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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00130
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Creation Date: October 30, 2005
Publication Date: 1988-
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:00130
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

Full Text





HIGHLANDS COUNTY'S HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1927






ews =Sun


754


* October 30, 2005


COMING
WEDNESDAY IN
THE NEWS-SUN


Making casseroles
rich in flavor

WHAT'S INSIDE


DIGGING DEEP
Tuffley shovels
his way out of
a grave
Business, 13A


HAUNTINGS
Spooky
findings found
in local area
Lifestyle, 1C


Arts and Leisure
Business
Classified ads
Commission agenda
Community briefs
Dear Abby
Editorial
Flash from the Past
Lifestyle
Lottery numbers
Obituaries
School menus
-Sports
Stocks


3C
13A
1B
6A
9A
2C
2D
6A
1C
9A
4A
8A
1E
14A


TODAY'S FORECAST
Highs

80s


Complete
weather
report on
page 12A.


Lows

60s


CONTACTS

Avon Park (8631) 452-1009
Sebring (863) 385-6155
Lake Placid (863) 465-0426
Fax (863) 385-1954
E-mail editor@newssun.com
Online www.newssun.com



90994 0100
SEBRING, FLORIDA
VOLUME 24/NUMBER 23


KATARA SIMMONS/News-Sun
A group of 1-)ear-olds with First Baptist Church Preschool take a stroll Friday morning during
Harvester Treats in downtown Sebring. The trick or treating event was sponsored by the Downtown
Merchants & Professionals Association. See more Halloween-themed pictures on page ID. By now, every-
one should have set their clocks back one hour for the end of Daylight Savings Time.


High oil profits



draw little



local reaction
By PHIL ATTINGER
News-Sun
SEBRING - Local officials did not want to pass judgment
Friday upon hearing how an oil company broke record sales at,
$100 billion.
Exxon Mobil Corporation announced third-quarter earnings:
of almost $10 billion Thursday, and sales hitting $100 billion,'
the first publicly-held company to have such high sales.
Anglo-Dutch competitor Royal Dutch Shell PLC wasn't far
behind, posting a profit of $9 billion for the quarter.
Locally, government officials have noticed the high prices,
and recent drops, in pricing, but have withheld judgment on'
whether companies were acting responsibly.
Highlands County Commissioner Bob Bullard, traveling to
Tallahassee Friday, said he witnessed some disparity in gaso-'
line retail'prices throughout Central Florida. In Clermont, he&
found gasoline for $2.53, despite the area having fuel taxes'
similar to Sebring, where fuel prices were about $2.79.
When Bullard researched the issue almost two years ago, he
talked with Highlands County retailers about lowering their
prices. He found out they don't actually make a high profit off
their fuel. What's more, their prices are set further up the chain,
such as with oil companies, the ports or the distributors.
"If someone's jacking it up artificially, it's not the local
See OIL, page 11A



Dilley & Son


Nursery hit hard
By PHIL ATTINGER
News-Sun
AVON PARK - Dilley & Son Nursery Inc., which grows
nearlyb one third of the citrus industry's nursery trees each year,
may end up losing every one of its. 1.2 million budded trees.
Three canker-infected trees - one on the west side and two
on the north - have condemned the whole nursery.
Roland Dilley, 76, has growers asking for trees he can't
deliver. The canker find came in time to stop an order of plas-
tic sheeting for one greenhouse, daughter-in-law Linda Dilley
said, but just one day after they received an expensive order of
Canadian peat soil.
'This is a sad time," Roland Dilley said.
They would like to'save their budwood - buds kept for
grafts - which were kept in a greenhouse. If the state of
Florida finds no canker and lets them keep the buds as grafts
for citrus trees, they could be the only resupply source for cer-
tain varieties.
"Had we not got hit, we would have moved a lot of grape-
fruit," Linda Dilley said.
If not, the nursery will be out of business, unable to grow
any citrus at the Avon Park location for two years.
See DILLEY, page 11A


National Guard at Sebring to help storm victims


Black Hawk
flying to survey
affected areas
By PHIL ATFlNGER
News-Sun
SEBRING . - Firemen's
Field and fairgrounds not only
has played host to a unit from
the U.S. National Guard, it also
became a heliport Friday for a
Black Hawk assigned to survey
hurricane-damaged areas.
First Sgt. Cesar Martinez,
with the U.S. Army National
Guard 2-116 Field Artillery,
said the helicopter was there
along with Deputy Brig. Cmdr.
Col. Richard Gallant, of the
53rd Infantry Brigade. They
surveyed damage and recovery
in southern Highlands County,
along with Glades and
Okeechobee counties.
It's a slow process getting
hurricane-hit areas back on
their feet, but it's showing
progress, Martinez said.
He actually only lives four
miles away from Firemen's
Field. He'd like to be done this
weekend so he can take his chil-


dren trick-or-treating for
Halloween. He doesn't think
that will happen.
His unit would have gone
with the rest of the 2-116
Battalion to Afghanistan had it
not already served a tour of
duty in Iraq.
After serving, they came,
back with only a matter of
weeks before hurricanes
Charley, Frances, Ivan, Jeanne,
Dennis, and now Wilma hit
Florida.
"We didn't make the outfit
for Katrina," Martinez said.
"We were slotted to go in mid-
October, but we got downsized
(from) that."
Downsizing is what's going
on right now with the National
Guard, he said, as most of the
heavily hit areas are recovering.
With last year's hurricanes, a lot
of residences were hit, he said,
but this year it's infrastructure:
Power, phone and water lines.
Traveling around the area,
especially right after the storm,
he saw flooding and water dam-
age on the south end of lakes
Okeechobee and Istokpoga.
Moore Haven was hit hard, but


KATARA SIMMONS/News-Sun
United States Army Sgt. Ronald Evans Jr. landed a Black Hawk Friday morning at Firemen's Field in
Sebring. He and Deputy Brig. Cmdr. Col. Richard Gallant are surveying damage and recovery in south-
ern Highlands County, as well as in Glades and Okeechobee counties.


not nearly as hard as Clewiston,
which is not actually part of the
area his unit is helping.
Those areas are recovering,


he said, very well now that
power has been restored.
Schools there will start back
Monday. Businesses in


Okeechobee County are open.
There are no lines at gasoline
See HELP, page 11A


$UNDAY


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News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


Dual taxation continues



to concern city council


By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
News-Sun
AVON PARK - At the
Thursday night's city council
special meeting, members con-
tinued to express concern over
'the issue of dual taxation.
Currently, city residents pay
an ad valorem tax of $7.75 for
every $1,000 of the assessed
value of real estate.
At the same time they pay the
county $9 for every $1,000 of
assessed real estate.
In other words, city residents
pay a larger amount to the
county government than they
do to their city government.
According to City Manager
C.B. Shirey, the county collect-
ed $1,537,000.09 from Avon
Park residents in the last fiscal
year.
The city council is concerned
because the. city provides the
majority of the services its resi-
dents rely upon - for example
fire protection and law enforce-
ment to name two.
Members wonder why resi-
dents would pay more to the


county government, when it is
the city government that carries
the primary responsibility and
cost for local services.
They were concerned enough
to recently pass a resolution
asking the county commission
to look into the matter.
The county commission had
been going to address the issue
in last Tuesday's commission
meeting, but that discussion had-
to be postponed due to pressing
business caused by Hurricane
Wilma. It has been rescheduled
for this Tuesday's meeting.
The city council is not opti-
mistic.
The county doesn't think this
is an issue, Shirey said. "I'm 99
percent sure their finding of fact
will state this."
The difficulty facing the
council is what action to take,
or if they should take any action
at all.
In order to prove dual taxa-
tion, the city would have. to
conduct studies that would
include examining county


books. Expensive and difficult
legal action would be neces-
,sary, Shirey explained. "Do you
spend more than you gain?"
"This is not a time for a deci-
sion, but time for talk," council
member George Hall said
Thursday night. "Let the county
go on record. The county's
numbers are skewed. The coun-
ty lumps outside people into the
city when it suits their purpose,
and cuts them out likewise."
In one specific example,
members wondered outloud
about possible adaptations.
For example, city residents
currently help fund the sheriff's
road patrol through the county
portion of their property taxes.
"If we got out of the police
business, and negotiate with the
sheriff (to provide law enforce-
ment services to the city), there
you are, $1.3 million in the
good. That would be easier than
passing dual taxation year after
year - a reason to do away
with dispatch for example,"
Mayor Tom Macklin said.


ALICE FLETCHER/News-Sun
Thursday's final night for making the semifinals for Heartland Idol found (from left) Tiffany
Howard, Maria Barrera, Frank Hardy, Niedrana King and Jennifer Altman the winners to
advance to this coming Thursday's elimination, taking the 20 semifinalists down to 10. The new
Heartland Idol will be named Saturday, Nov. 12, at the Highlands Art League Festival. Barrera is
hoping to keep up the family tradition of being named a winner. Her younger sister, Deanna
Barrera, was named co-Junior Idol earlier this year.


Canker a bigger concern


from Wilma than fruit loss


,, 5 r ". - . . -



HIGRHANDS

in bdei

Where to give
storm relief
If anyone is interested in
assisting those most affect-
ed by Hurricane Wilma,
the following are organiza-
tions providing aid to the
e victims of die t.ourm
Initial. reports indiicate-
- th foll.Qwing Public Risk .
Management of Florida
members had storm dam-
age. While FEMA is pro-
.viding ice and water, these
PRM members are in need
of food, toiletries, baby
food, diapers, etc.
Significant damage was
seen in the cities of Belle
Glade,'Clewiston, Moore
Haven and Pahokee.
Other areas needing
help, according to
Highlands County Public
Information Officer Corine
Burgess, include: Glades
County, Hendry County,
Lake Placid, Lee County
Port Authority,
Okeechobee"City,
Okeechobee County and
South Florida
Conservancy.
Society set for
festival
.The Humane Society of,
Highlands County help cel-
ebrate in Highlands
Hammock State Park's
CCC Festival Saturday.
Tickets will be available
for the drawing of the
hand-made quilt and the
holiday baskets.


SFCC registration


begins Tuesday


Special to the News-Sun Registration begins for new stu-
AVON PARK - South dents, transfer students, and
Florida Community College is students who are returning after-
ready to begin registering stu- an absence of one semester or
dents for the 2006 Spring Term. more., They must register in
Students can register at person and bring their college
Building B at the Highlands transcripts.
Campus in Avon Park, at the ' Monday, Nov. 28 - Open
DeSoto and Hardee Campuses, registration begins for all stu-
and at the Lake Placid Center. dents, including transient, dual
Registrations for college credit enrolled, and those not seeking
courses and other selected a degree.
courses are accepted 24 hours a Tuition must be paid at the
day over the Internet at Panther time of registration. Students
Access Web Services (PAWS). receiving financial aid may use
Visit the Web site at the PAWS online network to
wai n' oi lthl ,.t it ,it aind click" . check thetr sltiS. .
on the link"'o.P.A VS .., tthehot-.1 Kn .e-jeUou oplais, 1h.
6.4,ni*of the page_... . . -. . �- RePIrtiar- . O( fice . .' ill A. ke
Registration dates are as fol- walk-in registrations 8:30 a.m.
lows: to 6 p.m., Monday through
* Tuesday - Registration Thursday, and 8:30 a.m. to 4
begins for returning students p.m. Friday. On Monday, Nov.
who have completed 40 or 21, registration hours will be 1-
more semester hours. 6 p.m. The Registration Office
* Friday - Registration will be closed Dec. 16-Jan. 4,
begins for returning students although students can continue
who have completed 20-39 to access PAWS during that
semester hours. time.
* Wednesday, Nov. 9 - Registration ends Jan. 8. This
Registration begins for return- will also be the final day to
ing students who have complet- drop a class and receive a full
ed fewer than 20 semester refund. Spring term classes
hours. begin Jan. 9.
* Monday, Nov. 14 - The Spring term Schedule of
Report warned FPL Classes is available at any
Report warned FPL SFCC Campus or Center and at
AssociatedPress the PAWS online network. For
MIAMI - A report by reg- more information, call 453-
ulators issued in July said 6661, 465-5300, 773-2252, or
Florida Power & Light was not 494-7500.
doing enough to inspect utility.
poles, possibly allowing the
creaky and rotting to slip "The Card Shoppe"-N
through the cracks. GREETING CARDS
Many of the utility's 1 mil- for, 100
lion wood poles snapped dur-
ing Wilma's high winds. More d geg
than a third of the its cus- 385-5884
tomers, about 1.7 million, were _ __
still without power Friday, four
days after the storm hit. .
The report by the state
Public Service Commission N
said the utility may not be con-
ducting enough inspections.


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By PHIL ATTINGER
News-Sun
SEBRING - Southern
Highlands County citrus grow-
ers with heavy fruit losses from
Hurricane Wilma may yet lose
several hundred acres of trees to
canker.
That's the big concern,
according to Ray Royce, execu-
tive director of the Highlands
County Citrus Growers
Association Inc. Growers are
concerned about' how much
crop they have lost, but they
won't know how many standing
trees have canker until the dis-
ease begins to develop in a few
months.
After last year's hurricanes,
Highlands County growers lost
11 percent of their trees to
canker. Wilma was a huge
iorn and co% ered a large area.
.. Thepennal for spread ..was
Sprety .lar.g ..,Ro.c, iid: . .
.-That �i-'ur niiln -oncein."
Royce said. "We don't want to
lose another 11-12 percent."
Royce doesn't know yet if


there will be a relief program
similar to last year.. He's
encouraging growers to report
their losses to the local Florida
Farm Service office.
Fruit loss
In the bulk of the county, he
said, fruit losses are relatively
light at about 5 percent. In the.
southern and southeastern
areas, Royce has had reports of
50-75 percent losses.
"I have, not personally been
out to the locations and seen for
myself," Royce said, but added.
that people have reported being
hit hard.
Dan Phypers on State Road
70 reported losing 75-80 per-
cent of his grapefruit crop,
Royce said, and as much as 40-
50 percent of his early season
oranges. Other growers in the
State Road 70 and Kissimmee
Ri\er area hale reghaepr losing
ad, mtjh" o morethn iherdid
in lait )ear'-s humcanes -"-
It depends on the variety of
the fruit and its location, Royce
said. If it was close to harvest,


the fruit were ready to fall. Still,
there are no official loss num-
bers for the state. Growers are
still waiting for the U.S.
Department of Agriculture to
make an official determination.
One saving grace, Royce
said, is they may be able to sal-
vage the dropped fruit:Valencia
won't be salvageable, but crews
are trying to get up the grape-
fruit and Hamlins (early season
oranges) and take them to juice
plants in time.
The fruit will have to meet
state maturity standards, Royce
said. Once fruit is on the ground
for more than a week, it loses its
quality, then it's too late.
Last year, fruit stayed on the
ground in summer swelter and-
floodwaters while growers and
residents tried to clear debris
from roads and buildings. This
S'ear had a cold front bringing
"oolebr-dtiaa-,nd inosi ofthe
fruit has matured
In Glades, Hendry and
Collier counties, growers have
had significant losses.


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News-Sun, Sunday. October 30, 2005 3A











News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


Left turn

causes wreck

at U.S. 27,

Vicki Drive

By PHIL ATTINGER
News-Sun
SEBRING - U.S. 27 and
Vicki Drive, the site of a triple-
fatality wreck two years ago,
had another two-car wreck
Friday involving 9 left-hand
turn from the northbound lanes.
Fortunately, this time, no one
was killed. Although two were
hospitalized with serious
injuries, both were treated and
released. Everyone was wear-
ing a seat belt.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol, Alfred L.
Anna, 81, of Lake Placid, driv-
ing a 2004 Toyota van tried to
make that turn at 4:06 p.m.
Friday into Lakeshore Mall in
Sebring.
At the same time, however,
Norman D. Conley, 53, of Lake
Placid, and his passengers
Deborah Conley, 51, and a 10-
year-old girl from Hollywood,
were heading southbound into
the intersection in a 1995 Ford
van.
FHP reported the Anna hit
the left front side of the Ford.
Both vehicles came to a rest in
the southbound lanes. - ,
Anna and Deborah Conley
both were taken to Highlands
Regional Medical Center,
where they were treated and
released.
FHP cited Anna with making
a left turn into approaching
traffic.
The wreck occurred just two
days and a few hours short of
the second anniversary of a
fatal wreck at the same inter-
section, under similar circum-
stances. That wreck killed two
southbound teenagers and the
driver of the second turning
vehicle. A passenger in the sec-
ond car survived.
Just before 7:30 p.m. on Oct.
31, 2003, a F-150 Sport was hit
by a GMC Sonoma that was
turning left into Lakeshore
Mall. Driver Michael David
Albin, 17, died on the scene
after he was ejected from his
seat.
Albin's passenger, 17-year-
old Derrick Raposa, and the
other driver, 77-year-old
Slayton Willis Matthews Jr.,
later died from their injuries.
The only survivor of that
wreck was Matthews' passen-
ger, 14-year-old Anthony
Matthews.
A memorial to Albin, a deco-
rated cross draped in an athlet-
ic jersey, still stands at that cor-
ner, on Lakeshore Mall proper-
ty. Albin's parents, Mike and
Lisa Albin, have asked the
Florida Department of
Transportation to look into
whether or not the intersection
is as safe as it can be.
They and other concerned
citizens have blamed the 2003
wreck on poor visibility and
need for a more restrictive left-
turn traffic signal. After study-
ing it, FDOT has refused to
alter the signal.
In February 2005, County
Engineer Ramon Gavarrete
reported that his department
plans to offset turn lanes at
Vicki Drive, making them more
like those at Howey Road. The
proposed change should give
left-turning motorists a better
view of oncoming traffic.


SEBI
863/38


RALPH BUSH
Publisher


OBITUARIES


Kathy Delaney
Kathy Lee Delaney, 51 of
Sebring, died Oct. 27, 2005, in
Sebring.
Born in Marietta, Ohio, she
came to Sebring in the mid
1970s from Fort Lauderdale.
She was a secretary and
attended the Nazarene Church
of Sebring.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Mathew. of Lake Placid;
parents, Irene and Jack Tabor of
Lake Placid; sons, Sean
Hawker of Bonita Springs and
Michael Bennett of Gainesville;
daughters, Erin Bennett of
Gainesville, Cathy Keck of
Lake Placid and Suzanne
Delaney of Orlando; brothers,
Rick Sampson of Ohio and
Gary Sampson of Lake Placid;
sisters, Vicki Urquisa and
Debra Hanmonds, both of Lake
Placid; and four grandchildren.
A memorial service will be at
11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, at the
Church of the Nazarene in Lake
Placid, with Pastor Tim Taylor
officiating.
Arrangements are being han-
dled by Chandler Funeral
Home, Lake Placid.

Joy Fasnacht
Joy (Elaine) Fasnacht, 90, of
Sebring, died Oct. 21, 2005, in
Sebring.
Born in Beatrice, Neb., she
had been a resident of Sebring
for the past several years.


She was a missionary for the


SFCC dental program gets teaching chair endowed


The idea of endowed teach-
ing chairs at community col-
leges came from research chairs
at universities.
"They attract high quality
faculty, high quality students,
and it honors great work done
by faculty members," said Don
Appelquist, executive director
of South Florida Community
College Foundation.
To that end, the Highlands
County Health Facilities
Authority has endowed the first
fully funded teaching chair in
dental education at South.
Florida Community College.
The HCHFA's donation of
$60,000 over three years is eli-
gible to be matched by the
Philip A. Benjamin Academic
Improvement Trust Fund at $4
for every $6 raised locally.
Therefore, the donation is eligi-
ble to be matched by $40,000,
creating a teaching endowment
of $100,000.
According to Appelquist,
"The money is invested, and the
earnings on that endowment
provide a stipend to the desig-
nated occupant of that chair.
This enables us to give $5,000
to a designee. The purpose of an
endowed chair in teaching is to
attract and keep the highest
qualified faculty that we can
find. It is expected that the hon-
oree will use the funds to
improve a program. For
instance, they may be used for
equipment, professional devel-
opment, or to attend a confer-
ence."
The teaching chair in dental
education is important to SFCC
and its dental hygiene and den-
tal assisting students for a vari-
ety of reasons.
"There is a shortage of dental
education instructors across
Flogida," said Becky' Sroda,
director of SFCC Dental
Education. "The additional
stipend allows instructors to
attend staff development pro-
grams in which they would not
otherwise be able to participate,


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863-465-4134


and it funds projects that pro-
mote, student achievement.
above and beyond what is usu-
ally offered. The instructor can
provide enrichment in the class-
room and a greater connection
with the community. The extra
compensation sends the mes-
sage to a potential applicant that
both SFCC and the community
are committed to producing
graduates who will provide the
highest quality health care in
the state."
In fact, the American Dental
Association Council on Dental
Accreditation maintains strict
standards, indicating that'facul-
ty must have a minimum of a
bachelor's degree, master's
degree preferred, and that the
instructor to student ratio
should be one to six.
"We're currently functioning


with one less instructor," Sroda
said. "We're recruiting for
someone who is highly quali-
fied. With the endowed chair,
more qualified applicants will
be attracted to the open position
and will desire to settle in our
community.
"The ability of SFCC's
Dental Education instructors is
reflected in the quality of our.
graduates. It is our intention to
be one of the best programs in
the nation. However, we need
the best instructors to reach this
goal."
SFCC's two-year associate in
applied science degree program
in dental hygiene started in
August 2003 and accepts 12
students every fall term. The
college's 11-month vocational
certificate program in dental
assisting began in August 2003
and accepts 12 students every
fall term.


News-Sun
2227 U.S. 27 South
Sebring, Florida 33870
RING LAKE PLACID AVON
5-6155 863/465-0426 863/45:


Fax: 385-1954
ROMONA WASHINGTON
Executive Editor


CRAIG SUTTER
Production Director
The News-Sun (ISSN 0163-3988), a HarborPoint Media publication is pub-
lished every Wednesday,, Friday and Sunday by the Sebring News-Sun Inc. at
2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. Periodicals Postage Paid at Sebring,
FL. The contents of this publication are the property of the News-Sun Inc. and
are protected by the copyright laws of the United States. They may not be
reproduced, in whole or in part, without the prior written permission of the
News-Sun.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the News-Sun, 2227 U.S.
27 South, Sebring, FL 33870
CIRCULATION
SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not
receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circula-
tion department before 11 a.m. on publication days and a replacement copy
will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after 11 a.m., will receive
credit to their account. Please call 385-6155, 452-1009, or 465-0426.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES 12 mo. 7% Fla. tax Total
HOME DELIVERY $47.50 $3.33 $50.83
IN FLORIDA MAIL 78.00 5.46 83.46
OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL 78.00 78.00
FOREIGN MAIL 105.00 105.00
Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on
Thursday for the Friday edition and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after
the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.


Church of the Brethren in west-
ern India for nearly 40 years.
Survivors include her sons,
Robert Paul of Pensacola and
Dean Merrill of Seattle, Wash.;
six grandchildren; and seven
great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be from 2-4
p.m. Sunday at Morris Funeral
Chapel in Sebring. A funeral
service will follow at 10 a.m.
Monday at Sebring Church of
the Brethren, with the Rev.
Cecil Hess officiating.
Interment will follow in
Pinecrest Cemetery in Sebring.
Memorial contributions may
be made to Church of the.
Brethren General Board, 1451
Dundee Ave., Elgin, Ill. 60120,
designated to Rural Service
Center.

Michael Muskin
Michael Richard Muskin, 90,
of Avon Park, died Oct. 28,
2005, in Avon Park.
Born in Jersey City, N.J., he
had been a resident of Avon
Park since 2000, coming from
Sarasota.
He was an accountant in agri-
culture.
Survivors include his son,
Michael R. Jr. of
f Mountainview, Calif. and
daughter, Kim of Avon Park.
Cremation arrangements
were handled by Stephenson-
Nelson Funeral Home, Avon
Park.


Lewis Pickett
Lewis Spencer
Pickett, 88, of
Crystal River, died
Oct. 27, 2005, in Crystal River.
Born in Callahan, he moved
to Highlands County in 1918.
He graduated from Sebring
High School in 1936.
He served in the United
States Army during World War
II. He moved to Avon Park in
1944, where he was a building








Kenneth S. Coftle
Kenneth S. Cottle age 78 of Sebring
died, Saturday, Oct. 22nd at The
Oaks of Avon in Avon Park. He
was bor in Portsmouth, OH
moving to Sebring in 1985 from
Cambridge, OH. He served in the
U.S. Navy and attended Ohio
State. He was a retired Ohio State
Trooper, member of VF.W. Post
#5356, Clairsville, OH and Elks
Lodge #1699, Bamrnesville, OH and
Sebring Municipal Golf Association.
He is survived by his companion,
Margaret Mercure, Sebring; sons -
Wayne Cottle, Cambridge, OH and
Craig Cottle, Sebring; daughters -
Dawn Cottle, Robin Cottle both of
Cambridge, OH and Leanne
Cottle-Kimbler, Columbus, OH;
brother - Ray Cottle, Anniston,
AL; four grand children and three
great grandchildren. Services will be
in Wheelersburg, Ohio with burial
at the Old Wheelersburg Cemetery.


contractor for 30 years. He was
a member of Florida Avenue
Baptist Church in Avon Park.
Survivors include his sister,
Louise Smoak of Sebring; four
grandchildren; four great-
grandchildren; and two great-
great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be from 11
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday at
Stephenson-Nelson Funeral
Home in Avon Park. A grave-
side service will follow at 1
p.m. at Bougainvillea Cemetery
in Avon Park, with the Rev.
R.L. Polk officiating.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the Hospice of
Citrus County, call (352) 527-
2020.

F. Eugene Waite
F. Eugene (Gene)
Waite, 82, formerly
of Sebring, died Oct.
26, 2005, in Jacksonville.
Born in Renovo, Pa., he
moved to Sebring in 1971,
coming from Harrisburg, Pa.
He was former owner of
WSEB-AM (WCAC-WITS),
Sebring, from 1971 to 1973. He
retired as manager of Fairmount
Cinema 6, Sebring. He served
in the United States Army in the
Rhineland Campaign
(Germany) and Occupation
Forces in Japan during World
War II. He was a Past Master of
Sebring Masonic Lodge 248
Free and Accepted Masons. He
was a member of Zion Lutheran
Church in Renovo, Pa.
Survivors include his daugh-
ter, Sharon S. Stesen of
Jacksonville; son, Barry of
Sebring; three grandchildren;
and two great-grandchildren.
Interment will be in Bay
Pines National Cemetery.
Memorial contributions may
be made to any hospice organi-
zation.
Arrangements were handled
by Morris Funeral Chapel,
Sebring.

In Loving Memory
Derek James Raposa
May 5, 1986
November 1, 2003









It's year number TWO
and we are forever missing you.

The Earth is not the same
without your smile and laughter
yet we carry it in our heart
forever after

There is no day that goes by
where your not on our minds,
as we long for your presence
in anyway or anytime.

Derek, I do not know if my
questions will ever go away
as to why, but I pray
that you are at peace with
the Lord in the Beautiful Blue Sky.
Love,
Aunts, Cousins, Uncles


Dousing a blaze


PHIL ATTrNGER/News-Sun
Firefighters with Sun 'N Lake and West Sebring volunteer fire-
fighters douse a blaze at 6:30 p.m. Friday through a hole in the
roof of 3831 Durango Ave. in the Sun 'N Lake of Sebring
Improvement District. According to firefighters, the fire
appeared to be electrical, accidental and centered just below
where the power line weather head met the roof. Progress
Energy had to cut power to the house so they could safely fight
the fire, and that left resident Deryck Taylor without lights.
Firefighters had to install a small blue tarp to protect his home
until it could be repaired.


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News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005 5A





Hybrids getting scarce as fuel prices spike


Toyota Prius sold

out; Ford Escape

sales up

By PHIL ATTINGER
News-Sun
SEBRING - Anyone shop-
ping for a new car this year may
have noticed it's getting harder
to find a hybrid.
They're out there, but since
the most recent spikes in gaso-
line prices, everyone seems to
want one.
Chris Wilson, fleet salesman
for Alan Jay Automotive
Network, said there has been
such a demand on retail sales
for the Toyota Prius, the
automaker has cut off govern-
ment orders.
He also sells a hybrid version
of the Chevrolet Silverado pick-
up, but it isn't as well known as
the Prius. When a Prius rolls


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK - The Mid-
Florida Center for Mental'
Health and Substance Abuse
Services, Inc. announces a new
grant award to offer substance
abuse, HIV and hepatitis pre-
vention services in Highlands,
Hardee and Polk counties in the
amount of approximately $1.25
million.
The award is from the
Substance Abuse and Mental
Health Services Administration
- Center for Substance Abuse
Prevention, a branch of the fed-
eral Department of Health and
Human Services, and calls for
prevention services for minori-
ty populations and minority re-
entry populations in communi-
ties of color. The agency will
receive roughly $250,000 annu-
ally for the next five years.
Mid-Florida is partnering
with local behavioral health and
faith-based organizations as


down the road, its distinct look
means people don't have to
look at the logo to tell it's a
hybrid.
Plus, it has had more press,
he said.
Alan Jay Automotive
Network has sold 300-400 since
the Prius first hit the market in
2001, Wilson said, which is
rather good for one model.
Right now, Alan Jay Imp ort
Center has about 12 people
waiting on a new Prius, accord-
ing to Danny Taub, import cen-
ter manager.
"We're not taking any more,"
he said.
He can't pinpoint when they
will be delivered.
Kevin Hendrix, new car sales
manager for Sebring Ford, said.
the Ford Escape hybrid sport-
utility vehicle also has been in
short supply.
"When they come, they go,"
he said.


KATARA SIMMONS/News-Sun
Rental agent James Box, of Alan Jay Auto Rental, points to the
Toyota Prius touch-screeni control panel, which displays fuel con-
sumption, energy flow and can switch to controls for air-condition-
ing or the stereo system. Box explained that another unique feature
of the hybrid car is a keyless ignition: The Prius starts with the push
of a button.


well as county departments of
health to establish prevention
initiatives and outreach servic-
es, primarily in communities of
color.
The grant award was based
on the agency's ability to
demonstrate .that persons of
color in the local communities
are at higher risk for substance
abuse and HIV and hepatitis,
when compared to national
rates for these problems. Mid-
Florida researched the data that
revealed significantly higher
rates in local communities of
substance abuse as well as HIV
and hepatitis infection, in com-
parison to similar communities
across the nation. The agency
and its partners have proposed a
variety of outreach activities,
and prevention strategies to
address the growing concern
over these public health con-
cerns.
Mid-Florida will target spe-


They have four people on the
waiting list, but they also have a
lot of people coming in looking
for the Ford Focus and other
-more gasoline efficient models,
such as the Ford 500 and the
soon to be released Ford Fusion
four-cylinder.
"When (Hurricane) Katrina
came in, we were flooded with
people," Hendrix said. "It
comes and goes with the weath-
er."
By 2010, he said, Ford hopes
to have seven or eight different
hybrid' models for people to
choose.
Toyota has begun to see
increased sales of the Corolla
and Camry, which will have its
own hybrid version by the end
of 2006.
Meanwhile, Honda has
begun aggressively promoting
the Civic hybrid, although there
are no local dealers for .that
model.
Why hybrid?
When a normal gasoline
engine car drives in traffic, the
engine is burning gasoline but
the car isn't moving. Mileage
goes way down.
With a hybrid, the gasoline
engine shuts off when the car
slows below a set speed, and an
electric engine takes over using
power from batteries. Once the
car gets going up to speed
again, the gasoline engine takes
over and the electric motor
stops using current and starts
making it, as a generator, to run
air-conditioning, computer sys-
tems and recharge the batteries
for the next stop.
Gasoline gets saved only for
highway driving, so'where a car


cial populations to include men
and women of color, specifical-
ly African-Americans, Hispan-
ics and Caribbean-Americans,
as well as youth and adoles-
cents re-entering the communi-
ty from jails, prisons and deten-
tion facilities.
The Mid-Florida Center has
a history of working with other
local organizations on the
development of prevention
services in the area and this is
its second grant award from the
Center for Substance Abuse
Prevention. In addition, the
agency offers a wide array of
behavioral health services.
Persons interested in partici-
pating in these new prevention
initiatives should contact
Arlene Alvarado, project direc-
tor, or Dr. Arthur Cox Sr., prin-
cipal investigator, at 452-6818
or plan to attend the committee
meeting at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 8, at the Sims-Cox Center.


Email: kochcon@strato. net State Certified License #CBC058444


KATARA SIMMONS/News-Sun
Dottie Posado, of Sebring, prepares to take off in her brand new Toyota Prius. 'I love it; it is so quiet,'
she said.


once got better mileage on the
open road, hybrids can boast
better fuel economy in town.
Hendrix said the Escape, an
SUV, can get 38 mpg in the city
and 31 mpg on the highway.
Dave Wilson, Chris' father,
with the Alan Jay rental office,
has two Toyota Prius models in
stock for people to try out. He
once took one to Savannah, Ga.,
and averaged 40 mpg.
Local owners have told the
News-Sun that they get as much
as 60 mpg driving around
Sebring.


Field study will take students to coral reefs


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK - A South
Florida Community College
marine biology course is taking
students out of the classroom
and into the coral reefs of the
Florida Keys. .. '
The Marine Biolog5 Field
Study, a first for SFCC, is being
held in conjunction with the
Newfound Harbor Marine
Institute, which sprawls across
the tip of Big Pine Key. On
Friday, Feb. 24, SFCC Biology
Professor Jay Zimmer and a
contingent of, students will
leave Highlands County for an


intense weekend of observing
offshore bank coral reefs, patch
reefs, coral heads, sponges, and
other sea life in their natural
environment. They will return
by early Monday, Feb. 27.
Fod pa~r"f the field study,
studeqt.s will take a pontoon
boattoI'the Looe Key National
Marine Sanctuary, a part of the
Florida Reef Tract that sits,
seven miles south of the
Institute. With depths ranging
2-60 feet, this particular tract is
known for exhibiting the classic
development patterns of coral
reefs.


Students will observe the
reefs by snorkeling, wading,
and canoeing. Along with expe-
riencing these delicate commu-
nities firsthand, they will learn
to identify fish and other marine
life that make the reefs their
home.
The rest of the time will be
spent conducting labs at the
Institute, Zimmer said.
"It will be a long weekend,"
Zimmer emphasized. "We'll
have two to three classes a day,
even in the evenings."
Coral reefs are known for
being sensitive indicators of the


health of the ocean. Zimmer
said he didn't expect that stu-
dents would see damage to the
reefs from Hurricane Wilma,
which avoided hitting the Keys
directly, but they might see a
condition called coral bleach-
ing, caused by hot ocean
waters.
The cost of $550 includes
food, housing and transporta-
tion. Students may bring their
own snorkeling gear and wet-
suits, or rent them from the
Institute.
Classified as a science lab,
the field study provides one
hour of college credit. It is open
to students who have completed
or are signed up to take SFCC's
Marine Biology Teleweb
Course, or who have the
instructor's permission.
Zimmer has been teaching
biology at SFCC for three
years. He has a bachelor of sci-
ence degree in Broad Field
'Science from the University of
Wisconsin-Stevens Point and' a
master's degree in Biology
from Purdue University. As a
teacher, he was selected to
spend more than a month study-
ing aboard a sailboat through
SEA Education, a teaching pro-
gram that operates from Woods
Hole, Mass.
For information, contact
Zimmer at 784-7449 or visit the
Web site at http://www.nhmi.
org.
Registration for students
returning to SFCC begins Nov.
1. Open registration begins
Nov. 28.


I VBirthday
na h will tie

- A i *ov- 1 ? Our 'i-ay
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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA

VICTORIA FRIEND and others, on her own behalf and on behalf of all .
other similarly situated individuals, Plaintiffs,
vs.
SUNSHINE COMPANIES, and others, Defendants.
Case No. GCG 2001-629.

NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT OF CLASS ACTION;
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF CLAIMS

To: All current or former leased employees of Sunshine Companies
whose covered claims under Fidelity Benefit or TRG healthcare
plans are still unreimbursed or unpaid.
The class action seeking reimbursement or payment of the covered
medical expenses described above has been settled. If you are an
eligible claimant, you may be entitled to reimbursement or payment of
your medical claims. If you have not previously registered, you may
obtain a claim form by contacting class counsel:


Robin Gibson or Robert A. Young
GIBSON, VALENTI & ASHLEY
212 East Stuart Avenue
Lake Wales, FL 33853


Phone:
Fax:
E-Mail:
Internet:
(Click on


(863) 676-8584
(863) 676-0548
Mail@GVALawyers.com
GVALawyers.com
"Sunshine Class Action")


The deadline for submission of a completed claim form is January
2, 2006. A claim form received after that date will be barred and will
not be considered for payment.


Agency receives $1.25 million


for various prevention services


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6A News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


County's school population continues to rise


Editor's note: The News-Sun
has been publishing news
about Highlands County since
1927. As a treat for our read-
ers, we have gone through our
archives and pulled some sto-
ries from previous issues that
we will share on future
Sunday. Sit back and enjoy
this Flash From the Past of
March 12, 1964.

Highlands County Board of
Public Instruction approved a
group of routine reports and
requests in a two-hour session
Tuesday night.
The reports included a six-
month's attendance report
which showed that the county
school's population is continu-
ing to climb.
At the end of the sixth
months of the 1963-64 school
year, enrollment stood at a new
high of 5,383. Average daily


attendance in the sixth months
was 5,058. In the same month
last year the average attendance
was 4,851.
Another report showed that
the county schools received 762
visitors on par-
ent-teacher con-
ference day Feb.
10. Teachers
reported a total
of 2,296 confer-
ences.
In Avon Park
the visitors
reported were
158 at Avon Elementary, 58 at
Avon Park High School, 81 at
Hopewell and 72 for E.O.
Douglas.
A bid committee reported on
proposed repairs to gymnasium
roofs at Avon Park, Sebring
High Schools and Lake Placid
School. The board voted to fol-
low the committee's recom-


Highlands County Commission Agenda
November 1, 2005


1. Meeting called to order
2. Invocation and Pledge of
Allegiance
3. Call for "Citizens not the
agenda" forms to be turned in
4. Announcements
A. Clerk
* Tuesday, 3 p.m.,
Highlands Soil and Water
Conservation District 3, Ag-
Center, 4509 George Blvd.
m Tuesday, 4 p.m., Hurricane
Wilma Post-Event Briefing,
Board room, 600 S. Commerce
Ave.
* Tuesday, 7 p.m.,
Construction Licensing,
Enforcement & Appeals Board
Board room, 600 S. Commerce


Ave.
* Wednesday, 10 a.m.,
911 Communications
Committee, Desoto City Fire
Station 19, 6800 W. George
Blvd.
5. Consent agenda
A.Request approval to pay
all duly authorized bills and
employee benefits Nov. 1.
B. Request approval of board
meeting minutes of Sept. 13,
20, 27, and Oct. 4, and 11.
C. Request approval to
declare attached County
Property as Surplus, waive two-
step Surplus Disposal process,
and allow said Surplus to be
disposed of by utilizing our


/
/1
V


mendation and advertise for
new bids while holding the bids
submitted by two firms late last
month.
The school board voted to
follow a committee's recom-
mendation that
r the county's pol-
icy on recency of
credit be revised.
T h
Superintendent
said the recom-
mended changes
will bring the
county's policy
in line with the state policy. The
new statement is more specific
about the requirements for
teachers earning additional col-
lege credits at regular intervals,
he said.
The board voted to extend for
another year its participation in
the newly formed regional film
library. The library, which was


contract with GovDeals an
Internet Auction service compa-
ny based out of Montgomery,
Alabama.
D. Request approval for
Satisfaction of Mortgage for
Donna Clute.
E. Request approval for
Satisfaction of Mortgage for
Betty Lee McNeil.
F. Request a a Release of
Nuisance for Case CE
02070090, 3217 Sonnett Road,
Sebring.
G. Request approval to
appoint Ann M. Berner to the
Children's Services Council as
a non-voting Associate
Member.
H, Request approval to
appoint Kathy Main as an
Honorary Member of the
Children's Services Council of


Phone increase goes into effect Tuesday


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press Writer
TALLAHASSEE -
Surrounded by such props as a
phone-clutching grim reaper,
tombstones, a bat and a rat, con-
sumer advocates, decried the
State's largest telephone rate
increase that will go into effect
Tuesday, a day after Halloween.
They said Thursday they will
push for repeal or modification
of a new law that allowed for
"The Nightmare on Phone
Street" and urged citizens to
vote against lawmakers who
passed the legislation. Gov. Jeb
Bush and other supporters say


the $344 million local service
increase will result in more
competition that will reduce
long-distance rates.
The Public Service
Commission, based on the leg-
islation, approved the increase
two years ago, but it was
delayed by a failed appeal to the
Florida Supreme Court by con-
sumer groups and Attorney
General Charlie Crist.
"There is something more
horrific than the monsters that
threaten to attack on
Halloween," said Walter
Dartland, executive director of
the Consumer Federation of the


Southeast and state chairman of
Common Cause. "The follow-
ing day is Nov. 1, which is the
most fearful monster of all."
On Tuesday, Florida's three
largest phone companies will
begin raising rates by about
$2.25 per month, but over the
next three to four years those
increases will to grow to $3.50
for BellSouth, $4.73 for
Verizon and $6.86 for Sprint,
said Bentley Lipscomb, Florida
AARP director.
The increase is one of many
that Floridians are facing for
gasoline, electricity, prescrip-
tion drugs, insurance, etc.


launched for the 1963-64 year.
pools the audio-visual resources
of the Hernando, Highlands,
Pasco and Polk County schools.
Highlands County's share of
the budget amounts to 25 cents
per student. The Superintendent
said the schools have been
enabled to have more audio-
visual materials at a smaller
cost to each county.
The board approved requests
for several school trips - for
exhibitors entering the regional
science fair at Wauchula, March
12-14; for any exhibitors who
may qualify to enter the state
science fair at Jacksonville,
April 1-4; for the E.O. Douglas
Band to participate in the Lily
White Parade at Tampa on April
19; and for the Douglas seniors
to visit Bethune-Cookman
College campus at Daytona
'Beach on March 25.


Highlands County for one year
ending Oct. 31, 2006
I. Request approval of
Resolutions and budget amend-
ments 05-06-18, 23, 24 and 25
6. Action
A. Lake Placid Chamber of
Commerce: Presentation of a
Spectrum Award to Bruce Van
Jaarsveld and Jack Bennett
B. Gabriel Read: Request
approval of a Proclamation in
support of Mentor/Tutor
Program Month
C. Human Resources
Director: Request approval to
adopt the. Revised Personnel
Rules & Regulations
D. Board Attorney:
Discussion on Ordinance for
Civil Citation
E. County Administrator:
1. Discussion on a
request for a Resolution
approving the borrowing by the
Sebring Airport Authority of an
amount not to exceed
$2,500,000 from the Florida
Local Government Finance
Commission
2. Discussion of City
of Avon Park Dual Taxation
Issue
7. Commissioners
8. Adjourn


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News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005 7A


PUBLIC C
DONATES1
TO HUR
WILMA


HARITIES
'1 MILLION
RICANE
RELIEF.


Publix Super Markets Charities is donating $1 million
to United Way to help those most affected by Hurricane Wilma.

You can help, too.
Donate to the Hurricane Wilma Relief Fund
right at the register.
Your neighborhood Publix has a quick way for you
to help support relief efforts.
Donate any amount you choose by adding it to your grocery
total. All money collected will be channeled through
United Way and its affiliated agencies.
Cash contributions are the most efficient way to get help
to the people who need it most.
We expect to continue this program at our stores for a few
weeks. Thank you for your thoughtful concern and
generous donations.


PUBLIC SUPER MARKETS
CHARITIES


Public.
WHERE SHOPPING IS A PLEASUREe


This program made possible by United Way and Publix.










8A News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


SCHOOL BREAKFAST AND LUNCH MENUS


Breakfasts and lunches being
served in the Highlands County
School District for the upcom-
ing week of Oct. 31 to Nov. 4
include:
High schools
Breakfasts
All breakfasts are served
with milk and juice.
Monday: Sausage biscuit,
assorted cereals, cinnamon
toast, assorted jelly.
Tuesday: -rench toastst icks
and syrup, assorted cereals, cin-
namon toast, assorted jelly.
Wednesday: Tony's Cheese
Sticks, Doughnut, assorted
cereals, cinnamon toast, assort-
ed jelly.
Thursday: Chicken biscuit,
assorted cereals, cinnamon
toast, assorted jelly.
Friday: Pancake, sausage
and syrup, assorted cereals, cin-
namon toast, assorted jelly.
Lunches
Monday: Baked chicken,
Pillsbury biscuit, mashed pota-
toes, chicken gravy, cabbage,
assorted fruit, juice TKO, milk
variety, hoagie speedy, chicken
sandwich basket, Gilardi pizza
basket, tuna salad plate, chef
salad, ketchup, salad dressing,
mustard.
Tuesday: Chili con care,
grilled cheese sandwich, white
rice, mixed vegetables, assorted
fruit, juice TKO, milk variety,
cheeseburger basket, chicken
sandwich basket, ham and
cheese speedy, chicken Caesar
salad, chef salad, ketchup, salad
dressing, mustard.


Wednesday: Breaded chick-
en wings, yeast roll, shells with
garlic herb sauce, tossed salad,
assorted fruit, juice TKO, milk
variety, hoagie speedy, chicken
sandwich basket, Red Baron
pizza basket, chicken Caesar
salad, chef salad, ketchup, salad
dressing, mustard.
Thursday: Sliced turkey
with gravy, yeast roll, mashed
potatoes, chicken gravy, Prince
Edward blend, assorted fruit,
sugar cookie, juice TKO, vari-
ety milk, cheeseburger basket,
chicken sandwich basket,
turkey and cheese speedy, ori-
ental chicken salad, chef salad,
ketchup, salad dressing, mus-
tard.
Friday: Spaghetti and sauce,
yeast roll, tossed salad,
California blend, assorted fruit,
juice TKO, variety milk, chick-
en sandwich basket, Red Baron
pizza basket, ham and cheese
speedy, chicken Caesar salad,
chef salad, ketchup, salad dress-
ing, mustard.
Middle schools
Breakfasts
All breakfasts are served
with milk and juice.
Monday: Sausage biscuit,
assorted cereals, cinnamon
toast, assorted jelly.
Tuesday: French toast sticks
and syrup, assorted cereals, cin-
namon toast, assorted jelly.
Wednesday: Tony's Cheese
Sticks, Doughnut, assorted
cereals, cinnamon toast, assort-
ed jelly.
Thursday: Chicken biscuit,
assorted cereals, cinnamon


toast, assorted jelly.
Friday: Pancake, sausage
and syrup, assorted cereals, cin-
namon toast, assorted jelly.
Lunches
Monday: Tony's Pizza,
California blend, assorted fruit,
chocolate cookie, juice TKO,
variety milk, tuna salad plate,
chef salad, ketchup, hoagie
speedy, salad dressing, mustard.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets,
yeast roll, mashed potatoes,
chicken gravy, Prince Edward
blend, assorted fruit, juice
TKO, variety milk, turkey and
cheese speedy, oriental chicken
salad, chef salad, salad dress-
ing, mustard.
Wednesday: Cheeseburger,
potato puffs, baked beans,
assorted fruit, juice TKO, vari-
ety milk, chicken Caesar salad,
chef salad, hoagie speedy,
ketchup, salad dressing, mus-
tard.
Thursday: Macaroni and
cheese, yeast roll, steamed
broccoli, assorted fruit, juice
TKO, variety milk, ham and
cheese speedy, chicken Caesar
salad, chef salad, salad dress-
ing, mustard.
Friday: Chicken tender
bites, yeast roll, mashed pota-
toes, .chicken gravy, California
blend, chocolate pudding, juice
TKO, variety milk, hoagie
speedy, chicken Caesar salad,
chef salad, salad dressing, mus-
tard.
Elementary schools
Breakfasts
All breakfasts are served


with milk and juice.
Monday: Sausage biscuit,
assorted cereals, cinnamon
toast, assorted jelly.
Tuesday: French toast sticks
and syrup, assorted cereals, cin-
namon toast, assorted jelly.
Wednesday: Tony's Cheese
Sticks, Doughnut, assorted
cereals, cinnamon toast, assort-
ed jelly.
Thursday: Chicken biscuit,
assorted cereals, cinnamon
toast, assorted jelly.
Friday: Pancake, sausage
and syrup, assorted cereals, cin-
namon toast, assorted jelly.
Lunches
Monday: Peanut butter and
jelly sandwich, Tony's' Pizza,
green beans, assorted fruit,
chocolate pudding, variety
milk.
Tuesday: Ham sandwich,
baked chicken, yeast roll,
mashed potatoes, California
blend, chicken gravy, assorted
fruit, salad dressing, mustard,
variety milk.
a Wednesday: Peanut butter
and jelly sandwich, spaghetti
and sauce, yeast roll, tossed
salad, green beans, assorted
fruit, brownies, variety milk.
Thursday: Peanut butter and
jelly sandwich, chicken patty
sandwich, baked french fries,
Prince Edward blend, dill stack,
apple slices, ketchup,' salad
dressing, mustard, variety milk.
Friday: Deli turkey sand-
wich, cheeseburger, potato
puffs, corn cobbettes, dill stack,
apple slices, ketchup, salad
dressing, mustard, variety milk.


Early Learning Coalition plans several meetings
The Early Learning Coalition office, 3028 Caring Way, Suite ing is at 3 p.m. College DeSoto campus, 2251
of Florida's Heartland has #4, Port Charlotte, at 5 p.m. 0 Friday, Nov. 11 - Early NE Turner Ave, Arcadia.
planned several meetings in 0 Thursday, Nov. 10 - Early Learning Coalition of Florida's The mission of the Early
November that are open to the Learning Coalition of Florida's Heartland-Charlotte/DeSoto Learning Coalition of Florida's
public. Heartland-Hardee office, 324 office, 3028 Caring Way, Suite Heartland is to facilitate access
Advisory board meetings are North 6th Ave, Suite #100, 4, Port Charlotte, at 11 a.m. to high-quality early education
as follows: Wauchula,-at 4:30 p.m. M Wednesday, Nov. 16 - and care for children ages birth
M Wednesday, Nov. 9 - Early The Early Learning Coalition South Florida Community to 12. The coalition oversees
Learning Coalition of Florida's of Florida's Heartland commit- College DeSoto campus, 2251 local school readiness and vol-
Heartland-Highlands office, tee meetings are as follows: NE Turner Ave, Arcadia, quali- untary prekindergarten pro-
209 N. Ridgewood Drive, , Wednesday, Nov. 2 - ty committee meeting is at 2 grams in a four-county region
Sebring, at 3 p.m. South Florida Community p.m. serving Highlands, Charlotte,
- ' Wednesday, Nov. 9 - Early College DeSolo caunpus. 2251 The board meeting will beat DeSoto and Hardee counties.
Learning Coalition of FlUeida'gs NEr Turner A\e, Arcidia,; 3p.m. \\eincddai, Nov. 16, at For more information, call 314-'
Heartland-Charlotte/DeSoto administrative committee meet-- South Florida Community 9213 or (800) 660-9213:


News-Sun classified ads get results

"Harvest Home Craft Festival"
Saturday - November 5th - 8am to 1pm
Emmanuel United Church of Christ
3115 Hope Street - Sebring
(1.8 miles west of Highway 27 on Hammock Road)
Donuts & Coffee - Brunch served 10am to 1pm
Christmas Items - Crafts - Goodies - Raffle Items
For Information, call 471-1999

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News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005 91


Community
(- News and events


Facade grants
available again
AVON. PARK - The Avon
Park Main Street Community
Redevelopment Agency facade
grants are open once again.
Residents and businesses
may qualify for up to $2,000
in grants. For information, call
452-0272 or 452-4405.

Blood drives
scheduled this
week in
Highlands
The Florida's Blood Centers
- Highlands has coordinated
the following blood drives in
Highlands County:
* Tuesday - Crystal Lake,
Avon Park, from 9 a.m. to
3:30 p.m.
* Wednesday - South
Florida Community College,
Avon Park, from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m.
* Thursday - Sebring Ford,
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; and
Wells Motors Company, Avon
Park, from 2:30-4:30 p.m.
* Friday - Medical Data
Systems, Sebring, from 9 a.m.
to noon; and Bill Jarrett Ford,
Avon Park, from 1:30-3:30
p.m.
* Saturday - Highland
Hammock State Park, Sebring,
9 a.tm. to 2 p.m.
All donors can receive 50
percent off Universal Studios
when giving blood.
, For more details or to
schedule a blood drive, call
Florida's Blood Centers Donor
Development Coordinator








Florida Lottery

LOTTO Oct 26
17 33 34 46 49 52

MEGA MONEY Oct. 28
6 22 40 44 # 5

CASH 3
Oct. 28- 2 -2 4
Oct. 27 - 8 0 1
Oct 26- 4 6 0
Oct 25 - 7 9 2
Oct. 24 - 1 5 4
Oct. 23 - 3 7 4

PIAY 4
Oct. 28- 1 3 5 3
Oct. 27 - 0 6 0 9
Oct. 26- 8 4 9 5
Oct. 25- 6 6 2 8
Oct. 24- 8 9 2 3
Oct. 23 - 3 8 7 9

FANTASY 5
Oct. 28 - 8 12 14 30 36
Oct. 27 - 4 10 13 1" 19
Oct. 26 - 12 19 21 31 33
Oct. 25 - 10 30 31 32 34
Oct 24- 3 20 30 32 35
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77' per minute
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Deah Spires at 382-4499 or
stop by 6550 U.S. 27 N.,
Sebring to donate. Hours of
operation are from 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday and Friday; 11
a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday; and 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.

