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Suwannee Democrat
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028422/00619
 Material Information
Title: Suwannee Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: J.E. Pound
Place of Publication: Live Oak, Fla
Creation Date: July 29, 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
weekly[ former <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
 Notes
Review: The Suwannee Democrat LCCN: sn95026787 is one of the oldest continuously published weeklies in the State of Florida. It began publishing in 1884 in the city of Live Oak (FL). Noting the shifting demographics of Florida in the 20th century, in 1906, one observes that Live Oak was the fifth largest city in Florida, preceded only by Jacksonville, Pensacola, Tampa, and Key West. The Suwannee Democrat enjoyed a corresponding reputation as a journalistic leader in early 20th century Florida. For approximately two years, from 1906 through 1907, the weekly Suwannee Democrat was supplemented by the Live Oak (FL) Daily Democrat LCCN: sn95026788. The Suwannee Democrat has won numerous awards from the Florida Press Association, both as in the weekly category and for the quality of its agricultural reporting. In its early days, the Suwannee Democrat reported a Democrat Party affiliation. The newspaper's first editor hid under an assumed name when he was suspected of murder. A deathbed confession by the actual perpetrator allowed him to resume his true identity: F.R. McCormack. Very little else, however, is known of F.R. McCormack. Fires have taken their toll on the Suwannee Democrat. In 1906, a disgruntled printer left by railroad on the night that its offices burned to the ground. Arson again in October 1995, destroyed a historic block of Live Oak's downtown and the newspaper's office was one of the casualties. Lost in the fire were last-known issues of the Suwannee Democrat dating from 1897 through 1900. The issues had just been scheduled for preservation microfilming under the auspices of the U.S. Newspaper Program, when they were destroyed. The event was bitterly regretted and served to show the precariousness of local newspaper archives. Live Oak is the seat of Suwannee County (FL) government. Suwannee County is surrounded on three sides by the Suwannee River. And, its karst topography gives the area an abundance of natural springs and fresh water. Industries of the region, particularly during the early days of the Suwannee Democrat, were lumber, turpentine and cotton. Live Oak was known for its grist and lumber mills. The character of these industries and the regional economy survived through the 1920s, when economic down-turn resulted in change. Change was already being seen as early as 1910, when the poultry underwent industrialization in the county. Poultry took such a strong foothold in Suwannee County that even front yards were cultivated for the production of feed grains. Agriculture and other land-based industries, particularly forestry and related industries, were also seeing change with the establishment of nurseries supplying hybrid bulbs and plants to markets. The Crash of 1929 and the Great Depression brought change and growth to a halt. With recovery, the region became semi-rural. Florida's demographic shifts, both that following World War II and the completion of the Interstate Highway System initiated by Governor Bryant in the 1960s, have marked a trend of increasing urbanization in Suwannee County.--E. Kesse, University of Florida Digital Library Center.
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note: Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33273856
lccn - sn 95026787
issn - 2151-5387
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: UF00028422:00619
 Related Items
Related Items: Live Oak daily Democrat
Preceded by: Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by: Suwannee leader
Preceded by: Suwannee citizen

Full Text



Wednesday Edition - July 29, 2009
! - ,


we'ree breaking local news every day at suwa nneedemocrat.com
J " ' "' " ' " " " "' "M'I .& W.;


124th YEAR, NO. 82 3 SECTIONS, 42 PAGES
Serving Suwannee County since 1884, including Live Oak, Wellborn, Branford, McAlpin and O'Brien


crat
50 CENTS


Ready to rumble


. . -IIT 2..

.... ....- ..-..._ . .. ... . -. -




Practice is underway for SHS football, 1B


INDEX
Arrest Record .....2A
Briefly ..........2A
Legal Notices .....8B
Obituaries ...... .15A
Sports ....... .1-6B
Suwannee Living .. .4A
Viewpoint ........6A
Weather .... ... ..2B
Classifieds special
section inside


So more wea their Wednesday Thursday Friday k


I v II ll r e VU LII I
visit our Web site at
Wftft~j.sullnddinCifmiivclVai '.rl'i


87/73


90/74


90/74


25-year sentence

for drug trafficking
By Carnell Hawthorne Jr.
c:arnell hawThorne@gallnews corn
A Live Oak woman has been sentenced to 25 years in prison
for drug offenses in a courtroom presided over by Circuit Judge
Paul Bryan.
Theresa Judith Meyers, 26, of 9801 CR 136 West, was sen-
tenced Thursday for trafficking the prescription drug by- Meyers
drocodone, according to a court report. Meyers, who was original-
ly arrested in September for selling 70 drug tablets (28-34 grams) to a local Task
Force operative, was found guilty Jily 14.


Bond




backer




jailed


Newspaper's inquiries
bring fraud to light
By Jeff Waters fraudulent, the county
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com may be forced to secure
payment. However, four
An investigation by the of the five county com-
Suwannee Democrat has missioners were unaware
revealed that the man who the bond's backer was in
backed a $200,000 bond prison until contacted by
for a road through an the Democrat. Most
abandoned subdivision blamed County Attorney
here has beeri jailed on Hal Airth for not keeping


federal fraud charges.
Should the bond prove


SEE BOND, PAGE 16A


Home invasion

victims give

thieves a struggle


Pilgrim's Pride to close 2 plants
900-plus jobs in Georgia and Alabama could be lost Athens, Ala., plant will be consoli-
dated into two other Pilgrim's Pride
complexes, bringing thQse facilities
Staff Ga., the company said Friday. More to full capacity. The hatchery in
Pilgrim's Pride will close a chick- - than 900 jobs could be lost. Moulton, Ala., the feed mill in


en processing plant in Athens, Ala.,
and one of its two plants in Athens,


rOfficer threatened
with beer bottle
By Jeff Waters
A Live Oak man was arrested Sat-
urday for allegedly threatening an
LOPD officer with a beer bottle, ac-
cording to reports from Live Oak Po-
lice Det. Sgt. Ron Shaw.


According to a company press
release, production from the


Thomas
Perez


SEE OFFICER, PAGE 16A


Transient charged
in theft of wallet
By Jeff Waters
A homeless man was arrested Sat-
urday for allegedly renting a local
motel
ii 111i a umnn 111111111111 room


6 911307520!


Michael
Blizzard


with a stolen credit
card.
According to a re-
SEE TRANSIENT,
PAGE 16A


SEE PILGRIM'S, PAGE 11A


Local nightspot loses
full-service designation
Out of compliance apartment, In addition, of-
with ordinance ficers on twd separate oc-
casions reportedly count-
governing alcohol, ed more than 70 cus-
say authorities tomers leaving the build-
ing, which has a maxi-
By Jeff Waters mum occupancy of 60,
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com according to authorities.


A local nightspot has
lost its designation as a
full-service restaurant af-
ter an investigation deter-
mined the establishment
was operating against city
rules concerning alcohol.
The Big B or Ms. D's
Cozy Corner was found to
be selling alcoholic bever-
ages after 2 a.m. and im-
posing a $5 cover charge,
in violation of its license,
according to a report by
the Live Oak Police De-


SEE LOCAL, PAGE 11A


Couple fights
off intruders
at back door
By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com
A home invasion rob-
bery early Monday marks
the 22nd such crime since
December, according to a
report from Live Oak Po-
lice Det. Sgt. Ron Shaw.
This time, the victims
fought back and the rob-
bers fled.
Debra Alvarez, 53, and
husband Enrique Alvarez,
39, told officers they were
sleeping when they awoke
at about 2:40 a.m. to
someone forcing open the
back door of their 1405
NE Duval Street home.
Enrique Alvarez con-
fronted a suspect at the
back door where the two
began fighting, according
to Shaw. During the fight
the suspect allegedly
yelled for another suspect
to help him. Both Enrique
and Debra Alvarez were.
struck with long wooden


handles that appeared to
come from a posthole dig-
ger, according to Shaw.
Both suffered minor in-
juries and were treated by

SEE HOME, PAGE 16A

Home
invasion
total jumps
By Jeff Waters
Home invasion rob-
beries in Live Oak
since December
jumped from 15 to 21
overnight last week, but
not due to a sudden
crime wave. It turns out
that six previous crimes
were reclassified as
home invasions.
"Due to the reclassi-
fication of types of
crimes that we work the
official number is 21,"
said LOPD Chief Bud-
dy Williams Friday.
With Monday's rob-
bery, that figure is 22.


Every vehicle on

the lot reduced


S,., U.


www.suwanneedemocrat.com


IPOIE












ON THE FLIPSIDE


HOW TO REACH US

Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, www.suwanneedemocrat.com
Mail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
* Publisher,
Myra Regan, ext. 122


CONTACT US WITH

YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, call us at 386-362-1734
or visit our web site at
www.suwanneedemocratcom



NEWSROOM
* Editor,
Robert Bridges, ext. 131
E Reporter,
Carnell Hawthorne Jr., ext. 134
* Reporter,
Jeff Waters, ext. 133



ADVERTISING
* Advertising Manager,
Monja Robinson, ext. 105
M Sr. Advertising Representative,
Bill Regan, ext. 107
I Advertising Representative,
Tami Stevenson, ext. 109
* Telesales Ad Representative,
Nancy Goodwin, ext. 103
* Classified/Legal,
Janice Ganote, ex. 102




CIRCULATION
N Circulation Manager,
Angle Sparks, ext. 152
S Circulation
Service Hours, M-F 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Subscription Rates,
In-county, $33 Out-of-county, $48




uukranna

democrat




Serving Suwannee County Since 1884

-
The Suwannee Democrat, published
Wednesday and'Friday.
Periodicals postage paid at
Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located
at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
FL. Publication number 530180.
7-,'; : ,'*..
"POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL
S 32064."Annual subscription rate is
$33 in county, $48 out of county and
$48 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.

OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday - Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Letters, comments and opinions on
the Viewpoint & Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Suwannee Democrat.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
- Letters may be mailed, faxed or
e-mailed to our office. All letters are
' read. Not all letters are published.
Letters may be edited to fit available
space. The editor should not alter the
- writer's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
the point, an ideal range is 150 to
200 words. Please include your
name, address and day and evening
. phone numbers for verification.
Letters MUST be signed. Letters.to
the editor can be limited to one
C1 letter per quarter per individual.
1.',.


RANT & RAVE HOTLINE
Here's your chance to tell everyone what you
think! Callers may dial 208-8314 and leave a
message to express their thoughts, good or
bad, 24/7 about issues and politics, but not
about private individuals or businesses. If you
prefer, you may e-mail your comments to
robert.bridges@gaflnews.com. Your name is
not necessary, but please, x .;-tr'
take 30 seconds or less for '
your message.
t, SuwanneeCunt' Part of
. "The Orlgmnal Florida" \)


Editor's note: The
Suwannee Democrat
prints the entire arrest
record each week. If your
name appears here and
you are later found not
guilty or the charges are
dropped, we will be hap-
py to make note of this in
the newspaper when judi-
cial proof is presented to
us by you or the authori-
ties.
The following abbrevi-
ations are used below:
SCSO-Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
LOPD-Live Oak Po-
lice Department
FDLE-Florida Depart-
ment of Law 'Enforce-
ment
FHP-Florida Highway
Patrol *
FWC-Florida Wildlife
Commission
DOT-Department of
Transportation
OALE-Office of Agri-
cultural, Law Enforce-
ment
P & P-Probation and
Parole
USMS-US. Marshals
Service
ATF-Department of
Alcohol, Tobacco and
Firearms
DOC-Department of
Corrections

July 23, Cory Dejuan
Brown, 28, 5907 Central
Road McAlpin Fl,
sentenced 90 days cj
SCSO-J. Mills
July 23, Jerome Louis
Carter,.23, 301 Parshley
Street Live Oak Fl.,
sentenced 366 days doc
SCSO-A. Loston
July 23, Donna Gaylord
Hall, 45, 7183 240th Street
OBrien F, vop o/c retail
merchant; petit theft 1st
appppd pt pr rs CSOr-
S.Law


July 24, Charles
Carrithers, 61, 4811 Saxton
Ave New Smyrna Beach
Fl, suw cty wrt vop o/c,
poss cocaine / poss
alprozolam $3000.00 or
$300. prob., 1st app pd
n/appt per wrs SCSO C
Smith
July 24, Carnell
Hawthorne Sr., 49, 206
Long St Live Oak, FI, suw
cty wrt writ of bodily
attachment, child support
SCSO C Smith
July 24, John Patrick
Vance, 32, 502 Clay St
Live Oak Fl, sent to 24
months doc SCSO T
Roberts
July 24, Darryl Felton
Morrell, 53, 515 W 7th
Street Live Oak Fl, sent 24
months doc SCSO T
Roberts
July 24, Maurice
Boatman, 33, 805 McGee
Street Live Oak Fl, no
vaild license, poss of
cocaine, suw co wrt battery
madison co wrt, fta no d/l
1st app pd appt per wrs
SCSO-DTF-F.Gorski
July 24, Juan Jose
Cuenca, 23, 7679 169th
Road Live Oak Fl,
Sentenced to 1 week end
SCSO-D. McDaniel
July 24, Ashley Danielle
Frier, 24, 4015 Hwy 129 N
Live Oak Fl, vop o/c grand
theft iii, bond $5000 or
$500 p&p 1st app pd appt
per wrs SCSO-K. Osborn
July 25, Fredrick Dadiel
Quijano, 20, 8114 Embassy
Blvd Port St Richey Fl,
sent to 14 months doc
SCSO T Roberts
July 25, Michael Paul
Blizzard, 22, Homeless
Transient Live Oak Fl,
fraud credit card (3cts),
theft, identity theft (3cts)),
forgery (3cts), Ist app pd
Sappt per wrs.LOPD-B.
Harrison


July 25, Jeffrey Baiter
Crawford, 48, Homeless
Live Oak Fl, wrt marion co
dwls, 1st app n/pd appt per
wrs LOPD S. Riggs
July 25, Eddie James
George, 53, 414 Evelyn
Ave Live Oak Fl, vop o/c
felony dui, vop o/c felony
dwls, hamilton co wrt, 1st
app n/pd appt per wrs
SCSO-K. Osborn
July 25, Eric Jarrod
Williams, 27, 10180 73rd
Loop Wellborn Fl, sent 24
months doc SCSO-L.,
McDaniel
July 25, Eric A Nelson,
41,102 Mary Mac Live
Oak Fl, no valid d.l., resist
w/o violence, 1st app pd
appt per wrs LOPD Fipps
July 25, Cameron Lesene
Francis, 46, 9735 CR 136
Live Oak F, Dui, 1st App
Pd Appt Per Wrs LOPD D
Slaughter
July 25, Ralfy
Valasquez, 23, 12173 58th
Place Live Oak Fl, no valid
d.l., 1st app pd appt per
wrs, suw cty wrt vop o/c,
no valid drivers license,
suw cty wrt fta o/c, trespass
after warning 1st app pd
appt per wrs LOPD T Faller
July 25, Chad Anthony
Schmit, 22, 3.16 NW
Cottonfield Lane White
Springs Fl, poss -20 g
cannabis, columbia county
wrt vop o/c resist w/o viol,
loitering/prowling,
hamilton county wrt vop
poss -20g cannabis, dwls
07-546-mm & 1st app pd




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Arrest Record


appt per wrs FHP B Stuart
July 25, Dexter
Williams, 43, 9900 110
Terr Live Oak Fl, battery
dom violence, resist w/o
violence 1st app pd appt
wrs SCSO A Robinson
July 26, Donald Lewis
Bailey, 55, 3903 284th St
Branford Fl, disorderly
conduct SCSO T
Rodriquez
July 26, Sanita Nicole
Walker, 27, 840 5th Street
Live Oak Fl, sentenced to
24months doc SCSO-M.
Jelks
July 26, Thomas perez,
38, 420 Horizon Circle
Live Oak Fl, assault on leo,
1st app pd appt per wrs
LOPD T Faller
July 26, Kevin Scott
Taylor, 45, 2726 Zuni Road
St Cloud Fl, dui 3rd
offense, 2nd refusal breath
test FHP B Stuart
July 26, Theresa Pascual
Ramierz, 20, 420 Horizon
Circle Live Oak.Fl, no


--"BRIE FLY-j -

Suwannee County
Schools Summer
Food Service Program
Breakfast meals will be available for 7:30 to 8:30 a.m.
and lunch from noon to 1 p.m., Monday through Thurs-
day at both sites. All children one year old to 18 years of
age are eligible for meals no charge. Parents of children
must pay $3.00 per meal. Suwannee High School Cafete-
ria will be in operation from June 1, 2009 to August 13,
2009. Branford High School Cafeteria will be.open from
June 8, 2009 to July 30, 2009.


Suwannee River Challenge
and Marathon
Oct 10
The 8th Annual Suwannee River Challenge and
Marathon date has been set for Saturday, Oct 10, on
Columbus Day Weekend. -


Suwannee County Fire/Rescue ca'ls

for service from July 18 to July 26


Total calls: 100

Medical calls: 85
Weakness: 5
Cardiac: 11
Trauma: 13
Motor.vehicle crash: 14
Misc. medical calls: 19
Altered mental status: 4
Respiratory: 4
Diabetic: 1
Abdominal pain: 3
Seizure: 5
CVA: 3
Nausea/vomiting: 1


& Products


Ob: 1
Cardiac arrest: 1

Fire calls: 15
Brush fire: 1
Motor vehicle crash: 10
Medical assist: 1
Down power line: 1
Smoke investigation: .
Mutual aid to another
county: 1

Volunteer fire
responses: 18


9 364-3644


232 Court St. SE., Live Oak
Behind Dixie Grill
Next to Dana E. Hill Law Offices 63 -


valid dl LOPD-T. Faller
July 27, Lashawn
Farmer, 19, 205 Louis Ave
Live Oak,.fl baker co vocc
o/c poss., concealed
weapon, poss cocaine
P&P-J.D Holton
July 27, Amy Sweat, 25,
9433 147th Rd Live Oak
Fl, vop grand theft iii
SCSO-T. Lee
July 27, James Sherman
Frier II, 22, 5462 SW 1St
St Plantation Fl. vop o/c
burg of Structure,& uttering
a forgery SCSO-T. Lee
July 27, Jeremiah
:Underwood, 22, 4750 Hwy.
255 Madison Fl, vop o/c
felony criminal
mischief(lio);felony
criminal mischief, vop o/c
deal in stolen property
trafficking SCSO-S. Law
July 27, Colby Lynn
Williams, 18, 21773 180th
St Live Oak Fl, improper
exb. firearm, trespass
prop/convey, while armed
LOPD T Faller


Coming in


September '09


537010-F


I


m


--,


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGEF 9A







WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


The Safety Line
From Suwannee County Fire Rescue



Hurricane



season's here

By Paul Haas
Suwannee County Fire Marshal

Hurricane season is upon us. Many of us have prepared
for this hurricane season by purchasing portable
generators. Portable generators are useful during power
outages. However, many homeowners are unaware that
the improper use of portable generators can be risky. The
most common dangers associated with portable
generators are carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning,
electrical shock or electrocution, and fire hazards.

Facts and figures:

CO deaths associated with generators have spiked in
recent years as generator sales have risen.

Inf-1999, generators were associated with 6 percent of
the total yearly estimated CO poisoning deaths associated
with all consumer products compared to 24 percent in
2002.


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


There were at least 64 deaths in 2005 alone from CO
poisoning associated with generators.

Source: Consumer Product Safety Commission

National Fire Protection Association safety tips:

* Generators should be operated in well-ventilated
locations outdoors away from all doors, windows and
vent openings.
* The generator should be placed so that exhaust fumes
cannot enter the home through windows, doors or other
building openings.
* Install carbon monoxide alarms in your home. Follow
manufacturer's instructions for proper placement and
mounting height. Should CO enter the home and pose a
risk, an alarm will sound.
* The generator must not be refueled while it is
running. It should be turned off and allowed to cool down
before refueling.
* Fuel for the generator should never be stored in the
home. Gasoline and other flammable liquids should be
stored outside of living areas in properly labeled safety
containers.
* Appliances should be plugged directly into the
generator or a heavy-duty outdoor-rated extension cord.
The cord should be checked for cuts or tears and that the
plug has all three prongs, especially a grounding pin.
* If the generator must be connected to the house
wiring to power appliances, a qualified electrician should
install a properly rated transfer switch in accordance with
the National Electrical Code and all applicable state and
local electrical codes.


Hurricane season has arrived. -Photo:'Metro


"School Tools for Cool Kids/Operation

Stuff the Bus" starts tomorrow at Publix


PAGE 3A


Live Oak Fire Department
6th Annual M.D.A. Car Show

The 6th annual M.D.A. Car Show will be held at the
Live Oak Fire Department located at 200 E. Duval
Street, on August 1, from 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.
$10 pre-registration (post date by July 31)
$15 day of show
Judging starts at noon, trophies will be given.
Classes will be:
* Classic cars
* Classic trucks
* Street Rods
* Muscle Cars
* Tuner class
* Under Construction Class
There will be goody bags and the first 40 cars re-
ceive a dash plate.,
There will also be a race car class with 1st, 2nd, 3rd
place trophies given, sponsored by: B.S. Racing. Each
class will be judged and awarded tropies for 1st, 2nd,
and 3rd places. Also awards for Best of Show, Best
Paint, Best Undercarriage, and Cleanest Ride will be
given.
Live entertainment by William Scott and Silverado
with Caitlin Nicole Eadie.
:q,,,Friday night Cruise in 7 - 10 p.m. Live music by
Elvis.
100% of the proceeds benefit the Muscular Dystro-
phy Association.
Contact: Alan Bedenbaugh at (386) 590-0595 for
more information.

SHS class of 1994
to hold reunion
Attention SHS class of 1994! We are planning our
15 year class reunion for Aug. 1. Please contact the
committee at classofl994shs@yahoo.com or call Sheri
Riggins-Sanders at 352-348-3998 for more informa-
tion.


Class reunion
Suwannee High Class of 1989
Upcoming 20th reunion
October 9-10, 2009
For more information please contact:
Paula Gianeskis McCullers
386-590-4385

Register now for rec dept. sports - Page B



Surrey Place

Care Center

A SAyHealthCARE Community
--"3I


Publix Super Markets invites the
community to participate in a program
to collect school supplies from July 30
through August 29 for homeless
children in Suwannee County. This
program, similar to "Operation Stuff
the Bus," is different in that there are
"recipes" of supplies for various grade
levels, and these supplies are pre-
packaged and available for purchase
by community members. Store
customers can purchase the pre-made
packages of school supplies that range
from $11 to $14.


The Suwannee County Historical
Museum's inaugural gathering of the
"Hit the Streets" Walking History Tour *
program was a great success. On
Saturday, July 25, Eric Musgrove
presented a history of the county seats
and courthouses of Suwannee County to
nearly two dozen citizens on the
courthouse lawn. Mr. Musgrove, a
Museum Association member and author
of the local history book entitled
"Reflections of Suwannee County,"
discussed the various locations of the
county seat, from the "house of William
Hines" to Houston and finally to Live
Oak. He also presented little-known
history of the drama and politics
surrounding the selection of a county site
in Live Oak that ended with the current
location of the Suwannee County
Courthouse. As the Records Manager
and Historian for the Office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court, Mr. Musgrove
brought along various documents of
early Suwannee County history relating


United Way of Suwannee Valley
Inc. is coordinating the distribution of
the school supplies for the Publix
Super Markets in the Suwannee
Valley. As donated school supplies
accumulate, they are picked up by
United Way staff members. The.
supplies,will be delivered to
Suwannee County schools for the new
school year. Homeless children in
need of school supplies will receive
these donated items.
Publix Super Markets thanks its
dedicated customers for their support


t9.the Courthouses and county sites for
the public to view. Mr. Musgrove also
holds a monthly presentation on
Suwannee County history at the Museum
entitled "Reflections." This presentation
occurs on the first Tuesday night of each
month at 6:30, and is free to the public.
The next Reflections program is set for
on Tuesday, August 4.
SIf you would like more information
about any of the museum's programs,
please contact Randy Torrance at the
museum at 386-362-1776.
The museum is located at 208 N. Ohio
Avenue in Live Oak in the historic
Atlantic Coastfine freight station. Their
operating hours are Tuesday - Saturday
from 9 am - 3 pm, closing from 12 - 1
pm for lunch. Admission is free,
donations are accepted. The museum's
phone number is 386-362-1776. The
museum's website is
www.suwanneemuseum.org; Randy
Torrance is the Executive Director /
Curator.


of this program and for helping make
it possible for many children to
receive the "tools" they need to learn.
this school year.
United Way of Suwannee Valley is
a community impact and fundraising
organization which advances the
common good by utilizing volunteers
on all levels to identify unmet
community needs and seek to
alleviate those needs through United
Way of Suwannee Valley initiatives
and the funding of 23 affiliated health
and human service agencies.


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386-364-5961


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Justine Hurst and Brooke Poole




Justine Hurst and Brooke Poole


Hurst - Poole

wedding set

for Aug. 1
Lathon, Brooklynn, Waylon and
Harley would like to announce the
engagement and approaching mar-
riage of their parents, Justin Hurst and
Brooke Poole.
Brooke is the daughter of Glenn Jerni-
gan and Nancy Garner of Live Oak. Ma-
ternal grandparents are the late Franklin
and Vivian Johnson of Lake City. Pater-
nal grandparents are the late Billy and
late Laverne Jernigan of Live Oak. Brooke is
employed at First Federal in Live Oak.
Justin is the son of Michael and Tammie Hurst
of Luraville. Maternal grandparents are the late
Ashton and late Betty Payne of Live Oak.,Paternal
grandparents are Catherine and the late Gordon Hurst
of Hatch Bend. Justin is employed at Gilman's Building
Supply in Perry.
The wedding will take place on Saturday, August 1,
2009, on the beach in St. Augustine,'with a reception fol-
lowing at Harry's in old St. Augustine.
Justin and Brooke will be flying to Jamaica for their
honeymoon.


Vacation Bible School time at McCall's Chapel


Hi, my name is Gizmo
and I live in Gadget's
Garage, a Vacation Bible
School program spon-
sored by McCall's Chapel
United Methodist Church.
At Gadget's Garage we
will learn about Jesus,
meet new friends, do fun
activities, sing awesome
songs, make crafts, play
games, eat snacks, and
more. There is going to
be lots of fun and we
want you to come.
The garage is open Au-
gust 3 - 7, from 6-9p.m.


at McCall's Chapel Unit-
ed Methodist Church, lo-
cated at 7755 South
State Road 349. This is
the southern edge of
Hatch Bend. A meal will
be provided each


evening.
Bring a friend and re-
ceive a gift. If you are an
adult and bring a child,
your name will be en-
tered into a drawing.
If you wish to pre-reg-


ister, or need transporta-
tion within five miles of
the church, call 352-542-
8628 or 386-935-0776.
And REMEMBER
God's always doing
great, exciting things.


