Title: Suwannee Democrat
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028422/00653
 Material Information
Title: Suwannee Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Suwannee Democrat
Publisher: J. E. Pound
J.E. Pound
Place of Publication: Live Oak, Fla.
Live Oak Fla
Publication Date: December 11, 2009
Copyright Date: 2010
Frequency: semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
weekly[ former <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
Coordinates: 30.294444 x -82.985833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note: Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028422
Volume ID: VID00653
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE4563
oclc - 33273856
alephbibnum - 000398954
lccn - sn 95026787
 Related Items
Other version: Live Oak daily Democrat
Preceded by: Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by: Suwannee leader
Preceded by: Suwannee citizen

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North Florida


MAGENTA


BLACK


Wednesday Edition December 2, 2009


125th YEAR, NO. 14


3 SECTIONS, 40 PAGES


50 CENTS


Serving Suiannee County since 1884, including Live Oak, Wellborn, Branford, McAlpin and O'Brien


-3-


Military test

provokes

ire of some

parents

Student privacy
concerns raised
By Carnell Hawthorne Jr.
carnell.hawthorne@gaflnews.com
Recently at Suwannee High School
all juniors were required to take the
Armed Services Vocational Aptitude
Battery (ASVAB) test despite some
parents' view that the test should
merely be optional. For several par-
ents, and apparently several students
who hid out on testing day Nov. 17,
full junior class test participation be-
came a major issue.
"If they come to school on that day,
they take it," said Jim Simpson, assis-
tant principal at SHS. "We require it
as part of our school's yearly curricu-
lum."
The ASVAB "is a timed multi-apti-
tude test, which is given at over
14,000 schools and Military Entrance
Processing Stations (MEPS) nation-
wide and is developed and maintained
by the Department of Defense," ac-
cording to the armed services Web site
www.military.com.
The site suggests that anyone seri-
ous about joining the military should
take the ASVAB.
At SHS, Simpson said the test is
used "for the kids' sake, to determine
job and career paths they'll be suited
for. It has a correlation score to the
ACT, which makes it a great practice
for that exam."
Donna Odom, the parent of an llth
grade student, spoke recently with the
Democrat about issues she has with


SEE MILITARY, PAGE 14A


The burned-out wreckage of a live-in furniture workshop in Wellborn.- Photo: Kenneth Thrower


2 CHARGED IN


WELLBORN FIRE


By Carnell Hawthorne Jr.
carnell.hawthorne@gaflnews.com
An 18-year-old and a minor
have admitted to setting the 1
blaze that ravaged a live-in fur-
niture workshop Nov. 11 in
Wellborn, sheriff's records Shayne
show. Deputies say the fire Cooper-Olin
was set to cover up an alleged has been
burglary. charged with
The two suspects, along with burglary and
a third man, are charged in a arson. A ju-
series of burglaries that oc- venile faces
curred in recent weeks, accord- similar
ing to sheriff's reports. Shayne charges.
Cooper-Olin, of 45 Tomoka
Meadows Blvd., Ormond Beach; Thomas
James Burke of 9416 147th Road, Live Oak,
and a third suspect, a minor, reportedly admit-
ted to their involvement in the thefts.


SEE 2 CHARGED, PAGE 14A


The fire that destroyed this furni-
ture workshop in Wellborn Nov. 11
was the result of arson, say author-
ities. Photo: Kenneth Thrower


Branford civic,
business leader
dies at 86 --
Story, Page 7A. -
Obituary, Page 10A. .."
A pioneer of modem day Bran-
ford, Leon Dupree Hatch Sr., ..
passed away Saturday at the age of
86 after a lengthy illness. Hatch was
a farmer and businessman who ded-
icated his life to serving the Bran- Leon Dupree
ford community through civic orga- Hatch Sr.
nizations, community activities and
charitable contributions. He and his brother Rudolph were re-
cipients of the Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce
Trailblazer award in 2004. Hatch also served in WWII where
he participated in 29 combat missions over Germany as a gun-
ner on a B-17 Flying Fortress.
Hatch is remembered as a man who lived simply and gave
from the heart. He loved the wide-open spaces and enjoyed
hunting and fishing. Hatch was a true gentleman who valued
dedication to God, country and family. He will forever be re-
membered for his generosity and service.
Stephenie Lit ii -i..,,



I I78/54
Windy with showers
I %--x \


6 19117113 1J0!'20JII 1


.....


For more weather,
visit our Web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com


Radio pioneer L
Protsman passes
away at 88
Story, Page 3A.
Obituary, Page 10A.
Former radio station owner and
community leader Norman "Norm"
Protsman passed away Sunday in
Athens, Ga. He was 88.
Protsman purchased WQHL (98.1
FM) in 1953 and was a long time Norman Protsman
member and past president of the
Florida Association of Broadcasters. Protsman was active in
numerous local civic activities including Rotary and Shriners.
He was also a member of the 493rd Bomb Group stationed in
England during WWII.
A viewing for Protsman is set for Friday at First Presbyterian
Church in Live Oak from 5 to 7 p.m. The service will be Satur-
day, Dec. 5 at 11
a.m. at Daniels
Funeral Home in s
Live Oak.
The family is 0AI
asking that in lieu
of flowers, dona-
tions be made to
the Florida Sher-
iffs Youth Ranch-
es, PO. Box 2000,
Boys Ranch, Fla. On A 2009 GM
32064.
Jeff Waters


News as it happens at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com
The Christmas parade begins
Saturday at 6 p.m. next to the
Suwannee River Regional Library.
The route is scheduled to head
north on US 129 to West US 90,
ending at Paul Langford Stadium.


25 years of


Christmas on


the Square


Yearly event
marks a milestone
By Carnell Hawthorne Jr.
carnell.hawthorne@gaflnews.com
Live Oak's longest running holiday fes-
tival, Christmas on the Square, returns for
its 25th year Saturday.
The widely-hailed community event
will sparkle this year as vendors, shop
owners and the local community gather to
decks the halls or rather fill the four
corners of downtown Live Oak with
holiday cheer, according to event chair-
man Roy Crain.
"Each year it gets better," said coordi-
nator Susan Hillhouse of the Chamber of
Commerce.
The event kicks off at 8 a.m. with a spe-
cial ribbon cutting ceremony near the
Downtown Caf6 to usher in the 25th an-
SEE 25 YEARS, PAGE 14A


Looking out for

the little ones


By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com


Every year,
LOFD
comes


Each year, just be- through
fore Christmas, volun- for needy
teers spend a few hours kids at
at the Live Oak Fire Christmas
Department handing Christmas
out bags of toys to local
kids. Last year they were responsible for
the smiles on the faces of about 300 chil-
dren. Alan Bedenbaugh, coordinator of
LOFD's Toys for Sparky's Kids program,
said this year he expects that number to
double.
"I think this will be the biggest year,"


SEE LOOKING, PAGE 14A


www.suwanneedemocrat.com

- PPO UOA]

MAGENTA M ,M, M BLACK


Saying goodbye to 2 of our finest


S72 months



Vehicles In Stock
M AN Ah U M 565023-F




North Florida


Snewvnew $,

MAGENTA Even Odd


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


ON THE FLIPSIDE


HOWTO REICH US


Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, nf.edRorial@gaflnews.com
Mail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
* Publisher,
Myra Regan, ext. 122


CONTACT US WITH

YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, call us at 386-362-1734
or visit our Web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com


NEWSROOM
* Editor,
Robert Bridges, ext. 131
* Reporter,
Carnell Hawthorne Jr., ext. 134
* Reporter,
Jeff Waters, ext. 133
* Reporter,
Stephenie Livingston, ext. 130



ADVERTISING
* Advertising Manager,
Monja Slater, ext. 105
* Sr. Advertising Representative,
Bill Regan, ext. 160
* Advertising Representative,
Tami Stevenson, ext. 109
* Telesales Ad Representative,
Nancy Goodwin, ext. 103
* Classified/Legal,
Janice Ganote, ext. 102



CIRCULATION
* Circulation Manager,
Angie Sparks, ext. 152
* Circulation
Service Hours, M-F 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
Subscription Rates,
In-county, $33 Out-of-county, $48





iemnrrat


.-. -. -
^^~-^

Serving Suwannee County Since 1884

The Suwannee Democrat, published
Wednesday and Friday.
Periodicals postage paid at
Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located
at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
FL. Publication number 530180.

"POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL
32064." Annual subscription rate is
$33 in county, $48 out of county and
$48 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.

OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Letters, comments and opinions on
the Viewpoint & Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Suwannee Democrat.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters may be mailed, faxed or
e-mailed to our office. All letters are
read. Not all letters are published.
Letters may be edited to fit available
space. The editor should not alter the
writer's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
the point, an ideal range is 150 to
200 words. Please include your
name, address and day and evening
phone numbers for verification.
Letters MUST be signed. Letters to
the editor can be limited to one
letter per quarter per individual.


RANT & RAVE HOTLINE


Here's your chance to tell everyone what you
think! Callers may dial 208-8314 and leave a
message to express their thoughts, good or
bad, 24/7 about issues and politics, but not
about private individuals or businesses. If you
prefer, you may e-mail your comments to
robert.bridges@gaflnews.com. Your name is
not necessary, but please,
take 30 seconds or less for "
your message.
.. .. Part of ,
Florida" "


BRIEFLY


Old time music weekend

at Foster Center
WHITE SPRINGS The Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park will host the Suwannee
Old Time Music Weekend Friday through Sunday on
the banks of the historic Suwannee River. This three-
day event offers participants in-depth instruction in
old time music techniques on the banjo, guitar, fiddle
and voice for beginning, intermediate and advanced
students.
This year's special guest instructors and nationally
known performers include Mac Traynham, Shay
Garriock and Jenny Traynham. Concerts will be held
on Friday and Saturday evenings in the park
auditorium at 7 p.m. Tickets for public admission are
$10. Friday evening is the Florida Masters Concert
featuring Tom and Kay Van Treese, Gail Gillespie
and Dwight Rogers. Saturday evening will feature an
Instructor's Showcase Concert with Florida
favorites, Chuck Levy, Lloyd Baldwin, Greg Allen
and Chuck Anton. For more information and
instructions for registration, call Morris Cook at 386-
397-7005.

Tiny

Yorkie

Puppies '

For Sale .
$750.00
850-584-9882
850-295-1823
b' su.su1 :


iou wani mte most In-c(el)ltl coverage.
tlie latest neu s and stories ltial loicli home.
We want to give it to you.
$ 1 Year In County
Subscription
148 1Year
Out of County

Mail or bring payment to:

uwannee remnocrat
P.O. Box 370 211 Howard St. East
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1734 1-800-525-4182 ext. 152


Arrest Record


Editor's note: The
Suwannee Democrat
prints the entire arrest
record each week. If your
name appears here and
you are later found not
.i.,,to n or the (.I,, ,. are
dropped, we will be hap-
py to make note of this in
the newspaper when ju-
dicial proof is presented
to us by you or the au-
thorities.
The following abbrevi-
ations are used below:
SCSO-Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
LOPD-Live Oak Po-
lice Department
FDLE-Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforce-
ment
FHP-Florida Highway
Patrol
FWC-Florida Wildlife
Commission
DOT-Department of
Transportation
OALE-Office of Agri-
cultural Law Enforce-
ment
P & P-Probation and
Parole
USMS-US Marshals
Service
ATF-Department of
Alcohol, Tobacco and


Firearms
DOC-Department of
Corrections

November 25, Angela
Leigh Elmore, 19, 699 SW
CR 300 Mayo Fl, poss -20
cannabis, poss hy-
drocodone. vop(battery)
taylor co wr LOPD D.
Slaughter
November 25, Jose An-
tonio Torres, 20, 1940 78th
Terr Live Oak Fl., no dl,
tag attached not assighne,
vehicle not registered
FHP-A. Hughes
November 25, Jerica
Janay Jolly, 20, 2611 Be-
miss Road Apt B114 Val-
dosta Ga, consp traf excess
28gms of powder cocaine
SCSO-A. Loston
November 25, Terrance
Lavar Hall, 31, 933 Maca-
fina Trail Valdosta Ga,
consp traf excess 28gms of
powder cocaine SCSO-D.
Falgout
November 25, Vincent
Lenard West, 41, 933 Mea-
fina Trail Valdosta Ga,
consp traf excess 28gm of
powder cocaine SCSO-A.
Loston
November 25, Clifford
Earl Arnold, 61, 11664


217th Road Live Oak Fl,
alabama wrt-theft of prop
SCSO-C. Tompkins
November 26, Ayana
Briette Thomas, 29, 9996
110th Terrace Live Oak Fl,
battery domestic violence
LOPD-J. Rountree
November 26, Reginald
Bevels, 30, 5570 Bulb
Farm Rd Wellborn Fl., bat-
tery (domestic), violation
of injunction, judge slaugh-
ter revoked LOPD SGT.
J. Rountree
November 28, Shayne
Cooper-Olin, 18, 45 Tomo-
ka Meadows Blvd Ormond
Bch Fl, burglary x4,
grandtheft x4, arson, 1st
app-pd app per wrs
SCSO S St John
November 28, Thomas
James Burke, 18, 9416 147
Rd Live Oak Fl, burglary
x2, grandtheft x2, 1st
app-pd app per wrs
SCSO S St John
November 28, Eric
Wayne Foster, 18, 663
187th Place Live Oak, Fl,
retail theft, 1st app-pd
app per wrs SCSO-M. Lan-
dis
November 28, Douglas
Hogue, 44, 26643 Hwy
247 Branford Fl, lake co
wrt vop oc d.u.i., 1st app
n/pd appt wrs LOPD D
Slaughter
November 28, Stephanie
Starling, 38, 518 SW 8th St
Lake Butler Fl, disorderly
intox, 1st app pd appt wrs
LOPD T Faller
November 29, Stacey
Deeter, 36, 127 SW Meet-
ing Ave Madison Fl, dwls
(knowingly), 1st app-pd
app per wrs LOPD D
Slaughter
November 30, Daniel
Ervin Fralick, 25, 5753
Pine Crest Dr Live Oak Fl,
felony battery SCSO C.
Tompkins
November 30, Rhonda
Gay Liphart, 42, 2812
Dellwood Drive Orlando
Fl, agg battery (dom viol)
SCSO C. Tompkins
November 30, Ralph Al-
bert Minster, 51, 277 SW
Timber Ridge Dr Lake
City Fl., dui SCSO CPL.
S. Sena
November 30, Robert
Lee Wright, 24, 509 Wa-
terman Avenue Live Oak
Fl, retail theft SCSO-L.
Willis
November 30, Hilario
Camacho-Exiga, 20, 201 N
Irvin Avenue Live Oak Fl,
no d/1 2nd offense SCSO-
W. Kelly




CASH 3 PLAY 4
Day Day
11/30/09 4,7,7 11/30/09 .9,2,5,8
Night Night
11/30/094,2,9 11/30/09 .7,5,1,4
FANTASY 5
11/30/09 .......... 1,3,23,31,32
MEGA MONEY ..... 4,8,12,28,18
LOTTO ...... 2,7,12,17,28,41,2


Medical Calls: 123

Weakness: 9
Cardiac: 11
Trauma: 19
Motor vehicle crash: 13
Miscellaneous medical
call: 21
Altered mental status: 7
Respiratory 20
CVA: 2
OD: 3
OB: 2
Nausea/vomiting: 4
Diabetic: 3
Seizure: 4
Abdominal pain: 4
Standby @ structure
fire: 1


Fire Calls: 26
Structure Fire: 3
Brush fire: 2
Vehicle fire: 2
Motor vehicle crash: 11
Medical assist: 2
Smoke investigation: 2
Hazmat: 1
False alarm: 2
Down power line: 1

Volunteer Fire
Responses: 37

Falmouth Volunteer
Rescue Responses: 5

Century Ambulance
Responses: 2


Culinary Arts and
Commercial Foods Program
Classes starting January 21st
TABE testing must be completed prior to enrollment


SUWANNEE-
HAMILTON ;I I
TECHNICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 647-4210
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING
BENEFITS. ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.


POINSETTIAS MAKE

CHRISTMAS

DECORATIONS EASY!
Fill your home with Christmas cheer by
adding beautiful poinsettias to your
Christmas decor! Our exotic poinsettias
are arriving this week in a new fabulous
colors that are sure to match any color
scheme! If traditional colors are more
your style we offer red, pink or white in
five different sizes and prices! Stop by
today and we'll show you how easy it
is to enjoy poinsettias!
Prices starting at only
$4.99

CHRISTMAS TREES
THAT CAN BE PLANTED
AFTER THE HOLIDAYS!


Choose one of our potted living Christmas
trees! After the Christmas season plant it
and next year you'll have a tree to decorate
outdoors!


9248 129th Road Live Oak
(386) 362-2333
Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Closed Sunday
"For over 30 Years"

564466-F


M PPO UOA3

MAGENTA $ U-$M4M *


PAGE 2A


BLACK


Check out the Suwannee

Democrat on Facebook


Suwannee County

Fire/Rescue calls
for service from Nov. 15 Nov. 28

Total calls for service: 149


CVfaima


Ethtna


y0T/


Sponsored by Altrusa International, Inc. of Live Oak
Saturday, December 12, 2009
N 12 Noon ~ 5 p.m. fJ
.** Ticket. -10 Each 1*9%

The tour will include special featured
homes decked out in their holiday finery
sure to put you in the festive spirit.
Tour begins at the Live Oak Garden Club
(Next to Shands Hospital C.R. 136)

You will be provided a map to each
home, and refreshments.
Tickets will also be sold on day of event.


2- s Tickets may be
purchased in advance at:
I Live Oak City Hall/Shannon
Court
McCrimon's Office Supply
| Any Altrusa Member
All proceeds to benefit community projects.
' 565018-F


BLACK


I bb/Zbl - I


90,-"




North Florida


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Radio pioneer Norm



Protsman dies at 88


Broadcast bluegrass
all over the south from
right here in Live Oak

By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com

In the 50s and early 60s bluegrass was broadcast across
the south from old tobacco warehouses in Live Oak
thanks to one former resident's love for the music.
Norman "Norm" Protsman created the Suwannee River
Jamboree and aired it on his former radio station, WNER
in Live Oak (now WQHL 98.1). He purchased the station
in 1953 after moving to Live Oak from Melbourne in
1950.
Protsman was a staple in the community, serving in
many civic clubs including the Rotary for 59 years before
relocating to Athens, Ga. with his wife Leone in
November 2008. He passed away Sunday, in Athens at
about 6 p.m.
Former friend and employee of Protsman Clare Parker
remembered him from the days of the Jamboree.
"Norm started bringing the Stanley Brothers to the
Jamboree and also some stars out of Nashville," said
Parker. "At the Jamboree he did do some emceeing
himself, but mostly he made sure the show went on."
"Cousin Clare" Parker was the engineer and announcer
for the Jamboree. He worked at the radio station under
Protsman from 1951 until 1981.
"I didn't see him as being a boss man," said Parker.
"He was also my friend and he will be greatly missed."
Former Live Oak Mayor A.P. "Buddy" Nott ate
breakfast with Protsman for several years at a local


restaurant. He said Protsman was a straightforward kind
of guy.
"You never had to guess where he was coming from,"
said Nott. "Also his selection for playing music out at the
radio station is something to be remembered. He was a
good-minded person."
Local realtor Ronnie Poole said Protsman was one to be
admired.
"He served a mighty long time in Rotary," said Poole.
"Norman was always a good community leader and
always a great friend."
Protsman was born near Celina, Ohio in April 1921. He
was stationed in England during WWII as a member of
the 493rd Bomb Group. In addition to operating the local
radio station, Protsman was the proprietor of several other
stations, including ones in Madison, Dade City and
Winter Haven. He was also past president of the Florida
Association of Broadcasters.
Along with Rotary, Protsman was a member of the


"Norm started bringing the Stanley
Brothers to the Jamboree and also
some stars out of Nashville," said
"Cousin Clare" Parker, Protsman's
long time engineer and announcer.
'At the Jamboree he did do some
emceeing himself, but mostly he
made sure the show went on."


The Santa Shop

Kimberly Sue Cordle, needs your help
SO L !- Tl -. ....


--muui rrincetss


Kimberly Sue Cordle
was chosen by her
classmates as "School
Princess 2009-10" at a
recent pageant at her
school.
She sang "Jesus Loves
Me" and is outstanding in
citizenship and student
behavior. She is on the
honor roll.
Kimberly Sue is the
daughter of Kevin and Liza
Cordle. Kevin Cordle is
formerly of Live Oak.
Kimberly Sue is the
granddaughter of Susan
Cordle, the great
granddaughter of the late
Mr. Bill Cordle and Fred
and Willie Haas.
She is the granddaughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Floren
Valasko of Olongapo City,
Philippines. She also has
many aunts, uncles and


Kimberly Sue Cordle

cousins.
Kim is six years old and
in the first grade at Inter-
Denominational Private
School in the Philippines.
The school was built by
members of the Methodist,
Catholic and Baptist faiths.


It is time to start planning for the Santa Shop. Last
year, with a community effort, the Santa Shop provided
gifts to more than 200 students in the Students in
Transition program at Suwannee County Schools. All the
leftover donations, toys and gifts were donated to
Sparky's Toy Drive.
The need in our community is growing, so the Santa
Shop is growing, too.
This year, we plan to provide toys & gifts for the
Suwannee County Schools Students in Transition
(approximately 180 students at this time), children at
Guardian Ad Litem (280 children), and all the leftovers
will be given to Sparky's Toy Drive at the Live Oak Fire
Department (Sparky's usually provides gifts for
approximately 400 children).
We need toys and gifts for school-age children (4 to 18
years).
With all of us pulling together, we can meet the needs
of MANY children in Suwannee County!
Please talk to your clubs, businesses, churches, etc. to
get involved!
For more information please contact Lisa Garrison at
386-647-4623, Debra Ross at 386-647-4628, Tammie
Williams at 386-364-7720 or Missy Norris at 386-364-


3789.


IEDAY DIFT


JAVA JAX and
the Suwannee
Democrat


South Oaks Square Location: 1520 S. Ohio (386) 362-2591
SMedical Equipment Div: (386) 362-4404
SHours: 8:30 am-6:30 PM Mon-Fri.,
8:30 am-3:00 pm Sat.
by Kathy Fletcher, PharmD Drive-up window
Various Drugs Prescribed for Dementia
Dementia is a condition of decreased intellectual capabilities, which
include memory, judgment, and abstract thinking. Personality changes
also occur in persons affected by dementia. Alzheimer's disease is the
most common type of dementia. An estimated 4.5 million Americans
have Alzheimer's Symptoms of the condition may also include
hallucinations, delusional thoughts, and illusions.
Treatments for Alzheimer's are aimed at controlling symptoms
associated with certain behaviors and emotions, and also reducing the
progression of the condition. Medications that decrease anxiety, such as
lorazepam (Ativan) and buspirone (Buspar), may be prescribed to help
control behavioral and emotional symptoms. Antidepressants, such as
sertraline i and citalopram (Celexa), may be prescribed for
persons with depression that may worsen cognitive functioning in
persons with Alzheimer's. Cholinesterase inhibitors work to decrease
symptoms by affecting acetylcholine activity in the brain. By inhibiting
the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, cholinesterase inhibitor medications,
such as rivastigmine (Exelon) and donepezil (Aricept), may prevent or
decrease deterioration of cognitive function. 563996-F


Look for -r, itl
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the board at
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Suwannee
Democrat

$150
Only
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-362734

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211 Howard St. East
Live Oak
362-1734 500072-F


Norm Protsman at a Rotary meeting in 2007. Photo: Staff

Suwannee Valley Tourist Development Council, Shriners
and a member of the Florida Association of Community
Colleges, as well as others. A bell tower was erected in
1992 on the campus of North Florida Community College
in Norm and Leone's name.



UW campaign report

luncheon set for Dec. 9
Submitted
United Way of Suwannee Valley will conduct the
December and final community fundraising campaign
report luncheon of the 2009-10 campaign season at
Columbia County Senior Services' LifeStyle Enrichment
Center at noon on Dec. 9.
The report luncheon will feature three Fort White High
School students who visited the United Way affiliated
agency locations in their community and will speak
about their experience. The students, Tiffany Joseph,
Virginia Vasquez and Irene Lang, spent time with both

SEE UW CAMPAIGN, PAGE 11 A

Love a mystery?

Try locating your ancestors by working on your family
tree. The Suwannee Valley GCinic .il, Society invites
you to join and learn how to find your ancestors.
Membership is $30 for a single member or $35 for a
family. Corporate membership is also available for
donations of $100 or more (tax deductible). Meetings are
held on the first Thursday of each month at 7:00 PM at
the Gcic.ih ,-.', Center at 215 Wilbur Street SW in Live
Oak. The library is open on Tuesday and Thursday from
9 a.m. until 5 p.m. and the talented folks there will be
glad to help. For more information call Jinnie or Alice at
386-330-0110.




FLOORING


Q


We are thinking of upgrading
our flooring throughout our
home as a Christmas gift to
our family, can you help us
choose which type of flooring
would be best for us?


T 44 improvementspeople7makeimsto
change or upgrade their floors.
Let's face it: a good looking floor can add a
lot of value to a home. Whether you choose
carpet or other flooring depends on your
needs. If you have allergies or don't like to
vacuum, you may want to investigate
laminate or hardwood flooring. If you like to
lie on the floor or tussle with the kids or
your pets, carpets may suit you. Come to
Live Oak Paint & Flooring and talk with our
professionals for more detailed information.

1512 South Ohio Avenue, 362-7066
563992-F


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PAGE 3A


REGISTER NOW!
Early Childhood Education Program
Earn Your CDA Today!
Day & Evening Clasess
Classes starting January 21st
TABE testing must be completed prior to enrollment

SUWANNEE-~
HAMILTON. B
TECHNICAL CENTER --
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064 (386) 647-4210
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING
BENEFITS. ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.


BLACK


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North Florida


CYAN ,dwd.w*
MAGENTA Even Odd


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


suwannee living


Altrusa Tour

of Homes

just around

the corner
Submitted
The annual Altrusa Tour of
Homes is set for Saturday, Dec.
12, just over a week away.
The homes to be visited during
this year's Altrusa Tour of Homes
are those of Herb and Janet
Mantooth; Allison and Gayle
Eyster; John and Joann Martz;
Tony and Stacy Chauncey; and
Carolea Evans.
These homeowners have
graciously volunteered their
homes for the tour, which is set
for Dec. 12 from noon 5 p.m.
The event is held to raise funds
that are returned to the community
through contributions and service
projects.
Guests to will meet at the Live
Oak Garden Club beginning at
noon to pick up information
including a map to the featured
homes. Refreshments will be
served.
Cost per ticket is $10. Advance
tickets may be purchased from
any Altrusa member, or stop by
the Live Oak City Hall (Shannon
Court) or McCrimon's Office
Supply. Tickets will be sold at the
door on day of event.
All profits from the Tour of
Homes goes directly to Altrusa
projects for the upcoming year.
Currently, Altrusa proceeds go to
support community needs such as
Vivid Visions, hospice, literacy,
scholarships, Suwannee schools
reading programs and many
others.
The featured homes for the tour
will be elegantly decorated and fill
you with cheer. Featured homes
will be announced in the
upcoming month.
For more information contact
Kellie Hicks at 386-362-3919 or
Marlene Geise at 386-364-1947.


unrsismas scene (Trom a previous tour). Photo: Statt


SUWANNEE



HEALTH



CARE CENTER

We're not just a nursing home.

