Citation
Suwannee Democrat

Material Information

Title:
Suwannee Democrat
Place of Publication:
Live Oak, FL
Publisher:
Suwannee Democrat, Myra Regan - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
Coordinates:
30.294444 x -82.985833 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note:
Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Suwannee Democrat, J.E. Pound publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000398954 ( ALEPH )
33273856 ( OCLC )
ACE4563 ( NOTIS )
sn 95026787 ( LCCN )
95026788 ( lccn )
33273861 ( oclc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by:
Suwannee leader
Preceded by:
Suwannee citizen

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This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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Midweek Edition August 8, 2018 Suwannee Democrat rf Serving Suwannee County since 1884, including Live Oak, Wellborn, Dowling Park, Branford, McAlpin and OBrien www.suwanneedemocrat.com SEE SCHOOL, PAGE 10A SEE WRECK, PAGE 10A rf 122516-1 ntb nntn tbn bn t tn b r Freds closed after bomb scare LIVE OAK The Live Oak Freds store was closed Monday evening after a bomb scare. According to Suwannee County Sheriff Sam St. John, what sounded to be a young female called the store around 6:30 p.m. and said there was a homemade bomb in the back of the store. When the employee asked who the caller was, the caller hung up, according to St. John. Members of the Live Oak Police Depart ment, Live Oak Fire Department, Suwannee County Fire Rescue and SCSO responded and conducted a search throughout the build ing. St. John said no bomb was located. You cant take things like this lightly, St. John said. St. John said authorities left the decision on whether to reopen the store Monday night to store ofcials. rfntnnbr rfnrnf f ffntffbrrf jamie.wachter@ganews.com LIVE OAK The crowd that descended upon Suwannee High School on Saturday re ceived more than just backpacks and school supplies. While the book bags and supplies helped at tract nearly 1,000 students and their parents, the Back To School Bash also hopes to spread the message of Christ, according to Wayne Gods mark of Christ Central, who helped found the event 15 years ago. The good news wed like to share today is that Jesus Christ is the Son of God, who came to this world to save all of us from our sins, so that we can have this relationship with God, Godsmark said as he delivered a message to the crowded SHS auditorium. Gods love has transformed my life. He has brought me great joy, happiness and peace. But in addition to the message, Godsmark said the other purpose is to show Gods love to others. Our purpose was a tangible expression of Gods love, Godsmark said about the reasoning behind starting the event, which was Christ Cen trals rst community outreach project. School is starting and theyve got clothes, shoes, hair cuts, backpacks, school supplies, all of that. We cant meet all of those needs, but we thought we could do something. When the Back To School Bash rst began, Godsmark said it drew around 350 people. Through partnering with the Suwannee Coa Lake City man critically injured in wreck WELLBORN A two-vehicle accident near Suwan nee Correctional Institution left a Lake City man with life-threatening injuries Sunday evening. According to the Florida Highway Patrol, 38-year-old Meliton Martin Perez, of Lake City, was headed east on U.S. Highway 90 at 5:10 p.m. when his Ford Explorer veered through the westbound lane for unknown reasons f ffffnbnrrn nnnrnfnnnnt Live Oak man accused of setting LIVE OAK A Live Oak man was arrested Friday after allegedly setting his ex-girlfriend on re. According to a Suwannee County Sher iffs Ofce, the victim walked outside her residence in western Suwannee County around 1 a.m. Friday to smoke a cigarette when the suspect, 27-year-old Philip James Pettey, approached her, throwing gas on her and using a lighter to set her on re. The victim and suspect share a child, ac cording to the report. The report states that when authorities arrived, the victim was in the shower crying and trying to put water on her injuries. According to the SCSO, the victim suffered burns on her chest, arms and neck and her hair was partially burned. Suwannee County Sheriff Sam St. John said an accelerant detection canine from the states Bureau of Fire, Arson and Explosives Investigations did alert that an accelerant was on the victims clothes. He added the clothes were sent to the State Fire Marshals ofce to determine what was the accelerant used. Suwannee County Fire Rescue transported the victim to UF Health Shands Hospital in Gainesville. SCFR personnel said the victim suffered third-degree burns on her chest. St. John said ofcers were still hoping to interview the victim Tuesday afternoon to gather more information leading up to the incident. Pettey was charged with aggravated battery. He was arrested Friday afternoon but has since been released on bail. f t rfnfnntnb t rnrnb nft

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AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 Advertising Manager, Monja Slater ext. 105 Sr. Advertising Representative, Bill Regan, ext. 150 Advertising Representative,Ashley Hingson, ext. 103 Advertising Representative,Samantha Smith, ext. 141 Classified/Legal, Louise Sheddan ext. 102 Telesales Ad Representative, Ninan Rogers, ext. 109The Suwannee Democrat, ublished Wednesday and Friday. Periodicals postage paid at Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located at 521 Demorest St. SE, Live Oak, FL. Publication number 530180. The Jasper News, published every Thursday. Periodicals postage paid at Live Oak, FL 32064. Business locat ed at 521 Demorest St. SE, Live Oak, FL. USPS #755-980. The Mayo Free Press, published every Thursday. Periodicals postage paid at Live Oak, FL 32064. Business locat ed at 521 Demorest St. SE, Live Oak, FL. USPS #334-600. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Suwannee Democrat, Jasper News or Mayo Free Press, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064. Subscribe online at www. suwanneedemocrat.com.Letters, comments and opinions on the Opinion page are not necessarily those of the management/ownership of the Suwannee Democrat, The Jasper News and the Mayo Free Press.LETTERS TO THE EDITORLetters may be mailed, faxed or emailed to our office. All letters are read. Not all letters are published. Letters may be edited to fit available space. The editor should not alter the writers point of view. Well written letters require less editing. Keep it to the point, an ideal range is 150 to 200 words. Please include your name, address and day and evening phone numbers for verification. Letters MUST be signed. Letters to the editor can be limited to one letter per quarter per individual. Suwannee Democrat The Jasper News Mayo Free Press HOW TO REACH US Switchboard, 386-362-1734 Fax, 386-364-5578 Email, nf.editorial@gaflnews.com Mail, P.O. Box 370 Live Oak, FL 32064 Office, 521 Demorest St. SE Publisher, Jeff Masters jmasters@cnhi.com General Manager, Monja Slater ext. 105 CONTACT US WITH YOUR COMMENTSIf you have any questions or concerns, call us at 386-362-1734 or visit our Website at www.suwanneedemocrat.com NEWSROOM Editor, Jamie Wachter ext. 131 Reporter, Jessie Box ext. 130 Sports, Mike Jones ext. 133 ADVERTISING Suwannee Democrat Circulation Subscription Rates, In-county, $35 Out-of-county, $50 Jasper News Circulation Subscription Rates, In-county, $18 Out-of-county, $26 Mayo Free Press Circulation Subscription Rates, In-county, $18 Out-of-county, $26 OFFICE HOURS Open Monday Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. CIRCULATION RANT & RAVE HOTLINEHeres your chance to tell everyone what you think! Callers may dial 208-8314 and leave a message to express their thoughts, good or bad, 24/7 about issues and politics, but not about private indi viduals or businesses. If you prefer, you may email your comments to jamie. wachter@gaflnews.com. Your name is not required, but you must adhere to no more than 200 words. Rant & Rave only publishes in the weekend Suwannee Democrat. SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 2A Suwannee Democrat prints the entire ar rest record each week. If your name appears here and you are later found not guilty or the charges are dropped, we will be happy to make note of this in the newspaper when judicial proof is presented to us by you or the authori ties. The following abbreviations are used be low: SCSO-Suwannee County Sheriffs Ofce LOPD-Live Oak Police Department FDLE-Florida Department of Law Enforce ment FHP-Florida Highway Patrol FWC-Florida Wildlife Commission DOT-Department of Transportation OALE-Ofce of Agricultural Law Enforce ment P & P-Probation and Parole USMS-US Marshals Service ATF-Department of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms DOC-Department of Corrections Aug. 2, Joshua Davis Traub, 28, 3690 SW itchetucknee Ave., Lake City, FL, Probation Vi olation: SCSO-Hunter Aug. 2, Marcus Kevron Burch, 33, 968 Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL, False ID Given to LEO, Retail Theft-Shoplifting, Grand Theft: SC SO-Roberts Aug. 2, Jeffery Scott Crowson, 32, 20264 33rd Road, Wellborn, FL, Probation Violation: SCSO-Tompkins Aug. 2, Tomas Alejandro Cortes-Johnson, 18, 5296 91st Place, Live Oak, FL, Burglary, Grand Theft, Deal In Stolen Property: SCSO-Wadford Aug. 2, Anthony Hernandez-Valdes, 31 16 Paradise Dr., Hasting, NE, Possession of Canna bis Under 20 Grams: LOPD-Chauncey Aug. 2, Thomas James Quinn Jr., 53, 12705 72nd Terr., Live Oak, FL, Probation Violation: SCSO-Fleming Aug. 2, Jacob Joseph Winters, 33, 807 SW Blaylock Ct., Lake City, FL, Failure To Appear: SCSO-Hunter Aug. 3, Philip James Pettey, 27, 14894 221st Road, Live Oak, FL, Aggravated Battery-Cause Bodily Harm or Disability: SCSO-Thakor Aug. 3, Steven trent Wingett, 36, 22043 45th Drive, Lake City, FL, Withhold Support: SC SO-Hedgespeth Aug. 3, Lee Elliott Wilson, 21, 3575 196th Terrace, Wellborn, FL, Simple Battery (DV): LOPD-Rhoden Aug. 3, Ernest Lamar Hurley, 41, 9801 CR 136, Live Oak, FL, Out of County Warrant: SC SO-Harmon Aug. 3, Aron Alonso-Espinoza, 35, 6th St., Live Oak, FL, Disturbing Peace, Trespassing of Structure/Conveyance: LOPD-Nicholson Aug. 4, Andron Martinas Baldon, 35, 966 Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL, DWLS/R: FHP-Her nandez Aug. 5, Adam Lee Mandeville, 4123 28th Terrace, Branford, FL, Possession of Controlled Substance, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia: SCSO-Stout Aug. 5, Joshua Jer Vonn Butler, 27, 2806 Hoffman, Orlando, FL, Evidence Tampering/ Destroying, Resisting Arrest Without Violence: SCSO-Stout Aug. 5, Adam Roy Draper, 33, 10991 192nd Terr., OBrien, FL, Hold For Other Reason: SC SO-Williams Aug. 5, Marshaia Floredith Acree, 18, 618 Webb Dr., Live Oak, FL, Aggravated Assault With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill: LOPD-Nicholson Arrest Record Hamilton County Arrest Record Editors note: The Jas per News prints the entire arrest record. If your name appears here and you are later found not guilty or the charges are dropped, we will be happy to make note of this in the newspaper when judicial proof is presented to us by you or the authorities. The following abbrevia tions are used below: DAC Department of Agriculture Commission DOA Department of Agriculture DOT Department of Transportation FDLE Florida Depart ment of Law Enforcement FHP Florida Highway Patrol FWC Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission HCDTF Hamilton County Drug Task Force HCSO Hamilton Coun ty Sheriffs Ofce ICE Immigration and Custom Enforcement JAPD Jasper Police Department JNPD Jennings Police Department OALE Ofce of Agri cultural Law Enforcement P&P Probation and Parole SCSO Suwannee County Sheriffs Ofce WSPD White Springs Police Department July 30, Bobby Jarmard Satchel, 37, 3607 Highland Ave., Fort Myers, FL, Cocaine Possession, Out of County Warrant: DOAMack July 31, Blaze A., Sac chi, 26, 2340 SW 17th Dr., Deereld Beach, FL, Possession of Controlled Substance Without Pre scription: DOA-Porter July 31, Fernando Pe rez, 26, 3866 19th St., Cleveland, OH, Possession of Controlled Substance Without Prescription: DOA-Williams July 31, Jesus David Rivera, 41, 9879 Morris Glenn Way, Tampa, FL, Possession of Controlled Substance Without Pre scription, Marijuana Possession, Narcotic Equipment Possession: DOA-Mack July 31, Demetrice A. Boone, 36, 3290 NW 43rd Place, Oakland, FL, Out of County Warrant: DOA-Buckles July 31, Larry Clyburn, 37, 1475 Bennett Road, Fort Pierce, FL, Possession of Controlled Substance Without Prescription, Mar ijuana Possession, Narcotic Equipment Possession: DOA-Buckles Aug. 1, Dany Ray Dun away, 39, 2355 NW 99th Ave., Jasper, FL, Warrant: HCSO-Burnam Aug. 1, George Anthony Cruse, 43, 520 Cope Creek Road., Sylva, NC, Failure To Appear: HCSO-Jackson Aug. 1, Dekeondris Shunquez Taylor, 10447 Kendrick St., White Springs, FL, Resisting Ofce With Violence, Narcotic Equipment Pos session, Possession of Controlled Substance: WSPD-Anderson Aug. 2, Bertha Lee Daniels, 53, 1451 Berry St., Jennings, FL, Proba tion Violation 2x: HCSO Aug. 2, Ronald Ran dolph Claridy, 19, 310 SW 5th Ave., Jasper, FL, Burglary of Dwelling or Structure Causing over $1000 Damage, Contrib uting to the Delinquency of Minor, Larceny, Tres passing: JAPD-Harris Aug. 3, Anthony Jessie Stewart, 21, 11099 38th St., Jasper, FL, Burglary of Dwelling or Structure Causing over $1000 Dam age, Contributing to the Delinquency of Minor, Larceny: JAPD-Harris Aug. 3, Lauryn Ash leigh Jones, 29, 5722 Pinecrest Road, Live Oak, FL, DWLS/R: JAPD-Rickerson Aug. 3, William Robert Webb, 33, 3983 NW CR 150, Jasper, FL, Bond Re voked: HCSO-Fraley Aug. 3, Jody Ray En nis, 33, 6712 Coronet Court, Lakeland, FL, Out of County Warrant: DOA-Buckles Aug. 4, Lionell Thomas Nelson, 30, 2030 Shady Ln., Tucker, GA, Posses sion of Controlled Sub stance Without Prescrip tion, Marijuana Posses sion, Narcotic Equipment Possession: DOA-Young Aug. 4, Christopher Javon Hawkins, 27, 1386 Berry St., Jennings, FL, Battery (DV): JNPD-Rob inson Aug. 5, Alexandra Ma rie Duran, 30, 1099 Mary St., Jennings, FL, Battery (DV): JNPD-Robinson Aug. 5, Christopher Michael Duran 22, 6291 24 Ct., Hialeah, FL, Fail to Stop at Ag Station, Possession of Controlled Substance Without Pre scription, Marijuana Possession, Narcotic Equipment Possession: DOA-Porter Aug. 5, Anthony Alber to, 34, 15451 SW 302nd St., Leisure City, FL, Resiting Ofcer Without Violence, Possession of Controlled Substance Without Prescription, Narcotic Equipment Pos session, Out of County Warrant: DOA-Porter Aug. 5, Nicole Katrice Newton, 34, 1515 Matin Luther King Road, Jas per, FL, Bond Revoked: HCSO Aug. 5, Joseph Tris ton Dyal, 20, 2245 NW 30th Place, Jennings, FL, Possession of Controlled Substance: JAPD-Harris $ 699 $ 699 $ 699 Your Choice! 112010-1 Election security grants approved for local counties TALLAHASSEE Forty-nine Florida counties had Election Security Grants approved last month, including Hamilton, Lafayette and Suwannee. Following Gov. Rick Scotts direction to the De partment of State to draw down $19 million in feder al funding for securing Floridas elections, Secretary of State Ken Detzner approved and submitted nearly $10.3 million in the election security grants July 27 to Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis office. Lafayette County was approved to receive $55,743 in funding while Suwannee County will receive $76,246 in funding. Hamilton County was approved for $59,700. According to Lafayette County Supervisor of Elec tion Travis Hart, the funds received will be used to purchase electronic poll registers to prevent double voting, buying and installing an off-site server and hiring an IT professional to implement the new offsite server and the on-site server purchased earlier this year. With the help of this grant, we will be able to upgrade our office equipment and further harden our election systems against a cyber threat, Hart said. It will also allow us, in the event of an equipment malfunction or failure, to have backups in place to resume the continuity of operations instantaneously. The electronic poll registers will be implemented for the Nov. 6 General Election. According to Suwannee County Supervisor of Elections Glenda Williams, their funds will be used to upgrade the computer security including a fire wall update and relocating their backup server off site. Security upgrades will also be done to the office itself including two-factor authentication locks on the doors and a security system. We are very happy the state was able to get the money to us to prepare for the 2018 elections, Wil liams said. Applications from the remaining Florida counties will be reviewed and approved in the coming days, according to Scotts office. As Florida prepares for the upcoming election, nothing is more important than our work to ensure secure elections, Scott said in a release. This fund ing will help local Supervisors of Elections enhance their security so they can administer another smooth round of voting. I want to thank Secretary Detzner and the team at the Department of State, the Florida Legislature and CFO Jimmy Patronis for expediting this important funding. WELLBORN A forum for the four candidates for the District 4 seat on the county commissions is scheduled for next week. The forum is slated for Thursday, Aug. 16, at 7 p.m. at the Wellborn Community Association building at 1340 8th Ave. in Wellborn. The four candidates running for the spot on the Suwannee County Board of County Commissioners are Jesse Caruthers, Philip Oxendine, Len Stapleton and Harry Kin Weaver. All four will have the opportuni ty to address those in attendance and the voters at the forum also will be able to ask questions of the commission hopefuls. The commission seat will be decided in the Aug. 28 election. For more information about the forum, please call 386-963-1157. Political forum scheduled for Wellborn WELLBORN The Florida Highway Patrol is investigating a crash early Sunday morning that killed a Trenton man. According to an FHP report, 27-year-old Jus tin James Wooddell was driving north on County Road 137 near 172nd Street around 1:30 a.m. when he failed to negoti ate a right curve. That caused the Ford F150 pickup to overturn on the west shoulder and strike a utility pole, the report states. Wooddell was flown to UF Health Shands Hospital in Gainesville, where he was pro nounced deceased. Trenton man killed in crash

