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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/00091
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Creation Date: July 31, 2005
Publication Date: 1988-
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:00091
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

Full Text





HIGHLANDS COUNTY'S HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1927








SUNDAY * July 31, 2005


GED
Residents find
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S************** iLL FOR flDC 320
*01 6010596 / /
U OF F LIB OF FLfl HISTORY
* UNIV OF FLORIDA
.; T..'.t' ILLE FL r , ,

^ 75.


* ~ I


COMING
WEDNESDAY IN
THE NEWS-SUN


Graphic by AR.I SALGLIEIRO'New.-Sun I


Try an Al Fresco
menu for warm
summer nights.

WHAT'S INSIDE


GARBAGE
County landfill
workers keep
'The Beast'
under control
Business, 13A

HEADING BACK
- Local
kids

get a
party
before
school starts
Inside, 3A
Arts and Leisure 3C
Business 13A
Classified ads '0
Commission agenda 19A
Community briefs 9A
Dear Abby 2C
Editorial 20A
Flash from the Past . 19A
Lifestyle 1C
Lottery numbers 9A
Obituaries 4A
Sports 1D
Stocks 14A

TODAY'S FORECAST


Complete
weather
report on
page 12A.


Highs

90s

Lows

70s


CONTACTS


Avon Park (863) 452-1009
Sebring (863) 385-6155
Lake Placid (863) 465-0426
Fax (863) 385-1954
E-mail editor@newssun.com
Online www.newssun.com



90994 01007
SEBRING, FLORIDA
VOLUME 24/NUMBER 10


Meth acts quickly, stays a long time


Healing comes with

time and courage
* This is the second in a series.
By PHIL ATTINGER
News-Sun
Jim Holley started using crystal meth at age 22.
He went in and out of binges, hospitals and rehabili-
tation. He became paranoid, and on July 4, 2000, shot
himself in the head.
After his death, his older sister, Dr. Mary F. Holley,
studied methamphetamine and wrote, "Power Over
Addiction," a book on why the drug is so hard to fight.


Episcopal



Church of the



SRedeemer sold

New owners may convert historic
church to community theater
By BARRY FOSTER
News-Sun
AVON PARK - As the designation of the Episcopal Church
of the Redeemer is continuing down its path to become the lat-
est historic building in the City of Champions, word comes the
building may have been sold.
Reportedly, new owners are planning no physical changes to
the church itself.
City officials said their conversations with the unidentified
owners are that they plan to live in the parsonage and are con-
sidering converting the former church building into a commu-
nity theater.
In granting the municipal historic designation at their
Monday night meeting, city council members decided to look
at their municipal land development regulations and fine tune
some of the language in that measure.
Under the current ordinance, any properties which are listed
on either the National Register of Historic Places or on the
State of Florida Master Site File must be designated as historic.
"It's required under the statute and there are nine pages of
sites here in the city," Avon Park City Manager C.B. Shirey
told the council.
Mayor Tom Macklin confirmed the way the ordinance had
been written required the designation, with city attorney Mike
Disler confirming that saying simply, "shall means shall."
Macklin asked that council members take a look at the land
development regulations to see how they have been written.
The mayor is seeking where changes might be made, in an
effort to more specifically target buildings they would like to
see preserved as historic structures, rather than the current
shotgun approach which encompasses a long list of homes,
businesses, churches and other buildings.
Councilman Doug Eason said that as part of the measure to
keep the church from being torn down, there is a requirement
that the building and the property must be maintained.
"We're asking that the property be kept up. Who is going to
be responsible for that?" he asked. "What is the penalty if they
don't? Somewhere along the line there should be some people
with their heart in this."
President of the Avon Park Historical Society Jean Jordan
told the council that the organization's next step would be to
attempt to get the building on the National Register of Historic
Places. She said a past shortfall in revenue at the church gave
the effort a better shot at the designation.
"There were plans to enlarge the building at one time, but
they were never carried through," she said.
Because it is still the original structure, Jordan said the
chances were better that it might be included.
Meanwhile, the search has started for grants that might aid
See CHURCH, page 11A


She is a gynecologist and surgeon residing in
Albertville, Ala.
She believes people can recover.

How the body works
Brain cells send coded electro-chemical signals -
neurotransmitters - back and forth the tiny empty
spaces between them. The signals carry information
from a person's senses to their brains.
The center of the brain - the "mid-brain" - controls
personality and behavior. It redirects signals to parts of
the brain controlling vision, movement, balance, coor-
dination, memory, emotion and judgment. The pleasure
See METH, page 11A


Meeting set to help

kids affected by meth
By PHIL ATTINGER
N, us-Su n
SEBRING - Highlands County officials want
to take a proacti'e approach to dealing with
methamphetamine.
On the morning of Aug. 4. several agencies will
meet at the Children's Advocac. Center to discuss
local protocols on how to help drug-endangered
See KIDS, page 11A


PHIL ATTINGER/News-Sun
Eddie Mae Henderson reads down a long list of friends and family Saturday, thanking them for helping
her get out a holiday dinner for needy people each year. The mural behind her on the south side of
Wauchula State Bank, on the corner of Main Street and Interlake Boulevard in Lake Placid, honors her
and her ministry.


Mural recognizes Eddie


Mae Henderson'
By PHIL AITINGER Assembly 1
News-Sun year and
LAKE PLACID - For the last 20 years, Eddie missed soi
Mae Henderson of Lake Placid has served later.
Christmas dinner to others. "Thank
She believes God gave her that ministry. She showing m
started by inviting a few people to her house, then heat to hon
to Stuart Park when the numbers grew. Now her Her past
dinner serves more than 600 people at the Lake she is a tre
Placid Masonic Lodge each year. "We're
Harriet Porter, of the Lake Placid Mural opportunity
Society, said the dinner even includes gifts for he said.
children under a Christmas tree in the comer of Frank H
the dining room. side of the
On Saturday, Lake Placid residents honored and his sib
her by dedicating a new mural recognizing her order foo
ministry. Artist Charles Peck painted the mural
on the southern wall of the Wauchula State Bank, Grocery
on the comer of Main Street and Interlake helped her
Boulevard. It features her in the same green Porter; S
gown, gold-rimmed glasses and butterfly pendant Society;
she wore to Saturday's dedication. Grimsley a
"I just thank all of y'all," she said. "I would be Lake P
no greater than you would help me to be." Henderson
She thanked her husband Albert, her daughter If people b
Eugena Moorehead, and a long list of family Norman as
members, friends, and members of the New Life we can kee


s ministry
Church who help her get food out each
get gifts for needy children. If she
meone, she promised to make it up
you so much, because if you weren't
e love, you wouldn't be out here in the
[or me," she said.
or, Bishop Willie Charles Holden, said
mendous servant.
not all privileged to have the same
ies throughout life to help someone,"

:artzell, featured in the far right-hand
mural, said Henderson babysat him
clings. After three years of seeing her
d from his folks' store, Hartzell's
market , he asked her about it. He has
ever since.
Steve Bastardi, president of the Mural
and Florida Representative Denise
also were on hand to honor her.
lacid resident Beth Norman said
prefers to hug rather than handshake.
believee hugs add time to others' lives,
iked everyone to hug Henderson, "so
ep this woman around longer."


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2A News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005



Evidence in shooting points Makingc


away from self-defense claim


By PHIL ATTINGER
News-Sun
SEBRING - Evidence at
the scene, where noted Avon
Park attorney Janette Branham
was shot and killed Tuesday
night, seems to dispute her hus-
band's self-defense claim.
Former Avon Park police
officer Michael Branham, 46,
has been charged with first-
degree murder after Hardee
County sheriff's deputies found
his wife dead at their home in
Wauchula. When questioned
Wednesday, he said she had
come after him with a pair of
scissors. A pair was found
beside her at the scene.
However, when Highlands
County Sheriff's Office crime
scene technicians processed the
scene for the Hardee County
Sheriff's Office, they found the
pair of scissors in the foyer
beside Janette, with blood
underneath the handles where
the scissors were touching the
floor.
According -to complaint affi-
davits, that seemed to indicate
the blood was there before the
scissors, and suggests that he


planted them there.
A preliminary medical exam-
iner's report indicated Janette
was shot 13 times, with six
entrance wounds in her front
side, six in her rear side, and
one in her right forearm.
Investigators found 13 shell
casings in the living room and
foyer of the house. Most of
them sat to the right of a chair
where Michael said he was sit-
ting during the incident.
Some of the
shell casings
indicate he
S walked toward
her as he fired.
S One casing
indicates he
fired one shot
BRANHAM while. standing
in the foyer.
Police reports say he was sit-
ting in a chair that was 15 feet
from the foyer when she arrived
home. Investigators believe he
would not have felt threatened
by her at that distance.
According to investigators,
Michael was sitting in the chair
in the living room when Janette
arrived home. With her car keys


still in hand, she is believed to
have walked to the threshold
between the living room and
foyer and turned toward
Michael, who then allegedly
shot her with a 9 mm Glock
handgun, one of two recovered
during investigations.
One bullet, according to the-
ory, hit her in the right arm,
causing the arm to fly back-
ward, sending the keys onto the
stairs. Allegedly, he continued
to fire as she turned and fell,
making two shots from just out-
side the foyer, and the last from
just inside the foyer.
After shooting her, affidavits
suggest he then found a pair of
scissors and placed them in a
puddle of blood in the foyer.
Before arriving home that
night, Janette allegedly stopped
by a female friend's house, at 7
p.m. and talked for more than
three hours before heading
home. Janette, in private prac-
tice for 13 years, had started
divorce proceedings against
Michael after 10 years of mar-
riage.


Downtown Avon Park Post


office to be new and improved


By BARRY FOSTER
News-Sun
AVON PARK - It appears
that residents may be able to
send and receive letters at the
downtown Avon Park post
office within the next three
months or so.
"The plans are to move in by
the end of October," said
United States Post Office
Public Information Officer
Gary Sawtelle.
Crews from L. Cobb
Construction have been work-
ing on the post office building
for some time.
The architect for the project,
Jim Hassett, said the damage
caused by the hurricanes pro-
vided them with an opportunity
to make some changes to the
building which would make it
more convenient and more effi-
ciei. tor both ci tomers and
dlyRere iwas sdch extensive
damage done to the Avon Park
Post Office building that the
postal service looked at it and
said 'If all this material is being
cleared out and repairs are
being done, it's a good opportu-
nity for us to go in and do some
upgrades,'"'Hassett said.
Postal officials plan to
change the layout of the post
office boxes, which will pro-
vide for more of them as well as
easier access by customers.
"We had some old boxes and


some parcel lockers," he said.
"There wasn't room for the par-
cel lockers in the wall so they
were placed in the lobby."
A redesign of the layout now.
will put them in the wall, which
ultimately makes the lobby
more spacious. Additionally,
Hassett said plans are to extend
air conditioning to the lobby -
something that it did not have in
the past.
"Ultimately, we can open up
the area from the post office
box area into the retail area, so
the whole thing will be a little
more open," he said. "It proba-
bly will appear to the customers
that we actually enlarged the
building."
Hassett said there would be
no change in traffic pattern at
the post office. But, he added,
he was certain people would be
-pleasied it h the c'inhge:
-The question of xheithr the
post office should remain at its
temporary location in the Avon
Square shopping plaza has been
a polarizing one.
Some patrons felt so strongly
they signed and circulated a
petition to attempt to convince
postal officials to make the
move a permanent one. Postal
officials declined to make the
temporary move to the former
Tractor Supply location on U.S.
27 permanent, noting the lease
at the downtown facility runs to


2014.
Downtown Avon Park mer-
chants said they are looking for-
ward to the return of the facility
with great anticipation, indicai-
ing that with the loss of the post
office, much of their customer
base also departed the area.
"I'll tell you, if we don't get
them back down here I don't
know if we can survive," said
Betty Ballard of the Candle
Arbor. "I mean, there were so
many people that came down-
town to check theii post office
boxes every day."
Ballard said the fact she
owns the building she is in was
the determining factor in keep-
ing her doors open.
"I love this town and I love
this shop, but if I had to pay rent
I'd be out of here," she said. "I
have a lot of great customers
-Lho tell me IC jut t.orgit- O
..-come do%%n to ce \ou.. io
guess it's kind of out of sight,
out of mind."
Dave Cornell, who owns
Annabelle's of Avon, had much
the same opinion.
"The more people that we
have coming down here the bet-
ter it is for the merchants," said
Cornell, who also serves on the
Main Street Community
Redevelopment Agency. "We
need the exposure."
He described this summer as
"awfully slow."


'Sittin
By RACHEL PEACOCK
News-Sun
LAKE PLACID - The
"Sitting Pretty" Program hopes
to provide respite for the com-
munity and the chamber's
financial burdens.
Long time chamber member
Debbie Graves, owner of
AllStar Car Sales in Lake
Placid and Sebring, contrived
the idea about three months ago
as a way to retire the chamber's
mortgage payment. The pro-
gram allows members of the
community to sponsor benches
to be placed throughout the
town.
"Lake Placid
is like no other
little town,"
S^ Graves said.
S "There are.peo-
ple walking
through town
looking at
MAY murals, and
adding benches seemed like a
real good fit."
Eileen May, executive direc-
tor at the chamber, said the pro-
gram has raised $22,000 in less
than a month.
"I had no idea that we could
raise this much money in such a
short amount of time," May
said. "We're thrilled with the
success."
Doug Lockhart, of Lockhart
Service Center, purchased the
very first bench. Now, the
chamber has received sponsor-

"The Card Shoppe"-
GREETING CARDS
2 for $100

130 N. Ridgewood Dr. * Sebring
385-5884


ships f
each. I
benche
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The
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Each A
plaque
There,
from
engrav


Pretty' in L

'or 22 benches at $1,000 "In memory of ...," which will
May said it will take 100 appear in black lettering.
es to cover its $90,000 Susan Rhodes, of Rhodes
age. Without the mort- Law Firm, decided to sponsor a
payment, she' said the bench in memory of her parents
er could put more fund- and brother. Rhodes said she
o Lake Placid. first heard about the program in
four-feet long benches the chamber's monthly newslet-
from recycled material, ter and immediately wanted to
;ray seats and black legs. participate.
will feature a silver oval "It gives different business
on the seat's back. the opportunity to be a part of
the sponsor can choose the community and it's a great
two phrases to be idea tourismwise," Rhodes said.
ied "Sponsored by ..." or "I think its a relatively inexpen-


Let us show you

how to make your

house a home.

Call to discuss how you can
distinguish your home or just
stop by our showroom to,
look at our product displays.


* Gladiator Garageworks
* Locksets & Door
Hardware
* Ceramic Tile
* Stone
* Porter Paints
* Paint Sundries
* Pitcsburg Paints


* Cast Aluminum Address
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* Warm Tiles
* Custom Woodwork
Trim & Molding
* Custom Hardwood
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ake Placid kicks off


sive way to contribute to the
community."
May said the chamber want-
ed to ensure the benches were
"tasteful," so they are uniform
and won't be used for advertise-
ments. She wants them to pro-
vide a "pleasant" place for citi-
zens and visitors to sit and rest
while enjoying the town.
Sponsors also may choose
the location of their benches.
May said they plan to place
them along Main Avenue,


Interlake Boulevard and in the
parks.
Marie-Claire Hoy, of M.C.
2000 Reality, requested to have
her bench placed in front of the
Caladium Co-op on Interlake
Boulevard. She sees the bench-'
es as coordinating with' the
murals to become another beau-
tification element for a town
that takes particular pride in its
presentation.
"They will provide a very
inviting feeling for people com-


ing to the town," Hoy said. "It is
a welcoming gesture."
The benches are currently
being shipped in from the
American Recycled Plastics in
Naples, but won't arrive for
about another week. May
already put in another order of
20 benches, due to increasing
demand.
Anyone interested in spon-
soring a bench should contact
May at 465-4331 at the Lake
Placid Chamber of Commerce.


Home & Auto Insurance


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at the best price.

Representing CHUBB for

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PH: (863) 385-5171
www.heacock.com


Sometimes receiving is a sweet deal

m4 Ksa


KATARA SIMMONS/News-Sun
Fred Leavitt (left) gets a pie in the face and a $100 check Friday afternoon from local attorney Jim
McCollum (right) in downtown Sebring. Leavitt is raising money for Primal Connection, a percus-
sion ensemble and community outreach. Leavitt plans to use the money for children' programs,
new equipment and an Alzheimer's program. For information or to help support Primal
Connection call Leavitt at 402-8238.
* ' . ''. 'I _______


m







News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005 3A


Going back in style


Gina Patino gets a different
view of the event by hanging
upside down.


SEBRING - The Highlands
County Housing Authority,
McDonald's, Ryzicon Pest
Control and Highlands
Emergency Recovery
Operation joined forces to
sponsor a back-to-school bash
Friday afternoon at Hope
Villas.
About 100 residents enjoyed
free hot dogs, snow cones,
chips and drinks.
Highlands County Housing
Authority vice chairman Ryan
Haynes said, "We gave spiral
notebooks, paper, scissors, glue
and pencils to 50 children,'
from the neighborhood. Three
backpacks stocked full of
school supplies and 10 first aid
kits also were given away dur-
ing a drawing.
Haynes said this is the first
year for the back-to-school
event, but he has plans to host it
annually.


Highlands Emergency Recovery Operation (H.E.R.O.) representa-
tives Keaetta Ruth (left) and Maverick Fleming (right) help Shawn
Succes on the monkey bars.


Jay Williams, 13, (from left) Sumaj Mitchell, 6, and Dewayne
Collins, 11, attend a back-to-school benefit Friday afternoon at
Hope Villas in Sebring.




News-Sun


SEBRING
863/385-6155


2227 U.S. 27 South
Sebring, Florida 33870
LAKE PLACID
863/465-0426
Fax: 385-1954


RALPH BUSH
Publisher


AVON PARK
863/452-1:009


ROMONA WASHINGTON
Executive Editor


CRAIG SUTTER
Production Director
The News-Sun (ISSN 0163-3988), a HarborPoint Media publication is pub-
lished every Wednesday,, Friday and Sunday by the Sebring News-Sun Inc. at
2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. Periodicals Postage Paid at Sebring,
FL. The contents of this publication are the property of the News-Sun Inc. and
are protected by the copyright laws of the United States. They may not be
reproduced, in whole or in part, without the prior written permission of the
News-Sun.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the News-Sun, 2227 U.S.
27 South, Sebring, FL 33870
CIRCULATION
SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not
receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circula-
tion department before 11 a.m. on publication days and a replacement copy
will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after 11 a.m., will receive
credit to their account. Please call 385-6155, 452-1009, or 465-0426.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES . 12 mo. 7% Fla. tax Total
HOME DELIVERY $47.50 $3.33 $50.83
IN FLORIDA MAIL 78.00 5.46 83.46
OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL 78.00 78.00
FOREIGN MAIL 105.00 105.00
Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on
Thursday for the Friday edition and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after
the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.


Photos by KATARA SIMMONS/News-Sun
Rosalba Escamilla, 9, helps David Diaz, 2, get a snow cone.


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News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


Combined enforcement nabs OBITUARIES


eight DUI violations Friday


Local law enforcement tickets 29

speeders, makes four drug arrests
By PHIL ATTINGER
News-Sun
A combined effort of sheriff's deputies, municipal police and
Florida state troopers nabbed eight motorists Friday for driving
under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
The next largest group of violators were speeders, and after
that equipment violations, according to Lt. James McGann of
the Highlands County Sheriff's Office. "Operation Gotcha" was
in force between 8 p.m. Friday and 4 a.m. Saturday, starting two
hours earlier than previously reported, and focused on a wide
variety of violations.
Highlands County law enforcement were invited to join in a
statewide effort headed up by Manatee and Sarasota counties.
The local effort included 22 officers from the Avon Park, Lake
Placid and Sebring police departments, Florida Highway Patrol,
and both the Highlands and Okeechobee sheriff's offices. This
is the second year for the enforcement effort, inaugurated in
Sarasota County last year.
While the effort was concentrated on U.S. 27, officers could
stop people on side roads, as well. In Highlands County alone,
since October 2004, nearly 300 incidents have occurred where
officers had a driver submit to a breathalyzer to test for impair-
ment.
McGann said increased traffic enforcement, especially DUI
enforcement, is long overdue.
Friday's enforcement was planned as a zero-tolerance opera-
tion to catch not only DUI motorists, but also people possessing
drugs, with invalid licenses or vehicle tags, with improper
equipment, or with standard traffic violations, such as riding
without seat belts or speeding.
McGann said minor violations don't always indicate that
drivers may have major violations. However, the more
motorists officers stop, the more violations they can find or pre-
vent.
"We have far more tools than we had before," McGann said.
"It's getting better."
For example, uniform patrol at the Highlands County
Sheriff's Office have three laser speed detectors, rotated
between the squads, McGann said. His Thursday night shift had
four with radar and two with lasers.
Just about every deputy sheriff who is certified on radar has
one installed in the patrol car, he said, and more have been
ordered.


Operation

Gotcha results
In "Operation Gotcha," law
enforcement focused on driv-
ing under the influence
charges,. but cited more
motorists for speeding, faulty
equipment, and failure to use
seat bells.
Arrests:
* Dnming under the influ-
ence - 8
* Drug possession - 4
* No valid driver's license
-4
* Driving with a license
suspended or re\ oked - 2

Moving violations:
* Speeding - 29
* Seat beltl violations - 14
* MoNe Over Act violations
-8
* Other miscellaneous vio-
lations - 15

Citations:
* Equipment iolzaon -
21
* Driver's license iestric-
tion %olauions - 6
* Child restraint violations
-4
* No vehicle tag - 2
* Expired vehJcle tag - 2
9 No proof of insurance in
their possession - 2
* No driver's license in
their possession - 2
* No registration in their
possession - I

Warnings:
* Fault equipment - 14
* Written % earnings - I I


Sparta Road traffic study in works


Congestion

concerns killed

rezoning request
By PHIL ATTINGER
News-Sun
SEBRING - Sparta Road,
already slated for wider shoul-
ders and a longer turn lane at
U.S. 27, may need a traffic
study, before anyone else can
build on or near it.
On Tuesday, county commis-
sioners refused a residential
rezone of 14 acres of agricul-
ture land on the west side of
Sparta Road, just north of
Sudan Mission Road.
Owner Keatley Waldron with
the Heartland Investment Trust
Inc. asked for medium-density
residential, which the Planning
and Zoning Board denied July
.12 in favor of low-density resi-
dential. It would cut his
requested 96-112 homes down
to 35-42.
Development Services
Director Jim Polatty told com-
missioners the intersection at
U.S. 27 and Sparta Road is
cramped and any future devel-
opment on Sparta Road or its
feeder roads would aggravate it.
"The build out has increased
considerably," Polatty said.
"Staff feels the need to decrease
intensity." .
Commissioner Barbara
Stewart asked. if Polatty had
traffic engineer's studies to
back up his opinion. He didn't,
but cited his 25 years as a plan-
ner as qualifying him to recog-


nize a problem with more
intense land use.
Three commissioners agreed
with his concerns and voted
against any rezoning.
Commissioner Guy Maxcy
abstained, because he owns
land on Sudan Mission Road.
Commissioner Edgar Stokes
voted in favor of the rezoning
request, saying pending
improvements on Sparta Road
should accommodate the extra
traffic.
When asked Thursday about
a traffic study, Polatty said,
"We're going to start working
on it."
Denied
When the proposed rezoning
went before planning and zon-
ing, Alan Hoekstra with H.&S.
Development Group Inc. was.
prepared to purchase the prop-
erty as medium-density resi-
dential.
The staff report recommend-
ed it for approval, but Polatty
had transmitted.changes - rec-
ommending denial - to the
staff report while he was out of
state on vacation. The changes
didn't get put in. Polatty real-
ized the mistake some four
hours into the meeting and
handed out a new report.
Board members agreed, rec-
ommending lower density.
Attorney Mike Swain, repre-
senting Waldron, told county
commissioners Tuesday that
Hoekstra felt "hometowned" -
undercut by local associations
- by this, especially since he
saw Maxcy talking with board


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Funeral Home
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o Burials

* Out-of-State
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members before the meeting.
Swaine said he assured
Hoekstra this wasn't the case.
Maxcy wouldn't do it, laws
prohibit it, and many board
members are "rugged individu-
alists" who react negatively to
pressure to vote a certain way.'
Still, Swaine said Polatty's
insistence on access require-
ments had'nothing to do with
zoning consistency. Both he
and Stokes pointed out that
properties surrounding
Waldron's also are medium-
density residential.
Future concerns'
Swaine said the city backed
up the county's desire to impose
impact fees on developments. If
needed, the fees will pay for
traffic improvements as devel-
opments create the need.
Sooner or later, Swaine. said,
the county will have to "bite the
bullet" and fix problems with
the road.
Several housing develop-
ments not yet built or being
built on Sparta Road, its feeder
roads, or on nearby State Road
66, will increase traffic, Polatty
said. �


Janette Branham
Janette Louise Seamans
Branham, 40, of Wauchula,
died July 26, 2005, in
Wauchula.
Born in New Hampton,
Iowa, she had lived here since
1989. She graduated from
Fredericksburg High School in
1983, Iowa State University
with a bachelor of arts degree in
business in 1986 and the
University of Iowa with a doc-
tor of jurisprudence in 1989.
She took the Florida Bar Exam
in 1989 when she became a res-
ident.
She was a state prosecutor
for four years before going into
private practice in Avon Park,
practicing both civil and crimi-
nal law in Highlands and sur-
rounding counties.
She was a member of Law
Library in Sebring, serving as
co-chairperson; Highlands
County Bar Association, serv-
'ing as president; Law Day in
Highlands County, serving as
chairperson; and Avon Park
Chamber of Commerce.
She was the choir director at
the First Christian Church in
Avon Park. She sang solos,
played the piano, directed many
cantatas and enjoyed singing at
events at Warner Southern
College in Babson Park.
Survivors include her par-
ents, Charles and Kathleen
Seamans of Fredericksburg,
Iowa; brother, Lawrence
Seamans of Ionia, Iowa; and
sister, Mary Wiltgen of
Fredericksburg, Iowa.
A memorial service will be at
4 p.m. Tuesday at the First
Christian Church in Avon Park
with Bill Raymond officiating
and Steve Bishop assisting.
Memorials may be directed
to the'family.
Fountain Funeral Home in
Avon Park handled the arrange-
ments.

Ike Eldridge
Ike Eldridge Jr., 46, of Avon
.Park, died July 28, 2005.
Born in Avon Park, he had
lived in Avon Park all his life.
i? He was an auto mechanic for
Rodney's Auto Repair and.
Towing.


News-Suni
SEBRING - At 2:10 p.m.
Friday, July 22, a Highlands
County sheriff's deputy
stopped a red 1999 Hyundai for
a traffic violation.
The driver - Tuesday Jean
Arnold, also Tuesday Maxwell,
22, of Fort Meade - gave him
permission to search the car,
and the deputy found a
Jennings 22LR and an AG .25-
caliber handgun underneath the
dashboard on the driver's side,
near the steering column.
The Jennings didn't have a
magazine attached, but had a


Max Eldon Shively
MILFORD - Max Eldon Shively, 83, of
4795 N. CR 175E, Leesburg, went to be M - .
with the Lord at 3 a.m. July 17, 2005, in
his residence.Pa

He was born Feb. 5, 1922, in Marshall
County, to Frank and Inez Shively. On
May 2, 1943, he married Kathleen Dye,
who survives. Together more than 63
years, they built a legacy of love, hope
and honor. On the way, they served God,
each other, their family and friends.
He was a lifetime member of New Salem United Church
of the Brethren. He was a Leesburg farmer all of his life
and also entertained people with his trumpet and organ
music. He was a director at Kosciusko County REMC for 18
years.
Also surviving are two sons, Dennis A. (and wife Candy)
Shively, Leesburg, and Douglas D. Shively, Longview,
Texas; three grandchildren: six great-grandchildren; and a
brother, Allen (and wife) Shively, Goshen. He was preceded
in death by a son, Dallas Ray Shively, and a sister, Anna
Lou Vance.
Services were at 10 a.m. today at Salem Church of the
Brethren with the Rev. Robert Rice Jr. officiating. Burial
was in Leesburg Cemetery.
Mishler-Eastlund Funeral Home, Milford, was in charge
of arrangements.

Memorials to New Salem Church of the Brethren.


Survivors include his wife,
Patricia D.; daughter, Cameron
Dyan Smith of Sebring; son,
Ike III of Sebring; sisters,
Wanda Gerlach, Joyce Huerta
and Doris Rebmann, all of
Avon Park, and Mary Willis of
Sebring; brothers, Jackie of
Fort Meade, Glenn of Spring
City, Tenn., Ernest of
Hephzibah, Ga., Garry of
Porterdale, Ga. and James of
Mayo; and two grandchildren.
Visitation will be from 6-8
p.m. Monday at the Fountain
Funeral Home, Avon Park.
Funeral service will be at 9 a.m.
Tuesday at the funeral home,
with the Rev. Mike Roberts
officiating. Interment will fol-
low at Lakeview Memorial
Gardens.

Hope Gaber
Hope H. Gaber, 90, of
Sebring, died July 21, 2005, in
Sebring.
Born in New York state, she
had been a resident of Sebring
since 1990, coming, from
Miami Beach. She was an
office secretary.
Cremation arrangements
were handled by Stephenson-
Nelson Funeral Home, Sebring.

Michael Myers
Michael James
Myers, 47, of
Sebring, died July
30,2005.
Born in Melrose, Mass., he
attended Avon Park High
School and entered the United
States Army. He returned to
Highlands County and joined
the Highlands County Sheriff's
Office, retiring in 2000 as a
lieutenant. He was the owner of
Computers by Mike Myers in
Sebring.
He was a member of Sebring
Sunrise Rotary Club and First
Baptist Church, Sebring.
Survivors include his wife,
Donna; daughters, Amanda
Leigh of Sebring and Linda of
East Flatrock, N.C.; son, David
of Wauchula; brothers, William
of Merritt Island, Steven of
West Fargo, N.D., Robert of
Jasper and Mark of Sebring;
sisters;" Ardelle Heick 6f
Buffalo, N.Y., Janine Jones of


live round in the chamber. The
AG had a live round in the
chamber and six live rounds in
the magazine.
Both were readily accessible
and not securely encased,
reports said.
When questioned under
Miranda rights, she told the
deputy she kept them for pro-
tection.
She was arrested and charged
with two counts of carrying a
concealed firearm and one
charge of driving with a license
suspended with knowledge.
Bail was set at $2,500.


Sebring, Lisa Woltz of
Jamestown, N.Y. and Anna Hall
of Waynesville, N.C.; step-
brother, Andrew Leach Jr. of
Avon Park; and three grandchil-
dren.
Visitation will be-from 5:30-
7:30 p.m. Monday at Morris
Funeral Chapel, Sebring.
Funeral service will be at 11
a.m. Tuesday at First Baptist
Church in Sebring, with Dr.
James Henry officiating.
Memorials may be made to
Good Shepherd Hospice.

Reba Turner
Reba Jane Turner, 88, of
Avon Park, died July 29, 2005,
in Gainesville.
Born in Fort Meade, she
moved to Avon Park in the
1930s, coming from Fort
Meade.
She was the owner and oper-
ator of the Avonlon Grill and
Hitching Post Restaurant and
was a dietician for Camp
Wingman Episcopal Church
Camp in Avon Park. She was a
past member of Business
Women's Association of Avon
Park and a current member of
First Baptist Church in Avon
Park.
Survivors include her sons,
Dickie R. of Avon Park and
Jackie D. of Sebring; daughter,
Beverly Clarke of Williston;
sisters, Walta Cherry of Avon
Park and Lola Sapp of
Lakeland; eight grandchildren;
and four great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be from 6-8
p.m. Monday at Stephenson-
Nelson Funeral Home in Avon
Park. Funeral service will be at
11 a.m. Tuesday at the funeral
home, with the Rev. R.L. Polk
and Dr. Vernon Harkey officiat-
ing.
Interment will be in
Bougainvillea Cemetery in
Avon Park.


O. cl'c pas-.,o away
. M.:.r.ldav. .jlV 1 20105
al ir., Lak.- Placia nursing
-* lrn.s She *an Dorr, on
January 4, 1926 in Athens,
GA. She moved to Miami
in her early years, then to
Lake Placid in 1990. Ms.
Hamm is survived by her
daughter, Sharron and
son-in-law Frederick L.
Semon, of Lake Placid, FL;
sister, Lola P. Miller, of
Newman, GA.;
granddaughters, Anna
Felecia Mancuso (Michael
Mancuso, Sr) and Tabatha
Jordan (Melvin Jordon II);
grandson, Frederick L.
Semon, Jr., of Tucson, AR;
great-grandsons, Richard
"" Anthony Mancuso and
l, I I.o ,r, Jordarn III an.
S .anary r..:es and
r .� nepws f.1s Hamrr
'- wa_' . a -pecal and
4, i i.' ng tol 'r Morrier.
'. Gr.an c.her and
rr d i


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You Are Entitled To:
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Arnold charged with


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2605 Bayview St. * Sebring, FL 33870
863-385-1546


I - _


I









News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005 5A



New teachers learn lessons as school year approaches


Orientation program prepares many first-
time educators for a new school year


By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
News-Sun
SEBRING - Florida is fac-
ing a teacher shortage crisis.
The situation has become so
acute than schools superintend-
ent Wally Cox freely admits he
has no reservations about woo-
ing candidates away from
neighboring counties.
That's why Vivianne
Waldron couldn't help smiling
Friday morning as she wel-
comed 96 new teachers to the
district's orientation day at
Hill-Gustat Middle School.
Waldron, her staff, and
school administrators have
been conducting a recruitment
blitz for months. The energized
crowd who sat before her were
proof of their hard work.
"You're all awake and alive
and that's a good thing," she
said. "Thank you for the choice
you've made. We think you've
chosen well."
School board members, dis-
trict-staff and several principals
were on hand to lend support
and encouragement.
Teachers are leaders who
"bridge the gap between poten-
tial and performance," said
school board chairman Wally
Randall when he spoke to the
group.
Cox handed his business
card to each teacher and asked
each one to introduce them-
selves to the group.
The 96 teachers span a broad
spectrum of experience and
backgrounds.
Many are veteran educators
who left larger areas like Palm
Beach and Dade counties seek-
ing a quieter lifestyle and more
personal attention.
Cliff Avon, who taught in
Las Vegas and Miami during
his 19-year career, echoed the
sentiments of many when he
said, '",There, you're a number.
Here, you're a name."


A significant number of the
new teachers are from Indiana.
Waldron said that is because
that state produces a surplus of
teachers. The Highlands
County school district attracted
them through Internet postings
and events like the Great
Florida Teach-In.
Some of the new teachers are
leaving other careers behind.
The Alternative Certification
Training program, which cur-
rently provides a free route to
teaching, was the reason sever-
al new teachers decided to enter
the profession in Highlands
County.
Chris Snellgrove is a prime
example. He majored in
English in college and planned
to become a teacher, but he
hadn't taken courses in educa-
tion. This limited his opportuni-
ties, and he wound up in bank-
ing. The training program got
him into the classroom.
The new teachers learned
more about that program from
Janet Harris, a graduate of the
program and the teacher of the
year at Fred Wild Elementary
School.
But the number of former
county residents who were
returning home to teach was the
most gratifying statistic for Cox
and Waldron. Many are gradu-
ates of local high schools, and
some are second- and third-.
generation educators.
"We worked hard to teach
you something so you'd come
back here," Cox said.
Cox reminded everyone that
if a school system had only one
employee, that person would be
a teacher. As it is, the 96 new
hires join the county's largest
workforce, with a total staff of
about 1,600.
The day was designed to
give the new teachers a back-
ground in district policies and
procedures. It included a two-


By BARRY FOSTER
News-Sun
AVON PARK - Lots of stu-
dents get free breakfasts at
school, but on Monday Park
Elementary School teachers
will be treated to the most
important meal of the day.
Breakfast will be catered by
Malcom Trott of Jeni's on
South Lake and served by
members of the Avon Park
Chamber of Commerce's exec-
utive board.
It's part of an ongoing effort
that stemmed from a visioning
session held by the chamber
and South Florida Community
College. The idea was to help
build the community on a num-
ber of different levels.
"This was listed as one of our
strengths so we wanted to keep
education a positive thing. Park
Elementary has faced a few
challenges here recently so we
want to focus on helping them,"
said the chamber's executive
director, David Greenslade.
The chamber board expects
to feed 70-75 teachers and
administrators.
The breakfast is the latest in
a series of events to be planned
and staged by action commit-
tees, which were named at the


close.of the visioning session.
Greenslade said the commit-
tees have been working dili-
gently to find ways to help on a
number of different fronts.
"For instance, we're looking
at the possibility of maybe put-
ting together a brochure' that
would help people who want to
start a business," he said. "The
idea would be to list things like
where to go and who to see for
permits, licensing and that kind
of thing."
Greenslade said the
Welcome to Avon Park signs
also are coming along well.
"Tom Tulle of Auto Options
is going to do the graphics," he
said, "Tom has a new process
that's done digitally - which
gives us a lot of different alter-
natives."
Avon Park City Manager
C.B. Shirey has been helping to
increase the communication
between the city and the busi-
ness community.
The four action committees
have been assigned' the task of
bolstering individual strengths
of the city and finding solutions
to identified problems in the
community.
To participate, call 385-3350.


9,we 4m �e ffr

-. 4 V.,
Smde;


hot-diamondt '

215 North Main Ave




(863) 699-5560


hour session on survival skills
and instructional strategies.
The teachers had already
attended a two-day curriculum
orientation, where they learned
about classroom management,
the district's reading programs,
the Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test and the
Florida Writes test.
John Rousch, president of
the Highlands County
Education Association, present-
ed information about the union
and gave a lesson on time man-
agement. Derrel Bryan, princi-
pal of Lake Placid Middle
School, presented the code of
ethics.
Throughout the day the
mood was relaxed and upbeat.
The day bean with a skit by
-John Mehling, a language arts
teacher at Hill-Gustat Middle
School, and his wife, Yvette,
who works at Sun 'N Lake
Elementary School. A subtext
of the humorous message was
that laughter coupled with pur-
pose can help children retain
what they learn.
Teachers report to schools orn
Monday. The school year
begins on Aug. 8.


CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY/News-Sun
School board chairman Wally Randall welcomes new teachers to Highlands County. He is shaking hands
with Chris Snellgrove (right) who is becoming a teacher after working as a banker. Cliff Avon (left) has
taught for 19 years in Las Vegas and Miami. He was attracted to the county's personal touch.


LAST DAY, SUNDAY, JULY 31!


NO FLORIDA STATE TAX CHARGED ON


CLOTHING OR FOOTWEAR ITEMS INDIVIDUALLY

PRICED $50 OR LESS.


SEMI-ANNUAL


homesale


its all inside.





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SEE OUR INSERT IN TODAY'S PAPER OR PICK ONE UP AT

ANY JCPENNEY FOR SAVINGS THROUGHOUT THE STORE.


- '"- -' Sale prices effective Sunday, 7/31 through Wednesday, 8/3/05 unless otherwise noted. Percentages off regular prices or original pricesas shown. Actual savings
., ] " may exceed stated percentage off. "Regular" and "Original" prices reflect offering prices which may not have resulted in actual sales. Any event designated as a "sale"
excludes Value Right merchandise and items sold everyday with discounts if purchased in multiples of "2 or more". Intermediate mark-downs may have been taken on
original-priced merchandise. Clearance items are available while supplies last. Merchandise selection may vary from one JCPenney store to another.
To find the JCPenney store nearest you, call 1-877-FIND JCP (1-877-346-3527) or go to jcpenney.com!


Avon Park chamber to serve

first breakfast to teachers


--�-








6A News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


COMMUNITY PRIDE


Foley's Child Safety


Act is approved by


Senate committee


Courtesy photo
Victor Alvarez (from left), the service learning coordinator for Highway Park All Stars Enhancement Learning Program, gives instruction
on operating lawn equipment to Devontray Flemming, Quaneisha Maybell, Dederrian Williams, Juwann Legree and Deondre Chisom.



All Stars students revitalize



two yards in Highway Park


Learning exercise
gives kids pride in
their community
LAKE PLACID -
Participants in the Highway
Park All Stars Enhancement
Service Learning Program
cleaned two areas on the corner
of Zion and Bethune streets on
Wednesday.
The iomena ei c , nii.iutria-,d by
- Estelle and Algin McGahee Sr.,
who are lifelong residents of the
community. Health problems
have prevented them from
maintaining the properties in
recent years.
In July Audrey Deveaux
asked staff and students in the
program to consider these proj-
ects. Deveaux, who lives across
the street from the homes,
describedthem as always hav-
ing flowers and clean, neatly
mowed lawns.
"The McGahees took pride in
their homes and loved their
community," Deveaux said.
The students voted unani-
mously to take on the project.
Under the supervision of
Deveaux. and Victor Alvarez,
the program's service learning
coordinator, the students
learned how to operate lawn
mowers, weed eaters, chain-
saws and a wood chipper, and
they expanded their knowledge
of invasive plant species.
The work was completed.
from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. over the
course of two days. Once done,
the participants reflected on the
pride they felt from working on
behalf of their community.
These projects are two of the
final four projects in an ongoing
Title IV Service Learning Grant


'it
, . . . -.-' .

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Courtesy photo
Students in Highway Park's All Stars Enhancement Learning Service Program take a break after work-
ing on two years in Highway Park. The youngsters increased their knowledge of lawn maintenance
machinery and invasive plants and learned about the value of taking pride in their community.


that began in 2003. Funding for
this program will end on Aug.
30,. when the government dis-
continues the grants.
These projects encourage
participants to learn about dif-
ferent topics based on the
Sunshine State Standards,
which shape the curriculum of
the state's public schools.
Earlier projects have includ-
ed the All Stars Enhancement
Program, which built character
by exploring such topics as pre-
mature sexual activities and
substance abuse. It has been


implemented in Lake Placid
Elementary and the Middle
School in the past.
Some Lake Placid Middle
School students were encour-
aged to create a community
park through the Vision Street
Project. They adopted Highway
Park Veterans Memorial and
planted flowers in memory of
soldiers who gave their lives in
the service of their country. A
flower bed was planted by par-
ticipants at the Star Center in
the Martin Luther King Jr. Park.
The students held a


Christmas program for resi-
dents of the Lake Placid Health
Care Center, a Highway Park
Christmas program, bBlack his-
tory program at Lake Placid
High School, teen expression
day on Martin Luther King Day,
workshops with the Soil and
Water Conservation District
and Harmony in the Streets
with the Highlands County
Sheriff's Office.
Despite the loss of govern-
ment funding, organizers hope
to continue the program with
community support.


WASHINGTON, D.C. -
Congressman Mark Foley (R-
District 16) enjoyed a big win
this week when the House
Judiciary Committee over-
whelmingly approved the Child
Safety Act of 2005.
The measure includes legis-
lation authored by Foley, whose
district includes Highlands
County. It was sponsored by
House Judiciary Committee
Chairman James
Sensenbrenner.
Foley serves as the co-chair-
man of the Missing and
Exploited and Children's
Caucus. His goal has been to
strengthen the nation's laws
regarding the registration and
notification of sex offenders.
The bill is expected to be
considered on the House floor
in September.
"We keep better track of our
library books than we do child
predators," said Foley. "Those
who break such a sacred trust
and prey on our children - no
matter who they are, where they
are from or where they commit
their crime - should have to
make their whereabouts known
or be subject to additional jail
time and other penalties.
Foley said that sex offenders
"are running out of time" as
Congress moves to act on the
legislation. He cited troubling
statistics as the need for it.
For example, Foley said
more than half a million con-
victed sex offenders in the
United States. Of those,
150,000 are unaccounted for.
Furthermore, sex offenders
often show a pattern of commit-
ting the same crimes once


'We need to stop
playing Russian
roulette with the
lives of our
children.'
CONGRESSMAN MARK FOLEY
(R-District 16)

released from prison.
"We need to stop playing
Russian roulette with the lives
of our children," Foley said.
The Foley provisions are the'
main elements of the Sex
Offender Registration and
Notification Act of 2005 that he.
and Hatch introduced last
month. The Senate version of
the bill is scheduled for mark
up in the Senate Judiciary
Committee.
Provides of the bill include:
* Improving Sex
Offender Registration and
Notification Program to ensure
that sex offenders register, and
keep current, where they reside,
work and attend school.
* Requiring states to
have a uniform, public access
sex offender registration Web
site.
* Requiring States to
notify each other when sex
offender moves from one state
to another.
* Expanding community
notification requirements to
include active efforts to inform
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'ICE' cell phone numbers


could he
By RACHEL PEACOCK
News-Sun
SEBRING - Cellular phones are touted
for the convenience they provide, but that
convenience could now extend to saving
lives.
There is a new nationwide initiative
requesting cell phone users to store the
numbers of family members or close
friends that can be contacted in emergen-
cies in their electronic address books.
Emergency service personnel could type
in ICEI, ICE2, ICE3, etc., to access the
contacts. ICE stands for "In Case of
Emergency."
The Highlands County emergency serv-
ices recently heard about the new cam-
paign, and are in the planning stages of
making the project useful.
"We are aware of the program and do
plan to implement it this winter," Robyn
McIntyre, in the crime prevention depart-
ment of the sheriff's office, said.
"We have programs like this for seniors,
but this seems like a program that may
work for everyone."
Nell Hayes, crime prevention practition-
er, plans'to use community civic groups to
promote the project. But, McIntyre said
Hayes is out of the county until September


Ip in
and progress won't beg
"For it to work, it w
laborative effort for
agency services," sai
Florida Hospital's dil
and public relations.
She informed Donn,
dent of nursing ser ice
on the agenda for N
assurance meeting with
agency department.
Rick Weigand, High
tor of Emergency Med
plan wouldn't benefit
as other emergency pei
"Once an emergency
field by the paramed
department or hospital
nearest relative," Weig
Until that point,
medics are to busy stab
look for emergency co
to inform paramedics o
are aware of it.
Choosing the right
sent for emergency
should be a careful p
under ICE should have
sion to be an emergency
If under 18 years


emergencies
gin until she returns. agency contacts should be the mother, father,
rill need to be a col- or an immediate family member.
all people in emer- The plan does have a few potential set
d Cathy Albritton, backs. The listed contact information could
rector of marketing be out of date. Then, different mobile phone
brands have different operational functions
a Snyder., vice presi- that could make it hard for personnel to
2s, who put the topic quickly access the ICE listing.
Wednesday's quality And, the phone could be lost or broken in
the hospital's emer- the accident that caused the patient to be
unresponsive initially.
lands County direc- For these reasons, it is best use the ICE
ical Service, said the plan and carry a written list of emergency
paramedics as much contacts at all times.
rsonnel. The original campaign was launched by
y is resolved on the Bob Brotchie, a British paramedic, who
ics, then the police often used patients' cell phones to search
I usually contact the for contact information. He realized valu-
and said. able time was being wasted trying to guess
Weigand said para-
Weigand said para- which contact should be called.
bilizing the patient to .
ntacts. Still, he plans Vodafone, a United Kingdom mobile
)f the practice so they telecommunication service, is sponsoring
the campaign. Its research found 75 percent
person to give con- of people carry no contact information with
medical decisions them.
process. Those listed Since the recent London bombings, there
e given their perrnis- has been surge of heightened interest for
:y reference, the initiative in the United Kingdom and iii
old, a child's emer- other countries.


Salvation Army wraps up second Clothes for Kids


By BARRY FOSTER
News-Sun
SEBRING - School days
are right around the corner once
again, and thanks to the
Highlands County branch of
The Salvation Army, Lakeshore
Mall and numerous citizens,
115 local students will be get-
ting back-to-school clothes and
supplies.
"We ended up with 125 chil-
dren and all but 10 have been
taken up," said The Salvation
Army Captain Mary Holmes.
The second annual Back-to-
School Clothes for Kids cam-
paign ended up Saturday at
Lakeshore Mall. The Salvation
Army board members and vol-
unteers staffed a table in the
JCPenney's court, distributing
names and descriptions of
youngsters who needed help in
getting outfitted for the upcom-


ing school year.
"Clothes were what we really
were looking for," Holmes said.
"But there were people who
gave us money as well."
They collected a total of
$465 in cash, but Holmes said
they d spent nearly twice that in
purchasing supplies.
"Hopefully what people
bought for the children was
clothing and that sort of thing."
Holmes said. "So then we'll fill
in with the school supplies."
Those are set to be handed
out this coming Wednesday.
Being the second year for the
program, things went more
smoothly for the campaign.
Holmes said this time around
the effort also was aided by a
number of businesses and indi-
'viduals who put out a special
effort.
She pointed to Sebring City


Councilwoman Annette Daff.
who also is an employee in the
office of Highlands County
Clerk of Courts Luke Brooker.
"She was instrumental.in get-
ting a number of people who
adopted multiple names,"
Holmes said.
If there are any left over, the
plan is to distribute them to
youngsters at school.
"The counselors are good
about letting us know about
that," Holmes said.
Donations for the back-to-
school promotion still are being
accepted and donations to The
Salvation Army's general relief
fund are always appreciated,
Holmes said.
She said while this year's
general donations have stayed
pretty much on par with 2004.
the increase in demand was sig-
nificant - especially during


"I think last month I spent
this month's money," she said.
Holmes said there appeared
to be a lot of different reasons,
but at least part of the problem
was due to skyrocketing electric
bills as people ran their air con-
ditioners to beat the heat.
"People weren't prepared.
Some of the bills were like
$100 higher than what they've
been used to," she said.
The next promotion for the
local Salvation Army branch
will be Circle the Circle with
cans. That is the annual
Thanksgiving collection done
in conjunction with the Rotary
clubs.
Over the years it has expand-
ed from Sebring to include a
simultaneous collection on the
Mall in Avon Park.'


Public shows no opposition to County Road 623 project


By RACHEL PEACOCK
News-Sun
SEBRING - If the public had any oppo-
sition to the County Road 623 Project
Development, it wasn't voiced at a meeting
designed specifically as a forum for resi-
dents to express their opinions.
No formal public testimonies were
shared at the county's public hearing
Thursday to discuss the development and
an environmental study that is to go with it.
The hearing is a requirement of the Florida
Department of Transportation, which the
county must conduct to receive a $1.3 mil-
lion grant, about one-third of the project's
total costs.
Ramon Gavarrete, the county's project
manager said, as of Friday, he only received
one comment form about the project.
"That is usually a good thing," Gavarrete
said. "That means people are mostly behind
the project."
Gavarrete said it is important to remem-
ber the project is addressing future prob-
lems. He said the county is trying to be
proactive and solve problems caused by
population and economic growth before
they start.
If approved, construction on the four-
way intersection won't begin until at least
2008.
"The intersection will be a good imple-


mentation for the airport and will also func-
tion as a safety improvement," Gavarrete
said during the informal segment of
Thursday night's hearing.
The "preferred-build alternative," as it is
being called, would realign County Road
623 to create a four-way intersection where
Airport Road (or Haywood Taylor
Boulevard) crosses the airport's south
access road.
. Gavarrete said he will accept public
comment on the project until Aug. 8. He
and his staff will read and consider each
comment and suggestion.
Afterward, the project will be resubmit-
ted to DOT for approval. If it gets the green
light, the county can start preparing design
permits and negotiating the purchase of
right-of-ways.
Ron Cauthan, of Chastain-Skillman
engineering firm, discussed the "no-build
alternative" .and "preferred-build alterna-
tive" project implications during the formal
presentation.
The no-build alternative is the existing
situation and involves no road alterations.
Cauthan said the layout for the preferred-
build alternative was chosen because it had
the least environmental impact and was the
most cost efficient.
Still, some property owners who stand to
be directly affected by the change weren't


pleased w ith the alternative.
"My main concern is my sister losing her
yard and having traffic under her window,"
Raegan Rothchilde said in an informal ses-
sion of the meeting.
Rothchilde also is uncertain if the county
will pay her sister full value for the land
purchased for the right-of-way now that the
law of imminent domain has passed.
According to the preferred-build alterna-
tive, County Road 623 would be.four-laned
for 4,700-feet between the intersection and
Central Boulevard. The project also will
finish the 1,600-foot section of Airport
Road that the intersection ties into. The sec-
tion wasn't included in recent Airport Road
improvements due to lack of funds.
The improvements will include an multi-
use path on the north roadways. A federal
wildlife refuge on the south side of County
Road 623 forced the county to widen the
roadway to the north.
The Florida Wildlife Commission sent
the county letters stating the wetlands will
not be effected by the preferred-build alter-
native.
Anyone wishing to submit comments
about this issue for consideration and pub-
lic record can e-mail to
rgavarre@bcc.co.lhighlands.fl.us; fax to
386-6548; or submit in person to 505 South
Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870.


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8A News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005

Comuit Cleda


MONDAY
* ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting, 8-9 p.m. at
Episcopal Church, Lakeshore
Drive, Sebring. For more
details, call 385-8807.
* ALZHEIMER'S ASSOCI-
ATION SUPPORT GROUP
meets at 2 p.m. at the Oaks of
Avon, 1010 U.S. 27 North,
Avon Park. For details, call
385-3444.
* ALANON meets at 8 p.m.
at St. Agnes Episcopal
Church, 660 NW Lakeview
Drive, Sebring. For details,
call (863) 687-3800.
* AMERICAN LEGION
PLACID POST 25 has shuf-
fleboard at 1:30 p.m. at the
post in Lake Placid.
* AMVETS BRUCE L.
SIMPSON POST 21 meets 7
p.m. second Monday, at the
post, 2027 U.S. 27 South,
Sebring, behind the Allstate
building. For details, call 385-
0234.
* BOY SCOUT TROOP 482
meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave.;
Lake Placid.
* FRATERNAL ORDER
OF EAGLES 4240 AERIE
plays darts at 7 p.m. at the
club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring.
For details call 655-4007.
* HIGHLANDS COUNTY
COMPOSITE SQUADRON
314 meets at 6:30 p.m. at the
Knights of Columbus Hall,
east of U.S. 27 across from
Lakeshore Mall in Sebring.
For details, call 385-1234.
* HIGHLANDS STAMP
CLUB meets at 1 p.m. the
first Monday at Christ
Fellowship Church, 2935 New
Life Way, Sebring. Guests are
welcome. Talk and swap
meeting will follow the regu-
lar meeting. For details, call
Frits Rubbens at 382-2343.
* HIGHLANDS DELTA
CHORALE, rehearses 7 p.m.,
Faith Lutheran Church, 2230
NE Lakeview Drive, Sebring
(September through May). No
auditions are required to join
and all ages are welcome. For
details or to book a concert,
call Cheryl Cometta at 699-
2663 or Pat Riccobono at 385-
4045.
* INSULIN PUMP SUP-
PORT GROUP meets from
3:30-5:30 p.m. first Monday at
Conference Room 2, Florida
Hospital Heartland Medical
Center, 4200 Sun 'N Lake


Blvd., Sebring. For details,
call 402-0177.
* LAKE PLACID ELKS
2661 provides a snack bar,
live music and happy hour
from 4-7 p.m. at the lodge.
Darts is at 7 p.m. Euchre is at
1 p.m. It is open to members
and their guests. For details,
call 465-2661.
* LAKE PLACID
LIBRARY has storytime at
10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except
during holidays.
* LAKE PLACID MOOSE
plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to
members and qualified guests
only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m.
* NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION FOR ADVANCE-
MENT OF COLORED
PEOPLE, HIGHLANDS
COUNTY BRANCH meets
7:30 p.m., 401 Tulane, Avon
Park.
* ROTARY CLUB OF
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
meets at 6:15 p.m.,
Savannah's restaurant in
Sebring. For details, call
Darrell Peer at 385-0107.
* SEBRING OPTIMIST
CLUB meets at 6:15 p.m. first
and third Mondays at various
locations. For details, call
Gabriel Read, 453-2859 or
Earle Luke at 381-3514.
* SEBRING AMERICAN
ASSOCIATION FOR
RETIRED PERSONS meets
1:30 p.m., The Palms, Pine
Street, Sebring.
* SEBRING BRIDGE
CLUB plays at 12:30 p.m. at
347 Femleaf, Sebring.
* SEBRING RECRE-
ATION CLUB has ice cream
shuffleboard at 6:30 p.m. at
333 Pomegranate Ave.
Summer memberships are
available. For details, call
385-2966 and leave a name,
number and message. Call
will be returned.
* SERTOMA meets noon,
Takis Family Restaurant,
Sebring.
* TOPS FL. 632, SEBRING
meets at 3:30 p.m. at the fel-
lowship hall at the First
Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, Sebring. For
details, call Betty Gregeson at
699-2132 or Donna Goodwin
at 655-2118.
* VETERANS OF FOR-
EIGN WARS POST 3880
euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224
County Road 621 East, Lake


Placid. For more details, call
699-5444.

