Suwannee Democrat
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028422/00804
 Material Information
Title: Suwannee Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: J.E. Pound
Place of Publication: Live Oak Fla
Publication Date: 9/9/2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
weekly[ former <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
Coordinates: 30.294444 x -82.985833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note: Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000398954
oclc - 33273856
notis - ACE4563
lccn - sn 95026787
lccn - 95026788
oclc - 33273861
System ID: UF00028422:00804
 Related Items
Preceded by: Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by: Suwannee leader
Preceded by: Suwannee citizen

Full Text



Wednesday Edition September 9, 2009


124th YEAR, NO. 94 3 SECTIONS, 38 PAGES 50 CENTS
Serving Suwannee County since 1884, including Live Oak, Wellborn, Branford, McAlpin and O'Brien


--


* Page 1


-'cal news every day at suwanneedemocrat.com

Branford News

UPHILL BATTLE
Bill Procko had tried and failed twice to climb Mt.
1 Rainier. This time, he was doing it for his son Evan,
who suffers from a rare, deadly form of muscular
2A dystrophy. He wasn't about to let him down.
See Branford News, Page 7A. Photo: Submitted


10-year-old, mauled by dogs,


listed in good condition


Animals' owner injured
during rescue of child
By Jeff Waters is in good con
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com Shands UF after e


A 10-year-old boy
mauled by pit bulls Friday


edition at
emergency


surgery on his leg, a hospi-
tal spokesperson said.
Kaleb Patterson of


Suwannee County was at-
tacked by two dogs in a
,neighbor's yard, according
to sheriffs reports. The
dogs' owner, Shannon
Marie Sanders, suffered nu-
merous bites while rescuing
him from the animals, re-


ports show.
Sheriffs deputies Brian
Barrs and Kyle Descar-
reaux, dispatched to a 68th
Terrance residence around
6 p.m. in reference to a dog

SEE 10-YEAR-OLD, PAGE 12A


Councilman

Ken Duce

dead at 76
By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com

Live Oak City -<
Councilman Ken
Duce died early
Tuesday morn-
ing after a long '
fight with cancer. .
He was 76.
Duce repre- r -
sented the city's Ken Duce
District 3 for al-
most eight years before his death.
He had been a resident of Su% an-
nee Counts and Live Oak since
1980 when he transferred here
with Alltel as a commercial man-
ager. He worked for Alltel until
his retirement in 1993.
Live Oak Mayor Sonny Nobles
said the city lost a good represen-
tative.

SEE COUNCILMAN, PAGE 12A


Driver in

fatal crash

faces more

charges


By Jeff Waters
See more
Branford-area
news, Pages
7-9A.
Nico 1 e
Marie Sallas,
the 25-year-
old charged in.


5-
Nicole
Marie
Sallas


May with vehicular homi-
cide in the January death of
an 11-year-old girl, was ar-
rested again Sunday in con-
nection with the crash.
Sallas was charged with
driving with a suspended li-
cense resulting in death, ac-
cording to a report from the
Florida Highway Patrol.
Alyssa Jones was killed
on 89th Road near O'Brien
Jan. 10 while a front pas-
senger in a 2003 Pontiac
SUV driven by Sallas.
Jones, who was not wearing
a seatbelt, was ejected
when the vehicle over-
turned.
Sallas was also charged
with neglect of a child and
child neglect resulting in
great bodily harm.





6 ll 3015ll
6 97113 07520 1


Anxious parents flood Live Oak,
Branfordschools with questions


By Carnell Hawlhorne Jr. ,Democ
carnell ha~it',,rrEe@galir, ..,.S:r 'O the Pre
tion's s
Editor's note: Go to suiwan- Teac
needemocrat.com, or see Friday's School


Shrimp wrangling,
Suwannee-style
Suwannee High FFA students with instruc-
tors De Broughton, Travis Tuten and vol-
unteer Don Boyette spent time Tuesday
morning trudging through mud to retrieve
shrimp from a pond at the Suwannee High
Agricultural Farm. It was a team effort as
students dragged a 50-foot seine across
the.pond's bed while others stood with
hand nets and bare hands to pluck the
homegrown shrimp from the murky water.
The students hope to sell the shrimp lo-
cally and at the state farmer's market.
Photo- Carnell Hawthorne Jr.


crat for local reaction to
resident's address to the na-,
choolchildren.
hers at Suwannee Primary
I were busy Tuesday miom-


ing checking backpacks for notes
from parents who asked that their
child be exempt from viewing a
"Back to School" speech by Pres-
ident Barack Obama at noon.
"We have had a number of

SEE PRESIDENT'S, PAGE 12A


Swine flu

2 more cases

confirmed

in Suwannee
By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com

Two more cases of the
H1N1 virus (swine flu)
have been .laboratory con-
firmed in Suwannee Coun-
ty, the local health depart-
ment said Friday. The
count in Suwannee is now
five, with three cases con-
firmed at the end of July.
"We've had' t-Wo m6re
confirmed, cases," said
Suwannee County Health
Department administrator
Pamela Blackmon. She did
not release the age of the
victims.
Blackmon said the num-
ber of those with the virus
could be higher, but said
that with so many exhibit-
ing flulike symptoms, it is
hard to test everyone.
Blackmon said the de-
partment looks to offer
swine flu vaccinations here
in the coming weeks.

Still no

word on

Pilgrim's
Staff
There's still no word on
the possible sale of Pil-
grim's Pride to Brazilian
beef company JBS. The
Wall Street Journal report-
ed on its Web site last week
that JBS would buy Pil-
grim's Pride for $2.5 bil-
lion.
A Pilgrim's spokesman
declined comment.
JBS is one of the world's
largest beef producers. In
2007 it purchased the U.S.
meatpacking firm Swift and
Co.
Follow this story on our
Web site as it develops. Go
to suwanneedemocrat.com
for updates.


WeatherL, INSIDE TODAY
Arrest Record ...2A Suwannee Living .4A
Legal Notices ...5B Viewpoint ...... 6A
Obituaries ...... 13A Weather .... ...2B
High sports ...... 1-3B Classifieds special. ..
930 F section inside

www.suwanneedemocrat.com


. I


- Pholu Paul Buchanan SuwanneeSpons com
Above: Suwannee was hitting on all cylinders during
its regular season opener against Hamilton Friday
night in Jasper. The 'Dogs downed the Trojans 28-7.
See story, more Paul Buchanan photos, in Sports.
See special toolball poster inside. Right: The Bucs
won big in their regular season opener.
See Branford Sports, Page 8A.


A transcript of the speech was posted online yesterday at suwanneedemocrat.com.',

President's speech creates a

stir before it's delivered


V


, L p












ON THE FLIPSIDE


HOW TO REACH US

Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, wwwsuwanneedemocratcom
Mail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
* Publisher,
Myra Regan, ext 122


CONTACT US WITH

YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, call us at 386-562-1734
or visit our web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com



NEWSROOM
0 Editor,
Robert Bridges, ext. 131
Reporter,
Carnell Hawthorne Jr., ext. 134
Reporter,
Jeff Waters, ext. 133



ADVERTISING
Advertising Manager,
Monja Robinson, ext. 105
Sr. Advertising Representative,
Bill Regan, ext. 107 .
Advertising Representative,
Tami Stevenson, ext. 109
Telesales Ad Representative,
Nancy Goodwin, ext. 103
Classified/Legal,
Janice Ganote, ext. 102




CIRCULATION
Circulation Manager,
Angie Sparks, ext. 152
Circulation
Service Hours, M-F 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Subscription Rates,
In-county, $33 Out-of-county, $48






SIgnotrat





Serving Suwannee County Since 1884


The Suwannee Democrat, published
Wednesday and Friday.
Periodicals postage paid at
Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located
at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
FL. Publication number 530180.

"POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL
32064. Annual subscription rate is
$33 in county, $48 out of county and
$48 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.

OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday -'Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Letters, comments and opinions on
the Viewpoint & Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Suwannee Democrat.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters may be mailed, faxed or
e-mailed to our office. All letters are
read. Not all letters are published.
Letters may be edited to fit available
space. The editor should not alter the
writer's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
the point, an ideal range is 150 to
200 words. Please include your
name, address and day and evening
phone numbers for verification.
Letters MUST be signed. Letters to
the editor can be limited to one
letter per quarter per individual.


RANT & RAVE HOTLINE


Here's your chance to tell everyone what you
think! Callers may dial 208-8314 and leave a
message to express their thoughts, good or
bad, 24/7 about issues and politics, but not
about private individuals or businesses. If you
prefer, you may e-mail your comments to
robert.bridges@gaflnews.com. Your name is
not necessary, but please, .
take 30 seconds or less for ', \
your message.
SuwanrieL Cun, Part of
"The O0 .'.ua Florida" *i


Arrest Record


Editor's note: The
Suwannee Democrat
prints the entire arrest
record each week. If your
name appears here and
you are later found not
guilty or the charges are
dropped, we will be hap-
py to make note of this in
the newspaper when ju-
dicial proof is presented
to us by you or the au-
thorities.
The following abbrevi-
ations are used below:
SCSO-Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
LOPD-Live Oak Po-
lice Department
FDLE-Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforce-
ment
FHP-Florida Highway
Patrol
. FWC-Florida Wildlife
Commission
DOT-Department of
Transportation
OALE-Office of Agri-
cultural Law Enforce-
ment
P & P-Probation and
Parole
USMS-US Marshals
Service
.ATF-Department of
Alcohol, Tobacco .and
Firearms
DOC-Department .of
Corrections

September 3, Christina
Marie Gonzales, 20, 12938
116th Street Live Oak Fl,
grand theft iii spec prop, 1st
app pd appt wrs SCSO C.
Thomokins
September 3, Lisa M
Lopez, 28, 12910 US Hwy
90W Lot 18 Live Oak Fl,


fta o/c no valid d/1 LOPD-
D. Slaughter
September 3, John
William Haygood, 30,
17915 16th Terrace Live
Oak Fl, vop o/c agg batt
intended& burglary of
dwelling, 1st app pd appt
per wrs P&P-D. Cherry
September 3, Larry
James Vukas, 59, 1654
Hammond Blvd
Jacksonville FH, viol prob
o/c dwls/r, $5 000 or $500
cash p&p 1st app pd appt
per wrs SCSO-S. Law
September 3, James Earl
Tompkins, 68, 5908 264th
St Branford Fl, viol of
injunction, agg/batt
w/motor veh, dom/viol ror
revoked, agg assault dom
viol, per wrs no bond, no
bond SCSO-C. McInnis
September 3, Marilyn
Ann McKnight, 49, 415
Anna Avenue Live Oak Fl,
poss of cocaine, tampering
w/ evidence, intro
contraband corr fac LOPD
- C. Kinsey
September 4, Thomas
Earlton Burch, 49, 3308
256th Street O'brien FI,
battery domestic violence,
1st app pd appt wrs SCO D
Allen
September 4, Katherine
Collins, 41, 808 NW 2nd
Street Branford Fl, alachua
county wrt vop, fraud
insufficient funds SCSO D
Allen
September 4, Deanna
Marie Gillette, 35, 13540
Hwy 90W Lot 09 Live Oak
Fl, criminal use of
personal, identification
info pinellas county'wrt .
SCSO-M. Jelks


*07l E8iubishl .
wmlaut m ,
wa10s 5 ,
Ask about EASY-PAY LAY-A-WAYfl
Aet ready for Chrfstmasi
Wild Fire ATVs, Motorcycles, Dirtblke & Kids 4Wheelers

Fa Cl aranem o
881i0 St .--


September 4, Loretta
Irene Whistlar, 32, 11115
215th Terrace O'brien Fl,
worthless ck under $150
SCSO B Mincks
September 4, James
David Galloway, 29, Rt 3
Box 308 Mountsville, Wv,
west va wrt vop abscond
ohio wrt fta theft SCSO-K.
Osbom
September 4, Donald
Jeffery David, 49, 15037
61st Rd Welborn Fl., dui,
1st app n/pd appt wrs
SCSO-C. McIntyre
September 4, James
Watson Colvert, 50, 11492
75th Loop Live Oak Fl,
dui, 1st app n/pd appt wrs
FHP- B. Stuart
September 5, Lazaro T
Gazo, 47, 14056 SW 13th
Street Miami Fl, transport
uninspect fruit OALE-
M.Terill
September 5, Richard
Webb, 47, 13399 30th St
Live Oak Fl, retail theft,
1st app pd appt wrs SCSO
M Landis
September 6, William
Mcleod Kennedy, 30,
23015 45th Drive Lake
City FH, suw ctywrt o/c
burglary of
structure/conveyance
SCOS D Allen
September 6, Nicole
Marie Sallas, 25,25244 SR
129 Obrien Fl, dwls
death/serious bodily injury,
neglect of a child, child
neglect great bodily harm
SCSO-R. Rodriguez
September 6, Sherry
Denise Brown, 48, ,
Gadsden Correctional Inst
Quincey Fl, burglary of a
structure SCSO M. Jelks
September 6, James
Brendon Kirby, 19, 7315
152nd Street Live Oak Fl,
felony battery SCSO-T
Smith'
September 7, Cynthia
Rusinoyich Davis, 50,
20349 Lancaster Road Live
Oak Fl, agg assault, battery
on leo 3 cts, resist
w/violence SCSO C.
Tonipkins
September 7, Randy Lee
Pring, 21, 9143 240th.
Street Obrien Fl,
trespassing, aggravated
assault, throw deadly
missiles 3ct, 1st app/pd
appt wrs, throw deadly
missiles 2ct felony criminal
mischief SCSO-K.
Descarreaux
September 7, Elijah
Lawrence Wilson, 22, 4347


GRAD Y 'S Heg & A
|f AUTOMOTIVE i
5Mf W5 Howa SMet (US 90), UveOak
I a


284th Street Branford Fl,
trespassing, aggravated
assault, throw deadly
missiles 3ct, throw deadly
missiles 2ct, felony
criminal mischief SCSO-
K. Descarreaux
September 7, Ryan


Douglas Kolovitz, 20,
22049 133rd Lane Obrien
Fl, trespassing, aggravated
assault, throw deadly
missiles 3ct, throw deadly
missiles 2ct, felony
criminal mischief SCSO-
K. Descarreaux


Artist Guild presents 13th
annual Fine Art Exhibition
Art presented September 14-25
The 13th annual Fine Art Exhibition will be presented by
the Live Oak Artist Guild, September 14 through.Sep-
tember 25, at the Suwannee River Regional Library in
Live Oak.
Awards will include Best of Show, First, Second, Third
place, honorable mentions and purchase awards.
An opening day reception will be held on Sunday, Sep-
tember 13 from 2 pm to 4 pm at the Suwannee River Re-
gional Library. Music will be provided by the Suwannee
Trio. All participating artists, their guests, award sponsors
and general public are invited to attend.
Works shown will include painting, drawing, photogra-
phy and sculpture by artists from Live Oak, North Flori-
da and Georgia.
The community is encouraged to view this year's exhi-
bition; the show will be open during the library's daily
schedule. For more information, please call the Live Oak
Artist Guild Gallery at 364-5099 or go to LOAG.org.

Future Now at Melody
Christian
Sept. 9
Melody Christian Academy is hosting a Future Now
event on Sept. 9.
Future Now will be doing an afternoon assembly with
middle and high school students and will have a "Back to
School Bash" at 7 p.m. in the Revolution Club (next to
Melody Christian Center) that is open to the community.
Free event for the whole family.
For more information call 386-364-4800.

Quarterly Community Forum
at Suwannee Health Care

SEE BRIEFLY, PAGE 3A


Suwannee County Fire/Respue calls

for service from Aug. 30 to Sept. 5


Total calls for
service: 100

Medical Calls 85
Weakness: 9
Cardiac: 15
Trauma: 10
Motor vehicle crash: 6
Miscellaneous
medical call: 16
Altered mental status: 5
Respiratory: 10
Seizure: 1
Diabetic: 3


Abdominal pain: 3
Nausea/vomiting: 3
OD: 1
OB: 1
Death: 1
Cardiac arrest: 1

Fire Calls 15
Brush fire: 3
Motor vehicle crash: 4
Medical assist: 5
Vehicle fire: 1
Down power line: 1
Smoke investigation: 1

Volunteer fire
responses: 14


s CASH PLAY 4
Day Day
Conditioning 9/7/09.. 9,0,4 9/7/09 ...5,5,6,7
Night Night
3L c o9/7/09 2,3,6 9/7/09.. .0,6,3,5
FANTASY 5
9/7/09 ............ 1,6,12,13,19
MEGA MONEY. ... 2,6,26,27,5
LOTTO ....... 11,14,15,37,44,51


JAVA JAX and

the Suwannee


Terms and conditions apply. Applicable sales tax required. Rates are subject to change without notice.
o$S5.00 replacement key-card fee. 54431-F


Look for great
daily specials on
the board at
Java Jax

Regular Cup of
Coffee and a
Suwannee
Democrat



Only

Cal Ihe Suwannee

1Crao star,
Your ome
subs '-on ,od.ay
386-362-1734


#uwannre

Brmntrrat
211 Howard St. East
Live Oak
362-1734 500072-F


0SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNE SDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 2A







WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


THE SAFETY LINE

From Suwannee County Fire/Rescue




Hidden dangers at




emergency scenes


By Paul M. Haas
Suwannee County
Fire Marshal

Recently, Suwannee
County Fire Rescue
responded to a vehicle fire
north of County Road 132.
At this fire an event
occurred that reminded all
firefighters of safety first.
While approaching the
burning vehicle, two
sequential explosions
occurred within the
vehicle's interior. The first
explosion was the firing or
activation of the
passenger's side air bag
and was immediately
followed by a second
explosion from the driver's
airbag. Both airbags were
deployed or fired by the
heat of the fire within the
vehicle. The driver's side
airbag was blown out the
rear window of the car and
landed approximately 10
feet on the ground outside
of the car. The blue nylon
airbag was mostly intact
when it was projected out
of the car. The passenger's
airbag was blown into the
foam seating padding of the
passenger's seat. Thanks to
the protective gear worn by
the firefighters and their
tactical skills and training,
no one was injured.
This is another example
of the hazards faced on
emergency scenes. Hazards
not only to the firefighters'
fighting the fire but to any
civilians who could have
ventured into what we as
eni6knr e 'es'ponders call .
the hot zone or danger
zone. Emergency
responders take the oath "to
preserve and protect life
and property" very
seriously. The preservation
of life comes first and
foremost. This is why we
often secure an emergency
scene and limit access or
how close people are
allowed to be from the
scene. Every scene has the
potential for harm. It is that
potential for harm that must
be addressed first before
any tactical actions are
taken. So when you see
firefighters, police, or
emergency responders
setting up buffer zones or
limiting access to any
scene, this is the reason.
Often, emergency
responders do not have to
time to explain the what,
where, why, and how for an
incident. The reasons are
for your safety and ours.
Remember, in the State
of Florida failure to follow
the directions of both law
enforcement officers and
firefighters can result in
arrest and prosecution.
Florida Law also requires
that you move over for
emergency vehicles.
Florida's Move Over
Law
Protects law
enforcement officers,
emergency workers and
tow truck drivers stopped
along roadways while
performing their jobs;
Requires motorists to
move over when a patrol
car, emergency vehicle or
tow truck/wrecker is
stopped on the side of a
road with lights flashing. If
such movement cannot be
safely accomplished,
motorists shall slow down
to a speed of 20 mph below
the posted speed limit.
Motorists are required to:
Approach the
emergency vehicle with
caution;
Change lanes away


from the emergency
vehicle IF traveling on a
multi-lane roadway AND
able to move over safely;
OR
Slow down while
maintaining a safe speed of
20 mph below posted


speed limit being careful
NOT to impede or block
the flow of traffic unless
otherwise directed by a law
enforcement officer.
For more information,

SEE HIDDEN, PAGE 4A


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Continued From Page 2A

Sept. 10
Suwannee Health Care invites the
community to participate in its Quar-
terly Community Forum, set for
Sept. 10 at 6 p.m.
The guest speaker will be Webster
Baker, who will make a presentation
on wills and other healthcare op-
tions.
Hors d'oeuvres and refreshments
will be served so please RSVP by
calling 386-362-7860.

Hernando de Soto
and the Indians of
Suwannee County


Sept. 12
Saturday, Sept 12 from 9:45 a.m.
to 2 p.m. at Camp Weed. Cost -
$25.00 each, includes lunch. A com-
plete exploration of the period of
events leading up to and following
Hernando de Soto's expedition
through this county. A recent archeo-
logical discovery on the Camp Weed
property by the University of Florida
revealed that this was indeed where
de Soto's army (600 men and 200
horses) stayed on Sept 12, 1539. Join
us as we visit the site and search for
artifacts. Also present will be a horse
from the original Spanish breed, a
Galicino. A fun day for the family.
Please register for this event by call-
ing Camp Weed at 364-5250.


PAGE 3A


BRIEFLY








suwannee living


7/-77-


Wedding announcement

Captain James P Bertolino
and Laramie Lynn Ohms
^ ....~ I ",


-

Captain James P. Bertolino and Laramie Lynn Ohms
Captain James P. Bertolino and Laramie Lynn Ohms
wish to announce their marriage on August 31' at a civil
ceremony in Tallahassee, Florida. Laramie is the
daughter of Larry and Anessa Ohms of Cedar Rapids, IA
and Anthony and Kerry Harmon of Dowling Park, FL.'
James is the son of Reverend Paul and Barbara Bertolino
of Dowling Park, FL. The couple met in May 2008 after
he returned from his first tour of duty in Iraq. He will be
deployed.soon for a second tour in Iraq. Laramie was the
pianist at the Bixler Memorial Church at the Advent
Christian Village in Dowling Park. She currently attends
Florida State University in Tallahassee. The couple will
announce a time for a celebration for family and friends
after his return from Iraq.

SHS Class of 1969 Reunion
Suwannee High School Class of 1969 will hold their
40 year reunion at the Live Oak Train Depot October 10,
starting at 7 p.m. Please share this information with other
class members you see or have contact with.
This will be an awesome reunion for all who attend!
For details, contact Nelda Land Croft,at 386-362-1535.
We need a head count, so let us hear from you no later
than September 30.


WEDDING

* Woolard & Allen
Mr. Michael Woolard of Folks.ton Ga and Ms.
Kathy Woolard of Branford are pleased to announce
the upcoming marriage of their daughter Miss Karri
Ann to Mr. James Boyce Allen of Chiefland. James
is the son of Earlene Allen and the Late Harry Allen
of Cheifland.'
The wedding will take place on Saturday the 12,
lay of September at 5 in the afternoon at the First
Baptist Church of Branford. A reception will follow.
All family and friends are invited to attend.


SHS Class
f 1989

20th reunion
October 9-10, 2009
Contact Paula Gianeskis
McCullers
pgianeskis@msn.com
386-590-4385


Carroll Family
Reunion
The Carroll Family Re-
union will be held on Sep-
tember 19, 2009, beginning
at 4 p.m. at Philadelphia
Baptist Church Recreation
Hall.
Come bring a covered
dish. Meat, drinks and pa-
per goods will be provided.
For more information con-
tact Adel at 386-776-1325.


THE SAFETY
Fro m S " i" '


Hidden dangers at emergency scenes

Continued From Page 3A ... ..* ;. ,.


please visit www.flhsmv.gov/fhp
Specific provisions of the Move
Over Law can be reviewed under
Section 316.126(1)(b), Florida
Statutes. Available online at
www.leg.state.fl.us
For more information, contact the
Florida Highway Patrol, Office of
Public Affairs, www.flhsmv.gov/fhp or
850-617-2301.

r
RIGHT: Two secondary explosions oc-
curred with emergency personnel at
the, scene of this, recent Suwannee
County crash. No one was hurt.
Photo: Suwannee County Fife/Rescue


. ....... ...


Photo

Contest


L&~4 .5inuaince Demnorrat together with I
Fishing Tackle Outlet is sponsoring our very first
Fish Photo Contest.

Open to boys, girls and adults of all ages, and to
enter is simple.

Simply clip out the coupon, attach your very best fish
photo (you and the fish must be in the picture) --
and send or deliver it to The Suwannee -


Aug. 19 to

Sep. 16, 2009


'a,


Democrat at 211 Howard St. East, PRIZES WILL '
Live Oak, FL 32064. BE AWARDED 1

We're looking for the best photos. IN THREE
The fish car-be-large or small, funny, CANFEGORIES: :'
unusual, entertaining, whatever. --- ',
-- rget.l rh Photo
The decision of the judges will be final. & Fu4niet Photo '
Photos will be printed in "anieo"
The Suwannee Democrat. ( Undlei 12 yeori -,: "
-.. .,old photb '
Photos must be submitted no later than .dp ,
Sept. 16, 2009. 7 .

-Winner will be chosen Sept. 1,8, 2009.

