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Suwannee Democrat
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028422/00020
 Material Information
Title: Suwannee Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: J.E. Pound
Place of Publication: Live Oak Fla
Creation Date: March 16, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
weekly[ former <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
Coordinates: 30.294444 x -82.985833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note: Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000398954
oclc - 33273856
notis - ACE4563
lccn - sn 95026787
lccn - 95026788
oclc - 33273861
System ID: UF00028422:00020
 Related Items
Preceded by: Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by: Suwannee leader
Preceded by: Suwannee citizen

Full Text





I-


T/he 5est Pg



1See Page 8D


I Race fans from South
Georgia and North Florida
attend inaugural race at
South Georgia Motorsports
Park - Focus 1C


SI-ANDS at
Live Oak to hold
annual community
Easter Egg Hunt -
Details Page 4-5B


wannrr


Midweek Edition - March 16, 2005


imn rntf


PO BOX 117007



Woman killed - four injured in crash


Susan K. Lamb
Democrat Managing Editor
A McAlpin woman lost her life
March 12 five miles east of Bran-
ford at CR 49 and 256th Street t hen
a driver failed to stop at a stop ignr
and rammed a car carrying five peo-
ple.
Barbara Evans, 67, of McAlpin.
:died in that crash at about 2:12 p.m.
:'Saturday, March 12, according to
.the Florida Highway Patrol. Four
,other women in the 1999 SUV k ere
injured when their vehicle \ struck broadside on the driver's side
by a 1991 GMC pickup truck that
failed to stop for a stop sign, FHP
said.
The driver of the vehicle that
failed to stop fled the scene on foot.
FHP said. On March 15 the FHP had
the Florida Department of Law En-
forcement Crime Lab in Branford
going over the pickup with a fine


tooth comb searching for forensic
and micro analysis evidence as to
\\ho \\as acruall drming that ,ehi-
cle. according to FHP Lt. Like Bur-
roughs.
DorothN Courtemanche. 42. of
IMcAlpin. driver of the SLUY. \as in-
lured in the crash. Burlroughs said
FHP feels the accident \\as alcohol-
related and therefore took a blood
sample from Courtemanche as a
routine matter.
Also injured were three others
\who were passengers in Courte-
manche's SLUV. Angel Rodnquez,
23, and Michelle Morris, 3. all of
McAlpin and Valene Smith. 41. of
O'Brien.
According to a press release filed
b\ FHP Trooper J T. Clark. The
pickup truck \\as eastbound on
256th Street \while the SUVY \as
northbound on CR 4c \when the
crash happened.


- ------


SEE WOMAN, PAGE 3A


****3-DIGIT 326 000000
JIM CUSICK
SMATHERS LIB. SPECIAL STUDY


90th county fair offers


something for everyone


thro

Susan K. Lamb
Democrat Managing Editor
The 90th Suwannee
County Fair i open and
-ready to ientetain you all.
week culminating %with a
concert by Country Music
star Blake Shelton Satur-
day night beginning at 7:30
p.m. The fair opened., at
5 p.m. Monday afternoon
with a official ribbon cut-
ting followed by the Youth
Goat Show, Bovine Cos-
tume Contest, Pee-Wee
Dair) Show, Adult Dairy
Challenge and beginning'
of a week-long series of
talent shows that will cul-
minate Friday evening
with the grand finale and
overall winner being
named.
Tuesday senior citizens
enjioed a free lunch fol-
lowmed by the fair midway


ough Saturday
opening followed b\ the political school
damr show. showmanship off.
contest, the second phase
of the talent show and a SEE F


arship bake-


AIR, PAGE 3A


A COW IN CURLERS: Carlie Herring and her cow, both
dressed in curlers, a nightgown and complete with flowers on
the cow's hooves, Won a trophy for the 'Most Detailed' Cos-
tume Monday night, March 15 in the Bovine Costume Contest
at the Suwannee County Fair. The fair will be running all week
beginning at 5 p.m. until 11 p.m. - Proto ivene Hanrnon


BRANFORD MAN INJURED IN MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT: A Branford man was injured Sunday
March 13 after he lost control of his motorcycle on CR 137,,According to passenger Michael Par-,
ris of Wellborn, the driver, Richard T. Hosmer of Branford, lost control of his motorcycle norlh-
bound on CR 137 approximately three miles from US 90. Parris, who said he was unhurt, said he
was thrown from the bike and refused medical treatment. Hosmer's motorcycle came to rest in a'
field just west of CR 137. Suwannee County Fire Rescue, Suwannee County Sheriff's Office, Flori-
da Highway Patrol and Wellborn Volunteer Fire Department responded to the scene. Hosmer was
transported to Shands at Live Oak Hospital for treatment of his injuries. The accident is under in-
vestigation by FHP. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


This 1999 Chevrolet
SUV, top, carried five
people, one who died
in the crash March 12
on CR 49 when it was
struck by the driver ol
this 1991 GMC pickup
truck, right, when the
Florida Highway Patrol
said the driver of the
pickup failed to stop at
an intersection. Bar-
bara Evans, 67, of
McAlpin, died in the
resulting crash.
.... - Phi eW Shilty Hiati . .
Brarilorri News Pubhlisher


County fair to host Country star

Blake Shelton Saturday night
Blake Shelton stining a song .ou' e come to


Susan K. Lamb
Derrocral Managing E.litor
The Suit annee County Fair \t ill host Coun-
rry Miusic star Blake Shelton Saturda\ night
at the rodeo arena for a night of Country Mu-
sic.
"Ole Red,"
"Some Beach,"
"Austin," "The .
Bab\.". Asphall
Co%%bo\," "In llNI
Hea. en." "The
Dreamei." "In M%
Neck of the
Woods," "Under-
neath the Same
Moon." "Someda\."
"Georgia In a Jug."
and "Playboys of the
S o uth w e ster n
World," are just some
of Blake' Shelton's
many hits and will hbe
likely be among the
songs he sings Salitrda3
night as the concert
kicks off at 7:30 p.m.
In a telephone interview with Blake Shel-
,ton recently, the Country star said he's taking
a little side trip to entertain at the Suwannee
County Fair's 90th event March 19. He's been
touring with Rascal Flatts but said he would
head to Live Oak from Texas to sing to' the
Live Oak fans that evening
Fans will surely be glad he did, as Blake
Shelton is one of the hottest Country Music
stars around today with his multiple hits.
Every time you turn on the radio, you hear


loe.
Blake said he's loved singing most of his
life and knewl at an earl\ age lie wanted to
ha e a career in music "I loi ed music as a
teenager more than most kids." he said.
"That's when I realized
I % anted to make it my
S.., t l. life." he added. As a
child hlie sang irn lal-

singing ability. Blake
said when he %\as 16
and gro ing up in
AohAda, Oklahoma. he
had his own car, but
Snone of his friends
would d ride %%ith
him because he al.-
ways had the
same music on.
Some of his fa-
vorite perform-,
ers were Tra% is
Trift and Earl
Thomas Conley.
"Nobod, in Oklahoma had ever heard of
Kelly Willis, but I \\as just killing her album
in mi, car!"
Another Ada, Oklahoma resident had been
Mae Boren Axton, a legend in Country ,and
Rock N Roll song writing who had moved to
Nashville years before. But, Mae Axton uisit-
ed her hometown and met Blake, encouraging
him to look her up in Nashville. Well, Blake
took that as a person invitation and did just
that when he arrived Several years later. It
w as a deed that paid off in spades as Mae.\-

SEE COUNTY, PAGE 3A


TODAY'S
WEATHER


Big Deals during The Big Dance.*
The Price You See on the Tag is the Price You Pay.
It's That Easy!*


WES HANEY A
Just East Of Downtown. 362-2976 Live O0


Suwannee County should see scattered thunderstorms in the morn-
ing then mainly cloudy during the afternoon with thunderstorms likely.
High today around 71�F. For up to the minute weather information go
to www.suwanneedemocrat.com FEATURED ON PAGE 7B


INDEX
Calendar......................................4-1 1C
Classifieds ...............................1-5D
Sports ........................................ 1-3B
Suwannee. Living .......................... 5A
Viewpoint ...................................... 4A
Legal Notices................................ 9B


AREA DEATHS
Jeanette Lanier, 75, Branford
Ruby Jordan Stewart, 74, Live Oak
Velma 1. Lehman Wilcox, 83, Dowling Park
Curtis Evans, 79, Live Oak
Yvonne Richards, 59, Live Oak
Anthony Lamonda, 74, Live Oak
Kathryn Mahoney, 72, Live Oak
Mae Helen Polite Stills, 60, Live Oak
OBITUARIES ON PAGE 6A


D&iry Queen
Business of the Week
,, S. Winner of a
Complimentary
S D Frozen
Cake from

*1


www.suwanneedemocrat.com


Serving Suwannee County since 1884












ON THE FLIPSIDE


HOW TO REACH US

Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, www.suwanneedemocrat.com
Mail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
* Publisher,
Myra Regan, ext. 122


CONTACT US WITH

YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, contact us by phone or
make contact through the
Internet through our web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com


NEWSROOM
* Managing Editor,
Susan K. Lamb, ext. 131
* Sports Reporter,
Janet Schrader-Seccafico, ext. 134
* Reporter,
Yvette Hannon, ext. 130
. Editorial Clerk,
Marsha Hitchcock, ext. 132


ADVERTISING
* Retail Advertising Manager,
Monja Robinson, ext. 105
* Advertising Representative,
Bill Regan, ext. 107
* Advertising Representative,
Joel Turner, ext. 109
* Advertising Representative,
Kathy Sasser, ext. 160
* Classified Advertising Manager /
Telesales Ad Representative,
Myrtle Parnell, ext. 103
* Classified/Legal,
Louise Sheddan, ext. 102


CIRCULATION
* Circulation Manager,
Angie Sparks, ext. 152
* Circulation
Service Hours, M-F 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Subscription Rates,
In-county, $30 Out-of-county, $40



#uwannr

Ormofrat




Serving Suwannee
County Since 1884

The Suwannee Democrat, published
Wednesday and Friday.
Periodicals postage paid at
Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located
at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
FL. Publication number 530180.

"POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL
32064."' Annual subscription rate is
$30 in county, $40 out of county and
$40 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.
OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday - Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Letters, comments and opinions on
the Viewpoint & Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Suwannee Democrat.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters may be mailed, faxed or
e-mailed to our office. All letters are
read. Not all letters are published.
Letters may be edited to fit available
space. The editor should not alter the
writer's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
the point, an ideal range is 150 to
200 words. Please include your
name, address, and day and evening
phone numbers for verification.
Letters MUST be signed. Letters to
the Editor can be limited to one'"
letter per quarter per individual.


SPEAK OUT SUWANNEE
Call 386-208-8314. Comments to
Speak Out Suwannee MUST include
your name and day and evening
phone numbers for verification. We will
include your name with your
comment. Speak Out Suwannee
comments can be ----.,
limited to one comment "* '.
per quarter per individual.
.ih7 4 'nr',o,'i.-,',1 PI ri ,)f


BRIEFLY


Office hours with
Congressman Boyd's staff
in Live Oak today
A member of Congressman
Allen Boyd's (D-North Flori-
da) staff will be visiting Live
Oak today so the people of
Suwannee County have the
opportunity to personally dis-
cuss issues concerning them.
Congressman Boyd's staff is
trained to assist constituents
with a variety of issues relat-
ing to various federal agen-
cies. It is important to Con-
gressman Boyd that his staff is
available for those who are not
able to travel to either his
Panama City or Tallahassee
offices. Office hours with
Congressman Boyd's staff this
month will be today, Wednes-
day, March 16, from 9:30 a.m.
- 11:30 a.m., Live Oak City
Hall, Live Oak.
Branford Camera Club
will meet March 17
Branford Camera Club,
7:30 p.m., Thursday, March
17; Branford Public Library;
Speaker: Gilbert Bernardo -
antique cameras; Info: Car-
olyn Hogue, 386-935-2044;
Gilbert Bernardo, 386-935-
0340; Dick Bryant, 386-935-


1977; Dick Madden, 386-935-
0296.
American Red Cross will
hold an Adult, Infant and
Child CPR and First Aid
class in Lake City March 17
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley; Adult, In-
fant and Child CPR and First
Aid class; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Thursday, March 17; 264 NE
Hernando Ave., Suite 102,
Lake City. Info: 386-752-
0650.
2005 Florida Trail
Conference, Live Oak,
March 18-20
2005 Florida Trail Confer-
ence; March 18-20, Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park and
Campground, Live Oak;
Info/registration: 877-HIKE-
FLA; www.floridatrail.org or
386-362-3256.
Register now!
Suwannee Parks &
Recreation offers Umpire
Clinic March 19
Suwannee Parks & Recre-
ation; volunteer umpires need-
ed for Babe Ruth program;
*free, one-day Umpire Clinic;
10 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday,
March 19, First Federal Sport-
splex; season: April-May; All-


star games: June-July. Volun-
teer positions open: coaches,
assistant coaches, team moms,
concession workers, team
sponsors and scorekeepers;
training available; Info: 386-
362-3004.
International F. &A.M.
Masons and Order of East-
ern Star, Lake City present
a free barbecue March 19
International F. &A.M. Ma-
sons and Order of Eastern
Star presents a free barbecue
for anyone 21 and older at 5
p.m., March 19, at the Lodge
and Chapter on SW Sisters
Welcome Road, off U.S. 90,
Lake City; free barbecue
sandwiches, drinks, music
and door prizes; Bring a date,
a friend or a relative. Info:
Karla, 386-752-6266 or 386-
754-9461.
Porch sale to benefit Puppy
Place CARES March 19
Porch sale to benefit Puppy
Place CARES, a nonprofit an-
imal support group; 9 a.m.-3
p.m., Saturday, March 19;
White Springs Bed and Break-
fast, US 41 and Kendrick
Ave.; all new merchandise;
Info, donations, newsletter:
386-397-1665.