After a stay in the
hospital, our full time
therapists and high tech
modalities can help get
you on your feet and
back at home.

Services Provided:
Physical Therapy
Occupational Therapy
Speech Therapy
Skilled Nursing
Out Patient Therapy
Clinic


1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Phone: 386-362-7860
563725-F


The Live Oak Christian Church is pre-
senting a unique Christmas program on
December 18. With music, fun and laugh-
ter, we will see the birth of Jesus through
a special kind of country humor. The pro-


I


SUWANNEE-
HAMILTON4
TECHNICAL CENTER


gram will begin at 7 p.m.
The church is located at 1015 Ohio Av-
enue North. For more information call the
church at 362-1015 or check our web
page at liveoakchristian.org.


^^ Matt Goike
Nov. 23, 1983- June 29, 2007
To my son Matt,
My eyes filled up with tears when I heard the news.
It never occurred to me, how much I could lose.
I find myself wishing it wasn't real
Every time I think about it, pain is all I can feel.
Tears fall from my eyes, I can barely see
But my heart tells me that he'll always be with me.
I'm glad he feels no pain now- he lives in a perfect land.
I can still feel the soft touch on my shoulder of his loving hand.
I lie in bed and cry at night,
And I don't feel any better in the morning light.
I will miss him and love him forever,
Until the day we are again together.
Together in that perfect place above,
Filled with caring, sharing and love.
But until that day comes- I will wipe my tears away
and hopefully see him again someday. 562968-F


* Pacest 2009
S0EDy a


Dec. 14 & 15


Testing $70.00


415 S.W. Pinewood Dr
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-647-4200


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PAGE 4A


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Yee Haw Country

Christmas


You must attend a registration session.
Wed., Dec. 9th 9 a.m. or 6 p.m.

Call Lynn Lee at 386-647-4201
to sign up for registration


BLACK


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North Florida


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Boyette's Pecan Company: 36 years and going strong



Mime,.' rV-.


I


(1


David & Richard Gross have been working for Boyette's for about 12 years. Photos: Staff


Dale Boyette weighing pecans.


They're into their 3rd generation as a family owned and operated business


It was 1973 and Dale
Boyette had just retired
from the Navy. Dale was
a cook while serving our
country and when he got
out he knew he didn't
want to go into the restau-
rant business so the
Boyette brothers, Dale
and Don, decided to go
into the grocery and pecan
business. They've had a
few different locations
during this last 36 years;
one was where Burger
King stands now.
In the '80s Don decided
to go into the oil business
and keep the grocery busi-
ness and Dale decided to
stay in the pecan business
with his wife Priscilla. In
1999 they moved to their
current location at US 129
S. in Live Oak. Dale and
Priscilla had two sons,
Mike and Randy, who
grew up in the pecan busi-
ness. Today, Randy (Ran-
dall) is a conductor for
Amtrak. Mike decided to
follow in his father's foot-
steps and stay in the
pecan business. When
Mike married Shari
Goolsby, she fell right
into it as well, making a
great addition with her
bookkeeping and office
skills.
Today Dale's grandson
Randall (Randy Boyette
Sr.'s son) works with
them running the cracking
machine, loading, unload-
ing and weighing in the
pecans, etc. And Dale's
granddaughter Adrienne
(Mike and Shari's daugh-
ter) works in the office.
She also won the National
FFA Agriscience Fair in
the Bio Chemistry Divi-
sion. Her project was
called 1.I ici-,, Is It Nut-
ty?" It was a project creat-
ed to determine the
amount of energy con-
tained in pecans. It was
determined that the 'El-
liot' pecan had the most
energy. "And likely so,"
said Dale, "because it
contains the most oil."
According to Dale there
are over 200 varieties of


pecan trees. The Elliots
are the best producer and
the best tasting. The trees
(Elliots) are less suscepti-
ble to disease and drought
and are self-pollinating,
which, if you're a grower,
is a great benefit! It takes
about 12 years for a tree
to start producing nuts.
They grow around a foot
per year and live 125
years or more. "Back in
earlier times most people
would have 10 or 12
pecan trees on their


/


Grandson Randall Boyette Jr. running the cracking ma-
chine.


NEW CARERPROGRA
A A






Filers' Club ^
Attn: Pilots & Prospective Pilots

3 planes for personal use
or learn to fly with an instructor
Reasonable Fees

1 hr. Intro Flight $00 gift
Great s t.,, ;i,. '#,, certificate
Include all costs involved with the first flight
Call Mark Fessler 303-775-5015
www.liveoakflyers.com
Email: liveoakflyers@gmail.com
3 plans forpersoal us


farm," Dale said, "and
they would use the money
from harvesting the nuts
each year to pay their tax-
es and buy Christmas."
Dale also said about 95
percent of the pecans
from this area are picked
up by hand. The Boyette's
Pecan Company ships
mostly to the southeastern
U.S. to various processing
plants. They have to wait
until they get a semi load
and as you can imagine,
that's a lot of nuts!


COMING SOON
Have you ever wanted to walk
into a store and have every
magazine at:..., .. i-
j I'wsStand


E A MAGAZINE SUPERSTORE!
Business Cooking Gaming General Interest Ethnic Women's
Puzzle Sports Health Home Teen Weekly Men's Comics
Top 20 Best Seller Books in Hardcover/Paperback
303 East Howard Street, Live Oak 364-0748


ASK DR. MANTOOTH Boyette's Pecan Company i
ASK DR. MANTOOTH FRESH PECANS

Q: What's the difference between a i P I
dentist with a DDS degree and one with
a DMD?
A: The answer is nothing. The degrees -
are interchangeable and describe the
degree awarded upon completion of
dental school to a person now qualified
to be a general dentist. Universities that
confer the degrees simply have the
prerogative of describing the degree they
confer. DDS stands for Doctor of Dental
Surgery; DMD for Doctor of Medical
Dentistry. The education is the same.
Either degree has to satisfy the
curriculum requirements set by the
American Dental Association's. 0-
Commission on Dental Accreditation. -,
Generally this entails three or more years -
of undergraduate work followed by four
years of dental school. State licensing .
boards view the degrees as equivalent
and the degrees allow licensed
individuals to practice the identical range I
of general dentistry
some dentists choose to practice.
here arhe a numberhof areas of sp cialty
Additional postgraduate education and
specialist. An example of a specialty is
orthodontics, a field that concentrates on
the techniques and appliances used for
straightening teeth. Your dentist would be
happyto talktoyouaboutchis training. Honey Roasted Chocolate Covered
Presented asa service tothe coamiunityby Pecan Logs Specialty Syrups & More!
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH, D.D.S., P.A. 386-362-1414
w 602 Railroad Ave. 386-362-1 u 4
Live Oak, FL 10031 US Hwy. 129, Live Oak, FL
362-6556 L564463-F
(800) 829-6506 "

Men and Women of God you're invited to

Our Christmas Celebration!

Theme: "Pathway to Holiness (Isaiah 35:8)"
Saturday, December 5th, 2009 at 10:00 a.m.
Location: Suwannee Golf and Country Club
7932 US 90, Live Oak, FL 32060
SPECIAL SPEAKER HOST SPECIAL SPEAKER









Pastor Charm Greene Linda Walker Dr. Deborah Coleman
Pastor Charm prophetically teaches God's word Dr Deborah ts theFounder of Good News
She operates n the gtifs ofhealmng with His virtue Evangelism Church n Jacksonville, FL where
flowing through her and many have been healed by she and her husband pastor n the inner city
God She ts the founder ofNew Begtnmngs Of Lfe Pastor Deborah moves in the gt;fs of
Church n Lake City, FL The Holy Spirit; she flows wth an Apostolic Mantle




State -- -- --------- Zip ---------------------------- -Incl-des-L-c
Must register: Women of God Ministries In Christ, Inc. Registrations
Available:
Send in this bottom portion to: 184 SW Windswept Glen, Lake City, FL 32024 New Life Bible
For More Information: 386-755-3678; 386-752-2397 or 386-418-8881 Book Store in
Names: Live Oak,
Lady Bug Flowers
Number of attendants: and Plants in
Alachua, Greene
Church Name/Ministry: and Associates in
Lake City
Address: Registration Cost:
Free Admission
State: Zip: Includes Lunch
Jesus Christ is
Phone: Cell: Lord to the Glory
Email: of our Father in
562611-F Heaven amen!


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North Florida


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MAGENTA Even Odd


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


Viewpoints/Opinions


BIBLE VERSE
"In the beginning was the Word, and
the Word was with God, and the Word
was God. He was with God in the begin-
ning. The Word became flesh and made
his dwelling among us. We have seen his
glory, the glory of the One and Only, who
came from the Father, full of grace and
truth."-John 1:1-2, 14



Surann


O2mocrat


MYRA C. REGAN ROBERT BRIDGES
Publisher Editor
Members of the Suwannee Democrat
editorial board are Myra C. Regan, publisher,
and Robert Bridges, editor. Our View,
which appears in Friday's editions of the
Democrat, is formed by that board.






Of Black


Friday past
By Jim Holmes
Well, I hope you survived Black Friday and you
found the experience tolerable, if not enjoyable.
It is funny how Black Friday has become almost
like a holiday unto itself. For many of us, the an-
ticipation of getting a great deal rivals the anticipa-
tion of getting a particular gift on Christmas mom.
I know some families who get up on Thanksgiving
Day and with the Macy's Parade blaring in the
background -study the newspaper and TV ads
with the intensity of a biblical scholar analyzing
the Dead Sea Scrolls. Then over turkey, they join
with relatives in plotting when they will arise on
Friday morning and who will camp outside Best
Buy and who will brave the throng at Wal-Mart.
All this to buy an item that, by this time next
year, will most likely be taken for granted, shelved
and gathering dust, or broken.
Another seemingly modem wrinkle to the holi-
day season is the now annual "to die for" gift for
kids. I met a granddad last week who planned to
be at Wal-Mart at 2 a.m. in order buy this year's
must have gift: the Zhu Zhu hamster. I've never
seen one, but based on what I learned on the Inter-
net, they are little stuffed replicas of the rodents
and somehow they interact with the kids. They
are supposed to retail for under seven bucks each,
but I found folks on eBay bidding well over a hun-
dred dollars in an effort to obtain a set of four! I
wonder what they would pay me for that rat in my
chicken coop? It favors a hamster and lord knows,
I've been interacting with it for weeks now.
I don't remember Christmas fads like that when
I was a kid back in the 40s and 50s. Of course, we
were raised by folks who survived the Great De-
pression, meaning that while Santa would bring
toys, there was a practical side to him that meant
gifts of clothing. It always worried me how Santa
knew my size. I couldn't help but wonder if some
elf was assigned to visit and go through my draw-
ers ... and if that was the case, I knew with my
luck he would have come on the day Mama used
the flyswatter on me.
And I'll tell you for a kid, heck for an adult
- there is nothing quite as disappointing as open-
ing a brightly wrapped package only to discover it
contains new underpants.
As far as Black Friday was concerned, back then
I don't think anyone ever heard the term. That
didn't mean we didn't look forward to the day af-
ter Thanksgiving. For those of us who lived out in
the sticks, we were in for a daylong adventure that
began with flagging down a Greyhound bus and
riding into the big city in order to visit a depart-
ment store or two. Perhaps the most memorable
part of the trip was looking at the brightly decorat-
ed and for us at the time highly animated
window displays. There we'd see replicas of San-
ta's Workshop or perhaps a Christmas morning
scene. By today's standards, I'm sure those dis-
plays were primitive, but back then they mesmer-
ized us.
For our family, department stores trips normally
focused on what could be found "on the cheap" in
the bargain basement. But at Christmas time, it
also meant a tour of the entire store made neces-
sary because old Saint Nick was up on the third
floor in the toy department. Of course, the visit
with him was the highlight of my day. Once on
his lap, I'd shyly mutter my list of toys ... tickled
to be in his presence, but also anxious for the ex-
perience to end. Otherwise, I might have found
the courage to tell him, "Please Santa, more toys!
I like jeans with holes in the knees and honestly, I
can get by with one pair of underpants. Heck, un-
less Mama catches me, I only change them once a
week anyhow."
Jim Holmes lives in Live Oak.


E
*


OPINION


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A


GUEST COLUMN


I saw it all, right
It's funny how sometimes a single
comment will spur a cornucopia of
thoughts about past experiences.
And so I'm listening to the Florida
State vs. Maryland game on my radio
and the announcer tells me that the
Seminoles have the ball and "they are
moving left to right" on my radio.
My first thought was, that's not nec-
essarily so. If I'm sitting behind my ra-
dio it would be the opposite.
And this took me into the past when indeed we often
sat "around" the radio. Specifically, we sat around it as
we shelled butter beans on the back porch and listened to
the Milwaukee Braves.
Among my earliest memories is an old RCA radio that
sat on an apple crate. I'm not really sure why we would
sit around the radio and watch it as though keeping an
eye on that old brown box allowed us to interact more
than if we had our backs to it.
And I recall vividly that Saturday morning when I
came running through the living room and got my feet
tangled in the radio power cord. The casing was smashed
to smithereens and life was in slow motion for a few sec-
onds. For the moment my whole world fell into the pit of
stomach where it sloshed like a wringer washing ma-
chine. The bile began rising into my throat. It was like I
had accidentally shot old Tuffy, our squirrel dog.
When the debris had settled, Hank Williams was still
singing "My Bucket's Got A Hole In It." And so did our
radio. I picked up the skeleton and sat it back on the ap-
ple crate. I had always wondered what it looked like on
the inside. The tubes were still glowing orange, well insu-


there on my radio
lated with little dust bunnies that had accumulated over
the years. Even in its naked state, that old radio continued
to link our farm house at night to WCKY in Cincinnati,
WWL in New Orleans and WSM in Nashville. And of
course, to Wolf Man Jack somewhere down on the Mexi-
can border.
I think maybe that was when I first learned the essence
of not judging the content by the container. Since then I
have heard the and .il-., adjusted for many occasions:
"Don't judge a book by it's cover." "Beauty is only skin
deep." "Clothes don't make a man." And from the movie
"The Dirty Dozen," "they're pretty, but can they fight."
While I remember that morning when I splattered our
radio, I do not remember the day we replaced it. I guess
trauma has greater shelf life.
Now back to the radio announcer, I fully understand
what he was trying to tell me because most people listen-
ing via radio probably were in their cars. So if I had been
behind my radio in that venue, I would have been riding
on the hood ... which also takes me back to some other
memories like when we used to ride on the front fenders
of the pickup traveling from one tobacco field to the next.
But that was when we actually had fenders and they were
made of heavy steel. If one fell off on your foot, it would
hurt.
By the way, did you know that whether a team has
gained a first down or not depends on where the officials
spot the ball? Or that a missed field goal could determine
the outcome of the game? And it doesn't matter whether
they are moving left or right on your radio. Once I tried
"laying hands" on that radio, but the Braves lost anyway.
(DwainWalden is editor/publisher of The Moultrie Ob-
server e-m ail: di,ni n,i,,i 1 ,1 .'1., h i i .. )


Please address letters to: Letters To The Editor, Suwannee Democrat, PO Box 370,
Live Oak, FL 32064. Please include your full name, address and daytime phone number. We ask this so we
can verify your letter and discuss any questions about it with you.


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North Florida


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Branford News
Serving southern Suwannee County, including Branford, O'Brien and McAlpin


Sfortung


te


i


e


Leon Hatch, a pioneer of modern day Branford, dies at 86


By Stephenie Lit iii..-.l.

Leon D. Hatch, a pioneer of modem day Bran-
ford who dedicated his life to the welfare of the
community in which he spent his life, died Satur-
day after a long illness. He was eighty-six.
His son, Lee Hatch, said his dad "loved chil-
dren, especially his grandchildren, and being out-
doors." He described a humble man who was
dedicated to serving Branford through civic orga-
nizations, community activities and charitable
contributions, and who worked diligently for his
family's well-being and was deeply loved and re-
spected.
Leon grew up in a time when a Ford Model T
cost $400 and the first bridge across the Suwan-
nee River was being built in Branford. His great-
grandfather fought in the Civil War and his 1941
high school graduating class consisted of 28 stu-
dents. He noted in his memoirs that many chil-
dren in the community were stricken with pover-
ty.
"Most all the children from the county they
would have to bring their lunch and some of
them were pretty meager lunches," he wrote. "I
remember one family that they never had any
lunch and would have to ravage the old drum to
catch anything that somebody happened not to
need and pass away."
Leon worked the rest of his life to ensure his
family, and the Branford community, would nev-
er suffer in that way. He worked to bring business
to Branford, and succeeded in boosting the rural
economy. After making $1 a day working as a
teenager in six-foot high tobacco, hot sun over-
head, Leon built an auto business, a large farm
and a mining operation, all of which he owned
and operated at the same time, along with his
brother Rudolph.
And although Leon was a hard-working man,
his children remember him as supportive and
ever-present in their lives. "I don't think he ever
missed one of our games," said Lee. Leon, who
played football and basketball, was very support-
ive of athletics. "He may have missed once when
mom was sick."
"We didn't have a lot of athletic activities,"
Leon wrote in his memoirs of the Branford he
grew up in. "Sometimes we'd have to play in
drizzling rain or a windstorm." It was important
SEE A FORTUNATE LIFE, PAGE 8A

Leon Hatch served
his country as well as
his community.
During WWII he flew
29 combat missions
over Germany as a
gunner aboard a B-
17 Flying Fortress.
On the second
mission his plane
exploded over the
English Channel. The
crew of nine escaped
by parachuting from
the plane.
'The last man to
leave the plane was
Sgt. Leon Hatch,
gunner. He rushed
back to see if the tail
gunner was safe and
he realized he was
the last man in the
bomber. He had to
struggle back
through the flames
to get out,' read an
Associated Press
dispatch.
Leon D.


Leon and Shirley Hatch on their 50th wedding anniversary.
Couresy photo


LeonHatc greIupinatm
whe a Frd ode Tost$40
andth frs bide crssth
Suane Rve *asbingbiti
Brnod Hi gea-ganfahe
fogh in he ivil Wa anhi
194 highcholgrauain


Hatch (top row, second from right) and the other nine members of a B-17 Flying Fortress crew. Courtesy photo


Arrests..............2A Sports...............1 B
I DLegal Notices........ 5B Suwannee Living ...... 4A HI 74 LO 50 Follow us on
I X D Obituaries ...........10A Viewpoint ........... .6A P
S PAGE 2B FACEBOOK


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North Florida


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* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


Branford News


A fortunate life Leon Hatch, a pioneer of modern day Branford, dies at 86


Continued From Page 7A

to Leon that he provided a
place for Branford's chil-
dren to go to play. A dream
he fulfilled. Leon donated
the land that is now Hatch
Park in Branford. Later,
when three ball fields were
not enough, Leon donated
land for three more fields.
Leon Hatch served his
country as well as his
community. During WWII
he flew 29 combat mis-
sions over Germany as a
gunner aboard a B-17 Fly-
ing Fortress. On the sec-
ond mission his plane ex-
ploded over the English
Channel. The crew of nine


escaped by parachuting
from the wounded plane.
"The last man to leave
the plane was Sgt. Leon
Hatch, gunner. He rushed
back to see if the tail gun-
ner was safe and he real-
ized he was the last man in
the bomber. He had to
struggle back through the
flames to get out," read an
Associated Press dispatch.
"After I got out of the
plane it was spiraling
around and it came under
me," wrote Leon. "It
looked like them pro-
pellers was gonna eat me
up."
He was rescued by an
old English couple upon


landing, barely missing the
North Sea where he would
have frozen in minutes.
Leon never hesitated to
participate in the 27 addi-
tional missions following
the explosion.
He returned home a
hero, although Leon never
saw himself that way, and
barely spoke of the war for
the rest of his life, said
Lee. What he was proud of
was what he called his
"most fortunate thing," his
wife Shirley whom he met
a few years after the war.
"After a fairly short
courtship, we got married
and began to have a fami-
ly," wrote Leon. "I reckon


that's the most fortunate
thing I've had happen to
me in a lifetime."
For Shirley, there were
no words to describe her
loss.
"I feel very honored to
have been his wife for 56
years," she said simply,
emotion evident in her
voice.
Leon continued, "To
sum up my life and my ex-
periences and so on it's
sort of like I told my dad
when he was still living. I
feel like I've been privi-
leged to live in some of
the best that this world has
had to offer from time of
the first man right up to to-


Leon Hatch, left, and his brother Rudolph.
Courtesy photo


day. All in all I've had a
good life. Some times
have been better than oth-


ers, but overall I've en-
joyed life and feel that life
owes me nothing."


-i
-ii

Shirley and Leon Hatch and some family members.
Courtesy photo


Toys for Kids +

overwhelmed with requests


Many kids still aren't
covered, say organizers

By Roger L. Burnside
Toys for Kids+ needs your help badly.
Christmas is a time of joy and celebration.
Unfortunately, there are many children in
the Branford area that will be missing the
joy of receiving Christmas presents. We
are in need of toys, clothes and in some
cases, food for these children.
With the economy the way it is right
now we are experiencing more requests
than in past years. No donation is too
small, if you can just provide one toy, a
box of food, a winter coat or shoes it will
be greatly appreciated.


Anyone interested in helping us with this
project can take their donations to the
Branford Health Department. Thompson
Custom Homes at 3554 256th St., O'Brien
has agreed to be an additional drop off site
for donations. You may also call Karen at
the Branford Health Department at 386-
935-1133 or Roger Burnside at 386-935-
3343.
Should you know of a child in need you
may also call these numbers.
Over the years the folks in the Branford
area have brought a lot of joy to the area's
children and their families, for this we
thank each and every one of you. The
smiles and appreciation the children ex-
press each year make this project a bless-
ing to all.


On Saturday, Dec. 12 we will hold the
annual Keeping Christ in Christmas Fes-
tival and Parade. Booths and entertain-
ment will be in Hatch Park from 10 a.m.
until 4 p.m. with a short break for the pa-
rade.
The parade will line up at the High
School Football Field and will begin at 1
p.m. The parade route will start at Gov-
ernor Street, go to Hwy 129 and then to
Houston Street. The parade will end at
Hatch Park.
Music will be provided by "Main-
stream" and other local talent. The Bran-


ford High School band will perform at
2:30. Pictures with Santa will be avail-
able from 10-Noon and 2 p.m.-4 p.m.
Vendors who are interested in having a
booth may contact Mamie Jackson at
386-935-9121. If you are interested in
being part of the musical entertainment
you can contact Kathy Woolard at 386-
935-1127 or 935-6400. For the parade
you may contact Debbie Yates at 386-
935-3131.
Bruce Arnold
Branford Area Inter Church Ministries
Secretary


McAlpin Community Club Christmas party


The McAlpin Community Club Christ-
mas Party scheduled for Dec. 14 will begin
at 7 p.m. with a potluck supper. Please
bring a covered dish to share as well as
special Christmas goodies.
Each person is asked to bring a wrapped,
very inexpensive item (from Dollar Tree or
Dollar General). We will be playing Dirty


Bingo -- everyone will win a prize.
Everyone is welcome to attend. The
Club is located at 9981 170th Terrace in
McAlpin, directly across from the Post Of-
fice. Membership fees are $5 per family
per year. For Information, call Donna
Wade at 963-3516 or Shirley Jones at 963-
5357.


O'BRIEN AND OUR NEIGHBORS


'Bits & Pieces' from


south Suwannee County


By Ana Smith
Last Sunday was "5th Sunday Sing
Night" at O'Brien Baptist Church, and it
was a really nice evening to worship in
song. It was a blessing to watch and hear
some of our children get up and sing, from
the teens right down to one little girl who
is now about 3 years old, tiny Charlotte
Johnston. Her oldest brother, one of her
sisters, and their mother played as a trio,
much to our delight. One of the older sis-
ters sang a lovely song as she "signed," one
of the trademarks of the older children
when they perform, and one of her broth-
ers played a piano solo. Several solos
were sung by our adults, and some really
great food was waiting for us to "snack" on
afterwards. I use the word "snack" very
loosely here, because there was more of a
dinner buffet from turkey, veggies, dips
and crackers, pies, cakes, cookies and oth-
er deserts to satisfy everyone. It's a "Bap-
tist thing," but we sure did enjoy the food
as much as we enjoyed the singing worship
service. I'm just so sorry I didn't bring my
camera ... there would have been some
nice photos to share!
This Saturday is Christmas On The
Square, and if you are new to our area and
haven't experienced this event, plan to take
it in this year. From early in the morning,
about 8 a.m., until about 4 in the afternoon
you'll hear and see lots of entertainment,
enjoy a variety of food vendors in the food
court and find a lot of great crafts that will
make wonderful Christmas gifts. Then
find a good place along the parade route to
watch the lighted night Christmas parade.
That's one of the events I try my best to
watch every year, and this will be no ex-
ception. It seems to get longer and better
each year. Look through this paper for a
schedule of the day's events. You won't
find a better full day of entertainment for
your whole family in our area, and I'd ven-
ture to say, in my opinion, one of the best
the whole year.
And make plans to drive through the
two-mile long lighted Christmas extrava-
ganza at the Spirit Of the Suwannee. If
you can, come on Monday, Tuesday, or
Wednesday, Nov. 30, Dec. 1 and Dec. 2, or
on Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday, Dec.


7, 8, or 9, and help the Suwannee County
Animal Shelter. A portion of the ticket
sales for the Christmas Lights on those
nights will be donated to our shelter, and
will make a big difference in helping our
animals through the winter months. The
event starts about 6 p.m., and at the end of
the scenic drive there will be live music,
lots of Christmas items in the craft store,
and hot cocoa and cookies to enjoy.
This year's Christmas program at OBC
will be the adult choir's program during
morning worship, which will begin at
10:30 a.m. (no Sunday School), and the
children and youth choirs will present their
program at 5 p.m., not our usual 6 p.m. ser-
vice. Adults and children have worked
hard, and we sincerely hope you will come
and share our worship service in the morn-
ing and come listen to our children and
youth in the evening. Everyone in our
community is welcome. So come join us!
Also, there will be a food pantry at
O'Brien Baptist Church starting in a couple
of weeks. I'll have more information on
this project next week.
On Dec. 12, at 10:30 a.m. in our Fellow-
ship Hall, there will be a baby shower for
Matt and Nikki Snider. All family and
friends of the couple are invited to come
and share in the fun as they are wished the
best for the coming new addition to their
family.
From "Humorous Quotations":
"Why not go out on a limb? Isn't that
where the fruit is?"
"The greatest disappointment in a
golfer's life is when he makes a hole-in-
one without witnesses."
"There ain't much fun in medicine, but
there's a lot of medicine in good fun."
"Football is, after all, a wonderful way
to get rid of aggression without going to
jail for it."
"You don't set a fox to watch the chick-
ens just because he has a lot of experience
in the henhouse."
"Don't be concerned whether God is on
your side or not; be concerned whether you
are on God's side."
Have a wonderful week! Take time this
weekend to enjoy some fun with your fam-
ily. God bless!