SHS Project
Graduation
meets Tuesday
SEBRING - Sebring High
School Project Graduation
parents will meet at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday in the media center.
For more details, call Janine
Jones at 465-0090.

Hospice hosting
chamber mixer
SEBRING - Good
Shepherd Hospice, 4418 Sun
'N Lake. Blvd., will host a Tri-
Chamber Mixer from 5-7 p.m
Thursday, Nov. 17, at 4418
Sun 'N Lake Blvd. 402-1066.
Food, non-alcoholic bever-
ages, music, tours and net-
working will be available.
Parking will be at Florida
Hospital Hearitland Medical
Center.
Respond to any of the three
local chambers by Thursday,
Nov. 10 if planning to attend,
by calling Sebring at 385-
8448; Avon Park at 453-3350;
o1 Lake Placid at 465-4331.:

Forty & Eight
plans casino
trip as benefit
LAKE PLACID - Voiture
863 Forty & Eight, will be
taking a casino day trip Nov.
21.
Cost is $25 per person. This
includes round trip transporta-
tion, free continental breakfast
at American Legion Post 25,
free boarding on ship, free
hot/cold sit down buffet, free
casiiio beverages, plus $10 in
cash, an outdoor sun deck and
free live entertainment. Also a
free holiday season opporttni-
ty to win $11,000 in casino
cash, up to $35,000 in free gas
and a brand new 2006
Hyundai car.
Open to all by calling 699-
0532 on a first come basis.
Persons must be 18 to enter

health Care




With A Hea<

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Health Care, Inc.
Wauchula
Dr. Kathleen McNamara
Family Practice
Board Certified ,
Dr. Francis Quito
Internal Medicine
Board Certified
19o4 t.10 Phep ~

Entire Family, X-Ray & Lab
204 East Palmetto Street
Wauchula, FL 33873
863 773-2111
Se Habla Espaiol


We have


the casino and 21 to have
alcoholic beverages. Picture
identification is required.
By reservation only, first
come first serve, as seating is
limited.
Charter bus leaves
American Legion Post 25,
Lake Placid at 7:30 a.m.
Coffee and doughnuts served
at 7 a.m.
The trip will benefit the
nurses training program
endowed at South Florida
Community College.

TOPS plans
open house
SEBRING - Take Off
Pounds Sensibly 632 Chapter
is hosting a free informational
6pen house meeting at 3 p.m.
Monday at the First Baptist
Church of Lake Josephine, off
U.S. 27 and Lake Josephine
Drive.
Kathleen MacNeill and
Sarah Johnson from the
Florida Hospital Heartland
Diabetes Center will be guest
speakers.
If interested in learning how
to eat healthier, lower pressure
and sugar counts, look better
and feel like a million bucks,
come join this meeting.
TOPS Club is a non-profit
weight loss support organiza-
tion.
The open house is free and
open to the public.
For more information, call
Jean O'ttoway at 655-3673.

Ridge
Rollaways to
start dancing
SEBRING - The Ridge
Rollaways Square and Round
Dance Club meets from 7:30-9
p.m. every Wednesday begin-
ning Nov. 2 at the Highlands
County Agri-Civic Center,
U.S. 27 South.
Early rounds are from 7-
7:30 p.m., with mainstream
plus squares from 7:30-9:30
p.m.
For details, call 385-3696.

Neighborhood
Watch meets
SEBRING - The Greater
Kenilworth Boulevard
Neighborhood Watch will dis-


tribute free gun locks during
the November meeting.
This session will be at 7
p.m. Wednesday at Christians
In Action Building, 2812
Kenilworth Blvd. just a few
hundred feet behind the
Kenilworth Lodge. The
Neighborhood Watch program
includes side streets directly
connected to Kenilworth
Boulevard.

Moose hosts
several events
LAKE PLACID - Lake
Placid Moose will have these
events this week in the lodge
for members and qualified
guests:
* Wednesday - Mexican
dinner will be served from 5-7


p.m. Loyal Order of Moose
officers meeting will be at 7
p.m.
* Thursday - Burgers,
jumbo hot dogs and fries
served at 6 p.m. Music provid-
ed from 5:30-8:30 p.m.
* Friday - Wings burgers
and fish served at 6 p.m.
Music by Tom Brazzell will
be from 7-10 p.m.
* Saturday - Pavilion is
open at noon. Prime rib dinner
will be at 6 p.m. Music by
Don West will be from 7-10
p.m.

Register for
SHARE food
SEBRING - SHARE reg-
istration will be from 1-2:30
p.m. and 5-7 p.m. Thursday at


Floods -

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Earthquakes

Gas Prices Soaring


Crime

Violence


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St. John United Methodist
Church, 3214 Grand Prix
Drive (behind Wal-Mart).
Distribution day will be
Saturday, Nov. 19.
The basic package is avail-
able for $18 and two hours of
volunteer service.
In addition, there will be
SHARE specials: Traditional
Thanksgiving holiday dinner
package, $19 and a bacon
wrapped steak box, $15. For
further information, call 382-
6385 or 471-0734.
Check with the following
host sites:
* Sebring First United
Methodist Church, comer of
Center and Pine streets, 385-
5184 or 655-5854;
* Lake Placid Faith Baptist
Church, 600 Holmes Ave.,
465-0060 or 465-3619.


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News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


SUE ANN CARPENTER/News-Sun
Dr. Antonio Roa and his medical staff recognize their patients who are 90 years old and older Monday
during a special party at the office in Lake Placid.



Roa recognizes patients



90 years old and older


By SUE ANN CARPENTER
News-Sun correspondent
LAKE PLACID - Dr.
Antonio Roa planned a special
recognition Monday for his
patients who are 90 years old
and older.
Roa, a general practitioner,
coordinated the annual lunch-
eon with 34 invitations, sent this
year. They're mostly female,
which is typical. Photos of
these special patients are scat-
tered throughout the office at
201 U.S. 27 South.
"Everyone's excited about
this event - not only the
patients, but the staff," said
Doris Whitaker, a secretary-
receptionist for Roa. She has
been working for him for 12
years.
"I'm 72, but I'm not leaving
until he retires. He's wonderful
to work for. Plus we have a
new, younger associate, Dr.
Fonda (internal medicine.).
Although he's at the Sebring
office, he's here in Lake Placid
every Tuesday. And they are
both advocates of wellness,"
Whitaker said.
Roa has been in family prac-
tice for more than 20 years. He


also hosts a Christmas party for
all his patients.
"It's like a family feeling
with his patients. It's a good
atmosphere. His heart is with
the older people. He also
believes in natural medications
and they like that. We .used to
do an over-80 party, but there
became too many, so now he's
changed it to over 90.
Christmas is for everyone,
though," Whitaker said.
Jim Schmidt brought his par-
ents, Anne P. and Al J.
Schmidt, age 92 and 98, respec-
tively.
"They were both born in
New York. They feel that their
secret to a long life is being
lucky and having a support
group. I've taken care of them
for a year now. They were pret-
ty independent, but this year
they got sick and it took a lot
out of them. Now they're ready
for some physical therapy..
Thank God for Dr. Roa," Jim
Schmidt said.
"I wasn't going to come. This
is my first party here. I didn't
even know about it until my sis-
ter, Evelyn Shannon, 94 told me
about it," said Gay Kelly, 90'.


This special party is in their
honor because Roa feels
blessed to have as many
patients as he does who. follow
his orders and eat right and take
care of themselves so that they
live happy, healthy and produc-
tive lives. He feels that is
deserving of recognition and
praise.
Honorees and ages of the 90s
Club are Estellar Ankron, 92;
Harriet Armstrong, 91; Floyd
W. Baker, 90; Walter Barnes,
90; Ray F. Basten, 94; Irene
Blakeley, 92; Irving Brown, 93;
Mary L. Cunningham, 92;
Leaor Denniard, 93; Herbert
DeWitt, 95; Edward Dickson,
S95; Martha Dickson, 92; Walter
Going, 90; Hattie Golden, 90;
Gray Harman, 95; Webster
Heath, 92; Edwin Jackson, 91;
.Gay Kelly, 90; Frances Kirch,
96; Florence Larson, 92;
Frances Sample, 91; Al J.
Schmidt, 98; Anne P. Schmidt,
92; Evelyn Shannon, 93; Mary
T. Smith, 94; Elizabeth
Sorensen, 91; Imre Szabo, 93;
Esther Stillwell, 99; and Dennis
Wilson, 91.


I, ,PcI A R


10A









News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


PHIL ATTINGER/News-Sun
Workers at Dilley & Son Nursery uproot young citrus trees Friday to begin burning them. After the
Avon Park nursery had a citrus canker find on Friday, Oct. 21, before Hurricane Wilma, the infected
trees were destroyed. Canker control protocol dictates that every tree within 1,900 feet of the infected
ones must be destroyed, too. That includes the greenhouses to the rear. Beyond the greenhouses, to the
upper right, part of a Ben Hill Griffin grove was discovered infected before the storm, and is being
pushed over and burned.


DILLEY
Continued from 1A
They got the news on Oct.
21, right before Hurricane
Wilma arrived. Allegedly,
canker had only been in the
trees for two weeks.
They pushed over infected
trees and burned them before
the storm, but the rest will have
to go. Workers on Friday were
pulling up young citrus trees to
be burnt.
Caught in protocol
Better and more frequent
inspections might have prevent-
ed it, Roland Dilley said. The
protocol is to check every six
months, but the Ben Hill Griffin
grove to the north had the dis-
ease, too.
Citrus canker first came to
America through the port of
Miami. When the disease is
found, every citrus tree within
1,900 feet - 280 acres - of an
infected tree must be destroyed.


HELP
Continued from 1A
pumps. Glades County is the
same way.
Martinez is not sure how
much longer he and the other
soldiers will be there, though he
hopes to be done in a matter of
days. When asked by his men,
he says, "Soon." When they ask
how soon, he says, "Sooner or
later."
It's a positive outlook
method he and other Iraqi war.
veterans have learned when
waiting for relief of duty, he
said.
Fortunately for him, living

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Roland Dilley has heard the
state and the U.S. Department
of Agriculture have looked at
buying out citrus nurseries and
moving them north, out of the
heavily-hit canker areas, into
greenhouse-only operations.
It takes a lot of money and
nearly two years to get a tree to
market, he said. He has men
hired just to clip buds and nur-
ture them to graft onto root
stock so the trees can grow in
various types of soil.
Using just greenhouses raises
-production costs and will triple
the price from $4 to $12 per
tree, he said. Moving nurseries
north of Gainesville, 300 miles
from Immokalee, will make
round-trips last 8-10 hours,
including loading and .unload-
ing, so shipping costs will go
up.
Meanwhile, growers in
Brazil and South Africa, for
example, can produce the fruit
for one third of his cost, he said.
They have fewer restrictions on


here, he knew immediately who
to call for a good base of opera-
tions. The fairgrounds has
buildings for barracks, running
water and electricity - with
showers - and all other neces-
sities. All he had to do was call
Assistant County Administrator
Tom Portz and Artie McIntyre
with the Highlands County Fair


pesticides, fertilizers and other
controls.
"I hope we don't start
depending on foreign countries
to feed us," Roland Dilley said:
Loss and optimism
Jim Dilley, 51 - Roland's
son and Linda's husband -
said their losses could be as
much as $9 million, which
doesn't count lost income for
the next two or three years.
They'll have to hunt an alterna-
tive crop, but so will everyone
else.
Still, they're optimistic.
Roland Dilley has "loved every
minute" of growing citrus trees,
and is proud to call himself one
of the true natives of Florida.
Though neither Jim Dilley nor
his dad want to start over, they
said they wouldn't have gotten
where they are now without
being aggressive and taking
care of their workers.
"That's important to us," Jim
Dilley said.


AoCliiion
The city of Sebring, county
government, schools with
scheduled athletic events and
Fair Association have been very
cooperative and helpful, he
said. Despite any imposition,
they have not let him or his men
down.


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Oktoberfest now Novemberfest


By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
News-Sun
AVON PARK - Meinen
damen tnd herren, Hurricane
Wilma packed a punch this past
week, knocking Avonr Park's
Oktoberfest into next month.
Malcolm Trott, who has been
the driving force behind the fes-
tival, refuses to be deterred.
Thursday night he appeared
before the Avon Park City
Council to ask that the festival,
now dubbed Novemberfest, be
scheduled for Friday and
Saturday, Nov. 18-19.
The council was happy to
oblige.
Trott wants everyone to


know the only thing different
from Oktoberfest will be the
dates.
South Lake Avenue will still
be the place, and cordoned off'
from traffic.
. There will still be plenty of
German beer (and Budweiser),
all kinds of German food,
games, bands, crafters, vendors,
and lots of fun.
A special children's area will
be set up Saturday from noon
until 3 p.m.
A Best German Costume
Contest will be held Friday at 7
p.m. and Saturday at 3 p.m.
The Ugliest Mug Contest
(making the best contorted


face) will be held Saturday at 4
p.m.
And the ever popular Battle
of the Bartenders, where' drink
orders are filled and served
without spilling - careful there
are no rules, bumping and
jostling are absolutely allowed
- will be held Saturday at I
p.m.
Mayor Tom Macklin will cut
the opening ribbon at 5 p.m.
Friday, and the festivities will
go on until 10 p.m.
The fun continues from noon
until 10 p.m. on Saturday.
For more information, or to
volunteer, call Ashley Elder at
453-0034 or 304-1586.


AP may flag low profile wheelchairs


News-Sun
*AVON PARK - City
Council members expressed
concern over the growing num-
bers of motorized wheel chairs
and scooters being run on city
streets. It was pointed out that
the vehicles are really designed
for sidewalk use, and some
ramps at street corners have
been added to make that use
easy.


OIL
Continued from 1A
owner," Bullard said.
Supply has not been a prob-
lem for the county, he said.
Local government has been
able to get the fuel it needs, and
fortunately, the prices have
dropped over the last few days.
County Administrator Carl
Cool, also reserving judgment,
said prices seem to have
dropped almost 25 cents from
$2.99 before the storm to $2.75
by Friday.
Democrats in Congress have
demanded a new windfall prof-
its tax.
"Big oil behemoths are mak-
ing out like bandits, while the
average American family is get-
ting killed by high gas prices,
and sodr-to-be record heating
oil prices," Seri:.'Chfick


As more of these chairs and
scooters take to the streets, they
become an increasing hazard,
members said, especially
because the vehicles have a low
profile and are hard to see.

Members worry that unless
something is done to help make
them easier to spot quickly,
someone may be seriously hurt,
or even killed.


Schumer, D-N.Y., said in a
statement.,
However, Energy Secretary
Samuel Bodman has said
President Bush opposes such a
move and would rather consid-
er proposals to cushion con-
sumers, such as creating an
emergency reserve of gasoline
and other refined products.
Some Republican members
of Congress called on the indus-
try to invest in ways that will
increase production so that con-
sumers get a break at the pumps
or when they pay their heating
bills. Analysts, however, said
telling the industry how to
spend its money was unfair, if
not futile.
"Exxon is a good corporate
citizen but it does not work for
the welfare of the country," said
oil analyst Fadel Gheit at
Oppenheimer & Co. in New
Yoi'k.


Several members described
incidents where they had nearly
run over individuals in chairs or
scooters themselves.

While no action was taken,
the council is considering creat-
ing an ordinance which would
require an orange flag on an
antenna, or some type of atten-
tion getting device, be attached
to any such low profile vehicle.


Reportedly, Thursday's high
earnings resulted from surging
oil and natural gas prices push-
ing pump prices to record highs
after Hurricane Katrina. Those
record prices and profits have
come on the heels of similar
gains reported last week by B.P.
PLC, ConocoPhillips Inc. and
Marathon Oil Corporation.
Chevron Corporation report-
ed earnings were not available
by Saturday.
Exxon Chairman and Chief
Executive Lee R. Raymond did
not mention the record earning
in a company release. Instead,
he said the world's largest pub-
licly traded oil company "acted
responsibly in pricing at our
company operated service sta-
tions, and we also encouraged
our independent retailers and
distributors to do the same."
Associated Press contributed
to this story.


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News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


ini_ -Forecasts and graphics provided by
A C C U ^ P� BAccuWeather, Inc. 02005


ACCU S mAccuWeather.com


Five-Day forecast for Highlands County


National Forecast for October 30


TODAY






Partly sunny and
breezy.

High 80/Low 62
Winds: NE at 10-20 mph.


MONDAY






Breezy with clouds
and sunshine.


TUESDAY






Some sun with a
shower in spots.


High 85/Low 66 High 86/Low 70
Winds: ENE at 8-16 mph. Winds: E at 8-16 mph.


TalfOamu ---------



, -'Av8J-



St. Pe-rT.#1


Avon Park
79/62 .

Sebring ./,
80/62

* *
Lake Placid Lorida
80/62 80/66


Venus
80/62


L ..


Shown is today's
weather. Temperatures
are today's highs and
tonight's lows


Regional summary: Breezy nonh-east winds across the area today and
tl orlrc'w with plenty of sunshire Tropical moisture will begin to work back
into the area by Tuesday allowing or some showers across Ine area.


'Florida cities
Today
city Hi Lo W
Daytona Beach 76 62 pc
Ft. Laud. Bch 82 75 sh
Fort Myers 8, ' 64 S
Garresvlle . .' I 51 S
,Homestead AFB 81 74 sh
Jacksonville 72 51 s
Key West 80 7i 4 r.
Miamt 81 -.41 ,
Orlando 78 61 pc
Pensacola 76 53 s
Sarasola i 62 s ,
Tallahase- 7'. 46 ?.
Tampa 79 62 s
W. Palm Bch. 80 73 sh


WEDNESDAY






Clouds and sun,
t-storms possible.

High 84/Low 68


THURSDAY


Periods of clouds and
sunshine.


High 84/Low 66


Winds: SE at 10-20 mph. Winds: SW at 10-20 mph.


Heat index
For 3 p m. loday
Relative humidity ................. 45%
Expected air temperature ........ 80�
Makes It feel like ...................... 800


Weather History

On Oct. 30, 1948, acid smog killed
20 and sickened thousands at
'Donora, Pa. The steel mill towns
southeast of Pittsburgh had poor air
quality before the clean air laws.


About 8 to 10 hours ot
possible sunshine today
with a northeast wind at 10-20 mph
will allow for excellent drying condi-
tions. Shower chances will increase
later in the week.

Water restrictions
Even numbered addresses can water on
Tuesday and/or Saturday. Odd numbered
addresses can water on Wednesday and/or
Sunday.




For today
9a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 3 p.m. 5 p.m.
S 3 II 6 _3
The higher the UV index number, the greater
the need for eye and skin protection.
0-2, Low; 3-5, Moderate; 6-7, High;
8-10, Very High; 11+ Extreme


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are
highs for the day. Forecast high and low temperatures are given for selected cities.


Showers

F k T-storm

Rain

SFlurries

SSnow

Ice



FRONTS
Cold

A . Warm

A, Stationary


-10s -Os 0: , 10s 208 a 40s Q5 60s 70sB 0

National summary: A cold front passing through the Plains will spread a few showers across the northern Plains
today, while behind the front clouds will break for sunshine. After a chilly start to the weekend, warmer air will filter
into the eastern Great Lakes, Northeast and New England. After a chilly start to the day in the Southeast, an area
of high pressure will give yet another day of pleasant weather with afternoon temperatures comfortable. Breezy
toward the Panhandle of Texas with another day of dry weather.


iu and moon.

Today Sunrise ..
QSuns t


Alman"t:


.. 6:34 a.m.
:45. n m


1OfLI Ib ...... 0 .-+D IJ .
Moonrise .. 4:15 a.m.
Moonset .... 4:23 p.m.
Monday Sunrise .... 6:34 a.m.
Sunset ...... 5:45 p.m.
Moonrise .. 5:10 a.m.
Moonset ...,-4:53 p.m.

Moon phases .





New First Full Last
Nov1 Nov8 Nov 15 Nov 23


'U.S. cities.


Tomorrow
Hi Lo W
80 64 pc
83 75 sh
84 68 pc
78' 58 p.:
84 73 t
75 58 s
82 7-1 I1
84 74 sh
82 65 pc
76 55 s
83 64 pc
76. 54 a
82 64 pc
84 74 sh


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
82 63 sh
84 73 t
84 7, I
80 58 sh
85 73 t
78 65 sh
83 76 t
85 T4 I
84 68 sh
78 58 sh
84 668 h
78 60 sh
82 68 sh
85 74 t


Today
City Hi Lo W
Aluqluerque 67 42 pc
Ailania 70 46 s
Baltimore 68 42 s
BiiI.T.ingn.i 7.T i 7 4 J ,
Boston 62 44 pc
Charlorte 70 38 s
Cheyenne 50 28 pc
Chic-go 64 45 1
Cleaeland 62 43 a
Colurrbus 65 43 s
Dallas 74 65 pc
Derivei 8Q 32 shV
Delrorl 64 46 s
H-rrisburg 70 40 s


Tor
Hi
164
73
70

66
74
51

60
63
74
55
58
70


morrow Tuesday
Lo W Hi Lo W
38 s 66 38 s
51 s 73 55 pc
S44 s 70 46 pc
. 49 - 74 49 ,
48 s 60 44 c
145 s 74 48 pc.
35 sh 64 39 s
44 sh 58 42 pc
) 46 sh 59 45 sh
45 pc 57 45 sth
S56 t 70 53 s
S1.4 :h 69 36 s
44 sh 56 40 sn
45 s 61 42 pc


Today
City Hi Lo W
Honolulu 86 72 s
Housion 8C 64 pc
Indianapolis 65 47 s
.13.:1 .,r.,,ile '7e 51
Kansas CITy 61 48 sh
Lex.ngionr 64 45 s
Little Rock 71 52 s
Los Angeles 74 56 s
Louibsille 68 J7 s
Memphis 72 52 a
Miami 81 74 sh
Minr.eapI'": 61 43 r
Nashwlle 70 45 s
New Orleans 78 56 8


Tomorrow
Hi Lo W
86 74 snl
80 62 I
61 46 sh
75 58 s
59 44 F
66 46 pc
69 54 t
84 58 s
70 49 c
71 62 pc
84 74 sh
56 39 pc
74 47 s
79 61 s


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
86 73 pc
'4 54 PC
62 43 pc
I'8 65 Th
64 44 a
62 46 pc
66 47 sh
84 58 s
68 49 pc
68 54 sh
85 74 t
56 35 pc
68 48 pc
75 61 t


Today
City Hi Lo W
New York Cry 67 53 s
Norfolk 67 48 s
Oklahoma City 72 56 pc
Philadelphia 66 46 s
Prioer., . 86 60 a
Pittsourgh 66 38 s
Portland 59 39 pc
Raleigh 70 40 s
Rochester 62 43 s
St. Louis 69 g50 sn
San Francisco 67 51 s
Seattle 54 46 sh
Tampa 79 62 s
Wasa,nrpon DC70 46 s


Temperature
(Readings at Archbold Biological Station
in Lake Placid)
High Wednesday ................. 72
Low Wednesday ................... 49
High Thursday ..................... 73
Low Thursday ....................... 46
High Friday ........................... 80
Low Friday ........ ....... 52
Precipitation

Wednesday ..................... 0.00"
Thursday ...................... 0.00"
Friday ...................... 0.00"
Month to date ................... 9.24"
Year to date ....... ......... 53.54"
Barometer


Friday ............................. 30.15
Tides
(Readings at St. Petersburg)
High ......................... 12:49 a.m .
Low ........................... 6:14 a.m .
High ......................... 12:38 p.m .
Low ........................... 6:16 p.m .
(Readings at Palm Beach)
High ........................... 6:28 a.m .
Low ........................... 1:01 a.m .
High ........................... 6:39 p.m .
Low ......................... 12:24 p.m.
Lake Levels
Lake Jackson ................. 81.35'
Lake Okeechobee ......... 15.61'
Normal ........................... 14.51'


W wednesday ........................ 30.18
Thursday ............................ 30.20

World cities


Tomorrow
Hi Lo W
66 52 a
71 52 s
62 48 r
70 50 s
86 58 s
68 46 pc
63 41 pc
76 46 s
60 44 .1n
58 47 r
72 53 s
56 46 r
82 64 pc
72 50 s


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
64 50 pc
69 53 s
70 46 s
66 48 pc
88 56 s
58 42 sh
55 38 c
74 46 pc
56 41 asn
68 47 sn
73 53 s
54 45 r
82 68 sh-
72 48 pc


City
Acapulco
Berlin
Calgary
Dublin
Edmonton
Freeport
Genrema
Hong Kong
Jerusalem
Kiev


Today
Hi Lo W
88 72 s
65 53 s
48 26 pc.
59 43 sh
47 27 pc
80 66 pc
70 47 pc
"6 68 c
68 48 pc
43 28 s


City
London
Montreal
Nice
Ottawa
Quebec
Rio de Janeiro
Sydney
Toionlo
Vancouver .
Winnipeg


Today
Hi Lo W
66 57 r
55 40 pc
68 55 pc
55 39 pc
48 31 pc
75 69 r
76 64 t
58 41 s
53 41 c
54 29 pc


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy,
sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice.


12A


I


. .. . .. . . h n


Renional forecast


I














Business


~4. ~ .tc.� 2'.: '. - 'c -- . - - ' Ut' - . - ~ ~ . . -


NEWS-SUN + SEBRING, FLA.


PAGE 13A + SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2005


TOFFI ' IT
WITH TUFFLEY
Christopher Tuffley


In over


my head
Last week, I spent a morn-
ing helping Jason Miller dig a
grave in. Oak Hill Cemetery
down in Lake Placid.
To get into the mood the
day before, I watched an old
fashioned, totally gross horror
movie about dead people who
come back to life as flesh eat-
ing zombies.
In one particular scene, dis-
gusting looking corpses rose
suddenly out of their graves,
streaming dirt and uttering
chilling cries. They started
chasing the mostly soon-to-be-
dead heroes all over the ceme-
tery.
At night, with the lights out
for atmosphere, the movie's
graveyard scene had been
scary indeed.
Quite unlike the graveyard I
entered for real the next day
- a bright, not too hot, breezy
Sunday morning.
Oak Hill Cemetery still has
plenty of open space. The
ground runs out toward the
horizon which is marked by
orange groves. There are
enough trees to provide a soft
rustling sound, which mixes
with the music of song birds.
The headstones are neatly
laid out, and of all different
kinds. It is a peaceful place,
without a hint of Zombieville.
In fact, it is with relief I can
-report that this Halloween, -
See HEAD jagel.6A


Grave digger


Miller finds peace in his work


By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
News-Sun
AVON PARK - Jason Miller moved to the
Heartland with his parents when he was a child. They
hailed from Flint, Mich. and were looking to get out of
the cold.
While he was in high school in Hardee County,
Miller began to work on a dairy farm. For 11 years he
worked for two farms, becoming nightshift foreman,
responsible for 1,600 cows.
The work was hard, he said, especially because cows
have to be milked every day, no matter the weather or
circumstances. It was a 24/7 existence, he said.
When his father-in-law suggested Miller join the
family business, Fountain Funeral Home & Crematory,
in 1994, he was happy to give it a try.
Digging graves and preparing grave site services are
only a part of Miller's duties, but they are the ones he
finds the most pleasant. He enjoys working outdoors,
and it keeps him in shape. He takes pride in his work,
and knows how important it is for a family to put their
loved one to rest in peace.
In addition to digging the grave, Miller sets up the
tent and chairs at thd internment site, and covers the
grave after the burial service.
As the grave site deepens, Miller lines the sides with
boards to prevent the sides from caving in. This is
especially important at the time of the internment, as
people walking up to the sides could trigger a dirt slide.
Even the cement vault, which 'is already in place at
the time of the burial, can't guarantee that the sides will
hold. In fact, collapsing dirt is one of the main reasons
vaults are now required. In the past, coffins have col-
lapsed over time, causing the surface soil to collapse
with it.
He learned on the job. "If you don't like working
outdoors, and if you can't handle being around people
who are grieving, this job isn't for you," he said. "It's
hard not to get involved in what (a family) is going
through, but it will kill you, So every now and then,
you have to take a vacation."
He has met some challenges digging graves.
At one site in Fort Meade, the soil was black dirt.
Usually, the deeper the hole, the cooler it is. However,
in'this case, the deeper he dug, the hotter it got. By the
time he was done, "It was like a furnace," he said.
To make matters worse, the dark soil acted as an
optical illusion, and he ended up digging a hole almost
five feet deep, about two feet deeper than necessary.
The worst problem he has faced involved a grave
dug near the base of a 30 foot oak tree.


Jason Miller lowers a burial vault into place. Made of
concrete with a plastic lining, a vault protects the coffin
from decay. The lid is lifted for the internment service,
the coffin is lowered into it, and the lid is sealed in place.
He started work at 8 a.m. for an internment service
scheduled to begin at 3 p.m., usually more than enough
time.
But the oak tree had other plans. Its roots spread out
in all directions, and as Miller dug he came up against
some which were six and seven inches in diameter.
I Even .breaking out a chain saw and attacking the
roots didn't speed up the process. In fact, Miller said,
the roots were so many, and so large, the first chain saw
burned out its motor, and someone had to rush out and
buy another one.
By the time of the internment, the grave was still far
from ready. A dummy site had to be rigged, arnd the


Photos by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY/News-Sun
A view from the grave of digger Jason Miller, 'the last
person to let you down.' Graves rarely are dug the
proverbial six feet deep any more. State statute doesn't
mandate a depth. Instead, it requires at least a foot of
dirt on top. This grave was about four feet deep. The
boards are in place to keep the sides from collapsing.
They will be removed, after the internment just before
the vault and casket are buried.
family was warned of the delay. Fortunately, Miller
said, the family was understanding, but it bothered him
that their farewell was disrupted.
Once the family left the area, Miller brought in a
.hose, to wash off the tree's roots, making them easier to
see and handle. In the end, the grave wasrbt finished
until 9 p.m.
It is important to keep a sense of humor, Miller said.
He was once asked why he uses a flat shovel. "Have
you ever tried to dig a square hole *with a round shov-
el?" he answered.
One thing that makes him smile is the sound of all


See MILLER. page 16A


'.4.


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South Lakeland 604o S. Florida Ave. / North Lakeland lo9o Wedgewood Estates Blvd. / Auburndale 2146 U.S. Hwy. 92 W. / North Winter Haven 2075 8th St. N.W. / South Winter Haven 5540 Cypress Gardens Blvd.
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,N)


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the
















14A News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005



S-..W MARKER ToP STOCK PERFORMERSON


Dow Jones

industrials
For the week ending
Friday, October 28



10,402.77
Record high: 11,722.98
Jan. 14, 2000

Nasdaq

composite
For the week ending
Friday, October 28



2,089.88
Record high: 5,048.62
March 10, 2000

Standard &
Poor's 500
For the week ending
Friday, October 28



1,198.41
Record high: 1,527.46
March 24, 2000


a 11,000


S I I9 , I I I I I I 1 9,500
O N DJ F M A M J J A S O N

2,300



2 iC00



I 9,800

, , I I , I I I I I I 1,800
O N D J F M A M J J AS N

1,300


*, " :.i ..- -* 1,200
S- 1,100




I I . I I I I I I I 1,000
O N DJ F MA M J J AS O N


Most Aain(Sl or more MoAaNM (SI mnoI l MoAlt tve I11rr
Nane VCd La-i C?. JName vol Lail Crg Name Vol Last ChLg


Lucent 4307386 2.79 -.29
Pfizer 2103950 21.50 +.25
Texinst 1336872 28.00 -2.49
ExxonMbl 1143661 56.31 +.94
GenBec 957832 34.05 +32

Gaers ($2 e more)
Name Vol Last Chg
RPCs 27.45 +5.33 +24.1
AMU Rs 38.00 +6.73 +21.5
PlaylxPd 13.34 +2.17 +19.4
MPS Grp 12.53 +1.93 +18.2
Spherion 8.70 +1.31 +17.7

Ltiers(S2omore)
Name Vol Last Chg
KineticC 34.93 -19.48 -35.8
ChicB&l s 20.31 -9.69 -32.3
Primedia 2.07 -.94 -31.2
DoralRn If 8.50 -3.38 -28.5
Domtarg 4.05 -1.54 -27.5


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


1,831
1,648
145
400
3,561
82
12,453,809,770


SPDR 3568854119.80 +1.67
iShRs2000s1l61573463.06 +.04
SPEngy 1508341 48.27 +2.25
iShJapan 1177594 11.96 +.31
SemiHTr 959138 33.31 -1.40


Nasd100Tr5110133 38.32
Microsoft 3209421 25.53
Intel 2568346 23.33
Oracle 2162166 12.71
Cisco 2106837 17.14


Nam w Gaeri iel Ch N am e (S l r ) Chg
Name- Vol Last Chg Name Vol Last Chg


RightSaf
Hemispx
NAPall g
Q0 Comm
FortDiv n


+.96 +37.6
+.74 +332
+126 +25.8
+.54 +25.5
+1.05 +21.2


Name Vol Last Chg
IntriConIf 4.48 -1.55 -25.7
Cenucolf 2.49 -.81 -24.5
OdeansH 19.35 -4.02 -172
RELMn 4.50 -.92 -17.0
iMergent 3.10 -.57 -15.5

Diary

Advanced 619
Declined 480
New Highs 36
New Lows . 97
Total issues 1,147
Unchanged 48
Volumq 1,726,405,879


MakMusc 8.73 +5.53+172.8


Phazar
SentoCp
Regenm
Coinstar


13.19 +4.38 +49.7
5.52 +1.80 +48.4
11.97 +2:97 +33.0
24.91 +5.74 +29.9


Loseris I *.4 e)
Name Vol Last Cr,,


UnvAmr
Nylixinc If
GandrMt
OrchidCell
i2Tech n


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


14.17 -9.04 -38.9
2.93 -1.75 -37.4
5.25 -3.11 -37.2
5.71 -3.0,1 -34.5
12.44 -6.06 -32.8


1,637
1,594
. 173
274
3,327
96
8,819,919,982


52-Week FriNet Net YTD
Hgh Low Name Last Chg Chg % Chg % Chg

DOMESTIC
10,914.46 9,708.40 DowJones Industrials 10,402.77 +172.82 +172.82 -3.53 +187.55
3,889.97 3,344.77 Dow Jones Transportation 3,741.81 +67.49 +67.49 -1.48 +118.09
438.74 303.38 Dow JonesUtilities 396.01 +8.98 +8.98 +18.23 +9.35
7667 6 6,497.32 NYSE Composite . 7,369.55. 106.23 +106.23 +1,65 +115.06
6,111.97 5,437.17 US 100 5,889.33 +95.33 +95.33 -1.80 +114.62
11000 i 35 7,466.67 NYSE Energy 9,830.03 +199.89 +199.89 +23.89+377.78
7,' C6 1, 6,608.03 NYSE Finance 7,491.09 +92.93 +92.93 -.04 +169.56
6,545.47 5,493.49 NYSE Healthcare 6,207.38 +69.50 +69.50 +1.44 +8.68
1,75221 1,186.14 AMEX Index 1,642.58 +18.97 +18.97 +14.52 +44.59
353.35 254.80 AMEX Industrials 349.03 +6.09 +6.09 +17.78 +11.85
2,219.91 1,889.83 Nasdaq Composite , , 2,089.88 +26.07 +26.07 -3.93 +7.67
1245.86 1,090.19 S&P500 1,198.41 +19.51 +19.51 -1.11 +18.82
725.02 583.89 S&PMidCap 689.51 +11.18 +11.18 +3.95 +7.31
688.51 565.71 Russell 2000 635.33 +11.30 +11.30 -2.49 +2.60
FOREIGN
5,138.02 3,854.41 Frankfurt +19.59 +19.59 -12.76 -.26 -.26
15,508.57 12,818.10 HonkKong ndex -165.23 -165.23 -272.02 -1.88 -1.88
1,176.86 869.73 Madrid +1.19 +1.19 -1.85 -.17 -.17
16,120.08 11,178.01 Mexico +142.05 +142.05 +676.32 +4.54 +4.54
13,783.60 10,657.15 Nikkei225 -70.54 -70.54 +146.59 +1.11 +1.11
1,244.27 808.14 Milan -25.64 -25.64 -42.76 -3.61 -3.61
2,377.13 1,953.44 Singapore . -9.49 -9A49 -46.95 -2.10 -2.10
4,627.60 3,694.40 Sydney -48.70 -48.70 -23.80 -.55 -.55
6,455.57 5,632.97 Taipei -28.21 -28.21 -105.79 -1.84 -1.84
11,081.19 8,749.16 Toronto +66.85 +66.85 +21.43 +.21 +.21
7,042.26 5,309.70 Zurich -44.70 "-44.70 +23.29 +.34 +.34
3,468.24 2,771.55 New Zealand -16.21 -16.21 +29.86 +.92 +.92
26,912.00 21,341.00 Milan +24.00 +24.00 -236.00 -.95 -.95
905.38 686.33 Stockholm -.20 -20 +8.06 +.94 +.94

- . .. . ' ' .
. : . . ... . .. . . .. i, '

Name High Low Last Chg. Name High Low Last Chg.
ORANGE JUICE SOYBEANS-MINI
15,000 lbs.- cents per lb. 1,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Nov 05 116.90 109.25, 116.40 +8.30 Nov 05 581 5636 565 -70
Jan 06 119.40 111.30 118.80 +8.55 Jan 06 593o 576 5770 -7
Mar06 120!60 112.75 120.50 +8.75 Mar 06 601 584fl1 586 -6
Frfs sales 32766 Fri's sales 9082
Fri's open int 32050, up 1839 Fri's open int 10012, off 3013
CATTLE CORN
40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. 5,000'bu minimum- cents per bushel
Oct05 89.30 87.15 89.00 +.43 Dec 05 2010 196fl1 197 -4o
Dec05 91.60 89.15 91.30 +1.38 Mar06 2140 2100 2100 -4
Feb 06 94.40 92.17 94.37 +1.50 May 06 2220 219 2190 -30
Fri's sales 125135 Fri's sales 355011
Fri's open int 165503, off 2347 Fri's open int 857991, up 53202
FEEDER CATTLE COFFEE C
50,000 Ibs.- cents per lb. 37,500 Ibs.- cents per ib.
Nov05 115.60 113.50 115.35 +.93 Dec05 105.25 97.90 98.35 -5.10
Jan 06 113.85 111.40 113.52 +1.40 Mar06 108.10 101.25 101.70 -4.85
Mar06 110.60 107.50 110.60 +2.30 May06 109.30 103.50 103.55 -4.70
Fri's sales 28956 Fri's sales 76215
Fri's open int 28123, up 812 Fri's open int 84946, off 1191
LUMBER SUGAR-WORLD 11
110,000 bd. ft.- $ per 1,000 bd. ft. 112,000 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Nov05 306.9 287.7 304.9 +11.4 Mar06 11.86 11.59 111.61 -.19
Jan06 315.2 298.7 311.1 +7.5 May06 11.77 11.54 111.54 -.18
Mar06 325.6. 314.0 323.0 +4.0 Jul06 11.50 11.27 11.32 -.10
Fri's sales 3186 Fri's sales 185971
Fri's open int 3869, up 80 Fri's open'int 472824, off 6233


The Dow this week

Daily high, low and close for
the week ending October 28

10 ,450 . ..... ...................... ...... ........ ..........
10450








M T W Th F

Week's close:
10,402.77


Nasdaq .
2,089.88


S&P 500
1,198.41


Russell 2000
635.33

AMEX .
1,642.58


NYSE .-
7,369.55

AP


Sp oV QLoc INTEREST

Stock Exch 524nek PE Last Chg
High Low


AutoZone
CSX
Citigrp
CocaBtl
Dillards
Disney
ExxonMbl
FPL Gp s
FlaPUtil s
FlaRock s
GenElec
GnMotr
HomeDp
HuntBnk
Intel
LennarA
LockhdM
McDnids
NY Times
OffcDpt
OutbkStk
Penney
PepsiCo
ProgrssEn
SprintNex
SunTrst
TECO
WalMart
Wendys
Wrigley


N 79.78 77.77 11.00 79.73 +13.30
N 44.83 43.93 10.00 44.59 +13.80
N 45.98 45.42 10.00 45.90 +15.90
0 45.50 44.80 18.00 45.34 -3.00
N 19.85 19.42 14.00 19.68 -4.60
N 24.00 23.50 18.00 23.82 +8.40
N 56.61 54.79 11.00 56.31 +9.40
N 42.95 42.25 19.00 42.95 +4.30
A ... ... 18.00 14.59 +4.90
N 55.68 53.00 27.00 55.40 -6.00
N 34.25 33.52 19.00 34.05 +3.20
N 27.67 26.95 ... 27.26 -10.00
N 40.58 39.62 16.00 40.52 +8.70
O 23.28 22.65 13.00 23.20 +10.90
O 23.37 22.78 18.00 23.33 +1.80
N 55.12 53.80 8.00 55.12 -3.20
N 61.34 60.22 17.00 61.32 +5.20
N 32.29 31.55 17.00 32.29 -1.90
N 27.28 26.58 12.00 27.28 +1.90
N 26.49 25.49 38.00 26.42 +10.50
N 37.40 36.26 18.00 37.28 +.70
N 49.09 47.25 18.00 49.01 -10.10
N 58.95 58.30 25.00 58.83 +12.40
N 43.17 42.40 14.00 43.17 +13.40
N 23.35 22.61 19.00 23.25 +2.50
N 72.80 71.01 14.00 72.80 +25.80
N 17.09 16.68 ... 17.03 +6.80
N 45.55 44.76 18.00 45.50 -2.20
N 45.85 44.75 93.00 45.80 -9.70
N 70.30 69.52 29.00 70.02 -11.20


Heartland
Natiomdl Bank


block LI W7 ~ LAI LIIU Suci u wenry ~tLMh LN


I


At Heartland National Bank. \\e

answer \our phone call personall\...

No computer operator. and \ou
don't need a code number to get

help.


L Ag 'Rllew0 I


Avon Park
930 US 27 South 33825
1863) 453-6000
fat18031545345%

Sebring
32(0 US 27 North 33870
(863) 386-13100
FaixS63i) -I.W

Sebring
6011 I 27 North
(S63i 386-1322
Faxl*1.)%6M' . I

Lake Placid
600 LUS 27 North 33852
. 63 699-,, 0


Banking Boears
9 ar. *4 pm. M.nda) - Th-.Arf
9 am I(. pm, Fnda) 1
Ddrir-In Hourmn
Sam- pma Monday-i �da3
Shm.NoaS'nrda




in i in ilv LTu I Ias)LR Nhi,
Assets %Rb %R . Price PwM
AARP Invst:
GNMAx 2,949 +29 +1.70 14.75 1475
Girwnc 2,556 +112 +9.10 22.08 22.08
AIM Investments A:
BascValAp 3,828 +14.1 800 32.09 32.09
Cwmslp 4,683 +10.7 +9.90 2333 23.33
MdCpCrEq 2,635 +14.5 +8.40 29.05 2905
PwmEqy 3,527 +87 +7.40 9.68 9.88
Summl 2,306 +15.1 +13+60 1126 1126
AMF Funds:
AdjMtgn 2,712 +1.8 +1.90 9.70 9,70
AllianceBern A:
GrolncAp 2,606 +133 +7.50 3.72 3.72
Amer Century Inv:
Eqlncon 3,841 +12.7 +580 7.97 7.97
Groywhln 4,063 +9.6 +6.40 19.60 19.60
IrcGron 3,767 +13.9' +9.80 3036 30.36
IrGroln 2,268 +14.3 +15.60 9.44 9.44
SeldIn 3,379 +6.3 +5.90 36.78 3678
Pton 19141 ;F +5.70 28.72 28.72
'..... .. . 820 7.32 7.32
., i� . .. . . , r-12.50 14.73 14.73
Amercan Funds A:
1,5,. i' , +7.50 18.29 18.29
AmMutIAp 14,027 +12.3 +7.60 26.42 26.42
BalAp 32;396 +11.4 +4.90 17.72 17.72
BondFdAp 17,532 +83 +220 1323 1323
CaplnBIdAp42,503 +142 +.60 5223 5223
CapWGrAp 37,631 +22.2 +16.50 35.38 353B
EupacAp 41,920 +20.9 +19.40 38.74 38.74
FundlnvAp 23,370 +172 +13.30 33.39 33.39
GwthFdAp 68,625 +15.8 +13.80 28.97 28.97
HITrstAp 7,447 +16.6 +4.90 12.10 12.10
IncoFdAp 48,141 +14.1 +6.60 1808 18.08
InIBdAp 3,708 +2.4 +.70 13.43 13.43
InvCoAAp 66,254 +12.9 +8.90 30.95 30.95
NwEconAp 6,817 +166 +11.20 21.40 21.40
NewPerAp 35,341 +17.8 +12.40 28.56 28.56
NeWorildA 4224 +26.4 +2400 35.99 35.99
SmCpWAp 12,543+23.0 +16.80 32.81 32.81
TaxExplAp 3,599 +4.7 +250 12.38 12.38
WshMutAp 62,~09 +11.9 .00 3016 3026
American Funds B:
BablnBt 5,130 +10.6 +4.20 17.6 17.66
CaplnBldBt 3,407 +13.3 +7.70 52.23 52.23
CapWGrSt 2,023 +212 +15.60 3522 35.22
GrolhBI 6,157 +14.9 +13.00 27.99 27.99
InconeeBl 4,166 +132 +5.80 17.99 17.99
ICABI 3,806 +12.0 +8.10 30.82 30.82
WaslB 2,983 +11.1 +5.203009 3009
Ariel Mutual Fds:
ApWec 3,358 +13.7 +800 47.21 47.21
Arieln 5,019 +166 +4.40 52.01 52.01
Artisan Funds:
Inll 7,689 +16.9 +17.40 23.37 23.37
MdCap 4,917 +15.2 +1090 29.80 29.80
MidCapVal 2,758 +26.4 +21.30 18.61 1861
Baron Funds:
Assetn 2,687 +20.3+20.40 55.60 5560
Growth 5,005 +18.1 +1010 44.38 44.38
SmrCap 2,828 +17.7 +11.10 21.64 21.64
Bernstein Fds:
InltDur 3,384 +4.6 +1.80 13.12 13.12
DilMun 2,972 +3.2 +.0 13.97 13.97
TxNgdl tM 6,079 +21.6 +15.80 23.70 2370
IWtVaO 2,783 +22.0 +1610 22.31 22.31
Brandywine Fds:
Brandy�nen3,993 +14.8+2130 29.38 29.38
Calamos Funds:
Grth&lncAp 2,689 +14.3 +12.30 30.44 3044
Grow"iAp 11,987 +172 +8.90 52.16 52.16
GrowthCI 13,513 +163 +810 49.96 49.96
Calvert Group:
Incopx 2,974 +89 +320 16.68 16.88
Causeway IntI:
lnsMuioral 2,817 +236 +11+40 16.26 1626
crper 6,221 8 .2 +4.30 8688 86.88
Cohen & Steers:
RtyShrsn 2,450 +29.8 +19.70 73.81 73.81
Columbia Class A:
Acnmt 3,149 +24.4 +1550 26.89 26.9
Columbia Class Z:
AcomZ 9,994 24.9 +15+90 2751 27,51
AcamIrZ 2,409 +29.7 +2490 31.61 31.61
IrdmTEBdn 2,088 +35 +60 1031 10.31
IrAI 2,511 +255 +13.80 22,61 22.61
LgCapldxZ 2,366 +12.2 +810 2338 23.38
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 18224 +167 +130 32.38 32.38
Davis Funds B:
NYVenB 5,126 �15.6 +12.70 30.87 3087
Davis Funds C & Y:
NYVenY 2,762 +17.1 +14.0 3281 32.81
NWYeC 5,183 +15.8 +12.70 31.07 31.07
Dimensional Fds:
EngMVtal 1,980 +431 +34.0021.+ 2100
IntlSmVan 3,920 +38.1 28.90 17.09 1709
USLgCon 1,971 t123 +820 3520 3520
USLgVan 3,824 +1921 +1660 2084 2084
USMiro 3,858 +25.6 +12.90 14.96 1496
USSmaIln 2,645 +228 11.90 1944 1944
USSmVal 6,888 +290 +15.50 27.13 27.13


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%%%%w.heartlandnb.com


'Heartland
National Bank
S . i. ..../ll, O.n tJ .*m li, BjnA
Nr.4 , IU q/ H.L hia;n!, ',,.,nr""


rM-


rerk iWll II R .1' *fCnw
Assets %R %RW Price I
IntISmCon 2,690 +339 +25.00 1575 1
IntVan 2,381 +287 +19.90 17.09 I
TMUSSmV 2,564 +26.7 +15.40 24.06 2
Dodge&Cox:
Balancedn 23,381 +14.6 +9.30 7969 7
IrnomFd 9,299 +4.9 +1.80 12.58 1
IntlStk 10,728 +31.3 +21.80 32.97
Stock 49,915 +19.1 +14.00 13223 13
Dreyfus:
Aprec 4,641 +6.0 +830 39.32 3
DreyMil 2.103 +18.5 +15+60 27.38 2
Drey5001nt 3,391 +11.9 +7.70 3525
Mun8dr 2,051 +5.0 +2.90 11.73 1
Eaton Vance CI A:
NatlMun 2,141 +8.5 +7.00 11.18
Evergreen A:
AstAlAp 2,560 +13.8 +930 13.91 1
Evergreen C:
Asl oCIt 2,687 +130 +850 13.48 1
Evergreen I:
CoreBdl 3,618 +42 +1.40 10.44 1
AdjRatel 2,014 +2.1 +2.10 927
InWlEqIyl 2,037 +18.6 +18.60 963
Excelsior Funds:
ValRestln 5275 +23.6 +14.00 43.70 4
FPA Funds:
Cap 2,041 +22.5 +19.00,43+91 4
Federated A:
Cap +pA 2,431 +9.3 +5.10 24.99 2
KaulfmAp 2,228 +17.5 +12.40 5.42
Federated Instl:
Kauhman 4,006 +17.5 +12.60 5.43
Fidelity Advisor A:
DivntAr 2,759 +22.6 +19.10 20.03
Fidelity Advisor I:
DivItln 2,214 +23.0 +1950 20.30
Fidelity Advisor T:
DMnlTp 2,421 +22.3 +18.80 19.86
DivGrthTp 2,475 +7.7 +5.60 11.55
EqGiTp 3,965 +9.7 +.00 45.39
EqlnT 3,046 +13.7 +920 28.452
GlVppT 3,133 +11.1 +8.30 30.73
MkdCapTp 4282 +19.5 +13.80 25.09
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2010n 9,529 +9.1 +6.10 13.76
FF2020n 11,440 +121 +8.70 14.16
FF203On 6,626 +13.5 +10.00 14.331
FF2040n 2,774 +14.5 +10.70 8.42
InconmeFdn 2,060 +46 +3.50 11.26
Fidelity Invest:
AggrGrr 4,476 +156 +7.50 16.46
AMgr 10204 +7.8 +4.90 1598
AMgrGrn 3,308 +89 +5.60 14.76
Balac 15,285 +15.2 +12.00 17.801
BlueChipGr 22244 +8.6 +5.70 41.14
CapAppn 7,131 +18.4 +830 25872
Caplonr 5,348 +22.1 +720 827
Contran 55,682 +16.2 +17.60 61.706
Destlnyln 2,991 +114 +13.10 13.43
Deslinylln 4,970 +9.9 +600 11.67
MOEqn 5,924 +13.1 +13.90 26.39
Divedrnn 30,283 +22.9 +17.90 30.43
ivGhn 16,566 +8.3 +620 27.93
Equllncn 25,992 +13.8 +8.60 51.75
EQlin 12292 +13.1 +7.50 23.462
Europen 2,699 +27.7 +21.80 36.733
Elporn 3,305 +18.0 +17.90 20.582
FKldeFd 9,851 +112 +8.10 29.992
FIRateHir 2,429 +5.55,+430 995
GNMAn 3,967 3.0 +1.70 10.83
GovtIncn 5,290 +3.1 +1.30 10.08I
G;oCon 25,668 +18.1 +13.40 5820
Grolnc 31288 +83 +6.40 38.463
Highlncrm 3273 +15.1 +4.90 8.75
lrepifdnen4,596 +123 �1180 18.10
IrfBdn 7,414 +4.1 +80 10261
rMIDLMsc 3,983 +23.1 +20 0 30253
nldSmCapm 2211 +41.8+3020 2670
InvGBn 7,264 +4.7 +1.60 7.34
LevCoSlock 3,502 +45.3 +21.90 2405
LowPim 37,195 +21.1 +13.20 38993
Mage]ann 52,491 +9.5 +6.90 103.61 1'
KMdCapn 9399 +15.1 +14.10 24.432
Munlncn 4,730 +53 2.70 12.88
NewMn 3,408 +12.7+10.60 3163
OTC 7,897 +136 +11.70 34.913
Ovrsean 5,016 +19.3 +16,50 37.153
Purian 24,077 +113 +640 1826
RealEsIn 5,821 +27.1 +1850 3041
STBFn 4,995 +30 +1.30 885
SmaCaPSnr 4,312 +199 +1080 1766
Strallncn 3,965 +11.6 +470 10.42
USBIn 5,848 +4.4 +120 1084
Vaken 13.309 215 +1550 74767
Fidelity Selects:
Electrn 2637 +15.7 +1000 38523
Energyn 2,662 +34.1 +5370 45.754
Eqilndinv n22,99 +12.3 +8.10 42.45
Heathn 2549 +11.1 +2080 141.76 1
Fidelity Spartan:
500nd1lnvnr12,905 +123 +810 8315
InvGrgdn 2942 +50 +180 1046
TotMklhInlnv 3256 +142 +990 3337


