Citation
Suwannee Democrat

Material Information

Title:
Suwannee Democrat
Place of Publication:
Live Oak, FL
Publisher:
Suwannee Democrat, Myra Regan - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
Coordinates:
30.294444 x -82.985833 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note:
Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Suwannee Democrat, J.E. Pound publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000398954 ( ALEPH )
33273856 ( OCLC )
ACE4563 ( NOTIS )
sn 95026787 ( LCCN )
95026788 ( lccn )
33273861 ( oclc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by:
Suwannee leader
Preceded by:
Suwannee citizen

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This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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Midweek Edition July 4, 2018 Suwannee Democrat rfn Serving Suwannee County since 1884, including Live Oak, Wellborn, Dowling Park, Branford, McAlpin and OBrien www.suwanneedemocrat.com SEE SUWANNEE, PAGE 10A SEE TAYLOR, PAGE 10A SEE WEAVER, PAGE 10A rf 109836-1 jessie.box@ganews.com LIVE OAK School grades were recently released by the Florida Department of Education and, as a whole, Suwannee County passed with ease. For the 2017-18 school year, the Suwannee County School District kept its B grade. This is the rst time the district has made back-to-back grades of B, Superintendent Ted Roush said. In addition to the district maintain ing its grade from a year ago, four of the individual schools also kept its 2017-18 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15 2013-14 Suwannee County School District B B C B C Branford High School B B C B B Branford Elementary School C B C B B Suwannee High School B B C B C Suwannee Middle School C C C C C Suwannee Intermediate School D C C C D Suwannee Elementary School A A B C D Suwannee County School District retains B grade grades this past year. Suwannee Ele mentary School received the highest grade in the district with an A for the second straight year. Suwannee High School and Branford High School both received a B grade once again, while Suwannee Middle School kept a C grade. Suwannee Interme diate School dropped to a D, from a C. Branford Elementary School rfntbbfnf bfrtnbrftrf bfrtfrrtntbbfn nrbnftbrntbb rfnrbfnnbnrfbfrt frr r ntbbbn nnn fntbr frrbnfrnbnr rttftrtfbnt jessie.box@ganews.com LIVE OAK Jerry Taylor was sworn in as the next President of the Florida School Boards Association on June 14. Taylor becomes the rst president-elect from Taylor becomes FSBA President ELECTION 2018 ELECTION 2018 LIVE OAK Longtime Dis trict 4 home and property owner Harry K. Kin Weaver Jr., a Republican, announces his can didacy for the District 4 County Commission seat. The only vote in the District 4 race will take place Aug. 28 in the primary. Because there are Weaver seeks District 4 commission seat ff ff ffbfbffrbrtbf ntbbbfbnrbnrfrrb ftrfffbfbff bf LIVE OAK The rst four winners in the 2018 Country Show down preliminary were chosen Friday at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park after an evening of ex citing music and artists who gave all in their presentations. Competing in this rst contest for the longest-running country mu sic talent search in America were Sondra Hunt Band (Lake Butler), Kassidy Kolwyck (McAlpin), Trini ty Ann Martinez (Inverness), Vince Carver (Lake City), Reggie Stacy (Bronson), Amanda Gilbert (Val dosta, Ga.) and Katie Ondrejicka (Jacksonville). The winners moving on to the regional nal July 27 were the Son dra Hunt Band, Stacy, Gilbert and Ondrejicka. They will return to the Music Park on July 27 to compete where one act will be chosen from 12 preliminary winners to move to the Oct. 6 seminal, also at the SOSMP. The seminal winner goes to Nashville to compete for the na tional championship. All of the artists brought fantastic performances to the rst prelimi nary before a lled room of fans who cheered and clapped thunder ously with their support. Some of Friday nights artists are just getting their performance ca reers underway. Ondrejicka, one of the winners, is only 12, Martinez is 14 and Kolwyck is 11. WQHL 98.1-FM early morning DJ Scott Berns was the emcee and will be through the upcoming pre lims Friday and July 20 and the July 27 nal. For those wishing to attend Fri days second preliminary, admis sion is free with doors to the Music Hall opening at 6 p.m. for dinner and competition starting at 7 p.m. First Country Showdown preliminary winners chosen frbrftbbffffbrbfrrnrfn frbrbrtfb SECOND SHOWDOWN PRELIMINARY SET FOR FRIDAY b bbb n nb nnfnbnt n nbn nn b r

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 Advertising Manager, Monja Slater ext. 105 Sr. Advertising Representative, Bill Regan, ext. 150 Advertising Representative,Ashley Hingson, ext. 103 Advertising Representative,Samantha Smith, ext. 141 Classified/Legal, Louise Sheddan ext. 102 Telesales Ad Representative, Ninan Rogers, ext. 109The Suwannee Democrat, ublished Wednesday and Friday. Periodicals postage paid at Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located at 521 Demorest St. SE, Live Oak, FL. Publication number 530180. The Jasper News, published every Thursday. Periodicals postage paid at Live Oak, FL 32064. Business locat ed at 521 Demorest St. SE, Live Oak, FL. USPS #755-980. The Mayo Free Press, published every Thursday. Periodicals postage paid at Live Oak, FL 32064. Business locat ed at 521 Demorest St. SE, Live Oak, FL. USPS #334-600. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Suwannee Democrat, Jasper News or Mayo Free Press, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064. Subscribe online at www. suwanneedemocrat.com.Letters, comments and opinions on the Opinion page are not necessarily those of the management/ownership of the Suwannee Democrat, The Jasper News and the Mayo Free Press.LETTERS TO THE EDITORLetters may be mailed, faxed or emailed to our office. All letters are read. Not all letters are published. Letters may be edited to fit available space. The editor should not alter the writers point of view. Well written letters require less editing. Keep it to the point, an ideal range is 150 to 200 words. Please include your name, address and day and evening phone numbers for verification. Letters MUST be signed. Letters to the editor can be limited to one letter per quarter per individual. Suwannee Democrat The Jasper News Mayo Free Press HOW TO REACH US Switchboard, 386-362-1734 Fax, 386-364-5578 Email, nf.editorial@gaflnews.com Mail, P.O. Box 370 Live Oak, FL 32064 Office, 521 Demorest St. SE Publisher, Jeff Masters jmasters@cnhi.com General Manager, Monja Slater ext. 105 CONTACT US WITH YOUR COMMENTSIf you have any questions or concerns, call us at 386-362-1734 or visit our Website at www.suwanneedemocrat.com NEWSROOM Editor, Jamie Wachter ext. 131 Reporter, Jessie Box ext. 130 Sports, Mike Jones ext. 133 ADVERTISING Suwannee Democrat Circulation Subscription Rates, In-county, $35 Out-of-county, $50 Jasper News Circulation Subscription Rates, In-county, $18 Out-of-county, $26 Mayo Free Press Circulation Subscription Rates, In-county, $18 Out-of-county, $26 OFFICE HOURS Open Monday Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. CIRCULATION RANT & RAVE HOTLINEHeres your chance to tell everyone what you think! Callers may dial 208-8314 and leave a message to express their thoughts, good or bad, 24/7 about issues and politics, but not about private indi viduals or businesses. If you prefer, you may email your comments to jamie. wachter@gaflnews.com. Your name is not required, but you must adhere to no more than 200 words. Rant & Rave only publishes in the weekend Suwannee Democrat. SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 2A Suwannee Democrat prints the entire ar rest record each week. If your name appears here and you are later found not guilty or the charges are dropped, we will be happy to make note of this in the newspaper when judicial proof is presented to us by you or the authorities. The following abbreviations are used be low: SCSO-Suwannee County Sheriffs Office LOPD-Live Oak Police Department FDLE-Florida Department of Law En forcement FHP-Florida Highway Patrol FWC-Florida Wildlife Commission DOT-Department of Transportation OALE-Office of Agricultural Law En forcement P & P-Probation and Parole USMS-US Marshals Service ATF-Department of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms DOC-Department of Corrections June 27, Justin Allen Bannister, 40, 2616 SE County Road 252, Lake City, FL, Proba tion Violation: SCSO-Hunter June 27, Bradley Allen Griffin, 43, 321 SE Smart Court, Lake City, FL, Probation Violation: SCSO-Hunter June 27, James Robert Sapp, 46, 504 Houston Ave., Live Oak, FL, DWLR, Re sisting Officer Without Violence, Hold For Other Reason: LOPD-MacFadden June 27, Ilona Apzara Aymond, 72, 22038 47th Road, Lake City, FL, Neglect Elderly Disabled Adult Without Great Harm: SC SO-Hedgespeth June 27, Franklin Jerone Mobley, 62, 7853 129th Drive, Live Oak, FL, Failure to Appear: SCSO-Williamson June 27, Christopher Brian Jennings, 39, 6050 CR 252, Lake City, FL, Grand Theft: SCSO-Harmon June 27, Phillip Clark Douglas, 19, 439 Hazel Way, Lake City, FL, Grand Theft: SCSO-Harmon June 28, Chip Dorian Strickland, 35, 20021 29th Drive, Wellborn, FL, Probation Violation: SCSO-Hedgespeth June 28, Nathalie Shaina Charles, 27, 2170 12th St., Jacksonville, FL, Drug Pos session, Larceny: DOA-Buckles June 28, Steve Bivens, 63, 7206 189th Dr., Live Oak, FL, DWLS/R: LOPD-Mac Fadden June 28, Ronald Ernest Corbett, 51, 1531 Commercial Glen, Lake City, FL, Probation Violation: SCSO-Ford June 29, Tanya Sheree Smith, 33, 20998 158th St., Live Oak, FL, Probation Viola tion: SCSO-Hunter June 29, Patrick Allen McAnany, 60, 7328 52nd Street, Live Oak, FL, Failure To Ap pear: SCSO-Lee June 29, Robert William Yates, 36, 1402 2nd St., Live Oak, FL, DWLS/R, No Motor Vehicle Registration: LOPD-Watson June 30, Edward Robinson, 52, 302 Braughton St., Branford, FL, Probation Vio lation: SCSO-Miara June 30, Quaysean Monismith, 24, 9328 Nelson Park Circle, Orlando, FL, Marijuana Possession, Larceny, Burglary: SCSO-Henry June 30, Victor Gil-Lazo, 46, 8690 199th Road, Live Oak, FL, Probation Violation: SCSO-Lee June 30, Keith Richard Harris, 44, 3621 Highway 129, Jasper, FL, DUI: LOPD-Parisi July 1, Nestor Daniel Mite Roman, 40, 6081 77th Place, Live Oak, FL, Simple Bat tery (DV): SCSO-Henry July 1, Alvin Bernard Webb, 32, 355 Bickel Dr., Lake City, FL, Disorderly Intox ication, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Resisting Arrest Without Violence, Proba tion Violation: LOPD-Chauncey July 1, Walter Charles Cline, 42, 5626 Pinecrest Road, Live Oak, FL, False Name, Resisting Arrest Without Violence, Proba tion Violation: LOPD-Parisi July 1, Devonta Antron Jordan, 25, 618 Walker Ave., Live Oak, FL, Out of County Warrant: LOPD-Parisi Suwannee County Arrest Record Hamilton County Arrest Record Editors note: The Jasper News prints the entire arrest record. If your name appears here and you are later found not guilty or the charges are dropped, we will be happy to make note of this in the newspaper when judicial proof is presented to us by you or the authorities. The following abbreviations are used be low: DAC Department of Agriculture Commis sion DOA Department of Agriculture DOT Department of Transportation FDLE Florida Department of Law En forcement FHP Florida Highway Patrol FWC Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva tion Commission HCDTF Hamilton County Drug Task Force HCSO Hamilton County Sheriffs Ofce ICE Immigration and Custom Enforce ment JAPD Jasper Police Department JNPD Jennings Police Department OALE Ofce of Agricultural Law En forcement P&P Probation and Parole SCSO Suwannee County Sheriffs Ofce WSPD White Springs Police Department June 26, Faceless Alvarez Caceres, 26, Bay amon, Puerto Rico, Reisting Ofcer: HCSO June 26, Travis Lamare Nails, 39, 343 Pa triot Court, Lake City, FL, Probation Viola tion: HCSO June 27, Sheena Darae Burleigh, 30, 2550 Lake Grifn Road, Lady Lake, FL, Out of County Warrant: DOA June 28, Eboni Unique Douglas, 21, 576 SW Dexter Circle, Lake City, FL, Probation Violation: HCSO June 29, Kennard Brandon Jarrett, 28, 1902 Manseld Road, Cedar Hill, Texas, NVDL, Fail to Stop at Ag Station: DOA June 29, Hiram Walker, 27, 3423 CR 152, Jennings, FL, Larceny, Resisting Ofcer: HCSO June 29, William Tyrone Jones, 41, 1332 Bee St., Jennings, FL, Possession of Synthetic Drugs: JAPD June 29, Quentin Bernard Gandy, 32, 1113 Southern St., Jennings, FL, Possession of Synthetic Drugs: JAPD June 30, Rene Vasquez, 37, McCall St., Jennings, FL, Disorderly Intoxication: JNPD June 30, John Henry White, 37, 10292 Ken drick St., White Springs, FL, DWLS/R, Bat tery, Cruelty Toward Child: HCSO July 1, Jamar Oketo Scott, 31, 1935 Cran berry Isles, Apopka, FL, Flee/Elude LEO, Drive with Expired License: HCSO July 1, Delvon Jamar Johnson, 27, 4361 SW County Road 152, Jasper, FL, Cruelty Toward Child: HCSO July 1, Amber Marie Parrish, 20, 4361 SW County Road 152, Jasper, FL, Possession of Synthetic Drugs: HCSO July 2, Johnny Bernard Hickman, 47, 5906 Ithaca Circle, Lake Worth, FL, DWLS/R: DOA July 2, Vincent Crutcheld, 29, 1715 Wiese Lane, Mount Pleasant, WI, Drug Possession, Marijuana Possession, Narcotic Equipment Possession: DOA July 2, Dwayne Kyle Petersen, 25, 5743 Timberleaf Blvd., Orlando, FL, Drug Posses sion, Marijuana Possession, Narcotic Equip ment Possession: DOA LIVE OAK The Florida Department of Health in Suwannee County has issued a healthy advisory after two horses tested positive for a mosquito-borne disease. According to the health department, two Suwannee County horses tested pos itive for an Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus infection, which means the risk of transmission to humans has increased. DOH-Suwannee said it will continue its surveillance efforts. The health department also said there are a few basic precautions residents can take to help limit exposure and hopefully avoid being bitten by mosquitoes. According to the release, people should remember to Drain and Cover to protect oneself from mosquitoes. Draining standing water stops mosqui toes from multiplying. That includes draining water from gar bage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, ower pots or other containers where water has collected. People should also discard old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, bro ken appliances and other items not being used. Birdbaths and pets water bowls should be emptied and cleaned at least once or twice a week. Boats and vehicles should be protected from rain with tarps that dont accumulate water. And swimming pools should be main tained and appropriately chlorinated. Plas tic swimming pools should be emptied when not in use. Residents are also encouraged to cov er their skin with clothing or repellent. Shoes, socks, long pants and long-sleeved shirts may be necessary for people work ing in areas where mosquitoes are present. People should also apply mosquito repel lent to bare skin and clothing. According to the release, repellents with DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, pa ra-methane-diol and IR3535 are effective. Also, people should cover doors and windows with screens to keep mosquitoes out of the house. For more information, visit the DOHs website at http://www.oridahealth. gov/%5c/diseases-and-conditions/mosqui to-borne-diseases/index/html or contact the local health department. DOH-Suwannee issues mosquito-borne illness advisory JASPER The Jasper Public Library will be showing a pair of movies this month related to the Ruby McCol lum story. The rst movie, The Other Side of Silence, will be shown Tuesday from 3:30-5 p.m. The documentary was written and re-told by Dr. Claudia Johnson, a former resi dent of the area, renowned author and gifted writer. The second lm is You Belong to Me, a dramatized documentary of the McCollum-Dr. Clifford L.. Adams story, will be shown July 19 from 3:30-5 p.m. Produced by Hilary Salesman and Jude Hagan, it includes inter views with Sam McCollum Jr. and Edna Rae Black Hindson, daughter of the late A. Keith Black, the state attorney during the McCollum trial. On Aug. 3, 1952, the late Ruby McCollum, a prom inent African-American woman in Suwannee County, shot and murdered the late Dr. Clifford L. Adams, one of the most prominent Live Oak citizens. It was a story that garnered national and international attention. Those interested in local history will enjoy the two lms upcoming at the Jasper Public Library. Both movies are free of charge. Jasper Library to show McCollum movies

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 3A Dr. Bruce Ornstein RETIRING at the end of August 2018rfnrtbnn Patients are being referred to: Phone: 352-331-4333 111662-1 Thank You! Thank You! Thank You! Thankful and Blessed!Marion McCrayPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Marion McCray for School Board, District 3. Thank you for the confidence that you have shown by allowing me to continue to serve as your Lafayette County School Board Member for District 3. To have no opposition is truly a blessing. I will continue to prove my integrity, honesty and commitment through my actions. If I can be of service to you in ANY way, please let me know. Blessed beyond measure! LOOKING FOR WANT TO PLACE AN AD?For Employment, Call: 800-600-4838 For Other Classieds, Call: 386-362-1734 x102Check Out Our Classied Ads in the B Section of this Edition.108811-1 LIVE OAK Its time to get ones hula on with a rst in North Florida and at the Spirit of the Su wannee Music Park with Prince Peles Polynesian Revue, a whole lot of shaking going on with Ted TeddyMac Elvis Mc Mullen as Elvis in Hawaii and enjoy some real Poly nesian/Hawaiian food. The event will also feature the areas favorite Legends performers July 13-14 at the SOSMP. Advance tickets are on sale now by calling 386364-1683, emailing spir it@musicliveshere.com or stopping by the SOSMP main ofce. Saturday, July 14, will transport the audience to Hawaii when Ted McMul len presents Prince Peles Polynesian Revue with Ted TeddyMac Elvis McMullen as Elvis in Alo ha from Hawaii. The spe cial event features Ted as Elvis in costume, a Hawai ian king/queen contest for the best Hawaiian outts, Hawaiian leis, door prizes and theme dcor. Prince Pele and his dancers will take the audience on an imaginary trip throughout the islands of the South Pacic Hawaii, New Zealand, Samoa and Ta hiti. Based in St. Augustine, Prince Pele and his fam ily began his Polynesian Revue shows in 1973 and continue to astonish audi ences everywhere. The weekend of great fun, dancing, memories and memory-making will get underway Friday, July 13, with the celebrated Ted TeddyMac Elvis McMullen Legends Show in the Music Hall. Legends artists performing will be Trese Hill as Tammy Wynette, Diane Johnston as Lorrie Morgan, Calvin Smart as Johnny Cash, Dale Bennett as Loretta Lynn, Kathy Stafford as Shania Twain, Texanna as Patsy Cline, Leamon Nipper as Merle Haggard, Penny Hannah as Wynon na Judd, Bobby Long as Willie Nelson, Keith Thrift as Conway Twitty and in troducing for the very rst time, Anthony ONeal as John Anderson. Doors open each night at 5 p.m. for dinner with shows beginning at 7 p.m. Ticket prices at the door are $10 per person Friday night, $15 Saturday night (food not included either night). Weekend tickets that include both nights are just $20 per person in advance only with advance ticket sales ending at the SOSMP main ofce at noon Friday, July 13. Prince Peles Polynesian Revue coming to Music Park next week T ravis Henr y, AAMS Financial Advisor 123 Howard Street Liv e Oak, FL 32064 386-364-1657 tra vis .henr y@edw ardjones .com www .edw ardjones .com Questions to Ask Your Financial Advisor rf fntb FINANCIAL FOCUS fff fftb rftfftrff fbrf f ftft ffrb ftfrr fff ftr ffbr fftrf ttbff tfrf brff fft rfrfffb rf fft tfrftrbrf t ftffrr tfttf rfftrf rtbtrff rfr frff ttb ff ffrt fff tb nttfb frbtf frtf bff tffr ff fftb ntb b f tf bnt fff frbfff frft tf fttf t bftf ftrfr trb ff frrftt ftrff tfbnt tftfrf trb Units located on Gold Kist Road Rental Oce: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-6626 8991-1 CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE ABBEY & LIVE OAK MINI STORAGE

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 4A Check out these reviews and others on the product pages at STIHLdealers.com. STIHLdealers.com All prices are DSRP. Available at participating dealers while supplies last. The actual listed guide bar length may vary from the effective cutting length based on which powerhead it is installed on. 2017 STIHL00 bar Im glad I went with the 170--the price and reliability are outstanding. user prutsmanbros93MS 170 CHAIN SAW This is absolutely the best blower I have ever purchased. It is a great piece of equipment for the price, plus with the STIHL name, it has dependability I can count on. user TL805 BG 50 HANDHELD BLOWER $12995 FS 38 GAS TRIMMERFSA 45 BATTERY TRIMMERLightweight trimmer just 7.3 lbs. with AK 10 batteryNEW! FSA 56 BATTERY-POWERED T R I M M ER Includes AK 10 battery and AL 101 charger. NEW BGA 56 BATTE RY-POWERED H A N D HELD B L O W E RIncludes AK 20 battery and AL 101 charger. Lightweight handheld blower just 7.3 lbs. with AK 20 battery Johns Lawn Equipment 386-362-5020 62757-1 LOOKING FOR WANT TO PLACE AN AD?For Employment, Call: 800-600-4838 For Other Classieds, Call: 386-362-1734 x102Check Out Our Classied Ads in the B Section of this Edition.108811-1 rfnt bbn tbn tb 111058-1 Parker Memorial Service Glenna Parker passed away on June 6, 2018 at the age of 83. She was a loving and devoted wife, mother, grandmother, great grandmother & friend. As a proud resident of Jasper, Florida she will be truly missed by many. A memorial service celebrating her life will be held July 7, 2018 at The Greater Poplar Springs Missionary Baptist Church in Jasper from 12:00-2:00pm. Anyone attending is more than welcome to speak a few words on her behalf. LIVE OAK The Live Oak Public Library will be home to a winemaking presentation this week. On Thursday, Betsy Martin will be at the Live Oak branch of the Suwan nee River Regional Library system to demonstrate winemaking from noon to 1 p.m. Martins presentation will follow the winemak ing process from the selec tion of the grapes or other produce to the bottling of the nished wine. In addition to learning about the process, those in atten dance will also hear about the supplies and equipment needed for the process. Call the library at 386362-2317 for more infor mation. The winemaking presen tation comes one day after the Live Oak Library and the rest of the SRRL sys tem are closed for the ob servance of Independence Day on July 4. On Saturday, Cafe Libro will be open in the new book area from 8:30-11:30 a.m. Free coffee will be available while patrons browse the new books. Debra Barney, a library staff member, will host a knitting class on July 11 and a crochet class on July 18, both at 11:30 a.m. in the small conference room. Those attending are asked to bring needles and yarn. Barney will also lead the Armchair Travels pre sentation July 19 when she takes the audience on a trip to Bolivia at noon. Bolivia is a beautiful, geographically diverse, multi-ethnic and democrat ic country in the heart of South America according to the librarys release. It is bordered by Brazil, Peru, Chile, Argentina and Paraguay. On July 12, Jennings Bunn will hold a Native American artifacts presen tation at noon. Burn will demonstrate the uses for many of the artifacts as well as tell how they were made. A display of his per sonal collection of artifacts is on display now at the library through July 12. Suwannee County Fire Rescue will conduct a free CPR and First Aid Class on July 21 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Those completing the class will receive a certicate. Space is limited so those wanting to attend are asked to pre-register by calling the library at 386362-2317. The Book Club meets July 25 at 2 p.m. to dis cuss Watership Down by Richard Adams. The worldwide bestseller for more than 40 years, Wa tership Down is described as a timeless classic and one of the most beloved novels of all time. Copies are available for checkout at the front desk. Linda Lamarue, a local food blogger, will present easy, no-cook food demos and recipes at the library on July 26 at noon. Her blog can be found at http:// bestoongislandandcentral orida.blogspot.com. Also on July 26, a Song Farmers Gathering will be held at 6 p.m. Accosting musicians and music lov ers are welcome to attend. A Young at Heart Game Day for Adults is sched uled for July 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Games such as Scrabble and dominoes will be available but those participating are encour aged to bring their own games as well. The librarys adult sum mer program is also ongo ing through July 27. The program is open to adults, ages 18 and older. Prize drawings are held every Friday with a Grand Prize drawing held July 27. Winemaking to be discussed at library GAINESVILLE Live Oak Mayor Garth Nobles, Jr. was recently awarded a Certicate of Service recognizing 25 years of service at the North Central Florida Regional Planning Council meeting in Lake City. In August 1992, No bles began his 25 years of service on the Council as a local elected ofcial rep resenting the City of Live Oak. The Council, whose members are local elected ofcials and gubernatorial appointees, administers a variety of state and federal programs for north central Florida including Alachua, Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafay ette, Levy, Madison, Su wannee, Taylor and Union counties. Programs include development of the Strate gic Regional Policy Plan, technical assistance to local governments in develop ment of comprehensive plans, land development regulations and grant man agement, and administra tion of hazardous materi Nobles recognized for 25 years of service rfntbttt fnnnnnfnt nntnrt t als, homeland security and economic development programs. In addition, the Council staffs the Met ropolitan Transportation Planning Organization for the Gainesville Urbanized Area, the North Central Florida Local Emergen cy Planning Committee, the North Central Florida Regional Hazardous Ma terials Response Team and The Original Florida Tour ism Task Force. Nobles has been very ac tive in the organization. He previously served two terms as Chair, Vice-Chair, and Secretary-Treasurer of the Council and Chair of the Finance Committee, Nominating Committee and Program Commit tee. He has also served as a Council representative to the Florida Regional Coun cils Association. The Councils ofces are located in Gainesville. More information about the Council can be found at ncfrpc.org. Summer time brings many opportunities for outdoor activities. With these oppor tunities, there are many dangerous elements that must be kept in mind: sun protec tion, extreme heat and heat-related illness. In Suwannee County, from 2014 through 2016, 12.3 percent of resi dents were diagnosed with skin can cer. The overall average for the State of Florida is only 9.1 percent. We are quite a bit above average. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, but most skin cancers can be prevented. Nearly 5 million people are treated for skin cancer. There are about 76,000 new cases of and 9,000 deaths from melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Prevention methods are typically simple and can potentially save you from a very dangerous outcome. Use a layered approach for sun pro tection. Sunscreen works best when used with shade or clothes and it must be re-applied every two hours and after swimming, sweating, or towel ing off. Wear a hat, sunglasses, and protective clothing to shield skin. Use broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15 to protect exposed skin. Seek shade, especially during midday hours. All of these efforts will help you pro tect the skin youre in. Extreme heat events are a leading cause of extreme weather-related deaths in the United States. The num ber of heat-related deaths is rising. Heat stress is a heat-related illness caused by your bodys inability to cool down properly. The body nor mally cools itself by sweating. But under some conditions, sweating just isnt enough. In such cases, a persons body temperature rises rapidly. Very high body temperatures may damage the brain or other vital organs. The most serious heat-related illness is heat stroke. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided. Heat-related death or illnesses are preventable if you follow a few simple steps. during the hottest hours of the day. If you dont have air conditioning in your home, go to a public place such as a shopping center or library to stay cool. you are thirsty. activities if you are outside or in a building without air conditioning. When in the sun, wear a hat, prefera bly with a wide brim. This summer, while you are enjoy ing the activities that warm weather and vacationing can bring, please be aware of your current condition. If you experience any of the signs leading to heat-related illness, seek medical attention immediately. Symptoms include extremely high body tem peratures, hot and dry skin, profuse sweating, hallucinations, chills, throb bing headache, confusion or dizziness and slurred speech. Remember to stay hydrated, apply simple sun protections methods, and avoid extreme heat con ditions for extended periods of time. For more tips on how to stay cool, hydrated and informed visit the Flori da Department of Healths website at FloridaHealth.gov. Kimberly Law is the Health Edu cator at the Florida Department of Health Suwannee/Lafayette Counties. Stay safe this summer 111563-1 SUWANNEE RIVER READINGS Branford 2018The water levels provided here refer to the height at the US Hwy. 27 bridge in Branford in feet above mean sea level (ft-msl) at the gauging station. In the past the levels were read as gauge height not mean sea level. Sponsored By:SCAFFSBranfordSupermarket386-935-15276/25/18 ........... 13.14 6/26/18 ........... 12.93 6/27/18 ........... 12.74 6/28/18 ........... 12.73 6/29/18 ........... 12.73 6/30/18 ........... 12.82 7/01/18 ........... 12.82 JASPER All the la dies of Hamilton County are invited to attend the Countywide Sisterhood meeting next week. The meeting is sched uled for July 10 at 6 p.m. at the Harvest Fellowship Church, which is across U.S. Highway 129 from the Hamilton County High School. Those wishing to attend are asked to bring their favorite salad or dessert and join in a wonderful time of fellowship and inspiration. Hamilton Countywide Sisterhood meeting set