MAGENTA $MM


PAGE 8A


BLACK


UPDATE


Keeping C Christ In Christmas


Festival and Parade


BLACK




North Florida


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


CYAN
MAGENTA


Branford News

200-plus served at Community Thanksgiving Dinner


Submitted
The Branford Area Inter Church Min-
istries held the annual Community
Thanksgiving Dinner at the Hatch Park
Community Center on Nov. 21. More
than 200 people came out to enjoy a tra-
ditional Thanksgiving meal consisting of
turkey, ham, mashed potatoes, dressing,
sweet potato pie, green beans, cranberry
sauce, collard greens, corn bread, rolls,
dessert and tea.
The Branford Area Inter Church Min-
istries would like to thank the many peo-
ple from area churches came out to help
serve, prepare food, set up and clean up.
We would also like to thank members of
Pack 570 Webelo Scouts and Troop 570
Boy Scouts of America who came to help.
The Branford High School kitchen staff
cooked five turkeys for us and members
of Vineyard of Grace fellowship in Bran-
ford were present to cook hams and keep
food warm on their grill. Also, the follow-
ing businesses contributed to the success
of the day and we are grateful for their
contributions: Nell's Restaurant, Hard-
ee's, Time Saver, The Sub Shop, New Mt.
Zion Missionary Baptist Church, Living
Springs Family Worship Center, McCall's
Chapel United Methodist Church, Jim


Hollis Home Church Ministry, First Bap-
tist Church of Branford, Vineyard of
Grace, Beachville Advent Christian
Church, Branford Church of God, Bran-
ford United Methodist Church, Northern
Florida Christian Center and Christian
Mission in Action. In addition, many indi-
viduals brought food, donated time and
funds and served and for that we are truly
grateful. We would also like to thank
County Commissioner Wesley Wain-
wright, who came and spent most of the
time serving food to all who came. Those
who worked in the serving line and help-
ing in so many ways exemplified true ser-
vanthood as they hardly even took time
eat!
It is a privilege to be part of a commu-
nity like Branford where people can come
together this way to serve and to enjoy
each other's company.
On Sunday, Nov. 22 the Branford Com-
munity Thanksgiving Service was held at
First Baptist Church. Music was provid-
ed by the First Baptist Church choir and
Kevin Fletcher. Rev. Arthur L. Bryant of
New Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church
and Rev. Gordon Keller of First Baptist
Church of Branford were the speakers for
the evening. After the service refresh-
ments were served.


Good food, good friends.
- Courtesy photos


Dessert followed a tasty din-
ner.


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CYAN
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SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


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PAGE 9A


Good food, good friends.


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SUWANNEE RIVER READINGS
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The water levels provided here refer to the height at the US Hwy. 27 bridge
in Branford in feet above mean sea level (ft-msl) at the gauging station. In
the past the levels were read as gauge height not mean sea level.
Nov. 24, '09 8.59 Nov. 28, '09 8.65
Nov. 25,'09 8.65 Nov. 29,'09 8.66
Nov. 26,'09 8.66 Nov. 30,'09 8.67
Nov. 27, '09 8.64 Dec. 01, '09 8.67
Sponsored By:

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* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


Obituaries

Leon Dupree Hatch Sr.
August 3, 1923 -
November 28, 2009

eon Dupree Hatch
Sr., age 86, of
Branford, FL
passed away peacefully at
the Haven Hospice
Suwannee Valley Care
Center in Lake City on
November 28, 2009
following a lengthy illness.
Mr. Hatch was bom on
August 3, 1923, the son of
Robert E. and Mamie
Woods Hatch. With the
exception of a few years
following his graduation
from Branford High School
in 1941, Mr. Hatch was a
lifelong resident, farmer
and businessman in
Branford.
Mr. Hatch was proud to
serve his country during
World War II in the United
States Air Force and, along
with his nine man crew
aboard a B-17 Flying
Fortress, put in 29 combat
missions against Germany.
On the second mission, his


plane exploded and burst
into flames as they were
about to cross the English
Channel. The Associated
Press dispatch, describing
the incident, in which the
crew of nine narrowly
escaped death said: "The
last man to leave the plane
was Sgt. Leon Hatch,
gunner. He rushed back to
see if the tail gunner was
safe and he realized he was
the last man in the bomber.
He had to struggle back
through the flames to get
out." The press dispatch
said that nine parachutes
puffed through the smoke
of the flaming plane,
barely escaping the wild
zigzagging of the wounded
craft. An old English
farmer and his wife
rescued Mr. Hatch and
took him to their house
where Air/Sea Rescue
eventually located him and
took him back to his base.
After completing his
time in the service, Mr.
Hatch came back to
Branford, and along with
his brother Rudolph,
opened a business and


began farming.
It wasn't long before Mr.
Hatch met and married his
wife of 56 years, Shirley
Williams. Together, they
raised three children: Lee
(Debra) Hatch, Shawn
(David) Campbell, and
Chuck (Amby) Hatch, all
of Branford. His pride and
joy were his eight
grandchildren: Bethany
(Barton) Byrd, Dupree
Hatch, Eddie Hatch, Will
Campbell, Jesse (Reid)
Fleming, Emilee Hatch,
Kimberly (Seth) Jackson,
David Campbell, Jr. and
one great-grandchild, Troy
Fleming. In addition, Mr.
Hatch is survived by one
brother, Rudolph Hatch of
Branford, FL and one
sister, Betty Jean Daughtry
of Lake City, FL. He was
preceded in death by his
parents, a brother, Robert
Hatch, and a sister, Doris
Hatch Long.
Mr. Hatch was a member
of First Baptist Church of
Branford for many years,
where he was bestowed the
honor of Deacon Emeritus.
Through the years, he was


CALL TODAY


-plus ITal


Plus Tax


active in many civic
organizations and
community activities and
was interested in anything
that would benefit the
Branford community. He
and his brother Rudolph
were recipients of the
Suwannee County
Chamber of Commerce
Trailblazer award in
February 2004. In addition,
in 2008 he was bestowed
the Paul Harris Fellow
award by the Branford
Rotary Club.
Mr. Hatch will be
remembered by all who
knew him as a man who
loved the simple things in
life. He felt blessed to have
been born at a time when a
person could enjoy the
wide-open spaces and the
unrestricted things in life,
such as hunting and
fishing. He had a deep
respect for all living things.
He was a true gentleman
and derived pleasure from
being generous with
others, whether he was
delivering a home grown
watermelon to a shut-in, or
donating property so that


Rates
at




0


386-362-2790


966 N. Ohio Avenue

Live Oak, Florida 32064
563033-F


the children of the
Branford community could
have a place to play. Above
all, he valued dedication to
God, country and family.
A celebration of his life
was held on December 1,
2009 at 2:00 at the First
Baptist Church Christian
Life Center located on
Suwannee Avenue in
Branford. Visitation was
held one hour prior to the
service. Interment followed
at Oak Grove Cemetery,
Branford.
Memorial contributions
can be made to the Haven
Hospice Suwannee Valley
Care Center, 6037 US
Hwy. 90 West, Lake City
FL, 32055.
Arrangements are
entrusted to Daniels
Funeral Homes and
Crematory of Branford, Fl.

Please sign the
online .... i7.. ,..1 Go to
www. suwanneedemocrat.comrn
and click on obituaries


Extend your stay with


weekly & monthly rates


from the Untied States Air
Force, was a sport
parachute instructor for the
Air Force Academy and
was a private pilot.
A son Michael Eugene
Morgan preceded him in
death.
Survivors include his
wife Annie Floyd Morgan,
sons Francis Clayton
Morgan, VA, Stephen
Arnold Morgan, New
Mexico, David Keith
Morgan, Florida, Michael
Edwin Morgan, Idaho,
daughters Regina Lynn
Carter, Arizona, April
Morgan Morris, Cynthiana,
14 grandchildren and 3
great grandchildren.
Funeral services will be
11 AM Wednesday, Dec. 2,
2009 at the Drake-Whaley-
McCarty Funeral Home.
Friends may call after 10
AM Wednesday at the
funeral home.
www.drakewhaleymccar
tyfuneralhome.com.

Please sign the
online .... -. .--i Go to
www. suwanneedemocrat.com
and click on obituaries


Norman Oliver Protsman
April 8, 1921 -
November 29, 2009

S1 orman Oliver
Protsman was
born April 8,
1921 near Celina, Ohio. He
was a veteran of World
War II, member of the
493rd Bomb Group, and
was stationed in England.
He owned several radio
stations in Florida,
including WNER/WQHL
in Live Oak, one in
Madison, one in Dade City
and one in Winter Haven.
He was a long time
member and past president
of the Florida Association
of Broadcasters.
Mr. Protsman was a long
time resident of Live Oak,
Florida.
He was active at Advent
Christian Village in
Dowling Park and with the
Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch.
He was a member of
Shriners, Rotary other
fraternal organizations.
He was a supporter of 4-
H and a member of the
Suwannee Valley Tourist
Development Council.
Mr. Protsman was a
charter member of the Dog
Island Yacht Club, a
member of the Florida
Association of Community
Colleges and a member of
Suwannee County Civil
Defense.
The Norman 0. and
Leone N. Protsman Bell
Tower erected in 1992 on
the campus of North
Florida Community
College.
Mr. Protsman was a
supporter of a wide variety
of other community,
county and state groups
He is survived by his
wife, Leone N. Protsman;
her two sons, David and
Steve, and their families
including four
grandchildren and nine
great-grandchildren; and a
wide extended family of
nieces and nephews.
In lieu of flowers, the
family asks that donations
be sent to the Florida
Sheriff's Boys' Ranch, P.
O. Box 2000, Boys Ranch,
Florida.
A viewing is planned for
Friday from 5-7 p.m. at
First Presbyterian Church
in Live Oak.
A funeral service will be


Joyce Ann Voyles Fox
January 17, 1950 -
November 28, 2009

oyce Ann Voyles
Fox, age 59, of
Live Oak, Florida
passed away
Saturday, November 28,
2009, in Shands at UF in
Gainesville, FL following a
brief illness. She was a
native and life long
resident of Live Oak, FL.
Joyce worked for the past
ten years for Winn Dixie,
she enjoyed cooking, loved
Elvis Presley and was a
member of the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter Day
Saints.
Survivors include two
sons, Ronald Lee, Jr. of
Live Oak, FL and John
Ellison, Jr. of Lake City,
FL; two brothers, Renny
Voyles and Buddy Voyles
both of Live Oak, FL; four
sisters, Alice Parson and
Angie Voyles both of Live
Oak, FL, Peggy Stratton of
Panacea, FL, Evelyn Hafen
of Las Vegas, Nevada; one
granddaughter, Alayne
Nayback of Conway, South
Carolina.
Visitation will be held,
Thursday, Dec. 3rd from 5
to 7 PM at Harris Funeral
Home.
Funeral services will be
held 2:00 PM Friday,
December 4, 2009 at the
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints with
Bishop Wayne Law and
Mr. Ken Voyles officiating.
Interment will follow in the
Rocky Sink Baptist Church
Cemetery.
Please sign the
guestbook at
www.harrisfuneralhomeinc
.net.
Harris Funeral Home &
Cremations, Inc., 932 N.
Ohio Ave., Live Oak, 386-
364-5115 is in charge of all
arrangements.

Please sign the
online ..... 7..,..1 Go to
www. suwanneedemocrat.comrn
and click on obituaries


Vernon Morgan
April 11, 1932 -
November 28, 2009

V eemon Morgan, 77
of Cynthiana, KY
died Saturday
November 28, 2009 at the
Harrison Memorial
Hospital, Cynthiana.
He was born April 11,
1932 in Hamilton Co., Fl. a
son of the late Odus and
Mattie Allen Morgan.
Mr. Morgan was retired


YAAGNO TA A

MAGENTA M- *M -*M~u* *


PAGE 10A


BLACK


held at Daniels Funeral
Home on Saturday at 11
a.m. A graveside service at
Live Oak Cemetery will
follow the service.

Please sign the
online ..... -..- Go to
www. suwanneedemocrat.com
and click on obituaries


See obituary,
Page 12A


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North Florida


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


V


-Christian Mission

in Action Ministries
.....-.... Christian Mission in Action Ministries celebrates
"A Christmas on the Square in downtown Live Oak on S
urday, December 5, 8 a.m.4 4p.m.
. Stopby our booth for an early breakfast and home-
"- .made baked goods.


Sat-


Join us for a day of fun. Contact Audry Howell at 386-
364-4560 for more information.


Live Oak Artist Guild invites you
to annual Holiday Celebration


.--.


The Live Oak Artists
*- Guild invites you to our
Annual Holiday Celebra-
tion December 11, 2009 1-
8 p.m. Meet the artists
from 5-8 p.m.
Browse our Holiday Gift
'"'-. Shop, sample our artists fa-
"* vorite festive treats. Enjoy


UW campaign report luncheon set for Dec. 9


Continued From Page 3A

some of the youngest and
some of the oldest
participants in United Way
agency programs at
Suwannee Valley 4Cs
Head Start and at
Columbia County Senior
Services at the agencies'
Fort White facilities.
Two United Way of
Suwannee Valley affiliated
agencies will be featured
during the luncheon.
Donna Fagan, executive
director of Another Way,
will speak about the
services offered by this
United Way affiliated
agency, which is a state-
certified domestic
violence and sexual
assault center for a multi-
county area. Happy
House students will
perform the blessing and
provide holiday


entertainment by singing
Christmas songs.
Eddy Hillhouse, general
manager for Land
O'Lakes Purina, will serve
as the business speaker
and share his company's
involvement in the
community fundraising
campaign. His company
employees participate both
as donors and as loaned
executives on the
campaign team.
Hugh Giebeig,
administrator of the
Columbia County and
Hamilton County Health
Departments and a long-
time member of the United
Way of Suwannee Valley
Challengers' Club, the
organization's leadership
donors, will speak about
investing in our
community as a member
of the Challengers' Club.
The featured United


Way community impact
initiatives will be the
homeless coalition, the
Homeless Services
Network of Suwannee
Valley.
Bunny Warren and Chris
Tylutki, employees of
Corrections Corporation
of America (CCA) and
members of the United
Way of Suwannee Valley
Communications
Committee, will emcee the
event. CCA is the sponsor
for the cost of the facility
for the event.
The caterer for the event
will be the Blue Roof
Grill, which will serve a
luncheon of boneless
baked pork chops served
with Asian rice,
homemade yeast rolls,
mandarin orange salad,
sour cream pound cake,
tea and water. The cost of
the luncheon is $10 per


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CHOOSE-n-CUT and PRE CUT CHRISTMAS TREES

"Jones' Christmas Tree Farm
1230 NW 95th St., Branford, FL 32008 -
(386) 935-3549
Gilchrist County Take Hwy. 138
(East of Hwy. 129 or West of Hwy. 47)
To N.W. 7th Terrace.... Follow Signs
16 Acres of CYPRESS,
VIRGINIA PINE, CEDAR,
AND BLUE ICE.
TREE STANDS, TREE LIGHTS, ETC.
POTTED TREES
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10 A.M. 'TIL 6:00 P.M.
THURS. NOV. 26, THRU DEC. 23


person.
Guests are invited to
bring $5 to participate in
the "Heads or Tails" 50/50
contest.
Reservations for the
luncheon may be made by
contacting the United Way
office at 386-752-5604 by
today.
During each month of
United Way's annual
community fundraising
campaign, the local United
Way conducts a campaign
report luncheon to provide
an opportunity for
campaign team volunteers,
community citizens,
business representatives
and agency personnel to
learn more about the


partner agency services,
United Way community
impact initiatives and
businesses supporting our
community's well being
through their support of
the United Way.
United Way of
Suwannee Valley is a
community impact and
fundraising organization
which, utilizing volunteers
on all levels, advances the
common good by
identifying unmet
community needs and
seeking to alleviate those
needs through United Way
of Suwannee Valley
initiatives and the funding
of 22 affiliated health and
human service agencies.


inspirational and unique art
works.
There will be live holi-
day music and Enchanted
Christmas tree forest.


Mrs. Vickers'
class yard sale
Mrs. Vickers' class is
taking donations for their
upcoming yard sale on Sat-
urday Dec. 12. Pickups are
available. For more infor-
mation please call 647-
4047 or 344-2993.


Suwannee Middle
School Softball
Boosters fundraiser
The Suwannee Middle
School Softball Boosters
are having a BBQ chicken
dinner fundraiser on Friday,
Dec. 4, starting at 11 a.m.
in the Cheek and Scott
parking lot.
Dinners include: BBQ
chicken, baked beans,
coleslaw, bread, and dessert
for $5.
For more information
contact Coach Jeff Smith at
386-590-1059.


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North Florida


CYAN
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PAGE 12A


' Tnewtnew

Even Odd

SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


BLACK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


Live Oak Lights

A crowd of more than 400 turned out for Live Oak Lights, an inaugural downtown celebration
designed to kick off the holiday season. There was a Christmas tree lighting, carriage rides,
musical entertainment and, best of all, an appearance by Santa. In addition, some downtown
businesses stayed open late to showcase their wares. Here are some scenes.



ABOVE: Live Oak's Redevelopment Agency was represented by Development Manager
George Curtis. Through the Redevelopment Agency, the city will initiate a number of pro-
grams in the coming months to help eliminate blight in certain areas, as well as to facili-
tate and promote redevelopment within the downtown area and surrounding commercial
corridors, according to Curtis. Courtesy photo
BELOW: The sign says it all. Photo: Staff


Santa listens earnestly to youngsters' requests. Photo: Kim Boatright


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Anxiously awaiting Santa.
- Photo: Staff


J Obituarv
Jesse Lewis
August 29, 1935 -
on November 28, 2009
esse Lewis, 74,
t passed away
Saturday November
28, 2009 after a
long Illness. He was born
0 in Suwannee County, FL
August 29, 1935 and
returned to Branford 7
years go from Jacksonville,
1. FL., He was a automobile
Mechanic, a US Army
h veteran, and of the Baptist
faith.
Survivors include his
wife, Ann Lewis of
Dr. Branford, FL., one
daughter, Sharon Hice of
Jacksonville, FL., four
sons, Albert J. "Bo" Lewis,
Jr., Jacksonville, FL., Mike
Ik Dees, Ricky Dees, Shane
RK Dees also of Jacksonville
C FL., two brothers,
g James Lewis of
' Wellborn, FL and Claude
Lewis of Tifton, GA and
nephew James E. Lewis,
Jr., of Branford, FL.
mr Twelve Grandchildren and
C eight great grandchildren
5 also survive.
Daniels Funeral Homes
and Crematory, Inc.
Branford, FL., in charge of
= arrangements.
S Please sign the
pm online .. ... ..... Go to
S www.suwanneedemocrat.com
m and click on obituaries

P More obituaries,
AK Page 1OA


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


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TOP: Singer Lynn Brannon "The Best Defense Is Self-Defense!
entertains the crowd. Timothy Walker
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ABOVE: A big hug for Santa. Branford, Florida
- Photo: Staff Children, Teen & Adult
ABOVE RIGHT: Some of the (386) 935-3777
kids chat with Santa. American Kenpo 201 SuwanneeAve.-Branford,.FL
- Photo: Staff AKKUinc@Juno.com
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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


Second dose of H1 N1 vaccines scheduled for arades Pre-K-5


By Carnell Hawthorne Jr.
carnell.hawthorne@gaflnews.com

The Suwannee County Health Department has
released a follow-up schedule for students grades
Pre-K-5 who received their first H1N1 shot back in
November. As noted in a previous article, younger
children are required to receive a second dose of
the vaccine to help build their immunity. Shots will
be administered at the start of school on the fol-


lowing dates:

Dec. 7 Suwannee Intermediate School
Dec. 8 Suwannee Elementary School
Dec. 9 Branford Elementary School
Dec. 11 Suwannee Primary School

Anyone who wants to get an H1N1 shot should
visit the health department Monday-Friday from 8
a.m.-11 a.m. or 1 p.m.- 4 p.m.


Military test provokes ire of some parents


Continued From Page 1A

the exam and the way it is
administered at the school.
"The students were told
that they had no option but
to take it," Odom said.
"They were told it was a
skills assessment test spon-
sored by the military."
Although juniors are re-
quired to take the ASVAB
at SHS, the option to with-
hold personal information,
including social security
numbers, from recruiters is
available, but left to the
school's discretion.
SHS, like many schools,
has selected to share stu-
dents results and personal
contact information with
recruiters, according to
Simpson.
That being the case, stu-
dents were left with the op-
tion of submitting a written
opt-out letter prior to the
exam being administered.
"Under the No Child
Left Behind Act, parents
have the right to request
that their child opt-out in
writing, but if parents do
not object in writing, the
schools must provide the
students name to the mili-
tary," said Jim Bradshaw, a
spokesman for the U.S.
Dept of Education.
Many students simply
didn't know they had that
option.
In any case, the same
law that gives students the
right to opt out, requires
schools to provide stu-
dents' names to the mili-


tary upon request regard-
less of whether they take
the ASVAB or not.
The Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act
(FERPA), does not protect
students rights in this case.
FERPA contains an excep-
tion giving schools the
right to disclose student
records to "organizations
conducting certain studies
for or on behalf of the
school."
This exception, which
permits disclosure without
consent, grants disclosure
of student records by
school officials "for legiti-
mate educational inter-
ests," and therefore shields
the ASVAB under FERPA
law, according to the
ASVAB counselor manual.
Odom worried the
school would suffer under
the federal No Child Left
Behind Act, which penal-
izes schools for absen-
teeism.
"They should have had
an alternative place for
those who did not want to
take it," Odom said. "In-
stead, kids were told the
only way to avoid taking
the exam was to stay
home."
Odom was initially un-
der the assumption that
students could chose to
withhold their information
from recruiters through
"Option 8," listed in the
ASVAB counselor manual.
This is not the case.
This choice is left to the
school's discretion. Option


8 is built into the con-
structs of the ASVAB, and
"provides no recruiter con-
tact from the listing of stu-
dent results," according to
the manual. With this op-
tion, a student's test results
are not released to recruiter
services. However, SHS
administrators have chosen
to forego that option.
Odom also noted that the
test gives military re-
cruiters access to students'
personal information such
as social security numbers,
addresses and phone num-
bers, making it easy to con-
tact and "harass" kids, par-
ticularly those like her son,
who have no interest in
joining the military at the
current time.
"I just have issues with
it," Odom said. "My son is
not enlisting in the mili-
tary. I'm not anti-military,
in fact I'm the daughter of
a retired colonel and fight-
er pilot, but my son has no
intentions to join."
Simpson said, as far as
he knows, students can
chose not to give their per-
sonal information on the
exam.
"I've never known a test
to force students to put
their social security on it.
Usually that has always
been optional, and students
can leave that area blank."
Still some argue that the
ASVAB is not required by
the Florida Department of
Education, and therefore
should not be forced upon
students.


"I had a couple of stu-
dents who tried to hide out
the day of the test, but we
found them. We tell them
they need to take it," Simp-
son said. "If they don't
come to school that day
we're not going to chase
them down or anything."
At least one student, the
Democrat has learned, was
placed into in-school sus-
pension for writing a false
name on his/her ASVAB
exam. The parent of that
child has chosen not to
come forward for fear her
child could be ostracized
by school officials.
Such was the case with
other parents as well, who
chose not to speak for fear
of potential repercussions.
Across the county line at
Columbia High School, the
ASVAB is administered a
bit differently.
"Our students opt in to
take it," said Kay Dekle,
assistant principal at CHS.
"They sign up to take it."
The test will be adminis-
tered on Dec. 12 at CHS to
llth and 12th graders who
registered to take it, Dekle
said.
As it stands, school offi-
cials stand behind the way
in which the ASVAB is ad-
ministered at SHS.
"It's helping the students
plan their future, which is
what we're about," Simp-
son said. "We're not in the
business to help out the
military, we're in the busi-
ness of helping out the stu-
dents."


'Times are hard, people are losing their jobs and can't get their kids anything
for Christmas. They need help, and that's what we're here for.'
Alan Bedenbaugh, coordinator of LOFD's Toys for Sparky's Kids program


Looking out for

Continued From Page 1A calls from parents and foi
guardians around Decem-
said Bedenbaugh, in his ber looking for help. This tha
21st year with the program. year started in September. be
"Our phones are ringing Monday marked the first a
off the hook and there is day of sign-ups to receive St(
constantly someone at the help and 51 signed their co
door needing our help." names before noon. Oh
Bedenbaugh said people Bedenbaugh said when rai
are looking to LOFD and it comes to kids, people th(
other groups more than don't let their pride get in we
ever. the way. ha
"Times are hard, people "People tell me that
are losing their jobs and they hate they have to do ed
can't get their kids any- it, to come get the toys, bu
thing for Christmas," said but they say they want co
Bedenbaugh. "They need their kids to have a good sai
help, and that's what Christmas, that is what wa
we're here for." they are here for," said ha
He said he usually gets Bedenbaugh. "We all do it fle
is

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U jev
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r the kids."
He's not the only one
at feels that way. Eliza-
th Starling is raffling off
cedar chest at the Jiffy
ore she manages on the
rner of Duval Street and
hio Avenue. The money
sed, $300 so far, went to
e purchase of toys that
ere given to LOFD to be
ended out.
Starling's husband start-
building the cedar chest
t passed away before he
uld finish it. Starling
id completing the chest
is never in question. It
d to be finished and raf-
:d off for the kids. This
the second year she has
lped in this fashion.
ast year she raffled off a
welry box her late hus-
nd Mabry constructed.
When asked why she


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MEDICAL

SECRETARY


does it, Elizabeth Starling
said modestly, "to help the
less fortunate."
Folks can purchase a
raffle ticket at the store.
The drawing will be held
Dec. 22.
Those wishing to donate
toys may drop them off at
LOFD. Boxes are also set
up at the Duval/Ohio Jiffy
Store, Publix, Wal-Mart
and the Dollar General
next to Publix.
Those in need may stop
by LOFD and sign up for
the giveaway, which will
be held Monday, Dec. 21
beginning at 8 a.m. at
LOFD, on East Duval
Street. The last day to sign
up is Dec. 14. The age lim-
it for the giveaway is 0-13.
Bedenbaugh said he
hopes to be able to give
each child five toys.


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ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.


