Title: Suwannee Democrat
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028422/00658
 Material Information
Title: Suwannee Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Suwannee Democrat
Publisher: J. E. Pound
Place of Publication: Live Oak, Fla.
Publication Date: December 9, 2009
Copyright Date: 2010
Frequency: semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
weekly[ former <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
Coordinates: 30.294444 x -82.985833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Electronic reproduction of copy from George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida also available.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note: Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028422
Volume ID: VID00658
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - ACE4563
oclc - 33273856
alephbibnum - 000398954
lccn - sn 95026787
 Related Items
Other version: Live Oak daily Democrat
Preceded by: Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by: Suwannee leader
Preceded by: Suwannee citizen

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Full Text

Continuing

ed at

Shands

Live Oak
Page 15A


SHOUiDAY


GIFT GUIDE
A complete guide for a stress-free holiday!


Serving Suwannee County since 1884, including Live Oak, Wellborn, Branford, McAlpin and O'Brien




^uuwnnei lrnncrat


3 SECTIONS, 46 PAGES


I *


50 CENTS


. L


Dropout rate


cut by half


in Suwannee

Graduation rate rises slightly


By Carnell
Hawthorne Jr.
carnell.hawthorne
@gaflnews.com


wUilJw


HERE'S WHAT'S


COMING fOR


THE WEEKEND


By Carnell Hawthorne Jr.
carnell.hawthorne@gaflnews.com


As the community recuperates from the
bustle of last weekend, everyone should
know there is
still plenty of
holiday fun HOLIDAY
to be had. HAPPENINGS
In Live HAPPENINGS


Oak, families
can enjoy the
Suwannee
Lights Festi-
val, or the
Altrusa Tour
of Homes
this Saturday.
The
Suwannee
Lights Festi-
val continues


* Branford Parade
SAltrusa Tour of
Homes
* Kiwanis Christmas
trees
* NFCC Nutcracker
* Suwannee Lights
continues
* Mayo Parade


in an awesome display all week
long at the Spirit of the Suwan-
nee Music Park. The Christmas
light exhibit is filled with more
than 5 million bulbs and colorful
3-D displays this year and is sure
to brighten the spirits of the whole
family. Visitors to the park can en-
joy the 2-mile-long lit display from
the comfort of their vehicles. The
event cost Sunday through Thursday
is $6 for adults (ages 13 and up), $2
for children ages 3-12, and ages two
and under are free. On Friday and
Saturday, folks can drop by the Art
and Crafts Village and Country Store
where there will be live entertainment
and photos with Santa. The Friday and
Saturday cost is $8 for adults. The fesii-
val lasts until Dec. 24.
Also, in Live Oak Saturday is the Al-
trusa Tour of Homes from noon- 5 p.n,

SEE HERE'S, PAGE 14A


the 25th annual Chrin oes her thing Saturday at
the 25th annual Chstmas on the Square in Live Oak. Mad-
die was participating in a skit by Sharon's School of Dance.
See more photos, pages 10-11A.
- Photo: Jeff Waters


Santa Claus hidL 1; oCarnl l
Christmas parade Saturday- -photo: Cam" 1auI't


Suwannee County has
seen a marked improve-
ment in high school
dropout rates this year
compared to last, accord-
ing to an annual report re-
leased Friday by the Flori-
da Department of Educa-
tion.
Graduation rates for
2008-2009 were also in-
cluded in the report.
The local dropout rate
fell from 6.8 percent in
2007-2008 to 3.4 percent
this year, a stark differ-


By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com
Early morning showers
and gusty afternoon winds

Float winners
announced for Lighted
Christmas Parade
Page 14A


kept some folks from en-
joying Christmas on the
Square Saturday, but
event coordinators called
the event's 25th anniver-
sary a success.
"I think it went really
well after about 10 o'-
clock," said event chair-
man Roy Crain. "After the


ence from Suwannee's
standing as the district
with the highest dropout
rate in the state last year.
"We're certainly not
proud of 3.4, but it's defi-
nitely an increase over last
year," said Superintendent
Jerry Scarborough. "We
look forward to decreas-
ing it even more over the
coming years."
He said in order to see
even greater strides in stu-
dent success everyone
must be on board.
"We're still encourag-
ing parents and the com-
munity to help us it's a
SEE DROPOUT, PAGE 14A


12-year sentence

in deadly crash
By Carnell Hawthorne Jr.
carnell.hawthorne
@gaflnews.com


Donald Robert Davis, of Bran-
ford, was sentenced Thursday to
12 years in prison for the crash
that killed Joshua Franklin Votano,
of Lake City, on June 30, 2008.
Convicted of vehicular homi-
cide, Davis, 31, must serve 3 years
probation after prison, and his
Florida driver's license has been
permanently suspended, court
documents show.
Ruby Votano, Joshua's mother,
looked Davis in the eyes on Thurs-
SEE 12-YEAR-OLD, PAGE 14A


Donald Robert
Davis during his
trial at the Suwan-
nee County Court-
house.
- Photo: Carnell
Hawthorne Jr.


rains died out it turned out
to be a nice Christmas on
the Square like all the oth-
ers.
Sheriff Tony Cameron
estimates around
12,000 people at-
tended this year,
compared with about
15,000 the previous
year.
Two hundred and
sixty one vendors proudly
displayed and sold home-
made cookies, jams, quilts
and other items. Games
for the children and hand-
crafted toys were also
available. School civic
clubs, such as the


SEE COS, PAGE 14A


77/55 ,-
For more weather,
visit our Web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com





6 97113 07520 1


Arrest Record ....... 2A
Branford News ..... 7-9B
Sports .............1B
Viewpoint ......... 6A
CLASSIFIED
FEATURED INSIDE




Sports 1B


Last cheer for
Laxton, 1B.


'09 Chevrolet
Silverado Beg. C
uu~ i r u, - P I P D L
CL) -wi RadPJio PC
Pj iii-. Tr3 a %: I.:.r,, jr


www.suwanneedemocrat. com


12 EAR, NO. 16


,T


COS draws thousands,

despite the weather


L1I L 1









ON THE FLIPSIDE


HOWTO REACH US


Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, nf.ediorial@gaflnews.com
Mail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
* Publisher,
Myra Regan, ext. 122


CONTACT US WITH

YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, call us at 386-362-1734
or visit our Web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com


NEWSROOM
* Editor,
Robert Bridges, ext. 131
* Reporter,
Carnell Hawthorne Jr., ext. 134
* Reporter,
Jeff Waters, ext. 133
* Reporter,
Stephenie Livingston, ext. 130



ADVERTISING
E Advertising Manager,
Monja Slater, ext. 105
E Sr. Advertising Representative,
Bill Regan, ext. 160
E Advertising Representative,
Tami Stevenson, ext. 109
E Telesales Ad Representative,
Nancy Goodwin, ext. 103
E Classified/Legal,
Janice Ganote, ext. 102



CIRCULATION
M Circulation Manager,
Angie Sparks, ext. 152
M Circulation
Service Hours, M-F 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
Subscription Rates,
In-county, $33 Out-of-county, $48




Humwannee

remonnrat



'. -
Serving Suwannee County Since 1884

The Suwannee Democrat, published
Wednesday and Friday.
Periodicals postage paid at
Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located
at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
FL. Publication number 530180.

"POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL
32064." Annual subscription rate is
$33 in county, $48 out of county and
$48 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.

OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Letters, comments and opinions on
the Viewpoint & Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Suwannee Democrat.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters may be mailed, faxed or
e-mailed to our office. All letters are
read. Not all letters are published.
Letters may be edited to fit available
space. The editor should not alter the
writer's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
the point, an ideal range is 150 to
200 words. Please include your
name, address and day and evening
phone numbers for verification.
Letters MUST be signed. Letters to
the editor can be limited to one
letter per quarter per individual.


RANT & RAVE HOTLINE
Here's your chance to tell everyone what you
think! Callers may dial 208-8314 and leave a
message to express their thoughts, good or
bad, 24/7 about issues and politics, but not
about private individuals or businesses. If you
prefer, you may e-mail your comments to
robert.bridges@gaflnews.com. Your name is
not necessary, but please, ---
take 30 seconds or less for \
your message.,
.. ... 1 Part of
Florida" j"


Editor's note: The
Suwannee Democrat prints
the entire arrest record
each week. If your name
appears here and you are
laterfound not...',, \ or the
I. I,,., are dropped, we
will be happy to make note
of this in the newspaper
when judicial proof is pre-
sented to us by you or the
authorities.
The following abbrevia-
tions are used below:
SCSO-Suwannee Coun-
ty Sheriff's Office
LOPD-Live Oak Police
Department
FDLE-Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement
FHP-Florida Highway
Patrol
FWC-Florida Wildlife
Commission
DOT-Department of
Transportation
OALE-Office of Agri-
cultural Law Enforcement


GARDEN ACCENT

MAKE PERFECT

CHRISTMAS GIFT
Beautiful fountains, benches.
birdbaths and statuary all ac
finishing touch to the gardeji
Stop by today and we'll shov
you our brand new arrivals.
They'll make gifts that you v
be remembered for!

THEY WANT A
NOBLES'
GIFT CARD!
We've been hearing it for a.
of months! "Tell my family !,
Christmas I want a gift card I
here!" You can't go wrong i:
what they're asking for!


K-if


P & P-Probation and Pa-
role
USMS-US Marshals
Service
ATF-Department of Al-
cohol, Tobacco and
Firearms
DOC-Department of
Corrections

December 3, Kwone
Levelle Matthews, 19, 826
SW 9th St, Live Oak Fl,
sale cocain w/1000' chrc,
poss cocaine w/i sell-2ct,
1st appear/wrs/pd appt,
LOPD F Gorski
December 3, William
Matthew Denson, 36,
11690 SW 83rd Dr Lake
Butler Fl, misapplication
of construction funds, 1st
app pd appt wrs, SCSO-T.
Smith
December 4, Guillermo
Islas Barraza, 23, 426 5th
St, Live Oak Fl, retail theft,
SCSO E. Padgett


9248 129th Road Live Oak
(386) 362-2333
Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Closed Sunday
"For over 30 Years"
WWW.NOBLESGREENHOUSE.COM
564466-F


Sat.


fZE&.


December 4, Ronnie
Goodman, 19, 902 Douglas
Street, Live Oak Fl, vocc
(sale cntl subs/poss cntl
subs w/i sell), SCSO E
Padgett
December 4, Joseph
Michael Deangelis, 20, 121
NE Hillcrest Circle, Bran-
ford Fl, vop -20 grams
cannabis, SCSO J Brooks
December 4, Pedro
Jaramillo, 35, 1120 Silas
Dr SW Apt 412, Live Oak
Fl, sent 30 days cj SCSO
- J. Stout
December 4, Gray Whit-
lach, 47, 10845 Lynell
Road, Baton Rouge La, in-
terfer obst oale emp, will-
ful refusal to indent, OALE
- M. Jones
December 4, Deshorie
Diane Richburgh, 28,
16583 Jewett Street #702
White Springs Fl, sale coc
w/i 1000' church, sale -20g
marij 1000' chu, poss co-


12


aniz


Sun.


6


fZE&.


13


:30


(Doors open at 5:45 p.m.)

Nursery provided for 4 years old and under
565785-F


caine w/i sell, poss -20g
marij w/i sell, sale -20g
marij 1000' chu, poss -20g
marij w/i sell, hamilton co
wrt, sell/manu/del cntrl
subs w/i 1000' place wor-
ship, poss cntl subs w/i
sell, SCSODTF-F. Gorski
December 4, Shonquette
Latoya McQuay, 29, 188
Bull Ave, Live Oak Fl, ut-
tering counterfeit note, vop
o/c poss cntrl subs, vop o/c
poss cntrl subs, SCSO-A.
Loston
December 4, Eian David
Allen, 23, 1110 Platt Street,
Live Oak, Fl, burg of a
dwelling-2ct, grand theft
iii-2ct, SCSO-L. Willis
December 4, Brandon
Lee Mortlock, 24, 705
Dunn Alley, Live Oak Fl,
Dwls W/Knowledge,
LOPD T Faller
December 6, Jason Mal-
com McLeod, 37, 18129
66th Street, Live Oak Fl,
agg battery (dom viol),
SCSO E. Padgett
December 6, Amos
Cray Jr, 46, 262 SW Flatt
Glenn, Lake City Fl, sent
30 days cj-weekends,
SCSO-T. Lee
December 6, Seth
Richard McDonald, 24,
2066 Scrubby Bluff Rd,
Kingsland Ga, fta (unlaw-
ful speed), SCSO A. Prins
December 6, Bobby
Brannan, 49, 13534 144th
Street, Live Oak Fl, Agg
Assault (Domestic), As-
sault (Domestic), SCSO -
W. Kelly
December 7, Judell Mel-
lie Vasi, 28, 418 NW Eve-
ly N Ave, Live Oak Fl, co-
lumbia cty case 09954cf,
o/c grand theft iii: burglary


Total calls for service: 89
Medical Calls: 80
Weakness: 11
Cardiac: 12
Trauma: 5
Motor vehicle crash: 10
Miscellaneous medical
call: 12
Altered mental status: 5
Respiratory: 11
CVA: 1
OD: 2
OB: 1
Nausea/vomiting: 3


structure/conv., LOPD B
Harrison
December 7, Michael
Lee Mosley, 30, 603 NW
Jenkins Ave, Branford Fl,
vop o/c burg of dwelling,
vop o/c grand theft iii,
3000.00 or 300.00 to p&p,
SCSO-T Smith
December 7, Daniel
Carrico, 44, 12287 31St
Road, Wellborn Fl, fta o/c
battery, SCSO-C. Home
December 7, Shawn An-
dre Murphy, 38, 1229 Pon-
derosa Dr, Valdosta Ga,
vop utter a forgery 2cts,
vop grand theft iii, vop ut-
ter a forgery 2cts, vop
grand theft iii, SCSO-S.
Law
December 7, Franklin
Lester Burkett, 34, 2505
NW 31St Court, Oakland
Place Fl, vop o/c escape,
vop sal/del cocaine 3ct,
vop conpir sel/del cocai,
vop poss of cocaine w/int,
vop sell/deliver 3cts,
SCSO-M. Jelks
December 7, Anthony
Ray Martin, 48, 5762
Pinecrest Blvd, Live Oak
Fl, ; -.-. b.illc, dom vio-
lence, reckless driving,
agg/battery/dom/violence,
false imprison/x2, battery
dom/violence, 1st app n/pd
appt per wrs,
SCSO/LOPD-Roberts/Kir-
by.


LOTTEYRESULT


CASH 3
12/7/09.0,2,3
12/7/09.0,5,2


PLAY 4
12/7/09 .0,3,1,5
12/7/09 .9,7,8,4


FANTASY 5
12/7/09 .......... 8,25,31,32,34
MEGA MONEY... 10,34,36,43,11
LOTTO....... 7,13,24,29,36,37


Diabetic: 4
Seizure: 1
Abdominal pain: 1
Death: 1
Fire Calls: 9
Brush fire: 2
Motor vehicle crash: 6
Medical assist: 1
Volunteer Fire Respons-
es: 10
Falmouth Volunteer Res-
cue Responses: 3


COMING SOON
Have you ever wanted to walk
into a store and have every
magazine at:...,, ri .. i !

ewsStand
A MAGAZINE SUPERSTORE!
SBusiness Cooking Gaming General Interest Ethnic Women's
SPuzzle Sports Health Home Teen Weekly Men's Comics
Top 20 Best Seller Books in Hardcover/Paperback
303 East Howard Street, Live Oak 364-0748


Yiu % ant the most in-deptlh coverage.
lie latest news and stories hliat ouchl home.
We want to give it to you.
1 Year In County
Subscription

J1 Year
Ok 3 3 48Out of County
Mail or bring payment to:

umannee lremocrat
P.O. Box 370 211 Howard St. East
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1734 1-800-525-4182 ext. 152
557251 -F


Arrest Record


Suwannee County Fire/Rescue calls

for service for Nov. 29 to Dec. 5


Bks Eid1WOOc


- - - - - -


0SUWANNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 2A






WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 3A


U tELLIeLL L LWRsL-V


For the love of Wellborn


By Bonnie Scott
The nostalgic, stereotyp-
ical ideas many of us asso-
ciate with rural life seem
accurate here in Wellborn.
When we moved to Well-
born from the Jacksonville
area 11 years ago, seeking
a more peaceful retire-
ment, God "plopped" us
down in the middle of a
blueberry farm. We had
never farmed in our lives
nor had we any intentions
of ever doing so. The blue-
berries have thrived most
years and we've enjoyed
our porch swing, the bird,
owl and coyote song, and
laughed at the antics of our
small herd of goats. Large
doses of peace and con-
tentment mixed in with a
bit of blueberry season
"stress" have combined to
make us thankful for our
happy Wellborn farm life.
We involved ourselves
early in church and com-
munity life. If you have
never experienced a
church and/or community
family, what blessings you
may be missing. The
church family gathers
around in love in good
times and bad. A commu-
nity of volunteers also
gather to enjoy one anoth-
er's company, raise funds
for community assistance,
and assist physically as
needed with community
needs and safety. I wish to
personally thank our Well-
born Volunteer Fire De-
partment for the excellent
job they do and for their
presence, firefighting
skills, and help during the
recent fire in downtown
Wellborn. We are also
grateful to the police who
caught those they believe
responsible. We all owe a
big thanks to the Wellborn


We see some phenomenal
talent here especially in the
arts. We have novelists,
handcrafters, outstanding
musical talent, artists and
many others. Encourage and
support your neighbors,
especially the young ones who
need the attaboyss' to carry on
the wonderful artistic traditions
of this area.


Community Association
and the Wellborn Neigh-
borhood Watch for all they
do for our community
from assistance to educa-
tion to a variety of free ac-
tivities open to all Well-
born residents. I can't
name everyone here who
is an "unsung hero" giving
of their time and money to
make Wellborn an even
better place to live. Some
of these heroes also wish
to remain anonymous, but
most of us know who they
are and we thank you for
your compassion especial-
ly to those who need lift-
ing up at times. Neighbors
naturally look out for one
another by phone calls and
personal visits. Our
churches are "alive and
well" in Wellborn, which
adds richly to community
support and spiritual nour-
ishment of its citizens.
We have lived in a num-
ber of different states and
abroad and have never
taken part in a community
as caring as this one, but
one has to be willing to
take the risk and taste
what Wellborn has to of-
fer. It is a risk, I am con-
vinced, you will be glad


you have taken. For those
of you born, bred and still
residing here, you have
made Wellborn a jewel,
safely nestled in its peace-
ful, rural trappings far
from the crowded hustle
and bustle of city life. I
pray all of us will strive to
keep Wellborn a special
gem as it tempts more and
more people from less
tranquil environs to our
quieter, slower lifestyle
some refer to as the "Out-
back."
I invite you to become
an active participant in the
life of Wellborn. We see
some phenomenal talent
here especially in the arts.
We have novelists, hand-
crafters, outstanding musi-
cal talent, artists and many
others. Encourage and
support your neighbors,
especially the young ones
who need the .iii.ihi'o, ,"
to carry on the wonderful
artistic traditions of this
area. Government was not
formed to be responsible
for every citizen's well-
being nor is it able to do
this. Wellborn citizens
willingly shoulder that re-
sponsibility and they do it
well.


TOPS is here for you

Anyone interested in learning more about nutrition, portion control, and
exercise while having fun is cordially invited to come join our TOPS group.
TOPS is nonprofit, noncommercial and affordable. TOPS# FL. 662 meets
weekly on Thursday mornings at the First Advent Christian Church in Live
Oak.
We start our weigh in at 8 a.m., and the meeting begins at 9 a.m. 10.
For more information please call Elaine at (386) 364-5537. We all make
New Year's resolutions about watching our weight. If you are in need of a
good support system to help you, make your New Year's resolution come
true, please come join us for informative programs and fun. Hope to see you
soon.



Minor injuries in Friday morning crash


Lt. Paul Haas of Suwannee
County Fire/Rescue com-
forts this little girl after a
two-car wreck on US 90
East Friday morning. The
two cars collided in front of
the Florida Sheriffs Youth
Ranch Opportunity Store
shortly before 10 a.m. The
girl was riding in the car
pictured with her mother
(shown) and two other kids.
Only minor injuries were re-
ported, according to Haas.
- Photo: Jeff Waters


Looking for a job?
suwanneedemocrat.com is here to
help. Log on today and click the
monster.com link on our homepage.
Here you'll find a search tool to
help you find the job you've been
looking for, also on Monster is career
advice and on the job information too!
522213-F


SMS teacher nets


major national award


Submitted
Jennifer Joy Campbell,
who teaches language arts
and journalism at Suwan-
nee Middle School, was
awarded the National
Council of Teachers of
English Leadership Devel-
opment Award at the 99th
Annual NCTE Convention
in Philadelphia recently.
The National Council of
Teachers of English, with
more than 50,000 individ-
ual and institutional mem-
bers worldwide, is dedicat-
ed to improving the teach-
ing and learning of English


and the language arts at all
levels of education.
The NCTE Leadership
Development Award nur-
tures the development of
new leaders within state/re-
gional/provincial affiliates
and NCTE. The award
provides each recipient a
monetary award of $500 to
attend the NCTE Annual
Convention. The award is
given to early career teach-
ers who have demonstrated
a capacity for professional
leadership.
Campbell, a Suwannee
County native, is in her


fourth year teaching. In ad-
dition to her contributions
to the local community, she
serves as the Recording
Secretary for the Florida
Council of Teachers of
English Executive Board.
She also serves as the
FCTE liaison for the Stan-
dards & State Require-
ments Affecting Classroom
Instruction commission.
Campbell will be ex-
panding her leadership
roles as the Middle Level
local chair for the 2010
NCTE Annual Convention
in Orlando.


Jennifer Joy Campbell


DR-529

DEPTMENOTICE R.8/09
OF REVENUE

Tax Impact of Value Adustment Board

SUWANNEE County TaxYear 2 0 0 9

Members of The Board

Honorable BILLY MAXWELL Board of County Commissioners, District No. 4

Honorable IVIE FOWLER Board of County Commissioners, District No. 3

Honorable JULIE ULMER School Board, District No. 3

Citizen Member DR. RICHARD CASON Business Owner within the school district

Citizen Member DANIEL BENNETT Homestead property owner

The Value Adjustment Board (VAB) meets each year to hear petitions and make decisions
relating to property tax assessments, exemptions, classifications, and tax deferrals.

Summary of Year's Actions
Number of Parcels Reduction Shift in
in County
Typeof Exemptions Assessments* Both Taxable Taxes Due
Type of Value Due to Board
Property Granted Requested Reduced Requested Withdrawn to Board Actions
or Resolved Actions
Residential 0 0 1 5 2 $30,950 $503.27

Commercial 0 0 0 5 1 $0 $0

Industrial
and
Miscellaneous 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0

Agricultural or
classified use 0 0 0 8 7 $0 $0

High water
recharge 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0

Historic
commercial or
nonprofit 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0

Business
machinery and
equipment 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0

Vacant lots
and acreage 0 0 0 25 21 $0 $0

TOTALS 0 0 1 43 31 $30,950 $503.27
All values should be county taxable values. School and other taxing authority values may differ.
*Include transfer of assessment difference (portability) requests.

If you have a question about these actions, contact the chair or the clerk of the Value Adjustment Board
Chair's name BILLY MAXWELL Phone 386-364-3400 X
Clerk's name BARRY BAKER Phone 386-362-0522 X
565400-F


Culinary Arts and
Commercial Foods Program
Classes starting January 21st
TABE testing must be completed prior to enrollment


SUWANNEE-
HAMILTON
TECHNICAL CENTER c k
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 647-4210
FINANCIAL AID ISAVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING
BENEFITS. ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC. I


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


0SUWANNEE DEMOoCRAP/LIVE OAK


PAGE 3A







suwannee living


Obituary
See more Obituaries,
Page 13A
Fred J. Eakins
October 14, 1921-
December 7, 2009

O'Brien, Fl passed
away on Monday,
December 7, 2009 after
short illness. The Perry, Fl
native moved to O'Brien
form Lake Whales, Fl
seven years ago.
He is survived by his
son: Freddie Eakins,
O'Brien, Fl; four
grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren.
Services will be held at
2:00 pm Thursday,
December 10, 2009 at
Daniels Memorial Chapel
and Interment will follow
at Memorial Park Cemetery
in Plant City, Fl.
Daniels Funeral Homes
& Crematory, Inc. Branford
is in Charge of All
Arrangements.
Please sign the
online...... i.. .1 Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.com
and click on obituaries


Find us on Facebook


Memorial service for


Raymond F. Hood


A memorial service will be held for
Raymond F Hood at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday,
December 27 at Fire Rescue Headquarters
next to the county airport, 13530 80th
Terrace, Live Oak.
In the early hours of December 27,
1984, Paramedic Raymond Hood was
responding to a call for help when he
made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of
duty for the citizens of our county.
Ray was hired July 1, 1976 by
Suwannee County Hospital to work as an


EMT. At the time of his death Ray was the
assistant director of the county ambulance
service with eight years of service.
Our department has prepared a garden
and memorial area in honor of Ray Hood.
We invited the public to attend the service.
We are looking forward to sharing
memories with family, friends, and co-
workers. Anyone with information on the
location and phone number of family or
co-workers, please contact Robert Eyer
386-590-0499.


Harry C. Gray II Memorial American Legion

Auxiliary Unit #107 makes presentation


Carmen Noa, Tanya Lees, Kathy Woods, Annette Burnhay, Beth
Miditidir, assistant principal. Photo: Submitted


Happy 17th Birthday
December 9



Eric you



Webb "11'
a^1 ^^^H^ 1^^^y !!-F! !


The Harry C. Gray
II Memorial American
Legion Auxiliary Unit
#107 of Live Oak
Auxiliary presented
the teachers of Suwan-
nee Intermediate
School with a basket
of fruit in honor of Ed-
ucation week, (Nov.
18, 09).
The Auxiliary also
delivered a Thanksgiv-
ing fruit basket to the
Robert Jenkins Veter-
ans Domicilliary in
Lake City.


Guardian ad Litem/Voic-
es for Children is raffling
off this dollhouse for
Christmas. Tickets will be
sold for $2 per chance or 3
chances for $5 for Dec. 1,
through Dec. 22, 2009.
This benefit will raise
funds for the Guardian ad
Litem/Voice for Children
program to assist in provid-
ing children with basic
needs and special requests
as well as training materi-
als to better prepare volun-
teers.


Tickets are $2 each or 3
tickets for $5. The drawing
will be held Dec. 22.
For more information,
please call Tammie
Williams at (386) 364-
7720, ext. 105.


SI I

'a l


Weddings


Smart & Thomas
United in marriage


Mr. and Mrs. Casharo Thomas


Priscilla Latrelle Smart and Casharo Thomas were
united in marriage on Saturday, October 10, 2009 at 3 o'-
clock in the afternoon at Triumph the Church of the
Kingdom of God in Live Oak.
The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry
Smart, Jr. of Live Oak. The groom is the son of Mrs.
Janie Brown and the late Mr. Wesley Thomas of Bran-
ford. The reception followed at the African Baptist Ban-
quet Hall.
The bride is a graduate of Suwannee High School. She
received her Bachelor of Science in Psychology from
Florida State University. She is a counselor for Meridian
Services in Columbia County.
The groom is a graduate of Branford High School. He
received his Bachelor of Science in Psychology from
FAMU University. He is employed by Lake City Middle
School. The couple resides in Lake City.


