and the
award; if an award is.made, will be made to the most
responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indi-
cate that the award will be in the best interest of the
City of Sebring The council reserves the right to
waive irregularities in the bid.
Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB
Purchasing Agent
Sebring, Florida
SFebruary 11,13, 2009.


1100 Announcements


CHECK


YOUR AD

Please check your ad on the first day
it runs to make sure it is correct.
Sometimes instructions over the
phone are misunderstood and an er-
ror can occur. If this happens to you,
please call us the first day your ad
Appears and we will be happy to fix
it as soon as we can.
If We can assist you, please call us:
385-6155--452-1009
465-0426
News-Sun Classified


1450 Babysiters

CRASH BARS fo motorcycle. $15.
863-214-1965.

1550 Professional Services


BINGER BROTHERS PAINTING
Family run, home town business in
Highlands County 20 yrs. Commercial,
residential, pressure washing.
No job too great or too small!
Call Gary for free estimates
@ 863-471-2444, leave message.

Dave's Home Maintenance
Interior/Exterior. Basic home repairs,
handyman, kitchenibath remodels, mobile
home repairs. Call 863-441-5135
Licensed & Insured - Quality Guaranteed!

HANDYMAN BOB
Install doors, windows, flooring, minor
electric & plumbing and more.
Lic. & Ins. Call 863-452-5201 or
863-449-1744.
RODRIGUEZ LAWN CARE
Mowing, trimming, mulch, landscaping. Free
estimates. Expert work at a fair price. Excel-
lent references. Licen. and insured. 863- 314-
0969


Classified ads

get fast results


ALL STAR TILE, LLC A dvertise Avertise
a Complete Bathroom Remodeling
YiO TusMin.,SS Your Business


* Change Balhtb to Shower Avlt "AP IU 'L' eJ "LJ. . ^ ^. ' -'
installation Ceramic Floor Tile Here! Here!
L '11' ' * Shower door sales& i ntalalllton
, - - - Call Robert for Your Y11
SFREE Estimate AT1 I S-Stul

-a P863ld65j83 " Call 385-615. Call 385-61554


J









www.newssun.com


1550 ProfessionalServices 4060


Tax Services
Semi-retired Certified Public
Accountant available for tax and
accounting services. Reasonable fees.
Expert services. 863-465-1124


2000
Employment


2100 Help Wanted
COOKS Needed - Experience
Preferred. P/T & F/T Day & Night Shifts
Apply in person Tues - Sat; 9-11AM or 2-5PM
Spring Lake Golf Resort - Hwy 98
Call for directions only. 863-655-0900.
Experienced Medical Secretary wanted for
fast paced oncology/hematology office.
Must be a self-starter and multi-tasking is
required. Monday-Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Good benefits and competitive salary.
Fax resume to 863-385-6086.
LOOKING FOR P/T Teachers. Must love work-
ing with young children in a loving, Christian
atmosphere. Apply in person at First Baptist
Church/Pre-School, 200 E. Center Ave.,
Sebring, FL 33870. 863-385-4704.
LPN /CMA
Fastpaced multi physician orthopedic
practice. Must be team player and able to
multi task. Excellent Salary & Benefit package.
Fax resume 863-385-3866 Attn: Nancy Henry.
MEDICAID CASE WORKER
needed in Sebring area. Please
fax resume to 863-402-3197.

,Ll.LABOR
V -








* General Labor - Construction
* CDL-A w/Hazmat
* Light Industrial - All Shifts
* Carpenters w/Tools
*Equipment Operators

Daily Work, Daily Pay
Report Ready To Work
6:00 A.M. Daily
Office Hours 6:00 A.M. - 6 P.M.

3735 Kenilworth Blvd.
471-2774
EOE/Drug Free Workplace

NOW HIRING: companies desperately need
employees to assemble products at home.
No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential
Info. 1-985-646-1700 DEPT. FL-6654
PART-TIME BOOKKEEPER
St. James Catholic church, Lake Placid is
seeking an experience part-time bookkeeper
in QuickBooks, ADP Payroll, AP, AR, GL,
postings, reconciliations and month-end
reporting. Successful candidate should have
a minimum of two (2) years of experience.
An Associate's Degree is preferred. Qualified
candidates are invited to e-mail a
resume and salary requirements to:
humanresources@dloceseofvenlce.oro

Peaceful environment calling you? Looking
for a friendly, mature, service oriented person
for front of the house duties. Must be willing
to work weekends. Some lifting required. 35 +
hours. Wages negotiable. No attitudes please!
Apply between 3-4PM @ The Hammock Inn.
Salon seeking self-motivated, enthusiastic,
responsible individuals. Full-time hair stylist,
barber, and nail technician positions available.
Call 863-385-1429 or 305-781-3487.
SERVERS Needed - Experience Preferred
P/T & F/T Day & Night Shifts
Apply in person Tues -Sat; 9-11AM or 2-5PM
Spring Lake Golf Resort - HWY 98
Call for directions only. 863-655-0900.
STYLIST needed for busy
Sebring Salon. We are turning
clients away! 863-441-2852.


3000
Financial


4000
Real Estate


4040 Homes For Sale
FSBO-2/1, A.P. Close to
Wal-Mart. Also 3/2 in Sebrng, priced @
$55 per sq ft. Possible owner financing.
Ready to Move In! Won't last long. Call
for details. 863-655-4000. Private.


Homes for Sale
Avon Park


Avon Park Lakes 2/2/1 CG
Family room w/fireplace. Screened
patio, fully furnished. New metal roof,
lot 100 X 160. $135,000. 863-452-0019.
AVON PARK Newly remodeled 2BR, 1BA
home in Avon Par< Lakes. 2573 W..Seville Dr.
Stove, fridge, dishwasher, W/D, new roof,
lawn irrigation on well. $62,500. 863-471-
8012

l4080 Homes for Sale
0 Sebring
SEBRING - OPEN HOUSE @ Builder's Model
in desirable Vantage Point Development, 3249
Pointe West, Sat, Feb 14th & Sun, Feb 15th.
2PM-4PM. 2br, 2ba, never lived in; clubhouse
w/pool. HOA $75/mo, includes lawn
mowing/watering. Quiet neighborhood con-
venient to shopping. $139,900. 18 yrs and
older. Call for details 440-552-8709.

SEBRING: LAKEFRONT: EXCEPTIONAL
2BR, 2.5BA, 2CG Home on Lake Josephine.
(Over 2500 sq ft living area). on Lake Jose-
phine, 507 Lake Josephine Shores Dr., 130
ft catwalk to boathouse, back patio, marble
foyer entrance, tile baths & lots more!
Adjacent lot on lake also available.
$425K. Call 863-655-2335.
SEE TO APPRECIATE!!


4100 Homes for Sale
4 'I Lake Placid
BY BUILDER
Now for sale. REDUCED BY 80K. 3BR, 2BA,
full 2CG. Cathedral ceilings, plant shelves, all
large rooms, close to Placid Lakes park &
boat ramp. Deeded Lake June access. NOW
$199,000. 620 Catfish Creek Rd in Placid
Lakes. Meyer Homes, INC. 863-414-4075,
cell or 863-465-7338 after 3pm.
4 16 0 Commercial Property
4 6I For Sale
SEBRING 6-UNIT APT Building w/ over 100 ft
Dinner Lake frontage. $350,000.
LAKE PLACID 4-Unit APT Building w/ over
100 ft Lake Huntley frontage. $300,000.
For more information call 773-868-6666.
4170 Lakefront Property
4'70 For Sale
AVON PARK HISTORIC LAKE BYRD
100ft lakefront, lake view,
& lake access lots. Ready to build, starting -
@ $59,000. Financing available. Only
Smiles N. of downtown Avon Park, on US 27
Call David @863-452-2536.

4220 Lots forSale
SEBRING 2 Lots, total 80 x 140,
available at corner School St &
Weeping Willow. For details call
561-713-4170, ask for Rose.
SEBRING 2 lots, total 80 x 140, available at
corner of School St & Weeping Willow. For
details call 561-713-4170, ask for Rose.


5000
Mobile Homes

5050 Mobile Homes
5 5 For Sale
OPEN HOUSE
2005 PARK MODEL 2BR, 1.5BA
AVON PARK:: Sunday, February 14th, 10 am -
4 pm., in Reflections on Silver Lake, 1850 US
27, S., Lot S-30, Silver Lake Dr, left, to stop
sign, left, look for ballons on right, shed,
full-size W/D. Asking $25,000 obo, SOON!
Call 863-453-8757.

SEBRING FISHERMAN'S DREAM
Lakefront, on Dinner Lake, dock available. All
upgraded, very clean, fully furnished 2br, 1 ba,
Fla Room, enclosed screen room w/windows,
CHA, new carport, tile kitchen & bath. Lots of
room + storage shed. Must sacrifice - No res-
onable offer refused. 2900 St Rd 17, North,
863-382-8426
WHAT A DEAL!
40' 5TH Wheel Trailer & Florida Room.
Solid & Clean. $3800. Come Check It Dutl
Located: Highland Wheel Estates, Hammock
Rd., Lot 14, Sebring. 863-202-5618.



6000
Rentals


6050 Duplexes for Rent
Sebring-4103 Sparta Rd. Cracker Trail
Elementary area. Freshly painted 2BR/'
1/BA, central air/heat. Utility with w/d,
lawn maint. incl. No pets. $560/mo. +
sec. 863-763-1759 or 863-381-2810.
SEBRING-N E W ConstrucLiun 2
story Town Home for rent.
3BR/ 2.5BA /1CG.,$800/mo
No smoking, no pets.
PH: 863-655-0311

6200 Unfurnished
6 Apartments
*** Key Lake Villas***
Sebring- Orange Blossom Estates
2/1 & 3/2, townhouses on Lake.
Clean, quiet, screened in porch, outside
patio, W/D hookup. $575 & $765
lst.month& sec. (863) 465-2740
AP- Highlands Apts 1680 North
Delaware 1/1 & 2/2 Available.
Central heat & air. Extra insulation. Play
ground. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195.


Highlands County Board of

County Commissioners


The following position closes on
2/20/2009

Road Supervisor Sebring

992 PG-24 $20.31 - $33.42 hourly.


For application, minimum qualifications and full job descriptions visit
us on our website at www.hcbcc.net, or call our job line at 402-6750, or
apply at 600 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870.
It re f/I m)aI-lg 1;.cc n pafftv


Ivews-bun * -naay, ieoruary ia, zuum


new belt. $25. Call 863-4022285.
BAND SAW Wood Cutting, 3/4 hp, cast iron.
14" cutting capacity w/2 Ig boxes of assorted
blades, $400. 863-214-1983
Bristol dishes, fine china. Made in Japan. Set
of 8 for $30. Call 863-382-9022.
CAMERA POLAROID Instant Spectra AF,
lifetime warranty, still in box. $25 OBO.
863-465-1091.
FORD TAURUS 1994 GL, 4-door, V6 3.0
automatic, A/C, airbags. $500. Please
call 863-664-0229.
Golf clubs, ladies right handed. Daiwa irons,
big bertha driver, ping putter & bag, all for
$175. Call 863-382-1049.
GRINDER Craftsman Industrial rated 1/2 hp.
Totally enclosed ball bearing capacitator mo-
tor. $75. 863-214-1983.


6200 Unfurnished
6200 Apartments
AVON PARK - studio with balcony
overlooking Lake Verona and City Park,
laundry facilities, $365/mo.
100 E. Main St.
863-453-8598
BAYSIDE APARTMENTS - Special Rates Now
Available. Now Renting
1 & 2 BR Studio Apartments.,
Security deposit required.
729 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring,
863-385-2063.
BEAUTIFUL APTS
2/1 tile floors, central air., screen back porch,
beautiful landscaping, $695 mo. Pet friendly
HWY 27 S. behind Dunkin Donuts, up the hill,
turn left, 3106 Medical Way,
(8631446-1822
DINNER LAKE area, Sebring. 1 & 2
bedroom apartments. $495 - $600/mo.
Includes water, large rooms, fresh
paint & tile floors. Call Gary Johnson
@ 863-381-1861.
LEMON TREE APTS.
Single story 1 bedrooms w/private patio
N E W refrig, stove, washer/dryer.WSG incl.
Pets OK, quiet friendly Avon Park Communty
Call 386-503-8953

6300 Unfurnished Houses
2BR/1BA HOUSE in Avon Park,
125 E. Canfield St. $500/mo +
$500 sec. Call 963-840-0071
AVON PARK Large 3br, 2ba on Anoka
$600 mo. + Security. No house pets.
863-453-3685 or.863-399-2524 *
LAKE PLACID - Newer, clean 3br,
2ba, 2cg in nice area of Placid
Lakes. Non-Smoke, $895 month.
863-441-2844 or 863-465-3838.
LAKE PLACID 3BR, 2BA in Sylvan Shores.
Large privacy fenced back yard, pets consid-
ered. $750 month + 1st & security. Please call
863-633-9097 for more Information.
SEBRING LOVELY HOME - 3/2/2
717 PORSCHE AVE, LIKE NEW, LG SCRN'D
PORCH, W/D INCL., PET FRIENDLY, $1100
MO., 1ST/LAST/SEC. NEGOTIABLE.
CALL TO VIEW . 954-821-4192





SEBRING- RErJT iri,, tre.iului jBA 2iA
that has never been lived in for $975 a month
including lawn care. This home was built with
attention to quality and amenities saved for
cpstom homes. Sitting on a large corner lot in
a quiet neighborhood, this home has a built-in
closet unit in Master Bedroom, his & hers
sinks, roman tub, walk-in shower, granite tops
throughout, all wood cabinets, tile floors,
screened entry & lanai, irrigation on well &
timer, laundryroom in the A/C area, upgraded
fixtures and a 250sf decked attic area. There is
1429 sf living area and a total of 2272 sq ft.
Lease option may be considered.
For further information or to set a showing,
please contact Robert at 863-453-0850.