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 5A OBITUARIES Healthy Living Its OK not to be perfect all the time Perfection. The need to be perfect can be so scary to many of us that it can stop us dead in our tracks. But when it comes to our health, do we really need to be perfect ALL the time? Trying to do our best is a great thing but when we are so focused on being perfect that we do not make any progress at all thats where the trouble is. This is some thing Ive gotten better at but it denitely is a trait I have that gets me in trouble every so often. If you are like me, you like to do things right the rst time. After all, who wants to have to go back and do it over? It can be tough if youre the the type of person who likes structure, order and routine (raises hand). When it comes to my health, however, Ive realized its OK not to be perfect. What is important is that I actually do something to move forward. As an example, you have your meals planned for the day but at the last-minute, a friend asks you out to lunch. What do you do? We have two options to go or not to go. Some of us would go and enjoy catch ing up with our friend and not worry about straying for one meal. After all, we will get back on track with dinner. For others, we would say no because we are afraid of not staying on track with our nutrition program especially if we are trying to lose weight. The fear is actually that by not staying on track, we will never be able to get back on track. This is the category I used to fall into. I used to think that if I got off track at lunch, Id give up for the day and start over in the morning. You know what they say about mak ing plans right? So of course, Im planning on getting back on track the next day WHEN something else happens and Im off track before I walk out the door. One meal leads to another meal which leads to another day which ends up into the next week. See the picture? The good news is there is more to life than being perfect. When we allow our selves a little wiggle room, it makes it easier for us to get back on track. And by allowing ourselves not to be perfect, we of ten nd we are moving forward at a faster pace. And we are happier too. Have a great week! To your health, Denise Denise Sanger is a certied tness in structor, Silver Sneakers Instructor, AMPD Kettlebell Instructor, licensed Zumba, STRONG by Zumba instructor, gentle ow yoga, teaches morning classes at Country Strong Health & Fitness. Denise may be reached at DeniseSanger.com, 386/2926105 or denisesanger@gmail.com. Happy Birthday America!! As the re works explode, lets celebrate our country by considering the freedom we enjoy as cit izens. Freedom is a powerful thing, and like anything powerful, it brings with it a mea sure of risk and uncertainty. Having free dom means that no one makes our choices for us, but it also brings the liability of those choices; whether they produce blessing or suffering, the results are ours to claim. Given that the driving force behind Americas birth was religious freedom, it is strange that while our country is associated with independence, Christians have long convinced the world that we are anything but free. It is the common perception that Christians have a long list of impossible rules to live by, (hence their sour dispo sitions.) In his book A Scandalous Free dom, author Steve Brown tells the follow ing story: Abraham Lincoln went to a slave mar ket. There he noted a young, beautiful African-American woman being auctioned off to the highest offer. He bid on her and won. He could see the anger in her eyes and could imagine what she was thinking, An other white man who will buy me, use me, and then discard me. As Lincoln walked off with his property, he turned to the woman and said, Youre free. Yeah. What does that mean? she re plied. It means that youre free. Does that mean I can say whatever I want to say? Yes, replied Lincoln, smiling, it means that you can say whatever you want to say. Does it mean, she asked incredulously, that I can be whatever I want to be? Yes, you can be whatever you want to be. Does it mean, the young woman asked hesitantly that I can go wherever I want to go? Yes, it means you are free and can go wherever you want to go. Then, said the young woman with tears welling up in her eyes, I think Ill go with you. Galatians 5:1 says, It is for freedom that Christ has set us free. Stand rm then and do not let yourselves be burdened again by a yoke of slavery. God gives us freedom because He wants us to choose Him. Picture this newly freed young woman living and perhaps even serving in Lincolns home, not because she must, but because she chooses, out of gratitude and for her own protection. In her world, there would always be one waiting to take her back to slavery. She understood well that she would not stay free on her own and neither will we. Our culture and our own desires (sin nature) will lay the same trap for us. If we want to stay free, we too will stay close under the protection of the One who grants our freedom! God is after a relationship with you and me, not a list of rules. Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. (2 Corin thians 3:17) Healthy relationships always reect freedom rather than bondage. Experi ence real freedom. Its your choice. Because your heart matters. Blessings, Angie Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, Director of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Associa tion, where she teaches Bible studies, leads marriage and family conferences and offers Biblical counseling to individuals, couples and families. Contact Angie with questions or comments at angieland3@windstream. net. Heart Matters Use your freedom to choose God rfnntbnntnb rfntbnnn rtn rf rntrn rf r frfn nfn nf fnn fn rnf rfnrnfn nrf rnrfnn nrnfn nrnnrn nnnrn nnnrn tfnbfn fnfn nn rfrf rn rfrrff ff tbf r frr rff rrf rf rffn tb b nn tfb t bn b bntbnrb rfn ntbnfb fbb rbb bb nrf LIVE OAK The Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park will host the second pre liminary in the nationwide Country Showdown talent search this week. After the Country Show down preliminary on Friday, Gainesville band Fair Game will make its rst appear ance at the SOSMP on Saturday. The Country Showdown is the longest running coun try music competition in the nation, holds its talent search nationwide and is in its 37th year. The SOSMP has been the North Florida home of this competition since 2008, sending three acts to the Nashville nation al competition. Once again the SOSMP is hosting this years Regional talent search along with Live Oaks country radio station WQHL 98.1-FM. The Music Park will also host the seminal for multiple state winners Oct. 6 with one winner go ing to Nashville to compete for the national title. Last week the rst search produced four terric winners who move to the Regional Final on July 27 at the Music Park. This week four more winners will also earn the right to move to the July 27 nals. For those interested in vying for the title of Best New Act in Country Music, go to www.musicliveshere. com and sign up. There are two more preliminaries Friday and July 20 left to get into the competition. Admission is free for the Second Showdown preliminary set for Friday Fair Game to play Saturday at Music Hall DAY The Ezell Family Reunion is scheduled for July 8 at the Day Commu nity Center. The reunion is set to begin at 11 a.m. Those attending are asked to bring a basket lunch along with children and grandchildren. For more information, please contact Zelda Ezell Dietrick at 386-294-2080 or Libby Ezell Singletary at 386-294-1168. Ezell Family Reunion set for July 8 rfntbb rfntt brtt t nnt nt tnt t tfrt rntt rttt tft nfttt nr brrntfn t ttt n ftfr nnntrt trtt ttftft rfn tbfn rbn b bbbf rfrntbt nnfnn nfnr nf fr fnr fn r fnn nnnn nn nrnn rf nfnntrnbt nnnfr fnn nnfnfr rbtn nb nnfnn nrnn Country Showdown com petition. On Saturday night, Fair Game Band takes the Mu sic Hall Stage for the rst time with its great band. Fair Game is described as one of the most dynamic and energy driven bands. Based in Gainesville and traveling throughout Florida and South Georgia playing danceable classic, Southern rock, R&B, country and more, Fair Game is sure to get the audience out on the dance oor Saturday night. Formed last year, all members are experienced musicians who are passion ate about entertaining. There is free admission Saturday night as well. Doors to the Music Hall open at 6 p.m. for dinner Friday and Saturday. Coun try Showdowns begin at 7 p.m. Friday, Fair Game takes the stage at 8 p.m. Saturday. rfnt rbr rb rrbrb nb *Pricing depends on quantity of photos uploaded, word count and amount of dates chosen to run.

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SEE DEADLY, PAGE 7A I drove down to the Florida Keys last week to do some shing and to see how the island chain has recov ered after Hurricane Irmas direct hit last September. There was much progress being made, but there is still much work to be done. I am sure they are glad that there are not any tropical storms menacing the state right now. Hopefully, Mother Nature will give that part of our state a long break from a strong storm like Irma. I enjoy driving down to the Keys when the trafc is not too heavy. That was the case this past Tuesday. I have driven across the country, and in my opinion the drive in the middle and lower Florida Keys, when you can see the Gulf of Mexico on one side of you and the Atlantic Ocean on the other, is the most beautiful in America. We made a brief stop at one of my favorite places to have a drink in the Keys, Wahoos Bar and Grill at the Whale Harbor Marina in Islamorada. They have a large deck overlooking the charter boats and the Atlantic that is my denition of paradise. The area had suffered some damage from Irma and had just opened about a month ago. The famous Holiday Isle Tiki Bar, located right across the channel from Wahoos, was not so lucky. It was still closed for repairs when we drove by. That was the case in many areas of the middle and lower Keys. Some structures survived, and some right next door were not so lucky. There were many repairs and construction projects go ing on while we were there, but there were still plenty of stores and restaurants open. Duval Street seemed to have avoided the wrath of Irma and was somewhat crowded for a Wednesday. My favorite place to play pool in Key West, Captain Tonys, is still open for business. Thankfully, the sh did not seem to have suffered any ill effects from Irma. The full moon in June is one of the best times to sh for snapper in South Florida, and the shing was as good as I remembered it. Even though we were not able to get to the deep reef, Dawson and I caught a decent number of various types of snapper and grunts. It is amaz ing how many sh you can catch hanging some chum off the stern and dropping various baits down to the hungry sh. It is much easier than trying to trick the trout and the redsh around Steinhatchee. Last years hurricane season was one for the record books. It had the most named storms since 2012. It tied for the most consecutive storms in a single season at 10. Last September had the highest accumulated cyclone energy ever recorded in a single month, and Irma, with her 185mph winds, was the second strongest storm on record. I really hope this years hurricane season is nothing like last years. Eric lives in Suwannee County and is a public school educator. He is an independent contractor. You can reach him at miamistyle8@gmail.com. Opinion A PAGE 6 rfrfnftrbfbf ftfrrbfbf The Keys, while recovering, are open for business Amy Wax, a University of Pennsyl vania law professor, has come under attack and scathing criticism because she dared criticize the schools racial preferences program. In an interview with Brown University economist Glenn Loury, discussing afrmative action, Wax mentioned how racial preferences hinder the ability of blacks to succeed academically by admitting them into schools at which they are in over their heads academ ically. At Penns seventh-ranked law school, Wax said, she doesnt think that she has ever seen a black law student graduate in the top quarter of his class, and rarely is a black student in the top half. That got her into deep trouble. Penn students and fac ulty members charged her with racism. Penn Law School Dean Ted Ruger stripped Wax of her duty of teaching her mandatory rst-year class on civil procedures. Im guessing that Penns law faculty members know Waxs statement is true but think it was something best left unsaid in todays racially charged climate. Ruger might have refuted Waxs claim. He surely has access to student records. He might have listed the number of black law students who were valedictorians and graduated in the top 10 percent of their class. He rightfully chose not to so as to not provide evidence for Waxs claim. One study suggests that Wax is absolutely right about academic mismatch. In the early 1990s, the Law School Admission Council collected 27,000 law student records, representing nearly 90 percent of accredited law schools. The study found that after the rst year, 51 percent of black law students ranked in the bottom tenth of their class, compared with 5 percent of white students. Twothirds of black students were in the bottom fth of their class. Only 10 percent of blacks were in the top half of their class. Twenty-two percent of black students in the LSAC database hadnt passed the bar exam after ve at tempts, compared with 3 percent of white test takers. The University of Pennsylvania controversy highlights something very important to black people and the nation. The K-12 education that most blacks receive is grossly fraudulent. Most predominately black schools are costly yet grossly inferior to predominately white schools and are in cities where blacks hold considerable political pow er, such as Baltimore, Detroit, Chicago and Philadelphia. In these and other cities, its not uncommon for there to be high schools where less than 17 percent of the students test procient in reading, and often not a single student in such schools tests procient in math. Nonetheless, many receive high school diplomas. Its inconceivable that college administrators are un aware that they are admitting students who are ill-pre pared and have difculty performing at the college level. Theres no way that four or ve years of college can re pair the academic damage done to black students through out their 13 years of primary and secondary education. Partial proof is black student performance at the post graduate level, such as in law school. Their disadvantage is exaggerated when they are admitted to prestigious Ivy League law schools. Its as if you asked a trainer to teach you how to box and the rst ght he got you was with Anthony Joshua or Floyd Mayweather. You might have the potential to ultimately be a good boxer, but youre going to get your brains beaten out before you learn how to bob and weave. The fact that black students have low class rankings at such high-powered law schools as Penn doesnt mean that they are stupid or uneducable. It means that theyve been admitted to schools where they are in over their heads. To admit these students makes white liberals feel better about themselves. It also helps support the jobs of black and white university personnel in charge of diversity and inclusion. The question for black people is whether we can afford to have the best of our youngsters demeaned, degraded and possibly destroyed to make white liberals feel better about themselves. You might ask, Williams, without afrmative action, what would the University of Pennsylvania Law School do about diversity and inclu sion? Id say thats Penns problem. Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University. To nd out more about Walter E. Williams and read features by other Creators Syndi cate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate webpage at www.creators.com. r College destruction of black students JULY 4 & 5, 2018 The Suwannee Democrat, The Jasper News and Mayo Free Press welcomes letters from readers on matters of public interest, with the following guidelines: Letters must contain your full name, address, daytime phone number and city of residence. Only your full name and city of residence will be published with the letter. Letters must reect issues of current interest to the general public and be concise. Management has the right to refuse any material it believes does not meet standards of publication. You can email letters to nf.editorial@ganews.com fax them to 386-364-5578 or mail them to: Letters to the Editor, Suwannee Democrat P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 To Submit Letters www.suwanneedemocrat.com Jeff Masters Publisher jmasters@cnhi.com Follow us: facebook.com/suwanneedemocrat @suwanneedemocra (Twitter) Members of the Suwannee Democrat editorial board are Jeff Masters, Publisher, Monja Slater, General Manager, and Jamie Wachter, Editor. Masters, Slater and Wachter are joined on the board by community members Jim Holmes, Bruce Kemmerer and Otha White Sr. Jamie Wachter Editor jamie.wachter@ganews.com Monja Slater General Manager monja.slater@ganews.com Suwannee Democrat The Jasper News Mayo Free Press Thirty-ve years ago, as the editor of a suburban Boston newspaper, I faced a hostile crowd in a church meeting room over a story my newspaper had written about the public suicide of a young man. Efforts to per suade him to give up his gun blocked main street trafc for several hours and caused confu sion across the city. The gathering at the church occurred in response to more than 200 cancellations received from readers angry the story had been written in the rst place, and then placed on the front page. The room overowed with resentful residents from the tight ethnic neighborhood where the young man lived. As many times as I tried to explain the news worthiness of the story, theyd boo, hiss and have none of it. A few shouted epithets about journalism and jour nalists. The family of the deceased sat in the front row, staring intently at me throughout the excruciat ing long discussion. Finally, the crowd thinned and we agreed to call it a night. My personal consequence: four at car tires in the church parking lot, and a scribbled note on the windshield consigning me to hell. Several nasty letters to the editor followed, a few of which were printable. It was a nerve-rattling experience. Yet I accepted it as the tough nature of the news business, and moved on, albeit with a greater understanding of the role difcult news decisions play in the lives of the people affected by them. The point is journalists learn to live with criticism from people who strongly disagree with our reporting and news decisions. Occasionally, the appraisal is vile, even threatening. But rarely does it cause us concern for personal safety, especially within the seemingly secure con nes of a newsroom, even when shoe boxes of bit terly critical letters are delivered to your doorstep, as happened in the public suicide case. That notion of newsroom invulnerability was shat tered in January of 2015 with an attack by three ter rorists on the Paris ofces of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in retaliation for cartoons lampooning Deadly newsroom shooting jars journalists f

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 7A Islam. Twelve people were killed, including the top editor. Now, an attack by an en raged shooter has occurred in this country, at the com munity newspaper serving Annapolis, the capital city of Maryland. Four journalists and a sales assistant were killed in Thursdays news room tragedy at The Capital Gazette, commonly known as The Capital. The Washington Post described it as the deadliest attack on journalists in the U. S. in decades. It is a stark reminder no newsroom is immune from the climate of media loath ing and violence prevalent in todays society. Schools, movie theaters, nightclubs, churches, outdoor concerts and now a newsroom have experienced mass shootings in recent years in this coun try. Jarrod W. Ramos, the 38-year-old charged with the Annapolis shootings, appar ently had no record of ex tremism such as that which motivated the Charlie Hebdo attack. He did, however, har bor a long-standing grudge against the paper, including an unsuccessful defamation lawsuit, over a column writ ten seven years ago detailing criminal harassment charges involving a female high school classmate. Tom Marquardt, former editor and publisher of the Annapolis paper, said he wasnt surprised authorities identied Ramos as the shooter, explaining Ramos had constantly harangued The Capital after the col umn published, causing the paper to notify police and also consider requesting a restraining order. I remember telling our attorneys, This guy is going to come in and shoot us, Marquardt told the Balti more Sun, which owns The Capital. Marquardt retired from the paper in the fall of 2012. His warning unfortunately proved true Thursday at about 2:40 p.m. (EDT) when a gunman, armed with a pump-action shotgun and smoke grenades, shattered the newsrooms glass doors and randomly started ring away. Editors, reporters and others in the room dove un der desks to frantically avoid the gunre. Ramos outrage against The Capital had been per sonied on a 2011 Twit ter page he dedicated to foul-language disparagement of the paper. The introduc tory statement read: Dear reader: I created this page to defend myself. Now Im su ing and making corpses of corrupt careers and corpo rate entities. Later on, he also made reference to the Charlie Hebdo attack. Marquardt tried to put the jarring news in context with a Facebook post when he rst heard it: I cant even fathom with any degree of understanding what hap pened at my old newspaper today. The Capital, like all newspapers, angered people every day in its pursuit of the news. In my day, people protested by writing letters to the editor; today its through the barrel of a gun. Journalists across the nation are reecting on what this senseless shoot ing means to them. We are ooding The Capital with offers of help and heartfelt sympathy for the families and colleagues of the vic tims. The journalists slain in Annapolis were doing their essential job of informing the public and serving the news needs of the commu nity. They are deserving of special commendation for commitment to those noble goals. They are fallen sol diers in the battle to report the news without fear or favor. Bill Ketter is the senior vice president for news of CNHI, LLC. Contact him at wketter@cnhi.com. Continued From Page 6A Deadly Life in White Springs Because some truths are timeless, and because good stories are worth repeating, Ill share with you some old and new ob servations about Independence Day. Ill start with this quote from more than two hundred years ago. Thus may the 4th of July, that glorious and ever memorable day, be celebrated through America, by the sons of freedom, from age to age till time shall be no more. Amen and Amen. Virginia Gazette on July 18, 1777. Like many of you, much of our activity this week is centered on the Fourth of July, a holiday created to celebrate the birth of our nation. Interestingly enough it wasnt declared a legal Federal holiday until 1941, just in time for me to be able to celebrate it every year of my life. Re ecting on this holiday, Id like to share a few thoughts with you. Our Fourth of July, Independence Day, is now celebrat ed in ways never imagined by our found ing fathers, but I believe that they would approve of most of what we do. As I grow older and much more appreciative of tradition, something that I really ap preciate about this holiday is that it is one of the few constants in my life. Unlike some traditions, I can still recognize this one. I still know what it really means and the celebration on the Fourth of July is still today what it was when we all were children and what it will be when we are long past earthly celebrations. Thank goodness! There is a wide variety of regional recipes for 4th of July treats, but there is one consistency. Would you like to have the recipe for the one thing that is served and enjoyed on the Fourth all over the country? My family has enjoyed it for generations and it tastes better each time you serve it! Take one Declaration of Independence, a Constitution, and some carefully crafted amendments, add as many American ags as you can, along with a liberal dose of fam ily, friends and food. Throw in a few games and stir with some inspirational music. To give it substance, add an ample quan tity of honor, respect and duty and to really spice it up and make each serving unfor gettable, add plenty of Fireworks. Serve once every year on July 4 and savor its meaning for the rest of the year. Preserve and protect this recipe at all costs so that you can continue to pass it on to each and every generation. A love for tradition has never weak ened a nation; indeed it has strengthened nations in their hour of perilSir Win ston Churchill. Independence Day is one of our nations most notable and noble traditions. The very idea of tradition it self has grown in importance to me over the years, partly because it provides the comfort of continuity, a strong sense of belonging and it gives me a thing of per manence amidst all of our changing lives and times. Traditions however, dont stand on their own. They continue because some people are willing to make the effort nec essary to preserve them. A good example of this on the local level is that for 30 years now, along with a crowd of people from Hamilton, Suwannee and Lafayette counties, weve gone to the Millingtons Fourth of July Party. Theyve always had the traditional Fourth of July hoopla at their gathering, including all the tradi tional food and games. In the beginning years of the party, when all the children at the gathering were very young, Paul and Sherry would patiently instruct them how to play the games, and not so pa tiently yell at us adults to get up off our lawn chairs and get out there and play too! Now grown, many of those same children come back with their young children. Its become important to them to attend this special, traditional part of their lives whenever they can. Its a very special gathering and day of celebration for all of us. It may sound corny, but we all really do feel like one big family at the Millingtons Fourth of July party each year. We all share heartfelt and fond remembrances of Paul Millington on this special day, and we give thanks to him, his wife Sherry, their daughter Sara and all their helpers for nourishing our collec tive Fourth of July spirit over the past 30 years with their tender loving preservation of this wonderful, traditional celebration. Its been a good run! One last comment about the Fourth of July Celebrations. Mark Twain said; July Fourth! Statistics show that we lose more fools on this day than in all the other days of the year put together. This proves, by the number of fools left in stock, that one Fourth of July per year is now inadequate. Now this was said with humor, but here is a very serious mes sage. Dont be a Fourth of July reworks fool! Be careful, be safe. Its HOT, and thank God for air con ditioning. Before the invention of air conditioning people would spend their nights sleeping on the old time sleeping porches that were an important part of the architecture of many of our historic older homes. Its hot now, but before AC people really dreaded the prospect of the Dog Days of summer, which are now upon us. Dog Days is the name for the most sultry period of summer, from about July 3 to Aug. 11. Named in early times by observers in countries bordering the Mediterranean, the period was reckoned as extending from 20 days before to 20 days after the conjunction of Sirius (the Dog Star) and the sun. This period co incided with hot days that were plagued with disease and discomfort. According to Wikipedia, the ancients sacriced a brown dog at the beginning of the Dog Days to appease the rage of Sirius, be lieving that that star was the cause of the hot, sultry weather. Ive always thought that Dog Days meant the weather was so hot that even the dogs couldnt take it, and they would just lie down in the shade and pant for most of the day. That is the denition that my dog Rarebit has always been in agreement with, so based on his expert testimony, I will give his interpre tation equal ranking with wisdom of the ancients! I think the dogs have said enough and so have I, so until next week, thats life in White Springs! Were always glad to hear about goings on in the community and will be glad to share anything appro priate for this column. Email is the best way to contact me, but any way is wel come. I am thankful that we truly are all connected, and I hope that we can contin ue to feel proud of who we are and where were headed, and that we all appreciate that White Springs and its surrounding re gion is a very special place, to be honored and protected. As always, I look forward to seeing you out and about, enjoying your community and your life in White Springs or wherever you may be. Walter McKenzie 386-303-1394 lifeinwhitesprings@gmail.com A recipe for Independence Day WHITE SPRINGS The White Springs Li brary wants its patrons to make the library rock this summer. As part of the Libraries Rock summer program, the library is hosing a karaoke contest July 11 at 3:30 p.m. All ages are welcome to enter as the library is want ing patrons to show off their skills and sing their favorite songs for fun and prizes. Also during July, the librarys Drama Teens are performing skits and shadow puppet plays in the Puppet Theater on July 19 at 2 p.m. The dramatic per formances will last an hour. On July 25, the library is hosting a rock painting par ty from 1:30-3:30 p.m. All ages are welcome to attend the free party. A kimono sewing work shop will be held July 31 from 1:30-5:30 p.m. in partnership with the UF/ IFAS Hamilton County Extension ofce. The workshop costs $5 to cover materials or people can bring their own two yards of soft owing fabric or a large scarf to make into a kimono. Through Aug. 2, the librarys summer schedule features Anime Rocks from 3-5 p.m. on Tuesdays, the Libraries Rock summer program from 12:30-1:30 p.m. on Thursdays as well as Rock & Read Story Time from 2-3 p.m. on Thursdays. The library also is offer ing free lunches on Mon days through Thursdays from 12:30-1 p.m. No meals will be served July 2-5. Adult coloring is offered Monday-Friday from 1-6 p.m. as the library provides coloring sheets, pencils and markers. White Springs Library hosting karaoke contest rfntbtftbftbfrftftftbff fttbrtffrftbbtft bfbbbrtffftfttf tftffftbrtrbtbtbbfbtf ftrft LOST & FOUND CELEBRATES RIBBON CUTTING BRANFORD McCalls Chapel United Methodist Women will be hosting a barbecue chicken dinner fundraiser on Saturday. The fund raisers goal is to support Another Way Out, a domestic abuse and shelter located in Chieand. Another Way Out serves the tri-county area and is in need of additional support due to government cut-backs. Din ners for adults are $7 and childrens dinners are $4. McCalls Chapel is located at 7755 SE SR 349 in Bran ford, just north of the Dixie/Lafay ette County line. McCalls Chapel to host barbecue fundraiser