FANTASTIC FISH .
PHOTO CONTEST -EF ." -a 2 week sample
"' -"" "- ''"annee Democrat
N a m e : "-'-*ti "" -" .. ... ": "
.ame .. ..' W TO YOU BY:
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NORTH FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Festival of Ars
NFCC Campus Madison, Florida


A fun-filled day celebrating the arts,
our community and the opening of
the 2009-2010 NFCC Artist Series
VANAVER CARAVAN presents:
25-Minute Workshops & Presentations
African Drumming Swing Dance
World Instruments International Songs for Children
TIMES: 10 a.m. 110:40 a.m. 111:20 a.m.
Funded in part by a grant from the Southern Arts Federation
in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts
and the Florida Department of Cultural Affairs.
Many local artists and organizations are
offering presentations and activities:
THE PARALOUNGE, INC. will have African Djembe drums
available for all ages to participate in rhythm exercises and drum
circles. Drums provided. Sessions Begin: 10:30 a.m. 11:30 p.m.
NFCC FINE ARTS AUDITORIUM (Bldg. 10):
10:30-10:50 a.m. --"Florida Cracker" Storyteller Butch Harrison
11-11:30 a.m. Becky's Dance Steps Studio presentation
11:35-11:55 a.m. Madison County Youth Choir
12-12:30 p.m. Excellence Dance Studio presentation
12:35-12:55 Monticello Opera House/The Opera House
Stage Co. "sneak peek" of Fiddler On The Roof
1-2 p.m. Guitarist Kenny Harper, classic rock concert
ALL DAY EVENTS (10 a.m.-3 p.m.):
NFCC Hardee Center for the Arts (Bldg. 11):
Works by local artists Marsha Pokomy and Ina Thompson
NFCC Bacot Art Gallery (Bldg. 9): Works by area artists
Kenny Harper. Jeff Byers, Charles Bell
NFCC Student Art Contest & Exhibit (11th Grade)
"Rock the Arts"-Junior Auxiliary of Madison County Children's
Art Activity: create your ovn unique and creative pet rock
Saint Leo University Free Popcorn
NFCC Art. Department Face Painting
Madison County Solid Waste and Recycling Department:
find out how you can help protect our environment
Sincerely Janr,.,ar. selling delcious Jamaican and
American dishes. including children's menu items
NFCC Artist Series Information Booth
NFCC COLIN P KELLY GYMNASIUM (Bldg. 12):
Planetarium Shows NFCC Science Department's portable
planetarium will be taking guests on a journey of the cosmos
10:20-11 a.m. 111:20 a.m.-12 p.m. 11-1:40 p.m. 12-2:40 p.m. i
850.973.1653 | WWW.NFCC.EDU
B 1 Ui I l 'i[ d NI 1


-r_ .- ,..


0SUWANNEE DEMlOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 4A


Barrett Lodge of

Live Oak fundraiser
Barrett Lodge of Live Oak hosted a scholar-
ship fund raiser on August 22, 2008. At this
time I would like to thank the businesses and
individuals who contributed to make this fund
raiser a success. Publix, Walmart, Winn Dixie
and Save-A-Lot groceries supplies gift certifi-
cates for food. Also, Old Tyme Barber Shop,
Suwannee Styles and Smart Styles supplies gift
certificates for hair care. The Not Brothers
Band provided music for everyone's enjoy-
ment and those members are Doyle
Carmichael, Walt Wilkinson, Danny and Lyn-
net Lyons, Richard Laster, Evan Spangler and
Jasper Lowder. Don and Freida Houser donated
cups, plates, condiments and desserts and well
as painted glassware. Danny and Lynnet Lyons
supplied tea.
There were many willing hands to help with
whatever needed to be done. I would like to
thank Wyatt and Charlene Clark, Danny and
Lynnet Lyons, Walt Wilkinson, Kitty. Ridenour,
Richard Laster, Evan Spangler, Doyle and Ann
Carmichael, Don and Freida Houser and Jasper
Lowder. You are appreciated for all your help
and support. Jerry L. Sattler, Worshipful Mas-
ter of Barrett Lodge.










suwannee living


Spirit of Christ Lutheran Church


helps CCS make a dream come true


Submitted
Spirit of Christ Lutheran
Church of Lake City
responded to the need of
Comprehensive
Community Services to
complete a pavilion over a
concrete pad in the
backyard of their daytime
activity center in Live
Oak. Comprehensive
Community Services is a
not-for-profit agency that
serves developmentally
and intellectually impaired
adults in North Florida.
The church had a
spaghetti dinner planned
so they added a live
auction to the evening's
program. More than 100
dinners were served, and
Chuck Maxwell,
professional auctioneer,
assisted by his wife, Judy,
brought in over $1,100 for
CCS. In addition to
providing matching funds'
for the spaghetti dinner,


Thrivent Financial for
Lutherans is adding an
additional $400 to the
CCS total. Many
businesses, church
members and friends from
Lake City and Live Oak
contributed items for the
auction.
"We're really excited by
the support that you all
gave us at the auction,"
said Bobbie Lake,


executive director of CCS.
"The turnout was great
and from my
conversations with many
of the people at the'
'spaghetti dinner, they'
were there because
someone invited them to
attend. What a great
ministry opportunity of
sharing a need of one
group with another. And
what about that auction. I


r
-4:



.-" -W


H'


was really impressed by
the hand crafting abilities
of many of the
contributors. Bird houses,
handcrafted knives,
paintings, quilts and more
- such talent, and all home
grown."
As a result of the efforts
of Spirit of Christ, CCS
will now be able to make
their dream of the pavilion
a reality.



LEFT:
June Branch in
kitchen preparing
spaghetti dinner.
ABOVE:
.Chuck and Judy
Maxwell running
the auction.
RIGHT:
.. Judy and Wayne
Anderson enjoying
the evening.
Photos: Submitted


0


Deputy Donald
F. Gambel

September 5, 2009

Deputy Donald. F.
Gambel of the
Dixie County
Sheriffs Department, "Mr.
Don," passed away Sep-
tember 5,' 2009 at his
home with his family at
his side. He was 69.
Mr. Gambel served in
the United States Army-
Reserve. He worked for 30
years at PCS as a leader
man, working on heavy
equipment, before retiring'
in 2001. He also worked
as a reserve officer for the
Suwannee County Sher-
iff's office. After moving a
to Steinhatchee, from Live,
Oak, in 2001 he became a
deputy for the Dixie
County Sheriffs office. He
was currently serving as
bailiff.
Don attended the Stein-
hlatchee United Methodist
Church in Jena, Fla.
His greatest pleasure


was family get-togethers
and air boating, fishing
and jeep riding with his
kids and grandkids. He
was the heart and soul of
our family and will be
sorely missed.
He is survived, by his
wife of 50 years, Charlotte
Gambel of Steinhatchee;
sons, Scott (Penny) Gam-
bel of Live Oak, Steve
(Darlene) Gambel of
Irvine, CA, and Seth
(Dena) Gambel of Lake
City; daughter, Stacey
(Jay) Etheridge of Pen-
sacola; sister, Marilyn
Schoenborn of Oldsmar,
Fla., 8 grandchildren and 5
great grandchildren.
A memorial.service will
be held Wednesday, Sep-
tember 9, 2009 at 2p.m. at
the Rick Gooding Funeral
Home Chapel with Rev.
Glenda Brayman officiat-
-ing.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions can be made to the
American Cancer Society.
Arrangements have
been placed under the care


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Please sign the
online guestbook. Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.com
and click on obituaries


Muriel L. Richards
December 21, 1925 -
September 5, 2009

-uriel L.
Richards, 83 ,
passed away
Saturday September 5.,
2009 in the Lafayette
Health Care Center, Mayo


Florida, following a long
Illness.
Mrs. Richards was Born
December 21, 1925 in
Chicago Illinois and
moved to Mayo two years
ago from Branford, FL.
She was a retired telephone
operator with 30 years of
services with Illinois Bell
in Chicago Illinois and
AT&T in Florida .She was
also a member of the
Branford Church of God,
Branford, FL.'
Her hobbies were
sewing, cooking and ball -
room dancing and she
loved her Lord Jesus Christ
and lived by Psalm 23, it


ICS CREMATION &
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Survivors include one
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, Glenn Richards of
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Tommy Richards of
Branford, FL., Six
Grandchildren, Dillon
Richards Leanna :
Richards, Tommy
Richards, Jr., Tanner
Richards, Savanah
Richards and Lucas
Richards.
Graveside services will
be conducted Thursday
September 10, 2009 at
2:00 pm in Oak Grove


Memorial Cemetery with
Rev. Dale Dansby
officiating. Visitation will
be from 12:00 1:45 pm
Thursday at the funeral
home.
Daniels Funeral Homes
and Crematory, Inc.
Branford, FL.,in charge of
arrangements.

Please sign the '
online guestbook. Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.com
and click on obituaries


More Obituaries, Page 13A


Jllgna/8a ~k


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A


PAGE 5A


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Al


1


~-- -~~-~~ ~_-~_


Hill
.8..











Viewpoints/Opinions


BIBLE VERSE

"Teach me to do your will,
for you are my God; may
your good Spirit lead me on
level ground."
Psalm 143:10






4 rnotrnrat







MYRA C. REGAN ROBERT BRIDGES
Publisher Editor

Members of the Suwannee Democrat editorial board
are Myra C. Regan, publisher, and Robert Bridges,
editor. Our View, which appears in Friday's editions
of the Democrat, is formed by that board.







The joy of


gardening

By Jim Holmes
Well, it's that time of year again when a lot of
Suwannee Valley residents will give home garden-
ing yet another shot, planting mustard, collards and
other cool weather crops. '
My wife and I have put in our share of veggie
plots and we have come to the conclusion that for
most of us, gardening should be considered a sport
rather than a hobby. You see, there are two sides;
The Gardener versus an all-star team of players
fielded by Mother Nature, including ravenous
bugs, seemingly indestructible weeds, drought,
flood and plant diseases galore.
And if that isn't enough, then there are the-deer,
who I have determined are a lbt smatter than I will
ever be. That's because, no matter what deterrent I
come up with, they thwart it. (The most recent was
a friend's suggestion I use bars of Zest soap to re-
pel them. As it turned out, the soap was an hours
d'oeuvre before the deer moved on to the main
course.)
But please, don't think I'm opposed to home gar-
dening. If you like the out-of-doors, plenty of ex-
ercise -- some of it backbreaking -- and most im-
portantly the taste of really fresh fruits and veggies,
give it a try.
On the other hand, don't expect your home gar-
den to save any money. My wife and I joke, that if
we were commercial farmers, our mission state-
ment would read, "Spending More to Grow Less!"
With today's mega-farms and cheap, foreign com-
petition, I don't think there's any way to save mon-
ey with a backyard garden plot.
But those of us who enjoy gardening won't give
it up. We are a stubborn lot ... and perhaps not as
.bright as we should be. Let me give you an exam-
ple.
Before coming here three years ago, I spent
nearly all of my life in Fort Pierce, where citrus
was kiag for decades, until landowners figured out
that growing condos a heck of a lot more prof-
itable -- and much easier -- than nurturing oranges
or grapefruit. When we first moved up here, we
thought backyard citrus trees were a thing of the
past, until we learned about the Satsuma Mandarin
orange tree that the experts say can survive tem-
peratures in the 20s.
So for old times' sake, we planted one ... and I
have petted that little tree as if it,were my child!
When it needed fertilizer, it got the best. When it
was dry, it was watered. And aphids, look out! If I
find you on my little satsuma, you will die!
This past winter -- when we were facing tem-
peratures in the teens -- I even raced out and with
PVC pipe and plastic sheeting built my little bud-
dy its very own mini-greenhouse. And if that was-
n't enough, I put a heat lamp under the plastic.
Heck, there were mornings when I suspect my
house was colder than that tree.
And for all my efforts, I now have a beautiful
crop ... of a single orange!
Mind you, it's a lovely little orange, assuming of
course, some bug hasn't gotten to it while I'm in
here writing this. In fact, I hope to be able to enter
it at the next county fair ... if I can just convince
them to create a new category, "The Most Expen-


sive Piece of Fruit Ever Grown in Suwannee Coun-
ty!"

Please address letters to:
Letters To The Editor,
Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Please include your full name, address and daytime
phone number. We ask this so we can verify your letter
and discuss any questions about it with you.


OPI


Inflation a
With the massive increases in
federal spending, inflation is one
of the risks that .awaits us. To
protect us from the political dem-
agoguery that will accompany
that inflation, let's now decide
what is and what is not inflation.
One price or several prices rising
is not inflation. Increases in
money supply are what consti- D
tute inflation, and a general rise BY WALT]
in prices is the symptom. As the
late Nobel Laureate Professor Milton Friedman said,
"(I)nflation is always and everywhere a monetary phe-
nomenon, in the sense that it cannot occur without a more
rapid increase in the quantity of money than in output."
Thinking of inflation as rising prices permits politicians
to. deceive us and escape culpability. They shift the blame
saying that inflation is caused by greedy businessmen, ra-
pacious unions or Arab sheiks. Instead, it is increases in
the money supply that cause inflation, and who is in
charge of the money supply? It's the government operat-
ing through the Federal Reserve Bank and the U.S. Trea-
sury.
Our nation has avoided the devastating hyperififlations
that have plagued other nations. The world's highest infla-
tion rate was in Hungary after World War II, where prices
doubled every 15 hours. The world's second highest infla-
tion rate is today's Zimbabwe, where last year prices dou-
bled every 25 hours, a rate of 89 sextillion percent. That's
89 followed by 23 zeros. Our highest rate of inflation oc-
curred during the Revolutionary War, when the Continen-
tal Congress churned out paper Continentals to pay bills.
The monthly inflation rate reached a peak of 47 percent in
November 1779. This painful experience with inflation,
and collapse of the Continental dollar, is what prompted
the delegates to the Constitutional Conveption to include
the gold and silver clause into the United States Constitu-
tion so that the individual states could not issue bills of
credit. The U.S. Constitution's Article I, Section 8 permits
Congress: "To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and
of foreign Coin, and fix the Standard of Weights and Mea-
sures."
The founders of 6ur nation feared paper currency be-


NION


nd deficits
A cause it gave goN
means to steal fron
INORJ Try When inflation is i
as it so often is, their
VIMEW bution of wealth froi
debtors. If you lend


2009 Creators Syndicate
ER WILLIAMS


vernment the
i its citizens.
unanticipated,
re's a redistri-
m creditors to
me $100. and


over the term of the loan prices
double, I pay you back with dol-
lars worth only half of the pur-
chasing power they had when I
borrowed the money. Since infla-


tion redistributes (steals) wealth
from creditors to debtors, we can identify inflation's pri-
mary beneficiary by asking: Who is the nation's largest
* debtor? If you said, "It's the U.S. government," go to the
head of the class.
Inflation is just one effect of massive increases in
spending. Some might argue that future generations of
Americans will pay for today's massive budget deficits.
But is there really a federal budget deficit? The short an-
swer is yes, but only in an accounting sense -- but not in
any meaningful economic sense. Let's look at it. Our GDP
this year will.be about $14 trillion. If 2009 federal expen-
ditures are $3.9 trillion and tax receipts are $2.1 trillion,
that means there is an accounting deficit of $1.8 trillion. Is
it the Tooth Fairy, Santa or the Easter Bunny who makes
up the difference between expenditures and revenue? Is it
a youngster who is born in 2020 or 2030 who makes up
the difference? No. If government spends $3.9 trillion of
our $14 trillion GDP this year, of necessity it has to force
us to' spend privately $3.9 trillion less this year. One
method to force us to spend less privately is through taxa-
tion. Another way is to enter the bond market and drive up
the interest rates, which put a squeeze on private invest-
ment in homes and businesses. Then there is inflation,
which is a sneaky form of taxation.
Profligate spending burdens future generations by mak-
ing them recipients of a smaller amount of capital and
hence less wealth. N
Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at
George Mason. University. To find out more about Walter
E. Williams and read features by other Creators Syndicate
writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www.creators.com.


I tmmiz
ARM sw ""


GUEST COLUMN


By gosh it was
Dwain Walden .
I don't know why they have a "bad
writing contest" every year in San Jose,
"Calif. What I meafi is, you can go into
any video store in the country and find I"
numerous scripts, interspersed with ex- !
ploding jugulars and flaming vehicles,
that would qualify for the final round of .
"bad writing."
I get really frustrated when I seek out a good movie and
most of what I find are flicks about chainsaw massacres
and snakes that swallow small boats. You see, it's much
more difficult to write about plausible events. The reason:
Someone can check out the plausibility.
Now back to the bad writing competition. It's a parody
of course. It's all based on the 1830 novel "Paul Clifford"
with the infamous opening line, "It was a dark and stormy
night," so often noted as the worst ever opening line in a
published povel. It was written by Lord Edward Earle
Lytton.
Now Miss Grace Puckett, my high school English
teacher, would have set her steely eyes upon me should I
have handed her such -prose. She would have expected
something like: "Shards of lightning laid open the mid-
night, revealing in its powerful illumination a row of live
oaks along the bayou's edge." This is assuming, of course,
I was writing a story about a manhunt in the backwaters
of Louisiana.
I've never read "Paul Clifford," so I really do not know
the context of that infamous opening line. Everything is
relevant. The novelist's great-great grandson might write
a sequel as a rebuttal and begin it with, "By gosh it was a
dark and stormy night. You would have to have been
there."


dark and stormy
I guess I'm curious now. I'll probably read some of this
book. So what follows the fact that it was pitch black and
raining like a giant spitting on a flat rock?
The "bad writing contest" asks the competitors to give
an opening line to a make-believe novel. In other words,
it's not a povel at all, therefore the contest itself is a bit
out of context.
Anyway, here's the winning entry:
"Folks say that if you- listen real close at the height of
the full moon, when.the wind is blowin' off Nantucket
Sound from the nor' east and the dogs are howlin' for no
earthly reason, you can hear the awful screams of the
crew of the 'Ellie May,' a sturdy whaler Captained by
John McTavish; for it was on just such a night when the
rum was flowin' and, Davey Jones be damned, big John
brought his men on deck for the first of several scream-
ing contests."
When I read that, it actually sounded a little like Mark
Twain. So there might be a symposium on: "Could Mark
Twain sell in today's market?"
But to qualify my remarks, I don't claim to be an Ernest
Hemingway. I've never written a book about an old man
catching a big fish out on the sea (The Old Man and the
Sea).
I could, however, knock out a short story about some
country boys huddled waist deep in tannic water under
the Turkey Creek Bridge late one afternoon. They
clutched the staffs of their seine like a group of teenagers
slow dancing, while the game warden relieved himself
from six feet over their heads. (The Young Boys and The
Creek) And that's not even fiction.
(Dwain Walden is editor/publisher of The Moultrie
(Ga.) Observer, 229-985-4545. E-mail:
dwain. walden@gaflnews.com)


0SUWANNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 6A









WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 7A


Branford News
Serving southern Suwannee County, including Branford, O'Brien and McAlpin


, C,


Bill Procko scales


Mt. Rainier in an


effort to save his son


By Stephenie Livingston
stephenie.lIivingston@gaflnews.com

.As.he made his way
back down Mt.
Rainier, the joy he
felt at the summit
abandoned him.
The euphoria of finally reaching
the top on his third try vanished,
and he began to sob quietly behind
his goggles. He was thinking of
Evan's leg braces;
Reaching the top of Mt. Rainier
filled Bill Procko with hope that
one day researchers will find a
cure for Duchenne muscular dys-
trophy, the rare disease that afflicts
his son Evan and 25,000 other
boys around the nation. However,
reality set in as he began his de-
scent. If a cure is not found, Evan,
who just learned to hold his breath
under water and dreams of skydiv-
'ing when he's older, will be in a
wheelchair by the time he's 12. By
15 he'll have.to use a night ventila-
tor because the muscles around' his,
heart and respiratory system will
have deteriorated. If he's lucky,
he'll make it to his early 20's.
But what Bill thinks of the most
is how his wife Kimberly tip-toes
into Evan's room at night after he's
asleep and quietly slips on leg
Braces meant to keep'his tendons.
.franm fightiening.
"Fifteen minutes in descent I
, started to lose iL I got really sad."
said Bill only hours after returning
.to Biranford from Seattle, Wash.
"When-you're up there it's such an
explosive high. But coming back
down, it's back to reality. I started
Thinking.abolit Evan."
Bill's voice cracked and his light
blue eyes, the same as Evans,


filled with tears. "His braces. He
just really doesn't want to wear
them. He knows his older brother
(Billy) doesn't have to wear them."
"He feels really self-conscious
about his braces and when we have
to stretch his legs," said Kimberly.
"One.night he said 'I wish I was
Billy'. Billy heard, though, and he
knew the perfect thing to say. He
said, 'Well, Evan, I wish I was you.
You won the' game tonight in Can-
dy Land'."
On the day of the summit, the
climbers fought against the clock
in the face of an approaching
weather system. During the first
10,000 feet to base camp, the
group of 12 encountered dangerous
60-degree ascents, falling pumice
and deep crevasses.
"The climb, to base camp felt like
other whole mountains I have
climbed." said Bill. Short after
reaching Camp Muir, a violent
avalanche of pumice covered the
planned trail to the summit. "We
heard the rumbling," said Bill.
"Suddenly huge plumes of rocks
and dust covered our pass." Half of
the group was ready to quit. "I re-
member one of the climbers say-
ing. 'Bill. I'm a father'." said
Procko, who recounts the experi-
ence as one of the most difficult
and frightening of his life. After a
.sleepless rest, the team set out
:around midnight on the second day
to climb the 14,410-foot summit.
Roped together in teams and by the.
light of headlamps, they braved the
Cowlitz Glacier above Camp Muir.
On the traverse of the Cowlitz
Glacier, which leads to Cathedral
Rock (which accesses Ingraham
Glacierl. the winds suddenly
picked up. Bill. wearing, a picture


SINk


Bill Procko sends a message to the world from the summit of Mt. Rainier. Photo: Submitted


of Evan around his neck, and the other
climbers were hit with gusts of wind
mixed with ice and pumice. which one
climber said had them "reeling like
drunken sailors."
The cold was considerable as well.
Bill says at one point he pulled out a
Snickers for a snack. "It was frozen so
solid I couldn't even hammer it into
pieces," he said. At that point, post of
the six who vould eventually turn back,
already had. Then things got really rough.
"One creasse was what I called 'The
Jumping Board'," Bill laughed. "It was-a
wide, deep crevasse. I was the last man
on my team to have to jump it. I sort of


just closed my eyes and went for it. It
was so dark I couldn't see anyway."
Six of the 12 reached the summit at
sunrise, including Bill. But with the
winds ever increasing, the victory was-
short lived. "The weather was going .
downhill only 10 minutes after summi;"
said Bill. The team had to quickly .
scramble to take group photographs. B
also paused to take a picture with his "
banners for both Evan and" Billy. 'It was '"
really amazing," Bill said of reaching the.
summit. "It was my third try and of all U
the important times, this was it."

SEE UPHILL, PAGE 8A


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el l -.4,40" .-

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Crossing an icy snowfield en route to the 14410 foot summit of Mt. Rainier in Washington. Photo: Submitted


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


ESUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 7A


. *,,.r.. '" .


P H-


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P SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


Branford News


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WK4
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--...-...- ..-.-- .. .._.,
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Somethingfor everyone


Suwanmnr rrmorai
Covering Suwannee County, including Branford.

211 Howard St. East, Live Oak, FL 32064 (386) 362-1734
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For-v to' ~**:

'4 ., a. .