U PICK

YOUR PYMT
No Credit Check!! RENT 2 OWN.
New Construction
Leisure Lakes 3/2/2.
239-898-1108

6400 Rooms for Rent
Historic Downtown Sebring. Close to Sebring
Races. Furnished room in private home for
rent. All util. included + cable. Perfect for
single / retired couple. No smoking, drinking
in home. Small pets ok w/dep. Contract req.
$550/mo. + $300 dep. Call 863-471-6976.

6550 Warehouses forRent
Warehouse or Office Space For Rent
1200sq ft on busy street near downtown
Sebring. Call 863-385-8738
for more information.
6600 Business & Offices
60 0 VFor Rent
DOWNTOWN SEBRING- High rent draining
your bottom line? Office Space as low as
$299 Per Month plus tax. 200-1400Sq ft avail-
able. A/C, Electric included. Full sized elevator,
access to conference room. Low cost DSL
avail. (863)-385-1705 www.halnzcenter.com


7000
Merchandise


7180 Furniture
WEST COAST FURNITURE
now accepting quality
consignment items.
CALL 863-382-7666

7260 Musical Merchandise
HILL-GUSTAT MIDDLE SCHOOL NEEDS
DONATIONS OF YOUR ATTIC INSTRUMENTS!
Instruments will be cleaned, repaired, and put
in the hands of students who otherwise would
not be able to participate in band. Donors will
be offered a tax deduction letter for the esti-
mated value of the instrument. Thanks!!!!!

7310 Bargain Buys
ART TABLE Professional, many
positional, $49.
Avon bottles, box of 17. $10.
Call 863-382-9022
BAGLESS VACUUM
completely cleaned in & out,


Page 7B


7320 Garage &Yard Sales 7420 Ainting


7310 Bargain Buys
Crochet articles, 5 pieces. $6.00.
Call 863-382-9022.
High rise portable toilet, adjustable walker &
cane. All for $50. Call 863-382-1049.
Lamp, 3 way, hangs on wall, neat. $25.
Call 863-382-1049.
Light fixture, flush mount 13". $10.
Call 863-382-9022.
Magazine rack, maple. Unique. $25.
Call 863-382-1049.
Microwave, Whirpool. $40.
Call 863-382-1049.
NECKLACE Porshe or Mercedes,
$35. 863-214-1965.
ORGAN - Large, professional; discon-
necting pedals. $500. 863-471-6976.
Oriental flower arrangements, 4 for $11. Call
863-382-9022.
POOL LADDER Aluminum, fits 5'
pool, $50. Call 863-471-6976.
Pool table w/accessories, heavy slate, good
felt, 4' X 8'. $135. Call 863-381-3254.
RECLINERS (2) $19 each.
863-214-1965.
REFRIGERATOR, Compact, Like new Magic
Chef 4.0 cu ft. Top-of-the-line! Retail value,
$230. My price, $150. Call 863-465-3690.
Refrigerator- Frigidaire. Freezer on top. $50
OBO. 863-443-0912.
RV washer/dryer combo, Splendide ventless
model 5200, like new & used very little. 1/2
price, $500. Call 863-314-9966.
SCOOTER - Electric, $350.
863-471-6976
SCOOTER 2005, Gas, Sun LLB, 50 qt 6,139
miles, $300 OBO. 863-465-1091.
SDKLFJSJFL
VACUUM Hoover Wind Tunnel Upright. Excel-
lent condition, new belt & bag. $20. Please
call 863-402-2285.

SISSY BAR for Motorcycle. $19.
863-214-1965
TILLER Craftsman, 5 hp, rear lines,
$250. Call 863-655-0342.
TOOL BOX fits Ford F-150, $200
863-471-6976
TV 20" Sony Color,
$45 OBO. 863-781-3757.
WALL UNIT "The Classic", new,
$69. 863-214-1965.

WASHER/DRYER Combo for RV, Splendide
ventless model 5200, like new, used very
little. 1/2 price $500. 863-314-9966
WOMEN'S CLOTHES Size 3X - 6X, large
variety. $5 each. Call 863-471-6976.
YARD TRAILER 42x30x14, $60.
Please call 863-655-0342.

7320 *-****1--
7320 Garage & Yard Sales
ALPINE VILLAGE, RT 27 South to 70 East.
Rummage & Bake Sale. Fri, Feb 13th, 7AM-
2PM. Sat., Feb 14th, 7AM-12PM. Refrigera-
tors, gas stoves, nice sofas, chairs, dinette
sets, microwaves, mattresses & box springs;
TV's, assorted tables, flowers, plants, fruits &
vegetables. Rec Hall packed with treasured
items, all reasonably priced. Refreshment
stand will be open. Lots of home baked goods
for sale!


LAKE PLACID 729 Lake Blue Dr
Holiday Inn sign on US 27, F
Feb 13-14, 8 am -3 pm. Trea
EVERYTHING FROM A-Z


LAKE PLACID HUGE SALE! Placid La
W. Waterway Ave, NW, Fri-Sat, Feb 1
4. Items for kitchen, 2 tables w/chairs
saws, 2 wheel trailer 4 X 8. LOTS OF
Lake Placid- 1010 Tennyson
224 Flamingo St. Highland Par
Fri-Sat., Feb. 13th & 14th. 8Af
Furniture, tools, antique
and collectibles.
Lake Placid- 435 Catfish Cr
Sat., Feb. 14th. 8AM-2PM. Golf
antique scales, tools, household
books, sewing machines, dvd's, ci
chair, adult clothing & mor
Lots of nice stuff!!
SEB-COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE, Es
Sebring Park Annual multiple home
Fri-Sat, Feb 13-14, 8Am-4PM. Go E.
the intersection of 98 .& 27, for
miles, The Estates is on the S. side o
SEBRING - DON'T MISS THIS HUGE
2640 Blue Bonnett Dr, off Hammock
Thurs-Fri-Sat, Feb 12-14, 8:30 am -2
Everything in 4BR house + garage mi
Cash Only!
Sebring - Thunderbird Hills
2 & 3 Annual Garage Salt
Thunderbird Rd. Sat. Feb.
7:30AM-? Coffee & don
in the Clubhouse.
SEBRING 105 Pinehurst Rd, off Sebr
way next to Church of Christ, Sat, Fel
am - 3 pm. Yard/Bake Sale with proc
go to American Cancer Society Relay
SEBRING 521 Elgin St, corner of
Haven/Elgin, behind Harder Hall,
13, 8 am - 4 pm. Patio furniture,
chairs, carpet cleaner, jewelry, L
GOODIES!
SEBRING HUGE SALE! Su n Lake,
Alcantarra Ave, 33872, Fri & Sat. Elec
office supplies & equip, household it
clothes. Also, discount prices on new
golf cart access. from store close-out
MISS THIS ONE!!

7340 Wanted t
HOUSE OR MOBILE HOME, Lease/P
Rent to Own or Assume Paymens up
$1,000 per month. No Realtors! Cal
818-464-6550


HAVE SOM


Need Heat or Air? We have New Units for
LESS! 2-5 ton package or split systems w/10
year warranty. Free delivery or installation
available. Prices are $700 per ton.
Call 813-850-6289.

7520 Pets & Supplies
KITTENS (4) FREE TO GOOD HOME.
Beautiful, wormed, litter box tralned...READY
for a family of their own! Call 863-840-9046..


AVON PARK HAIR DEPOT- 2650 US 27,
North, Sun, Feb 15th. Nice Furniture, Tools,
Antiques, Milk Cans, Toys, Tables, Chairs,
Dolls, Pictures, Lamps, & LOTS OF MISC!
AVON PARK LAKES 2265 N. Cochrane Rd,
Sat, Feb 14,8 am - ? Nascar collection, Dale
Earhardt Jr. Budwiser hood, trading cards,
dye cast, & misc. 863-452-2260.
Avon Park- 2670 N. Hewlett Rd.
Avon Park Lakes. Sat.,
Feb. 14th. 7AM-1PM.
LAKE PLACID - Lakeshore Resort, 121
Sunset Terrace, Sat, Feb 14, 8 am -1
pm. Furniture, Children's Toys &
Clothes, Household Items, Lots of Misc.


r, ll t w uv a u
ri-Sat, and prc
idmill, testinal
TZ
kes, 309 75M
3-14,8-
s, edger,
MISC! & C
St& P
k Estate.
M-4PM.
es

eek Rd.
clubs,
goods,
d's, high V
e ., -
'97 2
45hp, for
states of generatel
'ard sale. Never be
on 98 at
approx. 9
f98.
SALE!
Rd,
2pm.
ust go!

91
Village
e, off 2005
14th. condi
.uts $350
SCOO
power
ing Park- trans
b 14 7 Financi
eeds will $895. R
For Life. Se
Suzuki I
f Lake . Silvermetr
Fri, Feb trunk w/l
folding miles. Exc
OTS OF
944
4464
etronics, 1998 Pon
erocs, Dual air/h
truck & roof rack,
t. DON'T
MITSUBI
nal miles
SBuy MUST SI
Bu]y obo. 863
purchase, DOES MA
Sto Sell you
I Chuck classifil



ET[


N
Florida
all dog
must be
hn, m


TO SELL


THAT


$500?




We will run it free!


S UNDER


IOTICE
statute 585.195 states that
s and cats sold in Florida
e at least eight weeks old,
n official health certificate
lper shots and be free of in-
and external parasites.

60 O Medical Supplies
& Equipment
ELECTRIC LIFT
Chauffeur Mobility, $800.
leae call 863-471-3418


8000
Recreation


50 Boats & Motors
2Oft Fiesta Pontoon With Too.
rce motor. Fish finder, trolling motor,
or & lights. Equipped for salt water.
en in salt water. Can deliver. $4,995.
Call 863-465-3902.


9000
Transportation


00 Motorcycles & ATVs
Yamaha Raptor 660 ATV, exc.
tion. Used very little, like new!
10 OBO. Call 863-243-4614.
TERS-GAS. 80 to 120 MPG high
4 cycle motor, with CVT automatic
mission. Guaranteed for 2 years.
ng, 90 days. Visa, MC or Discover.
EADY TO RIDE! 5535.US 27 South,
bring, FL. Call 863-382-7666.
Burgmon 400 2005 Scooter.
allic w/Givi large windshield, also
brake light & pin striping. 5,350
ellent condition. Call 863-453-7027

5 Automotive for Sale
tiac Trans Sport Florida Mini Van V6:
%eat, power, tinted windows. Stereo,
hitch. Clean vehicle. $3800.
Lake Placid. 863-465-7755.
SHI 2000 ECLIPSE, 42K origi-
, white, excellent condition,
ELL! No room for kids! $4,300
-254-3576 or 863-254-3673
KING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY?
r used appliance with a News-Sun
ed ad. Call-today, gone tomorrow!
385-6155


IING


. t. ,_>. /�!







News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


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Page 8B


www.newssun.com








www.newssun.com


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


RELIGION


Singer Lynda Randle returns to Lake Placid

Sunday night at United Methodist Church


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID - On
Sunday evening, Memorial
United Methodist Church
will once again host Lynda
Randle in concert.
The concert is slated to
begin at 6 p.m. and is free to
the public, though a love
offering will be .received.
This will be the fourth con-
cert in Highlands County by
Randle. She has appeared
twice previously at
Memorial in Lake Placid
and once at South Florida
Community College in Avon
Park.
She will be accompanied
by Joey Gore at the piano
and her backup, singers.
In her previous appear-
ances at Memorial an over-
flow crowd experienced
both her ministry and her
music. Randle shared testi-
mony about growing up in
the inner city as well as
offering an encouraging
word from Scripture. Her
husband Michael offered to


pray with those who had a
need. Her music was inspi-
rational and blessed every-
one in attendance.
Randle, who is perhaps
best known for her appear-
ances around the country
with Bill Gaither in the
Homecoming Concert Series
in recent years, has released
10 albums and made numer-
ous appearances on DVDs
both in the Homecoming
series and as a solo artist.
In addition to appearing
with the Bill and Gloria
Gaither, she has been a guest
soloist at the National Day
of Prayer Celebration in
Kansas City, Mo., has
appeared with Dr. Tony
Evans, Dr. Jerry Falwell and
Chuck Swindoll, sang at
Billy Graham's crusade in
Kansas City, appeared on
ABC's Extreme Makeover:
Home Edition, opened for
Gladys Knight and per-
formed with her brother,
Michael Tait of DC Talk.
Born and raised in the


Courtesy photo
Lynda Randle will be in concert Sunday at Memorial
United Methodist Church. It will be her fourth perform-
ance locally.


inner city of Washington.
D.C., 'Randle married
Michael in 1989. They have
two daughters together.
Michael and her children
will be traveling to
Highlands County with her.
Michael Randle will deliver
the message at the 10:45
a.m. New Song Worship


RELIGION NEWS SNAPSHOTS


Sebring Christian
Church hosting
Valentine Banquet
SEBRINGG' -At 6:30
p.m. today, Sebring
Christian Church will host
its annual Valentine
Banquet. The theme this
year is "My Country
Valentine," so the dress is
casual. Live entertainment
will be provided by Jim and
Melanie Robertson from the
Back Porch Revival. The
menu is either ribeye steak
or chicken, and the cost is
only $10 per person. Call
for reservations.
On Sunday, Tom Shelton
returns in concert at 6 p.m.
There is no cost for the


concert, but a love offering
will be accepted.
Call 382-6676 about any
of the church's services or
programs.
Sebring Ward plans
Sweetheart Dance
SEBRING - The
Sebring Ward of The
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints will have
a Sweetheart Dance on
Saturday, Valentine's Day.
The dance will begin at 7
p.m. in the cultural hall at
the church. Married couples
and singles are invited, 18
years or older.
There will also be a
dance for the young single
adults on Saturday. It will


begin at 9 p.m. at the Stake
Center in Brandon.
Acclaimed pianist to
perform at Unity of
Sebring Saturday
SEBRING - At 7 p.m.
Saturday, master pianist,
composer, educator and
writer Will
Tuttle will
grace the
stage at
Unity Life
Enrichment
Centre and
Tuttle perform a
concert enti-
tled "Piano Passions." The
Valentine concert will high-
light original music by
Tuttle that will open your


service at Memorial on
Sunday.
Randle will be available
to meet with the congrega-
tion and sign CD's follow-
ing the concert. She will
have her albums arid DVD's
available for purchase.
Concert organizers plan to
open the doors at 5 p.m.


heart and inspire your soul.
Refreshments will be served
during intermission.
Suggested love offering of
$10 per person will be
received.
From 1-3:30 p.m.
Sunday, Tuttle will facili-
tate a workshop entitled
"Opening the Intuitive Gate
- The Keys to Developing
Your Intuition." -
Tuttle's insights include:
* Discovering your
unique ways of accessing
your intuitive wisdom
* Effective inner and
outer practices for develop-
ing joy and spiritual aware-
ness
Continued on page 13B


Alliance Church of
Sebring
SEBRING - Sunday
morning Pastor Steve Hagen
continues the series "C&MA
DNA: Alliance Distinctives"
and will preach about "Jesus
Christ our Sanctifier" during
the morning worship service.