2 CHARGED


IN WELLBORN


FIRE
Continued From Page 1A

Acting on a tip, investigators visited the home of the
minor suspect. Once there, officers said, they observed
several items reported stolen from a local residence. The
owner identified the items as those stolen from his home
and they were returned to him. Cooper-Olin, Burke and
the minor admitted responsibility for the crime, sheriff's
reports show.
Officers then arrested 18-year-old Cooper-Olin and
transported him to the county jail. Once there, Cooper-
Olin reportedly confessed that he and the juvenile suspect
were responsible for breaking into another residence,
along with the live-in workshop of Whisnant, before set-
ting that facility on fire. According to a sheriff's report,
Cooper-Olin confessed that he and the minor stole sever-
al items from the workshop, vandalized it, then set it
ablaze to hide possible evidence.
Although Burke, 18, said he had CHARGED WITH
previously gone to the Whisnant shop BURGLARY
with the two others to steal items, he
told officers he was not present when
the fire occurred.
In addition to the other crimes,
Cooper-Olin reportedly admitted to
breaking into a vehicle on Nov. 14,
several days after the fire.
Cooper-Olin and the minor, arrest- Thomas
ed Saturday, were each charged with James
four counts of burglary, four counts Burke faces
of grand theft and arson. Burke was burglary
arrested and is charged with two rgary
counts each of burglary and grand
theft.



25 years of Christmas


on the Square


Continued From Page 1A

niversary celebration.
Community members who
played a key role in the
event's history will be rec-
ognized.
"We have more vendors
than we've ever had be-
fore," Hillhouse said.
The number of booths is
expected to hit 260 by
Wednesday, with folks
planning to travel from as
far as Atlanta and through-
out the south, along with
plenty of area folks. The
Saturday event will last un-
til 4 p.m.
The food varieties will
be immeasurable, with
everything from home-
made jams and jellies to
hand-dipped candies,
baked and fried goods,
and everything in be-
tween.
There will be artisans
and craftsmen from nearly
all walks of life displaying
their handmade quilts, pil-
lows, wreaths, stained
glass, paintings, wood-
work and crafts.
Teens from the Florida
Sheriffs Boys Ranch will
be on location to show off
some of their woodshop
handiwork, Hillhouse
said.
"The event is not re-
stricted to handmade
items only," Hillhouse
said. "There will be a
commercial division as
well, with novelty items
and more."
There will be perfor-
mances by church groups,
dancers, cheer gym partic-
ipants and others.
This year entertainment
will be featured in two lo-
cations.
The Suwannee High
band will perform all day
at the end of Suwannee
Street, said Crain. A sec-
ond location, at the comer
of Howard Street and Pine
Avenue, will host other
staged performances.
Millennium Park in


downtown will be the site
of the kids' play area with
inflatable jungle gyms and
other play equipment
hosted by Suwannee Val-
ley Party Rentals. Santa
Claus will be seated there-
about for photos with the
children. He'll be check-
ing to see who's been
naughty or nice.
On Church Street, there
will be a train ride and a
petting zoo for all to en-
joy, said Hillhouse.
Christmas on the Square
is the largest and longest
running event of its kind
in the Live Oak Commu-
nity.
"There were four folks
who started it," said Susan
K. Lamb, former editor of
the Suwannee Democrat.
Stanley and Betty John-
son, Edwin McCook and
Lamb decided Live Oak
needed something signifi-
cant for the holidays after
the old time tobacco festi-
val dwindled.
"We got together and
put it together and had
about 2000 people show
up that first year," Lamb
said.
Since that time, Christ-
mas on the Square partici-
pation has grown to be-
tween 10-20,000 people a
year, she said.
In an effort to encourage
more pedestrian traffic on
Highway 90, Hillhouse
said, there will be an an-
tique tractors display for
the older kids at heart at the
100 block of West Howard
Street. The fire department
will also coordinate an an-
tique car show at the 200
block of West Howard.
All are encouraged to
come out and enjoy this
down-home holiday tradi-
tion.
And don't forget, the
Christmas parade begins
at 6 p.m. This year's grand
marshals will be Bob and
Francis McGranahan,
owners of Live Oak Pest
Control.


MAGENTA $MM


PAGE 14A


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I




North Florida


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


GARDENING TIPS
FROM THE LIVE OAK
GARDENING CLUB


Poinsettias.

The Christmas Flower
By Lucille Heinrich
During the Christmas holidays, thousands of these
lovely red, pink, and white plants are given out as gifts or
purchased to decorate our homes, work places, hospitals,
churches, and public buildings. Poinsettias are native to
Mexico and were known as the Flores de Noche Buena,
or Flowers of the Holy Night, for they bloomed each year
during the Christmas season. The poinsettia got its
American name when it was introduced to the United
States in 1825 by John R. Poinsett, the first American
Ambassador to Mexico.
What many people perceive as the "bloom" on a
poinsettia is actually a cluster of colored leaves called a
bract. The flower of the poinsettia is in the center of the
bracts. When selecting a plant, be sure to choose a plant
with dark green leaves, sturdy, healthy bracts and little
pollen showing on the flowers. Do not pick a plant that is
waterlogged or too tightly packed on the display shelves.
Be sure to remove the paper or plastic sleeve from the
plant immediately and place it in a container that has
drainage holes in the bottom. Keep the plant moist but not
soggy (it will rot if too wet) and give the plant indirect
natural sunlight for at least six hours per day. Bring
indoors if temperatures dip below 50 degrees F. Do not
fertilize while the plant is in bloom!
If your plant makes it past New Year's Day,
congratulations, you have treated your poinsettia with
reasonable care, and your plant has survived the "shock"
of being taken out of a controlled greenhouse
environment. With some attention, you can enjoy your
plant's colorful foliage for many Christmas seasons to
come. In late March cut the plant back and, when all
danger of frost has disappeared, take it outdoors and keep

It is a popular belief
that the poinsettia plant
is highly toxic. This is
not true, and studies
have shown that while
the sap can cause an
allergic reaction in
people who are latex
sensitive, ingesting the
leaves will only cause an
upset stomach.


S; -AIN
The poinsettia, also known as the Christmas Flower. Photo:
it in indirect sunlight. At this time, it would be a good
idea to repot using rich, loosely packed potting soil. Keep
the plant watered regularly and fertilized. You may need
to prune back during the summer to keep the plant bushy
and compact, but do not prune after August. Like the
Christmas cactus, at the end of September, keep it in
complete darkness for 14 hours per day. Your plant will
naturally come into bloom sometime during
November/December.


It is a popular belief that the poinsettia plant is highly
toxic. This is not true, and studies have shown that while
the sap can cause an allergic reaction in people who are
latex sensitive, ingesting the leaves will only cause an
upset stomach. In fact, the taste of the leaves is very
unpleasant, and small children and pets would more than
likely not get past the first bite. Not only will this plant be
a beautiful addition to your Holiday d6cor, but it has also
proven to be a great plant to improve indoor air quality!


PPO UOA3

MAGENTA $N2UM4M *


-


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MAGENTA Even Odd


BLACK


PAGE 15A


i4




North Florida


MAGENTA


',,new ,new
Even Odd
* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


BLACK


S 2 ^ 1529 SE
oys Ohio Ave.

THEB.EST LIVE OAK


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


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MAGENTA


uwatuInnee ernmorrat
Section B
Wednesday, December 2, 2009


Even Odd


Bowler of the Week


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The SMS Lady PupS. Photo: Submitted


SMS Lady Bulipups



outscore opponents




25-1


SPORTS
COMMENTARY

Who's #1?

Sportabout
By Tom Daniels
The college I*aj
polls are out '
and the top six
teams are /
undefeated.
They are, in order, Florida,
Alabama, Texas, TCU,
Cincinnati and Boise State.
The BCS was suppose to
give us a number 1 team.
These six teams are
undefeated.
The Gators and Crimson
Tide will square off and the
ranks will go to five
undefeated. The winner will
probably get Texas for the
National Championship.
What happens to the team
that loses, will they get an
undefeated team in a bowl
game? What reward does a
TCU get for beating an
Alabama or Florida? Even
if the undefeated match up
we will still have
undefeated. The reality is
we could end up with four
undefeated teams, more
likely three undefeated
teams. So how do we
determine the winner?
Beats the crap out of me.
Obviously Alabama and
Florida have played the
toughest opponents and one
of these teams could drop
to sixth when it's all over. If
Florida and Alabama play
two or three overtimes to
determine a winner will
they get some extra credit ?
Will Cincinnati ever make
it back to the top five,
shouldn't it count for
SEE SPORTABOUT, PAGE 3B


By Coach Kim B... i' ,.'lit


The Suwannee Middle School
Lady Bullpups are 5-0 so far this sea-
son and have outscored their oppo-
nents by a total of 25-1.
Here is a look at recent games.
Nov. 16 Lady Pups played Perry
in Perry. Goals were made by Beth
Glass(2), Ashley Wood, Staci
Cashmore, Riley Walczak and Madis-
en Buzbee. Players of the Game:
Kayla Watson, Shan Johnson, Molly


Youth basketball


in full swing


By Alden Rosner
Suwannee Parks and Recreation
kicked off the 2009 Youth Basketball
season on Thursday, November 19 at
the Suwannee County Coliseum. Over
60 boys and girls ages eight through
13 are participating in this year's pro-
gram. Players are learning and devel-
oping their dribbling, passing and
shooting skills and having a great time
playing the game of basketball.


Suwannee Parks and Recreation is
currently accepting registrations for
the 2009-10 youth soccer program.
The registration deadline for youth
soccer is Friday, December 4. Play-
ers can register at the Suwannee Parks
and Recreation office, located at 1201
Silas Drive, or online at www.suwan-
neeparksandrecreation.org. For more
information, please contact Suwannee
Parks and Recreation at 386-362-
3004.


Coach KOD Catncart instructing the Junior Celtics during a timeout. Photo: Submitted


Presented by:

BANK of FLORIDA


Vogel, Brooke Wainwright ad Riley
Walczak.
Nov. 19 Traveled to Lake City to
take on Lake City Middle
School. The Lady Pups were
scored on for the first time this sea-
son, but didn't let that goal get them
down. Goals for Pups were Beth
Glass with two, Shan Johnson and
Ady Canjay. Pups win 4-1.
Players of the Game: Madisen
SEE SMS LADY BULLPUPS, PAGE 3B


JV Bulldogs win big

in season opener
Submitted
The JV Bulldog basketball team took a sound victory
of 63-29 on the road against Ft. White in their season
opener on November 23. This marks the official start of
the upcoming basketball season for the JV 'Dogs, who
return eight players from last year whose final season
record was 16-6.
After about three minutes of first-game jitters, the team
took a very commanding lead as the 'Dogs ended the
first quarter of play with a lead of 25-7. Starting guard AJ
SEE JV BULLDOGS WIN BIG, PAGE 3B


Geiger

is Bowler of the Week
By Debbie Rice
Lorrie Geiger is Thunder Alley's Bowler of the
Week.
She led the King and Queens with a 593 series.
She was followed by Greg Carter with a 535 and
Ed Ritchie with a 516. Rice led the Monday
Morning Blues with a 516 series followed by El-
bert Hamrick with 478 and Suzanne Graf with
466. Larry Schattle led the Sassy Seniors with a
547 series followed by Winston Warner with 524
and Ray Goodman with 519. Aline Nevels led the
9 Pin No Tap league with a 645 followed by Roy
Sprouse with 598 and Jerry Hakes with 591. Roy
bowled above his average of 141 with two 205
games. Way to go Roy. Chris Rathbun led the
Men's League with a 532 followed by Doug
Mabey with 513 and Johnny Murrah with 513.


804 S. Ohio Ave. & 1102 N. Ohio, Live Oak 386-362-3433


11035 County Rd. 136, Dowling Park 386-658-6488 /
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S- PPO UOA

MAGENTA *- *M-,M**,*


BLACK




North Florida


MAGENTA


PAGE 2B


Even Odd

* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


BLACK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


SPORTS




Suwannee Parks & Recreation
Live Oak, FL

2010 Youth Soccer Program


AGE
GROUPS:




SIGNUPS:



COST:

PLAYER
DRAFT:



PRACTICES:


GAMES:


Suwannee Parks & Recreation offers 4 age divisions for soccer
6U for players 5 and 6 years old
8U for players 7 and 8 years old
10U for players 9 and 10 years old
13U for players 11 to 13 years old
(Age determined as of December 31, 2009)
November 16th through December 4th
Participants may sign up at the Suwannee Parks & Recreation Office
Located at the First Federal Sportsplex, 1201 Silas Drive, Live Oak
Or online at www.suwanneeparksandrecreation.orq.
$75 per participant (cost includes team uniform)
$65 per participant if signed up by November 20th
Saturday, December 12th @ 2:00 pm
The draft will be held at the First Federal Sportsplex
10U Draft Field 3
13U Draft Field 1
(No player draft for 6U and 8U divisions)
December 14th through January 7th
January 9th through February 27th

Registration Begins Monday, November 16, 2009
For more information,
Contact Suwannee Parks & Recreation
(386) 362-3004
IT STARTS
rN PARKS!


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MAGENTA *MaMu* BLACK




North Florida


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


SPORTS




SMS Lady Bullpups outscore opponents


Continued From Page 1B
Buzbee, Staci Cashmore,
Ady Canjay, Kassidy Ellis,
Maria Herrera, Sydney
Gatewood, Jasmine Ros-
alio and Rebecca Alban.


Nov. 23 SMS hosted
Ft. White. Ashley Wood
had two goals, Beth
Glass, Riley Walczak,
Kayla Watson and Ruby
Segura each had 1 goal to
make the final score 6-0.
Players of the Game: Kay-


la Watson, Brooke
Lawrence, Kaila Dalton
and managers, Emily Wat-
son and denver Cameron.
The SMS boys and girls
soccer teams will travel to
Lake City on Saturday, De-
cember 5 to play in an in-
vitational soccer tourna-
ment.
Come out and support
the SMS Boys and Girls
soccer teams.


,____I ___I I__ Players fighting for a loose ball in the Junior Kings vs. Junior Celtics game.


S- SPORTS COMMENTARY


_Who's #1?
S~' borta bosome regularity, disputed Natid
po a ouD t I can understand TCU's Champion. T(


By Tom Daniels
Continued From Page 1B
something? What does it
S. take to take a team that
S. paints its grass, seriously?
Boise State has been
finishing in the top 10 with


dilemma. It is difficult to
take a Homed Frog
seriously but they have a
riveting football team. They
all have legitimate
arguments for #1.
When the New Year
arrives and the smoke
clears we will have a


onal
o avoid this


situation simply consider
Florida versus Alabama as
the National Championship
game. That being said the
winner had better not lose
to Texas. Longhorns and
Homed Frogs just
shouldn't match up against
Gators.


..-A


W 7 .



Pee Wee Cavaliers huddle up during a time out.


JV Bulldogs win big in season opener


Continued From Page 1B
Robinson, returning from
last year's team, came out
on fire as he hit his first
three attempts from be-
yond the three point line in
the low comer. A new ad-
dition to the team this
year, guard Jimmie Taylor
III, also helped lead the
initial scoring drive with
nine points in the first half
and several key rebounds.
The score was 42-16 at
the half, after guard Jere-
miah Ross was also a key
scoring contributor and
had several strong drives
into the basket for lay-ups.
Ross also was fouled on a
3-pt attempt and made all
three free throws follow-
ing the foul. Additional
defensive moves were pro-
vided by Tony Frierson
and Alex Robinson on the
backside, and on the top
guard Marcus Lane led the
night with four steals.


Coach Naite motivaiitnathe pPeeA Weei ikers


-p


I


hotos: Submitted A

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The team pulled deep
from the bench to play by
the end of the fourth quar-
ter. Key contributors in-
cluded Taiwan Williams
with three points and four
rebounds, Austin Miller
with four points and four
rebounds, Dontavius
Hampton with four points
and one steal and DeAnge-
lo Ross with three points
and two rebounds.
The team's overall
shooting percentage was
32 percent, but free throw
percentage was 76, which
was a key component of
many wins last year and
will be a focus of this year
as well. The team had nine
assists, but still too many
turnovers at 15. Leading
scorers of the evening in-
cluded Jimmie Taylor (16),
AJ Robinson (11), Jeremi-


ah Ross (11) and Marcus
Lane (7). Leading re-
bounders were Jimmie
Taylor III (8) and Alex
Robinson (5).
There has never been a
better time to come see
this team, which will play
eight home games in a row
during the month of De-
cember. They will be chal-
lenged as they play the
next three games on con-
secutive days, beginning
with rival Lake City at
4:30 p.m. on Thursday De-
cember 3 at the SHS gym
in Live Oak. The following
games are Santa Fe (12/4),
Madison (12/5), and new
matchup Williston (12/8).
Fans are always invited to
bring posters and fun ban-
ners to show school spirit
for the team. Go JV 'Dogs
and good luck this year.


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PAGE 3B


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North Florida


CYAN *,ew Od*
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* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


FWC to meet in Clewiston Dec. 9 and 10


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) will
meet in Clewiston Dec. 9
and 10 to vote on and dis-
cuss numerous inland and
marine issues. The
Wednesday and Thursday
sessions at the John Boy
Auditorium, 1200 South
W.C. Owen Ave., will be-
gin at 8:30 a.m. both days
and are open to the public.
The Dec. 9 meeting fo-
cuses on inland issues.
The Commission will con-
sider the final rule that
would allow use of pere-
grine falcons for falconry
in Florida, consistent with
the rules and regulations
of the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service.
Commissioners will dis-
cuss draft rules that would
change deer hunting sea-


sons and zone boundaries.
The purpose of these
changes is to align season
dates with the rut (a time
of peak white-tailed deer
activity), and thus in-
crease hunter satisfaction.
Commissioners also
will consider draft rule
proposals pertaining to
hunting on about 150
wildlife management ar-
eas, wildlife and environ-
mental areas, mitigation
parks and miscellaneous
areas.
The first day's full
agenda also includes a
discussion of a draft rule
change for taking or re-
moving nuisance wildlife,
adding the possibility of
allowing off-site reloca-
tion under specific condi-
tions, rather than eutha-
nizing the wildlife, and re-


quiring trap and snare in-
spection at least once
every 24 hours.
Other proposed rules
would require a permit to
import nonnative wildlife
on the conditional list, in-
cluding the Northern
largemouth bass. Another
proposed rule would pro-
hibit importation of quag-
ga mussels.
Commissioners will
consider draft rules revis-
ing Florida's listed-species
process. The proposed
changes would create one
Florida list for imperiled
species that includes any
species listed at the federal
level as well as Florida-
designated listed species.
The new draft rules con-
centrate on sound manage-
ment strategies to ensure
no species goes extinct in
Florida.
Commissioners will
hear a request to continue
consideration of changes
to manatee zones in Sara-
sota County and discuss
potential changes to the
permits available to com-
mercial fishers and profes-
sional fishing guides for
higher speed operation in
some manatee zones
statewide. Land acquisi-
tion and management is-
sues will also be dis-
cussed. Commissioners
will wrap up the first day
with election of a new
chairman and vice chair-
man for 2010.
Presentations during the
second day of the meeting
include a report on options
for future action for rep-
tiles of concern, including
the Burmese python. Also
on Dec. 10, the Commis-
sion will hold a final pub-
lic hearing on proposed
federal consistency rules
to address overfishing of
grouper in the Atlantic
Ocean off Florida. These
rules would:

decrease the aggregate
daily recreational bag limit
for all grouper in Atlantic
and Monroe County state
waters from five fish to
three fish per person,
prohibit the captain
and crew of for-hire ves-
sels from retaining any
species in the aggregate
grouper bag limit, and


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decrease the aggregate
recreational bag limit for
gag and black grouper
from two fish combined to
one fish in Atlantic and
Monroe County state wa-
ters.

The proposed federal
consistency rules also
would prohibit all recre-
ational and commercial
harvest of shallow-water
groupers (including gag,
black grouper, red
grouper, scamp, red hind,
rock hind, coney, graysby,
yellowfin grouper, yellow-
mouth grouper and tiger
grouper) from Jan. 1
through April 30 in At-
lantic and Monroe County
state waters.
In addition, a final pub-
lic hearing will take place
on a proposed federal con-
sistency rule that would
require dehooking tools to
be aboard commercial and
recreational vessels and
used as needed when fish-
ing for reef fish in Atlantic
state waters.
Another final public
hearing will take place on
proposed new rules that
would be compatible with
an Atlantic States Marine
Fisheries Commission
management plan for At-
lantic coastal sharks and
enhance current FWC pro-
tective measures for
sharks that inhabit Florida
waters. These rules would:

prohibit harvest of
sandbar, silky and
Caribbean sharpnose
sharks from state waters;
establish a 54-inch
fork-length minimum size
limit for all sharks, except
Atlantic sharpnose, blac-
knose, bonnethead, fine-
tooth and blacktip sharks
and smooth dogfish;
prohibit removal of
shark heads and tails at
sea;
allow only hook and
line gear to harvest sharks;
and
make other technical
shark rule changes.

A final public hearing
will also revolve around
proposed rule amendments
that would automatically
allow use of new designs
of bycatch reduction and
turtle exclusion devices in
shrimp trawls in state wa-
ters when new designs are
certified for use in adja-
cent federal waters; re-
strict the use of the Florida
fisheye to inshore and
nearshore Florida waters,
where trawls are limited to
500 square feet; and delete
a provision that allows use
of the extended funnel in
state waters. Technical
changes to turtle-excluder
device rules are also pro-
posed.
In other marine fisheries
action, the Commission
will receive reports on
permit and bonefish man-
agement issues; consider
draft rules that would pro-
hibit harvest of lemon
sharks from Florida waters
and extend the expiration


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date of the moratorium on
new spiny lobster com-
mercial dive permits from
July 1, 2010, until July 1,
2015; review and discuss
various federal fishery
management issues; and
receive reports on goliath
grouper and the Marine
Recreational Information
Program.
Before adjourning the
two-day session, Commis-
sioners will also examine
draft rules updating boat-
ing-restricted areas along
the Florida Atlantic Intra-
coastal Waterway portion
in Palm Beach County.


Its consent agenda for
that day includes approval
of division work plans for
FWC divisions of Law
Enforcement and Marine
Fisheries Management.
Anyone ../t* ii .' spe-
cial accommodations to
participate in the i,. iti.
because of a disability
should notify the FWC at
least five days in advance
by (., 1111. 850-488-6411.
H. .iti;..- or speech-im-
paired people can ,, ,,.111
assistance by ., l, i. 800-
955-8711 (;,.- ,- im-
paired) or 800-955-8770
(voice impaired).


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MAGENTA n MM


PAGE 4B


BLACK


FWC extends participation

in mooring pilot program

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion (FWC) has extended its deadline for local govern-
ments that have an interest in establishing mooring ordi-
nances to participle in a mooring '.l,'l ,i iiiv.- pilot pro-
gram. Local governments interested in the program have
until the close of business on Dec. 31 to send letters of
interest to the FWC.
Under the pilot program, the FWC will select, from the
letters of interest, five locations to work with local gov-
ernments on the best way to regulate boats that anchor
outside of permitted mooring fields. The program allows
for local governments to establish and enforce FWC-ap-
proved mooring ordinances outside of a mooring field.
The five sites will be selected prior to July 1, 2011.
Currently, local ordinances for anchoring are unen-
forceable outside of mooring field boundaries.
Letters of interest can be sent via e-mail to anchor-
ing.mooring@MyFWC.com, or mailed to:

Tara Alford, FWC
Boating and Waterways Section
620 South Meridian St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399.

For more information on the ,...'. in' 1 ..*1,111. visit
MyFWC ... '" 7?.P,i. or send inquiries to
O i hl ,'I i ,.. ., :.'1 l l\ l ... I,,



FWC reminds Floridians

that balloon releases

take a toll on wildlife
With holiday celebrations and bowl games coming
up, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion (FWC) is reminding event organizers and other
Floridians that a little-known law prohibits releasing
more than nine lighter-than-air balloons within 24
hours.
Wildlife, especially sea turtles, mistake balloons for
food, and strings attached to balloons can entangle birds
and other animals.
The release into the atmosphere of large numbers of
balloons inflated with lighter-than-air gases poses a
danger and nuisance to the environment, particularly to
wildlife and marine animals, according to Florida
Statute 379.233. The law provides for a $250 fine for
violations.
The only exceptions are for scientific or meteorologi-
cal balloons released by a governmental agency or un-
der a governmental contract, hot air balloons that are re-
covered after launching, and balloons released indoors.
The law also allows for the release of balloons that are
biodegradable or photodegradable under FWC rules, but
no balloon material qualifies under FWC rules so far.


FWC encourages use

of safety harnesses after

2 tree stand accidents

Two serious tree stand accidents recently have Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC)
hunter safety staff reminding hunters to wear a safety
harness when using a tree stand.
On Saturday, November 21, Pace resident Anthony Ed-
die Vanna, 33, died after falling from his tree stand in the
Blackwater River State Forest near Munson. Vanna was
muzzleloader hunting for deer when he fell 23.5 feet. He
apparently was attempting to come down the tree at sun-
down.
The previous day, Susan Rudd of Quincy fell back-
wards off a 12-foot tall ladder stand while hog hunting
on private property in Gadsden County. Although injured,
she managed to walk out and call for help.
Rudd was Life-Flighted to Tallahassee Memorial Hos-
pital and admitted. She has since been discharged from
the hospital.
FWC law enforcement investigators say neither hunter
wore a safety harness.
Bill Cline, the FWC's section leader for hunter safety
and public shooting ranges, said anyone who hunts from
a tree stand should wear a safety harness.
"If you're going to leave the ground, you need to wear
a full body harness. If a hunter isn't willing to do that,
they need to stay on the ground. It's that simple," Cline
said.
Hunters who use older tree stand belts or upper-chest
straps should discard them, Cline said. He encourages
hunters to visit MyFWC.com/HunterSafety and take the
free online tree stand safety course.