WEDDING REMINDER

SWinburn & Jordan
Stephen and Sandra Winburn would like to re-
mind you of the approaching marriage of their
daughter Stephanie, to Tyler Jordan.
The ceremony will be December 12, 2009, 1:30
p.m. at First Baptist Church of Live Oak. All friends
and family are invited.


Turkey shoot
The Harry C. Gray Memorial American Legion Post
#107 will have a turkey shoot on Saturday starting at 12
noon.
12 gauge shotguns only; Post will provide shells. Public
is welcome.
Food and drinks available. Post is located at 142nd
street McAlpin from Live Oak, take US 129 south seven
miles to 142nd Street, turn left, go 1 mile. Post is on the
right. For more information call 386-362-5987.


GRADY'
AUTOMOTIVE


SIZE PRICE (36 mos.)
8x16 $2645.00 $122.46
10x18 3770.00 174.54
12x24 5245.00 242.83
S 500 West Howard Street (US 90),
Live Oak
/ E 386-362-4012


CHOOSE-n-CUT and PRE CUT CHRISTMAS TREES

.Jones' Christmas Tree Farm
1230 NW 95th St., Branford, FL 32008 -
(386) 935-3549
Gilchrist County Take Hwy. 138
(East of Hwy. 129 or West of Hwy. 47)
To N.W. 7th Terrace.... Follow Signs
16 Acres of CYPRESS,
VIRGINIA PINE, CEDAR,
AND BLUE ICE.
TREE STANDS, TREE LIGHTS, ETC.
POTTED TREES
FREE CLEANING & WRAPPING
LIGHTED TREE LOT OPEN DAILY
10 A.M. 'TIL 6:00 P.M.
THURS. NOV. 26, THRU DEC. 23



& Back-to-Schoodl


ao! b g2009

.ED

Dec. 14 & 15 Testing $70.00

You must attend a registration session.
Wed., Dec. 9th 9 a.m. or 6 p.m.

Call Lynn Lee at 386-647-4201
to sign up for registration

SUWANNEE- 415 S.W. Pinewood Dr
HAMLTON Live Oak, FL 32064
TECHNICAL CENTER 386-647-4200


oack-to-sch~/


Win this beautiful

dollhouse!


NOW AT GRAD Y' S
I Utility ]| Cabin


Ben's Repair Service
Auto, Truck, Tractor Gas, Diesel
Commercial, Industrial, Logging, Farming
Mechanical Repairs Most Makes & Models
Welding Repairs & Fabrication Most Models
Will Go ToYou orYou Can Bring ItTo Us!

I am Benjamin Wimberley,
owner of Ben's Repair Service in Mayo.
I placed an advertisement with the
Suwannee Democrat and Branford News
section about 3 weeks ago and the very
first week my ad paid off. I wanted to say
Thank You Suwannee Democrat for all
the friendly and timely service.

123 SE Tiger Road, Mayo, FL

386-590-4836 386-294-3215


PAGE 4A


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009








Fun, and then some, at Boy Scout Camp-o-ree


By Tom Burnett
Asst. Scoutmaster,
Troop 693
Boy Scouts from Troops
408 and 693, both in Live
Oak, participated in the
Suwannee River District's
annual gathering and com-
petition on the Suwannee
River in northeast
Lafayette County.
Troops from the district's
7-county area came togeth-
er to test their skills against
each other. This year's
theme was lashing and
knot-tying.
For the lashing, there
were two items that had to
be built:
The first challenge was
to build a frame on which
to carry an injured person
100-yards across the finish
line. Scoring was based on
the ability to complete the
proper lashings for the type
of connections, having the


frame be secure enough to
carry a person safely and
the shortest time in which
to complete the tasks.
The second challenge
was to build a catapult and
have it throw a ball. Scor-
ing was based on the abili-
ty to complete the proper
lashings for the type of
connections, having the
frame be secure enough to
throw the ball the greatest
distance as well as to throw
a second ball with the
greatest accuracy ... all in
the shortest time.
For the knot-tying, a pa-
trol of scouts had to take
numerous short pieces of
rope and connect them us-
ing specifically named
knots in order to have a
length of rope which will
be long enough to connect
two vertical poles. Scoring
was based on the ability to
tie the correct knots in the
shortest time.


During free-time, scouts
played kick-ball, chess,
went hiking and visited
other units (troops.) Satur-
day evening was a camp-
fire where an old-timer told
of his adventures as a scout
while living in Pennsylva-
nia back in the 1940s.
Boys were listening so in-
tently you could hear a pin
drop in the grass.
After the storytelling,
there were skits and songs.
The North Florida Coun-
cil offers scouting pro-
grams for boys in the first
grade to their 18th birthday.
Handicapped boys can stay
until their 21st birthday.
The council also offers co-
ed programs for boys and
girls ages 14 until their 21st
birthday. For additional in-
formation, contact the
council at its toll-free num-
ber, 800-232-0845, or Ce-
ciley Jeffers, District Exec-
utive, 386-288-6937.


Scouts Austin Wolf and David Duckwiler remove a camp table from Troop 693's trailer. The
table was made from only one 4' x 8' 3/4" plywood. When assembled, it has seating and
table-top. The troop arrived at about 7 p.m. Friday, and darkness had already arrived.


'. '" ". .. .:. -, Y: '-
*i. -.
-. .--- ,e
Troop 150, having finished its lashing for a catapult, raises the catapult into position.


Love a mystery?
Try locating your ancestors by working on your family tree. The Suwannee Val-
ley Gcinc..il-, Society invites you to join and learn how to find your ancestors.
Membership is $30 for a single member or $35 for a family. Corporate membership
is also available for donations of $100 or more (tax deductible). Meetings are held
on the first Thursday of each month at 7:00 PM at the Gcnc.ilb,-h, Center at 215
Wilbur Street SW in Live Oak. The library is open on Tuesday and Thursday from
9 a.m. until 5 p.m. and the talented folks there will be glad to help. For more infor-
mation call Jinnie or Alice at 386-330-0110.


Register Now!
Automotive Tech
or Auto Body
Repair
Earn your ASE today!
Classes start January 21st
Call (386) 647-4210
to schedule TABE test

SUWANNEE-l
HANMLTONi
TECHNICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.,
Live Oak, FL 32064
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING BENEFITS. ACCREDITED BY THE
COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.


Boy Scout Troop 693 scouts
David Duckwiler, Austin
Wolf, Clint Brown and assis- WANNEE-
tant Scoutmaster Keith HAMILTON Il
Ryan work on their omelet- TECHNICAL CENTER T
in-a-bag breakfasts. Each
scout prepared an omelet AR AM
with the specific ingredients Sa l T n
he wanted and then cooked IF e. 201l0
it in a pan of boiling water
until done to his satisfac- A l uiaioB'L' A epe
tion. Photos: Tom Burnett 38 6 7 2 50






SUWANNEE





HEALTH




CARE CENTER


We're not just a nursing home.

After a stay in the
hospital, our full time
therapists and high tech
K modalities can help get
j.*' you on your feet and
Back at home.


Services Provided:
Physical Therapy
*Occupational Therapy
Speech Therapy
Skilled Nursing
Out Patient Therapy
Clinic


1620 E. Helvenston St.

Live Oak, FL 32064

Phone: 386-362-7860


563725-F


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


0SUWANNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE OAK


PAGE 5A


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~' .".rY**l*1..~Ei~L~;I'~ Ippi~j~e~p









Viewpoints/Opinions


BIBLE VERSE

"Jesus answered, 'I am
the way and the truth
and the life. No one
comes to the Father
except through me'."
-John 14:6




^uuwanni


Ormicrat






El
MYRA C. REGAN ROBERT BRIDGES
Publisher Editor
Members of the Suwannee Democrat
editorial board are Myra C. Regan, publisher,
and Robert Bridges, editor. Our View,
which appears in Friday's editions of the
Democrat, is formed by that board.







'Real


Floridians'
By Jim Holmes
How can you tell if you are a real Floridian?
Is it where you were born or how you live your
life? Mind you, I don't think anything south of
Gainesville qualifies as Florida anymore. It has
all been annexed into the State of Chaos.
At any rate, I'd argue being a Floridian is
more about how you live your life than where
your birth certificate is filed. But then I have a
dirty little secret. You see, I was born on an
Ohio mink ranch. (Don't laugh. Those little
buggers are tough to saddle, let alone ride.) As
a result, Florida didn't become a part of my life
until I was nine. Having said that, I think in the
following 55 years, I have eaten enough col-
lards, grits, catfish, hush puppies and black-
eyed peas to have flushed my soul, if not my
body, out of any bad Yankeeisms. Add to that
the fact that I married a gal whose Florida roots
go back to at least the 1830s and I think I should
qualify as a full-fledged native.
So what traits do I think real Floridian exhib-
it? Here are some thoughts from my wife and
me, along with others shared in a recent email
forwarded to us by a good friend and Hamilton
County native:
You are a real Floridian if you have a little tea
with your sugar. On a related note, you're a real
Floridian if you ask your wife or girlfriend for
a little sugar and you aren't looking for any-
thing to put in your tea.
You are a real Floridian if you don't think
twice about seeing someone in a restaurant say
the blessing before starting their meal, even if
you don't do it yourself.
You are a real Floridian if you know "twiced"
is a real word, while djlci '" is a question
about supper. You also know that the correct
pronunciation of "cement" is "C-ment."
You are a real Floridian if, upon meeting new
arrivals, your first question is, "Have you
picked a church yet?" And if the answer is no,
extending a sincere invitation to come visit
yours.
You are a real Floridian if the geographic area
in which you reside has four seasons, all of
which can sometimes be experienced in the
same day.
You are a real Floridian if you can't figure out
why the start of deer season isn't a national hol-
iday.
You are a real Floridian if catfish is "the oth-
er white meat" and if your idea of caviar is mul-
let roe.
You are a real Floridian if you always use
"Sir" and "Ma'am" when speaking to your el-
ders, while good acquaintances, who are your
seniors, are addressed as "Mr. Jim" or "Miss
Lynda."
You are a real Floridian if you understand
NASCAR is not a religion, but pretty dang
close.
And finally, you are a real Floridian if you al-
ways have a penknife hooked to your belt or
tucked in your jeans' pocket. (Florida gals get
a pass on that last one. You young ones like to
wear your jeans skin tight ... and I'm not about
to say anything that might discourage that.)


Jim Holmes lives in Live Oak.


Please address letters to: Letters
To The Editor, Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Please include your full name, address and daytime
phone number. We ask this so we can verify your
letter and discuss any questions about it with you.


-L Q )

do 41W 4w- 4 a- n
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To the Editor:
As we continue to meet here in Tallahassee in Special
Session to discuss SunRail, I thought it best to share my
thoughts on the subject with you.
First of all, I would like to share with you how I am con-
cerned we are meeting to discuss this subject when the
people of our state are truly suffering. I am concerned be-
cause we should be discussing how to get our state econo-
my back up and running in a long term, sustainable man-
ner, not one which continues to rely on the backs of tax-
payers and the federal government. The people of this state
are not concerned about high speed rail. They are con-
cerned with the economy, job creation, high taxes, in-
creased public utility fees and health care. These are the is-
sues we should be discussing, not high speed rail. While
rail is an issue, it should not be a high ranking issue before
our legislature as the personal needs of our constituents is
must!
SunRail, in its current form will cost the state nearly $5
billion dollars, it shifts liability from CSX to the taxpayers
and further expands government by creating another level
of state bureaucracy. The state currently has no money for
high speed rail and there is no guarantee the federal gov-
ernment will even allocate any federal money towards the
project. As it stands now, Florida is on the lower tier on the
list of states to get federal money for rail projects. Careful
examination of the federal contract shows, no $300 million
in approved federal funds for this project have been ap-
proved. Further, as it stands now $1.2 billion dollars is a
huge expense for the state of Florida- especially when you
consider the assessed value of the rail line is just $22 mil-
lion dollars.
While the idea of high speed rail is acceptable, the price
tag is just too high. I feel at the very least, the state should
renegotiate the price tag of this boondoggle. There has
been no funding source identified for SunRail or TriRail,
despite the state working on the issue for three years. With
the projected deficit in our state budget to be $2.8 billion
dollars in the coming fiscal year, as our population is in
continuing decline, how can we, as leaders, add another
cost on the backs of our families? Furthermore, the passage
of SunRail will not create "thousands of new jobs," as


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some have speculated. The Florida Department of Trans-
portation estimates the project will only create 364 new
jobs in our state, combining both direct and indirect jobs
associated with the project. Furthermore, studies show only
a maximum of 3500 people, out of 175,000 commuters on
the I-4 corridor will even ride the line.
The new bill still does not address the continuing issues
of liability. How can we purchase the rail corridor, be re-
sponsible for its upkeep and maintenance, meanwhile CSX
is running unlimited freight on the line for 12 hours a day.
On top of this, the current bill leaves the state liable for
damages in too many accident scenarios, even those caused
by CSX freight trains. SunRail's proposal to indemnify
CSX for accidents which occur in the rail corridor continue
to trouble me. As I continue to review this bill, time and
time again, I find no language which reduces the state of
Florida's exposure to litigation. This will by far outweigh
any annual subsidies for SunRail or south Florida's Tri-
Rail. We must, as a legislature stand firm and insist CSX
be responsible for any and all accidents the company caus-
es.
I believe we need to renegotiate the terms of the contract
with CSX if we are really determined to make this pur-
chase a reality. Furthermore, we need to find a way to ade-
quately fund TriRail and figure out a way to connect Tri-
Rail with Tampa Bay Area Regional Transportation Au-
thority. This seems to be a more adequate way to use our
rail funds in a manner which actually would assist our resi-
dents. A long term, well thought out rail plan is essential,
not pie in the sky promises, or allocations of monies which
may or not be a reality in 4 or 5 years.
As it stands now, our counties are struggling- NOW. Our
families are struggling- NOW. The families in Florida are
hurting. We have families who cannot afford to pay their
mortgages, cannot pay their electric bills, and are worried if
they will have a job tomorrow. How can we, in good con-
science, as the elected leaders of our state, pass this type of
project on the backs of our counties, the families and the fu-
ture families of state of Florida.

Charles S. "Charlie" Dean
State Senate, District 3


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OPINION


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LETTER TO THE EDITOR


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 6A


4


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK






WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 7A


Branford News

Serving southern Suwannee County, including Branford, O'Brien and McAlpin


Riding to remember


Raymond Mickel of Branford takes to his bike in effort to help others beat leukemia


By Stephenie Li ;i,.*..i.i-,
..t. I'h. i. li\ in :- .".i, ,_ "_ .', alTn n ,. ,.. 1 1

Eleven-year-old Raymond Mickel's
biggest worry is whether he'll make the
JV football team next year. He doesn't re-
member being diagnosed with leukemia
nine years ago. The chemotherapy, hair
loss, and three-year struggle for his life
seems like a vague dream. This is why he
rides his bike. So all children diagnosed
with leukemia can grow up and remem-
ber the ordeal as it were only a bad
dream.
Since 2006 Raymond has raised
$4,255 for the Leukemia and Lymphoma
Society, the world's largest voluntary
health organization dedicated to funding
blood cancer research, by riding his bike
each year more than forty miles on the
Nature Coast Trail. His donors range
from locals to medical doctors and busi-
ness people.
Last May Raymond started his "Ride
for Cancer" at 9 a.m. at the Florida Trail-
head of the Nature Coast Trail. The first
quarter of his trip to Fanning Springs
Trailhead went quickly, with a max speed
of 13 mph. Florida State Greenways and
Trails employees cheered him on along
his journey. It was the second leg that
was toughest for Raymond. His speed


dropped and the hot sun had risen above
the trees. After a break in Chiefland,
Raymond was rejuvenated and nearly
broke his previous record. He finished in
just five hours at the Trenton trailhead.
Raymond's journey is a symbol of the
long road that so my children with
leukemia face.
"I thought it was a good idea," said
Raymond. "I want people to be cured just
like me."
His hope is to encourage, said Mike,
Raymond's father.
"He went through something that most
adults would not be able to handle," said
Mike. "Now he wants to encourage
everyone going through the same thing to
think positive."
While Raymond barely remembers his
battle with leukemia, Mike remembers
the experience all too well.
"We thought it was death sentence,"
Mike said.
Raymond was diagnosed after falling
off a play set and developing abnormal
bruising when he was two years old.
"He never complained during his treat-
ment. He was so young when he was di-
agnosed and dealt with it for so long,"
said Mike. "He didn't know to complain."


SEE RIDING, PAGE 8A


Toys for Kids +

overwhelmed with requests


Many kids still aren't
covered, say organizers

By Roger L. Burnside

Toys for Kids+ needs your help badly.
Christmas is a time of joy and celebra-
tion. Unfortunately, there are many chil-
dren in the Branford area that will be
missing the joy of receiving Christmas
presents. We are in need of toys, clothes
and in some cases, food for these chil-
dren.
With the economy the way it is right
now we are experiencing more requests
than in past years. No donation is too
small, if you can just provide one toy, a
box of food, a winter coat or shoes it


will be greatly appreciated.
Anyone interested in helping us with
this project can take their donations to
the Branford Health Department.
Thompson Custom Homes at 3554
256th St., O'Brien has agreed to be an
additional drop off site for donations.
You may also call Karen at the Branford
Health Department at 386-935-1133 or
Roger Burnside at 386-935-3343.
Should you know of a child in need
you may also call these numbers.
Over the years the folks in the Bran-
ford area have brought a lot of joy to the
area's children and their families, for
this we thank each and every one of
you. The smiles and appreciation the
children express each year make this
project a blessing to all.


Cancer survivor Raymond Mickel rides his bike to help kids with leukemia.
- Courtesy photo

O'BRIEN AND OUR NEIGHBORS


'Bits & Pieces' from


south Suwannee County


By Ana Smith
Can you believe it? Another year just
about gone! It's been a rough year for so
many, but isn't it great that the human
spirit keeps hanging on! There is one
thing that really stands out this year,
though, that I just have to address as my
own personal observation. Who in their
right mind ... and this is not just to indi-
viduals, but to any businesses that have
adopted this as their 'new' policy ... could
even think of taking the word CHRIST-
MAS out of this holiday? Have we com-
pletely forgotten our country's history, and
the reason the Pilgrims came here to begin
with?
As for me, maybe all that's happened in
this past year has brought home how criti-
cal it is that I stand up and remind every-
one I can that it's not just the material
freedoms that matter, but also the spiritual
and moral freedoms that seem to be slow-
ly taken away from us.
If you don't want to celebrate this holi-
day as CHRISTMAS, that's your privi-
lege. God knows how many have given
their lives so you can do that. But I also
have the freedom to celebrate it as
CHRISTMAS, no matter what religion I
practice. It is still CHRISTMAS, it is still
the time when now, more than ever before
in our history here in the USA, we need to
celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ. I'll bet,
if this tradition was to be dismissed as
some seem to be forcing on you, and we
stopped calling it CHRISTMAS, the busi-
ness "powers that be" would see such a
huge decline in their profits that they
would be more than happy to call this
time of the year CHRISTMAS again!
Yes, I love looking at the beautifully
decorated homes and yards! Yes, I love
going through the stores and the mall, see-
ing all the decorations and enjoying the
cheerful greetings of everyone I see. But I
also love the thought of hearing in church
the familiar story of Christ's birth, singing


those time-honored CHRISTMAS hymns,
and sharing in the celebration with all
those I know and love. And yes, I admit
it, I love to watch the faces of the children
as they open the gifts that come with the
special day. But I also love to see how
people put aside their differences and
come together, mending those 'broken
fences', forgiving slights or wrongdoings
by family or friends, and extending their
hands and their hearts to help those less
fortunate. And in these days, the number
of 'less fortunate' seems to be larger than
ever.
So, from my heart to yours, please don't
take your religious freedom for granted!
Even if you are not a regular churchgoer,
please find a church to attend this
CHRISTMAS and enjoy the CHRIST-
MAS STORY with others who know how
valuable that freedom is. Share what you
can with those who are feeling the finan-
cial pinch, or who are alone this year, and
do it willingly. And I don't mean just the
material things, but your love and friend-
ship and everything we hold so dear in a
country that used to be the richest country
in the world in so many ways, and now
stands on the edge of losing so much. And
I reiterate, these are my personal feelings,
but I will stand by them as long as I live.
I've said it many times before, I'm say-
ing it again, and I'll say it until I die ... I
am a first generation AMERICAN, and
I've been taught what losing any of these
freedoms will mean, and what it has al-
ready cost, and continues to cost, to attain
it! And with every new change I hear or
read about that really gets my blood boil-
ing, I remind myself that it is those people
who are supposed to be working for my
betterment, and whose salaries my hard-
earned money has paid for so many years,
who need to know that we, as American
citizens, will no longer accept the way


SEE O'BRIEN, PAGE 8A


IX Arrests .............2A Sports.............. 1B 7 n
Legal Notices ......... 6B Suwannee Living ......4A HI 75 L 55 Follow us on
IN D IX Obituaries ..........13A Viewpoint ........... .6A G FACEBOOK
134 PAGE 2B


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


PAGE 7A








Branford News


Good deeds, courtesy McAlpin 4-H

UK?, :i


Filling Thanksgiving baskets with goodies.
Recently the McAlpin 4-H club made
Thanksgiving baskets for residents of the
Dowling Park community. They donated
items such as oranges, apples, nuts, crack-
ers, candy and more. The club has donated
Thanksgiving baskets in the past and club
members say they enjoy giving to others.
Club members also made shoeboxes for


the Operation Christmas Child program.
The members donated the items and filled
10 boxes to be given. The club has also
done this in prior years and we hope to
continue to do both of these wonderful
projects for years to come. The McAlpin
4-H Club members all have big hearts and
enjoys helping the community beyond.


Riding to remember


Continued From Page 7A

Every three weeks for
nearly three years Ray-
mond returned to Shands
in Gainesville for
chemotherapy. An under-
the-skin port was implant-
ed in his chest so he could
receive the treatments.
"We had to hold him
down. It's just terrible to
have to hold your kid
down," said Mike. "You
think, is he going to re-
member this for the rest of
his life?"
Said Raymond, "All I re-
member is the bubble gum
anesthetic."
As the treatments contin-
ued, things just got
tougher.
"I remember when he
developed these awful skin
rashes. We could not stop
it. We tried all kinds of dif-


National Certified

MEDICAL

SECRETARY


ferent lotions, but nothing
helped," said Mike. "I can
remember saying, 'Please,
God, let this be over. Give
him a break'."
Raymond said a break
was exactly what he got.
At his recent five-year
checkup, Raymond was
told he now has only a one
percent chance of reoccur-
rence. The Mickels had
stem cells saved from Ray-
mond's younger brother's
umbilical cord, in case the
odds didn't go their way.
"It is kind of like a spare
tire. You hope you never
have to use it," said Mike.
"I just hope it won't
come back," Raymond
added. "But I don't really
think about it."
Although the Mickels
struggled to understand
how one little boy could be
put through so much pain,


COSMETOLOGY
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Classes start Jan. 21st Classes start Jan. 21st


Call 386-647-4210

to Schedule TABE Test


SUWANNEE-
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415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. 8
APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING BENEFITS.
ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.


Make A Joyful "Christmas" Noise!










An Evening at the Advent "Christmas Village"
Dowling Park, Florida

A Musical Celebration & Drama of the Christmas Story
featuring The Village Church Chancel Choir, Children's
Choir Drama, Instruments and Te Deum Handbell Ringers

Saturday, December 12 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, December 13 10:00 a.m.
Sunday, December 13 3:00 p.m.

Tickets are available at no charge for the Saturday night
and Sunday afternoon performances at the
New Life Bible Bookstore and The Music Center or
by calling The Village Church at 658-5344.

Tickets will be honored until 6:15 on Saturday and
2:45 on Sunday, after which the doors will be opened
to non-ticketed guests. 562638-F
562638-F


Raymond feels lucky he
was able to fight his
leukemia. "Others aren't so
lucky," he said. Kids come
in, they are diagnosed with
cancer, sent home, and
dead four months later,
said Mike.
And so, Raymond rides
his bike.
Next May he will ride
again, this time with his
little brother, his spare tire,
Colby, 8. He hopes to raise
more donations and possi-
bly ride for more miles.
Last May, Raymond re-
ceived a Special Commu-
nity Service Award from
Branford Elementary
School's Student Council
for his 2009 ride.
For all those children
currently fighting cancer,
Raymond said, "I hope
they can make it through."
And he plans to help.


Filling shoeboxes for Operation Christmas Child.
- Courtesy photos


O'Brien and our neighbors
Continued From Page 1A needs are real and urgent. sick with tt
Sunday morning at 10:30 seasonal cc
they are ignoring our cries the adult choir of O'Brien some who
and slowly tearing this Baptist Church will present tal or dealii
country apart. its CHRISTMAS program. health issut
I'm off my soap-box There will be no Sunday for all those
now! At least until I see School. And at 5 p.m. the the knowle
what the new year brings! children will put on their hears all ou
This Saturday is the program, followed by light for our cou
CHRISTMAS celebration refreshments in the fellow- the crisis it
in Branford, and I hope to ship hall. Our children have "Humorous
see a lot of you folks out worked hard to do their "If you fi
there. Stop by a booth that best, so if you know any of hot water, t
I'll be helping with and say the children who will par- "Lord, gi
hello. Take your kids and ticipate in this program, humor that
enjoy the parade, then please come to OBC and let happiness f
come and listen to the en- them know how much you share it wit
tertainment and maybe do a love them and appreciate "Think o
little CHRISTMAS shop- their talents and their love happen to w
ping at some of the booths, of Our Lord as they praise there were
It's a chance to enjoy the Him in song. And even if life would
day with your family, and you don't have children par- Congressio
to meet and greet some of ticipating, if you live in this "It's pretty
your neighbors. And community, come and join what does 1
please, in our part of us for a loving evening in Poverty and
Suwannee county, read praise and worship. both failed.
Roger Burnside's column Next Wednesday evening "Gather t
about the needs of so many OBC will also celebrate our happiness a
children and families. Not CHRISTMAS week with a have a loaf
just toys, but clothes and candlelight service starting ment."
food! His column is called at 6:00pm. It's a wonderful "Cherish
"Toys For Kids," and the way to prepare for the birth moments; t
of Our Lord Jesus Christ, cushion for
and to truly 'get in the spirit' As you hc
ER READINGS of what this season is all CHRISTM
d 2009 about. the time to
We have so many folks true meanii
7 7 in our community who are God bless!


ie flu and the
ilds, as well as
are in the hospi-
ng with serious
es. Please pray
e you know, with
dge that He
ir prayers. Pray
ntry and each of
is going From
SQuotations":
ind yourself in
ake a bath!"
ve me a sense of
I may take some
rom this life and
h others."
f what would
is in America if
no humorists;
be one long
nal Record!"
y hard to tell
bring happiness.
d wealth have
.t.
the crumbs of
md you will
of content-

all your happy
hey make a fine
Sold age!"
lead into this
AS season, take
remember the
ng of the season.


nyers Uliu
Attn: Pilots & Prospective Pilots
3 planes for personal use
or learn to fly with an instructor
Reasonable Fees
1 hr. Intro Flight $ gift
Great .,.. / ; certificate
Include all costs involved with the first flight
Call Mark Fessler 303-775-5015
www.liveoakflyers.com
Email: liveoakflyers@gmail.com


DAYV UFZ



JAVA JAX and

the Suwannee

Democrat


Lookfor ail
daily specials on
the board at
Java Jax

Regular Cup of
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Call the Suwann
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Your home
subscripti today
386-362-1734

uutannee

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211 Howard St. East
Live Oak
362-1734 500072-F


SUWANNEE RIV
Branforc


The water levels provided here refer to the height at the US Hwy. 27 bridge
in Branford in feet above mean sea level (ft-msl) at the gauging station. In
the past the levels were read as gauge height not mean sea level.
Dec. 02, '09 8.87 Dec. 05, '09 9.76
Dec. 03,'09 8.84 Dec. 06,'09 10.16
Dec. 04, '09 9.09 Dec. 07, '09 10.54
Dec. 08,'09 10.69
Sponsored By:


SCAFF'SSupermarket
Branford 386-935-1527
525103-F


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1Tiolh.'.uh Sleep Distributors

US 90 West (Next To 84 Lumber) Lake City, 386-752-9303P


I


Pin


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 8A


c
19
c






s



e
c











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ji
f
11






Branford News


The spirit of Christmas all year long

Pickett Lake woman rises above her own circumstances to help those in need


Darlene Spikes and Officer Lavaughn Wynn with blankets Darlene and sister Jackie Knight made for those in need.
- Courtesy photo


Submitted
Darlene Spikes and her sister, Jackie Knight, recently presented 100 homemade blan-
kets to their nephew, Lavaughn Wynn, Community Resource and Crime Prevention Po-
lice Officer of the Lake City Police Department. These blankets are donated to the Lake
City Police and Fire Department Christmas Give Away Program.
The story behind the gift of blankets reflect the true spirit of the commandment that
Jesus gave that we love our neighbors. Darlene Spikes is an awesome example of angels
among us. She has been handicapped since birth needing daily care, yet she continues to
rise above her circumstances to help others. This is how the story unfolds.
The Child Protection Education of America organization worked with the Lake City
Police and Fire Department in 2007 to begin a toy drive which served 69 families with
approximately 80 children. After the items were distributed to the families, a few blan-
kets were left. In the spring of 2008, a tornado hit Lake City leaving families homeless
and in great need. Those extra blankets were given to people who had lost everything.
Darlene's mother and caretaker, Sybil Spikes, passed away in February 2007, leaving
a huge void in the life of Darlene and her devoted family. Jackie is one of the sisters who
has committed to the care of Darlene so she can remain in her home in the Pickett Lake
area, near Branford. After Officer Wynn told them how much those people affected by
the tornado appreciated the blankets, Darlene and Jackie started to work to make a few


extra blankets to be used throughout the year. Their donations helped the Lake City Po-
lice and Fire Department serve over 200 families and 300 plus children during the Christ-
mas season of 2008.
Darlene and Jackie really worked this year and finished about 100 blankets. They use
donated fabric and remnants which allows them to keep the cost to a minimum. Darlene
was asked how she feels about this project and she replied, "I'm doing something that I
know Jesus wants me to do." Truly Darlene is an angel among us with a tremendous sup-
port system in her loving family.