Avon Park Church of
Christ
AVON PARK - "The
Stature of The Fullness of
Christ" (Ephesians 4: 13-14),
will be the message Sunday
morning, presented by
Minister Larry Roberts.
The Sunday evening serv-
ice will be a devotional fol-
lowed by a fingerfood fel-
lowship.
There will be a dinner for
all members and their guests
on Tuesday night at a local
restaurant.
Monday Night Tutoring
School will meet every
Monday at 6 p.m. in the fel-
lowship hall. There will also
be crafts, games and refresh-
ments. This is a free service.
For information and/or to
enroll, call the church office.
Avon Park Church of
Christ is at 200 S. Forest
Ave. Call 453-4692.
Bethany Baptist
Church
AVON PARK - Bethany
Baptist Church Annual
Missions Weekend will
begin on Saturday, Feb. 21
with a "Getting to Know
You" time at 4 p.m. There
will be finger foods and a
question and answer time for
all the missionaries.
Missionaries Samuel and
Beth Rojas and Jeff and
Ivana Reiner will speak
Sunday. Also, special guest
speaker will be Dr. John
Greening.
Wednesday is Family
Night. AWANA Club for
boys and girls ages 3
through sixth grade has fin-
ished for the. school year.


Church News
Word of Life for teens will
meet at 6:30 p.m. Adults will
meet in the auditorium at 7
p.m. for Bible Study.
Senior Ministry Carry-In
Luncheon will be at 11:30
a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 24.
Entertainment furnished by
"The Tootsie Roll Man."
Call the office at 452-1136
or go to the Web page at
www.bethanybaptistap.com
and e-mail bethanybai .'
tistap@gmail.com.
Bethany Baptist Church is.
on the corner of State Road
17 and C-17A South (truck
route) in Avon Park.
Christ Lutheran
Church
SEBRING - Pastor Scott
McLean will be preaching a,
sermon, entitled "Simply
Clean."
The church is at 1320 . i
County Road 64, east of the",
Avon Park High School.
Visitors are welcome to wor-
ship and fellowship. For
more information, call 471'-
2663 or search the Web for
christlutheranavonpark.org'.

Christian Science
Church
SEBRING - The lesson
sermon on Sunday morning
is titled "Soul." The keynote
is from Psalms 9047, "... let.
the beauty of the Lrd our
God be upon us."
The church is at 146 N. :
Franklin St.

Christian Training
Church
SEBRING - Associate
Minister Casey L. Downing
will bring the message titled
"Deliberate Destiny: Part 2"
this week at the Sunday
morning service. The ;
Wednesday night Bible study
will continue in the book of '
Romans.
Continued on page 10B


Honey Samples

30 Plus Seafood Items


*Shrimp

* Grouper

,Mahi Mahi

* Salmon

* Scallops

* Talapia

* Sword fish

* Monk fish


* Lobster

* Crab legs

* Cod

* Conch

* Flounder

* Haddock

all items as
available


Open
10am -6pm


"IT HELPS




TO BE ONA




WINNING




TEAM:'


- Earvin "Magic" Johnson


9 OUT OF 10 JACKSON HEWITT

CUSTOMERS GET A TAX REFUND*
That's because our teamworks hard for you.
We dig deep, asking you all the right
questions so you'll get every &edit.
and deduction you deserve.

For Highlands offices, call:
1-800-234-1040
www.jacksonhewitt.com
Visa & MasterCard Accepted



iACKSON HEWIT
-i TAX SERVICE
A Partner And A PathsM


* Based on 2007 & 2008 Jackson Hewitt customers receiving a federal tax refund. Current year customer experience may
be different. A taxpayer's refund eligibility is determined by his/her individual tax situation. Most offices are independently
owned and operated.


FPage 9B


I.. I


* ~ -


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m


1P *~;;�F'~


4.









www.newssun.com


* News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


Page 10B
.Ck,,, h Neo i? c� continued


Continued from page 9B

Covenant Presbyterian
Church
SEBRING - The Rev. W.
Darrell Arnold will deliver a ser-
mon from Acts 10 on Sunday.
4M Ministry will meet from 8
a.m. to noon Saturday to "spruce
up " the outside of the church. The
Women's Book Club will meet at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Seniors will
enjoy popcorn and a movie at 3:30
p.m. Thursday. The movie will be
"The Last Bricklayer in America."

Eastside Christian
Church
LAKE PLACID - At 5 p.m.
Thursday, those attending Ladies
Craft Night will work on a church
scrap booking project. All those
who love to scrapbook are wel-
come to join us.
At 6:30 p.m. Saturday the church
will have its annual "Building for
All Generations" pledge dinner.
Immediately following the dinner
will be the showing of "Fire
Proof." If you have not seen this
movie yet, don't hesitate to come
and join us for this special show-
ing. It might just save your mar-
riage. ,
Monday join the pastor his wife
for the special Valentine Promise


RELIGION GUIDELINES: The News-Sun publishes religion news on Fridays.
The submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday to be considered for publication in the follow-
ing Friday's paper.
Submit items to the News-Sun's from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays; fax to 385-2453; send

e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or mail to Lifestyle Editor, News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring, FL 33870. For information, call 385-6155, ext. 516.


Keepers meeting at Community
Bible Church in Avon Park. This
month's program is specifically
designed to promote a deeper love
and greater unity within the mar-
riage. Dinner is free and starts at 6
p.m. followed by a worship service
and a message. Men, don't miss
this great opportunity to have a
free evening out with your sweet-
heart and a chance to show her just
how much you really do love her.
Call the church office at 465-7065
for more details or-transportation
needs.
Join the lunch bunch at 11:30
a.m. Thursday, Feb. 26 as they try
out the new No Frills restaurant in
Placid Lakes. Carpooling is avail-
able; call the church office at 465-
7065 for more details.
The pastor continues with his
sermon series on Building
Relationships with part three that
deals with how to lovingly build a
relationship with someone you
might not like or have anything in


common with. Love is more than
just a word said on Valentine's
Day, it's an action to be shown all
year long.


An open prayer time is offered at
6 p.m. Tuesday, followed by pas-
tor's adult Bible study on the book
of John at 7 p.m.


Emmanuel United Church Faith,Missionary Baptist
of Christ Church


SEBRING -.The Rev. Jim
Langdoc will deliver the Sunday
morning sermon "What a Joy!"
Scripture is II Corinthians 9:6-15.
The church is 1.7 miles west of
U.S. 27 on County Road 634
(Hammock Road). Call 471-7999
or visit sebringemmanuelucc.com..
Wednesday, Feb. 25 is Ash
Wednesday with two opportunities
for worship.with Communion, one
at 11 a.m. and the other at 7 p.m..

Faith Lutheran Church
SEBRING - Pastor Gary
Kindle's sermon title for Sunday
morning is "Trust in the Word of
the Lord" based on II Kings 5:1-
14.


SEBRING - Remember the
Golden Rule taught in school? Did
you know it was found in the
Bible? Pastor Ken Lambert will
share from the Word of God using
the book of Matthew as his main
text.
The adults and children are still
studying the book of Esther. Esther
was asked to do something that
was very hard, maybe the hardest
thing anyone has asked of her. She
knew she was the only one who
could do it. Learn how .she finds
the courage to do something that
could have cost her life. The same
resource of amazing strength is
available to everyone today.
On Wednesday nights members


PLACES To


WORSHIP


Places to Worship is a paid
advertisement in the News-Sun
that Is published Friday and
Sunday. To find out more infor-
mation on how to place a listing
in this directory, call the News-
Sun at 385-6155, 465-0426 or
452-1009, ext. 502.


APOSTOLIC

* Greater Faith Apostolic
Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. invites you to
oome worship with us in spirit and
truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday. For information con-
tact 840-0152. Pastor Larry
Carmody.


ASSEMBLY OF GOD

I Christ Fellowship Church
(Assembly of God), 2935 New
Life Way. Bearing His Name;
Preaching His Doctrine; and
Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping
God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship,
10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6:30
p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m.
Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-
0924.
: Crossroads Community
Church, 114 South Central Ave.,
Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-
4453. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship: 10:45 a.m. and 6
p.m. Sunday Children's Church:
10:45 a.m. Wednesday Adult Bible
Study and Youth/Royal Explorers,
7 p.m. Pastor: John E. Dumas.
* First Assembly of God, 4301
Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev.
Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday
School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship
and' KIDS Church, 11 a.m.;
Evening Worship, 7 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night, (Adult
Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group,
Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-6431.


BAPTIST

* Avon Park Lakes Baptist
Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd.,
Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall
,- Pastor. Christ centered and bibli-
cally based. Sunday worship serv-
ices, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Nursery facilities are available.
Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday
and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer
Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible
classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered
for all ages. Spanish worship serv-
ice, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Choir prac-
tice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church
phone: 452-6556:
* Bethany Baptist Church
(GARBC) We are located at the
corner of SR17 and C-17A (truck
route) in Avon Park. Join us
Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for cof-
fee and doughnuts, followed with
Bible Study Classes at 9:30.
Sunday morning worship service
begins at 10:30 a.m., and an
evening worship service is at.6
p.m.. On Wednesdays, the
AWANA program and the Word of
Life teen ministry begin at 6:30 PM.
The adult Bible and Prayer Time
begins at 7 p.m.. For more informa-
tion go to wwwbethanybap
.tistap.com or call the church office
at 863-452-1136.
* Faith Missionary Baptist
Church, off State Road 17 North of
Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave.
Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday
Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation
available. Ken Lambert, Pastor.
4*


Phone 386-5055.
* Fellowship Baptist Church,
1000 Maxwell St., Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday: Sunday School,
9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Evening Service, 7
p.m.; Children/Youth/Young Adult
Ministries, 7 p.m. Rev. James
Weatherly, Pastor. Telephone: 453-
4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-maili apfe/-
/owship @tnninet.
* First Baptist Church of Avon
Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park.
Dr. Vernon Harkey, pastor; Jared
Hewitt, interim youth minister; and
Joy Loomis, interim music director.
Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30
a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m.
Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 9:30 a.m. Library open; 11
a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m.
Children's Church; 4:30-5 p.m.
Youth activities; 6 p.m. Vesper
Service. Monday schedule: The
Gutter Service, 7 p.m. Tuesday
schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic comput-
er class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m.
conversational English, basic com-
puter- and citizenship
classes/Sonshine House. Regular
Wednesday schedule: 4:45 p.m.
Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. chil-
dren's choir rehearsals, youth
activities and prayer meeting; 6:30
p.m. adult choir rehearsal; 7 p.m.
children's mission groups.
Thursday schedule: 7-8:30 p.m.
adult reading and writing classes.
Nursery provided for all services,
except Sonshine House.
LifeGroups (Bible studies) are
offered on various days and times.
Call 453-6681 for details. The 24/7
prayer line is (863) 452-1957.
Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N.
Lake Ave., Avon Park. Johnattan
Solotero, Pastor. Regular Sunday
schedule: 9:30 a.m., Bible study;
11 ' a.m., Worship Service.
Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible
study. Friday schedule: 7 p.m.,
activities for adults, youth and chil-
dren.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine
Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 mid-
way between Sebring and Lake
Placid). Your place for family,
friends and faith. Sunday morning
worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery
is provided for both services with
Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life
changing Bible Study for all ages
starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor
Allen Altvater leads the youth in
their quest to become more like
Christ. Sunday night worship at 6
p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and
Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with
youth worship in the youth facility,
and missions training for all chil-
dren. Call the church at 655-1524.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Placid, Knowing God's Heart and
Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal
Palm Street. (2 blocks south of
Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL
33852 (863) 465-3721, Email:
www.fbclp.com. Contemporary
9:00 a.m., Traditional Blended
10:45 a.m., Link Groups 9:00 a.m.
& 10:45 a..m., Sunday Evening
6:00 p.m., Wed. Evening Activities
for all 6:15 p.m.
a First Baptist Church of Lorida
located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida.
Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.
for all ages. Sunday worship serv-
ices are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Preschool care is provided at the
11 a.m. worship service.
Wednesday evening (September to
May), a youth group meets at 6:20
p.m. and is for ages 3 through 12th
grade. Middle and high school
meet year-round. Also at 6:30 p.m.,
is a prayer service followed by
adult choir rehearsal . First Lorida


