Title: Suwannee Democrat
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028422/00494
 Material Information
Title: Suwannee Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Suwannee Democrat
Publisher: J. E. Pound
J.E. Pound
Place of Publication: Live Oak, Fla.
Live Oak, Fla
Publication Date: November 21, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
weekly[ former <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Electronic reproduction of copy from George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida also available.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note: Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028422
Volume ID: VID00494
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - ACE4563
oclc - 33273856
alephbibnum - 000398954
lccn - sn 95026787
 Related Items
Other version: Live Oak daily Democrat
Preceded by: Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by: Suwannee leader
Preceded by: Suwannee citizen

Full Text






WM Season in review age 1B

-c- r ,k


' ,. ..


Page 15A


Stay current

between edition
Our online edition
Is updated dally. Go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.coT
and check it out.


Friday Edition November 21, 2008


Servii .


,124th YEAR, NO. 11 3 SECTIONS, 38 PAGES



IMurder.


weapon


found,



Police

believe

In fatal stabbing
at local nightclub
By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com
A knife police believe was used in the fatal stab-
bing of a Live Oak woman has been recovered
from a dumpster at a local business, Det. Sgt. Ron
Shaw of the Live Oak Police Department said
Thursday.
Elizabeth Jones, 31, was stabbed to death in the
parking lot of Illusions, a non-alcoholic nightclub in
the Suwannee County Mall, early Saturday morn-
ing.
Charged with second-degree murder in the inci-
dent were Lace Laronda Jelks, 23, of 1733 Long
Ave., and Kelli Sue Coulter, 22, of 615 N.W. Sec-
, ond St., both of Live Oak.
Shaw said! a.tip lbdfpolice toa,dumpsfter outside, a
SEE MURDER, PAGE 11A

Syrup making the

old-fashioned way
By Vanessa Fultz
Suwannee High agriculture and Future Farmers
of America students will be producing and selling
cane syrup at the SHS Land Lab on Ontario Ave.
tomorrow. Students will also be selling fresh
greens, locally grown citrus and cane juice. The
public can come out between 9 a.m.- 2 p.m.
The annual production and sale is a learning ex-
perience. Students plant and cultivate the cane, har-
vest it by hand, grind it, cook it down and bottle it
up. For more information call 386-590-6287.


Suwannee High agriculture and Future Farmers
of America students label syrup bottles during
last year's cane grinding and sale.
- Photo: Vanessa Fultz

QUESTION OF THE WEEK: Will you spend more
or less on Christmas gifts this year?
VIEWPOINT PAGE 6A
Vote online at www.suwanneedemocrat.com .. ':
Today's Weather
61/ 310
Suwannee County
should see mainly
sunny skies today. For more
weather, see Page 11A
6 97113 07520 1 or visit our website at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com


:rr" i.( NI
D



nrfat
'rtiattt


50 CENTS


WOOLEY FIRED

Heated debate ends in 3-2 vote


By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com
Suwannee County Coor-
dinator Johnny Wooley
was fired Tuesday night
by a 3-2 vote of the coun-
ty commission. The mo-
tion to terminate Wooley
was made by newly elect-
ed District 5 commission-


er Wesley Wainwright,
who was sworn in earlier
that day. Commissioners
Jesse Caruthers and Ivie
Fowler voted with Wain-
you saw

breakingg news
ime^ts^,t l ,p,\^


OF T." .


James Montique, left, and Wayne Martin enjoy the new Live Oak Skate Park at John H.
Hale Community Park on Duval Street recently. The grand opening of the park was this
week. Funding for the facility -- which includes a skate park, tennis courts, racquetball
and handball courts, and softball and baseball fields -- was provided by the Florida
Recreational Development Assistance Program through the state Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection. Photo: Vanessa Fultz.


Husband
and wife
arrested
on gun
charges

^ r.

L.D. Wilson T.A. Wilson
By Jeff Waters
A Live Oak couple
was arrested last Fri-
day and each charged
with aggravated as-
sault, improper exhibi-
tion of a firearm and
SEE HUSBAND, PAGE 11A


wright to fire Wooley.
Commissioners Douglas
Udell and Billy Maxwell
voted no.
Udell suggested Wain-
wright was paying a polit-
ical debt by firing Wooley.
Wainwright said he simply
acted on the wishes of his


SEE WOOLEY, PAGE 11A Wooley


Park,

cultural

center

on hold
City will try again
next year for grant
By Vanessa Fultz
vanessa.fultz@gaflnews.com
Plans for a new park
and cultural center in
Live Oak have been put
on hold after the city
failed to secure a $3.5
million state grant.
City officials had
sought a non-matching
Florida Communities
Trust Grant to purchase
the property of Daniel
Crapps on Helvenston
Street for the develop-
ment of the Live Oak
Heritage Park and Gar-
dens.
Plans for Live Oak
Heritage Park and Gar-

SEE PARK, PAGE11A

South county
taxes won't
fund Lake
Louise boat
ramp project
By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com
A plan by former coun-I
ty commissioner Randy
Hatch to use tax revenues
from his district to help
build an access road to a
public boat ramp on Lake
Louise has been derailed.
Hatch, who lost his, re-
election bid Nov. 4 to
Wesley Wainwright, of-
fered some weeks back to
use $150,000 in gas tax
SEE SOUTH, PAGE 11A

------- --

rI
I Publtx


For Kids 12 & Under
No Purchase Necessary l
Must Present Coupon l
Limit 1 PerPerson


OATH OF OFFICE


Jerry Scarborough takes the oath of office as Suwannee
County's new superintendent of schools Tuesday in a
ceremony at the courthouse. His wife, Jeannette, holds
the Bible, while Judge Bill Slaughter swears him into of-
fice. (See video on our website, Suwanneedemocrat.com.)
Also sworn in Tuesday were school board members Jer-
ry Taylor and Muriel Owens, along with county commis-
sioners Jesse Caruthers, Ivie Fowler and Wesley Wain-
wright. Photo: Vanessa Fultz


OLE TIMES

COUNTRY BUFFET
"Home cooking' the way Mama does it"
Call 386-752-1670
Lake City Mall
Open: 10:30 a.m. 9:00 p.m. Daily
MasterCard, VISA, American Express, Discover 488004F


www.suwanneedemocrat. cor


.~ ~.,
~?
i!


1 "U











-PAGE 2A SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


ON THE FLIPSIDE


HOW TO REACH US

Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, www.suwanneedemocrat.com
lVail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
Publisher,
'Myra Regan, ext. 122


CONTACT US WITH

YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, call us at 386-362-1734
or visit our web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com


NEWSROOM
Editor,
-Robert Bridges, ext. 131
-8 Reporter,
Vanessa Fultz, ext. 134
'* Reporter,
~effWaters, ext. 133



ADVERTISING
Advertising Manager,
Monja Robinson, ext. 105
Sr. Advertising Representative,
Bill Regan, ext. 107
Advertising Representative,
Tami Stevenson, ext. 109
SAdvertising Representative,
Louise Sheddan, ext. 141
Telesales Ad Representative,
Nancy Goodwin, ext. 103
6 Classified/Legal,
Janice Ganote, ext. 102



CIRCULATION
Circulation Manager,
Angle Sparks, ext. 152
a Circulation
Service Hours, M-F 8 a.m..- 5 pm......
Subscription Rates,
.It-count,$23,. Oui-olfoCun, ,$48.




Z m-inn4






Serving Suwannee County Since 1884
:-t- .;... .:.

The Suwannee Democrat, published
Wednesday and Friday.
Periodicals postage paid at
Cive Oak, FL 32064.:Business located
$ 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
PL. Publication number 530180.

"POSTMASTER:
SSend address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL .
32064" Annual subscription rate is
$33 in county, $48 out of county and
$48 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.

OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

[ Letters, comments and opinions on
-the Viewpoint & Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
. yianagement/ownershipof the '
guwannee Democrat.


SETTERS TO THE EDITOR
letters may be mailed, faxed or
S-mailed to our office. All letters are
mad. Not all letters are published.
letterss may be edited to fit available
pace. The editor should not alter the
wFriter's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
e point, an ideal range is 150 to
S0O words. Please include your
Oame, address and day and evening
Sone numbers for verification.
tters MUST be signed. Letters to
e editor can be limited to one
hitter per quarter per individual.


BANT & RAVE HOTLINE
Mere's your chance to tell everyone what you
:ink! Callers may dial 208-8314 and leave a
glessage to express their thoughts, good or
trid, 24/1 about issues and politics, but not
o out private individuals or businesses: If you
Siefer, you may e-mail your comments to
:bert.bidges@gaflnews.com. Your name is
gt necessary, but please, ~-"'--
otake 30 seconds or less for \
your message.
SSuwanneeCounty Part of
"The Original Florida" "i


This weekend!
Nov. 22
St. Luke's Busy Hands for Babies will hold a
yard sale on Saturday, Nov. 22, from 7 a.m. un-
til 2 p.m., at St. Luke's Episcopal Church, locat-
ed at 1391 SW Eleventh St., in Live Oak, across
from the Garden Club. The sale will be inside
and there will be clothing, books and lots more.
Come and see our new handmade gift table for
Christmas presents.

Health Care Seminar
Nov. 23
A special service of information will be pro-
vided at the Live Oak Church of the Nazarene,
located at 915 S Church Ave., on Sunday, Nov.
23, at 6 p.m. This will be advantageous for the
disabled and retirees. Focus will be on health
care plans that work with medic care and federal
programs for low income people.

Make plans now!
Nov. 24
The annual Community Thanksgiving Service
will be on Monday, Nov. 24, at 7 p.m., at the
Live Oak Christian Church. The Church is lo-
cated at 1015 Ohio Ave. N, between Walt's Ford
and the cemetery. This year it will be hosted by
both the Suwannee County Ministerial Alliance
and the Suwannee County Pastor's Prayer Fel-
lowship.
One important aspect of the service had been
a special offering for Love INC. With the down
turn in the economy and an increase of requests
for assistance, our support of this important
community organization is vital. This year we
are asking people to bring canned foods and


BRIEFLY

other non-perishable items as a food offering to
the people of the community. A cash offering
will also be received.
The speaker for this year's service will be
Pastor Willie Warren of the Mt. Sinai Baptist
Church. The Young Adult Choir from the church
will also be presenting special music. The wor-
ship service will be led by a Praise Team com-
posed of members from several congregations
in the community. Pastors from various congre-
gations will also be taking part in the service.
For additional information you can contact
Pastor Ray Kelley, Live Oak Christian Church
at 386-209-1614 or Pastor Randy Wilding,
Community Presbyterian Church at 386-362-
2323.

Register now!
Dec. 6
The Suwannee County Historical Museum
will hold a Trash N' Treasure Flea Market on
Saturday, Dec. 6, at the Museum. The flea mar-
ket will take place during the annual Christmas
on the Square festivities conducted by the
Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce in
Live Oak. As in years past, this event will draw
thousands of visitors to the Live Oak communi- -
ty, many of which will park at the museum fa-
cilities because of its close proximity to the fes-
tivities.'Christmas on the Square festivities be-
gin at 8 a.m. and continue into the evening
hours.
Flea market booths will be located in front of
the museum facilities adjacent to Hwy 129.
Spaces are based on a first-come, first-served
basis.
For vendor information contact
museum program director, Randy


TlIank You!

"It is my honor


to serve you as


"your Sheriff. '
.P S e r .... 5,nn:

PAud PILiI i .dul.1icmileneni PJid I.r ilnd Apprmcd t* Tom C rTern



HAVE YOU SEEN

THESE ABSCONDERS

FROM PROBATION?


i n Name: NEWBY, GARY
:Race: WHITE
Sexi FEMALE
Hair Color: BLONDE
P OR STRAWBERRY
Eye Color: HAZEL
Height: 5'10"
Weight: 145 Ibs.
Birth Date: 09/18/1964
Current Community Supervision History:
Ofensa Datle0411 3 Oftense Date 07412007
Olise DRI(WILIC S/RCD FELONY Offense DRIVE WCSCID FELONY
Sentence Date 05/182006 Sentence Dale W2007
County SUWANNEE Cunty LAFAYETTE
.Case Na03 182 Case No0700074
Community Supernision Length 3Y OM OD CommuniySupervskLn Lengl OY 48M OD
Name: PERRY,
JOSHUA, LAVONN
Race: BLACK
SSex: MALE
Hair Color: BLACK
Eye Color: BROWN
Height: 5'04'
Weight: 225 Ibs.
Birth Date: 04/03/1987
Current Community Supervision History:
OffenseDalte0142007 Offense Dalte0314/2007
Offnse POSS.CONTROLSUBSIOTHER Offense COCAINE-POSSESSION
Sentence Date 0731t2007 Sentence Date 07131/2007
County SUWANNEE County SUWANNEE
Case No. 0700271 Case No. 0700271
Cormuniy Supervisio Lengt OY 42MtD Cmmbnily Supervision Length OY 42M 0D


Name: WALKER, NICOLE
Race: WHITE
Sex: FEMALE
Hair Color: BLONDE OR
SSTRAWBERRY
Eye Color: BLUE
Height: 5'03"
Weight: 150 Ibs.
Birth Date: 03/05/1975
Current Community Supervision History:
OffenseDate 122OO06 CountyLAFAYETTE
Oflene SIMPLEBATERY-MISO Case No.0700002
Sentence Date 04022007 Community Supevision Length IY OMOD

Name: BROGDON,
WILLIAM
Race: WHITE
Sex: MALE
f Hair Color: BLACK
S Eye Color: BROWN
Height: 5'06"
Weight: 150 Ibs.
Birth Date: 04/21/1984
Current.Community Supervision History:
Offense Date 07282007 Offense Date 071282007
Offense BURGUNOCCSTRUC/CV OR AT. Offense COCAINE-POSSESSION
Sentence Date 11272007 Sentence Date 11/2712007
C SUWANNEE CountySUWANNEE
Case N o. 0700422
ComnuninySupervision Length OY 30M 0D Case No. 0700640
Comuninty Supervision Length OY 30M OD


Calt


CRIME STOPPERS

where you may be eligible for a reward!
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO APPREHEND!

If your information leads to an arrest, or seizure of narcotics, the recovery of
stolen property, you may be eligible for a cash reward of up to $1,000. You do not
have to testify in court and you will remain anonymous.







~i208-8411


Paid for by the office of Attorney General, Crime Stoppers T t Fund
Paid for by the office of Attorney General, Crime Stoppers Trust Fund


Editor
Suwann
prints t
record e,
name al
you are
guilty or
dropped
py to ma
the new,
dicial pi
to us by
thorities.
The fc
nations ar
SCSI
County
LOPE
lice Dep
FDLE
ment ol
ment
.FHP-I
Patrol
FWC-
Commis
DOT-1
Transpol
OALE
cultural
ment
P &
Parole
USMS
Service
ATF-I
Alcohol,
Firearms
DOC-
Correcti(
Note:
will a
Wednesd
edition.
Nov,


Torrance at 386-362-1776.
The museum is located in Live Oak at 208 N
Ohio Ave. (Just north of the intersection of Hwy
90 and 129).

Customers needed!
Dairy Queen of Live Oak will host Dairy
Queen Benefit Night the second Tuesday of
every month from 6-8 p.m. to help buy books
for Suwannee Middle School.

Donations needed!
Suwannee County Environmental Watchdogs,
a non-profit organization, seeks donations for
yard sale merchandise. Info: Sandy, 386-364-
8020.

Plan your holdiay party
now!
The Woman's Club of Jasper, located at 103
6th Ave. NW, in Jasper, will be fully decorated
by Dec. 2, for the the holiday season and will be
available for rental during the month of Decem-
ber. The Club is splendidly appointed and deco-
rated from the mantel, piano and window treat-
ments to two large and beautiful fully decorated
Christmas trees.
Rental fees during the month of December are
$200, plus a $100 security deposit, which will
be returned upon a successful and thorough in-
spection of the building after the event.
For more information or to register during the
month of December call Geri Huddleston at
386-792-3092.




arrest Record
r 's note: The Hinson, 53, 10286 227th
ee Democrat Lane, Live Oak,- Florida,
he entire arrest SCSO L. Descarreaux,
ach week. Ifyour
appears here and grand theft m, fail .to
later found not report lost or abandoned
r the charges are property, 1st
, we will be hap- appear/WRS/PD/Appt.
ke note of this in Nov. 18, McArthur
paper when ju- Howar Jr. 23, 617 E
roof is presented ward, Jr. 23, 617 E
you or the au- Duval Street, Live Oak,
Floridia, SCSO' DTPA'F
Allowing abbrevi- Gorski, petit theft. .1:.
e used below: Nov. 18, Timothy Lee
O-Suwannee
Sheriff's Office Jean, 37, Gulf CI Annex,
i-Live Oak Po- Wewahitchka, Florida,
artment SCSO S. Law, return for
-Florida Depart- court.
f Law Enforce- Nov. 18, Kevin Dennis
Florida Highway O'Conner, 28, 6406 Post
Court, Springfield, Florida,
Florida Wildlife FHP F. Teslo, DWLS/R
sion Habitual, grand theft auto,
Department of fleeing and elude.
station
-Office of Agri- Nov. 18, Johnny Olen
Law Enforce- Ogburn, 35, 16272 145th
Place, Live. Oak, Florida,
P-Probation and SCSL K. Descarreaux,
i-US Marshals uttering a forgery.
Nov. 18, Vicki Rachelle
departmentt of Owenby, 38, 4 Friendly
, Tobacco and Hollow, Asheville, NC,
S SCSO M. Locke, VOP
Department of (Burg Dwell/Deal Stln
ons
ons prop), 1st
Arrests for Nov. 19 pp) /WRS/PDAppt.
e in t Appear! WRS/PD/Appt.
appear in the Nov. 18, Michael Allen
ay Nov 26 Smith, 42, 2771 Billy
18, Talf Stuart Osceola Ave., Hollywood,
Florida, SCSO S. Law,
VOP O/C pass a worthless
bank check.


Adv. Tx on SaleTHE DAY THE EARTH STOOD
STILL
TWIUGHT(PG-13) (100)420740 1030
BOLT (P) (12020)440720940
QUANTUM OFSOLACEPG-13) *
Q1210240)5107501020
ROLE MODELS (R)- Ig REED 730 PM 1000 PM
MADAGASCAR 2: ESCAPE TO AFRICA PG)
1220235) 450710950
CHANGELING (R)- ID REQ'D
F12303IR507001010
FIREPROOF (PG). (1250 PM) 410 PM
La~a;~Imomilmimm"~


CASH 3 PLAY
Day Day
11/19/08 0,2,0 11/19/08.7,1,6,9
Night Night
11/19/084,2,3 11/19/08.2,4,1,0
FANTASY 5
11/19/08 ......... 9,13,17,19,33
MEGA MONEY.... 18,19,33,39,7
LOTTO......... 1,6,10,38,46,49


David Gore Scott Daniel, PSM
Cell: (386) 365-0298 Cels (3o6) 2084176
Email: dgore@dgsurveying.com Emal: sdanel@dgsurveying.com
490040aF


I Ir


491766-F










FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


EXTENSION UPDATE


Have you had your 2009 Medicare

Part D drug plan check-up?


By Mary Lee Tanca, SHINE, and Cathy
Rogers, Suwannee County Extension

It's that time of year again!
Medicare's Annual Enrollment Period
for the Part D: Prescription Drug Plans.
It is important for you to know that the
plan you are currently enrolled in may
not be the one that best suits your needs
in the coming year. In 2009, all of the
plans will be increasing their plan pre-
miums as well as changing their formu-
laries (the list of drugs that they cover).
By now you should have received in-
formation from your current plan on the
changes to expect in 2009. But, do you
know how to calculate just how much
your drugs, plan premium and de-
ductible will cost you?
To begin with, most low cost plans
will require up to a $295 deductible
(Pre-initial Coverage). This means th,
you will be paying full cost for your
drugs until the deductible is met.
Once that deductible is met (or if you
do not have a deductible), you will
reach the Initial Coverage. During this
time you will pay, on the average, 25%
of the cost of your drugs. BUT, the sys-
tem calculates the cost of your drugs at
full cost to determine when you reach
the Gap.
The Gap (Post-initial Coverage) has
been set at $2700 for 2009. Remember,
this is arrived at from calculating the
full cost of the drugs you purchase.
Once you hit the Gap, you will pay full
price for your drugs until you
reach $4,350 out-of-pocket costs
for your drugs. Confused yet?
In 2009, there are 54 stand- sta
alone drug plans in the State of
Florida. Medicare provides a inl
Plan Finder Tool at
www.Medicare.gov to assist you
in figuring out which plan will
cover your drugs at the least cost
to you. If you do not have ac-
cess to a computer or need help
in understanding this program, ....
please coniace a SHINE volun-
teer. SHINE, a. volunteer pro-
gram with the FL Dept of Elder
Affairs, is offering free, unbi-
ased, and confidential assistance t


to help you understand your options.
Through Social Security, there is a
program to help low income beneficia-
ries with the plan. premium, deductible,
and cost of your drugs called Extra Help
or LIS (Low Income Subsidy). If you
have full Medicaid, the state is paying
for your Medicare Part B, or if you are
receiving SSI, you automatically receive
LIS status. If you are (in 2008):
Single: Income is $15,600 or less; As-
sets total $11,990 or less.
Couple: Income is $21,000 or less;
Assets total $23,970 or.less.
Assets do not count your home, the
land your home is on or your vehicles.
They do count all your cash in the bank,
CDs, stocks, bonds, annuities, cash val-
ue on your life insurance policies, and
any additional real-property. Please ask
for an application.
Even beneficiaries that receive LIS or
are assigned a plan by Medicare should
have a plan check-up. Those that are
paying a partial premium for their plan
ne.J to realize that their partial premi-
um will be as high as $18/month in
2009. Also, you need to find out if the
assigned plan will cover your drugs.
Tha means that you need to check the
plan's formulary to see if your drugs are
listed. Otherwise you may have to pay
full price for your drugs.
During the Gap there may be pro-
grams that will help you to pay for your
drugs. The Florida Discount Drug Card
is one program that offers a small per- .


n 2009, there are 54
.nd-alone drug plans
the State of Florida.
Medicare provides a
Plan Finder Tool at
Tv. Medicare.gov to
ssist.you in figuring
o0L- which plan. will
*cover your drugs at
the least cost to you.


centage off the retail cost of a drug.
Also, depending on your income, you
may qualify for one of the free drug
programs provided by the pharmaceuti-
cal companies. Don't forget to ask your
doctor if there is a generic drug avail-
able or even a lower cost brand name
drug in the same drug category as one
of your expensive drugs. SHINE can
help you understand your options.
Don't find out in January that you
should have looked into other options.
The deadline for making changes to
Medicare Part D prescription drug plans
is Dec. 31. Be an informed consumer!
Everyone with a Part D Drug Plan
needs to have a plan check-up. Call
SHINE today for a site near you or ask
for assistance from a local volunteer
over the phone. Call 1-800-262-2243


With Thanksgiving just days away,
Florida Agriculture and Consumer Ser-
vices Commissioner Charles H. Bronson
today reminded state residents to follow
a few food safety tips to avoid holiday
celebration resulting in cases of food-
borne illness.
"Everybody enjoys holiday meals, and
with a little care, nothing will mar the
pleasure of the celebration," Bronson
said. "But food safety measures are par-
ticularly important, especially with the
variety of foods being served, the num-
ber of helpers in the kitchen and the fact
that food is often left out for long peri-
ods of time after being served."
An estimated 76 million people con-
tract food-borne illness in the United
States each year and about 5,000 such
cases are fatal. Young children, pregnant
women, the elderly and those with com-
promised immune systems are the most
vulnerable for contracting such illness.
Bronson offered the following food-
safety tips:
Clean and sanitize cooking equip-
ment.
Wash your hands thoroughly with
soap and warm water before preparing
food and after contact with raw meat,
poultry, seafood and eggs.
I Keep raw foods away from cooked
Foods to avoid cross-contamination, and
make sure that raw meat juices never
come in contact with salads and vegeta-


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


bMMMH *r PxRW~x -
nnnmmlap, mm i V mm lllylj .:
bles.
Defrost the turkey in the refrigerator,
or if time is short, it can be defrosted un-
der cold running water in a matter of ,
hours. But never defrost the bird at room
temperature as bacteria can rapidly grow
on raw meat at room temperature.
Keep cold foods cold and hot foods
hot, especially when serving buffet style.
Buffet servings should be kept small aid
replenished often.
State and federal food safety offi-
cials stress that the turkey should be
cooked to an internal temperature of at
least 165 degrees F, and a food ther-
mometer should be used to verify the '
temperature. While many people cook
stuffing inside the bird, officials suggest
that it be cooked in a separate pan be-
cause there is no guarantee that the "
stuffing will reach 165 degrees F at the'
same time as the turkey.
Carefully store leftovers. They
should be refrigerated promptly and
should sit out no more than two hours
after coming from the oven or stovetopt
Slice the turkey before refrigerating,
whole turkeys do not store safely in thq
refrigerator. Leftovers should be put in.,
shallow containers to speed up the cool-
ing process and prevent bacterial
growth. : ae:....
For more holiday food safety tips.visit
www.florida-agriculture. com/con-
sumers/foodsafety_winter.htm.


Tentative Five Year Work Program
District Two
Fd Fiscal Years Beginning July 1, 2009 June 30, 2014

The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), District Two, is conducting public
hearings pursuant to Section 331.135(4)(c), Florida Statutes, to consider the
Department's Tentative Work Progr: n for the Fiscal Years 2009/2010 through 2013/2014,
and to consider the necessity of making any changes to the Work Program, to which all
persons are invited to attend and be heard.

1. Lake City Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the Gainesville Metropolitan
Transportation Planning Organization (MTPO) and the County Commissions forAlachua,
Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Levy and Union counties serving as Metropolitan
Planning Organization for their respective counties.

DATE AND TIME: Monday, December 8, 2008 at 5:30 p.m.'
PLACE: FDOT District Two Office, Madison Room
1109 South Marion Ave., Lake City, FL

2. Live Oak Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the County Commissions for
Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee and Taylor counties serving as Metropolitan
Planning Organization for their respective counties.

DATE AND TIME: Monday, December 15, 2008 at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: Suwannee RiverWater Management District, Board Room #103
9225 County Road 49, Live Oak, FL

3. Jacksonville Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the North Florida
Transportation Planning Organization (NFTPO), the Jacksonville City Council and the
County Commissions for Baker, Clay, Nassau, Putnam and St. Johns counties serving as
Metropolitan Planning Organization for their respective counties.
DATE AND TIME: Tuesday, December 16, 2008 at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: FDOT Jacksonville Urban Office, Training Facility
2198 Edison Avenue, Jacksonville, FL
Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, national
origin, disability or family status. Persons who require accommodations under the
Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation services (free of
charge) should contact Mr. Bill Henderson, District Planning & Environmental Manager,
Lake City District Office at 1-800-749-2967 at least seven (7) days in advance of the Public
Hearings.
Written comments from the Metropolitan Planning Organizations, County Commissions
and other interested parties will be received by the Department at the Public Hearings and
up to December 31,2008 following the hearing. Comments should be addressed to:

Charles W, Baldwin, RE,, District Secretary
Florida Department of Transportation, District Two
1109 South Marion Ave. Mail Station 2000
Lake City, FL 32025-5874
Telephone 1-800-749-2967

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 4
489051 -F


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1675 SR 14 South
Live Oak 386-362-2424 1-888-454-8362
1717 West Howard Street
490062-F


Adhere to food safety

mp-a-iirp this hnlidhv


PAGE 3A

and connect with a SHINE volunteer
near you!
All programs and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted by, the Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons with non-dis-
crimination with respect to race, creed,.'
color, religion, age, disability, sex, or
sexual orientation, marital status, na-
tional origin, political opinions, or affil-
iations.
For persons with disabilities requiring
special accommodations, please contact
our office at least five working days pri-
or to the program so that proper consid;
eration may be given to the request. Our
phone number is 386-362-2771. For the
hearing impaired, please contact the
Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-
8771.










suwannee living


WEDDING.'.


/.. /


. 1'.


Landen & Blue


Bart and Joy Landen, of Live Oak, would like to
announce the engagement and approaching mar-
riage of their daughter, Tracy Lynn Landen to
Jayson Colby Blue, son of Jayson Calvin Blue, of
Perry, and Beverly Mullis Blue, of Mayo.
Tracy is a graduate of Lafayette High School and
is currently employed at Drummond Community
Bank of Mayo.
Her maternal grandparents are the late Earl and
Dorothy Allen, of Live Oak, and her paternal
grandparents are the late Bill and Florence Landen,
of Live Oak.
Jayson is a graduate of Lafayette High School
and is currently employed at Mayo Town and
Country Animal Hospital.
His maternal grandparents are James and Mil-
dred Mullis, of Mayo, and his paternal grandpar-
ents are Calvin and Erma Blue and Wanda Blue, of
Mayo.
The ceremony will take place Dec. 13, 2008 at 2
p.m. at Lighthouse Christian Center in Mayo. A re-
ception will follow at Alton Church of God in
Mayo.
Local invitations will not be sent. All friends and
family are invited to attend.

Thank you
Luraville Volunteer Fire Department would like to
thank those who donated gifts, money and/or their time
to make the annual dinner such a success. It is the top
priority of the L.V.F.D. to help those in need whether you
live in our community or are just passing through. We
would like to say thank you for your support and hope to
see you all next year in April.
Chief Paul Gamble


Tracy Landen and Jayson Blue


Stephens

& Helvenston
Susan Stephens Hodges and Brantly Walker Helvenston,
IV are pleased to announce their upcoming marriage.
The wedding will take place on Dec. 20, 2008 at their
residence in Live Oak.
After a honeymoon in Venice, both Susie and Brant will
continue to pursue their respective doctoral degrees.

E -7- R LMINDER

Burton & Durden
Diane Landis Burton, of St. Augustine, and
Robert Burton, of Jacksonville, would like to re-
mind you of the approaching marriage of their
daughter, Meghan Landis Burton to Larry Lewis
Durden, Jr., son of Jessie and Larry Durden, Sr.,
Live Oak.
The ceremony will take place Nov. 22, 2008 at 4
p.m., at the Llambias House Garden in'St. Augus-
tine.


Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) volunteers sought


United Way of Suwannee Valley, in collaboration with
the IRS and with the assistance of local volunteers, will
be instituting Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) at
the Suwannee River Regional Library in Live Oak in
preparation for the 2008 tax filing season.
The VITA program offers free tax help to low- to
moderate-income (generally, $40,000 and below) people
who cannot prepare their own tax returns. Volunteers will
receive training to prepare tax returns. VITA sites are
generally located at community and neighborhood
centers, like the Suwannee River Regional Library.


Trained community volunteers can help with special
tax credits, such as Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC),
Child Tax Credit and Credit for the Elderly for which
residents may qualify. In addition to free tax return
preparation assistance, most sites also offer free
electronic filing (e-filing).
Please consider sharing your skills for the benefit of
your fellow community members by volunteering in the
VITA program. Contact Jenny Sawyer, VITA
Coordinator, United Way of Suwannee Valley, 386-752-
5604, for further information.