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4-Willis Lancaster-Quitman,Ga.-86-Laps avg mph 28.91


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Sales & Service
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CLOSED SATURDAYS UNTIL SPRING
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Hours: Mon-Fri. (386) 935-1544
7 a.m.-5 p.m. (386)9 544
525122-F
PHONE
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ESTABLISHED 1904

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TIM VERDI BRANFORD, FL 32008
525158-F


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BUILDING SUPPLY INC.


I


DURON
WILLIAMSON'S
TRFF SERVICE


SServing the community Blue Cross Blue Shield Complete tree removal,
since 1979 Health Options trimming, pruning, stump grinding,
Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.; Everything For Your Home Recovery haul off, and bobcat service.
SSat. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. From Prescriptions to Medical Supplies Hazardous trees our specialty.
? www.gilchrist.doitbest.com Serving your area for over 10 years.
w 19 B, FL C y L 101 S.W. US Highway 27 Licensed and insured free estimates
Hwy129BeFL F Cherry LumberF rid
Pharmacist Branford, Florida 32008 Call 352 318 3610 or 386 835 2180
3C110Q525194-F (386) 935-6905 564016-F

Daniels Funeral Homes CLASS "A" COLLISION INC.
"The Wrecksperts"
SSpecializing In Heavy Collisions
& Crematory, Inc. Quality Guaranteed
&n Insurance Preferred Shop
SUnibody & Frame Straightening
24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE Branford 386-935-1124 Major Credit Cards Accepted.
*Automatic Fuel Delivery Prompt installation & Repair / Live Oak 386-362-4333
Safety Trained Professionals Easy Payment Plans James (Jim) B. Daniels, III, L.F.D.
ustomeratisfaction 502 SUWANNEEAVE. SW BRAFORD LarryKeith Daniel FREE ESTIMATES Shop 386-935-9334
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ZEE ANGEL To advertise your

BAGEL CAFE business here, call
907 N. Suwannee Ave., Branford Rhonda at
Located in front of Hospice
38-123 386-362-1 734 for

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PHARMACY 8:30 am-6:00 pm
PHARMACY ''a',
OF BRANFORD Sunday-Closed
Now accenting


'Mini-Storage
Large and Small Units
Reasonable
386-935-2122 386-935-0298
525190-F


wO65


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


PAGE 9A


I





PAGE 1OA U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


Lots of folks were on hand for the ribbon cutting for the 25th anniversary of the Christmas on the Square Saturday. Photos: Jeff Waters


A rockin' little Christmas
Scenes from Saturday's Christmas on the Square
















Girls with Sharon's School of Dance performed to a variety of Christmas songs.













C- r w
Classic cars were a hit Saturday.


Carol and Harry Andrews sold University of Florida and oth-
er college memorabilia at the square.


This little girl enjoyed the Sharon's School of
mances with her family.


# Sound of Suwannee members: (from left) Nicole Potter, C.J. Peaden and Erin Carroll.


wII1


Ma
Many crafts were available for sale.


S LIVE OAK LEARNERS


The 4H club sold hot chocolate and other tasty treats.


JH 0 (~~olo
/- I rcrd~f


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 10A








A rockin' little


Christmas Suwannee V

Scenes from Saturday's Christmas -P Squ
on the Square


Santa Claus happily greeted children throughout the day. Photos: Jeff Waters


Just one of the many handmade items that was for sale at the square.


- .I--.~-. --
-l "
-,- .,-* r* --


.T


tymu


Here were performances by many groups Saturday.


U


Sue Lamb, one of the original founders of Christmas on the Square, was
presented with a gift of thanks at the ribbon cutting ceremony.


This officer helped make sure the crowd stayed safe.


The Suwannee Drug Free Coalition had a
furry friend to greet kids.


About 12,000 people from as far away as Atlanta filled the streets of downtown Live Oak. Photo: Amber Waters


'II


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


PAGE 11A


mR~~


NIOFrs4 AMTl

OWTU WLAI:~
TOMOMOR "'MaU








New driver's license requirements kick in Jan. 1


Suwannee County Tax
Collector Sharon Jordan
says new requirements are
coming for Florida driver's
licenses and ID cards on
January 1, 2010. These
changes are the result of
the Federal Real ID Act
adopted by Congress in
2005 as part of the Depart-
ment of Homeland Securi-
ty's security measures and
under recommendation by
the 9/11 Commission.
When renewing, replac-
ing or getting a new Florida
driver license or ID card,
beginning January 1, 2010,
you must bring to a Florida
driver license office origi-
nal documents that prove
your identity, Social Secu-
rity number and residential
address.

Here are some accept-
able documents for each.

Identification: U.S.
Citizens
(BRING ONE)
Bring one of the follow-
ing original documents as
proof of your identity:
Certified U.S. birth
certificate, including terri-
tories and District of Co-
lumbia (A hospital birth
certificate is not accept-


able.)
Valid U.S. passport
Certificate of natural-
ization
Consular report of birth
abroad
Social Security Num-
ber (BRING ONE)
Bring one of the follow-
ing original documents as
proof of your Social Secu-
rity number, if issued:
Social Security card
W-2 Form
Pay check showing
number
DD-214
School record showing
number
Documentation from
the IRS showing number
Residential Address
(BRING TWO)
The address on a driver
license or ID card can no
longer be a post office box.
Bring two proofs of resi-
dential address:
Deed, mortgage,
monthly mortgage state-
ment, mortgage payment
booklet, or rental agree-
ment.
Florida voter registra-
tion card
Florida vehicle regis-
tration or title
W-2 form or 1099 form
Utility bill, hookup, or


Live Oak tipuRon
AINT & A
FLOORING



I'm decorating for Christmas this year
and I would like to pound some extra
nails in my walls to hang decorations
on. Can you give me some tips on
repairing the walls once I take the
decorations down?
A .n lll holk.. tluci .s IhosI,, caLis. d
*A h\ nails. sCI'C\\ s. or dln'1s. .cian hc
pilchcld call). .\ ll \)u nCCd is
some spackling compound, sandpaper, and
touch up paint. Repair holes by filling them
completely. Allow it to dry and sand the area
smooth. After you repair the holes, if
shrinkage is noted, apply a second generous
coat of compound. Once dry, sand the
surface smooth and wipe away all sanding
residue. Paint the area to match the rest of
the wall. This is a good reason to save
leftover paint after a painting project.

1512 South Ohio Avenue, 362-7066
563992-F



C uoa


Qwdlmad


work order not more than
two months old
Current automobile or
homeowner's insurance
policy or bill
Mail from financial in-
stitutions, not more than
two months old
Medical or health card
with address listed
A letter from a shelter


or half-way house verifying
that applicant lives at the
address
Educational transcripts
for current school year
Statement from an ac-
companying parent, step-
parent or guardian residing
at the same address as ap-
plicant. The parent or
guardian must present


proof of residential address.
See additional docu-
ments at:
www.GatherGoGet.com
Legal Name Change (if
applicable)
Original or certified
copy of all marriage certifi-
cates or court orders that
show name changes) (Un-
certified photocopies are


not valid)
For more information
and a complete list visit
www.GatherGoGet.com
For immigrants and non-
immigrants please visit
www.GatherGoGet.com


Suwannee County Tax
Collector Sharon Jordan


Daughters of the American


Revolution chapter to meet


The Edward Rutledge
DAR Chapter's December
meeting is set for Thurs-
day, Dec. 10 at 10:30 a.m.
A delightful program is
planned at Kazbor's Grille
(located in Lake City in the
new Publix shopping cen-
ter). Stay for a Dutch lunch
following the meeting. Vis-
itors and prospective mem-
bers are welcome.
For additional informa-
tion please call 386-755-
5579 or 386-752-4881.
Those in the Live Oak area
may wish to call 386-362-
2180
For more, we invite you
to visit our Web site at
http://fssdarchapters.org/ed
wardrutledge/
The National Society of
the Daughters of the Amer-
ican Revolution was



Hearing


Aids

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at



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off



("4(
Columbia Balance Center


330-2904
205 Houston Ave. NW
Live Oak 536096-F


founded in 1890 to pro-
mote patriotism, preserve
American history, and sup-
port better education for
our nation's children. Its
members are descended


from the patriots who won
American independence
during the Revolutionary
War. With more than
165,000 members in ap-
proximately 3,000 chapters


worldwide, DAR is one of
the world's largest and
most active service organi-
zations. To learn more
about the work of today's
DAR, visit www.DAR.org.


DAR Christmas Membership Coffee
Members as well as prospective members of the Edward Rutledge Chapter of the Daugh-
ters of the American Revolution enjoyed a Christmas Membership Coffee hosted by Betsy
and Donald Burch in their Live Oak home Friday. The chapter was honored to have the
State Regent, Barbara Makant of Tallahassee, in attendance for this festive event. Pictured
from left: Chapter Regent and hostess, Betsy Burch; State Regent, Barbara Makant; and
Joy Sedgley, prospective member. Courtesy photo


The Santa Shop needs your help


It is time for the Santa Shop. Last year,
with a community effort, the Santa Shop
provided gifts to more than 200 students in
the Students in Transition program at
Suwannee County Schools. All the left-
over donations, toys and gifts were donat-
ed to Sparky's Toy Drive.
The need in our community is growing,
so the Santa Shop is growing, too.
This year, we plan to provide toys &
gifts for the Suwannee County Schools
Students in Transition (approximately 180
students at this time), children at Guardian
Ad Litem (280 children), and all the left-
overs will be given to Sparky's Toy Drive


FSJUWANNEE
INSURANCE
A AGENCY, INC.
386-364-1000
CALL US FOR YOUR INSURANCE NEEDS
AUTO ~ HOME ~ MOBILE HOME ~ BOAT ~ RV ~ BUSINESS LIABILITY
~ PROPERTY ~ LIFE ~ HEALTH ~ MEDICARE SUPPLEMENTS
1720 OHIO AVENUE N. Fax (386) 362-6118
LIVE OAK, FL 3064-4800 56196-F www.suwanneeinsurance.com
HO! HO! HO! At Grady's Automotive







o d v -
-: ii -


GRADY'S
U T 0 AUTOMOTIVE
500 W5est Howard Street (US 90), Live Oak
386-362-4012


at the Live Oak Fire Department (Sparky's
usually provides gifts for approximately
400 children).
We need toys and gifts for school-age
children (4 to 18 years).
With all of us pulling together, we can
meet the needs of MANY children in
Suwannee County!
Please talk to your clubs, businesses,
churches, etc. to get involved!
For more information please contact
Lisa Garrison at 386-647-4623, Debra
Ross at 386-647-4628, Tammie Williams
at 386-364-7720 or Missy Norris at 386-
364-3789.


Open Mon.-Sat. Come see us, we're located
8 a.m. 5 p.m. in the Village Square at
658-5771 Advent Christian Village
565390-F





CHEEK!

-SCHOT T

S Medical Equipment Div: (386) 362-4404
Hours: 8:30 am-6:30 PM Mon-Fri.,
8:30 am-3:00 pm Sat.
by Jeffrey F. Scott, R.Ph Drive-up window
Prevention & Treatment for Tuberculosis
Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by a bacteria called Mycobacterium
tuberculosis. This bacteria primarily infects the lungs, although other
parts of the body can be infected. Signs and symptoms include fever,
chest pain, cough, and muscle aches. Tuberculosis can be transmitted
from person-to-person through coughing or sneezing. The spread of
tuberculosis can be prevented by early detection and treatment of
infected persons who have not yet developed active tuberculosis, but
are infected with a latent form of the disease. The tuberculin skin test is
a screening test that is commonly used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis.
The test material is injected under the skin, and then the area is
observed for interpretation of results 2 or 3 days later. The TB test is
typically recommended for persons who may have been exposed to a
person with TB or people with symptoms of TB.
Medications for treatment of TB must be taken every day for six
months or longer. Initially, a combination of the following four drugs is
recommended: isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol.
These medications are all bactericidal, and work to kill the bacteria.
Ethambutol is more bacteriostatic, and works to prevent bacteria from
multiplying. 563996-F


Riverside 5ifts
Handcrafted Jewerly, Games, Men's Gifts,
Unique Greeting Cards and Much More
.


0f Cqqml


Sponsored by Altrusa International, Inc. of Live Oak
Saturday, December 12, 2009
S 12 Noon ~ 5 p.m.
.*% Ticket 10 Each *

The tour will include special featured
homes decked out in their holiday finery
sure to put you in the festive spirit.
Tour begins at the Live Oak Garden Club
(Next to Shands Hospital C.R. 136)

You will be provided a map to each
home, and refreshments.
Tickets will also be sold on day of event.


Tickets may be
purchased in advance at:
Live Oak City Hall/Shannon
Court
-- -McCrimon's Office Supply
| Any Altrusa Member
--All proceeds to benefit community projects.
565018-F


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 12A







WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 13A


Obituaries
Continued From Page 4A

Irene Eleanor Welker
October 31, 1914-
December 3, 2009

/Trene Eleanor Welker,
age 95, of Dowling
Park, Florida passed
away Thursday, December
3, 2009, at the Good Samar-
itan Center in Dowling
Park, FL following a
lengthy illness. The De-
catur, Illinois native moved
to Dowling Park in 1974
from Louisville, KY. Irene
married George Welker the
love of her life in 1955. She
was a self-employed grocer,
and she loved to sew and
was an excellent seam-
stress. She was a member of
the Village Church in
Dowling Park, FL.
Survivors include her
husband, George Welker,
Dowling Park, FL and sev-
eral nieces & nephews.
Visitation was held, Sat-
urday, Dec. 5 from 3 to 4
PM at Harris Funeral
Home.
Funeral services were
held 11:00 AM Monday,
December 7, 2009 at the
graveside in the Bixler
Memorial Gardens East in
Dowling Park, FL with Rev.
Steve Lawson officiating.
Please sign the guestbook
at www.harrisfuneralhome-
inc.net.
Harris Funeral Home &
Cremations, Inc., 932 N.
Ohio Ave., Live Oak, 386-
364-5115 is in charge of all
arrangements.

Please sign the
online .. ,. -i7...1 Goto
www.suwanneedemocrat.com
and click on obituaries


Bobby Clark
March 20, 1941-
December 3, 2009

bobby Clark, 68, of
Branford, FL
passed away on
Thursday, December 3,
2009 of a long illness. The
Daisy, TN native lived in
the Branford area for most
of his life. He was a mem-
ber of Heaven Central Fam-
ily Worship, Branford, FL.
Mr. Clark is survived by
his wife: Pearlie Mae Clark,
Branford, FL; three daugh-
ters: Martha Johnson,
Callahan, FL; Glenda Stall,
Okeechobee, FL; Darlene


& Keith Bass, Live Oak,
FL; one step-daughter:
Donna & Bobby Ford,
Lake City, FL; two sons:
William Bryant Clark, New
York; Marvin & Tania
Johnson, Callahan, FL; two
step-sons: Michael & Di-
ane Avery, Bell, FL; Roy &
Nichole Avery, Bell, FL;
sixteen grandchildren;
fourteen great-grandchil-
dren.
Services for Mr. Clark
were held Monday, Decem-
ber 7, 2009 at 11:00 am at
Heaven Central Family
Worship with Rev. James
Aultman officiating. Inter-
ment followed in Wayfair
Cemetery, Bell, FL.
Please sign the guest-
book at www.danielsfuner-
alhome.com
Daniels Funeral Homes
& Crematory, Inc. in
charge of all arrangements.

Please sign the
online...-.. i.. .. i. Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.com
and click on obituaries


James William Bynum
October 3, 1974-
December 3, 2009

ames William
Bynum, 35, of
McAlpin, FL passed
away on Thursday, Decem-
ber 3, 2009 of a long ill-
ness. The Oklahoma City,
OK native moved to
McAlpin fifteen years ago
from Tampa. James was a
member of Philadelphia
Baptist Church, McAlpin,
FL.
He is survived by his
mother: Nelly Cagle (Bob-
by Cash), McAlpin, FL;
one brother: Patrick (Lakr-
ishna) Cagle, Live Oak,
FL; grandparents: James
Ray (Yolanda) Johnson,
Tampa, FL; two aunts:
Nannette (Ray) Kimbro,
McAlpin, FL; Neena Funi-
celli, McAlpin, FL; three
cousins: Stephen Funicelli,
Samantha Funicelli, and
Gerardo Funicelli, all of
McAlpin, FL; and many
other family and friends.
Services for Mr. Bynum


were held on Monday, De-
cember 7, 2009 at 10:00 am
at Philadelphia Baptist
Church with Rev. Leroy
Dobbs officiating. Inter-
ment followed in the
church cemetery.
Please sign the guest-
book at www.danielsfuner-
alhome.com
Daniels Funeral Homes
& Crematory, Inc. in
charge of all arrangements.

Please sign the
online...'.. i-.i -/ Go to
www. suwanneedemocrat.corn
and click on obituaries


JoAnn Kennedy
Coggeshall
August 4, 1935-
December 4, 2009

M /rs. JoAnn
/P Kennedy
Coggeshall,
age 74 a resident of
Auburndale, Florida passed
away Friday, December 4,
2009 at the Good Shepherd
Hospice in Auburndale.
Mrs. Coggeshall was born
August 4, 1935 in Aurora,
Indiana to John "Chick"
and Mary "Tudy"
Kennedy. JoAnn was an
Auburndale resident since
1994 coming from Aurora,
Indiana. She was a retired
School Teacher, a member
of the Big Horn Hunting
Club in Live Oak, Florida
and was of the Methodist
Faith. After retirement she
worked for Royal Celebrity
Tours as Guest Service Re-
lations in Talkeetna and
Denali, Alaska. She was
preceded in death by her
parents, husband, Chester
Coggeshall, and brother,
Robert Kennedy. JoAnn is
survived by;
1 Son: David A. (Donna)
Coggeshall of Auburndale,
FL.
1 Daughter: Pam
(Howard) Berryman of
Naples, FL.
1 Brother: John "Mike"
(Linda) Kennedy of Mari-
on, IN.
2 Grandsons: David A.
(Barbara) Coggeshall of
Port St. Lucie, FL. Cazzie
Hays of Naples, FL.
2 Great Grandchildren:
Ander Coggeshall and
Chani Coggeshall
Sister-in-Law: lone
Kennedy of Brownsburg,
IN.
3 Nephews and 1 Niece.
In lieu of flowers the
family requests donations


to Good Shepherd Hospice,
105 Arneson Avenue,
Auburndale, Florida,
33823.
Visitation will be held
Wednesday, December 9,
2009 from 5:00 til 7:00 PM
at the Kersey Funeral
Home, 108 East Lake Stel-
la Drive, Auburndale,
Florida, 33823. (863) 967-
1167.
Visitation will be held
Friday, December 11, 2009
from 5:00 til 7:00 PM.
Funeral services will be
held 11:00 AM Saturday,
December 12, 2009. Both
will be held at the Rullman-
Hunger-Denney Funeral
Home, 219 Mechanic
Street, Aurora, Indiana,
47001. (812) 926-1450. In-
terment will be at the
Riverview Cemetery.

Please sign the
online...... .. .1 Go to
www. suwanneedemocrat.corn
and click on obituaries


Ruby Joyce Quimby
November 25, 1926-
December 5, 2009


uby Joyce Quim-
by, 83, beloved
wife of Jesse
Quimby, Live Oak; cher-
ished mother of Joyce and
Ed Scott, Live Oak, Fl Al-
ice and Charlie Molter,
Davie, Fl; doting grand-
mother of Michele and
Bryan Brewster, Matt and
Barbie Scott, Leah and Stu-
art Lane Heather and John
Orr, Christine and Steven
Kazmarski and Katherine
Scott; Gigi to Zachary
Glickman, Hannah and
Myka Scott, Jordan and
Jackson Brewster.
Ruby was an active
member of the First United
Methodist Church of Live
Oak where she served in
the Adult Choir and direct-
ed the Children's Choir and
Men's Chorus. She lived in
Live Oak for 23 years after
coming from South Flori-
da. She was on the found-


ing Board of World's Chil-
dren. Services will be held
at the First United
Methodist Church of Live
Oak on Saturday, Decem-
ber 12, 2009 at 2:00 pm. In
lieu of flowers, the family
request donations be made
to World's Children, Inc.,
P.O. Box 2708, Corvallis,
Or 97339-2708 or Haven
Hospice, 6037 W. U.S.
Hwy 90, Lake City, Fl
32055. We will always love
and greatly miss you Gigi.
Daniels Funeral Homes
& Crematory, Inc. Live
Oak is in Charge of All
Arrangements.

Please sign the
online .. i, .. i. Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.com
and click on obituaries


Betty Jean Windham
October 8, 1934-
December 8, 2009

etty Jean Wind-
ham, 75, of Mayo,
Fl Passed Away on
Tuesday, December 8,
2009, after a Short Illness.
The Live Oak, Fl Native
Moved to Mayo, Fl in 1996
from Olustee, Fl. Mrs.
Windham Was a Customer
Service Representative for
South Trust Bank, a Volun-
teer for Lafayette Health
Care for Three Years and an
Active Member of the New
Hope Baptist Church,
Mayo, Fl.
She Is Survived by One
Daughter :Jeanne Perme-
nter, Mayo, Fl; Two Sons:
Laurence Windham, Bris-
tol, Va. and Nivin Wind-
ham, Olustee, Fl; Eight
Grandchildren and Three
Great-grandchildren.
Funeral Services Will Be
Held 11:00 Am Saturday,
December 12, 2009 at the
New Hope Baptist Church
Mayo, Fl with Rev. Charlie
Walker Officiating .Inter-
ment Will Follow in the
New Hope Cemetery. In
Lieu of Flowers Family
Wish Donations to Be
Made to the New Hope
Baptist Church Building
Fund, Mayo, Fl
Daniels Funeral Homes
& Crematory, Inc. Live
Oak and Branford in
Charge of All Arrange-
ments.

Please sign the
online.. ,. -, .. Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.com
and click on obituaries


Mary Enneis McLeod
July 26, 1915-
December 7, 2009

Siary Enneis
McLeod, age
94, of Live
ak, Florida passed away
Monday, December 7, 2009
at Archbold Memorial Hos-
pital in Thomasville, Ga.
following a brief illness.
The Jacksonville, Fla. na-
tive had resided in Live
Oak, Fla. for many years
and will be remembered by
many as the organist at the
First Baptist Church and
later Community Presby-
terian Church. She will
also be remembered by
many as one of Suwannee
County's best English
teachers. She loved her
students, family, music and
Shakespeare and was a
member of the Community
Presbyterian Church.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
William (Bill) Zachariah
McLeod, Sr. and son
William Zachariah (Zack)
McLeod, Jr.
Survivors include one
son, Pat (Sharon) McLeod,
Thomasville, Ga.; one
daughter, Enneis Haney, Ft.
Myers, Fla.; five grandchil-
dren, Patrick Robertson
McLeod (Renata), Kelly
Doster McLeod, Brooke
Weller Haney, Sonne
Meredith McDonald
(Brent), Bates McLeod
"Max" Haney, and three
great grandchildren, Katie
Marie McLeod, Natalie
Kristina McLeod, and
Maddon Haney McDonald.
Visitation will be held
tonight from 5 to 7 at Har-
ris Funeral Home.
Funeral services will be
held at 11 a.m., Thursday,
Dec. 10, 2009 at graveside
in the Live Oak Cemetery
with Rev. Jim Walkup offi-
ciating.
For those wishing to do
so contributions may be
made to the American Can-
cer Society, 2119 SW 16th
St., Gainesville, FL 32608.
Please sign the guest-
book at www.harrisfuneral-
homeinc.net.
Harris Funeral Home &
Cremations, Inc., 932 N.
Ohio Ave., Live Oak, 386-
364-5115 is in charge of all
arrangements.

Please sign the
online .... .i ..-1 Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.com
and click on obituaries


Stormy weather?
Check out the weather radar on
our homepage at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.
When bad weather is on the
horizon, the weather radar
appears to keep you in touch and
on top of things. While you're
there, click the weather link.


