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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: On The FLIPsi...
 Section A: Main: Suwannee...
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Viewpoints and...
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Days Gone By
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 Section C: North Florida Focus
 Section C: Calendar of Events
 Section C continued
 Section C: Calendar of Events
 Section C continued
 Section D: Classified Marketpl...
 Section D continued














Suwannee Democrat
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028422/00196
 Material Information
Title: Suwannee Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: J.E. Pound
Place of Publication: Live Oak Fla
Creation Date: November 22, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
weekly[ former <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
Coordinates: 30.294444 x -82.985833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note: Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000398954
oclc - 33273856
notis - ACE4563
lccn - sn 95026787
System ID: UF00028422:00196
 Related Items
Related Items: Live Oak daily Democrat
Preceded by: Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by: Suwannee leader
Preceded by: Suwannee citizen

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: On The FLIPside
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Suwannee Living
        page A 4
        page A 5
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Viewpoints and Opinions
        page A 6
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
    Section A: Main: Days Gone By
        page A 10
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 11
        page A 12
        page A 13
        page A 14
    Section B: Sports
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
    Section B continued
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
        page B 9
        page B 10
        page B 11
        page B 12
        page B 13
        page B 14
    Section C: North Florida Focus
        page C 1
        page C 2
    Section C: Calendar of Events
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
    Section C continued
        page C 6
    Section C: Calendar of Events
        page C 7
        page C 8
    Section C continued
        page C 9
        page C 10
        page C 11
        page C 12
        page C 13
        page C 14
        page C 15
        page C 16
    Section D: Classified Marketplace
        page D 1
        page D 2
        page D 3
        page D 4
        page D 5
    Section D continued
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
        page D 9
        page D 10
        page D 11
        page D 12
Full Text





See Page 14B for Thanksgiving Greetings


I1- .r e


nuuannee4


Serving Suwannee County since 1884 Midweek Edition -- November 22, 2006


n itDi.st riH arsq


122 nd YEAR, NO. 10


50 CENTS


Groundwater Levels
October, 2006


water shortage


Staff
The Suwannee River Water
Management District (SRWMD)
issued a Phase I Water Shortage
Advisory Nov. 16 that will re-
main in effect district-wide until
further notice.
The District covers all of Co-
lumbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamil-
ton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwan-
nee, Taylor and Union counties,
and portions of Alachua, Baker,
Bradford, Jefferson, Levy and
Putnam counties.,
No mandatory restrictions are
in place, according to SRWMD,


but water managers are calling
on all residential, commercial,
.agricultural and industrial users
to voluntarily reduce water con-
sumption through conservation
measures.
Lack of rainfall has created a
moderate drought throughout the
Suwannee River basin in Florida
and Georgia, according to the
National Weather Service
(NWS). Most areas of the Dis-
trict are experiencing low or ex-
tremely low ground ater and

SEE DISTRICT, PAGE 7A


Table 1. County and District-wideR Rainfall Totals


County
Afacltua

Bradford
Columbia.


Jeffeisori
Lafayette
Levy
Madismt
SuwMvrlnee
TOVWi
U no'n


Oct-2006


1.83
S1.82
195S
1.85
1.65

4.08
1.83
1.76
3.63
S 1.90
2.40
1 .53


Oct-2005 Average


4.5l6
3.27
308

2.46
2.29
2.28
2.96
122
2.568

1.84
2.91
2.20
4.17


3.05
3.31
2.76
306
3107
2.98
3.01
307
309
.3.14
324
3,22
3.17
3 27


fliv.ric Ocuvber 200 Avrerage 2 23
Dist~d -fKtMcaI Ocober Average 3.10
Dis"Id tHistorical 12-month Averaep 5562
Cumulative Distric1 12-nionth Rainfaill41A5
CumuIMAle Dkstrtf 12.montt' Defic.42.17


Civil rights leader


honored, remembered

Robert Bridges .. .


PANCAKES ARE YUMMY: The pancakes, eggs and sausage were a hit even with the children
at the Garden Club's Annual Fall Pancake Breakfast and plant and bake sale Nov. 11. See ad-
ditional photos inside. Photo: Vanessa Fultz


Ceryak retires after 16


years on School Board


Vanessa Fultz
Democrat Reporter
"And if there\s
no more business
to come before
the board, this
meeting is ad-
journed," said
School Board


Chairper-
son Bar-
bara
Ceryak as
she struck
the gavel
Barbara Ceryak Oct. 24.
It would
be her last regular School Board
ineeting. Her last chance to strike
the gavel. Her last chance to ad-
Journ the meeting.
After serving on the School
,Board for 16 years-Ceryak has re-
tired. James Cooper, who-beat his


opponent in the general election for School
Board District 4 seat, has taken her place.
Cooper was sworn in Nov. 21.
"Barbara was the mediator and the Eng-
lish expert," said Vice Chairperson Julie
Ulmer about her fellow School Board
member. "At times when things got a little
heated on the board, she, was always the


Democral Reporter

It's more than just a street
sign it's a sign of the
times, and of how they've
changed. Martin Street in
Live Oak is now Martin-
Mayhue Street, in honor of
Earnest Mayhue, a local
civil rights pioneer who'
passed away in 2001.,The
street was recently renamed
by proclamation of the Live.
Oak City Council.
Mayhue was one of a
number of local men and
women who fought for hu-
man dignity when doing soI
meant taking your life in
your hands.
"They didn't back up,"
Live Oak Mayor Sonny No-
bles said at a ceremony un-
veiling the sign. "The) had
a mission, they had a goal.
And we appreciate that."
Suwannee County
NAACP President Samuel


Ernest Mayhue and Edna Blake Mayue


Beasley, one of the men to
whom Nobles was referring,
was also on hand for the un-
veiling. "Mr. Mayhue was a
man who worked tirelessly
to improve ,his city,"
Beasley told a small crowd
of neighborhood residents
and elected officials. "It's a
pleasure that now we can all
come together as one."
Mayhue, who served as
NAACP president for 20


years, spearheaded the drive
to introduce single-member
voting districts to Suwannee
County. A federal court
made single-member dis-
tricts the law of the land
here in 1984. Beasley said
this opened the doors of po-
litical office to those previ-
ously excluded.
A Nov. 7 referendum


SEE CIVIL, PAGE 7A


SEE CERYAK, PAGE 7A


Animal shelter addition

plans presented


Susan K. Lamb
Democrat Managing Editor
Drawings for a
planned addition to the
Suwannee County Ani-
mal Control Shelter
were presented this
month to the County


Commission by local
architect Curtis Keen on
behalf of the Animal
Control Board (ACB).
The addition, some-
thing the commission
has asked to have done
since it provides money

SEE ANIMAL, PAGE 7A


TWO-VEHICLE CRASH ON US 90: Several people were checked for injuries in a crash involving a
pickup truck and this 1995 Ford Taurus at about 4:10 p.m. on US 90 west. According to the Live
Oak Police Department, the driver of the 2000 Dodge pickup truck, Brandie Danielle Johnson, 20,
of 14183 128th Pass was charged with careless driving, violation of driver's license restriction and
of child restraint laws. LOPD said Johnson's truck hit the back of the Ford at what witnesses told
LOPD was a high rate of speed as both were westbound. Live Oak Fire, LOPD and Suwannee Coun-
ty Fire/Rescue assisted at the crash in front of Gwen's Gifts. Photo: Robert Bridges


Sh T OfA i'S uwannee County should see showers. Highs in the upper 50s
2 07 C i evY ITo" and lows in the upper 30s. High today around 58FE For up to
"; v rad g WEATHER the minute weather information go to www.suwanneedemoc-
S. OlIv ra e ratcom FEATURED ON PAGE 2B

ACs1 9 9 Your Guide To Giving 200"6

A/. Auto,1 ise Only HOLIDAY
ahc'' rebala It
WES HANEY M AMER RoUi GIFT GUIDE iE
uS Ea s Of rDfwd O3i62t2d OpFerated Simt. 196"e i
Just East Of Downtown. 362-2976 Live Oak, FL ,x,V ]F.Must Bef Slflanta..l ,


INDEX
Classifieds 1-4D
Sports 1-5B
Suwannee Living 5A
Viewpoint 4A
Legal Notices 11B
AREA DEATHS,
Ruth Battles Montague, 81, O'Brien
Wesley R. "Wes" Holding, 70, Plantation
Donald Kelly, 19, Branford
Jason Green Sr., 25, Lake City
Jerry Lee "Buddy" West, 20, Branford
OBITUARIES ON PAGE 14A


www.suwanneedemocrat.com


_1





a~~


nl











ON THE FLIPSIDE


Arrest Record


-"--- BRIEFLY "


Editor's note: The
Suwannee Democrat prints
the entire arrest record each
week. If your name appears
here and you are later found
not guilty or the charges are
dropped, we will be happy
to make note of this in the
newspaper when judicial
proof is presented to us by
you or the authorities.
The following abbrevia-
tions are used below:
SCSO-Suwannee County
Sheriff's Office
LOPD-Live Oak Police
Department.
FDLE-Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement.
FHP-Florida Highway
Patrol.
FWC-Florida Wildlife
Commission
DOT-Department of
Transportation
OALE-Office of Agricul-
tural Law Enforcement
P and P-Probation and
Parole
USMS-US Marshals Ser-
vice
ATF-Department of Alco-
hol, Tobacco and Firearms
Nov. 16, German Men-
doza Hemandez, 24, Mayo,
no valid driver's license,
LOPD W. Kelly.
Nov. 16, Gregory Eugene
Isom, 28, 12910 US 90
West, Lot 111, possession
of cocaine with intent to
sell, sale of cocaine, pos-


session of crack cocaine
with intent to sell, posses-
sion of less than 20 grams
cannabis with intent to sell,
possession of controlled
substance (Lake County),
sale of controlled substance
(Lake County), SCDTF R.
Sammoris.
Nov. 16, Karen. Ann
Perez, 45, O'Brien, viola-
tion of probation on origi-
nal charge of attempt to
possess controlled sub-
stance, P and P S. Schadl-
bauer.
Nov. 16, Larry James
Reeves,, 56, Jacksonville,
possession of unlawful dri-
.ver's license, failure to ap-
pear on original charge of
driving while license sus-
pended, SCSO S. Law.
Nov. 17, Gary Foraker,
48, Deland, throwing dead-
ly missile, SCSO E. Ro-
driquez.
Nov., 17, Steven Donald
Kenny, 48, Anglewood, pe-
tit theft, SCSO K. Putnel:
SNov. 17, Danny William
Peterson, 28, White
Springs, worthless check,
SCSO M. Jelks.'
Nov. 17, Christina Lynn
Rio, 18, 18654 183rd Place,
possession of drug para-
phernalia, violation of pro-
bation on original charge of
driving while license sus-
pended, probation on origi-
nal charge of possession of


Touchton's


Sales Service Installafion
10156 U.S. Hwy. 90 East, Live Oak
S GCommitment to Excellence
Owners: Jan ,ww Touchtons.com
& Sarah Touchton CAC08747
or, 19-fly^'A :I I 1 I T. h


paraphernalia, LOPD W.
Kelly.
Nov. 18, Benny Ayers, 60,
homeless, trespass after
warning, SCSO E. Ro-
driquez.
Nov. 18, Charlotte Colet-
.ter Hall, 40, 542 Georgia
Ave.', violation of probation
on original charge of wel-
fare fraud, LOPD C. McIn-
tyre.
Nov. 18, Ramirez Jose
Hernandez, 27, 1101 Davis
St., Lot 9, no driver's li-
cense, LOPD A. Moreno.
Nov. 18, Christopher Lee
Linille. 20, 13913 80th
Place, possession of less
than 20 grams cannabis,
possession of cocaine,
SCSO K. Putnel.
Nov. 18, Enrique Perez
Rodriquez, 31, 1613 183rd
Road, battery domestic vio-
lence, aggravated assault
domestic violence, criminal
mischief, SCSO S. St..John.
Nov. 19, Guadalupe Juan
Garcia, 48, Mayo, driving
under the influence, SCSO
M. Lee.
Nov. 19, Paul David
Johnson, 2.1, .disorderly-
conduct, SCSO K. Putnel.
Nov. 19, Michaelynn
Johnson, 51, 23100 98th
Terrace, child neglect,
SCSO S. St. Johns.
Nov. 19, Robert Minor
Sr., 31, 6889 213th Road,
manufacture of marijuana,
possession of drug para-
phernalia, possession of
less than 20 grams
cannabis, bAttery of domes-
tic violence, SCSO K. Put-
nel.
Nov. 19, Lawrence Dun-
nell Reid, 27, 611 Archer
Street, return for court,
SCSO S. Law.


Thursday
Nov. 23
Community
Thanksgiving meal
Live Oak churches and businesses will
provide a Community Thanksgiving meal at
11 a.m., Thursday, Nov. 23, Thanksgiving
Day in the fellowship hall of First United
Methodist Church, 311 S. Ohio Ave., Live
Oak; Cost: Free, dine-in or take-out; Note:
Tickets available in advance; Contact: 386-
364-6953 or 386-362-2047.

Tuesday
Nov. 28
Pat Summeral
speaks at LCCC
Lake City's own, Pat Summerall will be
at Lake City Community College Levy Per-
forming Arts Center Tuesday, Nov. 28 at 7
p.m. promoting his new book "Summerall
On and Off the Air." Summerall was the
signature voice for the CBS Sports broad-
casting team for 32 years and played foot-
ball and other sports for Columbia High
School. This event is free to the public, but
seating is limited. Info: Mike McKee, 386-
754-4329.

Make appointments
now!.
Dec. 2
Community benefit blood
drive for Mark Williams
Two and possibly three bloodmobiles will
be on hand for a community benefit blood
drive at Christmas on the Square in Live
Oak for Mark Williams who has acquired
aplastic anemia. Williams has needed and
will continue to need Weekly transfusions.
He will receive credit for one out of every
five units of any type donated in his name.
The drive will also benefit Live Oak and
surrounding areas. Blood supplies are low
and needs are greater than blood on hand
around holidays. Look for,people wearing
red T-shirts to make your donation. Special
treats for those who donate blood of life-.
saving blood and a drawing for a very nice


gift basket Tentative site is on Wilbur
Street one block west of Suwanpe' County
Jail near the old high school site. For ap-
pointments, call Kathleen Townsend, 386-
362-2195 or Amber Ingram, 386-330-2529.

Sign up now
.Dec. 8
Millennium Nights
The city of Live Oak and Herold White
are sponsoring Millennium Nights every
other Friday beginning Dec. 8 from 7-10
p.m. at Millennium Park in downtown Live
Oak. Entertainers who wish to perform
must call in'advance to White at 386-590-
0129 .or 386-362-3263 to, get your name. on
the list of performers. An open mic time
will be set aside for those who perhaps
aren't polished performers yet but want t6
be this is your time to shine!

Saturday-Sunday
Dec. 2-3
Christmas Tree Lane
Lake Citr Women's Club presents ,
"Christmas Tree Lane" from 12:30-4:30
p.m., Saturday-Sunday, Dec. 2-3, at 27 SE
Hernando Ave., Lake City featuring deco-
rated trees, holiday table settings, seasonal
arrangements and bazaar items. Adults $5.
children $3. Proceeds benefit restoration
fund. Info: Sandra Nlesser, 386-362-6886
or 386-961-6643.

Sunday
Dec. 3
Garden Club of St. Augustine


SEE BRIEFLY, PAGE 7A


CASH 3 PLAY -
11/19/06.6-7-9 11/19/06 .4,9,64
FANTASY 5
11/19/06. ... 10,21,27,30,35
MEGA MONEY..... 24,32,37,39
;a LOTO 5,11,2,3.7 9;,, .


orAmeount otoffers on approvedHSBC isued Badcock &More credit cardpurchases, NoFinance Charges if purha...pa;A F;n l l 8 A r.,.ed' Mn, rrn othlfv a 3r -is fr- 24rn~ onrhiifp,.-choe ..notfid nR
n ccutno tI,=rnI, Finance Charges assessed from purchase dateand MinimumMonthlyPymnsreq .ed 6,18 r 2A mon ,t3-is SiocladPadre o ,r A tF R D,-foli k~e 27 9'6A PR Mr.mm e PSnce Cka.ges12
rules applytohaloaoof paym~entosandFinance Charges on your promotional purchase 4yumake more Ikon one prchowan our HW ii.ued B.,dcock &moree A.icard Call 1B88. 36 .13 1LIor e, ve ar wr l-



04'
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IN THE STORE IS


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006,


PAGE 2A


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Friday, November 24th 7AM IPM
- -----------


O















UWANNEE LIVING
0 = 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 * * *0*0*0*0*0*0*0*0*a*0*0*0*0* * * *i*0*o* *o*o*I* * * *0*0*0*0*0* *D*0*0*


Catholic Charities receive bikes from


Columbia County Sheriffs Office


By Suzanne M. Edwards,'
Executive Director, Catholic
Charities Bureau, Inc..
Columbia County Sheriff
Bill Gootee donates five bi-
cycles to Catholic Charities
Bureau, Inc. "We're always
pleased to put something to
good use," said Sheriff Bill'
Gootee. "These bicycles
were' found property and
owners could not be locat-
ed."
The organization is always
in need of bicycles to enable
the less fortunate to gain em-
ployment and or go to day la-
bor before 5 a.m. daily. Part
of its case management to be
able to continue to assist
families on an ongoing basis
is to seek to find out what is
preventing them from being
self-sufficient.
The ability to provide for
yourself and family is an
honorable desire of most
people. However lack of skill
and encouragement people
fall flat on their hard times.
This is the true meaning of
being a "social .service
agency." Helping those in
need help themselves!
Thanks to Sheriff Gootee,
were able to get three men bi-
cycles by the end of the day
to go to work.
Catholic Charities- serves
,Columbia, Suwannee, Hamil-
ton and Union counties.
For volunteer opportuni-
ties, donations or services,
call our office 386-754-9180.


CATHOLIC CHARITIES: Columbia County Sheriff Bill Gootee, right, donates five bicycles to
Catholic Charities Bureau Inc. Executive Director Suzanne Edwards, left. Photo: Submitted


AADC celebrates 10thi'

anniversary Dec. 1


A joyous celebration will
take place at 7 p.m., Friday,
Dec. 1 in Ebenezer AME
Church, 411 Parshley Street,
Live Oak, hosted by the pas-
tor the Rev. Charles Graham.
The African American De-
velopment Council (AADC)
will celebrate its 10th an-
niversary, accomplishments
of helping more than. 60
Su,' aniee High School stu-
dents start on the path to
higher education, and the vi-
sions and goals, they have for
their futures.
More than $75,000 has
been given to students under
the umbrella of the AADC..
All of these efforts has been
guided by and is dedicated to
the "Glory of God
Almighty."'.'
The program will praise
and thank the Lord for giv-
ing AADC strength, commit-
ment and wisdom to be suc-
cessful. They will honor,
original members, major
scholarship participants. and
students who have benefited


Are you looking for a flexi-
ble volunteer opportunity that
enables you to make a real
difference in the lives of se-
niors in your community? Do
you like to help others resolve
problems? If you answered
yes to these questions, then
the Florida Department of El-
der Affairs may have the per-
fect volunteer position for
you! .
Volunteers are needed in
Suwannee County for the
award-winning SHINE (Serv-
ing Health Insurance Needs of
Elders) Program. SHINE is a
free Medicare and health in-
surance information and
counseling program that helps
elders make informed deci-
sions. SHINE counseling
takes place at designated
Community centers or by tele-


phone. Seniors and their care-
givers receive information
and assistance oil programs
that may help to reduce their
health insurance and prescrip-
tion medication costs. SHINE
volunteers help Medicare re-
cipients compare supplemen-
tal insurance policies, inter-
pret coverage, and review
Medicare 'and health insur-
ance forms. SHINE volun-
teers can also help seniors un-
derstand .the new Medicare
prescription drug benefit.
Free comprehensive train-
ing is provided. Please con-
tact the Elder Help Line and
tell them you would like to
find out more about becoming
a SHINE volunteer.
Apply now for our next
training class. Call toll-free
800-262-2243 today!


Wedding reminder

Webb Olson
William and Elizabeth Webb of Live Oak would like to re-
mind you of the approaching marriage of their daughter,
Lacrica Suzanne Webb, to Luke Benjamin Ole' Olson, son of
Rich and Gayle Olson of Elizabeth City, N.C.
The ceremony will take place Nov. 25, 2006 at 1 p.m. in
St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church in Live Oak. A reception
will follow at Live Oak Shrine Club.
Local invitations will be sent.


Douglas Johnson
Jamie and Leroy Cumniings of t'O'Brien and Chris and Kim
Douglas of Belleglade would like to remind you of the ap-
proaching marriage of their daughter, Christai;,Lee Douglas,
to Jesse Lee Johnson, son of Olen and Debbie Johnson of
Branford and Shirle\.j and B.D. Douglas of.Cross City.
The ceremony will take place No\. 25, 2006 at 5 p.m. at
First Baptist Church in Branford.
Local inm stations will not be sent. All friends and family
are invited to attend the \%edding.


'





Note change in date!
Ice skating for the family!
Dec. 7-Jan. 1, 2007
The Plaza Ice Palace
Downtown Community Plaza iin Gainesville welcomes
back The Plaza Ice Palace from Saturday, Dec. 7-Mon-
day, Jan. 1, 2007. Sharpen your skates, break out those
winter sweaters, mittens and hats, and get ready to glide
out onto the ice with family and friends. The skating sea-
son will last four weeks during the winter holidays, from
Dec. 2-Jan. .1. 2007. Call for hours of operation, admis-
sion and skate'retal sperial-&vents.6-grot' r talks ri-
vate parties, discounts and sponsorship opportunities.
Info: Bill Bryson, 352-393-8527.


from this organization. The
guest speaker will be attor-
ney Daryl Parks from the
law firm Parks-Crump of
Tallahassee. This law firm
has been a major scholarship
presenter for nine years. We
cordially invite you to be
part of this celebration.
There will be a souvenir
ad booklet for this occasion:
full page $50; 17/2 page. $35;
1/4 page $25; business card
$15; and patrons $10.
Please make checks
payable to African American
Development Council, P.O.
Box. 416 Live Oak, FL
32064, deadline to receive
ads is Monday; Nov. 13. Any
questions, please contact
AADC. President Yvonne
Scott, 386-362-2789 or
AADC Vice, President the
Rev. Clifton Riley, 386-362-
5784.
Thank you for your
prayers, participation and
continued support of our or-
ganization. We sincerely
hope to see you there.


We would like to thank you for allowing
us to serve you for 19 years and look
forward to our continued service with you.
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0SUWANNEE DEM06RAT/LIVE. OAK


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006


PAGE 4A













SUWANNEE- LIVING



Gardening t ips A/4 Fepromotes waste

In our area of North Florida, gardening can Y reduction
be quite challenging as we deal with the burn- '' The Freecycle Network is made up of
o e i ... -. The Fremcycle Network was tahe gl ob
ing rays of summer, freezing temperatures in any individual groups across the globe
the winter, and sandy soil. Our somewhat ter- -to "recycle" and keep good items out of
operate and subtropical climate puts us in a very :"landfills. It's a grassroots and entirely
unusual zone which is often not addressed in .: nonprofit movement of people wh are
gardening books. However, it is just this cli- giving (and getting) stuff for free in their
mate that allows us to grow a much wider pt. ioc [ own towns. Each local group is moderat-
range of plants than anywhere else in the coun-' 4 ed by a local volunteer. Membership is
try. free.
November is time for the most eagerly await- .he Freecycle Network w-as started in
ed annual: the pansy. November is the earliest ay 2003 to promote waste reduce ion in
you can count on these annuals to beat the heat Tucson's downtown and help save desert
and survive most frosts through late winter into landscape from being taken ol er by land-
the early spring months. Your local nurseries f" l Th ... .L--
will have a plentiful supply of pansies for sale. nd n on-profits arn electro ic forum to
Follow these steps when planting pansies: "recycle" unwanted items. One person's
Set the plants in the soil at the same depth q.'..trash can truly be another's .reasure!
they were growing in their original containers. To sign up, find.youcom.nuni. at (be
If planted too deep, they may rot. Web si te at wwwf reeccle.org orjoin di
Space pansies close together for a full garden r '"fr th Web Site at thw.fre le.rg or join di-te
look. A spacing of 6 to 8 inches is really not too http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Suwan-
close. neeFreecycle/
Keep the soil moist and feed in ground plant- a How does it work ?
ings every 3 to 4 weeks, container plantings' When gyou ant to find a new home for
every other week. Doug and Ivoree Cheney's yard. 0 orPlu subnri a something-whether it's a, chair, a fax ma-
Remove flowers for bouquets or cut faded chine, piano or an oldz door-yol simply
blooms as needed to encourage new growth. chine, pian e-mail offering it to members ofimply
It is a good idea to water well your plantings. the Suwannee Count Freece group.
one to two days before a freeze is expected. over or before the sun hitting the cover might mant trees are normally shipped during Decem- Or, maybe you're looking to acquire
Most cool-season annuals are frost resistant un- cause-heat damage. ber and January for winter planting. Be careful something yourself. Simply post a re-
less they are making a lot of tender growth. If Plants grow slower in the cooler weather: in- 'and select varieties proven to grow well in our quest for the item and you just might get
there is any doubt about the hardiness of any of ground annuals can be fed monthly with a gen- area. it.
your annuals, it is best to provide them with eral garden fertilizer. Plants in containers can be You still have time to 'divide and transplant Our main rule: Everything posted must
some protection. Avoid using plastic covers that feed every other week with 20-20-20 or similar some perennials such'as daylilies, mondo grass, be free, legal and appropriate for all ages.
touch the plant foliage. Plastic that touches the fertilizer or use a slow release fertilizer as di- and liriope. Cool-season vegetabless to plant Non-profit organizations are also wel-
plants will conduct the cold to the plant. To pro- reacted on them label. now include beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, come to join the Suwannee County
tect the annuals from a light frost, cover them Fall is an ideal time to plant trees and shrubs. cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, Chinese cabbage,. Freecycle Network at www.freecycle.org
with newspaper and then plastic. You can also With all winter to grow roots, they will be bet- collards, mustard, bulbing onions, radishes, or
use sheets or blankets or cover them with hay or. ter prepared for the heat stress of summer, and spinach, strawberries, and turnips. Somnie herbs http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Suwan
pine straw. Don't mulch thicker than two to you will be able to enjoy many spring-flower- to plant now are parsley, sage, thyme and rose- neeFreecycle/
three inches; mulch should be thinner within a ing plants such as azaleas and loropetalums if mary. You can e-mail the moderator with any
foot or two of the trunks of plants. Remember you plant them now. Visit your local garden IHappy Gardening The Live Oak Garden questions at
to remove all coverings when danger of frost is center to place your order for fruit trees. Dor- Club!!! suwanneefl.modl@yahoo.com. '





Frequentlyaskedquestions by our readers


How do I get an announcement about a meeting Anniversaries
or event in the newspaper?


* You can send your news release to the attention of the
Managing Editor at the Suwannee Democrat, P.O. Box.
.370, Live Oak, FL 32064-0370, or fax it to. 386-364-
5578. Press releases can be sent via e-mail to ,the edito-
rial department at nf.editorial@gaflnews.com. If you do
not talk to our news department before you send your
release, we recommend you do so afterward to 'make
sure we have received it dial 386-362-1734 x 132. Al-
ways include your name and phone number on the re-
lease in case we have any questions. When are deadlines
for submitting news items to the print version of the
Suwannee Democrat? The -pages of the printed version
of the Suwannee Democrat, especially the feature pages,
are planned well in advance of the actual publication
date. In fact, there are different deadlines for almost
every section of the newspaper.

To get your story published in a timely fashion, a gener-
al rule of thumb is to submit your material at least one
week in advance of the publication date, sooner if pos-
sible. If you are unsure about specific deadlines, contact
the Managing Editor.

How can I get my wedding, engagement or an-
niversary announcements in the newspaper?

Engagements and Weddings


The Suwannee Democrat publishes wedding aind en-
gagement announcements
in the each edition. A
form to write down all the a u II
event's details is avail- NW
able from the editorial de-
partment at the Suwannee
Democrat. All announce- A d
ments must include a
name, address and phone y pq,
number for verification. *. L I


* We will publish an an-
nouncement with or with-
out a photo. Announce-
ments cost $25. Photos
must be of good quality
color or black and white.
You may pick up the pho-
to after it runs in the pa-
per, but we are not re-
sponsible for loss or dam-
age of photos.
* Deadline for accepting
forms is two weeks be-
fore publication. Forms
are dated upon receipt'
and run in the order in
which they arrive.


* The Suwannee Democrat will publish anniversaries 50th
and thereafter with or without a photo free. All other an-
niversary announcements cost $25. Stories will run in
each edition.

* If an open house is planned, it is advisable to submit the
announcement two weeks before the event so that it will
appear in the paper at least one week before the open
house. Forms are available in the editorial department.
The same photo policy for engagements and weddings
applies to all anniversaries.

* Deadline for accepting forms is two weeks prior to pub-
lication. Forms are dated upon receipt and run in the or-
der in which they arrive.

What are your policies regarding Letters to the
Editor?

* The Suwannee Democrat welcomes letters from readers
interested in having their views on current issues pub-
lished. Letters must include your full name, address and
telephone number for verification purposes only. Letters
that cannot be verified will not be published. Letters
must be brief- no more than 200 words and in good
taste.'

We reserve the right to edit for brevity, clarity or libel.
Personal attacks, personal disputes and private litigation
are not appropriate issues, unless there is public con-


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ual consumer complaints referring to specific business-
es.

Letters by the same person may be limited to one
pei quarter. Thank yous, for public events o n 1 y,
must be limited to 20 people or organizations per letter.

There are several ways to get your letter to us:

E-mail it to:
nf.editorial@gaflnews.com
Or use our online form to send your letter. electronical-
ly.
Fax it
* 386-364-5578
Mail it
* Letter to the Editor
* 211 Howard St. East
* P.O. Box 370
* Live Oak, FL 32064


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006


ESUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 5A










X'. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 3A


Attention American Profile readers!
Here's a peek at what's inside the Friday, Nov. 24, Ameri-
can Profile which is a bonus newsmagazine in each weekend
edition of the Suwannee Democrat.
COVER STORY: What to Do with Your Leftover Turkey?
PEOPLE: Guide Dog-Judy From, from Poulsobo, Wash.,
is one of a select group of special animal trainers who raises
puppies to become guide dogs for the blind.
PLACES: Horse-drawn Holiday Parade-During the first
Saturday of December in Lebanon, Ohio, the holidays have
been celebrated for nearly 20 years with the nation's largest
horse-drawn carriage parade. Around 70,000 attendees watch
as 120 beautifully decorated carriages parade through town
during the day, and again in a glowing night parade.
MADE IN AMERICA: Authentic reproductions-When
Hollywood filmmakers or historic re-enactors need an 1800s-
style wooden bucket, washtub, barrel or keg, they call Jim
Gaster, a cooper and owner of Beaver Buckets in Indianola,
Neb..(pop. 642).
AROUND THE HOUSE: It's a Wrap!-Think beyond
-" wrapping paper from a store. Wrapping gifts in unexpected
ways not only makes the gift more personal but it lets you use
your creativity and resources in environmentally friendly
r, ways.
FAMILY: Make Time for Me Time-Learn practical tips for
how to identify and deal with common time robbers and re-
claim.an hour every day for fun and refreshment for yourself.
FOOD: Texas Style Beef Brisket with Panhandle Sauce-A
reader shares: Over the years,. I've tried quite a few brisket
recipes, and this one is by far the best! When fixing it for the
family, I'll make the brisket and serve it the same day. But
when we're having friends over for dinner, it's a great time
saver to fix the beef the day before.
FOOD: Butternut Squash Bake-An AP reader is, always
asked to share this recipe when she serves it. It's different and
always a hit at potlucks.


Sheriff's Report


Man jailed on two
counts of burglary

On Nov. 7, Suwvnnee
County Sheriff's Office
(SCSO) Deputy Arthur Robin-
son arrested Ste en Karl
Frese, 55, 7290 119th Rd, and
charged Frese with two counts
of burglary, two counts of
grand theft and two counts of
dealing in stolen property, ac-
cording to SCSO. .
That same day Deputy
Robin-on was investigating
two separate burgl.aries when
he receil ed information from
one of the victims that Frese, a
maintenance \ orker. had been
seen coming out of the victims
resident, -S:CSO said The
victim then im entoried the
items and discovered several
things missing. Deputy Robin-
son discovered the items had
been pa%,ned at a local pawn
shop, SCSO said. Frese was
located, arrested and tran<-
ported to the Suwannee Coun-


Branford, and charged her
with aggravated assault.
Deputy Akey was dis-
patched to the area of SR 247
and 256th.Street that day and
during his investigation it was
determined Clark had forcibly
tried \\th her vehicle to stop a
vehicle a family member was
in, SCSO said. Clark was ar-
rested and transported to the
Suwannee County Jail..,

Man charged with
violation of injunction

On Nov. 15, Deputy Rod
Polite arrested David Wayne
Lewis Jr., 35, 215. Woods St.,
and charged him. with yiola-
tion ofiniinctio '
That same day Deputy Po-
lite met. with a .victim who
presented the deputy with an
active 'injunction against
Lewis, according to SCSO.
The victim advised that Lewis
had called and had driven by
the residence, two conditions
T ---.Z I ,


ty Jail and booked Lewis was court-ordered not
to do, according to the SCSO(
('Branford woman charged Once contact "\as-made with
Silth aggravated assault Lewis, the deputy determined
the violation of injunction had
On Nov. 10, Deputy Bobby occurred. Lewi.s was then ar-
Akey arrested Wendy Lea tested and transported to the
Clark, 36, 3973 284th. St. Suwannee County Jail.

Live Oak Police Report
To arrested during Moreno conducted a traffic
traffic stop stop on a small graN truck on
Fifth Street due to a stop sign
Two people have been ar- violation.
rested by the Live Oak Police 'Williams. who was a pas-
Department and charged after senger in the vehicle, was ar-
a traffic stop. rested after crack cocaine was,
On Nov. 15, LOPD Officer found on the passenger side of
Alfredo Moretio arrested the ,ehicle
Leroy Smith. 4",1634 177th \Villianms was placed in the
Rd., and chaiged him with Su%%annee Countn Jail.
possession of cocaine ,Also
arrested:was Nildred Horton. Juvenile robbery suspect,
24, Mayo. Horton was arrested
charged, iith drl\ in., without a
valid driver's license. On Nov. 15, LOPD Sgt. Ja-
The arrests came at about son Rountree located and ar-
12:45 a.m., Officer Moreno rested a juvenile suspect in an
conducted a traffic stop in the armed robbery that occurred
area of Gold Kist Boulevard Aug. 24 at a residence at 618
and Eleventh Street due to an S Walker Avenue.
expired tag on a green Ford Rountree made the arrest af-
truck, LOPD said. The driver ter he was dispatched at about
was Horton and while Smith 5:04 p.m. to the Reddy Freddy
was a passenger. Store located at 528 S Walker
Both were transported to the Avenue in reference to a juve-
Suwannee County Jail where nile suspect wanted in the
they were incarcerated. The above case being at the store.
truck was towed and the co- .Upon Rountree's arrival at
caine was put into evidence at the location, the juvenile sus-
the LOPD. pect fled on foot, heading west
on Eighth Street then onto
Man charged during traffic Ninth Street where he was ap-
stop with narcotics violation prehended by LOPD Officer
Wayne Kelly.
On Nov. 15, LOPD Officer The juvenile was then ar-
Alfredo Moreno arrested rested and taken to the Suwan-
Alexander ,33, 215 Woods nee County Jail where a
Avenue, and charged him with search of Rountree's patrol
possession of cocaine, accord- vehicle after the arrest yielded
ing to the LOPD. 'a cigar tube containing crack
Williams was arrested at cocaine belonging to the juve-
about 2:15 a.m. when Moreno nile suspect, LOPD said. Ad-
was on patrol in the area of ditional charges of possession
Home Avenue and Sixth of cocaine and resisting with-
- Street LOPD said when out violence wiereI added


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HOW TO REACH US

Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, www.suwanneedemocrat.com
Mail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
* Publisher,
Myra Regan, ext. 122



CONTACT US WITH

YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, contact us by phone or
make contact through the
Internet through our web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com



NEWSROOM
* Managing Editor,
Susan K. Laitmb, ext. 131
* Reporter,
Robert Bridges. ext. 134
* Reporter,
Vanessa Fultz, ext. 130
* Editorial Clerk,
Marsha Hitchcock, exi. 132



ADVERTISING
* Advertising Manager,
Monja Robinson ext.-105
* Sr Aldvenriiing Repre'seniative,
Bill Regan, E'11.107
* Adveri sing Repr:esnrrtaivr,
Louise Sheddan e:.. 141 i
* Adve-rl;isin Repr--eraiv,
Joel Turner, ext. 109
* Telesales Ad Represeriiaiive
Myrtle Parnell, e..1. i:313
* Classified/Legal,
Tami Stevenson er 102



CIRCULATION
* Circulation Manager.
Angie Sparks,.ext. 152
* Circulation
d Service Hours, M-F 8 a.m. 5 p.i.
Subscription Rates,
In-county. $32 Out-of-county, $45


001 emuaorat





SServing Sa'wannee
County Since 1884,


The Suwannee Derrocrat published
Wednesday and Friday.
Periodi.ca.s postage paid at
Live Oak, FL 32064. Business localed
at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
FL. Pubicaiiori number 530180.

"POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Bo, 370. Live Oal FL
32064'." Anruali ubscriplion rate is
$32 in county, $45 out of county and
$45 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemnocral com.

OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday -.Friday 8 am. to 5 p.m.,


Letters, comments and opinions on
the Viewpoint & 'Opinions page are
not. necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Suwannee Democrat.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters may be mailed, faxed or
e-mailed to our office. All letters are
read. Not all letters are published.
Letters may be edited to fit available
space. The editor should not alter the
writer's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
the point, an ideal range is 150 to
200 words. Please include your
name, address, and day and evening
phone numbers for verification.
Letters MUST be-signed. Letters to
the Editor can be limited to one
letter per quarter per individual.


RANT & RAVE HOTLINE
Here's your chance to tell everyone what you,
think! Callers may dial 208-8314 and leave a
message to express their thoughts, good or
bad, 24/7 about issues and politics, but not
about private individuals or businesses. If you
prefer, you may e-mail your comments to
susan.lamb@gaflnews.com.
Your name is not necessary, N",..
but please, take 30 seconds
or less for your message.
Sii '-, ini -. .-'i i F U't of .
'rnv 1I'. I r ii: .7 1 f rida"


' *


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i WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006


PAGE 3A


NSUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


J1
lot - -- 1, -f -Z,-


Ua .


,IIIILI z-aiu, wilcoll












VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


BIBLE VERSE

"Come, let us sing for joy to -the
Lord; let us shout aloud to the Rock
of our salvation. Let us come before
Him with thanksgiving and extol
Him with music and song."
Psalm 95:1-2


^muaunrn! -kwrrat
MYRA C. REGAN Members of the Suwanneel
Publisher De mnocrat editorial board are Mvra


SUSAN K. LAMB
Managing Editor


C. Regan, publisher, and Susan K.
Lamb, managing .editor. Our
View is formed by that board. J


LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Dear Editor:
The Suwannee County Commissioners, as well
as other taxing authorities in Florida, may want to
consider how California property owners revolt-
ed, halting the ridiculous property tax inflation in
their state with Proposition 13. The power is ulti-
mately with the people. A similar ballot initiative
capping tax increases might be what Florida prop- -
erty owners need to control county government
greed and excessive, wasteful spending. A legally
mandated property tax cap is exactly what Florid;
ians need to' force local governments to spend and
budget responsibly. Why should local govern-
ments be able to.forcibly take more money each
year from property owners while continually in-
creasing:expenditures and wish lists that exceed
tax revenue?
My property taxes have risen over 100 percent
since 1999, with a whopping 23 percent increase
from last year to this most recent tax bill. I think a
23 percent increase in property taxes in one year is
absurd. I don't see any return on my investment in
Suwannee County's budget that makes me 'warm
and fuzzy about such a large annual tax increase.
I would like to be able to say that my salary has
double in the past eight years like my property
taxes have, but unfortunately it is not even close. I
live within a budget, and so should this county.
I begrudgingly wrote the check for my tax bill
this afternoon: Iam increasingly unhappy about
S the trend in Suwaninee County to tax and spend irT.,,
responsibly, with, no end in sight. The property
owners and voters have the power to get the last
word. It might be. wise to remember that when
you begin to dreain of more tax money for your
pet projects. "
James Daniell




Rant and Rave hotline is open!
Suwannee Countians, it's time to speak your
mind! How do you do that? By calling the brand
new Suwannee Democrat Rant and Rave hotline!
Hate the Waav\ the county mows down the beauti-
ful,flowers along Suwannee County roadsides in
the spring? Don't want anyone else moving :to;
Your county? Think zoning changes are a bit off?
The city charter should be changed? Think your
county goVernment isn't doing its job? Are you fed
up with traffic, bad roads, decimation of the coun-
ty's trees for development, general discourtesy
and zoning board decisions, both city and county?
Now you can let everyone know how you feel if
you will be respectful in how you express yourself
and don't use profanity.
Callers to 208-8314 may express their thoughts,
good or bad, 24/7 about issues and politics, but
not about private individuals or businesses. If you
prefer, you may e-mail your comments to
susan.lamb@gaflnews.com. You nmay give your
name, or not, but please, only take 30 seconds or
less for your comments. Let us know what's bug-
ging you.
During political years. like 2006, you iay ex-
press' your opinion about candidates, using the
same rules above, but no political opinions will be
printed the last full week before election, which is
Sept. 5 and Nov. 7 this year. Those' comments
would need to be on the hotline no later than Aug.
23 for the See
Although it won't'be printed in Rant and Rave,
you can also use the line to give the Democrat tips
on events happening in the area that just might be
"under wraps" and you think your hometown
newspaper should know about. Chances are we
may already know and are working on a story, but
we. urge our readers to make sure we know by
telling us what you know. We'll check it out.
The number is 208-8314. Call now! Call often!
Give your name if you like, but it's not required.


Please address letters to:
Letters To The Editor, Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Please include your name, full address and daytime
phone number. We ask this so we can varify your letter
and discuss any questions about it with you.


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COMMENTARY

Simple stuff itl somie fancy, names,,.,
S PIP, stuff", MetoT


S"The' City "of Chattanooga,-
IPTenn., has bought goats to eat


Dwain Walden


kudzu. Now that. sounds very
simplistic, "down to earth" and
probably very efficient. But, at a
time when projects typically de-
mand 'complexity with a' de-
tailed blueprint and extensive
cost analysis, the city fathers ob-
viously couldn't just call this ef-
fort "goats eating' grass"' -
though in essence, that's all it
is. Thus, it is being called "exot-


ic vegetation removal."
Yes indeed, wi-e must have names that appear to exude
complexity even when the fundamentals of a job require
only a paper clip and a rubber band.
I've never thought of goats as being "exotic.", And,
kudzu is not exotic even though it was brought to us
from Asia as a way to stop erosion and perhaps provide
cattle feed. .
Well, it will stop erosion. In fact, it will stop most any-
thing left parked in its vicinity. I recall a story, in my
youth of a.construction company that. lost a bulldozer.'
Typically a bulldozer is hard to lose. You generally don't
forget where you left one even if you had been drinking
Nyquil while operating it.
And it so happened, as the story goes, that an old timer
took a company representative out to where a new road
had been constructed. And after chopping kudzu 'for a
while, they found the bulldozer encased in its vines.
Kudzu is thick and tenacious. It's always been a theo-,
'ry of mine that somewhere on a once-eroded hillside un-,
derneath a heavy blanket of kudzu, lies the body of Jim- *;
my Hoffa.
There is irony in the fact that all sorts of chemicals and
machinery have been devised to defeat kudzu. But like.
annoying kinfolk, it just keeps coming back. And those
goats that had been watching this process since its incep-
tion just stood around with big grins, waiting for some-


' one.to employ the.obvious.
The question came up at the coffee table this morning
if kudzu could be converted to ethanol. I don't
know. Maybe it could be fermented and distilled. But I -s^
would have nightmares of driving down some lonely .as
road at night and a vine that had sprouted in the fuel i12
tank would come slithering over the back of the seat. in
Several years ago, there .was a contest over in Alabama Jl
to see who could come up with the best use of kudzu. sw
One inventor came up with a.tea from its roots and
leaves. Apparently it didn't catch on.-Another made e.L
some recipe from it. But, there is no indication that we are. o
running short of rope, even though some congressmen iq'
have been given a lot of it to run with, I'm told. /
.One.fellouw made baskets from the vines. But again, jol
how many baskets can we use? I'm sure someone tried fdt
smoking it, but nothing that plentiful and cheap is going -t
to find a market in that venue. It may only be a matter of -
time before we have a kudzu festival and a kudzu queen
... in Alabama, of cqtirse.
The goat application may only treat the symptom. I
think the problem is that the roots of this vine can grow "
down six to 10 feet. And if you don't get to the "root of sq
the problem,", then the goats amount to little more than as
cheap lawn mowers. I
And that may be the best we can do with confronting NA
this weed. In essence, man will negotiate with it as op- 'D
posed to destroying it kind of like how we deal with X4
fire ants. We keep applying stuff to their beds until they oJ
run over into the neighbor's yard.
In that regard, there may be a fine line between nego-,q
tiating and harassment. A
Back to "exotic." When I was a kid, they were called o-
crazy cropdusters. Now they are called aerial applica-
tors. The garbage man is now a sanitary technician. A :i?,
bus driver is now a logistics purveyor. The guy in the a:d
corner office with nothing particular to do is now an om- co
budsman. And a cab driver is called Akmed. '
(Dwain Walden is editor/publisher of The Moultrie Observ- Id
Ser, 229-985-4545. E-mail:dwain.walden@gaflnews.com)


Suwannee County School Board

(4-year terms, non-partisan) School Board Office 386-364-2601


Superintendent
of Schools


Walter Boatright Jr.
364-2601
Home: 364-1944


Dist. 1 Jerry Taylor
362-4720


SSchool Board Members


tplrl


Dist. 2 -
Muriel Owens
364-5350


Dist. 3 Julie Blake
Ulmer 362-7303


Dist. 4- James Cooper
362-4062


Dist. 5 -
J.M. Holtzclaw,
935-4962


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER -22,' 2006, 'VV


M SUWANNEE P~EMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGEF RA


I


I









VV luLJI"JL..LILU fi, vtlvi-,


Ceryak
Continued From Page 1A

one to bring us back togeth-
er."
Ceryak used her skills as a
family court mediator to
help the board come to con-
sensus. She has been a.medi-
ator for the Third Circuit
Court since 2001.
"I think that has been my
role on the board to be the
consensus builder because
that's how I am," she said.
"In most any situation if you
can get people to sit down
and talk it out, they can usu-
ally work things out."
Ceryak decided to run for
the School Board when the
member in her district decid-
ed not to run. She was elect-
ed in 1990 after running a
second time.
"I knew nothing about'
politics or how to run for of-
fice, but I thought it would
be an interesting thing to
do," she said.'
Ceryak said there have
been lots of funny moments
during her years serving on
the board. When she first got'
elected, she was the only'
woman at the time. On one
occasion the members went
to a training where they per-
formed a trust-building exer-
cise for team building. To


carry out the exercise they
picked up Ceryak and car-
ried her through a ropes
structure on an obstacle.
course.,
"They chose me because I
was the smallest one by far,"
she said. "It was pretty
bazaar, and it seems more
bazaar now than it did then.'"
Among the most exciting
things she's seen happen on
the School Board is watch-
ing the brain bowl compete
in Orlando at the state level.
Some of the other highlights
are seeing the Suwannee
High School football team
be state champs three years
in a row.
Being on the School Board
16 years has also given her
the' ability to see and follow
many students throughout
their entire school careers.
Ceryak began her teaching
career in Ohio in 1968.and
taught school in different
grades and schools for nine
years. After that time she
stayed home with her chil-
dren for a few years. When
she went back to work she
began working with children
on a different level.
"My whole working life
I've worked with children
and families in some capaci-
ty," she said. "I always liked


kids."
Ceryak worked with the
Child Abuse Prevention Pro-
ject where she provided par-
ent services and community
awareness addressing' child
abuse. She also worked with
Suwannee County Schools in
community education and in
a literacy program.
Later, she got involved
with the court system as a
mediator..
She was one of the first
volunteers when the
Guardian Ad Litem program
'started in 1985. She has
served on the advisory board
since 1990 and is currently
the president of "The Voices
of Children," a non-profit
corporation that supports the
program.
Ceryak will continue her
job with the court system
and with Guardian Ad
Litem.
The move from teaching
to the other capacities she's
served in was partly because
of the ability to have a direct
impact on families.
"It's such a privilege to.
have an opportunity to do
something like serve on the,
School Board. I was a part
of making things happen and
that was exciting," she said.
"We have such outstanding.


employees in Suwannee
County who give so much of
themselves over and above
what they're asked to do,
and I'm proud to-be part of
that."
Ceryak said when her co-
workers found out she was-
n't running again, they lav-
ished her.with greeting cards
and phone calls to tell her
how she would be missed.
"I'll miss the contact with
the people and schools; It's
been a big part of my life for


a long time, and I'll miss it,"
she said. "I've had a lot of
support in these 16 years on
the School Board. J just
want to say, 'Thank you,' to
all who have supported me."
At her last.regular School
Board meeting Ceryak was
honored with a shell symbol-
izing her love for the beach.
She and her husband, Ron,
who recently retired with
Suwannee River Water Man-
agement, are planning to
travel and spend time at the


beach.
As a practical joke, Ulmer
gave Cer) ak a tiara when
she became the board chair
so she could be crowned
queen of the School Board.
"It stemmed from a com-
ment made by someone that
Barbara would not be
crowned the chair but only
elected," said Ulmer.
Ceryak said she will at-
tend the School Board meet-
ing this week to pass her.
tiara back to Ulmer.