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AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 3A T ravis Henr y, AAMS Financial Advisor 123 Howard Street Liv e Oak, FL 32064 386-364-1657 tra vis .henr y@edw ardjones .com www .edw ardjones .com How Can You Help Your Kids Pay for College? is article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor. FINANCIAL FOCUS Its still summer, but were getting close to a new school year. One day, though, back-to-school will mean o to college for your children. Will you be nancially prepared to help your kids cope with the costs of higher education? Your rst step, of course, is to know what youre up against, so here are some numbers: For the 201718 academic year, college costs (tuition, fees, room and board) were, on average, nearly $21,000 for in-state students at four-year, public schools and nearly $47,000 for students attending private colleges or universities, according to the College Board. And you can probably expect even bigger price tags in the years to come. To help prepare for these costs, you might want to consider putting your money in a vehicle specically designed to help build assets for college, such as a 529 education savings plan. All withdrawals from 529 plans are free from federal income taxes as long as the beneciary youve named uses the money for qualied college, trade school or graduate school expenses. Withdrawals for expenses other than qualied education expenditures may be subject to federal, state and penalty taxes on the earnings portion of your plan. (However, tax issues for 529 savings plans can be complex, so please consult your tax advisor before investing.) You can generally invest in the 529 savings plan oered by any state, but if you invest in your own states plan, you may be able to claim a tax deduction or receive a tax credit. By starting your 529 plan early, when your children are just a few years old, the investments within the plan have more time for potential growth. Plus, you can make smaller contributions each year, rather than come up with big lump sums later on. A 529 plan is not the only education-savings tool you can use, but it has proven eective for many people. Yet you may also want to consider ways to keep college costs down in the rst place. For one thing, your children may be eligible for various forms of nancial aid. Some types of aid depend on your familys income, but others, such as merit-based scholarships, are open to everyone. But you dont have to wait until you get an oer from a schools nancial aid oce you can explore some opportunities on your own. For example, many local and national civic and religious groups oer scholarships to promising young people, and your own employer may even provide some types of grants or assistance. Plus, your state also may oer other benets, such as nancial aid or scholarship funds. It can certainly take some digging to nd these funding sources, but the eort can be worthwhile. Heres another option for reducing college costs: Consider sending your child to a local community college for two years to get many of the general requirements out of the way before transferring to a four-year school for a bachelors degree. Community colleges are typically quite aordable, and many of them oer high-quality programs. A college degree is costly, but many people feel its still a great investment in their childrens future. And by taking the appropriate steps, you can help launch that investment. 121839-1 Check out these reviews and others on the product pages at STIHLdealers.com. STIHLdealers.com All prices are DSRP. Available at participating dealers while supplies last. The actual listed guide bar length may vary from the effective cutting length based on which powerhead it is installed on. 2017 STIHL00 bar Im glad I went with the 170--the price and reliability are outstanding. user prutsmanbros93MS 170 CHAIN SAW This is absolutely the best blower I have ever purchased. It is a great piece of equipment for the price, plus with the STIHL name, it has dependability I can count on. user TL805 BG 50 HANDHELD BLOWER $12995 FS 38 GAS TRIMMERFSA 45 BATTERY TRIMMERLightweight trimmer just 7.3 lbs. with AK 10 batteryNEW! FSA 56 BATTERY-POWERED T R I M M ER Includes AK 10 battery and AL 101 charger. NEW BGA 56 BATTE RY-POWERED H A N D HELD B L O W E RIncludes AK 20 battery and AL 101 charger. Lightweight handheld blower just 7.3 lbs. with AK 20 battery Johns Lawn Equipment 386-362-5020 122643-1 Open Mic Night returns to the SOSMP LIVE OAK Its time for another Open Mic Night with Lyndie. Open Mic Night returns to the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park on Friday night with Lonely Highway Band play ing Saturday. For those who havent signed up for a live stage performance during Open Mic Night with Lyndie, nows the time. Lyndie Burris, a former Nashville artist who lives in Orange Park now, keeps the music going all evening at this pop ular event. Lyndie will perform onstage along with North Florida and South Georgia artists who love to entertain. To take part, contact Lyndie Burris at Lyndie@Lyndieonline.com. This is a laid back, beautiful evening where solo and duo musicians, singers and those who just want to hear some great music all come together to enjoy an evening of music and a dancing. It was previously announced Cole Tom linson would be a special guest. How ever, due to circumstances beyond his control, Tomlinson will not attend. Saturday evening will feature the Lonely Highway Band of Jacksonville on stage. This is a six-piece country band with the desire to be heard in every home in America. This energetic band can be heard on iTunes, Spotify and other popu lar music avenues. Lonely Highway will bring some serious country dancing mu sic to the Music Hall when they take the stage. Doors to the Music Hall open Friday and Saturday at 6 p.m. for dinner. Bands begin playing at 8 p.m. Admission is free. JASPER The Hamil ton County Clerks Ofce is warning residents of a jury duty scam. According to the release, the person calls at random and states to the person that answers that they have failed to report for jury duty in Hamilton County and there is a warrant out for their arrest and in order to clear the warrant you must pay $600 over the phone immediately. This person may also try to bully persons into providing Social Security Numbers, credit card infor mation, and other conden tial information that could be used for identity theft. According to the report, the person has identied himself as Ofcer Jeffery Aubrey to some. Any contact from the Hamilton County Clerks Ofce or Hamilton County Sheriffs Ofce, by phone, regarding Jury Duty will not require payment of nes nor requests for per sonal information. If you are contacted by a jury scammer, write down the phone number as it appears on your phone and anything that you can remember that the person says and contact the Ham ilton County Sheriffs Of ce at 386-792-2004. If you ever have any questions related to Jury Service, you can call the Clerks Ofce at 386-7921288. Hamilton County Clerk warns of jury scam Heavy rains increase ooding risks LIVE OAK Rainfall across the Suwannee Valley has increased lev els in the aquifer across much of the 15-county region of the Suwannee Riv er Water Management District and the springs and rivers are owing; but so is water in the streets in some areas. The SRWMD is warning residents to be prepared as we move into what is typically the most active months of the year for tropical weather. Water levels are the highest they have been for many years in some areas of the District, said Fay Baird, senior hydrologist with the district. If our area receives a tropical storm or heavy rainfall event, ooding in many low areas across the District could be signicant. Many areas throughout the SRW MD have experienced much higher than average rainfall during the past two months. Areas in Dixie and Levy counties have received almost 40 inch es of rain over the past three months, compared to a long-term average of approximately 18 inches for that same time period. Communities in Alachua, Levy and Dixie counties have already experi enced localized ooding, particularly in low-lying areas of the counties. Additionally, river-level forecasts on the Santa Fe River are already at minor ood stages, although water levels are currently expected to recede before sig nicant ooding occurs. Because of all the rain, there is little ability for the landscape to absorb more water. This can result in ooding. In many areas of the SRWMD, the only solution is for the water to move to another place, recede, evaporate or per colate into the ground. Historically, August and September are the months in which the district is most likely to have widespread rain from tropical systems. But even if there is no tropical weather over the next few weeks, summer thunderstorms can create local downpours. Under those conditions local ooding can happen very quickly especially when an area is already saturated. Residents in low lying areas and those along rivers and streams should be thinking NOW about what they can do to safeguard their homes and be longings from high water. evacuation routes in the event the homes main ingress and egress be comes ooded. Residents also should keep in mind that even if their home is on high ground, the roads that lead to it may not be. property, including animals, from low, ood-prone areas to higher ground. through the property are not blocked and allow for water ow. ahead of time. so. The SRWMD monitors river and rainfall levels on an hourly basis. If levels along river corridors approach ood stage, the district works with the National Weather Service and local emergency management personnel to warn citizens, so they can protect their homes, resources and roads. For more information on rainfall and river levels, visit www.MySuwannee River.com. The district works with lo cal communities to provide grant fund ing for ooding prevention and miti gation. If you have ideas for projects, please submit them to the SRWMDs Project Portal found on the website. The mission of the Suwannee River Water Management District is to pro tect and manage water resources using science-based solutions to support natu ral systems and the needs of the public. The district holds true to the belief of water for nature, water for people. Headquartered in Live Oak, the SRW MD serves 15 surrounding north-central Florida counties. Questions? Contact the Suwannee Democrat ofce at 386-362-1734. rfnrf ftbbfbffb rb rfrnn btfrftf fbffb *Pricing depends on quantity of photos uploaded, word count and amount of dates chosen to run.

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AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 4A Suwannee Living 127688-1 LIVE OAK The Live Oak Public Library will host Charles Barrett, Ph.D. on Thursday from noon until 1 p.m. Barrett works with the Suwannee Valley Ag ricultural Extension Center and will be giving a presentation on water and nutrient management. Barrett focuses on building in teragency relationships with the common goal of water resource sustainability and developing water resource Extension educa tion materials. He works directly with producers and Extension agents to improve water and nutrient management viability in the Suwannee Valley area. The public is invited to join the program. Live Oak Public Library is located at 1848 Ohio Ave. S in Live Oak. For more information, contact the library at 386-362-2317. Barrett to present on water and nutrients Backpack giveaway to be held next Saturday JASPER The Hamilton Coun ty Alcohol and Other Drug Pre vention Coalition will be hosting a backpack giveaway on Aug. 18. The event will be at the Hamilton County High School gym from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The children can also enjoy gam ing trucks, a bounce house and a huge bounce slide at the event. Some booths that will be there are Stephen Foster, North Florida Pediatrics, Another Way, Health Department, and the Suwannee Riv er AHEC as well as various others. This event is free. Yaricks presented Garden of Note award LIVE OAK The Live Oak Garden Club recently presented its Garden of Note residential award to Bill and Sara Yarick. The Yaricks home is located west of town off County Road 136. Against a background of lush green shrubs and lacy, red lo ropetalums, the Yaricks planted an array of showy green and white and pink and green caladiums across the front of their home and around an island of trees and shrubs facing the front of their house. Both Bill and Sara are longtime members of the Live Oak Garden Club. Sara, a Master Gardener, Past President of the Gar den Club, former Chairman of the clubs annual cala dium sale, and currently its Treasurer, remarked that these lovely tropical plants are perfect to add color and interest to Florida gardens especially during the hot summer months when most other owering plants are not blooming. For her gar den this year, Sara selected the Florida Moonlight and White Queen caladium varieties. Its not the blooms of caladiums that are so spec tacular, but its their foli age that gives them color, she said. Some of these colorful leaves will grow to the size of serving plat ters and keep their color from late spring until rst frost. Sara also added pots lled with caladiuns to her patio. The bulbs of the caladiums are easy to plant, some do well in full sun, and others in shade to partial shade. They can be planted both in the ground and in pots. The bulbs can be lifted in late fall, stored and replanted in the spring. If left in the ground, the bulbs will of ten reappear in the spring but with less vigor. The club starts taking orders for the bulbs in November for delivery in March. Last years se lection of caladiums can be viewed on the clubs website, www.liveoakor idagardenclub.com. rfntfftb ftffr DOWLING PARK Marie Willis, of Dowling Park, was surprised by her family for her 90th birthday at Suwannee River State Park. Willis has lived in Dowling Park for more than 40 years. There were many rel atives that traveled from South Florida and from Georgia to help surprise her including a brotherin-law, to nieces, great nephews, grandkids, great grandkids and great-great grandkids to cousins and friends. Fun was had by all. Food was ordered from Big Woods BBQ and it was delicious. trftfff ttntffrfr rffnf tttf tfttff

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rf rr fntbn rtb bb bbtb ntb ntbf ntb n bn f nfn bnbtt bn nn fntbbnnf bbtbtbnt b bnb fbntbbnn ftbb tbnftbn f fbbffbb bnrnb nfbbtb fnf ffbbnbn fbnbbf nf bffbfbnbb nbt bntbf jamie.wachter@ganews.com LIVE OAK Not even a rising river and browned out spring could discourage Kerry Waldron. The conditions of the Suwannee River and Little River Springs limited the turnout for Fridays Summer Safety Awareness event, but that has Waldron the Florida Depart ment of Health Suwannees administrator determined to try again next year. Well do it again, he said. The event, which the DOH hosted along with the Suwannee County Sheriffs Ofce, Suwannee County Sheriffs Ofce Division of Emergency Management, Suwannee County Fire Rescue and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, drew only about 20 visitors, Waldron said. That low turnout followed a heavy amount of rain in recent weeks that have led to the Suwannee River rising and the nor mal clear spring water turning brown with the river owing in. During the planning process for the event, ofcials said the spring was packed. Those that did attend Friday saw an alligator brought in by FWC and a demonstration from Mumsie, an accelerant detection canine from the states Bureau of Fire, Arson and Explosives Investigations. All in all, Waldron is convinced the event will be bene cial and successful. In fact, he said the plans are for multiple events next year, one right after school is left out and one or two more in the middle of summer. Well catch them in the prime part of swimming season, Waldron said. Were excited. The excitement around the event, and the bicycle rodeo the DOH-Suwannee held in July, is to help keep the community safer. Were trying to reduce accidental injuries, its what they call unintentional injuries, and teach folks how to be safe in the water, around the water and out in the sun, Waldron said. Its a matter of getting people to be smart in their environ ment. Thats what were trying to do is keep people safe. AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 5A OBITUARIES LOOKING FOR WANT TO PLACE AN AD?For Employment, Call: 800-600-4838 For Other Classieds, Call: 386-362-1734 x102Check Out Our Classied Ads in the B Section of this Edition.123422-1 Seventh-generation Floridian 30 years Law Enforcement 16 years Governor-appointed Board of Trustees, Florida Gateway College 35 years Proven Record of Civic Leadership Lifelong Cattleman and District ResidentPaid by Chuck Brannan, Republican for State Representative Combat Attacks on the Second Amendment Defend the Right to Life Ban All Sanctuary Cities Protect Our Springs Encourage Business Development Quality Education and School Safety Smaller Government, Less Taxes and Fees Support President Trumps Efforts to Make America Great Again! A Trusted Conservative: Only NRA-Endorsed Candidate 127943-1 rfntbf rfntt bbfb bbnr tfbfbf bntt rfbbr bnbfbn fbnnbr bbnn ntnfbbfntbn rbttntnnff nfrftbnbntbnfnn bfnbnbrbft bbbttfbbn nbbbbft bbfttntntb bfbnbftfbbfn nbftfbrrfbb tbbnr rf rfnt bbrtn t trtt ttfttbf tfbntnnt tbftft fntt fnfnttt fntnfftt fbt tnbfftnttnt tttntnfbt ffftfnfn ffntf tnnb ffftnffttn tftfft f rtftbf rftttrff nnbff bftffnttt rtfrft ffntt tttrttbtt ftftttft tnr Weather limits summer safety turnout To see related video, visit our website at suwanneedemocrat.com MORE ONLINE rfrntfbr nbftnbbf nnnb nnb nnn rfntb rffntb ftf rr r rt r rr rr rfntb r rr bfnfnbfnnn

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SEE COLLEGES, PAGE 7A SEE PRESIDENT, PAGE 7A This past Saturday it was hot. Luck ily, I was spending time at the river that gives our county its name, so I was easily able to cool off in the water when I got too hot. The river is high right now due to all of the rain we have had recently. The springs look as brown as the rest of the river so there is no advantage to swimming in them now. I had to be careful while cooling off to stay close to the bank or else the current would have given me a free ride to Branford. I saw my friend, Jackson Lord, later that night. He looked like he had gotten some sun. I asked him if he had spent some time on the river or at the beach. He told me it is tobacco harvest time on his farm, and he oversaw the loading of four tobacco barns that day. It is hard to imagine a more unpleasant job than working in a eld with no shade when it is more than 90 degrees outside. He told me there used to be many families in Su wannee County that grew tobacco. Now he can only think of a few who are left. Jacksons grandfather was one of many farmers in our area who grew tobacco before the allotment system. In 1938, during the Great Depression, the allotment system was created to control price volatility by placing limits on acreage and production. The allotment system provided more stability in the tobacco market. Many of those orig inal allotments got traded or sold away. Then in 2004 the allotment system ended, and the government purchased all of the remaining allotments using funds provided by the tobacco companies. You can still grow tobacco if you would like to, but you can only sell it if you have a contract with a tobacco company. The companies adjust the amount they will buy from you according to market conditions. The Lord family still grows tobacco because it is more protable than many other crops. Many farmers who were at or near retirement age and didnt have children who wanted to take over took advan tage of the buyout to leave the business. In 1997, Florida still had 196 tobacco growers. By 2012, there were only 10 growers left. The majority of the tobacco grown in the United States is grown in North Carolina, Kentucky and Virginia, and the majority of the worlds tobacco is grown in China and Brazil. Since the 2004 buyout, the number of tobacco farmers has dropped more than 70 percent in the U.S. Part of the reason for the decline is the lower consumption rate of cigarettes in the U.S. I enjoy a cigar from time to time so I asked Jackson if any of his tobacco was used in cigars. He said he grows the type of tobacco that goes in cigarettes because that is the type that grows best in Suwannee County. Jackson re members working in the tobacco elds as a boy in August right until school started. He would have loved it if school had started early in August like it does now. Eric lives in Suwannee County and is a public school educator. He is an independent contractor. You can reach him at miamistyle8@gmail.com. Opinion A PAGE 6 rfrfnftrbfbf ftfrrbfbf Not the most fun way to spend an afternoon in August Many of the nations colleges have become a force for evil and a focal point for the destruction of traditional American values. The threat to our fu ture lies in the fact that todays college students are tomorrows teachers, pro fessors, judges, attorneys, legislators and policymakers. A recent Brookings Institution poll suggests that nearly half of college students believe that hate speech is not protected by the First Amendment. Of course, it is. Fifty-one percent of students think that its acceptable to shout down a speaker with whom they disagree. About 20 percent of students hold that its accept able to use violence to prevent a speaker from speaking. More than 50 percent say colleges should prohibit speech and viewpoints that might offend certain people (http:// tinyurl.com/yayxt45u). Contempt for the First Amendment and other constitutional guarantees is probably shared by the students high school teachers, as well as many college professors. Brainwashing and indoctrination of young people has produced some predictable results, as shown by a recent Gallup Poll. For the past 18 years, Gallup has asked adults how proud they are to be Americans. This year, only 47 percent say they are extremely proud, well below the peak of 70 percent in 2003. The least proud to be Americans are nonwhites, young adults and college graduates. The proud est Americans are those older than 50 and those who did not graduate from college. The latter might be explained by their limited exposure to Americas academic elite (http:// tinyurl.com/y8wapel5). Johnetta Benton, a teacher at Hampton Middle School near Atlanta, was recorded telling her sixth-grade students, America has never been great for minorities. In a tirade, she told her class: Because Europeans came from Europe ... you are an immigrant. You are an illegal immigrant because you came and just took it. ... You are an immigrant. This is not your country. To exploit young, immature young peo ple this way represents an act of supreme cowardice. The teacher should be red, but Im guessing that her colleagues share her sympathies. At the same school, students were given a homework assignment that required them to write a letter asking lawmakers for stricter gun control laws. One might be tempted to argue that the growing contempt for liberty and the lack of civility stem from the election of Donald Trump. Thats entirely wrong. The lack of civility and indoctrination of our young people have been going on for decades. UCLA history professor Mary Corey told her class: Capitalism isnt a lie on purpose. Its just a lie. She added that capitalists are swine. ... Theyre bastard people. An English professor at Montclair State University, in New Jersey, told his students, Conservatism champions racism, exploitation and imperialist war. An ethnic studies profes sor at California State University, Northridge and Pasadena City College teaches that the role of students and teachers in ethnic studies is to comfort the aficted and afict the comfortable. The University of California, Santa Barba ras school of education emailed its faculty members to ask r Colleges: A force for evil Presidents, since the nations founding, have at times dis paraged the press for reporting news and expressing opinions they nd uncomfortable or un favorable. It is a natural tension that re sults from the primary purpose of the press to inform the peo ple and the propensity of pres idents to control their message to shape the opinion of the people. Political power does not like to be held account able. Yet that is the explicit reason James Madison and other authors of the Bill of Rights created the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. President Donald Trump is unusual among presidents in his unrelenting enmity toward the press. Hes made the news media the whipping boy of his populist politics. News is fake when he doesnt like it; journalists are the enemy of the people if they dont toe his line, and no patriotic American should believe anything except his ver sion of the truth. Ardent fans of Trump gladly embrace his con stant berating of the press. They dont see it for what it is a deliberate disinformation campaign to distract from Trumps problems by undermining the credibility of the press. They believe Trump can do no wrong. They applaud when he turns his animus on an unfriendly news outlet or journal ist. The latest example occurred last week during a Trump rally in Tampa, Florida. Supporters screamed vulgarities at reporters, showing their contempt with raised middle ngers. Chants of CNN sucks! greeted White House correspondent Jim Acosta during his live reporting on the event. Trump even shared a Twitter video of the CNN badgering with his 53 million followers. The public castigating of the press has become a regular feature of Trumps impromptu political rallies, causing CNN and other news organizations to fear for the safety of their journalists. Acosta said after the Tampa gathering that hes very worried the bellicosity encouraged by the president will lead to violence. We should not treat our fellow Americans this way, Acosta tweeted. The press is not the enemy. New York Times Publisher A. G. Sulzberger Presidents press bashing on perilous path AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 The Suwannee Democrat, The Jasper News and Mayo Free Press welcomes letters from readers on matters of public interest, with the following guidelines: Letters must contain your full name, address, daytime phone number and city of residence. Only your full name and city of residence will be published with the letter. Letters must reect issues of current interest to the general public and be concise. Management has the right to refuse any material it believes does not meet standards of publication. You can email letters to nf.editorial@ganews.com fax them to 386-364-5578 or mail them to: Letters to the Editor, Suwannee Democrat P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 To Submit Letters www.suwanneedemocrat.com Jeff Masters Publisher jmasters@cnhi.com Follow us: facebook.com/suwanneedemocrat @suwanneedemocra (Twitter) Members of the Suwannee Democrat editorial board are Jeff Masters, Publisher, Monja Slater, General Manager, and Jamie Wachter, Editor. Masters, Slater and Wachter are joined on the board by community members Jim Holmes, Bruce Kemmerer and Otha White Sr. Jamie Wachter Editor jamie.wachter@ganews.com Monja Slater General Manager monja.slater@ganews.com Suwannee Democrat The Jasper News Mayo Free Press f