TUESDAY
* AL-ANON FAMILY
GROUPS meet for discussion
and Twelve Step study at
noon, Union Congregational
Church, 105 N. Forest Ave.,
Avon Park. Parking available
south of old church.
* AMERICAN LEGION
PLACID POST 25 has shuf-
fleboard at 1:30 p.m. at the
post in Lake Placid.
* AVON PARK LIBRARY
has storytime at 10 a.m. for
ages 3-5 except during holi-
days.
* AVON PARK LIONS
CLUB meets 6:45 p.m., din-
ner included, Lions Club,
1218 W. Bell St., Avon Park.
* BUSY BEE CRAFT
CLUB meets 9-11 a.m.,
Community Christian Church,
New Life Way, Sebring.
Everyone is welcome. This
club is not affiliated with the
church. For more details,, call
Marie Rand, 385-3012.
* DEPRESSION BIPOLAR
SUPPORT ALLIANCE
GROUP meets every first and
third Tuesday in Sebring. For
details, call Ronnie Daugherty
at 382-6169 or e-mail rox-
ann@tnni.net.
* FLEET RESERVE ASSO-
CIATION BOARD OF
DIRECTORS Heartland
Branch No. 173 meets 7 p.m.,
Branch Hall, 1402 Roseland
Ave., Sebring. Regular meet-
ing, first Tuesday after board
of directors meeting. Call 471-
6109 for details.
* FLETCHER MUSIC
CLUB meets every Thursday
and Tuesday at Fletcher Music
Center in Lakeshore Mall,
Sebring. For more details, call
385-3288,
* THE HEARTLAND
HARMONIZERS BAR-
BERSHOP CHORUS meets
from 7-9 p.m. in the Magnolia
Room at the Kenilworth
Lodge, 836 SE Lakeview
Drive, Sebring. All men who
enjoy singing are invited.
* HIGHLANDS COUNTY
ADOPTION SUPPORT
GROUP meets from 7-8:30
p.m. first Tuesday at Quality
Inn & Suites Conference
Center, 6525 U.S. 27 North,
Sebring. For more details, call


382-0352.
* HIGHLANDS COUNTY
QUILT GUILD meets at
12:30 p.m. first Tuesday for a
business meeting at the
Women's Club of Sebring,
220 SW Lakeview Drive,
Sebring. Fordetails, call 382-
0722.
* LAKE PLACID
JAYCEES meets 7:30 p.m.,
first and third Tuesdays,
Jaxson's. Board meetings at
6:30 p.m. on second Tuesday.
For details, call Joe Collins,
655-5545.
* LORIDA COMMUNITY
CLUB meets at 7 p.m.
Tuesday at the Lorida
Community Center to plan
events.
* MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS
SUPPORT GROUP, meets 7
p.m. second Tuesday at
Highlands Regional Medical
Center, Sebring, in the first
floor doctor's conference
room. For more details, call
465-3138.
* OVEREATERS ANONY-
MOUS meets from 8-9 a.m.
every Tuesday at Walker
Memorial Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 1410 West
Avon Blvd, Avon Park. For
details, call 385-4277.
* PLACID LAKES
BRIDGE CLUB meets 9 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday
and has blood pressure screen-
ing from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
first and third Tuesday at
Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010
Placid Lakes Blvd. For
details, call 465-4888.
* PLACID LAKES HOME
AND PROPERTY OWN-
ERS ASSOCIATION INC.
has its board meetings at 7
p.m. first Tuesday at Placid
Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid
Lakes Blvd. Call 465-4888 for
details. Annual meetings are
in February. Quarterly meet-
ings are in May, September
and December.
* SEBRING ELKS LODGE
1529 has music by Reese
Thomas, 4-7 p.m.. All Elks
and their guests invited.
Tidbits of food served.
Canasta is played from 9:30
a.m. to 3 p.m. Bring a lunch.
For more details, call 385-
'8647 or 471-3557. '
* SEBRING LIONS CLUB
meets at noon at the club-
house, 3400 Sebring Parkway,


Sebring. For more details, call
First Vice President Dianne
Doty at 382-1273.
* SEBRING MOOSE
LODGE 2259 serves soft
shell tacos 5-7 p.m. at 11675
U.S. 98, Sebring. For details,
call 655-3920.
* SEBRING RECRE-
ATION CLUB plays bridge
at 1 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate
Ave., Sebring. Summer mem-
berships available.
For details, call 385-2966 and
leave a name, number and
message. Call will be
returned.
* SEBRING ROTARY
CLUB (NOON) meets noon,
Sebring Civic Center. For
details call 385-8850.
* SOUTH FLORIDA COM-
MUNITY COLLEGE COM-
MUNITY ORCHESTRA,
rehearses 5-7 p.m., Room 34,
SFCC Fine Arts building. For
details, call June Zweidinger
at 471-3968.
* TOPS (TAKE OFF
POUNDS SENSIBLY)
CHAPTER FL 618 has
weigh in from 4-4:45 p.m. at
First Presbyterian Church, 215
East Circle St., Avon Park.
Use the parking lot entrance
on LaGrande Street. Meeting
is at 5 p.m. For details, call
453-7984 or 453-0760.
* VETERANS OF FOR-
EIGN WARS POST 3880,
plays darts 7 p.m., 1224
County Road 621 E., Lake
Placid. The ladies executive
meeting is at 9 a.m. and the
house committee is at 11 a.m.
the first Tuesday. For more
details, call 699-5444.
M VETERANS OF FOR-
EIGN WARS POST 4300
has a card tournament at 2
p.m. at the post, 2011 SE
Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For
details, call 385-8902.
* ZONTA CLUB OF
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
meets second Tuesday. For
more details, call Rebekah
Kogelschatz at 314-9336.

WEDNESDAY
* AL COLLIS SOCIAL
CLUB meets 11:30 a.m., third
Wednesday at Candlelight
Restaurant in Sebring. All
Shriners and Masons are wel-
come to attend.
* AMERICAN LEGION
AUXILIARY UNIT 74 meets


at 7 p.m. third Wednesday at
the post, 528 N. Pine St.,
Sebring.
* AVON PARK NOON
ROTARY CLUB meets noon,
Rotary Club building, corner
of Verona Avenue and Pine
Street, Avon Park.
* THE BRIDGETTES meet
at 11:15 a.m. for lunch at
Bogey's at Sebring Golf Club,
3129 Golf view Road,
Sebring,and play bridge after
lunch. For details, call Claire
Marcotte at 382-6720.
* CHRISTIAN FELLOW-
SHIP GROUP meets 7 p.m.
For details, call 381-9005 or
381-9007.
* COUNTRY SWINGERS
has dances at the Sebring
Recreation Club, 333
Pomegranate Ave., Sebring.
Membership is required.
Beginners line dancing class
will be from 5-6 p.m.
Advanced dancing is from 6-8
p.m. Couples dancing is from
8-9 p.m. New dances taught
every other week. Call 655-
3458.
* DEPRESSION BIPOLAR
SUPPORT ALLIANCE
GROUP for Highlands,
Hardee and southern Polk
counties will have a chat room
open at
www.dbsalliance. org/Chat.htm
1 from 8-9 p.m. every
Wednesday. For details, call
Ronnie Daugherty at 382-
6169.
* HIGHLANDS COUNTY
INTER-AGENCY COUN-
CIL meets at noon at Homer's
restaurant in Sebring.
* HIGHLANDS COUNTY
NARCOTICS ANONY-
MOUS meets.at 8 p.m. at the
Lakeside house, 1513 S.
Highlands Ave., Avon Park.
For details, call the 24-hour
hotline 1-800-850-7347 or
(941) 616-0460.
* HIGHLANDS SHRINE
CLUB, 2606 State Road 17
South, Avon Park (between
Avon Park and Sebring) meets
from 8:30-10:30 a.m. for cof-
fee and doughnuts and social-
izing for members and any
interested person. For details,
call 382-2208.
* LAKE PLACID ELKS
2661 has casual dining from
5-7 p.,m..at the. lodge. Open to
members and their guests.
Shuffleboard is at 1 p.m. For
details, call 465-2661.


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* Year Built: 2005
" Total Sq. Ft.: 3300
* Master Bed
* Guest: 2
* Bath: 2.5
* Living/Dining
* Family Room
* Dining Room


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Sun 'N Lake Realty & Dev., Inc. 5689 Schumacher Rd
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Bob Severino 863-386-4500
Fax: 863-386-4800 * Voice: 863-386-4500
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News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


Community
( News and events


Brownies to
tour hospital
SEBRING - Brownie
Troop 62 will tour of Florida
Hospital Heartland Medical
Center at 10 a.m. Monday.
Girl Scout orientation will
be from 5-7 p.m. at Sun 'N
Lake Elementary School.
All girls who attend the
school are welcome.
For details, call Joan Geary
at 382-8782.

Special STARS
to talk over
district bowling
SEBRING - The Special
STARS will meet at 5 p.m.
Monday at the News-Sun
office to discuss the upcom-
ing district bowling competi-
tion.
Athletes in Highlands
County just finished their
county games Saturday and
the first, second and third
place finishers will advance
onto district to compete
against Hardee County.
District games will be Aug.
13 at Royal Palms Bowling
Center. Check in is at 8:30
a.m. and bowlers will start at
9 a.m.
For details, call 452-6607.
4-H to host
enrollment fair
SEBRING - The second
annual 4-H enrollment fair
will be from 5-7 p.m.
Monday.
Returning 4-H members
should make plans to attend
and complete their re-enroll-
ment packets.
Prospective members are
also welcome to learn more
about 4-H.
All members are urged to
attend as this cuts down on
the amount of additional work
required of the leaders and
helps members to avoid miss-
ing enrollment deadlines.
For details, call
ShareenLynn Childs 453-7538
in Avon Park; 465-2464 in
Lake Placid; and 402-6540 in
Sebring. The extension is
6540.

Meals on
Wheels needs
volunteers
Sebring Meals on Wheels
needs volunteers who can
deliver meals in Lake Placid
and in Sebring.
Meals are delivered
Monday through Friday
around noon. Drivers are
asked to drive one day per
week. Deliveries are usually


completed in 1 to 1 1/2 hours.
Meals on Wheels is a not-
for-profit organization that
delivers hot, nutritious noon
meals to elderly, disabled, or
those in need of assistance.
For information about vol-
unteering, call 402-1818 and
leave your name and phone
number. All phone calls will
be returned.

Elks change
bingo hours
SEBRING - Sebring Elks
Lodge 1529 has changed its
bingo hours for Sunday and
Monday.
Games are now being
played at 6 p.m. both days at
the lodge, 2618 Kenilworth
Blvd.
Sandwiches and snacks are
available. Doors open at 4
p.m. Papers start selling at 5
p.m.
The public is welcome. For
details, call 471-3557 or 655-
1982.

Lake Placid
Moose have
events all week
LAKE PLACID - Lake
Placid Moose welcome mem-
bers and qualified guests to
the following events.
* Sunday - The pavilion
will open at 1 p.m. Keith
Willis will provide music
from 3:30-7:30. Half-chicken
dinners will be served at 4.
* Thursday - Hamburgers,
jumbo hot dogs and french
fries will be available at 6
p.m. Music by "Frank" will
be played from 5:30-9:30
p.m.
* Friday - Chicken wings,
hamburgers and fish will be
served from 6 p.m. Live
music will be presented from
7-11 p.m.
* Saturday - The pavilion
open at noon. Prime rib din-
ner will be served at 6 p.m..
Live music will be played
from 7-11 p.m.

Legion to have
Wednesday
dinners
AVON PARK - Avon
Park American Legion Unit
69 will serve meals consisting
of sloppy joes, potato chips,
pickle spear and dessert each
Wednesday in August.
Cost is $3 per person.
Serving time is from 3-5 p.m.
VHS movies will be given
away in drawings. Those who
wish to donate old movies can
arrange donations by contact-
ing the legion.


Scottish-
American
Society to meet
Wednesday
SEBRING - The Scottish-
American Society of the
Highlands will meet
Wednesday at First
Presbyterian Church, corner
of Franklin and Poinsettia
streets.
A fellowship time will
begin at 7. The meeting will
be at 7:30.
The meeting is open to
anyone of Scottish ancestry or
who has an interest in
Scottish culture.
Refreshments will be
served after the meeting.







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1OA News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


Courtesy photo
Donald Schnoor (left) and John O'Sullivan (right) present hygiene supplies collected by the Pope John
XXIII Council of the Knights of Columbus to county Veterans Services Officer Joseph Dionne. The coun-
cil collected the supplies around Memorial Day. They are going to hospitalized veterans.



Knights collect supplies


for hospitalized veterans


SEBRING - The Knights of
Columbus conducted another
drive to collect toiletry items
and other gifts for veterans in
Veterans Administration hospi-
tals and nursing homes.
Many of the veterans need
hygiene products and other
items that enhance their quality
of life.
During the Memorial Day
period, the Pope John XXIII
Council of the Knights of
Columbus conducted its second
drive for these items to help


vets in VA nursing homes.
About 125-150 various items
were collected.
The county's veterans servic-
es officer, Joseph Dionne,
accepted the items at the
Highlands County Veterans
Service Office.
The drive is supported by
families of the Knights of
Columbus and patrons who
attend the Knights' bingo pro-
grams. They have also been
generous in their support of the
organization's charity work.


The Knights raise money for
the Highlands County Safe
House, phone cards for over-
seas military personnel, hurri-
cane relief, and other causes.
The Knights of Columbus is
a fraternal order of Catholic
men who are devoted to works
of charity and patriotism. The
grand knight, is John
O'Sullivan, and the faithful
navigator of the 4th Degree
Assembly is Michael Basile.
The next drive will be around
Veterans Day in November.


Free business counseling, workshop to be

offered at Sebring Chamber of Commerce


SEBRING - Free advice
and counseling on starting a
small business will be given
Wednesday, Aug. 10, at the
Sebring Chamber of Commerce
Conference- -Room,- 309 -S.-
Circle Driver
A counselor from the Small


Business Development Center
at the University of South
Florida will offer information
on starting a business, market-
ing, financing, bookkeeping,
business and marketing plans,
small business loans, protecting
patents and copyrights and


trademarks.
A free two-hour workshop
will be that day from 1-3 p.m.
Space is limited to eight.
To schedule an. appointment
with the council or make reser-
vations for the workshop, call
the chamber at 385-8448.


I YhE iPWELSE


News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


10A










Nes-un Sudy Jul 3 1,2051


KATARA SIMMONS/News-Sun
Jeni's on South Lake staff (from left) Patrick Riva, Tammy Elder, Adam Proctor, Amy Cochran,
Rashada Buchannan and Ashley Elder take part in a local version of 'Hell's Kitchen' Friday
evening in Avon Park. The restaurant staff were separated into two teams and then guests rated
them on timeliness, presentation and overall service. The blue team won the contest during the
first seating of the night. The contest also took place Saturday night. See Wednesday's edition of
the 'News-Sun' for further coverage.


Supervisors have no issues with budget,

plan workshop on general manager
By PHIL ATTINGER Severn Trent had proposed lion.
News-Sun having a "district administra- A lot of the budget is helped
SEBRING - Supervisors tor" as liaison to the board and by one-time revenue from
for the Sun 'N Lake contract administrator for the National Recreational
Improvement District and the Severn Trent agreement. Properties Inc. being able to
public had no problems with the Supervisors refused, saying it pay off overdue assessments to
budget presented Friday. made administration of the dis- the district. Getting loans paid
Still. supervisors want to trict more complicated than it back to the golf fund and the
hold a workshop on the ques- needed to be. general fund as well as paying
tion of what to do with the gen- A consensus on what they. off debt to Bank of America for
eral manager job. They've will do about the general man- golf course improvements
scheduled the general manager ager situation is expected by helped.
discussion for 9 a.m., Aug. 10. mid-August. District staff estimate 2006
They'll discuss the budget at On Friday. the fiscal year revenue from maintenance
9 a.m., Aug. 26. 2006 budget presented - to the assessments at $1.95 million,
In mid-June, after working board of supervisors had $7.75 up from this year's $1.57 mil-
90 days with Severn Trent million in the general fund, lion, because NRPI will have
Services Inc. managing the dis- water and sewer utility fund and sold lots to private homeown-
trict operations, and Bill Neron the golf course and restaurant. ers.
as general manager, the board That's up nearly $146,285 from On July 13, the supervisors
of supervisors said they want to last year's budget, but proposed agreed to keep maintenance
go back to having their own expenses have gone down. assessments at the same level.
general manager. General manager Bill Neron The 2006 budget would keep
They said they were unsatis- and Sun 'N Lake staff expect the same level of service, but
fied with the company failing to 2006 costs to total $7.6 million, ron and staff re mncapita
give them financial. information the exact amount of the 2005 improvrments until ,fter irelrc
-and having lost sf l--ricJid. u. d> i[. 6 r hn revenue n"-imber1
- ingthechief financial office.6 .djenses were $8.79 mil- willbe moreensolid.e nnber,
- ing the chief-financial officer,, ,,- enses were $8.79 mil-� .willlbe more solid.


Local version of 'Hell's Kitchen


KIDS
Continued from 1A
children, who have been
exposed - in one way or anoth-
er - to the effects of this drug.
.- , Highlands
County Sheriff
SSusan Benton
has asked other
law enforce-
ment agencies
and human
services organ-
BENTON izations to
meet with her
on the issue.


Because of the way the drug
is made - with toxic household
chemicals in non-laboratory
conditions - it endangers the
addicts and manufacturers, the
officers and emergency person-
nel who respond to calls at
those locations. It also endan-
gers children who may be living
with the,addicts.


METH
Continued from 1A
center is there, too, and controls
sex drive, appetite and sleep
cycles.
One tract of 200-300 cells
nerve cells connects the mid-
brain and to the pre-frontal cor-
tex where emotions and judg-
ment are processed. It helps
control messages about impuls-
es and cravings.
Damage this, and you can get
addicted, Holley said.

How meth works
Methamphetamine stimu-
lates production of dopamine, a
pleasure neurotransmitter.
Normally, brain cells release
dopamineaonce, then shut it off.
Methamphetamine floods nerve
receptors with dopamine for an
extremely pleasurable feeling.
After the body reabsorbs the
excess dopamine, people
rebound with depression.
When this happens too often,
the second cell tells the first to
stop sending the signal, but it
can't. Then,.the second cell will
sever the connection. This hap-
pens tens of thousands of times.


Recently, when Benton went
to a methamphetamine lab
training class, much of the dis-
cussion was about children.
Those exposed to the drug and
its production either suffer ill
effects as a result of being
around the toxic chemicals, or
abuse from parents who are tak-
ing the drugs.
If not helped, they could be
lead to use, make or sell the
drug themselves.
"It's not just the criminal act
of selling drugs," she said. "It's
families in crisis."
Northwest Florida is inundat-
ed with methamphetamine labs,
Benton said. Locally, more labs
are beginning to show up.
The state of Florida and the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement is addressing
these issues and will look to
local law enforcement agencies
to become partners in develop-
ing procedures to deal with
drug-endangered; children. The


Holley said a single dose of
methamphetamine can destroy
50 percent of the cells on the
path to the pre-frontal cortex.
Then the user can't finish
school, get to work, pay rent,
eat regularly, control temper, or
love others.
A user may resent people,
places and activities that don't
fit in with the drug. Eventually,
a user can't even get high
because nothing feels, tastes,
smells, sounds or looks good.

Long-term effects
Long-term, Holley writes,
the addict has exaggerated and
uncontrolled responses.
Innocent gestures get misinter-
preted. Uncontrolled anger can
turn to rage and violence.
Mental sharpness goes,
Holley writes. Without intense
concentration, users or former
users have trouble understand-
ing others' conversations, or
they may ramble in theirs, mak-
ing very little sense.
The drug destroys appetite,
leading to malnutrition and
vitamin deficiency. Hair falls
out. Gums get infected and
teeth fall out. Small infections
turn into severe disease.


Children's Services Council of
Highlands County, the
Community-Based Care
Council and Benton have all
agreed to act on the issue.
Benton would like to see
county agencies deal with the
problem now, before it becomes
too large of a problem.
"I don't want kids to slip
through the cracks," she said.




CHURCH
Continued from 1A


in the restoration of the build-
ing. While Shirey said for the
mostupart, such tax dollars gen-
erally are given for use on pub-
licly-owned structures,
Macklin countered he had
experience where privately
owned buildings had been
granted suhch.assistaAce.,. . ;


SCheck out the News-Sun ohlineat www.newssun.cofmt' ;


Introduces Lori Leaseburge, MD


U[JIY 12 161Ih .IiLIIUIU


E ' 3ii i1 hI'Ih- Gf'iJ


Lori Leaseburge, MD, Mia Branch, MD


and Rachel Cooper, MD


Di: Leaseburge is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology and will be
joining i fmen's WeUlness Center August 1, 2005. Dr: Leaseburge
received her medical degree from A larshaIll University School of Medicine.
She completed her obstetrics/gynecology residency at University of
Cincinnati College of medicine.


Women's Wellness Center offers complete women's
healthcare services including:


* Obstetrics


* Ilormone replacement therapy
* Major and minimally invasive gynecologic surgery.


Appointments with Dr. Leaseburge are now being accepted.
Please call 863-402-2229.


Most major forms of insurance accepted.


Women's Wellness Center


Sebring - 6325 US 27 North,
Suite 204
Lake Placid - 1352 US 27 North
Wauchula - 526 West Carlton Street
863-402-BABY (2229)


Users can get anemic and
feel tired all the time. They
have sores on their skin that
don't heal. They lose weight
and muscle mass. They suffer
insomnia. or have horrible
nightmares.

Getting clean
New brain connections form
during the first 12-18 months
free of the drug, Holley writes.
Users eat better and gain
weight. They sleep better and
the nightmares go away.
According to her research,
former users are extremely
fragile in the first two or three
years of their recovery. The
biggest problem, however, is
the wired-in sensory cues for
the memory of things that made
them high. These triggers can
spark cravings for the drug.
The best hope is to get in and
stay in a rehabilitation center.
Staff there make the former
addicts do chores, which is real-
ly the best way to rebuild the
emotion and judgment pathway.
Time and courage to with-
stand the cravings and depres-
sion will help a user recover,
she said.


* Gynecology * Infertility


H EARL A N 0 D I V 1 1 I O N

M S M I C AL - - T C U -
THE SKILL TO HEAL. THE SPIRIT TO CARE.


www.fpmg.com


'~ " ~"


' '~ ~


I--


L MY , NUNTHS-T3fMI


[ M IMOTHS GT 2f^f


---


11A


News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005














News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


A CC Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. @2005
A CCU'W W *10 m__ AccuWeather.com


Five-Dayforecast for ghlands County


Nati onia Fo ra ii for July31


TODAY


MONDAY


*, *0 -


An aftemoon thunder- An afternoon thunder-
- -.storm or two. storm possible.


High 93/Low 76
Winds: ESE at 4-8 mph.


High 95/Low 75
Winds: NE at 6-12 mph.


TUESDAY






Clouds and sun,
1-siorms possible.

High 94/Low 75
Winds: NE at 8-16 mph.


WEDNESDAY


THURSDAY


An afternoon thunder- An afternoon thunder-
storm possible. solrm possible.


High 94/Low 75
Winds: NE at 8-16 mph.


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are
highs for the day. Forecast high and low temperatures are given for selected cities.




i _ ' L" > >L Showers


1, NICE
NtewYoirk
it -
� .�nh,


High 94/Low 74
Winds: NE at 8-16 mph.


1gton n


Regional forecast _ . .. .-..



0 I4 -
' -,', ) '...-' JacksOnville
S- . . 9074




St. Petersburg
91/77.' '





Avon Park .' ,t Mi
94/75 c 90f17

Sebring
: 93/76 ; .

S '

Lake Placid Lorida
94/75 94/75


Venus
94/74
' [~ .


Shown is today's
weather. Temperatures
are today's highs and
tonight's lows


Regional summary: An eat-sounle3slt low will be in place icda3 with
aftemoon showers and ihuriderstormr, across the .area Drier air wiill work
into the regiori tomorrow allowing lor less in the way o: tIhijniersrmn achivi
ty.


Heat index _
For 3 p.m. today
Relative humidity ................. 59%
Expected air temperature ........ 910
Makes it feel like .................... 1030


Weather History

The temperature at Duluth, Minn.,
reached an all-time high of 106
degrees on July 31, 1936. This is
hotter than has ever been recorded
at Miami Beach, Fla.




Farm report
A 1:,',upie 1 ,lItitunrer. d r
storms will be around this
afternoon and evening across the
area. About 6 to 10 hours of possi-
ble sunshine.


Water restrictions ,
Even numbered addresses can water on
Tuesday and/or Saturday. Odd numbered
addresses can water on Wednesday and/or
Sunday.



AccuWeather UV Index
For today
9a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 3p.m.__5p.m.

The higher the UV index number, the greater
the need for eye and skin protection.
0-2, Low; 3-5, Moderate; 6-7, High;
8-10, Very High; 11+ Extreme


T-storm

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice


FRONTS
Cold

-- Warm

A- Stationary


-0s - 0s 20s 40s I50s. 60s 70s i80.

National summary: A frontal boundary that stalled over the Southeast will remain with plenty of moisture today.
Showers and thunderstorms will bring more rain to an area that has been saturated with rain the past few days.
The Northeast will be pleasant with plenty of sunshine as a high pressure just off the coast of Maine remains in
control. A weak cold front will pass through the northern Plains with just an isolated thunderstorm. Hot across the
central and southern Plains as summertime heat rises into the 90s during the afternoon.


Sun and:1

Today Sunrise .... 6:51 a.m.
Sunset ...... 8:13 p.m.
Moonrise .. 2:45 a.m.
Moonset .... 5:11 p.m.
Monday Sunrise .... 6:52 a.m.
Sunset ...... 8:13 p.m.
Moonrise .. 3:33 a.m.
Moonset .... 6:05 p.m.


Moon lf -.,>

- - n



New First Full Last
Aug4 Aug12 Aug 19 Aug 26


Aintanam :: : ;,,S j. -
Temperature
(Readings at Archbold Biological Station
in Lake Placid)
High Wednesday ................. 93
Low Wednesday ................... 76
High Thursday ..................... 95
Low Thursday ....................... 75
High Friday ........................... 93
Low Friday ........................... 76
Precipitation
Wednesday ..................... 0.00"
Thursday ...................... 0.07"
Friday ..... .......................0.00"
Month to date ................ 6.84"
Year to date ................ 33.54"
Barometer
Wednesday ..................... 30.00
Thursday ......................... 29.93


Friday .................. ........ 30.01
Tides
(Readings at St. Petersburg)
High ......................... 10:21 a.m.
Low ........................... 7:17 p.m.
High ................................. none
Low ................................... none
(Readings at Palm Beach)
High ........................... 5:38 a.m.
Low ......................... 11:51 a.m.
High .............................. 6:35 p.m.
Low ................................ none
Lake Levels
Lake Jackson ................. 96.89'
Lake Okeechobee ......... 16.32'
Normal ........................... 14.51'


Rorida cities ! :
Today Tomorrow Tuesday
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Daytona Beach 89 75 t 91 76 t 89 75 t
Ft. Laud. Bch 90 79 t 90 79 t 91 79 t
Fort Myers 92 -5 t 93 76 I 9 -t. I
GaineEVille 90 71 I 9 72 1 91 "3 1
Homestead AFB90 78 t 90 77 t 90 78 t
Jacksonville 90 74 t 90 74 t 91 73 t
Key Was 90 81 1 91 81 9U 81
Miami 90 7 r 90 N o9 I t
Orlando 91 76 t 93 76 t 93 76 t
Pensacola 90 76 t 89 75 t 88 75 t
Sarasota 90 '4 I 92 76 I 90 7',
Tallahas-ree 90 ,74 1 90 74 I 92 -4 I
Tampa 90 76 t 92 78 t 90 78 t
W. PalmBch 90 78 t 90 78 t 90 78 t


U.S. cities


City
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Baltimore
E ,,,,,,rm r
B.ri.:.n
Crarl.-.ne
Cheyenne
Chi-a3.10
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Dallas

Har,.buirg


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Hi Lo W
89 ,6 I
8A 7I I
83 68 pc

74 62 PC
8 :I -,i' I
86 58 t
90 0n pC
64 64 6 .
8"' 6: .',
98 75 s
86 6r. p,
,14 66 p,:


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Hi Lo W
85 Ti 1
89 68 pc
'8 .4
82 69 I
84 58 t
92 "0 p.-
89 ,.E pC
90 7-) p.:
100 74 s
87 60 1
*30 68 p.:
ti'., 6 p,-


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85 71 I
90 70 pc
i -. 1 1
C6 r.-l I
87 69 I
86 58 t
92 69 ?
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88 7:I pc
90 0 p,.
98 74 pc
87 62 t
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91 691


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Indianapolis
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KLina C"r,

Little Rock
L.:. nr,., ,-;
L.'.us ', iI
Mem.pFh.rS
Miami
Minneapolis
H-s rirll


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Hi Lo W
13 '6 1
96 741
87 68 s

91 69 c
69 .7 pPC
94 71 s
91 7.0 pc
93 '3 "
90 79 t
9i ' " p.:
90 7, ,


lle. Orleanr 91 77 1


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Hi Lo W
88 77
9. 74 I
90 70 pc

93 70 .
91 67 pc
94 71 s

92 72 pc
93 7, a
90 79 t

90 69 pc
92 -1 1


Tuesday
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89 '6 p.:
.96 74 t
90 69 s
-ii "
90 t.9 pc
90 68 1
93 71 s
64 ,.... "
93 71 pc
93 74 pc
90 79 t

91 71 I
93 77 l


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City Hi Lo W
jesA for'k C11 81 69 pC.
Nor.for 78 71 1
Oklahoma City 96 70 s
P ihiajelp-h;, 1 FA p.:
Pric.enu 105 867 1
Pilstburgn 85 64 S
Portland 73 57 pc
RH i.;..r 8: 8 i
Rocresler 83 64 pc
St Louli 91 7t E
San Francisco 72 58 pc
' l6nie .I 5 6 .
Tampa 90 76 1
Washington DC83 68 pc


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85 71 pe.
82 73 pc
98 68 s
88 -: p.:
102 88 t
88 68 pc
73 57 pc
Hi Ci I
87 e i1
91 72 a
70 57 pc
. F. p,:
92 78 1
86 70 pc


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88 74 1
893 73 oc
97 69 pc

106 88 1
39 66 r
81 60 t
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85 65 pc
91 73 3
70 57 pc
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City
Acapulco
Berlin
Caigary
Dublin
Ejm-Tr.,,.-l ,r,
Freeport
Genea
Hong Kong

Kiev


Today


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87 78 t
77 56 sh
85 57 s
62 52 c

90 78 t
75 51 ;h
67 8? I
9.., .1 .
94 69 pc


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Today
City Hi Lo W
London 69 56 pc
Montreal 79 61 t
Nice 81 66 pc
Ottawa 80 5.9 1
QuEt.': -4 �5 I
Rio de Janeiro 80 69 s
Syd.rev 67 50 a
Toronr)- ......83 64 pc
innipegu.er 86 62
Winnipeg 86 62 s


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy,
sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace.


12A


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. . ....v., - - t r :. -. :.. . .


14,1.























WITH TUFFLEY
Christopher Tuffley


Piled higher

and getting

deeper
In the 11 months I've been
writing the Tuffin' It With
Tuffley feature, my visit to the
county's solid waste manage-
ment site was the first assign-
ment I couldn't cover in a sin-
gle column and story.
This is because the landfill
is a complicated engineering
marvel, which uses technology
and nature to create a self-con-
tained system. Learning about
it can teach us things about
ourselves.
For instance, I was stunned
to see firsthand how much
garbage we produce.
I shouldn't have been so
surprised.
After all, last November I
had ridden with a sanitation
crew in Avon Park. I know
how heavy those garbage cans
are, and how many of them
line the streets on mornings
designated for pickup.
Still, it's one thing to empty
a few garbage cans, entirely
another to stand on top of a
hill created by emptying hun-
dreds of thousands of garbage
cans.
And that figure is conserva-
tive.
Take the city of Avon Park
for example. The average
house puts out two trash cans
twice a week. That means 16
cans a month, or 192, a year: ;,
See PILED, page 15A


PGEp -OA S U ,-- L 3,


Solid Waste Management Workers -



How workers build 'The Beast'


By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY
News-Sun
SEBRING - The county's solid
waste management site, at 12700
Arbuckle Creek Road, is self-contained
and divided into cells.
Cells are large rectangular plots,
which are subdivided into thirds, each
section separated by impermeable
berms.
This is done because water, which fil-
ters through garbage, is called leachate.
This is a product which can poison the
water table. By leaving sections free
from all trash, the rain water collected in
unused sections remains clean and does-
n't have to be treated.
The landfill also is divided into differ-
ent dumping sites. This is because some
types of garbage decompose quicker
than others, and some types of trash are
cleaner than others.
A separate section is reserved for
bricks and concrete blocks, for example,
because they can be broken up and recy-
cled. They're used to build roads within
the landfill.
Tires and roofing shingles are collect-
ed in a huge piles of their own. The shin-
gle pile is so large because a three-year's
amount was delivered in the six months
following the last hurricane. Tires and
shingles also are shredded and used in
the making of landfill roads.
There is a section for yard waste
which is mulched, mixed with dirt and
used in layers two feet thick on top of the
Class I site. That provides stability for
vehicles, and holds down the smell of
the rotting garbage.
Another section is set aside to collect
the hazardous materials some people
mistakenly bring in. Those materials are
tightly monitored by the state's
Department of Environmental
Protection, and have to be disposed of
according to strict provisions.
The largest section, in Cell 3, is called
'a Class I site. It requires the most moni-
toring and care, because it receives, the
nastiest stuff, and toxins run off it.


CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY/News-Sun
A Highlands County Solid Waste Management worker runs the compactor in one of
the sub-cells at the county landfill.


For that reason, it costs the most to
dump there. In the months following the
hurricane season, it rose by 12 feet.
All of the dump sites are closely mon-
itored, every load inspected, and there


are stiff penalties for cheaters who try to
unload prohibited materials at a less
expensive site.
This is because the landfill has to be
carefully balanced, and things like tires,


aluminum cans and dry wall are com-
pletely separated out.
Dry wall produces hydrogen sulfide,
which is noxious, so it can only be
dumped at the Class 1 site.
All of the cells sit on several layers of
protective membranes, some made of
synthetic material, others comprised of
sand or clay. All serve to protect the
water table, and make the landfill self-
contained.
Permeated pipes run throughout the
entire system. They pump water out or
in, and also are used to collect methane
gas with a vacuuming effect. There are
monitoring tubes so water levels can be
checked.
Water is an essential part of the
decomposition process, but it has to be
carefully balanced. That's because heat
is an essential ingredient, one that occurs
naturally. Too much water can cool the
growing mountain, and slow the process
of decay.
Currently the methane gas, a natural
by-product of decomposition, is burned
off. As fossil fuel costs rise, however, it
becomes more attractive to harvest and
sell.
According to Dick Gorman, landfill
operations manager, feasibility studies
have already been done, and in the future
the methane may be sold for use as an
energy source.
Because of the heat, and the presence
of methane gas, fire is an ever present
hazard. One fire, which began in the
construction section on Nov. 20, wasn't
completely out until Dec. 28.
Lightning also id a serious problem,
its presence within 10 miles is enough to
shut down the operation.
One reason the landfill's mountain is
called The Beast is because it's always
moving - side to side as garbage is
delivered and spread, and up and down
as garbage and compresses.
The Beast, therefore, is built in steps

See BEAST, page 15A


/,




..." "---; ." I l11
4..
^ .-^ ' . . 91.*';


.7


K1


CAt; 1-17/


~yii'i �


90


InLlS] C [o



yr)1 A


To qualify (or all aspects of this promo.
lion. you must have your Home Equity Loan
application In process by 8; 11,05 - no exceptions The
approval of a Home Equity ULne of Credit account is subjcrt
S applcaton, credit and acceptable property (property must be
primary residence) No appraisal cost is based on the acceptance
an online appraisal A $5 savings isharei account is required for mi
wtlh MiDFLORIDA Federal Credi Union The Introductory Annual Pe
IAPR) is as low as 3 99% for the first six months Beginning with the s
variable APR is as low as Pnme .0 whih is currently 6% as of 5i12.'05 In
vary based on your creditt and are Indexed in the Prime Rate as published I


Geta

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* PLUS get an IPMd shuffle with your new loan! b Adjusts to Prime





What A Bank Should Be
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membership loan amount S500.000 This offer available lor owner -ccupled properly only and ekdudes
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event month. MIDFLORIDA loans To qualify for the free gilt of either a Kodak digital camera or IPod shuffle, you will
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Ibi~


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a, g +


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.-.(..-) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^F


NEWS-SUN + SEBRING, FLA.


PAGE 13A + ,SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005


^*^^a-dif


K a~nd ~thc� ho~


Faf











News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


,-.- -" - .yj-- �11,000




- - 9,000

-8,000

I i i 7,000
J A S O N D J FM A M J J A


Nasdaq 2,500

composite
For the week ending -2,000
Friday,July29 , . , .
-1,500


2,184.83
Record high: 5,048.62 I0 i i 1,00
March 10, 2000 J A SO N D J FM A M J J A


Standard & 1,300

Poor's 500 1,100
For the week ending. -1 100"


" " -900

1,234.18
Record high: 1,527.46 I I I i i I I I i 700
March 24,2000 J A S O N D J FM A M J J A

- " r .s ... " .. . - - . "''i .."


MosI Ac (1 c mowEl
Name Vo Last Chg
Lucent 1774599 2.93 +.08
Motorola 1605248 21.18 +1.18
TimeWam 1395318 17.02 +.38
Pfizer 1102786 26.50
Cigrp 916069 43.50 -.48

Gars S2 or ffrel
Name Vol Last Chg
HangrOrth 7.79 +2.05 +35.7
Ducomun 22.02 +4.15 +23.2
SturmR 11.19 +2.10 +23.1
Microfnd 4.74 +.75 +18.8
VidSanNig 19.60 +3.00 +18.1

Loos(S2o famore)
Name Vol Last Chg
Prestigen 11.25 -8.35 -42.6
IntPoly 7.95 -2.75 -25.7
Wellmn 8.34 -224 -21.2
Spect8rds 31.00 -7.46 -19.4
ParPharm 23.42 -5.59 -19.3

Diary


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


2,112
1,374
682
65
3,576
90
9,660,839,702


MostAielS'(l r morul
Name Vol Last Chg
SPDR 2491983123.74 +20
iShRs2000 s116195267.89 +.57
IvaxCps 1104877 25.48 +2.60
SemiHTr 986427 37.36 +.16
SP Engy 543242 47.60 +21

Gners uIVorTpjrul
Name Vol Last Chg
IntriCon t 5.85 +3.45+143.8
ImpltScwt 2.70 +1.00 +58.8
TGC Inds n 10.90 +3.85 +54.6
IMI Intg 2.66 +.87 +48.6
NaMis 7.16 +221 +44.7

LrI.n(52 ormorw)
Name Vol Last Crg
CoreMold 8.02 -3.28 -29.0
RaeSyst 328 -.88 -21.2
IntlgSys 220 -.42 -16.0
DHB Inds 7.61 -1.43 -15.8
Crystallx g 2.76 -.48 -14.8

Diary

Advanced 673
Declined 405
New Highs 212
New Lows 39
Total issues 1,134
Unchanged 56
Volume 1,339,617,836


Mos Active IS I A more)
Name Vol Last Chg
Nasd100Tr3445009 39.58 +.16
Microsoft 2611056 25.61 -.07
Intel 2462345 27.14 +.39
SunMicro 2280367 3.84 -.04
Cisco 2212544 19.15 -.17

CUers & u rI' T-r
Name Vol Last Chg
i2Techn 21.43 +10.42 +94.6
StaarSur 5.28 +2.13 +67.6
SimaThera 4.25 +1.62 +61.7
MDSIg 7.85 +2.94 +59.9
FrghtCarn 32.06 +9.31 +40.9

LaS9roD4sliV Xo'ei
NfJuie V.j Ljai Cr.)

GrWIfResn 13.59 -8.74 -39.1
Genitope 7.95 -4.49 -36.1
PxIwrks 7.71 -3.99 -34.1
InfoSpce 24.14 -10.36 -30.0
Catuityrs 12.41 -4.98 -28.6


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


1,791
1,509
484
66
3,371
71
1,339,617,836


52-Week FriNet Net YTD
High Low Name Last Chg Chg % Chg % Chg

DOMESTIC
10,984.46 9,708.40 Dow Jones Industrials 10,640.91 -64.64 -64.64 -1.32 -10.27
3,889.97 2,959.58 DowJonesTransportation 3,799.95 -17.11 -17.11 +.05 +19.92
400.17 274.84 Dow Jones Utilities. 397.29 +.03 +.03 +18'.61 +4.37
7,529.01 6,215.97 NYSE Composite 7,476.66 -40.12 -40.12 +3.13 +29.50
6,111.97 5,407.27 US 100 . 6,008.54 -49.99 -49.99 +.19 9.06
10,059.86 6,714,08 NYSE Energy 9,716.36 -61.89 -61.89 +22.46 +49.60
7,523.43 6,401.23 NYSE Finance 7,411.51 -57.46 -57.46 -1.10 -20.54
6,491.87 5,493.49 NYSE Healthcare 6,390.99 -20.42 -20.42 +4.44 +86.92
1,610.22 1,186.14 AMEXIndex 1,604.63 +19.22 +19.22 +11.87 +58.09
336.08 244.65 AMEX Industrials 336.08 +8.64 +8.64 +13.41 +21.93
2,201.39 1,750.82 Nasdaq Composite 2,184.83 -13.61 -13.61 +.43 +5.09
1,245.15 1,060.72 S&P 500 1,234.18 -9.54 -9.54 +1.84 +.50
723.68 548.29 S&P MidCap - 720.38 -1.87 -1.87 +8.60 +4.67
684.81 515.90 Russell 2000 679.75 -3.29 -3.29 +4.32 +1.97
FOREIGN
4,892.50 3,658.11 Frankfurt -6 00 -6.00 +49.60 +1.03 +1.03
14,899.71 12,084.68 Honk Kong index +67.66 +67.66 +94.52 +.64 +.64
1,094.17 804.39 Madrid -2.15 -2.15 +8.92 +.82 +.82
14,409.66 9,790.62 Mexico +152.82 +152.82 +228.17 +1.61 +1.61
11,975.46 10,657.15 Nikkei225 +41.29 +41.29 +204.55 +1.75 +1.75
1,111.29 719.59 Milan +6.57 +6.57 +37.07 +3.45 +3.45
2,352.56 1,855.98 Singapore +6.37 +6.37 +33.22 +1.43 +1.43
4,347.60 3,480.70 Sydney +17.60 +17.60 +22.50 +.52 +.52
6,423.81 5,316.87 Taipei -63.66 -63.66 -68.75 -1.08 -1.08
10,516.23 8,132.34 Toronto -93.30 -93.30 +93.29 +.90 +.90
6,612.37 5,309.70 Zurich -11:49 -11.49 +108.36 +1.67 +1.67
3,359.27 2,728.38 New Zealand +2.35 +2.35 +43.05 +1.30 +1.30
25,818.00 19,833.00 Milan 46.00 -46.00 +135.00 +.53 +.53
863.84 649.36 Stockholm +.04 +.04 +11.32 +1.33 +1.33




Name High Low Last Chg. Name High Low Last Chg.
ORANGE JUICE SOYBEANS-MINI
15,000 Ibs.- cents per lb. 1,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Sep 05 99.30 96.20 97.90 -.30 Aug 05 695 660o 671fl +2o
Nov05 101.50 98.50 100.90 +.60 Sep05 701 664o 677 +3fl
Jan 06 103.30 100.95 102.40 +.70 Nov05 710 671 686fl +70
Fri's sales 18455 Fri's sales 10265
Fri's open int 31718, up 25 Fri's open int 17181, off 1682
CATTLE CORN
40,000 I1s.- cents per lb. 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Aug 05 81.30 78.35 81.20 +1.95 Sep 05 243 2271f 236o +3
Oct 05 83.50 80.80 83.40 +1.95 Dec 05 2540 238a 2480 +3o
Dec 05 85.55 83.25 85.47 +1.82 Mar 06 261 245fl 2550 +3fl
Fri's sales 131532 Fri's sales 693629
Fri's open int 137808, off 2610 Fri's open int 742374, up 6331
FEEDER CATTLE COFFEE C
50,000 Ibs.- cents per lb. 37,500 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Aug 05 109.40 106.62 109.22 +1.57 Sep 05 104.50 97.00 103.15 +3.70
Sep05 107.75 104.95 107.45 +1.70 Dec05 108.10 101.30 107.65 +3.80
Oct05 106.70 103.85 106.67 +2.15 Mar 06 1,11.35 105.50 111.35 +3.85
Fri's sales 25290 Fri's sales 70017
Fri's open int 23487, off 595 Fri's open int 92861, off 1225
LUMBER SUGAR-WORLD 11
110,000 bd. ft.- $ per 1,000 bd. ft. 112,000 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Sep 05 324.9 302.9 302.9 -20.4 Oct 05 9.99 9.76 9.83 +.13
Nov 05 317.4 293.0 300.0 -15.5 Mar 06 9.92 9.76 9.81 +.08
Jan 06 320.5 305.0 308.0 -14.4- May 06 9.62 9.49 9.57 +.10
Fri's sales 3384 Fri's sales 187441
Fri's open int 3590, up 388 Fri's open int 435023, up 23395


The Dow this week

Daily high, low and close for
the week ending July 29
10,720





10600 L .









10,560 ........ ............... ....
M T W Th F
Week'sclose:
10,640.91


Nasdaq .

2,184.83

S&P 500 ^ .

1,234.18


Russell 2000 t
679.75


AMEX .
1,604.63


NYSE
7,476.66

AP


Stock Exch 52week PE Last Chg
High Low
AutoZone N 99.56 97.25 14.00 97.44 -17.00
CSX N 45.88 45.11 11.00 45.54 -.10
Citigrp N 44.50 43.50 11.00 43.50 -4.80
CocaBtl 0 53.40 52.61 24.00 52.61. -5.90
Dillards N 23.25 22.81 19.00 22.86 -7.90
Disney N 25.98 25.63 21.00 25.64 -1.90
ExxonMbl N 60.17 58.75 13.00 58.75 -7.50
FPLGps N 43.24 42.91 19.00 43.12 -1.00
FlaPUtil s A 15.05 14.76 20.00 14.99 -.63
FlaRock s N 56.07 54.55 27.00 54.89 +24.90
GenElec N 34.92 34.44 20.00 34.50 -5.70
GnMotr N 37.57 36.80 ... 36.82 +5.70
HomeDp N 43.90 43.25 19.00 43.51 +.40
HuntBnk 0 25.34 24.85 15.00 24.94 -3.60
Intel 0 27.34 27.14 19.00 27.14 +3.90
LennarA N 68.04 67.07 11.00 67.27 +8.70
LockhdM N 63.14 62.28 19.00 62.40 +4.00
McDnlds N 31.18 30.50 16.00 31.17 +2.30
NY Times N 31.84 31.32 14.00 31.52 -2.70
OffcDpt N 28.45 28.15 25.00 28.38 +3.20
OutbkStk N 46.69 46.20 23.00 46.58 +10.50
Penney N 57.20 56.10 25.00 56.14 -14.40
PepsiCo N 55.16 54.52 22.00 54.53 -3.00
ProgrssEn N 44.84 44.40 19.00 44.61 +1.60
SpmtFON N 27.05 26.31 ... 26.90 +16.20
SunTrst N 73.98 72.66 14.00 72.72 -24.60
TECO N 19.13 18.86 ... 18.96
WalMart N 49.99 49.33 20.00 49.35 -1.90
Wendys N 52.07 49.82 ... 51.70 +61.30
Wrigley N 7218 71 04 3000 71 14+41630


Dow Jones

industrials
For the week ending
Friday, July 29



10,640.91'
Record high: 11,722.98
Jan.14,2000


I THIS WEEK ON WALL STREET [


4 Ik t o Us


Heartland
National Bank


,-\[ Heartland National Bink. we

ans\\er .our phone calls personally...


No computer operator, and 'ou

don't need a code number to gec

help.


[ uP Ic a EIsorg sI


Avon Park
930 US 27 South 33825
18631 453-6w J1J
rax i.I f 4c3.5a

Sebring
320 US 27 North 3387fl
1863)386-13.00
Fau 18j 38-I13M2

Sebring
6011 US 27 North
1i863) 386-1322
Fa fltsJy 38's-0891


Lake Placid
601L US 27 North 33852
t86311699-1300

Banking Hours
S t .- 4 p~ , Mu~a Ib- TUrid
9am.6 ipm.FridW.v
DriN-ln Hours
I sn � 6 p. Monday - Faida)
8 am - N on, Satmurdys



IW I i 1al I.. byOS as,
Assets %R %IM Priace Puoch
AARP Invst:
GNA0 3,043 +35 +4.40 14.96 1496
Grnc 2,544 +11.4 +1420 2254 22.54
AIM Investments A:
BasicVAp 4,127 +13.9 +1520 33.43 33.43
Coomsp 4,08 +110 +1420 2343 23.43
MdCpCEq 2,686 +15.4 +17.00 30.47 30.47
PemEqty 3,638 +9.0 +1250 10,12 10.12
SunWlI 2,186 +142 +1950 11.45 11.45
AIM Investor Cl:
DyrIM n 1.946 +17.9 +25.20 17.71 1771
AMF Funds:
AdjMilgn 2.819 +1.7 +1.80 972 9.72
AllianceBemr A:
GiolnsAp 2,741 NA NA 380 390
AllianceBem B:
GrIncBp 1,943 NA NA 3.73 3.73
Allianz Funds A:
Rerana 1,906 +17.3 +680 24.93 24.93
Amer Century Inv:
Eqlncon 3,657 +141 +12.20 825 825
Growt n 4,059 +106+13.90 2017 20.17
IncGon 3,760 +14.9 +15.80 31.74 31.74
InrdtGrtoln 2235 +11.4 +2020 921 921
SelIn 3,460 +9.5 +9.10 3834 38.34
USran 19,755 +9.9 +1190 29.60 29.60
Valuelnyn 2,315 +15.0 +13.80 760 7.60
Vistan 1,933 +17.0+21.30 15.32 15.32
Amer Express A:
DEI 3,261 +204 +2320 11.73 11.73
Growth 2,030 +112 +19.70 2834 2534
HliieWi 3,696 +42 +5.60 4.45 1 4.45
NewD 6,879 +72 +7.90 23.99 23.99
Amer Express B:
NewDl 2,025 +6.4 +7.10 22.64 2264
Amer Express Y:
Ne0n0 2,548 +7.3 +8.10 24.12 24.12
American Funds A:
AnoapFAp 14,062 +13.7 +14.10 1081 1881
.AmMurAp 13,535 +2.1 +12.40 27.18 27.16
BadAp 31,543 +12.0 +9.50 18.17 18.17
BondFdAp 17,014 +9.1 +6.00 13.42 13.42
CaplnBIAp 38,603 +14.7 +17.60 532.4 53.48
CapWGrAp 32,405 +21.1 +2330 35.02 35.02
EupacAp 37,382 +17.9 +24.30 37.47 3747
FundlnvAp 21,600 +162 +19.70 3384 33.84
Gw0hFdAp 83,202 +17.1 +19.60 29.22 2922
HITrstAp 7,257 +18.1 +11.10 1245 1245
IncoFOAp 45,953 +14.5 +14.30 18.70 18.70
IrnBdAp 3,154 +27 +2.40 1354 13,54
InvCoAAp 84,225 +13.1 +14.00 31.61 31.61
NwEcOwAp 6,659 +17.0 +1900 21,76 2176
NewPerAp 32,764 +17.0 +1.30 2826 2826
NeWol0dA 3,378 +24.2 +32.10 35.42 35.42
SrnCpWAp 11,438 +212 +28.20 33.58 33.58
TaxExplAp 3.473 +4.9 +6.10 12.52 12.52
WshMutAp 62,402 +12.1 +11.80 31.39 31.39
American Funds B:
BalanBt 5,074 +11.1 +6.60 18.11 18.11
CapInIldBt 3,186 +13.9 +16.70 5346 53.48
Growth 5,736 +162 +18.70 28 28 2828
InomreBI 4.,041 +13.6 +13.50 18.61 18.61
ICAB 3,687 +1 +122+13.10 31.47 31.47
WashBI 2,964 +11.3 +11.00 31.22 31.22
Ariel Mutual Fds:
Apprec 3,314 +14.4 +17.90 4924 49.24
Aiel n 4,807 +17.1 +20.0 55.64 55.64
Artisan Funds:
Inl 6,990 +12.3 +20.10 22.56 22.56
MidCap 4,921 +16.2 +20.80 3067 30.67
MidCapVal 1,972 +27.6 +32.40 19.37 19.37
Baron Funds:
Asset n 2,509 +16.0 +31.10 56.03 56.83
Gniolh 4,905 +196+3120 48.03 4803
SmlCap 2,716 +19.9 +30.10 23.97 23.97
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 3,256 +5.6 +5.30 1331 13.31
DMun 2,866 +3.2 +320 14.10 14.10
TxMgdlnllVi 5,358 +.17.4 +2070 2297 2297
IntVaI2 2,462 +18.0 +20.60 21.57 21.57
Brandywine Fds:
Brandy4Wnen3,723 +15.1 +3000 3005 3005
Buffalo Funds:
SnlC0ap 1,868 +258 +28.00 29.23 2923
Calamos Funds:
GrthilncAp 2,640 +13.9 +14.00 30.43 30.43
GrowIhAp 10,869 +17.8 +2070 53.78 5378
GioyhCIt 3,215 +169 +19.80 51.60 51.60
Calvert Group:
Incopx 2,778 +8 +6.000 17.06 17.06
Causeway Intl:
Institnal 2,336 +21.0 +20.90 1650 1650
Clqper 6,687 +7.3 +6.10 88.81 88.81
Cohen & Steers:
OlyShrsn 2,333 +29.4 .47.50 7893 7893
Columbia Class A:
Acoml 2,850 +24.3 +2730 27-60 276
Columbia Class Z:
AmmZ 9,183 +24.8 +27.60 2829 2829
AcmlnnlZ 2,084 +250 +33.80 31.19 31.19
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 16,882 +15.0 +16.40 32.13 3213


Quick and Eas3 MNorigage Lo:
Available

15 \ear/30() ear li\ed rate morig

Construction/Permanenit program

Home Equitl Credit Line,,

Home Equitl Term Loans,

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M iNM.hearllandnb.com





S Heartland
National Bank
I -F |, ,,r 1,-..l triL I t- J (0..,liriinii C ih.I A
F E *,--.at- I//..i Hcia',o1i.J C, ,i.,r.