Local man arrested after gun incident


A local man has been arrest-
ed after an incident involving
a gun. Robert Daniel Wintle,
27, 13764 92nd Terrace, was
arrested March 6 by Suwannee
County Deputy Danny Wat-
son. Watson charged Wintle
with improper exhibition of a
firearm.
The arrest came after Wat-
son was on patrol on US 90 at
about 6 a.m. and was ap-
proached by a male walking
east. He told the deputy he was
walking toward Live Oak


when a green SUV slowed
down and a firearm was aimed
at him from the vehicle. He
identified the man with the
gun as Robert Wintle and told
Deputy Watson he had been
involved in an argument with
him earlier in the day in
Wayne Frier's Trailer Park. As
the deputy entered the trailer
park looking for Wintle, he
observed Wintle leaving the
park and stopped his vehicle.
A search revealed a gun in a
black holster in a mesh storage


- 0
. Passion Week

( Revival w

,->, First Baptist Church -
of Dowling Park
March 20-24, 2005
Time: 7:00 Nightly
Evangelist: Rev. David Downing
C ome joir us for a griat week of \\oiship
and anointed preaching as v. e celebrate
the resurrection of.l esus Chrnsl.
John 3:16
"For God so loved the world that [
He gave His only begotten Son, that
whosoever would believe in Him would
--'l~1 not perish, buthave everlasting life."


area behind the driver and in
front of Wintle.
Wintle was arrested and
transported to the Suwannee
County Jail where his bond
was set at $1,000. Wintle
posted bond and was re-
leased.


Arrest Record


Editor's note: The Suwan-
nee Democrat prints the en-
tire arrest record each week.
If your name appears here
and you are later found not
guilty or the charges are
dropped, we will be happy to
make note of this in the news-
paper when judicial proof is
presented to us by you or the
authorities.
The following abbrevia-
tions are used below:
SCSO-Suwannee County
Sheriffs Office
LOPD-Live Oak Police
Department.
FDLE-Florida Department
of Law Enforcement.
FHP-Florida Highway Pa-
trol.
DOT-Department of Trans-
portation
P and P-Probation and Pa-
role
SCDTF-Suwannee County
Drug Task Force
March 10, Cetoria Yvette
Brown, 24, 611 Seventh
Street, battery, LOPD J.
Craig.
March 10, Justin Haulsee,
24, 9272 141st Dr., violation
of probation on original
charges of dealing in stolen
property, possession of con-
trolled substance, sale of con-
trolled substance, P and P C.
Suber.
March 10, Lisa Kerklin
Land, 25, Branford, writ of
bodily attachment (Lafayette
County), SCSO T. Lee.
March 10, Trudy Paulsen
Mansfield, 37, 1522 NW Sec-
ond St., violation of proba-
tion on original charge of
grand theft III, SCSO T. Ro-
driguez.
March 10, Catherine Diane
Milstead, 38, 711 Irvin Av-
enue, conspiracy to sell a
controlled substance, SCDTF
L: Rogers'.' '
March 10, 'Percy Lee
Owens, 19, 611 Seventh
Street, bond revoked, LOPD
J. Craig.
March 10, Cedric Jerome
Smith, 36, 508 Dunn Ave.,
violation of probation on
original charge of attempted
purchase of cocaine, P and P
J. Bristol.
March 10, Betty Jenkins
Sullivan, 64, 18547 CR 132,
retail theft - second offense,
SCSO T. Rodriguez.
March 10, Cindy Marie
Tillman, 24, 1310 Marion St.,
violation of probation on
original charges of posses-
sion of more than 20 grams
marijuana, possession of
drug paraphernalia, SCSO T.
Lee.
March 10, Steve Clayton
Vermillion, 38, 711 Irvin
Ave., conspiracy to sell co-
cainie, SCDTF L. Rogers.
March 10, William Ray
Yaun Jr., 25, 614 Helvenston
Street, sentenced to 30 days,
SCSO C. Smith.
March 11, Craig Micheal
Balzafiore, 30, Bell, no dri-
vers license, failure to appear


Touchton's
ating & * A i rC o Itoi

Sales * Service * Installation
10156 U.S. Hw3. 90 East, Live Oak
j Commitment to Excellence


Owners: Jan
& Sarah Touchton


www.Touchtons.com
CAC058747
147739JRS-F


on original charge of no dri-
vers license (Gilchrist Coun-
ty), OALE J. Brooks.
March 11, Robert Miley
Brown, 28, Mayo, failure to
appear on original charge of
expired tag more than six
months, SCSO B. Mincks.
March 11, Lanney K.
Kostal, 32, Gainsborough,
Tenn., violation of probation
on original charges of utter-
ing forgery, SCSO D. Leach.
March 11, James Edward
Solomon, 36, 805 McGee St.,
possession of cocaine with
intent to sell, possession of
drug paraphernalia, LOPD D.
Slaughter.
March 11, Scotty Starnes,
33, Jacksonville, failure to
stop for inspection, driving
while license suspended -
knowingly, OALE C. Mc-
Gauley.
March 11, Ronnie Eugene
Watson, 31, 306 Johnson
Blvd., sale of cocaine within
1000 feet of a school, posses-
sion of cocaine with intent to
sell, SCDTF T. Warren.
March 11, Christy White,
29, 11075 CR 49, violation of
probation on original charge
of workers compensation
fraud, LOPD K. Hurst.
March 11, Antonial Renard
Williams, 39, 2822 113th
Rd., possession of cocaine
with intent to sell, sale of co-
caine, possession of drug
paraphernalia, SCDTF R.
Sammons.
March 11, Kelly William
Woods, 37, Lake Butler, re-
turn for court, SCSO S. Law.
March 12, Brian Benton,
39, Brownfield, Texas, dri-
ving while license suspend-
ed, OALE L. Kent.
March 12, Angel Ernesto
Rodriguez, 23, McAlpin,
burglary, grand theft (DeSoto
County), possession of Ilss
than 20 grams cannabis, pos-
session of drub paraphernalia
(Alachua County), FHP C.
Tomlinson.
March 13, Michael Lee
Hancock, 38, Lake City, dri-
ving under the influence with
property damage, FHP J.
Clark.
March 14, Ronald
Woodrow Bowman, 46, 412
Carver St., violation of pro-
bation on original charges of
burglary of a structure, deal-
ing in stolen property, SCSO
S. Law.
March 14, Shantiell April
Cuffy, 23, 812 Maple St., as-
sault, LOPD J. Rountree.
March 14, Ray Anthony
Duncan Jr., 19, 612 N. Ohio
Avenue, driving while li-
cense suspended or revoked
knowingly, resisting officers
without violence, possession
of less than 20 grams
cannabis, inciting a riot,
LOPD D. Slaughter.
March 14, Julio Granado
Landrau, 21, Lake City, no
valid drivers license, failure
to appear on original charge
of petit theft, FHP B. Stewart.
March 14, Issac Santiago-
Bautista, 21, 1405 NE Duval
St. Lot 27, no drivers license
- third offense, FHP D.
Caulk.
March 14, Dodie Leigh
Welch, 23, 17363 76th Street,
sentenced to three days in
county jail contempt of civil
court, SCSO A. Loston.
March 14, Anthony Ed-
ward Wentworth, 55,
O'Brien, aggravated assault,
battery (domestic violence),
violation of injunction, SCSO
J. Kastor.
March 14, Craig Alan
Woodham, 41, 1203 Main
Street, contempt of court,
failure to pay child support,
SCSO S. Law.


CASH 3 PLAY 4
3/14/05.. 0,8,1 3/14/05 .. 1,9,0,4
FANTASY 5
3/14/05 ........... 4,7,12,28,29
MEGA MONEY .....3,9,20,29,5
LOTTO .....3,4,19,29,34,37


. , - ,-- ' L .<:,-o "' "- ' . - ,. - - ,-; ,; " , *-; , ,. ' ,,, .' ,', .





.:||-, ----j . ,.















;-- -.f . S ; ^ ^' _ . . ., ' '.-









A TWO SEMI ACCIDENT ON CR 51: An accident occurred in the early morning hours of
March 11 involving a Goldkist tractor trailer truck loaded with chickens and another semi at
the corner of CR 51 and 193rd Road. Both drivers of the vehicles were transported by
Suwannee County Fire/Rescue to Shands at Live Oak Hospital for medical treatment. Florida
Highway Patrol, Suwannee County Sheriff's Office responded to the scene. The accident is
under investigation by FHP. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


New in Live Oak


AMH Counseling


(386) 362-6483 * 1-800-691-9493

Individual Counseling d hi
Group Counseling "Assoation
Group Counseling Blue Cross Blue Shield
Sliding Scale Fee Accepted
Proras-t povie ubsane Aus
Threaten forCour & D I Mnat-ed Claien


1362-4 . 5


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16,2005


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK -


PAGE 2A


'7 12 P I I






PAGE 3A


USDA to hold buy-out Cherry Holmes Family to entertain
a - - . %- 2 1 * R A I - _


meeting
ULSDA'- Farm Service Agenct, (FSA i iilll
hold :ian information meeting for tobacco
quota produces iand qu.ta holders tonight,
Wednesday. March 1(. in Li.e Oak. to dis-
cut., the newv Tobacco Transition Pa. m-ent
Program iTTPPi.
Sign-up fur this program ends June 1"
Producers ', ho do not sign up before June
17 ill not rece''.e .a 2(J05 pa l enit
WHO: This meetin-2 is fi.or icbacco quo-
ta producers 'ho' are o'. ners. operators.
landlord-, tenants,. or sharecroppers v.ho
shared in the risk of producing tobacco
antlime betv een 200,2 and 220114 It is also
for quota holders -x ho owncd a farm .xith a


tonight
20 )- b.isic miarketiiin quiiota a of (O)ctuhbeT
'22. 20104.
WHAT: Thic mneeimr v.ill! explain 'ah.o
is eligible for the Tobhacco Tran-iii on Pa',-
mnent Program also called the Tobacco
Bu;.oitiI. \toiI tpes of quota tobacco are
ehgible and ho\l qi.uota producers and quo-
La holders can obtain payments
WHEN: March I h at 0-30 p m.
WHERE: Ar the Su',\annee Count',
High School AuditoritLuIm. 314 SW Pine
Ave. in Lixe Oak
For more inforImadtiLn on the T'bacco
Transition Payment Program. %isni
,.\\ I.tsa usd..gov robacco on the Internet


Fair


Continued From Page 1A

Today, handicap citizens
will enjoy a special day at the
fair, followed by free admis-
sion from 5 - 6 p.m. for stu-
dents ages 6-18 and pay one
price wristband day for $15
with $2 off the wristband with
a coupon. Also on he agenda
is the youth heifer show at 6
p.m.
On Thursday, it's another
pay one price wristband day
for $15, the Youth Hog show,
more talent show and the Egg
Drop Challenge.