REG SISTER NOW


0 A N D MK.
I.II .... I. I..I ......
B~jg~ilflM�sJHg)


Fall Schedule available at:
WWW.NFCC.EDU
CALL OR VISIT OUR CAMPUS
850.973.2288
325 NW Turner Davis Dr I Madison, FL

North Florida
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
SmalCCoflege. Big (Possibifities.
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Auto Body * Auto Service Tech
Construction * Cosmetology
S Child Care * Culinary Arts
With Coupon, Must enroll by August 1, Must be Pell eligible

SUWANNEE-
I I
TECHNICAL CENTER -iH I
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064
386-364-2750
FINANCIAL) IS A'AIAlABl E AND ACCEPTED. AI'IROVID FOI R VATRAINING
IBENlIITS'. ACCREDITEDIIBY THli COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.
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FURNITURE SHOWPLACE'
WIlholesale Sleep Distributors

US 90 West (Next To 84 Lumber) Llke City, 386-752-9303


S ~Live Oak
PAINT &a
FLOORING



I'm re-tiling my small
bathroom. There are so
many tile sizes to choose
from, which would you
suggest I use to make
my room appear larger?

A , Larger tiles have le8ss
* grout lines which means
less chance for dirt build up
and will give you the illusion
of a larger room, especially if
installed diagonally.

1512 South Ohio Avenue, 362-7066
'_635087-F


Birmingham gets degree from Kaplan
Shiloh Birmingham of Live Oak has the commencement speaker.
been awarded a Associate of Science The Kaplan University summer 2009
Degree in Interdisciplinary Studies from class of more than 2,500 students
Kaplan University. Birmingham's ac- earned their associate's, bachelor's and
complishment was celebrated during a master's degrees completely online.
live graduation ceremony on July 25 in Hundreds of them traveled from around
Chicago. Award-winning actress Ameri- the country and the world to attend te
ca Ferrera, star of ABC Television's ceremony, meeting face-to-face for the
popular series "Ugly Betty," served as first time.


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 4A


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WEDESAY JLY29 209U UWNNE EMCRT/IV OK AG 5


Anna Miller

Circle Sixth

Annual

Fishing

Tournament
The Anna Miller Circle
of Live Oak Elks Lodge
1165 will sponsor its
Sixth Annual Fishing
Tournament in Stein-
hatchee, Saturday, Oct.
24, at Riher Haven Mari-
na> Entri fee is $30 per
person. Weigh-in from 1-
4 p.m. Prizes total $1,500.
plus. free drawings and
give-always. Ne\\ chil-
dren's category added.
$10 entry fee (10 and un-
der) with a special prize.
Boat rental and lodging
available at local mannas.
Info/entry forms. Terri
Johnson 386-776-2508,
Elaine Lowe (cell) 386-
362-9149 or Riser Haven
Marina & Motel. 352-
498-0709.
Thank you for your as-
sistance in promoting this
tournament so the Anna
Miller Circle can contin-
ue to support the special
need children and the el-
derly in our local nursing
homes.
Felicia Vulerich,
Anna Miller Circle
President


The Shepherd's


at Live Oak Church of God


The Shepherds concert will be held at the Live Oak Church of God on Wednesday, August 5.
The Shepherds' concert will be held at the Live Oak Church of God on Wednesday, August 5.


The community is in-
vited to attend the nation-
ally known group The
Shepherds' concert at the
Live Oak Church of God
on Wednesday, August 5,
at 7 p.m. The Shepherds
will be performing such
radio hits as "A Black
Heart," "On My Knees,"
"Move Oh Mountain,"
and their signature song
"There's A Miracle In the
Making," along with
many others.
The Shepherds have


appeared on TBN Praise
the Lord and Daystar
Television Network. With
their true family harmony
and added youthfulness,
Dove recording artist The
Shepherds create a
unique vocal blend giving
a progressive sound that
is re-defining Gospel mu-
sic for future generations.
The Shepherd's latest
album "Reality" features
a wide variety of styles
and genres of Christian
music that seems to be


connecting with a diverse worship experience at the
group of audiences. Live Oak Church of God
You are invited to be a on August 5, at 7.p.m.
part of this unforgettable The church is located 1/2


miles past Burger King on
the left. For more infor-
mation, you may call the
church office at 362-2483.


Barry Baker

addresses

Republican group
Suwannee County Clerk currently held by Democrat
of Court Barry Baker was Allan Boyd) will be the
the guest speaker at the guest speaker on August 6,
Suwannee County Republi- at 7 p.m. at the public li-
can Party monthly meeting brary in Live Oak. For
on July 2. Baker gave a more information go to
short talk about the Clerk's www.suwanneegop.com or
many duties, changes that call 386-776-1444.
are and will continue to
take place (some dictated
by the state) and noted that
some fees have increased
(foreclosure filing fees in-
creased from $300 to $400
for $50,000 and under;
$905 for up to $250,000
and then $1900 for over
$250,000). Baker was es-
pecially complimentary of
his staff, their dedication,
expertise and hard work
during these financially
stressed times.
Eddie Hendry, Republi-
can candidate for Congres- e
sional District 2 (the seat


Phones
and More $
Your Downtown Live Oak
Wireless & Internet Store gs.

ver�_ionwireless bn s
LOCALLY OWNED Depn
Across from Pizza Hut
364-2868
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Live Oak 536096-F


www.suwanneedemocrat.com.


F irm

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in Concert


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 5A


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


um


.' ''' I~'








WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


PAGE 6A SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Siewpoints/Opinions


&I I
ROBERT BRIDGES
S Editor


Members of the Suwannee Democrat editorial board
are Myra C. Regan, publisher, and Robert Bridges,
editor. Our View, which appears in Friday's editions
of the Democrat, is formed by that board.



OPINION




Cap and trade

means lights out for

small businesses
By Dan Danner
Get ready to pay a whole lot more to keep the
lights on.
Congress currently is working to pass a huge
energy bill. The centerpiece is a system to force
energy utilities to purchase government credits
to offset their greenhouse gas emissions. This
would in effect be an energy tax on the Ameri-
can people as the utilities pass the increased
costs along to consumers and small business
owners.
The plan is called "cap and trade" and it refers
to a new trading market that Congress wants to
create. The government will set limits on the
amount of greenhouse gases businesses are al-
lowed to emit (the "cap"), and then businesses,
will purchase credits to offset their emissions.
Businesses that reduce their emissions below
the cap will be free to sell their .credits to other
businesses ithe "trade"), a system with the po-
tential to make trading mortgage derivatives
look like a good idea.
However, in the initial phases, more than 80
percent of the credits will be given away by the
government, rather than auctioned off as origi-
nally planned. The credits will go to lig busi-
nesses hand-picked to garner enough support to
pass the bill out of the House Committee on En-
ergy ahd Commerce.
Even President Obama admits current cap and
trade proposals will cause energy rates to rise.
"Under my plan of a cap and trade system, elec-
tricity rates would necessarily skyrocket," he
told The San Francisco Chronicle last year. At
the same time, the House Committee on Ways
and Means estimated we would lose anywhere
from 1.8 million to 5.3 million jobs.
That's because big businesses will pass the
cost on to small businesses and consumers in the
form of higher prices. An analysis by the Massa-
chusetts'Institute of Technology of a less-restric-
tive bill in the last Congress estimated electricity
rates would go up at least 40 percent.
And that would be devastating to small busi-
nesses. Consider the stories we've already heard:
A trucking company owner in Ohio spends
more than $4 million a year on his energy bills.
If his costs increase 40 percent, he'll be spending
$5.6 million a year just on electricity and fuel. In
order to absorb the new energy costs, he said he
would have to raise his prices, as well as cut
hours and employees.
A marketing and exhibit company annually
spends about $120,000 on energy costs, seeing
no decrease despite investing in a $40,000
"smart technology" heating-ventilating-air condi-
tioning system. This company wants to open a
second location in Illinois, but the owner says
with expected cost increases, including health-
care, property insurance and legal counsel, it
may be impossible to expand.
The Pennsylvania owner of four athletic clubs
spends about $600,000 a year to power the heat-
ing-ventilating-air conditioning systems and
lighting the facilities. If that cost goes up 40 per-
cent to $840,000, he says his only choice will be
to close his business.
Everyone wants cleaner air and a better envi-
ronment. But we all need to do our part to help.
Putting the burden on those who can least afford
it is not the way to go.
Dan Danner is president and CEO of the Na-
tional Federation of Independent Business in
Washington, D.C.

Please address fetters to:
Letters To The Editor,
Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Please include your full name, address and daytime
phone number. We ask this so we can verify your letter
and discuss any questions about it with you.


I .ploitng public ignorance


BIBLE VERSE

"I press on toward the goal
to win the prize for which
God has called me
heavenward in Christ Jesus."
- Philippians 3:14



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The dog n
When I was a
kid, I could nev-
er used the ex-
cuse "the dog ate
my homework."
The reason is re-
ally simple.
Mama wouldn't
let dogs in the
house. In fact where I grew up, I
didn't know anyone who let dogs in
their houses.
You see outin the country, most
of our dogs were hunting dogs or
herding dogs, and they all had a
particular ambiance about them that
screamed "essence of barnyard" or
perhaps "midnight stumpwater."
All my life I had heard that ex-
pression about dogs eating home-
work. I did have a dog to eat the
pocket out of my outfielder's glove
because I left in on the tailgate of
the pickup, and yes one chewed the
wiring off my boat trailer. But I'm
not even sure if I had put my home-
work on the back porch if Tuffy,
Spot or Bullet would have bothered
with it. An essay on John Milton
simply does not compare with road
kill. There was a "disstink" differ-
ence.
I was grown and married before
we ever had a dog in the house. Of


OPINION


ever ate my homework


course these were dogs that were
bathed regularly. But they were still
hunting and heard, dogs - Brittanies
and border collies.
Our Brittany named Fancy was
actually a weather dog. She would
go berserk when a storm was brew-
ing. The sky could be clear, and she
would start getting nervous and try-
ing to hide in a closet. I'm not sure
how far out Doppler radar reaches,
but Fancy could hear it thunder in
west Alabama. She would get so
nervous and wild, our veterinarian
prescribed tranquilizers. But unfor-
tunately, she still acted the same.
The only difference was that she
staggered while she was doing it. So
I took the tranquilizers and she
seemed so much better.
Now I read wherp the "dog ate
my homework" excuse is still
around but has mutated somewhat.
A woman in Arlington, Wash., has
been accused of dipping into her ex-
husband's bank account without per-
mission.
She said her dog got into her
purse and ate all her personal
checks. Not just one check or three
checks, the dog supposedly ate all
her checks. She told investigators
she had no choice but to take money
from her ex-husband's account.


Then comes another twist in ca-
nine intervention. An Eau Claire,
Wis., teenager missed a trip to Peru
because his dog chewed up his pass-
port. And,in this case it actually
happened. Officials at O'Hare
looked at the chewed document and
told him it was okay. But at Miami,
airport officials rejcteo t it. The teen
said he did not have hard feelings
against his dog Sunshine. "I love
her too much," he said.
-So here's a ready- made commer-
cial. I don't know what missing the
Peru trip with his Spanish class
would be valued at, but young John
Meier's response is priceless. A kid
who loves his dog that much might
become a great leader one day. Or,
he'll learn to turn around three times
before he sits down.
So at least once in modern histo-
ry, the "dog ate my homework" ex-
cuse was for real.
I'm surprised when asked where
all that money went, Bernie Madoff
didn't try "the dog ate it" routine.
But not even a 101 Dalmatians sce-
nario could have digested all he
"madeoff" with.
(Dwain Walden is editor/publisher
of The Moultrie (Ga.) Observer,
229-985-4545. E-mail:
dwain. walden @ gaflnews. corn)


* -


MYRA C. REGAN
Publisher


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Branford News
Serving southern Suwannee County, including Branford, O'Brien and McAlpin


Boaters becoming a




problem at Little River


By Stephenie Livingston
stephenie. livingston @ gaflnews. com

Last week at Suwannee County's
commissioners meeting, Greg Scott,
Suwannee Parks and Recreation Direc-
tor, spoke out about boaters causing an
increasingly hazardous situation for
swimmers at Little River Springs. As
the river rises, boaters have been com-


ing into the springs area to swim.
"When the river gets too high,
boaters tend to come up into the
springs," said Scott. "Boats and swim-
mers tend not to mix well together, as
you can imagine."
Scott says officials are closely moni-
toring the situation and there may be
discussion of new rules for boaters
eventually, if the situation worsens or


does not improve.
According to Karen Parker of the
state Fish and Wildlife Commission,
FWC officers "cannot patrol all areas at
once and need help from the public."
They are trying to keep a close eye
on Little River Springs, however, if you
see a boater driving recklessly, or too
close to swimmers, call FWC at 1-888-
404-3922.


Two Branford girls chosen for NCA All American Team


By Stephenie Livingston

The Branford JV cheerlead-
ers traveled to Jacksonville to
attend the National Cheerlead-
ing Camp and two girls were
picked for NCA's All Ameri-
can Team.
At the camp, the girls were
taught cheers, chants, dances
and stunts for the upcoming
year. The JV cheerleaders
were awarded Game Day Top
Team and several superior rib-
bons. Six girls were chosen to
tryout for NCA's All Ameri-
can Team. Those nominated
were Olivia Boney, Ashley
Horn, Kendall Hall, Rebecca
White, Traci Baldeon and
Rachel McKensie. Each
cheerleader was required to
perform three stamina jumps,
one tumbling pass and a camp
cheer. Out of the six girls, the-
Branford JV had two girls
make the team. They were
Rachel McKenzie and Rebec-


ca White.
Coach Tracy Lamb says het
girls have not ceased practic-
ing since last year's season
ended. Furthermore, most of
the girls on the team are high-
ly accomplish in their sport
and have been cheering for
years. However, she says the
most special story to come out
of this years cheer camp is
that of first time cheerleader,
Rebecca White, who made the
NCA's All American Team on
her first try.
'This is her first year being
a cheerleader and she is al-
ready accomplishing so
much," said Lamb. "She has a
beautiful smile, sharp moves."
She went on to praise the
team's captain, Rachel McK-
ensie, Branford's other All
American cheerleader.
"Rachel has been cheering
for three years and she is just
a very well rounded cheer-
leader," Lamb said.


All American
Team:
Rebecca White and Rachel
McKenzie


Game Day
Champions:
Front row: Rebecca White,
Christell Sanders, Rachel
McKenzie, Traci Baldeon,
Ashley Horn, Jordan Tem-
ples, Sara Kolvinsky. Back
row: Brittany Brasfield,
Cayla Derringer, Ashly
Lancaster, Camp instruc-
tor, Kasey Raulerson,
Kendall Hall, Mauri Bryant
and Olivia Boney.


4 '
All American
Nominees
L-R Olivia Boney, Rebecca
White, Ashley Horn, Rachel
McKenzie, Traci Baldeon, and
Kendall Hall.






Fun Day



Dair Da v Ca
By Slephenie Livingston
4-H will be sponsoring
Dairy Day Camp at Hatch
Park August 3-5. The camr
designed to prepare student
for the state Quiz Bowl Au
gust 6. 4-H youth will lean
about the proper nutrition (
cattle. This is a multi-coun
e\ent including Gilchrist,
Lafayette, Alachua and
Suwannee County.
On August 4-5, students
will tou tluee different di-


Town's


revitalization


on the


agenda

By Stephenie Livingston
stephenie.livingston @ gaflnews. com

The revitalization committee of
the Rotary Club of Branford, in
conjunction with Jim Beeler from
the University of Florida, will be
presenting a concept-design for the
revitalization of Branford during a
town meeting at The Perfect Set-
ting, 402 NW Suwannee Avenue,
August 4
at 7 p.m. a
Before and i g
after pic-
tures of
just how -
the town
could look uIle ie I
along with. i
"visionary
ideas" by Ev
Jim Beeler dev .lop
and com-
mittee
members dis r
will be
presented,
according
to the Ro-
tary club's press release.
The revitalization committee has
been working towards receiving
grants to improve downtown Bran-
ford and make it more inviting to
new businesses. The revitalization
project was started by the local Ro-
tary Club and is headed by Peggy
Maloney. The committee is plan-
ning a community wide meeting
nekt month. Jim Beeler, a UF grad-
uate student, will be there to present
enhanced photo of what downtown
Branford could look like with a lit-
tle sprucing up. Branford is "a gem
that hasn't been uncovered yet;"
said Maloney. "Eventually develop-
ers are going to discover it."
Maloney says they are pushing
for industries that will increase eco-
tourism, not just another Wal-Mart.
With plans underway for a state
park at Little River, Maloney says
Branford is becoming a hub for out-
doorists.
"We need to capitalize on this,
but do it in a way that will protect
our naturally resources," said Mal-
oney.
However, Maloney says.the revi-
talization committee cannot apply
for state grants. They need the town
council to do that. So far they have
the support of two council members
and hope to gainmore support after
the wide meeting.
"We want to see the community
improve. We just need the political
'will to do it," said Maloney. "If we
put public dollars into landscaping
and sprucing up, private dollars will
follow." According to the revitaliza-
tion committee, Branford is current-
ly "a place to go through, and not a




hope the public will turn out share
their ideas and opinions about Bran-
ford's future.


imp coming soon
aries and a feed muil] in Tren-
ton. Youth .wilearn about
water, energy and vitamins
is used to raise bovine, accord-
ts ing to Mary Sowerby, Live
- Oak's University of Florida
n Dairy Extension Agent. Ju-
of niors are especially encour-
ty aged to attend since all of
their Quiz Bowl questions
will be on bovine nutrition.
"There will be kids from all


around with lots of different
interests," said Sowerby.


PAGE 7A


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAYJULY 29 9








I r- ,.U - Om\ �

Branford News


Public Works Week in Branford



For a job well done


The town of Branford
held a cookout Friday in
honor of its public works
employees. Everyone en-
joyed hamburgers, hot
dogs, ice cream and cake.
Here are some scenes.














RIGHT, BELOW,
CENTER LEFT BELOW,
BOTTOM LEFT:
Enjoying a meal in
honor of Public Wbrks
Week.


�,: "'9r
'*A'""


L "V" *'...*


ABOVE, BELOW: Good food, good company.


IA4


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- Photos: Submitted


Looks good.


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SUWANNEE RIVER READINGS
Branford 2009







The water levels provided here refer to the height at the US Hwy. 27 bridge
in Branford in feet above mean sea level (ft-msl) at the gauging station. In
the past the levels were read as gauge height not mean sea level.
July 22,'09 11.92 July 25,'09 11.85
July 23,'09 11.91 July 26,'09 11.7
July 24,'09 11.87 July 27,'09 11.6
July 28,'09 11.54
Sponsored By:


SCAFPFSsupermarket
Branford 386-935-1527
625103-F


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE RA


,

~~


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..,.
~bl' _~U~
-B


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.� .. - ,- - q
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Cleaning up.







Branford News

RC racing results

NASCAR 21.5 LIPO


A -MAIN
1-Preston Carroll-LiveOak,FI.-89
Laps;
2-Richard Carroll-LiveOak, Fl.-87 Laps-Also
Top Qualifier;
3-Jason Carroll-Live0ak,FI.-87 Laps;
4-Mike Conley-Homosassa,FI.-85 Laps;
5-Willis Lancaster-Quitman,Ga.-84 Laps;
6-Sam Clark-Gainesville,FI.-29 Laps-DNF
broken body.mount's



A_MAIN
1-Preston Carroll-Live0ak,FI.-23 Laps;
2-Jason Caroll-Live0ak,FI.-23 Laps
-Also Top Qualifier;
3-Johnathan Bach-Perry,FI.-18 Laps;
4-Matthew Dey-Homosassa,FI.-5 Laps DNF
broken suspension


Truck open off road oval


Affordable Floral & Gifts
* Fresh & Silk Flowers *
* Plants & Balloons *


TRAILERS FOR SALE
Utility, Equipment, Car Haulers, Ect...
n,, @a^a,^ .0


DURON
WILLIAMSON'S
TREE SERVICE


GILCHRIST
BUILDING SUPPLY INC.


US Highwa 27 Serving the community Complete tree removal,
506 Saana reet since 1979 trimming, pruning, stump grinding,
506 S nnMon.-Fri.7 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.; haul off, and bobcat service.
S.Branford, FL 32008 - ' Sat. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Hazardous trees our specialty.
Swww.gilchrist.doitbest.com Serving your area for over 10 years.
SPRING SPECIAL 1 9.95 Licensed and Insured - flee estimates
1997-2007 (386) 935-3585 ,Hy 27 . Savannah St. (386) 935-9396 Call 852 18 8810 e 889 5 m2180

Byd's Power Equipment .NORTH FLORIDA pmon.Fri SUWANNEE OAKS"
I 8:30 am-6:00 pm
PHARMACY Saturday9am-lpm ANIMAL CLINIC, INC
SSales & Service OFBRANFORD Sunday-Closed .
All Makes & Models Now accepting Don Wolfersteig, D.V.M.
HUSQVARNA. Blue Cross Blue Shield
HUQVA24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE Health Options Bo Reich, D.V.M.
Open Saturday 7 a.m. - 12 Noon .AutomaticFuel Deive Promptinstlleation&Repair Everything For Your Home Recovery
11860 E. U.S. 27, Branford, FL 32008 O n Prsnals ynn From Prescriptions to'Medical Supplies Canine/Feline Medicine & Surgery
Hours: Mon.-Fri. Customersatsfaction 502SUWANNEEAVE.SW. BRANFORD 101S.W. US Highway 27 25670 CR247 telephone
7 a.m.-5 p.m. (386) 935-1544r e 386-935-1 728 Cherry Lumbert Branford, Florida 32008 O'Brien, FL 32071 (386) 935-2112
Saturday 7 a.m.- Noon 52122F a25152cis 525194-F (386) 935-6905 a511
PHONE
(386) 935-1442 Daniels Funeral Homes CLASS "A" COLLISION INC.
"The Wrecksperts
ESTABLISHED 1904 N F Specializing In Heavy Collisions
ESTABLISHED 1904 A. & Crematory, Inc. Quality Guaranteed Shop
S* Insurance Preferred Shop
SUnibody & Frame Straightening
a frof r M i rage Branford 386-9351124 Major Credit Cards Accepted.
SHOME FURNITUREy M ini-Storage . Live Oak 386-362-4333 P ^ fl
Its SoEasy. Large and Small Units L. James (Jiin)B. Daniels, I LED.
P.O. BOX 518 Reasonable L r Kcith Danielsi FREE ESTIMATES S
Lai KJ.B. Daniels,Jr. Shop 386-935-9334
OWNER 903 SUWANNEE AVE. 386-935-2122 386-935-0298 (Local) Family Owned & Operated TED or TERESA LAWRENCE Fax 386-935-0464
TIM VERDI BRANFORD, FL 32008 5217F 301 suwannee Ave., P.O. Box 519
525158-F 525190F 525127-F Branford, FL 32008-0519 525154-F

To advertise your business here,

call Nancy at 386-362-1734 for

more information
525110-F


- - �


PAGE 9A


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


I


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK












John Walt Boatright named



State Star in Agricultural Placement


The winner of the State
Star in Agricultural
Placement is John Walt
Boatright of the Suwan-
nee Senior FFA Chapter.
Boatright was recognized
at the 81st annual State
FFA Convention.
John Walt Boatright of
the Suwannee FFA Chap-
ter began his project as a
middle school student
helping his grandfather
on their family farm. Ini-
tially, his responsibilities
included feeding the bird
dogs and horses. He also
assisted in the hosing
'down of the dog kennels
and checking the water
supply in each pen. Even-
tually, he worked his way
up to feeding and water-
ing the quail and pigeons
that were scattered
throughout the 560 acre
farm. He also helped to
plant pine trees to pro-
vide cover for the release
birds to ensure safety
from predators. Boatright
now has the added re-
sponsibility of exercising,
training and caring for
the farm's 14 bird dogs.
In addition, he also works
in the production of hay
and cattle on the farm.
Boatright graduated as
the Valedictorian of his
high school class and will
attend the University of
Florida in the fall.
Other finalists in the


State Star in Agricultural
Placement area were
Buddy Duke, Avon Park
FFA; Darren Turner,
Plant City FFA and Colt
Wells, South Sumter
FFA. William E. Hamm
and Associates, Inc. and
Richard and Yolanda
Joyner generously spon-
sored this award area.
The National FFA Or-
ganization, formerly
known as the Future
Farmers of America, is a
national youth organiza-
tion of 500,823 student
members-as part of 7,358
local FFA chapters in all
50 states, Puerto Rico
and Virgin Islands. The
National FFA Organiza-
tion changed to its pre-
sent name in 1988, in
recognition of the growth
and diversity of agricul-
ture and agriculture edu-
cation. The FFA mission
is to make a positive dif-
ference in the lives of
students by developing
their potential for premier
leadership, personal
growth, and career suc-
cess through agricultural
education. For more in-
formation visit www.flaf-
fa.org or contact: Ronnie
Simmons Florida FFA
Association, P.O. Box
141570, Gainesville, FL
32614, 325-378-0060, or
email to Ronnie.Sim-
mons @flaffa.org.


Walter, Kim, John-Walt Boatright and De Broughton.


Boatright recognized as winner of Forage Production Proficiency
The winner of the State right's responsibilities in- area were Lawson Mozley :,' 0: .. ,, ' .. . 3


Forage Proficiency is John-
Walt Boatright of the
Suwanhee Senior FFA
Chapter. Boatright was rec-
ognized at the 81st annual
-State FFA Convention.
- :ohn-Walt:Boatright of
-Live Oak- and a member of
the Suwannee FFA chapter
has worked to establish a
50 acre habitat for quail.`
This endeavor included
growing the appropriate
Plantings to ensure quail
.had adequate habitat. Boa-




0,~qp


clude planting and testing
ground covers such as
sorghum and wheat. He
also helps to harvest and
fertilize this ground cover.
Boatright is key in the pro-
duction of forage, on his....
family's property and'has
become involved with all
levels of the operation. He
plans to attend the Univer-
sity of Florida to receive a
degree in law.
Other finalists in the for-
age Production Proficiency


Peavy Properties

386-364-1648


Mel-Mar-Go Apts.
Live Oak, FL
2 Br/2 Ba
Rent $675 Deposit $500

"Ask about our Move in Special"
Pets are welcome
538507-F


GREENVILLE TIMBER

CORPORATION
Post Office Box 540
Madison, FL 32341

"We Buy Pine and
SHardwood Timber"
Toll Free Phone:
800-533-4902
Office Phone:
850-973-4107
Fax:
850-973-3563

Timber Buyers
Matthew Webb, President, Cell 850-973-7311
Jimmy Chamblin, Vice-President, Cell 850-454-0889
Wally Ellis, Cell 850-973-7319
Todd Witt, Cell 850-973-7317 532028 F


of the Malone FFA Chapter
and Katie Story of the
South Lake FFA Chapter.
The winner of the Forage
Production Proficiency area
received a $200 check and
a plaque; his agriculture
teacher received a $100
check. The finalists were
awarded with plaques.
Kubota Tractor Corporation
generously sponsored this
proficiency area.
Boatright also received a
$250 check from the na-
tional sponsor and will now
go on to compete against
other state winners. The na-
tional sponsors of this
award are Lexton, Inc. and
Claas of America, Inc.