BLACK


11655 0-F


t


I I





North Florida


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Suwannee Legals
SUWANNEE COUNTY
Board of County Commissioners
224 Pine Avenue, Live Oak, FL 32064
Telephone: (386) 364-3450
Fax: (386) 362-1032
Request for Qualifications No. 2009-14
Qualifications Statement Title:
Attorney for Suwannee County BCC
Deadline for Submitting:
Friday, December 11, 2009 at 4:00 p.
m.
Opening Date and Time:
Tuesday, December 15, 2009
At 4:00 p. m. (Or as soon thereafter)
You are invited to submit qualifications
statement in accordance with the
requirements of this solicitation which are
contained herein.
The Suwannee County Board of County
Commissioners will receive qualifications
at the Clerk of Court Cashier Window at
the Courthouse to the attention of Clerk
to the Board, 200 South Ohio Avenue,
Live Oak, FL 32064 until Friday,
December 11, 2009 at 4:00 P.M.
Qualifications will be publicly opened and
read aloud at the Live Oak City Hall
Meeting Room, 101 S.W. White Avenue,
Live Oak, Florida 32064 on TUESDAY,
December 15, 2009 at 4:00 p. m. or as
soon thereafter, for Attorney for
Suwannee County Board of County
Commissioners.
In order for your qualifications statement
to be considered, it must be submitted by
the deadline date. Qualifications
statement received after the deadline
date and time will be retained by the
Clerk of Court Office unopened and will
not be considered.
The Board of County Commissioners
does not discriminate because of race,
creed, color, national origin or handicap
status.
The qualifications statement must be
signed by an official authorized to bind
the Responder, and it shall contain a
statement to the effect that the
qualifications statement is firm for period
of 90 days from the closing date for
submission of qualifications statement.
Qualifications statement must be
submitted in a sealed envelope/container
showing the above RFQ number,
opening date, and title. One original and
seven copies must be submitted.
This solicitation does not commit
Suwannee County to award the contract,
to pay any costs incurred in the
preparation of a qualifications statement,
or to procure or contract for services.
The Board of County Commissioners
reserves the right to reject any and all
qualifications statements received as a
result of this request, to negotiate with all
qualified responders, to cancel in part or
in its entirety this solicitation, or re-
advertise if it is in the best interests of
the County to do so.
The Board of County Commissioners
requires a Sworn Statement under
section 287.133(3)(a), F.S., on Public
Entity Crimes.
Anyone wishing to obtain RFQ
documents may contact the
Administrative Services Department, at
386/364-3410. Any questions
concerning the scope of work should be
directed to Murphy McLean, County
Coordinator, at 386/364-3450.
Responders must submit one original
and seven copies; and label on the
outside of the envelope as "SEALED
RFQ NO. 2009-14 ATTORNEY FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY BCC".
Wesley Wainwright,
Chairman
Suwannee County Board of
County Commissioners
11/25 12/2, 9
RFP SOLICITATION
RFP NO. 2009-15
The Suwannee County Board of County
Commissioners, Suwannee County,
Florida will receive sealed bids, at the
Clerk of Court Cashier Window at the
Courthouse, Attention: Clerk to the
Board, 200 South Ohio Avenue, Live
Oak, FL 32064 until Friday, December
11, 2009 at 4:00 P.M. Bids will be
publicly opened and read aloud at the
Live Oak City Hall Meeting Room, 101
S.W. White Avenue, Live Oak, Florida
32064 on Tuesday, December 15, 2009
at 4:00 P.M. (or as thereafter), for the
following:
IN-GROUND FOUR PIPE A/C
SYSTEM LOCATED AT THE
SUWANNEE COUNTY JAIL
The Board of County Commissioners
may accept all or part of any bid. Any bid
received after Monday, December 15,
2009 at 4:00 P.M., will be retained at the
Clerk of Court Office unopened and will
not be considered. The Board of County
Commissioners reserves the right to
reject any and all bids, waive formalities
and readvertise and award the bid in the
best interest of Suwannee County.
The Board of County Commissioners
does not discriminate because of race,
creed, color, national origin or handicap
status.
The Board of County Commissioners
requires a Sworn Statement under
section 287.133(3)(a), F.S., on Public
Entity Crimes.
Anyone wishing to obtain bid documents
may contact the Administrative Services
Department, at 386/364-3410. Any
questions concerning the bid
specifications should be directed to
Steve Sharpless, Maintenance Director
at (386)364-6524.
All bids must be submitted in triplicate
and labeled on the outside of the
envelope as ATTENTION: CLERK TO
THE BOARD, SEALED FOR RFP NO.
2009-15 IN-GROUND FOUR PIPE A/C
SYSTEM LOCATED AT THE
SUWANNEE COUNTY JAIL."
WESLEYWAINRIGHT CHAIRMAN
SUWANNEE COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
11/27 12/2, 9


DEP Encourages Floridians to



Go Green for the Holidays


-Simple green practices save resources and money this holiday season-


The Florida Department of Environmental
Protection (DEP) is encouraging Floridians to
adopt earth friendly practices this holiday
season.
"There are many simple ways to practice
sustainability this holiday season and reduc-
ing the season's impact on the environment is
something for which everyone can be thank-
ful," said DEP Director of Sustainable Initia-
tives Deas Bohn.
DEP offers the following 10 tips for a
green holiday season:
1. Use green cleaners. Trade in harsh
household cleaners for natural, non-toxic
cleaners that are safer for both human health
and the environment. For homemade green
cleaning recipes, visit
www.dep.state.fl.us/pollutionprevention/gree
n_cleaning.htm.
2. Choose green lodging. If traveling or
hosting out of town guests, consider utilizing
a designated Florida Green Lodging designat-
ed property. Green Lodging facilities adopt
cost-saving green practices to conserve ener-
gy, reduce water consumption, protect air
quality and reduce waste. Visit
www.dep.state.fl.us/greenlodging/lodges.htm
to find a Green Lodging property for holiday
arrangements.
3. Visit a state park. Entertain guests by
visiting one of Florida's state parks. Open
365 days a year, Florida's state parks span
more than 700,000 acres and 100 miles of
sandy white beach, offering a glimpse into
natural Florida. To locate a park, visit
www.floridastateparks.org or follow parks on
Twitter at www.Twitter.com/FlStateParks.
4. Avoid idling in holiday traffic Dial
511. Crawling traffic can contribute eight
times as much air pollution as traffic moving
at regular highway speeds. Check the Florida
Department of Transportation's 511 traffic in-


formation hotline or Web site,
www.fl511.com, to learn about traffic, road
closures and construction to avoid idling and
reduce air pollution.
5. Utilize reusable utensils during holiday
meals. Use cloth napkins, silverware, glass
drinking cups, ceramic coffee mugs and
reusable plates rather take up valuable land-
fill space.
6. Share leftovers with guests or compost
food waste. Send guests home with food or
create compost instead of letting food and
scraps go to the landfill. The U.S. Environ-
mental Protection agency offers helpful tips
for composting food waste at:
www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/materials/or
ganics/food/fd-compost.htm
7. Prevent pollution. Choose reusable bags
rather than plastic or paper when shopping.
According to reusablebags.com, an estimated
500 billion to one trillion non-biodegradable
plastic bags are consumed worldwide each
year and are among the 12 items of debris
most often found in coastal cleanup.
8. Shop green. Consolidate shopping trips,
shop locally or skip driving by shopping on-
line. Choosing to cut down on travel reduces
air pollution, fuel consumption and lowers
costs.
9. Give a green gift. As the gift giving sea-
son approaches, try giving appliances that are
eco-friendly and protect air quality such as an
electric grill or lawn mower, rather than gas-
powered appliances. These gifts save gas,
money and reduce noise and air pollution.
10. Use energy-saving LED lights for holi-
day decorating. Many families begin decorat-
ing for the holidays after Thanksgiving.
Choosing LED (Light Emitting Diodes) holi-
day lights, rather than traditional incandes-
cent lights results in both energy and cost
savings.


"There are many simple ways to
practice sustainability this holiday
season and reducing the season's
impact on the environment is
something for which everyone
can be thankful."

Deas Bohn
DEP Director of Sustainable Ini-
tiatives

For more ...,., 1 tips, visit
www.dep.state.fl.us/green/tips/default.htm.
DEP's Office of Sustainable Initiatives is
comprised of three voluntary, :'.--,. *..,,,. -ry
pl". -'.1,11'. that assist Florida industry and cit-
izens in p .,. I. .I' the environment. The
Florida Clean Marina 1 .- .1..1111 the Clean
Vessel Act grant p ...* and the Florida
Green L. *..-.* ,,1 .-.* ,1, offer a variety of
services 1ii.h.h..in., on-site assessments, con-
sultations, speakers and workshops, all at no
cost to citizens or *., ,.ii, ,*i..110. The goal of
the Sustainable Initiatives 1-. ,.'i, in. is to
meet the needs of the present population
without ,.. *., ... .- resources for future
H..o. ,,. ,W, ,;.,. To learn more about DEP's Sus-
tainable Initiatives, visit
www.dep.state.fl. ,, '-.:, ,


Snook seasons closed in some waters


KEYS


FOUND!

A set of GMC
keys were found on
185th Road in Live
Oak. You may call
or come by the
Suwannee Democ-
rat at 362-1734.


The first snook closure
started on Dec. 1 in all of
Florida's Gulf of Mexico,
Everglades National Park
and Monroe County coastal
and inland waters. The har-
vest season for snook will
remain closed until March
1 in these areas.
All other Florida waters
will close to the harvest of
snook beginning on Dec.


Congratulations to

Youth Bowler of the Week

Bridget Beaudoin

By Paige LeRoux

Bridget Beaudoin was the Youth Bowler of the
Week recently.
Her three game series of 220 was her best ever.
Each of her games, 51, 93 and 76 were well above her
average of 45. Way to go Bridget. Clayton Johns
bowled a 418 series for the Lost Bowlers team. For
the Lightening, Christian LeRoux rolled a 285. Alli-
son Parks of the Twilight Bowlers posted a 319 and
Christopher Johns brings the heat for the Ringers
bowling a 317.
Team standing for Thunder Kids Youth League are
as follows: In first place, the Lightning with 27 points;
second place, the Lost Bowlers with 21 points. And
only one point behind was the Ringers with 20. The
Beautiful Bowlers and the Twilight Bowlers find
themselves in fourth and fifth place with 18 and 16
points respectively.
December 5 and 6, 12 of the Thunder Kids Youth
League bowlers will compete in the City Tournament
in Lake City and Gainesville. Good Luck Bowlers.

Next Week: What is 9 Pin No Tap?


15. This includes all At-
lantic coastal and inland
waters, including Lake
Okeechobee and the
Kissimmee River. The har-
vest season for snook will
remain closed until Feb. 1
in these areas.


Snook regulations apply
to snook harvested within
or without state waters,
and no person shall pos-
sess any snook caught
within or without the state
during snook closed sea-
sons.


These closed harvest
seasons protect Florida's
valuable snook populations
during the colder months
when snook are most vul-
nerable and help sustain
and improve the fishery
for the future.


Your Community, Your Life.

Read the public notices in this newspaper.




School District Budgets Local Tax Changes


Property Auctions

Adoptions


Public Hearings


Search Florida's notices online at:

www.floridapublicnotices.com

551304-F



Now THAT'S Something

To Smile About!


s ""U^e FREE Coupons
2 Times are tough for everyone and we're
here to help! Log on to
I B www.suwanneedemocrat.com today and
S -'SAV[501 scroll down to coupons section. Click the
_f link and follow the instructions. Coupons
will be available to print and use. As an
extra value, you can access recipes at the
same site. Cool huh!
522163-F

Stormy weather?
Check out the weather radar on
our homepage at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.
5 When bad weather is on the
horizon, the weather radar
appears to keep you in touch and
on top of things. While you're
there, click the weather link.-
522223-F


Ready for the party in their Fall Festival "finery."
L-R Casey and Connar Paarlberg and Brooke Walker.

Thank you for submitting this week's SMILE photograph!
Submit your photo for publication to:

P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 500232-Fcrat
P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 500232_


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North Florida


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* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


Turkey and all the fixins, courtesy the WCA


From left: Mel Harding, Beanie Brooks, Ruth Ford, Linda Gaylord and Dee
Burt serve up Thanksgiving dinner recently in Wellborn.


By Bobbie Fenderson
In keeping with tradition, the Wellborn Commu-
nity Association served its 14th annual Thanksgiv-
ing dinner to over 100 residents of Wellborn on
Nov. 21. As most know, the mission of the WCA is
to help Wellborn families experience a quality life
in our small, close-knit community. We do this by
hosting annual parties for Wellborn children during
the various holidays, as well as our Thanksgiving
Dinner and our most well known Wellborn Blue-
berry Festival.
In this economical environment having a hot
turkey dinner supplied at no cost to our residents is
a welcome experience. The turkeys and the cook-
ing of them are donated by our WCA members as


are all the "fixins." It's all served under the direc-
tion of WCA member Ruth Ford. Many members
donate their time to prepare all the "fixins" and then
serve them. This year's dinner had over a dozen
volunteers helping out in the kitchen and dining
room. It's a great feeling to be a part of the Well-
born Community Association and know we are pro-
viding opportunities to strengthen our community.
If you are not already a member of the Wellborn
Community Association, please think about joining
us to support our projects. We meet the second
Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. and welcome
new folks to join us!
For more information contact Wendell Snowden
at 386-963-1157.


Find Outdoor Adventures and Family Fun at Florida's State Parks This Holiday Season

-Florida's state parks offer recreational opportunities to all visitors-


The Florida Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion's Florida State Parks
and the Get Outdoors Flori-
da! coalition encourage
Floridians and visitors to
spend time outdoors in
Florida's 160 state parks
this holiday season. Numer-
ous recreational activities, a
host of special events and
cool weather make this a
perfect time of year for out-
door adventure.
"After turkey, desserts
and football on television,
Florida's state parks are a
perfect venue for friends
and families to spend time
together in the great out-
doors," said DEP's Florida
Park Service Director Mike
Bullock. "Most state parks
are open 365 days a year,
including Thanksgiving,
and offer many activities for
entertaining guests while
connecting with nature and
burning off holiday calo-
ries."
As partners of the Get
Outdoors Florida! coalition,
DEP and Florida State


Parks are emphasizing the
importance of healthy, out-
door activities year round,
and especially during the
holiday season. Spending
time in nature and releasing
endorphins through physical
activity will help relieve
stress and maintain a
healthy balance. With 160
state parks throughout the
state, there are endless ac-
tivities to engage friends
and families of all ages and
abilities.
"Get Outdoors Florida! is
about helping children and
families learn to be happier,
healthier and smarter, and
sustaining Florida's natural
resources," said Bob Wat-
tendorf, Chairman of the
Coalition. "But the beauty
of it is that by simply visit-
ing a state park and having
fun with your family engag-
ing in any of the active na-
ture-based forms of recre-
ation that they feature you
can reap those benefits."
Ideas for outdoor recre-
ation this holiday season in-
clude:


Torreya State Park,
Bristol: The Weeping Ridge
Trail provides a healthy and
pleasant walk to one of the
park's deep ravines. A sev-
en-mile loop hiking trail
meanders through the park,
exposing the hiker to virtu-
ally all the park's natural
features. For more informa-
tion, call (850) 643-2674.
Big Shoals State Park,
White Springs: The Suwan-
nee River's average current
of two to three miles per
hour and white sandy
beaches make the Shoals a
popular spot for canoeing
and kayaking. For more in-
formation, call (386) 397-
4331.
Gamble Rogers Memor-
ial State Recreation Area,
Flagler Beach: On Saturday,
December 5 at 8:00 a.m.,
Jack's 25K, 50K trail race
and two free children's
races will take place along
the Joe Kenner Trail in the
park. For more information,
call (386) 986-8572.
Lake Louisa State Park,
Clermont: Offering 16 miles


of designated equestrian
trails, Lake Louisa offers
equestrian camping facili-
ties along with outstanding
fishing opportunities in its
six beautiful lakes. For
more information, call (352)
394-3969.
Rock Springs Run State
Reserve, Sorrento: The
park's Turkey Burn event
will take place on Saturday,
November 28 from 4:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Canoes,
paddles and life vests will
be provided for the 12 hour
race which involves pad-
dling on the Wekiva River,
biking and trekking through
the natural beauty of the
park. A four hour race is
also available for interested
participants. For more infor-
mation, call (407) 884-
2006.
Alafia River State Park,
Lithia: With unique topog-
raphy that offers some of
the most radical elevation
changes in Florida, the
Alafia off-road bicycling
trails are the most challeng-
ing in the area. For more in-


"After turkey, desserts and football
on television, Florida's state parks
are a perfect venue for friends and
families to spend time together in
the great outdoors."

Mike Bullock
DEP's Florida Park Service Director


formation, call (813) 672-
5320.

Highlands Hammock
State Park, Sebring: Burn
some calories before your
big meal on Thanksgiving
morning and enjoy the fun
with hundreds of other run-
ners during the 17th Annual
Turkey Trot 5K at the park


beginning at 8:00 a.m. For
more information, call (863)
385-4736.
Bahia Honda State Park,
Big Pine Key: Bahia Honda
has some of the best near-
shore snorkeling in the
Florida Keys, with a variety
of sea life just a few hun-
dred feet from the shore.
Bring a wetsuit this time of
year as the water gets cool.
For more information, call
(305) 872-2353.

The Get Outdoors Flori-
da! coalition, formed in
2008, is a partnership of
land managers, government
agencies, children's advo-
cates, health care profession-
als, public interest groups
and other individuals. The
coalition is the product of a
wide array of partners com-
ing together to address soci-
etal needs including public
well-being, health issues and
natural resource conserva-
tion. The coalition envisions
a healthy Florida communi-
ty that is connected with na-
ture and reflects social di-
versity exhibiting a conser-
vation ethic ensuring a sus-
tainable future and recre-
ational opportunities.
Tips for outdoor activities,
as well as a calendar featur-
ing a wide variety of
planned outdoor events for
youth, families and mentors
can be found on the Coali-
tion's Web site,
www.getoutdoorsflorida.org.
In 2010, the Florida De-
partment of Environmental
Protection's Florida State
Parks is celebrating 75 years
of recreation and preserva-
tion. Florida's 160 state
parks offer white sandy
beaches, vast open prairies,
steep ravines, lush semi-
tropical forests, cultural sites
and crystal clear lakes,
rivers and springs. State
parks also offer countless lo-
cations to learn about Flori-
da's cultural history and
serve as outdoor classrooms
for students of all ages. Af-
fordable, family-friendly ac-
tivities, such as swimming,
hiking, bicycling, paddling,
diving, fishing, camping,
horseback riding, birding,
photography, events and
ranger-led tours are just a
few ways people enjoy our
natural resources.
To learn about 75th An-
niversary events, contests
and discounts visit
www.FloridaStateParl, *
and follow us on Twitter at
www. Twitter com/FLStatePa
rks.


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Children exposed to secondhand smoke have higher rates of asthma and respiratory infections and .
are more likely to begin smoking themselves. Help them be safe...please don't smoke around kids. t li n

Call 1-877-U-CAN-NOW or visit FloridaQuitline.com L obaccoeflorida.comJ


A message from Tobacco Free Suwannee and the Florida Department of Health.

563450-F


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North Florida


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009


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"Rockin Little Christmas"
25th Annual ___


SChristmas KE

on the Square

'a Presented by a

The Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce
Festival on
Saturday, December 5, 2009,
8 am ~ 4pm
ENTERTAINMENT ALL BAY
HANBERAFTEB ARTS & ERAFTS 8AM 4PM
EAR & TRUE S HW 8AM 2PM
FaGB & BRINKS AVAILABLE 8AM 4PM
SANTAhANB IN MILLhhENNIUM PARK
NIGHT TIME EHiRISTMAS PARADE BPM
cwntcwn Live Cak (around the ccurthcuse
DIRECTIONS: Live Oak is located near the intersection of 1-10 and
1-75, two exits West on 1-10. From 1-10 (Exit 283 old Exit #40),
follow US 129 three miles South into downtown Live Oak. From 1-75
(Exit 451), follow US 129 ten miles South into downtown Live Oak.
^( VI V iwww.suwanneechamber.com
**P'*e Email:
... I suwannee@suwanneechamber.com
Vendor applications
LIVE .available online.
For further information please call:
The Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce
(386)362-3071 Fax (386) 362-4758



561229-F


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If the Sunbelt tag's not on your car you paid too much!


Hours: M-F 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.,
Sat. 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
1307 W. Howard Street (US Hwy. 90)
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1042
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NFCC: A trip down the rabbit hole, courtesy NFCC, Page 7


Wild Adventures: 20 concerts for 2010, Page 4


News Entertainment Classifieds


North Florida Focus
December2 & 3, 209 w w w n f I on I i n cSo- mS evnHaitLfyteadSu neeC nis


127 Howard Street E., Live Oak, FL
' Phone: 386-362-4539
Toll Free: 1-800-557-7478
Se Habla Espanol


ABOVE: Confederate reenactors on the line.
LEFT: Union forces reload amidst "the fog of war."
- Photos: Jamie Ganote


The Civil


pictures

"The Raid on the
Suwannee," a recreation
of Civil War action in
Florida, took place last
month at the Spirit of the
Suwannee in Live Oak.
Here are some scenes.


.41.
. '/^ *,y ". 7.' .
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1 1'6

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Doin batle in a tre ine

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Dial's Inspection
Services
For All Your Home
Inspection Needs!
386-364-4434 or
386-590-6534
Please visit our website: |
www.suwanneevalleyinspections.com


Doing battle in a treeline.
See more photos inside.



oa]@A~


-FOR RENT- I


www.poolerealtv.com


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GREAT RATES FOR NICE LOOKING
RENTALS STARTING AT $300 PER MONTH
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AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS.
386-330-2567 563738-F


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North Florida


CYAN S ew Odd

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PAGE 2, DECEMBER 2 & 3, 2009


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


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The Civil War in pictures


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TOP: Union troops stand ready.
ABOVE: On the advance. Photos: Jamie Ganote


REALTOR
529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389,
Evening 362-2990


(1) Horse Farm: 55 acres with a 4
bedroom, 3 bath CH&AC home
with fireplace cont. approx. 5000
sq. feet under roof with an 18 stall
horse barn with office and bath
cont. approx. 5000 sq. ft. under
roof. The property has 4 fenced
paddocks with room for expansion.
Call for more information. Just
listed $600,000.
(2) Off CR 49 5 acres in grass with
scattered trees, fenced on 3 sides
with survey. Only $4,900 per acre.
(3) 161st Rd: 9.82 acres partially
wooded with a 4BR/3-1/2 bath
CH&AC home with fireplace cont.
approx 2400 sq. ft. heated area,
10'x30' storage. Good buy @
$265,000.
(4) Off CR136: 5 acre partially
wooded some grass. Will work for
land home package. Reduced to
$39,900.
(5) CR 51 & Pinewood St.: 2.29
Acres, city water and sewer, zoned
office. Good location $192,500.
(6) Off CR 349: 10 acre wooded
tract with a two bedroom CH/IAC
log home in excellent condition
cont. approx. 1200 sq. ft. under
roof, 30'x40' pole barn. Reduced to
$175,000.
(7) Suwannee River .34 acre
wood o ford on
county -.he river,
well, I ice pole, 24x38
cook shed, 12x24 canopy, 12'x16'
storage. Good buy @ $79,900.
(8) Industrial Park: 1.13 acre
corner tract good exposure.
Reduced to $34,500.
(9) 40 acres with 835 ft. on paved
road in 13 year old planted pines.
Priced to sell at REDUCED TO
$179,600.
(10) Near City: 2 ac. with 3/2 home
cont. approx. 1280 sq. ft. under
roof, kitchen furnished, carport.
REDUCED TO $49,000.
(11) Luraville Area: Fly-in
Community 15 acre wooded large
trees, good county road. Priced to
sell reduced to $74,900.
(12) Suwannee River: Two acres
wooded river lot off CR 349 near
Royal Springs and Boat Ramp. 100
sq. ft. on the water. (Buildable)
good buy @ $55,000.
(13) Off Mitchell Rd.: 20 acres
wooded with survey on 199th Rd.
$89,900.


6


(14) Off CR 136 East: 40 acre tract
partially wooded, some grass small
pond, fenced. Good area.
REDUCED TO $149,000.
(15) Hamilton Co.: 10 acres on
CR751 and the river approx. 1300
ft. on the water and approx. 1300
ft. on paved road. Priced to sell at
REDUCED TO $79,900.
(16) Madison Co.: 40 acres in 16
year old slash planted pines off CR
255 good elevation. Good buy at
$175,000.
(17) Helvenston St.: 4 lots with a
4/3 CH/IAC 1-1/2 story brick/frame
home cont. approx 3,200 sq. ft.
under roof. Kitchen furnished,
fireplace, corner lots, plus 1
bedroom, guest house cont approx.
550 sq. ft. Priced to sell @
$170,000.
(18) Suwannee River home: nice
two bedroom two story CH&AC
home South of Branford, kitchen
furnished, beautiful view of river
from rear, screen porch. Good area.
REDUCED TO $189,900.
(19) Farms of 10 Mill Hollow: 4
acres in grass/cropland with
scattered trees. $32,500.
(20) Near City: Off US 90 East 5
acres wooded near golf course.
Good buy @ $44,900.
(21) 190th St.: 10 acres in planted
pines approx. 15 years old, with a
3/1 CH/AC SWMH, 2 car
carport/shop. Priced to sell @
$49,000.
(22) 208 Houston: 3/5 BR, 1-1/2 BA
frame home cont. approx. 2,000 sq.
ft. under roof. Zoned R/O, has
potential. Priced to sell @ $59,500.
(23) 16th St.: 3 ac. with a 3BR/2BA
CH&AC brick home with fireplace,
cont. approx. 2,780 sq. ft. under
roof. Kitchen furnished, survey.
Good Buy @ $172,500.
(24) Keaton Beach: Deep Water
Canal lot near public boat ramp,
sewer & water. Good buy @
$125,000.
(25) 169th Rd.: 5 ac. in grass with a
3/2 CH/AC DWMH cont. approx.
1,850 sq. ft. under roof in excellent
cond. 2 car detached garage. Good
area. $124,900.
(26) Off 16th St.: 2 100x530 river
lots with MH (needs some R&R),
well, septic and storage building.
Lot has large hickory white oak
magnolia. Well above the flood
elevation. $79,900 for the pair.
535418a-F


Buy One Get One Free

2lZZAY
Sof equal or lesser value
S 2888W US Hwy90
S Lake City, FL 32055
Exp. Date: 12-31-2009
Limt otter per personper vit
----------------------...

f20 FREE ,
STokens? ,
2888 W US Hwy 90 !
i Lake City, FL32055 "T
| Exp. Date: 12-31-2009 j
Limit 1 otterperperson per visit


A trip

down the

rabbit

hole,

courtesy

NFCC


Page 7




SUWANNEE
VALLEY
HUMANE

SOCIETY

CRITTER

CORNER

Page 6


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North Florida


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* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


DECEMBER 2 & 3, 2009, PAGE 3


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ABOVE: Firing a volley.
RIGHT: Union forces on horseback.
- Photos: Jamie Ganote


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any other offer. See participating stores for details. Ad405


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North Florida


CYAN Odw-,Aw*
MAGENTA Even Odd


PAGE 4, DECEMBER 2 & 3, 2009


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


(toir (?oat


Pink Ladies Needed!
Are you looking for a place to share your talents? Do
you enjoy meaningful conversation with a good friend?
How 'bout a good book?
Then We Want You!! Suwannee Health Care and Re-
hab Center is looking for volunteers to start a Ladies
Auxiliary.
Call Lynn Brannon, Activities Director at 386-362-
7860 or 386-590-2961.

Talent Search
Do you sing or play and instrument? Do you act or
dance? Do you like to read or spend time with a friend
in wonderful conversation?
WE WANT YOU! Suwannee Health Care & Rehab
Center is looking for your talent for our residents. Din-
ner for two $45; One night at the Beach $125; One
hour volunteering to make memories that last forever -
PRICELESS!
Call: Lynn Brannon, Activities Director 386-362-7860
or 386-590-2961.