Friday, it's midnight mad-
ness with another pay one
price wristband day for $15
with elementary school tours
during the morning and the
Youth Steer Show that
evening beginning at 6 p.m.
and the grad finale talent
show.
Saturday, the last day of this
year's fair, there will be a 5K
race beginning at 9 a.m. with
entry from 8-9 a.m., one price
wristband at $15 all day until
closing time and the sale of
the Youth Livestock animals
beginning at 1:30 p.m. In the


evening beginning at 7:30
p.m., the Blake Shelton con-
cert is expected to pack the
rodeo arena and fairgrounds
as this Country Star performs.
Take the family and head on
out to see the exhibits, the rab-
bits, chickens, goats, steers,
heifers and goats, the midway
and entertainment all week
long at the Suwannee County
Fair's 90th edition. You'll be
glad you did.
Susan K. Lamb may be
reached by calling 1-386-362-
1734 ext. 131 or by mailing
susan. lamb @ gaflnews. com.


t a Music Park Friday March 18


Your eyes may be seeing a
dad, a mom, and their four
children (ages 12-20). But
your ears are hearing veteran
musicians playing bluegrass
music. The band "Cherry
Holmes" is on stage playing
the music with their trademark
drive and fresh new energy.
Hitting their stride in 2003,
they traveled thousands of
miles in their vintage 1960
GM 4104 bus in their first
year on the road. The band
played The Grand Ole Opry,
Ernest Tubb's Midnight Jam-
boree, Nashville's Country
Music Fan Fare, Branson,
Dollywood, IBMA Fan Fest
and countless festival and con-
cert venues throughout the
U.S.
The first year also found the
family receiving numerous
nominations and awards. Be-
ing named "Entertaining
Group of the Year" at SPBG-
MA's 2003 Midwest conven-
tion. They also garnered a top
nomination for "Entertaining
Group of the Year" at SPBG-
MA's 2004 National Conven-
tion in Nashville, along with
IIIrd Tyme Out and the Del


McCoury Band.
As they begin their second
year their plate is full. Book-
ings for festivals, concerts,
television, and radio shows
stretch far into 2005.Their lat-
est recording "Bluegrass
Vagabonds" is doing well, and
plans are being made for an-
other later in 2004.
Since emerging on the na-
tional bluegrass scene, Cherry
Holmes has thrilled audiences
from coast to coast. Bringing
crowds to their feet at nearly
every performance, driving it
hard and serving it straight up,
they are "The Real Deal."
From the West Coast to the
east, the group Cherry Holmes
rouses their audiences, bring-
ing them to their feet at nearly
every performance. This
young family veteran musi-
cians playing traditional blue-
grass with a fresh and exciting
new energy.
Eleven-year-old fiddler
Molly Kate wrote and per-
formed her fiddle tune
"Frankie Belle" on Rhonda
Vincent's new CD "One Step
Ahead." By spring of 2003,
they had played in Branson

" ' '' \


- .


and Dollywood, and made
their first appearances on the
Grand Ole Opry, Ernest
Tubb's Midnight Jamboree,
and Nashville's Country Fan
Fare.
By the end of 2003, they
had performed at IBMA's Fan
Fest and received SPBGMA
nominations for "Entertaining
Group of the Year," "Tradi-
tional Bluegrass Band of the
Year," and "Album of the
Year." Molly Kate was nomi-
nated for "Fiddle Player of the
Year." Frank's Fiddles, Gibson
mandolins, Huber banjos, and
Black Diamond Strings have
given the family their endorse-
ments as well.
They have performed on
many radio and television
shows throughout the country
and will be performing at
many major bluegrass festi-
vals throughout the United
States in 2004, including their
own new festival at the
Hoofer's Gospel Barnam in La
Grange, GA.
Enjoy the Cherry Holmes
Family on Friday, March 18 at
the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park 386-364-1683.



S- -


County


li t,


Continued From Page 1A

ton introduced him to many
influential people, something
that led to his becoming a star.
But, stardom didn't come
overnight. Blake arrived in
Nashville in 1994 and didn't
get his debut until seven years
later when he recorded
"Austin," a huge hit still being
played on radio everywhere
today. Blake said he met
many people along the way
who. were struggling just like
him, most who are still strug-
gling to get that one big break
just like he did. "There's a lot
of guilt. Sometimes I hate go-
ing down to Broadway and
Nashville and seeing them,"
he said of the talented musi-
cians and singers who fre-
quently sing on the streets for
opportunity and tips. "There
are a lot that are more talented
than me. But, I made a lot of


good choices," he said of his
career's upward swing.
Blake said Mae Axton's in-
troducing him to Bobby Brad-
dock was his big break. "She
was a door opener," he said of
Mae, who is now deceased.
Mae introduced Blake to her
son, Hoyt Axton, who sang to
Blake a song that would later
be a number one hit for Blake,
"Old Red."
Blake recently purchased a
460-acre farm in Nashville
where .he. and his new bride,
Kaynette, live. Away from
the lights, the crowds, the
fans, the two raise pheasants
and quail. "I bought the farm
to go hunting," Blake admits.
"I live for deer and turkey
hunting," he added when told
Florida has lots of deer and
turkey.
When he's home, he enjoys
the farm, hunting, fishing and
being with his bride. And,


Suwannee Parks & Recreation

offers Umpire Clinic March 19
Suwannee Parks & Recreation; volunteer umpires needed for
Babe Ruth program; free, one-day Umpire Clinic; 10 a.m.-2
p.m., Saturday, March 19, First Federal Sportsplex; season:
April-May; All-star games: June-July. Volunteer positions open:
coaches, assistant coaches, team moms, concession workers,
team sponsors and scorekeepers; training available; Info: 386-
362-3004.


when he's on the road,
Kaynette travels with him, as
she will when Blake comes to
Live Oak Saturday night.
Tickets are still available for
the show and the $7 ticket will
get you into the Suwannee
County Fair and to the Blake
Shelton performance. Arrive
early as seats are expected to
go fast. Tickets are available
from the Fair office at the
Suwannee County Fairgrounds
or from the Suwannee County
Chamber of Comrierce on
south Ohio Avenue across
from Dairy Queen.
Susan K. Lamb may be
reached by calling 1-386-362-
1734 ext. 131 or by mailing
susan. lamb @ gaflnews. com.

Suwannee District
Schools will
administer Spring
2005 Assessments -
SAT 10 March 21-23
Suwannee District Schools.
will administer Spring 2005
Assessments - SAT 10 - March
21-23. SAT 10 is for Grade K-
2. Each school has more de-
tailed testing information
available. Daily student atten-
dance is critical during these
assessment periods.


p . . ....


I Vct l atill of the
online resources to hiake
your loan process fast & easy.


tic,


And to sweeten the deal...
Log on to www.ffsb.com to register
to win 1 of 3 Satellite Radios!
Please see official rules and details at www.ffsb.com.


FDIC Insured
*1 -h l l,, I. ,,1'


Em.


FIRST FEDERAL
. ~ IN . B NK . LORIIDA


Cherry Holmes Family


Woman-


Continued From Page 1A

Rodriguez, one of the pas-
sengers in . Courtemanche's
SUV, was arrested later after
being treated at Shands at


Live Oak. Rodriguez was
arrested on warrants from
DeSoto County for burglary
and grand theft and for war-
rants from Alachua County for
possession of less than 20


grams cannabis and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia.
Susan K. Lamb may be
reached by calling 1-386-362-
1734 ext. 131 or by mailing
susan. lamb @ gaflnews.com.


A5. B' 1


Premature babies


need hope, love


*v', , ' , , ,%, * -

Glenda Williams
Suwannee County
Honorary Chair


REPORTER HANDS SHANI

A r " " it"at .lke Shore aL Iive OI

SAVrDL- inBLAN IIBa
� l FIRST FEDERAL


and you.

By joining March of Dimes WalkAmerica,
you can help save babies from premature
birth. Every year, more than 470,000 babies
are born too soon. Some die; others face
lifelong disability. Premature birth is a
common, .serious and costly problem.
And it affects us all.

Walk for someone you love.'"
Walk in honor of your own baby, a relative's
or a friend's. Please join me and
* raise money to fight premature birth
* form a WalkAmerica team in your
company
* ask family and friends to participate

See you at WalkAmerica on:
)S April 16, 2005
k Theme: Walk For Someone You Love
Place: Olustee Park Downtown Lake City
S Address: 169 North Marion Avenue
0 RRegister: 8:00 AM
Register on line walkamerica.org
or call 1-800-525-9255
Questions: call 386-755-0507


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16,2005


.. ... .. .. . ... .











VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


BIBLE VERSE

"The fear of the LORD teaches a man
wisdom, and humility comes before
honor." --Proverbs 15:33


S umannr t hmarrat


MYRA C. REGAN
Publisher

SUSAN K. LAMB
Managing Editor


Members of the Suwannee
Democrat editorial board are r./ra
C. Regan, puthliher and Susan KI
Lamb, managing editor Our
View is formed by that board.


OPINION

- CLERK'S

CORNER


BY KENNETH DASHER


Suwannee County

Government
Suwannee County, a political subdivision of the State of Florida,
was created by an act of the Florida Legislature on Dec. 21, 1858.
We are governed by a five-member board of County Commission-
ers (BOCC) who are elected to represent their respective districts
for four year terms. The commissioners' terms are staggered such
that every two years either two or three Commissioners are elect-
ed. As a board, the commissioners consider all matters of concern
to the county.
The BOCC serves as the Legislative branch of county govern-
ment as well as having responsibility for many Executive Branch
functions. The other elected officials serving Suwannee County in-
clude the clerk of the circuit court, property appraiser, sheriff, su-
pervisor of elections and tax collector. Furthermore, we elect a su-
perintendent of schools and five school board members who are re-
sponsible for public education in Suwannee County.
The BOCC has a staff of 235 employees who carry out the poli-
cies and directives of the board. The various departments responsi-
ble to the BOCC, either directly or through the county coordinator,
include: county administration; Suwannee County Airport; 911
Addressing; building department; code enforcement; planning and
zoninc.soil and v.i ter conser-.ation. fire and EMIS, emergency
management: public works R.ioad and Bridge and Solid Waste);,
Suwannee River Regional Library; Suwannee Parks and Recre-'
ation; extension office; veterans' services; maintenance and custo-
dial services. These are the departments which provide a vast array
of services to the citizens of Suwannee County.
Each constitutional officer is responsible for numerous constitu-
tional and statutory duties. While they are independent of the
BOCC, their offices must interact with each other and some of their
budgets are the responsibility of the BOCC. Suwannee County cit-
izens are fortunate to be served by knowledgeable, hard-working
and dedicated elected officials.
The responsibilities of the clerk of the circuit court include:
Chief financial officer for the BOCC, auditor and comptroller, bud-
get officer, clerk to the board, recorder and guardian of official
records, and clerk to the county and circuit courts. The clerk has a
staff of 38 deputy clerks who assist him in meeting his duties and
responsibilities.
The property appraiser, Lamar Jenkins, is responsible for deter-
mining the assessed value of all real property and tangible person-
al property in Suwannee County. He accepts and approves a vari-
ety of exemptions including Homestead Exemption. The Property
Appraiser reports annually to the BOCC the certified role of prop-
erty values in Suwannee County. The property appraiser has a staff
of 10.
The sheriff, Tony Cameron, is the chief law enforcement officer
in the county and operates the county jail. Among his responsibili-
ties are maintaining public safety, courtroom security, crime pre-
vention, crime investigation, and traffic control and accident inves-
tigations. The Sheriff has 37 deputies, 26 correctional deputies, and
30 civilian employees who assist him in carrying out his duties.
The supervisor of elections, Glenda Williams, registers voters,
provides voter education, recruits and trains poll workers, and as-
sists candidates for political office each election cycle. Most im-
portantly, she conducts the elections in Suwannee County. The su-
pervisor has a staff of two working with her to serve you.
The tax collector, George Burnham, receives the property taxes
assessed in Suwannee County, issues vehicle license plates, boat
registrations, hunting and fishing licenses, and driver's licenses.
Additionally, the tax collector can register voters in Suwannee
County. The tax collector has a staff of 12 assisting in serving you.
It is an honor and privilege to serve you as your clerk of the cir-
cuit court, and if you need additional information or would like to
tour our offices, please give me a call at 362-0500.


IMPORTANT INFORMATION

IMPORTANT NUMBERS
Fire/crime or other emergency
911
Suwannee County Sheriff's Office
1/386/362-2222
Live Oak Police Department
1/386/362-7463

FLOOD INFORMATION NUMBER
Suwannee River Water Management District's flood informa-
tion phone number: 1/386/362-6626 or FL toll-free 1/800/604-
2272. Website is mysuwanneeriver.com

Please address letters to:
Letters To The Editor, Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Please include your name, full address and daytime
phone number. We ask -this so we can varify your letter
and discuss any questions about it with you.