A, Local residents meet Legend in Black
performer Bill Cayley at NFCC



dei i K


James and Barbara Beaty, of Madison, left, and Jesse and Bootsie Cone, of Live Oak, met
Johnny Cash impersonator Bill Cayley, center, following the North Florida Community Col-
lege Artist Series performance of "The Legend in Black: Tribute to Johnny Cash and June
Carter-Cash" on Oct. 30 at Van H. Priest Auditorium in Madison. The sold-out performance
was a hit with Artist Series patrons. Bill Cayley and his band traveled all the way from Cana-
da to perform "The Legend in Black" Johnny Cash and June Carter-Cash tribute at NFCC.
The next NFCC Artist Series performance is The Spencers Theatre of Illusion on Dec. 2.


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HAPPY 5TH


BIRTHDAY



TVson

Love, Daddy,
Mommy & Whitton n


Don't wash dishes through

the holiday season!
We have disposable:
SPlates Bowls Napkins Cutlery
STable Covers and much more
Come in or call 386-362-1803

BI-LO Chemical & Supply
12776 Railroad Street, Live Oak
bilo3621803@yahoo.com
Directly across West Hwy. 90 from Friers Mobile Home Sales


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E T -A EXTRA


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


PAGE 4A


I I


" Y'% "&I 'L Ir"l "W F- MlrW'" vr TlA IL Ylri










F SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


suwannee living


B~I ~f -;


Happy 1st Birthday


Maylee Jo Gabey








A-.l

7 ".



^ ; "^


Clay

Alston

Johnson

Tinsley Harris
would like to wish
her little brother, Clay
Alston Johnson, a
very happy 1st birth-
day.
Love, Mommy,
Daddy, Pookie and
family


Maylee Jo Gabey


Greg and Amanda Gabey would like to
announce the birth of their daughter,
Maylee Jo Gabey, who was born on Sept.
21, 2008 at 12:53 p.m. at the North Flori-
da Women's Center in Gainesville. She
weighed 6 pounds, 1 ounce and measured
18 inches long.


Maternal grandparents are Marvin and
Lynne Hutchins and Mike and Jean
Readyhough all of Live Oak. Paternal
grandparents are Jimbo and Sherry Willis
of Lake City.
Maylee joins a brother, 10 years old,
Chayse.


TV

Listings

Pages 4-5B


In Memory

Matthew Alan Gorkie
Nov. 23. 1983 June 24. 2007


Wilson Family and Southern Rukus

to play during Thanksgiving weekend

at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park

Also entertaining during the Old Tyme Farm Days
festival are the Andrews Family Band, Donnie Lott
and the Palmetto Ramblers.


The Wilson Family
Bluegrass Band will be the
featured group Friday
night, Nov. 28 in the Mu-
sic Hall after Thanksgiv-
ing at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park in
Live Oak. The group will
also play on Saturday dur-
ing the Old Tyme Farm
Days and Engine Show
which will be held Friday
and Saturday, Nov. 28-29
at the SOSMP.
Southern Rukus, a top
notch country band, will
be shaking the rafters on
Saturday night, Nov. 29, in
the Music Hall
The Wilson Family, a
family of four with a
cousin thrown in for good
measure, takes real plea-
sure in playing guitar, fid-
dle, banjo, bass and man-
dolin, the main tools of


bluegrass music. And,
they're all extremely good
at what they do. When
they strike out on a tune,
it's toe-tapping time with
lots of clapping thrown in,
spiced up with some old
tyme mountain clogging if
you've still got the urge
and physical ability! The
Wilsons also sing gospel
and will have you joining
in on your favorites.
Hailing from Georgia,
the Wilsons are making a
return appearance at the
SOSMP, having played
this venue before to the
delight of their many fans.
The group consists of
Robert on vocals and gui-
tar, his wife Melissa on
mandolin, children Clint
on fiddle and Katie on fid-
dle and the Wilson's
nephew, Blake Gowen on


bass.
Southern Rukus com-
bines talents from all mu-
sical spectrums spanning
from Southern rock and
country and blues featur-
ing both acoustic and elec-
tric styles for a unique
sound unlike any other
band in the state of Flori-
da. The band is known for
performing high-energy

SEE WILSON, PAGE 7A


BELVE


into the holidays






.W-


r *" < Lim
5 6
7 ,8 9
.7 0-- g-


A ailable in wh.I? anda lack


You were an amazing son. You put your mother
and brother first without one complaint. It
came time for me to give back and in a second
you were gone. I miss you every second of
every day. Thank you for being my angel.
Love,
Mom & Brother
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One winner will be drawn at random.
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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


PAGE 5A '.'!'


a N o 7% --














Viewpoints/ p lns


BIBLE VERSE
Come, let us sing for joy to
the LORD; let us shout aloud
to the Rock of our salvation.
Let us come before him with
thanksgiving and extol him
with music and song.
Psalm 95:1-2


Sumuanne

4jemnrrat







MYRA C. REGAN ROBERT BRIDGES
Publisher Editor
Members of the Suwannee Democrat
editorial board are Myra C. Regan,
publisher, and Robert Bridges, editor.
Our View, which appears in
Wednesday editions of the
Democrat, is formed by that board.


OPINION


CHIEF'S
CHAT


Rant



Want to vent?

Our hotline is open 24/7.
Suwannee Countians, it's time to speak your mind! How? By
calling the Suwannee Democrat Rant and Rave hotline. The hot-
line never closes and is your way to let it out. You can let every-
one know how you feel -- as long as you express yourself in a
respectful way.
Note: In written entries to Rant and Rave, errors in spelling,
grammar or punctuation are those of the authors.

I applaud the County Commission for the commitment to
build the boat ramp at Lake Louise. I am looking forward to be-
ing able to use the beautiful lake. The homeowners surrounding
Lake Louise should be ashamed for complaining about the im-
pending ramp. Just because you live on the lake doesn't mean
you own the lake. Beachside condominium owners don't own
the beach. What if they insisted no one visit the beach? If the
Lake Louise homeowners really think they own the lake, why
doesn't the property appraiser value the lake and include it in
the homeowner's assessed values. Maybe that could solve some
of the current economic crunch at the County.

Of all the places I have lived, Live Oak and Suwannee Coun-
ty have the biggest bunch of whiners I have ever encountered.
You whine when the city goes to once a week garbage pick-up
to save money and relieve employees so they can do other
things and not have to hire additional personnel. You whine


Rave


when your garbage goes up a little over a dollar when you al-
ready have one of the lowest rates in the state. You whine when
a fire truck blows its horn or siren at an animal event when they
were asked to be there. You whine when your kids have to walk
a block to catch the bus. The problem is you have had it so
good, for so long, so cheap. Stop your crying and join the real
world.

Thank you! To the person or persons that found and return
my check book, to the postal clerk on duty, Monday 11th of No-
vember @ the post office. Your honesty is greatly appreciated -
God Bless.

Yes, I just want to address the point about the ATV park. I be-
lieve it needs to be open to give our kids something to do be-
cause Suwannee County sure ain't doing nothing' for our chil-
dren. So thank you and stand your ground and do it for the kids.

And, I just want to make another point about the trick or
treating that was in the Rant & Rave on Friday. Halloween was
really horrible this year due to heavy traffic and no supervision.
It was very disturbing. And I do believe Veterans Day needs to
be closed, schools need to be closed and everything because it is
a very important holiday. So thank you.

Callers to 208-8314 may express their thoughts, good or bad,
24/7 about community issues and politics, but not about private
individuals or businesses. If you prefer, you may e-mail your
comments to nf.editorial@gaflnews.com. You don't have to give
your name, and please, take no more than 30-45 seconds for
your comments. Let us know what's bugging you.


IBY BUDDY WILLIAMS
Live Oak Chief of Police

I wanted to say "Thank You" to
the community for an awesome
turnout at the Live Oak Police De-
partment Fall Festival. I estimated
around 600 people attended the
event sometime during the night. I
would also like to thank all of the
volunteers and outside agencies
that participated to make sure that
our children had a safe place to vis-
';it and enjoy the festivities. Thanks-
giving is upon us and I hope that
everyone has a great time with
family and friends during this time.
I know that a lot of the women folk
plan to hit the stores with a
vengeance after Thanksgiving Day
looking for the ultimate sale. I
would like to remind everyone to
reflect on the last year and give
thanks to all of the things that make
our lives memorable, and show ap-
preciation to those that matter
most.
SI don't know about everyone else,
but I am glad that the political sea-
son is over and hopefully we can
all return to normal. I would like to
congratulate the winners in their
quest for office and wish them luck
on the new journey ahead of them.
-It is truly amazing how fast a year
goes by. It is definitely hard to be-
lieve that Christmas is around the
corner and the town will be
buzzing with excitement of Christ-
mas on the Square, Christmas Pa-
rade and all of the other yearly.
events at this time. I would like to
remind everyone to exercise cau-
tion during this time, it seems like
we all get so involved with things
going on around us that we forget
the most obvious things like keep-
ing ourselves and our property safe.
I am asking everyone to remember
to lock their doors, keep valuables
out of sight and although all those
presents around a tree look good it
can be an open invitation for some-
one to try to break into your house.
I don't think that anything can ruin
the holidays like a thief or a bur-
7glar. Let us all remember the real
reason for the season and slow
"down our lives and be thankful for
-all of the good things in life and
how fortunate we are to live in
such a great community and coun-
ty. As always the door is open and I
would love to hear from anyone
with concerns, suggestions or com-
ments. I once again say "Thank
You" for allowing me to serve as
your chief of police.

Please address letters
to: Letters To The Editor,
Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370, Live Oak,
FL 32064.
Please include your full name, ad-
dress and daytime phone number.
We ask this so we can verify
your letter and discuss any ques-
tions about it with you.


OPINION


It's that time of the year for my fa-
vorite holiday, Thanksgiving. I enjoy
Christmas especially when it comes to
the kids. With all the hustle-bustle,
Christmas can be.a very' tiring, frus-
trating and even depressing time for
some. All the going and running from
here to there can wear you out. It can
be frustrating with what to buy and es-
pecially this year, how to pay for it.
Our children have come to expect
more than an apple and a chunk of
coal as I have been told kids used to
get. Thanksgiving is a more laid back
holiday focusing more on family and
friends. It's a time to reflect on the
bounty that we have in this great na-
tion. Yes, times are a little tougher
than they were last year but.I don't
want to be booked on a flight to any
other place in the world to live. Diane
has been buying stuff for Thanksgiving
for weeks. As I have relayed to you
before, this is her favorite holiday.
Man, she puts on a scrumptious feast
for us all. Hopefully God will continue
to tolerate the many transgressions that
are heaped against Him and continue
to bless us as he has over the years.
May God forgive us and continue to
provide for us in the future with His
great bounty.
The Social Security Office in Lake
City is moving during the time be-
tween of December 3 to the 8. The ser-
vices from the office during this time
will be limited. They are expected to
be up to speed by December 9. I sug-
gest you call before making a trip
over. The new office will be located at
the corner of Bascom Norris Drive and
Sister's Welcome Road.
I had a call from a gentleman last
week about the rumors concerning the
possible closing of.Pilgrim's Pride. He
asked if the city had been paying at-
tention to this matter and if not, why.
The answer is yes. For months, I, Den-
nis Cason, Bob Farley and others have
discussed this matter. Dennis has had
numerous conversations with the Of-
fice of Tourism and Economic Devel-
opment (OTED). I contacted the Gov-
ernor's office about the situation and
subsequently met in my office with
David Mica, aide to Gov. Crist. We in-
formed him of the economic crisis that
the closing of Pilgrim's Pride would


MAYOR'S
CORNER


BY SONNY NOBLES

cause our community. He understood
the economic dilemma which would be
caused by the closing and was very
concerned about the situation. David
asked that I arrange a meeting between
Pilgrim's Pride, the Governor's office
and city officials. Subsequently, I have
been contacted by Pilgrim's Pride ask-
ing for the city's support in some im-
portant issues that face the company. I
have been in touch with both Senator
Nelson and Representative Boyd's of-
fice to discuss the issues facing Pil-
grim's Pride. I know Johnny Wooley
and others have also been in contact
with Tallahassee. I will continue to
give my full attention to this matter.
Drivers, please do not pull across
and past the stop bars at the red lights
at Pinewood and Walker. This is the
intersection at the schools. Sensors
cannot detect the weight of your.auto
if you are not located on them. These
sensors are located before the wide
white stop bar. The light will cycle
past you and go to the next stop. You
will find yourself waiting for the next
cycle to come around. Pull up to the
stop bars and not across them. Thanks
for your attention to this matter.
Teen clubs or youth recreation cen-
ters are known for violence and dis-
ruptive behavior especially late at
night or in the early mornings after
other establishments have closed.
Since they are supposed to be alcohol
free, there is limited regulation and
can stay open even after other estab-
lishments have closed. People congre-
gate at these locations and in parking
lots to continue their partying after
bars have closed. These type teen
clubs and recreation centers are notori-
ous for fights, loud noise, drug and al-
cohol abuse in parking lots. It is ironic
that the city.has been discussing
stricter regulation for these type clubs
and developing an ordinance to regu-


late them. Unfortunately, an ordinance
is too late to stop the murder that took
place outside one of these recreation
centers this past weekend. At the last
Drug Free Coalition meeting, I in-
formed the group of the situation with
theses type clubs. They were interested
and concerned about these clubs espe-
cially since the club was only a few
doors from their office. Hopefully the
new ordinance and stricter nuisance
regulations can prevent future
tragedies.
The Florida Discount Drug Card
program is designed to lower the cost
of prescriptions to eligible Florida res-
idents. If you are interested in finding
out if you qualify for this cost savings
benefit you can call toll-free 1-866-
341-8894 for information. I urge you
to make the call. It could save you a
bundle on your drug bill.
The Live Oak Fire Department will
begin its "Toys For Sparky's Kids" toy
drive next week. Receptacles for your
toy donations will be placed in area
businesses soon. Toys can also be
dropped off at the fire station. Cash is
also accepted. Give so kids in our area
can have a merrier Christmas. Hope-
fully the Christmas decorations that
will be going up next week will put
you in the Christmas giving mood.
Let's show this year we are truly the
caring community.
Hear ye, hear ye. District 4 Council-
man Mark Stewart invites his con-
stituents to "Coffee With Your Coun-
cilman" at JAVA JAX located in the
Publix shopping center. Come and
meet with him on the second Tuesday
of each month from 7 to 8:30 a.m.
This will be a time to get to know each
other and discuss current issues and
citizen concerns.
City Hall will close at 2 on Wednes-
day and be closed Thursday and Friday
for the holiday. Thursday garbage col-
lection will take place on Wednesday.
Thanksgiving is one of the most heav-
ily traveled holidays. Many will be on
the highways visiting friends and rela-
tives. Please be cautious and safe in
your travels. Watch out for the other
guy. He may be a worse driver than you.
Don't let a tragedy spoil your holiday
seasons. Remember, wear your seat
belts. Have a wonderful Thanksgiving.


.-. NE, W%_,,^..? .- Vote onlitne at
O"N INE O P 17.-. www.suwanneedemocrat.com


QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Will you spend more or less on

Christmas gifts this year?


/ More


/ About the same /Less


/ I haven't started thinking about Christmas.


Poll Results
(11-14-08)
Looking at your
Personal budget, are you:
A. Better off financially than you were a year ago. 22%
B. Worse off financially than you were a year ago. 41%
C. About the same financially as you were a year ago. 30%
D. Treading water. 7%


This poll is not scientific and reflects the opinions of only those Internet users who have chosen to participate.
The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of Internet users in general,
nor the public as a whole. www.suwanneedemocrat.com,


PAGE 6A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008












FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 7A


James Henry
Summerall Sr.
April 14, 1925 -
November 18, 2008

ames Henry
Summerall, Sr.,
83, of McAlpin,
FL passed away
Tuesday, November 18,
2008 at the Malcom
Randall V.A. Medical
Center, Gainesville, FL.
The Fort Myers, FL native
moved to McAlpin, FL
Eleven years ago from
LaBelle, FL. Mr.
Summerall was a U.S.
Navy Veteran of WWII and
a member of the Live Oak
Church of God.
He is survived by his
wife: Wilma Summerall,
McAlpin, FL; two
daughters: Debora Soto,
Stedman, NC and Phyllis
Huff, Farmersburg, IN;
three sons: Jackson P.
Summerall, Myrtle Beach,
SC, Robert V. Summerall,
Ozark, AR and James H.
Summerall, Jr., Live Oak,
FL; one step-son: William
O. Whaley, Waycross, GA;
thirteen grandchildren and
numerous great-
grandchildren.
Funeral services will be
held 2:00 PM Friday,
November 21, 2008 at the
Daniels Memorial Chapel,
Live Oak, FL with Rev.
Fred Watson and Rev.
avid Jones officiating.
Interment will follow in
the Live Oak Cemetery.
Daniels Funeral Homes
and Crematory of Live
Oak, FL is in charge of all
arrangements.

Please sign the
online guestbook. Go'to
www.suwanneedemocrat.com
and click on obituaries


Dean Collins
Febriuay 26, 1912-
November 12, 2008

ean Collins, 96,
Live Oak, FL
passed away,
Wednesday, November 12,
2008 after a short illness.
The Lake City, SC native
moved to Live Oak from
Lake City, SC in 1931. Mr.
Collins is survived by one
daughter: Deanette L.
Kuhn, Live Oak, FL; one
son: Tommye Collins, Live
pak, FL; four
grandchildren and one


great grandchild. Services
will be held 10:00 a.m.
Saturday, November 15,
2008 at Mt. Zion Christian
Church with Rev. Robert
Bass and Mr. Adam Collins
Officiating. Interment will
follow in Macedonia
Cemetery. Daniels Funeral
Homes & Crematory, Inc.
of Live Oak is in charge of
all arrangements.

Please sign the
online guestbook. Go to
iIww.su: Wanneedenocrat. coin
and click on obituaries


.1


Everette C. Howze
February 1, 1911-
November 11, 2008

verette C. Howze,
97, O'Brien, FL
passed away
Tuesday, November 11,
2008 after a long illness,
The Cotton, GA native
moved to O'Brien in 1991
from Hampton, VA. Mr.
Howze was a WW II &
Korean Conflict Veteran
while serving in the army.
He attended Fox Hill
Baptist Church in
Hampton, VA and Pleasant
Hill Baptist Church in
McAlpin, FL. Mr. Howze
is survived by his wife
Ethel Howze, O'Brien, FL;
three daughters: Suzanne
Howze, Boulder,'CO',
Helen Howze Darnell,
Williamsburg, VA, Sharon
Richardson, O'Brien, FL;
three sons: Glenn Bair,
Belle Glade, FL, Wayne
Bair, O'Brien, FL, Ralph
Bair, West Palm Beach,
FL; seventeen
grandchildren: thirty great
grandchildren and three
great-great grandchildren.
Services were held 3:00
p.m. Friday, November 14,
2008 at Pleasant Hill
Baptist Church with Rev.
Bob Richardson and Rev.


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Ronald Richardson
Officiating. Interment will
follow in Park Lawn
Cemetery in Hampton, VA.
Daniels Funeral Homes &
Crematory, Inc. of Live
Oak is in charge of all
arrangements.

Please sign the
online guestbook. Go to
WI' li: Sto waleedeinocrit. coin
and click on obituaries


Donna Lemon
July 20, 1959 -
November 12, 2008

/ onna Lemon, 49,
Jacksonville, FL
Passed away
Wednesday, November 12,
2008. Daniels Funeral
Homes & Crematory, Inc.
1126 Ohio Ave. N, Live
Oak, FL.

Please sign the
online gtestbook. Go to
www:. siwlanneedeinocrat.coin
and click on obituaries


Jacob Anthony
Wilkerson
November 13, 2008-
November 13, 2008

y acob Anthony
Wilkerson, infant,
of Lake City, FL
passed away
Thursday, November 13,
2008 at St. Vincent's
Hospital in Jacksonville,
Florida.
Graveside services were
held in Hopeful Baptist
Church Cemetery, Friday,
Nov. 21, 2008 at 10:00 am.
Harris Funeral Home &
Cremations, Inc. of Live
Oak (386-364-5115) was
in charge of all
arrangements.
Please sign the'
online guestbook. Go to
www.suIwlanneedemnocrat.coin
and click on obituaries


Suwannee

Bulldogs

Season

in review

Page 1B


The Florida Department of Health
(DOH) recently made the 2007 food/wa-
terborne illness statistics available, prov-
ing that the number of food and water
borne illnesses continues to decline in
Florida. The DOH reports that in 2007
there were 119 food/waterborne illness
outbreaks, which is a decrease from 148
in 2006 and a sharp decrease from 433
outbreaks in 1997. This 72 percent de-
crease in the number of food/waterborne
illnesses throughout 10 years is a direct
result of more aggressive food safety reg-
ulations in Florida.
Restaurants typically account for 75
percent of the total number of food/water-
borne illness outbreaks in Florida, and
were the primary culprit for the high
foodborne illness outbreaks prior to 2000
when the state enacted a proactive mea-
sure that required Florida restaurants to
train all employees who touch, handle or
come into contact with food. Since the
initiation of this requirement, the restau-
rant-specific and overall food/waterborne
illness numbers have decreased substan-
tially.
"I think the correlation between the
huge decrease in the number of foodborne
illness outbreaks and the mandatory train-
ing of all food handlers explains why
we're seeing a continual decline in food-
borne illness outbreaks," says Rick Wal-
lace, CEO of TrainSafe, a state-approved
food safety provider in Florida. "Train-
Safe is being offered to Florida's restau-
rants because we understand that we have
something important to teach that will re-
ally affect businesses, the industry and
consumers, and we believe that this train-


Continued From Page 5A

interactive sets of their
own songs and select cov-
ers of influential bands.
Southern Rukus is often
compared to artists such
as Trace Adkins, Toby
Keith, Travis Tritt and Di-
amond Rio.
If you're looking for
some good, clean fun Fri-
day and Saturday,. Nov.
28-29, get yourself on out
to the SOSMP to enjoy
Old Tyme Farm Days.
Hear the Wilson Family
play Friday night in the
Music Hall and on the
OTFD stage Saturday at
the festival along with
other great musical


!.fety laws work

ing should be as inexpensive as possible
and as entertaining as it is informative."
Florida is the only state that has enact-
ed a requirement for restaurant employees
to become trained in food safety. Some
organizations continue to claim that Flori-
da has the highest number of reported
foodborne illness outbreaks in the coun-
try, but state officials say that this claim is
not accurate because unlike other states,
Florida reports both suspected and con-
firmed outbreaks. In addition, Florida is
one of the only states that has a uniform ,
state-wide inspection and reporting mech-
anism. Most states divide the responsibili-
ty of restaurant regulation to various local
jurisdictions, which makes aggregate
state-wide data impossible to interpret.
Restaurants who do not have a propri-
etary state-approved food safety program
must provide proof to a state restaurant
inspector that all food-handlers are trained
and that the training is current. Employees
must be re-certified every three years.
Restaurants that are found to be in viola-
tion of the food safety training law, will
receive a critical violation and may have
to attend a Hospitality Education Program
certification.
TrainSafe is a state-approved food
safety training provider in Florida. Train-
Safe encourages restaurants to train safer,
train greener and train cheaper. TrainSafe
offers restaurants the option of download-
ing and copying the training manual for
free and re-use whenever training is need-
ed. To learn more about TrainSafe, down-
load the food safety manual or access
food safety news and information, go to
www.TRAINSAFEONLINE.com.


groups. Enjoy Southern
Rukus Saturday night in
the Music Hall. :
Plan now to spend the
weekend at the SOSMP,
enjoy Thanksgiving dinner
($5 and you bring a cov-
ered dish, you don't have
to wash dishes either!),
Old Tyme Farm Days and
Engine Show Nov. 28-29
($10 per carload per day),
the Wilson Family Band
and Southern Rukus,
along with Suwannee
Lights (more than 2 miles
of Christmas light dis-
plays) opening Nov. 29.
Shows in the Music
'Hall begin at 7 p.m. and
continue until. Friday
night admission to the


Music Hall is free; Satur-
day night Nov. 29 it will
be $10. The SOS Caf6 and
Restaurant will have deli-
cious food and beverages
available from their menu
at regular prices both
nights.
Contact the SOSMP at
386-364-1683 or go to our
website at www.musi-
cliveshere.com to learn
more about OTFD and
other upcoming events at
the SOSMP and to make
reservations for your RV,
camper, primitive camping
or rent one of our cabins.
It's the holidays, and we
can't wait to see you!
Come to see us, we'll be
looking.for ya'll!


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Florida foodborne illness

outbreaks continue to decline


Wilson Family and Southern Rukus

to play during Thanksgiving weekend

at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park


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,FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 7A


"I --r r


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Boyette elected as area II state vice president of Florida FFA


Aanrenne Boyeue


If you ask Adrienne Boyette about her
experience during the 80th Florida FFA
Convention, she will simply smile and say,
"I had the convention of a lifetime. I could
not have asked for anything more. Friday,
June 13, 2008 will go down in my history
as a day that changed my life forever."
Saying she had the convention of a life-
time is not an understatement either. Her
reference to Friday, June 13, is simply the
date she was elected and installed as the
Area II State Vice President of the Florida
FFA Association.


FF1
On Oct. 23, Drew Land, grammed, co
competed at the FFA Na- weeds among
tional Convention in Indi- peanut crop,
anapolis, Indiana in the apply herbici
Agriscience Fair. He is to help the
placed in the top five in new technolc
the nation, and won a gold be efficient,
medal for his project enti- and more ber
tied "Autonomous Rid-A- environment.
Weed Agbot." Drew quali
Drew's project was in pete at the na
the Engineering category after winning
and demonstrated how a his division a
small-scale robot he de- level in June,
signed, built and pro- grade.


The summer after her 9th grade year,
Adrienne attended her first state conven-
tion. It was then that a dream was born and
a goal was set. Since then, she has worked
relentlessly towards her goal of becoming
a Florida FFA State Officer.
However, this prestigious title was not
won over night. Boyette's FFA career start-
ed off right when at that same convention,
she won her first state title in the agri-
science fair. From there she attended the
National Convention also winning a 1st
place National Title. Throughout the re-
mainder of her high school career, she con-
tinued competing winning numerous state
and national honors, all of which added to
her resume.
Finally, during her senior year, Boyette
attended State Officer Screenings held at
the Florida FFA Leadership Training Cen-
ter in Haines City, Florida April 8-9. After
a series of rigorous interviews and testing,
Boyette was thrilled to be named one of the
Area II State Vice Presidential Candidates.
The 80th Florida FFA Convention was
held June 9-13 at the Caribe Royale Resort
in Orlando with over 3000 people in atten-
dance. Upon arrival, she began preparing
for the week ahead which included a 2
minute speech, a question and answer ses-
sion in front of a delegate body and then of
course, voting day. However, the election
was not the only thing Boyette was hoping
to win. Some of her convention highlights
include winning the Agricultural Sales
Proficiency and being a finalist in the Fruit
and Vegetable Production Proficiency be-
cause of her involvement with the pecan


industry.
Out of 200 applicants, she received one
of the five most prestigious awards the
FFA can bestow on its members. She was
named the Florida FFA State Star in Agri-
science. Although she was quite pleased
with the turn out, the real prize was still
undecided.
"Thursday was the most nerve racking
day. You get up and know that your peers
are about to decide what your future holds.
You go to bed knowing that your fate has
been decided, and then, you have to wait.
You have to wait for an eternity. Your
whole future changes in a matter of a few
minutes," Boyette said. "Sitting there cry-
ing, all I remember is the announcer say-
ing, 'Your 2008-2009 Area II State Vice
President, from the Suwa...' there was so
many people cheering. I didn't even hear
my name. I had just watched my dream
turn into a reality. The greatest feeling in
the world is knowing that your peers put
their trust and faith in you to serve them.
Knowing that they chose you as their rep-
resentative is an amazing feeling and 1 am
determined to do my best and make my
home chapter and area proud. I want to
make a difference, and although I realize I
can't do that overnight, I am committed to
giving it my all this year."
Boyette will spend the year traveling the
state promoting agriculture and agricultur-
al education in businesses and schools. She
and her teammates have already presented
two leadership conferences and are cur-
rently preparing for two other conferences.
The COLT (Chapter Officer Leadership


A national gold medal winner


uld locate
g rows of a
and directly
de. His idea
farmer with
>gy that will
cost effective
leficial to the

ified to com-
itional level
g 1st place in
it the state
while in 8th


St. Luke's Busy Hands for Babies
St. Luke's Busy Hands for Babies will hold a
yard sale on Saturday. Nov. 22, from 7 a.m. until
2 p.m., at St. Luke's Episcopal Church, located at
1391 SW Eleventh St., in Live Oak, across from
the Garden Club. The sale will be inside and there
will be clothing, books and lots more. Come and
see our new handmade gift table for Christmas
presents.


Drew Land, SHS Jr. Chapter President, with Anne Etcher,
his Middle School FFA advisor. Photo: Submitted


In order to allow our employees time off to spend with their families
'the following deadlines will be in effect:
Midweek Edition. Nov. 26
North Florida Focus Retail Advertising 3 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 20
Classified Line Ads 4 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 20
Legal Advertising 4 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 20
Retail Advertising (B Section) 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 20
Retail Advertising (A section) 2 p.m., Friday, Nov. 21
Weekend Edition. Nov. 28
Retail Advertising (B Section) 4 p.m. Monday, Nov. 24
Retail Advertising (A section) 11 a.m., Tuesday, Nov.25
Classified & Legal Line Ads 12 p.m. (Noon), Tuesday, Nov. 25
Have a safe and happy holiday



uuNumbn r ernmocrat
211 Howard St. East PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1734 Fax 386-364-5578 487579F


S. ,



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965 W. Howard St., Live Oak, FL
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Next to Gwyn's Gifts
1035 Howard St. W., Live Oak, FL 32064

386-330-67 7


Drew Land with his agriscience project and agbot.
-Photo: Submitted

SHS NJROTC to offer

spaghetti dinner
Suwannee High School NJROTC Booster Club-
will offer a spaghetti dinner from 3-7 p.m., Friday,
Nov. 21 at First Advent Christian Church, 699
Pinewood Dr., Live Oak. Menu: spaghetti, garlic
bread, salad, dessert and a drink. Only $6. Eat in
or take out. Info/tickets: Kathy Aukerman, 386-
364-2712 or 386-658-3915.