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Units located on Gold Kist Road Rental Oce: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-6626 8991-1 CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE ABBEY & LIVE OAK MINI STORAGE AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 7A them to consider classroom options concerning the Iraq War, suggesting they excuse students from class to at tend anti-war events and give them extra credit for writing about it. Rodney Swanson, a UCLA economics professor, told his class, The United States of America, backed by facts, is the greediest and most selsh country in the world. There is little question that colleges stand at the fore front of an attack on America and Western values. Leftists often say that the U.S. is the worlds worst country. But here are some empiri cal facts they might explain. According to a recent Gallup Poll, about 13 percent of the worlds adults 630 million people would like to move to another country. Roughly 138 million would like to live in the U.S. making us the No. 1 destination, followed by the U.K., Canada and France (http://tinyurl.com/ y8z9pfgo). Theres some thing exceptionally appealing about America and the West ern world that leftists choose to ignore or lie about. Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason Universi ty. To nd out more about Walter E. Williams and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and car toonists, visit the Creators Syndicate webpage at www. creators.com. Continued From Page 6A Colleges met with Trump at his invitation the day before the Tampa rally to warn the president his inammatory anti-press rhetoric has already con tributed to increased threats against journalists in the U.S. and abroad and will lead to violence. Trumps ill will toward journal ism and journalists has an edge that goes beyond criticism of the press. It fosters unparalleled public loathing for an institution thats been critical to our democratic society for more than two centuries. The ferment of political polariza tion doesnt help, causing portrayal of the press as liberal or conserva tive in news coverage; far right or far left in its commentary. The soil is fertile for a master propagandist like Trump to sow seeds of distrust. Yet when you truly think about it, the need for a free and independent press as a watchdog on government power and inuence has never been greater. We live in an era when truth is easily blurred on the internet and social media by deceptive, mislead ing and disconnected bits of infor mation. The role of the press is to connect the dots to the unvarnished truth as it can best be determined. The job of journalists is to report facts that give certainty to uncertainty. They are not the enemy of the people; they are the surrogate of the people. For the president of the country to iname the public to disrupt and threaten the safety of journalists is not only insidious, it is destructive to the primary purpose of the press under our form of government. Bill Ketter is the senior vice pres ident for news for CNHI. Contact him at wketter@cnhi.com. Continued From Page 6A President Lands of North Florida Realty expands to Branford BRANFORD United Country Lands of North Florida Realty recently opened a new ofce in Branford and held a ribbon cutting ceremony last week. William Billy Golightly and his mother, Enola Golightly, already owned an ofce in Live Oak, but decided to expand after seeing a need in the local market. We really like the Branford area. Its an emerging market, Billy Golightly said in a release. Theres a need there for the marketing that we are able to provide to be able to reach out-of-area buyers and connect with sellers. We can offer clients in this area an enhanced and unique marketing program that our competitors cant offer. Many of our folks come from metropolitan parts of the state like Jacksonville, Orlando, and Tampa. Were passionate about sharing information about the general area with those people just like our listing inven tory Enola Golightly has been in real es tate for more than two decades, while Billy received his real estate license in 2010 and became a broker in 2015. To learn more about UCRE | Lands of North Florida, visit www.Landsof NorthFlorida.com or call 386-935-0365. rfrntbr rfrfrbrfrrrntbrrbbrrfnrr Illinois man arrested for assaulting LEO JENNINGS An Illinois man was arrested for assaulting a law enforcement ofcer after an altercation with Jennings Po lice Chief Vincent Robinson. According to a Jennings Police Department re port, 37-year-old Eloy Garza, from Aurora, Ill., was observed loitering outside a closed business around 8:30 p.m. on July 28 by Robinson. The report states that the suspect responded with a vulgar reply when asked to leave by the police chief. After Robinson exited his marked car and identied himself, the suspect continued to reply with vulgar re sponses and balled up his st, accord ing to the report, drawing a crowd to gather. The report states that when Robin son attempted a pat down on the sus pect, he threw his arms and both men went to the ground with the suspect kicking his legs and resisting. While the men were struggling on the ground, 41-year-old Manuel Ponce-Moya, of Jennings, began lm ing the ght on his cell phone less than a foot away, according to the report, ignoring the ofcers request for as sistance and instead continued lming the struggle. The report states that after several minutes, Robinson was able to free one of his hands to request help over the radio. According to the report, an un known male then emerged to assist by grabbing Garzas hands, allowing Robinson to handcuff the suspect. Once backup arrived from the Jasper Police Department and the Hamilton County Sheriffs Ofce, Ponce-Moya was also arrested and had his cell phone conscated, the report states. Garza was charged with resisting with violence, disorderly intoxication and assault on a law enforcement of cer. Ponce-Moya was charged with refusing to aid a law enforcement ofcer. f r brf JASPER Superintendent Rex L. Mitchell announced that the Hamilton County School District earned continuing accreditation from the Southern Associa tion of Colleges and Schools Council on Accreditation and School Improvement (SACS CASI), an accreditation division of AdvancED. This action was taken at the AdvancED Accreditation Commission meeting held on June 20. SACS CASI provides nationally-recog nized accreditation, the purpose of which is continuous school improvement focused on increasing student performance. To earn accreditation, schools must meet SACS CASIs high standards, be evaluated by a team of professionals from outside the school and implement a continuous process of school improvement. Accreditation is granted on a ve-year term. Accreditation demonstrates to our stu dents, parents and community that we are focused on raising student achievement, providing a safe and enriching learning environment and maintaining an efcient and effective operation staffed by highly qualied educators, stated Superintendent Mitchell. SACS CASI accreditation is recognized across state lines, which not only eases the transfer process as students move from accredited school to accredited school but also assures parents that the school is meet ing nationally accepted standards for quali ty and successful professional practice. Dr. Mark Elgart, President/CEO of Ad vancED, the parent organization of SACS CASI, stated, SACS CASI Accreditation is a rigorous process that focuses the entire school district on the primary goal of cre ating lifelong learners. Hamilton County School District is to be commended for en gaging in this process and demonstrating a commitment to continuous improvement. Parents and interested community mem bers can learn more about accreditation at www.advanc-ed.org. Hamilton County School District earns Continuing SACS CASI Accreditation rfntnbfnbn tntnrnn brnffnf rttbnbtnnntttf nnnrbt frfrnnttntn *Pricing depends on quantity of photos uploaded, word count and amount of dates chosen to run.

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Weve been getting quite a bit of rain here in North Central Florida. The summertime rain pattern is dropping some serious rain al most about every afternoon at least over in my side of the county. In between raindrops or storms I often run back and forth to the ofce, warehouse, mailbox, or to feed the horses. One time while hurrying to beat the next storm, I took off across the pack porch hit the the concrete pad that is off the porch and hydroplaned on my ip ops. I tell you I was slipping and sliding for a good few feet and what is going through my head? Dont fall, Denise. Dont fall. Why would the thought dont fall pop into my head as Im trying to maintain my bal ance? Well to be honest, I have plans to live a good long life and have read along the way if I you want to live to be 100, dont fall. Luck and genetics play roles in how long we live but as we get older, falls account for serious injuries to our bodies. There are many reasons people fall from slipping as I did, to balance problems, medi cation we take daily, or poor muscle strength. Lucky for me, Im active and work on balance in all of my tness classes. If I did not have a strong core which enabled me to maintain my balance, I would have wiped out. What a sight that would have been at least for the horses because I was by myself when this happened. How can we prevent falls? The following are a few tips but one of the BEST things you can do for your body is to take the time to exercise and strengthen your muscles. EX ACTLY what we work on every Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings in Silver Sneakers. ip ops have a at bottom which kept me from getting traction as I stepped on to the slippery concrete. If you know the concrete or walkway can be slippery when wet, walk on the grass or wait until the ground is dry. poor vision, or any issue that may affect your balance, use a cane or walker. you walk free of clutter. use plastic runners or non-slip carpet runners. Be sure rugs have skid proof backs. the bathroom especial ly near the toilet, tub and shower and USE THEM. Most important? Strengthen your body and muscles which will improve your balance. Join a Silver Sneakers class where the focus is on improving and maintaining lifestyle skills. Cant get to a class? These exercises can help: other one at a time for 30 seconds. Add time as you improve. toes then rock back to your heels. with the other working and also lubricating the hip socket the switch to the other leg. Do not move your shoulders or feet. If you do nd yourself falling, try to fall forward or back on your butt versus falling on your side which my injure your hip. Most important? Remember, the stronger your body is including your bones, the less likely it is you will fall. Get up and get moving. Quick note: I am passionate about remov ing chemicals from my home and family. If you are not busy Saturday, Aug. 11, at 10 a.m. wont you join me at Country Strong Gym for a free educational class which will explain why its important to eliminate chemicals from our homes and on our bodies. There will be refreshments, mineral make-up match, giveaways and more. Have a wonderful week! To your health, Denise Denise Sanger is a certied tness instructor, Silver Sneakers Instructor, AMPD Kettle bell Instructor, licensed Zumba, STRONG by Zumba instructor, gentle ow yoga, teaches morning classes at Country Strong Health & Fitness. Denise may be reached at DeniseSanger.com, 386-292-6105 or denis esanger@gmail.com. AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 8A Healthy Living Want to live to be 100? Dont fall When someone is important to us, we will go to great lengths to be with them, see them or just hear their voice. A young man recently told me his girl friend, who is not a morning person, came out at 7 a.m. to cheer him on in a 5K he was running. Going out of her way to be there was a loud and clear state ment to him that he is valuable to her! A Samaritan Woman shared a similar expe rience as Jesus contradicted the cultural norm between the Jews and Samaritans to find her at the well: So He (Jesus) came to a town in Sa maria called Sychar, near the plot of ground Jacob had given to his son Jo seph. Jacobs well was there, and Jesus, tired as He was from His journey, sat down by the well. It was about the sixth hour. When a Samaritan woman came to draw water, Jesus said to her, Will you give me a drink? (His disciples had gone into the town to buy food.) The Samaritan woman said to Him, You are a Jew and I am a Samaritan woman. How can you ask me for a drink? (For Jews do not associate with Samaritans.) John 4:5-9 As the writer of this gospel, John was inspired by the Holy Spirit to tell us of the prejudice between the Jews and Sa maritans. Know that while the Scriptures do not condone prejudice in this passage, they do reflect the condition that was present. Even still, Jesus went out of His way to pursue her. The word prejudice means to prejudge. This happens when we arrive at an opinion of a person, or a group of people, without any input on their part. Instead, the origins of prejudice can usually be traced to the past. In II Kings 17:21-24, the Old Testament records the Assyrian conquer and resettlement of the nation of Israel by bringing in people from many other countries. This mixture of people came to be known as Samar itans and was despised by the Jews, so much so that the typical travel routes involved going the long way around the region of Samaria, avoiding the area at all costs. evokes such strong emotions that it can be very difficult to discuss. However, since it is unlikely that any of us avoid stopping by the store for fear of bumping into a Samaritan, this passage can help us look at prejudice a little more objectively. Here are a few truths we can observe: travel completely around an entire town, but it will never work for the building up of the kingdom of God. Sadly, we have all witnessed evidence of how it works against it. and fear are constant companions. Con sider why prejudice demands segrega tion and isolation. If we get to know someone personally, those pre-judged ideas become harder to justify. prejudice in our thinking. In the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37) Jesus pushed the issue of a Samaritan being the neighbor to the Jew. It is Gods desire that none should perish, but that all will have eternal life. the spread of the gospel to everyone. As we seek to walk with Christ, lets make sure if we go out of our way, it is to pursue, not avoid, because every heart matters... Blessings, Angie Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, Director of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches bible studies, leads marriage and family conferences and offers biblical counsel ing to individuals, couples and families. Contact Angie with questions or com ments at angieland3@windstream.net. Heart Matters Dont waste time, effort on prejudice Around the Banks Some trivia from Around the Banks of the Suwannee The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places youll go. Dr. Seuss, I Can Read With My Eyes Shut! Currently, the carillon bells, located in the historic Carillon tower at Ste phen Foster Folk Culture Center State ago, there was a lightning strike at the tower, and it rendered the bells inop erable. There are three sets of carillon bells, 96 bells, and one additional bell, Baby C which makes the bells at Ste phen Foster the largest set of tubular bells in the world. They were installed 60 years ago in the carillon tower. To coin the title of an old, old games show Ive Got a Secret, and its not going to make a dimes worth of dif ference BUT, technically, the carillon is not a carillon, its a Campanile. A carillon technically is bell shaped bells Carillon or Campanile, we are so pleased one set of the bells have been restored thanks to the generosity of many individuals, as well as the Ste phen Foster Citizens Support Organi zation. May the bells continue playing beau tiful and delight the hearts of many individuals today, and, in the future, as they have for 60 years. Our young people are our most pre cious commodities, and we appreciate Mr. Clarence Strong and his Founda tion for sponsoring basketball camps this summer at the South Hamilton gymnasium. Sportsmanship, coopera all of these components are part of what the basketball camp delivers for many young people. Thank you to Mr. Strong and his Foundation. Congratulations to several farm families in our area who were featured in an area magazine Family Magazine. They are wonderful articles for families who continue to mean much to our area and who work diligently to feed the world from the good earth right here in our area: Deas Family Farms of Jennings, Florida, as well as Townsend Brothers Farms, Live Oak, were among those featured in articles. School is about to begin for the 2018-19 school year!! The school supply lists are strategically placed in many public places. Soon many bright yellow school busses will be seen on our roadways in our area, and these busses contain the most precious cargo. Our prayers for all our students, par ents, grandparents, guardians, and all school personnel as we begin another school year. Happy New Year to all area schools!!! Some trivia for our area: Hamilton County is surrounded on three sides by rivers. It is contiguous to the state of Georgia and joins it by land. It is separated from the state of Florida by land. Once, many years ago, a report er for the Miami-Herald referred to Hamilton County as Florgia, because of its close proximity to Georgia, and because, I think the people and their traditions reminded him more of South Georgia than of what most folks think of when they think of Florida. Again, one newspaper reported once that Florida is a state that becomes more Southern as you travel north and more Northern as you travel south. More trivia: Suwannee County, three syllable Su-wan-nee was named for the famous river that is so much a part of the county that bears its name. Most people pronounce the three syllable Su-wan-nee Swan-nee shortening three to two syllables, because the world famous composer and songwriter Stephen C. Foster shortened it when he wrote his famous Old Folks at Home or Way down upon the Suwannee River. The first county seat of Suwannee County was Houston, located west of Live Oak, on U.S. 90 West. Now, Houston is a highly rural unincorporat ed rural settlement in Suwannee Coun ty marked by a sign. I dont know all the history of it, but I am sure its been shared in a wonderful way by Eric Musgrove, Live Oak, who does a great job documenting and sharing the rich history of Suwannee County. I always enjoy his newspaper articles, and I have enjoyed his historic publications. The Hamilton County Historic Mu seum located on Hatley Street in front itable treasure trove of historic mem orabilia and information about Ham ilton County and its people. Hamilton County was established in 1827 and was part of the territory of Florida at that time. A lot of photographs, books, good information, and friendly visits with the dedicated volunteers who give of their time and talent at the Hamil Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. till 3 p.m. Several rural communities in Su wannee County are fortunate enough to still have post offices that are open and operating. The presence of these post offices hark back to a day when rural settlements such as OBrien, McAlpin and Wellborn were bustling where many families resided, farmed, and made lives. All of these rural set tlements located in Suwannee County once had schools too. Many schools in Suwannee and Hamilton Counties be So many marvelous places to eat and purchase food in our area. I am so pleased that the A & B Barbeque in Jasper on Hatley Street is in op eration again. Love, love, love their barbeque. Take out only, but, oh, my worddelicious. In the famous motion picture Fried Green Tomatoes, the famous quote was coined Secrets in the Sauce, and the same can be quot ed about the great barbeque sauce and wonderful barbeque expertly prepared by Lenoris Anderson and his daugh ter, Sheridan. If I spelled your names incorrectly, I apologize, but I wont forget where A & B Barbeque is lo cated, and I will be back to see you, I guarantee. One more thing before I finish my article. I made an error, and I had this error pointed out to me, and it was done in a friendly way. It brightened my day, because it made me aware that this good and respected friend reads my article. It is in regards to the Dog Days of Summer. The Dog Days of Summer, the old Dog Days of Summer begin on July 28 and run until Sept. 5 according to the Old Farmers Alma nac. As always, I do appreciate those who support our local newspapers, and I do appreciate the wonderful staff at the Suwannee Democrat and Jasper News. Thank you for being an effec tive voice for our communities. From the Eight Mile Still on the Woodpecker Route north of White Springs, wishing you a day filled with joy, peace, and, above all, lots of love and laughter.

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AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 9A State & R egion eve.copeland@ganews.com TIFTON, Ga. Agribusiness is more than farming a row crop such as peanuts or tobacco. It encompasses everything from growing crops, such as cotton, watermelon, peaches and cucumbers, to raising animals such as chickens, cattle, horses and hogs, to growing pines for timber and pecans trees for pecans. In the SunLight Project coverage area Valdosta, Moultrie, Thomasville, Dalton, Milledgeville and Tifton, Ga., and Live Oak, Fla. agriculture plays a large role in local communities. Agribusiness contributes $73 billion to Georgias $972 billion economy each year, according to the University of Georgias Cen ter for Agribusiness and Economic Devel opment, with 383,600 Georgians working in agriculture, forestry or a related eld. In North Florida, the economic impact of Suwannee Countys agriculture is $260 mil lion for livestock sales with an additional $88 million in farm cash receipts when it comes to row crops. The Suwannee Valley basin ac counts for around $1 billion of the states $8 billion in agriculture. That impact can be summed up in as little as $2. As in the rare $2 bill. Cliff Starling, a Suwannee County farmer as well as Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Sciences employee, recalled a time when the dairy farmers in Lafayette County paid their employees in those rare bills. Those $2 bills showed up all over a 3-4 county area, Starling said. It was a pretty neat experiment. For the agricultural-dominant North Florida area, its accurate as well, even as the industry changes. Top Commodities According to the UGA CAED, the top 10 commodities Georgia agriculture produces are broilers (9to 12-week-old chickens), cot ton, eggs, timber, peanuts, beef, greenhouse plants, dairy, pecans and blueberries. In 2016, Georgia was ranked rst in the United States as a producer of broilers, pea nuts, eggs, pecans and onions, second in the country in cotton production and third in the country in watermelon and blueberry produc tion, according to the United States Depart ment of Agriculture. At roughly 9 percent of economic output, farming is the largest sector in Georgia by far. Although the percentage of Americans working on farms is minuscule compared to 100 years ago, production has increased dra matically during that period. For many small towns, the revenue generated by farmers is spent on trucks, tractors, clothes and thou sands of other goods and services, making it vital to those communities. Sydni Barwick, Thomas County agriculture and natural resources extension service agent, explained the diversity of areas beyond the farm affected by agribusiness. Agriculture plays a huge role in our com munity and employs farm managers and op erators, she said, as well as crop insurance agents, truck drivers, welders, accountants, mechanics, educators, well drillers, cotton gin employees, peanut buying point employees, vegetable packing shed employees, irrigation dealers, electricians, bankers, brokers, fuel company employees, fertilizer and other input dealers, veterinarians, agricultural aviators, UGA employees, and USDA employees. Our community would look vastly different with out the inuence of agriculture. According to the USDAs 2012 Census of Agriculture, Lafayette County, located in the agricultural-dominant North Florida area, ranked third in the state when it came to milk produced. And while Lafayette County was big in dairies as well as pigs and hogs also ranked third in the state in 2012 Suwannee County is the top poultry producing county in Florida. Nearly 7 million broilers and other meat-type chickens came from the county six years ago. Lafayette was third with just more than 1 million with Hamilton County, Fla., fourth in poultry production. Impact on communities Agribusiness has an enormous effect on lo cal communities, both by its presence and ab sence, according to state ofcials and farmers. In areas where agriculture is still a strong economic driver, the impact on the communi ty is strongly felt. Colquitt County led the state in farm gate value in 2016 at almost $550 million, Colquitt is tops in cabbage and zucchinis and also the number one county in the state in vegetable revenue. It is second in bell peppers, canta loupes, eggplants, greens and squash, and third in cucumbers and sweet corn. One thing that hasnt changed is the impor tance of farming to the economies of small towns. Merchants in Moultrie can tell when its been a bad farm year due to drought or low prices for commodities. In Tift County, the total economic contri bution of ag-, foodand ber-related indus tries to the local economy is more than $384 million. Justin Hand, Tift County agriculture and natural resources extension agent, said that largest commodity in Tift is vegetables. About 60 percent of what we produce in Tift County is going to be vegetables, he said. Everything from okra to 10 or 12 different kinds of peppers, squash, zucchini, cantaloupes, greens. We have a lot of those. Were number one in cantaloupe production in the state, were number one in greens production. I think were second or third in watermelon production. Cotton and peanuts, and a little bit of tobacco and soybeans. We dont have any poultry. Theres an ordinance, I think, that doesnt allow you to have chick en houses, largely due to the smell. Hand said the farm gate value of crops coming off farms is $176 million for Tift County. Farm gate value is the market value of the product multiplied by the weight minus the selling costs, such as transport costs and mar keting costs. Adding the ag contribution, which is how it directly or indirectly affects an industry, the total is $462 million, Hand said. Once you account for the direct and indi rect industries, ag is going to account for 13 percent of the employment in Tift County, Hand said. Its 15 percent of the total econ omy. Thats the farmer, the people selling ag inputs, the feed store, the people the feed store buys from, the truckers that haul stuff, everything directly or indirectly that is affect ed by ag in Tift County. Jessica Brim Kirk, director of food safety and marketing for Lewis Taylor Farms in Tift County, said the farm is the second or third largest employer in Tift County. Were one of the largest produce and ag ricultural business owners in the Southeast, she said. We have about 715 employees. Were busy year-round and we stay busy. Lewis Taylor Farms, which was estab lished approximately 60 years ago, produces 7,000 acres of produce such as squash, eggplant cucumber, bell peppers, specialty peppers, strawberries, a variety of greens, broccoli and melons. It utilizes greenhouses to grow transplants they then ship to other farms and institutions, and an average of 85 million pine tree seedlings, which are shipped out and used for timber and reforestation. We have our own packing facilities, Kirk said. We have our own shipping docks, all our own sales team, we do everything here at the farm. Thomas County farmer and long-time Commissioner Ken Hickey said agriculture is as important as it has always been, but aware ness of its importance is diminishing. In Thomas County and most surrounding counties, agriculture is the No. 1 revenue source, Hickey said. And thats the way its always been, he said. If agriculture has a good year, people spend money, and it is a good year countywide, he said. In production, Thomas County has the widest planting range the community has had in a while. Thomas Extension Agent Barwick said nearly one-third of the cotton crop has been planted much later than usual this year after the second week of June. Planting after this date reduces the crops yield potential. Early season dry weather with frequent rains to follow have impacted our cotton crops root system, making it very shallow, she said. Well-timed rains will be important for the rest of the season to keep our dry land crop from getting excessively drought stressed. Other factors, like the weather, insect and disease pressure, will also inuence the remainder of the season. The importance of agriculture is growing exponentially, Barwick said. The United Nations predicts the world population will reach 9.7 billion people in 2050 and we will need to feed, clothe and house all of these people, Barwick said. To make it possible, agricultural technology must continue to improve, she said. While Baldwin County no longer sustains the large-scale agriculture of the past, its unusual mix of Georgia Red Clay and drier, sandier soil still supports some crops. The county had 124 registered farms as of its most recent count in 2012, according to the 2017 edition of the Georgia County Guide from the University of Georgia statewide ex tension ofce, which provides access to state wide programs and information to Baldwin County farmers. While the report lists the biggest crop in Baldwin as hay, the county has several tree and poultry farms near its southern border, and a few small, organic farms have taken root in recent years. While employers such as Georgia College, Central Georgia Tech and the ever-growing row of shops and restau rants along 441 provide diverse employment for county residents, Baldwin County Com missioner Sammy Hall said he would like to see farming have a greater impact in coming years. In the decades after World War ll, Bald win County residents relied on agriculture as one of the major drivers of its economy. Part of the fertile swath of farmland stretch ing from coastal Georgia north and west, Baldwin County was a major producer of dairy, poultry and other crops for many years. Although agriculture was once a major part of the Baldwin County economy, changes in the countys employment pool have pushed younger workers into other industries in re cent decades. Agriculture in Baldwin County is not what it once was, Hall said. Going back when I was young, farming was pretty large there were a large number of dairy farms, row crop farming, poultry farms. Now, the biggest thing we have in farming is forestry. Agriculture in terms of row crops, dairy and things like that does not have the effect on the county that it once did. Mostly gone are the small family farms that dotted the North Florida landscape a gen eration ago. Instead, huge commercial farms now dominate. Growing Effects This trend holds true in Georgia and North Florida, due to a variety of issues ranging from the expense of getting started and keep ing up with changes in technology, to the stress of operating a farm and difculty with regulations. At one time in the nations history, farmers made up about 90 percent of the U.S. pop ulation; now it is less than 2 percent. After World War II, the population began to shift. The farms had to get larger due to scale of economy, said Starling, explaining the price of corn, for example, was about the same 50 years ago as it is now while the price of production has continued to rise. Part of the trend to larg er farms can be directed to the decline of tobacco. As tobacco phased out after the buyout, some of the farmers who grew SEE AGRICULTURE, PAGE 11A rfntbfbn rfnntbfnr rrfrnnrbnn n f