I __ji..... ,i * th, Is.-ompiled after the .nmket clos


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%-1- i.l. WbT.l hr 1, -1 13, kV IB i. I1l M I dh anLBS I Im I T l fues ftyB UP M. la I M I usL BuN N
Pch Ass %R JIm PIa PWch As , %bitm ln PIm PM Anm* %mFb Pi Pa n PA ta mn i PMl
1575 First Eagle: John Hancock A: Price Funds Adv Enegyn 2,422 38.7 +45.0 101.8510135
1709 GIblA 9,602 +242 +17.60 4214 42.14 ClasscWp 2,469 +19.5 +12.50 23.67 23.67 En Fp 2,438 +13.9 4820 26.01 26.01 Ezna 2357 +19.4 +12.60 70.14 70.14
'4.C06 OveseasA 4,926 +27.2 +20.90 23.98 23.98 Julius Baer Funds: Pnce Funds: EtiAdnn 2n318 +212 +15.10 3 32.38
FrankiTemp FmkA: hIlEqlr 8,600 +232 +21.40 34.65 34.65 Balann 2,482 +11.4 +7.60 19.49 19.49 500Admn 35,566 +12.3 820 110M2 11032
769 AGEAp 2,223 +18.5 +430 2.072.07 IdEqA 7297 +22.7 +21.10 33.99 33.99 BleChoGn 7,569 +11.4 +8.20305 305 GNMAMAnn�,791 +3.4 +230 1022 10.22
12.58 Balinvp 4,309 +19.9 +15.70 60.78 60.78 Legg Mason: Fd CapAprn 7,041 +152 +1020 1,19.96 196 G A 2,039 +12.7 +82049.87 4917
3297 CaTFrAp 12,517 +5,4 +4.80 7.27 7.27 OppodlTrt 355 +26.0 +12.60 '15221522 Eqncn 17,820 +14.1 48.40 26.06 26.06 H 7,947 +14.6+172057285728
3223 FedlfAp 6,331 +55 +3.80 1203 1203 SpInvrnp 3,488 +21.9 +16.70 46.15 46.15 Eqld n 5,543 +12.1 +7.90 3224 32.24
FoWFAIp 375 NS +9 12.38 12.38 Valp 11219 +162 +10.60 6321 6321 Gon 10,1 +12.n0 . 1 1Y n 3,741.1 5 2+2.70 6013 6107
39.32 HYTFAp 4,975 +73 +5.50 1I068 106B LeggMasoninsth WYii n 3,254 +13.3 +4.80 6.89 6.% t YUAdn 3,987 +5.8 +330 10.71 10.71
2738 IncoSerAp 21,907 +16.5 +5 2. 2.40 D nst 5,399+14 +11.7069.48 .48 tn 5,406 +172 +17.10 13.7413.74 hInsd nn 1,967 +5.0 +2.10 1256 12.5
3525 NYTFAp 4,451 +4.8 +320 11.81 11.81 Longleaf Partners: iMdCapn 14, +20.6 +1520 52.52 52.52 IThd 6i 2,78 +52 +.50 1028 102
113 SMCpGrA 7,064 +17.7 13.4035+303530 Paners 8,872 +13.7 +73D3155 31.55 MCapVan 5,267 +19.9 +9.7023.0023D lTsyAdrdn 2,071 +30 +30 1021 1.1
USGvAp 5,904 +21 +1.60 6A7 647 hIn 2,745 +18.8 +15.70 16.70 16.70 Nern 3,50 +292 000 4020 4020 InhMrAd 2,384 +195 +17.00 2 6328 3
1118 UblbisAp 1,984 +19.5+1620 1.77 1.77 SmCap 2,713 +20 +1270 31.09 31.09 NHIrnn 6338 +234 +16. 3025 3025 ITAlnn 7,915 +40 1.10 13256 132
1 Frank/TmpFmkAdv: Loomis Sayles: Nefton 3,527 +49 +2.10 892 8,2 ITCOMMa 2,40 +52 +S 9.72 9.72
3.91 I eA*v 220 +16.8 +5.70 239 22.3 LSBl 3,302 +16.8 6.50 1367 13.67 saTch 3428 +s,5 +5,5018.731.73 LTI 4.470 2.4 +.0 10.71 10.71
Frank/Temp Fnmk B: Lord Abbett A: &SI n 4.739 +2418 +1510 3724 3724 MCpAd'nijn 252 +202 +18.40 742 74.2
13.4 IncomeB 3,923 +15.7 +470 2.39 2.39 AMldAp 14,945 +139 +7.40 14.46 14.46 ,7PmCapr 6,930 +18 +920 65.47 65.47
Frank/TemprFmkC. C:ep 4W963 +112 +230 7.75 715 Specinn, 4,833 +9.1 +340 11.71 11.71 STBAmin 2261 +26 +.40 9.1 9.1
1044 Incrie 10,103 +15.9 +500 241 2.41 MkiCapAp 7,402 +179 +152022.54 22.54 Van 2,9 +16.1 +10.3023.09 23.0 ShTmAd 2,82 +11 +1.401553 1553
927 FranklrempMtiA&B: MFS Funds A: Putnam Funds A: S dGraMn 6,671 +3A4 +1.50 10.50 10.50
9.63 DLscovA 3,048 +18.8 +1730 2554 25.54 MITAp 3285 +11.0 +11.80 17.70 17.70 CATxAp 2058 +4.7 +2.70 825 835 &nWCapdrn2,252 +225 01250 27.10 27.10
ShresA 3,802 +14.6+1260 23.79 23.79 MIGAp 4,918 48.6 +820 1232 1232 Eqp 22 +13 +1010 1745 17.45 TdCr 223 +14 +113D 57 5768
43.70 Frank/Temp Temp A: EmnGrAp 2,325 +14.1 +12.80 32.74 3274 GoAp 39 +92 +590 1792 172 TlMdAdIn 4,3 +4.1 +130 99 9.99
De$UAld~ 3,122 +317 +2730 2fi Pfl wul'p t9i .272 A I MM GWeyAp 339 +92 +5.90 17.2 17.92 TfldAd n 4343 +4.1 +1 9 9J9 9.99,
4391 FoDegAp 16,144 +17.1 +15.O 12 09 1209 ToRPAp 7,371 +10.1 1.150 15.78 1578 G p 12,029 195 198 T.S091n4,8129 +143 0 3.70 251.70
GmwIlAp 21265 +17.1 +11.70 22.08 22.0 VaeAp 4,613 +14D +11.60233.60 23 6 qp 3,345 +16.7 +1730 24193 3 24 WA n 519 +12.6 03 52.71 52.71
24M WoddAp 8215 +18.0 +7017.09 17.09 1709 MFS Funds B: Ap 2155 +131 +11.90m 12.84 2114 YMnn ++12. 4+3 52.71 5271
542 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: MIGB 2,006 +79 +7.50 1127 1127 p 4,646 +37 +1210 426842 Wtornn7.534 +16.0 +830 59.71 5971
GrhAv 2,663 +17.4 +1200 22.10 22.10 TRBt 2,745 +9.4 +5.80 157815.78 VstaAp 1,971 +172 +15.10 9.83 9.83 WdslIAi 11,73 +172 +13 55.75 55.75
5.43 FranklTemp Tmp B&C: MainStay Funds B: VoyAp 7,W04 4.1 *720 16.61 16.1 Vanguard Fds:
GrwtiCp 2,017 +16.3 +1090 216021.60 HiYBBt 2529 +18.9 +520 622 622 Putnam Funds B: AsselAn 932 +122 +7.60 2447 24.47
20.03 GE Elfun S&S: Mairs & Power GnBt 2,589 +122 410 1907 19.07 Cap0ppn 5,231 +233 +10303095 305
S&Slomen2,561 +4.1 +1.40 1121 1121 .Gowthn 2,418 +14.7 +730 62 69.32 RS Funds: Ener 6,789 +38. +451 5422 5422
2.3 S&SPMn 4,068 +9.4 +6.50 4495 44.95 Managers Funds: RSPro *e 2,157 +353 +21.00 3725 3725 Eqkn 234 +13Z +9. 2328 232
Trustn 2,316 184 +5.80 53.92 53 -2 SpdEq 3.008 +17.8 +8.6 D 87.75 97.75 RiverSourceIAXPA: Epbw n B M +192 +12-40 75.24 7524
1986 GMO Trust III: Marsico Funds: DEl 3,750 +23.1 +18370 11.64 11.64 GNMAn 14,640 +33 +230 1022 102
1155 EgMkr 4,576 +37.6 +360 1921 1921 Focusp 3,739 +11.7 +1530 16.99 16.99 Gromt 2203 +9.8 +11.40 27.48 2748 Gbqn 2X1 +23.4 +15A 18.71 18.71
4539 Foren 4,092 +224 +1630 1523 1523 Grawp 2,124 +12.4 +11.10 1768 17 3,1 +42 +1.60 43 8 4 52 0 10 30
2845 InMGrt 2,433 +19.4 +16 90 27.60 27.60 Meridian Funds: NeWo 6,543 +8.1 +20 233 233 HYCorpn 5,422 +.0 +2.60 36.1
30.73 InIlGrEq 2,609 NE NE 27.40 27.40 Vale 2, +16.6 +900 37.40 37.40 RiverSource/AXPY: HYC-pn 5.422 +11 2.0 6.13 6.13
25.09 Intlntal 2233 +250 +1760 2972 2972 Merrill Lynch A: NeOn 2,351 +63 +300 23.44 23.44 HltCaren 1768 +145 +17.10 135. 135
USCoreEqy 2,776 NS NS 133 13.83 BasValAp 2268 +13.6 +630 29.70 29,70 RoyceFunds: 1. laP8n 6582 +73 +3.0012.301230
13.76 GMO Trust IV: GLbAAp 4,517 +193 +13.70 1720 17.20 Lo tkr 3974 +20.6 +760 15.18155.18 ktEkn 2215 +32.4 +26.10 176 17
14.16 Erild 2,821 +37.4 +. 5019.1719.17 Merrill Lynch B: Prmirr 3,102 +233 +130 16.01 1601 WtGr 8,454 +19.3 +16.80 1987 19
43342 GMO Trust VI: +17 2972 2972 136 189+12.70 16,84 16M T ir 4219+17.7 +11.70 12.47 12.47 itin 3,661 22.3 17.70 .3294
1126 EmgMrls 2,144 NS+0 1919 919 Merrill Lynch C: Russell Funds S: meGn 2.528 +5.1 +80 9.72 9.72
U r226 N + 1 Gl C 2,793 +19.0 +122 16.37 16.37 DivEqS 2571 +129 +12.00 44.03 44.03 UFEConn 4,110 +89 +5.40 15.17 15.17
16 USCore 2225 NS NA Merrill Lynch 1: ilecS 2,331 +193 +1550 64.61 64.61 UFEGoan 6,702 +131 +9.50 2021 2021
1S Gabelli Funds: BasVa 3,862 +13. 4 .60 29.5 295 OuatEq 264 +121 +920 37.91 371 UFEModn 7,52 +11.5 +7.40 1727 177
1598 Assel 2,296+1 +1110 4 143 2577 +202 +1390 1725 1725 SEI Portfolios: LTnGraotn 4,193 40 +3.60 932 9
17.8 Gartmore Fds Instl: Morgan Stnley A: CorFInAn 4I +1.4 1. n +10 + 161 16
41.14 S&P500lnstlnl,998 +12.1 +790 10.33 1033 ntalA 3544 +12.4 +720 35-11 35.11 kllEqAn 4322 +18.31 + 18. n64 +39 +10 i 1 i3n
2587 Gateway Funds: MoroanStanley lnst: LgCDGAn 4,007 +10.1 +97018m18889IB Mkutn 4N +2.4 +1.010325 1321
827 Gateway 2,635 +77 +00 2507 25.07 C= n 2105 4 +4 . 2 11 50 n 43 +15.5 +1110 21 2. 2404 +24 .70 10,71 10.7
In4Eqn 7,163 +18.1 +12.40 212921229 TakhC 2,171 +132 +1020 11.45 1,45 Pre 2,017 342 9 207720
61.70 Goldman Sachs A: ,Mtienrn 3,065 +24.6 +16.80 80.37 8037 Schwab Funds: Pmpr 20,643 +18.3 +900 63.04 63.04
13.43 HYMiniAp 2,044 4.0 +7.00 1111 11.11 M aS109.nr 4272 +930 35-O 3500 Selur 3788 +20+1420 1876 1876
11,67 MiCapVAp 2,812 +198 +1670 3545 355 Mutual Series: 15 5 16 r 422 +12.8 9.50 35.03 SIG TABRn 113740 +120.5 1408.76 1.91
26.39 Goldman Sachsinst,: newa 3,445 +15.9 +1220 16,35 1635 1SdRn 21,740 +12.5 0 1191
30.43 HYMA 2,473 +4 +730 11.11 1111 cZ 227 +19217.70 25.80 250 S&Pnvn 3,778 +12.1 +710 18M6 186 SrA N 10 264.3 +1.40 105 10530
27.93 Harbor Funds: Ouf 3618 + 17.1 +140 20.11 20.11 S&PSdn 3X +123 410 18.74 16.74 SatEqn 5,183 +218 +1430 212 21.2
51.75 CapAppInstn7,110 +1133 +142030.54 3054 StaresZ 8,540 +150 +13.10 23.97 23.97 PIS 5,348 0 +3.10 9.66 9.66 Tg25 168 I NS +7.10 11256 11
23.46 Inrnr 10,459 +23 0.90 46,80 4680 Neuberger&BennITr: Scudder Funds A: 3JsGon 4,62 9n8 +12.40 1678 16.78
3673 Hartford FdsA: GfeSisn 6,62 +207 +20.40 47.41 47.41 DNiRA 4.33 +16.5 +12.043.4643.48 dyn 7 .54 735 0 2214214
20.58 CapApAp 6,072 +210+170 . NicholassGroup:p 2,014.4+ 40 9.06 9,05 n 26,446+12.5+92D3S D51
29,9 DivGthpA 2,165 +133 +990 1901 1901 Nidrdn 2.490 +12.8 +11.40 590 2,1 +2.-6 +12D 0 8.40 8.40 n ,4 +20 1
995 HartfordHLSlA: NuveenClR: ScudderFunds S: n 191 +17.1 +12 17 17.
103 Bd 2,615 +6.1 +180 1165 1.65 5k nOuDMud2,242 +42 +2.40 9 0 9M 00 GS d 2,180 +11.1 .1022.5-05 Wdsan 29i231 +17.1 +12A 31.39313
1008 CapApp 10,02 +220 ++187054.99 5499 Oakmark Funds 1: Selected Funds: Vanguard Idx Fds:
5820 Dv&Giwth 5,002 +14.0 +103020862086 E r 9223 +145 +10302413 24.83 AhsSp 7'703 +159 +12M. 38.66 66 Sn 70. +12.3 410 11051110.51
3648 Mvers 8,400 +86 +750 23:39 23.39 IrnfIr 5,27 +23.1 +183.50 2.55 SeligmanrGroup: bAtr dn 4,147 +102 .40 1927 1927
875 Stock 4,852 +11.1 +1060 47.07 47.07 O *a r 640 +10.9 +1.40 39.72 39.72 CuA 2,249 +183 +12-10 25.75 2575 BEMin 5102 +32.5 +31.0 16M 163
1810 Hartford HLSIB: Seedi 5~07 +12.0 +5.80 3178 32.78 Sequoi 3,496 +72 +4.40154.4554.45 Epen 102 +20.7 +14.90 26.7926-9
1026 CapAppWp 2,703 +21.7+18.40 54.66 5466 Oppenheimer A: SmithBaneyA: Exridn 5.184 +21.+1530 3234 3234
3025 Hotchkis&Wiley: 1CApApp 5,3 +105 +530 40.5 40.9 5 AgxAp 3,788 + +2+16.101009313 03 n 6, &+, 3 7 4. 0 26.31 2631
2670 Lg Ap 2,715 +22.6 +1380230023 Capl p 2,665 +15.8 +850 1225 1225 AWApP 3 3 +112 43) 14.65 flB n 3,048 +52 +.40 10281028
7.34 MidCpVa] 2,571 +286 +1470 2795 27.95 DevlAp 4,702 +42.4 +41.80 32.40 32.40 Fd p 28 +149 4+7.10 14 9614 MCa 5w 20.1 +18.40 1651 165
2405 Husmr6Gr 2,125 +108 +60 1618 1618 EqutyA 2297+122+12.80 11.18 11.18 Smith Bar0eyB &P .S: , M - +21 & 1029 1029
389 JPMorganAClass: GaAp 10,427 +20.6 +17.5063.41 634 I1 +153 +15.10 90.40 90.40 T 4,449 .25.9 7.2015 10 1938 1938
1 pp 2,723 +18.0 +1140 22256 G 1 063 I S Ba 11 22 r 4,449 27 . 19 93
2443 JPMorgan Select: hAp 2,671 +16.7 +9,905A 5,99 DDtvS 2,7 +.;6 +2.20 16D87 16.87 SCapn 5.03 +2V4 *12.40 27 272
1288 Eq 2,561 +17.9P+1400 3057 30V57 Se 7, +11 0 48 35.D 35S0 SmithBarneyY: SrdC I 3,426 +2029 +1220 14.11 14.11
3183 4,7Morgan : +12.1 +50 4 426 LqCapGrY 2,75 +13.5 +.930 2A42 2.42 STIn 3,152 +2.5 +3 921 9.9
3715 CoreBon 2,773 +4 1 +0.106210.62 OppenheimQuest: SondShn 2,114 +17.7 +14.10370.2 3722 Toirdn 20 +4D +1420 999 9M
I2 Ir dnier 2,246 NS +14.60 2316 23.16 2. 6 a 3. +14. +2 50 17M 17.58 St Fa Aeso: To83dn 114931 +2 2 +1830 13 36133
30.41 Janus: C a Xa6 2214 +13`4 +1.701726 2617 G.tn 30 4112 +7.3048134813 lotr 2fl +142 +9.52MG 2aM
31 ni:edn 2,575 81 .790 2149 249 OppenheimerRoch: TCWGalileo Fd: i eVaen 3324 +162 ,113 21.43 2143
1785 Coxnan 2.980 +25 6 +1920 1397 1397 LYAp 2,487 +53 +520 335 3.35 SeE 3050 +172 +720 19.14 1914 Vanguard Intl Fds:
1042 Fundn 11,622 +8 +.80 2418 24.18 RoMuAp 5,689 .7 +860 18.10 18.10 Templeton Inst : En 278 1520 32.41 32
1084 Gln 5910 +128 33 64 3364 RC"uA 2,440 +13.0 +1130 12.07 1 = 2 , S 2.7; +2 .27 20 16M 16.87 Enn ,3" +15. 3.t 4C1
74 76 MeoJrynl 4,557 +13.0 .12.00 21.78 21.78 PIMCOAdmin PIMS: FSi 0T .16 1020`2 2.92 Inln 14W04 +12.4 +820D09I109V1 1
MiCapVaJ 4,339 +21.5H +160 23.04 2304 ToP Admn 18I3 49 .1 1052 1052 Third Avenue F :n 2420 3 18 16 16
3852 ODmusn 2281 +137 +16.10 308 3048S PIMCO Inst PIMS: 1,961 + 294 +9 )2033 2033 n2,420 +202 1.50 16 21
Ovemeasnr 2,570 +23.5 83120 2802 28+02 AIss 5,358 +13,0 +60,9 12.8 9 a ,mReaiWt 2V . 61 +252 +1600 29.03 2103 'SCCpOn IZO .226 AM2. 7.13 27.13
4245 T 917 +158 1790 468 46.88 CmodR s5,494 +251 +13.30 6 186016W0 Value 6290 25 +220 58 00 Tin 82 4 2 9.99 9
417 V Wr w 5206 47 +450 4107 41+07 EmMkIsSd 2` +20.7 .l J 11.14 11.14 ThornburgFds: TSWrn 1l, +143 +970 1 2 .70 2&7T
JennisonDrydenA: i'n 3,659 +142 +5.10 936 966 MInFAp 2. 12 +1950 220 2200 VantagepointFds:
8315 UiyA 3,544 +315*3560 1425 1425 Lo*Wn 9.568 *.26. 0 0 10.02 ThriventFdsA: GrO tn 2,811 44 .5.40 820 82
s046 2,525 +57 +2 80 2 350 s2 Mod3.5 n +T45 +. .70105 0.05 l9COap 3,420 +9.+860 257325.73 Victory Funds:
1046 ReanR 5,403 +7.9 +320 1124 1t24 Tweedy Browne: mSA 2.709 +157 +920 1628 166
33.37 Sho�T 2390 +2.6 +2.40 10 10 00 Glob 7350 +192 +16M0 25.41 2541 WM Sir AssetMgmt:
To7Raen 52.70 +5.1 +2.00 10.52 1052 USAA Group: BalsncdAp 2124 +.110 6.70 1324 1324
THIn Z138 .41 .3Z 9.4 194 kSikn 2,071 +13S+1030 16V3 1647
PIMCO Funds A: S&Plan 2239 +12.1 8.00177 17.97 Waddell & ReedAdv:
I g N e s .. CwroTt RRp2,558 NS +123)0 16.5 1651 TxEITn 2,779 45+ +2.0013.11 13.11 .COrt�A 365 .104 +10.40 535 55
R ealeAp 3,643 +7.4 +2.70 1124 1124 Tx.Tn 2,375 +.D +3.10 1O 14.00 SCTed 2.313 +13 16.10 11.15 1.1
TMtRiA 9315 +47 +1.50 1052 10.52 Van Kamp Funds A: Weitz Funds:
PIMCO Funds C: CDslAp 11,36 +17.4 +7.70 18.10 18.10 PatVW 220 +122 +1.50 227 2227
ReaeleCp 2.521 +6.9 +220 1124 1124 EmGroAp 3280 +9b +9O 39.7 07 auen 3,400 +13 +1.70 3506 3506
T1I0t0 2,586 +3 +20.50 10210.52 EqlytAp 9$12+133+1220 879 8.79 Wells FargoAdv:
PIMCO Funds D: Gtp 6243 .+163 +15.40 21.15 21.15 j Z#nZ227 +18.5 +960 462 463
To 1p 2945 +4 +1.70 10.52 a.5 HYMuAp 32V +7.7 +750 1080 1080 A et
Pioneer Funds A: Van Kamp Funds B: Western Asset
ighYbAp 2.700 +15.1 +3,40 I.5 11.15 CraSt 2,573 +16.5 490 18.9 1809 C ePIis 5 67 +7.7 +2.70 10.41 ' 4'
"The Lo a Pap " MCpVp 26 +195 +1120 2259 22S9 rWqlI 3229 +12.611.30 8 6.65 C 36,801 1 +1 .13A 0 1120 112
The Local Paper" p 11+9.40 4232 4232 Vanguard Admiral: William Blair N:
Vaep 399 +132 +940 1701 1 C01 An 3,003 +234 +10.40 71.53 71.53 IGI 2,623 +222 +21.0 299 273

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Sto Ex Wetey PE ULt Cg
KO Low
A
ACE Ud N 516250440150051.55+14.10
ADCTes 0 17.57 169513.001749 -7.90
AES 1I N 15.60 152222001551 .50
AFAC N 47.60 47,06160047.51.1640
AGCO N 15.14 1460100001492 -19.80
AK Seel N 697 6.76 .. 695 +20
AMR N 12198 1261 .. 12.88 +370
ASMLH)d 0 16.97 16.57 .. 16.96 -1.70
AT&T N 19.79 19.458.00 19.73 +.720
AclTech 0 1423 1377 . 1423 +600
AUOpton N 11.99 11+70 11.98 +510
AbtLab N 42.80 42.0720.0042.75
AberFDlc N 49.70 4716190049.58 -390
Ab O 0 10.36 1014 . 1023 +2.50
aCm 0 211 1.76 1.80 +460
Aenture N 2630 25.7817.0026.16 +.60
Acbvisns 0 1586 1520360015.54 -360
AdobeSysO 3236 31+87290032.31 .1100
AMD N 22.40 21.43 . 22.32 +4.70
Aetnas N 88.57 8445180088.12 +8.50
Agerers N 10.09 9.60 10.08 +320
Alenl N 31.05 29.9741.0031.00 -90
ATrian N 14.80 1420 14.40 +5.10
AkamanT 0 16.98 16.108.00 16.84 -4.10
Aiamosa 0 14.70 1426 ... 14.61 -7.20
Amertsn N 25.25 24.7918.0025.18 +11.20
Alcoa N 24.11 23+58170024.02 +6.70
AbData N 34.87 33.9424.00 34.73 -21.70
AJdWaste N 7.977.862300 7,95 +1.10
AIslate N 52.7352.0420.0052.69 -5.10
Ajel N 61.48 60.3615.0061.44 +6.70
AheaCp 0 16.46 15.9623.0016.32 10.40
Aia N 75.11 73.5815.0075.11 +21.40
kAmazon 0 39.65 38.7233.0038.95 -70.00
Amdocs N 26.26 25.8820.0026.08 +1.00
AmHess N 123.48115.8413.00122,91.+6620
AMovILs N 25.7625.07 25.70.26.50
AEaleOs O 22.41 21.6113,0022.39 -7.90
A N 37.90 36.86120037.90+16.40
AmEM N 49.5946.7616.0049.54+23.90
A Int It N 864.37 63.2614.0064.30+13.80
kmirBcnA 5.31 5.04 . 5.18 -.30
APwCnv 0 2224 212424.0021.63 -12.50
AmSland N 37.10 35.9620.0037.08 -6.60
AmTower N 2'3.52 23.03 .. 23.43 +.50
Amerild N 22.2521.5413.0022.18 -11.70
A. lprsn N 37.20 3621 ... 37.10+31.00
deO 20.6319.5625.002050 +2.90
0gen 0 75.94 74.0727.0075.78 +24.10
Am T 0 5.51 4.92 . 5.14 +9.10
Amyrn 0 34.46 3326 .. 33.52 -2530
Anadk N 90.92 862012.0090.69+44.50
AnalogDev N 34.69 33,5028.0034.61 -6.60
Andrew 0 10.50 102254.001028 -4.40
Anheusi N 40.67 40.30160040.57 -15.90
Annaly N 11.95 11,457.02 11.49 -3.20
AonCop' N 34.05 33,7516.0033.87+12.60
Apache N 6329 60.149.00 6297 +29.40
ApoG 0 C62.7061.4326006254+28.10.
AppiCs 0 56.43 54.17350054.47 -11.90
Applebees 0 21.52 20.5117.0021.52 -9.10
alB o N 24.16239319.0023.99+10.90
Ma 0 16.50 16.1420.0016.36 -5.70
AMCC 0 2.52 232 .. 240 -2.80
ArkCoai N 76.8571.84 .. 76.70+52.90
AchODan N 24.94 23.0015.0024.30 +5.20
kbIal rc 0 8.00 7.83 . 7.94 +8.50
AnTis 0 8.24 7.86 7.94 -16.00
AuTech 0 1.19 1.08 .. 1.15 +230
Aeal 0 2.41 234.. 2.35 +120
Auodsks 0 44.4543.5038.0043.95 -16.40
AutoData N 47.1546.7426.004684+41.50
,ava N 11.16 10.906.00 11.10 -5.90
AviTdlh 0 50.00 47.1224.0048.91 +86.20
Avon N 28.6825.3414.0027.79+11.60
Axceis 0 4.39 4.0884.00 4.20 -13.30


ffl Low
B
BB&TCp N 42.47 41.711.0042.41 +16.10
BEASys 0 8.83 84824.00 8.50
BHPBIIU N 30.8 3027 .. 30.73 +.90
BJSvcss N 34753280280034.51 +24.20
BMCSo N 19.39 1902 . 19.39 -2.00
BPPLC N 665065.31110066.46+21.80
Badun 0 71.9767.50 .. 6809-1910
BakHu N 55.1051.6626.0055.10 +32.00
BkoAm N 439843.2311.0043.98 +17.20
BkNY N 3094303716.0030.94+1100
BamdckG N 2745 26.4739.0027.20 +800
Baxter N 3900 3844320038.96 +8.50
BeaconP 0 1.93 1.80 . 182 -4.60
BeazHms N 5660 54.967.00 56.60 -650
BedBath 0 3997 3878220039.52 +5.50
BelSouth N 2604255412.002594 +6.30
BemaGod A 250 2.44 .. 2.46 +1.20
BestlBs N 4324 42.0520.0042.64 -13.60
BN ys 0 14.3313.32 .. 13.63 -17.00
Biognldc 0 3.79 38.0299.0038.49 -6.00
BomneI 0 34+68 33.3122.0034.57+16.80
BlSt N 4.57 423 ... 447 -8.60
Boecng N 65.75 63.7023.0065.64 -380
BoslonSc N 24.64 24.1036.002459 +7.00
Brinker N 38.07372119.0037.92 -11.00
BrMySq N 21.1420.7017.0021.14 -3.10
BrdDn 0 41.4639.57530041.42 -1030
BrcdeCrnfO 360 3.4116.00 3.60 -.80
BunrLt N 523.81 49.8613.0052.08 +5.00
BufiNSF N 60.40 59.3816.0060.39 +25.00
BudRsc N 72.6968,5913.0071.85+61.70
C
CBOTn N 12425110.00 .. 112.00
CMGI 0 ' 1.55 1.5231.00 1.54 -.50
CNET 0 1328 12.85 .. 13.17 -.20
CSX N 44.83 43.9310.00 44.59 +13.80
CVSCps N 25.16 24.5723.0025.12-10.10
CablvaNYN 24.83 24.16 ... 24.41 -33.90
Cadence N 16.11 15.8259.0016.00 +.40
Calpne N 2.40 2.00 .. 2.38 +.10
CdnNRsgsN 41.5939.48 . 41.53+36.50
CapOne N 75,4274.0011.007526 +8.10
CapidSre N 21.85 212516.0021.54 -7.10
Cpst0Trb 0 2.49 2.30 .. 243 -1.70
CardnIHtf N 62.73 62.0025.0062.65 -14.10
CaremkRx N 52.83 51.5030.0051.61 +16.90
Carnival N 48.9647.9519.0048.72 +9.70
Calerpis N 51.3649.8114.0051.07+21.50
CatIayGenO 38,5037.8520.0038.30 +37.50
Celescg N 9.39 9.11 .. 9.37 -.90
Celgene 0 5420 532694.0053.82 +21.80
Cemex N 5124 49.71 ... 51.18+24.30
Cendant N 17.88 172616.0017.64 -24.50
Centenes N 18.98 178516.0018.76 -53.40
CenterPnIt N 1320 12.74 .. 13.12 +4.70
Centex N 63.49 60.837.00 63.48 -6.10
CeradynesO 38.85 35.2028.003739 +3.90
CharCm 0 121 1.11 ... 1.20 +20
ChkPoint 0 22.4021.5019.0022.17 .920
Chemlura N 10.56 10.40 10.43 +240
ChesEng N 31.51 30.0019.0031.43+18.80
Chevron N 57.49 54.809.00 57.38 +10.80
ChicB&Is N 24.03 19.4924.0020.31 -96.90
Chicoss N 38.02 36.9441.0037.91 -11.60
Chiron 0 43.7943.10 . 43.40 +3.40
Chubb ' N 9230 91.0011.009245+67.80
CiwnaCp 0 2.38 2.27 2.37 -1.50
CircCily N 1726 16.5248.0017.19 -7.30
Cisco 0 1723 17.0620.0017,14 +1.10
CiVp N 45.98 45.4210.0045.90+15.90
Ct+0mn N 12.46 12.1649.0012.16 -.80D
CitixSy 0 27.05 26.4529.0026.70 +3.20
Clearoban N 30.67 29,6023.0029.88 -10.50
Coach N 31.8531.1330.0031.66 -6.00
CoaCE N 19.06 18.8114.00t8.91 -6,00
CocaCI N 42.97 42.3420.0042.83 +900


Stou UX wMy PE uS L J
Hgh Low
Coeur N 383 367 .. 3.82 +1.30
Ted 0 4588 43.9453.0045.39 .330
CooPhs N 53.14522324.0053.146+14.00
ComcastI 0 27.66 27.14450027.57 +500
Comso 0 27.1726.7044.002706 +.3.50
CrmcBis N 29.9928,9217.0029.99.10.60
CVRD N 40.13 39.0311.0039.84 +11.30
ContAs N 27.94 27.5390002724.10.40
CoroS N 49.9548.6011.0049.75.+44.00
Coiop 0N 7.89 7.5530.00 7.85 -.40
CmAira N 2339 0014230 37 +3.00
Conexant 0 1.93 1.83 .. 1.90 -.60
ConocPhtisN 63.476000700 6326+5420
ConsroEgy N 62.48 5829100062.10-37.50
ConsemllAs N 23.10 22518002270 +.20
ClAirB N 1218 11.89 .. 12.09 +3.40
CoopCam N 71.50 69.30270071.40+4620
Coming N 19.12 18.8237.0019.04 +4.80
Cost 0 47.35 46.&532.004734 420
CntwdFn N 32.03 30,819.00 32.03 +20
Coventrys N 53.10 500018.005238 60.10
Craylnc 0 120 1.10 .. 1.17 -20
Creeinc 0 23.89 229221.0023.61 -19.90
CwnCs N 24.65 24.08 ... 2423 -170
CypSem N 12.40 11.78 .. 1226 -7.90
D
DJIADiam A 103.96102.46 ... 103.84+17.00
DRHostnsN 29.94 28.96800 2978 -12.30
ORDGOLDO 1.29 1.25 . 127 -.10
OSLnelh A .06 .05 .. .06
DSTSys N 55.2853.8010.0055.00.22.60
Danap N 723 6.87 ... 720 -1.90
Danae N 5123 502819.0051.10 +12.50
Deere N 59.69 58.079,00 59.64 +24.80
Delllnc 0 31.54 30.8223.0031.06 -9.90
DevonEs N 6083 57.1512.0060A40+22.80
DiaOfs N 57.40 54.6146.0057.16+42.30
DigRver 0 28.77 27.0023.0028.19 88.30
DirecTV N 14.03 1383 .. 14.01 -.40
DiscHldAn 0 1426 13.70 14.19 +1.10
Disney N 24.00 23.5018.0023.82 +8.40
DobsonCmO 7.04 6.81 .. 7.03 +.90
DoIwG N 19.07 18.8418.0019.07 -3.40
DomFes N 75.56 74.1119.0075.34 -4.40
DoralFin N .5 8.182.00 8.50 -33.80
DowChmrn N 45.99 45.149.00 45.84+24.40
DowJns N 34.60 33.4352.0034.38+13.90
DuPon N 4220 41.3719.0042.00+33.60
DukeEgy N 26.4025.7914.0026.4010.80
Dynegy N 4.30 4.23 ... 428 -.40
E
ETrade N 1827 17.6717.0018.07 +1.90
eBays 0 38.55 37.5053,0038.43 -8.60
EMC-Cp N 13.98 13.7126.0013.82 +.90
EOGRessN 66.79 62.2419.0066.02 +47.70
EKodak N 21.44 20.77 ... 21.44 -6.00
EchoSlar 0 2723 26.589.00 26.91 -220
Edisonlnl N 43.09 41.4A79.00 43.09+19.50
EIPasoCp N 11.79 11.52 .. 11.74 +3.00
Elan N 8.19 7.92 . 797 -1.70
Electls 0 57.0855.5843.0056,72+19.50
EDS N 23.0022.35 ... 22.74+10.30
Emden 0 9.50 92758.00 9.35 -7.40
EnvsnEI N ,68.77 67A621.0068.59 -.60
Emnnulex N 18.75 17.8323.0018.52 +6.30
EnCanas N 46.50 44.70 ... 45.78 -3020
ENSCO N 4524 42.9330.0045.11 +42.50
EqOffPT N 30,92 29.95 .. 30.90 4.30
EqtyRsd N 39,54 38.4521.0039.48+14.40
Encsnr T 0 32.603220 ... 3253 -.80
EsteeLdr N 32.42 30.6820.0032.42 -13.40
Exelo N 52.43 51,3117.0052.42 +14.80
ExSIptsO 75.43 71.8330.007429+105.50
Netw 0 4.86 4.6747.00 4.74 +2.40
'ExxonMbi N 56.61 54.7911.0056.31 +9.40
F


iu , we" PL uml Cag

F5Netw 0 51.4950339.0050.93+10120
FPLGps N 42.95422519.0042.95 +4.30
Fardkls N 1520 14.41 - 14.90 380
FamDIr N 21.65 20.8716.0021.51 -4.50
FanneMIf N 48.0446.858.00 4804 +30.50
FedECpN 90.99 89119.0090.6321.00
FedDS N 5951 57.5613.005951 -15.00
RdNFns N 3720 36286.00 36.83 +230
FdThlld 0 40.88395616040.46+24.50
Finisar 0 1.39 128 . 1.36 -.30
FrstDa N 40.52 40.0319.004031 -1.00
Frszn 0 15.06 14.4018.0 14.50 -35.80
Esbaigy N 47.05 46.4518.0046.94 +7.60
Fie 0 43.08 42. 8.0043.01 +5.70
rfshrSa N 56.94 53028.005427 -4920
Flextn 0 9.60 93125.00 9.60 -22.00
FLYi 0 .20 .18 ... 20 -20
FootDLa N 19.22 183011.0019.19 -9.40
Foric N 822 71 88.00 8.02 -1.30
FdCCT2sN 3492 31.56 - 34.10 -29.10
e N 37.57 36.9918.0037.35 +100
Fndl 0 11.71 112031.0011.55 -5.80
Fra N 87.95842521.086.62+3030
FredMac N 62.036131 ... 61.75+19.50
FMCG N 49.50 47.1214.0049.36+31.60
Freescale N 22.92 21.8235.0022.88 +2.70
FreescBn N 2321 22.14 .. 23.13 +4.40
FridBR N 8.83 8.508.00 8.55 -7.00
G
GanmeS N 34,51 32.929.0O34.48 +390
Ganntt N 62.5362.03120062.48 -200
Gap N 16.95 16513.0016.87 +5.30
Gainm 0 58.3855.61230057.11 -84.90
Gateway N 2.78 269 ... 269 -20
Ge Nslar 0 258 2.38 .. 2.53 -.30
Genentch N 88.1086.0582.0087.72 +60
GenElec N 3425 335219.0034.05 320
GenMb N 48.75 48.3615.0048.75 ..60
GnMo# N 27.67 26.5 ... 2726-10.00
GMdb33 N 18.70 1820 ... 18.50 -3.70
GenBitc 0 129 1.11 .- 1.17 +200
Genta 0 1.55 1506.00 1.54 +.70
Gemwh N 30.8830.6012.0030.82 -240
Genzyne 0 71.6470.47 ... 71.76+14.90
GaPadf N 33.11 32.4415.0032.47+10.90
GceadSd 0 4723 453134.0047.12+15.00
GaxoSK]n N 52.755212 ... 52.39+24.90
GkloaSFe N 44.75 42.9057.00 44.64+29.80
GlobeTein A 2.15 2.00 ... 213 +1.90
GokFLt N 13.41 13.06 ... 13.41 -.60
M t g N 19.49 19.1337.001938 +8,50
N 5.45 57.8313.0058.44 +8.40
GoldmanS N 124.75122.5912.00124.56+57.90
Goodidl N 36.50 35.6919.0036.00 -73.10
SN 15.40 15.058.00 1524+16.40
M 0 358.953550279.0358.17
GranPrde N 38.00 362236.0037.99+3890
G A 7.63 7.1119.00 7.61 +4.10
Git N 63.18 62.1239.0063.16 -3.40
GKita 0 51.39 45520.0050.51-102.70
H
HCAInc N 47.5246.8315.0024752 -14.30
Hatrig N 57.68 55.229.657.63 -420
HaseyD N 49.04 473115.0048.72 -7.60
Hm 0 4.46 43049.00 4.45 +3.00
HamahE N 59.49 57.4317.0059.19 -26.80
N 21.58 20.7515.0021.00 -15.60
etNet N 46.10 44.784.0046.06 -3620
HedaM N 334 3.01 .. 311 -5.40
A 3.17 257 ... 2.97 +7.40
N 28.09 26.127.0027.96 +3.90
Him N 29.30 29.0026.0029.28 +1.10
Hilton N 19.35 19.0319.0019.10 -9.80
HonDp N 40.358 39.6216.0040.52 +8.70
HeSol A 5.85 5.5040.00 5.61 +3.60
HonwIIntl N 33.71 33.0418.0033.60 +90
HosAlarr N 1681 16.1951.001&78 +20
HovnanE N 44.10 42.557.00 44.00 -830
HudsCitysO 11.89 11.606..00117 +2.10
HuinGen 0 828 8 ...0 8.13 +.50
Hmana N 44.05 42.18.0043.92 -20.10
i2Techn 0 12.67 12.026.00 12.44 -60.60
lACInters O 26.3725371Z0025.65 -2.50
IMSHhft N 23.1522.320.0023.15 -10.60
iShBazl A 30.60 2995 ... 30.48 ,+6.40
ShJapan A 11.96 11.84 - 11.96 3.10
ShEMi dsA 78.1876.40 ... 78.10 +9.50
ShEAFEsA 56205557 ... 56.15+11.50
SRs2 sA 63276202 - 63.06 +.40
IShREsts A 62.13 60D1 - 62.05+1450
fTInds N 100.99 97.8617.00100.00-105.00
ITW N 8428 82.1917.008421 +40.40
Imdone O 34.35 322537.0034.08 +3.80
INCO N 40.67 39.6410.0040.60 +5.00
IrnC oy 0 39.75 39.1514.0039.41+69.60
InloSpce 0 25.49 24.917.00 25.16 +29.80
Infomt 0 11.97 11,55 ... 11.92 +9.10
IngerRds N 37.62 37.0710.003751 +7.80
inrmM N 17.93 16f0314.0017.74 +4.40
0 9.84 9.0443.00 9.82 +40
n 0 23.37 227018.002333 +10
IBM N 82.43 80.5017.0081.42 -19.10
IniPap N 28.86 28.4411.0028.86 +8.50
InFtod N 30.76 26.6215.002786 -69.00
Iniqd*lc N 10.36 10.18 .- 1035 +.10
rad 0 22.11 21.6043.0022.05 -2.60
Intralase 0 15.61 15.16 - 15.54+2220
IntSug 0 89.38875057.00 88.11+184.00
Invtog 0 64.33 60.1429.0061.76 -90.90
waxCop A 29.63 27.3041.002823 +260
J
JDSU o 2 1.92 ... 2.07 +.10
JP rC N 36.48M 36008.0036.44+1110
JanusC N 1728 16.7837.0017.08 +21.30
Jardens N 33.82 3226 . 3334 -12.60
JetBkiJue 0 1923 17.4486.00M18.05 +120
Joltin N 62.99 61..732.6295 -1120
JonesAp N 2739 27113.0027.17 +290
JnpNlw 0 22.94 222943.O22.67 -6.00
K
KBHoamesN 63.13 61378.00 63.13 -1150
KLATnc 0 45.95 44=2.0045.52 -240
KentcG N 86.0081.3210.0085.40+42.70
Kmibk N 57.35 56.4417.0057.33 +5.10
KIebC N 42.15 330 .0034.93-19430
Kots N 46&05 443920.0045.59 -15.70
K Nag 0 26.66 24.499,00 2635 -.90
KBIt N 28.45 28.1019.0028.32 +120
IKrmffI N 4.40 4.10 .. 4.40 -290
K r * N 19.69 1925 ... 19.60 -2.00
LSILg .N 7.97 7.0 ... 739 -4.70
LTX 0 3.54 320 .. 329 -6.60
La nta4* .V-W ,9PW ... 821 +2.00
La S�.- _. ._A4276.00 7.55 1.50
- �6.7l 5 -. 3025 +1.60
Lea 3a &O04.71ia5727.n104.0 -16.00
LeWB' N 118.05115.3712-00118.05+45.40
LennarA N 55.12 53808.00 55.12 -320
Lovef O 270 24 -. 2.70 +2.30
LeaMd 0 8.16 69 - 730 -7.50
LexmaTk N 41.44 40.7512.0041.09 -13.00
SN 7.85 7.7544.00 7.83 +1.50
0 3924 37.1624.03922 -52.00


Sia E. B E in C"0 w

ILyEI N 5051 49.84420049,9 -7.10
LM 1 N 219.35 18.8514.0019.32 +1.80
UnEarTd 0 34.25 33.1225.0033.44 -25.00
LMzCab N 35.08 33.7012.0034.93 -24.40
LodM"h N 61.34 602217.006132 +520
LwesCos N 59.87 58.5019.005982 -14.00
Lucen N 280 2.7511.00 2.79 -290
Lymdsl N 2724 26.0417.0027.19 -.60
M F 0 31.76 29.9041.0030.84 +.70
MBA N 25.67 25.321&002567 +9.00
MCIrncs 0 19.99 19.81 ..- 191 -1.10
MEMC N 1725 162013.0017.15 -25.30
MGIPtw 0 19,51 18.4941.0018.70 -9.90
MGMMirs N 37.65 36.9326.0037.40 4530
Maocnda 0 44.11 43.4572.0043.98+11.90
Mamtol N 6025 57.1110.005994.2620
MalrtA N 59.5458.1123.0059.40 -19.10
MarfM N 292428.76 .., 29.00 +6.50
MarveiT 0 44.56 41.6158.0044.40 -11.20
Mao N 28.55 27.84130028.55 4.30
Masse N 41.0036.6237.0040.00 -41.70
Malle N 14.91 145814.0014.72 -30
Mae 0 34.87 332822 034.60 -56.00
Maxtor N 3.49 22 .. 335 -3.9
M nt N 3229 31.5517.003229 -1.90
McAfee N 32.01 29.1221.0029.45 -11.50
MedPon 0 34.4333.176 - 34 +7.40
MednHI N 56.85 542730.0055.75 -8.90
Mednic N 57.03 56194310056.79+1020
MeknFnrc N 31.50 30.9917.0031.40 -2.90
Mer N 27.57 27.2010027.54 +13.60
Merdnt1 0 33.71 32.6332.0033.6821.70
MemlIn N 64.45 2.7513.006436+24.40
MetUe N 50.4648,858.00 49.00+10.90
M 0 30.48292827.0030.47 +7.70
MVo N 1278 12.4847.0012.67
Micosot 025.60 25.1022.002553 +7.50
Micotm 0 3.88 3.79 . 6 -9.70
MIPlar 0 9.14 8.0 . 896 +7.30
MdspeeddO 1.82 1.69 ... 1.79 -3.80
MSUFJ N 12.6012.31 ... 1260 +1.90
Moato N 653656 .4464.006.055+1420
MnSWw 0 3O09 31.4841.0D31.86+16.00
SN 19.92 19.336.00 19.44 .31.60
N 537852900052.92 +17.30
N 54.01 52.6916.0053.93+18.30
Motorola N 212520.7013.0021.09 +3.90
MwphOs N 4625 44.4110.0046.01 +35.60
MylanLab N 2030 18293002030 -1.70
N
NCsCs N 30.462990911.00292 -1320
ASrS 0 11.15 100 . 10.91 +320
Nadn A 68.90 65.8920.0068.75 +71.90
NasdIO1TrO 38.39 3792 .. 3832 -228
NaC N 32.10 31.558.0032.10 +7.70
NOWlazco N 61.9058.0139.0061.77+.4020
NatSei N 22.435212423.002222 -930
NektarTh0 14.90 13.63 ... 14.66 -350
Nelix 0 2651 25.41 2628 +1.30
Nelk 0 27227 26.1043.0027.12 +4620
NYR N 16.39 1&05130016.39 +3.90
S~Newf N 22.9922.6121.0022.94 -.30
NewrmT N 442743.0644.0044.13 +2.70
NewsCpAnN 142013.94 14.09 -430
NeWsCBnN 15.06 14.7625.0014.97 -380
NexP 0 2523 24836.025.09 -4.20
NWeB N 8332 82.4217.0082.80 -6.80
N NeCop N 64.01 618536.0064.00+23.10
NdIeEns N 4036382012.0040.0m+27.70
NWoaCp N 162916.10 .- 1629 +2.00
NadstimsN 32.8032. 0020.0032.77 -8.90
NcrtfkSo N 40.59 39.5314.0039.76 +930
Noiao N 333 322 ... 324 -1.60
NoFrkBflcs N 25.05 245812.0025.03 +820
Nrnlwpo N 54.10 52.5015.0054.10+13.70
Nwac" N 53.65 52.93 - 53.40 +8.70
NvWfris 0 12.94 123723.001257 +.10
Nov3iax 0 424 3.37 ... 359 -1.40
Novel 0 7.65 7.358.00 7.57 +1.40
Nots 0 21.6820.89 25&0021.61 -3.10
N N 60.05 573,537.00 59.92+30.70
Nvi 32.048 30.7527.0032.42 +4 .80
0
OccitPet N 77.48 73346.00 76.90+57.60
I N 26.4925.4938.0026.42+10.50
S A 116.41111.18 .. 11629+71.00
OmnIwm N 8427829620.008427+6320
OnSncrd 0 4.60 391 -. 433 -220
ONEOK N 28.48 27.9012.028.44 +2.50
OpOwSy 0 17.79 17.23 -. 1758+12.10
Oracle 0 12.77 124823.0012.71 +4.30
Pa
PFIhng 0 44.85 43.0131.0044.63 63.10
PG&ECp N 3 6.22 35.769.00 36.07 -30
PMCSra 0 6.41 6220513.00 634 -2.50
PNC N 5999 58.72130059.69+13.50
PRGScltzO 1.13' .76 ... 80 -16.70
PacS Ow 0 24.12 23.4117.0024.10 4.60
Packetr 0 7.88 7.5918.00 7.63 +1.70
Pacr N 19.91 19.5445.0019.5+28.40
Paninc 0 26.00 25.4236.002554 -13.40
ParPhann N 2628 25U.5029.0025.77 +32.90
ParmTc 0 622 6.1516.00 630 .50
PaltUl 0 34.31 32.0721.0034.31 +47.10
Payd.x 0 39.00 38.3637.0038.45+10.30
a sN 77.7873.1131.0076.74+27.10
S29,80273.040.0028&91 +12.80
PMey N 49M 472518.0049.01 -10.10
Pentak N 31.42 30.7918.0031.33 -4020
PepsiCo N 58.9558.3025.005883 +1240
P 0 1.08 1.03 ... 107 +.70
N 62.506088 -. 6230+1620
Pfizer N 21.53 21.1119.0021.50 +2.50
Ph*D N 12134117517.0012134 6+30
PlaceD N 1652 15.9472.001651 +4.60
0p 0 15.17 14.6824.0014.91 +3.40
n 19.54 18.6612.0019.35 -64.00
Pwv 0 1128 10.75 ... 1126 -30
Pride N 27.97 26.40 .. 27.62 +18.70
Primeda N 2.09 2.021.00 2.07 -9.40
PrinFnd N 49.79 49.0116.0049.56+1270
PromGam N 562455.1521.0055.92+11.10
Pnudrf N 71.60 70.4615.0071.11.4120
PuAeHs N 36.61 35.307.00 362 -2.70
S0 29.48 28.761&.0029.46 -1.30
0 4133 39.6M35.0041.07 -39.30
stDags N 4730 46.0018.&004650 -9.50
Oawts N 1120 11.014.0011.13 4.50
QwesCm N 4.12 4.05 ... 4.10 -.80
R
RFMid) 0 5.13 4.81 5.05 -720
RSASec 0 11.1010,0220011.1 +1.80
RadoS* N 21.8 21.4210.0021.7 -12.80
RayieQ N 37.49 36.4720.0037.43 +6.60
RwaNk 0 8.10 7.30 .- 7.50 -4.70
RedHal 0 22.15 21.6479.0022.15 -C-q
RAarEn N 12.39 11.M2301221 ,d
FRenACt 0 17.7717.399.00 17.70+iSO
RsdiMot 0 9 60.4237.0062.41 . T,
Retai A 9230 90.69 - 92.15 -8.50
RbeAid N 3.44 33510.00 3.44 -.60
RosSts 0 25.94 25.1521.002588 -1.00
Rowan N 3284 31.0836.332+.8 27.60
RyCab N 4120 40.5714.0040.95+1320
S
SBCCom N 23.96 235121.0023.89 +8.90


Sbd U " u P E LN Lbg

SLMCp N 5560545516.0055.55+.11.00
Safeway N 23.01 22.5617.0022.90 +10
Ses N 47.71 46.435.0047.18 -830
SPatairav N 44.49 431716.0044.46 +21.60
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Sanin 30 165 3.45 -. 53 -2.80
Sapent 0 5.455.0327.00 5.11 -10.6
SaraLee N 17.79 17.5520.0017.68 4.70
N 20.4020.06 -.. 20.33 -780
S N 89.885.6029.0089.38 +93.70
Schwab N 14.60 14M3932014.60 +820
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SearsHkdgsO 11.171152512.00117.45 42.90
SeniHTr A 33.33 32.57 . 33.31 -14.00
S Oac 55066 55.07 ... 55.42 +24.10
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Sthwin N 4223 41.6113.04223 -14.00
SWRFTch 0 2586 24.532.002506 -37.30
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STo N 23.35 22.6119.002325 +2.50
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SP A 3031 29.87 ...3031 +950
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StaeSI N 55.10 538224.W55.08 +.50
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Tean 0 38.10 36.0123.003729 -4.0
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W MI 2 N 9.9728.5015.0029.96+25.10
We dtnr N 61.4558M924.0061.15+3420
WebEx 0 23.70 21M.02002251 -4630
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N '1 I7 11 2510011.82 +4.70
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0 N 44.70 43.9053.0044.70 -00
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0 Ywmfds N 50.12 49.0419.0050.11 -11.0
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Zoran 0 14.99 14.02 . 14.89+23.8







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News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


MILLER
Continued from 13A
the remote car keys beeping as
people carefully lock their cars


at a grave site. He wonders who
they think will steal their cars.
Grave diggers arc paid by the
grave, currently $150. The
amount includes setting up and
breaking dovn the chairs and


service tent as well.
Fountain Funeral Home &
Crematory is at 507 U.S. 27 N.
Avon Park. The telephone num-
her is 453-3134.