an i" ITru i., nfe,uw a, eM r, m iu IT
Assets %0l05 %l Prae Puh as % te 1
Davis Funds B: SmaiCapSnr4,136 +20.1 +
NYVenB 5,203 +141 +1550 30.69 30.69 Stralncn 3,822 +13.1 +
Davis Funds C & Y: USIr1 5,747 +56
NYVenY 2,212 +154 +16.80 32.53 3253 Valuen 11,908 +20.9 +2
NYVenC 4,812 +14.1 +15,50 3.89 3089 Fidelity Selects:
Dimensional Fds: eal1 n 2,708 +126 +
IntSrnVan 3,348 +332 +3460 16.06 1666 Heai1n 2,139 .133 9
USLgVan 3,357 +18.1 2490 21.58 21.5 Techn 1,862 +17.8 +
US Mro 3,544 +24.7+2620 15.80 15080 Fidelity Spartan:
USSnaIn 2,396 22.3 +2550 20.62 2062 EqutIndxin 21,688 +13.0 +
USSnVal 6,394 269 +27.80 287 28.76 5001ndxnr 12,473 +13.0 +
IntlSmcon 2,149 +282 +2870 1520 15.20 IntrMunin 1,881 4.5
Fdn 2,070 .17 +170 10.15 10.15 InvGi6n 2,713 +.2
IOtVan 1,973 +235 +2670 16.68 1668 MurAnlon 4,721 +5.7
TMUSSmV 2,250 +24.2 +27.70 25.33 2533 TotMklid 3,043 +14.7 +
2YGIFxdn 1,857 +1.8 +1.50 9.87 987 First Amer Fds Y:
Dodge&Cox: Eqldxl p 1,912 +12.8 +
Balancedn 22,490 +14.5 +14.40 80.83 80,83 First Eagle:
IrmeFd 8,967 +5.8 +5.00 12.77 1277 Globa 8,795 +22.5 +
IntlStk 8231 251 +28.90 3208 32.08 OversesA 4,514 +24.9 +�
Stock 46,346 +164 +21.00 13416134.16 Frank/Temp FmnkA:
Dreyfus: AGEAp 2,275 NA
Aprec 4,490 42 +90.60 3983 39.83 Batllrp 4,130 +19.2 +2
DreyMdlr 1,953 +187 +25.40 28.54 28.54 alTFrAp 12.558 +5.7
DreySInt 3.23 +12.6 +1.370 36.19 3619 FedaxFoAp 6,382 +5.7
MunBdr 2,089 +4.7 +7.20 11.93 11.93 FIRlDApx 1,967 NA
Eaton Vance Cl A: FoundFAlp 2,794 NS +
NatSMun 2,011 +8.7 +1150 11.38 11.38 HYTFAp 4,912 +7.1 +
Evergreen A: Ino)SerAp 19,975 NA
AstAlp 2,17 6 +135 +15.50 14.01 14.01 NYTFAp 4,504 +5.2+
Evergreen C: SMufA 695 +18.11+
AslAIoCt 2279 NS+14.90 1361 13.61 USGovAp 6,045 +3.4
Evergreen I: FrankdTmp FmnkAd,
Coreldl 3,655 +5.2 +5.10 10.60 10.60 IncomreAdv 1,911 NA
Adj9atel 1,949 +2.3 +2.20 930 930 FrankiTemp Frnk B:
Excelsior Funds: IoomSIt 3,.972 NA
Retrn 4,684 +22.3+2590 4524 45.24 Frank/Temp Fmk C:
FPA Funds: IfoonreCt 9,217 NA
CapI 1,856 +22.3 +21.70 44.33 44.33 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B
Newlnc 2,005 +38 +70 10.97 1097 iscovA 2,602 +17.7 +
Federated A: SharesA 3,331 +14.0 +
CapAppA 2,415 +91 +10.40 25.66 25.66 Frank/TempTemp A
KaulmAp 2,041 +194 +2350 563 563 DevMktAp 2,587 +29.5 +
Federated Instl: ForeignAp 14,967 +153 +
Kaulman 3,797 +195 +2350 564 564 GrowthAp 19,842 +15.3 +
Fidelity Advisor A: WoidAp 7,65 +160 +
DiwlnllAr 2,197 +19.5+23.60 19.38 1938 FrankrTemp Tmp Ac
Fidelity Advisor I: Grtv 2,030 +15 6 +
Divlnlln 1,927 +199+24.00 19.62 19.62 FrankrTemp Tmp B&
Fidelity Advisor T: GrwhCp 1,848 +144 +
DivntlTp 2,045 +192 +23.30 19.22 19.22 GE Eifun S&S:
DivGlhTp 2,511 +10.1 +930 1183 11.83 S&S income n2,591 +5.1
EqGrTp 4,151 +10.0 +11,90 496 46.9 6 SISPMn 4,021 +10.7 +
EqInT 3,026 +13.8 +1390'29,24 2924 Trustsn 2,.317 +9.9 +
G0Op1T 3,214 +11.6 +1320 3120 31.20 GMO Trust IIl:
MidapTp 4,078 +20.8 +24.20 2564 25.64 EmgMkr 4,281 +34.9 +
Fidelity Freedom: Forein 3,793 +188 +
FF2010n 9,056 +9.7 +10.80 1390 13.90 InIGrwth 2,128 +17.2 +
FF2O20n 10,548 +12., +14.50 14.35 14.35 ntllntrVal 2,029 +21.7 +
FF2030n 6246 +138+1610 1454 1.54 GMO Trust IV:
FF2040n 2,381 +14.6 +1720 8.54 8.54 EmerMki 3,028 +347 +
InomneFdn 2,009 +5.1 +6.00 1138 11.38 IlntrWVal 2,324 +21,8 +
Fidelity Invest: GMO Trust VI:
AggrGrr 4414 +16.0 +17.70 17.19 17.19 EmgMkVIr 2,032 NS +
AMgr 10.413 +95 +830 1628 1628 USCo1eVI 1,976 NS +
AMgiGrn 3.443 +10.9 +960 14.99 14.99 Gabelll Funds:
Baelc 13,834 +154 +18.30 18.73 18.73 Asset 2,247 +17.6 +
BlueChipGr 22,029 +9.7 +11.30 4260 42.60 Gateway Funds:
CapAppn 6526 +195 +17.70 26.70 2670 Gateway 2,474 +86
Caplnconr 5,179 +24.9 +1570 851 8.51 Goldman Sachs A:
Contran 49,403 +16.1 +2280 6120 61.20 HYMuniAp 1,968 +7.6 +
Deslnyln 2,932 +10.4 +1530 1342 13.42 MiCapVAp 2,431 +20.1 +
Destnyll 4,844 +10.6 +10.90 11.75 11.75 Goldman Sachs Ins
DisEqn 5,492 +14.0 +2070 27.04 27.04 HYMuni 2,323 +80 +
iverlntln 26,251 +203 +24.40 29.64 29.84 Harbor Funds:
(D) thn 17,10 +10.9 +1000 2865 2885 Bond 1,843 +6.5
Equtlncn 25,958 +13.3 +1320 53.07 5307 CapApplns n 6,590 +12.4 +
EQII 12,151 +14.8 +13.70 2427 24.27 Intlnr 8,954 +209 +
Europe n 2,448 +25.2 +3950 3705 37.05 Hartford Fds A:
Exportn 2,776 +193 +2200 21.15 21.15 CapAppAp 5358 +208 +
FkdelFd 10,234 +11.9+12.20 3069 30.69 DG Ap 2073 +12.4 +
PRaleHir 2,356 NS +4.50 997 Hartford HLS IA:
GNMAn 4,056 +3.7 +4.40 11.00 1100 Boid 3,010 +.4
Gov0lcn 5,055 +4.1 +4.70 1020 10.20 CapApp 10,240 +224 +
GroCon 24,262 17.4+21.90 5855 555 &Gh 4,71 13.1 +
Grolnc 31,029 +9.1 +11.30 388.42 342 Asers 8,76 2 +.4
H4ghlncm 3128 +164 +10.10 893 8.93 Smck 5,163 + 106 +
Indepndncen4,394 +11.9 +19.50 1860 18+60 Hartford HLSIB:
InlOn 7,420 +49 +360 10.37 1037 u
Inl0Oisc 3239 +19.1 +2530 29.40 29.40 Apmcp i2,510 21 :
InflSrCap 1,981 NS +3800 2594 25.94 Hochkis & Wiley:
lnr6Bn 6,980 +5.9 +560 7.45 745 LgCapVaAp 2,414 .+23.3 +
LevCoStock 3,033 +551 +3470 2548 25.48 MiCpVl 2244 +296 +
LowPrm 36,205 +205 +2560 4268 4268 JPMorganAClass:
Magellan n 54,84 +10.7+12.60 1063 10635 MdCpValp 2,37 8 +21.3 +
MedCapn 8,701 +159 +2510 2542 2542 JPMorgan Select:
MIgeSecn 1,856 +43 +460 11.17 11.17 nEgq 2,479 +151 +
NewMlln 3,167 +124 +1540 3221 3221 JPMorgan Sel Cis:
OTC 7,685 +155 +2010 35.99 3599 CnOeondx 2,764 +4.9
Ovisean 4557 +15.4 +2120 36.17 36.17 Janus:
Purlan 23,075 +11.5 +1070 19.13 19.13 Balanin 2,660 +8.8 +
RealEstn 5275 +271 +4550 3368 3368 Conianan 2.653 +23.2 +
STRFn 4951 37 440a 890 890 Fundn 11.786 +t104


.1, U EtA " O C~ 0na '.. aL O'


MUTUAL FuwDs S-: .: -:


.'me SftL)S UsW

1920 18.46 18.46
1140 10.58 10.58
+520 11.02 11.02
27.10 78.40 7840
25.60 42.65 42.65
3220 142.82 14282
18.00 62.02 6202
14.10 43.72 43.72
14.10 8528 8528
+4.80 10.06 10.06
+5.70 10.61 10.61
+720 13.05 13.00
1720 34.34 3434
13.80 23.09 23.09

21.00 41.17 41.17
23.90 2325 2325

NA 2.14 2.14
+27.0 6326 63.26
+9.30 7.38 7.38
+8.10 1224 1224
NA 10.13 10.13
16580 1263 12.63
10.40 10.95 1095
NA 2.54 254
+7.10 11.96 11.96
24.0 3629 3629
+4.10 6.56 6.56
V:
NA 2.53 2.53
NA '2.53 2.53

NA 255 255
9:
25.30 25.83 2583
17.70 24.03 24.03

41.90 20.61 20.61
21.50 12.63 12.63
1870 23.47 23.47
2390 18.76 18.76
Iv:
19,00 23.51 23.51
MC:
17.80 22.92 22.92

+4.90 11.41 11.41
1220 46.21 46.21
12.10 55.49 55.49

5420 18.08 1888
20.70 14.72 14.72
23.60 2695 26.95
23.40 2885 2885
5430 18.84 1884
23.50 28.84 28.84
54.30 1885 18.85
15.30 14.58 14.58
22.30 43.71 4371

+820 2508 25.08
11.30111.28 1128
2900 3699 36.99
t:
1170 1128 1128
+620 1163 11.83
19.70 30.50 30.50
22.60 44.65 44.65

20.60 3559 35.59
14.60 1927 1927
+6.10 11.74 11.74
21.70 54.12 54.12
150 21.06 21.06
+.70 23.54 23.54
10.80 47.36 47.36

21.40 5384 534
2450 2404 2404
3070 2997 29.97
22.90 2387 23.87

1950 3000 3000
+460 1074 10.74
1290 21.88 21.88
31.10 1401 14.01
10.50 2494 2494


Call Today!! tN e



863-385-6155 N clP
"The Local Paper"


Asse %Rm %0Rn Pien Purchi
Grthlncn 5,379 +12.4 +20.50 3376 33.76
Meriuyn 4,401 +14.3 +16.00 21.84 21.84
MidCapV0 4,016 +204 +21.50 23.77 23.77
Olympsn 2211 +130 +2090 30.58 3056
Oveseasrm 2,181 +18 +33.36 2628 2626
Twmty 9,399 +16.6 +2450 46.33 46.33
WddWnr 5,454 +7.4 +11.30 4129 4129
JennisonDryden A:
urA 3,069 +31.9 +45,10 14.02 14.02
Jensen 2,674 +6.4 +6.90 24.11 2411
John Hancock A:
ClassicVap 2,024 +19 +16.50 23.96 23.96
Julius Baer Funds:
InEqr 7,051 +21.3 +28.50 33.59 33.59
IniEqA 6236 +208+28.10 32.97 3297
Legg Mason: Fd
Opp(lTrl 3,394 +28.7 +25.10 16.43 1643
Splnvnp 3,404 +24.8 +22.906 4821 4421
ValTrp 11,301 +19.8 +19.40 66.32 66.32
Laegg Mason Instl:
ai1a 4,932 +21.0 +20.60 72.70 72.70
Longleaf Partners:
Paomte 8,608 +12.0 +8.70 31.60 31.60
lIn 2,527 +14.0 +10.60 1620 1620
SmCap 2,680 +17.4 +2020 31.81 31.81
Loomis Sayles:
LSBonrl 3,079 +18.0 +13.80 13.75 13.75
Lord Abbett A:
AsirtdAp 14,608 +132 +12.70 14.68 1468
BoiDebAp 4,971 +119 +.50 799 7.99
M4Cap~p 6.98 +18.5 +24.70 23.6 2 23.62
MFS Funds A:
MITAp 3253 +114 +17.00 1791 17.91
MIGAp 4,906 +9.4 +15.50 12.66 12.66
EmGrAp 23 +13.6 +20.90 33.08 33.06
TonAp 72256 +10.8 +12.90 16.19 16.19
VlueAp 4,405 +13.9 +18.00 23.98 2398
MFS Funds B:
MIGB 2,076 +8.7 +14.70 11.60 1160
ToRBI 2,784 +10.1 +12.10 16.19 16.19
MainStay Funds B:
,HiY0BBtx 2,593 +18.6 +1070 8.36 636
Mairs & Power:
Gre tn 2,379 +15.3 +14.40 7222 7222
Managers Funds:
SpdEq 3,140 +182 +21.00 93.15 93.15
Marsico Funds:
Focusp 3,435 +12.6+2220 1714 17.14
Growp 1,950 +13.9 +20.60 18.15 18.15
Meridian Funds:
Value 2272 +18.1 +180 39.53 3953
Merrill Lynch A:
BasValAp 2249 +14.0+12.60 3224 3224
GbALAp 4,125 +18.5 +16.10 1689 1689
Merrill Lynch B:
GIAIBI 2.111 +17.6 +15.20 1657 16.57
Merrill Lynch C:
GlobAK1 2,442 +176 +15.10 1610 16.10
Merrill Lynch I:
BasVall .3,991 +14.3 +12.90 32.41 32.41
GAIIt 2,362 +188 +16.40 16.93 1693
Morgan Stanley A:
D0Gift 3,559 +9.B +1120 35.57 3557
US GA 1,942 +.9 +5.40 9.14 9.14
MorganStanley Inst:
CPlF.In 2,133 +5. +6.70 11.65 1165
InlEqn 6,902 +16.7 +18.70 21.14 21.14
Muhlenrnpn 2,685 +25.4 +3300 86.33 8633
Mutual Series:
BeacoZ 3,364 +15.6 +1920 16.67 16.67
DiscZ 2,735 +18.1 +25.70 2608 26.08
QuslidZ 3,481 +163+23.00 20.55 20.55
ShasesZ 7,945 +144 +1810 24.19 2419
Nations Funds Pri A:
In IfPrAn 2,344 +208 +1970 22.050 2205
Neuberger&Beim Tr:
Geneisn 5,775 +21.8 +2800 48.13 48.13
Nicholas Group:
Nichd n 2,506 +13.3 +1940 62.47 62.47
Nuveen Cl R:
InrDueruBd2287 +4.4 +600 909 9.09
Oakmark Funds I:
EqMfIncf 8,449 A3.9 +1070 24.38 2438
InIlr 5,045 +187 +2420 2243 22.43
OWlotr 6,769 +11.0 +11.10 42.14 42.14
Sel r 5,879 +132 +13.00 34.51 34.51
Oppenheimer A:
CpAppp 5,579 +115 +10.30 41.84 41.84
CapIncAp 2,618 8+16.6 +1570 1265 1265
Dev Ap 3,432 +35.8 +5310 30.75 0.75
EqulyA 2,214 +134 +1920 11.41 1141
GeIAp 9,577 +194 +26.70 63.48 6348
GOdppA 1921 +253 +3440 3373 33.73
InSdAp 2294 +17.5 +17.70 589 589
MnSIFdA 7,703 +11.0+1300 36.43 3643
StincAp 4,466 +12.8 +11.50 4.31 4.31
Oppenheimer B:
S 2,058 +10.0 +12.10 3525 3525
Oppenheim Quest:
OBaA 3,346 +16.5 +10.50 1852 18.52
OBalan 2,.448 +156 +9.60 1821 1821
Oppenheimer Roch:
UdNYAp 2,398 +54 +8.50 3.38 338
RoMcuAp 5,384 +7.8 61350 1838 1838
RcNMtuA 2,117 +12.1 +22.30 12.69 12.69
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ToRelAn 18,207 +6.1 +600 10.69 10.69
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIIA.ls 4,505 NS +1450 13.07 13.07
Cmno RR 4,442 +27.1 +16.40 1595 1595
EmMkMsBd 1,B95 +236 +1980 1110 1110
HiY6n 3,360 +165 *+11.0 991 991
LowDurn 9,367 +33 +220 10.10 1010
ModDun 1,994 +6.1 +390 1023 1023
Reaaletrrsl 4,916 +8.6 +7.10 1131 1131
ShoIT 2,76 +2.9 +2.40 1002 10.02
ToRelin 50,786 +64 +620 1069 1069
TPII.R, ."2 . ., '' ain ii Inl


HrsuCIPU^^^^K~i l ~ TOP STOCK PERFORMERS ON'AMEX, NYS AND NASDAQ : - -


I - ... . . ..


." l . .. . .. .." , . .... ... . _ .. . "'.

N ieD i, %-no S r M e . 41 Am S I M
o 0t 0 tn %0I Prod Pudh As s 0B % Pricea PFinud
PIMCO Funds A: Tweedy Browne:
Co RpR32,064 NS +15X.0 1587 15.87 Glba 6,888 +163 +20.10 25.51 25.51
RoielAp 3,642 +8.1 +6.60 11.31 11.31 USAAGroup:
T10RIA 9,68 +5.9 +5.70 10.69 10.69 IncStn 2,025 +12.4 +17.00 17.36 1736
PIMCO Funds B: SOPldxn 2219 +12.8+1390 18.51 18.51
ToRtiB 1,937 +5.1 44.90 10.69 10.69 TxEIfn 2,778 +4.7 +5.50 1327 1327
PIMCO Funds C: TxELTn 2,374 +6.4 +7.70 1420 1420
RealRetCp 2,580 +7.5 +6.10 11.31 11.31 VanKampFundsA:
TotRCI 2,586 +5.1 +4.90.10.69 10.69 CQrAp 11,19 +17.0 +15.10 18.59 18.59
PIMCO Funds D: ErroAp 3234 +8.7 +16.30 40.03 40.03
To0Rinp 2,735 +6.0 +590 10.69 10.69 EqyncAp 8912 +13.0 +15.60 .1 81
Pioneer Funds A: GrnAp 6,304 +15.1 +19.40 21.15 21.15
KOYkiAp 2,856 1 14.1 +.30 11.41 11.41 HYMAp 3201 +7.5 +11.60 10M8 1098
MdCpVaAp 1,989 +20.9 +24.80 26.81 26.81 Van Kamp Funds B:
PionFdAp 5,403 +12.0 +16.60 43.39 43.39 Cmst1 2.583 +16.1 +1420 18.59 18.59
ValueAp 3,820 +13.6 +15.00 18.30 18,30 EqincBt 3,123 +122 +14.70 8.68 8.68
Pioneer Funds C: Vanguard Admiral:
HNYdCI 1,85 +13.3 +7.50 11.56 11.56 CpOpAdn 1,843 +23.8 +21.00 73.75 73.75
Price Funds Adv: 500Adrdn 24,314 +13.1 +1420 11390 11390
Eqtylncp 2,405 +14.5+15.30 2692 26.92 GNMAA n 6,185 +4.1 +5.00 1025 10.35
Price Funds: IC 0n 3,813 +15.3 +19.60 57.79 57.79
BaHan 2,429 +11.7 +13.10 19.80 19.80 IOpn 2,456 +11.4 +6.30 629 629
BueChOpn 7,315 +12.9 +14.40 31.71 31.71 F Admin 2,030 +5.4 +7.10 0 10.14
CapApn 6.353 +1623+1590 2036 20.36 iAlAn 5,824 +3.8 +4.50 13.43 13.43
Eqlmn 17,073 +14.6�+1520 26.97 2697 ITCoAd 1310 +6.4 +5.50 990 9.90
Eqldxn 5,118 +12.8+13.90 3321 3321 LtdrmAdr 3,740 +23 +1.80 10.76 10.76
Grcmdn 9,468 +14.1 +1650 27.50 27.50 Pnapr 4,716 18.1 +17.60 0 6 6 66.66
H1d n 3,268 +13.4+10.60 7.07 7.07 SNTaimA 2403 +1.7 +1.50 15.56 156
InlStin 4,914 +12.9 +19.40 13.13 13.13 STOIGrAdm 4.886 +3.7 +2.60 10.54 10.54
MitCapn 13.010 +20.1 +250 53.52 5352 1 AONn 3,045 +50 +5.10 10.16 10.1
MCapVW n 5.173 +20.9 +21.40 2413 24.13 ToStkdimn 12,762 +14.9 +1720 29.68 29.66
Ne an 2, +5 2+9.7 0 39.81 39.81 We 2 A n 2,134 +5 +9.70 52.73 52.73
Nyhzn 5,925 +24.8 +29.30 3234 3204 32o ne n 6.936 +11.9 + 13.90 5321 532!
tnncon 33171 +5 +8.600 9.07 9.07 V'dwAdm n4,896 + +15 +1690 6229 6229
STchn 3,437 +15.4+1680 19.60 1960 Wdsdn 7,706 +17.0+19.40 563 56.93
SErCap n 6,393 +17.8+22.70 3320 33.32 Vanguard Fds:
SrCapValn 4,453 +22.1 +26.00 38.14 38.14 AseiArn 9,743 +13.1 +1470 25.12 25.12
Speci 2,623 +16 +20.60 17.64 17.64 CapOppn 6211 +237 +200 31.91 31.91
Specnn 4,716 +99 +40 11.94 11.94 Eergy 5355 359 +5330 52.44 52.44
auen 2,746 +16+1 6.40 23,67 23.67 Eqlncn 3,316 +1327+1560 23.9 232.9
Putnam Funds A: Epi n 8,.145 +19.8+26.00 7964 79.64
CARTAp 2,099 +4.8 +6.50 845 845 GNMAn 18,431 +4.0 +5.00 10.35 10.35
EqnAp 2,307 139+13650 17.98 17.98 G6 bEq 147 212.+2500 18.3 1820
GeoAp 3,411 +10.0 +1120 18.40 1B40 Grolnn 5,781 +132 +15.10 3139 31.39
GtaEqyp 1925 +14.4 +2020 .980 8.80 HYCran 6,625 +11.4 +820 629 629
Sd p 12,057 +13.1 +14.0 19.91 1991 lrCg 19,768 +152 +1930 136.91 136.1
udAp 1,55 +15.0+10.50 810 8.10 YbPmrn 8201 +6.40 12.33 13 3
In0Eqp 3,149 +13.6 +21.50 24.16 24.16 MIEp. n 2,011 +26.7 +34.30 17.76 17.76
InvAp 2,165 +14. +19.50 1321 1321 IrLt 6,103 +15.1 +21.30 1921 1921
mOpp 4666 +145.+22.00 43.87 4387 Int1 n, 3,157 +17.8+24.10 3226 3226
VstW p 1,99 +17.5+26.40 1011 10.11 02G1ade 3,049 6.3 +5.40 930 990
VoyAp 7.M.8 +1360 17.16 17.16 IT 2150 +4.5 +40 1107 1107
Putnam Funds B: LIFECn 3,942 +93 +1020 1543 15.43
GrI1 2,856 +122 +13.10 1961 1961 UFEGno 6,352 +135+16.0 20.5 205
VoySl 1.82 .3+ +1270 1495 145 95 LIFEdn 544 +1 3.60 1825 1825
Putnam Funds M: LTInraden 4.600 102 +14.00 973 9.73
QDrlncp 2,510 +1320 +9.40 1017 10.17 iMgann 4,62 +1523+18.00 18.99 169
Putnam Funds Y: MHYn 2,718 +5.4 +7.60 10.4 1034
Voyger 2,165 +93 +13.90 17.73 17.73 Muhn 36,744 +2. +4.40 13.43 13.43
RSFunds: Mn+0n 3,151 +2. 1+IV 10.76 1076
LFuonds: 3 1MuS 1 17 1 1 l3 x In 1947 +1.6 +1.150 156 15
RSPainer 1,868 +362 +34.70 37.6 37.96 Punp 21,507 +17. +17.40 641 6421
Royce Funds: Se uyuor 3342 +205+28.90 2619 2019
LePIIikr 3,973 +1823+15.40 15.56 15.56 'ST n 1129 +12.841500 1924 1924
Pr0ein 2,790 +22.6 +2.690 16.13 1613 STIGade .12350 +3.6 +20 1054 10.54
Totlrin 3,963 +17.6 +21.10 12.94 12.94 STFdn 2,33 +.3 +1.80 1029 1029
Russell Funds S: S& Eqn 4,5 +22.8+30.10 23.3320
EOS 2,355 +135 +18.40 4520 4520 USGon 4.92 +10.7 +172 0 1651 16.91
I prSecS 2,023+16.1 +2080 63.11 6311 We6 9,574 83 +9.60 21.76 21.76
n GrtEqS 2,444 +13.0 +1590 38.97 38.97 W 9 5 2 14 8 +11. +13.70 0 3.806 2
SEI Portfolios: Wndsi n 15923 16+16.4 +1680 18.46 1.46
CoeFxhAn 4,.04 +5.8 +520 1049 10,49 5 1 nds 31,366 +169 +1920 3207 307
InEqAn 2,929 +146+20.90 1124 1124 Vanguard ldx Fds:
LgC roAn 385 +10.8 +1590 1931 19.31 500n 7,782 +13.0 1400 11368 1138
LgCTaAn 4211 +15.1 +1870 22 26 2226 aacedn 4666 +11.0+1240 10 190 1980
TaD1.IAC 2,088 +13,5 +17.30 1177 11.77 E 4016 +30.6 +4810 150 1650
SSgA Funds: Europen 10.193 +17.5+24.10 26.78 2678
SPS00n 1.896 +13.0 +1400 2025 2035 E2e0nn 5,56 +2109+20 10 33.278 3378
Schwab Funds: unMn 7,136 +10.7 +1370 2712 27.12
150Cnr 4,323 +13.5 +1580 3594 3594 Iffl nd 3,780 +6.7 +6.00 10.51 1051
IDOSeIn 2218 +13.6 +16.00 356 3596 MC pa 5,918 +202 +600 17.12 17.12
S&P lnn 3.881 +12.8 +1390 19.14 19.14 Pasin 4.376 +13.7 +14.10 923 923
S&P5 Sn 37T7 +13.0 +14.10 1922 1922 REfir 4,855 +256 +4180 20 8 20.88
YIPlsSel 4,531 +32 +.00 968 9.68 STrCapn 6,102 +21.6 +2720 28.75 28.75
Scudder Funds A: SirlCpPVam 3230 +196 +27.50 15.02 152
OmHiRA 4.,578 +155 +18.70 4453 4453 ST ordn 3,643 +3.1 +2.00 9N9 95
no 1,951 +153+1220 552 52 Totidn 21,196 +50 +500 10.16 1016
Gounp 2,137 +4.3 +590 918 9.18 Toti07 n� 911 +17.7 +23806 1296 126
So 2,672 +32 +4.10 653 853 TotSkn 32.096 +148 +17.10 2967 2967
Scudder Funds S: Vatsn 3,600 +16 +1760 22.03 22.03
GmolcS 2,161 +11.4 +1410 22.51 2M51 Vanguard InstI Fds:
Selected Funds: Baf, n 1,846 +111 +1260 1981 1981
,mSsSp 7228 +142+1530 38.34 3834 EMn 2200 +221 +2830 D363 :313
Seligman Group: islMn 37X4 +131 +1420 112M6 11236
01i0rl 2,089 +184 +1970 2621 2621 nsPIn 14,040 +132 +1420 112.97 11297
SeW 3,586 +77 + 530 151.93 1515 kMdCapklsn2,130 +20.4 +3100 171 17 17.17
Smith Barney A: T101n 8294 +5.1 +5.10 10.16 10.16
AGrAp 3.364 +186 +194010044 120.44 TSI7 0n 10,923 +1449 +1720 2968 29.68
AppmAp 3.517 +106+1070 1479 1479 Vantagepoint Fds:
F'd.� p 2234 +13.1 +1080 1526 1526 Gro n 2,725 +85 .9.40 827 837
MgMuApx 1,963 +35 +4.40 15.47 15.47 Victory Funds:
Smith Barney B&P: SA 2,402 NA A 17.14 17.14
AgijI 2,178 +176 +1840 90.13 90.13 WM Str As et Mgmt:
Smith Barney 1: BalarxoAp 1,965 +11.7 +1250 1352 13.52
DiStall 2.148 +77 +620 17322 17.32 Waddell& Reed Adv:
Smith Barney Y: .AoogmB 135 +85+18.00 6.52 652
LgCapGiY 2,145 +148 +13.70 23.42 23.42 CoMmlrA 3316 +105 +1860 601 6.01
SoidSh n 1,917 +172 *1620 37.68 37.68 ScTecO 2,179 +185 +3310 1159 11.59
St FarmAssoc: Weitz Funda:
.h4n 2,946 +126 +12.50 49.43 4943 Pas J 2,551 +144 +1120 2364 23.64
TCW Galileo Fds: Valuen 3,967 +154 +1030 3696 36.96
SelEqly 2,820 +191 +1630 1954 19.54 Wells Fargo Adv:
Templeton Insft: Opp08 1n 2219 +189 +2010 4940 49.40
EmMSp 2,271 +600+4220 1681 1681 Wells Fargo Admin:
ForEqS 5.569 +,200+2610 209 6 2096 LgCoCdi 1,58 +95 +1390 4809 4809
Third Avenue Fds: Westemrn Asset:
Rea!EsIlr 2,922 +263 +3260 3026 3026 CoxePlus 4,996 +9.4 +850 1066 1066
Mdue 5,525 +23.3 +28.60 5730 5730 Core 3,645 +76 +620 11.45 11,45
Thrivent Fds A: William Blair N:
l ,-, rd 0432 46 +q 14In 74632 %01 1i.47 ??n ,1iOI+42710 2333 2333


ate is compiled after the market close at,4 p.m. For further ditalils, CJtphit;igt�T8 61550 4, : '" : .


14A


I %


6t Laow
A
ADCTlrs 0 26.27 255250026.14 .1400
SAESp N 16.15 159322016050 -160
AbLAC N 456345.0317.004510+1350
AKSteel N 944 9.2021.00 922 -3,90
AMR N 14.07 13.75 .. 1405 4.10
ASMLHId 17.70 17917.50 1760 -2.20
AT&T N 20.04 19.75 .. 1980 5.60
ATITech 0 12.68 12.4918.001258 -3.70
AUOpton N 16.03 15i1 .. 1586 +1.10
Aastom 0 3.38 318 319 +220
AblLab N 47.08465521.004663 +590
A x 1056 1 029 .1 . 1037 -2.70
Acceiure N 25.07 248217.002504 +2.40
Aclmsns 0 20,68 18.7231.002035+1900
AdobeSysO 30.40295429.002964 -1,40
AMD N 2036 20.05 .. 2008 4.10
Aelnas N 7887 77.2010.0077.40 +9.50
AIrel 0 47.85 0046584.004669 +720
Agersm N 1129 11.10 . 11.19 -13.40
Ae. N 2648 261335.002624 +6.50
od N 6059596520.0059.76 +2 80
ArTran N 11.49 1125 .. 11.4410.40
AkaiimT 0 15.57 15.0039.0015.27 +700
Aberlsn N 21.42 21.2616021.31 +3.20
Aloa N 2861 280319.0028.05 -5.60
MAJ Tch N 29.49 28.7019.0029.07 +7.90
ase N 888 85326.00 858 +5.00
eAts 0 1720 1675 ... 16.97 4.30
A7L5,te N 62.14 612412.006126 +1.90
Ael N 6658 65.4417.0066.50+38.10
AlonUSAn N 1781 17.16 . 17.75
AtlairNano 0 317 2.98 3.03 +90
AteaCp 0 22.15 21.8330.0021.87 -3.30
A0ia N 68.26 66.9614.0066.96 +4.40
Amazon 0 45.75 4461360045.15+72.00
AMoLs N 22.39 2141 .. 22.26 +920
aOs O 33.5032.7021.03295 -2.50
AEP N 39.30 38.6513.0038.70 -.70
AmEp N 55.61 5409819.0055.0 0 4.30
AmInlfl N 60.85601515.006020 -5.40
APCwn 0 28.4027,5028.0028.11+23.70
AmTowe N 23.2522.71 .. 229815.50
Amenade 0 19.74 1904328.0019.53 -.70
A o 81.14 79.7541.0079.77-15.40
T 0 4.75 4.40 ... 4.66-10.70
Arny O 18.9 1518.50 ... 18.66 -25.50
A4ad N 89.85 88.3513.0088.35 +40
nalo(g)ev N 39.80 39.0329.0039.20 -1510
Adew 0 11.67 10.9450.0010.99-21.00
AndrxGp 0 19.25 17.9018.0018.55 -3100
Anheusr N 44.73 44.2916.0044.35 -1370
eAnnaly N 16.04 15.809.00 15.50 -1300
Apache N 70.10 6.1511,0068.40 -15.50
ApolloG 0 76.12 74.9361.0075.15�35.70
ApptleCs 0 44.3842.2636.0042.65 -1350
A o N 21.3020.8218.0020.82 +940
a 18.54 18.1321.008132100.48 1.80
MCC 0 3.03 2.84.' 3.01 -220
ArCieoal N 58.25 56.8598.0056.92 420
A',hDan N 23.9022.7520.0022.94 +9.50
Ann 0 11.50 10.94 . 11.04+1590
Ashland N N 62.01 61.302.00 61.45 -540
spe 0 11.45 11.3519.0011.43 +.60
4T. N 45.5745.2520.0045.44+444.50
Atnmel 0 2.36 2.25 .- 2.34 4.40
AudCodes 0 9.30 8.9538.00 9.09 -9.10
Autodsks 0 34.75 34.0233.0034.19 -17.00
ALdoData N 44.91 44.4125.00244.41 44.70
Avaya N "10.55 102514.0010.33+10.80
AVitr A .07 .06 ... .07 +.10
Avme N 26.42 26.04190026.18 -.30
Avon N 33.04 32.6716.0032.71 17.10
B
BEAeo 0 17.60 17.05 . 17.53 +7.60
BEASys 0 9.39 89627.00 9.07 .2.40
BJS 9. N 62.0560,99250060.99.31.40


Hi9h Lao
BMCSf N 1935 188956.001909 +100
BPPLC N 6699 65,8813.006588 -.70
BaoHu N 5823 564231.005654 +14.90
Bko0Ams N 4420436011004360-1250
BkNY 0 3118 305816.003078 -3.50
BartckG N 24.81 24.494520024.50 -200
Baxter N 39.82 39.2756.003927 .3.60
BeaconP 0 1.48 1.34 .. 1.45 +300
BeangP N 08.26 8.16 .. 821 1.90
BeazHmsN 67.14 65,258.006544 +14.10
BeclCol N 54,95 540217.0054.34 -310
BedBah O 0 4994577270045.90 -1.00
BelSoiluth N 27.78 2749120027.60 +8.80
BeTaGold A 224 216 '. 2.17 -1.00
BesItB N 7860 7650250076.6041690
Bgn3dc 0 339921960003929 4830
BVns 0 3825 37.5027.0038.13+12.70
Bofltt N 8.706 856 8.67 .320
Boeng N 66,8266,0131,0066.01 -1.90
Bost ci N 29.152865220028.95 +5.20
Boydom N 52.99 520529.0052.44 -14.40
BM N 2525 24.9720.0024.98 +.30
BadV'is 0 .86 .831.00 .86 -5.10
Brdiom 0 4320 42.3275.004277 -230
Broading 0 5.44 4.75 ... 5.00 -2,50
BitdeCmtO 4.51 4.381400 4.48 +2.40
tBueLt N 61.48 59.9015.0061.39 42.60
8ufNSF N 54.72 53.8020.0054.254+21.10
BudrRsc N 64.6964.0114006411 +16.80
BusOb 0 33.70 32.1351.0033.01 +50.40
C
CITGp N 44.8043.8912.0044.14 -.30
CMGI O 1.94 1.9063.00 190 -.80
CMSEng N 1600 15.7111.0015.84 +5.00
CNET 0 1288 1233 .. 12.8011.10
CSX N 45.88 45.1111.0045.54 -.10
CVSCps N 3121 31.0029.0031.03 +6.10
Cadence N 16,15 15.60260.00160915.50
Cale N 338 3.32 ... 332 -.70
CanAg A .98 .96 ... 6 +2.70
CapOne N 83.43 82.3615.0082.50 -24.00
CapiSr 0 N 20.65 19.0416.0019.58 -18.70
CardnlHIh N 594658.7122.0059.58016.90
CareerEd 0 39.90 38.3121.0038.79+19.10
CarenkRx N 4448644.4029.0044.58+28.00
CarMax N 29.92 29.1627.002922 +20.50
Cam4al N 5320 52.3921.0052.40 -14.20
Catlerpis N 543453.3516.0053.91+15.00
Celescg N 11.65 11.27 .. 11.65 -5.20
Celgenes 0 48.50 47.39900047.85 -3.10
Cendant N 21.61 21.3218.002136 -5.60
Centex N 76.00 73879.00 73.98 -39.40
CntryTel N 34.50 342014.0034.37 +8.40
ChartCm O 1.37 1.31 .. 1.35 +80
ChkPont 0 23.00 225020.0022.53 4.90
ChesEng N 26.62 26,0118.0026.11 +5.80
Chewvrns N 59.67 57.899.00 58.01 +220
Chicoss N 40.39 39.7248.0040.11 +2.10
Chirne O 36.74 36.08 ... 36.23 +6.20
CienaCp 0 2.34 224 .. 2.24 -.60
CircCly N 18.40 18.2163,001825 +1.50
Cirrus 0 7.65 7.4142.00 7.47 +40
Cisc. 0 19.40 19.1123.0019.15 -1,70
C' N 44.50 43-011.0043.50 -4.80
C N 13.34 13.1166.0013.14 -.90
CilrixSy 0 2308923.4526.0023.83+16.30
CklaC an N 33.15 32.6125.003264 +520
Coadchs N 35.5834.7938.003511 -0.40
CocaCI N 44.4243.7622.0043.76 -2.70
CocaCE N 23.92 23.4817.0023.50 +7.60
Ceur N 3.59 3.51 .. 3.55 +.20
CooTech 0 49.48 48.2563.0049.08 4+7.60
oPal N 53.48 52.9024.0052.94 +9.60
Comnsa t 0 3127 30.7057.0030.73 +2.90
Comcs 0 30.41 29.956.0030.00 04.50
CrncBJs N 34.15338719.0033.93 +7.10
Cm1yH8 N 38.9336.6725.003861+31.30


I' I L e , . Lt s..
No h L.
CVRDs N 33.07322513.0032.56 -6.60
Comrrp N N 27.55 27 ... 27.45 17.80
Coompure 0 8505 8.3432.00 8.43 +4.00
Comes 0 25.44 24.9570.0002529 +7.80
ConAgra N 22.8 22.6718.0022.71 +.60
ConexanI 0 .96 10 .. 1.91 +.30
ConocPhdsN 638462.40800 6259+1650
ConoEgy N 68.33 672135.006736 +11.70
CtAirB N 1598 15.80 . 1581 +480
Coming N 19.12 18.63 .. 19.05+1370
Costco 0 46.50 45.7622004597 +20
CnlwdFns N 362735.7210003800 -1580
CreeIncl 0 2980 29,0125002965+22370
CrownHold N 1605 157254.0015.79 +20
Cr.slalg A 2.90 2.70 2.76 -480
Craw 0 320 3776 3862 -39.00
CS N 21445 14.10 1426 +5.10
c 25.25 247330.0024.96+11.90
0
DJIADiam A 107.16106.39 106.63 +1.50
DRHorbsN 4223 410010.0041.08 .60
DRDGOLD 0 .99 92 ... .96 -.80
DadeBeh 0 75.8374.41430075.80+66.90
Danaher N 56.45 554222.0055.45 +6.80
DayS 0 14.33 13.63 .. 14.10 -15.00
Deee N 7.98 73.001Z.0073.53+21.80
Dellnc 0 40.95 40.4232.0040.47 '-.20
Delphi N 5.39 5.0819.00 550 +2.10
DetaAur N 2.99 2.87 .. 2.96 -520
Depomed 0 5.39 491 .- 5.19 +6.40
Dv. Es N 5682 56.0412.0056.09 8.30
DiaOfls N 58.35 57008800057.06 -9.30
DigRiver 0 40.5839.6136.0039.98 34.95
DrecTV N 15.68 15.40 .. 15.40 -20
DiscHdAnO 1432 13.99 ... 1427 -720
Disney N 2598 25.6321.0025.64 -1.90
O y 0 7.14 685 .. 6.891220
0onCmO 7.37 7.01 ... 7.05 +2.00
Da.rG N 20.35 202219.0020.32 +1.10
DoraFin N 15.96 15414.00 15.43 -12.90
DowChn N 48054 47.7510.0047.95 -650
DuPOal N 43.00 423317.0042.68 -1520
DukeEgy N 29.6329.3114002954 -2.10
Dyoy N 5.63 5.50 .. 5.56 +3.00
E
ETrad. N 16.00 154916.0015.51 -1.50
eBays 0 42.6841.6761.0041.78 7.60
EMCCp N 13.87 13.6630.0013.69 -8.20
EOGRessN 61.4060.7220.0061.10-24.30
Ea nd A 20 .19 . 20 -20
lthUnk 0 9.67 9.4310.00 953 +1.30
EKodak N 26.93 26.42 ... 26.74 -530
EchoSlar 0 28.92 28.6023.0028.72 -3.60
Eclpsys 0 17.10 16.72 .. 16.97+31.70
BPasoCp N 12.07 11.90 12.00 .-3.60
Elan N 7.53 7.32 ..7.48 -3.10
Elec s 0 58.57 57.4743.00 57.0 -32.60
EDS N 21.20 20.4659.0020.57 +9.70
EnCanas N 43.00 41.18 ... 41.35 -7.30
ENSCO N 41.0040.0935.004028+22020
Entlst 0 600 5.6567.00 6.00 +5.90
EqOiFPT N 35.68 3522 ... 5.45 +44.70
EncsnTI 034.68 3422... 3436 -20
Exeloi N 54.0853.3618.0053520+16.50
Exp0ssO 5252251.5927.0052.30�39.10
ExxnnMbl N 60.17 58.7513.0058.75 -7.50
Eyelecti 0 11.78 11.33 . 11.37 -620
F
FairchldS N 16.860 16.58 ... 166 +320
FanneMIf N 57.27 55.819.00 55.86 -22.80
FedExp N 85.64 84.0918.0084,09 -10.10
FedriDS N 76.7475.7318.0075.87 +120
FiftTs iOd 0 43.4542.9917.0043.10 +7.30
Finisar 0 1.11 1.06 ... 1.09 +.30
FirstData N 41.40 41.0220.0041.14 4.40
Fiser. O 44.6044.2220.004437 +7.70


Rexlm 0 13.84 135125001354 -3.60
FootLock N 2565 24.9613.0025.00 -1210
FordM N 10.90 10.668.00 10.74 2120
FGeslLab N 40.44 39.8118.0039.92 4.80
Fovrwad 0 26.8924.7090260750+67.60
Fnony O 1192 11.1951.0011.84 +7.00
AFoxHntnO 53.3250.90 . 51.2982.00
FredMac N 64.7663,1717.006328 -23.70
FMCG N 40.4039,7514.004028 -20
FnedBR N 14.30 13.839.00 1406 -510
FumBrds N 19.44 189313.0019.16 -29.80
G
SGa N 21.47 21.1018.0021.11 2.50
Gamn 0 5529 54 3025.00 54.89 +3620
Gateway N 4.11 398 ... 3.98
Gemste r 3.16 3.02 3.08 -5.50
rnentch N 89.8388.7594.0089.320+17.90
GenEec N 34.92 34.420.0034.50 -5.70
GrMarn N 39.75 37255.00 3899 -40.00
Gen6I N 47.68 47.1515.004740 +7,40
GnMots N 37.57360 ... 36.82 +5.70
GenesMa 0 24.85 24.19 . 24.84 +1.50
Genitoe 0 8.34 7.86 7.95 -44.85
oGnwoitl N 32.65 312813.0031.36 -9.00
Oenzyre 0 75.0974.13 ... 74.41+56.30
Geidaus N 10.53 10.25 . 10.39 +.80
GronCp 0 11A2010.54 .. 10.95 +11.40
Gel N 82.90 80.4941.00 0.75+92.30
Gia 0r 0 600 52650.00 5.45 -11.70
GiTadSdsO 45.58445536.0044.81 +3.40
Gietn N 53.94+53.6131.0053.67 6.10
GtanoKn N 47.95047.34 .. 47.44 +9.40
GIbePft 0 7.44 6.75 ... 7.21 +2.80
GlobaSFe N 45.95 44.9857.0044.99 +.90
G N 16.28 16.638.001626 +.90
G anN 109.50107.441200107.48 -1650
= e N 17.82 17.3113.0017.41+12.90
O 292.84286984 00287,76-146.40
Gr N 32.78 32.0448.003210 +25.00
GriffResnO 1373 13.44 ... 13.59 -87.40
Gref ,of A 7.75 7.6326.00 7.67 -3.60
Guidant N 69.15 685043.00 6880 -4.80
H
HCAIn N 50.55 49.1216.0049.25 +2.30
HaIln N 5650 55.76600056.00527.60
Hanoer N 14.67 14.15 ... 14.54 +15.40
h N 53.99 53.1217.0053.19 -2.60
N 7925 78.3123.0078.74+10.10
Harss , N 37.42 35.7225.0037.07+54.90
JInp N 2425 23.7817.00230 .-6.20
He N 24.7724.3220.0024.62 4.40
Hilon N 25.12 245926.0024.75 -.50
HoneDp N 43.90432519.0043.51 +.40
Hoen l N 39.50 38.6923.003928+10.80
sa 18.73 18193.0018.65 +1.40
HolTc O 1775 16.4721.0017.04 -4.10
ilysO 11.85 11.75280011.83 +.50
HunGen 0 14.90 14.50 ..14.65 +.10
HunUBs 0 19.94 19.47160019.63 -310
QTechrn O 2225 1926 ... 21.43+10420
LACInteracO 27.102655 ... 26,70 -.90
IMS Hl N 27.54 27224.002723 -.60
IPIXCp 0 3.85 3.70 . 3.73 +3.50
hBr A 25. 2592252 .. 25.37 +3.10
iShJapan A 10.31 1023 ... 1025 -.10
iShEMI46sA 77.41 77.01 ... 77.10 +10.80
iSh EAFEA 542253.90 .. 53.96 +4.10
iShRuslnOOA 67.56 66.98 67.10 +1.70
iSRs2OOOsA 6826 67.44 ... 679 +5.70
iShREsts A 68.1067.66 .. 67.80+16.10
IC Holdn N 282027.75 . 28.00
Imcw e O 35.01 345238.0034.70 -12.50
INCO N 41.46 40.9710.9040.98 -20.30
Incyte 0 8.13 76 ... 7.97 -7.90
IrnSpa 0 2425 2366.00 24.14-103.60
Inlomart Q 10.74 10.30 ... 10.57 -.90
IngmM N 18.90 17.9813.0018.64+2050
n 0 11.59 112950.0011.56 +7.80
Intel 0 27.34 27.14190027.14 +3.90
IntrNAP A .50 .48 ... .49 +50
IB N 83.95 832270.0083.46 -9.80
M 27.95 272626.0027.36 -5.70
Inl'ap N 31.96031.18 - 31.60 +.10
IntRedt N 49.4545.8124.0047.05 -7890
InlmniU 0 9.98 9.1 . 9.63 -1.30
Inrtpubil N 12.63 12345 ... 1250 -1.00
Intlil 0 19.59 19.30 19.37 -1.00
InrdaLasenO 20.90 2023 .. 2051 +1920
Intuit 0 48.38 47.7625.0048.00 -3.60
IISw 0 69.51 65.5077.0069.40+192.0
in 0 35.00 342416.0034.42 +2.80
Isics 0 3.45 36 ... 3.43 +1.70
haxCps A 25.55 25536.0025.48+26.00
J
2G0 h 0 4025392826.0040.11+3360
JDSUih 0O 1.54 1.51 _. 1.51 -1.70
JMaI N 35.45 35.1119.0035.14 -4.60
.a N 152714.9817.001502 -9.320
Je0ue O 21.15 20.5778.0021.00 +40
JolMIJn N 64.7863.9421.0063.96 -3.60
JnprNtw 0 24.3023.5951.0023.99 +1.50
K
KBHomensN 83.51 81.4712.0081.91 -15.40
KLATnc 0 52.0849.4622.0051.70+14.50
Kelm c N 8.44 827 ... 8.38+11.30
S N 8125 80.1814008021 +5.40
Kitrbc N 6422 633318,0063.76- -620
IKn 0C N 59.97 59.4030.0059.97+26.40
Kos N 56.52 55.9226.0056.35 -6.00
Komnag 0 35.7334.6015.0035.48+33.30
Kraf N 31.033050.2003055 -2.90
K" r N 19.99 19.79 ... 19.85 +3.50
Kuicke O 0 9.89 9.6088.00 9.68 -.80
L
L-3CoIm N 79.05 78.1722.007823 6.90
LGPM s NN 23.022283 .8 23.02 +6.40
LSILog N 9.85 0.40 9.76 4.60
LTX 0 6.73 6.39 6.61 4.70
LaQuinta N 929 8.90 _ 9.00 .-670
Lafnll N 7.81 7.57 ... 7.59 +5.00
LamRscl 0 28.6427.7713.0028.45 -5.30
L saCrp N 45.0040.759.00 42.77+1520
=a sN 10323101.668.00102.15-9920
N 106.88105.1012.00105.13-18.70
LenarA N 68.0467.0711.006727 +8.70
LeveB O 092.09 42.004 ... 25 -.50
Lexa di 0 5.04 441 ... 4.93 .4.60
Levonrk N 63.30 62.5716.00662370 -7720
LI9 N 8.57 8.7980.00 .79 +120
Ufe 0 22.3821.8165.0022.19+58.00
LiNE N 5651 55.9049.0056.32+1320
Lonted N 24.7324.3017.002438 +6.80
LjearTchd 03922 385328.003846-2200
LocddM N 63.14 622819.0062.40 4.00
LookSrat0O .61 55 ... 59 -120
Loudeye 0 .84 .79 ... .80 +50
LaPac N 27.3526.700.00 26.82+15.80
LesCos N 66.05 66.0123.006622 4.90
Lucent N 2.98 2.9112.00 2.93 +.80
Lyocndell N 28.80 275515.0027.94 -14.60
M
M 0 259225.6334.0025S85+24.00
M N 25.4225.1615.0025.16 -5.30
MCIInc 0 25.5625.50 .. 25.52 +.40
MDI Inc 0 1.0 .96 100 +5.60


,',ac u *mrl fE LuM i0
Hg La.
MEMC N 17.15 16.7614.0016.99 -6.90
MGMMis N 45.77 44.7529.0045.45 +220
MarnCareN 38.1537.8021.0037.96012.90
Marathe N 59.12 58.17120058.36 +9.60
MarshM N 29.3628.92 ... 28.97 -520
MarvelE N 19.78 19.3118.0019.39 -27.90
MarveT 0 442343.5870.0043.69 +8.70
Masco N 34.6733.9016.0033.91 .70
MasseyEn N 4452 42.7654.004325 -11.00
Maxin 0 42.32 41.6927.0041.97 -525
Maxts N 600 5.90 . 5.90 4.00
May04 N 17.04 16.87 . 1647 46.70
McOns N 31.18 305016.0031.17 +2.30
McKesson 45.49 4485 45.00 4.30
McAfee N 31670.65230031.4024.60
Medmun 0 2800 27.77 .. 28.41 +11.60
MedcoHt N 49.05 48.3326.0048.44 +220
Medli N 54.0053.49360053.94 +820
MeloiFm N 3053 27170030.46 +310
Merck N 313430.9615.003106 -40
Merlntr 0 403739.1741.003927+13.40
MeriLyn N 5924 506013.0056878 -7.80
Meafe N 50,30 48.5411.0049.14 +27.50
MetLifeun N 280427.48 . 27.67+12.10
Miao#p 0 31500.8728.0031.07 40
Maownse 0 5.75 5.1951.00 5.65 -1.60
MnonT N 11.95 11.7635.0011.88 -.50
Mirosoft 0 26.0025.5923.0025.61 -.70
MicoSt 0 80.35 75.608.00 77.15 93.50
MiPhat O 10.43 10.15 .. 103 4.00
MndspeedO 1.54 1.41 .. 143 +1.70
Momsto N 6923 67.3755.006727 +7.30
Mns0rtw 0 31.03302843.003027+1580
MogSlan N 53.77 52.85130053.05 9.50
Motorola N 2121 20.8919.0021.18 +1140
MylanLab N 17.69 17.3028.001726 -1.60
N
NCRCps N 3528 343620.0034.71 -.40
NETear 0 2047 19.78250020.71 -2.90
Nabors A 67.00 652124,0065.45 -1.10
Napster 0 525 488 . 5.14 +820
NasdIOTrO 39.922392 ..- 3958 +155
NAOly N 3 36.799.00 36.91 -2.40
NOWoo N 53.00352.1935.005235 +.80
NatSernm N 24.89 24.5224.0024.71 +2.90
Neiux 0 1923185460.001856+21.60
NetwkAp 0 2620 25.5043.002551 -18.60
NYCraty N 18.74 18.3013.001836 +5.60
NedRubN 252324.72 .- 2447+1120
New0M N 38.4337.5237.003755 -6.80
NewsCpAnN 16.60 16.34 ... 1628 -3.00
NewsCpBnN 17.57 1726 ... 17.34 -3.10
NeeC 0 34.99 34.1718.003440+20.60
NexPit 0 25.10 24.6164.0024.90 +6.70
NiSrce N 24.54242215.002429 +1.10
NteB N 84.82 83.722.0083460 -230
Noi p N 68.48 67,0645.0067.18 -320
Nldac N 16.02 1505 .. 155 +3.90
Nastm0s N 37.42 36.8624.0037.01 -120
NOfkSo N 3822 37.1613.003721+2320
NolelNel N 2.74 2.63 2.63 -30
NorkBacs N 27.91 27.3814.00279 -5.10
N 5629 55.4515.0055.45 -820
S 0 4.75 4.57 ... 4.65 +.50
NviWrIs 0 12.30 12.0223.0012.03 -18.40
Noell 0 6.16 6.086.20 6.08 -20
Nevus 0 29.18282625.002850 -.50
NucaNs 56.1055206.00 55.45 +120
NniSys 0 23.70201 ... 232754.00
Nd 0 27.4526.8433.0027.06 +1230
0
OMI Cp N 1824 17.896.00 18.03-1020
OcdPt N 83.63 82179.00 8228 -620
gc a N 28.45 28.1525.002838 +320
N 30.05 29220.0029.70 +.90
OiSvHT A 114.7511350 ... 113.11 +17.60
Oranre N 461045.5621.0046.10 -7.60
OnSnd 0 5.82 5.69 ... 5.73 +1.30
Ocde 0 13.86 13.6724.0013.57 -2.30
PQ
PFCni 0 57.00 56.4740.0058.99 -70.00
PG&E'& N 37.91 37.639.02 37.63 +5.70
PMCSra 0 10.05 9.7582.00 9.4 -.70
PacSuiT 0 2528242517.002429 +11.10
PadlCre N 76.87 76.0021007620 +2040
Palmnc 0 28.75 28.01400028.54 -1.50
Pawtoin N 2430 23 26 . 23.42 -55.90
PanTc 0 6.94 6.7417.00 640 -.10
PattULT 0 32.91 32.6138003283+14.60
Paychex 0 3527 34336.0034.91 +150
Peadys N 6695 652734.0065.74 +3.80
Penney N 5720 5720610250056.14 -14.40
Ptoir N 40.39 40.0323.0040.17 -48.70
PepsCo N 55.16 54.5222.0054.53 -3.00
PeR e 0 123 1.17 .. 120
PethibA N 46.3045.50 45.72 +4.80
PeDu s N 5324 5227 . 52.57 +7.10
Pelsat 0O 30.71 29.6625.0029.75 +3.30
Pfizer N 26.96 26.4420.002650
pIPhRe N 108.7810555.006106.45 -2350
PSsonc N 214.72 1428 ... 14.43
PS 0 4.58 454 ... 455 -3.00
Piwi 0 7.82 7.6023.00 7.71 -39.90
PlacuO N 1425 13.812&0013.7 -1350
PorPlayn 0 2428 23.50 .. 240 -30.60
Poeewav 0 12.10 11.10 ..11.47 -1.10
Prair N 50.41 49.3621.004929 +6.80
Pies* n N 11.91 11.02 ... 1125 -83.50
Plider N 26.4025.96 26.02 +3.00
PrimusT O .66 .62 ... 63 +20
Proctam N 55.8555.5221.0055.63 +6.40
Providan N 19.1318.8511.0018.90 -1.40
Prudennt N 67.6666.88160066.90+14.80
PufeHm N 96.00 93.4010.0093.62 +1.30
QLT 0 874 8.50 ... 8533 -7.50
On 0 31.45 30.7617.0031.05 -9.90
. ns 0 40.15 39.4234.0039.48 +1.80
Q0lDSS N 282 2.69 ... 2.78 -3.30
QweslCm N 3.82 3.67 .. 32 +320
R
RFMicMkDO 0 620 6.00 . 6.069 -10
RadoShk N 23.88 23.301260023.47 -2.60
Rap"ieo N 39.78 02223.63953 -.90
Red- 0 15.43 15.121001524 -3.60
I N 19.386 19.0506001921 8.50
N 1329 1.10 -. 1326 g,70
Renisfe N 45.11 44.4079.0044.94 -.90
Reca 0 3.15 2.95 - 3.02 +720
Rsc0Motn 0 71.76 70.394&.0070.66 -720
RetieHT A 10341102672 _ 102.78 ..60
RiteAid N 452 4.4210.00 4.49 +2.40
P0wIlt N 5225 51.3417.0051.51 -30.80
RossSs 0 26.70 26.4023.002650 -230
Rowan N 34.6733.6270.0034.16+20.90
Ry5Cab N 45.77 45.3518.0045.45 -29.60
RoylDutI N 6.98 612710.006124 +.60
RoyShAnN 61.7 6125 -. 6128 +S0
R s N 82.5480.1509111008040 -11.70
SBCC l N 24.72 24.4517.002445 +7.30
STMicro N 17.42 17.1843.001725 -5.70
Safeway N 24.39 24.1617.0024.30 +5.50
SUudes N 47.97472741.0047.41 +7.90
StPaflTrav N 4425 43.3316.0044.02+29.30
Saks6 N 21.46205027.002122+1550
SanDisk 0 342533.6323.0033.82+2420
Sanmna 0 4.98 4.75 .. 4.78 -6.10


1jlji s lj exs Ls u 0

SaraLee N 19.97 19.7413.0019.93 +440
ScherP1 N 21.10 20.75 .200.82 +250
Sel N 685.09 83.6131.0083.74+14.60
Schwab N 13.95 13.6553.0013.70 -1.10
SdAganau N 3923 33725.0038.50+13.00
SeageT N 19.42 19.0514.001937 +10.60
Seasin sO 158021153.7615.00154.60-5020
Senior A 3755 37.10 .. 37.36 +1.60
a 0 53.37 51.39 ... 52.35 .21.40
FT 0 22.49 21.7520.0021.85+2890
SiebelSys 0 8.62 826 ... 8.40 -2.40
Si el 0 20.10 19.65100020.03 +3.50
Sl h N .72 .68 ... . 71 +.70
SkoLa 0 29.4828.9622.002927 +16.70
SST 0 47 4.70 .. 472 -130
SiusS 0 6.89 6.80 ... 6,82 -1.10
SirnaTheraO 4.56 44.05 425+1621
SkSd 0 7.40 7.1028.00 7.33 -5.30
Sa iWes A 6.9 5.7035,00 5.97+12.0
Smihlnr N 69.0067.8825.0067.94 -16.00
SmuDSRe 0 12.42 1.10 .. 12.13 +520
Sohi.cr 0 18.90 18.1323.0018.18 -202
Solcnm N 3.93 3 ... 3.84 +1.40
Sorsn 0 4.89 4061.00 4.84 +20
SN 32.73 32.46 ... 3251 -2120
Co N 35.31 34.9517.0034.99 +.0
Ss N 14.30 14.1828.0014.19 -2.10
SwMEys N 55.69 54.9535.0055.11 +16.10
So Bcp N 24.15 23.7216.0023.99 -350
SpecBrds N 3260 30.1018.0031.00 -74.60
SpIe 0 10.89 1021 ... 10.47 +30
SpiON N 27.052631 . 26.90+1620
SPDR A 124.63123.40 . 123.74 +20
SPMid A 13231131.35 -. 131.68 +980
SPMads A 28.96 28.62 ... 28.64 -120
SP Eng A 48.484759 ... 47.60 +2.10
SP A 3205 29.92 29.93 -220
SPUt A 932463223 ..322227 +4.70
S oupess 0 2320 22.7623.0022.77 .6.10
Slxuc N 0 5325 5254446.005255 +120
SlunHd N 64.02 62.9532006322 -1.70
SlateSt N 5028 49.6621.0049.74 +.70
Stinlo s 0 658 550 ... 6.10 450
StorTd N 136.7536.721.30036.73 3.10
sT Go n N 42.9642.79 .. 42.81 +3.60
S ,ykr N 54.4753.9341.0054.09 +100
SurMioo 0 346 383 ... 34 -.40
Sunor g N 49.79 48.69 ... 48.90 -1.70
SupTec 0 16.00 5 .. .96 220
Si.PVal N 35.45 35.0515.0035.40+20.40
S olS 0 5.63 5.4955.00 50 -2.90
SyantecsO 22.56 21212126.0021.95 -16.60
SyUo N 11.85 11.3930.0011.648 .150
Synap5cs 0 16 52516.0015.85 -54.10
Sex 0 420 3.7442030 3.74 +620
Ss N36.37 35624.0036.06 -5.90
T
TJA N 234923.5018.002351 -690
TOXUCop N 87.1985.77 -. 86.64+14.00
TaMSemi N 8.66 8,56 ... 859 -620
TakeTwosO 247 242.4518.0024.61 -6.50
Tage N 59.61 58.7316.0058.75 -3.50
TASERs 0 10.04 9.7151.00 9.72 +120
TeINorL N 15.84 15.62 ... 15.67 +2.90
TeMexLs N 19.68 1927 ... 1927 -5.40
TepC N 4.45 4.35 _ 4.39 +5 0
Telns 0 9.93 9.62 9.72 +90.
TriP N 1750 162018.001721 -750
w N 1225 12.02 12.14 +30
Tdyn N 15.70 1523 ... 15.53 4.00
e T 03523 305025.0035.12 +30.90
TevaPhonn 0 31.97 31.420.0031.47 +3.10
Texlrnst N 32.05 31.3529.0031.76+1030
3Com 0 3.72 3.60 ... 3.64 +.70
3MCo N 75.3274.4219.0075.00 +2.90
ThoS 0 7. 7. 745831.00 7.69 +3.10
Tnibras N 34.30 333214.0033.38 -5850
TieWam N 17.42 16.9924.0017.02 +3.80
1oric 0 06.44 625 ... 625 -3.80
ToBrsos N 56.68 55.0316.0055.42 -1540
Transon N 57.85 56.4183.0056.43 -22.40
TmSwlc 0 1.90 1.75 ... 1.85 +.90
TriadH N 50.17 49.4318.0049.67 -720
TndMic 0 32.95 31.96 .- 32.64 44320
T1peo N 2151 21.1613.002133 -27.6
TycoiM N 30.9730.4428.0030.47 -130
U
USUnwirn 0 623 62017.00 622 +20
USTInc N 46.7445.8015,0046.02 +3.70
UTS Om 0 897 8.7120.00 8.82 -150
UnoinPac N 70.90 70.0729.007021 +18.50
U N 6.53 6.43 _ &.47
S N 3.90 33 - 385 -3.70
UPSB N 73.757295023.0073.00 +.80
USBancopN 302930.0313.0030.06 -5.30
USSte N 43.90 42.554.00 42.65 +.90
UflFechdis N 5130 50.6017.0050.70 -4.40
ULdIs N 52.9452.2023.0052.30+15.00
UnvHRh N 53.1651.7311.0052.04 -5150
Unoca] N 6525 64.6913.006425 -1.50
UnumProv N 19.54 19.0112.0019.15 -2.50
V
ValeroEs N 83.94 82.6310.0082.78 -5.70
VhlanMs N 39.38 38.7033003926+1020
Verisign 0 26.53 26.0030.002621 +16.10
VerizonCm N 3455 342011.003423 +.60
VersoTCi 0 .37 .33 ... 35 -.82
V'acoiB N 34.0233.42 ..33.49 +6.10
VeoPhen 0 11.90 115046.0011.59 +6.70
Vishay N 1425 13.92 ... 14.02 +3.80
Vsaoi N 9.03 8.86 ... 8.90 +8.30
Vitsse 0 229 221 ... 222
Vodanee N 25.98 025.79 .. 25.83 +8.50
W
WPCSlrIntnO 7.67 7.06 ... 7.48+14.10
Wache N 51.12 50.3813.0050.38 -1.40
WalMart N 49.99.49.3320.0049.35 -150
Wak N 48.1847.7531.0047.86+1180
N 43.0042.4212.0042.48 -546
Ws0leie N 28.33 27.9613.0028.12 -1220
Waters N 46.00452825.0045280+384
WatPsti N 3350 32.4527.0033.40 +38O
Weat.int N 64.0363.1925.006328 +7.00
WebMD 0 1050 10.6082.0010.61 -1.00
WelPointsN 7094 69.7523.0070.74+3720
Wesirgo N 62.02612914.0061.34 -4.10
We s N 52.07496.82 . 51.70+6120
" N 15.14 14.7516.0014.99 +6850
N 8020 79.8314.0079.98 +280
0d O 137.86132.0758.0013651+174.41
Wildats 0 14.15 1323 ... 13.43 4465
WmsCos N 21.50-212234.002124 +4.40
Wa . N 46.0045.4536.0045.75 -4.00
0 57.7256.14 ... 56.30' -4.10
XYZ
XMSa, 0 37.10 35.55 . 35.63 -7.70
XTOEgys N 35.72 35.0018.0035.09 -11.70
Xerox N 1327 13.0313.001321 -6.40
OtW 0 29.19 28.3535.0028.35
Yahoo 0 34.0633&3431.0033.34 -1.90
ZebraTs 0 39.34 38.1524.0039.00 -7720
Zrnea N 82.4881.0930008236 +11.40
Zoran 0 14.70 14.16 - 14.40 -.4


la~s~8B8%~~"~;i~e"P~i~i~ut3d;


I


I









News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


SUE ANN CARPENTER/News-Sun
Shirley Raymond answers a customer's questions and makes travel arrangements at her business
UNIGLOBE King Travel in Sebring.