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 13A


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK






PAGE 14A U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


HERE'S WHAT'S COMING


Continued From Page 1A

This year's tour will feature
the homes of Herb and
Janet Mantooth; Allison
and Gayle Eyster; John and
Joann Martz; Tony and Sta-
cy Chauncey; and Carolea
Evan.
Each home will be bril-
liantly decorated for all to
see, and refreshments will
be served.
Guests will meet at the
Live Oak Garden Club at
noon to pick up information
packets and maps describ-
ing each home. The cost of
tickets is $10. Advanced
tickets can be purchased
from any Altrusa member,
Live Oak City Hall (Shan-
non Court) or McCrimon's
Office supply. All profits
from the Tour of Homes
goes directly to Altrusa to
help in upcoming charitable
and community projects.
Contact Kellie Hicks at
386-362-3919 or Marlene
Geise for more information.
In Branford, the Keeping
Christ in Christmas Festival
will be where it's at this
Saturday. You'll find booths
and entertainment at Hatch
Park from 10 a.m. until 4
p.m., with a short break for
the parade at 1 p.m. The
parade will line up at the
Branford High School foot-
ball field and make its way
down Governor Street to
US 129 and onto Houston
Street. Music will be pro-
vided by "Mainstream,"
other local talent and the
Branford High School
Band. Pictures can be taken
with Santa from 10 to
noon, and again from 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. If you're in-
terested in operating a
booth contact Mamie Jack-
son at 386-935-9121. Those
interested in performing are
asked to call Kathy
Woolard at 386-935-1127,
and for parade questions
and information contact
Debbie Yates at 386-935-
3131.
On Saturday in White
Springs, the Stephen Foster


Folk Culture Center State
Park will launch the Festi-
val of Lights, with a display
of more than two million
lights. The festival will last
until Dec. 31. A special
kickoff event to usher in the
light display, hosted in con-
junction with the town of
White Springs, will take
place from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Saturday. Activities will be-
gin with a breakfast hosted
by Santa Claus. Tickets for
the breakfast are available
at the White Springs Town
Hall or the White Springs
Library. Park lights will be
on each evening from 5 un-
til 9 p.m. The centerpiece
of the park's light display is
the Carillon Tower dressed
in holiday splendor. The
gift shop will be open each
evening until 9 p.m. and
will provide complimentary
refreshments, as well as a
bonfire and marshmallow
roast. Park entrance fees
for the evening event are $2
per person. Regular park
admission fees are waived
for this event, but a dona-
tion of canned goods or a
new toy is requested. The
Festival of Lights is spon-
sored by the town of White
Springs and its special
events committee, the
Stephen Foster Citizens
Support Organization and
numerous local individuals
and businesses. For more
information, visit
www.FloridaStateParks.org/
StephenFoster.
If folks want to drive a
little farther, a performance
of The Nutcracker will take
place Saturday at North
Florida Community Col-
lege in Madison. The
Dance Alive National Bal-
let, a southeastern ballet
company, will perform.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
Show starts at 7 p.m. The
cost of tickets is $12 for
adults, $6 for NFCC stu-
dents and $6 for children
ages 12 and under. For
more information call 850-
973-1653 or visit the
NFCC Web site at


www.nfcc.edu.
There's fun to the south as
well. Mayo's annual Christ-
mas parade is set for Satur-
day at 7 p.m. For more info
call the Lafayette County
Chamber of Commerce at
386-294-2705 or Jim Hollis
at 386-688-7269.
To make this season
bright, the Live Oak Kiwa-
nis Club is asking everyone
to stop by their open-air
Christmas tree shop and
purchase a live spruce this
year. The shop is located
downtown next to Tru
Fashion on US 90. The
shop will be open Monday
through Friday from 5 p.m.
to 8 p.m., all day Saturday
(8 a.m.- 8 p.m.), and 1 p.m.
to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Trees
ranging from 6-8 feet are
available.
All money raised through
the sale will stay in Suwan-
nee County and be used for
charitable purposes.

Dropout rate

Continued From Page 1A

team effort."
The graduation rate of lo-
cal students rose to 72.4
percent in 2008-09 com-
pared 71.6 percent last
year, an increase in student
achievement.
"I'm very, very pleased
with the numbers we're
seeing we've seen the
needs and have worked
hard to meet students
where they're at," said Jer-
ry Taylor, school board
chairman. As for specifics,
"We've doubled our efforts
at keeping track of those
students who are potential
dropouts," Taylor said.
Statewide, graduation
rates rose to 78.6 percent in
2008-09, an increase from
75.4 percent the previous
year and the highest figure
ever recorded in Florida.
In addition, the state
dropout rate has continued
to fall from 2.6 percent in
2007-2008 to 2.3 percent
this year.


No terrorism insurance


for Suwannee airport
By Jeff Waters Federal Aviation Administration and
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com the Florida Department of Transporta-
tion if the insurance is required.
Suwannee County Commissioners McLean said it was not.
felt the county airport just wasn't that "I checked with them and they said
appealing to terrorists when they de- we're not required to have it here,"
dined terrorism insurance recently. said McLean. "So the board's decision
The county currently pays about was that we don't need it."
$4,000 in liability coverage for the air- McLean said he and the board felt
port. Terrorism insurance used to be that if terrorism were a threat to the
standard in that package. However, the airport, the coverage would have been
insurance carrier decided to separate purchased.
the terrorism portion and charge the "If we felt like there was some-
county $5,500 for that policy alone, thing out there that could benefit a
Commissioners tasked County Co- terrorist, that would be different,"
ordinator Murphy McLean to ask the said McLean.



12-year sentence in deadly crash
Continued From Page 1A During trial, jurors never Craig Jacobsen. In addi-


day and said, "You killed a
special man. God forgive
me, but I cannot forgive
you right now."
The next day over the
phone she explained, "I
just can't forgive him. I
can't. There is no way I
can.
Since losing her son,
Votano said life has been
difficult for both her and
her husband, along with
the rest of the family.
"I sat outside looking at
the stars last night. "How
do you go on from here...I
don't know how."
She said it was difficult
to stand in court and ex-
press her grief. Her daugh-
ter Virginia Michelle
Votano also gave a state-
ment in court.
"My husband (Frank
Votano) could not get up
and do that," Ruby Votano
said. "I don't understand
how (Davis) could not
even acknowledge that
he's done wrong. No re-
morse. There's only self-
pity."
Davis, who did not testi-
fy at his trial, asked judge
Paul Bryan Thursday to
show mercy in a written
statement. His mother, De-
bra Ann Davis, begged the
judge for clemency, and his
sister plead on his behalf.
The morning of the
crash, Davis was traveling
north on CR 137 when his
1997 Cadillac crossed the
centerline and struck the
southbound vehicle of
Joshua Votano. Votano was
ejected from the driver's
side window of his 1993
Ford Escort and pro-
nounced dead at the scene.


heard details of Davis' dri-
ving record, which in-
cludes nine speeding cita-
tions, three careless dri-
ving citations and a prior
crash, DMV records show.
Much of that information
was brought to light on
Thursday by prosecutor


tion to his 12-year sen-
tence, Davis will serve his
first year of probation un-
der house arrest, and must
pay over $6,000 in courts
costs, including $1,330 for
Votano's funeral expenses.
Bryan denied a motion for
a new trial.


COS draws thousands,


despite the weather


Continued From Page 1A

NJROTC, helped keep
folks warm and fed with
hot chocolate and all kinds
of food.
Two of the four original
founders of the square were
honored at the morning's
ribbon cutting ceremony to
kick off the event. Susan K.
Lamb and Edwin McCook
each received a gift and
gratitude from Crain. Crain
also expressed his thanks to
Stanley and Betty Johnson,
also instrumental in the his-
tory of the event.
"There have been lots of
changes since then, but it's
still a wonderful feeling to
be involved," said Lamb.


"It's just a gift to the com-
munity from the four of
us."
The annual lighted
Christmas parade was also
a hit. The parade has al-
ways been the perfect end-
ing to Christmas on the
Square. Event coordinator
and Chamber of Com-
merce representative Susan
Hillhouse said spectators
started lining South Ohio
Avenue at 1:30 p.m. The
parade started at 6, despite
the promise of cold weath-
er to come.
"We were very pleased
with the turnout this year,"
said Hillhouse. "A lot of
people really enjoyed both
events."


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Catching a problem in your mouth,
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financial consideration is that spending a
small amount on maintenance now will
cost you less in the long run than filling a
cavity or adding a crown to your tooth
later.
In recent decades, as dental care and
education have improved, the incidence
of decay is down. But the incidence of
gum disease, also called periodontal
disease, is up. Even if your teeth are
sound, if your gums are diseased you
have a problem. As the disease
progresses, it can erode both the tissue
and the bone that support the teeth. Your
casual glances at your gums at home will
not detect gum disease when it's in its
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Float winners announced for

Lighted Christmas Parade
Commercial floats:
1 st Lowe's
2nd Wal-Mart
3rd SVEC

Non-commercial:
1st Suwannee Schools Transportation
2nd Advent Christian Village
3rd 4H

Overall winner:
Suwannee Schools Transportation


/ Name
, Address
,t City

Phone-


Qcdaat 6ea*ct eane a n le~a~i~tatiztoi~t 6e'e a< 6,o*e

110 SE Lee Ave., Live Oak, FL

386-364-5961
536109-F


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 14A


Ci


5"1
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Continuing ed at Shands Live Oak
Trauma Tracks-Basic, a program sponsored by Shands gressive concepts in the assessment and management of A Shands Live Oak spokesperson extended special
UF and presented at Shands Live Oak recently, was de- these patients. thanks to the nursing staff that worked the ER the morn-
signed to enhance the advanced knowledge of ER nurses Seventeen Shands Live Oak ER nurses were attended, ing of the program, making it possible for so many nurses
in the care of trauma patients, and to identify current pro- along with several EMS students and Lake Shore nurses, to attend.


Participants in a recent presentation of Trauma Tracks-Basic at Shands Live Oak. Courtesy photo


Dean announces

water protection


meeting
TALLAHASSEE State
Sen. Charles Dean (R-In-
verness) announced Mon-
day there will be an up-
coming public hearing to
discuss water protection in
District 3. The Senate Se-
lect Committee on Flori-
da's Inland Water will
meet in Ocala later this
month. The exact date has
not been set.
Dean had requested
three meetings, and says
he remains hopeful the Se-
lect Committee will also
schedule meetings in Cit-
rus and Suwannee counties
in the coming weeks.
"I am very proud to
bring my Senate col-
leagues to Ocala to discuss


mmmmmm


in Ocala
what I feel is one of the
most important policy is-
sues in our state springs
and water protection," said
Dean. "The people of Mar-
ion county have a long and
succinct history of water
protection and preserva-
tion. I invite everyone
from around the district to
attend this meeting to dis-
cuss water protection is-
sues."
The Senate Select Com-
mittee on Florida's Inland
Water will hold a public
hearing in the Klein Center
at Central Florida Commu-
nity College on Wednes-
day, Dec. 16 from 6-9 p.m.
For more information, call
352-873-6513.


: election
Where customer service is our
#1 priority
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415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 647-4210


mmmmmm


December 10, 2009 5:30 PM
Suwannee Coalition Office
813 Pinewood Dr SW Live Oak, Florida


Brian Cody has been actively involved in tobacco control
both in Florida and nationally since 1998. Originally
working with the $200 million 'truth' media campaign when
he was a student at Suwannee High, Brian has worked
with state tobacco programs including Connecticut,
Georgia, Arkansas, California, and New Hampshire. While
working on his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago, Brian
has continued as a trainer and presenter with the Florida
tobacco program, as well as continued support with the
local Suwannee County tobacco control efforts.


are welaoedto


this mer


Midday

wreck
Steve Riggs of the Live Oak
Fire Department works to
free the right front wheel of
this 1974 Ford pickup after
a crash at the intersection
of Walker Avenue and US
90 in Live Oak shortly after
12 p.m. Thursday. The ve-
hicle, driven by 55-year-old
Jerry Reliford, came into
contact with a Chevrolet
Tahoe, the unidentified dri-
ver of which was taken to
Shands Live Oak for treat-
ment.- Photo: Jeff Waters


MEL


I - - - - - - :


----- ---- ----


L


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


PAGE 15A


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0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 16A





umwannetur remotrat
Section B
Wednesday, December 9, 2009


More SHS
wrestling scenes
]'a 2 71, P M( rtmI e \B
amm -"" "!
fmPLm~ ~.r


b `







I3
LA' J, .7 iRFl


By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com
The Lady Bulldogs took on district rival Santa Fe
Dec. 1, beating them 59-48.
Tatiyanna Thomas led the ladies in points with
23. She also had six rebounds, seven assists and
five steals. Hope Chambers followed Thomas
with 14 points, 14 rebounds, two assists, two steals


and six blocked shots.
game included:
Kristiana Evans

Joy Baker
Rictoria Merrick
Tiyrenee Riley


Joy Baker jumps for a shot. Photo: Paul Buchanan SuwanneeSports.com



'Dogs fall


to Lake City

By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com

The Suwannee High School boys basketball team fell to
Lake City Thursday, Dec. 3, 69-64.
"The first quarter killed us," said coach James Perry. "We
scored only eight points with Lake City scoring 21."
The score at halftime was 39-24, Lake City.
Keith Cherry was the lead point maker with 17. Jarvis
Jordan followed with 12.
See more photos inside.


Other performers of the
13 pts., 8 rebounds,
2 steals
4 pts.
3 pts.
2 pts., 5 rebounds,
3 steals


The ladies also beat Ft. White 59-13 recently.
Suwannee led at halftime 36-4. Thomas led in
points with 15, followed by Baker with 11. Baker
also had six rebounds and four steals. Other per-
formers included:
Merrick 10 pts., 3 rebounds,
2 steals
Caity Foreman 6 pts., 3 rebounds
Tara Oliver 5 pts., 3 rebounds
Kemberlee Beaty 4 pts., 9 rebounds
Evans 4 pts., 4 rebounds
Chambers 2 pts., 6 rebounds,
4 steals
Riley 2 pts., 10 rebounds,
3 steals
The ladies record stood at 2-2, 2-0 in District 5-
3A play as of the Santa Fe game.
See more photos inside.


SPORTS
COMMENTARY


Lady 'Dogs


outplay Santa Fe


SEE MCKEE, PAGE 3B


Presented by:


B BANK of FLORIDA


804 S. Ohio Ave. & 1102 N. Ohio, Live Oak 386-362-3433
11035 County Rd. 136, Dowling Park 386-658-6488
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~


Upset!


Sportabout
By Tom Daniels
Well, unless q
you are a Gator *
Hater you're
pretty upset.
Being in the
sporting goods
business I al-
ways hoped FSU and Florida
would go 10-0-1. They don't
have ties anymore. The
Bearcats and Texas squeaked
by with 1-point victories. Had
they been upset, Boise State
or TCU would be fighting for
the National Championship.
Florida has every major team
represented in a bowl game.
South Florida vs. Northern
Illinois, International Bowl;
FSU vs. West Virginia,
Gator Bowl;
UCF vs. Rutgers, St. Pe-
tersburg Bowl;
Miami vs. Wisconsin,
Champs Sports Bowl;
Florida vs. Cincinnati, Sug-
ar Bowl.
Alabama will be playing
Texas for the National Cham-
pionship but don't tell TCU
and Boise State, who will
square off in the Fiesta Bowl.
The BCS was suppose to end
the nonsense but it will never
end until a playoff system.
The Miami Dolphins upset
the Brady Bunch Sunday and
are very much alive in the
playoff picture. The Jaguars
continue to win and do you

SEE SPORTABOUT, PAGE 3B


McKee is

Thunder

Alley Bowler

of the Week
By Debbie Rice
Chris McKee led the Sassy
Seniors with a 611 series,
followed by Jerry Hakes
with 559, Larry Schattle
with 542, Larry Robinson
with 523 and Sparky Fannin
with 518. Sparky bowled
above her average of 140.
Way to go Sparky.
Aline Neveils led the
Monday Morning Blues with
a 537 series followed by
Debbie Rice with 515 and
Kim Carter with 457. Mike
Friedman led the 9 Pin No
Tap with a 677 followed by
Margaret Pearson with 667
and John Shock with 625.
There were six bowlers
Tuesday evening with over
600. Thure Olson led the
Men's League with a 540 se-
ries followed by Tony Vasil
with 528 and Regie Rathbun








SPORTS



FWC announces continuation of python permit program


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) will
issue permits for capturing
reptiles of concern on
state-managed lands in
South Florida, beginning
January 2010. These per-
mits will expire Dec. 31,
2010. Applications are
available at MyFWC.com

; click on "Burmese
pythons" from the "Quick
Clicks" menu. Only quali-
fied applicants will be is-
sued the permits.
The first phase of this
program began July 17 and
ran through Oct. 31. The
FWC issued 15 permits for
capturing Burmese
pythons and other reptiles
of concern on specific
state-managed lands in
South Florida. Ten of the
15 permit holders actually
made trips on the wildlife
management areas, captur-


ing a total of 39 Burmese
pythons. No other reptiles
of concern were found. For
the 10 who made trips,
their original permit has
been extended through
Dec. 31, 2009. They are
eligible to apply for the
new permit.
The permit period begin-
ning Jan. 1 requires poten-
tial permit holders to be
Florida residents and to
have a reptile of concern
permit, digital camera and
a GPS unit. They also
must have experience in
capturing wild snakes,
handling large constrictors,
euthanizing reptiles and
working in remote areas.
The permit holders are re-
quired to photograph and
mark GPS locations, pho-
tograph and describe stom-
ach contents of euthanized
snakes, file reports with
the FWC within 36 hours
of capture, and euthanize


pythons onsite or transport
live pythons to be eutha-
nized at a location with
veterinary facilities or de-
liver live pythons to a rep-
tile of concern licensed re-
cipient. Permit holders will
be required to make at
least five trips each calen-
dar quarter. They also must
visit each WMA at least
twice during the year.
"We were able to collect
some initial data during
the first phase of this pro-
gram that will help us de-
termine the extent of the
population on state-man-
aged lands," said Scott
Hardin, the FWC's exotic
species section leader. "We
want to continue allowing
experts out there to ensure
this exotic species does not
spread any farther north in
Florida."
The permit holders may
work any time outside
hunting season and be-


There are no holiday hours for

Social Security's online services


By Donna Maitland
Social Security District Manager,
Gainesville, Fl

If you are one of the many Americans
who may have to conduct business with
Social Security over the holiday season,
it's good to know that you can use our on-
line services without having to worry
about opening or closing times. That
means you can handle your holiday shop-
ping and planning with one less time con-
straint or worry and one less shopping
line to wait in.
Some of the services available online at
http://www.socialsecurity.gov include:
Applying for retirement or disability
benefits;
Checking the status of your pending ap-
plication;
Getting an instant, personalized esti-
mate of your future retirement benefits us-


ing the Retirement Estimator; and
Applying for extra help for Medicare
prescription drug plan costs available to
some beneficiaries.
If you are already a Social Security
beneficiary, you can go online to change
your address, phone number, or your di-
rect deposit information, get a replace-
ment Medicare card, or request a proof of
income letter.
Social Security's online services are
available each work day from 5 a.m. until
1 a.m.; on Saturdays, from 5 a.m. until 11
p.m.; and on Sundays from 8 a.m. until 10
p.m. And the online services are available
even on federal holidays, including
Christmas and New Year's Day from 5
a.m. until 11 p.m. So if you have business
to take care of during the holidays, our
online services are here for you. All times


SEE THERE ARE NO, PAGE 6B


tween sunset and sunrise
during hunting season on
Everglades and Francis S.
Taylor WMA, Holey Land
WMA, Rotenberger WMA
and Southern Glades
Wildlife and Environmen-
tal Area.
Burmese pythons are a
nonnative species to Flori-
da and to North America,
but they have spread
throughout the Everglades
region, with populations in
the thousands. All reptiles
of concern may be taken
under this permit, although
in the first phase of the


program, only Burmese
pythons were found. Other
reptiles of concern include
Indian python, reticulated
python, African rock
python (both southern and
northern), amethystine or
scrub python, green ana-
conda and Nile monitor
lizard. Reptiles of concern
may be kept as pets in
Florida, but owners are re-
quired to have a reptile of
concern permit from the
FWC. The license costs
$100 per year and man-
dates specific caging re-
quirements. Reptiles of


concern more than 2 inch-
es in diameter must be im-
planted with a microchip
that identifies the animal.
It is unlawful to allow
them to escape or to re-
lease them into the wild.
For the application and
more information, visit
MyFWC. com

and click on I; .l,...
pythons." If you have a
reptile of concern you can
no '. .,,.. i keep as a pet,
call your local FWC re-
::';. *,I office.


Florida livestock market report

Federal-State Market News Service
605 East Main Street
Bartow, FL 33830
863-519-8477

This information is collected by the Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services, Division of Marketing & Development, Bureau of Develop-
ment & Information in cooperation with U.S. Department of Agriculture, AMS,
Livestock, Meat, Grain, & Seed Division, Livestock & Grain Market News.

Florida markets at a glance
For the week ended December 04, 2009

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 11,343, compared to
closed last week, and 12,203 a year ago. According to the Florida Federal-State
Livestock Market News Service: Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and
bulls were 1.00 to 3.00 higher; feeder steers and heifers were unevenly steady to
2.00 higher


Feeder Steers: Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs
300-400 lbs
400-500 lbs


Feeder Heifers:




Slaughter Cows:

Slaughter Bulls:


115.00-165.00
100.00-139.00
88.00-111.00


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 92.00-135.00
300-400 lbs 78.00-102.00
400-500 lbs 70.00- 86.00

Lean: 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent 35.00-39.00

Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs 46.00-53.00


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Y ~ ~


k 6


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A


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price
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CLOSED WED. & SUN.

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"Copyrighted Material



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ae


L~-~r------- I-- -77r --r~,l I II


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 2B


';1
;i
..


[:: :


;i'








SPORTS


JV Bulldogs down Lake City 65-43


Submitted

The Suwannee High
School boys JV basketball
team defeated rival Lake
City in Suwannee's first
home game of the season,
65-43.
The bulldogs dominated
the first half with a com-
bined team effort of scor-
ing, passing, and defense.
Freshman Jimmie Taylor
had a strong game, shoot-
ing 100 percent from the
field while scoring 13
points, six rebounds, five
assists, one block and one
steal. Taylor also had a
crowd-pleasing defensive
block shot with five min-


utes left in the second,
showing his versatility as
a forward on defense and
a guard on offense.
Sophomore Tony Frier-
son was also key on the
inside. With just over a
minute left in the second
quarter, Frierson drove in
for a powerful layup as
his hands hit the back-
board before he was hit to
the ground in the after-
shot foul by the frustrated
Tigers. Frierson finished
the half with 10 points,
five rebounds and one as-
sist. Marcus Lane added
nine points, three re-
bounds and three assists.
Guard AJ Robinson had


nine points as he showed
his speed, breaking for
three downcourt layups
while also sinking associ-
ated free throws. Austin
Miller had a good game
off the bench with nine
points, five rebounds and
two assists. Jeremiah
Ross contributed two,
three point shots in the
first half. He also had
four rebounds and one as-
sist.
Defensively, Lake City
had three big inside play-
ers, but they were denied
skillfully by Frierson,
Taylor and Alex Robin-
son on the back of a 2-3
zone. Attempting both


Squirrels are nature's acrobats


Bounding from tree limb
to tree limb, running up and
down and all around, chattering
and squeaking, the gray squir-
rel plays endlessly through the
treetops.
There are many things to
learn about this energetic crea-
ture.
Three kinds of squirrels live
in Florida the fox squirrel, the
southern flying squirrel and the
eastern gray squirrel, which is
the most common one.
Eastern gray squirrels are
a part of the rodent family, like
rats and mice.
Squirrels have bushy, gray-
brown tails; small, pointy ears;
whiskers; and a gray body that
is 8 to 12 inches long. Their tail
adds another 6 inches.
The tail is its most famil-
iar feature. The mammal uses
it for many things. When the
tail twitches, a squirrel may be
saying to other squirrels, "Get
away! That nut is mine!"
A squirrel's tail is very use-
ful. It helps with balance and
serves as a blanket in cold
weather, an umbrella on rainy
days and a shield in a fight.
Gray squirrels live in trees
- either in hollowed-out areas
or in a nest. Ground squirrels
(chipmunks, groundhogs and


prairie dogs) live in holes in the
ground.
Squirrels are acrobats and can
climb and jump to all sorts of
places. How many times have you
seen squirrels "rob" bird feeders?
People spend a lot of time trying
to make bird feeders that squir-
rels cannot get into.
These animals are accidental
farmers. The seeds and nuts they
drop or bury sometimes sprout
and become baby plants.
Get Outdoors Florida!
Can you spot an oak tree, a
favorite source of food for squir-
rels?
Look under the tree to see if
there are acorns on the ground.
Can you crack one with a rock?
Squirrels do it with their sharp
teeth. American Indians used
acorns for food, but first they had
to remove the shells, pound the
nuts with rocks and rinse or soak
the pieces many times to remove
the bitter taste. Then they ate the
mushy meal as a good source of
protein.
Acorns look like little elf heads
with hats. Can you draw little
faces on them?
Jumpin' Jiminy!
Think about the squirrel's gym-
nastic abilities. Some can jump up
to 6 feet! For a foot-long squirrel,
that is six times its body length.
How tall are you? Ask a parent to
measure you. If you are 4 feet tall,
and you jumped six times your
body length, you would have to
travel 24 feet, or eight yards.
Now go outside and measure
that distance.
Then see how far you can
jump. Do not be too disappointed,
though. Squirrels can do many
things people cannot.

Contact Jessica Basham at jessica.basham@
MyFWC.com


zone and man defense, the
Tigers were never able to
contain the dominant
game of the JV 'Dogs.
Lake City attempted a
brief full-court press late
in the second quarter, but
to no avail. Suwannee led
at halftime 56-20.
Resting up for the next
two games, the starters
would watch from the
bench in the second half
as the rest of the team
took to the court for a


lively second half. Guards
Dontavius Hampton and
Austin Collins ran the of-
fense. Scoring was led by
Taiwan Williams with
five points, four rebounds
and two steals. DeAngelo
Ross contributed three.
Although the Tigers
second team gained some
of the point deficit to
close the scoring gap late
in the fourth quarter,
Suwannee came away
with a strong win.


McKee is Thunder Alley

Bowler of the Week


Continued From Page 1B

with 514. Lorrie Geiger
led the King and Queens
with a 580 series fol-
lowed by Dave Ward with
543 and Al Music with
536.
There are some fun
games you can play in
bowling, 7, 8 or 9 Pin No
Tap. In 7 pin no tap, if
you knock down 7 pins it
counts as a strike, same
for the 8 or 9 pin no tap
games. Nine pins down
equals a strike. Then there
is 3-6-9 where you auto-
matically get a strike in
the third, sixth, and ninth
frames. Another game is
Split converted into Strike


or Split converted into
Spare. Depending on the
choice made at the begin-
ning of the game, if you
get a split it will automat-
ically be a strike or a
spare. That choice has to
be made before bowling
starts. These games are
mostly used in tourna-
ments but anyone can re-
quest to be set up for any
of the special games.
Have fun and good
bowling.

Next week:
How did the Thunder
Kids do in the tournament
Saturday, Dec. 5, and how
much fun did they have in
the parade?


SPORTS
COMMENTARY


Upset!


Sportabout
By Tom Daniels

Continued From Page 1B

think the Oakland Raiders
beating Pittsburgh was an
upset? It was a wacky
weekend as even Cleve-
land scored over 20 points
and the Saints needed
overtime to beat the Red-
skins. Dallas has apparent-
ly begun their annual De-
cember slide with a loss to
the G-Men, while we dis-
covered Brett Favre is hu-
man, the Vikings lost to
Arizona.
Baseball's Winter Meet-
ings have begun and you
will soon understand re-
cession. In baseball it
means you can only get 15
million a year for 5 years
instead of 7 or 8. The
numbers thrown around
and the reasoning will be
interesting. Look for the
Marlins and Rays to be
players in the trade games
but not to much in the free
agent signing.
If you are an NBA fan
you will be happy to know
the New Jersey Nets are 1-
19. And they laughed at
the ABA Generals when
they played in the Teaneck
Armory.


anta is coming to


Now THAT'S Something

To Smile About!



Macy


Wanted: Sports News!

The Suwannee Democrat needs and/or photos to
you. Coaches and parents, send us nf.editorial@gaflnews.com or drop
your sports news, stats, articles. The them off a the front desk at 211
Suwannee Democrat will run them Howard St. East. For more informa-
in sports for free. Send information tion call 386-362-1734.