UPHILL BATTLE


Continued From Page 7A

After the 9,000-foot descent, re-
sponses ranged from "brutal" to "that
was awesome." And Bill was sure to
fulfill Evan's only request.
"Evan's one request for the entire
climb was that I pee in the snow for
him," said Bill.
"I was really worried about him,"
Kimberly said while sitting next to Bill
in their Branford gym only hours after
Bill returned home. "He had this really
strong desire to make it. He wanted to /
make a point for people to understand
what's going on with our son. I knew it ,
was dangerous. There was a point
where I just wanted him to come back
home. I said 'I need you. I can't do this
on my own'."
"There was an entire team lost on
Mount Rainier in 1980. Nothing's pre-
dictable on that mountain," said Bill:.
"His first words to-me were 'Well,
I'm still, alive," laughed Kimberly.
Before the climb, Bill committed to
raising $14,000 for Duchenne's re-
search. He had gotten close to his goal
before the climb. "There were a lot of
no's," said Bill of his fundraising ef-
forts for Duchenne's. "Sometimes there
was just silence. But in the end, people
came through. It was so poetic. While
on the mountain I found out someone
had donated and my goal was
reached."
Altogether, the climb raised
$120,000 for Duchenne's research.
"People should know 10 dollars, 20
dollars. To me it's like ten votes, twen-
ty votes that my son may live," said
Kimberly.
The Prockos say Evan is completely
unaware of what may await him.
"He seems relatively normal now,
but everyday he continues to get weak-
er," said Kimberly. "His disease is 100
percent fatal. That's a certainty unless
there's a cure. It's the slow wasting
away of a beautiful boy. It's a death
sentence."
However, Kimberly says their goal is
to leave people who hear their story
with hope.
"What we want people to see is that
there's hope for a cure," she said.
"Whether we're speaking out or climb-'
ing mountains. We do it so people will
jump on our bandwagon of hope."
When hope is lost, people become in-


active, said Bill. And Duchenne re-
search looks promising with a success-
ful trial of a new treatment announced
in the Netherlands the day Bill returned
to Branford by a company sponsored
by CureDuchenne. The Prockos say a
lack of funding is the only reason a
cure has not already been found.
Until that cure is found, the Prockos
cherish every funny moment, each
family vacation, all of Evan's mile-
stones, because they know it, may be'
the last, or one of the few times it will
happen quite that way.
"Right now I can carry him on my
back up a mountain, but what about
next year?, What about when he's too
big for me to carry?" said Bill.
"We won't go without him," said
Kimberly. "In a really surreal way,
everything we do together is more im-
portant. There's no guarantee that we're
going to be able to do that again."
"It's like a powerful wave you can't
hold back," said Bill.
Still, Bill and Kimberly stand strong
against the wave. They lean on each
other. When one is about to break from
the pressure, the other is there for sup-
port. However, the tears in their eyes
are constant reminders of the stress
they are under, despite their optimism.
"We were more happy," Kimberly said
of her and Bill before Evan's diagnosis.
"We've been very sad."
"Seventy-five percent of our time is
spent coming up with ways to save
Evan's life. Twenty-five percent of our
time is spent coming up with ways to
save our sanity," said Bill.
What bothers Bill the most is worry-
ing that Evan might one day have to
learn of his fatal disease. At night, Bill
lies in bed with Evan until he falls
asleep and watches him gaze at the
glow-in-the-dark planets on his ceiling
in pure wonderment.
"He falls asleep thinking everything
is wonderful with everything ahead of
him," said Bill. "And I'm just lying
there with a sick stomach."
"You have this secret in your head as
you smile and laugh and play with him
that he doesn't know," said Bill. "What
keeps us going is that maybe he'll nev-
er have to know."
"I'm gonna climb Mount Rainier
when I get old," Evan said on the way
home from school the day Bill reached
the summit.


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LASSFIED- s 9'iu#e emoral
--'LOTS' OBF AMGE



wr everyone


PAGE 8A


IN


f.-








Branford News


Alleged brick-throwing incident lands 3 in jail


By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com
Three south county men were arrested Monday on
charges ranging from trespassing to throwing deadly mis-




Bucs 1


Wolve4

But Coach B

sees room for
By Stephenie Livingston
:.ieplierne h'.irlgsrlri jl lnrne':,.:. ,:.l.rl
The Buccaneers dominated the Wolves of St. Fran-
cis 42-7 Friday night in Gainesville The Noung Bran-
ford rushed for 136 yards and passed for 40. Still,
Coach Bill Wiles says his team has some kinks to work
out.
"The team played %with good effort, but made \\a.
too many mistakes." said Wiles. "We have got to learn
to practice with a purpose and then go oul on Frida)

COIN TOSS


a4


siles, according to probable cause reports from the Suwan-
nee County Jail.
The reports allege that 20-year-old Ryan Douglas
Kolovitz, 21-year-old Randy Lee Pring and 22-year-old
Elijah Lawrence Wilson took several bricks from an aban-




-allop


s 42-7

lill Wiles still

improvement
and execute well. Right now, we are still competing for
playing time at certain positions due to lack of execu-
tion. That should not be the case at this point in the sea-
son. especially .ith some of our gu. s that have expe-
nrence."
Bucs John Perry, Trent Thomson and Kyle Certain
all scored touchdowns. Saint Francis returned a fumble
90 \ ards for its lone score.
"M. expectation level for this team is high. There-
fore. I expect more than we are getting at this point."
said Wiles.


5.' 4~-.d5
5,
9,


"a


.5 .. -J I-


The Bucs dominated the St. Francis Wolves Friday in Gainesvlle. Photo Submirned


Byrd's Power Equipment
q Sales & Service
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--C- --~-L I I II I la


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


0SUWANNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE OAK_


PAGE 9A


'' I"


doned house on 39th Drive around 11:10
p.m. Sunday night. Kolovitz, of 22049
133rd Lane, O'Brien, reportedly drove the f
three to 288th Terrace. Kolovitz, along .
with Pring, of 9143 240th Street, O'Brien, '. .
and Wilson, of 4347 284th Street, alleged-
ly walked to a driveway with Pring and Ryan Douglas
Wilson carrying bricks. Reports allege that Kolovitz
Kolovitz stood watch at the driveway while
- the other two walked into the yard and
threw one brick through the window of a !'
truck and two through the window of a '
camper. The three then reportedly drove ,. ,
from the scene. .
About 20 minutes later, deputies were 4"'P
called to a residence at 4100 288th Street. Randy Lee
Once there, it was determined that a brick Pring
had been thrown through the rear window
of a van and into a bedroom window at the
residence. A report by deputy Jake Brooks, '
indicated the bricks were similar to the '
ones collected from the previous scene. "
Brooks further reported that photographs of
shoe patterns near a set of tire tracks in the
driveway match those of the defendants. Elijah
The three were later arrested around 2 Lawrence
a.m. Monday by deputy Kyle Descarreaux Wilson
after a caller advised dispatch that the three
were trespassing at a residence on 129th
Road. The caller told authorities that. several shots were
fired at him as he followed them. Sheriffs deputies
stopped the vehicle shortly thereafter. Reports state that
Kolovitz admitted going to the property on 129th Road
and to firing a gun three times into the air near the caller.
Pring allegedly said he wouldn't talk without a lawyer
present and Wilson stated he was in the car and saw
Kolovitz retreive a gun from his house and fire it in the
direction of the caller three times.
The three were arrested and charged with trespassing,
aggravated assault, five counts of throwing deadly mis-
siles and felony criminal mischief.

SUWANNEE RIVER READINGS
Branford 2009





The water levels provided here refer to the height at the US Hwy. 27 bridge
in Branfoid in feet above mean sea level (ft-msl) at the gauging station. In
the past the levels were read as gauge height not mean sea level.
Sept. 2,'09 11.14 Sept. 5,'09 11.19
Sept. 3, '09 11.06 Sept. 6,'09 11.18
Sept. 4, '09 11.17 Sept. 7, '09 11.06
Sept, 8, '09 11.02
Sponsored By:

SCAFF'Ssupermarket
Branford 386-935-1527
525103-F








PAGE 1OA U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


s5 oU FREE Coupons
0 t | Times are tough for everyone and we're
S/' here to help! Log on to
;, www.suwanneedemocrat.com today and
SAVE 5O scroll down to coupons section. Click the
,. link and follow the instructions. Coupons
': : will be available to print and use.-As an
extra value, you can access recipes at the
same site. Cool huh!
522163-F


Now THAT'S Something

To Smile About!


Thank you for submitting this week's SMILE photograph!
Submit your photo for publication to:

SuuwanTnu jErmnrrat
P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 :0__.


' ' '''T
i. ; r ;* :*


Stormy weather?
Check out the weather radar on
our homepage at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.


When bad weather is on the
horizon, the weather radar
appears to keep you in touch
on top of things. While you're
there. click the weather link.


an
di


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522F


Looking for a job?
suwanneedemocrat.com is here to
help. Log on today and click the
monster.com link on our homepage.
Here you'll find a search tool to
help you find the job you've been
'looking for, also on Monster is career
advice and on the job information too!


What can you get for the price of a diet coke a day?
Use of a Pool, Jacuzzi, and Sauna
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0t SUVMrNNEE DEMIOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 10A







WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 SLJWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE hA


I CI


Lt SPECIALTY STORE
108 Howard Street East
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-208-1316
www.mchales.us
email: store@mchales.us.


,. Reflections,,
W.. Here customer service is our "
#1 priority .,
*" Cut/St\ie Highlight .
.* 3 Wa 1 ing
Packages staleProduct as low as
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101 Sti'm annee A\e.. Live Oak
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YourLocalAuthorizedDIRECTVDealer .....
(CALL TODAY!
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ANDY'S SATELLITE
386-364-1832 iI
Your Local Authorized DIRECTV Dearer .f itun


2nd Annual

RAILROAD DAYS
September 14-19
OPEN HOUSE
Monday 6-9 p.m. Refreshments
HobO Night -Thursday 6-8 p.m.
Contest for Best Dressed Hobo
Vendors Entertainment
Special Events BBQ Cook-Off
R.R. Shop, Swap 'N Show Hobo Night
Vendor Space Available call 362-1776
Entertainers Welcome call 590-6487
Registration forms and information
available at www.suwanneemuseum.org
386-362-1776
Hwy. 129 Live Oak


SUWANNEE HEALTH

CARE CENTER


We're not just a
nursing home.
After a stay in the
hospital, our full time
therapists and high tech
modalities can help get
you on your feet and
back at home.


I Services Provided:
Physical Therapy
Occupational Therapy
Speech Therapy
Skilled Nursing
S* .Out Patient Therapy
Clinic

1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Phone: 386-362-7860
'" -- ______________53609g-F


PAGE 11A


WEDNElESDAY. SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


jj- SUWANNaLEE DEMIOCRAT/LIVE OAK










PAGE 12A U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


Former

Wal-Mart

employee

arrested for

fraud, theft
By Carnell Hawthorne Jr.
A former
employee of
Wal-Mart in
Live Oak was
arrested and
charged Thurs-
day with third Christina
degree grand Marie
theft after she Gonzalez
was allegedly
caught stealing
more than $2,500 over the
course of month's time.
Christina Marie Gonza-
lez, of 12938 116th Street,
was jailed after a warrant
was issued for her arrest.
According to a sheriffs
report, Gonzalez had been
under investigation by store
security personnel from
May 28 to June 24. During
that time, while working as
a customer service clerk,
Gonzalez conducted fraud-
ulent refunds and loaded
Wal-Mart cash cards, store
security told police. At one
point, Gonzalez was ob-
served taking money direct-
ly from a cash register and
sticking it in her pocket,
one employee reported.
Altogether, Gonzalez al-
legedly stole $2,515.78.


Hearing

Aids


Buy
Get


One
One


~H e
FOR




330-2904

205 Houston Ave. NW
Li\ e Oak


Awakening America

on Sept. 11
Awakening America, Friday at noon on the court-
house steps in Live Oak. County officials, law en-
forcement officials and pastors will be praying.
Come pray for revival and reformation in our coun-
try. All are invited. There will be special music.
Their link in the news gives updates: www.awak-
eningamerica.com.
For more information contact Carol Hudging, 935-
2997, carollew@windstream.net.


Woman arrested after

throwing knife at

store clerk, say police


By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com

A '50-year- .i-
old Live Oak
woman was ,
arrested Mon-
day for -- ,
throwing a
knife at a Cynthia
store clerk Rusinovich
and fighting Davis
with police,
according to a sheriffs re-
port.
Cynthia Rusinovich
Davis, of 20349 Lancaster
Road, entered the Shell
convenience store at CR
250 and SR 51 at around
3:30 p.m. and for no appar-.
ent reason began to argue
with the clerks, reports
show.
Davis allegedly threw a
closed pocket knife at one
of the clerks after the argu-

ASK DR. MANTOOTH|


Q: What are so ei rn I, ', :r,: ,
oral cancer?




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po ltIIo tII e t om tocr r, ,i at7.,m


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listed above, because mor t of them begin


i..;',rj Il: ,i-. r'.r that are those who
.1.:., I .,',.:, .:,,' .:ni tobacco. In fact, 75
f. ,re'. i ,i jrt ,. i-ou rs are attributed to
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Davis then allegedly left
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CR 250 wearing neither a
shirt nor bra. Reports say
that Davis resisted arrest
by spitting at and kicking
deputy Chuck Tompkins in
the left leg and Cpl. Scott
Senea in the groin area.
Davis was eventually
placed -into a patrol car and
transported to the Suwan-
nee County Jail. She. was
charged with aggravated as-
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tery on a law enforcement
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with violence.

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President's speech creates

a stir before it's delivered


I


Continued From Page 1A

calls," said Melissa Mose-
ley, the school's principal.
She herself had already
taken "half-a-dozen calls"
from parents before 9 a.m.
The President's speech,
which according to a tran-
script released Monday
will encourage school chil-
dren to "stay in school,"
"work hard" and "take re-
sponsibility for your edu-
cation," has drawn harsh
criticism from some par-
ents, particularly those
who feel the speech is po-
litically driven or could
somehow include informa-
tion contrary to the values
they have instilled in their
children. Others called just
to see if and how schools
would broadcast the
speech.
Suwannee Primary
School showed an alternate
child video for students
whose parents preferred
they not watch the Presi-
dent's speech.
At Suwannee Elemen-
tary, the phones were ring-
ing nonstop.
"Absolutely, we have
had a number of calls,"
said Principal Donna
Long, whose students
range from second to third
grade. She said more par-
ents called than sent notes.
Parents even flooded the
school's assistant principal.
with calls at home over the
weekend, Long said. .
In Branford, at the ele-
mentary school, Principal
David Campbell said par-
ents were asked to treat the
day like any other day by
sending their child to
school.
"This is nothing momen-
tous or nothing that is go-
ing to be detrimental." he
.'.rn~e"c~.,,V..fQ,., '4


10-year-old, mauled by dogs,
listed in good condition


Continued From Page 1A

bite, reported that Kaleb
Patterson was suffering
from severe dog bites to his
face, back, both legs, both
arms and feet.
'Barts reported that
Sanders heard a loud noise
in her yard and saw Kaleb
being attacked by the dogs.
Sanders ran to help Patter-
son and was herself bitten
several times on the hands
and legs before being able
to get him to safety.
Sanders told Barrs the dogs
continued biting her in an


attempt to get to Patterson
as she carried him.
Deborah Patterson,
Kaleb's mother, reportedly
said she was unaware that
her son had left the house
and gone into Sanders'
yard. Sanders told deputies
she did not know how
Kaleb gained entry to her.
back yard since it is fenced,
with a closed gate.
Kaleb was flown to
Shands UF where he un-,
derwent emergency'
surgery. Sanders drove her-
self to Lake City Medical
Center for treatment.


said. Campbell said he
viewed it as an "education-
al duty" to air the Presi-
dent's address, whom he
referred to as the "educc-
tional leader of our coun-
try."
The school advised par-
ents to go online and read
the transcript of the Presi-
dent's speech and to
"please send your children
to school."
"We don't need them to
miss all day for 18 min-
utes," he said. Attendance
didn't appear to be affected
Tuesday, Campbell said.
Principal Bill Yanossy
said it was "hard to tell" if
parents had decided to
keep their children home
early Tuesday at Suwannee
Intermediate.
However, parents defi-
nitely made phone calls to
the school. There were
fewer than 10 calls prior to
Tuesday, he said, and at
least one call Tuesday. To
carry out parents' wishes
Suwannee Intermediate
teachers worked in pairs,
so that one teacher would
host a class ot students
able to view the president's
speech, while another will
hold class with students
with parent opt-out re-
quests.
For students at Suwan-
nee Middle School and
Suwannee High, the story
wasn't much different.'
Kids at the middle
school were given a simple
choice.-
"They can opt out if they
want to," said Principal
Norri Steele.
At Suwannee High
School technology posed a
problem. but could also be,
seen as an unexpected so-,
lution for not having to
deal with the flurry devel-


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0SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 12A


oped by the President's ad-
dress.
"We have some techno-
logical issues," said Princi-
pal Dawn Lamb. "Our TV
system is completely ka-
put."
She said some teachers
would have the ability to
stream in the President's
speech using computer
technology, but worried the
system could be over-
loaded.
* "I think that the band-
width will not support that
kind of traffic," Lamb said.
Also, the speech falls
during a school lunch time,
she said, "so it is not really
conducive to. a mass show-
ing."
As at the other schools,
calls came in at the high
school main office regard-
ing the President's speech.
"It's been a mixed bag,"
said Lamb.
Branford High Principal
Ted Roush declined com-
ment.



Councilman

Ken Duce

dead at 76
Continued From Page 1A

"We're saddened with his
passing," said Nobles. "We
lost a good elected politi-
cian."
Councilman John Hale
said he will miss his fellow
councilman as well.
"He was a true gentle-
man and his input in city
affairs will truly be
missed," Hale. said.
"I feel like the communi-
ty hais lost a valuable asset.
He .was very sincere and
very conscientious and was
a man of his word," said
Councilman Ed Rewis.
"He will be sorely missed."
City Clerk Jimmy Mc-
Cullers said Duce was ded-
icated to the city.
"Ken was a very good
man and a very dedicated
public servant and tried to
always look out for the best
interest of the city," said
McCullers.
A viewing will be held
today from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
at Daniels Funeral Homes
on North Ohio Avenue.
The funeral will be at 10
a.m. Thursday at First Bap-
tist Church on West
Howard Street. Interment
will follow in the Live Oak
Cemetery.









WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 13A


------.-------------.---- --.-------------------- Continued From Page 5A


James Robert Cason, Jr.

September 5, 2009

ames Robert Cason,
Jr., affectionately
known by many as
"Case", passed
away Saturday, September
5, 2009 at North Florida
Regional Medical Center in
Gainesville, FL. He was a
native and lifelong resident
of Live Oak, FL, and a
1967 graduate of Suwannee
High School. 'He attended
North Florida Junior
College and Tallahassee
Community College. Case
served in the Florida
National Guard and owned
and operated Faye's
Flowers. He was a kind
and gentle soul with a dry
wit and wonderful sense of
humor who was dearly
loved by his family and
friends. He loved his cats,
the Beatles and tranquility.
Case was a black belt in
Karate, loved artifact
hunting, was an avid reader
and a member of
Westwood Baptist Church.
He was predeceased by
his parents, Robert and
Faye Cason.
He is survived by his
wife of 33 years, Mary
Cason, Live Oak, FL; one
sister, Conni Cason Hall
and husband Ron of Jasper,
FL; one niece, Casi and
husband Chad Burnett of
Jasper, FL; two nephews,
Kyler and wife Elisa Hall
of Tallahassee, FL; Logan
Hall of Tallahassee, FL;
two great nieces, Kynzie
Hall & McKenna Burnett.
Along with his many
friends and other family
members, Case leaves
behind a special aunt,
Bernice Lee of Manor, GA
and the wonderful,
dedicated staff at Faye's
Flowers: Kathleen Googe,
Ruby Royals, Margaret
Robbins and Judy Helms.
Graveside services were
held 2 00 PM Monday,
September 7, 2009 in the
Live Oak Cemetery with
Rev. Dr. Charles Helms
officiating.
Please sign the guestbook
at
www.harrisfuneralhomeinc.
net.
Harris Funeral Home &
Cremations, Inc., 932 N.
Ohio Ave., Live Oak, 386-
364-5115 was in charge of
all arrangements.

Please sign the
online guestbook. Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.corn
and click on obituaries


Lillian D. Lewis
August 1, 1927 -
September 5, 2009

illian D. Lewis,
82, of McAlpin,
S Fl Passed Away
on Saturday, September 5,
2009 in the Suwannee
Valley Care Center, Lake
City, Fl after a Long
Illness. The Bertrand,
Missouri Native Moved to
McAlpin, Fl in 1990 .
from Orlando, Fl. Mrs.
Lewis Was a Homemaker
and of Baptist Faith.
She Is Suirvived by Four
Daughters: Amanda
Bruenger, Linda Pass Both
of Lake City, Fl, Kay
SFerguson, Crawfordsville,
In and Margaret Kidwell,
McAlpin, Fl; Three Sons:
Randy Lewis, Wellborn, Fl,
Robert Lewis, Live Oak, Fl
and Stanley Lewis, St.
Louis, Mo; One Sister:
Olian Davis, St. Peters,
Mo; Eighteen


Grandchildren and
Seventeen Great-
grandchildren.
Graveside Services Will
Be Held on Wednesday,
September 9, 2009 at 2:00
pm at the Kidwell Family
Cemetery with Mrs.
Marlene Lewis Officiating.
Daniels Funeral Homes
& Crematory, Inc. Live
Oak and Branford in


Charge of All
Arrangements.

Please sign the
online guestbook. Go to
wiw.suwanneedemocrat.comn
and click on obituaries


Frances Mills Pilkington
July 29, 1951 -
September 4, 2009

/ ances Mills
Pilkington, 58,
formally of Live
Oak, Florida passed away
late Friday evening,
September 4, 2009, at
Suwannee Valley Care
Center in Lake City, FL
following a courageous
battle with cancer. The Ft.
Lauderdale, FL native
moved to Lake City, FL
five years ago from Live
Oak, FL. She was an
.Administrative Officer for
the Lake City V.A. Medical
Center for over thirty-
seven years. Frances
always put God and family
first, living right was very,
very important to her and it
was evident with her faith
in the Lord. She was a
member of the Suwannee
River Community Church.
Survivors include one
son, James A. Pilkington,
Il of Lake CAy, FL; one
daughter, Christy
Pilkington, Lake City, FL;
one brother, John (Cindy)
Mills, Jr., Live Oak, FL;
five sisters, Sandra
Carlton, Live Oak, FL;
Johnetta (Ray) Brown,
Live Oak, FL;.Jessie
(Larry) Durden, Live Oak,


JOHN WIGGINS, Agency Mgr. WANDA O'NEAL, career Agent
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Oak, FL; Debra (Keith)
Kight, Lake City, FL;
many nieces and nephews.
Visitation was held,
Sunday Sept. 6th from 3 to
5 PM at Harris Funeral
Home.
.Funeral services were
held 11:00 AM Monday,
September 7, 2009 in
Suwannee River
Community Church with
Rev. Ray Brown
officiating.
In lieu of flowers
contributions may be made
to Haven Hospice, 6037
Hwy 90 W., Lake City, FL.
Please sign the
guestbook at
www.harrisfuneralhomeinc
.net.
Harris Funeral Home &
Cremations, Inc., 932 N.
Ohio Ave., Live Oak, 386-
364-5115 was in charge of
all arrangements.

Please sign the
online guestbook. Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.comrn
and click on obituaries


Carolyn M. Underwood
July 31,1940 -
September 6, 2009

rs. Carolyn M.
Underwood,
j/ J 69, of Live
Oak, died Sunday,
September 6, 2009, in the
Haven Hospice of the
Suwannee Valley
following an extended
illness. Mrs. Underwood
was born on July 31, 1940
ini Punta Gorda, Florida,


Mrs. Underwood had been
a resident of Suwannee
County since 1983 having
relocated here from the
Punta Gorda, area. Mrs.
Underwood was a National
Honors Graduate of Punta
Gorda High School and
worked for a short time as
a legal secretary.
Following her marriage to
her husband of forty-two
years, Mrs. Underwood
became a homemaker who
enjoyed gardening and bird
watching, especially her
hummingbirds. Mrs.
Underwood was a member
of the Nazarene faith.
Mrs. Underwood is
survived by her husband,
David E. Underwood of
Live Oak; three daughters,
Holly Wilson (Bart) of
McAlpin, Florida; Jenny
Kipper of Cleveland,
Tennessee and Eva
Hopkins of Jacksonville,
Florida; a brother, Gaylen
May of Florida and a sister,
Laura Midget of Michigan.
Six grandchildren Rebekah
Wilson, Deborah Wilson,
Jennah Wilson, Sarah
Wilson, Joannah Wilson,
and Haley Hopkins also
survive.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Underwood will be
conducted at 4:00 P.M.,
Thursday, September 10,
2009, in the Siloam United
Methodist Church with
Rev. A.F. Donovan and
Rev. Frank Davis.
officiating. The family will
receive friends for one
hour prior to the funeral
service at the church.
Interment services will


follow in the church
cemetery. Arrangements
are under the direction of
the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 S. Marion
Ave., Lake City, FL
32025. (752-1234 or 752-
2211) Please sign the on-
line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome.
com.

Please sign the
online guestbook. Go to
www. suwanneedemocrat. corn
and click on obituaries


Mildred L. Gill
August 24, 1917-
September 5, 2009

w Stildred L. Gill,
92, of Live
Oak, Fl Passed
Away Saturday, September
5, 2009 after a Long
Illness. The Baxley,
Georgia Native Moved to
Live Oak in 1980 from
Jacksonville, Fl. Mrs. Gill
Was a Home Maker and a
Member of the First
Baptist Church, Live Oak,
Fl.
Mrs. Gill Is Survived by
Her Two .Daughters: Sandy
Thompson and Belinda
Anderson Both of
Jacksonville, Fl; Two
Sons: Stan Gill,
Jacksonville, Fl and Andy
Gill, Atlanta, Ga; Nine
Grandchildren and Nine
Great-grandchildren.
Funeral Services Will Be
Held 10:00 Am
Wednesday, September 9,
2009 at Daniels Memorial


Chapel with Clarence
Parker Officiating.
Interment Will Follow in
the Live Oak Cemetery.
Daniels Funeral Homes
& Crematory, Inc. of Live
Oak Is in Charge of All
Arrangements.