School Board Chairperson Barbara Ceryak thanks fellow'School Board members at her last regular
School Board meeting Oct. 24. After 16 years, Geryak has retired. Photo: vanessa Fultz


District


Continued From Page 1A

surfacewater levels due to be-
low-average monthly rainfall.
With a cumulative 12.17-inch
rainfall deficit, the year end-
ing Oct. 31 is the eighth driest
year since 1931..
New record monthly lows
were observed at the Aucilla
River near Lamont, the Stein-
hatchee River near Cross City,
and for the second month in a
row, the Santa Fe River near
Fort White. The end-of-month
reading at the Wifthlacoochee
River near Pmnenaied the his-'.'
toric monthly low at that sta-
tion, after setting a new low
last month.
Water shortage advisories
are issued by the District in
accordance with Florida
Statutes and the Florida Ad-
ministrative Code, which give
them authority to implement
water shortage plans.
With the NWS predicting a
return to El Niflo weather pat-
terns this winter, District offi-
cials hope winter rains will re-
pleiish the water resources to
levels where the advisory no
longer is needed. Until then,
they offer some important wa-
ter-saving tips:


Reduce lawn/land-
scape irrigation.
Don't water between'
10 a.m. 4 p.m.
Install an automatic
rain shutoff switch on irriga-
tion system.
Plant drought-resis-
tant trees, plants and grasses.
Equip hoses with au-.
tomatic shutoff nozzles.
Wash vehicles infre-
quently and only on porous
surfaces.
Use a broom or
blow er not a hose to clean
sidewalks, drive%\as, parking
areas.
Fix leaky faucets and
toilets, which can waste up to
100 gallons per day.
Replace older fix-
tures with low-flow devices.
Don't let the water
run while brushing teeth,
shaving, or washing dishes.
Take shorter show-
ers; staying under 5 minutes
can save 1,000 gallons per I
month.
Don't use toilet as a
waste basket.
Use appliances effi-
'ciently (run full loads in
clothes washer and dishwash-
er).


Briefly


Continued From Page, 3A

38th Annual
Christmas
Tour of Honqes:
The Garden Club of St. Au-
gustine invites you to .its
38th Annual Christmas Tour
of Homes from 1-5 p.m.,
Sunday, Dec. 3. Seven
homes dating from 1750-
1912 on one of the nation's
oldest streets-St. George
Street-will. be showcased.
Tickets: $15 in advance.
$20 da' of tb.r also i- -
cludes, a delightful tea, and, a
visit to their "Christimas
, Store" at 22 Marine Street,
St. Augustine. Info: Janice
Sperlanes, 904-471'-2891 or
Myra James, 904-824-1580.


Ice skating for

the family!
Dec. 7-Jan. 1, 2007
The Plaza Ice
Palace
Downtown Community
Plaza in Gainesville wel-
comes back The Plaza Ice
Palace from Thursday, Dec.


7-Monday, Jan. 1, 2007.
Sharpen your skates, break
out those \\ inter \\eaters.
mittens and hats, and get
read) to glide out onto the,.
ice with family and friends.
The skating season will last
four weeks during the win-
ter holidays, from Ded. 2-
Jan. 1, 2007. Call for hours
of operation, admission anid
skate rental, special events,
group rentals, private par-
ties, discounts and sponsor-
ship opportunities. Info:
Bill Br\ son. 352-393-8527.
. ,- '. ,,i i

Saturday
Dec. 9
Fourth Annual
Altrusa Christmas
Tour of Homes
Altrusa International, Inc.
of Live Oak will offer its
Fourth Annual Altrusa
Christmas Tour of Homes
from noon-6 p.m., Saturday,
Dec. 9. Tour begins at Live
Oak Garden Club, Eleventh
Street, Live Oak where di-
rection map and refresh-
ments will be provided.
Visit all five homes at your ,
leisure. Cost: $10 per per-


son with profits to be used:
for community projects. Ad-
iance tickets ale available
at \\iudstream, 386-364-
2502, Esther Bass; Cit\
Hall, 386-364-3722, Shan-
non.Court; and McCrimon's
Office S stems. 386-362-
2171, Barbie Scott; Info:
Julie Ulmer, 386-362-3882
or Esther Bass, 386-362-
2502.

Saturday-

Sunday
D e c l O 1t ,


Civil

Continued From Page 1A

called for a return to county-
wide voting, but Beasley said
the NAACP will file a federal
suit to enforce the previous
decision.
Mayhue also led -he fight
against job discrimination in
Sun\annee Coniur~and
.worked to get city roads
payed in the African-Ameri-
can community.
Born in 1921, Mayhue
served in World War II as a


Christmas
musical/drama
presentation "A
Christmas Praver"
Parkvie\w Baptist Church.
invites the community to its
Christmas Musical Drama
presentation "--A Christmas
Prayer, at 7. p.mn., Saturday,
Dec. 9 and Sunday Dec. 10.
Admission is free. The
church is located at 268
NW Lake Jeffery Road,
Lake Cith, across fiomn
Young's Park Info 386-





member of the famed Red
Ball Express, a trucking oper-
ation which supplied ammu-
nition and rations to Ameri-
1 can troops during their march
to Germany after D-Day.
A long-time deacon at the
African Baptist Church, May-
hue w as manied for 59 ears
to the late Edna Blake May-
hue.
Robert Bridges can be
reached by calling 386-362-17'4
ext. 134 or by e-mail at .
robert.bridges @gaflnews.com.


Animal


Continued From Page 1A

each year to the ACB for ex-
pansion, could cost as much
as $425,000 to $475,000,
Keen said. Members of the
ACB pointed out that cur-
rently $100,000 of that coun-
ty money has been set aside
to help with building the ad-
dition.Keen said he expects
the addition could possibly
provide for the next 15 years,
depending on how fast the
county grows.
Currently, the shelter con-
sists of two portable outdoor
buildings on two sides of a
concrete slab with a metal
roof covering those two
buildings and the areas
where dogs are housed in
open cages. During winters
and.storms, chicken house
type curtains are rolled down
to provide for safety and
keep cold winds out of that
area as much as possible.
Two animal control officers
coverage for the entire coun-
ty at animal control with one
part-time worker in the of-
fice. All three work for
Suwannee County Sheriff
Tony Cameron.
Keen said the addition,
which would add additional
space to house animals, in-
cludes a larger enclosed area
for cats and kittens, has a
spay neuter room and has
rolling doors to provide safe-


ty for the animals during
times .of bad weather such as
hurricanes, is "bare essen-
tials, turn key" and has no
frills, but was well-thought
out to meet the needs of the
facility.
Commissioner Randy
Hatch, who serves as the
commission's member on the
ACB, asked for and got ap-
proval for the ACB to go out
for Request for Proposals
(RFPs), to see what the addi-
tion will cost. By taking that
route, the ACB can then
work with the company that
gives the best price and pos-
sibly reduce that price by
making changes. Hatch said
the ACB needs to find out
what the bottom line will be
after grants and the money it
has already saved is applied.
Lexie Soles, who heads up
the Humane Society which
has its offices in Madison
County, said as a taxpayer,
she hopes all people in the
county will help to pay for
the facility, not just a few.
Just prior to the presenta-
tion by Keen, about a half
dozen volunteers at the shel-
ter presented petitions with
more than 1,000 signatures
asking the commission to ex-
pand the facilities. That
group also told the commis-
sion they had raised more
than $2,870 at the recent' ani-
mal expo at the Suwannee


County Coliseum to help the
shelter. During that presenta-
tion, several people suggest-
ed that all petitions that ask
for change should be accom-
panied by the costs of the
change. Commissioner Doug
UDell noted that the entire
county, voted recently to im-
plement county wide voting
without knowing how much
it will cost." If people had,
known that cost before; -they
may not have voted for it,"
UDell stated.
Hatch said he volunteered
to draft the petitions. He said
although the petition didn't
have a dollar figure, "that
doesn't negate the fact that
over 1,000 of our county tax-
payers want to see this im-
provement." Hatch pointed
out that the money the com-
mission has allotted to the
ACB each year has gone a
long way. Hatch also thanked
Soles for her help along the
/ way in animal issues. "The
Humane Society has taken
the lead in the spay-neuter
program," he stated.
UDell suggested that 1,000
people signing the petitions
wasn't representative of the
county's wishes. He said
there are many adults and
children in the county with
no home and hungry with no
place to go.
"It's not an animal issue,
it's a people issue," Hatch


;told UDell. "Not,an animal
in the county has read over
our ordinances, it's the peo-'
ple who call us!"
UDell suggested there has
to be a program to educate
the people about spay-neuter
and animal issues, something
Hatch and others pointed out
is being done at this time as
the ACB gathers more volun-
teers.
Commissioner Billy
Maxwell suggested the coun-
ty needs more animal ordi-

ASK DR. MAN TOOTH

Q. Any advice for Thanksgiving dinner?
A. Thanksgiving is a day for counting
one's blessings--and, of course, for
feasting. Here's one general rule about
eating: The food you eat during your
Thanksgiving meal will cause less harm to
your teeth than repeated snacking. During
the course of a big meal, your mouth will
generate more saliva, and saliva helps
wash away food and lessens the potential
damage from acids generated by eating.
Acid can damage the tooth's enamel.
Preliminary studies show that cranberries,
the tart little fruits that are one of the stars
of the Thanksgivirg table, contain
antioxidants that help prevent tooth decay.
Compounds in the berries appear to have
the ability to inhibit enzymes associated
with the formation of plaque on teeth. Now
bear in mind that some cranberry
preparations use sugar to cut the tartness
of the fruit and that, of course, can reduce
the protective benefits. Brush your teeth
after the feast, if you can. If not, at least
rinse your mouth out with water or chew
some sugarless gum.
Happy Thanksgiving.
Presented ats service to the community by
'HERBERT C.
MANtTOOTH, D.D.S., P.A.
L, c ,,, ,, -L
362-6556 '-
1800) 829-6506


nances. Animal Control Offi-
cer Janis Huntei agreed, but
said there also has to be
more animal control officers,
,if more ordinances are
added.
The discussion' led to a
plan to hold a workshop in
early 2007 regarding making
changes in animal ordinances
and other animal control is-
sues.


If you are interested in be-
coming a volunteer at the
Suwannee County Animal
Shelter, please call 386-208-
0072 between the hours of 9
a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday -
Friday. You may also call
that number for animal con-
trol problems, or to find out
about adoption of adult cats
and dogs and kittens and
puppies.


SCOTT
',pi... L.:... ..n '542 E Hu,. ard tr..-J 3.;.; :,. 362-1244
-' N uC c L-,.c_, hn n 1 "I O- II-_o I 3 1. 362-2591
Mdkical Equipminl Di: 3W 362- 441144
Hw. '.' Houur: a.Ju .uu.3. PM MoiFnri., .3u .uh3.J00 rJ pi- Sit.

by Jeffrey F. Scott, R.Ph Drive-up window

Medications Used to Treat High Cholesterol
Cholesterol is found in the bloodstream and in all the cells of the
body. Cholesterol is produced by the body, and is also obtained from
animal foods, such as eggs, meat, and dairy products. The American
Heart Association recommends that we should all consume less than
300 milligrams of cholesterol per day. Persons with heart disease
should limit this number to less than 200 milligrams of dietary
cholesterol per day.
Hypercholesterolemia, a high level of cholesterol in the blood,
increases the risk of coronary heart disease, which may lead to a heart
attack.. Different types of drugs may be prescribed to decrease
cholesterol. The stations are one type of medication used to slow down
the body's production of cholesterol and remove cholesterol buildup
in the arteries. Atorvastatin (Lipitor) and simvastatin (Zocor) are
examples of stations. Bile acid sequestrants such as colesevelam
(Welchol) help to lower LDL, or "bad" cholesterol. Fibric acid
derivatives, such as Tricor, help to decrease triglycerides and also
increase HDL, or "good" cholesterol. Niacin can lower triglycerides
and LDL cholesterol, and also increase HDL cholesterol. Cholesterol
absorption inhibitors, such as Zetia, work by decreasing the amount of
cholesterol that is absorbed by the intestines. 309692-r


I


PAGE 7A


IA/inr~i:.qny JPMRF 22.200


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE OAK









SCHOOL


SMS honored for scoring a "B" on the FCAT


SMS AWARDED: School Board members recognized Suwannee Middle School [or beinBg a "B" .
school in a board meeting Oct. 24. SMS Principal Norri Steele gives a word of thanks for the award. WE'RE GONNA GET AN "A": SMS faculty and staff are shooting for an "A" on the FCAT this year.
Pictured from I to r. Superintendent Walter Boatright, School Board Chairperson Barbara Ceryak, At the Oct. 24 school board meeting they sung "We're gonna get an 'A' on: the FCAT" to the tune of
Steele and SMS Dean of Students Gary Caldwell. Photo: vanessa Fultz "I've been working on the railroad." Photo: Vanessa Fultz


SMS FACULTY AND STAFF RECOGNIZED: In a meeting .Oct.*24, SMS faculty and staff were recognized for their hard work in achieving a "B" school last year. Staff are pictured with School Board At-
torney Andy Decker, School Board Vice-chairperson Julie Ulmer, School Board members J.M. Holtzclaw, Jerry Taylor, and Muriel Owens, Superintendent Walter Boatright; School Board Chairperson Bar-
bara Ceryak, SMS Principal Norri Steele, SMS Dean of Students Gary Caldwell and SMS Assistant Principal Donna Long. Photo: Vanessa Fultz J


SES homecoming float t
Submitted by Connie Little
'The staff and faculty at Suwannee Ele-
mentary School (SES) are very proud the
school float tied for third place in the SHS
homecoming parade!
The wonderful float would not have been
possible if SES had not received such ter- V.
rific help' from various businesses in our
community. The school would like to say
thank you to the following local businesses
who donated materials for the float: How- g .
land's, Floors Installed, Signs and Banners,'
Tedder's Cornerstone Construction and Dr.
Albert Hendricks.
SES would also like to thank the APT ,
(Association of Parents and Teachers) for
all their hard work in helping prepare the
float and all the super members of the fac- S-
ulty who stayed late after school to help get I
the SES float ready.
Several outstanding individuals selflessly I
gave their time to help as well: Tom Mus-
grove, Anthony Selph, Julie Ulmer,
Michelle Ernest, January Jernigan, Sabrina
Corbett, Rick Little, Dennis Nixon and
Marty Teddep.
Thanks again to everyone who helped .
make the float memorable for SES stu- SES HOMECOMING FLOAT: Suwannee Elementary School Assis
dents! Council ride on the school float which tied for third place in the h


es


for third place


,,: ., ,,**^ *-5
tant Principal Stevan Bass, the wounded Crusader, and members oi SfLS Student
homecoming parade. Photo: Submitted


PAGE 8A


0SUWANNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 20ID6








VVtL.I-U EOu/.r, I'IV..IVIu- --- DEM CR TLA,----- V OAG..

SCHOOL


I..' .. "-,"

"those conducting the Families Building Better Readers Program
from I to r, Cheryl Mae Brinson, Carol Yanossy, Angela Martin,
Angie Stuckey, Veronica Dequilla and Nancy Roberts.
Photo: Submitted


Families



B building



Better


n Readers



Program

t. i was a fun night for all when 300-plus at-
tended the Families Building Better Readers
program at Suwannee Intermediate School"
: SIS) on Oct. 19.
Region II Literacy Center Director Angie
Sruckey.collaborated with Volunteer Florida,
Just Read, Florida! and ,Suwannee County
School Board's Title I Program and Migrant
Program to bring a fun-filled, family night
.j"t' ^ for all families with children Pre-K-grade 5.
The evening kicked-off with a. free dinner,
children \\ere offered free books and each familywas given a
"free book bag which included many items to promote reading
acti\ lines with their child. Parents then participated in a reading
workshop. children practiced reading strategies and then pre-
.Lsented a nationn on the play, "The Three Little Pigs," for all to.
.gnjo '
The emphasis of the night was to provide training to parents
in 10 different reading strategies which they could use at home
with their child, to boost reading skills needed for the FCAT and
other areas of reading. O-ver 150 children went wild when pre-
senter Angela Nlartin, of the University of West Florida, an-
n-ounced that it \\ as "the parents who would be given the 'home-
work" tonight."
Local businesses proved to be greatly supportive of Stuckey
and the Region II Literacy Council, when they generously pro-
v..ided o er 25 different door prizes, which included the grand
. pnze. a La-Z-Boy recliner chair, compliments of Morrell's Fur-
, iture Store
Thanks to the many volunteers and to all who made this
evening possible.
tA Those who gave door prizes are: Advanced Auto Parts,
-IXllbritton's Pontiac-GMC Truck, Badcock Furniture Store of
Live Oak, Dollar General, Golden Corral Restaurant, Gordon
Tractor, Hayes Produce, Little Caesars Pizza, Live Oak Florist,
Movie Gallery, The Music Center, Inc., Publix Super Markets,
-Rainbow Birdland & Pet Center II, Southern Sportsman Gun &
Pawn, Suwannee Democrat, Tri-county Locksmiths, Winn-Dix-
se and Morrell's of Live Oak, Inc.


Presenter of Martin conducts asign parade athe program. oto: Submitted
Presenter of the workshop Angela Martin conduces a sign parade at the program. Photo: Submitted


Student at the reading program participates in arts and crafts. -Photo: Submitted


Computers for 4-H RoboDogs


PCS Phosphate of White
Springs recently donated six
refurbished Dell computers to
Su\\aimee County Extension
Office tfor its computer lab,
complete with monitors, key-
boards, mice and surge protec-
tors-.JUSTIN TIME!
T he computer lab at the
Suwannee County Extension
Office has a capacity of 13
computer stations. Three years
6go. eight refurbished desktop
computers received from the
4 'niversity of Florida, the
Suv annee River Water Man-
;,,'agement District and other
sources, were installed in the
lab. Since this time, 4-H has
-extensively used the comput-
ers for a GIS study, for live-
stock and farm judging, and
more recently, for program-
ming by the Suwannee 4-H
RoboDogs robotics team.


The RoboDogs club has,
grown to 12 members while
the number of working com-
puters had shrunk to only
three. The robotics team has
been under pressure lately,
meeting twice a week after
school since September for
three hours or more as they are
preparing for competition this
fall. With nine working comL
puter stations, the team mem-
bers can program their robots
freely with virtually no lines
... no waiting.
The robotics team gratefully
acknowledges PCS's donation
as a Silver Sponsor of their
team.
You can learn more about
the robotics club at
www.geocities.com/suwan-
nee4hrobodogs or by contact-
ing Mary Ward, 386-362-
2771.


-i
COMPUTERS FOR 4-H ROBODOGS PROJECTS: Pictured, I to r, 4-H RoboDog team members Drew Land, Matt Wotton, C.J. Peadon,
Tyler Carrozza, Erik Swart, Tyler Harmon, Ryan Burley, Jed Arnold, Tineke Swart and Caleb Land. Not pictured, Kimberley Clark and
Ethan Clark. Photo: Submitted


projects


:


PAGE 9A


E SUWALNNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE OAK


r-,,v~i~nrir=czny Kivr~RF 3 222oo


v.'












PAG iQ iUANEDMCRTLV A ENSAY.OEBR2,20




FROM THE PAGES OF THE SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT, THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1973'


4-H'ers Honor

Merry Taylor,

Ed Jowers
The 4-H'ers a d 1aders of
Suwannee CounLy.. dedicate/
this week to Mrs Merry Taylor I
and Ed Jowers because of
their combined efforts and
devotion to the 4-H program
~In our county;.
S Merry Creel Taylor came in
June 1969. and is Assistent -
Home Economics Agent and
4-H Coordinator. Ed Jowers
_. came to Suwannee County in
September of 1971 and is As- M-". '-
sistantt County Agent and 4-H
Coordinator. e >
The 4-H'ers would like to ex-
Pi press their sincere gratitude to
these two people for the out-
standing jobs they've done.
They are appreciated more
MeUs= Tklor and Ed Jowers than they will ever know '


Dr. Donald Burch, left, presented the University of Florida Scholarship Award to Lin Wil-
liams, right, of O'Brien, Standing to the extreme right and left are Lin's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Frank Williams.


Suwannee High Outstanding Juniors: (Back, 1-r) Tommy Clayton, Mike Brown, Tommy
Randolph: (center) Jackhie Kent, Pam Crews, Patti Slemp, Carol Sandquist, Carol Graham:
(front) Dede Anderson, Pam Howland, Mary Shepherd;, Melanie Cheney, and Debble Long.


' .1VI .:- -.-. p..ar.a.m.., .. ,
Mrs. Conner Thomson second from right) and Mrs. Winston Barr (far left) were in Live
Oak Wednesday morning, April 18, to check the facilities at the Suwannee High School' audi-
torium for "The Singing Americans" presentation of "When You Wish Upon A Star", which
is being sponsored by the Live Oak Woman's Club. Standing from I-r are: Mrs. BarP Mrs.
Frank Futch Sr., club's second vice president, Mrs. Leon Koon. Mrs. H. W. Hodek, Mrs..W. M,
Jernigan, Mrs. Thomson, and Mrs. T. J. Kennon Sr., ticket chairman.


Branford High Outstanding Juniors: (Back, 1-rl Todd MetIrger. Mike Banks Bay Milliban,
Marie Severance, Sandy Goss; (front) Ann Griffin, Cheryl Bas, Debbie Jones, Denise Bar*
nett, and Patricia Mason.



-SK


SNOW DAYS: Pine View Elementary School students in Live Oak enjoy the snow Feb. 13,
1958. Jerry Snipes.is pictured second row, fourth from left.
Photo: Submitted by Erma Deas

This page sponsored by: .


Lamar Hancock, right, presented George W. Harmony
with the "Distinguished Service Award" on behalf of the
University of Florida Alumni Association.
294106-F


All Seasons Baskets N' Decor


Now open in Downtown Live Oak.
A Beautiful Home Decor &
Gift Baskets Store


15OFF
Everything in the Store,


We carry: Candles Pictures
* Christmas Ornaments Floral Designs
* Beautiful Wreaths All Occasion Gift
Baskets and much, much more!


215 W. Howard St. (Two doors down from the old TNT Fitness, 6
across from the old Howell's Office Supply) Downtown Live Oak 386362 2612
I BRING IN THIS AD AND RECEIVE AN ADDITIONAL 10-----------% OFF--------YOUR ENTIRE ORDER
BRIG IN THIS AD AND RECEIVE AN ADDITIONAL 10% OFF YOUR ENTIRE ORDER!
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'


I


I


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 200&


SUWANNEE -DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 10A












BUSINESS


Chuck Williams joins


Farm Credit of North Florida


Farm Credit of North
Florida, ACA Commer-
cial Officer Russ Pope is
Proud to announce
Chuck Williams has
joined the Farm Credit
team as a loan officer. He
will be working primarily
''in Suwannee, Lafayette,
Hamilton and 'Columbia
7 Counties. Williams will
.maintain an office in both
'the Live Oak and Lake,
City branch offices.
Chuck will be joining a
very experienced staff in
both of these areas. He
will work closely with
Pope and the rest of the
Live Oak and Lake City
staff, ensuring that any-
one needing financial as-
sistance will find expert
help at Farm Credit.
Prior to coming to Farm
Credit Williams was em-'
ployed with the St. Toe
Company located in the
panhandle of Florida. St.
Joe is a real estate sales
development company
with large land holdings
throughout Florida and
',other states. Williams is a
nativee of.lasper. After
.,graduation from high
"school, he attended Val-
.'dosta State University in
?Valdosta, Ga. receiving a
.bachelor's degree in mar-
29keting in 2004. Williams
.Olans to pursue a mas-
'ter's degree in real estate


Chuck Williams
at Florida State Universi-
tv.
Williams will make his
home in Lake City. He
enjoys hunting, fishing
and golf. Everyone at,
Farm Credit welcomes,
him and is proud to have
him join an 'outstanding
group of lending profes-
sionals.


Farm Credit of North
Florida is a customer-
owned cooperative provid-
ing ftiancuig to rural Amner,
icans throi ghour 18 North
Florida counties. Farm
Credit of North Florida ser-
vices over 1,800 members'
and, because of its coopera-.
tive structure, has returned
over $92 million to stock-
holder/members since 1988.


October 2006. Photo: Submitted
Candy Bouquet Inter- their franchise and rela-
national. Inc. recently tions with the corporate
namednd Candy Bouquet headquarters. Candy
4200 owner/designer Bouquet stores specialize
Kim Stefanik Candy Bou- in creating beautiful flo-
quet International Fran- ral-like arrangements
'Jchisee of the Month for from gourmet chocolates,
'.October 2006. The store is candies and accessories
located at 626 Ohio Av- from around the world.
enue, South, Live Oak. In addition to the bou-
Stefanik was selected quets, Candy Bouquet
,because of her excellent 4200 also carries bal-
Spractices in customer re- loons, plush toys, We-
hlations, development of bkiriz, fudge, candles and


SThursday
Nov. 23
Community Thanksgiving meal
Live Oak churches and businesses will pro-
vide a Community Thanksgiving meal at 11
a.m., Thursday,'Nov. 23, Thanksgiving Day in
the fellowship hall of First United Methodist
Church, 311 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak; Cost: Free,
dine-in or take-out; Note: Tickets available in
,advance; Contact: 386-364-6953 or 386-362-
204-7.


local honey.
Founder and Piesident of
Candy Bouquet Internation-
al, Inc. Margaret McEntire
started the company in 1989
by creating the bouquets in
her garage as gifts for
friends. The unique concept
grew in popularity and to-
day there are over 720fran-
chise locations in 50 states
and 44 foreign countries.
V i s i 't
www.candybouquet.com for
more information.


Lowe's growth strategies for 2006


Lowe's Companies, Inc.
(NYSE: LOW) 'discussed
how the company's culture
of customer service and its
key initiatives position- for
its continued growth when
Lowe's met. with analysts
and investors recently in
Lansdowne, Va. at its an-
nual conference.
In an update to the com-
pany's business outlook,
Lowe's indicated current
sales are trending below its
prior expectations, but the
company anticipates deliv-
ering diluted earnings per
share at or near the low end
of its prior guidance range
of $2.00 to $2.07.
"We remain focused on
strategies to drive market
share, however near term
pressures on the US con-
sunmer have led to.a more
cautious outlook for the
second half of the year,"
commented Lowe's Chair-
man,, President and CEO
Robert A. Niblock. "De-
spite the backdrop of de-
clining housing turnover,.
elevated energy costs and
difficult comparisons re-
sulting from' active 2004
and 2005 hurricane sea-
sons, I'mn confident we
have the plans and people
in place to ensure we con-
tinue to meet the needs of
consumers and gain mar-
ket share.
"Opportunities for
Lowe's lie in our ability to
prudently manage expens-
es while continuing to pro-
,vide the 'best products,
everyday low prices and
knowledgeable service in a
compelling shopping envi-
ronment," Njblock added.
.Lowe's 'Executive Vice
President and CFO Robert
F. Hull Jr. provided an out-
look for fiscal years 2007
and 2008 and shared
,Lowe's future store growth
plans.
"Our continued invest-
ment in the business, bal-
anced with diligent ex-
pense management, posi-
tions Lowe's for continued
profitable growth," said
Hull. "We plan to add ap-
proximately 155 and 150
stores in 2007 and 2008, re-
spectively, equating to ap-
proximately 11 percent
square footage growth in
2007 'and 10 percent in
2008. We expect this square
footage growth to drive an-
nual sales increases of 10 to
13 percent in fiscal 2007
and approximately 11 to 13
percent in 2008. This
planned sales growth is ex-
pected to drive ;diluted
earnings per share growth
of 10 to 14 percent for.2007
and a 12 to 16 percent in-
crease in 2008."
During the conference,
Lowe's executives focused
on key programs and ini-
tiatives to improve opera-
tions, continually enhance
customer service and in-
crease market share. High-
lights of the presentations
included:
Larry D. Stone, senior
executive vice president of
merchandising / marketing:
"During the past year, we
implemented programs to
more efficiently merchan-
dise our products and
make our stores more cus-


tomer friendly and easier
to shop. With our inviting
stores and compelling mer-
chandise, we are confident
we will continue to gain
market share in each of our
20 product categories. Ad-
ditionally, our marketing
programs continue to res-
onate with customers and


build the
Lowe's
brand."
Charles
W. (Nick)
Canter, exec-
utive vice
president of store opera-
tions: "Knowledgeable as-
sociates consistently deliv-
ering exceptional customer
service is critical to our
continued success.. Our
Customer Focused Pro-
gram, in place since 1999,
rewards great service and
has helped us enhance our
culture of customer service.
We are building ori our sol-
id foundation of great em-
ployrees and compelling
merchandising to capture
market share."
K. Scott Plemmons, se-
nior vice president of spe-
cialty sales: "Our specialty.
sales initiatives remain an
important part 'of our
growth strategy and .'dri-
vers of dur business. Our
new specialty sales organi-
zation is designed to meet
the evolving needs of cus-
tomers and help our stores,
maximize sales. By. work-
ing .to improve our In-
stalled Sales, Special Order,,
e-commerce and C6mmer-
cial Business Customer
programs, and we are con-
tinuing to strengthen our
relationship with cus-
tomers."
Joseph M. (Mike)
Mabry Jr., executive vice
president of logistics and
distribution: "Our indus-
try-leading logistics aind
distribution infrastructure
is focused on providing ca-
pabilities to support
"growth, improve service
and drive profitability. The
evolution of our capabili-
ties, including the imple-
"mentation of our Rapid Re-
sponse Replenishment ini-
tiative, has put us in a great
position to deliver on those.
goals. Our continued in-
vestment in state-of-the-art
Regional Distribution Cen-
ters, Flatbed Distribution
Centers, Transload facili-
ties, and our replenishment,
systems will ensure we re-
tain our supply chain. ad-
vantage."
S* Maureen K. Ausura, se-
nior vice president of hu-.
man resources; "Our
knowledgeable employees
are the foundation of our
continued success. At.
Lowe's we work to en-
hance employee knowl-
edge and customer service
with tools such as job aids,
telecourses, teleconfer-
ences, e-learning and for-
mal classroom training.
We're also working to bet-
ter understand the effec-
tiveness of all employee
programs on driving the
high level of service expect-
ed at Lowe's."
Gregory M. Bridgeford,
executive vice president of
business development:
"We continually strive to
understand the key compo-
nents and drivers of con-
sumer purchase behavior.
Our focus on the customer
enables us to identify arid
address, their changing
needs and apply that
knowledge to new store ex-
pansion opportunities as


well as new business
growth initiatives."
Lowe's fiscal third quar-
ter ends on Nov. 3 with op-
erating results to be pub-
licly released on Monday,
Nov. 20.
This news release in-
cludes "forward-looking


statements" within the


meaning of the Private Se-
curities Litigation Reform
Act of 1995 (the, "Act").
Statements of the compa-
ny's expectations for sales
growth, comparable store
sales; earnings and perfor-
mance, capital expendi-
tures, store :openings, de-
mand for services, and any
statement of an assumption
underlying any of the fore-
-going, constitute "forward-
looking statements" under
the Act. Although the com-
panNy believes that the ex-
pectations, opinions, pro-
jections, and comments, re-
flected in its forward-look-
ing statements are reason-
able, it can give no assur-
ance that such statements
will prove to be correct. A,
wide- variety of potential
.risks, uncertainties, and
other factors could materi-
ally affect our ability to
achieve the results ex-
pressed' or implied by our
forward- looking state-
ments including, but not
limited to, changes in gen-
eral economic conditions,
such as interest rate and
currency fluctuations, fuel.
and other energy costs,
slower growth in personal
income,' declining housing
turnover, and other factors
which can negatively affect
our customers as %well as
our ability to: (i) respond to
decreases in the number of
new housingitg.s a. the
level of repalrs;.'temh6del-
ing, and additions to exist-
ing homes, as well as gen-
eral reduction in commer-
cial building activity; (ii)
secure, develop, and other-
wise implement new tech-
nologies and processes de-
signed to enhance our effi-
ciency and competitive-
ness; (iii) attract, train, and
retain highly- qualified as-
sociates; (iv) locate, secure,
and develop new sites for
store development; (v) re-
spond to fluctuations in the
prices and availability of
services, supplies, and
products; (vi) respond to
the growth and impact of
competition; (vii) address
legal and regulatory mat-
ters; and (viii) respond to
unanticipated weather con-
ditions. For more informa-
tion about these and other
risks and uncertainties that
we are exposed to, you
should read the "Risk Fac-
tors" included in our An-
nual Report on Form 10-K
to the United States Securi-
ties and Exchange Com-
mission and the descrip-
tions of any material'
changes in those "Risk Fac-
tors" included in our sub-
sequefit Quarterly Reports
on Form 10-Q.
The forward-looking
statements contained in
this news release speak
only as of the date of this
release and the company
does not assume any oblig-
ation to update any such
statements.
With fiscal year 2005 sales
of $43.2 billion, Lowe's Com-
panies, Inc. is a FORTUNE@
50 company that' serves ap-
proximately 12 million cus-
tomers a week at more than
1,275 home improvement
stores in 49 states. Based in
Mooresville, N.C., the 60-year
old company is the second-
largest home improvement re-


tailer in the world. For more
information, visit Lowes.com.


.Local Candy Bouquet store owner


| receives corporate recognition


FRANCHISEE OF THE MONTH FOR OCTOBER 2006: Candy Bouquet 4200 owneridesigner Kim Ste-
fanik in Live Oak receives recognition as Candy Bouquet International Franchisee of the Month for


PAGE 11A


;-I!,. WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 22,2006


SSUWANNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE OAK









* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Garden Club's fall pancake breakfast


AN
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 200o


Haven Hospice doctors


weigh option


00


DIGGING IN: Participants at the Garden Club's Annual Fall Pancake Breakfast dig in Nov. 11. Photo: Vanessa Fultz



S .. -......


.''. '" ,


... :,:: ,
RIP



POURING COFFEE: Garden Club member refills coffee at the pancake breakfast Nov. 11. Photo: Vanessa Fultz
5 ; ;.


a .
Bg ^ ffl~m ^ ^ ^ ^ ^X SBS^isSSS H ^ "S "^"'e M """-^0 r .,' 81 g-'"y^ i^E flfi ^


PANCAKES AND SYRUP: Garden Club President Glenda Williams fills the crock pot with delicious syrup for a hot batch of pancakes.
- Photo: Vanessa Fultz


,- 4








PLANT SALE: Garden Club member Ivoree Cheney, right, assists with the Garden Club plant sale Nov. 11. The club also had a bake
sale where numerous homemade items were sold. Photo: Vanessa Fultz


H AVEN
H : P I C E
S' FH' .... '. .

All pain is not the same,
and for that reason, different
types of pain need to be
treated individually. There
are different options for
treating the pressure of an
occasional headache, the
soreness of overworked
muscles or the immobility of
chronic back pain.
Generally, there are two
ways to treat pain; .
Conventional medicine:
and alternative treatments.
Conventional medicine usu-
ally refers to the pills we take
to combat pain or treat a'
number of other ailments.
Alternative treatments
take a different approach
and can range from herbal
medicine to chiropractic
work.
Both conventional and al-
ternative medicines have
their positives and negatives
and both are used together
or separately as a treatment
for pain.
Conventional Medicine
There are two general cat-
egories of conventional pain
relievers: Over-the-counter
medications and prescrip-
tion drugs. Over-the-counter
medications like aspirin, ac-
etaminophen, naproxin and
a host of similar name-brand
and generic drugs are con-
sidered to be safe if used as
directed and come in lower
doses than prescription pain
relievers. They are meant to
treat occasional aches, pains
and fever and should not be
taken for more than a couple
weeks at a time.
"You wouldn't ignore
your doctor's instructions
for using a prescription
drug; so don't ignore the la-
,bel when taking a. nonpre-
scription medicine," said
Haven.. Hospice pharmacist
Rebecca Borgert, Pharm.D.
"Each person must make a
decision about whether the
potential benefits of taking
the medicine outweigh the
potential side effects."
Prescription, drugs include
higher doses of some over-
the-counter pain medicine,,
muscle relaxants and opi-
oids. They are most often
prescribed for arthritis, bone
or tissue injuries, dental pain
and some chronic pain con-
ditions, Borgert said. Be-
cause of the higher risks and
side-affects that accompany
prescription drugs, physi-
cians need to monitor pa-
tients more closely.
The Food and Drug Ad-
ministration reviews all
pharmaceutical drugs for ef-
fectiveness and safety. Be
aware that all pain medica-
tions can have side effects,
some of which can be very
harmful, she said. People
taking any pain relievers
should speak with their doc-
tors to weigh the risks, bene-
fits, side effects and costs.
Alternative Treatmenits
Today there are nmunber of
alternative treatments from a
host of different back-
grounds available. Some re-
quire the patient to harness
the strength from within,
others contend it is an off-kil-
ter balance of energy, and


still others involve the phys-
ical manipulation of the
body.
Within everyone is the
power to control his or her


ns for pain o
own pain through P
meditation, prayer,"
hypnosis and visu-n
al imagery. At least
that is what practi.-
tioners of mind andl
body therapies bed,
lieve. When usedq
.: '" properly, this merai
tal pain relief hags
been shown to have a posi-
tive effect on pain, especially
for arthritis and the side ef-2
fects of chemotherapy, said
Michelle Boatwright, M.l.
Boatwright serves as an as^
sociate medical director foc
Haven Hopice's Suwannees
Valley office based in Lak&e
City.
Some, alternative practices
focus on harnessing outside
energy to restore the balance
of energy within a patient,
These methods follow that a.
person feels pain when their
energy is out of balance, or
there is a buildup of negative
energy. In this practice. Rei:
ki, Qi Gong. magnetic fields
and light therapies are called
upon to restore this balance,
she said. Patients 'have re-
ported positive results, but'
no research has been able to
show exactly how or why it,
works.,
Acupuncture is a hybrid of
physical and energy thera-
pies. It involves the strategic
placement of needles un-
block flows of energy. There..
have been promising results
when it is used for post-op-
erative pain, chemotherapy
induced vomiting, addi-1.
tion, headache and f-,
bromyalgia. Ila
The most common alterna-
tives to conventional pain r,
lief involve, ii- physic
manipulation of 'the bod.
NMassage and chiroprac
therapies are the most co
mon alternative treatment
to date. Little evidence su
ports the use of spinal m
nipulation for asthma, h,
pertension and dysmeno-
rhea, though it has proven
effective for migraine and
tension headaches and carn
temporarily help ease nedc
pain. M measuring the effecI3
of massage has also provei
illusive, though patients .C
both hav e reported high ley-'
els of satisfaction
when considering altema,
tihe treatments Boatwrigh t
said, "A sage therapy doss.
no harm when used under
defined conditions and as in-
tended. An effective therapy
is one that has measurable
benefits."
While some evidence supl-
ports alternative treatment;
there are still importait
questions that need to be an-
swered. Like with any medj5
cine, if you decide to use am
alternative treatment check
the practitioner's certificam
tions and background. Re&'
search the treatment you are
interested in. And rememr2
ber-it is always important to
consult your healthcared
provider before changing,
anything about your healthly
care. r
Both conventional and al-
ternative treatments carry
much promise for people liv;
ing with pain. In the end it i'


up to the individual and the'
individual's physician to d6&
cide what is the best way to
proceed. For more informn-
tion on go to www.fda.gov,
the National Center fo,
Complimentary and Alterfj
native Medicine's Web sitep
www.nccam.nih.gov, the)
National Library of Medin
cine at www.nlm.nih.gov, oV
the FDA's Center for Food
Safety and Applied Nutri-
tion at www.cfsan.fda.gov.


PAGE 12A








WE.NES.... NOVEMBER.2.


PCS clients participate in Disability Mentoring Day


Comprehensive Conmmuni-
tv Services (CCS) clients re-
cently joined \with thousands
q( other adults throughout the
Lpited States by participat-
ing in Disability Mentoring
Da\. Florida Disability Men-
toring Day is part of a nation-
al. broad-based effort to pro-
rrote career development
through hands-on career ex-
ptioranon. job shadowing and
internship or employment
opportunities.
.-CCS clients and mentors
\,pre matched to pro\ ide on-
site job-shadowing experi-
ences. Area businesses in
Suwannee County \vho took
part were: Wal-Mart, Dixie
Motors, Cheek & Scott
Drugs. Inc., Golden Corral.
and Suwannee Healthcare. In
Ramilton County. the future
career seekers visited Jasper


Hardware and Foodway. The
participants were given a tour
of the business they were
partnered with and given an
opportunity to work during
the day. The experience al-
lowed them to evaluate per-
sonal goals. target career
skills for improvement and
explore possible career paths.
Participation by job seek-
ers in past Disability Mentor-
ing Day events has led to in-
terview% opportunities %with a
host employer which resulted
in securing part-time or full-
time employment.
Local businesses in the
area that %would like to re-
ceive more information about
betng a mentor can contact
CCS Manager for Supported
Employment Sharon
Richards, at 386-362-7143 or
srichards_ccsia'alltel.net.


LEARNING RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT: Pictured, I to r, CCS job seekers Angie Armstead and Kel-
ly Klingensmith learn restaurant management at Golden Corral in Live Oak. Photo Submined


LEARNING TO STOCK SHELVES: Pictured, I to r, Wal-Mart Staff Mentor Larry Dyal and CCS job
sdekers Telissa Winebrenner, Zach Morgan and Farrah Clark receive instruction on how to stock
shelves at Wal-Mart in Live Oak. Phomo Subrrminea


INSTRUCTIONS IN MAINTAINING CARS: Pictured, I to r, James Drury-CCS job seeker, Lee Ford-CCS supervisor andGreg
job seeker receive instructions in maintaining cars at Dixie. Motors in Live Oak. Photo: Submitted'


eOOPER eO --


This .week's kitty pick:
_Khlua, a small tortoiseshell,
female, just about a year old,
ad Riley, a large Siamese
mix, adult, male. Both are
+vry lovable, have beautiful
mfarkings and are in search of
f-rever loving homes.
AOur dog picks for this week
awe: Kayla, a brown, medium,
mixed breed, over a year old
apd. Brittany, a small bindle,
u.der a year old. Brit is very
playful and Kayla more laid
back.
They are overloaded with
animals, and some are on bor-
r'wed time which is fast run-
ning out. If you have room in
yiur home and heart, and are
looking to make the forever
commitment needed to add a
Wnw family member, please
vjpit them at the shelter locat-
ejl at 11150 144th Street,
McAlpin.
The residents at the shelter
aie in need of your help,
pItease. They are running short
of towels and blankets, some-
thing they use a lot of, espe-
cially in winter. They also
need bleach, paper towels,
ain-clumping litter, canned
kitten food and cash to buy
shots and meds for the animals
in need of extra help.
Cooper's $1 challenge to
Cooper's $1 challenge to


you all this week: If everyone
reading this could send a $1
donation, it would make a dif-
ference in the lives of a lot of
animals and would save lives.
Send donations to: Suwannee
County Animal Control,
11150 144th St., McAlpin, FL
32062..
Have an animal question?.
Need more information on an
animal subject' We are start-
ing a new phone information
line in the near future, thanks
to the donation and kindness
of the folks .at Windstream.
Send your questions, and they
will try and answer then on the
line. More information will be


provided soon on how to call.
For now, please send any
questions or comments to
Cooper at his e-mail address:
hugsandpuppy kissesi'ya-
hoo.com. The. would lo\e to
hear from you.
Don't want to adopt an ani-
mal, but want to help those
there in need? Sign up now for
our "sponsor a cat or dog in
need" program: %38.50 will
provide one feline leukemia
test; $82 will spay a cat; $100
will .spay a dog; $90 will
neuter a dog; $50 will neuter a
cat; $6 will buy a dog shot;.
$17. will buy a cat shot pack-
age; $12 will buy a tube of eye


meds; $6 will buy an antibiot-
ic powder; $10 will buy flea
meds; $15, will buy enough
Capstar to treat five animals.
$71 for bulk purchase of shots
to treat up to 25 dogs. All of'
your. help makes a difference
in the lives of the residents of
the shelter and they couldn't
do what they do without the
love and kindness of all of
you. Thanks to all of you who,
are able to help make life bet-
ter for the animals..
Hugs and puppy kisses,
Love Cooper

SPAY NEUTER ... THE
KEY TO SUCCESS


KEEPING PRODUCE LOOKING FRESH: Pictured, I to r, Foodway
| Staff Mentor Linda McLeod. and CCS job seeker Rosa Rodriquez
. at Foodway in Jasper. Phoio Submined


S Kiwanis

Christmas trees

ARE HERE!
Sales start 11/20/06 thru 12/19/16 or while supplies last!