State.President, Marshall Sewell, John-Walt and Travis Tuten.


The National FFA Orga-
nization, formerly known
as the Future Farmers of
America, is a national


MA 52983* MA 55825



DISCOUNTS
!! Free Estimates !!
Licensed & Insured


Lewis Walker Roofing, Inc.

386-497-1419
RC 0067442 5372586F


IX-"-, J_r ' -'


1 L L -I- r -'. "il' LI

JAVA JAX and

the Suwannee

Democrat


Look for great
daily specials;on
the board at
Java Jax

Regular Cup of
Coffee and a
Suwannee
Democrat


$150
Only g

'lle Swnnee
Deflocrat to start
Y'ur horne
subscriport today
386-362.1734


S.tmn rat


211 Ho ard St. East
Lie Oak
3 2-1734 .. ...


youth organization of
500,823 student members-
as part of 7,358 local FFA
chapters in all 50 states,
Puerto Rico and Virgin Is-
lands. The National FFA
Organization changed to
its present name in 1988,
in recognition of the
growth and diversity of
agriculture and agriculture
education. The FFA mis-
sion is to make a positive
difference in the lives of


American Kenpo
Karate University
5 311 -.F


students by developing
their potential for premier
leadership, personal
growth, and career suc-
cess through agricultural
education. For more infor-
mation visit
www.flaffa.org or contact:
Ronnie Simmons Florida
FFA Association, P.O.
'Box 141570, Gainesville,
FL 32614, 325-378-0060,
or email to Ronnie.Sim-
mons@flaffa.org.


"The Best Defense Is Self-Defense!
Timothy Walker
Senior Instructor
Branford, Florida
SChildren, Teen & Adult
(386) 935-3777
201 Suwnnee Avc..Branford, FL
AKKUinc@Juno.com
Protection for Today's World!


SHERIFFS RANCHES

THRIFT STORE

Proudly supporting the Florida
Sheriffs Youth Ranches since 1987


9291 97th Lane
U.S. Hwy 90 E.
Live Oak, FL 32060


HOURS:
MON. thru SAT,
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.


1-386-364-7700




Pick up service is available for your donations

THANK YOU FOR CARING AND SHARING
526793-F


, .. .


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGEF 10A


.1


I:.I
2.









WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE hA


Tori Henderson named State Star Farmer


The winner of the State Star Farmer is Tori Henderson
of the Suwannee FFA Chapter. Henderson was recog-
nized at the 81st annual State FFA Convention.
Tori Henderson of the Suwannee FFA Chapter began
working in the family dairy business as a middle school
student. She bought into the business as a partner when
she was 15 years old. Henderson and her family milk
2600 cows, three times a day. Henderson is actively in-
volved in the day to day operations, of the dairy. She is
proficient in all areas including forage production where
they grow and cut 1000 acres of corn silage a year.
Henderson is very aware of the environmental issues
and works with the Suwannee River Water Management
District to ensure safe practices. All waste products are
used, solids are spread before planting and liquids are
used through overhead irrigation. Henderson also assists
in the reclaiming of the sand used in the barns, with 90
percent being reused. Henderson believes that buying into
the family business was her greatest accomplishment.
She plans to attend the University of Florida to receive a
degree in Agribusiness Management and then return to
the family farm.
Other finalists in the State Star Farmer area were Bai-
ley Ann Burns, Santa Fe FFA; Cody Chandler, South
Sumter FFA and Austin Courson, Tate FFA. Farm Credit
Associations of Florida generously sponsored this award
area.
The National FFA Organization, formerly known as the
Future Farmers of America, is a national youth organiza-
tion of 500,823 student members-as part of 7,358 local
FFA chapters in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and Virgin Is-
lands. The National FFA Organization changed to its pre-
sent name in 1988, in recognition of the growth and di-
versity of agriculture and agriculture education. The FFA
mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of
students by developing their potential for premier leader-
ship, personal growth, and career success through agri-
cultural education. For more information visit www.flaf-
fa.org or contact: Ronnie Simmons Florida FFA Associa-
tion, P.O. Box 141570, Gainesville, FL 32614, 325-378-
0060, or email to Ronnie.Simmons@flaffa.org.


Travis Tuten, Tori Henderson, Tammy Henderson and Ted Henderson.


Henderson recognized as winner


of Dairy Production Proficiency


The winner of the State Dairy
Production Proficiency is Tori Hen-
derson of the Suwannee FFA Chap-
ter. Henderson was recognized at
the 81st annual State FFA Conven-
tion.
Tori Henderson of the Suwannee
Senior FFA chapter has been in-.
volved with the dairy industry since
she was a small child. Since she was
young she has been given responsi-
bility on their family dairy. Over the
years Tori has become proficient in
many areas of the business and is
able to perform many of the daily
tasks to keep the dairy running. Her


family currently houses 4570, where
3000 are milked daily. Tori is key in
the keeping of records; feed records,
employee files, tax papers, milk
records, and cow history records. In
the next ten years, Tori hopes to
have graduated from the University
of Florida with a degree in Agribusi-
ness. She plans to return to the fami-
ly farm and eventually take over the
family business.
Other finalists in the Dairy Pro-
duction Proficiency area were,
Chanse Huggins of the Plant City
FFA Chapter, Kali Sharpe of the
Lafayette FFA Chapter and Sarah


Luther of the Suwannee FFA Chap-
'ter. The winner of the Dairy Produc-.
tion Proficiency area received a
$200 check and a plaque, her agri-
culture teacher received a $100
check. The finalists were awarded
with plaques. Dairy farmers; Inc.
generously sponsored this proficien-
cy area.
Henderson also received a $250
check from the national sponsor and
will now go on to compete against
other state winners. The national
sponsors of this award are DeLaval,
Inc., New Holland, GEA Westfalia-
Surge and Kuhn North America.


Pilgrim's Pride to close 2 plants


Tori Henderson, John-Walt Boatright, State FFA Convention.


Local nightspot


Continued From Page 1A

In response to the find-
ings, City Development
Manager George Curtis re-
voked the designation.
"In full compliance with
this requirement of the law,
and based on the evidence
that has been presented; ef-
fective immediately, the
designation of the above
referenced establishment
as a full-service restaurant
is hereby revoked," Curtis
wrote in a July 10 letter to
the establishment's owners.
Curtis said as a result of
the change in designation
the establishment would'
have to abide, by earlier
hours in which alcohol can


be sold and consumed.
Establishment owner
Marion Gross .said she
feels she was treated un-
fairly.
"I think it was unfair be-
cause they didn't give me a
chance to say anything,"
Gross told the Democrat.
Gross referred to a previ-
ous Democrat article in
which council members
said they would "take up
the issue July 14 at its next
regular meeting." The city
council did not hear the is-
sue, however.
"They need to do some
changes around here," she
said. "You got to bring
some kind of entertainment
to this area."


Continued From Page 1A

Falkville, Ala., and other
live production operations
associated with the Athens
plant will continue to oper-
ate.
Approximately 640 em-
ployees who work at the
Athens, Ala., processing
plant will be affected by
the plant idling. Pilgrim's
Pride expects to be able to
offer positions at other fa-
cilities to many of these
employees. The company
will provide transition pro-
grams to employees who
are not retained in order to
assist them in securing new
employment, filing for un-
employment and obtaining
other applicable benefits.
I Production from the
company's Athens, Ga.,
plant on Oneta St. will be
consolidated at the neigh-
boring Barber St. plant as
well as at several other
company complexes in
north Georgia, bringing
those facilities to full ca-
pacity. The live production
operations, including
hatcheries and feed mills,
will continue to operate.
Pilgrim's Pride expects to
be able to offer positions to
most of the approximately
330 employees at the One-


ta St. location by the time
the plant is idled. The com-
pany will provide transition
programs to any employees
who are not retained after
the consolidation.
The company does not
expect any significant re-
duction in the number of
Pilgrim's Pride contract
growers in either Athens,
Ala., or Athens, Ga:, as a di-

ASK DR. MANTOOTH


Q: How often should I see a dentist?
A: It's generally recommended that you
see a dentist twice a year for a cleaning
and an examination. There are plenty of
reasons why you should do your best to
adhere to that schedule. Here are a few
of them: As with any medical .problem,
the earlier your dentist detects a problem
in your mouth, the easier - and probably
less expensive - it will be to correct.
A cavity, for instance, identified early can
be cleaned and filled. Left to grow, it can
lead to infection, toothache and perhaps
ultimately a costly root canal procedure.
One of the basic problems your dentist
will check for is gum disease, also called
periodontal disease, which is one of the
major reasons for tooth loss in older
Americans. Oral cancer is another
potentially life-threatening condition your
dentist may be able to detect early.
And don't discount the great feeling you'll
have after your teeth are cleaned
professionally. Plaque can build up on
teeth despite your best efforts at home
with brushing and flossing. When it's
removed by your dentist or hygienist,
'ou'll have a clean fresh feeling. So if it's
een a while, give your dentist a call
today.
Presented as a service to the community by
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH, D.D.S., P.A.
S i' b: Ruilroad A\ c
L6 e Oeak. FL
l 1 362-6556 I


rect result of' idling, these
plants. Most growers will
be transitioned to supplying
other complexes.
Since production from
these two plants will be
consolidated into other
complexes, the idling of
these two facilities will not


result in any decrease in the
company's overall produc-
tion or in any change in
product mix, the press re-
lease said.
The Pilgrim's plant in
Suwannee County, despite
recent layoffs, remains in
operation.


&/&ed &elling

Catering & Events


r



", . .



. . . ;,

Capacity 250
We take care of all the little details so you
can concentrate on your special day.
Weddings, Weddh)g Showers, Anniversaries,
Religious Occasions, Special Occasions, Birthdays,
Business Events, Conventions, Office or House
Parties, Outdoor Functions, Children's Events,
Sports Events, School Functions
402 Suwannee Ave., Branford, FL 32008
386-365-2951 or 386-935-4577
aperfectsetting@gmail.com
twww.apscatering.com 3




SUWANNEE HEALTH


CARE CENTER


'U~


Not just a
nursing home.
After a stay in the hospital, our
full time therapists and high
tech modalities can have you
back on your feet and at home.

To provide an aggressive
rehabilitation prograti that
facilitates shorter lengths of stay
and gets patients home.
Services Provided:
SPhygical Therapy
SOccupational Therapy
* Speech Therapy
" Skilled Nursing
" Out Patient Therapy Clinic


1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Phone: 386-362-7860
536099-F


Surrey Place


Care Center


A (//ZCd/ HealthCARE Community


w^QaU44 6aci atke t 4m e

110 SE Lee Ave., Live Oak, FL

386-364-5961
536109-F


Is S.:.uJl it a. Squj, L...- ..:.n I l 52 S 01,O :.., 3 .i 362-2591
. Mrdical Equipment Dj': 186i 362-4404
H. -1, ' . H . lj .. I PM M,:,n.Fr. .
' . " u . rj rr. 1 I( I r p i S i
by Joy Lamb, PharmD Drive-up window

Treatment Options for Hyperthyroid Conditions
Graves' disease is a common type of hyperthyroidism, an
autoimmune condition. When the immune system attacks the thyroid
gland, this abnormality leads to overproduction of the hormone
thyroxine. Increased levels of thyroxine may lead to an overall
increase in metabolism, which can cause problems for other body
systems. Symptoms of Grave's disease may include fatigue, fast
heart rate, and weight loss. A person's eyes are commonly affected.
There may be swelling of the eyelids, red eyes, and sensitivity to
light. Due to tissue swelling behind the eyes, the eyeballs may bulge
forward.
Anti-thyroid medications, such as propylthiouracil and
methimazole (Tapazole), prevent excessive production of thyroxine
by the thyroid gland. Typically, these medications are used in
conjunction with radioactive iodine, which works to decrease the
over activity of the thyroid gland. Beta blocker medications, such as
propranolol (Inderal) and metoprolol (Lopressor), may alleviate
some of the symptoms of hyperthyroidism, such as increased heart
rate or tremors. For symptoms affecting the eyes, artificial tears are
recommended during the day, along' with lubricating gels at night.
Prednisone may be prescribed to decrease swelling behind the eyes.
535092-F


PAGE 11A


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK






PAF SO


Suwannee-Hamilton Technical Center

honors 14 practical nursing graduates


I


I r~O

6~P i*..f


Instructor LaFrenchee McCreary leads
cession. - Photos: Carnell Hawthorne Jr.


Class President
gives a welcome.


Krystyna Taylor


Superintendent Jerry Scarborough gives a wave while seated with other distin-
guished guests.


Director LaFrenchee McCreary in-
troduces the graduating class.


Guest speaker Nita W. Fico gives her speech before a packed audience.


Graduates file into the ceremony.
�' . " .
V t~~a


,I
ABOVE: Awards and hugs!
LEFT: (left to right) School board
Chairman Jerry Taylor; instructors
LaFrenchee McCreary and Earlene
:' Howard; and Superintendent Jerry
Scarborough all gather at the podi-
- um.






. r .,*
*-40 ... - (I:
-*- ***^Oki ~ ii~iiii


J


Deli Equipment

FOR SALE
* Upright 5' freezer 1 door
* 6' refrigerator on wheels


* 6' cooler


1 door


* 6 burner, 2 oven, 1 grill gas stove
* Hood w/fire extinguisher
* Sandwich making table
w /counter enclosure


* Pie case
* Convection oven
* Cash register
Coll to see above

Tunison Company
110 North Ashley Street
Vaodosta, Georgia 31603-103
229-247-1760
^^!^N&?as �


539669-F


ABOVE:
Nursing
graduates
stand proud.


RIGHT:
Christina
Mahan
gives a
benediction.


1

Pamela Brown is pinned,
then hugged by her sister.


. .. Expanded to include Salon

Facial Specialist-
Theresa Fowler
SMicrodermabrason, Aid
S .Peels, Deep Pore
; 1 Cleansing, Speciality
Facials with Hard Mask
Howard Street : evonaBotanicals
* Clarisonic Pro and
Dry Clean in our spa
5 W. H d S. Massage Therapy also available
705 W. Howard St., CALLTODAY
Live Oak 362-4630
364-5211 536102-F

prj derI ,,::,nip.an l
:rduc rq ,r?.
U.i,- wih Rrle. i " , c.II -I r A I OR
..lurn n i dJ .ld r ds
1 ,l tr I SPECIALTY STORE
.', ro.i :.i u: -,rp
108 Howard Street East
1. Inc Live Oak, FL 32064
, Reinke 386-208-1316
...,.. www.mchales.us
' - .; email: store@mchales.us


V (


James R.


Moon receives a plaque for a job well done.


, ICS CREMATION &
Sj-N~FUNERAL HOME
1 --,_ . 357 N.W. Wilks Lane, Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3436 * 866-935-9273
COMPLETE FUNERAL FOR
*3995O00
Includes: Service with visitation, Casket, Vault and Open & Close of Grave
DIRECT CREMATION - *875.00
"AFFORDABLE AND CARING SERVICES FOR YOUR FAMILY" '
536107-F


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 12A


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WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 13A


':1
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Suwannee-Hamilton Technical Center

honors 14 practical nursing graduates


Bobbi Brantley is all aglow as she receives her nurse's pin.
' Bobbi Brantley is all aglow as she receives her nurse's pin.


Classmates light the torch: - Photos: Carhell Hawthorne Jr.


Graduate
plaque.


Trunesha Crawford


receives her certification


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"I
Graduates take a final walk.


Heather Humphrey and Cindy Ward recite their oath.


All smiles for a job well
done!


Scarborough congratulates the nursing graduates.


,'* L-r' � ,, ; --'--


Cindy'Ward and Destiny Lemming ignite the flame.

















Graduate James R. Moon is pinned by his brother-in-law
Carl Peeler, a previous graduate of the program.


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$13,987 $13,997
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2000 Cadillao CTS 2004 OPllan DeVll .


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daughter Aaralyn.


Hopkins

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


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County Sheriff's Deputy Tommy Roberts, Bryson Hatfield, Charlie McCullers, Ethan Gill, Chase Hatfield, Lexi Gude, Deputy Arthur Robinson, Debbie McCall. -Photos: Submitted


something,



back.
During the month of June, First Baptist Church held
Studio Go, during which families learned about serving
others. One night focused on "risk takers" and how they
give their lives for others. As a gift of appreciation, they
made cookie pops to give to the local police, fire and
sheriff's departments. Here are some photos of kids
making their deliveries.

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:LOFD Chief Chad Croft, Bryson Hatfield.


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' Bryson and Chase Hatfield, Charlie McCullers and Ethan Gill learri how important fireman's gear is from Alan Bedenbaugh
of LOFD.



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Debbie McCall, Children's Director of FBC; Lexi Gude; Lt. Keith Davis; Chase Hatfield; Bryson Hatfield; Charlie McCullers; Ethan Gill; Brentson McCall; Chief Buddy Williams.


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* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


PAGE 14A


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WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 15A


Haylie Wasloski, Hayden
S Wasloski, Isaac Denson,
Marricio Denson (all of
Jacksonville, Florida) and
Dominic Bechtol of Fort
Hood, Texas. He was
' ,.t , preceded in death by three
brothers, Kennith Alton
Sand Marshall Lee of Fort
Worth, Texas and Charles
Raymond of San Diego,
California; his mother and
father Elsie Marie and
Griffith Lee of Fort Worth,
Texas.
A memorial service was
held at HARDAGE-
Donna Tanner Hopkins GIDDENS FUNERAL


HOME, 1701 Beach Blvd.,
Jacksonville Beach,
Florida on Tuesday, July
28 at 2:00 PM.
In lieu of flowers, it is
requested that
contributions be donated to
Suwannee Valley Hospice
Care Center, 6037 W
Highway 90, Lake City,
Florida, 32055.

Please sign the
online guestbook. Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.com
and click on obituaries


William Elijah Hunter

July 27, 2009

- illiam Elijah
Hunter, age 85,
VY of Live Oak,
FL. passed away Monday,
July 27, 2009 at Lake City
VA Medical Center in Lake
City, FL. following an
extended illness. He was
born in Hamilton County,
FL. to the late William L.
and Doris Moody Hunter.
Mr. Bill retired from
Anderson Columbia Co.
and was a veteran of the


United States Army.
Survivors include his
sister, Frances Pauline
Hunter, Live Oak, FL.;
nephew and niece, Richard
Fountain and Doris
McLure (David); great
nephews and nieces,
Richard Fountain, Ashton
Walgamott and Casey
Mitton.
Funeral services will be
held at 1:00 P.M. Friday,
July 31 in the chapel of
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home, Jasper, FL.
Interment will follow in
Hebron Cemetery near


Jasper.
The family will receive
friends between the hours
of 5:00-7:00 P.M.
Thursday, July 30 at the
funeral home.
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home, Jasper, FL is in
charge of arrangements.

Please sign the
Sonline guestbook. Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.com
and click on obituaries


July 25, 2009

Sonna Tanner
Hopkins, 46,
Wellborn, FL,
passed away in her home
on July 25, 2009. She is
survived by her husband,
John Wayne Hopkins, Jr.,;
three children: Roger
(Crystal) Tanner, Angela
Tanner, and Christopher
Tanner, and four
grandchildren, all of Ocala,
FL; her mother: Rhoda
Robarts, Lake City, FL,
three sisters, one brother,
and a host of nieces,
nephews, and friends. A
private memorial service
will be held at a later date.
Arrangements are under the
direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
S. US Hwy 441, Lake City,
FL (386-752-1954). Please
sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn.co
m.

Please sign the
online guestbook. Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat. corn
and click on obituaries


Laurence Edwin Cooper
March 17, 1936 -
July 23, 2009

aurence Edwin
Cooper,73, of
Live Oak, Florida,
passed peacefully
Thursday, July 23, 2009 at
the Suwannee Haven
Hospice Center following a
long, courageous battle
with cancer. He was a
native of Fort Worth,
Texas; a twenty five year
resident of Neptune Beach,
Florida and a ten year
resident of Live Oak,
Florida. Laurence was a
retired US Navy Master
Chief Petty Officer and
served aboard the USS
Frank Knox, the USS
Antietam, the USS Long
Beach, the USS Truxton
and the USS Springfield.
He also served as a drill
instructor, Recruit Training
Command, Great Lakes,
Illinois and completed
Nuclear Power School,
Vallejo, California. His
final assignment was Fleet
Maintenance Group,
Mayport, Florida, where he
retired after twenty years.
Following military
retirement, Laurence
completed his education
with FCCJ while working
at Daniel Memorial Home
for Children. From there,
he was employed with the
City of Jacksonville for a
few years, then traveling
the world again repairing
shipping vessels for Bird'
Johnson. A few years with
the Nuclear Power Plant in
Baxley, Georgia, then ten
years as a supervisor with
Atlantic Marine and Dry
Dock.
He was survived by his
beloved wife, Estell, of 52
years,; daughter Darla
(Erick) Gonzalez, son
Laurence Duane (Dora)
Cooper of Jacksonville,
Florida; brothers.Clarence
Griffen Cooper of Virginia
Beach, Virginia and Ronald
Glen Cooper of Granburry,
Texas; grand children
Laurence Gustavo Cooper,
Marriza Cooper, Vanessa
Wasloski, Steven Wasloski
(all of Jacksonville,
Florida), Kelly (Justin)
Bechtol, of Fort Hood,
Texas; great-grand children


UIIDDV IM RnD


Ls BIIu n/n Ii- I run



SPECIAL VALUES

Let's Build Something Together� Prices valid 7/26/09 - 8/2/09 unless otherwise noted.


Applies to walk-behind mowers with yellow clearance
labels. Prices reflect discount. While supplies last.
Selection may vary by location. See store for details.


Applies to patio fumiture marked with yellowdearance labels.
Price reflects discount. Whe supplies last. Selection may vary
by store See store for details.


Applies to gas grills marked with yellow clearance labels.
Price reflects discount. While supplies last. Selection may
vary by store. See store for details.


IA
* 1 I
Dfree
NEXT-DAY'
DEIVERY AND^


7 DAYS A WEEK.

NO REBATES.

NO MINIMUM
PURCHASES.
SIn-stock major appliances only.
US deliveries only. See sales
associate for details. Offer valid
now - 7/31/09.
f


6mmfi 4
Laminate Flooring
.10-year warranty .Easy to install #165849


Commercial
NeverKink Hose
#6082;44541


Bottled


#46256;45072;57282,3,4,5
Brands may vary by market.


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Picket #202922


Holland Pavers


1 1


50 LB. BAG ai
PLAY SAND
Item may vary by
market. Discount taken
at register. Offer valid -
7/26/09 - 8/2/09.
See store for details.


32 Oz. Glass Plus Glass
and Multi-Surface Cleaner
#206966
Gain 40-Count Fabric
Softener Sheets #198381
32 Oz. Glade Carpet and
Room Deodorizer #170044
Mr. Clean 40 Oz. Summer
Citrus Liquid Cleaner
#20952


Bug-B-Gon Granules
*10 Ib. covers up to 10,000 sq. ft.
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#196055,85;294827
32 Oz. Lysol Toilet Bowl.
Cleaner #43967
Pledge Duster Plus
#39010
28 Count Windex Wipes
#197615


Details on our policies and services: Prices may vary after 8/2/09 if there are market variations. "Was" prices in this advertisement were in effect on 7/20/09 and may vary based on Lowe's Everyday Low Price policy See store for
details regarding product warranties. We reserve the right to limit quantities. CREDIT FINANCING PROMOTION DETAILS Aplies to any single-receipt in-store purchase of $299 or more made through 1/31/2010 on a Lowe's
Consumer Credit Card account. No monthly payments will be required and no finance charges will be assessed on this promotional purchase f you pay the following in full within 6 months: (1) the promotionalpurchase amount, and
(2) any related optional credit insurance/debt cancellation charges. If you do not, finance charges will be assessed on the promo balance from the date of the purchase and monthly payments will be required. Regular account terms
apply to non-promotional purchases. Standard APR is 22.99%. Delinquency APR is 26.99%.Minimum finance charge is $1.00. Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for their applicable terms. Offer is subject to
credit approval. Excludes Lowe'sl Business Credit Accounts, Lowe's Proect CardSM Accounts and Lowe's Visae Accounts. While Lowe's strives to be accurate, unintentional errors may occur. We reserve the right to correct any error.
Prices and promotions apply to US locations only, and are available while supplies last. � 2009 by Lowe's". All rights reserved. Lowe's� and the gable design are registered trademarks of LFLLC. (6497)
001/6497/021
208 72nd Trace (South of the Intersection of 1-10 & Highway 129) Live Oak, FL 386-330-5760
Store Hours: Monday-Saturday 7 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. 537,,1


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l SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 15A


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


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WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


PAG 16A U UANE EOCA/IV A


Amtrak may be rolling through Live Oak again


Continued From Page 1A

areas east of New Orleans.
,Prior to Hurricane Katri-
na, the Sunset Limited --
Amtrak's locally running
intercity passenger service
since 1993 -- ran three
times a week from Los An-
geles to Orlando, with
stops in between, includ-
ing Madison and Lake
City. But that all changed
in 2005 when the cata-
strophic storm hit land and
ravished system infrastruc-
ture. No passenger rail ser-
vice this side of New Or-
leans has run since. Ac-
cording to Amtrak that
may change.
The July 16 report has
proposed as one option to
restore the Sunset Limited
passenger service that
once made tri-weekly
stops in both Madison and
Columbia counties.
Under the federal Pas-
senger Investment and Im-
provement Act of 2008
(PRIIA), Amtrak has been
reauthorized and new pro-
grams have been estahb-


lished to strengthen the rail
system, the report states.
In recent months, Con-
gressman Allen Boyd, D-
Monticello, has vocally
backed the restoration of
Amtrak.
"I am pleased that Am-
trak has released its pro-
posals for restoring train
service between New Or-
leans and Sanford," Boyd
said.
Out of 12 proposed al-
ternatives for restoring
passenger rail service be-
tween New Orleans and
Florida, three preferred op-
tions were "selected for
study based upon project-
ed ridership, revenue, op-
erating costs, and operat-
ing loss," the report states.
The three options include:
Option 1: Restoration of
the tri-weekly Sunset Lim-
ited service between Los
Angeles and Orlando,
which includes the stations
in Madison and Lake City.
Option 2: Extension of
the daily City of New Or-
leans Service, which cur-
rently operates between


Chicago and New Orleans,
east from New Orleans to
Orlando.
Option 3: Implementa-
tion of daily stand-alone
overnight services be-
tween New Orleans and
Orlando.
Under all three options,
passenger trains would
once again run through
Live Oak.
The first option, accord-
ing to the report, projects
capital and mobilization
costs of $32.7 million. An-
nual passenger revenue
would be estimated at $6
million and ridership at
53,300. The direct cost of
the service would be $10.8
million, which would pre-
sent a loss of $4.8 million.
For options two and
three, capital and mobi-
lization costs are projected
at 57.6 million to $96.6
million each. However,
revenue generated under
option two would reach
$9.2 million, with 96,100
total ridership. The direct
cost of that option is pro-
jected to reach $20.9 mil-


lion and a loss of $11.7
million is expected.
Revenue for option three
would reach $5.6 million,
assuming that 79,000 pas-
sengers used the service
each year. In that case, a
direct cost of $24 million
would result in an $18.4
million loss.
Of the three preferred
options, most reports have
cited option one as the
most favorable. Imple-
mentation of that option
would require a minimum
of 20 months lead time
from the date of funding,
Amtrak states. A decision
has not been made, howev-
er.
"Congress will now ful-
ly examine these options,
and I am looking forward
to working closely with
my colleagues in the com-
ing months to raise aware-
ness about the possibility
of restoring this service to
North Florida," Boyd said.
The ball for funding re-
mains in Congress' court,
and all Amtrak can do for
now is wait.


l ,1' 1 1529 SE


Sat Oho AVe.