Raymond sets up local



residents in travel plans


By SUE ANN CARPENTER
News-Sun correspondent
SEBRING - The move to
Sebring was just one more jour-
ney in Shirley Raymond's life.
For the past 11 years in
Cleveland, Ohio, Raymond
operated the national franchise
UNIGLOBE King Travel. "I
like to say my husband Bob's
job showed us the country and
mine showed us the world,"
Raymond said. "I love to travel,
and after our baby turned 16 in
1984, I went to travel school,
got my first job in the travel
industry and it was in my
blood."
Raymond was born in
Arcadia and attended
University of South Florida.
"At the time I wanted to
become a stewardess for TWA,
marry a pilot and have three
kids. Then I was inl Spanish
class, and Bob walked in wear-
ing aviator shades. That's the
closest I ever got to a pilot. We
were married my ,freshman
year, so my degree, was Bob.
Although 'I never graduated
from college, all three of our
kids did," Raymond said.
Married 41 years, they have
10 grandchildren ranging from


PILED
Continued from 13A
Allow a rough estimate of
4,000 households, and that
means about 768,000 trash
cans are unloaded every year.
Remember, that's just one
municipality, and only house-
holds, it doesn't include com-
mercial trash or construction
debris. But you begin to get the
idea.
There are several sanitation
haulers in Highlands County,
but the bulk of the pickups are
done by the "big five" - the
three cities, Reliable and
Florida Recycling.
Avon Park runs two trucks,
Sebring four or five, Lake
Placid three, Reliable six and
Florida Recycling nine.
Garbage is measured in two
ways, by weight or by space.
At the collectors end, because
loads vary in weight, a truck's
capacity is usually measured in
cubic yards.
At the receiver's end, how-
ever, because space is hard to
measure, and doesn't always
correlate to the waste's impact
on the landfill, loads are sorted
and weighed and the customer
charged by the ton.
Some of the solid waste
removal supervisors I inter-
viewed for this piece spoke in
terms of yardage, others used


age 16 to new twins born this
year.
Raymond's husband is the
newly hired business analyst
for the Small Business
Development Center in
Sebring. "The great thing about
moving to Sebring for Bob's
job is that I could transfer my
travel company here. I have an
office set aside in our home. I
want to know my personal cus-
tomers, and I like them to come
into my home and see how I
live. I keep regular office hours
and take appointments.
Besides, most travel arrange-
ments are easily handled by
phone or e-mail, so I don't see a
need for a storefront,"
Raymond said.
"I don't consider seniors,
honeymooners, etc. as individ-
ual groups. I take each cus-
tomer personally and try to dis-
cover what they like and need,
so the vacation experience is
unique for them," Raymond
id. - -
The. next - trip Raymond
,wanrto take and recommend
to others is a seven-night
Mediterranean cruise on Royal
Caribbean's Splendor of the
Seas. It's a round trip from


pounds. In fact, most of the
trucks have similar capacities,
however that capacity is meas-
ured.,
A conservative estimate
averages about 20,000 to
25,000 pounds per truck, and
most trucks will need to unload
at the end of each run,
although in slow seasons it
might be every run and a half.
Of course there are times, like
the holiday season, or
Monday and Tuesdays, when
that figure rises.
So take 25 trucks and multi-
ply that by 20,000 pounds, and
the trucks collectively haul
away approximately 550,000
pounds of garbage with each
run. Multiply that by five
working days and you find that
we householders throw away
about 2,750,000 pounds of
garbage every week. More or
less, usually more.
According to Dick Gorman,
the landfill operations manag-
er, the amount of residential
trash delivered to the landfill in
May alone increased 32 per-
cent this year over last. And if
you count all trash delivered, it
was 43 percent more.
Put another way, a section of
the landfill was originally pro-
jected to max out in 25 years.
Now it looks like the area will
have to be expanded in 15
years.


Barcelona Spain, starting at
$799, and it leaves every
Saturday through Nov. 5.
Day one is Marseille, France
where C'zanne was born, then
Monte Carlo for Princess Grace
aficionados; Next is Florence,
Italy with a side trip to the lean-
ing tower of Pisa; There's
Rome and all its enticements,
and finally Naples with a look
at Mount Vesuvius, with the
last day spent at sea.
For two years after Sept. 11,
2001, it seemed Americans
stayed home, went to Mexico
or went on a cruise. But from
2004 to 2005 a surge in travel
occurred. Everyone is , now
more alert and aware about
safety, but the most common
complaint is the hassle of long
lines. Italy is very popular this
year, and Raymond just
returned from an 11-day back-
ground trip to Tahiti.
"As for a favorite, Bob and I
loved Australia, and we'd like
to go back there," Raymond
said.
Call Raymond at 382-485Q
to discuss possible travel ideas.
Her hours are from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through Friday,
and evenings and weekends by
appointment.


Then think about this
when something grows green
al Z
with mold or breaks, if you're
like me, you can't wait to get
rid of it. With no further
thought we hold that leaky bag
at arm's length, or drag the old
ratty sofa out onto the street,
wipe our hands on the seat of
our pants, grateful to be done
with it.
As long as it's bagged and in
a can we feel we've been good
citizens. We pass off the
responsibility. So we slip in
that AA battery, or the used
insulin syringe, or the outdated
propane tank, without thinking
twice.
We should think twice. The
battery leaches toxins into the
landfill, the needle could pierce
a foot, and a propane tank can
blow up under the weight of a
86,000 pound trash compactor.
Gorman hopes we trash cre-
ators will remember the people
who shovel away our mess at
the other end of the line. Good
help is hard to find, and he
can't afford to lose a single
soul to a careless explosion.


Next week Christopher
Tuffley gets a refreshing
change of pace cleaning pools.
Any person with a job they
would like to spotlight in the
Tuffin'It With Tuffley feature,
call 385-6155, ext. 528.


I _ Small Business Development


---Center counsels business owners
, -- .--\1LA ..* i ^ _____________________^---------------r.1


ri : W


BEAST
Continued from 13A
with sloping sides, staring at
one end of the cell. When the
first section reaches 92 feet in
height, garbage is added to the
slope extending the length. The
new section is raised to the
height of the first, which is then
raised even higher, and so on. A
cell tops out at about 140 feet.
When the entire rectangle has
risen to that level, a new por-
tion is opened, and the process
begins all over again.
The landfill is open from
7:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. Monday
through Saturday. It is closed
New Year's Day, the 4th of
July, Thanksgiving and
Christmas.
The telephone number is
655-6483.


1. I


By SUE ANN CARPENTER
-News-Sun correspondent
SEBRING - Eighty-five
percent of small businesses end
within three years.
And one-third of them fail
because they run out of money.
Certified Business Analyst Bob
Raymond's mission with the
Small Business Development
Center in Sebring is to help.
"There's a real need in this area
because of all the growth. I
counsel one-on-one. If some-
one's thinking of opening a
business, I can help," Raymond
said.
Raymond was born in St.
Petersburg and received his
undergraduate degree in busi-
ness from the University of
South Florida with his masters
in business administration from
Duke University. After working
in a variety of capacities for
Electronic Data Systems out of
Cleveland, Ohio for the last 19
years, he and his wife (who
operates Uniglobe King Travel,
a franchise travel company)
wanted to return to Florida to be
positioned for retirement.
"We did our research and tar-
geted this area. I found this job
on the USF Web site. Out of
100 who applied, they liked my
background and education. We
were excited to move to this
area, so I feel it is mutually for-
tunate for both of us,"
Raymond said.
A consortium of six groups
funded this position: USF,
Economic Development
Commission, Heartland
Investment Board, South
Florida Community College,
Florida Heartland Rural
Economic Development
Initiative, and the Board of
Highlands County
Commissioners.
USF felt there was now a
need for a full-time person in
Sebring. Previously they would
send a consultant monthly.
"My boss is in Tampa, as are
the resources. They have 18
employees there, so if I need a
specialist like a banker or a
CPA (certified public account-
ant), an expert on SBA'(Small
Business Association) loans, or
how to deal with government, I
can call them or bring them
here," Raymond said.
A weeklong seminar on mar-
keting and advertising was held
in May with hosts at SFCC, a
local hospital, Holiday Inn
Express, and Inn on the Lakes.
Raymond's presentation cov-
ered steps in starting a business,
advertising and marketing.
"I love the diversity of peo-
ple and types of businesses I


deal with. So far I've counseled
about possible businesses in
massage therapy, lawn care, and
with some companies who
wanted certification to be able
to deal with the government,"
Raymond said.
Since all of Highlarids
County is a Highly
Underutilized Business Zones
Raymond can assist with mak-
ing application for certification,
which takes about a month for
approval, and the certification
is free. This is especially
appealing to manufacturers
who have products to sell to the
government. There's also an
incentive of 10 percent, a 10
percent bogey really. If when
submitting a bid, a business
owner is 9 percent higher, they
are still eligible to get it.
"I also help them get regis-
tered with CCR (Central
Contractor Registration) and
NAICS (North American
Industrial Classification
System, which assigns a six
digit code to various categories
for identification and gathering
of statistics."
The only requirements for
HUBZone is that a person has
to own a small business, be a
United' States cimzen, and:have
35 percent of employees living
within the HUBZone of their
home office. The intent is to
bring business into Highlands
County and this project will
continue until 2010.
"If there's any remote chance
you might deal with the federal
government, I recommend that


you should do it," Raymond
said.
"Sometimes when I counsel,
I actually talk people out of
going into a business. I follow
my gut feeling, if I think the
business is for a wrong reason.
A person must have ability, and
financing. I don't mean to
throw water on a person's
dreams, but I try to help them
realistically prepare. I think
people work the hardest they
ever work when they work for
themselves. They have to be
self motivated, and commit-
ted," Raymond said.
This is not just for people
thinking of opening a business;
it's also for those who want to
go to the next level. Perhaps
they're thinking of expanding
by adding products or another
location and need help with
direction and focus.
"I can help them write a busi-
ness plan if they need a loan.
Anything that is business relat-
ed I can help with. I can pull
demographics, and find out
what the saturation point is. I
have access to lots of informa-
tion and am excited and willing
to share .it and ,be part of
Highland's growth and future,"
Raymond said.
The Small' Businiess
Development Center is at 2730
U.S. 27 North in Sebring Plaza,
out of the One-Stop Career
Center. For details, call
Raymond at 385-3672, ext.
240. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. Monday through Friday
and by appointment.


Eric C. Keibe
Vice President, HF
Financial Advisor
RJFS


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15A


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I


pppp-


I I - -


SUE ANN CARPENTER/News-Sun
Bob Raymond works on the phone and computer in his office at the
Small Business Development Center in Sebring.








News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


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News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


DEED TRANSFERS


March 24
* Indigo Group Ltd. to Roy
G. Karro, L5 Blk G Tomoka
Heights Sec IX, $25,000.
* Michael L. Szmit to 1040
Investment Inc., LIO0-17 BIk 46
Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sec 2,
$12,000.
* Ezequiel Labiosa to
Ulrick Dorvilus, LI/2 Blk 8
Holiday Lake Est., $25,000.
* Ezequiel Labiosa to Jules
Lubin, L3 Blk 8 Holiday Lake
Est., $12,500.
* Richard B. Carlson to
Crystal Nursery Inc., L7/8 Blk
90 Placid Lakes Sec 14,
$20,000.
* A. George Burkus to
Crystal Nursery Inc., Lll Blk
106 Placid Lakes Sec 15,
$10,000.
* Albert Mileham to Crystal
Nursery Inc., L11 Blk 274
Leisure Lakes Sec 13, $10,000..
* Ezequiel Labiosa to Amos
Ducatel, L4 Blk 8 Holiday Lake
Est., $13,000.
* J E Futch Custom Homes
Inc. to Paul Gaetano, PT L8/9
Blk 257 Lake Sebring,
$320,000.
* Fred W. Knight to Crystal
Nursery Inc., PT L4 Blk 22
Avon Park Est., $10,000.
* M R J Enterprises Inc. to
Carl E. Cline, L12 Blk 9
Orange Blossom Est. Unit 11,
$9,500.
* Jo Anne Burchfield to
Banyan Land Title Corp.,
L6243/6244 Avon Park Lakes
Unit 19, $1,700.
* Henry G. Pearson to
Banyan Land Title Corp., L2
Blk 13 Highland Park Est. Sec
S, $5,000.
* Benson Seetaram to
William Locurto, LI Blk 21
Sun 'N Lake Est. See 4,
$16,500.
* Edmond C. Thomas to
Jack W. Haneline, L10/11 Blk
74 Sebring Country Est. Sec 3,
$16,000.
* Josephine T. Ludwig to C
H L Holdings Inc., L43 Blk 166
Leisure Lakes Sec 4, $11,100.
* C H L Holdings Inc. to
Kamal Sooklall, L10 Blk 171
Leisure Lakes Sec 3/Other,
$53,000.
* Dolores D. Mercede to
Julio Labrador, L8 Blk 60 Sun
- 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 5,
$22,000.
* John F. Mercede to
Samuel L. Nunez, L13 Blk 63


Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit
5, $21,000.
* Randy Bean to Jamwant
Ramdeholl, L3 Blk 11 Lake
Haven Est. Sec 1, $32,000.
* C H L Holdings Inc. to
Maria N. Hernandez, L9 Blk 59
Leisure Lakes Sec 16, $26,000.
M C H L Holdings Inc. to
Arturo Alzate, L25 Blk 66
Leisure Lakes Sec 12, $31,000.
* Alan R. Chancey to
Ezequeil Labiosa,
L6438/6439/6499/6500 Avon
Park Lakes Unit 20, $20,000.
* Alan R. Chancey to
Ezequiel Labiosa, L6460/6461
Avon Park Lakes Unit 20,
$10,000.
* Alan R. Chancey to
Ezequeil Labiosa, L10-16 Blk
32 Avon Park Lakes Red Hill
Farms Add Unit K, $32,500.
* Patrick J. Ulrich to
Goldstar Homes Itc., L25 Blk
10 Sebring Country Est. Sec
I/Others, $90,000.
* Edward L. Maher to
Howard Builders Inc.,
L713/714 Sebring Ridge Sec C,
$27,700.
* Maria Elena Gonzalez to
Howard Builders Inc., L8 Blk
13 Sebring Ridge Sec G,
$6,500.
* Garrett Den Bleyker Jr. to
Howard Builders Inc., Lll Blk
1 Sebring Ridge Sec G,
$20,000.
* Sean Donovan to Howard
Builders Inc., L1532 Sebring
Ridge Sec F, $15,000.
* Suzanne P. Myers to J.L.
Baker Inc., J L Baker Inc., L5
Blk 23 Town of Sebring,
$50,000.
* Olga M. Vargas to Luis
Gerardo Arceo, L12 Blk 68
Sebring Country Est. Sec 3,
$21,000.
* Properties of Central
Florida to Diana Moll, L30 Blk
36 Placid Lakes Sec 19,
$24,900.
* Douglas W. Bennett to
James Brown, L24 Overlook
Terrace Sub, $2,400.
* Karla Renee Bennett to
James Brown, L24 Overlook
Terrace Sub, $2,400.
* Elizabeth Nichols to Jose
G. Esquilin, L7 Blk A Cherokee
Heights Sub, $56,000.

March 28
* Eddie N. McElroy to
Raymond Moro, L728 Sebring
Ridge Sec E, $3,500.


* Frances K. Neely to
Richard P. Neely, L7 Blk 255
Sun 'N Lake Est. Lake Placid
Sec 20, $142,000.
* Jack R. Stroup to
Jainarine Singh, L4 Blk 191
Woodlawn Terrace Sub, $9,500.
* Christine Hurley Mills to
Innovative Investment
Strategies, L1401/1402 Avon
Park Lakes Unit 4, $8,500.
* Rosemary Fender to
Innovative Investment
Strategies, L2514/2515 Avon
Park Lakes Unit 8, $8,500.
* Margaret B. Senn to
Millard D. Sunderland, PT L40
Blk 2 Lake June Hills, $35,000.
* James A. Hoekenga to
John D. Allspaw Jr., L92 Twin
Lakes Est., $22,000.
* Blanca Josefina Genty to
Carlos Cuervo, L5 Blk 91 Sun
'N Lake Est. Sec 10, $13,000.
* M B S S Investment Inc.
to Willis H. Michaelson, Lll
Blk 13 Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sec 3,
$17,000.
* Manuel A. Oliveras to
Florida Majestic Properties,
LI3 Blk 30 Lake Haven Est.
Sec 2, $18,000.
* Mark Inc. to Jay Orlow,
L10 Blk 2 Lake Regency
Woods, $145,000.
* Heriberto Galan to Steven
F. Goyette, L5 Blk E Spring
Lake Village II, $20,000.
* Properties of Central
Florida to Amerifirst Properties
Inc., L13447-13450 Avon Park
Lakes Unit 42, $34,900.
* Properties of Central
Florida to Churaman Maharaj,
LI1/12 Bik 7 Avon Park Lakes
Red Hill Farms Add Unit D,
$17,500.
* O.L. Wisely to Banyan
Land Title Corp., L17/18 Blk
66 Leisure Lakes Sec 12,
$1,000.
* Joan L. Andrews to
Banyan Land Title Corp.,
L 11806/11807 Avon Park Lakes
Unit 37, $2,700. .
* Eddie Carrico to Equity
Trust Co., L7 Blk 78 Orange
Blossom Country Club
Community Unit 17, $14,300.
* Walter A. Katz to Ronald
Klepzig, L8/9/18/19 Blk 14
Highlands Park Est. Sec F,
$64,000.
* Leroy Shakes to Verdieu
Nord, L28 Blk 114 Placid
Lakes Sec 16, $20,000.
* Highvest Corp. to Roger
C. McCann, L32 Blk E Replat


PT Lake Placid Camp Florida
Resort, $32,900.
* Leota F. Madden to John
F.K. Varricchio, L4-6 Blk 11
Town of Harding Sec 2,
$25,000.
* Herder George Den to
Highlands Park Estates Group,
L12 Blk 6 Highlands Park Est.
Sec C, $7,500.
* Ana Quintana to Willis H.
Michaelson, L18 Blk 218 Sun
'N Lake Est. Sec 19, $15,000.
* Highvest Corp. to James
Lucey, L5 Blk H Replat PT
Lake Placid Camp Florida
Resort, $35,900.
* Alan W. Chastain to Ivy
Brown, L15 Blk 21 Orange
Blossom Est. Unit 12, $7,500.
* Wilfredo Fernandez
Orellana to Antonio Rodriguez,
L4 Blk 101 Sun 'N Lake Est.
Sebring Unit 8, $5,200.
* Carl F.- Stevenson to
Thomas R. Rebec, L25-A
Cormorant Point Sub Unit II,
$110,000.
* David A. Smith to Bhrgu
Itwaru, PT L9 Blk 14 Town of
Avon Park, $52,000.
* Manuel Neris Flores to
Entrust Administration, L13
Blk 35 Sebring Hills South,
$15,000.
* Alphonso Jackson to Jose
Quinones, L174/174-A Sebring
Ridge Sec C, $105,000.
* Flora Fuerst to Nova Star
Investments Inc., LI Blk 91
Orange Blossom Country Club
Community Unit 18, $500.
* Rocio Escobar to Caliton
Buitrago, L8230/8231 Avon
Park Lakes Unit 26, $19,900.
* Neal E. McGilvary to
Joseph A. Hull, L10 Blk 6
Leisure Lakes Sec 1, $78,000.
* Lawrence Albright to
Beharry Singh, L5663-5665
Avon Park Lakes Unit 18,
$5,000.
* David A. Bennett to Paul
A. Ors, L11095-11099 Avon
Park Lakes Unit 34, $24,000.
* Nancy Ayala to Liloutie
Ahuja, L12666/12667 Avon
Park Lakes Unit 40, $6,500.
* Sebastian Del Rio
Martinez to Francisca Wong,
L1161-1165 Avon Park Lakes
Unit 4, $7,000.
* Frank A. Franze to Mark
S. Rupert, L24/25 PT L23
Lakeview Place Sub, $22,900.
* Paul H. McClanahan Jr. to
C & S Land Co., PT L2 Blk 11
Sec 15-33-58, $149,100.
* Floyd Yarbrough to
Robert Helpling, L497 Sebring
Hills/Other, $139,900.
* Jerry Ryan to Lewis E.
Snavely, L3/4 Blk 129
Northside Sub, $19,000.
* J.M. Smith to Sandra
Tyrell, PT Gov't. L10 In See
12-35-30, $12,500.
* John Curran to Perfilo
Beckford, L25 Blk 203 Sun 'N
Lake Est. Sec 18, $8,000.
* Richard Mavis to Samuel
Gooden, L132 Blue Heron Golf
& Country Club, $24,900.
* Richard Mavis to Samuel
Gooden, L131 Blue Heron Golf
& Country Club, $24,900.
* Placid Lakes Country
Club Inc. to Nathan Rowe, LI
Blk 55 Placid Lakes Sec 19,
$25,500.
* Edward Robertson Jr. to
Christopher S. Capuano, L13
Blk 2 Country Walk, $177,500.
* Hector M. Lopez to
Laguna Properties of Florida,
L19 Blk 93 Sun 'N Lakes Est.
Sec 11, $8,000.
* Edgar Paz-Alvarado to
Alfonso Donies, L4 Blk 256


Leisure Lakes Sec 5, $14,000.
M Elizabeth Palmer to Starr-
Lite Pools of Highlands Co., PT
Sec 34-35-29, $225,000.
* Bryan Miner to Elmer E.
Watson, L7 Bristols Mobile
Court Unrec, $39,000.
* Franklin T. Boyer to
Robert Douglas, PT L7 Blk 2
Lake Blue Est., $98,000.
* David J. Gangeri to
Felicia R. Lewis, L26 Blk 443
Leisure Lakes Sec 17, $22,000.
* James F. Helmeke to
William Heath Ward, L15
Sebring Hills, $117,000.
* Celestine 0. Ezenwa to
Ashok J. Patel, PT Sec 27-34-
28, $92,000.
* Stephen A. Franchi to
Maria B. Flynn, L6769/6770
Avon Park Lakes Unit 21,
$9,000.
* Israel Rodriguez Martell
to Patricia L. Palmer, L 1 Blk A
Spring Lake Village, $30,000.
* John J. Bradley to Lucille
C. Tyson, L3 Blk 13 Placid
Lakes Sec 2, $22,000.
* Rubin E. Halter to Daniel
Fulghum, L14 Blk 84 Orange
Blossom Country Club
Community Unit 18, $8,000.
* Marlon Parker to David L.
Price, LI Blk 307 Leisure
Lakes Sec 13, $18,000.
* Tilden R. Schofield to
Daniel Fulghum, L27/28 Blk 94
Orange Blossom Country Club
Community Unit 18, $15,000.
* Avtec Engineering Inc. to
Gene A. Veliquette, L27
Hampton Woods Sub,
$279,300.
* Everett E. Hamblen to
Daniel Fulghum, L8 Blk 43
Orange Blossom Country Club
Community Unit 15, $10,000.
* Alexander A. Vega to
Amerifirst Properties Inc.,
L12621-12623 Avon Park
Lakes Unit 40, $19,900.
* Robert E. Ary to Daniel
Fulghum, L10 Blk 115 Orange
Blossom Country Club
Community Unit 19, $5,000.
* Gaspare Boncimino to
Daniel Fulghum, L34 Blk 55
Orange Blossom Country Club
Community Unit 16/Other,
$20,000.
* River Greens Golf Course
Inc. to Keith E. Albritton, I7
Village Green Sub, $30,9q0.
* Daniel Fulghum to Marie
Elodie Jean, L24/25 Blk 10
Highlands Park Est. Sec D,
$22,000.
* Antonio Rios Rivera to
Daniel Fulghum, L4 Blk 9 Sun
'N Lakes Est. Holiday Country
Club Sec, $6,500.
* Richard D. Roarick to
Raymond T. Boeshart, L36 The
Knoll Sub, $67,000.
* Blanca Rosa LaBorde to
Peter J. Michaelson, L15 Blk 26
Sun 'N Lake Est. Sec 5,
$14,000.
* Phyllis Lucas to Gladys A.
Salmeron, L42 Blk 7 Orange
Blossom Est. Unit 6, $7,000.
* Shirley May Claus to
Daniel Fulghum, L22 Blk 68


Orange Blossom Country Club
Community Unit 17, $6,000.
* Darlene J. Walker to
Daniel Fulghum, L22 Blk 81
Orange Blossom Country Club
Community Unit 18, $9,000.
* Homer Robert
Chamberlain to Patrick Curtis,
L8 Blk 336 Sun 'N Lake Est.
Sebring Unit 16, $25,000.
* Dennis C. Griffin to
Grantley E. Simpson, L19 Blk
12 Placid Lakes Sec 2, $22,000.
* Dennis E. Orlos to
Richard T. Bond, PT Sec 2-37-
29/Other, $500,000.
* David J. Gangeri to
Chander Naresh, L8/9 Blk 452
Leisure Lakes Sec 17, $38,000.
* Frederick Sacco to
Richard Harper, L5 Blk 213
Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sec 18,
$13,000.
* Aida Robledo De Mas to
Clifton M. Beckford, L16 Blk
200 Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sec 19,
$13,000.
* Nicholus Schustyk to
Saunji Fyffe, L9 Blk 146 Sun 'N
Lake Est. of Sebring Unit 10,
$19,000.
* Jai Ock Chu to Ivan A.
Velasquez, L25 Blk 330 Sun 'N
Lake Est. of Sebring Unit 16,
$30,000.
* Pedro Ramirez to Helena
Panigirakis, PT Sec 7-36-
29/Easement, $180,000.
* Hadrian Leisure Inc. to
James S. Blake Jr., L4 Blk 1
Highlands Park Est. Sec Z,
$10,000.
* James S. Blake Jr. to
James S. Lake Jr. and Leonor D.
Martinez, L4 Blk 1 Highlands
Park Est. Sec Z, $12,000.
* Casimir Zielinski to Ivan
Williams, Lll Blk 1 Highlands
Park Est. Sec B, $14,000.
* Thurston A. Faris to
Stephen R. Klutey, L13
Thunderbird Hill East, $60,500.
* Angelen R. Geurink to
Gregg S. Foster, L7 Blk 83
Orange Blossom Country Club
Community Unit 18, $2,000.
* Thomas Fogarty to
Clarence Fred Neeley, L9/10
Blk H Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sec 4,
$268,000.
* Hadrian Leisure Inc. to
Stewart Dunn, L24 Blk 12
Highlands Park Est. Sec Z,
$4,000.
* Rene Smit to James L.
Thomas, L504 Replat PT
Dearin Lakefront Est.,
$115,000.
* Mary E. Baker to
Mathilde Alabiad, Lll Blk 26
Highlands Park Est. Sec P,
$12,000.
* Billie Jo Carlson to
Robert J. McDarby, PT L4/5
Blk 208 Altamont Place Add,
$61,500.
* Agnes P. Fuchs to Daniel
Fulghum, L10 Blk 50 Orange
Blossom Country Club
Community Unit 15, $8,000.
* Daniel Fulghum to
Paulette Vilmar, L23 Blk 10
Highlands Park Est. Sec D,
$11,000.


Service Times
10:00 am Contemporary Rites
A modern service ot Music, Praise
& Holy Communion
Services being held at South Florida
Commuuty College
F.-,ll,, . h -i ii-n.I

Child Care -will be available

-Every Wednesday Night-
Bible Study 7:00pmr - 8:30pm
Fellowship & Newcomers Welcome
Held in Rectory; 18 E. Pleasant St.,
Avon Park

-Friendship Sunday - Today-
Service with Holy Communion at 10:00am
followed by covered dish luncheon.
Setups, beverages and meat provided.


ww dvnediremta .n


18A


Caladiums in bloom


JARRETT BAKER/News-Sun
A teen-age field worker picks weeds in a field of caladiums at Happiness Farms in Lake Placid on
Wednesday. The caladium fields are in full bloom now.


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Objecting soldier gets prison for refusing Iraq duty


40-year-old said he
was tired of seeing
misery of war
By RUSS BYNUM
Associated Press Writer
FORT STEWART, Ga. -
While his fellow Army troops
finish a yearlong deployment in
Iraq, Sgt. Kevin Benderman
will begin serving a 15-month
prison sentence for refusing to
return to war with them - a
decision he insisted was based
on conscience rather than disre-
gard for duty.
"I am not against soldiers,"
Benderman told a military
judge before being sentenced at
his court-martial Thursday.
"Though some might take my


actions as being against sol-
diers, I want everyone to be
home and safe and raising their
families. I don't want anyone to
be hurt in a combat zone."
The 40-year-old Army
mechanic was embraced by
anti-war advocates and scorned
by soldiers when he refused a
second combat tour in Iraq in
January, saying the destruction
and misery he witnessed there
during the 2003 invasion turned
him against war.
Col. Donna M. Wright, the
military judge presiding over
the court-martial, convicted
Benderman of missing move-
ment - meaning he skipped his
Jan. 8 deployment flight. Along
with his prison sentence,


Benderman will receive a dis-
honorable discharge and have
his rank reduced to private.
However, Wright acquitted
Benderman on the more serious
charge of desertion, which is
.punishable by up to five years
in prison.
Defense attorneys argued the
Army wanted to punish
Benderman for seeking a dis-
charge as a conscientious objec-
tor and speaking out publicly
about his anti-war views.
Prosecutors said he had an obli-
gation. to deploy while the
Army considered his objector
application, which Benderman
filed 10 days before his 3rd
Infantry Division unit
deployed.


Benderman's company com-
mander in the division's 3rd
Forward Support Battalion,
Capt. Gary Rowley, applauded
the verdict for sending a mes-
sage to other soldiers who may
look for a way out of serving in
Iraq.
"If they saw this and found
out it works using smoke and
mirrors to get by, we'll have
other soldiers saying, 'Well, I'm
a conscientious objector,"' said
Rowley, who returned to Fort
Stewart from Iraq to testify at
Benderman's court-martial.
"They need to know there are
consequences for not doing
their duty."
William Cassara,
Benderman's civilian defense


Enrollment in schools sets record


EDITOR'S NOTE: The
News-Sun has been publishing
news about Highlands County
since 1927 as a treat for our
readers. We have gone through
the archives and pulled stories
that we will share on future
Sunday. Sit back and enjoy this
Flash from the Past of Sept. 1,
1966.

A record number of children,
even more than school officials
had anticipated enrolled during
the opening day of Highlands
County Schools Monday.
School Superintendent
George F. Douglass said the 10
public schools enrolled 5,448


students on the opening day,
233 more than the first day of
the 1965-66 school year.
"Enrollment always grows as
the school year goes along and I
feel certain Highlands County
will top 6,000 by the end of the
school year," Douglass predict-
ed Tuesday.
Teachers were available for
each class Monday, Douglass
said, but he is still seeking some
staff. A librarian is needed for
the E.O. Douglass School and a
science teacher at Carver and
additional classroom teachers
will be needed as enrollment
grows, the superintendent said.
Sharpest climb in enrollment


Highlands County Commission Agenda
August 2, 2005


1. Meeting called to order
2. Invocation and Pledge of
Allegiance
3. Call for "Citizens not on
the agenda" forms to be turned
in
4. ANNOUNCEMENTS
A. Clerk
B. Sheriff
C. Upcoming County
meetings:
* Tuesday, 3 p.m. -
- Highlands Soil and Water
Conservation District, 4509
George Blvd., Sebring
* Wednesday, Noon -
Public Safety Coordinator
Council Sub-Committee, 600
S. Commerce Ave., Room 251,
Sebring
* Monday, Aug. 8, 9
a.m. - Highlands County
Homeowners Association,
3240 Grand Prix Drive,
Sebring
* Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2
p.m. - Veterans Advisory
Board, 7205 S. George Blvd.,
Sebring
* Wednesday, Aug. 10,
10 a.m. - Highlands County
Community Traffic Safety
Team. 4509 George Blvd.,
Sebring
D. Other meetings:
5. CONSENT AGENDA:
A. Request approval to
pay all duly authorized bills
and employee benefits Aug. 2,
2005
B. Request approval for
a Satisfaction of Mortgage for
Michael Anthony
Leone
C. Request approval for
a Satisfaction of Mortgage for
Larry Allen Lowder
D. Request approval of
notice of nuisance for case CE
05050178, 3703 County Road
17 South, Sebring
'E. Request approval of
notice of nuisance for case CE
05050179, 3709 County Road
17 South, Sebring


F. Request approval of
notice of nuisance for case CE
05050175, 2701 Hacienda Dr.
Lorida
G. Request approval of
notice of nuisance for case CE
05050174, 3208 Elaine Drive,
Lorida
H. Request approval and
signature of Agreement,
recording Quit Claim Deed and
drainage easement for Sparta
Road 'Widening ahd
Res irfacing Project
I. Request approval of
the Technical and Clarifying
Revision to the SHIP
Local Housing Assistance
Plan
J. Request approval of
the update to the 4 H Arena
Use Manual and Stall
Rental Agreement
K. Request approval of


..-.- The increase at Avon Park
was 107 to bring the total
enrollment to 2,025.
,,^, , The enrollment by schools is
--' . f) as follows: Sebring High
fr t "School, 844, up 62; Woodlawn
IND Elementary, 619, up 14; Fred
Wild-DeSoto City, 332, up 22(
E.O. Douglass, 428, down 67.
has come at Lake Placid where Avon Park High School, 728,
1,146 students are registered. up 99; Avon Elementary, 844,
This is an increase of 90 - up 20; Hopewell (which this
almost 10 percent above the year dropped its grade 10). 453,
opening day in 1965-66. The down 12.
smallest percentage gain is in Lake Placid High School,
the Sebring schools where an 410, up 103; Lake Placid
increase of 31 students sent the Elementary, 452, up 5: Carver,
'total enrollment to 2,277. 284, down 13.


Certification of Mileage
L. Request approval of
Resolution & budget amend-
ment 04-05-271; 272
6. ACTION:
A. James Reagan:
Requesting assistance with
flooded roads in Toni Circle
B. Dave Simpson:
Requesting closure of Lake
Denton Boat Ramps
C. Pamela Cross: Interim
Financial Report of Key
Operating Performance
Measures as of June 30.2005
D. Clell Ford:-Request
approval of Agreement
OT050887 with South Florida
Water Management for Lake
Istokpoga Canal Maintenance
Dredging and Sediment
Removal.
E. County Administrator:
1. Request approval of
budget amendment 04-05-268
decreasing funds 005 Reserve
for Contingency.


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2. Request approval a
lease for the Animal Control
facility
7. CITIZENS NOT ON
AGENDA: 5 minute limit
(Agenda Request form must be
filled out)
8. COMMISSIONERS:
A. Commissioner
Barbara Stewart: Resolution to
show support and appreciation
to the Battery B, 3rd Battalion.
116 Field Artillery (Bravo
Battery) Florida Army National
Guard deploying in support of
Operation Iraqi Freedoimi
-9. ADJOURN


,.'* ',t^
-*.1,'* ,%:


p, :

V ,."


attorney, told the judge
Benderman skipped his deploy-
ment I'-lght because of confu-
sion rather than defiance. He
said Benderman's senior non-
commissioned officer relieved
him from duty hours before his
unit deployed to work on his
objector application.
Benderman, he said, thought he
had been excused.
"I think the sentence was
overly harsh," Cassara said,
adding that Benderman would
get an automatic appeal. "I do
not believe Sgt. Benderman
would have been prosecuted to


the degree that he was had he.
not filed for conscientious
objector status."
Benderman stood straight
and emotionless as Wright sen-
tenced him Thursday. He then
turned to kiss his wife, Monica
Benderman, who wore a strip of
yellow ribbon in her hair.
During the sentencing phase
of his trial, Benderman testified
he grew opposed to war after
witnessing scenes of grisly mis-
ery in Iraq - a young girl suf-
fering third-degree burns, Iraqis
.drinking from mud puddles and
dogs feeding on mass graves.


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--~--~II-,----~---- = -------- ----- -- - I -


News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


19A












20A





NewsSun
Serving Highlands Count) since 1927


News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


EDITORIALS/OPI N IONS



Scotty says 'Beam me up God'


ROMONA WASHINGTON
Executive Editor
SCOTT DRESSEL
Sports Editor


Global warming: It's real
Here's a big exclamation point reiterating what's been
obvious to just about everyone except the Bush adminis-
tration for several years:
Global warming is real, caused by increasing levels of
greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and it's largely the
result of the burning of fossil fuels.
That was the clear conclusion of Ralph Cicerone, the
new head of the National Academy of Sciences, who told
a Senate committee last week that scientific consensus on
the issue has been reached.
Even President Bush has acknowledged, very belatedly,
that human activity is raising the Earth's temperature.
But he still refuses to have the U.S. sign the Kyoto
Accords to limit gas emissions, claiming voluntary pro-
grams and cleaner technologies can be used instead to
reverse the dangerous trend.
Bush and too many members of Congress still have their
heads in the sand on this critical issue.
They've refused to mandate federal caps on emissions in
favor of useless, nonbinding resolutions to do something,
sort of, someday.
Their foot-dragging only serves to hasten the severe,
massively disruptive climate changes that lie ahead if solu-
tions to global warming aren't quickly implemented.
Capping greenhouse gas emissions is the crucial first
step.

This is an excerpt from Florida Today.


FEMA's cleanup fiasco
As Hurricane Dennis bore down on the Panhandle July
10, Escambia County residents and work crews still had
their hands full with the debris from Hurricane Ivan, which
hit 10 months ago.
The biggest problem is that the Federal Emergency
Management Agency takes too long to approve cleanup
and sets deadlines for their completion that counties must
meet to be reimbursed for expenses.,
The final FEMA deadline for Ivan was May 31.
Incredibly, the agency refused to extend it - even though
debris still was a problem and Escambia government,
which is strapped for cash, had asked for more time.
- Setting any type of cleanup deadline for coping with
effects of natural disasters is ludicrous, especially in hurri-
cane-prone states such as Florida.
In addition, some residents, who already have endured
enough pain, -are faced with an absurd exercise in debris
identification. Since the FEMA deadline for Ivan has
passed, residents are not supposed to throw debris from
that storm in roadside piles during the current aftermath. If
they do - and monitors somehow can tell it's not from
Dennis - the stuff won't be picked up. This is asinine.
Cleanup procedures should be expedited and made more
flexible. And FEMA agents should be given the authority
to make decisions in the field, where they can see damage
for themselves. In Escambia's case, officials say, decisions
to approve or deny cleanup efforts were made by FEMA
officials in Orlando who never saw the destruction. That's
stupid. FEMA needs to clear the bureaucratic clutter from
the process.

This is an excerpt from The Tampa Tribune.,


College binge drinking on rise
Gainesville has a problem with binge drinking. The
University of Florida has a problem with binge drinking.
And from a liability standpoint, the owners of the city's
bars and night clubs really ought to have a problem with
binge drinking as well.
But while there has been a lot of discussion about how
to combat binge drinking in a college town that has seen
its share of alcohol-related deaths, there isn't exactly com-
mon agreement about what contributes to the problem.
Take the issue of drink specials.
UF, city leaders and law enforcement officials contend
that bars offering free-or-cheap drink specials as a lure to
bring in customers contribute to the problem of binge
drinking.
City commissioners have talked about restricting drink
specials, but lack the legal authority to do so. But with the
recent establishment of the Gainesville Responsible
Hospitality Council, it is hoped that bar and club owners
might be induced to voluntarily cooperate with communi-
ty efforts to curtail binge drinking.
And there is reason to be optimistic in that regard. Early
council discussions may soon lead to better training of bar
employees to spot underage customers and a more cooper-
ative relationship between bars and law enforcement to
combat illegal sales to minors.
It is undeniable that cheap or free drink specials are
designed to .pack in as many customers as possible, and
that the lure is the promise of a cheap drunk. To the extent
that collegiate binge drinkers tend to be "party animals,"
they are less likely to be sitting quietly at home drinking
30 shots of vodka than out partying in packed bars offer-
ing cheap beer and liquor.
City commissioners should renew their attempt to get
the Florida Legislature to authorize the regulation of such
promotions, on the argument that the bars offering them


"are not good neighbors."

This is an excerpt from The Gainesville Sun.


Of all the versions
of Star Trek that have LAURA
come and gone, the
first one holds a spe- Laur
cial place in my heart. _
It is not necessarily
my favorite one, but it was the
trailblazer, the one that made all
the subsequent ones possible.
From that three year run we
were introduced to Vulcans and
transporters and Klingons and
many other concepts that were
building blocks for the future
series.
My favorite character from
the first series was not the dash-
ing Captain Kirk or the cool,
logical Mr. Spock. It was
Scotty, engineer extraordinaire,
who I liked the best.
The Scotsman could proba-
bly have built a warp engine
from a combination of duct
tape, twine, and a bent paper
clip. If Kirk and Spock decided
to take a jaunt off the ship,
Scotty was more than able to sit
in the Captain's chair and run
things.
The actor who portrayed the


Stop supporting

oil companies
Editor,
"This bill would funnel $2.7
billion in tax breaks to oil and
gas industries and provide addi-
tional support in form of royal-
ty relief, including $500 million
over 10 years for research into
drilling in extremely deep areas
of the Gulf of Mexico, would
provide $14.5 billion in energy
tax breaks, much of it to tradi-
tional energy companies. It also
provides money for promoting
renewable energy sources and
new energy technologies and
measures to revitalize the
nuclear power industry, but is
expected to do little to reduce
United States oil consumption
or dampen high energy prices,"
according to an AP article
today.
If this is accurate, the bill
falls very short on the reality of
alternative fuel being aggres-
sively pursued to save the plan-
et from global warming, pollu-


'S LOOK

a Ware

Vancouve
on Marcl
the Cana
and was o
ed on Ju
His time
finger, bu
pursuing
Dooha
tried ou
accents %
for the p
chief eng
interview
asked hii
the best.
character
neer, you
Scotsman
they say,
In som
that histo
when Ja
away at
and pne


memorable Scotsman second of the original cast to
had a life nearly as travel on; Deforest Kelley, who
full of adventure as played Dr. McCoy in the series,
his starship counter- died in 1999. That did not make
part. James Doohan Doohan's passing any less sad
was born in to his fans.
er, British Columbia, Online, Star Trek news-
h 3, 1920. He joined groups were filled with tributes
dian army at age 19 and memories. Doohan was
one of those who land- mostly remembered as an actor
ino Beach on D-Day. who was courteous to fans. That
in the war cost him a may not sound like much, but
it didn't stop him from you have to realize that Star
a career in acting. Trek fans can be pretty ... let's
n, a master of dialects, say enthusiastic, and it takes a
ut several different special person to bear with us.
vhen he was reading He didn't even mind being
art of the Enterprise's associated with the catch
gineer. He said in an phrase, "Beam me up, Scotty."
/ that the producers Oddly enough, no one ever
m which one he liked actually said "beam me up,
He told them, "If this Scotty," in the old series or any
's going to be an engi- of the movies, but that didn't
I'd better make him a bother Trek fans. In an inter-
n." And the rest, as view in 1998, Doohan remi-
is history. nisced that he'd heard the
ne ways, a chapter of phrase shouted to him across
ry closed on July 20, four lanes on the freeway going
mes Doohan passed 70 miles an hour. "It's been
age 85 of Alzheimer's fun," he said.
umonia. He was the Today I learned that his fam-


tion and possible nuclear plant
accidents with radiation con-
tamination to all. It would be
more prudent to budget the
majority of our tax dollars for
solar, wind and solar cell type
technology as the energy of
choice for now and the future.
We need to stop the abusive
welfare state of the large energy
and oil companies. Our future is
one of independence from
them. It appears that we have
the best legislative branch oil
and energy money buys, forget
the moneyless paying taxpay-
ers. In the end your bill will per-
meate more wars, again, allow-
ing the murders of many inno-
cent people, causing much per-
manent suffering to many inno-
cent families, many animals,
and ultimately, the total
destruction of the environment.
I challenge anyone to
respond to the above accusa-
tions with specifics about this
bill.
Mario Rivera
Winter Haven


Where are the

game rooms?
Editor:
I recently wrote a letter
regarding the game rooms
which were closed because it
was supposedly against the law
at least that's what I've been
told.
There has been nothing in the
papers recently from anyone
other than the ones that really
miss the opportunity to go to
the game rooms. How mu=h
pleasure did that give us seniors
who stay at home and have no
other forms of entertainment for
such a small amount and can
reap rewards such as gift certifi-
cates to the local markets and
restaurants. A placemto go in tf
afternoons to meet rie,'. friend,.
have fun and even . snack ori
two.
Can someone in the 'Know'
please inform our local papers
to what is happening? Will the
game rooms be once again in
operation, or do we just have to


ily is planning to have a portion
of his ashes shot into space.
Space Services, a Houston
company that specializes in
space memorials (I am not kid-
ding) indicated it would do so
later this year. It seems fitting,
somehow, that a man who
showed viewers adventures in
the stars should himself travel
among them, at least for a short
time.
My prayers are with the fam-
ily of James Doohan in their
loss. Scotty, however, will live
on. As long as there is a Trek
fan, the engineer will continue /
to burnish his reputation as a
"miracle worker" as he and his
fellow crewmates travel the
galaxy in imaginations the
world over. And those of us
whose imaginations were fired
up by men and women such as
Doohan are grateful for it.
Laura Ware is a Sebring resi-
dent and a contributing colum-
nist to the News-Sun. She. can
be contacted by e-mail at book-
wormlady @earthlink.nfiet


forget about them? Please tell
us what is going on. Thank you.
Helene Hamrick and friends
Lake Placid


Get tax exempt

items straight
Editor,
As a voter in the state of
Florida and at the same time a
college student trying to
become a special education
teacher that has a very tight and
limited budget for school sup-
plies, it is sad to know that the
legislators who are in charge
are not bight enough to see that
essential items for school, such
as binders, markers, construc-
tion paper, ect., are not tax
exempt yet items that are not
essential for school*such as
swimsuits, snowsuits, tuxedos,
ect. are tax exempt.
What is wrong with this pic-
ture?
Jack Z Sanders III
Lake Placid


Redes'Rspos


How do you feel about all
the new growth in Highlands
County?

Growth does not pay for
itself. Our Board of County
Commissioners has finally,
after years of pleading by con-
cerned citizens, agreed with
that fact. A public meeting will
be held in August and hopeful-
ly, the process will be started,
giving Highlands County the


authority to impose impact fees
on all new development.
John Williams and myself
will feel vindicated in our con-
stant appeal to the County
Commission for these fees fnd
as just mere citizens seem to
have had the forward vision that
seemed to be lacking in our
well paid Board of County
Commissioners, whose vision
seems always to be obscured
with the rosy picture of unbri-


dled growth.


Hank Kowalski
Lake Placid


London has been attacked
twice in less than a month. As
an American, does that con-
cern you?

Our founding forefathers left
that Godless country because of
its way of life to establish a free
nation! What does bother me is


this nation's government over
the past 20-plus years. It seems
to me that they are like a dog
returning to its own vomit.
Then it also bothers me that our
people don't have the guts to
take our country back. This
country is ours, not the govern-
ment's. We reap what we sow
friends, so go ahead and shut
your eyes.
Russell Willsey
Sebring


'Knowledge and understanding of the past is vital equipment for a

society as it moves into its future. Transparency in government defines

true

democracy.'
ANTHONY SUMMERS, author, 2001


RALPH BUSH
Publisher
CINDY MARSHALL
Night/Weekend Editor


Letters-
















A war aimed mainly at killing Iraqi civilians


Forget for a moment how
shamelessly President George
W. Bush tried to manipulate
Americans' emotions by invok-
ing Sept. 11 six times during his
recent prime-time sales pitch
for staying the course in Iraq.
There is no need to recall the
reports finding no connection
between that day's terrorist
attacks and Iraq, and no call for
repeating that Iraq was not in
danger of becoming a "safe
haven" for al-Qaida until after it
was invaded. The president
doesn't really claim otherwise.
Instead, he says that, since
the invasion, "ruthless killers"
affiliated with al-Qaida "are
converging on Iraq to fight the
advance of peace and freedom."
Whatever its pre-war state of



Space is
Notwithstanding the CIA
evaluation after Sept. 11, 2001,
that a missile attack on the
United States is the least likely
threat to our nation, the Bush
administration fanned the fears
of terror to implement plans to
weaponize space under the
guise of its so called "missile
defense" program. In order to
move forward, Mr. Bush
trashed the Anti-Ballistic
Missile Treaty with Russia.
That increased the certainty that
the development of anti-ballis-
tic. missiles would lead to an
arms race and would forestall
further efforts for nuclear disar-
mament.
Indeed, as nations met during
the subsequent treaty review
last month, newspaper head-
lines trumpeted that the Air


affairs, today Iraq has become a
"central front" in the global war
on these extremist Islamists.
Hence, the United States has
only one option-"to defeat
them abroad before they attack
us at home." This is the so-
called "flypaper" theory of the
war on terrorism: If you can't
find al-Qaida fighters where
they are hiding, attract them to
an overseas locale where over-
whelming U.S. firepower will
guarantee their demise. Mr.
Bush made this theory the cen-
terpiece of his effort to con-
vince Americans that an open-
ended military deployment in
Iraq is "vital to the future secu-
rity of our country."
Forget that U.S. commanders
in Iraq say "foreign fighters"


constitute a tiny minority of the an strife. Clearly, bombings
insurgents they are battling, outside mosques and in market-
Don't unravel the tangled logic places have exacted a dispro-
whereby the bait luring jihadis portionate civilian toll. Still
to Iraq is also the only means of more civilian bystanders have
saving Iraq from their mortars died in attacks directed at
and car bombings. Did anyone recruits of the nascent Iraqi
ask Iraqis if they wanted the police force and national guard,
United Stateg to hang or at U.S. troops.
its flypaper in their Iraqis for their part
country? GUEST COLUMN are not confused about
Iraqi civilians, after whether the U.S. pres-
all, have taken the vast Chris Toensing ence is the cause or the
majority of casualties cure for this insecurity.
inflicted by the small jihadi As far 'back as May 2004, a
wing of the insurgency. Iraq's U.S.-sponsored poll found that
interior minister states that 59 percent of Iraqi Arabs
12,000 civilians have been thought attacks on U.S. soldiers
killed during the past 18 occurred because the attackers
months, most of them Shiites. want all foreign forces to leave,
They were victims of Sunni and, 53 percent thought they
jihadis' attempt to stoke sectari- occurred to protect Iraqi nation-


no place for cowboys


Force was already seeking per-
mission to deploy its lethal
assortment of space weapons.
These included killer satellites,
space lasers to hit targets on
earth, radio waves to disable
enemy communications, and
the blasphemously named "rods
from God," 250 pound tungsten
bars which can be hurled down
from an orbiting platform.
Right now, we are in a costly
arms race with ourselves.
Russia and China repeatedly
call on the United Nations to
begin negotiations on a treaty to
ban weapons in space: Last
year, every nation on earth
voted to support their resolution
except the United States, Israel,
and Micronesia. The 1967
Outer Space Treaty prohibits
weapons of mass destruction in


space, but doesn't ban the cur-
rent U.S. space weapons in
development. It is folly to
assume that the United States
can "dominate and control the
military use of space," as the
U.S. Space Command
proclaims, or that it is
"possible to project GUEST
power through and
from space in response Alic
to events anywhere in


the world." Just as we were
unable to maintain a monopoly
in nuclear weapons, we will
face a similar challenge in
space. Indeed, Russia, which
has declared that it will not be
the first country to field
weapons in space, also
announced that it would consid-
er resorting to force were the
United States to put a combat


C
eS


weapon ou
announced
develop "p
lites that
selves to U
rupt and
gr
'OLUMN ad
- tic
later en
is
ability to c
tion of nuc
earth. A
Command
Lance Lo
superiority
attack as w
attack" in
the new
Global St
United St


al dignity. Undoubtedly, the ele-
ments of the insurgency that tar-
get civilians have ulterior
motives-from killing Shiites
because they are "infidels" to
fomenting civil war-as well as
the aspiration to expel U.S. sol-
diers from the heartland of clas-
sical Islamic civilization. But
the fact remains that these dark
forces-whether they are of
foreign or indigenous - have
been unleashed by the U.S.-led
invasion and occupation.
It is offensive, to be sure, that
the White House still thinks
Americans are so gullible as to
believe that the Sept. 11 attacks
justify the war in Iraq. But the
Bush administration reveals
even greater contempt for both
the public's intelligence and its


who carry small
ut there. And China bombard the planet with a half-
I possible plans to ton of munitions that could
>arasitic" microsatel- destroy targets "anywhere in
could attach them- the world." Is it any wonder that
J.S. satellites and dis- countries designated by Mr.
destroy them on Bush as the "axis of evil," like
round command. Iran and North Korea, seek
Further, the Bush nuclear weapons as a hedge
Administration's fixa- against U.S. aggression from
on on using the heav- space? Or that nuclear disarma-
is as a battleground ment talks are stalled, not only
sorely affecting our by U.S. abrogation of the ABM
control the prolifera- Treaty, but by Pentagon asser-
lear weapons here on tions that the United States
ir Force Space must prevent the use of space
leader, General by other nations and establish
rd, defined "space "full spectrum dominance?"
'" as "freedom to President John F. Kennedy in
/ell as freedom from 1962 acknowledged that "space
space. He described science, like nuclear science
Air Force strategy, and all technology, has no con-
science of its own"... and noted,
rike, as giving the "whether it will become a force
ates the ability to for' good or ill depends on


sense of decency when it
insists, in effect, that the future
security of Americans requires
that Iraqis mortgage their secu-
rity indefinitely. There is no
reason whatsoever why invad-
ing a Muslim country-howev-
er many "foreign fighters" the
invading force entraps-neces-
sarily reduces the risk of a radi-
cal Islamist attack on U.S. soil.
Quite the opposite may be true.
Meanwhile, the inescapable
corollary of Bush's flypaper
theory is: If thousands of Iraqi
civilians are killed in the cross-
fire, better them than us.
Chris Toensing is editor of
"Middle East Report," pub-
lished 'by the Middle East
Research and Information
Project in Washington, D.C.