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 8A State & Region rr sunlightproject@ganews.com VALDOSTA, Ga. Alma Young was born at the border between worlds. If you look at a map, the very tip next to the Gulf, there is a river which separates Brownsville, (Texas) and, Matamoros (Mexico), she said. I was born right there. Because Young lived along the border and had family on both sides, she started crossing it regularly as a 7-year-old. She had a border-crossing visa and still has no idea how her mother obtained it because such visas are expensive. Growing up in Mexico was tough, Young said. Even in Mexico, we moved a lot. Thats not something that started when we moved to the U.S. It was mostly because of poverty. We never had enough money to stay in one place, she said. She said her father was a welder and her mother worked in American factories across the border. She worked for Fisher Price when I was little, Young said. Which is weird when I think about it because I never had any toys growing up. Yet, my mom made toys for a living. After her parents divorced, her mother decided to move the family across the border to the U.S. to be closer to her side of the family. Young said they came to the U.S. in 1993 when she was 11 years old. They crossed the border legally with the border crossing visa and stayed after it expired. When it expired, they were stuck in the U.S. illegally. Young said they were giv en illegal status for about ve years, at which point her mother started the applica tions to obtain legal residency cards. I think I was about 14 or 15, and I had a work permit, she said. My brother was even younger. I spoke to a lawyer and she said that she knew babies that have a work permit. Thats just the process you have to take. First, you have to have a work per mit, then you can apply for residency. She said she obtained permanent resi dency status after her mother remarried, adding the only reason she got perma nent-residency status was because of the marriage. Young became an American citizen in 2012, after she held permanent resident status for more than ve years. Its a process, she said. Its not like one day you become a resident and then the next day you can apply for citizenship. There are all these stages you have to go through, and its not like you can do each one back to back to back, even if you did have the money and time and resources. You have to wait so many years before you can do the next step. Coming to America The process can vary for everyone com ing to America. Some do whatever they can to nd a rf SEE BECOMING, PAGE 9A ntbttbtbbt fnftbtfttf tfffftntr t better life for themselves. Others escape desperate situations and look to the U.S. for refuge. Others become American citizens for reasons such as marrying an American and wanting to make things easier for their children. Whatever the reason, about 700,000 people become U.S. citizens every year, according to the U.S. Citizens and Immi gration Services. The SunLight Project representing Valdosta, Tifton, Millidgeville, Dalton, Thomasville, Ga., and Live Oak, Fla. spoke to several people who were born in other nations but came to America for a new life. The SunLight reporters asked what being an American means to them and what brought them to the home of the brave and the land of the free. These are not stories about foreigners becoming Americans. These are American stories. Roman ruins. It used to be called the Paris of the Middle East. But signs of war were always present. Refugees from the surrounding conict trickled into the town and ghting broke out to the north and south of the city. The ghting continued until, when she was 15 years old, things became untenable. That was when her mother decided it was time to leave Lebanon. Things got bad that year, Gladwin said. Luckily, my brother left earlier in the war for America and had made a life there. He got his citizenship and had a family. He helped us get humanitarian visas. Before they could come to America, the family had to nd a U.S. embassy, which Lebanon didnt have at the time. So, she and her family boarded a cruise ship trans porting people away from the conict to the island of Cyprus about 150 miles away in the Mediterranean. From there, they traveled to Cape Coral, Fla., arriving in 1990. They began a new life in a strange new land. Her brother, who left Lebanon early in the war, helped his family tremendously, she said. Without his help, she doesnt know what they would have done. Howev er, his help could only go so far. The transition was horrible. It was rough, Gladwin said. Everything was new to us. We didnt speak the language and the American school system it was different. She said school was a mixed bag. She did well in school, but was bullied for be ing a foreigner and for how she spoke. America was in the early phases of the Persian Gulf War. When kids learned she was from the Middle East and from a ma jority Muslim country, they teased her and asked derogatory questions such as what was it like seeing bathrooms for the rst time. But Gladwin made strong bonds with her teachers. She fondly remembers Mrs. Hen derson and her school guidance counselor helping her through the toughest times at school, while she struggled through learn ing English and her new homes culture. I was engulfed in the culture, in the society, Gladwin said. In the beginning, I was going through the motions. The next step was to get my green card, so I did. I didnt think that I was never going home until I started my own family here. Getting a green card took nearly three years after arriving in the U.S. It took longer to become a citizen. that this country can have a comprehen sive and fair immigration system. We just need to be human to one another. I mean, this country is built on immigration. A New Home Although remarkable, Gladwins story is not unique. Many hardworking people come to America where they earn citizen ship and success. Erika Silva Wyatt, a Bogata, Colombia, native came to the U.S. when she was 18 years old. She joined her father and step mother, who lived in Douglas. Wyatt, a Cairo resident and Spanish teacher at Thomas County Central High School, was studying in Costa Rica, July 4, 2017, when she joined other American citizens in an Independence Day celebra tion. Of the trip, she said she missed her adopted country, the country where she is now a citizen. She said she cried, wishing she were back home in America. Having completed high school in Co lombia, Wyatt spent ve years learning English and American culture. She learned about Thanksgiving, attending church, Christmas and fellowship in the South. People were so warm, Wyatt said. I didnt know what to do, so I smiled. She had to get used to a few things. Grits were new to her, but she now likes the Southern staple, and the rst time she opened a refrigerated biscuit dough con tainer, the loud pop scared her. In the beginning, (everything) was overwhelming, Wyatt said. She said she learned by becoming in volved. I had to get out of my comfort zone. I love the culture here, she said. She decided to become an American cit izen because she wanted to vote for people who would represent her. Her two broth ers a certied public accountant and a member of the U.S. Marine Corps also became U.S. citizens after emigrating from Colombia. n bntbb nt ft fntfn tttfn fnfftt fnff ntbttbtbbt tftf ntb tf Young American Young said she was very, very lucky in her process to become a citizen. If her mom hadnt remarried, they would have stayed in illegal status and there would have been no way for her to become a resi dent or citizen, she said. Unless I was a victim of abuse or traf cking, she said. Other than that, theres no path for citizenship for anyone who is illegal in this country. You have to be the victim of a crime or you have to marry a citizen, and even then people are review ing your case, so its up to them to decide whether or not your claim is valid, so it may never happen. Without legal status, there would be no way for her to get a job or drive. I would just be that burden they make us out to be, she said. If you just give us the opportunity we can do so much more to help. Young is married with a small child and works at Valdosta State University as director of the College Assistance Migrant Program, which helps students with a mi grant, agricultural or seasonal farm working background apply for nancial aid to attend college. The students I work with have to be citizens or permanent residents because we are a federal grant, Young said. But a lot of times their parents or siblings are undoc umented. People say, Well, if they come here illegally I came to this country legally. I stayed illegally. Thats actually how most immigrants get into this country. Just from my personal experience and the experience of students Ive worked with, if you give them that opportunity, they will take it and run with it and try the best they can to give back to the country that gave them that op portunity. For people to give back, they must be offered the chance to succeed, but many are denied the chance by the dice roll of fate. Land of Probability Celine Gladwin was one of the lucky ones. She and her family managed to escape the Lebanese Civil War in 1990, which claimed the lives of about 120,000 people during a 15-year period of time. Gladwin was born about the time the war started in 1975. She said she cant even remember what started the war, but her hometown of Jbeil remained a neutral zone for most of it. It was a beautiful place, Gladwin said. It was not unusual for me to be playing on bbt bntbb tbft tfnt tf To me, there was no question about becoming a citizen. There was nothing to think about, she said. This is it. This is home. When youre here, you are an Amer ican. There wasnt another decision to be made. Now, Gladwin has a family, her own architecture rm situated in Downtown Valdosta. She sits on the Greater Lowndes Planning Commission. By any standard, she has lived the American dream. From her rst step on American soil, Gladwin said she knew what she wanted to do, and she was determined to make it in this country. With a bit of luck and a lot of willpower, the U.S. offers all of the op portunities a person needs to be successful, she said. The opportunities that were available to me are still here. Its what we make of them, she said. Immigration has always been important to this country. My hope is tt tt ffntt tfffn ft tf tfftf tt ffnbf

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 9A State & Region Wyatt and her husband, John Wyatt, have two children. She teaches upper-level Spanish at the high school, as well as the schools class for native speakers. She is gifted, certied and very dedi cated to her students and our school, said Trista Jones, principal. She is an active member of the Professional Association of Georgia Educators and attends confer ences to stay up to date on current issues and legislation affecting education. Wyatt recalled while living in her home country hearing about Hollywood movies, American victories in world wars and Americans as humanitarians. American Heroes The image of America throughout the world attracts people to the country. As a child growing up in Pakistan, T.J. Kaikobad was enthralled by John Wayne movies, and 50 years later, he said the Duke remains a touchstone for him. Whenever I think about the tough problems facing our nation or the state, the ones that dont have a clear answer, I ask myself, What would John Wayne do? he said. If you ask me Was John Wayne a Republican or a Democrat? Id say Yes. He believed in strength, in standing up for yourself, in being indepen dent all things that Republicans believe in. But he also believed in protecting those who cant protect themselves, in fairness things that are perceived of as Demo cratic values. Kaikobad, who now owns Cyras restaurant in Dalton, said he wanted to come to America because of John Wayne movies. But that wasnt the determining thing. The city I was born and raised in wasnt large enough to have a U.S. consulate, he said. But it had something called the United States Information. It had a library with books about the United States. It also screened documen taries every week, including one called A Day on an American Farm. Kaikobad saw it when he was about 11 or 12, and through the years, he said he must have watched it at least 20 times. Even now, he said, I can look into space and recall scenes from that docu mentary. Kaikobad was captivated by the images of the boys in the lm with their buzzcut hair waking up early, working on the farm and then going to school and then coming home to have dinner with their family. I dont recall this part, but my mother tells me that after I saw it the rst time, I told her I want to go to America. I want to live in America. She said, One day you will. And I said, I want to go tomor row, he said. Kaikobad came to the U.S. when he was 18 years old in November 1976 to study international relations and political science at Indiana University. My goal at the time was to join the (Pakistani) Foreign Service and become a diplomat. My dream was to become the ambassador to the United States. I wasnt ready to let go of Pakistan, but I wanted to be in America. Its hard to cut the ties with your native country. I wanted it both, he said. But Kaikobad said he was hurt and shocked by some of the things he heard on campus. We were still in what I call the Viet nam syndrome, he said. I was hearing the military called baby killers, and people were talking about Americans like we were the lowest form of life. I had some pretty heated arguments defending the United States. People from Pakistan are pretty com mon now, he said. They are doctors and teachers and scientists. But back then, he was a novelty, and people always wanted to know What do you think of America? How does it compare to all of the other places youve been? And my answer then and now is that its like an automotive race, Kaikobad said. Youve got 130 nations, 130 cars in the race. One-hundred-twenty-nine of those cars are Ford Pintos and one is a Ferrari. While at school, he made a big change in his professional plans. His college roommate, who was also his cousin, was complaining about his work in a restaurant. Kaikobad said it couldnt be that bad. He bet me $50 I couldnt last two weeks, he said. I had long hair at the time, so they wouldnt let me be a server. I got a job, they called it a wine steward. It was really a wine clerk. Kaikobad threw himself into the work, impressing the restaurants maitre d. He said You get your hair cut. Ill make you a server. I was having so much fun, I said, OK. I enjoyed it so much, I took a one-semester sabbatical from school. By the end of that time, the maitre d was joining another company in another town. So they offered the position to me. So I decided to take a second semester sabbatical. By the end of the semester, the restau rant business was in his blood. Kaikobad said he rst started thinking about becoming a U.S. citizen after the Soviet Union invaded Pakistan. His hometown was 50 miles south of the border of Afghanistan, he said. Mil lions of refugees came across the border. Some of them squatted on land his family owned. It was a difcult situation, espe cially for his mother. One of the strong cultural beliefs in Pakistan is that if someone comes to your house seeking refuge, even your worst enemy, you must give them the same hos pitality you would your greatest friend, Kaikobad said. At the same time, it quickly became apparent this was a pre carious situation. A situation made worse, he said, by Arabs coming to the region because they wanted to ght the Soviets. He realized returning home to Pakistan would be too difcult, even dangerous, he said. At the same time, in America, his ca reer in the restaurant industry was thriving. He was hired by a rm in Atlanta in the 1980s. So he began the process of ap plying for permanent residence and, later, citizenship. Living the Dream After leaving Nicaragua eight years ago, Martita Jones is living her American dream. Jones came to America in 2010 after marrying her husband, Mike, whose sister Amanda introduced them while visiting her in Nicaragua. I didnt speak any English and he didnt speak any Spanish at the time, Martita Jones said. She said growing up she always loved the English language and wanted to learn. My stepfather, who worked at the American Embassy as a security guard, would always bring me books in English, Jones said. After they started dating, she told Mike she wasnt interested in leaving her coun try. She dreamed of nishing her social work degree and helping people. Mike agreed to stay because he fell in love with Nicaragua, the language and the culture, she said. Their son, Michael, was born in May 2010 in Nicaragua. We plan, but God has his plans for us, Jones said. Michaels lungs were underdeveloped and he wasnt getting better. The family moved to Maryland with Mikes family to get medical care. Doctors said Michael needed time for his lungs to develop, but overall, he was healthy. We always say Michael wanted to live in America from the start, Jones said. The original plan was to only stay a few months, just enough time for Michael to get his health back. However, Mike found a good job, and they ended up staying lon ger than expected. New American Martita Jones said she was sad to leave her country, and with her poor English, Continued From Page 8A she was initially terried when they went out in public. I was terried when we went out to eat, she said. I was worried they would make fun of the way I talk or my accent. Undeterred, she kept learning and prac ticing. After living in three larger cities in Florida, the Jones moved to Live Oak, Fla., in 2016, where there are about 2,500 foreign-born residents, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau. She began working at Branford High School as an English language learner paraprofessional. I fell in love with my job, Jones said. God has a purpose for us to be here. Co-worker Dan Taylor encouraged Jones to become an American citizen. She said he printed off study material for her and helped her study for the interview. She had been eligible to apply for a few years but had put it off. She was also inspired to apply after someone stole her wallet, which had her green card inside. Seven months later, it was returned with everything inside, in cluding her green card. But she said she didnt want to worry about it getting lost again. So, she sent in her application at the end of September 2017 and had her inter view in January 2018. She took her oath on Feb. 22, along with 35 other newly declared U.S. citizens who represented 29 countries. I believe, if you work hard and trust in God, you can achieve your dreams, Martita Jones said. I put my heart and soul into everything I do. I feel like God is really using me. Starting a New Life John and Asha Downy, a Milledgeville couple, originally met in Ashas home country of Nepal. In the three years since Asha moved to America, she has begun the process of integrating into American culture and so ciety, both in the eyes of the U.S. govern ment and the people of Milledgeville and Baldwin County. I was doing some mission work in Nepal, and her family introduced me to her, John said, recalling the rst time he and Asha met. That was back in 2012 on a 10-day trip, and the next year I came for about two months. They got married two years later. In the four years since John and Asha married, the two have been working on starting a new life for themselves in Milledgeville. While Johns local barn and shed business keeps the couple nancially aoat, the couple has faced many chal lenges in securing Asha a green card. Having a green card allows a person to live and work permanently in the United States. The steps a person must take to apply for a green card will vary depending on his or her individual situation. John said the process is long, costly and time-consuming. Asha is still without an ofcial card after the government mis spelled her name on the original copy, he said. Shortly after we got married, we start ed working on the process, and it took probably a year and three months, John said. We got married in her hometown in Nepal, but we only had a ceremony, and she was able to come over on a ancee visa and we got married here. Asha said it has taken time to adapt to her new home. Communication was difcult for me because Im (already) a shy person, Asha said. And I would get so nervous so fast whenever other people talked. Not only did she leave behind a hard life in the mountains of Nepal. She had to leave her family. Because Asha and her ve sisters stayed with an uncle in a more urban area, they received a better education than most Nepalese. Many people in her parents village barely attended school and survive mostly on subsistence farming, she said. The couple is discussing the possibility of some of Ashas sisters eventually mov ing to Millegdeville. They hope to attend an American university. Family, however, isnt the only thing Asha misses from home. For the rst year, being away from my family was the toughest part, but now Ive gotten settled in a little more. The second toughest part is the food, she said with a laugh. Finding Home Its about a 2,800-mile drive from Moultrie to the Mexican state of Hidalgo. But sometimes, distance is about more than a simple matter of geography. Austin Kenneth Lane hardly knew the country or the central Mexican state where he was born. Thats because he was brought to the U.S. four months after his birth. His mother, a U.S. citizen, had accom panied her boyfriend to Mexico at the age of 15 which accounts for his name. Lane is a 22-year-old Colquitt County Sheriffs Ofce employee and part-time farmworker. He works at the jail. For him, becoming a U.S. citizen was a little confusing and quick. Mom came up to me and said we have to take a trip to Mexico, he said. When we got there, we had to get my birth cer ticate. We had to go all the way to where I was born (a very small town in Hidalgo). There was nothing there. There was one store on the street owned by my grand mother. Then, mother and son had to have their mouths swabbed for a DNA test to prove kinship. Unfortunately, the man at the consulate building was not cooperative and told Lanes mother he couldnt help her, causing her to become distraught. He called us back in and said he was very sorry, Lane said. Dad took her to Mexico without my grandmothers permission. Grandma took out a miss ing-child report on my mom. In the eyes of the law, it looked like she was forced to have me over there. That helped me a lot to get the papers. As Lane remembers, his mother paid $1,200 in expenses related to authorities during the trip. I still had to stay a year and four months before I could come back, he said. That meant his ninth-grade school year was spent in the country of his birth, where Lane was unfamiliar with both the environment and language. There, he made friends who became his Spanish teachers, and in return, he taught them English. When it came time for him to make a decision on where to live, it was a rela tively simple answer, he said. After all, his family was in the U.S. When he made it back to his home, Lane still remembers the thrill of getting his drivers license, a major step into adulthood and his rst, real piece of pho to identication. He also remembers the proud feeling he gets identifying himself as an American. Lane and his wife, Maria, who also has an American-born parent and was born in Cairo, have a 5-year-old son Isaiah and 4-year-old daughter Avah. There are amazing people down there, he said of Mexico. I still have some friends down there that I talk to to this day. (Some) of them are trying to come up here and work. Lane said he enjoys his job and would like to get out on the road as a patrol of cer, but he does have a Plan B. I love farming, he said. If I ever quit the sheriffs ofce, thats what Im going to do farming. The SunLight Project team of journal ists who contributed to this report includes Thomas Lynn, Alan Mauldin, Eve Gue vara, Alan Mauldin, Patti Dozier, Will Woolever and Jessie R. Box. r fntbt r ntt nt rrfntb tnnfffbf bfnnn r tt t

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 10A Suwannee Democrat 111345-1 dropped to a C, from a B. This is the rst time Suwannee High has earned back-to-back grades of B and has been a B three of the past four years, Roush said. He said historically SHS has received a C or D grade from 1999-2014. He added that while Su wannee Primary School is not measured by the Florida Standards Assessment, as a feeder school, the school shares in the success of Suwannee Elementarys A grade. The 2017-18 school grades are based on four achievement components: English language arts (ELA), mathematics, sci ence and social studies as well as middle school ac celeration, learning gains, graduation rate and high school acceleration. Each component is worth 100 points in the overall cal culations. The grades are calculated by adding togeth er points earned for each component and dividing the total by the number of available points. Learning gains are in cluded in the grade calcula tions and are measured by the FSA. SES received some de creases in learning gains after signicant increases last year. For the English Language Arts Leaning Gains, SES increased from 58 points to 100 points in 2016-17 but fell to 88 points this year. For the Mathematics Learning Gains, the school dropped a few points from 88 to 83 points. Suwannee High School, Branford Elementary School and Branford High School also saw small changes in learning gains. Areas where we have remained the same or have seen a slight decrease will be areas of focus and op portunities to make growth for the 2018-2019 school year, Roush said. Continued From Page 1A Suwannee a small/rural county for the FSBA. It is very humbling to be honored with this dis tinction, Taylor said. He is thrilled the Suwan nee County School District will receive recognition from this appointment. Taylor currently serves as the chairman of Suwan nee County School Board and has served as the Dis trict 1 School Board mem ber since 1996. He has previously served as FSBAs treasurer, vice president and presi dent-elect. We are the voice of ed ucation, Taylor said. We are advocates for public education. As the newly sworn in president, Taylor wants to build stronger relationships between county commis sioners, Florida League of Cities and law enforce ment. We all serve the same constituents, Taylor said. He also wants to nd a way to get students input on their education. Continued From Page 1A Taylor no Democrats in the race, all four Republican can didates will face off Aug. 28 in a universal election where all voters in Dis trict 4 regardless of their party afliation may vote in this race. The winner will be determined Aug. 28 as the candidate with the most votes. I am asking for your vote during this one-time vote for this very import ant county commission seat that serves Suwan nee County residents from US 129 east to the Columbia County line and south to CR 252 and thereabouts, Weaver said. This is a very im portant election for Dis trict 4 to select the can didate who has the most experience, the best abil ity to make important de cisions that touch every resident and has shown throughout his life he has the ability to make good decisions after thorough ly investigating each and every issue. I am the only candidate who has had a 34-year career in law en forcement doing just that successfully. I believe I am the best candidate and the most qualified. Weaver points out that many District 4 voters have known him almost all of his life and can make their judgments on voting for him based on that knowledge. I have served my community through law enforcement and contin ue to do so today where making good decisions based on fact is absolute ly required, he said. Weaver, 58, purchased his District 4 property on County Road 136A in 1988 where he built his home and farming operation, Weaver Cattle Company & Custom Hay business. As a county resident with a great interest in providing better job op portunities for District 4 residents and other Su wannee countians, Weav er believes the county should not add more tax es but spend more wisely. Weaver emphasizes his voice will always be hon est and fair for District 4 and all of Suwannee County if elected as Dis trict 4s County Commis sioner. I dont believe you can borrow your way out of debt, he said. Weaver has based his campaign on Values Matter, Families Mat ter, and Taxes Matter. He has made it clear throughout this campaign that he will not change his values and principles to get elected and will remain true to his values and principals once elect ed. This is Weavers sec ond bid for the District 4 County Commission seat. Weaver, born in Talla hassee, came to Suwan nee County at age 2 to live at the Florida Sher iffs Boys Ranch with his parents, Harry K. Weaver Sr. and Jacky Weaver, when his dad was hired to run this honored home for boys in need of a home. Weaver grew up, graduat ed from Suwannee High School, attended ABAC College in Georgia and North Florida Community College where he earned an AS degree in criminal justice. He is a graduate of the 1981 62nd FHP Recruit School where he became a Florida Highway Patrol Trooper. After 34 years of service to the state of Florida, he retired as an FHP Master Corporal with nine years experi ence as a homicide in vestigator serving in Su wannee and surrounding counties. When he retired and ended his FHP career, Weaver continued his farm operation and com munity service. He farms while continuing to serve as a volunteer Suwan nee County Sheriffs Ofce reserve deputy with four years of ser vice, is a member of the Florida Association of State Troopers/Troop B Board of Directors, North Florida Cattlemens As sociation Board and as a member of the Suwannee Bulldogs Quarterback Club. He is also a past president of the Suwan nee County Cattlemens Association and a mem ber of the American Association of State Troopers. In addition, Weaver serves on various boards and committees locally which work to provide a broader look at area high way improvements and better communications equipment for local law enforcement. He believes he is al ready up-to-date on many county issues including the chip seal highway paving program which is currently benetting Su wannee County. Weaver believes this program will be very important to District 4 in the coming years. Weaver has a keen interest in Suwannee County where he chose to make his permanent home with his wife of more than 35 years, Virginia Weaver. They raised sons Jabe Weaver, Hal Weaver and Lee Weaver here in Suwannee County. Lee and his wife Kris and their two children, Kaden and Reece Weaver, live out of state but return to Suwannee County fre quently. Republican District 4 County Commission candidate Harry K. Kin Weaver Jr. is proud to be a District 4 and Su wannee County resident and humbly asks for your vote and support in this one time election Aug. 28, 2018, for this com mission seat. Continued From Page 1A Weaver

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 11A Around the Banks Celebrating America and its birth What is America to me? A name, a map, a ag I see, A certain word, Democracy, What is America to me? The house I live in. A plot of earth, the street, The grocer and the butcher, Or the people that I meet. The children on the playground, The faces that I see, All races and religions, Thats America to me. The House I Live In or What is America to Me?, lyrics by Lewis Allen, music by Earl Robinson, 1945 As the Fourth of July is upon us, I asked a number of individuals about special memories, special thoughts of this summer holiday when we, as Americans, pay a little more special attention to, well, our Americaness. That is not a word, but thats really what we do on the Fourth of July. We reect upon the marvelous, al most miraculous birth of our nation on July 4, 1776, when young Thomas Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence and our founding fathers put their various John Hancocks on the page, no pun in tended, and stated for the entire world that the United States of America was a free nation, not shackled to Great Britain nor any other power. It was a brave step and some considered it foolish for a small group of colonists to shake their sts in the face of the worlds greatest military power, but what was even more miraculous was more than seven years after the Declaration of Independence was drafted and signed by 56 colonial representatives, the United States, in the Treaty of Paris, Sept. 3, 1783, gained their independence as a sovereign nation when Great Britain signed the treaty in surrender to the rag tag American Colonial Army. Deprivation, starvation, freezing, terrible deaths, separations, sickness and despair, it took all those emotions, all those circum stances to bring our Republic to its birth. Along with all of that, though, came satis faction, joy, elation, victory, independence and, today, nearly 240 years later, we are celebrating a birthday of our nation. It is the 239th birthday of our great nation this Fourth of July. Several of my readers shared special memories of the Fourth, and I am going to share those with you. Sparklers, cold watermelon, boiled pea nuts were part of our Fourth of July. We were so happy to have the day off from working in tobacco. Old fashioned homemade lemonade served with lots of ice; the kind frozen in a block that you chipped off with an ice pick. I can still taste it, and the boiled peanuts. Great memories. Fish fries with our family. My Dad and his cousins would fry fresh mullet, as well as chan nel catsh caught fresh from the Suwannee River served with grits, coleslaw, hushpuppies, guava jelly, g pre serves, mayhaw jelly, lots of sweet iced tea and, in between, boiled peanuts. As children we ran under the sprinklers and played under the hose. We would light sparklers at dark, and Dad dy would shout Sing God Bless Ameri ca!! We would oblige. Wonderful days. Summertime meant tobacco harvest time, and my father was a tobacco farmer. Sometimes we had to work on the Fourth of July, but if we did, Mama and Daddy would always have a sh fry down at the tobacco barns for everyone who was work ing, as well as a number of other guests. My daddy was determined that we honor the Fourth and remember the reason we were celebrating. In later years, we gath ered at my parents home, and we grilled and barbecued chicken and ribs, swam in their pool, and just enjoyed a day of social izing and enjoying. I grew up near Branford and the most fun I remember on the Fourth of July was when my grandma, my Mimi, would load us all up and take us for the day to Little River Springs, and oh the fun we had. Swimming in the cold water, using water melons as oating devices and balls. Life was so much fun for us with my grandma, and she enjoyed the day as much as we did. Her joy made ours more complete. Playing with sparklers and running un der the re of the sparklers. It is a wonder we didnt get hurt. Oh, we loved those sparklers on the night of the Fourth of July, and we thought they were beautiful. Most recently, I pushed my young grand daughter in her baby stroller through an urban neighborhood where my daughter and son-in-law live. I pointed out the ags along the way, the American ags to my granddaughter, who promptly told me that she knew the Pledge of Allegiance, and she took her little hand and put it over her heart and recited it. It wasnt the Fourth of July on the calendar, but it was a celebra tion for me. I am one proud grandma and am proud of the fact that she has a concept of the Fourth of July even at her young age. I grew up in the Northeastern United States. I can recall many friends and rel atives coming over to our house on the Fourth of July, bringing all kinds of won derful food, and, oh, the fun we had. We all loved the Fourth of July, and I still do. The Fourth of July is, to me, waking up to perking coffee, the aroma of bacon frying and my aunts homemade blueber ry pancakes. The entire family enjoying grilled hot dogs with all the trimmings, and her special recipe for the most wonderful homemade peach ice cream in the world. And this one is personal, I can remem ber the year of the nations Bicentennial, 1976 for a number of reasons. I graduated high school that year. Also, that year, the late John Robertson was the Director of the, then, Stephen Foster Memorial. I dont know how he got it done, but, that year, over at the park, there were some of the most fabulous reworks ever. I recall one that illuminated the sky with an Amer ican ag and another 1776-1976! Great memories. I can still recall the reworks display! For the past several years, I have spent the Fourth of July with dear friends down at Branford on the river. I am not going to put their names here, but they know who they are. Their graciousness and kindness to me is appreciated and, on top of that, I have a ball visiting with them. Always fun!!! The place I work in, The worker at my side, The little town and city, Where my people lived and died, The Howdy and the handshake, The air of being free, And the right to speak my mind out, Thats America to me. I asked some of my readers a question. Give me a quote of what America means to you? Here are a few responses. Whats right about America is being able to say whats wrong about America. Think about that one. Theres a lot of won derful truth there. America to me is seen in the beauty of children playing, the wonder of a childs eyes when they view reworks in the Fourth of July sky. America is heard in its music, rollicking bluegrass, cool jazz, folk ballads, the blues of the Mississippi Delta, the rollicking Latin music of Texas or Mi ami. America is diverse, but its sights and sounds are wonderful. A beautiful patchwork quilt quilted by someone with care represents the nation to me. Someone who saved the most memo rable and some of the most beautiful items to make quilt squares for glorious quilt. America is made up of folks who repre sent those quilt squares. Some folks might prefer one of the quilt squares to another, but sewn together, they provide comfort, protection, strength, and, yes, beauty. Each one represents something unique and won derful. The things I see about me, The big things and the small, The little corner newsstand, And the house a mile tall, The wedding and the churchyard, The laughter and the tears, The dream thats been growing, For over two hundred years. The town I live in, The street, the house, the room, The pavement of the city, Or the garden all in bloom, The church, the school, the clubhouse, The million lights I see, But especially the people, Thats America to me. Wishing you all a marvelous Fourth of July. Celebrate the birthday of our nation in your own special way and with your own special style. Enjoy a grilled hot dog, hamburger, some boiled North Florida sweet corn, a churn of peach ice cream, a piece of homemade pound cake, and be sure and spend time with those you love and hold dear, and give them a special gift on the Fourth by saying to them three words they are longing to hear, and they are longing to hear them from you...I love you. Cel ebrate with love in your heart, with golden memories of the past, and with faith in our future. God bless you all. God bless America. Lets especially give thanks on this Fourth of July for all of those brave men and women serving our nation in the military all around the world. They are the guard ians of our freedom. Think of them on Independence Day, and think of all those who gave their lives so we can wear crazy red, white and blue outts, so we can go to the lake, Heres a recipe for you for the Fourth. Homemade Peach Ice Cream: 2 1/2 pounds of fresh peaches, peeled, pitted and sliced 1/2 cup of white sugar 1 pint of half and half cream 1 14 oz. can of sweetened condensed milk 1 12 oz. can of evaporated milk 1 tsp. of vanilla extract 2 cups of whole milk, or as needed 1: Puree peaches with sugar and half and half in batches in a blender or food processor. 2. In a one gallon ice cream freezer container, mix together the peach mixture, sweetened condensed milk, evaporated milk and vanilla. Pour in enough whole milk to ll the container to the ll line, about 2 cups. 3. Follow the manufacturers instructions to freeze the ice cream. From the Eight Mile Still on the Wood pecker Route north of White Springs, wishing you a day lled with joy, peace, and above all, lots of love and laughter. Happy Fourth of July! 73473-1 111556-1 LIVE OAK TCC Live Oak will be part of a nationwide campaign to donate backpacks full of school supplies later this month. Round Room LLC, the nations largest Verizon Authorized Wireless retailer, has announced that its TCC and Wire less Zone stores including TCC Live Oak, 634 S. Ohio Ave. are donating 187,000 backpacks to ensure children across the United States are well pre pared for the start of the school year. The annual School Rocks Backpack Giveaway, the sixth year TCC has held the event in which stores have donated 752,000 backpacks, will be held July 22 from 1-4 p.m. Local families are invited to bring their children to the store to pick up a backpack lled with pencils, paper, a pencil box, folders, glue and more. One backpack per child present will be given away on a rst-come, rst-served basis while supplies last. Each TCC store is donating up to 220 backpacks. We are thrilled to support the educa tion of our youth in our communities, Scott Moorehead, CEO of Round Room, said in a release. By providing families across the country with essential school supplies, were easing the back-to-school shopping burden and helping set children up for success. According to the National Retail Fed eration, families with school-aged chil dren plan to spend an average of $687.72 each an 8 percent increase for a total of $29.5 billion on school supplies this year. TCC Live Oak donating backpacks, school supplies