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


PAGE 3B






PAGE 4B U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


FISH- BLUSTERS'

BULLETIN


December 2009


FWC needs your input on the draft black
bass management plan
Black bass are the most popular recreational fishes in
the United States, but do you know what they are? In the
Sunshine State, black bass include Florida largemouth,
shoal, spotted and Suwannee basses. We are fortunate to
live in a state known as the Garden of Eden for these fiesty
sport fish. Scientists specializing in fish species will tell you
they aren't real bass
at all, but rather mem-
bers of the sunfish
family that include
crappie and bluegill.
But anglers who have
tussled with a Florida
largemouth bass will
insist they are the
"reel" basses.
In Florida, black
bass annually provide
more than 800,000
anglers with nearly 15
million days of healthy
Sgt. Boardman, who served in the U iS.ion as
Army in Iraq, looks forward to returning outdoor recreation and
to Florida to catch another 16-pound generate substantially
bass like this one. more than a billion
dollars in economic
impact for Florida.
So although the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) has always zealously managed these
fish to ensure their survival and sustainable use, it is now
time to pull together all the loosely connected pieces into one
cohesive management plan.
Darrell Scovell, director of the Division of Freshwater
Fisheries Management, announced the framework for such
a plan at the first public meeting of the rapidly evolv-
ing Florida Freshwater Fishing Coalition (FLFFC.org), in
October in Orlando. The FWC's Black Bass Management
Plan will ultimately provide the blueprint to ensure
Florida's recognition as "The Bass Capital of the World,"
according to Scovell. The meeting drew representatives
from 17 fishery-dependent type organizations, businesses
and groups who actively participated in the discussion and
commended the FWC for its outreach effort.
Tom Champeau, an FWC fisheries expert and director of
the South Region, introduced the concept at the meeting.
He emphasized that the prominence of our bass fisheries


9 By Bob Wattendorf

Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
MyFWC.com


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OK to take 'big game snakes' during small-game seasons


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) re-
minds hunters that they
may continue to take
Burmese pythons and all
other reptiles of concern
within four South Florida
wildlife management areas
(WMAs).
An FWC executive or-
der, which went into effect
Aug. 29, gives all properly


licensed and permitted
hunters authority to harvest
pythons and other reptiles
of concern (Indian python,
reticulated python, north-
ern and southern African
rock python, amethystine
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anaconda and Nile monitor
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More


specified hunting seasons.
Besides Big Cypress
WMA, small-game sea-
sons are going on in the
other three management
areas, continuing through
March 7. On Big Cypress,
general gun season is in,
immediately followed by
the area's small-game sea-
son, which goes through
Feb. 1. In all four WMAs,
only a Florida hunting li-
cense and management
area permit are required to
hunt reptiles of concern
from now through the end
of the small-game seasons.
"Because hunters contin-


ue to play a key role with
wildlife conservation in
this state, and since many
of them have great local
knowledge and really
know the lay of the land, it
just makes good sense to
once again enlist their ser-
vices in helping us eradi-
cate these invasive rep-
tiles," said FWC Commis-
sioner Ronald Bergeron.
With the exception of
the small-game season in
the Deep Lake Unit of Big
Cypress (where only bows
and muzzleloaders are al-

SEE OKTO TAKE, PAGE 6B


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cannot be taken for granted. Participation in freshwater
fishing has been affected by societal changes related to
urbanization and changing demographics. Freshwater fish-
ing license sales have shown an overall decline since the
1980s, although sales have stabilized over the past 10 years.
Development of land and water resources to support our cur-
rent and projected population growth threatens lake, river
and associated wetland habitats. The uncertain impacts
of climate change on freshwater habitats and bass fishing
require investigation and adaptive management.
To protect our valuable bass fisheries, the FWC plans
to engage more stakeholders through a year-long process
to develop a long-term (2010-2030) management plan for
Florida bass species. This plan will provide strategies and
programs to manage for high quality fisheries and increase
opportunities for anglers to pursue trophy Florida bass.
"The FLFFC is ecstatic about being involved at the grass
roots level in discussing Florida's black bass management,"
said Todd Kersey, CEO of the FLFFC. "The enthusiasm of
the participants shows how important this is and the desire
to see all aspects of management from aquatic vegetation
control, to habitat enhancement and stocking, to regulation
management and enforcement included in the plan."
That is just what the FWC biologists wanted to hear, not
only from the FLFFC, but from all of the nearly 1 million
anglers who enjoy fishing in Florida for black bass. The plan
will include all those aspects and more, but the final product
depends on good, solid science, knowledge of local fisheries -
including the constraints and opportunities and what you,
the public, want your fisheries resources to be. From creat-
ing relaxing, low-pressure aesthetic fisheries where natural
scenery is the major draw, to fast-action schooling bass in
the small to average
size range, to limit-
ed-entry trophy bass
fisheries, FWC biolo-
gists are willing to
work with local com-
munities to design
a management plan
that, with adequate
funding and public
support, can provide
the sustainable fish- Todd Kersey, CEO of the FLFFC, welcomes
ing opportunities the group to the discussion on the FWC Black
you want. Bass Management Plan.
To see a draft
of the plan and the PowerPoint presentation given at the
FLFFC meeting, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and select Black
Bass Management Plan proposal. You'll also have the oppor-
tunity to fill out a survey to provide the FWC with more
information about what you think is important to having
quality bass fishing in Florida. Make your voice heard, fill
out the survey today.

Instant licenses are available at MyFWC.com /License or by
calling 888-FISH-FLORIDA (347-4356). Report violators by calling
*FWC or #FWC on your cell phone, or 888-404-3922. Visit MyFWC.
corn/Fishing/ for more Fish Busters' columns.


1


Open
Christmas
Day!


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 4B


v~nt~ay M






SPORTS


Lady 'Dogs


outplay Santa Fe


IULLDOGSj


L3J~


--7s


I t


N .4


t


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT:
Tiyrenee Riley gets pressure from a Raider,
Tatiyanna Thomas in action against the
Raiders,
Hope Chambers advances the ball,
Kristiana Evans looks for a shot.
- Photos: Paul Buchanan SuwanneeSports.com


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


PAGE 5B


,"\


[D






* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


SHS SAC

meeting

postponed
Postponed to Dec. 10
The Suwannee High
School SAC meeting
that was scheduled for
Thursday, Nov. 12, has
been postponed to
Thursday, Dec. 10, due
to conflicts in the SHS
calendar.



Live Oak

Artists Guild

invites

you to

celebration
Dec. 11
The Live Oak Artists
Guild invites you to
our Annual Holiday
Celebration December
11, 2009 1-8 p.m.
Meet the artists from
5-8 p.m.
Browse our Holiday
Gift Shop, sample our
artists favorite festive
treats. Enjoy inspira-
tional and unique art
works.
There will be live
holiday music and En-
chanted Christmas tree
forest.



Yee Haw

Country

Christmas
Dec. 18
The Live Oak Christ-
ian Church is presenting
a unique Christmas pro-
gram on December 18.
With music, fun and
laughter, we will see the
birth of Jesus through a
special kind of country
humor. The program
will begin at 7 p.m.
The church is located
at 1015 Ohio Avenue
North. For more infor-
mation call the church
at 362-1015 or check
our web page at
liveoakchristian.org.


Suwannee Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 612007CA0001650001 XX
CRESTONE PARTNERS LIMITED,
Plaintiff,


vs.


ROBERT
EARL,


A. EARL andDEBRA K.


Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to an Order Resetting Sale
dated December 2, 2009, in Case
Number 612007CA0001650001XX of the
Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit
in and for Suwannee County, Florida, in
which CRESTONE PARTNERS
LIMITED is Plaintiff and ROBERT A.
EARL and DEBRA K. EARL are
Defendants, I, BARRY A. BAKER, Clerk
of the Court, will sell at public sale the
following described real property:
Part of the NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4, part of
the S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4
and part of the N 3/4 of the N 1/2 of the
SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 33,
Township 6 South, Range 14 East,
Suwannee County, Florida, being more
particularly described as follows:
BEGIN at the Northwest corner of said S
1/2 of the NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 thence
run N 8905'29" E, along the North line
of said S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4
and the North line of S 1/2 of the NE 1/4
of the NE 1/4, a distance of 1359.72 feet;
thence run N 0036'10" W, a distance of
661.68 feet to the North line of said
Section 33; thence run N 8903'54", E,
along said North line, a distance of 60.00
feet; thence run S 0036'10" E, a
distance of 879.43 feet; thence run N
8747'17" W, a distance of 654.27 feet;
thence run S 0439'54" E, a distance of
977.33 feet; to the South line of said N
3/4 of the N 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of the NE
1/4; thence run S 8907'36" W, along
said South line, a distance of 836.42
feet, to the West line of said NE 1/4;
thence run N 0033'19" W, along said
West line, a distance of 1156.85 feet to
the POINT OF BEGINNING.
SUBJECT TO: A perpetual easement in
favor of Suwannee Valley Electric
Cooperative, its successor or assigns
over and across the East 20 feet of the
West 60 feet of the N 1/2 of the NE 1/4 of
the NE 1/4 of said Section 33.
TOGETHER WITH: A non-exclusive
easement for ingress and egress, as
needed, over and across the East 10 feet
of the West 110 feet of the North 879.43
feet of the NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of said
Section 33.
PAC 04434-002001
The sale will be held on Tuesday,
December 29, 2009, at 11:00 A.M., or
as soon thereafter as possible to the
highest and best bidder for cash, at the
front door of the Courthouse at Live Oak,
Suwannee County, Florida, in
accordance with Section 45.031 of the
Florida Statutes.
SEAL
BARRY A. BAKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Keith M Gentry
Deputy Clerk
12/9, 16


Suwannee Legals
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING:
The District Board of Trustees of North
Florida Community College will hold a
special meeting Tuesday, December 15,
2009 at 5:45 p.m. in the NFCC Library
Annex, NFCC, 325 NW Turner Davis Dr.,
Madison, FL. A copy of the agenda may
be obtained by writing: NFCC, Office of
the President, 325 NW Turner Davis Dr.,
Madison, FL 32340. For disability-related
accommodations, contact the NFCC
Office of College Advancement, 850-973-
1653. NFCC is an equal access/equal
opportunity employer.
12/9

RFP SOLICITATION
RFP NO. 2009-15
The Suwannee County Board of County
Commissioners, Suwannee County,
Florida will receive sealed bids, at the
Clerk of Court Cashier Window at the
Courthouse, Attention: Clerk to the
Board, 200 South Ohio Avenue, Live
Oak, FL 32064 until Friday, December
11, 2009 at 4:00 P.M. Bids will be
publicly opened and read aloud at the
Live Oak City Hall Meeting Room, 101
S.W. White Avenue, Live Oak, Florida
32064 on Tuesday, December 15, 2009
at 4:00 P.M. (or as thereafter), for the
following:
IN-GROUND FOUR PIPE A/C
SYSTEM LOCATED AT THE
SUWANNEE COUNTY JAIL
The Board of County Commissioners
may accept all or part of any bid. Any bid
received after Monday, December 15,
2009 at 4:00 P.M., will be retained at the
Clerk of Court Office unopened and will
not be considered. The Board of County
Commissioners reserves the right to
reject any and all bids, waive formalities
and readvertise and award the bid in the
best interest of Suwannee County.
The Board of County Commissioners
does not discriminate because of race,
creed, color, national origin or handicap
status.
The Board of County Commissioners
requires a Sworn Statement under
section 287.133(3)(a), FS., on Public
Entity Crimes.
Anyone wishing to obtain bid documents
may contact the Administrative Services
Department, at 386/364-3410. Any
questions concerning the bid
specifications should be directed to
Steve Sharpless, Maintenance Director
at (386)364-6524.
All bids must be submitted in triplicate
and labeled on the outside of the
envelope as "ATTENTION: CLERK TO
THE BOARD, SEALED FOR RFP NO.
2009-15 IN-GROUND FOUR PIPE A/C
SYSTEM LOCATED AT THE
SUWANNEE COUNTY JAIL."
WESLEYWAINRIGHT CHAIRMAN
SUWANNEE COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
11/27 12/2, 9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR SUWANNEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 612009CA00002360001XX
THE HORIZON GROUP, LLC,
a Florida Limited Liability Company,
Plaintiff,


vs.


SUWANNEE VALLEY LAND, INC.,
a dissolved Florida Corporation and
FABIAN LAWRENCE; et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: FABIAN LAWRENCE, Defendants,
unknown tenants; and other unknown
parties in possession, including the


Mantengase Informado



Lea los avisos oficiales que afectan su vida.


Presupuesto del distrito escolar



Cambios sobre impuestos locales


Subasta de inmuebles



Audiencias Publicas



Adopci6n


/


Busque los avisos oficiales de la Florida en la red en:



www.floridapublicnotices.com



550849-F


Suwannee Legals
unknown spouse of any person in
possession of the property, and if a
named Defendant is deceased, the
surviving spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, and all other parties
claiming by, through, under or against
that Defendant, and all claimants,
persons or parties, natural or corporate,
or whose exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under any of the named or
described Defendants.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclosure a mortgage on the following
described property in Suwannee County,
Florida, to-wit:
Part of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 7;
the West 1/2 of the Southwest 1/4
(Government Lot 5); and the
Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4
(South 1/2 of Government Lot 6) of
Section 8, all being in Township 3
South, Range 11 East, Suwannee
County, Florida, being more
particularly described as follows: For
Point of Beginning, commence at the
Northeast corner of the SE 1/4 of said
Section 7, the same being the
Northwest corner of Government Lot 5
of said Section 7; thence run N
8935'19" E along the North Line of
said Government Lot 5, a distance of
1303.21 feet to the Northeast corner of
said West 1/2 of the SW 1/4 (Northeast
corner of said Government Lot 5);
thence run S 0'30'44" E along the East
line of said Government Lot 5, a
distance of 1321.34 feet to the
Northwest corner of said SE 1/4 of the
SW 1/4 (Northwest corner of said
South 1/2 of Government Lot 6);
thence run N 89035'56" E along the
North line of said South 1/2 of
Government Lot 6), a distance of
1307.11 feet to the Northeast corner of
said SE 1/4 of the SW 1/4, (Northeast
corner of said South 1/2 of
Government Lot 6); thence run S
0033'40" E along the East line of said
SE 1/4 of the SW 1/4 (East line of said
South 1/2 of Government Lot 6), a
distance of 1324.29 feet to the
Southeast corner of said SE 1/4 of the
SW 1/4 (Southeast corner of said
South 1/2 of Government Lot 6);
thence run S 8919'12" W along the
South line of said Section 8 (South
line of said South 1/2 of Government
Lot 6) and the South line of said West
1/2 of the SW 1/4 (South line of said
Government Lot 5), a distance of
2629.47 feet to the Southwest corner
of said Section 8 (Southwest corner of
said Government Lot 5); thence run N
007'28"W along the West line of said
West 1/2 of the SW 1/4 (West line of
said Government Lot 5), a distance of
796.51 feet to the Southeast corner of
Suwannee Vista, as recorded in Plat
Book 1, Page 316, of the Public
records of said county; thence run N
2644'11"W along the East line of said
Suwannee Vista (Easterly right-of-way
line of 241st Drive), a distance of
1833.91 feet to a Point of Intersection
of said Easterly right-of-way line and
the South line of Penner Subdivision
as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 124,
of said Public Records; thence run N
8952'12" E along said South line, a
distance of 821.51 feet to a point on
the West line of said Section 8 (West
line of Government Lot 5); thence run
N 0008'50" W along said West line, a
distance of 221.98 feet to the Point of
Beginning.
SUBJECT TO that portion of land in
114th Circle right-of-way, situated in
part of the SE 1/4 of said Section 7,
Township 3 South, Range 11 East, of
said county, being more particularly
described as follows: For Point of
Reference, commence at the
Northeast corner of said SE 1/4 of
said Section 7, thence run S 0008'50"
E along the East line of said Section 7,
a distance of 221.98 feet to the Point
of Beginning; thence continue S
007'28" E along said East line, a
distance of 60.00 feet; thence run S
8952'12" W, a distance of 791.47 feet
to a point on the Easterly right-of-way
of said 241st Drive; thence run N
2644'01"W along said Easterly right-
of-way line, a distance of 67.11 feet to
the Point of Intersection of said
Easterly right-of-way line and the
South line of said Penner Subdivision
as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 124,
of the Public Records of said county;
thence run N 8952'12" E along said
South line, a distance of 821.51 feet to
the Point of Beginning.
LESS AND EXCEPT that portion of
real property described as follows:
Part of Government Lot 5 or part of
the W 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of Section 8
and part of the SE 1/4 of Section 7,
Township 3 South, Range 11 East,
Suwannee County Florida, being
more particularly described as
follows: For Point of Beginning
commence at the Southwest corner of
said Section 8; thence run N 00007'28"
W, along the West line of said Section
7 a distance of 796.51 feet to the
Southeast corner of Suwannee Vista
as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 316,
of the Public Records of said County;
thence run N 2644'00" W, along the
East line of said Plat Book 1, Page
316, a distance of 200.00 feet; thence
run S 68'03'56" E, a distance of
1503.99 feet; thence run S 0004'48" E,
a distance of 400.00 feet to a Point on
the South line of said Section 8;
thence run S 8919'12"W, along said
South line a distance of 1307.46 feet

Subject to an easement for utilities
over and across the North 10.00 feet
and the West 20.00 feet of the North
200.00 feet thereof.
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on Plaintiff's
attorney and counsel of record, ROSE M.
DECKER, JR., Esquire of The Decker
Law Firm, P.A., 320 White Avenue, Post
Office Drawer 1288, Live Oak, Florida
32064, within thirty (30) days after the
first publication of this Notice of Action,
and file the original with the Clerk of the
Court, Honorable BARRY A. BAKER,
whose address is 201 South Ohio
Avenue, Suwannee County Courthouse,
Live Oak, Florida 32064, either before
service on the Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter. If you fail to
answer, defend or otherwise plead to this
action to foreclose a mortgage, a Default
will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint. This Notice
of Action is executed and published
pursuant to the provisions of 49.08, et
sea., Florida Statutes.
Date: November 30, 2009.
SEAL
Honorable Barry A. Baker
Clerk of the
Court
Suwannee County, Florida


By: Sharon Hale
As Deputy Clerk
12/9, 16




Lady


Bullpups


remain


on top

Page 8B


There are no


holiday hours for


Social Security's


online services

Continued From Page 2B

are Eastern Standard Time and some online services
have extended hours. You can find the individual op-
erating hours for different online services at
http://www.socialsecurity.gov/onlineservices
In addition to these interactive services, there is a
wealth of information available 24 hours a day on our
Web site that can help answer your questions and get
you the information you need, including frequently
asked questions, publications and forms, information
for specific groups, news and press releases and even
videos and public service announcements. You can
find it all at http://www.socialsecurity.gov.
So remember: while banks and other offices in the
private sector and in government are closed for the
holidays, Social Security's online office is open and
ready to assist you.






OK to take 'big



game snakes' during



small-game seasons


Continued From Page 4B

lowed), hunters may use shotguns, rimfire rifles and
handguns to take pythons. Nets and snares also may
be used, but no matter the method of take, all reptiles
of concern must be euthanized on site.
Reptiles of concern may not be taken out of the
wildlife management areas alive and must be reported
to the FWC within 36 hours by calling, toll-free, 866-
392-4286, or going to MyFWC.com and selecting
"Burmese pythons" in the "Quick Clicks" menu.
However, any reptile of concern taken from Big Cy-
press must be checked in at one of the area's six check
stations.
Hunters may do what they wish with the reptile's
skin and meat. However, according to the National
Park Service, mercury testing on two dozen captured
Burmese pythons in Everglades National Park re-
vealed extraordinarily high levels of mercury in the
meat well above levels considered safe to eat in
freshwater fish and alligators.
Officials estimate there are thousands of Burmese
pythons in the wild in South Florida. The FWC's goal
is to contain the spread of these pythons in the wild
and prevent establishment of other reptiles of concern.
Data collected by hunters on these state-managed
lands will assist in preventing their northern move-
ment.





Celebrate the holiday


season with Florida


State Parks

-State parks host special

events in northeast Florida

during December-

The Florida Department of Environmental Protec-
tion's (DEP) Florida State Parks invite Floridians
and visitors to create a new holiday tradition this
year by attending a state park special event. With
festive decorations and activities, state parks are a
great setting for friends and family to enjoy natural
Florida while celebrating the season.
"There are few greater treasures than sharing the
holiday season with family and friends and there is
no better place to do so than in Florida's state
parks," said DEP's Florida Park Service Director
Mike Bullock. "From visits with Santa to displays
of millions of lights, we hope all visitors will enjoy
the festivities that park staff and volunteers work
diligently to offer during this time of year."
Following the holiday season, in 2010, DEP's
Florida State Parks will celebrate 75 years of recre-
ation and preservation. Florida's 160 state parks of-
fer white sandy beaches, vast open prairies, steep
ravines, lush semi-tropical forests, cultural sites and
crystal clear lakes, rivers and springs. State parks
also offer countless locations to learn about Flori-
da's cultural history and serve as outdoor classrooms
for students of all ages. Affordable, family-friendly
activities, such as swimming, hiking, bicycling, pad-
dling, diving, fishing, camping, horseback riding,
birding, photography, events and ranger-led tours


are just a few ways people enjoy our natural re-
sources.
Special events for the holiday season in northeast
Florida include:

Union Holiday Encampment
Fort Clinch State Park, Amelia Island
Saturday, December 5, 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Sunday, December 6, 9:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m.
The Fort Clinch State Park Union Holiday En-
campment will feature re-enactors decorating the
fort for Christmas. Volunteers in Civil War-era cos-
tumes will place fresh greenery on the mantle, deco-


SEE CELEBRATE THE HOLIDAY, PAGE 8B


PAGE 6B


I


f





SPORTS


More SHS

wrestling


scenes


Jamie Alvarado handles his opponent in overtime. Photo: Randy Fletcher


Logan Fletcher breaks down his opponent. Photo: Randy Fletcher


Aaron Fountain takes down his opponent. Photo: Paul Buchanan SuwanneeSports.com


Jonn oatrngnt sets nis opponent up for a single-leg taKe down. Photo: Randy Fletcher


ilanlln ien iesnn action on nme mat. Photo: Paul Buchanan SuwanneeSports.com


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


PAGE 7B








SPORTS


'Dogs fall


to Lake City


- "I.


Coach James jerry talks with some of the guy. Photos: Paul Buchanan- SuwanneeSports.co
Coach James Perry talks with some of the guys. Photos: Paul Buchanan SuwanneeSports.com


Celebrate the holiday season



with Florida State Parks


Xavier Perry feels the pressure.


By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com

The Suwannee Middle School girls soccer
team remains undefeated at 6-0.
The girls downed Mayo, Monday, Nov. 30
6-1.
SMS led 6-0 until Mayo scored right at the


Continued From Page 6B

rate a period Christmas
tree and portray daily life
as it was in the winter of
1864. The ladies will
string berries and pop-
corn while fires burn in
the fireplaces and sol-


diers answer questions
about what it is like to be
stationed at Fort Clinch.
Regular park entrance
fees apply, plus $2.00 per
person for Fort admis-
sion. For more informa-
tion, call (904) 277-7274.


end of the game.
"As the time had expired they scored a
penalty kick," said coach Kim Boatright.
The Bullpups travel to Ft. White Thursday.
Their last regular game of the season is Dec.
14 at home against Perry. The team will hon-
or all eighth grade players at that game.
Come out and support the Bullpups.


Ashley Wood in action against the Falcons. Photo: Submitted


Holiday Tea Party
Washington Oaks Gar-
dens State Park, Palm
Coast
Saturday December 5,
10:00 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Mrs. Claus will wel-
come boys and girls ages
five to eight years old, as
well as their favorite
stuffed animal, to join the
tea party festivities, in-
cluding a wish list ses-
sion, storytelling, a sou-
venir photograph, a
stocking with goodies and
tea and cookies. Children
are encouraged to dress
up for this special event.
The tea party fee is
$20.00 per child, includ-
ing park entrance. Space
is limited and advance
reservations are required.
For more information and
to register, call (386)
446-6783.

Festival of Lights
Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park, White Springs
Saturday, December 12
- Thursday, December 31,
5:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m.
Enjoy millions of lights
on display throughout the
park, including the majes-
tic oak trees adorned with
thousands of lights, the
antebellum museum
dressed in full holiday
splendor, a gingerbread
village located at the gift
shop and craft square. On
Saturday, December 12,
in conjunction with the
Town of White Springs,
the park will have a full
day celebration to kickoff
the beginning of the Fes-
tival of Lights. Santa
Claus, children's crafts, a
Christmas parade and hot
dogs and cookies will be
offered, as well as an
evening concert inside the
park's carillon tower, and
a bonfire and marshmal-
low roast will be held at
the gift shop & craft
square. Regular park ad-
mission fee is waived for
the festivities at the park
on December 12, but a
donation of canned goods
or a new toy is requested.
Entrance Fees for the
evening event from De-
cember 13-31 are $2.00
per person. For more in-
formation, call (386) 397-
4331.

Holiday in the Gardens
Washington Oaks Gar-


dens State Park, Palm
Coast
Saturday, December 12,
9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
Visit Santa's Garden
Celebration where chil-
dren can share their holi-
day wish list with Santa
and Mrs. Claus in the gar-
dens. This event will also
include a souvenir photo
with Santa, Santa's play-
ground with crafts and
games, complimentary
hot chocolate, pizza
available for purchase, a
gingerbread house con-
test, ornament making,
entertainment and other
vendors. Park entrance
fees waived will be
waived with the donation
of a toy and non-perish-
able food item. For more
information, call (386)
446-6783.

Caroling in the Ravines
Ravine Gardens State
Park, Palatka
Saturday, December 12,
6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m.
Ravine Gardens State
Park will host the first
annual Christmas event
with an old fashion
evening of friends, family
and fellowship, with wag-
on rides around the
ravines while local
church groups, school
groups and organizations
sing seasonal carols. En-
tertainment will also be
provided on stage in
Civic Center and under
the pavilion and holiday
refreshments will be
available for purchase.
For more information,
call (386) 329-3721.

Peace at Last
Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park, White Springs
Thursday, December
31, 1:00 p.m.
Celebrate the New Year
with a peaceful gathering
among friends for a caril-
lon concert and poetry
readings on the banks of
the Suwannee River. This
event is free with regular
park admission. For more
information, call (386)
397-4331.
To learn more about
Florida State Parks and
the 75th Anniversary, vis-
it www.FloridaS-
tateParl, ..i :. and follow
us on Twitter at
www. Twitter. com/FLState
Parks.


Lady Bullpups remain on top


0SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 8B


I .


~4rll~




W E D N S D A D C E M B R 9 2 0 9 U S U W A N E E D E M C R A / L I V O A P A E 9


Among the most popular sites online these days
are newspaper websites. Yes, Newspaper sites.
Maybe that is because newspaper sites are
trusted, cherished and informative local content
destinations.

#1 Newspaper websites are locally dominant as the number one
local website in 22 of the top 25 U.S. Markets.


74 Million. In September 2009, 74 million unique visitors
went to a newspaper website. That represents 38% share of visitors.


3.4 Billion. Visitors looked at 3.4 billion pages and
spent 43 million hours on newspaper sites in September 2009.


2L.U9%0 Newspaper share of local online advertising is 26.9%
exceeding yellow pages, TV sites and radio sites combined.