11 guns
man.... [O]nly if the United
States occupies a position of
pre-eminence can we help
decide whether this new ocean
will be a sea of peace or a new
terrifying theater of war." While
acknowledging that we can't go
unprotected "against the hostile
misuse of space," he urged that
space "be explored and mas-
tered without feeding the fires
of war."
The United States now occu-
pies a position of pre-eminence.
The fate of the earth is in our
hands. With a world of willing
partners, we should negotiate a
ban on weapons in space and
preserve the use of space for
peace.
Alice Slater is president of
the Global Resource Action
Center for the Environment
(GRACE) www.gracelinks.org.


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21A


News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


Ui


mr












22A News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


Lightning kills
more Scouts
Associated Press
FRESNO, Calif. -
Lightning struck a group of
Boy Scouts taking shelter
from a storm, killing the troop
leader and critically injuring a
13-year-old, according to a
ranger and the boy's parents.
At least one of the injured
was kept alive only because
the troop managed to admin-
ister cardiopulmonary resusci-
tation for an hour after
Thursday's strike in Sequoia
National Park, park ranger
Alex Picavet said Friday.
The deaths come just days
after four men were electro-
c.uted while putting up a tent
at the National Scout
Jamboree in Virginia.
Ryan Collins, 13, was in
critical condition Friday at the
University Medical Center in
Fresno, hospital spokes-
woman Mary Lisa Russell
said.
The assistant scoutmaster,
Steve McCullagh, 29, was
killed instantly when the bolt
struck Thursday afternoon,
the Tulare County coroner's
office said.

Parents sue
school district
for girl's death
Associated Press
CLEARWATER - The
parents of a 16-year-old girl
who died last year when she
was hit by a car after getting
off a school bus are suing the
Pinellas County school dis-
trict.
Clearwater High School
studentRebecca McKinney
was killed Oct. 8 while cross-
ing six lanes of traffic after
she and her older sister got
- off the bus. There were no


traffic lights or crossing
guards at the intersection.
The lawsuit, filed on behalf
of parents James and Sara
McKinney, claim the girl's
death was caused by the
school district's negligence.
After McKinney's death,
Pinellas schools transporta-
tion officials identified nearly
300 bus stops that violated
district policy.
In February another
Pinellas County student, 8-
year-old Brooke Ingoldsby,
was struck by a car and killed
after getting off a school bus.
The school district said the
bus driver dropped her off on
the wrong side of the street.

Officer fired
for leaving gun
with children
Associated Press
LADY LAKE - A police
officer was fired after sher-
iff's deputies said she left her
three young daughters home
alone with a loaded handgun.
The oldest girl, 12, greeted
Lake County Sheriff's
deputies at the door late
Wednesday wearing Marie
Kasinger's bulletproof police
vest. She said she had been
holding her mother's utr. Sihe
and her sister \i re frightened
by a banging noise outside.
The 12-year-old girl told
dispatchers her mother was
out celebrating a friend's
birthday, and that she and her
sisters, ages 11 and 7, thought
they heard a prowler.
Deputies found Kasinger's
police handgun in a closet
with one bullet in the cham-
ber.
Kasinger was cited for
unsafe storage of a firearm, a
misdemeanor. She was not
arrested. A court hearing was
scheduled for Aug. 17.


STATEIN



NATIT


Our Pricm. are

on '7


As EPA deadline
looms, farmers
struggle with air
monitoring program
Associated Press
MEXICO, Mo. - Hog
farmer Bill Kessler hopes a
voluntary federal program for
monitoring livestock emissions
will keep his 500-sow opera-
tion out of court for a few
years.
For $200, Kessler has essen-
tially bought four years of
amnesty from air-pollution
penalties while the federal
Environmental Protection
Agency determines appropriate
air quality standards for farm
operations.
EPA officials had hoped to
enlist thousands of hog, poul-
try, egg and dairy farmers when
they announced the program in
January. As of July 20, howev-
er, only 832 businesses signed
on, said Bob Kaplan, an attor-
ney in the EPA's enforcement
office.
The program's success
requires a range of participants,
from factory farms to contract
growers, to be monitored for
ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and
other potentially harmful air-
borne emissions.
The four-year program will
help officials determine emis-
sions levels for different types
of farms before they crack
down on emissions such as
ammonia, hydrogen sulfide,
volatile organic compounds
and dust.
In the meantime, farmers
who participate in the program
pay a one-time penalty based
on the type of farming opera-
-tion, plus $2,500 toward moni-
toring costs.
Even with the promise of
four years of legal amnesty, the
incentive to participate is diffi-
cult to determine, said Morril
Harriman, executive vice presi-
dent of the Poultry Federation
of Arkansas, Missouri and
Oklahoma.
"You 'are signing an agree-
ment that says, 'I am not violat-
ing any air quality laws. Here,
I'm going to pay you to see if
I'm violating any air quality
laws,"' he said. "It's extremely
difficult to explain to people."


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News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


1050 Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO.: GC 05-252
FIRST HORIZON HOME LOAN
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC.
PLAINTIFF
-VS-
FELECIA M. MATTHEWS, IF LIVING, AND IF
DEAD, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, '
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST FELECIA
M; MATTHEWS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
FELECIA M. MATTHEWS, IF ANY;
HIGHLANDS COUNTY FLORIDA; JOHN DOE
AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN
POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dat-
ed July 18, 2005, entered in Civil Case No. GC
05-252 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judi-
cial -Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County,
SEBRING, Florida, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash in the Jury Assembly
Room in the 'basement of the HIGHLANDS
County Courthouse located at 430 SOUTH
COMMERCE AVENUE in SEBRING, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 15th day of August, 2005
the following described property as set forth
int said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOTS 6 AND 7, BLOCK 4, MAP OF OAK-
LAND, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 26, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Dated this 18th day of July, 2005.
L. E."LUKE" BROKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J. STERN, P.A.
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
801 S. University Drive, Suite 500
Plantation, FL 33324
(954) 233-8000
05-40484(INL)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERI-
CANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with
disabilities needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT ADMINISTRATION, at
the HIGHLANDS County Courthouse at 863-
471-5313, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-
955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
July 24, 31, 2005
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. GC 05-185
VELMA JEAN SOWELL,
Plaintiff,
V.
LILLIAN C.. GRAHAM, if alive, and if dead her
-_ unknoWrq pouSq, theirs, devisees, grantees,
judgment creditors, and all other parties'"
claiming by, through, under or against her.
NOTICE OF SUIT TO QUIET TITLE
IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
To the Defendant: LILLIAN C. GRAHAM,
if alive, and if dead to her unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees, judgment creditors,
and all other parties claiming by, through, un-
der, or against her.
And to:
All parties or persons having or claiming any
right, title or interest in and to the following
described property, situate in. Highlands
County, Florida:
Lots 5 and 6, Block 3, LAKE VIEW VIL-
LAGE, according to the plat thereof recorded
in Book 5, Page 86, of the Public Records of
Highlands County, Florida.
You, and each of you, are notified that a
suit to quiet title to the above described prop-
erty has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your answer to the
complaint on the Plaintiff's attorney, ANDREW
B. JACKSON, 150 North Commerce Avenue,
Sebring, Florida 33870, and file the original in
the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on
or before August 12, 2005; otherwise the alle-
gations of the complaint will be taken as con-
fessed.
This notice shall be published once each
week for four consecutive weeks in the News-
Sun, Highlands County, Florida.
Dated this 8th day of July, 2005.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Highlands County, Florida
By: Is/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
July 10,17, 24, 31, 2005

1 55 Highlands
1055 County Legals
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING
NOTICE OF INTERNET AUCTION
START DATE: Thursday July 28, 2005 at 9:00
A.M.
END DATE: Monday August 8, 2005 at 6:00 P.M.
through 10:00 P.M.
LOCATION / WEBSITE: GOVDEALS.COM
Pursuant to Florida Statutes and Board adopted poli-
cies, the Highlands County Board of County Commis-:
sioners (HCBCC), Highlands County; Sebring, Florida,
has declared various items as surplus property and
have therefore authorized an Internet Auction to be
conducted for the purpose of disposing of all said
property.
A list of specific surplus items may be obtained from
the following locations and/or by requesting a list by
fax (863)402-6735 or email to sbutler@bcc.co.high-
lands.fl.us or dgilbert@bcc.co.highlands, fl.us:
1) HC Purchasing Department; 4320 George Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33875.
Contacts: Sandra Butler at (863)402-6527 or Danielle
Gilbert at (863)402-6528.
2) HC Government Center, 600 S. Commerce Ave.,
2nd Floor BCC Receptionist;
Sebring, FL 33870 at (863)402-6500.,
Additional information can be obtained Monday
through Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. about the
County's Internet Auction process by contacting High-
lands County BCCIs General Services/Purchasing De-
partment at the following numbers. (863)402-6527 or
(863) 402-6528
Note: All property will be sold on an as is, where is
basis.
The HCBCC reserves the right to add or delete items
from GovDealsl Website at anytime during the Inter-
net bidding dates above.
Board of County Commissioners
Purchasing Department
Highlands County, Florida
July 27,31;August 3, 7, 2005
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
(HCBCC)
GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING
INVITATION TO BID (ITB)
The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), High-
lands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed
bids in the County Purchasing Department for: ITB
05-064 ROOF REPLACEMENT ROAD & BRIDGE TIRE
SHOP BUILDING
Specifications may be obtained from Johanna Feick-
ert, Assistant Director, Highlands County General
Services / Purchasing Department, 4320 George
Blvd., Sebring, FL. 33875-5803, 863-402-6526, Fax:


402-6735 or by E-Mail:
ijeicker@bcc.co.highlands.fl.us
Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the
bid number and name so as to identify the enclosed
bid. Bids must be delivered to the Highlands County
Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring,


PLEASE

SEE

ADDITIONAL

LEGALS

ON PAGE 7C

OF TODAY'S

NEWS-SUN


1055 County Legals
FL 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than
2:00 P.M., Thursday, August 18, 2005, at which time
they will be opened. Bids received later than the date
and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will
not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that
are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail
or any other type of delivery service.
One or more County Commissioners may be in at-
tendance at the above bid opening.
The Highlands County Board of County Commission-
ers reserves the right to accept or reject any or all
bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award
is made, will be made to the most responsible bidder
whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award
will be in the best interest of Highlands County. The
Board reserves the right to waive minor informalities
or irregularities in the bid.
The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands
County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis
of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimi-
nation policy involves every aspect of the Board's
functions, including one's access to, participation,
employment or treatment in its programs or activities.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as pro-
vided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or
Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr.
Freddie Carino, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509
(Voice), 863-402-6508 (TTY), or via Florida Relay
Service 711, or by e-mail:
fcarino@bcc.co.highlands.fl.us. Requests for CART or
interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours
in advance to permit coordination of the service.
Board of County Commissioners
Purchasing Department
Highlands County, Florida
Website: hcbcc.net
July 31; August 7, 2005


HIGHLANDS COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
(HCBCC)
GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP)
The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), High-
lands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed
proposals in the County Purchasing Department for:
RFP 05-061 - ADVERTISING & RELATED MARKET-
ING SERVICES FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY TOURIST
DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL (HCTDC)
Highlands County requests proposals
from individuals or firms to provide Advertising & Re-
lated Marketing Services for Tourist Development
Program. RFP with criteria and requirements can be
provided upon written request by contacting: Johan-
na Feickert, CPPB, Assistant GSPD Director, High-
lands County Purchasing Department 4320 George
Boulevard, Sebring, Florida 33875 5803 Phone: 863
402-6526; Fax: 863-402-6735; or E Mail: HYPER-
LINK "mailto:jfeicker@bcc.co.highlands.fl.us"
Proposal submissions must be sealed and marked
with the name of the proposer, and the RFP number
and title so as to identify the enclosed proposal. Each
submittal shall include one (1) original and ten (10)
copies of the proposal. Proposals must be delivered
to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320
George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803, so as to reach
said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday, August
25, 2005, at which time they will be opened. Propos-
als received later than the date and time as specified
will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for
the late deliveries of proposals that are incorrectly ad-
dressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other
type of delivery service.
One or more County Commissioners may be in at-
tendance at the above proposal opening.
The Highlands County Board of County Commission-
ers (HCBCC / COUNTY) reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the
award, if an award is made, will be made to the most
responsive and responsible proposer whose proposal
and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the
best interest of Highlands County. The Board re-
serves the right tc waive irregularities in the proposal.
The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands
County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis
of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimi-
nation policy involves every aspect of the Board's
functions, including one's access to, participation,
employment or treatment in its programs or activities.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as pro-
vided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or
Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr.
Freddie Carino, ADA Coordinat : 863-402-6509
(Voice), 863-402-6508 (TTY), or via Florida Relay
Service 711, or by e-mail:
fcarino@bcc.co.highlands.fl.us. Requests for CART or
interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours
in advance to permit coordination of the service.
Board of County Commissioners
Purchasing Department
Highlands County, Florida Web-
itfe hcbee npn


July 24, 31, 2005 ,,


Here!


News.Su-l

Call 385-615


DARRELL KORANDA REFRIGERATION
& AIR CONDITIONING, LLC


t Re ot JO their
ComtM iaEtoL REiLFNTIAL Ai CONDITIMrdij G& RIfmForti F
\\e Service All Make- & Models
25 Years in the Field
471-0226 .. 381-9699


Advertise

Your Business

Here!


News-Si3-

Call 385-6155


* Shell R.-..-.

* Tr.jc� H., i'.;:.rl
* Fill Dirt


1150 Personals
ALONE? Seniors Dating Bureau
RESPECTED since 1977! Ages 50-90.
Call 1-800-922-4477 (24 hours).


1055 Highlands
1 0 5County Legals

HIGHLANDS COUNTY
The following legal notices are from the Highlands
County Board of County Commissioners and are be-
ing published in the font, size, and leading as per their
specifications.
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
(HCBCC)
GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP)
The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), High-
lands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed
proposals in the County Purchasing Department for:
RFP 05-062 - TOURISM RELATED RESEARCH FOR
HIGHLANDS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT
COUNCIL (HCTDC)
Highlands County requests proposals from individu-
als or firms to provide Tourism Related Research for
Tourist Development Council. RFP with criteria and
requirements can be provided upon written request
by contacting: Johanna Feickert, CPPB, Assistant
GSPD Director Highlands County Purchasing Depart-
ifent 4320 George Boulevard, Sebring, Florida 33875
5803 Phone: 863 402-6526 Fax: 863-402-6735; or
EMail: HYPERLINK
'mailto:jfeicker@bcc.co.highlands.fl.us"
Proposal submissions must be sealed and marked
with the name of the proposer, and the RFP number
and title so as to identify the enclosed proposal. Each
submittal shall include one (1) original and ten (10)
copies of the proposal. Proposals must be delivered
to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320
George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803, so as to reach
said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday, August
25, 2005, at which time they will be opened. Propos-
als received later than the date and time as specified
will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for
the late deliveries of proposals that are incorrectly ad-
dressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other
type of delivery service.
One or more County Commissioners may be in at-
tendance at the above proposal opening.
The Highlands County Board of County Commission-.
ers (HCBCC / COUNTY) reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the
award, if an award is made, will be made to the most
responsive and responsible proposer whose proposal
and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the
best interest of Highlands County. The Board re-
serves the right to waive irregularities in the proposal.
The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands
County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis
of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimi-
nation policy involves every aspect of the Board's
functions, including one's access to, participation,
employment or treatment in its programs or activities..
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as pro-
vided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or
Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr.
Freddie Carino, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509
(Voice), 863-402-6508 (TTY), or via Florida Relay
Service 711, or by e-mail:
fcarino@bcc.co.highlands.fl.us. Requests for CART or
interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours
in advance to permit coordination of the service.
Board of County Commissioners
Purchasing Department
Highlands County, Florida Web-
site: hcbcc.net
July 24, 31,2005

1100 Announcements


CHECK


YOUR AD

Please check your ad on the first day
it runs to make sure it is correct.
Sometimes instructions over the
phone are misunderstood and an er-
ror can occur. If this happens to you,
please call us the first day your ad
appears and we will be happy to fix
it as soon as we can.
If We can assist you, please call us:
385-6155--452-1009
465-0426
News-Sun Classified


1200 Lost & Found
MALE BOXER
LOST FROM Buttonwood Bay, Male Boxer,
reddish brown brindle, 5 yrs. old, wearing red
electric collar. Very Friendly! Very Missed!
(863)381-3814 or 381-3487
WANT NEW FURNITURE?
Need to sell the old furniture first?
Call News-Sun classified, 385-6155.
Then shop till you drop!


15 50 Professional Services
A HANDYMAN, aluminum, phone and TV
jacks, minor plumbing, carpentry, fans, re-
pairs, screens, painting. 863-385-1936

BANKRUPTCY
**Not An Ending, But A Beginning **
Toward Solvency and Relief
A. R. Gonzalez, Attorney
Free Consultation
SEBRING OFFICE 382-1616


We are a growing profession.

company...



WE NEED


sxComrputer Knowled
� .. ". ..- ::. " .. . , � �

,.; sectionn Expenei


odPhone Skills









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Here!


News'SUlj

Call 385-615










K. Mlichael Knox
Certified Public Accountant
Cell 243-1368 Office 465-1124


* L'..:~1 tl ..rl.
* I .'i ,i' rt

* Fr,- t E iri,-i.-.


(863) 453-5712


BRICK - BLOCK
STONE - CONCRETE

STUCCO WoRK



RUwLL MASONRY * 655-2307
35 Years Exp. State Certified 99-05604




T E L E . 0 IVI |


Advertise

Your Business

Here!

3Neiws-u1


Call 385-6155A


Classified ads
get fast results


SALES / SERVICE / INSTALLATIONS


w,



EfCaDoITn m _ A IHfl3RT)\

Efrain Galon (863)381-4780


(Se Habla Espaiol) (863) 314-8756
State Lic #CAC057808 1-877-580-4534


Complete Balhioom Remodeling
� Change Balhlub If Shower
SInslallalion Ceramic Floor ile


Call Robert for Your
FREE Estimate
(863)465-6683
Lake Placid


7 0Advertise
Your Business


Here!


News .Suni

Call 385-6155
* ....- '.* '" '" ' -' " - r "

SoI LADWIG

LAND CLEARING
SITE WORK * HAULING


HOMES & 99
BUSINESS 9 .9-
PHONE MONTHLY
SERVICE
>DSL > High Speed Dial-up
>International Long Distance
1.800.501.0012


FL


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News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


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TAKE ADVANTAGE NOW!
- * ^. . . . ..------------------- . .-. ..-.a-... . 3..----.- --.- ---. -- ... .. .- . . . . . - - . - -... ---

d Expedition Lincoln Navigator Ford land Marquis
*..- -. ' - .... "* ' 'I '


$50,54500o s..P 52,03000 s, P $30,21000 MSP
,1084 ,OY .-4MY 8 EMPLOYEE
S3,000 S LESS'0LESS5,LESS
3CUSTOMERCASH CUSTOMERn Csn , CUSTOMER CAS
RI07 I 0 SiNG FAMILY501 SK 5 003984 SE ING F IL
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$33,3850 M SRP
290,94530 EMPLOYEE
^ *_' ; ,,' ~PRICE
12,500oo ESS
SK0-, CUSTOMER CASH
SS94530 SEBRING FAMILY
511501DISCOUNT
^' , SK LL5001


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L Ford Escape


$21,23500 MSRP
24,356RICE
s27AO 0oo LESS
" I W 2^,UU CUSTOMER CASH
s 7564 SEBRING FAMILY
$15644"DISCOUNT
SKFS5018


BAD CREDIT


0 CREDIT


NO PROBLEM


CALL


1-800-431-1942

FOR PRE-APPROVAL


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$42,85500 MSRP
f -, 38,28U PRICE







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DISCOUNT .
SKFW5008




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$100000 LESS
;U CUSTOMER CASH41
DISCOUNT


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Family ..ice

r ForilRanger


$27,02500 MSRP
-\ $23,561 ,EMPLOYEE
PSD PRICE
$2,5000 L_ - _ESS
23,56i CUSOiERCASH
P it 1 5001 5SEBRING FAMILY
DISCOUNT
SK FR5O01


2 r Ford F150 Flareside


$31,5900. MSP
S9R 19830 EMPLOYEE
._s26,728 o PRICE
2.52,5000 CUSTOMER CASH
$12830 SEBRING FAMILY
SFF503DISCOUNT
SKFF5036


S Ford Ranger
1 11 g I i ' ,
28,535 0"S R
$91 0A~25 EMPLOYEE
24,846 PRICE
$2,50000 CUSTOMER CASE
$ 525 SEBRING FAMILY
S " 6 DISCOUNT
SK FR5008


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'- . ,." .Price includes all rebates & incentives. Ford Programs aid Rela


subject to prior sale.


I h ueliUe Uval Lertitled
Thumbprint represents the commit-
ment of each employee in our dealer-
ship to provide their own unique
brand of personal service to meet and
exceed your expectations with every
purchase, lease and i-
service experience. , a
Our Mission
To build client relationships for life by pro-
viding service that exceeds all expecta-
tions, thru our people... who are profes-
sional, totally dedicated and always appre-
ciative of our / ( a
client's business,


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News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


1550 ProfessionalServices
BILL ORR'S PAINTING &
PRESSURE CLEANING
Servicing Highlands County since 1973
Free Estimates, Lic. #6362 and Ins.
Call.(863)386-4233.
DUNCAN TRACTOR service, Inc., lic. and ins.,
bush hogging, rotovating, box blading, front
end bucket and hauling, (863)441-3594 or
(863)465-5825 please leave message
GARREIT REPAIR AND REMODELING
Electrical, Plumbing, heating, A/C,
carpentry, painting.
Lic. and Ins. Free Estimates,
(863)465-0980--cell 441-6569



HANDYMAN
Carpentry, aluminum, fans, screens, lights,
tile, repairs, remodeling, lic. 863-382-6782.


2000
Employment


2100 Help Wanted
2 PRESCHOOL TEACHER Level I Positions (
full-time and Part-time)- Provide children with
developmentally appropriate activities in a
quality early childhood program that offers a
safe and nurturing environment while promot-
ing the physical, social, emotional and intel-
lectual development of young children and
families. 'Insure a warm, secure, affectionate,
social-emotional climate with respect for
young children is maintained in and outside of
the classroom. Provide the training and fol-
low-ups to teachers in assigned classrooms
to insure a safe and healthy environments are
maintained. Assist with implementing each
teacher's career development plan. This is the
highest level of the Teacher job classification.
Minimum of twenty-four (24) months exp. in
early childhood work. Be in possession of and
AD or AA Degree in Early Childhood or related
field. Possess a High/ School Diploma, GED or
equivalent. Apply with Diane Judge, South
Highlands CDC, 124 Washington St., Lake
Placid, FL 33852 by August 19, 2005.
We are an Equal Opportunity Employer. We do
not discrimination the basis of race color,
creed, sex, sexual orientation, age or national
origin, religion or disabilities.

440 OR 220 lic. Personal lines CSR busy
Sebring office, health/retirement. Contact Se-
lena Leal, 382-6611 or fax resume, 382-1334
440 OR 220 lic. Personal lines CSR busy
Lake Placid office, health/retirement. Call
.(863)465-7155 or fax resume, 699-1925
A POOL CLEANER
Seeking individual for pool route, customer
service exp. helpful. Clean driving record,
863-655-6993
ALL TRADE SUBS NEEDED
Jim Waiter Homes is seeking foundation
crews, framers, plumbers, electricians, roof-
ers, drywall crews, punch out crews, cabinet
and painters in and around the Sebring area.
Workers Comp can be deducted!
Please join us at our Sebring office for more
information on Monday, August 1st, from 12-
6pm and Tuesday, August 2, from 7:30-12.
2928 US 27 N., Sebring
(863)386-1100
EOE/ODrug'Free Workplace'
__. ALUMINIUM , INSTALLER, exp. pref., must
have own transportation, drug free and sober
workplace, call 441-3964.
ALUMINUM INSTALLER
needs exp. helper w/tools. (863)443-1407.
ALUMINUM INSTALLERS, Punch-out carpen-
ter, steel erectors, laborers w/ exp. F/T w/
benefits. DFWP. E.O. Koch Construction.
(863) 385-8649
AUTOMOTIVE TECH. Outstanding earning po-
tential no weekends. Busy well equipped shop
looking for honest, motivated tech. Apply in
person. Must have experience and tools Car
Medic Center. 555 US Highway 27 N. Sebring.
CABLE TV INSTALLERS needed immediately,
must have. truck and valid drivers lic. Exp.
helpful, but not necessary, 863-559-6736 or
toll free 888-361-8721
CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTS/
RESIDENTIAL ASSISTANTS
FAIRWAY PINES at Sun 'N Lakess seeking a
top-quality, energetic Certified Nursing Assis-
tants to provide personal assistance, routine
daily care and services to our residents.
11:00pm-7:00am positions available. Must be
able to work weekends.
For consideration, please send resume or ap-
ply in person to Fairway Pines at Sun 'N
Lakes, 5959 Sun"'N Lakes Blvd. Sebring Fl.
33872. Fax 863-385-3930.EOE
CHAIN LINK FENCE installer/helper, need
ed, exp. pref. Hot, physical work. Lazy need
not apply. Call Brooker Fence Co., 385-1991.
CHANCEY RADIATOR looking for help, Wau-
chula area, mechanical ability, apply in person
251 S. Hart Ave., Avon Park, (863)453-3053

CHAPLAIN

The selected candidate will provide spiritual
support to patients/familes requiring hospice
care in a home and nursing home setting,
while working to conjunction with our inter-
disciplinary teams in Highlands and Hardee
Counties. Requires a Master's degree in Divin-
ity.
Interested candidates, please fax resume to
Good Shepherd Hospice at 863-687-6977. or
call 800-464-3994
www.lphcareers.com
EOE






IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
WORKERS NEEDED
* General Labor - Construction


* CDL-A w/Hazmat
* Light Industrial - AM Shifts
* Carpenter w/tools
* Hospitality Servers




Daily Work, Daily Pay
Report Ready To Work
6:OOAM Daily
Office Hours 6:00 A.M. - 6 P.M.
Applications accepted daily
with proper ID.
3735 Kenilworth Blvd.
471-2774
EOE/Drug Free Work Place


2100 Help Wanted
BOOKKEEPER FOR growing automotive busi-
ness. Exp. in Reynolds & Reynolds Acct. pre-
ferred, but will train the right person. Send re-
sume and salary preference to P.O. Box 1649,
Lake Placid, FL. 33862-1649.
CONCRETE POURER AND FINISHER, exp. Call
(863)471-0626 or 863-381-4144.
DENTAL ASSISTANT for busy office, apply in
person at either location, 106 E. Main St.,
Avon Park, Tue. or Thu. or 1735 US 27 S.,
Sebring, Mon. or Wed.
DYNAMIC INTERNET technology company is
seeking candidates for entry level Technical
Support/Help Desk positions in a growing, vi-
brant and customer focus culture. Job de-
scription: provide technical phone support for
internet and computer issues. Perform basic
computer diagnostic and repair. Strong phone
and interpersonal skills; good at working with
and teaching non-technical customers. A
+ certification preferred, but not required.
Must be able to work evening and weekend
shifts. Apply in person 4325 Sun N Lake Blvd,
Suite 101, Sebring.
ELECTRICIANS HELPER
Min 2 year exp., drivers license required.
Call (863)655-1125 Bennett Electric
ESTIMATOR NEEDED, will train, drug free
workplace, (863)385-0351
EXP. KITCHEN help and Dishwasher, F/T. Call
before 2pm, 382-2333 benefits avail.
EXP. LAWN TECH help wanted to work in drug
free workplace, drivers lic. needed, 382-6732

EXP. PRE-K teacher needed for local pre-
school, must have a CDA or a S degree in Ear-
ly Childhood or higher. Please call or tax re-
sume to 382-2727, fax is same as phone
Experienced welder, Immediately hiring in
Venus, 863-465-2044. 863-465-5757.
EYE CLINIC has openings in all positions, F/T-
P/T, Send reply to Box 02210, The News-Sun,
2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring FL,33870.
F/T EQUIPMENT Assembler, must enjoy work-
ing outdoors. Forklift exp a plus, but not nec.
$7.-$9. per hour. Apply in person, King Equip-
ment Co, 6814 US 27 S., Sebring, 382-7701
FORMING & POURING CONCRETE,
some experience needed, (863)465-1116
FRONT DESK PERSON, FIT in busy physi-
cian's office. Exc. benefits, neg. salary. Please
fax resume/letter of interest to 314-0944.
GROWING POOL company needs Service
Tech. Must have valid drivers lie. 453-7665
HARD WORKING DEPENDABLE Driller's help-
er, no exp. nec., will trainmust have valid
driver's lic./able to drive manual shift pick-up
for local well drilling company, 453-8200
HEARTLAND MOTORS
2905 US 27 N. Sebring, Florida
Wanted Auto/RV detailer/misc., immediate
opening, must be willing to work,
Apply in person, no phone calls!
HIGHLANDS RIDGE Landscape Maintenance,
Call Dan, 452-1525. Golf Maintenance, Call
Dave at 471-11412. Good benefits, Drug Free
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS for Floor Tech., F/T
evenings. We train! Apply now 6434 US 27 S.
JEWELRY SALES/DATA ENTRY, F/T, 8-5:30,
medjcal/dental w/many benefits Call 402-2274
KAHN GROVE Service Company is now ac-
cepting applications for an equipment opera-
tor in Highlands/Polk County. Activities incl.
spraying, herbiciding, fertilizing, and general
grove work. Benefits incl. paid holidays, vaca-
tion, ins., 401k, sick pay. Pay commensurate
w/exp. Call Ashley Ham at (863)385-6136
LABORER NEEDED for local concrete
company, exp preferred. 382-6639
LOOKING FOR A
CAREER
AND
NOT JUST A JOB?

Join us in our growth.
The News-Sun is accepting
applications for an

ADVERTISING AccouNT
REPRESENTATIVE

We are looking for an enthusiastic,
self-motivated outside sales repre-
sentative. This full-time position
primarily consists of maintaining
existing accounts and developing
new customers within an establish-
ed sales territory. Must be well or-
ganized, have two years sales ex-
perience, valid driver's license/reli-
able transportation, and possess
excellent written and verbal com-
munication skills. Competitive sal-
ary, commission plan and benefits.
Qualified applicants should e-mail
resume and cover letter to: vicki.
sherman@newssun.com.


- ,S i4
a m -l


The News-Sun


2100 Help Wanted
INSTRUCTORS NEEDED to teach ESOL
classes in Highlands and Hardee counties. Im-
mediate openings. Positions are P/T with a va-
riety of scheduling options. Bachelor's degree
required. Teaching experience and/or TESOL
training pref. Hourly pay rate: $15.85. contact
Human Resources, SOUTH FLORIDA COM-
MUNITY COLLEGE, 863-784-7132. Applica-
tions are avail, at all SFCC Campuses. EA/EO
FLORIDA ENVIRONMENTAL Institute juvenile
program in Venus needs has the following po-
sitions avail:
MATH TEACHER
The right candidate for this position will teach
middle and senior high school classes, assists
in the testing program, maintains related ad-
ministrative systems and supervises Institute
student activities as req. In addition, as a staff
member, the Academics Teacher's primary
concerns incl. the safety, supervision, advis-
ing, counseling and roll modeling for our stu-
dents. Must have State and/or local Teacher
Certificate as req. by law, 4 year college de-
gree (or should be eligible to receive and 1-2
yrs. related exp. or equivalent of education
and exp. Salary is negotiable.
TEAM LEADER
The Team Leader is responsible for the super-
vision of a residential-program staff-team that
ensures the safe and effective operation of the
Institute. The Team Leader reports to the di-
rector of Operations and/or Program Manager
and Executive Director. High School Diploma
or equivalent is req. 1-2 yrs supervisory exp
req. Must have prior exp. as an Institute Staff.
Salary is negotiable
INSTRUCTOR
The Instructor is responsible for teaching stu-
dents, assists the testing program, maintains
related administrative systems and supervises
institute student activities as req. High School
diploma or equivalent is req. Salary is neg.,
but starts at $9. per hour.
All three position req. background screening,
drug test and a current Florida Drivers Li-
cense. For appt. call 863-699-3785. EOE.


Designer/Decorator

Leader in the home fashion industry is seeking

2 experienced designer/decorators for new

Thomasville gallery store. Benefits offered.

For an appointment:
Call Donna 382-3933





)WELLS

1DODE CHRYSLER
Sin6e 1931
Between Avon Park & Sebring

HAS AN IMMEDIATE OPENING
FOR

PARTS COUNTER PERSON

Top Pay
Health Insurance
401 (K) Retirement Plan
Paid Training
Vacation & Holiday Pay
Full Benefit Package

Contact Jeff Noel, Parts manager
863-453-6644
Drug-Free Workplace


FIELD OPNS.

COORDINATOR WANTED

SOUTH-CENTRAL FLORIDA

Fed./St. funded 501.c.3 org. working w/older
workers, host agencies, and communities, in South
FL. Desired candidate will implement & monitor
Fed./St. employ. & trng. programs. Must possess
excellent verbal & written com. skills, be org. and
willing to travel. Min. H.S. diploma. Bi-lingual a plus.

Competitive salary and benefits. Qualified
candidates mail resume and cover letter to:
B. Smith-Fischer
P.O. Box 330006
Atl. Bch., FL 32233-0006

Or fax: (904) 241-8523 Applications deadline - 8/19/05

Funded by FL Department of Elder Affairs and USDOL - EOE


2100 Help Wanted
HELP WANTED
Maintenance Aide: Avon Park Housing Author-
ity is accepting applications for a full time res-
idential maintenance aide position with excel-
lent benefit package. Criminal records check
and drug testing required. Drug-free work-
place. EOE
Applications available at the Heartland One
Stop Centers and Housing Authority offices,
406 Tulane Drive, Avon Park. Applications
must go through the One Stop Center, 2730
U.S. Hwy. 27 North, Sebring.
Alice C. Oldham
Executive Director




THE PALMS
OF SEBRING
L.P.N.'S
for
ALF

3-11 and 11-7
Full and Part Time

$1,500.00 Sign-On Bonus

Competitive Wages, IRA Plans
Available, Shift Differentials,
Attendance Bonuses. Join the
Professional Staff at Sebring's
Premier Senior Care Facility.

Apply in person at the
725 S. Pine St.
Sebring, Fl 33870 or
Resume to: Fax 385-2385 or
E-mail: palmshr@yahoo.com
DFWP/EOE


2100 Help Wanted
FIELD OPNS. COORDINATOR WANTED
SOUTH- CENTRAL FLORIDA
Fed/State funded 501. C.3 org. working w/old-
er workers, host agencies, and communities
in South FL. Desired candidate will implement
& monitor Fed./State employ. & training, pro-
grams. Must possess excellent verbal & writ-
ten com. skills, be organized and willing to
travel. Min. H.S diploma. Bi-lingual a plus.
Competitive salary and benefits. Qualified can-
didates mail resume and cover letter to:
B. Smith-Fisher
P.O. Box 330006
Atlantic Beach., FL 32233-0006
Or Fax: (904) 241-8523. Applications deadline
8/12/05 Funded by FL Department of Elder Af-
fairs and USDOL -EOE
MAINTENANCE WORKER
Responsible for maintenance, repair and
cleanliness of physical plant, grounds and
equipment. Must be 21 yrs. of age w/a High
School diploma, valid Fl. Drivers lic. and meet
criminal background requirements. Please Call
Rick at 863-452-5141 or complete an applica-
tion at 55 E. College Dr., Avon Park, FL 33825

MDS/CARE PLAN COORDINATOR
A great career opportunity, for an experienced
RN/LPN in a leading long-term care facility.
Qualifications needed include excellent techni-
cal assessment. documentation, communica-
,tion skills, computer skills a must and a genu-
ine concern for working with residents, family
and staff in the skilled nursing setting. Earn
competitive salary and benefits. Apply in per-
son at. Royal care of Avon park, 1213 Strat-
ford Rd. Avon Park, or call (863)453-6674.
EOE, M/F. DFWP.


WAREHOUSE & DELIVERY


Must be reliable & know area.
Clean driving record required.
CDL Class D License required
Benefits offered, apply in person to:
USHER FURNITURE

6300 U.S. 27 North * Sebring * 382-2423


SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 453-6661 * FAX (863) 784-7497
e-mail: jobs@southflorida.edu
www.southflorida.edu


SPECIALIZED MAINTENANCE: SECURITY & FIRE ALARMS
Full-time, year round position responsible for fire and security alarm system
maintenance and trouble-shooting. Experience or training in Simplex alarm
systems and fire sprinkler systems required. At least two years of related full-
time experience preferred. Position involves moderately heavy manual work.
Hourly rate: $9.49 to $10.22, plus benefits package. Deadline: 5 p.m., Friday,
August 5, 2005.
Application forms are available in Human Resources, Building I (Highlands
Campus), on SFCC's Web site, or at any SFCC campus/center.
EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITYNETERAN'S PREFERENCE


SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 453-6661 * FAX (863) 784-7497
e-mail: jobs@southflorida.edu.
www.southflorida.edu


POSITION VACANCIES
ADMIN. ASSISTANT II, COMMUNITY RELATIONS AND MARKETING* -
Full-time, year round position to assist in public relations, publications, website,
and news releases, etc., and provide secretarial support in the Community
Relations and Marketing office. At least three years full-time secretarial (or
education equivalency) experience, and ability to type at least 50 net words per
minute required. Exceptional computer skills required. Salary: $20,119 to
$21,258 (hourly $9.67 to $10.22) plus benefits package. Deadline: 5 p.m.,
Tuesday, August 9, 2005.
Required skills test will be administered at 5:30 p.m. on the deadline date
in Room 1218.
TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN STUDENT ADVOCATE - Part-time, grant-funded
position responsible for developing relationships in the school system and with
affiliate organizations to ensure successful program completion by students.
Associate's degree required; Bachelor's preferred. Significant experience or
educational background in the areas of child psychology, education, or social
work preferred. Hourly pay rate: $12.50 (approx. 20 hrs/wk). Deadline: 5 p.m.,
Thursday, August 11,2005.
FOOD SERVICE WORKER* - Part-time position responsible for cashiering,
counter support, and/or food preparation at Kelly's Komer cafeteria. Food
service and/or cashiering experience preferred. Ability to prepare regular food
items without direct supervision Is expected. Hourly pay rate: $6.97. (approx. 30
hrs/wk). Deadline: 5 p.m. Tuesday, August 9, 2005.
*Veterans Preference may be claimed for this position.
Application forms are available in Human Resources, Building I (Highlands
Campus), on SFCC's Web site, or at any SFCC campus/center.
SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION


is accepting application for an


Accounting Manager/


Business Manager

This position will be responsible for the overall accounting and financial
reporting and human resource functions of the company including
supervision of the business office employees. Must be able to complete
monthly, quarterly and annual financial reporting and assist in preparation of
annual budgets.
A successful candidate must be proficient in computer accounting systems
and be experienced in Excel and Word. The position will work cross-functionally
with the Publisher and corporate office making effective organization and
communication skills essential.
Qualified applicants should e-mail a resume and cover letter to:
ralph.bush@newssun.com.




News Sun
Written. Printed. Published. IN Highlands County.

2227 US 27 South * Sebring * (863) 385-6155


When Highl.lnd: Reginal Medial ,i:
Ienrer fir.il iipened s15 dour i ri
1965 we pledged to provide our
palHernis A.ih mirrip.3ssiuon an1 care
without :mprnmiie The T ean[me ER,[ICU& OIW
corrimmrrerilhold; true todayy A� s i Bn y
the omrrirrmunities we serve continue
to grow, so does HRMC-torever
improving to meet the future needs of our friends and neighbors. While
the challenges of our commitment may seem grand, so is the pride and
satisfaction we receive from helping so many. Then again, it's all in a
day's work at HRMC.

HRMC team members are rewarded for their contributions
with competitive compensation, exceptional benefits, a truly
collaborative environment, and the opportunity to make an impact
with an evolving healthcare leader. For priority consideration,
forward your resume to: HRMC, Attn: Human Resources, 3600
S. Highlands Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870; fax: 863-385-0498;
e-mail: dennis.almquist@hrmc.hma-corp.com O
Io


2100 Help Wanted
GROUNDS MAINTENANCE person, exp
w/ comm mowers, line trimmers. etc. Apply
in person. 3000 tanglewood.
MOTORCYCLE TECHNICIAN for a growing
power sports company. Must have exp. Apply
in person with resume at 4163 US 27 S.,
Sebring or call 1-800-915-1574 for appt.
MRI/ CT technologist, ARRT preferred. f/t
w/ benefits. fax resume to 863-402-0946 or
contact General Mngr 863-402-0938
NURSERY HELPER. Responsible incl. operat-
ing bobcat, loading/unloading, light mainte-
nance/cleanup, etc. Hours 8-5, Mon.-Fri. Must
be able to lift 50 lbs. Applications in store.
OUTSIDE TECHNICIAN for satellite and anten-
na work, exp. pref., call (863)465-5099.
PARTS/SERVICE COUNTER Person needed
for a growing power sports company, exp. in
parts aned service a plus. Apply in person at
4163 US 27 S. Sebring.
PERSONAL ASSISTANT for local real Estate
investment company, must have excellent typ-
ing, computer, phone and people skills. Ex-
tremely busy office, some legal exp. preferred.
$10 - $12 an hour. Send reply to Box 02213,
The News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring
FL,33870. Attn: Assistant.
PLACID LAKES COUNTRY CLUB now hiring
bartender, waitresses, kitchen staff, fax re-
sume 863-465-9813 or call (863)443-6000.
RECEPTIONIST POSITION in busy professio-
nal office, F/T., health/retirement benefits
avail. Call 465-7155, fax resume 699-1925
RESPONSIBLE TRACTOR driver needed, full
time job, (863)452-1313


j


I








News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


21 00 Help Wanted
RISK MGMT. Field Rep. needed, Position req'
on site loss prevention and compliance moni-
toring, primarily for agricultural companies.
Must have knowledge of OSHA and DOT regu-
lations. Must be bilingual. Company vehicle
provided. Good benefits. Call 888-786-6207,
ext. 104 or fax resume to 239-275-7591.




THE PALMS
OF SEBRING
RN's & LPN's
(All Shifts) and
RN UNIT MANAGER
SIGN ON BONUS
$1,500.00 F/T
$1,000 P/T

Join Sebring's Premier Staff
of Caring Professionals
Competitive Salary,
IRA plans,
Shift Differentials,
Attendance bonuses

Apply in person at the
725 S. Pine St.
Sebring, Fl 33870 or
Resume to: Fax 385-2385 or
E-mail: palmshr@yahoo.comni


I -


4141


2100 Help Wanted


SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE


All interested candidates please call one of our staffing specialists for an appointment

RESOLVE STAFFING

US 27 North, Suite 8 * Sebring, FL 33870 * 402
. Locaited,1/8 mlnfc north of WVl -Mart:., r I... Q, u r..., Subs Shoppirig Center,.
next door to Pi:.,n.', P.::


2100


Help Wanted


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 453-6661 * FAX (863) 784-7497
e-mail: jobs@southflorida.edu
www.southflorida.edu


POSITION VACANCIES
SPECIALIZED MAINTENANCE: Full-time, year round position responsible
for general carpentry and repairs on College facilities. Related experience in
building and construction with an emphasis in carpentry work, preferred.
Plumbing experience preferred. Position involves moderately heavy manual
work. Hourly rate: $9.13 to $10.22, plus benefits package. Deadline: 5 p.m.,
Tuesday, August 9, 2005.
EVENING ASSISTANT, CRIMINAL JUSTICE - Part-time position responsible
for performing a variety of clerical and building monitoring duties at the
Criminal Justice Training Center. Schedule requires evening hours 6:00 -
10:00 p.m. Mon. - Thurs. Two years of full-time clerical experience or an A.S.
degree in Secretarial Science (or equivalency) required. Proficient typing skills
required; computer literacy in word processing preferred. Hourly rate: $7.94
(up to 16 hrs/wk). Deadline: 5 p.m., Tuesday, August 2, 2005.
TUTORING AND LEARNING CENTER (TLC) SPECIALIST - Part-time, term
by term position to supervise, monitor, and assist users in the TLC math and
writing labs. Schedule requires two evenings per week (M-W) and Sunday
afternoons. Associate's or higher degree required. Experience working with
and training others in a variety of software, applications and in troubleshooting
and repairing PC software/hardware problems required. Hourly rate: $10.70
(up to 20 hr/wk). Deadline: 5 p.m., Tuesday, August 2, 2005.
Application forms are available in Human Resources, Building I (Highlands
Campus), on SFCC's Web site, or at any SFCC campus/center.
EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITYNETERAN'S PREFERENCE


-2201


2100 Help Wanted
APPOINTMENT SETTERS
No Selling! $12.50-$28/hr.
Full benefits - Paid training.
This is a great place to work!
Call Ms. Peterson, 863-452-0330
OPPORTUNITY KNOCKING....
One of America's largest home builders is
seeking a highly energetic sales person to as-
sist customers w/the purchase of a new horns
to be built on their lot or one we help them
find. A well organized, team player is a must!
Must be avail, to work weekends. 6 mos pd
training then commission vs. draw pay plan.
Benefits incl.:
* Med./Dental/Life Ins.
*Retirement plan
Email resume to:
JWHHRSC@walterind.com or
Fax 813-871-4150. Ref ID #
SEDC01 in response.
EOE/Drug Free Workplace
RN'S NEEDED
Ambulatory Surgical Center. Willing to train.
F/T P/T and Per Diem. 863-385-1074. Fax re-
sume 863-385-3743. Attn: Gayle.
ROOFERS NEEDED - Top wages.. Drug-
Free Workplace (863)385-0351
SUNSHINE STAFFING is currently accepting
applications for Development Plan
Reviewer/Inspector. Responsible for review of
plans and documents related to the permit-
ting, construction and inspection of commer-
cial. projects, subdivisions, utilities and resi-
dential site plans. Requirements include
knowledge of FDOT design standards, as well
as construction codes and related laws and
ordinances. Call Sunshine Staffing at (863)
382-4994 to set up an interview
SUNSHINE STAFFING is currently accepting
applications for part-time food service work-
ers throughout Highlands County. Drug test
and background check req. Apply at 817 US
27 South, Sebring, (863)382-4994
THE GEO GROUP INC.
A worldwide leader in privatized corrections.
OFFERS CHALLENGING AND
EXCITING OPPORTUNITIES.
& BENEFITS AVAILABLE

DATA ENTRY CLERK
LIFE SKILL INSTRUCTOR
CORRECTIONAL OFFICER
MOORE HAVEN CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
1990 East State Road 78.NW
Moore Haven, FL 33471
Phone 868-946-2420
Fax 863-946-2487
Equal Opportunity Employer
TRACTOR DRIVERS NEEDED! Consolidated
Citrus Limited Partnership is looking for sev-
eral tractor drivers to fill immediate vacancies
at our Avon Park Citrus Grove. Exp. preferred,
but will train qualified candidates. We offer an
exceptional pay and benefits package includ-
ing 10 paid holidays, vacation, health/dental
insurance and 401 (k) with a generous com-
pany match. To apply or for further informa-
tion call us at 863-443-9242 or 863-453-3958
TURNER FURNITURE
Now hiring Furniture Sales Person. Great op-
portunity with unlimited earnings. Benefits
pkg. Fax resume to 863-402-1976 or apply at:
2900 US 27 S., bet. Avon Park and Sebring.
TV TECH, exp. pref., F/T-P/T. Don's TV, 351
E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, 863-465-5099
WAITRESSES
Fairway pines at Sun 'N Lake Blvd. is seeking
a top quality team players to serve food in a
friendly, courteous manner and helpful atti
tude at our senior living residence. F/T-P/T
position avail. Must be able to work weekends
For consideration, please send resume or ap-'
ply in person to Fairway Pines at Sun 'N Lake,
5959 Sun 'N Lake Blvd., Sebring, FL 33872.
Fax 863-385-3930. EOE
WANTED F/T BUS DRIVERS. S8.PER HOUR,
health benefits, pension plan, paid vacation,
paid training, EDE, drug/smoke, free work-
place. Apply in person 9-12, 1-4pm. Annett
Bus Lines, 130 Madrid Dr., Sebring. No calls!


Interviews on the Spot!

Monday July 25th 11am - 3pm


Weekly Year Round Full Time

Pay Employment Positions


Comprehensive Benefit Package

Tuition Reimbursement * Life Insurance
Vacation Time * Holiday Pay * Medical * Dental
As a Customer Service Associate, you will be responsible for answer-
ing incoming calls and dispatching assistance to customers in need of
emergency roadside assistance. You will need customer service and
computer skills. We will train you in our products and programs.

3310 Hwy. 27 South* Sebring, FL 33870 C-= FOSS

863-402-2786-_ Country,
E-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.com - -


Join us in our growth.


The News-Sun is accepting application for an



ADVERTISING



ACCOUNT



REPRESENTATIVE



We are looking for an enthusiastic, self-motivated
outside sales representative. This full-time position


primarily


consists


of maintaining


existing


accounts and developing new customers within
an established sales territory. Must be well
organized, have two years sales experience,
valid driver's license/reliable transportation, and


possess


excellent


communication
commission ohl


written


and verbal


skills. Competitive
an and benefits.


Salary,

Qualified


applicants should e-mail resume and cover letter
to: ralph.bush@newssun.cOm.





News HSun
Written. Printed. Published. IN Highlands County.


RESOLVES AffING


*Formerly SupportStaff Employment Services
NOW HAS THE FOLLOWING JOB OPPORTUNITIES
School Board Custodial for 2006 school year
Full-time and part-time positions available
at all 15 county schools and district offices. No experience necessary
School Board Food Service for 2006 school year
Full-time and part-time positions available
at all 15 county schools. No experience necessary
Production/Manufacturing
Full-time day and night shift work available
No experience necessary, willing to train
Staffing Specialist
Resolve Staffing is seeking a professional with excellent communication and computer
skills for our Sebring office. Candidate must be able to multi-task in a fast paced
customer service environment. This is an excellent career opportunity for the right
candidate, with one of the fastest growing staffing companies in Central Florida.
Competitive pay & benefit package available, including company paid health insurance
with Blue Cross/Blue Shield.


2100 Help Wanted
SUNSHINE STAFFING has immediate opening
for general laborers for a variety of positions
both temporary and temporary to direst hire.
Apply at 817 US 27 S, Sebring, 382-4994

2 5O Part-time
2 i Employment
A SIGN DISTRIBUTOR needed, make good
money in yourspare time placing For Sale
signs on vacant lots in Highlands County area,
must be familiar w/real estate in the a-ea and
have a digital camera. Kim, (954)728-9381







CARRIERS
The News Sun is now accept-
ing applications for Newspa-
per Single Copy Route Carrier.
Late night hours on Sat./ Tue./
Thur. Please call Rodrigo at
385-6155, Ext. 533 or stop
by the News Sun and fill out
an application.
2227 US 27 S., Sebring
CASHIER P/f at Lakeshore Car Wash, male/fe-
male. Apply in person Lakeshore Car Wash.

FRONT DESK CLERK - Part-time posi-
tion to assist hotel and restaurant guests with
reservations, registration and accommoda-
tions, and to perform clerical functions related
to the Front Desk operation at the HOTEL JA-
CARANDA. Hotel/restaurant and cashiering
exp. preferred. Hourly pay $8.25-$9.13 (ap-
prox. 30 hr./wk). Flexible work schedule in-
cludes evenings and weekends as needed.
Open until filled. Apply in Human Resource,
Building 1 SOUTH FLORIDA COMMUNITY
COLLAGE (Highlands Campus) or at the HO-
TEL JACARANDA, 19 E. Main St, Avon Park.
EA/ EO/ VET. PREF.
WANTED P/T Bus Drivers. $8 an hr., work
Fri./Sat., Aug.-May, approx. 30hrs per week,
pd. training, pension plan, EOE, Drug/Smoke
free workplace. Apply 9-12, 1-4pm. Annette
Bus Lines, 130 Madrid Dr., Sebring. No Calls

3000
Financial


4000
Real Estate


4040 Homes For Sale
2/1 LAKEVIEW HOME, new roof, tile,
kitchen cabinets, fixtures, windows, private
access to Lake Letta. Won't last long at
$110k. Located in Avon Park. Call Todd Hav-
lock, 414-0546, MC 2000 Realty, 699-5550
LAKE HAVEN Estates, close to golf course
2/2/2. large living/dining room. All new appli-
ances, fire place, pool; wood floor, new car-
pet, rt,:r.il,' repainted. $218 0,0. 863-385-
2151.
060 Homes for Sale
4 6 Avon Park
3/1 W/2 Extra Lots.
New roof, electrical, plumbing, and A/C and
duct work. 22 S. prospect Ave. Avon Park.
$149,000. (863)-402-0165
3/2, WITH Hurricane Shelter, large spacious
house, near hospital and shopping, central air
make offer, 863-453-5984


4080 Homes for Sale
4080 Sebring
1728 SQ. ft., 2/2 w/attached garage, screened
patio, new roof, new A/C, quiet neighborhood,
needs paint, $125,000, 4816 Queen Palm Dr.
Call (863)382-9861
LAKE HAVEN ESTATES.
Harder Hall area. Large 2/2/1 screen porch,
carpet, newly painted, fenced yard, nicely
landscaped.$150.000. 863-385-6691.
LARGE 4/3.5 bath golf course home w/30x34
garage and bonus room. $360,000. (863)-
382-3350
LIQUIDATING 5 SEBRING investment houses
in Highlands Homes area. Must sell all 5.
$290,000 OBO. worth $380k plus. Won't last!
(772)528-0881.
NEWLY LISTED
GOLF HAMMOCK
2/3/2.5, pool, on golf course. Porcelain tile,
security system, lighted curbing, $259,000.
863-381-9113.
SEBRING SHORES. Built 2001. Fur/unfurnish-
ed. 3/2/1/1.5 car garage converted to recrea-
tional room. 30X15 detached shed converted
into finished office space. $230K turn: $220K
unfurn. (863)471-3790
4100 Homes for Sale
4'10 Lake Placid
2/2 MANUFACTURED home, vinyl siding,
awnings, utility room , new roof, lanai, patio,
carpet and sandstone tile, ceiling fans, deco-
rator shutters inside, appl. like new, large pan-
try, A/C, golf cart, irrigation, many extras,
must see, $63,500. (863)-465-7706
LEISURE LAKES-LAKE PLACID
2/2 w/attached garage, irrigated, corner lot,
water view (access), $179,900, 465-0679.
OPEN DAILY
NEW Model, great floor plan, 3 bedrm split
plan, 2 baths, full 2 car garage, cathedral ceil-
ings. 620 Catfish Creek Rd, Placid Lakes.
MEYER HOMES 465-7900,465-7338 after 5

S4 1 40 Retirement Facilities

NOW LEASING
Sebring - Affordable Apts for 55+ & over Spa-
cious 1 and 2br, Secured entry, Activities in-
clude fitness center, arts & crafts area., shuf-
fleboard court and pool.
Starting at $451/per month.
THE GROVES L
AT VICTORIA PARK o'
863-385- 8460
l 7I A Lakefront Property
4170 For Sale
SUNSET TO RIVAL KEY WEST
135' on Lake Istokpoga, sea wall , private
road, water and sewer, deed restricted, many
Ig. fruit, palm and exotic trees, (863)699-6856

4180 Duplexes for Sale
WATERFRONT DUPLEX
Sebring, 2/1, furn., appliances, both sides, re-
cent roof, both currently rented, unique loca-
tion, great neighborhood, close to every thing.
$150,000 negotiable, 863-370-5552.

4220 Lots for Sale
ACRE LOTS.
For sale, in Orange BlossonimEstate and Avon--
Park Estate. Starting price $55K-$75K. 321-
284-6762.
AVON PARK LAKES, Ideal site for lovely fami-
ly home, good location, only 10 min. from
downtown Main St. Clear lot, new construc-
tion in area or a great investment opportunity
in a fast growing area. $34,500,, Call Kersey
Hebb, Remax of Stuart., (772)530-4536
GREAT INVESTMENT Lake Placid. 3402 Pea-
cock Avenue, Leisure Lakes, 80 x 125 lot.
Paved roads $29,900. Call: Ed. 863-214 1383


I � ~









News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


4220 Lots for Sale
LEISURE LAKES, 2 adjorning lots on Blue St.,
off Lake June Rd., $64,500, (863)655-1125.
LOTS FOR SALE, Doug Stewart Realty Inc., 2
commercial lots on US 27 and more
(407)344-3076 and 407-399-4169, florida
homedreams.com Builders and investors are
also welcome.


