Title: Suwannee Democrat
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028422/00651
 Material Information
Title: Suwannee Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Suwannee Democrat
Publisher: J. E. Pound
J.E. Pound
Place of Publication: Live Oak, Fla.
Live Oak Fla
Publication Date: December 4, 2009
Copyright Date: 2010
Frequency: semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
weekly[ former <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
Coordinates: 30.294444 x -82.985833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note: Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028422
Volume ID: VID00651
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE4563
oclc - 33273856
alephbibnum - 000398954
lccn - sn 95026787
 Related Items
Other version: Live Oak daily Democrat
Preceded by: Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by: Suwannee leader
Preceded by: Suwannee citizen

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North Florida


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* $2.4 million stimulus fuels effort regenerate injured spinal cords, Page 12


* A chance to win an original masterpiece, Page 3


News Entertainment Classifieds



North Florida Focus

December 6 & 17, 209 www. n I on I ine. cornS evnHaitLfyteadSu neeC nis


ABOVE: The Gandy Brothers. RIGHT: The Wilson Family
Band. BELOW RIGHT: Gentle River Band. BELOW: To-
morrow's News. Courtesy photos


127 Howard Street E., Live Oak, FL
I* Phone: 386-362-4539
Toll Free: 1-800-557-7478
Se Habla Espanol


Mike 'Gator Chomp'


Mullis to perform


in Live Oak


Mike Mullis is appearing at the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park in Live Oak Dec. 26. Courtesy photo
Submitted
You know him as the Gator Chomp song guy. Mike
Mullis will be shaking up the fans Saturday night, Dec. 26,
when he and his band, WhooWhee, heat up the night at the
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park.
Mike co-wrote words and music for the song
"GatorChomp," a rollicking song about the University of
Florida football program. GatorChomp was a licensed
collegiate product sold throughout Florida and at the Ben
Hill Griffin Stadium Gift Shop and gained Mike lots of
publicity and fans. Mike has opened for groups such as .38
Special, Charlie Daniels, Montgomery/Gentry, Sawyer
Brown, John Conlee, Billy Dean, Suzy Boggus, Grand Ole
Opry stars Tommy Cash, David Houston, Johnny Russell,
Nat Stuckey, Charlie Louvin, Melba Montgomery and
many others. He's played during numerous events at the
SOSMP including the Gator Chomp Romp.
Admission Saturday night is $10. Put on your dancing
shoes and come enjoy a night out after Christmas and
dance the night away! Bring that Christmas company and
show them a good time with good food and give mom a
break from the kitchen.
If you're looking for good entertainment during the week


www.poolerealiv.com


Dial's Inspection
Services
For All Your Home
Inspection Needs!
386-364-4434 or
386-590-6534
Please visit our website:
www.suwanneevalleyinspections.comr


before Christmas, bring
your company and come out
Monday, Dec. 21, and
Wednesday night, Dec. 23,
and enjoy karaoke with Ted
McMullen. Ted has moved
his regular Thursday night
karaoke to Wednesday for
Christmas week to
accommodate his many
fans. Tuesday night, Dec.
SEE MIKE, PAGE 6


-FOR RENT- I


GREAT RATES FOR NICE LOOKING
RENTALS STARTING AT $300 PER MONTH
FOR SINGLEWIDES AND $450 PER MONTH
FOR DOUBLEWIDES. WATER, SEWER,
AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS.
386-330-2567 563738-F


rRankin-Granthamu
& ASSOCIATES
(386) 362-7080
"':.,tt,, 4. .. ...,=


Prime Farmland... 48 acres of fenced and cross-fenced
fertilized hay fields. There is a pole barn, workshop, shed, storage
building, pens, ponds...everything you need for a producing farm!
The 1996 DWMH has more than 2,000 heated sq. ft. with 3 BR 2-1/2
BA, fireplace, huge utility room, large front porch, small back porch,
2 car carport, and nicely landscaped. The huge oaks make this a
real showplace. Paved road frontage. Only 2 miles to 1-10. Owner
may finance part of sale. $275,000. FIRM MLS #70047 Call Mary
(386) 364-9527 or (386) 362-6241. To see more pictures or other
listings, go to www.maryprankin.com. 567454-F


G PPO UOA3

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North Florida


CYAN S ew Odd

MAGENTA Even Odd


PAGE 2, DECEMBER 16 & 17, 2009


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Sparks headlines




Gainesville holiday




charity ball


Nashville-based
Florida native Tori
Sparks headlines South
Main Community Arts
Center's inaugural holi-
day charity ball, with
Civic Media Center on
Thursday. A delightful
evening of good food,
good music and fine art
beginning with a 5:30-7
p.m. Happy Hour with
hors d'oeuvres to the
music of Patrick Koch;
then a 3-course dinner
served "farm style" by
our head-chef-in-resi-
dence from Atlanta,
Taria Camerino (see en-
ticing menu below),
with music during din-
ner by Agap6. After
dinner, opening act Rio
de la Muerte performs
(Rio Aubry Taylor, vo-
cals and guitar and Nel-
lie Eshleman, cello), be-
fore headline start Tori
Sparks until 9:30 p.m.
Tori Sparks is an
award-winning, female
singer-songwriter with a
national following.
She's been praised by
critics and fans alike
(see
www.torisparks.com/pre
ss.html). Songs from
her new album, The
Scorpion in the Story,
will be the highlight of
the evening.
Tickets $25-50 slid-
ing scale for Happy
Hours and Dinner &
Show, 5:30-9 p.m. $10
for a second concert at
10 p.m. Happy Hour
begins at next door
neighbor, Civic Media
Center, 433 S. Main.
"Starlight Supper Club"
starts at 7 p.m. at
SMArts, 435 S. Main
St.


Tori Sparks will sing selec-
tions from her new album,
The Scorpion in the Story.
- Courtesy photo


' ADVANCED 3G PHONES




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529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389,
Evening 362-2990


(1) Horse Farm: 55 acres with a 4
bedroom, 3 bath CH&AC home with
fireplace cont. approx. 5000 sq. feet
under roof with an 18 stall horse barn
with office and bath cont. approx.
5000 sq. ft. under roof. The property
has 4 fenced paddocks with room for
expansion. Call for more information.
Just listed $600,000.
(2) Off CR 49 5 acres in grass with
scattered trees, fenced on 3 sides with
survey. Only $4,900 per acre.
(3) 161st Rd: 9.82 acres partially
wooded with a 4BR/3-1/2 bath
CH&AC home with fireplace cont.
approx 2400 sq. ft. heated area,
10'x30' storage. Good buy @
$265,000.
(4) Off CR136: 5 acre partially
wooded some grass. Will work for
land home package. Reduced to
$39,900.
(5) CR 51 & Pinewood St.: 2.29
Acres, city water and sewer, zoned
office. Good location $192,500.
(6) Off CR 349: 10 acre wooded
tract with a two bedroom CH/AC log
home in excellent condition cont.
approx. 1200 sq. ft. under roof,
30'x40' pole barn. Reduced to
$175,000.
(7) 410 Dexter: Corner lot with
CH/AC brick home in good
condition. Approx. 2,000 sq. ft. under
roof with 2 car garage, kitchen
furnished, large pool with privacy
fence. Good location. Good Buy @
$135,000..
(8) Industrial Park: 1.13 acre corner
tract good exposure. Reduced to
$34,500.
(9) 40 acres with 835 ft. on paved
road in 13 year old planted pines.
Priced to sell at REDUCED TO
$179,600.
(10) Near City: 2 ac. with 3/2 home
cont. approx. 1280 sq. ft. under roof,
kitchen furnished, carport.
REDUCED TO $49,000.
(11) Luraville Area: Fly-in
Community 15 acre wooded large
trees, good county road. Priced to sell
reduced to $74,900.
(12) Suwannee River: Two acres
wooded river lot off CR 349 near
Royal Springs and Boat Ramp. 100
sq. ft. on the water. (Buildable) good
buy @ $55,000.
(13) Off Mitchell Rd.: 20 acres
wooded with survey on 199th Rd.
$89,900.
(14) Off CR 136 East: 40 acre tract
partially wooded, some grass small
pond, fenced. Good area.
REDUCED TO $149,000.


(15) Hamilton Co.: 10 acres on CR751
and the river approx. 1300 ft. on the
water and approx. 1300 ft. on paved
road. Priced to sell at REDUCED
TO $79,900.
(16) Madison Co.: 40 acres in 16 year
old slash planted pines off CR 255
good elevation. Good buy at $175,000.
(17) Helvenston St.: 4 lots with a 4/3
CH/AC 1-1/2 story brick/frame home
cont. approx 3,200 sq. ft. under roof.
Kitchen furnished, fireplace, corner
lots, plus 1 bedroom, guest house
cont. approx. 550 sq. ft. Priced to sell
@ $170,000.
(18) Suwannee River home: nice two
bedroom two story CH&AC home
South of Branford, kitchen furnished,
beautiful view of river from rear,
screen porch. Good area.
REDUCED TO $189,900.
(19) Farms of 10 Mill Hollow: 4 acres
in grass/cropland with scattered trees.
$32,500.
(20) Near City: Off US 90 East 5 acres
wooded near golf course. Good buy @
$44,900.
(21) 190th St.: 10 acres in planted
pines approx. 15 years old, with a 3/1
CH/AC SWMH, 2 car carport/shop.
Priced to sell @ $49,000.
(22) 208 Houston: 3/5 BR, 1-1/2 BA
frame home cont. approx. 2,000 sq. ft.
under roof. Zoned R/O, has potential.
Priced to sell @ $59,500.
(23) 16th St.: 3 ac. with a 3BR/2BA
CH&AC brick home with fireplace,
cont. approx. 2,780 sq. ft. under roof.
Kitchen furnished, survey. Good Buy
@ $172,500.
(24) Keaton Beach: Deep Water Canal
lot near public boat ramp, sewer &
water. Good buy @ $125,000.
(25) 169th Rd.: 5 ac. in grass with a
3/2 CH/AC DWMH cont. approx.
1,850 sq. ft. under roof in excellent
cond. 2 car detached garage. Good
area. $124,900.
(26) Off 16th St.: 2 100x530 river lots
with MH (needs some R&R), well,
septic and storage building. Lot has
large hickory white oak magnolia.
Well above the flood elevation.
$79,900 for the pair.
(27) 193rd Rd.: 6.59 acres wooded on
paved road. Good area. Good buy @
$37,500.
(28) Hamilton County: 40 acre
wooded on county road. Good
hunting area that adjoins SRWMD.
$149,500.
(29) 410 Dexter St.: 2/2 CH/AC brick
home with pool, approx. 2000 sq. ft.
under roof, kitchen furnished. Priced
to sell @ $142,000. 54ai 8


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THE RLUEL1inE


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I j (38) 362-7227

1040 Ouval Street NE Live Oak, PL 32064 I

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0 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA DECEMBER 16 & 17, 2009, PAGE 3



.-. -






















ABOVE: Dean Mitchell, Fort Scott Barrels, watercolor, 5.25" x 10". BELOW: Dean Gioia, Autumn in the Field, acrylic, 16 x 20". Courtesy photos






to win an


original


masterpiece


Buy your chance to win an orig-
inal masterpiece by two of the re-
gion's most highly acclaimed fl
artists, Dean Mitchell and Dean .- .
Gioia. The artists have generously ,
donated original paintings for the 1
drawing, which will raise funds to .
underwrite the Gadsden Arts Cen-
ter's free and low cost youth edu-
cation programs.
Quincy native Dean Mitchell, a
leading watercolor artist who has
won more than 450 awards inter-
nationally, has donated a painting
entitled Fort Scott Barrels, 5.25 x 10 inches, watercolor,
which retails for $4,500. An award-winning painter of
figures depicting black middle and lower class people
and landscapes from his southern background, Dean
Mitchell's work is inspired by his personal experiences:J
grizzled laborers, time-worn elderly faces, Gadsden/
County landscapes with tobacco barns.
Inspired by Southern culture and the nature that sur-
rounds him, Dean Gioia captivates viewers with his ethe-
real interpretation of light and atmosphere. He has donat-
ed for the drawing a painting entitled The Autumn in the
Field, 16 x 20 inches, acrylic on canvas, which retails at
$2,100.
Chances are $10 each or 3 for $25 stop by Gadsden
Arts or visit www.gadsdenarts.org/events to reserve your Navigation is easier than ever! Just type what you are
chance to win. The winners will be drawn at the Gadsden looking for and you are there.
Arts Center winter Gala on the evening of January 30, Search Valdosta and the surrounding areas all from
2010. (You do not have to be present to win.) your computer at www.valdostadailytimes.com.
The Gadsden Arts Center works to improve the quality
of life in the region through fine art, art education and View classified ads, display ads and yellow page
cultural events. The Center is located on Quincy's his- listings all in one convenient place.
toric Courthouse Square at 13 N. Madison St., just 10 Customize your shopping experience!
miles from Tallahassee City Limits. Admission is $1 You can search by brand, ad or category.
(members and children admitted free). Gallery and gift
shop hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Narrow your search with the
Miss Helen's Espresso Caf6 D'art and the Artists Guild Advanced Search feature.
Co-op is open Monday-Friday 7 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday 10


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North Florida


CYAN ,dwd.Aw*
MAGENTA Even Odd


PAGE 4, DECEMBER 16 & 17, 2009


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


(toir (?oat


Pink Ladies Needed!
Are you looking for a place to share
your talents? Do you enjoy meaningful
conversation with a good friend? How
'bout a good book?
Then We Want You!! Suwannee Health
Care and Rehab Center is looking for
volunteers to start a Ladies Auxiliary.
Call Lynn Brannon, Activities Director
at 386-362-7860 or 386-590-2961.

Talent Search
Do you sing or play and instrument?
Do you act or dance? Do you like to read
or spend time with a friend in wonderful
conversation?
WE WANT YOU! Suwannee Health
Care & Rehab Center is looking for your
talent for our residents. Dinner for two -
$45; One night at the Beach $125; One
hour volunteering to make memories that
last forever PRICELESS!
Call: Lynn Brannon, Activities Direc-
tor 386-362-7860 or 386-590-2961.

Head Start/Early
Head Start early
enrollment
Suwannee Valley 4Cs Head Start/Early
Head Start is accepting applications for
children from birth to age 5. Head
Start/Early Head Start is a FREE compre-
hensive early childhood education pro-
gram that includes health, dental, nutrition
and VPK services to eligible
children/families.
Centers are located in Suwannee,
Hamilton, Lafayette and Columbia coun-
ties. Parents bring proof of income and
child's age to register.
For more information call 386-754-
2222.

Customers needed!
Dairy Queen of Live Oak will host
Dairy Queen Benefit Night the second
Tuesday of every month from 6-8 p.m. to
help buy books for Suwannee Middle
School.

Donations needed!
Suwannee County Environmental
Watchdogs, a non-profit organization,
seeks donations for yard sale merchan-
dise. Info: Sandy, 386-364-8020.


family plan reunion in 2009
Descendants of the late Sarah Calhoun,
Eva Calhoun and Thomas Calhoun are in-
vited to a family reunion to be held in
2009. Info:
misstheresamartin@yahoo.com or pre-
dop@aol.com.


Coffee with your
councilman
City Councilman for District 4 Mark
Stewart invites his constituents to "Cof-
fee with your Councilman" at JAVA JAX
located in the Publix shopping center.
Come and meet with him on the sec-
ond Tuesday of each month from 7 a.m.
till 8:30 a.m. This will be a time to get to
know each other and discuss current is-
sues and citizen concerns.

CJBAT tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by ap-
pointment): CJBAT (Criminal Justice Ba-
sic Abilities Test) at NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison. CJBAT is required
for acceptance into Corrections & Law
Enforcement programs. Photo ID re-
quired. Pre-registration & scheduling time
and date are required. To register please
call 850-973-9451.

College Placement
Tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by ap-
pointment): College Placement Test
(CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. #16),
5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC Stu-
dent Services 24 hours before test. For in-
formation please call 850-973-9451.

TABE tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by ap-
pointment): TABE (Test of Adult Basic
Education) at NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison. TABE is required
for acceptance into vocational/technical
programs. Photo ID required. Pre-re-registra-
tion & scheduling time & date are re-
quired. To register please call 850-973-
9451.

Greater Visions


Register now! Support Group
1Register now! Addiction Support Group: Greater Vi-
Descendants of Calhoun sions faith-based addictions support


group meets at the Grace Manor Restau-
rant. Meetings are held on Thursday
mornings at 9:30 a.m. This group pro-
vides spiritual and emotional support in a
non-judgmental setting. Come experi-
ence the freedom from addictions that is
found in Christ.
Greater Visions is an outreach of
Christ Central-Live Oak. For more infor-
mation contact 208-1345.

Suwannee County
Republican Executive
Committee to meet
The Suwannee County Republican Ex-
ecutive Committee meets in the council
chambers of Live Oak City Hall at 7
p.m. on the first Thursday of the month.
If the first Thursday is the first day of
the month, the meeting will be held on
the following Thursday.
Each meeting has a guest speaker or
current issues will be discussed. All are
welcome to attend. For more informa-
tion call Chairman Carl Meece at 386-
776-1444.

Legislative candidate
to speak at Republican

meeting
The Suwannee County Republican Ex-
ecutive Committee meets at Live Oak
City Hall, in the Council Chambers, at 7
p.m. on the first Thursday of the month. If
the first Thursday is the first day of the
month, then the meeting will be on the
following Thursday. Each meeting has a
guest speaker or there will be current is-
sues brought up for discussion. All are
welcome to attend.
For more information, call Chairman
Carl Meece, 386-776-1444.
Terry Rauch, candidate for Dist. 11
Florida House seat, will be guest speaker
on Dec. 3.

Branford TOPS
meeting changes
locations
We now meet every Tuesday at L & M
Scrapbooking located at 105 SW Suwan-
nee Ave. in Branford.
Weigh-in begins at 4:30 p.m. Meeting
starts at 5.
For more information please contact
Donna Hardin at 386-590-2333.
"Take Off Pounds Sensibly."

SREC seeking

location in Branford
Suwannee River Economic Council,
Inc., a non-profit organization is seeking a
location in the Branford area that could be
used to serve meals to persons 60 years of
age or older.
Any business, organization or church
that has space available and would be in-
terested in assisting in this much needed
service to the elderly population of Bran-
ford, should contact Bruce Evans, Senior
Center Director, at 362-1164 or Janis
Owen, Director of Client Services, at 362-
4115, ext. 240.


Toys for Kids+
'We really need your help'
By Roger L. Bumside
Toys for Kids+ really needs your help.
Christmas is a time of joy and celebration;
unfortunately there are many children in
the Branford area that will be missing the
joy of receiving Christmas presents. We
are in need of toys, clothes and in some
cases, food for these children.
With the economy the way it is right
now we are experiencing more requests
than in past years. No donation is too
small, if you can just provide one toy, a
box of food, a winter coat or shoes it will
be greatly appreciated.
Anyone interested in helping us with
this project can take their donations to the
Branford Health Department. You may
also call Karen at the Branford Health
Department at 386-935-1133 or Roger
Burnside at 386-935-3343. Should you
know of a child in need you may also call
these numbers.
Over the years the folks in the Branford
area have brought a lot of joy to the area's
children and their families, for this we
thank each and every one of you. The
smiles and appreciation the children
express each year make this project a
blessing to all.


Love a mystery?
Try locating your ancestors by working
on your family tree. The Suwannee Valley
Gcic.il l-:., Society invites you to join and
learn how to find your ancestors.
Membership is $30 for a single member or
$35 for a family. Corporate membership
is also available for donations of $100 or
more (tax deductible). Meetings are held
on the first Thursday of each month at
7:00 PM at the Gcc..il. Center at 215
Wilbur Street SW in Live Oak. The
library is open on Tuesday and Thursday
from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. and the talented
folks there will be glad to help. For more
information call Jinnie or Alice at 386-
330-0110.

The Santa Shop needs

your help
It is time to start planning for the Santa
Shop. Last year, with a community effort,
the Santa Shop provided gifts to more than
200 students in the Students in Transition
program at Suwannee County Schools.
All the leftover donations, toys and gifts
were donated to Sparky's Toy Drive.
The need in our community is growing,
so the Santa Shop is growing, too.
This year, we plan to provide toys &
gifts for the Suwannee County Schools
Students in Transition (approximately 180
students at this time), children at Guardian
Ad Litem (280 children), and all the
leftovers will be given to Sparky's Toy
Drive at the Live Oak Fire Department
(Sparky's usually provides gifts for
approximately 400 children).
We need toys and gifts for school-age
children (4 to 18 years).
With all of us pulling together, we can

CONTINUED ON PAGE 6


Bu One Get One Free
IZZA.
of equal or lesser value
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Exp. Date: 12-31-2009
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SALE


Each Kit includes:
* 3 Bright 11" x 14" All-weather Signs
* Over 275 Pre-Priced Labels
* Successful Tips for a "No Hassle" Sale
* Pre-Sale Checklist
Sales Record Form


Run your Yard Sale in the

Wednesday North Florida Focus &

Friday Suwannee Democrat Classifieds

and get the Yard Sale Kit for FREE.
Deadline for placing your yard sale is Friday at 11:00 a.m.
499534-F


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* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


DECEMBER 16 & 17, 2009, PAGE 5


Help Wanted ... .Pa


Announcements















Help Wanted

Contact

TODAY
M ,,' to Place

Classified


Candy Montgomery
Your Classified Sales Rep.
For your convenience you
may send your ad to me by:
Email
candv.montaomerv@aaflnews
.como
Phone 244-3400 Ext. 1378
1-800-600-4838 Ext. 1378
Fax 229-244-4479
Be sure to ask about our
Vehicle, Pet, Real Estate,
& Help Wanted Specials!!

Contact
Me











TODAY
S to Place
Your






















Classified
Ad

Kay Floyd
CLASSIFIED
SUPERVISOR
For your convenience you
may send your ad to me by:
Email
kay.floydntomer aflgaflnews.com
Phone 229-244-3400 Ext.
1205
1-800-600-4838 Ext. 1205
Fax: 229-244-4479
Ask about our
Vehicle, Pet, Real Estate,
Merchandise and
Employment Specials!!

EMPLOYEE NEEDED,
Established business needs
motivated, dependable
employee. Must have valid
driver's license and
transportation to work. Heavy
lifting involved. Duties include
installation of party tents,
deliveries, maintenance and
cleaning. Serious applicants
only 30 to 40 hours per week.
Starting pay $9.00 per hour.
Suwannee Valley Event & Party
Rentals, 516 5th Street, L. 0.
362-7368.
FirstDay.
EMPLOYSERVICE AINEEDED,







PartEtim Service Aide positions,
required High School diploma or
motivatGED, 2 years minimumdable







experloyee in education, child
liftnursing involved. Duties elds or workincludeg with







people with developmental
disabilitveries. Apply in person atnd
ComprSuwannee Valley Event & ParCommunity





Services, Inc., 511 Goldkist
Boulevard, Live Oak, FL 32064
Boulevard, Live Oak, FL 32064


age 5


ONLINE
When you place your Classified Ad it automatically ap-
pears on our Web site, www.nflaonline.com. Your ad is live
on the Internet 24 hours a day (free ads excluded).


In the Arts...


FirstDay.







COTTAGE PARENTS
The Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch is looking for couples to
be full-time Cottage Parents.
Responsibilities include the
direct care and development
of 10 boys, ages 8-18.
Professional skill based
training & support provided.
Help children develop social,
academic, and independent
living skills. Salary
$47,000.00 per couple with
housing, utilities, board, and
benefits provided. High
school diploma or GED
required. For more information
contact Linda Mather at (386)
842-5555
Imather@youthranches.org
Fax resume to (386) 842-
1029 (EOE/DRUG FREE
WORKPLACE)

Job List
DRIVERS Immediate Need!
Regional & OTR positions
available Now! CDL-A w/Tanker
Req'd. Outstanding pay &
Benefits! Call a recruiter Today!
877-484-3042
www.oakleytransport.com
Jobs Wanted
DO YOU NEED YOUR HOME
CLEANED or Pressure Washed,
or your yard cleaned up? Done
at a very reasonable rate. Call
Christine or Gary 386-792-1655
Lost & Found
FOUND HAIR BOWS AT
WOMANS CLUB BAZAAR, IN
BRANFORD. 386-935-6893 or
386-935-0119
FOUND READING GLASSES:
Found on Antelope Rd, Branford,
Hatch Bend Area. 386-935-3548
VEHICLE KEYS FOUND: They
have been turned into Suwannee
Democrat. They were found on
185th Rd.

Special Notices
















LIVE NATIVITY SCEEN
OUTDOORS: Sat Dec 19th,
shows start @6,7&8 p.m. Free
Refreshments to follow. Dowling
Park Church of God CR 250.
658-3151

Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING!! Do You
Earn $800 in a Day? 25 Local
Machines and Candy All For
$9,995. Call 1 -888-753-3430
AIN#B02000033 Call Us: We
Will Not Be Undersold!


.............Page 3


Miscellaneous
HOME DAYCARE CDA,
Registered. Infants and up,
fenced outside play area, meals
provided, references. Near Camp
Weed on Hwy 90E. Call 386-
364-7736
SAMSUNG 19" COLOR T-V
EXCELLENT COND. W/
REMOTE MANUAL INCLUDED
$75.00, MAGNOVOX 25INCH
CONSOLE STEREO T-V WITH
REMOTE. EXC. COND,
BEAUTIFUL MAPLE CABINET
$100.00, SMALL COLOR
PORTABLE T-V OLDER MODEL
PANASONIC BUT WORKS
VERY GOOD. $30.00, APOLLO
PORTABLE DEHUMIDIFIER
SAVES ON A/C ELECTRIC
BILL. EXC. COND. $35.00,
TRAILOR HITCH MADE BY
HIDDEN HITCH 2002-2010
FORD ESCAPE, 2005-2010
MERCURY MARINER AND
MAZDA TRIBUTE, NO HOLES
TO GRILL MANUAL INC.
W/RUNNING LIGHT HOOK UP.
EXC. COND. $75.00 CALL 362-
4713 LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO
ANSWER

Vocational
AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train
for high paying Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid
if qualified, Housing available.
Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (888) 349-5387
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Accounting, *Criminal Justice.
Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call 800-443-
5186 www.CenturaOnline.com
AVIATION MAINTENANCE /
AVIONIC Graduate in 14
Months. FAA Approved;
financial aid if qualified. Job
placement assistance. Call
National Aviation Academy
Today! 1-800-659-2080 or
NAA.edu
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA!
Fast Affordable & Accredited
Free Brochure. Call Now! 1-
800-532-6546 ext. 16
www.continentalacademy.com
NEED YOUR HIGH SCHOOL
DIPLOMA? Finish from home
Fast for $399! Nationally
accredited. EZ pay. Free
brochure.
www.diplomaathome.com Call
800-470-4723

FirstDay.
Want to be a CNA?
Don't want to wait?
Express Training
is now offering our quality
Exam Prep Classes in Lake
City. Class sizes limited.
Next class 01/04/2010.
Call 386-755-4401
expresstraining
services.com

LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072.
M-F from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Pets for Sale
POMERANIAN PUPPIES, AKC
registered. $400. Call 386-935-
2642.
Building Materials
MOBILE HOME ROOF
EXPERTS 100% Financing, Free
Estimates We Finance Almost
Everyone Reroof, Repairs,
40yrs Experience Home
Improvement Services Toll-FREE
1-877-845-6660 State Certified
(Lic.#CCC058227)


Medical Directory

LUMBER LIQUIDATORS
Hardwood Flooring, from $
.99/Sq.Ft. Exotics, Oak,
Bamboo, Prefinished &
Unfinished. Bellawood w/50
year prefinish, plus A Lot More!
We Deliver Anywhere, 5 Florida
Locations, 1-800-FLOORING (1-
800-356-6746)
METAL ROOFING TAX
CREDIT! 40 yr Warranty.
Direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock Quick
turnaround. Delivery available.
Gulf Coast Supply &
Manufacturing, 1-888-393-0335
www.gulfcoastsupply.com

Electronics
FREE GPS! FREE PRINTER!
FREE MP3! With Purchase of
New computer. Payments
Starting at Only $29.99/week. No
Credit Check! Call GCF Today.
1-877-212-9978
Miscellaneous

Contact

TODAY
to Place
Your
Classified
Ad

Nancy Kilpatrick
Your Classified Sales Rep.
For your convenience you
may send your ad to me by:
Email
nancy.kilpatrick@gaflnews.co
m
Phone 229-244-3400 Ext.
1297
1-800-600-4838 Ext. 1297
Fax 229-244-4479
Be sure to ask about our
Vehicle, Pet, Real Estate,
Merchandise,
& Help Wanted Specials!!