$3.1 Billion. Advertising on newspaper websites
exceeded $3.1 billion per year

2A X. Borrell reports that newspaper website's share of local
online revenue is more than that from all other local media
combined (2.8x directories; 2.9x that of local tv; 12x radio station
sites, 20x business and alternative papers and 28x magazines)

48% People do more than visit a newspaper site. 46% of adults
visiting a newspaper website took some action. More newspaper
website users took action after seeing online advertising than all
other local sites, and portals according to OPA research.

28%. The percentage of newspaper websites visitors who go
once a day or more frequently.

Content sites produce greater purchase intent,
online ad awareness, brand favorability and message association
than the market norms, portals and ad networks according to
OPA research.
Sources: MORI Research, Nielsen Online, Borrell Associates, OPA




Newspaper advertising.
A destination, not a distraction.
www.newspapermedia.com










N
Newspaper Association of America 4401 Wilson Blvd., Suite 900, Arlington, VA 22203 571.366.1000


565506-F


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


0 UWANNEE DEMOoCRAP/LIVE OAK


PAGE 9B




PAGE lOB U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009
I U


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1307 W. Howard Street (US Hwy. 90)
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1042
www.sunbeltchryslerjeepdodgeofliveoak.com
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~~LLE


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0 SUWANNEE DEMIOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


PAGE 10B


QL


~allI$~Z~Zu8~~


MAMMI




Stephen Foster State Park: Festival of Lights, Pages 10-11


News Entertainment Classifieds


North Florida Focus
Decemb er9&10,2009www.nfIonIine.com t ervingHmitoLfaeteaduwnneCunie


teacher gives


students the


gift of the arts


P- ; Lo
'iee inie irrieciia[e S:IcrcIicii 'li~ir.i: ea: hei SIis.n RCJLIi.I'I.0. Ci O~~c i. ~ In LIi-
iv ( olte:Ie' Aiic''.1 Se' 'ec. c'i.flc,. Si''~'ann 'S.Ii'Cill. lc'. Ef ic en ici aueno i fl NCP'. 19
,..F( ( Ailic.1 St' 'es. r'eo c,'ii'i-':n e Pia, 11iAga~iin. Sarnii rie o -iiii~l .iO rnio em
EB'iinna EBIa:kIl11-1 iii n wE i i ei v a niI P-'i rc i:k wa/iia e. P: I'C i 'lim me'lil .Iii S lt~lcin. '
waki:jl, Ii on r or 1r1) Siian PRoIiE.I'I. 'o'iloci-: '(1.1:iaiis'i Kell%,I vDo'o'. oIsiE.iEIKaii
Sari:rhe:-. la----''0: lici.I lic Davi~ is nl iSLIoai''nncc i eicieni Paiii Ha.iin:c..


127 Howard Street E., Live Oak, FL
* Phone: 386-362-4539
Toll Free: 1-800-557-7478
SSe Habla Espanol


Three more SIS students who got to go on stage, courtesy
of Roush, to meet members of the famous Tampa singing
group Brotherhood. On stage at NFCC's Van H. Priest Audi-
torium are, left to right, Wayne Hill and John King of Broth-
erhood, SIS student Juan Campos, Harry Williamson of
Brotherhood, SIS student Keith Claridy, SIS music teacher
Susan Roush, SIS student Kurime Rojo and Brent Uppercue
of Brotherhood. Courtesy photos


Dial's Inspection
Services
For All Your Home
Inspection Needs!
386-364-4434 or
386-590-6534
Please visit our website:
www.suwanneevalleyinspections.com 9


Old


Tyme
Farm
Days


I -FOR RENT- I


www.poolerealtv.com


GREAT RATES FOR NICE LOOKING
RENTALS STARTING AT $300 PER MONTH
FOR SINGLEWIDES AND $450 PER MONTH
FOR DOUBLEWIDES. WATER, SEWER,
AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS.
386-330-2567 563738-F


Pages 2-3


NFCC ARTIST SERIES: The Nutcracker, Page 17





PAGE 2, DECEMBER 9 & 10,2009 U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Farm


More crafts. One of many crafts booths. I ""
Here are


some scenes
from the
most recent
edition,
held
Thanksgiving
weekend.


ABOVE: Handmade cases.
RIGHT: Good old-fashioned root beer hits the spot.


LEFT:
HOnienliade
lellies anid jams.


The Suwannee County Animal Shelter was well represented.


.----- - - - -
Buy One Get One Free
IZZA!
ofequal or lesser value
2888 W US Hwy 90
Lake City, FL 32055
Exp.Date: 12-31-2009
r---------------------- %
20 FREE ,
Tokens ,
2888 W US Hwy 90
Lake City, FL 32055
Exp. Date: 12-31-2009 i i
Lmnt 1 offer per person per v 1slt
.. . . ..k__ .


State Direct Capital
Take advantage.
Say no to Bankruptcy
Low rate Debt loans
Quick approval ~ No fees
Personal Business Auto Loans
All scores welcome
Call 1-877-431-3631
565446-F


PAGE 2, DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA





U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009, PAGE 3


Ai I


BELOW: Old time tractors.
Kb~,fIA^-^",~~h ^A~1


ABOVE:
Craftsmen at work.


\\\\U


LEFT:
Antique truck.


Old Tyme




Farm Days






4: .0


Antique fire engine.


Metalworking.


THE GLUELINE|

Grab Compang inc.
S(38s ) 3S2-7227 I
1040 Puval Sbreet NE Live Oak, PL 32064 I
Call for our specials!
Come in an' a
great athio I
some awesome food!
SBring this ad and receive an additional 5% off
Excludes Friday Night _j







Show Pigs For Sale
For information call
Blue Butt Farms
386-623-3305
386-867-2075

560017-F 564811gay


Syrup, made the old-fashioned way.


Navigation is easier than ever! Just type what you are
looking for and you are there.
Search Valdosta and the surrounding areas all from
your computer at www.valdostadailytimes.com.
View classified ads, display ads and yellow page
listings all in one convenient place.
Customize your shopping experience!
You can search by brand, ad or category.
Narrow your search with the
Advanced Search feature.


ill


mmwm~i.nB


DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009, PAGE 3


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


rl I


r


C~ ~~-
C
n rT~~-_~=bL
f
r3~i
4
The petting zoo. Courtesy photos










PAoG 4,? CLASTNOT


Pink Ladies Needed!
Are you looking for a place to share your talents? Do
you enjoy meaningful conversation with a good friend?
How 'bout a good book?
Then We Want You!! Suwannee Health Care and Re-
hab Center is looking for volunteers to start a Ladies
Auxiliary.
Call Lynn Brannon, Activities Director at 386-362-
7860 or 386-590-2961.

Talent Search
Do you sing or play and instrument? Do you act or
dance? Do you like to read or spend time with a friend
in wonderful conversation?
WE WANT YOU! Suwannee Health Care & Rehab
Center is looking for your talent for our residents. Din-
ner for two $45; One night at the Beach $125; One
hour volunteering to make memories that last forever -
PRICELESS!
Call: Lynn Brannon, Activities Director 386-362-7860
or 386-590-2961.

Head Start/Early Head Start
early enrollment
Suwannee Valley 4Cs Head Start/Early Head Start is
accepting applications for children from birth to age 5.
Head Start/Early Head Start is a FREE comprehensive
early childhood education program that includes health,
dental, nutrition and VPK services to eligible
children/families.
Centers are located in Suwannee, Hamilton, Lafayette
and Columbia counties. Parents bring proof of income
and child's age to register.
For more information call 386-754-2222.

Customers needed!
Dairy Queen of Live Oak will host Dairy Queen Bene-
fit Night the second Tuesday of every month from 6-8
p.m. to help buy books for Suwannee Middle School.

Donations needed!
Suwannee County Environmental Watchdogs, a non-
profit organization, seeks donations for yard sale mer-
chandise. Info: Sandy, 386-364-8020.


Register now!


Descendants of Calhoun family plan
reunion in 2009
Descendants of the late Sarah Calhoun, Eva Calhoun
and Thomas Calhoun are invited to a family reunion to
be held in 2009. Info: misstheresamartin@yahoo.com or
predop@aol.com.

Coffee with your councilman
City Councilman for District 4 Mark Stewart invites
his constituents to "Coffee with your Councilman" at
JAVA JAX located in the Publix shopping center.
Come and meet with him on the second Tuesday of
each month from 7 a.m. till 8:30 a.m. This will be a
time to get to know each other and discuss current is-
sues and citizen concerns.

CJBAT tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): CJ-
BAT (Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test) at NFCC
Testing Center (Bldg. #16), Madison. CJBAT is required
for acceptance into Corrections & Law Enforcement pro-
grams. Photo ID required. Pre-registration & scheduling
time and date are required. To register please call 850-
973-9451.

College Placement Tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): Col-
lege Placement Test (CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg.
#16), 5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC Student Ser-
vices 24 hours before test. For information please call
850-973-9451.

TABE tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education) at NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison. TABE is required for acceptance
into vocational/technical programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration & scheduling time & date are required.
To register please call 850-973-9451.

Sheriff, commissioner
at Whistle Stop
The Wellborn Neighborhood Watch would like to wel-


come our members, friends and neighbors of our com-
munity of Wellborn to "Meet and Greet" your sheriff,
Tony Cameron, and our county commissioner, Billy
Maxwell, at the Whistle Stop Cafe and Deli for free cof-
fee and sweets.
This will give us all a personal and face-to-face meet-
ing with those who have such a great bearing on the run-
ning of our community. They will answer any question
that you have pertaining to each of their jobs and we
hope to have a good turn out from our community.
This will be held on the 2nd Thursday of each month
at 10:30 a.m. at the "Whistle Stop Cafe in the middle of
our town of Wellborn.
Please try to come and bring a friend or two or three!
Remember, folks, this is free to all our community!

Greater Visions
Support Group
Addiction Support Group: Greater Visions faith-based
addictions support group meets at the Grace Manor
Restaurant. Meetings are held on Thursday mornings at
9:30 a.m. This group provides spiritual and emotional
support in a non-judgmental setting. Come experience
the freedom from addictions that is found in Christ.
Greater Visions is an outreach of Christ Central-Live
Oak. For more information contact 208-1345.

Suwannee County Republican
Executive Committee to meet
The Suwannee County Republican Executive Com-
mittee meets in the council chambers of Live Oak City
Hall at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of the month. If the
first Thursday is the first day of the month, the meet-
ing will be held on the following Thursday.
Each meeting has a guest speaker or current issues
will be discussed. All are welcome to attend. For more
information call Chairman Carl Meece at 386-776-
1444.

Legislative candidate to speak
at Republican meeting
The Suwannee County Republican Executive Commit-
tee meets at Live Oak City Hall, in the Council Cham-
bers, at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of the month. If the

CONTINUED ON PAGE 7


LETpS !'
ABOUT YOU HEALTH

ABOUT YOUR HEALTH


North Floria


Pharmacy

Medical
Equipment
Oxygen

"Everything For Your
Home Recovery"

Locally Owned & Operated
101 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL 32008
(386) 935-6905
229 W. Main St., Mayo, FL 32066
(386) 294-3777 501051
_________ ____________________501051-F


Ophthalmology

GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
522 South Ohio Avenue
r, 330-6260 or 1-800-435-3937

Physical Therapy

f/ iloL, Dnoa.

* Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy
* Specializing In Arthritis* Fibromyalgia Geriatrics* Spinal &
Joint Pain Sports Injuries Work Injuries Pediatrics
Manual Therapy Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Protegrity
Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross, Av Med
Jasper 792-2426 Medicaid-pediatrics
Branford 935-1449 Workers Comp
Mayo 294-1407 Most Other Insurance Plans
A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore


Easy Ways to Combat

Cold and Flu Season


Winter is upon us once again. With
winter comes the holiday season, some
snowfall, a New Year, and, of course, flu
season. Few issues have gripped the
headlines more this year than the flu, as
more and more strands of the flu appear
each year, wreaking havoc on the
nation's schools and offices.
Flu shots are often the first line of
defense against the flu. But even those
who have received a flu shot can still
find themselves battling the cold and flu.
Adults and children alike spend so much
time in the classroom or office that it's
hard to make it through the winter
without battling some type of illness.
However, there are ways to combat cold
and flu season without missing a beat
this winter.
* Wash your hands. Germs often spread
through our hands, as hands come into
daily contact with germs whenever we
touch doorknobs, sneeze or cough into
our hands. While it might seem simple,
washing hands thoroughly is a highly
effective means to stopping the spread of
germs. It also helps to sneeze or cough
into a tissue or handkerchief, or
immediately wash hands after sneezing
or coughing. In addition, wash hands
whenever you arrive at home, school or
the office. This can help remove any
germs that might have attached
themselves to your hands while you
were out and about.
* Work from home. Parents often find
themselves in a bind when their kids
inevitably fall victim to the cold or flu
during the winter months. This often
leads to one parent staying home from
work and using a personal day to do so.
Even if kids manage to stay healthy
through the winter, parents are just as
susceptible to cold and flu when they
spend the workday in their office or
traveling for business.
However, thanks to the Internet and
GoToMyPC, parents of sick children or
even just workers hoping to avoid the flu


Physical Therapy


Heartland"
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA
Mandy McCray, PTA
Carolyn McCook Office Manager,
Patient Care Coordinator
AQUATIC THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports
Medicine, Pediatrics Providers
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS Providers
405 11th St., Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051 501053-F


can safeguard themselves from the
winter sick season while still getting
their work done. Whether you're
working from home or even the doctor's
waiting room, it's easy to gain fast and
convenient access to your own files,
programs, network resources, and e-mail
in a matter of seconds from any location
connected to the Internet. Instead of
heading into the office or downloading a
bunch of your files onto a laptop, simply
use GoToMyPC to work from the
comforts of a home computer while
taking care of sick family members,
yourself, or just avoiding the germs that
congregate in the nation's office
buildings during cold and flu season.
Everything on your work computer will
be at your fingertips, just as if you were
at the office. Best of all, it's so easy to
use that no training is needed.
You can sign up anytime for a 60-day
account at no charge. Simply visit
http://www.gotomypc.com/webcommuti
ng. The program installs automatically
on the computer that you want to be able
to use remotely, such as your office
computer -- and it's as secure as online
banking. Now, getting well doesn't need
to mean getting behind on your work.
Tip: Continue to enjoy the time-saving
convenience of working remotely from
home or anywhere, even when you're
not sidelined by a cold or the flu! Now,
getting well doesn't need to mean getting
behind on your work.
* Stay hydrated. Drinking water is
highly beneficial at all times of the year,
but even more so during cold and flu
season. Water flushes your system,
including the poisons that might enter
the body during cold and flu season.
Each individual is different, but doctors
often recommend drinking eight 8-ounce
glasses of water each day to maintain or
achieve optimal health.
* Get outdoors. While the weather
outside might be frightful, it's still
beneficial to get outdoors and breathe
some fresh air. Central heating dries the
body out, making it more vulnerable to
cold and flu viruses. In addition, because
few people go outside during the cold
weather, germs tend to gather inside
before circulating among those who
spend ample time indoors. Even if it's
cold, bundle up and get outdoors to
breathe some fresh air during cold and
flu season.

Family Dentistry
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH,
D.D.S, P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-6556
1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County) 501056-F


To place an ad on this page, please call Nancy at 386-362-1734 Ext. 103


PAGE 4, DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA






* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009, PAGE 5


Help Wanted


Announcements
















Help Wanted

FirstDay.
ASSISTANT NEEDED to help
disabled man who just recently
broke both ankles. Healing quiet
well but still will need physical
therapy. I have a new Bowflex
but need someone to help
operate it. A phone call is
needed to apply 386-364-1071.
Located near downtown Live
Oak.
FirstDay.
BILLING CLERK
Part-time Billing Clerk, High
school diploma or GED, one year
general office experience.
Completion of business or
Medicaid Billing courses
desirable. Experience in
Microsoft Word, Excel, etc.
Excellent people and
organizational skills. Ability to
work well under pressure. Valid
driver's license. Must pass all
background screenings. Apply in
person at Comprehensive
Community Service, Inc., 511
Goldkist Blvd. SW, Live Oak, FL
32064, ADA, EOE, Drug Free
Workplace
CERTIFIED DIETARY
MANAGER NEEDED
LTC experience preferred. Must
be able to manage large staff
and oversee daily food
preparation for 180 bed facility.
Full time with excellent benefits.
Email resume to Greg Roberts

groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com
or fax resume to: 386-362-4417
Live Oak FI. EOE/V/D/M/F
FirstDay.
EMPLOYEE NEEDED,
Established business needs
motivated, dependable
employee. Must have valid
driver's license and
transportation to work. Heavy
lifting involved. Duties include
installation of party tents,
deliveries, maintenance and
cleaning. Serious applicants
only. 30 to 40 hours per week.
Starting pay $9.00 per hour.
Suwannee Valley Event & Party
Rentals, 516 5th Street, L. O.
362-7368.

FirstDay.



APAL ACHEE

RECOVERY SPECIALIST II
Apalachee Center, Inc. for
behavioral health invites
mental health professionals to
apply for our Recovery
Specialist II positions.
Bachelor's degree in
counseling, social work,
psychology or related fields
and one year of related mental
health experience required,
case management experience
preferred. For more info and
application, visit
www.apalacheecenter.org
AA/EEOE/DFW


0
\%i\ L.([J i ij I ij \! J \ i.. \ ;IJ.
AT DOWLING PARK
Good Samaritan Center
A Tradtion of Excellence







* 161-bed Medicare/Medicaid
skilled nursing facility
* Alzheimer's Unit specialized
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hands-on care
* Individualized Care through
stimulating physical and social
environment, physical,
occupational, and speech therapy,
short-term rehabilitation, well-
balanced meals and family support
and involvement
* Physician services provided
through our on-site Copeland
Medical Center
* Admission Standards resident
must be 60 years of age and meet
the State nursing home admission
guidelines, as ordered by a
physician.

\ For more m r
,-, information call .'
386-658-5550 or 1-800-647-3353
TDD# 800-955-8771
563933-F


.Page 5


ONLINE
When you place your Classified Ad it automatically ap-
pears on our Web site, www.nflaonline.com. Your ad is live
on the Internet 24 hours a day (free ads excluded).


In the Arts...


FirstDay.
Park Maintenance Worker I
Suwannee Parks & Recreation
The Suwannee Parks &
Recreation Department is
seeking applicants for the
position of Park Maintenance
Worker I. This regular full -
time position, working under
close supervision; is in a local
parks & recreation system of
over 300 acres at 21 parks
requiring the knowledge, use
and routine maintenance of
mowers, weed eaters,
blowers, edgers, trailers and
other light equipment. This is
a semi skilled manual labor
position that performs in a
variety of adverse and
uncomfortable weather
conditions. Duties performed
include general parks /
grounds maintenance and
repair, including but not limited
to the following: picking up
trash, mowing, weed eating,
edging, blowing, trimming,
pressure washing, painting,
cleaning, and the inspection,
maintenance & repair of
facilities and equipment used.
Partial high school education
and one year work experience
in general grounds
maintenance, commercial
lawn maintenance or other
related experience required.
Must possess a valid Florida
Drivers License. Starting
salary is $8.10 / hour.
Retirement, health insurance,
paid holidays, annual & sick
benefits included. Interested
applicants are required to
submit a County application to
the Administrative Services
Department, 224 Pine
Avenue, Live Oak, FL 32064,
(386)362-6869. Deadline for
application is December 16,
2009 at 4:30 p.m. The
Suwannee County Board of
County Commissioners is an
equal employment opportunity
employer that does not
discriminate against any
qualified employee or
applicant because of race,
color, national origin, sex,
including pregnancy, age,
disability, or marital status.
Spanish speaking individuals
are encouraged to apply. All
applicants subject to pre-
employment physical.
Successful completion of a
drug test is a condition of
employment. EEO/AA/V/D



PUBLIC AUCTION
Trucks, Vehicles, Tractors,
Misc. Tools
Consignments Welcome
Sat., Dec. 19th at 9 a.m.
6 mi. West of 1-75 on US 90
Atkinson Realty & Auction
800-756-4098
www.atkinsononline.com T


.............Page 17


FirstDay.
SENIOR ACCOUNTANT II
The City of Live Oak is seeking
an experienced accountant. The
individual must be able to
reconcile and report, project
related transactions, cash, cash
applied to A/R, and bad debt
allowance on an annual basis.
This individual will act as month-
end support, assist in
preparation of monthly and year-
end reports, as well as help
develop written Finance
Department policies and
procedures. The individual must
be able to effectively handle
multiple projects simultaneously
in a deadline driven
environment. The successful
individual will have 4 to 6 years
of progressively responsible
experience in the accounting
field, with a thorough
understanding of GAAP
Governmental accounting
experience is a plus. A degree in
accounting is desired, with
intermediate to advanced
experience with Word, Excel,
and Outlook. Interested parties
should forward their resume' and
salary requirements to: City of
Live Oak, 101 White Ave. SE,
Live Oak, Florida 32064, Attn:
City Administrator. Posting open
until position filled.
FirstDay.
SERVICE TECHNICIAN
Needed for local Pest Control
Company. Route experience
preferred. Drug Free workplace
program. Excellent driving record
required. Retirement and
insurance benefits available.
Apply in person at Live Oak Pest
Control, Inc. 8:00am to 4:00pm
Monday thru Friday.

I FirstDay.


TECHNICAL SUPPORT
SPECIALIST
The Florida Sheriffs Youth
Ranches is seeking a
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
SPECIALIST to provide
support to department
operations and users of
computer systems within the
agency. The ideal candidate
should possess at least 2
years related experience.
Microsoft certifications are
preferred. Knowledge of
personal computers and user
support is required. For
further information regarding
salary and benefits contact
Blake Woolsey
bwoolsey@youthranches.org
at 386/842-5501.
EOE/Drug Free Work Place


Medical Directory


Advent Christian
Village
Current JOBS Line
Advertisement
call 386-658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net
24 hrs/day, 7 days/week
Want more than a Job?
Experience a Community.

Accounting A/R Clerk

FT; HSD or equivalent
required; AA degree or
certificate in accounting,
medical billing, or relevant
field strongly desired. Prior
experience in insurance billing
and ICD-9 coding, accounting,
PC operation with MS
applications, including word
processor, spreadsheet, and
database required. Must be
detail oriented.

CNA & LPN at
5-Star Nursing Home

FT/PT/long-term care setting.
Florida certification (CNA) or
unrestricted license (LPN)
required.

RN Quality of Care
Leader at 5-Star
Nursing Home

FT., Unrestricted Florida RN
license, excellent clinical
nursing/assessment skills,
current CPR certification,
verifiable IV skill (start,
regulate, maintain, discontinue
IVs) required. Good
communication,
organizational, and computer
skills required; must work as
part of interdisciplinary team
to assure outstanding qualify
of life/quality of care for LTC
residents. On-call rotation
required. management
/supervisory experience and
knowledge of LTC regs
desired.
FT positions include health,
dental, life, disability,
supplemental insurance; 403b
retirement account; paid time
off, access to onsite daycare
and fitness facilities. Apply in
person at Personnel Office
Monday through Friday from
9:00am until 4:00pm, or fax
resume/credentials to 386-
658-5160
EOE/Drug-Free
Workplace/Criminal
background checks required.


Job List
DRIVERS Immediate Need!
Regional & OTR positions
available Now! CDL-A w/Tanker
Req'd. Outstanding pay &
Benefits! Call a recruiter Today!
877-484-3042
www.oakleytransport.com


S '

I,,'


Don't miss an opportunity to be part of the exciting growth
and innovation in Internet advertising while working within an
established industry and a first class company.
Local advertisers are waking up to the potential of the Interet,
and CNHI is on the front lines. Help those advertisers learn where
they can grow as you build innovative advertising products and
marketing opportunities in our local markets.
Interet sales consultants will be responsible for Internet revenue
growth in their assigned region as well as working as a team to meet
overall company goals.
The ideal candidate will be motivated, organized, and possess a
strong work ethic. Must have solid written, oral, and interpersonal skills.


In the assigned region this position will be responsible for:
Growing and maintaining Internet advertiser base
Helping each property exceed Internet revenue goals
Training inside and outside sales reps on new
Interet initiatives
Training and monitoring of administration tools
Coordinating, preparing and leading sales training
Insuring timely roll out of new products
Reporting site traffic, advertising results and
sales to publishers, ad managers and supervisor
Regular reporting of project status to supervisor
Additional responsibilities as needed


If you possess these qualifications and are
ready to learn and embrace the new Internet
business environment send your resume to:

Mae Stokes
Vice President of Sales & Marketing
CNHI Mid-South Division
P.O. Box 968
Valdosta, GA 31603
a mmae.stokes@' gaflnews.com
(y .


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Deadlines for line ads
Publication Deadline
Wednesday..........Fri. at 10 a.m.
Friday ..................Wed. at 10 a.m.


...Page 4


Jobs Wanted
DO YOU NEED YOUR HOME
CLEANED or Pressure Washed,
or your yard cleaned up? Done
at a very reasonable rate. Call
Christine or Gary 386-792-1655
IN HOME COMFORT CARE:
Cert Nursing Assist, Quality
Asst for Post Surgery Care.
Loving Companionship & Health
Aid for Elder Care Day or Night.
386-658-2038

Lost & Found
FOUND HAIR BOWS AT
WOMANS CLUB BAZAAR, IN
BRANFORD. 386-935-6893 or
386-935-0119
FOUND READING GLASSES:
Found on Antelope Rd, Branford,
Hatch Bend Area. 386-935-3548
LOST BLACK CAR DOOR
OPENER ON TUES 11/17.
LAST PLACE USED
SUWANNEE CO HOSPITAL.
SMALL, SQUARE, 2/BUTTONS
386-362-2832
REWARD!! $1,000.00 For the
return of two 2009 KX 250F
Green Dirt Bikes taken from my
home the week of 11/23/209.
Please call 386-364-4942, 386-
916-9034 or 386-249-9896
VEHICLE KEYS FOUND: They
have been turned into Suwannee
Democrat. They were found on
185th Rd.

Auctions

FirstDay.
SUWANNEE COUNTY SHERIFF'S
OFFICE AUCTION
There will be a Sheriff's Office auction at
9:00 AM, Saturday, December 12, 2009.
The auction will be located in the field
across from the Suwannee County Jail at
305 Pine Avenue SW, Live Oak, FL. An
assortment of vehicles will be available
for sale.
For more information, please contact
John Mills at 386-362-2222.
12/4,9, 11
Special Notices





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Page 4


Calendar


Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING!! Do You
Earn $800 in a Day? 25 Local
Machines and Candy All For
$9,995. Call 1-888-753-3430
AIN#BO2000033 Call Us: We
Will Not Be Undersold!
Miscellaneous
SAMSUNG 19" COLOR T-V
EXCELLENT COND. W/
REMOTE MANUAL INCLUDED
$100.00, MAGNOVOX 25INCH
CONSOLE STEREO T-V WITH
REMOTE. EXC. COND,
BEAUTIFUL MAPLE CABINET
$150.00, SMALL COLOR
PORTABLE T-V OLDER MODEL
PANASONIC BUT WORKS
VERY GOOD. $35.00, APOLLO
PORTABLE DEHUMIDIFIER
SAVES ON A/C ELECTRIC
BILL. EXC. COND. $50.00,
TRAILOR HITCH MADE BY
HIDDEN HITCH 2002-2010
FORD ESCAPE, 2005-2010
MERCURY MARINER AND
MAZDA TRIBUTE, RUNNING
LIGHT HOOK UP EXC. COND.
$100.00 CALL 362-4713 LEAVE
MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER
YAMAHA DT EXPRESS IV SP
ELECTRONIC DRUM SET:
upgrade version 2 cymbals &
extra 13" crash/splash cymbal,
Hi hat stand, bass drum pedal.
$800 firm. BLU-RAY DISC
PLAYER-MODEL BD390. Brand
new/still in box. Will sell for $250
Call 386-364-2896 or Ask for
Marlene 904-885-9685

Vocational

Want to be a CNA?
Don't want to wait?
Express Training
is now offering our quality
Exam Prep Classes in Lake
City. Class sizes limited.
Next class 03/16/2009.
Call 386-755-4401
expresstraining
services.com

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train
for high paying Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial
aid if qualified, Housing
available. Call Aviation Institute
of Maintenance (888) 349-5387
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Accounting, *Criminal Justice.
Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call 800-443-
5186 www.CenturaOnline.com
AVIATION MAINTENANCE /
AVIONICS Graduate in 14
Months. FAA Approved;
financial aid if qualified. Job
placement assistance. Call
National Aviation Academy
Today! 1-800-659-2080 or
NAA.edu


7E


529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389,
Evening 362-2990
1.