4260 Acreage for Sale
7.5 ACRES, $7500, $1000 down, $144.60 per
month on gravel road w/electricity avail.
Home, mobile home or RV okay, located near
Ft. Stockton Texas, Owner fin., (863)655-
6936

4300 Out-of-Town Property
NORTH CAROLINA -LOG CABIN shells on se-
cluded mtn. $89,900 1-11 acre home sites
with breathtaking mtn. views $39000 to
$79900. Exc. financing. 828-247-0081.


5000
Mobile Homes

5050 Mobile Homes
O050 For Sale


5050 Mobile Homes
505 For Sale
AVON MOBILE HOME PARK
55 PLUS PARK, NO PETS
1 BEDROOM MOBILES FOR SALE
1 BEDROOM FURN. APT. FOR RENT
(863)453-3415, 1350 N. LAKE AVE.
LAKE ISOPOKA RETREAT, $13,900 Very
clean, 23' furnished mobile home, 1/1 nice
Florida, lake view & boat dock. 863-385-8832.
ONE ACRE+, HANDYMAN SPECIAL
3/2 Mobile, $59,900., 863-235-0152.

51' O Mobile Home
51 0 Lots for Sole
AP- REDHILL Farms, (four) 55 x 100 mobile
home lots, each $7, 500, all $25,000. Cash.
PCI Real Estate Services 1-407-933-4442.

5150 Mobile Homes
5 ' I For Rent
DBL. WIDE, 2/1, partially furn., A/C, washer/
dryer, $400 mo. $400 deposit, 863-635-4625.


6000
Rentals


6050 Duplexes for Rent


6 100 Villas & Condos
6100 |For Rent
AVON PARK
2/1 VILLA w/screen porch & fenced back
yard. Fresh paint and clean carpet,, cable
hook-up. $400 mo. 1st last & $250 sec. dep.
954-854-1938..
BRIARWOODS APARTMENT.
Now renting spacious 1-bedroom apts homes,
CHA. Convenient,. quiet. Call: 863-385-4078,
Hearing impaired please call:1-800-840-2408.
or stop by office 1335 Spinks Lane, Sebring.
Equal Housing opportunity
KEY LAKE VILLAS
Lake Front Living in Sebring
Spacious 3/2 Villa, Island kitchen, large living
room, family room, utility room, screened
porch w/storage room & outside patio. No
pets. $775 monthly 863-465-9151

6J15 Furnished
6 1 Apartments
EFFICIENCY, NEWLY RENOVATED, great for
one or two persons, $200 per week, Inc. utilit-
ies and cable w/HBO, also has efficiency
rooms for $250 week, (863)465-2134
2006 Unfurnished
6 0 Apartments
BANYAN WOODS apt. now accepting applica-
tion for 2 bedroom handicapped apt. Call
(863)452-0800 Mon./Wed./Thu. 9-4 or 863-
635-4264 Tue. and Fri. 9-4. Equal Housing
Opportunity.


6200 Unfurnished
6200 Apartments
SUMMER SPECIAL
Country Hill Apts, 1/1 only, 1st mo., $300
(sec. $500), Call Libby, (863)446-1702


6200 Unfurnished
6200 Apartments
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Lake Placid, Observation and lake view apts.,
1/1, $400 mo., 863-465-7480, ask for Julio


Lakefront Home & 4 Homesites on Lake Istapoga
Sale to be held on site at 200 Windy Point Road, Lake Placid, Fl.
1:00 PM -
All ofthfe allowing sales willbe held at:
Lake Placid American Legion Post 25,
1490 US-l.ly. 27 f4mtle nrhoftheSR-70), Lake Placid, FL
200� Ac. Lakefront Grove/Development Tract
with Doublewide Home, Womble Road, Lake Placid (offeredin parcs)
44,000� s.f. Building on 3.2� acres offeredd in paocei)
111 W. Interlake Blvd. (on the Circle, Lake Placid)
3.8� Acre Industrial Property with 3 Buildings
744 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid (offered in parcis)
40� Acre Grove/Development Tract (offrnd , parcls)
South of Hwy 70 and east of US 27 on Cambria Road, Lake Placid
25� Acre Residential Development Tract
55 LaGrow Road just north of Lake Clay in Lake Placid


14� Acre Development Tract
3235 Powerline Road, just east of Arbuckle Creek Road, Sebring (Avon Park)
10� Acre Residential Development Tract (ofere in pa nc)i
Hillside Lake Estates, on River Drive just north & cast of


10:00 AM


Previ.w On Sia
Saturday -Aug. 13th
11-4pm



Preview On Site
Saturday -Aug. 13th
11-4pm
Preview On Site
Thurs-Aug. 11th - 1-Spin
Saturday -Aug 13th 11-4pm
preview On Sit
Thur -Aug. 11th -1-Spmi
Saturday -Aug. 13th-*114pm


In coope-tion with


6200 Unfurnished
620 Apartments
CLEAN QUIET 1 and 2 bedrooms from $425
mo., call 863-385-8996.


6250 Furnished Houses
2/2/1, NEWLY renovated, screened porch,
shed, no pets/smoking, senior community,
$800 plus utilities, (863)382-1080.
LARGE 2/2 lake home furnished, in Sebring.
visit: http://67.8.140.89:5080 (954)270-6186

6300 Unfurnished Houses
3/2/2 WITH family room, fenced yard, screen
room, $950 mo., nice area, 471-1500 days
LAKE CLAY RENTAL
4/2/1 or 2/1/1 across from lake & boat ramp.
Huge yard, w/sreened-in-patio, fire place.
$1000/$800. 863-465-5034 or 305-803-3901.
LAKE DENTON- lake house 2/2/ annual, un-
furn. Sebring/Avon Park, $1000 mo. 1st/last/
sec. no pets/smoker. 414-5300 or 441-2994
LAKE PLACID, 2/2, Fl. room on canel to Lake
Grassey, Scrn. Lanai, $1050 mo., year lease,
incl. yard and water service, (239)597-2274.
LG. IMMACULATE 3/2/2, FL. room, new tile/
paint, washer/dryer, golf course front/back,
$1250, dep., lease, (863)773-3956
SEB- VERY small 2/1 house w/ Carport. Suit-
able for two. 863-471-1435.

6550 Warehouses for Rent


mk


6400 E " n W I t r,.:,u:t e :.',- -. ,-ir b ,t: ,? and 8
overhead doors; 640 Park St., Sebring; 3
phase elect.; fenced yard; close to Sebring
Pkway. $2750 Perry Carter Advanced All Serv-
ice Realty, Inc. 863-385-1181.

6750 Commercial Rental


COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE
Call Carol Edwards at C.S. Edwards Realty,
863-441-2994 or 863-699-0404


7000
Merchandise


'a a


s01


7020 Auctions

ESTATE AUCTION

Sat 8/6, 9am (view 8) 1219 W Lk Buckeye
Dr NE, Winter Haven. 10%buyers fee.
SALE RAIN OR SHINE! This is a partial list-
sorting not done & attic not unloaded.
Treasures turn up every day!!! Much
Goods!
Meade Motor-drive Refractor Telescope
w/tripod, camera adapter, 4 lenses, 2x amp
(cost $850). Nice Above Ground Hot Tub
w/cover.
GUNS: JC Higgin .22cal mod 31 w/scope;
30/06 Military Rifle; 1936 Mil Rifle; 3 .22 cal
Pistols; Vintage Daisy C02 BB Pistol; Sav-
age 4x Scope; Old Boy Scout Leather Han-
dle Hunting Knife by Western Cutlery; Bayo-
net; Samurai Style Sword; Flare Gun; Tooled
Leather Holster w/belt; Gun Racks.
FURNITURE: Dbi & Sgl Beds; $1299 King
Mattress Set; Desks; 60s Mahogany BR Set;
Lane Swing-Out Walnut Coffee Table; Sofas;
LR Chairs; Bar Chairs; Dinette Table;
Wrought Iron DR Table w/4 Chairs; Book-
shelves; Office Chairs; Computer Desk; 2
Cedar Wardrobes & Dresser; Marble Floor
Lamp w/Tiffany Style "Dragonfly" Shade
COLLECTIBLES: Coo-Coo Clock; '88 Olym-
pics Framed Spoon Coll; Nice asst of Men's
Hats; Art & Wall Decor; Eclectic Lamps; Ko-
dak Brownie One-Six Projector; Schatz
1000-Day Clock; Anniv Clock; Vintage elec-
tric & battery Wall Clocks; 50s Smith-Coro-
na "Skywriter"; Video Disc Player & Star
Wars Movie Disc; Noritake "Rosales" Chi-
na 59pcs + 12 Pc Snack Set; 39 7-Eleven
1970s FB & BB Cups; Vintage Games &
Toys; more.
MORE: Pool Table 39x71"; Hot Tub; File
Cabinets; Crafts & Sew Material; Sew Ma-
chine in Cab w/Chair; Many Golf Clubs &
bags; 300 Golf Balls; Bed & Bath Linens;
Luggage; Camp Cot; BP Monitors; Vintage
LXI Video Camera; Punching Bag; 50 Gal
Aquarium w/Stand & Accessories; 12" &
19" TVs; 45" Wide Screen TV; Ping Pong
Table; Fishing Tackle; Exercycle; Redwood
patio Furn; 2 Bicycles; Kitchen contents; Sm
Apple; etc
APPLIANCES: Washer/Dryer; 17cu.ft. Re-
frigerator w/Ice maker.
MILITARY: USAF- 4 Vintage Officer's Uni-
forms, Topcoats, Trench Coat, Rain Coats,
Tuxedos; Shirts, Caps; Belts; Dress Hats,
Uniform Adornments; Aviators Leather Gog-
gle Kit in box; 1943 Nash Kelvinator M3
6x30 Binoculars; 5 Heavy Duty Footlockers;
Luggage. Navy- Hats & Cadet's Wool Long
Coat. Signed Ltd Edition 202/650 Framed
Aeronautics Print by Richard R. Broome;
MORE,
TOOLS & EQUIPMENT: Garage Packed
Full! Sm Table Saw; 5 sp Bench Drill
Press; 2-Wheel Bench Grinders; Belt/Disc
Sander; 10" Band Saw; Scroll Saw;
Work Table w/Vise; Bench Lights; 200 Hand
Tools; Power Tools; Saw Horses w/Table
tops; Lawn Tools; etc
PHIL RINER AUCTIONS
863-299-6031
ab282au261. Our 27th Year!
PHIL RINER AUCTIONS - OUR 27TH YEAR!
Estate Auctions; Business Liquidations; Ap-
praisals. 863-299-6031 ab282au261
EMail - RIN.ER@VERIZON.NET


7040 Appliances
DRYER
$50, (863)655-2429


GE ELECTRIC ISLAND STOVE
36" Long, 21" wide, $200, OB0,
(863)385-1187 leave message if not home.


HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL


HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL
THAT IS UNDER $250?
We will run it free!
Either mail to or drop it off at our office
2227 US 27 S. Sebring, FL. 33870
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!


STOVE ( maylag) oven dr window, good cond.
$75.00 (863)214-5995
WASHER
$50, (863)655-2429


7060 Antiques - Collectible
TWO OAK DRESSERS
(old) 25" wide & 50 " high. 36" wide & 55"
high. $100. for the pair. 863-452-2815.


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News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


7 100 TV, Radio, & stereo
25" ZENITH color TV floor model, cherry
wood cabinet. $150. 863-471-6728.

7 140 Computers & Supplies
LEXMARK 722/Z32 color jet printer lyr-old,
like new. Just installed new B?W cartridge.
$35.00. 863-465-1870.

7180 Furniture
1 LG. lounge chair, maroon, $50; 1 sm. swivel
rocker, mellon, good cond., (863)465-1458
3 DESK CHAIRS
Pink & Blue fabric, no wheels $30 OBO
(863)385-1187 leave message if not home
COMPUTER DESK with hutch for storage. 49'
wide by 24' deep, 71' high. $125.00
385-3770
DINING ROOM SET
pickled wood, hutch w/light, table 4-chairs,
2/leaves, $600. OBO. 863-414-7244.
DINING TABLE, round on pedistal, 36", good
cond., $25 OBO, delivery avail. (863)452-
5706
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER 5' x 3' excellent
condition, 2 doors w/ shelves $70.00
382-3659
FORMAL DINING table, 42X72, white w/black
trim, 6 high back formal chairs, black and
white cloth, like new, $3000 new, sale $500. 4
swivel pair stools, matching floral chairs, new
$800, sell $200, (863)633-9059
HARDWOOD BOOKSHELVES, natural wood.
$100 each. (863)-382-6628.
HARDWOOD COFFEE table natural wood,
$150. (863)-382-6628. -
HARDWOOD ENTERTAINMENT center. $200.
(863)-382-6628.
HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL
THAT IS UNDER $250?
We will run it free!
Either mail to or drop it off at our office
2227 US 27 S. Sebring, FL. 33870
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!
HIDEAWAY COUCH (queen) green $240. 863-
382-6628.
LARGE CUSTOM built desk, Natural hard
wood. $300.00 382-6628
LARGE DINING table, natural wood. $250.
(863)-382-6628.


LAZY BOY Recliner,
$50.00 214-5995


tan excellent Cond.


7 180 Furniture
LIKE NEW 42" round glass table, 2 regular
chairs, 2 swivel tilt chairs. $400. 452-6268.
MATTRESSES- Brand new orthopedic pillow
top sets. Full $150, queen - $185, king, $250.
5 yr. warr. Can deliver, (863)452-6063
MEMORY FOAM 10" mattress, Devi by
Nasa. As Seen On TV. New in plastic 20 yr-
warr. $550. Can deliver. 863-452-6063
OAK BR/ set triple dresser w/mirror annrmoire
chest 2-night stands double/queen headboard.
$395. 863-453-4409.

OLD ROUND Ice-cream parlor set. Table w/4
matching chairs. Excellent condition. $175.
863-471-6728
PATIO CHAIRS and cushions (4) pvc, white.
$100.00 863-655-5126
QUEEN SIZE SLEEPER COUCH
beige tones, $200 OBO,
(863)385-1187 leave message if not home

SEARS SECTIONAL Sofa with ottoman. One
section makes queen size bed. Excellent con-
dition, $500. OBO. (863)385-3277
SOLID CHERRY bookcase head board and
frame full size mattress & Box spring $150.
863-382-7439.
STUDENT DESK, good condition 10.00
863-655-5126
TWIN SIZE MATTRESS SET
like new $75 OBO, (863)471-0198.

7260 Musical Merchandise
FLEET ONE Yamaha Organ, double keyboard,
base pedals, 5 octave, storage bench, exc.
shape, like new. $1500. Call (863)385-1985
GUITAR, ACOUSTIC, Round hole, blonde top,
$85, (863)452-5374.
HILL-GUSTAT MIDDLE SCHOOL NEEDS
DONJATIONS OF YOUR ATTIC INSTRUMENTS!
Instruments will be cleaned, repaired, and put
in the hands of students who otherwise would
not be able to participate in band. Donors will
be offered a tax deduction letter for the esti-
mated value of the instrument. Thanks!!!!!

7300 Miscellaneous
10X25 SCREEN ED PORCH for Mobile home.,
awning, 2 doors, windows, in section, good
screens, $800 unassembled, $1200 neg., as-
sembled, 85-2741 or 786-877-7071 cell �


7300 Miscellaneous
4 CASES OF CASSETTES
R&B and Rap Music, $50 for all OBO,
(863)385-1187 leave message if not home.
6X8 utility trailer, $500; assisted mobilty
scooter, $900; 811 Lake Bety Dr. Lake Placid.
Call 441-1326 or 441-1795.
BEDSPREAD, ALL sizes, 2 beige color, 1
flowered w/pink skirt, 1-blue flowered king,
$7.50 OBO, (863)471-6962. '
GENERATOR,, 1750 watt, Sears older model,
runs and works good, $75, (863)402-2285.
HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL
THAT IS UNDER $250?
We will run it free!
Either mail to or drop it off at our office
2227 US 27 S. Sebring, FL. 33870
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!
MULTI COLOR Rug 24.5 x 59 New 5.00
453-3766
NEWBORN 3 pc new outfit, blue 5.00
453-3766
SKETCHERS SHOES brown, sz 9, almost
new $10.00 453-3766
SLOT MACHINE 3 & 4 spinning wheels. 500
tokens: Lifetime warranty- Retail $475. Now
$275. Video Games. Retail $675. Now $325.
Have your own, don't pay to play. Lots of fun.
863-414-2899 or 863-699-9312
SPANISH BAYONET PLANT
$2.00, (863)385-9390

USED SOLAR panels for pool, used domestic
panels and tanks, exc. bargains. Different
brands for pools, big inventory, must reduce.
Hurry! Next to Discount Auto in Avon Park,
(863)453-7663, Miller Energetic Inc.


7340 Wanted to Buy
BUYING COINS, CURRENCY, WATCHES
55 YRS COLLECTING! TOP PRICE!
(863) 414-1632 or (863) 452-5688
WANTED USED concrete blocks, two cell,
(863)381-4110

7400 Lawn & Garden
FULL SERVICE lawn care. Pressure clean-
ing & handi- work. Affordable, licensed, exp.
Commercial and residential 863-381-4608
TORO RIDING mower, Briggs and straton
8hp, 32" cut, 4 cycle, $400, (863)452-6439
WALKER MOWER, MTSD, 20hp, 56" deck, ex-
tra blades, runs good, asking $2850,
(863)314-0725.

7440 Building Supplies
MULTIPLE GALVANIZE roofing on sale. 3"
wide and up. Call: 863-453-4960.

74 80 Nursery, Gardgning,
748 & Supplies
BLUEBERRY PLANTS FOR SALE
(863)453-7677

7500 Livestock & Supplies
BLACK ANGUS BULL
2 years old , $800, 863-381-0373.

7520 Pets & Supplies
AILIARILIM 10 al g :T:.(,let Le.-up. hoodJ00
staiid, $65, t863)214-54t9.
BLUE CROWNED CONURE, 2 yrs. old, talks,
dances, very sweet with large cage and travel
cage, $300, (863)441-4224.
BOSTON TERRIER pup, male, AKC, papers,
health certificate, $650. Call Joan at 863-452-
5653 or 863-443-0951


7520 Pets & Supplies
FREE FEMALE american bulldog mix, approx
95 lbs, 2.5 years old,gQod nature, white and
brindle color. (321) 624-8045
FREE- MOTHER WITH five kittens, part cali-
co/minxs. No tail, available for good home.
863-990-3614.
JACK RUSSELL Puppies, 5 males, 1 female,
nice markings, 1st shots/wormed. Ready to
go. $250., (863)452-1479 or 863-990-8363
MINI DACHSHUND
male, 9 weeks old, shots, $300, 471-2944


NOTICE

Florida statute 585.195 states that
all dogs and cats sold in Florida
must be at least eight weeks old,
have an official health certificate
and proper shots and be free of in-
testinal and external parasites.
ONE FEMALE medium size, mixed breed dog
to be given to good home. 863- 990-3614.
SMALL TRI-COLOR Beagles Puppies, 5 males,
first shots, vet checked, $250, ready now. Call
(863)382-3370 after 5, 381-1668 anytime.

TWO BEAGLE Puppies male/female, vet
checked, w/first shot. $350 each. (863) 382-
3795
WHITE MALTESE mixed answer to the name
Peggy, Missing on Highlander Rd, near DeSo-
to. If found pleasecall: 863-382-1948.

7 60 Medical Supplies
7 TU & Equipment
ADJUSTABLE TUB or shower chair $25.00
465-2730
BEDSIDE COMMODE chair 20.00
465-2730
FOLDING WALKER w/ wheels $50.00
465-2730
SHOWER CHAIR $20.00 465-2730
WHEELCHAIR
CHAMPION folding $75.00, 465-2730


8000
Recreation


8050 Boats & Motors
18 FT Bay Liner Capri Cuddy, w/trailer timini
top humming bird fish finder. Runs and looks
great. $3400. OBO. 471-9788.
1999 LOWE JOHN Boat, 14', 15hp Johnson
electric start, Bimini top, trolling motor, 2 bat-
teries, less than 10 hours, live well, $2500,
(863)465-4429
2-USED MOTORS for parts. 67 Evenrude. 60
HP 1968 Johnson 100 HP. Both for $150.00.
863-465-1870.
8 15 Fitness & Exercise
8 1 0 Equipment
BOFLEX XLT
w/all attachments, $500,
385-7272 AFTER 6:30PM
Q8 00 Bikes & Cycle
- Equipment
3 WHEE! re,, o, d r.,iond .:ond lrg re.
$95, (863)314-8539.

8300 Pools & Supplies
ABOVE GROUND POOL. 15 X 30 $500.
(863)-441-1431


I 1i-aeu sm -TATUSED TOB EBIS.

GRANNY'S HOME FURNISHINGS
New and Selective Used. I
eCT mneR 'I------- -----------
1 8" FUTON MATTRESS ' ALL WOOD FUTON'
'' WITHOUTTHE FRAME 3995
:: $13995 2990
$ 3 Reg. $359.95 i
Various colors to choose from. Not valid with any :
S Not valid with any other offers. ther offers.
------ i EXPIRES 07/28/051--- - - ' it 8"M sEXPIRES 07/28/05 (------ -
219 US 27 S., SEBRING * (863) 402-0219
VISIT US ON THE WEB AT wwwjranntuff.com
L ------


A.P.-3 FAMILY yard sale, Sun., 9-2, beannie
babies, household, building material ie win-
dows, doors, etc. 2342 Beach Dr. Corner of
Avon Blvd and Beach Dr. Near Old Walker
Hospital.
Having a Garage Sale?
Make more money by reaching thou-
sands of potential customers. For only
$8 you get 5 lines for one week in the
News-Sun and Highlands Herald Shop-
per, plus FREE GARAGE SALE SIGNS! If
your sale gets rained out, call us and
we'll run it again at no additional charge.
Call today! (863) 385-6155.
AVON PARK lakes Garage sale- Sunday
7/31 8am-2pm All Misc items. stryker rd,
right on morningside, left of Tern rd to blue
home at end corner, Tern & terrapin rd.
LP -MOVING SALE- 106 Loquat Rd, NE. 7am-
4pm. Fri. Sat. Sun. July 29 -31 Computer ta-
ble, microwave,, furniture, clothes & misc.
items.
SEB-SHORES. DOWN-SIZING! 305 Parkview
Rd. Off Sebring Parkway. Aug. 5-7 8am-dark.
Bikes, guitar amps, furniture, piano & more


SEB.- HILLS. 7: 30- ?? Thurs. Fri. & Sat. Aug.
4,5, 6. 113 Robin Ave. Clothing, men & wom-
en, tools, rugs, rug cleaner, yarn, books, old
records, shoes & misc.
Seb.-6024 Praise Ave., Desoto City, refrigera-
tor, 2 end tables and set summer ware, new
sock, new, what knots, new hats for both sex,
new, towel sets, new, July 30-31
SEB-HOT WHEELS, FURN, clothing, Bratford
plates, something for everyone., Aug. 5-6,
6402 HANCOCK RD, (863)471-2763.
SEBRING- 3000 Hammock terrace. Aug. 5-6,
8am-? Big Moving sale, lots of carpentry
tools, power, antique table, chairs, China cabi-
net, push mower w/elect start. 11 cu. ft. up-
right freezer, queen bed, convection micro
oven/stand, means & women clothes & crafts.

SEBRING-MOVING SALE 1806 elf dr. fr aug
5th & sa aug 6th 7am- noon Multiple house-
hold items, kids toys, office items.
SEB.- 2305 Kristen drive. Hammock Rd to
Brunns Rd turn right follow signs. Aug. 6-7.
8am- 4pm. Recently moved too much to list..


8350 SportingGoods 9400 AutomotiveWanted


RIFLE CASE grey with foam lining. 25.00
453-3766

8500 Golf Carts
YAMAHA GOLF
Cart new batteries and tires with charger
$1500. 863 441-5098. 863-465-6552.


9000
Transportation


9 100 Motorcycles &ATVs
1997 HONDA 750 night Hawk, good cond.
runs great. Asking. $3,500. OBO 381-6338
KX60 MOTORCYCLE, $1200; Yamaha PW50,
$300, (863)471-2944.

9 150 Four Wheel Drive
1990 BRONCO II, 4X4
Air, manualtransmission, Needs engine work,
$600 firm, (863)441-0343
ONE OWNER, 70k mi., 1989, 1/2 ton Chevy
4X4, tool boX, bedliner. Like new Tires, Bat-
tery, Cold A/NC, looks and runs good, $3500
FIRM. (863)453-4743.

9200 Trucks
2004 CHEVY SILVERADO Crew Cab, 4X4,
9000 mi., loaded wall the extras, towing pkg.,
roll and lock cover, Rhino sprayed bed, run-
ning boards, On Star, $25,000 ($2500 below
book value) (863)471-6608. ,
2004 EXPEDITION; EDDIE BAUER, 12,750 ac-
tual miles, like new cond., $28,900, (863)386-
.1436 or 954-270-3005 cell.

9250 Vans
GMC,,1990, Vandura 1500 Cargo Van, great
work truck, $2100 OBO, (863)465-6265 or
465-0477.


FREE REMOVAL of unwanted vehicles. Cash
paid for some, (863)449-1893
9 4 Sport Utility
944O Vehicles
1983 CJ 5 Jeep $4,500 ( 863)-441-1431

9450 Automotive for Sale
1989 FORD Mustang LX 5.0. Many modifica-
tions, strong running, great A/C. $2200. OBO
(863) 381-7044.
1994 GRAND CARAVAN
New transmission, new tires, single owner,
well maintained, good running cond. 863-
449-1125.
1996 SATURN LSI 1
Good cond., $1200, (863)452-6101.
1996 SATURN SC-2 coupe, 5-speed manual,
in running cond., $800. OBO. Call for details,
863-381-7039
1998 PONTIAC SUNFIRE
New tires, alloy wheels, AM/FM/Cassette,
power everything, auto, runs great! $3000
OBO. Call (863)453-7423.
97 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
white, w/tan interior, old body style, 120k
miles, runs well looks good $3,900. 863-402-
0888.
CHEVROLET LUMINA 1996 128 MI.
WHITE, 4DR. PWR WINDOWS, AUTO, A/C.
AM/FM CASS. GOOD COND. OWNER BOUGHT
WITH 8,000, ALL MAINTENANCE RECORDS,
NEW TIRES. 2000.00 655-1808

DAE WOOD, 2002, LEGENZA, silver, 34,500
mi., auto., A/C, PW, nice car, $4800,
(863)471-2775, 414-3867.
FORD T-BIRD, '88, new paint/tires, runs great,
A/C needs work, $1500, (863)214-1483
MITSUBISHI, 3000 GT, 1994 green cold air
.new tires, new clutch, exc. :'.' r,'3 n'u. ,Tiui
see, 92k mi., $8000 OBO 382-4926,443-0950 -_


Classified ads
get fast results


Wa"1Realtor
Office: (863) 382-2000 - Beeper:'(239) 279-7219
___. Res: (863) 382-8542 " _




U.-7n al


GOLF HAMMOCK
Spacious acre beauty - with fabulous in-law
suite complete with it's own kitchen, dining
area, bedroom & bath and access to huge
patio overlooking the gorgeous lawn, fruit
trees. The main house has huge family room,
living room, dining room w/sliders to patio, 3
bedrooms and 2 baths. Big kitchen w/pass
thru to patio, huge utility room w/pantry. 2 car
garage.
Listed 330.000


LAKEFRONT HOME
Charming brick front home smack on Lake
Sebring w/lots of upgrades. Lovely tile
flooring throughout, new cabinets in the
kitchen. Enjoy the lake views from most
every room. 3 bedrooms, 2 lovely tiled
baths. Newer roof, all appliances. Big
detached double car carport for boats or
cars.
$.. 399,000


This Space is Availabll

Call Your Account

Representative Today!





N^5...61ewsSun



T. 3856155


1564 US t











, * .s s* . ' -a a"'





BEAUTIFUL HOME...
...that sits on 4.75 secluded acres.
Home is custom built with too
many extras to mention. Detached
garage, horsebarn & padlocks.
'699,000 .


of Okeectiotbe realtyy, 'Inc.

"Lake IstoLogLa 'Branch"
Hwy. 98 - P.O. Box 225, Lorida, FL 33857 * (863) 655-3891



a Broker Bob (63)610a ieS
Tin W w (63610444 Blh Hil 863 64-36 on 61ugh (6I 1-)S
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PAUSE AND CONSIDER
Jan Merop

All roads

lead to Rome
My husband and I eager-
ly started out on a brisk
morning walk while visiting
Ken's Mom and sister,
Joyce, in rural
Pennsylvania. We set a pret-
ty good pace going around
the "block" as Mom had
suggested.
We came around once
and continued that route.
But, then a curving country
road lined on both sides by
beautiful trees beckoned us
off our circular course.
Ken has a great sense of
direction, so I wasn't con-
cerned about getting lost.
The canopy of trees and
beauty of free-roaming deer
captivated us and we fol-
lowed this route as it led us
from one road to another.
We were working up a
pretty good sweat when we
rounded another bend -
sure we were going in the
right direction. But, every
step found us panting more
and wishing for the sight of
our familiar home away
from home. Instead, we
scratched our heads as more
deer, woods and curving
roads made us wonder if we
were lost or simply a little
confused.
It can be that way in our
walk with God sometimes.
He points us in the right
direction and we walk
along with him, content to
have him by our side. But,
then, we get distracted by
something that is pleasing
to the eye. It's not necessar-
ily bad, just maybe not the
best since we don't quite
know his ways well enough
yet.
Before we know it,
we've wandered further
than we intended to go. The
scenery is still beautiful, but
the earlier excitement is
diminishing. That wonder-
ful sense of direction that
we had when we walked
closely beside the Lord has
left us. Are we lost or sim-
ply a little confused?
When we reached that
place of uncertainty on our
unfamiliar walk in
Pennsylvania, a car came
by. I took it as the perfect
opportunity to inquire of
someone who lived in the
neighborhood (since it's
usually the woman who is
willing to ask for direc-
tions).
According to the friendly
neighbors, we had a long
trek still ahead of us. To my
husband's credit, we were
going in the right general
direction. But, the specific
instructions saved us more
guessing and walking than
had we tried to find our
way alone.
When we discover that
our wandering has us con-
fused, God will usually
send someone along who
can help redirect our steps.
If we're willing to heed the
advice, we'll get back on
track with the Lord. That is
the best path to place our
feet.
"You have made known
to me the path of life; you
will fill me with joy in your
presence, with eternal
pleasures at your right
hand." (Psalm 16:11, NIV)
They say that all roads
lead to Rome. But some
roads we roam may not be
wise. Stay on the road that
will lead you securely
home. Selah.


Jan Merop of Sebring is
a contributing writer of the
News-Sun. Her book
"Pause and Consider" is
available at the News-Sun.
* ..


INSIDE


Crossword 2C
Dear Abby 2C
Horoscope 3C


ifestyle
/^aA H ' ^


NEWS-SUN + SEBRING, FLA.


SECTION C + SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005


Reaching for success


Photos by KATARA SIMMONS/News-Sun
Jordan Chin, of Avon Park, uses a comput-
er to study for his GED. Chin said he plans
to take his test by September so that he can
start the Security Enforcement program in
November.


By SUE ANN CARPENTER
News-Sun correspondent


general


AVON PARK
Educational


G Development, a high school
diploma issued by the state of
Florida, has a different mean-
ing for everyone.
"It is not a 'lesser than' diploma. It's a
nine-hour exam on the heels of course
work. First the TABE (Tests of Adult
Basic Education) is given to discover
the prescription for what's lacking, and
where the holes are for that person,"
said Dr. Michael J. McLeod, dean of the
Division of Adult and Community
Education at South Florida Community
College.
Everybody has a right to get a GED
diploma. There's no charge for instruc-
tion, use of books, or the pre-GED exam
- which is half the length of the final
test and helps one prepare for the it.
However, it does cost $50 to. take the
final exam (an administration fee.)
"For those who acquire a GED diplo-
ma, there's a full range of ages, from 16-
70, and their reasons are varied:
Commonly there are dropouts who have
entered the workplace and now realize
they have a dead end job. There are lots
of homeschool students. And there are
those who simply march to the beat of a
different drummer. They may have
failed in regular school, and didn't fit.
For others there are religious reasons,
and a few want to accelerate past the
public school system to enter college
early. Some older adults do it clandes-
tinely, and others have lost time because
of illness or a cataclysmic event or even
a move. Lots of people move down here
and their credits don't always fully
transfer," McLeod said.
Classes are offered at SFCC campus-
es in Avon Park, Lake Placid and at the
teacherage in Sebring. Hours are 8:30
a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday,
and 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through
Thursday.
"People have jobs, and we try to
make classes fit their life. They come in
whenever they can. They may have to
start late or leave early for a job, etc.,"
McLeod said.
If there is a business or a church that
wants to offer GED to their community,
the instructors will go wherever needed.
"Countywide we graduate 150 per
year. It makes it all worthwhile when
you, see a grandmother walk across a
3tage and her family cheers her,"
McLeod said.
"We usually have 10-15 students at a
time and they all work on something dif-
ferent. This is not a 'chalk and talk' sit-
uation. Our teachers are here to support
and teach whatever is needed. They
focus on correcting student's weakness


SFCC adult education instructor Jan Morris (left) answers a question for Bennie Carson, of Avon Park. Carson has been working
toward her GED since March and said, 'My goal is to take the test by late August.'


so they can accomplish their goal and
become productive. In Florida, we have
the highest (93 percent) success rate. I
feel that's because of our excellent staff.
Our instructor here, Jan Morris, is what
makes the difference. She 4has the cur-
riculum nailed," McLeod said.
These are just some of the inspiring
quotes instructor Morris recites and
believes in: "We shape our tomorrows
by what we think and do today" and
"Winners make goals; losers make
excuses."
Morris said the final GED test is
given every month, and her students
pass the first time. She's been doing this
"forever" having started as an adviser in.
1992.
"I love it. This is education. One on
one. I take each one where they are and
move them up. It's individualized edu-
cation," Morris said.
"I look at this as two-tier: Some may
need remediation to improve in certain
areas in preparation for taking a voca-
tional program such as nursing or the
police academy. But the majority wants
to take their GED test. We usually grad-
uate 35 a year from my class," Morris
said.
Soft classical music plays in the back-
ground to help them focus.
"The goal is to get them out of here as
soon as possible. I set it up so they can
concentrate, and can learn better,"
Morris said.
The GED is for people over 18, but
there is a waiver committee that will
consider someone as young as 16, how-
ever the approval of the school district is
required.
See GED, page 4C


Deborah Starks studies, while her instructor Jan Morris sits in the background ready
to offer assistance if needed. Starks said she hopes that she will soon be ready to take
her GED at South Florida Community College in Avon Park.


Don't leave used tissues behind on table


* News-Sun correspondent Pauline Au Yang provides eti-
quette tips for readers on the last Sunday of each month in
the Lifestyle section.

In response to last month's Serving Up Etiquette, a
reader asked for consideration from other patrons who
have low immune deficiency and enjoy eating out once
in a while.
This reader thinks it's downright unhealthy for those
with somewhat healthy immune system to blow their
noses in tissues or napkins and leave the dirty items on
the table. This kind of disgusting behavior happens
often. This individual stated, unaware waiters/waitress-
es will pick up that napkin then wipe the table with the
sponge or cloth thus spreading the germ to other tables.
She also is asking that patrons refrain from blowing
their noses at the table while other patrons are trying to
enjoy a delicious meal. She thinks there ought to be a
way for restaurants to subtly educate the public on
health issues caused by these unhealthy practices.
Recently, my colleagues and I visited a restaurant
which also had a salad bar. We were appalled at what
we saw management do. A manager, who passed the
salad bar, felt the need to munch. Without hesitation, he
grabbed a piece of a morsel for the salad bar with his
hand, walked over to a nearby table, added extra


Serving .

Up ..
11 , .4


- - --


- k-





SPauline Au Yang


condiments and shoved the food down his throat. Yes,
there were available plates, cutleries and serving uten-
sils.
Another colleague stopped by a fastfood chain to
pick up a tasty meal. However, that particular day,
which was Sunday, assigned employees called in sick.
Only one person was operating the cash register,
answering the phone and assisting in food preparation.
All this was done with gloved hands. Gloves which
were never disposed of during each transaction. This


employee is said to have touched her head when orders
appeared overwhelming. Just imagine all the shared
germs that were ingested. Or better yet don't.
It is nasty to blow one's nose in the presence of oth-
ers, especially while dining. It's even worst to dispose
of the snot riddled napkin/tissue on the table at which
you are eating. You should mind your manners, taking
into consideration the feelings of the other patrons.
It is unsanitary to use ones hand to select food from
a salad bar. In addition, once the gloves is used to touch
money, telephone or anything not associated with the
food being prepared, it must be discarded. Remember,
mind your manners.


Pauline Au yang has been an etiquette advisor for
Faith Pentecostal Youth Enrichment program, Vision
Christian Community Youth program, Blushing
Brides Wedding Centre, Tatianna's Bridal,
Blackaestetics Institute and YDC 2001 and has
served as a judge for the Miss JaMerica Beauty
Pageants. She can be reached for consultation or to
conduct etiquette workshops by e-mail at
psmartch@strato.net or mail to Empowering the
People, News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL
33870.


I











2C News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


DIVERSIONS


Get counseling before giving ultimatum to straying spouse


Question: My wife has been involved in
an affair with her boss for six months. I've
known about it from the beginning, but just
haven't been able to confront her. Melanie
acts like she doesn't love me anyway. If I
give her an ultimatum I could lose her
completely. Can you assure me that won't
happen? Have you ever offered the "love
must be tough" advice and had it backfire,
ending in divorce?
Dr. Dobson: Yes, I have, and I certainly
understand- your caution. I wish I could
guarantee how Melanie will react to a
firmer approach. Unfortunately, life offers
few certainties, even when all the probabil-
ities point in one direction. Sometimes
well-conditioned athletes drop dead from
heart attacks. Some outstanding parents
raise children who rebel and become drug
addicts. Some of the most intelligent, cau-
tious businessmen foolishly bankrupt them-
selves. Life is like that.
Things happen every day that shouldn't
have occurred. Nevertheless, we should go
with the best information available to us. I
saw a sign that said, "The fastest horses
don't always win, but you should still bet
on them." Even as a nongambler, that
makes sense to me.
Having offered that disclaimer, let me
say that there is nothing risky about treating
oneself with greater respect, exhibiting
confidence and poise, pulling backward
and releasing the door on the romantic trap.
The positive benefits of that approach
are often immediate and dramatic. Self-
respect expressed in a loving way virtually
never fails to have a salutary effect on a
drifting lover, unless there is not the tiniest


spark left to fan. Thus, in
instances when opening the cage
door results in a spouse's sudden
departure, the relationship was
over already. I'm reminded of the
proverb that says, "If you love
something, set it free. If it comes
back to you, it's yours. If it does-
n't come back, it never was yours
in the first place." There is a
great truth in that, and it applies
to your relationship with your
wife.
Now, obviously, it is risky to
precipitate a period of crisis.
When explosive individuals are
involved in mid-life turmoil or a
passionate fling with a new lover,
great tact and wisdom are


Foc
ON T
FAm

Dr. Ja
Dobs
i


*required to know when and how to respond.
That's why professional counsel is vital
before, during and after the confrontation.
It would be unthinkable of me to recom-
mend that victims of affairs indiscriminate-
ly pose ultimatums with 24-hour deadlines,
or that they push an independent partner in
a comer. Great caution is needed in such
delicate conflicts.
In short, I suggest that you seek the assis-
tance of a competent counselor who can
help you deal with the problem of
Melanie's affair.
Question: Children seem to be growing
up at a younger age today than in the past.
Is this true, and if so, what accounts for
their faster development?
Dr. Dobson: Yes, it is true. Statistical
records indicate that our children are grow-


ing taller today than in the past,
probably resulting from better
nutrition, medicine, exercise, rest
and recreation. And this more
ideal physical environment has
* w apparently caused sexual maturi-
ty to occur at younger and
younger ages.
It is thought that puberty in a
particular child is triggered when
US he or she reaches a certain level
of growth; therefore, when envi-
iHE ronmental and general health fac-
MILy tors propel a youngster upward at
a faster rate, sexual maturation
ames occurs earlier.
son For example, in 1850, the
- average age of menarche (first
menstruation) in Norwegian girls
was 17.0 years of age; in 1950, it was 13.0.
The average age of puberty in females had
dropped four years in one century. In the
United States the average age of the menar-
che dropped from 16.5 in 1840 to 12.9 in
1950. More' recent figures indicate that it
now occurs on average at 12.8 years of age!
Thus, the trends toward younger dating and
sexual awareness are a result, at least in
part, of this "fast track" mechanism.

Dr. Dobson is founder and chairman of the
board of the nonprofit organization Focus
on the Family, P.O. Box 444, Colorado
Springs, CO 80903; or http://www.fami-
ly.org. Questions and answers are excerpt-
ed from "The Complete Marriage and
Family Home Reference Guide, " published
by Tyndale House.


Grown kids blush at the sight of their motorcycle mama


Dear Abby: I love my mother
very much; however, during the
past few years she has changed
drastically. My siblings and I are
at a loss as to what to do.
A few years ago, my parents
found a new hobby - motorcy-
cling. My 50-something parents
are now the proud owners of a
Harley Dayidson, and they're
having the time of their lives.
The problem is my mother has
changed her physical appear-
ance. She now wears her hair
halfway to her waist, permed and


*.





:"

DEAR

Jeanne


bleached a strange shade of yellow. She
wears only clothing that says "Harley
Davidson" on it. These shirts are designed
for girls in their 20s, not women in their
50s. Mom may be. happy, but she looks like
a classic Motorcycle Mama - and it's
embarrassing.
Should I say something? Should I tell her
I want to see her dress like my mother, not
some leather biker queen? It has reached
the point that I don't invite her places
because I'm afraid she'll show up wearing
her HD gear. How can I ask her to dress
more appropriately?
Please don't.mention my name or state.
Mom would kill me if she knew I wrote
about her. - Embarrassed in the
Northwest
Dear Embarrassed: Look at the bright


LABOR'S REWARD

By Alan P. Olschwang


ACROSS
1 Discard
5 French father
9 Off. underling
13 Disappear
19 Muted trumpet sound
20 Norway's patron saint
21 Neighbor of Algeria
22 Old Testament prophet
23 News piece
24 Relieve
25 Touched down
26 Liam of "Schindler's
List"
27 Start of Theodore
Roosevelt quote
31 Given a hint
32 Travels to the runway
33 Dame Myra and
Walter Rudolf
34 Acts
35 Filled out
37 Flophouse in London
38 Otto I's realm
.40 Woosnam or Fleming
41 Napping
43 Part 2 of quote
50 Pilfer
52 Singer Sumac
53 Digestive fluid
54 TV oldie, "The _
Woman"
55 Gathered, as sheep
57 M. Damon title role
60 Push in the right direc-
tion
61 Dashboard gauge
63 How
65 School subj.
68 Part 3 of quote
72 ETO commander
73 Bikini creation
76 Rising and setting with
the sun
79 Synthetic fiber
80 Fluid courses
84 Dancer/actress Ruby
88 Ancient calculator


90 Takes to court
91 Very wide shoe width
93 Poised for action
94 Part 4 of quote
96 Black Sea peninsula
98 Capital of Colombia?
99 CBS logo
100 Freeway fillers
102 Green clubs
104 Goldman's Wall Street
partner
108 Doe or damsel
111 Indiana pros
112 Stew pot
113 End of quote
117 Farmer, at times
119 Catch sight of
120 Jay of SNL fame
121 Nabokov novel
122 Horse-drawn carriage
123 Stagger
124 Tennis great Nastase
125 Sicilian mount
126 Martin and Charlie
127 Mach-2 breakers
128 Fictional sleuths
129 Fly high
DOWN
1 Silly fop
2 Pledge
3 Sugar, e.g.
4 Ballroom dances
5 Creative verses
6 With high spirits
7 Coarse files
8 Even once
9 Bedazzles
10 Purchase evidence
11 Skirt cuts
12 Church contribution
13 Let off steam
14 Pub purchase
15 Extended family mem-
ber
16 Subject of discussion
17 Did a farrier's job
18 Manual laborers
28 Breathed out


side. You are blessed with par-
ents who are active and in good
health. Many families are not so
lucky.
That said, because your sib-
lings are in agreement, approach
your mother as a group and have
a "mini-intervention." Tell her
you love her and you're happy
she and your father are enjoying
ABBY themselves, but when you invite
her places with you, you wish
Phillips she'd dress more conservatively.
- You're entitled to your feelings
- and your preferences.
Dear Abby: I have been dating a won-
derful man I'll call "Zack" for nearly a year.
Zack is smart, funny, attractive, well-edu-
cated, and has a well-paying job that could
provide us with a very good lifestyle if our
relationship becomes permanent. .
Several months ago, after a few drinks,
Zack confided in me that he had always
fantasized about me spanking him. Having
had a few myself, I decided to make his
fantasy come true. Afterward, we had the
most amazing night.
I have indulged Zack once a week ever
since, and I'm a little ashamed to admit
this, but I rather enjoy it. It gives me a feel-
ing of power.
Should I continue in this relationship? I
don't think I'm being abusive because Zack
has requested the spankings. We are both in
our late 20s. He was never spanked as a


child and seems to have a wonderful rela-
tionship with his folks. - Questioning in
Canada
Dear Questioning: Because you both
enjoy it, I see no reason not to continue the
relationship. Whatever happens between
consenting adults in the privacy of their
bedroom, as long as it hurts neither one, is
no one else's business, including mine.
Dear Abby: I was recently at a party
where I felt very uncomfortable. The guests
were all -speaking fluent Spanish and I
could barely understand a word they were
saying. The party was hosted by a close
friend and was being held for a mutual
acquaintance. How could I leave the party
without ruffling anyone's feathers? -
Uneasy in Rancho Santa Fe
,Dear Unegy: It's easy! Just smile:and,
say, "Graciagsy adios." - .

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren,
also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother; Pauline Phillips.
Write Dear Abby at
http://www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.
Good advice for everyone - teens to
seniors - is in "The Anger in All of Us and
How to Deal With It." To order, send a busi-
ness-size, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $5 (U.S. funds
only) to: Dear Abby, Anger Booklet, P.O.
Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447.
(Postage is included.)


See solution 3C


29 Flapjack chain's letters 65 Ermine lifting


30 Arthur of tennis
34 Pin down
35, Go angling
36 After the bell
37 Severe shortage
39 Hold up
42 Irish patriot Robert
44 Under the weather
45 Cost to participate
46 Bridge group
47 Concluded
48 Unbending
49 Act part
51 Hubbub
53 Hardwood trees
56 Nothin' !
58 Arikara
59 Org. founded in 1858
62 Bit of time: abbr.
64 Dang!


66 Type of loading?
67 Acquired family mem-
ber
69 Coop parent
70 Modifies
71 First-generation
Japanese-American
74 Start of a motive?
75 Habituates
77 Added bubbles to
78 Jamie _ Curtis
81 New World nat.
82 Capek's 1923 play
83 VIP's rug
85 Assails
86 Fulda feeder
87 Bread choices
89 Wild blue yonder
92 Like fellow feeling
95 Determine weight by


96 Yachting team
97 Deceives by under-
handed means
101 Monovalent radicals
103 Figures of speech
104 Former frosh
105 God of the Koran
106 Dolly the sheep, e.g.
107 Ship measure
109 Bedside pitchers
110 Hebrew lawgiver
111 Worker
113 Appendages
114 Leave off
115 Singer Simone
116 Snarl
118 Long period


Sleep Gallery
Fairmount Cinema Square. Sebring
3750 US 27 N 382-6668


GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE AT
Mwww.carmike.coIn

001 U.S. 07 NORTH
FRIDAY 7/29 THRU THURSDAY 08/04
FANTASTIC FOUR (PG-13)
1:30-4:15-7:10-9:45
WEDDING CRASHERS (R)
1:20-4:15-7:10-9:50
DEVILS REJECTS (R)
1:50-4:10-7:15-9:55
HERBIE (G) 1:10-4:10-7:10-9:45
WAR OF THE WORLDS (PG-13)
1:20-4:20-7:00-9:50
CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE
FACTORY (PG) 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:35
CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE
FACTORY (PG) E 1:30-4:30-7:20-9:55

SKY HIGH (PG) 1.55-4:25-7:15-9:40
Dolby Digital
1 ,l l, , I lh iH il il 'hil'ld


MUST LOVE DOGS PG-13
(John Cusack, Diane Lane)
2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15
STEALTH PG-13
(Jamie Foxx, Jessical Biel)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
MADAGASCAR PG
2:15 4:15


BAD NEWS BEARS PG-13
(Billy BobThorton)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
THE ISLAND PG-13
(Ewan McGregor, Scarlet Johansson)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
BATMAN BEGINS PG-13
(Christain Bale, Michael Caine)
2:00 5:00 8:00
MR. AND MRS. SMITH PG-13
(Angelina Jolie, Brad Pitt)
2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30

COMING SOON
March of the Penguins
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News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005 3C


ARTS &.LEISURE


New books are fuel for information addicts Beatles manuscript fetches $1
millionn at anri'inn in I nndnn


It's an addiction, I
think, and like most
addictions doesn't -
leave you alone until
it's satisfied, so give
in! Come to your
library, and look
through all the new
books. There's a
book for everyone,
maybe several LIBRAF
books.
You'll be a winner Car
if you take home Hess
"Poker Nights" by
Scott Tharler, who
"prefers poker among friends to
the nerve-wracking big money
games."
Thinking of those who made
big money, think no further than
Thomas Edison. "The Edisons
of Fort Myers" begins with a
man who at 39 was world
famous for his patents of the
phonograph and the incandes-
cent lamp. He was also wid-
owed and had three children to
raise. Says author Tom Smoot,
"In that year he made first
acquaintance with the two great
loves of his life: Mina Miller
and Fort Myers, Florida."
In the late 1800s Fort Myers


Aries (March 21 - April 20)
- You're on the go early in the
week. Not only do you have a
lot of things to do, but others
need your help too. Do all that
you can. You'll be rewarded
with a relaxing weekend. An
old friend calls you for advice.
Don't be surprised; just try to
help.
Taurus (April 21 - May 21)
- A family problem takes up
most of your time this week.
This is important, so rearrange
your plans and help your loved
ones. Your efforts will be appre-
ciated. The person you've been
dating wants to step up the rela-
tionship. Is this really what you
want? Think before saying yes.
Gemini (May 22 - June 21)
- You're very moody this
week. One minute, you're
happy; the next minute, you're
angry. Try to relax, and turn to
your loved ones for help. A
close friend wants your input on
a business idea. Be honest, and
don't get involved if you don't
believe it can work. Cancer
plays a key role.
Cancer (June 22 - July 23)
- Things go well for you
throughout the week. You
impress your superiors at work,
and that special someone final-
ly says yes. Enjoy yourself. A
close friend has a problem and
needs your help. Be supportive.
Help him or her as much as you
can - even if it means cancel-
ing plans. He or she always has
been there for you.
Leo (July 24 - Aug. 23) -
You make great strides at work


was really out in the
boonies. Thomas
found his perfect
retreat from the cold
winters of New
Jersey, and spent the
next 46 years winter-
ing at what he fondly
called his "jungle."
Today you can see
dozens of royal palm
trees lining the streets
- one of the many
gifts Edison and Mina
bequeathed to the
town they loved.


World War II books continue
to fill our shelves. Two of the
newest titles concern the med-
ical professionals and their
experiences. Hall Vaughn's
"Second World War: Doctor To
the Resistance" tells the story of
an American family in Paris
who risked everything to fight
Nazi Germany and help Allied
flyers escape to freedom.
"Conduct Under Fire," by John
Glusman, documents a journey
of four Navy doctors captured
on Corregidor in May of 1942,
from relative safety to the
enemy camps, all the while
practicing their skills under hor-


when you come up
with an idea that saves
the company money.
Your efforts will be
rewarded. A loved one
brings you into a fami-
ly disagreement. Don't


want to get involved.
Scorpio and Pisces play impor-
tant roles early in the week.
Virgo (Aug. 23 - Sept. 23)
- You take control when a per-
sonal problem overwhelms
everyone else involved. Be
strong, and do what you think is
best for everyone. However,
don't let your power go to your
head. You run into an old flame
over the weekend. Don't be bit-
ter. Leo plays a key role later in
the week.
, Libra (Sept. 23 - Oct. 23)
- You need to think fast on
youifeet when a family mem-.
ber gets into trouble. Do what
you can to help, but don't get in
over your head. That special
someone needs to see you at the
end of the week. Everything
will work out for the best. He or
she just wants to talk to you.
Scorpio (Oct. 24 - Nov. 22)
- It's a hectic week for you
when it comes to business-deal-
ings. You have a lot of plans to
make, because a great opportu-
nity is knocking on your door.
Don't let it slip away. A loved
one needs your advice. You
have to tell him or her the truth
- even though it is going to be
difficult.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23 - Dec.
21) - While you've been put-
ting it off for a long time, you
have to make an important per-


tY LINES

rolyn
selink


sonal decision. Think
about what you really
want and how getting
it will affect your
future, then decide. If
you need advice, turn
to your loved ones.


Capricorn (Dec. 22 -
Jan. 20) - You feel rushed
early in the week as you try to
finish an important project.
However, after it is done, you
are free to do as you please.
Splurge on yourself; you
deserve it. Go out with friends
you haven't seen in a long time.
A loved one has something to
tell you. Don't worry - it's not
bad news.


Aquarius (Jan. 21 - Feb. 19)
- A close friend asks to borrow
money from you. Even though
you may want to say yes, think
about how quickly you'll be
paid back. You're going to need
a lot of money soon. A family
member invites you to dinner.
Enjoy yourself; it's going to be
a good time.
Pisces (Feb. 20 - March 20)
- You feel like you're going
crazy this week. Everyone is
either asking you a question or
giving you work to do. Spend
some time alone to collect your
thoughts. This will calm you
down and get you ready to face
the world again. That special
someone has a surprise for you.


IIIIIIIUIICIL Ii U U LlVII III1 i-VIIUUll


'It's one of the most
important musical
manuscripts in
existence.'


TED OWEN, owner of
auctioneering firm


Key West remembers author

with look-alike contest
Associated Press during the 1930s. The contest
KEY WEST - Woolen fish- was judged by former winners.


ermen's turtlenecks in the mid-'
dle of summer?
At the annual "Papa"
Hemingway Look-Alike
Contest, it's almost required
attire.
With his cream-colored
turtleneck sweater, ruddy com-
plexion and white beard, 61-
year-old letter carrier Bob
Doughty took the top prize at
this year's event, then immedi-
ately shed the sweater.
Doughty beat 146 others
Saturday in his 13th try at the
festival, held,1yery ear at
Sloppy Joe's Bar - Ernest
Hemingway's favorite watering
hole when he lived in Key West



Y T 2

/1 + .


There was also a surprise at
the event: Hemingway's grand-
daughter introduced a man who
believes he is the author's ille-
gitimate son.
"I've known since the age of
5 that I was supposed to come
to Sloppy Joe's in Key West
and find a picture of my father,"
said Richard Steel Hemingway,
.44, of Davison, Mich.
Lorian Hemingway,
Hemingway's granddaughter,
believes he is credible.
"I know that Richard is com-
pletely sincere'and guileless in
his quest for his father, and I do
believe his father is Ernest
Hemingway," she said.


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An inspirational thought

S' Galatians 5:7 read in the K)V,
-I e did run well; who did hinder
- - you that ye should not obey the
truth?" Now look at that same
, r scripture in the NCV bible, it
'a reads. "You were running a good
* race. Who stopped you from
following the true way?" The
j assignment given to you from the
Lord to do, only you can do it. Now let me ask you
a few questions. Who stopped you from fulfilling
your assignment? \\'ho got in your iwa"? No one or
nothing is big or bad enough to stop you from i
assignment the Lord has placed in your life.
Whatever your assignment may be. you got to want
it bad enough to go after it. Don't let anything stop
you. The decision to make a difference and go on is
yours. Your level of determination determines how
far you go. There are timess you will have to use the
process of elimination. Life may sometimes involve a
detour, if that's your case, Just change direction and
keep going. Keep in Mihd Psalmn 8-4:11. "For the
Lord God is a sun and sh'teld: the Lord will give
grace and glory: no gio4. thing will lie withhold
from them that walk uprIghtljy." Stay in the race and
know the outcome is worth the trip. Be encouraged.
* - Piattial1 \ IlcIltl


Ronnie
Sachsenmaier
---4eallor - N
863-452-1205
r*.gayaehoo com



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I Please support the above businesses. They have made this page possible. I


rific conditions.
If you think that war stories
are all old ones, contemplate
the biography of Lieutenant
Shane Childers, the first volun-
teer soldier to be killed in Iraq.
In "Shane Comes Home,"
Rinker Buck tells the story of
"the most legendary marine of
his generation".
Track fans have memories,
too, of those now dead racing
legends. If you'd like to see rac-
ing up close but can't spring the
money, you need to take home
the "Insider's Guide to the
NASCAR Tracks." Don Coble
and Lee Buchanan call their
book "the unofficial, opinionat-
ed, fan's guide to the Nextel
Cup Circuit." You'll get their
take on NASCAR tracks all
over the U.S., with plenty of
emphasis on southern tracks
(Atlanta Motor Speedway,
Daytona International
Speedway, Homestead-Miami
Speedway, North Carolina
Speedway and others). They list
the must-see races, must-eat
restaurants, must-try speedway
food, and can-do races on a
budget, plus what you need to
take to make your day memo-


Virgo: In midst of trouble, you'll take charge


HOROSCOPES

Metro News
Service


TOSS PERE ASSET VAN I SH
WAWA OLAV MAL1 EL IS"H'A
I TEM EASE ALI1T NEESON
THE BESTPR I ZETHAT CUED
TAX I ES HESSES DEEDS
FLESHED DOSS HRE



SBA CSS UE L EE READ
P LAW YMA BY M PNI N
ODO MITR WHIEIN



TOWE EL
SC A SRCE DDE
T A NL IN011EICG
0 LO N CURRK iP EELER
A NIB U 1EA Y
H E IsCN OST ARR


WELLS
DORDE CHRYSLER
'Established1931
1600 US 27 South * Avon Park


i


rable, not miserable.
My pick for lots of laughs
has to be "Extreme(ly Dumb)
Sports." You'll get the picture
when you see the pictures of
do-it-yourself diving gear,
spring mobile home snagging
season, body bowling, boulder
surfing, aerobic snowmobiling,
Wayne and Rodney's mobile
duck blind, and fishing for sand
trout.
Meet vegetarian cowboys,
Idaho's Olympic fencing team,
see truck farming, or enjoy
spring cycling in Minnesota.
It's all here, including that
messy end of summer sport
known as the squash tourna-
ment. You'll also find the
answer to the question of "What
is America's favorite hair-
piece?" It's pictured in the
"Active Lifestyle" section.