* *







If you're searcd*i for that perfect set of wheels,
look no further than www.nflaonline.com


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


PAGE 8A


"1---~11~


Training) Conference had an outstanding
turnout and was attended by over 1200 in-
dividuals. Boyette also traveled to Indi-
anapolis, Indiana to the 81st National FFA
Convention as a member of the Florida
Delegation. In January, she will be going to
China to attend an International Leader-
ship Summit for State Officers.
Boyette is excited about the upcoming
year and she knows that she would not
have been able to accomplish her goals
without the help, thoughts and prayers of
many individuals. She would like to espe-
cially thank her parents Mike and Shari
Boyette, her family, friends, the Mount
Olive Baptist (Live Oak) and New Hope
Baptist (Jennings) Church families, Ms.
De Broughton, Mr. Travis Tuten, Mr. Tom
and Ms. Shirley Carte, Ms. Tammy Bog-
gus, Ms. Stacy Young, Mr. Keith Wynn,
Mr. Walter Boatright, Ms. Sarah Carte, Ms.
Anne Etcher, the Suwannee FFA Alumni,
and everyone else who served as an inspi-
ration.
Boyette will finish her year of service in
June of 2009 when she retires at the 81st
Florida FFA State Convention. Then she
will begin classes at the University of
Florida.
If you would like to request Adrienne for
an event or appearance, please contact her
at Adrienne.Boyette@flaffa.org or contact
the state office on their website at
www.flaffa.org.
The National FFA Organization impacts
the lives of students by developing their
potential for premier leadership, personal
growth and career success.
i


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Class of 1998 celebrates 10 year reunion


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Class of 1998 celebrated their 10 year reunion Oct. 18. Photo: Submitted
The Suwannee High
School Class of 1998 cele-
brated their 10 year re-
union on Oct. 18, 2008.
The reunion was held at
the Suwannee Coliseum
Exhibition building. Over
100 people were in atten-
dance. Music and enter-
tainment was provided by
D. J. Keith Hunter of
Chambo Media.
Trophies were awarded
to recognize certain class-
S.-, mates such as, fartherest
traveled (Darrin
Townsend), most kids
(Sara Musgrove Kelly),
newest newlywed (Tim
Ward), Newest parent (Jeff
Watson) and most hair lost
(Tony Pagliai).
-., There were also several
drawings held for various
Winner of the dance contest Rhett Clower. Photo: Submitted gift. cards. Rhett Clower
was the winner of the


Informative talk on how

yellowfin tuna use oil rigs


"Dance Contest" that high-
lighted the night.
A single candle burned
through the night to com-
memorate the classmates
who are no longer with us.
The classmates said good-
bye with a group hug
while the class song "My
heart will go on" was soft-
ly played.
The class of 1998 plans
to hold their next reunion
in 5 years.

Class president
Joey Bricker.
Photo: Submitted


Environmentalists, naturalists, biology
and other students, Mike Randall of the
U.S. Geological Survey group at the
University of Florida will present an in-
formative talk Nov. 22 beginning at 2
p.m. at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music
Park's Music Hall on How Yellowfin
Tuna Use Oil Rigs. And it's free!
Photos and other information will be
used in this interesting session for stu-
dents of nature of all ages who would
like to know about the relationship of
.these sea creatures and oil rigs in the


HIV/AIDS affects millions worldwide.
UNAIDS estimates that there are now
more than 33 million people worldwide
living with HIV, including 2.5 million
children. According to the Florida Depart-
ment of Health, there are over 100
HIV/AIDS cases in Suwannee County
alone. HIV is a preventable problem and
through increasing our knowledge we can
help decrease the number of new infec-
tions.
Since 1988, December 1st has been rec-
ognized as World AIDS Day. Being that
2008 marks the 20th anniversary of World
AIDS Day, this year's theme is "Stop
AIDS; Keep the Promise: Leadership:" It
calls on individuals and organizations to
come together to help raise awareness and


Gulf of Mexico. If you're a student and
need to write a report on an interesting
subject, you've found it. Bring your
camera, your recorder and enjoy this free
session by Mike Randall who has spent
thousands of hours studying marine biol-
ogy and the effects of man upon the
seas.
Other talks coming up are the Future
of the Florida Manatee: Mermaids in
Peril and Alligators. To learn more, go to
www.musicliveshere.com or call 386-
364-1683.


spread information about HIV/AIDS. The
goal is for all sectors of society, not just
the government, to take initiative. While
since 1988 there has been significant
progress in treatment and prevention,
there is still much to be done.
In recognition of this day, On Eagles
Wings, along with the Columbia and
Suwannee County Health Departments,
will be celebrating on Friday, November
21, at Millennium Park in Live Oak.
There will be free food and prize give-
aways. HIV testing will be offered with-
out a needle stick. The event goes from
10:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Get tested. Know
your status. For more information call the
Suwannee County Health Department at
386-362-2708.


Mr. and Mrs. Travis Stratton and Mr. and Mrs. Dale Buonell socialize during their 10 year
class reunion. Photo: Submitted


jAA JAX'S


xva alk





Coffee makers today can be so complicated!
Cousin Shelly is the world's worst at getting instructions mixed up. When ,;h Espresso
got married her husband bought her one of those fancy, electric coffee Il11niJ Drive Thru
It had all the latest gadgets on it. Salesman Jones carefully explained i' ,,
everything worked; how to plug it in, set the timer, go back to bed, .i
upon rising, the coffee is ready." A few weeks later Elly was back in ihrce rlrteao
store and Riley asked her how she liked the coffee maker. "Wonderful'
she replied, "However, there's one thing I don't understand. "
Why do I have to go to bed every time I want to make a pot of coffee: '
jA VA JAX
~-- -- -37700-F
Next to Publix
Great 1538 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak Now Open
-Lunches www.myjavajax.com Tl 9pm


ATTENTION
The Floridj Legislature created A Business Community (ABC)
SSchool Program to promote business partnerships in education.
: An ABC school is a public school that offers instruction to
,tudenti in kindergarten through third grade at a facility provided
b a local business The host business would d be responsible for
prodding the ppropre hte apprpes of spice tor the school. The '
School district would be responsible for prosding the instructional
S supports. ,ddmfniitration and sitff. teachers, te".tbooks, materials,
s- supplies. ajnd urriculumni for the school. Parents would be i4
reponsible ,lor pro% idiner rransportaiion to and from the school for
their children

~ n ABC schooll program at .i busine ,ss rkplace is an incentive
I:I'hor empl n \e~i Studies of iorksie -ch" 'ools sh.w that employees
S['.1ho hai.e studieni enrollled in the \.orksite school have increased
SpIodiiC. I, i. decreased absenteeillm and turn over rate. If
yuur business is interested in ubmitting a proposal for this
program or to find out about further partnership opportunities,
contact Bill Brothers, District ABC Program Liaison, at 364-2755.

I91811-k


On Sunday,
NovcmKbr 23rd from nnocn-Ipm
bring i n rriY ..i nal n r..-.n-p ri>hibl. t.'iod
do'n mjn i berct'r \rr,,r i= ic .ci J
H-, r-,c. to .a p rti Fipatring. SS _IBA ,\A'Y '
Rc..ltaura. rt Iocal.t'In aid get
FREE regular 6" sub.


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World AIDS Day celebrated

at Millennium Park today


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N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 9A


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


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Branford


may hire a


code officer

To enforce local ordinances,

once they've been revised

By Barbara Gill
BRANFORD The need for a code enforce-
ment officer was discussed at the regular meeting
of the Branford Town Council on Nov. 11.
Town Attorney Kevin Daly recommended a
rewrite of several outdated ordinances: yard sale
permits, the noise ordinance and the dog control
law. The council instructed Daly to recommend
updates to these ordinances. A designated code
enforcement officer is needed because violations
of an ordinance are not criminal offenses, say
town officials, and cannot be enforced by law en-
forcement officers.
In other business, the council approved the
minutes, the financial reports and accounts
payable.
Check your water meters! Charles Hurst re-
quested an adjustment on his mother-in-law's wa-
ter bill, which was for 67,000 gallons. Addie
Hunt had several visits from the town's mainte-
nance workers to investigate the erratic levels of
water usage. No leaks or other reasons for the ex-
tremely high usage were found. A new meter has
been installed and everything now appears be
working properly. The town approved an adjust-
ment reflecting her average monthly bill. It is
town policy for a meter reader to notify a resident
promptly when a reading is unusually high.;
Diane Walker Saunders of the Miss Suwannee
River Valley Pageant requested and.received
$1,000 to assist with upcoming pageants.
The council continued discussion regarding the
possible exchange of properties with James Kent,
who owns property adjacent to Hatch Park on the
west side. Kent said he might be interested in
trading his property for the Presbyterian House
on Haines.
Town Hall will close at noon on Nov. 26 and
remain closed on Thursday and Friday in honor
of the Thanksgiving holiday.
The Dec. 9 regular.monthly meeting of the
town council will begin at 6 p.m. with a potluck
dinner. The council meeting will begin at 7 p.m.
The public is invited and encouraged to attend
and participate in all meetings.


Pageant queens addressed the Branford Town Council Nov.
11 concerning the uses to which funds donated to
pageants are put. The council gave $1,000 to the Miss
Suwannee River Valley Pageant to assist with upcoming
pageants. Front row: Tanya Dicks, Miss Suwannee River
Valley Outstanding Teen; second row: Megan O'Kelley,
Miss Suwannee River Valley. Photo: Barbara Gill

After 16 years, 'Mac' McGauley

retires from county commission
By Jo Ross
JASPER Hamilton County elected officials and
department heads took a few minutes from their Election
Day activities on Nov. 4 for a luncheon at the Courthouse
Annex in honor of retiring District 5 County
Commissioner Leon McGauley.
McGauley "Mac" was joined by his wife, Gloria,
son Doug, daughter Karen and friends.
During Sunday's renaming ceremony at the Virginia B.
Chandler Library, Library Director Danny Hales gave
special recognition to McGauley's accomplishments in,
helping to secure funding for our current library.
Hamilton County thanks him for his 16 years of faithful
service and wishes him well in his future endeavors.


T-Bird


BY BARBARA GILL
barbara.gill@gaflnews.com
MAYO Local Ford fan Mike
Koon fell in love at the tender age
of 10 when he first saw a Thun-
derbird. That love affair is going
strong today. In fact, it's hotter
than ever.
Mike now owns four Thunder-
birds: 1955, 1978, 1980 and 2002
models.
Last month, his restored 1955 T-
Bird took first place in its division


ove affair runs hot


at the Florida Forestry Festival in
Perry. Mike purchased this two-
seater in the 90s from the pastor
of the local Methodist Church. In
1996 the car was completely dis-
sembled and rebuilt from top to
bottom by a hobbyist from Perry.
Mike's restoration includes a
292 Y-block with a four-barrel
carburetor. It also has the rare op-
tion of a stick overdrive. Only 300
of these rolled out of the factory.
The first Thunderbird went on
sale in October of 1954 and 3,500


Mike Koon's classic '55 is a beauty. Photo: Barbara Gill


NI M




Charting a course to
help Hamilton County
High students succeed

By Jo Ross
JASPER Hamilton County High School
Administrators in conjunction with the Hamilton County
School Board and Southern Regional Education Board,
are looking for solutions to the problems that face middle
and high school students in Hamilton County.
For the 2006-07 school year HCHS produced a 67.7
percent high school graduation rate in other words, a
32.3 percent drop out rate.
"This statistic is just not acceptable," Principal Maceo
Howell said at a meeting of concerned parties at HCHS
recently. "We have got to work together to find sonie
method to encourage all students to succeed." Howell, a
30-year education veteran, replaced former principal
Gene Starr at the beginning of the 2008-09 school term.
Assistant Principal Wanda Law also began the current
school year at HCHS with high hopes for a turn-around
of the conceptual ideas currently possessed by our
students.
Realizing the need for change, the current
administrative staff, along with members of the Florida
Department of Education, Southern Regional Education
Board (SREB), FLaRE, Madison County High School
staff, High Schools that Work (HSTW), parents,
community members and the students have all'engaged
in an in-depth evaluation of many of the practices and
procedures currently being utilized at HCHS.
The Technical Assistance Visit Team (TAV) discussed
perceived problem areas, current measures to address
problem areas, teaching techniques, and teacher, student
and parental perceptions of the school as a whole. Ideas
were then formulated for improvement.
While numerous positive aspects were observed and


orders were briskly taken in the
first 10 days. More than 16,000
sold that first year. Sticker price
was about $3,500 and it was de-
scribed as "a personal luxury car."
It was not meant to be a sports
car.
The first Thunderbird Mike pur-
chased was a 1980 model. That
was the year he graduated from
Lafayette High School. He saved
money from working in tobacco
to buy his first dream car.
Enjoy the ride, Mike.


noted by the team, there is always room for
improvement. Hamilton County High School's "D"
grade, give by the state of Florida, is proof of that.
By looking at what is now being done, what state
standards require, what other high schools having better
success are doing, and what we lack, a highly effective
improvement plan can be generated and implemented to
ensure our children have the best possibilities available
for success, say officials.
The final report is due be delivered to the school in the
near future. In his preliminary report given on Nov. 12,
Robert "Bob" Moore, of HSTW, enumerated five
recommendations that the team believes would make
substantial impact on improvement:
(1) Set clear expectations of students each class
having a clearly defined expectation for course work,
work ethics and the ability for a student to re-do work
they may have problems with. All classes and teachers
should be cohesive allowing for a better transition from
class to class and grade level to grade level.
(2) Engage all students in rigorous, relevant, engaging
and meaningful learning. Course descriptions that are
clearly indicative of expectations should be developed
and published immediately.
(3) Develop a supportive culture of continuous
improvement. School leadership and teachers should be
actively involved in School Improvement Planning (SIP).
(4) Teach a solid academic core. Implementation of a
common planning time for instructional departments
would allow teachers to become more cohesive in
transition from one subject to another. This would allow
students to follow a "learning thought" throughout the
day in between subjects.
(5) Set clear, functional, believable "Goals" and
develop a "Mission Statement." Emphasizing the
imperative need to increase the student retention rate for
9th grader retention, would enable our high school
students to set,attainable goals for graduation.
To assist HCHS in reaching and maintaining these
objectives, a coach has been assigned to the high school
to be on hand to answer any question staff may have
regarding the fluid implementation and interactions of
these goals.
'The best advice I can give is, build a culture in which
students want to work hard and succeed," Moore told
HCHS representatives.


..o ... I




Educators, Department of Education staff members, HCHS administration, representatives from the Southern Regional
Education Board and representatives of High Schools That Work, came together to seek resolutions to problems facing
Hamilton County High School recently.- Photo: Jo Ross


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


PAGE 10A


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK











FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE hA


WOOLEY FIRED


Continued From Page I A

constituents.
"In speaking with a
number of business com-
munity leaders and com-
munity leaders through-
out District 5, there
was...a sincere concern in
the direction this county
is going, both with board
of county commissioners
and with our county co-
ordinator," Wainwright
said.
Udell pressed Wain-
wright for specifics.
"Mr. Wainwright,
you're very generic in
what the persons who
make statements who
want to get rid of Mr.
Wooley, I heard no
specifics, none whatsoev-
er," Udell said. "I would
challenge anybody in
Suwannee County that
can make a statement, an

Husband, wife
arrested on
gun charges
Continued From Page 1A

shooting into an occupied
dwelling.
According to Suwannee
County sheriffs reports,
Lyle David Wilson, 51, of
8425 Gold Kist Blvd., and
Teresa Ann Wilson, 45,
same address, were arrest-
ed and booked into the
county jail. Teresa Wilson
was additionally charged
with providing false infor-
mation to a law enforce-
ment officer.
According to sheriffs
reports, officers were dis-
patched at around 11:40
p.m. in reference to gun-
shots coming from inside
the Wilsons' residence.
Teresa Wilson told au-
thorities that she and her
husband, Lyle Wilson, got
into an argument, at which
point a third person inside
the residence fired several
shots at her.
Lyle Wilson told offig
cers that there was no
third person in the resi-
dence and that he had
fired the gun to scare his
wife but did not intend to
harm her.
After being confronted
by officers, Teresa Wilson
reportedly admitted she
had lied so as not to get
her husband into trouble.
Reports indicate she also
said that when Lyle Wil-
son put the gun down, she
picked it up and fired it at
him to scare him, though
she did not intend to harm
him.
Officers said that bullet
holes in the home were
found to support the
claims of both Wilsons.
Bond was set at $8,500
for Lyle Wilson. No bond
was assigned to Teresa
Wilson.
Both remained in cus-
tody as of Thursday morn-
ing.







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accurate statement, that
Johnny Wooley has
harmed this county. It has
not happened."
Wainwright said there
were residents who would
speak against Wooley, but
he would not share names
without their consent.
"I'm not going to just
blurt their names out, but
rest assured, and I know
that's not going to satisfy
your questions, the indi-
viduals that I'm speaking
of probably have shared
this with Mr. Hatch and
Mr. Hatch is not here to
respond and tell you that
Mr. Wooley wasn't doing
a satisfactory job," said
Wainwright.
"I haven't heard one
person say to me about


terminating Mr. Wooley,
not a person, no sir,"
Udell said. "It leads me to
ask a question. How
much debt is there that
you owe in a campaign,
who do you owe in a
campaign, who have you
made promises to about
things you would do?"
Wainwright said it was
his constituents who
wanted Wooley fired.
"I didn't solicit from
those individuals in the
south end of the county,
that Mr. Wooley is the
one that I hold account-
able, he was brought up
by those individuals, and
like I said, I'm carrying
this forward," Wainwright
said.
Udell pressed on.


Murder weapon found


Continued From Page 1A

nearby business where a
folding pocketknife was
found. The knife, which
has a four-inch blade, was
sent to a forensics lab for
testing, Shaw said.
According to police re-
ports, Jones and Jelks had
an altercation inside the
club while dancing. The
two reportedly bumped
into each other a number
times, after which a fight
broke out between them
and both were asked to
leave.
Jones reportedly con-
fronted Jelks as she was
getting into a vehicle in the
parking lot shortly before 4
a.m. Saturday.


A fight ensued involving
Jones, Jelks and Coulter,
the vehicle's driver.
Jones suffered seven
stab wounds and died at
Shands Live Oak, accord-
ing to Shaw.
There was no apparent
motive for the crime, ac-
cording to Shaw.
"It just got out of hand,"
said Shaw. "It was just a
case of same two people
kept bumping into one an-
other. I'm sure by looking
there was too many people
inside (the club) to begin
with."
"It's a senseless act,"
said Shaw. "You've got two
young people who are go-
ing to be affected by this
for the rest of their lives."


Continued From Page 1A

revenues from District 5,
which he then represented,
to help fund the ramp,
which is in District 4. Dis-
trict 4 is represented by
Commissioner Billy
Maxwell.
Hatch made the propos-
al Tuesday night in a letter
that was read by Commis-
sioner Douglas Udell. The
letter, which Hatch called
his "last official act as
county commissioner," re-
quested that $150,000
from District 5 be used "to
construct the access road
into Lake Louise with the
expectation that fifth dis-
trict residents will enjoy
the exceptional recreation
opportunity created by
this act."
Newly elected District
5 commissioner Wesley


Wainwright, who was
sworn in just prior to the
meeting, rejected the
plan.
"I found two people in
District 5 that would be
approving of a boat ramp
at Lake Louise," said
Wainwright. "The vast
majority of individuals
that I spoke with would
rather have their roads
fixed. So with all due re-
spect to Mr. Hatch, our
constituents have spoken,
and I am not in agreement
to allow this money be
spent this way."
Udell said all districts
should pitch in and con-
struct the road.
"I don't think he
(Maxwell) should have to
build that road by himself
in his district, just because
the lake happens to be in
his district," Udell said.


Jesse Caruthers was elected chairman and Wesley Wainwright
vice-chairman of the board of county commissioners for the
coming year at Tuesday night's meeting.


"Mr. Wainwright, tell
the truth now, you're a
good man, now you know
and I know that (county
Tax Collector) George
Burnham wants you to
get this man fired," he
said.
"He hasn't come up and
told me, Mr. Udell,"
Wainwright countered.
Burnham, who was pre-
sent at the meeting, ini-
tially declined to com-
ment when contacted by
the Democrat Wednesday,
but said finally that he
"never really fully under-
stood where the man
(Udell) was coming from
last night."
Caruthers kept his
thoughts to himself Tues-
day night, but offered this
by phone Wednesday:
"We'll pick up and
move on. I received no
great pleasure from this at
all, it was a unique situa-
tion and we (the board)
will try to achieve the
goals the public would
like us to achieve."
Commissioner Ivie
Fowler had little to say
about the situation.
"I just have a bad work-
ing relationship with
(Wooley)," said Fowler.
Fowler seconded a mo-
tion by Caruthers to fire
Wooley at a county com-
mission meeting in 2006.
Maxwell said he saw no
reason to fire Wooley,


since, he said, Wainwright
gave no reason to do so.
"If I vote to fire some-
body, I want to know why
I'm firing them," Maxwell
said.
Public reaction was
mixed.
County resident
Michael Wooley (no rela-
tion to Johnny) worked
with Wainwright on his
campaign.
"I worked with (Wain-
wright) many a days, and
the conversation of firing
Mr. Wooley never came
up," Michael Wooley told
commissioners Tuesday.
Local resident Jim
Ward said he was not
Pleased with Wainwright's
proposal to fire Wooley.
"The people spoke, .
you're our county com-
missioner," he said. "I'll
support you as much as I
can, but I'm telling you
right straight off as far as
I'm concerned you started
off on the wrong foot."
Ward lives in Wain-
wright's district.
Johnny Wooley said he
understands the need for
change, but wished the
board had handled things
differently.
"Certainly there's no
hard feelings with me
with any board member
up there," Wooley said
Tuesday. "This is politics
tonight, this has no reflec-
tion, in my opinion, on


what type of job I've done
in the last five, six years
I've been here. It's called
politics, and I understand
that. My only disappoint-
ment would be the way it
was probably handled
tonight as an emergency
agenda item. Had ya'll
come to me and said,
'Listen, we got three votes
and we want to change,
ain't got nothing to do
with the type of job
you've done, we just need
to change,' ya'll wouldn't
have had to went through
this charade tonight.
"I would have given
you a resignation, I would
have walked on down to
the house and looked for
another job, that's just the
type person I am," Woo-
ley continued, holding
back tears. "As I told ya'll
when I got hired, I under-
stand politics, and politics
is about change, and we
had to change, and I'm
leaving because of that
change, I don't have a
problem with that."
Wooley served as coun-
ty coordinator since May
2000. He was also direc-
tor of emergency manage-
ment.
Assistant County Coor-
dinator Donald Robinson
will take over duties as
both coordinator and
emergency management
director until a replace-
ment is hired.


Park, cultural center on hold


Continued From Page 1A

dens included restoration
of the Crapps home, which
will be developed into a
cultural center for wed-
dings, receptions and other
gatherings. The home will
also house an art gallery.
In addition, the park will
include a children's play-
ground, a neighborhood
park, a youth community
center, amphitheaters, pic-


nic facilities, tennis courts,
ball fields, nature trails and
a jogging course.
The council voted on
Nov. 13 to have Synergy
Solutions for Florida, the
firm assisting the city in
gaining the funds, to reap-
ply for the grant next year.
"Remember, this is very
competitive throughout the
state and we feel very con-
fident we will be able to
come up with those extra


points this next year," said
John Canada, Synergy So-
lutions CFO.
Canada said the city was
just five points away from
receiving the grant this
year.
If the grant is awarded,
the city will turn the 102-
acre tract over to Suwan-
nee Parks and Recreation
to be developed and oper-
ated. The county will seek
grants to develop the park.


24th Annual LIVEO


Christmas


) on the Square


Presented by V C



The Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce

Festival on

Saturday, December 6, 2008,

8 am 4pm

ENTERTAINMENT AL:L BAY
ANBERAFTEB ARTS & CRAFTS 8AM 2PM
EAR & TRUE SiBW 8AM 2PM
FOGB & BRINKS AVAlhABBE 8AM 4~PM
SANTAlANB IN MILbENNIUM PARK
NIGMtT TIME EHRISTMAS PARADE 5PM

cDwntcwn Live Cak aroundd the courthouse)
DIRECTIONS: Live Oak is located near the intersection of 1-10 and
1-75, two exits West on 1-10. From 1-10 (Exit 283 old Exit #40),
follow US 129 three miles South into downtown Live Oak. From 1-75
(Exit 451), follow US 129 ten miles South into downtown Live Oak.


www.suwanneechamber.com
Email:
S[ruw: nncc~'i ,i r .'' l, lltll .. h it.


Early Childhood Ed
Start a career in Child Care
EMT/Paramedic
Emergency Medical Services

Classes Begin lan. 7
WWW.NFCC.EDU


For further inlorniidlon please c ll.
SThe Suwannee County
Chamber o/J
Commerce



(386)362-3071
Fax (386) 362-4758


489086-F


South county taxes won't fund

Lake Louise boat ramp project


a &


*m D 0 0


ib *




Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers


.dk*0


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 11A


_ til


AO-











PAGE 12A U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


j :.;'



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Gardening .tools. Photo: Submitted

GARDENING TIPS FROM THE LIVE OAK GARDEN CLUB


Time to put away your gardening


tools


By Lucille Bobiney Heinrich
North Florida gardeners don't
have a very long break between
winter and spring, but now is the
time to get your gardening tools in
order; determine what tools you
will need for spring; and properly
clean and store your tools for the
winter.
Getting Your Tools in Order: As-
semble all of your gardening tools
to determine if your tools are all in
good working order or if some need
to be replaced. While this may be
an easy job for many, for those who
subscribe to the "Stop & Drop
School of Gardening" this may a
formidable task. These are the gar-
deners who after a backbreaking,
sweaty session in the garden have a
tendency to just leave that rake or a
trowel in the garden where they
stopped working. This group may
now have to do a little detective
work to,do in order to locate their
gardening equipment!
Determine What Tools You Need:
Basic gardening tools include rakes,
pruning shears, spades, hoes, shov-
els, wheel barrel/cart, gardening
gloves, and watering cans/hoses.
For the sake of your back and
shoulders, using the right tool can
be very important, but don't buy ex-
pensive tools until you know you
love gardening. Flea markets and
yard sales are good sources of inex-
pensive tools.
Cleaning Tools: Remove any
dried mud or debris from your tools
with a hose or a screwdriver. Never
put your tools away wet! Use a file
to smooth away any nicks on the
edges of your shovels and trowels.
Sharpen your cutting tools such as
clippers and shears with a fine file,
sharpening stone, or by cutting
through sandpaper. Remove any
rust with steel wool and coat metal
parts of your tools with a penetrat-
ing oil or petroleum jelly to protect
them from rust. Sand wooden han-
dles to remove rough spots and
condition the wood by wiping the
handles with an oily rag.
Tool Storage: Drain water from
your hoses, and hang them in a
garage or shed until spring. This


-- the right

procedure will dramatically in-
crease the life span of your hoses.
(Caution: Don't hang your hose
from a nail as this tends to produce
kinks which damage the walls of
the hose!) Long-handled tools such
as rakes, shovels, and loping shears
can be hung on a nail or peg rack.
Not only will they not be in the
way, but this will keep their edges
from dulling. Short-handled tools
such as trowels and shears can be


way
stored in containers or in the gar-
dening bag that travels with you as
you work in the garden. Avoid
leaving tools on the floor of your
garage or shed or in other places
that tend to get damp during the
winter months.
Remember keeping your garden-
ing equipment in good repair
means these tools will be ready to
help you come springtime when
you are ready to start in again!


..


Marshall Norris art exhibit currently on display in the NFCC Art Gallery. Photos: Submitted


NFCC hosts closing

reception for Marshall Norris

art exhibit Nov. 24


The North Florida Community College Art.
Department invites the public to a closing recep-
tion for the Marshall Norris art exhibit currently
on display in the NFCC Art Gallery. The recep-
tion will be Monday, Nov. 24 from 5-7 p.m. and
the featured artist will be available to greet
guests and answer questions about his works.
Norris, a local artist and owner of Artistic Things
by Marshall in Greenville, has several metal
sculptures and paintings on display at the NFCC
Art Gallery. The public is invited to attend the
closing reception Nov. 24 at NFCC and help sup-
port the local arts. For more information, contact
NFCC art instructor Lisa Barden at 850-973-
1642 or email bardenl@nfcc.edu.


Marshall Norris


'~. *~: s'.'


Park Street Band and Adam Sanders to


entertain
It's time to get your boogie shoes on
again...this weekend coming up at the
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park
will be a dancing good time, and if you
don't dance, you will certainly be tap-
ping your toes!
The weekend kicks off Friday night,
Nov. 21 with the talented singer Adam
Sanders who has made a name for
himself in country music circles in
North Florida. Adam, 20, has compet-
ed in many talent shows, including the
Colgate Country Showdown and has
done an exemplary job of showing that
he's truly a country singer. He comes
from a long line of country singers and
musicians, including his grandfather,
Billy Earl Sanders, a Nashville profes-
sional musician and his uncle, Scott
Sanders, who used to live in North
Florida also, who has been one of the
most in demand steel guitar players in
Nashville for years. Adam hasn't let
any grass grow under his feet his en-
tire life...he started singing when he
was less than three feet tall and has
played dozens of dates every year


at Spirit of the
since that time in other words, he's a
seasoned performer. Although he's
still a young man, Adam has already
written and recorded his own album,
"The Dream." Adam and his band look
forward to being in the Music Hall this
weekend for your dancing and listen-
ing enjoyment.
Then, it's Saturday night, Nov. 22
when the fabulous Park Street Band of
Jacksonville will be in the house!
WOW! Is this group good! They're
different, exciting and bring with them
a different style than you're used to
seeing on the Music Hall stage. Their
music ranges from Joe Crocker, Jimi
Hendrix, Lenny Kravitz, Johnny Cash,
Ted Nugent, Santana, Bob Marley and
Pat Benatar to Norah Jones and James
Brown.
Singing lead vocals is Myrna Stall-
worth, an outstanding singer, song-
writer, arranger and performer who
has been gifted with a fantastic alto
voice all rolled into a 6 ft. 2 inch
package; playing bass guitar is Ray
Lunn; veteran Marine John Parker Ur-


Suwannee Music Park!


ban plays a mean guitar for this di-
verse group and handles vocals; Steve
Luten, a native of Westside Jack-
sonville, has played acoustic and elec-
tric guitar, piano and keyboards since
high school days; and Duane Wash-
burn, who plays drum styles ranging
from Jazz, R&B, Classic Rock and
Modern and does vocals all make up
the Park Street Band. This is not a
band you will want to miss.
Don't forget those boogie shoes,
you'll need them!


Admission is free to the Music Hall
Friday night; Saturday night it's $10
per person. The SOS Caf6 and Restau-
rant will have your favorite beverages
and delicious food items from its var-
ied menu available at regular prices
both nights. Doors open at 6 p.m. both
nights; shows begin at 7 p.m.
For more information, call us at 386-
364-1683 or go to our website at
www.musicliveshere.com to learn
more about these events and others
coming up during the holiday season.