is the "Place to discover God's
love." Jonathan Booher, Senior
Pastor, Toby Cribbs,
Youth/Children Ministries; Bus
rides to Sunday School and 11 a.m.
worship service are provided for
children grades first through adults
by calling 655-1878. For informa-
tion about the church or the min-
istries offered, call 655-1878.
* First Baptist Church, Sebring,
200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL
33870. Telephone: 385-5154. A.R.
Fugan, interim pastor; Rev. David
Thomas, associate pastor music
and senior adults; Rev. Joe Delph,
minister of youth and activities.
Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday
Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday night programs for
children, youth and adults from
5:30-7:30 p.m. Preschool and
Mother's Day Out for children age
6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky
Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704.
* Florida Avenue Baptist
Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon
Park. Mailing address is 710 W.
Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825.
Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D.
Girdley, pastor. Sunday School,
9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11
a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church;
Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday night programs for
children, youth and adults at 7 p.m.
* Independent Baptist Church,
5704 County Road 17 South,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday
..School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship,
10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m.
Wednesday service, 7 p.m.
Fundamental, soul-winning, mis-
sion-minded, King James Bible
Church. Dr. John Hankins, pastor.
Larry Ruse, youth pastor. Phone
655-1899. Bus transportation.
* Leisure Lakes Baptist Church,
808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just
off of Miller at the west end of Lake
June) "Where the old fashion
gospel is preached." Sunday
School begins at 9:45 a.m.;
Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.;
Sunday Evening Service is at 6
p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the
church at 699-0671 for more infor-
mation.
* Maranatha Baptist Church
(GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east
of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle
Creek. Road.) Sunday School, 9
a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.;
Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week
service,'Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily
Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m.,
Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald
Webber and Associate Pastor Stan
Mohr. Phone 382-4301.
* Parkway Free Will Baptist
Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the
church where the "Son" always
shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and
Wednesday Evening Worship, 7
p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6
p.m. on the last Sunday of each
month. The Rev. John D. Cave,
pastor. Church phone: 382-3552.
Home phone: 452-5868. Affiliated
with the National Association of
Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn.
,.1 Sparta Road Baptist Church,
(SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev.
Winfred White, interim pastor.
Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.
Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 7
p.m.; Choir practice, 6 p.m.
Nursery provided. For information,
call 382-0869.
* Southside Baptist Church
(GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave.,


Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor;
Chuck Pausley, Youth Pastor;
Ralph O. Burns, Assistant to the
Pastor. Sunday School for all ages,
9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship
Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening
Worship, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday!
Awana kindergarten through fifth
grade, 6:30 p.m.; Youth Meeting for
Teens, 6:30 p.m. Adult Midweek
Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. A
nursery for under age 3 is available
at all services. Provisions for hand-
icapped and hard-of-hearing.
Office phone, 385-0752.
* Sunridge Baptist Church,
(SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27
and Valerie, across from Florida
Hospital), Sebring. Ed Howell, tran-
sitional pastor. Sunday School,
9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday
Evening Service, 6 p.m.
Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study,
and Youth, 6:30 .p.m.Nursery pro-
vided. For information, call 382-
3695.


CATHOLIC

* Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church, 595 East Main St., Avon
Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas
McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil
Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7
p.m. in Spanish; 8 and 10:30 a.m.
in English and 6 p.m. Teen Mass.
Weekdays at 8 a.m. Confessions
are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday.
Religious Education Classes are 9-
10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K
through 7th. Confirmation class is
at 7:15 p.m. Sunday.
* St. Catherine Catholic Church,
820 Hickory St., Sebring (mailing
address: Parish Office, 882 Bay
St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049.
Rev. Jose GonzAlez, Pastor.
Masses - Saturday Vigil: 4 p.m.
Sunday: 7:30, 9, abd 10:30 a.m.
and noon Spanish Mass.
Confessions: 3-3:45 p.m.
Saturday and 7:15-7:45 a.m. on
First Friday, or on request. Daily
Masses, 8 a.m. and noon Monday-
Friday. Enroll your students grades
K3 through second grade in
Catholic School. Faith Formation
Classes for grades kindergarten
through fifth, from 9-10:15 Sundays
in the Parish Hall. The Edge
Program for grades sixth through
eighth, from 6-7:30 p.m
Wednesday in the Youth Center.
Life Teen for high school students
from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Sunday in
the Youth Center. Adult Faith
Formation classes from 7-9 p.m.
Thursday in the Youth Center.
Choir rehearsal from 7-9 p.m.
Wednesday in church. Robert
Gillmore; Director of Music.
* St. James Catholic Church,
3380 Placidview Drive, Lake
Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael
J. Cannon. Mass schedule:
Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) -
Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8
a.m. and 9:30' a.m.; Weekdays, 9
a.m. December thru Easter -
Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m.,
9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9
a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30
a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9
a.m.


CHRISTIAN

* Eastside Christian Church,
101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, EL
33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27
on County Road 621), 465-7065.
Stephen Bishop, pastor. Sunday:
Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship
Celebration with the Lord's Supper
each week 10:15 a.m. Youth
Church with Martha Crosbie, direc-


tor at 10:40 a.m. Sophia Bishop,
secretary; Thelma Hall, organist;
and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday:
Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.;
"Building God's Kingdom for
Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way,
Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth
the Drive!"
* Sebring Christian Church,
4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher;
David Etherton, Youth Pastor.
Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Youth Service, 6 p.m; Wednesday
night meals, 5 p.m.; and
Wednesday Bible Study, 6 p.m.
Phone 382-6676.
* First Christian Church, 1016
W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL
33825. "Where truth is taught and
love abounds. "Greg Ratliff, Senior
Minister; Tammy Johns, Secretary
and Children's Director; Bart
Culpepper, Youth. Director; Jon
Carter, Music Director. Bible
School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.;
Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesday
Choir Practice & Children's
Classes, 5:15 p.m.; Study Groups
for all ages and Children's Choir,
6:15 p.m. Nursery provided for all
events.
* First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ), 510
Poinsettia- Avenue, (corner of
Poinsettia .and Eucalyptus),
Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-
0358 or 385-3435. The Rev.
Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast,
10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30
a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, Praise and Worship,
6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15
p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15
p.m.


CHRISTIAN &
MISSIONARY
ALLIANCE

* The Alliance Church of
Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road,
Sebring, FL 33875. Call 382-1343.
Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday
services: Sunday School meets at
9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship Service meets at 10:30
a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study
meets at 6 p.m. (off site);
Wednesday Prayer Gathering
meets at 6 p.m.


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

* Christian Science Church, 146
N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m.
Morning Worship and Sunday
School. Testimonial meetings at 5
p.m. each second and fourth
Wednesday. A free public Reading
Room, located at the church, is
open from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Thursday. The Bible and the
Christian Science textbook,
"Science and Health with Key to
the Scriptures" by Mary Baker
Eddy are our only preachers. All
are welcome to come and partake
of the comfort, guidance, support
and healing found in the lesson-
sermons.


CHURCH OF
BRETHREN

* Church of the Brethren, 700 S.
Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30
p.m. Phone 385-1597.
* Lorida Church of the Brethren
332 Palms Estates Road, Lorida


(three blocks south of U.S. 98)
Mailing address is P.O. Box 149,
Lorida, FL 33857. Phone 655-
1466. Sunday School classes for
children, youth and adults at 9:30
a.m. Christian worship at 10:30
a.m. Pastor, Rev. Jim Baker.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

* Avon Park Church of Christ;
200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FLI
33825. Minister: Larry Roberts,
Sunday Worship Services, 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities
are available at every service. Bible
Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered
classes for all ages. Church phone:
453-4692.
* Sebrrig Parkway Church of
Christ,, 3800 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443. We
would like to extend an invitation
for you and your family to visit with
us, here at Sebring Parkway. Our
hours of service are: Sunday Bible
Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship
Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening
Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible
Class, 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF
NAZARENE

* Church of the Nazarene of
Sebring, 420 Pine St., Sebring.
Sunday: Sunday School begins at
9:45 a.m. for all ages; Morning
Worship at.10:45 a.m.; Service at 6
p.m. Wednesday evening service
at 7 p.m. with special services for
children, youth and adults. Special
services once a month for seniors
(Prime Timers), and young adults
and families. Call for details at 385-
0400. Pastor Emmett Garrison.
* First Church of the Nazarene
of Avon Park, PO. Box 1118.,
Avon Park, FL 33825-1118. 707 W.
Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor.
Sunday: Sunday school begins at
9:45 a.m. for all ages; moving wor-
ship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening
service at 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening service is at 7 p.m. with
special services for children and
adults. Special services once a
month for seniors (Prime Time) and
Ladies ministries. If you need any
more information, call 453-4851.
* First Church of the Nazarene
of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake
Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852.
Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.;\Moming
worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7
p.m. Classes for adult children and
youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tin
Taylor.


CHURCHES OF
CHRIST IN
CHRISTIAN UNION

* Community Bible Church :
Churches of Christ in Christian
Union, (Orange Blossom
Conference Center) 1400 C-17A
North (truck route), AvonPark.
Presenting Jesus Christ as the
answer for time and eternity.
Sunday morning worship service,
10:30 a.m. Nursery provided:
Junior Church activities at same
time for K-6 grade. Sunday School
Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m.
(Transportation available.) Sunday
evening praise and worship serv-
ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening
prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and
youth activities at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Everyone is welcome,
please come worship with us. Don
Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone
452-0088.
A


-uIM' Vg - vurcullV�I _ju-


are studying the book of Jonah.
The pastor has a way of helping
members see how this account
applies to our life in more ways
that often faced. God was wise in
putting each and every book in the.
Bible as He did, for each has much
for our learning. None were written
for pure entertainment. The Bible
is like no other book ever penned
or read.
On Wednesday, Feb. 25 the
church will host a concert with
Evangelist/Singer Doug Day.
Everyone is welcome to attend this
free concert.
The church is at 1708 LaGrange
Ave. in Sebring (off the Sebring
Parkway).

First Baptist Church of
Lake Josephine
SEBRING - First Baptist
Church of Lake Josephine is bust-
ing with great news. Not only does
it have a'new pastor, Dr. Kevin
Arhens, but the mission work is
going full force.
This weekend is just a sample of
the wonderful things to come. On
Saturday the folks called "Faith
Riders" (folks who share the
Gospel with motorcycle riders) will
be having a motorcycle run called
the Sweetheart Ride, on Saturday

Continued on page 11









News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


www.ne wssun. com


Page 11B


Church News continued


Continued from page 11B
starting at First Baptist
Church of Lake Josephine,
111 Lake Josephine Drive.
Enjoy a leisure motorcycle
ride to Okeechobee. Stop at
Speckled Perch Restaurant
so you can treat your sweet-
heart with a wonderful meal.
Return ride after everyone is
done dining. Kickstands up
at 10:30 a.m. Call 385-7872
for details.
Sunday will have a special
service featuring a mission
family returning from China
to share their experiences
and adventures in a country
that it's hard to share Jesus
with. Following the 11 a.m.
service will be dinner on the
grounds.

First Christian
Church
AVON PARK - Happy
Valentine's Day tomorrow.
Do you know that Jesus
loves you? Jesus gave the
ultimate gift showing love,
he laid down his life for you.
The church will have its


Valentine's Day Dinner on
Friday; it will be a time to
share the love that Jesus has
given with those around you.
During Sunday's sermon
the pastor will share with
from Romans 15:14, where
Paul is speaking saying, "I
myself am convinced, my
brothers, that you yourselves
are full of goodness, com-
plete in knowledge and com-
petent to instruct one anoth-
er." This sermon, which is
titled "Teach One Another,"
will be a wonderful encour-
agement to be a teacher to
all of those around you.
The small groups have
started and will be meeting
in various homes this week,
as well as the group that will
meet at the church. If inter-
ested in attending, sign up at
the Welcome Center on
Sunday morning.
One week of the
Revelation study remains on
Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. If
you plan to attend the fol-
low-up.fellowship following
Bible study at 8 p.m., con-
tact the church office by


noon Monday.
First Christian Church of
Avon Park is at 1016 W.
Camphor (behind the
Wachovia Bank). Call 453-
5334 or e-mail firstchris-
tianap@embarqmail.com
with any questions or to
request information. The
church Web site is
www.firstchristianap.com.

First Christian
Church (Disciples of
Christ)
SEBRING - At the
Lord's Table on Sunday will
be Teresa Williams and Liz
Klingerman. Communion
will be served by Diane
Beidler, Maria Null, Barbara
Slinkard and Terri Trainer.
Greeting the congregation
will be Howard and Shirley
Lewis. The Call to Worship
leader is Shirley Lewis.
The pastor's message will
be "The Widow's Mite" from
Luke 21:1-4.
Wednesday the "Our
Journey" Support Group
meets at 10 a.m.


The youth fellowship-
DOC Crew meets at 7 p.m.
Thursday.
The Disciples Men will
sponsor a spaghetti and
meatball dinner from 5-7
p.m. Friday, Feb. 20. Cost
for adults $5, children $3.

First Presbyterian
Church - A. R. P.
AVON PARK -- On
Sunday, Pastor Bob
Johnson's sermon is entitled
"God's Sons and Daughter"
based on Romans 8:12-17.
The choir's introit will be
"Surely the Presence" and
the anthem "Holy Spirit Live
in Me."
The adult Sunday school
class led by Tom Christoph
will conclude its study of
Galatians with Chapter 6
(Christians serving each
other).
The church office will be
closed Monday due to the
holiday.
On Wednesday,.the
Johnson will continue the
study on the Gospel of John.
The family potluck will be at


6:30 p.m. Bring a covered
dish and table service.
Dessert will be furnished.
This "Jubilee Birthday" pro-
gram will honor the mission-
ary ladies.
On Thursday, the youth
group led by Dave and Rene
Blackmon will meet for din-
ner at 6 p.m. followed by
activities from 6:30-7:30
p.m. On Saturday evening,
the youth will meet from
6:30-8:30 p.m. for a spaghet-
ti dinner and game night.
Youth from sixth grade
through 12th grade are wel-
come.
The church is at 215 E.
Circle St. (with two
entrances on LaGrande
Street). Call the church
office at 453-3242.