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 12A 111557-1 JULYJULY 1: The U.S., Britain, Soviet Union and 58 other nations sign the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty to halt the spread of countries possessing nuclear bombs. JULY 18: The semiconductor company Intel is founded. JULY 20: The first International Special Olympics Summer Games are held at Soldier Field in Chicago. The organization was founded by Eunice Kennedy Shriver, sister of President John F. Kennedy.A U G U ST AUG. 8: Richard M. Nixon wins the Republican nomination for president at the convention in Miami Beach, Florida. AUG. 21: The Medal of Honor is posthumously awarded to James Anderson Jr., the first black U.S. Marine to receive the award. AUG: 28-29: Tens of thousands of Vietnam War protesters clash with Chicago police and state and federal officers in the streets outside the Democratic National Convention at the International Amphitheatre, bringing outcries against Mayor Richard J. Daly for encouraging Gestapo tactics to contain the protesters. Vice President Hubert Humphrey receives the partys presidential nomination. S EP T EMBERSEPT. 6: 150 women arrive in Atlantic City, New Jersey to protest against the Miss America Pageant, which they believe to be exploitative of women. SEPT. 11: Air France Flight 1611, en route from the island of Corsica to Nice, France, crashes into the Mediterranean Sea, killing all 95 people on board. SEPT. 23: The Tet Offensive comes to an end in South Vietnam.IN POP CUL T UREA UG 26: The Beatles release Hey Jude, a song that would become one of the most popular tunes of all time. SEPT. 20: Hawaii Five-O debuts on CBS and eventually becomes the longest-running crime show in television history until Law & Order overtakes it in 2003. SEPT. 24: 60 Minutes debuts on CBS and is still on the air as of 2018. SEPT. 30: Boeing rolls out its 747 passenger jetliner, more than twice the size of the 707. It ushers in a new era of domestic and international air travel. THIRD OF FOUR PARTS: It was perhaps the most turbulent year in modern history the deadliest year of the Vietnam War; the year many cities erupted in violence after the assassination of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.; the year in which Sen. Robert Kennedy was killed en route to securing the Democratic nomination for president. It was also the year in which President John F. Kennedys dream of putting a man on the moon moved closer to reality, as Apollo 8 became the first manned spacecraft to orbit the moon. On the 50th anniversary of that pivotal year, CNHI presents a quarterly look back at 1968 the year that changed America. Graphic by Kevin Burkett | (Logansport, Indiana) Pharos-Tribune AUG. 10, 1968: An anti-war march take place as Chicago is preparing to host the Democratic National Convention. Photo by David Wilson

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The (Sunbury, PA) Daily Item rdandes@dailyitem.com America arrived at a boiling point in the summer of 1968. Martin Luther King and Robert F. Ken nedy had been assassinated. The Vietnam War raged on, spurring civil unrest and student rebellion on the home front. Nationwide, people in small towns and big cities wondered, Whats next? said Laura Belmonte, a professor of history at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater. Whats next turned out to be the tu multuous Democratic convention, and in Europe, the sudden end of the Prague Spring, when Soviet troops and tanks invaded Czechoslovakia, quashing the freedom-seeking people of Prague. Those events happened almost con currently, said Belmonte. And at least with Prague, happened unexpectedly. In this third part of a year-long series on the 50th anniversary of 1968, the year that changed America, CNHI newsrooms across the United States review the tu multuous months of July to September. By August, anti-war groups, along with many students, and African Americans, felt the traditional Democratic establish ment was not listening, Belmonte said. Many of them came to Chicago to pro test at the Aug. 26-29 Democratic con vention, only to run headlong into the Mayor (Richard) Daley machine, which was determined to show that Chicago would not join the list of cities that had been engulfed by urban unrest in the last four years, Belmonte said. Two weeks earlier, at a peaceful Re publican Convention In Miami Beach, Florida, Richard Nixon, who had lost narrowly to John F. Kennedy in the 1960 presidential election, completed his im probable political comeback by winning the GOP nomination. In his acceptance speech, Nixon criti cized the U.S. being tied down in the Vietnam War with no end in sight. The summer of and 2018 The 1968 Democratic convention was a turning point in American politics that still resonates today, said Chris Ellis, associate professor of political science, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Penn sylvania. You can trace a reasonably straight line from that convention, followed by Nixons victory in November, to Presi dent Donald Trumps election in 2016, he said. The process of working and mid dle-class whites moving away from the Democratic party had started a few years earlier, he said, particularly in the South. But the Democratic convention was perhaps more pivotal than any other in starting the exodus of working class whites the core base of the Democrat ic party for decades away from the party. Alabama Gov. George Wallace took advantage of the division, with a hardcharging style that played well in the South. Running as a third party candidate, Wallace said, theres not a dimes worth of difference between the Republicans and Democrats. In the fall, Wallace would win 13.5 percent of the vote and ve Southern states. Seeing the disorder at the convention and associated events such as those on campuses provided a stark image traditional, mostly white socially conser vative working-class Americans who the Democratic Party could no longer count on as theirs alone, Ellis said. It was now a party that tolerated disrespect for au thority and social convention, and at least some elements wanted to push social change that they did not want or werent ready for. It took decades of change and lots of other strategic politicians Reagan, Bush, and now Trump to fully com plete that realignment, Ellis said. But the roots of all of that are rmly in the 1960s. Violence in Chicago In 1968, when the time came for the Democrats to meet in Chicago, anti-Viet nam and anti-President Lyndon Johnson fervor had become rampant, Belmonte said. There was some discussion among Democrats about moving the 1968 con vention to Miami, site of the GOP con vention, because it was more inaccessible to protests and because it was already wired for television and had working phone lines. Ultimately, Chicago Mayor Richard Daley shut down those discussions by threatening to withhold the Illinois del egations support for Hubert Humphrey, Johnsons vice president, and promising to maintain peace. Daley called on 12,000 police ofcers and another 15,000 state and federal ofcers to do that. It back red. The City of Chicago denied protestors requests for a permit to demonstrate out side the convention hall and in Lincoln Park. The protestors came anyway and multiple clashes with law enforcement ensued. The worst occurred on Wednes day night, the so-called Battle of Michi gan Avenue during which police gassed and clashed with protestors. By the time the convention ended, Chi cago police has arrested nearly 600 peo ple and more than 215 including 119 police ofcers were injured. Meanwhile, over at the International Amphitheatre, Humphrey won the Dem ocratic nomination for president behind closed doors. Eugene McCarthy and Robert F. Ken nedy had run on an anti-war platform. Humphrey had not and his nomination angered many Democrats. Humphrey didnt enter the primary until April 27 as a pro-war candidate but McCarthy won 80 percent of the primary votes run ning on a peace platform. Nonetheless, Belmonte said, the party establishment threw its support behind Humphrey. To peace delegates, this was outright theft of the nomination by the party boss es, one more betrayal in a year punctuat ed by violence and crushing disappoint ments in the political system. Humphrey did not push for a pause in the bombing until the week before the election and although it did create a spike in the polls, it came too late in the race to prevent a Richard Nixon victory. The one-two punch of the Democratic convention and the aggressive quash ing of the anti-war protesters, crushed the impact of those who hoped that the revolution was just about to go forward, Belmonte said. Soviet invasion ends the Prague Spring While Americans protested in Chicago the Prague Spring ended. There was so much hope internation ally during the early part of 1968, Bel JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 13A 1968, Part 3: America boils over 111558-1 rfntbnf bfbbn ttbf nnnn 109500-1 monte explained. When the Alexander Dubcek regime took power in January 1968, he began pushing for what they called socialism with a human face. The most instant change was the loosening of censorship and having a press that could critique the communist regime, which it did. There seemed to be a period of stabi lization in Czechoslovakia, so in many ways the Soviet invasion took the west unaware when it happened, Belmonte said. The Soviets gathered supercial sup port from other Warsaw Pact countries to make it look like a statement from the entire Eastern Bloc but the majority of troops were Soviets, Belmonte not ed. Perhaps there was an element of diversion, since the invasion happened at about the same time as the Chicago convention. It was shocking, she said, because a lot of westerners were traveling to Prague during the Prague Spring. There was a hopefulness that this new left move ment, the student uprisings that were also happening in the United States, Mexico, Japan, and Germany...that this was con tagious beyond the Iron Curtain. That hope was dashed when troops invaded the country. I think in a lot of ways the importance of the Prague Spring, and the Soviet in vasion ending it, was the beginning of the end of the Soviet Union, Belmonte said. Prague Spring illuminated this incredi ble discontent that the Soviets were not going to be able to quash forever. And so the beginning of the end of the cold war was being put in place; and the limits of Soviet power is the key takeaway. Seeds of student rebellion Meanwhile, in New York City, during the early summer months, revolution was in the air or at least talk of it by a group called Students for a Democratic Society, or SDS. At Columbia University in New York City SDS was led by Mark Rudd. As events played out in Prague, Rudd was the most visible face during an occu pation of Columbia Universitys Hamil ton Hall, in April. Rudd chaired the Co lumbia chapter of SDS, and later became a founder of The Weathermen, a more radical offshoot of the group. New York City police eventually ended the Columbia occupation. Three weeks after the bust, three other SDS students and I were suspended from school, said Rudd, reecting on that time, 50 years ago, from his present-day home in New Mexico. Most of the summer of 1968 was spent at Columbia organizing what Rudd called the Liberation School. We rented a fraternity house right across the street from Columbia and had nonstop class es. We also prepared for the opening of Columbia in the fall and an international assembly or convocation of revolutionary students. Tom Hayden was a leader of one of the occupied buildings at Columbia and was arrested on April 30, Rudd recalled. He subsequently visited with Columbia SDS and the Liberation School and talked about the plans for the demonstrations at Chicago. Rudd did not accompany friends to Chicago that summer. Many Columbia people went to the Democratic convention, but I didnt because I had so many charges pending against me at Columbia and my lawyer warned me that Id be singled out and arrested in Chicago, he said. Rudd and his friends wanted revolu tion. Transforming themselves into the more radical Weather Underground, they planned greater more violent actions, until three of their members died while making a bomb in Greenwich Village. By the end of 1970 Rudd had gone underground and was a fugitive for seven years until he turned himself in, he said. He plea bargained and wound up serving no jail time. Rudd is now retired, writes books, and often appears at speaking engagements. For many years Rudd didnt want to talk about the Weathermen because of my guilt and shame. Much of what the Weathermen did granted, I was 20-years old at the time had the oppo site effect of what we intended. We split the larger anti-war movement around the issue of violence. My story, Rudd said, is not heroic. Its anti-heroic. National

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michael.jones@ganews.com JASPER It was 11 years ago that the Hamilton County Special Olympics Basketball Team traveled to China and returned home with a gold medal. Hamilton County is back and looking for gold once agin. The Hamilton County High School Unied Team with ve special needs players and ve help ers had a sendoff Friday as they waved goodbye to the community before heading to Seattle, Washington for the Special Olympics USA Games. Its like dj vu, said Mike Cohen, who was the teams coach in 2007 and will be coaching once again. It seems like we were just doing this a couple of Sports SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SEE BRANFORD, PAGE 2B SEE WR2, PAGE 2B SEE OLYMPICS, PAGE 2B rffr rfr michael.jones@ganews.com BRANFORD The Branford High School football team participated in its rst 7-on-7 workout of the summer Thurs day. The Buccaneers, who have been con ducting team workouts since early June, werent that crisp to start against visiting Aucilla Christian. But after the rst pos session of 10 plays, BHS quarterbacks Jevin Johnson and Seth Heiderman found rhythm with their receivers. It started out like I thought it would. Im glad by the end neither (team) looked as rusty as the beginning, said Branford coach Tim Clark. We had guys that ex pected after what Ive seen in the spring and summer come out and be playmak ers for us. Junior Cress had a really good day went up and got some deep balls. CJ Pep per is going to be a go-to receiver. Jevin Johnson threw the ball really well. Johnson completed 13 of 22 passes, many of those dropped in with a nice ntbbb rfntbfftfb tbfffbtntftrftnbffbf ntbbb ftb btttbfr WR2 fantasy football wide receivers with WR1 potential My disdain for drafting wide re ceivers early in fan tasy football drafts is well-known. I favor running backs over wide receivers, so its imperative to find low-valued wide receivers in the preseason who can be a consistent hammer for fantasy football rosters. Thats why I examine targets, com pared to production from previous years, to hopefully predict the future (which worked well last year with Keenan Allen). Heres three wide receivers ranked 13th or lower in the preseason fantasy football wide re ceivers rankings, capable of putting up top-12 fantasy football numbers. Amari Cooper, WR, Oakland Raiders The fantasy football world is crush ing Cooper for one bad season with out his starting quarterback. Theres no denying he was bad last year. He totaled just 96 targets, with 680 yards receiving on 48 catches. The lone bright spot was he tallied seven touchdowns. He was a colossal disappointment in 2017, so now hes ranked 15th among wide receivers, which would cost you a 36th overall draft pick, ac cording to rankings by FantasyPros. Lets not completely write off Cooper just yet. Hes still the same guy who had at least 130 targets in each of his first two seasons, with a healthy Derek Carr at the helm. Hes been pretty durable during his career, so theres no reason to believe inju ries should hamper him. Hes a WR1 with Carr as the quar terback, so youre getting great value in this position. Demaryius Thomas, WR, Denver Broncos What I love most about Thomas is that bad quarterbacks dont devalue him too much. Denvers quarterback situation isnt

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 2B Dont let sunburn derail summer fun Many people nd it impossible to think about summer without conjuring visions of spending endless hours outdoors from morning until evening, whether beachside, on the open water or even oating in a backyard pool. Although a certain measure of sun exposure is required for some natural functions of the body, its well documented that too much time in the sun can be hazardous to ones health. ats why summer frolickers need to exercise considerable caution each time they step outside. Taking sunburn for granted can be a big mistake. Many people wouldnt risk burns from a hot stove or open re, but they wont think twice about being unprotected under the very hot rays of the sun. e Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says more than one-third of adults and nearly 70 percent of children admit to suering from sunburn within the past year. Depending on the intensity of the sun and the amount of time spent outside, sunburn can be a rstor second-degree burn. In rst-degree burns, damage aects the topmost layer of skin. However, sunburn can even aect deeper layers and cause blistering in addition to redness and pain. Sunburn also can cause some irreparable damage that goes unseen. According to WebMD, ultraviolet light from the sun can alter DNA, prematurely aging skin or even contributing to skin cancers. It can take years before symptoms become noticeable. erefore, it is best for people of all ages to exercise caution when spending time in the sun. Sunburn is one of the most easily prevented summertime ailments. Its also important to note that sunburns are not just limited to the hot weather or when it is sunny outside. Ultraviolet damage can occur at any time of the year, and also from articial UV sources, such as tanning beds. Preventing sunburn is simple. strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., so schedule outdoor activities for other times of day. Otherwise, limit exposure to the sun and take frequent breaks in the shade. the arms and legs. Some outdoor gear is designed to oer sun protection. Tightly woven fabrics tend to help the most. an SPF of 15 or greater. e American Academy of Dermatology actually recommends an SPF of 30 or greater. Make sure the product is broad-spectrum, meaning it protects against UVA and UVB rays. Apply sunscreen thoroughly, paying attention to the tops of feet, hands and other places that tend to go untreated. Reapply every two hours or more frequently, if necessary. habit of getting a tan to prevent subsequent sunburn. highly rated UV protection sunglasses. e Skin Cancer Foundation says a persons risk for melanoma doubles if he or she has had ve or more sunburns. Use protection, stay hydrated and play it smart to enjoy summer to the fullest. Please Call Nan at 386-362-1734 to place your ad here104396104404-1 1506 S. Ohio Ave. Live Oak, FL 32064Phone 386-208-1414 386-755-8680 Fax 386-208-1411 healthcorelibby@bellsouth.net John C. Palmer Physical erapist Lacey Bailey PT Assistant Locally Owned & Operated 104405-1Family Dentistry HERBERT C. MANTOOTH, D.D.S, P.A. Now Oering BOTOX!(386) 362-6556 1-800-829-6506 touch. Pepper led the way with seven catches. Two of those went for more than 30 years. Heiderman went 6 of 12. Cress had six receptions while Trevin White, Dakota Stevens and Lakendrick Shonk tallied multiple recep tions. Heiderman, Stevens, Markell Pugh and Colton Leibold had interceptions for the Bucs, but defense was something Clark hopes improves. Weve got to iron up some things on the back end because were really young in our coverages, Clark said. But overall, I thought the effort was good. Branford will host another 7v7 next week which also includes area team Hamilton County. Continued From Page 1B Branford years ago, said Cohen. Its great. Everyone is ex cited. If you turn on to ESPN you can see the hometown team doing what we do. Helen Udell, Hamilton County Special Olympics Coordinator, has been in volved in the Special Olym pics for more than 20 years rst as a volunteer, then a fundraiser coordinator and now as county coordinator. She was in China in 2007 and will be with the team in Seattle. I truly thank Hamilton and the surrounding counties for supporting us, Udell said. It does take money to go to these places. Cohen said that whoever wins the tournament will qualify for the World Games in 2020 in Dubai. Continued From Page 1B Olympics good. Despite that, Thom as still has at least 140 targets in each of his last six seasons. However, his production hasnt been what fantasy football owners have anticipated in recent years, with less than 100 catches in each of his last two years. And his touchdowns have disappeared, go ing from a combined 35 touchdowns from 2012 to 2014, to a combined 16 touchdowns from 2015 to 2017. The targets are still plentiful, so Im still hitching my wagon on Thomas. Hes ranked 19th among wide receiv ers, putting him at 43rd overall. Thats a nice place to draft Thomas, especially with his solid stature as the No. 1 op tion in Denver. Allen Robinson, WR, Chicago Bears Robinson has the chance at being one of the biggest steals in this years fantasy football draft. Hes ranked 18th among wide receivers in fantasy football rankings, placing him in the 39th position overall. What you get with Rob inson is an extremely high ceiling, as long as he stays off the injury list. When healthy, he was a target hog in a Jacksonville of fense that was pathetic, racking up 151 targets apiece in 2015-16. Robinson is accustomed to playing with bad quar terbacks, so second-year quarterback Mitchell Tru bisky shouldnt be out of the ordinary. Trubisky needs a go-to receiver and Robinson de livers in that department. Dont tell anyone in my fantasy football leagues, but Robinson is my top-rated receiver when I start focusing on that posi tion in the third round. Scott Levine is the Asso ciate Editor for the Clinton Herald. During his free time, he blogs about fan tasy sports and handicaps games. His Against The Chalk blog has earned him back-to-back Iowa News paper Association awards for Best Blog. Check out more at Against The Chalk. Scott Levine can be reached at scottlevine@ clintonherald.com or on Twitter @ScottLevineCH. Continued From Page 1B WR2 rfnn tb Sports rffn tbt