State Park to host Suwannee

Old Time Music Weekend
The Florida Department of Environmental Protection's Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park in White Springs is now accepting registration for the
Suwannee Old Time Music Weekend Friday-Sunday, Dec. 5-7. This three-day
event offers participants in-depth instruction in old time music techniques on the
banjo, guitar, fiddle and voice for beginning, intermediate and advanced students.
Ticket information and registration forms are available online. After Friday, Nov.
7, there is a $15 late registration fee. Info: Kelly Green, 386-397-4478, toll-free
877-635-3655 or www.FloridaStateParks.org/stephenfoster/Events.cfm.


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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


PAGE 12A


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GAMETIME

Review of recent

game releases
By Cody Webb
This fall has been great for garners
everywhere, with so many new and
already-established series making
their appearances. November, in par-
ticular, has had some really great ti-
tles. Most of them have already been
released and you may have missed
some of them. So let us go back and -f:'
explore some of the bigger titles that By Cody Webb
have come out.
First on the roster is Tom Clancy's EndWar. If "Tom
Clancy" sounds familiar, you've probably played the
Rainbow Six series or the Splinter Cell series. It's rated T
for Teen and available for the Xbox 360, PS3, PSP, and
the DS. EndWar's biggest "gimmick" is the "Speed of
Thought" controls, which is just a glorified name for the
voice-activated commands. I've had a chance to try out
the 360 version of the game, along with the voice con-
trols, and I've found that they respond and recognize
words superbly. I wouldn't try sneaking this game in the
middle of the night, or playing in a library, because you
have to be just a little bit loud for the mic to pick up your
voice. Other than that though, the gameplay flows better
than any other console-based RTS (Real-time Strategy)
game I've ever played. You can whip back and forth be-
tween troops and units with just one simple command. It
does tend to get a bit overwhelming in the bigger fights,
though. I definitely recommend this game for any strate-
gy-loving gamer.
Next is the sequel to ever-popular Gears of War. Rated
M for Mature and available only for the 360, I've heard
great things about this game. It takes the scope of the first
game and triples it, throwing you into a war instead of
just isolated events. The Locust will attack from any di-
rection with anything they can throw at you, and if you
don't learn to take cover you'll end up just a smear on a
wall. The controls stay intact and tight, with new
weapons and grenade types thrown into the mix. I cannot
wait to get my hands on this beauty and I hope you will
give it a chance.
Now we have a newbie title coming out: Mirror's Edge.
You may or may not have heard about this game, de-
pending on how much new titles interest you. It's rated T
for Teen and you can get it on the PS3 or the Xbox 360.
If anyone out there remembers the original Xbox title
Breakdown, this game will definitely seem familiar. You
become a runner, leaping across rooftops and outrunning
trains to get away from the police. This utopia isn't as big
of a paradise as it puts itself out to be, huh? The first-per-
son mechanics are superb, your arms pump into view as
you run faster, you can look down and see your lower
body. If you've got access to Xbox Live, you can down-
load a great demo for this game, so try it for yourself! The
only real downside to the game is you can frequently get
lost and I wouldn't play this if you have a weak stomach.
Finally we come to Left 4 Dead, Valve's first-person
zombie shooter. It's rated M for Mature for a really good
reason, and you can buy it for Windows PC and the 360.
If Valve rings a bell in your head but you can't quite place
it, they were the geniuses behind the Half-Life series,
Portal and Team Fortress. Left 4 Dead puts you in the
shoes of one of four confused survivors trying to escape
from zombie infested locales. There aren't many
cutscenes, and you don't get much story aside from what
you can decipher from writing left on safehouse walls.
Much like the movie Cloverfield, the survivors don't get
to learn much. What's truly amazing about this game is
the engine behind it all, codenamed "The Director". This
engine will decide when and how many zombies to throw
at you, when you find items and ammo, and where you
respawn if you die. So no two games will ever play the
same! Also to make the game more interesting, the Ver-
sus mode lets players play on the side of the Infected as
different special types. These fellows get to royally mess
with the hapless survivors, making life Hell and trying to
kill them all off. When one side wins, the players switch
sides so everyone gets a chance to play as everything.
There's also a demo available for this on Xbox Live,
which is worth a look.
Well, hopefully those will tide you folks over until
Christmas. Who knows what else we have to look for-
ward to next month? Oh, and remember Fallout 3? I've
got my hands on it and you can expect a review next time
in Gametime!














4th annual pre-Thanksgiving dinner a success


By Otha White Sr, Christian Mission in Action Youth Committee
chairperson
The Christian Mission In Action Ministries would like to thank
all partners and supporters for helping to make this year's Thanks-
giving dinner and fellowship on Nov. 8 a great success. The re-
sponse and turnout proved to be one of the best despite the loca-
tion change for this year.
Shepardess Leann Charlton opened the doors to Triumph The
Church & Kingdom of God to the community and the atmosphere
was one to be remembered. Pastor McLurkin's message "God has
brought us a mighty long way" was perfectly suited for the occa-
sion. Prayer by Ben Ivey and the attendance of Reverend Tommie
Jefferson, Pastor Craig Topping and Charles Blalock was'especial-
ly appreciated this year.
Special thanks also to Carla Blalock, Mary Taylor and volun-
teers from The Youth Advocacy Program. They added to the many
volunteers that came to serve. Thanks to all that support us all year
long, too many to list. Thanks to the Suwannee Democrat for news
coverage.
Thanksgiving basket sponsors: Triumph The Church & King-
dom of God of Live Oak, New National Grove Missionary Bap-
tist, Springfield Missionary Baptist, Hopewell Missionary Church,
Mt. Zion AME Church, Dr. Kevin Rolle, Vision SSeeds Inc., Sher-
iff Tony Cameron, Live Oak City Masonic Lodge #21, Christian
Mission In Action Members, Grace Jenkins, Hardees of Live Oak,
Triumph The Church & Kingdom of God of Belville, Grace Com-
munity Church of Live Oak, Clare Whitehead, Allen Chapel AME,
New Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist, Jeanette Davis, Suwannee High
School, Steve Ampula, Hazel Holland, Mr. and Mrs. Kiser, Edna
Harmon and Margaret Wooley. Thank you all!


Christian Mission In Action Ministries' annual Thanksgiving dinner
and fellowship drew numerous participants. Photo: Otha White Sr.


4
. ...'- *. .. '

Christian Mission In Action Ministries members and volunteers who served participants a Pre-Thanksgiving din-
ner are as follows: Front row from left, Barbara Baker, Frances Manker, Daysia Price Jones and Brittany Topping.
Back row from left, Stanley Woodson, Jeanette Davis, Pastor Craig Topping, Christian Mission In Action Ministries
President Audrey Howell, Elaine Darling and Ruby Royal. Photo: Vanessa Fultz


Christian Mission In Action Ministries members and volunteers serve participants at the annual Thanksgiving
dinner and fellowship on Nov. 8. Photo: Otha White Sr.


Medicare prescription drug plan open season


By Paul Barnes
Social Security Regional Commissioner, Atlanta, Ga.
Open season for enrollment in the Medicare Part D
prescription drug program is currently underway and
Medicare beneficiaries can enroll in a Medicare Part D
plan or change to another plan. Open season runs from
Nor. 15'to'Dec: 31.
The Medicare Part D prescription drug program is
available to all Medicare beneficiaries to help with the
costs of medications. Joining a Medicare prescription
drug plan is voluntary, and participants pay an additional
monthly premium for the coverage. While all Medicare
beneficiaries can participate in the prescription drug pro-
gram, some people with limited income-and resources
are also eligible for extra help to pay monthly premiums,
annual deductibles and prescription co-payments. In.
2008, the extra help is worth an average of $3,600; in


Social security offers

safeguards for all the

stages of your life
By Donna Maitland
Social Security District Manager, Gainesville
Each stage of life -- youth, middle age, retirement --
comes with its own set of financial concerns. Luckily,
just by having a better understanding of the Social Secu-
rity program you should be able to calm some of those
concerns.
The first thing you need to know is that Social Securi-
ty is much more than a retirement program. Of the 50
million Americans receiving Social Security benefits,
nearly one-third are not retired workers or their depen-
dents. They are severely disabled workers and their fami-
lies, or the survivors of a deceased worker covered by
Social Security. These non-retirement Social Security
benefits can be especially important to young workers
because about one in eight young people will die before
retirement, and about one in four will become disabled.
While the death of a husband, wife, or parent is emo-
tionally devastating, it can often be financially devastat-
ing as well. Social Security provides monthly survivors
benefit checks to help the family of a deceased worker
continue on.
Social Security disability protection is equally valu-
able. Relatively few workers have an employer-provided,
long-term disability policy. With Social Security, howev-
er, the average worker has the equivalent of a disability
insurance policy that would pay monthly benefits to both
the worker and his or her family, based on his or her life-
time earnings. So you can rest a little easier knowing that
Social Security provides some measure of security, if life
does not turn out as planned.
On the other hand, if you do work and retire as
planned, Social Security is the foundation for a secure
retirement. For the average wage earner, Social Security
will replace about 40 percent of pre-retirement earnings.
And you can earn a higher benefit by choosing to retire a
little later instead of a little earlier.
The Social Security Statement that you receive in the
mail each year provides an estimate of your retirement,
survivors, and disability insurance benefits. If you'd like
to try out some different scenarios and see how different
retirement ages and future earnings may change your re-
tirement picture, visit our online Retirement Estimator at
www.socialsecurity.gov/estimator. It's a quick, accurate,
and easy way to plan for your retirement.
If you would like more information about these Social
Security programs you can visit our website at www.so-
cialsecurity.gov.


2009, it's worth an average of $3,900.
To determine if you're eligible for the extra help, So-
cial Security needs to know your income and the value
of any savings, investments and real estate you own. The
value of your home is excluded. To qualify you must be
receiving Medicare and have:
Income limited to no more than $15,600 for an indi-
vidual or $21,000 for a married couple living together.
Even if your annual income is higher, you still may be
able to get some help with monthly premiums, annual
deductibles and prescription co-payments. Some exam-
ples where your income may be higher include:
If you support other family members who live
with you;
Have earnings from work; or
Live in Alaska or Hawaii.
Resources limited to $11,990 for an individual or


$23,970 for a married couple living together. Resources
include such things as bank accounts, stocks, and bonds.
We do not count your house or car as resources.
You can complete an easy-to-use online application for
yourself or someone you care about at www.socialsecuri-
ty.gov. Click on Medicare on the top right side of the
page. Then click on "Apply for help with prescription
drug costs." To apply for the extra help by phone or have
an application mailed to you, call Social Security at 1-
800-772-1213 (T'Y 1-800-325-0778) and ask for the
Application for Help with Medicare Prescription Drug
Plan Costs (SSA-1020). Or go to your nearest Social Se-
curity office.
If you would like more information about the
Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Program visit
www.medicare.gov. or call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-
633-4227; TTY 1-877-486-2048).,


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GRAND PRIZE: ONE $2,500 VISA GIFT CARD

FIRST PRIZE: ONE $1,500 VISA GIFT CARD

SECOND PRIZE: ONE $1,000 VISA GIFT CARD



DRAWING TO BE HELD ON MONDAY, DECEMBER 8
SPONSORED BY THE ROTARY CLUB OF LIVE OAK


Ask any Rotarian how you can get your ticket


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21,2008


PAGE 13A


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BUSINESS



Why the "Pro" in Pro Arms?


When Jon and Terri
Strayer first envisioned
owning a gun shop, it was
not because they wanted
another business to oper-
ate. They already have a
well-established and suc-
cessful lawn equipment
business that keeps them
very busy. But Jon and Ter-
ri both have a sincere inter-
est in personal protection
and the tools available for
that purpose. That interest
has led them through many
firearms and self defense
training classes, as well as
regular participation in self
defense oriented competi-
tive shooting.
They compete in local,
regional and national
matches of the Internation-
al Defensive Pistol Associ-
ation (IDPA) and Jon is one
of a very small number of
IDPA Five Gun Master
class shooters.
The idea behind Pro
Arms, Inc. is to have a
firearms and related equip-
ment store that primarily
addresses the needs of peo-
ple who are interested in
their own personal protec-
tion. This certainly in-
cludes guns and gear, but
also, through the Training
Division of Pro Arms, it in-
cludes sharing the knowl-
edge that is, available for
people to make informed
decisions about their own
protection. Pro Arms staff
members teach classes on
all aspects of personal pro-
tection, including con-
cealed carry, basic firearms
safety and skills and other
unarmed methods of self
defense.
Jon and Terri also regu-
larly assist with teaching


classes presented by the
Lethal Force Institute
(LFI), directed by Massad
Ayoob, and Jon is an NRA
certified Basic Pistol and
Personal Protection in-
structor. They have attend-
ed classes taught by many
of today's best firearms
trainers, including Massad
Ayoob, John Farnam,
Frank Garcia and Andy
Stanford, just to name a
few. Their vision for Pro
Arms is to share that
knowledge with their cus-
tomers and help them make
the best selections when
purchasing any self defense
related products.
But, the vision doesn't
stop there. They wanted to
-involve a number of their
friends and associates in
fulfilling their mission of
helping people protect
themselves and their loved
ones. Shortly after the idea
of a gun shop materialized,
they asked friend, fellow
shooter and lifelong public
safety professional Steve
Denney to be General
Manager of Pro Arms, Inc.
During his career, Steve
has been a supervisor and
administrator in military
and civilian law enforce-
ment and public safety, as
well as the manager of a
private healthcare security
and safety department. He
Sis also an NRA certified in-
structor and is a senior in-
structor for the Lethal
Force Institute's Judicious
Use of Deadly Force,
Stressfire, Handgun Reten-
tion and Disarming and
Kubotart/Persuader disci-
plines.
Steve regularly teaches
LFI classes, as well as pro-


grams presented by Pro
Arms, Inc. He also writes a
monthly column about
firearms and firearms train-
ing for the online law en-
forcement resource and in-
formation' site,
Officer.com. He is a mem-
ber of the International
Law Enforcement Educa-
tors and Trainers Associa-
tion (ILEETA) and the In-
ternational Association of
Law Enforcement Firearms
Instructors (IALEFI).
Steve shares the Strayer's
enthusiasm and commit-
ment to making Pro Arms a
valuable resource to all of
the firearms community.
Speaking of community,
the staff and associates of
Pro Arms also share their
expertise with the Live Oak
community by assisting the
Live Oak Police Depart-
ment with presenting
women's self defense class-
es and providing training
opportunities for the
LOPD, Suwannee County
Sheriffs Department and
other local law enforce-
ment agencies.
Pro Arms also serves a
wider audience by hosting
regular Internet podcasts
on such subjects as reviews
of guns and gear, firearms
training and various as-
pects of personal protec-
tion. Participants in the
podcasts, in addition to the
staff at Pro Arms, are other
well known firearms pro-
fessionals from both the
Live Oak community and
around the country who
have graciously provided
their time and their knowl-
edge for the benefit of the
podcast audience.
Regular participants in


the podcasts are Jon and
Terri, Steve, well-known
firearms writer, trainer and
use of force expert Massad
Ayoob, firearms dealer and
trainer Herman Gunter, re-
tired police officer and Pro
Arms staff member Mike
Larney, Chris Christian, the
professional hunting, out-
door and gun writer and
shooting industry reporter,
and Gail Pepin, our intre-


pid podcast producer.
Gail, by the way, is not
just our techno-wizard, but
also holds multiple
women's titles in IDPA and
Glock Shooting Sports
Foundation matches from
around the country.
Through these and other
activities, Pro Arms contin-
ues to interact with the
community and it's cus-
tomers, with the goal of


Prosperity ]


holds grand o


Prosperity Bank cele-
brated its grand opening
recently as Lake City's
newest banking center.
Located at 295 NW
Commons Loop (Publix
Shopping Center), bank
employees welcomed
members of the areas busi-
ness community at a rib-
bon cutting ceremony.
Tours of the new bank
center were conducted
which has 2,000 square
feet, and ATM, teller line


ands new account offices.
The new office will pave
the way for a more perma-
nent building to be con-
structed next door to the
Publix Shopping Center.
The staff includes Kevin
Gray of Live Oak; he is
the business development
officer.
Prosperity offers a com-
plete line of banking and
other related financial ser-
vices to commercial and
retail customers.


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providing not just products,
but also our experience in
their selection and use. It is
our ultimate goal to help
our friends and neighbors
stay safe and secure as they
go about their daily lives.
Whether its in the store, on
the range or in the class-
room, you can always
count on straight shooting'
from the protection profes-
sionals at Pro Arms.


Bank


opening

The bank also was rec-
ognized by "Jacksonville
Magazine" as one of
northeast Florida's "25
companies that care".
The State of Florida
Commissioner's Business
Recognition Award was re-
ceived by the bank as well
as The Prosperity Banking
Company was recognized
by Allen C. Ewing & Co
as a member of the "Top
Ten High Performing
Florida Banks and Thrift."






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The staff at Pro Arms of Live Oak is Jay Hershbergger, sales, from left; Terri and Jon Stray-
er, owners; Gail Pepin, producer.pro arms broadcast; Massad Ayoop, shooting team mem-
ber; and Steve Denney, general manager. Photo: Staff


Ribbon cutting participants pictured are (front row I-r) Pam Kitchen, Eddie Creamer,
President and CEO of Prosperity Bank; Kevin Gray, Vice President; Sherri Cassidy, Assis-
tant Vice President; Stacey King, Steven Witt, Mayo of Lake Cityd; Bob Wineberg.


Florida Farm Bureau Federation


Nov. 21 27 is farm-city week


Before sitting down to Thanksgiving dinner, Florida
Farm Bureau would like everyone to remember that the
meal they are about to enjoy is made possible by Farm-
City partnerships.
National Farm-City Week, celebrated annually on
the week leading to and ending on Thanksgiving Day,
recognizes the importance of this cooperative network
to the success of America's agricultural industry.
"Our farmers know how to grow the 280 different
commodities that we produce in the state of Florida,"
said John Hoblick, president of Florida Farm Bureau
Federation. "They also know that it takes many other
partnerships in order for that food to get to America's
table, and it's the success of those partnerships that we
celebrate during Farm-City Week."
County Farm Bureaus across the state are hosting
various local events to commemorate this partnership.
From breakfasts and luncheons to farm tours and
booths set up in urban and rural areas, Farm Bureaus
are looking to educate and inform both city dwellers
and those closer to agriculture.
Today, the agricultural industry provides us with
many of the necessities of life, such as food, clothing
and fuel for our energy needs.
Farm-city collaborations help maintain and improve
our nation's food supply and contribute to a better qual-
ity of life for countless citizens," said Hoblick. "With
this Farm-City Week observance, we commend the
many Americans whose hard work and ingenuity re-
flect the true spirit of America and help ensure a pros-
perous future for all."
Where does Florida agriculture fit into this equa-
tion? Florida has 40,000 farms growing more than 280
different crops on a commercial scale that's more
than any other state except California with cash re-


ceipts totaling over $6.7 billion. Florida agriculture has
an annual impact of over $97.8 billion to the state's
economy.
"Through our farm-city partnerships, agriculture has
an enormous economic impact on our state," said
Hoblick.
How are they getting the job done? Florida farmers
employed more than 94,000 farm workers, and overall
the industry supports over 388,000 jobs in the state.
And what about the environment? About two-thirds
of Florida is farmland and forests. More than 30 per-
cent is devoted to agriculture, which includes crop pro-
duction as well as improved pastures, woodlands and
open spaces, and nearly 40 percent, representing com-
mercial forestry, is covered with trees. These well-man-
aged, productive lands help preserve Florida's environ-
ment by providing green space, conserving water and
protecting wildlife habitat.
Farmers and ranchers, growers and producers, care
about their environment. According to a U.S. Geologi-
cal Survey report, Florida farmers reduced their
groundwater withdrawals 7 percent by installing more
efficient irrigation systems and implementing other
Best Management Practices (BMPs) such as using re-
claimed wastewater and stored rainfall. During the
same period, withdrawal for public supply increased by
7 percent due to population growth.
Agricultural crops provide many of the same envi-
ronmental benefits as natural vegetation. Plants and
trees emit water into the atmosphere through transpira-
tion, contributing to the hydrologic cycle that produces
rainfall. Once land is paved over it cannot absorb the
water and recharge the aquifer. Agricultural land does
not waste rainfall. Water not absorbed by plants or
evaporated into the atmosphere is returned to the soil


where it replenishes the aquifer and provides ground-
water for other uses.
Agricultural land also provides homes for Florida's
unique wildlife such as alligators, bald eagles, panthers
and wood storks. Many farms and ranches have estab-
lished management programs to maintain wildlife habi-
tat.
With agriculture as a cornerstone of our nation's se-
curity and way of life, America's farmers and ranchers
provide the safest, most abundant and most affordable
food supply in the world. It's important to remeniber,
though, that American agriculture reaches far beyond
the farm or ranch. It is an industry that includes many
urban and suburban residents who help process, sell
and trade the nation's food and fiber. We remember
those 24 million American workers, about 17 percent
of the total U.S. workforce, who are involved.
National Farm-City Week strives to increase under-
standing, cooperation and relationships between rural
and urban residents. As this year's commemoration
again culminates on Thanksgiving, all Americans are
encouraged to thank someone who helps make it possi-
ble for you and your family to enjoy the bounty of our
food supply.
The Florida Farm Bureau Federation is the state's
largest general-interest agricultural association with
more than 135,000 member-families statewide. There
are Farm Bureaus in 61 counties in Florida, where agri-
culture comprises a stable, vital leg of Florida's econo-
my.
Headquartered in Gainesville, the Federation is an in-
dependent, non-profit agricultural organization and is
not associated with any arm of government. More in-
formation is available on the organization's website,
http://FloridaFarmBureau.org.


PAGE 14A


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK










FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 15A


KidzTime holds


fish-off event


My name is Dalina Brushingham, I am a
host of the afternoon radio show heard here
in North Florida through the air waves of
WOLR 91.3FM. This shows airs weekdays
(except Wednesday) 3-4. It is radio show
geared toward kids.
Playing the music they like to hear as well
as trivia question of the day that gives them
a chance to win and play. I host the show
with 4 little guests host ages range from 8-12
years old. Lindy and the McIntosh kids:
Sean, Morgan, Brendan.
We recently (Oct. 12) held our 1st Annual
"Fish-Off'. Kids were invited out to try and
catch the biggest fish. With several in atten-
dance the winner was Bo Brushingham and
coming in second was Elijah Pancake.
We want to thank all that was in atten-
dance and a special thank you to the owners
of the pond; Mike and Gwen Altman of
Wellborn.
Kidztime is positive impact on our young
children and we invite everyone to support
this type of venue by reaching our children
through positive music.
For more. information on how you can
support this ministry contact: Kidztime, P.
O. Box 1448, Live Oak, Florida, 32064 or
call 386-362-3042. Contact Ms. Dalina at
386-590-4270 for information on how you
can be a guest on KidzTime.


'I


wt


L


KIDZTIME
l '"Fish Off" Oct 12,
B-BO BRLUSHING5HAr_

KidzTime held its 1st Annual "Fish-Off"
on Oct. 12, an event for kids to try and
catch the biggest fish. Bo Brushingham,
1st place winner, is pictured with his
fish. Elijah Pancake came in 2nd place.
Photo: Submitted


Kids at the 1st Annual KidzTime "Fish-Off" hold their fishing poles at the event Oct. 12.
Photo: Submitted


Scriven Avenue RR

crossing set to close


By Vanessa Fultz
Live Oak motorists will lose access to
another rail crossing this weekend. The
city council on Nov. 13 approved the clos-
ing of the crossing at Scriven Avenue.
The city will receive $15,000 from CSX.
railroads and $7,500 from the Florida De-
partment of Transportation'for complying
with the closure. '
City Administrator Bob Farley said
Wednesday the measure will also save the
city about $1,500 annually in maintenance
costs.
DOT officials announced their intention
to close the crossing earlier this year. Offi-
cials have said DOT has been mandated by


the state to reduce crossings by 24 percent
statewide. A DOT report cited liability
concerns and maintenance costs among
reasons for the closures.
The crossing at Irvin Avenue was closed
last year. The city council initially fought
DOT's request to close the crossing, citing
safety concerns emergency vehicles
could be delayed and inconvenience to
motorists. However, the council gave in af-
ter learning the matter would be too costly
to fight in court.
Farley said he does not anticipate any
more closings in the city of Live Oak.
City officials have reported that 263 ve-
hicles cross Scriven Avenue daily.


M .. a a ---a--------a f



TODAY ONL

3T4e *uwannue Demiocrat

is making you a special

"ONE DAY ONLY OFFER"

You can purchase
Sea Clay Body Wraps (4 available)
OR a 1 Hour Swedish Massage (6
available) Gift Certificates by Healing,
Hands of Suwannee County, LLC
at 50% savings

*50 value only *25
LIMITED SUPPLY AVAILABLE-FIRST COME FIRST SERVED

Gift certificate available at the Suwannee Democrat 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday Nov 21
Gift certificate available at the Suwannee Democrat 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 21


M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 15A


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


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Muwanneur e mocrat
Section B
Friday, November 21, 2008


Season in review


Go 'Dogs! -Photos: Paul Buchanan SuwanneeSports.com


William Kannady says, "your going down.
William Kannady says, "your going down."


Quarterback David Campbell rushes the ball past a de-
fending Tiger.

FI Arip


William Kannady tries for a catch against a Raines defender.
William Kannady tries for a catch against a Raines defender.


Garrett Pritchett advances the ball.


Homecoming queen Dale Townsend and king David Burrus.


Rashad Gardenhire attempts a pass.


Garrett Pritchett goes for a Taylor offensive lineman.


A Sound of Suwannee player
performing to the theme of
Pirates of the Caribean.

SPORTS
COMMENTARY

What goes

around?


The
Florida
Gators put a
whipping on
the South
Carolina
Spurriers. If
the roles had
been
reversed
would Stevie
Wonder
have quit at
56u aIthink Sportabout
you all t
know the By Tom Daniels
answer.
Give the
Gators some credit for
gamesmanship. I thought two SEC
schools would battle for the national
championship before the official
game but I didn't think one of them
would be Alabama. Just remember,
the championship has a detour in
Tallahassee.
Remember when we laughed at
the Dolphins of Miami? They are in
the thick of it and the mighty
Jaguars are looking like pussycats.
The Bucs continue to win and are
one game out of first. If someone
were to check Jeff Garcia's record
they would find this guy rarely loses
even if he is 72 years old (really 38).
Florida may have two teams heading
to the NFL playoffs.
My good friend Dr. Fred Mickler
remembers when Nellie Fox was the


Xavier Perry leaps for a touchdown.


Quarterback David Campbell looks for an open man.


SEE SPORTABOUT, PAGE 3B


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P SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


NFL Insider: Week 12


This Week's Schedule
All times Eastern.
TOP MATCHUP
N.Y. Jets at Tennessee,
1 p.m., Sunday
* Jets (7-3): Running back Thomas Jones leads the AFC
with 854 rushing yards and aims for his third consecutive
100-yard rushing yard game (149, 104).
* Titans (10-0): Dating back to Dec. 16, 2007, the Titans
have 13 consecutive regular-season wins, the longest
current streak in the NFL.
* Favorite: Titans by 5 1/2
OTHER GAMES


Philadelphia
at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Eagles (5-4-1): The defense
had eight sacks last week,
including two each by defensive
ends Darren Howard and Trent
Cole.
Ravens (6-4): Linebacker Ray
Lewis has three interceptions in
the past two games.
Favorite; Ravens by 1
Houston at
Cleveland, 1 p.m.
*Texans (3-7): Owen Daniels
ranks second in the AFC
among tight ends in receptions
(45) and yards (555).
Browns (4-6): The Browns are
5-0 when running back Jamal
Lewis has 25 or more carries.
Favorite: Browns by 3
San Francisco at
Dallas, 1 p.m.
49ers (3-7): The offense has
47 plays for 20 or more yards,
tied for most in the NFL.
Cowboys (6-4): Wide receiver
Terrell Owens played 121
games with the 49ers from
1996-2003.
Favorite: Cowboys by 10
Tampa Bay at
Detroit, 1 p.m.
* Buccaneers (7-3):
Comerback Aqib Talib is tied for
the NFL lead among rookies
with three interceptions.
* Lions (0-10): Rookie running
back Kevin Smith leads the
team with 513 rushing yards
and five rushing touchdowns.
* Favorite: Bucs by 8 1/2
Minnesota at
Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
* Vikings (5-5): Quarterback
Gus Frerotte has won five of
eight starts this season.
* Jaguars (4-6): Running back
Maurice Jones-Drew has six
rushing touchdowns in the past
three games.
* Favorite: Jags by 2 1/2
Buffalo at
Kansas City, 1 p.m.
* Bills (5-5): The Bills are 12-3
(.800) under head coach Dick
Jauron when holding opponents
to 300 yards or fewer.
* Chiefs (1-9): Tight end Tony
Gonzalez extended his
reception streak to 125 games
last weeks.
* Favorite: Bills by 3
New England at
Miami, 1 p.m.
* Patriots (6-4): Quarterback
Matt,Cassel posted career-
highs in completions (30),
passing yards (400) and
rushing yards (62) last week.
* Dolphins (6-4): The Dolphins
are looking for their fifth win in a
row for the first time since Dec.
24, 2005.
* Favorite: Dolphins by 1 1/2
Chicago at
St. Louis, 1 p.m.
* Bears (5-5): Running back
Matt Forte leads NFL rookies


i


with 1,099 scrimmage yards
and 51 first downs.
* Rams (2-8): In three games
against the Bears, quarterback
Marc Bulger is averaging 314.3
yards per game.
* Favorite: Bears by 8 1/2
Oakland at
SDenver, 4:05 p.m.
Raiders (5-4): Wide receiver
Ronald Curry posted a season-
high six receptions for 73 yards
(12.2 avg.) last week.
Broncos (6-3): The Broncos
have won six of the past seven
games against the Raiders. The
team is 90 when quarterback
Jay Cutler has a passer rating
of 100 or higher.
Favorite: Broncos by 9 1/2
N.Y. Giants at
Arizona., 4:15 p.m.
Giants (9-1): The Giants have
won 13 of their past 14 road
games, including playoffs.
Quarterback Eli Manning is 23-
5 (.821) in his past 28 starts.
*Cardinals (7-3): Quarterback
Kurt Wamer is looking for his
fifth game in a row with 325 or
more yards.
Favorite: Giants by 3
Carolina at
Atlanta, 4:15 p.m.
* Panthers (8-2): Quarterback
Jake Delhomme has won four
of his,past five starts against the
Falcons.
* Falcons (6-4): Rookie
quarterback Matt Ryan is 4-1
(.800) at home with a 110.1
passer rating.
* Favorite: Falcons by 1
Washington at
Seattle; 4:15 p.m.
* Redskins (6-4): Rookie Head
Coach Jim Zom returns to
Seattle, where he played nine
seasons at quarterback.
* Seahawks (2-8): Running
back TJ. Duckett, who spent the
2006 season with Washington,
had two rushing touchdowns
last week
* Favorite: Redskins by 3 1/2
Indianapolis at
San Diego, 8:15 p.m.
* Colts (6-4): The Colts are
looking for their sixth
consecutive win in November.
* Chargers (4-6): Since 2006,
the team is 14-1 (933) at home
vs. AFC foes.
SFavorite: Chargers by 3
Green Bay at
New Orleans,
8:15 p.m., Monday
SPackers (5-5): Running back
Ryan Grant had 145 yards and
one touchdown last week.
* Saints (5-5): The Saints lead
the NFL in total offense with
411.5 yards per game
Defensive end Jeff Charleston
had a career-high 2 0 sacks last
week.
*Favorite: Saints by 2 1/2

Soutrt: NFL


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They Said It...
"The players are only talking about
playing the Jets on Sunday. That's
the challenge right now,"

JEFF FISHER,
Tennessee Titans head coach, on his team looking
ahead to an undefeated season.