CI IRISTOPI IFR TUFFLEY/Ne s Siun
Jason Miller has been digging graves by hand since 1994, although he is quick to point out he actually
uses a shovel because it's quicker.


HEAD
Continued from 13A
thanks to modern technology,
zombies won't be a problem
for trick or treaters. Now a
days, anybody put into the
good old Florida soil stays
there. Period.
That isn't because bodies are
buried six feet deep. Miller
says, the state doesn't mandate
how deep a person has to be
-buried; instead, the state ,
requires a minimum of one
- foot of dirt to cover the coffin.
Miller, who is with Fountain
Funeral Home & Crematory in
Avon Park, has been digging
graves long enough to have
mastered all their ins and outs.
He said a foot of dirt cover is
enough to allow for a healthy
layer of grass to grow.
However, as any aficionado
of creepy-crawly movies will
tell you, a simple foot of dirt,
even with grass roots anchor-
ing it, is not enough to keep a
self-respecting zombie in its
place.
No, what keeps Florida's
dead patiently so, is the advent
of the cement vault, which is
lined in plastic and has a rub-
ber O-ring to keep out all
moisture.
Coffins, I learned, are no
longer put directly into the
ground. After the hole is dug, a
cement vault (typically weigh-
ing about 1,500 pounds) is put
inside. The lid is removed,
using a hoist, and the coffin is
put into the vault, then the lid
is put back and screwed into
place. Only then is the grave
filled in.
It's a one way ticket to ride.
Thank goodness.
Now I have to admit the
grave I dug almost turned out


to be my own.
That's because we were dig-
ging by hand. Well, to steal
Miller's joke, we were digging
.by shovel, not by hand, but the
point is, it took significant
effort.
While most busy cemeteries
now use back hoes almost
exclusively, there are times in
any graveyard, especially ones
crowded with headstones,
where a back hoe just doesn't
fit. And there-are cemeteries
and internment companies that
prefer to use people instead of
machines.
Miller likes digging graves
with a shovel, he estimates he
digs 40 to 60 a year.
I quickly learned that grave
digging is like roofing, only
lower; the work wears you out
in a hurry.
When I arrived Miller had
already begun to dig.
He is a big man, with a foot-
ball player's build and stamina.
He was so fit he talked without
loosing his breath, while he
systematically worked the
shovel without breaking his
rhythm.
Of course, as he worked the
hole got, deeper and deeper.
When I took my turn on the
shovel, the hole was some-
where between my knees and
my waist.
To one side of the hole,
Miller had parked a miniature
John Deere dump truck. It
stands about two or three feet
above the ground. This meant,
standing in the hole, we were
lifting shovelfuls of dirt and
tossing them five or six feet
into the air, well over our
heads, creating a pile in the
back of the truck.
I became a victim of my
own pride.
Miller made it seem so easy,


I felt I had to try and match
him when it came to my turn
(there's only room for one in a
grave).
So I used my foot to drive
the shovel deep into the
ground, then lifted honking
large scoops of dirt and hurled
them into the truck. In one case
I threw the dirt so hard, it
missed the back of the truck
altogether, and landed in the
driver's compartment, making
a mess.
At that rate, of course, I did-
n't last long, digging only one
(smaller) truck load to Miller's
(larger) five.
My arms felt like rubber. I
gasped for air. Even though it
wasn't awfully hot, and we
worked under .the shade of a
large beach umbrella, I was
soaking wet.
That was when Miller point-
ed out I had been digging in
too deep, and lifting with my
back - while he slid the shov-
el into the loose dirt and lifted
with his arms.
But I was too tired to really
care. By then I was thinking
that becoming a zombie might
have its advantages, like it was
still daylight and I could lie
down for a nap before maraud-
ing at night.
Worse, I was so worn out I
needed Miller's help to scram-
, ble out of the grave. Now that
was a true horror film moment.

Next week Christopher
T7ifley learns about agricul-
ture and 8-year-olds, volun-
teering at Ag-Ventire. Any
business person who has a job
they would like to highlight in
the Tuffin'It With Tuffley fea-
ture can call 385-6155, e.xt.
528.


Physical therapists play a vital role in getting

patients back on the road to speedy recovery


By JEFF 1. LADINSKY
Special to the News-Sun
Highlands Regional Medical
Center's Department of
Rehabilitation Services and the
American Physical Therapy
Association observed October
as Physical Therapy Month.
This year's theme is "Your
Health. Our Hands."
Although the nearly 120,000
physical therapists in the
United States are celebrating
this month with great enthusi-
asm, it is surprising how the
general public does not under-
stand the significant role physi-
cal therapists play in the health
care system, nor do they realize
the unique services that physi-
cal therapists provide. The title,
"physical therapist" is familiar
to most, and many have benefit-
ed from the clinical interven-
tion that a physical therapist has
provided. However, the true
nature and purpose of this pro-
fession remains an enigma.
A physical therapist is one of
the most commonly consulted
health professionals who are
educated in understanding the
interactions of all body parts.
They take a "hands-on"
approach to the evaluation,
examination and treatment of
neurological, musculoskeletal,
cardiovascular, pulmonary 'and
congenital disorders that may
produce movement impairment,
disability and other functional
limitations.
Simply put, a physical thera-
pist is an expert in normal and
abnormal human movement
science. They may provide pre-
ventative, acute or rehabilita-
tive care that may impede or
prevent functional decline and
the need for 'costlier care. A
physical therapist is an educa-
tor; not only to patients, but
also to other health care
providers, insurers, government
agencies and to the general pub-
lic about the numerous services
therapy may have to offer.
These services are provided to
people of all ages who have or
the potential to have diminished
functional conditions.
Physical therapists are pro-
fessionally educated through an
accredited college or university
program. Today, all of these
programs offer a master's
degree with a growing number
of programs offering a doctor-
ate of physical therapy degree.


All physical therapists are
required to complete the
requirements for physical thera-
py practice according to state
and federal regulations and pass
the state board exam. In addi-
tion, a physical therapist that
formally demonstrates
advanced clinical competencies
" and pass certification examina-
tion can be designated as a spe-
cialist. Specialty areas recog-
nized by the American Physical
Therapy Association include
cardiopulmonary, electrothera-
py, geriatrics, neurology, ortho-
pedics, pediatrics and sports
medicine.
Physical therapy includes not
only those services provided by
physical therapists, but also
those services rendered under
their direction and supervision.
In response to the growth and
expectation of rehabilitative
health care services, the physi-
cal therapist assistant was
developed as a technical health
care worker who functions
under the direction and supervi-
sion of the physical therapist in
the application of specific phys-
ical therapy procedures.
Preparation of the physical ther-
apist assistant includes a mini-
mum of two years of college
work leading to an associates
degree in physical therapy. All
physical therapist assistants
also are required to pass a state
board exam.
After assessing patients with
impairments, disabilities or
functional limitations, the phys-
ical therapist designs, imple-
ments and modifies a treatment
plan of care to include thera-
peutic interventions designed to
correct the identified deficits.
Interventions may include ther-
apeutic exercise, manual thera-
py techniques (including joint
mobilization, myofascial
release and massage), elec-
trotherapeutic and mechanical
modalities, prescription and


application of assistive, adap-
tive, supportive and protective
equipment, airway clearance
techniques, and burn/wound
care.
Today's physical therapists
practice in many settings.
Traditionally, they have prac-
ticed in hospitals, rehabilitation
centers, private clinics and
nursing homes. However, the
modern practice of physical
therapy has extended to private
homes, schools, fitness centers,
athletic training centers, educa-
tion/research centers and the
work/industrial setting.
Until recently, physical ther-
apists received patients based
on referrals from other practi-
tioners. Consumers today can
access a physical therapist
directly as it has been shown
that when including a move-
ment specialists on the primary
care team there is a reduction in
patient healing time, costs and
an improvement in patient care
efficiency.
As essential participants in
the health care delivery system,
physical therapists have
assumed a leadership role in the
provision of proactive and reha-
bilitative services. They seek to
minimize risk of injury, reduce
functional deficits and improve
the quality of life through the
delivery of skilled professional
services.
As it is your right to choose
your physician, it is also your
right to choose a physical thera-
pist. If you feel that you or a
loved one may benefit from the
professional therapy services
provided by the Highlands
Regional Rehabilitation Center,
consult with your physician or
call the office at 471-6336 to
speak with a physical therapist.

Jeff L Ladinsky is director of
rehabilitation 'services at
Highlands Regional Medical
Center.


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\Jews-Sun. Sunday, October 30, 2005


17A


Learn proper manners when using cell phones


* News-Sun correspondent
Pauline Au Yaig provides cli-
quetue tips lotr readers on /hc
la.1 Suindultla () ('t /I oi t in ,
the News-Sun.

How are your cell phone
manners? Are you invading
social spaces with your loud
inconsiderate chattering? W\ ith
the kno.'ledge that 137 million
cell phone users reside in tle
United States and spend an
average of approximately seven
hours monthly. ()One billion
internationally, 'H cclle on ic
Rudeness" is irritating, howev-x
er. we can correct our behavior
by being considerate of others.
The cell phone has become a
prosthesis, an additional bodly
part. Users feel helpless without
it. Many cell phone users are
oblivious to how annoying they
are when using tins electronic
device, especially in the the-
aters, libraries, museuIms,
churches, funerals, restaurants
and classrooms.
N In the hush of a funeral, a
cell phone rings. Unless it's the
decease calling to say "arrival
in heaven, great location," don't
answer.
If you have to take the call
quietly leave the immediate
area. Even if you whisper. you
will still be irritating those
around you.


* It is so rude to accept or
make calls or check messages
during the sermon or praise and
worship. Unless its God calling
you ignore your phone, God
checks in on you in the spirit he
doesn't need a cell phone.
Emergency service responders
can have their phones on
\ ibrate. leave your seat and take
the call outside.
* The theaters, the only peo-
ple who should be talking
should be the stage actors. The
nlv ringing phone should he
the one used as a prop in the
per ormance. Talking loudly
describing the scene to a person
left at home is rude. Leave your
commentary for later. Kecxin
Spacey while in a Broadway.
production in New York.
iespoiiding to a loud cell phone
l lining romi an audience mem-
ber said, "'ell them you arc
busy." Your cell phone interrup-
tion can cause the actors on
stage to mess up their lines.
Actor Lawrence Fishburne. irri-
tated by a ringing cell plione
during a live performance,
shouted. "Turn your %&@#*
off."
* Libraries are a place where
people go to study, do home-
work research, seek refuge
among the pages of a good
book. This a place where no one
wants to- be disturbed. A con-


'1


i~ JJ)


p


Pitilile Au Yang


stant ringing cell phone inter-
rupts focus and concentration.
Recently, a friend of mine
was in a business establishment.
As the customer was being
served, the barking of a cell
phone interrupted the transac-
tion. For 15 minutes this indi-
vidual had a loud personal con-
versation with the caller. We
were privy to conversation we
dare not repeat. It was obvious
that she was unaware that we
had heard the whole sordid
detail. .
Zagat Restaurant Guide
reports that cell phone rudeness
is the number one complaint
filed by diners. Diners said that
it is difficult to have undis-
turbed intimate dinners without
hearing, a meowing cat,


whistling bird, a revving motor
car, a barking dog, or some type
of musical sound coming from
a cell phone. Some restaurants
have listened to clients com-
plaints and have posted cell
phone control signs.
Annoyed by the constant
high decibel cell phone conver-
sation encountered in places of
public performance. New York,
City Councilman Philip Reed
proposed legislation that pro-
hibits use of mobile phones in
places of "public performanc-
es." Namely movie theaters,
plays, dance recitals, art gal-
leries, museum etc. Offenders
with be ticketed and fined $50.
Response by the public has
been mixed, but favorable.
"Technology does not trump


thoughtfulness. Infringing on
the rights of others, reflect
poorly on you and certainly
isn't what wireless technology
is about," said Tom Wheeler,
president and chief executive.
officer of Cellular
Telecommunication & Internet
Association.
"We need to use our cell
phones responsibly now, before
we find ourselves outside in the
cold sneaking a call the way
smokers sneak a cigarette," said
Carol Page, founder of
Cellmanners.com
"Cingular Wireless believes
deeply in wireless courtesy,
when you're at a movie, muse-
um place of worship etc. set
your phone to silent/vibrate,"
said Daryl Evans, vice president
of Cingular Wireless.
The explosion of the cell
phone on the world scene with-
out proper training to it's users
has invited others into our lives
as strangers. They listen to our
sex lives, how many Viagras we
had -to take, which friend had
liposuction, breast or buttocks
implants, who made the latest
real estate deal, who is having
an affair with who, who broke
up with who or which doctor
left his scalpel where. All their
private business has become


public business. Recently, a cell
phone user was asked to tone it
down. The user responded,
"Mind your own business. You
shouldn't be eaves dropping on
other people's conversation."
The other person responded,
"You shouldn't be dishing that
kind of dirt in public
spaces."
It's a matter of common
courtesy to be considerate to
others. We all have to commu-
nicate with the world around us.
It's not what we do, it's how we.
do it.


Pauline Au yang has been
an etiquette advisor for Faith
Pentecostal Youth Enrichment
program, Vision Christian
Community Youth program,
Blushing Brides Wedding
Centre, Tatianna's Bridal,
Blackaestetics Institute and
YDC 2001 and has served as a
judge for the Miss JaMerica
Beauty Pageants. She can be
reached for consultation or to
conduct etiquette workshops by
e-mail at
psmartch@strato.net or mail
to Empowering the People,
News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S.,
Sebring, FL 33870.


DEED TRANSFERS


April 20
* Robert Hageman to
Edward Vazquez, PT LI I Blk
278 Sun 'N Lake Est. of Sebring
Unit 13, $85,000.
* Jacobson Auction Co. Inc.
to Siavash T. Amanieh, PT
L571/572 Orange Blossom Est.
Unit 2. $34,100.
* Jacobson Auction Co. Inc.
to Frank C. Odierno, L24 Blk
14 Orange Blossom Est. Unit
3/Corrective, $37,400.
* Ashby Construction Inc. to
Brian E. Weston, PT LI/2 Blk
47 Sebring Lakes Unit 4-A,
$6,000.
* Susan Straker Virtue to
Dennis James Gleason, PT


Tract 7 Blk 2 River Ridge
Ranches Unrec, $68,500.
* Julien Wayne DeSmith to
Richard P. Klocko, LI-4/70/71
PT L5 Blk 62 Sebring Lakes
Unit 4-B, $20,000.
* Joseph F. Kovatch to
Eloise W. Best, L538 Sebring
Hills, $17.000.
M. Jennie L. Kovatch to
Eloise W. Best. L539 Sebring
Hills, $17,000.
H Edwin Cary Pigman to Fay
E. Barry, L2254-2259/2260-
2263/2285-2288 Avon Park,
Lakes Unit 7, $320,000.
M Michael G. Baier to Victor
,R. K.iiin-l. ', L24 Blk I1
Orange Blossom Est. Unit 6,
*t... . .


$12,000.
* Jacobson Auction Co. Inc.
to Davichan Ramnarine, L23
Blk 9 Orange Blossonm'Est.'Unit
6/Other, $42,900.
* Jacobson Auction Co. Inc.
to Mary L. Mygatt, L15/16
Orange Blossom Est. Unit 1,
$34,100.
1h Highvest Corp. to John E.
Boyer, L36 Blk F Replat PT
Lake Placid Camp Florida
Resort, $32,900.
* Jacobson Auction Co. Inc.
to Gary Roberts, L36 Blk 14
Orange Blossom Est. Unit 6,
$3,600.
* Highvest Corporation to
Frank L. Miller, L38 Blk F


Replat PT Lake Placid Camp
Florida Resort, $32,900.
* Audrey M. Brunner to C.J.
Boomgaard, Ll Blk 135
Northside Sub, $35,000.
* Jacobson Auction Co. Inc.
to Marvin Doster, L12 Blk 8A
Orange Blossom Est. Unit
7/Other, $55,000.
* Joaquin Zulueta Casarrota
to Laguna Properties of Florida,
L7 Blk 93 Sun 'N Lakes Est.
Sec 11, $7,000.
* Hugh Brooks Jr. to Donald"
E. Uhl, L78 Blk I Venetian
Village Revised, $60,000.
* Ramon E. Melean Alarza
to John H. Svoboda, L7 Blk 212
Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sec 18,


$3,700.
* John Sciacca to Kiersten
Ohlson, L10 Blk Y Spring Lake
Village V, $34,000.
* John Jerry Pasquino to B P
Properties Group, L18 'Blk P
Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sec 3,
$110,000.
* Eileen Perry to Nad Group
Inc., L32 Blk 162 Sun 'N Lakes
Est. of Sebring. Unit 10,
$19,500.
' Thomas Blake Martin to
Ronald Persaud, L35 Blk 4
Highlands Park Est. Sec G,
$20,000.
* Patricia J. Scott to
Murdoch Montgomery, L10-12
Blk 32 River Ridge Est. Sec 1,


$14,500.
* Terry D. Gilbert to Richard
L. Straight, L88A Vantage
Pointe Sub Phase II, $159,200.
* Patricia J. Scott to Larry
D. Montgomery, L7-9 Blk 32
River Ridge Est. Sec 1,
$13,500.
* Eduardo Santiago to Yamil
Martin, L18 Blk 285 Sun 'N
Lake Est. of Sebring Unit 14,
$5,500.
* Charles Haygood to
Gilberto Castillo, L5 Blk 5
Orange Blossom Est. Unit 9,
$141,500.
* John H. Knepper to
Christian M. Allison, L5 Blk 15
Sebring Ridge Sec G, $192,000.


The Brightest Way to


Turn Your Real Estate


Advertising into


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Look for our





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Available at Over 60 Locations throughout Highlands
County, including:


AVON PARK
Avon Plaza (Sav-A-Lot) . . Main St.
Big Lots .............. US 27 S
Century 21 Advanced All Service
... . US 27 N
Chamber of Commerce . . . Main St.
Chamber Rack ......... Main St.
Coldwell Banker ........ US 27 S
Federal Discount ........ US 27 S
Jacaranda Hotel ........ Main St.
Post Office ......... Verona Ave.
Publix . . . . . Publix Shopping Plaza
Royal Oaks Realty ...... US 27 N
Shoppes at Avon Park ... US 27 N
Winn Dixie ............ . US 27 S
SEBRING
Ag Center ............. . US 27 S
Banyan Plaza ............ US 27
Bayless Realty ......... US 27 N
Bealls Outlet ......... Southgate
BP Station .... US 27 & Fairmount
Century 21 Advanced Realty .....
.... US 27 N
City Market ....... Ridgewood Dr.
C.S. Edwards Realty ..... US 27 N
Coldwell Banker ........ US 27 S
Dee's Place ....... Ridgewood Dr.
Desoto Square ......... US 27 S
Feathers Laundry ...... Southgate
Golden Key Realty ........ US 27
Harvey's BP .............. . US 27
Help U Sell ............. US 27 N
Homer's .......... Town Square
IHOP .............. . . US 27 N
Lakeshore Mall ........ US 27 N
Lakeview Plaza ......... US 27 N
MaeLee's Deli ..... Ridgewood Dr.
News-Sun ........ 2227 US 27 S


NewsSun


Pet Supermarket .... Town Square
Post Office . . .... .Ridgewood Dr.
Preferred Properties, Inc. . . .Hwy 98
Sebring Chamber ... On the Circle
Sebring Chamber Rack .........
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .On the Circle
Spring Lake Shopping Center .....
. . .. . Hwy 98
Spring Lake Realty ...... Hwy 9.8
Sun 'N Lakes Shell Gas Station ...
................ Sun 'N Lake
Village Inn .............. US 27
Winn Dixie ........ Town Square

LAKE PLACID
A Star Realty Services ..........
. .... ...... . .Interlake Blvd.
Barber Shop .................
. .......Interlake Blvd. & US 27
Brantley-Properties . .Interlake Blvd.
C.S. Edwards Realty . .Main Avenue
Century 21 Compton Realty ......
.... . . .Access Rd. @US 27 S
Citgo Conv. Store .............
........... Lake Josephine Rd.
Citgo Conv. Store . . Lake June Rd.
Coldwell Banker ........ US 27 N
Ed Fisher Realty ...............
.......... Access Rd. @US 27 S
ERA Realty ............ US 27 N
Florida Scenic Realty . . . . US 27 S.
Lake Placid Chamber . ... Oak Ave.
Lake Placid Tourist Club .........
. . . . . . . . . . . Interlake Blvd.
Premier Realty . . 300 Dal Hall Blvd.
& 1998 Placid Lakes Blvd.
Ridge Florist ...... Interlake Blvd.
Winn Dixie ............ .US 27 N
"Woody's Restaurant ..... US 27 N
Wrightway Realty .... .Tower View
US 27 South* Sebring, FL* 33870

(863) 385-6155


DEEDTRANSFERS










18A


Veterans

office warns

of scams
Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING - There are a
number of scams being aimed
at the country's veterans,
according .to Joseph Dionne,
director of the Highlands
County Veteran Service's
Office.
The Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA) is warning veter-
ans not to give credit card num-
bers over the phone to callers
. claiming to update VA prescrip-
tion information.
"Some unscrupulous scam-
mers have targeted America's
veterans, especially our older
veterans," said the Honorable
R. James Nicholson, Secretary
of Veterans Affairs. "VA does
not call veterans and ask them
to disclose personal financial
information over the phone."
Dionne said the latest scam,
currently centered in the
Midwest, comes from callers
who identify themselves as
working for the "Patient Care
Group." They say VA has
recently changed procedures
for dispensing prescriptions
and ask for the veteran's credit
card number. *
"VA has not changed its
processes for dispensing pre-
scription medicines,"
Nicholson said. "And we've
definitely not changed our
long-standing commitment to
protect the personal informa-
tion of our veterans:"
Veterans with questions
about VA services should con-
tact the nearest VA medical
center, or call toll-free (877)
222-8387.
Dionne also informed the
News-Sun that there is a House
bill that ha been introduced that
will bring stiffer penalties
against those who wear
unearned military decorations.
The bill, he shared, will "ban
purchasing, soliciting, mailing,
shipping, importing, exporting,
producing blank certificates of
receipt for advertising or
exchanging medals without
authorization."
The bill provides six-month
jail terms for those who falsely
represent themselves verbally
or in writing as legitimate
medal recipients. The penalty
increases to one year for higher
earned medals.

CCC Festival is
next weekend
Special to the News-Sun
SEBRING - Highlands
Hammock State Park will host
this year's Civilian
Conservation Corps festival
from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday.
Enjoy antique and classic
automobiles, arts and crafts
vendors, wildlife exhibits, chil-
dren's activities, Florida
Division of Forestry's
"Smokey Bear," Highlands
County Fire Prevention Safety
Education Trailer and mascot
"Pluggy," SFWMD's mascot,
"Freddie the Alligator," the
Sebring Model Railroad Club's
model railroad exhibit, living
history, demonstrations and
more. Live music will be per-
formed throughout the day,
offering varieties such as
gospel, bluegrass, ragtime gui-
tar, acoustic rock, old time
country, pop and more. The
Highlands County square
dancers will kick off the morn-
ing with a square dance demon-
stration at 9 a.m.
Hank Mattson, the Cracker
Cowboy Poet, will spin yarns
from early Florida days. The
Time Travelers will highlight
life in the early 1800s, includ-
ing living accommodations,
cooking skills and daily sur-
vival tactics. Croc Encounters
of Tampa will be coming with
some of their native reptile


News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


SUPERIOR MEATS


7 DAYS ONLY
,--,.". . , ... . . f -. -
W S-''"*'"' * "-*"-Call Now
Open Sunday

655-6500



,, 20 Sirloin Steaks
to anyone
opening aduin ti
90-day account
6 during this
SSIO! "ge:
. ~~,[ '
,":, -


SUPERIORR MEATS
to the order of: uWLo: leol& "S' , u6ofn



Signature: Supe.,o&, 4Meat&


2I 260 lbs. USDA Choice 175 Ibs. USDA Choice
19 41PerWeek $16 Per Week
for 13 Weeks for 13 Weeks
Consists of: Consists of:
S*,iri cr iD SIe1,Rio ks * Rib Ev- SRib s E 'Clu : * arbtiu Slejs . * i"und uli : ril
* Po inertrou Si~e * Filers * .l.rnding Ri D RiAR l R L *ea l' . * iej * Arid Moii
*,'-Bone Sr13" * Bjalieque RiDI. * EngTi n Cut Rojai Rif R,:, l * S' le.j
* sch .. � Sirp, S a* Gii:urd ge d MIre � r SlOl Rit,; *( u,. C R,:j .l
E-,T i� .I i'L'iA 1:r.ini .i i ''S :A4I r it. 'i b,-iq.4 ILI ' " i ii l.:. i ii r.... pHiH . z 1E I , i . i t .- l i .H L
$1 � 41 . I:, IL, ' E .rii NsOu ,.' i .1 r lE i wI ) H , .i F . W - ) I, .. : ii 1 1: I 1 t ,,,u' F';i AB'i'. I). i, r1 1 H ,I ' ,ti.IIi,: i'. : I.w i: I : I'
*30 lbs grade A chicken * 10 lbs. Picnic Ham * 20 lbs grade A chicken * 5 lDs Picnic Ham
S10 lbs. Lean Pork Chops *10 lbs. Veggies *5 lbs. Lean Pork Chops *10 lbs. Veggies
*10 lbs. Sliced Bacon * 5 lbs. Sliced Bacon
. 10 lbs Sausage i 5 lbs. Sausage


lqw�


Poultry
Boneless Breast
Bone In Breast
Leg 1/4
Whole Chicken
Turkey
Cut Chicken
Cordon Bleu


Chicken Soln
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1


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Spring Lakes, FL



'En.9


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Quality - USDA Prime & Choice Mid - Western
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Guarantee all meals are guaranteed for
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E-Z Terms - NO MONEY DOWN,ist payment
30 days alter purchase, 90 days same as casn for
those who qualify


'LAN FOR FAMILY OF TWO
ia Fish Sticks Veggies Delmonico Country Ribs
ets Shrimp Onion Rings Sirloin Pork Roast- :
Breaded Shrimp Corn Porterhouse . Bacon


S


Grouper
Catfish


Cauliflower
Breaded Mushrooms


Oven Roast
Ground Beef


Sausage ,f.-
Ham
Ham Slices .
, . - :'-"


species and Lakeside Stables
will be offering pony rides. The
Friends of Highlands
Hammock State Park will offer
tram and hayride tickets for
free, so stop by the booth to get
yours. The Peace River Electric
Company will present their
"Electric Junction" safety
demonstration. The Hammock
Inn will be open and serving
delicious dinners, sandwiches,
and deserts.
Admission is just $4 per car-
load, up to eight people per car.
Campsites cost less than $20
per night and offer the conven-
ience of walking right to the
festival activities.


Oktoberfest fun


t7'~71


KATHY ROSE/News-Sun
The Wood Haven Music Makers German Band performed for residents, family and friends at the
Fairway Pines Oktoberfest celebration on Thursday. Everyone enjoyed authentic German cuisine
prepared by the staff at Fairway Pines.








News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


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NewoSumundayCtobendr 3,20 1


The Community Calendar pro-
vides a brief listing of local
clubs and organizations who
meet on a regular basis. It is
the responsibility of the group
to update the News-Sun on any
changes in this listing by call-
ing 385-6155, ext. 528; send
,any changes by e-mail to
cindy.marshall@newssun. com;
or mail them to News-Sun
Community Calendar, 2227
U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL
33870.

TODAY
* HIGHLANDS COUNTY
NARCOTICS ANONY-
MOUS meets at 8 p.m. at the
Lakeside house, 1513 S.
Highlands Ave., Avon Park.
For details, call the 24-hour
hotline 1-800-850-7347 or
(941) 616-0460.
* VETERANS OF FOR-
EIGN WARS POST 4300
plays euchre at 1:30 p.m. and
E&J Karaoke is from 4:30-
7:30 p.m. at the-post, 2011 SE
Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For
details, call 385-8902.
* VETERANS OF FOR-
EIGN WARS POST 9853
euchre, 1 p.m. in the canteen
in Avon Park. Open to mem-
*bers and guests only. Music is
provided from 5-8 p.m. The
public is invited.

MONDAY
* ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting, 8-9 p.m. at
Episcopal Church, Lakeshore
Drive, Sebring. For more
details, call 385-8807.
* ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS One Day At A Time
group meets, for a closed dis-
cussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday
and Friday at Covenant
Presbyterian Church, 4500
Sun 'N Lakes Blvd., Sebring.
For details, call Jim Marett at
314-0891 or e-mail to maret-
tjim@att.net.
* ALANON meets at 8 p.m.
at St. Agnes Episcopal
Church, 660 NW Lakeview
Drive, Sebring. For details,
call (863) 687-3800.
* ALZHEIMER'S ASSOCI-
ATION SUPPORT GROUP
meets at 2 p.m. at the Oaks of
Avon, 1010 U.S. 27 North,
Avon Park. For details, call
385-3444.
* AMERICAN LEGION
PLACID POST 25 LAKE


PLACID has shuffleboard at
1 p.m. Lounge hours are 12-9
p.m. For details, call 465-
7940.
* AVON PARK VETER-
ANS HONOR GUARD
meets at 5:30 p.m. the last
Monday at the American
Legion Post 69 in Avon Park.
Breakfast will not be served
until September. For details,
call 382-0315.
* FRATERNAL ORDER
OF EAGLES 4240 AERIE
plays darts at 7 p.m. at the
club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring.
For details call 655-4007.
M HIGHLANDS COUNTY
COMPOSITE SQUADRON
314 meets at 6:30 p.m. at the
Knights of Columbus Hall,
east of U.S. 27 across from
Lakeshore Mall in Sebring.
For details, call 385-1234.
* HIGHLANDS DELTA
CHORALE, rehearses 7 p.m.,
Sebring Church of the
Brethren, 700 S. Pine St.,
Sebring (September through
May). No auditions are
required to join and all ages
are welcome. For details or to
book a concert, call Cheryl
Cometta at 699-2663 or Pat
Riccobono at 385-4045.
* HIGHLANDS COUNTY
NARCOTICS ANONY-
MOUS meets at 8 p.m. at the
Lakeside house, 1513 S.
Highlands Ave., Avon Park.
* LAKE PLACID ELKS
2661 provides a snack bar,
live music and happy hour
from 4-7 p.m. at the lodge.
Darts is at 7 p.m. Euchre is at
1 p.m. It is open to members
and their guests. For details,
call 465-2661.
* LAKE PLACID.
LIBRARY has storytime at
10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except
during holidays.
* LAKE PLACID MOOSE
plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to
members and qualified guests
only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m.
* ROTARY CLUB OF
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
meets at 6:15 p.m.,
Savannah's restaurant in
Sebring. For details, call
Darrell Peer at 385-0107.
* SEBRING BRIDGE
CLUB plays at 12:30 p.m. at
347 Fernleaf, Sebring.
* SEBRING OPTIMIST,


CLUB meets at 6:30 p.m. first
and third Mondays at Sebring
Library. For details, call
Gabriel Read, 453-2859 or
Barbara Stringer, 453-6661,
Ext. 305.
* SEBRING RECRE-
ATION CLUB has ice cream
shuffleboard at 6:30 p.m. at
333 Pomegranate Ave.
Summer memberships are
available. For details, call 385-
2966 and leave a name, num-
ber and message. Call will be
returned.
* SERTOMA meets noon,
Takis Family Restaurant,
Sebring.
* TOPS FL. 632, SEBRING
meets at 3:30 p.m. at the fel-
lowship hall at the First
Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, Sebring. For *
details, call Jean Ottoway at
655-3673 or Barbara Mason at
465-0132.
* VETERANS OF FOR-
EIGN WARS POST 3880
euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224
County Road 621 East, Lake
Placid. For more details, call
699-5444.

TUESDAY
* AL-ANON FAMILY
GROUPS meet for discussion
and Twelve Step study at
noon, Union Congregational
Church, 105 N. Forest Ave.,
Avon Park. Parking available
south of old church.
* AMERICAN LEGION
PLACID POST 25 LAKE
PLACID has shuffleboard and
euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge
hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
For details, call 465-7940:.
* AMVETS POST 21 plays
darts from 5-8 p.m. for mem-
bers and guests. For details,
call 385-0234.
* AVON PARK LIBRARY
has storytime at 10 a.m. for
ages 3-5 except during holi-
days.
* BUSY BEE CRAFT
CLUB meets 9-11 a.m.,
Hidden Creek Clubhouse,
Sebring. Everyone is wel-
come. For more details, call
Marie Rand, 385-3012.
* FLETCHER MUSIC
CLUB meets every Thursday
and Tuesday at Fletcher Music
Center in Lakeshore Mall,
Sebring. For more details, call


IVU

L O 0 WNO1T


385-3288.
* THE HEARTLAND
HARMONIZERS BARBER-
SHOP CHORUS meets from
7-9 p.m. in the Magnolia
Room at the Kenilworth
Lodge, 836 SE Lakeview
Drive, Sebring. All men who
enjoy singing are invited.
* HIGHLANDS COMMU-
NITY ORCHESTRA,
rehearses 5-7 p.m., Room 34,
South Florida Community
College auditorium, Avon
Park. The chorus rehearses at
7:15 p.m. New members are
welcome. For details, call
Bryan Johnson at (863) 638-
7231.
* HIGHLANDS COUNTY
QUILT GUILD meets first
and third Tuesday, St. Agnes
Episcopal Church, Sebring.
Call Lynn Ullinn for meeting
times at 314-0557 or e-mail
luckyduck @mymailstation.co
m.
* LAKE PLACID MOOSE
has euchre at 7 p.m. Food
available. Open to members
and qualified guests only.
* LORIDA COMMUNITY
CLUB meets at 7 p.m.
Tuesday at the Lorida
Community Center to plan
events.
* OVEREATERS ANONY-
MOUS meets from 8-9 a.m.
every Tuesday at Walker,
Memorial Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 1410 West
Avon Blvd, Avon Park. For
details, call 385-4277.
* PLACID LAKES
BRIDGE CLUB meets 9 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday
and has blood pressure screen-
ing from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
first and third Tuesday at
Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010
Placid Lakes Blvd. For
details, call 465-4888.
* ROTARY CLUB OF
SEBRING (NOON) meets at
noon at the Sebring Civic
Center, near the library in
downtown Sebring. For infor-
mation, call 385-3829 or 471-
9900.
* SEBRING ELKS LODGE
1529 plays darts, beginning
with sign in at 6 p.m. Lodge
opens at 3 p.m. serving a var-
ied menu from 4-6 p.m. For
more details, call 414-2659 or
471-3557.


* SEBRING LIONS CLUB
meets at noon at the club-
house, 3400 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring.
* SEBRING MOOSE
LODGE 2259 serves soft
shell tacos 5-7 p.m. at 11675
U.S. 98, Sebring. For details,
call 655-3920.
* SEBRING RECRE-
ATION CLUB plays bridge at
1 pm. at 333 Pomegranate
Ave., Sebring. Summer mem-
berships available.,
For details, call 385-2966 and
leave a name, number and
message. Call will be returned.
* TOPS (TAKE OFF
POUNDS SENSIBLY)
CHAPTER FL 618 has weigh


in from 4-4:45 p.m. at First
Presbyterian Church, 215 East
Circle St., Avon Park. Use the
parking lot entrance on
LaGrande Street. Meeting is at
5 p.m. For details, call 453-
7984 or 453-0760.
* VETERANS OF FOR-
EIGN WARS POST 3880,
plays darts 7 p.m., 1224
County Road 621 E., Lake
Placid. For more details, call
699-5444.
* VETERANS OF FOR-
EIGN WARS POST 4300 has
a card tournament at 2 p.m. at
the post, 2011 SE Lakeview
Drive, -Sebring. For details,
call 385-8902.


- AVOID


jTHE

.RUSH



Planning to reduce taxes should be a year-round event, not
a last minute rush. As a financial advisor who listens to your
needs, I can help you develop a proactive investment plan
designed to minimize the toll of the IRS.
Contact me today.
Travis R. Stivender
Vice President, HFG
Financial Advisor, RJFS
Securities offered through
RAYMOND JAMES
FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.
Member NASDISIPC

HEACOCK
FINANCIAL GROUP
A RF.GSltUUD INVESrM4.NTADVISOW FIRM
153 S. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring, FL 33870
863-385-5172


Announcing the SecondAnnual

Red & White


Golf Tournament

Spring Lake Golf Resort

November 5, 2005
Two Person Scramble to benefit the American Red Cross

Entry Fees: $60 per person
Includes: Round of Golf, Continental Breakfast & Lunch.
In addition, there will be a raffle and special contest.

8:00 am: Registration & Continental Breakfast

8:45 am: Shotgun Start

Noon: Lunch and Raffle Prize Drawings
(Prizes for Longest Drive, Closest to Pin, Low Gross, Low Net)

Sponsorship Opportunities:
$500: Business sign placed on hole, name on welcome sign,
and entry fee for two teams.
$250: Business sign placed on hole and entry fee for one
team.
$125: Business sign placed on hole.


November 4th: Activities begin Friday night at 7pm

with Horse Racing! A myriad of prizes, free hors

d'oeuvres, cash bar, and the thrill of racing.

Spring Lake Resort has put together a special package that you might like to
take advantage of- A 3-Day, 2-Night stay is available directly from
Spring Lake Resort! This features two nights in a Spring Lake Villa and
three days ofgolf (one day being the Red and White Classic).
For more information on this package, please call 635-7277.
....m . ... ...- --- - - - ----. --m
REGISTRATION:
Corporate Team Name:
Player Name:
Address:
Phone:____________ Handicap:

Player Name:
Address:
Phone:____________ Handicap:
Proceeds benefit the American Red Cross, Highlands County Service Center For more
information, call (863)386-4440. Make Checks payable to American Red Cross,
Highlands County Service Center Mail to 1430 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870.


*irfIIfi'rdU


21A


News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005







News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


22A


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News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005 1B


Shop Highlands County's Best Marketplace...


Classified
To place your News-Sun ad call:385-6155 Sebring, 452-1009 Avon Park, 465-0426 Lake Placid.


Behind the Wheel
News and information you need to put you in the driver's seat. Every Friday in the News-Sun.


I ,-I I


Live lperator Assisted Searches 1-800-FREE-IIST


internet Searches www.newssun.cogi


m


ms


---------- -- ----------- --------------------------









News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


CLASSIFIED
INFORMATION

HOURS
Lobby: Monday-Friday 8a.m.-5p.m.
Classified Line Ads may be placed by
telephone Monday-Friday 8a.m.-5p.m.
OFFICE LOCATION
2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring

PHONE NUMBERS
Avon Park (863) 452-U1009
Sebring (863) 385-6155
Lake Placid (863) 465-0426
Fax (863) 385-1954
DEADLINE INFORMATION
LINE AU DEADLINES: Monday, 4 p.m.
(for Wednesday edition); Wednesday, 4
p.m. (for Friday edition); Friday, 4 p.m.
(for Sunday edition). All FAX deadlines
are 1 hour earlier.
GENERAL IMPORTANT INFORMATION
The publisher reserves the right to cen-
sor, reclassify, revise, edit, or reject
any classified advertisement not meet-
ing our standards. We accept only
standard abbreviations and required
proper punctuation.
ERRORS
We make every effort to avoid errors in
- advertisements. Please check your ad
the first day it appears. We cannot be
responsible for incorrect ads beyond the
.first business day of an advertising
schedule. If you find an error, report it to
the Classified Advertising Department
immediately. See telephone numbers
listed in this directory. The publisher
assumes no financial responsibility for
errors or omissions. Liability for errors
shall not exceed the cost of that portion
of space occupied by such error.
CANCELLATIONS: When a cancellation
is called in a KILL number will be given
to you. THIS NUMBER IS VERY IMPOR-
TANT and must be used if ad failed to
cancel. All ads cancelled prior to sched-
uled expiration date will be billed for
complete run unless a KILL number has
been issued. Claims for adjustments to
billing of advertising should be made
upon receipt of billing by telephoning
385-6155, 452-1009, or 465-0426.
As a compliment to our valued cus-
tomers, the News-Sun offers five 3-line
ads a month for items under $250 FREE
OF CHARGE. However, due to the high
demand of Classified Advertising, we
ask that these ads be either mailed or
hand delivered to the News-Sun at 2227
US 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870; or e-
mailed to advertising@newssun.com


Subscribe


to the


News-Sun


Call


385-6155


452-1009


465-0426


THERE IS
SOMETHING
NEW UNDER
THE SUN


When placing your help wanted ad, the News-
Sun now has the capability of placing your
logo in the ad. Using your logo enhances the
appearance of your ad. So when faxing your
ad copy to us, also fax us a copy of your logo
and we will place it in your ad as well. Or
when calling ask the Advisor about having
your logo included.
CALL CLASSIFIED
THEY WORK
385-6155



1000
Announcements


1050 Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. GC 05-397
NOTICE OF ACTION
PAULETTE SANKARA
Plaintiff(s),
vs.
ERNEST M. KEMP and RUBY'R. KEMP, etc.
Defendantss:
TO: Defendants ERNEST M. KEMP and RUBY
R. KEMP ("Defendants"), and if dead, un-
known spouses, if any, persons in posses-
sion, if any, heirs, devisees, grantees, assign-
ees, lienors, creditors, trustees, beneficiaries,
legatees, Personal Representatives, or any
persons claiming by or through the named
Defendants.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that-action to
quiet title the following real property in High-
lands County Florida:
Lot 6, Block 96, of ORANGE BLOSSOM
COMMUNITY COUNTRY CLUB, UNIT 19, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 10, Page 6, of the Public Records 'of
Highlands County, Florida.
has been filed against you. You are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any,
to it upon Plaintiff PAULETTE SANKARA
(Plaintiff"), attorney Charles D. Franken, PA,
whose address is 8181 W. Broward Blvd.,
Suite 360, Plantation, FL 33324, on or before
the November 23rd, 2005 and file the original -
written defenses with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint.
Dated: October 17th, 2005,
WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court.
As Clerk of said Court
L.E. LUKE BROKER
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
October 23, 30, 2005
PUBLIC NOTICE
Avon Park Air Force Range
Restoration Advisory Board
Meeting Notice
The next meeting of the Avon Park Air Force
Range (AFR) Restoration Advisory Board
(RAB) will be held on Tuesday, November 15,
2005, at the Avon Park Community Center,
310 W. Main Street, Avon Park, iFL, starting at
6:30 P.M.
The purpose of the RAB is to allow the public
to provide input on environmental restoration
activities at the Avon Park AFR. Members of
the public are invited to attend. I
Additional information may de obtained by
contacting, Mike Stevens at
michael.stevens@avonoark.macdill.af.mil,
863-452-4119, ext. 325 or Stacey Hayford at
stacey.havford@avonpark.macdill.af.mil, 863-
452-4119, ext. 327.
October 30; November 13, 2005
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: FC 04-1534
MELISSA LYNN MARTY,
Petitioner,
and
ANTHONY DAVID ANDREW MARTY,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Anthony David Andrew Marty,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for dis-
solution of marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve copy of
your written defenses, if any, to: Melissa
Lynn Marty, Petitioner, 3800 Delgado Avenue,
Sebring, Florida 33872, on or before Novem-
ber 30, 2005, and file the original with the
Clerk of Court, 430 South Commerce Avenue,
Sebring, Florida, either before service on Peti-
tioner or immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the re-
lief demanded in the petition.
DATED: October 25, 2005.
L.E. Brooker
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ Lisa M. Osha
Deputy Clerk
October 30; November 6,13, 20, 2005


1050 Legals
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", un-
der Section 865.09 of the Florida Statutes as
amended, will register with the Division of
Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida, upon re-
ceipt of proof of the publication of this notice
the Fictitious Name to wit: KAHAKAI TAN-
NING, under which name I am engaged in
business 1198 CR 621 East Suite 2 in Lake
Placid, Florida and that the owners) -of said
business is: Jiminic Holdings, Inc.
Dated at Sebring, Highlands County, Florida,
this 28th day of October, A.D., 2005.
/s/ Meredith Alejandro
October 30, 2005

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO. JP05-000687-XX
IN THE INTEREST OF:
UNKNOWN BABY BOY DOB: 09/26/05
Now known as A.V.
Minor Child
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF
ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP
THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO:
UNKNOWN MOTHER
UNKNOWN FATHER
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition
for Termination of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in the above styled Court by the
Department of Children & Families, seeking
the termination of your parental rights to:
UNKNOWN BABY BOY
a white male child
born September 26, 2005
and you are hereby COMMANDED to per-
sonally appear before the HONORABLE SUS-
AN BARBER FLOOD, a MAGISTRATE/HEAR-
ING OFFICER in the Juvenile Division of the
Circuit Court in and for Highlands County,
State of Florida, on the 30th day of November,
2005, at 8:30 A.M., at the HIGHLANDS COUN-
TY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE
AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA, COURTROOM
2B.
YOU MUST PERSONALLY APPEAR ON
THE DAY AND TIME SPECIFIED OR YOU WILL
LOSE ALL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE
CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION. YOUR FAIL-
URE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR WILL BE
DEEMED TO BE YOUR CONSENT TO THE
TERMINATION OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION.
YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO HAVE AN AT-
TORNEY REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY,
YOU MUST BE PRESENT AND REQUEST
THAT THE COURT APPOINT AN ATTORNEY
FOR YOU IF YOU WANT ONE.
In accordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities need-
ing a special accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should contact the individual
or agency sending the notice at 1556 Lake-
view Drive, Sebring, FL 33870 telephone
(863) 382-2141, not later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired,
(TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-
955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
DATED this 25th day of October, 2005.
L. E. "LUKE" BROKER, CLERK
By: /s/ R. Howard
Deputy Clerk
October 30; November 6,13, 20, 2005



Classified ads
get fast results.



1100 Announcements

CHECK

YOUR AD
Please check your ad on the.first day
it runs to make sure it is correct.
Sometimes instructions over the
phone are misunderstood and an er-
ror can occur. If this happens to you,
please call us the first day your ad
appears and we will be happy to,fix
it as soon as we can.
If We can assist you, please call us:
385-6155--452-1009
465-0426
News-Sun Classified


ATTENTION
You can now send your
classified ad to us on line. Send
it by e-mail to:
advertising@newssun.com
AND VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT
http:/lwww..newssun.com


1550 Professional Services 1550 Professional Services


1100 Announcements
CHRISTMAS IS coming soon, why not have a
OPEN HOUSE or PARTY...and earn alot of free
gifts for Christmas. Call Cindy (863)531-0068
NEED A FRESH START
GOOD CREDIT BAD CREDIT
1st or 2nd Mortgage, Consolidation, Re- fi-
nancing, Business or all purpose loans.
Call today for fast results
Toll Free 1-866-517-4484
THANKSGIVING DINNER
Will be served at the Sun Room Senior
Center. 3009 Herring Ave. Thurs. Nov.
24th. at noon. Reservations only.
Call: 863- 385-4697 Wed or Friday


1450 Babysitters
LOOKING FOR a Sitter for 2 children.
My home. Weekends and evenings
Possibly 3-11? Hours will vary.
Please call (863)314-8790 leave message.

1500 Child Care Services
CHILD CARE in my home. Avon
Park Lakes. For Information
Call: Nadine 863-452-5796

155 0 Professional Services

0 COMPUTER ASSISTANCE
Computer & Internet Training & Trouble
Shooting. Call Donielle (863)381-6089
A HANDYMAN, aluminum, phone and TV
jacks, minor plumbing, carpentry, fans, re-
pairs, screens, painting. 863-385-1936
AFFORDABLE HOUSE CLEANING
New construction/residence.
Free estimates, low rates, licensed
(863) 381-3410
BANKRUPTCY
* * Not An Ending, But A Beginning * *
Toward Solvency and Relief
A. R. Gonzalez, Attorney
Free Consultation
SEBRING OFFICE 382-1616
DUNCAN TRACTOR service, Inc., lic. and ins.,
bush hogging, rotovating, box blading, front
end bucket and hauling, (863)441-3594 or
(863)465-5825 please leave message
FREE VACATION over 25 destinations
for trying our travel savings program. Travel
Better for le$$. (888)279-8101 ext. A4651
www.lincolnz.MonevwavZ.com
GARY'S HAND WASHED AND WAXED, mobile
homes/houses; Prices starting at $40 single,
$50 double, Licensed and insured, 471-3453.


LORNA'S TLC. CLEANING SERVICE
*******AND ORGANIZER*******
. Your home and office will sparkle from my
PROFESSIONAL touch.
863-471-2763 or 863-441-3952
A TREE REMOVAL
STUMP GRINDING.
Please Call Jim (863) 381-6021
PALM Tree timing starting at $15. Call Pa-
blo at (863) 214-9547 or (863)453-4354


HANDYMAN
Carpentry, aluminum, fans, screens,
lights, tile, repairs, remodeling, lic.
( 863)-382-6782.

JAMES REID CARPENTRY, INC.
Carpentry, cabinet installation, resurfacing
and remodeling. 25 yrs. exp. Lic/ ins.
HC00839. Call today for your FREE estimate.
863-531-5115



2100 Help Wanted


Help Wanted


Designer/Decorator

Leader in the home fashion industry is seeking
2 experienced designer/decorators for new

Thomasville gallery store. Benefits offered.

For an appointment:
Call Donna 382-3933





ASSISTANT COUNTY ENGINEER
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
Graduation from an accredited 4 yr. college with a BS in
Civil Engineering. 4 yrs experience in Public Works
Engineering including 2 yrs in a highly responsible/supervi-
sory capacity. Registered as a PE in the State of FL or be
able to obtain within twelve (12) months from date of
employment. Must possess a valid FL DL while employed.
Salary $49,108 - $80,974 plus benefits. Call (863) 402-6509
or visit our website at www.hcbcc.net for application.
Closes: Open until filled.
Drug-Free Workplace/EOE/VET PREF Employer




FIREFIGHTER/EMT

Fire fighting/rescue duties of a varied nature under
the direction of a superior officer. HS/GED Possess FL
Fire Fighter's Certification of Compliance and FL State
EMT Certification. 1 year experience as firefighter.
Possess FL Drivers License with Class D, Emergency
Vehicle Endorsement. Salary $9.88/hr - $17.25/hr plus
benefits (40 hours per week position).
Apply at 600 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870.
Closes: Open until filled.
Drug-Free Workplace/EOE/VET PREF Employer


i-Cross
- =
- -
- -
--A Country,
m AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES


HERO'S WANTED
It's more than a job ... it's making a difference.