COMMENTARY

Anti-intellectualism at Harvard


Dr. Lanrry Summers, Harvard's presi-
dent, remains under siege for remarks
(HYPERLINK "http://www.presi
dent.harvard. edu/speeches
/2005/nber.html" www.president.har-
vard.edu/speeches/2005/nber.html) made
in his Jan. 14 address to the National Bu-
reau of Economic Research (NBER). Dr.
Summers suggested that there might be
three major reasons why women are un-
derrepresented in the higher reaches of sci-
ence and ranked them in order of impor-


tance.
First is what Dr. Summers calls the "high-powered job hypothe-
sis," where success demands putting in 80-hcur weeks, and men are
more willing or capable to do so. In support of how marriage and
family impact women's careers, he added that when one does see
women in the higher reaches of science, they tend to be unmarried or
have no children.
Dr. Summers' second hypothesis is that there are sex differences
in IQ and aptitude at the high end, and his third is that socialization
and discrimination might explain some of the underrepresentation.
It's Dr. Summers' second hypothesis that caused MIT biologist Dr.
Nancy Hopkins to leave the lecture, explaining to a Boston Globe
(Jan. 17, 2005) reporter that, "I would've either blacked out or
thrown up." Previous temper tantrums served Dr. Hopkins well as
reported in the Women's Freedom Network Newsletter (Jan./Feb.
2000), "MIT Tarnishes Its Reputation with Junk Gender Science,"
by Judith Kleinfeld. After claiming sex discrimination, "Professor
Hopkins received an endowed chair, a 20 percent salary increase,
$2.5 million of research funds from internal MIT sources, a 5,000
square foot laboratory, an invitation to join the prestigious National
Academy of Sciences, and an invitation to the White House where
president and Mrs. Clinton praised her courage and expressed the
hope that other institutions would follow the MIT example."
Virtually all academic literature on sex, IQ and aptitude reach the
conclusion that there are differences between men and women.
While the mean intelligence between men and women is similar,
the variance differs significantly. Women cluster more about the
mean while men are more spread out. That means fewer women,


A

MINORITY

VIEW


relative to men, are at both the low end
and the high end of the intelligence and
aptitude spectrum. That might partially
explain why so many men are in jail
compared to women, and why more ge-
niuses like Mozart and Einstein are
men. On last year's SAT math test,
more than twice as many boys as girls
scored in the top range (750-800).
The only debate among scholars isn't
whether these patterns exist but whether
they reflect acculturation or genetics. A


substantial body of work suggests genetics. The fact of business is
that we do differ genetically by race and sex, not only in intelligence
and aptitude, but in physical ways as well.
Why in the world would we deny these differences, and deny their
effects on observed outcomes, particularly in an academic setting
where there's supposed to be open inquiry? I think we do so for a
couple of foolish reasons. First, most of us share the value of equal-
ity before the law. We falsely believe that equality before the law re-
quires that we must in fact be equal. In my book, being a human be-
ing is the only condition for equality before the law. The second rea-
son has to do with human arrogance. If a particular outcome is
deemed undesirable and it's genetically determined, our hands are
tied and we just have to accept it.
Dr. Summers has responded to the criticism created by his NBER
remarks with serial mea culpas, groveling and apologies. He's in
deep trouble. Faculty members don't differ that much from chickens
in a barnyard. The sight of the boss chicken bleeding is all that's
needed for the vicious pecking to commence.
If there's a legitimate criticism that can be made about Dr. Sum-
mers' NBER comments, it's that he didn't exercise discretion. There
are certain things best left unsaid in front of children. Children have
little understanding and can be easily offended by. unvarnished
truths.
Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason
University. To find out more about Walter E. Williams and read fea-
tures by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page at HYPERLINK "http://www.cre-
ators.com" www.creators.com.


COMMENTARY

- Healthcare Tour Recap -


Access to quality, affordable healthcare
is a critical part of American life Un:for- .r
tunately, over 45 million Americans ire '
currently uninsured and thereby defined 'y
access to quality care. The rising cosis ot
healthcare, lack of adequate instLurance.
and equitable access to that care a i e s.nim
of'tle toughest issues, facing Coniigrs '". .
and our nation, in the 2-1st century H
During the past few years, my con-
stituents have consistently voiced similar BY CONGRESS
concerns about the availability, afford-
ability and quality of healthcare in North Florida. I have been active
in tackling these problems on a national level by working on issues
such as prescription drugs, Medicare reimbursement rates, and med-
ical malpractice reform. Although much more needs to be done in
Washington, there is more that we can do at home as well. For this
reason, I hosted a 15 city healthcare tour across North Florida re-
cently to start a dialogue within our communities on healthcare. By
bringing the community together, we will be able to turn these con-
versations into workable plans to help our citizens receive the qual-
ity healthcare they need and deserve.
With 15 healthcare community meetings from Live Oak to Santa
Rosa Beach, no healthcare issue was left untouched. I have taken the
concerns expressed by my constituents, members of the medical
community, and area healthcare providers to help identify the local
problems and resources unique to each community.
Many citizens in rural areas expressed the need for better access
to healthcare facilities with improved local ambulance service and
timelier transfers to major hospitals. These are problems that we as
a community can tackle. County commissioners, other local leaders,
members of the medical community and citizens must come togeth-
er to develop a comprehensive strategy for enhancing healthcare op-
portunities for everyone. The city ofApalachicola has taken the first
step by establishing a committee to address healthcare issues in their


area.JWth rp,,resentatives from local~


TH E government and the area hospital as well
vBO Y D as consumers, the 16-person committee
BOY IIwill work to solve healthcare problems
REPO RT locally, and I urge other communities to
follow .suit. Through collaborative com-
munity efforts, healthcare concerns that
.,',,q on 'h'.m *:! t '{fi~ejm i'nsitrmountbtibaeiea dftbaddituatdch
.... , . .. more approachable. ;.!,w a ism'air
In areas like Panama City and Talla-
3MAN ALLEN BOYD hassee, the meetings centered on the is-
sues of medical malpractice and more af-
fordable healthcare with the high cost of prescription drugs. These
are national issues that Congress must address. I will continue to
work in Washington to reform medical malpractice law and help our
seniors get the prescription drugs they need at a reasonable price. In
January of 2006, the Medicare Prescription Drug Act will go into ef-
fect to alleviate some of the burden of high prescription drugs
costs. Although this plan is not perfect and will inevitably require
modifications in the future, it is a step in the right direction toward
affordable prescription drug costs for our seniors.
The United States sets the world standard for quality medical care.
The excellence and expertise of our medical system helps patients sur-
vive illnesses that once would have been fatal. Good physical and
mental healthcare are essential for children to learn in school, for our
nation's employees to be productive at work, and for our senior citi-
zens to enjoy their well-deserved retirements. I implore the residents
of North Florida to participate in planning the future of our healthcare
system. Please know that I am working towards these goals in Wash-
ington, but I also ask that our citizens come together in their commu-
nities. If we all work together to recognize the problems and resources
available, then we will also be able to find the answers and implement
responsible and effective solutions. We must work together to make
healthcare accessible and affordable for allAmericans, because our.na-
tion's strength depends on the health of its citizens.


COMMENTARY

Boardwalk or Park Place? This monopoly is no game
Although technology has elevated Unlike small firms, Unicor doesn't even
game-playing to new heights, there's still have to pay to expand its facilities when it
no substitute for traditional board games grabs more government business; it just
such as the longtime favorite, Monopoly, enlarges its prison work space with feder-
where friends and families match their al dollars, and then hauls in excess pro-
wits, knowing they can achieve million- duction equipment from other federal
aire status or wind up penniless simply " " agencies at no cost. When it does find it-
by tossing the dice. .J self in need of cash, Unicor simply goes to
But in the contest for government con- the U.S. Treasury and exercises its author-
tracts, the nation's small businesses face BY JACK FARIS ity to borrow up to $20 million at rates far


a monopoly that is no game. Rather, it is
a government agency that not only blocks many of their attempts
to compete, but uses its unfair advantage to ensure that small firms
have little chance of winning.
Perhaps those small businesses that want to compete would find
the lop-sided challenge more acceptable if they were going up
against businesses more capable and better qualified to meet the
specifications of the work. If they were compelled to go toe-to-toe
against large companies with long histories of successfully fulfill-
ing such contracts, losing a bid would be seen as the result of
strong competition.
But many small firms are denied opportunities to provide the
government with products and services at reasonable costs by an
agency that was initially created to help rehabilitate federal prison-
ers. Federal Prison Industries, which exists within the oxymoron-
ic category of a "government-owned corporation," is a massive
government outfit posing as a business under the innocent name
Unicor. It monopolizes a huge share of government contracts, of-
fering a host of goods and services that would be the envy of most
Fortune 500 businesses.
This official arm of the government also exempts itself from reg-
ulatory mandates that legitimate businesses must accept, and Uni-
cor is allowed to pay its labor force of prisoner-workers a sub-min-
imum wage of $1.23 an hour or less.


S * below those available to even the largest
commercial enterprise. No wonder small-business owners see
Unicor as a deterrent to entrepreneurship and a violation of basic
fairness.
But the dice may have begun rolling in favor of small business.
According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, last month the U.S. Small
Business Administration's (SBA) Federal Contracting Office took
Unicor down a notch, telling the Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) the company was not qualified to work on a computer recy-
cling project because Unicor can only bid on small-business con-
tracts supplying items, not services. EPA was forced to cancel the
contract.
Unicor had already taken a hit in December when Congress
banned the government company from using its preferential status
to block small businesses from bidding on certain government con-
tracts. The actions of Congress and the SBA don't mark the end of
the Unicor monopoly, but small-business owners are pleased that
they have at least passed "go."
Jack Faris is president of NFIB (the National Federation of In-
dependent Business), the nation's largest small-business advocacy
group. A non-profit, non-partisan organization founded in 1943,
NFIB represents the consensus views of its 600,000 members in
Washington, D.C., and all 50 state capitals. More information is
available on-line at www.NFIB.com.


'1' 2005 Creators Syndicate
BY WALTER WILLIAMS


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16,2005


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK


PAGE 4A


. �w W�








WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2005 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 5A


^ UWANNEE LIVING


Black - Ryals
Ashley and Amy Black are happy to remind you of the
marriage of their mother, Tammy Lou Black, to Daniel Owen
Ryals.
The wedding ceremony will take place at the Live Oak
Garden Club, Eleventh Street, Live Oak, at 7 p.m. in the
evening on Friday, March 18, 2005. A reception will follow
at the same location. Local invitations will not be sent. All
family and friends are invited to attend.



Kirby - Anderson
Mr. and Mrs. Douglas (John) Kirby wish to remind you of
the approaching marriage of their daughter, Christie
Danielle, to Joshua Daniel Anderson, son of Mr. and Mrs.
David (Danny) Anderson of Live Oak.
The wedding will be at the First Baptist Church on March
19 at 5:30 p.m. The reception will follow at the Shrine Club
in Live Oak.
Everyone is invited to the wedding and the reception. In-
vitations are being sent to out-of-town guests only.



Douglas - Lindblade
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Skeen of Live Oak and Rance Dou-
glas of Trenton would like to remind you of the approaching
marriage of their daughter, Kandace Nicole Douglas, to, Roy
Edward "J.R." Lindblade Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy E.
Lindblade of O'Brien.
The wedding will take place at Westwood Baptist Church
in Live Oak at 5 p.m., March 19, 2005. A reception will fol-
low at the Train Depot, Live Oak.
No local invitations will be sent. All friends and relatives
are invited to attend.


Art League


news Cala
Thank you for joining the Anyone who has ordered
ART LEAGUE OF NORTH caladium bulbs through Sh-
FLORIDA at our introductory eryl Kirby needs to pick
meeting last week. We're excited .them up on March 19 at the
about the strong community in- Garden Club building be-
terest in this organization and tween 8 and 10 a.m. There
want to invite you to join us will be extra caladium
again next Thursday, March 17 bulbs available during a
at 7 p.m. at the Lake City Li-
brary.
We plan to give each of you
an opportunity to share your
ideas with a group focused on
your area of interest in the orga-
nization. Sharing your ideas in a
brainstorming session will help
launch this North Florida organi- '
zation and create the basis for fu-
ture operations. It's your oppor-
tunity to be a part of a ground- .
breaking group to make art ac-
cessible to all in North Florida. A
sample of the groups include:
Web Design and Maintenance
and Database Management T e
Membership CoordinationThera
Publicity
Education and Scholarship J D W
Programs) Jew
Exhibit Planning and Coordi-
nation
Finances (operations/fundrais-
inglendowment/grants)
Strategic Planning (current vi-
sion and long-range vision)
Your ideas are important to us
and we want to include all peo- HOW magne
pie interested in all forms of fine Sport, her..e. .upercur. .
art. So please join us next Thurs- r here s'e n.:. r.egarre.- ari
day, March 17 at 7:00 at the about the late r.. i. :. re*a
Lake City Library. And, tell your v.ii h rma�r.
-r-c, p,-er , ;uCh j. -\C.de
friends about it too. Everyone is ,th,, H r... rl e .I
welcome! natural heaJirng .. a n,iracl.k
and the phl\ >al ,:\mp[on
-Attention ,"I iin e'D.r. lhir huir ,.ri
-" i ld �' . ' ,e P ." ril ,:, H :



a ersic a! ...ir, ...r hi m,,a r.
___l' urnd ankie ni. r'rl., b'.
thePr ofile hearli mee u, I;a t -, al. a
Pre rl whicih, Iid i i b o u n.,--.