DISH NETWORK. $19.99/mo,
Why Pay More For TV? 100+
Channels. Free 4-Room Install.
Free HD-DVR. Plus $650 Sign-
up Bonus. Call Now! 1-866-573-
3640
GET DISH WITH FREE
INSTALLATION $19.99/mo
HBO & Showtime Free Over 50
HD Channels Free Lowest
Prices No Equipment to Buy!
Call Now for full Details 877-
233-8693
GET DISH WITH FREE
INSTALLATION $19.99/mo
HBO & Showtime Free Over 50
HD Channels Free Lowest
Prices No Equipment to Buy!
Call Now for full Details 877-
887-6147
PROFLOWERS Christmas
Decor and Holiday Flowers &
Other Gifts starting at $19.99.
Go To www.proflowers.com/Elf to
get an EXTRA 15% OFF Or Call
1-877-697-7697!
SMOKE HEALTH-E
CIGARETTES. Kick The Habit


..Page 9


But Still "Smoke." Nicotine Free,
Looks & Feels Like A Real
Cigarette. Complete Kit, Only
$49.99 Go To
WWW.PTVDEALS.COM/167
STEEL BUILDINGS: 4 only
25x36, 30x48, 40x52, 45x82.
Selling for Balance Owed! Free
Delivery! 1-800-411-5869
x131
YOU'RE FAMILY'S BEST
BENEFIT...SAFETY! Let ADT
help protect your family and get
$100 Visa Gift Card! Hurry, offer
ends soon. Call Now! 1-866-265-
4139
Boats/Supplies
BOATS; 1000's of boats for sale
www.floridamariner.com
reaching 6 million homes weekly
throughout Florida. 800-388-
9307, tide charts, broker profiles,
fishing captains, dockside dining
and more.
Camping
CAMPING MEMBERSHIP
LIFETIME! Camp Coast to
Coast USA/Canada/Florida. $10
per night (full hook-up) Year
Round. Paid $1595, Must Sell
$595.1-800-236-0327
Guns/Ammunition
FirstDay.
GUN SHOW
Live Oak Armory,
Dec 19 Sat 9-5 Dec 20 Sun 9-4.
Concealed Weapons Classes
Daily. Bring your GUNS to sell or
trade.
GunTraderGunShows.com
Apartments for Rent



OPPORTUNITY
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE
All real estate advertising in
this newspaper is subject to the
Fair Housing Act which makes it
illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability,
familial status or national origin,
or an intention, to make any
such preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age
of 18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women
and people securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in
violation of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimination call
HUD toll-free 1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free number for the
hearing impaired is 1-800-927-
9275.


BUSINESSES


IRENT
Rental Assistance
1,2,3, & 4 BRHC & Non-
HC Accessible Ap ents

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY 711
Equal Housing Opportunity


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living
2 bedroom duplex.
Call 362-3110.
501033-F


Contact us
classads@ gaflnews.com

FAX
386-364-5578

Phone
386-362-1734
800-525-4182

HOURS
Monday-Friday
8 a.m. 5 p.m.





IETPCE


Calendar


Page 4


Houses for Rent
1102 PINE AVE. 4Bd/2Ba CHA,
in Live Oak close to schools &
shopping. $750/mo, $500
Deposit 352-493-3487 or 386-
963-2032
Contact
Me
TODAY
to Place
Your
Classified
Ad

Jessica Mullis
Your Classified Sales Rep.
For your convenience you
may send your ad to me by:
Email
jessica.mullis@gaflnews.com
Phone 229-244-3400 Ext.
1203
1-800-600-4838 Ext. 1203
Fax 229-244-4479
Be sure to ask about our
Vehicle, Pet, Real Estate,
Merchandise,
& Help Wanted Specials!!

BRICK HOUSE 3BD/2BA Close
to Town. $700 mo, 1st last &
Security. Call 386-362-6556
FirstDay.
BRICK HOUSE 3BD/2BA Close
to Town. $700 mo, 1st last &
Security. Call 386-362-6556
FirstDay.
HOUSE 3BD/2BA on 5 wooded
acres, No Smoking or Pets.
$650/mo, $2000 Security
561-451-1638 Bob
TWO HOUSES 1-2Bd/1Ba
ALSO 1-CHARMING 1 BIG
Bd/1Ba. Lots of closets 1 mile
from Live Oak. NO PETS
$600/mo, 1st, Last & $300 Dep.
Includes Water /Sewerage/ Lawn
Maint. 386-362-3002.

Mobile Homes for Rent
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba in the country,
6 miles from Live Oak off 129
S. 4 Acrer, No Pets, Non-Smoker
$675/mo $1000 Deposit. 407-
709-0355
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba, New Carpet &
Paint, kids/pets/horses all
possible. Live Oak, Nobles Ferry
/Stagecoach Rd. area. Available
now. $650/mo 1st, last, security.
386-842-2006

FirstDay.
HORSES, COWS, GOATS?
Over 3 acres near the
Suwannee River in Mayo, Fl.
Doublewide mobile home, 3
BR, 2 BA, completely
renovated! New floorings!
$650/month, 1st, last, $1,000
deposit.
Contact 386-935-2256


SERVICES


Rental assistance may be available!
HUD Vouchers Welcomel
1, 2 & 3 BRHC &Non-HC
Accessible Apartments


705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housing Opportunity


PPO UOA3


MAGENTA M* M-*


BLACK


Deadlines for line ads
Publication Deadline
Wednesday..........Fri. at 10 a.m.
Friday ................ Wed. at 10 a.m.


BLACK


North Florida 0 0






CIassifieds


I





North Florida


CYAN *,ew Od*

MAGENTA Even Odd


PAGE 6, DECEMBER 16 & 17, 2009


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


FirstDay.
SINGLEWIDE MOBILE
HOMES-3 available in Live Oak,
FL. 3BD/2BA. Now accepting
section 8. 1st mo rent & last to
move in. No Pets Call 386-330-
0126
Vacation Rentals

FirstDay.
WATERFRONT VACATION
(RENTAL) SUWANNEE, FL
N/wkly. Mouth Suwannee
River/Gulf views, 2/2, sleeps
6. Freshwater boat ramp on
site (no wait), boat lift,
wireless DSL, fax, printer,
scanner, copier, fresh/salt
water fishing, pool, golf cart.
S/Thurs-l1st night $167.
$107/ea. add. night. F/Sat-1st
night $194. 2 nights $328
includes: cleaning/taxes. Call
Suwannee Realty for
buckmullet 352-542-0704
www.buckmullet.com

Office Space for Rent
SPACE FOR LEASE IN LAKE
CITY
Marion Cr. 1118-2236sf @ $13/sf
Campbell St. 1260sf @ $14/sf
Warehse space 1247sf $750/mo
www.ScottDStewart.com
386-867-3498 Westfield Realty
Grp
Mobile Homes for Sale
DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE
HOME, 1998 model, 4 acres, 3
bedrooms, 2 full baths. New
carpet! Only one owner!
$90,000. Call Billie Vincent 386-
688-0470.


OWNER FINANCE MAYO
AREA: 3Bd/2Ba on 2.5 Acres,
Private River Access. Workshop.
Small down $675 mo. 386-590-
0642 or 386-867-1833
"REPO MAN" Just received (5)
Bank Repo Mobile Homes. SW &
DW, Call Mr Mott for list.
(386)752-1452
NEW 5Bd/2Ba DWMH $54,319.
You pick all colors, Call Rick
(386)752-8196
2010 4Bd/2Ba DWMH $39,995.
Includes delivery, set-up, CHA,
Skirting & Steps within 60 miles
of Lake City, FL Call Rick
(386)752-8196
Vacation Property
NC MOUNTAINS Top of the
mountain! 10acres with great
view, very private, creek,
waterfalls & large public lake
nearby, $99,500. Bank
financing. Call 1-866-789-8535
NORTH CAROLINA Holiday in
the mountains. Make your
family memories today; even the
family pet is welcome! Call
Foscoe Rentals 1-800-723-7341
book online
www.foscoerentals.com
NORTH CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS Ski & Snowboard
Efficiency to 6-bedroom houses
& condos. Fully equipped.
Spectacular-Views, pools, Ice
Skating, Tubing & more. Sugar
Mountain Accommodations &
Realty staysugar.com 1-800-
545-9475


Lots
FOR SALE BY OWNER
W/FINANCEING. 4 Acres on
202nd St in O'Brien. Co
maintained Road, Lots of nice
trees. $19,000 386-935-2301
Acreage

FirstDay.
PRICE REDUCED
Lafayette County
10ac, Hwy 51 N. of Mayo,
near river, $64,900
1 ac RV/Mobile home lots,
Branford area, $15,000
Suwannee County
5 ac, Park like,
near airport, $49,900
Easy Financing
1-941-778/7980or7565
www.landcallnow.com

FirstDay.
PRICE REDUCED
Lafayette County
10Oac, Hwy 51 N. of Mayo,
near river, $64,900
1 ac RV/Mobile home lots,
Branford area, $15,000
Suwannee County
5 ac, Park like,
near airport, $49,900
Easy Financing
1-941-778/7980or7565
www.landcallnow.com


Aircraft
FLY AT JET SPEEDS, altitudes
and comfort for piston twin cost
in this pristine 2007 Eclipse 500,
SN 60. This Eclipse Jet is in
perfect condition. Always
professionally flown and
maintained by a corporate flight
department. Always hangared. It
has never been used for charter
or flight instruction. Options
include LX interior/exterior
package, sixth forward facing
seat and plated metals. RVSM
certified. Absolutely no damage
history. Logbooks are complete
and all ADs are complied with."
View details at:
http://TinyURL.com/Eclipse500

Motorcycles
FirstDay.
YAMAHA RAPTURE 700-2007-
4 WHEELER Low hours, new
tires, good condition, Gold Card
Service $5000
2006-HONDA DIRT BIKE 230.
Low Hours, Good Condition.
$2500 386-590-2086


PUBLIC AUCTION
Trucks, Vehicles, Tractors,
Misc. Tools
Consignments Welcome
Sat., Dec. 19th at 9 a.m.
6 mi. West of 1-75 on US 90
Atkinson Realty & Auction
800-756-4098 2
www.atkinsononline.com


A elIYoCa't Rfus!4iiAR


C North Florida 0 0
classified


to perform in Live Oak


Continued From Page 1

22, enjoy the Herold White
Show and open mic time.
Free admission all three
nights.
Doors open to the Music
Hall at 5 p.m. for dinner
with shows beginning at 7
p.m.
The SOS Cafe and
Restaurant will be open
until 2 p.m. Christmas Eve


and is closed Christmas
Day, re-opening at 7:30
a.m. Dec. 26.
For more information
about this event or the
many ,/'..'i;iii'- events in
2010, go to the SOSMP
website at
www.musicliveshere.com or
call the SOSMP at 386-
364-1683. You may also
e-mail the SOSMP at
spirit@musicliveshere.com.


MAGENTA M M*Mu


BLACK


1$5 &:U Csh


BLACK


Continued From Page 4

meet the needs of MANY children in Suwannee County!
Please talk to your clubs, businesses, churches, etc. to
get involved!
For more information please contact Lisa Garrison at
386-647-4623, Debra Ross at 386-647-4628, Tammie
Williams at 386-364-7720 or Missy Norris at 386-364-
3789.


TOPS is here for you
Anyone interested in learning more about nutrition,
portion control, and exercise while having fun is cor-
dially invited to come join our TOPS group. TOPS is
nonprofit, noncommercial and affordable. TOPS# FL.
662 meets weekly on Thursday mornings at the First
Advent Christian Church in Live Oak.
We start our weigh in at 8 a.m., and the meeting be-
gins at 9 a.m. 10.
For more information please call Elaine at (386) 364-
5537. We all make New Year's resolutions about
watching our weight. If you are in need of a good sup-
port system to help you, make your New Year's resolu-
tion come true, please come join us for informative
programs and fun. Hope to see you soon.


Seasonal flu vaccines available

to eligible veterans
Through Jan. 29
In an effort to reduce the impact of the seasonal flu and
connected illness, enrolled/eligible veterans may obtain a
seasonal flu vaccination through Jan. 29 at the Lake City
VA Medical Center.
This is an especially challenging influenza season this
year. Many people suffer severe consequences from the
flu. It is very important for every veteran to get his or
her flu shot. The flu shot is the only measure of protec-
tion from the influenza virus.


Yee Haw Country Christmas
Dec. 18
The Live Oak Christian Church is presenting a unique
Christmas program on December 18. With music, fun
and laughter, we will see the birth of Jesus through a spe-
cial kind of country humor. The program will begin at 7
p.m.
The church is located at 1015 Ohio Avenue North. For
more information call the church at 362-1015 or check
our web page at liveoakchristian.org.


LiveOnStage Theatre
Dec. 18
In partnership with First United Methodist Church pre-
sents:

"A Christmas Carol"

Adapted by Greg Oliver Bodine, A surprise Reading

Date: December 18, 2009
Time: 7 p.m.
Place: First United Methodist Church Sanctuary
Cost: Love Offering

Refreshments will be served after performance in the fel-
lowship hall.


Annual Christmas dinner
Dec. 19
Faith in Christ Anglican Church and the Christian
Mission in Action will be sponsoring the free annual
Christmas Dinner this year.
The dinner will be a traditional Christmas dinner with
all the fixings. We will have turkey, ham, beans, sweet
potatoes, greens, cranberry sauce and desserts.
There will be singing, gifts, and a gospel message.
We will also have a prayer team circulating for
individual prayer needs.
The dinner will be served from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. on
Dec. 19 at the Suwannee County Coliseum.
Every one is welcome and this dinner is free to all.

Suwannee High Class of 1980
The Suwannee High Class of 1980 is planning their 30
year class reunion. If you were a member, had a child,
sibling or relative as part of the graduating class, please
email your name (maiden and married), address, phone
number and email address to shsclassl980@yahoo.com.
Or call 386-362-6309 to leave a message.
We look forward to hearing from you and seeing you
at the reunion.

Mike 'Gator Chomp' Mullis




North Florida


CYAN Odwm-w*,
MAGENTA Even Odd


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


DECEMBER 16 & 17, 2009, PAGE 7


Calendar of Events

December 2009 February 2010
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
University Auditorium
Alan & Carol Squitieri Studio Theatre


UFPA presents
CATS
Saturday, January 9, 7:30 pm
Sunday, January 10, 1:00 pm and 5:00 pm
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Sponsored by Home Magazine and The Sky 97.3 FM
Reserved Seating: $34.00 $66.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu.

UFPA presents
Complexions Contemporary Ballet
Wednesday, January 13, 7:30 p.m.
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Reserved Seating: $28.50 $44.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu.

UFPA presents
The 5 Browns
Thursday, January 14, 7:30 p.m.
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Sponsored by Lowry Financial Advisors and WGFL CBS
4
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $50.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
GROOVALOO
Friday, January 15, 7:30 p.m.
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Sponsored by Gainesville Health & Fitness and JMAJ,
LLC
Reserved Seating: $28.50 $44.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Naoko Takada, Marimba
Sunday, January 17, 7:30 p.m.
The Squitieri Studio Theatre
Reserved Seating: $28.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Nnenna Freelon, Harolyn Blackwell and Mike Garson in
Dreaming the Duke
Friday, January 22, 7:30 p.m.
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Reserved Seating: $28.50 $50.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Natalie MacMaster and Donnell Leahy Masters of the
Fiddle
Saturday, January 23, 7:30 p.m.
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Sponsored by Coldwell Banker M.M. Parrish Realtors
and WUFT-TV
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $39.25
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Leipzig String Quartet
Sunday, January 24, 2 p.m.
Squitieri Studio Theatre
Reserved Seating: $34.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Haochen Zhang Thirteenth Van Cliburn International Pi-
ano Competition Gold Medalist
Thursday, January 28, 7:30 pm
Friday, January 29, 7:30 pm
The Squitieri Studio Theatre
Sponsored by Shands HealthCare
Reserved Seating: $34.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
L.A. Theatre Works
Susan Albert Loewenberg, Producing Director presents
RFK: The Journey to Justice
Thursday, February 4, 7:30 p.m.
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $44.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Joshua Bell, Violin
Jeremy Denk, Piano
Saturday, February 6, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Shands, Koss-Olinger and S.F.I.
Reserved Seating: $39.25 $60.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
THE OPERA SHOW
Tuesday, February 9, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Shands HealthCare
Reserved Seating: $39.25 $55.25
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents


Hairspray
Wednesday, February 10, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Bosshardt Realty, Holloway Financial Ser-
vices, WCJB TV20
Reserved Seating: $34.00 $60.50


For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Soweto Gospel Choir
Thursday, February 11, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Gainesville Guardian
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $39.25
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Richie Havens
Friday, February 12, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, February 13, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, February 14, 2 p.m.
Squitieri Studio Theatre
Reserved Seating: $34.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
The Israel Ballet
Sunday, February 14, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Cox Media and Dharma Endowment


Foundation
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $44.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Philharmonia of the Nations with Jon Nakamatsu, Piano
Thursday, February, 18, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Dharma Endowment Foundation
Reserved Seating: $34.00 $55.25
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Eileen Ivers Beyond the Bog Road
Saturday, February 20, 7:30 p.m.
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $39.25
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UFPA presents
Christine Brewer, Soprano
Sunday, February 21, 2 p.m.


SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 15


I WE ARE THE MANUFACTURER


WIMETALROOFING
STATE OF FLORIDA APPROVED
Residential* Commercial* Agricultural

SAGRIMETAL SUPPLY, INC.
Phone: 38-294-1720 Fax: 386-294-1724
232 SE Industrial Park Cir. Mayo, FL



S SUIWANNEE AU

HARDWARE & FEEDill)
We carry Central State Brand Feeds for dogs,
horses, goats, rabbits, hogs, chickens, wild game,
birds & fish, as well as all purpose feeds L m e
Hay & Pinestraw Available Let Me un your errail
Hay & Pinestraw Available Pharmacy Grocery Vet Hardware
16660 Spring St., White Springs Restaurant* Etc.
386-397-2551 Ir suW inAlovaib
Under the new ownership of Call Eugene at
Don & Celeste Wilson Cell: 590-3869 Home: 330-4521



SAffordable Seamless Gutters
"Satisfaction Guaranteed"
Specializing In:
Seamless Gutters Carl Kirk
WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS *Soffit & Fasia 386-776-1835
Gutter Guard
PUMP & WELL REPAIRS C S re nell
SCOTT TAYLOR Enclosures and Repair 386-209-2740
TEL. 407-719-3726 Residential & Commercial Licensed & Insured
LIVE OAK FLORIDA SERVING NORTH FLORIDA FREE ESTIMATES FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED



SLIVE OAK E-LIMB-INATORS, INC.
MINI S1R AV I Complete Tree Service
jMINI SRA l El Licensed & Insured
5x15 5x20 10x15 10x20 Owners:
Keith & Glenda Hudson
CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE Keith & Glenda Hudson
9351 220th Street
5x5 5x10 10x10 10x20 o'Brien, FL 32071
Units located on Gold Kist Road Phone 386-935-1993 -
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-6626 Fax 386-935-3321 i


TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 386-362-1734

DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M.


CYAM AG TA UnA

MAGENTA M -M-M


BLACK


Time to Upgrade.


BLACK




North Florida


CYAN *,ew Od*
MAGENTA Even Odd


PAGE 8, DECEMBER 16 & 17, 2009


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Dear Classified Guys,
I used to think my brother Trevor was
a fool. Now I'm beginning to realize
that he's a genius in disguise. For
years he's been buying things in the
classified while I would buy things
new in the store. But when he found
out my husband and I were having a
baby, he surprised us with every-
thing we needed for our nursery, all
in new condition and at a fraction of
the new cost. I was so amazed. The
only problem is, we found out we're
having twins! Since he found such
great deals, I want to buy another
set of everything like he did. 4m
But after razzing him for so
many years, I figure I better
do it myself. Can you give
me a few pointers on finding
& buying baby items so I don't
make too many mistakes?
Cash: It seems Uncle Trevor may
have a few things to teach your children
when they grow up.
Carry: And considering the cost of
children's items, his talents could be very
useful to you in upcoming years.
Cash: Fortunately, it doesn't take a
"genius" to follow in your brother's
footsteps. Shopping the classified is
like shopping any catalog. Once you


OF


Duane "Cash" Holze
& Todd "Carry" Holze


W 12/13/09
@2009 The Classified Guys


spot an item you need, call the seller
and ask more specifics.
Carry: The trick to finding a good
deal is knowing the value of an item. If
you've been shopping for children's
items recently, you may be well aware
of their cost.
Cash: Try to purchase from parents
who used things only once. Items that
are used through multiple children or
passed among family members tend to
see higher wear and tear.
Carry: If you're still nervous about
taking your first "baby steps" toward
buying in the classified, ask the future
Uncle Trevor for some assistance.


When he finds out you're having twins,
he'll probably be more than happy to
help. Although considering you've
razzed him for years, be prepared for a
little ribbing in return.
Cash: If you can't find everything
you need in your local classified sec-
tion, visit a few yard sales in your area.
Baby items are among the most popular
merchandise since items are rarely
worn out by the time children outgrow
them. It's also common to find toys and
games still in their original box.
Carry: Although if your twins are
like most kids, the box may be the best
toy of all.


Amb IH ED
GUY

eimin.B

I n s


Happy Birthday
Twins, triplets and quadruplets are
more common today than ever before.
The Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention has tracked a steady rise in
multiple births since 1980 and the pace
quickened throughout the 1990's.
Their latest statistics now document
more than 137,000 twins, 6000 triplets
and 350 quadruplets born each year.
The steady increase is attributed to not
only fertility drugs, but also to the
increased age of women bearing chil-
dren. Women in their thirties or older
are more likely to have a multiple birth
than women in their twenties.
Be Alert
When it comes to buying items for
children, nothing is more important
than safety. Whether you choose to
buy your items at a yard sale, through
the classified or directly off the
department store shelves, make sure
that the items you choose are safe.
Every year many toys, games or baby
items are given safety warnings or
recalled, yet they are still sold nation-
wide. Before your next purchase, visit
the U.S. Consumer Products Safety
Commission at www.cpsc.gov. A few
minutes online can go a long way for
your child's safety.


I wwCasiiedu scoI


Citrus County:



A natural choice for affordable RV travel


Every day, more and more RV lovers are discovering
the natural attraction and unique recreational opportuni-
ties of Citrus County. An easy reach from 1-75, the
quaint towns of Crystal River, Homosassa and Inverness
offer a wide variety of things to see and do for today's
active RVer. Some of the region's best equipped and
most welcoming RV resorts reside within the borders of
this, The Water Lover's Florida.
When you pull off of the interstate into the county, you
will find endless natural riches. The county's top-notch
campgrounds like the state-park-like Elite Resorts at
Rock Crusher Canyon, Chassa Oaks RV Resort and Na-
ture Coast Landings can be found right around the cor-
ner from the area's renowned outdoor places to play. Full
hook-ups for your vehicle, marinas, camp stores, pull-
through camping and resort-style amenities are common.
Look for special activities among residents, where you
can meet new friends and discover new things to see and
do. Just a few examples of exceptionally equipped parks
include Crystal Isles RV Resort, River Lodge RV Resort
and Nature's Resort Campground and Marina.
What's more, RV campgrounds are among the most af-
fordable ways to stay in Citrus County. Whether you are
with one of the many acclaimed private parks or at a
state forest location, you will find the perfect travel solu-


Announcements


Advertise in Over 100
Papers throughout Florida.
Advertising Networks of
Florida, Put us to work for
You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com.

Apartment for Rent

HUD HOMES! 4bdr 3ba
$217/mo! 3 bdrm only
$199/mo! Stop Renting! 5%
dw, 15 yrs @ 8% apr For
Listings (800)366-9783 ext
5669

Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING TAX
CREDIT! 40 yr Warranty.
Direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock Quick
turnaround. Delivery
available. Gulf Coast Supply
& Manufacturing, (888)393-
0335
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Business Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING! Do
you earn $800 in a day? 25
Local Machines and Candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033 CALL US: We
will not be undersold!

Cars for Sale

Police Impounds! Acura
2000 Integra $300! Honda
2000 Civic $800! VW 1998
Jetta $300! for listings call
(800)366-9813 ext 9275

2000 Honda Civic $800!
2001 Nissan Altima $350!
2000 Acura Integra $300!
POLICE IMPOUNDS! for
listings call (800)366-9813
ext 9271


tion for you and your family.
If you choose to stay in Inverness,
in the eastern part of the county not
far from 1-75, you will have the glo-
ries of an Old Florida downtown at
your beck and call. Explore the his-
toric square, which is lined with shops
and restaurants, living under the
benevolent gaze of the Old 1912
County Courthouse. This beautiful,
historic building is an ideal place to
begin your tour of the area. Step in-
side to explore the Old Courthouse
Heritage Museum, which showcases
traveling exhibits from across the
state, as well as a robust collection of
items relating to Citrus County history.


Once you have a sense of the past, present yourself
with the delightful challenge of seeing all that there is to
do in the immediate vicinity. Boutiques and cafes
abound, including the "theme park" shopping experience
of Ritzy Rags and Glitzy Jewels. This boutique tran-
scends the boundaries between antique store, high-end
consignment shop and museum. After your shopping ex-
hibition, dine at local favorites Little Italy of Inverness,


For Sale

Get Dish -FREE Installation-
$19.99/mo HBO &
Showtime FREE-Over 50
HD Channels FREE Lowest
Prices-No Equipment to
Buy! Call Now for full
Details- (877)416-0191

Help Wanted

Travel, Travel, Travel! $500
Sign-on-bonus. Seeking
sharp guys and gals, Rock-n-
Roll Atmosphere, Blue Jean
Environment! Call Ally
(800)716-0048 today.

PTL OTR Drivers. NEW
PAY PACKAGE! Great
Miles! Up to 46cpm. 12
months experience required.
No felony or DUI past 5
years. (877)740-6262.
www.ptl-inc.com

Become a Foster Parent.
Celebrate the meaning of the
Holiday Season by giving an
adolescent hope, help and a
loving home. For
information contact Florida
MENTOR at (800)910-7754
or
www.thementornetwork.com


Prices-No Equipment to Buy!
Call Now for full Details-
(877)227-2998

Miscellaneous

AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance Career.
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified -
Housing available. CALL
Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (888)349-5387.

ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance.
Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (888)203-3179,
www.CenturaOnline.com.