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 3B BAPTIST (Southern)NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCHSR 6 West, 6592 NW 48th St., Jennings, FL 32053 www.newhopejennings.org 938-5611Sunday School ..................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Youth Happening, Mission Friends, R&A & GA ............................ 6:30 p.m. WednesdayPrayer Meeting, Team Kids, Youth 6:30 p.m.Van pick-up upon request68728-1CATHOLIC CHURCHST. THERESE CATHOLIC CHURCHree miles north of Jasper U.S. 41 P.O. Box 890, Jasper, FL 32052 Rectory U.S. 90 E., Live Oak, FL (386) 364-1108 Saturday MASS 4:00 p.m.68726-1 METHODISTFIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH405 Central Ave., Jasper, FL Pastor Missy Turbeville Phone 386-792-1122 SUNDAY Morning Worship ........................... 10:00am WEDNESDAY Bible Study ....................................... 10:00am(Family Night Dinner 3rd Wednesday at 6pm)Clothes Closet 4th Saturday 10am-1pm 68730-1PRESBYTERIANFIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH204 N.W. 3rd Avenue, Jasper 792-2258 Pastor: Ruth Elswood SUNDAYSunday School .............................. 10:00 a.m. Worship Service ........................... 11:00 a.m. Youth Ministries ............................ 4:00 p.m. Elementary WEDNESDAY Choir Practice ................................ 7:00 p.m.68732-1 Non-DenominationalBURNHAM CHRISTIAN CHURCH4520 NW CR-146, Jennings, FL 32053 386-938-1265 Youth Pastor: Patrick Murphy SUNDAYSunday School ................................ 9:45 a.m. Worship ......................................... 11:00 a.m. Bible Study ...................................... 5:00 p.m. Youth Program ............................... 5:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY Kids Rock: Pre-K4 6th Grade 6:00pm 7:30pm68734-1 To list your church in the church directory, Please call Nan 386-362-1734 68724-1Hamilton County CHURCH DIRECTORYLAFAYETTE COUNTYTO LIST YOUR CHURCH IN THE CHURCH DIRECTORY PLEASE CALL NAN 386Your Guide To Local Houses Of Worship 44884-1 AIRLINE BA PTIST CHUR C H Pastor ........................................................... Preston Gainey Youth Pastor ................................................Derek Garland Childrens Pastor ............................................... Chad Little Sunday Sunday School ........................................ 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship ............................................... 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship ................................................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Fellowship Supper ........................... 6:00 p.m. AWANA & Bible Study ....................................... 6:30 p.m. Located Four Miles East of Mayo on Highway 27 www.airlinechurch.com44887-1 Helping Families Follow Jesus 44891-1MAYO BAPTIST CHURCH Rick James, Pastor Music Director Dale CroSunday Sunday School .......... 9:45am Worship Service ..... 11:00am Evening Service ........ 6:00pm Wednesday Supper ................................ 6:00pm Children/Youth Program .. 6:30pm Prayer Meeting .................. 7:00pm 44893-1 LIGHTHOUSE CHRISTIAN CENTER Freedom is Here www.lccmayo.orgMorning Worship ..................................... Sun. 10:30 a.m. Kids of the King ........................................ Sun. 10:30 a.m. Prayer Meeting ........................................... Mon. 7:00 p.m Bible Study. ................................................ Wed. 7:00 p.m. Army of Fire Youth ................................... Wed. 7:00 p.m. Pastor: Ronnie Sadler ALTON CHURCH OF GOD .............. 294-3133Pastor. ....................................................... Rev. Tim Hamm Youth Pastor .................................................. Jeremy Davis Music Director ............................................ Holly Braswell Childrens Pastor. ............................ Ryan & Tiany Perry Sunday School. ........................................... 9:30 10:30am Worship Service/K.I.D.S. Church. ... 10:30am 12:00pm Evening Worship. ................................................... 6:00pm Family Night Youth club Church .... 7:00pm WednesdayState Road 27 44888-1 MIDWAY BAPTIST CHURCH ... 294-2365 Pastor: Bruce BrancheSunday School ......................................................... 9:45 a.m. Worship Service .................................................... 11:00 a.m. Discipleship Training ............................................. 5:00 p.m. Evening Worship ................................................... 6:00 p.m. Prayer Meeting Wednesday ................................ 7:00 p.m. Team Kids ................................................................ 7:00 p.m. Located on County Road 405 For If Ye Forgive Men eir Tresspasses Your Heavenly Father Will Also Forgive You Matt. 6:14 44892-1 44895-1 NEW HARMONY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 160th St. (Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right) Pastor: Dalas Monismith Phone (386) 776-1806 SUNDAY Sunday Worship. .................................................... 9:30 am Bible Study ............................................................ 10:30 amWEDNESDAYWomens Bible Study. .......................................... 10:00 am HATCHBEND APOSTOLIC CHURCH 935-2806Pastor ........................................................ Rev. Steve Boyd Sunday School .................................................... 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Service .............................................. 7:30 p.m.Located 4 miles South on Hwy. 349, then le on CR 138, follow signs. 44889-1 44890-1FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD ....... 294-1811 Sunday School ................................... 10:00 a.m. Worship Service ................................ 10:45 a.m. Kids Church ...................................... 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ............................... 6:00 p.m. Youth Impact ......................................... :00 p.m. Adult Bible Study .............................. 7:00 p.m. Sunday Wednesday Pastor: Rev. Kenny Sullivan Youth Pastor: Daryl FletcherLocated at 294 SE Mill Street, Mayo Renewing Hope and Building Lives 44886-1 PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC) 294-1306 Interim Pastor ............................ Jimmy Corbin Sunday School .................................... 9:45 a.m. Worship Service ................................ 11:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Service .................... 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting ............... 7:00 p.m. Seven miles West of Mayo, le on CR 534 then right on 350A ---Jesus Saves--Legal sports gambling could put NCAA athletes at risk CNHI Sports Longtime Las Vegas odd smaker Kenny White stum bled into the role he holds today. White, vice president of data integrity at Don Best Sports, whose clients include the Big 12 conference, owned Las Vegas Sports Consul tants, a company that provid ed odds and betting informa tion to sportsbooks. He began receiving com plaints from his clients how they were consistently getting destroyed on Mid-American Conference football and basketball game wagers from 2004-06. White says he dedicated re sources to constructing more competitive lines, but his cli ents ran into the same prob lem the following year. In trying to gure out what was wrong, he unearthed what appeared to be suspicious activity at the University of Toledo. Turns out, he was right. Eventually, seven former To ledo football and basketball players were tried, convicted and received varying sentenc es of probation and nes. Incidents like the one in Toledo, and other NCAA gambling scandals throughout the years, have resurfaced now that the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that states have the authority to legalize sports gambling. Amateur athletes are at the highest risk because there are no paychecks. They dont make any money, White said. They get a stipend a month and a gambler throws down $10,000 in front of them and says, Fix one game you dont even need to lose. Just dont cover the point spread. Theres a pretty good chance (they do it). As Delaware and New Jer sey take their rst bets, with Mississippi, West Virginia and Rhode Island looming next, other states are left to wonder the impact it will have on college athletics. Athlete impact To date, the NCAA hasnt said much beyond the state ment released from its pres ident, Mark Emmert, a few days after the Supreme Court decision. In that statement, Emmert said the NCAA supports a federal model on legalized sports gambling. While we recognize the critical role of state gov ernments, strong federal standards are necessary to safeguard the integrity of college sports and the athletes who play these games at all levels, Emmert said. Emmett also expressed some concerns about the im pact on student athletes. Our highest priorities in any conversation about sports wagering are maintaining the integrity of competition and student-athlete well-being, Emmert said. Sports wager ing can adversely impact stu dent-athletes and undermine the games they play. We are committed to ensuring that laws and regulations promote a safe and fair environment for the nearly half a million students who play college athletics. Several sports gambling experts told CNHI it would make sense for the NCAA to get ahead of the situation since legalized sports gam bling at the amateur level is inevitable. Jake Williams, general legal counsel for the U.S. branch of Sportradar, a Euro pean sports data and integrity company, said less than 1 percent of the 400,000 match es the company covers are deemed to have suspicious betting or likely to be xed. Still, he acknowledged how susceptible college athletes are. To help alleviate prob lems, Williams suggested the NCAA, along with member schools, beef up corruption and integrity units and invest in education and monitoring. To ignore and not edu cate those types of athletes is going to be problematic in the long run, Williams said. I hope the conferences, the schools and the NCAA understand the scope and breadth of whats required and actively participate in making sure theyre doing everything they can to protect their athletes. Monitoring In addition to research for the NBA and other profes sional leagues, also serves as a consultant for SportsLine, a division of CBS Sports. He said he has done oversight for the NCAA, the Big 12, and three other college con ferences he did not name. He explained that used algorithms and formulas to monitor point spreads that raise ags for seven or eight different categories. White said he knows it doesnt take much for a col lege player to veer off the wrong path. If they do it once, thats it. Theyre done, he said. Theyre going to do it forev er. (The bookies will) never let them out of it. Thats what the kids dont understand. Then theres the topic of how prevalent sports betting is on college campuses. A 2016 NCAA study of nearly 23,000 student-athletes found 55 percent of men reported gambling for money and 24 percent reported vio lating NCAA bylaws by wa gering on sports for money. Eleven percent of Division I football players and 5 percent of mens basketball players reported betting on a college game in their sport (not in volving their team). If colleges truly did not want gambling, they would lobby to make all gambling lines on college sports ille gal, said David Ridpath, an associate professor of sports management at Ohio Univer sity. It has to be an either-or, not just, Hey its illegal, we know it is going on and, man, we make a ton of cash but we can look the other way. Ridpath spent seven years in athletic compliance at Marshall University and We ber State University. He de scribed gambling safeguards in place at the time as whacka-mole. He said schools used in-person education, news letters, emails and specic educational moments during high potential gambling times such as March Madness. Protect integrity Purdue Athletic Director Mike Bobinski told CNHI the school already discusses gambling and point shaving with student-athletes, but he said theyll have to be more diligent, comprehensive and intentional moving forward in order to protect integrity. Once you lose that, youre shot, Bobinski told CNHI. If people dont trust that whats happening in front of them is legit ... you cant get away with it. For those concerned with integrity, Sara Slane, senior vice president of public af fairs at the American Gaming Association, argued the more transparent and regulated a sports betting system is, the better equipped a league, in this case, the NCAA, is in detecting when something goes awry. West Virginias legal sports betting regulations will allow wagers on in-state programs, unlike Delaware, New Jersey and New Jersey, which prohibit any bets on in-state college teams, includ ing notable programs like Rutgers University, Seton Hall and Princeton Universi ty. Regulations passed June 21 in Mississippi detailed no such restrictions, meaning the public will soon be able to walk into a Mississippi casino and bet on Mississippi State University or the University of Mississippi. The increased activity will put more of an emphasis on information, including inju ries and suspensions, in order for oddsmakers to accurately set betting lines. Inside info Thats why Tim Otteman, a former gambler and now assistant professor at Central Michigan University, said athletic administrators all the way down to students who are around the team on a dai ly basis should be educated properly. The person I would go to (as a bookie) is the athletic trainer and student manager, said Otteman, who researched gambling tendencies. Thats how Im going to nd out whos hurt, whos not, who has a boyfriend/girlfriend problem, who has a credit problem, how they are doing in school. Those people know everything. To help combat any pos sible insider trading, the Southeastern Conference mentioned at its May league meetings the possibility of league-wide injury reports, similar to the NFL, to help with integrity. The Atlantic Coast Conference implement ed an injury report policy for several years before discon tinuing it for the 2017 season. White even suggested legal sportsbooks could pay the NCAA for streamlined information, doubling as an additional revenue source and a way to cut down on xes. But there are obvious obstacles, Williams said. The NCAA doesnt have a players union like the NFL or NBA to negotiate on their behalf. Then there is HIPPA, a federal law that provides medical privacy. Its healthy for the market, but from a legal perspective, there has to be a balance, Williams said. You dont want a lot of sensitive in formation being released without consent, or at least an understanding of that, or a proper framework around that. That obviously is a con cern at the collegiate level. Sean Isabella covers the Big 12 Conference for CNHI Sports.