Head Start/Early Head Start
early enrollment
Suwannee Valley 4Cs Head Start/Early Head Start is
accepting applications for children from birth to age 5.
Head Start/Early Head Start is a FREE comprehensive
early childhood education program that includes health,
dental, nutrition and VPK services to eligible
children/families.
Centers are located in Suwannee, Hamilton, Lafayette
and Columbia counties. Parents bring proof of income
and child's age to register.
For more information call 386-754-2222.

Customers needed!
Dairy Queen of Live Oak will host Dairy Queen Bene-
fit Night the second Tuesday of every month from 6-8
p.m. to help buy books for Suwannee Middle School.

Donations needed!
Suwannee County Environmental Watchdogs, a non-
profit organization, seeks donations for yard sale mer-
chandise. Info: Sandy, 386-364-8020.


Register now!
Descendants of Calhoun family plan
reunion in 2009
Descendants of the late Sarah Calhoun, Eva Calhoun
and Thomas Calhoun are invited to a family reunion to
be held in 2009. Info: misstheresamartin@yahoo.com or
predop@aol.com.

Coffee with your councilman
City Councilman for District 4 Mark Stewart invites
his constituents to "Coffee with your Councilman" at
JAVA JAX located in the Publix shopping center.
Come and meet with him on the second Tuesday of
each month from 7 a.m. till 8:30 a.m. This will be a
time to get to know each other and discuss current is-
sues and citizen concerns.

CJBAT tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): CJ-
BAT (Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test) at NFCC
Testing Center (Bldg. #16), Madison. CJBAT is required
for acceptance into Corrections & Law Enforcement pro-
grams. Photo ID required. Pre-registration & scheduling
time and date are required. To register please call 850-
973-9451.

College Placement Tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): Col-
lege Placement Test (CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg.
#16), 5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC Student Ser-
vices 24 hours before test. For information please call
850-973-9451.

TABE tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education) at NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison. TABE is required for acceptance
into vocational/technical programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration & scheduling time & date are required.
To register please call 850-973-9451.

Sheriff commissioner
at Whistle Stop
The Wellborn Neighborhood Watch would like to wel-
come our members, friends and neighbors of our com-
munity of Wellborn to "Meet and Greet" your sheriff,
Tony Cameron, and our county commissioner, Billy
Maxwell, at the Whistle Stop Cafe and Deli for free cof-
fee and sweets.
This will give us all a personal and face-to-face meet-
ing with those who have such a great bearing on the run-
ning of our community. They will answer any question
that you have pertaining to each of their jobs and we
hope to have a good turn out from our community.
This will be held on the 2nd Thursday of each month
at 10:30 a.m. at the "Whistle Stop Cafe in the middle of
our town of Wellborn.
Please try to come and bring a friend or two or three!
Remember, folks, this is free to all our community!


Greater Visions Support
Group
Addiction Support Group: Greater Visions faith-based
addictions support group meets at the Grace Manor
Restaurant. Meetings are held on Thursday mornings at
9:30 a.m. This group provides spiritual and emotional
support in a non-judgmental setting. Come experience
the freedom from addictions that is found in Christ.


Greater Visions is an outreach of Christ Central-Live
Oak. For more information contact 208-1345.

Suwannee County Republican
Executive Committee to meet
The Suwannee County Republican Executive Com-
mittee meets in the council chambers of Live Oak City
Hall at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of the month. If the
first Thursday is the first day of the month, the meet-
ing will be held on the following Thursday.
Each meeting has a guest speaker or current issues
will be discussed. All are welcome to attend. For more
information call Chairman Carl Meece at 386-776-
1444.

Legislative candidate to speak

at Republican meeting
The Suwannee County Republican Executive Commit-
tee meets at Live Oak City Hall, in the Council Cham-
bers, at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of the month. If the
first Thursday is the first day of the month, then the
meeting will be on the following Thursday. Each meet-
ing has a guest speaker or there will be current issues
brought up for discussion. All are welcome to attend.
For more information, call Chairman Carl Meece, 386-
776-1444.
Terry Rauch, candidate for Dist. 11 Florida House seat,
will be guest speaker on Dec. 3.

Branford TOPS meeting
changes locations
We now meet every Tuesday at L & M Scrapbooking lo-
cated at 105 SW Suwannee Ave. in Branford.
Weigh-in begins at 4:30 p.m. Meeting starts at 5.
For more information please contact Donna Hardin at
386-590-2333.
"Take Off Pounds Sensibly."

SREC seeking

location in Branford
Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc., a non-profit
organization is seeking a location in the Branford area
that could be used to serve meals to persons 60 years of
age or older.
Any business, organization or church that has space
available and would be interested in assisting in this
much needed service to the elderly population of Bran-
ford, should contact Bruce Evans, Senior Center Direc-
tor, at 362-1164 or Janis Owen, Director of Client Ser-
vices, at 362-4115, ext. 240.

Toys for Kids+
'We really need your help'
By Roger L. Burnside
Toys for Kids+ really needs your help. Christmas is a
time of joy and celebration; unfortunately there are many
children in the Branford area that will be missing the joy
of receiving Christmas presents. We are in need of toys,
clothes and in some cases, food for these children.
With the economy the way it is right now we are
experiencing more requests than in past years. No
donation is too small, if you can just provide one toy, a
box of food, a winter coat or shoes it will be greatly
appreciated.
Anyone interested in helping us with this project can
take their donations to the Branford Health Department.
You may also call Karen at the Branford Health
Department at 386-935-1133 or Roger Burnside at 386-
935-3343. Should you know of a child in need you may
also call these numbers.
Over the years the folks in the Branford area have
brought a lot of joy to the area's children and their
families, for this we thank each and every one of you.
The smiles and appreciation the children express each
year make this project a blessing to all.

TOPS is here for you
Anyone interested in learning more about nutrition,
portion control, and exercise while having fun is cor-
dially invited to come join our TOPS group. TOPS is
nonprofit, noncommercial and affordable. TOPS# FL.
662 meets weekly on Thursday mornings at the First
Advent Christian Church in Live Oak.
We start our weigh in at 8 a.m., and the meeting be-
gins at 9 a.m. 10.
For more information please call Elaine at (386)
364-5537. We all make New Year's resolutions about
watching our weight. If you are in need of a good sup-
port system to help you, make your New Year's resolu-
tion come true, please come join us for informative
programs and fun. Hope to see you soon.


Seasonal flu vaccines available

to eligible veterans
Through Jan. 29
In an effort to reduce the impact of the seasonal flu and
connected illness, enrolled/eligible veterans may obtain a
seasonal flu vaccination through Jan. 29 at the Lake City
VA Medical Center.
This is an especially challenging influenza season this
year. Many people suffer severe consequences from the
flu. It is very important for every veteran to get his or
her flu shot. The flu shot is the only measure of protec-
tion from the influenza virus.

Suwannee Middle School


Softball Boosters fundraiser
Dec. 4
The Suwannee Middle School Softball Boosters are
having a BBQ chicken dinner fundraiser on Friday, Dec.
4, starting at 11 a.m. in the Cheek and Scott parking lot.
Dinners include: BBQ chicken, baked beans, coleslaw,
bread, and dessert for $5.
For more information contact Coach Jeff Smith at 386-


590-1059.

Christian Mission

in Action Ministries
Dec. 5
Christian Mission in Action Ministries celebrates
Christmas on the Square in downtown Live Oak on
Saturday, December 5, 8 a.m. 4 p.m.
Stop by our booth for an early breakfast and home-
made baked goods.
Join us for a day of fun. Contact Audry Howell at
386-364-4560 for more information.


SHS SAC meeting postponed
Postponed to Dec. 10
The Suwannee High School SAC meeting that was
scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 12, has been postponed to
Thursday, Dec. 10, due to conflicts in the SHS calendar.

Live Oak Artist Guild invites
you to our Annual Holiday
Celebration
Dec. 11
The Live Oak Artists Guild invites you to our Annual
Holiday Celebration December 11, 2009 1-8 p.m. Meet
the artists from 5-8 p.m.
Browse our Holiday Gift Shop, sample our artists fa-
vorite festive treats. Enjoy inspirational and unique art
works.
There will be live holiday music and Enchanted
Christmas tree forest.

Live Oak Artists Guild invites
you to annual holiday
celebration
Dec. 11
The Live Oak Artists Guild invites you to our An-
nual Holiday Celebration December 11, 2009 1-8
p.m. Meet the artists from 5-8 p.m.
Browse our Holiday Gift Shop, sample our artists
favorite festive treats. Enjoy inspirational and unique
art works.
There will be live holiday music and Enchanted
Christmas tree forest.


Mrs. Vickers' class yard sale
Dec. 12
Mrs. Vickers' class is taking donations for their
upcoming yard sale on Saturday Dec. 12. Pickups are
available. For more information please call 647-4047 or
344-2993.


Suwannee High Class of 1980
The Suwannee High Class of 1980 is planning their 30
year class reunion. If you were a member, had a child,
sibling or relative as part of the graduating class, please
email your name (maiden and married), address, phone
number and email address to shsclassl980@yahoo.com.
Or call 386-362-6309 to leave a message.
We look forward to hearing from you and seeing you
at the reunion.



Wild Adventures schedules


20 concerts


for 2010 season
VALDOSTA Wild Adventures Water & Theme
Park promises to deliver a year of unforgettable
concerts in 2010 with 20 performances. Diverse
and popular acts are included in the line-up from
country, Christian, rock, Gospel, R&B, and pop
genres. More concerts will be announced soon to
create a concert season not to be missed.

2010 Concert Schedule (as of November 20)*
Mar. 20 George Thorogood & Los Lonely Boys
Mar. 27 Lynyrd Skynyrd
Apr. 10 Jeremy Camp
Apr. 17 REO Speedwagon & STYX
May Backstreet Boys (date to be confirmed)
May 15 Chicago
May 29 David Crowder Band
June 12 Steven Curtis Chapman
June 19 Tye Tribbett & Kirk Franklin
June 26 Billy Ray Cyrus
July Great American Country Network
Emerging Artist Showcase
(date to be confirmed)
July 10 Rodney Atkins
July 24 Frankie Beverly with Maze
Aug. 28 CMA Award Winning Trio TBA
Sept. 25 Third Day

General admission to all of the 2010 concerts is
free with park admission or a 2010 Season Pass.
EZ Pay online payment plan makes it easier to pur-
chase a season pass in monthly installments to en-
joy all that Wild Adventures has to offer in 2010.
EZ Pay is available through December 31, 2009.
In addition to general concert admission, the park


MAGENTA M MM


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also offers reserved seating for an additional cost.
Reserved seating for each announced concert, with
the exception of the major country trio, will go on
sale January 15, 2010 and will be available for pur-
chase online, by phone or at the park. General con-
cert seating is included in park admission; reserved
seating is an additional cost to park admission.
*All performers and dates are subject to change
due to circumstances beyond the park's control.


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North Florida


MAGENTA Even Odd


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


DECEMBER 2 & 3, 2009, PAGE 5


Deadlines for line ads
Publication Deadline
Wednesday..........Fri. at 10 a.m.
Friday ................ Wed. at 10 a.m.


Help Wanted


Announcements













Help Wanted1/ ]
CDL DRIVERS NEEDED for
over the road flatbed positions.
Minimum of 2 years experience,
clean CDL, flatbed experience
preferred. Driver's home every
weekend during seasonal freight,
every 10-15 days during off
season. Late model Preterbilts
and Freightliners. Average
salary $50K to $60K. Call 386-
590-1980 or 386-776-1857.
FirstDay.
CERTIFIED DIETARY
MANAGER NEEDED
LTC experience preferred. Must
be able to manage large staff
and oversee daily food
preparation for 180 bed facility.
Full time with excellent benefits.
Email resume to Greg Roberts

groberts@ gulfcoasthealthcare.com
or fax resume to: 386-362-4417
Live Oak Fl. EOE/V/D/M/F
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
COURT ADMINISTRATION
~Trial Court Law Clerk~-
www.jud3.flcourts.org

FirstDay.
Advent Christian
Village
Current JOBS Line
Advertisement
call 386-658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net
24 hrs/day, 7 days/week
Want more than a Job?
Experience a Community.

Accounting A/R Clerk
FT; HSD or equivalent
required; AA degree or
certificate in accounting,
medical billing, or relevant
field strongly desired. Prior
experience in insurance billing
and ICD-9 coding, accounting,
PC operation with MS
applications, including word
processor, spreadsheet, and
database required. Must be
detail oriented.
CNA & LPN at
5-Star Nursing Home
FT/PT/long-term care setting.
Florida certification (CNA) or
unrestricted license (LPN)
required.
RN Quality of Care
Leader at 5-Star
Nursing Home
FT., Unrestricted Florida RN
license, excellent clinical
nursing/assessment skills,
current CPR certification,
verifiable IV skill (start,
regulate, maintain, discontinue
IVs) required. Good
communication,
organizational, and computer
skills required; must work as
part of interdisciplinary team
to assure outstanding qualify
of life/quality of care for LTC
residents. On-call rotation
required. management
/supervisory experience and
knowledge of LTC regs
desired.
FT positions include health,
dental, life, disability,
supplemental insurance; 403b
retirement account; paid time
off, access to onsite daycare
and fitness facilities. Apply in
person at Personnel Office
Monday through Friday from
9:00am until 4:00pm, or fax
resume/credentials to 386-
658-5160
EOE/Drug-Free
Workplace/Criminal
background checks required.


Page 5


ONLINE
When you place your Classified Ad it automatically ap-
pears on our Web site, www.nflaonline.com. Your ad is live
on the Internet 24 hours a day (free ads excluded).


In the Arts...


Jobs Wanted
DO YOU NEED YOUR HOME
CLEANED or Pressure Washed,
or your yard cleaned up? Done
at a very reasonable rate. Call
Christine or Gary 386-792-1655
IN HOME COMFORT CARE:
Cert Nursing Assist, Quality
Asst for Post Surgery Care.
Loving Companionship & Health
Aid for Elder Care Day or Night.
386-658-2038
Lost & Found
LOST BLACK CAR DOOR
OPENER ON TUES 11/17.
LAST PLACE USED
SUWANNEE CO HOSPITAL.
SMALL, SQUARE, 2/BUTTONS
386-362-2832
Special Notices















Miscellaneous
REWARD!! $1,000.00 For the
return of two 2009 KX 250F
Green Dirt Bikes taken from my
Please call 3863644942, 386neous
916-9034 or 386-249-9896
FirstDay.
YAMAHA DT EXPRESS IV SP
ELECTRONIC DRUM SET:
upgrade version 2 cymbals &
extra 13" crash/splash cymbal,
Hi hat stand, bass drum pedal.
$800 firm. BLU-RAY DISC
PLAYER-MODEL BD390. Brand
new/still in box. Will sell for $250
Call 386-364-2896 or Ask for
Marlene 904-885-9685
Vocational

FirstDay.
Want to be a CNA?
Don't want to wait?
Express Training
is now offering our quality
Exam Prep Classes in Lake
City. Class sizes limited.
Next class 03/16/2009.
Call 386-755-4401
expresstraining
services.com

LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072.
M-F from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Pets for Sale
FirstDay.
CHRISTMAS SNOW DOGS:
HIGH BRED HUSKY PUPPIES:
2-weeks old, Will have shots,
worming, Well Puppy Cert. $350
ea 3-Females 4-Males. Must
see to appreciate, Mother/Father
on premises. 386-776-1966
Wanted to Buy
CASH FOR YOUR COINS!
Private collector seeking U.S.
coins and currency. Older
varieties, all denominations. I
travel to you I pay more than
dealers and pawn! Questions?
call 352-949-1450.
Garage/Yard Sales
MULTI FAMILYYARD SALE:
12/4th & 5th, Like New Clothing,
Toys, Dishes, Jewelry, Plants &
Many More Items. 2.5 miles E.
Main & 86th St. 362-3863
YARD SALE: SAT 12/5 9-2
Hwy 51 S & 252 near Taylor
Store & Luraville area. Follow
signs. Clothes, Dishes, Framed
Pictures, Christmas Decor, Man
Items ETC
YARD SALE: SAT 12/5 9-2
Hwy 51 S & 252 near Taylor
Store & Luraville area. Follow
signs. Clothes, Dishes, Framed
Pictures, Christmas Decor, Man
Items ETC


- - - -

THE gLUELINE


Crab Compang Inc.

.I (388) 382-7227
1040 9uval Streeb NE Live Oak, PL 32064 I

Call for our specials!

Come in andej a

great atmosphIher^'

some awesome food!
Bring this ad and receive an additional 5% off
' *Excludes Friday Night


.............Page 7


Campers/Motor Homes
TWO TRAVEL TRAILERS: 2006
Fleetwood 8X32, with pull-out
$7K, 2006 Cavalier 8X32 sleeps
6, $6K. Both in excellent
condition. Contact Gary at 229-
834-7554 or 229-559-5305 or
Larry @ 229-559-3770
Apartments for Rent




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE
All real estate advertising in
this newspaper is subject to the
Fair Housing Act which makes it
illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability,
familial status or national origin,
or an intention, to make any
such preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age
of 18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women
and people securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in
violation of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimination call
HUD toll-free 1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free number for the
hearing impaired is 1-800-927-
9275.

Houses for Rent
BRICK HOUSE 3BD/2BA Close
to Town. $700 mo, 1st last &
Security. Call 386-362-6556
Mobile Homes for Rent
FirstDay.
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba CHA,
Dishwasher, Washer/Dryer. $550
mo NO PETS. Dowling Park.
386-658-2103 after 5pm
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba Double
Porches. Sets on 1/2 acrer lot.
SWMH 2Bd/2Ba Double Porch
on 1/2 acrer. Both Live Oak area
off hwy 349. 786-525-9331
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba, New Carpet &
Paint, kids/pets/horses all
possible. Live Oak, Nobles Ferry
/Stagecoach Rd. area. Available
12/1. $650/mo 1st, last, security.
386-842-2006
Rankin-Grantham &
Associates
Real Estate, Rentals &
Property Management
386-362-7080
FOR RENT
Live Oak
3BR/2BA House, Garage, 3
Acres, Fireplace, $900, CR252
2BR/1BA Duplex $450/ Mo. 1
mile from town
700 Square foot Office $450/
Mo. Downtown Live Oak-US 90
3BR/1.5BA House, $750/ Mo.
East of Lee on US 90
Dowling Park
2 Bd/ 1 Ba M/H-$450 a Month
2 Bd/2Ba M/H-$475 a Month
2 Bd/1Ba House, $650 a Month,
Butterfield Acres
Roommates Wanted
FirstDay.
ROOMMATES WANTED.
$300/mo $150 deposit. All
utilities included and full home
amenities. Lake City/Live Oak
area.
Call Mike 386-963-2279
Mobile Homes for Sale
DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE
HOME, 1998 model, 4 acres, 3
bedrooms, 2 full baths. New
carpet! Only one owner!
$90,000. Call Billie Vincent 386-
688-0470.


Medical Directory

FirstDay.
OWNER FINANCE MAYO
AREA: 3Bd/2Ba on 2.5 Acres,
Private River Access. Workshop.
Small down $675 mo. 386-590-
0642 or 386-867-1833
FirstDay.
THIS 16X60-$300 Above
Factory Inv.- 2Bd/2Ba SWMH,
Save Thousands. Call Rick 386-
752-1452
BANK REPO 2005 24X48
3Bd/2Ba "Like Brand New" "With
a Used Price." Call Mr Mott 386-
752-8196
"Mossy Oak" 2010 Model
4Bd/2Ba MH $39,995. Includes
Delivery, Set-Up, AC, Skirting &
Steps. You Pick all Colors. Call
Mr. Mott 386-752-8196
Lots
FOR SALE BY OWNER
W/FINANCEING. 4 Acres on
202nd St in O'Brien. Co
maintained Road, Lots of nice
trees. $19,000 386-935-2301
Acreage
PRICE REDUCED
Lafayette County
10ac, Hwy 51 N. of Mayo,
near river, $64,900
1 ac RV/Mobile home lots,
Branford area, $15,000
Suwannee County
5 ac, Park like,
near airport, $49,900
Easy Financing
1-941-778/7980or7565
www.landcallnow.com


BUSINESSES


FOR
ORENT|
Rental Assistance
1, 2, 3, & 4 BRHC & Non-
HC Accessible rtments

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY 711
Equal Housing Opportunity


. .Page 9


Contact us
classads@ gaflnews.com

FAX
386-364-5578

Phone
386-362-1734
800-525-4182

HOURS
Monday-Friday
8 a.m. 5 p.m.





rETr PACE

Calendar ... . .Page 4


l $49 1999- -


. ... BUY- NE-GET-ONE-FREE -E.







aPlus shop fee & tax

$2 99
mIi29
DIFFERENTIAL
Itsrn SERVICE ES
Plus shop fee& 86tax



GRAD Y 'sS
500 West Howard Street (US 90), Live Oak 386-362-4012


SERVICES


Rental assistance may be available!
HUD Vouchers Welcomel
1, 2 & 3 BRHC &Non-HC
Accessible Apartments

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housing Opportunity


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living
2 bedroom duplex.
Call 362-3110.
501033-F


.,~ONLY $55,000 &Move in


* I


phn~


Ready. No repairs needed.
1995, 1700 Sq Ft DW/MH on
5 acres. Metal roof just 3 yrs
old, central heat & air, &
p large kitchen. Handicap
accessible with ramp and
concrete pad. Located in
McAlpin. MLS#71268.


Great location down town. i
3/2 frame house with 2
gorgeous hardwood floors & -
high ceilings. Spacious -
bedrooms & family room.
Fenced back yard, rear deck
and new TRANE A/C unit.
Large storage building. Down
payment assistance from
seller. $98,000.MLS#71481 ...

RGA Contact
Rankin-Granthan Jacob Grantham

& ASSOCIATES 386-362-7080


563602-F


Time to Upgrade.


f you're search for that pifct set of wheels,

look no further than www.nflaonline.com


BLACK


BLACK


PPO U A]


MAG ENTA ** ****


I ---. I


North Florida 0 0





CIassifieds


I


11,1111-1 Coast to Coast, Aro-ur. I'll. 70111..-' I





North Florida


CYAN newvnew *
MAGENTA Even Odd


PAGE 6, DECEMBER 2 & 3, 2009


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


SUWANNEE VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY



CRITTER CORNER


Suwannee Valley Humane Society
1156 SE Bisbee Loop
Madison, Florida 32340

Two ml,. south of Lee off C.R. 255
From 10 Exit 262. Take C.R.2555 north 1/2 ,/ml.

We are a Limited Space Shelter (no kill). You must
check with us prior to bringing a drop-off animal to the
shelter. Hours; Tues. to Sat. 10:00 to 2:00, or by appoint-
ment. Visit our website and see the animals that need a
really good home at www.geocities.com/suwanneehs or
at our e-mail address suwanneevalley@embarqmail.com.

We service the surrounding counties of Madison,
Suwannee, Hamilton, Lafayette, Columbia and Taylor.

Lost and Found Pets:
If you have lost a pet or found one, the humane soci-
ety will help you find your pet. Call us at (850) 971-
9904 or toll free at 1-866-236-7812. Leave a message if
we are closed, we will return your call. Remember to al-
ways call your local animal controls or shelters if you
have found a lost or found pet.

THRIFT STORE:
You must come see our thrift stores, if you have not
been here before. We have three stores, a boutique,
clothing and furniture. We are always looking for dona-
tions for the stores. Please keep us in mind if you have
items in good condition you would like to donate to us.

RECYCLING:
We have a recycling bin on our property newspapers,
magazines, and catalogs. The bin will take all kinds of
paper. We also have a bin in Live Oak at 305 Pinewood
Drive, just west Of Johnson's Appliance/Radio Shack.


We also collect aluminum cans to recycle. Just bring
them to the shelter. All the money goes to help the
homeless animals.

The Suwannee Valley Humane Society depends on
adoptions for $65.00 which INCLUDES, spay/neuter,
de-worm, heartworm/feline leukemia tested and rabies
shot (if old enough). Please come and visit us, our ani-
mals would love to meet you.
REMEMBER; DO NOT LEAVE PETS IN VEHI-
CLES FOR ANY LENGTH OF TIME DUE TO THE
HEAT AND HUMIDITY.

FEATURED ANIMALS FOR ADOPTIONS

DOGS:
3265 Drake is a Hound Mix, he is 2 years 4 months
old. He is brown with white. He is a very nice dog.

3215 Pettunia is 2 years 8 months old. She is a
Hound Mix and is brown and white. She is a very sweet
doggie.

3203 Andy is 3 years 5 months old, hound mix. He
is all brown and is very friendly.

3146 Madison is a 3 years old, Mixed Breed. She is
brindle color and a very sweet dog.

2936 Ms. Wiggles she is a brown, Lab Mix. She is
4 years 4 months old and is a sweetheart.


CATS:
We have 10 kittens from 12 weeks to 14 weeks. All
different colors and size, come in and look for the one
you want.


3477 Polly is a short haired kitty. She is all black
and is 1 year 5 months old. She is a very sweet kitty.

3419 Zena is a 4 year 5 month old, short haired,
black kitty. She is a very loveable cat.

3341 Precious is a 2 year 3 month old, short haired
male cat. He is black with a white spot on his belly.

3227 Megan is a grey and white kitty. She is 2
years 6 months old. She is a medium length haired kitty.

3226 -Morgan is a short haired grey kitty. She is 2
years 2 months old. She is a very sweet kitty.

If you have lost or found an animal, you would like to
report. Please feel free to call us and I will put your re-
port in the newspaper free.

FOUND:
He was found at the Boy's Ranch Road #795. A male
Boxer Mix, he is brown and white with black on his
face. He has not been neutered. I he is about 6 months
old. He has a couple of nicks on him and blood blister
on toe. He is a very friendly dog. If this is your dog,
please call Cindy Ewing @ 386 -842 5193.

FOUND:
Off of RTE 53 on Harvey Green Drive, near watermel-
on place in Madison, FL. A Miniature Dachshund, it is
black and tan. It is a male about 2 years old and in real
good health. If this is your dog, please call Amy at 850-
673-6626.