Please sign the
online guestbook. Go to
wwwisuwanneedemnocrat.comn
and click on obituaries


Eason Berry
July 11, 1938 -
September 5, 2009

Season Berry, 71, of
Mayo, FL passed
away September 5,
2009 at Doctor's Memorial
Hospital in Perry, FL.
Finalization was by
cremation.
Harris Funeral Home &
Cremations, Inc. of Live
Oak (386-364-5115) is in
charge of all arrangements.

Please sign the
online guestbook. Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.comrn
and click on obituaries



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0SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


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PAGE 14A


0SUWANNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE: OAK








utwaunu I temrorat Bucs wallop Suwannee Storm Basketball
Section B St. Francis 42-7 could receive grant from Hike
Wednesday, September 9,2009 BranfordSprts.
Wednesday, September 9, 2009 P.-ae sA.,


'Dogs open





with a win

Suwannee downs Hamilton 28-7
in regular season opener


By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com

The 'Dogs came home with a 28-7
win in their regular season opener
against an aggressive Hamilton
County Trojan defense Friday night
in Jasper.
The 'Dogs were set back in the first
half with 50-odd yards in penalties,
but still managed to get nine points
on the scoreboard.
Kyle Driskell added two points
early on with a safety. The "X Man,"
Xavier Perry, gave the 'Dogs six
more points on a one-yard run
touchdown. "Automatic" Austin
O'Conner added the extra point to
give the 'Dogs a 9-0 lead.
Quarterback Jimmie Taylor
completed four of five passes for 35
yards. J.R. Bass had 37 yards
rushing. Perry added 22 yards,
Rashad Gartlenhire, 13 and Greg
Swinson five yards.
In the third quarter, the Trojans
returned a J.R. Bass fumble 29 yards
for a score, making it 9-7.
After a little give and take. a 15-
yard pass from Taylor to Perrm and a
10-yard Swinson run put the 'Dogs in
scoring position. Suwannee had to
settle for an O'Conner field goal to
make it 12-7.
With eight minutes left in the game


a 14-yard touchdown run by Bass
gave the 'Dogs an 18-7 lead. The
extra point was blocked.
The "Dogs would later take the ball
to the to the Trojans' bne, with
Swinson accounting for 40 yards on
the drive. The Trojan defense held,
however, and Suwannee settled for an
O'Conner field goal and a 21-7 lead
with two minutes left in the game.
Jacob Palmer then made a great
defensive play to recover a Hamilton
fumble on the Trojan five. Bass.
scored on the next play, sealing the
28-7 win over former Bulldog head
coach Mike Pittman.
Defensively the 'Dogs still have a
lot of room to improve, but Demarcus
Smith, Jackson Brown, Tre Robinson,
Andre Zander and Alex Falleck had
standout performances.
"We got to learn to put people
away when we have the game
secured like this," said head coach
Jerry Odom Tuesday. "I think we
played solid."
Odom said Pittman was a worthy
opponent who played a good game.
Taylor ended the game with
negative 10 yards rushing but still
played well in his first big game as a
freshman. He was named WQHL's
offensive player of the game. Driskell
and Falleck were named defensive
players of the game.


Alex Falleck has a firm grip on the ball.


Irk.


P


1. i


Suwannee's Andre
Zander goes up
for a pass.


SPORTS
COMMENTARY

Out of your

league

Sportabout
By Tom Daniels
Shawne
Merriman was
arrested this
weekend. Shawne
is an All-Pro
linebacker for the San
Diego Chargers. Shawne
allegedly assaulted
Tequila, an MTV
personality whose claim to
fame was a dating show
where men and woman
vied for her affections.
Shawne said he was trying
to protect her from driving
home intoxicated. Shawne,
stick to stopping NFL
quarterbacks. The
seriousness and humorous
ramifications to this story
are endless. This is beyond
multitasking.
Bruce Johnson as of this
writing has made the New
York Giants. He is the only
non-drafted, free agent to
make the squad. Never
mind that another
Hurricane has made the
NFL, this is another
Suwannee Bulldog. Being
a professional athlete is
demanding, but it would
be nice if the community
could find a way to get its
three NFL players together
for a celebration of sorts. I
think Andra Davis, Kelly
Jennings and Bruce
Johnson could be poster
boys as to wvhy you need to
finish school. The NFL
was not out of Bruce's
league.
Pacman Jones the anti-
role model is out of the
NFL and into the Canadian
league. Stay tuned, I am
sure a soap opera is to
follow with French sub
titles. With the NFL cuts
others are sure to make the
trek north. Ricky Williams
announced his retirement
in 2010. Who cares? Head
shops across the Miami
'area. A.J. Feeley was the
first Michael Vick
casualty. He is out of the
league. The Eagles had no
room for four
quarterbacks.
NFL predications: The
Lions will win a game.
T.O., who has a show on
the same network as
Tequila, will implode the
Buffalo Bills. The Bucs
- will return to the hapless
group of losers we came to
love. The Jags and
Dolphins will frustrate us
all season. Oakland will be
the worst team in the NFL
and for that matter maybe
Canada. They are
definitely out of their
league.


~Ct.rm3F


A


The X Man," Xavier Perry. gains ground.

Presented by: 804 S. Ohio Ave. & 1102 N. Ohio, Live Oak 386-362-3433

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Go to www.suwanneedemocrat.com for athlete's profile


~s


~-1~~111~~~_~,~,,,~,~.^~.~,~~I~y-~I-~.~


*L
Air


www.ffsb.com b E












SPORTS


Suwannee Storm Basketball




could receive grant from Nike


But they need your help


A f~re -~

9

I~i
~ N


Suwannee Storm Basketball team. Photo: Submitted


By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com

Suwannee Storm Basketball needs
your help. Nike is offering .a.ints- up
to $650,000 for youth sports and
Suwannee Storm was qualified to
register for the Back Your Block
grant. Suwannee Storm needs you to


go to www.nikebackyourblock.com
and vote for them to win so they can
take Suwannee Storm Basketball Inc.
to the next level. But hurry, voting
ends Sept. 15.
Here's n hat you do:
Go to
www.nikebackyourblock.com
Click on View Applicants By Tag


and select basketball.
Scroll over a few pages of
applicants until you get to Suwannee
Storm Basketball Inc.
Vote in the upper right hand
corner by entering your email,
selecting VOTE, and following the
instructions.
Thank you in advance.


Florida livestock

market report

Federal-State Market News Service
605 East Main Street
Bartow, FL 33830
-863-519-8477

This information is collected by the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services,
Division of Marketing & Development, Bureau of
Development & Information in cooperation with
U.S. Department of Agriculture, AMS, Livestock,
Meat, Grain, & Seed Division, Livestock & Grain
Market News.


FLORIDA MARKETS AT A GLANCE

For the week ended September 3, 2009


At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled
10,779, compared to 10,841 last week, and .5,625 a
year ago. According to the Florida Federal-State
Livestock Market News Service: Compared to last
week: Slaughter cows and bulls were steady to 1.00
higher; feeder steers and heifers were steady to2.00
lower.


Feeder Steers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 115.00-150.00
,300-400 lbs 98.00-132.00
400-500 lbs 87.00-109.00


Feeder Heifers: Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 93.00-130.00
300-400 lbs 84.00-104.00
400-500 lbs 79.00- 93.00


Slaughter Cows:
Lean: 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent

Slaughter Bulls:
Yield Grade No. 12 10002100 lbs


39.00-44.00


52.00-57.50


Wanted:

Sports News!
The Suwannee Democrat needs you.
Coaches and parents, send us your
sports news, stats, articles. The Suwan-
nee Democrat will run them in sports
for free. Send information and/or photos
to nf.editorial@gaflnews.com or drop
them off a the front desk at 211 Howard
St. East. For more information call 386-
362-1734.


Today's Weather


* A d- v '~, W-e,


93/72
A few isolated thunderstorms devel-
oping during the afternoon under
partly c.


Sunrise Sunset
7-:1 AM 7-44 PM


- -T
9/10^O^


91/71
isolated thunderstorms. Highs in the
low 90s and lows in the low 70s.


Sunrise Sunset
7-14 AM 7-:. PM


Fr[-
.9/11


89/71
Partly cloudy with a stray thunder-
storm.


Sunrise Sunset


Florida At A Glance


Jacksonville
92/78


89/73


Moon Pham




Full Last
Sep4 Sep12


S t
New First
Sep 18 Sep 26


UY kdex

Wed 9/9 f Very High
Thu 9/10 Very High
Fri 9i/11 Very High
-r.. ij ir.m. i ,,-,a :. r ] :. i. r I
I jI,3- ") : i


Area CrItikr
le-I r ,vlmr ,i 3 ._:.rrm
Crestview 90 67 t-storm
Daytona Beach 89 75 t-storm
Fort Lauderdale 85 77 rain
Fort Myers 90 73 t-storm
Gainesville 91 72 t-storm
Hollywood 85 76 t-storm
Jacksonville 92 78 mst sunny
Key West 88 81 t-storm
Lady Lake 91 73 t-storm
National Cities
Mii~~~flL^ o~is un


tI_ e C:.r 91
Madison 93
Melbourne 87
Miami 86
N Smyrna Beach 89
Ocala 92
Orlando 91
Panama City 91
Pensacola 89
Plant City 91


71 t-storm
76 t-storm
77 rain
75 t-storm
72 t-storm
75 t-storm
72 t-storm
73 t-storm
74 t-storm


P.:. r-. fr': f-5.:r, 5. -6 ra~ri
Port Charlotte 91 73 t-storm
Saint Augustine 88 75 mst sunny
Saint Petersburg 88 77 t-storm
Sarasota 91 73 t-storm
Tallahassee 92 71 t-storm
Tampa 91 75 t-storm
Titusville 90 74 t-storm
Venice 90 74 t-storm .
W Palm Beach 87 76 t-storm


Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


97 78 pt sunny
81 59 pt sunny
68 55 rain
83 64 mst sunny
70 64 rain


6)2009 American Profile Homeio~n C-omen, Ser~ce 5~869 F


Friday and Saturday only!

t-. -'.... -",, ^ .- -- .


FURNITURE











Great A;.' Furniture


at Liquidation prices!

^ Home of
^ ^y/ North Florida's

Sharpest Pencil!
Home -Urnishings 1 ws. OioAve., uve Oak
386-330-5252
Hours: Friday 9 am. 6 p.m.
MaurrufI awmus C. Saturday 9 a.m. 5 p.m.


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver


65 mst sunny
54 cloudy
60 pt sunny
72 t-storm
56 t-storm


Houston
Los Angeles
Miami
Minneapolis
New York


rn -Go7ll2satr-urm


72 t-storm
64 pt sunny
77 rain
60 t-storm
61 rain


"' '' "


ZIL~


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


0SUWANNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE OAK


PAGE 2B


0209 American Profile Homelo~vn Content Servire


500869-F










SPORTS


Suwannee opens



season with a win


SPRT


*J'9 ,

4


-- ~
2i.4


Quarterback Jimmie Taylor looks for an open receiver.
SPh'jti : Paul BuCharjsn Sua 3,neSipcrlts c',rr


J.: vl


TOP: Rashad Gardenhire runs outside for yardage.
MIDDLE: Suwannee head coach Jerry Odom addressing the troops.
ABOVE: The Bulldog line opens a hole for a Suwannee running back.


, ^ --^ i !1 .. ... ... ..";,



*~~ ~ ^ r "i '*A ^ B '
6 .. --,-. ."o; ,


____ Optimal Health


Diamond Extreme Bass Tournament


The Noith Florida Bass Anglers is
holding a charity fundraising bass
fishing tournament to benefit the
Lake City 12-year-old Diamond
Extreme baseball team as they raise
funds to travel to Cooperstown for


the Hall of Fame Tournament
Summer of 2010. The bass
tournament will be held at Clay
Landing on the Suwannee River on
Saturday October 3rd. Cost is $60
per boat plus an. optional $10 big


Live Oak -Ego'S
sO PAINT &
FLOORING


Q :
0 a


I would like to remove some existing
wallpaper from my bedroom walls and
paint them, can you give me some tips
on removing the wall paper?


Yes, score the walls with a razor blade
'* or a scoring tool., Ensure that you
make Xs on the wall that cut the paper
but do not push down so much that you cut into
the wall. DIFF with very. hot water is highly
recommend. It is not caustic enough to harm
your hands so you don't need to wear rubber
gloves. Use a scraper from the paint section of
the store. Be careful when picking or scraping
the paper so you don't damage the wall
underneath. Once the surface is softened it is
very easy to mar the walls. After you have
removed all of the paper you need to wash the
walls by making another batch of DIF and water
to scrub off the remaining glue. For more
information, stop in to Live Oak Paint and
Flooring, we're here to help.
1512 South Ohio Avenue, 362-7066
546210-F


bass pot. For complete rules and a
signup form please visit
http://nfba.webs.com or call Derriel
Cribbs at 386-438-7927,.or Matt
Cummings at 386-623-0143.


.S. COTT
i, ,1 ,' Square Location: 1520 S. Ohio (386) 362-2591
\lrical E quipment.Div: (386) 362-4404
Hours: 6:30 am-6:30 PM Mon-Fri.,
8:30 am-3:00 pm Sat.
by Kathy Fletcher, PharmD Drive-up window
Medications to Help Lose Weight
It is estimated that 60% of Americans are overweight. Thirty
percent of this group is classified as obese. The body mass index
(BMI) is a measurement that takes into account both height and
weight and is used to determine overweight and obesity, categories.
Persons with a BMI above 25 are generally considered to be
overweight, while persons with a BMI above 30 are considered to be
obese. Overweight and obesity are generally caused by an excess
intake of calories relative to calories that are burned.
Lifestyle modifications, such as diet and exercise, are generally the
first recommendation for weight loss for overweight or obese
persons. Both over-the-counter and prescription medications are
available to assist weight loss when lifestyle modifications have not
caused satisfactory weight loss over an extended period of time.
Orlistat. a fat absorption inhibitor, is now available over-the-counter
(Alli) and with a prescription (Xenical). Sibutramine (Meridia) and
phentennine (Adipex) are available with a prescription. They work
to suppress the appetite, although serious side effects may
occur. Although there are also many weight loss supplements
available, these products are not approved by the FDA and should be
used with caution due to the risk for serious adverse effects. 54215-F


Weight Loss


Wellness


Laboratory

Phenomenal Results
Seen!

Our clients are achieving a. 5-19 pound weight loss
in their first month!
One Monthly fee includes:
V Consultation and Evaluation
V Four Weeks B 12 injections with Fat burning
Amino Acids!
Counseling regarding Diet, Exercise and other
Lifestyle Changes,
V 30 Day Supply of Appetite Suppressant
V ECG included for all patients
Mention you saw this ad and
receive 2 additional B12 injections
(a $24 value!) free with next paid visit!

Currently sharing clinic space with

Three Rivers Medical
in Branford, FL at
208 NW Suwannee Ave,
across from the Capital City Bank.
386-935-2799
(It is not necessary to become a patient of Three Rivers Medical to
participate in the Optimal Health Program.) 536106-F


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7. Il


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0SUWIANNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE OAK


PAGE 3B


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


-rS !*


44









SPORTS


j~i~~*


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p..
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1"


k.4


Mitey Mites waiting to get in the game.- Photos: Submitted


Pop

By Jeff Waters
The Suwannee Dog
Pound Pop Warner di-
vision kicked off their
football and cheer sea-
son with a Jamboree in
Keystone Heights re-
cently.
Suwannee was met
by other surrounding
Pop Warner counties
for an all day event.
The next game for
the Dog Pound was
held Saturday in Lake
Butler. Come out and
support the Dog
Pound.

BELOW:
The Tiny Mites take,
down their opponent.


Warner






w... cA .''
Al
< -y


Jamboree


Tiny Mites.


A` A


* ,...


The Tiny Mites in action.
._-~U;CI. ,-: -. *


Members of the Pee Wee Dog Pound team.


ito
VV m


The Tiny Mite and Mitey Mite cheerleaders.


SUWANNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 4B


SPORTS


-waft-


ML-.-AjjM I --








WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 5B


Suwannee Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR SUWANNEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09-95-CP
IN RE: Estate of,
INAMAE CHRISTINE FEATHER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(SUMMARY ADMINISTRATION)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIM OR
DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been
entered in the estate of INAMAE
CHRISTINE FEATHER, deceased, Case
No. 09-95-CP, Circuit Court for
Suwannee County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 200 S.
Ohio Avenue, Suwannee County, Florida
32064; that the total cash value of the
estate is less than $10,000.00 and that
the names and address of those to
whom it has been assigned by such
order are:
CONNIE BROWN
5693 SW CR 751
Jasper, FL 32052
CATHY CARSWELL
6334 Happy Lane
Milton, FL 32570
CLAYTON FEATHER
9904 Hwy 90 E
Live Oak, FL 32064
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the
decedent and persons having claims or
demands against the estate of the
decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in
the Order of Summary Administration
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER
APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD. ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'SDATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice
Is September 2, 2009 September 9,
2009.
Person Giving Notice:
CONNIE BROWN
5693 SW CR 751
Jasper, FL 32052
CATHY CARSWELL
6334 Happy Lane
Milton, FL 32570
CLAYTON FEATHER
9904 Hwy 90 E
Live Oak, FL 32064
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
DANA EDMISTEN HILL
Florida Bar No. 980412
230 Court Street SE
Lve Oak, Florida 32064
Telephone: (386) 362-1900
STelefax: (386) 362-1902
9/2, 9
ATTENTION COMCAST CABLE
CUSTOMERS
Effective October 9, 2009, Comcast Will
aad NFL Reo Zone to channel 741 on
*na DIgl Spo3 Er, rits;rm-r,I P.cik 4
prI-l0Wof' its .er,,.e r,.a,, De seen by
customers that subscribe to the
appropriate tier level prior to the effective
date.
This affects current and new residential
and commercial subscribers serviced by
Comcast in Jacksonville, Callahan,
Macclenny, Femandina Beach, Yulee,
Orange Park, St. Augustine, Palatka,
Lake City, Live Oak, FI.,. St. Mary's,
Brunswick, Jekyll Island, Ga. and
surrounding areas.
A digital set-top box provided by
Comcast is required to.view this channel.
For more information, please call 1-800-
266-2278.
9/9
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
PEST CONTROL
Maintain Pest Control for the Housing
Authority's 104 Units located at three
sites. Contract will be for one year with
the option of 2 year renewal. Contact
Housing Authority for scope of work.
(386)362-2123.
Bids will be accepted until 3:00 P.M., .111
September 2009. The Housing Authority
of the City of Live Oak is an. equal
opportunity employer. The Davis Bacon
wage determination does apply.
9/4,9, 11
A&A MINI STORAGE
313 NE RIVER RD
MAYO, FL. 32066
386-208-1062 OFF
NOTICE OF SALE A & A MINI
STORAGE LOCATED AT 10198 90th
TRAIL IN LIVE OAK, FL WILL ACCEPT
BIDS ON THE CONTENTS OF THE
FOLLOWING UNITS:
(1). JEROME CREWS UNIT# A-3
CONTENTS: MISCELLANEOUS
PERSONAL ITEMS
(2). VIRGINIA BUSCHER UNIT# C-21
& C-20 CONTENTS: MISCELLANEOUS
PERSONAL ITEMS
(3). SHELISA BUTLER UNIT# B-42
CONTENTS: MISCELLANEOUS
PERSONAL ITEMS
(4)'. PATRICIA LANE UNIT# F-6
CONTENTS: MISCELLANEOUS
PERSONAL ITEMS
(5). SHERYL OLSEN UNIT# C-2
CONTENTS: MISCELLANEOUS
PERSONAL ITEMS
(6). SHANNON POPPELL UNIT# C-19
CONTENTS: MISCELLANEOUS
PERSONAL ITEMS
(7). HUBERT & MARIANNE SMITH -
UNIT# D-22
CONTENTS: MISCELLANEOUS
PERSONAL ITEMS
(8). DIANE WOOD UNIT# G-10
CONTENTS: MISCELLANEOUS
PERSONAL ITEMS
CONTENTS MAY BE PURCHASED IN
PART OR WHOLE. PAYMENT MUST BE
IN CASH. SALE DATE IS TUESDAY THE
15TH OF SEPTEMBER, 2009 AT 10:00
AM AT A & A MINI STORAGE. A & A
MINI STORAGE RESERVES THE


RIGHT TO BID.
9/9,11


Suwannee Legals
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a
Writ of Execution e the County
Court of Dade County, on the 9th day of
June, 2009 in the cause wherein S. Peter
Capua as plaintiff and Magdalena Gager
was defendant, being Case No. 08-11615
SP-05 in said Court, that I, Tony
Cameron, as Sheriff of Suwannee
County, Florida had levied this, 25th day
of August, 2009 upon all the rights, title
and interest of the defendant, Magdalena
Gager pursuant to any and all other liens,
taxes, judgments or encumbrances
whatsoever, in and to the following
described property, to-wit:
TOWNSHIP 5, SOUTH, RANGE 15
EAST
The W 1/2 of the SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4,
subject to County road right-of-way
along the South side thereof, LESS
AND EXCEPT the East 30 feet thereof,
and subject to any power line
easement in visible use, AND
SEC 8, TOWNSHIP 5, SOUTH, RANGE
15 EST
The W 1/2 of the SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4,
subject to County road right of way
along the South side thereof, LESS
AND EXCEPT the East 30 feet thereof,
and subject to any power line
easement in visible use.
On Tuesday, the 6th day of October, 2009
at the front door of the Suwannee County
Courthouse in Live Oak, Florida at 11:00
A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible, I
will offer for sale all the defendant's right,
title and interest in aforesaid property at
public outcry and will sell the same,
subject to all prior liens, to the highest
and best bidder for cash, the proceeds to
be applied as far as may be to the
payment of costs and the satisfaction of
the above-described execution.
"In accordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act," person needing a
special accommodation to participate in
this proceeding at the address given
above.Telephone: (386) 364-3222,
Tony Cameron
Sheriff of Suwannee County, Florida
By: Tony Cameron
Sheriff
9/2,9,16,23




'Dogs


open with

a win
Pages 1.3.6B Al&A


DEP secretary applauds $1.45 million


in grants for Florida's communities

-Federal brownfields grants restore environment, stimulate economy-


TALLAHASSEE Florida De-
partment of Environmental Protec-
tion (DEP) Secretary Michael W.
Sole congratulated three Florida
communities recently for being
awarded $1.45 million in brown-
fields grants from the U.S. Environ-
mental Protection Agency (EPA).
The Treasure Coast Regional Plan-
ning Council, the city of Miami and
Florida,Community College at
Jacksonville received grants to as-,
sisq with the cleanup and redevelop-
ment of brownfields sites within
their communities. .
These EPA grants, funded
through the federal American Re-
covery and Reinvestment Act of
2009 (ARRA), are in addition to the
$4.8 million in brownfields grants
awarded to Florida communities in
May. The additional funding brings
the total bfownfields grant awards
in Florida to $6.25 million for this
year.
"Redevelopment of brownfields
sites removes contamination, builds
stronger communities by creating
economic opportunities and protects
the environment," said DEP Secre-
tary Michael W. Sole. "With the
help of Florida's brownfields pro-
gram and federal grants, these com-
munities can receive brownfields-
specific job training and reduce en-
vironmental hazards."
Treasure Coast Regional Planning
Council was one of the 55 appli-
cants chosen from a nationwide
pool to receive-supplemental fund-
ing for a brownfields revolving loan
fund grant. The $450,000 grant will.
be used to replenish its current re- -
volving loan fund and support
cleanup work at. a former incinera-
tor and landfill in the city of West


Palm Beach.
The city of Miami and Florida
Community College at Jacksonville
were among only 14 communities
in eight states selected to receive
Brownfields Environmental Job
Training grants. The grants are
$500,000 each and will enable the
city of Miami and Florida Commu-
nity College at Jacksonville to teach
environmental assessment and
cleanup job skills to individuals liv-
ing in areas near brownfields sites.
EPA selected these Florida pro-
posals in a nationwide 'competitive
process based on community need
and public involvement. DEP assist-
ed applicants during the grant appli-
cation process and will continue to
provide support as they carry out
their proposals.
Brownfields are properties where
expansion, redevelopment or reuse
may be complicated b'y the presence
or potential presence of environ-
mental pollution. State and federal
brownfield redevelopment programs
help communities revitalize proper-
ties environmentally, restore eco-
nomic vitality and mitigate potential
health risks to areas where brown-
fields exist.
The federal Small Businiess Lia-
bility Relief and Brownfields Revi-
talization Act of 2002 authorizes up
to $250 million in funds annually
for broWnfields grants. With ARRA,
$100 million was added to. federal
brow fields funding. Together with
financial awards, participants in the
brownfields program can access ex-
pertise and other resources from
more than 20 federal agencies.
DEP's brownfields redevelop-
Sient program, which began in
1998. is one of the fastest growing


"Redevelopment of brownfields sites
removes contamination, builds
stronger communities by creating
economic opportunities and protects
the environment."
Michael W. Sole
DEP Secretary

programs in the nation with a
steady annual increase in develop-
ment projects. Today, there are
more than 130 brownfield projects
underway and 229 designated
brownfield areas in Florida. Based
upon economic and regulatory in-
centives, the program uses private
revenue to clean up and redevelop
sites, create new jobs and enhance
the local economy.
For more information about
Florida's brownfields program, visit
www.dep.state.fl. us/waste/cate-
gories/brownfields/default.htm. For
more information on the federal
.brownfields grants, visit
http://www.epa.gov/brownfields/epa
recovery/index.htm.
For more information about
Florida's use of federal- recovery
dollars made available through
ARRA, please visit www.FlaRecov-
ery.com..