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AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 10A Suwannee Democrat 127692-1 lition and then moving the event rst to the Suwannee County Coliseum and now to Suwannee High School, the event has continued to grow. Never knew it would get this big, he said, add ing that the growth has been great. Thats the whole idea. Obviously the need is there for parents to come and sit in line, stand and all of that, there is a great need. Its really been a bless ing. Also helping spur the events growth has been the addition of corporate sponsors such as First Fed eral Bank, Pilgrims Pride, North Florida Pediatrics, Gamble Construction, Poole Realty, Klausner, Derek Loadholtz State Farm as well as Melody Church, the Live Oak Lions Club, DoGood Me dia, Christian Mission in Action Ministries and the Suwannee County School Board. In addition to those sponsors, other businesses and agencies lled the SHS gymnasium with booths. Among those were the Florida Department of Health Suwannee County. Giving out toothbrush es, rst aid kits, hand sani tizers, everything your kid will need to keep safe and be productive during the school year, said Kerry Waldron, the administrator of health. Thats what we do at the Department of Health and what were about. Continued From Page 1A School and onto the grassy north shoulder. The FHP report states that the vehicle then veered back onto the westbound lane of U.S. 90 and into the path of a Nis san Murano headed west, which struck the left side of the Explorer with its front end. Perez was airlifted to UF Health Shands Hospi tal in Gainesville in criti cal condition. Ruben Carballo De Je sus, a 31-year-old from Lake City and a passenger in the Explorer, suffered minor injuries and was taken to Lake City Medi cal Center. Phyllis N. Johnson, the driver of the Nissan, was also transported to Lake City Medical with serious injuries. Johnson is 34 and also from Lake City. The accident shut down U.S. 90 for close to two hours. Continued From Page 1A Wreck Duke breaks ground on Hamilton solar plant JASPER Duke Energy Florida broke ground last month on its next solar pow er plant, located in Hamilton County, and announced another facility for Columbia County. Together, the Hamilton and Columbia solar power plants are expected to elim inate approximately 645 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions in Florida each year upon commercial operation, Duke Energy Florida President Catherine Stempien said in a release. Thats the equivalent of taking 63,000 passenger cars off the road. These projects represent our commitment to more fuel diversity in the state and to rapidly expand renewable generation for our Florida customers benet. The 74.9-megawatt Ham ilton solar plant will consist of 300,000 panels on 565 acres. The facility is located in western Hamilton County, near the Suwannee River State Park and Dukes exist ing Suwannee Solar Plant. It is near SW 69th Drive and SW 40th Avenue. According to Duke, once operational the plant will be able to power more than 20,000 homes at peak pro duction. The facility, which was originally developed by Tradewind Energy, is expected to be nished later this year. We are pleased to deliver on the demand for clean, sustainable energy with the Hamilton County Solar rfrrntbtr frtrrr Project, Tradewinds VP of Business Development Jeff James said in a release. Its exciting to be part of the continued growth in the in dustry in addition to facilitat ing economic development in rural communities. Duke also announced July 31 that it will also build a so lar plant on 580 acres in Fort White, off of Fry Road. That plant will also produce 74.9 megawatts and will include 245,000 panels. The compa ny expects groundbreaking to occur next year with the plant being operation in March 2020. The site will be developed by Core Solar. The North Florida projects are rst announced as part of Dukes push to construct 700 MW of solar generation by 2022. In order to cover the in vestment cost with the solar plants, Duke also led a request last week with the Florida Public Service Com mission for a rate increase. Duke said the increase is expected to be less than half a percent for each project. The Hamilton rate in crease would begin in Jan uary 2019, according to the release. The Columbia plant increase would begin in April 2020.

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AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 11A State & Region tobacco, they had to get a little bit bigger and expand in order to sustain themselves eco nomically because tobacco was such a cash crop, said De Broughton, commercial crops agent at the UF/IFAS Suwannee County Ex tension ofce. Now theyre either having to get bigger or get out and nd another job. Starling added: Almost everybody had a patch of tobacco. Every farm had a tobacco allotment or rented a tobacco allotment. So all the other stuff they had on the farm support ed the tobacco in order to make that farms living. Instead, some farms grew in size. Other farmers, such as Starling, farm part-time while also working another job. That job subsidizes the farm. As he travels across North Florida helping other farmers implement best management practices mandated by state legislation, he understands their needs and concerns because hes also a farmer. He has to enroll in BMPs and hes asking farmers to enroll in BMPs, Broughton said. He has to go through the same process. Starling said there are times hell even use his farm as a testing ground for certain things before hell pass them along to other produc ers. It also allows him to see how some sug gested BMPs may not work for all farms and all operations. While technology in agricul ture is constantly expanding, some of that, such as soil moisture probes, arent sensible for Starling and his 40-acre farm. It also wouldnt be benecial to some commercial farms that arent irrigated. There comes a point that you cant really afford some of the technology, he said, add ing, were doing (some) of the stuff that was done by our great-great-grandfathers out on our place. Jason Ridley has been a farmer only about six years, but he says hes been around farm ing his entire life. After spending 13 years working as a lending ofcer at banks and farm credit unions, helping farmers grow their businesses, he started 4 Oaks Farm and Produce, which grows organic vegetables and free-range chickens and chicken eggs, in northern Murray County. Everything has gotten so automated now. Like every other industry. It just doesnt take as many people, he said. But the cost of capital has also squeezed smaller operations, he said. When my grandparents were farming, you could put up a couple of chicken houses and bring in some extra income, he said. Now, youve got to have at least four or six or more houses to make money because the input costs are so high. The houses alone can cost $250,000 to $350,000 to build. If you build six of those, your investment can be $2 mil lion, and thats if you already own the proper ty. When I was in banking, I saw operations where the people they hired were making more money than the owner-operator. He said thats why more farmers have be gun to diversify. Ridley said the tremendous increase in U.S. natural gas production, and the fall in prices, has been a big boon to farmers, especially to poultry farmers. Locally, many farmers have switched to natural gas from propane to heat chicken houses in the winter. That (switching to natural gas) has taken some houses that were breaking even or maybe even losing money and made them protable, he said. Tift Extension Agent Hand said the indus try is trying to produce more with less. Were running out of farm land, he said. Farmers are aging. Its not easy for new peo ple to get into farming, its a process. There have been a lot of changes to the agriculture industry, mostly in the realm of technology. Technology both helps the farmer increase yield but is also expensive. In many cases technology cannot take the place of human labor, but the cost of that labor and the rules that regulate it sometimes make things dif cult. Events that play out on the international stage have a direct impact on agribusiness on the local level. Technology The largest change in the industry is in technology. Large-scale operations are using state-ofthe-art equipment and innovative practices as well as diversifying to stay ahead of the game and continually increase yield while keeping overhead down. Justin Hand, Tift County agriculture and natural resources extension agent, said that changes in technology has been the single biggest change in agriculture as an industry. As far as technology goes, youre looking at anything from legit computer tech in the tractors to chemicals to having apps on their phones to turn pivots on from across town, Continued From Page 9A he said. All you need is a wi signal. Its coming along, and its big business, too. Its not just the plows and the cotton and the old beat-up tractors anymore. Its a legit industry. It affects so much. This includes both changes in farming practices, such as when and how often to spray pesticides and fungicides, to creating Round-Up resistant strains of cotton and us ing tech such as iPads and drones to automate processes. We have a lot of progressive farmers in Tift County, he said. Weve got a couple that are like, Well grandpa aways did it this way, but we actually have a lot of progres sive farmers that are really on the cutting edge. Technology utilization makes the differ ence, he said. Some outts have precision planting equipment and their irrigation systems will have water probes throughout the eld, so it will gauge when to water and where to water, which also helps with water conservation. Hand said technology gives them an edge compared to those who arent utilizing it. At the end of the day when they go and pull yield on them, those guys are always going to be higher, Hand said. More input obviously, but theyll have a higher, better crop nine times out of 10. Hand said another example of being on the cutting edge is a resource he calls peanut RX. It is a survey that helps farmers know when in the growth cycle to spray their peanuts, what to watch out for and how often to spray, based on records of peanuts grown in that eld or area. I go back to mule days, when I was a boy, said Louie Perry, a Colquitt County farmer, who was born in 1939. I was there when the rst tractor came to the farm. The s is when they got to going pret ty strong, Perry said of tractors and other machinery. When I went to college we had three tractors, all 50 horsepower or less. In the early days of tractors, the cost could be as little as $400 still a lot of money in the early 1900s. Today, a 115-horsepower John Deere can start in the range of $100,000 and a huge cotton picker can fetch $700,000. The larger farms that have emerged need bigger machines. In addition to getting bigger, just like most peoples phones, tractors are getting smarter. Huge irrigation pivots powered by elec tricity or natural gas water huge elds of row crops; drip irrigation is used on vegetables. Using GPS technology, for instance, farm ers can plow in the spring with the tractor steering itself through the eld and being turned around by the operator at the end of the row. Then at harvest time, the tractor can drive itself in the exact same path, increasing the amount of cotton picked. But Brian Corbett, co-owner of Ty-Core Farms in Lowndes County, said not a lot has changed in the farming business in the last 15 years. As far as picking technology goes, its pret ty much the same, but packaging and market ing is becoming a much bigger issue, he said. Were getting orders where we have to put stickers on every pepper, Corbett said. So we have to buy equipment that will apply the stuff to it and other things like that. Corbett grew up in farming. His dad started growing tobacco until the tobacco companies bought his farm in the early 2000s, Corbett said. Now, he grows and sells fresh vegeta bles all over the eastern United States. TyCore Farms sells about 1.2 million packages a year to cities mostly along the East Coast. Its number one cash crop is bell peppers, but it also grows about seven different kinds of crops, including eggplants, cabbage and zucchini. Global positioning system planting is a new trend in agriculture. A lot of people are going to the precision farming to try to save money, cut costs, make it more economical, said Ken Hickey, a Thomas County farmer. GPS is set on a tractor, the operator releas es the steering wheel, and the GPS decides the row for planting and guides the tractor to the end of the row, where the operator turns the tractor around. The GPS method is repeat ed on the next row. GPS also is used to fertilize, spray and gather crops. If you sit still and never do anything, youll never get ahead, said Hickey, a long time Thomas County commissioner. Jessica Brim Kirk, director of food safety and marketing at Lewis Taylor Farms in Tift County, said the farm uses drones to look at the overall slope of the land and help with planning out what crop to plant where, as well as working with researchers to imple ment cutting-edge practices in the eld. We do a lot of work hand in hand with the University of Georgia and extension, she said. Its a win-win for everybody. They learn something, we learn something in turn and its a more hands-on learning experience for the kids. Kirk said things have changed in the indus try even since she was a little girl, growing up on the farm. Everythings done by GPS, she said. Its not done by hand anymore. Theres so many different crops. We grow both organics and conventional vegetables now. She said that one issue that she sees is a lot of misinformation concerning agriculture. People arent educated about what stuff is, what it means and why its done one way or another, she said. She gave genetically modied organisms as an example. Many people have a prob lem with GMOs because they think they are something like a franken-food, cooked up in a lab that will harm people who consume it. Most of your consumables, although they may have created a genetically modied ver sion of it, theyre not on the market, she said. Most people dont realize that. You cant go to the store and buy GMO squash, it doesnt exist. They have it in cotton and in corn, but its for feed corn for livestock, not for people to eat. She said humans have been modifying things they eat since they began cultivating crops during the early days of human civili zation. I ask people if they eat broccoli, Kirk said. They always say yes, and I tell them theyre eating a GMO because years and years and years ago broccoli was modied from what it was, not using our current tech nology but using the technology they had at the time to create broccoli as we know it. Kirk refers to other results of modifying foods through selective breeding, such as mangos and wheat, adding there is no scien tic proof these plants have harmed anyone. Kirk said organic foods have misinforma tion swirling around them. She said organics are still sprayed with pesticides, but spraying organics is very unregulated, whereas con ventional crops are highly regulated. They can spray as much as they want, she said, referring to organics. Theres no limits on how much they can spray. So hon estly, youre probably getting more pesticides on an organic than you are on a convention al. Kirk said she started a Facebook page and an Instagram account to combat the misinfor mation and help educate people. The use of social media for promotion and education is yet another way agriculture and technology are becoming intwined. Labor and Regulation Hand said local governments seem to be supportive of agriculture in their communi ties. They dont get in the way, he said, but the federal government can get in the way, sometimes. I think its better than it had been, from what I can gather from everyone. He said farmers growing cotton and soy beans are worried about China, but most farmers are focusing on the North American Fair Trade Agreement. I think all the farmers like free trade be cause it helps them easily get their products around to different places, Hand said. But for example, there were several hundred loads of produce dumped in California last week, and obviously thats going to drop our prices here because were a big vegetable county. So weve actually had a few farmers have to leave product in the eld because they couldnt afford to pick it this year because of a big produce dump from Mexico. Hand gave cucumbers as an example, say ing Mexico is selling cucumbers for $7 a box and Georgia cucumbers cost $9 a box before it even leaves the packing shed. Farms that left product in the eld allowed people to come in and pick what they want ed and donated a lot of that product to food banks, too. They try to give out as much as they can, Hand said. They dont like to see it just rot. Selling fresh vegetables, instead of row crops such as corn, means crops have to be picked by hand. So, labor is one of their biggest issues, Kirk said. Kirk said the company makes sure its em ployees are H2A employees, which is a visa program that brings in seasonal workers from other countries to work the farms. We bring them in from Mexico and El Salvador, she said. They can come in and we guarantee them a certain pay rate which is well above minimum wage. We provide housing for them, transportation, health care. At our cost, not their cost. With the wage theyre paid, the added cost of everything they provide, the cost per per son, per hour is approximately $15 per hour, Kirk said. She said its a really big issue because of the need for that labor and the expense of it. Its really expensive and we dont have a choice, Kirk said. We see it as something that we have to do to protect ourselves, rst to make sure we have a viable work force. She said the farm doesnt hire anyone with out legal status because the risk isnt worth it. We mostly use migrant workers who come here from Mexico, Corbett said of TyCore Farms. We bring in around 200 to 250 people a year, and the government has some substantial laws regulating what a person has to have for suitable living space. Some of the regulations can be very spe cic, Corbett said. For example, the farm was written up once when a worker left eggs out side of a refrigerator. Its dumb laws like that, he said. Most laws and regulations he would like to change come from the federal level. He said farming is impacted by every new president, and President Donald Trump has made things easier than when President Barack Obama was in ofce. With the last eight years, while Obama was in ofce, it was pretty much all we could do to just keep our head above water, Cor bett said. Its changed since Trump has gone into ofce and started shaking things up a little bit. He said Trump is more critical on trade agreements with other countries such as Mexico that have fewer regulations. Corbett said he cant compete with countries that pay their workers $6 a day when he has to pay his workers $10 an hour. He also has to follow strict regulations about food safety, while oth er farmers have no one watching over them. Theres no one making sure they arent using the wrong chemicals or something like that, Corbett said. They just send truck after truck in here without any checks and balanc es. Farming in the Lowndes County and Echols County area comes with its benets, he said. The farm is never short on water, and farmers in the area get along with each other pretty well, he said. This is a very good place for what we do, Corbett said. In a lot of places around the country they have water restrictions. We dont have that here. And everyone around here is pretty friendly. When prices get low, it can get a little cutthroat, but the majority of it is friendly. As far as the future of farming, Corbett said he looks forward to the rise of new tech nology in farming. He said he knows there is research going into making machines that can pick fresh vegetables, which Corbett would be interested in. However, a machine capable of doing what a person can do would take an array of censors and robotics that technology cant do right now, he said. Until technology catches up with humans, Corbett asked that people set aside their bias es against migrant workers who come to the U.S. just looking to do the work no one else wants. He said he would also like for laws to treat workers more fairly while they are here. One of the things that bothers me most is the ignorance of the importance of migrant workers, Corbett said. If we want our food picked, it has to be done with their help. The law snatches them up left and right and sends them back home, and theyre just here work ing and gathering our food for us. The SunLight Project team of journalists who contributed to this report includes Thomas Lynn, Derrek Vaughn, Jason Smith, Kevin Hall, Patti Dozier, Will Woolever, Eve Copeland and Jamie Wachter. rrf

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AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 12A 114622-1 Do your children ride the bus to school? Before its time to head back to class, take a few minutes to remind them of the following safety guidelines: without running, and wait calmly, away from the road and trac. bus. feet, under the seat, or on your knees. make sure the bus has come hol ding on to the rail and shing others. from the dan ger zone. If you Make eye con tact with the any de tours or delays. School transportation safety is everyones business; its up to you too! suwanneegraphics.com rfntbtfrntfr bbttrftrbfffrtrbbbt 125122-1 125125-1 Sheri Brian N. Lamb Lafayette County Sheris OceWishes all students and school sta a safe school year Jerry Smith, DMDDentistry 125411-1 Superintendent Ted L. Roush and School Board MembersSchool Starts 124895-1 124968-1 Hamilton County Say Live Oak Jewelry 106 Howard St. W. Live Oak, FL 32064 Tel (386) 362-1140 Fax (386) 364-3654 Email liveoakjewelry@windstream.netEstablished 1946Jon C. Boggus Bart L. Boggus 125446-1 124997-1 Sheri Sam St.John & e Suwannee County Sheris Oce PRACTICE SAFETY THIS SCHOOL YEAR 317 E. Howard Street | Live Oak, FL 32064 | (386) 362-4535 www.townandcountrytireliveoak.com 125322-1 Back To School SafetySmart tips for school bus safety ESTES ALTMAN JOSH ALTMAN 125281-1

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michael.jones@gaflnews.com Editors Note: This is the fifth part of an eight-part series that will preview Suwannee, Branford, Lafayette and Hamil ton County football teams at each position. Suwannee Jay Williams, Billy Duchaj, Keandre McKay, Dustin Konvalinka For a team that graduated plenty of impact players in different positions, the Suwannee Bulldogs still have great continuity. No where is that more evident than on the defensive line. SHS graduated two good defensive ends, but this years D-line is full of seniors with plenty of playing experience. Jay Williams returns as a starting DT and can cause plenty of havoc. Dustin Konvalinka (NG, 6-foot-2, 310 pounds) is Suwannees biggest D-lineman. Billy Duchaj and Keandre Sports SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SEE DEFENSIVE, PAGE 6B r Position Previews: Defensive Line fntnbffntn rfnftrfbff fntnbn fbffftnfrfnf Wide receivers carry a lot of baggage. Thats why Im a major proponent in skipping the po sition in the rst two rounds in fantasy football. Its tough for a wide receiver to be a consis tently high producer in fantasy football. To be competent, the wide receiver generally needs a good quarterback, a scheme that focuses mainly on him and a game ow that keeps the ball in the air. Thats a lot that has to go right each week. Once again, Ill be skipping the wide receivers early in the draft. If youre thinking of hitching your wagon to an ear ly wide receiver, be careful of these three likely wide receiver busts in the 2018 fantasy foot ball draft. Keenan Allen, WR, Los Angeles Chargers Of all my picks last season, this may have been my favorite. I was all over Allen in the preseason, thanks to his low average draft position and ability to garner a high level of targets. He averaged 9.9 targets per game in 2017 and after a slow start, was one of the most productive fantasy football wide receivers late in the year. However, with an ADP that is hovering around the 16th overall pick in this years fantasy foot ball draft, Im fading on Allen. Even with a high number of tar gets, Allen was not a productive option during the rst half of last season. He tallied just two double-digit fantasy scoring games in the rst nine weeks of the season, and was ignored in the red zone. Its not just that red ag that has me a bit concerned. The reason he was rated so low last year had nothing to do with his on-eld exploits. His injury his tory scared away owners. So we shouldnt completely forget that heading into this season. In 2015 and 2016, he played in nine total games. Thats a risk that has to be evaluated, even with a healthy season in 2017. The risk is too much to con sider him a mid-sec ond round option in 2018. Adam Thielen, WR, Minnesota Vikings Theres nothing to say that Thielen wont be a high-produc ing wide receiver in the NFL for years to come. But do you really want to be on the hook with him on your team to nd out? Thielen was a surprising star in 2017 for the Vikings, racking up more than 1,200 yards and notching 91 receptions. It goes in line with an improvement from 2016, where he tallied just under 1,000 yards and 61 recep tions. So maybe he is going to be a highly targeted wide receiver, capable of putting up top-10 wide receiver numbers. Or may be hes going to take a step back with a new quarterback and a healthy Dalvin Cook occupying more of the offense. With the risk presented by Thielen, who is not a touchdown threat, you would have to risk the 30th overall pick, accord ing to ADP, which ranks 10th among wide receivers. That puts him in line to be a teams No. 1 wide receiver if they follow the strategy to grab two running backs early in the draft. Im just not comfortable yet with Thielen as my No. 1 on my fantasy team, especially with his lack of touchdown production, even with 142 targets in 2017. Be careful employing Thielen as your No. 1 option in 2018. Josh Gordon, WR, Cleveland Browns I dont see the Gordon ex periment going anywhere other than two ways hes a top-ve fantasy football wide receiver or hes a complete bust. Talent-wise, Gordon is one of the best wide receivers in the NFL. Its tough to see that talent when hes not on the eld, and with the recent story that hes taking some time off, that doesnt exactly generated much condence that hell be a week ly option in 2018 as a fantasy wide receiver. And if his ADP wasnt so high, hed probably be worth the risk. Currently, hes going off at 43rd overall, 17th among wide receivers, so thats still risking decent draft capital on such a volatile player. If his ADP sinks, then it would be wise to consider Gordon, based on his potential. However, at this level, its not worth the risk of having to lose your teams likely WR2. Scott Levine is the Associate Editor for the Clinton Herald. During his free time, he blogs about fantasy sports and hand icaps games. His Against The Chalk blog has earned him back-to-back Iowa Newspaper Association awards for Best Blog. Check out more at Against The Chalk. Three likely wide receiver busts in 2018 fantasy football draft