-.... ....







Prices are.
$40,6-7 ft.; $45 7,8 ft.; $50 8-9 ft.
Trees are fresh from
Franklin, North Carolina
All proceeds go to benefit the
children and youth of this area.

Located downtown Live Oak
across from Live Oak Jewelry i,


I v Slow Credit i Bad Credit / Bankruptcy I Chargeoff 4 Foreclosure OK! I


PAGE 13A


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006.


I









PAGE14AU SUANNE DMOCRT/LVE OK WDNEDAYNOVMBER22,200


OBITUARIES


Ruth Battjes Montague
Nov. 13, 2006

R uth Battjes Montague,
81, of O'Brien, Flori-
da, passed away Mon-
day Nov. 13, 2006 in Wood-
lands Care .Center in
Gainesville, Florida of lung
cancer.
She was a member of San
Juan Mission Catholic Church
of Branford, Florida. Mon-
tague retired in O'Brien from
Civil Service in 1985.
Survivors include her sister,
Etta D. Whelan of Michigan;
five children, Judith Mon-
tague, John Montague and Jer-
ry Montague, all of Key West,
Florida and Joan Barry of Pen-
sacola, Florida and Jaye
Brown of Palm Harbor, Flori-
da; and eight grandchildren.
Memorial mass will be held
at 11 a.m., Friday, Nov. 24 in
San Juan Mission Catholic
Church in Branford.


Wesley R. "Wes" Holding
Aug. 5, 1936 -
Nov. 15, 2006

Sesley R. "Wes" Hold-
ing, 70, of Plantation,
Florida and Live
Oak, Florida, passed away
suddenly Wednesday, Nov. 15,
2006 in Plantation. He worked
for Shell Oil Company for 35
years at Port Everglades. Be-
ing a perfectionist, Holding
took great pride and satisfac-
tion in building his dream
home in Live Oak.
Survivors include his wife,
Miriam; daughters, Wendy
and Cindy Holding; his son,
Todd and his wife, Jodi Hold-
ing; two grandchildren, Olivia
-and KiLeigh;, and two broth-
ers, Roger and Russell Hold-
ing..
Funeral services were held
Saturday, Nov. 18 in'Planta-
tion and graveside services
was held Monday, Nov. 20 in
Rosemary Baptist' Church


Dec. 2'
SCormnmunity benefit blood drive for
HMiar1 Williams
Two and possibly three.bloodmobiles will. be on hand
for a community benefli blood drive at Christmas on the
Square in Live Oak for Mark Williams who has acquired
aplastic anemia. Williams has needed and will continue to
need weekly transfusions. He will receive credit for one
out of every five units of any type donated in his name.
SThe drive will also benefit Live Oak. and surrounding ar-
,esi. ~1tood .supplies are low and needs are greater than
blood on hand around holidays. Look for people. wearing
4TshirT-s'rto make your donation. Special treats for those
0%oc donate lifeiviha bldod'and a drawing f6r a vrr nice.
gift-basket Tentativijslte is on Wilbur Street onri block
west of Suwainee County JWil near the old hih'shoo
.site. For appointments, call Kathleen Townsend, 386-362-
'....2195 or Amber Ingram, 386-330-2529.


Cemetery in Live Oak.
Donations in' his memory
may be made to the Salyation
Army, 1445 W. Broward
Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale, FL
33312.
T.M; Ralph Plantation Fu-
neral Home was in charge of
all arrangements.

DEATH

NOTICES


Donald Kelly
Dec. 17, 1986 -
Nov. 14, 2006

onald Kelly, 19, of
Branford, Florida
passed away Tuesday,
Nov. 14, 2006.
Daniels Funeral Homes and
Crematory, Inc. of Branford is
in charge of all arrangements.

Jason Green Sr.
Jan. 21, 1981 -
Nov. 14, 2006

Season Green Sr., 25, of
Lake City, Florida
passed away Tuesday,
Nov. 14, 2006.
Daniels Funeral Homes and
Crematory, Inc. of Branford'is
in charge of all arrangements.

Jerry Lee "Budd." West
Nov. 9, 1986 -
Nov. 14, 2006

erry Lee "Buddy" West,
f 20, of Branford, Florida
passed away Tuesday,
Nov.. 14. 2006.
Daniels Funeral Homes and
Crematory, Inc. of Branford is
in charge of all arrangements.'


CIVIC SUWANNEE


KIWANIS: Carolyn Prudy speaks about how the community can get involved in Take Stock
in Children, a program to mentor local students. Phoio vyrtle Parneill


BROADBAN :IsH:etwo
STATIN ,A

-U--W
$2 im __A h*9


PHONE
BROADBAND windstream
DIGITAL TV 1..877.312.WIND windstreamn.com

Wn(


LEEDS
8372 ist Avenue'
205.699.2531


FLORIDA
LIVEOAKl
206 White Avenue
386.364.2400


MISSISSIPPI
FLORENCE
101 Lewis Street
601.845.7513


PRENTISS
2324 Columbia Avenue
6'01.792.5151


Limited-time offer. Subject to availability in certain locations. Must be a Windstream wireline customer. Broadband 2.5: Price is good, when bundled with qualifying service, for first 12 months & includes Broadband transport
& Internet access. Broadband Speeds: Windstream cannot guarantee Broadband speeds or that Broadband service will be uninterrupted or error-free. DISH Network Family: Offer ends 2/31/07. Available In the continental
United States for new, first-time DISH Network residential customers. All prices, packages and programming subject to change without notice. Local and state sales taxes may apply. All DISH Network programming, and any
other services that are provided, are subject to the terms and conditions of the promotional agreement and Residential Customer Agreement, available at www.dlshnetwork.com or upon request. Social Security Numbers
are used to obtain credit scores and will not be released to third parties except for verification and collection purposes only or if required by governmental authorities. DISH Network is a registered trademark of EchoStar
Satellite L.L.C. Windstream: Credit approval required & pre-payment may be required. Taxes, fees & other charges, including Universal Service Fund, apply. Windstream reserves the right to cancel or discontinue this plan at
any time. If any required bundle component is disconnected, all remaining components convert to the regular tariffed monthly rate. Other restrictions may apply. Offers are subject to the Windstream Terms & Conditions for
Communications Services available at any Windstream store or at windstream.com. Contact a Windstream representative for details.
315046|rv


FDACS files


lawsuit for


vi0lalins,of

"Do Not Call" law
Florida Department' of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services (FDACS) .,an-
nounced recently that legal
action has been taken against
a Tampa Bay area telemar-
keter for violating Florida's
"Do Not Call" law.
A lawsuit filed in Pmellas
County Circuit Court alleges
that United Vacation Net-
work inc., of Largo, made at
least seven calls to Floridg
residents on th& state's "Do.
Not Call" list during the past
17 months. In addition,, the
suit claims that at least four
of the company's telemarket-
ing calls contained recorded
messages, which is a sepa-
rate violation of state law.
"Consumers who join the
program are entitled to be
spared the intrusion of com-
mercial telemarketing calls;
and we're committed to see-
ing that their privacy is pro-
tected," FDACS Commis-
sioner Charles H. Bronson
said. "We' have little toler-
ance for companies who
flout the law."
The legal action seeks an
injunction prohibiting the.
company from making any
future calls to residents on
the list and fines of up to
$10,000 for each of the calls
it made to prohibited phone
numbers.
FDACS has collected or
obtained judgments of more
than $1.5 million against
.companies that have called
residents on the list, and sev-
eral such legal actions are
.pending in courts throughout
the state.
The Commissioner en-
courages Floridians to join
the program, which prohibits
most commercial telemar-
keters from calling numbers
on the list. For more infor-
mation about the program,
consumers can call, the
FDACS toll-free hotline 800'
HELP FLA or 800-435-
7352-or visit the FDACS
Web site at
www.800helpfla.com.


ALABAMA
ECLECTIC
55 Main Street
334.541.2915





0SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 14A


.WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006










Section B
Wednesday,
November 22, 2006
Ar


"Out of 22 games, if we win 13 or 14 I'd say that
. would be an outstanding regular season.
k.t And I think that's feasible." Vernon Wiggins


LChillabration Cakes


PORT


817 S. Ohio
S Live Oak I



"ijj


ogs gui ul ir Ulrsi Will III


Boys' match
against
Mayo called \.
with Suwannee
leading 4-3

Robert Bridges
Democrat Reporter


Corey Bridges
plays offense
during a
recent match.
Photo: Paul Buchandn


The Bulldogs got their first win of the soccer sea-
son lThursday at Langford, but it wasn't quite what the
boys had in mind. Leading 4-3 with just over 13 minutes
left on the clock, the Lafayette Hornets were forced to for-
feit for unsporting behavior on the part of Mayo players and
fans.
The Dogs improve to 1-3.
Things got ugly early on, with lots of name-calling and numer-
ous yellow cards. Suwannee coach Frank Johnson said officials
should have taken control earlier. "The refs have a tendency to let
too much pushing and sho% ing go in in the first five to ten minutes,"
he said.
Finally the Mayo fans got into the picture. The mother of one player
refused a referee's demand to stop shouting at him and officials asked a
shenffs deputy to eject her and two other unruly fans from the stadium.
The %woman refused to leave, even when threatened with arrest. Her son
climbed the fence to confront the deputy, but was restrained bN other fans.
The woman finally agreed to leave, but by then the scoreboard had been
-- SEE DOGS, PAGE 3B




r Baseball: An early ioo.



M ,g Fy
_.. -. _. ..,F A.".. _. .. ._ y e
,-.-...:- :, -. i season *r9W'ubd'ehipr




1 1dogsd&ttei20gamesi e-, h year;thout eaeball
.... .. ti ..... .. ... *' ;.'' ".'' -,w:.. ..


Boys Ranch golf

.o srnament

Raises nearly ., .


^$10,000
bat
Subminted
Columbia County Sher-
iff Bill Gootee, along
ad with six other sheriffs,
-mr hosted a charity golf tour-
?ll nament in Lake City to
_, benefit the children of the
-o, Florida Sheriffs Youth
-ai Ranches (FSYR).
As part of the Boys
Ranch 49th Anniversary
oi\ Celebration, over 100
players and sponsors
gathered at the Southern
Oaks Golf Club recently
to participate in the four-
man scramble. Jim Coe,
o Bobby Mayer, Jeff Blood-
all worth and Frank Culpep-
( per took first place [gross
score], while Mike Con-
-7 nolly, Brian White, Mar-
cus Perez and Brad
J,.n Whitehead came in first
bgL place [net score].
_, With the help of First
Federal Savings Bank of,
J Florida, the tournament
raised nearly $113,000 for
the children of the FSYR.
ii The FSYR is a charita-
a ble, nonprofit corporation,
which operates four resi-
dential child-care cam-
-0 puses and two youth
camps. Additionally, it
d provides family counsel-
001 ing to as many of Flori-
2D :SEE BOYS, PAGE 3B


for kids
Thank you
We say thank you!
The Florida Sheriffs Youth
Ranches would like to thank
the following businesses for
sponsoring the 8th Annual
Boys Ranch Golf Tournament.
Title sponsor:
First Federal Savings Bank of
Florida
Corporate sponsor:
Keefe Commissary Supply
Additional sponsors:
Ajax Building Corporation
Black Creek
Integrated Systems Corp.
Columbia Ready-Mix Con-
crete, Inc.
Eagle Food Services Inc.
Econo Lodge Live Oak
Eddie Accardi Chevrolet
Embarq
Florida Power & Light Com-
pany
Florida Woodland
GTC Design Group, LLC
Hunt Insurance Group, LLC
Live Oak Paint Center
Parks Johnson Agency
Poole Realty, Inc.
Progress Energy
Red Roof Services Inc.
Ronsonet Buick Pontiac GMC
Rountree-Moore Inc.
Shands at Live Oak
Suwannee Valley
Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Wal-Mart
Windstream Communications


EU: "


Goalie Noah Walker, left, and Kyle Salazar on defense during a recent match. Photo Paul Bucnanan

AAAA', i AT';
...w .. ..- ._- ha...s-,- a.. to""' ug "h act' to follo-w;:' T", zh'-Y"J .',. ,;
", r, .',j, .4 ak., ,,- .;,.:% ''.,.' .;'? 1.. '.=,'- ;, :- ,t",," ;t_, ..?-'. :'. :'i ,." ,' F f.:


a.SEEWIGGINS jAGA.BF
,igg,,i, :,._., ,,' '.'g ,* f:;-: :." ,^* ::.' ^ : ? '-'-, ,? '-.,.'


FLORIDA SHERIFFS YOUTH RANCHES: Columbia County Sheriff Bill Gootee along with fellow north Florida sheriffs present a
$10,000 check to Youth Ranch President Roger Bouchard. Pictuired, Ito r, Sheriffs: Jerry Whitehead-Union, Pete Bucher-Madi-
son, Gootee-Columbia, presenting check to FSYR President Roger Bouchard, Joey Dobson -Baker, Tony Cameron-Suwannee,
Harrell Reid-Hamilton and Larry Campbell-Leon. Photo: Submitted



Give thanks for hunting seasons in November


By Tony Young
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
November means it's time to gas up
the truck and break out your shooting
iron, because the 2006-07 hunting sea-
son's here. This month, general gun, fall
turkey, quail and gray squirrel, snipe and
the second phase of mourning and
white-winged dove hunting seasons
open.


The first thing you need to do is pick
up a $12.50 Florida resident hunting li-
cense. Non-residents pay $46.50. for a
10-day license or $151.50 for 12
months.
If you plan to hunt one of Florida's
many wildlife management areas
(WMAs), you'll also need a $26.50
management area permit, and don't for-
get to study the brochure for the specific
area you plan to hunt, because dates, bag


limits and rules differ greatly from area
to area.
You can get these brochures at tax
collectors' offices and regional Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) offices in close proximi-
ty to the area, or you can download
them from the FWC's Web site -
MyFWC.com/hunting.


SEE GIVE, PAGE 3B


4


aot








-rD G .-..SPO---------- TS--
SPORTS ........


Mechanical problems jar McCumbee at Phoenix


Rookie hopesto bounce back
at Season Finale Weekend


Submitted
Beginners' luck didn't
find Chad McCumbee this
weekend as the NASCAR
Craftsman Truck Series
headed to Phoenix Interna-
tional Raceway for the
Casino Arizona 150 event,
where he brought the #08
TheGPSstore.com/Garmin
machine home to a 29th-
place finish. ,
"This weekend wasn't
too good for us," said Mc-
Cumbee. "In racing you
aren't ever going to have a
perfect weekend every
weekend. We have had two
good ones in a rowe. and we
thought that we were going
to have another good one
going this weekend.
"We practiced really
well. and I thought that we
;had a really good shot at
getting a good finish at
Phoenix, which is the type
of track that we have strug-
gled with this year. But
come qualifying time we
were really loose, and we
didn't get the starting posi-
tion we really wanted."
Once he took the green
flag, things didn't get much
better for the Green Light
racing team .
"We struggled all race'
long. It turned out that we.
had a reair-end problem, and
then we also had a battery
'.go dead halfway through
the race. It just kind of'
added insult to injury and
made a bad day even
worse. It wasn't a really
good outing for us."
Chad hopes to turn that
around this' weekend as the
NASCAR Craftsman Truck
Series heads to'Homestead-
Miami'SpeedWaN for the


season finale with the Ford
200 on Friday night. It will
be the last chance for Chad
to make a statement this
season, and he would really
like to end it in a bang.
It will be yet another
new track for the young
hotshoe, but he isn'tgoing
to let that deter him.
"I am really looking for-
ward to Homestead," he
said. "It's the style of track
that we have had the most
success on all year long.' I
think it will be a good cross
between a Nashville and an
Atlanta, and we have run
good at'both of those
places. I have never been
there before, but I think
with Bobby's experience
and everybody behind me,
that we will have a really
good run with TheGPS-
store.com'Garmin Chevro-
let."
After competing in the
Craftsman Truck Series
event on Friday night. Mc-
Cumbee will board a plane
and be back on his way to
North Carolina, where he
-plans to spend the rest of
:his weekend returning to his
roots.
McCumbee V ill be com-
peting in the Late Model.
Stock portion of the Myrtle:,
: Beach 200 weekend at Myr-
tle Beach Speedw:ay (SC).
It.is a track that McCumbee
has been around several
times, and he hopes that
these next two races will al-.
low him to make it a dou-
ble-win weekend.
"It's going to be tough to
do all I want to this week-
end," said McCumbee. "I
haven't missed a Myrtle
Beach 400 weekend in thee


last few years. I'm going to
try and come make that race
again. It will obviously be
tougher this year because of
my Craftsman Truck sched-


ule. I will miss two days of
practice and just show up
Saturday and try to qualify.
It will be a challenge for
me, and who knows, under


that amount of stress,
maybe we can pull out a
win."
The Ford 200 event will
get underway this Friday


evening at Homestead-Mia-
mi Speedway with racing
action starting at 8:00 p.m..
'The race will be broadcast
live on SPEED Channel.


Suwannee High School

.Boys.' 200Soccer

schedule 2006-2007


Date


Opponent


*Di


Friday, Dec. 1 (H) I
Saturday, Dec. 2 (A) I
Saturday, Dec. 2 (A) N
Tuesday. Dec. 5 (H) S
Wednesday. Dec. 6 (A)
Thursday, Dec. 7 (A) I
Thursday. Dec. 14 (A) I
Saturday, Dec. 16 (A) (
Thursday, Dec. 21. (A)
Friday, Dec. 29 (A) I
Saturday, Dec. 30 Chris
Saturday, Jan. 6 (H) I
Tuesday, Jan. 9 (H) -
Friday, Jan. 12 (H)N
Tuesday, Jan. 16 ; (H) f
Thursday, Jan. 18 (A) (
Tuesday, Jan. 23 (A)
Friday. Jan. 26 atM
Thursday, Feb. 1 TBA
Tuesday. Feb. 6 TBA
Friday, Feb. 9 TBA
Friday, Feb. 16 and
Saturday, Feb. 17 TBA


district Match
Ridgeview*
Panama City Arnold
Marianna
St. Francis
Wakulla I
Lafayette
Florida High
Oak Hall
Taylor
Fort White/Columbia
tmas Tournament
Keystone
Taylor
Wakulla
Fort White
Columbia
District Tournament
iddleburg .


Tip-of
JV
5 p.


: 5,p.

5 p.

5p,


Time
Varsitv
m. 7 p.m.
11 a.mni. (CST)
S5 p.m. (CST)
7 p.m.
,m. 7 p.m.
6 p.m.
.m. 7 p.m.
3 p.m.
nm. 7 p.m.


TBA
2 p m.
5 p.m. 7p.m.
5 p.m. 7p.m.
5 p.im. 7 pm.i
5 p.m. : 7 p.m.
5:30 p.m. 7:20 p.m.
S-.-,* 7,p.m. 1
Quarters Regional
Semis Regional
Finals Regional


State Final Four


Principal: Dawn Lamb
Athletic Director: Randy Etheridge
Head Coach Frank Jphnson, JV Coach Tim Smith and Assistant Coaches: Stan Posey. Steven Chapman and
'Reggie Johnson. "" '* J.t ,.


/


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22- 2006


E SUWALNNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


fA-M~ IDP'


- V I


No










WEDNESDAYM, NOJ~VEMBER~ 22, 206u .- ----- ------- -- -


SPORTS


Wiggins-
Continued From Page 1B

at full strength this season.
Last year's team, which went
21-5 and ranked 10th in the
state, was "probably one of
the best teams we've ever
had," said Wiggins. Ten se-
niors were lost to graduation
and only two starters will re-
turn.
Wiggins will promote ju-
nior varsity players to fill the
holes. The JV squad went un-
beaten last year, but that
doesn't mean the transition to
varsity will be easy. "We
may struggle early in the sea-
son, because they hav en't
faced varsity pitching e% er>.
single game," Wiggins said.
Still, Wiggins expects a
winning season. "Out of 22
games, if we win 13 or 14 I'd
say that would bean out-
standing regtilar season." he
said. "And I think that's fea-
sible."
Wiggins said his team may
start slowly and improve
throughout the season.
"Hopefully they'll be where
you want them to be at the
end of the year," he said.
A 1985 University of
Florida graduate, Wiggins
began his head coaching ca-
reer at Mayo. He coached
under Gray at Suwannee
from 2000 to 2003, then took
the head coaching job at
Branford for a year. He's
been teaching at Suwannee
High for the last two % ears
His wife, Cindy, is a guid-
ance counselor there.
Wiggins had praise for his
predecessor. "People who
know high school baseball
know what kind of program
Ronnie built," he said. "He's
got a- lot of respect around
the state."
Wiggins is Gray's hand-
picked successor. In Septem-
ber Gray told the Democrat
that he was "going to be dis-
appointed" if Wiggins % wasn't
:picked to replace him. "I
'wanted him to get the job."
|Gray said Thursday. "He got
!it and I'm happy."
Wiggins also had praise for
Harvey Williams, a former
Gray assistant who left
Suwannee to create a ne\\
program at Melody Christian
Academy this year. Se\ eral
|other members of Gray's
.staff followed Williams to
Melody. "I think the) 're great
'coaches," Wiggins said.
"We're going to miss them a
lot." (Look for a featte story'
on tllIharns and his staff in a
Juiire edinon of the Democ-
rat.) .
Theseason begins Feb. 8
against Columbia County.
Robert Bridges can be,
reached by calling 386-362-
1734 ext.. 134 or by e-mail at
robtn. bridges' tieflnews.co


*Boys

Continued From Page 1B

da's neglected, troubled chil-
dren as funds will permit,
Voluntary contributions are
the primary source of fund-
ing, especially thoughtful
gifts made through special
bequests in wills and trusts.
he Florida Sheriffs Youth
.anches, Inc. is nationally
accredited by the Council on
Accreditation of Services for
Families and Children, Inc.
nd the American Camp As-
.Sociation.
: For more information.


lease visit w-ww.youthranch-
ps.org or contact your local
sheriff.

Be a

good sport
Send your sports stories
and pictures to the
Democrat. Either drop
them by the office at
211 East Howard St., or
e-mail them to
sd.sports@gaflnews.com.


Give


Continued From Page 1B

You can buy your license
and permits over the telephone
by calling toll-free 1-888- -
HUNT-FLORIDA or online at
MyFWC.com/license. Just
have-your credit card ready.
You also can purchase them
from tax collectors' offices
and most retail outlets thaf sell
hunting and fishing supplies.
The general gun season


runs Nov. 11 Jan. 21 in the
Central Hunting Zone. In the
Northwest Zone, it comes in
Thanksgiving Day and lasts
four days until Nov. 26. Two
weeks later, the season re-
opens Dec. 9 and runs through
'Feb. 14. For readers hunting
the South Hunting Zone, the
general gun season's already
in and lasts until Jan. 7.'
Hunters can take bucks
-having at least one antler five


inches or longer. On private
lands, the daily bag limit for
deer is two.
On private lands, hunters
can take wild hogs year-round
with no bag or size limits. On
most but not all public
lands, there's also no bag or
size limit on wild hogs, and
hunters can take them during
any hunting season except
spring turkey. Check the
WMA brochure to be certain.'


The highly anticipated
antlerless deer season, often
called "doe week" is Dec. 16-
22 in the Northwest Zone,
Nov. 18-24 in the Central
. Zone and Nov. 4-10 in the
South Hunting Zone.
,During doe week, the daily
bag limit's one buck and one
doe or two bucks. You may
not take two does in one day
like you ma\ during archery
season, and spotted fawns are


law, ~


BOYS' SOCCER: Andrew Cundiff in action during a recent soccer match. Prhio:. Paul BuChanir,


Dogs
Continued From Page 1B

turned off and the game called.
Johnson was glad to have the win, but wasn't all
that impressed with his team's play. '."We're young
and inexperienced," he said. He fielded six fresh-'
men during most of the game.


-m ,'


"/,Look


-What


MY..ou


Missed...


...if you missed the last edition of
.1 4 uwmania e mocrat

~ 5 Branford-area men Cfd
Suspect with if Ie' shot by diputi

~ FormnerSuiwannee county scfoo(teacher turns 100

-~ %,aior: -ec 'Dept. to b(ame./ r no stte park,

~ Local business mourns the loss of ltoutown trees
----------------------.-I
To subscribe to umantine lDemocrat call (386) 362-1734 or complete this.
coupon and mail to: giutainnee ehimorrat, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064

0 1 Year, In-County 0 1 Year, Out-of-County
*32.00 *45.00 I
NAME
I ADDRESS
"CITY STATE ZIP
PHONE We Accept:
I Payment must accompany coupon 232761-F


"We're going to have to come out here with a
little more fire, a little more intensity" to win
more games, he told his boys,
Ty Smith scored Suwannee's first goal at the
one-minute mark with an assist from Jordan Bud-
wick. Cullen Boggus added a score at the 12-
minute mark with an assist from Andre%%


not legal game. Doe week.
does not apply on WMAs.
If you hunt with deer dogs
anywhere. in Florida, special
rules and registration require-
ments may apply. Call the
FWC for details.
Fall turkey season in the
Northwest Hunting Zone is
Nov. 23-26 and Dec. 9 Jan.
14. In the Central and South
zones, it's Nov.: 11 Jan. 7.
Only bearded turkeys or gob-
blers are legal game, and you
must have a $5 turkey permit
to hunt them. The bag limit's
one bird per day, and a total of
two during the archery, cross-
bow, muzzleloading gun and
fall turkey seasons combined.
It's .also against the law to
hunt turkeys in Holmes Couin-
ty during the fall season.
Quail and gray squirrel sea-
son runs statewide Nov. 11 -
March 4. There's a daily bag
limit of 12 for each, and shoot-
ing fox squirrels is against the
law.
Shooting hours for deer,
turkeys, quail and gray squir-
rels is a half hour before, sun-
rise to a half hour after sunset.
All legal firearms, muIzzleload-
ers, bows, crossbows and
handguns are legal for taking,
these resident game animals
during the general gun, antler-
less deer, fall turkey and quail
and gray squirrel seasons.
Stupe hunting in Florida
ranks second in the nation in
number of birds harvested
each year. and the season runs
No\. I Feb. 15 statewide.
The second phase of the
mourning and lute-winged
doe season also comes in this
month and runs Nov. 11-26.
Shooting hours for migratory
birds are one-half hour before
sunrise to sunset. The bag
limits are eight for snipe, and
12 for doves.
You must get a no-cost mi-
gratory bird permit if you plan
to hunt snipe. doves or any
other migratory game birds.
For up-to-date information
on Florida's public dove fields,
call the FWC's Dove Hunters'
Hotline at (850) 875-BIRD.
The hotline gets updated every
Thursday throughout the dove
season. Information includes
do% e densities, previous
week's s harvests and field con-
ditions.
Whether small-game hunt-
ing with friends and family or
hunting solo, going after that,
monster buck, boar hog or big
torn, November brings loads of
great hunting opportunities.
Here's wishing you all a
happy Thanksgiving and a suc-
cessful hunting season.


Cundiff. Smith scored the go-ahead goal 35 min-
utes in with an 'assist from Brad Scott. and Mar-
shall Boggus ended the scoring at the 60-minute
mark on a penalty kick.,
Robert Bridges can 'be reached by calling 386-
362-1734 ext. 134 or by e-mail at
robe rt.bridges @ga eaflnws.co ,nC.


Now THAT'S Something


Kasey Robinson loves to kick-box

Thank you for submitting this week's SMILE photograph!
Submit your photo for publication to:

Puxamnne hrnt orat
P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 23276.-.


i I I


PAGE 3B


N SUWANNEE DEMOnCRALT/LIVE OAK


prMK iEr--"rA\/ V tln\/r'-K, Ml' r- 0 oo/*nn


' ,,









PAr-j[-i ADW


SPORTS


BARREL -_ 2 __ -elo-r e- .--a-.










Bny


A,4
vzt


41 .


Ilee muannte nmtocrat

and Southern Heritage Press
are proud to offer this 128-page, hard-bound,
library quality edition of





A Pictorial History of Suwannee, Hamilton


Now Only




$ 19.95


Make Checks Payable to Southern Heritage Press


Ic'


.. .. .4 ,& .,


Be a good sport
Send your sports stories and pic-
tures to the Democrat. Either
drop them by the office at 211
East Howard St., or e-mail them
to sd.sports@gaflnews.com.


Petty named


grand marshal


of Rolex 24.,
Submitted .
Richard Petty, international motorsports
icon and NASCAR's all-time wins leader
with 200 victories, has been named Grand
Marshal for the 45th anniversary of the
prestigious Rolex 24 At Daytona on Jan.
27-28.
As Grand Marshal, Petty will give the
starting command, "Drivers start your en-
gines," to kick off the legendary twice-
around-the-clock sports car endurance race.
"We're honored to have a legend such as
Richard Petty serve as Grand Marshal for
America's premier sports car event," Day-
tona Intemanonal Speedway President
Robin Braig said. "Daytona International
Speed ay and Richard Petty share many-
memorable moments over the years and
fla% e always had a special relationship."
"It's an honor to be the Grand Marshal
for this event," said Petty.. "Any event at
Daytona is a special event and the Rolex
24 is one of them. It \as always a great
track for us and this is a chance to give
back to a place that has given us so much
'mn looking forward to be a part of one of
the opening events of the speed ay in
2007."
Wlhde Petty renred from competition in
1992, he did recently drive his restored
1972 Dodge Charger race car in an exhibi-
non run at the Goodwood Fesftial of
Speed in England, one of the largest and
most diverse celebrations in motorsports.
Known as the "'King" in the stock car
racing world, Petty captured seven
NASCAR championships and won the
sport's iost popular driver award nine
times At Daytona Internanonal Speedway.
Petty has 13 victories including a record
se% en D'atona 500 wins and three Pepsi
400 triumphs.
Petty earned his 200th and final
NASCAR \ victory in the 1984 Pepsi 400
with President Ronald Reagan in atten-
dance.!
The Rolex 2-1 At Dayiona is the kick-off
,event to the international motorsports cal-
endar as well as the season-opening race
for the Rolex Sports Car Series presented
by Crown Royal Special Reserve.
A star-studded field of champion dri-
vers. including four-time NASCAR N-EX-
TEL Cup Series champion Jeff Gordon,
will compete, on Daytona's historic 3.56-
mile road course in the ultimate test of man
and machine..
Tickets for the 45th anniversary of the
Rolex 24 At Daytona are available online
at www.racetickets.com
orby call-
ing 1-800-PITSHOP.


NFCC Men's Basketball


Academy begins season
Team's first home game set for son) 5 points; and Philip
Nov. 30 against Pasco Hernando Clark (The ) pointsket-


Submitted
The North Florida Com-
munity College Men Basket-
ball Academy played its inau-
gutal game Nov. 9 in Ocala
against Central Florida Com-
munity College. NFCC, down
46-29 at halftime, outscored
CFCC in the second half by
five points but still took an'
88-76 loss to the Ocala team.
"Our guys pla ed, hard,",
said NFCC basketball coach
Clyde Alexander. "Terrance
McClain (Jasper) was the of-
fensive leader with 31 points.


While they last!
PLEASE PRINT
I Name:
Address:
Cily. Stale, Zip
No. Copies- Check Enclosed. $
Or Credit Card: Visa Mastercard .:.r.:i, ,:.n I
Card #:
Expiration Date:
NMail oidei form to Southern Heritage Pie,
L -P.O. Box 10937, St. Petersburg, FL 33733


Books available for pickup at the offices of The Suwannee Democrat,
Jasper News, Branford News or the Dust Catcher in Mayo.
You may have your book mailed to you for an additional cost of $5.95,
Call (3 86) 362-1734 for more information


He [McClain] also had 7
dunks in the game and was
immediately put on recruiters'
lists for next year."
Other NFCC point leader,
were Pierre Wilson (Braden-
ton) 8 points; Toren Hogan
(Jasper) 7 points and Brian
Hill (Madison) 7 points. Also
adding to the points were Eric
Cato (Midway) 4 points;
Allen Demps (Madison) 4
points; Andy Bruton
(Greenville) 2 points; Forrest
McDaniel (Madison) 3
points; Bryan Johnson (Madi-


ball Academy travels to Talla-
hassee Nov. 28 for competi-
tion against Tallahassee Comn-
munity College. The team's
first home game is Thursday,
Nov. 30 at 3 p.m. against Pas-
co Hemando. Other upcom-
ing home"games are Dec. 13
against Central Florida at 6
p.m. and Dec. 14 against
Chipola College at 7 p.m.
Home games are open to the
public and are held at Colin
P. Kelly Gymnasium, located
on the NFCC campus in
Madison.


Ice skating for the family!
Dec. 7-Jan. 1, 2007
The Plaza Ice Palace
Downtown Community
Plaza in Gainesville welcomes
back The Plaza Ice Palace
from Saturday, Dec. 7-Mon-
day, Jan. 1, 2007. Sharpen
your skates, break out those
winter sweaters, mittens and
hats, and get ready to glide
out onto the ice with family
and friends. The skating sea-
son will last four weeks dur-
ing the winter holidays, from
Dec. 2-Jan. 1, 2007. Call for
hours of operation, admission
and skate rental, special
events, group rentals, private
parties, discounts and spon-
sorship opportunities. Info:
Bill Bryson, 352-393-8527.
r .


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006


0 SU.WANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK






WENSDY NOEME 22 06UWNE EORTLV A AE5


s from Suwannee girls' soccer


W~' ~ -



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$0




4. ~l
I -

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*1~


RECENT

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'Top right:
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Above left:
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Above right:
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Photos: Paul Buchanan


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1996 Saturn SL1 .................................................................... $1,995
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1995 Chrysler LeBaron Convertible.................................... $2,495
1994 Chevy Corsica................................................................. $995
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If you need a car or truck, or if you need a car or truck part;
if we don't have it, we can get it! After all, Why buy new when used will do?
We are located off HWY 90 just east of the 1-10 overpass, behind the United 500.
310377-F


Suwannee Valley

Dental Inc.


Dr: Gus is delighted to announce the addition it I, ny B. Ttckei;
Dental Hygienist to his practice. 7Tmnmy's experience includes
18 successidl years as a ITIv.';i i; Live Oak and surrounding
areas. Thnmmy would like to invite former patients as well as new
patients to make an appointment with her at her new location.
Please call 386-362-1408
for appointment
510 South Ohio Ave., Live Oak


-- o


SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 5B


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER, 22, 2006








PAGE 6B MoB I-..-.*v-II ..

1st


Nine



Weeks


All honor rolls are subnnit
ted by the schools. If your
child made the honor roll
amn his or her name does not
appear here, please call the
respective schools, not ihe
Democrat. We accept addi-
tions to the honor roll fivmn
schools only.
Westwood Christian
School
Honor Roll 20p6-2007
First ne'Weefes,
-,1-., n .-N i r N '
"A"-
Second Grade
Nathan Barker
Cheyenne Bricklos
Matthew Dixon
Kyle Gamble
Elizabeth Goolsby
Isaac Green
Caleb Guillery
Cole Herring
Pavyton Howell
Kelton Kmghton
Mikaila Letu
Abby Mickler
Ashley Nobles
Justin Price
Colt Seaman
Brock Tow nsend
Third Grade
Kami Boswell
Tessa Ferrieta
Ryan Glass
Lloyd C. Hawthorne
Megan Letu
Mikayla Mathews
Rachel McCoy
Ryan McCoy
MindeU Robinson
Tiffany Smith
Ka) la Wilson
Fourth Grade
Jason Arthmann
Ryan Builey
Abby Barker
Stacy Erixton
Madison Hallmark
Katie Lent
Brittant McCullers
Ta\lor Swindell
Cheyeine Wamer
"B"
Second Grade
Colten Crews
Colby Guillery
Morgan Hughes
Alex Nielsen
Hannah O'Donnell
Third Grade
Jordan Alger
Alex Beavel
Chiquandia Br\ant
Corbm Gill
Catilyn Hughes
Scan Price
Rebekah Winburn
Fourth Grade
Tylier Canozza
Johnathon Goolsby
Fifth Grade
Michael Guillery
Oliver Ivie
Emily Batket


* All. honor rolls are
submitted by the schools.
If your child made the
honor roll and his or her
name -does not appear
here, please call the re-
spective schools, not the
Democrat. We accept*
additions to the honor
roll from schools only.

Suwannee Elementary
School
First Nine Weeks
Honor Roll 2006-2007



Second Grade
Kristopher Allen
Cordale Aue .
Kiera Bispham
Jamie Bowen
Joshua Boyette
James "Harley" Breeden
Lindsay Carter
Carson Chauncev
Timothy Choe
Susan Conrad
Karen Crossno
Cody Daniel
Baylee Davenport
Haylee Deas
Shilah Eades
Tyla Edwards
Phillip Fortner
Braxton Furry
Dawn Furst
Hannah George
Erika Gilbert
Jessica Girard
Michael Gregory
Dillon Harrell
Fred Hatfield
James Hawthorne
Tristan Henderson
Miranda Hill
Cody Honcoop
Cierra Home
Savannah Jackson
Madeline Johns
Steven Jones
Karen 'Lagunas
Cierra Lee,-'
Jordan Leishur
Savannah LeNeave
Aleigha Long
Shealah Martinson
Jahve McCray
Caitlin McCubbin
Laurel McGee
Samual McMillan
Bianca Morgan
Harley Mullins
Kayla Parker
Erika Prowant
Elvis Quiterio-Ramirez
Monica Ramirez
Blain Roberson
Kimberly Rodriguez
Wendy Salazar
Roger Sansone
Savannah Slaughter
Austin Stansel
Zane Stephens
Paige TenBroeck
Lauren Tingle
Mariah Torres
Bryce Watson
Jasmine Williams
Eric Word

Third Grade
Alexis Adams
Deni Allen
Karl Anderson
Sarah Anderson
Emily Bermudez
Ta. lotr Blackmon


Maegan Burkett Brooke Driver
Denver Cameron Briana Dutton
Gavin Cashmore' Kaleb Dye
Jillian Christiansen Christopher Dyess
Aldren Collins Baily Elmore
Lydia Corbett Brice Finney
Samantha Dortch Kenneth Foster
Marissa Dye Kasey Frazier
Steven Eddings Tyler Freeland
Ramsey Elliott Madison Fuller
Matthew Ernst Damon Gandiana
Darrah Fortner William Garcia'
Brinany Furst Ja'Dames Gardner
Dylan Gaskins Leon Graham
Skyler Gaylord Shantrell Granville
Carmen Gray Kayla Gray
Kyler Gray Kyle Hagan
Jackson Greene Ca'Jaira Hall .
Akira Gwinn Da'Dreonna Hall
Chase Hamilton Kaitly n Hamm
Brooke Hinton. Anakkin Harrell
Jasmine Hollingshead Josh Hartsfield
MolhHumphrey Kiersten Hartsfield:.
Makylah Jackson Bryce Hatfield
Phillip Jones Erika Hayes
Grecia Lagunas Tania Henderson,
Charles Law Selina Hernandez
Kirsten Lee Tyler Herron
Krisien Logsdon Scott Hertl.
Kyra Lyras Preston Hicks
Miah Martinson Lindsey Hill
Cods Mla\ o Reagan Hobbs
Lucas McClain Angel Home
SKTa NMcClendon William Howell
Shalice McClendon Miranda Hunt;
Victoria McDonald Ambur Hunter
Cod\- Nenliennett Pascnal JaHuey -
Annah NMonismith Billy Jenkins
KassidN Perkins Ean Johnson
Steven Potter Shine Johnson
Chyenne Putnel Tristan Johnson
Kaitlyn Rogers Mayana Jones
Dean Shingola Taylor Jones
Hayley Stanford Harleston Kight'
Raivyn Summerfield Hunt&r Lanier
Miranda Townsend Destiny Lansford
Blake Ulmer Clinton Lashley
Bryce Walker Zachary Law
Rosanna Weaver Keverly Lee
Angeline Lents
"B" DaltonLeroux
Ezekiel Linton
Second Grade Julisa Loredo ..
Hector Agapito Maura Lott
Ashley Allred Elizabeth Maldonado
RubenAlvarez Morgan Martin
Jo-Anna Barnett Camryn McCallister
Manuela Barrios Nadine McCardell
Jacob Barrow Kaylee McFarlin
Cheyenne Beasley Darius McQuay
Rebecca Beasley Jacob Melo
Gavin Beine Hallie Middleton
Thomas Bingham Roberto Miguel
Joey Borrell Valerie Moreno
Kamryn Boyd Brett Murphy'
Amber Bradford, Kelyn Murray
Bethany Brown Kadeisha Nails
Courtney Bryant Bemardo Neria
Leigh-Anna Byrd Scarlett O'Hara
Kayla: Caldwell Eileen Ortiz
Devan Cameron Randa Padgett
Diana Carrier. John Peeler
Syanne Carwise Jakashia Perry,
Brooklyn Cashinore Allie Phillips
Abby Cato Haley Polo
Jarrius Cherry Cameron Potter
Keith Claridy Danielle Potter
Jimmy Clay Joanna Quezada
Arrion Clayton Kayla Rice
Joseph Combs Ronnie Rice
Jena Conine Jorge Riveron
Eric Copland / Kirstin Rogers
Trevor Corbett Guadalupe Romulo
Jennifer Corbin Lakiya Rossin
Angela Cronan Brenda.Rowell
Rebecca Crouch Carlie Sadler
Sierra Daniel Emily Saldana
Cody Davison Gracie Sandlin
Amber Deaton IHeather Sannizzaro


Melody Christian
Academy
Honor Roll 2006-2007
First Nine Weeks


All honor rolls
are submitted by
the schools. If
your child made
the honor roll and
his or her name
does not appear
here, please call
the respective
schools, not the
Democrat. We ac-
cept additions to
the honor roll .
from schools only.


First Grade
Arley.Bryant
Skii Claridy
Alexis Corbett
Russell Farrell
Elijah Pancake

Second Grade
Sarah Brakenwagen
Carter Chancey
Gerald Corbett
Luke Henderson
. Devin Holcomb
Josh Johns
Faith Lang
Aaron Sanchez


Third Grade
Summer Andrew s
Meghan Barber
Jenson Brown
Ashleigh Corbett
Kaylee Morris
Christopher Sawyer
Meagan Tuvell

Fourth Grade
Hailey Baker
Erin Barber
John Paul Carter
Myrna Irizarry
Christopher Johns
Zakeria Pierce
Donald Reed

Fifth Grade
James Henderson
Shayla Kicklighter
Lydia Moellenkamp
Lindy Squire
John Swinney,


Ciara Sansouci
Trent Selph
Joshua Shingola
Cecil Smith
Maikayla Smith
Keishaun Snead
Christine Spinks
Ben Stavig
Parker Stevens
Tomorra Stever
Austin Stewart
Ken'Dria Stoudemire
Austin R. Strickland
Austin T. Strickland
Danielle Swartz
Josh Sweat,
Jesse Taylor
Michael Thomas
Sierra Thompson
Jaelen Tucker
Nala Velaquez
Zac Voss
Roy Wainwright
R.J. Walker
Macy Warner
Madison Warner
R"an WXamner
Chase W.arren
Destiny Warren
Danielle Wible
Tahia Williams
Joshua Wink
Logan Zimmermann

Third Grade
Ka\ A\erN
Will Baker
Kyle Barker
Andrew Barton
Jarrod Beegle
Kayla Bell
Abby Bennett
Kayleigh Berry,
Karl Biddle
Kaitlyn Blanco
Kollin Blanco
Damon Bonds ./
Bryson Bracewell
Drake Brantley
Steven Bridges
Alexis Brown
Blakely Burch
,, ,iTaylor Burcker
SMakayla Buzbee
Katelynn Candela
Miguel Canjay
Garrin Cantella
Ashley Carlton
Johnathan Carrier
Jesse Carver
.Jarod Cato '
Kacie Champion
Hunter Cheney ;
Anthony Cioffe
Quantrell Cobbler
Clarence Coleman
Andrew Cook
Sean Crawford.
Kaleb Cromn
Steven Crossno .
Giovanni Cruz
Kyle Cunningham
Kaila Dalton .
Zoey Denny
Breanna DeWitt
Jeffrey Domer
Kila Douglas'
Dakota Ehemann
Marcel Ferro
Cassandra Fischer
Tyler Foster
Holland Freeman
Sabrina Gaither
Jody Gamble
Pablo Garcia
Antyone Gibbons
Charles Giem
'Abby Gilbert
James Gilbert


Sixth Grade
Travis Corbett
Collin Shields
Dustin Wagner
Antwon Williams

Seventh Grade
Brook Corbett
Ben Glass
Ashley Jones
Amanda Thrasher
Christian Tuvell

SEighth Grade
Kayla Jackson

Ninth Grade
Alyssa Rodriguez
Paige Rodriguea


"B"
Third Grade
Alexie Cruz
Hayden Fleming


Rhys Goulet
Bethany Guilmett'e
Peyton Hale ,
Alexis Hankla
Deleah Harris
Terrab Henderson
Casey Hemrnandez
Gabriela Hemandez
Chelsea Hetrick
Sara Hinton.
Michelle Hodges ..
Breanna Hofstetier
Brianna Hole
Alexis Howard
William Ho\\ ard
Nicholas Hurst
Katie Hutchins
Austin Jernigan
Kary Johns
D'Nlarai Johnson
Jenna Johnson
Jeremy Johnson
Diamondnique Jones
Jerrid Jones
Malick Jones
Jordan Joyner
Gage Kilcollins
Samantha Kihnire
' Matthew Kunkle
* Aaron Lake
Destiny Langford
" Luis Lopez
Christina Loredom
Paloma Machado
AlINssa Maniung
Haley Marlowe
Hadi NMasoodi
Logan Mauldehr
Nikki Mayo ,
Akijhitae McCray
Justin McCumber
Ryan NMcGrath
Kyle McGuire
Chelse NlcKire
Tyler McWarters
Kendnck Memck
Jessie Minatree
Kenta% ia Mitchell,
Zachary Morgan
Austin Murray
Drew Musgroxe
Luke Nelson
,. ,Cheyenne.Newell
.Montana Newgent .
Aubree Page
Alexis Parker
Micaela Parker
Alexandria Parks
Kelsey Parlato


Fourth Grade
Ashley Hand
Patrick Kelley,
Caleb Parson
Tyler Pridgeon

Fifth Grade
Lizzy Brooks
Halley Fleming
Mark Morris
Devontaye Thomas

Sixth Grade
Mauri Bryant
Chris Hurst
Clayton Johns
Marcus Muniz
Lorraine Poore
Zachary Pierce
Brandon Slane

Seventh Grade
Chelsea Atzert
Jalandra Brown


Erin Paulk.
Cole Peacock
Angel Peiffer
Monte Pefez
Jalon Perry
Greg Plummer
Hayden P ymel
Rachal Poling
Nlegan Powell
Brandon Quezada-.
Jahuey
Shailah Ramirez
Uriel Ramirez-Perez
Chauncey Ratliff
Jasmine Reed
SaVone Reed
Timothy Retherford
Connor Rickett
Josh Roberson
Jordan Roberts
Kalie Rpmine
Kelsi Roper
Ke\ in Ross
Krissy Samrnons
Jacob Segura
T Tler Sellars
William "John" Sey-
luour
Briana Shearer
NMegan Shearer
SLmndsey Smithart
Danielle Starling
Sonn\ Stevens
Cheyenne Stills
Jacob Smtrckland
VWhitney Taylor
Sierra Theeninii
Cyiera Thomas
Sannago "Nestor" Tor-
res
David Tran
Justin Truesdale
Anthon\ Wmalker
. Alexandria Warren
. Emily Watson
Jessica Weddle
AkMnanna Wheeler
SMarquis Wheeler
Carter Wiggins
BrNanna Williams
James Williams
Justin Williams
. Kay lee Wjllkams .
Raven Williams -
Tasha. Williams
Brandon Willis
Trevor Willis
Chase Woods
Cody Woods


Alyssa Fast
Joel Jones
Kaley Nobles
Haley Rosenthal

Eighth Grade
Tyler Putnel
Ninth Grade
Francheska Barrett
Elizabeth Irizarry
Kyle Jenkins
Alex Macadangdang
Cameron Miller
Travis Simmons

10th Grade
Jaida Butler

11th Grade
Nick Henderson

12th Grade
Chris Klee


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22,' 2006


M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/~TLIVE OAK


MA-- --







VVFnNF"DAYINOVME 22aWN O A I AP 7


1st


Nine


Weeks


All honor rolls c
submitted by the
schools. If your ch
made the honor ro
and his or her nap
does not appear h
please call the re"-
spective schools, n
the Democrat. We
cept additions to t
honor roll from
schools only.