SR UT LIVE OAK




�ISUMMER COOKOUT EXTRAVAGANZA


Bond backer jailed


Continued From Page 1A

them informed of the situa-
tion despite their having
asked him about it at previ-
ous commission meetings.
"It's upsetting to me that
to find out there's informa-
tion we asked for so we can
make a decision and for
whatever reasons he decid-
ed not to reveal it for us,"
Commissioner Wesley
Wainwright said by phone
Tuesday. "We got to bring
this to light. If he would
only have kept us in-
formed." Wainwright said
he learned of the situation
from County Coordinator
Murphy McLean, who said
he found out from a Demo-
crat reporter.
The bond in question was
purchased by local devel-
oper, Nathan Properties
LLC, t6 secure payment for
a road to be constructed at
Nathan Oaks Estates, a sub-
division off 76th Street, in
the western part of the
county. The developer has
since abandoned the project
and left town.
According to documents
from the Department of
Justice, William Raymond
Miller II was sentenced in
June to 10 years and one
month in federal prison for
mail fraud and wire fraud
for issuing bonds with a
face value of more than
$535 million. Miller re-
ceived premium payments
of more than $22.5 million
in the multi-state scheme.
Miller sold surety bonds
to contractors and sub-con-
tractors to secure payment
for various ventures. A
bond was issued by Miller
on March 1, 2007 to secure
payment for the road at the
Nathan Oaks subdivision.
The bond was issued under
the name AMS Surety
Holdings Corporation.
AMS was cited in court
documents as one. of the


the bond so the road could
be paved for property own-
ers. About four lots have
been sold.
"I was very concerned
about it for a year and have
been asking questions
about it for over a year and
a half but have not received
no good answers from the
county attorney but that
there was just a company,"
said Fowler. "I never re-
ceived a good answer. I
don't know why he didn't
follow it up. If there is no
agent or company that's
wrote it and the man who.
owns the company is in
prison for fraud,. that's an
indication it's no good."
Fowler said Airth has
sent letters and tried con-
tacting the company, to no
avail. He said he was in-
formed of the owner's
prison status last week from
someone doing research on
the Internet.
Commission Chairman
Jesse Caruthers said he felt
Airth did not perform his
duties properly.
"Airth dropped the ball
by not researching it like he
was asked to," Caruthers
said by phone Tuesday.
Commissioner Douglas
Udell said he wanted to
avoid this happening again.
"From this point on I'm
going to ask the county at-
torney to not just accept pa-
perwork that developers
have a bond," he said. "I
want it verified by the
bonding company."
Commissioner Billy
Maxwell said Miller's im-
prisonment was news to
him and said he hopes the
county does not accept any
more bonds in the future.
"That's the first one I re-
member ever doing," he
said. "I surely don't think
we'll do any more of them.
We just have to wait to see
what the legal avenues are
going to be."


. pan. nam u r ,Leans, who is ne
S" ~cb1 MiI~leri-P ffa tn6b. was also untrmlllP


consumers.
Commissioner Ivie
Fowler said he has worried
about the bond for some
time and began asking
Airth about it at commis-
sion meetings more than a
year and a half ago. After
the developer abandoned
the project it became neces-
sary to attempt to cash in


of the situation. He said
county officials are still in
the process of sorting
things out. *."
"We need to see where it
all stands," said McLean.
Airth declined codiment.
Miller, 37,f Clafksville,
Md., has been ordered to
make restitution to any vic-
tim of his crimes.


Officer threatened

with beer bottle


Continued From Page 1A

Shaw reports that officer
Thomas Faller made a rou-
tine traffic stop on a car at
around 11:21 p.m. The pas-
senger, Thomas Perez, 38,
of 420 Horizon Circle, ex-
ited the vehicle holding a
beer bottle by the neck and
started making threatening
gestures and statements to-


wards Faller, according to
Shaw. Shaw said Perez
failed to drop the bottle af-
ter being commanded to do
so by Faller. Faller then ad-
vanced toward, Perez, who
dropped the bottle;
Perez was arrested and
charged with assault on a
law enforcement officer
and booked into t he
Suwannee County Jail.,


EF Transient charged
in theft of wallet
Continued From Page 1A sons were located at the
SRoyal Inn Motel on North
95 Lb. Chub port from Live Oak Police Ohio Avenue, where Bliz-
Det. Sgt. Ron Shaw, 63- zard was found to bein
year-old Wycliff Wynn, re- possession of the stolen
Imported his wallet and car wallet, reports show.'
BananaS keys missing after having Blizzard was arrested
visitors over Friday night, and transported to the
loS/S| Shaw said Wynn reported Suwannee County Jail. He
. 0 the items missing after his was charged with three


visitors left. Shaw said
Michael Blizzard, 22, left
with the wallet. He and
several other homeless per-


counts of credit card fraud,
theft, three counts of iden-
tity theft and three counts
of forgery.


Home invasion victims


Continued From Page 1A

emergency crews at the
scene.
Nothing was reported
stolen from the home.
The two suspects fled on
foot in an unknown direc-
tion.
The suspects are de-
scribed as two black males


wearing all black clothing
with black shirts tied
around their faces. One
was described as large and
the other was described as
small.
Anyone with informa-
tion is asked to call LOPD
at 386-362-7463 or
Crimestoppers at 386-208-
8477.


ITH I . MET I T


4 1


:14*


Quantity Right Reserved.
We accept USDA Food Stanips, Personal Checks, Debit/Credit Cards and WIC


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 16A







Puuijnn'ee rmnoirrat
Section B
Wednesday, July 29, 2009


We're #1 In the #2 Business!
C complete Septic Tank Services
and Pump Outs
dc&ended & feaaored
Call 386-364-5485
8596 US 90 E, Live Oak
% www.lundysseptic.com


Getting




ready

The SHS Bulldogs get ready to take to
the field under head football coach Jerr
Odom. The 'Dogs first game of the sea-
Son \ Uil be against Chiefland Aug. 28
for the fall classic Here are some scenes
from a recent practice. See more photos,
inside.


Ir ..


. . , - . .e
"-..,'% :. � , . ..

TOP: Waiting for the snap. MIDDLE: SHS head football coach Jerry Odom
gives instruction. LEFT: Assistant coach Pete Irby gives advice Io Ryan
DaSilva. ABOVE: Tyler Wells (let) and Quentin Hines wait for the snap.
- Prillos Jetl Walter


SPORTS
COMMENTARY

Don't go

there,

Democrat

Sportabout
By Tom Daniels
Always 0
wanting to
know the latest
news I
frequently
check the
Democrat
online. Seeing a headline
with Dustin Doe I began to
think, another dumb athlete.
Upon inspection, another
dumb story about an athlete.
The last time I checked
Doe graduated Suwannee
High three years ago and was
having a decent career at the
University of Florida. He's
about 20 years old and hasn't
committed a capital crime.
Why is the fact that he was
driving with a revoked
license headline news? Doe is
a good football player and
may have a shot at the pros,
but he doesn't deserve this.
The Democrat has certainly
missed the boat. If we are
looking to headline
celebrities for driving
infractions. I am sure we
could find a juicy list of local
coaches, teachers, politicians
and go% ernment workers who
S* haverdeoni orse. So people
who educate our children,
legislate our laws and enforce
our ordinances are not subject
to the same indignation. I am
willing to bet you most
people in Suwannee County
don't even know Doe. He
grew up in Hamilton County.
Recently Ben
Roethlisberger was accused
of rape. Whether he did it or
not, he is now tarnished. A
hotel worker one year later
says this happened. It was
never reported to the police,
there are no witnesses, no
evidence and she doesn't

SEE SPORTABOUT, PAGE 3B


Register

now for

rec dept.

sports

By Alden Rosner
Preparations have begun
for the 2009 Suwannee Parks
.and Recreation youth foot-
ball and cheerleading pro-
grams.
Those interested in recre-
ation sports can register now
through Friday, Aug. 7.

Flag football
7-8 year old players
Tackle football
9-13 year old players
Cheerleading
5-13 year olds

Tackle football tryouts will
be held Saturday, Aug. 15 at
9 a.m. at the First Federal
Sportsplex. Games will start
after Labor Day. We encour-
age all interested individuals
to register for what is sure to
be an exciting, fun-filled sea-
son.
With over 30 years of ex-
perience providing football
SEE REGISTER, PAGE 3B


I I


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SPORTS


Getting




ready



2009 SHS varsity
football schedule


Fall classic
Aug. 28 Chiefland
Sept. 4 Hamilton
Sept. 11 Madison
Sept. 18 Ft. White
Sept. 26 Santa Fe
Oct. 2 Taylor Cty
Oct. 9 Raines
Oct. 16 Open
Oct. 23 Ribault
Oct. 30 Baker
Nov. 6 Baldwin
Nov. 13 Columbia


Away
Away
Away
Home
Home
Away
Home


7:30 p.m.
7:30
7:30
7:30
7:30
7:30
7:30


Away 7 p.m.
Away 7:30
Home 7:30
Home 7:30


ABOVE: Ryan DaSilva at a recent practice. TOP RIGHT: Hanging
out at a recent footbIll practice. RIGHT: Head coach Jerry Odom
goes over plays. - photos J.en waTlr:


wof


,- o 0


Sunbatable Vai
Purcaame $1999 of
Uving Room Furndture .
Purerms $19�9 of
SBedroom Puraitur A


- r . t
____________ J~~~Orn


lorida's
iSharpest
ncil!


-1
Copyrighted Material
'Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers
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Home Furnishings
. . ...... .. . . . . .. .
* mann ow urnwa a C.


1556 S. Ohio Ave, LU
386-3304252
Houre: Mon., Tuo., Thurs
9 a.m. - 6 p.m.; Closed W


* -
m
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~-0 S


ve Oak
.,Fd. & St.
red. & Sun.


mm-M-1


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


PAGE 2B


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SPORTS


Thanks,


- 1 4-H

Suwannee County 4-H
was recently recognized
by City of Live Oak May-
or Sonny Nobles for im-
provements they made
on the, veteran's section
of Live Oak Cemetary.
Pictured back row from
left: John Burley, TJ,
Burke, Rudy Reimsnyder
and Nobles. Front row
from left: Clayton
Carrozza, Tyler Carrozza,
Ryan Burley, Ashley
Low, Hannah Warren
and Renee Carrozza.
- Photo: Jeff Waters .


Tournaments galore
By Jeanne Fannin
The Suwannee 500 Bowling Club held a recent
meeting, to discuss upcoming tournaments.
A Scotch Doubles will be held at Thunder Alley
Bowling Center Aug. 1 at 2 p.m. The price will be $15
per person. For more information, please contact Thun-
der Alley at 386-364-7778.
The 500 Club will be playing a surprise doubles
tournament at Gainesville's new "Splitz" Bowling
Center Aug. 8. Eight of our bowlers are going so far,
We will be in Daytona Beach Sept. 26, leaving Friday
and returning Sunday. The Florida State 500 Club will
also hold it's 20th Annual Doubles and Singles Tourna-
ment Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 17 and 18. We are
also planning a PJ and fuzzy slipper banquet. Fun and
money to be won. Speaking of money, two bowlers
from the 500 Club came into money while down in the
Melbourne State Tournament in late May. Gail Feder
and Jeanne Fannin were the big winners.


The Suwannee 500 Bowling Club at a recent meeting. - Photo: Submitted


SPORTS
COMMENTARY

Don't go

there,

Democrat

Sportabout
By Tom Daniels
Continued From Page 1B

even care if he goes to jail.
Just show me the money.
This is a he said, she said
civil suit against the Super
Bowl winning quarterback.
Even if he wins he has
already lost. Guys like Vick
and Clemens got what they
asked for, but athletes can be
targets.
Maybe the Big Ben
allegations are a' story, but
not for the sports page. If
Ben wasn't a. football player
the story never makes the
wire. Which is my whole
point. Dustin Doe is not
going to sell newspapers.
This story belonged in the
arrest record and no further.
Stories like these make it
tough for guys like me to
walk in a locker room.
Dustin, pay your tickets,
suck it up and lead Florida to
a winning season. Good
Luck.
Editor's note: For the
Dustin Doe story, as well as
other local news, go to
suwanneed emocrat.com.


Register

now for

rec dept.

sports

Continued From Page 1B

to the youth of our com-
munity, we believe that all
children can benefit from
the experience provided


through our recreational
programs. ,
A quality recreational
youth sports program will
take into account the over-
all well-being of the par-
ticipating child including
their physical, emotional
and social develop.n:..,
Our goals are to protect
participants from physical
injury. By teaching correct
playing techniques and in-
specting all playing sur-
faces and equipment prior
to competition we are sure


to acheive that goal. Also,
by creating an environ-
ment that fosters positive
emotional and social de-
velopment by empowering
coaches with the knowl-
edge and skills to enable
players to succeed on and
off the field .kill help fo,-
ter those ideals. Coaches
stress the values of hard
work, self-discipline and
sportsmanship, and moti-
vate young athletes to be
the best they can be.


Additional benefits of
enrolling in a recreation
program offered through
Suwannee Parks and
Recreation:

- Promoting a healthy,
physically-active lifestyle.
- The opportunity to
work with high school'
players and coaches to


TRIP INCLUDES:


provide valuable training
clinics and instill commu-
nity pride through athlet-
ics.
- Learning positive life
lessons, such as the value
of hard work, achieving
goals as a team and how
to accept both victory and
d at"" '""" "
- Developing social


skills through team-build-
ing exercises

Limited scholarship op-
portunities are available,
for qualified individuals.
Contact Suwannee Parks
and Recreation at 386-
362-3004 for more infor-
mation on a ailable s ecr-
ational programs.


* Charter Bus from ILive Oak
to Savannah


*Entry Deadline: July 29, 5 p.m.
* Must be 18 years old to register
* Original entry forms only
* All entries will be entered into a drawing to be held on July 30. Winner will be called
and announced In the July 31 edition of the Suwannele Democrat,
539208-F


Employee of the Month


(386) 364-1683
MusicLivesHere.com


539530-F


Register to win a


day trip for 2 to



c ) /// )ft l Ua) /


*.-...... * .
.�r� "�n. imllf'' Imm~


TRIP DATE: Saturday, Aug. 1, 2009


Now THAT'S Something

To Smile About!
= M8 o�rriie i�-m3r '


Thank you for submitting this week's SMILE photograph!
Submit your photo for publication to:

Pu3anniee emrnorat
P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 500232-F


PAGE 3B


M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAYJULY 29 9


'^'MacSI


�'�~le~�~~









SPORTS


Getting ready


.,i-. i�

*u'* I.�


CLOCKWISE
FROM ABOVE:
SOuaiirterack
Josh WrigLt calls
the play Ryan
DaSilva throws
at practice The
Bulldogs get
ready for the tall
c lassie against
Chiefland Aua
28. Josh Wright
after the snap
Gening ready lor
a play.
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Coca-Cola Brandsi
CUBED ICE Y".. '
2/ 81b. 1 n, WZ 3For I


Optimal Health


Weight Loss


Wellness


Laboratory

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Seen!


Our clients are achieving a 5-19 pound weight loss
in their first month!
One Monthly.fee includes:
V Consultation and Evaluation
V Four Weeks B12 injections with Fat burning
Amino Acids!
V Counseling regarding Diet, Exercise and other
Lifestyle Changes,
V 30 Day Supply of Appetite Suppressant
V ECG included for all patients

Mention you saw this ad and
receive 2 additional B12 injections
(a $24 value!) free with next paid visit!

Currently sharing clinic, space with

Three Rivers Medical
in Branford, FL at
208 NW Suwannee Ave,
across from the Capital City Bank.
386-935-2799
(It is not necessary to become a patient of Three Rivers Medical to
participate in the Optimal Health Program.) 536106-F


eFlection
lt hetre customer service is our
i .rio ir1
SCut/Style * Highlights
Perms * Lowlights
SW'axing
Style Products Available
Walk-ins Velcome
Monday - Satuday
101 Su\\annee Ave., Liv'e Oak
i 364-5331





CALL TODAY!
Packages start as low as


$ 099
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ANDY'S SATELLITE
386-364-1832 IRECT
Your Local Authorized DIRECTV Dealer * uo.n a
021109 DIRECV, Inc. DIRECIVand Ihe Cyclone Design logo areg istered tradeniarks
of DIRECIV. Inc.


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Waiting for instruction.


Ryan DaSilva at the snap. - Photos: Jeff Waters


Getting ready


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Head coach Jerry Odom gets the boys in order.
... -. - . -- . . . . .. . : ,.. .. .... . ...


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A recent Bulldog practice.


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PAGE 5B


5 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT K


DAYJULY 29 2009


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- Photos: Paul Buchanan - SuwanneeSports.com


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Scenes from Suwannee Parks and
Recreation ladies softball league.


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Jennifer Dalton leaps over Dale Townsend as she slides into second.


De Broughton at bat.
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WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


PAGE RR6


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


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WEDNESDAY. JL 2


Suwannee Health



Care and Rehab



Center activities


~-L-~-~


We always have a lot
going at Suwannee Health
Care and Rehab Center of
Live Oak.
A glance over this
school year.... We had the
Suwannee High School
FFA help us with a very
fruitful garden. We plant-
ed and tilled up our land


and planted, squash, corn,
peas, okra, tomatoes and
cantaloupe. We harvested
our crops and were able
to sell some of the vegeta-
bles to our staff members
to raise money for our
Activities Dept.
We also had a flag rais-
ing ceremony to celebrate


Tending to the flag.


Memorial Day which in-
cluded our local Suwan-
nee High School ROTC.
We celebrated the 4th of
July with some of our lo-
cal heroes from the 868th
Engineers. We had a
dunking booth, watermel-
ons donated by some of
our local farmers and ice
cream sundaes provided
by some of the nursing
students that interned
here.
Suwannee Health Care
and Rehab Center loves
our local community and
Iwe have enjoyed all of the
participation from differ-
Sent agencies within our
community.
We have won the Bingo
Challenge between our fa-
i cility, Surrey Place and
SSuwannee Valley Nursing
Center out of'Jasper. The
trophy has now moved on
to one of the other facili-
ties but we have pictured
our Bingo Challenge
group.
Currently our Red Hat
Society members within
our facility are working
on a way to give back. We
are putting together a dri-
ve for Operation Christ-
I mas Child. Our Red Hat
Ladies will be putting to-
gether shoe boxes filled
with goodies for children
within our borders as well
as outside of our borders.
These boxes will be given
to children in different
parts of the world that
might not have a Christ-
mas if it wasn't for this
organization. Our resi-
dents know the benefits of
giving back not only to
our community but abroad
and are excited about hav-
ing this opportunity.
Our residents have thor-
oughly enjoyed all of the
involvement we have had
from our community and
welcome others to come
join the fun, and help cre-
ate and bring great activi-
ties for our resi-
dents to take part ' _


Taking a break to pose. - Photos: Submitted


ABOVE and BELOW: Plenty of young tolKS were in attendance.


p.V~ r~ 1%L 'Z. .ez


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-s3~ii i: .�"-.t l~�~~l~~Cctt


I ne winners!


ABOVE and BELOW: A good time was had by all.


With a little help from some friends.


I r~-----�--


PAGE 7B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAYJULY 29, 2009


~~. r~th;.Cft~~.


Helping out.


Doing yardwork.










PAGE 8B U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009


NEW SMYRNA SPEEDWAY

OFFICIAL RESULTS - 07.25.09


LATE MODELS:
1. #55 Todd Allen
2. #4B Alan Bruns
3. #10 Michael Seay
4. #19 Bobby Good
5. #43 Randy Dye
DNS #72 Tommy Elliott


MODIFIEDS:
1. #22
2. #4B
3. #15x
4. #86


Jason Boyd
Alan Bruns
Robert Deal
David Rogers


5.
6.
7.
8.
DNS


#29
#330
#20
#9
#31


SPORTSMAN:
1. #4B
2. #23
3. #70
4. #10
5. #7


Joe Yarborough
Joe Gerard Sr.
David Costello
Art Kunzeman
John Zidek


Alan Bruns
Mike Pletka
John Nusbaum
Matt Montineri
Brennan Palmiter


DAYTONA DODGE SUPER STOCKS:
1. #1 Chad Pierce
2. #56 Bobby Holley
3. #2x Mike Amato
4. #68 Alvin Morris
5. #61 David Russell Sr
6. #29c John Cummins
7. #21D Mike Dahm
8. #42 Mark Tracey
9. #25 Geno Smith,
10. #01 Scott Smith
11. #86 Richard Goodrich
12. #22 Bruce McGonigal


13.
14.
15.

PUB 44
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.-
6.
DQ


#16
#16D
#15


David Russell
David Gould
Michael Wofford


STRICTLY STOCKS:
#54 Cody Whitley
#29 Tim Walters Jr
#21 Maureen Dahm
#45 Dean Sarver
#86 William Hindman
#13 Andrew Chandler
#59 Chris Brannon


Florida Livestock


Market report

Federal-State Market News Service
605 East Main Street
Bartow, FL 33830
863-519-8477

'This information is collected by the Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services, Division of Marketing & Development, Bureau of Devel-
opment & Information in cooperation with U.S. Department of Agriculture,
AMS, Livestock, Meat, Grain, & Seed Division, Livestock & Grain Market
News.


FLORIDA MARKETS AT A GLANCE'

For the week ended July 23, 2009


At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 8,665, compared to'9,515
last week, and 7,399 a year ago. According tb the Florida Federal-State Live-.
stock Market News Service: Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls
were steady to 2.00 lower, feeder steers and heifers were steady to 2.00 higher.


Feeder Steers: Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs
300-400 lbs
400-500 lbs

Feeder Heifers: Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs
300-400 lbs
400-500 lbs


Slaughter Cows:

Slaughter Bulls...


112.00-145.00
102.00-124.00
89.00-109.00


95.00-112.50
85.00-103.00
82.00- 94.00


Lean: 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent 40.00-46.00

YieJd GraceNO. :- 1000-2100 lbs 54.00-60.00


Dachshunds dashing to victory

at Volusia Speedway Aug. 1


Anticipation is building for the 2nd
Annual Barberville Wiener Nationals
when Volusia Speedway presents the' Dog
Days of Summer Night on Saturday, Aug.
1. Fans will be treated to free Nathan's
hot dogs (while supplies last). Wiener
dogs (dachshunds) will take to the track
for special racing exciterient during in-
termission. A large showing of the low-
to-the-ground canines is expected for this
event. The 2008 winner, Cena, owned
my Jaime Herceg, will face a very strong
field of short-legged competitors to take
home first-place honors again.'
The dogs will race a 50 foot course.
Each dog will have a "pet crew" member
assisting at the starting line and another
coaxing them to the finish line. Plenty of
treats will be available for all participants
and trophies will be awarded to 1st, 2nd
and 3rd place finishers.
Hot Fastlane Five racing will include


the Daytona Dodge Chrysler Jeep Late
Models, 'Taylor Racing Products Sports-
man and Daytona Sportswear Street
Stocks. In addition, Aerotec Aluminum
4-Cylinder Challengers will be "dog-eat-
dog" chasing a $250 first place check
and the Mini Stocks will be racing for
$500 to win.
Bring the entire family for the best val-
ue in family entertainment in the area.
Children ages 10 ind under are always
admitted free. Regular weekly adult ad-
mission is $10, students ages 11 to 15 are
$5. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. - racing be-
gins at 7:30 p.m.

Volusia Speedway Park is located 15
miles west of Ormond Beach, Florida on
State Road 40. Additional information
and updates will be available on the Web
site - www.volusiaspeedwaypark.com, or
call 386-985-4402.


Florida High School Athletic Association

Nike announces "Back Your Block" grant program


Nike has launched a new grant program
that is open to applications from high
schools across the nation. Nike is investing
up to $650,000 in communities across the
country to unlock the potential of youth
through sports, and as leaders in this field,
the company wanted the members of the
FHSAA to be among the first to know. This
year the process is going to be online and
anyone will be able to nominate, apply and
vote for the programs .hey ca_.14bout in
their community. Iet startedToday at
www.nikebackyourblock.com. Grants will


range between $2,500 and $5,000 and can
support both product and/or other costs
necessary to advance your program. Thank
you for all you do for your community to
help young people unlock their potential
through sports.

Nike Retail Community Relations Grants
are limited to 501c3 organizations which
meet the Nike giving guidelines listed at
www.nikebiz.corp/responsibility/nike.giv-'-
ingguidelines.html. Applications will be
open through Aug. 24.