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AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 2B Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Aug. 17 Armchair Travels Rick and Barbara Phipps served as Southern Baptist music missionaries in Japan for 27 years, mostly in the city of Nagoya. Rick direct ed many hand bell choirs and helped church es develop their music programs. Barbara led sewing classes for women and English lessons for school children. Come and hear about living and working in that very different culture on August 17 at 10:00AM. Jo Kennon Public Library, 10655 Dowling Park Dr in Live Oak. 386-658-2670 Aug. 22 Introduction to Aviation Noon-1 p.m. Learn about Aviation from local pilot Clark Dechant. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Aug. 22 Last Kind Words Saloon Book Club 2:00-3 p.m. Join us to discuss Last Kind Words Saloon by Larry McMurty. Copies available for checkout at the front desk. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Aug. 23 Cooking Demo Noon-1 p.m. Brown Rice Jambalaya Cooking Demo by Bonnie Box, Suwannee County Extension Of ce. Bonnie will share recipes that are low-cost, healthy, easy, and tasty. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Aug. 24 Game Day for Adults 10 a.m.-noon Bring your favorite board or card game and your friends! Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Aug. 26 Awards Day at Poplar Springs Church Everyone is invited to attend the annual Edu cational Awards Day program on August 26 at GPSMB Church at 11 a.m. The types of awards presented are: Humanitarian, Evangelistic and Academic. The motivational speaker will be a native and graduate of Hamilton County schools, Mrs. Verna Jackson Johnson. Dinner will be served at the ceremony. Pastor: Rev. J.T. (Billy) Simon Aug. 30 SongFarmers Gathering 6 p.m. Enjoy a musical gathering of musicians with song and acoustic instruments. Musicians welcome! Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Sept. 9-12 Pleasant Grove Baptist Revival Pleasant Grove Baptist Church will be having a revival with Brother Bill Jenkins from Sept. 9-12. Times will be as follows: Sunday at 6 p.m., Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday at 7 p.m. nightly. The church is located at 816 SW CR 351 in Mayo. Sept. 12-16 Jellystone Park Jam The Jellystone Park Jam will be hosted from September 12-16 at Yogi Bears Jellystone Park in Madison. Over two dozen of gospel musics nest talents are scheduled to appear throughout the ve-day event. The Jellystone Park Jam is a free event for anyone to attend. For a complete list of the concert events and times or more information, visit https://www.jel lystoneparkjam.com/home, call 850-464-0114 or email jellystoneparkjam@gmail.com. Sept. 16 139th Homecoming at Pleasant Grove Bap tist Pleasant Grove Baptist Church will be cele brating its 139th homecoming on Sept. 16 with an 11:30 a.m. morning service. A cov ered dish dinner will be held after the service. The church is located at 816 SW CR 351 in Mayo. Oct. 13 Class of Reunion The Suwannee High School Class of will be hosting its 25th class reunion on Oct. 13 at 6 p.m., located at the Brown Lantern. Members of the Class of are encouraged to make plans to attend to catch up with classmates and their signicant others. Oct. 13 Annual Fall Festival Spirit of Christ Lutheran Churchs Annual Fall Festival will be held on Saturday, October 13, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m., located at 145 SW Sweetbreeze Drive, Lake City (386-752-3807) take US-90 West past Harveys Supermarket. The festival will feature local vendors, and will also have local bands performing, including Skip Johns and Martin Feagle. Monthly Meetings Rock Painting Rock Painting parties will be held regularly on the third Tuesday of the month from 6-7PM. Stop by to paint your own rock and visit with other rock star artists. All supplies are provided. Jo Kennon Public Library, 10655 Dowling Park Dr in Live Oak. 386-658-2670 Hymn Singing Old-fashioned hymn singing takes place at White Springs United Methodist Church on the fourth Sunday of every month at 4 p.m. Hymn requests from the congregation are welcome. The church invites the community to attend. White Springs United Methodist Church is lo cated at 16580 Spring St. in White Springs. Mens Community-wide Church Fellowship and Supper The Live Oak Church of God invites the com munity to join them for their dinner on the third Monday night of each month for their Mens Community Wide Church Fellowship and Supper at 7 p.m. Each month, there will be a guest speaker. For more information, call Johnnie Philman Mens Ministry at 386-842-5494 or Pastor Wes Tanksley at 386-362-2483. Alcoholics Anonymous The Live Oak Group of Alcoholics Anonymous meet three days each week on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday at 7 p.m. at 911 Nobles Ferry Road (Gray Precinct Voting Building), the building next to the Health Department. For more information, contact Charlie at 386-3646410. The number is not monitored 24 hours a day, so please leave a message. Suwannee River Toastmasters The Suwannee River Toastmasters Club invites you to join us as we work together to em power individuals to become more effective communicators and leaders. We meet the 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the Suwannee River Water Management District Headquarters. Contact Joe Flanagan at 386-209-1912 for additional information. Kiwanis Club of Live Oak The Kiwanis Club of Live Oak invites you to join us in making the world a better place one child and one community at a time. We meet each Wednesday from noon to 1 p.m. at the Florida Farm Bureau Insurance building. Contact Joe Flanagan at 386-209-1912 for additional information. Suwannee County Conservation District supervisor meeting The supervisors of the Suwannee County Conservation District will meet on the third Thursday of each and every month at 7 p.m. in the USDA Service Center Conference Room for their regularly scheduled District Meeting. The USDA Service Center is located at 1525-B Ohio Ave. South, Live Oak. History of Suwannee County Presented by County Historian Eric Musgrove Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 1st Thursday of the month, 12-1 p.m.. 386-658-2670 McAlpin Community Club meeting The McAlpin Community Club meetings are held on the second Monday every month at 9981 170th Terrace, in McAlpin. A covered dish dinner is served at 6 p.m. with the meet ing and/or a scheduled program beginning at 7 p.m. Find them on Facebook by searching McAlpin Community Club. For more information, contact Susan Fennell at mcalpincommunityclub@outlook.com. Seed Library and Gardening Workshop Presented by Master Gardener Rhonda Lepper Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 1st Thursday of the month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. 386-658-2670 Recipe Swap Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Mutual relationship meeting request I am Earlene Green, Director of the recently established Agape Green Acres Ministry, Inc (AGAMI), an Holistic, Non-Denominational Womens Ministry and non-prot Organization, in Jasper, FL The purpose of this notice is to request a meeting with you, or your Ministry administrator(s) to discuss a mutual working and referral relationship between our organiza tions to benet our mutual clients. We are currently an outreach ministry with the near future goal of a brick and mortar loca tion. I can be reached at 267-779-4845 or by email at drgreen49@yahoo.com. Thank you, and I look forward to hearing from you soon! Aug. 8 Knitting Class 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn how to knit, purl, cast on, and bind off. Please bring needles and yarn. Taught by Debra Barney Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Aug. 9 Recipe Swap Recipe Swap will be held on the second Thursday of every month from 1-2PM. Join us in the library meeting room to meet with other foodies, discuss new or old recipes, and maybe have a sample or two. Our August recipe swap will feature Mexican inspired dish es. Samples are welcome but not required. Please be sure to bring your recipe, well make copies at the library for anyone interested. Jo Kennon Public Library, 10655 Dowling Park Dr in Live Oak. 386-658-2670 Aug. 9 Water Resources for Suwannee Valley Agri culture Noon-1 p.m. Presented by Dr. Charles Barrett, Suwannee Valley Agricultural Extension Center Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Aug. 11 CPR and First Aid Class 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Learn lifesaving techniques of CPR and rst aid taught by Suwannee Fire Rescue. Space is limited. Please preregister. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Aug. 11 Pancake Breakfast Pancake Breakfast, Sat., August 11, from 8 a.m., at Spirit of Christ Lutheran Church, located at 145 SW Sweetbreeze Drive, Lake City (386-752-3807) take US-90 West past Harveys Supermarket. **Takeout available.** Aug. 12-14 Youth Alive Bellville Baptist Church will be hosting its Youth Alive program for youth and college ages. Youth Alive will be held from 6:30 until 8 p.m., with dinner being served at 6:30 p.m. The ser vice begins at 7 p.m., and there is no charge to attend. Bellville Baptist Church is located at 3809 NW CR 152 in Jennings. Aug. 13 SVTA Board of Directors scheduled meeting The Suwannee Valley Transit Authority Board of Directors will hold its regularly scheduled meeting Monday, August 13, at 6 p.m. The location of this meeting is the SVTA Board Room, 1907 Voyles Street, SW in Live Oak. You may contact our ofce at (386) 362-5332 x6329 or visit our website www.ridesvta.com for a copy of the Agenda packet. Aug. 14 & 28 Free Clinic Opening Shepherds Hands of Suwannee Valley Free Medical Clinic, located at St. Lukes Episcopal Church, will be open Tuesday, August 14 from 5:30:30 p.m. The clinic serves persons from 18-64 years of age who do not have health insurance. The church is located at 1391 11th St. in Live Oak. 386-362-1837 The Madison Clinic, at St. Marys Episcopal Church, will be open Tuesday, August 28 from 5:30:30 p.m. St. Marys is located at 140 NE Horry St. in Madison. 850-973-8338 For more information, please contact the phone number of the clinic you plan to attend. Aug. 14 Christmas Hemming, Slave On August 14th at 10:00AM, Pat Hines Mitchell will be at Jo Kennon to discuss her great, great, great grandfather, Christmas Hem ming who was born sometime in the early 1800s in Florida and lived most of his life as a slave. Come learn about artifacts that were recovered on the property and how Thomas Dowling bought the railroad rights through Mr. Hemmings property. Jo Kennon Public Library, 10655 Dowling Park Dr in Live Oak. 386-658-2670 Aug. 15 Crocheting Class 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn how to crochet. Please bring needles and yarn. Taught by Debra Barney Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Aug. 16 Informational table at HCHS The Agape Green Acres Ministry, Inc. will have a table at Hamilton County High Schools Meet the Teacher on August 16 inside the HCHS Media Center from 4 p.m. Their table will have information available concerning parental, educational, health care, nutrition, housing, legal and governmen tal benet eligibility needs for women and children in Hamilton County. Free clothing will also be available to high school girls. For more information, contact (retired) Judge Earlene Green, Director at 267-779-4845. Aug. 16 Volunteering with Disaster Relief Mardelle Nasshan is a three-year ACV mem ber who was a pastors wife for 36 years, a volunteer and keynote speaker at a rescue facility for abused children in South Carolina. More recently she served with the Billy Graham Association as a trained volunteer chaplain on their Rapid Response Team. Come and learn why she is called The Singing Chaplain on Thursday, August 16 at 10:00AM. Jo Kennon Public Library, 10655 Dowling Park Dr in Live Oak. 386-658-2670 Aug. 16 Armchair Travels to Vietnam 6 p.m. Travel to Vietnam from the comfort of the library. Presented by Sheila Hiss and Sherry Millington. Community Calendar Community Calendar event submissions Want to place your upcoming event(s) in our weekly Community Calendar? Email your events to aimee. buckner@ganews.com Include basic details such as who, what, where and when. Please note: protable events will need to be handled by our advertising department. For more information, contact Aimee via email. Deadline for submissions is Monday at 3 p.m. SEE COMMUNITY CALENDAR, PAGE 3B

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AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 3B Community Calendar Live Oak, FL 32064 2nd Thursday of the month, 1-2 p.m. Bring in a favorite recipe or dish, meet other foodies and exchange ideas. Call 386-6582670 for featured recipe of the month. Florida Native Plant Society The Sparkleberry Chapter meets on the sec ond Tuesday of the month at Hatch Park Community Center, 403 S.E. Craven Street in Branford, presenting a variety of education al programs concerning our Florida native plants, the birds, bees and other wildlife that visit our plants, their place in our landscapes, and the contributions they make to our Florida environment. Meetings are always open to the public. More at www.sparkleberry.fnpschapters.org, or call 407-319-2488 or 386-364-9309. Rock Painting Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 3rd Tuesday of the month, 6-7 p.m. Paint rocks and visit with other rock star artists. All supplies are provided. 386-658-2670 EAA monthly pancake breakfast The EAA Chapter 797 hosts a pancake break fast every third Saturday of the month from 8:30 a.m. in the EAA building at Suwannee County Airport. The EAA building is located at 13302 80th Terr. in Live Oak. For more information, contact 817-308-9752. Armchair Travels Presented by Don and Joanne Mott Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 3rd Friday of the month, 10-11 a.m. Travel around the country and learn about exciting new places to visit. Dementia Support Group Location: Good Samaritan Center Private Dining Room 10676 Marvin Jones Blvd. Dowling Park, Florida When: the fourth Tuesday of each month Time: 10 a.m. This is for anyone who is a caregiver for someone who is suffering with Dementia or Alzheimers. There is no charge for this support group. You do not have to have a loved one residing in the Good Samaritan Center to attend this meeting. For more information please feel free to con tact Ginger Calhoun at 386-658-5594. Book Club for Adults Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 Last Friday of the month, 10-11 a.m. Join us to discuss our latest read. 386-658-2670 Suwannee Valley Branch of the NAACP meeting The Suwannee Valley Branch of the NAACPs regular monthly meeting will be at New Bethel Baptist Church located at 205 4th St in Jasper from 7 p.m. every third Monday. Meetings will begin after May 22, 2017. SREC, Inc. Senior Center monthly events The SREC, Inc. Senior Center, located at 1509 Martin Luther King Dr. SW in Jasper has month ly birthday parties the third Friday of every month at noon, as well as monthly karaoke the fourth Wednesday of every month at 10 a.m. For more information, contact Barbara Daniels at 386-792-1136. Events are subject to change. Mom 2 Mom The community is invited to Mom 2 Mom on the fourth Thursday of the month from 1-2 p.m. at the Lafayette Three Rivers Library. Get together with other parents. Door prizes and goodies will be provided. Call Healthy Start at 386-294-1321. Estas invitada a Mom 2 Mom, un evento que se celebru el cuarto Jueves de cada mes la 1p.m. hasta la cas 2 p.m. en la Biblioteca de Lafayette. Reunirse con otras mams. Se propocionarn premios y regalos. Llame a Healthy Start al 386-294-1321. All-You-Can-Eat Wellborn Blueberry Pancake Breakfast The All-You-Can-Eat Wellborn Blueberry Pan cake Breakfast will be held the rst Saturday of each month from 7:30 a.m. All new menu items including blueberry pancakes, scram bled eggs, sausage, grits, bacon, orange juice and coffee. Located at the Wellborn Community Associ ation Building 1340 8th Ave. Wellborn, FL. For pricing and other information, call 386-8671761 or visit us online on Facebook or www. wellborncommunityassociation.com. Come join us for great food and help benet the Wellborn community. Taylor County Beekeeping Club meeting Taylor County Beekeeping Club meets the second Monday of every month at 6:30 p.m. at the Taylor County IFAS center: 203 Forest Park Dr, Perry, Fla. 32348 www.facebook.com/tcbeeclub tacobeekeepers@gmail.com WoodmenLife monthly member meeting, bring a dish WoodmenLife monthly member meeting is held on the rst of every month. Located at 1339 SR 47 in Lake City. RSVP with your local WoodmanLife representative Kristen Hunt at 386-688-7942. Singspiration at Suwannee Church of the Nazarene Every 5th Sunday, the church will host a Sing spirationa night where members of the congregation sing, read poems, share testi monies, etc. Want to participate? Visit the church, or call at 386-397-2309, to be added to the list. The more participation, the longer it goes. After wards, there will be snacks and refreshments in the fellowship hall. The church is located at 18763 SE CR 137 in White Springs, FL 32096 The Florida Gateway Bee Club meeting The Florida Gateway Bee Club meets at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Suwannee Valley Agriculture Center locat ed at 8202 CR 417, Live Oak. Professional and hobby beekeepers are wel come, as well as anyone with an interest in learning about honeybees. San Juan Mission Catholic Church public Rosary The community is invited to join San Juan Mis sion Catholic Church, 304 SE Plant Ave, Bran ford, for the public Rosary on the rst Saturday of every month at 9 a.m. The community will pray for religious freedom, traditional moral standards and freedom of conscience. The Suwannee Chapter, Florida Trail Associ ation meetings The Suwannee Chapter, Florida Trail Associa tion holds its monthly meetings on the second Monday, 7-9 p.m. at the Suwannee River Water Management District, 9225 CR 49, Live Oak, corner of US 90 and CR 49, 2 miles east of Live Oak. Programs and activities available, and public is welcome. For more information, call 386-776-1920 or visit Suwannee.FloridaTrail.org. Disabled American Veterans Chapter 126, Suwannee Memorial Meets the rst Tuesday of each month at the hall in John Hale Park, 215 East Duval St., Live Oak. Disabled veterans and their spouses are encouraged to attend and join. Suwannee Republican Executive Committee Meets the 1st Thursday of each month at 7 p.m., Live Oak City Hall 101 White Ave SE Contact Sherri Ortega 386-330-2736 for more information. www.suwanneegop.com Suwannee County Republican Executive Committee Live Oak City Hall, 101 White Ave SE, Live Oak Meets rst Thursday, 7 p.m. www.suwanneegop.com Suwannee Valley 500 Club Third Saturday of each month the Suwannee Valley 500 Club will meet at 1 p.m., at the Suwannee River Regional Library located at 1848 Ohio Ave S. in Live Oak.727-804-4739 Clothes Closet open donations The Jasper First Methodist Church is accept ing donations of clean and gently used items of clothing for children, women and men to be offered in the monthly Clothes Closet. The Clothes Closet is open to everyone on the fourth Saturday of every month from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Christmas and Thanksgiving months the schedule is subject to change). All items are offered free of charge. For more information call 386-397-2316. *The Clothes Closet will be closed due to the Christmas holiday on December 16. Suwannee County Historical Commission The Suwannee County Historical Commission meets on the third Thursday of the month at 3:30 p.m. at the Suwannee County Historical Museum (old Freight Depot) on Ohio Avenue in Live Oak. Meetings are open to the public. Public rosary rst Friday Join St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church for the public rosary every rst Friday of the month at 3 p.m. The church is located at 928 Howard St West. Contact Sheri Ortega at 386-3641108 or Paul Schmitz at 386-362-5710 for more information. MOAA-Military Ofcers Association of America The Suwannee River Valley Chapter of MOAA meets monthly (September through June) in Lake City. All active duty, retired, and for mer military ofcers of all services, including Reserve and National Guard, and spouses/ guests are welcome. For information and reservations call Mo Becnel (386)755-0756 or Steve Casto at (386)497-2986. The Suwannee River Valley Chapter, founded in 1990, is one of over 400 MOAA chapters around the world. Suwannee County Riding Club Bob Holmes Arena, Live Oak We have roping events on the second and fourth Fridays of the month. Sign ups at 7 p.m. and rides begin at 8 p.m. Speed events are held on the second and fourth Saturdays of the month. Sign ups begin at 6 p.m. and rides begin at 7 p.m. We ride from the fourth weekend of January until November with the exception of March where we have no rides. If you have any questions contact Brittney Smith at 386-688-1482. Recipe Swap Suwannee River Regional Library 1848 Ohio Ave. S, Live Oak 1st Tuesday of the month, 12 p.m. 1 p.m. Bring in a favorite recipe or dish, meet other foodies, and exchange ideas. Call 386-3622317 for Featured Recipe of the Month Christian Singles Meet every other Saturday at 5 p.m. Call for more information: 386-623-5810, 386-2880961, 386-438-3394. Branford Camera Club Hatch Park Community Center 403 SE Craven St. Branford Meets 3rd Thursday with an occasional ex ception 386-935-2044 or 386-590-6339 Critter Corner Suwannee County Animal Shelter 11150 144th St., McAlpin, Fla. (approx. 8 miles South off Hwy 129). If you are missing a pet or would love to adopt a pet, please come see us. Animals can be viewed Monday-Friday 9-1 and Saturday 9-12. Volun teers and transporters are desperately need ed; Tues.-Sat., 9-9:30 a.m., see Ms. Norma. Spay/Neuter 386-208-0072 Suwannee County Seniors Free Breakfast and Lunch Suwannee River Economic Councils Senior Center 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW, Live Oak. Mon day-Friday 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Breakfast8:30 a.m./Lunch11:30 a.m. (make reservation for lunch by 9:30 a.m.) Bingo: (Wednesdays) 10 a.m. Meeting/Service: (Fridays) 10a.m. 386362-1164 First Baptist Church of Live Oak Clothes Closet 515 SW 5th Street, 1st and 3rd Thursday, 8 a.m.-12 p.m. (The Old Red Barn) Suwannee Valley Branch NAACP-Unit #5137 PO Box 6105, Live Oak, FL 32064 President: Alonzo Philmore Triumph The Church & Kingdom of God in Christ, 410 Taylor Ave. SW off of 7th St. 1st Monday each month, 7 p.m. Email: a1101st@comcast.net 386-205-9132 American Legion Post 107 10726 142nd St., Live Oak Off of Hwy 129 S, post is 1 mile on the right. Meets 1st Thursday at 12 p.m. 386-362-5987 Social Sewing Club Center Ave., off of 7th St. 2nd and 4th Tuesday For more information: 386-362-4062 Live Oak Garden Club 1300 11th St. SW, Live Oak 3rd Friday of each month, 11 a.m. liveoakoridagardenclub.com 386-364-4189 Stars Widow Group Antioch Baptist Church 5203 CR 795, Live Oak, FL 4th Monday, 10:30 a.m. 386-362-3101 Suwannee Amateur Radio Club 1st Tuesday, social at 6:30 p.m., regular meeting at 7 p.m. North of I10 & US Hwy 129, Live Oak. Call for exact location and directions. www.suwanneearc.org 386-249-3616 Live Oak Art Guild Suwannee River Regional Library 1848 Ohio Ave. S, Live Oak Meets 1st Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Judith Adams-386-776-2675 Suwannee Democratic Executive Committee Live Oak City Hall 101 White Ave. SE, Live Oak Meets 2nd Thursday, 7 p.m. Suwannee County Bassmasters Poole Realty Inc 127 E. Howard St., Live Oak Meets 1st Tuesday, 7 p.m. 386-688-0978 or 386-590-2885 Save the Cats of Live Oak Help needed at the shelter with feeding and cleaning Monday through Sundays. Help is also needed within the city limits with feeding several cat colonies Monday through Sun days. Items always needed are food, litter and resalable items for the thrift store located at 217 W. Howard St. downtown. For more information, contact 386-364-1006 or 407748-0396. The Arc North Florida Recycle with us We recycle cardboard, name brand ink cartridges, laser toners, working cell phones w/charger, digital cameras, GPS, MP3, and laptops. 386-362-7143 ext. 0 Book Club for Adults Suwannee River Regional Library 1848 Ohio Ave. S, Live Oak Meets 4th Wednesday of the month at 2 p.m. Join us to discuss our latest read! 386-362-2317 Lunch & Learn History of Suwannee County Presented by County Historian, Eric Musgrove Suwannee River Regional Library 1848 Ohio Ave. S, Live Oak Meets 2nd Thursday of each month from 12-1 p.m. Bring your lunch & learn about our historic county! 386-362-2317 Weekly Meetings Childrens Programs at JKPL Preschool Storytime Wednesdays, 10:0011:00AM Lego Construction Zone Wednesdays, 3:004:30PM Movies Thursdays, 3:00-4:30PM and Satur days, 1:00-3:30PM Bridge Club seeking players Monday Bridge Club meets every Monday at 5:30 p.m. at a local restaurant in Live Oak. Club needs players. Contact Diana at 904254-8923 for details. Grace Lutheran Church hosting educational prayer classes Would you like to learn more of Jesus? Do you have questions about the Christian faith? Are you going through a difcult time and seek Gods council? Classes starting soon, those who attend can do so to t their schedules best. Different class times will be available. Please contact Pastor Doug Priestap at Grace Lutheran Church Live Oak, 386-364-1851 or gracelutheranliv eoak@gmail.com Childrens Table Food Distribution The Childrens Table Food Distribution will be at Peace Baptist Church, 7794 S. Hwy. 27, Bran ford, FL each Wednesday between 2:00-2:30. Bring a large laundry basket or other container to put food in. Donations will be accepted. For further information, 386-935-4681 Beginners AA meeting Beginners AA at Dowling Park meets Mon day-Wednesday-Saturday, 7 p.m. at The Lighthouse 23595 CR 250, Live Oak, 32060 For more information call 305-407-0895. www. LiveOakAA.com GriefShare Support GriefShare is a pastor-supervised, lay-led, Biblically based, Christ-centered, video assist ed support group for persons who have lost loved ones or friends by death. The group will meet each Thursday at 10 a.m. beginning May 18 and run through August 10. This 13 week support program will be scheduled throughout the year on dif ferent day and time to give those on varying personal schedules an opportunity to partici pate. All who have experienced the death of a loved one are cordially invited to become a participant in GriefShare. For more informa tion call 383-792-1122. Finding Your Roots? The Suwannee Valley Genealogy Society is the place to start! The library, located at 215 Wilbur Street SW near the football eld in Live Oak, is open to the public on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. to help you nd your ancestors. You do not have to be a member to use the library. Meetings are held on the rst Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the library. For further information, including membership prices, call Jinnie Han cock at 386-330-0110 or email JinnieSVGS@ windstream.net SREC, Inc. Senior Center weekly events The SREC, Inc. Senior Center, located at 1509 Martin Luther King Dr. SW in Jasper hosts weekly support counseling every Wednesday beginning at 10 a.m. and Bible study every Friday at 10:30 a.m. For more information, contact Barbara Daniels at 386-792-1136. Events are subject to change. Quilting Friends Each Tuesday from 9 a.m.-noon Jasper Public Library, 311 Hatley St. in Jasper. 386-792-2285 He Speaks to Me bible study for women He Speaks to Me, a Priscilla Shirer Bible study for women, will be held on Tuesdays from 9:30-11 a.m. beginning Jan. 17 at Pinemount Baptist Church on Hwy 129 in McAlpin led by Chaplain Judy. For more information, con tact her at 364-5558. We hope to see you there! Suwannee River Church of the Nazarene schedule The Suwannee River Church of the Naza rene is located at 18763 SE CR 137 in White Springs. For more information, call 386-3972309. Sunday School9:45 10:45 a.m. Sunday Morning Service11 a.m. noon Afternoon PotluckNoon Sunday Evening Service6 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service6 p.m. TOPS #662 (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) Meets every Thursday. (8 a.m. for weighin, meeting at 9 a.m.) at Advent Christian Church, 911 Pinewood Ave., Live Oak, Fla. For more information, call Mary at 386-3302535. Branford Seed Library Every second and fourth Tuesday from 2:304:30 p.m. Presented by the Suwannee County Master Gardeners. Check out seed packets and get all your gar dening questions answered at the Branford Public Library. 386-935-1556 TOPS #9798 TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) TOPS #9798 is a support group that offers weekly weigh-ins and programs. The pro grams provide participants with health and weight loss information. Those ready to achieve weight loss and wish for more information may call Barbara at 386-362-5933 or Dori at 386-658-2767. Mayo AA Group Located at the First United Methodist Church, meet every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday at 8 p.m. For more information, contact 386-294-2423 or 386-647-6424 AWANA Club New Hope Baptist Church, Mayo on Hwy. 51. From 6-8 p.m. and runs throughout the school year. Open to children ages two through sixth grades. For more information, call 386-294-2742. Grief Share GriefShare, a special support group for peo ple experiencing grief and loss, will be held on Wednesday evenings from 6-8 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Live Oak. The church is located at 401 W. Howard St. Childcare is provided. Please call the church at 386-3621583 if you would like to attend. Continued From Page 2B