Suwannee
Intermediate
School
Honor Roll,
2006-2007
First Nine Weeks

"A"
Fourth Grade
Boggus, Andrew,
Boston, Dixie'
Brantley, Ryan
Brown, Ajanae
Butler, Timothy
Carter, Timothy
Chamberlain, Ian
Coblentz, Austin
Collins, Mitchell
Cortez, Jesus
Cosgrove, Justin
Cummings. Alora
Dunn, Brittany
Ellis, Megan
Fletcher, Preston
Furry, Brandon
Haney, Jonathon
Hurst, Danielle
Jackson, Wyatt
Johnson. Shanquis
Lane, Darrah
Law, Grace
Lawrence, Brooke


are McNair, Ashli
Mongeon, Devin
zild Poppell, Luke
Wll Randall, Allie
ne Sansone, Gary
ere, Singh,-Austin
Zint, Amanda
,ot
ac- Fifth Grade
'he Boatright, Daniel
Bonds, Kayla
Bryant, Audre
Cameron, Bo
Carroll, Aspen
DaSilva, Tyler
Deas, Hunter:
Eddings, Kaitlynn
Faircloth, Karla
Feeney, Harli
Hale, Jonathan
Hamilton, Hunter,
Herring, Carley
Kellison, Kelli
Ledford, Jake
Lee, Katel\nn
Loadholtz, Morgan
McClendon, Alana
Menhennett, Cole
Morgan, Mallory
Munsell, Malory
Pennington. Zach
Santana, Jennifer
Smith, Dallas
Smith, Dustin
Smith, Lauren
Staley. Mackenzie
Stover, Skyler
VanMeter. Amanda
Wainwright, Emi
Yarick, Mike

3e "B"

Fourth Grade
Africano, Christopher


Alban, Rebecca
Alvarez, Leonel
Baker, Harley
Baker, Zach
Barritt, Shelby
Bell, Celena
Bellamy, Karonical
Bemiss, Stephanie
Bennett, Brooke
Bilodeau, Austin
Blige, Jashari
Bracewell, E nmalee
Brisbois, Juliana,
Brooks, Shambreya
Brown, Jason
Brown, Tavarse
Burcker, Devon
Buzbee, Madisen
Byrd, Caitlin
Byrd, James
Calmo, Ricardo
Carmichael, Gage
Carr, Michael
Cashmore, Staci,
Cherry, Kierra
Choe, Haejin
Clark, Jah
Clay, Kimberly.
Clayton, Deondre
Crain, Jonathan
Crump, Paige
Crutchfield, Holly
Curtis, Kenny
Deas, Brooke
Dennard, Jordan
Dennard, Danielle
Dixon, Elizabeth
Dobbs, Alyssa .
Downs, Colleen
Duran, Laurentino
Ellis, Kassidy
Fisher, Amy
Fleming, Derrick
Ford, Keandra
Freeland, Kendra


Galloway, Savanna
Garcia, Kassandra
Gatewood, Sydney
Gervasini, Teco
Gimenez, Brittany
Grand, Marchayla .
Gray, Jordan
Guenther, Adrian
Hamm, Cody
Harris, Anthony
Hernandez, Iva
Herrera, Maria
Hetrick, Terri.
Hofer, Robert
Hollon, Shla j
Howell. Cameron
Hucko, Brandon
Jefferson, Jainil .
Jordan, Laura Beth
Key, Sasiha
Kinsey, Jai
LedeW, John
Lock, Tamara
Mabey, Anianda
Marler, MNadeline
Nlartello. Rice
NIManhe\\. Josh
McGowan, Paige
McManawa3, Sami
McQuay, Dalvious
Melton, Steven
Mentha, Miguel
Messer, Jordan
Miniranek, Gage /'
Moarrero, Karina
Mongeon, Kaineu "
Murray Shania I
Neria-P!rez, Yul i a
Olguin, Yorcli /
Owens, Katelyn
Parnell, Lindsej.
Parsons, Ronal
Perkins, Jakai/
Perkins. WesleN
Pidgeon, Ayla


Rafferty, Shelby
Ramos, Julissa
Rana, Amirah
Ratliff. Sarah
Ratliff, Fallon
Reed, Kyle
Register, Jessie
Roberts, Retrina
Rodriguez. Robert
Rosalio. Andrea
Rosp, Savannah
Rourke. Kerstin
Santerfeit, Brianna
Scon, Danan
Scot. Ja'Da% ian
Segura. Ruby
Simmons. Frame
Smith. Larshonda
Smith. Jaden
' Smith. Hannah
Snied. Khayree
Snipes, Haley
Spier, Enoch
Stalh e. Katie
Ste\\ art, Stephanie
Sullivan. Ethan
Sweat. Cour ney
Thomas, Titus
Thompson, Keifer
Tillman, Lyric, :
Todd, Alexis.
Tontes. Nicholas
Torres. Alexander
Tuckeri Makayla
Turner, Cod\
Uribe-Romulo, Yuliet
Vilardi. Anthony.
Vilardi, Brittany
Vogel, Molly
Wadford, Shelby
Warren, Saydra
Watkins, Katel\n
Weddle, Joshua
Wickham. Dalton
Wiggins, Denitra


Williams, Bailiegh
Williams, Amara
Williams, Ty'eisha
Williams, Marissa
Williams, Harley
Wood, Ashley
Young, James:.

"B"

Fifth Grade
Almanza, Jesus
Alonso. Joseph
' Aed, Kayla
Alitmai. Bailey
Andeison. D'Andre.
Bakei. Laura Beth
Baker. Jacob
Bandy. Da\ cia
Banks, Samanthia
.Bean. Presley
Bispham, Kamree
Blaukinslup, Chad
Bowers, Darias
Brannan, Stephanie
Breedlo\ e, Brittany,
Brock, Braiden
Bush, Ajauae
Byrd, Alexis
Camejo, Amy
Campos, Christian
Cashmore, Taylor
Cavazos, Alberto
Chain, Cole
Chamberlain, Caitlyn
Clayton. Sha
Clayton, Lakendra
Conrad, Kimberly
Contreras, Jonathon
Cooks, Marquis
Cruz, Melamie
Cushman, Yancey
Daniels, Tanisha
Daniels-Floyd, Davin
Day, Katelyn


Driver, Dustin
Eady, Travis'
Ezwll, Victoria
Fisher, Eric
Folsom, Carolyi
Fortner, Trey
Foster, Dakota
Frazier, Taylor
Gaskins, Saman
Gilbert, Brittany
Gist, Taylor
Gonzales. Paola
Good, Joseph
Grest, Mikaila
Gross. Dewitt
Hallock. Austin
Hallock., Jasmin
Harris, Hunter
Herring. Jasmin
Hester. Sami
'Hester, Chelsea
Hicks, Zak.
Hingson. Dein
Huerta. Miguel
Jenkins. Kenny
, Wa\ne
Jones, Eric
Lane, Alyssa
Larreille, Andre
Lee, Imani
Liles, Rebecca
Maldonado, Isa
Martin, Tiffany
Martin. Justin
Martin. Ashleig
Mathis. Keegan
McCra,. Carl
McGraw. Emily
McIntosh, Larry
McLeod, Tyler
Meza, Gonzalo
Mobley, Taylor
Moffat, Amber
Morales, Santia
Ne\eils. Katelvi


.Noyes, Seth
Olguin, Yareli
O'Steen, Desirae
Padgett, Taylor
Parker, Casey
Parnell, Jeramiah
Pearson, Courtney
Peeler, Evlee
Perry, Sierrah
Quiterio, Zulema
Reynolds. Tristan
Robbinson. Darren ,
Robinson. Averva
Rojo. Fernando
Sanders. Samuel
na Santangelo. Ashley
SSeele%. Tyler r
Shaffer. Ka.la. ,
Sierra. Joel
tha Silva,,Ana
Skaates, Gail
y Skeen. Matt
Skinner. Dallas
Smith. Janue
Ste\ ens. Joey
Sullivan. Christopher
Siunluers. Justin
Taylor, Brandi
Taylor. Patrick
)e- The\enin. Taylor
Thomas. Chasity
Thomas. Wyatt
Torres. Lionel
Touchton. Jason
Trayden. Chrissyv
SVance, Akashia
Villalobos, Juan
Waddy. Sierra
SWainwright. Brooke
a, Walker. Emmanuel
Walker, Eric
lWalker. Ebony
ac are. Michael -
Watson. Kavla
SWatson, Khadijah
h Watson, Dillon
S Williams. Shelly
Williams. Brandon
Wilson. Jowanna
Woodson. MIchaela
S Yawn, Angel
Yott, Justin
Zasada., BrNson

go
nn


All .411honor rolls a
sulininired b the
schools. If your
ituade the honor
and his or her n
do's nret appear

spcnv re schools
thi Democrat. V
cept additions tU
"honor toll from
schools only.

Suwannee
School
First Nine Wee
Honor Roll 200
2007

"A" ,

Ninth Grade
Alley, Hailey.
Billups, Connor
Boggus; Marsha
Clayton, Phillip
Garland, Justin
Hadden, Tyler
Hall, Earnest
Haney, Katherin
Haney, Westin
Hicks, Justin
Lee, Kayla
Luther, Sarah .
McManaway, A
da
McMillan, Film
Ohrmund, Jesse
Rafferty, Meaga
Roberts, Sara
Schroeder, Andi
Shea, Ellen
Tomlinson, Clay
Udell, Katherine
Vickers, Terry
Weaver, Jabe
Welch, Donovan

10th Grade
Bestoso, Rebeki
Boatright, Johni
Campbell, Kath
Carlton, Megan
Cato, Ashley
Cody, Barbara
Fraley, Robert
Hancock, Callie
Harmon, Saman
Hett, Deborah
Michal, Lauren
Roberts, Jessica
Summers, Kristi
Valdez, Robert
Williams, Amy

11th Grade
Barclay, Brittan
Boyette, Adrien
Do, Thuy Thi


rne Duren, Katie
Fels, Christina
child Gardies, Marine
roll Garrison, Nicole
ame Hill, Mark
* here. Hinrich', Jan-Lukas
e- "Howard. Torre)
. not Johannson, Carolina
Ve ac- Johnsen. Christopher
o the Lara, Luis
Laxton, Brittany
Monroe, Cara
Perez, Hosafat
High Rodriguez, Angela
Schultheiss, Maike
ks Sweat, Ashley
1.6- West, Misty.
Zeiner, Kim

12th Grade
Barnes, Arron
Brearley-Wamer,
Katlin
Ford, Terakia
ill Goolsby-Zak, Ashley
Hoffmann, Racheal
Ivey, Shatpya
Jones, Joshua
Kus, Kristina
le Lee, Cody
Mann, Randi
Martin, James
Motes, Amanda
Spicer, Heath
man- Taylor, Amanda
Williams, Chelsea
ore
"B"
n
Ninth Grade
rew, Armstead, Arbre
Batton, Ashley! .
yton Bennett, Brittany
e Bennett, Taylor
Benson, Eric
Benson, Kathleen
n Bilodeau, Victoria
Bispham, Kyla
Boise, Marissa
ah Bowers, Gregory
e Bracewell, Nicholas
ryn Brock, Zachary
Buchanan, Gabrielle
Callum, Quineisha
Carroll, Erin
Carruthers, Craig
Catledge, Jessica
itha Chambliss, Bradford
Cherry, Cherise
Cherry, Keith
Cherry, Samuel
in Clark, John
Clayton, Latavia
Cole, Andrew
Collins, Margaret
Collins, Nicole
y Combs, Shykera
ne Crapps, Stephanie
Crawford, lesha


Crosier, Emily Touchton,/Trevor
Cundiff, Katy Turman, Ryan
Cundiff, Kelly Turner, Brittany
Curls, Kelsey Turner, Jason
Dilung; Patrick Van Meter, Bruce
Do-ney, Samnihtkhau \'ann, Amber
buong. And3"' ,.s. Branden
Finch, Mary Voss, Cory
Fite, Rebecca 1Watson. Jamie
Fontenot, Kerry Watts, James ,
Forsythe, Ashley Wheeler, Eden
Fort, Fredrick Whitaker, Jalexis
Gainer, Jasmine Whitmore, Laurence
Gill, Ashley Whittington, Kalie
Grand, Marc Whittington, William
Grantham, Rebecca Willianms, Antoinette
Hamilton, Dana Winstead, Amanda,
Hargrove, Niketta
Harper, Morgan 10th Grade
Hayes, Sidney Adams, Kyle
Hernandez, Noe Allen, Bryne
Hill, Susan Altemose, Christo-.
Holden, Heather pher
Huffman, Robert Anderson, Dana
Hunter, Natalie, Baker, Leonard
Hurst, Sarah Barnhart, Kenneth
Jackson, Justin Bartolotti, Joshua
Jarvis, Alison Barton, Tara
Jenkins, Kaleigh Bass, Celia
Johnson, Jaznine Box, Jessie
Johnson, Tyrah Branham, Arpanda
Jones, Anitra Brannon, Hali
Kurtz, Virginia Bresk, Amanda
Lamm, Brooke Brewer, Casey
Laxton, Travis Brothers, Shelby
Lewis, Leroy Burrus, David
Livingston, Shynee- Causey, April,
qua Chandler, lRenee
Loadholtz, Kaitlyn Cheshire Karli
Locklear, Benjamin Clayton, Joanna.
Manns, Brenna Coar,'Chelby
Markham, Corey, Cober1. Joshua
Martell8d,Mia Deato Ashley
Martin, Joshua Este\es, Carlos
Mincey, Adrian Farris, Emilie
Mohler, Lisa Fortner, Stacie
Moses, Matthew Fortner, Tyler
O'Connor, Austin, Fullbright, John
Oliver, Tara Furst, Allysen
Owens, Tiffany Gaylord, Brandon
Pecina, Natalie Goff, Kristin
Peterson, Jessie Gordon, Melanie
Piet, Tarra Gray, Antonio
Pipkin, Jawanza Harman, Novia
Prevatt, James Henderson, Tori
Quillen, Nikki Hill, Phillip
Raines, Brandon Hodge, Erika
Reliford, Christian Hough, Matthew
Riley, Tiyrenee Humphrey, Amber
Robinson, Joel Jernigan, Braxton
Salazar, Christian Johnson, Reese
Smith, Dakota Jones, Faye ,
Smith, Kody Kannady, William
Spacek, Song-Doh Kennon, Kylie
Tehan, Sarah King, Samuel
Thomas, Jessica LaBrecque, Arielle
Threm, Aaron Lee, Lewis
Tillison, Kevin Lewis, Lindsey
Tomlinson, Kara Little, Brandy


Mahan, Ashley .
Main, Amber
McFarland, Randi
McMillan, Christo-
pher
IMcMlullen. Dana .
Miller" Anteno .
SNlOwr), Stacy
Musgrove, Crystal
Musgrove. Stephanie.
Musgrove, Tyler
Parker, Matthew
Pfender. Virginia
Phillips,.Skyler
Pierce, Mark
Rainey, Christiana
Reed, Brooke
Robinson. Skxe
Rodriguez, Karla
Rodriguez, Yetsenia
Rogers, Aaron
Royals, Sydney
Salazar, Omar
Salvati, Gina
Sardina, Deeanna
Shafii, 'Alina
Shirah, Kelsey
Skipper, Stephen
*Smith, Timothy
Stefanik, Russell
Stoughton, Jennifer
Tewalt, Tabitha
Thomas, Austin.
Tice, Jessica
Tillman, Emma,
Townsend, Dale
Wainwright, Chelsea
Wainwright, Leslie
White, Corey
Whitt; Misty
\\ illiams. Cassandra
Willis, Casey
Woolsey, Austin
Young, Christopher

11th Grade
Alvarez, Maria
Arnaud, Lucille
Arreguin, Alma
Badgerow, Mary
Baldwin, Kalie
Beckner, Beverly
Bedell, Joseph
Bell, Ralph
Blankinship, Thomas
Boyett, Heather '
Brown, Kendall
Brown, Precious
Budwick, Jordan
Bullock, Danielle
Burrows, Damian
Butler, Rachel
Corbin, Candice
Courtney, Joseph
Crosier, Nicholas
. Cupp, Marissa
Dapa, Sandra
Daugherty, Richard
Davis, Chelsea


Da\is. Jennifer
Davis, Roger
Deal, Narrisa
) Demoss, Michael
Diaz, Jessica
,', Diaz, Juan
T'Duks', Terica
Edwards. Amanda
Fina, Natalie
'Folk, Ryan
Forsythe, Kristen,
Garcia-Pacheoo, Car-
los
Garlick, Nicholas
Gonzalez, Margarita
Granville,. James.
'Green. Suzanne.
Harris, Brittany
Hatch, Edith
Hicks, Heath
Hillhouse, Edward
Hoesl, Stefanie
Huntsman, Lexie
Jefferson, Jasmine
Jenkins, Tiffany
Jeong, Ye Eun
Johnson, Hinnah
Johnson, Jessica
Johnson, Justin
.Jordan, Brittany
Joseph, Ashli
Kelly, Michael
Kinard, Clay
Klasen, Caroline
Kong, Yei
Kyne, Lucinda
Lamoureux Theoret,
Marjoiaine
Le, Linh
Matthews, James
Maulden, Evan
McCullers, Jessica
McGuire, Austin
McMillian, Deana
Megahee, Krista
Melia, Jacqueline
Melland, Katey
Mobley, Krystal
Mooney, Mary
Nagel, Lisa
Newman, Katherine
Nobles, Brandon
Owens, Casey
Patel, Madhvi
Patten, John
Perkins, Cathleen
Pidgeon, Kendell
Prevatt, Jennifer
Radford, Lee
Ragan, Tiffany
Reed, Shantavis
Register, Stevie
Ridgeway, Derek
Salazar, Kyle
Sanders, Caleb
Schlich, Elena
Schultz, Katherine
Sin, Na-Ra
Smith, Keith


S Smith, Nathaniel
Snyder, Jonathajn
Starling. Justin
Tana, aisu,\ an. Siri-
\\anll
Tanner, Ashley
TrOdi, MTohika
Townsend, Tyler
Tu, Phuc
Virgil, Keedra
Ward. Javontae
Weaver, Brittany
Wilkes, Rebecca
Williams, Jacob
Williams, Kayla
Wood, Victoria
Young, Chelsea.
Yulee, Jarrett

12th Grade
Aho, Roger
Baker, Dustin
Baker, Robert
Bales, Jessica
Beale, Cameron
Boggus, Cullen
Bowen, Michaiah
Brack, Sandra
Branche, Tyler
Brewster, Austin
Bridges, Corey
Butler, Julie.
Butler, Laronda
Capozzia, April
Carrasquillo, Shan-
non
Carter, Randy
Cherry, Larrell
Cody, Elizabeth
Cook, Brandon
Cramer, Brandie
Cundiff, Thomas
Davenport, Adam'
Davis, Brittany,
Duenas, Emmanuel
Duval, Melba
Estrella, Jessica
Fieler, Matthew
Foote, Tabatha
Galloway, Gabriel
Gandiana, Kayla
Geiger, Charles
Gibbs, Krista
Gillette, Kayla
Graham, Tiquesa
Grand, Michael
Grantham, Mary
Grinnell, Russell
Hamalian, Christina
Harris, Ashley
Haynes, Skylor
Henderson, Kelsey
Herron, Heather
Herron, Kyle
Hight, Ryan
Hill, Brittany
Hillhouse, Paula
Howard, Cody
Hughes, Lori


Hunter. Lovee
Jahnke, Joshua -
Johnson. Adrienne
Jones. Amelia
Jordan. Jeffrey
Kellv. Joseph
Lansing. Jessica
Laxton. David
Laycock. Tiffany
Little. Dustin
Mathews. Daniel
Maxson, Michele
McManawa\y, Kyle
McMillian, Amber .
IMcMhilan. Amethyst
McNeil, Tekera
Mendez. Amanda
Mills, Ashley
Moody, Merideth
Mott, Nicholas
Mowry, Rebecca
Nelson, Jessica
Norman, Josey
Oliver, Jessica
Ortega, Meghan
Pacenza, Jacob
Pate, Steven
Perrin, Brett
Pomeroy, Christine
Poole, Michelle
Porter, Brena
Prevatt, Katherine
Pritchard, Brenda
Proulx, Brittany
Quinones, Amanda
Raines, Brittany
Read, Cannon
Read, Julia
Reed, Dominique
Rizzo, Rachel
Roberts, Rebecca.
Robinson, Mathew.
Rogers, Jennifer
Safreed, Ashley
Schneider, Wesley
Smith, Cassandra
Smith, James
Smith, Justin
Smith, Mara
Smith, Stephen
Sperring, Meredith
Starks, Emily
Thomas, Cindy
Thomas, Jaclyn
Thornbury, Lindsay
Tillman, Daniel
Tooten, Jamese
Touchton, Rebecca
Underwood, Justin
Villanueva, Tyler
Wainwright, Joseph
Wainwright, Levi
Walker, Noah
Ward, Cynthia
Williams, Kari
'Winburn, Stephanie
Wintons, A'shanta
Woods, Ken Michael
Young, Chauncey


PAGE 7B


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAP/LIVE OAK








PAG B U UANEDEORTLVEOKWDESANVMBR2,20


SAll honor rolls are submit-
ted by the schools. If your
child made the honor roll and
his or her name does not ap-.
pear here, please call the re-
spcctive schools. not the De-,
mocrat. We accept additions
ro thc honor roll from schools
only.

Suwannee Middle School
First Nine \\eeks
Honor Roll 2006-2007

*" ,A,,

Sixth Grade
Boggus, Livesay
Bond, Aspen
Brothers, Lindsey'
Carter, Courtney
Carter, Kristin
Cioffe, Mark
Denmark, Autumn
Fields. Macy'
,Former, Carhe
Gamble. Cody
Hadden. Emil
Jackson, Tia
Marsee. Ashtin
Morgan. Marissa
Ontiveros, Manuel
Peaden, Charles
Randell, Ta\lor
Segura, Alfher
Selph, Shannon
Sweat, Robert
Watson, Adam.
Weaver, Hal

Seventh Grade
Barker, Richard
Bingham, Destany
Boatright, Laura-Kaitlyhn
Bonds. Logan ,,
Collins, Rachel
Cruz, Ricky
Forsythe, Barbie
Hamm, Brittany
Hughes Dillon
Lance, Mara.
Ledogar, Holly
Mccall, Kaitlyn
Morgan, Amberlyn
Rang, Zachary
Ratliff, Kayla
Roberson, Zachary
Roddenberry, Philip
Rode, Tayler
Salazar, Irving
Thomas, Christopher
Tuman, Brittany
Verdegem, Caitlin
Wainwright, Ali
Williams, Chantel.
Yarick, Amy

Eighth Grade
Abercrombie, Hollan
Bedell, Steven
Brown, Jackson
Brown, Stuart
Butts, Ethan
Carter, Adam
Chambers, Hope


Daly, Kelly '
Driskell, Jonathan
Harris, Jordan
Jackson, Cody
Lagunas, Alexander
Mahan, Alexandra
Michal, Lindsay
Pennington, Matthew
Perkins, Kevin
Perry, Raechel
Singh, Amberly
Singh, Ritika
Ulmer, Lauren
Vences, Doris
Wood, Shannon

"B"

Sixth Grade
Allen, Kelsie
Anderson, Heather
Anderson, Jeffery
Andiewvs. Aubrev
Baker, Danielle,
Bass, James
Baucom, Leslie.
Blanton; Kaycie
Bowen. Austin
Brookins, Thomas
Brown, Hunter
Bryant, Danielle
Bullock, Rachael
Burnett. Jordan
Bush; Tiffaul
Campbell. Cartie
Cannon. Nakala
Carlton, Dustin
Carmichael, Mercedes
Carter, Cade
Cason, Bobby
Coker, Molly
Collins, Autumn
Corbett, Clay
Covell, Darius
Croft, Caroline
Cruz, Jesus
.Curtis, Cassondra
Daly, Tyler
Dean, Jesse
Delcastillo, Mitchel
Ditter, Lauren
Douglas-Home, Taylor
Do% e, Christina
Dnskell, Kay la
-Dykes, Kaytlynt
Egan, Hunter
Evans, Carra
Falcone, Alyssa
Fletcher, Logan
Foerman, Mercedes
Ford, Sharonda
Former, Makalia
Foster, Allen
Friedrich, Robert
Gilbert. Dustin
Gillette, Meghan
Gimenez. Christina
Gonmez. Eduardo
Hadden, Austin
Hannon, Stephannie
Harper. Jenna
Harris, Ja\onita
Henderson, Lillian
Henderson, Taylor
Hernandez, Itzel
Hernandez, Maryah
Herring, Bria
Hicks, Braxton
Hill, Zachary
Hines, Makai
Huntsman, James
Jandle, Lyndze
Johnson, James T.
Johnson, Kelsey
Jones, Sha'Kinna
Jones, Tamara
Jordan, Olivia
Koehn, Danielle
Krasnow, Jamie
Kuykendall, Thomas
Laidig, Dakota
Lawrence, Andrea
Lock, Brittany
Loper, Taryn
Mabey, Christine
Martinez, William
Mathis, Ivana
Mckinley, Cansas
Mcnair, Dalton
Messer, Sierra
Monroe, Amber
Morales, Brittany
Morgan, Ashley
Murphy, Quanisha
Nelson, Markitia
NeWsome, Christie
O'steen, Kaleb
Ortega, Christopher
Owens, Stacey
Padgett, Jenna


Patterson, Gabriel
IPerez Shawntell
Perkins, Kayla
Perrin, Destiny
Pinkard, Destiny
Polite, Keandra


Poison, Elizabeth.
Posey, Harley
Prescott, Stephen
Rader, Rhett
Raines, Taylor
Riley, Kierra
Roberts,'Stephanie
Robinson, Samantha
Royals, Delmar
Rye, Richard
Salazar, Carlos
* Shirah, Justin
Sierra, Janie
Sleigher. Rebecca
Smith, Kheryn
Spier, Shainah
Stratton, Tyler
Summerfield, Kaitlyn
Tankersley, Dustin
Tenbroeck. Jessie.
.Thomas, Genita
Thomas, Joseph ..
Thornton, Savannah
Threm, Ashley,
Tibert, Imani
Torres, Robbie
Turner, Jessica
T%\ illey.. Ashley
Tyrell, Meghan
Waddy, Randolph
Wain\r'ight, Jacob
Warren, Megan
:Wea\er, Mitchell
h\\ieeler. Alivah
White, Allison
Shiite. Austin '
SWhitnmore. Jack
Whitt. Carl
Wiggins, Miesha
Wiggins, Zachary
Wiliiams, KayslNnn
Williams, Ken\ ona
Williams, Lajonathan
Williams, Olivia
Wilson, Brittany
Winstead, Cary
Wright, Cara
Young, Caleb

.Seventh Grade
Allen, Leslie
Alley, Teylor
Alonso, Maria
Anderson, Corey
Andrews, Samantha
Arreguin, Raul
Ashbaugh, Melany
Bailes, Victoria
Baker, Patresha
Barker, Melissa,
Barritt, Abagail
Bates, Adam
Bates, Nathan
Batton, Danyel
Beasle\, Amanda ..
Beegle, Sean
Bennett, Kimberly
Bent, Ha\ le\
Blanico, Kaylem
Bo\d, Summner
Bradley, Naomi
Brannon, Heidi
Brock, Brittany
Brock, Marissa
Brown, Kerri
Brown, Shanise
Brown, Stacy
Byrd, Ashley
Carlton, Cody
Carr, Donald
Carter, Cole
Carwise, Tramane
.Cashmore, Kelli
Cason, Ahmad
Chane.\, Luke
Clayton, Jonathan
Cole, Ciera.
Collins, Austin
Coriniff, Rebecca
Contreras, Jennifer
Copland, Kevin
Coulter, Morgan
Cronan, Michael
Cross, Travis
Cupp, Michaela
Dennison, Zachary
Domer, Alyssa
Dukes, Nahjawan
Dunn, Kaylee
Ellis, Dillon
Fleming, Jamikka
Frederick, Buster
Fullbright, Damien
Fullbright. Joshua
,Gallaliar, Jessica
Garcia, Angela
.Garland, Lindsey
Gaskins, Brandon
Gilbert, Stephanie
Gill, Madison


Glass, Robyn
Graham, Joshua
Grantham, Larry
Grantham, Wiley
Guenther,.Ava
Hallock, Johnathan


Harris,'Brandon
%Haynes, Marissa
Henderson, Jasmine
Herring, Maya
Hett, Travis
Hightower, Shanika
Hines, Edward
Hines, Markari
Holland, Cheyenne
Howard, Alesha
Hupka, Heather
Johnson, Chelbie
Jones, Chelsea
Jones,Plase
Jones, Tia
Jordan. Shatanna
Keen. Crystal
Kunkle, Nicholas .
Ladue, Daniel
Lara. Samuel
Latreille. Samantha
Leighit. Ashle\
Lo\. lii. Alan
Main. Alexander
Mangtun.. Julia .
Maynard. Steven
McCall, Amanda
. NlccCallister, Lauren
McNManaway. Jessica
McMana\\a\. Kell
McQuay. Kacy
SMelanson. R\an
Mlesser. Laken
SMiller. Bnanna
Nloffat, Cr'stal
NIonismith. Quaysean
Mort. Kvlei
Munsell. Andrea
Musgrove, Dustin
Newman, Dustin
Norris, Tony
O'Conney, Taylor
Parker. Ashley
Parson, Makayla
Perez,..Francisco
Pettey, David
Pfender, Emily
Poe, Katey
Poole, Nikki
Potter, Nicole
Pournelle, John
Qualls, Kylie
Ragan. Hanna
Ragans. Joshua
Raines, Bryan
Ratliff, Mason
Register, Cody
Riley, Tiffany:
Roberts, Kristyn
Robinson, Abraham
Robinson, Mark
Rodriguez, Christian
Roper, Kayla
Rosalio, Mariana
Ross, Jeremiah
Sanchez, Natalie
Sardina, Kristina
Sasser, Christopher
Scott, Ashley
ShatTer, Cods
Stmmons. Jessica
Singleton, Dalton
Singleton, Darren
Sivyer, Katrina
Slater, Jordan
Smart,. Christopher
Smith, Delicia
Smith, Keven
Smith, Tara
Smith, Tinsley
St. John, Jill
Stalnaker, Kristin
Stevenson, Emalie
Strickland, Charles',
Sword, Ty
Tankersley, Jerry
Tanksley, Kutonah
Tehan, Miranda
Thomas, Nina'
STillman, David
Tooke, Moriah
Torres, Leonardo
Tovar, Andrew
Traydon, Justin
Tucker,. Megan
Tucker, Samantha
Turman, Chase
Vaughan, Meagan
Voege, Brendan
Vogel, Emily
Webb, James
Williams, Felisha
Williams, Tavaris
Williamson, Jacob

Eighth Grade
Asher, Hector
Babbitt, Destiny
Baker, Joy
Barlow, Tylonsheya
Bemis, Hannah


Bennett, Christian
Benson, Victoria
Blanton, Brandon
Bonds Alton
Boyette, Marshanna


Bracewell, Ashton;
Bradley, Marshauna
Breland, David
Brooks, Lashandre'
Brown, Taylor
Bullock, Jason
Butcher, Shannon
Cardenas, Lianet
Carruthers, Curtis
Cato, Matthew
Chambliss, Camill
Charles, Nicklaus
Cherry, Ariel'
Chewning, Chelsea
Conine, Christen
Corbin, Taylor
DaSilva, Ryan'
Davis, Kiara
Deyo, Al ssia
Duntz, Bryan
Evans, Krisnana -
Faircloth, Britan\
Flowers, Billie
Foreman. Caitlyn
Franklin. Kandace
Frye, Rebekah
, Funicell. Gerardo
Futch, Lillie
Gandiana, Kortn
Gardner, Shaymorra
Gaskins. Brandon
Giannoble. Crhnsnan
Gonzalez, Denise
Good, Ja\ sen
Gray. Jen'rron
Gutierrez-Diaz, Angel
Hall. Perry
Hammunerle, Courtney
Hannah. Joshua
,'Harmon. John
Helvenston. Brantld
Henderson, Da\ id
Henderson, Kev in
Hendry, Jared
Hernandez, Anagraviel
Herron, Garn
Hodge, Esly
Hoffert. Sebastian
Hooper, Nicole
Huerta, Eduardo
Johnson. Kaitlyn
Johnson, Lindsay
Jones, Anthonette
Jones, Deon
Keenan, Brandi
.Key, Joshua
Kirkpatrick. Shelby
Lake, Kalan
.Lane, Dustm
Lister, Trevor
Livecche. Kayla
Livingstone, Jessica
Long, Brooke
Lopez, Caroline
'Luke, Ashle\
Maynard, Joshua
McCall, Tay lor
McClanm, Amanda
T McCoy, Deanna
NlcCra). Latncia
IMendez. Adolfo
Merritt, Alexander
Mitchell. Jessica
Morgan, Rachel
Muller, Lillian
Munsell. Victoria
Nelson, Morgan
Neria-Perez. Efrain
Newsome, Rachel
Olson, Maegan
Orange, Mar in
Palmer, Jacob
Patak, Jonathan
Pate, Donovan
Peaden, Patricia
Pearce; Cicely
Perez-Pacheco. Gretel
Perez-Pacheco, Nu\ ia
Perkins. Brandon
Pickman. Thomas
Poison, Timothy
Prince, Kylie
Quinones. Michael
Raines, Nicks'
Randolph. Joshua
Register. Logan
Register. Nicholas
Riley, Briana
Robinson. Haley
Robinson, Rita
Rosalio, Gerardo
Russ, Tierne\
Russell, Logan
Sanders. Joshua
Scott, R:a\
Segura, Dulce
Severance, Brandon
Sierra, Gilberto
Sims, Kennethi
Skipper. Stonee


Smith, Christopher
Smith, Demarcus
Sneed, Vassel
Sollowen, Feizan
Spinks, Angelia
Spray, Jared


Stavig, Karson
Steedley, Summer
Ste\' art. Verinon
Stokes, Vescell
Story, Casey ..
Stoughton, John
Stratton, Kimberly
Sullivan, Nathan
Summertield, Autumn
Summers, Jamie
Swann, Blake
Sweet, Timothy,
Thomas, James
Thomas, Kenmisha
Thomas. Rachard'
Tyrrell, Jacob..
Vins. Katie .


1st


Nine



Weeks


Wain,,right, Dakota
Walker, Brittany
Waters, James
Waters Morgan
Watson, Dylan
Weaver. Angela
Weaver, :Destiny
Weaver. Shayla
,Whleeler, Tanisha
Williams. Tamara
W. ilson. Shanae
Wood, Darnel
Woodham, Taylor
VWoolsey, Nicolas
Young,-Linda


Suwannee-Hamilton Hannah Palmer
Technical Center Darnetta Smith -
Honor Roll 2006-2007 A'Shanta Wintons
First Nine Weeks


AUTO BODY
Dustm Al ford
Jackie Davis
Yovani Guzman
Lucas McCubbin
Richard Smith
Gary Turley

AUTO
TECHNICIAN
Robert Drew\ing

BUILDING
CONSTRUCTION
TECHNICIAN
Matthew Hough
Jacob Pacenza
Oscar Ramirez
Kyle Salazar

MASONRY'
Sandra Brack
Cody Howard
Hayden Kellog
Steven McHughes
Ryan Rehkop

BUSINESS
Camneron Beale
Hannah Palmer
Justin Dale Smith
Elizabeth Terry

COSMETOLOGY
Lisa Perr)
Katie Schmunk
Jennifer Schraud
Shannon Williams

CULINARY ARTS
Shannon Fiene
Deana McMillian
Theresa Mevers
Nanrisa Deal

EARLY
CHILDHOOD
EDUCATION
Julie Butlei
Jessica Diaz
V\cky Dunn
Stefanie McCallar
Crystal Mobley


MEDICAL
ADMINISTRATION
SPECIALIST
Brandie Cramer
Lisa TalleN
Jamese Tooten

PATIENT CARE
TECHNICIAN
Janell Roberts
Theresa Russell
Konikita Warren

PRACTICAL
NURSING
Susie R. Baker
Jordan Carroll
Lisa Carter
Kathryn Clark
Juauita Clay
Janice Cruz
Virginia Daniels
Amanda Davis
Carol Davis
Jan Elhiot
Andrea Flickinger
Tabitha Hall
Jody Hutchinson
Harriet Jenkins
Mary Lawson
Michelle Mattox
Desma Nicholson
Carla Patterson
Jennifer Peeler
Amanda Raines
Lora Veras
Robert Wells
Connie Walters

RADIOLOGIC
TECHNICIAN
Tabasam Akbar
Crystal Baxley
Savannah Burns
Melanie Dilger
Jesica Harris
Jenna Raska
Alexx Roberson
Daisy Robinson
Paul Robinson
Davi Smith
Jamie Swain
Tara Warner


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006,~


. SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 8B








WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 22, 2006


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 9B


.,

v ~ 'r


,*1. :-~~'~


RECENT

GIRLS'

SOCCER
ACTION:
Top left: Katie
Prevatt.
Top right:
Tori Wood.
Above left:
Monika Todd.
Above right:
Kelsey Bowen. -
Photos: Paul Buchanan


MORE THAN HEAT... WOw,
Beautiful fireplaces that are
clean, efficient heaters too!


THE WOOD STOVE
AND FIREPLACE CENTER
611 N Main St M-F9:30 :30 i


Bark Avenue Pet Salon
Pattie Lane
Groomer/Owner l.

We Never Sedate!!
We treat your prince like a King and
your princess like a Queen i
- 9595 102nd St, Live OakFL. 386-364-6053 '


-0A1


UREArsi

University


RE/MAX Professionals in Lake City and Live Oak is now
enrolling new agents in RE/MAX University. Learn how
to be a successful real estate agent from the company that
sells more real estate than anyone else. This is an activity
based, hands on, state of the art training course for new
agents. RE/MAX has many brand new tools to offer and
a totally new and exciting program specifically designed
for new agents. Real Estate school teaches you how to
pass the exam...We teach you how to make a living.
Call now to enroll.
(386)758-8900 310730,o


Apply NOW
* Take Entry Test
* Get Financial Aid
Start Jan. 9
* 6 month, course
* Tues/Thurs nights
North Fbrida Community ColUge
WWW.NFCC.EDU


I


r=










0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006


Scenes from Suwannee boys' soccer

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BULLDOGS IN ACTION: Top left: Cullen Boggus. Top right: Ty Smith. Above left: Jordan Budwick. Above right: Noah Walker. Photos: Paul Buchanan
I 4 1' '


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006


M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Scenes from Suwannee boys' soccer


pa" .- -


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,iai -Fk


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BULLDOGS IN ACTION:

Above top and middle: Corey Bridges in action during a recent match. Below:

Cullen Boggus.- Photos: Paul Buchanan


40b



.......


Suwannee Legals


~rstaa~-~t~ti~


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
,3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 612006CA0001890001XX

HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES INC,

Plaintiff,
vs.

CHRISTOPHER L. ROGERS, et al,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: CHRISTOPHER L ROGERS
(LAST KNOWN ADDRESS UNKNOWN)
(CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)

UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
CHRISTOPHER L. ROGERS
(CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Fore-
closure of Mortgage on the following de-
scribed property:

LOT 17, QUAILWOOD, AS' PER PLAT
THEREOF AS FILED AT PLAT BOOK 1,
PAGE 228, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETH-
ER WITH A 1986 MOBILE HOME.
ID#33619C5977 A & B

has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, PA., At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW
*49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUD-
ERDALE FL 33309 on or before December
15, 2006, a date which is within thirty (30)
days after the first publication of this Notice in
the SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court either be-
fore service on Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint.

In Accordance with the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled persons
who, because of their disabilities, need special
accommodation to participate in the proceed-
ing should contact the ADA Coordinator at 200
S. Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, FL 32064 or Tele-
phone Voice/TDD 386-362-0551 prior to such
proceeding.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court
this 30th day of October, 2006.

KENNETH DASHER
AS CLERK OF THE COURT

By: Arlene D. Ivey
As Deputy Clerk
11/08, 15, 22,29


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2006-CP-203

IN RE: ESTATE OF
DORIS VIRGINIA SETLIFFE,

Deceased.,

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of DORIS
VIRGINIA SETLIFFE, deceased, whose date
of death was August 25, 2006, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Suwannee County, Flori-
da, Probate Division, the address of which is
200 S. Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, FL 32060.
The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth below.

All creditors, of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is
required to be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 301
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with.
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS
,SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publication of this
notice Is November 15, 2006.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Personal Representative:
John Moxley, P.A.
Florida Bar No. 124157
2320 NE 2nd'St., 'Suite 4
Ocala, Florida 34470
Telephone: (352) 7328085

Barbara E. Harper
P.O. Box 4783
Dowling Park, Florida 32064
11/15,22 ,

SUWANNEE RIVER WATER
MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
PUBLIC NOTICE OF APPLICATION

Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chap-
ter 373, Florida Statutes, the following appli-
cation for permit was received on November
13, 2006:

Rolling Pines & Pine Meadows Subdivisions,
BKL investments, 672 E. Duval St., Lake City,
FL 32055, has submitted an application for an
Environmental Resource Permit Number
06-0193, for a total project area of 179.56
acres. The project is located in Township 4
South, Range 12 East, Section 1, in Suwan-
nee County.

Interested persons may comment upon the
application or submit a written request for a
staff report containing proposed agency ac-
tion regarding the application by writing to the
Suwannee River Water Management District,
Attn: Resource Management, 9225 C.R. 49,
Live Oak, Florida 32060. Such comments or
requests must be received by 5:00 PM within
21 days from the date of publication.

No further public notice will be provided re-
garding this application. A copy of the staff re-
port must be requested in order to remain ad-
vised of further proceedings. Substantially af-
fected persons are entitled to request an ad-
ministrative hearing, pursuant to Title 28, Flori-
da Administrative Code, regarding the pro-
posed agency action by submitting a written
request after reviewing the staff report.
11/22


11/08, 15, 22, 29


By: Arlene D. Ivey
As Deputy Clerk


Make plans to visit!

Thru Jan. 14, 2007
Florida Museum of Natural

History in Gainesville will
display two ivory-billed
woodpecker specimens thru
Sunday, Jan. 14, 2007 during
museum hours. Cost: $8.50
adults ($7.50 Fla. residents),
$4.50 children 3-12; Contact:
352-846-2000,
www.flmnh.ufl.edu.


Fourth Annual Altrusa


Christmas Tour of Homes

Altiusa International, Inc. of Live Oak will offer its
Fourth Annual Altrusa Christmas Tour of Homes from
noon-6 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 9. Tour begins at Live Oak
Garden Club, Eleventh Street, Live Oak where direction
map and refreshments will be provided. Visit all five
homes at your leisure. Cost: $10 per person with profits to
be used for community projects. Advance tickets are avail-
able at Windstream, 386-364-2502, Esther Bass; City Hall,
386-364-3722, Shannon Court; and McCrimon's Office
Systems, 386-362-2171, Barbie Scott; Info: Julie Ulmer,
386-362-3882 or Esther Bass, 386-364-2502.


PAGE 11B


a:.


I ,, ,


I _


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2006-CA-0108

CAPITAL CITY BANK, a Florida
banking corporation,

Plaintiff,
vs.

STARR OF CROSS CITY, INC., a dissolved
Florida corporation; STARR OF CROSS
CITY & BRANFORD, INC., a dissolved
Florida corporation; RICHARD A. SPOON-
ER, Individually; SUZETTE MADDOX, as
Tenant; GENERAL MOTORS ACCEP-
TANCE CORPORATION; and JEFFREY B.
KLEIN, M.D.,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that I, KENNETH
DASHER, Clerk of the Circuit Court of the
Third Judicial Circuit, in and for Suwannee
county, Florida, pursuant to the Summary Fi-
nal Judgment In Foreclosure entered in the
above styled cause, will sell at public sale the
following described property situated 'in
SUWANNEE County, Florida, to wit:

For the Point of Beginning, commence at the
Southwest corner of Block 14 of the Town of
Branford; thence North 2216'28" West, a dis-
tance of 57.14 feet to the Northwest corner of
Lot 2 of said Block 14; thence North 6741'32"
East, along the North line of said Lot 2, a dis-
tance of 65.00 feet; thence South 2218'28"
East, a distance of 3.00 feet; thence North
6741 '32"East, a distance of 35,00 feet to the
East line of said Lot 2: thence South 2218'28"
East, a distance of 54.14 feet to the Southeast
corner of Lot 1' of Block 14; thence South
67.41'32" West, a distance of 100.00 feet to
close on the Point of Beginning.

Said sale shall be made to the highest and
best bidder for cash pursuant to the Final
Judgment entered in the above styled cause
and will be held at the front door of the
SUWANNEE County courthouse' in Live Oak,
Florida, on the 18th day of December, 2006,
commencing at the hour of 11:00 A.M.

All interested parties shall be governed ac-
cordingly by this Notice.

DATED this 9th day of November, 2006.

KENNETH DASHER
Clerk of the Court

By: Arlene'D. Ivey
Deputy Clerk
11/22,29



LEGAL NOTICE

The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc.
Board of Qirectors will hold a meeting of the
Board of Directors on Monday, December 4,
2006, 6:00 PM. at the Quality Inn & Confer-
ence Center in Lake City, Florida
11/22


IN THE CIRCUIT COURTTHIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 612006CA000211001XX

RONNIE CORBETT,

Plaintiff,
vs.