First United
Methodist Church of
Sebring
SEBRING - The Rev.
A.C. Bryant's sermon title is
"John - A Voice Crying"
with Scripture reading from
John 1:23-28.


Sunday at 3 p.m. in the
sanctuary, Brian Arner, a
Christian recording artist,
will present a concert, which
is open to the public. A love
offering will be taken.
Wednesday morning Bible,
Study is at 10 a.m. and the
evening dinner and study is
at 6 p.m. with the pastor.
The United Methodist
Men are sponsoring a
Valentine's Day Dinner
today.
Visit the Web page at
www.sebringfirstumc.com
for more church information
or call the church office at *1
385-5184.

Heartland Christian
Church

SEBRING - At the
Praise and Worship Service .
this Sunday, The Heartland ,
Singers will sing "Gone."
Walt Malinowski will sing.
the special hymn "When
Jesus Says It's Enough."
Richard Swenson will sing .
"Never Alone." Mina West,,

Continued on page 12B


PLACES To WORSHIP


EPISCOPAL

* The Episcopal Church of the
Redeemer.Service times are'7:30,
8:30 and 10 a.m. with Holy
Communion. Coffee hour following
services. Newcomers welcome.
Rector is the Rev. Joyce Holmes.
Call 453-5664 or e-mail
redeemer1895@aolcom Web site:
redeemeravon.com. The church is
at 839 Hqwe's Way, Avon Park
(two miles north of Sun 'N Lake
Boulevard, across from Wells
Dodge.)
* St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL
33870. Sunday Services: Holy
Eucharist Rite I - 7:45 a.m., Holy
Eucharist.Rite II - 10 a.m. Midweek
servicee on Wednesday at 6 p.m.
Sunday School .for all ages at 9
a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m.
until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m.
service ends. Wednesday: Adult
Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are
always welcome. The Rev. Jim
Kurtz, rector. Church office 385-
7649, for more information.
i St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal
Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-
0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers,
Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m.,
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday
evening: Holy Communion with
Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child
care available at the 8 a.m. and
10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come
and join us.


GRACE BRETHREN

* Grace Brethren Church, 3626
Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-
0869. Dr. Randall Smith, Senior
Pastor, Rev. David Ogden,
Associate Pastor, Matt Wheelock,
Assistant to the Pastor, and Aaron
Michaud, Youth Director. "Kid City"
Children's Ministries: 9 a.m.-12
noon, First Service: 9 a.m.-10:15
a.m., Drinks, Donuts and
Fellowship: 10:15 a.m.-10:45 a.m.,
Second Service: 10:45 a.m.-12
noon. Sunday Evening Service: 6
p.m.-7 p.m., Wednesday Evening
Service: 7 p.m.-8 p.m. "Crave"
Youth Doings, Christian Life:
Application, Bible Study and
Prayer, and "Kid City" Children's
Activities. "Kid City" Pre-School/
Day Care: Nursery Age Through
5th Grade. Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-
6 p.m. (By Registration Call: 385-
3111).


INTERDENOMINATIONAL

* World Harvest and Restoration
Ministries, (non-denominational)
2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-
3771. Sunday service: Sunday
School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11
a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m.
prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor:
W.H. Rogers.


JEWISH

* Temple Israel of Highlands
County, 1305 Temple Israel Drive,
Sebring, FL 33870. Shabbat servic-
es held on Nov. 7, 21 and 28 at
7:30 p.m. All are welcome! Torah
Study at 10 a.m. Nov. 8, 22, 29.
Havdalah services and dinner at 6
p.m. Nov. 8, 22, 29. Silent auc-
tion/Past Presidents Gala at 1 p.m.
Nov. 2. Open to anyone who cares
to attend. Summer hours may vary.
For further information, call the
Temple office at 382-7744.

LUTHERAN

I Atonement Lutheran Church
(ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview


Drive., Sebring. The Rev. Felice A.
Johnson, pastor. Jim Helwig,
organist/choir director. Holy
Eucharist at 9:30 a.m.; Parish Choir
at 6:45 p.m. Wednesday; and
Mary/Martha Circle meets at noon
first Tuesday for lunch. Phone 385-
0797.
* Christ Lutheran Church Avon
Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2
mile east of Avon Park High
School. Sunday Divine Worship is
at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is cel-
ebrated every week with traditional
Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs
of praise. Fellowship time with cof-
fee and refreshments follows wor-
ship. Come worship and fellowship
with us. For information, call Pastor
Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see
christltheranavonpark.org.
* Faith Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 2740 Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848,
Faith's Closet phone: 385-2782.
Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann
Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship serv-
ices: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday
School for children and adult Bible
classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise
worship service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Communion is served the
first and third and fifth Sunday of
the month. Sunday worship service
is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8
a.m. each Sunday. Educational
opportunities include weekly adult
Bible studies. Special worship serv-
ices are on Thanksgiving Eve,
Christmas Eve, New Year's Eve
and Easter. Midweek services are
during Advent and Lent. Faith's
Closet Resale Shop is open to the
community from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m.
to noon Saturday. The Closet is
closed Mondays. All are warmly
welcome in the family of faith.
* Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church (AALC) American
Association of Lutheran
Churches, 4348 Schumacher
Road, Sebring, one mile west of
Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor.
Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Bible Study, 9 a.m.
Nursery provided. Social activities:
Choir, Missions, Evangelism.
Phone 385-1163.
* New Life Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a
Congregation of the Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship
with the Wisconsin Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday
Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9
a.m. For more information, call
Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or
visit the Web site at wwwnew//fe
sebring. corn.
* Resurrection Lutheran Church
- ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon
Park. Pastor: Rev. John C.
Grodzinski. Holy Eucharist, 8 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; Sunday
School (adult and youth, 9:15 a.m.
Sunday. Coffee and fellowship hour
follow the service. Midweek
Frangrance Free Wednesday wor-
ship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office
phone number is 453-6858.
* Trinity Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake
Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The
Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and
Noel Johnson, youth and family life.
Worship schedule for December
through Easter: Worship service 8
and 11 a.m.; Communion services,
first and third Sundays; (Children's
Church, 11 a.m. only); and
Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship
schedule for summer through fall:
Worship service, 9 a.m.;
Communion services, first and third
Sunday; Education Hour 10:30
a.m. Additional services: Lent and
Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy
Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.;
Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.;
Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas
Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve,
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship


activities: Youth Group, Senior
Citizens, Younger Side Adults,
Ladies Missionary League, Ladies
Guild, Small group studies as
scheduled. Music: Choir and hand
chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5
years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday. License:
C14H10020: Susan Norris, direc-
tor. Visit us online at: www.vchurch-
es.comr/tnityl/utheran/p.


NON-DENOMINATIONAL

* Bible Fellowship Church, 3750
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Sunday: First Worship serv-
ice and Sunday school, 9 a.m.;
Second Worship service and
Sunday school, 10:45 a.m. A nurs-
ery is provided for children up to 2
years old. Evening: Junior and
Senior Youth, 6 p.m. and evening
service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday:
Youth, 5-8 p.m. Children (3 years to
fifth grade), 5:50-7:30 p.m. Adult
classes, 6:30 p.m.; Prayer time,
6:30 p.m. Dr. Eugene Bengtson,
pastor; Todd Patterson, associate
pastor. Church office 385-1024.
* Calvary Church, 1825
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872; 386-4900. An independent
community church. Sunday morn-
ing worship, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday
School, 11 a.m.; Wednesday Bible
studies, 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small
friendly church waiting for your
visit. ,
* Christian Training Ministries
Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off
County Road 17 on Simpson
Avenue. Sunday service is at 10
a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7
p.m. A nursery and children's
church are provided. The church is
part of Christian International
Ministries Network, a full gospel,
non-denominational ministry. Linda
M. Downing, minister: Phone, 314-
9195, lindadowning@hotmail.com.
Casey L. Downing, associate min-
ister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown
ingc@hotmal.com. Web site is
www.christiantrainingministries.net
* Grace Bible Church, 4541
Thunderbird Road, (second church
on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone,
382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior
pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30
p.m.
Sunday, 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m. (ASL),
11:30 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace
Bible Academy Adult Investigating
Truth; first and third Tuesday,
Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.;
Wednesday, Children's & Youth
Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday,
8:30 p.m., College Ministry.
w w w . G B Cc o n
nected org
* Highlands Community Church
is meeting at the Community
Christian Church at 3005 New Life
Way. Highlands Community
Church features a casual contem-
porary church. Our Celebration
Service is at 10 AM and includes a
quality nursery and Kid's world for
ages through elementary age.
Church phone is 471-1236, or
Pastor Bruce Linhart's cell is 402-
1684. Web site: highlandscommu-
nitycom e-mail: pastor@highland-
scommunity comn
* Unity Life Enrichment Centre,
new location, 10417 Orange
Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL
33875; 471-1122; e-mail
unlty@vistanet.net. Web site,
www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Celebration Service,
Nursery and Children's Church.
Weekly Classes, Christian
Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer
Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups.
Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior
minister transforming lives from
ordinary to extraordinary.
* Visions Christian Community
Church, 105 Jim Rodgers Ave.,


Avon Park (in the historical build-
ing). Pastor is Alvin Conner.
Sunday worship,,. 11:.15 a.m.
Wednesday - Youth Cultural Arts
Ministry, 5:30 p.m.; Youth Bible
Study, 7 p.m.; and Adult Bible
Study, 7 p.m. Holy Communion is
first Sunday of each month. Youth
ministry is fourth Sunday. Women's
Ministry is fifth Sunday. "Where
there is no vision my people per-
ish."
* The Way Church, 1005 N.
Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday
school and worship service at 9
a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Youth activi-
ties, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. The
Way is a church family who gathers
for contemporary worship, teaching
of God's Word, prayer and fellow-
ship. Come early and stay after for
fellowship time. Child care and chil-
dren's church are provided.
Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The
Way - A place for you. Office
Phone:471-6140, Church Cell
Phone:381-6190. Email: theway
church@hotmal.com. Web site:
www The WayChurch. org


PRESBYTERIAN

* Covenant Presbyterian Church
(PCA), 4500 Sun 'N Lake Blvd.,
Sebring, 33872-2113. A
Congregation of the Presbyterian
Church in America. Worship servic-
es: Sunday morning worship, infor-
mal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m..
Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday
evening, -6:30 p.m.; Wednesday.
evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.;
Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:30-
7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m.
Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759;
e-mail: covpres@strato.net Web
site: wwwcpcsebring.org. Rev. W.
Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours:
8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through
Thursday.
* First Presbyterian Church
ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two
entrances on LaGrande), Avon
Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242.
The Rev. Robert Johnson is the
pastor. Fellowship time, 9 a.m.;
Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Adult
Bible Study, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Children's
Church, 10:45 a.m.; and Women's
Bible Study, 6:30 p.m. Other week-
ly activities: Wednesday Prayer,
'9:30 a.m.; Pastor's Bible study,
10:30 a.m.; First Wednesday lunch,
11:30 a.m.; Circles: Second
Tuesday, 1 and 7:30 p.m. and sec-
ond Wednesday, 1 p.m.; Potluck
dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday;
and choir practice, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Be a part of a warm,
caring church family with traditional
services, following biblical truth.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring,
FL 33870. 385-0107. Sunday
School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.;
Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday:
"KFC" Kids for Christ Youth Group,
3:15-4:15 p.m.; Senior High Youth
Group, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Wednesday:
Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir
rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery avail-
able for Sunday worship. Call the
church office for more information
and other classes. Rev. Darrell A.
Peer, pastor. Richard Hart, director
of youth ministry.
* First Presbyterian Church,
ARP 118 North Oak Ave., Lake
Placid, 465-2742. E-mail:
fpc/p@ealrh/ink.net The Rev. Ray
Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev.
Drew Severance, associate pastor.
Sunday morning worship is at 8:30
and 11 a.m.; and contemporary
worship is at 10:45 a.m. in
Friendship Hall. A variety of Sunday
school classes for adults and chil-
dren are at 9:30 a.m. Call the
church office for more information
about the classes offered. Nursery
is provided for babies and toddlers;


while young children up to second
grade have a special Children's
Church offered during the worship
service to help them grow in their
spiritual knowledge.
* Spring Lake Presbyterian
Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School,
9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m.
Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the
second Thursday of the month,
September through June. Board of
Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first
Monday of the month. Choir
rehearses at 7 p.m. each
Wednesday, September through
April. Presbyterian Women meet at
10 a.m. the third Thursday of the
month. Pastor: The Rev. Kathryn
Treadway. Organist: Richard
Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan
Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713;
e-mail, springlakepc@embarq-
mai/.com, Web site,
http.//s/pc.presbychurch.org.


SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST

* Avon Park Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 1410 West
Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone:
453-6641 or e-mail: avonparks-
da@embarqmail.com, Saturday
early morning worship service is at
8:30 a.m..; Saturday, Sabbath
School, 9:30 a.m Saturday.;
Vespers at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.
Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m.
Church Service 10:45 a.m.
Saturday. Community " Service
hours on Tuesday and Thursday is
from 9:00 a.m. till Noon. Senior
Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate
Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker
Memorial Academy Christian
School offering education for
kindergarten through 12th grades.
ALL ARE WELCOME. Website is
www. disco verjesus. org
* Sebring Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, 2106 N. State
Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438.
Worship Services: 9:15 a.m.
Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meet-
ing, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m.
Community service: every Monday
9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr.
Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m.
Pastor Amado Luzbet.