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Public Notices Protecting Your Right to Know Legals LIVE OAK HOUSING AUTHORITY 2018 REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR CO-DEVELOPMENT PARTNER The Live Oak Housing Authority (LOHA) is requesting qualification statements from experienced devel opers (Co-Development Partners). Full scope of services and require ments are outlined in the solicitation package and will be available by con tacting LOHA. To request a copy of the RFQ, please contact: Vickie Hogg, Executive Director at 386-362-2123, or by mail at lopha@windstream.net All responses to the RFQ must be delivered to the LOHA Main Office located at 406 Webb Drive, NE, Live Oak, FL 32064 by 4:00 p.m. EST, Tuesday, August 21, 2018 Respons es received after this time will not be accepted. LOHA is n Equal Opportu nity Employer (EOE) and does not dis criminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age or handicapped status in the employ ment or procurement of services. The Authority reserves the right to waive any informality in qualifications and to reject any and all qualification statements if it is in the best interest of the Authority to do so. 08/03, 08/08, 08/10, 08/15, 08/17/2018 FIND IT IN THE LEGALS Legals NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to en gage in business under the fictitious name of Totally Clear Pool Service located at: 14825 83rd Drive in the County of Suwannee in the City of Live Oak Florida 32060 intends to register the said name with the Divi sion of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Live Oak Florida, this 2nd day of August 2018. Owners Name: Judy A. Johnson 08/08/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE Jacobs Engineering Group is propos ing to construct a 305-foot tall overall height self-supporting lattice type telecommunications structure located near 550 East Howard Street, Live Oak, Suwannee County, Florida (30 17 37.1, -82 58 44.4). Jacobs Engi neering Group invites comments from any interested party on the impact the proposed undertaking may have on any districts, sites, buildings, struc tures or objects significant in Ameri can history, archaeology, engineering, or culture that are listed or determined eligible for listing in the National Reg ister of Historic Places. Comments pertaining specifically to historic re sources may be sent to Environmental Corporation of America, ATTN: Dina Bazzill, 1375 Union Hill Industrial Court, Suite A, Alpharetta, Georgia 30004. Ms. Bazzill can be reached at (770) 667-2040 ext. 111. Comments must be received within 30 days of the date of this notice. U1703 RJE 08/08/2018 Legals SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT PUBLIC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the following application for permit was received on May 22, 2018: George Townsend, 13535 52nd St, Live Oak, FL 32060, Bennie Thom as, 1009 5th St, Live Oak, FL 32060, and Travis Tuten, 12709 52nd St, Live Oak, FL 32060 have submitted an ap plication to modify Water Use Permit Number 2-121-221111-3, authorizing a maximum average daily use of 0.3662 million gallons of groundwater for ag ricultural use in 1-in-10 year drought conditions. This project is located in Township 1S, Range 13E, Sections 32 and 34 in Suwannee County. Interested persons may comment upon the application or submit a writ ten request for a staff report contain ing proposed agency action regard ing the application by writing to the Suwannee River Water Management District, Attn: Resource Management, 9225 CR 49, Live Oak, FL 32060. Such comments or requests must be received by 5:00 PM within 14 days from the date of publication. No further public notice will be provid ed regarding this application. A copy of the staff report must be requested in order to remain advised of further proceedings. Substantially affected persons are entitled to request an administrative hearing, pursuant to Title 28, Florida Administrative Code, regarding the proposed agency action by submitting a written request after reviewing the staff report. 08/08/2018 Public Notices Protecting Your Right to Know Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 242018CA000033CAAXMX U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIA TION, AS TRUSTEE, FOR MANU FACTURED HOUSING CONTRACT SENIOR/SUBORDINATE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATE TRUST 2000-1 Plaintiff(s), vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, BENEFICIARIES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES OF KENNETH W. WALPOLE, DECEASED, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTS; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA-IN TERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; THE UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSES SION Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVI SEES, BENEFICIARIES, GRANT EES, ASSIGNS, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES OF KENNETH W. WALPOLE, DE CEASED, AND ALL OTHER PER SONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSLast known address6004 NW 44th Street, Jennings, FL 32053 Previous address-6004 NW 44th Street, Jennings, FL 32053 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court of Hamilton Coun ty, Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: A tract of land in Section 3, Town ship 1 North, Range 12 East, Ham ilton County, Florida, more particu larly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest cor ner of said Section 3, thence North 89 degrees 58 minutes 37 seconds East along the South line of Sec tion 3 a distance of 1073.96 feet; thence North 0 degrees 41 minutes 00 seconds West, 20 feet to the North side of County graded road and the Point of Beginning; thence continue North 0 degrees 41 min utes 00 seconds West, 1295.92 feet to the North line of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Sec tion 3, thence South 89 degrees 56 minutes 23 seconds East along the North line of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 and Southeast 1/4 of Southwest 1/4, 460.58 feet; thence South 0 degrees 41 minutes 00 seconds East, 1295.34 feet to the North side of said County grad ed road; thence South 89 degrees 58 minutes 37 seconds West along said graded road, 460.58 feet to the Point of Beginning. Together with that certain 2000, 52 x 28, mobile home with Vehi cle Identification No.s: FLHM LCB151322460A and FLHML CB151322460B. Mobile Home Serial Number(s): FLHMLCB151322460A, FLHML CB151322460B. Property address: 6004 NW 44th Street, Jennings, FL 32053 You are required to file a written re sponse with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Padgett Law Group, whose address is 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, FL 32312, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either be fore service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. DATED this the 27th day of July, 2018. (Court Seal) GREG GODWIN CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: /s/ Cynthia Johnson Deputy Clerk 08/09, 08/16/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 242018CA000033CAAXMX U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIA TION, AS TRUSTEE, FOR MANU FACTURED HOUSING CONTRACT SENIOR/SUBORDINATE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATE TRUST 2000-1 Plaintiff(s), vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, BENEFICIARIES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES OF KENNETH W. WALPOLE, DECEASED, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTS; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA-IN TERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; THE UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSES SION Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVI SEES, BENEFICIARIES, GRANT EES, ASSIGNS, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES OF KENNETH W. WALPOLE, DE CEASED, AND ALL OTHER PER SONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSLast known address6004 NW 44th Street, Jennings, FL 32053 Previous address-6004 NW 44th Street, Jennings, FL 32053 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court of Hamilton Coun ty, Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: A tract of land in Section 3, Town ship 1 North, Range 12 East, Ham ilton County, Florida, more particu larly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest cor ner of said Section 3, thence North 89 degrees 58 minutes 37 seconds East along the South line of Sec tion 3 a distance of 1073.96 feet; thence North 0 degrees 41 minutes 00 seconds West, 20 feet to the North side of County graded road and the Point of Beginning; thence continue North 0 degrees 41 min utes 00 seconds West, 1295.92 feet to the North line of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Sec tion 3, thence South 89 degrees 56 minutes 23 seconds East along the North line of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 and Southeast 1/4 of Southwest 1/4, 460.58 feet; thence South 0 degrees 41 minutes 00 seconds East, 1295.34 feet to the North side of said County grad ed road; thence South 89 degrees 58 minutes 37 seconds West along said graded road, 460.58 feet to the Point of Beginning. Together with that certain 2000, 52 x 28, mobile home with Vehi cle Identification No.s: FLHM LCB151322460A and FLHML CB151322460B. Mobile Home Serial Number(s): FLHMLCB151322460A, FLHML CB151322460B. Property address: 6004 NW 44th Street, Jennings, FL 32053 You are required to file a written re sponse with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Padgett Law Group, whose address is 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, FL 32312, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either be fore service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. DATED this the 27th day of July, 2018. (Court Seal) GREG GODWIN CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: /s/ Cynthia Johnson Deputy Clerk 08/09, 08/16/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 242018CA000033CAAXMX U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIA TION, AS TRUSTEE, FOR MANU FACTURED HOUSING CONTRACT SENIOR/SUBORDINATE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATE TRUST 2000-1 Plaintiff(s), vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, BENEFICIARIES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES OF KENNETH W. WALPOLE, DECEASED, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTS; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA-IN TERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; THE UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSES SION Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVI SEES, BENEFICIARIES, GRANT EES, ASSIGNS, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES OF KENNETH W. WALPOLE, DE CEASED, AND ALL OTHER PER SONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSLast known address6004 NW 44th Street, Jennings, FL 32053 Previous address-6004 NW 44th Street, Jennings, FL 32053 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court of Hamilton Coun ty, Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: A tract of land in Section 3, Town ship 1 North, Range 12 East, Ham ilton County, Florida, more particu larly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest cor ner of said Section 3, thence North 89 degrees 58 minutes 37 seconds East along the South line of Sec tion 3 a distance of 1073.96 feet; thence North 0 degrees 41 minutes 00 seconds West, 20 feet to the North side of County graded road and the Point of Beginning; thence continue North 0 degrees 41 min utes 00 seconds West, 1295.92 feet to the North line of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Sec tion 3, thence South 89 degrees 56 minutes 23 seconds East along the North line of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 and Southeast 1/4 of Southwest 1/4, 460.58 feet; thence South 0 degrees 41 minutes 00 seconds East, 1295.34 feet to the North side of said County grad ed road; thence South 89 degrees 58 minutes 37 seconds West along said graded road, 460.58 feet to the Point of Beginning. Together with that certain 2000, 52 x 28, mobile home with Vehi cle Identification No.s: FLHM LCB151322460A and FLHML CB151322460B. Mobile Home Serial Number(s): FLHMLCB151322460A, FLHML CB151322460B. Property address: 6004 NW 44th Street, Jennings, FL 32053 You are required to file a written re sponse with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Padgett Law Group, whose address is 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, FL 32312, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either be fore service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. DATED this the 27th day of July, 2018. (Court Seal) GREG GODWIN CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: /s/ Cynthia Johnson Deputy Clerk 08/09, 08/16/2018 NOTICE OF AGENCY ACTION TAKEN BY THE SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT Notice is given that the following per mit was issued on July 25, 2018 to the Oak Woodlands Property Owners Association P.O. Box 197, Jennings, FL 32053, permit# ERP-047-2070894. The project is located in Hamilton County, Section 15, Township 2N, Range 11 East. The permit authorizes a surface water management system on .09 acres for replacing culverts, installation of millings on the roadway, armament of the roadway swales and the restoration of wetland impacts on and along NW 34th Boulevard, from the intersection of NW 21st Circle up to and including the intersection of NW 22nd Lane within the Oak Woodlands Subdivision. The receiving water body is the Suwannee River. A person whose substantial interests are or may be affected has the right to request an administrative hearing by filing a written petition with the Suwannee River Water Management District (District). Pursuant to Chapter 28-106 and Rule 40BB-1.1010, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), the peti tion must be filed (received) either by delivery at the office of the Resource Management Business Resource Specialist at District Headquarters, 9225 CR 49, Live Oak FL 32060 or by e-mail to tjm@srwmd.org, within twen ty-one (21) days of newspaper publi cation of the notice of intended District decision (for those persons to whom the District does not mail or email actual notice). A petition must com ply with Sections 120.54(5)(b)4. and 120.569(2)(c), Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28106, F.A.C. The Dis trict will not accept a petition sent by facsimile (fax). Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., is not available. A petition for an administrative hear ing is deemed filed upon receipt of the complete petition by the District Clerk at the District Headquarters in Live Oak, FL during the Districts regular business hours. The Districts regu lar business hours are 8 a.m. 5 p.m., excluding weekends and District hol idays. Petitions received by the Dis trict Clerk after the Districts regular business hours shall be deemed filed as of 8 a.m. on the next regular District business day. The right to an administrative hear ing and the relevant procedures to be followed are governed by Chapter 120, Florida Statutes, Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code, and Rule 40B-1.1010, Florida Administrative Code. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formu late final agency action, the filing of a petition means the Districts final ac tion may be different from the position taken by it in this notice. Failure to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the requisite time frame shall constitute a waiver of the right to an administrative hear ing. (Rule 28-106.111, F.A.C.) If you wish to do so, you may request the Notice of Rights for this permit by contacting the Business Resource Specialist in the Division of Resource Management (RM), 9225 CR 49, Live Oak,, FL 32060, or by phone at 386.362.1001. 08/09/2018 Legals NOTICE OF AGENCY ACTION TAKEN BY THE SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT Notice is given that the following per mit was issued on July 25, 2018 to the Oak Woodlands Property Owners Association P.O. Box 197, Jennings, FL 32053, permit# ERP-047-2070894. The project is located in Hamilton County, Section 15, Township 2N, Range 11 East. The permit authorizes a surface water management system on .09 acres for replacing culverts, installation of millings on the roadway, armament of the roadway swales and the restoration of wetland impacts on and along NW 34th Boulevard, from the intersection of NW 21st Circle up to and including the intersection of NW 22nd Lane within the Oak Woodlands Subdivision. The receiving water body is the Suwannee River. A person whose substantial interests are or may be affected has the right to request an administrative hearing by filing a written petition with the Suwannee River Water Management District (District). Pursuant to Chapter 28-106 and Rule 40BB-1.1010, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), the peti tion must be filed (received) either by delivery at the office of the Resource Management Business Resource Specialist at District Headquarters, 9225 CR 49, Live Oak FL 32060 or by e-mail to tjm@srwmd.org, within twen ty-one (21) days of newspaper publi cation of the notice of intended District decision (for those persons to whom the District does not mail or email actual notice). A petition must com ply with Sections 120.54(5)(b)4. and 120.569(2)(c), Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28106, F.A.C. The Dis trict will not accept a petition sent by facsimile (fax). Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., is not available. A petition for an administrative hear ing is deemed filed upon receipt of the complete petition by the District Clerk at the District Headquarters in Live Oak, FL during the Districts regular business hours. The Districts regu lar business hours are 8 a.m. 5 p.m., excluding weekends and District hol idays. Petitions received by the Dis trict Clerk after the Districts regular business hours shall be deemed filed as of 8 a.m. on the next regular District business day. The right to an administrative hear ing and the relevant procedures to be followed are governed by Chapter 120, Florida Statutes, Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code, and Rule 40B-1.1010, Florida Administrative Code. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formu late final agency action, the filing of a petition means the Districts final ac tion may be different from the position taken by it in this notice. Failure to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the requisite time frame shall constitute a waiver of the right to an administrative hear ing. (Rule 28-106.111, F.A.C.) If you wish to do so, you may request the Notice of Rights for this permit by contacting the Business Resource Specialist in the Division of Resource Management (RM), 9225 CR 49, Live Oak,, FL 32060, or by phone at 386.362.1001. 08/09/2018 Legals NOTICE OF AGENCY ACTION TAKEN BY THE SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT Notice is given that the following per mit was issued on July 25, 2018 to the Oak Woodlands Property Owners Association P.O. Box 197, Jennings, FL 32053, permit# ERP-047-2070894. The project is located in Hamilton County, Section 15, Township 2N, Range 11 East. The permit authorizes a surface water management system on .09 acres for replacing culverts, installation of millings on the roadway, armament of the roadway swales and the restoration of wetland impacts on and along NW 34th Boulevard, from the intersection of NW 21st Circle up to and including the intersection of NW 22nd Lane within the Oak Woodlands Subdivision. The receiving water body is the Suwannee River. A person whose substantial interests are or may be affected has the right to request an administrative hearing by filing a written petition with the Suwannee River Water Management District (District). Pursuant to Chapter 28-106 and Rule 40BB-1.1010, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), the peti tion must be filed (received) either by delivery at the office of the Resource Management Business Resource Specialist at District Headquarters, 9225 CR 49, Live Oak FL 32060 or by e-mail to tjm@srwmd.org, within twen ty-one (21) days of newspaper publi cation of the notice of intended District decision (for those persons to whom the District does not mail or email actual notice). A petition must com ply with Sections 120.54(5)(b)4. and 120.569(2)(c), Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28106, F.A.C. The Dis trict will not accept a petition sent by facsimile (fax). Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., is not available. A petition for an administrative hear ing is deemed filed upon receipt of the complete petition by the District Clerk at the District Headquarters in Live Oak, FL during the Districts regular business hours. The Districts regu lar business hours are 8 a.m. 5 p.m., excluding weekends and District hol idays. Petitions received by the Dis trict Clerk after the Districts regular business hours shall be deemed filed as of 8 a.m. on the next regular District business day. The right to an administrative hear ing and the relevant procedures to be followed are governed by Chapter 120, Florida Statutes, Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code, and Rule 40B-1.1010, Florida Administrative Code. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formu late final agency action, the filing of a petition means the Districts final ac tion may be different from the position taken by it in this notice. Failure to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the requisite time frame shall constitute a waiver of the right to an administrative hear ing. (Rule 28-106.111, F.A.C.) If you wish to do so, you may request the Notice of Rights for this permit by contacting the Business Resource Specialist in the Division of Resource Management (RM), 9225 CR 49, Live Oak,, FL 32060, or by phone at 386.362.1001. 08/09/2018 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jason Valinsky, the holder of the fol lowing certificate(s) has filed said cer tificate(s) for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number(s) and year(s) of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO.: 633 Issued May 31, 2016 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Parcel No. 4676-000 Section 8 Township 1N Range 11E 5-282 Lot 282 NAME(S) IN WHICH ASSESSED: Willard H. Cassidy All of said property being in the Coun ty of Hamilton, State of Florida. Unless such certificate or certificates shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certif icate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder at the South Front Door of the Hamilton County Courthouse, 207 Northeast First Street, Jasper, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on Thursday, August 30, 2018. Pursuant to Chapter 197.542(2), Flor ida Statutes, the highest bidder is re quired to post a non-refundable cash deposit of $200 with the Clerk of Court at the time of the sale, to be applied to the sale price at the time of full pay ment. The Clerk may require bidders to show their willingness and ability to post the cost deposit. /s/ Greg Godwin Greg Godwin Clerk of Circuit Court Hamilton County, Florida 07/26, 08/02, 08/09, 08/16/2018 Legals NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jason Valinsky, the holder of the fol lowing certificate(s) has filed said cer tificate(s) for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number(s) and year(s) of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO.: 633 Issued May 31, 2016 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Parcel No. 4676-000 Section 8 Township 1N Range 11E 5-282 Lot 282 NAME(S) IN WHICH ASSESSED: Willard H. Cassidy All of said property being in the Coun ty of Hamilton, State of Florida. Unless such certificate or certificates shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certif icate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder at the South Front Door of the Hamilton County Courthouse, 207 Northeast First Street, Jasper, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on Thursday, August 30, 2018. Pursuant to Chapter 197.542(2), Flor ida Statutes, the highest bidder is re quired to post a non-refundable cash deposit of $200 with the Clerk of Court at the time of the sale, to be applied to the sale price at the time of full pay ment. The Clerk may require bidders to show their willingness and ability to post the cost deposit. /s/ Greg Godwin Greg Godwin Clerk of Circuit Court Hamilton County, Florida 07/26, 08/02, 08/09, 08/16/2018 PUBLIC AUCTION Location: Dennis Garage 8109 NW CR 146 Jennings, FL 32053 Date: 08/20/2018 Time: 8:00 A.M. 2000 HONDA VIN: 2HKRL1863YH555603 2011 KENWORTH VIN: 1XKDD49X9BJ278779 2005 PEER VIN: 1PLE042235PM54219 08/09/2018 Public Notices Protecting Your Right to Know Lafayette County Courthouse Legals AGENDA, TOWN COUNCIL, TOWN OF MAYO, FLORIDA REGULAR MEETING MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2018, 7:00 P.M. TOWN HALL, COUNCIL CONFERENCE ROOM, 276 WEST MAIN STREET REGULAR MEETING 1. Adopt Agenda 2. Approve Minutes 3. Citizen Input 4. Old Business 5. Dewberry-Status of Storm Water Project and Update on Grant for Project 6. Department Reports a. Sampson Edwards b. Aaron Lawson c. Mac Hinkle d. Sheriff Brian Lamb e. Lafayette Activities Group f. Severance Disposal 7. Miscellaneous Items 8. Pay Bills 9. Adjourn 08/09/2018 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 2017-000152-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, v. WAYNE R. PETRENA a/k/a WAYNE RANDY PETRENA, as Personal Representative of the Estate of George H. Petrena, Jr., Deceased; and MAXINE RAY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of foreclosure dated July 16, 2018 and entered in Case No. 2017-CA-000152 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judi cial Circuit, in and for Lafayette Coun ty, Florida, wherein Capital City Bank is the Plaintiff and Wayne R. Petrena a/k/a Wayne Randy Petrena, as Per sonal Representative of the Estate of George H. Petrena, Jr., deceased, and Maxine Ray (tenant) are the Defen dants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at North Door (corner of Fletcher and Main) of the Lafayette County Courthouse, 120 West Main Street, Mayo, Florida 32066, at 11:00 a.m. (ET) on the 14th day of Septem ber, 2018, the following described property located in Lafayette County, Florida, as set forth in said Final Judg ment: LOT 147 OF RIVER BEND, A SUBDI VISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A, PAGE 32 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LAFAYETTE COUN TY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim with in sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on July 16, 2018. (Court Seal) STEVE LAND LAFAYETTE COUNTY CLERK OF COURT By: /s/ Hannah Owens Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administration, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, Phone: 3867582163 or ADAmail@jud3. flcourts.org at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 08/02, 08/09/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 2017-000152-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, v. WAYNE R. PETRENA a/k/a WAYNE RANDY PETRENA, as Personal Representative of the Estate of George H. Petrena, Jr., Deceased; and MAXINE RAY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of foreclosure dated July 16, 2018 and entered in Case No. 2017-CA-000152 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judi cial Circuit, in and for Lafayette Coun ty, Florida, wherein Capital City Bank is the Plaintiff and Wayne R. Petrena a/k/a Wayne Randy Petrena, as Per sonal Representative of the Estate of George H. Petrena, Jr., deceased, and Maxine Ray (tenant) are the Defen dants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at North Door (corner of Fletcher and Main) of the Lafayette County Courthouse, 120 West Main Street, Mayo, Florida 32066, at 11:00 a.m. (ET) on the 14th day of Septem ber, 2018, the following described property located in Lafayette County, Florida, as set forth in said Final Judg ment: LOT 147 OF RIVER BEND, A SUBDI VISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A, PAGE 32 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LAFAYETTE COUN TY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim with in sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on July 16, 2018. (Court Seal) STEVE LAND LAFAYETTE COUNTY CLERK OF COURT By: /s/ Hannah Owens Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administration, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, Phone: 3867582163 or ADAmail@jud3. flcourts.org at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 08/02, 08/09/2018 Public Notice Lafayette County will submit the Annu al Report required by the State Hous ing Initiatives Partnership Program for fiscal years 2014/2018, 2016/2017, and 2015/2016 by September 15, 2018. Once approved at the Board of County Commissioners meeting on August 13th, copies of the reports are available for public inspection and comment at the Office of the Chair man of the Lafayette County Board of Commissioners, Mayo, Florida. 08/09/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE The District School Board of Lafayette County will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 at 6:30 p.m. in the School Board Meeting Room of the Lafayette School Dis trict Administration Building, 363 N.E. Crawford Street, Mayo, Florida 32066 for the purpose of amending and adopting School Board Policies. (The School Board approved for advertise ment of a Public Hearing at their regu lar meeting on July 17, 2018). Authority for amending and adopting policies and forms is found in Article IX, Section 4(b), Constitution of the State of Florida and in Florida Statutes 1001.41. The following policies will be consid ered for revision: 1. STUDENT PROGRESSION PLAN 2. CHAPTER IV CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION: No. 4.12 In structional Materials Selection 2. CHAPTER VII BUSINESS SER VICES: No. 7.25 Hospitality Funds The following new policy will be considered for adoption: 1. CHAPTER V STUDENTS: No. 5.152 Medical Marijuana A. Name of person presenting the proposed policies: Mr. Robert Edwards, Superintendent of Lafayette County Schools. Date of Approval by Board for Advertisement: July 17, 2018. B. Explanation of the purpose and ef fect of school board policies: Provide policies required by Florida Statutes (F.S.) State Board of Education Administrative Rules (S.B.E.R.) and other controlling regulations; and to provide policies for matters for which it appears prudent for the orderly operation of the school system. C. A summary of the proposed policy revisions is as follows: Policies nec essary for the effective operation and general improvement of the school system for the District School Board of Lafayette County, Florida. D. Economic impact of the proposed policies: None School Board Policies may be ex amined at the District School Board Office at 363 N.E. Crawford Street, Mayo, Florida between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M., Monday through Friday. __________________ Robert Edwards, Superintendent of Schools 07/26, 08/02, 08/09/2018 Legals PUBLIC NOTICE The District School Board of Lafayette County will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 at 6:30 p.m. in the School Board Meeting Room of the Lafayette School Dis trict Administration Building, 363 N.E. Crawford Street, Mayo, Florida 32066 for the purpose of amending and adopting School Board Policies. (The School Board approved for advertise ment of a Public Hearing at their regu lar meeting on July 17, 2018). Authority for amending and adopting policies and forms is found in Article IX, Section 4(b), Constitution of the State of Florida and in Florida Statutes 1001.41. The following policies will be consid ered for revision: 1. STUDENT PROGRESSION PLAN 2. CHAPTER IV CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION: No. 4.12 In structional Materials Selection 2. CHAPTER VII BUSINESS SER VICES: No. 7.25 Hospitality Funds The following new policy will be considered for adoption: 1. CHAPTER V STUDENTS: No. 5.152 Medical Marijuana A. Name of person presenting the proposed policies: Mr. Robert Edwards, Superintendent of Lafayette County Schools. Date of Approval by Board for Advertisement: July 17, 2018. B. Explanation of the purpose and ef fect of school board policies: Provide policies required by Florida Statutes (F.S.) State Board of Education Administrative Rules (S.B.E.R.) and other controlling regulations; and to provide policies for matters for which it appears prudent for the orderly operation of the school system. C. A summary of the proposed policy revisions is as follows: Policies nec essary for the effective operation and general improvement of the school system for the District School Board of Lafayette County, Florida. D. Economic impact of the proposed policies: None School Board Policies may be ex amined at the District School Board Office at 363 N.E. Crawford Street, Mayo, Florida between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M., Monday through Friday. __________________ Robert Edwards, Superintendent of Schools 07/26, 08/02, 08/09/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE The Lafayette County Board of Coun ty Commissioners will be holding a Public Hearing to discuss possible improvements to the Edward Perry Sports Complex on Monday, August 13, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. The Public Hearing will be held in the County Commissioners meeting room on the second floor of the Lafayette County Courthouse in Mayo, Florida. By Order Of: Earnest L. Jones, Chairman Lafayette County Commission All members of the public are wel come to attend. Notice is further here by given, pursuant Florida Statute 286.0105, that any person or persons deciding to appeal any matter consid ered at this public hearing will need a record of the hearing and may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with disabilities request ing reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact (386) 294-1600 or via Florida Relay Service at (800) 955-8771. 08/09/2018 Legals PUBLIC NOTICE The Lafayette County Board of Coun ty Commissioners will be holding a Public Hearing to discuss possible improvements to the Edward Perry Sports Complex on Monday, August 13, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. The Public Hearing will be held in the County Commissioners meeting room on the second floor of the Lafayette County Courthouse in Mayo, Florida. By Order Of: Earnest L. Jones, Chairman Lafayette County Commission All members of the public are wel come to attend. Notice is further here by given, pursuant Florida Statute 286.0105, that any person or persons deciding to appeal any matter consid ered at this public hearing will need a record of the hearing and may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with disabilities request ing reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact (386) 294-1600 or via Florida Relay Service at (800) 955-8771. 08/09/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE The Lafayette County Commission will be holding a regular scheduled meet ing on Monday, August 13, 2018 at 9:00 a.m. The meeting will be held in the County Commissioners Meeting Room at the Lafayette County Court house in Mayo, Florida. Listed below is an agenda for the meeting. By Order Of: Earnest L. Jones, Chairman Lafayette County Commission BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS: 1. Open the meeting. 2. Invocation and pledge to the flag. 3. Approve the minutes. 4. Requests and comments from the community. 5. Department Heads: A) Marcus Calhoun Mainte nance. B) Scott Sadler Public Works. C) Robert Hinkle Building/ Zoning. D) Marty Tompkins EMS. E) Jana Hart Extension Office. 6. Approve a recommendation from the Insurance Committe on RFPs that were received for Insurance Services. 7. Appoint a Committee to review RFPs for the Industrial Park Metal Building. 8. Approve Group Health & Life Insurance renewals. 9. Approve the SHIP Annual Report. 10. Discuss property on SE Wolf Road. 11. Consider Resolution No. 201808-01 for approval. 12. Consider Resolution No. 201808-02 for approval. 13. Consider Resolution No. 201808-03 for approval. 14. Consider Resolution No. 201808-04 for approval. 15. Leenette McMillan-Fredriksson various items. 16. Approve the bills. 17. Other Business. 18. Adjourn. All members of the public are wel come to attend. Notice is further here by given, pursuant Florida Statute 286.0105, that any person or persons deciding to appeal any matter consid ered at this public hearing will need a record of the hearing and may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with disabilities request ing reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact (386) 294-1600 or via Florida Relay Service at (800) 955-8771. See www.lafayetteclerk.com for up dates and amendments to the agenda. 08/09/2018 Legals PUBLIC NOTICE The Lafayette County Commission will be holding a regular scheduled meet ing on Monday, August 13, 2018 at 9:00 a.m. The meeting will be held in the County Commissioners Meeting Room at the Lafayette County Court house in Mayo, Florida. Listed below is an agenda for the meeting. By Order Of: Earnest L. Jones, Chairman Lafayette County Commission BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS: 1. Open the meeting. 2. Invocation and pledge to the flag. 3. Approve the minutes. 4. Requests and comments from the community. 5. Department Heads: A) Marcus Calhoun Mainte nance. B) Scott Sadler Public Works. C) Robert Hinkle Building/ Zoning. D) Marty Tompkins EMS. E) Jana Hart Extension Office. 6. Approve a recommendation from the Insurance Committe on RFPs that were received for Insurance Services. 7. Appoint a Committee to review RFPs for the Industrial Park Metal Building. 8. Approve Group Health & Life Insurance renewals. 9. Approve the SHIP Annual Report. 10. Discuss property on SE Wolf Road. 11. Consider Resolution No. 201808-01 for approval. 12. Consider Resolution No. 201808-02 for approval. 13. Consider Resolution No. 201808-03 for approval. 14. Consider Resolution No. 201808-04 for approval. 15. Leenette McMillan-Fredriksson various items. 16. Approve the bills. 17. Other Business. 18. Adjourn. All members of the public are wel come to attend. Notice is further here by given, pursuant Florida Statute 286.0105, that any person or persons deciding to appeal any matter consid ered at this public hearing will need a record of the hearing and may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with disabilities request ing reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact (386) 294-1600 or via Florida Relay Service at (800) 955-8771. See www.lafayetteclerk.com for up dates and amendments to the agenda. 08/09/2018 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR CONSTRUCTION SERVICES FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY INDUSTRIAL PARK METAL BUILDING I. INTRODUCTION Lafayette County Board of County Commissioners is requesting written proposals from qualified construction firms to provide professional At-Risk Construction Management Services for the budgeting and construction phase on the proposed for Lafayette County Industrial Park Metal Building with an estimated budget of $750,000 or less. II. It is Lafayette Countys intention to employ the Construction Firm to provide overall Project Construction Management, Cost Benefit Studies, Information Management, Construc tion Contract Management, Claims Management and Technical Inspec tion during the Construction on a cost plus a fee basis, with a guaranteed maximum price. III. PROPOSAL INSTRUCTIONS AND GENERAL INFORMATION: Proposal Submissions: Submit five (5) copies of a written proposal no later than 12:00 PM on August 23, 2018 to: Steve Land Clerk of Circuit Court Lafayette County PO Box 88 Mayo, Florida 32066 For questions pertaining to the build ing contact: Brian Yarbrough Clemons, Rutherford, and Associates 2027 Thomasville Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32308 850-385-6153 Proposals must be responsive to the requirements and questions of the Re quest for Proposal. Reservations: Lafayette County re serves the right to reject any and all proposals, to negotiate changes in the scope of work or services to be provided, and to otherwise waive any technicalities or informalities. Method of Selection: Proposals will be reviewed and a recommendation will be made by the Selection Com mittee to Lafayette County Board of County Commissioners on the basis of proposals. Upon acceptance of the recommendation by LCBCC, nego tiations or bids will or may be enter tained. Please respond by including but not limiting your response to the following: 1. Company name and length of time in business. 2. Company location. 3. Bonding capability and name of bonding company. 4. Insurance carrier and applicable coverage. 5. Qualifications of staff to be utilized on these projects with names, resumes, length of time with firm and previous clients served. 6. Names of five (5) previous clients within the past 5 years with phone numbers and contact person. 7. Description of previous expe rience, with Lafayette County and emphasis on understanding of similar local trades and projects. 8. Company organizational chart with reference to this project. The Construction selection will be made on the proposals received. There will be no presentations. 08/09, 08/16/2018 Legals REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR CONSTRUCTION SERVICES FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY INDUSTRIAL PARK METAL BUILDING I. INTRODUCTION Lafayette County Board of County Commissioners is requesting written proposals from qualified construction firms to provide professional At-Risk Construction Management Services for the budgeting and construction phase on the proposed for Lafayette County Industrial Park Metal Building with an estimated budget of $750,000 or less. II. It is Lafayette Countys intention to employ the Construction Firm to provide overall Project Construction Management, Cost Benefit Studies, Information Management, Construc tion Contract Management, Claims Management and Technical Inspec tion during the Construction on a cost plus a fee basis, with a guaranteed maximum price. III. PROPOSAL INSTRUCTIONS AND GENERAL INFORMATION: Proposal Submissions: Submit five (5) copies of a written proposal no later than 12:00 PM on August 23, 2018 to: Steve Land Clerk of Circuit Court Lafayette County PO Box 88 Mayo, Florida 32066 For questions pertaining to the build ing contact: Brian Yarbrough Clemons, Rutherford, and Associates 2027 Thomasville Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32308 850-385-6153 Proposals must be responsive to the requirements and questions of the Re quest for Proposal. Reservations: Lafayette County re serves the right to reject any and all proposals, to negotiate changes in the scope of work or services to be provided, and to otherwise waive any technicalities or informalities. Method of Selection: Proposals will be reviewed and a recommendation will be made by the Selection Com mittee to Lafayette County Board of County Commissioners on the basis of proposals. Upon acceptance of the recommendation by LCBCC, nego tiations or bids will or may be enter tained. Please respond by including but not limiting your response to the following: 1. Company name and length of time in business. 2. Company location. 3. Bonding capability and name of bonding company. 4. Insurance carrier and applicable coverage. 5. Qualifications of staff to be utilized on these projects with names, resumes, length of time with firm and previous clients served. 6. Names of five (5) previous clients within the past 5 years with phone numbers and contact person. 7. Description of previous expe rience, with Lafayette County and emphasis on understanding of similar local trades and projects. 8. Company organizational chart with reference to this project. The Construction selection will be made on the proposals received. There will be no presentations. 08/09, 08/16/2018 FIND IT IN THE LEGALS Stay Informed!Exercise Your Right To Know! Public Notices keep you up to date on government announcements, hearings, meetings, and more.Subscribe and Stay Informed! rfntb386.362.1734SDT MF S eJN AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 4B