JOSEPH BUTLER and CAROLYN SMITH,
alk/al CAROLYN PAT SMITH

Defendants,

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: JOSEPH BUTLER
P.O. BOX 414
O'BRIEN, FLORIDA 32071

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close mortgage on the following property in
Suwannee County Florida:

Parcel Number: 16-05S-13E-0915002.0150
1998 Pioneer 29x48 mobile home s/n
PH2602GA3285AB cty. to wit together with
and consider apart hereof Lot 15 Dove
Meadows, Unit II as recorded in Plat Book 1,
Page 172 in public records of Suwannee
County, Florida situated in Section 16, Town-
ship 5 So., Range 13 East of said county
property ID#09150020150 including well,
septic, power pole (customer will be respon-
sible to carry fire, wind, storm insurance at all
times in the amount of $40,000 insurance to
be listed with Ronnie Corbett as lien holder).
Customer will be responsible for all taxes due
on property. Customer agrees if payment is
over 31 days late they (Joseph & Carolyn)
will be in breach of contract. Monthly pay-
ments of $509.16 on the 18th of each month
hereafter starting February 18, 2006.

has been filed against you, and CAROLYN
SMITH, a/k/a CAROLYN PAT SMITH, and
you are required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Rhett Bullard,
Esq., Plaintiffs' attomey, whose address Is
100 South Ohio Ave., Live Oak, Florida
32064, on or before thirty (30) days from the .
date of the first publication of this notice on
November 8, 2006, and file the original with
the Clerk of Court either before service on
Plaintiffs' attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
Dated this 31st day of October 2006.

KENNETH DASHER,
AS CLERK OF THE COURT


~~










N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006


Scenes from Suwannee boys' soccer


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BULLDOGS IN ACTION: Top left: Noah Walker. Top right: T.J. Vickers.
Above left and above right: Cullen Boggus during a recent match. Photos: Paul Buchanan


PAGE 12B


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 13B


,.


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VI1


A Bounty of Best -

Wishes at Thanksgiving
As family and friends gather around, may good times, good
food, and good spirits abound; and know our best wishes are
headed your way for a bountiful, beautiful Thanksgiving Day!


-Bob &r cWoxUs I
^Uhh mountain, E- ZN
25" OFF ALL GIFTS!
We're thankful for atill the ,iodernld friends
we've made in our 21 \ears of business! ..
303 E. Howard St.,
P Live Oak, FL 32060 O
.. 386-364-6454 J


fiitel IMPACTING
,B SUWANNEE COUNnT
"9 AFOR CHRIST
386-362-1120
WESTWOOD
BAPTIST CHURCH
Live Oak, Florida
Bible Study 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship 10:50 a.m., 6:30 p.m.
Mid-?leek 6:30p.m. tWed.


Wayne's
Carpet Plus


All First Quality Flooring
lt hope %ourr Thlaikirs 1g is oiveri \n1h1g w/til
"-o'd tdiiuin tII te blhssad to have such
h No de uti- t ot i 01-ii 1f'i i \i 7s
Hwy. 441 South y
(at CHS intersection) '..
Lake Cily
386-719-420 31.1
SL. OaA .3.i6-362-3433
LaAl Ci 386-'55-06010


gie


FIRST FEDERAL
SAVINGS BANK of FLORIDA
t FDIC [NSlURED [QLUL HOLDING LENDER 5591


We're thankful for our
families & friends.
And all our wonderful customers
HAPPY THANKSGIVING



104 Dowling Ave. SE
| 386-330-2908
Call today for appointment!


IThanksgiving-



LIVE OAJ *
FORD MERCURY
FAX (386) 362-7348
1-800-814-0609
US 129 NORTH, LIVE OAK, FL
(386) 362-1112 a
waltsUveoakford.com 141 F


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to our familY, friends & customers!


& -r //Jntici/ L
12)093 Co. Rd. 137 & Sth Ave.
Wellborn, 963-4S98
Hour -F 9-5
4- F


to Students, Teachers & Staff
from
Melody Christian Academy
j Hwy. 129 South, Live Oak
364-4800
jy Check us out at
www.melodychristian.org



k SCO'TT
Medicare and most insurances accepted!
L: r/(,. ,' l '

I' i 51,S (rhi VA LisOtl.
3c a E r2_-_5 I


G,,d ha, bl Ie ,.d 11 1h .nle rtIld cl> 1,.r a% ci,. ."1 w.ald
A k ??It ;(.1 1 ) ,I i I c' I ,i Itt I 11 .47d, 'tIb t 0,, 1l lb'" t ,.: .
lii j'I. I r ,p'rritlilltiJ ThIt, ,, c ri riti t hc lM lila T / L, ,rJ
FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Our \ ision is to make disciples tbr Je.us Christ


311 South Ohio,
Live Oak
386-362-2047
Pastor Jim Wade


Convenientl, located in p l (386)
South Oaks Square |h,:, g i 3

Happv Thanksgiving! I
I ..L1.


@PPYt NKSGIVING
First Assembly of God
13793 76th St.
Live Oak, FL 32060
386-330-2210
Pastor: Donald Ray Suggs
,Morning Service 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service 5:00 p.m.

Handy Buildings
FULL LINE OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS


FREE DELIVERY FREE SETUP FINANCING AVAILABLE
Metal Carports & Garages
Since 1985
.IUS Highway 129 S Live Oak




Thanksgiving


S.C. Suflivan
Agency
529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131 |
S.C. Sullivan 1386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990
.3 I4, j:.F


14AP1Yii TIVING
Live Oak
Paint Center
Also: CARPET o VINYL BLINDS WALLPAPER
,it' d like to join \ou & vour ftimil
\ '"' ?i imi iha ks far e native
; \ .onderfi 'l I iv t >/ i are
_- 9',$',*.",Q.. 1512 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak


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SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 13B


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006


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PAt 1RUSUANE EOCA/LV.AKWDNSA, NOEMER22.20
'C
IN
0


- Publix will be closed Thanksgiving Day, November 23.
We're taking the day off so our associates can spend time with their
families and loved ones We will be open regular store hours
on Wednesday, November 22 and Friday, November 24.


3999
Publix
Fully Cooked
Turkey Dinner
10 to 12-lb Turkey Dressing
I.lashed Potatoes Gravy,
and Cranberry Oranqge Relish.
Sere& s tc 10. Heating is Required
Befor:-e Ser.ing each
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE


PUB LI X

-1I


Publix Deli
Iced Tea .........
S -.crc^,e: :- iLlr,c.,eet'ered.
C.:)l andr. Petre-.lhr.q 1-g9 l tor.
SAVE UP TO .40


P L6 ,I
-MI

1.89


Del Monte
Fresh Cut Canned -.
Vegetables ..... ; TONE FRE
Assoted Varieties, 11 to 16-oz can
S(E'.cludirg Speci;alty Varieties,
Sa.ory Sides and Asparagus.)
SAVI UPTO 1.05


Mushroom a .

Gampbell's "
Cream Soup........ 0
Assorted Varieties
10.5 or. 10.75-oz car .
SAVE UP TO 1.45 ON 3


Swanson
Broth.. .. .
_ ..-sorted V.rietie,
14-or car,
SAVE UP TO 1.88 ON 4


4*-0


-4


(yffEU~~~~


V-*~I;fj~
Ipl Jw7,


Jellied
CRANBERRY
. SAUCE


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Publix
Premium
Brown'N
S UP TO1-.:...
SAVa UP TO


Ocean Spray 99Q
Cranberry Sauce....... ....... ............... ..
r. Jellied or Whole Berry, 16-oz can
SAVE UPTO,48AS


NestlI
Carnation
Evaporated Milk,...
Vitamin D, Fat Free
Vitamins A& D or Lowfat 2%
Vitamins A & D Added, 12-oz can
SAVE UP TO ,10


Breakstone's
Sour Cream....
. 79 Regular, Reduced Fat,
,or Fat Free, 16-oz cup
SAVE UP TO .50


Land 0 Lakes
.. 19 Sweet Cream
Butter............ 4.00
Salted,.Light Salted,
S or Unrsalted Sweet,
4-sticks, 16-oz box
SAVE UP TO 1.98 ON 2


Philadelphia
Cream Cheese.....
Original, 1/3 Less Fat,
or Fat Free, 8-oz box
SAVE UP TO.40


Prices effective Thursday, November 16 through Thursday, November 22, 2006.
Only in Chatham, Camden, Gl,nn, Lowndes and Thomas Counties in GA.
Only in.Live Oak, Fla. Quantity Rights Reserved.
Prices effective Wednesday, November 15 through Thursday, November 22, 2006.
Only in Dougherty County in GA. Quantity Rights Reserved.
w. w w p u b l i x. co m / ad s ., s


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306407]rv


.3w'


Recipe
Serve Rolls...


.99



4


PHILADELPHIA
R.J.


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2.2, 2006


PAG-F 14R


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Serving uwanee Hahilo, and 5 ties,


Section

C


4A& ea am4WwweS Ch-4itma Tow oj 4om1e0


Julie Ulmer, president ofAltrusa Internation-
al, Inc. of Live Oak, announces the Fourth An-
nual Altrusa Christmas Tour of Homes. The
featured homeowners, have graciously volun-
teered their homes for the tour which will be
held on Dec. 9, from noon until 6 p.m.
The event is held to raise funds which are re-
turned to the community through contributions
and service projects.
The Live Oak Garden Club will be the home
base for guests to arrive beginning at noon to
pick up information including a map to the fea-
tured homes. Refreshments will be served.
The cost per ticket is $10. Advance nckeis
may be purchased from Altrusa members or
from the Live Oak City Hall. Windstream
Communications or McCrimon's Office Sup-
ply. Tickets will also be sold at the door on the
day of the event.
All prof-
its from the
Tour of
Homes go
directly to
Altrusa
projects for
the upcom-
ing year.
Julie Ulmner Currently,
Altrusa
proceeds
go to support community needs such as Vivid
Visions, Hospice, Literac) Programs, Scholar-
ships, Suvn annee School Supply Program and
man\ others.
The featured homes for the tour will be ele-
gandl. decorated and fill \ou with cheer.. Fea-
tured homes will be announced in the upcom-
tng month
For more information you may contact Julie
Ulmer at 386-362-3882 or Esther Bass at 386-
362-2502.


.........





W.M


ured is one of the homes during last year's


Medicare Part D open enrollment is underway


AARP offers tips to help
Once again it is time to enroll in a
Medicare Part D prescription drug plan.
It is also the time to evaluate your current
plan and, if necessary, switch to a differ-.
ent plan that better meets your needs.
Open enrollment runs through Dec. 31
for coverage starting January 1, 2007.
People are urged to, make their decision
early in.December to allow for the timely
processing of their applications..
Millions of older Americans and per-
sons with disAbilities are now saving
with'their Medicare drug plans, but ac-
cording to AARP, even those with drug
coverage can find ways to save even


lower your drug costs,
more. "Because prescription drugs costs
so much, AARP wants to help Americans
become wiser consumers, said Cheryl
Matheis, AARP Director of Health Strat-
egy. "Don't let advertising lead you to
believe you need the advertised brand
name drug, which may be the most ex-
pensive. Talk to your physician or phar-
macist about alternatives."
Here are five more tips to help you
keep drug costs down:
Ask your doctor or pharmacist about
alternatives to high priced drugs. See if
there is a generic equivalent for your pre-
scription. Generic medicine .can help you


save money and give you the same quali-
ty benefits of brand name drugs.
Do your homework. Use the drug
comparison website at
www.aarp.org/comparedrugs to find cur-
rent options for treating conditions and
average drug costs. Or order the print
"Know Your Rx Options" brochures. Dis-
cuss these options with your doctor or
pharmacist.
Take all medications as prescribed.
Skipping doses or not filling the orders
your doctors prescribe can lead to pro-
longed illness and relapses.
Keep a record of the prescription
drugs .you take and dosage, include over
the counter and dietary supplements.
Share this information with your doctors
and pharmacists. They can help identify
duplicative .prescriptions and help you
avoid any adverse reactions. Order a Per-
sonal Medication Record at
www.aarp.org.healthorderform.
Use mail order to get a 90 day supply
of the medications you take on an on-go-
ing basis.
If you are in Medicare, and you do not
have drug coverage, consider enrolling in
a Medicare Part D plan. You could face a
late enrollment penalty if you wait and
enroll later than when you were first eli-
gible. Call Medicare at 1-800-
MEDICARE for information on plans of-
fered in your area. Those with lower in-
come can qualify for extra help in paying


all or part of the monthly plan premiums
and co-payments. If your income is less
than $14,700 ($19,800 for a married cou-
ple) you should apply for Medicare's low
income subsidy by contacting the Social
Security Administration at:- 1-800-772-
1213.
If you have high drug costs, and you do
not qualify for Medicare's low income
subsidy, look into a Medicare Part D plan
that provides drug coverage that extends
into the coverage gap. In 2007, this is the
period after. you have incurred $2,400 in
drug costs. At that point, you are respon-
sible for 100% of drug costs until you
reach the catastrophic level, which is
$5,450 in total incurred costs. Once you
reach the catastrophic level, your plan
.will pay about 95 percent of the rest of
your drug costs for the year.
Contact your local area agency on ag-
ing or a Serving Health Insurance Needs
of Elders (SHINE) Counselor, by calling
the ELDER HELPLINE at 1-800-963-
5337 or click here to obtain a listing of
Elder Helplines in each of Florida's 67
counties. The SHINE program provides
elders and their caregivers with informa-
tion and unbiased health insurance coun-
seling. Through a network of trained vol-
unteer counselors, assistance is provided
regarding Medicare, Prescription Assis-
tance, Long-Term Care Insurance, Med-
icaid, and a variety of other health insur-
ance issues.


2310 U.S.Hwy,90W(AcrossfromPublx)424
Like City, FL 32055 13~l3 8 455" 4


North Florida


November 22-23, 2006
Live Oak Publications, Inc. a


U,


Mimmm








PAGE 2C, NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Complete Line of
Leather KKits,
Finishes & Dyes,
Hides, Tools, Classes
MasterCard, Visa

Fred's Leather
Shop & Shoe
Repair
309 N. Marion Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-0083
Fax 386-752-4604




306003-1


2941 West Hwy. 90,
SSuite 113, Lake City
0 F LAKE CI-TY
Open Mon.-Fri. 10-6; Sat. 10-4. 386-752-5501 We've got your
team spirit merchandise for the home, tailgate parties...even
magnetic dots for your car in team colors... Gators, Seminoles,
Bulldogs. .3060 1-F







* Custom built
kitchen cabinets
* Furniture for
every room
* Crafts
* Furniture is all
handcrafted in
the U.S.
Gateway Furniture Specialties DBA Country Oak Wood
Works, specializing in solid wood and quality craftsmanship.
Owner: Willie Knepp 386-758-8005, 386-984-6250 (cell)
181 NW Burk Ave., Lake City, FL 32055 (behind Gateway Plaza)
306082-F


Morrell's Furniture of Live Oak, in the Publix Shopping Center,
Live Oak, 386-330-5252, Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10-7; Sat. 10-5
The finest in Dining Room, Living Room and Bedroom Furniture
305998-F


Off US 90 behind Publix Shopping Center, 321 NW Cole
Terrace #103, Lake City, FL 386-755-8886, Mon.-Fri. 10-6;
Sat. 10-4. At Scrappy Papers you can choose papers,
stamps, ink pads, ribbons & various tools to help you
complete your paper crafting project! 3
.1


305997-F


mmDDii


872 SW Main Blvd (US 41)
Lake City 1-888-831-5711,
Mon.-Fri. 8-6; Sat. 8-3:30.


Serving North Florida's trailoring needs. Custom-built trailers,
golf carts, utility vehicles by Honda. 30o0o-F


Walt's Live Oak Ford Mercury, US 129 North, Live Oak,
386-362-1112, 1-800-814-0609. We service all makes &
models. Certified Diesel Service Center, Brake Service, Engine
Service, Tire Maintenance & Replacement, Troubleshooting,
Oil and Filter Change. We Service RV's to Heavy Trucks 305999-?







NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006, PAGE 3C




af (?


Register and pay before Nov. 24
Dec. 2
Mom's Day Out*
Branford Women's Club will offer Mom's Day Out from
10 a.m.-3 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 2 at its clubhouse on US
247 across from The Gathering in Branford. Children ages
3-14 only, potty trained please, can enjoy family rated
movies, games and fun. Lunch and snacks provided. Waiv-
er of Release must be signed by parents, photo ID required
with contact number. Advanced reservations encouraged.
Cost: $10 first child, $7.50 for each additional child. Mail
checks to Branford Women's Club, P.O. Box 1084, Bran-
ford, FL 32008 before Friday, Nov. 24. Cash only at the
door. Info: Terri, 386-935-6532 from 5-7 p.m. only, Mon-
day-Friday.

Tonight!
Nov. 24
Free! Old Tyme Gospel Sing'
The Campbells will present an Old Tyme Gospel Sing at
7 p.m., Friday, Nov. 24 inside the Music Hall, rain or shine,
at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park, US 129 North, Live
Oak. Southern Gospel and Bluegrass Gospel featuring The
Diplomats, Harvest and The Campbells. Cost: Free! Door
prizes. Brifig your entire family.p RAIN, puppets and door
prizes for children. Info: Pam 386-362-5214, 386-364-1683
or visit www.musicliveshere.com.

Monday
Nov. 27
Early Learning Coalition
program/quality meeting
Early Learning Coalition of Florida's Gateway, Inc. will
hold a program/quality meeting at 3 p.m., Monday. Nov. 27
in the Coalition Office. Lake City. Info- Heidi Moore, 386-
752-9770 .

Tuesday
Nov. 28
NFCC will conduct TABE (Test of Adult
Basic Education)
' North Florida Community College will conduct TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education) at 1:30 p.m., Tuesday, Nov.
28, at NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. No. 16), on the Madi-
son campus. TABE is required for acceptance into voca-
tional/technical programs. Photo ID required. Pre-registra-
tion is required. Info/registration: 850-973-9451.

Thru Nov. 28 -
Driver's license checkpoints
ThI.olda- liglh\aN Patrol will conduct dri her's license


and vehicle inspection checkpoints through Nov. 28, on
Brown Road, CR 252, CR 252-A, CR 252-B, CR 25-A, SR
47, SR 341, US 441, US 41, CR 245, CR 238, CR 135,
Turner Road, SR 100, Trotter's Road, Fairfield Farms
Road, CR 250, CR 349, SR 247 and SR 25 in Columbia.
County; CR 132, CR 136, CR 136-A, CR 137, CR 249, CR
250, CR 252, CR 349, CR 49, CR 795, SR 20, SR 247, SR
10, SR 51, US 129 and Mitchell Road in Suwannee Coun-
ty; and CR 136, CR 152, CR 143, CR 249, CR 137, CR
251, CR 146, CR 135, CR 141, CR 150, CR 145 and US
41, SR 6, SR 25 in Hamilton County. Recognizing the dan-
ger presented to the public by defective vehicle equipment,
troopers will concentrate their efforts on vehicles being op-
erated with defects such as bad brakes, worn tires and de-
fective lighting equipment. In addition, attention will be di-
rected to drivers who would violate the driver license laws
of Florida. The Patrol has found these checkpoints to be an
effective means of enforcing the equipment and driver's li-
cense laws of Florida while ensuring the protection of all
motorists.

Tuesday
Nov. 28 .
American Red Cross Adult CPR class in
Lake City
American Red Cross of Suwannee Valley; Adult CPR
class; 6-9 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. '28; 264 NE Hernando Ave.,
Suite 102, Lake City. Info: 386-752-0650.

Register now!
Nov. 29
Craft classes
Craft classes are now being offered at Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park. Carol Dobbs will teach Christmas
crafts from 10 a.m.-noon, Wednesday. Nov. 29. Cost $15
includes all supplies. Info registration: 386-364-1683.

Register now!
Nov. 29 '
Craft classes
Craft classes are now being offered at Spirit o,f the
Suwannee Music Park. CarolDobbs will teach Christmas,
crafts from 10 a.m.-noon, Wednesday, Nov. 29: Cost $15
includes all supplies. Info/registration: 386-364-1683.'


Nov. 30
NFCC will conduct College Placement
Tests (CPT)
North Florida Community College will conduct College
Placement Tests (CPT) on computer on at 8:30 a.m., 1:30
p.m. and 6 p.m ., Thursday, Nov. 30, in the NFCC Testing
Center. Buildirig No 16. on the Madison.icampus. Persons


1 ir '1' '


taking the tests will be required to register in NFCC Stu-
dent Services 24 hours before testing. Info registration-
850-973-9451.

Nov. 30
The Nutcracker
NFCC Artist Series presents The Nutcracker (Dance
Alive National Ballet) at 7 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 30, at Van
H. Priest Auditorium, NFCC campus, Madison. Info/tick-'
ets: 850-973-1653, ArtistSeries@nfcc.edu.

Nov. 30
American Red Cross First Aid class in
Lake City
American Red Cross of Suwannee Valley; First Aid class;
6-9 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 30; 264 NE Hernando Ave., Suite
102, Lake City. Info: 386-752-0650.

Make plans to visit!
Thru Jan. 14, 2007
Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville will
display two ivory-billed woodpecker specimens thru Sun-
day, Jan. 14, 2.007 during museum hours. Cost: $8.50 adults
($7.50 Fla. residents), $4.50 children 3-12; Contact: 352-
846-2000, www.flmnh.ufl.edu.

Dec. 1
AADC 10th anniversary celebration
African American Development Council (AADC) will
hold its 10th anniversary celebration at 7 p.m., Friday, Dec.
1 in Ebenezer AME Church. 411 Parshley Street, Live Oak.
Guest speaker: Daryl Parks an attorney with Parks-Crump
of Tallahassee; Note: deadline to purchase souvenir booklet
ads will be Monday, Nov. 13: full page $50; 1/2 page $35;
1/4 page $25; business- card $15; and patrons $10; Contact:.
Yvonne Scott, 386-362-2789 or the Rev. Clifton Riley, 386-
362-5784.'

Must purchase tickets in
advance!
Dec. 2, 8 and 9
Madrigal Dinners
Lake City Community College Choir and Lake City VA
Medical Center will present Christmas Madrigal. Dinners: on
Saturday, Dec. 2 at 6 p.m. and Friday-Saturday, Dec. 8-9 at
7 p.m. Dec. 2 at Lake City VA Medical Center Auditorium',
and Dec. 8-9 at Lake City First Piesb. terian Church fel-
lowship hall; Cost: Adults $25, 65 and older $20, LCCC
staff $18 and children $15; Note: Tickets must be pur-
chased in advance. The cost of the tickets sold for the Dec.
S2 dinner will benefit the \'A Hospice Program. Info" Warren


SEE CO9001M.l LENDAR, O PA(*


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Or"-


NOW!


[1 '. .


Suwannee.com
3076 95th Drive, Live Oak, Florida 32060
(386)364-1683 .


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PAGE 4C, NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


0 p^n


Continued From Page 3C

McClunney, 386-755-3016, ext. 2638 or Owen Wingate,
386-754-4255.

Dec. 2
Mom's Day Out
Branford Women's. Club will offer Mom's Day Out from
10 a.m.-3 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 2 at its clubhouse on US
247 across from The Gathering in Branford. Children ages
3-14 only, potty trained please, can enjoy family rated
movies, games and fun. Lunch and snacks provided. Waiv-
er of Release must be signed by parents, photo ID required
with contact number ..Advanced reservations encouraged.
Cost:, $10 first child, $7.50 for each additional child. Mail
checks to Branford Women's Club, P.O. Box 1084, Bran-
ford, FL 32008 before Friday, Nov. 24. Cash only at the
door. Info: Terri, 386-935-6532 from 5-7 p.m. only, Mon-
day-Friday.

Dec. 2-3 .
Christmas Tree Lane
Lake Chit Women's Club presents "Christmas Tree
Lane" from 12:30-4:30 p.m., Saturday-Sunday, Dec. 2-3, at
27 SE Hernando Ave., Lake City featuring decorated trees,
holiday table settings, seasonal arrangements and bazaar
items. Adults $5, children $3. Proceeds benefit restoration
fund. Info: Sandra Messer, 386-362-6886 or 386-961-6643.

Dec. 3
Garden Club of St. Augustine 38th
Annual Christmas Tour of Homes
The Garden Club of St. Augustine invites you to its 38th
Annual Christmas Tour of Homes from 1-5 p.m.; Sunday,
Dec. 3. Seven homes dating from 1750-1912 oil one of the
nation's oldest.,streets-St. George Street-will be showcased.
Tickets: $15 in advance, $20 day of tour, also includes a.
delightful tea and a visit to their "Christmas Store" at 22
Marine Street, St. Augustine. Info: Janice Sperlanes, 904-
471-2891 or Myra James,,904-824-1580.

Dec. 4
Free Medicare Prescription
Drug Plans presentation
SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders), a
program of the Florida Department of Elder Affairs, offers
a free presentation from 10-11:30 a.m., Monday, Dec: 4, in
the Branford Public Library Conference Room on what you
need to know, about: Medicare Prescription Drug Plans and
other t' pes of prescription assistance; how to Choose the
Plan that is Best for You, and ho\\ to receie extra help
\\iith costs. Info: Karla McAnaney. 352-692-5264.


Dec. 5
Democratic Executive
Committee meeting
Suwannee County Democratic Executive Committee will
meet Tuesday, Dec. 5, at Spirit of the Suwannee Music
Park, US 129 North, Live Oak. A sit-down dinner is served
at 6:30 p.m. for $10 per person. The meeting starts at 7
p.m. Dinner is not required to join us for the meeting. All
Democrats are invited to join us in participating in the De-
mocratic Process. Meetings are held the first Tuesday of
each month. Info/RSVP for dinner: Monica, 386-330-2036.

Buy tickets now!
Dec. 5-9
Great Florida Cattle Drive of Ought 6
Florida Agricultural Museum presents "Great Florida
Cattle Drive of Ought 6" Tuesday-Saturday, Dec. 5-9 be-
ginning just south of Kissimmee and end at the new Silver
Spurs Arena in Kenansville; Note: Friday, Dec. 9, trails
end celebration for participants and'the public at Silver
Spurs Arena in Kenansville; Info/participant registration:
352-429-0100, www.floridacattledrive.com.

Note change in date!

Ice skating for the family!
Dec. 7-Jan. 1, 2007
The Plaza Ice Palace
Downtown Community Plaza in Gainesville welcomes
back The Plaza Ice Palace from Saturday, Dec. 7-NlondaNv,
Jan. 1, 2007. Sharpen your skates, break out those winter
sweaters, mittens and hats, and get ready to glide out onto
the ice with family and friends. The skating season will
last four weeks during the winter holidays, from Dec. 2- '
Jan. 1, 2007. Call for hours of operation, admission and
skate rental, special events, group rentals, private parties,
discounts and sponsorship opportunities. Info: Bill Bryson,
352-393-8527.

* Dec. 9'
Fourth Annual Altrusa
Christmas Tour of Homes
Altrusa International, Inc. of Live Oak will offer its
Fourth Annual Altrusa Christmas Tour of Homes from
noon-6 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 9. Tour begins at Live Oak
Garden Club, Eleventh Street, Live Oak where direction
map and refreshments will be provided. Visit all five
homes at your leisure. Cost: $10 per person with profits to
be used for communitN projects. Advance tickets are avail-
able at Windstream, 386-364-2502. Esther Bass: City Hall.


386-364-3722, Shannon Court; and McCrimon's Office
Systems, 386-362-2171, Barbie Scott; Info: Julie Ulmer,
386-362-3882 or Esther Bass, 386-364-2502.

Dec. 18
Free Health Talk
The community is cordially, invited to attend on-going
health talks sponsored by GFWC Woman's Club of Live
Oak, in conjunction with the Suwannee County Health DIe-
partment, on the third Monday of each month at the
Woman's Club on Eleventh Street in Live Oak at 5:30 p.m.
Each session will last approximately one hour and will al-
low time for questions and answers. There is no charge. Dr.
Connie Steele will be speak about boosting the immune.
system on Dec. 18. The schedule for 2007 will include
talks on weight loss, hearth health, shingles and bioidenti-
cal hormones just to name a few. Info: Rita, 386-776-1711.

Thru Dec. 28
Driver's license checkpoints
The Florida Highway Patrol will conduct driver's license
and vehicle inspection checkpoints through Dec. 28, on :
Brown Road, CR 252, CR 252-A. CR 252-B, CR 25-A,;SR
47, SR 341, US 441, US 41, CR 245, CR 238, CR 135,
Turner Road, SR 100, Trotter's Road, Fairfield Farms
Road, CR 250, CR 349, SR 247 and SR 25 in Columbia,
County; CR 132, CR 136, CR 136-A; CR 137, CR 249, CR
250, CR 252, CR 349, CR 49, CR 795, SR 20, SR 247, SR
10, SR 51, US 129 and Mitchell Road in Suwannee Coun-
ty; and CR 136, CR 152, CR 143, CR 249, CR. 137, CR
251, CR 146, CR 135, CR 141, CR 150, CR 145 and US
41, SR 6, SR 25 in Hamilton County. Recognizing the dan-
ger presented to the public by defective vehicle equipment,
troopers will concentrate their efforts on vehicles being op-
erated with defects such as bad brakes, \orni tires and de-
fective lighting equipment. In addition, attention will be di-
rected to dri\ ers lho \\ would violate the driver license laws
of Florida. The Patrol has found these checkpoints to be an
effective means of enforcing the equipment and driver's li-
cense laws of Florida while ensuring the protection of all
:motorists.: .

Buy tickets now!
Thru Dec. 31 '
Human-size digital moth prints


on display at Florida Museum
"Moths: Beauty and Biodiversity" is on display at the
Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville through
Dec. 31. The digital prints by renowned artist Joseph
Scheer are large format, high resolution scans that bring
the structure and beauty of moths to life. This. exhibition of
24 images, some of which transform small moths into hu-
man-size prints. His work
has been featured in more
S. i .,ti";120 books aud periodi-
Scals including National Gept.
graphic. Info: 352-846-2000,
or visit www.flmnh.ufl.edu.


It's The Perfect Gift I

Even Santa Knows that. 4
Now Includes FREE parking at both Parks until 12/31107! )i A


An Old Fashioned Christmas
.... ..............thru-De 30
Valdosta Symphony...... Dec 2
Jingle Jam with Jonas Brothers,
Nuttin But Stringz & Katelyn Tarver
......... ............ De 9
Blake Shelton ............Dec 16


BEST CONCERT LINE-UP EVER* THRILLING RIDES EXOTIC ANIMALS ALL NEW SHOWS
$69.95 Per person, plus tax: Unlimited admissions until 12/31/07 to Wild Adventures Theme Park of Valdosla. :-.4
Cypress Gardens Adventure Park of Winter Haven, FL, Splash Island. Water Park located inside both Parks, over 100 all-atar concerts,
over 100 thrilling rides, including 14 coasters, daily shows and hundreds of wild animals. Includes Free parking until 12/31/07
229.219.7080 1-75 Exit 13, Valdosta, GA wildadventures.net


272054-F


Buy tickets

how!
Dec.. 31
Broadway's "Chita
Rivera: The
Dancer's Life" in
Gainesville Dec. 31,
University of Florida Per-
forming Arts presents "Chitai
Rivera: The Dancer's Life,"
for one performance only at'
3 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 31 in
Curtis M., Phillips Perform- '
ing Arts Center, Gainesville;
Cost: $50 front
orchestra/mezzanine: $40.
mid-orchestra, $35 rear or-
chestra; $30 balcony; Note:
Tickets available from
Phillips Center Box Office,
352-392-2787 or toll-free
800-905-2787 or www.tick-'
etmaster.com; Info: Merle,
Frimark, 212-819-1133, mer-
le@merlefrimarkpr.com.

Make plans to

visit!
Thru Jan. 14, 2007
Florida Museum of Natur-
al History in Gainesville will
display two ivory-billed
woodpecker specimens thru
Sunday, Jan. 14, 2007 during
museum hours ,Cost: $8.50
adults ($7.50 Fla. residents),
$4.50 children 3-12; Con-
tact: 352-846-2000,
www.flmnh.ufl.edu.

Jan. 2, 2007
Democratic
Executive
Committee meeting
Suwannee County Democra-
tic Executive Committee
will meet Tuesday, Jan. 2, .
2007 at Spirit of the Suwan-
nee Music Park, US 129
North, Live Oak. A sit-down
dinner is served at 6:30 p.m.

SEE COMMUNITYCALENDAR,
PAGE 5C


PAGE 4C, NOVEMBER 22-23,2006 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


I







NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006, PAGE 5C


Continued From Page 4C

for $10 per person. The meeting starts at 7 p.m. Dinner is
not required to join us for the meeting. All Democrats are
invited to join us in participating in the Democratic
Process. Meetings are held the first Tuesday of each
month. Info/RSVP for dinner: Monica, 386-330-2036..

Visit now!
Ends Jan. 7, 2007
"Hatching the Past: The
Great Dinosaur Egg Hunt"
Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville will
host a traveling exhibit "Hatching the Past: The Great Di-
nosaur Egg Hunt" Sept. 16-Jan. 7, 2007. Cost: $4 adults,
$2 -ages 3-12; Note: Special opening day events scheduled.
Butterfly Rainforest admission is $8.50 for adults ($7.50
for Florida residents with ID) and $4.50 for children ages
3-12. Info: 352-846-2000, www.flmnh.ufl.edu.

Jan. 20, 2007
Hot dog stand and winter yard sale
Branford Women's Club will offer a lip-smacking meal
at its "Hot Dog Fund-raising Stand" and a winter yard sale
from 8 a.m.-3 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 20, 2007 at the club-
house on US 247 across from The Gathering in Branford.
Hot dogs a buck, other items priced separate. Enjoy hot
dogs, hot coffee, hot cocoa, soda and chips. Note: Yard
sale set for November rescheduled. All funds benefit club
activities. Info: Terri, 386-935-6532 from 5-7. p.m. only,
Monday-Friday.

Jan. 23, 2007
Glenn Miller Orchestra
NFCC Artist Series presents The World Famous Glenn
Miller Orchestra at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2007 at Van


H. Priest Auditorium, NFCC campus, Madison. Info/tick-
ets: 850-973-1653, ArtistSeries@nfcc.edu.

Feb. 6, 2007
Democratic Executive
Committee meeting
Suwannee County Democratic Executive Committee will
meet Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2007 at Spirit of the Suwannee Mu-
sic Park, US 129 North, Live Oak. A sit-down dinner is
served at 6:30 p.m. for $10 per person. The meeting starts
at, 7 p.m. Dinner is not required to join us for the meeting.
All Democrats are invited to join us in participating in the
Democratic Process. Meetings are held the first Tuesday of
each month. Info/RSVP for dinner: Monica, 386-330-2036.

Feb. 20, 2007
LCCC presents the
musical Urban Cowboy
Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2007 Lake City Community College
showcases the musical Urban Cowboy. See the story of
"Bud," the modem cowboy, looking for love and life with
a spirit of youth and curiosity in this exciting show of,
rugged urban song and dance. Performance begins at 7:30
p.m; at the Levy Performing Arts Center on the campus of
LCCC. Info: 386-754-4340.

Feb. 20, 2007
Some Enchanted Evening
NFCC Artist Series presents Some Enchanted Evening:
The Songs of Rodgers and Hammerstein at 7 p.m., Tues-
day, Feb. 20, 2007 at Van H. Priest Auditorium, NFCC
campus, Madison. Info/tickets: 850-973-1653, Artist-
Series@nfcc.edu.

March 6, 2007
Democratic Executive


Committee meeting
Suwannee County Democratic Executive Committee will
meet Tuesday, March 6, 2007 at Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park, US 129 North, Live Oak. A sit-down dinner is served
at 6:30 p.m. for $10 per person. The meeting starts at.7 p.m. Din-
ner is not required to join us for the meeting. All Democrats are in-
vited to join us in participating in the Democratic Process. Meet-
ings are held the first Tuesday of each month. Info/RSVP for din-
ner: Monica, 386-330-2036.

March 13, 2007
The Piano Men
NFCC Artist Series presents The Piano Men starring Jim Witter
at 7 p.m., Tuesday, March 13, 2007 at Van H. Priest Auditorium,
NFCC campus, Madison. Info/tickets: 850-973-1653. Artist-
Series@nfcc.edt. '

March 16,2007
LCCC presents The Piano Men
Friday, March 16, 2007 Lake City Community College presents
The Piano Men. Enjoy the experience of Jim Witter and his band
as they brilliantly recreate music from the 70s with hits from music
greats such as Elton John and Billy Joel. Performance begins at
7:30 p.m. at the Ley Performing Arts Center on the campus of
LCCC. Info: 386-754-4340.

Buy tickets now!
March 31,2007
93.7 K COUNTRY Jamboree
93.7 K COUNTRY Jamboree featuring Brad Paisley and Phil
Vassar and three acts to be announced at a later date will be
held from 2 p.m.-into the evening. Saturday. March 31,
2007 at Alachua County Fairgrounds; Cost: Advance tick-
ets $55 or $70 at the door; Note: Tickets available thru
Ticketmaster beginning at 10 a.m., Saturday, Dec. 2; pro-
ceeds benefit Shands Children's Hospitals; Info: 352-338-
6704, www.countrymusic4kids.com.


Weekly Meetings


Al-Anon/Mayo Al-Anon Group now meets with Ban
ford Al-Anon Group Tuesdays and Fridays, 7:30 p.m., a
First United Methodist Church on the comer of Express ani
Henry Streets, Branford. Info: Barbara, 386-294-3348; Linda
386-935-5362.
Alcoholics Anonymous Branford Tuesdays, Friday
and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., Branford United Methodist Church
Express and Henry St., Branford. For more info, call 386
963-5827 or the District 16 Help Line toll-free, 800-505
0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous Live Oak Tuesdays, Thurs
daC,1 and Fridays, p m.. Precinct Voting Building, Noble
Fernr Road. Liue Oak Info- District 16 Help Line toll-free
800-505-0702.
Alcoholics Anon)ymous Nla)o Group Sundays, Mon
da\s, WVednesda. ; and Thutrdads at S p.m.; Manna House
Pine Street. Mayo. Info 380-294-2423 or District 16 Hell
Line toll-free, 800-505-0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous Trinity Group Mondays, 7-8
p i'. Jsper'L ibrra. Dismict 16 HelpLine toll-free, 800-505
0702.
Alcoholics Anon mous white e Springs Courage to
Change Mondays. S p m., Methodist Church, Whiti
Springs. Info 386-397'-1410 or-District 16 Help Line toll'
free. 800-505-0702
Bluegrass Association Sarurda, s, 6 p.m.. bluegrass jam
PicLn Shed. except during main t'est al e enuts; Spirit ofthe
Suwamnnee Music Park, US 129 North, Live Oak; potluck din
ners third Saturday of each month; Info: 386-364-1683.
Bridge Club Mondays, 6:45 p.m., Golden Corral Restau
rant, Live Oak. Info: 386-362-3200.
Boy Scout Troop 693 Mondays, 7
p.m., Shrine Club, Bass Road, until fur- PA C
other notice. Info: 386-776-2863. rA 1
Christian Home Educators of
Suwannee (C.H.E.S.) a homeschool *Diesel Tractc
support group that meets weekly in Live
Oak. For more info e-mail *Rotary Cutte
ches3inl@yahoo.com
Civil Air Patrol-Suwannee Valley *Top Link
Composite Squadron Thursdays,
6:30-9:30 p.m., at the EAAharigar at the *PfnS & HOOk
Suwannee County Airport, Live Oak.
Membership open to children ages 12 to 16ft. Dual A
18, and all adults. Info: Capt. Grant;W. Trailer
Meadows Jr. in Live Oak, 386-208-0701-
or Capt. Rick Peters in Lake City, 386- *Ifcludes WaI
623-1356 or www.gainesvillecap.org or
www.cap.gov. s*Other Packa,
Dowling Park Volunteers Satur- ASTIN
days; 1100 hours-1 am.; at 22992 CR
.U. Li\e Oak t 11 ff 17
Farmer's Market Suwannee Coun- Exitloff 175
ty Small Farmnner's Market opened April. 8 7-24
18. Local fresh fruit and vegetables -
available, Tuesdays and Thursdays, thru
Thursday, July 27. Hours: 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
The .ite ha changed back to the loading
dock of the old Atlantic Coasilne
Freight Depot on the easi end of the
Suwannee Historical Museum. US 129
North, Lie Oak The. accept both the
Senior and WIC Farmer's Market Nutri-'
tion Coupons, as well as cash. Sched-
uled closed dates: Tuesday, May 30 and
Tuesday, July 4. Vendors call 386-362-
1728, 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
Girl Scout Junior Troop 1077 -, Spon
every Friday; 3:30 p.m.; Suwannee Riv-
er Regional Library, US 129 South, Live Satu
Oak. Info: Jenise Freeland, 386-364-
4932 or jenifree@alltel.net..
Greater Vision Support Group -
every Friday; 9:30 a.m.; Christ Central
Ministries, 1550 S. Walker Ave., Live / I
Oak, FL 32064; Info: 386-208-1345.
Home Front Ministries weekly Tour b
meetings; offers spiritual and emotional u
support to women going through separa- YYOu w
tion, divorce or a troubled marriage;
also, offers individual prayer ministry to
women, regardless of marital status, for
healing life's hurts. Located in Lake VISIT
City. Info: 386-754-2800 or 386-963-
4903. LEISURE
Jasper Kiwanis Club of Hamilton
County Wednesdays, 12:15 p.m., J.R. HO
Lee Complex, Jasper. Call for an appli-
cation, 386-792-3484, 386-755-4896 or
386-792-1110; leave name, address and
phone or contact number.
Live Oak Singles Group Fridays,
7-10 p.m., at St. Luke's Episcopal
Church, 1391 SW Eleventh St., Live
Oak across from Coliseum. (This is not
a church function); If you are lonely,
join them and have some fun. Voluntary
donation at the door; light snacks, Ul
games, darts, line dancing and karaoke;
SSorrn:,, no children aill6ed Info. Judy.
. 3b-3t2--444-l. An 366-(63.-5774 or
Sim 3 ih6.o935-0421 __Wdida
Narcotics Anonymous Wednesdays j--,


- and Saturdays, 8 p.m.; at the Jasper Public Library.
at Narcotics Anonymous Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6-7
d p.m.; Closed sessions. Info: Lee Devore, 386-294-3220.
, .Over .Eaters Anonymous Mondays, 11:35 a.m.-12:50
p.m., at Suwannee River Regional Library, 129 South, Live
s Oak. We care. Info: 386-364-4749.
h, Quarterback Club Meetin| Mondays, 6:30 p.m.; at Old
- Nettie Baisden school next to the football stadium.
- Square Dance Vagabond Squares, Thursdays, 7-9:30
p.m., St. Luke's Episcopal Church, Newbern Road. Info:
- Loyce Harrell, 386-963-3225 or Ralph Beekman, 386-752-
s 2544.
:, Suwannee River Riding Club Mlemberthip lee 125 per
year. Team roping first and thirdTnd.a night. Speed e'.,ents
- first and third Saturday night. Irifo: 386-935-2622.
, Suwannee Valley Barbershop Chorus Tuesdays, 7
p p.m., Crapps Meeting Room, Suwannee River Regional Li-
brary, US 129 South, Live Oak; Info: Fred Phillips, 386-362-
8 1886. .
- Suitannee Valle- Flight-Cihil Air Patrol Thrsda, 5,
6 30-9.30 p m., EAA hangar ar the Suw.annee Count, Airport.
o Live Oak Cunently accepting applications for membership
e and welcome visitors, Info: www.gainesvillecap.org or
- www.cap.gov.
TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly; Thursdays; 8:30 a.m.
; weigh-in; meeting 9 a.m.; Live Oak Community Church of
e God; Info: Barbara, 386-362-5933; Pat, 386-935-3720.
- Weight Watchers Mondays, 9:30 a.m. and 6 p,m. St.
Luke's Episcopal, toll-free 800-651-6000

'As low as .
AGE DEAL!4995-

ia



TRACTO


rrantyY
ges Avail.

IGER TRACTORS E TRACER
1/4 Mile West Then Turn Left on White Water Road Valdosta, GA
19-8885 229-249-8484


scored by Altru
irday, 1
12 No
ticket

egins at t
Nill be pro
Re
SALL OF
EAND EN
LIDAYD


usa International, Inc. of Live Oak
)ecember 9, 2006
on ~ 6:00p.m.
- $10.00 Each .4

heLive Oak Garden Club
vided Direction Map and
?freshments.
THE HOMES AT YOUR
IJOY THEIR REMARKABLE
ECOR AND DESIGNS!
Tickets may be purchased at:
Live Oak City Hall
Windstream Communications
McCrimon's Office Supply
For more information contact:
Julie Ulmer at 362-3882 or
Esther Bass at 364-2502
Proceeds to benefit community projects
including Literacy, Scholarships,
Domestic Violence, Hospice, and More.
I 314966-F


oCelebrate Family at

1AA
Photograph

118 Parshley St. SW
Uve Oak, FL 32064

November Special
20% off Slimline cards
20% off wall frames
$10 of your $45 session fee
is donated in your name to...
MaL,&&Fo.w.A o f,,enc ,a, Appointments Limited
Ian.m lCall Today!.

MWAQ- ISH. 386.362.2223
www.colonial-photography.com ,,.,,F



North Florida PAWS
dNorth Florida People for Animal Welfare Society, Inc.
N 0 RTH P.O. Box 208, Ft. White, FL 32038-0208
LoU I g d. e-mail: nfpaws@bellsouth.net

A non-profit corporation whose missions to end the overpopulation of pet animals and promote humane treatment
of all animals kept as pets, domestic livestock, and wildlife. Donations are tax deductible under IRS Rule 501(c)(3).


N..Need Help to Spay




North FloridaPAWS received a grant from "Florida Animal
Friends'Spay/NeuterLicense Plate Fund" to assist limited-
income households at $24,000 or lesstospay their female
dogs and cats. For a small co-payment, we will pay the
entire cost of the surgery for eligible pet owners. Vouchers
to spay female dogs and cats at 8 weeks of age or older
will be issued as long as funds are available


Applications are available on our website o
www.northfloridapaws.org and at participating
veterinarians' offices.


1. Huston Veterinary Clinic in Jasper
2. All Springs Veterinary Hospital in Wellborn
3. Suwannee Oaks Veterinary Clinic near Branford
4. Mayo Town & County Veterinary Clinic


PREVENTING the thousands of unwanted puppibsand
kittens P.roduced every year in our community is out first
priority. North Florida PAWS is in the process of building a
facility in Hamilton County which will house a Spay~-Neuter
clinic, Dog Training Center, and small Adoption Center.
We hope to eventually support a Mobile Spay/Neuter Unit
to serve outlying areas.