On the Spot Interviews!

Monday, October 31st

11am-3pm



Weekly Pay

Full Time Positions

Year-Round Employment

Comprehensive Benefit Package

Tuition Reimbursement * Life Insurance
Vacation Time * Holiday Pay * Medical * Dental


Additional Opportunities For
Spanish As A Second Language


As a Customer Service Associate, you will be responsible for answering
incoming calls and dispatching assistance to customers in need of emergency roadside assistance.
You will need customer service and computer skills. We will train you in our products and
programs.


3310 Hwy. 27 South * Sebring, FL 33870 - S . E:

863-402-2786 = Cou~ iti
E-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-outo.com - A MOTVE Mics


pI i


NewsSIun


Full-Time Outside

Sales/Marketing Position

Are you a self-motivated individual

with a proven track record for

exceeding revenue goals. Do you have

a great attitude and enthusiasm?

I would love to hear from you.

Media experience is helpful but not

necessary. We offer excellent

benefits including health, dental,

vision and 401k.

Please mail, .fax or

email your resume to:

Tonya Squibb, 2227 U.S. 27 South,

Sebring, FL 33870.

Fax: 863 385-1954.

Email: tonya.squibb@newssun.com.


- I1


2100







News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005

I__ - .V. _,,,T, -__-_...._.- . - - .i
INEmY EUT


A


Auto., Pwr. Lks/Win/Mir, Pioneer CD, Cruise, Tilt, 1.6L
Only 58k Miles
WAS s8
1105995 ,8390

2001 TOYOTA
CAMRY LE 4 DR.


Leather, CD/Cass, Pwr Seat, Cruise, Tilt, Pwr
Lks/Win/Mir, Walnut Decor Pkg., Alloy Wheels
WAS $ 000


7001 LINCOLN
TOWN CAR 16. SERIES


Loaded, Leather, All Toys/Bells/Whistles, Keyless
Entry, Chrome Wheels, "Black Beauty," Only 52k Miles
WAS S, D i
14,99$1 I.1S~


2000 PONTIAC
GRAND PRIX iT 40R.




Auto., 3.8L V6, Pwr Seat, Pioneer CD, Pwr
Lks/Win/Mir, Cruise, Tilt, Alloy Wheels, Low Miles
WAS SEg


2002 SATURN
LW300 VE WASON




Leather, Auto., CD/Cass Advanced Audio, Pwr. Seat,
Lks/Win/Mir, Cruise, Tilt, Alloy Wheels, Low Miles
WAS $ n
19 11 170

2003 TOYOTA
EAMRY LE 4 DR.


Auto., CD/Cass, Pwr Lks/Win/Mir, Cruise, Tilt
WAS 1i
114,00 12i 9 8-

2002 JEEP
GRAND CHEROKEE
LAREDO EWD 4 DR


Auto., 4.0L, CD, Pwr Seat, Cruise, Tilt,
Pwr Lks/Win/Mir, Alloy Wheels, Low Miles
WAS s1 ,D
115,995'139010

2005 CHEVY
SILVERADO L.B.
RES. CAB



V6, Auto., A/C, Ready For Work, Only 6K Miles

14,A900'120 B

2003 DODGE
RAM 1500 QUAD CAB LARAMIE
THNDER ROAD "HEMI"


2001 GME
ONOMJA SLS EXT. CAB 4X4



V6, Auto., CD, Pwr Lks/Win/Mir, Cruise, Tilt, Alloy
Wheels, Tow Pkg. Only 18K Miles
WAS 13,800


2003 GME
1500 SLT QUAD CAB
Z71 ROAD 4X4



Leather, Auto., Bose Sound System, CD/Cass - RDS,
Steering Wheel Stereo Controls, Pwr Seat/Lks/Win/MIr,
Cruise, Tilt, On Star, Alloy Wheels, Tow Pkg
WAS e_ O
$21,995I189UU


2004 CHEVY
CLASSIC M41BU 4 0D.




Aulo. Pwr Lks/WinrMir. Cruise. Till CD.
Only 14h Miles


2002
BLAZER


CHEVY
4WV0. LS


CD. V6. Auto . Loaded


IWAS
"s2.995


11,sDi0


2000 BME
1500 �AVANA CONVERSION
VAN BY SHERROD



Leather. (EC ass TVN/CR Rear Sierea CO. Pwr Side Sota.
Pwr Seal. LsIfW n/lir. [ru-se. Till. Dual AC. O y 56k Mles
WAS s15,800
116,995 1a.5800


Auto . Pwr I.s/W,r/Mir. Cruise Till P r Adli Pedals.
Cnrome Wnees. Iow Pkg Only 53k Miles
WAS S14500


2001 FORD
F.3 50LAIATI oB W 0? PO#STRO
OISEL V8I0EW (AB �Y
o^m{ s ian [ M


S W.A.C. PLUS TAXO G TITLE AND DEALER FEES. 5.99% ON CERTAIN MODEL YEAR & % DOWN. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. SEE SALESPERSON FOR DETAILS. ALL PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. CUSTOMER MUST PRESENT AD AT TIME OF
Haymaker \/ r
. & McPhail'5 s!1 n ns- w-c i-- K N-


* Jeartland Motors


., 1^ *B


Conveniently located
between
Walmart & Home Depot.


Dan The
Finance
�E rn


Brunce
Kimball
RV Consultant


JXeremy
Leach
Sa~espersoil


www.hearl:Iandmotors.com
S 27 NORTH * SEBRI MG * 382.2886 CARS * 382-8785 TRUCKS


2000 HONDA
CIVIC LX 4 DR.
'SK


2000 PONTIAC
BONNEVILLE SSEI 40R.
SUPERCHARGED


2003 FORD
FOCUS SE 4 DR.


Auto., CD-Upgrade, Pwr Lks/Win/Mir, Alloy Wheels,
Low Miles
WA s 8D00
1'0,995


2001 CHRYSLER
300 M 4 DR.


Leather, Cass, Keyless Entry, Pwr Seat/Lks/Win/Mir,
Cruise, Tilt, Wood Tone Trim, Only 27k Miles
W1AS 8 1090
*13,995 I |,11 0 0


* I

"4


I


p

A



L


2001 FORD
F-150 XLT SUPER CAB


Auto., CD, Pwr Lks/Win/Mir, Cruise, Tilt, Alloy
Wheels, Two-Tone Paint, Tow Pkg, Low Miles
W 1AS 800


2001 DODIE
RAM 1500 QUAO CAB
LARAMIE SLT 4X4


Auto., CD/Cass, PwITLks/Win/Mir, Cruise, Tilt, Run
Brds, Alloy Wheels, Tow Pkg., Only 67K Miles
WAS 840
*16.995 14,900


Auto., Leather, Pwr Lks/Win/Mir, Cunise, Tilt, Pwr Seats, CD/Cass,
Wood Tone Trim, 20" Chrome Wheels, Run Bds, Tow Package
WAS s8 OO
118,995 1 10U


Auto., Pwr Lks/Win/Mir, CD, Cruise, Tilt, Alloy
Wheels, Only 10K Miles, Dealer Cost
WAS 2299 00
125995 22,00


k










News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


2000
Employment


2100 Help Wanted
440 OR 220 LIC. COMMERCIAL
or Personal lines CSR needed. Health
retirement. benefits. Call 863- 465-7155
or fax resume 863- 699-1925
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE SPECIALIST
Computer Literate, H.S. Graduate or
equivalent. We are a 20- year Sebring firm,
specializing in Medical Receivables/ Join our
winning team. Professional, Pleasant
surroundings await you. Please fax resume
to 86.3-382-2638 or Call 863-382-6050.
We are an equal opportunity employer.
Background Checked.
ALUMINUM INSTALLERS, Punch-out carpen-
ter, steel erectors, laborers w/ exp. F/T w/
benefits. DFWP. E.O. Koch Construction.
(863) 385-8649
ATTENTION! CABINET installers needed
F/T, paid holidays, vacations and christmas
bonus. Call (863)465-0033 Today!
What are you waiting for?
AUXILIARY SERVICES ASSISTANT-P/T posi-
tion to assist the Bookstore Mgr with daily op-
erations, Cashiering, Customer Service exp.
and computer proficiency is preferred. Posi-
tion involves moderately heavy manual work.
Hrly pay rate $7.94 (up to 30 hrs/wk)
Apply in Human Resources, Building I,
SOUTH FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE.
(863) 453-6661, Ext. 7132. App.
Deadline: Mon., 11/07/05 by 5p.m.
EA/EONET.PREF.
BOOKKEEPER/RECEPTIONIST
For Family Real Estate and Ag. Business
Quick Books and Real Estate Knowledge help-
ful, Self motivated & Detail orientated essen-
tial. Written response and/or resume to:
Rafter T Ranch
P 0 Box 1069
Sebring, FL 33871

BUDWEISER
Budweiser supplier has an immediate opening
for energetic Admin,Assistant. Ideal
candidate
must possess proficient knowledge of Micro-
soft Office as well as a proven record of de-
pendability. If you are interested in joining
the Budweiser team apply at:
8049 Associate Blvd. (off Hwy. 98)
between 10:30 am and 5:00 pm
**PLEASE- NO PHONE CALLS**
CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTS, Royal
Care of Avon Park is looking for compassion-
ate, caring, reliable and hardworking C.N.A.'s
7-3 & 11-7am shifts, to join our staff. If this
describes you, then contact: Maria Perez,
Royal Care of Avon Park, 1213 Stratford Rd.
Avon Park, FL (863) 453-6674.
E0E M/F, DFWP.
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
looking for an experienced Plan Reviewer.
Please call 239-825-4203
CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATOR for General
Contractor. Must Have at least 5 years exp.
Have opening for one part-time and one full-
time. Will consider a qualified retired person
for either position. Call E.O. Koch Construc-
tion (863)385-8649
DELIVERY DRIVER FOR WAREHOUSE.
COL DRIVER, CLASS A OR B Must have
2 years exp. & clean driving record.
Drug-free workplace (863)385-0351
- DETAIL/LOT PERSON needed. Experienced
p helpful but will train. Apply in person at:
WARRENS AUTO SALES
811 US 27 S. Avon Park.
DRAFTSMAN NEEDED FOR BUSY Hollowcore
company. Knowledge of Architectural Desk-
top 3.3 or AutoCAD Version 2000 or greater,
necessary. Fax resume to (863)655-1215
DRIVERS
Werner needs -OTR truckers NOW! No exp.
needed! $700+/wk earning potential. No CDL?
No Problem! Training available! CALL NOW
1-800-493-1440
EXPERIENCED SCREEN, siding and
aluminum Installer. 40-45 hrs wk.
$10-14$ HR. CALL TONY (863)381-1993
FLA. DEPT. of AGRICULTURE. Now hiring for
OPS Ag techs $10.13/hr. H.S. diploma, GED &
drivers lic req'd. (863)314-5900 Apply in Per-
son: 3397 U.S. 27 S Avon Park
GOLF HAMMOCK RESTAURANT
Now Hiring Cook and Waitress. Great Pay and
Great working environment.
Call (863) 382-0404 ask for Greg.
Homemakers for the Elderly
Serve the elderly in their homes.
All Shifts. Retirees encouraged to apply
Home Instead Senior Care
866-224-1290


HOSPICE
OPPORTUNITIES
Satisfying challenges
Countless Rewards
GOOD SHEPHERD
HOSPICE
The following full time positions are available
in our Sebring office:

RN
TEAM LEADER
Responsible for the daily coordination and de-
livery of clinical services to patients and fami-
lies in a home setting as indicated in the plan
of care. Minimum 1 year supervisory experi-
ence (hiring, development and performance
reviews) required.

LPN
WEEKENDS
Provide continuous care to patients one on
one at the bedside in a home and nursing
home setting. Three 12- hour shifts.
(8a-8p or 8p-8a) available.

LPN
Provide continuous care to patients one on
one at the bedside in a home and nursing
home setting. M-F, 4p-12a or 12a-8a shifts *
available, with only one weekend per month.
Good Shepherd Hospice also offers mileage
reimbursement, bilingual premiums and
much more!

MASTER'S OF SOCIAL
WORK
Counselor needed to conduct initial assess-
ments and provide psychosocial services to
patients and families in a home and nursing
home settings, based out of our Sebring of-
fice. MSW required.
Good Shepherd Hospice offers excellent
benefits including:
Mileage reimbursement
Bilingual premiums
And much more!
Interested candidates should fax resume to
Good Shepherd Hospice at 863-687-6977 or
call 800-464-3994 E0E


21 00 Help Wanted
EXPERIENCED SERVERS
Apply at Sonnys Barbeque. 751 US 27
South,. Sebring.
No PHONE CALLS PLEASE!
EXPANSION CREATES
Immediate Openings!
Earn $1500 this week!
50 yr. old environmental co. seeks
(5) energetic men & women to join USA #1
office. No exp nec. full training
provided. We provide air & water testing for
local business & residents.
$1150-$1650/wk to start + full bnfts. It's fun.
pays great and provides a
valuable community service!
Call fast, this won't as!
Mr. Jones 863-452-0330
ACTIVITIES DIRECTOR for 79 bed SNF. Re-
sponsible for coordinating, directing and plan-
ning the activity program to meet the needs of
all residents in our nursing home. Ensures
resident's lifestyle is maintained as much as
possible by providing activities and contacts
with the community as desired.
Qualifications: State of Florida certified or
two years experience in a nursing home.
Apply or Fax Resume' to:
Hardee Manor Care Center
401 Orange Place
Wauchula, FL 33873
PH: (863) 773-3231
FAX: (863) 773-0959


THE GEO GROUP INC.

The GEO Group.Inc., a worldwide leader
in privatized corrections
OFFERS CHALLENGING AND EXCITING
OPPORTUNITIES FULL TIME POSITIONS
&
BENEFITS AVAILABLE
* CORRECTIONAL OFFICER
* SUBSTANCE ABUSE CLERK (P/T)
MOORE HAVEN CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
1990 East SR 78 NW
Moore Haven FL. 33471
Phone 863-946-2420
Fax 863-946-2487
Equal Opportunity Employer
************************************


2100 Help Wanted

SKENILWORTH
CARE & REHAB

C.N.A. Positions
Available

Come join our
team at Kenilworth
Care & Rehab Center
Apply in person
3011 Kenilworth Blvd
Sebring, FL 33870
or call Connie Bass,
HR Director at
382-2153 X-317


HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT


Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump Trucks,
Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Next Class: Nov. 14"'
TRAIN IN FLORIDA
-National Certif ication
-Financial Assistance
-Job Placement Assistance
800-383-7364
Associated Training Services
www.atsn-schools.com


2100 Help Wanted

A
LABORFINDERS


IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
WORKERS NEEDED
* General Labor - Construction
* CDL-A w/Hazmat
* Light Industrial - AM Shifts
* Carpenter w/tools
* Hospitality Servers




Daily Work, Daily Pay
Report Ready To Work
6:OOAM Daily
Office Hours 6:00 A.M. - 6 P.M.
Applications accepted daily
with proper ID.
3735 Kenilworth Blvd.
471-2774
EOE/Drug Free Work Place

MECHANIC- MAJOR line equipment dealer
offering immediate employment for an experi-
enced mechanic. Top wages and Benefits
available to the right person.
Must have own tools. Apply in person:
6820 U.S. 27 N. Sebring, Fl


THE PALMS
0 F SE BRING

Medical
Records
The Ideal Candidate
Will Have:
* Minimum 1, year Experience
* Computer Literate
* Highly Detail Oriented
* Medical Terminology
Knowledge 4
* Work Well Under Pressure
Competitive
Compensation.
Interested?
Apply in Person: 725 S. Pine St.
Sebring, FL 33870 or
Fax 385-2385
E-mail: palmshr@yahoo.com


SURVEY TECHNICIAN III
HIGHLANDS COUNTY-
HS/GED supplemented by drafting courses. 2 yrs
experience in surveying or drafting. Must possess
a valid FL DL while employed.A comparable
amount of training or experience may be substi-
tuted. Salary $10.61/hr - $17.15/hr plus benefits.
Call (863) 402-6509 or visit our website at
www.hcbcc.net for application.
Closes: Open until filled.
Drug-Free Workplace/EOE/VET PREF Employer

-- nwsu- -ww ewsu-omww-ewsn o


.4.


Ad Today!
,, g









Call today to place your Help Wanted Ad!

385-6155


News-Sun
Written. Printed. Published. LN Highlands County.
-ww~esu~o www-ne ssu cm w0


12:Am 111a


BRICK - BLOCK
STONE - CONCREr
STUcco WORK
-- g . g' ]n. - ~: , ~: ;q" .t(-l

RrE11z MJsoswY * 655-230"7
35 Years Exp. State Certihied 99-05604


2100 Help Wanted
DRIVER - HABITAT'S HOME SUPPLY
Needs a truck driver.
Class E license required, Experienced.
Contact Dave Graham- Habitat's Home Supply
137 S. Commerce. Sebring
Call (863) 446-1914 for appt.
DELIVER AUTO TRADER MAGAZINES
Trader publishing Company. the nation's
largest publisher of classified & photo
advertising, is currently seeking
individuals to deliver magazines in Avon
Park one day a week on Friday.
Individuals interested in pursuing this
business opportunity must have a
rehable vehicle, valid driver's license,
good driving record,valid automobile
insurance, and will be required to sign
an Independent Contractor Agreement.
Interested individuals should call
800-513-6776


2100 Help Wanted

FLORIDA ENVIRONMENTAL
Institute Juvenile program in
Venus hiring for Motivated
Staff.

OPERATION'S SECRETARY
4- DIRECT CARE STAFF
1- TEAM LEADER
EXCELLENT BENEFITS,
CALL FOR MORE DETAILS.
ALL POSITIONS ARE FULL TIME.
FEI is a Non-profit school. Must pass
background screening/drug testing.
(863) 699-3785. Ask for Tina or
Lorri. or Fax Resume, Inquiry to
(863) 699-3787 EOE


PUBLIC WORKS SPECIALIST
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
HS/GED. 3 yrs. clerical experience preferably
in a computer-interactive environment. Must
word process minimum of 45 wpm. Must pos-
sess a FL DL while employed. Salary $9.71/hr -
$15.64/hr plus benefits .Call (863) 402-6509
or visit our website at www.hcbcc.net for
application. Closes: October 31, 2005.
Drug-Free Workplace/EOE/VET PREF Employer





DRAFTING TECHNICIAN
HIGHLANDS COUNTY

HS/GED. College level courses in drafting. 2
yrs experience in surveying and/or drafting.
Knowledge of CADD and GIS (ArcMap) soft-
ware. Must possess a valid FL DL while
employed. Salary $11.54/hr - $18.64/hr plus
benefits. Call (863) 402-6509 or visit our web-
site at www.hcbcc.net for application.
Closes: Nov. 2, 2005.
Drug-Free Workplace/EOE/VET PREF Employer


Electrical/Mechanical Maintenance
Full-time openings with local manufacturing facility. We are seeking experienced
candidates who can troubleshoot and repair production equipment. Must have strong
electrical/electronics and mechanical experience. $11-$16 Hr. + full benefits package.
Operators/Lead Operators
Full-time openings in a fast paced manufacturing environment. Strong mechanical and
forklift skills desired. $9-$13 Hr. to start + full benefits package.
School Board Custodial For 2006 School Year
Full-time and part-time positions available at all 15 county schools and district offices.
No experience necessary.
School Board Food Service For 2006 School Year
Full-time and part-time positions available at all 15 area schools, no experience necessary.
Production/Manufacturing
Full-time day and night shift work available, no experience-necessary.
Staff Accountant
We are seeking a F/T staff accountant with a background in manufacturing.
$27-$30K, + full benefits.


RESPLVE SMBNG

4141 US 27 North, Suite 8 * Sebring, FL 33870 * 402-2201
*Located 1/8 mile north of Wal-ltart in the Quizno's Subs Shopping Center,
next door to Pizzano's Pizza


RE FOLLOWING JOB OPPORTUNITIES


NOW HAS' THE FOLLOWING JOB OPPORTUNITIES


ALL STAR TILE, LLC
. Complete Bathroom Remodeling


A Change Bathtub to Shower
Installation Ceramic Floor Tile
Call Robert for Your
FREE Estimate
(863) 465-6683
Lake Placid


/ - 7 ' i

g -


Stacey's Professional Painting
& Pressure Washing
(A.^ Commerat &ResdMenti W
^n|H s_ Ika& Insured


Over 15 Years Experience
No lob Too BIG or too SMALL
(863) 381-0991
(863) 382-4072


. . , ..


r-










News-Sun. Sunday, October 30, 2005


2100 Help Wanted
GROUNDS MAINTENANCE
needed. F/T. Apply in Person Lakeviev;
Memorial Gardens: 854 Memoiial Dr.
. 863- 385-4942
MEDICAL SECRETARY. Doctor s office eyp
preferred, Computer Skills Mandatory.
Good English necessary
Fax Resume to: 863- 402-1090
MYSTERY SHOPPERS needed in Lake
Placid to shop businesses. Apply Online
at www.secretshoonet.com or
call 1-403-261-5000 ext. 449
NEED 15 people-to-work-home. PT S500-
$1,500/mo. FT $2.000-S6.000/mo. No-door
to door-sellag no telemarketing. Paid vaca-
tions Use your home for your office
1-888 216-6893.
www.BecomeSuccessful.net

" KENILWORTH
CARE & REHAB

New pay rates
available for
RN's & LPN's
Benefit package
available
Come join our
professional
nursing team at
Kenilworth Care &
Rehab Center
Apply in person
3011 Kenilworth Blvd
Sebring, FL 33870
or call Connie Bass,
HR Director at
382-2153 X-317

NOW FIRING Lawn Technicians & Concrete
curbing technicians. Must like working out-
doors. Will train, good pay & benefits. Must
have valid Driver's License. (863)385-0404
NOW HIRING painters with proven experi-
ence. MUST HAVE OWN VEHICLE. Call Bernie
at (863)381-0084
,,.'< -:-~ :*.. ,, " . " '. .


2100 Help Wanted
NURSES- ROYAL CARE of AVON PARK
currently has twelve hour shifts available for
nurses, whlio have a willingness to give excel-
lent, loving care to our residents. We offer an
excellent benefit package, attendance bonus,
wages based on experience. Call Maria Perez
(863) 453-6674. EOE, M/F, DFWP.






PART TIME

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY


DO YOU HAVE THE GIFT
OF GAB?
WHY NOT USE IT TO EARN
EXTRA CASH. $$$$$
EARN UP TO $150 WEEKLY
JOIN THE NEWS-SUN
SUBSCRIPTION SALES CREW
AS A CONTRACTOR
HOURS ARE TUESDAY AND
THURSDAY 6PM. TO 8PM.
AND
SATURDAY 8AM. TO NOON
WALKING IS REQUIRED

APPLY IN PERSON AT THE
NEWS-SUN
2227 US 27 S.
SEBRING

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!


� j' Your Staffing Solution
for Highlands County
0 : Accepting Applications


b e Manufacturing
S* Clerical

* Survey Draft Operator
* General Laborers
817 US 27 South. Keys Plaza. Sebring
382-4994


2100 Help Wanted
$$$ EARN EXTRA MONEY, $$$
delivering New Sprint telephone book in
your area.
No experience necessary.
Work your own hours
Must have insured vehicle
* Must be 18yrs and over.
*Office help and loaders also required.
1-800-247-4708



TAX SERVICE
EARN UP TO

$10,000
IN 3 MONTHS
AS AN AMSCOT
TAX PREPARER
* Tax season is from
January to April.
* Full or part-time
positions.
* Managers, Asst. Mars
& Preparers neededc.
* Bilingual a plus.
* Only a $49 enrollment
fee for tax class.


* Successful completion
makes you eligible
for hire.
Call Amscot Tax Service at
1-800-801-4444.
amscottax.com


PARTS, SALES & WAREHOUSE OPERATIONS
Must be self starter and team player. Diesel
Engine knowledge helpful. We offer
exceptional pay and benefits.
Please send resume to Tradewinds Power
Corp. 600 SR 66, Sebring, FL 33875 or fax
863-382-1206 EOE/Drug Free Workplace

PERSONAL SUPPORT ASSISTANT
Responsible for assisting residents in all fac-
ets of daily living and encouraging independ-
ence. Must be 21 yrs of age with a HS diplo-
ma or equivalent, valid Fl. drivers license and
meet criminal background requirements.
Please call 863-452-5141 or complete an ap-
plication at 55 E. College Dr. Avon Park. Fl.
33825
PLUMBERS AND LABORERS NEEDED for
busy plumbing company with residential and
commercial exp. Excellent pay/benefits. Valid
drivers-license required, (863)699-1229
PROCESSING DEPT. POSITION
Avail. Insurance exp. preferred. Fax
resume to (863)- 699-1925 or
telephone (863)-465-7155
PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS/ STAGE CREW-
Now hiring crew members for the 2005-06
season. Interested applicants should have the
ability to work varying hours, including nights
and weekends. Some heavy lifting involved.
Hourly rate: $12.00. Positions are part- time
and seasonal with a volunteer program also
available. Call Human Resources
SOUTH FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE .
(863) 784-7132 tor application information:
EA/EONET.PREF.


D4


We are a growing professional company...


WE NEED


TEAM PLAYERS

* Computer Knowledge Required

* Collection Experience Preferred

* Good Phone Skills







Benefits include medical insurance, 401K andl

bonus potential after introductory period.

Drug-Free pleasant work environment mandatory background check


Fax Resume: 883-382-2838 * Attention Richard

128 W. Center Avenue, Sebring

12nd floor, Suntrust BuHilding


(8631 382-S050


* INSTANT HIRING DECISIONS A
' EOE


2100 Help Wanted
PROPANE DISPENSER Operator/ Property
Maintenance. 40 hrs/ .,Lek, + 5 hrs overtime.
DRUG FREE WORK PLACE
Apply in Person at: Coker Fuel, Inc.
3515 US hwy 27, South Sebring, FL
RAMP TRUCK driver position available in local
Citrus Plant. Experience a must. Call
(863)635-7668 or fax (863) 635-7328
RANCH HAND position. P/t or F/t. Hardee
County. (863)381-0123
REAL ESTATE MANAGER needed for high
volume Real Estate office in Highlands Coun-
ty. Real Estate License and Exp. req.
Send Resume' to:
Box 686 Lake Placid, FL 33862

RECEPTIONIST POSITION
In busy professional office, F/T.
Fax resume to 863-699-1925
863-465-7155

( KENILWORTH
CARE & REHAB

Receptionist
position
available at
skilled nursing.
Must have clerical
experience


Apply in person
3011 Kenilworth Blvd
Sebring, FL 33870
or call Connie Bass,
HR Director at
382-2153 X-317


RESTAURANT WAIT STAFF
great hours gd.pay apply in person.
Pinecrest Golf Club. 2250 South Little
Lake Bonnet Rd.
RIVERSIDE BANK
SEBRING- FT CSR
RIVERSIDE BANK IS LOOKING FOR
AN EXTRAORDINARY ADDITION TO
OUR TEAM! COMPETITIVE SALARY,
INCREDIBLE INCENTIVES, AND COM-
PLETE BENEFITS PACKAGES ARE
ONLY ONE REASON TO JOIN OUR
FAMILY. INTERESTED? Fax your re-
sume to 863-824-2297, or visit us on-
line at www.riversidenb.com
EOE/AA/M/F/D/V.


THE PALMS
OF SEBRING
Join Sebring's
Premier Staff of
Caring Professionals

W's & LPN's
3-11 & 11-7
SIGN ON BONUS
$1500 F/T
$1000 P/T
Competitive Compensation Package
Shift Differentials
Apply in Person: 725 S. Pine St.
Sebring, FL 33870 or
Fax 385-2385
E-mail: palmshr@yahoo.com

RN NEEDED,
No nights, or weekends. Fax resume.
863-471-6834.





SALARY POSITIONS:
Revenue Supervisor
HOURLY POSITIONS- Room Divisions:
Night Audit F/T & P/T
FOOD & BEVERAGE POSITIONS:
Servers - P/T
Bartender - P/T
HOUSEKEEPING POSITIONS:
Housekeepers- F/T & P/T
Painter/ Maint.
KITCHEN:
Line Cook (2)
Dishwasher
150 MIDWAY DRIVE
SEBRING , FL 33870
SOUTHEAST MILK, INC.-Transport Driver
Wanted. Hiring Bonus, Home Every Day. Start
at 30k-35k. 2 yrs. Tractor Trailer exp. req.
Christmas bonus. Annual Increase, Paid Vac.
& Holidays. 401k, Profit Sharing & Medical.
Apply in person Mon- Fri 7:30-4:30 at.1301
W. Main st. Avon Park. Call 863-452-5772
SURGERY TECH
needed, will train right person. Full time.
Fax resume to (863) - 471-6834.
TIRE KINGDOM- 585 US HWY 27 N SEBRING
Tire Techs- Hourly + comm. Benefits after 90
days. No experience needed will train. Ap-
ply in person or online www.tirekinodom.com
(863)471-3661
WILDSPRING ASSISTED Living Facility is
currently looking for a F/T CNA and P/T Sitter
(863)655-4741
2 15 Part-time
2150 Employment







CARRIERS
The News Sun is now accept-
ing applications for Newspa-
per Single Copy Route Carrier.
Late night hours on Sat./ Tue./
Thur. Please call Rodrigo at
385-6155, Ext. 533 or stop
by the News Sun and fill out
an application.
2227 US 27 S., Sebring


2 1 0 Part-time
2 15 Employment
JANITORIAL P/T evenings. Need reliable
transportation. We Train. Apply in Person
SERVICEMASTER 6434 US 27 S. Sebring, FL
DFW/BKGRND CHK


3000
Financial

Business
3 3 050 Opportunities
A CASH COW!!
90 Vending Machine Units/ You OK Locations
Entire Business- $10,670
HURRY! '1-800-836-3464 #802428
FLORIST GIFT SHOP
Antiques. great location includes
inventory equipment, goodwill,
delivery van. Asking $65,000 call:
863-385- 3170
WANT TO START YOUR OWN BUSINESS?
NEED INFORMATION?
WE HAVE WHAT YOU NEED!
ESTABLISHED SOD DELIVERY
BUSINESS.
(76 years old- retiring) 1997
Ford F-250 Heavy Duty long bed
truck- white- under 52,000
miles, air, cruise, tilt, reg-
ular heavy duty hitch and also
gooseneck hitch. 2000 2 axle
20' gooseneck trailer, "road
ready" , brakes, lights, dec-
als. (3 ) ratchet binders in-
cluded. Call DeWayne Braman-
evenings (863)465-0219


Business
31 | Opportunities Wanted
MEN & WOMEN need extra $$$ will
bills? Want to fulfill your dreams and
have financial Independence. You can
start your own business for as little as
$10.00 +Call Cindy (863) 531-0068+

4000
Real Estate


4040 Homes For Sale
ABOUT TIME- WHY RENTI
UP TO 100% FINANCING
GOOD-FAIR-NO CREDIT
BANKRUPTCY OK 24 hr info line.
REFINANCES/ NEW CONSTRUCTION LOANS
1-800-583-1959 ext. 501
ATTENTION
Will pay cash for your home, duplex,
apartment or commercial property. Rapid
closing, "as is" cond. Call Ken or Stephanie
863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL

4 6 A0 Homes for Sale
4060 Avon Park
2/2 NEW 30yr Roof in 04', New paint in 04',
Irrigation syst, laminent floor in LR, DR, MBR.
Tile in Kitchen & baths. Landscaping w/
Large
Trees. Quiet Neighborhood
$155,000 (863)453-8731
3/2/2 AVON Park Lakes New appliances, paint,
carpet and tile, New drain field, New SOD:
$189,500 (863)453-5631 NO SATURDAY
CALLS!
LAKE DENTON, lake front' home.
2bd/2bth, home on lake. No smokers,
no pets. (863)-414-5300. or
((863)-441-2994.
4080 Homes for Sale
4080 Sebring
3/2/2 ELF Dr. (off Sparta)
NEW CONSTRUCTION! Near Schools, Tile
throughout, Carpet in Bdrms. Lot and a Half.
$189,900 (863)385-0774
This is a Must See!
3/2/2+ W/ Huge Tool bench. Cracker Style
Home on 1 acre. Spacious w/ vaulted ceil-
ings, wood floors in kitchen & dining. Porch
on 3 sides, Custom built cherry cabinets. New
Interior Paint, vinyls siding & fenced bk yard
220 Revson Ave. $265,000 (863)655-5545
3/2/2-CAR GARAGE w /Genie opener
Enclosed Sunrm, cathedral ceiling Ivg
rm. Dining rm & Breakfast rm. kitchen &
pantry w/ pull out shelves. 1-bthrm is
equipped w/whirlpool tub. 717-491-7888
' 4/2/ 2-STORY HOME
ON 4-LOTS. w/ 2 out buildings, 50 fruit trees
small nursery. in Desoto City . $275,000
863-655-0687
BEAUTIFUL 4/2/2 Located in Fabulous Sun N
Lakes. 3928 Mendoza Ave. New Carpeting
and tile. New paint in/out. Large 16 x 24 Fam-
ily room. $279,000 For further details visit
www.owners.com or (863) 202-0815.

LOT FOR SALE w/ Handyman house on site.
329 MLK Blvd. Call for Details.
(904)259-8195
SUN N Lake in Sebring- 2/2/1 Concrete block
stucco, too many upgrades to list. $153,900
(863)471-6040 or (863) 381-4590
4100 Homes for Sale
4'OO ILake Placid
2/2 MANUFACTURED home, vinyl siding,
awnings, utility room, new roof, lanai, patio,
carpet and sandstone tile, ceiling fans, deco-
rator shutters inside, apple. like new, large pan-
try, A/C, golf cart, irrigation, many extras,
must see, $63,500. (863)-465-7706
A MUST SEE! NEW EVERYTHING!
Immaculate, completely refurbished 2/2 with
all new carpeting, ceramic tile, A/C, Roof,
paint, appliances, hot water heater, hardware
& fixtures. 1037 Breckenridge ave LP.
$169,500 (616)334-3427
OPEN DAILY
NEW Model, great floor plan, 3 bedroom
split plan, 2 baths, full 2 car garage, cathedral
ceilings. 620 Catfish Creek Rd., Placid Lakes.


*Two additional homes- w/ same floor
plan. Ready Now. Call for Directions.
MEYER HOMES (863)465-7900,
(863) 465-7338 after 5


iNenkun


THERE IS
SOMETHING
NEW UNDER
THE SUN


When placing your help wanted ad, the News-
Sun now has the capability of placing your
logo in the ad. Using your logo enhances the
appearance of your ad. So when faxing your
ad copy to us, also fax us a copy of your logo
and we will place it in your ad as well. Or
when calling ask the Advisor about having
your logo included.
CALL CLASSIFIEDS--THEY WORK
385-6155


4100 Lake Placid
3/2 Nice home in quiet neighborhood.
eiH Split floor plan and fireplace.
NEW roof, carpet, paint, sod and appliances.
Walking distance to private park, with dock for
fishing on Lake Istokpoga. Vacant and ready
to move in. $174,900 (863)221-3000

4 1 40 Retirement Facilities

NOW LEASING
Sebring - Affordable Apts for 55+ & over Spa-
cious 1 and 2br, Secured entry, Activities in-
clude fitness center, arts & crafts area., shuf-
fleboard court and pool.
Starting at $451/per month
THE GROVES 1. .
AT VICTORIA PARK
863-385- 8460



Classified ads

get fast results



4 170 Lakefront Property
4'70 For Sale
LAKE FRONT community lot for sale. 57 Free-
dom way. Camp Florida Resort .Pets wel-
come, located on Lake Grassy. $50.000
(610)326-2585 or ( 610)718-2422 Come see
what your missing! www.campfla.com
SUNSET TO RIVAL KEY WEST
135' on Lake Istokpoga, sea wall , private
road, water and sewer, deed restricted, many
Ig. fruit, palm and exotic trees (863)699-6856

4220 Lots for Sole
1 1/4 acre Grand Concourse Sebring lakes by
the creek $44,500 and also one lot for sale
Douglas St. Sebring. (863)441-0893
HIGHLANDS PARK ESTATE LOT FOR SALE
1/4 acre Lot22 Blk 21 Sect. BSelling for
$25k. Call Lori Stephen's & Assoc. ask for
Sena (904)591-6729 or email senabaker @
Bellsouth.net with all offers.
LOT FOR SALE- Sun N Lakes Sebring-
By Owner. (863)382-4483
LOTS OF LOTS
Orange Blossom Estates- 80' x 125' at
6205 Sunrise Way $29,000 (MLS176728)
Avon Park Apple Red Hill Farms- 102' x 150
Actually 3 lots, only need (2) to build.
$35,000 (MLS 174897)
Avon Park Billy Hill Rd. Buildable lots-
60' x 100', $8,000 (MLS 177002)
Memorial Dr- Paved rd.- Location! Reduced
to $31,900- 80' x 125' (MLS 176505)
Sebring Country Estates- 914 Morgan-
92' x 102' $31,900 (MLS 177729)
Orange Blossom Estates- 6251 Olga Ave.
$49,900 (MLS 176429)
Call Mary Clark (863) 414-7281
Ruth K. Davis, Inc. (863) 382-2000
ORANGE BLOSSOM ESTATES. 1-,acre
property, vacant, Avon Park Estates
1-acre. Spring Lakes, half acre.
from $40K - $60K (407)- 340-0537
SEBRING HAWKS LANDING. 136 Acre Private
Gated Comm. Access to Lake Huckleberry.
3.9 acres $370,000, 4.1 acres $390.00
4.8 acres $460,000
Great Price! (954)478-7313
SELLER RELOCATING...
LIQUIFYING
INVENTORY WHOLESALE
Sebring, Lake Placid, Avon Park.
Olympus Realty, (866)-592-0451


4300 Out-of-Town Property
NEW LOG CABIN NC Mountains, new
shell on secluded mountain site, hardwood
forest, great fall colors, paved road, near
parks and lakes. Acreage and financing avail-
able. PLEASE CALL 828-247-0081.

4320 Real Estate Wanted
ROSE BUYS HOUSES & VACANT LOTS
Fast Cash, Quick Closing
Any situation or price or condition.
Save your Credit! Avoid foreclosure or....
We can make your payments for you!
863-223-2298/ 866-958-CA$H


5000
Mobile Homes


O50 AMobile Homes
5050 For Sale
2/1.5 BATH
Sold alone or as land /home package, in
Sun'N Lakes, Lake Placid. $49.900. Possible
financing 863-385-9134
2/2 IN Nice 55 + park. 10 x 21 Fla. Room. New
dishwasher. 12 x 21 screen porch on corner
lot. $65,000 (863) 633-9012
2/2/ LARGE CARPORT
& screened porch appr. 300 yds to Lake
Istokpoga, w/rights to Lake in Shady Oaks.
Mobile Park.. 8015 Elliott Rd. off Rte. 98 in
Spring Lake 724-747-7131
40FT 1- BEDRM 1-BATHRM
Furnished, including kitchen and house-
hold supplies. Move in condition.
$4,900. 843-274-5560.
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE
2/2. 1000+ sq ft. & screen room. New Roof,
electric, plumbing, a/c & heat, carpet & vinyl.
ceramic tile baths 75' X 140' lot, City'water
$79,000. owner financing $10,000 down
759.75 per mo.. 5203 Barnum St. 835-1445.
SINGLE WIDE 2/2 + CARPORT
Adult park w/ planned activities. Leased land
$200. per month. NO PETS! $12,000
(863)385-8806 OR (863)-385-3829
OR (863)-446-2151
TRAILER -
$39,900. Henderson Fish Camp on
Lake Istopoka. Number:32. 2/2 w/CHA.
Gas/fire place, on water. Beautiful view.
941-697-2210.
5 15 Mobile Homes
5 I 5 For Rent


1/1 MOBILE Home, Furnished. Best view of
Lake. $1 600.00 mos. 3 Month Min.
(863)207 2713

6000
Rentals


60 50 Duplexes for Rent
LARGE 2 /2 DUPLEX. Sebring. $650.
monthly. (863) 471-3074 or (863) 273-0469


1;:








News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


6 100 Villas & Condos
6100 For Rent
2-BEDROOM 1-BATH,
Unfurnished, has appliances. 1st last & Se-
curity. $550.00 monthly. Ground mainte-
nance Included. (863)-443-1503.
NO PETS! NO SMOKERS!
6 150 Furnished
6 15 Apartments
2-BDRM APT
Furnished seasonal, Red Beach Lake,
location: (off US 98) Starting at
$900.per mo. (863)-655-3807.
(716)465-5531.
ENJOY RESORT LIVING
Affordable price, furnished or unfurnished,
nice, spacious 2/1, quiet and secure, ameni-
ties. Monthly, Seasonal or Yearly.
(863)452-2020
FURNISHED EFFICIENCY, Spring Lake area,
all utilities included, $120 week or $420 mo.
$300 security deposit, (863)655-4610.
LARGE 1-BDRM/1-BTH
Deposit $100. Rent $385. Pay own electricity.
References. (863)-385-1806
LARGE FULLY Furnished & Equipped Apt. in
Guest house on full wooded park like acre set-
ting. Apt. opens to Ig screened pool/ BBO/ pa-
tio area w/ above ground hot tub. MUST SEE
TO APPRECIATE. 3 mos. min. req. $1100.00
mos. & depo. (863)655-2289

Unfurnished
6200 Apartments
2/1 APT. $ 600.00 per mos. 1st, Last & Sec.
req. Nice, Clean and refurbished.
(305)743-2300
SEBRING SQUARE APTS.
Lg. clean 1 /1 apts $450 mo. Near Wal-Mart,
WSG. 863-382-1208

6250 Furnished Houses
4/2 LARGE, Beautiful Furnished house (3.25
acres) on Lake Josephine w/ 100 ft. dock, 12
x 52 Screen Porch. $2000.00 (954)478-7313
HARDER HALL 2/2/2
$1500 month. 3- months minimum
863-471-1491
LARGE 3/2/1 home on lake w/ dock, furnished
with w/d. Exceptional value. Must see!!
visit: http://neybythebay.com/
(954)270-6186
SMALL 2/1 COTTAGE
ON LAKE FRANCIS, SEASONAL
RENTAL $800.00 PER MONTH, FIRST
LAST & 300 SEC.
(561)996-5697 or (561) 985-1760

6300 Unfurnished Houses
4/2 HOME
Living , Dining, Glass Porch, laundry room,
new roof & air cond. Fenced yard, cement pa-
tio. Good Family home!
$149, 500. (863) 471-2837. after 1:00pm.

f1 2/2/1 located off Cemetery Rd.
$600.00 per mos. + Sec. Depo.
Call 727-560-3724
LAKE DENTON
Lake front home. 2/2 on lake.
No smokers! No pets! $850 monthly,
863-414-5300. or 863-441-2994.
LAKE FRONT
Open houses, Sat & Sun. Oct.. 29th & 30th.
10am -5pm. New owned market, one
w/ apartment. on Lake Letta 21 60 S.R. State
Rd Hwy.17 S. bet.Avon Park & Sebring. 813-
624 -3284 Owner anxious, accepting offers.
LAKE PLACID Placid Lakes. 3/2/2. $985. non
smokers. (863)-441-2844. 465-3838
SEBRING SUN N LAKES 2/2/2 Central AC,
Nice yard. $800.00 month
Call (954)914-5149
or (863)214-9614

6650 Wanted to Rent
FURNISHED 1 or 2 bedroom home or mobile
in Sebring Hills area, For J4n- March. Phone
Bob or Linda (309)475-8241
WANT TO RENT in Sebring. Jan, Feb, March-
Nice clean furnished 2/2 home or mobile.
Must be clean! Man and wife are non smokers
non drinkers. Call (317)513-0879

6750 Commercial Rental
2400 SQ FT.
With new roof includes 1200 sq. ft. under air
in Sebring on N. Ridgewood Drive. $1000
monthly. 1st & last.(863)385-0077
Remax Realty Plus Bill Bryan.
COMMERCIAL OFFICE SPACE
Downtown Sebring, with 2- garages.
Lots of storage. $600 monthly.
863-471-0044.


COMMERCIAL SPACE
2,000 -8,000 Square Ft. Sebring/Avon Park.
(863)-699-6033


7000
Merchandise


7020 Auctions

HOUSEHOLD AUCTION
SAT. NOV. 5TH @ 10:00 AM
LOCATION: 911 Gray Fox. Ave. Sebring,
FL off US 27, take Golfview rd. (at Inn on
the lakes) To Lafayette behind Harder Hall
to Gray Fox Ave. Watch for Auction Signs.
PARTIAL LIST: China Cabinet, Lowry
Organ, Glass top table w/ 4 chairs, Drop
leaf table w/ 4 chairs, Wicker love seat,
Rocker, Nice 3pc. Bedroom suite, Book
cases, Entertainment center, Computer
desk, Pictures, Love seat, End tables &
other furniture, Glassware, Goebel, Occu-
pied Japan, Old Oriental figurines as well
as other assorted items.
MISC: Lots of new Knives and Cutlery
sets & swords. Approximately 500 New &
Used golf clubs, Lots of Brass Items. Con-
crete fountain, dolls, sentry safe.
TOOLS: Like New 18 hp V-T Win DR
Chipper elect, start less than 10 hrs. on it,
Sears 10 in. Table saw, Grinders, Belt
sander, Furniture clamps, ladders, hand &
yard tools and lots of other items not list-
ed. -
TERMS: Cash or check with ",ositfe ID
10% Buyers Premium.
LIC.# AU-10099 AB1047
Lake Placid, FI
863-699-2400 *** CELL 863- 414-2300
LEE
Begley/Auction eer


Subscribe


to the


News-Sun


Call


385-6155


452-1009


465-0426


7020 Auctions
PHIL RINER AUCT" 'IS - OUR 28TH YEAR!
Estate Auctions; BLi s Liquidations; Ap-
praisals. 863-2&- J31 ab282au261
EMail - RIN.ER@VERIZON.NET


7040 Appliances
HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL
THAT IS UNDER $250?
We will run it free!
Either mail to or drop it off at our office
2227 US 27 S. Sebring, FL. 33870
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!
USED MAYTAG
Washer/dryer. works good. $100. each.
863--655-1089


7060 Antiques - Collectible
CREAM SEPARATOR, Milk Can, Water Pumps
(3), Cultivator/plow, 5 gl crock, coal pail, push
real mower, hand sickle. ALL $375.00 or will
sell separately. (863)386-0684


Classified

ads

get fast

results


7 100 TV, Radio, & Stereo
GE COLOR tv 14 in. Very Clear Picture $25.00
(863)385-4250

7180 Furniture
3 CUSHION sofa and loveseat. Excellent con-
dition, beautiful off white. Both for $400.00
(863)385-8658 or (863)386-1800
3FT. LIVING ROOM COUCH
w/matching chair. $200. 863-385-4088
4 PIECE WICKER Patio set! Really Nice!
$150.00 and Matching 36 in. Table
$20.00 (863)382-9686
BEAUTIFUL WOOD CHINA CABINET.
w/ matching dining table and 6-chairs.
863-385-2952
DINING ROOM table with 48" beveled glass
top, 4 chairs w/ casters cushion seat.
$850.00(863)386-0684
DISPLAY CASES,
curios, cabinets, and shelving
863-464-0863 or 863 465-7601.
DOUBLE BED good cond. $30.
(863)-381-6946
EXCELLENT FULL size dining table, 4 chairs,
upholstered seats. (863)471-3069
HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL
THAT IS UNDER $250?
We will run it free!
Either mail to or drop it off at our office
2227 US 27 S. Sebring, FL. 33870
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!


0


/Modem Housing of Fla., Inc.
MODULAR HOME MODEL CENTER




* 1/2" Drywall Interior Walls
* 3/4" T & G Plywood Flooring
* 12" Overhang * 8' Side Wall Height
* Florida Building Code - 130 mph wind speed
* 6/12 Pitch Roof * Insulated Windows
* Set on Raised Stemwall Foundation
* 10-Year Structural Warranty


For Details, Call Toll Free: 877-439-0450
BlI-


MMMMMEEMOMMEMMMMMMI









News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


7180 Furniture
CHAIRS
2-WING back & swivel rocker by
Thomasville. Medium blue Good condition.
$125. (863)-314-0811 Leave Message.
MATTRESSES- Brand new orthopedic pillow
top sets. Full $150, queen - $185, king, $250.
5 yr. warr. Can deliver. (863)452-6063
MEMORY FOAM 10" mattress, Devi. by
Nasa. As Seen On TV. New in plastic 20 yr-
warr. $550. Can deliver. 863-452-6063


NE.
ERA"
REAL ESTATE


NS#167254


7 180 Furniture
OAK TOP 48 x 30 -good condition. $65
863-314-0811
QUEEN SIZE BED ( Mattress , springs, frame
and headboard) Firm Orthopedic.
Excellent Cond. (863)655-1903
REMODELING SALE
WHITEWASHED OAK COMPLETE KITCHEN
FITS 10X 10 KITCHEN. INCLUDES CENTER
ISLAND, MICROWAVE AND DOUBLE STAIN-
LESS SINK AND FAUCET. $1500.00
MUST SEE!! LIKE NEW!!!!
(863)414-0924


Advanced All Service
Realty, Inc.
801 US HWY 27 N, Lake Placid
(863) 465-9838 (800) 295-6829
%"vw^lpflori C .com


LISTINGS - CALL TODAY!
PEACEFUL SETITNG
On rented land, very nice and clean mobile home on canal
to Lake Huntley.


'59,900


NS#172400


UNIQUE COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
6.25 acres ,industrial zoning, 78,000+ sq. ft.Warehouse CB
and stucco.Tenant in place, income producing..


'1,250,000


PRICE REDUCED
Spacious 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage with a great
view of Lake June. Home is situated on one and a half
lots for privacy. Close to Lake June public park access..
NS#171920 *244,900

BUILD ON TWO LOTS
Two building lots in Highlands Park Estates.

NS#173047 '75,000

5 ACRES IN THE COUNTRY
This updated mobile home is open and bright and has
new carpet. Fenced and cross fenced.
NS#166568 '249,500


Ill


Realtor
Tiodt' Office: (863) 382-2000 * Cell: (863) 414-7281


OVA - A


Country Club Of Sebring!
Great new listing in Oak Brook Subdivision on golf
course at Creekside Drive. A unique courtyard
entry to this 3 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath home with spa
and waterfall. Big kitchen, formal living and dining
rooms, deni and oversized 2 car plus cart garage in
top condition.
Listed at $379,000


I -. -~


Lakefront Home!
Charming brick front home smack on Lake Sebring
with lots of upgrades. Lovely tile flooring
throughout, new cabinets in the kitchen: Enjoy the
lake views from most every room. 3 bedrooms, 2
lovely tiled baths. Newer roof, all appliances. Big
detached double car carport for boats or cars.
Listed at $399,000


This Space is Ava il,

Call Your Account .

Representative Today!





News.Sui




yff .u


7260 Musical Merchandise
DUE TO Death in Family, the following organs
are being sold. Lowery Century $5,000 and
Roland AT90S $9000,00 or best offer. The
Roland is less than 2 yrs old. Both have a
bench, are in excellent condition.
(863)386-0684
HILL-GUSTAT MIDDLE SCHOOL NEEDS
DONATIONS OF YOUR ATTIC INSTRUMENTS!
Instruments will be cleaned, repaired, and put
in the hands of students who otherwise would
not be able to participate in band. Donors will
be offered a tax deduction letter for the esti-
mated value of the instrument. Thanks !!!
ORGAN- TOPAZ dual keyboard- midi-input
output. NEW $2475.00. Blue Book $1995.00
asking $850.00. Includes bench.
(863)382-0984
SPINET PIANO. MAPLE COLOR
Like new, great sound. $500.00
863-382-0046.

7300 Miscellaneous
10 GALLON fish tank comes with
everything $20. 863-381-6946
CIRCULAR SKILLSAW-
2.3 horsepower 71/4,Model # 5150.
Only $25. 863-735-1763
DR. SCHOLLS Massager, Like New!! $25.00
(863)385-1615
ELECTRIC BLANKET for double size bed, 2
controls, beige color. $15.00 (863)385-1615
ELECTRIC CAN opener. Like new. $10.00
(863)385-1615
EUREKA UPRIGHT BAGLESS VACUUM- Ex-
cellent Condition. Works like new!
$30.00 (863)402-2285
FLOOR LAMP $10.00 (863)382-9686
FOUND
AT Homers pay phone multiple keys on
ring. please call:382-6792 to identify.
GENERATOR BRAND NEW Briggs & Stratton
in the box, 5600 watt. w/ 5 yr warranty.
$1000.00 (863)385-4250
HALOGEN POLE light. $25.00
(863)385-4250
HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL
THAT IS UNDER $250?
We will run it free!
Either mail to or drop it off at our office
2227 US 27 S. Sebring, FL. 33870
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!
HOT TUB/ SPA 5-PERSON
never been used 24 jets. 5-HP pumps,
Waterfall red wood cabinet.
Sacrifice $1475.( 863)-651-3155.