Suwannee Storm Basketball could receive grant from Nike

But they need, your help -,Page 2B .


,. "" V v ..-.- "" ......... -.. .:,--.~

Thurs.-Frih.Sat.-Sun.

4 DAY SALET Sept. 10th 13th


Box #1
10# Chicken Leg Quarters
10# Ground, Chuck
5# Smoked Sausage
5# Beef Cube, Steak
10# Pork Chops

45#




^-e^







Family Pack Mc

T-BONE

STEAK C



LB.
\. 99 \


Tender Beef Bottom Round Fresh Frozen

CUBE ROAST MIX

STEAKS VEGETABLES


15 2Pkg 2#5/ 1P
5# Pkg. L , 2# Pkg. ,


4 -


THE SAFETY UNE WeacepViaMatcr
From Suwannee DAYS LIVE
County Fire/Rescue OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK LIVE LOAK STORE OPEN SUNDIIN


Hidden dangers

at emergency

scenes
Pages 3-4A


636 South Ohio Avi

Live Oak, FL 32064

386-330-5122


L.J. Mobley & Son

e.

Prices good
September 10-13


6769-180th St.

McAlpin, FL 32062

386-963-5215
546248-


Mobley's Asst.

PORK CHOPS
8# BOX,


Fully Cooked Honey
Glazed Spiral Sliced

HALF HAMS


Box #2
5# Pan Sausage
5# Stew Meat
5# Pork Chops
5# Ground Beef
5# Beef Roast
5# Round Steak

30#$5


3 I~


I0o


1,


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


0SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 5B


Ij


I


F


I








SPORTS




Suwannee opens season with a win


w~k~:lb


; .,

_\ "%, ', 'I-.x. :

*^
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.4



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The 'Dogs line up during their regular season opener in Jasper. Photop: Paul Buchnaan- SuWanneeSports.com


I- ~
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m~,v


Josh Martin sweeps to the outside.


..* ,. , 4 :^


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,' *i ,i..l't.." ..
i-

:. .41


A pair of Bulldogs upend a Hamilton ballcarrier.


The swarming .Bulldog defense was dominant.


The 'Dogs on defense.


ESUWANNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 6B


;~ r.r


t





W SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


,-,
~-


I.-b
STK #T9082


m STK # T9102


2008 Hyundia
Tt Sonata
~;.._, STK # T9041


2008 Toyota
Yaris STK # T906


2003 Ford
Explorer XLS
"-- STK#T9101


- .. . ..


h 2009 Ch
Impala


2005. Ti
Siennr


2007 Dodge e
Durango SXT
STK# T9120 *

REEMOORETOYOTA.COM


(
0
0i


- ,..
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2004
Chevy
Impala -


)8 Dodge Charger T9125...............$15,988*"
)7 Toyota Tundra Limited T9120....$28,988*"
)6 Jeep Wrangler SE 4x4 T9140..$17,788*
37 Nissan Sentra 2.0 S T8992B...$14,995*,

0% down 7.99% apr 72 ,mo. with approved cred
*Plus Tax, Tag & Title
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2006
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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 7B


~PSr~e~t~":


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In the past two years, the newspaper business has faced unprecedented challenges, but make no mistake:
newspaper media print and digital remains strong and.will emerge from the current environment an een stronger multi-platform force.


Number of adults who read a print
newspaper every day, more than
115 million on Sunday. That's more
than the Super Bowl (94 million),
American Idol (23 million) or the
average late local news (65 million.)


61%
18-24 year olds
and 25-34 year
olds who read
a newspaper
in an average
week. 65% of
everyone in those
age groups read
a newspaper
or visited a
newspaper
website ,
that week.


40%
Households with
unique visitors
to newspaper
websites in an
average month.


56%
According
to Google,
percentage of
consumers that
have researched
or purchased
products
they saw in a
newspaper.


52%
Percentage of
people who are,
more likely to buy
a product if it is
seen in the paper.


TONS
Number of
creative options
for advertisers
choosing to utilize
the newspaper.
From belly bands,
polybags, post-it
notes, scented
ads, taste-it ads,
glow-in-the-dark
and temporary
tattoos, as
well as event
and database
marketing,
behavioral
targeting,
e-mail blasts,
e-newsletters
and more.


MOST
Newspapers make a
larger investment in
journalism than any
other medium.
Most of the
information you
already read from
"aggregators"
and other media
originated with
newspapers.
No amount of
effort from local
bloggers, non-profit
news entities or
TV news sources
could match the
depth and breadth
of newspaper-
produced content.


This is not a portrait of a dying industry. It's illustrative of transformation. Newspapers are reinventing themselves to focus on serving distinct audiences
with a variety of products, and delivering those audiences effectively to advertisers across media channels.
For more on the power of newspaper media, visit newspapermedia.com.


A
CONCEPT AND DESIGN BY ALLIED ADVERTISING PUBLICITY PROMOTIONS ALLIED-CREATIVE.COM
Sources: Scarborough Research, Google, Nielsen Online


Newspaper Association of America
4401 Wilson Blvd., Suite 900, Arlington, VA 22203 571.366.1000
newspapermedla.com


545340-F


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


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SPANISH: Cuerpoi

ITALIAN: Corpo

FRENCH: Corps

GERMAN: Korper


What's the Difference?
There are four things different between Picture A
and Picture B. Can you find them all?


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Shelby GT 500-- I LTZ 1500 Work Truck- Magnum SRT8 Sport LS Navigator Ultimate

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386-755-0630 ,,.,
Mile East Of 75 onU.S.,Hwy90 Lake City


THIS DAY IN...




HISTORY

* 1927: BABE RUTH HIT
HIS 60TH HOMERUN OF
THE SEASON.
* 1946: TWENTY-TWO
NAZI LEADERS WERE
FOUND GUILTY ATTHE
NUREMBERG TRIALS.
*1955: POPULAR
ACTOR JAMES DEAN
DIED IN A CAR ACCIDENT.


DERMIS

skin


SPA TREATMENTS, INCLUDING FACIAL
MASKS, MAY CLEANSE .-
THE SKIN AND
REMOVE IMPURITIES. -".- -
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the bigger picture is?
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. . . ..I. . . .


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CHRYSLER


- JEEP- DODGE


NOTICE1
NOW fiiiinn
salespeSople
fti Applyin
pesi on


If the Sunbelt tag's not on your car you paid too much!


$1500 down WAC, APR from 7.5-8.5,36-72 month terms.
Hours: M-F 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.,
Sat. 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
1307 W. Howard Street
(US Hwy. 90)
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1042
www.sunbeltchryslerjeepdodgeofliveoak.com


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 10B


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Deadlines for
Line Ads
Publication Deadline
Wednesday...... Fri. @ 10 a.n
Friday ............Wed. @ 10 a.

Announcements















* A



You can Reach.

Over 4 Million

Potential Buyers

fbr your product

through our Internet

and Newspaper

Network in Florida

and throughout

the Nation.

Call Nancy at


386-362-1734
499651-F


1.
m.


HOURS: MONDAY FRIDAY 8 A.M. 5 P.M.

Contact Us!

Online... Email... Fax... Phone...
When you place your Classified Ad it automatically classads@gaflnews.com (386) 364-5578 (386) 362-1734
appears on our website, www.nflaonline.com. Your ad is 1-800-525-4182
live on the internet 24 hours a day (free ads excluded). Don't forget your name, address & phone number we can reach yCall us Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.


Help Wanted
FirstDay.
ARNP
Primary Care Center in Jasper,
FL is seeking an ARNP. Must
have graduated from accredited
nursing school & have 1+ yrs of
clinical exp. State ARNP License
required. Email resumes to:
sheri.adkins@hcahealthcare.co
m. Drug screen & background
check required. EOE

FirstDay.
CDL DRIVERS NEEDED for
over the road flatbed positions.
Minimum of 2 years experience,
clean CDL, flatbed experience.
preferred. Driver's home every
weekend during seasonal freight,
every 10-15 days during off
season. Late' model Preterbilts
and Freightliners. Average
salary $50K to $60K. Call 386-
590-1980 or 386-776-1857.

PART-TIME
BOOKKEEPER WANTED
at Green Industries (NFCC),
Monticello FL: See
www.nfcc.edu for details.




Dial's Inspection

Services
For All Your Home
Inspection Needs!

386-364-4434 or
386-590-6534
Please visit our website:
www.suwanneevalleyinspections.corm


EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
Hamilton County
Development Authority
The position is responsible for
the promotion of economic
development within Hamilton
County, Florida.
Qualifications: Successful
applicant will have proven
leadership and able to perform
short and long term strategic
planning. Bachelor's degree from
accredited college or university
and five (5) years work-related
experience or ten (10) years
work-related experience without
degree. Strong written, verbal,
auditory, and computer skills are
required as position deals. with
potential prospective employers
and the public in general. Ability
to work independently with little
supervision. Personal vehicle
and valid driver's license as
some travel is required.
Knowledge of county's
geography, culture, a and
residents as well as the
transportation routes in the
North Florida/South Georgia
area. Excellent salary package
and benefits.
Application: Send cover letter
with salary range expectations
and resume to: Hamilton County,
Development Authority c/o Rhett
Bullard, Esq., 100 South Ohio
Avenue, Live Oak, FL 32064 or
email to
hamiltoncountydevelopmentauth
ority@ live.com.

FirstDay.
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
Court Administration
Positions Available
www.jud3.flcourts.org


FirstDay.
LPN
The Primary Care Center of Live
Oak is seeking a full time
Licensed Practical Jlurse.
Responsibilities yvill include
patient triage, scheduling of
appointments, administering
PFTs, and assisting with
procedures. Job qualifications
are 2+ years experience, as a
LPN in medical office or med-
surg environment. Qualified
candidate must be detail
oriented, possess excellent
organizational skills, and the
ability to establish and maintain
positive relations with patients
and hospital staff.
Qualified candidates will be
asked to complete an application
and authorization for HCA to
conduct a background
investigation and pre-
employment drug screen. Email
resumes to: Amber.Jones @
hcahealt care.com
HCA Physician Services


FirstDay. -
SERVICE AIDE
Part-time Residential Service
Aide positions. Requires High
School diploma or GED, 2 years
minimum experience in
education, child care,; medical,
psychiatric, nursing fields or
working with people with
developmental disabilities. Must
possess good people skills.
Evening & weekend hours. Apply
in person at Comprehensive
Community Services 511
Goldkist Boulevard, Live Oak.


Job List
DRIVERS Miles & .Freight;
Positions available ASAP! CDL-
A with tanker required. Top pay,
premium benefits and Much
Morel Call or visit us online,
877-484-3042
www.oakleytransport.com
HEATING/AIR TECH TRAINING!
3 week accelerated program.
Hands on environment. State of
Art Lab. Nationwide
certifications and Local Job
Placement Assistance! Call Now:
1-877-994-9904


Jobs Wanted
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR
SOMEONE to take care of an
elderly person for you, in your
home? REF IF NEEDED. Call
after 6:00 pm 386-364-7779
DO YOU NEED YOUR HOME
CLEANED or Pressure Washed,
or your yard cleaned up? Done
at a very reasonable rate. Call
Christine or Gary 386-792-1655


BEST OF THE BEST REAL ESTATE COMPANY 008
i386-755-6600
Toll Free 1-877-755-6600
"^ Ton 540 W. Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida 32055
email:
hallmark0l @comcast.net
www hallmark tal eclly con



FEATURED PROPERTY:
10..CRFS!! 2?rOu. .q.ft..home with
.-ceplnm %rap ar.,und porches, new,
paran ,n &d e nd our, and neA carpel
Land i, grac.d nbh cluster. of large
oals, fenced and ha. truit trees. Bring.
,lllfer.' Sb ,rn :ic subject to bank
ppr.:..I c "l-itnha q haffer 386-397-
J7sh or Janel Creel 's8r-719-0382
OTHER PROPERTIES:
JUST REDUCED Lovely custom built home 10.42 ACRES with well, septic and power pole.
on 5 acres. Fenced anid cross fenced with a ,Approx. one acre cleared for your home or
barn. Horses are welcome MLS 66328 Now mobile home. Located close to Suwannee
askig $279,900 Call Bryan Smithey 386- County line. $79,000 MLS 70961 Call Sharon
965-2922 eloe"386-365-1203


HAMILTON COUNTY 2 story home of
concrete block, and poured concrete offers
cooling respite from summer heat. Peaceful
S. I- *I. : 1 i'.- -ici r,..-' r . rt-, Only
I. ; r .,T., Ir,. 1 .....1A ', .. :.i r. .mp Call
Bob Dezendorf 386-623-1277 or Hallmark
386-755-6600
COMMERCIAL LAND IN LAKE CITY 4
3 :86 ..3 r, 5- 3 : N ., t8i Corn-,mi'i;
i-r ;ll A .1e *ir11 0 l. J,'5. 3 W Wil II | t l .-l 1-.111.
I o. .L r. :'" ,"? rL. 'AI i ,I I ,-
386-365-3081


MC ALPIN AREA 15.61 acres with old
homesite in beautiful country setting. Huge
pecan trees. Adjacent 37 Acres available for
additional reasonable price. MLS 69914 Call
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
M'KET OFFETR 7 cle. ,;., Hieh-u '" miih
S r .,,,riull,llne 1 I hal ,l Pen used I. Itr C
I-t.1I. %ill r] ? irpii M.u,3.tale onef
S1,1 1i ` '.'n MLS '271 1 Call icrihu
n]'lr b "? rn7F
500887-F


-FOR RENT-


GREAT RATES FOR NICE LOOKING
RENTALS STARTING AT $300 PER MONTH
FOR SINGLEWIDES AND $450:PER MONTH.
FOR DOUBLEWIDES. WATER, SEWER,
AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS.
386-330-2567 5s,





529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL ,
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389,
Evening 362-2990


(1) Hamilton Co: 4 acres on CR
143 with well, septic & service pole,
10x12 storage, nice grass & trees.
Reduced to $40,000.
(2) Off CR 49 10 acres in grass
with scattered trees, surveyed into
two 5 acre tracts, 3 sides fenced.
Priced to sell at $4,900 per acre.
(3) Near City 133rd Road: 3BR/2-
1/2BA CH/AC brick home with
approx. 3,200 sq. ft. under roof,
fireplace, kitchen furnished, shop,
storage one acre homesite, with
large trees. Priced to sell @
$207,500.
(4) Off CR136: 5 acre partially
wooded some grass. Will work for
land home package. Reduced to
$39,900.
(5) On 103rd
Rd. p ..omesite,
well, spq l- .
(6) Off CR 349: 10 acre wooded
tract with a two bedroom CHIAC
log home in excellent condition
cont. approx. 1200 sq. ft. under
roof, 30'x40' pole barn. Reduced to
$175,000.
(7) 410 Dexter: Corner lot with
CH/AC brick home with 2050 +-
sq. ft. under roof, large inground
pool, kitchen furnished. Good buy
@ $149,500.
(8) Branford area: 15 acres in good
cropland. with county roads and
fence on three sides. Excellent
location near US 27 & US 129.
Bring all offers.
(9) Suwannee River: 2.34 acres
with 150 ft on the river below
Branford. Well, septic, service pole,
camper canopy, storage bldg., etc.
Priced to sell @ $79,900. ,
(10) OffCCRvith a 3/2
C .R Iwith
firepp l rnished,
20'x2 0"op.. fenced. REDUCED
TO $65,000
(11) Industrial Park: 1.13 acre
corner tract good exposure.
Reduced to $34,500.
(12) 40 acres with 835 ft on paved
road in 13 year old planted pines.
Priced to sell at Reduced to
$189,600.
(13) Near City: 2 ac. with 3/2 home
cont. approx. 1280 sq. ft. under
roof, kitchen furnished, carport.
REDUCED TO $49,000.
(f4) Luraville Area: Fly-in
Community 15 acre wooded large


trees, good county road. Priced to
sell reduced to $74,900.
(15) Suwannee River: Two acres
wooded river lot off CR 349 near
Royal Springs and Boat Ramp. 100
sq. ft. on the water. (Buildable)
good buy @ $55,000.
(16) Off Mitchell Rd.: 20 acres
wooded with survey on 199th Rd.
$89,900.
(17) Off CR 136 East: 40 acre tract
partially wooded, some grass small
pond, fenced. Good area.
REDUCED TO $149,000.
(18) Hamilton Co.: 10 acres' on
CR751 and the river approx. 1300
ft. on the water and approx. 1300
ft. on paved road. Priced to sell at
$85,000.
(19) Madison Co.: 40 acres in 16
year old slash planted pines off CR
255 good elevation. Good buy at
$175,000.
(20) Helvenston St.: 4 lots with a
4/3 CH/AC 1-1/2 story brick/frame
home cont. approx 3,200 sq. ft.
under roof. Kitchen furnished,
fireplace, corner lots, plus 1
bedroom, guest house count. approx.
550 sq. ft. Priced to sell @
$170,000.
(21) Suwannee River home: nice
two bedroom two story CH&AC
home South of Branford, kitchen
furnished, beautiful view of river
from rear, screen porch.. Good area.
REDUCED TO $179,900.
(22) Farms of 10 Mill Hollow: 4
acres in grass/cropland with
scattered trees. $32,500.
(24) Near City: Off US 90 East 5
acres wooded near golf course.
Good buy @ $44.900.
(25) Suwannee River: Nice river lot
with a one bedroom cabin needs
some work. well, septic, etc. 82 ft on
the water. Good location with
survey. $75.000.
(26) 208 Houston: 3/5 BR. 1-1/2 BA
frame home cont. approx. 2,000 sq.
ft. under roof. Zoned R/D. has
potential. Priced to sell @ $59,500.
(27) 16th St: 3 ac. with a 3BR/2BA
CH&AC brick home with fireplace.
cont. approx. 2,780 sq. ft. under
roof. Kitchen furnished, survey.
Good Buy @ $172,500.
(28) Keaton Beach: Canal lot near
public boat ramp, sewer & water.
Good buy @ $125,000. 534-F


127 Howard Street E., Live Oak, FL

Phone: 386-362-4539

SToll Free: 1-800-557-7478

Se Habla Espanol

=CEMAIL: info@Doolerealty.comIl


www.poolersalty.com


EM~air


~T~b~Lr~fial


rt~9 r I s \ t~r









PAGE 2, SEPTEMBER 9 10, 2009 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


dL 4uau~unnee DientarnCI


L(


in& m fIi ~Ia-r E n- -w-M


j


EXPERIENCED CARE, GIVER
W/Refers., Looking for elderly, or
disabled person to take care of.
I'll take you to the Dr, hel. with
your meds, or just
companionship. 386-638-1603 or
386-984-0123
EXPERIENCED CARE GIVER:
23 years experience. Available to
take care of someone in their
home. Excellent References
386-364-2899
RESPITE CARE FOR YOUR
LOVED ONE. Bathing, Dressing,
Light Housekeeping, Meals, Dr's
Appt & Companionship.
References 386-466-5514
Lost & Found
LOST WHITE MALTESE at
Newburn Rd. 3yr old Female.
Large REWARD for her return
386-208-4084
Special Notices*















GUN SHOW
Sat 9/12 From 9:00-4:00
Sun 9/13 From 9:00-3:00
Columbia County Fairgrounds
Hwy 247 Lake City, FL
Concealed Weapons Classes,
Twice Daily. 904-461-0273

Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING!! Do You
Earn $800 in a Day? 25 Local
Machines and Candy All For-
$9,995. Call 1-888-753-3430
AIN#BO2000033 Call Us: We
Will Not Be Undersold!


Miscellaneous
FREE-FOUR PERSON HOT
TUB WALL NECESSARY
COMPONENTS. NEEDS WORK
386-294-3798

Computer

DONNA'S COMPUTER
SERVICE We Will Find A
Solution! Please contact Donna
386-559-7311 for more
information

Vocational

ADULT HIGH SCHOOL
DIPLOMA at home Fast!
Nationally accredited $399. Easy
payment plan. Free brochure.
800-470-4723
www.diplomaathome.com
ATTEND COLLEGE 'ONLINE
from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Accounting, *Criminal Justice.
Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call 800-443-
5186 www.CenturaOnline.com
AVIATION MAINTENANCE /
AVIONICS Graduate in 14
Months. FAA Approved;
financial aid if qualified. Job
placement assistance. Call
National Aviation Academy
Today! 1-800-659-2080 or
NAA.edu
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA!
Fast Affordable & Accredited
Free Brochure. Call Now! 1-800-
532-6546 ext. 16
www.continentalacademy.com

FirstDay.
Want to be a CNA?
Don't want to wait?
Express Training
is now offering our quality
Exam Prep Classes in. Lake
City. Class sizes limited.
Next class 03/16/2009.
Call 386-755-4401
expresstraining
services.com


LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072.
M-F from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.

Pets for Free

FREE ADULT CATS 10 years
old spay 1-Male 1-Female,
Owner passed way, need a good
home, no children. 386-362-2208
FREE BOXER MIX LESS THAN
1 YR OLD. All Shots, Neutered,
Playful, Good w/Children. 386-
362-3953
LAB WHITE/FEMALE 2 1/2
years old. "TO A 6OOD HOME".
Please call for details 386-590-
0691

Building Materials
LUMBER LIQUIDATORS
Hardwood Flooring, from $
.99/Sq.Ft. Exotics, Oak,
Bamboo, Prefinished &
Unfinished. Bellawood w/50
year prefinish, plus A Lot More!.
e Deliver Anywhere, 5 Florida
Locations, 1-800-FLOORING (1-
800-356-6746)
METAL ROOFING TAX
CREDIT! 40 yr Warranty. Direct
from manufacturer. 30 colors in.
stock Quick turnaround.
Delivery available. Gulf Coast
Supply & Manufacturing, 1-888-
393-0335
www.gulfcoastsupply.com
MOBILE HOME ROOF
EXPERTS 100% Financing,
Free Estimates We .Finance,
Almost Everyone Reroof,
Repairs, 40yrs Experience
Home Improvement Services
Toll-FREE 1-877-845-6660 State
Certified (Lic.#CCC058227)
ROOF REPAIRS CALL 24/7,
Flat Roof & Mobile Home
Specialist. Free Certified
Inspections. Lic/Ins
CCC1327406. All Florida
Weatherproofing & Construction
1-877-572-1019


Electronics
FREE GPS! FREE Printed!
FREE MP31 With Purchase of
New computer. Payments
Starting at Only $29.99/week. No
Credit Check! Call GCF Today.
1-877-212-9978

Furniture

FirstDay.
DAY BED W/MATTRESS $150,
13" TV W/VCR $50, 19" TV $100
or OBO on all. 386-623-1544
FOR SALE
42" Rnd Dining TbI w/4 chairs
$50
Leather lift chair, reclines too.
Needs minor upholstery work.
$75 Sewing machine cabinet
desk $15
Table Saw, needs guide $75
Wood Twin Bed Frame $15
Call 386-638-1617

Miscellaneous

DIRECT FREE 5 Months!
Includes All. 265+ Digital
Channels + Movies with NFL
Sunday Ticket! Ask How Today!
Free DVR/HD Receiver!
Packages from $29.99
DirectStarTV 1-800-973-0161
DIRECTV Satellite Television,
Free Equipment, Free 4 Room
Installation, Free HD or DVR
Receiver Upgrade. Packages
from $29.99/mo. Call DIRECT
Sat TV for Details 1-888-420-
9482 ,
DISH NETWORK'S BEST
OFFER EVER! Free HD/DVR
$9.99/mo For Over 100"All-digital
Channels. Call Now And
Receive $600 Signup Bonus! 1-
866-573-3640
FREE DIRECT 5 Months!
Includes All 265+ Digital
Channels + Movies with NFL
Sunday Ticket! Ask How Today!
Free DVR/HD Receiver!
Packages from $29.99
DirectStarTV 1-800-216-7149


SWEI



P"'M E


NEW ADT CUSTOMERS Free
Home Security System! ADT
24/7 Monitoring starting at just
$35.99/mo. $99 Install Fee. Call
Now! 866-265-4139 ADT Auth
Co
STEEL BUILDING
MANUFACTURER: Pre-
engineered 20x40, 20x60,
25x50, 30x40 and up. Huge
Summer Rebates! Financing
available w/ low payments.. Kit
form or statewide install.
WWW.ORLANDOSTEEL.COM
(800) 868-1640
SWIM SPA-FACTORY
CLEARANCE Four Fantastic
models to choose from,
wholesale pricing! Warranty,
financing. HOTTUBS @ 50%
Discounts, Can deliver. Call 1-
800-304-9943

Boats/Supplies

BOATS; 1000's of boats for sale
www.floridamariner.com
reaching 6 million homes weekly
throughout Florida. 800-388-
9307, tide charts, broker profiles,
fishing captains, dockside dining
and more.