Carolyn Hesselink is the admin-
istrative secretary of the
Highlands County Library
System. Library cards are
always free. For information,
call 452-3803 in Avon Park,
402-6716 in Sebring, or 699-
3705 in Lake Placid; or visit the
Internet Web site at
http://www.myhlc.org.


By JILL LAWLESS
Associated Press Writer
LONDON - John Lennon's
handwritten lyrics for "All You
Need is Love," salvaged from
his music stand after The
Beatles' final television appear-
ance in 1967, have sold at auc-
tion in London for $1 million.
It was among a trove of
Lennon memorabilia which
fetched $1.75 million during a
sale at London's Hippodrome
nightclub on Thursday.
The tunic of a World War I
military bandsman, worn by
Lennon for a 1966 Life maga-
zine photo shoot - and a pos-
sible inspiration for the group's
martial look on the cover of
"Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts
Club Band" - sold for
$175,000.
The sale included youthful
paintings and handwritten
lyrics, jackets, eyeglasses and
even furniture from the late for-
mer Beatle's home.
The most valuable items
were gathered over 25 years by
one anonymous American col-
lector. Auctioneer Cooper
Owen, a company which spe-
cializes in music and film mem-
orabilia, said it was "the most
definitive collection of John
Lennon memorabilia ever
assembled."


Cooper Owen managing
director John Collins said the
items stood out for their "rarity,
importance, and cultural signif-
icance."
A piano from Lennon's New
York apartment fetched
$245,000 and watercolors
painted by the musician aged 11
were bought for $123,000.
A pair of his signature round
granny glasses, which came in a
box addressed to "Mr. John
Lennon," went for $97,000.
Cooper Owen director Ted
Owen said the "All You Need is
Love" manuscript was "the
Holy Grail of Beatles lyrics." '
"It's probably one of the few
remaining Beatles lyrics in pri-
vate collectors' hands and one
of the most important musical
manuscripts in existence,"
Owen said. "It was the anthem
of the peace movement ... the
anthem of 1967."













News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


Sea hibiscus has unusual blooms,


but should be planted with caution


Until a few weeks
ago, I was not knowl-
edgeable about sea
hibiscus (Hibiscus
tileaceus). A friend of
mind, whose first
love is palms, has
seen the plants grow-
ing on the Pinecrest
golf course and near
one of the older
homes on the south
side of Lake Lotela.
He asked me about it.
I had seen the
plants on the golf
course and thought


,"' i







GROIN

SEA'

Highly
County
Garden


they were members of the Ficus
family. After talking to my
friend, I knew another new
plant might be on the horizon.
Last week, one of the plants
began to bloom, and there was
little doubt that this flower was
from the hibiscus clan. The
blooms resemble other hibiscus
plants, but have this interesting
characteristic: In the morning,
they are yellow with a maroon
eye. Over the course of the day,
the bloom changes to dark red,
and by evening it falls off.
As I drove home late one


afternoon these deep
maroon blooms
caught my eye. Since
learning the plant, I
have noticed several
others in the Avon
Park area.
Sea hibiscus has its


1P_^ d o w n s i d e .
According to Dr.
WING John Watkins in

SON "Florida Landscape
Plants," this plant's
lands rapid growth and dense
Master head make it unpopu-
eners lar with many home-
- owners. It can reach a
height of 25-35 feet, and it has
huge roots that grow near the
surface. It can fare well in sugar
sand, but it requires regular
watering during droughts.
It may be too large for a reg-
ular quarter-acre homesite, but
it could fit well into a planting
scheme that covers several
acres. It can be propogated
from cuttings using sections of
the roots and by air layering.
Plant it away from houses and
buildings.
Sea hibiscus is native to trop-
ical Asia but now grows in
warm climates throughout the


world. This species is used in
seaside plantings along
Florida's coasts and in other
tropical locations.
The Florida Exotic Plant
Council has listed sea hibiscus
as a Category II pest plant.
Information at Floridata.com
suggests it may be invasiv At
the time, it is not a prohibit
plant, and you can find it at
nuseries, particularly along the
costs.
Watkins and Floridata.com
advise against using this plant
in landscaping. Photos are
available at the Web site.

If you have a plant that you
would like for one of the Master
Gardeners to write about or if
you have gardening questions,
call 402-6540 or visit the
Master Gardeners office in the
Highlands Counrt Agri-Civic
Center: Send questions to:
Master Gardeners, 4509
George Blvd., Sebring, FL
33872.
Don Farrens is a Florida
Master Gardener; affiliated
with the University of Florida's
Institute of ,Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


SUE ANN CARPENTER/News-Sun
South Florida Community College students (from left), Deborah Starks, Jordan Chin, Bennie Carson,
all from Avon Park, and Leigh Anne Carrero, Cristina Caldwell and Melina Saravia, all from Sebring,
study for their GED test at the college. Instructor Jan Morris challenges and encourages them from her


motorized wheelchair.


GED
Continued from 1C
"We're tough. We require
them to do a career search, use
college counselors, write a let-
ter of introduction, and then
write a plan, explaining what
they want to do, and how they
plan to do it before interviewing
with the committee," Morris
said.
The students are intent and
impassioned-as they express the
reasons they're here.
Jordan Chin of Avon Park,
who is attending GED classes at
SFCC, had dropped out of


school and moved here' from
Toronto. "I want to finish this. I
want to go to college and have a
career in criminal justice."
Bennie Carson of Avon Park,
another student, dropped out of
school at 16 and recently
moved here from Ocala to live
with her mom. "This is hard,
but when I finish I'll get a job
with my stepdad."
GED student Cristina
Caldwell of Sebring wants to
get her college placement test
scores higher. "This is so help-
ful," she said.
Melina Saravia of Sebring, a
GED student, moved here from
Peru five years ago. "I want a
career in teaching or nursing.


This helps a lot with my
English, and most important it
will help my daughter's future."
Deborah Starks of Avon Park
is 61 and attending GED class-
es. "I made myself a promise
that, I'd get my high school
diploma before I die. I love this.
I'm learning so much ... things
I never knew existed."
If, out of necessity or youth-
ful misjudgment, you've been
forced to set your dreams aside,
and you often wish for that high
school diploma, the facilities
are here for you, and dedicated
people are willing to help you
achieve your goals. Call SFCC
at Avon Park 784-7441 or Lake
Placid 465-5300.


PLACES to


Places to Worship is a paid
advertisement in the News-Sun
that is published Friday and
Sunday. To find out more infor-
mation on how to place a listing
in this directory, call the News-
Sun at 385-6155, 465-0426 or 452-
1009, ext. 518.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD

* Christ Fellowship Church
(Assembly of God), 2935 New Life
Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching
His Doctrine; and Awaiting His
Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit
and in Truth." Sunday School, 9
a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.;
Evening Worship, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor
Eugene Haas. Phone 471-0924;
Church phone, 386-4419.
* First Assembly of. God, 4409
Kenilworth Blvd. The Rev. Wilmont
McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10
a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS
Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship,
7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night,
(Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth
Group, Royal Rangers,
Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-
6431.

BAPTIST

* Avon Park Lakes Baptist
Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd.,
Avon Park, FL 33825. Christ cen-
tered and biblically based. Sunday
worship services, 11 a.m. and 6
p.m. Nursery facilities are available.
Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday
and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Bible class-
es at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all
ages. Choir practice at 4:45 p.m.
Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556.
Minister, Rev. R.L. Polk - home
phone 635-0053.
* Bethany Baptist Church,
(GARBC), Christ-centered,
Biblically based, family focused
church on 798 C-17A South, Avon
Park, FL (corner of SR-17 and C-
17A Truck Route). Pastor: David L.
Conrad. Sunday School 9:45 a.m.;
Moming Worship 11 a.m.; Evening
Service, 6 p.m.; AWANA Club for
children age 3 to sixth grade is 6:45-
8:15 p.m. Wednesday. Conquerors
for Christ teen group (with Pastor
Ben Kurz) and Adult Prayer and
Praise time meet at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Nursery careis provid-
ed for all services. For more infor-
mation, phone 452-11.36.
* Cornerstone Baptist Church -
We're new in town and can't wait to
meet you. No matter what your age,
no matter where you come from, no
matter who you are, there is a place
for you at Cornerstone. You'll enjoy
a blend of traditional and praise and
worship music, friendly people, and
relevant messages from God's
Word. Currently meeting in the con-
ference room of the new Holiday Inn
Express, 4400 U.S. 27 North,
Sebring, across from Tanglewood
Resort. Service times are 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday. Nursery
and childcare provided for morning
service. For information, call 314-
0932 or visit the Web site at
www.cbcsite.com. Pastor Randy
Gaines.
* Faith Missionary Baptist
Church, off State Road 17 North of
Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave.
Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship,
6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m.
Deaf interpretation available. Ken
Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055.
* Fellowship Baptist Church, 700
Maxwell St., Avon Park, FL 33825.


Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.;
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening
Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday:
Evening Service, 7 p.m.;
Children/Youth/Young Adult
Ministries, 7 p.m. Michael Roberts,
Pastor. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax:
453-6986. E-mail: fellowsh@stra-
to.net.
* First Baptist Church of Avon
Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park.
Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30
a.m. Orchestra rehearsal, 9 a.m.
Library open, 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School, 10 a.m. Spanish Bible
Study capepe, 10:30 a.m. Library
open, 11 a.m. Morning Worship, 11
a.m. Spanish Worship Service, 5
p.m. ESL, 5:45 p.m. Youth choir,
5:45 p.m. Discipleship Training,
6:30 p.m. Spanish Worship Service
(chapel), 7 p.m. Evening Worship
Service. ESL Tuesday schedule:
9-10 a.m. computer class; 10 a.m.
to noon conversational English; 7-9
p.m. computer class and conversa-
tional English. Regular Wednesday
schedule: 3:15-5:30 p.m. youth
(seventh through eighth) after
school program, 5 p.m. Family Night
Supper, 6 p.m. Children's choir
rehearsals, 6:15 p.m. youth activi-
ties, 6:30 p.m. Prayer meeting and
adult choir rehearsal, 7 p.m. Bible
studies and mission groups, 9 p.m.
College Bible Study (FLC). Nursery
open for all services. Telephone
453-6681. Dr. Vernon Harkey, pas-
tor.
* First Baptist Church of Lake
Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine
Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 mid-
way between Sebring and Lake
Placid). Your place for family, friends
and faith. Sunday morning worship
service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provid-
.ed for both services with Children's
Church at 11 a.m. Life changing
Bible Study for all ages starts at
9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen
Altvater leads the youth in their
quest to become more like Christ.
Sunday night worship at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer
meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth
worship in the youth facility, and
missions training for all children.
Call the church at 655-1524.
* First Baptist Church of Lorida
located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida.
Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.
for all ages. Sunday worship servic-
es are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Preschool care is provided at the 11
a.m. worship service. Wednesday
evening, a youth group meets at 7
p.m. and is for grades seventh
through 12th. Also at 7 p.m., is a
prayer service followed by adult
choir rehearsal at 8 p.m. First Lorida
is the "Place to discover God's
love." Marcus Marshall, senior pas-
tor. Randy Chastain, associate pas-
tor. Mike Ford, bus captain. Bus
rides to Sunday School and 11 a.m.
worship service are provided for
children grades first through adults
by calling 655-1878. For more infor-
mation about the church or the min-
istries offered, call 655-1878.
* Florida Avenue Baptist Church,
710 Wst Bell St., Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday: Service, 8:30 a.m.;
Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Service,
10:45 a.m. Wednesday night:
Mealtime for children, 6:15 p.m.;
Games, 6:40 p.m.; Adult Bible
Study, 7 p.m. Youth Group (seventh
through 12th grade), 7 p.m.; Agape
Club (3 year olds through sixth
grade), 7 p.m. Nursery provided.
Pastor: Scott Waldron. 453-5339.
* Independent Baptist Church,
5704 County Road 17 South,


Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School
- 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship -
10:30 a.m. Sunday evening - 6
p.m. Wednesday service - 7 p.m.
Fundamental, soul-winning, mis-
sion-minded, King James Bible
Church. Dr. John Hankins, pastor.
Larry Ruse, youth pastor. Phone
655-1899. Bus transportation.
* Maranatha Baptist Church
(GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east
of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle
Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9
a.m.;.Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.;
Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week
service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily
Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.rm.,
Hamman Hall. Pastor Kenneth L.
Andrus; Associate Pastors, Rev.
Robert Rowland and Rev. Duane
Bell. Phone 382-4301.
* Sparta Road Baptist Church,
(SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Mike
Adams, Pastor. Sunday School,
9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning
Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening
Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday:
Prayer/Bible Study, 7 p.m.; Choir
practice 8 p.m. Nursery provided.
For information, call 382-0869.
* Southside Baptist Church
(GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave.,
Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor;
Chuck Pausley, Youth Pastor; Ralph
0. Burns, Assistant to the Pastor.
Sunday School for all ages, 9:30
a.m.; Morning Worship Service,
10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6:30
p.m. Wednesday: Awana kinder-
garten through fifth grade, 6:30
p.m.; Youth Meeting for Teens, 6:30
p.m. Adult Midweek Prayer and
Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for
under age 3 is available at all serv-
ices. Provisions for handicapped
and hard-of-hearing. Office phone,
385-0752.
* Spring Lake Baptist Church,
7408 Valencia Road, Sebring, FL
33876. Phone: 655-2610. Contact:
Richard E. Meyer. Independent, fun-
damental, affiliated with the
GARBC. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.
Sunday morning service, 10:45
a.m.; Sunday evening service, 6
p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting
and Bible study, 7 p.m.
* Sunridge Baptist Church,
(SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27
and Valerie,' across from Florida
Hospital), Sebring. Dr. George R.
Lockhart, Pastor; Michael D. Paris,
Minister of Music; and Nathan
Didway, Director of Student
Ministries. Sunday School, 9;30
a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship,
10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening
Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer,
6 p.m.; Bible Study, 6:30 p.m. Youth
Worship, 6:30 p.m. and Team Kids,
6:30.p.m. Nursery provided Sunday
and Wednesday. For information,
call 382-3695.

CATHOLIC

* Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church, 595 East Main St., Avon
Park, 453-4757. Father Gerald P.
Grogan, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass
is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in
Spanish; 8 a.m. and 10:15 a.m.
Sunday; Weekdays at 8 a.m.
Monday through Friday.
Confessions are at 3:30 p.m.
Saturday. Religious Education
Classes are 8:50-10 a.m.
September through May for grades
prekindergarten through 12th. Youth
Nights for fifth grade and older are
from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday.
* St. Catherine Catholic Church,
820 Hickory St., Sebring (mailing


WORSHIP


address: Parish Office, 882 Bay St.,
Sebring, FL 33870), 385-0049. The
Rev. Jose Gonzalez, pastor.
Masses - Saturday Vigil: 5 p.m.
Sunday: 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and
noon Spanish Mass. Confessions:
4-4:45 p.m. Saturday (or on
request). Daily Mass, 8 a.m.
Monday through Friday. Faith
Formation Classes for grades
kindergarten through fifth, 9-10:15
a.m. Sunday in the parish hall
(Rebecca Propst, coordinator of
Faith .Formation for grades kinder-
garten through eighth, 385-7844.)
The Edge Program for grades sixth
through eighth is from 6:45-8:15
p.m. Wednesday in the Youth
Center (Rebecca Propst). Life Teen
for high school students from 6:30-
8:30 p.m. Sunday in the Youth
Center. (William Sr. and Sandy
Manint, youth ministers, 382-2222).
Adult Faith Formation and people
waiting to be Catholic in the Youth
Center from 7-9 p.m. Thursday.
(William Manint Sr., program direc-
tor, 385-0049). Choir rehearsal from
7-9 p.m. Wednesday in church.
Robert Gillmore, director of music.
* St. James Catholic Church,
3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid,
465-3215. Father Vincent Llaria,
Pastor. Mass schedule: Summer
(May 1 to Oct. 31) - Saturday Vigil, 4
p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.;
Weekdays, 9 a.m. Winter (Nov. 1 to
April 30) - Saturday, 4 p.m.;
Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.;
Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8
a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first
Saturday at'9 a.m.

CHRISTIAN

* Community of Christ, Avon
Park/Sebring, 3240 Grand Prix
Drive, Sebring Country Estates,
(behind Wal-Mart). Sunday servic-
es: 10 a.m., Sunday School, 11 a.m.
Worship service. Wednesday: 7
p.m. Prayer service. Marcia Roark,
Pastor. Phone 655-5379 or 382-
2631. World Church Mission: We
proclaim Jesus Christ and promote
communities of joy, hope, love and
peace.
* Eastside Christian Church, 101
Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852
(two miles east of U.S. 27 on
County Road 621), 465-7065. Web
site: www.eastsidecc.org. S.C.
Couch, minister; cell phone 464-
2845 or home, 699-2617. Sunday
Worship Celebration with the Lord's
Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Youth
Church with Martha Crosbie, direc-
tor at 11 a.m. Janet Couch, choir
director. Thelma Hall, organist.
Wednesday: Praise and Prayer,
6:30 p.m.; Choir rehearsal, 7:35
p.m. "Building for ALL generations."
"God is able to do immeasurably
more than we ask or imagine by His
powerful Spirit at work within us."
Ephesians 3:20.
* First Christian Church, 1016 W.
Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825;
453-5334. Bill Raymond, minister
(on Sabbatical). Steve Bishop,
youth minister will be preaching.
Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible School, 10
a.m. Worship. Wednesday: 6:45
p.m. Youth Groups and Adult Study.
Nursery is always provided.
* First Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ), 510
Poinsettia Ave., (corner of
Poinsettia and Eucalyptus),
Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-
0352. The Rev. Juanita S. Roberts,
supply pastor. Sunday School, 9
a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.;
* Sebring Christian Church, 4514


Hammock Road, Sebring, FL
33872. Tod 'Schwingel, Preacher;
Sam Wirick-Velez, Youth Minister;
Cora Schwingel, Children's Director.
Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening
Worship, 6 p.m.; Wednesday night
meals, 5 p.m.; and Wednesday
Bible Study, 6 p.m. Phone 382-
6676.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

B Christian Science Society, 146
N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m.
Morning Worlship & Sunday School
Testimonial Meeinngs each 2nd &
4th Wednesday at 5 p.m. ' free'
public Reading Roorh, located at the
church, is open 'Tuesday and
Thursday, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The Bible and the Christian Science
textbook, "Science and Health with
Key to the Scriptures" by Mary
Baker Eddy are our only -reachers
All are welcome to come and par-
take of the comfort, guidance, sup-
port and healing found in the les-
son-sermons.

CHURCH OF BRETHREN

* Church of the Brethren, 700 S.
Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
Sunday: Church School, 9 am'
Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday: All Day, Ladies Aid;
Family Night Supper, 5:30 p.rm.;
Children and Youth Clubs, 6:30
p.m.; Adult Forum, 6:30 p.m.;
Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. The Rev.
Cecil D. Hess, Pastor. The Rev.
Wendell Bohrer, Associate Pastor.
Phone 385-1597.
* Lorida Church of the Brethren
332 Palms Estates Road, Lorida
(three blocks south of U.S. 98)
Mailing address is P.O. Box 149,
Lorida, FL 33857. Phone 655-1466.
Sunday School classes for children,
youth and adults at 9:30 a.m.
Christian worship at 10:30 a.m.
Varied programs at 7 p.m. Pastor,
Rev. John Tubbs.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

* Avon Park Church of Christ,
200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Minister: Larry Roberts.
Sunday Worship Services, 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities
are available at every service. Bible
Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and
Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered
classes for all ages. Church phone:
453-4692.
* Sebring Parkway Church of
Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway,
Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443.
Minister: Bryan Naugle. We would
like to extend an invitation for you
and your family to visit with us here
at Sebring Parkway. Our hours of
service are: Sunday Bible Class, 9
a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10
a.m.; Sunday Evening Service, 6
p.m.; Wednesday Bible Class, 7
p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD

* Living Waters Church of God,
4571 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL
33875. Sunday opportunities:
Homecoming Worship, 8 a.m., tradi-
tional and southern gospel music;
Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.;
Encounter Worship, nursery, kids
church, 10:30 a.m.; Adoracion en
Espanol, 1 p.m.; Choir Practice,
5:30 p.m.; and Camp Meeting, 6:30
p.m. (Last Sunday of every month:
Newcomer's dessert). Tuesday:
C'mon guys, pastor's prayer part-


Continued on page 5C



ners. 7 a.m , Bread of Life Food
Pantry. 4-6 pm m and Prayer
Meeting len Espanoil, 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Wednesday night mm-
isties, 7 p m. and Worship team
rehearsals. 8 15 p m Home groups
meet various days, times and loca-
lic-ns Call 385-8772 tor details, en
Espancl 385-4-3289

CHURCH OF NAZARENE

* First Church of the Nazarene of
S.ebring, 420 Pine St. Sebring.
Sunday Sunday School begins at
9-45 a m for all ages Morning
Worship at 10.45 a m , Service at 6
p m Wednesday evening service at
7 p m. with special services for chil-
dren, youth and adults. Special
services once a month for seniors
(Prime Timersl. and young adults
and families. Call for details at 385-
0400. Pastor Emmetl Garrison.
Associate Pastor Tim Taylor.

CHURCHES OF CHRIST
IN CHRISTIAN UNION

* Community Bible Church -
Churches of Christ in Christian
Union. lOrange Blossom
Conference Centeri 1400 C-17A
Nonr, (truck roulel. Avon Park
Presenting Jesus Christ as the
answer for time and eternitly.
Sunday moving worship service,
10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior
Church activities at same time for K-
6 grade. Sunday School Bible hour
(all ages), 9:30 a.m. (Transportation
available.) Sunday evening praise
and worship service, 6 p.m.
Wednesday evening prayer service,
7 p.m. Children and youth activities
at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is
welcome, please come worship with
us. Tom Schankweiler, Pastor.
Phone 453-6052.

EPISCOPAL

* The Episcopal Church of the
Redeemer, Sunday morning satel-
lite location is South Florida
Community College University
Center, 600 East College Drive,
Avon Park. One service at 10 a.m. -
Traditional Rite II and music. Coffee
hour following service and potluck
lunch on the fourth Sunday of the
month. Babsitting available.
Newcomers welcome. E-mail
redeemerl895@aol.com or call
453-5664 or 452-1264.

* St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL
33870. Sunday Services: Holy
Eucharist Rite I - 7:45 a.m., Holy
Eucharist Rite II - 10 a.m. Midweek
service on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m.
Sunday School for all ages at 8:45
a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m.
until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m.
service ends. Wednesday: Adult
Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are
always welcome. The Rev. Jim
Kurtz, rector. Church office 385-
7649, for more information.

* St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal
Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake
Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-0051.
Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, Rector.
Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m.
and 6 p.m. Wednesday evening-
Order of St. Luke Study, 5:15 p.m.
and Holy Communion with Healing
Service, 6:15 p.m.


III


�,';
�t,"











Ncvws-Sun, Sunday. July 31. 2005


Heat drives away visitors, but wildlife flocks to hammock


In the steamy sum- I
mer months, park vis- .'
itation slows down. l.
Families of white- M
tailed deer feed
throughout the park
and leisurely munch
their way through the
campsites, while the
small group of
campers relax and REALF
enjoy the view.
It amazes me how Doroth
quiet the park can
become during cer-
tain periods of the summer. I
often wonder why more fami-
lies aren't visiting to bike ride,
explore and wander the nature
trails. Did they just forget that
one of the most beautiful state
parks in Florida is right here in
their own back yard? .
Perhaps it's time for you to
plan a family outing to the ham-
mock. Here are some sugges-
tions to ensure that you have a
good time without experiencing
effects of heat, sun and insets.
It's true that mosquitoes can
put a damper on hikes, but a
good spraying of a 30-percent
DEET-based bug spray will
keep them at bay. Fluctuating
water levels causes mosquito
populations to vary throughout
the park. When you arrive, stop
at the Ranger Station and ask
which trails are recommended.
Right now, the Cypress


Fl

y


Swvamp Trail is
swollen with water,
but it is not necessar-
a ily inundated with
mosquitoes. They
tend to prefer the foot
"2 path trails with low
areas that pool stag-
nant water, such as
the Wild Orange
LORIDA Grove Trail. There, a
- bay swamp has over-
Harris flowed, flooded
some of the foot path,
and resulted in an
abundant mosquito population.
The other popular, board-
walk, the Fern Garden Trail, is a
good choice, too. Look over the
railings to spot snakes, turtles,
frogs or alligators. Be fore-
warned that Fern the Alligator
has been known to rest on this
boardwalk at night, so keep an
eye out for her if you are walk-
ing on this trail near dusk.
Other close encounters might
include our playful river otters,
who seem to enjoy flopping
themselves onto the board-
walks, too. You might see them
or perhaps their little footprints
drying on the boards.
Your DEET bug spray will
last about an hour before you'll
need to refresh it. Be sure you
also refresh your body with
cool sports drinks or water.
Dehydration is a concern, espe-
cially if you are very active. If


you tend to get a headache after
being outdoors in the heat, you
may very well be dehydrated.
Remember that sodas and sug-
ary drinks don't rehydrate your
body well.
Sunblock is a good idea,
especially if you bike the
upland sections of the off-road
bicycle trail. This six-mile loop
runs through scrubby and pine
flatwoods habitats and is nearly
full sun. There is less humidity
there, and evenings are very
breezy. Plus, your chances of
viewing deer, turkey and bob-
cats are excellent.
If you are up for a workout,
plan to ride the whole bike trail.
It's about eight miles and con-
tinues through a densely shad-
ed, remote area, over the county
road, onto the park's loop drive
and back to the Ranger Station.
This trail is a great workout,
with some slight hills, bumps
and varying road surfaces.
Keep an eye out for sunning
gators or deer crossing the
trails. Wear sunblock and bring
water or sports drink, but don't
worry about the bugs because
you'll be traveling faster than
they can fly!
Flying by is what this sum-
mer has been doing. Believe it
or not, there's just a few weeks
left! Plan an adventure day in
"'the real Florida" before your
summer days evaporate.
And don't forget that the


Courtesy photo
A doe feeds in the campground at Highlands Hammock State Park.


Hammock Inn is open from 11
a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through
Sunday. The Friday Night fish
fry is from 5-8 p.m. The inn is a
great place to cool off after a
sweaty hike or bike ride or to


hide out during a rainstorm. Try
a cone of its refreshing soft-
serve wild orange ice cream!

Dorothy Harris is a park serv-
ice specialist at Highlands


Hammock State Park. For
details, call 386-6094. For
more information about
Florida's state parks, visit the
Web site at http://www.floridas-
tateparks.org.


PLACES to


WORSHIP


GRACE BRETHREN

* Grace Brethren Church, 3626
Thunderbird Road, Sebring. Sunday
School (all ages), 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
Worship. Service, 10:30 a.m.;
Sunday Evening Bible Study, 6 p.m.;
Wednesday Prayer Meeting and
Youth activities, 7-8 p.m. Kid
City/Preschool Day Care is from 7
a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through'
_ Friday. Call the church about regis-'.
tration. Dr. Randall Smith, Senior
Pastor; Rev. Vince Lohnes, Pastoral
Care; and Rev. Denny Brown,
Family Ministries. Phone 385-3111.

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

* Spirit . of Life Ministries
International, temporarily meeting
at Safari Inn meeting room, 1406
U.S. 27 North, Sebring. Pastors, Jim
and Helen Todd. Phone: 214-6133.
Sunday service, 10 a.m. Bible study
in pastor's home 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Call for directions.
Visit our Web site: www.spir-
itoflifeintl.org. "Where the future is
as bright as the promises of God."
* World Harvest and Restoration
Ministries, (non-denominational)
2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone. 452-9777 or 453-
3771. Sunday service: Sunday
School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11
a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m.
prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor:
W.H. Rogers.

JEWISH

* Temple Israel of Highlands
County, 1305 Hillside Drive,
Sebring, FL 33870. Shabbat servic-
es held on first and third Friday at
7:30 p.m. All are welcome. Women's
luncheon, fourth Tuesday of every
month at noon at different restau-
rants. Torah Commentary at 3 p.m.
every Thursday. Adult educational
movies at 2 p.m. every second
Sunday. Open to the public. For fur-
ther information, call Bernie
Wolkove, president, 385-1925, or
the office at 382-7744.

LUTHERAN

* Avon Park Lutheran Mission
(LCMS), Sunday services are at the
Good Shepherd Church, 4348
Schumacher Road, Sebring.
-Sunday morning service is at 9 a.m.
Bible study is at 10:30 a.m.
Thursday devotion is at 6:30 p.m.
The pastor is Scott McLean.
* Atonement Lutheran Church
(ELCA), 1744 S.E. Lakeview Dr.
The Rev. Eugene R. Fernsler,
Pastor; Jim Dunn, Deacon; Alan
Long, Director of Music. Holy
Eucharist at 9:30 a.m. (nursery pro-
vided); Healing Service on Holy
Days at 11:30 a.m.; Parish Choir at
6:45 p.m. Wednesday;
Mary/Martha Circle at 11 a.m. first
Tuesday; Dorcas Circle at 10 a.m.
second and fourth Monday; and
Lutheran Men at 6:30 p.m. third
Monday. Phone 385-0797.
* Faith Lutheran Church - LCMS,
2740 Lakeview Drive, Sebring.
Church phone: 385-7848, Faith's
Closet phone: 385-2782. Gary
Kindle, Pastor; Paul Ruff, Emeritus;
Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse.
Worship services 10 a.m. Sunday
atu 6 p.m. Saturday. (Communion
the first and third Saturday and


Sunday of the month.) Sunday
Worship Service is broadcast on
WITS 1340 AM at 10 a.m. Sunday
School for children and adults, 8:45
a.m., September through May.
Educational Opportunities: Weekly
Adult Bible Studies September
through May. Special Worship
Services .on Thanksgiving Eve,
Christmas Eve, New Year's Eve and
Easter. Midweek Services during
Advent and Lent. Faith's Closet
ResalekShop is open to the commu-
nity from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday. All are warmly welcome in
the Family of Faith.
* Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church (AALC) American
Association of Lutheran
Churches, 4348 Schumacher
Road, Sebring, one mile west of
Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor.
Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Bible Study, 9 a.m. Nursery
provided. Social activities: Choir,
Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-
1163.
* New Life Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a
Congregation of the Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship
with the Wisconsin Evangelical
Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday
Worship at 10 a.m. Sunday School,
9 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. Weekday
Bible Study on Tuesdays at 9:30
a.m. For more information, call Rev.
Richard Fyffe at 385-2293 or 385-
5793.
* Resurrection Lutheran Church
- ELCA, 324 East Main Street, Avon
Park. Pastor: Rev. John C.
Grodzinski. Sunday Worship 9:30
a.m. (The 8 a.m. service resumes
Oct. 3) Coffee and fellowship hour
follow the service. Wednesday wor-
ship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office
phone number is 453-6858.
* Trinity Lutheran Church -
LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake
Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The
Rev. Richard A. Norris, Pastor.
Worship Schedule for December
through Easter: Worship Service 8
and 11 a.m.; Communion Services,
first and third Sundays; (Children's
Church, 11 a.m. only); Education
Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship Schedule
for Summer - Fall: Worship Service
9 a.m.; Communion Services, first
and third Sundays; Education Hour
10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent
and Advent season, Call office for
times; Maundy Thursday and Good
Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and
10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.;
Christmas Day, 110 a.m.;
Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7
p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth
Group, Senior Citizens, Younger
Side Adults, Ladies Missionary
League, Ladies Guild, Small group
studies as scheduled. Music: Choir
and hand chimes. Trinity Tots
Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m.
to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
License: C14H10020: Susan Norris,
director.

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

N Bible Fellowship Church, 3750
Hammock Road. Sunday: First
Worship Service and Sunday
School, 9 a.m.; Second Worship
Service and Sunday School, 10:45
a.m.; Junior and Senior Night Youth,
5:30 p.m.; and Evening Service,
6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Friends


Clubs (ages 3 through fifth grade);
Youth Bible Study, Prayer Meeting,
6:30 p.m. Dr. Eugene Bengtson,
Pastor; Reinhold Buxbaum,
Associate Pastor; and Wayne
Henderson, Youth Pastor. Church
office 385-1024.
* Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock
Road. Sebring, FL 33872; 386-
4900. An independent community
church. Sunday morning worship,.
9:45 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.,
Wednesday Bible studies, 10 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m. Pastor Lester,
Osbeck. A small friendly church
waiting for your visit.
* Christian Training Ministries
Inc., member of Christian
International Apostolic Network
(ClAN), meets at the Sebring Civic
Center (behind the library) on
Lakeview Drive at 10 a.m. Sunday.
Members also meet at 7 p.m.
Thursday at Arise in the Shops of
the Highlands Plaza across from the
Highlands County Agri-Civic Center
on U.S. 27 South. Linda M.
Downing, Minister: Phone, 314-
9195, lindadowning@hotmail.com.
Casey L. Downing, Associate
Minister: Phone, 385-8171,
caseydowning@hotmail.com. Web
site is christiantraining.net.
* Divine Destiny International
Church & Bible Institute, a new full
gospel church plant at 126 E.
Center Ave. (off the Circle in down-
town Sebring). Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
to 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible
Institute is through 6 p.m. It is a two-
year accredited course. Pastor
Steven Brown. Call (863) 458-2413.
Acts 1:8 And you shall receive
power after theH-foly Spirit has come
upon you.
* Highlands Community Church
meets on Sundays at 10,a.m. at the
Hill-Gustat Middle School in Sebring
for casual and contemporary wor-
ship. Kid's Zone and nursery are
provided each Sunday. Youth and
adult small groups meet throughout
the week. Bruce Linhart is pastor.
Phone 402-1684 or e-mail
www.highlandscommunity.com.
* Iglesia Cristo Te Ama Outreach
Community Church, 1900 State
Road 64 West, Avon Park, FL
33825. Sunday Bible study, 10 a.m.
Domingo Estudio Biblico 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship, 11 a.m. Domingo
Adoracion, 11 a.m. Sunday night
miracle healing service, 7:30 p.m.
Domingo noche servicio de milagros
y sanidad, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday
Bible service and prayer, 7:30 p.m.
Miercoles studio Biblico y oracion,
7:30 p.m. Come visit us and experi-
ence the power of the word of Jesus
Christ in salvation, deliverance, mir-
acle and healing. Pastor Candi
Garcia, 471-6893.
* Unity of Sebring Family
Worship Centre at the Centre for
Positive Living, member of the
Association of Unity Churches, 204
S. Orange St., Sebring, FL 33870
(between Highlands County
Courthouse and Sebring Middle
School). Sunday Celebration
Service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery care
available. Adult Discussion Group, 9
a.m. Sunday. Weekly classes,
.Christian Bookstore, Prayer Ministry
and Spiritual Counseling also avail-
able. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior
minister. For information, call 471-
1122.
* Visions Christian Community
Church, 105 Jim Rodgers Ave.,


Avon Park (in the historical build-
ing). Pastor is Alvin Conner. Sunday
worship, 11:15 a.m. Wednesday ,
Youth Cultural Arts Ministry, 5:30
p.m.; Youth Bible Study, 7 p.m.; and
Adult Bible Study, 7 p.m. Holy
Communion is first Sunday of each
month. Youth ministry is fourth
Sunday. Women's Ministry is fifth
Sunday. "Where there is no vision
my people perish."

PRESBYTERIAN

* Covenant Presbyterian Church
(PCA), 4500 Sun 'N Lake Blvd.,
Sebring, 33872-2113. A
Congregation of the Presbyterian
Church in America. Worship servic-
es: Sunday morning worship, 10:30
a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.;
Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.;
Wednesday evening Prayer
Meeting, Youth Group and Kids
Quest, 6 p.m. Phone: 385-3234;
Fax: 385-2759; e-mail:
covpres@strato.net; Web site:
www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W.
Darrell Arnold, Pastor; Brent
Bergman, Pastor of Youth and
Families. Office hours: 8:30-11:30
a.m. Monday through Thursday.
* First Presbyterian Church, ARP,
319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL
33870. 385-0107. Sunday School,
all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Worship
Service, 11 a.m.; Monday: Junior
High Youth Group (grades fifth
through seventh), 3:15-4:15 p.m.
Tuesday: Senior High Youth Group
(teens), 6:30-8:15 p.m. Wednesday:'
Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; "KFC"
Kids for Christ Youth Group (grades
first through fourth), 3-4 p.m.; choir
rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Rev. Darrell A:
Peer, pastor. Tracey A. Bressette,
director of Christian education.
* First Presbyterian Church, ARP
117 North Oak Street, Lake Placid,
465-2742. E-mail: fpclp@earth-
link.net. The Rev. Ray Cameron,
senior pastor; the Rev. Drew
Severance, associate pastor.
Sunday morning worship, 8:30 and
11 a.m.; Contemporary service,
10:45 a.m.; Sunday School, 9:45
a.m.; Youth Groups, 5 p.m. Nursery
provided at all services. Tuesday:
Explorers (third through fifth grade)
2:45 p.m. Wednesday: Small Group
Bible Studies, 7 p.m.; Youth Group,
6:45 p.m.; Rock Solid, 6:45 p.m.;
Elevate, 9 p.m. Thursday:
Sonbeams (kindergarten through
second grade).
* Spring Lake Presbyterian
Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98,
Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School,
9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m.
Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday of the month,
September through June. Board of
Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first
Monday of the month. Choir
rehearses at 7 p.m. each
Wednesday, September through
April. Presbyterian Women meet at
10 a.m. the third Thursday of the
- month. Pastor: The Rev. Kathryn
Treadway. Organist: Richard Wedig.
Choir Director: Suzan Wedig.
Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,
s/pc@tnni.net; Web site,
http://slpc.presbychurch.org.

CHURCH OF LATTER
DAY SAINTS

� The Church of Jesus Christ of


Latter, Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix
Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Phone:
382-9092. Dale Bargar, bishop;
Alfred Schreiber, first counselor; and
Scott Gadsden, second counselor.
Family History Center: 382-1822.
Sunday services: Sacrament serv-
ice, 9 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 10:20
a.m.; and Priesthood/Relief Society,
11:10 a.m. Youth activities from 7-
8:20 p.m. Wednesday: 11-year-old
Scouts, 7-8:20 p.m. firzi a fd third.
Wednesday; and activity days for 8-
11 year old girls Irom 7-8 20 p m
second and fourth Wednesday.

SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST

* Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist
Church, 2106 N. State Road 17,'
Sebring; 385-2438 Worship
Services: 9:15 a m. Saturday Bible
study; 11 a.m. Saturday preaching:
7:15 p.m. Tuesday, prayer meeting.
Community service: 9-11 a.m. every
Monday. Health van ministry: 9-1
a.m. every second Thursday of the
month. Pastor Gregg Aguirre.
* Walker, Memorial Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 1410 West
Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone: 453-
6641 or e-mail: wmc@strato.net.
Saturday morning worship services:
8:15 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. Sabbath
School, 9:50 a.m. Adventist Youth in
Action (AYA), 4 p.m. Vespers one
hour before sunset. Wednesday
prayer-meeting 7 p.m. Senior Pastor
Paul Boling; Associate Pastor Eben
Aguirre; and Youth Pastor Tom
Baker. Walker Memorial Academy
Christian School offering education
for kindergarten through 12th
grades.

THE SALVATION ARMY

* The Salvation Army - Center
for Worship. Sunday: Sunday
School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meet-
ing, 11 a.m.; Praise Meeting, 12:30
p.m. Tuesday: Bible Study, 6:30
p.m.; Women's Ministries, 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 5
p.m. Every fourth Thursday is Men's
Fellowship, 6:30 p.m. All meetings
are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave.,
Sebring. For more information, visit
the Web site www.salvationarmyse-
bring.com or call Captain Mary
Holmes at 385-7548.

UNITED METHODIST

* First United Methodist Church,
200 S. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL
33825. Phone: 453-3759. Weekly
services: 6 p.m. Saturday; 8:30 and
11 a.m. Sunday; 9:45 a'.m. Sunday
School; Youth Fellowship, 6 p.m.
Sunday; choir practice 4:15 p.m.
Wednesday; Cub Scouts, 6 p.m.
Monday; Boy Scouts, 7:15 p.m.
Monday. Karen Wilson, choir direc-
tor/organist; Rev. Edward Wilson,
minister of visitation; Rev. Robert
Thorn, pastor. Everyone is wel-
come.
* First United Methodist Church,
125 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.
The Rev. Ron Daniels, pastor. Rev.
Betty Kniss, assistant pastor.
Traditional Worship Service at 8:15
and 10:55 a.m. Contemporary
Sunday Worship at 9:40 a.m.
Sunday School at 9:40 and 10:55
a.m. Youth meeting, 5:30-8 p.m.
Sunday. Youth After School Ministry,
3-5 p.m. Tuesday. Rick Heilig, youth


.director Children s. After School
Ministry. 2.30-4:30 p.m.
Wednesday Marge Jernigan, direc-
tor. The 10 55 a m. Sunday worship
service is broadcast over WITS
1 340 c.r AM dial There is a nursery
available at all services
* Memorial United Methodist
Church. 500 Kent Ave., Lake
Placid, FL. 33.52 Douglas S.
Pareli senior paslor Claude H L
Burnr,ll a-s.iar c. their pastor.
Sunday worship schedule Sunday
school for all ages at 9 30 a.m. and
Worship service al 10 45 a m. We
offer Christ.centered Sunday school
classes, youth programs; Bible stud-
ies book studies and Christian fel-
lowship We are a congregation that
wants to know Christ and make him
known For more intormallion. check
out our church Web site at
uwv memnorialumc com or call the
church office 465-2422
* St. John United Methodist
Church, 3214 Grand Pnx Dnie,
Sebring. FL 33872, Sebring Country
Estales. The Re� Ronald
DeGenarc Jr, Pasior Sunday
School. 9 15 a.m.. Sunday Morning
Worship 8 a.m iNovember-Apnl)
and 10:30 am. tall year) Hispanic
Worship 10 30 a m Classes for all
ages Phone
382-1736.
* Spring Lake United Methodist
Church, 8170 Cozumet Lane,.
Sebring. The Rev. Dale Schanely,
Pastor. Sunday Morning Worship.
9:55 a.m., adults and children;
Fellowship hour, 11 a.m. after wor-
ship service; Prayer and Bible
Study, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Choir
rehearsal 7 p.m., Thursday. United
Methodist Men, 8 a.m. second
Saturday. United Methodist Worien,
1 p.m. first Thursday. Church office
phone, 655-0040.

UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST

* Emmanuel United Church of
Christ, 3115 Hope Street, Sebring,
FL 33875. Sunday worship, 9:30
a.m. Children's Christian Education,
9:30 a.m. Everyone is welcome at
Emmanuel. We are located 1.7
miles west of U.S. 27 on Hammock
Road. For more information, call the
church office at 471-1999 or e-mail
to eucc@strato.net.

* Union Congregational, U.C.C.,
106 North Butler Ave., Avon Park,
FL 33825; 453-3345., Pastor: The
Rev. Bill Breylinger. Sunday servic-
es are at 8 a.m. at the Historic
Church, 101 Jim Rodgers Ave.; 9
a.m. and 10:30 a.m. at Millennium
Church, 106 Robert Britt St. Sunday
school: 9 a.m. Bible study: 5 p.m.
Wednesday worship service: 6 p.m.
Sunday evening worship: 6 p.m.

VINEYARD/WORD
OF FAITH

* Heartland Fellowship, 2523 U.S.
27 South, (just past the Wild Turkey
Tavern) Avon Park. Contemporary
Worship is at 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Children's Church and
Preschool/Nursery provided
Sunday. Women's meeting is at 7
p.m. Wednesday. No childcare
available. Pastor, Gerry Woltman.
Telephone: 453-9800. Casual, con-
temporary and Christ-centered.


�_I� 1__1_ I�








6C News-Sun, Sunday, July 3 1. 2005


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News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


Book identifies caterpillars


GAINESVILLE - Many
books focus on butterflies in
Florida, but now the state's
caterpillars are also in the spot-
light, thanks to a new guide by
two University of Florida ento-
mologists.
"Florida Butterfly
Caterpillars and Their Host
Plants," from the University
Press of Florida, is the first
book of its kind, said Jerry
Butler, a professor emeritus of
entomology with UF's Institute
of Food and Agricultural
Sciences.
"We thought caterpillars
deserved more attention than
they had gotten in the past,"
Butler said. "They might be a
little less flashy than butterflies,
but they're fascinating crea-
tures."
Aimed at laypeople, the book
includes color photographs of
all but one of Florida's 168
caterpillar species (missing is
the rare amethyst hairstreak
caterpillar), 185 host plants and
19 habitat types. There are pho-
tographs of the complete life
cycle, from egg to caterpillar to
pupa to adult, for 18 species.
Information for each species
includes a range map, descrip-
tion of the larva, similar
species, habitat, U.S. distribu-
tion, natural history, seasonal
activity and host plants. A key
can help readers identify cater-
pillars without consulting every
photo.
The text also includes a
checklist for noting caterpillar
sightings and chapters on but-
terfly gardens and finding and
rearing caterpillars. A section
on caterpillar behaviors
includes little-known facts
about caterpillar defenses
(spring azures recruit ants as
bodyguards by feeding them a
sweet- tasting liquid) and con-
cealment (chlorophyll in the
diet of green caterpillars keeps
them green, but they have.to
avoid sunlight to prevent fad-
ing).
Although the title of the book
says "Florida," all of the butter-
fly species are found elsewhere,
said Don Hall, a professor of





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to the


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Call


385-6155


452-1009


465-0426





1000
Announcements


1050 Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NUMBER: GC 05-345
SUN 'N LAKE OF SEBRING IMPROVEMENT
DISTRICT, a special district and a public
- corporation of the State of Florida,
Plaintiff,
vs.
A.B. LAUTENSHLAGER and ROBERTO ROGER
LAUTENSHLAGER, as Joint Tenants with
Right of Survivorship and Not as Tenants in
Common, if alive and if not, their unknown
spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors,
or other parties claiming by, through, under or
against A.B. LAUTENSHLAGER and ROBERTO
ROGER LAUTENSHLAGER, and all claimants
under any of such party;
JESUS E. MARQUEZ MORENO, if alive and. if
not, his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against JESUS E.
MAROUEZ MORENO, and all claimants under
any of such party;
MANUEL JOAO JARDIN DE SOUSA and
DEYSI PEDROMO DE JARDIN, HIS WIFE, if
alive and if not, their unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against
MANUEL JOAO JARDIN DE SOUSA and
DEYSI PEDROMO DE JARDIN, and all
claimants under any of such party;
ANTOUN ISRAEL SAMAN, if alive and if not,
,his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grant-
ees, creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against ANTOUN ISRAEL


SAMAN, and all claimants under any of such
party;
JOSE ANTONIO HERNANDEZ ROURA, if alive
and if not, his unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties
claiming 'by, through, under or against JOSE
ANTONIO HERNANDEZ ROURA, and all
claimants under any of such party;
MIGUEL T. NINO, if alive and if not, his
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against MIGUEL T. NINO,
and all claimants under any of such party;
VITORIO DE NISIO, if alive and if not, his
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against VITORIO DE NISIO,
and all claimants under any of such party;


University of Florida IFAS
Jerry Butler, a professor emeritus of entomology with the University
of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, inspects a
caterpillar destined to become a monarch butterfly. He has written
'Florida Butterfly Caterpillers and Their Host Plants' to share his
love of these insects.


entomology at UF who co-
authored the book. Florida's
location makes it home to tem-
perate species from eastern
North America as well as tropi-
cal species from the Caribbean.
"We're fortunate to have
such a variety of butterflies
here," Hall said. "There are
always new things to learn,
which is one of the reasons peo-
ple enjoy studying butterflies,
as a hobby or a profession."
Butler and Hall began assem-
bling material for the book 11
years ago. At the time, they
were simply curious to see how
many larvae they could identify
and photograph.. They found
that identifying caterpillars
sometimes meant rearing them
until they metamorphosed into
adults.
"There was no one-stop ref-
erence available, and some
caterpillar species were not well
documented," Butler said.
"Initially, we had no intention
of producing a reference book
ourselves, but as we collected
more and more photos, we real-
ized we ought to do it."
Obtaining photos of certain
species'was a long process, he
said.





1050 Legals
VINCENZO P. CICIOTTI CIOFANI and ALFIO
PIERLEONI TONASSETTI, if alive and if not,
their unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against VINCENZO P.
CICIOTTI CIOFANI and ALFIO PIERLEONI
TONASSETTI, and all claimants under any of
such party;
FELICE DI MARTINO FELICIANI, if alive and if
not, his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against FELICE DI
MARTINO FELICIANI, and all claimants under
any of such party;
CARLOS ENRIQUE RODRIGUEZ MANZO, if
alive and if not, his unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against
CARLOS ENRIQUE RODRIGUEZ MANZO, and
all claimants under any of such party;
ALBERTO MAMAN and RAQUEL ATTIAS DE
MAMAN, HIS WIFE, if alive and if not, their
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against ALBERTO MAMAN
and RAQUEL ATTIAS DE MAMAN, and all
claimants under any of such party;
LUIS FIGUEIRA PEREIRA and MILAGROS
RODRIGUEZ TINOCO DE PEREIRA, HIS WIFE,
if alive and if not, their unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by, through, under or against
LUIS FIGUEIRA PEREIRA and MILAGROS
RODRIGUEZ TINOCO DE PEREIRA, and all
claimants under any of such party;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT-PROPEIRTY
TO: ALBERTO MAMAN and RAQUEL ATTIAS
DE MAMAN, HIS WIFE, if alive and if not, their
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against ALBERTO MAMAN
and RAQUEL ATTIAS DE MAMAN, and all
claimants under any of such party;
Portal Del Hatillo Calle P-1, OTA'Raquel,
Parcela No. 21, La Lagunita, 'Caracus 108,
Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose bonded capital improvements and
operation and maintenance assessments liens
on the following property in Highlands Coun-
ty, Florida:
Parcel 11: Lot 20, Block 334, Unit 16, OF
SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, accord-
ing to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book
10, Page 4, of the Public Records of High-
lands County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to John K. McClure, Esquire,
MCCLURE & LOBOZZO, 230 South Commerce
Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, the Plaintiff's at-
torney, and file the original with the Clerk of
the above styled court on or before August
31st, 2005; otherwise a default may be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court
on the 27th day of July, 2005.
L.E. "LUKE" BROKER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: /s/ Annette E. Daft
Deputy Clerk
July 31; August 7, 2005

FORECLOSURE SALE
Norwood Storage, 4235 Sparta Rd., Sebr-
ing, FL, will be auctioning varied household
items on August 16, 2005 at 9:00 AM at above
location in lieu of overdue payments on Unit
31 by Richard Wheaton whose address is list-
ed as 1801 Kent Dr. #5, Sebring, FL 33875
and on Unit B17 by Joshua Stolar, whose ad-
dress is listed as 3015 Jacaranda Ave., Lake
Placid, FL 33852.
July 31,2005


"The metalmark life cycle
took a year and a half," Butler
said. "We had 'to find a gravid
female and wait for her to lay
an egg on the host plant provid-
ed."
As the book neared comple-
tion, internationally known but-
terfly authority Marc Minno
was brought on board to con-
tribute his expertise and addi-
tional photos, Hall said. Minno,
a senior regulatory scientist at
the St. Johns River Water
Management District in
Palatka, is the author of several
other books including "Florida
Butterfly Gardening."
A book on Florida's moth
caterpillars isn't on the immedi-
ate agenda of the authors.
"There are 4,000 moth species
in Florida," Hall said. "On the
average, we tracked and pho-
tographed about 15 butterfly
species a year. I think we'll
leave the moth book for some-
one else."
"Florida Butterfly
Caterpillars and Their Host
Plants" was published in April
2005 by University Press of
Florida. It is available from
booksellers or from the publish-
er at http://www.upf.com. With
360 pages in a softcover format,
the book retails for $34.95.