7300 Miscellaneous
AB LOUNGER new $50. (863)381-6946
LARGE SAMSONITE LUGGAGE
on wheels. paid $159. will take $50.
only used once 863-385-4250
LARGE SAMSONITE LUGGAGE
on wheels. paid $159. will take $50.
only used once 863-385-4250
LARGE TABLE lamp with floral painting. Good
Condition. $25.00 (863)385-1615
MOVING SALE!
LEATHER SECTIONAL- sleeper w./ 2 recliners.
Light yellow- Custard. $300.00, King Bed-
Seally Posturepedic, Plush Top $300.00,
Sears Craftsman Generator $400.00, PATIO
SET w/ 6 chairs. Good Condition.
$150.00 (863)471-3174
WORK BENCH- small w/ mounted motor w/
grinding wheel on switch. Very Sturdy.
$20.00 (863)402-2285
WROUGHT IRON Table w/ 4 chairs-
Very Unique! Thick Glass top, Excellent
Condition! $60.00 (863)402-2285


7340 Wanted to Buy
BUYING COINS, CURRENCY, WATCHES
55 YRS COLLECTING! TOP PRICE!
(863) 414-1632 or (863) 452-5688
COLEMAN PACKHORSE One wheel orange
plastic utility trailer. Call (540)890-3824

7380 Machinery & Tools
HANDY MAN misc. tools, all mixed variety.
$10.00 (863)385-1615

7400 Lawn & Garden
PROFESSIONAL WALKER, RIDING
MOWER.
w/ bagger& mulching blades.New bat-
teries, new tire..$2,200 863-381-3249
TREE REMOVAL
and Property clean up.
Free estimates Call Chris.
863-414 -0842.

7520 Pets & Supplies
J p
Female American Bull Dog
w/ papers. (8 months old)
$400.00 (863)381-3863


6504 Haincock Road
.OTORHOME, BOAT, AN'.IQUE CARS?
MOTORHOME, BOAT, ANTIQUE CARS?


Have we got the place for you! Situated on one acre with a 30x60
garage/workshop; ideal for parking your precious toys! Not to mention
a spacious, immaculate 2/2 manufactured home w/vaulted ceilings,
formal living/dining room w/built-in hutch & bookshelves, kitchen
w/large island/breakfast bar open to spacious den, plus a front porch
with surrounding vinyl windows & carport.
..................... .......................................................... $ 154 ,900
Directions: U.S. 27 to Sparta Rd. to (R) on Bassage Rd. (L) on Hancock
Rd; to property on (L).



KIM REED
C 41L LT' BROKER/ASSOCIATE
COUNTRY CLUO ALTY
o Seb- -. - 4800 Haw Branch Road
- / Sebring, FL 33875

Office: (863) 382-6575
Cell Phone: (863) 381-6575


Wei dr S:lr ere pr eteo oecioe. om Emi: rpoot arIln~lc


A.P. LAKES-.2731 N. Lanc,: .tr Road
Sat. j..: 29th & Sun Oct. 3rbth a'.Spmn
Furniture, baby items, plus size clothes
anr mi.: nem'
A.P.--BIG SALE Fri, Sat & Sun. Oct. 28, 29th
& 30th 8am nruon 2081 W. AVON BLVD
Lots of tilech loo'ls enre lools & equip il,,r
Doay shop Antiques & Colleclhles Every.
thing woris, Check this sale oull
ANNUAL OCT Highlander Motel Street sale.
Fresh produce, dishes, furniture, fish gear,
Snapper Rider, car-tow dolly and other Great
_uy/ Fri & Sat. Nov. 4th & 5th. 8am-5pm.
L::aied US 27 S. Bet. Sebring & L-Placid..
ANTIQUES FAIR
RAINTREE ANTIQUES
Salurd3, Noj'imber 511, * 40ui U: 27 S
-uil-ide Dealeri Space Available
Call Jar. a 86i-382 6351
AP- 1823 N Homerick RO Nov. 41h 51h
& 61h. 73am -2pm three- larrily sale oits
of goodies too rnriny to lis
AP- 2-FAM yard sale 2716
Nautilus Dr. Nov Jth & 5irt 7am - til
Many Household items & some tools
AP- 324 E Canfield. Sat No 5th.
8am -?? Antique China cabinet chairs
microwave, bread maker lots ol misc
SA' A.LL COME... LOOK AND BUY.
AP-716 E Corneil SI Nov. 4th & Sin 83m -
5pm boal motjlr 5-HP new Lihrit gray c.c
mode w'[eedes)i siiin. ,lai-tare. decorative
mrini ft Knightl :liw h tlub. Iolt ot ri sC

LORIDA -1644 Heron Dr. S. Nov 41h &
5lh Ram - ?)9 Four Family Sale fishing
gears. lotls. silver Incas lurnilure ouldoor
ben he-, small appliance, antique
glss;wire & loi of m s.:
LP- TOMOKA Heighls annual rummage,
bake sale. Sat Now 51h 8am 1pm at
clubhouse, lurn household items., ard
equipmentl.leeilryv mas. decoralion- & lois
more t l
Real Estate Secretary ror High Volume Real
Estate oflice ir, Highlands Luruntr
Send re'suire to
P 0 B1o 686 lahe P.laud. FL 33352-0686
SEB- FRI. Nov.41h & SAT. Oct. 5th 8am.3
HUGE MULTI FAMILY SALE 1010 N Frainlin
lofl mail by la.evriewl 100's of mi c iletmr,
colitciiblpie Nirendo r ilr loans. v.acuumis
turniure silk Ireel park ptern.h Melai luoe
car port irame 10''. 20 . Benwood rocker,
Nice slutted animals stained glass lamps, ap-
pllanLes tools plants glassware. new ted
s lealc. 'Gone with trih Aid ,:ommem:,ra.
1ive plates K'arate i'i. bag bed liner Lots ol
ulemiis -I: . T:o muLn moi'e lsil Plan on
spendilrig suioe lima aI ins very clean onie o
a lird siale iSomeiirirq toI make ev ryoine
nappy Come in with this add after 12
NOON sat and get 50�. off your to-
tal!!!!!!


7520 Pets & Supplies
FERRET CAGE
3-siory with lols oit accessories $70.
OB 863-453-4720,,-
.,--T.-77tERR.ETCAGE
Mebidm with accessories $35 080.
863-453-4720
MOVING! MUST GO! 6 mos old playful ham-
ster with aquamarine cage, food wheel & toys.
FREE TO GOOD HAMSTER LOVER!
(863)471-0606


NOTICE

Florida statute 585.195 states that
all 'dogs and cats sold in Florida
must be at least eight weeks old,
have an official health certificate
and proper shots and be free of in-
testinal and external parasites.
PET SITTING by the hour, or by the day.
Excellent references. 781-6912
SIAMESE CAT spayed w/ shots, 2 white kit-
tens with spots w/ shots. And many more.
$25.00 each Heartland Cat Rescue
(863)382-7138


8000
Recreation


8050 Boats& Motors
14 FT. V- Hull w/ 25 hp motor, Includes
Trailer. $1350.00 obo
(863)471-6525 or
(863)381-9108 '
16 FT. Run a Bout w/ Trailer. Fish Finder and
extra motor. $800.00 (863)314-9194
88' 16ft. Glasstream deep-v 181 hp Boat
3.0 Mercruise inboard/outboard and 6hp Evin-
rude trolling motor. In good running condi-
tion. Includes trailer. New canvas top
installed. $3000.00 (863)655-3182

..lJ I BUY BOATS
(863)381-1000



8400 Recreational Vehicles
03' DUTCHMAN CLASSIC
31 ft. Super slide and 3 separate tanks, rear
bunk beds, front queen sleeper. Used only
3- times. $17,500 (863)465-5775
99' COLEMAN pop up camper 10' Excellent
Condition $3900.00 Awning, AC/heat
(863)452-1955


8450 Motor Homes
1993 30 FT. SUPER SLIDE
Terry 5th wheel with new tires.
$7,900 OBO. (863)-443-0274


COLLECTION OF Good glass & more for
your selection. A $300 valued, for quick
sale $250. 863-471-6962 or 863-214-6697
Having a Garage Sale?
Make more money by reaching thou-
sands of potential customers. For only
$8 you get 5 lines for one week in the
News-Sun and Highlands Herald Shop-
per, plus FREE GARAGE SALE SIGNS! If
your sale gets rained out, call us and
we'll run it again at no additional charge.
Call today! (863) 385-6155.
SEB- 1216 Katcalani Ave. Nov 4th, 5th, 11th
& 12th. 8am- ???. Double recliner. Sofa bed
couch . radios. upright freezer. wate- ,ait.iier
1,,li , ,f el i.i .:,m e. ,:[rall, m i'Tl
SEB- 6800 CGrjrn.ida 61d Sal Oi:l, 2'lIn &
Sunir O.1 301ri 8imr. ' LOIS 01 MiSC HCIu.e-
I-.ld item: LO'i tu iTEm i., lot vervCne
iSES CORNER of Romeo & Citroen Dr.
ruov -th & irn 8m - 1 pm Double
lamiil aftair Fis.hing supplies. tools TV
lurnilure & lis ol Misc
SEB HUGE moving S]al 5633 Lorg-
bow Dr Fri & Sat O 0 28th & 29th
83 rn *1pmr Contents of Home
863-655-0031
SSEB- NOV 51rh i-i5& 6ih 18-1'1 98i 1B8 P3ne
r.j Ni) o i\t birdc1 Appiai,.: i.rn'c, Ihei Rnec
L'j Mi lrble Ihp LOl-, 01 Miti.;, [rie'S
SEB- RUMMAGE Sale -1118 Elsori Aue
Nov 5th 83m-3pm ChriinsIas items,
qglassware. lolhers turnitre adults
porch swing Ilis or mIsr.
cEB TH. & FRI. Nov. 3rd & 4th 8.4
115 Whallev Blsd. RH .iiner .miil Iiirrinr,
able W,' z crariir' c.:r[iol vi dt ri urmidiier.
:abbtiJge patli ilil. CriritiTi : a.lecor
. .an' i 'd : m e ,-"i
SEB- TOPS ,NNUAL GARAG SALE
FL .3; t 210 rj.ilur -e in i L lei Jo.epriir
dr 1 miler Sat Nov. 4th 8am-lpm lajhe-s. 5
r ijihi l ls. l hlri nri r , S rucr oMil
items L uI' 'ir rIT c iiiT i'i i, e.,'vr ryorie
SEB-SILENT AUCTION. Heartland Career
Connection System. One Slop Center
2730 Hwy 27 N (Rear) Lool. for �igns
on Bay'view Dr Sal,. Nov 5
93m. 1larn.(Bids received from
9jm -10 30am) liems incl Busin. ss
macrhinres. & office equipment
Four - 55' big screen TV s All irlice
equipment will be sold AS IS Some
need minor repairs Winning bidders
must De prepared to take items at tne
en o01 :atr Cash Only-All Sale are Final
SEB SHRINERS Club. Old 17 week-
ends, Fri .Sat & Sun, wide assortment of
fresh Produce
| EB -. Fri a. Ni o 41r, ,, Sir. 8-1 4-i.ju _e-
i3r Rd Hamm'jork Rd to 635 urn lell nii Io
eian Across lo'm Counli'.1y luuO Rii Iop
de-il, S ,cl De;- lon0 irn T.mai tower
lOOiS ih: LOIS' I m-.': l-Tr


8450 Motor Homes
3 AERO flo vent covers by Camco for Travel
trailers, 5th wheels, motorhomes....6 mos. old
$60.00 for all (863)453-7027
HIDDEN HITCH receiver, Class 3-4. Universal
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9000


Transportation


91 00 Motorcycles & ATVs

05 YAMAHA V-STAR
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GOOD NOLAN- half cycle helmet- size medi-
um. $20.00 (863)453-7027

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01' DODGE Dakota. 57,500 mi. Auto,
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92' ISUZU P/U w/ camper shell. 5sp.
$1200.00 (863)314-9194
99' CHEVY S10 Rebuilt motor & auto trans-
mission, new brakes, A/C, cruise, will run as
long as new truck. $3500.00 (863)385-2696

9340 Automobile Insurance
NEW 2ND LOCATION
Budget BI- Rite Insurance. Full Line of Auto
Insurance from PIP PD to Full Coverage. We
accept International Drivers License.
BUDGET BI-RITE INSURANCE
642 S., Commerce Ave.
(by courthouse & tag office- downtown sebr-
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9450 Automotive for Sale
1996 GEO Metro, 2 dr hatchback. 48+ mpg, 5
speed, A/C, CD Player. $2150.00
863-214-3083
2002 DODGE Cargo van 25,000 miles
Great Condition. $10,500 (863)655-5051
2003 CORVETTE
Convertible 33K. miles, one owner local
car. automatic loaded. exc. cond.
$35, 900. 863-655-0533 eves..
96' NISSAN maxima- LOADED! auto, A/C,
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84' Chevy Trk, A/C, Auto, Pwr Locks, CD
player. LOADED! Short bed. $2500.00
(863)273-0497
98' CADILLAC 76 k miles, FULLY LOADED!
Excellent Condition. $8000.00 (863)382-8884


_., __-__,__--. - 2000 CHEVY
SUBURBAN
LS 4X4
Loaded, has all
the toys. Leather,
C.D. Player and
OnStar equipped.
Sale
r S12,995


Garage S es


I


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Licensed Real Estate Broker # Licensed Mortgage Broker Bob BrAke (863) 61K431 Jamie Solis (863) 8335-16H Id Hill (863) 634796
Tina Weawr-(863)6104434 Billy Hill (863) 634516 Don D67auft (863)381-6080

Website: ii�iv.preferredpropertiesofokeecliobee.com Barbara.\ IcClellan (S63) 64547 Shen�i �Td (863) 643572








8B News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005






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ifestyle


PAUSE AND CONSIDER
Jan Merop

Gracious

spaciousness
Off we went to find two
beautiful waterfalls we'd
been told about in North
Georgia. The road that
would take us there dis-
guised itself as a steep grav-
el driveway which after a
time brought us to a small
stream we had to cross with
our car. The parking lot was
merely a turn-around where
few vehicles could park at a
time.
The trail-head - a narrow,
dense forest opening - beck-
oned us. Immediately, cool-
er air embraced us as we
stepped gingerly into our
adventure.
The trail was pleasantly
easy. We descended its nar-
row, curving path. However,
we wouldn't think it so easy
on the way back.
The deeper we traveled
into the woodlands, the
more beautiful the sounds of
nature. Then we heard it -
the distinct sound of water.
Below us to the left, a
stream rushed along swiftly
- higher than normal due to
unexpectedly intense rain
during the previous months.
We'd gone about half
way when the narrow trail
suddenly became flat and
open - filled with trees, yet
not crowding each other.
This new spaciousness invit-
ed rest and a place to take a
breath from the relentless
pace we'd been keeping
along the wooded trail.
We eventually found the
two ,waterfalls, one more
beautiful than the other. The
refreshing spray from the
thunderous cascade of water
made us reluctant to leave.
Yet, as we traveled back-
uphill this time - the spa-
cious area of forest arrested
my attention again.
My husband, Ken, and I
had embarked on this partic-
ular hike after spending time
studying God's Word during
a weekend retreat in.
Georgia. We'd been con-
fronted by some refreshing
insights. One thought that
had come to us was the spa-
ciousness of God.
When we come into
God's presence, there's an
atmosphere of gracious hos-
pitality that says, "breathe,
rest, spread out and be
refreshed." As we
approached this area in the
forest, I felt as though God
had given me a picture of
his gracious spaciousness.
His presence and majesty
encompass us more vastly
than we can comprehend
because he can "do immea-
surably more than all we ask
or imagine." (Ephesians 3:
20, NIV).
"And I pray that you may
have power together with all
the saints, to grasp how
wide and long and high and
deep is the love of Christ,
and to know this love that
surpasses knowledge - that
you may be filled to the
measure of all the fullness
of God." (Ephesians 3: 17b,
18 & 19, NIV)
On our hike, we started
out on a narrow road to find
refre thingg waterfalls and
great, hospitable spacious-
ness in the midst of a wind-
ing path. When we come to
Christ, we come through the
narrow way - the only way
God has provided.
It leads us to the refresh-
ing water of life and to
God's gracious spacious-
ness. Selah.
Jan Merop of Sebring is a
contributing writer of the
News-Sun. Her book
"Pause and Consider" is
available at the News-Sun.


INSIDE

Crossword 2C
Dear Abby 2C
Horoscope 6C


SECTION C + SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2005


By SUE ANN CAREER
News-Sun correspondent

Halloween is a contracted corrup-
tion of "All Hallows Eve."
All Hollows Day (or All Saints
Day) on Nov. 1 is a Catholic day
of observance in honor of saints. But in the
Fifth Century B.C. in Celtic Ireland, sum-
mer officially ended on Oct. 31. That holi-
day was called Samhain, which was their
Celtic New Year.
The legend is that disembodied spirits of
all those who died throughout the preced-
ing year came back in search of living bod-
ies to possess for the next year. The Celts
believed all laws of space and time were
suspended during this time, allowing the
spirit world to intermingle with the living.
Naturally, the still-living did not want to
be possessed. So on Oct. 31, villagers
extinguished the fires in their homes in


By SUE ANN CARPENTER
News-Sun correspondent
Here are some area spook sitings
allegedly reported:
Harder Hall
Legend is that Alma .and Elva
Spoon from upstate New York
always visited and stayed in room
602 at Harder Hall in Sebring. When
Harder Hall closed in 1986 and
workmen tried to remove furniture
from that room, they said two older
women there for ade it. In 1996,
another ghost wa s reported by a
workman who wished to remain
anonymous. He said the ghost was
an elderly man, 5 feet 8)inches, with
slicked-back white hair wearing a
sky-blue leisure suit. /
Jan Morris, project coordinator of
Harder Hall, said she hasn't seen any
ghosts since being there. "Oh there's
hearsay of giggling, or laughing, but
most likely it's a prankster wanting
to keep the myth alive. But if they're
here, at least they're friendly ghosts.
Nothing bad has happened," she
said.
Kenilworth Lodge
Guests at Kenilworth Lodge in
Sebring say stairs give an eerie
sound and doors open and close on


their own. And the most interesting
anonymous report was of footsteps
going nowhere when remodeling
was done in the 1980s.
"I think it's the water pipes.
People can't tell if it's real or not.
Nothing's been validated. I've per-
sonally never seen anything unusual
or ghostly, but if so, I'm glad they're
friendly," said Madge Stewart, mar-
keting director for the lodge.

Frostproof/Bereah Road
ghost lights
At the four-way stop of Bereah
Road in Frostproof, lights will float
up to your car, called the ghost
lights. It's recommended that you
may have to park and sit a while to
experience this one.
Doug Singletary, a Sebring resi-
dent and owner of Impact Awards &
Promotions in Avon Park, said this
phenomenon has occurred for more
than 25 years, and that his brother,
Stephen, actually experienced it
while in high school.
"Nobody knows if it was original-
ly paranormal, but Stephen's experi-
ence was a product of boys in 4x4s
driving out, waiting, then turning on
their headlights and making noises.
They all had a good laugh and this
tradition or gag is perpetuated today.
It's a spooky area with wetlands and
woods," Singletary said.


NEWS-SUN + SEBRING, FLA.


order to make them cold and undesirable
for spirits. They then dressed up in all
manner of ghoulish costumes and noisily
paraded around the neighborhood being as
destructive as possible in order to frighten
away spirits looking for bodies to possess.
A better explanation of why the Celts
extinguished their fires was so that all the
Celtic tribes could ceremoniously relight
their fires from a common source, the
Druidic fire that was kept burning in the
middle of Ireland at Usinach.
Halloween did not grow out of evil prac-
tices. It grew out of the rituals of the Celts
celebrating a new year and out of medieval
prayer rituals of Europeans. Today,
Halloween is a harmless vestige of an
ancient pagan ritual, and only as evil as
one cares to make it. Yet, people love to
hear spooky stories and suspend belief.
People love to be scared.


Chief Cufcowellax and his tribe set-
tled on Lake Wales. Soon a huge bull
alligator moved into the lake and
regularly attacked the Indians. Aided
by the Great Spirit, the chief stalked
the beast and engaged him in a
month-long battle, after which the
chief rose from the water in victory.
During the battle a small lake,
now North Lake Wales, appeared
next to the big one. The chief was
later buried on the shores of the new
lake. Some attribute the Spook Hill
enigma to the alligator seeking
revenge, while others speculate that
Cufcowellax has returned to defend
his homeland from encroachment.
To experience the phenomenon,
stop your car at the bottom of the
incline known as Spook Hill and
release the brake. It's located on
North Wales Drive at North Avenue
in Lake Wales, and can be experi-
enced throughout the year. Your car
will roll uphill, or so it appears, but
it's only an optical illusion.
Ghost hunter
Gloria Ladd of Sebring, a certified
ghost hunter and paranormal investi-
gator, is a published author on a vari-
ety of subjects, having written about
a 1930 murder that occurred at
Kenilworth and Rainbow. She not
only investigates the paranormal, but
said she has performed an exorcism
at a person's home in Sebring.
"It was a benign ghost. It only
took five to 10 minutes. A month
later, it still had not returned," Ladd
said. "As a child, I was
always looking for


something. This is who I am."
She also is a minister with an hon-
orary doctorate in theology with
Universal Life - through the
Internet.
"I haven't started a church, but am
empowered to do so. As a member of
MENSA (top 2 percent of intelli-
gence) and being left handed, it
means I am intelligent and use the
right side of my brain. I used to do
far life readings (former lives and
reincarnation.) One time I got a mes-
sage through automatic writing for a
woman who wanted to contact her
mother. I looked at it and it looked
garbled to me. I handed it to her and
she said it was Armenian and it was
her mother, and it had special mean-
ing to her," Ladd said.
Ladd claims there are ghosts
everywhere..
"Ghosts are around us all the time.
At the Avon Park Cemetery I went
and sat on a cement bench with my
tape recorder and waited. When I
went home, I popped it in and lis-
tened. It was static and then "help
me ... help me" could be clearly
heard. Later it progressed and they
even called me by name. I think the
purpose is for understanding and it
proves you don't die, that there is a
different dimension," Ladd said.
Go to wwi:glorialadd.com to
experience her ghost photos and
recorded ghost voices.
Whether you believe in ghosts or
not, Halloween is a time when it is
acceptable to suspend belief ... to
even scare yourself.


Keeping spirits away


Spooky happenings witnessed



in the Heartland











2C News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


DIVERSIONS



Class clown uses humor as self-defense


Question: I'm a teacher and
I love my students. However,
there is one kid in my sixth-
grade class who drives me nuts.
He works overtime trying to
make everybody laugh. What
drives this impish child? Why
does he.want to make life mis-
erable for me?
Dr. Dobson: We all remem-
ber the kid you're talking about.
He's called "the class clown,"
anti some other things that are
less flattering. He is a trial to his
teachers, an embarrassment to
his parents, and an utter delight
to every child who wants to
escape the boredom of school.
There are millions of class
clowns on the job today. It's my
belief that boards of education
assign at least one such kid to
every class just to make sure
that school teachers earn every
dollar of their salaries.
These skilled little disrupters
are usually boys. They often
have reading or other academic
problems. They may be small in
stature, although not always,
and they'll do anything for a
laugh. Their parents and teach-
ers may not recognize that
behind the boisterous behavior
is often the pain of inferiority.
You see, humor is a classic
response to feelings of low self-
esteem. That's why within


many successful
comedians is the
memory of a painful
childhood. Jonathan
Winters' parents
were divorced when
he was 7 years old,
and he said he used to
cry when he was
alone because other
children teased him
about not having a
father. Joan Rivers
frequently jokes
about her unattrac-
tiveness as a girl. She
said she was such a
dog, her father had to
throw a bone down


Focus
ON THE
FAMILY

Dr. James
Dobson
-


the aisle to get her married. And
so it goes.
These and other comedians
got their training during child-
hood, using humor as a defense
against the pain. That's usually
the inspiration for the class
clown. By making an enormous
joke out of everything, he con-
ceals the self-doubt that churns
inside.
That understanding should
help us meet his needs and
manage such a child more
effectively.
Question: I am a single mom
who is struggling to survive. Of
all the things that frustrate me, I
am bothered most by having to


Dear Abby: . engaged, but they're
I'm a 21-year-old woman " in the process of try-
who is happily married to a ing to buy or build a '
wonderful man. My best friend house together. He
is a guy I'll call "Tom." We acts like he's unhap- .
have been friends for four py in the relation-
years. My husband likes Tom, ship, but seems afraid -
trusts me and has no problem to stand up for him-
with it. self. What should I
The problem is Tom's live-in do?
girlfriend, "Ginny." Ginny Tom's Best EAR
doesn't like or trust me. She Friend in Fort
doesn't like any of Tom's other Worth Jeanne)
friends, either. (Most of his Dear Best Friend: -
friends are female.) Abby, Tom You, your husband
is not a flirt. He's loyal to Ginny and some of Tom's other friends
and would never dream of should stage an intervention
cheating. with him. Warn Tom that sneak--
Ginny is extremely insecure. ingarouod .and trying., tQ ,fool
- She goes haywire if Tom has Ginny won't work. At some
any contact with any of us - so point she'll catch on and erupt
he has begun sneaking around like Mount Vesuvius - and who
behind her back to hang with could blame her? Instead of
us. I'm uncomfortable with the behaving like an adult and
sneaking around because it informing his girlfriend that if
makes me feel we're doing the relationship is to continue,
something wrong when we she'll have to accept that he has
aren't, but it seems to be the platonic female friends, he's
only solution. taking the coward's way out.
Tom and Ginny are not A home is the largest invest-


Across
1 Zany
7 Identify
11 Apple PCs
15 Belgrade native
19 Satellite of Jupiter
20 Linen source
21. Bruins sch.
22 Sector
23 Postage
24 The laidback were-
wolf...
27 Monopolize
28 Hellenic vowel


30 New York City
31 Iditarod I
unit?
32 The ag
mummy...
37 Irritate
38 1985
Malkovich film
40 Me in Marsei
41 Standstill
42 Marvel
43 Student at
Point
44 CPA's assign
46 Conniption
48 Earthy tones
50 Doc for Fido
51 Scaled-down i
53 Cartoonist Ad
57 Orchid circle
58 The slick wiza
62 Connive
65 Mears and Mc
66 War hero-tu
actor Murphy
67 Ransackers
69 Relative positi
70 Moniker for N
72 Perfect
73 Asian skey


85 Procrastinator's
motto?
88 Foamy drink
89 Sidled
91 Rich or Castle
92 Thingamajig
96 "Baseball Tonight"
stn.
99 Exist
100 One cubic decime-
ter
101 Metal mixture
102 The timid ghost...
105 Rudolph's distinc-


y river tion
power 107 Defaulter's worry
108 80 yards of'wool
itated 109 Little barker,
briefly
112 The vindictive
John vampire...
116 Exultant Spanish
les shout
118 -Tass: (Russian
news agency)
West 119 Pawnee neighbor
120 Concerning
nent 121 Hood's heater
122 Word from CNN
123 Soot-covered
124 Legendary
plans? Himalayan
dains 125 Twists and turns

ard... Down
1 Go well together
oranis 2 NASCAR word
irned- 3 The reluctant zom-
bie...
4 E-mail dot follower,
ions often
/ao 5 Hunger
6 Noodles
were 7 Giants and Titans


Nearly is one
The angry witch...
Lofty poem
Vietnamese holi-

Wind-borne soil
Excellent, slangily


grp.
8 Schooner filler
9 San _, CA
10 Deplete
11 Requirement
12 Bremen exclama-
tion
13 Hold tight
14 Leave port


send my kids to visit
their dad for three
weeks every year.
That will happen next
month, and I'm
already uptight about
putting them on the
plane. Can you help
me accept what I'm
about to go through?
Dr. Dobson:
Maybe it will help to
know that many other
single parents have
similar feelings. One
of these mothers
expressed her frustra-
tion this way: "I
stand in the terminal


and I watch the kids' airplane
disappear into the clouds. I feel
an incredible sense of loss. The
loneliness immediately starts to
set in. I worry constantly about
their safety, but I resist the urge
to call every hour to see how
they're doing. And when they
do call me to tell me how much
fun they're having, I grieve
over the fact that they're living
a life completely separate from
my own. My only consolation
is knowing that they're return-
ing soon. But I'm haunted by
the fear that they won't want to
come home with me."
If the anxieties of that moth-
er represent your own feelings,


ABBY

Phillips
"""


a ment most people.
make in their life-
times. Tom should
carefully consider the
wisdom of making an
investment like this
with Ginny under the
circumstances. If you
can't make him see
reason, then urge him
to discuss it with a
lawyer. You'll be
doing him a huge
favor.


P.S. And while
you're at it, do yourself a favor.
Distance yourself from Tom a.
bit; until he works this out.
Dear Abby: .
I am being married soon, but
the engagement has not yet
been formally announced. I am
42 years old, and this will be
my first wedding.
Although I know my friends
and family will be happy for
me, I anticipate a number of
people saying, "It's about time
- what took so long?" They'll
think they are being funny, but


15 Make blue
16 Became worn away
17 Intertwined again
18 British sausage
25 Money _ every-
thing!
26 Transplant
29 Soprano Gluck
33 Unique individual
.34 "Mona Lisa" muse-
um
35 Broaden
36 Surprise victories
38 EPA concern
39 Loafer lack
42 Like Solomon
45 Repeats
47 Utmost degree
49 Mob tail?
51 Ship repair site
52 Uses a brayer
53 Grasshopper's trill
54 The irate skeleton...


55 Very dry
56 Hook's flunky
59 Hesitation sounds
60 Shore or
Washington
61 Attended
63 Pincers
64 Chopper (for short)
67 Great_ Valley
68 Without work
69 Cheerful sounds?
70 45% of M
71 Pizzeria need
73 Binaural
74 Vipers
76 Decamped
77 Adversary
78 Find fault with
80 Carried out
81 Basin accessory
86 Getty or
Rockefeller, notably
87 Middle of a minuet


let me offer some suggestions
for how you might make the
most of your days alone.
Instead of seeing the next three
weeks as a period of isolation,
view it as an opportunity to
recharge your batteries and
reinvigorate the spirit.
Single parenting is an
exhausting responsibility that
can cause burnout if it knows
no relief. Take this time to
enjoy some relaxing evenings
with your friends. Read an
inspirational book or return to a
hobby that you've set aside. Fill
your day with things that are
impossible amidst the pressures
of child care, recognizing that
your children will benefit from
your rehabilitation. They'll
return to a re-energized parent,
instead of one coming off
weeks of depression.


Dr James Dobson is founder
and chairman of the board of
the nonprofit organization
Focus on the Family, P.O. Box
444, Colorado Springs, CO.
80903; or www.family.org.
Questions and answers are
excerpted from 'The Complete
Marriage and Family Home
Reference Guide, 'published by
Tyndale House.


friendships
really, it's a sensitive subject
and it makes me want to
respond with a sarcastic retort.
What's an appropriate response
so I can take the high road?
Wants To Be Polite in
California
Dear Wants To Be Polite:
Smile and say, "I wanted to
be sure I got it right the first
time."
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also known
as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline
Phillips. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or' P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles; CA
90069.
Abby shares more than 100
of her favorite recipes in two
booklets: 'Abby's Favorite
Recipes' and 'More Favorite
Recipes by Dear Abby.' Send a
business-size, self-addressed
envelope, plus check or money
order for $10 (U.S. funds) to:
Dear Abby - Cookbooklet Set,
P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Postage is
included in price.)


Solution on 8C


88 Delta habitat
89 Bridge stratagem
90 Give a hand?
92 "The Voyage of the
Beagle" writer
93 Soap ingredient
94 Oft-heard saying
95 Philanthropists
97 "Oklahoma" trans-
port
98 Roman commoner
102 Woven fabrics
103 Hangman's knot
104 Full calendars
106 Greek colonnade
110 Hautboy
111 Jemison and West
113 Cry of delight
114 Ex-Giant Mel
115 And how!
117 N. Mandela's coun-


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News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005 3C


ARTS & LEISURE


Robin Hood to read to children


Halloween being on the horizon reminds me of
all the fun of celebrating this holiday - the excite-
ment of dressing up and being someone else,
even if only for several hours, and, of course, the
promise of getting a bag full of candy. If you
think getting dressed up as someone else is just
for kids, then you obviously haven't
been around the theater. We enjoyed ._
this year's Zenon winner, "Cabaret," at T-
the Highlands Little Theatre, and were
very impressed with the way costumes ' *-
helped to change our friends and
neighbors into completely different ,
characters. Getting into the mind of a
character involves a lot more than
assuming the garb, but an appropriate
costume certainly helps set the mood LIBRAR
and gives insight into the role being
acted out. Car
Sebring Library is fortunate to have Hess
John Ritter, who is playing Robin
Hood at the Highlands Little Theatre,
coming to read to our children, ages 3 years and
up at 3:30 p.m. Monday. Halloween is really
going to be special for all who are here to see the
legend come alive.
If you enjoy films or live theater, then you
should realize that producers go to great lengths
to create an atmosphere that takes you to the time
and place of the storyline. You can find out more
about the medieval world of Robin Hood and the
classic tale of a good person forced to assume a
way of life contrary to the law of the land in order
to right the wrongs taking place. It's such a good
story that nearly every major Hollywood produc-
tion company has filmed their version. Check out
these videos and DVDs: "The Adventures of
Robin Hood" (a 1938 production starring Errol
Flynn and Olivia de Havilland); "Rob" (a 1991
Warner Home Video starring Kevin Costner);
"Robin Hood" (the animated version in both
video and DVD, by Walt Disney).
Books to enjoy include one that was published
the same year as the film, Kevin Costner is Robin
Hood, "Prince of Thieves:" a novel; the Parke


Godwin books "Sherwood, and Robin and the
King;" Jennifer Roberson's novels "Lady of the
Forest and Lady of the Sherwood:" a novel of
Sherwood; and the Elsa Watson tale published in
2004, "Maid Marian." When it comes to chil-
dren's and teen's books, we offer 'Tales of Robin


!Y LINES
rolyn
selink
-


Hood;" "The Adventures of Robin
Hood;" "Robin Hood;" "The Merry
Adventures of Robin Hood;" "Robin of
Sherwood;" "Some Merry Adventures
of Robin Hood of Great Renown in
Nottinghamshire;" "The Forest Wife;"
"Rowan Hood, Outlaw Girl of
Sherwood Forest;" and "Sherwood:
Original Stories from the World of
Robin Hood" edited by Jane Yolen.
Get into the skin of Robin's world
with.our Medieval Wordbook, a dic-
tionary of medieval terms; "Medieval
Folklore: an Encyclopedia of Myths,
Legends, Tales, Beliefs, and Customs;"
or browse the juvenile section of the


library and take home the beautifully illustrated
books by Rachel Wright, "Knights, and Castles."
Now if you are at all a hands-on person, then
you are going to really enjoy Rachel Wright's
"Craft Topics Series: Facts, Things to Make,
Activities."
If it's too much trouble to bring this column to
the library to look in our on-line catalog for
which materials we have at hand and which ones
you need to reserve to come to you at your
library, then ask at Sebring for the bibliography
put together by our Children's Librarian Maria
Chenique. We're looking forward to a great sto-
rytime on Monday, so listen up - Robin says
read.

Carolyn Hesselink is the administrative secretary
of the Highlands County Library System. Library
cards are always free. For information, call 452-
3803 in Avon Park, 402-6716 in Sebring, or 699-
3705 in Lake Placid; or visit the Internet Web site
at http://www.myhlc.org.


Courtesy photo
Bill Farmer stars as the vil-
lainous 'Sheriff of
Nottingham' in Highlands
Little Theatre's upcoming
production of 'Hoodwinked'
in Sebring. Don't miss this
hilarious spoof of 'Robin
Hood and his Merry Men,'
Opening night will be Nov. 4.
Tickets are now available at
the box office by calling 382-
2525.


jLA~trLAVJL -T 1 -- e ia
Placid Art League will have a
20th anniversary reception for
the community from 2-6 p.m.
Saturday.
Members will exhibit art-
work, chat with visitors and
offer refreshments to everyone.
The event is free and open to
the public.
A gsoup from the community
orgadiized the art league to pro-
mote art in Lake Placid, to pro-
vide an outlet for artists to
exhibit their artwork and sell it


uuiing a ree auauossion annual
show at the Highlands County
Agri-Civic Center the last
Saturday in January, and to fos-
ter the arts throughout the year.
Meetings are on the third
Wednesday of the month and
the art league encourages inter-
ested parties to join the organi-
zation.
A scholarship is awarded
yearly to a Lake Placid High
School senior art student to
encourage young artists to pur-
sue a career in the arts.


News-Sun classified ads get results

385-6155 452-1009 465-0426

\\ Celebrating 15 Years
of Business!

Thank You


Plants can grow free from


chemicals in organic gardens


* This is part one of a two-part series on
organic gardening.

When you hear the term organic gardening
what do you envision? Do you think of
extremely large and beautiful fruits and veg-
etables free of pesticide residues
and containing an abundance of '
vitamins and minerals or do you
picture insect chewed leaves and .4,
fruit marred by worm holes? To
clear up some confusion surround-
ing organic gardening. This article I
will try to explain some of the con-
cepts of organic gardening. .
Organic gardening first came on
the scene in the United States in the GROW
1940s and today many people are
going back to organic gardening in SE
an effort to grow plants free of pes-
ticide residues and commercial fer- High,
tilizers. County
Many people have probably used Gard
a form of organic gardening with-
out realizing it. The addition of manure or
compost into a garden bed, the addition of
peatmoss, ground bark or leaf mold to a plant-'
ing mix, using bone meal to fertilize bulbs and
squirting aphid off a plant with a hose are all
form of organic gardening. (I have done all of
this without knowing I was doing organic gar-
dening).
There is no disagreement between the
organic gardener and the conventional garden-
er on the value of the addition of organic mat-
ter to the soil. Both realize that organic matter
makes soil easy to work, increases its nutrient
and water retention, improves soil atmos-
phere, promotes increased biological activity
and adds nutrients to the soil. The difference
of opinion arises with the method of supplying
nutrients (fertilizer) to the plant. The organic
gardener uses only organic materials (animal
manure, blood meal, cottonseed meal and


/
Il
'~>~


We File
Insurance


wood ashes) while the conventional gardener
uses inorganic materials (commercial fertiliz-
er). Organic fertilizers release nutrient very
slowly and therefore there is less chance of fer-
tilizer bmrn. However, the nutrient content of
organic fertilizer is far less than that of com-


I.
1 4





WING
SON

lands
Master
eners


mercial fertilizers. There fore large
quantities of organic fertilizer are
needed to do the job of a small
amount of commercial fertilizer.
The primary difference between
organic gardening and conventional
gardening is the method of pest con-
trol. Organic gardeners use natural
forms of control.
One form of natural control of
organic gardeners is by physical
means. This involves picking an
insect off a plant and squashing him.
Washing insects off plants with a
strong water spray from a garden hose
is another method of physical control.
Another method of natural control
of harmful insects is natural predators.


Some insects such as ladybugs, praying man-
tises, lacewing and trichogramma wasps feed
on harmful insects. Soapy water sprays and oil
sprays are also effective in controlling many
harmful insects.
Some organic gardener's believe that
marigolds planted near other plants will keep
away harmful insects. There is no scientific
evidence to prove or disprove this at present.
Organic gardening is not for everyone.
Those who pursue organic approach to gar-
dening should expect to have more chewed
leaves and more physical exertion. For those
of you who have the time and are willing to
exert the extra effort, gardening may be both
productive and rewarding.

Anna R. Coley, is a master gardener affili-
ated with the University of Florida's Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences.


Located Behind
HRMC


_____ - -.--- -- I U


*Attend the Church of Your Choice!


[ Wayne Whitmire 1
Air Conditioning and Electric, Inc.
Residential * Commercial * Mobile Homes
"Small Enough to Know You...
Large Enough to Serve You"
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Richard S. Taylor, D.C.
525 U.S. 27 South *Sebring
382-3700




THI LE
CALL 386-415 ,xt. 502


An inspire


71 thought


I Corinthians 2:14-15, "But the
natural man does not receive the
things of the Spirit of God, for
they are foolishness to him; nor
can le know then, because they
are spiritually discerned. But he
who is spiritual judges all tht'
yet he himself is rightly jud
by no one."- Though diff
circumstances may leave us feeling as if our lives
have been crushed to bits, God has a specific
purpose for allowing hardship. You see, because God
has purposed to bring every area of our lives into
submission to Him, #e must break us free from
anything working against His divine plan. In I
Corinthians 2:14, we re reminded that the natural
man does not accept thgs of the Spirit. they
seem foolish, and h ot understand them.
However, verse 15 tells t the mature Christian
who is taught and the Spirit is better
equipped to understa 's ways in his life. So
how do these things ether? As we grow in
spiritual maturity, we come less rattled when
God allows hardship lives. Instead we will
accept the challenges iculties, knowing they
will produce growth a fruit. Be Encouraged!
- Patricia Valentine


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V "We're More Than ' "Sal
8086E CHRYSLER COMPLETE
'Estabised1931 Building Supplies
1600 US 27 South * Avon Park F"i' .,l


Please support the above businesses. They have made this page possible.


Farmer stars in Lake Placid Art League's 20th

'Hoodwinked' anniversary reception planned
I A VE PLT ACIDTT - Th nl, P dni.,a n drpp n n nif i i


Highlands Breast


& Imaging Center



October is

Breast Cancer

Awareness Month

Maintain Your
Health, Schedule A
Mammogram TODAY!

114-115 Medical Center Avenue
Sebring, Florida 33870


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Open Monday-Friday 8-5


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THI LE
CALC6�6. .5021









4C News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2.005
*i~~ I - 1 . . 1I- ----


'eaa9o


On the Circle, Historic Downtown Sebring
Saturday * November 12, 2005
9:00am to 9:00pmr
The Circle, along with North and South Ridgewood, will feature Fine Art.
The spoke streets will include a Christmas Street, Children's Street,
Cultural Street and a Community Street.

Come and esnoy food, music, entertainment
)' and an exciting fireworks display.


* TIRE & SERVICE
2306 Hghlamnds A. * Seabng 1 t triangle Park * Lake Placid 200s US 27 North * Sin
863-385-1574 863-46-9876 863.385-2500


#41


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2. Mark an "X" on the matching numbers on your entry form.
3 Fill out your name, address, home and work phone numbers and mail the entry form and
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Each Sunday the subscribers of the News-Sun will receive a Bingo Card. By correctly identify
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week Entries may be mailed to the News-Sun. You can purchase a Bingo Card/Entry every of t
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Miller's Central Air, Inc.
19 W. Interlake Blvd. * Lake Placid, FL 33852
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Printed. Published. N Highlands County.
.Printed. Published. IN Highlands County.


News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005 5C


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LIVING BETTER














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Office Essentials
Office Supplies You Need -
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businesses during the
upcoming
holiday seasor..
Save on time
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Shop for the unusual,
the creative, the
quaint and the
practical...right here
in.our town.
Discover Lake Placid!


See us for Holiday gift ideas. Gift Certificates available!
Need something special? We can have it the next day.

Home & Office Essentials
204 S. Main Avenue - Lake Placid
Convenient Store Hours:
Monday - Friday 7:30 am - 5 pm 465-166 1
Saturday 9 am - 12 noon
r ^ Proud Member: Lake Placid Merchants Assoc.
& ,,. & Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce .l













6C News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005





Libra: Seek advice before making big decision


Aries (March 21 - April 20)
- Your world is a mix of love
and adventure this week, Aries.
Impulse runs wild, but it never
steers you wrong. You do your
best sharing fun with friends.
Taurus (April 21 - May 21)
- Don't start any new projects
this week, Taurus. You are
known to anger easily and
sometimes can be slow to learn
new things. It's best if you stick
with the basics.
Gemini (May 22 - June 21)
- Expect positive develop-


ments in a working relationship,
friendship or romance. For you
this week, Gemini, actions
speak louder than words, so
move forward.
Cancer (June 22 - July 23)
- Less is more this week,
Cancer, because it won't take
much for people to warm up to
you. Consider curbing spending
on any excesses and concen-
trate it strictly toward invest-
ments.
Leo (July 24 - Aug. 23) -
Your senses are alive, Leo, and


you're feeling invincible. You - It's a rare day when you have
leave a path of change at work all of the answers in your hand,
and others are inspired to fol- Libra. It's best if you seek the
low your lead - with advice of others
varied degrees of suc- HOROSCOPES when it comes to a
cess. big decision. Work
Virgo (Aug. 23 - Metro News. relations improve.
Sept. 23) - You can't Service Scorpio (Oct. 24
find a system that - - Nov. 22) - In a
caters solely to your clash of wills this
needs, Virgo. You have to admit week, Scorpio, you will come
that sometimes it won't go your out the loser. Your opponent has
way. Keep things simple for this so much power that a fair fight
week. is impossible. Walk away with
Libra (Sept. 23 - Oct. 23) your head high.


Sagittarius (Nov. 23 - Dec..
21) - Time and distance are no
match for Sagittarians who
work their extensive connec-
tions. You are a person who def-
initely understands how to net-
work. Your smile this week is
proof that you're on top.
Capricorn (Dec. 22 - Jan.
20) - Write a thank-you note
to someone who has done you a
favor lately, Capricorn. It is best
if you try to rekindle old friend-
ships. A valuable relationship
needs to be refreshed or rein-
forced this week.


Aquarius (Jan. 21 - Feb. 19)
- It's best if you curb your
sudden feeling of aggression,
Aquarius. You can put the ener-
gy to better use. Make a list of
top ideas and put a plan in
motion. Gemini is key to the
plan.
Pisces (Feb. 20 - March 20)
- You're feeling a bit discon-
nected from the world, lately,
Pisces. It's nothing to get wor-
ried about. You just need some
time to yourself and then you'll
reacquaint yourself to the norm.


Trees for America Program gives five free trees


Five free crapemyrtle trees
will be given to each person
who joins the National Arbor
Day Foundation during
October.
The free trees are part of the
nonprofit Foundation's Trees


for America campaign, a pro-
gram dedicated to environmen-
tal stewardship through the
planting of trees.
Crapemyrtles were selected
for this campaign because of
their elegant color and form,


making them an attractive addi-
tion to the home landscape,"
John Rosenow, the foundation's
president, said. "Our members
enjoy planting trees and know-
ing they're participating in
improving the health of the


environment." ,
The trees will be shipped
postpaid at the right time ,for
planting between Nov. 1 and
Dec. 10 with enclosed planting
instructions. The six to 12-inch
trees are guaranteed to grow, or
they will be replaced free of


charge.
Members also receive a sub-
scription to the foundation's
colorful bimonthly publication,
"Arbor Day and The Tree
Book" with information about
tree planting and care.


To receive the free trees, join
online at arborday.org. There is
a $10 membership contribution.
For more details, write National
Arbor Day Foundation, 100
Arbor Ave., Nebraska City, NE
68410.


PLACES to


Places to Worship is a paid adver-
tisement in the News-Sun that is
published Friday and Sunday. To
find out more information on how
to place a listing in this directory,
call the News-Sun at 385-6155,
465-0426 or 452-1009, ext. 518.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD

* Christ Fellowship Church
(Assembly of God), 2935 New Life
Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching
His Doctrine; and Awaiting His
Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit
and in Truth." Sunday School, 9
a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.;
Evening Worship, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor
Eugene Haas. Phone 471-0924.
* First Assembly of God, 114
South Central Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone: 453-4453. Sunday
School: 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship:
10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday
.Children's Church: 10:45 a.m.
- Wednesday Adult Bib.le Study and
Youth/Royal Explorers, . 7 p.m.
Pastor: John E. Dumas.
* First Assembly of God, 4409
Kenilworth Blvd. The Rev. Wilmont
McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10
a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS
Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship,
7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night,
(Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth
Group, Royal Rangers,
Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-
6431.

BAPTIST

* Avon Park Lakes Baptist
Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd.,.
Avon Park, FL 33825. Christ cen-
tered and biblically based. Sunday
worship services, 11 a.m. and 6
p.m. Nursery facilities are available.'
Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday
and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Bible class-
es at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all
ages. Choir practice at 4:45 p.m.
Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556.
Minister, Rev. R.L. Polk - home
phone 635-0053.
* Bethany Baptist Church,
(GARBC), Christ-centered,
Biblically based, family focused
chuchh on 798 C-17A South, Avon
Park, FL (corner of SR-17 and C-
17A Truck Route). Pastor: David L.
Conrad. Sunday School 9:45 a.m.;
Morning Worship 11 a.m.; Evening
Service, 6 p.m.; AWANA Club for
children age 3 to sixth frade is 6:45-
8:15 p.m. Wednesday. Conquerors
for Christ teen group (with Pastor
Ben Kurz) and Adult Prayer and
Praise time meet at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Nursery care is provid-
ed for all services. For more infor-
mation, phone 452-1136.
* Cornerstone Baptist Church -
We're new in town and can't wait to
meet you. No matter where you
come from, no matter who you are,
there is a place for you at
Cornerstone. You'll enjoy a blend of
traditional and praise and worship
music, friendly people, and relevant
messages from God's Word.
Currently meeting in the conference
room of the new Holiday Inn
Express, 4400 U.S. 27 North,
Sebring, across from Tanglewood
Resort. Service times are 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday. Nursery
and childcare provided for morning
service. For information, call 314-
0932. Pastor Randy Gaines.
* Faith Missionary Baptist
Church, off State Road 17 North of
Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave.
Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship,
6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m.
Deaf interpretation available. Ken
Lambe t.slor. Phone 386-5055.
* Fellowship Baptist Church,
1000 Maxwell St., Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday: Sunday School,
9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Evening Service, 7


p.m.; Children/Youth/Young Adult
Ministries, 7 p.m. Michael Roberts,
Pastor. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax:
453-6986. E-mail: fellowsh@stra-
to.net.
* First Baptist Church of Avon
Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park.
Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30
a.m. Orchestra rehearsal, 9 a.m.
Library open, 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School, 10 a.m. Spanish Bible Study
(chapel), 10:30 a.m. Library open,
11 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m.
Spanish Worship SerVice, 5 p.m.
ESL, 5:45 p.m. Youth choir, 5:45
p.m. Discipleship Training, 6:30 p.m.
Spanish Worship Service (chapel),
7 p.m. Evening Worship Service.
ESL Tuesday schedule: 9-10 a.m.
computer class; 10 a.m. to noon
conversational English; 7-9 p.m.
computer class and conversational
English. Regular Wednesday sched-
ule: 3:15-5:30 p.m. youth. (seventh
through eighth) after school pro-
gram, 5 p.m. Family Night Supper, 6
p.m. Children's choir rehearsals,
6:15 p.m. youth activities, 6:30 p.m.
Prayer meeting and adult choir
rehearsal, 7 p.m. Bible studies and'
mission groups, 9 p.m. College Bible
Study (FLC). Nursery open for all
services. Telephone 453-6681. Dr.
Vernon Harkey, pastor.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine
Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 mid-
way between Sebring and Lake
Placid). Your place for family, friends
and faith. Sunday morning worship
service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provid-
ed for both services with Children's
Church at 11 a.m. Life changing
Bible Study for all ages starts at
9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen
Altvater leads the youth inr their
quest to become more like Christ.
Sunday night worship at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer
meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth
worship in the youth facility, and
missions training for all children. Call
the church at 655-1524.
* First Baptist Church. of Lorida
located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida..
Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.
for all ages. Sunday worship servic-
es are at 11 -a.m. and 7 p.m.
Preschool care is provided at the 11
a.m. worship service. Wednesday
evening, a youth group meets at 7
p.m. and is for grades seventh
through 12th. Also at 7 p.m., is a
prayer service followed by adult
choir rehearsal at 8 p.m. First Lorida
is the "Place to discover God's love:'
Marcus Marshall, senior pastor.
Randy Chastain, associate pastor.
Mike Ford, bus captain. Bus rides to
Sunday School and 11 a.m. worship
service are provided for children
grades first through adults by calling
655-1878. For more information
about the church or the ministries
offered, call 655-1878.
* Florida Avenue Baptist Church,
710 West Bell St., Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday: 9:45 a.m. Sunday
School for all ages (nursery provid-
ed); 11 a.m. Worship Service (nurs-
ery provided); 11 a.m. Children's
church, ages 3-7 years old and
Junior church, ages 8-12 years old;
5 p.m. choir practice; 6 p.m. Evening
Worship Service. Wednesday (dur-
ing school year): 6:15 p.m. Mealtime
for children, youth and workers; 7
p.m. -Agape Club for ages 3-12
years old, youth prayer and Bible
study and adult prayer and Bible
study (nursery provided). Interim
Pastor: Ken Geren. 453-5339.
* Independent Baptist Church,
5704 County Road 17 South,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School
- 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship -
10:30 a.m. Sunday evening -- 6
p.m. Wednesday service - 7 p.m.
Fundamental, soul-winning, mis-
sion-minded, King James Bible
Church. Dr. John Hankins, pastor.
Larry Ruse, youth pastor. Phone
655-1899. Bus transportation.