Apartments for Rent

APARTMENT FOR RENT
2Bd/1Ba Fully Furnished. 1st &
$500 Security. 386-935-3638 or
386-854-0123.

FirstDay.
EFFICIENCY APARTMENT:
1Bd /1Ba Furnished. Satelite &
Utilities incl. Private enter, 8
miles from town.. No
Smoking/Pets. $375, mo, $150
Dep. 386-842-5106

FirstDay.
LIKE AN APARTMENT:
1Bd/1Ba, Kitchen, Livingroom.
Attached to house, all utilities
included., Ini McAplin. $475 mo/
$120 Wk. 1 Mo sec 386-362-
6314

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in
this newspaper is subject to the
Fair'Housing Act which makes it
illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability,
familial status or national origin,
or an intention, to make any
such preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age
of 18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women
and people securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in
violation of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed that all
,dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimination call
HUD toll-free 1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free number for the
hearing impaired is 1-800-927-
- 9275.



OPPORTUNITY


Houses for Rent
AVAILABLE RENTALS
3/2 at 11068 89th Road, Live
Oak 3/1 at 16892 53rd Road,
Wellborn
3/2 at 17671 91st Place, McAlpin
3/2 at 3246 101st Lane, Live
Oak
Pick up your application and
check for viewing dates at the
rental!
BRICK HOUSE 3BD/2BA Close
to Town. $700 mo, 1st last &
Security. Call 386-362-6556
TWO HOUSES 1-2Bd/1Ba
ALSO 1-CHARMING 1 BIG
Bd/1 Ba. Lots of closets 1 mile
from Live Oak. NO PETS
$650/mo, 1st, Last & $300 Dep.
Includes Water /Sewerage/ Lawn
Maint. 386-362-3002.
Mobile Homes for Rent

FirstDay.
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba, 28X60 on 1
acre, surrounded by horse farm.
Falmouth area 19377 68th St.
$650 mo. 1.st, last, security. 386-
249-0197

Homes for Sale

FirstDay.
RECENTLY FORECLOSED,
Special Financing Available, Any
Credit, Any Income 3BD, 2BTH,
1344SqFt, located at, 13933
24th, Live Oak, $65,000. Visit
www.roselandco.com/842,
Drive by then call (866) 7q9-
4495.
SALE OR LEASE 3Bd/1Ba
House Remodeled in Live Oak
Owner Financing. Sale $65K
Lease $675 mo. 386-752-6947
or 386-365-3030

Mobile Homes for Sale

DWMH 3Bd/2Ba W/Many
Upgrades including, Fireplace,
Stainless appi, Large rooms,
w/walkin Closets. $119,900
Westfield Realty, Carrie Cason
386-623-2806

OWNER FINANCE/HANDYMAN
SP. 14X70 3Bd/2Ba .45 acres,
needs clean-up. Rent applied. to
down'pmt. $550. mo, 1st & last.
1634 177th Rd 386-867-0048



Mobile

Homes



Land for

sale.

Financed

by owner.

386-362-2720


Mel-Mar-Go Apts.

Live Oak, FL

386-364-1648

2 Br/2 Ba

Rent $695 Deposit $500
Pets are welcome 5,-F









Sat. Sept. 19th, 1 1:00 AM

Echols Cty, Statenville, Ga

575 Acres Planted Pines

Offered Divided or

as a Whole
Directions from Statenville:
Travel South on US Hwy 129,
2 miles, Property on Left.
Salesite: Property will sell
On Site from Tract #5


10% BUYERS PREMIUM


J.Dra AscIc
xvw-w~~jdurhamacin~o
1-80-3422666 GAL 112


For Detoils & Photos Visit
www.jdurha muclions.com
Call For Free Color Brochure
1-800-342-2666


I hiltvitI t


PAGE 2, SEPTEMBER 9 10, 2009


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA







SEPTEMBER 9 10, 2009, PAGE 3


M CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM -: I'Mr. ri; NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Dear Classified Guys,
I've always lived in the part of the
country that gets snow. Not just a
dusting, but serious snow that clos-
es roads and requires one to shovel
out to find the car. Then I moved
south. These people don't know
what snow is. When they see snow
flakes fall from the sky, schools
close, bread and milk sell out and
people cancel everything. Last year
when we got an inch of snow, people
were offering to buy my 4-wheel
drive car at the gas station. At that
time I wasn't selling it, but now I am.
Unfortunately, it's nothing but hot
weather for the next few _
months. Since people -
around here are so crazy
when it comes to winter,
I'm wondering if it pays to
hang on to the car until snow
season. Do you think I could get a
lot more for a 4-wheel drive car if I
wait until wintertime?
Carry: As most salespeople would
tell you, selling for the best price is
strictly a function of demand. When
the weather's hot, air conditioners can
sell out. Try to sell one in the middle of
winter and you'll be waiting for the
telephone to ring.


THE

CLASSIFIED

GUYS,



Duane "Cash" Holze
& Todd "Carry" Hoize


09/06/09
@2009 The Classified Guys"


Cash: Four-wheel drive vehicles
may have been standard equipment
where you previously lived, but in a
southern climate they probably won't
see much snow.
Carry: However, you may find that
selling now is not going to make a dif-
ference in your price. People choose
their vehicles for any number of rea-
sons. Some want a 4-wheel drive for
snow. Others want to tow a trailer or
just want the capability of driving off-
road.
Cash: Many buyers choose their car
more by its features than the drive train.
A car in good shape with a nice radio,
good air conditioning or even extra cup


holders may prove to sell better.
Carry: In short, the decision on
when to sell your car is more dependent
on your circumstances than the time of
year. If you have already bought another
car or don't need this one, then selling
now may be the best choice. Besides,
paying car insurance for an unused
vehicle would negate any additional
value you could get at a later date.
Cash: So while it's possible you
may fetch a better price for your 4-
wheel drive when the flurries fly, its
probably not worth holding out that
long. However, if you have any unused
air conditioners, now may be a good
time to advertise them for sale!


w Clasif ied 0uys-com


FirstDay.
MUST SELL never titled
4Bd/2Ba all warranties apply will
move ad set-up on your property
for 39,995 call Manager Mike
352-378-2453 X-12
2010 4Bd/2Ba 32X76 save
thousands 10% down 350 a
month Set-up and delivery
Included 352-378-2453
LOTS FOR LEASE in the City of
Gainesville ready for your new
mobile home 275 a month 352-
373-5428.
THIS. 16X60-$300 Above
Factory Inv.- 2Bd/2Ba SWMH,
Save Thousands. Call Rick 386-
752-1452
BANK REPO 2005 24X48
3Bd/2Ba "Like Brand New" "With
a Used Price." Call Mr Mott 386-
752-8196
"Mossy Oak" 2010 Model
4Bd/2Ba MH $39,995. Includes
Delivery, Set-Up, AC, Skirting &
Steps. You Pick all Colors. Call
Mr. Mott 386-752-8196

Autos for Sale
PONTIAC GRAN PRIX 2001: In
good condition, needs
transmission. Just $1000 OBO
386-330-6318 or 386-688-5661



















Silas Oaks
Apartments
Now leasing affordable
1, 2 & 3 bedrooms!
Brand New Construction
W/D Connections
Dishwashers & Microwaves
Central Heat & Air
Fitness Center
Swimming Pool
Close to Schools & Shopping
We accept Section 8
For more information, call:
386-330-5354
1120 SW Silas Drive
Live Oak, FL 32064
546190-F


Vacation Property
BEST BUY IN THE NORTH
CAROLINA MOUNTAINS!
2.5acre parcel. Gated
development. Spectacular view.
High altitude. Bryson City
$39,500. Owner financing.
Owner 1-800-810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com
GEORGIA BLUE RIDGE
MOUNTAINS- Only 4 remain!
Reduced for immediate sale!
2.5acre lots on incredible trout
stream, county water, pristine
location on Cutcane Rd.,
$39,000. Seller Financing. 706-
364-4200
LAND SALE NOTICE:
VIRGINIA MTNS Closeout Sale!
2.5 acres with pond near
stocked trout stream, near state
park, $29,500, must 'sell. Bank
financing. 1-866-789-8535
LOG. CABIN SALE ON 5
ACRES with dockable lakefront
only $69,900. 1680 sf log cabin
kit on 5 acres with lakefront on
12,000 acre recreational lake.
Boat to Gulf of Mexico. Excellent'
financing. Call now 1-866-952-
5339, x1561.
www.grandAewharbor.com

Acreage
GEORGIA CRAWFORD
COUNTY. 198 ACRES -
$1,750/AC. Two built ponds,
one beaver pond, hardwood &
,.,pine timber, fantastic hunting!
".478-987-9700 St. Regis Paper
SCo.
OWNER MUST SELL 4+ acres -
$57,300 Nice oak trees, private
access to lake. All utilities in.
Ready to build when you are!
Financing available. Call now
866-352-2249.
www.fllandbargains.com
S.E. TENN MTNS LAND
DISCOUNTED 5+ acre Tracts
from $24,900 w/ utilities. Must
Sell! Ocoee/Hiwassee River
Area. Large MTN Tracts from
$2250/acre. 1-800-531-1665 or
1-931-260-9435.
FIVE ACRE ESTATE
PROPERTY Drastically
Reduced! 'On Alachua line, in
Gilchrist County. Only $63,000
w/financing available. For
photo/plat: 1 -00-294-2313
x2673, days 7-7. A Bar Sales,
Inc.

PRICE REDUCED
Lafayette County
10ac, Hwy 51 N. of Mayo,
near river, $64,900
1 ac RV/Mobile home lots,
Branford area, $15,000
Suwannee County
5 ac, Park like,
near airport, $49,900
Easy Financing
1-941-778/7980or7565
www.landcallnow.com


4 r A


Pages 8-9


Historic Florida tourism

images exhibit added to


Florida Memory Site


BUSINESSES


FOR
Rental Assistance
1, 2. 3. & 4 BRHC & Non-
HC Accessible Apartments

7015 N\ DrE)LV, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936 |
TDD/TTY 7011
Equal Housing Opportunity


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living
2 bedroom duplex.
Call 362-3110.
.501033-F


SERVICES


Rental assistance may be available!
HOD Vouchers Welcome!
1, 2 & 3 BR HC & Non-HC
Accessible Apartments

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL,
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housing Opportunity


l/J7 C/ --




- CSD Enterprises


B~yDDi


SMetal Roofing
Quality Metal Roofing & Accessories At Discount Prices
| Quality Metal Roofing & Accessories At Discount Prices!!


3' wde gahvalume
3'.wide painted
2' wide 5-\


Cut to your desired lengths!
*Delivery Service Available*
Ask about steel buildings


Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg. Inc.

CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-393-0335


I Bush Hogging Landclearing Hauling
Stump Removal Discing Fencing


BILL'S BACKHOE
& LAND CLEARING
-:; -- a FREE Estimates

12150 196th Terrace
(386) 364-1418 O'Brien, FL 32071


Additions
* Renovations
Repairs
Roofing


Landscaping
* Brick & Block Walls
Concrete / Brick
Walks & Patios


Licensed and Insured

Call Wayne Darby at
386-658-3512 or 386-688-9356
MOMM.'UaM


SUWANNEE

IRONWORKS
V,., ,b 1 ;., Bit. ",, Sms l'
Ernie Caparelli
We do Aluminum. Steel. Stainless.
Welding & Fabricating
We also ao Metal Sales
386-935-3466
Cell 386-984-5112
22618 CR 49
O'Brien, FL 32071


LAKEWOOD


APARTMENTS

IN LIVE OAK

Quiet country living 2 bedroom duplex

Call 362-3110


ABBEY MINI STORAGE
All New Units
*5X15 5X20 10X15 10X20 15X20
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd.
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak


364-5300D


TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 386-362-1734

DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M.


If you're searching for that perfect set of wheels,
look no further than www.nflaonline.com


BsasBa~B~rul


~p---BBL-~BBaJ~n~8~8~88~


i~~~~rla-r.Irntr5-t


Traction Control
According to a recent survey, only
about 18% of 4-wheel drive owners
ever use their vehicle to go off-road.
Most simply like the idea of having the
added traction for rain, sleet or snow.
However, the performance of many 4-
wheel drive vehicles isn't all that it's.
cracked up to be. Comparison tests
performed by automotive enthusiast
magazines found that most 2WD drive
vehicles with snow tires on all four
wheels can outperform a 4WD vehicle
with regular tires in snowy conditions.
Reinventing the Wheel
While historians can debate the true
origin of the 4-wheel drive, it is com-
monly sited that the first vehicle of its
kind dates back to 1900 and was
designed by Ferdinand Porsche
(founder of Porsche cars). His design
was not the mechanical 4-wheel drive
systems like today, but instead had four
electric hub motors, one on each wheel,
powered by a generator from the
engine. While the idea never took off,
it did surface many years later when
NASA used a similar design to put its
lunar vehicle into motion.
* *
Got a question, funny story, or just want to give
us your opinion? We want to hear all about it!
Email us at comments@classifiedguys.com.


Under the Weather
My wife and I haven't been shop-
ping for a new car in quite a while, so
prices were a bit surprising to us.
Unfortunately, we picked the hottest
day of the year to visit the dealership.
Outside in the sun, we were bak-
ing, and apparently we weren't the
only ones. After we stepped inside to
look at a new model, another cus-
tomer came in with a salesman, start-
ed to wobble and fainted right on the
showroom floor.
The salesman looked confused,
glanced our way and asked if we
knew what happened. I told him it
must have been the weather, but my
wife had a different idea. Looking
up from the new car, she whispered.
"It's not the heat. He probably just
had sticker shock!"
(Thanks to Benny H.)


This snow-going Subaru
lives solely in the present.

FOR SALE
2002 4WD drive SubarU, r
e now Best offer











PAGE, i., 4, SEPTEME 9- 10 fte,0 F A S

... Y-j_^^- .^ U i1^^1J \y J v^ u u


Pink Ladies Needed!
Are you looking for a place to share your talents? Do
you enjoy meaningful conversation with a good friend-? --
How 'bout a good book?
Then We Want You!! Suwannee Health Care and Re-
hab Center is looking for volunteers to start a Ladies
Auxiliary.I
Call Lynn Brannon, Activities Director at 386-362-
7860 or 386-590-2961.

Talent Search
Do you sing'or play and instrument? Do you act or
dance? Do you like to read or spend time with a friend
in wonderful conversation?
WE WANT YOU! Suwannee Health Care & Rehab
Center is looking for your talent for our residents. Din-
ner for two $45; One night at the Beach $125; One
hour volunteering to make memories that last forever -
PRICELESS!
Call: Lynn Brannon, Activities Director 386-362-7860
or 386-590-2961.

Head Start/Early Head Start
early enrollment
Suwannee Valley 4Cs Head Start/Early Head Start is
accepting applications for children from birth to age 5 for
the 2009-20 school year beginning Monday Feb. 23.
Head Start/Early Head Start is a FREE comprehensive
early childhood education program that includes health,
dental, nutrition and VPK services to eligible
children/families.
Centers are located in Suwannee, Hamilton, Lafayette
and Columbia counties. Parents bring proof of income
and child's age to register.
For more information call 386-754-2222.

Flyball racing classes
Too Hot to Handle Flyball Racing Team will be hold-
ing flyball classes in O'Brien and Live Oak. The classes
will teach you and your dog how to compete as a team.
Flyball is a relay race in which four dogs race against an-
other team of four dogs over four hurdles to a box that
they leap upon to release a tennis ball, they catch the ball
and bring it back to their handler so that the next dog on
their team may then run the course. There are two
leagues that teams can compete in to win titles and

Limited time offer
$9.99
after malPin ebatl e debit cadi
$5999 2-year really price
'. 2,-,0mac nmad., r-6e
,Nvatl USB 760




.. "" ,' .RQR1CR .
;01 9 S =a"ges (Icl. Fea Univ. Svc. Of12.9% of interstate & rnl telecom charge (var[ e 5$rteey, 70 Regulatory & 920
$175 tmnnnalce lee & agaar c g, $029219 alftaroitneranMe. '1 $29 gngrere -ee rr ap ret cct'atlt ED0 ecU device
(sel sprately).iMd t Broadanid Is aeate to moreaIran 262 nrte penplen2m8 n ma e Ire t e U.S O &r ,oage ey
smienoav~a~e~, .Wa~euerttongchat e dmypl. a~eoe.tr etdgrieet.
ph. ete '.itmdtaks p o wls foie n 2 ords. dtes &co~r .. .. a15LF Fa~


Apartment for Rent

HUD HOMES! 4bdr 3ba
$217/mo! 3 bdrm only_ $199/mo!
Stop Renting! 5% dw, 15 yrs @
8% apr For Listings (800)366-
9783 ext-5669

Auctions

FORECLOSED HOME
AUCTION <500+ FLORIDA
Homes REDC I Free Brochure
www.Auction.com RE' No.
CQ1031187

AUCTION SATURDAY,
September 12, 10 am, Centre,
Alabama, Hwy 411 80+/- Acre
Premier Cattle Farm in tracts,
selling Equipment ABSOLUTE
(866)789-5169 www.amnerican-.
aqctioneers.com, Keith Baldwin
AL1416.

Auto Donations

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY
COUPON UNITED BREAST
CANCER FOUNDATION Free
Mammograms, Breast Cancer
Info www.ubcf.info FREE
Towing, Tax Deductible, Non-
Runners Accepted, (888)468-
5964.

Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING. 40 yr
Warranty-Buy direct from
manufacturer 30/colors in stock,
w/all accessories. Quick turn
around. Delivery available.- Gulf
Coast Supply & Mfg, (888)393-
0335 www.GulfCoastSupply.com

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING! Do you
earn $800 in a day? 25 Local
Machines and Candy $9,995.
(888)629-9968 B02000033
CALL US: We will not be
undersold!

DOLLAR & DOLLAR PLUS,
MAILBOX, PARTY, DISCOUNT
CLOTHING OR TEEN STORE
FROM $51,900 Worldwide!
100% TURNKEY CALL NOW
(800)518-3064
WWW.DRSS6.COM.


awards.
For more information call Cathy at 386-362-4956 or
visit the website at http://toohottohandle-flyball.com/.

Customers needed!
Dairy Queen of Live Oak will host Dairy Queen Bene-
fit Night the second Tuesday of every month from 6-8
p.m. to help buy books for Suwannee Middle School.

Donations needed!
Suwannee County Environmental Watchdogs, a non-
profit organization, seeks donations for yard sale mer-
chandise. Info: Sandy, 386-364-8020.

Register now!
Descendants of Calhoun family plan
reunion in 2009
Descendants of the late Sarah Calhoun, Eva Calhoun
and Thomas Calhoun are invited to a family reunion to
be held in 2009. Info: misstheresamartin@yahoo.com or
predop@aol.com.

Coffee with your councilman
Beginning Jan. 13, 2009 City Councilman for District
4 Mark Stewart invites his constituents to "Coffee with
your Councilman" at JAVA JAX located in the Publix
shopping center. ,
Come and meet with him on the second Tuesday of
each month from 7 a.m. till 8:30'a.m. This will be a
time to get to know each other and discuss current is-
sues and citizen concerns.

CJBAT tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): CJ-
BAT (Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test) at NFCC
Testing Center (Bldg. #16), Madison. CJBAT is required
for acceptance into Corrections & Law Enforcement pro-
grams. Photo ID required. Pre-registration & scheduling
time and date are required. To register please call 850-
973-9451.

College Placement Tests
Monday- Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): Col-
lege Placement Test (CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg.
#16), 5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC Student Ser-
vices 24 hours before test. For information please call
850-973-9451.

TABE tests
Monday Thursday
Monday- Thursday at 5 p.m; (by appointment): TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education) at NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison. TABE is required for acceptance
into vocational/technical programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration & scheduling time & date are required.
To register please call 850-973-9451.


Cars for Sale

Acura Integra 98 $500! Honda
Civic 01 $550! Nissan Altima 99
$500"! Toyota Corolla 02 $500!
Police Impounds! For listings call
(800)366-9813 ext 9275.

Help Wanted

Heating/Air Tech Training. 3
week accelerated program. Hands
on -environment. State of the Art
Lab.: Nationwide certifications
and Local Job Placement
Assistance! CALL NOW:
(877)994-9904.

Homes For Rent

A Bank Repo! 5bdr 4ba $317/mo!
3 br Foreclosure! $199/mo!! 5%
dw, 15 yrs @ 8% apr For Listings
(800)366-9783 ext 5853

Homes For Sale

FORECLOSED HOME
AUCTION 500+ FLORIDA
Homes REDC I Free Brochure
www.Auction.com RE No.
CQ1031187

Lots & Acreage

Owner Must Sell. 4+ acres-
$57,300 Nice oak trees, private
access to lake. All utilities in.
Ready to build when you are!
Financing avail. Call now
(866)352-2249. ..
www.fflanldoffer.com


Real Estate


AUCTION 16 residential lots
ranging from .39 acres to 5.68
acres in beautiful Roan Mountain,
TN. 3 lots to be offered Absolute
'higgenbotham.com (800)257-4161

LOG CABIN SALE ON 5 ACRES
WITH DOCKABLE
LAKEFRONT only $69,900. 1680
sf log cabin kit on 5 acres with
lakefront on 12,000 acre
recreational lake. Boat to Gulf of
Mexico. Excellent financing. Call
now (866)952-5339, x1560
www.grandviewharbor.com

Services

CRIMINAL RECORD?
MISDEMEANOR, FELONY?
Have them expunged for $99.95,
30 to 60 days including DUI's. Get
a Fresh Start Today. Call (800)621-
4889 24/7days.

Waterfront Properties

ORTEGA LANDING Waterfront
condos and marina on Ortega
River in Jacksonville, FL. 3
bedroom, 3 bath condos approx.
2,600 .SF from $999K. Private
elevator access, covered parking,
GE Monogram appliances, 9 ft
ceilings. Marina slip memberships
and leasing available. (800)800-
0 8 9 5 or
www.visitortegalanding.com


Miscellaneous


ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement
assistance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified. Call
(866)858-2121,
www.CenturaOnline.com.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train
for high paying Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid
if qualified Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (888)349-5387.


A-NF
ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA

Classified Display I Mqro Daily


[ Week of Sept. 7,2009 1


49962SFJ


Artist Guild presents 13th
annual Fine Art Exhibition
Art presented September 14-25
The 13th annual Fine Art Exhibition will be presented by
the Live Oak Artist Guild, September 14 through Sep-
tember 25, at the Suwannee River Regional Library in
Live Oak.
Awards will include Best of Show, First, Second, Third
place, honorable mentions and purchase awards.
An opening day reception will be held on Sunday, Sep-
tember 13 from 2 pm to 4 pm at the Suwannee River Re-
gional Library. Music will be provided by the Suwannee
Trio. All participating artists, their guests, award sponsors
and general public are invited to attend.
Works shown will include painting, drawing, photogra-
phy and sculpture by artists from Live Oak, North Flori-
da and Georgia.
The community is encouraged to view this year's exhi-
bition; the show will be open during the library's daily
schedule. For more information, please call the Live Oak
Artist Guild Gallery at 364-5099 or go to LOAG.org.

Future Now at Melody
Christian
Sept. 9
Melody Christian Academy is hosting a Future Now
event on Sept. 9.
Future Now will be doing an afternoon assembly with
middle and high school students and will have a "Back to
School Bash" at 7 p.m. in the Revolution Club (next to
Melody Christian Center) that is open to the community.
Free event for the whole family.
For more information call 386-364-4800.

Quarterly Community Forum
at Suwannee Health Care
Sept. 10
Suwannee Health Care invites the community to partici-
pate in its Quarterly Community Forum, set for Sept. 10
at 6 p.m.
The guest speaker will be Webster Baker, who will make
a presentation on wills and other healthcare options.
Hors d'oeuvres and refreshments will be served so
please RSVP by calling 386-362-7860.

Hernando de Soto and the
Indians of Suwannee County
Sept. 12
Saturday, Sept 12 from 9:45 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Camp
Weed. Cost $25.00 each, includes lunch. A complete ex-
ploration of the period of events leading up to and fol-
lowing Hernando de Soto's expedition through this coun-
ty. A recent archeological discovery on the Camp Weed
property by the University of Florida revealed that this
was indeed where de Soto's army (600 men and 200
horses) stayed on Sept 12, '1539. Join us as we visit the
site and search for artifacts. Also present will be a horse
from the original Spanish breed, a Galicino. A fun day
.for the family. Please register for this event by calling
Camp Weed at 364-5250.