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 4B Public Notices Protecting Your Right to Know Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA FAMILY DIVISION CASE NO.: 2018-DR-76 IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF: KHRISTIN DENI CALABRESE WINTERS, Wife, and JACOB JOSEPH WINTERS, Husband AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PUBLICATION TO: JACOB JOSEPH WINTERS YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action on ANGELA M. CANCIO, Esq., Petitioners attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 6051, Live Oak, Florida 32064, on or before Au gust 7, 2018 and file the original with the clerk of this court at SUWANNEE County Courthouse, 200 South Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064, either before service on Petitioners attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Fam ily Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of docu ments and information. Failure to com ply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. DATED this 13th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Amy Hopkin Deputy Clerk 06/20, 06/27, 07/04, 07/11/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA FAMILY DIVISION CASE NO.: 2018-DR-76 IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF: KHRISTIN DENI CALABRESE WINTERS, Wife, and JACOB JOSEPH WINTERS, Husband AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PUBLICATION TO: JACOB JOSEPH WINTERS YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action on ANGELA M. CANCIO, Esq., Petitioners attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 6051, Live Oak, Florida 32064, on or before Au gust 7, 2018 and file the original with the clerk of this court at SUWANNEE County Courthouse, 200 South Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064, either before service on Petitioners attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Fam ily Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of docu ments and information. Failure to com ply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. DATED this 13th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Amy Hopkin Deputy Clerk 06/20, 06/27, 07/04, 07/11/2018 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2015-CA-000199 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ANNETTE GIBBS AKA ANNETTE M. GIBBS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursu ant to an Order Rescheduling March 15, 2018 Foreclosure Sale dated June 13, 2018 and entered in Case No. 2015-CA-000199 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for Suwannee County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage LLC, is the Plaintiff and Annette Gibbs aka Annette M. Gibbs, First Federal Bank of Florida, and Midland Funding LLC as successor in interest to Chase Bank USA, N.A., are defendants, the Suwannee County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front steps of the Suwannee County Courthouse, 200 South Ohio/Dr. MLK, Jr. Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064, Suwannee County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 17th day of July, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: A PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC TION 27, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST, SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTH WEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 27, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DE GREES 54 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4, 1322.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 39 SEC ONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4, 1093.70 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 51; THENCE NORTH 52 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY, 1256.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST, 81.91 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SOUTH WEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, 739.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING. Property Address: 13886 HIGHWAY 51 SOUTH, LIVE OAK, FL 32060 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim with in 60 days after the sale. Dated in Suwannee County, Florida this 14th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) Clerk of the Circuit Court Suwannee County, Florida By: /s/ Felicia Flowers Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Persons with a disability who need any accommodation to participate should call the ADA Co ordinator, Jacquetta Bradley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL 32056, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice impaired call (800) 955-8770. 06/27, 07/04/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2015-CA-000199 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ANNETTE GIBBS AKA ANNETTE M. GIBBS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursu ant to an Order Rescheduling March 15, 2018 Foreclosure Sale dated June 13, 2018 and entered in Case No. 2015-CA-000199 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for Suwannee County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage LLC, is the Plaintiff and Annette Gibbs aka Annette M. Gibbs, First Federal Bank of Florida, and Midland Funding LLC as successor in interest to Chase Bank USA, N.A., are defendants, the Suwannee County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front steps of the Suwannee County Courthouse, 200 South Ohio/Dr. MLK, Jr. Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064, Suwannee County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 17th day of July, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: A PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC TION 27, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST, SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTH WEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 27, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DE GREES 54 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4, 1322.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 39 SEC ONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4, 1093.70 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 51; THENCE NORTH 52 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY, 1256.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST, 81.91 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SOUTH WEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, 739.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING. Property Address: 13886 HIGHWAY 51 SOUTH, LIVE OAK, FL 32060 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim with in 60 days after the sale. Dated in Suwannee County, Florida this 14th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) Clerk of the Circuit Court Suwannee County, Florida By: /s/ Felicia Flowers Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Persons with a disability who need any accommodation to participate should call the ADA Co ordinator, Jacquetta Bradley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL 32056, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice impaired call (800) 955-8770. 06/27, 07/04/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2015-CA-000199 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ANNETTE GIBBS AKA ANNETTE M. GIBBS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursu ant to an Order Rescheduling March 15, 2018 Foreclosure Sale dated June 13, 2018 and entered in Case No. 2015-CA-000199 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for Suwannee County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage LLC, is the Plaintiff and Annette Gibbs aka Annette M. Gibbs, First Federal Bank of Florida, and Midland Funding LLC as successor in interest to Chase Bank USA, N.A., are defendants, the Suwannee County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front steps of the Suwannee County Courthouse, 200 South Ohio/Dr. MLK, Jr. Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064, Suwannee County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 17th day of July, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: A PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC TION 27, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST, SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTH WEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 27, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DE GREES 54 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4, 1322.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 39 SEC ONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4, 1093.70 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 51; THENCE NORTH 52 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY, 1256.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST, 81.91 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SOUTH WEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, 739.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING. Property Address: 13886 HIGHWAY 51 SOUTH, LIVE OAK, FL 32060 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim with in 60 days after the sale. Dated in Suwannee County, Florida this 14th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) Clerk of the Circuit Court Suwannee County, Florida By: /s/ Felicia Flowers Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Persons with a disability who need any accommodation to participate should call the ADA Co ordinator, Jacquetta Bradley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL 32056, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice impaired call (800) 955-8770. 06/27, 07/04/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2015-CA-000199 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ANNETTE GIBBS AKA ANNETTE M. GIBBS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursu ant to an Order Rescheduling March 15, 2018 Foreclosure Sale dated June 13, 2018 and entered in Case No. 2015-CA-000199 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for Suwannee County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage LLC, is the Plaintiff and Annette Gibbs aka Annette M. Gibbs, First Federal Bank of Florida, and Midland Funding LLC as successor in interest to Chase Bank USA, N.A., are defendants, the Suwannee County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front steps of the Suwannee County Courthouse, 200 South Ohio/Dr. MLK, Jr. Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064, Suwannee County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 17th day of July, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: A PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC TION 27, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST, SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTH WEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 27, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DE GREES 54 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4, 1322.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 39 SEC ONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4, 1093.70 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 51; THENCE NORTH 52 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY, 1256.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST, 81.91 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SOUTH WEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, 739.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING. Property Address: 13886 HIGHWAY 51 SOUTH, LIVE OAK, FL 32060 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim with in 60 days after the sale. Dated in Suwannee County, Florida this 14th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) Clerk of the Circuit Court Suwannee County, Florida By: /s/ Felicia Flowers Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Persons with a disability who need any accommodation to participate should call the ADA Co ordinator, Jacquetta Bradley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL 32056, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice impaired call (800) 955-8770. 06/27, 07/04/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/04/2018 Legals PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/04/2018 Public Notices Protecting Your Right to Know Legals NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING A FUTURE LAND USE MAP AMENDMENT TO THE HAMILTON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COM MISSIONERS OF HAMILTON COUN TY, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF HAMILTON COUNTY, FLOR IDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161 through 163.3215, Florida Statutes, as amended, and the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Compre hensive Plan, objections, recommen dations and comments concerning the amendment, as described below, will be heard by the Board of County Commissioners of Hamilton County, Florida, at a second public hearing on July 17, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the County Commission Meeting Room, County Courthouse located at 207 Northeast First Street, Jasper, Florida. CPA18-01 an application by Westport Capital Partners, LLC (d/b/a Bien ville Plantation), to amend the Future Land Use Map of the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan by changing the future land use classification from Ag ricultural (Ag-1) to Mixed Use on Prop erty described as follows: A PARCEL OF LAND IN SECTIONS 13, 24, 25, & 30, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, AND IN SECTIONS 7, 18, 19, & 31, TOWN SHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, HAMILTON COUNTY BEING DE SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SW CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST AND RUN THENCE S.892553E., ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC TION 25, A DISTANCE OF 2672.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING; THENCE N.003641W., A DISTANCE OF 1400.80 FEET; THENCE S.884943W., A DIS TANCE OF 1332.88 FEET; THENCE N.003212W., A DIS TANCE OF 1576.17 FEET; THENCE S.895502E., A DISTANCE OF 975.51 FEET; THENCE N.595029E., A DISTANCE OF 1306.53 FEET; THENCE N.310944E., A DIS TANCE OF 2546.20 FEET; THENCE N.044049W., A DISTANCE OF 1417.02 FEET; THENCE N.053602E., A DIS TANCE OF 369.66 FEET; THENCE N.425344E., A DISTANCE OF 171.64 FEET; THENCE N.115928E., A DISTANCE OF 498.84 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3355.67 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3178.35 FEET; THENCE N.260553W., A DISTANCE OF 98.10 FEET; THENCE N.424346W., A DISTANCE OF 639.61 FEET; THENCE N.834356E., A DIS TANCE OF 2043.26 FEET; THENCE N.035717W., A DISTANCE OF 1026.30 FEET; THENCE S.825708E., A DISTANCE OF 744.92 FEET; THENCE S.010853E., A DISTANCE OF 2363.73 FEET; THENCE S.244308E., A DIS TANCE OF 83.39 FEET; THENCE S.561142E., A DISTANCE OF 1025.10 FEET; THENCE S.613004E., A DISTANCE OF 277.82 FEET; THENCE S.695222E., A DISTANCE OF 327.36 FEET; THENCE S.894215E., A DIS TANCE OF 71.31 FEET; THENCE N.642651E., A DISTANCE OF 341.50 FEET; THENCE N.884915E., A DISTANCE OF 1046.34 FEET; THENCE S.002023W., A DIS TANCE OF 6144.49 FEET; THENCE S.695416W., A DISTANCE OF 246.26 FEET; THENCE S.003550E., A DISTANCE OF 5571.11 FEET; THENCE S.194050E., A DIS TANCE OF 9.22 FEET; THENCE S.115544E., A DISTANCE OF 184.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 173734, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 77.52 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.030657E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 153.21 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 153.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.054150W., A DISTANCE OF 168.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CEN TRAL ANGLE OF 323817, A TAN GENT LENGTH OF 146.39 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.103718E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 280.99 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 284.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.265627E., A DISTANCE OF 127.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 300.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 245507, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 66.28 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.142854E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 129.45 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 130.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.020120E., A DISTANCE OF 168.65 FEET; THENCE S.005006W., A DIS TANCE OF 160.48 FEET; THENCE S.883804W., A DISTANCE OF 1886.19 FEET; THENCE S.005218E., A DISTANCE OF 575.61 FEET; THENCE N.894931W., A DISTANCE OF 2113.32 FEET; THENCE S.005524E., A DIS TANCE OF 2095.16 FEET; THENCE S.890810W., A DIS TANCE OF 717.36 FEET; THENCE S.001041W., A DISTANCE OF 73.44 FEET; THENCE S.891439W., A DISTANCE OF 1142.78 FEET; THENCE N.000352W., A DIS TANCE OF 2638.12 FEET; THENCE S.892553W., A DISTANCE OF 1336.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL CONTAINS 2030.20 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any inter ested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continua tion of the public hearing shall be an nounced during the public hearing and that no future notice concerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above ref erenced public hearing. At the afore mentioned public hearing, all interest ed parties may appear to be heard with respect to the amendment. Cop ies of the amendment are available for public inspection by request to Megan Carter, County Planner, at 386-3653034. All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such pur pose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the tes timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. 07/05/2018 Legals NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING A FUTURE LAND USE MAP AMENDMENT TO THE HAMILTON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COM MISSIONERS OF HAMILTON COUN TY, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF HAMILTON COUNTY, FLOR IDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161 through 163.3215, Florida Statutes, as amended, and the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Compre hensive Plan, objections, recommen dations and comments concerning the amendment, as described below, will be heard by the Board of County Commissioners of Hamilton County, Florida, at a second public hearing on July 17, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the County Commission Meeting Room, County Courthouse located at 207 Northeast First Street, Jasper, Florida. CPA18-01 an application by Westport Capital Partners, LLC (d/b/a Bien ville Plantation), to amend the Future Land Use Map of the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan by changing the future land use classification from Ag ricultural (Ag-1) to Mixed Use on Prop erty described as follows: A PARCEL OF LAND IN SECTIONS 13, 24, 25, & 30, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, AND IN SECTIONS 7, 18, 19, & 31, TOWN SHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, HAMILTON COUNTY BEING DE SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SW CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST AND RUN THENCE S.892553E., ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC TION 25, A DISTANCE OF 2672.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING; THENCE N.003641W., A DISTANCE OF 1400.80 FEET; THENCE S.884943W., A DIS TANCE OF 1332.88 FEET; THENCE N.003212W., A DIS TANCE OF 1576.17 FEET; THENCE S.895502E., A DISTANCE OF 975.51 FEET; THENCE N.595029E., A DISTANCE OF 1306.53 FEET; THENCE N.310944E., A DIS TANCE OF 2546.20 FEET; THENCE N.044049W., A DISTANCE OF 1417.02 FEET; THENCE N.053602E., A DIS TANCE OF 369.66 FEET; THENCE N.425344E., A DISTANCE OF 171.64 FEET; THENCE N.115928E., A DISTANCE OF 498.84 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3355.67 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3178.35 FEET; THENCE N.260553W., A DISTANCE OF 98.10 FEET; THENCE N.424346W., A DISTANCE OF 639.61 FEET; THENCE N.834356E., A DIS TANCE OF 2043.26 FEET; THENCE N.035717W., A DISTANCE OF 1026.30 FEET; THENCE S.825708E., A DISTANCE OF 744.92 FEET; THENCE S.010853E., A DISTANCE OF 2363.73 FEET; THENCE S.244308E., A DIS TANCE OF 83.39 FEET; THENCE S.561142E., A DISTANCE OF 1025.10 FEET; THENCE S.613004E., A DISTANCE OF 277.82 FEET; THENCE S.695222E., A DISTANCE OF 327.36 FEET; THENCE S.894215E., A DIS TANCE OF 71.31 FEET; THENCE N.642651E., A DISTANCE OF 341.50 FEET; THENCE N.884915E., A DISTANCE OF 1046.34 FEET; THENCE S.002023W., A DIS TANCE OF 6144.49 FEET; THENCE S.695416W., A DISTANCE OF 246.26 FEET; THENCE S.003550E., A DISTANCE OF 5571.11 FEET; THENCE S.194050E., A DIS TANCE OF 9.22 FEET; THENCE S.115544E., A DISTANCE OF 184.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 173734, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 77.52 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.030657E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 153.21 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 153.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.054150W., A DISTANCE OF 168.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CEN TRAL ANGLE OF 323817, A TAN GENT LENGTH OF 146.39 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.103718E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 280.99 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 284.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.265627E., A DISTANCE OF 127.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 300.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 245507, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 66.28 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.142854E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 129.45 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 130.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.020120E., A DISTANCE OF 168.65 FEET; THENCE S.005006W., A DIS TANCE OF 160.48 FEET; THENCE S.883804W., A DISTANCE OF 1886.19 FEET; THENCE S.005218E., A DISTANCE OF 575.61 FEET; THENCE N.894931W., A DISTANCE OF 2113.32 FEET; THENCE S.005524E., A DIS TANCE OF 2095.16 FEET; THENCE S.890810W., A DIS TANCE OF 717.36 FEET; THENCE S.001041W., A DISTANCE OF 73.44 FEET; THENCE S.891439W., A DISTANCE OF 1142.78 FEET; THENCE N.000352W., A DIS TANCE OF 2638.12 FEET; THENCE S.892553W., A DISTANCE OF 1336.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL CONTAINS 2030.20 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any inter ested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continua tion of the public hearing shall be an nounced during the public hearing and that no future notice concerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above ref erenced public hearing. At the afore mentioned public hearing, all interest ed parties may appear to be heard with respect to the amendment. Cop ies of the amendment are available for public inspection by request to Megan Carter, County Planner, at 386-3653034. All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such pur pose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the tes timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. 07/05/2018 Legals NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING A FUTURE LAND USE MAP AMENDMENT TO THE HAMILTON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COM MISSIONERS OF HAMILTON COUN TY, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF HAMILTON COUNTY, FLOR IDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161 through 163.3215, Florida Statutes, as amended, and the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Compre hensive Plan, objections, recommen dations and comments concerning the amendment, as described below, will be heard by the Board of County Commissioners of Hamilton County, Florida, at a second public hearing on July 17, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the County Commission Meeting Room, County Courthouse located at 207 Northeast First Street, Jasper, Florida. CPA18-01 an application by Westport Capital Partners, LLC (d/b/a Bien ville Plantation), to amend the Future Land Use Map of the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan by changing the future land use classification from Ag ricultural (Ag-1) to Mixed Use on Prop erty described as follows: A PARCEL OF LAND IN SECTIONS 13, 24, 25, & 30, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, AND IN SECTIONS 7, 18, 19, & 31, TOWN SHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, HAMILTON COUNTY BEING DE SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SW CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST AND RUN THENCE S.892553E., ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC TION 25, A DISTANCE OF 2672.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING; THENCE N.003641W., A DISTANCE OF 1400.80 FEET; THENCE S.884943W., A DIS TANCE OF 1332.88 FEET; THENCE N.003212W., A DIS TANCE OF 1576.17 FEET; THENCE S.895502E., A DISTANCE OF 975.51 FEET; THENCE N.595029E., A DISTANCE OF 1306.53 FEET; THENCE N.310944E., A DIS TANCE OF 2546.20 FEET; THENCE N.044049W., A DISTANCE OF 1417.02 FEET; THENCE N.053602E., A DIS TANCE OF 369.66 FEET; THENCE N.425344E., A DISTANCE OF 171.64 FEET; THENCE N.115928E., A DISTANCE OF 498.84 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3355.67 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3178.35 FEET; THENCE N.260553W., A DISTANCE OF 98.10 FEET; THENCE N.424346W., A DISTANCE OF 639.61 FEET; THENCE N.834356E., A DIS TANCE OF 2043.26 FEET; THENCE N.035717W., A DISTANCE OF 1026.30 FEET; THENCE S.825708E., A DISTANCE OF 744.92 FEET; THENCE S.010853E., A DISTANCE OF 2363.73 FEET; THENCE S.244308E., A DIS TANCE OF 83.39 FEET; THENCE S.561142E., A DISTANCE OF 1025.10 FEET; THENCE S.613004E., A DISTANCE OF 277.82 FEET; THENCE S.695222E., A DISTANCE OF 327.36 FEET; THENCE S.894215E., A DIS TANCE OF 71.31 FEET; THENCE N.642651E., A DISTANCE OF 341.50 FEET; THENCE N.884915E., A DISTANCE OF 1046.34 FEET; THENCE S.002023W., A DIS TANCE OF 6144.49 FEET; THENCE S.695416W., A DISTANCE OF 246.26 FEET; THENCE S.003550E., A DISTANCE OF 5571.11 FEET; THENCE S.194050E., A DIS TANCE OF 9.22 FEET; THENCE S.115544E., A DISTANCE OF 184.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 173734, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 77.52 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.030657E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 153.21 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 153.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.054150W., A DISTANCE OF 168.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CEN TRAL ANGLE OF 323817, A TAN GENT LENGTH OF 146.39 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.103718E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 280.99 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 284.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.265627E., A DISTANCE OF 127.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 300.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 245507, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 66.28 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.142854E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 129.45 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 130.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.020120E., A DISTANCE OF 168.65 FEET; THENCE S.005006W., A DIS TANCE OF 160.48 FEET; THENCE S.883804W., A DISTANCE OF 1886.19 FEET; THENCE S.005218E., A DISTANCE OF 575.61 FEET; THENCE N.894931W., A DISTANCE OF 2113.32 FEET; THENCE S.005524E., A DIS TANCE OF 2095.16 FEET; THENCE S.890810W., A DIS TANCE OF 717.36 FEET; THENCE S.001041W., A DISTANCE OF 73.44 FEET; THENCE S.891439W., A DISTANCE OF 1142.78 FEET; THENCE N.000352W., A DIS TANCE OF 2638.12 FEET; THENCE S.892553W., A DISTANCE OF 1336.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL CONTAINS 2030.20 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any inter ested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continua tion of the public hearing shall be an nounced during the public hearing and that no future notice concerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above ref erenced public hearing. At the afore mentioned public hearing, all interest ed parties may appear to be heard with respect to the amendment. Cop ies of the amendment are available for public inspection by request to Megan Carter, County Planner, at 386-3653034. All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such pur pose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the tes timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. 07/05/2018 Legals NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING A FUTURE LAND USE MAP AMENDMENT TO THE HAMILTON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COM MISSIONERS OF HAMILTON COUN TY, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF HAMILTON COUNTY, FLOR IDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161 through 163.3215, Florida Statutes, as amended, and the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Compre hensive Plan, objections, recommen dations and comments concerning the amendment, as described below, will be heard by the Board of County Commissioners of Hamilton County, Florida, at a second public hearing on July 17, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the County Commission Meeting Room, County Courthouse located at 207 Northeast First Street, Jasper, Florida. CPA18-01 an application by Westport Capital Partners, LLC (d/b/a Bien ville Plantation), to amend the Future Land Use Map of the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan by changing the future land use classification from Ag ricultural (Ag-1) to Mixed Use on Prop erty described as follows: A PARCEL OF LAND IN SECTIONS 13, 24, 25, & 30, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, AND IN SECTIONS 7, 18, 19, & 31, TOWN SHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, HAMILTON COUNTY BEING DE SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SW CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST AND RUN THENCE S.892553E., ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC TION 25, A DISTANCE OF 2672.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING; THENCE N.003641W., A DISTANCE OF 1400.80 FEET; THENCE S.884943W., A DIS TANCE OF 1332.88 FEET; THENCE N.003212W., A DIS TANCE OF 1576.17 FEET; THENCE S.895502E., A DISTANCE OF 975.51 FEET; THENCE N.595029E., A DISTANCE OF 1306.53 FEET; THENCE N.310944E., A DIS TANCE OF 2546.20 FEET; THENCE N.044049W., A DISTANCE OF 1417.02 FEET; THENCE N.053602E., A DIS TANCE OF 369.66 FEET; THENCE N.425344E., A DISTANCE OF 171.64 FEET; THENCE N.115928E., A DISTANCE OF 498.84 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3355.67 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3178.35 FEET; THENCE N.260553W., A DISTANCE OF 98.10 FEET; THENCE N.424346W., A DISTANCE OF 639.61 FEET; THENCE N.834356E., A DIS TANCE OF 2043.26 FEET; THENCE N.035717W., A DISTANCE OF 1026.30 FEET; THENCE S.825708E., A DISTANCE OF 744.92 FEET; THENCE S.010853E., A DISTANCE OF 2363.73 FEET; THENCE S.244308E., A DIS TANCE OF 83.39 FEET; THENCE S.561142E., A DISTANCE OF 1025.10 FEET; THENCE S.613004E., A DISTANCE OF 277.82 FEET; THENCE S.695222E., A DISTANCE OF 327.36 FEET; THENCE S.894215E., A DIS TANCE OF 71.31 FEET; THENCE N.642651E., A DISTANCE OF 341.50 FEET; THENCE N.884915E., A DISTANCE OF 1046.34 FEET; THENCE S.002023W., A DIS TANCE OF 6144.49 FEET; THENCE S.695416W., A DISTANCE OF 246.26 FEET; THENCE S.003550E., A DISTANCE OF 5571.11 FEET; THENCE S.194050E., A DIS TANCE OF 9.22 FEET; THENCE S.115544E., A DISTANCE OF 184.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 173734, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 77.52 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.030657E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 153.21 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 153.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.054150W., A DISTANCE OF 168.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CEN TRAL ANGLE OF 323817, A TAN GENT LENGTH OF 146.39 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.103718E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 280.99 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 284.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.265627E., A DISTANCE OF 127.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 300.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 245507, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 66.28 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.142854E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 129.45 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 130.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.020120E., A DISTANCE OF 168.65 FEET; THENCE S.005006W., A DIS TANCE OF 160.48 FEET; THENCE S.883804W., A DISTANCE OF 1886.19 FEET; THENCE S.005218E., A DISTANCE OF 575.61 FEET; THENCE N.894931W., A DISTANCE OF 2113.32 FEET; THENCE S.005524E., A DIS TANCE OF 2095.16 FEET; THENCE S.890810W., A DIS TANCE OF 717.36 FEET; THENCE S.001041W., A DISTANCE OF 73.44 FEET; THENCE S.891439W., A DISTANCE OF 1142.78 FEET; THENCE N.000352W., A DIS TANCE OF 2638.12 FEET; THENCE S.892553W., A DISTANCE OF 1336.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL CONTAINS 2030.20 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any inter ested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continua tion of the public hearing shall be an nounced during the public hearing and that no future notice concerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above ref erenced public hearing. At the afore mentioned public hearing, all interest ed parties may appear to be heard with respect to the amendment. Cop ies of the amendment are available for public inspection by request to Megan Carter, County Planner, at 386-3653034. All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such pur pose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the tes timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. 07/05/2018 PUBLIC AUCTION Location: Dennis Garage 8109 NW CR 146 Jennings, FL 32053 Date: 07/16/2018 Time: 8:00 A.M. 2006 JEEP VIN: 1J4FA39S36P701459 2013 FORD VIN: 1FTFW1CT1DFA68492 2000 DODG VIN: 1B4GP44G4YB685593 1999 PONT VIN: 1G2NE52E5XC523864 2003 FORD VIN: 1FAFP34P83W216152 07/05/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/05/2018 Legals Legals PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/05/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/05/2018 FIND IT IN THE LEGALS Public Notices Protecting Your Right to Know Lafayette County Courthouse Legals AGENDA, TOWN COUNCIL, TOWN OF MAYO, FLORIDA REGULAR MEETING MONDAY, JULY 9, 2018, 7:00 P.M. TOWN HALL, COUNCIL CONFERENCE ROOM, 276 WEST MAIN STREET REGULAR MEETING 1. Adopt Agenda 2. Approve Minutes 3. Citizen Input 4. Old Business 5. Discussion of Drafted Ordi nance for Professional Tree Removal Services & Lawn Care Services 6. Memorandum of Agreement, State of Florida, Department of Eco nomic Opportunity 7. Department Reports a. Sampson Edwards b. Aaron Lawson c. Mac Hinkle d. Sheriff Brian Lamb e. Lafayette Activities Group f. Severance Disposal 8. Miscellaneous Items 9. Pay Bills 10. Adjourn 07/05/2018 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2012CA000040 U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSO CIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF FEBRUARY 1, 2007, GSMAP TRUST 2007-NS1, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-NC1 Plaintiff, vs. JORGE A. PACHECO A/K/A JORGE PACHECO; et. al., Defendant, NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursu ant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 6, 2018, and entered in Case No. 2012CA000040 of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Lafayette County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK, NATION AL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SER VICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF FEBRUARY 1, 2007, GSMAP TRUST 2007-NS1, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-NC1 is Plaintiff and JORGE A. PACHECO A/K/A JORGE PACHECO; et. al., are Defendants, the Office of Steve Land, Lafayette County Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the North Door of the Lafayette County Courthouse, 120 West Main Street, Mayo, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd day of Au gust, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Government Lot 6 lying East of County Road 251-B, Section 8, Township 4 South, Range 11 East, Lafayette County, Florida. and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff mort gage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 11th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) Steve Land Clerk of said Circuit Court By: /s/ Hannah Owens Deputy Clerk McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Avenue, Suite 1000 West Palm Beach, Florida 33401 Telephone: (561) 713-1400 Email: FLpleadings@mwc-law.com 06/28, 07/05/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2012CA000040 U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSO CIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF FEBRUARY 1, 2007, GSMAP TRUST 2007-NS1, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-NC1 Plaintiff, vs. JORGE A. PACHECO A/K/A JORGE PACHECO; et. al., Defendant, NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursu ant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 6, 2018, and entered in Case No. 2012CA000040 of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Lafayette County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK, NATION AL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SER VICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF FEBRUARY 1, 2007, GSMAP TRUST 2007-NS1, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-NC1 is Plaintiff and JORGE A. PACHECO A/K/A JORGE PACHECO; et. al., are Defendants, the Office of Steve Land, Lafayette County Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the North Door of the Lafayette County Courthouse, 120 West Main Street, Mayo, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd day of Au gust, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Government Lot 6 lying East of County Road 251-B, Section 8, Township 4 South, Range 11 East, Lafayette County, Florida. and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff mort gage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 11th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) Steve Land Clerk of said Circuit Court By: /s/ Hannah Owens Deputy Clerk McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Avenue, Suite 1000 West Palm Beach, Florida 33401 Telephone: (561) 713-1400 Email: FLpleadings@mwc-law.com 06/28, 07/05/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2012CA000040 U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSO CIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF FEBRUARY 1, 2007, GSMAP TRUST 2007-NS1, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-NC1 Plaintiff, vs. JORGE A. PACHECO A/K/A JORGE PACHECO; et. al., Defendant, NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursu ant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 6, 2018, and entered in Case No. 2012CA000040 of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Lafayette County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK, NATION AL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SER VICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF FEBRUARY 1, 2007, GSMAP TRUST 2007-NS1, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-NC1 is Plaintiff and JORGE A. PACHECO A/K/A JORGE PACHECO; et. al., are Defendants, the Office of Steve Land, Lafayette County Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the North Door of the Lafayette County Courthouse, 120 West Main Street, Mayo, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd day of Au gust, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Government Lot 6 lying East of County Road 251-B, Section 8, Township 4 South, Range 11 East, Lafayette County, Florida. and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff mort gage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 11th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) Steve Land Clerk of said Circuit Court By: /s/ Hannah Owens Deputy Clerk McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Avenue, Suite 1000 West Palm Beach, Florida 33401 Telephone: (561) 713-1400 Email: FLpleadings@mwc-law.com 06/28, 07/05/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/05/2018 Legals PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/05/2018 Legals PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/05/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE The Lafayette County Commission will be holding a regular scheduled meeting on Monday, July 9, 2018 at 9:00 a.m. The meeting will be held in the County Commissioners Meeting Room at the Lafayette County Court house in Mayo, Florida. Listed below is an agenda for the meeting. By Order Of: Earnest L. Jones, Chairman Lafayette County Commission BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS: 1. Open the meeting. 2. Invocation and pledge to the flag. 3. Approve the minutes. 4. Requests and comments from the community. 5. Department Heads: A) Marcus Calhoun Mainte nance. B) Scott Sadler Public Works. C) Robert Hinkle Building/ Zoning. 1) Review applications for the Mayo Community Center custodian. D) Marty Tompkins EMS. E) Jana Hart Extension Office. 6. Approve a Resolution to name J.B. Land Road. 7. Leenette McMillan-Fredriksson various items. 8. Approve the bills. 9. Other Business. 10. Adjourn. All members of the public are wel come to attend. Notice is further here by given, pursuant Florida Statute 286.0105, that any person or persons deciding to appeal any matter consid ered at this public hearing will need a record of the hearing and may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with disabilities request ing reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact (386) 294-1600 or via Florida Relay Service at (800) 955-8771. See www.lafayetteclerk.com for up dates and amendments to the agenda. 07/05/2018 Legals PUBLIC NOTICE The Lafayette County Commission will be holding a regular scheduled meeting on Monday, July 9, 2018 at 9:00 a.m. The meeting will be held in the County Commissioners Meeting Room at the Lafayette County Court house in Mayo, Florida. Listed below is an agenda for the meeting. By Order Of: Earnest L. Jones, Chairman Lafayette County Commission BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS: 1. Open the meeting. 2. Invocation and pledge to the flag. 3. Approve the minutes. 4. Requests and comments from the community. 5. Department Heads: A) Marcus Calhoun Mainte nance. B) Scott Sadler Public Works. C) Robert Hinkle Building/ Zoning. 1) Review applications for the Mayo Community Center custodian. D) Marty Tompkins EMS. E) Jana Hart Extension Office. 6. Approve a Resolution to name J.B. Land Road. 7. Leenette McMillan-Fredriksson various items. 8. Approve the bills. 9. Other Business. 10. Adjourn. All members of the public are wel come to attend. Notice is further here by given, pursuant Florida Statute 286.0105, that any person or persons deciding to appeal any matter consid ered at this public hearing will need a record of the hearing and may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with disabilities request ing reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact (386) 294-1600 or via Florida Relay Service at (800) 955-8771. See www.lafayetteclerk.com for up dates and amendments to the agenda. 07/05/2018 Stay Informed!Exercise Your Right To Know! NEED TO PLACE A LEGAL AD? CONTA CT NORTH FLORIDA CLASSIFIEDS Public Notices Protecting Your Right to Know Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA FAMILY DIVISION CASE NO.: 2018-DR-76 IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF: KHRISTIN DENI CALABRESE WINTERS, Wife, and JACOB JOSEPH WINTERS, Husband AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PUBLICATION TO: JACOB JOSEPH WINTERS YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action on ANGELA M. CANCIO, Esq., Petitioners attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 6051, Live Oak, Florida 32064, on or before Au gust 7, 2018 and file the original with the clerk of this court at SUWANNEE County Courthouse, 200 South Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064, either before service on Petitioners attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Fam ily Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of docu ments and information. Failure to com ply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. DATED this 13th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Amy Hopkin Deputy Clerk 06/20, 06/27, 07/04, 07/11/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA FAMILY DIVISION CASE NO.: 2018-DR-76 IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF: KHRISTIN DENI CALABRESE WINTERS, Wife, and JACOB JOSEPH WINTERS, Husband AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PUBLICATION TO: JACOB JOSEPH WINTERS YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action on ANGELA M. CANCIO, Esq., Petitioners attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 6051, Live Oak, Florida 32064, on or before Au gust 7, 2018 and file the original with the clerk of this court at SUWANNEE County Courthouse, 200 South Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064, either before service on Petitioners attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Fam ily Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of docu ments and information. Failure to com ply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. DATED this 13th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Amy Hopkin Deputy Clerk 06/20, 06/27, 07/04, 07/11/2018 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2015-CA-000199 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ANNETTE GIBBS AKA ANNETTE M. GIBBS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursu ant to an Order Rescheduling March 15, 2018 Foreclosure Sale dated June 13, 2018 and entered in Case No. 2015-CA-000199 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for Suwannee County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage LLC, is the Plaintiff and Annette Gibbs aka Annette M. Gibbs, First Federal Bank of Florida, and Midland Funding LLC as successor in interest to Chase Bank USA, N.A., are defendants, the Suwannee County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front steps of the Suwannee County Courthouse, 200 South Ohio/Dr. MLK, Jr. Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064, Suwannee County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 17th day of July, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: A PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC TION 27, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST, SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTH WEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 27, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DE GREES 54 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4, 1322.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 39 SEC ONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4, 1093.70 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 51; THENCE NORTH 52 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY, 1256.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST, 81.91 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SOUTH WEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, 739.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING. Property Address: 13886 HIGHWAY 51 SOUTH, LIVE OAK, FL 32060 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim with in 60 days after the sale. Dated in Suwannee County, Florida this 14th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) Clerk of the Circuit Court Suwannee County, Florida By: /s/ Felicia Flowers Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Persons with a disability who need any accommodation to participate should call the ADA Co ordinator, Jacquetta Bradley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL 32056, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice impaired call (800) 955-8770. 06/27, 07/04/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2015-CA-000199 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ANNETTE GIBBS AKA ANNETTE M. GIBBS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursu ant to an Order Rescheduling March 15, 2018 Foreclosure Sale dated June 13, 2018 and entered in Case No. 2015-CA-000199 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for Suwannee County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage LLC, is the Plaintiff and Annette Gibbs aka Annette M. Gibbs, First Federal Bank of Florida, and Midland Funding LLC as successor in interest to Chase Bank USA, N.A., are defendants, the Suwannee County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front steps of the Suwannee County Courthouse, 200 South Ohio/Dr. MLK, Jr. Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064, Suwannee County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 17th day of July, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: A PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC TION 27, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST, SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTH WEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 27, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DE GREES 54 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4, 1322.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 39 SEC ONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4, 1093.70 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 51; THENCE NORTH 52 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY, 1256.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST, 81.91 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SOUTH WEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, 739.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING. Property Address: 13886 HIGHWAY 51 SOUTH, LIVE OAK, FL 32060 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim with in 60 days after the sale. Dated in Suwannee County, Florida this 14th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) Clerk of the Circuit Court Suwannee County, Florida By: /s/ Felicia Flowers Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Persons with a disability who need any accommodation to participate should call the ADA Co ordinator, Jacquetta Bradley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL 32056, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice impaired call (800) 955-8770. 06/27, 07/04/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2015-CA-000199 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ANNETTE GIBBS AKA ANNETTE M. GIBBS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursu ant to an Order Rescheduling March 15, 2018 Foreclosure Sale dated June 13, 2018 and entered in Case No. 2015-CA-000199 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for Suwannee County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage LLC, is the Plaintiff and Annette Gibbs aka Annette M. Gibbs, First Federal Bank of Florida, and Midland Funding LLC as successor in interest to Chase Bank USA, N.A., are defendants, the Suwannee County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front steps of the Suwannee County Courthouse, 200 South Ohio/Dr. MLK, Jr. Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064, Suwannee County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 17th day of July, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: A PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC TION 27, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST, SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTH WEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 27, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DE GREES 54 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4, 1322.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 39 SEC ONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4, 1093.70 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 51; THENCE NORTH 52 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY, 1256.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST, 81.91 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SOUTH WEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, 739.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING. Property Address: 13886 HIGHWAY 51 SOUTH, LIVE OAK, FL 32060 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim with in 60 days after the sale. Dated in Suwannee County, Florida this 14th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) Clerk of the Circuit Court Suwannee County, Florida By: /s/ Felicia Flowers Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Persons with a disability who need any accommodation to participate should call the ADA Co ordinator, Jacquetta Bradley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL 32056, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice impaired call (800) 955-8770. 06/27, 07/04/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2015-CA-000199 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ANNETTE GIBBS AKA ANNETTE M. GIBBS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursu ant to an Order Rescheduling March 15, 2018 Foreclosure Sale dated June 13, 2018 and entered in Case No. 2015-CA-000199 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for Suwannee County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage LLC, is the Plaintiff and Annette Gibbs aka Annette M. Gibbs, First Federal Bank of Florida, and Midland Funding LLC as successor in interest to Chase Bank USA, N.A., are defendants, the Suwannee County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front steps of the Suwannee County Courthouse, 200 South Ohio/Dr. MLK, Jr. Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064, Suwannee County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 17th day of July, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: A PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC TION 27, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST, SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTH WEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 27, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DE GREES 54 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4, 1322.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 39 SEC ONDS WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4, 1093.70 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 51; THENCE NORTH 52 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY, 1256.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST, 81.91 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SOUTH WEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, 739.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING. Property Address: 13886 HIGHWAY 51 SOUTH, LIVE OAK, FL 32060 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim with in 60 days after the sale. Dated in Suwannee County, Florida this 14th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) Clerk of the Circuit Court Suwannee County, Florida By: /s/ Felicia Flowers Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Persons with a disability who need any accommodation to participate should call the ADA Co ordinator, Jacquetta Bradley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL 32056, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice impaired call (800) 955-8770. 06/27, 07/04/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/04/2018 Legals PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/04/2018 Public Notices Protecting Your Right to Know Legals NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING A FUTURE LAND USE MAP AMENDMENT TO THE HAMILTON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COM MISSIONERS OF HAMILTON COUN TY, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF HAMILTON COUNTY, FLOR IDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161 through 163.3215, Florida Statutes, as amended, and the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Compre hensive Plan, objections, recommen dations and comments concerning the amendment, as described below, will be heard by the Board of County Commissioners of Hamilton County, Florida, at a second public hearing on July 17, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the County Commission Meeting Room, County Courthouse located at 207 Northeast First Street, Jasper, Florida. CPA18-01 an application by Westport Capital Partners, LLC (d/b/a Bien ville Plantation), to amend the Future Land Use Map of the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan by changing the future land use classification from Ag ricultural (Ag-1) to Mixed Use on Prop erty described as follows: A PARCEL OF LAND IN SECTIONS 13, 24, 25, & 30, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, AND IN SECTIONS 7, 18, 19, & 31, TOWN SHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, HAMILTON COUNTY BEING DE SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SW CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST AND RUN THENCE S.892553E., ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC TION 25, A DISTANCE OF 2672.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING; THENCE N.003641W., A DISTANCE OF 1400.80 FEET; THENCE S.884943W., A DIS TANCE OF 1332.88 FEET; THENCE N.003212W., A DIS TANCE OF 1576.17 FEET; THENCE S.895502E., A DISTANCE OF 975.51 FEET; THENCE N.595029E., A DISTANCE OF 1306.53 FEET; THENCE N.310944E., A DIS TANCE OF 2546.20 FEET; THENCE N.044049W., A DISTANCE OF 1417.02 FEET; THENCE N.053602E., A DIS TANCE OF 369.66 FEET; THENCE N.425344E., A DISTANCE OF 171.64 FEET; THENCE N.115928E., A DISTANCE OF 498.84 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3355.67 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3178.35 FEET; THENCE N.260553W., A DISTANCE OF 98.10 FEET; THENCE N.424346W., A DISTANCE OF 639.61 FEET; THENCE N.834356E., A DIS TANCE OF 2043.26 FEET; THENCE N.035717W., A DISTANCE OF 1026.30 FEET; THENCE S.825708E., A DISTANCE OF 744.92 FEET; THENCE S.010853E., A DISTANCE OF 2363.73 FEET; THENCE S.244308E., A DIS TANCE OF 83.39 FEET; THENCE S.561142E., A DISTANCE OF 1025.10 FEET; THENCE S.613004E., A DISTANCE OF 277.82 FEET; THENCE S.695222E., A DISTANCE OF 327.36 FEET; THENCE S.894215E., A DIS TANCE OF 71.31 FEET; THENCE N.642651E., A DISTANCE OF 341.50 FEET; THENCE N.884915E., A DISTANCE OF 1046.34 FEET; THENCE S.002023W., A DIS TANCE OF 6144.49 FEET; THENCE S.695416W., A DISTANCE OF 246.26 FEET; THENCE S.003550E., A DISTANCE OF 5571.11 FEET; THENCE S.194050E., A DIS TANCE OF 9.22 FEET; THENCE S.115544E., A DISTANCE OF 184.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 173734, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 77.52 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.030657E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 153.21 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 153.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.054150W., A DISTANCE OF 168.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CEN TRAL ANGLE OF 323817, A TAN GENT LENGTH OF 146.39 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.103718E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 280.99 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 284.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.265627E., A DISTANCE OF 127.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 300.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 245507, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 66.28 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.142854E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 129.45 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 130.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.020120E., A DISTANCE OF 168.65 FEET; THENCE S.005006W., A DIS TANCE OF 160.48 FEET; THENCE S.883804W., A DISTANCE OF 1886.19 FEET; THENCE S.005218E., A DISTANCE OF 575.61 FEET; THENCE N.894931W., A DISTANCE OF 2113.32 FEET; THENCE S.005524E., A DIS TANCE OF 2095.16 FEET; THENCE S.890810W., A DIS TANCE OF 717.36 FEET; THENCE S.001041W., A DISTANCE OF 73.44 FEET; THENCE S.891439W., A DISTANCE OF 1142.78 FEET; THENCE N.000352W., A DIS TANCE OF 2638.12 FEET; THENCE S.892553W., A DISTANCE OF 1336.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL CONTAINS 2030.20 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any inter ested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continua tion of the public hearing shall be an nounced during the public hearing and that no future notice concerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above ref erenced public hearing. At the afore mentioned public hearing, all interest ed parties may appear to be heard with respect to the amendment. Cop ies of the amendment are available for public inspection by request to Megan Carter, County Planner, at 386-3653034. All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such pur pose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the tes timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. 07/05/2018 Legals NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING A FUTURE LAND USE MAP AMENDMENT TO THE HAMILTON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COM MISSIONERS OF HAMILTON COUN TY, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF HAMILTON COUNTY, FLOR IDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161 through 163.3215, Florida Statutes, as amended, and the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Compre hensive Plan, objections, recommen dations and comments concerning the amendment, as described below, will be heard by the Board of County Commissioners of Hamilton County, Florida, at a second public hearing on July 17, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the County Commission Meeting Room, County Courthouse located at 207 Northeast First Street, Jasper, Florida. CPA18-01 an application by Westport Capital Partners, LLC (d/b/a Bien ville Plantation), to amend the Future Land Use Map of the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan by changing the future land use classification from Ag ricultural (Ag-1) to Mixed Use on Prop erty described as follows: A PARCEL OF LAND IN SECTIONS 13, 24, 25, & 30, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, AND IN SECTIONS 7, 18, 19, & 31, TOWN SHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, HAMILTON COUNTY BEING DE SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SW CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST AND RUN THENCE S.892553E., ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC TION 25, A DISTANCE OF 2672.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING; THENCE N.003641W., A DISTANCE OF 1400.80 FEET; THENCE S.884943W., A DIS TANCE OF 1332.88 FEET; THENCE N.003212W., A DIS TANCE OF 1576.17 FEET; THENCE S.895502E., A DISTANCE OF 975.51 FEET; THENCE N.595029E., A DISTANCE OF 1306.53 FEET; THENCE N.310944E., A DIS TANCE OF 2546.20 FEET; THENCE N.044049W., A DISTANCE OF 1417.02 FEET; THENCE N.053602E., A DIS TANCE OF 369.66 FEET; THENCE N.425344E., A DISTANCE OF 171.64 FEET; THENCE N.115928E., A DISTANCE OF 498.84 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3355.67 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3178.35 FEET; THENCE N.260553W., A DISTANCE OF 98.10 FEET; THENCE N.424346W., A DISTANCE OF 639.61 FEET; THENCE N.834356E., A DIS TANCE OF 2043.26 FEET; THENCE N.035717W., A DISTANCE OF 1026.30 FEET; THENCE S.825708E., A DISTANCE OF 744.92 FEET; THENCE S.010853E., A DISTANCE OF 2363.73 FEET; THENCE S.244308E., A DIS TANCE OF 83.39 FEET; THENCE S.561142E., A DISTANCE OF 1025.10 FEET; THENCE S.613004E., A DISTANCE OF 277.82 FEET; THENCE S.695222E., A DISTANCE OF 327.36 FEET; THENCE S.894215E., A DIS TANCE OF 71.31 FEET; THENCE N.642651E., A DISTANCE OF 341.50 FEET; THENCE N.884915E., A DISTANCE OF 1046.34 FEET; THENCE S.002023W., A DIS TANCE OF 6144.49 FEET; THENCE S.695416W., A DISTANCE OF 246.26 FEET; THENCE S.003550E., A DISTANCE OF 5571.11 FEET; THENCE S.194050E., A DIS TANCE OF 9.22 FEET; THENCE S.115544E., A DISTANCE OF 184.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 173734, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 77.52 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.030657E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 153.21 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 153.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.054150W., A DISTANCE OF 168.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CEN TRAL ANGLE OF 323817, A TAN GENT LENGTH OF 146.39 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.103718E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 280.99 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 284.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.265627E., A DISTANCE OF 127.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 300.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 245507, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 66.28 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.142854E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 129.45 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 130.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.020120E., A DISTANCE OF 168.65 FEET; THENCE S.005006W., A DIS TANCE OF 160.48 FEET; THENCE S.883804W., A DISTANCE OF 1886.19 FEET; THENCE S.005218E., A DISTANCE OF 575.61 FEET; THENCE N.894931W., A DISTANCE OF 2113.32 FEET; THENCE S.005524E., A DIS TANCE OF 2095.16 FEET; THENCE S.890810W., A DIS TANCE OF 717.36 FEET; THENCE S.001041W., A DISTANCE OF 73.44 FEET; THENCE S.891439W., A DISTANCE OF 1142.78 FEET; THENCE N.000352W., A DIS TANCE OF 2638.12 FEET; THENCE S.892553W., A DISTANCE OF 1336.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL CONTAINS 2030.20 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any inter ested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continua tion of the public hearing shall be an nounced during the public hearing and that no future notice concerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above ref erenced public hearing. At the afore mentioned public hearing, all interest ed parties may appear to be heard with respect to the amendment. Cop ies of the amendment are available for public inspection by request to Megan Carter, County Planner, at 386-3653034. All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such pur pose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the tes timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. 07/05/2018 Legals NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING A FUTURE LAND USE MAP AMENDMENT TO THE HAMILTON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COM MISSIONERS OF HAMILTON COUN TY, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF HAMILTON COUNTY, FLOR IDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161 through 163.3215, Florida Statutes, as amended, and the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Compre hensive Plan, objections, recommen dations and comments concerning the amendment, as described below, will be heard by the Board of County Commissioners of Hamilton County, Florida, at a second public hearing on July 17, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the County Commission Meeting Room, County Courthouse located at 207 Northeast First Street, Jasper, Florida. CPA18-01 an application by Westport Capital Partners, LLC (d/b/a Bien ville Plantation), to amend the Future Land Use Map of the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan by changing the future land use classification from Ag ricultural (Ag-1) to Mixed Use on Prop erty described as follows: A PARCEL OF LAND IN SECTIONS 13, 24, 25, & 30, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, AND IN SECTIONS 7, 18, 19, & 31, TOWN SHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, HAMILTON COUNTY BEING DE SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SW CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST AND RUN THENCE S.892553E., ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC TION 25, A DISTANCE OF 2672.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING; THENCE N.003641W., A DISTANCE OF 1400.80 FEET; THENCE S.884943W., A DIS TANCE OF 1332.88 FEET; THENCE N.003212W., A DIS TANCE OF 1576.17 FEET; THENCE S.895502E., A DISTANCE OF 975.51 FEET; THENCE N.595029E., A DISTANCE OF 1306.53 FEET; THENCE N.310944E., A DIS TANCE OF 2546.20 FEET; THENCE N.044049W., A DISTANCE OF 1417.02 FEET; THENCE N.053602E., A DIS TANCE OF 369.66 FEET; THENCE N.425344E., A DISTANCE OF 171.64 FEET; THENCE N.115928E., A DISTANCE OF 498.84 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3355.67 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3178.35 FEET; THENCE N.260553W., A DISTANCE OF 98.10 FEET; THENCE N.424346W., A DISTANCE OF 639.61 FEET; THENCE N.834356E., A DIS TANCE OF 2043.26 FEET; THENCE N.035717W., A DISTANCE OF 1026.30 FEET; THENCE S.825708E., A DISTANCE OF 744.92 FEET; THENCE S.010853E., A DISTANCE OF 2363.73 FEET; THENCE S.244308E., A DIS TANCE OF 83.39 FEET; THENCE S.561142E., A DISTANCE OF 1025.10 FEET; THENCE S.613004E., A DISTANCE OF 277.82 FEET; THENCE S.695222E., A DISTANCE OF 327.36 FEET; THENCE S.894215E., A DIS TANCE OF 71.31 FEET; THENCE N.642651E., A DISTANCE OF 341.50 FEET; THENCE N.884915E., A DISTANCE OF 1046.34 FEET; THENCE S.002023W., A DIS TANCE OF 6144.49 FEET; THENCE S.695416W., A DISTANCE OF 246.26 FEET; THENCE S.003550E., A DISTANCE OF 5571.11 FEET; THENCE S.194050E., A DIS TANCE OF 9.22 FEET; THENCE S.115544E., A DISTANCE OF 184.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 173734, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 77.52 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.030657E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 153.21 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 153.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.054150W., A DISTANCE OF 168.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CEN TRAL ANGLE OF 323817, A TAN GENT LENGTH OF 146.39 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.103718E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 280.99 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 284.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.265627E., A DISTANCE OF 127.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 300.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 245507, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 66.28 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.142854E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 129.45 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 130.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.020120E., A DISTANCE OF 168.65 FEET; THENCE S.005006W., A DIS TANCE OF 160.48 FEET; THENCE S.883804W., A DISTANCE OF 1886.19 FEET; THENCE S.005218E., A DISTANCE OF 575.61 FEET; THENCE N.894931W., A DISTANCE OF 2113.32 FEET; THENCE S.005524E., A DIS TANCE OF 2095.16 FEET; THENCE S.890810W., A DIS TANCE OF 717.36 FEET; THENCE S.001041W., A DISTANCE OF 73.44 FEET; THENCE S.891439W., A DISTANCE OF 1142.78 FEET; THENCE N.000352W., A DIS TANCE OF 2638.12 FEET; THENCE S.892553W., A DISTANCE OF 1336.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL CONTAINS 2030.20 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any inter ested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continua tion of the public hearing shall be an nounced during the public hearing and that no future notice concerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above ref erenced public hearing. At the afore mentioned public hearing, all interest ed parties may appear to be heard with respect to the amendment. Cop ies of the amendment are available for public inspection by request to Megan Carter, County Planner, at 386-3653034. All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such pur pose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the tes timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. 07/05/2018 Legals NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING A FUTURE LAND USE MAP AMENDMENT TO THE HAMILTON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COM MISSIONERS OF HAMILTON COUN TY, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF HAMILTON COUNTY, FLOR IDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161 through 163.3215, Florida Statutes, as amended, and the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Compre hensive Plan, objections, recommen dations and comments concerning the amendment, as described below, will be heard by the Board of County Commissioners of Hamilton County, Florida, at a second public hearing on July 17, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the County Commission Meeting Room, County Courthouse located at 207 Northeast First Street, Jasper, Florida. CPA18-01 an application by Westport Capital Partners, LLC (d/b/a Bien ville Plantation), to amend the Future Land Use Map of the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan by changing the future land use classification from Ag ricultural (Ag-1) to Mixed Use on Prop erty described as follows: A PARCEL OF LAND IN SECTIONS 13, 24, 25, & 30, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, AND IN SECTIONS 7, 18, 19, & 31, TOWN SHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, HAMILTON COUNTY BEING DE SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SW CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST AND RUN THENCE S.892553E., ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC TION 25, A DISTANCE OF 2672.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING; THENCE N.003641W., A DISTANCE OF 1400.80 FEET; THENCE S.884943W., A DIS TANCE OF 1332.88 FEET; THENCE N.003212W., A DIS TANCE OF 1576.17 FEET; THENCE S.895502E., A DISTANCE OF 975.51 FEET; THENCE N.595029E., A DISTANCE OF 1306.53 FEET; THENCE N.310944E., A DIS TANCE OF 2546.20 FEET; THENCE N.044049W., A DISTANCE OF 1417.02 FEET; THENCE N.053602E., A DIS TANCE OF 369.66 FEET; THENCE N.425344E., A DISTANCE OF 171.64 FEET; THENCE N.115928E., A DISTANCE OF 498.84 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3355.67 FEET; THENCE N.011752W., A DIS TANCE OF 3178.35 FEET; THENCE N.260553W., A DISTANCE OF 98.10 FEET; THENCE N.424346W., A DISTANCE OF 639.61 FEET; THENCE N.834356E., A DIS TANCE OF 2043.26 FEET; THENCE N.035717W., A DISTANCE OF 1026.30 FEET; THENCE S.825708E., A DISTANCE OF 744.92 FEET; THENCE S.010853E., A DISTANCE OF 2363.73 FEET; THENCE S.244308E., A DIS TANCE OF 83.39 FEET; THENCE S.561142E., A DISTANCE OF 1025.10 FEET; THENCE S.613004E., A DISTANCE OF 277.82 FEET; THENCE S.695222E., A DISTANCE OF 327.36 FEET; THENCE S.894215E., A DIS TANCE OF 71.31 FEET; THENCE N.642651E., A DISTANCE OF 341.50 FEET; THENCE N.884915E., A DISTANCE OF 1046.34 FEET; THENCE S.002023W., A DIS TANCE OF 6144.49 FEET; THENCE S.695416W., A DISTANCE OF 246.26 FEET; THENCE S.003550E., A DISTANCE OF 5571.11 FEET; THENCE S.194050E., A DIS TANCE OF 9.22 FEET; THENCE S.115544E., A DISTANCE OF 184.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 173734, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 77.52 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.030657E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 153.21 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 153.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.054150W., A DISTANCE OF 168.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 500.00 FEET, A CEN TRAL ANGLE OF 323817, A TAN GENT LENGTH OF 146.39 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.103718E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 280.99 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 284.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.265627E., A DISTANCE OF 127.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING: A RADIUS OF 300.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 245507, A TANGENT LENGTH OF 66.28 FEET, A CHORD BEARING OF S.142854E. AND A CHORD LENGTH OF 129.45 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 130.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.020120E., A DISTANCE OF 168.65 FEET; THENCE S.005006W., A DIS TANCE OF 160.48 FEET; THENCE S.883804W., A DISTANCE OF 1886.19 FEET; THENCE S.005218E., A DISTANCE OF 575.61 FEET; THENCE N.894931W., A DISTANCE OF 2113.32 FEET; THENCE S.005524E., A DIS TANCE OF 2095.16 FEET; THENCE S.890810W., A DIS TANCE OF 717.36 FEET; THENCE S.001041W., A DISTANCE OF 73.44 FEET; THENCE S.891439W., A DISTANCE OF 1142.78 FEET; THENCE N.000352W., A DIS TANCE OF 2638.12 FEET; THENCE S.892553W., A DISTANCE OF 1336.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL CONTAINS 2030.20 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any inter ested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continua tion of the public hearing shall be an nounced during the public hearing and that no future notice concerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above ref erenced public hearing. At the afore mentioned public hearing, all interest ed parties may appear to be heard with respect to the amendment. Cop ies of the amendment are available for public inspection by request to Megan Carter, County Planner, at 386-3653034. All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such pur pose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the tes timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. 07/05/2018 PUBLIC AUCTION Location: Dennis Garage 8109 NW CR 146 Jennings, FL 32053 Date: 07/16/2018 Time: 8:00 A.M. 2006 JEEP VIN: 1J4FA39S36P701459 2013 FORD VIN: 1FTFW1CT1DFA68492 2000 DODG VIN: 1B4GP44G4YB685593 1999 PONT VIN: 1G2NE52E5XC523864 2003 FORD VIN: 1FAFP34P83W216152 07/05/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/05/2018 Legals Legals PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/05/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/05/2018 FIND IT IN THE LEGALS Public Notices Protecting Your Right to Know Lafayette County Courthouse Legals AGENDA, TOWN COUNCIL, TOWN OF MAYO, FLORIDA REGULAR MEETING MONDAY, JULY 9, 2018, 7:00 P.M. TOWN HALL, COUNCIL CONFERENCE ROOM, 276 WEST MAIN STREET REGULAR MEETING 1. Adopt Agenda 2. Approve Minutes 3. Citizen Input 4. Old Business 5. Discussion of Drafted Ordi nance for Professional Tree Removal Services & Lawn Care Services 6. Memorandum of Agreement, State of Florida, Department of Eco nomic Opportunity 7. Department Reports a. Sampson Edwards b. Aaron Lawson c. Mac Hinkle d. Sheriff Brian Lamb e. Lafayette Activities Group f. Severance Disposal 8. Miscellaneous Items 9. Pay Bills 10. Adjourn 07/05/2018 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2012CA000040 U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSO CIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF FEBRUARY 1, 2007, GSMAP TRUST 2007-NS1, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-NC1 Plaintiff, vs. JORGE A. PACHECO A/K/A JORGE PACHECO; et. al., Defendant, NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursu ant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 6, 2018, and entered in Case No. 2012CA000040 of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Lafayette County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK, NATION AL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SER VICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF FEBRUARY 1, 2007, GSMAP TRUST 2007-NS1, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-NC1 is Plaintiff and JORGE A. PACHECO A/K/A JORGE PACHECO; et. al., are Defendants, the Office of Steve Land, Lafayette County Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the North Door of the Lafayette County Courthouse, 120 West Main Street, Mayo, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd day of Au gust, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Government Lot 6 lying East of County Road 251-B, Section 8, Township 4 South, Range 11 East, Lafayette County, Florida. and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff mort gage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 11th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) Steve Land Clerk of said Circuit Court By: /s/ Hannah Owens Deputy Clerk McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Avenue, Suite 1000 West Palm Beach, Florida 33401 Telephone: (561) 713-1400 Email: FLpleadings@mwc-law.com 06/28, 07/05/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2012CA000040 U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSO CIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF FEBRUARY 1, 2007, GSMAP TRUST 2007-NS1, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-NC1 Plaintiff, vs. JORGE A. PACHECO A/K/A JORGE PACHECO; et. al., Defendant, NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursu ant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 6, 2018, and entered in Case No. 2012CA000040 of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Lafayette County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK, NATION AL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SER VICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF FEBRUARY 1, 2007, GSMAP TRUST 2007-NS1, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-NC1 is Plaintiff and JORGE A. PACHECO A/K/A JORGE PACHECO; et. al., are Defendants, the Office of Steve Land, Lafayette County Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the North Door of the Lafayette County Courthouse, 120 West Main Street, Mayo, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd day of Au gust, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Government Lot 6 lying East of County Road 251-B, Section 8, Township 4 South, Range 11 East, Lafayette County, Florida. and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff mort gage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 11th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) Steve Land Clerk of said Circuit Court By: /s/ Hannah Owens Deputy Clerk McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Avenue, Suite 1000 West Palm Beach, Florida 33401 Telephone: (561) 713-1400 Email: FLpleadings@mwc-law.com 06/28, 07/05/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2012CA000040 U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSO CIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF FEBRUARY 1, 2007, GSMAP TRUST 2007-NS1, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-NC1 Plaintiff, vs. JORGE A. PACHECO A/K/A JORGE PACHECO; et. al., Defendant, NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursu ant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 6, 2018, and entered in Case No. 2012CA000040 of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Lafayette County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK, NATION AL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SER VICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF FEBRUARY 1, 2007, GSMAP TRUST 2007-NS1, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-NC1 is Plaintiff and JORGE A. PACHECO A/K/A JORGE PACHECO; et. al., are Defendants, the Office of Steve Land, Lafayette County Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the North Door of the Lafayette County Courthouse, 120 West Main Street, Mayo, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd day of Au gust, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Government Lot 6 lying East of County Road 251-B, Section 8, Township 4 South, Range 11 East, Lafayette County, Florida. and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff mort gage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 11th day of June, 2018. (Court Seal) Steve Land Clerk of said Circuit Court By: /s/ Hannah Owens Deputy Clerk McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Avenue, Suite 1000 West Palm Beach, Florida 33401 Telephone: (561) 713-1400 Email: FLpleadings@mwc-law.com 06/28, 07/05/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/05/2018 Legals PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/05/2018 Legals PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Notice of Entry of Final Orders Adopting the Suwannee River; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa River and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans The Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice that, pursuant to Sections 403.067 and 373.807, F.S., Final Orders were entered on June 29,2018 adopting the Suwannee Riv er; Santa Fe River; and Wacissa Riv er and Wacissa Spring Group Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs). These BMAPs identify the projects and management actions necessary to achieve the nutrient (nitrogen) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the impaired water bodies. These BMAPs were developed as part of the Depart ments TMDL Program, as authorized under the Florida Watershed Resto ration Act [Section 403.067, Florida Statutes (F.S.)]. The Final Orders have been assigned OGC Case Nos. 17-1165; 18-1061; and 18-1063. The BMAPs and the adopted Final Orders may also be obtained from the Depart ment website at: https://floridadep.gov/dear/ water-quality-restoration/content/ basin-managementaction-plans-bmaps A person whose substantial interests are affected by any of these Final Or ders may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Section 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., in accor dance with the full notice of rights lan guage contained in each Final Order. The petition, which must contain the information identified in the full notice of rights language contained in each Final Order, must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Departments Office of General Counsel at 3900 Common wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tal lahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of publication of this notice or within 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. A copy of each of the Final Orders may also be obtained by contacting: Terry Hansen, P.G. Department of Environ mental Protection, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 3565, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400 or by calling (850) 2454561 or by emailing: terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.gov 07/05/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE The Lafayette County Commission will be holding a regular scheduled meeting on Monday, July 9, 2018 at 9:00 a.m. The meeting will be held in the County Commissioners Meeting Room at the Lafayette County Court house in Mayo, Florida. Listed below is an agenda for the meeting. By Order Of: Earnest L. Jones, Chairman Lafayette County Commission BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS: 1. Open the meeting. 2. Invocation and pledge to the flag. 3. Approve the minutes. 4. Requests and comments from the community. 5. Department Heads: A) Marcus Calhoun Mainte nance. B) Scott Sadler Public Works. C) Robert Hinkle Building/ Zoning. 1) Review applications for the Mayo Community Center custodian. D) Marty Tompkins EMS. E) Jana Hart Extension Office. 6. Approve a Resolution to name J.B. Land Road. 7. Leenette McMillan-Fredriksson various items. 8. Approve the bills. 9. Other Business. 10. Adjourn. All members of the public are wel come to attend. Notice is further here by given, pursuant Florida Statute 286.0105, that any person or persons deciding to appeal any matter consid ered at this public hearing will need a record of the hearing and may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with disabilities request ing reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact (386) 294-1600 or via Florida Relay Service at (800) 955-8771. See www.lafayetteclerk.com for up dates and amendments to the agenda. 07/05/2018 Legals PUBLIC NOTICE The Lafayette County Commission will be holding a regular scheduled meeting on Monday, July 9, 2018 at 9:00 a.m. The meeting will be held in the County Commissioners Meeting Room at the Lafayette County Court house in Mayo, Florida. Listed below is an agenda for the meeting. By Order Of: Earnest L. Jones, Chairman Lafayette County Commission BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS: 1. Open the meeting. 2. Invocation and pledge to the flag. 3. Approve the minutes. 4. Requests and comments from the community. 5. Department Heads: A) Marcus Calhoun Mainte nance. B) Scott Sadler Public Works. C) Robert Hinkle Building/ Zoning. 1) Review applications for the Mayo Community Center custodian. D) Marty Tompkins EMS. E) Jana Hart Extension Office. 6. Approve a Resolution to name J.B. Land Road. 7. Leenette McMillan-Fredriksson various items. 8. Approve the bills. 9. Other Business. 10. Adjourn. All members of the public are wel come to attend. Notice is further here by given, pursuant Florida Statute 286.0105, that any person or persons deciding to appeal any matter consid ered at this public hearing will need a record of the hearing and may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with disabilities request ing reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact (386) 294-1600 or via Florida Relay Service at (800) 955-8771. See www.lafayetteclerk.com for up dates and amendments to the agenda. 07/05/2018 Stay Informed!Exercise Your Right To Know! NEED TO PLACE A LEGAL AD? CONTA CT NORTH FLORIDA CLASSIFIEDS