The American Cancer Society (ACS) of North Cen-
tral Florida Reaching out to seniors in our area. A vari-
ety of locations all over the north central Florida area are
available for each program. Contact The American Cancer
Society toll-free at 800-ACS-2345 for more information or
on the Web at www.cancer.org. Or contact ACS locally at
352-376-6866, ext. 114 or 127.
ACS Support groups:
I Can Cope a free educational program for people fac-
ing cancer-either personally or as a caregiver. Offered
through a partnership between the Florida Division of The
American Cancer Society and the Florida Society of On-
cology Social Workers; provides participants with reliable
information, peer support and practical coping skills.
Meets third Monday, 6-7 p.m., Phillips Dining Hall, Ad-
vent Christian Village, Dowling Park.
Road To Recovery lack of transportation is one of the
biggest challenges for thousands of cancer patients. Many
need daily or weekly treatment and they don't have a car
or are too ill to drive. The program provides volunteer dri-
vers to transport cancer patients to and from these life-sav-
ing cancer treatments. Call toll-free 800-227-2345 to re-
quest a ride or train as a voluteer-Live Oak/Lake
City/Dowling Park.
Look Good, Feel Better a free, community-based pro-
gram that teaches beauty techniques to female cancer pa-
tients currently in chemotherapy or radiation treatment to
help restore their appearance and self-image. This partner-
ship between the American Cancer Society, the Cosmetic,
Toiletry and Fragrance Association Foundation and the
National Cosmetology Association enables certified and
licensed beauty professionals to help cancer patients re-
gain self-confidence during their treatment. Meets second
Monday, 9:30 a.m. in the conference room in Shands at
Lake Shore hospital, Lake City. Continental breakfast pro-
vided courtesy of Shands. Call toll-free to reserve free
make-up kits 800-227-2345.
Reach to Recovery connects breast cancer patients
with trained breast cancer survivors. Breast cancer sur-
vivors provide free one-on-one support and information to
help cope with their breast cancer experience. Gift bag in-


You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Nancy at

386-362-1734
499651-F


cluded. Request a visitor by
calling toll-free 800-227-
2345-Lake City/Live Oak.
Man to Man provides
men with prostate cancer a
comfortable, community-
based setting for discus-
sion, education and support.
The program provides men
with free support on indi-
vidual and group levels,
and offers participants the
opportunity to educate their
communities and advocate
for prostate cancer issues.
Meets second Tuesday, 7
p.m., classroom at Lake

CONTINUED ON PAGE 8


Show Pigs For Sale
For information call
Blue Butt Farms
386-623-3305
386-867-2075

560017-F


MAGENTA MM


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North Florida


CYAN
MAGENTA


newtnew~
AIF ~ u4u4


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* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


DECEMBER 2 & 3, 2009, PAGE 7


A trip down


the rabbit hole,


courtesy NFCC


'Alice in
Wonderland'
staged for area
youngsters in
Madison


MADISON North Florida Community College Chil-
dren's Theater recently entertained over 1,200 local school
children, grades K-3rd, from Hamilton, Madison, Jefferson
and Taylor counties as they enjoyed a magical journey
through Wonderland. Three performances of "Alice &
Wonderland" by Bits 'N Pieces Puppet Theatre were of-
fered to area children Friday, Nov. 6 and Saturday, Nov. 7
at the Van H. Priest Auditorium. The larger-than-life musi-
cal mixed nine-foot-tall body puppets, costumed characters
and traditional puppetry into the classic tale of "Alice in
Wonderland."
For more information about the NFCC Children's The-
ater call 850-973-1653 or email artistseries@nfcc.edu.


TOP: NFCC Children's Theater Coordinator Kim Scarboro
and nieces Kaylee and Taylor Zebiker meet the March Hare
and the Mad Hatter after the Saturday performance of "Al-
ice in Wonderland."
ABOVE: South Hamilton's 1st grade classes enjoy "Alice in
Wonderland"
- Photos: Submitted


Cost tCost
Aroud te Crne


.. WE ARE THE MANUFACTURER

METAL ROOFING
STATE OF FLORIDA APPROVED
Residential* Commercial* Agricultural
AGRI-METAL SUPPLY, INC.
Phone: 38-294-1720 Fax: 386-294-1724
232 SE Industrial Park Cir. Mayo, FL

Trees, Trimmed or Removed Firewood *in i
Licensed & Insured Free Estimates tump

TREE WORK
Bucket Truck and Climbing
963 5026 Jim Sellers 386-776-2522
|_ __ __ __ __ __ Cell 386-647-5978


BWAER S affordable Seamless Gutters
REEDIAMD "Satisfaction Guaranteed"
Specializing In:
Seamless Gutters Carl Kirk
WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS soffit & Fasia 386-776-1835
PUMP & WELL REPAIRS Sutte (Guaid Cell
SCOTT TAYLOR Enclosures and Repair 386-209-2740
TEL. 407-719-3726 Residential & Commercial Licensed & Insured
LIVE OAK FLORIDA SERVING NORTH FLORIDA FREE ESTIMATES FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED

SLIVE OAKI E-LIMB-INATORS,INC.
MINIT S10R A I V Complete Tree Service
MINI STORAGLicensed & Insured
5x15 5x20 10x15 10x20 Owners:
Keith & Glenda Hudson
CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE Keith & Glenda Hudson
9351 220th Street
5x5 5x10 10x10 10x20 O'Brien, FL 32071
Units located on Gold Kist Road Phone 386-935-1993
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-6626 Fax 386-935-3321

TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 386-362-1734
DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M.


CYAN
MAGENTA


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PAGE 8, DECEMBER 2 & 3, 2009


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Dear Classified Guys,
My husband and I have been school-
teachers for several years at an ele-
mentary school. We were thrilled
when we both applied and were
offered jobs to teach in China for
three years. My daughter will even
be able to attend school there. We've
been packing for the last month and
are just about ready to go, except for
one detail: our car. It's nothing fancy,
just your average SUV, but we just
finished paying it off a few months
ago. I'm thinking we should store it
while we're gone, but my husband
says to just sell it and buy something
else when we come back. It's our
last tie to the states. We're J
taking everything else with 4-.
us. My Dad offered to park
it at his place for us while
we're gone so we don't have to
pay for storage. That's a huge
savings right there. Do you think it's
worth storing or should I just give in
to my husband and let him sell it?
Cash: Congratulations on the new
jobs. But even more impressive may
be that you have figured out how to
pack all your things to go overseas.
That's an impressive feat!
Carry: As a schoolteacher, you know


Duane "Cash
& Todd"



the importance of a good math assign-
ment. And choosing whether to sell
your car or store it is just that.. .a little
math homework.
Cash: Most vehicles, regardless of
how long they may take to pay off,
depreciate quickly once you drive them
from the dealership. And they continue
to lose value as they age.
Carry: Although you may be saving
the cost for storing your SUV while
you're gone, the car will continue to
depreciate while you are away. It's like
putting money in the bank and having
negative interest.
Cash: If you sell the car today, you
can recoup the current value of the vehi-


SIRn,





i" Holze
Carry" Holze


11129/09
@2009 The Classified Guyse


cle and prevent losing more of your
investment. Like your husband sug-
gests, you can then buy something else
when you return from China.
Carry: If depreciation isn't enough of
an incentive, consider the car's condi-
tion after three years of storage. Cars
that sit unused, especially if stored out-
side, can develop a number of prob-
lems. Not only could you see exterior
rust, but the lack of driving the car and
circulating the fluids could cause things
to seize up over time.
Cash: Your best bet is to sell the car
and enjoy your travels to China with no
worries. Besides, after three years over-
seas, who knows where you'll move next!


Self Storage
If you plan on storing a car for an
extended period of time, prepare it prop-
erly to prevent mechanical problems in
the future. First, change the oil and filter
and use oil that doesn't contain caustic
detergents. Fill up the gas tank with
fresh gas to keep condensation from col-
lecting. Then, leave the windows
cracked to let moisture and heat escape
and place paper under the windshield
wipers to keep the rubber from adhering
to the windshield. And finally, chock the
wheels and release the parking brake so
the pads don't stick. A little preparation
will keep the vehicle in good condition.
Under Appreciated
When buying a car, most people
spend a lot of time choosing the right
color, style and interior fabric but forget
to consider the vehicle's depreciation.
Although depreciation, or the car's loss
in value over time, varies for each
make, model and year, the general rule
of thumb is a loss of 10% to 20% each
year. You can minimize the effect by
choosing a vehicle with a history of
good resale value and by properly
maintaining your vehicle.
* *
Got a question, funny story, or just want to give
us your opinion? We want to hear all about It!
Email us at comments@classifledguys.com.


I w.Clssfidysco


Announcements


Advertise in Over 100 Papers
throughout Florida.
Advertising Networks of
Florida, Put us to work for
You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com.

Auctions

AUCTION Santa Rosa
County, Florida, December 12,
Saturday, 11:00 AM The
Moors Golf & Racquet Club
Milton, FL. 66 Beautiful Lots
- 20 Lots will sell
ABSOLUTE. Gated
Community, Clubhouse, Pool,
Tennis Courts, Workout
Center. Walking distance to
championship Golf Course -
For More Information
(205)822-4229 Redmont
Auction Eddie Propst AU2051
Bob Vagi Auctioneers &
Realty, Inc. AB 177 AU331

Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING TAX
CREDIT! 40 yr Warranty.
Direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock Quick
turnaround. Delivery
available. Gulf Coast Supply
& Manufacturing, (888)393-
0335
www.gulfcoastsupply.com

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING! Do
you earn $800 in a day? 25
Local Machines and Candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033 CALL US: We
will not be undersold!

Cars for Sale

Police Impounds! Acura 2000
Integra $500! Honda 1999
Civic $200! Ford 2001 Taurus
$700! for listings call
(800)366-9813 ext 9275


2000 Honda Civic $800!
2001 Nissan Altima $350!
2000 Acura Integra $500!
POLICE IMPOUNDS! for
listings call (800)366-9813 ext
9271

Financial Services

BIG PLANS Being Held up
by the Economy? Turn Court
Settlement, Annuity, or
Lottery Winnings into the
Cash You Need. Call Chris
(816)582-11 9 3 o r
chris @yourcashout.com

For Sale

Get Dish -FREE Installation-
$19.99/mo HBO & Showtime
FREE-Over 50 HD Channels
FREE Lowest Prices-No
Equipment to Buy! Call Now
for full Details- (877)416-
0191

Help Wanted

Travel, Travel, Travel! $500
Sign-on-bonus. Seeking sharp
guys and gals, Rock-n-Roll
Atmosphere, Blue Jean
Environment! Call Ally
(800)716-0048 today.

Homes For Rent

Homes From $199/mo! 1-4
Bedrooms Avail From
$199/mo! For Listings
(800)350-4142

A Bank Repo for Sale! 5 Br
$25,000! Only $225/Mo! 3 Br
$12,500! Only $199/Mo! 5%
down 30 years @ 8% apr. for
listings (800)366-9783 ext
5853

4Br 2Ba Foreclosure!
$11,500! Only $217/Mo! 5%
down 15 years @ 8% apr.
Buy, 3 Br $199/Mo! for
listings (800)366-9783 ext
5798


Misc. Items for Sale


Get Dish -FREE Installation-
$19.99/mo HBO & Showtime
FREE-Over 50 HD Channels
FREE Lowest Prices-No
Equipment to Buy! Call Now
for full Details- (877)227-2998
Miscellaneous

AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for high paying Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial
aid if qualified Housing
available. CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance
(888)349-5387.

Miscellaneous

ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call (888)203-
3179,
www.CenturaOnline.com.

Sporting Goods

Gun Show! Dec. 5-6. Sat 9-5
& Sun 10-5. Atlanta Expo
Center. (3650 Jonesboro Rd
SE). Buy-Sell-Trade. Over
1000 Tables! National Arms
Show. Info: (563)927-8176







ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA

Classified | Display | Mayo Daily






(Week of Nov. 30, 2009
499626-F


Continued From Page 6

City Medical Center. Refreshments provided by LCMC.
Info: Bill Mann 386-758-7681. Meets second Thursday, 7
p.m., Copeland Community Center, Advent Christian Vil-
lage, Dowling Park. Info: Albert Applewhite, 386-658-
3085.
Angel Food Ministry Love INC of Suwannee Coun-
ty Anyone may purchase a package of food for $32. Also,
one or more specials will be available for an additional
charge, only with the purchase of a regular box. You can
purchase with Food Stamps (EBT) or by cash or check.
Regular box: $32. Specials vary each month. Please bring
a box (Banana box size) for packing your food in on the
day of pickup. Pay first of month, food delivered end of
month. Info: 386-364-4673.
Childbirth classes (free) Suwannee County Health
Department; every Tuesday; 6-8 p.m.; Info or to register:
Coleen Cody, 386-362-2708, ext. 218.
Christian Home Educators of Suwannee (CHES) -
home school support group; weekly park days; informal
meetings; fellowship for parents and kids; Info:
ches3inl @yahoo.com or Tammy, 386-362-6939.
Christian Mission in Action Ministry free food and
clothing give-away, second Saturday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., at
John H. Hale Community Park & Recreation Center, 215
NE Duval St., Live Oak; Info: Audrey Sharpe, 386-364-
4560.
Dairy Queen Benefit Night Dairy Queen of Live Oak
will host Dairy Queen Benefit Night the second Tuesday
of every month from 6-8 p.m. to help buy books for
Suwannee Middle School.
Experience Works a national nonprofit organization,
(formerly Green Thumb) provides training and employ-
ment services to older workers over 55 and with a limit-
ed income in Suwannee County through the Senior
Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP); min-
imum wage 20 hours per week. Info: Lake City One
Stop, 386-755-9026, ext. 3129 for Loretta or ext. 3134 for
Ronald; www.experienceworks.org.
Experimental Airplane Association (EAA) Breakfast
- fourth Saturday; breakfast served from 9-11 a.m.; at the
EAA Chapter Building at the Suwannee County Airport;
eggs, sausage, pancakes, toast, coffee, fruit and juice for
$4.50; the EAA Chapter sponsors two students from
NJROTC to go to the Air Academy in Oshkosh, Wis.
Food free to anyone in need Alapaha River Band of
Cherokee, Inc., a non-profit organization, will give away
free food to anyone in need first and third Fridays, from
noon-3 p.m. at Free Food Service Pantry, 3589 NW 28th
Terrace, Jennings. Info: Chief Joan Nelson, 386-938-4625
or 386-938-3609, or http://www.alapahariverbandofchero-
keeinc.org.
Food Bank of Suwannee Valley a division of Catholic
Charities of Lake City whose purpose is to distribute food
to 14 member agencies for further distribution in Colum-
bia, Suwannee, Hamilton and Union counties to help elim-
inate hunger. Volunteers are always needed, call Glenda
Parton at 386-755-5683.
GED Tests Suwannee-Hamilton Technical Center;
mandatory registration session before test; Info: Lynn Lee,
386-364-2782; age waivers, Karen Williams, 386-384-
2763, counselor.

For the entire
FYI Meetings, go to
suwanneedemocrat.com
Look under Local Happenings


Mobile

Homes

and

Land for

sale.

Financed

by owner.

386-362-2720


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Stop The Bus
I was waiting for a bus outside of
the supermarket when an older
woman of about 85 years walked up
to me. We were both smoking a cig-
arette and got to talking.
In our short time together, she
managed to tell me about all of her
latest ailments. She apparently had
back surgery that left her with limit-
ed head movement, cataract surgery
that left one eye a little blurry and
new blood pressure medication that
caused her dizziness in the after-
noons.
"That's a lot to handle," I said as the
bus pulled up. "Can I help you on?"
"Oh no," she said fumbling for
keys in her purse. "I drove here."
(Thanks to Luther P.)


These "teacher-aids" must be
needed for proofreading.

part-Time Preschool
Feature-Aids Needed.
Mornings 9 am to pm.
Send resume




North Florida


CYAN
MAGENTA


new new Odd

Even Odd


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


DECEMBER 2 & 3, 2009, PAGE 9


The Civil



War in



pictures

RIGHT: Battle orders. BELOW: A Confederate advance.
- Photos: Jamie Ganote .


Sneak some exercise into

regular activities


/ LET YALT

ABOUT YOUR HEALTH


Ophthalmology
GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
522 South Ohio Avenue
-,330-6260 or 1-800-435-3937 I

Physical Therapy

Heartland
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA
Mandy McCray, PTA
Carolyn McCook, Office Manager,
Patient Care Coordinator
AQUATIC THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports
Medicine, Pediatrics Providers
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS Providers
405 11th St., Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051 501053-F


Many people equate "exercise" with
doing a workout video or heading to
the gym. This doesn't have to be the
case at all. Regular daily activities
provide a lot of the exercise a person
needs and can be tweaked to provide
even more.
* Move while watching TV or
playing video games: There are
several video games today that make
physical activity part of the fun.
Even if your gaming system doesn't
feature getting up and being active,
do so on your own. While watching
a television show, dance, walk in
place, do jumping jacks, or any
other activity during commercials.


* Go outdoors:


Instead of


recreational activities inside of the
house where space is limited, play
games, go on walks, or organize a
pick-up sports game in the
neighborhood. You'll burn calories,
get exercise, and enjoy fresh air, too.
* Leave the car at home: Whenever
possible, bike, walk, rollerblade, or


get to your destination another way.
Suburban life tends to create the car-
to-store-to-car-to-house pattern,
which doesn't make for much
physical activity.
* Keep moving: If you simply must
sit, such as in school or at the office,
tap or kick your legs. A little
movement is better than none at all.
* Park further away: When in store
parking lots, park furthest from the
entrance so you're forced to walk a
bit more to and from the car.
* Take a walking tour: Sightseeing
during a vacation? Many big cities
are perfect for strolling. With so
much to see, you won't even realize
how much walking you're doing.



<-,Y7 groCs, qna.

* Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy
* Specializing In Arthritis Fibromyalgia Geriatrics Spinal &
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Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross, Av Med
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Branford 935-1449 Workers Comp
Mayo 294-1407 Most Other Insurance Plans
A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com
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North Florida


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PAGE 10, DECEMBER 2 & 3, 2009


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Confederates on the line. Photos: Jamie Ganote


The Civil War in pictures


-t--p
,.osL
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DECEMBER 2 & 3, 2009, PAGE 11


A Confederate volley. Photos: Jamie Ganote


The Civil War in pictures


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PAGE 12, DECEMBER 2 & 3, 2009


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) Staff
third Wednesday; Town Hall, Council Ch
ford; 1-2:30 p.m.; trained staff visits to assi
Info: 202-225-5235, www.house.gov/boyd
Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) Staff L
Wednesday; City Council Chambers, City
White Ave., Live Oak; 9:30-11:30 a.m.; tr
its to assist constituents; Info:
www.house.gov/boyd/.
State Representative Debbie Boyd's
fice hours in Branford, Mayo and Live
ber of State Representative Debbie Boyd's
staff will visit Branford in Suwannee Cou
Wednesday afternoon of every month an
Lafayette County and Live Oak in Suwan
the first Thursday of every month so the cit
an opportunity to meet personally with st
issues. Schedule: Branford 2-5 p.m., V
Branford City Hall; 9:30 a.m.-noon,
Lafayette County Commissioners Board Ri
5 p.m., Thursdays in the Live Oak City
Meeting Room.
Alzheimer's Support Group third Th
December) at 3:30 p.m.; Good Samaritan
ing Park. Info: Angie Paarlberg, 386-658-5
American Legion Post 59 third Tu
Nell's Restaurant, Branford.
American Legion Post 107 The Ha
Memorial American Legion Post No. 107 -
ing, first Thursday at noon and third Th
p.m., at 10726 142nd St., east of US 12
Road), McAlpin. This is to accommodate 1
cannot travel after dark and those who w
day. Info: Richard Buffington, 386-364-59
American Legion Auxiliary Unit No.
urday; 10 a.m.; Harry C. Gray II Memoria
gion Post No. 107, 10726 142nd Rd., L
Tanya Lees, 386-364-8331.
American Legion Post 132 second
a.m.; Wellborn Masonic Lodge, on CR 1
Wellborn; Info: Gerald McKean, 386-963-
Bible college classes offered Third Sa
5 p.m. at 104 Beech St., NE, Live Oak. Ye
more about the Word? Can't attend class
Maybe this is your answer. Info: Dr. Sim]
1607 or 386-344-4192.
BINGO at Wellborn Community Cent
day, from 4-6 p.m. Prize money based on
dinner's follow at 6 p.m. $5.00 per person
the Marine Corps League.
Bluegrass Pickin Suwannee Valk
Pickin first Saturday, 7 p.m., Otter
Lodge, 6470 SW 80th Ave., Trenton. It is h
lic, in a nice, air-conditioned building. Info
toll-free 800-990-5410.
Bosom Buddies a breast cancer su
meets at 6 p.m., second Monday, at First Ad
Church in Live Oak. Breast cancer survivor
share information, prayer and strength w
Info: Lisa Mills, 386-208-3949.
Branford Camera Club third Thursd
Branford Library; second Thursday; No
meeting; December meeting held on secoi
accommodated Holiday season. Info: C
program chair, 386-935-2044.
Chamber of Commerce Suwannee C
Thursday; 7:30 a.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave.
386-362-3071.
Christian Mission in Action first Tue
Triumph the Church and Kingdom of God
Center, 12001 NW Seventh St., Live Oak
Sharpe, 386-364-4560.
Christian Mission in Action Ministry
clothing give-away, second Saturday, 11
John H. Hale Community Park and Recr
Duval Street, Live Oak; Info: Audrey Sh
4560.
Council for Progress of Suwannee C(
Tuesday; 7:30 a.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. L
386-362-3071.
Cub Scout Pack No. 408-Tiger, Wolf, B
belos dens (grades one five) every Tues
only; 6:30-8 p.m. at First Baptist Church,
Disabled American Veterans Chapter
ond Thursday; 6 p.m.; 226 Parshley St., S
Info: 386-362-1701.


- Branford Disaster Animal Response Team (DART) first Tues- and formerly h
chambers, Bran- day, 5:30 p.m., Companion Animal Hospital, 605 N. those who are
st constituents; Houston Street, Live Oak. DART helps out with pets, ened with horn
/. livestock, horses, birds and all animals during natural dis- Humane So(
ive Oak third asters. Volunteers needed. Info: 386-208-0072. second Mond
y Hall, 101 SE Dowling Park Volunteers first Saturday; 1100 hours Loop, south en
gained staff vis- (11 a.m.); training each following Saturday at 1100 (11 ty; Info: t(
202-225-5235, a.m.); 22992 CR 250, Live Oak. www.geocities
Drug Free Coalition of Suwannee County last Lady of the
staff holds of- Thursday, 5:30 p.m. at 813 Pinewood Way, Live Oak. in Lake City; f
Oak A mem- Info: Mary Taylor, 386-362-2272, suwannee coali- quilting; the
(D-Newberry) tion@mac.com, www.drugfreesuwannee.com. Kazmierski, pr
nty on the first Fibromyalgia support group first Monday, 6 p.m., at Leona 4-H
id in Mayo in Suwannee River Regional Library, 1848 Ohio Avenue home of Avon,
nee County on South, Live Oak. Feel free to bring family members. Info: Info: Betty Hi(
izens will have 386-842-5206. 1236.
aff and discuss Florida Gateway Charter Chapter of the American Lions Club
Wednesday in Business Women's Association second Thursday; 6 p.m.; Farm But
Thursday in p.m.; locations change; Info: Sandy Harrison, 386-754- 386-364-4098.
oom; and 1:30- 0434 or 386-752-0516. Live Oak Ai
Hall's Council Friends of Suwannee River State Park second Tues- Second St., Liv
day; 10 a.m., board meeting; Suwannee River State Park, day. Artwalk E
ursday (except US 90 West, Live Oak; Last birding walk for 2008 will be day, June 20. /
Center, Dowl- held Saturday. Oct. 25; meet at park 8 a.m.; bring water, Info: 386-364-
5594. binoculars and favorite bird ID book; wear comfortable Live Oak A
esday, 7 p.m., shoes or boots. Park entrance fees apply. Info: Member- Monday, 6 p.m
ship Chair Walter Schoenfelder, 850-971-5354, NW, Live Oak
rry C. Gray II wbs@surfbest.net or 386-362-2746, fosrsp@surfbest.net. aged to join the
business meet- Ft. White Quilt Sisters last Saturday, 9 a.m.-until, at Live Oak Se
ursday at 6:30 Ft. White Town Hall near Library. Quilters of all skill lev- Exhibition II
29 (Blue Lake els are welcome to join us for a relaxing time of fun, fel- Eleventh St., I
both those who lowship and of course quilting. No dues or fees required vary; Deposits
york during the just the love and desire to quilt. Bring your lunch and Info: Walter an
85. quilting make new quilting friends. Info: 386-497-4179. GFWC Woi
107 first Sat- Food free to anyone in need Alapaha River Band of noon; 1308 Ek
I American Le- Cherokee, Inc., a non-profit organization, will give away Suwannee V
ive Oak. Info: free food to anyone in need first and third Fridays, from second Monda
noon-3 p.m. at Free Food Service Pantry, 3589 NW 28th Loop, south en
Saturday; 9:30 Terrace, Jennings. Info: Chief Joan Nelson, 386-938-4625 ty; Info: t(
37, downtown or 386-938-3609, or www.thealapahariverbandofchero- www.geocities
5901. keeinc.org. Live Oak, Si
turday, from 2- GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak first Friday; ond Wednesda3
warning to learn noon; 1308 Eleventh Street, Live Oak. offices, 1201 S
sses full time? Girl Scout Leaders, Girl Scouts of Gateway Council MADD Da(
pson, 386-364- first Monday; 7 p.m.; First Advent Christian Church, County Courth
Live Oak; Info: Peggy Rudser, membership specialist, Man To Ma
er First Tues- 212 N. Marion Ave., Suite 230, Lake City, FL 32055, 386- vin E. Jones B
n participation; 758-3230 or toll-free 866-295-1727. provided; Info
. Sponsored by Hamilton County Riding Club first Saturday; 5 ACS-2345 or
p.m., meeting-games; Hamilton County Arena, Jasper; (Press 2) Ext. I
ey Bluegrass third Saturday; 5 p.m.; trail ride-dinner, location an- McAlpin Co
Springs Resort nounced at the first Saturday meeting; new members wel- covered dish di
free to the pub- come; Info: 386-792-2725. acquaint memt
: Cloud Haley, Hamilton County Tourist Development Council in the county
second Wednesday; 1 p.m.; 1153 US 41 NW, Suite 4, Shirley Jones,
pport group Jasper (courthouse annex); public is welcome. Info: 386- Owens, 386-36
dvent Christian 792-6828. MOMS Clu
rs are invited to Healthy Horizons, a chronic illness support group fellowship hall
ith each other. meets at 6:30 p.m., second and third Thursdays at Christ West on US 9(
Central Ministries, 1550 Walker Ave. SW, Live Oak. from the Colur
lay; 7:30 p.m.; Group discussion, educational materials and friendly sup- Live Oak; Inf4
te: No August port provided to enable all to live to their fullest potential. LakeCityFl@a
nd Thursday to All who live with a chronic condition are invited to attend. North Flori
arolyn Hogue, Open to all members of the community. Info: Church, Tuesday; 10 a.i
386-208-1345.. Suwannee Riv
county second Home and Community Educators (HCE) first Live Oak.. Pl
Live Oak; Info: Wednesday, 9:30 a.m., at Suwannee County Extension serge or can cu
Office, Coliseum Complex, 1302 Eleventh Street, Live premature babi
sday, 6 p.m., at Oak; new members welcome; Pleasant Hill-second Mon- 590-4075.
in Christ Youth day, at 10 a.m.; McAlpin Community Center, McAlpin; North Flori
:; Info: Audrey Formerly known as Pleasant Hill Home Extension Club. second Tuesda3
Short business meeting, followed by a workshop of dif- Recreation Cen
- free food and ferent projects for the community. Visitors are always ings covered d
a.m.-1 p.m., at welcome. Info: Donna Wade, president, 386-963-3516, or keep public lan
reaction Center, Barbara Parks, 386-362-3044. Happy Homemakers-sec- and enjoy. No
arpe, 386-364- ond Wednesday; Suwannee County Coliseum Complex, Williams; Vice
1302 Eleventh Street, Live Oak. Info: 386-362-2771. Treasurer Patt
county second Homeless Services Network of Suwannee Valley 386-362-6716
Live Oak; Info: second Tuesday, 4 p.m. at Columbia County Public Li- pattyannwood(
brary, Lake City. United Way of Suwannee Valley serves North Flori
Bears and We- as the lead agency for the Homeless Services Network of Suwannee Coi
sday, Aug.-May Suwannee Valley, which serves the counties of Columbia, Training Roon
Live Oak. Suwannee, Lafayette and Hamilton. The network includes St., Live Oak.
No. 126 sec- agencies and individuals interested in the services avail- ents and fami
.W, Live Oak; able to those who are homeless or threatened with home-______
lessness. Agency representatives, individuals, homeless


homeless, with an interest in the needs of
experiencing homelessness or are threat-
elessness are encouraged to attend.
city, Suwannee Valley Animal Shelter
lay; noon; at the shelter located on Bisbee
trance, in Lee off CR 255, Madison Coun-
oll-free 866-Adoptl2, 866-236-7812,
.com/suwanneehs.
Lake Quilting Guild fourth Wednesday,
or anyone interested in quilts and the art of
quilting public is invited. Info: Marcia
resident, 386-752-2461.
Community Club first Monday; 7 p.m.;
and Betty Hicks, 6107 180th St., McAlpin;
cks, 386-963-4205; Pam Nettles, 386-963-