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rfnntbrrb rffnnttbft ftnfnnttbt nn tfn tn f 16013-1 -FOR RENTGREAT RATES FOR NICE LOOKING RENTALS WATER, SEWER, AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS. 386-330-2567 Special Notices DEADLINES FOR CLASSIFIED & LEGAL LINE ADS: FOR WEDNESDAY SUWANNEE DEMOCRATNOON FRIDAY PRIOR FOR FRIDAY SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT-NOON WEDNESDAY PRIOR FOR THURSDAY JASPER NEWSNOON FRIDAY PRIOR FOR THURSDAY MAYO FREE PRESSNOON FRIDAY PRIOR ClassiedsAre In TO ALL TRADESMEN & SERVICE PROVIDERS:Havent you always heard the old saying Big things come in small packages? Well, this is the idea for the Tri-County Service Directory seen on the classi fied pages of the Mid-Week Editions of the Suwannee Democrat, The Jasper News & the Mayo Free Press!Call 386-362-1734 X102 for more info on how to place a small ad (thats the small packages part)to appear in all 3 of our publica tions which means the opportunity for your ad to be seen by more than 4000 potential customers (and thats the big things part). General Help Wanted CDL Drivers Wanted Home Nightly and Weekends Min 2 Yrs Experience. dbraman@beaverbulk.com 1-386-362-1185 Professional Madison, FL: : : Dir of Re source Development; Co ordinator of Recruitment; Academic Case Manager; Programmer/Data Retrieval Manager. See www.nfcc. edu for details. Antiques and Collectibles ANTIQUES FOR SALE CALL (386)364-3613 Educational YOU CAN BE A CNA Nursing Assistants are in GREAT demand! Quest Training offers nurse taught classes. No GED required if age 18 yr. Day and Evening classes available. (386)362-1065 Yard/Estate Sales STOP BY THE SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT OFFICE 521 Demorest Street, SE Live Oak, FL AND PLACE YOUR GA RAGE (YARD, ESTATE, OR MOVING) SALE AD IN TWO EDITIONS OF THE SU WANNEE DEMOCRAT TO RECEIVE A FREE GARAGE SALE KIT* *Kit contains: 3-11X13 Signs 1Pre-Sale Checklist 1Tipsheet for a Successful Sale 1Sheet of Price Stickers Misc Merchandise FOR SALE: Gun Cabinet for rifles and pistols, wooden, light finish, glass front, top & bottom locks. New $500 value, selling for $200. 386-362-5287. HAVE YOU BEEN MEANING TO CLEAR OUT SOME OF THE CLUTTER? RECYCLE, REDUCE, REUSE? MAYBE GET RID OF THAT UGLY (YOU THINK) VASE AUNT EDNA LEFT YOU IN HER WILL? WE CAN HELP! IF YOU CAN PART WITH ANY SINGLE UNWANTED ITEM FOR LESS THAN $500.00, YOU CAN RUN A 5-LINE AD WITH US FOR ONE WEEK AT NO CHARGE! (Offer restricted to one ad for one item within a 4-week period) CALL THE CLASSIFIEDS DEPARTMENT AT 386-362-1734 X102 Pets for Sale AKC ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES 3 Females $2500 1 Male $3000 Call 850-668-3440 Land/Acreage Lake Lots for Sale 1.5 +/Acre Lots 2 lakefront 2 lake view In gated Private Lake Subdivision For More information call (352) 516 1277 $25,000 for all four lots, Each lot can be sold seperately. ONE ACRE PAVED ROAD FRONTAGE Beautifully Wooded, Owner Fi nance, No Down. $14,900. Only $153/mo 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com TEN ACRES OBRIEN, FL Paved Rd, well & culvert. Owner financing. NO DOWN $69,900. $613/mo 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Commercial/Business FOR SALE Landy Building534 S Patterson St. Valdosta, Ga.Will take best offer! Contact 229-242-9685 FOR SALE: 6500 sf warehouse on paved rd. (1K sf w/ac office/ retail space), 2 lg roll-up doors. 20608 CR 49, OBrien, FL. Own er financed: $159,900. $5K down, $1,360/mo. 352-215-1018. www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Real Estate Auctions For sale byAUCTION EVERYONE WELCOME TO ATTEND This 1903 Victorian Home Purchase this meticulously maintained elegant 6143 sf Victorian home at a price that you determine. This home has 7 bedrooms/3 bathrooms. Detailed stained Artisan hardwood oors, doors, moulding, trim and staircase. 25 x 25 kitchen with granite. Central Air/Heat. New electric and plumbing. Plus much much more AUCTION HELD AT THE HOME417 N. COURT ST, QUITMANSAT. AUG 11th at 12 noon Open from 10am sale day. CALL MICHAEL PETERS727-251-0531 for details and photos go to www.AmericanHeritage Auctioneers.com American Heritage Auctioneersin cooperation with Re/Max of Valdosta Homes For Rent Two Bdrm/One Ba home in Live Oak, FL. Close to everything! NO PETS. $850/mo. first, last, $300/ dep rqd. (incl lawn maintenance) Call 318-840-4802 or 386-3623002. Apartments MEL-MAR-GO APARTMENTS in Live Oak, FL. 1/2/3 Bd avail. Clean, modern, W/D hookups. Starting at $650/mo + dep. 386-364-1648 Manufactured Homes FOR RENT 2Bd/1Ba SWMH $375/mo. & 3Bd/2Ba DWMH $475/mo in Mayo, FL. Call 386-294-2070 for more information. Find it in the Classifieds! On 5 beautiful ac near Dowling Park, FL: 3/2 MH. Fully furn & equipd. Avail now for 6mos-1yr. $1200/mo (negotiable) + 1 mo sec dep. Call 863-843-5469 for more info & appt to see. Autos FOR SALE: Buick LeSabre, Limited, 2003: 4 dr. silver, auto. trans. <101K mi, great cond. $3,500.00 OBO. Call for more info: 386-362-4278 RUN YOUR TRUCK OR AUTO FOR SALE AD FOR 4 WEEKS FOR JUST A LITTLE MORE THAN THE PRICE OF 1 WEEK: 1 WEEK REGULAR RATE: $25.83 4 WEEK SPECIAL RATE: $30.90 This special rate gets you 8 issues of the Suwannee Democrat, 4 issues of The Jasper News & the Mayo Free Press plus 8 days online!!! ADD A PHOTO FOR ONLY $10.50 MORE CALL NOW TO GET YOUR AD STARTED 386-362-1734 X102 Place Your Car or Truck Here And Hear The Phone Ring Off The Hook RV Sales/Service WE BUY USED RVS! CALL 229-740-0375 SUV FOR SALE: 2015 Jeep Wran gler Sahara 2-dr, V6, man trans; hard top, tow pkg. 21.4K mi. exec cond. $28,000 obo. (352) 422-3992. Answer Y our CallingOnline Today at suwanneedemocrat.com The Suwannee Democrat JOBS SECTIONIn Print & Online 386.362.1734Browse Dozens of Rewarding Career Opportunities forAnimal Lovers Caretakers Educators FIND IT IN THE CLASSIFIEDS TODAY!! AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 5B 127694-1 ANF ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA FLORIDA STATEWIDE rf ntbf bn bn nf bb bb b fff 123917TRI-COUNTY SERVICE DIRECTORY Serving Suwannee, Hamilton & Lafayette Counties These businesses are ready to serve you.Tradesmen & Service Providers:Call now to place your ads 386-362-1734 x 102 rfWeGoShop.comweshop4u@wegoshop.com 123453-1 rntbt tn n nn tntttnn nnn n n 124224BYRDS POWER EQUIPMENTSales & Service All Makes & Models 11860 E. U.S. Hwy 27 Branford, Florida Hours: Mon-Fri 7 a.m. 5 p.m. Open Saturdays 7 a.m. Noon(386) 935-1544 124228SUBURBAN PROPANE24-Hour Emergency Service 386-454-3690 FREE ESTIMATESSpecializing in custom metal roof systems. Covering all of Florida.(386) 205-3865 124236-1Like Us on Facebook Credit Cards Accepted