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rfnntbrrb rffnnttbft ftnfnnttbt nn tfn tn f 16013-1 -FOR RENTGREAT RATES FOR NICE LOOKING RENTALS WATER, SEWER, AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS. 386-330-2567 Special Notices DEADLINES FOR CLASSIFIED & LEGAL LINE ADS: FOR WEDNESDAY SUWANNEE DEMOCRATNOON FRIDAY PRIOR FOR FRIDAY SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT-NOON WEDNESDAY PRIOR FOR THURSDAY JASPER NEWSNOON FRIDAY PRIOR FOR THURSDAY MAYO FREE PRESSNOON FRIDAY PRIOR JOB WANTED Im looking for work as private health care aide. 7am-5pm Mon-Fri in patients home. Call for more information 386-6883698. TO ALL TRADESMEN & SERVICE PROVIDERS:Havent you always heard the old saying Big things come in small packages? Well, this is the idea for the Tri-County Service Directory seen on the classi fied pages of the Mid-Week Editions of the Suwannee Democrat, The Jasper News & the Mayo Free Press!Call 386-362-1734 X102 for more info on how to place a small ad (thats the small packages part)to appear in all 3 of our publica tions which means the opportunity for your ad to be seen by more than 4000 potential customers (and thats the big things part). General Help Wanted JOB FAIRFL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser vices, Div of Fruit & Vegetables, is holding a Job Fair for Season al Employees for the Lee/Jasper / OBrien areas on July 12 from 9 AM to 4 PM at the Career Source North Florida Building located at 705 East Base Street, Madison, Florida.Retirees Welcome to Apply! For more info, contact Theresa Stade at 352-5297232AA/ADA/EOE E-Verify Employer LIBRARY AIDE II LIVE OAK LIBRARYSuwannee River Regional Li brary is seeking applicants for the position of fulltime Library Aide II at the Live Oak Library. This position is open until filled. Applications are avail able on line at suwcounty. org or may be obtained at the Suwannee County Build ing Department, 224 Pine Ave., Live Oak, FL 32064, telephone (386) 364-3407 or at Public Works, 13150 80th Terrace, Live Oak, FL 32060, telephone (386) 364-3400. The Suwannee County Board of County Commissioners is an equal employment opportunity employer that does not discriminate against any qualified employee or applicant because of race, color, national origin, sex, including pregnancy, age, disability, marital status or genetics. Spanish speaking individuals are encouraged to apply. Successful comple tion of a drug test is a condi tion of employment. Failure to successfully test free of illegal or controlled drugs will result in non-employment of the applicant for a minimum of 1 year. EEO/AA/V/D JOB HUNTING?Find It In The Classieds Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative (SVEC) Su wannee Valley Electric Co-op currently has an opening for Apprentice Dispatcher . This is a rotating shift position which requires strong tech nical and map reading skills. This position provides oppor tunity to train for higher levels of dispatch responsibilities. Resumes can be emailed to aphillips@prdothan.com or applications can be printed from www.svec-coop.com and emailed or turned in to the SVEC office. Deadline to apply July 13, 2018.SVEC is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Professional Madison, FL: Positions available Biology Instruc tor (Faculty Position). See www.nfcc.edu for details. Madison, FL: PT Truck Driv ing Instructor; Chemistry Instructor; Coordinator of Recruitment; English In structor. See www.nfcc. edu for details. PART TIME RECEPTIONISTCity of Live Oak has an opening for a part time Receptionist. Deadline to apply is July 13, 2018 at 4:00 PM. Please visit www.cityofliveoak.org/jobs for application and additional posi tion information. Educational YOU CAN BE A CNA Nursing Assistants are in GREAT demand! Quest Training offers nurse taught classes. No GED required if age 18 yr. Day and Evening classes available. (386)362-1065 Yard/Estate Sales 2661 103rd Rd Live Oak, FL, behind SOS Music Parkfollow signs from US 129 N to 103rd Rd. ongoing from Fri, 6/29, thru the next weekend MOVING SALE (inside & outside) Shop tools, storage shed contents, house hold items, some furn & lots, lots more. Dealers welcome. Every thing must go. Byrds Store 15 mi S of Live Oak on CR 49. 7/6, 7/7, 7/8, 8a4p. New & used items, Antiques. YARD SALE. IN & OUTSIDE NO RAIN. Watch for signs. STOP BY THE SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT OFFICE 521 Demorest Street, SE Live Oak, FL AND PLACE YOUR GA RAGE (YARD, ESTATE, OR MOVING) SALE AD IN TWO EDITIONS OF THE SU WANNEE DEMOCRAT TO RECEIVE A FREE GARAGE SALE KIT* *Kit contains: 3-11X13 Signs 1Pre-Sale Checklist 1Tipsheet for a Successful Sale 1Sheet of Price Stickers Misc Merchandise FOR SALE: Gas grill w/propane tank, fish fryer w/propane tank $50.00 ea. Office desk $50.00 OBO. Call (386)362-4614 for more info. HAVE YOU BEEN MEANING TO CLEAR OUT SOME OF THE CLUTTER? RECYCLE, REDUCE, REUSE? MAYBE GET RID OF THAT UGLY (YOU THINK) VASE AUNT EDNA LEFT YOU IN HER WILL? WE CAN HELP! IF YOU CAN PART WITH ANY SINGLE UNWANTED ITEM FOR LESS THAN $500.00, YOU CAN RUN A 5-LINE AD WITH US FOR ONE WEEK AT NO CHARGE! (Offer restricted to one ad for one item within a 4-week period) CALL THE CLASSIFIEDS DEPARTMENT AT 386-362-1734 X102 KENMORE TOP-MOUNT REFRIDGERATOR Factory installed ice maker, Great Condition. $299 or best offer. Please call (386)9383922. Please leave a message if no answer Pets for Sale FOR SALE1 CKC female blue and gold Yorkshire Terrier. 3 1/2 pounds, 9months old. $900 OBO. Lo cated in Homerville Ga. Call (912)487-6024 Manufactured Homes FOR SALE: 28X62 DWMH on 5 acres in Live Oak, FL. $100,000. Call 386-362-4614 for more info. Land/Acreage ONE ACRE PAVED ROAD FRONTAGE Beautifully Wooded, Owner Fi nance, No Down. $14,900. Only $153/mo 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com TEN ACRES OBRIEN, FL Paved Rd, well & culvert. Owner financing. NO DOWN $69,900. $613/mo 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Commercial/Business FOR SALE: 6500 sf warehouse on paved rd. (1K sf w/ac office/ retail space), 2 lg roll-up doors. 20608 CR 49, OBrien, FL. Own er financed: $159,900. $5K down, $1,360/mo. 352-215-1018. www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Homes For Rent Three Bdrm/Two Ba brick home in Live Oak, FL. Close to everything! NO PETS. $850/mo. first, last, $300/dep rqd. Call 318840-4802 or 386-362-3002. Two Bdrm/One Ba home in Live Oak, FL. Close to everything! NO PETS. $850/mo. first, last, $300/ dep rqd. (incl lawn maintenance) Call 318-840-4802 or 386-3623002. Apartments MEL-MAR-GO APARTMENTS in Live Oak, FL. 1/2/3 Bd avail. Clean, modern, W/D hookups. Starting at $650/mo + dep. 386-364-1648 FIND IT IN THE CLASSIFIEDS TODAY!! Roommates ROOMMATE WANTED to share nice home in great neighborhood in Live Oak, FL. $450/mo. Call 386-362-3768. Autos RUN YOUR TRUCK OR AUTO FOR SALE AD FOR 4 WEEKS FOR JUST A LITTLE MORE THAN THE PRICE OF 1 WEEK: 1 WEEK REGULAR RATE: $25.83 4 WEEK SPECIAL RATE: $30.90 This special rate gets you 8 issues of the Suwannee Democrat, 4 issues of The Jasper News & the Mayo Free Press plus 8 days online!!! ADD A PHOTO FOR ONLY $10.50 MORE CALL NOW TO GET YOUR AD STARTED 386-362-1734 X102 RV Sales/Service WE BUY USED RVS! CALL 229-740-0375 Trucks Ford Ranger, 2004 Auto. Trans. 79K miles, 2-dr ext. cab, radio & casette player. Cold air, good tires. $6,900 OBO. Call (386) 364-1247 The Best Deals Can Be Found Here In the CLASSIFIEDS JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 5B ANFADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA FLORIDA STATEWIDE FLORIDA STATEWIDE rfn ntbn rnnbnn nnn Building Supplies nbnrr nnbb bnn ntn nnnbnb 103661TRI-COUNTY SERVICE DIRECTORY Serving Suwannee, Hamilton & Lafayette Counties These businesses are ready to serve you.Tradesmen & Service Providers:Call now to place your ads 386-362-1734 x 102 rfWeGoShop.comweshop4u@wegoshop.com 103667-1 rntbt tn n nn tntttnn nnn n n 103724-SUBURBAN PROPANE24-Hour Emergency Service 386-454-3690 103711BYRDS POWER EQUIPMENTSales & Service All Makes & Models 11860 E. U.S. Hwy 27 Branford, Florida Hours: Mon-Fri 7 a.m. 5 p.m. Open Saturdays 7 a.m. Noon(386) 935-1544 r fntbtf fntntb btnf ftf btfb tttftttt bnt 103746-1 FREE ESTIMATESSpecializing in custom metal roof systems. Covering all of Florida.(386) 205-3865 106363-1Like Us on Facebook Credit Cards Accepted