(1) Horse Farm: 55 acres with a 4
bedroom, 3 bath CH&AC home with
fireplace cont. approx. 5000 sq. feet
under roof with an 18 stall horse barn
with office and bath cont. approx.
5000 sq. ft. under roof. The property
has 4 fenced paddocks with room for
expansion. Call for more information.
Just listed $600,000.
(2) Off CR 49 5 acres in grass with
scattered trees, fenced on 3 sides with
survey. Only $4,900 per acre.
(3) 161st Rd: 9.82 acres partially
wooded with a 4BR/3-1/2 bath
CH&AC home with fireplace cont.
approx 2400 sq.t. heated area,
10'x30' storage. Good buy @
$265,000.
(4) Off CR136: 5 acre partially
wooded some grass. Will work for
land home package. Reduced to
$39,900.
(5) CR 51 & Pinewood St.: 2.29
Acres, city water and sewer, zoned
office. Good location $192,500.
(6) Off CR 349: 10 acre wooded
tract with a two bedroom CH/AC log
home in excellent condition cont.
approx. 1200 sq. ft. under roof,
30'x40' pole barn. Reduced to
$175,000.
(7) Suwannee River: 2.34 acre
wood n f rnford on
o nt 9 he river,
well, s 3 x38 cook
shed, 12x24 canopy, 12'x16' storage.
Good buy @ $79,900.
(8) Industrial Park: 1.13 acre corner
tract good exposure. Reduced to
$34,500.
(9) 40 acres with 835 ft. on paved
road in 13 year old planted pines.
Priced to sell at REDUCED TO
$179,600.
(10) Near City: 2 ac. with 3/2 home
cont. approx. 1280 sq. ft. under roof,
kitchen furnished, carport.
REDUCED TO $49,000.
(11) Luraville Area: Fly-in
Community 15 acre wooded large
trees, good county road. Priced to sell
reduced to $74,900.
(12) Suwannee River: Two acres
wooded river lot off CR 349 near
Royal Springs and Boat Ramp. 100
sq. ft. on the water. (Buildable) good
buy @ $55,000.
(13) Off Mitchell Rd.: 20 acres
wooded with survey on 199th Rd.
$89,900.
(14) Off CR 136 East: 40 acre tract
partially wooded, some grass small
pond, fenced. Good area.
REDUCED TO $149,000.


(15) Hamilton Co.: 10 acres on CR751
and the river approx. 1300 ft. on the
water and approx. 1300 ft. on paved
road. Priced to sell at REDUCED
TO $79,900.
(16) Madison Co.: 40 acres in 16 year
old slash planted pines off CR 255
good elevation. Good buy at $175,000.
(17) Helvenston St.: 4 lots with a 4/3
CH/AC 1-1/2 story brick/frame home
cont. approx 3,200 sq. ft. under roof.
Kitchen furnished, fireplace, corner
lots, plus 1 bedroom, guest house
cont. approx. 550 sq. ft. Priced to sell
@ $170,000.
(18) Suwannee River home: nice two
bedroom two story CH&AC home
South of Branford, kitchen furnished,
beautiful view of river from rear,
screen porch. Good area.
REDUCED TO $189,900.
(19) Farms of 10 Mill Hollow: 4 acres
in grass/cropland with scattered trees.
$32,500.
(20) Near City: Off US 90 East 5 acres
wooded near golf course. Good buy @
$44,900.
(21) 190th St.: 10 acres in planted
pines approx. 15 years old, with a 3/1
CH/AC SWMH, 2 car carport/shop.
Priced to sell @ $49,000.
(22) 208 Houston: 3/5 BR, 1-1/2 BA
frame home cont. approx. 2,000 sq. ft.
under roof. Zoned R/O, has potential.
Priced to sell @ $59,500.
(23) 16th St.: 3 ac. with a 3BR/2BA
CH&AC brick home with fireplace,
cont. approx. 2,780 sq. ft. under roof.
Kitchen furnished, survey. Good Buy
@ $172,500.
(24) Keaton Beach: Deep Water Canal
lot near public boat ramp, sewer &
water. Good buy @ $125,000.
(25) 169th Rd.: 5 ac. in grass with a
3/2 CH/AC DWMH cont. approx.
1,850 sq. ft. under roof in excellent
cond. 2 car detached garage. Good
area. $124,900.
(26) Off 16th St.: 2 100x530 river lots
with MH (needs some R&R), well,
septic and storage building. Lot has
large hickory white oak magnolia.
Well above the flood elevation.
$79,900 for the pair.
(27) 193rd Rd.: 6.59 acres wooded on
paved road. Good area. Good buy @
$37,500.
(28) Hamilton County: 40 acre
wooded on county road. Good
hunting area that adjoins SRWMD.
$149,500.
(29) 410 Dexter St.: 2/2 CH/AC brick
home with pool, approx. 2000 sq. ft.
under roof, kitchen furnished. Priced
to sell $142,000. 535418-F


Contact us
classads@ gaflnews.com

FAX
386-364-5578


Phone
386-362-1734
800-525-4182


HOURS
Monday-Friday
8 a.m. 5 p.m.






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Inen'et Sl "C o "nut-
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Internet Sales Consultant


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North Flrida 0


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PAGE ^^^^^^^^ N rt 6IDFlorida 6 E02C F R A W A C S G H ASG







CIassified


HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA!
Fast Affordable & Accredited
Free Brochure. Call Now! 1-
800-532-6546 ext. 16
www.continentalacademy.com
NEED YOUR HIGH SCHOOL
DIPLOMA? Finish from home
Fast for $399! Nationally
accredited. EZ pay. Free
brochure.
www.diplomaathome.com Call
800-470-4723

LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072.
M-F from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Pets for Sale
CHRISTMAS SNOW DOGS:
HIGH BRED HUSKY PUPPIES:
2-weeks old, Will have shots,
worming, Well Puppy Cert. $350
ea 3-Females 4-Males. Must
see to appreciate, Mother/Father
on premises. 386-776-1966


FirstDay.
POMERANIAN PUPPIES, AKC
registered. $400. Call 386-935-
2642.

Building Materials
MOBILE HOME ROOF
EXPERTS 100% Financing,
Free Estimates We Finance
Almost Everyone Reroof,
Repairs, 40yrs Experience
Home Improvement Services
Toll-FREE 1-877-845-6660
State Certified
(Lic.#CCC058227)


NFCC Artist

Series presents
The

Nutcracker
on Saturday

Page 17


BUSINESSES


C" CD "Ar
FOR
RENT
RentalAssistance
1, 2, 3, & 4 BRHC & Non-
HC Accessible artments

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY 711
Equal Housing Opportunity


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living
2 bedroom duplex.
Call 362-3110.
501033-F


LUMBER LIQUIDATORS
Hardwood Flooring, from $
.99/Sq.Ft. Exotics, Oak,
Bamboo, Prefinished &
Unfinished. Bellawood w/50
year prefinish, plus A Lot More!
We Deliver Anywhere, 5 Florida
Locations, 1-800-FLOORING (1-
800-356-6746)
METAL ROOFING & STEEL
BUILDINGS. Save $$$ buy
direct from manufacturer. 20
colors in stock with trim & access.
4 profiles in 26 ga. panels.
Carports, horse barns, shop
ports. Completely turn key jobs.
All Steel Buildings, Gibsonton,
Florida. 1-800-331-8341.
www.allsteel-buildings.com.
METAL ROOFING TAX
CREDIT! 40 yr Warranty.
Direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock Quick
turnaround. Delivery available.
Gulf Coast Supply &
Manufacturing, 1-888-393-0335
www.gulfcoastsupply.com


SERVICES


Rental assistance may be available!
HUD Vouchers Welcomel
1, 2 & 3 BR HC & Non-HC
Accessible Apartments
705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housing Opportumty


Miscellaneous
DISH NETWORK $19.99/mo,
Why Pay More For TV? 100+
Channels. FREE 4-Room Install.
FREE HD-DVR. Plus $650 Sign-
up BONUS. Call Now! 1-866-
573-3640
FREE GPS! FREE PRINTER!
FREE MP3! With Purchase of
New computer. Payments
Starting at Only $29.99/week. No
Credit Check! Call GCF Today.
1-877-212-9978
GET DISH WITH FREE
INSTALLATION $19.99/mo
HBO & Showtime Free Over 50
HD Channels Free Lowest
Prices No Equipment to Buy!
Call Now for full Details 877-
238-8408
GET DISH WITH FREE
INSTALLATION $19.99/mo
HBO & Showtime Free Over 50
HD Channels Free Lowest
Prices No Equipment to Buy!
Call Now for full Details 877-
242-0978












80-2548


I'


PROFLOWERS Christmas
Decor and Holiday Flowers &
Other Gifts starting at $19.99.
Go To www.proflowers.com/Elf to
get an EXTRA 15% OFF Or Call
1-877-697-7697!
SMOKE HEALTH-E
CIGARETTES. Kick The Habit
But Still "Smoke." Nicotine Free,
Looks & Feels Like A Real
Cigarette. Complete Kit, Only
$49.99 Go To
WWW.PTVDEALS.COM/167
SWIM SPA Loaded, new. List
$18,000, sacrifice $8,995.
HOTTUB, deluxe, lounger, seats
5. Retail $4,995, Buy Now
$2,195. Call 727-851-3217
YOU'RE FAMILY'S BEST
BENEFIT...SAFETY! Let ADT
help protect your family and get
$100 Visa Gift Card! Hurry, offer
ends soon. Call Now! 1-866-265-
4139

Garage/Yard Sales
SIX FAMILY YARD SALE 12/11
& 12 8 TIL 4 Lots of Household
items, books, clothes, shoes,
baby items. 2 miles past Publix
on 129 South. Gray house with
Red Roof.

Boats/Supplies
BOATS; 1000's of boats for sale
www.floridamariner.com
reaching 6 million homes weekly
throughout Florida. 800-388-
9307, tide charts, broker profiles,
fishing captains, dockside dining
and more.
Apartments for Rent
FirstDay.
APARTMENT 1Bd/1Ba on Pine
Ave. $400/mo. 386-590-3926

.I2
EtUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE
All real estate advertising in
this newspaper is subject to the
Fair Housing Act which makes it
illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability,
familial status or national origin,
or an intention, to make any
such preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age
of 18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women
and people securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in
violation of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimination call
HUD toll-free 1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free number for the
hearing impaired is 1-800-927-
9275.

Houses for Rent
FirstDay.
1102 PINE AVE. 4Bd/2Ba CHA,
in Live Oak close to schools &
shopping. $750/mo, $500
Deposit 352-493-3487 or 386-
963-2032
BRICK HOUSE 3BD/2BA Close
to Town. $700 mo, 1st last &
Security. Call 386-362-6556
FirstDay.
HOUSE 3Bd/1Ba 816 Longleaf
Dr. $650/mo $400 Deposit. Close
to all schools in Live Oak. 386-
688-2869








"If you can't live at home,
this is the next best place
to live! Everyone here
is so good to the residents."


When you or your loved one need
assistance with the tasks of daily
living, consider Dacier Manor
Assisted Living Facility (ALF
#7641). Our loving, qualified staff
is on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week. And our secure, comforting
atmosphere allows our residents
to maintain the highest level of
self-care. Our residents enjoy
a variety of activities and a
supportive environment.
Call us today for more information
or to schedule a free tour.
(386) 658-5552

ADVENTCHRISTIANVILnGE
-- AT OWLING PA --
PO Box 4551 DOWLING PARK, FL 3z264
(386) 658-5552 1-800-955-8771 TTY
1-800-647-3353 '.
www.acvillage.net
563932-F


FirstDay.
TWO HOUSES 1-2Bd/1Ba
ALSO 1-CHARMING 1 BIG
Bd/1Ba. Lots of closets 1 mile
from Live Oak. NO PETS
$600/mo, 1st, Last & $300 Dep.
Includes Water /Sewerage/ Lawn
Maint. 386-362-3002.

Mobile Homes for Rent
FirstDay.
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba in the country,
6 miles from Live Oak off 129
S. 4 Acrer, No Pets, Non-Smoker
$675/mo $1000 Deposit. 407-
709-0355
FirstDay.
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba, New Carpet &
Paint, kids/pets/horses all
possible. Live Oak, Nobles Ferry
/Stagecoach Rd. area. Available
now. $650/mo 1st, last, security.
386-842-2006
FirstDay.
SWMH 2Bd/2Ba w/Jacuzzi.
Located in Suwannee River
Mobile Estates. $450 mo $300
Dep. NO PETS 386-842-5566

Office Space for Rent
FirstDay.
SPACE FOR LEASE IN LAKE
CITY
Marion Cr. 1118-2236sf @ $13/sf
Campbell St. 1260sf @ $14/sf
Warehse space 1247sf $750/mo
www.ScottDStewart.com
386-867-3498 Westfield Realty
Grp
Homes for Sale
FirstDay.
RECENTLY FORECLOSED:
Special Financing Available, Any
Credit, Any Income 2BD, 1BTH,
672SqFt, located at, 24432 69th
Rd., O'brien, $84,900. Visit
www.roselandco.com/8BP,
Drive by then call (866) 249-0680.

Mobile Homes for Sale
DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE
HOME, 1998 model, 4 acres, 3
bedrooms, 2 full baths. New
carpet! Only one owner!
$90,000. Call Billie Vincent 386-
688-0470.
OWNER FINANCE MAYO
AREA: 3Bd/2Ba on 2.5 Acres,
Private River Access. Workshop.
Small down $675 mo. 386-590-
0642 or 386-867-1833
FirstDay.
"REPO MAN" Just received (5)
Bank Repo Mobile Homes. SW &
DW, Call Mr Mott for list.
(386)752-1452
NEW 5Bd/2Ba DWMH $54,319.
You pick all colors, Call Rick
(386)752-8196
2010 4Bd/2Ba DWMH $39,995.
Includes delivery, set-up, CHA,
Skirting & Steps within 60 miles
of Lake City, FL Call Rick
(386)752-8196
Vacation Property
LAND SALE NOTICE:
VIRGINIA MTNS Closeout Sale!
2.5 acres with pond near stocked
trout stream, near state park,
$29,500, must sell. Bank
financing. 1-866-789-8535
NORTH CAROLINA Holiday in
the mountains. Make your
family memories today; even the
family pet is welcome! Call
Foscoe Rentals 1-800-723-7341
book online
www.foscoerentals.com
Lots
FOR SALE BY OWNER
W/FINANCEING. 4 Acres on
202nd St in O'Brien. Co
maintained Road, Lots of nice
trees. $19,000 386-935-2301
Acreage

PRICE REDUCED
Lafayette County
10ac, Hwy 51 N. of Mayo,
near river, $64,900
1 ac RV/Mobile home lots,
Branford area, $15,000
Suwannee County
5 ac, Park like,
near airport, $49,900
Easy Financing
1-941-778/7980or7565
www.landcallnow.com







You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
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through our Internet
and Newspaper
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and throughout
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Call Nancy at

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499651-F


GRADY'S"Tn
Layaway for christmas! WFG-47MPR Kids Pocket Bike
Kids 4 wheelers and bikes S 05
WF492-Q 49cc s
Kids 4-Wheeler L I_ _


I


PAGE 6, DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA










MTPNoNLNOA AND UTHORADE


Continued From Page 4
first Thursday is the first day of the month, then the
meeting will be on the following Thursday. Each meet-
ing has a guest speaker or there will be current issues
brought up for discussion. All are welcome to attend.
For more information, call Chairman Carl Meece, 386-
776-1444.
Terry Rauch, candidate for Dist. 11 Florida House seat,
will be guest speaker on Dec. 3.

Branford TOPS meeting
changes locations
We now meet every Tuesday at L & M Scrapbooking lo-
cated at 105 SW Suwannee Ave. in Branford.
Weigh-in begins at 4:30 p.m. Meeting starts at 5.
For more information please contact Donna Hardin at
386-590-2333.
"Take Off Pounds Sensibly."

SREC seeking

location in Branford
Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc., a non-profit
organization is seeking a location in the Branford area
that could be used to serve meals to persons 60 years of
age or older.
Any business, organization or church that has space
available and would be interested in assisting in this
much needed service to the elderly population of Bran-
ford, should contact Bruce Evans, Senior Center Director,
at 362-1164 or Janis Owen, Director of Client Services,
at 362-4115, ext. 240.

Toys for Kids+
'We really need your help'
By Roger L. Burnside
Toys for Kids+ really needs your help. Christmas is a
time of joy and celebration; unfortunately there are many
children in the Branford area that will be missing the joy
of receiving Christmas presents. We are in need of toys,
clothes and in some cases, food for these children.
With the economy the way it is right now we are
experiencing more requests than in past years. No
donation is too small, if you can just provide one toy, a
box of food, a winter coat or shoes it will be greatly
appreciated.
Anyone interested in helping us with this project can
take their donations to the Branford Health Department.
You may also call Karen at the Branford Health
Department at 386-935-1133 or Roger Burnside at 386-
935-3343. Should you know of a child in need you may
also call these numbers.
Over the years the folks in the Branford area have
brought a lot of joy to the area's children and their
families, for this we thank each and every one of you. The
smiles and appreciation the children express each year
make this project a blessing to all.

Love a mystery?
Try locating your ancestors by working on your family
tree. The Suwannee Valley Gcinic-.il;, Society invites
you to join and learn how to find your ancestors.
Membership is $30 for a single member or $35 for a
family. Corporate membership is also available for
donations of $100 or more (tax deductible). Meetings are
held on the first Thursday of each month at 7:00 PM at
the Gcle.,li .: Center at 215 Wilbur Street SW in Live
Oak. The library is open on Tuesday and Thursday from
9 a.m. until 5 p.m. and the talented folks there will be
glad to help. For more information call Jinnie or Alice at
386-330-0110.

The Santa Shop needs

your help
It is time to start planning for the Santa Shop. Last
year, with a community effort, the Santa Shop provided
gifts to more than 200 students in the Students in
Transition program at Suwannee County Schools. All the
leftover donations, toys and gifts were donated to
Sparky's Toy Drive.

Coast 0to Cost.
Around the Corner


The need in our community is growing, so the Santa
Shop is growing, too.
This year, we plan to provide toys & gifts for the
Suwannee County Schools Students in Transition
(approximately 180 students at this time), children at
Guardian Ad Litem (280 children), and all the leftovers
will be given to Sparky's Toy Drive at the Live Oak Fire
Department (Sparky's usually provides gifts for
approximately 400 children).
We need toys and gifts for school-age children (4 to 18
years).
With all of us pulling together, we can meet the needs
of MANY children in Suwannee County!
Please talk to your clubs, businesses, churches, etc. to
get involved!
For more information please contact Lisa Garrison at
386-647-4623, Debra Ross at 386-647-4628, Tammie
Williams at 386-364-7720 or Missy Norris at 386-364-
3789.


TOPS is here for you
Anyone interested in learning more about nutrition,
portion control, and exercise while having fun is cor-
dially invited to come join our TOPS group. TOPS is
nonprofit, noncommercial and affordable. TOPS# FL.
662 meets weekly on Thursday mornings at the First
Advent Christian Church in Live Oak.
We start our weigh in at 8 a.m., and the meeting be-
gins at 9 a.m. 10.
For more information please call Elaine at (386)
364-5537. We all make New Year's resolutions about
watching our weight. If you are in need of a good sup-
port system to help you, make your New Year's resolu-
tion come true, please come join us for informative
programs and fun. Hope to see you soon.


Seasonalflu vaccines available
to eligible veterans
Through Jan. 29
In an effort to reduce the impact of the seasonal flu and
connected illness, enrolled/eligible veterans may obtain a
seasonal flu vaccination through Jan. 29 at the Lake City
VA Medical Center.
This is an especially challenging influenza season this
year. Many people suffer severe consequences from the
flu. It is very important for every veteran to get his or
her flu shot. The flu shot is the only measure of protec-
tion from the influenza virus.


SHS SAC meeting postponed
Postponed to Dec. 10
The Suwannee High School SAC meeting that was
scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 12, has been postponed to
Thursday, Dec. 10, due to conflicts in the SHS calendar.

Live Oak Artist Guild invites
you to our Annual Holiday
Celebration
Dec. 11
The Live Oak Artists Guild invites you to our Annual
Holiday Celebration December 11, 2009 1-8 p.m. Meet
the artists from 5-8 p.m.
Browse our Holiday Gift Shop, sample our artists fa-
vorite festive treats. Enjoy inspirational and unique art
works.
There will be live holiday music and Enchanted
Christmas tree forest.

Mrs. Vickers' class yard sale
Dec. 12
Mrs. Vickers' class is taking donations for their
upcoming yard sale on Saturday Dec. 12. Pickups are
available. For more information please call 647-4047 or
344-2993.

Yee Haw Country

Christmas
Dec. 18
The Live Oak Christian Church is presenting a unique
Christmas program on December 18. With music, fun
and laughter, we will see the birth of Jesus through a spe-
cial kind of country humor. The program will begin at 7
p.m.
The church is located at 1015 Ohio Avenue North. For
more information call the church at 362-1015 or check
our web page at liveoakchristian.org.

Suwannee High Class of 1980
The Suwannee High Class of 1980 is planning their 30
year class reunion. If you were a member, had a child,
sibling or relative as part of the graduating class, please
email your name (maiden and married), address, phone
number and email address to shsclassl980@yahoo.com.
Or call 386-362-6309 to leave a message.
We look forward to hearing from you and seeing you
at the reunion.


I /j^^^^^ I


.. -^WE ARE THE MANUFACTURER


METAL ROOFING
STATE OF FLORIDA APPROVED
Residential. Commercial. Agricultural

AGRI.METAL SUPPLY, INC.
Phone: 38-294-1720 Fax: 386-294-1724
232 SE Industrial Park Cir. Mayo, FL


S-3L TSIJIAMNNEE
HARDWARE & FEED
We carry Central State Brand Feeds for dogs,
horses, goats, rabbits, hogs, chickens, wild game,
birds & fish, as well as all purpose feeds
Hay & Pinestraw Available
16660 Spring St., White Springs
386-397-2551
Under the new ownership of
DnnM &felest IA/i snn


WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS
PUMP & WELL REPAIRS
SCOTT TAYLOR
TEL. 407-719-3726
LIVE OAK FLORIDA SERVING NORTH FLORIDA


I TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 386-362-1734
DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M. I


Affordable Seamless Gutters
"Satisfaction Guaranteed"
Specializing In:
Seamless Gutters Carl Kirk
Soffit & Fasia 386-776-1835
Gutter Guard Cell
SScreen
Enclosures and Repair 386-209-2740
Residential & Commercial Licensed & Insured
FREE ESTIMATES FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED


S LIVE OAK

MINI STORAGE
* 5x15 5x20 10x15 10x20
CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE
5x5 5x10 10x10 10x20
Units located on Gold Kist Road
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-6626


E-LIMB-INATORS, INC.
) Complete Tree Service
Licensed & Insured

Owners:
Keith & Glenda Hudson
9351 220thStreet
O'Brien,FL 32071
Phone 386-935-1993
Fax 386-935-3321


O


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~sr


DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009, PAGE 7


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


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PAGE 8, DECEMBER 9 & 10,2009 U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


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Copyrighted Material



SSyndicate Content


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from Commercial News Providers


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-




NFCC instructor is Pushcart Prize nominee

Under consideration for prestigious poetry award


Tolu Jegede Photo: Submitted


Announcements

Advertise in Over 100 Papers
throughout Florida.
Advertising Networks of
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Building Supplies

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Cars for Sale

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Financial Services

BIG PLANS Being Held up
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chris @ yourcashout.com

For Sale

Get Dish -FREE Installation-
$19.99/mo HBO &


MADISON North Florida Community College Eng-
lish Instructor Tolu Jegede of Tallahassee is a nominee to
have his poetry included in the prestigious Pushcart Prize
- Best of the Small Presses series. Jegede's poem The
Country of Beaten Things was nominated by Mythium:
The Journal of Contemporary Literature and Cultural
Voices to be included in the upcoming Pushcart Prize
edition. Published annually since 1976, the Pushcart
Prize is one of the most honored literary projects in
America; hundreds of presses and thousands of writers of
short stories,
poetry and es-
says have been O
represented in
the publication. FIid a
"I am grate-
ful, flattered Flo a C
and humbled Z
by it all," said
Jegede.
Jegede was
one of six nom- O
inees chosen by O
Mythium, I
which is locat- r
ed in Lexing-
ton, Ky. Jegede r


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*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Accounting,
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placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial
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AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
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Real Estate

LAND OR
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RV's/Mobile Homes

PUBLIC AUCTION 150+
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ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA

Classified I Display | Ma o Daily

I




Week of Dec. 7, 2009
499626-F


and other nominees are featured on Mythium's home
page at www.mythiumlitmag.com.
The Pushcart Prize was named among the most influ-
ential projects in the history of American publishing by
Publishers Weekly; winner of the 2005 National Book
Critics Circle Lifetime Achievement Award; A New York
Times Book Review notable book of the year; was
awarded the Poets & Writers / Barnes & Noble "Writers
for Writers" prize; and described as "must reading for
anyone interested in the present and future of America's
arts and letters" by Kirkus Reviews. For more informa-
tion on the Pushcart Prize, visit www.pushcartprize.com.



Wild Adventures

schedules 20 concerts

for 2010 season
VALDOSTA Wild Adventures Water & Theme
Park promises to deliver a year of unforgettable
concerts in 2010 with 20 performances. Diverse
and popular acts are included in the line-up from
country, Christian, rock, Gospel, R&B, and pop
genres. More concerts will be announced soon to
create a concert season not to be missed.

2010 Concert Schedule (as of November 20)*

Mar. 20 George Thorogood
& Los Lonely Boys
Mar. 27 Lynyrd Skynyrd
Apr. 10 Jeremy Camp
Apr. 17 REO Speedwagon & STYX
May Backstreet Boys (date to be confirmed)
May 15 Chicago
May 29 David Crowder Band
June 12 Steven Curtis Chapman
June 19 Tye Tribbett & Kirk Franklin
June 26 Billy Ray Cyrus
July Great American Country Network -
Emerging Artist Showcase
(date to be confirmed)
July 10 Rodney Atkins
July 24 Frankie Beverly with Maze
Aug. 28 CMA Award Winning Trio TBA
Sept. 25 Third Day

General admission to all of the 2010 concerts is
free with park admission or a 2010 Season Pass.
EZ Pay online payment plan makes it easier to
purchase a season pass in monthly installments to
enjoy all that Wild Adventures has to offer in
2010. EZ Pay is available through December 31,
2009.
In addition to general concert admission, the
park also offers reserved seating for an additional
cost. Reserved seating for each announced con-
cert, with the exception of the major country trio,
will go on sale January 15, 2010 and will be avail-
able for purchase online, by phone or at the park.
General concert seating is included in park admis-
sion; reserved seating is an additional cost to park
admission.
*All performers and dates are subject to change
due to circumstances beyond the park's control.