,i* Necklaces

Here's a peek at what's inside * Shoe I ,soles
the Friday, March 18, American * r latres , Pad r
Profile which is a bonus news-l


ARDEN CLUB

dium purchasers


mini-plant sale. The Live
Oak Garden Club will have
it's annual plant and yard
sale April,,2 from 8 - 11
a.m. at the clubhouse on
Newbern Road, next to
Shands Hospital.
Anyone who would like


to donate yard sale items,
may bring them to the club-
house on Friday, April 1 be-
,Iitween 4 -6 pm.,..
Any unsold yard sale
items will be contributed to
the Pregnancy Crisis Cen-
ter's upcoming sale.


peutic Magnetic


weIry I More







ts help banish aches & pains


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*Cristal Roses~
&- Iiolph ini
0 Hu,,aiilc Jc'ils
*Beatitilul
H-andmade Copper p
Pictu~res


magazine in each weekend edi-
tion of the Suwannee Democrat. B I B�
Cover Story: Hazel Smith, a Ial y
longtime music journalist and ayalble
cookbook author, shares the
SEE AMERICAN PROFILE, PAGE 7A


11 16
4&maa


FASHIONS, Inc.


Live Oak Plaza
Hours: 9:00-6:00
Monday-Saturday


Lindsey Sutton looks as pretty and fresh as springtime in this light blue eyelet
sundress from Maggy London. She said wearing it makes her feel like "Alice in
Wonderland". Sizes 4-12
'Easter Dress Safe
Aft Dresses & Pantsuits

$10 off
Sizes 2 to 18 Petite, 7Misses, & Womens
Receiving new Easter dresses EVERYDAY!


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16,2005


11


-.- 0- --

















Draedyn Alexander Carolton

Draedyn Alexander Carlton
Angie Fortney and Danny Carlton would like to introduce
their new arrival to the world, Draedyn Alexander Carlton. He
was born at Shands at Lake Shore in Lake City at 10:55 a.m.,
Jan. 10, 2005, weighing 8 pounds, 11 ounces and measuring 20-
1/4 inches in length.
Maternal grandparents are Vicki and Alex Bray of Fulton,
N.Y. and George Fortney of Waynesboro, Pa. Maternal great-
grandparents are Charlie and Linda Bray of Live Oak and Judy
and Richard Lininger, Ivan and Donna Fortney, all of Waynes-
boro, Pa., great-great-grandmothers Hazel Loundensleger, Mar-
get Fortney and Annie Layman, all of Waynesboro, Pa.
Paternal grandparents are Sandra Carlton of Live Oak and the
late Daynon Carlton
Also proud to welcome him is his big brother, Dustin Carlton.


110 Magnetic Coppei; Stainless Steel & Titanium


SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK PAGE 5A


9


Tht. f.'5tst of. -I .
I .PAGE 8D




To my mother Catherine Banks, one person I will
always look up to:

A mother can be anyone,
a stranger you meet, or a friend you know.
A mother can be someone who comes
around once in a blue moon.
But to me, a mother is more,
than someone who gives birth to a child.
She s someone who is around through
the good times as well as the bad.
A mother is someone who will lend
you their shoulder to cry on when you have a bad day.
She s someone who is your best friend,
a person who you can tell your deepest secrets to,
and know that they will stay close to her heart.
A mother to me is simply someone exactly like
YOU!!

One year ago today, you made the commitment of
being my mother and forever I will cherish this day.
Don t ever have any regrets or think I don t care
because without you and dad standing beside me the
whole way through, I would t be the person I am
today.

Thank you for being my mom!
I will love you forever and ever!!
Priscilla Banks 150833DH-F



Eternally Grateful




















The family of the late Shepherd W.M. Philmore would like to express their
most sincere gratitude for every thought of love and kindness shown their
family during their great loss. The food, the flowers, the cards, the heartfelt
prayers, the donations and pledges for the W.M. Philmore Fellowship Hall
which was her last project as Pastor of Triumph, The Church and Kingdom
Of God In Christ located at 410 Taylor Avenue.
Shepherd Philmore will be greatly missed in the community and surrounding
areas but her good works will continue and her legacy will live on in the
hearts of those whose lives she touched. Anyone wishing to make a
contribution or donation to the W.M. Philmore Fellowship Hall building fund
can contact Romana Perkins at 364-4439 or Lee Ann Charlton at 364-5351 or
by mail at P.O. Box 15, Live Oak, FL 32064-0015.
With heartfelt thanks and loving gratitude: The Philmore Children, Dorothy,
Lee, Jr. Lee Ann, Alonzo, Arnold, Ramona, Ebony, Monique, Felonzie,
Grandchildren and Great Grandchildren. 150876DH-F
adM -I b


NO i =777-







PAIlpI_ AOA


N SUlIWANNFF DFMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FAWL.6t b --- .-M


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2005


HELP HAYLEY! These logos were worn on
shirts by promoters of a fund-raiser March 7
to help Hayley Freeman and her family. Hay-
ley, four months old, is still in Shands at UF
receiving treatment for leukemia that was
found on her three-months-birthday. The
ladies, all friends of Dee and Shaun Freeman,
parents of Hayley, and of Hayley's big sister,
Holland, have so far raised more than $2,000
through the generosity of Pizza Hut and hun-
dreds of friends and strangers who gave.
More events are planned so watch for these
events. - Photo: 6usan K. Lamb


PIZZA HUT FUND-RAISER FOR HAYLEY FREEMAN IS HUGE SUCCESS: A fund-
raiser at the Live Oak Pizza Hut to help the family of little four-month-old Hayley
Freeman who was diagnosed with leukemia was a huge success. Shown are just a
small number of boxes of pizza that were sold during the three-hour event March 7.
- Photo: Susan K. Lamb


Tobacco Transition



Payment Program


This is an important notice
for tobacco quota holders
and producers. The U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture's
new Tobacco Transition Pay-
ment Program sign-up peri-
od is March 14 through June
17, 2005.
The Tobacco Transition
Payment Program ends fed-
eral tobacco support and
provides payments to tobac-
co quota holders and produc-
ers.. \
The program is commonly
called the 'Tobacco Buyout.'
You may be eligible if you


are an owner of a farm with a
2004 tobacco marketing
quota or acreage allotment
Or if you were a producer of
tobacco in 2002, 2003 or
2004.
So contact your local
USDA Service Center to en-
roll in the Tobacco Transi-
tion Payment Program be-
tween March 14 and June 17
because marketing quotas
are ending.
To learn more,
visitwww.fsa.usda.gov/to-
bacco or call 1-866-887-
0140.


Yvonne Richards
March 7, 1946 -
March 9,2005

V vonne Richards, 59,
Sof Live Oak, passed
Saway Wednesday,
March 9, 2005, in her home af-
ter a short illness. The Miami
native moved to Live Oak from
Portland, Ore. 15 years ago, was
a homemaker and a member of
Westside Baptist Church, Live
Oak.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Floyd Richards of Live
Oak; her goddaughter, Kathryn
Howell of Live Oak; her god-
son, Matthew Howell of Live
Oak; two sisters, Ruth Miles of
Richland, Wash. and Joan How-
ell of Live Oak; two brothers,
Don Howell of Orlando and
Clarence Howell of Bowling
Green, Ky.
Graveside services were con-
ducted at 4 p.m., Tuesday,.
March 15, at Philadelphia Bap-
tist Church, Live Oak, with the
Rev. Rob Sweat officiating.
Daniels Funeral Homes, Inc.
of Live Oak was in charge of all
arrangements.

Curtis Evans
April 24, 1925 -
March 12, 2005

Surtis Evans, 79, of
Live Oak, passed
C away Saturday, March
12, 2005, in his home. The Ash,
N.C. native moved to Live Oak
from Chesapeake, Va. 22 years


ago, a retired U.S. Army veteran
serving during World War II in
the Army Corps of Engineers as
a lock operator and also served
in the U.S. Coast Guard. He was
a member of Dowling Park
Church of God and a member of
Masonic Lodge Pythagoras No.
249, South Park, N.C.
Survivors include his wife,
Diana Evans of Live Oak; two
sons, Curtis Roger Evans and
Gregrey Scott Evans, both of
Chesapeake, Va.; one brother,
Norwood Evans of Nakina,
N.C.; one grandchild; and two
great-grandchildren.
Graveside services were con-
ducted at 10 a.m., Monday,
March 14, at Dowling Park
Church of God Cemetery,
Dowling Park with the Rev.
Retis Flowers and the Rev.
Frank Jones officiating.
Daniels Funeral Homes, Inc.
of Live Oak was in charge of all
arrangements.

Anthony Lamonda
June 1, 1930 -
March 10, 2005

SnliJhon Lamonda.
1 '4 'of'Like Oak,
pas-sed a%% a\ Thursday..
March 10, 2005, in his home af-
ter a short illness. The Famham,
N.Y. native moved to Live Oak
from Lake City in 1999, was a
U.S. Air Force veteran serving
during World War II. After his
retirement as a supervisor for a
pipe manufacturing company,
he worked at Wal-Mart as a


VA



* CHEEIK.



S Plaza 3L,.ou,:,n 54: E i H.u, jrd Sireeu .ii 1362-1244
S-.i, th O .,S quare Loc.,:i,.n 15211 S Oh10 1 1 t, 362-2591
NMedical Equipment D[i i: 1386 1 362-44114
. JHour. 6.30 amn-o.30 PM Mon-Fn., b.30 am-3.00 pm Sat.
by Joy Lamb, PharmD Drive-up window

March is National Kidney Month
More than 20 million Americans, one in nine adults, have chronic kidney
disease (CKD). Surprisingly, most do not even know it. Another 20 million
are at an increased risk for developing chronic kidney disease, especially
African-Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and American Indians. Silently, two
conditions, diabetes and high blood pressure, can damage the kidneys over
time. Interestingly, the person affected may have no symptoms of this
condition until it is too late. Controlling your blood sugar and blood pressure
with medication and diet is essential to preventing the progression of kidney
disease to a point where dialysis becomes necessary. Dialysis can be either
hemodialysis (blood) or peritoneal (abdomen) and is a gift to current day
patients. Not that long ago, there was no medical treatment.
To prevent the progression to CKD, your doctor will likely suggest the
following: stop smoking, lose excess weight, avoid large amounts of over-
the-counter pain relievers like ibuprofen, decrease salt in your diet, and
control blood sugar and blood pressure. If you think ,you might be at
increased risk for CKD, do not wait. Simple blood and urine tests can save
your life. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist if you have questions about
kidney disease, controlling blood pressure, or diabetes. 147737JRS-F


OBITUARIES


greeter in Live Oak and Lake
City for 10 years. Lamonda was
of Catholic faith.
Survivors include his wife,
Brunhilda Lamonda of Live
Oak; two daughters, Lohreann
Root of Jasper and Barbarann
Phillips of Jacksonville; one
son, Travis Lamonda of Lake
City; one sister, Bertha Dickin-
son of Rochester N.Y.; two
brothers, James LoMando of
Rochester, N.Y. and Samuel Lo-
Mando of Buffalo, N.Y.; seven
grandchildren; and three great-
grandchildren. He was preceded
in death by his brother Joseph
LoMando.
Memorial services were con-
ducted at 2 p.m., Tuesday,
March 15, at Daniels Memorial
Chapel with the Rev. Mike Pen-
dergraft officiating.
Daniels Funeral Homes, Inc.
of Live Oak was in charge of all
arrangements.

Kathryn Mahoney
Nov. 8, 1932 -
March 8, 2005

athryn Mahoney, 72,
n passed away, Tuesday.
* " "MAlarch , 22005. in ilhe
Surrey Place Nursing Home,
Live Oak, after a short illness.
The Lafayette, Tenn. native
moved to Live Oak from Car-
rolton, Ky. in 1968, was a home-
maker and was of Baptist faith..
Survivors include four daugh-
ters, Rita Corbin of Live Oak,
Kathy Hudgins of Bowling
Green, Ky., Sandy Snyder of


Carrolton, Ky. and Betty Bums
of Indiana; two sons, Jerry Dri-
ver of Lafayette, Tenn. and
Tommy Mahoney of Milton,
Ky.; one sister, Sue Craighead of
Avon, Indiana; a brother, Rondal
Flippin, Lafayette Tenn., 14
grandchildren; and 14 great-
grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Ed Mahoney and
brother, Wendell Plippin.
Funeral services were con-
ducted at 1 p.m., Saturday,
March 12, at Daniels Memorial
Chapel in Live Oak with the
Rev. Clarence Parker officiating.
Interment will follow in Live
Oak Cemetery.
Daniels Funeral Home, Inc. of
Live Oak was in charge of all
arrangements.