1050 -,
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice of Public Sale or Auction of the con-
tents of the following storage units located at
Bayview Self Storage, 2609 Bayview Street,
Sebring, FL 33870 on August 10, 2005 at
1:00 P.M.
Unit # Tenant Name
A172 Kelly L. Richardson
G489 Marcus Butcher
H571 Barbara R. Trice
K750 Michael Broderick
K765 Connie Hodge
L1146 Joseph B. Quinn
Contents of all storage units consist of house-
hold goods unless otherwise stated. Sale be-
ing made to satisfy landlord's lien. Cash pay-
ment. Contents to be. removed within 24
hours.
July 24, 31, 2005
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. GC 05-401
IRMA BRACERO and HECTOR BRACERO,
wife and husband,
Plaintiffs,
-vs-
M.J.P. FINANCIAL, INC., a Florida Dissolved
Corporation, and all known or unknown
persons claiming under or through them,
unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against any known or
unknown person who is know to be dead or is
not known to be either dead or alive,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: Defendants, M.J.P. FINANCIAL, INC. a
Florida Dissolved Corporation, and all known
or unknown persons claiming under or
through them, and the unknown spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors and all
other parties claiming by, through, under or
against her who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all unknown natural persons, if
alive, and if dead, or not known to be dead or
alive, their several and respective unknown
spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees or cred-
itors, or other parties claiming by, through, or
under those unknown natural persons; and
the several and respective unknown assigns,
successors in interest, trustees or any other
person claiming by, through, under or against
any corporation or other legal entity named as
a Defendant; and all claimants, persons or
parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact
legal status is unknown, claiming under any of
the above-named or described Defendants or
parties claiming to have any right, title or in-
terest in and to the lands thereafter described.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to
quiet title on the following described property
in Highlands County, Florida:
The West Half of the North 105 feet of
Block 18, in ORANGE BLOSSOM ESTATES
UNIT No. 4, according to the Plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 44, of the Pub-
lic Records of Highlands County, Florida. Also
known as Lot 1, per unrecorded survey of
Block 18
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to Lon Worth Crow IV, Attorney for
Plaintiffs, 211 North Commerce Avenue, Sebr-
ing, Florida 33870, and file the original with
the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or be-
fore September 6, 2005, otherwise a judg-
ment may be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court
on July 28, 2005.
L. E. "LUKE" BROKER
As Clerk of said Circuit Court
By: /s/ Annette E. Daft
Deputy Clerk
July 31; August 7,14,21,2005


1050 Lels
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC AUCTION: AUGUST 12, 2005
AT 9:00 A.M.
LOCATION: AVON TOWING, 1102 W. HILL
ST., AVON PARK, FL 33825
YEAR MAKE
1984 FORD
VIN # 1FTEF25H6FLA21361
July 31, 2005
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Probate Division
File No.: PC 05-651
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELENORE R. HUTCHINGS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR
DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE.
The administration of the estate of ELE-
NORE R. HUTqHINGS, deceased, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Highlands County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebr-
ing, Florida. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and that personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is
served within three months after the date of
the first publication of this notice must file
their claims with this Court, WITHIN THE LAT-
ER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and per-
sons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent must file their claims
with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this No-
tice is July 31,2005.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Alice Rutledge
ALICE L. RUTHLEDGE
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ James V. Lobozzo, Jr.
JAMES V. LOBOZZO, JR. Esquire
230 S. Commerce Avenue
Sebring, Florida 33870
(863) 402-1888
Florida Bar No. 274178,
July 29; August 7, 2005

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NUMBER: GC 05-345
SUN 'N LAKE OF SEBRING IMPROVEMENT
DISTRICT, a special district and a public
corporation of the State of Florida,
Plaintiff,
vs.
A.B. LAUTENSHLAGER and ROBERTO ROGER
LAUTENSHLAGER, as Joint Tenants .with
Right of Survivorship and Not as Tenants in
Common, if alive and if not, their unknown
spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors,
or other parties claiming by, through, under or
against A.B. LAUTENSHLAGER and ROBERTO
ROGER LAUTENSHLAGER, and all claimants
under any of such party;
JESUS E. MARQUEZ MORENO, if alive and if
not, his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against JESUS E.
MARQUEZ MORENO, and all claimants under
any of such party;
MANUEL JOAO JARDIN DE SOUSA and
DEYSI PEDROMO DE JARDIN, HIS WIFE, if
alive and if not, their unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties
caining tby, through; under or against
MANUEL JOAO JARDIN DE SOUSA and
DEYSI PEDROMO DE JARDIN, and all
claimants under any of such party;
ANTOUN ISRAEL SAMAN, if alive and if not,
his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grant-
ees, creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against ANTOUN ISRAEL
SAMAN, and all claimants under any of such
party;
JOSE ANTONIO HERNANDEZ ROURA, if alive
and if not, his unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against JOSE
ANTONIO HERNANDEZ ROURA, and all
claimants under any of such party;
MIGUEL T. NINO, if alive and if not, his
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against MIGUEL T. NINO,
and all claimants under any of such party;
VITORIO DE NISIO, if alive and if not, his
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, o other parties claiming by,
through, under or against VITORIO DE NISIO,
and all claimants under any of such party;
VINCENZO P. CICIOTTI CIOFANI and ALFIO
PIERLEONI TONASSETTI, if alive and if not,
their unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against VINCENZO P.
CICIOTTI CIOFANI and ALFIO PIERLEONI
TONASSETTI, and all claimants under any of
such party;
FELICE Dl MARTINO FELICIANI, if alive and if
not, his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against FELICE Dl
MARTINO FELICIANI, and all claimants under
any of such party;
CARLOS ENRIQUE RODRIGUEZ MANZO, if
alive and if not, his unkflbnown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against
CARLOS ENRIQUE RODRIGUEZ MANZO, and
all claimants under'any of such party;
ALBERTO MAMAN and RAQUEL A-TIAS DE
MAMAN, HIS WIFE, if alive and if not, their
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against ALBERTO MAMAN
and RAQUEL ATTIAS DE MAMAN, and all
claimants under any of such party;
LUIS FIGUEIRA PEREIRA and MILAGROS
RODRIGUEZ TINOCO DE PEREIRA, HIS WIFE,
if alive and if not, their unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by, through, under or against
LUIS FIGUEIRA PEREIRAoand MfLAGROS
RODRIGUEZ TINOCO DE PEREIRA, and all
claimants under any of such party;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT-PROPERTY
TO: JESUS E. MARQUEZ MORENO if alive
and if not, his unknown spouse, heirs, devi-
sees, grantees, creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against JESUS
E. MARQUEZ MORENO, and all claimants un-
der any of such party;
27 Feburero #492, General Consulado, Ven-
ezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action


to foreclose bonded capital improvements and
operation and maintenance assessments liens
on the following property in Highlands Coun-
ty, Florida:
Parcel 2: Lot 20, Block 333, Unit 16, OF
SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, accord-
ing to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book
10, Page 4, of the Public Records of High-
lands County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to John K. McClure, Esquire,
MCCLURE & LOBOZZO, 230 South Commerce
Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, the Plaintiff's at-
torney, and file the original with the Clerk of
the above styled court on or before August
31st, 2005; otherwise a default may be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court
on the 27th day of July, 2005.
L.E. "LUKE" BROKER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: /s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk


1050 --Leg
July 31; August 7, 2005



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 10OTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. GC 05-344
CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC, successor by
merger to CHASE MANHATTAN
MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GEORGE W. GIRDLER, et ux., et al.,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: TOM KNOX GIRDLER, if alive, and/or
dead his (their) unknown heirs, devisees, leg-
atees or grantees and all persons or parties
claiming by, through, under or against him
(them).
Addresses unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Action for fore-
closure of a mortgage on the following prop-
erty in HIGHLANDS County, Florida:
LOT 1068 TO 1072, INCLUSIVE, OF AVON
PARK LAKES, UNIT 3, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 4, PAGE 90, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to it on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN,
P.A., Attorneys, whose address s 708 South
Dixie Highway, Coral Gables, Florida 33146,
(305) 666-2299, within 30 days after the first
publication of the notice, and to file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court either before
service on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., attor-
neys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the re-
lief demanded in the Complaint or Petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court
on this 26th day of JULY, 2005.
L.E. "Luke" BROKER, CLERK
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities need-
ing a special accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should contact Court Admin-
istration at 430 Commerce Avenue, Sebring,
Florida 33870-3701, telephone (863) 386-
6566, no later than seven (7) days prior to the
proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8770, via Florida Relay Service./dca
July 31; August 7, 2005
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NUMBER: GO 05-345
SUN 'N LAKE OF SEBRING IMPROVEMENT
DISTRICT, a special district and a public
corporation of the State of Florida,
Plaintiff,
vs.
A.B. LAUTENSHLAGER and ROBERTO ROGER.
LAUTENSHLAGER, as Joint Tenants with
Right of Survivorship and Not as Tenants in
Common, if alive and if not, their unknown
spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors,
or other parties claiming by, through, under or
against A.B. LAUTENSHLAGER and ROBERTO
ROGER LAUTENSHLAGER, and all claimants
under any of such party;
JESUS E. MARQUEZ MORENO, if alive and if
not, his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against JESUS E.
MARQUEZ MORENO, and all claimants under
any of such party;
MANUEL JOAO JARDIN DE SOUSA and
DEYSI PEDROMO DE JARDIN, HIS WIFE, if
alive and if not, their unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties
.claiming by, through, under or against
MANUEL JOAO JARDIN DE SOUSA and
DEYSI PEDROMO DE JARDIN, and all
claimants under any of such party;
ANTOUN ISRAEL SAMAN, if alive and if not,
his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grant-
ees, creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against ANTOUN ISRAEL
SAMAN, and all claimants under any of such
party;
JOSE ANTONIO HERNANDEZ ROURA, if alive
and if riot, his unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against JOSE
ANTONIO HERNANDEZ ROURA, and all
claimants under any of such party;
MIGUEL T. NINO, if alive and if not, his
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against MIGUEL T. NINO,
and all claimants under any of such party;
VITORIO DE NISIO, if alive and if not, his
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against VITORIO DE NISIO,
and all claimants under any of such party;
VINCENZO P. CICIOTTI CIOFANI and ALFIO
PIERLEONI TONASSETTI, if alive and if not,
their unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against VINCENZO P.
CICIOTTI CIOFANI and ALFIO PIERLEONI
TONASSETTI,d nd all claimants under any of
such party;
FELICE Dl MARTINO FELICIANI, if alive and if
not, his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against FELICE DI
MARTINO FELICIANI, and all claimants under
any of such party;
CARLOS ENRIQUE RODRIGUEZ MANZO, if
alive and if not, his unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against
CARLOS ENRIQUE RODRIGUEZ MANZO, and
all claimants under any of such party;
ALBERTO MAMAN and RAQUEL ATTIAS DE
MAMAN, HIS WIFE, if alive and if not their
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against ALBERTO MAMAN
and RAQUEL ATTIAS DE MAMAN, and all
claimants under any of such party;
LUIS FIGUEIRA PEREIRA and MILAGROS
RODRIGUEZ TINOCO DE PEREIRA, HIS WIFE,
if alive and if not, their unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by, through, under or against
LUIS FIGUEIRA PEREIRA and MILAGROS
RODRIGUEZ TINOCO DE PEREIRA, and all
claimants under any of such party;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT-PROPERTY
TO: JOSE ANTONIO HERNANDEZ ROURA, if
alive and if not, his unknown spouse, lieirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against JOSE
ANTONIO HERNANDEZ ROURA, and all claim-
ants under any of such party;
APDO Postal #50513, Caracus, Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action


to foreclose bonded capital improvements and
operation and maintenance assessments liens
on the following property in Highlands Coun-
ty, Florida:
Parcel 5: Lot 04, Block 334, Unit 16, OF
SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, accord-
ing to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book
10, Page 4, of the PublicRecords of High-
lands County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to John K. McClure, Esquire,
MCCLURE & LOBOZZO, 230 South Commerce
Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, the Plaintiff's at-
torney, and file the original with the Clerk of
the above styled court on or before August
31st, 2005; otherwise a default may be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court
on the 27th day of July, 2005.
L.E. "LUKE" BROKER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: /s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
July 31; August 7,2005


1050 e
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OFT THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: GC-01-585
BANKERS TRUST COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA,
N.A. IN TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE
HOLDERS OF AAMES MORTGAGE TRUST
2000-1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2000-1 C/O
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TAYLOR BROWN, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
July 20, 2005 and entered in Case NO. GC-01-
585 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial
Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida
wherein BANKERS TRUST COMPANY OF CAL-
IFORNIA, N.A. IN TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT
OF THE HOLDERS OF AAMES MORTGAGE
TRUST 2000-1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2000-1 C/0 COUN-
TRYWIDE HOME LOANS, is the Plaintiff and
TAYLOR BROWN; LAWARETHA D. THOMAS;
are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash in the JURY ASSEM-
BLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGH-
LANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH
COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the
15th day of August, 2005, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
LOT 11, BLOCK A, STEWART'S ADDITION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 11, PAGE 3, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
A/K/A 1044 Tangerine Avenue, Sebring, FL
33870
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on July 20, 2005.
Luke E. Brooker
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Annette E. Daft
Deputy Clerk
Echevarria & Associates, P.A.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F01010853
July 24, 31, 2005

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NUMBER: GC 05-345
SUN 'N LAKE OF SEBRING IMPROVEMENT
DISTRICT, a special district and a public
corporation of the State of Florida,
Plaintiff,
vs.
A.B. LAUTENSHLAGER and ROBERTO ROGER
LAUTENSHLAGER, as Joint Tenants with
Right of Survivorship and Not as Tenants in
Common, if alive and if not, their unknown
spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors,
or other parties claiming by, through, under or
against A.B. LAUTENSHLAGER and ROBERTO
ROGER LAUTENSHLAGER, and all claimants
under any of such party;
JESUS E. MARQUEZ MORENO, if alive and if
not, his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under against JESUS E.
MARQUEZ MORENO, and all claimants under
any of such party;
MANUEL JOAO JARDIN DE SOUSA and
DEYSI PEDROMO DE JARDIN, HIS WIFE, if
alive and if not, their unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against
MANUEL JOAO JARDIN DE SOUSA and
DEYSI PEDROMO DE JARDIN, and all
claimants under any of such party; "
ANTOUN ISRAEL SAMAN, if alive and if not,
his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grant-
ees, creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against ANTOUN ISRAEL
SAMAN, and all claimants under any of such
party;
JOSE ANTONIO HERNANDEZ ROURA, if alive
and if not, his unknown spouse, heirs, .
devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against JOSE
ANTONIO HERNANDEZ ROURA, and all
claimants under any of such party;
MIGUEL T. NINO, if alive and if not, his
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against MIGUEL T. NINO,
and all claimants under any of such party;
VITORIO DE NISIO, if alive and if not, his
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against VITORIO DE NISIO,
and all claimants under any of such party;
VINCENZO P. CICIOTTI CIOFANI and ALFIO
PIERLEONI TONASSETTI, if alive and if not,
their unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against VINCENZO P. -
CICIOTTI CIOFANI and ALFIO PIERLEONI
TONASSETTI, and all claimants under any of
such party;
FELICE Dl MARTINO FELICIANI, if alive and if
not, his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against FELICE DI
MARTINO FELICIANI, and all claimants under
any of such party;
CARLOS ENRIQUE RODRIGUEZ MANZO, if
alive and if not, his unknown spouse, heirs,
claiming by, through, under or against
CARLOS ENRIQUE RODRIGUEZ MANZO, and
all claimants under any of such party;
ALBERTO MAMAN and RAQUEL ATTIAS DE
MAMAN, HIS WIFE, if alive and if not, their
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against ALBERTO MAMAN
and RAQUEL ATTIAS DE MAMAN, and all
claimants under any of such party;
LUIS FiGUEIRA PEREIRA and MILAGROS
RODRIGUEZ TINOCO DE PEREIRA, HIS WIFE,
if alive and if not, their unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by, through, under or against .
LUIS FIGUEIRA PEREIRA and MILAGROS
RODRIGUEZ TINOCO DE PEREIRA, and all
claimants under any of such party;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT-PROPERTY
TO: MIGUEL T. NINO, if alive and if not, his
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against MIGUEL T. NINO,
and all claimants under any of such party;
APDO Postal #50513, Caracas, Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose bonded capital improvements and
operation and maintenance assessments liens
on the following property in Highlands Coun-
ty, Florida:
Parcel 6: Lot 08, Block 334, Unit 16, OF
SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, accord-
ing to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book


10, Page 4, of the Public Records of High-
lands County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to John K. McClure, Esquire,
MCCLURE & LOBOZZO, 230 South Commerce
Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, the Plaintiffs at-
torney, and file the original with the Clerk of
the above styled court on or before August
31st, 2005; otherwise a default may be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court
on the 27th day of July, 2005.
L.E. "LUKE" BROKER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: /s/ Annette E. Daff
Deputy Clerk
July 31; August 7, 2005


A AUTOMOBILE SALE SPECIAL!
3 LINES, 2 WEEKS, $25.
CALL NEWS-SUN CLASSIFIED, 385-6155.










8C News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


Agricultural research adds to quality of life


The Agricultural
Research Service is
the research branch
of the U.S.
Department of
Agriculture. In the
past, its work has
brought us products
such as Deet (used to
repel mosquitos) and
Superslurper, the
magic stuff inside of
diapers that can soak
up many times its
own weight in water.
Its monthly publica-
tion, "Agricultural
Research," highlights


some of its current projects.
In Alabama and Maryland,
ARS teams are developing fish
vaccines to protect against dis-
eases. This is good news for
fish producers who lose profits
when diseases kill fish. The lab-
oratory has patented several
vaccines and is working with
companies to try to get the vac-
cines on the market.
One vaccine developed in the
lab is called a modified live
vaccine. The fish are subjected
to live bacterium called
Flavobacterium columnare.
This bacterium causes colum-
naris disease, which is the sec-
ond-leading cause of death for
catfish. The vaccine is given


through a bath, and it
more effective than
current attempts to
treat diseased fish.
Fish producers will
save an estimated
$100 million a year
with this vaccine.
The bacteria
Streptococcus is a
problem worldwide.
The disease is found
in 22 species of cul-
tured and wild fish
such as tilapia and
rainbow trout, and it
can also infect
humans and cattle.


Researchers have developed a
successful killed vaccine that
was patented in 2002. As of
now the vaccine is administered
through injection. Researchers
are now developing an oral
delivery method for killed vac-
cines, which would be a cheap-
er and easier method to admin-
ister than an injection or immer-
sion vaccine.
In the 1960s the ARS devel-
oped permanent-press cotton
and permanent creases in wool
trousers. A new breakthrough
from ARS is the development
of a biopolishing method that
makes wool feel silky smooth
instead of scratchy. The method
also bleaches the wool white


and alters the surface of wool
fibers to make them shrink-
proof.
The method increases
smoothness and shine on the
wool's surface by removing
fiber-yam ends projecting from
it. The two-step process
involves using activated perox-
ide bleach, which allows the
fabric to be more easily dyed,
and then an enzyme treatment,
which allows the fabric to be
machine washed."
Although washable wool has
been available for about 35
years, it is all imported to the
United States due to the chemi-
cal environmental concerns
associated with the processing
method. The new method is
more environmentally friendly.
The U.S. military is interest-
ed in using biopolished wool in
undergarments for our troops.
Currently, underwear garments
being used by the military con-
tain synthetic fibers that can
burn and melt into wounds dur-
ing combat. Wool produces a
self-extinguishing flame and a
dissipating ash when burned.

Jennifer Donze is a natural
resource special with the
Highlands County Soil and
Water Conservation District. Its
Web site is at http://www.high-
landsswcd.org.


Tickets are available for 'Cabaret'

SEBRING - Highlands
Little Theatre is now selling
tickets for its upcoming pro-
duction of "Cabaret."
The box office is open from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday
through Saturday and 6:30-8
p.m. Tuesday.
The show is sponsored by
Tim and Martile Blackman and
family. For ticket availability,
call the box office at 382-2525.
Co-directors are Melanie
Boulay and Jennifer i
Westergom, directors of "Peter
Pan" and "The Scarlet
Pimpernel."
The musical production will
run Aug. 12-28. The theater is
in the Allen C. Altvater .t-
Cultural Center on. LakdvieW The cast of 'Cabaret' prepares for opening night.
- Drive. ... _ii_ .. . ._ _ _ _ _ _ _ __...-_


199CI RDgI 93BUC A f IH oe
MARQUS UY 8,00 mile, -ILI59I


NEWS
FROM THE
WATERSHED

Jennifer Donze


2000 SATURN 130
p .< -, .


Very nice, fully equipped.

--aB S


2002 BHICK LESABBfE






White, 35,000 miles.
i2,9gaa


2002 CHRY#SflE R IS CION






40,000 miles, very clean.

s 13,9U


,ou
0.4
















SSports


On a mission in Miami
'Canes Winston has a lot
to prove this season
Page 4D


NEWS-SUN + SEBRING, FLA.


SECTION D + SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005


F The

Sideline
SCORES AND MORE
On Deck
TODAY
Golf
Sertoma Junior Golf Tour
Championship at Sebring
Golf Club, 12 p.m.
SATURDAY, AUG. 6
Dixie Boys Baseball
Avon Park vs. Georgia in
World Series in Muscle
Shoals, Ala., 8 p.m. (EDT)
Golf
Sebring Firemen Memorial
Classic at Sebring Golf
Club and Harder Hall, 8:30
a.m.
SUNDAY, AUG. 7
Dixie Boys Baseball
Avon Park vs. TBD in
World Series in Muscle
Shoals, Ala., TBA
SATURDAY, AUG. 20
Golf
Sertoma golf tournament at
Highlands Ridge, 8 a.m.
SUNDAY, AUG. 21
e Golf
Sertoma golf tournament at
Highlands Ridge, 8 a.m.


History Lesson
1 Year Ago
July 31, 2004: It was a bad
day for Sebring teams at a
pair of Dixie World Series.
The Dixie Belles suffered
through a four-run second
inning and could only
respond with a Chastity
GodreyRBlI single in a 4-1
loss to Texas in Jackson,
. Tenn:': Meanwhile in
LaGrange, Ga., the 14-year-
old Dixie Boys could only
muster two hits - a
Michael Jones single'in the
third and Adam Simmons'
double in the fifth - in a
10-0, five-inning loss to
South Carolina.

5 Years Ago
July 31, 2000: Fort Walton
Beach eliminated Sebring
from the Dixie Youth Majors
state tournament in
Wewahitchka with a 9-1
victory. Luke Birge and
Quinlan Wolfe each had two
hits for Sebring, with Birge
hitting a run-scoring double
to account for Sebring's
lone run.

10 Years Ago
July 31, 1995: Host team
Belleview hit a pair of home
runs and took advantage of
some shaky Avon Park
defense for a 13-4 win in
the opening round of the
Dixie Youth Majors state
tournament. L.T. Galimba's
two-run home run was the
only highlight for Avon Park
in a game that saw John
Paul Heston get knocked
unconscious when he was
hit in the head by a pitch.


Trivia Time
Who is the only sec-
Qond baseman ever to
win the World Series
MVP award?

� ae iu!sol o WOif
A poa9|9S eq ot JOAa1d
AlUO 9qn OS1B S! OtIM
'0961. ui uospJlyEo!
Aqqog ,s99|uBA Sui


Farm Report
David Asher
Former SFCC pitcher David
Asher is 0-1 with a 4.15


ERA and 10 strikeouts in 13
appearances for the Everett
AquaSox (Mariners) of the
short-season Class A
Nortwestern League.


News-Sun photos
(Clockwise from top right) Shevas Hicks, Buddy Duke, Dillan Runner and Heath Barnes give Avon Park's 14-year-old Dixie
Boys All-Stars a formidable starting rotation.

Pitching will be key for Avon Park in World Series


BY CHUCK MYRON
Sports Writer
AVON PARK
Avon Park is going into the
Dixie Boys World Series
well-armed.
Head coach Kevin
McIntyre said he has never coached a
team that has as many quality starting
pitchers as the one that he'll take to
Muscle Shoals, Ala. next week.
"I went to the World Series before
with a team from Sebring and we had
some really stout pitching, but we
only had three really stout pitchers,
and when we got to the World Series,
that's what wiped us out, quick," he
said. "I've never had one, two, three,
four, and especially never had a five
or six that we could put out there to
get an inning or two and save a


OId


school A


Team collecting donations
The Avon Park All-Stars will be at
Wal-Mart starting at 9 a.m. on Monday
collecting donations to help fund their
trip to the World Series.They leave
Thursday, and any funds donated
before then will be greatly appreciated.

starter."
The starting four are Dillan Runner,
Shevas Hicks, Buddy Duke and Heath
Barnes, and Kelvin Rosa and Logan
Hunter are there to back them up.
"The key is No. 4, and having a
No. 5 and No. 6 that can come in and
throw strikes like Kelvin did to get
the game bver in the 12-2 (loss to
Holmes County in the state tourna-
ment). Kelvin steps out there, throws


strikes and gets things over with."
Yet it isn't just the volume of pitch-
ers that has led to Avon Park's suc-
cess; it's also the way they've been
used.
McIntyre caused a stir in his own
dugout when he told his assistants he
would start from the back end of the
rotation and work his way up in the
state tournament.
"When I start a tournament I
always start my best pitcher," assis-
tant coach Ronnie Barnes said. "He
went the opposite way. It turned out
our No. 3 and No. 4 pitchers pitched
the games of their lives. That night,
they could have been No. 1 or No. 2."
Ronnie's son Heath came up with an
11-strikeout two-hitter in the first
See FOUR, Page 3D


Golf

Battles rage


as Sertoma


Tour finishes
BY CHUCK MYRON
Sports Writer
SEBRING - It's a fight to the finish.
Several age group championships are still
in doubt heading into the today's final round
of the Sertoma Junior Tour Championship
at Sebring Golf Club, and for some, it's the
conclusion of a weeklong battle as well as a
season's worth of struggle.
Matt Comuet and Cody Brownell fin-
ished second and third, respectively, against
worldwide competition in a three-day tour-
nament in Fort Myers this week, and then
two of them, along with W.T. Redding, fired
70s in the first round of the Tour
Championship Saturday to create a pitched
battle for the boys 17-18 lead.
"They're a little tired, they said," tour
founder Tom McClurg said.
Yet Brownell holds the best chance of
waking up Monday morning with the title,
holding a nine-point lead over Redding and
,10-point edge over third-place Comuet. All
three, along with fourth-place Rocky Khara,
are within reach of the title.
In the boys 15-16 group, points leader
Kaleb Saunders could only muster an 84,
Opening the door for Brad Ellis, who is in
second place and shot a 77. Roben Griffen
is in fourth place, 20.5 points back in the
standings, but paced the group Saturday
with a 75.
Still, Saunders thinks he can still hang on.
"They have bad days, too," Saunders said
of his competition. "I had a bad day today.
They can have bad days."
Another points leader is counting on her
competition to struggle Sunday. Heather
Brownell, who held a 2.5-point lead over
Kayla Dunn in the girls 14-15 group coming
" into the tournament, is 10 strokes back of
SDunns 78 after-Saturday; .. -
Little such drama exists in the girls 16-18
division, where Jocelyn Dunn leads in the
standings by 23 points, and smoked the
course for a 78 Saturday, impressing even
McClurg.
See TOUR, page 3D


SCOTT DRESSEL/News-Sun
Silas Berry chips up to the No. 12 green at
Sebring Golf Club on Saturday as his
father, Steve, looks on.


Has baseball lost its place as America's pastime?


It is still the sport the
matters the most and it still
captures the attention of
more people in this country
than any other sport. It is
baseball and it is still the
national pastime.
Avon Park, Sebring and
Lake Placid help prove the
point every summer. Take a OLD i
look at how many people ULD S
are involved in the youth -
baseball programs in this John
area. Kids want to play
baseball. They want to grab a glove
and play catch. They want to swing a
bat and run to first. Baseball is a great


SC
n B


game.
No team sport has the
same kind of individual
drama as the confrontation
between the pitcher and the
hitter. No team sport has the
same possibility of a rally
like baseball. The offense
keeps going until the
OOL defense gets three outs.
HOOL When the offense scores
-- in football, basketball and
edell soccer the other team gets
~ the ball. In hockey, there is a
face-off to give the other team a shot.

See OLD, Page 3D


Trying to argue that base-
ball is no longer the national
pastime in a county that has
remained a little oasis of the
sport is probably futile, but
the fact is that baseball has
lost its place at the top.
Baseball has some great
things about it, it has some
very unique things about it, NEW
and I don't think that as a NEW
sport it will ever die, like so -
many love to croon that it Dani
will whenever a new scandal
arises.
But it is a sport that has lost the fans
that really count, and those are the


kids.
Now, I realize kids still
play, but they almost exclu-
sively play in organized
leagues, which tells me that
parental influence plays a
huge role in keeping kids
playing. Maybe people will
disagree with that, but when
HOOL was the last time you saw 10
NUUL or 15 kids get together to
-- play a baseball game by
Bedell themselves? When was the
"last time you saw kids out in
the yard playing catch? When was the

See NEW, Page 3D


L


SC
el L
""




















Tryouts for traveling
AAU baseball team sel
SEBRING - Tryouts for
the Sebring traveling AAU
baseball team (ages 14-16)
will be held at Max Long
Recreational Complex at 8
a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 6.
The player's birth date can
not be before May of 1989,
and all players should bring a
copy of their birth certifi-
cates and a recent photo to
the tryouts.
Interested players can con-
tact coach Ron Cochran at
385-2888 for-more informa-
tion.
Some LPHS sports set
to start up on Monday
LAKE PLACID - Aug. 1
is the starting date for some
fall sports at Lake Placid
High School. Students who
plan on participating in any
of these sports, should be at
practice at'the designated
time. Students who did not
have their physical completed
and notarized at the school
physical day should bring
their completed forms with
them.
No one can begin practice
without a completed physical.
Students who cannot come on
the first day of practice,
should let their coach know
why they cannot attend. Non-
attendance at practice this
first week will severely limit
chances of making the team.
Football: Both varsity and
JV meet on Aug. 1 at 5 p.m.,
on the football practice field.
Swimming: Meet on the
pool deck at 3:30 p.m. in you
suit.
Volleyball: Both varsity
and JV meet in the gym at
3:30 p.m.
All other fall sports have a
starting date of Aug. 8.
Students should prepared for
practice on the first day of
school, but check with their
coach about when practice
will actually begin.
_ Sebring Golf Club sets
second summer camp
SEBRING - Sebring Golf
Club will host Summer Golf
Camp II Aug. 2-5 from 10.a.m
to 12:30 p.m. each day.
Basic skills, rules and golf
etiquette will be taught, prizes
can be won each day and a
tournament will be played on
the final day.
Lunch will be served fol-
lowing each clinic, which will
be taught by Joel Walkup and
his staff. Cost is $75 for each
player for all four days. Call
the pro shop at 314-5919 to
sign up or any questions.
Sertoma tournament
slated for Aug. 20-21
SEBRING - The
Highlands Sertoma Club has
announced that they will be
hosting their 28th annual
Highlands Independent
Bank/Sertoma Golf
Tournament on Aug. 20-21, ai
the Highlands Ridge Golf
Club in Sebring, utilizing
both the south and north
courses.
This year's tournament will
continue to sport Sertoma's
unique format of a two-man
team best-ball on Saturday


and a two-man team scramble
on Sunday.
t With Highlands Indepen-
dent Bank's continued title
sponsor support, entry fees
and flexible player options for
this year's tournament have
remained unchanged. The
individual player fee is still at
$145, while the entry fee for
golfers who wants to attend
a (with a guest) Saturday
night's Sertoma Luau is still
$195.
The eighth annual Luau
will again feature live enter-
tainment from Sertoma's own
Vinny Liles and the Backstage
Pass Band, open bar, heavy
hors d'oeuvres, lots of fun,
dancing and fellowship for
all..
If you didn't receive a per-
sonal invitation by mail, reg-
istration forms will be avail-
able at local golf pro shops or
can be mailed or faxed by
calling Eddie Freeland at
(863) 661-1142.
Business/player sponsorships
are also available, as are team
sponsor packages.
Highlands, Polk golfers
to meet in showdown
SEBRING - The first
Highlands/Polk Counties
i Challenge Cup will be held
Sept. 24-25 at Bartow Golf
Course, pitting a Highlands
County team against one from
Polk County in a Ryder Cup-
style competition.
Qualification for the
Highlands team is Saturday,
Sept. 17 at Sebring Golf
Course with and 8:30 a.m.
shotgun start. There will be two
r divisions so all can compete:
scratch and handicap. Players
sign up with their verifiable
handicap (above 18 will only
be given a maximum 18) and .
play a qualifying round. The
low 12 gross plus one alternate
and the low 12 net plus one
alternate make the team.
Entry fee is $50 which
includes golf, cart and lunch
and drinks during the qualify-
ing event. Final team members
also get two shirts. (Based on a
minimum number of partici-
pants) two more days of golf, a
Saturday banquet and a
Sunday lunch, with trophy
presentation.
All players except the alter-
nate are guaranteed three
rounds in the tournament, no
sit outs. The winner will be
determined by the aggregate
total of both divisions.
Winning team gets a traveling
trophy to be kept at the win-
ning club's club house and
bragging rights for a year. This
will be an annual home and
home event and will be played
next year in Sebring. Sign up
now as a full field for this one
of a kind event.
Call 314-5919 for more
information.
SHS volleyball tryouts
scheduled for this week
SEBRING - Tryouts for
t varsity and junior varsity vol-
leyball at Sebring High School
have been scheduled for
Monday through Friday, from
3:30-6 p.m. each day in the
1 gym.
For more information, call
coach Venessa Sinness at 655-
3387.


News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


STATS AND STANDINGS


Quick Reads
LOCAL NEWS IN BRIEF


STANDINGS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 57 45 .559 -
New York 54 47 .535 2'2
Toronto 52 50 .510 5
Baltimore 51 51 .500 6
Tampa Bay 38 66 .365 20
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 66 35 .653 -
Minnesota 54 48 .529 12/'
Cleveland 54 50 .519 13%'
Detroit 50 52 .490 1612
Kansas City 38 65 .369 29
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles . 60 43 .583 -
Oakland 56 46 .549 3Y2
Texas 52 50 .510 7Y2
Seattle 44 58 .431 15/2
Wednesday's Games
Kansas City 6, Chicago White Sox 5,
13 innings
Oakland 5, Cleveland 4, 10 innings
Boston 4, Tampa Bay 1
Texas 11, Baltimore 8, 11 innings
Minnesota 7, N.Y. Yankees 3
Toronto 3, L.A. Angels 2, 10 innings
Seattle 9, Detroit 3
Thursday's Games
N.Y. Yankees 6, Minnesota 3
Texas 2, Baltimore 1
Toronto 2, L.A. Angels 1, 18 innings
Tampa Bay 10, Kansas City 5
Cleveland 6, Seattle 5
Friday's Games
Boston 8, Minnesota 5
L.A. Angels 4, N.Y. Yankees 1
Texas 4, Toronto 1
Tampa Bay 6, Kansas City 3
Chicago White Sox 7, Baltimore 2
Oakland 8, Detroit 4
Cleveland 10, Seattle 5
Saturday's Games
L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees, late
Chicago White Sox at Baltimore, late
Detroit at Oakland, late*
Cleveland at Seattle, late
Texas at Toronto, late
Kansas City at Tampa Bay, late
Minnesota at Boston, late
. Today's Games
L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Texas at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 2:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 3:05 p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Chicago White Sox at Baltimore, 12:35
p.m.
Oakland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Kansas City at Boston, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at-Detroit,.2:O0t..m.. *
Toronto at Chicago White So*8:05
p.m.
Tampa Bay at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Oakland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Anaheim, 10:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 59 44 .573 -
Washington 55 48 .534 4
Florida 52 48 .520 5'h
Philadelphia 54 50 .519 5/2
New York 52 51 .505 7
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 64 38 .627 -
Houston 56 47 .544 8'h
Chicago 53 50 .515 11Y,
Milwaukee 50 54 .481 15
Cincinnati 45 58 .437 19'h
Pittsburgh 44 59 .427 20%Y
West Division
W L Pet GB
San Diego 51 52 .495 -
Arizona 50 55 .476 2
Los Angeles 47 56 .456 4
San Francisco 45 57 .441 5%'
Colorado 36 66 .353 1412
Wednesday's Games
Arizona 3, Milwaukee 0
Chicago Cubs 4, San Francisco 3
Atlanta 4, Washington 3
Florida 3, Pittsburgh 1
Houston 3, Philadelphia 2
N.Y. Mets 9, Colorado 3
San Diego 2, St. Louis 1
Cincinnati 7, L.A. Dodgers 6
Thursday's Games
Atlanta 5, Washington 4
Arizona 6, Chicago Cubs 0
Cincinnati 6, L.A. Dodgers 1
St. Louis 11, San Diego 3
Florida 3, Pittsburgh 0
Houston 3, N.Y. Mets 2
San Francisco 3, Milwaukee 0
Philadelphia 8, Colorado 5
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 4, Arizona 3
Philadelphia 5, Colorado 3
Atlanta 2, Pittsburgh 1
Florida 4, Washington 3
Houston 5, N.Y. Mets 2
San Francisco 7, Milwaukee 6
Cincinnati 8, San Diego 3
L.A. Dodgers 7, St. Louis 5


Saturday's Games
Arizona at Chicago Cubs, late
St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, late
N.Y. Mets at Houston, late
San Francisco at Milwaukee, late
Washington at Florida, late
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, late
Philadelphia at Colorado, late
Cincinnati at San Diego, late
Today's Games
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 1:05 p.m.
Washington at Florida, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Milwaukee, 2:05 p.m.
Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Philadelphia at Colorado, 3:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 1:05 p.m.
Florida at St. Louis, 8:10 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Los Angeles at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 7:05
p.m.
San Diego at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Florida at St. Louis, 8:10 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-Damon, Boston, .337;
MYoung, Texas, .328; BRoberts,
Baltimore, .327; Tejada, Baltimore,
.322; .ARodriguez, New York, .317;
RoWhite, Detroit, .316; ISuzuki, Seattle,
.314.
RUNS-Damon, Boston, 81; Jeter,
New York, 77; ARodriguez, New York,
76; Teixeira, Texas, 75; ISuzuki, Seattle,
72; MYoung, Texas, 72; DOrtiz, Boston,
72.
RBI-MRamirez, Boston, 92;
DOrtiz, Boston, 87; Teixeira, Texas, 85;
Sexson, Seattle, 80; ARodriguez, New
York, 80; Sheffield, New York, 80;
Matsui, New'York, 78..
HITS-MYoung, Texas, 140;
Damon, Boston, 139; ISuzuki, Seattle,
133; Tejada, Baltimore, 132; Crawford,
Tampa Bay, 126; Lugo, Tampa Bay, 123;
BRoberts, Baltimore, 122.
DOUBLES-Tejada, Baltimore, 35;
BRoberts, Baltimore, 28; DOrtiz,
Boston, 28; Damon, Boston, 28;
Matsui, New York, 27; Mench, Texas,
27; ASoriano, Texas, 27.
TRIPLES-ISuzuki, Seattle, 10;
Crawford, Tampa Bay, 9; Sizemore,
Cleveland, 8; Inge, Detroit, 7; DeJesus,
Kansas City, 6; Figgins, Los Angeles, 6.
HOME RUNS-Teixeira, Texas, 28;
ARodriguez, New York, 28; MRamirez,
Boston, 28; ASoriano, Texas, 26;
Sexson, Seattle, 26; DOrtiz, Boston, 24;
Konerko, Chicago, 23. '
STOLEN BASES-Podsednik,
Chicago, 52; Figgins, Los Angeles, 35;
Crawford, Tampa Bay, 34; Lugo, Tampa
Bay, 30; ISuzuki, Seattle, 24; THunter,
Minnesota, 23; BRoberts, Baltimore,
20; Womack, New York, 20.
PITCHING (9 Decisions)-Crain,
Minnesota, 9-1, .900, 2.87; Garland,
Chicago, 15-4, .789, 3.09; Clement,
Boston, 10-3, .769, 4.43; Halladay,
Toronto, 12-4, .750, 2.41; Moyer,
Seattle, 9-3, .750, 4.33; CILee,
Cleveland, 11-4, .733, 3.95; Buehrle,
Chicago, 11-4, .733, 2.96; Rogers,
Texas, 11-4, .733, 2.77..
STRIKEOUTS-JoSantana,
Minnesota, 154; RaJohnson, New York,
142; Lackey, Los Angeles, 134;
Bonderman, Detroit, 113; Halladay,
Toronto, 108; Clement, Boston, 108;
DCabrera, Baltimore, 107.
SAVES-Nathan, Minnesota, 28;
MRivera, New York, 26; Wickman,
Cleveland, 26; . FRodriguez, Los
Angeles, 25; FCordero, Texas, 25;
Hermanson, Chicago, 23; Guardado,
Seattle, 23.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-DeLee, Chicago, .363;
MiCabrera, Florida, .350; Pujols, St.
Louis, .341; Alou, San Francisco, .331;
BClark, Milwaukee, .319; NJohnson,
Washington, .319; Utley, Philadelphia,
.317.
RUNS-Pujols, St. Louis, 84;
DeLee, Chicago, 81; MiCabrera, Florida,
74; Dunn, Cincinnati, 73; BClark,
Milwaukee, 71; BAbreu, Philadelphia,
70; Bay, Pittsburgh, 68.
RBI-CaLee, Milwaukee, 85; Pujols,
St. Louis, 83; DeLee, Chicago, 82;
AJones, Atlanta, 78; CDelgado, Florida,
77; Ensberg, Houston, 76; MiCabrera,
Florida, 75; ARamirez, Chicago, 75.
HITS-DeLee, Chicago, 138; BClark,
Milwaukee, 136; MiCabrera, Florida,
135; Pujols, St. Louis, 132; Reyes, New
York, 123; Rollins, Philadelphia, 118;
ARamirez, Chicago, 117.
DOUBLES-Bay, Pittsburgh, 32;
DeLee, Chicago, 31; Wilkerson,
Washington, 30; MGiles, Atlanta, 30;
MiCabrera, Florida, 29; BGiles, San
Diego, 29; Lowell, Florida, 28; Lawton,


Pittsburgh, 28; CDelgado, Florida, 28;
Biggio, Houston, 28.
TRIPLES-Reyes, New York, 11;
Pierre, Florida, 9; Furcal, Atlanta, 9;
Rollins, Philadelphia, 7; JWilson,
Pittsburgh, 6; BGiles, San Diego, 6.
HOME RUNS-DeLee, Chicago, 32;
AJones, Atlanta, 32; Dunn, Cincinnati,
30; Pujols, St. Louis, .28; Ensberg,
Houston, 27; ARamirez, Chicago, 27;
CaLee, Milwaukee, 25.
STOLEN BASES-Reyes, New York,
34; Pierre, Florida, 34; Furcal, Atlanta,
32; Freel, Cincinnati, 28; Taveras,
Houston, 27; Rollins, Philadelphi* 24;
,"BAbreu, Philadelphia, 23.vi;' n2
PITCHING (9 Decisidis),-~�aton,
San Diego, 9-2, .818, 3.42; PMartinez,
New York, 12-3, .800, 2.76; Carpenter,
St. Louis, 15-4, .789, 2.33;
LHernandez, Washington, 12-4, .750,
3.32; Morris, St. Louis, 11-4, .733,
.3.60; Mulder, St. Louis, 12-5, .706,
3.94; Willis, Florida, 14-6, .700, 3.07;
Prior, Chicago, 7-3, .700, 3.26.
STRIKEOUTS-PMartinez, New
York, 155; Peavy, San Diego, 146;
Carpenter, St. Louis, 145; BMyers,
Philadelphia, 135; JVazquez, Arizona,
131; Zambrano, Chicago, 128;
Clemens, Houston, 127.
SAVES-CCordero, Washington,
34; Isringhausen, St. Louis, 28;
Hoffman, San Diego, 27; Lidge,
Houston, 25; Mesa, Pittsburgh, 25;
BWagner, Philadelphia, 23; Looper,
New York, 22.


STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE


Connecticut 18 5 .783
Indiana 14 8 .636
Washington 12 12 .500
New York 11 11 .500
Detroit 8 12 .400
Charlotte 3 19 .136
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct
Sacramento 15 7 .682
Houston 14 9 .609
Seattle 12 10 .545
Los Angeles 11 10 .524
Minnesota 11 12 .478
Phoenix 10 12 .455
San Antonio 6 18 .250
Thursday's Games
Connecticut 73, New York 70
Washington 73, San Antonio 58
Friday's Games
Phoenix 69, Minnesota 65
Indiana 62, Washington 58
Seattle 79, Charlotte 68
Sacramento 79, Los Angeles 59
Saturday's Games
Detroit at Connecticut, 1 p.m.
San Antonio at Houston, 3 p.m.
Today's Games
Indiana at New York, 4 p.m.
Phoenix at Detroit, 5 p.m.


Los Angeles at Seattle, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
Connecticut at New York, 7:30
Sacramento at San Antonio, 8
Charlotte at Washington, 8
Detroit at Houston, 8:30
STANDINGS


Eastern Conference


,,C iicagp .,.
New England
D.C. United
Kansas City
MetroStars
Columbus


GF GA
35 31
33 19
27 21
31 26
31 26
17 28


Western Conference
W L T Pts GF GA
FC Dallas 10 5 4 34 34 25
San Jose 9 4 7 34 30 23
Los Angeles 8 7 5 29 25 23
Colorado 6 11 3 21 24 27
Real Salt Lake 4 11 4 16 18 35
CD Chivas USA 3 14 3 12 21 42
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
Saturday's Game
Fulham vs. MLS All-Stars at
Columbus, late
Saturday, Aug. 6
CD Chivas USA at Real Salt Lake, 6
p.m.
Kansas City at New England, 8 p.m.
D.C. United at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
MetroStars at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Columbus at San Jose, 10 p.m.
I 1~y B s.e y

14-YEAR-OLD WORLD SERIES
At Muscle Shoals, Ala.
Double-elimination
(All Times Eastern)
Saturday, Aug. 6
First Round
Arkansas vs. Virginia, 2 p.m.
Louisiana vs. Alabama, 2 p.m.
South Carolina vs. Mississippi, 5 p.m.
North Carolina vs. Tennessee, 5 p.m.
Avon Park vs. Georgia, 8 p.m.
Texas vs. Muscle Shoals (host), 8 p.m.

Sunday, Aug. 7
Second Round
Arkansas-Virginia loser vs. Louisiana-
Alabama loser, 2 p.m.
South Carolina-Mississippi loser vs.
North Carolina-Tennessee loser, 2 p.m.
Avon Park-Georgia loser vs. Texas-
Muscle Shoals loser, 5 p.m.
Arkansas-Virginia winner vs.
Louisiana-Alabama winner, 5 p.m.
South Carolina-Mississippi winner vs.
North Carolina-Tennessee winner, 8
p.m.
Avon Park-Georgia winner vs.
Texas-Muscle Shoals winner, 8 p.m.


We've Been Catching





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8 p.m. Tuesday Night Fights ................ . . . ESPN2

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SUNDAY
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GOLF -
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TUESDAY
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News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005 3D


OLD
Continued from 1D
I think a game-winning home
run in the bottom of the ninth
inning packs as much excite-
ment and drama as any sport,
and it is tough to think of a
more graceful act than an out-
fielder leaping at the fence to
rob the hitter of A home run.
I will admit that Major
League Baseball has declined in
popularity from the time of my
childhood. Basketball and foot-
ball have grown by leaps and
bounds.
Yet in spite of steroid scan-
dals, contracts for ridiculous
amounts of money and strug-
gling franchises, baseball con-
tinues to hold a spell over the
country.
Last fall's dramatic come-
back win by the Red Sox over
the Yankees was an example of
how good baseball can be. It
was an irresistible story.
When I was 10 years old, my
hometown team, the Detroit
Tigers, won their first pennant
in 23 years. We had missed the
pennant by just one game the
year before. In that 1968 World
Series, the St. Louis Cardinals
were heavily favored to win.
The Cards jumped out to a 3-1
lead but Detroit came back won
it in seven games.
I can still see the image of
Detroit catcher Bill Freehan
blocking the plate and tagging
out Lou Brock in Game 5. I bet
any Michigan sports fan from
that time can see Tigers pitcher
Mickey Lolich jumping into
Freehan's arms after Game 7.
Baseball does those things bet-
ter than any sport.
Son, I know you will talk
about all the basketball poles in
driveways and on garages. I
love basketball, too. Maybe you
will talk about how crazy NFL
fans can be for their Packers,
Chiefs, Bills, etc. You certainly
have a point there. I love both
of those sports, too.
But I believe that baseball
can capture people's attention
more than the others. I was very
fortunate to have a great team to
cheer for at an early age. If the
Devil Rays had that type of
team, I think this area would
embrace them just as much as it
did the Bucs or the Lightning.
If I could be commissioner
for a day, I would end World
Series games that begin at 9
* p.m. and finish when all school
kids and most working people
.are in bed. My next move
would be to even the financial
playing fields so more teams
can compete for a title. I might
even schedule Sunday double-
headers.
More kids in this country
would have a reason to experi-
ence a pennant race in
September. Baseball is every
day, and it shines brightest in
the final weeks of the season
when things can completely
turn around after your teams
sweeps a weekend series.
I would also like to see more
kids playing sandlot baseball. I
played lots. and lots of pick-up
games without adults. If we had
three players to a team, pitch-
er's mound was out for first and
you put in a magic second base
so you could bat again.
I loved playing in front yards
and grassy parks without back-
stops. I played once in a cow
pasture. I loved pounding my
fist into the glove and waiting
for the ball to be hit. I loved the
dirt, the grass and the sky.
Baseball is a great game.



NEW
Continued from ID
last time you saw a kid at the
park hitting out into the field
and then running out to get the
Balls and hitting them back
towards the backstop'?
You haven't! That is because
it doesn't happen anymore.
Kids are out playing basketball,
Volleyball, soccer, football,


shooting each other with paint-
- balls and figuring out how to
kill all the zombies and evil
agents on level seven of the
- newest video game.
Your generation, Dad, is
what has kept the game going
as well as it has. Your homes
are the ones buying tickets,
sporting your home team's cap,
staying up to watch the late-
night games, making documen-
taries and going to listen to
Billy Crystal give his one-man
baseball routine.
My generation - the ones
who are supposed to start filling
the minors leagues with talent,


Roller hockey champs


Courtesy photo
Sebring 14-year-olds Trevar Augustin (left) and Kyle Weed
(right), pictured with coach RJ. Mehrer, were part of the
Lakeland Sharks team that won the 17-under ASR Inline Roller
Hockey Tournament at J.P. Igloo in Ellenton July 15-17.
Augustin also received the Most Valuable Player trophy for the
final game as well as the Top Gun trophy for the entire tourna-
ment.


FOUR
Continued from 1D
game, and Duke struck out 12
in a complete-game win the
next night to set up Hicks and
Runner, the top two arms, for
,the rest of the tournament.
"We knew we were a step
ahead of everybody else,"
McIntyre said.
"It makes you feel pretty
good," Runner said. "You know
if you get some trouble, you've
got somebody to come in and
help you out."
Still, whether Avon Park will
use the backwards rotation in
the World Series or not has yet
to be determined.
"I don't know if I'll be able
to talk them into again, but we
may very well," McIntyre said.
"We may have to play 10
gpnes. We pmay only have to
play (five) games if we win
them' all, We've got to count on
everybody to be on top of their
game."
The readiness to compete is
what unlocks the team's poten-
tial, McIntyre insists.
"If everybody's, on, I don't
think there's another team that
will have the pitching that we
have - if everybody's on their
game," he said.
Yet the pitchers will have to
find their groove without the
services of regular catcher Kyle
Jackson, whose has a knee
injury that will prevent him


TOUR
Continued from 1D
Boys 13-14 leader Austin
Smith also helped his case for the
title Saturday, shooting a 79 to
take a four-stroke lead over sec-
ond-place Greg Gentry. Colin
Walkup had a similar day in the
11-12 division, shooting a group-
leading nine-hole 48 while sit-
ting on a four-point lead. Brian
Dixon shot a nine-hole 72 in the
9-10 age group to protect his
lead, too.
In the boys 6-8 group, Jhett
See shot just two strokes better
than Silas Berry on Saturday.
Both See and Berry entered atop
the standings with 80 points, and


the stands with fans and the
pockets of all those involved -
doesn't care. We would rather
watch a game that is fast-paced
and a game that is on when you
are conscious and not at work.
The teenage dream for most
is not to make the majors. It is
to play basketball, football, get
in the X Games and, dare I say,
to be a pro paintballer.
Ask a 100 people who
Shaquille O'Neal is and 100
who Derek Jeter is, and my
guess is Shaq is going to dunk it
all over Jeter's face. Better yet,
ask Mom who Derek Jeter is or
who Shaq is. Who do you think
she will know?
Basketball and football are
king, and may they live long
and prosper. Baseball had its
chance. It was the ruler when
you were a kid. You had the
names -- Mantle, Mays,
Clemente, Rose and so many
more - but that was then, this
is now. Ken Bums can make
movies that make it seem like
baseball was the pillar of
America for the last 100 years


from getting behind the plate
and also from taking a turn on
the mound.
"They said that the damage
was from catching for the last
five years. Catching is out,
pitching is out," McIntyre said.
"Anything else he can do, and
we've already seen that it does-
n't bother his hitting."
Jackson's presence in the
lineup may be enough in and of
itself. While Avon Park suf-
fered its only loss after he was
hurt, the team rebounded the
very same night, with Jackson
going 3-for-3, to win the state
championship.
Despite the rare collection of
pitchers, McIntyre still sees his
hitters as the team's strongest
weapons.
"They can put anybody they
want to out there, and if every-
body's playing ball, we're
going to get some runs, we're
going to hit the ball," the coach
said. "Then, that's when you
fall on your pitching and your
defense, and just keep them
from getting as many as you
get.
"Because we're going to
score some runs. We're going
to hit the ball."
Ultimately, though, the arms
will be the difference.
"I've been doing this for 25
years, on and off, and if you
don't have pitching, you don't
have anything," McIntyre said.


McClurg said anything can hap-
pen today.
"Five, six shots can be made
up real quick with the little
guys," he said.
If that's true, Sarah Liles is
still strongly in contention in the
girls 9-10 group despite trailing
Sarah Liles by six strokes in the
tournament and four points in the
standings.
Camiel White, however,
knows precisely what she must
do to protect her lead in the girls
11-13 group, since second-place
Rachael Blocker completed both
of her rounds Saturday. White
holds a 16-point lead in the
standings and shot a nine-hole 46
compared to Blocker's 121 18-
hole score.


and that it is the game that God
personally gave to man, but that
is, dare I say it, just the movies.
The Red Sox story last year
was great, but what kind of
sport is it where a team wins a
championship and then loses its
best pitcher? A stupid one that
is what. Did you hear Tim
Duncan or Tom Brady talking
about going to the Nuggets or
Lions?
The greatest irony is the
game that prided itself on loyal-
ty, on hometown fans and play-
ers that stayed with one team
for a career is now the sport
with the least loyalty of all. It
seems every player has his
price, championship teams are
bought, not born, people are
willing to cheat to get ahead
and no one gives a rip about
their home team.
We still call them baseball
caps, but the crown has been
passed on. Baseball may be
classic, but that is about all it
has going for it, and the makers
of eight-track tapes will tell you
classic isn't enough.


Our Lake Istokpoga just a puddle


when compared to Lake Superior


We have a huge lake here in
Highlands County covering
more than 28,000 acres. Lake
Istokpoga is four miles wide
and 11 miles long, but those
measurements pale when com-
pared with a lake in the north-
ern boundary of our country.
I was a little surprised to
learn that Lake Superior is the
largest lake in the world. The
northern shores of Lake
Superior lie in Canada while
the states of Michigan,
Wisconsin and Minnesota form
its southern banks.
This huge, beautiful lake is
350 miles long and 160 miles
wide.
Larger than some small
countries', it is so huge that it
actually makes its own weath-
er. Fishermen don't take out
across this lake in small boats
because the lake does at times
produce squalls that rival those
of the north Atlantic.
Violent storms rake the
waters during the fall and
fierce winter blizzards bury
shorelines beneath lake-effect
snows. Just a few winters back,
more than 32 feet of snow fell
on Michigan's Keweenaw
Peninsula.
One of those fierce storms
- with waves 35 feet high -
sank an iron ore carrier, the
Edmund Fitzgerald, on the
night of Nov. 9, 1975. Sailing
from Superior, Wisc., and
bound for Detroit carrying
more than 26,000 tons of
taconite pellets, she disap-
peared with her crew of 29. At
the time the Edmund
Fitzgerald, measuring 729 feet,
was the largest ship on the


OUTDOORS

Lloyd Jones

Great Lakes.
Superior averages almost
500 feet in depth and contains
nearly 3,000 cubic miles of
water. Lake Baikal in Russia
holds more water due to its
greater depth, but its surface
area is much smaller than Lake
Superior.
All of this may sound omi-
nous, but there are many good
things about this,lake. The
fishing is great and the fish are
plentiful and large.
Smallmouth bass roam its
warmer areas in protected bays
and shallow waters.
Spinnerbaits, jigs and most
other bass baits will take these
bronze beauties.
Big walleyes also inhabit the
lake. Trolling in Duluth harbor,
Whitefish Bay or the St.
Mary's River is the method
used to put huge walleyes in
the livewell. They are not
found all over the lake but usu-
ally in deep bays and near
warm water rivers all year
long.
Lake Superior has quite an
array of game fish including
lake trout, whitefish, steelhead


and chinook salmon. There are
so many ways to catch these
large silvery tackle busters.
There isn't room here to
describe each method, but all
can be taken by either trolling
or casting spoons and plugs.
Whitefish and trout can be
taken while bait fishing with
salmon eggs or worms.
I got a chance to fish on
Lake Superior some 40 years
ago while I was visiting my
younger brother, who lived
near Moose Lake, Mirin. We
put his boat in from a state
park north of the city of
Duluth.
I remember the weather was
nice and a cool breeze blew
across the lake from the north-
west. The water was calm as
we drifted and trolled lines
baited with night crawlers.
No huge trout or salmon
took our bait. We did manage
to catch three northern pike
(which we released) and a cou-
ple of 20-inch walleyes.
We spent the next few days
on some of the local lakes and
caught several good-sized
walleyes.
We caught so many northern
pike that they were just a nui-
sance. We released all of them
to go bother someone else.
I don't think I will be fish-
ing Lake Superior again, but if
you take your vacation up that
way, I know you will enjoy the
sites and the fishing on this
beautiful giant of a lake.


E-mail your outdoors stories and
pictures to Lloyd Jones at
lfonesl@tnni.net.


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4D News-Sun, Sunday, July 31, 2005


College Football . .

Winston back, healthy and on 1 � -


a mission to lead Hurricanes


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press
CORAL GABLES - He already was good.
Really good. Experts touted him as a high first-
round NFL draft pick this past spring.
A serious knee injury put those pro plans on
hold. Now, Eric Winston is back to prove he's
better than ever.
Miami's left tackle is healthy and cleared to
participate when the Hurricanes open camp on
Aug. 8, when he'll start his mission to regain -
or exceed - the form that left scouts drooling
and opponents leery.
"If I would have not gotten hurt, I would have
been top five in the draft, gotten a ton of money
and I would have been some little kid with $20
million in my bank account and probably doing
something stupid right now," the 6-foot-7, 310-
pound Winston said. "Getting hurt kind of puts
everything back in perspective."
Winston's 2004 season ended eight games
early because of three torn ligaments in his left
knee, an injury that probably played a major role
in Miami's three-loss campaign - one in which
the Hurricanes failed to reach a Bowl
Championship Series game for the first time
since 1999.
It happened early in the fourth quarter of
Miami's 27-3 win at Georgia Tech last Oct. 2. A
missed block on the right side of the line allowed
Georgia Tech linebacker Chris Reis an unimped-
ed path to Miami quarterback Kyle Wright, who
tumbled to the turf in Reis' grasp.
Winston fell backward over Wright and shred-
ded his knee.
Season over, just like that.
"What happened with Eric took the wind out
of the coaches' sails and the team's sails that
day," Miami coach Larry Coker said. "We were
pretty down as a staff and as a football team for
quite a while. ... No doubt, we struggled offen-
sively without him. With Eric, things might have
been different."
With him, they were 4-0 and ranked No. 4 in
the nation. Without him, they went 5-3, each loss
coming by a touchdown or less - and in games
in which they certainly could have benefited
from having their best lineman, and perhaps their
best leader, on the field instead of the sideline.
Inability to run the ball was a consistent thread
in each of Miami's losses a year ago. The
Hurricanes averaged just 2.8 yards per carry in
defeats to Clemson, North Carolina and Virginia
Tech. In the games in which Winston was in the
lineup, Miami averaged 4.2 yards per carry.
"He's such a physical player. ... He makes
those backs. a lot better when he's in the ball
game," said Mickey Andrews, Florida State's
- longtime defensive coordinator. "You can't let
him get his hands on you. He's a great leader on
top of it. That might be the most significant con-
tribution to the team."
The leadership is visible on the field, in meet-
ing rooms and in the weight room - but the best
example Winston sets may be in the classroom.
He was an international finance and marketing


ASSOCIATED PRESS
University of Miami left tackle Eric Winston feels
compelled to silence any doubters as he comes
back from a knee injury.
major who finished his degree in three years, yet
isn't fixated on the millions that await him.
"Money can't buy happiness," he said. "To me,
the only thing it buys is freedom. You can do
whatever you want."
His goals are very simple, yet very lofty.
He wants to win a national championship -
not a day passes, he says, that he doesn't spend
time lamenting Miami's 31-24 double-overtime
loss to Ohio State in the BCS title game follow-
ing the 2002 season - and play well enough to
go No. 1 overall in the draft.
"No two ways about it," Winston said. "I
expect to be the top guy taken."
He pauses for a moment and shakes an index
finger toward his knee.
"This thing's not going to hold me back," he
added. "If I'm not there, it's not because of this.
It's because I didn't play good enough. And
whether or not that's going to be the case, it's not
going to be because I haven't worked hard
enough to do this."
Indeed, it wasn't unusual to see Winston arrive
for workouts at 6:30 a.m. this summer, beginning
a several-hour period of sprints, stair runs,
weightlifting and other exercises.
He has blossomed into one of the nation's best,
and vows to be better than ever in his final colle-
giate season.
"I started playing in full pads when I was in
third grade, 9 years old," Winston said. "Every
kid, this is where they want to get to. I've out-
lasted about 98 percent of them. Now it's time to
finish them off. I've always had goals. I've never
not gotten to them - and I've got two or three to
finish off this year."


I I I I


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