Suwannee Legals
PUBLIC NOTICE
HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY
OF LIVE OAK (LOHA), Live Oak, Florida
will receive bids on August 25, 2009 until
10:00 a.m. bids will be opened
immediately after in the Board Room at
406 Webb Drive Northeast, Live Oak,
Florida 32064 for the construction of:
DESIGN BUILD
IMPROVEMENTS FOR HANDICAPPED
ACCESSIBILITY
Live Oak, Florida 32064
Sealed bids must be accompanied by bid
deposit: A Bid Bond, Cashier's Check or
Certified Check for five (5%) percent of
the total amount bid. The successful
bidder shall furnish a Performance Bond
and Labor ad Material Payment Bond
issued by a surety company approved by
the Govemment, for one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract price for'
any contract that exceeds $100,000.
Contractors bidding this work shall have
an occupational license and be licensed
as a General Contractor or
Archtect/Engineer or combination to do
business in the State of Florida. A copy
of each license is to be submitted with
the Bid.
Project Manual will be available from
LOHA. A nonrefundable cost of $25.00
per set Is required. No partial sets will be
Issued. Reproductions of Contract
Documents without written permission of
LOHA are strictly forbidden.
There will be a pre-bid conference held
consisting of review of the project at 2:00
pm August 4, 2009 In the Board Room at
406 Webb.Drive Northeast, Live Oak,
Florida 32064. At this time the Owner's
representatives will discuss the project
requirements and procedures.
Contractors are strongly encouraged to
attend. Failure to attend does not relive
the bidder from the responsibility to carry
out the work in the manner discussed at
the conference. This pre-bid conference
does not relieve the bidders of the on-site
inspection of the project requirements.
LOHA reserves the right to waive minor
Informalities in the bidding if said waiver
is in the Housing Authority's best interest.
7/24, 29, 31
A&A MINI STORAGE
313 NE RIVER RD
MAYO, FL. 32066
386-208-1062 OFF
NOTICE OF SALE
A & A MINI STORAGE LOCATED AT
10198 90th TRAIL IN LIVE OAK, FL.
WILL ACCEPT BIDS ON THE
CONTENTS OF THE FOLLOWING
UNITS:
(1). JEROME CREWS - UNIT# A-3
CONTENTS: MISCELLANEOUS
PERSONAL ITEMS
(2). SHELLY MONROE - UNIT# C-13
CONTENTS: MISCELLANEOUS
PERSONAL ITEMS
(3). DONNA PEPPER - UNIT# E-6 & E-7
CONTENTS: MISCELLANEOUS
PERSONAL ITEMS'
(4). TAMI NELSON - UNIT# B-68
CONTENTS: MISCELLANEOUS
PERSONAL ITEMS
CONTENTS MAY BE PURCHASED IN
PART OR WHOLE. PAYMENT MUST BE
IN CASH. SALE DATE IS TUESDAY THE
4TH OF AUGUST, 2009 AT 10:00 AM
AT A & A MINI STORAGE. A & A MINI
STORAGE RESERVES THE RIGHT TO
BIp.
7/29, 31


Florida Highway Patrol partners with


Alabama to take back our highways

Program runs through Friday

~ Troopers from 5 states unite to target dangerous drivers~


The Florida Highway Patrol's Northern Re-
gion is teaming up with the Alabama Depart-
ment of Public Safety and the Georgia State
Patrol for a joint initiative to reduce traffic fa-
talities while increasing safety.
Through-out this week, FHP will increase
patrols on the roads throughout this region as a
part of the multi-state safety campaign called
'Take Back Our Highways." The campaign in-
cludes Alabama and her border states of Flori-
da, Georgia, Mississippi and Tennessee, and
will result in an increased number of law en-
forcement officers on the road.
"The goal of this effort is to save lives by
targeting aggressive and dangerous drivers


throughout the region," Director of FHP, Col.
John Czemis said. "If you are breaking any of
our traffic laws, you can expect to meet a state
trooper."
During the week-long enforcement period,
FHP will use all available personnel, including
members of its Aviation Section, Contraband
Interdiction teams and Special Programs, as
well as Auxiliary and Reserve troopers to focus
on aggressive drivers, impaired drivers, speed-
ers and drivers who fail to buckle up,
"Every time you get behind the wheel, you
have a responsibility that must be taken seri-
ously. All drivers and passengers should buckle
up, pay attention to speed limits and avoid dis-


tractions to drive safely," adds Chief Grady
Carrick, Commander of the Northern Region.
'This multi-state campaign yields results, and
we are proud to join Alabama and her border
states in this partnership."
The Florida Department of Highway Safety
and Motor Vehicles provides highway safety
and security through excellence in service, ed-
ucation and enforcement. The department is
leading the way to a safer Florida through the
efficient and professional execution of its core
mission: the issuance of driver licenses, vehicle
tags and titles and operation of the Florida
Highway Patrol. To learn more about DHSMV
and the'services offered, visit www.fllsmv.gov.


DEP Highlights Top Five State Parks for a Summer Swim, Snorkel or Splash

-Florida's state parks offer visitors many opportunities to escape the summer heat-


In celebration of Parks and Recreation
' Month, the Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection's (DEP) Florida Park Ser-
vice is highlighting five state parks for aquatic
recreation. From springs and lakes, to rivers
Sand oceans, Florida's state parks are home to
many water bodies and offer activities that fos-
ter an appreciation of Florida's water resources
while providing a break from the summer heat.
"July is not only National Parks and Recre-
ation Month, but one of Florida's hottest
months," said DEP's Florida Park Service Di-
rector Mike Bullock. "What better place to es-
cape the July heat than one of Florida's 160 af-
fordable state parks which offer water activi-
ties for any interest ranging from swimming
and canoeing to snorkeling and surfing."
The top five state parks to get wet and not
sweat this July include:
John Pennekamp Coral Reef State
Park-America's first underwater park, locat-
ed off Key Largo, boasts 70 nautical square
miles of beautiful coral reefs. During the sum-
mer, the water is calm and cool, and guests can
take a boat trip to scuba dive or snorkel near
the reefs. Nearby, guests can also dive down to
see Christ of the Abyss, an 8.5 foot, 4,000
pound bronze sculpture of Jesus Christ that


stands in 25 feet of water.
Sebastian Inlet State Park- Located in
Melbourne Beach, Sebastian Inlet's three miles
of beaches provide opportunities for swim-
ming, scuba diving, snorkeling, shelling, sun-
bathing and surfing. The park is a popular des-
tination for saltwater fishing on Florida's east
coast and hosts several major surfing competi-
tions throughout the year.
Oscar Scherer State Park- Lake Osprey
is a perfect place to cool off during the hot
summer days in Osprey. This three-acre fresh-
water lake has a sandy beach front and is lo-
cated at the Lake Osprey Picnic Area. The
park also offers saltwater and freshwater fish-
ing, and canoeing and kayaking are available
in South Creek.
Suwannee River Wilderness Trail-
Stretching from White Springs in North Flori-
da, to the town of Suwannee on the Gulf
Coast, the Suwannee River offers 170 miles of
adventure perfect for canoeing, kayaking and
camping along.the way. The Suwannee River
State Park in Live Oak offers a boat ramp for
visitors to launch their journey along the river.
The Suwannee River Wilderness Trail is a
partnership program between DEP, the Suwan-
nee River Water Management District and


communities and local businesses along the
river.
St. George Island State Park-Miles of
undeveloped beach, with the Gulf of Mexico
on one side and the Apalachicola Bay on the
other, provide many opportunities for cooling
off on St. George Island, located just 75 miles
southwest of Tallahassee. Swimming, canoe-
ing, shelling, boating and fishing are some of
the activities that make this park a North Flori-
da summer favorite.

The first two-time Gold Medal winner hon-
oring the nation's best state park service, Flori-
da's state park system is one of the largest in
the country with 160 parks, most of which are
open 365 days a year. Florida's state parks,
which span more than 700,000 acres and in-
clude more than 100 miles of sandy white
beach, provide an affordable outing for people
of all ages. Fort Mose Historic State Park in
St. Augustine was recognized by the National
Park Service in April 2009 with its inclusion in
the National Underground Railroad Network
to Freedom Program.
For more information about Florida's state
parks, or to locate a summer swim destination,
visit www.FloridaStateParks.org.


PAGE 8B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009








VrI-Lf4LrOLVAYli VUll , 2Q- 2Q U A E DM A/V KG


ACV Coffee Icrrr



ConcertI 'J




to fatur


By Sall\ Q. Smith
Member Sn'rices
Advent Chrisuian i illage

The Arts In Healthcare at
Advent Chnsuan Village is
pleased to host its eighth
bi-annual Coffee Concert
on TuesdaN. August 18. at
10 a.m. in the Saw mill and
Depot Rooms at Puhlips
Center. The concert
features Donna Wissinger.
flutist, and Mar) Bngid
Roman, harpist. Coffee,
hot tea and pastries will be
served prior to the concert
- beginning at 9 a.m. - in
the Sawmill and Depot
Rooms.
Wissinger has performed
at ACV several times in the
years past via both the
Coffee Concert Series and
the 'Live! At Dowling
Park' Artist Series. This is
Roman's first performance
at ACV. The duo has
planned a delightful
program of engaging and
intriguing folk melodies
from around the world,
pieces of great lyrical
beauty, and well-loved
masterpieces of the
Western classical
repertoire. From the light-
hearted and playful
virtuosity of Rossini to the
impressionistic washes of
sound color of Faure and
Debussy, the combination
of flute.and harp charms,--
Donna Wissinger has
been heralded by the New
York Times as a "flutist of
rare gifts" and hailed as a
dynamic international star
whose concerts include
acclaimed recitals
throughout Europe, the
USA, and several republics
of the former Soviet
Union, as well as the main
stages of Carnegie Hall
and the renowned Glinka
Capella. Audiences are
captivated by her beautiful
and communicative
playing, her charismatic
stage presence, and her
obvious love and
enthusiasm for her art.
Miss Wissinger was
awarded a scholarship to
the prestigious Mozarteum
in Salzburg; among her
teachers are Julius Baker
and Jean-Pierre Rampal.
Additional information
about Wissinger can be
found on her web site at
www.donnawissinger.com.
Mary Brigid Roman,
associate professor of harp
at the Florida State
University School of
Music, heads one of oldest
harp departments in the
country. After receiving the
B.M. and M.M. degrees
from the Eastman School
of Music, she joined the
faculty in 1968. Since then,
she has appeared as a solo
and ensemble performer
throughout the Southeast.
Currently, she is principal
harpist with the
Tallahassee Symphony
Orchestra.
In addition to her
position at Florida
StateRoman's skills as a
teacher have been in
demand at other
southeastern universities,
including Valdosta State
University, Stetson
University, and Mercer
University. She has served
as a competition judge and
been a member of the
Board of Directors of the
American Harp Society.
Articles she has written


ABOVE: Donna Wissinger, flutist.
RIGHT: Mary Brigid Roman, harpist. pno.w suct.ned


have appeared in The
Instrumentalist and the
American Harp Journal.
The ACV Coffee.
Concert Series takes place
on a bi-annual basis and
has been established in
memory of Mrs. Velma
Wilcox. The purpose of
this memorial endowment
is to specifically support
and foster daytime music
concerts that take place at
ACV, and they will be
open to the public at no
charge. Please make plans
to attend this very special
event in the life of the arts
here in Dowling Park!
For more info, please
call the Dick Grillo at
(386) 658-5557, or e-mail
dgrillo @acvillage.net.


o Credit Card Payment
I want to take advantage of EZ Pay, and I authorize you to bill my
credit/ATM/debit card for the applicable amount each month until I
instruct you otherwise.


0 $2.75 in county


DO YOU OKE

DO YOU DIP?

DO YOU SPrIT
-o PW /veTWruA

-Free Group Sessions-
Tuesdays 5:30 - 7:30 piny
August 4th thru Septem th
BranfordLipftlry'
703 SuwanneeAi ,-N.wy.
Branford " '::
www.sraheorgfqss.php

. HEC
NiCE34 D0 -
* , ':-_ '*'*-i *^*'2: " -"i - uaSF


Please bill my:
M E'
al 61 D


E $4.00 out of county


Credit card account number
Exp. Date
Signature
Required for validation
c Direct Debit from Checking/Savings Account
I want to take advantage of EZ Pay, and I authorize you to process a payment for the applicable
amount on my checking/savings account each month until I instruct you otherwise. Please debit
my checking/savings account on the:


0- 5th of each month
I $2.75 in county
0 20th of each month
0 $4.00 out of county
Enclosed is a blank check/deposit
slip marked "VOID" across the front.


CLIP AND MAIL TO:

UI uartnx e mocrat
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064


I Name


Address


Signature


City


State Zip


I Phone
-----. n --- ..-


F-�


Suwannee River Area Health Education Center

Nicotaiq aut

I Io Register calk'
Shary Humphrey 386-688-4289:
or Toll Free: 866-341-2730

I Qut -ine-
Quiline g|


We'll
gladly to


mailing

you bill



and give you one month FREE

How EZ Pay Benefits You

1. Monthly billing - doesn't tie up large amounts of money in advance.
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Choose From Two Convenient Payment Options


Required for validation


PAGE 9B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAYJULY 29 20 9





PAGE 10B U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009

SJeep,
DCoL3C FGET UP TO





FOR YOUR OLD CAR

EVERYONE GETS UP TO


$


GUARANTEED CASH ALLOWANCE[11
$3,500 or $4,500 on virtually evey model, depending on model purchased


$


PLUS


"CASH FOR CLUNKERS"
$3,500 or $4,500 government credit, depending on model
THE GOVERNMENT HAS JUST ROLLED OUT ITS CAR ALLOWANCE REBATE SYSTEM (CARS), WHICH
MEANS WHEN YOU TURN IN A QUALIFYING VEHICLE YOU COULD RECEIVE UP TO $4,500 TOWARD THE
PURCHASE OF A NEW, MORE FUEL-EFFICIENT VEHICLE, IN ADDITION TO MANUFACTURER INCENTIVES. [2]
,All ,�


VISIT SUNBELT CHRYSLER, JEEP, DODGE DEALER
ON THE DOUBLE!


DODGE.COM


CHRYSLER.COM


JEEP.COM


Excludes Wrangler and Challenger. Cash allowance offers in lieu of other incentives. [1] $3,500 or $4,500 CARS credit in addition to other incentives when you
turn in your eligible vehicle with 18 "new" combined mpg or Ies and your purchase an eligible, more fuel efficient new vehicle. Certain offer restrictions apply.
For vehicle eligibility, governn�nt credit amount and details see dealer or visit www.cars.gov.
Chrysler, Dodge and Je p are registered trademarks of Chrysler Group LLC.
2008 DODGE 2005 MSSAN 2005 JEE 2006 CHEVY 2007 CHRYSLER 2000 DODGE 2007 HYNDAI
NITRO ALTIMA GRAND CHEROKEE COBALT LT 300 TOURING DURANGO SNTA


$11,599 279 a
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$ 9.Qor CALL FOR Q per
m $MING$ mOi.
2006 CHEVY 2008 JEEP 2006 CHRYSLER
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CHRYSLER - JEEP - DODGE
If the Sunbelt tag's not on your car you paid too much!


Now Hiring
Salespeople
AppIl in
person,


Hours: M-F 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.,
Sat. 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
1307 W. Howard Street
(US Hwy. 90)
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1042
Email: usedcarsales@windstream.net
536223-F


,5












01lie nuallmee ffrner t


01lu r fsper Newuts


nl~Crr~ .ci]


Deadlines for
Line Ads
Publication Deadline
Wednesday......Fri. @ 10 a.m.
Friday............. Wed. @ 10 a.m.


Fram's s

story S

Pages 7-9 h


Dial's Inspection

Services
For All Your Home
Inspection Needs!
386-364-4434 or
386-590-6534
Please visit our website:
www.suwanneevalleyinspections.comm




You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Nancy at

386-362-1734
499651-F


HOURS: MONDAY - FRIDAY 8 A.M. - 5 P.M.

Contact Us!

Online... Email... Fax... Phone...
When you place your Classified Ad it automatically classads@gaflnews.com (386) 364-5578 (386) 362-1734
appears on our website, www.nflaonline.com. Your ad is 1-800-525-4182
live on the internet 24 hours a day (free ads excluded). Call us Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Don't forget your name, address & phone number we can reach you.


SU study: Invasive
)ecies threaten
itical oyster
habitats


Page 10



"If you can't live at home,
this is the next best place
to live! Everyone here
is so good to the residents."


When you or your loved one need
assistance with the tasks of daily
living, consider Dacier Manor
Assisted Living Facility (ALF
#7641). Our loving, qualified staff
is on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week. And our secure, comforting
-atmosphere allows our residents
to maintain the highest level of
.self-care. Our'residents enjoy
a variety of activities and a
supportive environment.
Call us today for more information
or to schedule a free tour.
(386) 658-5552

ADVENTCHIuSTIANVILAGE
-- AT DO--INA --
PO Box 455 * DOWUNG PARK, FL 32064
(386) 658-5552 * 1-800-955-8771 TTY
. 1-800-647-3353 . ..
www.acvillage.net -X'
536081-F


FWC offers Page 11

gator-hunting

classes

BEST OF THE BEST REAL ESTATE COMPANY 2008
n 386-755-6600
LToll Free 1-877-755-6600
" - l 540 W. Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida 32055
email:
hallmark0l @comcast.net
w'ww haiimarklakeciav c,-rr,
,eO \ ',\4C Halmark weklomes
E , 'Op\. RHONDA DYKES, Realtor.
to theiroffire
-RL FEATURED LISTING:
WELL CARED FOR BRICK
HOME in established
neighborhood with a park across
the street. Large eat-in kitchen.
bedroom with built in shelving and
storage, beautifully landscaped.
oversized carport. $120,000 MLS
71645 Call Myrtle Wall 386-752-
2655

OTHER PROPERTIES:
10 ACRES off CR 349. Want privacy? POOL HOME Reduced! 3/2 with 2044
This is the place for you! $79,000 MLS sq.ft. on a full acre, fenced backyard.
71387 Call Sharon Selder 386-365-1203 fireplace in great room, formal dining
room. $209,000 MLS 70824 Call Janet
HOME IN THE FOREST! Across from Creel 386-719-0382
Ocean Ponl. Peace and quiet with lots of
wildlife in the area! Great location for. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY! Bank
someone working in Jax or local owned drive through convenience store on
corrections location. $100,000 MLS 71237 Highway 90 in Lake City. Great location
Call Kay Priest 386-365-8888 with high visibility. Price recently
slashed to $298.500 MLS 71618.Call
NEAR RIVER BOAT RAMP One acre Myrtle Waif 386-752-2655 or Sharon
with well and septic. Tear down house on Selder386-365-1203
property. $55,900 MLS 68588 Call Martha
Saunders 386-752-3945 50s087-F


Announcements














Help Wanted
,FirstDay
AIRCRAFT MECHANIC
To work under supervision, A &
P preferred but not required.
Apply in person at BRC
Performance, 615 Industrial Ave,
Live Oak

CDL DRIVERS NEEDED for
over the road flatbed positions.
Minimum of 2 years experience,
clean CDL, flatbed experience
preferred. Driver's home every
weekend during seasonal freight,
every 10-15 days during off
season. Late model Preterbilts
and Freightliners. Average
salary $50K to $60K. Call 386-
590-1980 or 386-776-1857.
CUSTOMER SERVICE REP
needed Must have excellent
customer service skills, typing
and computer skills Apply at
3076 95th Dlive, Live Oak


FirstDay
RN, OT, COTA, SLP
expect
REWARDS
The homecare industry is
revolutionizing healthcare in
America. And Gentiva is
leading that revolution as a
progressive, employee-
focused organization with an
innovative Pay Per Visit and
Per Diem Program.
expect more rewards at
Gentiva
* Control your financial
rewards with flexible
scheduling to meet your goals.
* Put your mind at ease with
weekly paychecks and
streamlined payroll process.
expect more
When you work for America's
homecare leader, you can
expect more: more
opportunities, more
challenges, more rewards.
That's why Gentiva is the
employer of choice for some of
today's most talented
clinicians.
***Also seeking FT
Scheduler (Client Care
Coordinator) for Lake City
location***
For more info contact your
local Recruiter, Annissia, at
1.866.GENTIVA or visit us at
www.gentiva.com/jobs
*Gentiva Health Services, Inc.

W GENTIVA'
home health

is an Affirmative Action/Equal
Opportunity Employer
M/F/D/V encouraged to apply.


127 Howard Street E., Live Oak, FL

.T..a Phone: 386-362-4539

Toll Free: 1-800-557-7478

Se Habla Espanol

EMAIL: info@noolerealtv.com


I S..Slivn


www.p0oolerealty.com


D3
REALTOff


529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389,
Evening 362-2990


(1) Hamilton Co: 4 acres on CR
143 with well, septic & service
pole; 10x12 storage, nice grass &
trees. Reduced to $40.000.
(2) Off CR 49 10 acres in grass
with scattered trees, surveyed into
two 5 acre tracts, 3 sides fenced.
Priced to sell at $4,900 per acre.
(3) Near City 133rd Road: 3BR/2-
1/211A CH/AC brick home with
appro . 3,200 sq. ft. under roof,
fireplace. kitchen hI lriished,,shlip,
storage one acre homesite with
large trees. Priced to sell, @
$207,500.
(4) Oil' CR136: 5 cicre partially
wooded some grass. Will work for
land liomne package. Reduced to
$39,900.
(5) Near City: 3.13 acre tract witl
large trees on county road. I'riced
to sell @ $20,500.
(6) OIl CR 349: 10 icre wooded
tract witli a two bedroom CH('/AC
log lhoute in excellent condition
coait. llpprox. 1201) sqi. Ii. under
roof, 30'x40' pole Ibarn. Retluced to
$175,000.
(7) Suwalnllee River: i.6i acre
wooded tract with 100 ft. oil (lie
water,; togeller with it 3 bedroom,
2 1/2 bathl CII&AC I)VNWMlH count.
approlilx. 170(1 sq. I'. will detached
storage. Priced to sell @ $145,000.
(8) Bralford area: 15 acres inl good
cropland. with county ioads and
fence on three sides. Excellent
location near US 27 & US 129.
Bring all offers.
(9) Live Oak Area: New 3
bedroom, 2 bathl CH/AC home,
.kitchen furnished, parking pad,
sewer & water, will work for
S.H.I.P. 100% lfin dancing. Reduced
to $99,900.
(10) ()OIICR 132: 1.47 ac. wiith a 3/2
CII/AC 2008 DIWMIH with
fireplace, kitchen ifurnishled,
20'x20' shop, fenced. REDUCED
TO $65,000
(11) lIudnstrial Park: 1.13 acre
corner tract good exposure.
Reduced tl o $34,500.
(12) 40 acres with 835 11. ion paved
road inl 13 year old planted pines,
Priced to sell a( Reduced to
$1119,600.
(13) Near City: 2 ac. with 3/2 home
conlt. aIl"ox. 1280 sq. ft. inder
roof, kitelte o finished. carport.
$83,250.


(14) Luraville Area: Fly-in
Community 15 acre wooded large
trees, good county road. Priced to
sell reduced to $74,900.
(15) Suwannee River: Two acres
wooded river lot off CR 349 near
Royal Springs and Boat Ramp. 100
sq. ft. on the water. (Buildable)
good buy @ $55,000.
(16) Off Mitchell Rd.: 20 acres
wooded with survey on 199th'Rd.
$89,900.
(17) Off CR 136 East: 40 acre tract
partially wooded, some grass small
pond, fenced. Good area. Reduced
to $4,500 per acre.
(18) Hamilton Co.: 10 acres on
CR751 and the river approx. 1300
ft. on the water and approx. 1300
ft. on paved road. Priced to sell at
$85,000.
(19) Madison Co.: 40 acres in 16
year old slash planted pines off CR
255 good elevation. Good buy at
$175,000.
(20) lcelvenston St.: 4 lots with a
4/3 CI/AC 1-1/2 story brickframe
hIome count. approx 3,200 sq. ft.
under roof. Kitchen furnished,
fireplace, corner lots, plus 1
bedroom, guest house cont. approx.
550 sq. ft. Priced to sell @
$170,000.
(21) Suwannee River home: nice
tWo bedroom two story CH&AC
home South of Branford, kitchen
furnished, beautiful view of river
from rear, screen porch. Good area
priced to sell @ $215,000.
(22) Farms of 10 Mill Hollow: 4
acres in grass/cropland with
scattered trees. $32,500.
(24) Near City: Off US 90 East 5
acres wooded near golf course.
Good buy @ $44,900.
(25) Suwannee River: Nice river lot
with a one bedroom cabin needs
some work, well, septic, etc. 82 ft
on (he water. Good location with
survey. $75,000.
(26) 208 Houston: 3/5 BR, 1-1/2 BA
fraimit hnoae tcont. approx. 2,000 sq.
I't. under roof. Zoned R/D, has
iolential. Priced to sell @ $59,500.
(27) 16th St.: 3 ac. with a 3BR/2BA
CII&AC brick home with
fireplace, count. approx. 2,780 sq. ft.
under roof. Kitchen furnished,
survey. Good Buy @ $172,500.
535418-F


-FOR RENT-


GREAT RATES FOR RENTALS - SINGLE AND
DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOMES - STARTING
AT $375 PER MONTH. WATER, SEWER,
AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS.
386-330-2567 ,


TjFflflH iS


~I~~ I 'I --


**,









PAGE 2, JULY 29 - 30, 2009 * CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


014ir 4umannei Timocrat

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If you're searching for that perfect set of wheels,

look no further than www.nflaonline.com


. 3. . . . .


110& pCs


I I II� -C-- I~-~s----4.-s. C- C -II-~ -- - -----------�91~��- - --I


Job List
DRIVERS - Miles & Freight;
Positions available ASAP! CDL-
A with tanker required. Top pay,
premium benefits and Much
More! Call or visit us online,
877-484-3042
www.oakleytransport.com
WAREHOUSE NOW HIRING
All Departments.
Assembly/Shipping/Receiving &
Forklift Immediate Hire.
Management/Office Help
Available. No experience/Will
Train. 1st & 2nd Shifts.
Benefits. $13 - $22/hr. 1-800-
823-3830 Fee Reg.
Jobs Wanted
CNA WILLING TO LIVE IN
W/YOUR Loved One(s) in
exchange for Room & Board
Plus Small Salary. 386-330-
6941.
DO YOU NEED YOUR HOME
CLEANED or Pressure Washed,
or your yard cleaned up? Done
at a very reasonable rate. Call
Christine or Gary 386-792-1655
DOG NANNY: Need someone to
walk, take to vet or groomer, take
out to play or love your pet while
you are busy? Call Cindy 386-
362-4534
JOB WANTED: 35 yrs
experience in home building,
remodeling, cabintery. Also 30
yrs experience in upholstery for
cars & furniture. References
available. Call Dale at 386-330-
4723.
SURVEY PARTY CHIEF:
Instrument Man 20 yrs exp.
Land/Construction. Clean Driving
Record, Willing to learn any field
for work.
386-364-7702 or 386-208-8750
Lost & Foundd
FOUND BLACK LAB: Found at
12116 CR 252 in McAlpin. Well
groomed, companion. Pis Call
386-362-6417

Special Notices


Advertising Sales Rep

needed
Job Description:

Are you ready to join a growing sales team? Do you
have a proven track record in sales? Thrive in a fast-
paced environment? Do you want to be part of a
newspaper company that offers a creative and
challenging workplace?

The Suwannee Democrat is looking for an
Advertising Sales Rep that can consistently generate
new business and build on the momentum of an
existing sales team to grow established relationships
within the community arid surrounding counties.

The Suwannee Democrat is headquartered in Live
Oak, Florida and is owned by Community Newspaper
Holdings Inc. (CNHI). Live Oak is a north central
Florida town located, in Suwannee County (pop.
39,800) and is on the historic Suwannee River
offering plenty of outdoor recreation opportunities.
The newspaper group consists of three weekly
newspapers and a bi-weekly Shopper;
* The Suwannee Democrat- a twice weekly publication
servicing, Live Oak, Branford, McAlpin, O'Brien and
Wellborn in Suwannee County (pop. 39,800).
* The Mayo Free Press - Weekly publication servicing
Lafayette County (pop. 8,000).
* The Jasper News - Weekly publication servicing
Hamilton County (pop. 14,300).
* Suwannee Valley Shopper - Bi-weekly publication
servicing, Suwannee, Hamilton and Lafayette counties.

Responsibilities include: print and online sales,
growing and creating new revenue streams and sales
planning.

Qualified candidates should possess a successful
history of increasing ad revenue, excellent
presentation, communication and decision making
skills. Effective newspaper advertising sales skills are
desirable.

We offer a positive work environment with a base
salary and incentive program including a benefits
package with 401K and insurance.