Mae Helen Polite
July 12, 1944
March 4, 20(

A ae Hele
Stills, 60,
V Oak, passe
Friday, March 4,
Shands at Live Oak a'
tended illness. The S
,.Count n iiatie \'\as a i
Mt. Sinai Missionar
Church where she sa
adult choir until h
failed. She was emp
Lake City Communit
for 17 years as a secret
Surivors include
children, Glenn (Pan
lite, Cesandra Johnson
los Stills (Precious),


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Live Oak

Christian Outlet

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While Supplies Last O mmm- .Expires 3/31/05


Oak; mother Artice Polite of
Live Oak; sister, Erma Clark of
Orlando; seven grandchildren;
Eric Polite, Reneshia Johnson,
Adrian Johnson, Keandra Po-
lite, Cheyanne Stills, Alexia
Stills and Ashanti Stills.
Funeral services were con-
ducted at 11 a.m., Saturday,
March 12, in Mt, Sinai Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, Live
Oak with the Rev. Willie J.
Warren officiating. Interment,
followed in Green Briar Ceme-
tery, Live Oak.
Charles T. Hall Funeral
'Home of Live Oak was in
charge of all arrangements.'

Velma I. Lehman Wilcox
Aug. 25, 1921 -
March 12, 2005


Stills elma I. Lehman
- Wilcox, 83, of Dowl-
05 'ing Park, passed away
Sunday, March 12, 2005, at
n Polite Kindred Hospital in Green
of Live Cove Springs. She was bom in
ed away Defiance, Ohio and had lived in
2005, in Ft. Wayne, Ind. before moving
after an ex- to Quincy in 1983 and living
Su\\ annee, there. until 1998. ,ilcox retired,
nemberof'- fropi C.A. Lehian "and Sons'
y Baptist where she was an office manag-
ang in the er in Ft. Wayne, Ind. She was
er health past president of the Women in
ployed by Construction Chapter of Ft.
y College Wayne, Ind. and was a church
etary. organist for 67 years in Ft.
her three Wayne, Ind. and Quincy.
mela) Po- Wilcox was past treasurer and
n and Car- musician for the Quincy The-
all of Live atre in Quincy and was a mem-
,er of the Wnman's Club and


performed for President Hoover
at the age of 11 in Ft. Wayne,
Ind. She was a member of the
First Baptist Church of Live
Oak.


Survivors include her hus-
band, Albert Wilcox of Dowl-
ing Park; one brother, Dick Ed-
ward Lehman of Ft. Wayne,
Ind.; and a number of nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
at 11 a.m., Thursday, March 17,
at Bixler Chapel in Dowling
Park. Burial will follow in
Bixler East Cemetery, Dowling
Park. The family will receive
friends from 10-11 a.m., Thurs-
day, March 17, at the Bixler
Chapel.
Beggs Funeral Home Madi-
son Chapel was in charge of all
arrangements.


DEATH

NOTICE

Jeanette Lanier
March 29, 1929 -
March 8, 2005
eanette Lanier, 75, of
Branford, passed away
Tuesday, March 8,
2905, in Shands at Live Oak.
! Daniels Funeral' Hifies, 'Irind
of Branford Was in charge of all'
arrangements.

Ruby Jordan Stewart
March 22, 1930 -
March 13, 2005
. uby Jordan Stewart,
74, of Live Oak, a re-
-tired nurse's aide,
passed away Sunday, March 13,
2005, at Suwannee Health Care
Center, Live Oak.
Clark 'Funeral Home of
Cairo, Ga. was in charge of all
arrangements.


A


S . . -- -_ -- a .. . _,- .. .. . - , .. .-." .

Intercessory Prayer/ Easter Sunday
Group March 27th - 10 a.m.
Every Tuesday Special music and presentation of
6 p.m. DAY OF ATONEMENT



Hwy 129 South, Live Oak * 364-4800


But if you do... we're here for you.

We've provided professional, personalized
services for over 50 years. Maybe that's one
reason why the overwhelming majority of
families put their trust in Daniels Funeral Homes.


Live Oak
416 E. Howard St.
386-362-4333
ineralhome.com


Branford
408 Suwannee Ave.
386-935-1124
E-Mail: danielsfuneralhome@hotmail.com i


~I Y


J~j IT .~~J~





U iD : DI'd


TABE Test required


SUWANNEE- 415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
HAMILTONL O Live Oak, FL 32064
TECHNICAL CENTER (386) 364-2750
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING BENEFITS.
ACCREDITED BYTHE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.


---i


I


-----------


I


1, A.,."Ma







PAGE 7A


VV DnY. M 1 20S AN


Suwanr
The Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society (a no kill shelter)
and a limited space shelter. They
depends on adoptions for avail-
ability of space. Adoption fee of
$45 includes spay/neuter, de-
worming, heartworm/feline
(leukemia) testing and rabies
shot. Please visit the shelter, the
animals would love to meet you.
The shelter is located two miles
south of Lee in Madison County,
just of CR 255 on Bisbee Loop.
(Exit 262 off I-10 or from US 90
turn onto CR 255, go south to
Bisbee Loop.) Call for direc-
tions. You must check with them
prior to bringing a drop-off ani-
mal to the shelter.
REMINDER: DO NOT
LEAVE PETS IN VEHICLES
FOR ANY LENGTH OF TIME
DUE TO THE HEAT AND HU-
MIDITY
Visit the Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society web-site and see
the animals that need a really
good home at
geocities.com/suwanneehs.
Due to the generous gift of a
new building, we are now able to
accept donations of furniture ...
and we now have some nice
pieces to sell.
WE REALLY CAN USE
FURNITURE DONATIONS!!!
Attention: If you have lost a
pet or found one, the humane so-
ctety will help you find your pet.
Call 850-971-9904 or toll-free at
866-236-7812. Leave a message
if we are closed, we will return
your call. They will do what they
can to help you find your pet.
Please check with your local ani-
mal control if you have lost a pet.
LOST OR FOUND ANI-
MALS:
LOST DOG: BLACKIE -
5: Large Black German Shepherd.
Healthy and friendly. Lost in
Live Oak on 152nd Terrace.


American-
Continued From Page 5A

stars' favorite recipes for Easter.
Hometown Spotlight: For
centuries,. American. Indians.
have mined Catlinite, a soft red,,
stone, from quarries in Pipe-
stone, Minn., (pop. 4,280) to
make pipes for smoking tobac-.
co during religious rituals and
social ceremonies. The quarry
and stone remain sacred for
many native people. W
Made In America: When
24-year-old Arthur Spangler
purchased the Gold Leaf Bak-
ing Powder Co. in 1906 with
money saved from his ,paper
route, he couldn't have imag-
ined that the company would
become one of the nation's
largest producers of hard can-
dies. But thanks to the tremen-
dous popularity of Dum Dums
lollipops, Saf-T-Pops and candy
canes, the delightful aroma
wafting through the Spangler
Candy Co. in Bryan, Ohio,
(pop. 8,333) is the sweet smell
of success for a third generation
of the Spangler family.
Hometown Spotlight: When
the ice on the Kuskokwim Riv-
er breaks up in May, the only
road to Aniak, Alaska, (pop.
572) disappears with the melt-
ing snow and villagers await the
summer salmon runs.
Health: Exercise is not only
good for the body, it is good for
the mind.
Health: With an average life
expectancy of 77 years, Ameri-
cans are living longer than ever
before. Still, a longer life does-
n't automatically translate into a
better life-or healthier lifestyle.
Arthritis, Alzheimer's disease,
diabetes, heart attacks .and
strokes are just a few of the
health issues that people deal
with as.they get older. So how
, can people improve the daily
life while reducing the health


risks associated with the senior
years?
Health: Menopause is one of
the major turning points in a
women's life. As women leave
their childbearing years, they
face a new set of health issues
associated with aging and "the
change," from hot flashes and
sleep problems to increased
heart disease risk and hormone
replacement therapy.
Recipes: Zucchini-Pepperoni
Casserole - A Pennsylvania
reader suggests surprising your
family with this dish!


mee Valley Humc
LOST DOG: BANDIT - Sol- about this puppy that is irre-
id white Pyrenees, male, 145 sistible! Come see for yourself!
pounds, two years old. Lost near #2707 - JESSE - Eight week
50th Street in Live Oak. old, male, red. Cold nose, warm
These are just a few of the kit- heart and bright shining eyes.
tens and cats, puppies and dogs Captivating.
available. Featured animals for #2708 - ROSCO - Eight week
adoption: old, brown and black, male. Pure
DOGS: love in a wiggly little body.
#2699 - DEZI - Nine week Would like a chance to win your
old, female, chocolate and black, heart. Come on out!
Now here we have a lady who is #2710 - PRECIOUS - Four
frankly looking for a place in a month old, white with black, fe-
loving home. Yours? male. This plucky girl will cover
#2700 - DEMETREE - Three you with kisses and worm her
month old, white, brown and way into your heart.
black, male. There is something Many more beautiful puppies


mne Society Adoptables
and large dogs to choose from. #2709 - ONYX - One-and-a- and open by appointment only
CATS: half year old; black, female. A on Monday. ALL PROCEEDS
#2635 - DORA - One-and-a- slinky enchantress who is de- SUPPORT THE HUMANE
half-year old, grey, female. A lightful in every way. Meet her SOCIETY.
playful shadow with a heart of and fall in love! The Suwannee Valley Hu-
pure love. Would love to meet #2710 - FONZI - One year mane Society also recycles alu-
you and capture your heart. old silver and tabby, male. minumn cans. Take them to the
#2667 - ERMA - Six month Handsome as a lad can be, this shelter.
old, tabby, female. A stand-out in fine fellow will be a graceful and Recycle, recycle, recycle!
the feline world. A sweet nature loving addition to your home. Please recycle newspapers foi
and a bundle of personality, with Many more. kittens and cats the Suwannee Valley Humane
purrs on demand. available for adoption. Society. The recycle dumpster is
#2684 - ABE - Three year old, Please help care for the ani- located at 305 Pinewood Dr. ir


orange, male. A dignified man of
the world with an affectionate
and loyal personality. This is a
cat to cherish.


mals.
Visit our newly expanded
thrift store. Tuesday-Saturday,
10 a.m.-2 p.m. Closed Sunday


Live Oak, next to Johnson's Ap-
pliance Center. ALL PRO-
CEEDS SUPPORT THE HU-
MANE SOCIETY


nJ.


Improving Home Improvement�


Join Lowe's Garden Club

Call 1-877-61 -LOWES to


$998 $197po $297 $1298 $697
18 pack 6" pot quart 10" pot 10" pot
Landscaper Annuals Petunia Garden Club Select-" Premium Fiber Hanging Basket Boston Fern Hanging Basket
*Choose from your favorite *Produces beautiful, large Assorted Annuals *Choose from several premium varieties *Enjoy outdoors on your porch or
local varieties to complete flowers .Blooms from summer *Premium varieties selected for planted in a unique fiber pot .New patio #93415
your flower beds .Impatiens into autumn -Petunia (shown) their superior garden performance Guinea Impatiens shown #76778
shown #97779 #93934 *Gerbera Daisy shown #189299
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continued, clearance, liquidation and damaged items are excluded from this offer. On percent off sales, we will match the competitor's percent off offer. Limited to reasonable quantities for homeowner and one-house order quantities for cash and carry contractors. Current in-store price, if
lower, overrides Lowe's advertised price. Price guarantee honored at all Lowe's retail locations. Labor charges for product installation are excluded from our price guarantee offer in our stores with an Installed Sales Program. Visit store for complete details. 02005 by Lowe's. All rights
reserved. Lowe's and the gable design are registered trademarks of LF,LLC. 050303-1
001/0503031/021
147748-F


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16,2005


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is
n1


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In.