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 6B Mens and Boys Fellowship Event WHAT FREE Iron Sharpens Iron Mens and Boys Fellowship Event WHERE Live Oak Church of God 9828 US Hwy 129 Live Oak,Fla 32060 386-362-2483 or 386-842-5494 WHEN July 16,2018 at 7:00 p.m. WHO Guest Speaker Florida State University Football Chaplain Clinton Purvis July 16 Magic for Kids 10:00-11:00AM Chuck Maxwell moved to the ACV from Live Oak last December. He has been performing magic shows for adults and for children for 15 years in all kinds of venues such as camp grounds, churches and parties. Chuck was a charter bus driver before retiring. He drove groups to two Super Bowls and two Olympics and so many others places and events. Were looking forward to his wowing the kids on Monday, July 16 at 10:00AM. Jo Kennon Public Library, 10655 Dowling Park Dr. in Dowling Park. 386-658-2670 July 17 Rock Painting 6:00-7:00PM Rock Painting parties will be held regularly on the third Tuesday of the month from 6-7PM. Stop by to paint your own rock and visit with other rock star artists. All supplies are provided. Jo Kennon Public Library, 10655 Dowling Park Dr. in Dowling Park. 386-658-2670 July 18 Crocheting Class 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn how to crochet. Please bring needles and yarn. Taught by Debra Barney Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 July 19 Armchair Travels to Bolivia Noon-1 p.m. Travel to Bolivia from the comfort of the library. Presented by Debra Barney. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 July 21 CPR and First Aid Class 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Learn lifesaving techniques of CPR and rst aid taught by Suwannee Fire Rescue. Space is limited. Please preregister. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 July 25 Watership Down Book Club 2:00-3 p.m. Join us to discuss Watership Down by Richard Adams. Copies available for checkout at the front desk. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 July 26 Cooking Demo Noon-1 p.m. Linda Lamarre, local food blogger will present easy, no-cook food demos and recipes. Lin das blog can be found at http://bestoongis landandcentralorida.blogspot.com. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 July 26 SongFarmers Gathering 6 p.m. Enjoy a musical gathering of musicians with song and acoustic instruments. Musicians welcome! Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 July 27 Book Club for Adults Join other book lovers from 10-11AM on July 27 as we discuss our latest read, Mrs. Sherlock Holmes. Copies will be available for check out at the front desk of the library after June 29. Jo Kennon Public Library, 10655 Dowling Park Dr. in Dowling Park. 386-658-2670 July 27 Game Day for Adults 10 a.m.-noon Bring your favorite board or card game and your friends! Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Sept. 12-16 Jellystone Park Jam The Jellystone Park Jam will be hosted from September 12-16 at Yogi Bears Jellystone Park in Madison. Over two dozen of gospel musics nest talents are scheduled to ap pear throughout the ve-day event. The Jel lystone Park Jam is a free event for anyone to attend. For a complete list of the concert events and times or more information, visit https:// www.jellystoneparkjam.com/home, call 850464-0114 or email jellystoneparkjam@gmail. com. Monthly Meetings Hymn Singing Old-fashioned hymn singing takes place at White Springs United Methodist Church on the fourth Sunday of every month at 4 p.m. Hymn requests from the congregation are welcome. The church invites the community to attend. White Springs United Methodist Church is lo cated at 16580 Spring St. in White Springs. Mens Community-wide Church Fellowship and Supper The Live Oak Church of God invites the com munity to join them for their dinner on the third Monday night of each month for their Mens Community Wide Church Fellowship and Supper at 7 p.m. Each month, there will be a guest speaker. For more information, call Johnnie Philman Mens Ministry at 386-842-5494 or Pastor Wes Tanksley at 386-362-2483. Alcoholics Anonymous The Live Oak Group of Alcoholics Anonymous meet three days each week on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday at 7 p.m. at 911 Nobles Ferry Road (Gray Precinct Voting Building), the building next to the Health Department. For more information, contact Charlie at 386364-6410. The number is not monitored 24 hours a day, so please leave a message. Suwannee River Toastmasters The Suwannee River Toastmasters Club invites you to join us as we work together to em power individuals to become more effective communicators and leaders. We meet the 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the Suwannee River Water Management District Headquarters. Contact Joe Flanagan at 386-209-1912 for additional information. Kiwanis Club of Live Oak The Kiwanis Club of Live Oak invites you to join us in making the world a better place one child and one community at a time. We meet each Wednesday from noon to 1 p.m. at the Florida Farm Bureau Insurance build ing. Contact Joe Flanagan at 386-209-1912 for additional information. Suwannee County Conservation District supervisor meeting The supervisors of the Suwannee County Conservation District will meet on the third Thursday of each and every month at 7 p.m. in the USDA Service Center Conference Room for their regularly scheduled District Meeting. The USDA Service Center is located at 1525-B Ohio Ave. South, Live Oak. History of Suwannee County Presented by County Historian Eric Musgrove Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 1st Thursday of the month, 12-1 p.m.. 386-658-2670 McAlpin Community Club meeting The McAlpin Community Club meetings are held on the second Monday every month at 9981 170th Terrace in McAlpin. A covered dish dinner is served at 6 p.m. with the meet ing beginning at 7 p.m. Find them on Facebook by searching McAlpin Community Club. For more information, contact Susan Fennell at 386-688-1267 or s.fennel@windstream. net. Seed Library and Gardening Workshop Presented by Master Gardener Rhonda Lep per Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 1st Thursday of the month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. 386-658-2670 Recipe Swap Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 2nd Thursday of the month, 1-2 p.m. Bring in a favorite recipe or dish, meet other foodies and exchange ideas. Call 386-6582670 for featured recipe of the month. Florida Native Plant Society The Sparkleberry Chapter meets on the second Tuesday of the month at Hatch Park July 4 Fourth of July Patio/Yard Sale San Juan Mission will be hosting its 4th of July patio/yard sale on July 4 from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. There will be a variety of items, including clothing, household, shing, outdoor items and more. The sale supports their missionary and other ministries work. July 5 Winemaking Noon-1 p.m. Betsy Martin will present Winemaking as part of the Pioneer Life series. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 July 5 The History of Suwannee County 12:00-1:00PM Join us for this historical presentation about Suwannee County, where Eric Musgrove, our county historian will present about the early 1900s: Part One in our area. The presentation will take place in the library meeting room on July 5, 2018 from 12-1PM. Jo Kennon Public Library, 10655 Dowling Park Dr. in Dowling Park. 386-658-2670 July 6 Fried Chicken Friday Fried Chicken Friday, July 6th, from 4pm to 7pm, at Spirit of Christ Lutheran Church, located at 145 SW Sweetbreeze Drive, Lake City (386-752-3807) take US-90 West past Harveys Supermarket. Dinner includes: Fried Chicken, Green Beans, Mashed Potatoes, Cole Slaw, Roll & Brownie. Children half price. **Takeout available.** July 7 Gathering of the SongFarmers The July Gathering of the SongFarmers of the Suwannee River Valley will be Saturday, July 7, 7:00-9:00 PM, at St. James Episcopal Church, 2423 SW Bascom Norris Drive, Lake City, Florida 32025. This month also includes a special anniversary performance and cel ebration of our two-year anniversary. We are also completing lming Saturday night for the Woodsongs PBS documentary tentatively scheduled to be aired this fall and sponsored by Martin Guitars and Deering Banjos. Acoustic jam style format. Musicians, friends and families welcome. No charge. For ad ditional information, contact Skip Johns at 386-344-2906 or visit the Suwannee Valley SongFarmers Facebook page at https://www. facebook.com/songfarmersofthesuwannee rivervalley/ July 7 Caf Libro 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Free coffee in the new releases book area of the library. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 July 7 Bar-B-Que Chicken Dinner Fundraiser McCalls Chapel United Methodist Women is holding a Bar-B-Que chicken dinner fundrais er on Saturday, July 7. This event is in support of Another Way Out, Domestic Abuse and Shelter in Chieand, serving the tri-county area. All the proceeds from the sale of dinners will go to Another Way Out. McCalls Chapel is located at 7755 SE SRD 349,, Branford, FL, just north of the Dixie/Lafayette County line. For dinner pricing, contact the church at 386-935-0595. July 10 Shepherds Hands Medical Clinic Opening Shepherds Hands of Suwannee Valley Free Medical Clinic, located at St. Lukes Episco pal Church, 1391 11th St. in Live Oak (across from the coliseum), will be open Tuesday evening, July 10 from 5:30:30 p.m. The clinic serves persons from 18-64 years of age who do not have health insurance. For questions and more information, contact 386-362-1837. July 10 Hamilton Countywide Sisterhood Meeting 6 p.m. All ladies of the county are invited to attend the Countywide Sisterhood meeting to be held at Harvest Fellowship Church on July 10 at 6 p.m. The church is located on U.S. 129 South (with a red ashing sign) across from Hamilton County High School. Please bring a favorite salad or dessert and join in a won derful time of fellowship and inspiration. July 11 Knitting Class 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn how to knit, purl, cast on, and bind off. Please bring needles and yarn. Taught by Debra Barney Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 July 12 Native American Artifacts Noon-1 p.m. Presented by Jennings Bunn Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 July 12 Recipe Swap 1:00-2:00PM Recipe Swap will be held on the second Thursday of every month from 1-2PM. Join us in the library meeting room to meet with oth er foodies, discuss new or old recipes, and maybe have a sample or two. Our July reci pe swap will feature appetizers. Samples are welcome but not required. Please be sure to bring your recipe, well make copies at the library for anyone interested. Jo Kennon Public Library, 10655 Dowling Park Dr. in Dowling Park. 386-658-2670 July 14 TPOA meeting The Timberlake Property Owners semi-annual general membership meeting will be held at the Hamilton County Administration Building, located at 1163 U.S. Hwy. 41 NW in Jasper. The meeting will be July 14 at 10 a.m. July 14 Pancake Breakfast Pancake Breakfast, Sat., July 14th, from 8am to 11am, at Spirit of Christ Lutheran Church, located at 145 SW Sweetbreeze Drive, Lake City (386-752-3807) take US-90 West past Harveys Supermarket. **Takeout available.** July 1 6 Iron Sharpens Iron Community Calendar Community Calendar event submissions Want to place your upcoming event(s) in our weekly Community Calendar? Email your events to aimee. buckner@ganews.com Include basic details such as who, what, where and when. Please note: protable events will need to be handled by our advertising department. For more information, contact Aimee via email. Deadline for submissions is Monday at 3 p.m. SEE COMMUNITY CALENDAR, PAGE 7B

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 7B Community Calendar Community Center, 403 S.E. Craven Street in Branford, presenting a variety of education al programs concerning our Florida native plants, the birds, bees and other wildlife that visit our plants, their place in our landscapes, and the contributions they make to our Flori da environment. Meetings are always open to the public. More at www.sparkleberry.fnpschapters.org, or call 407-319-2488 or 386-364-9309. Rock Painting Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 3rd Tuesday of the month, 6-7 p.m. Paint rocks and visit with other rock star artists. All supplies are provided. 386-658-2670 EAA monthly pancake breakfast The EAA Chapter 797 hosts a pancake breakfast every third Saturday of the month from 8:30 a.m. in the EAA building at Su wannee County Airport. The EAA building is located at 13302 80th Terr. in Live Oak. For more information, con tact 817-308-9752. Armchair Travels Presented by Don and Joanne Mott Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 3rd Friday of the month, 10-11 a.m. Travel around the country and learn about exciting new places to visit. Dementia Support Group Location: Good Samaritan Center Private Dining Room 10676 Marvin Jones Blvd. Dowling Park, Florida When: the fourth Tuesday of each month Time: 10 a.m. This is for anyone who is a caregiver for someone who is suffering with Dementia or Alzheimers. There is no charge for this support group. You do not have to have a loved one resid ing in the Good Samaritan Center to attend this meeting. For more information please feel free to con tact Ginger Calhoun at 386-658-5594. Book Club for Adults Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 Last Friday of the month, 10-11 a.m. Join us to discuss our latest read. 386-658-2670 Suwannee Valley Branch of the NAACP meeting The Suwannee Valley Branch of the NAACPs regular monthly meeting will be at New Bethel Baptist Church located at 205 4th St in Jasper from 7 p.m. every third Monday. Meetings will begin after May 22, 2017. SREC, Inc. Senior Center monthly events The SREC, Inc. Senior Center, located at 1509 Martin Luther King Dr. SW in Jasper has monthly birthday parties the third Friday of every month at noon, as well as monthly ka raoke the fourth Wednesday of every month at 10 a.m. For more information, contact Barbara Daniels at 386-792-1136. Events are subject to change. Mom 2 Mom The community is invited to Mom 2 Mom on the fourth Thursday of the month from 1-2 p.m. at the Lafayette Three Rivers Library. Get together with other parents. Door prizes and goodies will be provided. Call Healthy Start at 386-294-1321. Estas invitada a Mom 2 Mom, un evento que se celebru el cuarto Jueves de cada mes la 1p.m. hasta la cas 2 p.m. en la Biblioteca de Lafayette. Reunirse con otras mams. Se propocionarn premios y rega los. Llame a Healthy Start al 386-294-1321. All-You-Can-Eat Wellborn Blueberry Pan cake Breakfast The All-You-Can-Eat Wellborn Blueberry Pan cake Breakfast will be held the rst Saturday of each month from 7:30 a.m. All new menu items including blueberry pancakes, scrambled eggs, sausage, grits, bacon, or ange juice and coffee. Located at the Wellborn Community Associ ation Building 1340 8th Ave. Wellborn, FL. For pricing and other information, call 386-8671761 or visit us online on Facebook or www. wellborncommunityassociation.com. Come join us for great food and help benet the Wellborn community. Taylor County Beekeeping Club meeting Taylor County Beekeeping Club meets the second Monday of every month at 6:30 p.m. at the Taylor County IFAS center: 203 Forest Park Dr, Perry, Fla. 32348 www.facebook.com/tcbeeclub tacobeekeepers@gmail.com WoodmenLife monthly member meeting, bring a dish WoodmenLife monthly member meeting is held on the rst of every month. Located at 1339 SR 47 in Lake City. RSVP with your local WoodmanLife representative Kristen Hunt at 386-688-7942. Singspiration at Suwannee Church of the Nazarene Every 5th Sunday, the church will host a Singspirationa night where members of the congregation sing, read poems, share testimonies, etc. Want to participate? Visit the church, or call at 386-397-2309, to be added to the list. The more participation, the longer it goes. After wards, there will be snacks and refreshments in the fellowship hall. The church is located at 18763 SE CR 137 in White Springs, FL 32096 The Florida Gateway Bee Club meeting The Florida Gateway Bee Club meets at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Suwannee Valley Agriculture Center located at 8202 CR 417, Live Oak. Professional and hobby beekeepers are wel come, as well as anyone with an interest in learning about honeybees. San Juan Mission Catholic Church public Rosary The community is invited to join San Juan Mission Catholic Church, 304 SE Plant Ave, Branford, for the public Rosary on the rst Saturday of every month at 9 a.m. The community will pray for religious freedom, traditional moral standards and freedom of conscience. The Suwannee Chapter, Florida Trail Associ ation meetings The Suwannee Chapter, Florida Trail Asso ciation holds its monthly meetings on the second Monday, 7-9 p.m. at the Suwannee River Water Management District, 9225 CR 49, Live Oak, corner of US 90 and CR 49, 2 miles east of Live Oak. Programs and activi ties available, and public is welcome. For more information, call 386-776-1920 or visit Suwannee.FloridaTrail.org. Disabled American Veterans Chapter 126, Suwannee Memorial Meets the rst Tuesday of each month at the hall in John Hale Park, 215 East Duval St., Live Oak. Disabled veterans and their spouses are encouraged to attend and join. Suwannee Republican Executive Committee Meets the 1st Thursday of each month at 7 p.m., Live Oak City Hall 101 White Ave SE Contact Sherri Ortega 386-330-2736 for more information. www.suwanneegop.com Suwannee County Republican Executive Committee Live Oak City Hall, 101 White Ave SE, Live Oak Meets rst Thursday, 7 p.m. www.suwanneegop.com Suwannee Valley 500 Club Third Saturday of each month, Suwannee Valley 500 Club will meet at 1 p.m. at Thun der Alley, located at 1605 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak. 386-364-7778. Clothes Closet open donations The Jasper First Methodist Church is accept ing donations of clean and gently used items of clothing for children, women and men to be offered in the monthly Clothes Closet. The Clothes Closet is open to every one on the fourth Saturday of every month from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Christmas and Thanksgiving months the schedule is subject to change). All items are offered free of charge. For more information call 386-3972316. *The Clothes Closet will be closed due to the Christmas holiday on December 16. Suwannee County Historical Commission The Suwannee County Historical Commission meets on the third Thursday of the month at 3:30 p.m. at the Suwannee County Historical Museum (old Freight Depot) on Ohio Avenue in Live Oak. Meetings are open to the public. Public rosary rst Friday Join St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church for the public rosary every rst Friday of the month at 3 p.m. The church is located at 928 Howard St West. Contact Sheri Ortega at 386-3641108 or Paul Schmitz at 386-362-5710 for more information. MOAA-Military Ofcers Association of America The Suwannee River Valley Chapter of MOAA meets monthly (September through June) in Lake City. All active duty, retired, and for mer military ofcers of all services, including Reserve and National Guard, and spouses/ guests are welcome. For information and reservations call Mo Becnel (386)755-0756 or Steve Casto at (386)497-2986. The Suwan nee River Valley Chapter, founded in 1990, is one of over 400 MOAA chapters around the world. Suwannee County Riding Club Bob Holmes Arena, Live Oak We have roping events on the second and fourth Fridays of the month. Sign ups at 7 p.m. and rides begin at 8 p.m. Speed events are held on the second and fourth Saturdays of the month. Sign ups begin at 6 p.m. and rides begin at 7 p.m. We ride from the fourth weekend of January until No vember with the exception of March where we have no rides. If you have any questions contact Brittney Smith at 386-688-1482. Recipe Swap Suwannee River Regional Library 1848 Ohio Ave. S, Live Oak 1st Tuesday of the month, 12 p.m. 1 p.m. Bring in a favorite recipe or dish, meet other foodies, and exchange ideas. Call 386-3622317 for Featured Recipe of the Month Christian Singles Meet every other Saturday at 5 p.m. Call for more information: 386-623-5810, 386-2880961, 386-438-3394. Branford Camera Club Hatch Park Community Center 403 SE Craven St. Branford Meets 3rd Thursday with an occasional ex ception 386-935-2044 or 386-590-6339 Critter Corner Suwannee County Animal Shelter 11150 144th St., McAlpin, Fla. (approx. 8 miles South off Hwy 129). If you are missing a pet or would love to adopt a pet, please come see us. Animals can be viewed Monday-Friday 9-1 and Saturday 9-12. Volunteers and transporters are desper ately needed; Tues.-Sat., 9-9:30 a.m., see Ms. Norma. Spay/Neuter 386-208-0072 Suwannee County Seniors Free Breakfast and Lunch Suwannee River Economic Councils Senior Center 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW, Live Oak. Mon day-Friday 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Breakfast8:30 a.m./Lunch11:30 a.m. (make reservation for lunch by 9:30 a.m.) Bingo: (Wednesdays) 10 a.m. Meeting/Service: (Fridays) 10a.m. 386-362-1164 First Baptist Church of Live Oak Clothes Closet 515 SW 5th Street, 1st and 3rd Thursday, 8 a.m.-12 p.m. (The Old Red Barn) Suwannee Valley Branch NAACP-Unit #5137 PO Box 6105, Live Oak, FL 32064 President: Alonzo Philmore Triumph The Church & Kingdom of God in Christ, 410 Taylor Ave. SW off of 7th St. 1st Monday each month, 7 p.m. Email: a1101st@comcast.net 386-205-9132 American Legion Post 107 10726 142nd St., Live Oak Off of Hwy 129 S, post is 1 mile on the right. Meets 1st Thursday at 12 p.m. 386-362-5987 Social Sewing Club Center Ave., off of 7th St. 2nd and 4th Tuesday For more information: 386-362-4062 Live Oak Garden Club 1300 11th St. SW, Live Oak 3rd Friday of each month, 11 a.m. liveoakoridagardenclub.com 386-364-4189 Stars Widow Group Antioch Baptist Church 5203 CR 795, Live Oak, FL 4th Monday, 10:30 a.m. 386-362-3101 Suwannee Amateur Radio Club 1st Tuesday, social at 6:30 p.m., regular meeting at 7 p.m. North of I10 & US Hwy 129, Live Oak. Call for exact location and directions. www.suwanneearc.org 386-249-3616 Live Oak Art Guild Suwannee River Regional Library 1848 Ohio Ave. S, Live Oak Meets 1st Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Judith Adams-386-776-2675 Suwannee Democratic Executive Committee Live Oak City Hall 101 White Ave. SE, Live Oak Meets 2nd Thursday, 7 p.m. Suwannee County Bassmasters Poole Realty Inc 127 E. Howard St., Live Oak Meets 1st Tuesday, 7 p.m. 386-688-0978 or 386-590-2885 Save the Cats of Live Oak Help needed at the shelter with feeding and cleaning Monday through Sundays. Help is also needed within the city limits with feeding several cat colonies Monday through Sun days. Items always needed are food, litter and resalable items for the thrift store located at 217 W. Howard St. downtown. For more information, contact 386-364-1006 or 407748-0396. The Arc North Florida Recycle with us We recycle cardboard, name brand ink cartridges, laser toners, working cell phones w/charger, digital cameras, GPS, MP3, and laptops. 386-362-7143 ext. 0 Book Club for Adults Suwannee River Regional Library 1848 Ohio Ave. S, Live Oak Meets 4th Wednesday of the month at 2 p.m. Join us to discuss our latest read! 386-362-2317 Lunch & Learn History of Suwannee County Presented by County Historian, Eric Musgrove Suwannee River Regional Library 1848 Ohio Ave. S, Live Oak Meets 2nd Thursday of each month from 12-1 p.m. Bring your lunch & learn about our historic county! 386-362-2317 Weekly Meetings Bridge Club seeking players Monday Bridge Club meets every Monday at 5:30 p.m. at a local restaurant in Live Oak. Club needs players. Contact Diana at 904254-8923 for details. Grace Lutheran Church hosting education al prayer classes Would you like to learn more of Jesus? Do you have questions about the Christian faith? Are you going through a difcult time and seek Gods council? Classes starting soon, those who attend can do so to t their schedules best. Different class times will be available. Please contact Pastor Doug Priestap at Grace Lutheran Church Live Oak, 386-364-1851 or gracelutheranliv eoak@gmail.com Childrens Table Food Distribution The Childrens Table Food Distribution will be at Peace Baptist Church, 7794 S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL each Wednesday between 2:00-2:30. Bring a large laundry basket or other contain er to put food in. Donations will be accepted. For further information, 386-935-4681 Beginners AA meeting Beginners AA at Dowling Park meets Mon day-Wednesday-Saturday, 7 p.m. at The Lighthouse 23595 CR 250, Live Oak, 32060 For more information call 305-407-0895. www.LiveOakAA.com Live Oak Seed Library Every Wednesday from 1-3 p.m. Presented by the Suwannee County Master Gardeners. Check out seed packets and get all your gar dening questions answered at the Suwannee River Regional Library. 386-362-2317 GriefShare Support GriefShare is a pastor-supervised, lay-led, Biblically based, Christ-centered, video assist ed support group for persons who have lost loved ones or friends by death. The group will meet each Thursday at 10 a.m. beginning May 18 and run through August 10. This 13 week support program will be scheduled throughout the year on differ ent day and time to give those on varying personal schedules an opportunity to partici pate. All who have experienced the death of a loved one are cordially invited to become a participant in GriefShare. For more informa tion call 383-792-1122. Finding Your Roots? The Suwannee Valley Genealogy Society is the place to start! The library, located at 215 Wilbur Street SW near the football eld in Live Oak, is open to the public on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. to help you nd your ancestors. You do not have to be a member to use the library. Meetings are held on the rst Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the library. For further informa tion, including membership prices, call Jinnie Hancock at 386-330-0110 or email JinnieS VGS@windstream.net SREC, Inc. Senior Center weekly events The SREC, Inc. Senior Center, located at 1509 Martin Luther King Dr. SW in Jasper hosts weekly support counseling every Wednesday beginning at 10 a.m. and Bible study every Friday at 10:30 a.m. For more information, contact Barbara Daniels at 386-792-1136. Events are subject to change. Quilting Friends Each Tuesday from 9 a.m.-noon Jasper Public Library, 311 Hatley St. in Jasper. 386-792-2285 He Speaks to Me bible study for women He Speaks to Me, a Priscilla Shirer Bible study for women, will be held on Tuesdays from 9:30-11 a.m. beginning Jan. 17 at Pine mount Baptist Church on Hwy 129 in McAlpin led by Chaplain Judy. For more information, contact her at 364-5558. We hope to see you there! Suwannee River Church of the Nazarene schedule The Suwannee River Church of the Naza rene is located at 18763 SE CR 137 in White Springs. For more information, call 386-3972309. Sunday School9:45 10:45 a.m. Sunday Morning Service11 a.m. noon Afternoon PotluckNoon Sunday Evening Service6 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service6 p.m. TOPS #662 (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) Meets every Thursday. (8 a.m. for weighin, meeting at 9 a.m.) at Advent Christian Church, 911 Pinewood Ave., Live Oak, Fla. For more information, call Mary at 386-3302535. Branford Seed Library Every second and fourth Tuesday from 2:304:30 p.m. Presented by the Suwannee County Master Gardeners. Check out seed packets and get all your gardening questions answered at the Bran ford Public Library. 386-935-1556 TOPS #9798 TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) TOPS #9798 is a support group that offers weekly weigh-ins and programs. The pro grams provide participants with health and weight loss information. Those ready to achieve weight loss and wish for more information may call Barbara at 386-362-5933 or Dori at 386-658-2767. Mayo AA Group Located at the First United Methodist Church, meet every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday at 8 p.m. For more information, contact 386-294-2423 or 386-647-6424 AWANA Club New Hope Baptist Church, Mayo on Hwy. 51. From 6-8 p.m. and runs throughout the school year. Open to children ages two through sixth grades. For more information, call 386-294-2742. Grief Share GriefShare, a special support group for peo ple experiencing grief and loss, will be held on Wednesday evenings from 6-8 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Live Oak. The church is located at 401 W. Howard St. Childcare is provided. Please call the church at 386-3621583 if you would like to attend. Continued From Page 6B

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JULY 4 & 5, 2018 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT JASPER NEWS MAYO FREE PRESS PAGE 8B 2005 DODGE VIPER 2016 RAM 3500 CREW 4X4 6.7 CUMMINS DIESEL 888-304-2277 229-263-7561 888-463-6831 801 E. SCREVEN ST. | QUITMAN 12000 HWY 84 | QUITMAN 4164 N. VALDOSTA RD. | VALDOSTA 2006 TOYOTA SOLARA 2015 RAM 1500 QUAD 4X4 2016 RAM 1500 CREW 4X4 2010 BMW 135 I CONVERTIBLE 2014 CHEVY 1500 CREW LT 2015 CHEVY 1500 CREW 4X4 2016 CHEVY CAMARO CONVERTIBLE 2013 RAM TRADESMAN 2014 RAM 1500 CREW 4X4 2015 NISSAN ROGUE 2012 MINI COOPER 2011 KIA SORENTO 2017 NISSAN TITAN CREW 4X4 2008 LEXUS RX 400 HYBRID 2018 KIA SOUL 2015 LEXUS RX350 2013 NISSAN PATHFINDER 2012 FORD EXPLORER 2017 DODGE CHARGER SRT 2015 FORD FUSION 2010 HYUNDAI GENESIS 2016 HYUNDAI GENESIS 2012 RAM 1500 TRADESMAN 2014 CHEVY EQUINOX 2005 BMW 530 I 2015 CHEVY TAHOE LT 2016 CHEVY SUBURBAN 2005 RAM 1500 SLT 2014 FORD F-350 CREW 4X4 KING RANCH 2015 FORD F-350 CREW 4X4 KING RANCH 2016 FORD F-150 2014 FORD F-150 CREW FX4 2016 FORD F-150 CREW FX4 2015 JEEP WRANGLER SAHARA 2015 JEEP WRANGLER 2016 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 2014 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 2012 JEEP WRANGLER 2014 FORD EXPLORER LTD 2016 FIAT 500 2016 FORD F-350 CREW 4X4 KING RANCH 2013 CHEVY TAHOE LT 2011 DODGE DURANGO 2015 DODGE JOURNEY 2013 CHEVY TRAVERSE 2015 CHEVY SUBURBAN LTZ 2013 CHEVY TRAVERSE 2017 TOYOTA IM 2016 TOYOTA 4-RUNNER 2008 NISSAN XTERRA 2006 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER 2017 CHEVY 1500 CREW LTZ 2014 CHEVY 1500 CREW 4X4 2013 VOLVO XC60 2015 TOYOTA RAV4 2017 TOYOTA COROLLA 2015 NISSAN ALTIMA 2013 TOYOTA AVALON 2017 TOYOTA CAMRY 2014 TOYOTA CAMRY 2017 FIAT 124 SPIDER CONVERTIBLE 2010 JEEP WRANGLER 2016 RAM 2500 CREW 4X4 LONGHORN108819-1