Cookout, ice cream social
planned at McAlpin
Community Club
Sept. 14
To kick off the fall season, members of the McAlpin
Community Club will
host a cookout and ice cream social on Sept. 14 at 7 p.m.
All members are encouraged to attend.
Neighbors in the McAlpin area are welcome to join us;
the membership
fees per year are $5 per family. The clubhouse is locat-
ed at 9981 170th Terrace. For more info, call Donna at
963-3516 or Shirley at 963-5357.

Reunion planned for BHS
class of '63
Oct. 3
The Branford High School Class of 1963 will hold a
reunion at the Jonas Mill in Hildreth, FL (seven miles
east of Branford on US Highway 27), starting at 11 a.m.,
Saturday, October 10. A hamburger/hot dog cookout is
planned. Please share this information with other class
members you see or have contact with. Let's make this a
great reunion! For details, contact Larry Jonas at 229-
559-6922, or mail your contact information to: Larry
Jonas, PMB 122, Moody AFB, Ga. 31699. We need a
head count, so let us hear from you no later than October
3.

Class reunion
Suwannee High Class of 1989
Upcoming 20th reunion
October 9-10, 2009
For more information please contact:
Paula Gianeskis McCullers
386-590-4385.


Suwannee River Challenge
and Marathon
Oct. 10
The 8th Annual Suwannee River Challenge and
Marathon date has been set for Saturday, Oct 10; on


Columbus Day Weekend.

L.H.S. Class of 1999
Oct. 16-17
LHS class of 1999 will hold their 10 year reunion on Oc-
tober 16-17, in Mayo.
Please send mailing address to
www.fdoacs.hotmail.com Darica Land, 386-288-4028.
Invitation to follow.


PAGE 4, SEPTEMBER 9 10, 2009,


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA








U LASIIE MRKTPAC -WW.NLA'IlE ERIN NRT _ii __DSOTHGERGA EPEMER9 1, 00, AG


Suwannee Valley Humane Society



CRITTER



CORNER


Medical Network


4 1,
.~
r ~ -


4


Suwannee Valley Humane Society
1156 SE Bisbee Loop
Madison, Florida 32340

Two miles south of Lee off C.R. 255
From 10 Exit 262. Take C.R.2555
north 1/2 miles

We are a Limited Space Shelter (no
kill). You must check with us prior to
bringing a drop-off animal to the shelter.
Hours; Tues, to Sat. 10:00 to 2:00, or by
appointment, Visit our website and see the
animals that need a really good home at
www.geocities.com/suwanneehs or at our
e-mail address suwanneevalley@embarq-
mail.com,

We service the surrounding counties of
Madison, Suwannee, Hamilton, Lafayette,
Columbia and Taylor.

Lost and Found Pets:
If you have lost a pet or found one, the
humane society will help you find your
pet. Call us at (850) 971- 9904 or toll free
at 1-866-236-7812. Leave a message if we
are closed, we will return your call. Re-
member to always call your local animal
controls or shelters if you have found a
lost or found pet.

THRIFT STORE:
You must come see our thrift stores, if
you have not been here before. We have
three stores, a boutique, clothing and fur-
niture. We are always looking for dona-
tions for the stores. Please keep us in mind
if you have items in good condition you
would like to donate to us.

RECYCLING:
We have a recycling bin on our property
newspapers, magazines, and catalogs. The
bin will take all kinds 'of paper. We also
have a bin in Live Oak at 305 Pinewood
Drive, just west Of Johnson's Appli-
ance/Radio Shack. We also collect alu-
minum cans to recycle. Just bring them to
the shelter. All the money goes to help the
homeless animals.

The Suwannee Valley Humane Society
depends on adoptions for $65.00 which
INCLUDES, spay/neuter, de-worm, heart-
worm/feline leukemia tested and rabies
shot (if old enough). Please come and vis-
it us, our animals would love to meet you.
REMEMBER; DO NOT LEAVE PETS
IN VEHICLES FOR ANY LENGTH OF
TIME DUE TO THE HEAT AND HU-
MIDITY.

FEATURED ANIMALS
FOR ADOPTIONS
DOGS:
3628 Tats is a 9 1/2 month old, Heel-
er Mix. He is silver, black and brown. He


is looking for a good home.

3613 Mindy is a Border Collie Mix.
She is 9 months old and is black color.

3612 Vicki is a 1 year 3 month old,
Blood Hound. She is brown and is very
friendly.

3605 Buddy is a Bassett Mix, he is 1
year 6 month old. He is tri color and
loves everyone.

3590 Trenton is 10 months old, he is
black, has white on his chest and brindle
feet. He is a Dobe/Lab Mix. He is good
. with kids, and animals and will sit for
treats.

CATS:
3604 Romeo is a 1 year 3 month old
cat. He is Orange and white and is quite
the lover.

3603 Cher is a 11 month old Torte -
Shell. She likes to be patted and held.

3599 Twilight is a black, 10 month
old kitty. She is a house cat and is good
with kids.

3568 Baby Cat is 2 year 8 months,
old. She is all black and loves to be made
of.

3555 Bandie is a black and white kit-
ty. She is 2 years 1 month old. She is
friendly and likes to play.

If you have lost or found an animal, you
would like to report. Please feel free to call
us and I will put your report in the news-
paper free.

LOST:
2 Huskies dogs,.a female and a puppy.
Female is White and the pup is Black and
Silver. The female is 9 years old and the
pup is 9 months old. If you have seen them
please, call Alan Fowler @ 386 935 -

We have a new Web site available to
view, www. petango.com. Get shelter ani-
mal information and pictures of all our an-
imals. Go check it out. When you get to
web suite be suie to put in the zip code for
this area, 32340.

Florida Animal Friend Spay & Neuter
License Plate has given us a grant for spay
& neutering. We have $25.00 coupons
available for you to have your Cats or
Dogs done. For more information call us
at 1 866 236 7812 4
Monday 9 a.m.-noon
Tues-Sat. 9 a.m.-2 p.m.


Buy e On Get OneFe

us online for more detaf qul or lesser value
S 2888 w.usHwy 90
Lake City, FL,32055
,, F- J M-. -.. .: _.
2-- 2--- ---- .-- ". .
jr ,is a^ purchased
V TokensT -


us online for more details '.- ,._ .: _. -,.-..--*- ....'


Sell Your Car for "Top Dollar"


SAL-


Each Kit Includes:
* 2 All-Weather Fluorescent "For Sale" Signs
* Successful Tips
"Get Top Dollar for Your Used Car"
Pre-Sale Checklist
Vehicle Options Window Display
E-Z Closing Forms
including Deposit Form & Bill of Sale


Run your Car For Sale classified in the Wednesday
North Florida Focus & Friday Suwannee Democrat
Classifieds and get the Car Kit for FREE.*
Deadline for placing your ad is Friday at 11:00 a.m.
*Not valid with the $18.95 special 499524-F


Gregory D. Snodgrass, M.D.
522 South Ohio Ave., Live Oak
386-330-6260
1-800-435-3937

Heartland Rehabilitation
Services
405 11th St., Live Oak
386-364-5051

North Florida Pharmacy
101 SW. US Hwy. 27, Branford
386-935-6905
229 W. Main St., Mayo
386-294-3777

Eye Center of North Florida
876 SW. State Road 247,
Lake City
386-755-7595
1-866-755-0040


Ophthalmology
Eduardo M. Bedoya, M.D.
Now at Shands in Live Oak
386-755-7595
Toll Free 866-755-0040.
Se habla espafiol 546546-F

Family Dentistry
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH,
D.D.S, P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-6556
1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County) 501056_F

Physical Therapy

,,r/E ; ......o ...., ... ..

* Physical Therapy *Occupaticn Tri.r.ap, ,p.,:r, Th r,.
* Specializing In Arthritis Fibrc.m n i ..ga i r. o li, .l
Joint Pain Sports Injuries* 'jrr ir, ur,- e i.lr,.:-
*Manual Therapy Lympnedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Protegrity
Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross, Av Med
Jasper 792-2426 Medicaid-pediatrics
Branford 935-1449 Workers Comp
Mayo 294-1407 Most Other Insurance Plans
A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore .

Ophthalmology

GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
522 South Ohio Avenue
(386) 330-6260 or 1-800-435-3937

"The Village Pharmacy at Advent
Christian Village offers full
prescription services to the
communi'."






At the W.B. Copeland Medical Center at Advent
Christian Village, modern facilities provide a
comfortable setting for our experienced staff to
deliver quality, full-service medical care.
Following your medical appointment, have your
prescription filled on the spot and purchase over
the counter medications at Village Pharmacy. Our
experienced Pharmacist gives professional
consultations and personalized service.Village
Pharmacy also offers free prescription delivery
service within Dowling park, as an additional
convenience. Most forms of insurance accepted.

ADVENT CHRISTIAN VILLAGE
AT DOWLING PARK
PO Box 4345 Dowling Park, FL 32064
386-658-5860 1-800-955-8771 TTY
1-800-647-3353
www.acvillage.net 54723-F


The Village Pharmacy at
Advent Christian Village
Dowling Park, FL
386-658-5860
1-800-647-3353

Healthcore, Inc.
Live Oak 386-208-1414
Lake City 386-755-8680
Jasper 386-792-2426
Branford 386-935-1449
Mayo 386-294-1407

Herbert C. Mantooth,
D.D.S., P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak
386-362-6556
1-800-829-6506

Steele Chiropractic
110 Irvin Ave., Live Oak
386-362-4112

Copeland Medical Center
10820 Marvin Jones Blvd.,
Dowling Park, FL
386-658-5300

Physical Therapy

Hearland'
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA
Mandy McCray, PTA
Carolyn McCook, Office Manager,
Patient Care Coordinator
AQUATIC THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis}Ot'thopedic/Sports
Medicine, Pediatrics Providers
Medicare "Mdicaid, AvMed & BCBS Providers
405 11th St., Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051 50105-F


North FlorIEa


Pharmacy

Medical.
Equipment
Oxygen

"Evoeiything For Your
Home Recovery"
Locally Owned & Operated '
101 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL 32008
(386) 935-6905
229 W. Main St., Mayo, FL 32066
(386) 294-3777




COPELAND

MEDICAL

CENTER
ADVENT CHRISTIAN VILLAGE
AT DOWLING PARK




Cinic: Family Practice, Urgent Care,
Geriatric Consultation5, Women's Health, School Physicals
Re:hab: Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Occupational Therapy
Pharmacy
10820 Marvin Jones Blvd., Dowling Park, FL
386-658-5300
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Nasseer Masoodi, M.D.
Rich Corley. PA-C
Accepting Medicare and Most Insurance,
Sliding Scale Also Available 5472o-F


To place an ad on this page, please call
Nancy at 386-362-1734 Ext. 103


Did you know?
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), at least 45.000
American adults die of complications of influenza, pneumococcal inifection-, and
hepatitis B each year. Those figures can be startling considering that each of the
aforementioned diseases can be prevented with vaccines. While certain vaccines given
during childhood, such as the one given for polio, protect people for the durauon of
their lives, vaccinations for certain-diseases must be given periodically for people to
maintain immunity. Other vaccines, such as the chickenpox vaccination, k ere not
available when many adults were children. The CDC recommends all adults eet annual
vaccinations for varicella (chickenpox), hepatitis B. measles-mumps-rubell a i MMR),
and tetanus. The CDC also notes that as people age they grow more susccptble to
serious diseases caused by common infections, emphasizing the need for the elderly to
receive annual vaccinations for influenza for those over the age of 50 and pneumonia
for those 65 and older. To receive a complete adult immunization schedule. visit the
CDC Web site at www.cdc.gov.


k SEPTEMBER 9 10, 2009, PAGE 5


[Get your Car For Sale Kit


N CLSSIFED ARKEPLAE WW.FLA SEVINGNORH 1:--(RIi'-A HND SOUTH GEORGIA


i':


i













PAGE 6, SEPTEMBER 9- 10,2009 U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Campers on


Rocket scientists,


among others, turn


to church-building


By Delores Kilpatrick
Gerald Oliver squinted
thoughtfully.
"Campers on Mission
save the churches big time
-- between 48 and 52 per-
cent of the cost of con-
struction," he noted.
Ken Pert, onsite manag-
er from the First Baptist
Church of Dowling Park,
nodded in agreement.
"Our church is grateful to
the campers," he said.
"They are a tremendous
asset. We figure they are
saving us three quarters of
a million dollars in labor.
Not only do they work
faithfully, but they also
donate generously to our
building fund."
Twenty men along with
their wives came to Dowl-
ing Park to frame in the
church recently. The
leader of the team, Wilton
Whigham, dressed in
overalls appeared to be a
simple, plainspoken man,
but the truth is that he
worked with Werner Von
Braun, the famous Ger-
man rocket scientist to put
the first man on the moon.
Pete Garrett, another
member of the team,
helped design and build
rocket boosters and the
Lunar Rover that was
used on the moon by the
astronauts.
Gerald Oliver, who
stayed to finish the project
after the initial group left
to work on other church-
es, was a school principal.
He and his wife, Judy, are
members of both Alabama
and Florida Campers on'
Mission.
Why would these highly
educated scientists stoop
to the manual labor of
building a church?
Who are these
campers? If you could
meet them for the lunch
that the church ladies pro-
vide (dished out by Au-
drey Starling and Velma
Lee) you would see a
scruffy lot of men in
worn jeans with knives
and phones dangling from
their belts. Their hair is
tousled from the ball caps
pitched upside down on
the outside table. Their
boots are old and covered
with sheetrock dust. Their
average, age is 73. They
are men full of laughter
and talk men wvho are at
ease with each-other. Men
who are serious in their
commitment to God.
Big Julian Hall, a
singer, has several mellow
gospel CD's. The men
work to his music. Julian
also worked for the Space
Shuttle on the solid rocket
booster. He grins, "None
of us work at what we
used to. We had to learn
how to pound nails and


hang sheet rock. I guaran-
tee that's not rocket sci-
ence. But we love it. If I
couldn't do this work, I
don't know what I would
do."
Eight men and eight
women on the team live
in campers in Tresca Park
at Advent Christian Vil-
lage for the four to five
months it will take them
to complete the church.
When asked how they
settle disputes, they look
incredulous. "Hey, our
motto is 'No fussing and
no cussing.' We just get
along."
Bill Speedie, an engi-
neer by trade, says his
wife, Joyce, had bought
him a pool table just two
days before Julian Hall.
called with an SOS, "We
need you." He left
promising the pool table,
"Later."
Charlie and Jean Claar
began traveling with
Campers 14 years ago
when he was seventy. He's
84 now and can't imagine
quitting. Charlie is a wiry
man and the guys say he
is an electronic whiz who
can scamper up the ladder
like a squirrel. .
There are risks on the
job. Charles Thompkins,
' from Gainesville suffered
broken bones in his foot
when a huge scissor-lift ,
ran over it. Reluctantly,
he and his wife, Joan,
obeyed the Doctor's order
to go home and take it,
easy.
Many of the Campers
are full-timers with no
home to go back to. Carol
Ledford said, "We sold
everything and we don't
even have a storage unit.
Everything we own is in
our thirty-four foot R V.
Between jobs we sightsee,
visit our kids an4 catch
up on Doctor's visits."
Julian and Nancy Hall
live in a 38-foot motor
home full-time. It does
have slide outs. Every-
thing else they own is in a
storage unit they haven't
visited in two and a half
years.
As the Campers age,
the wives find that they
caii no longer do the mud-
ding on the wallboard,
nor sweep, nor be the go-
fers. But they stay busy.
They've gone out to the
Sunshine Home in Live
Oak and made clothes for
the teenagers. They make
lap robes and bags for
wheelchairs for the Good
Samaritan Nursing Home.
They entertain the resi-
dents by singing. And
they're doing their best to
spoil Pastor Shawn's baby,
Bekah.
While in Mayo working
on the Baptist Church, the


Campers and participants from First Baptist Church of Dowling Park. Photo: Diane Kilpatrick


ladies adopted 48 children
from the school. They
made three outfits for
each child. When one lit-
tle boy tried on some
jeans, he looked up plead-
ingly, "Can I please just
wear them now? I've
never had a pair of jeans
that were new." They also
bought shoes for the chil-
dren and had them model
their new clothes.
Jerry McLeod is the
new kid on the block. The
Campers worked on his
100-year-old Hendry
Memorial Methodist
Church in Shady Grove.
The Campers were having
so much fun that Jerry
volunteered to work with
them everyday for two
months. Grinning, he said,
"When they left I kinda
missed them. They in-
spired me. Finally, I
couldn't stand it and asked
them if I could come help
out. They said yes. So I
joined the Campers. Ger-
ald keeps us working; he .
just don't let up."
While the Thompkinses
worked in Montana near
Glacier National Park
they led the Vacation


Jakea, of A a. P : J
Jake Carroll and John Baughman, of Alabama. Photo: Judy Oliver


professional clothing, .
looked down at her jeans
and laughed, "I can't be-
lieve that I dress like this
now." While working in


pressed with Gerald's
leadership that he, asked
him to be a member of
the Board of Directors.
Judy enjoyed her expe-


Leaving a note for posterity. Photo: Submitted


Bible School parade.
They canvassed the neigh-
borhoods for kids and ran
backyard camps.
Joyce Speedie, a retired
executive of Wachovia
Bank who always wore


,''1 ,:.. B'I..:-' .
Camper Gerald Oliver and Ken Pert of First Baptist Church of Dowling Park.
Photo: Diane Kilpatrick


Charlotte with a Disaster
Relief team cleaning up
.from the hurricane, she
was impressed with the
Campers on Mission vol-
unteers, especially the
feeding unit. What she
had seen and heard
touched her so deeply,
that she and her husband
decided that they wanted
in.
The Campers learned of
a church in Ocala meeting
under a tree with the con-
gregation packing in their
own chairs. The challenge
to help them build their
own church was just too
tantalizing to pass up.
And so they did.
The Campers talk about
the work they did at the
Canadian Baptist Semi-
nary in Calgary, Canada.
The wives made 200 out-
fits for the students and
their children. Later they
worked at Yellowstone
Baptist College where the
President was so im-


rience on an Indian Reser-
vation in Ft. Belknap,
Montana. While Gerald
built ramps and renovated
homes, Judy helped the
ladies make blankets for
the nursing home. One
old Indian asked incredu-
lously, "You made this for
me...for me?" The
Campers were invited to a
Pow Wow and also assist-
ed in an Indian funeral.
The Chief, a lady and a
Christian, joined in the
morning prayer circle
with the men.
One Camper said they
just pray and ask God
what they should do next.
"It is understandable now
that they are puzzled, But
Lord, what am I doing in
Florida in the middle of
July?"
Campers on Mission is
sponsored by The North
American Mission Board
of the Southern Baptist
Convention. Gerald points
out they work on


Methodist, Presbyterian
and African American
churches, or any church
that needs them.
The Campers at Dowl-
ing Park counted off the
states where they have
worked: Kentucky, Alas-
ka, Arizona, Minnesota,
Mississippi, Oregon,
Texas, Washington, North
Carolina, New York,
Wyoming, Missouri,
Montana and Indiana.,
Surprisingly enough,
Campers have the min-
istry of taking up tickets
and helping with parking
at the Talladega Raceway.
As a courtesy, the man-
agers allow them to put
up a booth to meet the
visitors and talk about
their ministry.
They do the same at the
North Florida Fair. There
the clowns entertain the
children while the men
talk to the parents in the
background. The women
make clothes for the
carnies and their families.
Another ministry is to
the men on the foreign
ships that dock at Mobile,
Tampa Bay and Jack-
sonville. They meet the
ships with bags full of
goodies and knitted caps.
There are Bibles in many
languages and a van to
take them shopping at
Wal-Mart.
CarolLedford summed
it up, "We started a new
life with a new purpose. It
gives our life meaning."
Joyce Speedie agreed:
"It's prompted by love for
people and love for the
Lord. We saw God's chil-
dren hurting after the ter-
rible Katrina hurricane
and we had to help."
'Don't feel sorry for
these retired men who
work early and late. They
are laughing and teasing
and having the time of
their lives.
Learn more by
Googling "Campers on
Mission."


Mission


E CASSFIE MAKETLAC WW.FLANLIE.CM -SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


PAGE 6, SEPTEMBER 9 10, 2009







M CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Photo courtesy of Getty Images


EVERYDAY


Easy (and affordable)

wiave fn i Iunwinr


SVYUJ, I,,V UIIIIV IUIU





n1 u e ces


Women across the country The silent treatment
are meeting the demands
of busy schedules and In today's age of technology, the silent treatment is imperative to maintain sanity.
tightened wallets by set-. Home phones, cell phones, email, instant messaging, pagers, not to mention the
ting aside life's simple multiple ways you get pinged when you turn on the computer, can all be over-
pleasures and putting whelming. Get serious about your silent treatment and power off the technology.
themselves at the bottom of the to-do list. Turn off the ringer on all phones, shut down the computer, and turn off the
In'fact, a new survey commissioned by the television and the radio. Now it's time for a 15 to 30 minute scheduled time out
makers of Edwards frozen desserts finds more because you deserve a little peace and quiet.
than nine in 10 American women have cut
back on indulgences during the past year.
Fifty-nine percent of survey respondents are Bring nature indoors
cutting back on events out with friends and
more than one-third (35 percent) are cutting A great way to nurture yourself is to bring nature .indoors. You can do this
back on even the smallest treats, such as mani- simply by cultivating a container garden. This could be a window box, urn,
cures and desserts. basket or round fish bowl. For a fabulous display of nature indoors use a Bonsai
The survey also found that: plant, an orchid, a robust green plant, herbs or layer two different kinds of
n Nearly all (94 percent) American women tulips. This is especially good for chilly winter months as floral aromas and
in the study admit that they don't indulge popping colors can brighten a dark day.
or treat themselves as often as they'd like
because other people or commitments T *
come first. The flip side
Fifty-six percent of women say they don't Pamper yourself by flipping to the right side of your brain. Engaging in art and
treat themselves as often as they'd like creative pursuits fires-up the right side of your brain, which is the side of the brain
because they can't afford to. that savors freedom. The left side of your brain is good when you need to pay the
bills or figure out your kids' 5th grade math problem. Spend a little time painting,
s Nearly a third (32 percent) of women say drawing, making jewelry or knitting. You deserve to play on the flip side.
they now have less free time for them-
selves than they did a year ago.

Small rewards offer
sweet peace of mind
Heather Reider and Mary Goulet, founders
of MomsTown.com and hosts of MomsTown
Radio, know a thing or two about the
challenges of juggling a family and career
while making the time to treat themselves.
"Self-pampering may seem like the lastJ
thing on your mind these days, but treating
yourself to somethfmig special is so critical to
relieving the stress of every day life," says '.
Reider.
A personal treat does not have to break the
bank and can be as simple as an at-home facial
or sneaking a dessert in at the end of the day," .
adds Goulet.
Reider and Goulet share these tips and
strategies for effortless and affordable ways
to celebrate everyday indulgences.
Photo courtesy of Fotoliac


Back to basics
It's hard to do but it is
important to put yourself
at the top of the to-do list
every once in a while.
Simple indulgences, like
an Edwards Singles A La
Modes dessert, are a
quick and easy way to
treat yourself to some-
thing sweet, as well as
fill your kitchen with a
delicious home-baked
aroma.


Essential
essence Photo courtesy of Edwards frozen desserts
Treat yourself to the power of fragrance. Aromatherapy sachets placed in
drawers are a sensational way to feel good without having to do or spend much
at all. If you're looking for an energizing scent try citrus, peppermint or
bergamot. To take the stress down a few notches choose lavender, chamomile,
sandalwood or ylang-ylang. You deserve to tickle your nose.

Budding beauty
Invest in four to six bud vases or use any vase that's lying around your house.
Go to your local farmer's market or grocery store and buy a bouquet of flowers.
When you get home, break the flower bunch apart into single stems and place
the flowers in the bud vases. Distribute these vases around the house in the
rooms you visit most frequently. Place one by the kitchen sink, the vanity in
your bathroom, on your nightstand, in the powder room and in your kids' bed-
rooms. You'll be amazed at how your kids will appreciate the gesture. Then
when you walk around your home you'll be greeted with flowers wherever you
go. And you did it with just one bouquet.

Hit your funny bone
When it comes to our emotions it's really hard to multi-task. It's nearly impos-
sible to be sad and exuberant in the same exact moment. You deserve to laugh
so choose more moments to get a giggle in your day. Read something funny or
rent a funny movie.

While life is full of stressful moments, the benefits of taking time to reju-
venate and unwind really can make a difference.
For more information on Edwards Singles A La Modes desserts, visit
EdwardsBaking.com.