* Maranatha Baptist Church
(GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east
of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle
Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9
a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.;
Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week
service, Wednesday, 6 p m Daily
Prayer and Bible Study,' 8 a.m.,
Hamman Hall. Interim Pastor, Cliff
Owens. Associate Pastor, Rev.
Duane Bell. Phone 382-4301.
* Open Door Baptist Church,
located in the Sebring Square shop-
ping center in the Music .Makers
Music Store (between Winn Dixie
and the pet store). The Bible is our
doctrine. Our faith is 'he Lord Jesus
Christ. "Come let us search the
Scriptures together." Everyone is
cordially invited to attend. Bible
study, 10 a.m.; morning worship, 11
a.m.; evening worship, 6 p.m.; and
Wednesday evening service, 6 p.m.
Pastor Rev. James R. Stevans. Foi-
information, call 402-5699;'
* Parkway Free Will Baptist
Church, 34136 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the
church where the "Son" always
shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday
Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and
Wednesday Evening Worship, 7
p.m. Affiliated with the National
Association of Free Will Baptists,
Nashville, Tenn. For more details,
call the Rev. James Klingensmith at
465-2296.
* Sparta Road Baptist Church,
(SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Mike
Adams, Pastor. Sunday School,
9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship,
11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6
p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible
Study, 7 p.m.; Choir practice 8 p.m.
Nursery provided. For information,
call 382-0869,
* Southside Baptist Church
(GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave.,
Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor;
Chuck Pausley, Youth Pastor; Ralph
0. Burns, Assistant to the Pastor.
Sunday School for all ages, 9:30
a.m.; Morning Worship Service,
10:45 a.m.; E-vening Worship, 6:30
p.m. Wednesday: Awana kinder-
garten through fifth grade, 6:30
p.m.; Youth Meeting for Teens, 6:30
p.m. Adult Midweek Prayer and
Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for
under age 3 is available at all serv-
ices. Provisions for handicapped
and hard-of-hearing. Office phone,
385-0752
* Spring Lake Baptist Church,
7408 Valencia Road, Sebring, FL
33876. Phone: 655-2610. Contact:
Richard E. Meyer. Independent, fun-
damental, affiliated with the
GARBC. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.
Sunday morning service, 10:45
a.m:; Sunday evening service, 6
p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting
and Bible study, 7 p.m.
* Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC)
3704 Valerie Blvd.. (U.S. 27 and
Valerie, across from Florida
Hospital), Sebring. Dr. George R.
Lockhart, pastor; and Nathan
Didway, director of student min-
istries. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.;
Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45
a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service,
6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, 6 p.m.;
Bible Study, 6:30 p.m. Youth
Worship, 6:30 p.m. and Team Kids,
6:30 p.m. Nursery provided Sunday
and Wednesday. For information,
call 382-3695.

CATHOLIC

* Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church, 595 East Main St., Avon
Park, 453-4757. Father Gerald P.
Grogan, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass
is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in
Spanish; 8 a.m. and 10:15 a.m.
Sunday; Weekdays at 8 a.m.
Monday through Friday.
Confessions are at 3:30 p.m.
Saturday. Religious Education


ORSHIP


Classes are 8:50-10 a.m.
September through May for grades
prekindergarlen through 121h. Youth
Nights for tifth grade and older are
from 6:30-8:30 p.m Wednesday
* St. Catherine Catholic Church.
820 Hickory St.. Sebring (mailing
address Parish Office, 882 Bay St.,
Sebring FL 33870), 385-0049. The
Rev Jose Gonzalez, pastor. Masses
- Saturday Vigil- 5 p m. Sunday: 8
a.m., 10:30 a.m. and noon Spanish
Mass Confessions. 4-4:45 p.m
Salurdavy or on request). Daily
Mass 8 a.m Monday through
Friday Faith Formation Classes for
grades kindergarten through fifth. 9-
10-15 a.m Sunday in the parish hall
(Rebecca Propst. coordinator of
Faith Formation for grades kinder-
garten through eighth. 385-7844.i
The Edge Program for grades sixth
through eighth is from 6:45-8:15
p m Wednesday in the Youlh Center
IRebecca Propstl Life Teen for high
school students Irom 6:30-8 30 pm
Sunday in the Youth Center (William
Sr. and Sandy Manini, youth minis-
ters. 382-2222) Adult Faith
Formation and people waiting to be
Catholic in the Youth Center from 7-
9 p.m. Thursday (William Manint Sr.
program director, 385-0049) Choir
rehearsal from 7-9 p.m Wednesday
in church Roberl Gillmore, director
of music
* St. James Catholic Church,
3380 Placidview Drive. Lake Placid,
465-3215 Faiher Vincent Liaria.
Pastor. Mass schedule Summer
iMay 1 to Oct. 31) - Saturday Vigil, 4
p.m . Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m :
Weekdays. 9 a.m. Winter (Nov. 1 to
April 30) - Saturday. 4 p m.; Sunday.
8 a.m.. 9-30 a m.; Weekdays 9 a m.;
and Holy Days 8 a.m.. 9-30 a.m. and
7 p m.., first Saturday at 9 a.m.

CHRISTIAN

* Community of Christ, Avon
Park.Sebring, 3240 Grand Prix
Drive. Sebring Country Estates.
behind Wal-Mart). Sunday servic-
es 10 a m.. Sunday School. 11 a m.
Worship service. Wednesday. 7 p.m.
Prayer service. Marcia Roark,
Pastor Phone 655-5379 or 382-
2631. World Church Mission: We
proclaim Jesus Christ and promote
communities of joy. hope. love and
peace
* Eastside Christian Church, 101
Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852
ilwo miles east of U S 27 on County
Road 621)., 465-7065. Web site:
is'i n eastsidecc org S.C Couch,
minister: cell phone 464-2845 or
home, 699-2617. Sunday Worship
Celebration with the Lord's Supper
each week 10:15 a m Youth Church
with Martha Crosbie, director at 11
a.m. Janet Couch, choir director.
Thelma Hall, organist. Wednesday:
Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Choir
rehearsal, 7:35 p.m. "Building for
ALL generations." "God is able to do
immeasurably more than we ask or
imagine by His powerful Spirit at
work within us." Ephesians 3:20.
* First Christian Church, 1016 W.
Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825
(across from McDohald's). Bill
Raymond, preaching minister.
Stephen Bishop, youth minister.
Sunday schedule: 9 a.m. Bible
School; 10 a.m. Worship. Monday
evening is aerobics for ladies. Study
groups for high school boys and
girls only will be 7 p.m. Tuesday.
Wednesday schedule: 6 p.m., choir
practice; 7 p.m., youth groups for all
ages and Adult Study. Nursery pro-
vided Sunday and Wednesday. For
details, call the church office at 453-
5334.
* First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ), 510
Poinsettia Ave., (corner of Poinsettia
and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL
33870. Phone: 385-0352. The Rev.
Ronald Norton, pastor. Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship,


10 30 a.m.
* Iglesia Cristiana de
Restauracion. 1825 Hammock
Road. Sebring. FL 33872 Tel. 452-
0745. Dr Pastor Pascual
Hernandez. Orden de servizios
Domingo 2 p.m - Escuela Biblica
classes para lodos Domingo 3 30
p.m. Adoracion y Predicacion
Marles 7 pm Conociendo las
Escrituaras Jueves 7 p.m Clamor a
Dios-Oracion. Esanri tod,'s
Bienvendios SI no tiene una Iglesia
dornde ir', haga esta su Iglesia En
esta Iglesia Nunca seras un estra-
nrc
* Sebring Christian Church, 4514
Hammock Road. Sebring, FL
33872 Too Schwingel, Preacher:
Sam Wirick-Velez. Youth Minister,
Cora Schwingel, Children's Director
Sunday Worship. 9:30 a m.; Sunday
School, 11 a m ; Sunday Evening
Worship, 6 p m., Wednesday night
meals, 5 p.m : and Wednesday Bible
Study.:6'p.m. Phone 382-6676. .

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE "[

* Christian Science Society, 146
N. Franklin SI Sunday 10:30 a m.
Morning Worship & Sunday School
Testimonial Meetings each 2nd &
4th Wednesday at 5 p rri. A free pub-
lic Reading Room, located at the
church, is open Tuesday and
Thursday. from 11 a m to2 p.m. The
Bible and the Christian Science text-
book, "Science and Health with Key
to Ihe Scriptures" by Mary Baker
Eddy are our only preachers. All are
welcome to come and partake of ihe
comfort, guidance, support and
healing lound in the lesson-ser-
mons

CHURCH OF BRETHREN

* Church of the Brethren. 700 S.
Pine St.. Sebring, FL 33870
Sunday. Church School, 9 a.m.,
Morning Worship. 10-15 a.m.
Wednesday: All Day, Ladies Aid:
Family Nignt Supper. 5 30 p mr;
Children and Youth Clubs. 6 30 p.m ,
Adult Forum, 6:30 p.m.. Temple
Choir, 7 30 p m. The Rev Cecil D.
Hess, Pastor The Rev. Wendell
Bohrer. Associate Pastor Phone
385-1597.
* Lorida Church of the Brethren
332 Palms Estates Road. Lorida
(Ithree blocks south of U S 981
Mailing address is PO. Box 1-19.
Lorida, FL 33857 Phone 655-1466.
Sunday School classes for children,
youth and adults at 9:30 a.m.
Christian worship at 10:30 a.m.
Varied programs at 7 p.m. Pastor,
Rev John Tubbs.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

* Avon Park Church of Christ,-
200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Minister: Larry Roberts.
.Sunday Worship Services, 10:30
a.hm. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are
available at every service. Bible
Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered
classes for all ages. Church phone:
453-4692.

* Sebring Parkway Church of
Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443.
Minister: Bryan Naugle. We would
like to extend an invitation for you
and your family to visit with us here
at Sebring Parkway. Our hours of
service are: Sunday Bible Class, 9
a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10
a.m.; Sunday Evening Service, 6
p.m.; Wednesday Bible Class, 7
p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD

* Living Waters Church of God,
4571 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL
33875. Sunday: Homecoming serv-
ice, 8 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:45
a.m.; prayer, 9:45 a.m.; Encounter
worship service, 10:30 a.m.; nurs-


Continued on 7C



ery, kids church. 10'30 a m.:
Adoracion en Esparol. 1 p.m
Tuesday Pastors prayer partners,
6-7 a.m . Intercessory prayer, 12-1
p m : Bread ol Lile Food Pantry. 4-6
p m.. Intercessory prayer, 7-8 p.m.
(all welcomes. Wednesday
Fellowship meals, 5 30 p.m.: Awana
Kid's Bible Club., 6 30-8 p m
Thursday Youth night'cafe and
game room. 6 p.m For a complete
schedule ol Spanish speaking min-
isiries, call 386-0292.

CHURCH OF NAZARENE

E First Church of the Nazarene of
Sebring, -1420 Pine St., Sebring.
Sunday: Sunday School begins at
9:45 a m. for all ages; Morning
Worship at 10 45 a.m : Service at 6
p.m Wednesday evening service at
7 p.m. with special services for chil-
dren,-,youth. and adults Special
services once-a monin for seniors
iPrime Timersi. and young adults
and families. Call for details at 385-
0400. Pastor Emmert Garrison

CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN
CHRISTIAN UNION

E Community Bible Church -
Churches of Christ in Christian
Union. (Orange Blossom
Conference Center) 1400 C-17A
North truck roulei. Avon Park.
Presenting Jesus Christ as the
answer for time and eternity Sunday
morning worship service., 10 30
a m. Nursery provided. Junior
Church activities at same lime for K-
6 grade Sunday School Bible hour
iall ages). 9:30 a.m. (Transportation
available.) Sunday evening praise
and worship service. 6 p.m
Wednesday evening prayer service,
7 p.m. Children and youth activities
at 7 p m Wednesday Everyone is
welcome, please come worship with
us. Tom Schankweiler, Pastor
Phone 453-6052.

EPISCOPAL

* The Episcopal Church of the
Redeemer, meets at satellite loca-
tion at South Florida Community
College University Center, 600 East
College Drive, Avon Park. Sunday
services: Traditional Rite II Holy
Communion at 8:30 a.m,;
Contemporary Rite 11 Holy
Communion at 11 a.m.; and church
school for kindergarten through fifth
grade is 9:30 a.m. Kids Praise Team
*at 10:15 a.m. Coffee hour between
services. Babysitting available. Last
Sunday of the month is Rite II at 10
a.m. followed by a potluck dinner.
Call 453-5664' or e-mail
redeemerl895@aol.com.
* St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring,. FL
33870. Sunday Services: Holy
Eucharist Rite I - 7:45 a.m., Holy
Eucharist Rite II - 10 a.m. Midweek
service on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m.
Sunday Schbol for all ages at 8:45
a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m.
until 15 minutes after, the 10 a.m.
service ends. Wednesday: Adult
Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are
always welcome. The Rev. Jim
Kurtz, rector. Church office 385-
7649, for more information.
* St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal
Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-0051.
Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, Rector.
Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m.
and 6 p.m. Wednesday evening:
Order of St. Luke Study, 5:15 p.m.
and Holy Communion with Healing
Service, 6:15 p.m.













News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005



Black bears wander Florida territory


Florida black bear numbers
are reported to be between 500
and 1,500, and occupy 5.7 mil-
lion acres in eight distinct
regions in the state - Elgin Air
Force Base, Apalachicola
National Forest, Osceola
National Forest, Ocala/Wekiva
River Basin, St. Johns River
Basin, Big Cypress National
Preserve, Chassahowitzka
National Wildlife Refuge Area,
and Highlands/Glades counties.
That is about 17 percent of our
country's total population of
black bears. Early this century
black bears in Florida num-
bered roughly 11,000 and were
found in every part of the state
including the Florida Keys. The
Florida black bear is considered
threatened with extinction by
the state of Florida.
Black bears feed throughout
the day and night; however,
they are most active during the
night and early morning hours.
Florida's bears prefer certain
forest habitats such as sand-
pine scrub, oak scrub, upland
hardwood forests and a variety
of forested wetlands, especially
riverine swamps. They are
omnivorous. Plant material
makes up 80 percent of their
diet, which consists of acorns,
berries, fruits, palmetto berries,
grass, honey, seeds, nuts, buds,
roots, tubers, the inner bark of
twigs, hearts of palm, insects,
grubs, lizards, snakes, frogs,


fish, rodents, is
armadillos, bird eggs,
wild hog, deer and
carrion. When they
are foraging they can
be very destructive.
They dig and claw at
tree stumps or rotting
logs in search of
insects, and destroy U
cabbage palms and EN
palmettos in order to T
get at the tender
heart. Bear foraging WATE
is unmistakable.
They will get quite Jennif
accustomed to eating
pet food and garbage
if it is left out, and will become
a nuisance. If you live in bear
country keep pet food and
garbage put away. Electric fenc-
ing is 99 percent successful for
deterring bears. Do not feed
bears ... a fed bear is a dead
bear. To report a nuisance bear
call the Florida Game and Fish
Commission at (352) 732-1225.
There has never been a
reported case of a black bear
attacking a human in Florida.
Their hearing and sense of
smell is so acute that they usu-
ally retreat before people are
even aware that they are there.
A black bear interaction in the
wild, although rare, could pos-
sibly be intimidating because
the bear may stand upright to
get a better look at you, or it
may snort or make loud blow-


HI

ER

'r


ing sounds because it
is nervous (not
because it is trying to
intimidate you).
Florida black bears
do not hibernate, but
rather go into a semi-
hibernation state
known as torpor. In
Florida, they may do
FROM so only during
E extremely severe
winter weather.
SHED Torpor tends to be
more common in
Donze females who den
-" when they are pro-
ducing cubs. The
female may stay in her den for a
few months. A den may be
made in a variety of situations,
including logs, stumps, tree
cavities, caves, banks and cul-
verts. Black bears climb well,
and some dens may be well
above ground level. Many
times a temporary nest, or bed,
is made on the ground for rest-
ing or napping. The nest is gen-
erally a depression found in a
palmetto thicket, or tangle of
vines, lined with pine.straw and
leaves.
The greatest threat to Florida
black bears is loss of habitat.
The second major threat is vehi-
cle deaths. Last year more than
100 bears were killed in vehicle
collisions. Protecting the habi-
tat of the Florida black bear
benefits many other species that


depend on the same habitat
type, such as the threatened
scrub jay and the eastern indigo
snake. For this reason, the
Florida black bear is considered
an "umbrella" or "key" species.
If we can save the Florida black
bear, we can save some of wild
Florida, for the future.
There's a Florida Black Bear
Festival, which took place this
year on Oct. 1 at Caldwell Park
in Umatilla, a community on
State Road 19 in northern Lake
County. Umatilla calls itself the
"Gateway .to Ocala National
Forest." The free event each
year features musicians, televi-
sion personalities, nature pho-
tographers and authors. The
unique festival also boasts
wildlife experiences, special
children's activities, tours of the
Ocala National Forest, educa-
tional opportunities and tradi-
tional Southern entertainment
and food.
For more information on the
Florida black bear visit the fol-
lowing Web sites:
myfwc.com/bear or www.kid-
splanet.org.


Jennifer Donze is a natural
resources specialist with the
Highlands County Soil and
Water Conservation District.
She can be reached at
www.highlandsswcd.org.


L- r


Va
I L �>**;; |


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ook like this?
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with a classified ad in the
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ORSHIP


GRACE BRETHREN

* Grace Brethren Church, 3626
Thunderbird Road, Sebring. Sunday
School (all ages), 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.;
Sunday Evening Bible Study, 6 p.m.;
Wednesday Prayer Meeting and
Youth activities, 7-8 p.m. Kid
City/Preschool Day Care is from 7
,a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Call the church about regis-
tration. Dr. Randall Smith, Senior
Pastor; Rev. Vince Lohnes, Pastoral
Care; and Rev. Denny Brown,
Family Ministries. Phone 385-3111.

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

* Spirit of Life Ministries
International, temporarily meeting
at Safari Inn meeting room, 1406
U.S. 27 North, Sebring. Pastors, Jim
and Helen Todd. Phone: 214-6133.
Sunday service, 10 a.m. Bible study
in pastor's home 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Call for directions.
Visit our Web site: www.spir-
itoflifeintl.org. "Where the future is
as bright as the promises of God."
* World Harvest and Restoration
Ministries, (non-denominational)
2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-
3771. Sunday service: Sunday
School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11
a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m.
prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor:
W.H. Rogers.

JEWISH

* Temple Israel of Highlands
County, 1305 Hillside Drive,
Sebring, FL 33870. Shabbat servic-
es held on first and third Friday at
7:30 p.m. All are welcome. Women's
luncheon, fourth Tuesday of every
month at noon at different restau-
rants. Torah Commentary at 3 p.m.
every Thursday. Adult educational
movies at 2 p.m. every second
Sunday. Open to the public. For fur-
ther information, call Bernie
Wolkove, president, 385-1925, or
the office at 382-7744.

LUTHERAN

* Avon Park Lutheran Mission
(LCMS), Sunday services are at the
Good Shepherd Church, 4348
Schumacher Road, Sebring.
Sunday morning service is at 9 a.m.
Bible study is at 10:30 a.m.
Thursday devotion is at 6:30 p.m.
The pastor is Scott McLean.
* Atonement Lutheran Church
(ELCA), 1744 S.E. Lakeview Dr. The
Rev. Eugene R. Fernsler, Pastor;
Jim Dunn, Deacon; Alan Long,
Director of Music. Holy Eucharist at
9:30 a.m. (nursery provided);
Healing Service on Holy Days at
11:30 a.m.; Parish Choir at 6:45
p.m. Wednesday; Mary/Martha
Circle at 11 a.m. first Tuesday;
Dorcas Circle at 10 a.m. second and
fourth Monday; and Lutheran Men at
6:30 p.m. third Monday. Phone 385-
0797.
* Faith Lutheran Church - LCMS,
2740 Lakeview Drive, Sebring.
Church phone: 385-7848, Faith's
Closet phone: 385-2782. Gary
Kindle, Pastor; Paul Ruff, Emeritus;
Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse.
Worship services 10 a.m. Sunday
and 6 p.m. Saturday, (Communion
the first and third Saturday and
Sunday of the month.) Sunday


Worship Service is broadcast on
WITS 1340 AM at 10 a.m. Sunday
School for children and adults, 8:30
a.m., September through May.
Educational Opportunities: Weekly
Adult Bible Studies September
through May. Special Worship
Services on Thanksgiving Eve,
Christmas Eve, New Year's Eve and
Easter. Midweek Services during
Advent and Lent. Faith's Closet
Resale Shop is open to the commu-
nity from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday. All are warmly welcome in
the Family of Faith.
* Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church (AALC) American
Association of Lutheran
Churches, 4348 Schumacher
Road, Sebring, one mile west of
Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor.
Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Bible Study, 9 a.rh. Nursery
provided. Social activities: Choir,
Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-
1163.
* New Life Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a
Congregation of the Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship
with the Wisconsin Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday
Worship at 10 a.m. Sunday School,
9 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. Weekday
Bible Study on Tuesdays at 9:30
a.m. For more information, call Rev.
Richard Fyffe at 385-2293 or 385-
5793.
* Resurrection Lutheran Church
- ELCA, 324 East Main Street, Avon
Park. Pastor: Rev. John C.
Grodzinski. Sunday Worship 9:30
a.m. (The 8 a.m. service resumes
Oct. 3) Coffee and fellowship hour
follow the service. Wednesday wor-
ship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office
phone number is 453-6858.
* Trinity Lutheran Church -
LCMS,. 25 Lakeview St., Lake
Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The
Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and
Phil Frahm, youth and family life.
Worship schedule for December
through Easter: Worship service 8
and 11 a.m.; Communion services,
first and third Sundays; (Children's
Church, 11 a.m. only); and
Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship
schedule for summer through fall:
Worship service, 9 a.m.;
Communion services, first and third
Sunday; Education Hour 10:30
a.m. Additional services: Lent and
Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy
Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.;
Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.;
Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas
Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve,
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activ-
ities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens,
Younger Side Adults, Ladies
Missionary League, Ladies Guild,
Small group studies as scheduled.
Music: Choir and hand chimes.
Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years
old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday. License:
C14H10020: Susan Norris. director.

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

* Bible Fellowship Church, 3750
Hammock Road. Sunday: First
Worship Service and Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Second Worship
Service and Sunday School, 10:45
a.m.; Junior and Senior Night Youth,
5:30 p.m.; and Evening Service,
6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Friends
Clubs (ages 3 through fifth grade);
Youth Bible Study, Prayer Meeting,


6:30 p.m. Dr. Eugene Bengtson.
Pastor; Reinhold Buxbaum,
Associate Pastor; and Wayne
Henderson, Youth Pastor. Church
office 385-1024.
* Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock
Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-
4900. An independent community
church. Sunday morning worship,
9:45 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.;
Wednesday Bible studies, 10 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck.
A small friendly church waiting for
your isit.
* Christian Training Ministries
Inc., member of Christian
International Apostolic Network
(CIAN), meets at the Sebring Civic
Center (behind the library) on
Lakeview Drive at 10 a.m. Sunday.
Members also meet at 7 p.m.
Thursday at Arise in the Shops of
the Highlands Plaza across from the
Highlands County Agn-Civic Center
on U.S. 27 South. Linda M. Downing,
Minister: Phone, 314-9195, lindad-
owning@hotmail.com. Casey L
Downing, Associate Minister-
Phone, 385-8171,
caseydowning@hotmail com. Web
site is chnstrantraining.net.
* Divine Destiny International
Church & Bible Institute, a new full
gospel church plant at 126 E. Center
Ave. (off the Circle in downtown
Sebring). Sunday, 10:30 a.m. to 6
p.m.; Wednesday, 7 p.m Bible
Institute is through 6 p.m. It is a two-
year accredited course. Pastor
Steven Brown. Call (863) 458-2413.
Acts 1:8 And you shall receive
power after the Holy Spirit has come
upon you.
* Highlands Community Church
meets on Sundays at 10 a m. at the
Hill-Gustat Middle School in Sebring
for casual and contemporary wor-
ship. Kid's Zone and nursery are
provided each Sunday. Youth and
adult small groups meet throughout
the week. Bruce Linhart is pastor.
Phone 402-1684 or e-mail
www.highlandscommunity.com.
* Iglesia Cristo Te Arma Outreach
Community Church, 1900 State
Road 64 West, Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday Bible study, 10 a.m.
Domingo Estudio .Biblico 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship, 11 a.m. Domingo
Adoracion, 11 a.m. Sunday night
miracle 'healing service, 7:30 p.m.
Domingo noche servicio de mila-
gros y sanidad, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible service and
prayer, 7:30 p.m. Miercoles studio
Biblico y oracion, 7:30 p.m. Come
visit us and experience the power of
the word of Jesus Christ in salva-
tion, deliverance, miracle and heal-
ing. Pastor Candi Garcia, 471-6893.
* Unity of Sebring Family
Worship Centre at the Centre for
Positive Living, member of the
Association of Unity Churches, 204
S. Orange St., Sebring, FL 33870
(between Highlands County
Courthouse and Sebring Middle
School). Sunday Celebration
Service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery care
available. Adult Discussion Group, 9
a.m. Sunday. Weekly classes,
Christian Bookstore, Prayer Ministry
and Spiritual Counseling also avail-
able. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior
minister. For information, call 471-
1122.,
* Visions Christian Community
Church, 105 Jim Rodgers Ave.,
Avon Park (in the historical build-
ing). Pastor is Alvin Conner. Sunday
worship, 11:15 a.m. Wednesday -


Youth Cultural Arts Ministry, 5 30
p.m.; Youth Bible Study, 7 p.m.: and
Adult Bible Study, 7 p m Holy
Communion is ilrst Sunday of each
month. Yourn ministry is lourinh
Sunday. Women s Ministry is lifin
Sunday "Where there is no vision
my people perish"

PRESBYTERIAN

* Covenant Presbyterian Church
(PCA). 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd.
Sebring. 33872-2113. A
Congregation of the Presbyterian
Church in America Worship servic-
es: Sunday morning worship, 10 30
a.m. Sunday School. 9:15 a.m..
Sunday evening, 6 30 p.m..
Wednesday evening Prayer
Meeting. Youth Group and Kids
Quest. 6 p m. Phone: 385-3234;
Fax: 385-2759. e-mail
covpres@'strato ner. Web site-
wiw.cpcsebrng.org Rev. W. Darrell
Arnold, Pastor; Brent Bergman.
Pastor of Youth and Families. Office
hours, 8:30-11.30 a.m. Monday
through Thursday
N First Presbyterian Church, ARP,
319 Poinsetira Ave., Sebring, FL
33870. 385-0107 Sunday School,
all ages, 9-30 a m.: Worship
Service, 11 a m: Monday: Junior
High Youth Group (grades filth
through seventh), 3.15-4:15 p.m
Tuesday: Senior High Youth Group
teenss. 6:30-8.15 p.m. Wednesday-
Adult Bible Study. 10.30 a.m.: "KFC"
Kids for Christ Youth Group (grades
first through fourth), 3-4 p m.; choir
rehearsal, 5 30 p m. Rev. Darrell A.
Peer, pastor. Tracey A Bressehle,
director of Christian education.
* First Presbyterian Church, ARP
117 North Oak Street, Lake Placid,
465-2742 E-mail.
fpcilpiearthlink.net. The Rev Ray
Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev.
Drew Severance, associate pastor.
Sunday morning worship, 8:30 and
11 a m.; Contemporary service,
10:45 a.m., Sunday School, 9:45
a.m.; Youth Groups. 5 p.m Nursery
provided at all services. Tuesday:
Explorers (third through fifth grade)'
2:45 'p.m. Wednesday: Small Group
Bible Studies, 7 p.m.; Youth Group,
6:45 p.m.; Rock Solid, 6:45 p.m.;
Elevate, 9 p.m. Thursday:
Sonbeams (kindergarten through
second grade).
* Spring Lake Presbyterian
Church (USA), 5887 U.S. -98,
Sebring,-FL 33876. Sunday School,
9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m.
Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday of the month,
September through June. Board of
Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first
Monday of the month. Choir
rehearses at 7 p.m. each
Wednesday, September through
April. Presbyterian Women meet at
10 a.m. the third Thursday of the
month. Pastor: The Rev. Kathryn
Treadway. Organist: Richard Wedig.
Choir Director: Suzan Wedig.
Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,
slpc@tnni.net, Web site,
http//slpc.presbychurch. org.

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST

N Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist
Church, 2106 N. State Road 17,
Sebring; 385-2438. Worship
Services: 9:15 a.m. Saturday, Bible
study; 1-1 a.m. Saturday, preaching;
7:15 p.m. Tuesday, prayer meeting.
Community service: 9-11 a.m. every


Monday Heallh van ministry 9-11
a m. every second Thursday of the
month. Pastor Gregg Aguirre
* Walker Memorial Seventh-day
Adventist Church. 1410 West Avon
Blvd . Avon Park. Phone: 453-6641
or e-mail: wmc'@strato.ner. Saturday
morning worship services: 8 15 a.m
and 11-15 a.m. Sabbath School.
9:50 a.m. Adventist Youlh in Action
IAYA), 4 p.m. Vespers one hour
before sunset Wednesday prayer
meeting 7 pmr Senior- Pastor Paul
Boling; Associate Pastor Eben
Aguirre: and Youlh Pastor Tom
Baker. Walker Memorial Academy
Christian School offering education
for kindergarten through 12th
grades.

THE CHURCH OF LATTER
DAY SAINTS

* The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints. 3235 Grand Prix
Drive, Senring. FL 33870. Phone
382-9092. Dale Bargar. bisriop.
Alfred Schreiber. first counselor, and
Scoh Gadsden second counselor
Family History Center 382-1822
Sunday services- Sacrament serv-
ice. 9 a.m . Gospel Doclrine, 10 20
a.m., and PriesthoodoReliel Society,
11:10 a.m. Youth activities from 7-
820 p.m Wednesday. 11-year-old
Scouts. 7-8:20 p.m first and IMrd
Wednesday, and activity days for 8.
11 year old girls from 7-8.20 p m
second and fourth Wednesday

THE SALVATION ARMY

* The Salvation Army - Center for
Worship. Sunday: Sunday School,
9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11
a.m.; Praise Meeting, 12:30 p.m.
Tuesday: Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.;
Women's Ministries, 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 5 p.m.
Every fourth Thursday is Men's
Fellowship, 6:30 p.m. All meetings
are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave.,
Sebring. For more information, visit
the Web site www.salvationarmyse-
bring.com or call Captain Mary
Holmes at 385-7548.

UNITED METHODIST

* First United Methodist Church,
200 S. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone: 453-3759. Weekly
services: 6 p.m. Saturday; 8:30 and
11 a.m. Sunday; 9:45 a.m. Sunday
School; Youth Fellowship, 6 p.m.
Sunday; choir practice 4:15 p.m.
Wednesday; Cub Scouts, 6 p.m.
Monday; Boy Scouts, 7:15 p.m.
Monday. Karen Wilson, choir direc-
tor/organist; Rev. Edward Wilson,
minister of visitation; Rev. Robert
Thorn, pastor. Everyone is welcome.

* First United Methodist Church,
125 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
The Rev. Ron Daniels, pastor. Rev.
Betty Kniss, assistant pastor.
Traditional Worship Service at 8:15
and 10:55 a.m. Contemporary
Sunday Worship at 9:40 a.m.
Sunday School at 9:40 and 10;55
a.m. Youth meeting, 5:30-8 p.m.
Sunday. Youth After School Ministry,
3-5 p.m. Tuesday. Rick Heilig, youth
director. Children's Affer School
Ministry, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Marge Jernigan, director. The 10:55
a.m. Sunday worship service is
broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM
dial. There is a nursery available at
all services.


* Memorial United Methodist
Church. 500 Kent Ave , LaKVe Placid,
FL 3.3852. Rev Douglas S Pareti.
senior pastor. Claude H.L Burnett.
assistant I, pastor Sunday worship
schedule First service at 8 30 a m.;
Sunday school for all ages at 9 30
a m , Second service at 10 45 a.m.;
Evening service at 6 pm Loving
nursery care provided every Sunday
morning We offer Christ-centered
children and youth programs. Bible
�,iudies_-, btacl ":.idl-s a "no1 ,Ciirviian
lellwcship We are a congregation
that wants Io know Chrisi and make
him known. For more information.
check Oul our churchh Web Sre. at
\it,\i 'memoralumc corn or call the
church office, 46,-2422
* St. John United Methodist
Church, 3214 Grand Pro Drive.
Sebring, FL 33872, Sebrinr Country
Estates. The Rev Ronald DeGenaro
Jr, Pasior Sunday School. 9 15
a m ; Sunday Morning Worship. 8
a m. iNJcvemntrer-Aprii and 10 30
a m. tall year. Hisparni: Worship is
at 6 p m. Sunday school classes are
for all ages. Doti Enghisr and
Hispanic Phone
382-1736
* Spring Lake United Methodist
Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane,
Sebring. The Rev. Dale Schanely,
Pasior Sunday Morning Worship,
9 55 a m adults and children;
Fellowship hour. 11 a.m. after wor-
ship service, Prayer and Bible Study,
6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Choir
rehearsal 7 p.m., Thursday. United
Methodist Men, 8 a.m. second
Saturday. United Methodist Women,
1 p.m. first Thursday. Church office
phone, 655-0040.

UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST

* Emmanuel United Church of
Christ, 3115 Hope Street, Sebring,
FL 33875. Sunday worship, 9:30
a.m. Children's Christian Education,
9:30 a.m. Everyone is welcome at
Emmanuel. We are located 1.7
miles west of U.S. 27 on Hammock
Road. For more information, call the
church office at 471-1999 or e-mail
to eucc@strato.net.

UNION CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH

* Union Congregational Church,
106 North Butler Ave., Avon Park,
FL 33825; 453-3345. Pastor: The
Rev. Bill Breylinger. Sunday services
are at 7:45 a.m. at the Historic
Church, 101 Jim Rodgers Ave.; 9
a.m. and 10:30 a.m. at Millennium
Church, 106 North Butler Ave.
Sunday school: 9 a.m. Bible study: 5
p.m. Wednesday worship service: 6
p.m.

VINEYARD/WORD
OF FAITH

* Heartland Fellowship, 2523 U.S.
27 South, (just past the Wild Turkey
Tavern) Avon Park. Contemporary
Worship is at 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Children's Church and
Preschool/Nursery provided
Sunday. Women's meeting is at 7
p.m. Wednesday. No childcare avail-
able. Pastor, Gerry Woltman.
Telephone: 453-9800. Casual, con-
temporary and Christ-centered.


I...









8C News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005




CCC Festival set for Saturday


Highlands Hammock State
Park will host its 20th Annual
Civilian Conservation Corps
Festival from 8:30 a.m. to 4
p.m. Saturday.
The day gets off to an early
start with the Highlands County
Square Dancers showing off
their moves a4 9 a.m. Following
the dancing demonstration,
you'll hear live music through-
out the day. Performances
include bluegrass, ragtime gui-
tar, country, gospel, jazz, rock,
pop, instrumental and folk
music. At 2:30 p.m., the
Highlands Pipe Band will per-
form with their bagpipes. Hank
Mattson, the Cracker Cowboy
Poet will spin yams of early
Florida at 11:30 a.m. Your fam-
ily will delight over these tales
of yesterday. Be sure and stop at
the CCC Museum and visit with
one of our CCC alumni to hear


what life in the corps
was really like back
in the 1930s and '40s.
Craft vendors and
artisans will provide
a wide variety of
handmade crafts.
Look for homemade
jams and jellies,
,woodcrafts, paint-
ings, pottery, jewelry, THE
floral arrangements,
stained glass and
much more. You can Dorot
also buy local fruits, Dorot
vegetables, herbs and
native plants. There
will be more than 30 antique
and classic automobiles and
tractors on display.
Kids will love to pose with
South Florida Water
Management District's Freddy
the alligator, or see a real, live
alligator. The Division of
Forestry and Smokey Bear also
will be visiting. Highlands
County's Fire Prevention fire
safety house will be here with
their robot, "Pluggy," who will
help kids learn fire safety skills.

There are many fun activities to
do at the CCC Festival for peo-
ple of all ages. This boy (at left)
tries his hand at a tomahawk
throw at last year's event. Older
people (below) enjoy checking
out the classic cars on display.


EREAL
ORIDA


The Non Electric
Toy Company will
have handcrafted
toys and the Time
Travelers will take
you back to pre 1840
with their demonstra-
tions of life in early
Florida. Try the tom-
ahawk throw or learn
some Dutch oven
cooking. Ride a
Lakeside Stables


Harris pony or horse or get
Harris your face painted. Be.
sure to see the native
reptiles at the Croc
Encounters of Tampa exhibit, or
other Florida wildlife at the
Woodland Wonders exhibit.
Park staff will provide
hayrides and tram rides through
the park. The Peace River
Electric Company will teach
electrical safety with their
Electric Junction Safety City
demonstration. Puppet shows
will also be held several times
throughout the day under the
shade of the big pavilion.
The Highlands County Blood
Mobile will be hosting a blood
drive and giving donors free T-
shirts and 50 percent off tickets
to Universal Studios.


Don't forget to bring a hearty
appetite for the Hammock Inn's
smoked turkey legs, hot dogs,
barbecue pork. sandwiches,
smoked chicken dinners,
sausage and peppers, their
famous peanut butter and Wild
Orange pies, waffle cones, sun-
daes and banana splits. There
also will be kettle corn, funnel
cakes and nachos this year. Plan
to load up on some goodies and
then relax and enjoy the musi-
cal entertainment or let the kids
play on the playground.
You can bring the whole fam-
ily to the CCC Festival for $4
per carload, the regular park
admission fee. The only thing
better than coming for the day
would be coming for the week-
end. A few campsites are still
available by contacting Reserve
America at (800) 326-3521 or
o n I i n e
www.ReserveAmerica.com.

Dorothy Harris is a park servic-
es specialist at Highlands
Hammock State Park. For
details, call 386-6094. For
more information about
Florida's state parks, visit the
Web site at http://www.floridas-
tateparks.org.


Courtesy photos
The Civilian Conservation Corps Festival at Highlands Hammock
State Park this Saturday will have lots of crafts on display. Guests
last year check out the jewelry at this booth.


you plan on entertaining this


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Service Time
8:30 am Traditional Rite II
South FHonda Commumtn, College,
Unesirsy Center, Avon Park.

11:00 am Contemporary Rite II
servicee with music)

Last Sunday of the Month -
One Service:
Traditional Rite 11
Monthly Pot-Luck following the service;
place settings and beverages provided.
CofJe hour between Services.
Place settings & beverages provided.
Church School at 9:30 am
for K-5th Grade
Baby sitting available.
Sunday at 10:15 am -
Kid's Praise Team


...ana your kitchen into

a showplace!




C.,.ct now & We will be able

to make your dreams come true

before this holdiay season and

choose your free gift.*


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-43 .-:.; 41


outlookk


PAGE ID + SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2005


NEWS-SUN + SEBRING, FLA.


Photos by KATARA SIMMONS/News-Sun
Larry Butler (left), 4, and Elijah Owens, 4, fill their bags with candy, while trick or treating with their
classmates from Cub City Learning Center.


Harvesters Treat and
Halloween bring out
masked men and women
In the spirit of Halloween, the staff at Alan Jay
Corporate Headquarters (above) dressed-up in
costumes and created a spooky 'haunted house in
the lobby area of the office in Sebring. Jomaris
Sotomayor (left), of the Eye Specialists of Mid
Florida optical department, arranges pumpkins
to be entered into a pumpkin carving contest
Wednesday evening in Sebring. Her display won
third place. Prizes ranged from $25 for fourth
place to $100 for first place. First place went to
Julie King, Jessica Collazo, Crystal Coleman and
Timmi Herbstreith.


Tina Dupriest, of Sebring, and her son
Jack, 14 months old, (right) take part
in the Harvesters Treat event. Jack is
dressed-up as Jack Jack from the movie
the 'Incredibles.'


Lynn McCray of Brenner's Pottery Shop passes out candy to kids
from Cub City Learning Center during Friday's Harvester's Treat
event on the Circle in Sebring.
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ROMONA WASHINGTON
Executive Editor
SCOTT DRESSEL
. Sports Editor


Other viewpoints

The gun lobby got its bill, the House last week follow-
ing the Senate, approving legislation that would shield
gun manufacturers and dealers from liability lawsuits.
President Bush'conveyed his eagerness to sign the meas-
ure, citing the need to "stem frivolous lawsuits." ...
No other industry, ever, has been armed with such a
broad shield, the few exemptions making little differ-
ence. Consider the retroactive application. Lawsuits
already filed would be thrown out of court, and not sim-
ply those pushed by gun control advocates. Defendants
who have behaved negligently will walk.
Often the influence of the National Rifle Association is
cited. Don't doubt the truth of its clout, Democrats and
Republicans rallying to the cause, placing legal protec-
tion of the gun industry ahead of American families seek-
ing justice.

An editorial excerpt from the Akron (Ohio) Beacon
Journal.
* .
Following Monday's Cabinet meeting, a reporter
asked President Bush if the White House was working on
a contingency plan for the withdrawal of Harriet Miers'
nomination.
A number of influential conservatives wish the presi-
dent would do that to avoid a fight over a Supreme Court
nominee they consider unqualified. The fight could leave
Bush's base shaken and divided.
Bush did not answer the reporter's question, choosirig
instead to address the issue of a request by Specter's
committee for legal opinions and memos drafted by
Miers as White House counsel.
Responding to that request, said Bush, "would make it
impossible for me and .other presidents to be able to
make sound decisions. They may ask for paperwork
about the decision-making process, what her recommen-
dations were, and that would breach very important con-
fidentiality. And it's a red line I'm not willing to cross."
It is a dilemma for Bush. He is a true believer that cer-
tain White House communications must be privileged to
protect the president's ability to get candid advice from
his aides.
On the other hand, the senators have a point, too. They
have very little to go on from her pre-White House legal
career to judge her fitness for the high court.
-- j Surely someone in the vetting process must have antic-
ipated this problem. It's why appointing your personal
attorney and White House aide to the Supreme Couirt is
not a great idea.

An editorial excerpt from The Knoxville (Tenn.) News-
Sentinel.

The Department of Homeland Security's bureaucratic
bumbling and resistance to common sense seems to con-
tinue unabated. The agency has announced it intends to
end a test program that allows frequent travelers who
agree to rigorous background checks to by-pass long air-
port security lines.
What's the problem?
According to the bureaucrats, nothing really.
Participating airports reported that the pilot "registered
traveler" program was a success as far as it went.
The only problem was that Homeland Security limited
the privileges of the registration program to the traveler's
home airport, so it was only helpful on the day of depar-
ture. Despite this hurdle, thousands of frequent fliers
eagerly enrolled.
In the real world, a program that works well would be
a basis for expansion and improvement. Indeed, at least
50 major airports nationwide have endorsed the idea and
would commit to participating in a network of airports
where registered travelers could avoid long lines. Fifty
airports, it should be noted, probably would cover a.huge
portion of heavy travelers.
But Homeland Security wants to "study" the idea some
more.
It's going to let contracts expire, which means rebuild-
ing the program from scratch - costing more money if
it ever is resumed.
Chalk this bungling up to one more stroke of genius
from the. same agency that brilliantly resisted allowing
airline pilots, many of whom are .ex-military pilots, to
carry side arms as a last line of defense against another
Sept. 11.
A question, therefore, for the Bush administration:
When - if ever - will real leadership be imposed on
this huge government bureaucracy?

An editorial exerpt from the Williamsport (Pa.) Sun-
Gazette.

Rosa Parks was living proof that ordinary people are
capable of extraordinary acts that can change the course
of history.
A half century ago, Ms. Parks, then a seamstress in
Montgomery, Ala., was arrested for refusing to give up
her seat on a city bus to a white man. Her courageous act
triggered a 381-day black boycott of the bus system and
ignited the modern civil-rights movement.
Ms. Parks "was anchored to that seat by the accumu-
lated indignities of days gone and the boundless aspira-
tions of generations yet'unborn," wrote the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr., who rose to prominence as a leader in
the boycott.
Ms. Parks died Monday at 92. The memory of her defi-


ance and dignity in the face of discrimination will live on
as an inspiration for all who battle injustice.

An editorial excerpt from the Orlando Sentinel.


News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


EDITORIALS/OPI N IONS



The kind of love you can see


This has been a
crazy week for me. L
First we had i URAN
Wilma, which was
loud, windy and wet. Laur
Fortunately, the only
damage we sustained was our
chain link fence. The damage
calls us once again to question,
the wisdom of attractive vines
on a chain link fence. I won-
dered if they were worth hurri-
cane damage, but the alterna-
tive to putting up with the vines
is killing half the yard to get at
them.
After Wilma, I had to make a
run to Jacksonville. My father,
who is more healthy than I am,
had been in a serious car acci-
dent over the weekend and I
drove up to see him. He kept
telling me he was fine, and I
knew he probably was, but I
still wanted to see for myself.
Jacksonville is an insane
place to drive, especially when
you know someone was just in
an accident .there. But I got
there without mishap and I am
happy to report that while my
father will be in some pain for


Neighbors help

neighbors

Editor:
Florida Hurricane Wilma, which tore
across the southern part of our
state as a Category 3 hurricane,
destroying much in its path.
Wilma has cut a wide swath
that will impact many Florida
communities - from the
coastal cities reliant on tourism
to the farmers who live in the
central part of the state.
Insurance, federal and state
agencies and other relief organ-
izations are not equipped to
cover all of the needs of
Floridians impacted by these
storms..In response, Governor
Jeb . Bush established , The,
Florida Hurricane Relief Fund,
for unmet needs and designated
the nonprofit Volunteer Florida
Foundation to manage it.
If you would like to make a
difference for Floridians whose
lives, homes and communities
have been impacted by these
storms, please visit our Web
site at www.FLAHurricane
Fund.org, or phone us at (800)
825-3786. Your donation is tax-
deductible and can make the
difference between success and
failure in this long recovery.
As one of Florida's leading
newspapers, the St. Petersburg
Times, wrote "The Florida
Hurricane Relief Fund, created
by Governor Jeb Bush after last
year's historic storms, has an
impressive .record of raising
money and getting it to com-
munities that need it most ...
This is the modem equivalent
of neighbor helping neighbor."
By contributing to the
Florida Hurricane Relief Fund,
you will help put Floridians
lives on the road to recovery.
Take for example Punta Gorda
citizen Sheryl Jones, who
directs a daycare center that
was severely damaged by
Hurricane Charley in 2004. Her
insurance did not .cover the
extensive damage to the build-
ing and she was not eligible for
FEMA funds. Sheryl received a
grant from the Fund and was
able to reopen and help parents
get back to work and get lives
back on track. "When you are
struggling to recover, knowing
your children are secure so you
can get back to business means
everything," she says.
Fern Dumas, who lives with
her handicapped husband in
Florida's panhandle, has dealt
with the aftermath of two
storms in one year - Ivan, and
Dennis. Ivan tore large gaps in'
her roof in 2004. With labor
and materials in short supply,


m


the next few weeks,
he is improving daily.
LOOK Before I left
- Jacksonville, I had
Ware one more visit to
make. My mother is
buried in Jacksonville. Life had
kept me from visiting her grave
for over a year. I felt the need to
go and pay my respects.
Why do we visit the dead? I
asked myself that as I stood
before her grave marker, which
I and my siblings had picked
out more than five years before.
I think it is a way for us to keep
a thread to them, to still touch
them even though we cannot
speak with them or hug them.
Whatever the reason, it was
something I knew I could not
leave Jacksonville without
doing.
After.leaving Jacksonville, I
headed to Orlando, where I was
to meet Don. He was attending
a medical conference there, and
the plan was we would have
some couple time before re-
entering real life.
Orlando can be an easy place


to drive through. I know this,
because I recall times I have
been able to do it. This was not
one of those times. Add to the
mix that I was tired and was not
quite sure I knew the way to the
hotel.
As I got close, I called Don
on his cell phone and doubled
checked where I was going. We
determined I was headed in the
opposite direction I needed to
go. That left me even more tired
and ready to cry. Yeah, it sounds
stereotypical, but that's how it
was.
Don stayed calm as he helped
me get turned around. He was a
soothing, calm voice in the
storm of traffic around me. He
told me to get in the parking
garage and wait for him - he
would come and help me
unload.
Now, some husbands would
have let their tired and worn out
wife lug their own suitcase to
the room. Don was not like that.
He even took most of my gear
and led me to our room, where
he let me sleep for a bit before


we did anything.
After a nap, I was more
amenable to going out. We went
to a chocolate shop in the
Disney area called Ghirardelli's
(if you have never had
Ghirardelli chocolate, you are
missing out). We ordered sun-
daes and decided to dine in.
While I was slurping up my
hot brownie sundae, I saw an
older couple sit at the counter
across from me. After a while,
they got their single sundae -
and two spoons.
A daughter checking on an
injured parent and paying
respects to one gone from this
world. A husband going out of
his way to assist a weary wife.
An elderly couple sharing a
sundae like dating teenagers.
The best kind of love is the
kind you can see.


Laura Ware is a Sebring resi-
dent and a contributing colum-
nist to the News-Sun. She can
be contacted by e-mail at book-
wormlady @ earthlink.net


,. I


recovery is a long process. A
report this past summer from
the University of Florida stated
that an estimated 1.3 million
Floridians have completed
repairs from the 2004 hurricane
damage, but repairs were still
under way for 696,000 resi-
dents and had not yet begun for
another 348,000.
The situation has been
adversely impacted by damage
during the 2005 season. The
Fund's efforts matter now more
than ever and depend on the
contribution of businesses and
citizens.
To date, the, Florida
Hurricane Relief Fund has
funded 270 organizations to
provide long-term recovery
assistance for the thousands of
families whose needs were not
adequately covered by govern-
mnent and insurance funds. Your
contributions will make a
tremendous difference as we
rise and rebuild. Give today.
Liza McFadden, president
Volunteer Florida
Foundation



Media is hero

of hurricanes
Editor:
Having made the decision
yesterday morning to ride out
this Hurricane Wilma, I went
about securing my fortress and
providing human comforts
within reach. With my radio,
flashlight, kerosene lamp,
wood matches, food, water and


Bible, I hunkered down for a
long night alone, yet not alone
as I sat fixated on the television
weather news.
I cannot find the words to
articulate my thanks and admi-
ration for all the meteorologists
dedicated to their professions
and the saving of lives.
No less heroes are the
reporters in "the field" who
stand for hours in the rain,
fierce wind and cold. Our .eyes
and ears keeping us aware of
the dangers and saving lives.
The news anchors always
alert and probing. Asking the
sensitive questions shedding
light and bringing to the fore-
front truth and visibility.
May God bless each and
every one of these very special
people who give so much of
themselves in the service of the
Lord and mankind facing dan-
gers and helping others out of
harm's way. *
Heroes, each and every one!
Una V. McLaughlin
Sebring


Mentoring Day

a huge success

Editor:
On Oct. 19, Highlands
County participated in its first
Disability Mentoring Day in
conjunction with National
Disability Employment
Awareness Month. The day was
a huge success with nearly 50
mentees with disabilities paired
with mentors from local busi-
nesses and governmental


'The freedom to share one's insights and judgments

verbally or in writing is, just like the freedom to

think, a sacred and inviolable human right that, as a

universal human right, is above all the rights of


princes.'


offices.
On behalf of Ridge Area Arc,
I would like to thank those
responsible for the event's suc-
cess. Assisting agencies: South
Florida Community College;
Vocational Rehabilitation;
Highlands County School
Board and Visions ADT. The
Kick Off Breakfast at the
Jacaranda, sponsored by SFCC.
Breakfast participants: Dr.
Norman Stephens, SFCC;
Patrick Patterson, Ridge Area
Arc; and Susan Benton,
Highlands County Sheriff.
Door prize donations by
Quality Inn. And the following
mentors: Albertson's, Arby's,
Avon Park Police Department,
Blessings Christian Book
Store, C.S. Edwards, Cindy's
Hallmark, City of Avon Park,
Cohan Radio Group Inc.,
Fairway Pines, Florida
Hospital Heartland Division
and Lake Placid, Heartland
Career Connections, Heartland
Horses and Handicapped,
Highlands County Board of
Commissioners, Highlands
County Emergency Manage-
ment, Highlands County Parks
& Recreation Department, The
School Board of Highlands
County, Highlands County
Sheriff's Department, High-
lands Coalition for the
Homeless, Highlands Ham-
mock State Park, Highlands
Today, Humane Society,
Merrill Lynch, Michael's
Restaurant, News-Sun,
Pizzano's, Precision Cabinetry
and Remodeling, Quality Inn,
Redlands Christian Migrant
Association, Ridge Florist,
Royal Care, Sebring Public
Library, SFCC, Vogue Beauty
Salon, Wal-Mart and Wells
Motors.
A special thanks goes to the
event coordinator, Cam
Barnard, employment coordi-
.nator at Arc. We look forward
to an even bigger and better
Disability Mentoring Day next
year.
Rhonda Beckman
Avon Park


The writer is executive director
CARL FRIEDRICH BAHRDT, German author, theologian, 1787 of Ridge Area Arc.
of Ridge Area Arc.