Every family pet that is ADOPTED form an animal shelter
or rescue group reduces the number of unwanted animals.
SPAY-NEUTER and ADOPTION literally saves lives!
313300-F


k. .-,


Ink .--a .1, ,-Ill
,. .' ," #',: '4.. ': ,t ., '-j ,







PAGE 6C, NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


SWe Take




r Health to


Your




Heart


Eating right and exercising are keys to a healthy lifestyle


Are you as healthy as you could be? It's important to make informed food choices and
develop sound eating and physical activity habits to stay healthy. The food and physical
activity choices you make today and everyday affect your health and how you feel right
now and in the future, says the American Dietetic Association (www.eatright.org). To
maintain good health, the Association suggests that you make smart choices from every food
group to give your body the balanced nutrition it needs, being sure to stay within your daily
calorie needs. Exercising regularly is just as important, which helps control body weight,.
promotes a feeling of well being, and reduces the risk of chronic diseases.
FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID UPDATE
,Since not all people are the same, the need for a more individualized approach to improving
diet and lifestyle is necessary. This important point led to a revision in the Food Guide
Pyramid last January by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services (HHS). Called MyPyramid, this new food-guidance system
utilizes interactive technology, allowing indi\ iduals to enter their age, gender and physical
activity level to obtain a more personalized recommendation on their daily calorie level based
on the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The Web site features MyPyramid Plan,
MyPyramid Tracker and Inside MyPyramid, plus tips, resources and a worksheet. There is
also a child-friendly version for children 6 to 11 years old. The main points of MyPyramid are
highlighted below, courtesy of the USDA. All daily servings are based on a 2,000-calorie diet.
Visit their Web site at www.mypyramid.gov to determine the amounts that are right foryou.
Make half your grains whole: Eat 6 ounces of whole-grain cereals, breads, crackers, rice,
or pasta. Substitute a whole-grain product (brown rice, bulgur. graham flour, oatmeal, whole-
grain corn, whole oats, whole rye, whole wheat, and wild rice) for a refined product such as
eating whole-wheat bread instead of white bread or brown rice instead of white rice. It's
important to substitute the whole-grain product for the refined one, rather than adding the
whole-grain product. Note that foods labeled with the words "nmulti-grain." "stone-ground,"
"100 percent wheat," "cracked wheat," "seven-grain," or "bran" are usually not whole-grain
products.
Vary your veggies: Eat 21/2 cups of dark-green veggies like broccoli, spinach, and other
dark leafy greens; orange vegetables such as carrots and sweet potatoes: and dry beans and
peas like pinto beans, kidney beans, and lentils. Stock up on frozen % vegetables for quick and
easy cooking in the nucrow ave, buy vegetables that are easy to prepare, pick up pre-washed
bags of salad greens and add baby carrots or grape tomatoes for a salad in minutes.
Focus on fruit: Eat a \ariety of fruits, and go easy on fruit juices. Choose 2 cups of fresh,
frozen, canned, or dried fruit, and keep a bo\ I of whole fruit on the table, counter or in the
refrigerator Buy fresh fruits in season when they may be less expensive and at peak flavor.
Consider convenience when shopping and buy pre-cut packages of fruit (such as melon or
pineapple chunks i for a healthy snack in seconds. Choose packaged fruits that do not hae


added sugars.
Get your calcium-rich foods: Two cups for kids ages 2 to 8, and 3 cups for people ages 9
and up are recommended. Go low-fat or fat-free when you choose milk, yogurt and other,
dairy products. If you don't or can't consume milk, choose lactose-free products or other
calcium sources such as fortified foods and beverages. Include milk as a beverage at meals. If
you usually drink whole milk, gradually switch to fat-free milk to lower saturated fat and
calories. Try reduced-fat (2 percent), then low-fat (1 percent), and finally fat-free (skim). If
you drink cappuccinos. or lattes ask for them with fat-free (skim) milk. Add fat-free or low-
fat milk instead of water to oatmeal and hot cereals. Have fat-free or low-fat yogurt as a
snack, or use as a dip for fruits or vegetables. Top casseroles, soups, stews, or vegetables with
shredded low-fat cheese.
Go lean withprotein: Choose 51/2 ounces of low-fat or lean meats and poultry and either
bake, broil or grill. The leanest beef cuts include round steaks and roasts (round eye, top
round, bottom round, round tip), top loin, top sirloin, and chuck shoulder and arm roasts. The
leanest pork choices include pork loin, tenderloin, center loin, and ham. Choose at least 90
percent lean ground beef. You may be able to find ground beef that is 93 percent or 95 percent
lean. Buy skinless chicken parts, or take off the skin before cooking. Boneless skinless
chicken breasts and turkey cutlets are the leanest poultry choices. Choose lean turkey, roast
beef, ham, or lo\ -fat luncheon meats for sandwiches instead of luncheon meats with more fat,
such as regular bologna or salami. Vary your protein routine choose more fish, beans, peas,
nuts, and seeds.
Find your balance between food and physical activity: Be sure to stay within your daily
calorie needs, and be physically active for at least 30 minutes most days of the week; about 60
minutes a day to prevent weight gain; and 60 minutes a day, or most days, for children and
teenagers. Choose activities that y ou enjoy and can do regularlK. Fitting acti\ ith into a daily
routine can be easy such as, taking a brisk 10-minute walk to and from the parking lot, bus
stop, or subway station. Or. join an exercise class. Keep it interesting by trying something
different on alternate days., What's important is to be active most da\ s of the \\ eek, and make
it part of a daily routine. For example, to reach a 30-minute goal for the da\. \\ alk the dog for
10 minutes before and after work, and add a 10-minute walk at lunchtime. Or, swim 3 times a
week and take a yoga class on the other days. Make sure to do at least 10 minutes of the
activity at a time, shorter bursts of activity will nothave the same health benefits. To be ready
anytime. keep some comfortable clothes and.a pair of walking or running shoes in the car and
at the office.
Know the limits on fats, sugars, and salt (sodium): Most of your fat sources should come
from fish, nuts, and vegetable oils. Limit solid fats like butter, stick margarine, shortening, and
lard, as well as foods that contain these. Check the nutrition facts label on product packaging
to keep saturated fats, trans fats, and sodium levels low. Choose food and beverages low in
added sugars, which contribute calories with few, if any nutrients.


b place an ad on this page, please call Myrtle at 386-362-1734 Ext. 103


Ophthalmology
GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
Located In SHANDS At Live Oak
1100 SW llth St. Live Oak
(904) 373-4300 or 1-800-435-3937

intbiill-, -liG irall
Medicine




Dr. Renaldas A. Smidtas, MD
American Board of Internal Medicine Certified,
Fellow of the American Board of Balance Medicine.
* Kathy Newman, ARNP, Pollyanna Bass, ARNP
* Comprehensive patients care InjectionTlierapy of Arthritis of Knees,
Shoulders and Back Low back pain treatment with Accu-Spina
technology Computerized dizziness and balance evaluation and
treatment Allergy evaluation and treatment Ultrasound diagnostics,
bone density evaluation Cosmetic BOTOX,dermabrasion
Live Oak Jasper
362-5840 792-0753
1437 N. Ohio Ave. 413 NW 5th Ave.
,. ,-'.J M laie j,'d -s.*.i.p,..i .:i ., F

Physical Thierlapy

977 (saL~Ikaom, LOea.

Phvical Therapy Occupalionail Therapy. Speech Therapy
Specia:lizinl in Arlhrinii Ftbromyalgia Geratric- Spinal &
J.Oini Pain Sports Irtjune, Work Injuries Pdialri.:s
'Manual Therapy Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Protegrity
Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross, Av Med
;Jasper 792-2426 Medicaid-pediatrics.
SBranford 935-1449. Workers Comp
:Mayo 294-1407 Most Other Insurance Plans
A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore


North' Florida


Pharmacy


* Medical
Equipment
* Oxygen


"Everything For Your
Home Recovery"

Locally Owned & Operated


101 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL 32008
(386) 935-6905
229 W. Main St., Mayo, FL 32066
(386) 294-3777 '226579.I


S'ou (iiay have seen our
sign many, many times.
IF SO, YOU KNOW where
to find comprehensive
dental care.
,A ,-,ill. In, /0 [,ro r,,^
-Hl ard ,n '
LIVE OAK DENTAL OFFICE
( 386)362-1646
S931 N. Ohio Ave..
t : e Live Oak, FL 32060
AIec F Redlearni Jr.
D.D.SR SPA
?Y5YtY F

Physical Therapy


Heartland
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA
Kalie Hingson, PTA
LisaGarrett% PTA
AQUATIC THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports
Medicine, Pediatrics Providers
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS Providers
405 11th St., Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051

0 EYE CENTER of North Florida
SGeneral 'Eye Care,& Surgery
EYE EXAMS CATARACT SURGERY
GLAUCOMA MACULAR DEGENERATION
DIABETESES* LASERS
Eduardo M. Bedoya, MD
Board Certified, American Board of Ophthalmology
Eye Physician & Surgeon


Medicare, Medicaid, Avmed,
Blue Cross/Blue Shield
& other insurance accepted.
Se habla espafiol.
917 W. Duval St.
Lake City
866-755-0040 !


Family Dentistry
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH,
D.D.S, P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak; FL
(36),36,655, 56
1-800-829-6506
i. ui >,: u's'.% m nee Ciun, i --

Tri-Care Medical Supply
506 NW 4th Street Suite 200
Jasper, Florida 32052
Located inside the hospital.
S"-Full Service durable
medical equipment company.
(/ i Offering oxygen, nebulizers,
wheelchairs, hospital beds,
bathroom equipment;
scooters and more.
Call (386) 792-7207
for more information.


Assisted Living
TP- ZoS10


to Va'Lcf'id 0elJ


ul." fu" ouc a mn.

rPtiet loomh, efinals, 24 ou a.
Visit us on the web at www.oakridgealf.com
Email: oakridgealf@alltel.net
Mayo, FL County Rd. 251-A ( 294-5050
License # AL9863 (386) 29 0,79,


1 Marlene
lSummers, CNM
OBGYN

Deliveries at:
Shands at LakeShore
Surgeries at:
Shands at LakeShore.
Lake City Medical Center
& North Florida Regional '
it l lqu.,le(d -t r .'il
by Dr. Rios

(386) 755-0500
e449 SE Baya Dr.
Lake City, FL 32055
226581-F


Cancer Care of North Florida
Now seeing patients at Shands at Live Oak
We are a Welcoming New Patients at Anemiang in:
total care our two offices at: *Thrombocytopenia
SBleeding or clotting disorders
medical Shands @ Live Oak or Lake Cit. Breast Cancer
oncology Covarian Cancer
Oncology & P, Please call (386) 755-1655 OvarisnCaer
hematology eehan, M.D. for an appointment or information Multiple Myeloma
practice. All Chemotherapy administration and management "Lymphoma
'Pro,80. Acepatinn Medicre &g Mrost Insurance


Chelation Therapy
Now available in
North Central Florida!

A proven, non-surgical
treatment for clogged arteries
and other chronic diseases.

Call for an appointment to start
your sessions. Lab work and
evaluation may be done during
first treatment visit.



Three Rivers Medical
Branford, FL


(386)935-1607


313556-F


North


Florida


EyeCare

Examination and Treatment of the Eye
Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses


PHONE (386) 362-5055
FAX (386) 208-8660


625 Helvenston
Live Oak, Florida 32066
226578-F


Urology, Urologic Surgery
& Impotence Center



ROBERT G. BUSCH, D.O.
ERIC ORDINARIO, D.O.
Board Certified Urology and Urological Surgery
Common Problems Treated:
* Infections Prostate Problems Kidney Stones Sexual
Problems Genital Surgery Cancer of the Urinary Tract *
Impotence Infertility Urinary Incontinence
Common Surgical Procedures In Office:
* Cystoscopy No Scapel Vasectomy Treatment of
Condyloma Prostate Ultrasound/Biopsy Bladder
Ultrasound Penil Vascular Studies
Common Surgical Problems In
Hospital or Ambulatory Surgical Center:
* Prostate, Kidney and Bladder Cancer Surgery
* Kidney Stone and Surgery Lithotripsy Microscopic
Vasectomy Reversal Impotence Surgery Hernia Surgery
Specializing in the evaluation and treatment of Male
Impotence Surgical and Medical Therapies
All patients are given
personal and confidential attention.

22M562-F


= I


I Medical Directory


2258- AOpuQmeivi *m t lbTd


2e


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bb/U-


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NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006, PAGE 7C




,, -(7 X (Q^


Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) Staff Branford third Wednesday; Town
Hall, Council Chambers, Branford; 1-2:30 p.m.; trained staff visits to assist
constituents; Info: 202-225-5235, www.house.gov/boyd/.
Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) Staff Live Oak third Wednesday; City
Council Chambers, City Hall, 101 SE White Ave., Live Oak; 9:30-11:30 a.m.;
trained staff visits to assist constituents; I1fo: 202-225-5235,
www.house.gov/boyd/.
Alzheimer's Support Group third Thursday (except December) at 3:30
p.m.; Good Samaritan Center, Dowling Park. Info: Angie Paarlberg, 386-658-
5594.
American Legion Post 59-third Tuesday, 7 p.m., Sister's Restaurant, Bran-
ford.
American Legion Post 107 The Harry C. Gray II Memorial American Le-
gion Post No. 107 business meeting, first Thursday at noon and third Thurs-
day at 6:30 p.m., at 10726 142nd St., east of US 129 (Blue Lake Road). This is
to accommodate both those who cannot travel after dark and those who work
during the day. Info: Ron Slater, 386-208-8073.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit No. 107 first Saturday; 10-11 a.m.;
Suwannee Elementary School, next to the track on Pinewood, Live Oak;- Info:
Pat McLauchlin 386-362-3524 or Tanya Lees 386-364-8331.
American Legion Post 132 second Tuesday; 7 p.m.; Wellborn Masonic
Lodge, on CR 137, downtown Wellborn; Info: Gerald McKean, 386-963-5901.
Bluegrass Pickin First Saturday, 6 p.m., at Trenton Community Center;
dates subject to change; various bluegrass bands; bring your lawn chair and
your old flat top or banjo; Info: Ask for Cloud, 800-990-5410 or 352-284-0668.
Branford Camera Club third Thursday; 7:30 p.m.; Branford Library;
Note: no August meeting.and December meeting second Thursday; Info: Car-
olyn Hogue, 386-935-2044.
Chamber of Commerce- Suwannee County second Thursday; 7:30 a.m.;
'816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak; Info: 386-362-3071.
Christian Mission in Action first Tuesday, 6 p.m., at Triumph the Church
and Kingdom of God in Christ Youth Center, 12001 NW Seventh St., Live Oak;
Info: Audrey Sharpe, 386-364-4560.
Christian Mission in Action Ministry free food and clothing give-away,
second Saturday, 11 a.m.- p.m., at John H. Hales Park and Recreation Center,
Duval Street, Live Oak; Info: Audrey Sharpe, 386-364-4560.
Council for Progress of Suwannee County second Tuesday; 7:30 a.m.;
816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak; Info: 386-362-3071.
Cub Scout Pack No. 408 Committee second Tuesday;, 6:30 p.m.; Live
Oak Church of Christ, 1497 Irvin Ave. SR 51 South; Info: 386-362-3032,
commchair@pack408.net, www.pack408.net; Tiger, Wolf, Bears and Webe-
los dens (grades one five) every Thursday-Aug.-May only; at the church;
6:30-8 p.m.; Pack meeting fourth Thursday; at the church; 6:30-8 p.m.
Disabled American Veterans Chapter No. 126 second Thursday; 6 p.m.;
226 Parshley St., S.W, Live Oak; Info: 386-362-1701.
Disaster Animal Response Team (DART) first Tuesday, 5:30 p.m., Com-
panion Animal Hospital, 605 N. Houston Street, Live Oak. DART helps out
with pets, livestock, horses, birds and all animals during natural disasters. Vol-
unteers needed. Info: 386-208-0072.
Dowling Park Volunteers first Saturday; 1100 hours (11 a.m.); training.
each following Saturday at 1100 (11 a.m.); 22992 CR 250, Live Oak.
Florida Gateway Charter Chapter of the American Business Women's
Association second Thursday; 6 p.m.; locations change; Info: Sandy Harri-
son at 386-754-0434 or 386-752-0516.
Friends of Suwannee River State Park second Tuesday; 10 a.m., board
meeting; Suwannee River State Park, US 90 West, Live Oak; Info: Member-
ship Chair Walter Schoenfelder, 850-971-5354, wbs@surfbest.net
Ft. White Quilt Sisters.- last Saturday, 9 a.m.-until, at Ft. White Town Hall.
near Library. Quilters of all skill levels are welcome to join us for a relaxing
time of fun, fellowship and of course, quilting.-No dues or fees required -just
the love and desire to quilt. Bring your lunch and quilting make new quilting
friends. Info 386-497-4179.
GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak first Friday; noon; 1308 Eleventh
Street, Live Oak.
Girl Scout Leaders, Girl Scouts of Gateway Council first Monday; 7
p.m.; Woman's Club, 1308 Eleventh Street, Live Oak; Info: Mary Check-Ca-
son, 386-362-4475. .
HamiltonRIioun. Go% rrnmenial. Belh ille.Volunteer Fire; Rescue- ecp- i
tive board ",'nr-.J-r.f rn'dj, 'm -- '.. .. .
Hafiilto'fiC'ounnr Alcohol and Other Drug Pre mention Coalition fourth
Wednesday; 9:30-11 a.m., Hamilton County School Board meeting room, JRE
Lee Administrative Complex, Jasper; Info: Grace McDonald, 386-938-4911,
mcdonaldgl@alltel.net
Hamilton County Board of Commissioners first Tuesday, 9 a.m., and
third Tuesday at 6 p.m., County Commissioners' Board Room, courthouse,
Jasper.
Hamilton County Chamber of Commerce, Inc. first Thursday; 6 p.m.;
1153 US 41 NW, Suite 4, Jasper (courthouse annex); Info: 386-792-1300.
Hamilton County Council on Aging, Inc. needs volunteer drivers; home-
delivered meals program; Info: Kanoye Capps; 1509. S.W. First Street, Jasper,
386-792-1136.
Hamilton County Development Authority second Thursday; 7 p.m., at
1153 US 41. NW, Suite 4, Jasper (courthouse.annex); Info: 386-792-6828.
Hamilton County Planning and Zoning Board second Tuesday, 6 p.m.;
Hamilton County Board of County Commissioners meeting room, Hamilton
County Courthouse, Jasper; open to the public.
Hamilton County Riding Club first Saturday; 5 p.m., meeting-games;.
Hamilton County Arena, Jasper; third Saturday; 5 p.m.; trail ride-dinner, loca-
tion announced at the first Saturday meeting; new. members, welcome; Info:
386-792-2725. .
Hamilton County School Board board meetings, second Monday (third
Monday during June and July); School Board workshois-fourth Mondays-as
needed. For times and locations, visit the district's Web site at
www.fim.edu/schools/hamilton/hamilton.
Hamilton County Tourist Development Council second Wednesday;
noon; 1153 US 41 NW, Suite 4, Jasper (courthouse annex); Info: 386-792-
6828..
Health Talks third Monday, 5:30,p.m. GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak,
in conjunction with the Suwannee County Health Department, offers health
talks at the Woman's Club on Eleventh Street in.Live Oak. Each session will
last approximately one hour and will, allow time for questions and answers.
There is no charge. Nov.. 20 Mindi Clark from the Health Department will be
speak about diabetes and on Dec. 18 Dr. Connie Steele will be speak about
boosting the. immune system. The schedule for 2007 will include, talks on
weight loss, hearth health, shingles and. bioidentical hormones just to name a
few. Info: Rita, 386-776-1711.
Home and Community Educators (HCE) first Wednesday, 9:30 a.m., at
,Suwannee County Extension Office, Coliseum Complex, Eleventh Street, Live
Oak; new members welcome; Pleasant Hill-second'Monday; MicAlpin Com-
munity Club, McAlpin; Happy Homemakers-second Wednesday; Suwannee
County Coliseum Complex, Eleventh Street, Live Oak. Info: 386-362-2771.
Homeless Services Network of Suwannee Valley second Tuesday, 4 p.m.
at Columbia County Senior Services, 480 SW Oleander Glen, behind the De-
partment of Transportation District 2 offices on Marion Street in Lake City.
United Way of Suwannee Valley serves as the lead agency for the Homeless
Services Network of Suwannee Valley, which serves the counties of Columbia,
Suwannee, Lafayette and Hamilton. The network includes agencies and indi-
viduals interested in the services available to those who are homeless or threat-
ened with homelessness. Agency representatives, individuals, homeless and
formerly homeless,, with an interest in the needs of those who are experiencing
homelessness or are threatened with homelessness are encouraged to attend.
Humane Society, Suwannee Valley Animal Shelter second Monday;
noon; at the shelter located on Bisbee Loop, south entrance, in Lee offCR 255,
Madison County; Capacity will be increased to 72-75 animals after remodeling
completed. Info: toll-free 866-Adoptl2, 866-236-7812,
www.geocities.com/suwanneehs.
Jasper City Council Meeting second Monday; 6 p.m.; Jasper City Hall.
Jasper Lions Club Meeting second and fourth Tuesday, 7 p.m., Roosters
Diner. Info: Bob Clark, 386-792-9328. .
Jennings Town Council'Meeting first Tuesday; 7 p.m.; Jennings Town
Hall. .
White Springs Town Council Meeting: Third Tuesday; 7 p.m.; White
Springs Town Hall.
Lady of the Lake Quilting Guild Fourth Wednesday, for May, June and
July only at Suwannee River Regional Library, US 129 South, Live Oak; for
anyone interested in quilts and the art of quilting; the quilting public is invit- .
ed. Info: Sandy Lindfors, president, 386-362-6850, riverfolk@alltel.net or
Joan Murray, 386-758-5980.
Leona 4-H Community Club first Monday; 7 p.m.; home of Avon and
Betty Hicks, 6107 180th St., McAlpin; Info: Betty Hicks, 386-963-4205; Pam
Nettles, 386-963-1236.
Lion's Club second Tuesday and fourth Tuesday; 7 p.m.; Farm Bureau


meeting room; Info: Richard Tucker, 386-963-4577.
Live Oak Artist Guild first Tuesday; 7 p.m.; St..Luke's Episcopal Church,
Live Oak; Info: Don Strickland, 386-362-5146.
Live Oak Garden Club Sept.-May; Morning Glories-third Friday; Night
Bloomers-third Tuesday, 1302 S.W. Eleventh Street, Live Oak.
Live Oak Senior Citizens first Monday; 10:30 a.m.; Exhibition II Build-
ing, Coliseum Complex, 1302 SW Eleventh St., Live Oak; escorted tours,
prices vary; Info: Lula Herring, 386-364-1510.
GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak first Friday at noon; 1308 llth
Street, Live Oak.


Monthly Meetings

Suwannee Valley Humane Society Animal Shelter second Monday;
noon; at the shelter located on Bisbee Loop, south entrance, in Lee off CR 255,
Madison County; Capacity will be increased to 72-75 animals after remodeling
completed.Info: toll-free 866-Adoptl2, 866-236-7812,
www.geocities.com/suwanneehs.
Live Oak, Suwannee County Recreation Board second Wednesday; 5:30
p:m. Suwannee Parks & Recreation offices, 1201 Silas Drive, Live Oak; Info:
386-362-3004.
MADD Dads Third Thursday; 7 p.m.; Suwannee County Courthouse.
Man To Man Group second Thursday; 7 p.m.; Marvin E. Jones Building,
Dowling Park; free; refreshments provided; Info: American Cancer Society
toll-free 800-ACS-2345 or the local office toll-free 888-295-6787 (Press 2)
Ext. 114. '
Market Days Advent Christian Village first Saturday; 8 a.m.-l p.m.;
Space-first-come, first-serve basis, $5 each; Village Square shops open; Info:
Lodge Office 386-658-5200.
McAlpin Community Club second Monday; 7 p.m.; covered dish dinner
first; everyone welcome; purpose to acquaint members of the community ser-
vices available in the county; Info: Grant Meadows Jr., 386-935-9316 or
Shirley Jones, 386-963-5357; building rental: Kristie Harrison, 386-364-3400.
MOAA (Military Officers Association of America) fourth Thursday,
6:30 p.m., at Elks Club, Lake City; former and present officers meet for dinner
and program; Info: Dennis Tarkington, 386-719-7092 or Tandy Carter, 386-
719-9706.
MOMS Club second Wednesday; 11:15 a.m. at the fellowship hall of
Bethel Missionary Baptist Church, go West on US 90 seven miles from 1-75,
and 1-1/2'miles from the Columbia/Suwannee County line, 12 miles from Live
Oak; Info: 386-397-1254, MOMSClubofLiveOakLakeCityFl@alltel.net
National Active and Retired Federal Employees (N,A.R.F.E.) Associa-
tion third Tuesday; 11:30 a.m.; Quail Heights Country Club, 161 Quail
Heights Terrace, Lake City; guest speakers; all present and retired federal em-
ployees invited; Info: 386-755-8570 or .3'":.--. -6593.
North Florida Chapter of Newborns in Need first Saturday; 9:30 a.m.;
St. Luke's Episcopal Church, 1391 SW Eleventh Street, Live Oak; joinrthem in
providing for these 'babies too young to help themselves. Info: Dorothy
Phillips, secretary, 386-362-1886.
North Florida Conservation and Airboat Alliance second Tuesday; 7
p.m.; Mark Carver's cook shed: 11166 100 St., Live Oak, first drive on right
just past Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc.; all meetings covered
dish; airboaters and sportsmen working to keep publiclands and waterways,
open for everyone to use and enjoy. Info: Cbris ,4u. S3'.r--.' 1092.
Nursing Mom's Group second Friday; I" a in S0L,, jrnnr-. River Region-
al Library, Live Oak; Info: Michelle, 386-776-2955.
Remembering the Loss of Your Baby first Thursday; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.;
Hospice of North Central Florida,
North Building Counseling Room,
4305 NW 90th Blvd., Gainesville;
open support group for families who
have experienced the loss of a baby;'
Info: Cheryl Bailey, 352-692-5107,
toll-free 800-816-0596.
SHINE Serving Health Insur-
ance Needs of Elders Advent
Christian Village.- Dowling Park -
trained volunteers help elders and
their caregivers in Dowling Park area
of Suwannee County to understand
Medicare and other health insurance
programs make informed decisions on
insurance, Medicare Prescription
Drug Cards and on discounted pre-
scription drug programs and eligibility 01 Grand Am
requirements; free; Info: appointment
386-658-3333 or 386-658-5329;
Florida Department of Elder Affairs
toll-free 800-262-2243, Monday Fri-
da;. S 30 .m Y 130 p.m.. i -X : r .
SHIlNE Serting H lth Insur-
ance Needs ol'Efdfs I -"Jsierr Mon-k -,l-irifi 7,,-rWo -..nl^
day-Friday, 1-4 p.m.; Hamilton Phar-: ..,. ..-.
macy Assistance Program; Sandlin
Building, 204 NE 1st Street, Jasper; ._
trained volunteers help elders and 01 Rodeo
their caregivers in Suwannee County
to understand Medicare and their:
health insurance programs make in-
formed decisions on insurance,
Medicare Prescription Drug Cards and
on discounted prescription drug pro-
grams and eligibility requirements; Atomntic Tranion
free; Info: Florida Department of El- .*Ar Coiionind9as
der Affairs toll-free 800-262-2243;, *AmiFm S reo.
Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
SHINE Serving Health Insur-
ance Needs of Elders Live Oak 98 Chevy Astro Van
second Monday, 1-3 p.m. or second
Thursday, 1:30-2:30 p.m.; Suwannee
River Regional Library, US 129
South, Live Oak; trained volunteers '
help elders and their caregivers in
Suwannee County to understand
. Medicare and other health insurance ........- T. ,.-.-...
programs make informed decisions on -Air Conditio ng
insurance, Medicare Prescription A ..Fm Stereo
Drug Cards and on discounted pre-
scription drug programs and eligibility
requirements; free;. Info: Florida De- 95 Eclipse
apartment of Elder Affairs toll-free
800-262-2243,.Monday.- Friday, 8:3d1
a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
SHINE Serving Health Insur-
ance Needs of Elders White
Springs first and third Thursday;
9:30-11:30A a.m.; Library, 12797 -Automaic Transmission .
Roberts Street, White Springs; free; -, .,,",.
trained volunteers help elders and
their caregivers in Suwannee County
to understand Medicare and, other 98 Expedition XLT
health insurance programs make in-*
formed decisions on insurance, E L-il ft l
Medicare Prescription Drug Cards and
on discounted prescription drug pro-
grams and eligibility requirements;
Info: Florida Department of Elder Af-
fairs toll-free 800-262-2243, Monday
Friday, 8:30 a.m .- 4:30 p.m. : .-., .. ., ,,,-
Suwannee Chapter of the Florida *Aantm Sicreo
Trail Association second Monday; .
7-9 p.m.; Suwaninee River Water Man-
agement District, US 90 and CR 49, 01 Accord
Live Oak; Info: Sam Bigbie, 386-362- I '
5090;. Don Neale, 386-362-4850;
Sylvia Dunnam, 386-362-3256.
Suwannee County Democratic
Executive Committee dinner meet-
ing, first Tuesday, 6:30 p.m. for din-
ner, meeting at 7 p.m., Spirit of the *AutomaticTrane.sion
Suwannee Music Park, US 129 North, .... .
Live Oak; Info/RSVP: Monica, 386- .-*--.
.330-2036. .
Suwannee County Cattlemen's
Association third Thursday; 6:30 03 Explorer
p.m.; Farmers Co-op meeting room; '-
Info: Herb Rogers, 386-362-4118. '.'j l-
Suwannee County Chamber of '
Commerce second Thursday; 7:30 -
a.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak; i ., "--
Info: 386-362-3071.
Suwannee County: Council for *Aiitomi, ot 1ns ei~on *on

Progress of Suwannee County sec- -Air CondiioniO ,-'3rd Sent
ond Tuesday; 7:30 a.m.; 816 South
Ohio Ave. Live Oak; Info: 386-362-
3071.
Suwannee County Development
Authority second Tuesday; 5:30
p.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak;
Info: 386-362-3071.
Suwannee County Tourist Devel-
opment Council fourth Tuesday; 1
p.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak; *
Info: 386-362-3071.
Suwannee County Senior Citi-


zens first Monday; 10:30 a.m., Exhibition II Building, Coliseum Complex,
1302 SW Eleventh St., Live Oak; escorted tours, prices vary; Info: Lula Her-
ring, 386-364-1510.
Suwannee Elementary School (SES) School Advisory Council (SAC)
committee meets at 6 p.m., third Tuesday, in the media center. The school is
located at 1748 South Ohio/Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, Live Oak:
Suwannee River Valley Archaeology Society third Tuesday; public li-
brary, Branford; Info: 386-935-4901.
Suwannee Valley Builders Association second Thursday; 6 p.m,; Farm
Bureau meeting room, 407 Dowling Ave., Live Oak; $5 per person for meal
and meeting. .
Suwannee Valley Genealogical Society first Thursday; 7 p.m., Wilbur St.
Live Oak; Open Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9 a.m.-noon and 1-5 p.m.; Info: 386-
330-0110.
Suwannee Valley Humane Society Animal Shelter second Monday;
noon; at the shelter located on Bisbee Loop, south entrance, in Lee off CR 255,
Madison County; Capacity will be increased to 72-75 animals after remodeling
completed. Info: toll-free 866-Adoptl2, 866-236-78.12,
www.geocities.com/suwanieehs.
Suwannee Valley Quilters first and third Thursday; 10 a.m.; Info: Jane,
386-776-2909 after 4 p.m.
Suwannee Valley Kennel Club third Tuesday; 7:30 p.m.; Hospitality and
Recreational Building, Columbia County FjirL round:. Lake City, Lake City.
Tobacco-Free Partnership of Suwannee County quarterly, Info: Mary
Jordan Taylor, 386-362-2708, ext. 232. .
Tourist Development Council-Suwannee County fourth Tuesday; 1
p.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak; Info:, 386-362-3071. ,
Vision SSeeds, Inc. second Tuesday,' 6 p.m. promptly, at location to be an-
nounced. Spirirual-Soc;al-Educatinjl-EcoF,:.ic De;ei..pmern Sjve our chil-
dren! Unil rn Chriit leue-Empi'.errin -xll are .elcone info Otha White
Sr., president, 386-364-1367 or 386-364-1209.
Vivid Visions, Inc. firj.t ,.l..,rai 5:30 p.m.; Douglass Center Conference
Room; a shelter and outreach agency for victims of domestic violence; Info:
386-364-5957.
Wellborn Community Association (WCA) .second Thursday; 7 p.m.;
Wellborn Community Center; Info: Bonnie Scott, 386-963-4952, 386-208-
1733-leave a message. WCA fund-raiser to benefit building, fund Blue-
berry Pancake Breakfast first Saturday; center of Wellborn, Andrews
Square; blueberry pancake. Ju-ag ajn orange juice or coffee. Blueberr%
Festival-first Saturday in Jane e'ch car .
Wellborn Neighborhood Watch last Thursday, 7 p.m., Blake Lowe Build-
ing, 1517 4th Ave., Wellborn; Info: Biuce or Jane, 386-963-3196.
GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak first Friday at noon; 1308 llth
Street, Live Oak.


1-$69-9


1 $88


-B0988


mi~


1 $2777i


5 -I


i


$24984


I













PAGE 8C, NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS











FYI Meetings


The American Cancer Society (ACS) of North Central Florida Reaching
out to seniors in our area. A variety of locations all over the north central Florida
area are available for each program. Contact the American Cancer Society toll-free
at 800-ACS-2345 for more information or on the web atwww.cancer.org. Or con-
tact ACS locally at 352-376-6866, ext. 114 or 127. Support groups:
I Can Cope-a free educational program for people facing cancer?-either per-
sonally of as a caregiver. This program is offered through a partnership between the
Florida Division of the American Cancer Society and the Florida Society of On-
cology Social Workers and provides participants with reliable information, peer
support, and practical coping skills.
Road To Recovery Lack of transportation is one of the biggest challenges for
thousands of cancer patients. Many need daily or weekly treatment and they don't
have a car or are'too ill to drive. The Road to Recovery program provides volun-
teer drivers to transport cancer patients to and from these life-saving cancer treat-
ments.
Look Good ... Feel Better a free, community-based program that teaches
beauty techniques to female cancer patients currently in chemotherapy or radiation
treatment to help restore their appearance and self-image. This partnership between
the American Cancer Society; the Cosmetic, Toiletry and Fragrance Association
Foundation; and the National Cosmetology Association enables certified and li-
censed beauty professionals to help cancer patients regain self-confidence during
their treatment.
Reach to Recovery connects breast cancer patients with trained breast cancer
survivors. Breast cancer survivors provide free one-on-one support and informa-
tion to help cope with their breast cancer experience.
Man to Man provides men with prostate cancer a comfortable, community-
based setting for discussion, education and support. The program provides men
with free support on individual and group levels, and offers participants the oppor-
tunity to educate their communities and advocate for prostate cancer issues.
Another Way, Inc. Support Groups support groups for victims and survivors
of domestic violence; Info: 386-792-2747, toll-free hot line 800-500-1119.
Branford Farmers' Market Mondays, 2-6 p.m. through June at the Commu-
nity Center at Hatch Park, 403 SE Craven Street, Branford. Available will be lo-
cally grown fruits, vegetables, flowers and other agricultural products. This market
is certified as a redemption point for Farmers' Market Nutrition Program coupons
for WIC and Elder recipients. Info: 386-935-1146 or 386-454-3950.
Childbirth classes (free) Suwannee County Health Department; every Tues-
day; 6-8 p.m.; Info or to register: Coleen Cody, 386-362-2708, ext. 218.
Christian Home Educators of Suwannee (CHES) home school support
group; weekly park days; informal meetings; fellowship for parents and kids; Info:
ches3inl@yahoo.com or Tammy, 386-362-6939.
I Christian Mission in Action Ministry free food and clothing give-away, sec-
ond Saturday, 11 a.m.-I p.m., at John H. Hale Park and Recreation Center, Duval
Street, Live Oak; Info: Audrey Sharpe, 386-364-4560.
Community Concerts of Lake City typical performances include jazz, swing,
and often Broadway performers. Reciprocity Program: North Florida Community
College and North Florida Community College. Info and/or tickets: Herman
Gunter, 386-362-7101; Joan Radford, 386-364-4923,
Department of Children and Families.(DCF) DCF service center, 501 De-
morest St., Live Oak; public assistance recipients,get help in completing voter reg-
istration applications; Info: 386-362-1483.
Disaster Action Team Volunteers Needed The American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley; needs voluriteets; Disaster Action Team; Inf:' 386-752-0650.
The Story of Dowling Park.- Advent Christian Village (ACV) at Dowling Park;
speaking engagement or a tour for your organization, club or church; ACV repre-
sentatives available; free videotape; Info: 386-658-5110, toll-free 800-714-3134, e-
mail ccarter@acvillage.net;,www.acvillage.net.
Experience Works a national nonprofit organization, (formerly Green Thumb)
provides training.and employment services to older workers-over 55 and with a
limited income-in Suwannee County through the Senior Community Service Em-
ployment Program (SCSEP); minimum wag -20 hours per week. Info: Lake City
One Stop, 386-755-9026, ext. 3129 for Loretta or ext. 3134 for Ronald; www.ex-
perienceworks.org.
Experimental Airplane Association (EAA) Breakfast fourth Saturday;
breakfast served from 9-11 a.m.; at the EAA Chapter Building at the Suwannee
County Airport; eggs,.sausage, pancakes, toast, coffee, fruit and juice for $4.50; the
EAA Chapter sponsors two students from NJROTC to go to the Air Academy in
Oshkosh, Wis.
Figure drawing classes with live model by John Rice Wednesday, 6:30-8:30
p.m., local artist and gallery owner offers.figure drawing classes with a live mod-
el; at Suwannee High School, $5 per class-to pay the model; anyone high school
age or older is welcome to attend; bring your pencils; Info: 386-362-2066.

i"


Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville Florida's state natural
history museum, near the intersection of Southwest 34th Street and Hull Road,
University of Florida Cultural Plaza, Gainesville; 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Satur-
day and 1-5 p.m., Sunday; closed Thanksgiving and Christmas; The Butterfly Rain-
forest is a permanent exhibit and includes nectar flowers and orchids from around
the world to support hundreds of live butterflies. Pre-school and home school pro-
grams offered. Info: 352-846-2000, www.flmnh.ufl.edu.
Food Bank of Suwannee Valley a division of Catholic Charities of Lake city
whose purpose is to distribute food to member agencies for further distribution in
the four county service areas, to help eliminate hunger. These 14 member agencies
serve Columbia, Suwannee, Hamilton and Union counties and have distributed
over 250,000 pounds of food since August 2005. Volunteers are always needed, call
Glenda Parton at 386-755-5683.
Friends of Suwannee River State Park memberships available; non-profit
organization; monthly bird walks will be held every fourth Saturday at 8 a.m., meet
at the ranger station, bring binoculars and your favorite bird identification book,
park admission $4; Info: membership chair Walter Schoenfelder, 850-971-5354,
wbs@surfbest.net.
GED Tests Suwannee-Hamilton Technical Center; mandatory registration ses-
sion before test; Info: Lynn Lee,.386-364-2782; age waivers, Lynne Roy, 386-384-
2763, counselor.
Haven Hospice of the Suwannee Valley Helping Hands Volunteer Orienta-
tion first Wednesday, 10-11 a.m.; or, third Tuesday, 5-6:30 p.m.; at Hospice of the
Suwannee Valley, 618 SW FL Gateway Drive, Lake City; Info: Carolyn Long, 386-
752-9191.
High Springs Farmers' Market Downtown Historic High Springs Thurs-
days, 2-6 p.m.; sponsored by the City of High Springs; behind City Hall on NW
Second Street; Info: 386-454-3950.
Lafayette. County Veterans-- DD Form 214, "Certificate of Release or Dis-
charge from Active Duty" can be recorded in the Clerk of Court's office, Lafayette
County Courthouse, Mayo:
Lake Butler Singles Club Saturdays, 7 p.m., at Lake Butler Community Club;
covered dish dinner 7-8 p.m., dancing 8 -11 p.m.; no smoking and no alcoholic bev-
erages are allowed; membership fees required; Info: Mildred Johns, 386-758-8223
or Margie Paulk, 386-294-3128.
LillyAnswers Program Available to Floridians 65 and older, who are enrolled
in Medicare, have an annual income below 200 percent of the federal poverty lev-
el and have no other drug coverage. Info: www.lillyanswers.com, toll-free 877-RX-
LILLY.
Live! At Dowling Park Artist Series 2006-2007 Advent Christian Village -
"Live! at Dowling Park" Artist Series 2006-2007 presents performances monthly;
Reciprocity Program: North Florida Community College and Community Concerts
of Lake City, Inc. Tickets available at Advent Christian Village Cashier's Office,
Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce and The Music Center in Live Oak.
Info/schedule of events: Retirement Services, 386-658-5400, dgrillo@acvillage.net
or http://artistseries.acvillage.net.
Love INC A non-profit Christian group; represents local churches; finds help
for valid needs; Info: 386-364-4673, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.- noon.
MDA Assists people with ALS; help with purchase and repair of wheelchairs;
support groups; expert-led seminars; Info: www.als.mdausa.org.
www.mdausa.org/chat.
Marine Corps League First Tuesday, 7 p.m., The Suwannee Valley Detach-
ment of the Marine Corps League of the United States meets at Wellborn Commu-
nity Center; ladies auxiliary meets at same time and place, Info: Jerry Curtis, 386-
984-6755; Janet Morgan, 386-362-2068.
Marriage? Help me! -' A program presented by Solid Rock Ministries, Inc. of
Jasper; at no charge to anyone. Helping.to apply Christian principles to our every
day living, Florida state certified. Info: 386-792-2603.
Morningside Nature Center Living History Farm, Gainesville Living His-
tory Days; Barnyard Buddies; Discover and Do; Who's Who in the Woods; A Night
at the Owlery; Info: 352-334-2170, www.natureoperations.org.
NFCC Lady Sentinels basketball Home games are played in Colin Kelly
Gym on the Madison campus. Admission is free. Info/schedule:
http://www.nfcc.edu/sports/home.html.
NFCC offers ed2go on-line courses in many different subject areas; instruc-
tor-led, affordable; informative; convenient and highly interactive; requires Inter-
net access, e-mail and Netscape Navigator or Microsoft Internet Explorer; course
fees vary; Info: Suzie Godfrey, 850-973-9453, communityed@nfcc.edu,
www.ed2go.com/nfec.
NFCC TABE,(Test of Adult Basic Education) every Monday at 6 p.m. and
every Tuesday at 1:30 p.m.; NFCC Technical Center, Madison campus; Photo ID;
Info/Pre-registration: 850-973-9451. i
Ncorptthu:i a un TIh ut n3l.:1 ; 3 rn

anc I ,,., p NFCC Technial culei.
Bldg. 13; Madison campus; registration
required 24 hours before testing; $10
fee; Info/pre-registration: 850-973-
1612.
NFCC E,-Spotlight provides, weekly
information Events,, current college
,sews and dcIpe',m=.I.itl ord directly
to your ee-1.,l .dde. fir.:, 350-973-
1613, Kim Scarboro,.
scarborok@nfcc.cc.
Narconon Arrowhead Drug addic-
tion can leave an individiti or... Ar,d
friends feeling .helpless arnd :.,r ,:, .:.,-
trol. Narconon offers free counseling,
assessments and referrals to rehlabilita-
tion centers nationwide Info: toll-free,
800-468-6933, www.stopaddictiori.com.
North Florida Workforge Develop-
ment strives to help dislocated work-
ers and other jobseekers find employ-
ment in a prompt manner; office hours at
One-Stop Centers in Hamilton: 386-


792-1229, Jefferson: 850-342-3338, Lafayette: 386-294-1055, Madison: 850-973-
9675, Suwannee: 386-364-7952 and Taylor: 850-584-7604; 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-
Friday and alternate Saturdays, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Old Time Gospel Memorial Jamboree-first Friday, 6:30 p.m., in Lee Worship
Center, 398 Magnolia Drive, Lee; free Gospel concert; open mike; everyone is in-
vited, bring a covered dish'and bring a friend; door prize; free will offering and do-
nations taken to benefit the roof building fund and expenses of the sing; groups,
singers and pickers, if you want to perform or for more information, contact Allen
and Brenda McCormick, 850-971-4135, after 6 p.m.
Operation Cleansweep FDACS and FDEP sponsor Operation Cleansweep to
collect and safely dispose of pesticides in Florida; Cost: Free; Info: toll-free 877-
851-5285, www.dep.state.fl.us/waste/categories/cleansweep-pesticides/ or local
Household Hazardous Waste program, www.earth911.
Parents of ADD and ADHD Children support group; Info: Lea-Anne Elaine,
386-362-7339.
Pregnancy Crisis Center Two locations: 112 Piedmont St., Live Oak, and 227
SW Columbia Ave., Lake City are open Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; offer
confidential counseling, free pregnancy tests, clothes for expectant mothers and in-
fants; referrals to pro-life,doctors; groups and churches may sponsor baby showers
with donation of the gifts to the center; needed: maternity clothes and hangers;
Info: 386-330-2229, 386-755-0058 or toll-free 800-696-4580.
Prescription Assistance patients who need help paying for their prescription
medicines should call Partnership for Prescription Assistance, toll-free 800-477-
2669, www.pparx.org
Prescription drugs nationwide free medication program eligibility based
on three qualifications: doctor must assist in application process, no prescription
drug coverage and earn less than $2,000 per month; Lawson Healthcare Founda-
tion, a non-profit public benefit organization; Info: Executive Director Stephanie
Tullis, toll-free 888-380-MEDS (6337), ext. 205 during normal business hours or
access the Foundation's new Web site at www.A2ZMedline.com.
Regional Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Coalition serving Suwanniee,
Lafayette, Hamilton, Madison, Jefferson and Taylor counties; meets quarterly;
Info: Diana King, 850-342-0170, ext. 220.
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park The Suwannee River Bluegrass Asso-
ciation every Saturday night; 6 p.m.; bluegrass jam; Pickin' Shed; except during
main festival events; Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park,.US 129 North, Live Oak;
potluck dinner third Saturday; Info: 386-364-1683.
Sun Country Jamboree second Saturday of each month at Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park, US 129 North, Live Oak; Info/tickets: 386-364-1683.
Sieph, n Fster State Culture Center State Park, White Springs first Satur-
d.. _-r kacl-r Coffeehouse, 7-9 p.m., auditorium; open stage night with songs, sto-
ries, yodeling, music and much more. Coffee and desserts available for sale. Free
admission; Located on US 41, three miles from 1-75 and nine miles from 1-10.
Info/schedule of events: 386-397-4331, www.FloridaStateParlks.org/stephenfoster/
Suwannee County Historical Museum free admission, open from 9 a.m.-3
p.m., Monday-Friday, US 129 North, Live Oak. Info: 386-362-1776.
Suwannee River Regional Library Donations of greeting cards needed -
Suwannee River Regional Library, 9828 US 129 South, Live Oak will be the drop-
off site for donations of used all-occasion cards. The cards will be picked up by An-
abelle Burhnam for the purpose of making bookmarks for the library. Info: 386-
362-2317.
Substance abuse prevention-Suwannee County-Youth can L.I ,- .:1 .:..' Info:
Steven L. Schneitman Jr., Regional Tobacco Prevention Coordinator, Lafayette
County Health Department, P.O. Box 1806, Mayo, FL, 32066, Office: 386-294-
1321, ext. 233, Cell: 386-562-2152, Steven_Schneitman@doh.state.fl.us; Tony
Greenberg, Suwannee High School, 1314 Pine Ave., Live Oak, FL 32064, 386-364-
2639; Hal Chaffee, Suwannee County Health ,Department, P.O. Box 6030, Live
Oak, FL 32064, 386-362-2708, ext. 258, Hal_Chaffee@doh.state.fl.us; and Mary
Jordan Taylor, Youth Advocacy Partnershipi 200 Marymac St., Live Oak, FL
.32064.
Suwannee Valley Builders Association (SVBA) a non profit.organization, is
a group of approximately 80 local citizens dedicated to building a stronger com-
munity, whose members volunteer their time.with active involvement with associ-
ate sponsorships of worthwhile community activities and associate members of the
Council for Progress 'and Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce. SVBA donates.
two academic scholarships each year, donates Christmas gift/food baskets each
year and sponsor of the children's playhouse raffle at Christmas. Featured speakers
from local businesses and a catered -dinner are the highlights of the evening at
monthly meetings. The general public is invited to attend and become members.
Donations of $5 a person are,accepted at the door to help cover catering expenses.
For more info on joining the organization, contact Ronnie Poole, 386-362-4539.
Taylor County Jamboree, Perry times and dates vary for monthly events held
ji O ld ..jl.-t. lUo l tl, Fl nq t r l. Pei h C ,ii ., -, ...A r ,. lr .. the
,I i .:.[ iiute skr t, i ...t:-'... .:' r,:i:';,no admission fee; tickets
d ..irJ.:....rpr cs suppdr'iheb ..:I.i r- .:.r.: ,r, .-l.'ome; Infd:z850-578-2484.
%olunie-r driver .fjcti training in'iructor needed -AARP Driver Safety in-
structors needed in this area, call Anne George, trainer, 386-752-9061.
Volunteers needed The American Cancer Society's Road to Recovery Pro-
gram in Suwannee County is stepping up efforts to recruit both drivers and pa-
tients-. This vital patient service program is in need of volunteers who are willing
to drive patients to and from their cancer appointments. To volunteer as a driver or
to request a ride, please call this toll-free number and ask to be connected to the
Road To Recovery Program in your local area: 800-ACS-2345 (800-227-2345).
Volunteers needed Disaster Animal Response Team (DART) is looking for
help. Volunteers are needed to help out with animals during hurricanes and all nat-
ural disasters. DART meets the first Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at Companion Animal
'Hospital, 605 N. Houston Street, Live Oak. Volunteers are especially needed to
help man pet-friendly shelters right here in Suwannee County. If you'd like to help
out or be put on the list of volunteers, call 386-208-0072, or come to the monthly
meeting. DART helps out with pets, livestock, horses, birds and all animals during
natural disasters.
Volunteers needed in Lafayette County-Lafayette Health Care Center in Mayo
is seeking volunteers to, assist with residents in its living facility. Volunteers offer
0n-,.i..r, l ,.r'r..:. j. ._.. ........., involvement that can truly touch lives. Duties
c:r. icclid. I.elp', iii m .: i .e, of daily living, sitting with a resident, provid-
ing reassurance or.companionship for residents and families and just being an at-
*tentive listener and friend. Info: Louise Johnson, activities director, 386-294-3300.









NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006, PAGE 9C


gift ideas for the




?do-it-yourselfer


Easily find gifts for the woodworking professional or hobbyist.


(MS) Everyone loves a
great gift and while the hol-
iday season is the obvious
time for gift-giving, there
are plenty of ideas out there
you can surprise that friend
or family member who loves
getting handy no matter
what the occasion.
For the budding or expert
craftsman you. know, build-
ing a gift around his or her
hobby will be appreciated
that much more. Here are
some ideas to get you start-
ed, courtesy of Woodcraft.
1. Pint-sized helper. Per-
haps you know a child who
just loves getting involved
in home-improvement pro-
jects watching dad fix the
sink or mom renovate a
room. Encourage. that bud-
ding curiosity by giving a
My First Project tool set
and project kit from Wood-
craft. Your resident young
apprentice will love the
down-sized versions of
adult tools, such as a ham-
mer, screwdriver, Phillips
screwdriver, tape measure,
and an 8" square. Addition-
ally, My First Project offers
a selection of easy-to-con-
struct, eco-friendly project
kits that kids love to build,
like birdhouses, butterfly
houses or a toolbox.
2. Hobby Enthusiast. The
popularity of woodworking
continues to grow. For those
you know who love passing
the hours working 'their
craft, help them along by
creating a gift basket with
everything they'll need. For
example, include instruc-
tions for building a sturdy,
yet decorative Adirondack
patio chair, and a gift card
for woodworking classes
and materials for use at your
local Woodcraft store.
3. Reliable storage. What
would the handyman be
without his tools? To get a
job done right, he has to use
the right tools and maintain
them. Make sure his pre-
cious equipment is well pro-
tected with an item like the
Gerstner Tool Box. This
moisture-free chest has 10
drawers for storage of a va-
riety of items. The box is
designed in classic Ameri-
can style, and is constructed
of Red Oak with tongue and
groove joinery that insures
strength and durability.
4. Get organized and
stocked. Create a work
space any tinkerer, do-it-
yourselfer or serious crafts-
man is sure to enjoy. There
are plenty of retail organiza-
tional systems available that
can quickly turn a cluttered
area in a garage or basement
into a dream work area.
Stock the work space with
the requisite power tools,
such as a pneumatic nailer
and air compressor, power
drill, electric sander, jig saw
and multi-tools, such as the
Fein MultiMaster, which
uses a broad assortment of
accessory blades to handle
sanding, scraping and hun-
dreds of previously "manu-


al" tasks.
These are just a few of the
hundred gift ideas to keep
do-it-yourselfers busy
throughout the season. For
more products and inspira-
tion, contact the Woodcraft
store nearest you, visit
www.woodcraft.com or call
(800) 535-4482.


Personal care a growing passion


(MS) The spa industry
is a booming one. Over the
last three years, visits to spas
have increased by 16 percent.
More than half of the men
and women visiting spas to
engage in facials, manicures,
pedicures, massages and
restorative baths do so for re-
laxation purposes, say reports
by Intelligent Spas. What's
more, many spa visitors want
to recreate the services and
relaxation values of spa visits
in the comfort of home.
Building upon this idea,
gifts involving personal care
can appeal to many on your
holiday shopping list. Plus,
gifts of this type can be put
together to meet a variety of
interests and budgets. Here
are a few ideas:
Pampered pedicures. Feet
take the brunt of daily activi-
ty. That's why routine pedi-
cures can keep them in top
shape and provide comfort.
Pedicures 'can be done at
home with a few supplies,
easily packaged into a gift
basket. Fill a gift basket with
nail clippers, cuticle pushers,
cotton balls and swaps, nail
polish remover, moisturizing
foot lotion, warm fuzzy
socks, as well as a Mi-
croplane Foot File. The Mi-
croplane Foot File has been
described as a "must have"
foot-care product by users


around the globe. The prod-
uct features 95 tiny files that
create a bi-directional exfoli-
ating system that quickly and
safely removes dry or cal-
lused skin. The end-result is
baby soft, smooth, beautiful
feet. For a set that is already
,prepackaged, making gift-
giving a snap, try the Mi-
croplane Essentials Gift
Set, featuring moisturizing
cream, spa socks, and the
patented Microplane Foot
File.
At-home facial. There are
many products sold at area
department stores and even
drug stores that offer the con-
venience and lower price of a
facial at home. From exfoliat-
ing facial scrubs to mecha-
nized devices that slough off
the signs of aging, you can
find items to cater to your gift
recipient. Complete the pack-.
age with a CD of relaxing
music, gentle cotton cleans-
ing: pads and makeup -re-
mover.
Merry. massages. Profes-
sional spa employees are cer-
tified in massage therapy and,
make easy work of loosening
up muscles and melting away
stress and tension. However,
similar results can be
achieved at home with a few
handy items. For massage-
lovers, recreate the spa expe-
rience with a gift of a luxe


I.:


Treat someone special to the gift of pampered feet. This foot file
is just one of the items packaged in this convenient gift set. *


robe, candles, scented (or un-
scented depending upon sen-
siti% ity) massage oil, and a
book of massage basics. If
you're gifting a romantic
partner, include a certificate
for your massage services.
A pampered day out.
Treat a friend or family mem-.
ber to a day out by purchas-
ing a gift card to his or her fa-
vorite spa or personal-care
salon. A simple massage or
pedicure "on you" will be ap-


preciattd. When offering
pedicure gifts, a complemen-
tary present is a Microplane
Foot File, which is more gen-
tle and safe than straight-ra-
zor callus shavers, and more
sanitary than the pedicure
tools used on all of the sa-
lon's clientele.
For more gift ideas and in-
formation about Mi-
croplane Foot Files in
Canada, visit www.mi-
croplaneintl.com.


IOF CGHVROLMTrI ,
IINWA00WISTr,1/2MIMPTMINE70ILAK0n
S386-752-6933 I

Afterallrebates,wwithP740e+Beacosin 8 m64 nTwi ; 9'.fl, l ag WAC

0I I'TIME'..






SYear End Sales Event

Test Drive. Save. Go.

2006 MAZDA 6
-,


sI r sinni OON SALSMORS:MON.-FRI. 9AM-7 PM:
m V f "^SS rSAT.9.:00 AM-6PM i

All prices after $5,800 due at lease inception, 24 month lease, 12,000 miles per year, plus tax, t










PAGE 10C, NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Gray Daniels wins the 28th Colgate


Country Showdown Florida State Final


Submitted

After a tough round of com-
petition, the fifth generation
Floridian, Gray Daniels walked
away from the 25th Annual
Colgate Country Showdown
Florida State Final with the
state title and $1,000 in prize
money. The Greater Jack-
sonville Fair in Jacksonville
showcased twelve acts who
had won a local contest spon-
sored by radio stations through-
out Florida enabling each to
perform at the state level com-
petition of America's largest
country music talent search.
WWKA of Orlando spon-
sored the local competition
where Daniels won prior to Sat-
urday's state level triumph. He
moved to Nashville two years
ago to pursue a career in the.
music industry and has met
with Capitol, Universal South
and RCA. Although the oppor-
tunity has arisen for artists to
record his songs. Daniels says,
"I'm.not in it for the money so I
have not let some artists use my
songs, because they are very
close to,my heart.' Iwrite from
my heart." Currently, he fronts
and. writes for a band called
B u c kl e d o w n
www.myspace.com/buckle-
dowinmusic and plays at \enues
in Nashville such as Lyrix. The
singer/songwriter/lead guitar
player has a passion for. stage
and producing other artists as
well, such as St. James, Kelly
Trudell and various bands in
Florida. Daniels' believes his
high-energy stage show, sells
vhat he does with "Keith Urban,
meets Garth Brooks" intensity.
With a rock and country back-
ground. Daniels spends a lot of
time trying to figure out how to
appeal to both genres '
In Saturday's competition,
Daniels entertained the crowd


with his performance of two
original songs Knockin' Boots
and Untouched.
Other acts listed with their
representing radio station are -
Crystal Miller WXBM Pace;
Lisa Hartley Hill, WIYD Palat-
ka; Jesse Lee WKIS Miami,;
Baby Girl WAIB Tallahassee;
Caitlyn Eadie WWGR.Ft. My-
ers; Adam Sanders WQHL
Live Oak; Kalee Coyle WZZS
Zolfo Springs; Toria Summers
WAVW,; Amy Maree .WQIK
Jacksonville; Matt Bailey
WROO Jacksonville and Don-
ny Barthelemy & The Fast Gun
Band WCTQ Sarasota.
Daniels will compete in the


Southeast Regional at the Lee
Auditorium in Thomast'on,
Georgia on Nov. 18 to deter-
mine if he will advance to the
National Final. The five region-
al winners from across the
country will receive an all ex-
pense-paid trip to the National
Final to compete for $100,000
and the coveted national title of
Best New Act in Country Mu-
sic. The National Final will be
televised nationally in March
andApril 2007.
Throughout all four levels -
local, state, regional and nation-
al of competition a uniform
judging system is used. The 1-
10 point scoring system is used


for the following categories:
Marketability in Country Mu-
sic, Vocal/Instrumental Ability,
Originality of Performance;
Stage Presence/Charisma and
Talent with bonus points for
song writing.
Colgate-Palmolive is a lead-
ing global consumer-products
company tightly focused on
Oral Care, Personal Care,
Household Surface Care, Fabric
Care and Pet Nutrition. In the
U.S., Colgate sells its quality
products under such nationally
recognized brand names as Col-
gate, Palmolive, Mennen, Ajax,
Irish Spring, Softsoap, Murphy
Oil Soap, Ultra Brite and Fab.


i
Gray Daniels


SPoole Realty, Inc.
123 E. Howard Street Live Oak, FL 32064
' Monday Friday 8:00AM 5:30PM
P Saturday 9:00AM 3:OOPM
Sunday by Appointment


PHONE: 386-462-4539
TOLL FREE: 1-800-557-7478
(EMAIL: info@poolereolty.com )


S103 ACRES..... Planted Pines & hardvoods over 2600 eet of county road
frontage and only '. mile off pased road. Lots of wildlife, lots of privacy and
a lot for the monc. $875.000. Call Kellie Shirah for more details:
386.208-3847. MLS# 5371)3.
40 AC RES OF PINES. $3410,000.00 MLSf55154 24th Road Live Oak, FL
Call Anna Kent Handy i386) 208-5877
OAKS OF PENNINGTON- The perfect site for your future equestrian
needs. Restricted to homes only and landscaping is courtesy of mother
. nature. Riding trails throughout, commons barn, 8+ acre pond, picmc areas
and more $86.90l1. Call Ronnie Poole for more information 362-4539.
NI MLS#54905.
INVESTORS LOOK!! It', hard to find land prices at this price, 30 acres
high & dry. Located on the corner of two graded roads. Property has planted
pines approximately 8 to 10 \ears old. Some lovely old oaks also share the
space. You can't buy property this cheap in Florida anymore. Only 9,750
per acre. Call Ric Donovan for details at
386-590-1298. iMLSr-9043
A NICE 10 AC RE TR-\CT.... with hardwoods. Property has paved road
frontage and is convenient to Branford. Great place to build your new home
or manufactured home No re'lrictions $129,500. Call Kethe Shirah at
386-208-3847. MLSu54834.
A HUNTER'S DRIAM- This- 4l acre parcel planted in pines is home to
deer, turkeyvs, and -ild hogs. C R 255 not far from the Suwannee River and
I1-10. Great place for your new home or your hunting camp! $300,000 Call
Nelda Hatcher at 386-o88-8067. NLS#528"3


* BEAUTIFUL 3/2.5 spacious recent renovated split floor plan home.
Recently replaced all flooring, light fixtures, ceiling fans, commodes, stove,
built-in microwave. All wall & ceiling hase been freshly painted. lacuzzi
hot tub on back covered patio. Roof replaced in 2005. Neighborhood is
comnenient to Live Oak. Home doesn't look its age! $229,000 00 MNSt55179
I 389 86th Terrace, Live Oak, FL Call Anita Kent Handy 13861 208-5877.
* BEAUTIF UL 3'2 brick home with man. high quality extras. Built in
2004/2005 and located on 19 acres. Most of the property is in improved
hayfields with remainder in wvoods and pond. A must see home and farm.
lan\ features. $420.000. Call Barr) Baker at 386-647-6674 for more
information. NMLs500148
*ONE.OF A KIND. This 43 home is nesdtdon 10acres. You'll adore the
brick fireplace & built in bookcase' in the living room. Kitctlen is any
woman's dream &8 a massive barn. With all these amenities it's a true value.
Onl. $424.500 Call Carol) n Spilatore. 208 4828 MLSf52735
* hVONDERFUL L9iLq HOMESTEAD- 40 acres for 'ale for only $365,000.
20 acres wooded, 20 acit, in ha% Propert ha, a 24'x40' barn with a 12'x40
loft. Has oak, pine' and fruit trees. AMso has a 4" well, 2 septic systems and
electric on site. Call Nelda Hatcher for detail, at 386 688-8067. MLS#53736
* 19 AC RES- PropertM ha- small pines up front and large Oaks in the back.
Owner will divide it desired. $213.400. Call Poole Realty at 362-4539
* THIS 30 AC RE TRACT is zoned multi-famil.. City water available, paved
road frontage. Great investmenl! i1,2"5,00u Call Ronnie Poole at
386-362-4539. iMLS'4-388


JOi:'-, F


SUWANNEE
LANDING


SLi


Exclusive Gated Airpark Community
coming soon to Live Oak. Located I mile west of town. This is a
first of it's kind luxury gated development. One and I 2 acre lots
in an exclusivegated coniinunity. More details to come.
Take CR136 iNewbeni Road I W'est approvimatcly I mile to
property on right, located directly across from Saimnahli Plainttion.
^L. .( 1 Please call for oricing details )..


New unique neighborhood, city water &-seiwer
available with underground utilities.
11 lots on paved road. Fake SR51 S to subdivision on right.
Lots starting at:
$42,500 ,,er lot-


Pjt ICE oni.




,Reseachers led by Dr. 'Dennis
-..MKenn9: from -'Albany. Medical
-,cerA anb4 rY. eently
presented their stWdy at the Re-
segach F r ."dUUne the anitu-

Cblleg 6.niemrgehcy Physi-
.-tia i ^A ) i e N,........
*'1asi.m ergency.4 ptes-- pat. n't
-ad tisiors r agreed 2to ra ...
ba th clphis wt4

s horreof nibet


Sgecy when.i emer-
ge'cy .e artment '-
staff explanl why it
is important and. i ow .
tb'dQ it
". 178 people vit-.
S -in. uan. emerged cy
tinmeitmwiho-dad cellt hofnes with them 'and li e
tD an education sessiob, 129 agreed to have ans eier-
igefic cofitact designated. on' their phones. using. the
acrono mICE..Of those 1t29people, 58.did it .themseoveai;,
.36 had.a fainily member do it, and.35 allowed hospital'
Ssiaff to dorit. for-hem. 'Reearchers explained- how im-.
pplrkat i is foi phy siciadstb be able-tocontactafamil',:
meinber"ot friend ~'hen an emergency patient is unable
to eomminicpte tiat information.. ...
.We. tohen ar struggling. -to teach family members
when.a patient cannot speak .to us, and the first place we
might look.is a:.cell.phionDesaid'Dr. McKenna. 'Afam-r -
i' iembdr or 'ien d is: bne of our best resources for.'
earning about the patient's medical history. Our'study
A.Wos. 4t11iat people.are -rety. willing to program their
:ones as long as.someone tells them why and how to do
..it..or even.does it. for them. ,
eA f Nna said. ergency phyesiciantsso e-
es-.hes hoippQrities to ediscate- patients and their
atnies Whle A Are wXiting in a emergency departed

.Once.a visitor is in the emergency department, we
c..ani ake'the most: of his or her time by teaching -some-
''thfig vyp4ble-' said Dr. McKenna. "In the futire,. pa-.
tiedjr 'wt.r ICECpedn.their cell phone may help us give
ibtah4 brpoan s ab] trs at.ent in a timely fashion.4 :
icis on. itsApliy.This week in,
w vOrldris a.al at a-EP's annual Scientific Assem-
-"riWh emrgi y p.fthyiicians fiom the around the..
a., nations .gather to share research '
e.cpt. "Te' 6%eeiglpments in emergency. care and
:hate resn teirg:,400 posler piesdn stations were
S e. t or .-' ., g ore-informafion aboutth.e re-.:-
"Act vsxt Wwwv:acep.brg.
I 'A :' 'tnal ,wddical specialty society repre--.
,rg, i c6y-,mediice with fiore than .25,000
-iit FbACiPis coinmiwted to advancing emergency
ic tollnning education, research and.public
s p i eadquarterd dipDallas, Texas, ACEP has 53'
,ersrepresentipg each state, as well as Puerto Rico
a: he, DiwIrict- of Columbia. A. Government Services.
Ihiaptbr..reiresents emergency physicians employed by
enlitary banches and.other government agencies.
.y Ei a. ng 'a nMedical specialty society repre-
itng rnerg5ncy medicine with. more 'than. 251000
-tfbers.- ACEP is committed to advancing emergency
1 choe la iomg education, research and,publiy -
e i'wiat iiHeadiattered in Dallas. Texas, ACEP has 53
c` pters representing each-state, as well as Puerto Rico
it. the"Dbj '6Lof columbia. A.Govern ent Services.,
Chapter representk emergency physicians employed by
.-jlitaryqb-snches.Apd othet government agencies.
.2.


ONE STROKE.

PAINTING CLASSES
Since no local stores carry any Donna Dewvberry
supplies, books, brushes, kits, etc, or Plaid Paint
Supplies anymore, you can now call me. I have
supplies on hand or' will be glad to special
order anything for you. Prices
will be comparable or
c4 cheaper than any local
store was. I will also be
.,, starting new classes right
after Jan 1, 2007. Call me
for more info. Carolyn
"Spilatore 386-208-4828



Chelation Therapy

Now available in North Central Florida!


A proven, non-surgical treatment for
clogged arteries and other chronic
diseases.

Call for an appointment to start your
sessions. Lab work and evaluation may be
done during first treatment visit.




Three Rivers Medical
Branford, FL
(386) 935-1607 314977-F


1/2 acre lots, in a pav ed road subdivision, restricted to
site built homes. Several lots to choose from.
Take SR51 1.5 miles from the Round-A-Bout tol29th Rd.
turn right, see Carriage Place entrance Lots starting at:
onilleft. .._5


I acre lots, on paved road. Subdivision is located
close to town.
Several lots to choose from. Take SR 51 to Old Sugar Mill
Entrance turn right, go to 98th Street, see newly paved roads.
... ... 500 o. n ,., ...... -.


lr@Isle]







NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006, PAGE 11C


Give the Gift of


v_ Syndica te con ent


Available from Commercial NewsRrovidersd


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PAGE 12C, NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Top 5 kitchen tools for budding chefs


This kitchen tool makes a "grate" gift foi
those who love cooking.
(MS) The right tools make fast
work of any project, from a home-im-
provement idea to preparing a holiday
feast for the family. Make sure the
loved ones on your gift list who love
to cook are equipped with the tools
and gadgets the professionals use. The
right kitchen tools help to reduce meal
prep times making cooking more en-
joyable and effortless.
So what do cooking experts recom-
mend? These .five tools are must-
haves for any kitchen.
1. Quality knife set. A good deal of
food preparation requires, chopping,
slicing and paring all achieved by
knives. Dull or poor-quality knives
cannot only make cutting harder, they
can make it more dangerous. Sharp
knives sail through food more easily
and in turn, safely. If your budget


does not allow for a top-of-the-line
complete cutlery collection, offer
the gift of one quality knife that can
multi-task, such as a santoku. A san-
toku is a general-purpose chef's
knife originating in Japan. Its un-
shouldered blade, which is typically
between five and eight inches long,
has a flat edge and a dull back which
curves down near the point to a tip
angle of around 60 degrees. It is
good for slicing, dicing and minc-
ing.
2. Graters. From grating hard and
soft cheeses to mincing garlic to
zesting citrus fruits, graters are mul-
ti-function workhorses in the
kitchen. There are styles for many
tasks, but not all graters are the
same. In general, most graters are
manufactured by punching or
stamping holes into flat or curved
stainless steel. The results are not
very sharp edges that rip and tear
food as they grate. Microplane es-
tablished its dominant position in
the market through its exclusive,
patent-protected manufacturing
process that engineers its grater
edges into extremely sharp cutting
surfaces that simply shave the food
with little effort. The company is
r recognized among professional
chefs and at-home-cooks alike as
the first choice in food grating tools.
For a particularly versatile gift. op-
tion, select the Microplane
Zester/Rotary Grater Gift Set. which
comes in two colors, including the
very festive holiday red and the tradi-
tional black.
3. Meat thermometer. Safety should
be a priority in the kitchen, which in-
cludes making sure foods are cooked
to the correct temperature so that they'
are free of harmful microorganisms. A
meat thermometer will tell exactly
that, and ensure roasts, poultry and
other cuts are to the temperature and
wellness
preferred. Digital models have an
easy-read display, but the standard
dial thermometers are just as effec-
tive.
4. Silicone spatula., Whether flip-
ping flapjacks or omelets, spatulas are


versatile tools. However, many people
bum or melt spatulas by using them
with very hot foods. Silicone spatulas
can withstand
heat in upwards
of 500 F, and
won't chip, crack
or melt. Stock up
on a variety of.
sizes offering ,
broad spatula sur-
faces for turning
larger items such
as cakes or
cr8pes. These can
be found in a vir- Novemt
tual rainbow of
colors at specialty Spirtt
kitchen retailers.
Try tying a pow-
der blue spatula to
the outside of a
gift wrapped in
winter wonder-
land paper for that
added special
touch.
5. Easy-use can
opener. Easy-use
can opener. Why
let gift recipients
continue to wres-
tle with-old-fash-
ioned" can open-
ers? There are so
many new" and in-,
novative models
out there you can
have a field day' T)iE f
browsing through
them all. There 540
are electric mod-
els that whiz
through lids, but
perhaps the best
option is openers
that slice through
the upper sides of
the can. Many va-.
rieties offer the 4
safety of produc-
ing 'no. sharp
edges when cut-
ting.
Equipping the
cooks in your life


with top kitchen tools can be an excit-
ing and thoughtful venture. Plus, you
may be offered the added benefit of a


home-cooked meal as a thank-you for
your perfect gift. For more gift ideas,
visit www.microplaneintl.com.


The Cmptnyb rFt PcrtfenIM ei;7 Anti*9 f


)LD TYME




SPELLINGG

er 24, 2006 Live Oak, Florida 7:00 p.m.
of the Suwannee Music Park- Music Hall


S

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1'- EUU""~- -


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
GOLD KIST, INC

HACCP Coordinator
For Live Oak location. Prefer BS degree in Food Science or a related field,
with 2 to 5 year HACCP or equivalent quality assurance experience
preferable in a foods industry. Effective technical reading and writing skills,
and interpersonal communication and oral presentation skills needed. Good-
math and analytical skills. Ability to use word processing, spreadsheet and
similar computer programs. Thorough working knowledge of USDA food
safety regulations (pertaining to HACCP / SSOP I Labeling / Nutrition / etc.)
and auditing preferred. Must be able to perform the essential functions of the
job with or without accommodations.

Fringe benefit program includes health insurance, life insurance, 401-k,
paid vacations, 9 paid holidays, credit union and other.
Applications available on site 9 4
Send resume to
HR Manager
GOLD KIST, INC
P.O. Box 1000
LIVE OAK, FLORIDA 32064
PH. 1-386-208-0225

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
EOE-AA-M-F-V-D
Applications also available at
EMPLOYMENT CONNECTIONS Locations
313583-FJ


iVYI~1I~II~PY










NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006, PAGE 13C






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NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006, PAGE 15C


Crafty holiday idea a fun project for families


w ---


J1 I




This decorative holiday project is a cinch to make because there's no sewing
involved. Just adhere the felt and fabric (above) to create finished calendar
(right).

(MS) The holidays serve as the per- r
fect time to roll up your slee% es and enjoysired pattern is achiex
the adhesive along bac
a craft project with a loved one. This No- the adhesive along ba
Sew Advent Calendar is a fun project for a buddies and press fir
n hot close off top of po
parent or grandparent to make with a
child. Strong, flexible Amazing GOOP 5. Fold top of calen
Craft Adhesive and a fe\v other inexpen- to assemble hanger. Fo
of cream felt in half
sive materials will make an afternoon of
fun and a memory that will.
last forever. The adhesie .. .
works well on fabric and it
dries to a flexible, rubbery
finish that'won't crack or
break. The snip tip makes it
easy to apply thin beads of E, .. 'i'..
glue where you need them.
Milk and cookies are rec- S
ommended while admiring
your handiwork.

NO-SEW ADVENT
-CALENDAR

Materials Checklist:
Amazing GOOP,,
Craft Adhesive wSnip Tip
(1 yd.) Cream-Col-
ored Felt
(1 (ld.) Red-Colored "


-ofheart border. Apply adhesive to each end of hanger and "cool" tip! Use an ice cube for easy, even
Press' firmlyvtoifelt.r-presfirply onto center of back of calen- spreadingef-the adhe-sve.) Sprinkle glitter
Repeat this step at dar. Fold calendar back over.- over the layer of adhesive.
bottom edge of 6. Remove Amazing GOOP Craft Ad- Allow your beautiful holiday project to
cream felt. hesive's snip tip and apply a very thin lay- dry 72 hours before using advent calendar.
3. Using ruler, er of the glue to. snowflakes, center of For. more information, contact (800)
position 25 red hearts and base of various snow buddies, 767-4667 ..,' or visit
pockets onto cream working on just a few at a time. (Here's a xvww.eclecticproducis.com.
felt -5,across and
5 down, allowing'-
approximately 1/2" EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
space from edges
of cream fabric, GOLD KIST, INC
heart border and in

pocket. Place a Staff Accountant
straight pin For new Live Oak location. Work with accounting manager to produce weekly

each pocket to hold and monthly financial statements to assist management. Assists in
in place. Pull pock- preparation of journal entries. Prepares schedules for balancing fixed assets,
et up. To backside leases, and capital expenditures.
of pocket, apply a 4-year college Accounting degree preferred. Will consider 2 5 years
bead of Craft adhe- combination proven experience and education as an accountant producing
sive along each journal entries, monthly statements, preparing schedules and spreadsheets.
side and bottom. Must have good people skills, and the ability to work in a team. Supervisory
Flip pocket back experience a plus. Computer skills to include Microsoft Office.
over and press
firmly to cream Fringe benefit program includes health insurance, life insurance, 401-k,
eaclt.h Repeat for paid vacations, 9 paid holidays, credit union and other.

remove pins. *Do Applications available on site 9 4
not glue top of Send resume to
pockets closed. HR Manager
4. Position oneManager
snow buddy and GOLD KIST, INC
randomly place a P.O. Box 1000
snowflake onto LIVE OAK, FLORIDA 32064
pockets. Once de-


ed, apply a bead of
side edges of snow
nly to pockets. *Do
ckets.
dar over just enough
ild the 1" x 5 piece
and in a "" shape.


PH. 1-O386-ZU-UO25

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
EOE-AA-M-F-V-D
Applications also available at
EMPLOYMENT CONNECTIONS Locations
liL ''''


(2) 3/16" Wood
Dowels
(1 panel) 'Snow
Buddies' Print Fabric (or
other holiday\ theme)'
(0.5 oz.) 'White
Glitter-
Other Supplies:
Straight-Edge Ruler, Pencil.
Pinking Shears, Straight
Pins
Preparation:
Note: If fabric needs iron-
ing,. do this prior to assem-
bly. Using:ruler and pinking
shears: Cut cream felt to
28'? x 40". From remaining
cream felt, cut a l"1x 5"
piece to be used as a hanger.
Next, cut red 'felt to (25?
5"x 5" squares to be used as
pockets. From 'Snow Bud-
dies' fabric, cut out 125)
snow buddies, the (2) heart
borders to 28" w and ap-
proximately (9) indiN ddual
snowflakes.
Assemble:
Always read complete di-
rections on Amazing
GOOP Craft Adhesi e
packaging before using
1. Using snip tip, apply a
bead of adhesive along top
edge of cream felt. Position
dowel just below the glue
line. Fold cream felt o er
dowel, about an inch, and
press firmly to felt. Use
straight pins to hold felt to-
gether until dry: Then, ap-
ply a dab of adhesive to
each end of folded felt and
press firmly together. Re-
peat this step at bottom
edge of cream felt. Turn
cream felt over to front
side.
2. On backside of 'heart
border, apply a bead of ad-
hesive along, top edge and
bottom edge. Position heart
border about 3/16"' (just be-
low dowel) from top edge
of cream felt. Apply a bead
of the adhesive at each end








PAGE 16C, NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS



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Section D
Nov. 22-23, 2006
386-362 1734
.... 800-525-4182
INCREASE YOUR NEVER KNOW NEED A RIDE?


ON WHAT YOU'LL
THE DISCOVER
NIOVE? General Merchandise
Real Estates Listings Employment Opportunities and Services Car, Trucks and Motorcycles

To place your ad in the Classified Marketplace, call Tami at 386-362-1734 today!
L Ujvv: 1' Lx I .. am -r L~


In 2005 Properties, Brokers &

Agents more than double'

But in 2006 were back to nor

So what do all these Extra Agents do no
They make it twice as hard 'to find the right ,

At J.W. Hill & Assopiates rea tale c

don't Lirprise 1 *
Our 20 es are


Before y

ask these
., How loni
ow mar&


w ? rveragj
iuagesc
analysis s


nines na
Beautiful 4-5 acre Io
Street) Paved Street
Minutes to Fam
C
Prices: $65,


ce Suoaivision Jackson Heights bubDaivision
Dts on Mitchell Road (76th Beautiful 4-5 acre lots on Hughes Road (129th
. Restricted to homes pnly. Road) Located just minutes from Live Oak.
ous Suwannee River Paved Street. Restricted to homes only.
)wner/Fin $995 dn, 20 yrs 11.5%
031 -$80,772 Payments: $682.90-$850.77

Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc. Realtor
Owner/Broker
ps 1-800-805-7566 1-800-771-5110
30aa8366.F


annsact i~ you closely'
iexperie ou bring to the table?
Pons does ur company belong to?
associates meet stricter standards.


lent has an advance degree, speaks two
knows advanced real estate investment
iniques AND we are partners with the
Pierid.
Commercial
Brokers
Ae*-or


AdIlilIIWIUiKl. "Real Estate.Done Right",
J.W. HILL 1105 HOWARD ST. W., UVE OAK
2 & ASSOCIATES
SEstare Broker & 3624300 -
iniorralor,-.ri a ;o or, ue y -A ML 3ali as (ro Floridd AUjton of rse l or ar Unrersif o Florla ReB Earstls Researh Coiler


Lighthouse Realty
of North Flondr Inc
Corner of I-wy. 27 6& Hvy 51, MaJo, Florida
Heather M. Neill, Broker
S Plo,: 13S6 .294-2131
Search the MLS at \W\V.LIGFIHTHOLiSEREPLTY.LiS


GREAT BUY Spic r. span .T.i...ie Clr e 1.. are, u1
roar Tidy y3rdj sC .Tinliely lurr,;urh d ard ni,,ul e 311
applicr,nt .i an after lonenaii. GiC4ait C ire'aed hold
porch. Clean 10xO10 storage shed. Handicap ramp to 10 ACRES Convenient location just north of'Fort
home. Quiet, peaceful area with lots(l) of deer, turkey Wr,,i r. ,01 ,Wroie :r., I T.l L.ir, y I.-ed
andotherwlildlifei #56204 $159,000 .,,,rry ,r, n.,:e ar, CG, .o .,& ..r,Dt ,r..:. o Diir.
"Sl,,,r,.. I, La. L.,r, .IIn" n ll Propert1, I 'i 1
JIIVIia 1. ; m


nICEST oAnRcTR Hum as a lot101 o potential. Big
fenced yard with two storage buildings: Large screened
back porch. Eat-In kitchen with new cabinets. Paved
road. Inside Branford city limits close to schools,-
shopping, etc. Brick veneer, and siding exterior. Seller
motivated, so bring an offer. Would likely quality as a
SHIP home. #56373 $97,000
A. ."l7k 4WW


GREAT IINVESTMENT. This cute little house. on 2 cie, lots in
Branford. wouldd be a great rental or starter home Priced right at
147,500 Call Pant \\olfe. 20S-3030) MIS#549"'3


COUNTRY LIVING MADE EASY...Custom 3 3 brick home on
30 ac, 20 ac is hay field. approx 5 ac planted pines. pasture are
fenced and cross fenced, open fron porch, Florida room w bnck
BBQ grill. solar heated inground pool. hot rub, pool house
$i 69.0I0 Call Glenda McCall. 2(i0-5244. Nf.LS4-8661 4


BEAUTIFUL LOG HOME -'This brand-new, beautiful
two.story log home comes complete with Australian fir
floors and pine walls and cedar-lined closets, It has
vaulted ceilings and hickory cabinets, breakfast bar, all
new appliances. Master bathroom has a garden tub
with jets, custom made shower and double marble.
sinks. French doors open onto a wrap around porctJ.
Situated on 10-acre parcel dotted with large trees.
#47944 $310.000


5 ACRES Lovely lot with paved frontage In excellent
MADISON COUNTY ACREAGE- A total of 202 acres, area just around the corner from Pickett Lake and
Owned 60' right-of-way off Highway 53. Sellers have public boat ramp. Quiet neighborhood. Good school
done a lot of clearing and put in a road for easy system. Additional adjacent lots available. Utilities
traveling of the property. Property Is subdivldable and readily available. #56064 $50,000
there are numerous excellent home sites. #56187 a
$1,625,000 t -


GREAT FIND Nice DWMH, with new siding & roof,
large livingroom w/ fireplace, big pantry in kitchen, large
bedrooms with walk-In closets. Landscaped 4.26 acres
mostly fenced for your animals with 23 huge pecan
trees. Delatched garage, shelter, storage and workshop
w/AC. Home anchored to cement slab. #53174
$159,9000


L ErrF Ur41d LU i i' l ,, I ,., I, I-I.. ll
Lake Subdivision. Large Oak trees and picturesque
view of the lake make this property Ideal for a peaceful
weekend getaway or your future homesite. Look out into
the back yard and see a beautiful cypress ponld. Bring
the family and friends, for an added bonus there is a 2
bedroom 1 bath mobile home. #51300 $130,000
3an:567-F


MOON-'


V-4










PAAF n NOVEMBER 22-23. 2006 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


m Ci ancFIFpn MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


362-1734


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE


1-800-525-4182


ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
LOST MALE COLLIE on 349 around
Suwannee Farms. Looks like Lassie.
11 years old. Named Buoy. Reward.
Call 386-697-7094




BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
My "Lucky Three System" -how to
juggle numbers so you can win big
time, Free details. Send SASE to Mr.
Cliff, PO Box 174, Jennings, FL
32053.


r-nk yLivestock
ANGUS CATTLE, regist
rich in Graham Angus g
birth weights, high wear
FINANCIAL SERVICES PETS highyearling weights. Y


LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072. M-F
from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
PERSONAL SERVICES Pets for Sale


Want to be
n-+-.tf


BEAUTIFUL AKC Cocker Spaniel
SPuppies (Party Colored) 5 males, 1
female. Health Certs,. ready 12/02.
Will hold for Christmas with deposit.
'$350.00 386-362-3969 or 647-6679
.SERVICES CKC FEMALE ENGLISH BULLDOG
S8 wks old. POP. Great early
a CNA? Christmas gift!'Call 386-867-4810


DonI L want toU Wait?
Express Training Services
is now offering our quality
Exam Prep Classes, day/eve, in
Lake City..Class sizes limited.
Next class 12/04/06.
Call 386-755-4401


WANTED: SMALL BREED AKC
PUPPIES Call 386-855-0631




AGRICULTURE


ered, deeply
enetics. Low
ning weights,
darling, 2 yr.
ri-d hpiffrsF &.


UlU, & y. yl. UIU UUlIO, UIGU I o a i
cow-calf pairs. John Miller Farms,
Valdosta, Ga., 229-244-2027 or 229-
563-2397; Lakeland, Ga., 229-482-
2970 or 229-563-8616
Horses
GREAT PACKAGE DEAL! If you are
interested in getting into or
expanding the race horse business I
have 4 mares and 1 sire with good
pedigrees. If serious call and lets
talk. Marcus 386-776-2373
Farm Equipment
FORD TRACTOR 8 END, $2500.00
Ford Front End Loader $3500.00
Call 386-776-2332





MERCHANDISE


REAL ES-A-E FOR RENT
Apartments
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal to
advertise "any !preference, limitation
or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability, familial
status, or national, origin, or an
intention, to make any such
preference, limitation .. and
discrimination." Familial 'status
includes children under the age of 18
living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of children
under 18. .
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
Which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal


Appliances
WHIRPOOL MULTI CYCLE Washeirm
& Dryer $200.00,, Antique industrial. GU. ,ou,
:OPPORTUNITY
sewing machine $300.00, Smoker, opportunity basis. To complain of.
charcoal grill $100.00. Stone, discrimination call HUD toll-free 1-
Malachite Chess Set ;150.00, Casio 800-669-9777. The toll-free number
Keyboard $75.00, Glider EX. for the hearing impaired is 1-800-
Machine. $150.00. Call 386-208- 927-9275
0443 afternoons. 927 -9275
Musical Instruments
LOWREY PIANO Good condition.
$525.00 Call 386-776-1380 or 386-
383-6776 ,


Vacation Rentals






North Carolina. Easy access, great
view, 10. min to Maggie Valley, 30 min
to Cherokee, 2 min to Parkway,
Mountain Stream with picnic area,
Fireplace, Sleeps 10. All Amenities.
$500/wk, $1600/mo. 386-330-4207
Lucy
Commercial
FOR LEASE 3,000 Sq. Ft. Building
on busy highway 5 miles from Live
Oak. could be used for large home,
business or a, combination. Lease
and credit check required. 386-208-
2844 http://www.righton129.com.
Office Space
OFFICE SPACE available for rent
with'approx. 1,296 sq. ft. in Live Oak.
Call Poole Realty 386-209-1766 for
more details.
OFFICE SPACE for rent in Live Oak.
Office has 2,100 sq.ft. and has
. previously been used as a medical
office. Call Poole Realty at 386-209-
1766




REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Homes for Sale
JENNINGS, GREAT DEAL!
Mortgage Company repo. 1646 Old
Hwy 41, Spacious 4Bd/2Ba 1892 sq.
ft. on very nice 1 acre lot. Call 800-
283-4041.


Mobile Homes for rent
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED 3- wide.
IMobile Home with handicap access,
just South of Live Oak. $800.00 per
month. Lease & credit check
required. 386-208-2844


KIICHEN REMODELED Beautiifu home ablh mans, unique features
farnnl home Iuth plenr. o!" appeal New including a stone alterfall sho:.uer' 20
Florind Room and ne d' remodeled lightlI N ooded acres "wih 3i .X 611
kilcren a ith ne., cabicns, counters. detached ,orkahop. frce-.lrm in ground
appliance.. ceramic tile SI 75,iij0 f.FLS .5 .'iimmrng pool' MLILS 555S'9 Cart Linda
51144- Call Sharon Selder 3'S .-365-1203 Roddenbemr 386.591i..025


TO 10 EA ON T CALLI iA R ALTO


'Ta /N
Ii,


v N


-. expertise


There are numerous elements to even.the most straightforward
V real estate transaction. Many buyers and sellers aren't aware, for
example, what property information must be disclosed, because
disclosure laws change.


A REALTOR has resources that provide updates on constantly
evolving rules and regulations. This knowledge can protect you


I/MW ofroml
So wh
Big Bend Realty perfect
190 SW Range Ave.
Madison, Florida 32340
Sam

Cell: (386) 623-1217
www.samanthaprueter.com
samanthaprueter@remax.net
@1997 FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OP REALTORS


ast-minute and long-lasting complications.


ether you're buying, selling or leasing real estate, it makes
t sense to look for the sign of the REALTOR.


iantha Prueter
Realtor


R19ALTA W


CALLING ALL CO YBOVSI1 30, acre QUIET PEACEFUL COUNTRY Ihtg
ranch. fenced and cross fenced Bahia on 10acre 'n h 1997.Doublew-ide Front
grais pasrure Reli& and pui ,cur bo*t_ ard back deck Surrounded by Erees and
up porchl ral of the comfonable reach nature Fenced area for children a,,n peal.
.,u-e bald in the 'rCo's and hor;e I [LS 52536 Call Tarnya Shalfer 38.-'55 ,
barn, C-all Janet Creel 3S,6-55-U)466 54-li

LAND AND MORE!
SERVICE GARAGE Built in 201i12 f. ih ioial under roof 3510 sq ft High
A itbilirv and fast growing area just off US 90.. Great for any type of service
buiress Call Manha Saunders 3S6-752-3945
6 \ ER' PRET TI ACRES South ao L ae City with paved frontage: Bring your
plan; or your mobile home' ML S 56104 Call Sharon Selder 386-365-1203
2 ACRES Suanrnee River froniage Locaied on a bend aith panoramic ieusr
5 .iX.eirl 5LS 12 iCall Bob Dezendorf 3.S6.623-12"7 ,
16 ACRE spread u ith ..coded and cleared-areas. Great shaded homesite. MLS
W.4 11 Call \kIc Lanro.:.p 35.-623-6401 .
THINKING OF SELLING? WE ADVERTISE IN
NEW YORK CITY AND WEST PALM BEACH!
3 '6'FI F


HOUSE FOR SALE
Spacious, .free flowing incredibly
gorgeous .homel Lovely retirement
home, nestled in the. woods of
Advent Christian Retirement Village.
Spacious, 3/3, brick home with
beautiful views of extra-large wooded
lot with mature camellias and
azaleas. New roof, heat/dir system,
and mother-in-law/guest suite. Large
kitchen, dining room. screened
porch,.palo Laundr'y/torage room.
Y0ut, really need to see 'i! Tre
Village offers emergency assistance.
yard maintenance, para-medics
nignts and weekends. 5 minute walk
























FOR RENT-
3BR, 2BA DWMH,
CENTRAL H/A.


RENT PLUS

DEPOSIT TO
MOVE IN.
WATER, SEWER

& GARBAGE

INCLUDED.
NO PETS
386-330-2567
226322-F


* Sun & Stars Realty, LLC *

Let Us Help You Reach For Your Dreams
2 locations to

4221 NCR 53
.DAY FL 32013
386-294-3671
WIin Vour R hge ',ur 1..,a1 wi1i al.a, Priced Just Right For lfe or, a bu dget
i.e i.:.-' Ir, e i r. ea ,ara at ir. s you i.,,e iris 2-bearc.m i..aih 704-S 119 E GREEN
Corih,T,..:.rar. I .iF r,n:.mr in Perr., mrrw.bt home in Perry Croe t hunting Developers: A Real Space Place
HMi, r,,hir.,, ,m ,rr.-.: ...i. .g clubs an i sa he Gull Ofers a irort soc1.. Check out' this prime 100 acre ST, STE 207A,
room, p:i" room kig room,, inside lerce ,are .:oered parking rr,etal roo undeveloped property in the City of 07A P
laundry ,,, ,,:n.r,. with vinyl floors. Ptei.s some waor $7i,0r. Please call Perry. Adjacent to Quail Point 207A PERRY
$97,00 Please call Debbe Calhoun for Debora. Ho.ara lor more intormralcr. Subdivision; $11,500 Per acre. Owner is FLORIDA 32347
more information. offering 3-bedroom/2-bath wood-sided
home for an additional $150k.A 850-223-1849,
Developers Dream $1,300,000.00 takes CELL
It all. Please call Debbie Calhoun for 386-590-0848
more information. 386-590-0848
Hunters: Make Your Own Rules Take
S p end W isely a ra r, lr.g a ad ,.a- fr ,l llndm, rl.. ,. r,..r. ,p ,u 1. i 'm 3- '.:r. 4h
94 F home ,. perr F .ar, Ir,,lud.e Msador. Cortun). ',vIerr I..lu1,
S I. a t,,iror.:.v 2.. ,,,T .p.:.. A i ia.: r.I Pro,, e- rat, E l .I.:,'. .c ,ded
Ir,f,:r.r I I ',I ,.:..:T| ,i1". raro ,:.,:. .:..:ri Prirre H unti.'g Pro .er tl 1.5 1a *:I -eeA'.
irr,:r,ur.i.m. ;.r, m i., .:r- ..,-..r..i Seek Sanctuary Here Is the place to Quail Turiey 1245,uu0 Plea s call
B '. F.:.r.-r, r.. a:.i a,' ir a.I-r. build that new homein Taylor County. Debty/HC'uardfior morenformeailr.
school snacks; Large closets, fireplace. Has Beautiful Mature Oak Trees,On
Beautiful I Acre lot; Fruit Trees, and Paved Road, Minutes to Town. $32,000. www.sunandstarsrealty.com
Grandaddy Oaks. $110,000. Please call Please call Deborah Howard for more Email: de by c oir[canlC .neIIt
Debbie Calhounformoreinformation information. Email: debbyh comcastnet

i"Sma Town Service Big Tm Results!"


r'M%;IV. ALLO, PVOV IIVJWl NWIM"FL. I V I-A%%'


ipw


''










I (=nAvIF.--- MR T AESE I NO HLRAA SUH ERAOTF RD FC.NVB...20PG3


362-1734


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE


1-800-525-4182


FOR

HUD Vouchers Welcome!
1, 2 & 3 BR HC & Non-HC
Accessible Apartrments


705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
S386-364-7936
TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housing Opportunity


to the health and fitness center with
heated pool, brand new medical
clinic, and wonderful neighbors!
23382 Meadow View Drive, Dowling
Park, FL 32064 $295,000. Call
386-647-6229, or 386-688-4884 for
appt.
OPEN HOUSEI Saturdays 11-4pm.