Real Estate

LAND OR
DEVELOPMENTS
WANTED. We buy or market
development lots. Mountain
or Waterfront Communities
in NC, SC, AL, GA and FL.
Call (800)455-1981,
Ext. 1034


4Br 2Ba Foreclosure!
$11,500! Only $217/Mo! 5%
down 15 years @ 8% apr.
Buy, 3 Br $199/Mo! for
listings (800)366-9783 ext
5798

Misc. Items for Sale

Get Dish -FREE Installation-
$19.99/mo HBO &
Showtime FREE-Over 50
HD Channels FREE Lowest


ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA

Classified I Display | Mayo Daily


Week of Dec. 14, 2009]
499626-F


Stumpknockers on the Square or other area eateries for a
delicious meal.
Should your explorations take you to Crystal River in
the northwest portion of the county, you will have a rich
tapestry of historical, natural and recreational resources
to choose from. Indeed, the region has drawn visitors for
thousands of years, and modem guests can get a glimpse
of this native past at the Crystal River Archaeological
State Park. The park contains a
mound complex that was an exten-
nplete list sive Native American ceremonial
irks and site that attracted thousands of pil-
grims each year. You can also learn
ntids, log on more at the on-site museum, which
chronicles the past of Crystal River,
us.corn or and through boat tours operated by
tct the the park.
For more contemporary enjoy-
office at ment, visitors can explore downtown
87-6667 Crystal River. The Heritage Village
in Crystal River contains a number
al vacation of quaint shops and eateries ideal for
assistance. RV travelers. Whether your stay is
short- or medium-term in length, this
will be a "go-to" place throughout
your trip. From souvenirs like plush manatees, to cloth-
ing and fresh local fare, the Historic Village has some-
thing for every taste.
In downtown Crystal River, there is a patriotic manatee
statue that symbolizes the sea cows that have made the
area famous. Together with its neighbor Homosassa,
Crystal River is the site of North America's largest mana-
tee gathering each winter, and home to a healthy popula-
tion of the gentle giants throughout the year. Citrus
County is also the only legal place in the United States to
swim and snorkel with manatees. A number of local
guide services offer supervised snorkel tours with all
equipment included, making meeting manatees face to
face as easy as it is fun. Some even videotape the experi-
ence for you to relive time and time again.
Another favorite way to see endangered manatees in
their natural environment is to visit the Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife State Park in Homosassa. The
park features its famous "Fish Bowl" observatory, where
you can stay completely dry as you watch manatees and
teeming schools of fish swim in a natural spring. Knowl-
edgeable park rangers or volunteers also give informative
talks on manatees three times daily. While you're there,
walk the park's 1.2-mile boardwalk for a showcase of na-
tive Florida fauna, including key deer to red wolves, rep-
tiles, birds and more.
Old Homosassa is an Old Florida artists' community
and fishing village that is home to a variety of waterfront
restaurants, including Riverside Crab House and The
Shed at MacRae's. Sip on a tropical beverage and eat
freshly caught blue or stone crab as you watch the play-
ful primates frolic on Monkey Island, a spoiled-island-
tumed-monkey-haven, complete with a miniature light-
house. Homosassa is also a center for offshore or flats
fishing charters and boat
rentals. Scalloping is a
popular season activity
Every summer, and a peak
time for RV visitors wanti-
,,nurIne d ng to dive in and scoop up
For ScaSeu the freshest seafood possi-
ble.
ol I ? However you enjoy
Crystal River, Homosassa
[. I i1 and Inverness, you will ex-
perience a combination of
FREEaffordability, friendliness
iand Old Florida charm
1(0)9286 found in few RV destina-
f k tions.


Mobile

Homes

and

Land for

sale.

Financed

by owner.

386-362-2720


You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Nancy at

386-362-1734
499651-F


MAGENTA MM


BLACK


Diaper Genie
With a three-month-old child, I'm
always stopping at yard sales to see
what I can find to save a few dollars.
Last week I found a potty training
chair that was still brand new.
"I never needed it," the woman
explained. "At first my husband
wanted nothing to do with potty
training. Then I found a way to con-
vince him to take over the process.
He had my daughter trained in three
months."
"That's amazing," I told the
woman. "What did you say to moti-
vate your husband?"
"Nothing," she replied. "I just
showed him the price of diapers."
(Thanks to Cassandra J.)


This sounds like a messy
twist on the classic toy.
FOR SALE:
s SPit4+.Sp'n, Vintage
1970's,reat\Shape.

Do you have a question or funny story about the
classified? Want to just give us your opinion?
We want to hear all about it! Email us at:
comments@classifiedguys.com.


For a con
of RV pa
campgroui
to VisitCitr
conta
tourism
1-800-5
for person
planning a


Homes For Rent


BLACK


%, I ol





North Florida


CYAN newvnew

MAGENTA Even Odd


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Suwannee Valley Humane Society



Critter Corner


Suwannee Valley
Humane Society
1156 SE Bisbee Loop
Madison, Florida 32340

Two ,i/. ,. south of Lee
off C.R. 255
From 10 Exit 262. Take
C.R.2555 north 1/2 re,l. .

We are a Limited Space
Shelter (no kill). You must
check with us prior to
bringing a drop-off animal
to the shelter. Hours;
Tues. to Sat. 10:00 to
2:00, or by appointment.
Visit our website and see
the animals that need a re-
ally good home at
www.geocities.com/suwan
neehs or at our e-mail ad-
dress
suwanneevalley @ embarq-
mail.com.

We service the sur-
rounding counties of
Madison, Suwannee,
Hamilton, Lafayette, Co-
lumbia and Taylor.

Lost and Found Pets:
If you have lost a pet or
found one, the humane so-
ciety will help you find
your pet. Call us at 850-
971- 9904 or toll free at 1-
866-236-7812. Leave a
message if we are closed,
we will return your call.
Remember to always call
your local animal controls
or shelters if you have
found a lost or found pet.

THRIFT STORE:


You must come see our
thrift stores, if you have
not been here before. We
have three stores, a bou-
tique, clothing and furni-
ture. We are always look-
ing for donations for the
stores. Please keep us in
mind if you have items in
good condition you would
like to donate to us.

RECYCLING:
We have a recycling bin
on our property newspa-
pers, magazines, and cata-
logs. The bin will take all
kinds of paper. We also
have a bin in Live Oak at
305 Pinewood Drive, just
west Of Johnson's Appli-
ance/Radio Shack. We
also collect aluminum
cans to recycle. Just bring
them to the shelter. All the
money goes to help the
homeless animals.

The Suwannee Valley
Humane Society depends
on adoptions for $65.00
which INCLUDES,
spay/neuter, de-worm,
heartworm/feline leukemia
tested and rabies shot (if
old enough). Please come
and visit us, our animals
would love to meet you.
REMEMBER; DO NOT
LEAVE PETS IN VEHI-
CLES FOR ANY
LENGTH OF TIME DUE
TO THE HEAT AND HU-
MIDITY.

FEATURED ANIMALS
FOR ADOPTIONS


DOGS:
2621 Kira is a Hound
Mix, she is 4 years 11
months old. She is tri -
color. She loves to play
ball, she likes to play and
she gives hugs. He hates
cats and would love a
home.

3748 Crissy is a 3
month old, Lab Mix. She
is black with a white spot
on neck.

3747 C. J. is a Lab
Mix puppy. He is 3
months old. He is black
and white.

3746 Carol is a 3
month old, Lab Mix pup-
py. She is black with a
white streak on her nose.

3741 Gideon is a
Terrier Mix, he is tan col-
or. He is 5 months old and
is a very sweet puppy.

CATS:
3735 Flop is 3 1/2
months old. He is a Tabby
kitty and is very sweet.

3734 Zeva is a fe-
male kitty, she is 3 1/2
months old. She is grey
with white paws.

3731 Unique is a 7
month old kitty. She is
white Tabby and likes to
play.

3727 Kit is a black
kitty, she is 1 year old and


is a short haired cat. She
loves to be patted.

3726 October is a
black tabby. She is 1 year
2 months old. She loves to
be made of.

If you have lost or
found an animal, you
would like to report.
Please feel free to call us
and I will put your report
in the newspaper free.

LOST: "Dickens" an
orange tabby, he is a male
and has been neutered. He
weight 5 lbs. and is a 10"
height. He is a clam and
lovable kitty. He was lost
from 165th road; Live
Oak. If you have found
him, please call Alfred
Walker @ 386-364-4191.

"Emma" is a short
haired kitty. She is a grey
tiger with white paws. She
has been spayed and has
been declaw. She is slight-
ly feral. She went missing
from Kaboodle Ranch in
Lee, FL. There is a $500.
00 reward if found and re-
turn. Please call, Ann
Bechler @ 850-619-3212.

2 dogs missing,
"Jasper" a large male un-
known breed. He is
brindle color and has a
bad back leg. He only
used 3 legs. Second dog
"Lady Bug" female Bea-
gle Mix. Mostly black
with some white. Both


dogs are very sweet. Have
been missing since Dec.
4th. Went missing 1 mile
North of the Suwannee
River on 751. If you have
found them please, call
Linda @ 386-938-3258.

"Sheba" a Lab Mix, She
is black. White and has a
grey muzzle. She has been
spayed, weight 48 # and is
36 inches height. She is in
good health. She was lost
from Route 90 in Jen-
nings. If you have found
her please, call Sandy
Frye @ 386-938-5623.


FOUND:
A female dog, unknown
Breed all white. Has short
hair and is very sweet and
gentle. Was found, in Live
Oak. If you own this dog
please, call Barbara Star-
ton @ 386-330-2509.

The Suwannee Valley
Humane Society would
like to ...i. Thanks all our
sponsors and friends who
gave and came to our Pet
Show this year.
We had a chance to
meet with all our old and
new friends and every
body had a ..*.. ,ii time.


Recognizing the Symptoms

of Autism in Children


LET' TK

ABOUT YOUR HEALTH


Ophthalmology

GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
522 South Ohio Avenue
S, 330-6260 or 1-800-435-3937


Physical Therapy


Heartland
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA
Mandy McCray, PTA
Carolyn McCook, Office Manager,
Patient Care Coordinator
AQUATIC THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports
Medicine, Pediatrics Providers
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS Providers
405 11th St., Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051 501053-F


Few child health issues have gotten more
publicity in the 21st century than autism. A
mental condition characterized by great
difficulty forming relationships and
communicating with other people, autism is
present from early childhood.
For parents of young children or even
expecting parents, the increased publicity of
autism has left many wondering what they
can do with respect to their own children.
The Autism Society of America notes
parents should be on the lookout for the
following symptoms, and consult a
physician should any of them begin to
appear.
* Difficulty in mixing with others. At times,
autism can be a heartbreaking disorder for a
sufferer's loved ones, mainly due to the
difficulty autistic children have in
communicating and befriending other
children. Lacking the capacity to
communicate with others is one of the more
prevalent traits associated with autism.
Parents of children who can't seem to mix
with other children should consider
consulting a physician.
* Inability verbalizing needs and wants. In
lieu of speaking, autism sufferers often
resort to pointing or gestures when
expressing needs. While this is a common
trait in many young children, it is abnormal
for toddlers who have already developed
language skills.


* Resistance to change. Autism sufferers
insist on never breaking from their routine,
a trait that was characterized in the 1988
film "Rain Man," where Dustin Hoffman's
character is an adult with autism who
strongly resists change and breaking from
his routine throughout the film.
* Not wanting to be cuddled or make eye
contact. While these are separate traits, they
both can be extremely difficult for parents
to cope with, possibly making parents feel
as though their child is not reciprocating
their love. Children will react negatively to
being hugged or cuddled and some autism
sufferers refuse to make eye contact as well.
* Unresponsive to verbal cues. Children
with autism often act as if they are deaf,
despite hearing tests that show their hearing
is in normal range.
To learn more, visit the Autism Society of
America Web site at www.autism-
society.org.



Physical Therapy


Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy
Specializing In Arthritis Fibromyalgia Geriatrics Spinal &
Joint Pain Sports Injuries Work Injuries Pediatrics
Manual Therapy Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Protegrity
Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross, Av Med
Jasper 792-2426 Medicaid-pediatrics
Branford 935-1449 Workers Comp
Mayo 294-1407 Most Other Insurance Plans

A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com 8
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore S


Christian Village offers full
prescription services to the
community."


To place an ad on this page, please call Nancy at 386-362-1734 Ext. 103


CYAGN ppN TAe, BLACKo

MAGENTA *MO*M~u* BLACK


BLACK


DECEMBER 16 & 17, 2009, PAGE 9


NorthF Ilorida


Pharmacy

S* Medical
Equipment
Oxygen

"Everything For Your
Home Recovery"

Locally Owned & Operated
101 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL 32008
(386) 935-6905
229 W. Main St., Mayo, FL 32066
(386) 294-3777 501051-F


COPELAND

MEDICAL

CENTER
ADVENT CHRISTIAN VILLAGE
AT DOWLING PARK
I i e. m e I


Clinic: Family Practice, Urgent Care,
Geriatric Consultations, Women's Health, School Physicals
Rehab: Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Occupational Therapy
Pharmacy
10820 Marvin Jones Blvd., Dowling Park, FL
386-658-5300
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Nasseer Masoodi, M.D.
Rich Corley, PA-C
Accepting Medicare and Most Insurance,
Sliding Scale Also Available 563934-F


At the W.B. Copeland Medical Center at Advent
Christian Village, modem facilities provide a
comfortable setting for our experienced staff to
deliver quality, full-service medical care.
Following your medical appointment, have your
prescription filled on the spot and purchase over
the counter medications at Village Pharmacy. Our
experienced Pharmacist gives professional
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service within Dowling Park, as an additional
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AT DOWLING PARK
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386-658-5860 1-800-955-8771 TTY
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DECEMBER 16 & 17, 2009, PAGE 11


Go to suwanneedemocrat.com and look
under Local Happenings for:


* Calendar of Events

* Monthly Meetings


* Weekly Meetings

*FYI


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including Deposit Form & Bill of Sale


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Edward Scott, Ph.D., an associate professor of molecular genetics at the UF Shands Cancer Center and director of the Program in Stem Cell Biology at UF's College of Medicine.
- Photo: Sarah Kiewel/University of Florida


$2.4 million stimulus fuels effort



to regenerate injured spinal cords


GAINESVILLE For more than 400 years, scientists
have studied the amazing regenerative power of salaman-
ders, trying to understand how these creatures routinely
repair injuries that would usually leave humans and other
mammals paralyzed or worse.
Now, fueled by a highly competitive National Institutes
of Health Grand Opportunity grant of $2.4 million, a mul-
ti-institutional team of researchers associated with the
University of Florida McKnight Brain Institute's Regen-
eration Project has begun creating genomic tools neces-
sary to compare the extraordinary regenerative capacity
of the Mexican axolotl salamander with established
mouse models of human disease and injury.
Researchers want to find ways to tap unused human ca-
pacities to treat spinal cord injury, stroke, traumatic brain
injury and other neural conditions, according to Edward
Scott, Ph.D., principal investigator for the GO grant and
director of the McKnight Brain Institute's Program in
Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine.
"The axolotl is the champion of vertebrate regenera-
tion, with the ability to replace whole limbs and even
parts of its central nervous system," Scott said. "These
salamanders use many of the same body systems and
genes that we do, but they have superior ability to regen-
erate after major injuries. We think that studying them
will tell us a lot about a patient's natural regenerative ca-
pacities after spinal cord injury and nerve cell damage."
The issue of what controls organ regeneration was
named among the top 25 major questions facing scientists
in the next quarter century by Science magazine in 2005,
Scott said. With medical science continually adding years


to the human lifespan, the importance of "rebuilding and
restoring" old tissues and organs is growing. But science
had to enter the 21st century to fully explore the use of
the highly regenerative axolotl as a model for human dis-
ease.
"Only now have new genetic, molecular and cellular
technologies as well as scientific knowledge of the sala-
mander, mouse and human genomes and 'regeneromes'
risen to a level where scientists can compare systemwide
responses to injury," according to Dennis A. Steindler,
Ph.D., executive director of UF's McKnight Brain Insti-
tute and a co-investigator on the grant.
"I am extremely hopeful with the discoveries being
made in comparative regenerative biology that the ques-
tions surrounding cell and tissue regeneration in the hu-
man following injury or disease are going to be an-
swered," Steindler said. "It is going to take broad, multi-
disciplinary collaborations across a number of scientific
fields, but we are making that happen. I think the GO
grant shows that these efforts are recognized and valued
on a national level."
GO grants are funded through the American Recovery
and Reinvestment Act and are intended to support re-
search with high short-term impact and a high likelihood
of enabling growth and investment in biomedical research
and health-care delivery.
"NIH Grand Opportunity grants support high-impact
projects, which lay the foundation for whole new fields of
investigation," said Naomi Kleitman, Ph.D., repair and
plasticity program director at the National Institute of
Neurological Disorders and Stroke. "This important mod-


el of regeneration is one of several being developed in or-
ganisms that can repair themselves, using genetics to find
links to mammals. We'll continue to watch the progress of
these exciting studies to ensure that discoveries of genes
that promote regeneration are one day applied to improv-
ing human health."
The Regeneration Project is also supported by private
foundations such as the Thomas H. Maren Foundation and
the Jon L. and Beverly A. Thompson Research Endow-
ment, the UF Office of the Vice President for Research,
and an anonymous donor, Steindler said. Enhancing the
discovery process are Regeneration Project research fel-
lows scientists who work across institutes and universi-
ties to advance discoveries in tissue and organ regenera-
tion to the clinic.
Even without help, people are capable of a certain de-
gree of regeneration. Humans can regrow fingertips and
even more than half of their liver. But they cannot replace
whole limbs and restoring parts of their brain and spinal
cord is a daunting challenge.
"The axolotl is the highest, most complex organism that
can still do this clever trick of completely reconstructing a
whole body part in adulthood," said Arlene Chiu, Ph.D., a
scientific adviser for the Regeneration Project and director
of New Research Initiatives at Beckman Research Insti-
tute of the City of Hope. "I like to think of it in construc-
tion terms where we need both the materials such as
bricks and beams and the architect's plans. In regenera-
tive medicine, can we learn where the biological blueprint
resides, and understand the basis of restoring and reorga-
nizing many different types of lost cells and tissues? Mus-
cles, bones, nerves and blood vessels all have to be recon-
structed at the right time and in the right place, all in per-
fect coordination with the original biological master plan.
"It may sound like science fiction, but the reality is the
salamander is able to do all of these things," she said.
"We are not so far removed that we can't relate to them,
learn from them and try to apply their secrets to improve
our capacity to regenerate."
As discoveries are made, more researchers will begin
using the axolotl as a model for exploring regenerative
techniques, according to S. Randal Voss, director of the
Salamander Genome Project at the University of Ken-
tucky.
"We've analyzed genes in common between the axolotl
salamander and humans, and found out we share about 90
percent of our genes in a one-to-one sense," Voss said. "It
could be that small but important changes in the way
these genes function in an injury environment affect the
repair process, but somehow the salamander is able to use
these genes for regeneration, while people are not."
The team has already referenced human and mouse
genes with axolotl counterparts.
"We started this with a list of genes in humans and
mice that are involved in repair processes and matched
them with their counterparts in the axolotl genome," Scott
said. "Ultimately, what makes the axolotl a great model
for regeneration is that the model systems we are most fa-
miliar with mice and humans do not regenerate very
well. By comparing how a mammal and a salamander re-
spond to injuries, we can identify genes or proteins that
we can now add back to the mammalian system to make
it regenerate better."


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0 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA

be IF" TT


DECEMBER 16 & 17, 2009, PAGE 13


Tips to Shed Those Holiday Pounds


The holiday season is a time of year with many tradi-
tions, from family outings to the local Christmas tree farm
to get-togethers over holiday meals to gift exchanges with
coworkers. However, not all traditions are as popular as
gift giving or Christmas vacations.
One such tradition that many would like to avoid is
packing on a few extra pounds during the holiday season.
While that's certainly the healthiest decision to make, it's
also the most difficult, particular for those who find
themselves spending ample time attending the host of hol-


iday-themed social gatherings throughout the season. For
those who find themselves looking to shed a few extra
pounds each January, the following plan should help ac-
complish that first goal of the New Year.
Practice portion control. Oftentimes, many people
don't have a problem with what their eating, but how
much they're eating. Resolving to avoid certain items is
likely going to increase desire for those items, which is a
recipe for overindulgence should you eventually cave in.
When it comes to holiday foods, simply manage your por-


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tions and eat every meal in moderation.
Don't save up your calories. Though it might seem
like it doesn't matter when you get your 2,000 calories
a day, it actually does. For example, you can't forgo
breakfast and lunch with the idea of cashing in on your
daily calorie intake at dinner. You will end up overeat-
ing under such a circumstance, and it's also unhealthy
to skip meals.
Consider that you might just be thirsty. The symp-
toms of dehydration can be quite similar to those of
hunger, as the stomach will make noise when you're
dehydrated just as when you're hungry. If you find
your stomach growling shortly after eating a meal,
there's a strong chance you need a glass or two of wa-
ter. Dehydration can also make you feel fatigued, so
keep up your energy by staying hydrated throughout
the day.
Another tip is to drink water while cooking. This will
help you avoid overeating when the dinner you've
been cooking is finally served. Cooks also commonly
eat while they're cooking, but having a glass or two of
water could be a good replacement for such unneces-
sary snacking.
Don't overeat because everyone else is. Nearly
every adult recalls doing something foolish as a child
just because friends were doing it as well. And Mom or
Dad likely said something like, "If Timmy jumped off
the Brooklyn Bridge, would you do that, too?" The
same principles can be applied to weight loss as well.
Just because others are still indulging after the holiday
season, be it with leftovers or just everyday meals,
doesn't mean you can also afford to do so. It can be
hard to stop overeating after spending the holiday sea-
son doing just that, but in the long run it will pay off,
and you'll be better off for having done so.






ANSWERS


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DECEMBER 16 & 17, 2009, PAGE 15


Calendar of Events
December 2009 February 2010
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
University Auditorium
Alan & Carol Squitieri Studio Theatre


Continued From Page 7
University Auditorium
Sponsored by Shands HealthCare
Reserved Seating: $28.50 $44.50
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu
UFPA presents
Craig Martin's Classic Albums Live: Bob Marley Leg-
end
Wednesday, February 24, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Wachovia and WGFL MY-11


Reserved Seating: $23.25 $39.25
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu
UFPA presents
An Evening of BraziliAHN Trio with Special Guests
Welson Tremura and Larry Crook
Saturday, February 27, 7:30 p.m.
University Auditorium
Reserved Seating: $23.50 $34.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu


UFPA presents
Cuarteto Latinoamericano with Manuel Barrueco, Guitar
Sunday, February 28, 2 p.m.
University Auditorium
Reserved Seating: $23.25 $34.00
For more information, call 352-392-2787 or visit
www.performingarts.ufl.edu

Events, dates, times andp ',,. w. are subject to change.
For updates, please visit the University of Florida Per-
f iiii,.. Arts web site at p i'. i i-.. -,i. t ,i,.ufl.edu and
click on the "Events" link.


Wild

Adventures

schedules

20 concerts for
2010 season
VALDOSTA Wild
Adventures Water &
Theme Park promises to
deliver a year of unfor-
gettable concerts in 2010
with 20 performances.
Diverse and popular acts
are included in the line-
up from country, Christ-
ian, rock, Gospel, R&B,
and pop genres. More
concerts will be an-
nounced soon to create a
concert season not to be
missed.
2010 Concert Schedule
(as of November 20)*
Mar. 20 George
Thorogood &
Los Lonely Boys
Mar. 27 Lynyrd
Skynyrd
Apr. 10 Jeremy
Camp
Apr. 17 REO
Speedwagon & STYX
May Backstreet
Boys
(date to be confirmed)
May 15 Chicago
May 29 David
Crowder Band
June 12 Steven
Curtis Chapman
June 19 Tye Tribbett
& Kirk Franklin
June 26 Billy Ray
Cyrus
July Great American
Country Network -
Emerging Artist
Show case
(date to be confirmed)
July 10 Rodney
Atkins
July 24 Frankie
Beverly with Maze
Aug. 28 CMA Award
Winning Trio TBA
Sept. 25 Third Day
General admission to
all of the 2010 concerts
is free with park admis-
sion or a 2010 Season
Pass. EZ Pay online
payment plan makes it
easier to purchase a sea-
son pass in monthly in-
stallments to enjoy all
that Wild Adventures
has to offer in 2010. EZ
Pay is available through
December 31, 2009.
In addition to general
concert admission, the
park also offers reserved
seating for an additional
cost. Reserved seating
for each announced con-
cert, with the exception
of the major country
trio, will go on sale Jan-
uary 15, 2010 and will
be available for purchase
online, by phone or at
the park. General con-
cert seating is included
in park admission; re-
served seating is an ad-
ditional cost to park ad-
mission.
*All performers and
dates are subject to
change due to circum-
stances beyond the
park's control.


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125th YEAR, NO. 18 3 SECTIONS, 50 PAGES


See more Branford-
area news, Pages 7-9A

By Stephenie Livingston
stephenie.Iivingston@gaflnews.com

setting the bar
high for environ-
mental practices
among dairies across the state.
Dairy Production Systems was
recently awarded the Ag-Envi-
ronmental Leadership award by
Florida Agricultural Commis-
sioner Charles H. Bronson for
the farm's innovative environ-
mental practices.
When one thinks of environ-
mental hazards, a dairy cow
does not typically come to mind.
However, the accumulating
waste from dairies across the


Wednesday Edition December 16, 2009




2mTmntntrat


Serving Suwannee County since 1884, including Live Oak, Wellborn, Branford, McAlpin and O'Brien
We're breaking local news every day at suwanneedemocrat.com




A first-fruits celebration


Kwanzaa comes to Live Oak


The kinara, or candleholder, is
symbolic of one's ancestors,
"those who hold the light."
By Carnell Hawthorne Jr.
carnell.hawthorne@gaflnews.com
A special treat is coming to
Suwannee County in the form of
a Kwanzaa celebration Sunday
beginning at 10 a.m. at the
Suwannee County Historical
Museum.
"It's a family unity affair,"
said event organizer Marilyn
Porter of McAlpin. "Kwanzaa is
a must for every family who has
African heritage, genetics or


The celebration centers around
seven principles called Nguzo
Saba, which emphasize the
unity of Black families. The
seven principals are:
UMOJA


KUJICHAGULIA


UJIMA


UJAMAA


NIA


KUUMBA


IMANI


Marilyn Porter, Kwanzaa event coordinator, stands next to a table of traditional
holiday items that will be described in detail at the Sunday celebration.
Photos: Carnell Hawthorne Jr.


African ancestry."
Porter said she saw the need to
bring the Kwanzaa event to the local
community so that those with


African lineage could show their
"appreciation of the struggles en-


SEE KWANZAA, PAGE 16A


50 CENTS


Another

no-bid

contract

for OMI?
Council gives
firm a chance to
make its case
By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com
The Live Oak City
Council voted unanimous-
ly Thursday, to renegotiate
with OMI rather than put
the contract out to bid.
However, the city still has
the option to bid the con-
tract out should negotia-
tions break down.
OMI is the private firm
that performs all the city's
public works functions.
The council had voted 3-2
earlier this year to request
bids on the contract.
"This is certainly not a
done deal," said Council-
man John Hale. "It's an
opportunity for OMI to
make a presentation to the
city. The door's still wide
open to go for bids to ei-
ther have someone else bid
on the contract or to let the
city have it back."
OMI and the city will sit
down in workshops early
next year to examine all
aspects of the contract.

SEE ANOTHER, PAGE 16A

Internship

program

may boost

grad rate
Students will get
work experience
in the process
By Carnell
Hawthorne Jr.
carnell.hawthorne
@gaflnews.com
Soon, more young faces
will be found behind the
counters and work spaces
of local businesses in an at-
tempt to help boost Suwan-
nee County's graduation
rates, according to the act-
ing director of a school in-
ternship program.
"What we're trying to do
is increase the career
awareness at Suwannee
High School," said retired
banker Dick Calvitt, acting
coordinator for the Work-
force Florida Grant pro-
gram.
"By creating the career
opportunities, these kids
will be exposed to job op-
portunities that will encour-

SEE INTERNSHIP, PAGE 14A


U.S. has been an environmental
concern for some time due to the
nitrogen and phosphorus parti-
cles that seep into the air and
water system. DPS President


David Sumrall, along with the
Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection and other
agencies and organizations, has
created a state-of-the-art sus-


tainable waste management sys-
tem that cleans and recycles its
own dairy waste, as well as
making special considerations
for the health of their cows.
Sumrall's goal was to deal
with the waste created by the
dairy, instead of simply buying
more land as the herd expanded.
The results have had an ex-
tremely positive environmental
impact.
"We decided to go from being
simply compliant to being ahead
of the curve," said Sumrall.
The 793-acre farm's relation-
ship with the environment was-
n't always a pleasant one, how-
ever.
Prior to forming DPS, which
is based in High Springs, Sum-
rall was the chief operating offi-
SEE BRANFORD, PAGE 11A


INSIDE: Early
;: y morning

crash
injures one
0 Page 16A

POLICE:
Man's
blood ties
him to
burglary
6 97113 07520 1 Page14A


65/45


Urash
leaves man
badly hurt
* Page 14A


I -


Arrest Record ...... .2A
Branford News ... ..7-9B
Obituaries ......... .5A


Sports ............ .1 B
Suwannee Living ... .4A
Viewpoint ......... .6A


Brand New 2009
Chevrolet Silverado- ----
LS Ext. Cab _


www.suwanneedemocrat.com

- PPO UOA]

MAGENTA MM-, M BLACK


GREEN ACRES


ABOVE: Corn is harvested for silage at the Branford DPS dairy. BELOW: Part of the 2,000-head herd being fed.
Photos courtesy Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services


Branford dairy's environmental

practices called revolutionary


NORTH FLORIDA
CLASSIFIED
FEATURED INSIDE




North Florida


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


ADVENT CHRISTIANVILLAGE

AT DOWLING PARK


Community Currents


Heroes among us


AlDert walker
Advent Christian Vil-
lage is honored to have
,.,.d.il 120 veterans of the
armed forces living within
the community. Two of
Dowling Park's outstand-
ing men are WWII veter-
ans who have received the
Purple Heart.
Edgar Melton served
in the Army for 3 years,
eventually earning the
rank of Technician 5th
Grade. He served in the
749th Tank Battalion.
His outfit served in Eu-
rope at the height of the
conflict. In fact, he was
supposed to be at Nor-
mandy during the inva-
sion of Omaha Beach,
but his outfit had to hold
back for some of their
equipment to arrive.
Melton states that he be-
lieves the delay saved
his life. On June 10, 1945,
however, he was part of
a tank convoy that was
traveling through Lan-
genburg, Germany
when enemy planes be-
gan strafing his convoy.
Melton raised up to close
the hatch on his tank just
as a bomb exploded in a
building nearby. Shrap-
nel from the blast went
into his head and right
hand. His wounds were
not life threatening, but
they earned him a 6-
week stay in a hospital
in England. When he
was well, he returned to
his battalion and re-
mained with them until
the end of the war.
Along with the Purple
Heart, Melton also
earned the Bronze Star
and a Good Conduct
medal.
Albert Walker served
in the Army for 3 years
in the 195th Field Ar-
tillery Battalion. He also

Real Estate,
Wills & Trust


Hal


A.