By the Numbers

25.8
The number of points the
Houston Texans are averaging
in the past nine games.

51
The number of sacks by Vikings
defensive end Jared Allen since
2004, most in the NFL. Included
are six sacks in the past five
games.

105.5
The passer rating of Cardinals
quarterback Kurt Warner, tops in
the NFL.


Next Week
WEEK 13
Thursday, Nov. 27
Tennessee at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
Seattle at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Arizona at Phil., 8:15 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 30
Miami at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Wash., 1 p.m.
San Francisco at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
N.O. at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at N.Y. Jets, 4:15 p.m.
K.C. at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.E., 4:15 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 8:15 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 1
Jacks. at Houston, 8:30 p.m.


2008 Leaders
RUSHING
Player, team Yards
1.A.Peterson MINI 1,100
2. C. Portis WASH 1,063.
3. M.Turner ATL 971
4. B. Jacobs NYG 879
5 T.Jones NYJ 854
PASSING
Player, team Yards
1.D,BreesNO 3,251
2. K. Warner ARI 3,155
3. J. Cutler DEN 2,832
4. D. McNabb PHI 2,711
5. P. Manning IND 2,568
RECEIVING
Player, team Yards
1. A. Johnson HOU 955
2. L. Fitzgerald ARI 939
3. R. White ATL 903
4. G. Jennings GB 865
5. C. Johnson DET 839
SACKS
Player, team Sacks
1.J. Porter MIA 13.5
2. J. Harrison PIT 12.0
3. J. Abraham ATL 11.0
4. D. Ware DAL 11.0
5. L. Woodley PIT 9.5


- *, **


RUNNING BACK
Start 'em: Warrick
Dunn, Tampa Bay at
Detroit Earnest
Graham is down and out.
Sit 'em: Brian
Westbrook, Philadelphia
at Baltimore The
Ravens rebound after get-
ting flattened by the
Giants.
QUARTERBACK
Start 'em: Matt Cassel,
New England at Miami -
Joey Porter isn't smart to
call the Patriots out again.
Sit 'em: Brett'avre,
N.Y Jets.at Tennessee -
Only because it's
Tennessee.
RECEIVER
Start 'em: Justin Gage,
Tennessee vs. N.Y Jets -
With three touchdowns in
the last two weeks, the
Titans (finally) have a re-
ceiver threat.
Sit 'em: Chris
Chambers, San Diego vs.
Indianapolis What he
did in the first three
weeks is a distant memo-
ry


PAGE 2B


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


W *c *"**"il











SPORTS


Season in



review


Nick Hurst leaps for a tackle.


Corey White gains yardage.


Wee! Jump for them 'Dogs.


Xavier Perry advances the ball.


Alex Fountain (#5) and Cody Chauncey (#62) guard while the X-Man (#23) rushes up the middle.


The 'Dogs take a knee for a quick breather.


What does the average person really

know about health and fitness?


In my 18 years of being fitness trainer
and speaking with numerous members and
clients, I have come to realize that most
people do not really understand what to do
when they become a member of a fitness
facility. Most people walk into fitness with
very little or no knowledge of how to
reach their specific goals. As a new
member they usually have the drive and
desire to change their lives but don't
posses the correct knowledge of how the
body really works, and in a short time the
member becomes discouraged and slowly
start to lose the drive and stop going all
together. What most members do not
realize is that there are many factor
involved in reaching fitness goals safely
and correctly. Members need to
understand the certain principles such as
rep range, max heart rate and fat burn
zone, nutrition is a huge part, what


supplements to use and what deviations
and muscle imbalances they have in their
kinetic chain, and also if they have any
neuromuscular deficiencies.
It is very important to know these things
before you can put together a complete
and safe fitness routine. We at Suwannee
Health and Fitness offer a Fitness
Assessment with one of our nationally
certified personal trainer to any member
who is interested in receiving information
about a fitness program designed just for
their goals. Our goal here is to make sure
every member has a chance to receive a
fitness program that is designed for them
with structure, science and knowledge
behind it. We change lives one person at a
time, it is our goal and it is our passion.
See you at the gym,
Larry Wall
Fitness Manager/CPT


A member of the color guard per-
forms a routine.


k '-~


Austin O'Connor gives the 'Dogs an
extra point.


SPORTS
COMMENTARY

What goes

around?

Sportabout
By Tom Daniels
Continued From Page 1B
American League MVP. The
year was 1959 and the Go-Go
Sox had just wrestled a
,pennant away from the
Yankees. Al Lopez was the
only non-Yankee manager to
win an A.L. pennant in the
decade of the 50s (won with
Cleveland in 1954). Nellie Fox
was the last second baseman
to be an American League
MVP before this years Dustin
Pedroia. Fox struck out 216
times in more than 10,000
plate appearances in his career.
The Sox' World Series bid
fell short to the L.A. Dodgers,
whose secret weapon was a
Stanford football player who
appeared in the 1952 Rose
Bowl. Chuck Essegian pinch
hit two home runs in the series
and along with Junior Gilliam
and Larry Sherry the Dodgers
ruined Fox's MVP year.
Nellie, also renowned for his
wad.of tobacco, led the Sox
with a .375 batting average.
The National League MVP
was Albert Pujols and before
his career is over you might be
saying Barry Who, A-What?


BECAUSE NOT EVERY HEALTH
PROBLEM IS AN EMERGENCY.
..

'4P


Alexander Mark
Jenkins is ready
to meet Santa for
the first time.

Thank you for submitting
this week's SMILE
photograph!
Submit your photo
b for publication to:



- Trnocrat
S P.O. Box 370,
Li c Oak, FL 32064
4184 5-F


Good health depends on regular medical check-
ups. from annual screenings and school physical. to
treatment of chronic conditions like allergies or
arthritis. That's why it's important to see a doctor who
knows you. We now offer:
Same week appointments for new patients
Walk-in appointments for established patients
Extended hours
Don't wait for an emergency. Call us today for an
appointment.


1116 SW I1th St
Live Oak. FL 32064
386.362.0820
i .,I, ,, ,


ShandsLiveOak
NMedicalGroup


Now THAT'S Something

To Smile About!


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* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 3B








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* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OA K


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Saturday Evening November 22, 2008
WTXLIABC Conlege FOit ball Luo, r
WCTV/CBS CSI Crme Scn Cr.minal M.nds 48 Houfr Myslery LO ,:a
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@2006 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it

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WTXIABC Music Award rs Lical
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WTWCNC Foc:,lball IrJFL Football L cal jDiel.- rje.s,
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MTV Sweel 16, IBrney Paris Hlln 150 CerltMney 50 CenI-.1:rey Run Run
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02006 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it


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PAGE 4B


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


A guide for

your viewing

pleasure




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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008 U SUWANNEEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 5B


I


A guide for

Your viewing

pleasure


The Lone Ranger
-75th Anniversary
Collector's Edition
DVD box set (retail $119.43)Amazon


Monday Evening November 24, 2008

SWTXUA BC .n,. I, Ir -I I I Ir, , I iI I. l I cal I ill I nI, I L. ,I L *
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LIFE Act'.3 R t.a Tnh- L,:, -I H-, Lil, 'V,1II VVlII FH .e I Fr r
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TNT Law & C.,rdier L i O'der e.r:.n,: The i,.:. er Wi/ rjul .3 Trae
USA H:use WWE M.:.ndr r a rjihl RIawI L) .s r.ger ,. I Li'. Ordn r I.1
HBO l-', -i.ar,, r, CrhiiTiuri i .: ::r, i: Oul .:.1 Englari.jnd iin, Dr.r.r g
@2006 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it

Tuesday Evening November 25, 2008

WTXAB Charlie Brown Dancing-Stars Local Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live
WCTVICBS NCIS The Mentalist Without a Trace Local Late Show-Letterman Late Late
WTWC/IBC Biggest Loser Law & Order: SVUI Local Tonight Show Late
WTLH/FOX House Fringe Local
A & E Tr, Fir-_'l ir Thr F- .i ...:. .:..: .io .-, Tr,": Fi,. i l
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USA S -l H:.:.- jIaD amrria H.:.u-z Hiuz:-ui L .'. ir i: IL.. Crci

'HBO The Bourne Ultimatum REAL Sports Entourage True Blood Summer
2006 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it

Wednesday Evening November 26, 2008

:wIt IABPushing Daisies Private Practice Dirty Sexy Money Local Nightline |Jimmy Kimmel Live
nWCTV!CBS Christine IGary Criminal Minds CSI: NY Local Late Show-Letterman Late Late
WT ..BC Rosie Live Deal or No Deal Deal or No Deal Local Tonight Show Late

A& E a Rb It. rogtio.q ParWng Fari PinF Fsarkinig Dl.:.l D
g aai Ho House Local ri
AMC Ci m 3lrio n3..:, Slarl t. utan H:.uiEse ,on Hill
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DISN Minurreen [Prnej Wzard Li Wlh Tne Suile Ir.,:,iana So Raaen ICtcrv
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FAM S,.ni-M,:ll.-e Tre:- i rirlm, L-I |Tre "1:1: .ro. "' W i.:,:e
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,TCM West Side Story The King and I
TLC Llie |Little Little ILittle Little [Little Little ILittle Little ILittle
: TNT Law & Order Law & Order Trial by Jury Law & Order Cold Case
USA 40-Year-Old Vir 40-Year-Old Vir
I HBO Comebackq24 7 Entourage ISummer True Blood Life 27 Dresses
2006 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it

Thursday Evening November 27, 2008

TXUABC Charlie Brown Grey's Anatomy Local Nightline IJimmy Kimmel Live
WCTV/CBS Survivor: Gabon CSI: Crime Scn [Eleventh Hour Local Late Show-Letterman Late Late
WTWC/NBC The Incredibles [Office Local Tonight Show Late
WTLH/FOX Click Local
A & E The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 The First 48
AMC The Godfather Godfather Pt 2
CMT Extreme-Home Extreme-Home Extreme-Home Hope Floats
DISN The Suite IThe Suite The Suite [The Suite Wizards ILife With The Suite IMontana So Raven Cory
ESPN College Football SportsCenter SportsCenter
ESPN2 College Basketball JScore College Basketball College Basketball
FAM The Notebook The 700 Club Whose? [Whose?
FOOD Good Eats IFood Iron Chef America Cakes ICakes Challenge Iron Chef America
FX Home Alone Christmas-Krank Sons of Anarchy
HGTV To Sell [Myles Rate IExtreme L House IHouse Property My First To Sell Myles
LIFE Fantasia Story Akeelah and the Bee Will Will Frasier Frasier
MTV 50 Cent-Money 50 Cent-Money [50 Cent-Money MTV Special
SCI Tomorrow Never Dies World Is Not ITomorrow Never Dies
TBS Friends [Friends Friends Friends IAustin Powers [Sex and t [Sex and t
TCM Cheaper by the Dozen Yours, Mine and Ours [With Six You Get Eggroll
TLC Jon & Kate Plus 8 IJon & Kate Plus 8 [Twins, Twins [Jon & Kate Plus 8 [Jon & Kate Plus 8
TNT NBA Basketball [NBA Basketball
USA House onwoHouseis siHouseg yHouse
HBO True Blood Hairspray Taxicab Conf. Entourage 24 |
@2006 Hometown Content, IIslings by Zap21l


Hi-yo, Silver! The most
famous masked cowboy of
all time gets the royal
treatment with this lavish
re-packaging of 78 classic
TV episodes from 1949
and 1950 starring Clayton
Moore as the Lone Ranger
and Jay Silverheels as his
loyal sidekick, Tonto.
Bonus materials include an
88-page commemorative
booklet, foldout poster,
comic book reprints, three
cartoon episodes from the
1960s, an original radio
broadcast and (worlds col-
lide!) an episode of Lassie
in which guest-star Moore
shows off his impressive
gun-twirling abilities.
-Neil Pond, American
Profile




Roads to Quoz
By William Least Heat-Moon
Hardcover 566 pages
(retail $27.99)Ama:.on
From the author of the
'80s travelogue Blue High-
ways comes this new diary
of adventures, encounters
with colorful characters
and stopovers at pleasingly
offbeat places along the
less-traveled back roads of


THINGS

TO

CHECK

OUT

THIS

WEEK-

END


WILLIAM
LEAST
HEAT-MOON


*- -,(1 )S TO,


.. 'An Amerian ii-sv


hby the author of Ble, Higrs-'v and Rilver-Honei


small-town America. Incorporating into its title a long-forgot-
ten word denoting anything strange or peculiar, Roads to Quoz
is an absorbing literary trek full of delightful surprises.
-Neil Pond, American Profile


The Best of Bond...
James Bond
CD/DVD (retail $24.98)Amazon

Clean the tux,.
gas up the Aston in
Martin and order
that martini
shaken, not F
stirred. Then put
on this CD of 23
musical themes ,
from James
Bond movies
and you're ready
for whatever
sexy villainesses, P a P i
evil geniuses and
other life-of-dan-
ger entangle-
ments that might come your way. Paul McCartney and Wings'
"Live and Let Die," Carly Simon's "Nobody Does It Better"
and Tom Jones' "Thunderball" share the swingin' space with
other signature soundtrack'tunes performed by Duran Duran,
Madonna, Sheryl Crow and others, plus a DVD of music
videos and an in-concert live performance of Shirley Bassey's
"Goldfinger."
-Neil Pond, American Profile


Visions of
Paradise
Hardcover; 304
pages (retail
$35)Amazon
Where is heaven
on Earth? National
Geographic asked
82 different photog-
raphers to seek it-
and bring back pho-
tos. From spectacu-
lar scenes of nature
to sublime places of
the heart impossible to find on any map, these 155 images
will transport you to realms of tranquility, beauty and wonder
that invite your eyes to linger on every page.
-Neil Pond, American Profile


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


N SUWANNEE: DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 5B









* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


CHURCH CALENDAR


Sunday
Nov. 23
Health care information offered
A special'service of information will be provided at the
Live Oak Church of the Nazarene, 915 S. Church Ave. on
Sunday, Nov. 23 at 6 p.m.
The service will be advantageous for the disabled and
for retirees. The focus will be on health care plans that
work through Medicare and federal programs for low-
income people.

Thursday
Nov. 27
Thanksgiving day dinner
O'Brien Baptist Church Men's Fellowship will provide


Thanksgiving day dinner for the community from 11
a.m.-4 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 27. All are welcome. Tradi-
tiona! menu with meats, veggies and desserts. Trans-
portation and delivery available. The church is located
one block west of the O'Brien flashing light. Info: 386-
935-4436.


Sunday
Dec. 7
Bethel Creek Baptist Church
to host the Yoeman Family
Bethel Creek Baptist Church will host the Yoeman
Family in concert at 6 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 7. Sings will
be held on the first Sunday of each month at 6 p.m. Hope


to see you there.

Ongoing church meetings

AWANA clubs-Wednesday nights, First Baptist Church
of Live Oak. Info: 386-362-1583, www.fbcliveoak.org-
click on children's ministry.
Bethel Creek Baptist Church hosts a singing group
at 6 p.m., first Sunday. Church is located at 8945 CR 53,
Day. Birthdays and anniversaries will be celebrated after
the singing and all are welcome.
Bible college classes offered Third Saturday, from 2-
5 p.m. at 104 Beech St., NE, Live Oak. Yearning to learn

SEE CHURCH, PAGE 7B


ADVENT CHRISTIAN


FIRST ADVENT
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
699 Pinewood Drive
(386) 362-1802
Rev. Tim Carver, Pastor

SUNDAY
Sunday School 9:
Morning Service 10:
Evening Service......................6..
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study.................... 10:30 am & 6:

BIXLER MEMORIAL
ADVENT CHRISTIAN
Advent Christian Village, Dowling I
Rev. Steve Lawson & Rev. Rosema
Humbles & Rev. John Harper
Youth Pastor Rev. Randy Lamb

SUNDAY
Morning Worship 9:5
Christian Education Hour.............. 11:1
Evening Worship and
Children's Group 6:0(

ANGLCAN
FAITH IN CHRIST CHURCH
9317 U.S. Hwy. 90 West, Lake Cii
1/2 mile east of Suwannee/Columbia Count
Rev. Don Wilson

SUNDAY
Holy Communion 9:30
1928 Book Of Common Prayer
Bible Study 10:45
For more information:- ...
Church Office 754-2827
Rev. Wilson 208-9882

BAPTST

SUWANNEE SPRINGS FREE
BAPTIST CHURCH
3801 US Hwy. 129, Live Oak, FL
Pastor Sid Baker
129 North, 3-1/2 miles past McDonal
SUNDAY
Morning Worship........................ 11:00
Evening Service 6:00 p
4H

PINE LEVEL MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
11885 217th Rd., Dowling Park
Church Phone: 658-3236
Pastor J. H. Brown 362-3134

Sunday School 9:45
Morning Service 10:45
Sunday Evening Service...............7:0(
Wednesday Night Service.............7:3(
48[


8le ^muau m lemoat





(386) 362-1734



Jiff Food Stor

LIVE OAK WELLBORN MAYO
DOWLING PARK
STORE ON NORTH OHIO OPEN 24 HOI
"The Store Around The Corner From Where You I



Howard Street Dry Cle

Quality Laundry and Dry Cleaning
Same Day Service *


705 West Howard Street
Live Oak, Florida 32064


(386) 364-52


Dixe Grill
"Specializing in Steaks & Seafood"
DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS (WITH VEGETABLE
Open 7 Days 5:00 a.m. 10:00 p.m.
364-2810 CATERING SERVICE & PRIVATE PART


:30 am
:30 am
:30 pm

30 pm
416172-F


'ark
ary



5 a.m.
5 a.m.
0 p.m.
416173-F


'H
ty


BAPTIST (SOUTHERN)
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF DOWLING PARK
"Sharing the Joy of Jesus"
Rev. Shawn Johnson Pastor
11274 235th Lane
(In Dowling Park on Hwy. 250)
Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 658-2360 or (386) 658-3715
E-Mail: lbcdp@hotnail.comn
www.dowlingparkbaptist.comn
SUNDAY
Sunday School 9:30 am
Worship Service 10:45 am
Evening Bible
Exploration Services 6:00 pm
Nursery Available all Services
SPre-K to 2nd Grade Junior Church
conducted during 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship Service
WEDNESDAY
Mid Week Prayer Service 6:30 pin
416178-F
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
401 West Howard Street Live Oak, FL 32064
Phone: 386-362-1583 Fax 386-364-6478
Email: firstbaptistchurch@fbcliveoak.org
www.fbcliveoak.org
Rev. Phillip Herrington, Pastor
Rev. Steve Sweitzer, Pastoral Care/Administration
Rev. Alan Lott, Music and Worship
Rev. Will King, Students and Education


y line SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 am
Sunday School 9:45 am
Morning Worship 11:00 an
)am Discipleship Training 6:00 pm
Evening Worship 7:00 pm
iam
WEDNESDAY
AWANA 5:50-8:00 pm
Youth Discipleship 5:30-6:30 pm
Dulos -Youth 6:45-8:00 pm
486741-F Adult Small Group 6:00-8:00 pm
Midweek Prayer 6:30-7:30 pm
416179-F
FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH
Wlll Pastor: Dr. David Teems
14364 140th St., Live Oak, FL 32060
386-776-1010or 386-776-1418
email address: Suwannee baptasso@alltel.net
Ids SUNDAY SERVICES
Sunday Morning Bible Study...................... 9:45 am
Worship Service 11:00 am
a.m. (Children's Church during Morning Worship)
Discipleship Training 6:00 pm
5.m. (Women's Bible Study, Men's Bible Study,
8857-F Youth Discipleship, Youth Choir, Children's Choir
Evening Worship 7:00 pm
Y
WEDNESDAY SERVICES
Wednesday Evening Supper........................5:45 pm
Awanas 6:30 pm
Bible Study & Prayer Time......................... 7:00 p
Nursery available during all services
486747-F
5am SUWANNEE STATION
0 pm BAPTIST CHURCH
Spm Everybody Welcomed
0708-F 3289 101st Lane, Live Oak, FL 32060
Bro. Wilbur Wood, (386) 362-2553

SUNDAY
Sunday School 10:00 am
Morning Worship 11:00 am
Choir Practice 6:00 pm
Sa Evening Worship.. 7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
SPrayer & Worship 7:00 pm
Children & Youth Program................7:00 pm

S PINEMOUNT BAPTIST CHURCH
US 129 South (Across from the S&S.Store)
Post Office Box 129-McAlpin. Florida
(386) 362-5634
416318-F Nursery provided for each worship service
Worship and Fellowship Opportunities of the Week
Pastor: Matthew Barker

s0 SUNDAY
Bible School 9:45 am
Morning Worship 11:00 am
Evening Worship 6:30 pi

URS WEDNESDAY
Family Night Supper 6:00 pmn
Live" AWANA Club 6:30 pm
416319-F Prayer Meeting 7:00 pni

n Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves
together... hut encouraging one another.
Hebrews 10:25 486746-F

WESTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
13969 Railroad St.
Live Oak, FL 32060
"Experiencing God Together"
11 Church Office: 386-364-1112
416323-F Van Freeman, Pastor
386-364-6413

SUNDAY
Sunday School .............................. 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Children's Church 11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship............................6:00 p.m.

i) WEDNESDAY
Prayer M eeting............................... 7:00 p.m.
474956-F


BAPIST (SOUTHERN)
WESTWOOD BAPTIST
920 11 th Street, SW (Newbern Road)
362-1120
Dr. Jimmy Deas, Pastor
Rev. Jim McCoy, Minister of Music
and Senior Adults
Rev. Jon Egan Minister of Students
SUNDAY
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship & Childrens Church
10:50 a.m.
Discipleship Training....................... 5:00 p.m.
Children's Choirs 5:00 p.m.
Youth Choir 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship Service.................6:30 p.m.
TUESDAY
Men's Prayer Group meet at Dixie Grill....... 6:30 a.m.
Lady Quilters 9:00 a.m.
Praise Team Rehearsal......................7:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Ladies Prayer Group 9:30 a.m.
Instrumental Ensemble Rehearsal....5:00 p.m.
Mid-Week Service 6:30 p.m.
Youth Group 6:30 p.m.
RA's. GA's, Mission Friends............6:30 p.m.
Adult Choir Rehearsal......................7:30 p.m.
1st Thursday of each month
Senior Saint Singers Rehearsal....... 10:00 a.m.
3rd Thursday of each month
Senior Saint Singers RehearsaL......10:00 a.m.
Senior Adult Bible Study................ 11:00 a.m.
Senior Adult Covered Dish Luncheon............. 12:00 noon
416184.F
MOUNT OUVE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Growing Together As Family"
5314 98th Terrace, Live Oak, FL 32060
(From US 90, lake CR 417 Io 98th Terace and follow signs)
Senior Pastor John Watkins
Associate Pastor Jason Fletcher
Youth Minister Jeremy Jackson
www.mtobc.com
386-963-5603
SUNDAY
.BjblStudy.(Sunday Schoo.......... .... 9:45 am
Celebration Worship 11:00 am
E\ cning Worship 6:00 pm
Depth (Student Bible Study)........................6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Family Supper 5:00 pm
Kidz Club 6:00 pm
Discipleship Classes for Adults....................6:30 pm
Flood Student Worship 6:30 pm
416187-F
WELLBORN BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Donald Minshew. Senior Pastor
Rev. Tommy Smith, Minister of Education and Youth
Mr. Jacob Martens. Minister of Music
U.S. 90 West & Lowe Lake Rd., Wellborn
Church Phone 963-2231
wellbornbaptist@windstream.net
SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 am
Sunday School 9:45 am
(Classesfor all ages)
Morning Worship Service.......................... 11:00 am
Children's Church (Grades K-4th)
Children's Choir 4:45 pm
CiA/Mission Friends 6:00 pm
Evening Worship 6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Family Dinner 5:30 pm
AWANA 6:30 pm
One Way Youth Ministry (Grades 7-12)......6:30 pm
Prayer/Bible Study 7:00 pm
Nursery is available for all services 416190-F
SHADY GROVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST
15 miles West Hwy.90 -
2 Miles Down.River Road
Rev. David Hingson, 658-2547
SUNDAY
Sunday School 9:45 am
Worship 11:00 am
Church Training 6:00 pm
Evening Worship 7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
AWANA Club (Ages 3-12 grades)....6:25 pm
Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 pm
416202-F
PLEASANT HILL BAPTIST
CHURCH
18008 113th Road, McAlpin
Church Phone: 386-364-5092
Pastor Phone: 386-364-1514
Pastor: Bob Richardson
Sunday School & Bible Study........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship &
Children's Church 11:00 a.m.
Nursery Available
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Midweek Prayer
and Worship 7:00 p.m.
486750-F











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PAGE 6B


.an,

BAPTIST (SOUTHERN)

ROCKY SINK BAPTIST CHURCH
Where the "Son" always shines
8422 169th Rd., Live Oak, Florida 32060
(386) 362-3971
Pastor Ed Tharpe
(129 S. to llth St. go to roundabout follow
to 136. Travel approx 7 miles turn right
onto 169th Rd.)
SUNDAY
Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Worship 11:00 am
Evening Worship 5:00 pm
Choir Practice 4:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Prayer service 6:00'pm
Team Kid Club 6:00 pm
Nursery & "Little Children's Church" provided
416205-F

ANTIOCH BAPTIST CHURCH
5203 County Road 795
362-3101- Church
Rev. David McKeithen
SUNDAY
Sunday School 9:45 am
Morning Worship 11:00 am
Evening Worship 6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Service 7:00 pm
416200-F

MARY BELLE BAPTIST CHURCH
14919 76th St.
(West 90, 1-3/4 miles from the Jiffy Store)
Darrell Curls, Pastor
SUNDAY
Sunday School 10:00 am
Morning Worship 11:00 am
Evegig. Worship............. ..............6:00 pm
S432925-F

CATHOUC
ST. FRANCIS XAVIER
CATHOLIC CHURCH
928 East Howard St. U.S. 90 East
Father Richard Perko
P.O. Box 1179 Live Oak, Florida 32060
(386) 364-1108
SUNDAY
St. Therese of the Child Jesus (Jasper)
Sunday Mass 8:00 am
St. Francis Xavier (Live Oak)
Sunday Mass 9:30 am
Sunday (Spanish) Mass..................2:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Wednesday Mass 7:00 pm
THURSDAY
Thursday Mass 9:00 am
FRIDAY
Friday Mass 9:00 am
SATURDAY'
Saturday (Vigil) Mass 5:00 pm
416207-F

EPISCOPAL
ST. LUKE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
1391 SW 11th Street, Live Oak
WEDNESDAY
Eucharist & Unction 10:30 am
& 6:00 pm
THURSDAY
Eucharist 7:00 am
SUNDAY
Eucharist 9:00 am
Sunday School 9:45 am
Eucharist 11:00 am
Nursery provided for both services.
Parish hall available for community activities
For more information call (386) 362-1837
The Rev. Donald L. Woodrum Rector
416216-F

To advertise

on this page,

please call

Nancy

Goodwin at

(386)

362-1734

ext. 103















416134-F











CHURCH CALENDAR


Continued From Page 6B

more about the Word? Can't attend classes full time'?
Maybe this is your answer. Info: Dr. Simpson, 386-364-
1607 or 386-344-4192.
First Baptist Church of Live Oak Free food an
clothing ministry Food ministry, second and fourth Fri-
days from 7-10 a.m.; clothes ministry, first and third
Thursday from 8:30 a.m.-noon. Info: 386-362-1583.
Greater Visions Support Group
Addictions Support Group Greater Visions, a faith-
based addictions support group Thursdays at 6 p.m. and
Friday at 9:30 a.m. in the fellowship hall at Christ Cen-
tral Ministries, 1550 Walker Ave. SW, Live Oak, in the
Suwannee County Mall. Group provides spiritual and
emotional support in a non-judgmental setting. Info: 386-


208-1345.
Old Time Gospel Memorial Jamboree-first Friday,
6:30 p.m., in Lee Worship Center, 398 Magnolia Drive,
Lee; free Gospel concert; open mike; everyone is invited,
bring a covered dish and bring a friend; door prize; free
will offering and donations taken to benefit the roof build-
ing fund and expenses of the sing; groups, singers and
pickers, if you want to perform or for more information,
contact Allen and Brenda McCormick, 850-971-4135, af-
ter 6 p.m.
Mothers of Pre-schoolers (MOPS)
A faith-based support group for mothers with infants to
school age children. Come and enjoy talking with other
moms, guest speakers, snacks, crafts, children's activities;
9:30 a.ni.-noon; second and fourth Tuesdays, September-
May) at First Baptist Church, 401 W. Howard Street, Live


INTERDENOMINATIONAL NON-DENOMINATIONAL


MELODY CHRISTIAN CENTER
& Melody Christian Academy
Highway 129 South Live Oak, FL
(386) 364-4800

Children's Ministry-Youth Ministry-Adults
Services:
Sunday 10:00 am and 6:00 pm (TBA)
Wednesday 7:00 pm Adults
Children's Ministry
Revolution Youth Church
Saturday 7:00 pm Revolution Club
Nursery Available All Services
Pastor Frank C. Davis 416233-F

CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
1550 Walker Avenue SE Live Oak, FL
(386) 208-1345
Sunday Morning....................... 10:30 am
Wednesday Night 7:00 pm
Pastor Wayne Godsmark
Senior Pastor 477425-1

LUTHERAN
GRACE LUTHERAN CHURCH
Karl R. Stewart Pastor
9989 CR 136 (Duval St.) 2 miles East from red lig
SUNDAY
Bible Class 9:30 am
Worship Service 10:30 am
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study 7:30 pm
386-364-1851
416242-F

NAZARENE
LIVE OAK CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
915 Church Ave., SW 1 Block So. of Mayo
Road North of High School
Rev. Louis J. Medaris

SUNDAY
Sunday School 9:45 am
Morning Worship 11:00 am
Evening Worship 6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Evening Prayer Meeting....................7:00 pm
"A Church on the Move" 416245.