Mobile Homes
MOBILE HOME 1996 24X50
3/2 Sold as is $15,500
Call 850-971-5249

2004 14x76 MOBILE HOME
3/1 with Heat/AC $17,500
Call 850-971-5249 :

FOR RENT: 24X50 MH
3/2w/AC, Appliances
New carpet/vinyl
$1100 Move in, $550 Mo.
No Pets-145 NW Hickory,
Madison near Cherry Lake
Call 850-971-5249
MOBILE HOME 3/2 For Rent on 5
acres. Off CR 252 between Lake City
& Live Oak. $600.00 mo. 1st plus 1
mo. security to move in, pets
allowed. Call -386-623-5227 Leave
Message. .
Acreage
ONE HUNDRED & FIFTY ACRES
Older home, planted pines, Approx. 7
mi, SW of Live Oak, FL Total price
s1.200 000 00 Ph 386-362-1,143.
SUWANNEE COUNTY
Beautilul. new subdivision on C R
349. 1 mi. S. of C R 252, right pn
160th Trace. 5 & 7 acre lots'starting
at $89,000.00. Owner financing.
Call 1-866-386-2376.
www.bullardproperty.com
THREE 112 ACRE LOTS... 1 mi. from
Royal Springs in Suwannee Belle
Estates. Has 2 wells, 2 septic tanks,
1 power pole and a 24 x 24 pole
barn.
Call 904-669-6368 for more info.






EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
DOMINOS PIZZA OF LIVE OAK
Now hiring Delivery Drivers. Earn
$10 15 per hr. Flexible Schedules.
Apply wihirn Or Call 386-364-8030
POSITION NOW AVAILABLE'
****************************"****
Order Entry/Imaging Looking for a
person that is self motivated with
great organizational skills. Person
must be able to key 55 correct wpm
and work. flexible 'hours. Job will
require some physical labor and
maintenance/mechanical skills. Basic
office skills, organization skills and
ability to prioritize work a must.;,
,. .....,,.......................
Benefits, competitive wage &
Opportunity for growth.
Please-mal resume C. fuliowinc
Corporate Graphics
240 SW.Commerce Drive, PO Box
650 Madion. FL 32341 or fax : o:
i85097'3-1377 Ann HR
PRIVATE DUTY LPN NEEDED
in L..e OaK area, must nave trach
and Pediatric experience. Please call
386-755-1544,; ask for Martha or
Beckie.


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living
2 bedroom duplex.
Call 362-3110.
226402-F


ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
Suwannee County
Administrative Office
GENERAL RESPONSIBILITIES
Responsible for agency financial
operations,. including receipt,.
withdrawal, disbursement of monies;
payroll maintenance of .accounting
records and preparation of financial
reports and budgets.

Desired Qualifications:
1. Four years of college ,training or
experience in Accounting or
Business Administratioh with major
course; Work in Business Economics
and Accounting.
2. Strong talent in fiscal interpretation
with a clear understanding' of
business and personnel costs and an
ability., to assemble and coordinate
such facts in a. clear and
comprehensive manner.
3. Training and experience in
computer operations.

Submit Resume to: Suwannee river
Economic Council, Inc., P.O. Box 70,
Live Oak, FL 3206-1

Equal Opportunity Employer.
Persons with disabilities are
encouraged to apply for
employment. Should special
accommodations be necessary,
please call 386-362-4115
Voice TDD.
Deadline for Receipt of Resume:
December 4, 2006 -1.30 P.M.
ATTENDANTS
Five positions available, complete
training provided 10 perform janitorial
services in Suwannee/Hamilton
area. Need dependable
transportation; able to lift 35 Ibs.
Uniforms provided. ADA/EOE/Drug
Free Workplace. Apply, in person at:
Comprehensive Community
Services, Inc., 506 S. Ohio Avenue,
Live Oak, FL 32064
CDL Drivers needed for local and
regional positions. A minimum of 2
years experience required. Drivers
home every weekend, avg. salary
$45-$50K per year. Also seeking a
iull time mechanic (386) 364-3250.

CLASS A CDL OTR DRIVERS
needed two 12) years experience
required Health insurance,
rete Ie.nt, t ..vacalipn,

Call 1386) 294-3411.


CLERICAL
Different Positions Avaiable. All
Levels. Fax Resume to 386-755-
7911 or Call 386-755-1991 for an
app. Wal-Staf Personnel .
EMPLOYMENT

Tne Suwannee County Tax Collector"
is currently seeking applications for
several' temporary positions triat will
lasi approximately 5 months.
Projected standing date is January 2.
2007. Salary will tie $10.00 an hour.
Minimum qualificaltons include- Hign
School graduate, Ihe ability to read a
county map and legal descriptions
some computer skills and good.
comn-municaion skills. For more
adeails contact the Tax Collectorfs
office at 362-2816. You must ask for
Kelly Joyner; Submirtal deadline is
Friday, December 15In, 2006.


AL OARC
RENT
Rental Assistance
1, 2, 3, & 4 BR HC & Non-
HC Accessible Apartments

,705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY 711
Equal Housing Opportunity -7


ESTABLISHED company is looking
for a hard worker with top notch
customer service skills. Great phone
skills are a definite plus Drug screen
and background check required.
-Please E-mail resume lakecity@.wal-
staf.com or fax to 386-755-7911. For
interview appointment or questions
you may contact our Lake City office
Monday Friday @ 386-755-1991
EXPERIENCED ACCOUNTANT
Large company based in Lake City is
seeking an experienced accountant
for' a fast paced industry.
Construction background and
management/supervisory experience
preferred. Bachelor degree or higher
required. Salary commensurate with
-experience, competitive benefits pkg.
Drug Free Work Place/EECO
Employer Please fax resumes to-
386-755-9132.


FIREFIGHTER
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY.
CITY OF LIVE OAK, FL

DUTIES: Performs fire fighting and
EMT -rescue activities; operates
and maintains fire, equipment;:
performs' inspections ana
recommends -fire prevention
measures; and administers lirsi
aid.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:
Graduation from a standard higri
school and music possess tire
tighter certification as required by
Florida .Statutes. Applicant must
Sreet'required health and physical
standards and possess a valid
Florida Driver License.

The applicant must -possess. a
certificate of compliance by the
Fire Fighters Standards and
Training Council in accordance with
Chapter 633.34 and 633.35 Florida
Statutes.

STARTING SALARY: $26,175.75,
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Application must be submitted to
the office of the Fire Chief, 200
Easi Duval Street, Live Oak,
Florida 32064. Applications will be,
accepted until positions are filled.

DRUG FREE WORK PLACE-
,. -GpfSlul applicarn.Will.4e sujecll
Stod'jlp3JifW place Policy.

A FAIR HOUSING/EOUAL
OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER/DRUG' FREE
WORKPLACE/HANDICAP:.
ACCESSIBLE JURISDICTION
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
BANK OF FLORIDA
is seeking :applicants for part-time
Teller positions. Applicants mmust
possess good interpersonal,
organizational, and computer skills
Sand have excellent math skills.
Previous experience is preferred. You
may pick up an employment
application at any First Federal
Branch and .forward to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029, Lake City,
FL 32056. Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.
HHA'S NEEDED IN LIVE OAK
and Lake City areas lor Home visits'
Must nave 1 year Home Care,
experience and current CPR. Please
call 386-755-1544, ask for, Martha or,
Beckie.


ERA ADVANTAGE REALTY

adds new associate to the team
ERA Advantage Realty recently announced the addition of O. Paul Elder to
its team of real estate sales professionals serving consumers in the North
Florida area.

Paul Elder (Broker Associate)

As a Broker Associate, Paul has the knowledge and skills that will benefit the
ERA Advantage Realty team and our customers. Paul has an extensive
background in business and knows the imriportance of ensuring customers
have a successful experience. Paul Elder started his Real Estate career in
1977 with ERA and will bring to ERA Advantage Realty his many years of
experience in helping Buyers and Sellers achieve their Real Estate goals. '
Paul is happily married and lives in Live Oak. and his personal.goal is to serve the "LORD". Paul will
be located at our Live Oak office.,

"We're delighted to have wonderful professionals join our winning teamm" said Fritz and JoAnna
Amrhein, Brokers/Owners. Fritz added, "Paul brings tremendous experience and proven leadership
that will certainly benefit our company and'our customers."

As part of ERA Advantage Realty, he will be able to offer homebuyers and sellers a wide variety of
valuable products and services including online listings, home warranty plans, the ERA Sellers
Security Plan and more.

About ERA Advantage Realty
Fritz and JoAnna Amrhein (Brokers/Owners)

Fritz and JoAnna Amrhein are the brokers and owners of ERA Advantage Realty. Fritz is
President of Advantage Realty Property Management,. and he is the Operations Director of
ERA Advantage Realty (as well as "Amrhein Commercial Realty Services"). He is
responsible for all commercial acquisitions and for procuring new locations for company
growth. His leadership and vision are unsurpassed.

JoAnna is a life long resident of Columbia County, and is truly the heartbeat of the company.
She not only has a Brokers License but holds a Graduate REALTOR Institute designation as well. When it comes to customer service and contract negotiations she is the
one you want on your side.
About ERA Franchise Systems, Inc.
ERA Franchise Systems, Inc. is a global leader in the residential real estate industry with more than 30 years
experience in developing consumer-oriented products and services. ERA Real Estate was recently named the
recipient of the prestigious 2006 J.D. Power and Associates Award for "Highest Overall Satisfaction For
W Repeat Home Sellers Among National Full Service Real Estate Firms." The ERA network Includes more
than 38,700 brokers and sales associates and nearly 3,000 offices throughout the United States and 29 other
En countries and territories. Each office is independently owned and operated except offices owned and operated
A p by NRT Incorporated. ERA'Franchise Systems, Inc. is a subsidiary of Realogy Corporation (NYSE: H), the
world's largest real estate franchisor. ERA information is available to consumers at ERA.com.


REAL ESTATE Located on Hwy. 129 N. in the Wal-Mart Plaza
Advantage Realty 386-362-4664 3145


96-F


INDUSTRIAL
New to Lake City or Live Oak? Tired
of looking for work on your own?
Various positions available/All Shifts,
Must ,be able to lift up to 701bs.
Please call 386-755-1991 for appt
Drug Screens & Backgrd check req.
LPN NEEDED,
7pm 7am shift
Full Time with Benefits
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston Street
Live Oak, FL 32064
Or call Angela at 386-362-7860
EOE/DN/V/M/F
Maintenance
HELP WANTED maintenance man
with knowledge of plumbing, electric
and carpentry: Tools required.
Transportation a must.. Drug free
workplace. Call (386) 330-2567
MECHANIC NEEDED Experience
necessary. Must have own tools and
transportation. JInsurance, 401K, paid
vacation. Apply at 140 Palm St. NE
386-362-1185 Ext 19.


PART TIME DISHWASHER Kilchen
help: and Cook. Flexible hours. Drug '
Free Workplace Apply in person ai
Camp Weed 11057 Camp Weed
Place, Live Oak. 364-5250. 8-4.


We rave immediate openings and
are seeking qualified applicants for
the following positions:


*RN's
ER
ICU
PACU
'Med/Surg

S Scrub Tech
Surgical Services

Cardiovascular Technologist
Camt Lab

Non-invasi e Vascular Technologist

"Physical Therapist

Administratmie Assistant
Physician Services

Financial Analy st Account

*Ask About ourtsign-onr bonus plan!

We offer a .generous, benefit
package that. includes health,
dental, life insurance, vision, stock
purchase plan, 401(k) retirement,
paid lime off and many more!
EOE and Drug Free Work Place
For more information and to apply:
Call: (386)719-9020'
Fax: (386)719-9028 .
SOnline: www.lakecitymedical.com


MH setrv/repair.
WAYNE FRIER
CORPORATE OFFICE
is now hiring for Mobile Home
service and Used Home Repair
Position.- Experience required. Call,
Larry J. Olds lor interview 386-362-
2720.
NURSES. 'NEEDED, caring,
compassionate, responsible. Full
Time, Part Time and PRN. Apply in
person at: 259 SW Captian Brown
Rd. Madison, FL or call 850-973-
8277




Mobile Homes

and

Land for sale.

Financed

by owner.


Ask for
LFFarry 01dS,


386-362-2720





Double and

single wide

mobile homes

for rent on

their own lots

in the

Live Oak area.

Ask for
Larry Olds.

386-362-2720
274137-F





You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper.
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Myrtle at

386-362-1734
226273-F


PARTS HELPER NEEDED-
Computer exp. (Quickbobks),
understand parts, breakdowns, be
able 1o operate forklift,, etc. Send
resumes to PO Box 1300 Live Oak,
FL 32064
PER DIEM LPN FOR HOME CARE
visits in the Lake-City and Live Oak
area. Must have Hmrne Care
experience and current CPR. Please
call 386-755-1544 ask for Beckie or
Marlha.
PSYCHOLOGIST/LCSW

Licensed FT or P'T whit leading
provider oe psychological services in
Long Term Care. Exp. a plus. Exc
salary.'Deneits. SIGN ON BONUS'
Call Arturo Cid, 866-325-5434. or
send resume to.
acid,''salustbehavioralhealln com
Visit www salus.Dehaviorairneaiin.c'.mrri


SHIFT MANAGER / ASSISTANT
GENERAL MANAGER
Flexible Schedule : .
Friendly/Outgoing Personality
Work well wiln others
Advancement Opponrunities
Aggressive Salary/Bonus Package
Strong LeadershpTraining Sklls
Time Management
Professionalism
Aggressive Fast 'Track Growih
SVacation.'Beneihs Package,401K


NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
COMETO
SHANDS LAKESHORE

Where our staff and leaders
Know they have made a difference
in the lives of our patients and
their families

MOTHER/BABY
MED/SURG
PEDS
'CU

Full time, part time, per diem
For more information contact
Human Resources at
386-754-8147, .

Apply in person at 368 NE Franklin
St., Lake City, Florida 32055, or
visit our web site at
www.shand.org "

EEbE. M'F.'DV,
Drug Free Workplace


RN STAFF NURSE NEEDED
7am 7pm day shift
Full Time with Benefits.
Suwannee Health Care Center
.1620 E. Helvensit.r Sireet
SLke Oak, FL 32064
Or call Angela ai 386.362-7860
EOEDVM'F


sales
ACTION TRAVEL
Girls/Guys 18 yrs &'older.
SNo experience necessary.
Call NiKki 1-800-201-117'3


SERVICE TECH NEEDED-Needs
electrical, exp (3-phase), must be
able.to read wiring diagrams & have
welding exp. Send resumes to PO
Box '1300, Live Oak, FL 32064
SUWANNEE HAMILTON TECHNICAL
Center is in need of a RT Instructor,
part-time/day-time. Please contact
the Suwannee County School Board,
Personnel Department at. 386-364-
3739 ''j' ,.


-FOR RENT-
2 or 3 BR
Singlewide
mobile home,
Central WIA.

First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
No pets.i. ..-

386-330-2567


'AL TP S OF TACTO

ILERcs A. A LABLE


WOIG* BUSH HOGGING.
-.ANDM UCH MORE *.

S EE ESTIMATES


lasso citnuvA -
732576thSt.,(313) 36 m53


r~x~~ThI0


REALTOR


529 S. Ohio Ave.. Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990
Realtor Assoc. M. Elizabeth Elliott. Evening 842-2372


(1) Off CR 252: 10+ acres with
some large trees on 61st Rd. with
survey. Good area. Reduced to
$10,000 per acre.
(2) Commercial: 11.79 ac +/- with
approx. 540 ft. on US 129 with a

multipurpose centralheat & air
condition commercial bldg. cont.
approx. 21,800 sq. ft. under roof
ample paved parking. Good'
location excellent commercial
potential. $1,920,000.
(3) Saddle Club: Nice four acre
tract in grass with scattered trees
fenced, Good buy @ $49,950
terms.
(4) Off LIS 27: 80 acres planted
pines in a cropland site 16 years
old, on good county road, good
buy at $11,000 per acre.
(6) Off CR 250: 10 acres partially
wood. Approved Well & septic
tank. Good County Road $11,000
per acre.
(6) Branford area: 15 acres in
good cropland, with county roads
and fence on three sides.
Excellent location near US 27 &
US 129. Reduced to $10,995 per
acre
(7) Dixie County near Rock
Bluff: Four two are tracts
wooded, good area. For all four
lots $98,000.
(8) Dowling Park Area: 3 lots 1
on the water (buildable) 2 across
the road, all 3 for $65,000.
(9) Off CR-349: Two acre wooded
corner lot near Royal Springs.
Good buy at $19,900.
.(10) Mayo: 4 acres with 4
bedroom/1 1/2 bath home cont.
approx 1550 sq. ft. $97,500.
(11) 167th Rd.: 3 Bedroom, 2
baths CH/AC brick with garage,
kitchen furnished. 2 ac. homesite
$165,000.
(12) Off Central Rd.: 10 acres in
grass fenced, scattered trees,
survey $85,000. Good Buy.
(13) Two wooded acres on paved
road, Will work for land home
package. *19,900.
(14) Jasper, FL: 3 bedroom brick
home with carpet. Numerous


updates, new CH/AC, paint
inside & out, carpet roll good,
new refrigerator & stove. Good
buy, at $89,900.
(15) Secluded: 5 acres fenced with
a 2/2 DWMH, kitchen furnished,
4" well. $83,000.
(16) Off CR49: 40 acres in
Coastal Bermuda grass on good
1/4 mile on county road. $10,900
per acre.
(17) Off US 129 South: Five acres
partial) fenced scattered trees &
ass. Good land home tract.
9,950..
(18) Suwannee River: One acre
wooded tract on paved roadwith
107 ft. on water, elevation survey
buildable, good buy @ $72,000.
(19) Falmouth Area: five acre
tract with a 2 bedroom, 1 bath
singlewide mobile home, 8x20
shop. $84,500.
(20) Hamilton Co.: CR 158, 5
acres in grass, with a few trees.
Seller will furnish survey.
$74,900.
(21) Suwannee River Park
Estates: 3 lots on good county
road, utilities to property. Priced
to sell at $16,500.
(22) ,Lafayette Co.: 5.3 aacres
with 1996 CH/AC DWMH 24x36
motor home storage, 628 ft. on
US 27. Reduced to 125,000.
(23) Jasper, FL: Vickers Court
4/3 CH/AC brick home with
kitchen furnished, garage approx.
2,100 sq. ft. under roof. $196,000.
(24) Off CR 349: 10 acres wooded
with CH&AC log home with
30'x40' pole barn, kitchen
furnished, washer & dryer,
10'x12' storage. Good area.
$225,000.
(25) Suwannee River: 1 acre with
100 ft. on the water, good county
road with survey. Priced to sell @
$35,000.
(26) Dowling Park: 5 acre
wooded on paved road, $59,900.
(27) 121st Street: 90 acres in good
coastal Bermuda. Old homesite
with pecan trees, 4" well, etc.
Good area $11,550 per acre.
308349-F


BUSINESSES SERVICES


I


RN CASE MANAGER
Big Bend Hospice, the leader in
compassionate care to individuals
viih iife-limiiinQ illnesses, has thle';
lollowing position available on our
care leam

RN Case Manager
Full-time RN Case Manager for.
Taylor County. Current Florida
license as RN required.t Plus 2 -3
years med-surgery experience.
preferred.

Great benefit package!
Interested candidates,can
S apply in person
1723 Marian Center Blvd:
Tallahassee, Florida
or by faxing a resume to
(850) 575-6814 or
Apply on-line!
at www.bigbendhospice.org

EOE/DFWP/ADA
Smoke.Free Workplace





,'t


g6-F


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006', PAGE 3D


E CLA SSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


c










PAE4, OEBE 223 06 OTHFOIA OU UCASIIDMAKTLAE-SRVN ORHFORD NDSUH ERI


362-1734


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE


1-800-525-4182


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Want To Work in N. Florida?,
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Live Oak, Suwannee County, FL
Due to growth we rave new
employment opportunities' in our
modern poultry operations.

*Examples of available jobs:
Deboner: $9,46
Packers: $8.91
Warehouse: $9.26
Night Sanitation: $9.26
Live Hangers: $11.40,
'Maintenance: $9.20-$14, 00
*Includes Perfect Attendance
Bonus of $1.05/hour .

Successful candidates must be
able io perform Ihe essential
lunciorns ol te lot nwi' or withioui
acconrri:,daihons. and be legally
aulhorized 10 work.. Will 'train.
Overtime work available daily and
weekend. Medical and life
insurance,- dental, .vision and
prescription drug programs, paid
vacations, paid holidays, credit
union and more.

Apply Now!!!
Gold Kist Inc.
19740US Hwy 90 W.
Live Oak, Florida 32060
English 386-208-0205
Espanol 386-208-0190
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
SEOE-AAM*-F-V-D

APPLIC1 '6NS'aalso ACCEPTED
Employment CONNECTIONS
LOCATIONS:
1416N. OhioAve. 200W.Base
Live Oak, FL Madison, FL


Suwannee Valley Nursing
I'Center
Accepting applications for the
following positions:
Full Time RN
Part Time LPN POSITION
Full Time CNA'S
(All Shifts and PRN positions).
427 N.W. 15th Ave. Jasper, Florida
32052. Please apply in person.


TILE & MARBLE
Well established company loonkng
For the rigri employee!,
Installer/Assistant
,Must have experience
Must be able tolift 701bs.
SReliable Iransporlaiiorn
Smoke free environment
Please call 386-755-1991 for appt..
Drug screen Backgrd req.

TRUCK DRIVER WANTED
w/CDL license to make local
deliveries & handle hardware,
lumber & building materials.
Excellent benefits Isuch as profit
sharing, 401K, paid vacation, etc.
W.B.Howland Co., Inc., PO Box 700,
Live Oak, FL 32064 13861 362-1235.






TRANSPORTATION

Antique Autos for Sale
JEEP 1960, CJ-3B Great Condition,
7400 mi. $6795.00 Call 386-658-
2516


Autos for Sale
KIA SPORTAGE-2001 61.000 mi.,
28 mi to gallon! Five speed slick
. sri, 4 door. Great cordilion
$5500.000 BO Ca, 386-209-16.56


Contact


us at the


paper.
.. at!



Classified

Advertising

386-362-1734 exT 102

386-364-5578



Sr r r .. '

We'd love to hear from you.





ve Oak, FI 3, 64


Give thanks for pie!


By Jenny Harper


My Thanksgiving
memories are made of
baking together, gathering-
lo\ed ones around the table,
a moist turkey dinner with
all the trimmings. But
nothing beats dessert.
Specifically pie.
When the leftovers are
safely tucked away in the
frig and I present the dessert
choices, I ne\ er hear groans
of "I can't eat another'bite"
around my Thanksgiving
table. For enticing desserts,
look no further than
pumpkin pie: It's the all-
American, must-ha\ e
holiday dessert.
In fact. in many homes,
it's not Thanksgi\ ing
without the traditional
delicious pumpkin pie:
Libby's Famous Pumpkin
Pie, the one everyone loves.
Perfectly spiced and
seasoned creamy pumpkin


is nestled in a flaky pie
crust. It's the pie -bhose
aroma announces.
unequivocally,
"'Tbaiksgiving." The
recipe for Famous
Pumpkin Pie is included
on the label of the can of
pumplkn, where I look
for it every time I bake
this pie throughout the
holiday season. ,
On occasion, I do like to
add my own signature touch
to pumpkin pie, and this
U! S -? : *.- ..


3 4 cup packed brown
sugar
I 19-inch) deep-dish pie
shell, unbaked
I I 15-ounce) can Libby's


Announcement
bhat Destrors Relationships? *-ns..'er pi 44,
Buy and Read Dianetics by L. .RonHubbard Send
$8.00 to: Hubbard Dianetics Foundation, 3102 N.
Habana Ave:, Tampa FL 33607 (813)872-0722.

Attorney
NEED .% L.\.\ER" Prciect o. R,.gr.li Nc..'-
Criminal... Personal Inipr. B r-,kr-up-,. Diorce
Labot Law.; Hurt.. H.-:cd ot. In-nT'r..hri.o
Wills. ALL LEGAL MIATTER'S A A',ir.e,
Rc fr.rl Se.- ice Pri, m i Trial-Lawyers Statewide 24
Hour ( -3 actions

Auctions


'L .ND AL'C lION- 2b"0 P.,.,p; Ie.' bc ".J.ld L.:.
Do ,n r .Z Fiaar.:,ni treei C l Io --
16i'' .., v. L ANDA I '-TION corr. NRLL E Fi
LL C .'B20 ..n Buleziuk:A'U3448,'
. n,' -.ij4. Mauck:AU3447..
Developers Closeout AUCTION 12/2/06 14
Residential Condominiums, Pompano Beach, FL
Financing .id (,niOnlic BilJAn A'.a.laile 2% Broker
,Cooperalor. ., ,. .- s a-.e....u, .o '. L. Fisher
AU93; ..iBlu'.'. i I"o: 1.*,..20 I.I in Coopera-
tion with Lauro'Auctioneers Sale subject to all terms.
Absolute Real Estate Auctions: Homes, Condos,
Commercial, Land, Waterfront. All will sell at
Auction, Brokers & Phone Bidding Welcome. Neal
VanDeRee Realtor/Auctioneer (941)488-1500
www vanderee com
GIG '% I IC 2-D % .aucArtioui N r. e .', 3i.,l,
D r? e ,r ? 2u, n lor, tc-e L. inr,lL"
tiarn em rri-rn Ic unmip:. m..:1 r-caor: l.:' ?
cr ki : Je: A ir:>:i.: e~ce'a r s c m ri.,r rL d-
ers & scrapers, backhoes, rubber tired loaders, right
of way machines, drilling EQ, forklifts, paving
skidders, feller bunchers, log loaders, farm tractors.
J.M. Wood Auction Co., Inc. (334)264-3265, Bryant
Wood AL LfC #1137.

Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING SAVE $ $ Buy Direct From
Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock with all Accesso-
ries. Quick turn around! Delivery Available
(352)498-0778 Toll Free (888)393-0335.

Business Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/
day? 30 Machines, Free Candy All for $9,995.
(888)629-9968 B02000033. CALL US: We will
not be undersold!
%, IIND YOUR OWN. BUSINESS! For as little as
- :, ... can start your own business. For full details
and a FREE sample visit:
www dpaschal mvarbonne.com
Learn to buy Foreclosures, tax liens, and rehabs
for pennies on the dollar. Mentor walks you through
each deal A-Z to.ensure SUCCESS (800)433-4556.

Business Services
GREAT WEBSITES $9.99/MONTH, includes de-
sign, hosting, email & www.yourname.com, No
hidden fees. Great Web Packages. Toll Free (800)882-
7226 www ercatwebpackaaes corn

Financial
CASH NOW FOR FUTURE PAYMENTS! We
will buy your Annuity, Structured Settlement, Lot-
tery or Owner Held Mortgage Note. Call R&P
Capital Resources Inc. (800)338-5815.

HelpWanted
$2,900 WEEKLY GUARANTEED! Address letters
for holiday- cash. No experience necessary. Free
information. Start immediately! Write: A&G Pub-'
lications, 2370-G Hillcrest Rd. #147-H, Mobile, AL
36695.


. D.ATA ENTR%' !.o.rk. ron- A,.., here Fic.eole
Hours. Personal Computer Required. Excellent Career
Opportunity. Serious Inquiries Only (800)344-9636
Ext. 700.
Earn Up to $550 WEEKLY Working-through:the
government PT No: Experience. ,Call Today!!
] -I|.1|4^ 921 -Ik ,:,or D 'parin-, .-.r V.1 i

Sales Salts Managers No-l-ee D-lrib.uh:r: ,'"rs
', L H.rr. li.'K frl M.n :.. \ r forur e -:o. PFe-
s'- Lead; Dit', O'.ernd,.i B:r.u Mi,.-_. N.o r.l.ul-
Le'. cl i ,, 1:1 1,2 3- -
Cdordinate Exchange Piogram! International
High School Exchange Program seeks enthusiastic
coordinator. and ESL _:r.itrd E'- 'elop 'e?,iting
- hc-rtl-er.m pro arn: jcr ,r i.L ,. l :r',a nts.
i~r'hi ;-'?4J4J. Eait:.-rr.;.c.h:.nL :E.4^.:.'. ne 'lc


DRI% ER: %O1 % \%ANT II. \%1 H %\ E I[: S..u
feI.m.- owner .:. -er.i.:r' ::-.mp. ar,, f ..r .ru.Jent.
recent grads, regional, dedicated, long haul. Van,
flatbed. Must be 21. CRST Career Center.'(800)940-
2778, www dl'iveforcrst corn.


Driver-HIRING QUALIFIED DRIVERS for Cen-
tral Florida Local & National OTR positions. Food
grade tanker, no hazmat, no pumps, et. I .ne. r'.,
competitive pay 8& new'equipment. Need 2 '.ear;
experience. Call Bynum Transport for your oppor-
tunity today. (800)741-7950. .
CLASS-A CDL DRIVERS- Now Hiring OTR &
Local Drivers- New .Equipment; Great Benefits;
Premium Pay .Package. Call Oakley Transport,
(877)882-6537.
OTR drivers deserve more pay and more
hometime! $.48/mi. 1 year. experience. More
experience makes morel Home weekends! Run.our
Florida Region! Heartland Express (800)441-4953
www heartlandexpress corm.

lHomes For Sale
PALM HARBOR Factory Liquidation, Sale.
2006 Models Must C,:.' r.,l..lui,"..xite & Stilt
Homes. 0% DOWN \' I,.. ':u ,: ', ...u Own
Landl! Call for FREE Color Brochure. (800)622-
2832.

Instruction
HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR TRAINING
FOR EMPLOYMENT: Bulldozers, Backhoes, Load-
ers, Dump Trucks, Graders, Scrapers, Excavators;
National Certification, Job Placement Assistance;
Associated Training. Services (800)251-3274
www equipmentoverator corn


Heavy Equipment Operator CERTIFIED. 'Hands
on Training. Job Placement Assistance. Call Toll
Free (866)933-1575. ASSOCIATED TRAINING
SERVICES, 5177 Homosassa Trail, Lecanto, Florida,
34461.

Lots & Acreage
*LAND AUCTION* 230 Props Must be Sold! Low
Down / E-Z Financing. Free Catalog (800)937-
1603 www LANDAUCTION corn NRLL East,
LLC:AB2509, Buleziuk:AU3448,
Johnston:AU3449, Mauck:AU3447.

Medical Supplies
FREE DIABETIC SUPPLIES! MEDICARE PA-
TIENTS! Call Us Toll Free (866)294-3476 and'
receive a FREE METER! Am-Med Quality Diabetic
Supplies.


Miscellaneous


ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medi-
cal, *Business, *Paralegal, *Computers *Criminal
Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer pro-
vided. Financial Aid if qualified. Call (866)858-
2121 www onlineTidewaterTech corn '


DIVORCE$275-*350*CO ERS ,.ildrcr,. etc
Only' one signarure iecqu.rcd' *Eclelude c i fccil
Call weekdays --2.) clt i.".' t aim-opmi
Alta Divorce, LLC Eu.iiTh.hed 1-"-
AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paynmq
Aviation Main'ernrcc Cn'ccr F p d prrc% d 'ro.
6r.-nl JOct. pi,-crr.c nt a ,.i[an c C LL A'. .n.r.i

WOLFF TANNING BEDS Bu. Dat,..t ar.d Soc'
Full Body. units from A22 a month! FREE Color
Catalog CALL TODAY! (800)842-1305
www.np etstan corn .

Real Esrate
Gull front lots $595$k. rHlome:, .,rur.5 nm.d 31.0k
NCe w1-- :r i- p.,r.ncd oce.n fi-.r.r ..'..rr.i.A._r o'
beautiful Mustang Island, near, Corpus Christi, TX.
wwwcinnamonshore corn (866)891-5163.


WYOMING RANCH DISPERSAL 35 acres. -
49,900; 50 acres $59,900. Snow-capped mountain
views. Surrounded by gov't land. Abundant wildlife.
recreuilnor. p.jd-.c Le,:Low taxes. EZ terms. Call
L'luh Runc-e., LL(; .,,48)541L5263.


BL I'TIFUL N. C IROLIN.A. E'-- APE Tn-'E
HE NT ]N TiiE BE..L']IFUL PE CEFUL I.IOLIN-
TAINS OF WESTERN NC.Homes, Cabins; Acreage
& TN,'EST'.IENTS CIHEROKEE T.rOUT.T.%TN
C lO: l RE -L EST ATE.
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NC Gated Lakefroknt Community. Pleasantly
mild climate 1.5 acres, 90 miles of shoreline. Never:
offered h.l ir. 2.i pl .-dc' ie.:.pi.neit discounts,
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Heavily Wooded with Stream. EZ: Financing-
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VA MOUNTAINS Large 5 acre tract along very
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(866)789-85.35. '
TENNESSEE Affordable lakelake & mountain prop-
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1Four seasons- Southern hospitality. For. more info
Call 'Lakeside Realty' (888)291-5253
www' lakesiderealtv-tn. corn
Coastal Georgia- New, Pre- Construction Golf
Community. Large lots & condos .w/ deepwater,
marsh, golf, nature views. Gated, Golf, Fitness
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(877)266-7376 www. cooperspoint corn


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20 AC $99,900. Pay No Closing Costs. Terrific
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survey, subdivision potential, excel financing at the
unbelievable price of $99,900. CALL NOW!
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Licensed Real Estate Broker.
120 Acres Northeast Alabama private lake front-
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fishing, good timber value, excellent investment
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5422.


Advertising Networks of Florida '
Week of November 20, 2006 J


Walnut Crunch Pumpkin Pie
makes a spectacular
appearance at the table.'
Before it disappears, that is!
A classic, deep-dish
pumpkin pie that is crowned
with a broiled walnut-brown
sugar topping makes a pie
that's almost almost! -
too pretty to eat.
Kick off the holiday
season in great
Thanksgiving style by using
the advice and. checklist to
Get Ready f6r Thanksgiving
Sat
www.verybestbaking.com,
which reminds hosts to:
Get organized early: plan
your menu, detailed
shopping list and guest list a
few weeks ahead.
Make your home festive,
and get kids involved in
dressing up the table.
Organize on the big day:
Begin baking early; plan
.multiple uses of your oven;
'enlist help for setting the
table or setting up a casual
buffet.
For extra-special touches
to your holiday pies, view
the video on making the,
perfect pumpkin pie at
www.verybestbaking:com
(click on the "Advice" tab,
,then on "Baking 101 Video
Learning"). You'll also find
tasty tips to make all your
holiday baking spectacular.

WALNUT CRUNCH
PUMPKIN PIE
(Makes 8 servings)

1 9-inch deep-dish pie
shell, unbaked
1 1/4 cups coarsely
chopped walnuts


100% Pure Pumpkin
I1 (12-punce) can Nestle6
Carnation Evaporated Milk
3 4 cup granulated sugar
.2 large eggs. lightly
beaten
1 1/2 teaspoons pumpkin
pie spice
1/4 teaspoon salt
-3 tablespoons butter.
melted

PREHEAT oven to 4250 F.
COMBINE walnuts and
brown sugar in small bowl.
Place 3/4 cup nut-sugar.
mixture on bottom of pie
shell. Combine punipkin,
evaporated milk, granulated
sugar, eggs, pumpkin pie
spice and salt in medium
bowl; mix well. Pour into
pie shell.
BAKE 15 minutes.
Reduce temperature to 3500
F.; bake 40 to 50 minutes or
until knife inserted near
center comes out clean.
Cool on wire rack.
COMBINE butter and
remaining nut-sugar
mixture; stir until
moistened.. Sprinkle over
cooled pie. Broil about 5
inches from heat 2 to 3
minutes or until bubbly.
Cool before serving.
Nutrition Information per
serving: 500 calories; 240
calories from fat; 27g total
fat; 7g saturated fat; 80mg
cholesterol; 300mg sodium;
59g carbohydrate; 4g fiber;
47g sugars; 9g protein
Jenny Harper is Senior
Culinary Specialist for the
Nestl6 Test Kitchens and.
VeryBestBaking.com.
Courtesy of Family
Features


-_


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PAGE 4D, NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


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* CLSSIIEDMARETPACE- SRVIG NRTH LORDA ND OUT GERGI NOTH LORDA FCUS- NVEMER 2-2, 206,PAG li


Desserts dressed for the holidays


Allbritton's Pontiac-GMC
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During the 'holidays I
enjoy preparing elegant-
looking desserts for my
family and guests
because it adds that extra
bit of festivity to my
table.
Pumpkin Roll is a
traditional favorite of
spiced-pumpkin cake
rolled up with a sweet
cream cheese filling.
Chilled, sliced and
served with a sprinkle of
powdered sugar, it's a
festive classic. A new
favorite is colorfully,
appealing White Fudge
with Crystallized Ginger
& Cranberries. This
dessert blends the spark
of ginger flavor with the
tartness of cranberries
against sweet, melt-in-
your-mouth fudge. Pass
a pretty tray of these
sweet morsels around
the table on a pretty tray
and watch this fudge
disappear.
For more festive
dessert ideas, holiday
gift ideas and baking tkp.,
please visit
www.VeryBestBaking.co
m.

LIBBY'S PUMPKIN
ROLL
(Makes 10 servings)
CAKE
Powdered sugar
3/4 cup all-purpose
flour
1/2 teaspoon baking
powder
1/2 teaspoon baking,
soda
1/2 teaspoon ground
cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground
cloves
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 large eggs
1 cup granulated sugar
2/3 cup Libby's 100%
Pure Pumpkin
1 cup chopped walnuts
'(optional)
INCLUDEPICTURE
"http:/ /verybestbaking.c
om / assets/images/ space
er.gif" \*
MERGEFORMATINET
FILLING
1 package (8 ounces)
cream cheese, softened
1 cup sifted powdered
sugar
6 tablespoons butter or
margarine, softened
1 teaspoori vanilla
extract
Powdered sugar
FOR CAKE:
PREHEAT oven to 3750
F. Grease 15 x 10-inch
jelly-roll pan; line with
wax paper. Grease and
flour paper. Sprinkle a
thin, cotton kitchen
towel with powdered
sugar.
COMBINE flour,
baking powder, baking
soda, cinnamon, cloves
and salt in small bowl.
Beat eggs and sugar in
large mixer bowl until
thick. Beat in pumpkin.
Stir in flour mixture.


Spread evenly into
prepared pan. Sprinkle
with nuts.
'BAKE for 13 to 15
minutes or until top of
cake springs back when
touched. Immediately
loosen and turn cake
onto prepared towel.
Carefully peel off paper.
Roll up cake and towel
together, starting with
narrow end. Cool on
wire rack.
FOR FILLING:
BEAT cream cheese,.
powdered sugar, butter
and vanilla extract in
small mixer bowl until
smooth. Carefully unroll


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cake; remove towel.
Spread cream cheese
mixture over cake. Reroll
cake. Wrap in plastic
wrap and refrigerate at
least one hour. Sprinkle
with powdered sugar
before serving, if
desired.
Nutrition Information
per serving: 350 calories;
150 calories from fat; 16
g total fat; 10 g saturated
fat; 105 mg cholesterol;
280 mg sodium; 44 g
carbohydrate; <1 g fiber;
35 g sugars; 5 g protein

Courtesy of Family
Features


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CLASSIFIEDD MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


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PAGE 12D NOVEMBERa 22L2 2100I6I LNOTHFORD -FC I QQoIimaI ImVanill I rIi If Alm mi -- w fVVlInHn (ri %anIA


Toast the holidays with a cup of good cheer


Baking for dough


-.


$~FuIn


Food Network personality and cookbook
author Sandra Lee
When you celebrate the family a
holidays with a special toast this When
year, do it with a signature family a
cocktail that can become your cup of g
new tradition. But leave the, ways to
squeezing of citrus fruits, the your gu
boiling of simple syrup, and the spirit.
shopping for multiple ". Create
ingredients behind with the old Arran
year. Instead, serve those and up t
signature cocktails in a fax orite
wonderful ambiance that is easy Sho(
and convenient for you too. with a si


That's the
philosophy of TV
Food Network
personality and
cookbook author
Sandra Lee. Known
for her "Semi-
Homemade"
approach to cooking
and entertaining-
using prepared food
and drink in creative
ways Lee likes to
make holiday
entertaining easier as
well.
"The best gift of


all is the gift of time -
time to enjoy your
md friends," says Lee.
i you want to invite
nd friends over for a,
good cheer, here are
make sure both you and
ests keep that holiday

an Intimate Ambiance
age chairs cozily close
die tempo \tith your
holiday music
case the drinks table
ingle-color tablecloth


and clear glassware. Place a
large clear glass bowl in the
center of your table and let it
overflow with fresh fruit
Arrange a variety of store-
bought nibbles on decorative
plastic silver trays.
Set a stack of small plates
and color-coordinated paper
napkins next to the tray of food.
Surround with unscented
votive candles in clear glass
holders or small water glasses.'
For easy cleanup, pour half an
inch of water into each candle
holder.
Mix Up a Signature Drink
Use "ready-to-pour" cocktails
that require only a few
accoutrements or garnishes.
Heat apple cider and potu
into each glass cup or mug. Add
a jigger of ready-to-pour spiced
rum and garnish each cocktail
with a cinnamon stick stirrer.
Pull out tie blender ahead of
time to make a batch or two of
Jingle Bell Margaritas with
cranberry, pomegranate or
blood orange juice and a
squeeze of fresh lime juice.
Start \ith restaurant-quality.


ready-to-serve Jose Cuervo
Golden Margarita, which is
already blended with the rich
orange flavor of Grand
Marnier. Then mix in the juices
to taste. Golden Margarita is
also great served frozen or on
the rocks.
Serve a holiday chocolate
martini from ready-to-pour
mixes. Drop a chocolate "kiss"
or a few chocolate chips in
each martini glass.
Offer warm apple cider or
chilled sparkling water and
pomegranate juice for non-
alcoholic "mocktails." Then get
creative with the garnishes a
dusting of freshly grated
nutmeg and a slice of oven-
dried apple.for the cider, small
wedges of citrus fruit threaded
onto a fresh lemongrass stalk
for the sparkling water, fresh
cranberries threaded onto
branches of sugared rosemary
for the pomegranate juice
For more information on
mixing up a signature holiday,
cocktail, visit www.cuervo.com;

Courtesy of Family Features


Bake sale season is
officially open! Selling treats
*to raise cash is a breeze, when
you know what sells and how
to manage the perfect event.
Whether fund-raising for the
school band, drama club or
football boosters, here are
some of the most valuable tips
we've collected over the
years:
Make posters to promote
the bake sale: distribute to ,
conimuniti bulletin boards,
around school and to local
retirement homes and /
churches.
When promoting ouw bake


BUCKEYE CANDY
(Makes about 6 dozen
candies)

2 cups creamy peanut butter
(not all-natural)
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter or
margarine, softened
3 3/4 cups (16-ounce box)
powdered sugar
2 cups (12-ounce package)
Nestl6 Toll House Semi-
Sweet Chocolate Morsels
2 tablespoons vegetable
shortening
LINE baking sheets with
wax paper.
BEAT peanut butter and
butter in large mixer bowl
until creamy. Beat in
powdered sugar until mixture
holds together and is
moistened. Shape into 1-inch
balls, place on.prepared
baking sheets. Freeze 1 hour.
:MELT morsels and
shortening in medium,
microwave-safe bowl on
HIGH (100%) 1 minute; stir.
Morsels may retain some of
their shape. If necessary,
microwave at additional 10-
to 15-second intervals, stirring
just until melted.
DIP peanut butter centers
into melted chocolate using
toothpick, leaving small
portion of center uncovered.
Shake off excess chocolate
and scrape bottom of candy
on side of bowl. Return to
baking sheets; refrigerate until
chocolate sets. Store
refrigerated in covered
container.
Nutrition Information per
Serving: 100 calories; 50
calories from fat; 6g total fat;
2g saturated fat; Omg
cholesterol; 40mg sodium;
11g carbohydrate; 9g sugars; 2g protein
Jenny Harper is Senior
Culinary Specialist for the
Nestl6 Test Kitchens and
VeryBestBaking.com.


PAGE 12D, NOVEMBER 22-23, 2006 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


I MCLSSFID ARETLAE SERVING NORTHT~ FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA~r~l


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sale, include on the flyer and
posters a statement of how the
proceeds will be used.
Keep prices simple
increments of 25 cents) for
adding and making change.
Candies, cookies and bars
are always top sellers: Sell
them by the dozen, or bake
bars in disposable aluminum
pans that double as selling
containers.
Package some goodies in
small amounts, such as four or
six, so customers can "mix
md match."
'Set out a basket of
individually %%Tapped and
priced bars to entice "Eat
aow!" sales.
Use frosting colored with
school colors to decorate
cookies, bars and cakes.
Take orders from customers
n advance; charge a bit extra
for delivery.
Make sure anything
containingg allergens is clearly
labeled (i.e.. peanut allergies,
lairy allergies).
One of the sure-to-sell
terns is Buckeye Candy
TheY're from Ohio- the
BuckeN e State and let me
ell you, these irresistible no-
>ake peanut butter and
chocolate bites are easy and
nm to make. The kids will
njoy rolling the Buckeyes
nd dipping in melted
chocolate. Host a cand\-
naking part\ for your kids
nd friends and make sure
ou ha\ e enough for
sampling."
Whether looking to plan the
perfect bake sale, prepare
lel icious 'after-school sweets
or create picture-perfect
aurumn desserts, get inspired
S\\tat .\er\ BestBaking com.