News-Sun
Serving Highlands County since 1927


RALPH BUSH
Publisher
CINDY MARSHALL
Night/Weekend Editor


Letters











News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005 3D


Subsidize heating costs for


zero dollars this winter


President Bush had
better initiate a pro-
gram to subsidize
home heating-oil
costs before sticker
shock turns the red
states blue with cold
this winter. e
With heating-oil
prices expected to
increase by at least 50
percent because of
the high global
demand for petrole-,
um and Hurricane
Katrina-induced


MORE FROM
MORRIS

DICK MORRIS


damage to American refineries.
Prices for natural gas and elec-
tricity will also inflate, lagging
not far behind.
And there's a way Bush can
subsidize those costs without
further adding to the federal
budget deficit. The U.S. strate-
gic petroleum reserve contains
about 700 million barrels of oil,
approximately a one-month
supply of oil for the nation (and
a bit more than two months if
we assume that only foreign oil
were to be cut off).
The oil in the reserve has
been purchased at an average
price of $27 per barrel over,
more than two decades to pre-
pare for a genuine national
emergency. What we face this
winter is not a calamity of suffi-
cient gravity to warrant selling
off part of the reserve, but we
can borrow it for a while.
Why doesn't the president
order that about 200 million
barrels of the reserve be sold at
current market prices? If the
price runs about $60 per barrel
at the time the sale is consum-
mated, the sale would generate


$12 billion. Since we
purchased the oil at
an average price of
$27 per barrel, or
about half as much
as we are now going
to make from the
sale, we should put
aside half of the pro-
ceeds ? $6 billion -
to use replenishing
the reserve once
prices have come
down to more nor-
mal levels. Then we
can feel free to use


the remaining $6 billion to sub-
sidize home heating-oil prices
this winter at no cost to the
treasury.
While oil prices are destined
to rise in coming years because
of increased demand, particu-
larly from developing nations
such as India and China, they
aren't likely to stay above $30
per barrel for more than the
period of the current emer-
gency. We should shortly be
able to replenish .all we have
borrowed from the reserve,
again without any additional
drain on the treasury.
We certainly will not need
the extra 200 million barrels
during this interim period. We
can replace it before we experi-
ence any ill effects from its
absence. The oil is doing us no
good sitting in the reserve.
There is no reason why our
government cannot cash in on
the current escalation of fuel
prices to mitigate some of the
effects of this rapid increase on
our people.
It would be great if Bush
could, for once, anticipate the
need for a program before he


has to be beaten over the head
to initiate one. The looming dis-
aster of higher heating-oil
prices clearly will require a fed-
eral subsidy. This proposal
offers a way Washington can
give help without spending
more money.
Without the subsidy, one can
well imagine low-income fami-
lies in Northern climes having
to choose between heating and
eating, not a choice they should
be forced to make. No means
test should be necessary to trig-
ger the federal subsidy, since
the increase in costs should not
cause otherwise self-sufficient
citizens to feel as if they are
receiving charity or welfare.
Nobody can plan for a 50-per-
cent increase in heating-oil
costs, and few can absorb the
higher bill without cutting out
something else in their budget.
The sell-off of reserve oil
would not require congression-.
al approval. Bush has ample
authority to order it under his
current executive powers.
Using that fund for heating-oil
subsidies will require Senate
and House consent, but legisla-
tors are particularly adept at
voting for subsidies that do not
cost anything. Passing the bill
should not present much of a
problem.
The administration should
act promptly to take advantage
of this win-win proposal.

Dick Morris was an adviser to
Bill Clinton for 20 years. Look
for Dick's new book 'Condi vs.
Hillary' available now. Send e-
mailfor Dick Morris to dmred-
ding@aol.com.


Inequality in America:
Fall is inequality ma- At the pinnacle c
season. Every OPINION U.S. wealth, 200
autumn, as the leaves saw a dramatic
change color, we get a Chuck Collins increase in the nun
vivid new picture of ind ber of billionaire
the trends that pull us andlice Yeskel According t
apart as a country. Felice Yeskel "Forbes" magazine
This year is no dif- there are now 374 c
ferent. But after almost three them. This growth in billion
decades of incrementally aires took a dramatic leap since
widening disparities of wealth the early 1980s, when the avei
and income, it's worth noting age net worth of the individual
that we've entered a new ver- on the Forbes 400 list was $40
sion of economic apartheid, million. Today, the average ne
American-style. Let's call it worth is $2.8 billion. Wal
Inequality 2.0. Mart's Walton family now ha
The United States is now the 771,287 times more than th
third most unequal industrial-' median U.S. household.
ized society after Russia and Does inequality matter? On
Mexico. This is not a club of problem is that concentration
which we want to be a member. of wealth and power pose
Russia is a recovering kleptoc- danger to our democratic sy,
racy, with a post-Soviet oli- tem. The corruption of politic
garchy enriched by looting, by big money might explain
And Mexico, despite joining why for the last five years th
the rich-nations club of the president and Congress hav
Organization for Economic and been more interested in repea
Community Development, has ing the federal estate tax, pai
some of the most glaring pover- only by multi-millionaires, tha
ty in the hemisphere. in reinforcing levees along th
In 2004, after three years of Gulf Coast.
economic recovery, the U.S. Now, to pay for hurricane
Census reports that poverty reconstruction and the war i
here continues to grow, while Iraq, Congress is considering
the real median income for full- cuts in programs that help poo
time workers has declined. Just people, such as Medicaid an
since 2001, when our economy Food Stamps. They have n(
hit bottom, the ranks of our yet considered fairer ways c
nation's poor have grown by 4 reducing the deficit like reverse
million, and the number of peo- ing special tax breaks for th
ple without health insurance rich, such as the recent cuts i
has swelled by 10 percent to capital gains and dividen
over 45 million, taxes.
Income inequality is now And inequality is non-part
near all-time highs, with more san. The pace of inequality ha
than 50 percent of 2004 total grown steadily over there
income going to the top fifth of decades, under both Republica
households, and the biggest and Democratic administration
gains going to the top 5 percent and Congresses. The Gin
and 1 percent. The average index, the global measure o
CEO now takes home a pay- inequality, grew as quickly
check 431 times that of their under President Bill Clinton a
average worker, it has under President Georg


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Version 2
W. Bush. Widening disparities
in the United States are the
result of three decades of bipar-
tisan public policies that have
tilted the rules of the economy
to the benefit of major corpora-
tions and large asset owners at
the expense of people whose
security comes largely from a
paycheck.
Public policies in trade,
taxes, wages and social spend-
ing can make a difference in
mitigating national and global
trends toward prolonged
inequality. But our priorities are
moving us in the wrong direc-
tion.
For example, the failure to
raise the minimum wage from
its 1997 level of $5.15 an hour
guarantees continued income
stagnation for the working poor
for years to come. The president
and Congress' focus on tax cuts
for the wealthy and their disin-
terest in government spending
to expand equal opportunity
sets the stage for Inequality
Version 3.0.
We shouldn't tolerate this
drift toward an economic
apartheid society.


Chuck Collins and . Felice
Yeskel are co-authors of the
new book, 'Economic
Apartheid in America: A
Primer on Economic Inequality
and Insecurity' (The .New
Press). Yeskel is co-director of
Class Action (www.classism.
org). Collins is senior fellow at
United for a Fair Economy
(w w w. faireconomy. org).
United for a Fair Economy is a
Boston-based national, inde-
pendent, nonpartisan organiza-
tion that puts a spotlight on the
dangers of growing income,
wage and wealth inequality in
the United States and coordi-
nates action to reduce the gap


* Is that dark spot harmless?


* Is it only a rough, red spot?


* Is it cancer?


* What is growing on my skin?


* Why doesn't that place heal?


* Why is it itching?


GET THE ANSWERS FROM


THE SKIN EXPERTS.!!


it


American Istitute DARRIN A. ROTMAN M.D.
odDermatalogy
CATRENA B. MITCHELL P.A.-C.

6lIO D MARIA L. FORTINGTON P.A.-C.


AT..VAILA



.ALL 614%0W=07


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Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Guest columns are preferred to be around 800 words.
When your letter is signed, sealed and ready to be delivered, write to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com.
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AllPitems will run on a flrq-come baris'-A pace permits, although more timely ones could be moved up.ILetters will be edited for good taste, grammar, length and libel, although we try to retain the
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The News-Sun


Brings Us Business!



























601 US 27 N. -Avon Park
863-453-5000 * 863-471-5000
All foundations of successful businesses are based on strong
cause and effects...

CAUSE: Running our ads on the BINGO page of the News-Sun.
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News Sun-
Written. Printed. Published. IN Highlands County.

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I E









4D News-Sun, Sunday, October, 30, 2005
1


Deadline nears for
three programs
GAINESVILLE - State
Conservationist Niles Glasgow
with USDA-Natural Resources
Conservation Service said Dec.
15 is the cutoff date for three
Farm Bill conservation pro-
grams. All applications for the
Environmental Quality
Incentives Program, Wildlife
Habitat Incentives Program,
and the Wetland Reserve
Program will be accepted until
close of business on Dec. 15.
For additional details on
these Farm Bill programs and
for specific eligibility require-
ments to participate, contact
your local NRCS Office.
For details on the EQIP pro-
gram contact Larry Sharpe at
the. NRCS office at 4505
George Blvd, or call 402-6545.


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RIC LILJENBERG/News-Sun
Motorcycle stunt rider Kyle Woods salutes the crowd Thursday evening as Lake Placid
Elementary and Lakeview Christian schools celebrate Red Ribbon Week. Woods is considered the
number one U.S. stunt rider, has performed in the movie 'Fast and Furious,' the television pro-
gram 'CSI Miami' and is performing in a movie based on the television series 'Miami Vice.' Using
Drug Awareness Resistance Education and other drug education resources, Red Ribbon Week is
an annual event throughout the Highlands County School District.


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Sports


Gamer's Corner
- Tips, hints &
reviews of the
latest video
game titles
, � Page 4E


NEWS-SUN + SEBRING, FLA.


SECTION E + SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2005


The

Sideline
SCORES AND MORE

F.Y.I.
Avon Park vs. CCC
game is Tuesday
The Clearwater Central
Catholic at Avon Park foot-
ball game, which was post-
poned due to Hurricane
Wilma, will be played on
Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Joe
Franza Stadium.
Other schedule changes
related to the hurricane
have the Region 2-1A
swimming and diving meet
on Saturday in Orlando and
the District 6-2A cross
country meet moved back
to Tuesday in Naples.

Scoreboard
Friday
High School Foottball
District 12-3A
Hardee ................ 16
DeSoto ............... 12
Hardee: Clinches district title.
District 5-2A
Nature Coast Tech .. 34
Mulberry ............... 27
Other Scores
LaBelle ............... 28
Estero .................... 21
Clearwater CC .... 21
Cardinal Mooney.. 16
Berkley Prep ....... 34
Frostproof ......... 14


On Deck
* TUESDAY
Cr 6'- Country
Lake Placid in District 6-2A
meet in Naples, TBA
Football
Clearwater Central Catholic
at Avon Park, 6:30 p.m.
Soccer
Sebring girls at Clewiston
(varsity only), 4 p.m.
FRIDAY
Football
LaBelle at Lake Placid
(homecoming), 7:30 p.m.;
Bradford at Sebring, 7:30
p.m.

SATURDAY
Cross Country
Regional meet in Fort
Myers, 9:30 a.m.
Softball
Clearwater Bullets at SFCC,
2 p.m. ,
Swimming
Avon Park, Lake Placid in
Region 2-1A meet in
Orlando, 9 a.m.
000

History Lesson
5 Years Ago
Oct. 31,2000: Kori Lai shot
an 89 to lead Sebring to a
second-place finish in the
Region 4-1A tourney at
Sebring Golf Club as the
Streaks advanced to the
state tournament for the
second straight year. Aimee
Cho shot a 6-under 66 to
leak Orlando Lake Highland
Prep to the overall win.

20 Years Ago
Nov. 1, 1985: Rioky Fields
scored on runs of 84 and
86 yards (both on toss
sweeps) to lead Lake Placid
to a 21-12 win at Fort
Meade, the Dragons' sec-
ond straight victory.


Trivia Time


Q



A


Who was the first
NFL running back to
catch 100 passes in a
season?
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66 lqlnBeo pue '966 L
Ul SleBUIpJBe uozIyJ
aql Jisassed 1.01. Ul
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Dragons ousted


in first round
By SCOTT DRESSEL
Sports Editor
LAKE PLACID - After getting delayed two
times, Lake Placid and Fort Pierce John Carroll got
their money's worth on Saturday.
.The Region 3-3A quarterfinal between the
Dragons and Golden Rams was supposed to be
played Tuesday, but Hurricane Wilma forced that
date to be changed to Thursday and then to
Saturday. After all that waiting around, the two
teams got in plenty of volleyball as three of the four
games went down to the wire, with the Rams escap-
ing with a 23-25, 25-14; 25-23, 25-22 win.
"We didn't really get going on offense. They had
some holes there and we just didn't hit them," Lake
Placid coach Marilyn Jones said. "We were hitting
too hard and they were going out.
"Some of the girls stepped up and played really
well. We're used to wonderful games out of every-
body and one or two of them, there was some mis-
communication on the court a few times and the
ball hit the ground. That's going to happen from
time to time. We're dealing with teenage girls here.
"Maybe we just had too much practice, I don't
know."
See DRAGONS, Page 3E


High School Football


SCOTT DRESSEL/News-Sun
Demetrious Gross of Avon Park (1) cuts in front of Sebring's Kyle Hoffner for an interception in the final minute of the fourth quarter
Friday night at Firemen's Field. Gross returned the pick 78 yards for the game-clinching touchdown.





PICK TO CLICK


Late interception return seals

Avon Park's dramatic victory


By SCOT DRESSEL
Sports Editor
SEBRING - The Red
Devils .came all the way back
this time.
Last year, Avon Park came
up just short in a second-half
rally against the rival Sebring
Blue Streaks before, los-
ing by six. They didn't Avon
come up short Friday '
night at Firemen's Field, 3
scoring 21 unanswered Seb
points in the final 13
minutes of the game to
erase an 11-point deficit Up
and take a 30-20 win, Devils
snapping Sebring's Cear
three-game winning CC Tu
streak in the 79-year-old Streaks
series. ' Bradfo
Quarterback T.K. Hill Friday
countered three intercep-
tions - two of them coming on
consecutive throws - with
three touchdown runs, setting
up two of them with long pass-
es, as the Devils took advantage
of great field position most of
the night to come back from a
20-9 Sebring lead.
Hill's final touchdown, a 2-


P


)ri


NE
h
at
es
s I
drd


I, a I4,.qfe play after 'i' 46-
yard completion to Gerrard
Coleman, put the Devils ahead
with 3:43 left in the game, but it
wasn't over until Demetrious
Gross picked, off an A.C.
Wilson pass and returned it 78
yards to the end zone with 35.4
seconds on the clock.


Park "I kept yelling, 'Lay
) down, lay down,' but I'm
DW glad he scored," Avoi
ng Park coach T.C. Cousins
i said. "The right thing to
LP do is lay down, we take a
knee and we win the
ost game, but you're not
ter going to stop him when
day; he gets a full head of
host steam."
d on "I thought we had a,
chance to-score, but he
- made a great play on that
interception," Sebring coach
Jared Hamlin said. "It was open
initially and he closed the gap
in a hurry and made a great play
on it."
The Devils opened up a 9-0
lead after Rafael Johnson's 62-

See PICK, Page 3E


SCOTT DRESSEL/News-Sun
The Red Devils celebrate following their win over Sebring Friday
night.


Barons top


Dragons to


clinch title
News-Sun
ST. PETERSBURG - For
most of the first half of Friday's
game at St. Petersburg
Catholic, Lake Placid coach
Shaw Maddox thought his
Dragons had finally figured
things out.
By the end of the game,
however, Maddox didn't have
that feeling anymore as .the
Barons ran away with a 31-9
win to clinch the District 5-2A
championship.
"The first half we actually
tackled better and played better
than we have all year on
defense," Maddox said. "We
got after it pretty good. We
knocked our speed up a notch
and tackled pretty well and,
truth be known, it should have
been 3-0 at halftime or 7-3 in
our favor. We squandered a
couple of chances to score with
missed blocks and missed
assignments, things like that."
It was 10-0
late in the first St. Pete Cath.
half before the 31
Barons (7-3
overall, 4-0 in Lake Placid
the district)
punched in a 9
score to take a Up Next
17-0 lead into Homecoming
halftime, then game against
scored two more LaBelle Friday
times in the
opening minutes of the second
half.
"Just a couple of miscues by
a couple of guys and it could
have been- 3-0 or 7-3 at the'half,
and then we do what we alWays
do, we go in at halftime and
talk to them and make adjust-
ments, then come out flat and
they score 14 points in like the
first three minutes of the sec-
ond half,".Maddox said.
The Barons got scoring runs
of 56 and 45 yards Jock
Sanders and Darius Bellamy
added two touchdown runs, one
from 45 yards out.
St. Pete Catholic kept Lake
Placid out of the end zone until
Conlin Veley's quarterback
sneak in the fourth quarter.
Lake Placid will try to
regroup for the regular-season
finale - and homecoming
game - this week against
LaBelle.
"I'm back to scratching my
head trying to figure out why
we can't put four quarters
together," Maddox said.
"I don't know what the deal
is. We're thinking about next
week just going behind the end
zone and just scrimmaging the
whole halftime so we don't lose
whatever intensity we have."


Avon Park BMX track


hosting state qualifier


Special to the News-Sun
AVON PARK - As fall
.sends a chill intothe air, the
BMX racing is heating up in
Avon Park.
Highlands County Family
YMCA BMX will host its
first qualifier for the 2006
Florida NBL State
Championship Season Nov.
12-13 and officially kick off
the six-month period for
BMX racers who will travel
around the state earning
points to qualify for the State
Championship Race.
Since this is the first chance
to earn points toward qualifi-
cation, Avon Park is preparing
to host an estimated 1,100
racers and their families from
across Florida for the race
weekend.
The racers, ages 3-64, are
eager to visit a track so known
for its unique design. From
the starting hill, the track
flows downhill as racers
speed through a quarter mile
of jumps, turns and obstacles


that range from 5 to 30 feet
long and as.high as 12 feet.
Although a single race
takes less than 90 seconds to
complete, there will be high-
flying, heart-pounding racing
all weekend long.
"This track is truly spectac-
ular for the racers and specta-
tors," said State Race
Commissioner Alice Bixler.
"We encourage everyone in
the community to come out
and watch. It is a great sport
for the entire family."
Highlands BMX also holds
local races and practices
every week and is open to any
member of the National
Bicycle League (NBL).
For more information,
please call the track at 452-
9995 or visit www.floridab-
lmx.Com.
The Highlands BMX track
is located just east of the
intersection of U.S. 27 and
Stryker Road at East Old
Bombing Range Road and
See BMX, Page 3E


SCOTT DRESSEUJNews-Sun
Darby Underwood of Lake Placid (9) tries for a
block against John Carroll's Emmalie Luther
Saturday.


2005 FHSAA State Volleyball Playoffs




















APHS golf teams to
hold tourney Nov. 12
AVON PARK - The Avon
Park High School boys and
girls golf teams will be hosting
a golf tournament on Saturday,
Nov. 12, at Pinecrest Golf
Course. Registration will begin
at 8 a.m. with a shotgun start at
8:30 a.m. The format will have
two divisions: adult/child-or
two-person.
The $50 per player entry fee
includes lunch, golf, refresh-
ments on the course and
awards. Sign sponsorships are
also available for $75 per sign.
Call Coach Bobby Barben at
443-0102 or 453-3659 for
more details. Entry forms are
available at APHS or Pinecrest
Golf Course.
Meals on Wheels golf
tourney set for Dec. 3
SEBRING - The Meals on
Wheels Sixth Annual Charity
Golf Scramble will be held
Dec. 3 at Harder Hall.
The entry fee is $50 per per-
son or $200 for the four-person
team. Entry forms are available
at the Harder Hall pro shop.
Sponsorship opportunities are
available.
Call Jeff Dressel at 381-
2752 or the pro shop at 382-
0500 for details.
HCTA hosting Senior
Games Nov. 4-6
SEBRING - The
Highlands County Tennis
Association will be the host of
the Heartland Senior Games at
the Thakkar Tennis Center
located in the Country Club of
Sebring Nov. 4-6.
There is a daily fee of $8 for
adults and $5 for under 18 to
practice on the Center's clay
courts. Please call Bobby
Fulcher at 471-3261 for.more
details.
Harder Hall Classic to
be held Nov. 11-13
SEBRING - The sixth
annual Harder.Hall Classic
will be held Nov. ll1-13.,This
individual stroke play event
will have pro and amateur
divisions for both men and
women.
Cost is $150 per player,
which includes 54 holes of
gojf, gift bag, continental
breakfast Saturday and Sunday,
box lunches on Friday and
Sunday and a steak dinner
Saturday night. Call the pro
shop at 382-0500 for details.
VFW golf tourney tees
off Nov. 5 in Sebring
SEBRING - Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post 4300's
Welcome Back Snowbirds
Golf Tournament will be Nov.
5 at Sebring Golf Club begin-
ning with 1 p.m. shotgun start.
Format is four-person scram-


ble. Cost is $45 per person.
Refreshments will be available
on course and a ham dinner
will be held at 6:30 p.m. at
VFW'Post 4300. The tourney
will benefit for the VFW Post
4300 building fund.
Sign up sheet will be at Post
4300. You must be signed up
and money paid no later than
Tuesday, Oct. 25.
SHS selling all-sport
passes for 2005-06
SEBRING - Sebring High
School is selling all-sport pass-
es for both students and adults.
This pass will provide
access to all athletic events for
the 2005-06 school year. The
cost is $50 for students and
$65 for adults. They are on
sale in the front office and the
athletic office.
Call 471-5500 for more
details.
American Red Cross
golf tourney Nov. 5
SEBRING - Golfers gear-
ing up for the fall season can
get in on the American Red
Cross Golf Tournament this
November.
The tournament will be on
Nov. 5 at SpringLake Golf
Resort. A two-person scramble
will begin at 8 a.m. with a
shotgun start.
Art Harriman, director of the
Highlands County American
Red Cross Service Center, said
the event will be preceded by a
horse racing night on Nov. 4 at
Spike's Sports Bar at
SpringLake Golf Resort.
Tickets are on sale now for
$60 per player, which includes
registration fee, cart rental, and
breakfast and lunch.
For more information, con-
tact the Highlands County
American Red Cross Service
Center, at 1430 Lakeview
Drive, Sebring; 386-4440, or
the SpringLake Golf Resort,
100 Clubhouse Lane, Sebring;
1-800-635-7277.
Local BMX track to
host state qualifier "
AVON PARK - Highlands
County Family YMCA BMX
will host its first qualifier for
the 2006 Florida NBL State
Championship Season Nov.
12-13.
The Highlands BMX track
is located just east of the inter-
section of U.S. 27 and Stryker
Road at E. Old Bombing
Range Road and Isabelle Lake
Road. The racing starts at 11
a.m., Saturday, Nov. 12 and 9
a.m., Sunday, Nov. 13. Both
days are free for spectators.
Highlands BMX also holds
local races and practices every
week and is open to any mem-
ber of the National Bicycle
League (NBL). For more infor-
mation about racing, please
call the track at 452-9995 or
visit www.floridabmx.com.


News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


STATS AND STANDINGS


STANDINGS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
Bbffalo
Miami
N.Y. Jets


Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston


Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland


Denver
Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland


East
W L T Pet PF PA
3 3 0 .500 138164
3 4 0 .429 112138
2 4 0 .333 115128
2 5 0 .286 92 139
South
W L T Pct PF PA
7 0 01.000189 77
4 2 0 .667 108101
2 5 0 .286 136177
0 6 0 .000 74 179
North
W L T Pct PF PA
5 2 0 .714 168111
4 2 0 .667 149 95
2 4 0 .333 69 100
2 4 0 .333 78 103
West
W L T Pct PF PA
5 2 0 .714 152131
4 2 0 .667 149132
3 4 0 .429 193146
2 4 0 .333 128133


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Washington
N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Dallas


Tampa Bay
Atlanta
Carolina
New Orleans


Chicago
Detroit
Minnesota
Green Bay


Seattle
St. Louis
Arizona
San Francisco


East
W L T Pct PF PA
4 2 0 .667 135103
4 2 0 .667 173137
4 2 0 .667 142118
4 3 0 .571 147124
South
W L T Pct PF PA
5 1 0 .833 116 72
5 2 0 .714 175133
.4 2 0 .667 148136
2 5 0 .286 119201
North
W L T Pct PF PA
3 3 0 .500 100 68
3 3 0 .500 104106
2 4 0 .333 90 155
1 5 0 .167 144118
West.
W L T Pct PF PA
5 2 0 .714 181127
3 4 0 .429 184210
2 4 0 .333 114144
1 5 0 .167 96 212


Today's Games
Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Dallas, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Houston, 1 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Miami vs. New Orleans at Baton
Rouge, La., 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Buffalo at New England, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Indianapolis, N.Y. Jets, Seattle,
Atlanta . .
Monday's Game
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 9 p.m.
-Sunday, Nov. 6
Atlanta at Miami, 1 p.m.
San Diego at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago vs. New Orleans at Baton
Rouge, La., 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Buffalo, Denver, Dallas, St.
Louis
Monday, Nov. 7
Indianapolis at New England, 9 p.m.



PLAYOFFS
Conference Semifinals
(Two-leg Aggregate Score Series)
Eastern Conference
MetroStars vs. New England
Saturday, Oct. 22
MetroStars 1,.New England 0,
MetroStars lead series 1-0
Saturday's Game
MetroStars at New England, late
Chicago vs. D.C. United
Friday, Oct. 21
D.C. United 0, Chicago 0, tie, series
tied 0-0
Today's Game
Chicago at D.C United, 4:30 p.m.


Quick Reads
LOCAL NEWS IN BRIEF


W L OT Pts GF
Carolina 7 2 1 15 43
Tampa Bay 6 3 2 14 34
Florida' 6 4 1 13 27
Washington 4 7 0 8 25
Atlanta 3 7. 0 6 29
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OT Pts GF
Detroit 10 1 0 20 47
Nashville 8 0 1 17 32
Columbus 4 7 0 8 22
Chicago 3 7 0 6 29
St. Louis, 2 6 2 6 30
Northwest Division


Vancouver
Minnesota
Colorado
Edmonton
Calgary


W L OT Pts
8 2 1 17'
5 4 2 12
,5 4 1 11
4 6 1 9
4 7 1 9
Pacific Division


GF GA
40,34
34 25
45 34
28 39
27 37


W L OT Pts GF GA
LosAngeles 7'4 0 14 38 30
Dallas 5 4 1 11 29 36
Anaheim 5 5 1 11 34 34
San Jose 5 5 1 11 35 42
Phoenix 5 6 1 11 31 34
Two points for a win, one point for
overtime loss or shootout loss.

Thursday's Games
Boston 2, Toronto 1
Philadelphia 5, Florida 4, OT
N.Y. Rangers 3, N.Y. Islanders 1
Ottawa 4, Montreal 3, OT
Detroit 5, Chicago 2
Pittsburgh 7, Atlanta 5
Colorado 6, Vancouver 2
Phoenix 3, Calgary 2
Friday's Games,
Carolina 8, Philadelphia 6
Columbus 2, Minnesota 1, SO
New Jersey 3, Buffalo 2
Tampa Bay 4, Washington 2
Edmonton 5, Dallas 3
San Jose 5, Los Angeles 4
Anaheim 6, St. Louis 4
Saturday's Games
Washington at Florida, ppd., hurricane
New Jersey at Boston, late
Ottawa at Toronto, late
N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, late
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, late
Buffalo at N.Y. Islanders, late
Carolina at Pittsburgh, late
Columbus at Minnesota, late
Edmonton at Nashville, late
Detroit at Chicago, late
Dallas at Phoenix, late
Vancouver at Colorado, late
Calgary at San Jose, late
St. Louis at Los Angeles, late
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Montreal at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Florida at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Boston at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Florida at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Columbus at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Nashville at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m.


. Western Conference
Los Angeles vs. San Jose
Sunday, Oct. 23
Los Angeles 3, San Jose 1, Los
Angeles leads series 3-1
Saturday's Game
Los Angeles at San Jose, late
Colorado vs. FC Dallas
Saturday, Oct. 22
FC Dallas 0, Colorado 0, tie, series tied
0-0
Saturday's Game
Colorado at FC Dallas, late


STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y. Rangers 5 3 3 13 35 27
Philadelphia 5 3 1 11 39 34
New Jersey 5 5 0 10 31 36
N.Y. Islanders 5 5 0 10 30 35
Pittsburgh 1 4 5 7 33 48
Northeast Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 7 2 1 15 31 27
Ottawa 7 1 0 14 33 17
Buffalo 6 4 0 12 30 28
Toronto 5 3 2 12 40 34
Boston 5 5 2 12 40 42
Southeast Division


PRESEASON STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
.New Jersey 5 3 .625
New York 3 4 .429
Toronto 3 4 .429
Boston 3 5 .375
Philadelphia 3 5 .375
Southeast Division
W L Pct
Orlando 5 3 .625
Miami 4 4 .500
Atlanta 3 5 .375
Charlotte 3 5 .375
Washington 3 5 .375
Central Division
W L Pct
Cleveland 5 3 .625
Indiana 5 3 .625
Detroit 4 4 .500
Chicago 3 5 .375
Milwaukee 3 5 .375
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
Dallas 6 2 .750
Houston 6 2 .750
Memphis 6 2 .750
New Orleans 3 5 .375
San Antonio 2 7 .222
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Denver 7 1 .875
Minnesota 4 4 .500
Seattle 3 5 .375
Utah 2 5 .286
Portland 2 6 .250
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 6 2 .750
L.A. Lakers 6 2 .750
Phoenix 6 2 .750
Sacramento 3 5 .375
Golden State 2 , 5 .286


Thursday's Games
Miami 104, Orlando 90
New Orleans 89, Houston 88
Memphis 99, Atlanta 84
Dallas 103, Detroit 97
San Antonio 101, Philadelphia 98
Phoenix 97, Golden State 92
L.A. Clippers 94, Seattle 92
Friday's Games
Atlanta 104, New Orleans 90
New Jersey 91, New York 86
Minnesota 96, Detroit 92
Washington 85, Indiana 77
Denver 89, Utah 83
L.A. Lakers 105, Sacramento 103
Seattle 96, Portland 85

REGULAR SEASON SCHEDULE
Tuesday's Games
Milwaukee at Philadelphia 7 p.m.
Denver at San Antonio 8 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Indiana at Orlando 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Cleveland 7 p.m.
Washington at Torpnto 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at New Jersey 7:30 p.m.
New York at Boston 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Memphis 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Detroit 8 p.m.
Portland at Minnesota 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Chicago 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Houston 8:30 p.m.
Dallas at Utah 9 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Seattle 10 p.m.
Atlanta at Golden State 10:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Denver 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Indiana at Miami 8 p.m.
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers 10:30 p.m.


Subscribe to the News-Sun!


* *... * * LIVE SPORTS ON TV * * * *

M AUTO RACING
SUNDAY
12:30 p.m. NASCAR Nextel Cup race (Atlanta) ............ NBC

Z BOWLING
SUNDAY
1 p.m. PBA Tulsa Championship ................. ESPN

M COLLEGE FOOTBALL
TUESDAY
7:30 p.m. Alabama-Birmingham at Memphis ......... ESPN2

M COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
SUNDAY
1 p.m. Women - Maryland at Florida State ............ SUN

B BULL RIDING
SUNDAY
4:30 p.m. PBR World Finals ........................ NBC

W GOLF
SUNDAY
8 a.m. European PGA Tour - Volvo Masters .......... GOLF
2 p.m. Nationwide Tour - Tour Championship......... GOLF
PGA Tour - Chrysler Championship ............ ABC
5 p.m. Champions Tour - Charles Shwab Cup......... GOLF

MNBA
TUESDAY
8 p.m. Denver at San Antonio .................. . . . TNT
10:30 p.m. Dallas at Phoenix ..................... . . . TNT

I mNFL
SUNDAY
1 p.m. Jacksonville at St. Louis ................ . . ., CBS
Washington at N.Y. Giants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FOX
4 p.m. Tampa Bay at San Francisco ................. FOX
Miami at New Orleans ......... ............ CBS
8:30 p.m. Buffalo at New England ................ . ESPN
MONDAY
9 p.m. Baltimore at Pittsburgh .............. ...... ABC

[ NHL

7:30 p.m. Montreal at N.Y. Rangers ................... OLN
TUESDAY
7 p.m. Chicago at Detroit.. . . . . : . . . . . . . . . . OLN
7:30 p.m., Atlanta at Tampa Bay .............. . . ..... . . . . SUN

V SOCCER
SUNDAY.
4:30 p.m. MLS Playoffs - Chicago at D.C............. ESPN2
TUESDAY
'2:30 p.m. UEFA - Chelsea vs. Real Betis ............. ESPN2
All Games and Times Subject to Change


Sports contact information
Scott Dressel, sports editor
385-6155, Ext. 541 or
scott.dressel@newssnn. coin
Report scores
385-6155, Ext. 541 or 517

To contact any other sports writer, leave a message at one of the above
numbers.
E-mail news items to sportsdesk@newssun.com, fax them to 385-1954
or mail them to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL, 33870.


When you have \ -t
something you - -
need to sell fast... U


CALL THE

EXPERTS!
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In Sebring call 385-6155
In Avon Park caN 4=2-1002
In Lkae Padd call 465-0426











News-Sun, Sunday, October 30, 2005


The rec


bass tha


didn't c

Back in late sumi
2003, a young lady
huge largemouth ba
fishing on a flood-c
in Sonoma County,
Leaha Trew was
nied by-her son, Jav
who helped her in r
and weighing the m
an IGFA-certified B
hand-held scale.
"It was 29 inches
a 25-inch girth, and
scale to just over 22
ounces," said Javad
entered several trop
largemouths in the I
American Fishing C
Catch and Release (
The 71-year-old
record is held by Ge
of Georgia. His bass
22 pounds, 4 ounces
Trew and her son
fishing for a couple
with plastic worms
decided to try a diff
She tied on a 7-inch
swim bait because a
"it just looked like i
catch bass."
She was using an
Shakespeare Intrepi
a Shimano 4000 bai
and 12-pound Stren
ment line.
At first she though
was snagged in the
then the line started
and it took nearly 1
to bring the bass to
They did photogr
fish, but one picture
they took because tl
able camera had oni
exposure left on it.'
another camera wou
meant a 5-mile driv
wanted to release th
"We always catcl
release," Javad Tre\
"Besides, I really di


OUTDOORS

Lloyd Jones


exist, but small prin
bottom of the signs
fish. The lake has a
minimum length lin
five-fish daily bag 1
The lake has prod
number of trophy cl
In 1997, Paul Duclo
what he reported to
pound bass (weighe
hnfhrnnm^- epn1p\ frnti


ord


it


ount

mer of
caught a
ss while
control lake
Calif.
accompa-
'ad Trew,
measuring
onster on
3ogaGrip

long, with
pulled the
pounds, 8
, who has
hy-class
North
club's
Contest.


SCOTT DRESSEL/News-Sun
Sebring's Colt Williams (right) moves in to intercept a pass tipled-by Avon Park's Rafael Johnson (3) Friday night.


world DIC
eorge Perry IC 1
s weighed Continued from 1E

s.had been yard return of the opening kick-
ofad been off led to Hill's 16-yard quarter-
when she back sneak for a score and a
went bait. short punt set up Michael
salerent bait.er Wagoner's 26-yard field goal,
Saltwater and led 9-6 at halftime.
is she said But Wilson, who had been
it would limited to punting duties in the
8-foot first half as punishment for
d rod with missing practice, took over at
itcaster reel quarterback to start the second
monofila-er half an led the Streaks to scores
on two of their first three sec-
ond half possessions, capping
ht the lure both drives with touchdown
weedsovingruns. The second score was a
o minutes nifty 26-yard scramble on
the boat.s fourth-and-four and gave
aph the Sebring its 11-point lead - and
was all what looked like all the
hewas a momentum - with 1:48 left in
,e dispos- the third quarter.
ly one
To get "We were a little, upset at

ld have halftime because we weren't
e and she playing very good football
.e fish. offensively, especially up
h and front," Hamlin I said.
w said. "Defensively, we didn't play
don't think great, but we did what we had
you could to do to keep us in the game and
keep the only down three. We came out
p Ther e in the second half ... and
fish. There marched down the field."
are signs But Johnson made an incred-
posted that ible leaping catch for a 26-yard
say emov-y gain on third-and-10 play to
amg any light Aire under the Red
animal, Devils. Hill scored on another
dead, from sneak five plays later, followed
the park is by a two-point pass to Johnson,
to get the Devils to within 20-
prohibit- I
ed." 17 and back into the game.
The "These kids never cease to
amaze me," Cousins said. "We
signs do
sig doh let down a little bit at the start
it at the
St te of the second half. We came out
. 12-inch flat and it was like we kept
12-inch
nit and a looking for a spark and Rafael's
limit. long catch to get us out of a big
uced hole gave us that spark. It was
duced a
lass bass. incredible.
Caught "Rafael was cramping and he
)s caught
be a 24- was hurting, but I told him,
b 4 'We're going to ride you like a
,, on . horse. You ain't coming out of


SCOTrr DRESSEL/News-Sun
An Avon Park defender gets a facemask-aided takedown of Sebring
quarterback Chris Welborn in the first half of Friday's game, but no
penalty flag was thrown on the play.


the game.' Whether he catches a
ball or not, he's the best decoy
we've got.
"I told them before the game
that big players make big plays
at big times. That's what Rafael
did on his long catch, that's
what T.K. did on the touch-
downs and that's what Gerrard
did on his long catch. You
couldn't have thrown that ball
any better than T.K. threw it."
Following a 42-yard kickoff
return by T.J. Hipps, the Streaks
converted two fourth downs -
one on a pass interference
penalty and the other on a 4-
yard scramble by Wilson - to
get. down to the Avon Park 25
inside the final minute before
Gross' interception dashed any
hopes of a last-second miracle.
"We're learning, but we
haven't gotten there yet when it
comes to putting the nail in the
coffin when we've got the
opportunity," Hamlin said. "We
didn't do that tonight, but we're
starting to get better.
"The wins and losses aren't
where we wanted to be right


now, but these kids haven't
given up all year long and
they've had plenty of chances
and plenty of opportunities
where they could have, and
they haven't done it. I'm proud
of them."
Hamlin said after some time
passes, he might be able to
appreciate how good of a game
his. team was involved in,. but
the sting was too much Friday
night.


1 2 3 4 Tot.
APHS 9 0 8 13 30
SHS 0 6 14 0 20
SCORING SUMMARY
First Quarter
APHS: Hill 16 run (kick failed) 10:59
APHS: Wagoner 26 field goal 5:27.
Second Quarter
SHS: Welbom 1 run (kick failed) 10:27
Third Quarter
SHS: Wilson 1 run (kick failed) 8:59
SHS: Wilson 26 run (Wilson run) 1:48
APHS: Hill 2 run (Hill pass to Johnson)
:22.6
Fourth Quarter
APHS: Hill 2 run (Wagoner kick) 3:43
APHS: Gross 78 interception return (kick
failed) :35.4
TEAM STATS
APHS SHS
First Downs 17 16
Total Offense 305 167
Rushes-yds. 22-58 44-64
Comp.-att.-int. 13-22-3 9-23-1
Passing yds. 247 103
Fumbles-lost 0-0 3-0
Penalties-yds. 7-45 4-30
INDIVIDUAL STATS
RUSHING
APHS - Caldwell 6-35; Hill 9-28;
Comadore 1-4; Young 5-(minus 2);
Johnson 1-(minus 7).
SHS - T.J. Williams 17-65; Wilson
13-18;'D. Williams 3-9; Lowe 6-4;
Welborn 5-(minus 32).
PASSING
APHS - Hill 13-22-247, 3 Int.
SHS - Welborn 5-10-62; Wilson 4-
13-41, 1 Int.
RECEIVING
APHS - Johnson 4-65; Coleman 3-
93; Comadore 3-47; Perry 2-27;
Wilson 1-15. -
SHS - Daniels 5-57; Hipps 3-29;
Tomlinson 1-17.

"I don't think it was a great
game because we lost, but I'm
sure it was a great game to
watch," he said.


UiLUUlat llroom scail) Urom tL e smell
waters.
The International Game
Fish Association denied a
world record application by
Trew.
"With a record of this mag-
nitude, you have to be
absolutely certain," IGFA pres-
ident Michael Leech said.
"There was nothing wrong
with what Le4ha Trew and her
son provided in the applica-
tion, there just wasn't enough;
no fish, just one photo and no
unbiased witness.
"It's just not enough to
replace such an important
record."
Trew also applied for record
status to the National
Freshwater Fishing Hall of
Fame, which also denied her
claim for a new world record.
They did grant her a 12-pound
line class record.
Since the bass was released
and could not be checked for
foreign objects and other dis-
crepancies, an official world
record could not be granted.
Rules state that a potential
world-record fish must be
examined.
The Trews also contacted
tackle manufacturers about
possible promotion partner-
ships, but refused media
requests for interviews. One
company, Stren, said that
Javad will be a member of its
field staff.
I'll bet that if the young
lady from California catches
another such monster, she
won't be so hasty in releasing
it.

E-mail your outdoors stories and
pictures to Lloyd Jones at
Ifjonesl@tnni.net.


DRAGONS
Continued from 1E
It looked like that extra prac-
tice was going to pay off for the
Dragons (15-6) at the start as
they scored eight straight points
to run out to an 8-1 lead in the
first game. The Rams (12-15),
behind strong play up front
from Emmalie Luther and
Lindsey Falkenberg, got back
on track with a 10-2 run to get
back to 16-16 and led 19-17
before the Dragons rallied back
on top, eventually winning the
game on an Allison Gilde tap
into a hole in the middle of the
defense.
John Carroll never trailed in
the second game, opening with
a 5-0 lead and getting six kills
from Luther to even the match.


BMX
Continued from 1E
Isabelle Lake Road. The racing
starts at 11 a.m. on Saturday,
Nov. 12 and at 9 a.m. on
Sunday, Nov. 13. Both days are
free for spectators.
What is BMX?
BMX, or bicycle motocross,
is a form of bicycle racing
based on motorcycle
motocross. The racetracks are
adapted from motocross tracks.
Bicycle designs are stronger
and more maneuverable than
other bicycles that they can
withstand the rigors of the
track.
BMX combines the riding
and racing skills of motocross
with the leg power and speed of


A 7-0 run put the Dragons up
8-4 in the third game before
Falkenberg took over, getting
five straight kills to put the
Rams up 10-8 and in the lead,
and they never trailed again the
rest of the match. Falkenberg
added four more kills for a total
of nine in the game.
The fourth game started
much like the second, with the
Rams sprinting to a 6-1 lead
before the Dragons woke up,
eventually getting back to with-
in 17-16. The Dragons rallied
for four unanswered points as
the Rams sat on match point,
but a wide serve ended the
game and the season.
"They're scrappy and they
don't give up," Jones said of
her team. "I know they're dis-
appointed, but they had a great
year."


the bicycle rider.
In Florida, most racetracks
are 1,200-1,500 feet long and
feature jumps, obstacles and
banked turns. The track surface
is hard packed dirt and shell
rock that has been covered with
a layer of clay. Jumps and
obstacles range from one to 12
feet in height and can be over
25 feet long.
A race consists of three
heats, known as motos. Riders
are grouped by age and then by
skill and experience. Sets of up
to eight riders begin their moto
at the top of the starting hill and
must complete three motos to
qualify for the next round.
When eight riders for that age
and proficiency remain, the
main event is run. This single
moto determines the final
standings for the race day.


PGA Tour hits $1

billion mark in

charity donations
Associated Press
PALM HARBOR - The
PGA Tour hits a milestone this
week that commissioner Tim
Finchem believes is as note-
worthy as Byron Nelson win-
ning 1-1 in a row or Tiger
Woods holding all the major
trophies at the same time.
Charitable giving in golf is at
the $1 billion mark.
"This week's tournaments
will put us over the top,"
Finchem said, noting that the
final dollars will come from
Charles Schwab Cup
Championship on the
Champions Tour, played three
hours behind in S6noma, Calif.
It all started with a $10,000
donation from the 1938 Palm
Beach Invitational. It accelerat-
ed a decade ago when the tour
put a strong emphasison chari-
ty for events on the PGA Tour,
Champions Tour and
Nationwide Tour.
A campaign called "Drive to
a Billion" began in February at
the Pebble Beach National Pro-
Am with typical pomp. Players
or dignitaries have hit a com-
memorative tee shot at every
PGA Tour event, using a driver
made in 1938 that served, as the
torch for the campaign.
, During the pro-am round
Wednesday at the Chrysler
Championship, all players were
asked to hit the persimmons
driver on the first tee, then their
titanium club to count for their
score.
Davis Love III nailed the
wooden club, but still hit his
modem driver some 40 yards
longer.
The tour hit the $100 million
mark in 1987, and it went over
$500 million in 1999.
Donations gained so much
momentum this year that the $1
billion milestone was at least
four months ahead of schedule.
When the "Drive to a
Billion" campaign began in
February, the tour thought it
would reach $1 billion early
next year, perhaps at the FBR
Open in Phoenix. The latest
projections showed it would be
this week.











News-Sun, Sunday, October 30. 2005


THE VIDEO GAME PAGE


The latest trends, tips and reviews


FEATURE OF THE WEEK: "F.E.A.R."




Conquer your F. E.A. i.'


"EE.A.R."
VU Games; PC. $49.99
ESRB Rating: Mature (17+) (blood and gore,
intense violence, strong language)
* r** *A Score: 5 out of 5
By SHAUN CONLIN
Cox News Service
A bout this time last year, the likes of
"Doom 3" and "Half-Life 2" raised
the bar for first-person shooters
(FPS) so high as to seem unsurpassable.
Guess what? It's indisputably surpassed
with Monolith's
"FE.A.R," simply the
best FPS game to
date - and easily the
game of the year.
Boasting the eye-
poppingly gorgeous
graphics you'd expect
in such a competitive
genre, "F.E.A.R" also
features the finest
artificial-intelligence
system yet seen in a computer game.
Enemies not only dynamically participate
*in their surroundings and the situational
appearance of you, the lone super soldier,
they actually react like it matters, taking
cover behind boxes, shrewdly tossing out
grenades or smoke, covering each other,
repositioning themselves, flanking you or
running away in hysterics, dead scared of
dying when wounded, all with a simulated
strategic reasoning that heretofore seemed
impossible for game developers to produce.


QUICK PICK
"Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow"
Konami; Nintendo DS; $34.99
ESRB Rating: Teen (13+) (blood and gore, fantasy vio-
lence)
**** I Score:'4.5 out of 5.
Funny thing about the undead: they don't die very
well, or at least don't stay dead for very long, as
"Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow" will attest. Following
a much-lauded, 20-year history'of Dracula-bashing,
"Dawn of Sorrow" marks the "Castlvania" fran-
chise's first appearance on Nintendo DS, where it
sticks with its hand-held, two-dimensional, side-
scrolling, platform-hopping ancestry (though DS is
capable of 3D gaming), but with seriously improved
graphics and sparing, but clever, use of touch-screen
interfacing and dual-screen display


You, meanwhile, are given-an arsenal of
smartly balanced weapons, each with a
strength and a shortcoming and precious
little ammunition, which makes you think
before you shoot (or not shoot at all, but use
martial arts or go stealth). Plus, you can
actually lean around corners, keeping your
body behind cover while poking your head
and shoulders out for a view or a shot,
which is only remarkable because so few
games include the plainly useful attribute
of full-body articulation. Add to that the


occasional act of slow-motion berserking
and you've got the whole ball of wax.
More than surreptitious running and
judicious gunning, "EE.A.R" plays out a
"X-Files"-ian plot of paranormal activities
and clandestine science gone awry, which
often has you creeping down corridors -
teeth firmly clenched - as you suspect a'
ghostly apparition or clone-soldier ambush
lying in wvait, which might be the case, or
not, or both. Awesome. "EE.A.R" is as good
as it gets.


You're basically hacking and slashing, shooting and
bashing your way through a fiendish variety of
fiends, but some of them are liable to cough up their
soul, which you capture and use as a power-up or spe-
cial skill or smart-bombish super spell (you can also
trade them via system link, along with custom-made
maps for multiplay).
While the action is displayed on the bottom screen
(which also has you physically drawing specific icons
to banish fallen bosses, or to smudge obstacles out of
your way), the game's map or character stats screen is
displayed up top, which makes for mostly contiguous
gameplay since you don't have to toggle between the
three.
Also staying true to the venerable series, "Dawn of
Sorrow" is mind-bogglingly big, usually intense,
decidedly smart and characteristically addictive.


The ratings: ***** - Excellent **** - Very good *** - Good ** - Fair * - Poor


: TOP XBOX GAMES
Top 10 Xbox games sold in September.
* Title
1. "Madden NFL 06" (E)
S 2. "Rainbow Six: Lockdown" (M)
* 3. "Burnout Revenge" (E10+)
4. "NBA Live 06" (E)
* 5. "X-Men Legends 2: Apocalypse" (T)
* 6. "Ninja Gaiden" (M)
7. "Tiger Woods PGA Tour 06" (E)
. 8. "NASCAR 06: Total Team Control" (E)
* 9. "Incredible Hulk: Destruction" (T)
10. "Mortal Kombat: Shaolin Monks" (M)


Publisher
EA
Ubisoft
EA
EA
Acti ision
Tecmo
EA
EA
Universal
Midway


Provided by NPD Group/NPD Funworld
Electronic Software Rating Board (ESRB) guide: Early childhood (EC);
Everyone (E); Everyone 10 and older (E10+); Teen (T); Mature (M); Adults
Only (AO); Rating Pending (RP).







now available in North America. While most obviously defined
THE 411 --
News and developments to play games (and take pic-
from the game industry
a After a couple of false starts,
Tiger Telematics' Gizmondo is
now available in North America. While most obviously defined
as a portable game player, Gizmondo is better described as a "dig-
ital lifestyle devie that happens to play games (and take pic-
tures, play multimedia, text message, Web browse, map a trip
around the world, etc.).
A bit bigger and buffer than Nintedno's Game Boy Advance SP
but less powerful than a Sony PSP, Gizmondo hosts a number of
features not seen on any competing device, most notably GPS and
a digital camera, along with music and movie playback of files
purchased separately or "home made" from audio/video stored
on a PC hard derived SIcommittd moto a separate cSDmedia card.
Alreadctually incorporaimed in the United Kingdom for its multifunc-
tionality, Gszmondo is the only pocket player that's self-aware of
its location, so op top of straight-up navigation abilities, it can
(and does) integrate sexy-cool ads and product promotions found
at a store, mall or movie theater within spitting distance of the
user.
Wt ih its onboard SIM card and motion-sensitive camera doing
double duty as a portable, gyroscopic Web cam, Gizmondo games
can actually incorporate the real world and location-specific
icons - like stop signs or l3" landmark structures -Burnto gameplay;
enable the creation and sharing a virtual dungeon defined by the
walls of one's office or school fences, or even stake out and
defend real-world turf, as happens in the forthcoming game, aptly
titled "Colors."
Gizmondo is available for $229.99. The 14 games currently
available, such as EA's "SSX 3" and SCI's "Richard Burns Rally,"
range from $19.99 to $39.99. More info and retailer list at www.giz-
mondo.com.


TIPS OF THE WEEK
Playing secrets to help you master your favorite games
When playing "FE.A.R" (single player), hit T then type kfa to
get all weapons, full ammo, full armor and full health.
Though you don't have to, collecting all the souls in
"Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow'' will unlock the Chaos Ring,
which will give you huge MP regeneration and a stat boost.


. .... .....L 'I ITrd






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