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

LIVE OAK CHURCH OF CHRIST
Minister: Craig Williams
Home: (386) 362-6409
1497 Irvin (S.R. 51)
P.O. Box 281 Live Oak, FL 32060
Church: (386) 364-5922
Bible Classes 10:00 am
Morning Worship 11:00 am
Evening Worship 6:00 pm
Wednesday Bible Class.....................7:00 pm
Featuring Mentoring Program for Jbulth
416251-F


LIGHTHOUSE
CHRISTIAN CENTER
"Freedom is Here"
P.O. Box 458. Mayo. FL 32066
386-294-3089
www.lccmayo.com
Sunday
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday
Bible Study & Youth 7:00 p.m.
490399-F

LVE OAK CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Pastor: Dr. W. Ray Kelley
Corner of Hamilton and Ohio Aves.
(Hwy. 129 N)
(386) 362-1085 (386) 209-1614
www.liveoakchristian.org


SUNDAY
Sunday School 10:00 am
Family Worship 11:00 am
F Evening Worship 6:00 pml
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study 7:00 pm
416247-F

PRESBYTERIAN
ht
FIRST PRESBYIERIAN CHURCH U.SA.
421 While Avenue. Live Oak
(386) 362-3199
Pastor Shirley Mergan
SUNDAY
Sunday School 9:45 am
Worship 11:00 amn
Communion First Sunday of ever' inonth
416255-F

PRESBYTERIAN (PA)

COMMUNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
830 Pinewood Street, Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-2323
SUNDAY
9:45 AM Sunday School
for children, youth and adults
11:00 AM Morning Worship
WEDNESDAY
5:45 PM Family Fellowship Meal
6:30 PM Kingdom Kids Children,
Partners in Christ Y6uth, and Adult Bible Study
F 7:30 PM Choir Practice
Randy Wilding, Pastor
A Christ-centered, Gospel-prmckimning,
L People-loving, Family Church 416254-F


PENTECOSTAL

COMMUNITY CHURCH OF GOD
Headquarters: Anderson, Indiana
10639 US Hwy. 129 S., Live Oak
386-364-4484
Pastor: Rev. James Frye, Jr. 386-362-7689
Pastoral Care, Rev. Wilber Hatch 386-364-5740
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.....................10:45 a.m.
Wednesday Mid-Week Service ................7:00 p.m.
491812-F


PENTECOSTAL
HEALING, DELIVERANCE,
PERFECTING THE SAINTS OUTREACH
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRIES, INC.
Dr. Linda Simpson, Senior Pastor
386-3(4- 1607
WELI(COMES AI.I SOULS UNSAVED AND
UNCHURCHED AND THOSE LOOKING FOR A
CHURCH HOME WHERE YOUR MIND. BODY AND
SOUL (CAN BE FED THE TRUE WORD OF GOD.
Sunday 7:00 p.m.
Thursday 7:00 p.m.
Bible College Every 3rd Saturday...............5:30 p.m.
2nd & 4th Sunday at 104 Beech St...........1 1:30 a.m.
Corner of Walker and Duval (the same building
where Love Ministries is housed)
486754-F
LIVE OAK CHURCH OF GOD
9828 US Hwy 129 South
Rev. Fred R. Watson 362-2483
Web: www.liveoakchurchofgod.com
SUNDAY
Sunday School 9:45 am
Morning Worship 10:38 amt
Children's Church 10:38 anm
Children Choir 5:30 pmt
Evening Worship 6:30 pm
WEDNESDAY
Pre-service Meal 5:45 pm
Family Training Hour........................7:00 pm
Preschool Classes. Boys Clubs. Girls
Clubs. V.I.B.E. Youth Church, Young
Adults Class and Sanctuary Bible Class
FRIDAY
Prayer at the Gates of the City...........7:00 8:15 am
416256-F
LIVE OAK FIRST
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
13793 76th St. (Mitchell Rd.). Live Oak. FL
Rev. Darin Wilson
362-2189
SUNDAY
Sunday School 9:30 am
Children's Church 10:30 am
Morning Worship 10:30 am
Evening tWorship 6:00 pum
Wednesday Night 7:30 pum
416303-F
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST

LIVE OAK SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
CHURCH
Pastor Brandon White
11239 SR 51, Live Oak, FL 32071
364-0717 English: 330-2575 Spanish
SATURDAY SERVICES
Sabbath School 9:15 am
Devine 11:00 am
TUESDAY
Worship & Tuesday Night
Prayer Meting 7:00 p.m.
416281-F

UNITED METHODIST

NEW HARMONY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
160th St. (Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right)
Pastor: Stan Posey
Phone (386) 776-1806
SUNDAY
Sunday Worship 9:30 am
Bible Study 10:30 am
WEDNESDAY
Women's Bible Study 10 am
416289-F


Oak; Info: 386-362-1583.
Christian Mission in Action first Tuesday, 6 p.m., at
Triumph the Church and Kingdom of God in Christ
Youth Center, 12001 NW Seventh St., Live Oak; Info:
Audrey Sharpe, 386-364-4560.
Christian Mission in Action Ministry free food and
clothing give-away, second Saturday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., at
John H. Hale Park and Recreation Center, Duval Street,
Live Oak; Info: Audrey Sharpe, 386-364-4560.
"Coming to terms with your divorce"
First Baptist Church of Live Oak, Howard Street; nine-
week course, "Coming to Terms with Your Divorce." Info:
386-362-1583.
Wanted Wanted Wanted!
Pregnancy Crisis Center, 112 Piedmont Street, Live Oak
needs volunteers. Info: 386-330-2229.


UNITED METHODIST

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
311 S. Ohio Avenue, Live Oak 362-2047
Pastor: Dr. Will Finnin
"('i: IOII 110S11 1'11 S"
SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 am
Opening Assembly 9:30 am
Sunday School 9:45 am
Morning Worship 11:00 am
WEDNESDAY
Children's Choirs 5:30 pm
SPY (kindergarten grade 5).................6:00 pm
Youth Meeting 6:00 pm
Adult Handbells 6:00 pm
Men's Crusaders 7:00 pm
Chancel Choir 7:30 pm
Nursery available Sunday
8:30 and 11:00 services 416291-F
WELLBORN UNITED METHODIST
12005 CR 137
963-2154 963-3071
Pastor James Messer
Music: Geiger Family
SUNDAY
Sunday School 10:00 am
Worship Service 11:00 am
Evening Service 6:00 pm
@ Huntsville UMC. Lake Jeffery Road
Youth Meeting 3:00 pm
TUESDAY
Prayer Intercession at the Alter
7:00 am. Noon and at 7:00 pm
Church is opened all day. Everyone is welcome
McLeran Memorial Public Library
Tuesday 9:00 am 12:00 pm
Saturday 10:00 am :00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study,..... .: ..! .. 7:00 pm
486748-F
PINE GROVE UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
5300 CR 136A. Live Oak
Phone (386) 362-5595
Pastor George Swearengin
SUNDAY
Celebration of Joy -
New Contemiporar Service 9:30 a.m.
Sunday School Adults &Young Children............9:30 a.m.
Choir Practice 10:30 a.m.
Traditional Service 11:00 a.Im.
Adult Bible Classes 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School Youth 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service 7:00 p.m.
MONDAY
Prayer Service 7:00 p.m.
TUESDAY
Praise Team Rehearsal 7:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Youth Group Service 5:30 p.m.
Pastor Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
"Enter to Worship .... Depart to Service"
416285-F


The power of prayer


Your prayers may or may not change the
world, but they will almost certainly
change you. Prayer has a calming as well
as an uplifting and reflective effect.
Sometimes the time spent in prayer is
the only time we have in our busy lives
to actually reflect on important aspects
of our lives. When our lives are filled
with turmoil, asking God for peace
can be amazingly effective at
quieting our anxieties. And
prayers of gratitude remind us
how much we have to be thankful
for, while letting God know that -4
we are truly grateful. Sometimes
we don't really know how to pray :
or what to pray for. At those times, a
simple prayer may be the best, such
as "Lord Jesus, have mercy on -
me." Certain timetis of tlie ldaiy niaIy
be more corndLciNe to prayer, such
as morning and eveniin. A prayer
of thanksgiving each morniniu is a
great way to start each day, and al
prayer of reflection at the end of cv\rv\yc dia is
a good way to reflect on our successes and
defeats. But perhaps \\e slhoIuld irenmemibcr
the advice of St. Paul, \\ho al\ised l Ius to, ,,
pray constantly, keeping ( od t)forL'e\'r in our vv",i
minds and in our lhearts.


4
:* -
"


---------
Rejoice always, pray constantly, give thanks in all
circumstances;for this is the will of God in Christ Jesusfor you.
R.S.. 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18


w anne Complete Pintin
Services from
Suw ae ABusiness Forms,
1 Tickets,
Letterheads,
graphics Envelopes,
Program Books,
PRINTING COPY SERVICE COLORCOPIES
621 North Ohio Avenue Live Oak, Florida 32060
(386) 362-1848 Fax (386) 364-4661* (800) 457-6082
417874-F


Bayway Services

Steam Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning

IICRC Certified Fire & Water Damage
Restoration Specialists 24 Hour Emergency Service

Residential & Commercial 362-2244 416324-F



NARP NAPA of Live Oak

Cars Trucks Imports Farm Auto Paint

Machine Shop Service

209 Duval (386) 362-2329

LAND GOKERAE
i"3 A-7E LT


Annette B. Land Realtor
Specializing In Real Estate Sales & Services In The Suwannee River Valley
U.S. 27 EAST P.O. BOX 394
386-935-0824 BRANFORD, FLORIDA 32008 1-800-426-8369
8i'0 w.lalndbr oktera'lg'realor.tcon, 417875-F
416134-F


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


PAGE 7B


'~~ry
k--


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


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RELIGION


A PARADOX


Happy Thanksgiving


By David H. Marier
Doctor of tlastoral Counseling

Probably the best known and
certainly the most memorized
verse of scripture is John 3:16.
But I have often marveled at
the depth of truth in this one
great verse! The God revealed;
the God that SPOKE (Genesis
1:3, 6, 9, 11, 14, 20, 24, 26 -


-

.


"And God said...") creation into existence (Psalm
33:6)!
This love is His love. A love He has for all human-
ity ("the world"). A mankind, including me, that
rebels against that love but He still extends it. I donft
understand why. I can't fathom His patience with my
foibles, my sins, but He loves me! He loves you.
His love was displayed by His action (Romans
5:8). Real.love is always evidenced by action. It was
shown in the sacrifice of His only begotten son in or-
der for you to have eternal life; no matter who you
are ("whosoever") or what you have done and as a
result, if you'll but believe the promise, you are guar-
anteed ETERNAL LIFE.
As you quote this verse do not lose its grandeur. It
reminds me of the quote, "the Bible is simple enough
so anyone can get something out of it but yet deep
enough that the greatest minds have never completely
fathomed it." No one has ever completely fathomed
this one verse! Yet, glory to God, it is simple enough
that anyone can benefit eternally from it!

David H. Matier; DPC
Christian/Biblical Counseling
mailto:dmatier@alItel.net



Antioch Baptist

Thanksgiving lunch
Antioch Baptist Church will hold a
Thanksgiving lunch following the morning,
service this Sunday. Church family and the
community are invited to enjoy a meal to-
gether as we celebrate God's goodness to
us. Morning service begins at 11 a.m. with
lunch to follow. The church will provide
the meat and church family is encouraged
to bring complimentary dishes. Guests are
invited to come and enjoy the meal provid-
ed by the church as an expression of God's
blessings and love. The church is located
four miles off the Boys Ranch Road (CR
795). Community guests are asked to RSVP
the church office at 362-3101 by Saturday
morning November 22.


Happy Thanksgiving!
What comes to mind as
you plan to celebrate the
holiday? Lots of good
food;' family getting to-
gether; football; hunting
season? By definition the
word "Thanksgiving"
means to feel gratitude and
give appreciation. (There
was not one word in the
entire definition about a
turkey, not even a picture!)
In fact, history records the
very first Thanksgiving in
America was actually be-
fore the pilgrims landed at
Plymouth Rock; it was
held by a group of 38 Eng-
lish settlers who arrived at
what is now Charles City,
Virginia and was an entire-
ly religious observance
that did not even involve
feasting! They were just
overwhelmingly grateful
to God for their safe ar-
rival to a land of promise
and freedom, and needed
to express their apprecia-
tion to Him.
Thanksgiving as we ob-
serve it today in America
was formally proclaimed a
legal holiday on the fourth
Thursday of November in
1939 by President Franklin
Roosevelt; for 75 years
prior to that it was cele-
brated on the last Thurs-

Wanted:
Church News!
Send us your church
news!
The Suwannee Democrat
needs you. Please let us
know of any interesting
events or happenings at
your church. The Suwan-
nee Democrat will run
them on the church page
for free. Send photos and
information via email to
nf.editorial@gaflnews.co
m or drop them off at the
front desk at 211 Howard
St. East. For more informa-
tion call 386-362-1734.


OLD TYME.


I FARM DAYS

JOIN US FOR THANKSGIVING DINNER ON THURSDAY THE 27TH
12:00PM $5 PERSON BRING A COVERED DISH -
SFRIDAY AND SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 28-29,2008
S ANNUAL HERITAGE FESTIVAL FEATURING LATE 19TH CENTURY SKILLS
SSUCHAS- tUILTINGSOAP-MAKING.STORY-TELLINCGCAIE GRINDING AND MULE .
tIm.aMONSTRATIONS. MUSICAL INSTRUMENT DEMONSTRATIONS. NATIVE A ERICAL .-
EX HIBIT. SPINNING WHEEL, OLD TYME BLUEGRASS BAADS.TRACTOR SHOW &
PARADE, FLYW HEEL ENGINE EXHIBIT,. PETTING ZOO,KIDS CAlES. ARTS & CRAFTS

-OLD TYME GOSPEL SING FEATURING "THE WILSON FAMILY"
t IN THE MUSIC HALL FRIDAY AT 7:00PM






S$10.00 PER VEHICLE. BRING YOUR LAWN CHAIRS! '
PRIMITIVE OR RV CAMPING ALSO AVAILABLE
FOR EXHIBITOR OR VENDING INFORMATION CONTACT.
- CHER SKINNER CMYCUTS2@YAHOO.COM


Hi (386) 364-1683 8

I MUSICLIVESHERE.COM
3076 95TH DRIVE, LIVE OAK, FL 32060
FROM 1-10 TAKE EXIT 283, NORTH 4.5 MILES
FROM 1-75 TAKE EXIT 451, SOUTH 4.5 MILES





Nv .r a Ev







Nov. 29th throu ristmas Eve


day of the month. What
was the reason for the
change? A longer shopping
period before Christmas,
better for business! Now, 1
for one admit to needing
the extra time to get ready
for Christmas, but this is a
great time for us to stop
and think about how and
why we celebrate a day set
aside for giving thanks.
Are you honoring this day
- or has it just become a
"let's get ready for Christ-
mas holiday" for you too?
Perhaps the way we cel-
ebrate our Thanksgiving
holiday is reflective of the
gratitude in our hearts in
general. If we rush
through Thanksgiving be-
cause we just get too busy
to stop and count our
blessings, we will easily
get caught up in complain-
ing over what we lack and
worry over things that
aren't going our way. In-
stead, we would do well to
follow the example of
those early settlers and
take the opportunity set
aside for us to feel grateful
and show appreciation for
the blessings we have;
they are many! We owe
thanks to God for our very
life, our salvation, and so
many blessings to our ser-


vice men and women be-
cause we still live in that
land of promise and free-
dom, and thank's to our
friends and families for
sharing our lives. As a
matter of fact, nothing
does our hearts so much
good as counting those
blessings, and a day set
aside for Thanksgiving is a
great time to break the bad
habit of complaining!
The relationships in our
lives will richly benefit
from a grateful heart; wor-
rying and complaining
wear us thin and they are
not much fun for those
around us! The Bible re-
minds us in Philippians
4:6 "Do not be anxious
about anything, but in
everything by prayer and
petition, with thanksgiv-
ing, present your requests
to God." I challenge you
to spend your Thanksgiv-
ing holiday celebrating
your blessings; express
gratitude to God and to
those special people in
your life and give your
heart (and them) a break
from worrying and com-
plaining. In fact, let's real-
ly do something different
this year and commit to a
zero tolerance for any
complaining coming from


Heart

Matters
By Angie [and


our own lips, maybe it will
be contagious! Let others
know what a blessing they
are to you and how much
you appreciate them. Let
them know that you are
truly thankful; it's a great
day for it, because your
heart matters!
Have a Thankful Day!

Angie,
Heart Matters is a week-
ly column written by Angie
Land, Director of the Fam-
ily Life Ministries of the
Lafayette Baptist Associa-
tion, where she teaches
bible studies, leads mar-
riage and family confer-
ences and offers biblical
counseling to individuals,
couples and families.
Contact Angie with ques-
tions or comments at ang-
ieland3@windstream.net


Good news on the doorstep


By Derek Maul


"Finally, brothers, whatever is
true, whatever is noble, whatever
is right, whatever is pure, what-
ever is lovely, whatever is ad-
mirable if anything is excellent i,,)
or praiseworthy think about
such things.... And the God of
peace will be with you." (Philip-
pians 4:8-9)
1 don't imagine anyone would
argue that we live in a broken world. Con-
flict, crime, disease, war, economic uncer-
tainty, moral confusion, shattered families -
the list is seemingly endless. Sometimes I
wonder if we should maybe hang a sign on
our planet that reads, "Out of order; closed
for repair."
But, far too often, we forget to acknowl-
edge what is right and
encouraging. We don't take enough time
to recognize the good, our many achieve-
ments, and the compelling evidence of
what is redemptive.
Local news networks are among the
worst in this regard. Headlines tend to be-
come fixated on the negative; reporters go
out of their way to hunt down depressing
stories; news anchors gloss over good
new's as if it isn't relevant.
My wife and I were watching Tampa's
11 o'clock news last week and the litany of
woes just kept coming. The anchor-woman
warmed to her topic: "Stocks are down
again, median home prices are plummet-
ing, and another teacher has been arrested
for viewing pornography. Everything
seems to be going down the tubes," she
said, grim-faced yet with relish, "including
gas prices, which have fallen to the lowest


1 level in over a year...."
Suddenly she realized what
she had said that paying less
for gas did not fit tidily into her
gloom-and-doom theme. So she
.' stopped short, looked directly
into the camera and offered
maybe a half-second smile be-
fore diving into something else
sleazy.
The New Testament writer
Paul wasn't in denial when he
penned the words "if anything is excellent
oi pjai'sej; ofthy think about such things."
Instead he was articulating a powerful spir-
itual principle. God is not silent; God is not
inactive; God does not sleep. The evidence
of the Creator's redemptive work is pre-
sent, and it is compelling. But it's our re-
sponsibility to pay attention, to associate
ourselves with the healing power of God's
goodness, and to align the cadence of our
lives with the sacred rhythms of a loving
God who will provide hope and peace.
Love and blessings DEREK
www.Dereklnaul.net

First Baptist of
Dowling Park to hold
Fall Festival Saturday
The First Baptist Church of Dowl-
ing Park tilI hold a Fall Festi\ al this
Saturday from 1 p.m, until 5 p.m.
The sheriff's department wvil be on
hand offering fingerprinting for chil-
dren. Come out and enjoy live enter-
tainment, food, bake sale and games.
Foi more information please call the
church at 386-658-2360.


LINING UlI t
To place your ad in our Dining Guide,
call Nancy at The Suwannee.Democrat at 362-1734.

SFlorida :PM Co:d Beer
E. HOWARD STREET Great^ tea|!
STEAKS & SEAFOODS | V Colee


STEcA anAu &-"d -
Lunch and Dinner 7 Days A
Week
US 90 West at 1-75 Lake City





. 716604-










J^U


Friday & Saturday Nights Prime Rib
"Good Home Cooked Meals"
364-2810


Whether you're
04H lookingfor a great
' U lunch or a delicious
Sf dinner...

4 '' 817 ,B Souith Ohio Av.


To place your ad in
our Dining Guide,

call Nancy at
The Suwannee

Democrat at 362-173


PAGE 8B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


ML.





FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 9B


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Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers%


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Enjoy Forida stone crab claws

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N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 9B


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


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PAGE lOB U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


.44


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PAGE 10B


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE liB


By The

NUMBERS
SEC S I,'
EASTERN DIVISION


Florida
Georgia
Vanderbilt
South Carolina
Kentucky
Tennessee


SEC All Top 25
7-1 9-1 3-0
6-2 9-2 2-2
4-3 6-4 2-2
,-4 7-4 0-3
2-5 6-5 0-3
1-5 3-7 0-4


WESTERN DIVISION
SEC All Top 25
Alabama 7-0 11-0 3-0
LSU 3-3 7-3 1-3
Mississippi 3-3 6-4 1-2
Auburn 2-5 5-6 0-3
Arkansas 1-5 4-6 2-3
Mississippi State 1-5 3-7 1-3
Records vs. Top 25 teams reflect rankings
for the week that the game was played.

INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
(Season totals)
PASSING YARDS
Matthew Stafford, Georgia .......2,802
Casey Dick, Arkansas. .. ....... 2,389
Jevan Snead, Mississippi ..... .1,983
Tim Tebow, Florida . . . . ..1,913
Jarrett Lee, LSU . . . . ... 1,824
John Parker Wilson, Alabama . . 1,775
Chris Smelley, South Carolina . . 1,531
RUSHING YARDS
Knowshon Moreno, Georgia . . 1,244
Glen Coffee, Alabama. . . . .1,091
Charles Scott, LSU . . . ... 1,071
Michael Smith, Arkansas ....... .1,012
Anthony Dixon, Mississippi State . 673
Ben Tate, Auburn . . . . 652
Mark Ingram, Alabama . . .... 617
RECEIVING YARDS
A.J. Green, Georgia. . . . . 887
Brandon LaFell, LSU . . . . 772
Mohamed Massaquoi, Georgia . . 730
Julio Jones, Alabama. . . . 687
D.J. Williams, Arkansas ........ 613
Jared Cook, South Carolina. ....... 548
*Shay Hodge, Mississippi . . . .545
TOTAL OFFENSE
Matthew Stafford, Georgia . . . 2,847
Casey Dick, Arkansas. ....... 2,363
Tim Tebow, Florida ......... 2,306
Jevan Snead, Mississippi. ...... 2,044
John Parker Wilson, Alabama . . 1,798
Jarrett Lee, LSU . . . . ... 1,734
Chris Smelley, South Carolina . . 1,532
SCORING
Knowshon Moreno, Georgia........96
Leigh Tiffin, Alabama . . . . 87
Percy Harvin, Florida . . . .. 84
Charles Scott, LSU . . . . ... 84
Jonathan Phillips, Florida. ...... 84
Ryan Succop, South Carolina . . . 84
Blair Walsh, Georgia . . . . 83
INTERCEPTIONS
SEric Berry, Tennessee ........... 6
Ahmad Black, Florida . . . . .. 6
D.J. Moore, Vanderbilt . . . . . 6
Rashad Johnson, Alabama . . . . 5
Four tied with 4

TEAM LEADERS
(Average per game)
PASSING OFFENSE
Georgia ................ 268.5
Arkansas ............... 250.2
South Carolina . . . . . 219.1
LSU. . . . . . . . 213.3
Florida . . ... . . . . 205.2
Mississippi .............. 203.5
Mississippi State . . .. .. . 178.5
RUSHING OFFENSE
Florida ................. 213.4
Alabama . . . . . . 198.6
Mississippi . . . . . ... 187.9
LSU. . . . . . . . .. 180.9
Georgia .............. 160.6
Vanderbilt ............. 151.7
TOTAL OFFENSE


Georgia . ..
Florida . . .
LSU ......
Mississippi ...
Alabama . .
Arkansas .....
South Carolina .
Auburn .....


. . . . 429.0
. . . . 418.6
........... 394.2
........... 391.4
. . . . 367.1
. . . . . . 363.7
. . . . . .. 318.0
. . . . . .. 315.0


PASSING DEFENSE
Mississippi State ........... 154.5
South Carolina ........... 156.7
Tennessee ............. 164.0
Florida . . . . . . . 172.1
Auburn ................ 178.9
Alabama ............... 180.6
Vanderbilt . . . . . .. 189.0
Kentucky . . . . . .... 192.2
RUSHING DEFENSE


Alabama ...........
Florida. . . .
Mississippi .........
Georgia . . . ....
LSU. . . . . .....
Tennessee . . .
South Carolina .......
Auburn ...........
TOTAL DEFEN
Alabama ...........
Florida ...........
Tennessee ..........
South Carolina . . . .


. 75.1


i.? E .'
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, . *
. '.. .

S2008 Sports Ne'
GAME OF THE WEEK

Mississippi at LSU






r




Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


fAvailable from Commercial News Provide


sentially run out of Arkansas after the 2007 regular-
season finale, Houston Nutt appears to be transform-
g the fortunes of Mississippi's football program.
Nutt won at least eight games in six of his 10 seasons as
the Razorbacks' head coach, but he was never quite able to
win over the fan base. Upon taking the Mississippi job,
Nutt's first order of business was to re-establish the
Rebels' tradition.
Nutt picked up his first signature victory as Missis-
sippi's head coach on Sept 27, when the Rebels left The
SSwamp in Gainesville, Fla., with a 31-30 victory over the
previously unbeaten Gators. Following a pair of losses to
South Carolina and SEC West champion Alabama, Missis-
sippi has won three consecutive games, including confer-
ence victories over Arkansas and Auburn.
On Saturday afternoon, Nutt and the Rebels will look to
add another feather to their cap with a victory over host
and defending BCS national champion LSU.
With the two teams tied for second place in their divi-
sion, Nutt's second straight win over the Tigers could
sendMississippi to Florida for a January bowl game and
pave the way for success on the recruiting trail.
Records: Mississippi 6-4 (3-3 SEC West); LSU 7-3 (3-3
SEC West). Coaches: Mississippi's Houston Nutt (117-74);
LSU's Les Miles (69-30). Series: LSU leads 55-37-4. Kick-
off: 2:30 p.m. CT Saturday. TV: CBS.
Outlook: Texas transfer Jevan Snead cemented his
status as the conference's top newcomer with his perform-
ance in the Rebels' 59-0 victory over Louisiana-Monroe.
Snead threw for 170 yards on 6-of-12 passing and
accounted for five touchdowns in the win. Snead is the first
Rebel to account for five touchdowns since Super Bowl
XLII MVP Eli Manning tied a school-record by generating
six touchdowns in a seven-overtime game against
Arkansas in 2001. An 88-yard touchdown pass from Snead
to Wallace was the longest scoring pass in school history.
Wallace has had three 100-yard receiving games this
season and running back Cordera Eason has surpassed
100 yards rushing in the past two games. Maurice Miller
and Michael Oher have earned SEC Offensive Lineman of
the Week honorsfor their performances in Mississippi's
past two games against Auburn and Louisiana-Monroe.
The Tigers faithful have to hope that redshirt freshman
quarterback Jarrett Lee turned the corner in the second
half of this past week's come-from-behind win over Troy.
Lee threw for 216 yards with one touchdown and one inter-
ception on 20-of-34 passing, while Brandon LaFell col-
lected 126 yards on 12 carries. The LSU defense will look
to pick up where it left off this past week. Troy picked up
just 46 yards on its last 30 offensive plays.

THE REST OF THE MATCHUPS


102.8 Tennessee at Vanderbilt
.... .103.4
. .... 104.6 Records: Tennessee 3-7 (1-5 SEC East); Vanderbilt 64 (4-3
..... 104.8 SEC East). Coaches: Tennessee's Phillip Fulmer (150-52);
..... 111.6 Vanderbilt's Bobby Johnson (86-90). Series: Tennessee
..... 123.6 leads 69-27-5. Kickoff: 11:30 a.m. CT Saturday. TV:
. . 130.3 Raycom Sports.
SE Outlook: The Commodores resurrected a once-promis-
. . 255.6 ing season and became bowl-eligible this past week with a
. . . 274.9 31-24 victory at Kentucky. With Mackenzi Adams battling
..... 275.6 a hip pointer, Chris Nickson got the start and threw for a
S.... 280.4 season-best 155 yards and three scores on 15-of-27 pass-


ing. Vanderbilt found a new offensive weapon in defe
back/return man DJ. Moore, who gave his a team a
early 14-0 lead with touchdown receptions of 25 and
yards. Nickson and Jared Hawkins combined for 202
ing yards on 35 carries for an attack that converted s
of its 15 third-down opportunities against the Wildca
The Vanderbilt defense held Kentucky to 97 rushing
and thwarted nine of its 10 third-down chances. This
be the Volunteers' first game since an embarrassing
homecoming loss to Wyoming on Nov. 8. Lennon Cr
filled in nicely for injured backs Arian Foster and Mo
Hardesty, rushing for 82 yards on 16 carries in his fir
career start Quarterbacks Jonathan Crompton and I
Stephens combined for 118 yards with one touchdown
two interceptions on a woeful 14-of-36 passing effort
against the Cowboys.
The Citadel at Forida
Records: The Citadel 4-7 (2-6 I-AA Southern); Florida
(7-1 SEC East). Coaches: The Citadel's Kevin Higgins
(76-49-1); Florida's Urban Meyer (79-17). Series: Flo:
leads 13-0. Kickoff: 1:30 p.m. ET Saturday. TV: Pay-pe
view.
Outlook: Having scored at least 42 points during i
past five games, Florida should have no trouble dispa
ing the overmatched Bulldogs. However, this is a tral
ation for head coach Urban Meyer, whose team is try
make a run at its second BCS national championship
the past three seasons. With games against state riva
Florida State and top-ranked Alabama on the horizon
Meyer must make sure that his team escapes health)
Gators also need to post a convincing victory in order
keep pace in the BCS rankings. A dramatic 24-21 hon
coming win over Chattanooga this past week marked
450th win in The Citadel's history. In addition to score
the game-winning touchdown on a 43-yard punt retur
Andre Roberts became the school's single-season rec
holder with 1,268 receiving yards.
Arkansas at Mississippi State
Records: Arkansas 4-6 (1-5 SEC West); Mississippi St
3-7 (1-5 SEC West). Coaches: Arkansas' Bobby Petrin
(45-15); Mississippi State's Sylvester Croom (20-37).
Series: Arkansas leads 12-5-1. Kickoff: 1:30 p.m. CT S
day. TV: None.
Outlook: With starting QB Casey Dick sustaining
concussion during a 34-21 loss at South Carolina on N
his younger brother, Nathan, got the majority of the s
with the first team during the Razorbacks' bye week.
Nathan Dick has received praise from his teammates
coaches for his composure and ability to grasp the ofl
Arkansas junior running back Michael Smith also mis
all of this past week's practices with a shoulder injury
he sustained in the first half of the South Carolina gar
Petrino will look to the offensive line to restart a rush
attack that has averaged just 52.0 yards during the pa:
two games. Mississippi State, which saw its chances c
making a bowl evaporate with this past week's 32-7 lo:
Alabama, must see some improvement from its special
teams units. A blocked punt led to an Alabama safety,
the Bulldogs yielded an 80-yard punt return for a touc
down. Mississippi State collected just 35 yards on 22 c
ries and quarterback Tyson Lee threw for 132 yards v
touchdown on 11-of-28 passing against the Crimson T


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-16
? ~ 'W ^'"~' ^t^Yy~ya


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 11B


iL
4',


uIBAJ A Javier Arenas set a new
school single-game record
for punt return yardage with 153 on six
ws Bureau punt returns in the Crimson Tide's 32-7
win over Mississippi State. Arenas, who
set the previous school record of 147
yards on Sept. 6 against Tulane, also set
the school record for career punt return
yardage with 1,146 yards on 88 returns.
I AS According to the Black
Coaches and
Administrators, Arkansas earned an "A"
for its search to replace former head
coach Houston Nutt. Arkansas was one
of 31 teams evaluated and graded in five
categories communication, search
committee, final candidates, time frame
and affirmative action for searches
conducted during the 2007-08 academic
year.
W1UMURN In this past week's 17-13
loss to Georgia, Mario
Fannin became the first Auburn player
in nearly two years to score a rushing
touchdown and a receiving touchdown
Srs in the same game. Fannin's 52-yard
scoring reception from Kodi Burns was
the Tigers' longest touchdown pass and
second-longest pass play of the season.
I His 35-yard scoring run was his first of
the season and surpassed his previous
season-long run of 19 yards.
PM IDA Before accounting for 212
yards of total offense and
three touchdowns in a 56-6 win over
South Carolina this past week, Tim
Tebow was named the SEC Offensive
Player of the Week and a "Player to
Watch" for the Walter Camp Award. With
former Gators standout/head coach
Steve Spurrier on the opposing
sideline, Saturday's game marked the
first time in history that a former
Heisman Trophy winner coached against
a Heisman Trophy winner.
wERmnIA The Bulldogs posted their
third straight victory over
ensive Auburn in the "Deep South's Oldest
n Rivalry," which dates back to 1892. With
18 the victory, Georgia improved to 51-53-8
Srush- all-time in the series. Georgia is 14-9-2
seven games played at Auburn and 22-18-8 in
ts. games decided by seven points or less.
yards
will a liNjCKM Y David Jones returned a
13-7 blocked field goal for a
eer touchdown in the second quarter of the
ntario ildcats' 31-24 loss to Vanderbilt. It was
st Kentucky's first blocked field goal return
Nick for a touchdown since Bo Smith scored
Sand on a 72-yard return against Vanderbilt
on Nov. 12, 2005.
owa LSU scored 37 unanswered
points in the final 16:26 this
past week to post a 40-31 come-from-
19-1 behind victory over visiting Troy. It was
s the largest comeback in the program's
rida modem era (since 1958). The previous
er- record was the Tigers' rally from a 21-0
deficit against Mississippi in 1977.
ts pIsglSSIPM On the strength of a
Itch- 38-point first half, the
p situ- Rebels became bowl-eligible for the first
ing to time since the 2003 season with a 59-0
in victory over Louisiana-Monroe. The 59-
1 point victory provided Mississippi's
, largest margin of victory since a 69-7
. The win over Southern Mississippi in 1969.
r ito i. STATE Derek Pegues
extended his SEC
the record for career kickoff return yards to
ing 2,455 in the Bulldogs' loss to top-ranked
n, Alabama. Pegues, whose previous record
:ord was 2,333 career kickoff return yards,
also set a school record with 3,222 yards
coming off punt and kickoff returns.
Tony 3ames held the old school record
ate of 3,194 total kick return yards.