If interested please send resume to
Monja Slater, advertising director,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Email resume to monja.slater@gaflnews.com
or pick up an application at
211 Howard St. East, Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1734

Our Web site: www.suwanneedemocrat.com

Job closing date: not set

EEOC notice: CNHI is an Equal Opportunity
Employer.

We are a Drug Free Workplace. 5


Construction
METAL ROOFING TAX
CREDITI 40 yr Warranty.
Direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock Quick
turnaround. Delivery available.
Gulf Coast Supply &
Manufacturing, 1-888-393-0335
www.gulfcoastsupply.com
MOBILE HOME ROOF
EXPERTS 100% Financing,
Free Estimates We Finance
Almost Everyone Reroof,
Repairs, 30yrs Experience
Home Improvement Services
Toll-FREE 1-877-845-6660
State Certified
(Lic.#CCC058227)
ROOF REPAIRS CALL 24/7
Flat Roof & Mobile Home
Specialist. Free Certified
Inspections. Lic/Ins
CCC1327406. All Florida
Weatherproofing & Construction
1-877-572-1019
ROOFING EXPERTS 100%
Financing, Free Estimates We
Finance Almost Everyone
Reroof, Repairs, Shingle, Tile,
Flat, Mobile Homes Home
Improvement Services 1-877-
845-6660, 727-530-0412 State
Certified (Lic.#CtC058227)

Legal
NOTICETO M/WBE FIRMS
WRScompass is looking for
M/WBE Compaines/firms
licended in the City of Live Oak
in the following areas: Paving;
Landscaping; Concrete Flatwork;
Plumbers; Electricians;
Mechanical Contractors. Andy
Hooper 813-684-4400
Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING!! Do You
Earn $800 in a Day? 25 Local
Machines and Candy All For
$9,995. Call 1-888-753-3430
AIN#B02000033 Call Us: We
Will Not Be Undersoldl
Computer
DONNA'S COMPUTER
SERVICE We Will Find A
Solution! Please contact Donna
386-559-7311 for more
information
Vocational
Want to be a CNA?
Don't want to wait?
Express Training
.is now offering our quality
Exam Prep Classes in Lake
City. Class sizes limited.
Next class 03/16/2009.
Call 386-755-4401
expresstraining
services.com


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0 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


PAGE 2, JULY 29 - 30, 2009


1�'P~I~-5~Ts~BFI~









* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


1e Onumtantre Demuocrat

0lre Majo Xee Press

014e Jasper Newls


0aA1,f Os 4a D WK *I
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I


ADULT HIGH SCHOOL
DIPLOMA at, home Fast!
Nationally accredited $399.
Easy payment plan. Free
brochure. 800-470-4723
www.diplomaathome.com
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Accounting, *Criminal Justice.
Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call 800-443-
5186 www.CenturaOnline.com
AVIATION MAINTENANCE /
AVIONICS Graduate in 14
Months. FAA Approved;
financial aid if qualified. Job
placement assistance. Call
National Aviation Academy
Today! 1-800-659-2080 or
NAA.edu
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMAT
Fast Affordable & Accredited
Free Brochure. Call Now! 1-
800-532-6546 ext.. 16
www.continentalacademy.com
LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072.
M-F from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Pets for Sale
CHIHUAHUA PUPPY'S 3
months old, All Females w/CKC
Papers. Shots up to date. Asking
$200
Call 386-792-2188
FirstDay
LONG HAIRED CHIHUAHUA
PUPPIES: 6 wks old, 2-Females,
1-Male. 1st Wormer done. $200
Ea. 386-294-3567
Pets for Free
FREE BULLDOG MIX to good
home. Approx 3 yrs old. Yhite
w/Tan spots. Loves other animals
& children. Very Sweet. House
Trained. 386-776-1708
Livestock
MINI DONKEY'S 3-Females, 2-
Breed, 1-Young. 2-Brown, 1-
Spotted. $400 Ea OBO 386-
935-9530
Building Materials
LUMBER LIQUIDATORS
Hardwood Flooring, from $
.99/Sq.Ft. Exotics, Oak,
Bamboo,. Prefinished &
Unfinished. Bellawood w/50
year prefinish, plus A Lot More!
We Deliver Anywhere, 5 Florida
Locations, 1-800-FLOORING (1-
800-356-6746)


Furniture
MEMORY FOAM ALL VISCO
New Thera-Peutic Mattresses
Member BBB - 60 Night Trial As
Seen on TV High Density 25
Year Warranty T/F - $348; Q -
$398; K - $498. Free Florida
Delivery. Thera-Pedic, Dormia,
# Beds, Craftmatic Adjustables.
Best Price Guaranteed!!
Wholesale Showrooms Tampa
813-889-9020 7924 W
Hillsborough Pinellas 727-525-
6500 7101 US 19N Miami
305-651-0506 21307 WW 2nd
Ave Polk 863-299-4811
Hernando 352-688-3454 3021
Commercial Spr Hill
www.mattressdr.com 1-800-AT
SLEEP 1-800-287-5337
FirstDay
TWIN BED COMPLETE $100
OBO, Day Bed w/Mattress $150
OBO. 386-623-1544

Miscellaneous
DIRECT FREE 5 . Months!
Includes All 265+ Digital
Channels + Movies with NFL
Sunday Ticket! Ask How Today!
Free DVR/HD Receiver!
Packages from $29.99
DirectStarTV 1-800-973-9044
DIRECTV Satellite Television,
Free Equipment, Free 4 Room
Installation, Free HD or DVR
Receiver Upgrade. Packages
from $29.99/mo. Call DIRECT
Sat TV for Details 1-888-420-
9482
DISH NETWORK'S Best Offer
Ever! Free HD/DVR $9.99/mo
For Over 100 All-digital
Channels. Call Now And
Receive $600 Signup Bonus! 1-
866-573-3640
FREE/GRATIS First month
Free home phone service. Free
unlimited local calls, Free 240
minutes long distance. No
contracts, . deposits, credit
checks. Starting $19.00/Month.
Libre Phone 1-877-223-2050
NEW ADT CUSTOMERS - Free
Home Security System! ADT
24/7 Monitoring starting at just
$35.99/mo. $99 Install Fee.
Call Nowl 866-265-4139 ADT
Auth Co
SWIM SPA-FACTORY
CLEARANCE Loaded $17,500,
must .sacrifice $9,500. Also
Hottub list $4,500, must sell
$2,195. Can Deliver. Call 1-
800-304-9943 Warranty
,*ri � :-.�i ~, '., ,


Wanted to Buy
CASH FOR YOUR COINS!
Private collector seeking US
coins and currency. Older
varieties, copper, silver, nickel
and gold. I pay more than
dealers or pawn.
Call 352-949-1450
Garage/Yard Sales
NEIGHBORHOOD SALE AT
Least 10 families plus. Sat 8/1,
8a.m. Any and everything. 15
min from Live Oak follow signs:
Hwy 51 to 136 ST. 776-2516
YARD SALE 7/31 8/1 8 - ? 129
S. 2 mi past Publics on right. Suit
Cases, Kenwood Stereo,
Shredder, Silicon Comm. Grade
Mix, Legal Desk, Bakers/Wine
Rack, Guitar Amp, Clothing,
Hshold Items. Proceeds go to
Protecting the Springs from
Pollution


Boats/Supplies
BOATS; 1000's of boats for sale
www.floridamariner.com
reaching 6 million homes weekly
throughout Florida. 800-388-
9307, tide charts, broker profiles,
fishing captains, dockside dining
and more.

Guns/Ammunition
FirstDay
GUN SALE: Winchester 30/30
$395, 12 ga Sears Shot Gun
$275, 30.06 Remington Model
742 $375, 16 ga CZ Double
$350, Many Others For Sale Call
for info. 386-294-3187


BUSINESSES


FOB

Rental Assistance
I, 2, 3 & 4 BR HC & Non-
HC Accessible Apartments

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY 711
Equal Housing Opportunity


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living
2 bedroom duplex.
Call 362-3110.
501033 F


Contact
us at the
paper.

Classified
Advertising
386-362-1734 ext 102
�. 386-364-5578
, ,'. , C .'. . ,rr.n..3en, i,.,:l'l o ,rr.
r jir :

We'd love to hear from you.
Classified
Marketplace
RO. Box 370
Lve OaK. FL 32064


SERVICES


Rental assistance may be available!
HUD Vouchers Welcome!
1.2 & 3 BR HC & Non-HC
Accessible Apartments
< 600A e II
705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housing Opportunity -9


----- ----- ----------
One Get One Free

4 .e !PIZZAT "
ofequa or lesser v aue

Exp. Date: 7-31-2009
Limi offer pr person per si
.------------- --S---
20 FREE =e s
Tokenst_..
U288 w US Hwy '90
Lake Cit>, FL 32055 www.pandamoniyum.com
Please call or visit Exp. Date: 7-31-2009 (36)4385200
us online for more details t.LoeC'L i.t - 438-5200
^^^^L~L^^L� ^^)W4L 00%*WL*WLO**AL kbiAO% AAIO%0-%0% ,


* 161-bed Medicare/Medicaid
skilled nursing facility
* Alzheimer's Unit - specialized
care by loving staff who provide
hands-on care
* Individualized Care through
stimulating physical and social
environment, physical,
occupational, and speech therapy,
short-term rehabilitation, well-
balanced meals and family support
and involvement
* Physician services provided
through our on-site Copeland
Medical Center
* Admission Standards - resident
must be 60 years of age and meet
the Slate nursing home admission
guidelines, as ordered by a
physician.
For more 12t
information call .'r ,
386-658-5550 or 1-800-647-3353
TDD# 800-955-8771
536082-F


COMMERCIAL TRUCK DRIVER II

The Suwannee County Public Works Department is currently
recruiting for the position of Commercial Truck Driver II. This
position will primarily be located at the landfill. This is semi-
skilled work in the operation of 10-wheel dump trucks, refuge
trucks, knuckle boom trucks and other equipment as required.
Requires decisions relative to the application of various
established rules and procedures, which may -affect quality,
accuracy, and safety. Minimum qualifications require education
equivalent to partial high' school education plus two years
experience in the operation of large commercial trucks related to
the position; or, an equivalent combination of training and
experience. Must possess a valid CDL Class "A" or Class "B"
license, and have a clean record. Entry rate is $9.02 per hour.
Interested applicants must submit a County application and a
copy of valid Florida Driver's License to.the
Administrative Services Department,
224 Pine Avenue, Live Oak, FL 32060, (386) 362-6869,
no later than 5:00 p.m. on August 4, 2009.
The Suwannee County Board of County Commissioners is an
equal employment opportunity employer that does not
discriminate against any qualified employee or applicant
because of race, color, national origin, sex, including pregnancy,
age, disability, or marital status. Spanish speaking individuals
are encouraged to apply. All applicants subject to a pre-
employment physical. Successful completion of a drug test is a
condition of employment.
5386971rv

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TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 386-362-1734 [

DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M.

ft- F. .14a4.F


JULY 29 - 30, 2009, PAGE 3


Classified


Bargain


Basement

$0 - $100 FREE

1100 - 1150 $5
C,:III today

800-525-41821


WRBaMe


- ' , 11 ,1 ,_, [ ,:






8" '*.^^BRH^^S^BSSBI^S^ S









PAGE 4, JULY 29 - 30, 2009








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* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


GUN *


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


-'-Available from Commercial News Providers
----- rnaew-o





-- - o a . 0

o 0- o -,,


* -
. - 9D M O


Apartments for Rent
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in
this newspaper is subject to the
Fair Housing Act which makes it
illegal ' to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability,
familial status or national origin,
or an intention, to make any
such preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial, status
includes children under the age
of 18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women
and people securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in
violation of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimination call
HUD toll-free 1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free number for the


OPPORTUNITY
hearing impaired is 1-800-927-
9275.

Houses for Rent
GILCREST CO 3Bd/2.5Ba. A-
Framed house on Suwannee
River, Beautiful for Weekend,
Week, or Permanent Rental. NO
Pets inside. Call 386-330-4600
for price.


HOUSE DOWNTOWN LIVE
OAK
3Bd/1.5Ba, CHA, $700 +
Utilities, $400 Security, Refer,
Non-Smokers, No Pets. Days
386-362-1837 After 6pm 386-
362-6156 Ellen
HOUSE FOR RENT 2Bd/1Ba
Brick Home on 1 acre. Paved
Road, CHA, Fireplace. $650, 1st
& Last. Call 386-362-5617
FirstDay
IN LIVE OAK NEW 3Bd/2Ba
CHA Range/Refrig/DW.WD
hook-up For Sale, Lease W/Opt
to buy, or Rent. $650 mo 386-
208-2384
FirstDay
IN LIVE OAK NEWLY
REFURBISHED 2Bd/1Ba CHA
Gas Range/Refrig/DW/Disposal,
WD hook-up. For Sale, Lease
w/opt to buy, or Rent $550 386-
208-2384
NEWER 3Bd/2Ba Brick House
on 5 acres in Wellborn.
Stainless Steal Appl. W/D, 8'
front porch, 10X12 back patio.
$850 mo, 1st, last, sec 352-528-
4748
FirstDay
RENT OR LEASE 2Bd/2Ba on
1/2 acrer lot, Lg fenced yard.
W/D hook-up. CHA. Located in
White Springs. $650 mo 1st, last
plus $500 deposit (904) 263-
0152
Mobile Homes for Rent
FirstDay
DOUBLE WIDE 3bd/2ba
located .7 miles from Live Oak
Hwy 129 S. $650mo/$650dep.
NO PETS Call 386-288-2774


Announcements

Advertise in Over 100 Papers!
One Call - One Order - One
Payment The Advertising
Networks of Florida - Put Us to
work for You! (866)742-1373
www.national-classifieds.com,
info @national-classifieds.com

Apartment for Rent

A 4bdr 3ba $217/mo! HUD
HOME! 3 bdrm only $199/mo!
Stop Renting! 5% dw, 15 yrs @
8% apr For Listings (800)366-
9783 ext 5669.

Auctions

Absolute Auction! 214+/- acre
farm, house. Pike County near
Troy, Alabama. Offered in
parcels, combinations and/or
entirety. August 13, 1:00.
www.gtauctions.com (800)996-
2877. Granger, Thagard and
Associates, Inc. Jack F Granger
#873.

Auto Donations

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY
COUPON UNITED BREAST
CANCER FOUNDATION Free
Mammograms, Breast Cancer
Info www.ubcf.info FREE
Towing, Tax Deductible, Non-
Runners Accepted, (888)468-
5964.

Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING. 40 yr
Warranty-Buy direct from
manufacturer 30/colors in stock,
w/all accessories. Quick turn
around. Delivery available. Gulf
Coast Supply & Mfg, (888)393-
.0335
www.GulfCoastSupply.com

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING! Do
you earn $800 in a day? 25


FirstDay
DWMH 2Ba/1Ba, Fulling
Furnished. $650 mo, 1st & last
on 5 acres. 321-239-4859
FirstDay
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba CHA,
Dishwasher, W/D Hook-up. $550
mo NO PETS. Dowling Park.
386-658-2103 after 5pm
FirstDay
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba, 28X60 on 1
acre, surrounded by horse farm.
Falmouth area 19377 68th St.
$695 mo. 1st, last, security. 386-
249-0197
FirstDay
RENT TO OWN YOUR
RETIREMENT HOME: Located
Winterhaven, FL close to all
amenities -golf-swim-fish-
clubhouse activities etc.
2Bd/2Ba, Fl room, Ig carport,
FSBO 863-299-4305
SINGLEWIDE MOBILE
HOMES-2 available in Live Oak,
FL. 3BD/2BA. Now accepting
section 8. 1st mo rent & last to
move in. No Pets Call 386-938-
5657
FirstDay
SWMH 2Bd/2Ba Furnished.
$500 per month, 1st, security.
Non-Smoker, No Pets. Rural
Country Setting. 386-294-2416
FirstDay
SWMH 2Bd/2Ba w/Jacuzzi.
SLocated in Suwannee River
Mobile Estates. $450 mo $300
Dep. 386-842-5566
FirstDay
SWMH's 2 Miles from Live Oak
on 5 secluded acres each.
3Bd/2Ba $575 mo, 2Bd/1Ba
$525 mo. Renovated. Water
Included. 386-697-9326


Local Machines and Candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033 CALL US: We will
not be undersold!

Cars for Sale

Buy Police Impounds!! 97
Honda Civic $400! 97 Honda
Accord $500! for listings call
(800)366-9813 ext 9271

Acura Integra 95 $500! Honda
Civic 99 $400! Ford Taurus 01
$750! Toyota Camry 98 $850!
Police Impounds! For listings
call (800)366-9813 ext 9275.

Help Wanted

Help Wanted. Join Wil-Trans
Lease or Company Driver
Program. Enjoy our Strong
Freight Network. Must be 23.
(866)906-2982

RV delivery drivers needed.
Deliver RVs, boats and trucks
for PAY! Deliver to all 48 states
and CN. For details log on to
www.RVdeliveryjobs.com

OTR Drivers for PTL. Earn up
to 46 cpm. No forced Northeast.
12 months experience required.
No felony or DUI past 5 Years.
(877)740-6262 www.ptl-
inc.com


FirstDay
SWMH 3 MILES EROM
DOWLING PARK on 5 quiet
acres. 3Bd/2Ba $575 per month.
Energy Efficient, Porches, Water
included
386-697-9326
FirstDay
SWMH 3Bd/2Ba Unfurnished:
$500 per month. 1st, Security.
Near Mayo Correctional
Institution. Non-Smokers, No
Pets
386-294-2416
WELL MAINTAINED 3Bd/2Ba
MH on 3.6 fenced, shaded
acres, Stage CoachlNobles
Ferry Rd area. Avail. early
August. $700 mo. lst/last/dep.
386-842-2006
Mobile Homes for Sale
BY OWNER 16X76 SWMH
3Bd/2Ba 1997, 1208 sq ft, 4.06
Acres. Utility Bldg, Frt & Back
Porch. Peacock Lake Addition.
$75,000 386-209-0893
DWMH 3Bd/3Ba 24X67 Good
Condition on 3.17 Acres: Steps
from WalMart. CHA, 11X22
screened back porch.
Handicapped equip. $60K 972-
952-8900
"BRAND NEW"
28X40 3Bd/2Ba DWMH for only
$25,900 Call Eric 386-719-
5560
"MONSTER MANSION"
5Bd/3Ba 2300 sq ft, all this for
payments of $500 a month.
Call Eric 386-719-5560
"TRADE IN"
28X60 3Bd/2Ba DWMH,CHA,
Skirting, Steps, Set-Up/Del for
$37,900 Call Eric 386-719-
5560


AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for high paying Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid
if qualified - Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (888)349-5387.

Real Estate

LAKEFRONT Grand Opening
Sale! 8/15/09 only! 10 acre
dockable lakefront only $49,900
Wooded park-like setting on one
of Alabama's top recreational
lakes. All amenities complete.
BOAT TO GULF OF MEXICO!
Excellent financing. Call now
(866)952-5302x 1514

LAKEFRONT STEAL! 1.2
acres $49,892. (In lieu of
foreclosure on builder.) Gently
sloping lakefront estate on
private bass lake. Gorgeous
unspoiled setting- no crowds, no
noise. Abutting lakefronts sold
for $69,900 and $64,900 - not
half as nice as this one!
Excellent financing. Call now
(888)792-5253, x2341

NC MOUNTAINS CLOSEOUT
SALE! Cabin Shell, 2+ acres
with great view, very private,
big trees, waterfalls & large
public lake nearby, $99,500
Bank financing. (866)275-0442


Homes For Rent


4Br 3Ba Foreclosure! $11,500!
Only $217/Mo! 5% down 15
years @ 8% apr. Buy, 3 Br
$199/Mo! for listings (800)366-
9783 ext 5798

Miscellaneous

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Accounting, *Criminal Justice.
Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call (866)858-
2121, www.CenturaOnline.com.


ANF
ADVERTIrllrG NFrw iOPkS Oc HOil)DA

or..I, ' e.l I ,' i Metrn Drl) y


Week of July 27, 2009
499626-F


OWNER FINANCE/HANDYMAN


OWNER FINANCE/HANDYMAN
SP. 14X70 3Bd/2Ba .45 acres,
needs clean-up. Rent applied to
down pmt. $550 mo, 1st & last.
1634 177th Rd 386-867-0048
THIS 16X60-$300 Above
Factory Inv.- 2Bd/2Ba SWMH,
Save Thousands. Call Rick 386-
752-1452
BANK REPO 2005 24X48
3Bd/2Ba "Like Brand New" "With
a Used Price." Call Mr Mott 386-
752-8196
"Mossy Oak" 2010 Model
4Bd/2Ba MH $39,995. Includes
Delivery, Set-Up, AC, Skirting &
Steps. You Pick all Colors. Call
Mr. Mott 386-752-8196
Vacation Property
GEORGIA BLUE RIDGE
MOUNTAINS Only 4 Remaining!
2.5acre unique lots on incredible
trout stream, county water,
pristine location on Cutcane Rd.,
$45,000. Seller financing Avail.
706-364-4200
NC MOUNTAIN LAND
CLOSEOUT SALE! 5+ acres
with 10ft waterfall, great views,
lots of options, only $99,500.
Must sell. Call owner 1-866-
275-0442
NC MOUNTAINS Cool
Summers/Mild Winters. Newl
E-Z to finish log cabin shell,
w/loft & basement, includes
acreage $99,900. Mountain &
waterfront homesites $39,000-
$99,000. Local Financing
Available! . 828-247-9966
(Code 41)
NC MOUNTAINS 2.5 ACRE
.HOMESITE. Spectacular view.
High altitude. Easily accessible.
Paved road. Secluded. Bryson
City. $39,950. Owner
financing. Call Owner 1-800-
810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com
S.E. TENN MTNS LAND




















Double and

single wide
mobile

homes
for rent on

their own

lots in the


area.

386.362-2720
I 499686-F


DISCOUNTED 5+ acre Tracts


DISCOUNTED 5+ acre Tracts
from $24,900 w/ utilities. Must
Sell! Ocoee/Hiwassee River
Area. Large MTN Tracts from
$2250/acre. 1-800-531-1665 or
1-931-260-9435.
TENNESSEE. Head for the
Smokey Mountains Vacation
Tours 2 night / 3 day stay only
$49 Home sites @ $29,900
Paved roads, water, sewer &
clubhouse
www.ocoeemountainclub.com
888-821-2006
TEXAS LAND - 0 DOWN 20-
acre Ranches, near El Paso.
Beautiful Mountain Views. Road
Access. Surveyed. $15,900.
$159/mo. Money Back
Guarantee. Owner Financing 1-
800-843-7537
www.SunsetRanches.com
Acreage
LAND, 7.7 ACRES- No Flood,
Paved Road, North of Live Oak.
$37K, Owner Finance Possible.
386-935-2953
FirstDay
ONE ACRE OF LAND: Approx 5
miles from Dowling Park. Elec,
Septic/Water Estb. 3-30 plus yr
old Cedar Trees. Quiet
neighborhood. $12,000 386-466-
2993 ,
FirstDay
PRICE REDUCED
Lafayette County
10ac, Hwy51 N. of Mayo,
near river, $64,900
1 ac RV/Mobile home lots,
Branford area, $15,000
Suwannee County
5 ac, Park like,
near airport, $49,900
SEasy Financing
1-941-7980/7565
www.landcallnow.com
SURVIVALIST HIDEAWAY: 5
acres, beautiful creek, stocked
pond, deer, turkey etc. adjoined
protected Natural Forest. Old
Livable 3Bd/2Ba furnished
mobile. Newly fenced, 5 miles I-
10. $79,000.352-493-7555
Motorcycles
HARLEY ROAD KING, 2005,
1450cc. 12,117 Miles, Fully
Loaded w/extras, Garage Kept,
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M ULMOF I A LRl MPI(ntPI L-WW Nvlvv AN[IN M -SRIGN THFODADSUHGE GA--I JULY-2 130-2009,PAGE1. . -


A � Ti Medical Network


Pink Ladies Needed!
Are you looking for a place to share
your talents? Do you enjoy meaningful
conversation with a good friend? Iow
'bout a good book?
Then We Want You!! Suwannee Health
Care and Rehab Center is looking for
volunteers to start a Ladies Auxiliary.
Call Lynn Brannon, Activities Director
at 386-362-7860 or 386-590-2961.

Talent Search
Do you sing or play and instrument?
Do you act or dance? Do'you like to read
or spend time with a friend in wonderful
conversation?
WE WANT YOU! Suwannee Health
Care & Rehab Center is looking for your
talent for our residents. Dinner for two -
$45; One night at the Beach - $125; One
hour volunteering to make memories that
last forever - PRICELESS!
Call: Lynn Brannon, Activities Direc-
tor 386-362-7860 or 386-590-2961.

Head Start/Early
Head Start early
enrollment
Suwannee Valley 4Cs Head Start/Early
Head Start is accepting applications for
children from birth to age 5 for the 2009-
20 school year beginning Monday Feb.
23. Head Start/Early Head Start is a
FREE comprehensive early childhood ed-
ucation program that includes health, den-
tal, nutrition and VPK services to eligible
children/families.
Centers are located in Suwannee,
Hamilton, Lafayette and Columbia coun-
ties. Parents bring proof of income and
child's age to register.
For more information call 386-754-
2222.

Community asked
to help animal
shelter win
$1 million makeover
Suwannee County Animal Shelter could
be the recipient of a $1 million shelter
makeover. All that is required is registra-
tion at www.zootoo.com/makeover. Please
use zip code of 32062 for the shelter
when registering. Participation by all area
residents is crucial, as we have about
three weeks to accumulate enough points
to be in the top 20. Fifty points are imme-
diately accumulated just by registering,
and additional participation in various ac-
tivities on site will add more points.
There are no requirements by the public
other than just registering and your sup-
port. We can't stress enough the impor-
tance of the community's support. A shel-
ter makeover could mean saving the lives
of many stray animals here in Suwannee
County.

Flyball racing
classes
Too Hot to Handle Flyball Racing Team
will be holding flyball classes in O'Brien
and Live Oak. The classes will teach you
and your dog how to compete as a team.
Flyball is a relay race in which four dogs
race against another team of four dogs
over four hurdles to a box that they leap
upon to release a tennis ball, they catch
the ball and bring it back to their handler
so that the next dog on their team may
then run the course. There are two leagues
that teams can compete in to win titles
and awards.
For more information call Cathy at 386-
362-4956 or visit the website at
http://toohottohandle-flyball.com/.


Customers needed!
Dairy Queen of Live Oak will host
Dairy Queen Benefit Night the second
Tuesday of every month from 6-8 p.m. to
help buy books for Suwannee Middle
School.

Donations needed!
Suwannee County Environmental
Watchdogs, a non-profit organization,
seeks donations for yard sale merchan-
dise. Info: Sandy, 386-364-8020.

Register now!
Descendants of Calhoun
family plan reunion in 2009
Descendants of the late Sarah Calhoun,
Eva Calhoun and Thomas Calhoun are in-
vited to a family reunion to be held in
2009. Info:
misstheresamartin@yahoo.com or pre-
dop@aol.com.