-14-0






WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2005


PAflF RA U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Naomi Mallory Dennard's
100th birthday party was at
First Methodist Church in
Lake City and many of us went
there on Saturday. She grew up
in Wellborn and taught in
Wellborn school. Murle Wester
remembered his first grade


teacher the year a fire in the
school house made necessary
several alternate locations for
classes to meet while repairs
were made to the schoolhouse.
Dennard met with her first
graders at the Wellborn
Methodist Church. Irene Mc-


Call brought a two-by-three-
inch black and white school
picture of herself as a first
grader and another of herself,
her sister Effie and Elizabeth
McMullen as three little girls
standing on the running board
of a car. The pictures were trea-
sures protected in a baggie.
Handle with care. They be-
came an invitation to nostalgia
about running boards and rum-
ble seats and the good life in
our hometown in olden days.
Nephew Joe Raines was one of
the three hosting the party for
Aunt Naomi. He had put to-
gether a fine power point pre-
sentation, 20-minutes worth,
covering Wellborn days, Cairo,


Ga. days and Dowling Park
days. Chairs were grouped
around the TV and we could
watch until we got to where we
came in. Niece Virginia
Giebeig Kindburg greeted us at
the door. Great nephew Bill
Giebeig was a familiar face to
us because he has been our
FP&L meter reader in Well-
born. It was fun to learn that his
claim to fame on Saturday was
his great-aunt Naomi. At the
party he was a digital camera
operator amongst many. Raines
used computer magic to allow
me to accompany this Well-
born News column with two of
his digital camera pictures; one
of fonnrmer first grade students
with their teacher and another
of J.L. McMullen and that


100TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION: J.L. McMullen and his fifth
grade teacher at Wellborn school, Naomi Mallory Dennard. J.L.
McMullen and his wife Kitty came to the party chauffered by their
daughter. - Photo: Joe Raines


It was an autographed (Chip-
per Jones of the Atlanta
Braves) baseball. The ball it-


HAPPY 100TH BIRTHDAY: Naomi Mallory Dennard surrounded by 11 of her for-
mer first grade students at Wellborn School. Pictured, I to r, backrow, standing
are: Ernest Williams, Maurice Geiger, Gary Raines, Robert Taylor, Murle Wester,
Mary Gem Wester, Thurston McLeran and Leonard McLeran; seated at the table
are Earle Bullock, Clyde Owens, Naomi Mallory Dennard and Mary Berry. Irene
McCall, Elizabeth McMullen and Helen Cribbs were at the party, had Miss Naomi
for a teacher, but didn't make it for Joe Raines camera. - Photo: Joe Raines


same teacher. When our turn
came to congratulate the birth-
day lady as she stood receiving
so many friends and family,.
she said, "Jinny look what is in
my pocketbook," and she
showed me she was carrying
the latest Wellborn Whisper to
her 100th birthday party. On
the guestbook table there were
copies of the "All About Me"
she had written, and we had
WHISPERed. Now a wider
group of Dennard admirers
could enjoy it, too. Niece Emi-
ly Robarts called us to order
and we sang "Happy Birth-
day." Pretty great-niece Brenda
Tillman presented the special,
one-of-a-kind birthday present.


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line of service on select rate plans $59.99 and higher, with no more than 4 secondary lines at $9.99/month. Service agreement required for each line. 1 -year service agreement required for each new line; 2-year service
agreement required in conjunction with a phone promotion. Plan Details: Calls to your home phone require 2 or more lines of wireless service on the same bill. 1 line must be a primary line on a
qualifying rate plan. Customer's wireless number & designated home number must be in the same geographic area. Minutes used for calls to your home phone are deducted from your mobile-to-mobile '
package. Some ALLTEL plans feature unlimited calls to your home phone and unlimited mobile-to-mobile minutes. Calls to your home phone and Mobile-to-Mobile calls must begin & end in your plan's /co'ume
calling area. Mobile-to-Mobile minutes apply to calls between ALLTEL wireless customers. Call forwarding, 411 & voice mail calls excluded. Nights are Mon-Thurs 9:00pm-5:59am. Weekends are Fri information
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147539bgv


self had been a gift from Miss
Naomi to her great-great-
nephew Ryan Tillman. He do-
nated it to his mom for the par-
ty when Mom's good idea was
to carry it to a Braves game in
Atlanta and get autographs on
it for a truly enthusiastic
Braves fan, Dennard. Jones
signed that ball for one of his
best fans who can quote all the
stats on him even yet. When it
was time to leave, I heard
Thurston McLeran say to
Leonard and Virginia Jane.
"We will see Wellborn people
again on the third Saturday in
April [16th] at the Wellborn
School Reunion at Wellborn
Baptist Church." That made it
a little easier to say goodbye
this time.
We Wilsons had our own
niece and nephew for a week of
visiting us at our log home in
some Wellborn woods. They


had to postpone departure from
their New Jersey home on ac-
count of snow so they didn't


complain about our
cool temperatures.
They are newly re-
tired and have turned
into truck camper en-
thusiasts. We went
spring hopping at Fal-
mouth Spring,
Charles Spring and
Peacock Springs,
where we watched
some weekend divers.
We enjoyed several
wonderful birding ex-
peditions. We hiked in
to admire the Coca-
Cola colored Suwan-
nee River rapids at the
Big Shoals. We shut-
tled for them to canoe
down the Ichetuck-
nee. Jack and I were
reminded that North
Florida really is beau-


tiful, and we promised our-
selves not to wait 'til company
comes to get outside in its love-
liness regularly. They thought it
was fun to rototill our garden
plot, and they also filled in the
armadillo holes in our yard. All
week long they wanted to see
an annadillo and on the last
night their flashlight beam fi-
nally found one. John chased
him, and we all got the giggles.
One more nice happening
this week was a visit from
friend Faye Gambrell of Vicks-
burg. She used to live on Bulb
Farm Road. Faye loves pretty
dishes and pretty linens so all
my Haviland china and my
linen table cloth from my
mother's day were enjoyed to-
gether with her and Bobby An-
derson. Friendships that con-
tinue through different chap-
ters of our lives are treasured
gifts to be appreciated. Amen.


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'- Live Oak Rotary Club's


To serve Ihe con nuniti during this
most 1o10/1 of seasons
the Live Oak
Rotary Club
will host a free
chicken pilati dinner
Saturday, CMarch 26
11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
at the John H. Hale

215 NE Duval St.
Tickets are required for this FREE
dinner xvhich may be picked up at:

First United Mlethodist Church
311 South Ohio Av\e.
Family and Children's Services
501I SE Demorest
Ebenezer AME Church
411 Parshley St.


WITH 200 I6BONU


OPEN HOUSE!
Friday & *Poker Run

Saturday * Refreshments
* Customer
April 1 & 2 Appreciation Sale


EBTas BONUS

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Available now on Honda Rancher AT and Rancher AT GPScape modelI


Interstate


CYCLES
580 Southwest Gateway Drive, Lake City, FL
(386) 758-2453
Fr: -87 -596-2453
Open: Tues. - Fri., 9-6; A~s 'ToVaIdosta
Saturday 9-4 Inups' ;or
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FOR RIDERS 16 YEARS AND OLDER. '200 Bonus Bucks oiler good on any now 2005 and pnor year TIXIOOfGA/FA models. Bonus Bucks can,
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151806DH-2A


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGF RA










Live Oak Woman's Club January meeting


The GFWC Woman's Club of Live
Oak held its first meeting of the year on
Jan. 7. District 3 smile chairman Glen-
da Gordon was the guest speaker.
FFWC state president Charlyne Car-
ruth chose Operation Smile as her pres-
ident's project. Gordon presented a
short film about the Operation Smile
POrganization and the work they do
,with children that have facial birth de-
(ifects that affect their ability to eat, talk
..and' even smile. A relatively short oper-
iiation can give them a whole new lease
on life.
Janet Theriault was appointed smile
';chairman for the local club and will be
.working with Gordon for the next two
years to raise funds in support of Oper-
'ation Smile.
* The Artist of the Month was Doris
'Van Jahnke. On display were pho-
1tographs taken during her several trips
'abroad.
" Luncheon piano music was provid-
ed by Eileen Box.
Pamela Hancock and Brenda Bailey
were welcomed as new members.
* The GFWC Woman's Club of Live
'Oak voted to donate $500 to World Vi-
'sion to be used for the victims of the re-
'cent tsunami. A check in this amount
was presented to Sylvia Taylor, the
'club's World Vision representative.


F

a"0'


OPERATION SMILE ORGANIZATION: GFWC District 3 smile
chairman Glenda Gordon speaking at the January meeting
of the GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak and presenting a
film on the Operation Smile Organization. - Photo: Submitted


JANUARY MEETING: Pictured, I to r, GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak smile chairman Janet Theri-
ault, GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak president Nancy Allen and GFWC District 3 smile chairman
Glenda Gordon. A short film on the Operation Smile Organization and the work they do for children
with facial birth defects was presented by Gordon. - Photo: Submitted
"" _ .. ... . ... . -


$Suwannee
TFoundation
_wishes to thanks
-local businesses
for their support
The Suwannee Foundation
6f'Excellence would like to
thaniL rhe following businesses
Vfor their continued support in
'promoting educational in
'Suwannee County.
Alltel
' Mercantile Bank
Capital City Bank
of Branford
Goldkist
F Poole Realty
First Federal Savings Bank
Parks Johnson Agency
, Progress Energy
. Suwannee Democrat
I and Branford Newspaper
SPCS Phosphate
Our sincere thanks, to the
following sponsors who were
unable to attend the Teacher of
the Year Banquet March 1 due
to prior commitments.
Keith Daniels
Daniels Funeral Home
Derek Loadholtz
State Farm Insurance
Matt Scott
McCrimon's Office Systems
Robert Bedenbaugh
Wal-Mart




g ' IN


Enjoy $50 rebate on any
ArtCarved gold class ring
(excludes the Odyssey series).

Hurry! Offer valid 3/1/05
through 3/31/05.
www.artcarved.com

ARTQIRVED.
CLASS RINGS
To receive rebate ask the store associate for a rebate form



106 W tea owrdSt4eetd
362-1140


,- 1 '4
DONATION TO WORLD VISION: GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak World Vision representative Sylvia
Taylor, left, accepts $500 donation for tsunami victims from GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak pres-
ident Nancy Allen. - Photo: Submitted


1510R1


Donations needed for
Pregnancy crisis Center yard
sale scheduled for May
The Pregnancy Crisis Cen- clothing. Center is a non-profit orga-
ter staff are beginning prepa- Items may be dropped off nization operating 100 per-
rations for its annual yard at the Center's location at cent on private donations,
sale to be held on May 13. 212 Piedmont St., or for serving the needs of over
They are now accepting more information call 386- 1,000 women and babies in
donations of good, clean 330-2229. crisis situations alone last
quality household items and The Pregnancy Crisis year.


USDA


United States Department of Agriculture


The Tobacco Transition Payment


Program (aso caed "Tobacco Buyout").




You've heard about it.


Now be a part of it.


This is it. The Federal tobacco marketing,quota system is over. No more plant-
ing restrictions. No more marketing cards. No more price support loans.
Instead, the USDA's new Tobacco Transition Payment Program will provide
money to eligible tobacco quota holders and producers to help in this transi-
tion that ends the old system. But sign up now or you will not get a 2005 payment.


> Did you own a farm as of October 22, 2004, with a 2004 basic
marketing quota?

� Are you an owner, operator, landlord, tenant, or sharecropper who
shared in the risk of producing tobacco anytime between 2002 and
2004?

> Do you grow Flue-cured, Burley, Fire-cured, Dark air-cured, Virginia
sun-cured, or Cigar filler/binder tobacco?


Please sign up between March 14, 2005, and June 17, 2005,
at your local USDA Service Center.

Call 1-866-887-0140 or visit http://offices.usda.gov
to find your local county Service Center.