SiAROLINA Turnovers helped
atr- contribute to Steve
Spurrier's worst defeat as a college head
coach. Florida scored 28 points off four
ov. 8 South Carolina turnovers in Spurrier's
na. 8 75th game on the sideline of the Gators'
n"aps Ben Griffin Stadium.
and ESSEE Eric Berry was named
fense. one of eight semifinalists
ssed for the Lott Trophy, which is sponsored
that by the Pacific Club IMPACT Foundation
me. and awarded to college football's
ing defensive impact player of the year.
st Berry is the SEC's all-time leader with
,f 442 career interception return yards.
ss to ImnERBIE D.3. Moore, who helped
al p Bi Vanderbilt become
and bowl-eligible for the first time since
:h- 1982 by intercepting two Kentucky
:ar- passes, was named the Walter Camp
nith a Football Foundation's National Defensive
ide. Player of the Week.


Nutt rouses Rebels


. . .












PAGE 12B U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


IPy The


ACC STANDINGS


ATLA


Maryland
Wake Fore
Florida St
Boston Cc
Clemson
N.C. State


,NTIC DIVISION
ACC All
4-2 7-3


Top 25
4-0


est 4-3 6-4 1-0
ate 4-3 7-3 0-1
oltege 3-3 7-3 2-0
3-4 5-5 0-3
2-4 4-6 2-2
COASTAL DIVISION


Miami 4-2 7-3 0-1
Georgia Tech 4-3 7-3 1-1
Virginia Tech 3-3 6-4 1-1
Virginia 3-3 5-5 2-2
North Carolina 3-3 7-3 3-0
Duke 1-5 4-6 0-0
Records vs. Top 25 reflect rankings for the'
week that the game was played.

i NDIViDUAL LEADERS
:.. (Season totals)
PASSING YARDS
Cullen Harper, Clemson ...... 2,075
Thaddeus Lewis, Duke . . . 1,893
*Riley Skinner, Wake Forest ...... 1,882
:-Chris Turner, Maryland..... . 1,809
, MarcVerica, Virginia ......... 1,800
'Chris Crane, Boston College . . 1,687
Christian Ponder, Florida State. . 1,604
RUSHING YARDS
Jonathan Dwyer, Georgia Tech . .. 1,056
0D'R-l Scott Mar/lard ........ . 858
Darren Evan;, Virginia Tech . . . 815
Graig Coper lilmi . . . . 686
Cea'nc Perman i'.rg, . . . 662
Motel Harris, Boston College . . 652
Antone Smith, Florida State . . . 651
RECEIVING YARDS
Hakeem Nicks, North Carolina ..... 911
Kevin Ogletree, Virginia . . . .640
Eron Riley, Duke . . . . ... 630
Demir Boldin, Wake Forest ...... 622
Demaryius Thomas, Georgia Tech. ... 559
Aaron Kelly, Clemson . . . .542
Darrius Heyward-Bey, Maryland . .. 539
TOTAL OFFENSE
Riley Skinner, Wake Forest....... 2,002
Cullen Harper, Clemson........ 1,988
Thaddeus Lewis, Duke ........ 1,987
Christian Ponder, Florida State. . 1,913
Chris Crane, Boston College ..... 1,892
Marc Verica, Virginia ......... 1,745
Chris Turner, Maryland. . . . 1,743
SCORING
Antone Smith, Florida State ....... 84
Dustin Keys, Virginia Tech. ...... .80
Matt Bosher, Miami ........... 80
Graham Gano, Florida State . . .. .77
Mark Buchholz, Clemson. . . . . 68
Obi Egekeze, Maryland . . . . 67
C.J. Spiller, Clemson............ 66
INTERCEPTIONS
Trimane Goddard, North Carolina. . . 6
Morgan Burnett, Georgia Tech ..... 6
Paul Anderson, Boston College ...... 5
Alphonso Smith, Wake Forest. . . . 5

TEAM LEADERS
(Average per game)
PASSING OFFENSE
Clemson . . . . . . 229.1
Virginia. . . . . . . 220.1
Duke .............. .. 207.4
Maryland .............. 198.0
North Carolina ......... 197.0
Wake Forest . . . . . 196.5
Florida State . . . . . 193.0
N.C. State. . . . . . ... 191.1
RUSHING OFFENSE
Georgia Tech.. .. . . . .. 250.7
Florida State ............ ..192.0
Virginia Tech . . . . . ... 163.0
Boston College ........... 154.2
Maryland ............... 151.7
Miami. .............. 133.4
North Carolina .......... 126.6
Clemson ......... .. 120.6
TOTAL OFFENSE
Florida State . . . . . .. 385.0
Georgia Tech . . . . . . .358.2
Clemson .............. 349.7
Maryland . . . . . . . 349.7
Boston College .............. 328.0
North Carolina ........... 323.6
Duke . . . . . . . 316.0
Virginia. . . . . . . 315.8
PASSING DEFENSE
Clemson . . . . . . 163.5
Florida State . . . . . 164.5
Georgia Tech . . . . . 165.9
Miami. ............... 176.6
Boston College ........... 178.6
Virginia Tech . . . . . 185.1
Virginia. ............ ... 189.2
RUSHING DEFENSE
Boston College. ... ......... 98.9
Virginia Tech . . . . . 105.8
Miami. ................ .106.6
Florida State . . . . . 110.2
Wake Forest . . . ... .... 118.0
Georgia Tech .. . . . . . 121.7
Clemson . . . . . . 140.9
TOTAL DEFENSE
Florida State . . . . . 274.7
Boston College . . . . .. . 277.5
Miami. . . . . . . ... 283.2
Georgia Tech . . . . . 287.6
Virginia Tech . . . . . 290.9


- 2008 Sports News B


GAME OF THE WEEK

Boston College at Wake Forest


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Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Provider

W F


Deacons can't afford loss


showing what kind of tumultuous season it has been
in the Atlantic Coast Conference, Boston College is
the only team in the country with three losses that
still controls its BCS destiny.
Coming off a 27-17 upset victory at Florida State, the
Eagles need just two more victories to earn their second
consecutive Atlantic Division championship and a return
trip to the ACC Championship Game. Boston College's
all-or-nothing situation starts this Saturday afternoon at
Wake Forest's Groves Stadium.
Wake Forest, which claimed the conference champi-
onship two years ago, currently finds itself on the outside
looking in at the division race after a 21-17 upset loss to
N.C. State. Falling to the Eagles would dash the Demon
Deacons' hopes of playing in Tampa on Dec. 6, but a vic-
tory and two losses by Maryland would put the once-woe-
ful program on the verge of its second BCS bowl in the
past three years.
Records: Boston College 7-3 (3-3 ACC Atlantic); Wake
Forest 6-4 (4-3 ACC Atlantic). Coaches: Boston College's
Jeff Jagodzinski (18-6); Wake Forest's Jim Grobe
(85-76-1). Series: Boston College leads 7-6-2. Kickoff: 3:30
p.m. ET Saturday. TV: ABC/ESPN.
Outlook: Wake Forest must guard against making
offensive and special teams mistakes. Boston College,
which leads the country with 21 interceptions, has gotten
a touchdown from its defense or special teams in each of
the past five games. The Demon Deacons have had a
knack for putting together quick scoring drives in their
past two games, Their 91-yard touchdown drive int the
first quarter of this past week's 21-17 loss to N.C. State
took one minute and 29 seconds, while a 68-yard touch-
down drive right before halftime took 1:26 off the clock.
Winning on third down is crucial for Wake Forest. N.C.
State was 9-for-16 on third-down chances this past week,
and Boston College was 9-for-16 on third down and held
the ball for more than 38 minutes against Florida State
this past week.

THE REST OF THE MATCHUPS
Miami at Georgia'Tech
Records: Miami 7-3 (4-2 ACC Coastal); Georgia Tech 7-3
(4-3 ACC Coastal). Coaches: Miami's Randy Shannon
(12-10); Georgia Tech's Paul Johnson (114-42). Series:
Georgia Tech leads 9-4. Kickoff: 7:30 p.m. ET Thursday.
TV: ESPN.
Outlook: The magic number for the Yellow Jackets
may be 20. The Hurricanes, who registered a season-high
seven sacks in this past week's 16-14 win over Virginia
Tech; have held four of their past five opponents to less
than 20 points. Georgia Tech, which ranks eighth nation-
ally in rushing offense, was hurt by turnovers in a 28-7
loss to North Carolina on Nov. 8. The Tar Heels turned
two fourth-quarter turnovers into a pair of touchdowns.
Miami has been nearly automatic in the red zone, con-
verting 19 straight trips and 36 of 38 trips inside the oppo-
sition's 20. Shannon's squad also is gaining a reputation
as a second-half team. During the past six games, 124 of
Miami's 164 points have come during the final 30 min-
utes.
Clemson at Virginia
Records: Clemson 5-5 (3-4 ACC Atlantic); Virginia 5-5 (3-3
ACC Coastal). Coaches: Clemson's Dabo Swinney (2-2);
Virginia's Al Groh (82-82). Series: Clemson leads 35-8-1.
Kickoff: Noon ET Saturday. TV: Raycom Sports.
Outlook: Clemson running back C.J. Spiller has turned
into an effective weapon for the Tigers' passing game. His


83-yard touchdown reception in the third quarter of this
past week's 31-7 win over Duke helped him set a school-
record for most receiving yards in a game by a running
back with 108. In Clemson's 27-21 victory over Boston
College on Nov. 1, Spiller tied a 60-year-old school record
for receiving yards by a running back with 105. Virginia's
defense must set the tone on Clemson's first possession
of the game. Each of the Cavaliers' past five opponents
have scored on the opening possession. Clemson will
have to keep Virginia linebacker Clint Sintim in check.
Sintim has registered nine solo sacks and four assisted
sacks this season, which gives him the most sacks in a
season by a Cavaliers linebacker.
N.C. State at North Carolina
Records: N.C. State 4-6 (2-4 ACC Atlantic); North
Carolina 7-3 (3-3 ACC Coastal). Coaches: N.C. State's Tom
O'Brien (84-58); North Carolina's Butch Davis (62-31).
Series: North Carolina leads 63-28-6. Kickoff: Noon ET
Saturday. TV: Raycom Sports.
Outlook: North Carolina's inability to stop Maryland
on third down helped contribute to this past week's 17-15
loss at College Park. The Terrapins converted nine of
their 18 third-down opportunities and held the ball for an
astounding 40:29. Wolfpack quarterback Russell Wilson
appears to be coming into his own. He accounted for all
three touchdowns against Wake Forest, becoming the
first N.C. quarterback since current San Diego Charger
Philip Rivers in 2003 to throw multiple touchdown passes
in four consecutive games. Wilson, who collected a team-
high 69 rushing yards on 14 carries against the Demon
Deacons, has not thrown an interception in 175 attempts.
Duke at Virginia Tech
Records: Duke 4-6 (1-5 ACC Coastal): Virginia Tech 6-4
(3-3 ACC Coastal). Coaches: Duke's David Cutcliffe
(48-35); Virginia Tech's Frank Beamer (215-112-4). Series:
Virginia Tech leads 8-7. Kickoff: 5:30 p.m. ET Saturday.
TV: ESPNU.
Outlook: The big question mark for Duke heading into
this game is the health of quarterback Thaddeus Lewis,
who leads the conference in passing yards per game.
Lewis injured his left foot on the second series against
Clemson. Although he suffered no broken bones, the
Blue Devils are preparing junior Zack Asack to take all
the snaps under center. Asack threw for 61 yards with
one touchdown and two interceptions on 10-of-22 passing
this past week. After being dominated by Miami's defen-
sive line, it will be up to the big fellows up front to get the
Hokies' offense rolling.
Florida State at Maryland
Records: Florida State 7-3 (4-3 ACC Atlantic); Maryland 7-
3 (4-2 ACC Atlantic). Coaches: Florida State's Bobby
Bowden (380-122-4); Maryland's Ralph Friedgen (63-34).
Series: Florida State leads 16-2. Kickoff: 7:45 p.m. ET
Saturday. TV: ESPN.
Outlook: Coming off the program's 200th conference
win, the Terrapins will look to take another step toward
the Atlantic Division championship with a win over a team
that has owned them in previous years. The running back
combination of Da'Rel Scott and Davin Meggett proved to
be the difference this past week against North Carolina.
Scott led Maryland in rushing for the ninth time this sea-
son with 129 yards, while freshman Davin Meggett, the
son of former NFL running back Dave Meggett, collected
86 yards on 13 carries. Florida State quarterback
Christian Ponder must avoid interceptions after throwing
three against Boston College.


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Interstate CYCLES
580 Southwest Gateway Drive, Lake City, FL
Open:Tues.-Fi.,9-6; (386) 7 82453
S -877-5a96-2453
T 1-877-596-2453


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Interstate CYCLES
580 Southwest Gateway Drive, Lake City, FL
Open: Tues.-Fr,9-6; (86) 582453

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1 -877-596-2453


Interstate CYCLES
580 Southwest Gateway Drive, Lake City, FL
Open: Tues.- Fri.,9-6;
Sat 9" (386) 758-2453

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PAGE 12B


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


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BOSTON COLL The Eagle set the
Stone for their 27-17
win at Florida State by recovering an
onside kick in the first quarter, making
them the first opponent in six years to
recover an onside kick against the
Seminoles. Boston College converted six
third downs in the first half and finished
the game with nine on 16 attempts.
Bm SON With 10 catches for 96
yards in the Tigers' 31-7
win over Duke, Clemson wide receiver
Aaron Kelly became the conference's
all-time leader with 217 career
receptions. The previous record of 216
was held by former Wake Forest standout
Desmond Clark (1995-98).
N UE Senior middle linebacker
Michael Tauiliili recorded a
team-high 12 tackles this past week and
was one of four Blue Devils defensemen
to register double-digit tackles against
Clemson. With the performance, Tauiliili
became the seventh player in program
history to register at least 400 career
tackles. He needs 11 more tackles to
take sole possession of fifth place on the
school's all-time list.
ItORIDA ST. Kicker Graham Gano
saw his streak of 18
consecutive successful field-goal
attempts snapped when he missed a 50-
yarder in the third quarter of the
Seminoles' first homecoming loss in
seven years. Gano's only two misses this
season have come from 52 and 50 yards.
iA-TECH Senior Michael Johnson is
one of 33 student-athletes
named to the mid-season watch list for
the Ted Hendricks Award, which is given
to the nation's top defensive end.
Johnson, who has been credited with 22
solo tackles, a fumble recovery, two
forced fumbles and a blocked field goal,
ranks fifth and sixth, respectively,
among ACC players in sacks (6) and
tackles for loss (12).
IM YWIO With this past week's 17-
15 victory over North
Carolina, Maryland became the only
team in the nation to register wins over
four ranked opponents. The Terrapins,
who have won seven straight games at
Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd
Stadium, extended their winning streak
against ranked opponents to a program-
record six games.
fMMM Matt Bosher helped the
Hurricanes take control of
first place in the Coastal Division
standings by booting three field goals in
a 16-14 victory over Virginia Tech. With
the victory, Miami extended its winning
streak in Thursday night games
televised by ESPN to 11 and improved to
13-1 in ESPN Thursday night telecasts.
~M ROLINA The Tar Heels advanced
the ball past the
Maryland 40-yard line five times this
past week, but they scored a total of
only six points on those possessions.
"By not converting those to
touchdowns, it is something that is
going to come back to haunt you,"
North Carolina head coach Butch Davis
said.
1kt-STATE Committing just one
turnover in this past
week's 21-17 win over Wake Forest, N.C.
State has turned the ball over only twice
during its last five games, marking the
longest stretch in school history since at
least 1959 with two or fewer turnovers.
IfNiiMNIA The Cavaliers announced a
home-and-home series
with Texas Christian last week. The
Horned Frogs will come to Charlottes-
ville on Sept. 12, 2009, and Virginia will
travel to Fort Worth in 2012. In their
only previous meeting, Virginia posted a
20-10 Independence Bowl-victory over
the Horned Frogs 14 years ago.
MIU"TECH Miami held the Hokies to a
season-low 77 rushing
yards on 38 carries this past Thursday. It
was the fewest rushing yards by a
Virginia Tech team since Sept. 8, 2007,
when eventual BCS national champion
LSU limited the Hokies to 71 yards in a
48-7 victory.
aMI KE FOREST For the second time
during the past three
seasons, a wide receiver threw a
touchdown pass for the Demon Deacons.
D.J. Boldin and Marshall Williams
connected for a 64-yard score in the first
quarter against N.C. State. Wide receiver
Nate Morton threw a touchdown pass
to Riley Skinner in a 27-17 loss to


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Section C Jobs -gAuts- el sae 11A'w2120


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Bcmocrat


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211 HOWARD ST. EAST, LIVE OAK HOURS: MONDAY FRIDAY 8 A.M. 5 P.M.

Deadlines for Contact Us!
Line Ads Online... Email... Fax... Phone...
Publication Deadline When you place your Classified Ad it automatically classads@gaflnews.com (386) 364-5578 (386) 362-1734
Wednesday......Fri. @ 10 a.m. appears on our website, www.nflaonline.com. Your ad is 1-800-525-4182
Friday..............Wed. @ 10 a.m. live on the internet 24 hours a day (free ads excluded). Don't forget your name, address & pho r we can reach yCall us Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Don't forget your name, address & phone nuLmber we can reach you.


Help Wanted
FirstDay
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
White Springs Florida Consulting
Firm, Must have ability to deal
with clients in a positive manner.
Must have solid computer skills.
Must want a career not just a
job. Must have a strong work
background and EXCELLENT
references. Must be a high
school graduate. Fax resume toll
.free 888-737-1652 or mail
resume
Program Director
PO Box 799
White Springs, Fl 32096
Advent Christian Village
Current JOBS Line
Advertisement
Call 386-658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net
24 hrs/day, 7 days/week
Be your BEST, Among the
BEST

LPN
FT/PT/tong-term care setting.
Unrestricted Florida license
required; GPNs welcome..

Housekeeping/
Operations Specialist
PT; indoors/outdoors in lodge
setting,,general custodial/
lawn upkeep; valid Florida DL
required; swimming pool
maintenance certificate
strongly desired; weekend
shifts may be required.
CNA
FT/PT/long-term care setting.
Florida certification required.
FT positions include health,
dental, life, disability,
supplemental insurance; 403b
retirement account; paid time
off, access to onsite daycare
and fitness facilities. Apply in
person at Personnel Office
Monday through Friday from
9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or
fax resume /credentials to
(386) 658-5160. EOE/Drug-
Free Workplace /Criminal
background checks required.


FirstDay
CHILD SUPPORT
HEARING OFFICER
www.jud3.flcourts.org

FirstDay






LAKE CITY
COMNUDITY CgtilIE
Coordinatorof
Library Research
The position of re(4rence
librarian is a professional level
job providing reference services
to library users, on campus or at
distance learning sites. The
reference librarian also provides
individual library instruction to
students and other users.
Master's Degree in Library
Science from an American
Library Association accredited
school required.
Salary: $37,500 annually,
plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 12/17/08
College application and copies
of transcripts required. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted
with a translation and evaluation.
Position details and application
available on the web at:
www.lakecitycc.edu
Inquiries: Human Resources
Lake City Community College
149 SE College Place
Lake City, FL 32025
Phone: (386) 754-4314
Fax: (386) 754-4594
E-mail:
boettcherg@lakecitycc.edu
LCCC is accredited by the
Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools
VP/ADA/EA/EO College in
SEducation & Employment

FirstDay
DRIVER needed. Class A CDL
with 2 year OTR experience. Will
train to haul cars. $50,000+
earning potential once trained.
Call Rusty at 386-590-1700.


EXPERIENCED LINE COOK:
SOS Cafe, Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park. Apply in
person at 3076 905th Dr, Live
Oak. Drug Free Workplace.


HOUSEKEEPING/
LAUNDRY SUPERVISOR
Experience Required. Full Time
with benefits. Apply in Person at:
Suwannee Health and Rehab,
1620 E. Helvenston St., Live
Oak, Fl. 32064 386-362-7860
EOE/D/VM/F

FirstDay
LPNs& CNAs NEEDED
Full and part time LPNs and
CNAs needed at Madison
Nursing Center, all shifts. Must
be able to work every other
weekend. Benefits include
health, dental and life insurance,
and 401K. Apply at 2481 West
US 90, Madison, Fl. or fax
resume to: Peggy Powers,
Director of Nursing 850-973-
2667.

FirstDay
skilled trades
DIRECTV Home Services
provides a rich benefits program
where compensation matches
contributions. For opportunity,
growth, and rewards in the
global market, it's DIRECTV!
DIRECTV Home Services is
currently recruiting for the
following position:
SATELLITE
TECHNICIAN
(Tallahassee, FL) 0800779
Must have valid driver's license
and be willing to work weekends.
Please reference "Newspaper"
as your referral source. If you are
not able to access our Web site,
please mail your resume and
salary requirements to:
DIRECTV Home Services, 6501
E. Belleview Ave, Ste 500,
Englewood, CO 80111.
www.DIRECTV.com
No phone calls, please. EOE


127 Howard Street E.,

* P Live Oak, FL

Phone: 386-362-4539

Toll Free:

1-800-557-7478

Se hablo Espanol


ll- 1- -.,.,
......... ^^, ,2 .-.... ,


THIS 3/2 HQME- features tile bathrooms, flat top electric stove, fenced backyard and more. Home
is immaculate and located in the City Limits of Live Oak, convenient to everything. $94,500. Don't
miss this one! Call Irvin Dees, 386-208-4276. MLS#68400


LUCAIIUN, LUCAIION- this cute house m town. Has /ll and is on two city lots. Needs a little
TLC. $129,900. Call Sylvia Newell, 386-590-2498. MLS#68854
BEST BUY- Charming 3/2 brick home with over 2,000 sq.ft. Home has inground pool, hardwood
floors, beautiful landscaped yard with 2+ acres. Conveniently located. $195,000. Call Ronnie Poole,
386-208-3175. MLS#68366
THIS PLACE IS READY! All new windows double insulated and double hung in 2007, new a/c
and tile floors in 2008. Has wood burning fireplace w/beautiful rock going up to the ceiling, wet bar.
Watch the sunrise or sunset through the upper windows in the great room. Asking $138,000. Call Ric
Donovan, 386-590-1298
A BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY SETTING- on 3+ acres awaiting your new home or mobile home. A
nice developing area not far from the Suwannee River and Charles Springs. $39,000. Call Sherrel
McCall, 386-688-7563. MLS#68196
WOODED 10 ACRES- with well and septic tank already there. Two older mobile homes no value.
One could be fixed up to live in. $68,000. Call Carl Rogers, 386-688-7087. MLS#68794
RIVER ROAD MANOR- 215th Drive, 4 acres, scattered trees, quiet county location. $29,900. Call
Glenda McCall, 386-208-5244. MLS#68108
BEAUTIFUL CORNER LOT IN DOWLING PARK- Just right for your new home or for
investment purposes. Great neighborhood, close to the Advent Christian Village and convenient to
Live Oak, Madison, & 1-10 and US90. $24,500. Call Nelda Hatcher, 386-688-8067. MLS#68703

www.poolerealtv.com
485863-F


.. ...

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Each Kit includes:
* 3 Bright 11" x 14" All-weather Signs
* Over 275 Pre-Priced Labels
* Successful Tips for a "No Hassle" Sale
Pre-Sale Checklist
Sales Record Form


Run yourYard Sale in the

Wednesday North Florida Focus &

Friday Suwannee Democrat Classifieds

and get the Yard Sale Kit for FREE.
Deadline for placing your yard sale is Friday at 1-1:00 a.m.
SIm.-,


BUSINESSES


Rental assistance may be available!
HUD Vouclheis Welcome!
1. 2& 3 BR HC&Non-HC
Accessible Apartments


705 NW Drive. Live Oak. FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY/711 t
Uq lII. ....! pp n 1


FirstDay
Advent Christian Village
Current JOBS Line
Advertisement
call 386-658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net
24 hrs/day, 7 days/week
Work in a Community; Feel
like one of the Family!

Director of Dietary
Services
Coordinate all aspects of
dietary service in institutional
setting, 3 meals daily+ limited
special events; prior
supervisory or management
experience in food service
industry strongly required.
CDM required. Relevant
specialized training a plus.

LPN
FT/PT long-term care setting.
Unrestricted Florida license
required. GPNs welcome.

Housekeeping/
Operations Specialist
PT; indoors/outdoors in lodge
setting, general custodial/
lawn upkeep;'valid Florida DL
required; swimming pool
maintenance certificate
strongly desired; weekend
shifts may be required.

CNA
FT/PT long-term care setting;
Florida certification required.

Food Service Staff
PT/FT in various settings
including summer seasonal,
institutional, and cafeteria.
Prior experience in
institutional or cafeteria food
service a plus but not required
FT positions include health,
dental, life, disability,
supplemental insurance; 403b '
retirement account; paid time
off, access to onsite daycare
and fitness facilities. Apply in
person at Personnel Office
Monday through Friday from
9:00am until 4:00pm, or fax
resume/credentials to 386-
658-5160. EOE /Drug-Free
Workplace/Criminal
background checks required.

Lost & Found

FOUND BEAGLE/HOUND DOG
MIX: Young, friendly, good
w/children. White & Red. Found
in McAlpin. 386-364-4377
FOUND YELLOW LAB
FEMALE:
Found nearTaylor store & CR 51.
Please call: 386-362-2396

LOST AMERICAN RED
BULLDOG W/White Patch on
chest, Male. Lost Walmart
Parking Lot in Live Oak.
REWARD Please Call
386-208-8029
REWARD: 2 female German
Shepherds. One black and Tan,
one looks like a coyote. Call 386-
294-1364 or 352-665-0717


SERVICES


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living
2 bedroom duplex.
Call 362-3110. '
416 20-F


LOST-BRITTENY SPANIEL
female. Suwannee River State
Park area. 15 years old, gentle,
deaf. Call toll free 1-888-PET-
WELL or 941-232-9397.





At ^


REWARD! REWARD!

Special Notices














ATTENTION
ADVERTISERS

CHECKYOUR AD
'*PROOFREAD YOUR AD.
Any error must be reported
the first day of publication.
Should the error inhibit
response, credit will apply only
to the first run date.
The South Georgia Media
Group is not liable for any loss
or expense that results from
publication or omission.


AVON REPS NEEDED in
this area. Start your own
business now: Start-up
kit available. Call Cindy
850-843-5550 or toll free
877-203-4428. 488652jbv






You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Nancy at

386-362-1734
4116625-F


FOR

Rental Assistance
2, 3. & 4 BRHC & Non-
HC Accessible Apartments
<*t: oa I, A
705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDDUTTY 711 O
[-t.lul HIosing Oplportulity


Miscellaneous
GALVANIZED METAL GATES
3-14 foot, 2-12 foot, 2-16 foot, 1-
18 foot. $10.00 EA
Call: 386-776-2275
KEROSENE HEATER: Top of
the line with safety features, half
price. $100.00 Used very little.
386-792-1290
Vocational
Want to be a CNA?
Don't want to wait?
Express.Training
is now offering our quality
Exam Prep Classes in Lake
City. Class sizes limited.
Next class 12/08/2008.
Call 386-755-4401
expresstraining
services.com

LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072.
M-F from 9 a.m.- 5.p.m.
Pets for Sale

FirstDay
HAVANESE AKC: Black & White
Female 11 wks, Male 11 Months.
Breeding pair 3 yrs old. 231-823-
2061.