THE CHURCH OF
LATTER DAY SAINTS

* The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand
Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33870.
Phone: 382-9092. Dale Bargar,
bishop; Butler Tyler, first counselor;
and James Parker, second coun-
selor. Family History Center: 382-
1822. Sunday services: Sacrament
meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel
Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; and
Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-1
p.m. Youth activities from 7-8:20
Sp.m. Wednesday: 11-year-old
Scouts, 7-8:20 p.m. first and third
Wednesday; and activity days for
8-11 year old girls from 7-8:20 p.m.
second and fourth Wednesday.


THE SALVATION
ARMY

M The Salvation Army - Center
for Worship. Sunday: Sunday
School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meet-
ing, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting
and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Prayer,
6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries,
7 . p.m. Wednesday: Youth
Ministries, 5 p.m. Every fourth
Thursday is Men's Fellowship, 6:30
p.m. All meetings are at 120 N.
Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For
more information, visit the Web site
www.sa/vationarmysebring.com or
call Captain Mary Holmes at 385-
7548, ext. 110.


UNITED METHODIST

* First United Methodist Church,
105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870,
The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor.
Traditional Worship Service at 8:15
and 10:55 a.m. in the sanctuary,
Contemporary Worship in the FLC,
at 9:40 a.m. Sunday School at 9:40
and 10:50 a.m. for all ages, Youth
Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday
with Rich Heilig, youth director.
The 11:00 a.m. Sunday worship'
service is broadcast over WITS
1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery
available at all services.
* First United Methodist Church,'
200 South Lake Avenue, Avon
Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759,
Reverend Gary Pendrak, Pastor,'
Summer Schedule, Sunday School
- 9:00 a.m., Worship - 10:30 a.m.
* Memorial United Methodist
Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlook-
ing lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL,
33852. The Rev. Douglas S. Pareti,
senior pastor. Claude H.L. Bumett,
pastoral assistant. Sunday sched-
ule: Heritage worship service at
8:30 a.m.; Sunday Bible classes for
all ages at 9:30 a.m.; Celebration
worship service at 10:45 a.m.; New
Song worship service at 10:45
a.m.; Youth fellowship for 6th
through 12th graders at 5 p.m.;
Loving nursery care provided every
Sunday morning. Bible fellowship
class 6;00 p.m. We offer Christ-,
centered Sunday school classes,
youth programs, Bible studies,
book studies and Christian fellow-
ship. We are a congregation that
want to know Christ and make Him
known. Call the church office at
465-2422 or check out our church'
Web site at
wwwmemorilumnc.com.
* St. John United Methodist,
Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive,,
Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev.
Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor.
Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday.
Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.,
and 11 a.m. Life Connections
meets at 5:30 p.m. each
Wednesday in the fellowship hall
from September to May for dinner,
and age appropriate studies.
Nursery provided for all services,.
Phone 382-1736, www.stjohnse-
bring.org
* Spring Lake United Methodisti
Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane',
(Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde
Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship serv-
ice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study
meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday:
Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on
Thursday. Church office phone'.
655-0040.


UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST

* Emmanuel United Church of
Christ, 3115 Hope Street, Sebring,
SFL 33875. Sunday worship, 9:30
a.m. Children's Christian.
Education, 9:30 a.m. Everyone is
welcome at Emmanuel. We are.
located 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27.
on Hammock Road. For more infor-
mation, call the church office at
471-1999 or e-mail to eucc@stra-
to.net or check our website,
sebringemmanuelucc. com.


VINEYARD

* Heartland Vineyard, 2523 U.S.
27 South, (just past the Wild Turkey
Tavern) Avon Park. Contemporary,
Worship is at 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Children's Church and
Preschool/Nursery provided
Sunday. Pastor, Gerry Woltman:
Telephone: 453-9800. Casual, con-
temporary and Christ-centered. -


..... ...~.���~i -. i;-.-









www.newssun.com


Page 12B
Church News continued


Continued from page 11B
Pat West and Mary VanHoorweghe will
sing "Sweeter As the Days Go By."
Marilyn and Deon Eaton will be this
week's greeters. Bob and Faun Parker
will be this week's Scripture readers.
Pastor Ted Moore's sermon this week
will be "Win Some - But Not All!"
with Scripture from the book of Acts
14:1-19.
The new expansion, which includes a
baptistery and classrooms, is scheduled
to be finished this week. The church is
at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South in
Sebring (behind Publix). Look for the
lighthouse.

Memorial United
Methodist Church
LAKE PLACID - Lynda Randle
will present a gospel concert at 6 p.m.;
admission is free, with a free will offer-
ing being received.
At the Heritage Worship Service and
the Celebration Worship Service, the
Rev. Doug Pareti will preach on the
subject "Come To Serve" from the
Scripture text Matthew 20:20-28. At
the New Song Contemporary Service in
Rob Reynolds Hall, Michael Randle
will preach with the Worship Band
leading the service.
Monday the AARP Defensive
Driving Class meets in Ladies Bible
Class, and on Tuesday it moves to Rob
Reynolds Hall.
The church is south of U.S. 27 at 500
Kent Ave. For more information, call
465-2422

Parkway Free Will
Baptist Church
SEBRING - The Scripture for the
10 a.m. Sunday Bible lesson, "Risky
Commitments," comes from the fourth
chapter of Esther. Pastor John Cave:
will bring the message in the morning
and evening services.
Wednesday evening service will be
prayer, praise and Bible study.

Placid Lakes Baptist Church
LAKE PLACID - On Sunday,
Pastor Darryl George will preach the
sermon entitled "Finishing ... My Very
Best Ever!" with regards to the power-
ful closing of 1 Corinthians! The
Lord's Supper will be celebrated at this
service.
The church is at the corner of
Washington and Kemper avenues in


Placid Lakes. For more information,
call 465-5126 from 8 a.m. to noon
Monday through Thursday or e-mail
the church at placidlakes@ho'tmail.com

Resurrection Lutheran
Church
AVON PARK - On the Sixth
Sunday after Epiphany, the pastor's ser-
mon will be based on the first chapter
of Mark. At the early service, Ed
Mosser will be the Communion assis-
'tant and Marcus McGinnis will be the
acolyte.
At the mid-morning service, Ginny
Schramm will be the worship assistant,
Sonia Altman will be the Communion
assistant, Jan.Minnich will be the lector
and Nicholas McGinnis will be the
acolyte.

St. John United
Methodist Church
SEBRING - The United Methodist
Men's Fellowship Group will lead all
three services Sunday. Jack Lownsdale
will serve as liturgist; Roger Jaudon
will bring the message "Grace, Grace,
Marvelous Grace" with Scripture from
II Corninthians 12:6-10 and John 1:17.
The United Methodist Men will also
serve their Sweethearts Breakfast at 8
a.m. Wednesday. Call the church office
to make reservations.

Sebring Church
of the Brethren
SEBRING - Pastor Keith Simmons
will preach "Becoming Holy" on
Sunday. The Scripture will be from
Deuteronomy 30:8-10 and also John
17:18-19.
Sunday school will be led by the
Rev. Wendell Bohrer and will meet in
the Fidelis Room. They will be study-
ing "God's Blessing for Ruth." They
will also be looking at Ruth 2:8-12 and
4:13-17.

Southside Baptist Church
SEBRING - The Rev. David
Altman will speak on "Honoring
Marriage" in the morning worship serv-
ice Sunday. In the evening worship
service the pastor will speak on
"Judging the Nations" from the
Matthew a Royal Gospel series.
Women for Missions will meet
Monday at 1 p.m.
Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. the AWANA


Clubs and youth group meet. Adult
Bible study and prayer meeting is at 7
p.m. Wednesday.
The church is at 379 S. Commerce
Ave. For information call 385-0752 or
visit www.southsidebaptistsebring.com.

Spring Lake Presbyterian
Church
SEBRING - The sermon title for
Sunday morning will be "Boot Camp"
with Scripture from 1 Corinthians 9:24-
27.

The Way Church
SEBRING - Pastor Reinhold
Buxbaum will continue his series on
the book of Esther. The Youth
Pantomime Team will be performing
during both services.
The Youth meet at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday.
Valentine's Day froni 7-10 a.m.
Saturday, the youth ministry will be
hosting a Sweetheart Breakfast at the
church. This is an all-you-can-eat waf-
fle breakfast for $5. It is a fundraiser
for the ministry.
The church is at 1005 N. Ridgewood
Drive. The office phone is 471-6140.
The pastor's cell phone is 381-6190.
I Church information and the pastor's
messages can be viewed at www.the-
waychurch.org.

Trinity Lutheran Church
LAKE PLACID - The topic for the
sermon by Pastor Richard Norris at the
two morning services will be "The Tale
of The Towers." There will be an edu-
cation hour for all ages following the
first service. A nursery will be avail-
able at the 11 a.m. service.
Norris will hold Bible studies on
Wednesday at the Youth House and on
Thursday at Tropical Harbor at 9:45
a.m. Anyone is welcome to attend.
They are currently discussing the book
"The Shack" by William Young. The
Men's Club will meet for breakfast at 8
a.m. Saturday at the Truck Stop.
There will be a fashion show and
luncheon beginning at 11:30 a.m.
Saturday, Feb. 21. The community is
invited to attend this afternoon of fun
and look at some of the new fashions
available in the area. Tickets may be
purchased at the church office for $18.
The church is at 25 Lakeview St. For
information call the office at 465-5253
or visit www.trinitylutheranlp.com.


Courtesy, photo
The Rev. Cannon Dr. Mark A. Pearson will visit St.
Francis of Assisi Episcopal Church during Holy Spirit
Weekend, starting Friday.

Pearson brings 'Fire in

the Fireplace' during Holy

Spirit Week at St. Francis


Special to the News-Sun
LAKE PLACID - St.
Francis of Assisi Episcopal
Church, The Timothy
Chapter of the Order of St.
Luke and the St. Francis
Ministry Team present The
Rev. Canon Dr. Mark A.
Pearson for a Holy Spirit
Weekend. The theme will
be "Fire in the Fireplace -
How the Gifts of the Spirit
Can Warm Us and Not
Burn Us."
Pearson's topics will
.include Supernatural Gifts
of the Spirit, Powers,
Manifestations, Strengths
and Dangers. The weekend
begins at 7 p.m. Friday,


Feb. 20 for dessert and an
evening session. The week-
end continues at 9 a.m.
Saturday with a breakfast
and morning session, and
lunch and afternoon session
starting at noon. Holy
Eucharist with Pearson at
10 a.m. Sunday concludes
the weekend.
St. Francis of Assisi
Episcopal Church is at 43
Lake June Road, just west
of U.S. 27. Registration fee
is $30 per person or $50 per
couple. Call the church to
register, 465-0051, or for
additional information visit
the Web site, www.
StFrancisLP.com.


Presents

Coming March 27"


The Musical Comedy


LY







*�









Winner of six Tony Awards

"Millie is strictly about having fun!" Theatremania.com

"A Heavenly Entertainment" The Theatre Mirror

"Millie is a kick up your heels musical you won't soon forget!"
Curtainup.com

Thoroughly Modern Millie paints a hilarious and colorful
picture of New York during the Roaring Twenties through the
eyes of a young naive girl from Kansas. The memorable musical
score will stay with you long after you leave the theatre! For a
delightfully entertaining everiing, don't miss Thoroughly Modem
Millie at Highlands Little Theatre. Order your tickets now at
highlandslittletheatre.org.


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009










www.newssun. com


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


Page 13B


Marantha

Baptist to

host harp

concert
Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING - The sec-
ond concert in the
Maranatha Winter Concert
series will be at Maranatha
Baptist Church at 7 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 20 and will
feature Eduard Klassen on
the Paraguayan Harp.
: Klassen was born and
raised in Paraguay, South
America. Playing the
Paraguayan Harp, a ttadi-
tional folk instrument, has
been his passion since
41975. His tours have taken
him to 17 countries where
le has performed more
than 3,000 concerts. He has
also performed in churches.
schools, colleges, concert
halls, radio and television.
E The third and final con-
cert of the concert series
Will feature Sean Fielder


Courtesy photo
Eduard Klassen with his
Paraguayan Harp will
present a second concert
in the Maranatha Winter
Concert series at
Maranatha Baptist Church
at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 20.

and Wayne Boda present-
ing an organ and vocal con-
cert on Friday, March 20.
The Maranatha congre-
gation invites the commu-
nity to attend these con-
certs. The church is in
Maranatha Village off
Arbuckle Creek Road, two
miles east of State Road 17
North in Sebring.


Deal presents sacred

piano concert on Feb. 22


Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING - G. Richard
Deal, concert pianist and
recording artist, will pres-
ent a sacred piano concert
at Bible Fellowship Church
at 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 22.
Deal is from the
Chicago area and
has presented more '
than 2,500 sacred
and classical piano
concerts in Europe, D
Asia, North and
South America. He is a
graduate of the American
Conservatory of Music, the
Moody Bible Institute and
the Sherwood
Conservatory of Music, all
of Chicago. He was a fac-
ulty member of the Sacred


Music Department of the
Moody Bible Institute.
Deal has been a partici-
pant in several internation-
al piano competitions
including the prestigious
Tchaikovsky Piano
Competition in
Moscow, Russia.
S He arranges his
own sacred piano
arrangements and
. has released six pro-
al fessional record-
ings. The most
recent is entitled "Majestic
Piano Praise," a collection
of favorite hymns and
praise music.
The church is at 3750
Hammock Road.
Admission is free. Call
385-1024.


Are you truly loved this Valentine's Day?