- second Tuesday and fourth Tuesday; 12
reau meeting room; Info: Homer Scroggin,

artist Guild first Tuesday; 7 p.m.; 213 NW
ve Oak; Artwalk from 7-9 p.m., third Fri-
End of the Season Celebration will be Fri-
Artwalk will resume again Friday, Oct. 17.
5099 or Linda Ruwe, 386-362-0985.
artist Guild's Theater group meets third
., Cultural Arts and Gallery, 213 Second St.
k. Members of the community are encour-
em.
senior Citizens first Monday; 10:30 a.m.;
Building, Coliseum Complex, 1302 SW
Live Oak; escorted tours available, prices
due at registration, balance due before trip.
nd Charlene Howell, 386-842-2241.
man's Club of Live Oak first Friday at
seventh Street, Live Oak.
Valley Humane Society Animal Shelter -
y; noon; at the shelter located on Bisbee
trance, in Lee off CR 255, Madison Coun-
oll-free 866-Adoptl2, 866-236-7812,
.com/suwanneehs.
uwannee County Recreation Board sec-
y; 5:30 p.m. Suwannee Parks & Recreation
Silas Drive, Live Oak; Info: 386-362-3004.
ds Third Thursday; 7 p.m.; Suwannee
house.
n Group second Thursday; 7 p.m.; Mar-
3uilding, Dowling Park; free; refreshments
: American Cancer Society toll-free 800-
the local office toll-free 888-295-6787
114.
community Club second Monday; 7 p.m.;
inner first; everyone welcome; purpose to
hers of the community of services available
; Info: Donna Wade, 386-935-3516 or
, 386-963-5357; building rental: Leslie
64-3400.
ub second Wednesday; 11:15 a.m. at the
1 of Bethel Missionary Baptist Church, go
O seven miles from 1-75, and 1-1/2 miles
mbia/Suwannee County line, 12 miles from
o: 386-397-1254, MOMSClubofLiveOak-
lltel.net
da Chapter of Newborns in Need first
m.-I p.m.; in the small conference room at
er Regional Library, 1848 US 129 South,
ease join them if you crochet, knit, sew,
t out or package. Help them take care of the
ies in our area. Info: Mabel Graham, 386-

da Conservation and Airboat Alliance -
y; 7 p.m.; John H. Hale Community Park &
iter, 215 NE Duval St., Live Oak; all meet-
dish; airboaters and sportsmen working to
nds and waterways open for everyone to use
December meeting. President Winston
e President Garry Garrison; Secretary-
y Wood-Williams. Info: Winston Williams,
; or e-mail
@realtyagent.com.
da Hope Share second Tuesday, 6 p.m.,
unty Sheriff's Office, Criminal Division
i, (old Mastec building), 1902 NE Duval
Non-profit support group for grieving par-
ly members. Light refreshments served.


CONTINUED ON PAGE 13


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DECEMBER 2 & 3, 2009, PAGE 13


Continued From Page 12

Info: Missy Norris, 386-364-3789 or 386-364-4064.
Nursing Mom's Group second Friday; 10 a.m.;
Suwannee River Regional Library, Live Oak; Info:
Michelle, 386-776-2955.
Pleasant Hill Home and Community Education
(HCE) Club, formerly known as Home Extension
Club second Monday, 10 a.m., McAlpin Community
Center Small business meeting, followed by a workshop
of different projects for the community. Visitors are al-
ways welcome. Info: Donna Wade, president, 386-963-
3516, or Barbara Parks, 386-362-3044.
SHINE Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders
- Advent Christian Village Dowling Park trained vol-
unteers help elders and their caregivers in Dowling Park
area of Suwannee County to understand Medicare and
other health insurance programs make informed decisions
on insurance, Medicare Prescription Drug Cards and on
discounted prescription drug programs and eligibility re-
quirements; free; Info: appointment 386-658-3333 or
386-658-5329; Florida Department of Elder Affairs toll-
free 800-262-2243, Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders)
Branford statewide program of the Florida Department
of Elder Affairs. Free unbiased Medicare counseling pro-
vided. Trained SHINE Volunteers offer information and
assistance with Medicare, Medicare Prescription Drug
Plans, Medicare supplemental insurance, Medicaid pro-
grams, and prescription assistance programs offered by
pharmaceutical companies. They can also provide valu-
able information about Medicare to persons soon to turn
65. Call the following number and they will refer you to
the shine counseling site at Branford Public Library or a
shine counselor will call you if you cannot visit this site.
Info: Elder Helpline, toll-free 800-262-2243.
SHINE Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders
- Jasper Monday-Friday, 1-4 p.m.; Hamilton Pharmacy
Assistance Program, Sandlin Building, 204 NE 1st Street,
Jasper; trained volunteers help elders and their caregivers
in Suwannee County to understand Medicare and other
health insurance programs make informed decisions on
insurance, Medicare Prescription Drug Cards and on dis-
counted prescription drug programs and eligibility re-
quirements; free; Info: Florida Department of Elder Af-
fairs toll-free 800-262-2243, Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.-
4:30 p.m.
SHINE Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders
- Live Oak second Monday, 1-3 p.m. or second Thurs-
day, 1:30-2:30 p.m.; Suwannee River Regional Library,
US 129 South, Live Oak; trained volunteers help elders
and their caregivers in Suwannee County to understand
Medicare and other health insurance programs make in-
formed decisions on insurance, Medicare Prescription


Addictions Support Group Greater Visions, a
faith-based addictions support group Thursdays at 6
p.m. and Fridays at 9:30 a.m. in the fellowship hall at
Christ Central Ministries, 1550 Walker Ave. SW, Live
Oak, in the Suwannee County Mall. Group provides
spiritual and emotional support in a non-judgmental set-
ting. Info: 386-208-1345.
Al-Anon/Mayo Al-Anon Group now meets with
Banford Al-Anon Group Fridays, 7:30 p.m., at Bran-
ford United Methodist Church on the comer of Express
and Henry Streets, Branford. Info: Janet, 386-362-1361;
Carol, 386-362-1283.
Alcoholics Anonymous Branford Tuesdays and
Friday, 7:30 p.m., Branford United Methodist Church,
Express and Henry St., Branford. Info: John, 386-362-
1361.
Alcoholics Anonymous Live Oak Tuesdays,
Thursday and Fridays, 8 p.m., Precinct Voting Building,
Nobles Ferry Road, Live Oak. Info: 386-688-6037.
Alcoholics Anonymous Mayo Group Sundays,
Monday, Wednesdays and Thursdays at 8 p.m.; Manna
House, Pine Street, Mayo. Info: 386-674-6424.
Alcoholics Anonymous White Springs Courage
to Change Mondays, 8 p.m., Methodist Church, White
Springs. Info: 386-397-1410.
American Legion Post 107 BINGO every Tues-
day, games at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m.; smoking permitted;
public invited; must be 18 or older; Turkey shoot Sat-
urdays, 12: 30 p.m. Directions: US 129 south to 142nd
Street, go east 1 mile, on the right. Info: 386-362-5987,
noon-6 p.m.
Bluegrass Association Saturdays; 6 p.m.; bluegrass
jam at the Pickin' Shed; except during main festival
events; Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park, US 129
North, Live Oak; potluck dinners third Saturday of each
month; Info: 386-364-1683.
Boy Scout Troop 693 Mondays, 7 p.m., Shrine Club,
Bass Road, until further notice. Info: 386-590-6121.
Civil Air Patrol Suwannee Valley Composite
Squadron Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m., at the EAA
hangar at the Suwannee County Airport, Live Oak.
Membership open to children ages 12-18 and all adults.
Info: Capt. Grant W. Meadows Jr. in Live Oak, 386-208-
0701 or Capt. Rick Peters in Lake City, 386-623-1356 or
www.gainesvillecap.org or www.cap.gov.
Dowling Park Volunteers Saturdays; (1100 hours)
11 a.m.; at 22992 CR 250, Live Oak.
Food free to anyone in need Alapaha River Band of
Cherokee, Inc., a non-profit organization, will give away
free food to anyone in need first and third Fridays, from
noon-3 p.m. at Free Food Service Pantry, 3589 NW 28th
Terrace, Jennings. Info: Chief Joan Nelson, 386-938-
4625 or 386-938-3609, or www.thealapahariverband-
ofcherokeeinc.com.
Girl Scout Junior Troop 1077 every Friday; 3:30
p.m.; Suwannee River Regional Library, US 129 South,
Live Oak. Info: Jenise Freeland, 386-364-4932 or
jenifree@alltel.net.
Greater Visions, a faith-based addictions support
group Thursdays at 6 p.m. and Fridays at 9:30 a.m. in
the fellowship hall at Christ Central Ministries, 1550


Drug Cards and on discounted prescription drug programs
and eligibility requirements; free; Info: Florida Depart-
ment of Elder Affairs toll-free 800-262-2243, Monday -
Friday, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
SHINE Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders
- White Springs first and third Thursday; 9:30-11:30
a.m.; Library, 12797 Roberts Street, White Springs; free;
trained volunteers help elders and their caregivers in
Suwannee County to understand Medicare and other
health insurance programs make informed decisions on
insurance, Medicare Prescription Drug Cards and on dis-
counted prescription drug programs and eligibility re-
quirements; Info: Florida Department of Elder Affairs
toll-free 800-262-2243, Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30
p.m.
Suwannee Chapter of the Florida Trail Association -
second Monday; 7-9 p.m.; Suwannee River Water Man-
agement District, US 90 and CR 49, Live Oak; Info: Sam
Bigbie, 386-362-5090; Don Neale, 386-362-4850; Sylvia
Dunnam, 386-362-3256.
Suwannee County Cattlemen's Association third
Thursday; 6:30 p.m.; Farmers Co-op meeting room; Info:
Herb Rogers, 386-362-4118.
Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce second
Thursday; 7:30 a.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak; Info:
386-362-3071.
Suwannee County: Council for Progress of Suwan-
nee County second Tuesday; 7:30 a.m.; 816 South Ohio
Ave. Live Oak; Info: 386-362-3071.
Suwannee County Conservation District third
Thursday, 7 p.m., at Suwannee River Water Management
District Office, US 90 and CR 49, Live Oak. Open to the
public. Info: District Office, 386-362-2622, ext. 3.
Suwannee County Republican Executive Commit-
tee first Thursday, 7 p.m., Suwannee County Regional
Library on US 129 S in Live Oak. All welcome. For
more information call Carl Meece at 386-776-1444 or
386-984-8605.
Suwannee County Democratic Executive Committee
- first Thursday, 7 p.m., Live Oak City Hall, 101 White
Ave. SE, Live Oak; All welcome. Info: Monica, 386-330-
2036.
Suwannee County Development Authority second
Tuesday; 5:30 p.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak; Info:
386-362-3071.
Suwannee County Tourist Development Council -
fourth Tuesday; 1 p.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak;
Info: 386-362-3071.
Suwannee County Senior Citizens first Monday;
10:30 a.m., Exhibition II Building, Coliseum Complex,
1302 SW Eleventh St., Live Oak; escorted tours available,
prices vary; Deposits due at registration, balance due be-
fore trip. Info: Walter and Charlene Howell, 386-842-
2241.


Walker Ave. SW, Live Oak, in the Suwannee County
Mall. Group provides spiritual and emotional support in
a non-judgmental setting. Info: 386-208-1345.
Healthy Horizons, a chronic illness support group -
6:30 p.m., second and fourth Thursdays at Christ Central
Ministries, 1550 Walker Ave. SW, Live Oak. Group dis-
cussion, educational materials and friendly support pro-
vided to enable all to live to their fullest potential. All
who live with a chronic condition are invited to attend.
Open to all members of the community. Info: Church,
386-208-1345.
Jasper/Jennings Boy & Cub Scouts Troop 908 &
Girl Scout Troop 402-every 1st and 3rd Tuesday at 6
p.m. at Corinth Baptist Church
7042 SW 41st Avenue, Jasper.
Jasper Kiwanis Club of Hamilton County -
Wednesdays, 12:15 p.m., J.R. Lee Complex, Jasper. Call
for an application, 386-792-3484, 386-755-4896 or 386-
792-1110; leave name, address and phone or contact
number.
Kiwanis International of Live Oak meets at
noon, Wednesdays at Farm Bureau, 407 S. Dowling
Ave., Live Oak.
Moms and Dads night out Dowling Park Church
of God will be hosting a Moms and Dads night out the
first and last Friday of every month. We will accept
children ages 6 months to 12 years old. Times: 6-10
p.m. (strictly enforced). Fees: infants to 2 yrs. $20.
Fees: 3-12 yrs. $15. There will be a sibling discount!
For information call Terri Pooler at 386-658-3151.
Narcotics Anonymous-Branford Thursday, 7:30
p.m.; at United Methodist Church, comer Express and
Henry, Branford. Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated
with United Methodist Church. Help Line: 352-376-
8008, http://fdt.net/~-ncoastna.
Narcotics Anonymous-Jasper Wednesdays, 8 p.m.;
at Jasper Public Library, 311 Hatley St., NE. Narcotics
Anonymous is not affiliated with Jasper Public Library.
Help Line, 352-376-8008, http://fdt.net/~-ncoastna.


Suwannee Elementary School (SES) School Adviso-
ry Council (SAC) meets at 6 p.m., third Tuesday, in the
media center at SES, 1748 South Ohio/Martin Luther
King Jr. Avenue, Live Oak. All interested parties are wel-
come to attend..
Suwannee High School (SHS) Band Boosters sec-
ond Thursday, 6:30 p.m., in the band room at Suwannee
High School, Live Oak.
Suwannee River Valley Archaeology Society third
Tuesday; public library, Branford; Info: 386-935-4901.
Suwannee Valley Bluegrass Pickin first Saturday, 7
p.m., Otter Springs Resort Lodge, 6470 SW 80th Ave.,
Trenton. It is free to the public, in a nice, air-conditioned
building. Info: Cloud Haley, toll-free 800-990-5410.
Suwannee Valley Genealogical Society first Thurs-
day; 7 p.m., Wilbur St., Live Oak; Open Tuesdays and
Thursday, 9 a.m.-noon and 1-5 p.m.; Info: 386-330-
0110.
Suwannee Valley Humane Society Animal Shelter -
second Monday; noon; at the shelter located on Bisbee
Loop, south entrance, in Lee off CR 255, Madison Coun-
ty; Info: toll-free 866-Adoptl2, 866-236-7812,
www.geocities.com/suwanneehs.
Suwannee Valley Quilters first and third Thursday;
10 a.m.; Info: Jane, 386-776-2909 after 4 p.m.
Tourist Development Council Suwannee County -
fourth Tuesday; 1 p.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak;
Info: 386-362-3071.
Vision SSeeds, Inc. Vision SSeeds Inc./Community
Development Unity & Empowerment Organization will
be meeting the first Saturday of each Month at 1 p.m. at
110 Lafayette Ave SW until
further notice. We're encouraging community and spiri-
tual leaders to join us. Together, "we can make a differ-
ence." Otha White Sr./President; Call 386-364-1367 for
info;
e-mail me @ otha_whitesr@yahoo.com or vision-
sseedsinc @ windstream.net.
Vivid Visions, Inc. first Monday; 5:30 p.m.; Douglass
Center Conference Room; a shelter and outreach agency
for victims of domestic violence; Info: 386-364-5957.
Wellborn Community Association (WCA) second
Thursday; 7 p.m.; Wellborn Community Center; Info:
Bonnie Scott, 386-963-4952, 386-208-1733-leave a mes-
sage. WCA fund-raiser to benefit building fund Blue-
berry Pancake Breakfast first Saturday; center of Well-
born, Andrews Square; blueberry pancakes, sausage and
orange juice or coffee. Blueberry Festival first Satur-
day in June each year.
Wellborn Neighborhood Watch last Thursday, 7
p.m., Blake Lowe Building, 1517 4th Ave., Wellborn;
Info: Bruce or Jane, 386-963-3196.
GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak first Friday at
noon; 1308 Eleventh Street, Live Oak.


Narcotics Anonymous-Live Oak Tuesday, 7 p.m.,
Thursday, noon and Friday, 7 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, 311 South Ohio Avenue, Live Oak.
Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated with First United
Methodist Church. Help Line, 352-376-8008,
http://fdt.net/~-ncoastna.
Narcotics Anonymous Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6-7
p.m.; Closed sessions. Info: Lee Devore, 386-294-3220.
Square Dance 7 p.m., Thursdays at John H. Hale
Community Park & Recreation Center, 215 NE Duval
St., Live Oak. Learn to square dance, it's fun, meet new
friends and get great exercise. First lesson free. Ralph
Beekman, caller. Info: 386-752-2544.
Suwannee River Riding Club Membership fee $25
per year. Team roping first and third Friday night. Speed
events first and third Saturday night. Info: 386-935-
2622.
Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. free ac-
tivities for seniors Monday-Friday, free full lunch and
bus pickup for seniors in Suwannee County. Other free
activities at 10 a.m., Wednesdays, including free BINGO
with prizes and at 11:30 a.m. free full lunch; Located at
1171 Nobles Ferry Road, Live Oak. Info: Bruce Evans,
386-362-1164.
Suwannee Valley Barbershop Chorus Tuesdays, 7
p.m., Crapps Meeting Room, Suwannee River Regional
Library, US 129 South, Live Oak; Info: Fred Phillips,
386-362-1886.
TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 662;
Thursday; meeting 9-10 a.m.; at First Advent Christian
Church, 699 Pinewood Dr., Live Oak; Affordable weight
loss support group. Weigh in from 8-8:50 a.m. Info:
Elaine, 386-364-5537.
TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 798;
Wednesday; meeting 9 a.m.; at Live Oak Community
Church of God, 10639 US 129 South, Live Oak; Afford-
able weight loss support group. Info: 386-362-5933.
Weight Watchers Mondays, 9:30 a.m. and 6 p.m., St.
Luke's Episcopal, toll-free 800-651-6000.


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"'i : BRAIID NEW TIRES, POWER DRIVER'S
",,,, : ,i: I THIS ONE IS SUPER NICE!!!


2003 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, AUTOMATIC, LEATHER, ALLOY
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2006 CHRYSLER PACIFICA
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA CLEAN, WE SOLD IT NEW! POWER WINDOWS
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WHEEL AUDIO CONTROLS. THE PERFECT SIZE FAMILY
CROSSOVER VEHICLE!!!


2006 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW FX4 4x4
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, LEATHER, ALLOY WHEELS W/RWL
TIRES, POWER DRIVER'S SEAT, WINDOWS & LOCKS, TWO-TONE PAINT,
SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, THIS GORGEOUS F-150 IS FULLY EQUIPPED!!!


2006 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, DVD SYSTEM, DUAL POWER
SEATS, DUAL CLIMATE CONTROLS, HEATED SEATS, LEATHER,
SUNROOF, WOODGRAIN INTERIOR TRIM, CHROME EXTERIOR TRIM.
EVERYTHING YOU'D EXPECT IN A LIMITED EDITION!!!


2007 JEEP WRANGLER X 4x4
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA CLEAN, WE SOLD IT HEW
18" ALLOY WHEELS W/BRAND Ni TI,,:
FACTORY RUNNING BOARDS, FOG LIGH1; I,'i ',:,:u- -I
SMARTEST BUY YOU CAN MAKE"'






2008 DODGE CALIBER SRT-4
LOCAL TRADE, XTRAXTRA 1.1: 1 i i ii lu,,'
CD CHANGER, FACTORY IT.i.,.,.,:1, k|,. .
Al.I nl- P ilD .:.


NEARLY
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5.L CUMMINS TURBO DIESEL.
RUCK MOTOR ON THE PLANET I a
2007 Ram 2500 QUAD SLT 4x4 200
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA CLEAN, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, TILT & LOCAL VEHICLE,
CRUISE, BRAND NEW BFG 315" TIRES, ALLOY WHEELS, FOG LIGHTS & DRIVER'S SEAT,
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09 RAM 1500 CREW SLT
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2006 CHEVY CREW CAB Z-71 4]
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, ALLOY V .I: I I i I
Tires, Tow PKG, DUAL CLIMATE CONTROL I ,
WE JUST TRADED FOR THIS OlIE'


S2006 TOYOTA 4-RUNNER
_,,,.,. ,:-,,,i :-',.,11 N, ALLOY W HEELS, POWER
I_ IG REAR WINDOW, FOG LIGHTS,
-, -,, I I~i ,,, AUTO CLIMATE CONTROL,
THIS IS THE IIICEST ONE WE HAVE HAD!!





CUMMINS TURBO DIESEL .
6 RAM 1 TON QUAD SLT FLATBED
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA CLEAN, POWER WINDOWS
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ONLY 29K MILES
S 2007 JEEP LIBERTY
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, ONE OWNER
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S MID SIZE SUV IS ONE OF THE NICEST ONES YOU WILL FIND!!!


C-7
2007 TOYOTA SEQUOIA SR5
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA CLEAN, ALLOY WHEELS, DVD SYSTEM
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YOU WILL NOT FIND A NICER ONE!!!
H ONLY 3K MILES


2008 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA CLEAN, POWER
WINDOWS & LOCKS, TILT, CRUISE, SPOILER
GREAT LOOKING SUBARU w/SUPER LOW MILES!!!


2004 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA CLEAN, POWEF lii. I
CRUISE, REAR AIR, DUAL CLIMATE Ci -I: 'I:. THIS IS AS
NICE VAN w/PLENTY OF ROOM FOR THE WHOLE FAI

OINIE
I^ s ^ '-


S'27994
2009 FORD MUSTANG GT
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, PERFECT INSIDE & OUT, LEATHER,
DUAL EXHAUST, 18" WIDE SPOKE ALUMINUM WHEELS, SPOILER, FOG
LIGHTS, SHAKER STEREO SYSTEM W/6 Disc CD CHANGER, AMBIENT
INTERIOR MOOD LIGHTING. THE NICEST ONE AROUND!!!


\= 1557988_
2002 SEBRING LIMITED CONVERTIBLE
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, CHROME WHEELS, LEATHER,
WOODGRAIN INTERIOR TRIM, ALL THE POWER EQUIPMENT.
THIS ONE HAS ULTRA LOW MILES!!!


2007 FORD FocuS SEDAN
L TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, Automatic, Ice Cold Air,
THIS FOUR DOOR SEDAN IS LIKE BRAND NEW!!!







06 FORD EXPLORER EDDIE BAUER
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, ALLOY WHEELS
LEATHER ALL THE POWER EQUIPMENT
THIS IS THF NICFT flNF ARnlINIIIf


LOCAL TRADE, XTRA CLEAN, LEATHER, ALLOY WHEELS
BRAND NEW TIRES, DIGITAL CLIMATE CONTROL, V-8
ENGINE, SUNROOF! FULLY LOADED w/ALL THE TOYS!!!

KS& '^ ,j;i, .


--2
2006 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4x4 2008 GMC ACADIA SLT
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, ALLOY WHEELS, BRAND NEW RWL LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, Du,. I:. : ii Li
TIRES, POWER DRIVER'S SEAT, 6 DISC CD CHANGER, TILT & CRUISE DUAL DIGITAL CLIMATE CONTROL, HEAil i:. il' I'
ULTRA LOW MILES ON THIS SUPER NICE MID SIZESUV!!! QUAD BUCKET SEATS, 3RD ROW SEAT. MUST SEE 10 APPRI


_119921
2006 CHEVY CREW CAB 4x4
""i. TRADE, XTRA CLEAN, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS
Sii Climate Control, Tow Pkg., Spray-In Bedliner.
TOUGH TO FIND THESE CREW CAB 4x4's!!!


7s6995
2004 CHEVY IMPALA
I Tr: .F XTRA CLEAN, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS
0:,. CD, SUPER NICE FOUR DOOR CAR!!!


ZUUU LIMU UREW UAB LI L-I1 4X4
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, LEATHER, DUAL DIGITAL CLIMATE
CONTROL, DUAL POWER/HEATED SEATS, ALLOY WHEELS, SPRAY-IN
BEDLINER, Tow PKG., THIS Z-71 CREW CAB HAS ALL THE TOYS!


2000 FORD EXT CAB XLT SPORT
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, Power Windows
& Locks, Tilt & Cruise, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER. THIS ONE
IS FULLY EQUIPPED w/ALL THE POWER OPTIONS!


2008 FORD F-250 CREW LARIAT 4x4
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAVIGATION HEATED
SEATS, DUAL DIGITAL CLIMATE CONTROLS, DUAL POWER SEATS TOO
MANY OPTIONS TO LIST. MUST SEE THIS ONE!!!
gt POWERSTROKE DIESEL r ,


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2006 FORD F-350 XLT CAB/CHASSIS
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA CLEAN, AUTOMATIC, BRAND NEW RWL
TIRES POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, FACTORY BRAKE CONTROLLER
THIS IS A SUPER NICE DIESEL TRUCK,
READY TO GO TO WORKTODAY!


ONLY LUl MILES
2008 CHEVY EXT CAB LT
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, POWER WINDOW
LOCKS, TILT & CRUISE, DUAL DIGITAL CLIMATE CONTR
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2004 DODGE 3500 SPRINTER
"LANDSCAPE"
H IS - IE COMES FUL EQUIPPED -. THE -.- DSCAPE
THIS OliE COMES FULLY EQUIPPED w THE LANDSCAPE


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