Coffee with your
councilman
Beginning Jan. 13, 2009 City Council-
man for District 4 Mark Stewart invites
his constituents to "Coffee with your
Councilman" at JAVA JAX located in the
Publix shopping center.
Come and meet with him on the sec-
ond Tuesday of each month from 7 a.m.
till 8:30 a.m. This will be a time to get to
know each other and discuss current is-
sues and citizen concerns.

CJBAT tests
Monday - Thursday
Monday - Thursday at 5 p.m. (by ap-
pointment): CJBAT (Criminal Justice Ba-
sic Abilities Test) at NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison. CJBAT is required
for acceptance into Corrections & Law
Enforcement programs. Photo ID re-
quired. Pre-registration & scheduling time
and date are required. To register please
call 850-973-9451.

College Placement
Tests
Monday - Thursday
Monday - Thursday at 5 p.m. (by ap-
pointment): College Placement Test
(CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. #16),
5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC Stu-
dent Services 24 hours before test. For in-
formation please call.850-973-9451.

TABE tests
Monday - Thursday
Monday - Thursday at 5 p.m. (by ap-
pointment): TABE (Test of Adult Basic
Education) at NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison. TABE is required
for acceptance into vocational/technical
programs. Photo ID required. Pre-registra-
tion & scheduling time & date are re-
quired. To register please call 850-973-
9451.

Suwannee County
Schools Summer
Food Service Program
Breakfast meals will be available for
7:30 to 8:30 a.m. and lunch from noon to
1 p.m., Monday through Thursday at both
sites. All children one year old to 18 years
of age are eligible for meals no charge.
Parents of children must pay $3.00 per
:meal. Suwannee High School Cafeteria
will be in operation from June 1, 2009 to
August 13, 2009. Branford High School
Cafeteria will be open from June 8, 2009
to July 30, 2009.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 6


Gregory D. Snodgrass, M.D.
522 South Ohio Ave., Live Oak
386-330-6260
1-800-435-3937

Heartland Rehabilitation
Services
405 11th St., Live Oak
386-364-5051

North Florida Pharmacy
101 SW. US Hwy. 27, Branford
386-935-6905
229 W. Main St., Mayo
386-294-3777

Eye Center of North Florida
876 SW. State Road 247,
Lake City
386-755-7595
1-866-755-0040


Ophthalmology
Eduardo M. Bedoya, M.D.
Now at Shands in Live Oak
386-755-7595
Toll Free 866-755-0040
Se habla espaol 537013-F


Family Dentlstry
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH,
D.D.S, P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak. FL
(386) 362-6556
1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwanne Co 50105-F

Physical Therapy

ch/6 9- a Gf/aovT, _LZcm.

* Physical Therapy * Occupational Therapy * Speech Therapy
* Specializing In Arthritis * Fibromyalgia * Geriatrics * Spinal &
Joint Pain * Sports Injuries* Work Injuries * Pediatrics
SManual Therapy * Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Protegrity
Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross. Av Mel
Jasper 792-2426 Medicaid-pediatlrics
Branlford 935-1449 Workers Comp
Mayo 294-14107 Most Other Insurance Plans
A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore




GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
522 South Ohio Avenue g
(386) 330-6260 or 1-800-435-3937 I
____________________________________l


The Village Pharmacy at
Advent Christian Village
Dowling Park, FL
386-658-5860
1-800-647-3353

Healthcore, Inc.
Live Oak 386-208-1414
Lake City 386-755-8680
Jasper 386-792-2426
Branford 386-935-1449
Mayo 386-294-1407

Herbert C. Mantooth,
D.D.S., P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak
386-362-6556
1-800-829-6506

Steele Chiropractic
110 Irvin Ave., Live Oak
386-362-4112

Copeland Medical Center
10820 Marvin Jones Blvd.,
Dowling Park, FL
386-658-5300




Heartland
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton,PTA
Mandy McCray, PTA
Carolyn McCook, Office Manager,
Patient Care Coordinator
AQUATIC THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports
Medicine, Pediatrics Providers
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS Providers
405 1 th St., Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051 501053-F


Pharmacy

9 * Medical

Equipment
* Oxygen

"Everything For Your
Home Recovery"

Locally Owned & Operated
101 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL 32008
(386) 935-6905
229 W. Main St., Mayo,FL 32066
(386) 294-3777 . s


To place an ad on this page, please call
Nancy at 386-362-1734 Ext. 103
* p
'Heel' and Pamper Your Feet
Millions of dollars are spent every year by women and men who want to parfb
their feet. While the pedicure has evolved into a spa treatment In recent yearitsf
really has its roots as a medical procedure designed to care for ailing feet. ,.
Although a pedicure Is a popular beauty treatment, there are still many Whoa
reticent to put their feet in someone else's hands. Concern about sanlt:
procedures at a spa or embarrassment about the condition of their feet i~a d'
many individuals to seek out home treatment options that are convenient, effegthiv
and affordable. So at-home spa treatments have become popular. ' . '
Cracked, dry heels is one condition that can cause embarrassment and even
pain. In many cases, this common problem is caused by dry skin, the presence'of
calluses and prolonged pressure on the heel, particularly for people with a job 1tat,
Requires a lot of standing. People with severely dry heels have been knowff-to
wear through pantyhose or socks, and may experience cracking so advanced that
heels ache or bleed. .
It may not be necessary to visit a spa or podiatrist to treat cracked heels. The.
Heeltastic'" soothing balm, in a convenient application stick, is the newest product
for your at-home foot therapy routine. It is formulated for chronically dry and
cracked skin. The balm penetrates deep into the heel with Neem and Karanja oils
imported from India, as well as skin moisturizers and nutrients that promote
healthy skin. Gentle enough to use several times a day, feet feel smoother and
softer after just days of use. To learn more, visit www.heeltastic.com.
Those who want to take additional steps to promote foot health and an attractive
appearance should consider these additional foot care tips:
* If you do have pedicures at a salon, it is a wise investment to purchase your bwp
tools so you are ensured they are sanitized and safe.
* Wash and soak your feet daily for cleanliness and be careful to rinse off all soap,
especially between toes. ..
*When clipping toenails, do so straight across, to prevent the formation of Ingrowh
toenails. Do so after a bath or shower so that the nails will be soft and easier to
cut.
* Wear shoes and socks that fit correctly. Otherwise you risk corns and calluse ,'
which can be painful and unsightly. Limit the use of high heels, which put
unnatural pressure on the balls of the feet.
" If you frequent a gym. locker room or public pool, do not walk around barefoot -
use a pair of sandals or flip-flops. This protects your feet from bacteria or fungus
that may be present on the floor.
" Regularly slough off dead skin that lorms on the feet with a pumice stone; or
something more convenient like the PedEgg"'. . ':,
'Walk around the home in bare feet frequently. It stretches out the tendons and:
liaments of the fool and promotes circulation.
' If you work on your feer or spend long hours standing, take frequent breaks And,
elevate the feet to prevent cracked heels or other foot pain.
' Enlist the help of a partner for a good foot massage every once in a will~-W--
product as simple as mineral oil can be used as the massage lubricant .
' If you are a diabetic, foot care Is essential. Regularly inspect your feet for,
cuts, blisters or calluses. Consult with a podiatrist for treatment.


MACHINERY(CONSIGNMENT) AUCTION
9 AM, Saturday, August 1, 2009
S,10350 176"' St., McAlpin, FL 32062
Drive by. Preview: 8 AM - 5PM July 27"' - July 31stl
Directions: 12 mi South of Live Oak on SR 129, Turn Right on 176"'Stret ... Watch for Signs!!
Tractors - Farm Equipment - Tools
Trailers - Misc., Antiques & Primitives
Household Goods - Furniture- Appliances- You name it!
Auction Born Is Donel - No Vehicles Pleasell - Bring In all unused Form Machlneryl
$$ Turn all those items into Cash! $$
Consignments taken Daily 9AM - 5PM July 27'" -July 31" & Auction Day until Auction Time!
Call for alternate times and dates to accept merchandise for auction.
Consignmeit Rates: $O.00- $250.00 - 15% - $251.00 + UP - 8% -$20.00 Fee on all No Salesl
No Reserves on Sales or $250.00 or less
Pick up & Delivery Available
"PLAN TO SPEND THE DAY - THE AUCTION WAYI"

1-888-999-7653 / 386-330-2025 or 386-965-2980 (Gr.... ..,>

Early Consignments: will be posted to website with pictures!
lr -is: Cislh, Cllshers Cheks., PIrLouni CheckL w/ID, VlVn/MOsterCurd
cro.llllI Checkl witl Auti. Approval or Ilank Letter or Credit - NO BUYERS PREMIUMI
Concession Available! Auctioneers - George & Mark

For pictures & upddics check wcbsite www.aeiohnsonauctionccrs.com * Join our E-Mail List Today!

,. E. Johnson Auctioneer
"u 1840IOb1337
S 10350 176th St. - McAlpln, FL 32062
1 ao- 08-99.010 (7663) 386-330-2028
All A llllltfllllrlll Illil(e Iy Alicliloleer frollol A clion Block lake Pirecellence lover nil illvertlselnelnts.


JULY 29 - 30, 2009, PAGE 5


D EIFISSALC MARKET GEORGIA


I


~�� ~14












POAG , FATEW


Continued From Page 5


Live Oak Fire Department's
6th annual M.D.A. car show
Aug. 1
The 6th annual M.D.A. Car Show will be held at the
Live Oak Fire Department located at 200 E. Duval
Street, on August 1, from 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.
$10 pre-registration (post date by July 31)
$15 day of show
Judging starts at noon, trophies will be given. Classes
will be:
* Classic cars
* Classic trucks
* Street Rods
* Muscle Cars
* Tuner class
* Under Construction Class
There will be goody bags and the first 40 cars receive a
dash plate.
There will also be a race car class with 1st, 2nd, 3rd
place trophies given, sponsored by: B.S. Racing. Each
class will be judged and awarded tropies for 1st,.2nd,
and 3rd places. Also awards for Best of Show, Best
Paint, Best Undercarriage, and Cleanest Ride will be giv-
en.
Live entertainment by William Scott and Silverado with
Caitlin Nicole Eadie.
Friday night Cruise in 7 - 10 p.m. Live music by Elvis.
100% of the proceeds benefit the Muscular Dystrophy
Association.
Contact: Alan Bedenbaugh at (386) 590-0595 for more
information.


SHS class of 1994
to hold reunion
Aug. 1


Attention SHS class of 1994! We are planning our 15
year class reunion for Aug. 1. Please contact the commit-
tee at classofl994shs@yahoo.com or call Sheri Riggins-
Sanders at 352-348-3998 for more information.

NFCC enrolling now
for fall classes
Open registration through Aug. 21
Classes begin Aug. 24
North Florida Community College is enrolling now for
Fall Term 2009. Classes begin Aug. 24; open registration
is now through Aug. 21. The Fall Term 2009 schedule of
classes is available at www.nfcc.edu
or from the NFCC Enrollment
Services department.
The admission and enrollment process at NFCC is easy.
Whether you are looking to take one course or deciding
on a college career path, NFCC academic advisors are
available to assist with course selection and career plan-
ning. NFCC has a variety of degrees, programs and
courses to choose from including new firefighter training
classes and a new Business Operations certificate pro-
gram with specializations in Accounting/Budgeting Op-
erations, Management, Retail Management and Market-
ing.
For more information and a complete list of available
courses and programs, call (850) 973-1622, stop by the
NFCC campus located at 325 NW Turner Davis Drive
(off US Highway 90) in Madison, Fla., or visit
www.nfcc.edu . NFCC's summer
hours are Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
(open Fridays after Aug. 17).

Artist Guild presents 13th
annual Fine Art Exhibition
Deadline to enter is August 28
Art presented September 14-25
The 13th annual Fine Art Exhibition will be presented by
the Live Oak Artist Guild, September 14 through Sep-


tember 25, at the Suwannee River Regional Library in
Live Oak.
A call for entries has gone to local artists to enter their
recent works. Entry forms are available at the Live Oak
Artist Guild, The Frame Shop, The Rainbow's End Art
Supply, Thunder Alley or LOAG.org. Categories for en-
tries include painting, drawing, photography and sculp-
ture. The deadline to enter is August 28.
Awards will include Best of Show, First, Second, Third
place, honorable mentions and purchase awards.
An opening day reception will be held on Sunday, Sep-
tember 13 from 2 pm to 4 pm at the Suwannee River Re-
gional Library. Music will be provided by the Suwannee
Trio. All participating artists, their guests, award spon-
sors and general public are invited to attend.
Works shown will include painting, drawing, photogra-
phy and sculpture by artists from Live Oak, North Flori-
da and Georgia.
The community is encouraged to view this year's exhi-
bition; the show will be open during the library's daily
schedule. For more information, please call the Live Oak
Artist Guild Gallery at 364-5099 or go to LOAG.org.

Class reunion
Suwannee High Class of 1989
Upcoming 20th reunion
October 9-10, 2009
For more information please contact:
Paula Gianeskis McCullers
386-590-4385.


Suwannee River Challenge
and Marathon
Oct 10
The 8th Annual Suwannee River Challenge and
Marathon date has been set for Saturday, Oct 10, on
Columbus Day Weekend.


Suwannee Valley Humane Society Critter Corner


Suwannee Valley Humane
Society
1156 SE Bisbee Loop
Madison, Florida 32340

Two miles south of Lee off
C:R. 255
From - 10 Exit 262. Take
C.R.2555 north 1/2 miles

We are a Limited Space
Shelter (no kill). You must
check with us prior to
bringing a drop-off animal


to the shelter. Hours; Tues.
to Sat. 10;00 to 2:00, or by
appointment. Visit our
website and see the
animals that need a really
good home at
www.geocities.com/suwan
neehs or at our e-mail
address
suwanneevalley @embarq
mail.com.

We service the
surrounding counties of


Madison, Suwannee,
Hamilton, Lafayette,
Columbia and Taylor.

Lost and Found Pets:
If you have lost a pet or
found one, the humane
society will help you find
your pet. Call us at (850)
971- 9904 or toll free at 1-
866-236-7812. Leave a
message if we are closed,
we will return your call.
Remember to always call


your local animal controls
or shelters if you have
found a lost or found pet.

THRIFT STORE:
You must come see our
thrift stores, if you have
not been here before. We
have three stores, a
boutique, clothing and
furniture. We are always
looking for donations for
the stores. Please keep us
in mind if you have items


in good condition you
would like to donate to us.

RECYCLING:
We have a recycling bin
on our property
newspapers, magazines,
and catalogs. The bin will
take all kinds of paper. We
also have a bin in Live Oak
at 305 Pinewood Drive,
just west Of Johnson's
Appliance/Radio Shack.
We also collect aluminum


cans to recycle. Just bring
them to the shelter. All the
money goes to help the
homeless animals.

The Suwannee Valley
Humane Society depends
on adoptions for $65.00
which INCLUDES,
spay/neuter, de-worm,
heartworm/feline ltiiketmia
tested and rabies shot (if

SEE SUWANNEE, PAGE 9


S " �'* ' ': - -' : *



AUCTIONi
Seu--


Certified Real Estate
Aution - M alrkaltngDo Wr k.'.i.


PAGE 6, JULY 29 - 30, 2009


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA







* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA




Fram' s


story


JULY 29 - 30, 2009, PAGE 7

Delores went to Mercer University in
Macon, Georgia, but didn't finish because
she met this strapping lad named August
Kilpatrick. He offered her a ride home,
but she refused to get in the car, so she
rode on the running board.


Dowling Park's Delores Kilpatrick, through the eyes of her grandson


By Addam Kilpatrick
little country girl living in Georgia never
dreamed that one day she would become a
world traveler racking up so many frequent
flyer miles that she could go anywhere and did. Or, that
she would become an award-winning writer and
nationally recognized. There is such a woman, Delores
Kilpatrick, my grandmother. Or, as I call her, Fram.
She was born March 19, 1930 in Atlanta, Georgia, not
in a hospital, but at her grandmother's house. She is the
second oldest of nine children born to Oscar and Mary
Katherine Gardner. Her older brother, Edward, was her
idol and she adored him. He was a genius building wire
tape recorders and improving the cotton gin, for which
he still holds patents. He even built a working Ferris
wheel that was over 20 feet tall. He and his new bride
died when his airplane crashed on Christmas Eve 1952.
The family lived in a house with no running water and
no plumbing. They got their water from a well and had a
nice two-seater outhouse. It was nice to have company
on some of those dark and stormy nights. Her father
worked for Carrier Air Conditioning so the family
moved for three months at a time, but always seemed to
make their way back to Georgia. They went to the same
school as their mother and oddly enough Delores had the
same teacher that her mother had, Mrs. Welch. Mrs.
Welch came from the old school and put her makeup on
with two rosy circles on her cheeks..Delores was very
bright and studious and graduated from Fulton County
High School as valedictorian.
She went to Mercer University in Macon, Georgia, but
didn't finish because she met this strapping lad named
August Kilpatrick. He offered her a ride home, but she
refused to get in the car, so she rode on the running
board. They took their wedding vows in 1949 at
Orchard Knob Baptist Church, a church her granddaddy
had started and built. Augie was the ripe old age of 26
while Delores was a still blossoming flower of 19.
Living in Atlanta the family congregated at Mother
Too's house. Mother Too was her grandmother and was
called Mother Too because she refused to be called
grandmother. Mother Too was a grand lady who
weighed roughly three hundred pounds and could cook
like the dickens. There were no hotels so company
stayed with the family. It was very family oriented.
There were lots of people at the table.
From Georgia, Augie and Delores went to Louisville,
Kentucky where Augie attended seminary to be a Baptist
preacher. In the summers, they would stay in DuPont,
Indiana. For their first anniversary, the couple had a
beautiful baby, whom they named Mary Diane, my mom.
A baby followed for the next two anniversaries, another
girl and then a boy. After four years they returned to
Georgia where the last girl was born.
From Kentucky they went to Milledgeville, Georgia
where the couple pastored a church. Milledgeville was


The love of Delores's life, Augie Kilpatrick, Chaplain, USAF. Augie was the first chaplain in Vietnam,
in, 1961.'- Photo Submtted


the site of the state mental hospital, which made for lots
of family jokes about the church. They moved back to
the Atlanta area in a housing project called Blair Village.
They pastored another church there and had the most
baptisms in the whole state of Georgia that year.
Augie decided to be a missionary, so the family moved
to Fort Worth, Texas for more seminary training. Augie
joined the Air Force as a chaplain, but the waiting list
was long. Augie made one call to the Chief of the Air
Force and was bumped to the top of the list. He entered
the service as a second lieutenant and was stationed at


McGuire Air Force Base, New Jersey. He contested the
second lieutenant designation and made his way through
the legal negotiations to triumph as a first lieutenant and
received $3,000 in back pay. The couple went to New
York to celebrate where Delores bought a beautiful
purple coat.
The Air Force ordered Augie to Tachikawa, Japan so
they packed the family up and headed overseas. Delores
was seven months pregnant and a few short months later
SEE FRAM'S STORY, PAGE 8


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PAGE~_ 8. J


They lived in
an apartment
on the top of
one of the
seven hills of
Istanbul which
overlooked
the
Bosphorus, a
narrow body
of water which
separates the
European and
Asian sides of
the city. From
this vantage
point they
could watch
Russian
submarines go
to the Black
Sea. You felt
the vibrations
from the sub,
then you
heard it and
all the dishes
clattering, so
you had plenty
of notice to go
see the subs
and wave to
the Russian


seamen.


S'' . ; .,., .'



Delores Kilpatrick as Mis
- Photo: Submitted


Fram' s


story

-I-
- ., Continued From Page 7
the last child,.a son, was born. The family'of
seven lived in a small hut made of chicken wire
covered with plaster. Delores found out the
r ? composition of the home when she backed the car
. , into it, cracking the plaster and creating a nice
. hole exposing the chicken wire. While in Japan,
- Augie got orders and in 1961 became the first
'. . chaplain from any branch of service to go to
-. - Vietnam. He was there for almost a year and
A helped build Tent City in Saigon. Delores began
S4L. ; work on her college degree at Sophia University
Lk " in Tokyo and before they left Japan she finished.
Although her classes were taught in English, her
diploma is in Japanese. Many years later it was
. - " translated for her and she learned she had
graduated with highest honors.
t The family planned for months for their next
move to Dover, Delaware. They had maps and
. learned about the local area from the Chamber of
Commerce. However, on Friday, June 5, they
learned that they would be going to San Antonio,
Texas. They were to leave on Friday, June 12.
Delores had to finish her degree, pack up a family
of seven, and sell their home and two cars. The
family pitched in and got it done.
Three short years later, the family was on their
1g -1 way to Istanbul, Turkey to live. They lived in an
apartment on the top of one of the seven hills of
Istanbul which overlooked the Bosphorus, a
narrow body of water which separates the
European and Asian sides of the city. From.this
vantage point they could watch Russian
submarines go to the Black Sea. You felt the
' vibrations from the sub, then you heard it and all
the dishes clattering, so you had plenty of notice
to go see the subs and wave to the Russian
seamen.
While in Turkey, the family traveled to Greece
and Italy. In Athens, they 'stayed in the penthouse
of a third rate hotel called the Carolina
(pronounced Caro-leena). Oddly enough, two
;. brothers from Charleston, South Carolina -
where Augie was raised - owned the Carolina
Hotel. Stranger still, they discovered that Augie.
had been their paperboy.
The Carolina sat at the base of the hill on which
the Parthenon sat. At night you could see the,
s. . Parthenon all lit up. Forays into Athens included
s Lakewood, Georgia around 1942. tours of art and history museums and fabulous
shopping sprees. The girls all got fur coats.
The family headed back to the States, Beale
A.F.B., Marysville, California. The three oldest
kids got married here in just over a year,
Augie got orders to Thailand where the Vietnam
I war still raged and Delores moved to Wilmore,
Kentucky to be near her oldest daughter, Diane.
Delores took and taught classes at the seminary
there.
Augie returned and they settled in Panama City,
across the street from the Gulf of Mexico. Of
course, they bought a boat and everyone learned
to water ski. Many a day was spent on a little
sandbar called Shell Island.
Augie was again transferred to California. This
time he was sent to the high desert of Southern
er than ever! Just type what you are California to George A.F.B. Augie retired from
I are there. the Air Force and the family lived in Apple Valley.
Not letting retirement slow them down, Augie and.
Ind the surrounding areas all from Delores were off to Hawaii for three months
irww.valdostadailytimes.com.
training with Youth With a Mission (YWAM,
Is, display ads and yellow page pronounced "Why-War"). They went to the
convenient place. refugee camps of Thailand for their outreach
mission. They joined World Map, a missions
;hopping experibncel organization, and traveled to India and Singapore
brand, ad or category. setting up crusades.
ch with the With Augie's mother's health failing they
feature. moved to Hobe Sound, Florida to care for her. In
five weeks, his mother passed away. They settled
S..., -there for a while, but soon' felt the call to ministry
- . i EOt in Redding, California where Bob, the oldest son,
S-: * - -- lived. They built a house at the bottom of the hill
Where Bob's house was built. They ministered at


SEE FRAM'S STbRY, PAGE 9


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* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


PAGE 8. JULY 29 - 30, 2009








M Ui Orirn IM TIf AI'.MF - i I - C - SERVING NOTHFLORDAANDNSOUTHI-- GEORGIA-ULY-290,2009. .PAE


1i aom *.:,.,Jii-g they moved back to E .
hoe'.'. , -.'::- of Georgia. Augie dic 1 tbh , .
shortly a-rc. they made the move. It -. as a
very IT qd time for the whole family, biti
espe illy for Fram. She had been man 'icd
to Augie for 42 years and had lived in more-
than 46 houses with him.






Fram' s



story


Continued From Page 8

small churches and filled in for
vacationing pastors. They decided to go
to Japan for a year to host a servicemen's
center. They enjoyed it so much that they
were not even home a year before they
were on their way to Spain for a year to
do the same thing. They traveled
extensively in Europe and it was their last
overseas journey.
From Redding they moved back to
Delores' home state of Georgia. Augie
died there shortly after they made the
move. It was a very hard time for the
whole family, but especially for Fram.
She had been married to Augie for 42
years and had lived in more than 46
houses with him. Delores moved to
Blairsville, Georgia in the mountains.
She bought a house she and Augie had
considered buying. She became very
active in the community and started
writing for the local newspaper. She won
national awards for her articles. Every
week she had front-page articles with
pictures she took..
Her last marriage was to Edgar
Mikronis and she left her beloved


mountains for The Villages near Ocala.
When Edgar died, she looked for a place
where she could grow old gracefully in a
Christian environment. She found Advent
Christian Village in Dowling Park that all
the services she felt she needed and
moved there in 2007. She started writing
articles for the Suwannee Democrat to
spotlight the many wonderful people who'
have come to Dowling Park. .
I asked her would she do it again and
she said, "Yes." All in all she rated her
life as great. She has had her ups and
downs, but overall it's been great.
Wisdom she would like to pass on
would be to learn how to commit to
people, ideals and things you believe in
and then not waiver from them. Also, she
tells people to enjoy life because the Bible
says that Jesus came enjoying life. Last,
but not least, she says that if she had the
chance to do it over, she would learn to
forgive and say you are sorry quicker.
As you can see, Delores Kilpatrick, my
grandmother, has had a very full life and
she is still going strong. She is an
inspiration to people every day and that is
one of the reasons I chose her to
interview. Thank you, Fram.


"After the Battle of Olustee"

event planned for February 2010


Chamber, NFCC seek

community input


The Madison County Chamber of
Commerce & Tourism and North
Florida Community College Founda-
tion are seeking community input on
an event planned for February 2010
entitled "After the Battle of Olustee."
The event, currently in the planning
stages, will re-enact historical events
that took place at the.Wardlaw-Smith-
Goza Conference Center in Madison,
used as a hospital during the Civil-
War, following the Battle of Olustee
in Olustee, FL.


An open meeting and discussion fo-
rum will be held on Wednesday, July
22-at the NFCC Fine Arts Auditorium
(Bldg. 10) at 5 p.m. The meeting is
open to the public and invites open
discussion on the support and design
of the "After the Battle of Olustee"
project.
For more information, contact Ted
Ensminger, Executive Director of the
Madison County Chamber of Com-
merce & Tourism, at 850-973-2788 or
email ted@madisonfl.org.


MADISON, FL - North
Florida Community College is
enrolling now for Fall Term
2009. Classes begin Aug. 24;
open registration is now
through Aug. 21. The Fall
Term 2009 schedule of classes
is available at www.nfcc.edu
or from the NFCC Enrollment
Services department.
The admission and
enrollment process at NFCC
is easy. Whether you are
looking to take one course or
deciding on a college career
path, NFCC academic
advisors are available to assist
with course selection and
career planning. NFCC has a
variety of degrees, programs
and courses to choose from


including new firefighter
training classes and a new
Business Operations
certificate program with
specializations in
Accounting/Budgeting
Operations, Management,
Retail Management and
Marketing.
For more information and a
complete list of available
courses and programs, call
(850) 973-1622, stop by the
NFCC campus located at 325
NW Turner Davis Drive (off
US Highway 90) in Madison,
Fla., or visit www.nfcc.edu.
NFCC's summer hours are
Monday through Thursday, 8
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (open
Friday after Aug. 17).