Mobile
Homes
and

Land for
sale.
Financed

by owner.

386-362-2720


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For Scial Seuity
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PAGE 8, DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009


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U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009, PAGE 9


Back by popular demand, We Need A Little Christmas is an entertaining song and dance performance featuring all of the favorite songs of the season. Front row, from left: Tim Oli-
var, Renita James, Caleb Spivey. Back row, from left: Carla Olivar, Charles Billingslea, Kamie Sullivan. Courtesy photo


Christmas


comes alive


at Wild


Adventures


Valdosta Family is at the heart of the holidays and
the heart of Wild Adventures Water and Theme Park
this Christmas season. Together, families can experi-
ence the true holiday spirit with The Miracle of
Christmas, an inspiring living nativity performance.
The moving show features memorable Christmas
songs to tell the true meaning of Christmas, such as
"O Holy Night," "Silent Night" and "Joy to the
World." In addition, the Christmas review, We Need
a Little Christmas, is back by popular demand to en-
tertain families with a classic song and dance holiday
performance.
It would not be the holidays without a visit from
the jolly man himself, Santa Claus. Guests can visit
with the man in the red suit and share their holiday
wish list with him. His elves will be nearby to the
capture the moment in a picture.
To make the merriment even more budget-friendly,
Wild Adventures recently introduced an EZ Pay On-
line Payment option for purchasing 2010 Season
Passes. Wild Adventures EZ Pay is only available


online and gives guests the option to pay for season
passes with automatic monthly payments. More in-
formation on Wild Adventures' EZ Pay is available at
wildadventures.com/ezpay.
2010 Season Pass benefits include unlimited park
admission through January 1, 2011, admission to
Splash Island Water Park (season opening April 10),
general concert seating for all 20 concerts, Bring-A-
Friend days throughout the year, admission to park
festivals, such as Kidzpalooza and Kid-o-Ween. Sea-
son pass holders will also receive admission to spe-
cial pass holder only events, and 50% off admission
to other Herschend Family Entertainment properties
and more!
Families can skip the shopping hustle and bustle to
enjoy the park's rides, shows, animals and lights.
Open select dates until January 2, 2010, the park's
thrill rides will be operating all season long. The thrill
rides, animals, and shows at Wild Adventures give
families more than enough reasons to stay close to
home to celebrate the holidays.


Businesses from A to Z


TO & TRUCK
SPECIALIST

B&B
920 E. Main, Mayo
Sammy Buchanan
Mon-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
386-294-2761
557496-F


Get Ready For
The Winter Also
Gutter Cleaning
386-288-6212
557495-F

immigration
Green Card;
Spouse/Family K Visa;
Student F Visa; Worker
HB Visa; Investor E Visa;
Change of Status
386-362-2030
www.fjslawcenter.com
557491 -F


Snique
Gifts

Chestsand Boxe
chestsandboxes.com
Quality items for
unique gifts6162


Printing Copying
lueprints
Suwannee
1 graphics
621 Ohio Ave. North
Live Oak
386-362-1848
557487-F

Daddy's
Gun Shop
Buy Sell Trade
Come To Daddy's,
We'll Take Care of You!
386-294-1532


John's
Painting LLC
Residential &
Commercial
386-688-3000
557845-F

PLUMBER
Live Oak
Plumbing, Inc.
Repairs/Remodel
New Construction
State Lic. #CFC1427438
386-362-1767
557492-F


CHOOSE YOUR LETTER!
PUBLISHES EVERY WEDNESDAY!
$5.00 PER WEEK
CALL JANICE GANOTE 386-362-1734


EXCELLENT
DEAL
ONLY $5.00
A WEEK


Buy this
space *5.00
per week


FANTASTIC
PRICES
This space
*5.00


Ready

Set

BUY!

X Marks
The Spot!

Place Your
Ad Here!!


-GREAT
DEAL!!
*5.00 a
week


UWANNEE
RIVER VALLEY
WINERY
Home Wine Making
Supplies and Classes
386-216-3362557493-F

OU CAN
SUCCEED
WITH THIS AD!
CALL TODAY!
$5.00 PER
WEEK


ZOWIE
*5.00 a
week
CALL
TODAY!


DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009, PAGE 9


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Classifieds As Individual AsYoK


a . .- r. .....


It's fast, easy, convenient, and always available!
To create your customized classified ad visit
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And click on "Buy a Classified"


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I Your Ad]






U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009, PAGE 11


Festival of Lights comes to




Stephen Foster State Park


Holiday celebration features more than two million lights


WHITE SPRINGS The Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park will host the Festival
of Lights, displaying more than two million
lights throughout the park, Dec. 12-31. The
park lights will be on display each evening until
9 p.m.
Visitors can enjoy the holiday sights and
sounds as they drive through the park to see
unique holiday light displays, including the ma-
jestic oak trees adorned with thousands of
lights, an antebellum museum dressed in full
holiday splendor, and a gingerbread village lo-
cated at the gift shop and craft square. The cen-
terpiece of the park's light display is the Caril-
lon Tower that illuminates the night sky stand-
ing more than 200 feet tall dressed from head to
toe in lights as holiday music rings from its
bells. The Gift shop will be open each evening
until 9:00 p.m. and will provide complimentary
refreshments, as well as a bonfire and marsh-
mallow roast. Park Entrance Fees for the
evening event are $2 per person.
To celebrate the park's light display, a special
kickoff event, hosted in conjunction with the
town of White Springs, will take place from 9
a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 12.
The day's activities will begin with a break-
fast hosted by Santa Claus. Tickets for the
breakfast are available from White Springs
Town Hall or the White Springs Library. A chil-
dren's ornament-making workshop will be held
from 11:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. at the Nature
and Heritage Tourism Center, and the Town of
White Springs' Christmas Parade down Main
Street will start at 5:30 p.m., and will culminate
at Stephen Foster State Folk Culture Center
State Park, with free hot dogs, cookies and an
evening concert at the park's carillon tower.
Special one-day sales, door prizes and holiday
treats will also be available at the park's Craft
Square and Gift Shop.
Regular park admission fees are waived for
this event, but a donation of canned goods or a
new toy is requested.
The Festival of Lights is sponsored by the
town of White Springs and its special events
committee, the Stephen Foster Citizens Support
Organization and numerous local individuals
and businesses.
For more information, visit www.FloridaS-
tateParks.org/StephenFoster.


The gift shop illuminated. Courtesy photos


I ne parK entrance.


Uarillon tower, full moon in tne DacKgrouna.


! s f viw


By Czerne M. Reid
A virus that in nature infects only rabbits could be-
come a cancer-fighting tool for humans. Myxoma virus
kills cancerous blood-precursor cells in human bone
marrow while sparing normal blood stem cells, a multi-
disciplinary team at the University of Florida College
of Medicine has found. The findings are now online
and will appear in an upcoming issue of the journal
Leukemia.
The discovery could help make more cancer patients
eligible for bone marrow self-transplant therapy and re-
duce disease relapse rates after transplantation.
"This is a new strategy to remove cancer cells before
the transplant," said virologist Grant McFadden, Ph.D.,
senior author of the paper and a member of the UF Ge-
netics Institute. "This is the first time anyone has
shown in a living animal that a virus can distinguish
normal bone marrow stem cells from cancerous stem
cells."
The major therapeutic applications will likely be for
blood cancers such as leukemia, lymphoma and bone
marrow cancers, the researchers say.
In mouse studies, myxoma virus was used to purge
cancerous cells from leukemia patient bone marrow
samples before they were infused into the test animals.
The technique was effective against an aggressive form
of leukemia that is resistant to conventional chemother-
apy.


Microorganisms have been used to fight cancer be-
fore. More than 100 years ago, physicians treating pa-
tients who had bone and head and neck cancers used
mixtures of bacteria to jumpstart the immune system,
which also happened to attack the cancer. While the
approach helped some people it sometimes also caused
harm.
Today, patients who have certain types of cancer
such as acute myelogenous leukemia are usually treat-
ed with using high doses of chemotherapy. But that can


destroy the patient's own immune system unless he or
she receives a transplant of blood stem cells, which can
be from the patient's own marrow samples or from a
donor.
Although reinfusion of a patient's own bone marrow
stem cells is generally safer in the short run, those pa-
tients are at high risk of dying from return of disease
because of leukemia contaminating the infused bone


SEE UF SCIENTISTS, PAGE 14


UF scientists use virus to


kill cancer cells while


leaving normal cells intact


DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009, PAGE 11


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Beatles tribute band, The Imposters. Courtesy photo


New Year's Eve


celebration


set for Bo


Diddley Plaza



The Imposters play a full range of
Beatles music from the popular hits of
the early heydays, through the
experimental era of "Revolver" and
"Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club
Band," to the final rooftop appearance
and "Abbey Road."


GAINESVILLE The Gainesville Department of
Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs will host
Downtown Countdown, a New Year's Eve celebra-
tion concert at the Bo Diddley Community Plaza.
Headlining the concert will be the Beatles tribute
band, The Imposters. In addition to drawing large
crowds for their appearances at the "Free Fridays"
concert series, The Imposters are the root band for
the annual All American Song Fest Fourth of July
celebration. The band began in 1999 as a two-piece
Beatles, Lennon and McCartney tribute. It has now
grown to a seven-piece group comprised of some of
the areas most popular musicians. Band members
include Mike Boulware, Don David, Michael Derry,
Mark Loveland, Mick Marino, Rob Rothschild and
Ron Thomas. Sitting in for Rothschild on the drums
will be Larry Thompson. The Imposters play a full
range of Beatles music from the popular hits of the
early heydays, through the experimental era of "Re-
volver" and "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club
Band," to the final rooftop appearance and "Abbey
Road." The Imposters also throw in some great cov-
ers of other groups such as The Byrds, The Hollies,
Jimi Hendrix, Neil Young and Left Bank.
Opening for the Imposters is the group Other
Voices. Other Voices brings a fun mix of upbeat
songs to the celebration. The band participated in
the "Free Fridays" concert series both with their
own feature concert and as part of the lineup for the


40th Anniversary of Woodstock Tribute. The Wood-
stock concert drew a crowd of 3,000 breaking all
previous attendance records for the series. The four
musicians who make up the band are Michelle Ott
(percussion and guitar), Dan Tampas (voice and gui-
tar), Fagan Arouh (voice and guitar) and Alan Hill
(bass and occasional voice). With a hallmark of in-
tricate vocal harmonies and tight arrangements, they
perform acoustic originals, select standards and ob-
scure classics in the realm of pop, folk, blues and
jazz. They have described their music as folk and
roll.
The free concert will begin at 9 p.m. and run until
12:30 a.m. At the stroke of midnight, there will be
showers of streamers and confetti along with the
sounds of noisemakers passed out to the audience
earlier in the evening.
The Bo Diddley Community Plaza is located on
the corner of Southeast 1st Street and East Universi-
ty Avenue. The City of Gainesville Cultural Affairs
Division is the designated local arts agency for
Gainesville and Alachua County. Its mission is to
promote cultural activity and encourage community
based cultural resources. Visit Cultural Affairs on-
line at http://www.gvlculturalaffairs.org/.
For event updates, call the City of Gainesville's
Arts Events Hotline at 352-334-ARTS. For more in-
formation or to schedule an interview, please con-
tact David Ballard at 352-393-8746.


Other Voices will open the night's entertainment. Courtesy photo


PAGE 12, DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009


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U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009, PAGE 13


Calendar of Events

December 2009 February 2010
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
University Auditorium
Alan & Carol Squitieri Studio Theatre


UFPA presents
Bela Fleck & The Flecktones The Holiday Tour Featur-
ing Victor Lemonte Wooten, Future Man and Jeff Coffin
Sunday, December 6, 3 p.m.
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Sponsored by Alta Systems, Inc., Falcon Financial Man-
agement, Inc. Jeff Davis, CFP and Fresco Neighborhood
Italian
Reserved Seating: $32.00 $52.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu.

UFPA presents
CATS
Saturday, January 9, 7:30 pm
Sunday, January 10, 1:00 pm and 5:00 pm
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Sponsored by Home Magazine and The Sky 97.3 FM
Reserved Seating: $34.00 $66.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu.

UFPA presents
Complexions Contemporary Ballet
Wednesday, January 13, 7:30 p.m.
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Reserved Seating: $28.50 $44.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu.

UFPA presents
The 5 Browns
Thursday, January 14, 7:30 p.m.
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Sponsored by Lowry Financial Advisors and WGFL CBS
4
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $50.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
GROOVALOO
Friday, January 15, 7:30 p.m.
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Sponsored by Gainesville Health & Fitness and JMAJ,
LLC
Reserved Seating: $28.50 $44.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Naoko Takada, Marimba
Sunday, January 17, 7:30 p.m.
The Squitieri Studio Theatre
Reserved Seating: $28.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Nnenna Freelon, Harolyn Blackwell and Mike Garson in
Dreaming the Duke
Friday, January 22, 7:30 p.m.
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Reserved Seating: $28.50 $50.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Natalie MacMaster and Donnell Leahy Masters of the
Fiddle
Saturday, January 23, 7:30 p.m.
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Sponsored by Coldwell Banker M.M. Parrish Realtors
and WUFT-TV
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $39.25
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Leipzig String Quartet
Sunday, January 24, 2 p.m.
Squitieri Studio Theatre
Reserved Seating: $34.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu


UFPA presents
Haochen Zhang _Thirteenth Van Cliburn International
Piano Competition Gold Medalist
Thursday, January 28, 7:30 pm
Friday, January 29, 7:30 pm
The Squitieri Studio Theatre
Sponsored by Shands HealthCare
Reserved Seating: $34.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
L.A. Theatre Works
Susan Albert Loewenberg, Producing Director presents
RFK: The Journey to Justice
Thursday, February 4, 7:30 p.m.
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $44.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Joshua Bell, Violin
Jeremy Denk, Piano
Saturday, February 6, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Shands, Koss-Olinger and S.EI.
Reserved Seating: $39.25 $60.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
THE OPERA SHOW
Tuesday, February 9, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Shands HealthCare
Reserved Seating: $39.25 $55.25
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Hairspray
Wednesday, February 10, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Bosshardt Realty, Holloway Financial Ser-
vices, WCJB TV20
Reserved Seating: $34.00 $60.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Soweto Gospel Choir
Thursday, February 11, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Gainesville Guardian
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $39.25
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Richie Havens
Friday, February 12, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, February 13, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, February 14, 2 p.m.
Squitieri Studio Theatre
Reserved Seating: $34.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu


UFPA presents
The Israel Ballet
Sunday, February 14, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Cox Media and Dharma Endowment
Foundation
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $44.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Philharmonia of the Nations with Jon Nakamatsu, Piano
Thursday, February, 18, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Dharma Endowment Foundation
Reserved Seating: $34.00 $55.25
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Eileen Ivers Beyond the Bog Road
Saturday, February 20, 7:30 p.m.
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $39.25
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Christine Brewer, Soprano
Sunday, February 21, 2 p.m.
University Auditorium
Sponsored by Shands HealthCare
Reserved Seating: $28.50 $44.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Craig Martin's Classic Albums Live: Bob Marley Leg-
end
Wednesday, February 24, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Wachovia and WGFL MY-11
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $39.25
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
An Evening of BraziliAHN Trio with Special Guests
Welson Tremura and Larry Crook
Saturday, February 27, 7:30 p.m.
University Auditorium
Reserved Seating: $23.50 $34.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Cuarteto Latinoamericano with Manuel Barrueco, Guitar
Sunday, February 28, 2 p.m.
University Auditorium
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $34.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

Events, dates, times and ',,-. .,i ,. are subject to change.
For updates, please visit the University of Florida Per-
f i ,iii,.. Arts web site at 1II i IA. I' i',11 mi,:. i. ,.ufl.edu and
click on the "Events" link.


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Nearly 300 attend fashion show to support Haven Hospice


GAINESVILLE Local celebrities
modeled the finest clothing and jewelry
for more than 280 guests at the Haven
Hospice Alliance's Ninth Annual Styles
for Life Fashion Show, a benefit for
Haven Hospice recently at the Para-
mount Plaza.
Emceed by KTK's Storm Roberts,


the show featured local fashions by
Coldwater Creek, Belk, Rapid City
Clothiers (RCC Western Stores) and the
Haven Hospice Attic, as well as door
prizes and a silent auction that raised
approximately $20,000 for programs
and services provided by Haven Hos-
pice.


Alliance members volunteer to pro-
mote and support Haven Hospice
through fundraising, special events,
volunteerism and community education.
Over the last year, Alliance activities,
including the 2008 Styles for Life fash-
ion show and the Third Annual Haven
Antique Roadshow, raised $16,274 for


unfunded programs provided by Haven
Hospice. Membership in the Alliance
includes many benefits. Dues of $30
per year support the chapter and its en-
deavors in the community. For more in-
formation about the Alliance, contact
the Volunteer Services Department at
352-378-2121 or 800-727-1889.


Scotty Cline, escorted by Rick Davis, was co-coordinator of the fashion show with Rusty Hunter. Photo: Submitted


UF scientists use virus to kill cancer


cells while leaving normal cells intact


Continued From Page 11
marrow.
"That's one of the major frustrations, so
we're looking for ways to clean these
stem cells before putting them back into
patients," said Christopher R. Cogle,
M.D., an assistant professor in the divi-
sion of hematology and o,'ii ,.-1, and a
leader of the research team.
Previous methods to remove contami-
nating cancer cells from bone marrow
have resulted in loss or damage of normal
blood-forming stem cells.
The UF team's work demonstrates that
a live virus can be used to target diseased
cells and separate them from normal cells
in a gentler way than currently used.
"They have shown that you can take tu-
mor-bearing marrow and purge the
leukemia cells while leaving the normal
cells unscathed," said John C. Bell, Ph.D.,
a professor of medicine, biochemistry,
microbiology and immunology at the Uni-
versity of Ottawa, who is not affiliated
with the study. "This could be hugely im-
portant because transplanting is one of the
few ways we can cure cancer patients."
When the researchers mixed healthy
human stem cells with myxoma virus they
did not become infected, and their devel-


opment potential was not stunted. On the
other hand, most of the leukemia cells
that were subjected to the same treatment
became infected and their growth and
spread was dramatically restricted. The
virus was able to eliminate the cancer
from 90 percent of the test mice, and was
shown to be safe when it did not infect
even animals whose immune systems
were severely compromised.
"This is a fascinating discovery because
it melds together two disciplines to show
a new vulnerability of cancer," Cogle
said. "Our ultimate goal with this is to
use nature to fight nature."
It is possible that re-infusing patients
with marrow in which leukemia cells
were killed by viruses might vaccinate
those patients against the tumor, which
becomes detectable by the immune sys-
tem, researchers said.
The researchers are working to identify
the exact manner in which the virus dif-
ferentiates between cancerous and normal
cells. They hypothesize that myxoma
might zero in on cells that have high ex-
pression of a cancer-related protein called
AKT. Also, it could be that while cancer
cells are trying to fight off virus infection
they produce conditions that stymie their
own ability to grow and spread.


The discovery

could help make

more cancer

patients eligible

for bone marrow

self-transplant

therapy and

reduce disease

relapse rates

after

transplantation.


Contact

us at the

paper.



Classified
Advertising

386-362-1734 ext, 102

fax: 386-364-5578
e-mail:
www.suwanneedemocrat.com
Mon,-.ri,:
8 am.-bp.m.

We'd love to hear from you.

Classified
Marketplace
P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064


PAGE 14, DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009


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U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009, PAGE 15


Suwannee residents meet NFCC Artist Series stars


North Florida Community College Artist Series patrons had the opportunity to meet award winning performers Julie Davis and Kelly Dow of Davis and Dow Jazz Duo and bassist Kai
Sanchez on Nov. 19 following the NFCC Artist Series performance of "Play It Again, Sam!" which featured some of Hollywood's classic silver screen melodies. Pictured in the lobby of
NFCC's Van H. Priest Auditorium are, from left, Leon Duke, Kai Sanchez, Sally Duke, Julie Davis, Kelly Dow and Paz Kent. Mr. and Mrs. Duke and Mrs. Kent are all residents of Live Oak.
- Courtesy photo




Calling all creative home bakers:


Step up to the Martha White Muffin Mix Challenge


NASHVILLE, Tenn. What does a Strawberry
Streusel Cheesecake have in common with Chocolate
Chip Coconut Bars and a Country Cinnamon Apple
Clafouti? These award-winning original dishes were
inspired and created with Martha White muffin mixes
and took top honors in the Martha White Muffin Mix
Challenge.
The inaugural recipe contest was so successful that
the premier baking company is announcing the call
for entries for the second annual Martha White Muf-
fin Mix Challenge. This year's challenge features
more prizes for the winning recipes and consumers
who vote online. The starting point is the same: cre-
ate an original recipe utilizing at least one of the 19
delicious varieties of Martha White muffin mixes.
"We realize home bakers create wonderful dishes
every day that are just as imaginative as they are de-
licious, but we were amazed by the creativity and
quality of the recipes submitted in the first Muffin
Mix Challenge," said Martha White baking expert
Linda Carman. "We saw everything from casseroles
to cobblers and tarts to tiramisus. The challenge of
using muffin mixes to create a unique dish brought
out the best in home bakers all over the country, and
we can't wait to see what they come up with this
year."
The Martha White Muffin Mix Challenge officially
is underway now and will end on Dec. 31. You can
enter by mail, email or submitting an entry online.
Each original recipe will be initially judged on five
evenly-weighted criteria: taste, creativity, appetizing
appearance, ease of preparation and appropriate use
of Martha White productss. After five finalists have
been determined, online voting at
www.marthawhite.com will help decide the Grand
Prize winner.
The Grand Prize winner will receive $5,000 and a
Martha White gift basket, while the four runners up
will receive $1,000 and a Martha White gift basket.
For official rules and entry information, visit
www.marthawhite.com.
To get your creative juices flowing, think of ways
to use muffin mix as a shortcut to make a delicious
loaf of bread with your favorite ingredients. As an
inspiration, try Cinnamon Banana Nut Breakfast
Bread, a hearty loaf made by adding oats, raisins and
applesauce to Martha White Banana Nut Muffin Mix.
It's great for breakfast served with fruit and yogurt,
and can be cooked ahead of time since quick loaves
usually taste and slice better the day after baking.
Another way to come up with your own recipe is
to start with the star ingredient. Go ahead and bake
your favorite variety of Martha White muffins, then
create a dish with the finished product. Our Wildber-
ry Muffin Trifles are a perfect example. Add a little
butter, sugar and an egg to the muffin mix, bake the
muffins, and slice in half when cooled. Then sprin-
kle with a little orange juice and layer with strawber-
ries and instant pudding pretty, delicious and easy
enough to cook with kids.
For the ", i;i,,;,.' recipes from the first Martha
White Muffin Mix ChIl. ,,*.. and the recipes fea-
tured, go to www.marthawhite.com and click on the
Recipe section.


Cinnamon Banana Nut Breakfast Bread

Crisco Original No-Stick Cooking Spray

Topping
2 tablespoons Martha White All-Purpose Flour
2 tablespoons quick oats
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons butter

Bread
2 (7.6 oz.) pkgs. Martha White Banana Nut Muffin
Mix
1/2 cup quick oats
1/2 cup raisins or dried cranberries
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 egg, beaten
3/4 cup applesauce
3/4 cup milk

1. Heat oven to 350 F. Spray 9x5x3-inch loaf pan
with no-stick cooking spray. Stir together flour, 2
tablespoons oats, granulated sugar, brown sugar
and 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon in medium bowl. Cut
butter into dry ingredients with pastry blender or
fork until crumbly.
2. Stir together muffin mix, 1/2 cup oats, raisins
and cinnamon in large bowl. Add egg, applesauce
and milk. Stir just until blended. Pour into pre-
pared pan. Sprinkle with topping.
3. Bake 45 to 50 minutes or until toothpick insert-
ed in center comes out clean. Cool in pan 10 min-
utes. Turn out onto cooling rack and cool com-
pletely. Wrap tightly for several hours or
overnight. For even slices, cut with gentle sawing
motion with serrated knife.

Yields 1 loaf


Outgrow Your
Wheels?


U


Wildberry Muffin Trifles

Crisco Original No-Stick Cooking Spray

Muffins
2 (7 oz.) pkgs. Martha White Wildberry Muffin Mix
2 tablespoons sugar
1 egg, beaten
2 tablespoons butter, melted
3/4 cup milk

Pudding and toppings
3 cups cold milk
1 (5.1 oz.) pkg. instant vanilla pudding and pie fill-
ing mix
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 cup orange juice
3 cups chopped, sweetened strawberries
Whipped topping or whipped cream

. Heat oven to 3750 F. Spray 12 muffin cups with
no-stick cooking spray. In large bowl, combine muf-
fin mix, sugar, egg, butter and 3/4 cup milk. Stir just
until blended. Fill muffin cups 2/3 full.
. Bake 15 to 18 minutes or until golden brown. Cool
in pan 3 minutes. Remove to cooling rack. Cool
completely.
. Combine 3 cups milk, pudding mix and vanilla in
large bowl. Beat with wire whisk 2 minutes. Allow
to set 5 minutes.
. Slice muffins horizontally. Place bottom half in
custard cup or dessert dish. Top with 1 tablespoon
orange juice and about 3 tablespoons each strawber-
ries and pudding. Place top half of muffin over pud-
ding. Top with 1 tablespoon each, strawberries and
pudding. Add a dollop of whipped topping. Repeat
with remaining muffins, pudding and toppings. Re-
frigerate until serving time.

Yields 12 muffin trifles


U I


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NFCC Artist Series presents


The Nutcracker

on Saturday

Dance Alive National
Ballet to perform
holiday favorite
MADISON It wouldn't be the holiday
season without The Nutcracker. Enjoy this
beautifully entertaining holiday tradition per-
formed by one of the most distinguished and
creative ballet companies in the Southeast -
Dance Alive National Ballet at North Flori-
da Community College on Saturday. Doors
open at 6:30 p.m. Show begins at 7 p.m.
Become entranced by the beauty of the la ..
Sugar Plum Fairy and her dazzling Court, en-
chanted by the swirling snowflakes and
breathtaking snow, and cheer for the tiny toy
soldiers and their leader, the handsome Nut-
cracker Prince. Van H. Priest Auditorium
Based in Gainesville, Dance Alive National NORTH ROC OMIIJHIYYCiLLEGE
Ballet is led by Artistic Director Kim Tuttle L
and Choreographer in Residence Judy Skin- 7
ner. The 15 dancers of Dance Alive have a
non-stop energy and love for dance that is at
the source of the company's undeniable suc-
cess. Elegant, exciting, dramatic, virtuosic,
and reveling in the pure beauty of their art,
the Dance Alive dancers are 100% committed
to bringing the best they, and dance, have to
offer.
"DANCE is not only ALIVE it is excit-
ing, beautiful, vibrant and very much Amer-
icanized. As Russia has the Bolshoi, England
the Royal Ballet, France the "Comic Opera" -
so America has "Dance Alive National Bal-
let," Albany Herald, Albany, Ga.
Tickets are on sale now at the NFCC Col-
lege Advancement Office or call (850) 973-
1653. More information is also available at
www.nfcc.edu (search: Artist Series) or email
ArtistSeries @ nfcc. edu.



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Toy soldier, as envisioned by Dance Alive, a Gainesville-based ballet company.


DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009, PAGE 17


The Nutcracker is coming to NFCC Saturday. Courtesy photos




PAGE 18, DECEMBER 9 & 10, 2009


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