FAMILY FEATURES


SEPTEMBER 9 10, 2009, PAdiE 7









PAGE 8, SEPTEMBER 9 10, 2009 U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


AIL


Tourists aboard the river steamboat "Okeehumkee" at Silver Springs (188-)


Historic Florida tourism images exhibit


added to Florida Memory Site


The StateL
and Archives of
Fki "' *added
an on".

exhibit t C-i
Roadside
Attra:-
Florida: Tourism
and Si) '
before to
the FF,",;-'.,
Memory Web s-a.
View "- -"""
online at


y.COt'/FV.< i

ehibi 0 -1!t
attrac' /

TALLAHASSEE-
Tourism is Florida's prin-
cipal industry, and every
year millions of people
from around the world
flock to the 'tate to see its
.tropical beauty and enjoy


its many theme parks.
Some may attribute the
tourism boom in Florida to
the opening of Disney
World in the early 1970s,
but Florida natives and
longtime visitors know
better. Beginning in the
late 19th century, tourists
traveled to Florida to view
lush gardens, peer through
glass bottom boats, see
mermaids, and interact
with the exotic environ-
ment.
In the late 19th century,
promoters began to em-
ploy popular myths and
legends about Florida,
such as the legendary
Fountain of Youth, to lure
visitors. Soon there were
"submarine" boats and
viewing areas that peered
underwater, and elaborate
underwater performances
by staff members. Tourists
also traveled long dis-
tances to see Florida's
many lush gardens. As a -
result of Florida's mild cli-
mate and long growing
season, profiteers were
able to create colorful and
lavish gardens out of the
state's swamps and pine
forests.


Visitors were fascinated
by exotic animals like the
alligator, which were often
found in Florida's roadside
attractions. The Miami
Seaquarium was-and still
is-a favorite with tourists.
In 1963, Six Gun Territory
opened in Ocala. This at-


traction offered vacation-
ers a Wild West town ex-
perience complete with sa-
loons, gun fights, stage-
coach rides, and a sky ride
until it closed in 1984.
These vintage attractions
have nearly been lost in
the new high-tech world of


Universal Studios and Dis-
ney. The memories linger,
thanks in large part to pho-
tographs like the ones fea-
tured in this exhibit.
The Florida Memory
Program is funded by a Li-
brary Services and Tech-
nology Act Grant from the


Institute of Museum and
Library Services, adminis-
tered by the Florida De-
partment of State, State Li-
brary and Archives of
Florida. For more infor-
mation, visit
http://www.floridamemo-
ry.com.


I'Y W-
,-4mi _


"Fountain of Youth 1513": Saint Augustine (ca. 1907). This fountain, called the Ponce de Leon Spring, is located on John
Whitney's estate, Ravenwood, and was popularized by him as the Fountain of Youth.


PAGE 8, SEPTEMBER 9 10, 2009


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Make Mealtime




a Reason to


,F.Ill fLATI 4
Kitchens across the county rely on tried and true talorites
to keep hungn families happy. In the rush to keep mouths
full, tlaor sometimes gets lost Easily turn these dinner-
time standbys into prime time players Fromi burgers toi
hot dogs and sandwiches to parry-ready dips, tum up the
.olume in your cupboard and Nou'll neer miss flawr again
By stocking your cupboard with simple ingredients that carry big
flavors, it's never been easier to add some flare to your favonie meals.
Here are a fe\\ recipes that are sure to bring back the po.er to >our
pantry
Accentuate the flavor in Beef Franks with sweet pickle relish and a
touch of Grei Poupon Heam Spicy Brown mustard The mustard's
inely diced yellow onions add a distincte taste, eleanng these dogs
and making barbecue season a reason to enternam. Or kick start that at-
home meal ith AMI .A ound Dip. featuring Haroest Coarse Ground
Mustard crafted wiLh a.hole mustard seeds. Tlus eent favorite -
paired \with fresh veggies from your favorite farmer's market -
.vill provide all the llaor \ou need to get the parn started Finally,
replace that dr turkey sandwich with a revamped Turkey Ciabata.
The crunch of warm bacon mtied with the robust flavors of fresh
avocado and classic Dijon mustard sill take this lunrihume faIonite
from dull to delicious in fise minutes flat.
For more memorable recipes. LSI wwv. greypoupon.com


Turkey Ciabatta
With Bacon and
Avocado
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes
Makes: 1 serving
1 ciabatta roll
(5 x 2-112-inch), split
1 tablespoon mayonnaise
1-1/2 teaspoon
Grey Poupon
Dijon Mustard
1 lettuce leaf
2 thin tomato slices
6 slices oven roasted
turkey breast
3 thin avocado slices
2 slices cooked bacon
Spread bottom half of roll with
mayo; spread top half with
mustard.
Fill with remaining
ingredients.


Coarse Ground
All-Around Dip
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes
Makes: 1-1/4 cups or
20 servings,
2 tablespoons each
1 package (8 ounces)
cream cheese, softened
1/4 cup Grey Poupon
Harvest Coarse
Ground Mustard
2 tablespoons sour cream
Mix all ingredients.
Serve with assorted cut-up
fresh vegetables.


Beef Franks
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Makes: I serving
1 .beef frank
1 hot dog bun, partially
split
1 teaspoon
Grey Poupon
Hearty Spicy Brown
Mustard
1 tablespoon sweet pickle
relish
1 tablespoon chopped
onion
1/4 cup sauerkraut,
drained
Dash celery salt
Heat frank as directed on
package.
Place in bun. Drizzle with
mustard.
Top with remaining
ingredients.


PAGE 10, SEPTEMBER 9 10, 2009


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The women of Patchwork. Photo: Submitted


Patchwork to Perform at




'Free Fridays' this week


GAINESVILLE-Patchwork is a band made up of
five women who like to play everything from original
Florida folk, country and bluegrass to 1940s' swing
and rhythm & blues, all on acoustic instruments. The
band hails from Gainesville, Florida, and performs at
concerts, festivals, schools, clubs and parties through-
out the state. Patchwork has even been known to.call
a square dance or two. In addition to adding their
feminine Florida flavor to special events at the Apple-
ton Museum in Ocala, the Cummer Museum in Jack-
sonville and the Sunday Sampler in Dunnellon, they
have also broadcast live on national public television
and radio. Patchwork is a favorite at the Florida Folk
Festival, where they have graced the main stage for
over 10 years.
With several musical awards on her mantle, Tammy
Murray is the most versatile instrumentalist in the
group. Among her many accomplishments are Florida
Rustic Fiddle and Twin Fiddle Champion, Florida
Hammered Dulcimer Champion, National Old-Time
Banjo Champion and Florida Old-Time Female Solo
Vocalist. She has performed in festivals and contests
all over the country, as well as schools, museums, ra-
dio and television shows, theatrical productions, clubs
and restaurants. In addition to releasing her own al-
bum, "Six White Horses," she also plays on several
other Florida folk albums, including Mark Johnson,
Anna Moo (with Bo Diddley) and Fay Baird (of the
Short Sisters). Carrying on the legacy of traditional
music, she holds old-time jams for children, teaches
music privately and is the music teacher at
Gainesville Country Day School.
A multi-instrumentalist that plays guitar, piano,
bass, and banjo, Janet Rucker is best-known for her


distinctive voice, described by one producer as "frag-
ile, yet powerful;, vulnerable, yet confident." A veter-
an of countless bands, she is in high demand as a ses-
sion singer at local recording studios. Her original
songs compose a large part of Patchwork's repertoire,
and her "Florida Home" was recently one of the win-
ners in the Will McLean Best New Florida Soaig
songwriting contest. She performed in the Hippo-
drome State Theatre's 1987 production of "Hair," and,
before forming Patchwork, she toured the festival cir-
cuit from Colorado to Atlanta to Florida with her
:band, Country Love. Rucker is a member of many
bands, including Antidote.
An eclectic musician whose roots branch out from
classical and folk music to jazz, Cathy Dewitt plays
piano and guitar and sings. Several of her original
compositions are on the Patchwork song list, includ-
ing "The Waves Roll In," a winner in the 1999 Gam-
ble Rogers Song Contest. She has played at clubs and
festivals throughout the state for over 20 years, in-
cluding the Florida Folk Festival. She performed with
Florida legends Will McLean and Don Grooms, and
has sung with Tom Paxton, Dave Frishberg, Garrison.
Keillor and others. In addition to hosting "Across the
Prairie," a popular folk music program on WUFT,
Dewitt is the Music Director/musician in residence
for the Arts-in-Medicine Program at Shands Hospital,
and presents national workshops on music and heal-
ing. She won the National League of American Pen-
women (Gainesville branch) Award for Music in
2000.
A graduate of the University of Florida's music pro-
gram, Jolene Stone Jones is in demand for her wide
vocal range. Her soaring harmonies and rhythmic


mandolin playing are a distinctive part of Patchwork's
sound. She has performed in several local bands, as
well as in the University of Florida production of
"Madame Butterfly." A music teacher, she has pre-
sented various workshops at festivals and schools
throughout the area, and her high harmony vocals
Shave graed many a stttdio project.
Annie McPhearson grew up playing music and
singing, influenced by her mother who was a trained
vocalist and piano player. An eclectic musician, she
won second place in mandolin and second place in
beginning banjo at the Old Time Music Champi-
onships in.2001, and started playing acoustic bass
with Patchwork in 2006. She also sings, plays piano
and loves to play bluegrass, old time, swing standards
and country music with her husband David Cook.
Especially for this "Free Fridays" plaza concert, the
women of Patchwork will be joined by the men of
Patchwork. The guys that are so often behind the
scenes helping Patchwork finally get to step out on
stage with the girls. You'll see David Cook, who
plays everything from pedal steel to piano; Rob Roth-
schild, keeping the beat on the drums; Robby Rucker
wailing on the harmonica and Richard Jones swinging
on the fluteand mandolin, in this unique and expand-
ed version of Florida's fabulous five female folkies.
The downtown plaza "Free Fridays" concerts run
every Friday night this year from May 2 through Oc-
tober 31. The Bo Diddley Community Plaza is locat-
ed on the corner of Southeast 1st Street and East Uni-
versity Avenue. The complete schedule for the down-
town plaza "Free Fridays" and links to the bands'
Web sites can be found at www.gvlculturalaffairs.org
or at www.myspace.com/downtowncommunityplaza.


Art collecting can be affordable fun for everyone!


QUINCY-Have you ever wanted to
collect original art, but thought it would
be too expensive? Have you considered
buying original art, and talked yourself
out of making the purchase because


you don't know enough about art? Col-
lecting original art can be very afford-
able, is fun, and stimulates your local
economy by supporting the artists
working in your area. "People can buy


-William McK Te Clerin, w olor on p r.
William McKeown, The Clearing, watercolor on paper.


original art for as little as $100 or $200,
even some of the artists represented in
this exhibition," said art collector Ca-
lynne Hill, referring to the Vernacular
Art from the Hill Collection exhibition,
on display at the Gadsden
1" S Arts Center through Octo-
:'.-- ber 25. "Art collecting is
Very personal, a powerful
way to express who you
are, and really adds charac-
ter to your home or office,"
commented Toni Robinson,
another longtime art col-
:'. lector.
You can learn more
S-., about collecting art at the
Gadsden Arts Center's Art
Collecting Seminar, offered
Friday, September 18, from
9 a.m. to noon. Topics will
include "Affordable Col-
lecting: Beginning &
Building", presented by
.---r- Jeanine Taylor of Jeanine
S ... Taylor Folk Art Gallery,
Sanford, FL, and "What's
My Art Worth?", presented
by Robert A. Stenstream of
Robert Stenstream Fine


Arts, Ocala. Workshop registration is
only $35 ($45 non-members) and in-
cludes snacks, coffee, and a guided ex-
hibition tour. To register, visit
www.gadsdenarts.org and click on the
Events tab, stop by the Center, or call
856-875-4866.
The Gadsden Arts Center improves
the quality of life in the region through
cultural, social, and educational oppor-
tunities. Fine art exhibitions, classes for
adults and children, cultural events,
summer art camps, a gift shop, and an
artists' co-op are housed in the Center's
beautiful historic buildings, along with
Miss Helen's Espresso Caf6 D'art.
Group tours are available free of charge
- call 850-875-4866 to make your reser-
vation.
The Gadsden Arts Center is located
on Quincy's historic Courthouse Square
at 13 N. Madison St., just 10 miles
from Tallahassee City Limits. Admis-
sion is $1 (members and children ad-
mitted free). Gallery and gift shop
hours are Tuesday through Saturday,
10am-5pm, and Sunday, 1-5pm. Hours
for Miss Helen's Espresso Cafe D'art
and the Artists Guild Co-op are Mon-
day-Saturday 7am-5pm


k SEPTEMBER 9 10, 2009, PAGE 11








PAG 12 ETME -1,20 LSIIDMREPAE-WWNLOLN.O EVN OT LRD N OT ERI


Bald eagles among


st


'snowbirds' to arrive in Florida


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) has re-
ceived reports of bald ea-
gles returning to nesting
territories throughout Flori-
da the past few weeks..
This majestic bird that
calls Florida home during
its nesting season has been
flying back to former nest-
ing sites from Duval to
Collier counties, although
there are no reports of nest-
ing activity yet. The official
start of the nesting season
is Oct. 1.
The FWC removed the
bald eagle from the state's
threatened species list in
2008 and at the same time
implemented a bald eagle.
management plan with
guidelines to help residents
avoid causing a disturbance
to nesting bald eagles. Peo-
ple should follow the man-
agement plan whenever ac-
tivities or projects are being
conducted within 660 feet
of an eagle's nest when ea-
gles are present. Bald ea-
gles are protected from dis-
turbance by the Florida Ad-
ministrative Code, as well
as two federal laws: the
Migratory Bird Treaty Act
and the Bald and Golden


4$- :, _.V
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jo











.'-- "-
Bald eagles are returning to nesting areas in Florida and will soon begin nesting activities. Photo: Dominick Martino
1 I 4, ,..w. t'-.






Bald, eagles are,,returningo nesting areas in Florida. and will soon beginnesting activities. Photo: Dominick Marno


Eagle Protection Act.
"The bald eagle is a suc-,
cess story in the United


States, particularly in,
Florida," said Ulgonda
Kirkpaitick, bald eagle.


management plan. coordi-
nator. "We went from 88
active nests in 1973 to


more than 1,100 nests in
2007; that's a twelvefold
increase in Florida."


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The bald eagle represents-a success story in Florida but is still protected from human ac-
tivities.
- Photo: Dominick Martino


The FWC is committed
to conserving the bald ea-
gle. All known nesting ter-
ritories are surveyed annu-
ally by-aircraft to monitor
nesting activity and repro-
duction, according to Iirk-
patrick.
In Florida, bald eagles
may begin gathering mate-
rials for nests in. late Sep-
tember or early October.
They begin laying eggs as
early as October and as
late as April; with incuba-
tion lasting approximately
35 days. Once hatched, the
fledglings begin flying
from the nest 'at 11 Weeks,
but stay \ i th heir'parents
an additional four to 11
weeks.
"If everyone does their
part to help conserve Flori-
da's bald eagles, we will
ensure that this magnifi-
cent species continues to
flourish in Florida for gen-
erations to come," Kirk-
patrick said.
For more information on
bald eagles and a copy of
the management plan, go
to MyFWC.com/Eagle. If
you suspect there is a po-
tential wildlife violation
occurring, call the Wildlife
Alert Hotline at 888-404-
FWCC (3922).


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PAGE 12, SEPTEMBER 9 10,20K09-







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River City Satin Swing opens LCCC Lyceum Series


Hot jazz performed by cool cats is in store when
Jacksonville's River City Satin Swing comes to Lake
City Community College. The show will be presented on
Tuesday, September 15, at 7:30 p.m. in the college's Levy
Performing Arts Center. "River City Satin Swing" is the
opening performance of LCCC's Lyceum Series, ;an
annual six-show series of performances.
Season tickets are currently on sale, as well as tickets
for the Satin Swing show only, but as always LPAC
coordinator Mark Kirby is urging patrons to buy season
tickets.
"It's cheaper in the long run and it saves time, as well.
Even if you have to miss a show or two, you still come
out way ahead, money-wise," Kirby explains.
A nine-piece offshoot (plus female vocalist) of the St.
Johns River City Big Band, Satin Swing is one of
Jacksonville's favorite ensembles, and brings to life the
big band sound in a sophisticated and intimate way. Satin
Swing "will transport you back to the jazz clubs of the.
1940s," Kirby says. Some of the songs slated to be
played and sung are "Almost Like Being in Love," "In
the Mood," "Let's Fall in Love," and "Boogie Woogie


Bugle Boy."
For reservations and further information for SATIN
SWING (or for season tickets) call the Levy Performing
Arts Center box office at (386) 754-4340. Tickets for
SATIN SWING will go sale September 8.
Prices are $15 for adults, $14 for seniors
(age 55 and over), and $13 for LCCC
staff and students and students from other
schools. Season tickets for the Lyceum
Series are currently available. For more
information for season prices and/or to
request a brochure call the PAC box
office.
Prior to the show dinner will be served
in the college's Lobo Caf6. For
reservations call 1-888-845-0925 or e-
mail info@lobocafe.com.
Kirby is excited about Satin Swing
kicking off the Lyceum season this year.
"The last two years we opened with
bluegrass, so this year I thought we'd
throw people a curve and start off with River City


some great jazz. There's an axiom in show business that
when people know what to expect from you it can be
fatal. And I want to keep this Lyceum Series alive for
many years to come."


, ^ ~ '.l,


Satin Swing. -Photo: Submitted


"Shrimp & Grits: The Wild Georgia Shrimp Festival" coming Sept. 18


JEKYLL ISLAND, Ga.-What was once a
simple food pairing deeply rooted in the
South, Shrimp & Grits has become a menu-
must for exclusive restaurants across the
country. The only event in the country
dedicated to this quintessential Southern
dish kicks off Sept 18: "Shrimp & Grits:
The Wild Georgia Shrimp Festival."
Set in the Jekyll Island Club Hotel's
landmark historic district, the popular
festival boasts amateur and professional
cooking competitions, shrimp boat
excursions, shrimp eating contests, cooking
demonstrations, races, entertainment, and
much more.
"The Jekyll Island Shrimp & Grits
Festival is a great time to enjoy the beauty of
Jekyll Island while dining on delicious
coastal cuisine caught right off the Georgia
coast," said Beth Burnsed, Director of
Special Events for Jekyll Island. "We began
the Shrimp & Grits Festival as a way to
showcase Jekyll Island and Wild Georgia
Shrimp. As more and more restaurants
began serving shrimp & grits, we realized
that we were at the forefront of a growing
trend. We are thrilled to host such a


prominent and highly anticipated signature
event."
In celebration, Sept. has been declared
"Wild Georgia Shrimp Month" on Jekyll
. Island and the neighboring Golden Isles, and
some of the South's finest professional and
amateur chefs will be competing for the
coveted title of "Best Shrimp & Grits"
recipes in the country. "Y'all Come!"

Friday, Sept 18
$3 shrimp sale night
Set amid Jekyll Island's picturesque Jekyll
Island Club National Landmark Historic
District, the festival will kick off on Friday
at 5:30 p.m. with a "$3 Shrimp Sample
Night." For only $3 per person participants
will have the opportunity to taste recipes
from each of the vendors.

Saturday, Sept 19
Amateur cooking competition
The Amateur Cooking Competition event
will offer mouth-watering tasting
opportunities of the ten shrimp & grits
dishes prepared by aspiring and self-taught
cooks throughout the region. Guests can


UF researchers find mechanism

behind zinc's immune-boosting power


Just in time for what
federal authorities warn
could be an extremely
severe flu season,
University of Florida
research has revealed a
fundamental mechanism
behind zinc's immune-
boosting power it ramps
up one of the body's
primary lines of defense,
white blood cells known as
T-cells.
"We've known for a long
time that zinc can give your
system a helping hand when
you're fighting illness," said
Tolunay Aydemir, a
researcher with UF's
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences anid
lead author of the study.
"This gives us an important
bit of understanding as to
why it confers that benefit."
Found in most
multivitamins and many
mineral supplements, zinc
has been shown to reduce
the duration and severity of
digestive and respiratory
tract infections as well as
blood infections such as
malaria.
"One of the most
important things that this
study shows is that a modest
increase in the amount of
zinc via supplement form
can lead to a notable
increase in certain immune
functions," said Daren


Knoell, a pharmacology
researcher at The Ohio State
University. "A lot of people
are zinc deficient, and this
shows that a small
supplementation could
probably go a long way."
As they report in the
August issue of the Journal
of Leukocyte Biology, the
researchers gave a group of
healthy volunteers 15
milligrams of zinc as oral
supplements for four days, a
dosage at the upper
boundary of the
recommended daily
allowance. Volunteers in a
control group got a placebo.
They then drew blood
from the patients to
examine their T-cells, an
essential part of the body's
immune function. Some T-
cells identify and destroy
bacterial and viral
pathogens, as well as human
cells infected by those
pathogens.
Others "remember"
pathogens, reacting quickly'
to summon the body's
defenses if exposed to those
pathogens again. Still other
T-cells moderate the activity
of all the others.
The researchers found
that, when exposed to
chemicals known to invoke
an immune response, the T-
cells from the group taking
the supplements showed


much greater biochemical
activity than T-cells from
the placebo group.
In particular, they.
observed a stimulation of
the T-cell protein ZIP8. This
protein ferries zinc into a
specific region inside.the T-
cells, where it triggers a
chain of events that prime,
the cell for action.
The work not only helps
illuminate the mechanisms
behind zinc's ability.to
improve immune function,
'but it could also be a first
step toward developing
medicines based on those
mechanisms, said professor
Robert Cousins, a co-author
of the papergand director of
the UF/IFAS Center for
Nutritional Sciences.
"We're still just
scratching the surface of the
role zinc plays in the body,".
said Cousins, a National
Academy of Sciences
member. "But it's not just
about tracking this one
element. It's discovering all
of the associated processes-
that's the ultimate payoff."
Along that line of
thought, Aydemir, Cousins
and colleagues will soon
embark on a much more
ambitious research project.
In 2010, they hope to study
how zinc interplays with the
entirety of the human
genome.


sign-up to be part of the esteemed
"Consumer Choice Panel" to taste the dishes
and select the winners for a fee of $25.00 per
person. The tasting begins at 1:15 p.m.
Saturday with music and entertainment
provided by the popular "Big Dawg and
Paul Show." Awards will be.presented at
2:30 pm.

Chef Robert Rulko cooking
demonstration
Chef Robert Rulko, Winn-Dixie's
Corporate Chef, will present a live cooking
demonstration Saturday at 11;00 a.m. Chef
Rulkois well-known throughout the entire
Southeast, and has worked in kitchens
throughout Europe, the Orient and
Caribbean. He also had the honor of
assisting the White House pastry chef, to
supply edible Christmas ornaments for the,
former President and Mrs. Clinton's
personal Christmas tree. "

Shrimp eating contests:
Are you a 'hrimp lover \ ho boasts to out-
eat-everyone you know? Adults and kids are
invited to sign up for one of several free
shrimp eating contests going on throughout
the weekend. Space is limited for each
contest, and interested participants should
stop by the Information Tent at the festival
to sign up for a contest. Saturday's contests
1 p.m. and 4 p.m.

Sunday, Sept.20
Professional cooking competition
The professional cooking competition will
be held on Sunday at 11:00 a.m. with music
and entertainment provided for the second
time by the "Big Dawg and Paul Show."
Throughout the day, visitors will have the
opportunity to purchase delicious shrimp &
grits dishes from'outstanding local
restaurants and vendors, and winners of the
.Professional Cooking Competition will be


named by an esteemed panel of judges at
3:00 p.m.
Chef Joe Randall cooking demonstration
Chef Joe Randall, of Joe Randall's
Savannah Cooking School, will host a live
cooking demonstration on Sunday at 11:30
a.m. Joe Randall is a forty-three year veteran
of all things food! He is noted for his
capacity to teach, guide and advise others in
the practical aspects of food.
Shrimp eating contest:
If visitors didn't have a chance to
participate in the free Shrimp Eating contest
on Saturday, they have another chance on
Sunday. Again, space is limited and they
can sign up at the Festival Information Tent.
Contests will be held on Sunday at 12:00
p.m. and 3:30 p.m.
Ongoing weekend activities:
Free live entertainment:
Throughout the weekend the Jekyll Island
Club National Landmark Historic District
will ring with the musical talents of many
favorite local bands. including Straight No
Chaser, Smokin' Section, OSKAR
Rockhammer, Stringrays, Randall Bramblett
Band, and Three of Us.,
Shrimp & Grits 3 Rice Challenge:
SOn Saturday and Sunday, a 3 Race
Challenge will take place across three
different terrains on Jekyll Island. It will
begin with the "Shrimper's 4-mile Beach
Course" jog starting at the Jekyll Island
Beachdeck on Saturday at 6:30 p.m. The
next event is "Shoe\ Yer Grit" run at the,
Jekyll Island Great Dunes Golf Course on
Sunday at 7:30 a.m. The Race Challenges
finishes up with the "Short Flight to Festival
1 Mile" sprint on Sunday at 2:00 pm. Racers
will end at the Festival in time to eat! Pre-
registration is $15, $45 for the series, and
$20 per race on the. day of the event.
For more information on the Wild Georgia
Shrimp Festival, go to
jekyllisland.com/shrimpandgrits.


And Make Your Event a Success!

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