Airth
ATTORNEY AT
LAW
112 West Howard Street
P.O. Box 448
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office: 386-362-4912
Residence: 386-362-4654
Fax: 386-364-4915
565538-F


served in Europe, and
earned the rank of Tech-
nician 5th Class. Walker
was wounded in the Bat-
tle of the Bulge. On Janu-
ary 1, 1945, he was sta-
tioned in Ardennes, Bel-
gium, where his outfit
was attached to the First
Army, under the com-
mand of British General
Bernard Montgomery.
The battalion's orders
were to hold the bridge
to facilitate the delivery
of supplies. Part of
Walkerfs duty was com-
munications. He and 5
other men were working
in a communications
bunker, when German


Edgar IVIelton
self-propelled guns
came through and fired
rounds into the bunker.
Walker took a shell
splinter in his right leg.
Three of his comrades
were also wounded, two
of whom died. The in-
jured men were trans-
ported to an aide station
and then to a field hospi-
tal 3 hours away. From
the field hospital, Walk-
er was sent to Paris and
then moved again to
England for recovery.
When able, he rejoined
his battalion and re-
mained with them for
the rest of the war. Walk-
er also earned a Good


Conduct medal for his
tour of duty.
These are just two of
the courageous vets rep-
resented in the Village
community. On Veter-
an's Day each year, ACV
holds a ceremony in
honor of the vets living
there. Each veteran re-
ceives a patriotic pin
honoring his or her ser-
vice to our country. The
small token of apprecia-
tion is offered with
grateful hearts, but it can
never be enough to ade-
quately thank these out-
standing individuals for
the sacrifices they made
in serving our country.


I 7ourfamily serving yours since 1948.



e Sincere Compassion Personal Service
A name you can trust


DANIELS
!iw, Funeral Homes and Crematory, Inc.
^W{1 Live Oak Branford
S f 1126 Ohio Ave. North 408 Suwannee Ave.
',.,-a-- g: 386-362-4333 386-935-1124
eb Page: www.danielsfuneralhome.com E-Mail: danielsfuneralhome@hotmail.com


Advent Christian Village
658-JOBS (5627) (audible recording)
10680 Dowling Park Drive
Live Oak, FL 32060
FTlaundry supervisor in long-term care setting; high school diploma or equivalent and prior laundry
/ supervisory experience strongly desired. Weekend rotation required.
FT/PTCNA for long-term setting; Florida unrestricted certification required; experience with geriatric
population strongly desired.
FT/PTLPNfor long-term setting. Unrestricted LPN license required.
FT Accounting AIR Clerk, high school diploma or equivalent required; AA degree or certificate in
accounting, medical billing, or relevant field strongly desired. Prior experience in insurance billing and
ICD-9 coding, accounting, PC operation with MS applications, including wordprocessor, spreadsheet,
and database required. Must be detail oriented.
FTRN Quality of Care Leader. Unrestricted Florida RN license, excellent clinical nursing/
assessment skills, current CPR certification, verifiable IV skill (start, regulate, maintain, discontinue
IVs) required. Good communication, organizational, and computer skills required; must work as part
of interdisciplinary team to assure outstanding quality of life / quality of care for LTC residents. On-call
rotation required. Management / supervisory experience and knowledge of LTC regs desired.
Generous Benefits for Full-time Positions Include
/ holidays, vacations, and sick time / retirement
/ health, dental, and disability insurance / onsite day care & fitness facilities
/ a chance to join a service-oriented Christian organization
Availability of vacant positions is subject to change.
For the most current listing, please call 658-5627.
Application to some positions at Advent Christian Village can be competitive; satisfaction of prerequisite
requirements determines which candidates are selected for interviews. All offers for employment are conditional
pending the successful results of post-offer/ pre-hire drug screening, TB screening, simple physical examination,
criminal background verification, and reference verification.
565535-F


Live Oak



Tractor Co.

O Hwy. 129 South, Live Oak
386-362-1113 A\

ti *" l iDeere.54




im Davis

Certified Public Accountant

Village Square
Advent Christian Village
Dowling Park, Florida

Tax Services
Investment & Financial Planning
Accounting & Bookkeeping
Services

Ph: 386-658-1433
565516-F

"If you can't live at home, this is the
next best place to live! Everyone here
is so good to the residents."
When you or your loved one need assistance
with the tasks of daily living, consider
Dacier Manor Assisted Living Facility
(ALF #7641). Our loving, qualified staff is
on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. And
our secure, comforting atmosphere allows
our residents to maintain the highest level of
self-care. Our residents enjoy a variety of
activities and a supportive environment. Call us today for more
information or to schedule a free tour. (386) 658-5552

0
ADVENTCHRISTIANVILAGE
AT DOWLING PARK

PO Box 4551 DOWLING PARK, FL 3zo64
(386) 658-5552 1-800-955-8771 TTY
1-800-647-3353 j.
og, www.acvillage.net 565534-F


SMALL BRICK HOME 1568 Sq. Ft., 2BR/2BA, Built in 2004, excellent condition, two car garage,
breakfast room, inside laundry room with storage, screened back porch, rear buffer zone. MLS
#70848, $195,000.


RICK 3/2 split plan, 1888 Sq Ft, landscaped with fruit trees and many flowering
al & Tray ceilings, dining room with breakfast bar, built in central vacuum system,
Dowling Park Area, MLS 68870 $260,000. 565544-F


CYAN ppO UTA]
MAGENTA M- *M*Mu


CYAN Odwm-w*,
MAGENTA Even Odd


BLACK


PAGE 13A


BLACK




North Florida


$E newvnew $

MAGENTA Even Odd


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


ON THE FLIPSIDE


HOWTO RECHUS


Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, nf.edRorial@gaflnews.com
Mail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
* Publisher,
Myra Regan, ext. 122



CONTACT US WITH

YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, call us at 386-362-1734
or visit our Web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com



NEWSROOM
* Editor,
Robert Bridges, ext. 131
* Reporter,
Carnell Hawthorne Jr., ext. 134
* Reporter,
Jeff Waters, ext. 133
* Reporter,
Stephenie Livingston, ext. 130



ADVERTISING
* Advertising Manager,
Monja Slater, ext. 105
* Sr. Advertising Representative,
Bill Regan, ext. 160
* Advertising Representative,
Tami Stevenson, ext. 109
* Telesales Ad Representative,
Nancy Goodwin, ext. 103
* Classified/Legal,
Janice Ganote, ext. 102



CIRCULATION
* Circulation Manager,
Angie Sparks, ext. 152
* Circulation
Service Hours, M-F 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
Subscription Rates,
In-county, $33 Out-of-county, $48






Democrat

- ,- .
^ -

Serving Suwannee County Since 1884


The Suwannee Democrat, published
Wednesday and Friday.
Periodicals postage paid at
Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located
at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
FL. Publication number 530180.

"POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL
32064." Annual subscription rate is
$33 in county, $48 out of county and
$48 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.

OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Letters, comments and opinions on
the Viewpoint & Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Suwannee Democrat.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters may be mailed, faxed or
e-mailed to our office. All letters are
read. Not all letters are published.
Letters may be edited to fit available
space. The editor should not alter the
writer's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
the point, an ideal range is 150 to
200 words. Please include your
name, address and day and evening
phone numbers for verification.
Letters MUST be signed. Letters to
the editor can be limited to one
letter per quarter per individual.


RANT & RAVE HOTLINE


Here's your chance to tell everyone what you
think! Callers may dial 208-8314 and leave a
message to express their thoughts, good or
bad, 24/7 about issues and politics, but not
about private individuals or businesses. If you
prefer, you may e-mail your comments to
robert.bidges@gaflnews.com. Your name is
not necessary, but please,
take 30 seconds or less for
your message.
S.m Part of ,
Florida" "


Editor's note: The
Suwannee Democrat
prints the entire arrest
record each week. If your
name appears here and
you are later found not
.,,ai/n or the (. ,.. ,. are
dropped, we will be hap-
py to make note of this in
the newspaper when ju-
dicial proof is presented
to us by you or the au-
thorities.
The following abbrevi-
ations are used below:
SCSO-Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
LOPD-Live Oak Po-
lice Department
FDLE-Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforce-
ment
FHP-Florida Highway
Patrol
FWC-Florida Wildlife
Commission
DOT-Department of
Transportation
OALE-Office of Agri-
cultural Law Enforce-
ment
P & P-Probation and
Parole
USMS-US Marshals
Service
ATF-Department of
Alcohol, Tobacco and
Firearms
DOC-Department of
Corrections

December 10, Aarnell
Moore Dye, 53, 14128
97th Lane Live Oak Fl,
poss. cocaine, 1st app-pd
app per wrs LOPD J.
Roundtree
December 10, Glenn Ed-
ward Ware Jr., 42, 387
N.E. Baughn Street Lake
City Fl, vop(poss-20/poss
paraph), 1st app pd appt
per wrs SCSO T. Donald-
son


December 10, Sarah
Irene Luke, 66, 20981 CR
349 Obrien Fl, battery (do-
mestic), 1st app-pd app
per wrs SCSO- C. Mcinnis
December 10, London
Ray Chapman, 45, 20891
CR 349 Obrien Fl, battery
(domestic), 1st app-pd
app per wrs SCSO C.
Mcinnis
December 10, Brenda
Lee Carter, 38, 405 NW
Scriven Avenue Live Oak
Fl, sale cocaine, poss co-
caine w/i sell, 1st app-pd
app per wrs SCSODTF-F.
Gorski
December 10, Kimberly
Eagan, 24, 327 Justice
Lane Mayo Fl, lafayette co
vop ( grand theft iii crim
mischf), ror per wrs, 1st
app-pd app per wrs P&P
- S. O'Hara
December 10, Paul
Daniel Williams, 36, 798
SW Troy Street Lake City
Fl, vop o/c poss f/a conv
fel, 1st app pd appt per wrs
SCSO-A. Loston
December 10, Robert
Andrew Cason, 40, 21414
139th Drive O'brien Fl,
vop o/c dealing in stolen
property, 1st app-pd app
per wrs SCSO-S. Law
December 10, Andrew
Weaks, 26, 11748 102nd
Terrace Live Oak Fl, vop
o/c poss of controled sub-
stance, $2000.00 or 200.00
to p&p SCSO-R. Ditter
December 11, Kelly
Edward Poole, 36, 20489
25th Road Lake City Fl,
vop o/c battery dom viol
SCSO-D-Allen & T.
Mullins
December 11, Cindy
Marie Allen, 29, 1310
Marian St Live Oak Fl, col
cty wrt fta-dwlsr P&P-
Raymond


LIVING PLANTS,

A GIFT

REMEMBERED! e.
I've never met anyone that doesn't
have at least one plant memory. *
Building a fort in your favorite tree,
your Grandma's sweet smelling
roses, picking grapes as a child or
planting a spring garden with your
Dad. All of these memories bring
back warm feelings of persons or
places that we love. This Christmas
start your own memory by giving a
plant or tree to that favorite person
on your list. Fruit trees, camellias,
Christmas cactus, roses and more
can all be gift wrapped and F
delivered in time for Christmas .
Stop by today and let us help you
select your Christmas memory!
9248 129th Road Live Oak
(386) 362-2333
Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Closed Sunday
"For over 30 Years"
WWW.NOBLESGREENHOUSE.COM
564466-F


December 11, Kimberly
Jean Henderson, 22, 818
Maple St Live Oak Fl, suw
cty wrt vop o/c petit theft,
ham cty wrt fta o/c petit
THEFT SCSO-K. Osborn
December 11, Ricky
Gene Neveils, 40, 9534
116th Place Live Oak Fl,
battery, aggravated assault,
1st app pd appt per wrs
SCSO C. Mcintyre
December 11, Richard
Allen Wood, 53, 13808
217th Rd. Live Oak Fl,
agg. bat. w/firearm(dom.
violence), agg. assault
w/firearm, (domestic vio-
lence) 1st app-pd app per
wrs SCSO-C. Tompkins
December 12, Johnathan
McCoy Adams, 29, 662 E.
Eagle Road, Branford, Fl,
disorderly intox, resist w/o
violence SCSO D. Taylor
December 12, Billy D.
Andrew, 24, 3316 196th
Terr Wellborn, Fl, vop o/c
viol injunction, cash only,
vop o/c poss 20 cannabis,
cash bond col co charges
SCSO CPL D. Manning
December 12, Thomas
John Leahy, 35, 7183 CR
136A Live Oak, Fl, burg of
a dwelling, grand theft iii,
1st app pd app per wrs
SCSO T. Roberts
December 12, James
Michael Marley, 47, 3282
SW Cypress Lake Dr.
Lake City, Fl dui 2nd of-
fense, refusal of breath test
x2, dui w/prop damage,
columbia cty
0801909mma, vop o/c
poss 20g cannabi, 1st app
-pd app per wrs FHP S.
Coody
December 12, Eddie Lee
McFatten, 67, 11380
Brantley Rd, O'Brien, Fl,
agg assault w/deadly weap,
battery domestic violence


BANK of FLORIDA

Santa is coming

to First Federal!

When:
Wednesday, December 23
S9a.m.- 4 p.m.

Thursday, December 24
9 a.m.- 12 p.m.
Where:
First Federal Live Oak
Main Branch
804 S. Ohio Ave.

Happy Holidays from
First Federal!
www.ffsb.com
Member
FDIS rsass


SCSO D. Allen
December 12, Clifford
Dale Scott, 43, 175445 168
St. McAlpin, Fl, dui, 1st
app -pd app per wrs FHP
B. Stuart
December 13, Madison
Marie Close, 19, 675 W.
Jefferson St. Tallahassee,
Fl, dwls/knowingly
OALE-JK Dewey
December 13, Paula
Jeanette Collier, 26, 9077
169t Rd Live Oak, Fl, bat-
tery dom/violence, 1st app
- pd app per wrs SCSO J.
Zimmerman
December 13, Veronica
Ruiz, 29, 701 Duval St.
Live Oak, Fl, battery dom.
viol. 1st app n/a pd per
wrs LOPD-S. Riggs
December 14, William
C. Dicks, 28, 11199 SW
CR 240 Lake City, Fl, vop
(battery 2 cts) SCSO-S.
Law
December 14, Terakia
Rashad Ford, 20, 519 9th
Street Live Oak, Fl, battery
on leo LOPD Sgt. J.
Roundtree
December 14, Justin Ra-
mon Freeman, 23, 612
Irvin Ave. Live Oak, Fl,
sale +20 gms marijuana,
w/i 1000' of a church, poss
+20 gms w/i to sell,
suwannee co wrt SCDTF
F. Gorski


December 14, Marcia
Lynn Grand, 37, 10719
96th Trail Live Oak, Fl,
vop poss of oxycodone
SCSO-S. Law
December 14, Robert
Leroy Habersham, 40, 605
Jones Ferry Rd Ap VV9,
Carborro, NC ftc (battery)
***cash only fine***
SCSO S. Law
December 14, Rossieq
Laparis Jackson, 21, 502
Church Street, Live Oak,
Fl, sale cocaine w/i 1000'
chu, poss cocaine w/i sell,
sale cocaine w/i 1000' chu,
poss cocaine w/i sell
SCODTF F. Gorski
December 14, Nicole
Sallas, 25, 25244 SR 129
O'Brien, Fl, Sent to DOC,
revoked bond in Feb. 4
SCSO D. Falgout
December 14, Lacie
Shantel Smith, 21, 12910
US 90 West Lot 90 Live
Oak, Fl, battery on leo
LOPD J. Roundtree




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Day Day
12/15/09 8,1,6 12/15/09 .4,4,7,7
Night Night
12/14/097,8,9 12/14/09 .8,4,9,5
FANTASY 5
12/14/09 ......... 3,11,12,13,16
MEGA MONEY... 12,22,36,43,12
LOTTO .....10,16,35,40,41,42,2


Love a mystery?
Try locating your ancestors by working on your family
tree. The Suwannee Valley Gciich .il, Society invites
you to join and learn how to find your ancestors.
Membership is $30 for a single member or $35 for a
family. Corporate membership is also available for
donations of $100 or more (tax deductible). Meetings are
held on the first Thursday of each month at 7:00 PM at
the Gcic.lh -..', Center at 215 Wilbur Street SW in Live
Oak. The library is open on Tuesday and Thursday from
9 a.m. until 5 p.m. and the talented folks there will be
glad to help. For more information call Jinnie or Alice at
386-330-0110.


Suwannee County

Fire/Rescue calls

for service for Dec. 6 Dec. 12

Total calls for service: 103


Medical Calls; 81
Weakness: 9
Cardiac: 9
Trauma: 7
Motor vehicle crash: 18
Miscellaneous medical
call: 10
Altered mental status: 3
Respiratory: 8
CVA: 4
OD: 2
Nausea/vomiting: 1
Diabetic: 2
Seizure: 2
Abdominal pain: 3


Death: 1
Cardiac arrest: 2

Fire Calls: 22
Vehicle Fire: 1
Motor vehicle crash: 14
Medical assist: 3
Hazmat: 1
Fire Alarm: 3

Volunteer Fire
Responses: 27

Falmouth Volunteer
Rescue Responses: 3


Free Wifi and
Notary & Fax Service Available


NewsStand
Books, Magazines, Fine Cigars & More
* Business Cooking Gaming General Interest Ethnic Women's
Puzzle Sports Health Home Teen Weekly Men's Comics
Top 20 Best Seller Books in Hardcover/Paperback
303 East Howard Street, Live Oak 364-0748







You anit the most in-depth coverage.
the latest neu s and stories that touch home.
We want to give it to you.
1 Year In County
Subscription

$48 1 Year
3 Out of County
Mail or bring payment to:

uumannee ernocrat
P.O. Box 370 211 Howard St. East
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1734 1-800-525-4182 ext. 152
557251-F


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PAGE 2A


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Arrest Record


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North Florida


CYAN
MAGENTA


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


' Tnewtnew
Even Odd

* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Award-winning artist returns to ACV
Flo Love Hernden's Japan-
ese art, Chigiri-e, will be on
display in the Old Pavilion
room in the Phillips Building
on Saturday, Dec. 26 at 3 p.m.
The show will follow a viola
concert at 2 p.m. in the Bixler
Chapel. Jesse Griggs and oth-
er family members will play
classical and holiday music. t ..
Flo gave a Chigiri-e demon-
stration at ACV two years
ago. She is a well-known
"Best of Show" winner at art
shows all over the south and
her works hangs in the office
of the governor of Georgia.


II
II
E l


Flo with a display of her work.


Flo at work on a painting. Courtesy photos


Ov 4rat IA -


~4A


r


Herndon's "Iris."


"Magnolias,"
by Flo Love
Hernden.


Give Two


"Blueflower," by Flo Love Hernden.


ss gUZa FREE Coupons
~2 s~i Times are tough for everyone and we're
,/N &.e here to help! Log on to
www.suwanneedemocrat.com today and
0 7^,2\S** _' 0( scroll down to coupons section. Click the
link and follow the instructions. Coupons
S 7 will be available to print and use. As an
extra value, you can access recipes at the
same site. Cool huh!
E m mm' 522163-F


mai


GoaSces 2009

Jan. 25-26, 2010 Testing 70o.oo
You must attend a registration session.
Wed., Jan. 20th, 2010 9 a.m. or 6 p.m.

Call Lynn Lee at 386-647-4201
to sign up for registration 1

SUWANINEE- C 415 S.W. Pinewood Dr
HAM -TON Live Oak, FL 32064
TECHNICAL CENTER 0386-647-4200 4

Ba57Smm4Lm


A


Presents For Theq

Price Of One! M
a gift subscription to
Suannn^ urrmtrat




One Year Gift Subscription
reg.
Price
9t FREEk
1 S ouou o
;Name
Address
City State_ Zip
Phone_________


Name -
Address
Citv State Zip


P


)hone_
Mail to: *Subscription of lesser value will be free

Poutannm OkmLtrrat
P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064


CYAN
MAGENTA


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6l k n dh n dh4


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North Florida


CYAN newvnew *
MAGENTA Even Odd


PAGE 4A suwannee living


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


sm
on
yea
and
liv


Jimmy and Susan K. Lamb to

celebrate 50th wedding anniversary
Jimmy and Susan Lamb wed in a Ranch in the early 1960s where and at the Suwannee County Jail.
all ceremony in Quitman, Ga. Jimmy ran the farm and helped Sue is an accomplished writer
Jan. 29, 1960. In the last 50 guide young men into productive and was editor of the Suwannee
ars they have lived in Central adults. He later worked as a Democrat for 11 years, spending
d North Florida. The Lambs fannrmer, at a farm products store, as 30 years in journalism. She owned
ed at the Florida Sheriffs Boys a correctional officer for the state the Enterprise Recorder in Madi-
son for a time, was editor of
the Mayo Free Press, worked
with the Jasper News, was
the staff writer for the Florida
Sheriffs Youth Ranches for
several years and is currently
employed with the Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park.
God graciously blessed the
Lambs with four children, the
Rev. Randy Lamb (Ginni
I--Porter Lamb), Kathy Lamb
Hals, Sherry Lamb Burnette
(Carlton Burnette Jr.) and
Roy Lamb (Trudy Dixon).
Their six grandchildren are
Shelly Monroe, the late
Casey Joy Lamb, CJ and
Katie Burnette and Carlena
and Shaundra Dixon.
All friends and family are
invited to be our guests as
Mr. and Mrs. Lamb and their
family celebrate the Lambs'
50 years of marriage with a
reception Saturday, Jan. 2,
2010 from 2 until 5 p.m. in
the Grande Hall at the Spirit
of the Suwannee Music Park
in Live Oak. Your presence
will be the only gift needed
to make this a very special
san K. and Jimmy Lamb occasion.


Su


Schenck Posey
wedding announcement
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Schenck, of Live Oak, Florida,
and Mr. and Mrs. Stanley W. Posey, of Live Oak, Florida,
would like to remind you of the marriage of Lea Jensene
Schenck to William Lee Posey.
Lea and Wil will be married on December 19, 2009 at
Whigham United Methodist Church in Whigham, Geor-
gia.


The Santa


Shop needs

your help


It is time to plan for the
Santa Shop. Last year,
with a community effort,
the Santa Shop provided
gifts to more than 200 stu-
dents in the Students in
Transition program at
Suwannee County Schools.
All the leftover donations,
toys and gifts were donat-
ed to Sparky's Toy Drive.
The need in our commu-
nity is growing, so the
Santa Shop is growing,
too.
This year, we plan to
provide toys & gifts for the
Suwannee County Schools
Students in Transition
(approximately 180 stu-
dents at this time), children
at Guardian Ad Litem (280
children), and all the left-


overs will be given to
Sparky's Toy Drive at the
Live Oak Fire Department
(Sparky's usually provides
gifts for approximately 400
children).
We need toys and gifts
for school-age children (4
to 18 years). With all of us
pulling together, we can
meet the needs of MANY
children in Suwannee
County!
Please talk to your clubs,
businesses, churches, etc.
to get involved!
For more information
please contact Lisa Garri-
son at 386-647-4623, De-
bra Ross at 386-647-4628,
Tammie Williams at 386-
364-7720 or Missy Norris
at 386-364-3789.


In Loving Memory


Duke Peppers

July 18, 1937 Dec. 19, 2005


















Daddy, it seems without you
things have never been the same.
What happened to those lazy days
when I was just a child.
What happened to all those times
when I always looked to you.
Daddy who will I turn to for
answers when life makes no sense.
Who will be there to hold me close
when the pieces just don't fit.
Daddy always know I love you
and as the years come and go
your memory will never fade.

Missing you and always
loving you Daddy!
567432F Jennifer


PAINT &
FLOORING



Q You just put down carpet in
Smy home, what can I do to
keep it looking new longer?


a do for your carpet is to vacuum it
regularly, this removes dirt particles which
can dull the carpet fibers through abrasion.
Soil is the greatest threat to your carpet's
appearance. Using entrance mats will help
trap soil before it's tracked into your
home. Immediately blot up spills, never
rub, scrub or brush the spot. Lastly, clean
your carpet using hot water extraction
before it begins to show traffic patterns. If
you follow these general guidelines your
carpet should continue to look beautiful
for a long time.
1512 South Ohio Avenue, 362-7066
563992-F


Marriage license

applications
The following couples applied for a marriage
license at the Suwannee County Courthouse last
week:

Sidney Cason to Linda Marie Green

Eric Danzelle Billingsley to Chris Lavon
Denice Washington

John Austin Mosley to Nikita Nicole Hand

Christopher Dale Hall Sr. to Jennifer Michelle
McIntyre



Yee Haw Country

Christmas
The Live Oak Christian Church is presenting a unique
Christmas program on December 18. With music, fun and
laughter, we will see the birth of Jesus through a special
kind of country humor. The program will begin at 7 p.m.
The church is located at 1015 Ohio Avenue North. For
more information call the church at 362-1015 or check our
web page at liveoakchristian.org.


LiveOnStage

Theatre

In partnership with First United Methodist Church pre-
sents:

"A Christmas Carol"

Adapted by Greg Oliver Bodine, A surprise Reading

Date: December 18, 2009
Time: 7 p.m.
Place: First United Methodist Church Sanctuary
Cost: Love Offering

Refreshments will be served after performance in the
fellowship hall.


M E R R Y


CHRISTMAS
In order to allow our employees time off to spend with their families
the following deadlines will be in effect:
Midweek Edition. Dec. 23
North Florida Focus Retail Advertising.................................3 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 17
C lassified Line A ds ..................... ....................4............4 p.m ., Thursday, Dec. 17
Legal A dvertising....................................................4............4 p.m ., Thursday, D ec. 17
Retail Advertising (B Section) ..............................................2 p.m Thursday Dec. 17
Retail Advertising (A section) ............ .. .......................2 p.m ., Friday Dec. 18
Weekend Edition. Dec. 25
Retail Advertising (B Section) ......................................... 11 a.m. Monday, Dec. 21
Classified & Legal Line Ads................................ 12 p.m. (Noon), Monday, Dec. 21
Retail Advertising (A section) ........................................ 11 a.m., Tuesday Dec. 22
Have a safe and happy holiday



umwann ermnirrat
211 Howard St. East PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1734 Fax 386-364-5578 566432-F


Memorial service for

Raymond F. Hood


A memorial service will
be held for Raymond F.
Hood at 2:30 p.m. on Sun-
day, December 27 at Fire
Rescue Headquarters next
to the county airport,
13530 80th Terrace, Live
Oak.
In the early hours of De-
cember 27, 1984, Para-
medic Raymond Hood was
responding to a call for
help when he made the ul-
timate sacrifice in the line
of duty for the citizens of
our county.
Ray was hired July 1,
1976 by Suwannee County
Hospital to work as an


EMT. At the time of his
death Ray was the assis-
tant director of the county
ambulance service with
eight years of service.
Our department has pre-
pared a garden and memo-
rial area in honor of Ray
Hood. We invited the pub-
lic to attend the service.
We are looking forward to
sharing memories with
family, friends, and co-
workers. Anyone with in-
formation on the location
and phone number of fam-
ily or co-workers, please
contact Robert Eyer 386-
590-0499.