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AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 6B Avoid back injuries by choosing the right backpack Finding the right backpack is an essential component of back-to-school shopping. Children may have their own ideas of whats in style, but parents should look for backpacks that are functional before factoring in style. Marrying form and function together can be challenging, but its necessary to prevent students from developing back problems. But parents must give consideration to more than just the size of their childrens backpacks. Backpacks may be lled with several pounds of stu, such as textbooks, binders, laptops, and other supplies, potentially leading to injury. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, at least 14,000 children are treated for backpack-related injuries every year. e American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons says that the weight of a backpack should not exceed 10 to 15 percent of a childs body weight. But many students pack their bags with much more weight than that. Improperly sized, worn and overstued backpacks can injure joints and lead to neck, back and shoulder injuries. ey also may aect childrens posture. job done without much added bulk. Many backpacks have been designed to hold technological devices as more and more schools integrate technology into the classroom. A less bulky bag might be lighter and easy to carry. goods store. Employees at camping and sporting goods retailers understand how to t backpacks for hikers and outdoor adventurers. ey can help measure a student and nd a pack that will t his or her body frame. Also, these retailers may have a wider selection of backpacks than some other stores, increasing the chances of nding the right t. Chiropractic Association, the body is not designed to carry items hanging from shoulders. By using the waist strap in conjunction with taut shoulder straps, students can distribute the weight in their backpacks over their hip bones instead of the shoulders. e padded and adjustable shoulder straps should be at least two inches wide. All straps should be used each time the pack is worn. near the center bottom to distribute the load, rather than placed on top. Students should only carry what is necessary, visiting lockers or desks as needed to lighten their packs. Backpack t and functionality is something parents should take seriously when shopping for school supplies. Please Call Nan at 386-362-1734 to place your ad here121320-1 121322-1 1506 S. Ohio Ave. Live Oak, FL 32064Phone 386-208-1414 386-755-8680 Fax 386-208-1411 healthcorelibby@bellsouth.net John C. Palmer Physical erapist Lacey Bailey PT Assistant Locally Owned & Operated 121325-1Family Dentistry HERBERT C. MANTOOTH, D.D.S, P.A. Now Oering BOTOX!(386) 362-6556 1-800-829-6506 McKay are experienced defensive ends. Hamilton County Brantley Hawkins, Jhebari Martin, Nick Williams, Daryl Slayton, Ivarius Armstead, Artevious Morgan Brantley Hawkins and Daryl Slay ton, both returning starters, headline a strong group of D-linemen for HCHS. Hawkins is quick at defensive end and the Trojans have good size inside at DT. Theres a lot of depth on the line, which is important considering most of Hamilton Countys roster will play both ways. Lafayette Gavin Taylor, Joseph Perry, Micah Poole, Chandler Padgett, Tristen Deas, Cody Dees Gavin Taylor, Joseph Perry and Chandler Padgett sophomores in 2017 combined for 81 tackles a year ago. Taylor led the group with 39 tackles and two sacks. He had a season-high nine tackles against rival Branford, which included four tackles for loss. Perry was consistent throughout the season and finished with 32 tackles. His best performances came against good offensive teams in Trenton and Dixie County. With a group of D-linemen that should grow with more experience, along with a good secondary and line backing corps, LHS looks poised to have a good defensive unit. Branford Blayne Olson, Junior Cress, Dylan Bonds Branford brings back a pair of start ers in seniors Dylan Bonds (39 tackles in 2017) and Junior Cress (43 tackles). Junior Blayne Olson (5-10, 280) will start at nose guard in Branfords 3-4 defense. The Bucs lost some key defensive players in other positions, mainly linebacker, so theyll be relying on Bonds and Cress to have another good season. Continued From Page 1B Defensive Sports rfrrn rfffn tbfrn

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AUGUST 8 & 9, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 7B BAPTIST (Southern)NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCHSR 6 West, 6592 NW 48th St., Jennings, FL 32053 www.newhopejennings.org 938-5611Sunday School ..................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Youth Happening, Mission Friends, R&A & GA ............................ 6:30 p.m. WednesdayPrayer Meeting, Team Kids, Youth 6:30 p.m.Van pick-up upon request68728-1CATHOLIC CHURCHST. THERESE CATHOLIC CHURCHree miles north of Jasper U.S. 41 P.O. Box 890, Jasper, FL 32052 Rectory U.S. 90 E., Live Oak, FL (386) 364-1108 Saturday MASS 4:00 p.m.68726-1 METHODISTFIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH405 Central Ave., Jasper, FL Pastor Missy Turbeville Phone 386-792-1122 SUNDAY Morning Worship ........................... 10:00am WEDNESDAY Bible Study ....................................... 10:00am(Family Night Dinner 3rd Wednesday at 6pm)Clothes Closet 4th Saturday 10am-1pm 68730-1PRESBYTERIANFIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH204 N.W. 3rd Avenue, Jasper 792-2258 Pastor: Ruth Elswood SUNDAYSunday School .............................. 10:00 a.m. Worship Service ........................... 11:00 a.m. Youth Ministries ............................ 4:00 p.m. Elementary WEDNESDAY Choir Practice ................................ 7:00 p.m.68732-1 Non-DenominationalBURNHAM CHRISTIAN CHURCH4520 NW CR-146, Jennings, FL 32053 386-938-1265 Youth Pastor: Patrick Murphy SUNDAYSunday School ................................ 9:45 a.m. Worship ......................................... 11:00 a.m. Bible Study ...................................... 5:00 p.m. Youth Program ............................... 5:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY Kids Rock: Pre-K4 6th Grade 6:00pm 7:30pm68734-1 To list your church in the church directory, Please call Nan 386-362-1734 68724-1Hamilton County CHURCH DIRECTORYLAFAYETTE COUNTYTO LIST YOUR CHURCH IN THE CHURCH DIRECTORY PLEASE CALL NAN 386Your Guide To Local Houses Of Worship 44884-1 AIRLINE BA PTIST CHUR C H Pastor ........................................................... Preston Gainey Youth Pastor ................................................Derek Garland Childrens Pastor ............................................... Chad Little Sunday Sunday School ........................................ 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship ............................................... 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship ................................................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Fellowship Supper ........................... 6:00 p.m. AWANA & Bible Study ....................................... 6:30 p.m. Located Four Miles East of Mayo on Highway 27 www.airlinechurch.com44887-1 Helping Families Follow Jesus 44891-1MAYO BAPTIST CHURCH Rick James, Pastor Music Director Dale CroSunday Sunday School .......... 9:45am Worship Service ..... 11:00am Evening Service ........ 6:00pm Wednesday Supper ................................ 6:00pm Children/Youth Program .. 6:30pm Prayer Meeting .................. 7:00pm 44893-1 LIGHTHOUSE CHRISTIAN CENTER Freedom is Here www.lccmayo.orgMorning Worship ..................................... Sun. 10:30 a.m. Kids of the King ........................................ Sun. 10:30 a.m. Prayer Meeting ........................................... Mon. 7:00 p.m Bible Study. ................................................ Wed. 7:00 p.m. Army of Fire Youth ................................... Wed. 7:00 p.m. Pastor: Ronnie Sadler ALTON CHURCH OF GOD .............. 294-3133Pastor. ....................................................... Rev. Tim Hamm Youth Pastor .................................................. Jeremy Davis Music Director ............................................ Holly Braswell Childrens Pastor. ............................ Ryan & Tiany Perry Sunday School. ........................................... 9:30 10:30am Worship Service/K.I.D.S. Church. ... 10:30am 12:00pm Evening Worship. ................................................... 6:00pm Family Night Youth club Church .... 7:00pm WednesdayState Road 27 44888-1 MIDWAY BAPTIST CHURCH ... 294-2365 Pastor: Bruce BrancheSunday School ......................................................... 9:45 a.m. Worship Service .................................................... 11:00 a.m. Discipleship Training ............................................. 5:00 p.m. Evening Worship ................................................... 6:00 p.m. Prayer Meeting Wednesday ................................ 7:00 p.m. Team Kids ................................................................ 7:00 p.m. Located on County Road 405 For If Ye Forgive Men eir Tresspasses Your Heavenly Father Will Also Forgive You Matt. 6:14 44892-1 44895-1 NEW HARMONY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 160th St. (Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right) Pastor: Dalas Monismith Phone (386) 776-1806 SUNDAY Sunday Worship. .................................................... 9:30 am Bible Study ............................................................ 10:30 amWEDNESDAYWomens Bible Study. .......................................... 10:00 am HATCHBEND APOSTOLIC CHURCH 935-2806Pastor ........................................................ Rev. Steve Boyd Sunday School .................................................... 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Service .............................................. 7:30 p.m.Located 4 miles South on Hwy. 349, then le on CR 138, follow signs. 44889-1 44890-1FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD ....... 294-1811 Sunday School ................................... 10:00 a.m. Worship Service ................................ 10:45 a.m. Kids Church ...................................... 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ............................... 6:00 p.m. Youth Impact ......................................... :00 p.m. Adult Bible Study .............................. 7:00 p.m. Sunday Wednesday Pastor: Rev. Kenny Sullivan Youth Pastor: Daryl FletcherLocated at 294 SE Mill Street, Mayo Renewing Hope and Building Lives 44886-1 PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC) 294-1306 Interim Pastor ............................ Jimmy Corbin Sunday School .................................... 9:45 a.m. Worship Service ................................ 11:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Service .................... 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting ............... 7:00 p.m. Seven miles West of Mayo, le on CR 534 then right on 350A ---Jesus Saves--Honor Roll Honor roll student to receive recognition in White Springs WHITE SPRINGS Its About My Efforts, Inc. and the Town of White Springs will be recognizing students who received honor roll for each week of the 2017-2018 school year at the Back2School Concert. The concert will be held Aug. 11 at 4 p.m. at the White Springs am phitheater and community center. Community resources, prizes, recognition, entertainment and food will be provided. The performing entertainment in cludes the legendary Jimmie Cole man, Southside Idols 2018 winner Brittanie Powell, Ashley Chante, Barbra Grifn and the Funny Man Richard Cuff. The event is free and open to the public. On behalf of the two sponsors we congratulate the students receiv ing honor roll each nine weeks in 2017-2018 and wish to recognize their efforts with giveaways at the event, Bea Coker, of Its About My Efforts, said. Students should RSVP their attendance to itsaboutmyeffort@ gmail.com or 386-867-1601. The students who received honor roll for each in weeks of the 2017-2018 school year are listed below. 7th Grade A Honor Roll Leann Adkins Tia Albritton Kirburn Bristol Morgan Grifn Sarah Needham Alexia Perrin 7th Grade A & B Honor Roll Kenley Brady Julia Bristol Leticia Cano Keyasia Cole Ashton Deas Christian Dye Julian Garcia Nevaeh Gardner Tobias Grant Brianna James Brelen Johnson Trevis Johnson Arianna McClain Rae Mercer Abelia Nava Jackson Parks Roman Perez Alicia Powers Annabelle Selph Brayan Silverio-Chung Gracelynn Steedley Merrill Wentworth Jamayia Williams Morgan Williams 8th Grade A Honor Roll Hannah Hawkins Mollie Meek Jasmine Smith Bailey Swayze Jenna Tolle Timothy Warfel Savanna Wicker 8th Grade A & B Honor Roll Sarai Aldama-Vaquero Jordan Beck Graciela Gallegos Christopher Harris Savannah Hawkins MelLesha Jones Vidal Lanier Maria Silverio-Chung Derrionna Smith Preston Smith Kailyn Starling Nora Thurmond 9th Grade A Honor Roll Rachel Armstrong Hana Cline Andrea Cromartie Jesse McElwain Carson Norris Kalei Spicer 9th Grade A & B Honor Roll David Alvarez Brooklynn Beam Cadarrias Brooker Anna Calderon Samantha Corby Deyahna Daniels Zachary Driggers Kayla Herriott Jhebari Martin Kejuan Robinson Blake Selph Ethan Touchton Joshua Welch 10th Grade A Honor Roll Jade Beck Kaylee Boatwright Kassondra Carter Jordyn Doolittle Noah Kersey Sage Mosteller Elizabeth Smith 10th Grade A & B Honor Roll Kelton Allen Earl Claridy Dakota Corby Charles Dunaway Ashley Hand Kalynda Heck Matthew Hughes Susan Johnson Hannah Law Araceli Nava Bradley Peacock Horacio Perez Ramsey Reynolds Kodi Richard Lee Sheppard Melvin Thompson Martina Williams 11th Grade A Honor Roll Alison Cheshire Ashley Davis Lorenzo Garcia Angelina Gaspar Joshua Hawkins Terrence Loper Hunter McCulley Madison Register Beatris Santana Jonathan Steedley Oriana Urzua-Tlapa Stephanie Whetstone 11th Grade A & B Honor Roll Tanyah Akins Jasmine Cooks Cassidy Cribbs Victoria Franklin Sydney Gist Ranesha Gunsby Raymond Hawkins Logan Hughes Brandon Lee Albino Lopez Aleah McCallum Preston Perry Alexandria Pinello Briseyda Sanchez-Rios Jeny Santos Joseph Stockton 12th Grade A Honor Roll Michael Allen Laura Bowen Bradley Driggers Quesean Gibbons Jaila Jackson Regina Jackson Zaevan Martin Cassidy Padgett Mackenzie Prueter Berry Robinson III Charles Speights Matthew Stewart 12 Grade A & B Honor Roll Eric Amerson Melanie Bowen Jonathen Corby Jacob Deas Austin Grifn Luke Hartman Kailey Henderson Sydney Hines Gerald Moore Arlie Hunter Darius Ingram Tiria Ingram Ocoee Jennings Javiel Jones Amanda Laceeld Eric Law Connor Lee Shanyah Lopez Daniel Manalis Destini Marshall OShuana Monlyn Jackson Norris Lakeyia Oliver Jesus Garcia-Rendon Leanicia Robinson Jakayla Smallwood Taylor Spicer ZiKirra Starling Tori Troy Julianna Wheeler LaQuiesha Willams Tatyana Williams Jayda Wilson

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