Suwannee Valley Humane Society Critter Corner


Continued From Page 6

old enough). Please come
and visit us, our animals
would love to meet you.
REMEMBER; DO NOT
LEAVE PETS IN
VEHICLES FOR ANY
LENGTH OF TIME DUE
TO THE HEAT AND
HUMIDITY.

FEATURED ANIMALS
FOR ADOPTIONS
DOGS:
3277 - Blake - is a hound
mix and he is brown. He is
2 years 1 month old. He is
a very friendly guy.

3265 Drake - is brown
and white, He is a hound
mix. He is 2 years 1 month
old, He is friendly and
likes people.

3215 - Pettunia - is 2
years 7 months old. She is
brown and white. She
doesn't like other dogs.
She friendly to people and
likes to play.

3203 - Andy - is 3 years
months old. He is brown


and is a hound mix. He is a
very nice dog and is
always friendly.

3187 - Conway -is 2
years 5 months old. He is
brown, white and black. He,
likes to be around people
and is playful.


CATS:
3227 - Megan - is 2
years 3 months old. She is
grey and white and is a
very friendly kitty.

3226 - Morgan - is 3
years 3 months old. She is
grey and likes to be made
of.

2985 - Oops - is a tabby,
she is 4 years 1 month old.
She likes teenagers and
adults.

3685 - Yang - is black
and white, he is 3 months
old. He is a medium haired
kitty. He likes to be patted.

3684 - Ying - Orange
and white kitty. He is a
medium haired kitty and he


Sell Your Car for "Top Dollar"


em�:|

ATI


is 3 months old.

LOST:
SRight off of Route 137
in Branford. A female
Shepard, Chow Mix. She is
Buff and Brown color. Her
name is "Casey Bo", she
has a head of Shepard and
her legs like a chow's little.
She is 18 months old and
one of her ears flop over.
She is a very sweet dog


,,'leeols?




' � . ,.."I " , '. ,k


and she was wearing a
pink collar. If you have
found her, please call
Beverly Riegel @ 386 -
935-4931.

LOST:
From home farm in
Wellborn. "Kismet" a
female, long haired,
Dachshund. She is Brown
with a little bit of white on
her chest. She is in good


health, but has a hernia on
her belly. She is very sweet
and friendly. She weight 10
pounds so if you have
found her , please call Erin
@ 386 - 984 - 0659 or
Home 386 - 963 - 4619 or
Farm 386 - 963 - 1107.

Lost or found an
animal, you would like to
report. Please feel free to
call us and I will put your


report in the newspaper
free.

We have a new Web site
available to view: www.
petango.conm.
Get shelter animal
information and pictures of
all our animals. Go check
it out. When you get to
web suite be sure to put in
the zip code for the area
(32340).


Tiime to pgicice.


If you're searching for that perfect set of wheels,
S look no further than www.nflaonline.com

4 "
.4,rT llli l ** I " - . .. . .. . .. *.. �x ; m .....r - ...


Each Kit includes:
* 3 Bright 11" x 14" All-weather Signs
* Over 275 Pre-Priced Labels
* Successful Tips for a "No Hassle" Sale
* Pre-Sale Checklist
* Sales Record Form


Run your Yard Sale in the

Wednesday North Florida Focus &

Friday Suwannee Democrat Classifieds

and get the Yard Sale Kit for FREE.
Deadline for placing your yard sale is Friday at 11:00.a.n.
i% a.


Each Kit Includes:
* 2 All-Weather Fluorescent "For Sale" Signs
* Successful Tips
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* Pre-Sale Checklist
* Vehicle Options Window Display
* E-Z Closing Forms
including Deposit Form & Bill of Sale


Run your Car For Sale classified in the Wednesday
North Florida Focus & Friday Suwannee Democrat
Classifieds and get the Car Kit for FREE.*
Deadline for placing your ad is Friday at 11:00 a.m.


*Not valid with the $18.95 special


499524.F


NFCC enrolling now

for fall classes


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Wilm-��� ��)�"m OR ! I'm - ~ �-�~ �~~~~-~~�� --Lrrr


JULY 29 - 30, 2009, PAGE 9


M CLASSIFIED MARKET
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And Mke Yur Evnt aSuccess! ~ `'









PAGE 10, JULY29 -30, 2009 U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE . WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


FSU study: Invasive species



threaten critical oyster habitats


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An FSU study shows oyster beds are threatened by invasive species.Photo:Metro
An FSU study shows oyster beds are threatened by invasive species. - Photo: Metro


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FWC brings habitat conservation



tools to o the Internet


Having the right information at the right time is the
most critical element to sound decision-making, and
it's no different for anyone trying to provide for
wildlife conservation through land-use planning or
land management. Anyone in the land-use planning
and development industry can tell you that pulling
together pertinent wildlife information can be a,
challenge.
Now the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC), in collaboration with the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Florida
Natural Areas Inventory (FNAI), offers a one-stop
shop for this information with the Florida Wildlife
Conservation Guide. The guide is an online portal that
provides access to much of the basic technical
assistance information that the partnering agencies use
when consulting with landowners and land managers
about conservation issues and opportunities in Florida.
"We've recognized for a long time that there is a
large number of regulated activities out there that
could really benefit from early consultations, but we
simply do not have the staff resources to handle the
volume," said Joe Walsh, environmental commenting
leader. "However, we envisioned a much wider
audience for the guide as well. For example, there are
new landowners who have moved to the countryside
and \ant to conserve n wildlife on their properties, but
simple. don't know \here to begin The guide pulls
together as man\ Florida-rele ant information source%
as \e could find to one convenient place "
While information on man\ of Florida's common
species. such as the robin or \ hite-tailed deer. is
available on this Web-based application, the guide also
emphasizes resources ital to the maintenance and
recover, of Florida's rare and imperiled specie . such


as the Florida scrub-jay and gopher tortoise. The guide
also is endorsed by the USFWS.
"We are pleased to be a part of this comprehensive
reference for managing and conserving Florida's
wildlife and their habitats," said Dave Hankla,
supervisor of the USFWS Jacksonville Field Office.
"Information unique to our federal endangered species
programs is included as well."
The Florida Wildlife Conservation Guide assists
landowners in understanding the resources at their site
and offers guidance for development and conservation.
The guide is intended to increase the capacities of the
FWC, USFWS, and FNAI to deliver technical
assistance on projects and land-use planning activities
to support fish and wildlife resources.
The guide consists of four sections that lead the user
through various conservation options. The first section
establishes a framework for site assessment and
natural resource evaluation. Habitat classification and
species on those habitats make up the second section.
The natural history of wildlife and possible
conservation actions are provided in the next section.
Finally, the user will be offered a host of conservation
opportunities, natural resource planning guidelines,
permit requirements and best management
practices.



, 4


Cs * at n i , I t





a a a a I c h
S.
, , *



. . . .


California's native Olympia oyster
(Ostreola conchaphila), which
provides critical nursery habitat for
a suite of species including crabs,
anemones and fishes.
Although Olympia oyster reefs
are normally preyed upon by native
predatory snails, said Kimbro, they
are somewhat protected by the
presence of native rock crabs that
both consume native snails and
force all others to spend more time
hiding from crabs - rather than
eating the oysters.
But when Atlantic snails and
crabs invade, the whole dynamic
changes.
"You'd think similar-looking
invasive and native species could
be swapped in a system without
adverse effects," he said. "But we
have shown that, functionally, this
is not the case." :
In Tomales Bay, the exotic
species occupy its inner reaches,
where saline levels are lower.
However, native predators cannot
tolerate the inner bay's lower.
salinity, so they can't help to check
the invasive snail population .
proliferating there. The invasive
crabs are stuck in the inner bay
because the natives hold the
Middle, with its higher salinity.
Once upon a time, native oysters
enjoyed a release from predation in
the inner bay - that is, until the
invasive species moved in.
"While native predator-prey
interactions that benefit oyster reefs
are intricate and took a long time to
develop, the invasive crab and snail
don't have the historical exposure
necessary to recreate these
important interactions," Kimbro
said. "A fellow researcher likened
the native crabs and snails to a
long-married couple who have
learned to coexist, leaving oyster
populations intact. But the lack of
experience the invasive crabs and
snails have with each other has led
to the destruction of parts of the
oyster population, much as an
incompatible couple might destroy
an entire family."


F


PAGE 10, JULY 29 - 30, i009


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N CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


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A study of oyster
Sr reefs in a once-pristine
California coastal estuary found them
devastated by invasive Atlantic Coast crabs and snails, providing new evidence of
the consequences when human activities move species beyond their natural
borders.
Led by marine biologist David L. Kimbro, now of The Florida State University
Coastal and Marine Laboratory (www.marinelab.fsu.edu), the study shows that in
Tomales Bay (www.tomalesbay.net), half the population of California's native
Olympia oyster has perished because its habitat has fallen victim to the
dysfunctional relationship between native species and non-native ones accidentally
introduced.
The work of Kimbro, a postdoctoral associate at the FSU (www.fsu.edu) lab, and
colleagues from the University of California-Davis and its Bodega Marine
Laboratory has magnified concerns that predator-prey mismatches between native
S and exotic species may lead to further losses of critical habitats that support marine
biodiversity and ecosystems.
"What David Kimbro's research reveals about California's Olympia oyster raises
a specter for Florida as well," said Felicia Coleman, director of the FSU Coastal
and Marine Laboratory.
"First, our state has a remarkably productive native oyster population at risk in
the Apalachicola Bay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ApalachicolaBay)," she said.
�..1 "These oysters are sustainably harvested and provide critically important
settlement habitat for an amazing array of species, so its loss would be devastating.
Second, we know that in Florida's benign climate, exotic species are pretty easily
established. One need only follow the trajectories of lionfish, Australian pine,
S Brazilian pepper and Burmese python for a grim view through the looking glass."
Kimbro and colleagues describe their findings in a paper ("Invasive species
S cause large-scale loss of native California oyster habitat by disrupting trophic
cascades") that was recently published in the online and print editions of the peer-
reviewed journal Oecologia
(www.springerlink.com/content/r6532w3g47751034/?p=27aa2b92baf44a6b8bdf46
lf8b387f79&pi=2>).
Their study is expected to help guide habitat management and conservation
efforts, including plans now being drawn up along the West Coast to restore native
oysters.
"We've identified what my California colleagues call 'an important restoration
bottleneck,' the attack on oysters by invasive species, which must be dealt with
prior to undertaking oyster population enhancement and the rebuilding of remnant
reefs," Kimbro said.
In California, said Kimbro, the artificial predator-prey mismatch has allowed
high numbers of invasive snails to destroy the biological diversity of Tomales Bay,
a coastal estuary about 40 miles northwest of San Francisco, by consuming and
eliminating oyster habitat.
As an example, he points to the invasive European green crab from the Atlantic
S Coast (inadvertently introduced from Europe, so an exotic species even there).
Smaller than California's native crab, it is less effective at controlling the snail
population because it uses only brute force to kill its prey - unlike its native
counterpart, which is capable both of crushing the snails and using its claws like a
can opener to peel open hard-to-crush larger shells.
Ecological consequences are profound when the species most affected by a
predator-prey mismatch is a "foundation species" that supports biodiversity by
creating extensive habitat, such as


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* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


FWC offers


gator-hunting

classes


The Florida Fish and \ildihfe
Conser auon Commission FW\'C i is
offering alligator hunters no-cost.
three-hour classes to help them
prepare for the Aug 15'- Nov. 1
statewide alligator harvest.
Reser' actions are not required to
attend a class.
Attendance is not mandatory for
licensed hunters, but the FWC
recommends that participants attend.
especially if they hate not previously
hunted for alligators. Class topics
include preparing for the hunt.
hunting techniques and safety.
har testing and processing, caring for
y our alligator hide and alligator
hunting rules and regulations Also.
people who do not haIe an alligator
harvest permit can attend if they \ant
to learn what hunting alligators is all
about.
Classes \. ill be offered at the
following locations:
July 29 today i. 6-9 p.m..
Gainesville. Paramount Plaza Hotel
and Suites. 2900 S.W. 13th St. For
directions, call 352-377-4000 or v isit
w \% paramountplaza corn.
. Aug. 1 (Saturday), 1-4 p.m., Dama
Beach, IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame
and Museum, 300 Gulf Stream Way.


For directions, call 954-922-4212 or
'i'sit %%vw.igfa org.
. Aug 2 Sunda), 2-5 p m..
Okeechobee. Okeechobee County
Ci\ ic Center, 1750 U.S. H\" 98
Noith. For directions call 863-462-
5195.
.Aug. 5 I Wednesday 1, 6-9 p.m.,
Tallahassee. Bryant Bldg., 2nd floor
auditorium. 620 S. Meridian St For
directions, call 850-488-3831.
. Aug. 8 (Saturday i. 1-4 p.m.,
Tampa, Florida State Fairgrounds,
4800 U.S. Hwy. 301 N . use the
Orient Road entrance For directions,
call 800-345-FAIR (3247) or visit
w \ww floridastatefair.com.
.Aug. 9 ISunday), 2-5 p.m,
DeLand. Wa\ ne G. Sanborn Activitie
Center. 751 S Alabama Ave. For
directions call 850-488-3831 or visit
, ww.deland org/parks/\w a ne.htm.
All hunt permits have been sold for
this year. however, alligator trapping
"agent" permits are available for $52.
Agent permits enable permit holders
to assist a licensed trapper in taking
alligators
For nort ,intonalttan on1 lItht e
e.ctuing alligator luntis, isi
MyFWC. com/gators and click
"Statewide Hunts."


TOP, CENTER and ABOVE: Alligator harvest season in Florida runs from Aug. 15 - Nov. 1.
- Photos: Metro


t AUCTii si


Ce rti f sied.Real 6i 6.o 0-7


JULY 29 - 30, 2009, PAGE 11




P CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


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PAGE 12, JULY 29 - 30, 2009


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Large school of mutton snapper in the Tortugas. - Photo: Don DeMaria


'Biologists



see spawning




fish in Marine



Protected Area


Biologists recently witnessed an extraordinary sight
while conducting an underwater study of mutton
snapper in the Florida Keys.
For the first time in Florida waters, scientists with the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's
(FWC) Fish and Wildlife Research Institute,i the
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and
the University of South Florida observed this species
spawning in a Marine Protected Area in the Florida
Keys. The site was established, in part, to protect
spawning schools of snapper and grouper in the
Tortugas Ecological Reserve.
Mutton snapper is an important species to both
recreational and commercial fisheries. When fish group
together in large numbers to spawn, they are more
vulnerable to fishing pressure. Allowing the fish to
spawn without angler pressure will help sustain the
fishery. The data collected from this study will help
biologists understand the effectiveness of creating no-


take Marine Protected Areas to protect a variety of sea
life, including fish and coral reefs.
Biologists spotted the large school of spawning
snapper while working on an acoustic tagging project.
The purpose of this research is to obtain information
regarding the movement, spawning and migratory
habits of snappers and groupers. They conducted
surgeries underwater at depths of up to 120 feet to
implant acoustic tags inside the fish. Conducting the
tagging at this ground-breaking depth causes less stress
to the fish than bringing them to the surface by
conventional hook-and-line methods to complete the
surgeries.
Biologists will continue to receive data-from the
tagged fish for the next few years. This information will
help them learn more about the movement, spawning
and migratory habits of these fish.
For more information on FWRI's marine fisheries
research, visit http://research.MyFWC.com.


Lobster poaching pretty pi


It's known as "poaching," so if you
think taking over the bag limit, out-of-
season lobsters, br lobsters from a
sanctuary is OK, you may want to talk to
the people recently penalized for doing
just that.
During "Operation Freezer Burn" the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) assisted the
National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA) Office for Law
Enforcement and the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service in the search and arrest
warrants of a group illegally harvesting
lobsters from artificial habitat placed in
the Florida Keys National Marine
Sanctuary (FKNMS).
The artificial habitats, referred to as
"casitas'' or "condos," are perceived by
lobsters as shelter, and they congregate
at the sites. This makes for easy
harvesting of the crustaceans.


In the end, six people were convicted
for the illegal harvest of 922 lobsters on
the opening day of Florida's commercial
lobster season in August 2008. They
faced additional charges after authorities
found approximately 1,700 pounds of
wrung lobster tail stockpiled that was
harvested during the 2008 closed season.
and intended for sale after opening day.
"Those who respect and follow the
rules want those who are exhausting and
abusing the resources to pay," said
Officer Robert Dube of the FWC. "More
than 1,700 pounds of lobster tails
represents more than 1,000 times the
legal bag limit for a mini-season sport
dive. If everybody took half that many
lobsters, there wouldn't be any left."
The six people were convicted this
year in federal court, each charged with
harvesting spiny lobster within the
sanctuary from illegally installed


artificial habitat, exceeding the bag
limits, and illegally offering the lobsters
for commercial sale. The convicted are
David W. Dreifort, 41, and Denise D.
Dreifort, 48, both of Cudjoe Key; Robert
H. Hammer, 46, of Miami; Sean N.
Reyngoudt, 25, of Summerland Key;
John R. Niles, 50, of Labelle; and
Michael Delph, 39, of Key West.
"With lobsters coming in season, we
want to remind everyone, poaching of
lobsters isn't tolerated, and the penalties
can be stiff," Dube said.
One of the convicted, David Dreifort,
was sentenced to imprisonment for 30
months, followed by three years of
supervised release. In addition, he is
prohibited from fishing for five years in
many of the waters in and around South
Florida. He and his wife also had to
forfeit three vehicles and three boats; and
the Dreiforts must sell two properties in


icey

the Florida Keys, including their
residence at Cudjoe Key, which was the
staging ground for the criminal conduct.
The proceeds from the sales up to $1..1
million will be used to remove the illegal
artificial habitats that the Drieforts
placed in FKNMS and help restoration
efforts for the approximately 700 sites.
The NOAA Office for Law
Enforcement, U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service, National Marine Fisheries
Service Restoration Center and the
Damage Assessment and Resource
Protection Office, and the FWC.worked
jointly throughout this investigation.
Recreational and commercial harvest
seasons for spiny lobster in Florida are
set to reopen soon. The special, two-day
spiny lobster sport season comes first,.
July 29-30 this year, followed by the
regular lobster season Aug. 6 -
March 31.


Lobsters congregate at an illegally placed artificial habitat, which makes for easy harvesting. - Photo: FWC


7. t.


JULY 29 - 30, 2009, PAGE 13


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PAGE 14, JULY 29 - 30, 2009 U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Protecting Your Dog's Immune System

FAMILY FEATURES


Allie stopped eating when she was 16. Her owner, Dr. Elizabette Cohen says she went
crazy trying to find a healthy diet for her beloved pet.


"Hie' prol snem is lthai she has'a--very sensiive dieiie
' stem jnd a, iddj ufler trom upsets prer, ti, ' id
Cohen, a New York veterinarian and popular radio show
host. With a majority of a dog's immune system residing in
the gut, it was critical to address Allie's digestive health.

Understanding Bacteria
Like humans, dogs and cats have short digestive tracts and a
complex gastrointestinal (GI) ecosystem. Bacterial cells in
their digestive tracts outnumber animal cells. In fact, they
account for approximately 95 percent of the cells in the GI
tract. As many as 500 different species of bacterial cells
may be represented.
Some of these bacteria are beneficial, and some have
the potential to be pathogenic.'It's-the balance between the
two types of bacteria that determines whether the digestive
system is healthy and functioning optimally. When the
bacterial balance is disrupted, the result is often digestive
upsets and loose stools.

What Causes Bacterial
Imbalance?
The intestinal microflora can vary from one animal to the
next and is influenced by a number of things, including host
species, breed, age, diet, environment and geography. But
beyond these variables, many factors can work to disrupt the
bacterial balance:
* Disease
* Age
a Diet
* Stress
* Antibiotic therapy

Finding a Balanced Solution
"I prefer to treat her digestive problems naturally; however,
it was challenging finding an effective natural solution,"
said Cohen.
Dr. Cohen is not alone in wanting to find more natural
solutions. According to experts, about half of dog- or cat-
owning households seek natural product solutions for their
pets. A growing trend in pet care is the use of probiotics and
prebiotics to support digestive health.
. Probiotics are live, beneficial or good bacteria supplied in


A Well-Balanced Diet
When it comes I In luii, el iie a * MU~lut-a n caMI.I uldii s ul'
balanced diet iiiii. cn, ri, ',aighmin and b'ey
* Animal protein to build and main- energy and vitality
tain strong muscles a Natural calcium for strong teeth
* Vitamins and minerals for heart' and bones
health Pet food makers study health, dogs
and cats to find which ingredienis
a Antioxidants, such as beta-carotene d cats to find w hired
and Vitamin E to promote a strong work best in providing complete and
immune system balanced nutrition. For example,
nutritional science ibund inu products '.
s Fiber blend for optimal digestive such sukaiuba nd lns deli er
health .uilnni.l pr:'tinm alnd iuntildants thai
* Omega-3 fatty akid, fi. healthy . rr e.peialls uipoant to a dog's
skin and coat . . hal


Dr. Elizabette Cohen and her dog Allie


without FOS*


with FOS*







simulation


* Good Bacteria FOS
Increases Good Bacteria
' Bad Bacteria for Optimal Health


some form (treat or supplement) to the animal that provide a health benefit.
, Prebiotics feed (or support) the good bacteria, helping the good bacteria to grow.
"Probiotics provide the digestive system with the healthy, good bacteria," said Cohen. "These bacteria support the
immune systemand its function, produce important B vitamins and take up space in theintestines. This is important
because this space could be taken up by disease-causing bacteria instead of the healthy bacteria."
Allie is 18 now, and even though she has some issues common to older dogs, Dr. Cohen says she's a healthy, happy
dog and enjoys the probiotics she's given in
supplement form.
"I am recommending lams Prostora Max
as a veterinarian, as a pet reporter, but most Prebiotics * t Fo
importantly, as a pet owner," says Cohen. "Allie rebl lotcs Ui et Fo
is extremely picky about what she likes to eat ' In eXamining your pet food ingredient list, you may see this
and she loves the taste of Prostora. I love it term -FructLoligosaccharide. or FOS. Pronounced, fruwk-
because I'm able to help support her digestive toe-l.-e.g o-sack-cr-id s, (FOS i. prebiotic found in a
health naturally." vrcart of fouds, such as bananas, barley, garlic, honey, rye
Available through veterinarians, Prostora and wheat. It is a fiber that is broken down in the intestine by
Max is one of the only probiotics that is derived the good bacteria that live there.
from the canine gut. It nutritionally manages FOS feeds the good bacteria to help crowd out the bad
dog's digestive health, promoting a healthy bacteria, helping to create the right balance between good and
microflora balance during stressful transitions bad bacteria. Check your pet's food labels to ensure the food
and a strong, healthy digestive system for over- yu're feeding your pet h.s "*Frutohli, dc" listed
all health and well-being .on Ihe ingredients panel.
For more information, visit www.iams.com.


4 I


PAGE 14, JULY 29 - 30, 2009


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


'5








* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


!r iEALER IN THE
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& LOCKS. V-6, 5 SPEED TRANSMISSION, RARE ONE-OF-A-KIND SPORTS CAR $AVE BIG ON THIS CAMRY WITH SUPER LOW MILESIII
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SUNROOF, POWER DRIVERS SEAT, 6 DISC CD CHANGER/ CASS. & CRUISE. ALLOY WHEELS, POWER DRIVER'S SEAT, V6 ENGINE WINDOWS & LOCKS, CD & CASSETTE, TILT & CRUISE SC Edition, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS,
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L.,i, . Ti,,,,l WE SOLD IT NEW. L:',.,i. - .i. - ,? r.l,,,,rl_ ,,,,,i Hl l.lli ,r.,,,,, . i. : ....i [II:IJ . i u l .. .':. . : .I . I ENGINE, POWER DRIVER'S SEAT, DUAL DIGITAL CLIMATE DRIVER'S SEAT, CD/CASSETTE, DUAL CLIMATE CONTR
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JULY 29 - 30, 2009, PAGE 15


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PAGE 16, JULY 29 - 30, 2009 * CLASSIFIEDMARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


32 x 72


C-
0


,-


p--�-�* ~..
...~P~ZiL�


P68r,8 10
Price include delivery, set up, AC, skirting and steps


%4, 7, 0 0
.......Prce includedelivery, set up, AC, sk!rtin and stps


.... .,,* .. . . . K . .... ...... ...


ON ALL LOT MODELS
ALL iPrlOmed Homs


agif ag ' MO'M . Oss w IBMa W -M W"igiW^

Reasonable ThousandSl! Exte
Offer! thr August

This is just a few of our many pre-owned homes

in LIKE NEW Condition,


D 2002 Fleetwood
o 1997 Palm Harbor
u 1996o acobsen
L 1998 Jacobsen
E 2000 General
w 1998 Fleetwood
S1999 General
E 1995'o.leetwood
s 199S(~leetwood.
1997 Destiny
SW 200C5o;layton


28x52
28x66
42x60
42x60
36x60
32x80
28x48
28x60
28x60
28x52
16x80


3/2
3/2
3/2'
4/2
3/2
.3/2
3/2
3/2
3/2
3/2
3/2.


1998
1995
1999
1998
1987
1996
2004
2004
1998
1985
1999


Palm Harbor.
Fleetwood
Weston
Fleetwood
Fleetwood
Fleetwood
Destiny
Destiny
Fleetwood
Edgewood
Hms of Legend


16x80'
14x70
16x80
16x80
14x66
16x66
14x70
14x70 ,
:16x70
14x46
16x80


2/2
3/2
3/2
3/2:
2/2
2/2
3/1
3/1
2/2
. 2/1
3/2


FREE ESTIMATES ON INSTALLWLTIONT .F 'I ,. .. ';


1%0060 Sq. FL Parft Warehouse
w, * . 386-362-4061


I "
a, r lx1t~~a 4.


*�.*I ft' &l'l1


Center in Live Oak
www.BobbyC orbtts. com . ..


WeAboCmVRVPat


raniraon ''Tl^f. ^my;lmu~urn^^iinumrimini~p (m.-..-TMiBjhjtninmii�-w~
V'al~yl ta "^^""--x
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'^^-^^^il^T^
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We have



LAND



available

Just price out your
home and let us
do the rest!
If you are looking for
country living but want
to be close to town, then
this is it. Best priced
property in Live Oak.
Just 1/2 mile south of
Hwy. 90 on CR 49.
Across from Gates
Subdivision.
2 1/4 Acres, no deed
restrictions, Zone. X


32, I000

4.5 Acres, 8.3 miles
from Roundabout


d39,000


Cor bett'N oeone


Hours: Mon-Sat 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Hwy. 90 & Lee St., Live Oak


386-364-1340395-F


j *~'A'c


PAG 1,UL 29 -' 3, 2009
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