Florida Guardian

ad Litem Program
New Volunteer Orientation'
How is your voice? Learn how to be the voice for a child
who has been abandoned, neglected or abused. No previ-
ous experience required. You can make an enormous dif-
ference in the life of a child.

Training is FREE!!
Join our team of dedicated volunteers today.
Call (386) 364-7720, ext. 103 for more information.

Columbia County: Wednesday, January 20, 10 a.m. 12
p.m. Lake City Guardian ad Litem office

Dixie County: Friday, January 22, 10 a.m. 12 p.m. Dix-
ie County Public Library

Suwannee County: Monday, January 25, 10 a.m. 12
p.m. Live Oak Guardian ad Litem office

Lafayette County: Tuesday, January 26, 10 a.m. 12 p.m.
Jimmy Barrington Agricultural Complex (USDA)

Madison County: Friday, January 29, 10 a.m. 12 p.m.
Madison County Public Library


National Certified

MEDICAL

SECRETARY


COSMETOLOGY
Now Only
1200 hours for
Hair Design


Classes start Jan. 21st Classes start Jan. 21st


Call 386-647-4210

to Schedule TABE Test


SUWANNEE-

TECHNICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. o
APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING BENEFITS.
ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.


CYAN ppO UTA]
MAGENTA n $nMM


BLACK


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North Florida


MAGENTA Even Odd


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Zack C Hutcheson
August 25, 1940 -
December 9, 2009

ack C Hutcheson,
69, of Live Oak,
Fl Passed away
Tuesday, December 9, 2009
at the V.A. Medical Center,
Lake City, F1 after a short
illness. The Rison,
Arkansas native moved to
Live Oak in 1996 from
Missouri. Mr. Hutcheson
was a U.S. Navy Veteran
Serving During Vietnam
Era and was a Project
Engineer for Gold Kist.
He is survived by his
wife: Polly Hutcheson,
Live Oak, Fl; Three
Daughters: Kelly Savage,
Maryland, Melissa
Claypool, Arkansas, Amy
Hutcheson, Tennessee. One
son: Zackary Hutcheson,
Live Oak, Fl; Seven
grandchildren, One Great
Grandchild; Blake Eric
Bennett, Maryland. and
many other family and
friends.
Daniels Funeral Homes
and Crematory of Live
Oak, F1 is in charge of all
arrangements.

Please sign the
online ...... 7-.. ..- Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.corn
and click on obituaries


Rev. Lorne Arthur Ross
August 20, 1924 -
December 9, 2009

ev. Lome Arthur
Ross died on
December 9,
2009 at Shands Hospital in
Live Oak, Fla. after a brief
illness. "A prince and a
great man as fallen in Israel
today." 2 Samuel 3:38.
Bom in Lowell, MA on
August 20, 1924, Larry (as
he was know to friends and
family) moved to northern
Maine where he came to
faith early. He began
preaching the Gospel at the
age of 14 in small churches
in Maine and Canada. He
was encouraged to attend
the New England School of
Theology (later Berkshire
Christian College) where
he met his wife, Arla
Collins Ross and
eventually received the
B.A. in Theology degree.
During over 65 years of
ministry, he was known as
a gifted evangelist and
pastor with a powerful
preaching style, a great
love of people, a wonderful


sense of humor, a strong
commitment to the truth of
scripture, and a deep
devotion to Jesus Christ.
Many people came to faith
in Christ under his
dynamic speaking at
churches, conferences,
camp meetings, youth
meetings, and special
services from Maine to
California.
He pastored Advent
Christian churches in Eliot,
ME, Auburn, ME (where
he also served as Director
of Central Maine Youth for
Christ), Charleston, WV,
and Hope Church in
Lenox, MA. From 1971 to
1990, he was one of only
three senior pastors in the
51-year history of the
Lenox church. From 1956 -
1970, he was Eastern
Regional Evangelist of the
Advent Christian
denomination a
responsibility that covered
all of New England, New
York, and southeastern
Canada. In 1958, he was
named the first Eastern
Regional Superintendent
and served concurrently
until 1970. He was a
member of the Advent
Christian Home Mission
Board and the National
Advisory Council.
After retiring in 1990, he
did interim pastoral work
in Torrington, CT, Four
Oak, NC, Iberia, MO, and
Panama City, Fla. He has
been a resident at the Good
Samaritan Nursing Home
in Dowling Park, Fla. since
2006.
Throughout his years of
ministry, he was an avid
sportsman and enjoyed
playing softball, and golf,


following his beloved
Boston Red Sox, and
delighted in the frequent
visits of family and friends.
He leaves his dear wife
of over 64 years, Arla
Collins Ross, two brothers,
Daniel Swim of Nova
Scotia, Canada, Raybon
Swim, Jr. of Hartland, NB,
four sons and daughters-in-
law: Wesley and Suzanne
Ross of Lenox, MA, Rev.
David and Shirley Ross of
Taylorsville, NC, Rev.
Brent and Janie Ross of
Loganville, Ga., and Steve
and Deb Ross of Albany,
NY. He also leaves eight
grandchildren and four
great grandchildren.
A memorial service will
be held on Thursday,
December 17, at 2 p.m. at
Bixler Memorial Advent
Christian Church in
Dowling Park, Fla., with
family visitation to follow.
In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to
the Berkshire Institute for
Christian Studies, PO Box
1888, Lenox, MA 01240.
1 Thessalonians 4:13-18

Please sign the
online .. .... i i Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.corn
and click on obituaries


Louise Johnson Housend
September 30, 1929 -
December 12, 2009

ouise Johnson
Housend, 80,
Live Oak, FI
passed away Sunday,
December 12, 2009 after a
short illness. The Live
Oak, Fl native moved back
to Live Oak 32 years ago


from Jacksonville, Fl.
She is survived by her
daughter: Robyn Bass,
Live Oak, Fl; four sisters:
Eloise Congdon,
Jacksonville, Fl, Barbara
Ross, Mayo, Fl, Betty
Campos, Jacksonville, Fl,
Alice Faye Bondron, Live
Oak, Fl; two brothers:
Hinton Johnson, Jr.,
Mexico Beach, Fl, Bobby
Johnson, Live Oak, Fl; one
grandson: Billy Gamble,
Live Oak, FI and numerous
nieces and nephews.
Daniels Funeral Homes
& Crematory, Inc. Live
Oak is in Charge of All
Arrangements.

Please sign the
online....i. ,7-. ..i Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.corn
and click on obituaries


Speci inO in
Microdermabrasion,
Acid Peels, Deep Pore
Cleansing, Speciality
Facials with Hard Mask
Pevonia Botanicals
Clarisonic Pro and
* Kendra products in our spa
Massage Therapy also available
CALL TODAY
362-4630
536102-F

ASK DR. MANTOOTH


Q:What's the difference between a
canker sore and a cold sore?
A: The main difference is that canker
sores appear inside the mouth. Cold
sores, sometimes called fever blisters,
appear around the lips and under the
nose. A canker sore is a small ulcer with
a white or gray base and a red border.
Canker sores are not contagious. Their
cause is uncertain, although it's been
determined that fatigue, stress or
allergies can increase their likelihood.
Immune system problems, viruses or
bacterial imbalance may also be
involved. They generally heal on their
own after a week or two. Over-the-
counter anesthetics may be helpful in
their treatment, as may an antimicrobial
mouthwash.
Cold sores are groups of fluid-filled
blisters. Cold sores caused by herpes
virus type 1 are very contagious. When a
person is infected with herpes, the virus
stays in the body. In some people the
virus may stay inactive. Stress, sunburn,
a skin abrasion or a fever may bring on
an outbreak of cold sores. Cold sore
blisters usually clear up in about a week.
You should talk to your dentist, though,
because prescription anti-viral
medication may be appropriate.
Presented as a service to the community by
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH, D.D.S., P.A.
602 Railroad Ave.
Live Oak, FL
362-6556
(800) 829-6506 9


PPO UOA3

MAGENTA $ M M


Gloria Ann Mindermann

December 11, 2009

M ps. Gloria Ann
Mindermann,
43, of Live
ak, FL passed away
Friday, December 11, 2009
at her residence.
Gloria was born in
Jacksonville, Florida, she
was preceded in death by
her father Wendell S.
Calkin, Sr. and was a dairy
farm worker, and of the
Baptist Faith.
She is survived by her
mother; Shirley Ann Gay
(Edward) of Mayo, FL her
brother; Wendell S.
Calkins, Jr. (Tammy) of
Mayo, Florida, sister;
Shirlene Cherry, of
Newark, Ohio and several


BLACK


other family members also
survive. Memorial service
will be held at ICS
Cremation and Funeral
Home, at 2:00 pm on
Thursday, December 17,
2009 with Brother Craig
Williams, officiating.
Friends are invited to call
Thursday, December 17,
2009 from 1-2pm until
time of serivce, at the
funeral home. Cremation
memorial service is under
the care and direction of
ICS Cremation and Funeral
Home, Lake City, FL 386-
752-3436.

Please sign the
online .. .... .7-.,.. Go to
www. suwanneedemocrat. corn
and click on obituaries


Back at full strength
With newly appointed District 3 representative David Burch, the Live Oak City Council is
once again operating with five members. The council lacked a council member from that
district for about three months after the passing of Ken Duce in September. Front row from
left: Mayor Sonny Nobles and Council President Mark Stewart. Second row, from left:
Burch, John Hale, Ed Rewis and City Clerk Jimmy McCullers. Back row: Councilman Ben-
nie Thomas. Photo: Shannon Court


BLACK


PAGE 5A


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i, _AUTOHOME*LIFE



JOHN WIGGINS, Agency Mgr. WANDA O'NEAL, Career Agent
JOHNNY BASS, Career Agent KEVIN GREENE, Career Agent

S407 South Dowling Ave. 308 SW Drane St.
SLive Oak Branford

362-1274 935-1274 EU
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details. All product guarantees are based on the financial strength and claims-paying ability of Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company.




North Florida


CYAN ewe .ew*,

MAGENTA Even Odd


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


Viewpoints/Opinions


BIBLE VERSE
"But the angel said to her, 'Do not be afraid,
Mary, you have found favor with God. You
will be with child and give birth to a son, and
you are to give him the name Jesus. He will be
great and will be called the Son of the Most
High. The Lord God will give him the throne
of his father David, and he will reign over the
house of Jacob forever; his kingdom will never
end.'"- Luke 1:30-33



umwannue


Ormocrat


MYRA C. REGAN
Publisher


ROBERT BRIDGES
Editor


Members of the Suwannee Democrat
editorial board are Myra C. Regan, publisher,
and Robert Bridges, editor. Our View,
which appears in Friday's editions of the
Democrat, is formed by that board.






A holiday


salutation

By Jim Holmes
So, how are you greeting folks in the Suwan-
nee Valley this holiday season? "Merry Christ-
mas?" "Happy Holidays?" Or how about,
"Seasons Greetings?"
This has become an issue of considerable
concern to many. At the public forefront may
be Fox News star Bill O'Reilly, but he certain-
ly is not alone in being angry or upset about the
current trend of replacing "Merry Christmas!"
with other, more secular greetings. In fact,
when I Googled the issue on the Internet re-
cently, I found more than three million articles
and comments dealing with the subject.
Most of the frustration comes from a feeling
that Christmas is already too secularized and
using salutations other than "Merry Christmas,"
furthers the trend.
I can certainly see why folks would come to
that conclusion. I mean, from Thanksgiving
until Dec. 25, we have commercial radio sta-
tions playing, what many of us would call,
"Christmas music" 24 hours a day. Yet few of
the selections deal with the Nativity itself. In-
stead, the vast majority of the music is all about
Santa, Rudolph or roasting chestnuts.
Those who see nothing wrong with using
greetings other than "Merry Christmas" point to
the fact that the US is much more religiously di-
verse now than it was 50 years ago. And they
too have a valid point.
Think about it for a moment. You leave your
Sunday morning church service and stop to buy
gasoline at a convenience store owned by a
Pakistani-born Muslim. Sunday lunch is at a
Chinese restaurant where your waitress is Bud-
dhist. And while you are there, you spot your
dentist who is Jewish and your physician who is
a practicing Hindu from India. Am I inadver-
tently insulting these folks and their religions
by wishing them Merry Christmas?
In the hope that doesn't occur, I try to ac-
commodate all. If I know someone is a Christ-
ian, I wish them a "Merry Christmas" otherwise
it will be "Happy Holidays."
But that leads me to this question. When we
debate holiday salutations, are we expending
our energies in the best way possible? Or,
should we be less concerned about what greet-
ing we use and pay more attention to the intent
of our salutation, regardless of its wording?
In Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare wrote,
"That which we call a rose, by any other name
would smell as sweet." I would think the same
should be also true with our holiday greetings.
This is the one time of year when "good will
toward all men" is at the forefront of our col-
lective psyche. And so, to me, it should be at
the heart and sole of any greeting we give. Oth-
erwise, our utterance no matter what the
words has little value.
So I invite you to join me in reflecting on
what your greeting really means in your heart.
As for me, I have come to the conclusion that
when I give a holiday salutation no matter
what the wording, I am trying to express one,
simple wish:
No matter what your religious belief, may
you somehow know God's peace.
Jim Holmes lives in Live Oak.


Please address letters to: Letters
To The Editor, Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Please include your full name, address and daytime
phone number. We ask this so we can verify your
letter and discuss any questions about it with you.


OPINION


Collusion again our youth


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By State Rep. Debbie
Boyd (D-Newberry)
According to recent
news reports, Tea Party ac-
tivists are angry over the
recent Sunrail/Tri-rail deal
just passed by the Florida
Legislature.
And they have every
right to be.
The Governor is pre-
pared to sign a new law
that will not only create a
brand new bureaucracy, but
will allow that new bureau-
cracy to buy 61 miles of an
existing rail corridor and
pay fifteen times the na-
tional rate in the process.
No, that is not a typo.
The state will be buying a
private rail line for $10
million per mile. Accord-
ing to at least one Senator
involved in this issue, the
national average for such
purchases is around
$700,000 per mile. It is
also not a typo that during
these tough economic
times, we created a new


government bureaucracy
that will operate without
legislative oversight. This
bureaucracy will be al-
lowed to negotiate this and
other (presumably) bad
deals. (I offered an amend-
ment to ensure that this
new bureaucracy was an-
swerable to the legislature,
but oddly leadership struck
that down.)
Why would anyone
agree to such a bad idea?
Florida lawmakers were
told that passing this bill
would create jobs and it
help ensure we get billions
in federal dollars for future
projects.
When I heard this news
about jobs, I was honestly
encouraged. Our state
needs good jobs and
Floridians need work more
than they need another so-
cial welfare program. Un-
fortunately, when I read the
bill, I learned that the
rhetoric about jobs simply
did not match the reality.
In fact, this bill does noth-
ing to guarantee that Flori-
da's citizens will be hired
for any of the jobs. To
make this point even clear-
er, I supported an amend-
ment to ensure job prefer-
ence for real Floridians it
too was struck down. In
the end, it appeared to me
that it was highly likely
that not a single citizen liv-
ing in North Florida was


, $ ."CopyrightedMaterial. -

, Syndicated Content 0

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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likely to get a job from this
deal. I for one am not
about to support a measure
that will allow foreign cor-
porations the ability to im-
port workers to our state
and displace citizens who
live here and pay taxes
here.
And speaking of taxes,
the idea that we should do
this because bureaucrats in
Washington D.C. may (and
I mean MAY...because
there were no guarantees)
give us more money later
on just felt wrong. Why
should we once again be on
bended knee to Washing-
ton? Why are some law-
makers suddenly support-
ive of running up the na-
tional debt (we are, after all
Americans who have to pay
back that debt) because
someone told us it is a good
deal?
Where did our state's



LETTER TO
To the Editor:
As chairman of the
Live Oak Partnership
Downtown Revitaliza-
tion Board I would like
to thank the businesses
and community mem-
bers that participated in
the recent Live Oak
Lights event.
This event was de-
signed to offer a small
town celebration of the
holiday season. One that
the local community
would come and support
its downtown business
community. Several
merchants have stated
that they were pleased
with this event, and with
an estimated 200 in at-
tendance, plans are al-
ready underway for the
next year.
Businesses were asked
to decorate their store-
fronts for this event,
most of which did so. It
really brightens up the
holiday season to see so
many merchants partici-
pating in this way.


leadership take a wrong
turn? This is supposed to
be a time of tightening our
belts, cutting the budget
and putting Florida citizens
back to work. Instead,
House and Senate leader-
ship and now our Governor
are prepared to buy into
this boondoggle, costing
Florida taxpayers billions
while becoming a willing
participant in running up
the federal debt. They are
creating a new government
bureaucracy that will be al-
lowed to spend taxpayer
dollars with no legislative
oversight and yet, there
were high fives all over the
Capitol.
Yes, Tea Party and other
conservative activists have
very good reasons to be an-
gry and frustrated over
those high fives. I applaud
their anger and share their
frustration.



THE EDITOR
I especially want to
thank the City of Live
Oak for assisting in the
decorating of Millenni-
um and Veteran's Parks.
Special thanks are ex-
tended to Mayor Nobles,
Shannon Court, George
Curtis, his wife Christi-
na, and the OMI crew.
Entertainment for the
evening was provided by
Melody Christian
Church. Free rides were
given on the Christmas
Carriage of Sunset Wag-
on & Carriage Company,
and of course special
thanks are extended to
the Live Oak Fire De-
partment and author, Jef-
frey Boatright for coor-
dinating Santa Claus's
visit.
Again, thanks are ex-
tended to everyone that
played a part in this
event. I look forward to
what the citizens of Live
Oak can do... by partner-
ing together to get the
job done.
Randy S. Torrance


MAGENTA n $M Mu


PAGE 6A


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_- "C* opyrighted Material -



- _" fSyndicated Content .


Available from Commercial News Providers.


- -W -ft



GUEST COLUMN

Rail deal was a boondoggle from day one


BLACK




North Florida


CYAN Ondww *,
MAGENTA Even Odd


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Branford News
Serving southern Suwannee County, including Branford, O'Brien and McAlpin



Keeping up with Rotary

Scenes from recent Rotary Club of Branford events.


Rotary Club tour of Suwannee American Cement. SEE MORE PHOTOS, PAGE 9A


Branford Shriners hold Christmas dinner


Pictured is the Brantord Hign bcnool Culinary Arts Class, led Dy Julie Deas (btn from leftt. Ie bnrine Club paid tor all tood/materials and the students got the practical experience.
From food preparation to serving, to clean up, everything was done in a very professional manner. This educational training should prove useful in the students' future endeavors.
Courtesy photos


Toys for Kids + overwhelmed

with requests


Pictured in forefront is Leonard and bana uouglas along with Big Jonn Bryant, his wire
Mary and their guest Christina Cannon. Everyone was enjoying their meals, but stopped
long enough to pose for this photograph.


Submitted
Branford Shrine Club members,
their ladies and guests recently held
their annual Christmas dinner at the
Depot Clubhouse. The dinner was


catered by the Branford High School
Culinary Arts School, led by Julie
Deas. The group served up a deli-
SEE BRANFORD SHRINERS, PAGE 8A


Many kids still aren't
covered, say organizers
By Roger L. Burnside
Toys for Kids+ needs your help
badly. Christmas is a time of joy and
celebration. Unfortunately, there are
many children in the Branford area
that will be missing the joy of re-
ceiving Christmas presents. We are
in need of toys, clothes and in some
cases, food for these children.
With the economy the way it is
right now we are experiencing more
requests than in past years. No dona-
tion is too small, if you can just pro-
vide one toy, a box of food, a winter
coat or shoes it will be greatly appre-
ciated.


Anyone interested in helping us
with this project can take their dona-
tions to the Branford Health Depart-
ment. Thompson Custom Homes at
3554 256th St., O'Brien has agreed
to be an additional drop off site for
donations. You may also call Karen
at the Branford Health Department at
386-935-1133 or Roger Burnside at
386-935-3343.
Should you know of a child in
need you may also call these num-
bers.
Over the years the folks in the
Branford area have brought a lot of
joy to the area's children and their
families, for this we thank each and
every one of you. The smiles and ap-
preciation the children express each
year make this project a blessing to


I D X Legal Notices .......10B Suwannee Livi...... 4A HI 74L 56 Follow us on
I X Obituaries ............ 5A Viewpoint ........... .6A PAGE 2B FACEBOOK
PAGE 2B FACEBOOK


MAGENTA $MM


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PAGE 7A




North Florida


CYAN OdwlAw*,
MAGENTA Even Odd


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


Branford News


O'BRIEN AND OUR NEIGHBORS


'Bits & Pieces from


south Suwannee County


By Ana Smith
It's been a very hectic
week for a lot of us, and
there's been quite a lot of
activity in and around
Suwannee County. But
the past few days have
sure tested my patience
and my faith. After sev-
eral days of getting our
craft projects finished
and baking cookies and
cakes for our booth at the
Branford Christmas
event, it was a dismal
day of nothing but rain,
rain and more rain. To
top it all off, the batteries
in my wheelchair ran
down ... naturally it had
to happen at the end of
the week ... and I felt so
bad Sunday from getting
wet and chilled that I
wasn't able to participate
in our Christmas program
at church or attend the
children's program Sun-
day night. Guess that
was inevitable, but it cer-
tainly put a damper on
my Christmas spirit.
On the up side, I did
get to meet and talk with
the members of "Main-
stream," the group that
provided music at the
Branford Christmas
event, and I enjoyed their
music and their enthusi-
asm for praising Our
Lord in their songs. If
you see them advertised
at any of our local
churches, I hope you'll
go listen to them. And I
was able to talk a little
bit with a dear local resi-
dent, Audrey Howell,
meet Karen Terry and
Mamie Johnson, and talk
to the few other souls
who came out to see
what was going on. Two
young teens got up on
the stage and sang for us,
but I didn't get their
names. I hope their pic-
tures are in this newspa-
per along with more
news of the event, rained


out as it was.
I also had a chance to
reconnect with a man
who has worked very
hard in recent years to
make Christmas as happy
as it can be for local
families here in our part
of Suwannee County who
wouldn't otherwise have
a Merry Christmas. This
year, if you have read
Roger Burnside's column
"Toys for Kids," you
know the need for your
help in the Branford area
is even more urgent than
ever. The number of fam-
ilies suffering from the
economic crunch ... lost
jobs, fewer work hours,
higher gas prices for
transportation to work,
and higher food costs,
etc. ... has taken its toll
on more families than
usual.
The donations of items
targeted for teens is the
most critical right now,
but if you can give a gift
card or make a money
donation, no matter what
the amount, it will enable
Roger and his team to get
the items most needed. I
talked with Roger this
past Saturday when he
stopped at our booth, and
with Christmas less than
two weeks away, the
need is still pressing. If
you can help in any way,
whether with providing
the items most needed, or
with cash or gift card,
please call Karen at the
Health Department at
386-935-1133, Roger at
386-935-3343, or bring
your donation to the
health department in
Branford or to Thompson
Custom Homes at 3554
256th Street, O'Brien, a
new drop-off site for do-
nations.
Put a smile on the face
of a child, and a family,
who otherwise won't be
experiencing a Merry


Christmas this year. And
God bless you for reach-
ing out to those less for-
tunate in our community.
If you are in Lake City
this Saturday, Dec. 19,
stop by the Suwannee
County Animal Shelter's
booth in the mall and say
hello to the volunteers
and the 'furry friends'
who will be up for adop-
tion. They will have
some items for sale as
well as literature about
our local shelter.
Last week we said
goodbye to another sweet
lady who went home to
be with our Lord.
Frances Holtzclaw
passed away on Dec. 7
after a very long illness.
She was one of those
women who made a pro-
found mark in my life
and my Christian walk.
Her love and dedication
to her family, her church,
her friends, and this com-
munity will be long re-
membered. My heartfelt
sympathy goes to J.M.
and the entire family.
From "Humorous Quo-
tations":
"If humble pie has to
be eaten, the best way to
eat it is to bolt it whole."
"Being a husband is
like any other job ... it
helps if you like the
boss."
"If ignorance is bliss,
then why aren't there
more happy people?"
"One out of four peo-
ple in this country is
mentally imbalanced.
Think of your three clos-
est friends ... if they
seem okay, then you're
the one."
"Blessed are they who
have learned to accept
the impossible, do with-
out the indispensable,
and bear the intolerable."
"The two most impor-
tant things about your in-
come are: make it first,
then make it last."
As the day we cele-
brate the birthday of Je-
sus Christ approaches,
make sure your heart and
your life are decorated to
welcome Him.
God bless!



Christmas

program

at Bethel

Creek
You're invited to
join us in celebrating
the birth of our Savior
on Sunday evening,
Dec. 20, at 6 p.m.
Following the Christ-
mas presentation,
there will be a time of
fellowship with cook-
ies and punch.


Branford Shriners hold

Christmas dinner


Continued From Page 7A

cious meal in a profes-
sional manner. A choice


of prime rib or chicken
cordon bleu was offered
and from all comments,
both were excellent. For


dessert, the group served
delicious cheesecake or
succulent chocolate
pound cake with coffee.


Members and ladies enjoying their meal. From left: James Rogers, Lori Rogers, Nancy See
and Bob See seated at one of the beautifully decorated tables.


GRADY' S
,* .AUTOMOTIVE
500 West Howard Street (US 90), Live Oak
35 86-362-40012


Masonry
Classes
Open
Enrollment
Call
386-647-4210
for more

information.


HAMILTON
TECHNICALCENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 647-4210


Building
Construction
Open
Enrollment
Call
386-647-4210
for more

information.


HAMILTON'
TECHNICALCENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 647-4210


CYAN ppo ue,-
MAGENTA $nM4


PAGE 8A


BLACK


Millers mark 50th

wedding anniversary


Judge and Mrs. Jeff Miller of Kissimmee will celebrate their 50th wedding anniver-
sary. They were married on December 27, 1959 in the Branford Methodist Church.
Mrs. Miller is the former Laura Ruth Jones of Branford, daughter of the late Oscar
and Mildred Jones. The Millers enjoy frequent visits to their home in Mayo. Family
and friends are invited to an informal celebration reception honoring their anniver-
sary. The reception will be in Kissimmee on Sunday, December 27, 2009, at the Or-
ange Blossom Masonic Lodge located near the Lakefront at 321 Dakin Avenue from
2-4 p.m.
- Courtesy photo


Christmas Sale
Dec. 14-24, 2009
Stop by and see our wide variety of gifts sure to
be on everyone Christmas List. 1-1 .hinn.. everyone
a safe and blessed Christmas holiday!

Byrd's Power Equipment
11860 E. U.S. 27, Branford, FL 32008
Hours: Mon.-Fri.7a.mrn.-5 p.m. (3Q6\ 95C C54
Closed Saturday until Spring (386) 935-1544


SUWANNEE RIVER READINGS
Branford 2009


The water levels provided here refer to the height at the US Hwy. 27 bridge
in Branford in feet above mean sea level (ft-msl) at the gauging station. In
the past the levels were read as gauge height not mean sea level.
Dec. 09,'09 10.95 Dec. 12,'09 11.15
Dec. 10,'09 11.01 Dec. 13,'09 11.35
Dec. 11,'09 11 Dec. 14,'09 11.56
Dec. 15,'09 11.68
Sponsored By:


SCAFF'SSupermarket
Branford 386-935-1527
525103-F


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North Florida


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


CYAN
MAGENTA


Branford News



Keeping up with Rotary


BHS Principal Ted Roush addressing Rotary.


Branford Elementary Student Council officers at lunch with Rotary recently.


Jonn and Irannie Lacquey of tne Rotary UluD ot Brantora as part oT a bnelterBox team in
El Salvador.


John and Trannie Lacquey with two other members of the ShelterBox team, Andy Biss and
Ben Spurway from the United Kingdom.