Every Valentine's Day, many will
give outward expressions of their love
to someone special in their life. But
how many will actually give and
receive true love? Do you know what it
means to love and to be loved? Each of
us has the innate desire to be cared for
and share our affection with others.
However, with all the movies on the
.subject, romance novels, and flowers
and cards, many marriages and individ-
uals are starving for true love.
In 1920, there was one divorce for
every seven marriages. Forty years
later, 25 percent of marriages ended in
divorce. In 1978, America hit the mile-
stone of one million divorces recorded
that year! Things are not improving
with at least half of marriages breaking
up.
It is important that we understand
what true love is all about. According
to the Bible, love begins with God,
because God is love. I John 4:7 says,
"Beloved, let us love one another: for
love is of God; and every one that
loveth is born of God, and knoweth


God."
- The more we
@ B! know God, the more
. we understand what
V' love is. God's love
' .' , was sacrificial: He
, gave His only son
SJesus to die for our
-2-- ;s' sin, that we might be
-L_. forgiven and have
Timeless the gift of eternal
life. This shows us
Treasures that God's love is
Luke continual. His love
Knickerbocker is fulfilling: nothing
in this world can
compare or replace it.
When we understand the clear pic-
ture of God's love, we will have the
proper love in marriage that God has
intended. The Scriptural instruction for
men is, "Husbands, love your wives,
even as Christ also loved the church,
and gave himself for it." The world has
a distorted picture of love. It says to
take what you want; and if it feels
good, do it. Love ha


The immoral permissiveness and sen-
sual debauchery is a perversion of what
God has intended for marital whole-
someness. Hebrews 13:1 says, .
"Marriage is honorable in all, and the
bed undefiled: but whoremongers and
adulterers, God will judge. Remember,
charity (God's love) rejoiceth not in
iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth."
True love is found in God alone.
When we receive His love, we may
learn to love Him and others. The
opposite of love is selfishness, dishon-
esty, and a lack of commitment.
When you know the love of God
through Jesus, you will have the great-
est friend of all. Every other relation-
ship hinges on this primary relation-
ship. We are loved so greatly, not
because we are worthy, but because of
who He is - the lover of our soul!

Luke Knickerbocker is the pastor of Bethel
Baptist Church in Lake Placid, Florida,
located on 216 E. Park St. You may e-mail
him at knickprint@yahoo.com.


Religion News Snapshots continued


Continued from page 9A
+ Techniques using med-
itation, imagery, music, and
art that inspire intuitive
insights
* How to respond to the
global "intuitive imperative"
and meditate more effective-
ly
* Ancient secrets for
awakening the love, compas-
sion, joy, and peace within.
The workshop is offered
on a suggested $15 tuition
basis. No one will be turned
away due to financial con-
cerns.
The concert and workshop
are open to the public and
will be held at Unity Life
Enrichment Centre, 10417 S.
Orange Blossom Blvd. For
more information and tick-
ets, call 471-1122.

Composer to be at
First Baptist Church
LAKE PLACID - At
10:45 a.m. Sunday, W. Elmo
Mercer, one of the great
composers of Gospel music


and a well-known music
evangelist, will be joining
First Baptist Church of Lake
Placid, 119 E. Royal Palm
St. His music is included in
hundreds of Gospel song-
books and denominational
hymnals.

Parkway Church of
Christ plans Worship
Workshop
SEBRING - Saturday
and Sunday, the Sebring
Parkway Church of Christ
will host a Worship
Workshop with Brother Lee
Milam from the Mayfair
Church of Christ in
Huntsville, Ala. Lee Milam
graduated from David
Lipscomb University with
his degree in music and
communications.
Milam taught music and
Bible before coming to
Mayfair Church of Christ in
Huntsville, Ala. in 1980,
where he served for 20 years
as Youth and Family minis-
ter and for the last nine


years as Worship and Family
minister. Using his educa-
tional and professional back-
ground in music, he is now
actively involved in con-
ducting congregational wor-
ship workshops, encouraging
churches to improve their
singing and worship to God.
Call 385-7443.

Groups meet for
special dinner
AVON PARK -
Highlands Promise Keepers
- Men of Integrity - Men of
Promise announce their third
annual special "Valentine"
Promise dinner on Monday.
Husbands bring your wives.
Everyone is welcome.
Dinner and fellowship is at 6
p.m. Praise worship service
is at 7 p.m. at Community
Bible Church, 1400 County
Road 17A North in Avon
Park.
The speaker will be Pastor
Dale Schlafer, president of
Center for World Revival
and Awakening. He served


as vice president of Church
Relations for Promise
Keepers in Denver from
1994-1998; director of Stand
in the Gap in Washington,
D.C. in 1997; and has co-
authored "Seven Promises of
a Promise Keeper," "The
Light House Movement,"
"Effective Men's Ministries"
and "Fight On Your Knees."
He is director of the Clergy
Conference "Fan the
Flame."
For more information, call
Tom Solyntjes at 991-2450 '
or FMI Regional Director
George Ridenour at 381-
3570.

vonMerveldt to be
ordained Feb. 22
LAKE PLACID - The
public is invited to the
Ordination Service of Paul J.
von Merveldt Jr. at 6 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 22 in the sanc-
tuary of First Baptist Church
of Lake Placid.'A reception
will follow in the fellowship
hall.


Back By Popular Demandu


Waft Strony


Friday, February 20, 2009


7:00p.m.


St. Johns United!Methodist Church



3214 GrandPrix'Drive, Sebring


Tickets are $10 per person



Avaifab6e by catfing



382-1736 or 214-6204


Tickets also available at the door


ea











Page 14B


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


Courtesy photo
Popular musical group, The Pfeifers will be featured in Avon Park at the Florida Avenue
Baptist Church on Feb. 28.


The Pfeifers featured Feb.


28 at Florida 1
Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK - One of Christian music's
most popular recording artists, The Pfeifers,
will be featured in Avon Park on Saturday,
Feb. 28 at Florida Avenue Baptist Church.
This exciting musical worship event will take
place at 7 p.m.
Since organizing more than two decades
ago, The Pfeifers, who make their home in
Washington Court House, Ohio, have enjoyed
much success nationally and internationally.
The group has been featured on a number of
the successful Bill Gaither Homecoming Tour
concert dates and award-winning Gaither
Homecoming videos and has enjoyed much
radio success with numerous popular Top 20
releases, including their most recent hits,
"Father's House," "Back To My Senses," "I
Will Trust Him" and "Jumpin' In." The
Pfeifers' brand new recording, "Carry The
Banner," promises even more success for this
talented group.
This talented group is featured across the


NY Catholic schools
explore conversion to
charter schools
- NEW YORK (- Four
Roman Catholic schools in
Brooklyn that are in danger
of closing due to declining
enrollment might insteadbe
converted into publicly fund-
ed charter schools under an
unusual church-state partner-
ship.
New York Mayor Michael
Bloomberg said the city and
the Diocese of Brooklyn are
exploring a pilot program
that would keep the schools
open with taxpayer dollars,
but also bring management
and curriculum changes,
including an end to religious
instruction.
The idea is modeled on a
similar conversion of seven
Washington area parochial
schools last year.
The plan faces obstacles.
Most notably, state law cur-
rently prohibits conversions
of religious schools into
charter schools, so the pro-
gram would require legisla-
tive action before being put
in place, Bloomberg said.
But the mayor said the
partnership might be a good
fit. City schools are short of
space and looking for ways
to expand, and Catholic
schools have unused space, a
dwindling number of stu-
dents and a need for new
funding.
Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio
said Feb. 7 that the mayor
was effectively throwing a
"life preserver" to drowning
schools - one he was
inclined to grab even though
it would mean an end to the
schools' Catholic identity.

Kentucky bishops
refute bishop who
denied Holocaust
FRANKFORT, Ky. - The
state's Roman Catholic bish-
ops affirmed their commit-
ment to strong Catholic-
Jewish ties after the Vatican
rehabilitated a bishop who
denied the Holocaust.
The Vatican caused an
uproar last month when it
lifted the excommunication
of four bishops from the
schismatic Society of St.
Pius X, a traditionalist group
opposed to the reforms of


Avenue Baptist
country each year in countless churches,
auditoriums, fairs and camp meetings, shar-
ing the message of the gospel with musical
excellence. The group's unique ability to
combine "exceptional vocal harmonies with
brass instrumentation, creates musical excite-
ment that is appealing to audiences of all
ages.
A Pfeifer concert is filled with musical
pleasure enjoyable for the entire family and a
true musical worship experience. Evidence of
this lies in group member John Pfeifer's
receipt of the 2006 Fan Award for Southern
Gospel Music's Favorite Instrumentalist, pre-
sented to him by The Singing News
Magazine, Southern Gospel Music's leading
fan and trade publication, as well as the
group's Favorite Trio nomination in 2008 by
the same publication.
To obtain additional information regarding
this event, call 381-1011 or visit
www.pfeifers.com. The Florida Avenue
Baptist Church is on South Florida Avenue.


the Second Vatican Council.
One of the bishops, British-
born Richard Williamson,
had said in a TV interview
that he did not believe any
Jews were gassed during the
Holocaust.
In a Feb. 6 statement
released by the Kentucky
Catholic Conference, the
bishops said that "we have
enjoyed groundbreaking,
interreligious relationships"
in the state.
The bishops also said that
they shared the "gravity" of
Pope Benedict XVI's "con-
cern about any expression of
anti-Semitism or any state-
ments - written or spoken
- that attempt to deny or
diminish the Holocaust."
Several U.S. bishops,
including Chicago Cardinal
Francis George, president of
the U.S. Conference of
Catholic Bishops, have made
similar statements condemn-
ing Williamson for denying
the Holocaust. The Vatican,
bowing to the growing furor,
last week demanded that
Williamson recant his views.

New Jonah leaves
Iraq to preach
Gospel in Michigan
BAY CITY, Mich. - The
Hebrew Bible tells the story
of Jonah, who receives
God's call to travel to
Nineveh and warn its people
to give up their evil ways.
Now a new Jonah from
Nineveh has come to
Michigan to preach the
Christian Gospel.
The Rev. Jonah Salim is a
33-year-old political refugee
from Iraq. Nineveh province
in northern Iraq includes the
city of Mosul, also known as
Nineveh.
Presbyterian leaders from
around the area came to
Saginaw to be on hand as he
became a minister this
month in the Presbyterian
Church (U.S.A.).
"Today, your action con-
firms that we are all equals
in God's eyes," Salim told
more than 100 representa-
tives from the Presbytery of
Lake Huron, gathered to
decide whether to accept a
transfer of record of Salim's
ordination from an Egyptian
seminary.
The Louisville, Ky.-based


Presbyterian Church has 2.3
million members, about
14,000 ordained ministers
and about 10,000 congrega-
tions nationwide.
Over the past year, Salim
took five ordination exams
and had to show his knowl-
edge of the Bible and under-
standing of faith issues, said
the Rev. Doug Tracy.
"He wrote a biblical exe-
gesis demonstrating his
knowledge of biblical lan-
guages, and part of the fun
for those of us who got to
read it was we .saw interpre-
tations of the text presented
in English, in Hebrew and in
Aramaic," Tracy said.
Salim fled to the U.S. two
years ago, citing fear of per-
secution from Muslim
extremists. He arrived in
Bay City in 2007 and
received asylum to stay in
the U.S. in June.

Fire destroys
landmark Mormon
church in rural
Nevada town
LAS VEGAS - A pre-
dawn fire reduced a land-
mark Mormon church to rub-
ble, destroying one of the
oldest buildings in the
Moapa Valley.
No one was injured in the
Feb. 4 blaze that destroyed
Logandale's Mormon church
in the small southern Nevada
farming town about 55 miles
northeast of Las Vegas.
Clark County fire
spokesman Scott Allison said
FBI and Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, Firearms and
Explosives agents joined
county fire investigators
probing the cause of the fire,
but said there was no imme-
diate evidence of foul play.
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints stake
President Asahel Robison
said nothing was reported
amiss when a women's
group left the church after a
meeting the night before.
But he noted that electric
fans were running overnight
to help dry carpets after a
cleaning. The building had
opened in 1951.
"Some older folks who
helped build that building
watched. helpless, as a large
piece of their lives went up
in flames." Robison said.