Pets for Free
FREE 2 KITTENS, SIAMESE.
Spay, Neutered & Declawed. All
shots, heart prevention once a
month. 7 months old. 386-638-
1603

Wanted to Buy
CASH FOR YOUR COINS:
All denominations, US, Copper,
Silver, Gold. I pay top dollar by
the book for date & grade, not
melt value. Cell (352) 949-1450
or (352) 472-1483 Leave
Message.

Garage/Yard Sales
CITY WIDE YARD SALE WHITE
SPRINGS 11/22 (8-?) Hwy 41
Baseball Field. Vendor Spaces
$10 no spaces held.(AII money
goes to Church) 386-397-2900
COLLECTIBLES SALE 11/22 9-
2
11090 Millsite Lane, Advent
Christian Village. 1940's Life
Magazines,. Sheet music,
Records, Music Boxes, Miniature
Musicians, Elvis, Spoons,
Golden Foliage Glassware, Cake
Decorating & Candy Making
Supplies and More. 386-658-
6462
INDOOR/OUTDOOR YARD
SALE: 11/21 & 22 9-2. One Mile
W. of the roundabout on CR136.
Clothes, Furniture, Houseware,
Home Decor, Hardware
Supplies.
MULTI FAMILY 11/22 7-12
15455 CR 129 McAplin.
Furniture, Baby Items, Clothing
& Lots More.

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION
SEEKS DONATIONS:
For Yard Sale Merchandise.
Call Sandy 386-364-8020.
Environmental Watchdogs.


mnALolfe


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PAGE 20 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


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YARD SALE 11/21 & 11/22 8 -
? 129 S. 2 mi past Publics on
right. Clothing, Hswr Items, Abb
Lounge Chair, Mini Stepper.
YARD SALE 11/22 8-12 Off SR
51 2 miles S. of-Taylors Store.
Kids toys, exercise equipment,
household items.
YARD SALE 11/22 8-5 19433 N
CR 349 Across from Suwannee
Farms. Girl Baby Clothes 3-18
Months, Ladies Clothes Med-16
casual or business ware. Twin
Bed, Christmas Decor, Hshld
Item
Apartments for Rent
FirstDay
EFFICIENCY APARTMENTS
FOR RENT: Totally Renovated
Live Oak Motel $150 + tax per
week; $32.95 + tax daily Call::
386-219-0070 or 386-209-8607
LAFAYETTE APTS.
Available Now 3BD HC Non-
HC Accessible Apartments.
Rental assistance. Laundry
facility & playground. We pay
water, sewer & garbage. 176 SE
Land Avenue, Mayo, FL. PH:
386-294-2720, TDDITTY 711.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
MEADOW APARTMENTS
Immediate Openings In Elderly
Section. 1 Bedroom, CH/A,
Patio, Carpet & Mini Blinds,
Laundry Facilities on property.
Rent based on Low Income. 386-
362-6397
THANKSGIVING SPECIAL
$500 Moves You In
Mel-Mar-Go Apartments
(Next to Lowes of Live Oak)
2/2 and 3/2 Units
Call For Details
386-288-3128
www.peavyproperty.com
Houses for Rent
BRICK HOUSE 3Bd/1.5Ba on 2
City Lots, Large Garage, Fenced
Back Yd, W/D Hookup. $700 mo,
$700 dep. Hud accepted,
386-697-9121 or 407-892-9857.
FOR RENT 3Bd/2Ba: Block
Home, Large Lot. Wellborn area.
Call Jane S. Usher Lic. Real
Estate Broker. 386-755-3500 or
386-365-1352
For Rent nice home in. the
country in Suwannee County. No
smoking or pets. For more info
call Marcus at 386-776-2373

FirstDay
HOUSE 3Bd/1Ba Walk to Live
Oak Schools. $700 mo $400
Deposit. Call Sam 386-688-2869


HOUSE 3Bedroom 2Bath, in
peaceful country setting. Wood
Floors, CHA, covered carport, on
paved road, In McAlpin. $750 mo
1st, last, sec. 352-338-7670
HOUSE FOR RENT 202
Helvenston. 2Bd/2Ba CHA.
$650 Rent $650 Deposit. 386-
963-2032 or
352-493-3487.
HOUSE FOR RENT 3Bd/2Ba
Brick, In Live Oak. $750 mo, 1st,
Last, Sec. Only serious inquiry
pis. Call 386-362-6556 or 386-
590-7765 Ask for Amanda

THREE BDRM 1 BATH HOUSE,
No Pets allowed $450 mo. In the
Country, A/C & Fireplace In
Mayo, Lafayette Co.386-294-
1634.
Mobile Homes for Rent
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba Nice area,
quiet, near Spirit of Suwannee.
$575 Mo. $575 Security Deposit.
Contact Dan at 386-590-1976.

FirstDay
DWMH VERY LARGE 4Bd/2Ba
on 5 acres. Off CR 49, very
quiet. 2 stall barn. Pets OK
w/approval. $850 mo, $850
Security.
321-636-0779

FirstDay
MH 2Bd/1.5Ba Live Oak $350
mo. 1st & Sec. Handyman work
for rent, roofing & carpentary.
Washer/Dryer Hook Up. In a-
country setting, 561-308-1022
MH FOR RENT 2Bd/2Ba, CHA,
on one acre. $550 Rent, $550
Deposit. 386-963-2032 or 352-
493-3487
MH FOR RENT 3bd/2ba Central
Heat/Air, Fireplace, on one acre.
$650mo/$650dep. 386-963-2032
or 352-493-3487.
MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT:
In White Springs. Contact
Charles @386-397-1522 or 386-
867-2337.

FirstDay
SINGLEWIDE MOBILE
HOMES-3 available in Live Oak,
FL. 3BD/2BA. 1st mo rent & last
to move in. No Pets Call 386-
931-5657 for more info.

FirstDay
SWMH 12X60 3BD/1BA Newly
Remodeled, Located in
Jennings. None Smoker. $450
Mo; $450 Security. Call Brenda
at 386-938-5227


Announcements

Run your ad STATEWIDE! Run your
classified ad in over 100 Florida
newspapers reaching over 4 MILLION
readers for $475. Call this newspaper or
(866)742-1373 for more details or visit:
www.florida-classifieds.com.

Auctions

FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION
FLORIDA STATEWIDE 1000 Homes
MUST BE SOLD! Free Catalog
(800)678-0517 USHomeAuction.com

Auto Donations

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE
$1000 GROCERY COUPON UNITED
BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION
Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer Info
www.ubcf.info FREE Towing, Tax
Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted,
(888)468-5964.

Business Opportunities

$1,000 A DAY POSSIBLE
RETURNING PHONE CALLS NO
SELLING, NOT MLM (800)479-8033
WWW.FOCUSONCASH.COM.

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you
earn $800 in a day? 30 Local Machines
and Candy $9,995. (888)629-9968
BO2000033. CALL US: We will not be
undersold!

Be Empowered! Realize Financial
Fulfillment with a Proven System! Six-
figure Potential. Returning 2 min-phone
calls. Not MLM. Full Training &
Support. References Available. Serious
Call (800)940-6301,
www.cashresultstoday.com

Business Opportunity Seekers!! Help
Others while Helping Yourself. Fire
your boss. No buying, No selling, Not a
MLM! www.wealthcomestoyou.com or
(800)242-0363 ext 7576

Cars for Sale

Police Impounds for Sale! 97 Honda
Accord $400! 95 Acura Integra $600!!
for listings call (800)366-9813 Ext 9271.

Employment Services

Learn to Operate a Crane or Bull Dozer
Heavy Equipment Training. National
Certification. Financial & Placement
Assistance. Georgia School of
Construction. www.Heavy5.com Use
code "FLCNH" or call (866)218-2763.

Post Office Now Hiring! Avg Pay $20/hr


Homes for Sale

HOUSE 3Bd/1Ba, 815 Bryson
St. SHIP Eligible, Ceramic
Flooring & Counter Tops, Newer
Appliances. 10X20 Concrete
Slab, Landscaped Yd. $86K 386-
688-1947

FirstDay
QUALITY COUNTY LIVING
Brick split plan house. 3bd/2ba, 1
half bath, 1 level, 1 fireplace, 20
acres. Lot is planted in pine
trees. 11784 CR 252 McAlpin,
FL. $475,000. Contact Jason
Blocker 386-965-2660.

Mobile Homes for Sale

BY OWNER: Doublewide mobile
home on 2 acres near Wellborn.
Good condition. $74,500. Seller
financing available. 386-365-
1130.
DW MOBILE HOME W/ 6+
ACRES. Renovated 3Bd/2Ba
$85,900 Split plan, Metal Roof, 2
Sheds (wired), 2 Horse Stalls,
within 5 miles of three Suwannee
River boat ramps. 386-935-
3371
FOR SALE OR RENT
DOUBLEWIDE 3bdrm 2bath on
4 acres. Lots of storage
buildings, $125,000 Owner
financing. Rent $700 month 386-
364-5173


or $57K/yr Including Federal Benefits
and OT. Placed by adSource not
affiliated w/USPS who hires. Call
(866)713-4492.

Health

Feeling Anxious About The Future? Buy
and read Dianetics by L. Ron Hubbard.
Price: $20.00. Order Now. Free
Shipping. www.DianeticsTampa.org or
Call (813)872-0722.

Help Wanted

No Truck Driver Experience-No
SProblem. Wil-Trans Trucking Will Teach
You How to Drive. Company Sponsored
CDL Training. Be OTR in Three Weeks.
(888)368-1205. Must be 23.

DRIVERS: CALL TODAY! Sign-On
Bonus 35-41cpm Earn over $1000
weekly Excellent Benefits Need CDL-A
& 3 mos recent OTR (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com

Exchange Coordinators Wanted EF
Foundation seeks energetic and
motivated representatives to help find
homes for int'l exchange students.
Commission / travel benefits. Must be
25+. (877)216-1293.

Driver PTL Needs Company Drivers-
CDL-A earn up to 46 cpm. l/2cpm
increase every 60K miles. Average 2,800
miles/week. www.ptl-inc.com Call
(877)740-6262.

Homes For Rent

3BR/2BA Foreclosure! $11,000! Only
$199/Md! 5% down 15 years @ 8% apr.
Buy, 4/BR $259/Mo! For listings
(800)366-9783 Ext 5798.

Miscellaneous

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from
Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal,
*Computers, *Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call
(866)858-2121,
www.CenturaOnline.com.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified Job
placement assistance. CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance (888)349-5387.

NOW AVAILABLE! 2008 POST
OFFICE JOBS. $18-$20/HR. NO
EXPERIENCE, PAID TRAINING, FED
BENEFITS, VACATIONS. CALL
(8(X))910-9941 TODAY! REF #FL08.


USED SINGLE WIDE Mobile
Home $10,500. Call Rick: 386-
752-1452
GREAT DEAL $500 Above
Factory Invoice On 3 Left Over
Fleetwood Mobile Homes Save
$1000'S Call Mr Mott 386-752-
3839.
2008 4Bd/2 Ba Mobile Home
for $42,995. Includes Delivery,
Set Up, CHA, Skirting & Steps.
Call
Rick 386-752-8196
STARTER MH 12X60
2Bd/1.5Ba Morgan's Trailer Pk.
hwy 90 W. Newly Renovated,
great buy. $12,500 OBO. Call
Randy 386-688-3736
Acreage

FirstDay
LAFAYETTE COUNTY
10 AC, Hwy 51 North of Mayo
Near River, $74,900
1 acres RV/Mobile Home lots,
Branford area, $15,000
SUWANNEE COUNTY
5 acres, Park Like,
Near Airport, $49,900
LOW DOWN
OWNER FINANCING
1-941-778-7980/7565
www.landcallnow.com
LAFAYETTE COUNTY, 5 acres,
6 miles North of Mayo on Hwy
27. Owner financing. Call 703-
399-9118.


Real Estate

TENNESSEE LAND RUSH! 1+acre to
2acre homesites, wood, views. Starting at
$59,900. Tenn River & Nick-a-Jack view
tracts now available! Retirement guide
rates this area #2 in U.S. places to retire.
Low cost of living, no impact fee.
(330)699-2741 or (866)550-5263, Ask
About Mini Vacation!

COUNTRY ACREAGE By Owner 5
Acres, Beautiful Mountaintop log cabin
site w/breathtaking views, gently rolling
property, surrounded by woods, 30mins.
from Cookeville, $29,900. Owner
financing (931)445-3611.

NC MOUNTAINS 2+ acres with great
view, very private, big trees, waterfalls &
large public lake nearby, $49,500 Bank
financing. (866)789-8535.

NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS-
Handyman special bordering U.S.F.S.
paved dr., well, septic, singlewide with
shop near Lake Nantahala, borders paved
road. Only $49,000.
http://valleytownrealty.com (800)632-
2212 valleytownrealty@verizon.net.

Buy Lot Now, Build when you Sell in
FL. Mountain Views/Pristine Riverfront/
CLAY COUNTY, NC. Pre-developed
incentives end 1 1/29.
www.harrisonspotlight.com Chip Manuel
(888)473-5253.

Steel Buildings

"EVERY BUILDING ON SALE!"
...Manufacturer Direct at "ROCK
BOTTOM PRICES" 32x60x18 $11,995.
35x60x16 $14,285. 40x80x16 $20,995.
48x100x18 $27,495. 60x120x18
$44,900. MANY OTHERS! Pioneer
Steel (800)668-5422.






ANF
ADVEP11fI.iG NETWORKS OF FLORIDA

r.l., iiId I Display Metro I) ,ly


Week of Nov. 16, 2008
416418-F


Antique Autos for Sale
FirstDay
ANTIQUE 8N FORD TRACTOR
1948 Rebuilt Engine, New Tires.
$2300 OBO. 386-590-2448
Autos for Sale
BUICK LESABRE 1995: Runs
Great 116K miles, Bk value
$2200 Asking Only $1500. New
tires & very well maintained. 386-
688-5661 Steven 386-688-
5658
BUICK PARK AVENUE 1998:
157K, Good Condition. A/C,
Climate Control, Leather, Power
Everything, 29 MPG Hwy miles.
$2800 OBO 386-362-8476
Trucks for Sale
NISSAN XE 1997: 5-Speed, 4
Cyclinder, White, Almost New
Tires, Good Condition, A/C,
Good Gas Milage, 69K miles,
$2500 OBO. 386-362-8476
Motorcycles
HARLEY ROAD KING CUSTOM
2006. Pearl Black, Ext Warrrenty,
Factory Alarm. Many Extras, 5K
miles, Garage Kept. $25K
invested, $17,500 OBO 386-688-
4191
Suwannee Legals
LEGAL NOTICE
The Suwannee River Economic Council,
Inc. Board of Directors will hold a
meeting of the Board of Directors on
Monday, December 1, 2008, 6:00 P.M., in
addition the Executive Committee
members will be holding a meeting at 5
P.M. at the Suwannee Economic Council
Inc., Senior Center Building in Live Oak,
Florida.
11/21

NOTICE OF MEETING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
SUWANNEE COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD will meet in the School Board
Meeting Room. 702 2nd Street, NW,
Live Oak, Florida, on the following date
and time:
FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 21,2008
10:00 a.m. Emergency Meeting to
request approval to issue Request For
Proposals (RFPs) for short-term
financing.
School Board meetings are open to the
public with the exception of Expulsion
Issues, which are private. Anyone
present wishing to appeal any decision
made during the Regular Meeting will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of
the meeting is made, including any
testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
Jerry A. Scarborough
Superintendent of Schools
11/21



FOR RENT-
3BR, 2BA DWMH,
CENTRAL H/A.
FIRST MONTH'S
RENT PLUS
DEPOSIT TO
MOVE IN.
WATER, SEWER
& GARBAGE
INCLUDED.
NO PETS
386-330-2567
460183-F


-FOR RENT-
2 or 3 BR
Singlewide
mobile home,
Central H/A.
First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
No pets.
386-330-2567
. . .. ...... ... . 24


NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANTTO
SECTION 83.806(4) (a),
FLORIDA STATUTES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to Section 83.806 (4) (a),
Florida Statutes, the personal property
described below shall be sold at Public
Auction to the highest and best bidder
for cash in accordance with the following
terms:
1. The description of the contents of the
storage unit is believed to be personal
property consisting of household items,
furnishings and supplies. The value of the
contents is unknown.
2. The name of the tenant is HERBERT
SMITH whose last known address is 28
John Knox Rd Apt 409 Tallahassee FI

3. The public sale shall be held on the
25th day of November 2008. at 2:00 PM,
at RAINBOW STORAGE Unit Number
D-105 located at 7434 CR 795, Live
Oak, Florida 32060.
4. The contents of the mini-storage unit is
being sold to satisfy a LIEN for non-
payment in the amount of $450.40.
5. The contents of the mini storage unit
may be sold in separate pieces or as a
total lot.
6. The tenant may satisfy the LIEN held
by Rainbow Storage and cancel this
scheduled sale by paying the full amount
of the LIEN owed to Rainbow Storage
together with all interest, legal costs and
fees.
DATED: 10/28/08
BY: Jack Flowers Owner
JACK FLOWERS, OWNER
RAINBOW STORAGE
7434 CR 795
Live Oak, Florida 32060
Phone: (386) 362-1171
11/19,21

Continued on Page 3C












orIl!It69

ALLTOLL

FRE


1.(0a)95286 a


Double and

single wide

mobile homes

for rent on

their own lots

in the

Live Oak area.

Ask for

Larry Olds

386-362-2720
479940-F


-J/


Ti ile to Upgrade.


If you're searching for that perfect set of wheels

look no further than www.nflaonflne.com



.-. ..4 ms


--- I i' --


PAGE 2C


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


SI


I










FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


1%


Copyrighted Ma

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.-. Syndicated Cor




Available from Commercial



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tent




News Providers


Suwannee Legals

Continued from Page.2C
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, OF
THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR SUWANNEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
DIVISION PROBATE
FILE NO: 96-53-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LIZZIE KING,
Deceased.
DAISY M. IVEY, as PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE
OF LIZZIE KING
vs
CARL NELSON, ET AL
NOTICE OF ACTION
(Formal Notice By Publication)
TO:
JOHN FLYNN, and all unknown heirs,
beneficiaries, creditors, or all others who
may have an interest in the above estate
claiming by and through JOHN FLYNN:

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition to
Partition Real Property for Purpose of
Distribution has been filed in this court.
You are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on petitioners
attorney, whose name and address are:
Heather H. Mclnnis, Esq.
207 S. Marion Avenue
Post Office Box 550
Lake City, FL 32056-0550
on or before the date that is 30 days from
the date of the first publication of this
notice and to file their original of the
written defenses with the clerk of this
court either before service or
immediately thereafter.
Failure to serve and file written defenses
as required may result in a judgment or
order for the relief demanded, without
further notice.
First Publication on November 11, 2008.
Kenneth Dasher
As Clerk of the Court
By Sharon Hale
As Deputy Clerk
11/21,28


ADVERTISEMENT OF BID
PPI Construction Management, Inc. will
accept sealed competitive bids on
Tuesday December 2, 2008 at 2 PM from
pre-qualified subcontractors for the
construction of Suwannee County Middle
School Addition located in Live Oak,
Florida.
Bid packages include sitework, fencing,
concrete, masonry, structural and
miscellaneous steel, casework, thermal
and moisture protection, preformed metal
roofing, doors and hardware, glass and
glazing, metal stud framing, drywall and
stucco, flooring, acoustical ceilings and
wall panels, painting, specialties,
walkway canopies, mechanical,
plumbing, electrical and data-
communications systems.
All bidders must submit 'a pre-
qualification form by 11/21/08. For a pre-
qualification form or questions, please
contact Brian Sheehan at PPI, 352-331-
1141 phone or 352-331- 9084 fax.
A pre-bid conference will be held at a
location to be determined on November
20, 2008 at 2:00 PM:
11/7, 14, 21


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, OF
THE 3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR SUWANNEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO: 612006CA0001890001XX
HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES INC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHRISTOPHER L ROGERS, et all,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES,
DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL
OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN
INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF JUDITH
A. MORE, DECEASED
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS
UNKNOWN
CURRENT RESIDENCE IS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for
Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:
LOT 17, QUAILWOOD, AS PER PLAT
THEREOF AS FILED AT PLAT BOOK 1,
PAGE 228, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A 1986 MOBILE
HOME. ID#33619C5977 A&B
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C.
Watson P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 1800 NW 49th,
STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE
FL 33309 on or before December 12,
2008, a date which is within 30 days
after the first publication of this Notice in
the SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT, and file
the original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint.
In Accordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled
persons who, because of their disabilities
need special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should
contact the ADA Coordinator at 200 S.
Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, FL 32064 or
Telephone Voice (386)362-0551 prior to
such proceeding.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on this 4th day of November, 2008.
Kenneth Dasher
As Clerk of the Court
BY: Sharon Hale
As Deputy Clerk
11/14,21

PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE
The Storage Place on highway 129 in
Live Oak, Florida announces a public
sale to be held on Saturday, November
22, 2008 at 12:00 P.M. The sale will be
held at the Storage Place Facility in Live
Oak, Florida.
The Sale is being held to satisfy a
Landlord's Lien. Everything is sold is
purchased "AS IS" WHERE IS" for csh.
The Storage Place reserves the right to
cancel any public sale that is advertised.
Also, the Storage place has the right to
no sale a unit if deemed necessary. The
units being sold are as follows:
L18-Jeff Alexander
L25-Shawn Roach
L27-Jennifer Burnham
L35-Alton Hill
L64-Lynette Manning
L79-Rhoshanda Herring
11/19,21


PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE
The Storage Place on highway 27 in
Branford, Florida announces a public
sale to be held on Saturday, November
22, 2008 at 8:00 A.M. The sale will be
held at the Storage Place Facility in
Branford, Florida.
The Sale is being held to satisfy a
Landlord's Lien. Everything is sold is
purchased "AS IS" "WHERE IS" for cash.
The Storage Place reserves the right to
cancel any public sale that is advertised.
Also, the Storage place has the right to
no sale a unit if deemed necessary. The
units being sold are as follows:
U89-Debra Holtzclaw
U85-Elizabeth Wickline
U133-Tammy Carson
U04-James Harrison
U112-Kathryn Jean Danaher
11/19,21

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR SUWANNEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-228-CP
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
DENA LAMBERT,
Deceased,
NOTICETO CREDITORS
The Order of Summary Administration of
the estate of DENA LAMBERT,
deceased, File Number 08-228-CP, has
been entered in the Circuit Court for
Suwannee County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 200
South Ohio Avenue, Live Oak FL 32064.
The Estate, except for exempt assets.
was valued at approximately $10,000.00,
and was distributed to James Lambert.
The name and address of the
beneficiary's attorney is set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedents estate, including
unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice
is November 14, 2008.
HEATHER H. MCINNIS
Florida Bar No. 0039040
Post Office Box 550
Lake City, FL 32056-0550
(386) 752-8420
(386) 752-8431 Fax
11/114,21



Call 386-


362-1734 to


place your


classified ad


ATTENTION COMCAST
CABLE CUSTOMERS
Effective December 21, 2008, Golf
Channel, on channel 727, will move from
the Digital Classic tier to the Digital
Starter tier on the Comcast channel line-
up. A free preview of this service may be
seen by customers subscribing to at
least Digital Starter pror to the effective
date.
These changes affect current and new
subscribers serviced by Comcast in Lake
City, Live Oak and surrounding areas.
Certain services are available separately
or as a part of other levels of service.
Basic service subscription is required to
receive other levels of service. A
converter is required to receive digital
service, and unless it is specifically
included in the package, is available for
an additional fee. Not all programming is
available in all areas. For information
about adding these or other Comcast
services please call 1-800-266-2278.
11/21

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 612008-CP-0002140001XX
IN RE: Estate of,
PATRICIA C. WIGELSWORTH,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
SUMMARY ADMINISTRATION


TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIM OR
DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been
entered in the estate of Patricia C.
'Wigelsworth, deceased, File Number
612008-CP-0002140001XX, by the
Circuit Court for Suwannee County,
Florida. Probate Division, the address of
which is 200 South Ohio/Dr. MLK Jr.
Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064; that the
decedent's date of death was June 12,
2008; that the total value of the estate is
approximately $63,580 and that the
names and address of those to whom it
has been assigned by such order are:
Name / Address
Maria Kay Davis
4770 S. Pierson Court
Littleton, CO 80127-1227
Wendi Rae Heydolph
24065 Whip-o-will Lane
Bonita Springs. Florida 34135
Pamela Carol Mingione
15399 Old Pine Court
Fort Myers, Florida 33912
David Robert Mowls
6866 Wigley Place
Live Oak, Florida 32060
William Ralph Mowls
1920 SE First Street
Cape Coral, Florida 33990
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIEDTHAT:


All creditors of the estate of the decedent
and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other
than those for whom provision for full
payment was made in the Order of
Summary Administration must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER
APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO. (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice
is November 14, 2008.
Person Giving Notice:
MARLA KAY DAVIS
4770 S. Pierson Court
Littleton, Colorado 80127-1227
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
TIMOTHY J. WARFSL
Attorney
Florida Bar No. 0398659
2015 Centre Pointe Boulevard
Suite 105
Tallahassee, FL 32308
Telephone (850) 942-1919
Fax: (850) 942-0313
11/14,21


Each Kit Includes4

* 2 All-Weather Fluoresce.nt "For Sale" Signs

* Successful Tips
"Get Top Dollar for Your Used Car"

Pre-Sale Checklist

Vehicle Options Window Display

E-Z Closing Forms
including Deposit Form & Bill of Sale


Run your Car For Sale classified in the Wednesday

North Florida Focus & Friday Suwannee Democrat

Classifieds and get the Car Kit for FREE.*

Deadline for placing your ad is Friday at 11:00 a.m.


*Not valid with the $18.95 special


416579-F j


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It's fast, easy, convenient, and always available!


To create your customized classified ad visit


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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2008


PAGE 4C


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These local businesses are here to take good care of you.


TO PLACE AN


CALL (386) 362-1734,


DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M.


ow


ABBEY MINI STORAGE r Metal Roofing
t $$$ $$SAVE$$$$$
All New Units Qual, Metal Roofing & accessories At Discount Prices"
S5X15 5X20 10X15 10X20 15X20 3'w de gahllume Cut to your desired lengths'
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd. 3' ldepanled Deli\ery Senice Available.
n2 alide 5-L 4k2 BbOut steel bu.ldengs
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak
-.^.-.I- I ... rHdf~'--i r 4i-i cr--_iy. IM 1"^ i-


364-5300


Trees, Trimmed or Removed Firewood
Licensed & Insured Free Estimates

TREE WORK
Bucket Truck and Climbinn

963-5026


) ppuSt saoCf luG & Mfg. Inc.
CALL TOLL FR EE 1-888-393-0335


*. I m la li t i:i m i ii;.rlv, i.ini;.in
Bad Water?
-' Call for a FREE Water Analysis!
Sle. Ser ice Repair Rental Aailable
No Salespeople No Hassle
Famrnl. 0\\ ned


For all of your waler problems call your
local WATTS Dealer. Davni B Downing
352 356 0474 or 352-498-2449
1-800-437-1128
We service wnat we sell'
a T ,-; 1 '-.n "l -'f l 5 f c. -. .- l.- .


R ick .t i I l i., 11.. .



BUILDERS SUPPLY
s i t ._ 1 1 1 N. i ri',-' -I 1.. 1 i i t T I IL .L.L,.-T" : ,1 i '-" ."J1_ ',L
i I 'lh'" h ll' l :hI I1"'IL.. 'i i L I j-1.l, .I
I, .. 1.. 1' I ,- ,. ,". L,,',,', ,'n1l, ..1 J I ,,-
hi.hbil: 48511 h"2-0 (RS Office: _22912 42-4J'511
Fax: i850i 584-3S34 SBS Fax: .221 242-6113


LIVE OAK

MINI STORAGE
* 5x15 5x20 10x15 10x20
CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE
5x5 5x10e10x10 u10x20
Units located on Gold Kist Road
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-6626


cj-THORIZge0
AWEWATTS
DEALER I


B ..
Woodworks
The Stair People
Interior/Exterior-Stairs/Stair Parts
SAll Types of Mouldings-Flooring/Siding
LET US RUN YOUR WOOD
SArchitectural Millwork/Shutters
Hardwoods!Exotic Woods/Plywood
Turnings 386-755-2556 Columns


WE ARE THE MANUFACTURER


ETAL ROOFING
STATE OF FLORIDA APPROVEDi
Residential Commercial* Agricultural
AGRI-METAL SUPPLY, INC.
Phone: 38-294-1720 Fax: 386-294-1724
232 SE Industrial Park Cir Mayo, FL


LAKEWOOD
APARTMENTS
IN LIVE OAK

Quiet country living 2 bedroom duplex
Call 362-3110


- -


ELIMB-INATORS, INC. Stump Grinding
Complete Tree Service
Licensed & Insured ,.
C!Nines


POWELL
ROOFING, INC.
State License: CC C057307
PO Box 1422, Mayo, FL 32066
All Phases of Rolirng
Root Repairs & Rool Inspct:lions
l FREE ESTIMATES*
Accepts Visa & MC Member BBB
Otice 386-294-1755 Fax 386 2943769
Toll Fr.e 888-358-ROOF 76631
imadil powellroohiriq2',,',iri1slream nlr|


SERICEHOORN
TH ODNRL


i.i ,, i,,r, l , .. i7 , , ,
Drigger's Heating,
Air Conditioning
and Refrigeration
Residential and Commercial
18113 I[e'l-rcrn .%\>%. 1386 1 3h4-57.14
I it nli k.r [320164 Clrk Dri 'gr,.
License CAC025404"

'I.F u NL


IRON-FREE WELL
WATER COMPANY, INC.
625 SE :5ith St.
Cross Ci\. FL ~3-1,s
NO SALT SYSTEM!
Lo:,, lo\, maintenance Take- ul ir,-,n.
sulfur. tannin and bacteria
The no-n:on.scnic .lteni
1-352-356-0474 or 1-800-437-1128

NKM':M;,


IJLUXURY LIMOUSINE
OF NORTH FLORIDA, INC.
i ,' 1, , i, i I 1 1
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LARRY PARKER OWNER
(386) 752-7754
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Lal- Clv FL ?'.204 Ic:rII 8 '.28'2011


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NO JOB TOO SMALL R L Chatincey
ALL WORK GUARANTEED (3861209.10; 3
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SLwn Care Pel Doors Oulaoor Storage
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CASH STRAPPED?
Will trade service for
anything of value!
SRoto Till Bushhog
SBackhoe
J.R.S. Excavation
386-364-1095

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Desperate Housewives
Do you need your
home or office cleaned
for the Holidays?
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Let us help!
Call Carlie @ 386-209-4399
or Martha 386-688-4019


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ONE STOP
SOLUTIONS
Computer Repair, High Speed
Satellite, Networking, New
Computers and Laptops
(386) 269-4092 (866) 598-6049
310 N. Ohio Ave., Suite B,
Across from Jiffy Store
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