Roger Burnside with Trannie Lacquey receiving Christmas gifts for kids from Rotary Club The men of the Rotary Club of Branford packing Christ's boxes to send to members of the
of Branford. Courtesy photos military serving in Iraq.


Byrd's Power Equipment
Sales & Service
All Makes & Models
;- Husqvarna--- HUSTLER
Dealer Turf Equipmen

CLOSED SATURDAYS UNTIL SPRING
11860 E. U.S. 27, Branford, FL 32008
Hours: Mon.-Fri. (386) 935-1544
7a.m.-5p.m. 3 93 525122-F
PHONE
P.H.935-1442
ESTABLISHED 1904

Badcok&more
HOME FURNITURE 10 .
It's SoEasy.
P.O. BOX 518
OWNER 903 SUWANNEE AVE.
TIM VERDI BRANFORD, FL 32008
525158-F


Mini-Storage
Large and Small Units
Reasonable


386-935-0298
525190-F


386-935-2122


GILCHRIST .NORTH FLORIDA 83 pmr DURON
BUILDING SUPPLY INC. OF BRANFORD's WILLIAMSON'S
Now accepting TR EE SERVICE
Serving the commu Blue Cross Blue Shield Complete tree removal,
s ince 1979 Complete tree removal,
since 1979 Health Options trimming, pruning, stump grinding,
_i Mon.-Fri.7 a.m.- 5:30p.m.; Everything For Your Home Recovery haul off, and bobcat service.
Sat. 8 a .m.-3 p.m. From Prescriptions to Medical Supplies Hazardous trees our specialty.
Swwwgilchrist.doitbest.com Serving your area for over 10 years.
101 S.W. US Highway 27 Licensed and insured free estimates
Hwy 129 Bell, FL Lumbert florida 3200
erBranford, Florida 32008 Call 352 318 3810 or 3886 835 2180
Phar0acist 525194-F (386) 935-6905 564016-F

Daniels Funeral Homes CLASS "A" COLLISION INC.
"The Wrecksperts"
C Specializing In Heavy Collisions
Pre&C emato n Quality Guanteedl
a nInsurance Preferred Shop
Unibody & Frame Straightening
24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE Branford 386-935-1124 Major Credit Cards Accepted.
*Automatic Fuel Delvery Prompt installation & Repair Live Oak 386-362-4333 F,
*Safety TrainedProfessionals Easy Payment Plans James (Jim) B. Daniels, III, L F D.
C. Keith Daniels, L.F.D.
Customer Satisfaction 502 SUWANNEE AVE. SW BRANFORD ( Larry Keith Daniel FREE ESTIMATE Shop 386-935-9334
htp1 wwsb obptaa 7cor m3 Som J.B1 Daniels, Jr.Shop3869359334
sAN mpm 386-935-1728 l=S (Local) Family Owned & Operated TED or TERESA LAWRENCEx 386-935-0464
301 Suwannee Ave., P.O. Box 519 FX 386-935-0464
525152-F _*_ 525127-F Branford, FL. 32008-0519 525154-F

ZEE ANGEL To advertise your

BAGEL CAFE business here, call
907 N. Suwannee Ave., Branford Rhonda at
386-935-1123 386-362-1734 for


2656-F more information
52511~ I -F


CYAN
MAGENTA


PPO UOA:]
6l k n dh n dh4


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' Tnewtnew

Even Odd

SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


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PAGE 9A


.loll-


I


I





North Florida


CYAN ,ew.n ew *
MAGENTA Even Odd


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


When parents show an interest in their child's education, the
students have higher grades, test scores, graduation rates, better
attendance, better self-esteem and increased motivation.


Bridget Hemphill from Kelli Williams' first-grade class with her study cubby. Courtesy photo


Parent U

Submitted
"Hope for the ability to
help their children learn."
Those were the words
that parent Dawn Fralick
used to describe the faces
of parents as they left the
Suwannee Primary School
recently following the first
Parent University at SPS
workshop.
"I have a passion for
parents," said Lisa Garri-
son, Suwannee County
Schools Parent Liaison. "It
touched my heart when
Ms. Fralick told me that
she watched the parents
walk into the workshop
with a hum-drum look on
their face, but once the
workshop was over, their
faces were lit up with
'hope of the ability to help
their child learn.' Those
words let me know that all
the work and planning that
went into this pilot pro-
gram at SPS were well
worth it."
The Parent University
Pilot Program at SPS was
created to bridge the gap


university

between home and school
by giving parents tips and
supplies needed to rein-
force learning at home.
Decades of research have
proven that when parents
show an interest in their
child's education, the stu-
dents have higher grades,
test scores, graduation
rates, better attendance,
better self-esteem and in-
creased motivation.
Parents arrived at 5:45
p.m. to register their chil-
dren in child-care and
headed straight to their
child's classroom where
their child's teacher wel-
comed them. On their
first night, all parents re-
ceive a "parents are teach-
ers too" canvas tote bag, a
dry erase marker board,
pen and eraser, a parent
portfolio, which is a note-
book to keep all their ac-
tivities and information or-
ganized, and a parent uni-
versity passport, which is
stamped each time they at-
tend. These items will be
used throughout the six-


program
month program. If the
parents attend four out of
the six workshops, they
will graduate from the par-
ent university program and
be honored at a dinner and
graduation ceremony in
May.
At each workshop
teachers begin with a brief
presentation on a main
topic. Parents are taught
different math and reading
concepts that their chil-
dren are learning daily at
school. The parents are
then incorporated in activ-
ities and games to rein-
force the concepts for
home.
Back in October the
main topic was CHAMPS,
the behavioral manage-
ment program used in all
of the Suwannee County
schools. During the No-
vember workshop, parents
watched a video of Garri-
son and her son, Cade (a
second grader at SES) in
their kitchen, modeling
tips about homework time
and creating a study area


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at SPS making a difference


at home. Following the Scho
video, parents and stu- are p
dents made their own work
study cubby together to be and I
used in the household. appr
"The Parent University Ov
was awesome, my hus- care
band and I were both able Suw;
to attend and we were ed th
amazed," said Fralick. "I 145
guess I didn't realize what work
goes on in the classroom. "A
The teacher shared so the p
much information and give
helpful tips to help our parel
daughter Bailey at home. Garri
We cannot wait for the danc
next one." will
Suwannee Primary mile


Free Christmas
dinner
Faith in Christ Anglican
Church and the Christian Mis-
sion in Action will be sponsoring
the free annual Christmas Dinner
this year.
The dinner will be a tradition-
al Christmas dinner with all the
fixings. We will have turkey,
ham, beans, sweet potatoes,
greens, cranberry sauce and
desserts.
There will be singing, gifts,
and a gospel message.
We will also have a prayer
team circulating for individual
prayer needs.
The dinner will be served from
11 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Dec. 19 at
the Suwannee County Coliseum.
Every one is welcome and this
dinner is free to all.


ol faculty and staff
putting a lot of hard
into this program
the parents seem very
eciative.
ver 180 parents and
givers of students at
annee Primary attend-
he first workshop, and
attended the second
shop.
, big thanks go out to
parents and the care-
rs who came to the
nt university," said
ison. "Their atten-
e shows that they are
ng to go the extra
to show their child


they care about their edu-
cation."
A reminder to parents:
check your child's back-
pack every day, ask your
child about school, review
their spelling words, make
sure their homework is
done, and remember, par-
ents are teachers too! For
more information call Gar-
rison at 647-4623.
Organizers would like to
thank First Federal, The
Florida Diagnostic and
Learning Resources Sys-
tem (FDLRS), Key Club,
Interact, and all the pre-
senters and volunteers.


Community happenings

at Grace Manor
Christmas dinner on a budget
Grace Manor Community Center and Restau-
rant is offering a free workshop offered in coop-
eration with the Suwannee County Extension Of-
fice. Learn how to prepare a healthful, festive
Christmas dinner without breaking the bank! Join
our staff and volunteers for an afternoon of
hands-on learning and fun. Preregistration is re-
quired. Call 386-330-0144. Saturday, 12/19, 2-4
p.m.

Helping Hands Christmas dinner
Grace Manor Community Center and Restau-
rant is working with Suwannee River Economic
Council to provide hot Christmas meals to local
elderly residents. Grace Manor will be preparing
and delivering these on Christmas Eve day.
Please drop by and see our "Helping Hands
Christmas Tree" for more details on how you can
help feed a senior in need! Grace Manor is locat-
ed at 406 Duval Street NE in Live Oak.


MAGENTA M$M *


PAGE 10A


BLACK


BLACK










WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


North Florida


PAGE 11A


Branford dairy's environmental practices called revolutionary


Continued From Page 1A

cer and business partner in
the Aurora Dairy Group. In
1995, the group set their
eye on a particular farm in
Georgia. As part of a pack-
age deal for that farm, Au-
rora inadvertently came
into possession of a run-
down, environmentally
hazardous farm just south-
east of Branford. The
farms previous owner had
gone bankrupt after being
sued by neighboring resi-
dents for contaminating
the local water supply, ac-
cording to Sumrall. After
taking on themselves the
penalties associated with
the lawsuit, Sumrall and
his partner went about re-
building the troubled farm
from the ground water up.
In 2004, Sumrall bought
out his partner and formed
DPS.
After the formation of
DPS, comprised of four
dairies in the southeast,
Sumrall continued to im-
prove the dairy's system
by changing the way his
dairy viewed its waste.
Rather than a liability, the
waste was now seen as an
opportunity. Solids and
liquids were separated into
streams and facilities was
built to recycle each. The
first facility processes liq-
uids and reintroduces them
into the system through ir-
rigation. The second turns
solids into a marketable
by-product like compost.
The process is simple.
The barns, which house
2,000 cows, are flushed
clean with recycled water
twice daily. Next, liquids
are separated from solids
and sent to the farms
wastewater treatment
plant. Through a chemical
process, nitrogen and
phosphorous particles are
then removed, as are odor-
causing bacteria.
"Seventy percent of ni-
trogen and phosphorus are
removed," said Sumrall.


By removing high per-
centages of nitrogen and
phosphorous, DPS nearly
neutralizes the water used
for irrigation. From here,
the dairy can adjust the nu-
trient level in the recycled
irrigation water to the re-
quirement of the crops.
Therefore, the farm no
longer needs to invest in
artificial fertilizer.
The Branford farm also
recycles sand, which is
used as bedding for the
cows. Sand is non-ab-
sorbent and does not col-
lect harmful bacteria, like
material bedding. Through
recycling, the farm has re-
duced its use of new sand
by 75 percent.
"Sand is the heaviest
particle in hat stream so it
settles out first," Michael
Pedreiro, Sumrall's son-in-
law and DPS executive
vice president and chief
operating officer, said in a
Florida Department of
Agriculture press release.
"We just go in there three
times a day with a front-
end loader, clean it out,
pile it up, let it dewater for
a few weeks, and then we
put it right back into the
stalls again for the cows to
reuse."
Although this system is
revolutionary, it may be
years before other Florida
dairies follow the example,
according to Sumrall.
"The same tcl in ,i ,1 -.1, is
used in municipal waste
systems," said Sumrall.
And as those systems are
scaled to fit large cities or
small towns, the system
used by DPS could be
scaled to use on any size
farm, he continued. "The
issue is that many farms al-
ready have money invest-
ed in other types of sys-
tems."
Starting nearly from
scratch, the Branford farm
required a new waste man-
agement system anyways.
However, DPS went far
and beyond what was ex-


pected. "We did so because
it is no secret that the envi-
ronmental practices of
large farms are kept under
intense scrutiny by the pub-
lic," said Sumrall. "We did
not shrink from that re-
sponsibility."
And the neighbors are
happy.
"We've had no com-
plaints. Everybody is hap-
py," Sumrall said. "The fact
that we are existing the way
we are speaks for itself."
So is the state of Florida.
"Dairy Production Sys-
tems does a wonderful job
of producing not only
some of the highest-quality
dairy products in Florida,
but it does so in an envi-
ronmentally-friendly way
by using recycled water,
reducing its animal waste


products and through its
efficient use of fuel and en-
ergy," said Florida Com-
missioner of Agriculture
Charles Bronson by email.
"It is a model for the dairy
industry."
A representative of DEP
concurred.
"Mr. Sumrall has shown
his commitment to environ-
mental stewardship," said
Jodi Conway, Northeast
District Communications
Manager for DEP, in an
email message. "He has
taken a dairy that was not
in compliance with state
rules and regulations and
turned it into a model facil-
ity. Providing beneficial
reuse of process wastes
means that he is providing
a greater level of environ-
mental protection."


By Carnell Hawthorne Jr.
carnell.hawthorne@gaflnews.com

Richard and Ellen Shelley of Pearl Avenue in Live
Oak were surprised to find three curious visitors in
their backyard Thursday peering in through the din-
ing room window.
Ellen said for about three days she had been hear-


A trio of peacocks dropped into a Suwannee County co
backyard for a visit this week. Here's one of the birds on a r
perch. Photo: Carnell Hawthorne Jr.


The people at DPS are
proud of their accomplish-
ments.
"We want to be a posi-
tive impact on the environ-
ment," Pedreiro said. "And
we take that approach ver-
sus the begrudgingly 'drag
me to where I need to go'
kind of approach. We al-
ways want to proactive ver-


sus reactive. And we take
that approach for every-
thing we do. I think life is
much more enjoyable if
you're proactive than wait
until somebody dictates
what you need to do and
how you need to do it."
In other words, DPS is
leading the herd and plans
to continue doing so.


Drum composer for Cowpeat at Branford dairy. Photo cour-
tesy Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services


ing strange noises outside her home, but couldn't
quite put her finger on the source.
"We pulled back the curtain to the sliding glass
door, and there standing on our back porch were
these three peacocks," said Richard.
Thursday, the camera-shy visitors were leisurely
walking about the couple's backyard and deck.
"We think they might belong to some of the folks
down the road, but we're just not sure,"
17 Richard said. "We called the Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office, and they said an-
imal control would stop by in the mom-
ing."
The three large, brilliantly colored birds
seemed right at home outside the Shelley
residence. At one point, the trio even ven-
tured upon the couple's roof as picture tak-
. ers moved in for a snapshot.
"We wish we could keep them, because
they're just so dam beautiful," said
Richard, but he knows that's not really an
option. The couple has several aging cats,
who for now, don't seem to mind the big
birds. They're keeping their distance from
one another. "I wonder if they've been eat-
)uple's ing the cats' food?" Ellen asked curiously.
ooftop "We just hope that someone claims
them."


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* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


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Following your medical
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By Rob Crankshaw, PhD,
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Youth & Family Services
For the elderly, the
holidays are often bitter-
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for families seeing
loved ones, feasting to-
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dishes, enjoying walks
in the brisk air, making
pumpkin pies and
Christmas cookies,
shopping and anticipat-
ing the surprises that
come with gift giving
and receiving. For the
elderly, though, this can
also be a bittersweet
time. Memories of better
times past, and loved
ones lost, as well as the
perception that they are
on the periphery of fam-
ily activities can leave
them feeling alone and
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today, and older family
members often cannot
join the family tradi-
tions, and the sense of
isolation is compound-
ed. What can you do to
help?
Families can do sever-
al things for their older
loved ones during this
time. First, communica-
tion is essential. Email,
instant messaging, cell
phones, Skype and
Facebook make contact
almost effortless. You
may need to help them
to set up accounts with
these services, as well as
verifying that they are
comfortable with how to
go about using them.
(Writing out the steps is
helpful.) A daily note
with an uploaded photo
can do wonders for
making someone feel in-
cluded and remem-
bered. Have children
make a series of cards
with their own draw-
ings and words, and
mail one every other
day to a grandparent or
great-grandparent who
cannot join the family.
A little time spent in
this kind of communica-
tion pays wonderful
dividends to the older
family member on the
receiving end and
means so much more
than a purchased gift.
In communications,
acknowledge personal
losses rather than avoid-
ing them. For instance,
mentioning that
"Grandpa would have
loved the fall colors this
year," or, "He sure
missed some good
bream-fishing on the


Localban
sudet
perfor m wt


Rob Crankshaw, PhD


umphant times puts our
past in proper perspec-
tive and stimulates a
positive look backward
on our experiences.
If an older person is
still grieving a lost
spouse and is especially
sad over the holidays,
offer to provide some
symbol of their presence
during get-togethers.
Displaying a special
wreath on the door, a lit
candle on the mantle, or
something the deceased
had made or valued (a
carving, painting or
gadget) in a prominent


older adults, if the "holi-
day blues" do not di-
minish within a week or
two, it may actually be
depression. Contrary to
what some people be-
lieve, depression is not a
normal part of aging
and can be effectively
treated, even among the
elderly. Left untreated
depression can cause
health problems and a
decline in self-care ac-
tivities. It is important
to understand however
that older people were
raised in a time when
depression carried a
stigma and it was not
believed to be a real ill-
ness. Many senior
adults are too proud to
ask for help, believing
they should be able to
pull themselves out of
it. Failure only intensi-
fies the feelings of
shame, hopelessness
and aloneness. If you
think your loved one
may be dealing with de-
pression, encourage
them to seek the advice
of a physician or mental
health professional.
Disclaimer: This article
is provided for informa-
tional purposes only and
should not be construed as
specific medical advice.
Please consult with your
physician before making
any changes to your med-
ical care.
Rob Crankshaw is the
VP for Youth & Family
Services at Advent Christ-
ian Village. He holds a
PhD from Florida State
University and is a li-
censed marriage and fami-
ly therapist. In his role at
ACV, he ..,ro counseling
for members of the com-
munity and has developed
programs for youth in-
cluding weekend retreats
for foster children and
Leadership Development
Training for high school
students.


CYAM AGTA UnA

MAGENTA M- *M -*M~u* *


PAGE 12A


BLACK


I PresureWashng lso vaiabl


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AT DOWLING PARK






Clinic: Family Practice, Urgent Care, Geriatric Consultations,
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North Florida


CYAN *,ew Od*
MAGENTA Even Odd


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


Police: Man's blood


SL :.. .ties him to burglary


A Live Oak man was seriously hurt in this crash on CR 136 Friday. Photo: Carnell Hawthorne Jr.


Crash leaves man badly hurt


By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com

A DNA test landed a
Live Oak man in the
Suwannee County Jail
Saturday when blood col-
lected on the window of a
burglarized residence
matched his, according to
sheriff's reports.
Thirty-five-year-old
Thomas John Leahy, of
7183 CR 136A, was
charged with breaking
into a home on 67th Road
on Nov. 19 at around 9
p.m. by breaking out a
rear window. Suwannee
County Sheriff's Deputy
Tommy Roberts respond-
ed to a delayed burglary
at the residence where he
found the window broken
out. He said Leahy ap-
peared to have cut him-
self on the broken glass
due the presence of blood


on several
items in the
residence
"including
the window,
walls, cur-
tains and Thomas
doors inside John
the resi- Leahy
dence."
Roberts said two rings
valued at $5,000, and
$200 in cash was stolen
from a bedroom.
Blood from the resi-
dence was collected and
sent to the Florida De-
partment of Law Enforce-
ment for analysis, which
confirmed Leahy as the
culprit, reports show.
Leahy, who denied in-
volvement, was arrested
and taken to the Suwan-
nee County Jail and
charged with burglary of
a dwelling and grand theft
III.


By Carnell Hawthorne Jr.
carnell.hawthorne@gaflnews.com

A Live Oak man was seriously
injured in a crash Friday afternoon
on CR 136 in Suwannee County.
Douglas Woodruff, 52, suffered
major injuries to the chest and leg
when the Ford Expedition he was


driving left the roadway and
struck a tree at a high rate of
speed, according to Suwannee
County Fire Chief Charlie Conner.
Woodruff was traveling east at
about 2:15 p.m. when the crash
occurred.
"There were no brake marks at
all," Conner said.


It took workers from Suwannee
County Fire/Rescue nearly 10
minutes to free the injured man
from the crushed vehicle. Both
driver's side doors of the vehicle
had to be removed.
Woodruff was transported to
Shands UF, where he was listed in
good condition Tuesday.


The driver of this vehicle was unhurt Thursday evening after a collision with a horse. Photo: Suwannee County Fire/Rescue


Horse killed, driver unhurt in collision


A Live Oak man es-
caped injury when his car
struck and killed a horse


on CR 49 Thursday
evening, Suwannee Coun-
ty sheriff's records show.


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John Delton Dukes was
southbound about a half-
mile past US 90 at 6:50
p.m. when his 1996 AMC
Eagle struck the animal at
about 50 mph, reports in-
dicate. The horse slid up
the hood and shattered the
windshield, but Dukes


was unhurt.
Dukes was judged not
to be at fault in the crash.
Deputies contacted area
residents but no one
claimed ownership of the
horse. Suwannee County
Animal Services disposed
of the animal. Staff


Internship


program may


boost grad rate


Continued From Page 1A

age them to stay in
school."
In September, school
board members approved a
Workforce Development-
STEM Project Workforce
Grant in the amount of
$448,238.
"Ten percent of that
money will be used to
pay an administrator and
evaluator, and the rest
will go directly to stu-
dents for tcchinii h1 .1', to
help them learn about the
workplace," said Cheryl
Mae Brinson, director of
curriculum and instruc-
tion for the school sys-
tem.
The STEM project,
which is an acronym for
Science, Tcchiii ,hi,., En-
gineering and Math, will
offer academies for stu-
dents in the areas of digi-
tal media, health science,
culinary arts, teacher
cadet and agricultural sci-
ence.
"We're identifying 225
students to be involved in
the workforce develop-
ment grant program,"
Calvitt said.
From that pool of stu-
dents, 75 will be offered
paid student internships
in the community, Brin-
son said.
While the logistics are
being worked out, Calvitt
has began working with
the iCare initiative, which
is the school system's 9th
grade mentorship and stu-
dent retention program.
"We have at least three
grant forces to help pro-
vide resources for the


iCare initiative, one of
which is the workforce
development grant,"
Brinson explained.
Calvitt said, "The 9th
grade iCare is specifically
for at-risk students due to
academic achievements
levels. The program as-
signs mentors to them
and pays them through
internships to work at a
business for a salary," he
said. "Students are al-
lowed to work up to 15
hours a week, and during
the summer up to eight
hours a day."
At-risk students are
considered those who
score a level 1 or 2 on the
FCAT, and fall within a
certain household income
bracket, Calvitt said.
"We want to raise them
up out of the situation
that they're in for what-
ever reason."
Last year, Suwannee's
dropout rate was 6.8 per-
cent, highest in the state.
This year's figure was 3.4
percent much improved,
but still too high, say ad-
ministrators.
Through these grant
programs, the district is
hoping to see a tremen-
dous turn around.
"Reducing the dropout
rate is only 10 percent of
our goal," said Calvitt.
"Our true goal is to in-
crease the graduation
rate."
Some progress has al-
ready been made. The
graduation rate for
Suwannee rose to 72.4
percent in 2008-09 com-
pared to 71.6 the previous
school year.


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A festive tour
Altrusa International of Live Oak sponsored a successful
Altrusa Christmas Tour of Homes Saturday. Many turned
out on a rainy day to tour the festively decorated homes of
Carolea Evans, Allison and Gayle Eyster, Tony and Stacy
Chauncey, Herb and Janet Mantooth and John and Joann
Martz. The Tour of Homes is just one way Altrusa raises
money to help support charitable causes in the community.


Donna Sandage (left) and Cheryle Chandler enjoyed the decorations at the home of John
and Joann Martz. Photos: Shannon Court


Altrusa President Kelli Hicks stands beside a Christmas tree
in the home of Carolea Evans.
iL T7 ? 'Iol


$~h~
4-.-


Some of the decorations at the Eyster home.


ABOVE: The home of Tony and Stacy Chauncey nicely ap-
pointed with Christmas decor. LEFT: A nativity scene greet-
ed guests at the Chauncey home.


The Allison and Gayle Eyster home was filled with holiday
cheer. A quaint Christmas village in the home of John and Joann Martz.


Cher Mahan helped greet folks at the home of Herb and Janet Mantooth.


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Guests enjoy a Christmas scene at a patio at the home of
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Even Odd

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PAGE 15A




North Florida


CYAN *,ew Od*

MAGENTA Even Odd


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


uwannee-Lafayette Retired Educators meet


Suwannee/Lafayette Retired Educators SHINE Program un-
der discussion.


Submitted

October meeting

The Suwannee Lafayette
Retired Educators met Oct.
19 at Grace Manor Restau-
rant in Live Oak.
Elouise Green, president,
called the meeting to order
at 10 a.m. Dorothy Jean
Johns read a daily prayer
with the hope that our asso-
ciation will be blessed with
many members. Kenneth
Lee, treasurer, gave the fi-
nancial status and reported
a membership total of 79.
Several members report-
ed on the workshops at the
District meeting. Ken Lee
reported that membership
is down. He stressed the
need to make younger re-
tirees feel that the Florida


Retired Educators Associa-
tion is also their organiza-
tion. He stressed that
FREA is concerned with
the welfare of teachers and
offers support to students
who wants to become
teachers. Judy Sweat
stressed the need for more
scholarship applicants and
the need to keep retirement
funds secure through
FREA.
The program was provid-
ed by Jennie Lyons, an em-
ployee of Vivid Visions, a
local domestic violence
center. She described the
programs available for
children and women. Sta-
tistics on domestic violence
in the local area, state and
nation were also provided.
She told the FREA group
that the center needs help


with money and supplies.
The Vivid Visions office is
located at 1227 Houston
Ave. N. in Live Oak.

November meeting

Suwannee Lafayette Re-
tired Educators met Nov. 16
in Mayo, in the fellowship
hall at the Methodist
Church.
Elouise Green, president,
called the meeting to order
at 10 a.m. Judy Sweat, vice-
president, introduced the
program presenter.
Mary Lee Tanca dis-
cussed SHINE (Serving
Health Insurance Needs of
Elders), a volunteer pro-
gram with the Florida De-
partment of Elder Affairs.
SHINE provides free, con-
fidential and unbiased
counseling on Medicare is-
sues. Tanca highlighted the
changes in Medicare Part D
in 2010, the Gap, and out-
of-pocket costs and Medic-
aid/Extra help plans.
The next meeting is
scheduled for Jan. 7, 2010
at the Village Church in
Dowling Park. The SLREA
meeting will be at 5:30
p.m., followed by dinner at
6 p.m. The retired educa-
tors will move to the Vil-
lage Church at 7 p.m. to en-


Judy Sweat, Vice President, Elouise Green President, Kenneth Lee, Treasurer, Sandra
Baldevin, Secretary.


joy "Tim Zimmerman &
the Kings Brass" concert.
Members are encouraged to
bring their spouse or guest


Display of hobbies


Early morning crash in

By Carnell Hawthorne Jr. Paula Phillips, of Lake City,
carnell.hawthorne@gaflnews.com walked away with a scraped chin
and nicks on her right wrist after
An early morning crash left one her westbound car struck the vehi-
person with minor injuries and an- cle ahead of her in traffic at about
other shaken but unhurt just east 9 a.m..
of Live Oak on US 90 Monday. The driver of that vehicle, Mark


Emergency workers tend to a driver involved in a crash on US 90 Monday morni
- Photo: Carnell Hawthorne Jr.


ijures one
Tuttle, also of Lake City, said
there were two stopped cars ahead
of him, one that was blinking to
turn left near The Ramblin' Rose
Tavern.
"I was stopped and even pulled
off to the right a little, but she still
smacked into me," said
Tuttle.
Phillips, who was
driving a green Pontiac
Sunfire, said the vehi-
cles ahead of her "start-
ed stopping. I tried to
brake, but my car start-
ed sliding. It just hap-
pened too quickly. I
tried pulling off to the
side of the road."
Her vehicle struck
the back of the blue
Toyota Matrix driven
by Tuttle, dislodging
the car's rear bumper.
The front of Phillips'
vehicle was badly dam-
aged as the hood and
front headlights were
crushed from the im-
pact. Both of her vehi-
cle's front airbags de-
ployed.
Wet road conditions
may have played a part
in the crash, emergency
officials said. Both Tut-
tle and Phillips walked
ng. away shaken up, but
without serious injury.


Another no-bid contract for OMI?


Continued From Page 1A

OMI representatives said that al-
though the contract runs through
Sept. 30, 2010, they are open to
renegotiating the pact now.
"Rather than spending the time
and money in going out for bids,
we'd like to sit down and go over
specific concerns (the council) has,"
said Richard D'Amato II, OMI's
global director of business develop-
ment. "Bottom line is we really val-
ue this partnership."