And Don't Miss

The Saturday Night Cruise

from 6pm until 9pm


Call 471-1122 for Tickets


Scheadlel
of C l '11 11 1'i t 1 I
Classes
Public Welcome
Monday's
Yoga For Health
10:30am-12pm

Tuesday's
Community Choir
Rehearsal
6pm
Metaphysical Bible
Interpretation
7pm

Wednesday's
Tai Chi
10am
Baha'u'llah's
Teachings on
Spiritual Reality
11am

Thursday's
The Quest Study
Group
The Power of Now
6pm
Yoga For Health
6:30pm-8pm

Sunday Services
Children's Church &
Nursery 10:30am
Youth of Unity
11:45am


Experience easy, simple ways to enrich your life - and the
life of everyone you know.- ultimately making the world a
positive place to live and thrive.
- Unity- A Positive Place Where Everyone Is Welcome


Come in and browse the areas best
Christian and Ne\w Thought Bookstore

Positive Outlooks Books & Gifts


OPEN
MONDAY - THURSDAY
10:00-2:00PM


Home of
Dain I nrdc
Magazine


Binflt.ua~imail


REGION NEWS ON THE WIRE


ak
:~S~


Devoi[ elflr ol




Wit WllTLII


www.newssun.com


Unity of Sebring - Life Enrichment Centre
10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S. * Sebring Fl.
Between SR 66.and Lakelosephiiie Road
(863) 471-1122 -. w�s w.unityolsebring.org email: uni(%(&N-isIanct.uc(


:t~rc1










www. newssun. com


News-Sun * Friday, February 13, 2009


Page 15B


DIVERSIONS


'Friday the 13th'


short on suspense


By ROGER MOORE
The Orlando SentinellMCT
Let's celebrate "Friday
the 13th" with a little red
meat, shall we? And hard
numbers.
There are 13 grisly deaths
in the re-boot of "Friday the
13th" - machete decapita-
tions, an arrow through the
head, somebody burned to
death in a sleeping bag -
you know the slasher drill.
The murders are for shock
and comic effect.
Three nubile young things
take their tops off. Two of
them have hot sex with not-
nearly-as-naked guys in the
same forest by the same
Crystal Lake where all those
camp counselors were
butchered back in 1980.
: This Michael Bay produc-
tion is a graphic homage to
the series that helped turn
simple slasher pictures into
a formula for success. It may
have Bay's big-budget"
sheen, and it's every bit as
efficient and heartless as the
original Fridays. But for all
its attempted jolts, it's not
11 that scary. The genre is
reduced to "Who gets it next
z'nd how?" and never for a
second makes us care.
;For the opening, we're
treated to a blameless quin-
tet of pot lovers murdered
after they come to the ruined
Camp Crystal Lake because
there's weed growing there.
"Six weeks later" we meet a
ifew group of seven young
people on a beer-and-booze
Blast at the rich boy's
daddy's cabin. A hunky
iiker (Jared Padalecki) is
looking for his missing sis-
ter (she was in the first five).
Jenna (Danielle Panabaker)
wants to leave her sex,
shots, skiing and bong-hit-
ting friends to help him.


Movie Review

'Friday the 13th'
Rating: R (Strong, bloody
violence, some graphic sex-
ual content, language, drug
material
Running time: 97 minutes
Review: (of 5)

The difference between
the worst slasher film ever
and the best one is about as
wide as a machete blade.
They all turn bloody, horrif-
ic murders into comic sport,
all feature faceless, soulless
masked (hockey, etc.) slash-
ers and all have plot holes so
big you could drive a
Zamboni through them.
"Friday the 13th" has .no
more room for "feeling" or
"fearing" than "My Bloody
Valentine."
At least last month's
slasher re-boot had 3D.
"Friday" skimps on sus-
pense and cuts straight to the
beheadings. We may feel
worried, for a second, when
an actor we recognize
(Aaron Yoo from
"Disturbia," . still playing
college potheads at 30) wan-
ders into a workshop filled
with cutting tools and sharp
objects. Only for a second,
though.
We can laugh at the
GPS/iPod nerd (Jonathan
Sadowski) who sings


Photo by John P. Johnson
Derek Mears stars as Jason Voorhees in Paramount
Pictures' Friday the 13th.


"Motoring" at the top of his
lungs in the middle of the
forest and see that he'll be
the first to die - it's only
right.
But with every cheap
scare, every surly, three-
toothed local, every raifdom
moment of nudity toplesss
water skiing, there's a
resume skill!), "Friday the
13th" feels more quaint. For


all its social ills, there is one
good that came from
"Hostel" and its torture-porn
cousins. The simple "slash-
er" formula doesn't cut it
anymore.
The only terror here is
that this "Friday" will be a
hit, and "Friday the 13th"
will enjoy another decade as
the unluckiest day of the
year for horror fans.


'Confessions' plays more like a sit-com


By RICK BENTLEY
McClatchy Newspapers
The character of Rebecca
Bloomwood, as written by
author Sophie Kinsella in her
"Confessions of a
Shopaholic" series, has plen-
ty of foibles. Sure, she can't
pass up a sale. That doesn't
stop the character from being
intelligent. Bored, maybe,
but not dumb.
P.J. Hogan has directed the
smarts right out of the char-
acter for his film version of
the best-selling book. Hogan
turns a potentially smart
movie about a quirky young
woman into a situation com-
edy.
Instead of an intelligent
conversation about the high
cost of love or a new pair of
Prada shoes, Hogan falls
back on pratfalls, funny faces
and what looks like leftovers
from episodes of "Will &
Grace."
Bloomwood (Isla Fisher)
is a journalist with a garden-
ing magazine who longs to
work for an "Ugly Betty"-
style fashion magazine.
Instead of landing her dream
job, she gets hired to write a
business column. Under the
nom de plume of The Girl in
the Green Scarf, she offers a
fashionable perspective on
Ifigh finance. She gets more
than a job when she falls for
ler new boss (Hugh Dancy).
Fisher has the unenviable














Movie Review

'Confessions Of A
Shopaholic'
Rating: PG (adult themes)
Running time: 102 minutes
Review: -k* (of 5)


Photo by Robert Zuckerman
Isla Fisher stars as Rebecca Bloomwood in Walt Disney Pictures' 'Confessions of a
Shopaholic.'


job of playing Bloomwood.
The Australian actress
showed great comic skills in
"The Wedding Crashers."
She also proved she could
handle romantic comedy
with her work in "Definitely,
Maybe." In both cases she
had better material.
The mangled script by
Tracey Jackson, Tim Firth
and Kayla Alpert relies heav-
ily on physical comedy. Look
how funny it is when
Rebecca tries to steal back a
mailed letter. Isn't she just a
hoot dancing so silly? Aren't
the scenes with the shopa-
holic support group hilari-
ous? The answers: seen it,
not in the least, and you have
to be kidding.
The most embarrassing
moments involve Joan
Cusack and John Goodman
as Rebecca's parents. Both
are funny actors. They
shouldn't be reduced to try-
ing to milk sight gags out of
driving an RV.
"The Devil Wears Prada"
showed it was possible to be
stylish and funny. The fash-
ion industry is rife with pos-
sibilities for lampooning.
Just having Leslie Bibb, who
plays Rebecca's chief roman-
tic rival, be thin and snooty
isn't enough. Wendy Malick,


who's wasted in this film, did
a better job with a similar
character on "Just Shoot
Me."
Every aspect of this movie
hap been done better else-


where. Hogan should have
been more confident in the
intelligence of the source
material. His direction
results in a major fashion
faux. pas.


Teenage girl second-


guesses engagement-


to impatient beau


Dear Abby: I am
16 but will be 17 in
a few months. I
have known my
boyfriend,
"Gabriel," for two.
years. He is my
first boyfriend.
After four
months of dating, Deal
Gabriel has asked
me to marry him,
and I said yes. He had been
hinting about an engage-
ment, and I didn't have the
heart to say otherwise.
Gabriel is very dear to me,
but I keep hearing people
say, "Keep your options
open." I told Gabriel that I
am young (he's 18), and I
want to take it slowly, but he
says if I break up with him
to date other guys, he will
never date me again.
Abby, I want to make sure
Gabriel is the person I want
to spend the rest of my life
with. Sometimes I wish I
hadn't started dating him �
because I feel too young to
be engaged or married. I
love Gabriel dearly. I don't
want to break his heart or
mine. I am also scared I
might mess up this relation-
ship. What should I do to
make myself believe that I
have found my true love?'
- Stuck in Oklahoma
Dear Stuck: You should
have been absolutely honest
with Gabriel from the begin-
ning. When you have found
your own true love, you
won't have to "make your-
self" believe it. You will
know it.
Gabriel is pressuring you
because he is afraid if you
start dating- others he won't
measure up. For both your
sakes, tell him that you are
not ready to make the kind
of commitment he is
demanding. He may not like
hearing it, but it is the truth.
You won't break his heart,
and once you have done it,
you will feel a sense of
relief.

Dear Abby: My husband
and I have been married
almost five years. Our wed-
ding present from his sister
and her husband - who owns
a video production company
- was supposed to be-our







On February 14
Stop in for a Sweetheart of a Deal
Buy 2 admissions & receive $2 Off.
Buy 2 med. drinks & receive a med.
popcorn for $2.00
HOTEL FOR DOGS G
1:00 3:30 7:15 9:30
FRIDAY THE 13TH R
1:00 1:55 3:20 4:45 5:40
7:15, 8:00 9:40 10:20 12:00
MY BLOODY VALENTINE
3-D R
1:15 4:30 7:15 9:40
MALL COP PG
1:15 4:30 7:30 9:45
PINK PANTHER 2 PG
1:30 4:00 7:00 10:00
CORALINE 3D PG
1:30 4:15 7:00 9:30
PUSH PG13
1:00 4:00 7:00 10:00
DEFIANCE R
1:00 4:00 7:00 10:00


Classified ads
get results!
Call 385-6155


Abby


wedding video.
Abby, we still
have not received it
or seen it. We have
asked for it many
times, and his
answer is always,
"I'm working on
it." It's really sad. I
now have two chil-
drent and this has


Become a sore sub-
ject. What can I do to get it
without causing any more -
drama in the family?
- Yearning to See It in
New Orleans
Dear Yearningt What can
you do to get it? Forget it!
Either the video was lost or
something went wrong with *
the camera during your wed-
ding, and your brother-in-
law didn't have the courage
to fess up. Shame on him.

Dear Abby: I am con-
fused. What is the rule of
etiquette for buying.drinks
these days? I feel as though I
am required to buy drinks'
for women whenever I am
out, but I can't afford to
keep this up. I'm afraid if I
don't offer, I will be regard-
ed as cheap.'
I'm not dating anyone, but
I still feel like it.is my
"macho duty" whenever I'm
out with female friends or
meeting women. What is the
acceptable social protocol?
- J.G. in College
Station, Texas
Dear J.G.: Things have
changed a lot over the last
20'years or so. Many women
prefer to buy their own
drinks these days. While it is
sweet of you to offer, you
are under no social obliga-
tion to do so. My advice to
you is to be less quick on the
draw.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail
Van Buren, also known as
Jeanne Phillips, and was found-
ed by her mother, Pauline
Phillips. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or PO. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069





New Dolby Digitaloun








THE INTERNATIONAL R
(Clive Owen, Naomi Watts)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
HE'S JUST NOT THAT
INTO YOU PGI3
(Scarlen Johanson, Justin Long)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
TAKEN PG
(Liam Neeson. Maggie Grace)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
THE UNINVITED PG13
(Ehrabeth Banks)
2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15
GRAN TORINO R
fClInt Eastwood)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
Coming Soon:


SULDOKLA
Fun By The
2 6 1 Numbers
6 4 Like puzzles?
- - -Then you'll love
8 sudoku. This
mind-bending
6 puzzle will have
Syou hooked from
8 5 1 the moment you
square off, so
3 9 7 2 sharpen your
pencil and put
7 8 4 .your sudoku
71 8 4 savvy to the test
9 1 2 7
5 2
Level: Intermediate
Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each
row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzlel

L 9 8. L 9 L 6 t
6 t Z l. L 9

t 9 EL 9 9 6

9 7 91I. 6 C 9 L
ST L 6 9 9 11 I-
S 1 9 E Z L 6 9
:H3MSNV







PAGE


n6 ..........


News-Sun.
News-Sun


CLASSIFIED


Religion


PAGE 9B

Friday, February 13, 2009


Saf. ,. , ;...a. , ,
-' , r.' ..1',-h%


Simprle!O carrle anrd gifts that get to the heart of the matler frorn FamiyFun magazine


This paper airplane card flies incredibly well
and is so easy to make. Simply print our air-
plane template and the folding instructions
from FamilyFun.com (search for .J
"'plane awesome"). Write your
message as shown, roll both
Sprintouts into a scroll
and tie them with 4I A/
a ribbon. '
^& T


A- RM' .. . . . .
... ... -A jA bo of conversation art and two lf
, "- . -- ,'peinit butter _c ps In d sgie ift a ttl .
right ,htes :or e & ohi ltt6r Qr
.. .. ... ',"'.(-+''.. ' The;t . 'e . .fron'-Granti(lEB-ia
SNeb.,-r'mlomLia 1lnipAsfdaltBl.,'
S' to tersAn, Ana, 14, a; n ifari a ,. iiiter , i,-
a new way to tellfrlertw 'sY "Xiu k
S: Tape each end of a pidte of.string
. .' to a peanut butterli .' T eon the other
S. piece of string midway between the can-
dies, then tape the Iod.end :t taoW bb
"^ - " ^ * ' ,; , * .. .. . Wrap e^.h.... t . . -r'. nm *p.-

Sd ' secure It with.' ag e t -;'
S heet. a;dpaYpe pes a I " i"
,_I e : ' ..._." . "".. ,li.t (or do n .
I.bnittbps ' :l .... '-' . ,^ oa om ; +oni, -^ t-. * --
mqc) o0tWration hearts EuillyFun.
Scire iSf ~iuimiium foilt , O); usd
at l2^1e^ pink.f-paper u~sU to k'
l -I ' attach e -.
:p, _iptntir paper or printable. :'the bOe. Wrie a,
NOW l-i"f1om FamHyFun;lCom-' el ms ' �'
4aW "o- n ... .; ; ,.
;" of o ' ' ' '


''.44
9


On Feb. 14, 6-year-old Quinlan Adams
of Scottsbluff, Neb., gives his teachers
a big round of applause and a little
luxury: a tube of hand lotion. To
make a gift like Quinlan's, trace
your hand on card stock. Cut out
the traced hand and use it as a tern-
t ite to make a second hand. Write
mgeW with marker. Affix the
a sa-be of lotion and add card
eawith double-sided tape.


CLaP HaPPY


GET

To THE

POINT
f lPencil in your
sentiments with
this super-easy -
and practical -
valentine gift. To
make one, cut a
43/4- by 1 /2-inch
strip of card stock,
roll one end
around the
top of a pen-
cil and
secure it
with double-
sided tape.
Draw on hearts
or tape on card
stock ones, then
write your message
with marker.


SUGGESTED MESSAGES:
"Valentine, I a door you."
"Peek-a-boo! I like you!"
"House it going, bud?"