Council President Mark Stewart
said his concerns were for the em-
ployees of OMI. He said if another
private company were to come in, it
is not guaranteed how many current
employees will keep their job.
"We need to determine what our
problem is," said Stewart. "We need
a more definitive scope of work,
something we can monitor."
Council member Bennie Thomas
said he wants the negotiations to be
open to everyone.
"We (the council) didn't know


anything about the contract in 2005
(when it was first negotiated)," said
Thomas. "If we look at it again, I
want everyone involved."
Per the current agreement, the city
is required to give OMI 120 days
notice before putting the contract
out for bids. OMI agreed to reduce
that to 90 days to allow for the rene-
gotiation.
OMI was originally awarded the
city contract for public works on a
no-bid basis.


to this affair. The cost will
be $23 for the meal and


concert. RSVP is required
by Dec. 30. See you there.


Suwannee/Lafayette Retired Educators Sherwood
Boatwright, Helen Hingson. Courtesy photos





Kwanzaa


Continued From Page 1A

dured, and the sacrifices
made to survive."
Outdoor activities begin
at 10 a.m. on the museum
grounds. There will be mu-
sic, performances, food,
crafts, art, various vendors
and African cultural tables.
Demonstrations and sever-
al films about Kwanzaa
will be shown throughout
the day. The museum will
be open from 1-5 p.m. in
case of rain.
The event is open to the
entire community, she said.
In 1966, Dr. Maulana
"Ron" Karenga founded
Kwanzaa so that African-
Americans could reconnect
to their cultural roots,
Porter explained.
According to the Web
site www.officialkwanza-
awebsite.org, Kwanzaa is
an African-American and
Pan-African holiday that
celebrates family, commu-
nity and culture. The holi-
day is celebrated from Dec.
26 through Jan. 1. It origi-
nated from the first harvest
celebrations in Africa. The
name Kwanzaa is derived
from the phrase "matunda
ya kwanza" which means
"first fruits" in the Swahili
language, according to the
Web site.
"It's a celebration of the
first fruits, whether it be the
birth of a child or the plant-
ing and feasting period,"
Porter said. "All Karenga
did was organize it for
African-Americans in a
way in which it doesn't
hurt anybody, offend any-


body, and doesn't have any
religious moorings or ori-
gins. It's non-religious."
The Sunday gathering
will reiterate the seven
principles highlighted on
the seven days of Kwanzaa,
which include: Umoja -
unity; Kujichagulia self-
determination; Ujima -
collective work and re-
sponsibility; Ujamaa co-
operative economics; Nia
- purpose; Kuumba -
creativity; and Imani -
faith. On each day of
Kwanzaa, a candle is lit
and placed into the kinara
(a special candle holder) to
emphasize one of each of
the seven principles, Porter
said.
Sponsors of the Sunday
event include Christian
Mission in Action Min-
istries, Vision Seeds, Inc.,
the African American De-
velopment Council
(AADC), the Boy's and
Girls Club of America and
the local museum. Funds
raised will go in support of
local charities and toward
AADC scholarships.
"I encourage everybody
to come out to learn and
help mend fences and heal
wounds," said Porter, who
operates the non-profit
Brownstone Life Skills
Center and Community
Development Corporation,
which is also sponsoring
the event.
Anyone interested in
performing African-Ameri-
can, cultural-related mater-
ial are asked to contact
Porter at 386-330-6559 or
386-362-6986.


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ug1SPORTS



Crushing loss for 'Dogs M:.NT
*esa


By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com

The Suwannee High School boys
basketball team was crushed by
Williston Dec. 8, 64-27.
"Williston has a good team," said
Suwannee's coach James Perry.
Perry said he thinks the guys
learned a little from the game.
"We've been hammering them at
playing the whole game, not just
giving up. I think this was an eye
opener for them."
Leading the team in points was
Andre Zanders with seven.
The team hosted Baker Friday
and Jasper Saturday.
The Bulldogs beat the Baker
Wildcats 50-48, but lost to the
Jasper Trojans 62-58. Leading in
points in the Baker game was Keith
Cherry with 10. Leading against
Jasper was Zanders with 21.
The 'Dogs record stands at 3-4.



JV 'Dogs


drop a


nailbiter

Submitted

The Suwannee High JV boys
basketball team suffered their first
loss of the year to Williston Dec.
8, 64-63.
Williston was added to the
schedule after redistricting of SHS
in basketball. Unsure of what this
first-time opponent would bring,
the JV 'Dogs found themselves
matched evenly in speed and de-
termination from a very solid
young Williston team. The Bull-
dogs kept a small lead throughout
most of the game, leading by
three points at the end of the first
and five points by the half. Play-
ing man defense and frequently
pressing, Williston kept playing
aggressively and although the
'Dogs climbed to an 11-point lead
in the third quarter, it would slow-
ly disappear as Williston made a
fourth quarter comeback. Suwan-
nee was up by two points (62-60)
with 43 seconds left in the game,
but couldn't hold the lead after
missed shot attempts and free
throws following the opponent's
intentional fouls. Williston got the
ball back with nine seconds and
made a shot to win the game by
one point. A final shot attempt
was made with 0.5 seconds on the
clock over half the length of the
court by Suwannee's Jimmie
Taylor, which actually hit the rim
and had the crowd on the edge of
the bleachers.
With only seven turnovers in
the very fast-paced game, the
most notable area that made a dif-
ference was Suwannee's 19
missed unfouled layups which

SEE JV'DOGS, PAGE 2B


Andre Zanders dunks the competition.


See additional photo inside. Photo: Paul Buchanan SuwanneeSports.com


Christopher Johns is Thunder Alley Bowler of the Week


By Debbie Rice

On December 5 and 6 The Thun-
der Kids bowled in the NCFUSB-
CY Championship Tournament in
Lake City and Gainesville.
Clayton & Christopher Johns,
Dalton & Christian LeRoux, Kara
Croft, Allison Parks, Sarah and


Jessie Carver, Austin Wolf, Allison
Dukes, Robert Chapels and Jacob
Chauncy participated in the tourna-
ment. All of our Thunder Kids
bowled above and beyond their av-
erages. We are proud of our young
bowlers. In the team event, the
Strikers placed fourth, the High
Rollers placed seventh and the


Blazers took eighth place.
Dave Tripp led the Monday
Morning Blues with a 509 series
followed by Kim Carter with 504
and Larry Robinson with 500. Lar-
ry Robinson led the Sassy Seniors
with 548 followed by Chris McKee

SEE CHRISTOPHER JOHNS, PAGE 2B


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Player stats: Baker Quinton Swader 2
Sam Cherry 9 Jasper
Williston Brandon Soler 9 Brandon Soler 15
Sam Cherry 6 Andre Zanders 7 Keith Cherry 11
Keith Cherry 6 J.T. Devore 6 Sam Cherry 7
Brandon Soler 6 Joey Dukes 5 J.T. Devore 2
Joey Dukes 2 Josh Randolph 2 Josh Martin 2


lit:


winner

Sportabout
By Tom Daniels
Alabama is
on its way to '

Crown of
college
football. A
conference
championship, a Heisman
Trophy winner and a
National Championship.
Mark Ingram was selected in
the closest election ever. Tim
Tebow finished a distant
fifth after winning the award
a few years back. Give
Ingram and Bama their due.
This Mark Ingram is a
little different than the other
Mark Ingram. Mark Ingram
the father was a Number 1
draft choice of the New York
Giants out of Michigan State
in 1987. He is best
remembered by Giant fans
for converting a critical third
down play in Super Bowl
XXV. He also caught four
touchdown passes from Dan
Marino as a Dolphin. He is
remembered by Jet fans as
the player who caught the
fake spike by Dan Marino.
He is remembered by the
federal government as a man
caught with counterfeit
money, amongst other
charges. He watched his
son's moment of glory from
prison on a TV.
Alabama's Mark Ingram
was coached by Nick Saban,
who was his father's wide
receiver coach two decades
earlier. Running backs are
not unique to win Heismans
but quarterbacks seem to be
most prevalent in recent
times. Winning the award is
no guarantee of NFL
success. It is, however, a
guarantee for success. Andre
Ware, who most don't
remember, has a nice radio
deal in Houston. Charlie
Ward is doing just fine as are
Chris Weinke, Gino Torretta,
Danny Wuerffel and Jason
White, all past winners you
may have forgotten. Reggie
Bush was the last running
back to win the award, in
2005.
Ingram will hopefully
have a great NFL career. His
financial success is pretty
much guaranteed. Bart Starr,
Joe Namath and Kenny
Stabler are three Alabama
alumni Super Bowl winners.
Ingram is the only Alabama
player to win the coveted
Heisman.
An institution that gave us
"The Bear" has waited this
long to win a Heisman.
Gator fans hope they wait
another 75 years to win the
award.




North Florida


MAGENTA


PAGE 2B


$ ,newtnew$
Even Odd

SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


BLACK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


SPORTS


Longwood man

injured by bear
A Longwood resident sustained minor injuries Thurs-
day night when an animal struck his face and knocked
him to the ground.
Ernest D. Stamm, 49, a resident of The Springs, was
apparently struck by a bear as Stamm was leaving his
house at approximately 8 p.m., according to Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) officials.
The Springs subdivision is located near Wekiwa Springs
State Park.


SEE LONGWOOD, PAGE 3B


Continued From Page 1B
came back to haunt them at the end.
Player stats:
Jimmie Taylor: 17 points, 8 rebounds,
6 assists, 2 steals


Continued From Page 1B
with 503 and Ray Good-
man with 485. James
Simpson led the 9 Pin No
Tap with 648, which was
well above his average of
179. He was followed by
Lorrie Geiger with 621
and Donell Richie with
612. Tony Vasil led the
Men's league with 606 fol-
lowed by Chris McKee
with 561, Larry Robinson
with 552 and Regie Rath-
bun 550. Roger Rathbun
led the Kings and Queens


Alex Robinson:
AJ Robinson:
Tony Frierson:
Trumane Ross:
Jeremiah Ross:
Marcus Lane:


with 564, followed by Al
Music with 559 and Larry
Schattle with 509. Larry
Robinson winds up with


10 pts, 10 rbs
13 pts, 2 ast, 1 st
7 pts, 7 rbs,
2 ast, 1 st
7 pts, 2 rbs
5 pts, 2 rbs
4 pts, 1 rbs, 1 st


Adult Bowler of the week
placing in the top three, of
three different leagues.


JV 'Dogs drop

a nailbiter


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Annual
Christmas
dinner
Faith in Christ Angli-
can Church and the
Christian Mission in Ac-
tion will be sponsoring
the free annual Christmas
dinner this year.
The dinner will be a
traditional Christmas din-
ner with all the fixings.
We will have turkey,
ham, beans, sweet pota-
toes, greens, cranberry
sauce and desserts.
There will be singing,
gifts and a gospel mes-
sage.
We will also have a
prayer team circulating
for individual prayer
needs.
The dinner will be
served from 11 a.m. until
2 p.m. on Dec. 19 at the
Suwannee County Coli-
seum in Live Oak.
Every one is welcome.
The dinner is free to all.
Fr Don Wilson
'inn''.fican ,,.,rg


Christopher Johns is Thunder

Alley Bowler of the Week


Lebanon presents a
Christmas Cantata
The Lebanon Baptist Church of Branford will
present a Christmas Cantata Sunday, Dec. 20 at 7
p.m. The church will be serving finger foods in the
fellowhip hall. The church is located in Branford at
6124 280th Street, off US 129 South. The church
number is 386-935-2440.


We're proud to be associated with Reinke
Manufacturing an independent company
that cares more about producing great
irrigation systems than returning dividends
to stockholders. All Reinke irrigation
systems use high-strength steel for the best
value in center pivots. Contact us for
Reinke irrigation systems and components.
Champion Irrigation, Inc
P0 Box 1236
Live Oak, FL 32064 REink
386-362-5719 w.ine.com
championirrigation@msn.com


ICS CREMATION &
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357 N.W. Wilks Lane, Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3436 866-935-9273
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Includes: Service with visitation, Casket, Vault and Open & Close of Grave
DIRECT CREMATION $875(AtNeed)
"AFFORDABLE AND CARING SERVICES FOR YOUR FAMILY"
"Prices Subject to Change" 536107-F


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2000 off all Mattresses 3000 off all furniture
500 all rugs, prints, accessories, and lamps


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SID,. INC.....386-330-5252


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North Florida


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


SPORTS


Florida Livestock Market Report


Federal-State Market News Service
605 East Main Street
Bartow, FL 33830
863-519-8477

This information is collected by the
Florida Department of Agriculture and


Consumer Services, Division of Market-
ing & Development, Bureau of Devel-
opment & Information in cooperation
with U.S. Department of Agriculture,
AMS, Livestock, Meat, Grain, & Seed
Division, Livestock & Grain Market
News.


Florida markets at a glance
For the week ended December 10, 2009

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 10,459, compared to 11,343 last
week, and 10,106 a year ago. According to the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market
News Service: Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were 1.00 to 3.00
higher; feeder steers and heifers were unevenly steady to 2.00 higher.


Feeder Steers:




Feeder Heifers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 115.00-180.00
300-400 lbs 97.00-139.00
400-500 lbs 88.00-110.00

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 93.00-140.00
300-400 lbs 80.00-103.00
400-500 lbs 72.00- 92.00


Slaughter Cows:
Lean:
750-1200 lbs 85-90
percent 37.00-42.00

Slaughter Bulls:
Yield Grade No. 1-2
1000-2100 lbs
48.00-56.00


FWC approves rules to help shrimpers

protect marine animals and turtles


The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission (FWC) on Thursday ap-
proved rule amendments that will give
Florida commercial shrimp harvesters
more ways to avoid the unintended catch
of marine animals and protected sea turtles
in their fishing nets.
The FWC has required the use of by-
catch reduction devices in shrimp trawls
for more than 10 years. These devices are
designed to reduce unwanted fish in
shrimp trawls by providing a way to let
them and other accidentally captured
aquatic animals escape through an opening
in the trawl while still allowing shrimp to
be harvested.
The new rules will allow the use of by-
catch reduction devices for shrimp trawls
in Florida waters that have recently been
cleared for use in adjacent federal waters.
The rules also will automatically allow fu-


ture federally approved bycatch reduction
devices to be used in state waters.
Shrimpers still will be able to use the
Florida finfish excluder fisheyee) in inshore
and nearshore state waters, along with sev-
eral other federally certified shrimp trawl
bycatch reduction devices in state waters.
In addition, the FWC approved technical
updates to its rules requiring the use of tur-
tle excluder devices in shrimp trawls.
These devices have been required in
shrimp trawls used off Florida's coast for
nearly 20 years and are designed to allow a
turtle caught in a shrimp trawl to escape
through an opening in the trawl.
These rule amendments take. t .. t in
mid-January. More information,.. .*.,,.11..
this action is available from the FWC's
Web site at: http://myfwc.com/docs/Com-
, Xi..... .. i. ,,-.'2009/2009_Dec_FPH_Sh
rimpBycatchpresentation.pdf


Longwood man injured by bear


Continued From Page 2B

The FWC is investigating the incident.
Stamm was taken to the Florida Hospi-
tal Altamonte. Biologists have examined
photos of the man's injuries and have de-
termined the scratches are consistent with
marks made by bear claws.
"We are grateful that Mr. Stamm wasn't
injured more severely," said Joy Hill,
FWC public information coordinator.
The FWC is setting a trap for the bear
today. When the bear is trapped, and
FWC biologists have determined it is the
bear in question, the agency will decide
how to proceed.
"Public safety is our highest priority,"
Hill said. "Bears are more of a threat
when they become habituated to humans
and lose their natural fear. That is why
feeding bears, either intentionally or unin-


tentionally, is illegal."
FWC investigators observed bear signs
around the home, including scratches on
structures and bear scat. There is evidence
of a bear being fed for an extended period
of time, officials said. Photographs taken
at the scene show food containers scat-
tered around the area, as well as bedding
on the porch.
"It is critical that residents follow our
recommendations and do all they can to
keep our food away from bears," said
Dave Telesco, FWC bear management
program coordinator. "These kinds of sit-
uations are preventable. The key is to
keep bears wild. When people follow our
advice, the bears have no reason to stay in
our neighborhoods, and the two can safely
coexist."
For more information about ,,..' in
bear country, visit MyFWC.com/Bear


FWC orders amnesty program


for reptiles of concern


The Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission (FWC) directed
staff Thursday to implement an execu-
tive order immediately that will allow
reptiles of concern to be turned over to
authorized reptile of concern permit
holders with no questions asked.
"We must enact an amnesty program
immediately," said FWC Chairman
Rodney Barreto. "Florida must be a
leader and send the right message to
our partners and to the reptile indus-
try."
Barreto made his recommendation to
the rest of the Commission after receiv-
ing reports by FWC division directors
from Habitat and Species Conservation
and Law Enforcement on reptiles of
concern at the meeting in Clewiston on
Thursday. The rest of the Commission
unanimously endorsed his suggestion.
"We must make the program easy for
licensed folks to accept these snakes,"
said FWC Vice Chair Kathy Barco. "It
needs to be as easy for them to take the
reptile of concern as it is for those with
the reptiles to walk in and turn it over."
Barreto further said he would craft a
letter to Secretary of the Interior Ken
Salazar on behalf of the Commission
requesting additional funds to help con-
tinue the state's effort to manage and
control nonnatives in Florida.
"The Burmese python has become
the poster child for a much bigger is-
sue," said Tim Breault, the FWC's di-
rector of Habitat and Species Conserva-
tion. "Nonnatives are the real issue
here, and it calls for full engagement
with federal leadership."
During Breault's presentation, he
broke the issue of nonnative species
regulation and management into four
major components: international move-
ment and trade, captive breeding out-
side of native range, risk assessment
and eradication or control. He suggest-
ed the Commission reach out to federal
partners.
"My biggest fear is what's going to
be the next Burmese python if we don't
do something now," Breault said.


Col. Jim Brown, director of the Divi-
sion of Law Enforcement, told the
Commission that sales of reptiles have
decreased since 2008.
"Sales have gone down to a trickle
because of the regulations the FWC
and the Florida legislature passed in
2008," Brown said. "But it is still ex-
tremely important to prevent further re-
lease of these nonnative species into
the wild."
Brown told the Commission a reptile
of concern technical assistance group
had been formed and will continue to
meet. The group supports the idea of
amnesty and supports further actions,
such as continuing the hunting program
on state-managed lands in South Flori-
da. The Commission directed Brown to
draft rules, with the assistance of the
technical assistance group, to bring
back to the February meeting in
Apalachicola.
"Eradication of reptiles of concern
from the wild is prohibitively costly
and ecologically impossible," Breault
said. "But unrelenting control is feasi-
ble."
Barreto directed staff to continue
work with the reptile industry, zoos and
all partners.
"Do whatever it takes to control this
problem," he said.
Anyone who holds a reptile of con-
cern license will be eligible to be an
amnesty facility once the executive or-
der is issued, in approximately two or
three weeks.










- r. 1
FWC Commissioners move forward with
measures to control the spread of rep-
tiles of concern in Florida. FWC photo


Looking for a job?
suwanneedemocrat.com is here to
help. Log on today and click the
monster.com link on our homepage.
Here you'll find a search tool to
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Now THAT'S Something

To Smile About!
ll-l- -/ -I


Thank you for submitting this week's SMILE photograph!
Submit your photo for publication to:

uumanniee remncrat
P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 500232-F


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PAGE 3B


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North Florida


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* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


ALCi


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


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Sam Cherry in action against Lake City. Photo: Paul Buchanan SuwanneeSports.com


Crushing loss


for 'Dogs

Find Find us on aceoo Early Childhood Education Pri


Merry Christmas
Happy New Year is


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Drawing to be held December 21. See store for details.
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Even Odd

* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


BLACK


PAGE 5B


ogram


Earn Your CDA Today!
Day & Evening Clasess
Classes starting January 21st
TABE testing must be completed prior to enrollment


Surrey Place
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North Florida


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MAGENTA Even Odd


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


FWC acts on more


protection for sharks


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) on
Thursday approved a se-
ries of rules to enhance its
long-standing policy to
protect stressed shark pop-
ulations in Florida waters.
These rules also are gener-
ally consistent with recent
management measures that
have been implemented
for sharks in coastal wa-
ters from Florida to
Maine.
Sharks have been strict-
ly regulated in Florida
since 1992 with a one-
fish-per-person/two-fish-
per-vessel daily bag limit
for all recreational and
commercial harvesters, a
prohibition on nearly two
dozen overfished or rare
shark species, and a ban
on the cruel and wasteful
practice of harvesting only
shark fins (called finning).
"Florida has been a
leader in shark manage-
ment efforts," said FWC
Chairman Rodney Barreto,
"and we are now bolster-
ing our shark management
rules to help ensure the
sustainability of our ma-
rine ecosystem that relies
in part on maintaining
healthy shark popula-
tions."
The new FWC rules
prohibit harvest of sand-
bar, silky and Caribbean
sharpnose sharks from
state waters. Sandbar
sharks are considered
overfished and are experi-
encing overfishing, which
means that fishing pres-
sure is too high to be sus-
tainable. Silky sharks are
highly vulnerable to over-
exploitation, and
Caribbean sharpnose
sharks do not occur in wa-
ters off Florida, so adding
this species will have no
effect on harvesters in


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state waters.
The rules also establish
a 54-inch fork length mini-
mum size limit for all
sharks, except Atlantic
sharpnose, blacknose, bon-
nethead, finetooth and
blacktip sharks and
smooth dogfish. This will
help protect the juveniles
of 14 species of sharks in
Florida waters. The
species where no size limit
is required are considered
to be at healthy population
levels or don't warrant a
minimum-size limit.
In addition, the rules
prohibit the removal of
shark heads and tails at sea
allow only hook-and-line
gear to harvest sharks, and
make other administrative
and technical rule changes.
These rules take effect
in mid-January.
In a related action, the
FWC has proposed a draft
rule that would prohibit all
recreational and commer-
cial harvest of lemon
sharks from Florida wa-
ters.
Lemon sharks are slow-
growing, produce relative-
ly few offspring and are
highly susceptible to fish-
ing pressure, especially
when they aggregate in
shallow waters close to the
shore. The Commission's
proposed action is intend-
ed to limit the potential of
overharvesting lemon
sharks in state waters.
A final public hearing
on the proposed lemon
shark rule will be held
during the February FWC
meeting in Apalachicola.
The presentations on
shark management used at
the ,i. iv i are available
online at
http://myfwc. com/docs/Co
mmissionMeet-
ings/2009/2009_Dec_FPH


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Local scouts make rank


David Duckwiler II is presented the rank of Second Class at a recent troop 693 meeting in Live Oak. David has been a scout
for a year. Courtesy photos


Austin Wolf is presented the rank of Scout at a recent troop
3 96 meeting in Live Oak Austin has been a scout for 3


Ad Elections:


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Stormy weather?
Check out the weather radar on
our homepage at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.
When bad weather is on the
horizon, the weather radar
appears to keep you in touch and
on top of things. While you're
there click the wpathpr link-
522223-F

fMerry fitness

and-a J-feafthy New year!

COMMIT TO GET FIT in 2010!
Sign-up today by enrolling
for onrlly $1999 plus a $.O0
donation to the Santa Shop.
Monthly dues still only
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ofyourlifel monthCallTday
Invest in membership
yourhealthl 362-4676 memberships
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"The Best Defense Is Self-Defense!
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Branford, Florida
Children, Teen & Adult
6 (386) 935-3777
American Kenpo 201uwannee Ave.*Branford, FL
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Culinary Ars and
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Classes starting January 21st
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FWC

selects 2010

chairman and

vice chairman
Amid numerous
changes in the senior-lev-
el staff at the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC), the
seven-member Board of
Commissioners unani-
mously voted to retain
Rodney Barreto as chair-
man.
Commissioner Kenneth
Wright noted the FWC
has a new executive di-
rector, assistant executive
director, director of law
enforcement and will
need a new general coun-
sel soon.
"We need to ensure
continuation of leadership
with the most-experienced
commissioner as chair-
man," Wright said.
Commissioner Brian
Yablonski amended the
nomination to include
naming Commissioner
Dick Corbett as vice
chairman. Corbett is sec-
ond to Barreto in experi-
ence on the Commission.
Barreto is from Miami
and Key Largo; Corbett
lives in Tampa.
FWC chairmen and vice
chairmen serve one-year
terms, beginning the first
day of the calendar year.


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Han




CYAN ,dwd.Aw*
MAGENTA Even Odd


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Members of the Suwannee High School band on stage with Dallas Brass. Courtesy photos



SHS SMS band students


"Our concerts
are intended


... 7 ......WM.for the entire
family," says
perform with Dallas Brass Dallas Brass
founder


Submitted
Advent Christian Village was recently
privileged to present Dallas Brass as part of
its annual Artist Series. Dallas Brass is a
six-member brass ensemble that offers a
unique blend of traditional brass
instruments with a full complement of
drums and percussion. They have appeared
with symphony orchestras worldwide. Each
member of the ensemble is an exceptional
musician in his own right, with training
from prestigious institutions such as
Julliard. Together they blend, in a unique
mix that sets feet tapping and faces smiling.
The concert was "An American Musical
Journey," with music from the time of
George Washington through the 21st
century. It included a wide variety of
musical styles, from Broadway, Dixieland,
swing, Hollywood, patriotic and classical,
as well as a number of holiday favorites.


Their smooth blend and humorous antics
made the 135-minute concert fly by. The
evening offered something for every person
in the audience, many of whom were
seasoned Artist Series patrons who said that
this was truly one of the best events they
have ever attended.
A highlight of the evening occurred as
the Suwannee Middle School Band joined
the ensemble for their rendition of John
Williams' "Theme from Star Wars,"
followed by the Suwannee High School
Band with "Christmas Festival," arranged
by Dallas Brass' Michael Levine.
Dallas Brass is committed to helping
young musicians develop their talents and a
lifelong love of music. The 150 band
students came to ACV to rehearse with the
ensemble and for a clinic taught by
members of Dallas Brass. The clinic
included helpful information for the


students on how to be motivated to practice
more, and in proper breathing and posture
while playing. Students went away awed by
the skill of Dallas Brass, and many were
inspired to devote more time and energy to
practicing.
Trombonist Michael Levine founded the
group in 1983. He is joined by Brian Neal
on trumpet, D.J. Barraclough and Charlie
Porter on trumpet and alto horn, Dan Peck
on the tuba and Jeff Handel on drums and
percussion.
"Our concerts are intended for the entire
family," says Levine. "Our goal is to
entertain and enrich by playing great music,
while showing our audience how much we
enjoy what we do."
The standing ovation and cheers of the
crowd as well as the throngs of students
requesting autographs are evidence that
they succeeded in achieving both.


Michael
Levine. "Our
goal is to
entertain and
enrich by
playing great
music, while
showing our
audience how
much we enjoy
what we do."


The Suwannee Middle School band rehearsing with Dallas Brass.


Dallas Brass in action.


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North Florida


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PAGE 7B


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North Florida


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


Lions Club Secretary Mark Stewart, left, and Wyatt 0'Neal, President, at Publix. Photos: Homer Scroggin
SI I I i i -


-4


Lion Jack Lewellyn at Wal-Mart.


DOING

THE MOST


Ringing


in the


season
Members of the Live
Oak Lions Club
participated in Ring
the Bells for the
Salvation Army on
Saturday throughout
Live Oak.


Local

scouts

make

rank,
Page 6B


Win this
beautiful
dollhouse!
Guardian ad Litem/Voices
for Children is raffling off
this dollhouse for Christmas.
Tickets will be sold for $2 per
chance or 3 chances for $5
for Dec. 1, through Dec. 22,
2009.
This benefit will raise
funds for the Guardian ad
Litem/Voice for Children pro-
gram to assist in providing
children with basic needs and
special requests as well as
training materials to better
prepare volunteers.
Tickets are $2 each or 3
tickets for $5. The drawing
will be held Dec. 22.
For more information,
please call Tammie Williams
at (386) 364-7720, ext. 105.


I


Happy Homemakers install officers
The Happy Homemakers Club of the Suwannee County Association for Home and Community Education held their annual Christmas luncheon and officers' installation at the Agricul-
tural Extension offices Dec. 9. Pictured from left are Dorie Peterson, President; Joan Stanton, Vice-President; Irene Sapp, Treasurer; Carlene Polk, Hospitality; and Katherine Allen, Coun-
ty Extension Director and HCE Advisor who performed the installations. Allen used the game Monopoly to illustrate the structure of HCE, showing how the players can have fun while
moving through the different levels of the game. Courtesy photo


CYAN
MAGENTA


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* ik $4MOU$ * 4


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North Florida


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Lion Wyman Clark at Winn Dixie. Photos: Homer Scroggin


Lion Adam Hitt at Winn Dixie.


Ringing in the season


THE MOST


Lions President Wyatt O'Neal, left, and Treasurer Jerry Allen at Publix.


Lions David Mullis, left, and Lion Edsel Blevins at Wal-Mart.


FWC approves rule


to allow peregrines


for falconry in Fla.


The Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission
(FWC) approved a
rule allowing falcon-
ers to take peregrine
falcons for the sport
of falconry at its
meeting in Clewiston
on Wednesday.
The U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service de-
termines the number
of falcons that may
be taken over a broad
range of states. It is
estimated fewer than
five falcons will be
allocated to Florida in
2010. Under the new
rule, falconers must
receive a permit for
the take of peregrine
falcons for falconry.
The FWC will ran-
domly select applica-


Peregrine falcon popula-
tions have increased sig-
nificantly since the Unit-
ed States restricted the
use of DDT in the 1970s.
- FWC file photo


tions and issue permits annually based on the
number allotted to the state. Priority for receiving
a permit will be given to Florida residents.
Peregrine populations plummeted because of
the use of DDT since the 1940s in the United
States. After DDT use was restricted in the 1970s,
populations significantly increased. The USFWS
took the peregrine off the endangered species list
in 1999, and the FWC delisted the peregrine fal-
con in June 2009, making it one of conservation's
greatest success stories. Today, scientists estimate
there are at least 3,100 breeding pairs in the Unit-
ed States.
"This is a historic moment for falconers, and
we strongly approve staff's recommendation,"
said Eric Edwards of the Florida Falconers Asso-
ciation and North American Falconers Associa-
tion. "It has been a privilege working with FWC
staff through this process."
The peregrine is a highly valued bird by falcon-
ers for its nearly 200-mph dives for prey. Falcons
have been used by people for hunting for more
than 1,000 years.
"Falconers contributed to the successful conser-
vation of the peregrine by providing birds for cap-
tive breeding so peregrines could be reintro-
duced," said Robin Boughton, the FWC's avian
coordinator. "Many falconers will now have the
opportunity to again use the birds in the sport of
falconry."
Seven speakers, including members of groups
such as the Florida Falconry Association, North
American Falconers Association, Audubon of
Florida and Defenders of Wildlife, spoke at the
meeting.
"Audubon views the peregrine as an iconic
species, and we have concerns regarding lack of
monitoring in Florida to help ensure no future de-
cline in this species," said Julie Wraithmell of
Audubon of Florida. "We hope the Commission
will help promote conservation of the species by
funding monitoring projects."
The FWC met with stakeholders, including fal-
coners and conservation groups, as the agency de-
veloped a management plan for the peregrine,
which was approved in June. Staff continued
working with stakeholders through the process of
creating the rule to allow harvest of the peregrine
for falconry.
Peregrines migrate as much as 18,000 miles per
year, and on average, 1,790 peregrines migrate
through the Florida Keys in the fall as they move
between northern breeding grounds and wintering
areas in Central and South America. Some pere-
grines stay the entire winter in the state, but they
do not breed in Florida. They can be spotted in
the fall and winter over open terrain, particularly
near coastal shorelines and wetlands.


MAGENTA $MM


CYAN *,ew Od*
MAGENTA Even Odd


BLACK


PAGE 9B


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North Florida


CYAN

MAGENTA Even Odd


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


Suwannee Legals
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MacClenny, Fernandina Beach, St.
Augustine, Palatka, Lake City, Live Oak,
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Full Basic service customers may
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price. Digital Starter includes a digital
set-top box at no additional cost.

For more information, please call 1-800-
266-2278.
12/16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 612007CA0001650001XX

CRESTONE PARTNERS LIMITED,

Plaintiff,


ROBERT
EARL,


A. EARL andDEBRA K.


Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to an Order Resetting Sale
dated December 2, 2009, in Case
Number 612007CA0001650001XX of the
Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit
in and for Suwannee County Florida, in
which CRESTONE PARTNERS LIMITED
is Plaintiff and ROBERT A. EARL and
DEBRA K. EARL are Defendants, I,
BARRY A. BAKER, Clerk of the Court,
will sell at public sale the following
described real property:

Part of the NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4, part of
the S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4
and part of the N 3/4 of the N 1/2 of the
SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 33,
Township 6 South, Range 14 East,
Suwannee County Florida, being more
particularly described as follows:

BEGIN at the Northwest corner of said S
1/2 of the NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 thence
run N 89 05'29" E, along the North line of
said S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4
and the North line of S 1/2 of the NE 1/4
of the NE 1/4, a distance of 1359.72 feet;
thence run N 0036'10" W, a distance of
661.68 feet to the North line of said
Section 33; thence run N 8903'54", E,
along said North line, a distance of 60.00
feet; thence run S 0036'10" E, a
distance of 879.43 feet; thence run N
8747'17" W, a distance of 654.27 feet;
thence run S 0439'54" E, a distance of
977.33 feet; to the South line of said N
3/4 of the N 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of the NE
1/4; thence run S 8907'36"W, along said
South line, a distance of 836.42 feet, to
the West line of said NE 1/4; thence run
N 0033'19" W, along said West line, a
distance of 1156.85 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING.

SUBJECT TO: A perpetual easement in
favor of Suwannee Valley Electric
Cooperative, its successor or assigns
over and across the East 20 feet of the
West 60 feet of the N 1/2 of the NE 1/4 of
the NE 1/4 of said Section 33.

TOGETHER WITH: A non-exclusive
easement for ingress and egress, as
needed, over and across the East 10 feet
of the West 110 feet of the North 879.43
feet of the NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of said
Section 33.
PAC 04434-002001

The sale will be held on Tuesday,
December 29, 2009, at 11:00 A.M., or
as soon thereafter as possible to the
highest and best bidder for cash, at the
front door of the Courthouse at Live Oak,
Suwannee County, Florida, in
accordance with Section 45.031 of the
Florida Statutes.


SEAL


BA
Clerk of t


12/9, 16


Suwannee Legals
PUBLIC NOTICE

This is to inform you that Suwannee
County will hold a pre-bid conference
and walk-thru for the weatherization work
of twelve (12) single-family dwellings in
the Suwannee County Weatherization
program.

This meeting will be held Wednesday,
December 16, 2009, the first six (6)
beginning at 8:00am and the second six
(6) beginning at 1:00pm at Suwannee
River Economic Council, Inc. Office,
1171 Nobles Ferry Road, Bldg 2 Live
Oak, Florida.

The conference and walk-thru is
mandatory, no exceptions, for contractors
who plan to bid. Suwannee River
Economic Council, Inc. requires each
contractor to be properly licensed, carry
general liability insurance of at least
$1,000,000.00, POI (Pollution
Occurrence insurance) and Workers
Comp Insurance (No Exemptions) before
bid opening.

Original bids for these units will be due
by 12:00 noon, Monday, December 21,
2009, at Suwannee River Economic
Council, Inc. Office, 1171 Nobles Ferry
Road Bldg 2, Live Oak, Florida 32060.
Please mark envelope "Sealed Bid for
Name of Homeowner". Bids to be opened
and awarded, Monday, December 21,
2009 at 12:30 p.m.

Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc.
has the right to reject any and all bids.
The bids will be awarded on the most
cost effective basis.
12/16

PUBLIC NOTICE OF INTENT
TO ISSUE AIR PERMIT

Florida Department of Environmental
Protection Division of Air Resource
Management, Bureau of Air
Regulation
Draft Air Permit No. 047016-001-AC
ADAGE Hamilton LLC, Woody
Biomass Power Plant, Hamilton
County, Florida

Applicant: The applicant for this project
is ADAGE Hamilton LLC. The applicant's
authorized representative and mailing
address is: Francis Reed Wills,
President, ADAGE Hamilton LLC, 225
Wilmington West Chester Pike, Suite
302, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania 19317.

Facility Location: ADAGE Hamilton LLC
proposes to construct the new ADAGE
Power Plant that will be located in
Hamilton County, at the intersection of
State Road 6 and County Road 146,
immediately west of Interstate Highway
75 and approximately 7.5 miles west of
Jasper, Florida.

History: On October 8, 2009, the
Permitting Authority gave notice of its
intent to issue an air permit to the
applicant for the project described below.
The applicant published notice of the
Public Notice of Intent to Issue Air Permit
for this project on October 14, 2009, in
The Suwannee Democrat and on
October 15, 2009, in The Jasper News.
During the public comment period, the
Permitting Authority received written
comments that resulted in substantial
modifications to the intended air permit
for this project. As a result of these
substantial modifications, the Permitting
Authority has withdrawn the October 8,
2009, intended air permit and has issued
notice of its intent to issue a Revised
Draft Permit for the project described
below.

Project: The fuel for the ADAGE Power
Plant will be clean woody biomass
including: clean untreated lumber; tree
stumps; tree limbs; slash; wood residue;
bark; sawdust; sander dust; wood chips;
scraps; slabs; millings; shavings; pallets;
and processed pellets made from wood
or other forest residues. The fuel will be
combusted in a bubbling fluidized bed
(BFB) boiler to produce 55.5 megawatts
(net) of electric power. Natural gas,
ultralow sulfur fuel oil or propane will be
used for BFB startup and stabilization.

Based on the air permit application, the
project will result in emissions increases
of: 247.5 tons per year (TPY) of carbon
monoxide (CO); 236 TPY of nitrogen


oxides (NOX); 140 TPY of particulate
matter (PM); 110 TPY of PM with a mean
diameter of 10 micrometers (Bm) or less
,RRYA. BAKER (PM10); 26 TPY of sulfuric acid mist
he Circuit Court (SAM); 150 TPY of sulfur dioxide (S02);
60 TPY of volatile organic compounds
Keith M Gentry (VOC); 0.175 TPY of lead (Pb) and 9.7
Deputy Clerk TPY of hydrogen chloride (HCI). A review
for the Prevention of Significant
Deterioration (PSD) and a best available
control technology (BACT) determination
were not required.


SHS,


SMS band


students


perform


with


Dallas


Brass,

Page 7B


To insure that emissions are less than
the respective major source thresholds
for PSD and hazardous air pollutants
(HAP) and that compliance is achieved
with applicable new source performance
standards, ADAGE will install or
implement the following air pollution
control equipment and practices on the
BFB boiler: fabric filters and good
combustion design and practices (PM,
PM10, CO, VOC); selective catalytic
reduction (NOX, VOC and dioxin furan);
and inherently low sulfur fuels and an
induct sorbent injection system (HCI,
SAM, S02). Continuous emissions
monitoring systems (CEMS) will be
installed for S02, NOX, CO and HCI.
Emissions from emergency support
equipment shall be controlled by use of
clean fuels and good combustion and
design. Reasonable precautions will be
employed to minimize emissions from
biomass handling, storage and
processing.

The Department reviewed an air quality
analysis prepared by the applicant. The


Suwannee Legals
analysis demonstrated that the sum of
ground-level concentrations of nitrogen
dioxide (N02), PM10, CO and S02
caused by the project and background
concentrations will be much less than the
respective National or Florida ambient air
quality standards (AAQS).

The Technical Evaluation and Preliminary
Determination document and the air
quality analysis are available at the
following web link:
"http://www.dep.state.fl.us/air/emission/c
onstruction/adagetech.pdf"

Permitting Authority: Applications for
air construction permits are subject to
review in accordance with the provisions
of Chapter 403, Florida Statutes (FS.)
and Chapters 62-4, 62-210 and 62-212,
Florida Administrative Code (FA.C.). The
proposed project is not exempt from air
permitting requirements and an air permit
is required to perform the proposed work.
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's Bureau of Air
Regulation is the Permitting Authority
responsible for making a permit
determination for this project. The Bureau
of Air Regulation's physical address is
111 South Magnolia Drive, Suite 4,
Tallahassee, Florida 32301 and the
mailing address is 2600 Blair Stone
Road, MS #5505, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-2400. The Bureau of Air
Regulation's phone number is 850/488-
0114.

Project File: A complete project file is
available for public inspection during the
normal business hours of 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday
(except legal holidays), at address
indicated above for the Permitting
Authority The complete project file
includes the Revised Draft Permit, the
Technical Evaluation and Preliminary
Determination, the application, and the
information submitted by the applicant,
exclusive of confidential records under
Section 403.111, FS. Interested persons
may contact the Permitting Authority's
project review engineer for additional
information at the address and phone
number listed above. In addition,
electronic copies of these documents are
available at the following web link:
www.dep.state.fl.us/Air/emission/constru
ction/adage.htm

Notice of Intent to Issue Air Permit:
The Permitting Authority gives notice of
its intent to issue an air permit to the
applicant for the project described above.
The applicant has provided reasonable
assurance that operation of the proposed
equipment will not adversely impact air
quality and that the project will comply
with all applicable provisions of Chapters
62-4, 62-204, 62-210, 62-212, 62-296
and 62-297, FA.C. The Permitting
Authority will issue a Final Permit in
accordance with the conditions of the
proposed Revised Draft Permit unless a
timely petition for an administrative
hearing is filed under Sections 120.569
and 120.57, FS. or unless public
comment received in accordance with
this notice results in a different decision
or a significant change of terms or
conditions.

Comments: The Permitting Authority will
accept written comments concerning the
proposed Revised Draft Permit for a
period of 14 days from the date of
publication of the Public Notice. Written
comments must be received by the
Permitting Authority by close of business
(5:00 p.m.) on or before the end of this
14-day period. If timely received
comments result in a significant change
to the Revised Draft Permit, the
Permitting Authority shall revise the
Revised Draft Permit and require, if
applicable, another Public Notice. All
comments filed will be made available for
public inspection.

Petitions: A person whose substantial
interests are affected by the proposed
permitting decision may petition for an
administrative hearing in accordance with
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, FS. The
petition must contain the information set
forth below and must be filed with
(received by) the Department's Agency
Clerk in the Office of General Counsel of
the Department of Environmental
Protection, 3900 Commonwealth
Boulevard, Mail Station #35, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-3000 (Telephone:
850/245-2241; Fax: 850/245-2303).
Petitions filed by any persons other than
those entitled to written notice under
Section 120.60(3), FS., must be filed
within 14 days of publication of this
Public Notice or receipt of a written
notice, whichever occurs first. Under
Section 120.60(3), EFS., however, any
person who asked the Permitting
Authority for notice of agency action may
file a petition within 14 days of receipt of
that notice, regardless of the date of
publication. A petitioner shall mail a copy
of the petition to the applicant at the
address indicated above, at the time of
filing. The failure of any person to file a
petition within the appropriate time period
shall constitute a waiver of that person's
right to request an administrative
determination (hearing) under Sections
120.569 and 120.57, FS., or to intervene
in this proceeding and participate as a
party to it. Any subsequent intervention
(in a proceeding initiated by another
party) will be only at the approval of the
presiding officer upon the filing of a
motion in compliance with Rule 28-
106.205, F.A.C.

A petition that disputes the material facts
on which the Permitting Authority's action
is based must contain the following
information: (a) The name and address of
each agency affected and each agency's
file or identification number, if known; (b)
The name, address, and telephone


Your Community, Your Life.


Read the public notices in this newspaper.





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Public Hearings


Suwannee Legals
number of the petitioner; the name,
address and telephone number of the
petitioner's representative, if any, which
shall be the address for service purposes
during the course of the proceeding; and
an explanation of how the petitioner's
substantial interests will be affected by
the agencydetermination; (c) A statement
of when and how each petitioner
received notice of the agency action or
proposed decision; (d) A statement of all
disputed issues of material fact; (e) A
concise statement of the ultimate facts
alleged, including the specific facts the
petitioner contends warrant reversal or
modification of the agency's proposed
action; (f) A statement of the specific
rules or statutes the petitioner contends
require reversal or modification of the
agency's proposed action including an
explanation of how the alleged facts
relate to the specific rules or statutes;
and, (g) A statement of the relief sought
by the petitioner, stating precisely the
action the petitioner wishes the agency
to take with respect to the agency's
proposed action. A petition that does not
dispute the material facts upon which the
Permitting Authority's action is based
shall state that no such facts are in
dispute and otherwise shall contain the
same information as set forth above, as
required by Rule 28-106.301, FA.C.

Because the administrative hearing
process is designed to formulate final
agency action, the filing of a petition
means that the Permitting Authority's
final action may be different from the
position taken by it in this Public Notice of
Intent to Issue Air Permit. Persons whose
substantial interests will be affected by
any such final decision of the Permitting
Authority on the application have the
right to petition to become a party to the
proceeding, in accordance with the
requirements set forth above.

Mediation: Mediation is not available in
this proceeding.
12/16

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR SUWANNEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 612009CA00002360001XX

THE HORIZON GROUP, LLC,
a Florida Limited Liability Company,

Plaintiff,

vs.

SUWANNEE VALLEY LAND, INC.,
a dissolved Florida Corporation and
FABIAN LAWRENCE; et al,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: FABIAN LAWRENCE, Defendants,
unknown tenants; and other unknown
parties in possession, including the
unknown spouse of any person in
possession of the property, and if a
named Defendant is deceased, the
surviving spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, and all other parties
claiming by, through, under or against
that Defendant, and all claimants,
persons or parties, natural or corporate,
or whose exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under any of the named or
described Defendants.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclosure a mortgage on the following
described property in Suwannee County,
Florida, to-wit:

Part of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 7;
the West 1/2 of the Southwest 1/4
(Government Lot 5); and the
Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4
(South 1/2 of Government Lot 6) of
Section 8, all being in Township 3
South, Range 11 East, Suwannee
County, Florida, being more
particularly described as follows: For
Point of Beginning, commence at the
Northeast corner of the SE 1/4 of said
Section 7, the same being the
Northwest corner of Government Lot 5
of said Section 7; thence run N
8935'19" E along the North Line of
said Government Lot 5, a distance of
1303.21 feet to the Northeast corner of
said West 1/2 of the SW 1/4 (Northeast
corner of said Government Lot 5);
thence run S 0'30'44" E along the East
line of said Government Lot 5, a
distance of 1321.34 feet to the
Northwest corner of said SE 1/4 of the
SW 1/4 (Northwest corner of said
South 1/2 of Government Lot 6);
thence run N 89035'56" E along the
North line of said South 112 of
Government Lot 6), a distance of
1307.11 feet to the Northeast corner of
said SE 1/4 of the SW 1/4, (Northeast
corner of said South 1/2 of
Government Lot 6); thence run S
0G33'40" E along the East line of said
SE 1/4 of the SW 1/4 (East line of said
South 1/2 of Government Lot 6), a
distance of 1324.29 feet to the
Southeast corner of said SE 1/4 of the
SW 1/4 (Southeast corner of said
South 1/2 of Government Lot 6);
thence run S 8919'12" W along the
South line of said Section 8 (South
line of said South 1/2 of Government
Lot 6) and the South line of said West
1/2 of the SW 1/4 (South line of said
Government Lot 5), a distance of
2629.47 feet to the Southwest corner
of said Section 8 (Southwest corner of
said Government Lot 5); thence run N
007'28"W along the West line of said
West 1/2 of the SW 1/4 (West line of
said Government Lot 5), a distance of
796.51 feet to the Southeast corner of
Suwannee Vista, as recorded in Plat
Book 1, Page 316, of the Public
records of said county; thence run N
2644'11"W along the East line of said
Suwannee Vista (Easterly right-of-way
line of 241st Drive), a distance of
1833.91 feet to a Point of Intersection
of said Easterly right-of-way line and
the South line of Penner Subdivision
as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 124,
of said Public Records; thence run N
8952'12" E along said South line, a
distance of 821.51 feet to a point on
the West line of said Section 8 (West
line of Government Lot 5); thence run
N 0 f0850" W along said West line, a
distance of 221.98 feet to the Point of
Beginning.

SUBJECT TO that portion of land in
114th Circle right-of-way, situated in
part of the SE 1/4 of said Section 7,
Township 3 South, Range 11 East, of
said county, being more particularly
described as follows: For Point of
Reference, commence at the
Northeast corner of said SE 1/4 of
said Section 7, thence run S 0008'50"
E along the East line of said Section 7,
a distance of 221.98 feet to the Point
of Beginning; thence continue S
0007'28" E along said East line, a
distance of 60.00 feet; thence run S
8952'12"W, a distance of 791.47 feet
to a point on the Easterly right-of-way


of said 241st Drive; thence run N
2644'01"W along said Easterly right-
of-way line, a distance of 67.11 feet to
the Point of Intersection of said
Easterly right-of-way line and the
South line of said Penner Subdivision
as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 124,
of the Public Records of said county;
thence run N 89052'12" E along said
South line, a distance of 821.51 feet to
the Point of Beginning.

LESS AND EXCEPT that portion of
real property described as follows:

Part of Government Lot 5 or part of
the W 112 of the SW 114 of Section 8
and part of the SE 114 of Section 7,
Township 3 South, Range 11 East,
Suwannee County Florida, being
more particularly described as


Search Florida's notices online at:


www.floridapublicnotices.com


551304-F


Suwannee Legals
follows: For Point of Beginning
commence at the Southwest corner of
said Section 8; thence run N 00007'28"1
W, along the West line of said Section
7 a distance of 796.51 feet to the
Southeast corner of Suwannee Vista
as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 316,
of the Public Records of said County;
thence run N 26044'00" W, along the
East line of said Plat Book 1, Page
316, a distance of 200.00 feet; thence
run S 68003'56" E, a distance of
1503.99 feet; thence run S 00004'48" E,
a distance of 400.00 feet to a Point on
the South line of said Section 8;
thence run S 8919'12"W, along said
South line a distance of 1307.46 feet
to the Point of Beginning.

Subject to an easement for utilities
over and across the North 10.00 feet
and the West 20.00 feet of the North
200.00 feet thereof.

has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on Plaintiff's
attorney and counsel of record, ROSE M.
DECKER, JR., Esquire of The Decker
Law Firm, P.A., 320 White Avenue, Post


Suwannee Legals
Office Drawer 1288, Live Oak, Florida
32064, within thirty (30) days after the
first publication of this Notice of Action,
and file the original with the Clerk of the
Court, Honorable BARRY A. BAKER,
whose address is 201 South Ohio
Avenue, Suwannee County Courthouse,
Live Oak, Florida 32064, either before
service on the Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter. If you fail to
answer, defend or otherwise plead to this
action to foreclose a mortgage, a Default
will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint. This Notice
of Action is executed and published
pursuant to the provisions of 49.08, et
sea., Florida Statutes.

Date: November 30, 2009.

SEAL

Honorable Barry A. Baker
Clerk of the Court
Suwannee County, Florida

By: Sharon Hale
As Deputy Clerk
12/9, 16


FWC approves


Atlantic grouper and


reef fish protections


The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) on Thursday approved rules consistent
with federal regulations to address overfishing of
grouper in the Atlantic Ocean and to encourage an-
glers to help protect Atlantic reef fish when releasing
them to the water.
Stock assessments indicate Atlantic gag, red and
black grouper are undergoing overfishing, which
means fishing pressure is too high to be sustainable.
Measures have been implemented already in Atlantic
federal waters (beyond 3 miles from shore) to reduce
the harvest of these species. Nine other kinds of shal-
low-water groupers also were included in this action to
reduce the incidental catch and discard mortality of
gag, red and black grouper.
The new FWC rules for Atlantic grouper in state
waters are consistent with the federal rules. They es-
tablish a three-fish-per-person aggregate daily recre-
ational bag limit for all grouper in Atlantic and Mon-
roe County state waters, prohibit the captain and crew
of for-hire vessels from retaining any species in the
aggregate grouper bag limit, and allow anglers to keep
no more than one gag or black grouper combined in
Atlantic and Monroe County state waters.
In addition, the rules prohibit all harvest of shallow-
water groupers (including gag, black grouper, red
grouper, scamp, red hind, rock hind, coney, grasby,
yellowfin grouper, yellowmouth grouper and tiger
grouper) from Jan. 1 April 30 in Atlantic and Monroe
County state waters. This spawning season closure
applies to all recreational shallow-water grouper har-
vest and lengthens the previous two-month closure to
commercial grouper fishing in the Atlantic.
"These rules are intended to help speed the recovery
and rebuilding process for Atlantic grouper and reduce
the likelihood of harvest overruns and possible addi-
tional fishing restrictions in federal waters," said Rod-
ney Barreto, FWC Chairman.
The Commission also approved a federal consisten-
cy rule that requires dehooking tools to be aboard
commercial and recreational vessels for anglers to use
as needed to remove hooks from Atlantic reef fish.
"Dehooking tools are a proven way to limit the han-
dling of fish and help increase the odds that fish will
survive when they are released," Barreto said.
These rules take effect in mid-January. The presen-
tations on .,* "/'. '. used at the commission i,.. iiin., are
available online at: http://myfwc.com/docs/Commis-
i. .,i.. i,. -.'2009/2009 Dec FPH Atlantic-
Grouper_presentation.pdf







FWC declares bonefish


a saltwater game fish


The Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission (FWC) voted on
Thursday to elevate public awareness of
the importance of Florida bonefish by
declaring it a saltwater game fish.
"Bonefish are one of the major rea-
sons Florida is 'The Fishing Capital of
the World,'" said FWC Chairman Rod-
ney Barreto. "We took this action today
to emphasize how important the bone-
fish fishery is to Florida anglers, visi-
tors and South Florida's recreational
fishing industry."
It is illegal to commercially harvest
and sell bonefish in Florida, and sport
anglers are allowed to keep only one
bonefish 18 inches in fork length per
day.
To further protect bonefish popula-
tions in Florida, the Commission also
directed staff to develop a draft rule for
consideration in February that would
add all species of bonefish found in
Florida waters to FWC rules, extend
FWC bonefish regulations into federal
waters, and require that bonefish be
landed in whole condition.
"Bonefish are one of the premier
sport fisheries in Florida and are known
as 'grey ghosts of the flats' because
they are stealthy, fast-swimming fight-
ers that are challenging to catch," said
Barreto. "That's why we recognize that
conserving Florida's bonefish resources
will ensure that anglers worldwide can
continue to enjoy fishing for this special
species."


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North Florida


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


CYAN
MAGENTA


Among the most popular sites online these days
are newspaper websites. Yes, Newspaper sites.
Maybe that is because newspaper sites are
trusted, cherished and informative local content
destinations.

#1 Newspaper websites are locally dominant as the number one
local website in 22 of the top 25 U.S. Markets.

74 Million. In September 2009, 74 million unique visitors
went to a newspaper website. That represents 38% share of visitors.

3.4 Billion. Visitors looked at 3.4 billion pages and
spent 43 million hours on newspaper sites in September 2009.

283 ./o Newspaper share of local online advertising is 26.9%
exceeding yellow pages. TV sites and radio sites combined.

$3.1 BillionH Advertising on newspaper websites
exceeded $3.1 billion per year

2. X. Borrell reports that newspaper website's share of local
online revenue is more than that from all other local media
combined (2.8x directories; 2.9x that of local tv; 12x radio station
sites, 20x business and alternative papers and 28x magazines)

48% People do more than visit a newspaper site. 46% of adults
visiting a newspaper website took some action. More newspaper
website users took action after seeing online advertising than all
other local sites, and portals according to OPA research.

28%. The percentage of newspaper websites visitors who go
once a day or more frequently.

Content sites produce greater purchase intent,
online ad awareness, brand favorability and message association
than the market norms, portals and ad networks according to
OPA research.
Sources: MORI Research, Nielsen Online, Borrell Associates, OPA



Newspaper advertising.
A destination, not a distraction.
www.newspapermedia.com









N
Newspaper Association of America 4401 Wilson Blvd., Suite 900, Arlington, VA 22203 571.366.1000


-


K-u--// /


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* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


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565506-F


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North Florida


MAGENTA


PAGE 12B


' newtnew
Even Odd
* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


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