Farm Service Agency

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer


PAGE 9A


�WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16,2005


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


oik


1I10I






WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2005


Florida Museum experts host Calusa Indian lecture and book signing


Submitted by Kristin Ede-
Florida Museum of Natural
History authors Darcie
MacMahon and William Mar-
quardt will discuss and sign
their book "The Calusa and
Their Legacy: South Florida
People and Their Environ-
ments" at the Florida Museum
from 2-3:30 p.m. on March 20
as part of the Science Sunday
lecture series.
The new book focuses on


the Calusa Indians who domi-
nated South Florida when the
Europeans arrived and then
succumbed to impacts of colo-
nization. Their culture eventu-
ally disappeared from Florida
in the 1700s. It chronicles
their traditions, the rich
coastal environments that sup-
ported them and the artifacts
they left behind. It also intro-
duces the Seminole and Mic-
cosukee, the native people


who live in the Calusa domain
today.
MacMahon is the Florida
Museum's assistant director
for exhibits. Marquardt is cu-
rator of archaeology at the mu-
seum and director of the Ran-
dell Research Center on Pine
Island. Together, they coordi-
nated the museum's South
Florida People and Environ-
ments permanent exhibition
hall, which opened in October


Sunbelt Dodge Presents


- 11 th Annual- [ J


Sr- - id- - --_


Friday March 18TH - 8:OOPM T
Wades Baled Pine Straw

ic"m Saturday March 19TH - 8:00PM
3 -- Travel Country R.V. Center

NELSunday March 20TH - 2:00PM
Baker's Communications, Inc.
Ticket Outlets Include:
Columbia County Fair Office 386-752-8822
Smitty's Western Store US 90 West 386-755-2688
The Money Man Lake City 386-752-7828
Wilson's Ace Hardware 386-752-2750
Waco Food Stores in Perry, Trenton & Fanning Springs




,.a I - TIK 1 ,r I 'I'L.'S ,


.i / * Rodeo Goes Rain or Shine Hanimm

A SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS INCLUDE'
Lake City Medical Center, Swift Lube, Trade& Save, Lake City ,-:;|
Clumbhe Home BuildEn Securi, Safe Compa
le&scaervaOin, Quahl Inn & SILSu Terry DcruMONEYg
Boozer Hellng&Ali.Rck'sCrire ,e A r tl T s'1 o
Heaven, Lisa D. Vanacore &Associates Realty


rch 2005

19TH, 20TH


Award Winning Livestock Columbia County Fairgrounds
LOWRY'S 4L US 90 W. Turn On CR 247 * 386-752-8822
Rodeo Company www.columbiacountyfair.org 152128DH-F



LIVE OAK'S PAST R FELLOWSHIP



























Inter-Denominational Renewal

Join us for 4 days of Spiritual Revival celebrating the resurrection of our

Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. This event is sponsored by multiple churches

in this area who would like to invite you to come and worship with us





March 20th-23rd, 7:00 PM- Nightly




Services Conducted at


Christ COntrai Minlslties Of Live Oak

1550 Walker Ave. SW
Contact Pastor Wayne Godsmark for more info 208-1345
151745-F


2002.
The Florida Museum also
will offer a new program for
children during the lecture,
"Sunday Snoop." Adults can
take a break and enjoy the lec-
ture while museum staff enter-
tain children ages 4-10 for an
hour with fun activities and a
guided tour. Registration for
"Sunday Snoop" is $5 and pre-
registration is required. When


The 90th Suwannee County
Fair is underway with lots to
see and do at the fairgrounds
on Eleventh Street. Take the
family or go by yourself, but
be sure to take in all it has to
offer. The exhibits are always
fun, as are the events such as
the bovine costume contest,
goat shows, and then there is'
the boiled corn! Wow! I don't
know what it is about that
boiled corn out there at the
fair, but it is too good to de-
scribe! Be sure to go by and
get yourself just one...you"ll
have to go back for more.
That booth is located just out-
,side Exhibition Hall II next to
the Lions Club site. Of
course, once you get out
there, there'll be more stuff to
eat and do than you can shake
a stick at but go ahead and try
it anyway. Raining? Don't
worry, there's shelter a plenty
and activities inside such as
the talent show, animal shows
every night and then on Satur-
day night, Country Music star
Blake Shelton (Come on
somebody, why don't you run
- this is one of his hits., '" e,
Red) will just wow you with
all his number one hits and
it'll be nice and dry inside the
covered rodeo arena that will
hold thousands if it's raining


book signing are held after a
lecture, children will be re-
turned to parents at the end of
the lecture portion of the pro-
gram.
The Florida Museum of
Natural History is Florida's
state natural history museum,
dedicated to understanding,
preserving and interpreting bi-
ological diversity and cultural
heritage. It is located near the


Saturday night. This is YOUR
county fair, get out there, en-
joy, eat, watch, learn, meet
your neighbors, ride the rides,
go to the livestock shows. It'll
give you something to talk
about for the next year.
If your calendar is as filled
as mine then you are just too
busy! Gee, why did everyone
schedule everything this
week!
Ladies, don't forget, the
Live Oak Garden Club will
have your caladiums (if you
ordered them) on Saturday,
March 19 at the clubhouse on
Eleventh Street. Get those
bulbs and get them in the
ground ONCE IT GETS
WARM and watch the beauty
grow until full bloom for the
entire summer. I understand
there will be some other
plants for sale that morning
also so get out there and get a
few and get gardening, or as
the woman on HGTV says,
"get those hands dirty!"
The Cherry Holmes Family
will be performing at the Spir-
it of Suwannee Music Park
this Friday. night in the NlMuic;
Hall. These folks sound great
so if you're not into the fair,
go on out and enjoy their
bluegrass type entertainment.
Don Miller played one of


intersection of Southwest 34th
Street and Hull Road in the
University of Florida Cultural
Plaza in Gainesville. Hours
are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-
Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. Sun-
day. For more information, in-
cluding ticket prices, direc-
tions and parking information,
call 352-846-2000, or visit the
museum on-line,
www.flmnh.ufl.edu.


their recordings Sunday
evening on his bluegrass.
show and it was great. You
know Don, he's the one who
says, "Neighbor" like he's
just walked out of the hills!
We just love Don Miller, he's
a long-time friend, great mu-
sician, great comedian (I
think he got that line about the
RC Cola and Moon Pie from
my husband) and general all
around good guy. Remember
when he used to be our only
UPS man? I do - guess that
dates me pretty good, huh?
Don't forget to put little
Hayley Freeman, her mom
and dad and big sister Holland
on your prayer list. So far so
good but the family faces new
challenges every day dealing
with the situation where a
newborn has leukemia so lift
them all up in prayer every
chance you get.
A speedy recovery to Miss
Eyvonne who's recovering
from a hospital stay. Miss
Eyvonne is one of the nicest
people I know and can grow
the most beautiful flowers
you've ever seen. You're in
our prayers, Eyvonne, so hur-
ry and get this behind you.
I understand that March 20
is the first day of spring. Usu-
ally by now everything has
bloomed out and it's much
warmer - I think - but this
year it's not worked that way.'
I guess I got so used to the
weather being warm so much
I can't remember how it's
supposed to be anymore.
Get up, get,'&i:it;go sone-
place and enjoy all that
Suwannee County has to of-
fer. There's far more to do
than you can attend so get
moving NOW!


Offes Ptftiftt Svlti4 l.uM0)5 Blcht f 35p, . ..... w i. . . .., . .
MMrnl t a lla om-'htA PHy' k ro eflIt itttrii i' f itVIe ,r rleSpl(
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Quality Plus

Communications, Inc.

N 330 West Howard Street
Live Oak, FL 32064
ALUmTHOMaE atiNwr^Ae 386-362-6789 (Live Oak Office)


386-935-9317 (Branford Office)
386-294-2424 (Mayo Office)


----7


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


AP GE 10A


^, . I. . .. . .. .. ... ...... .. . .. .... ..








WFNEDAvMRH 6.205U UWNNEIEOCATLIEOA PGEh


CGCC President receives PTK

Service Key award


Dr. Dorothy L. Lord, recipient of
the Phi Delta Kappa Service
Key. - Photo: Submitted
On Feb. 7 the Phi Delta
Kappa Service Key, a chapter
award of Phi Delta Kappa In-
ternational, was presented to
Dr. Dorothy L. Lord, president
of Coastal Georgia Communi-
ty College. Phi Delta Kappa
International is an education
association, professional and
collegial in nature, whose pur-
pose is to promote quality in
education, in particular pub-
licly supported and universally
available education. Its pur-
pose is accomplished through
research, service and leader-
ship and promoted through
professional relationships and
partnerships with educators
and other like-minded individ-
uals and groups. This award
recognizes outstanding Phi
Delta Kappa members world-
wide for their meritorious ser-
vice, outstanding leadership,
or significant research.
Dr. Lord, a member of Phi
Delta Kappa since 1976,
served in the Southwest Flori-
da Chapter as a member of the
Executive Board from 1977 to
1991. She served as vice pres-
ident for programs, vice presi-

Children's

Fashion


dent for membership, presi-
dent, and adviser. Under her
leadership the chapter grew
and prospered. During that
time, she received the coveted
chapter Heritage Award, as
well as the Outstanding Post-
Secondary Educator Educa-
tion Award. During Dr. Lord's
tenure as vice president for
academic affairs for Edison
Community College in Ft.
Myers she was instrumental in
working with the seven area
high schools to provide quality
dual enrollment programs, and
she frequently made the col-
lege campus available for
community-wide meetings
and professional groups.


In Brunswick, Dr. Lord con-
tinues to lend her leadership,
support, and guidance to the
Coastal Georgia Chapter of
Phi Delta Kappa, serving as
the chapter's Adviser from
2001 to the present time. She
has been a program presenter
at various chapter meetings
and has made many valuable
contributions to program and
service activities of this
group.
Dr. Lord has been president
of Coastal Georgia Communi-
ty in Brunswick, Georgia since
1991. She is a native of Live
Oak and graduated from the
local high school. She still has
family in this area.


VALENTINE'S LOVE LINE CONTEST: Winners of the Valentine's
Love Line Contest Lisa and Russell Landen accept a certificate for
a weekend stay at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park.
- Photo: Mvrtle Parnell


Show Now serving Suwannee and Columbia counties

For Relay 120 Gal. Tank

for Life oS W A S
The Crackerjack Clowns We Run A Route System


Relay for Life Team is hav-
ing a children's fashion
show, Saturday, March 19th
at 11 a.m. at Harmony Center
at Advent Christian Village
at Dowling Park. Proceeds
will go to the American Can-
cer Society. Tickets will not
be sold, but $2 donations
will be accepted at the door.

American Red

Cross will hold

an Adult CPR

class in Lake City

March 22
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley; Adult
CPR class; 6-9 p.m.,-
Tuesday, March 22; 264
NE Hernando Ave., Suite
102, Lake City. Info: 386-
752-0650

Suwannee District
Schools will
administer
Spring 2005
Assessments -
SAT 10 March 21-23
Suwannee District Schools
will administer Spring 2005
Assessments - SAT 10 - March
21-23. SAT 10 is for Grade K-
2. Each school has more de-
tailed testing information
available. Daily student atten-
dance is critical during these
assessment periods.


Office Cleaning

Service

Nights & Weekends
Please call
386-776-2147 or
904-308-7045
151595JRS-F


OFFICE
(386) 792-1012 .
k TOLL FREE (877) 203-2871
P.O. BOX 625, JASPER, FLORIDA 32052


136855DH-FI


>1!


Spirit of the Suwannee

Music Park & Campground

MARCH & APRIL UPCOMING EVENTS


* ,March IS
Friday. C herrN Hl-olmen
Fami ly, is a ,ouing taiml., of
veterann musicians pla. ing
traditional bluegrass v. ith a
fresh and excitinL nex, en-
erg\. Join the Holmcs par-
ents 'with their It'o son:; and
two daughters for a great
family night of entertmin-
ment at 'pm in the NMusic
Hall. Tickets $110 per person
plus t'a .
March IS - 20 - Frida',
through Suida',, Florid.i
Trail Association 21105 An-
nual Meeting and Confer-
ence wvitlh ieal \loiL.thops.
entertainment canoeing.
hiking and committee meet-
inWs Contact the Floridad
Trail Association at l-'7''-
Hike-FL.\ or iSit
\ w'a;. floridatrial org
"Mlarcih 24 -'" - Thurs-
da, through
Sunday\ Si,. annee
Springfest a festi'.al of
Great American Roots Mu-
sic featuring Bela Fleck
Acoustic Trio. Rodney,
Crok\ell. Donna the Buffa-
lo. Peter Rowan & Tony
Rice Quartet. Gnw Clark.
Keith Frank & Soileau Zy-
deco Band, Vassar
Clements. The Duhks,
Darol Angei & Mlike MNar-
-lhall. Laura Love Band, Jim
Lauderdale. Biscuit Burn-
ers. Reeltime Tra\ elders, Un-
cle Earl. The \\ib hacks.
Red Stick Ramblers, Ro.\
Book Binder. Verlon
Thompson. Larry Keel &
Natural Bridge. Caroline
Herring. Blueground Un-
dererass, David Gans. Old
School Frieght Train. Diead


Clampitt and more! O'.clr
4-j peit irnmer- on 5 stalnes'
Child renri Area Dali;, No a
and Music Workshops. Cdll
94-1-249-7990 tor ticket in-
lfoirmation or '.'isit
i'w- .manantusic.coIn
.April I - 2. Friday , &
Satuida', Rock-N-\\heels
teaitures on Frida', the pat
Tra'.crs Band v.'nh special
guests The Josh Kirkland
B.nd. Faster Than Fliash
and Michael Buffalo
Smith. Saturd.i', teatO res
Blackfoot v. ith special
guests Michael Buffalo
Smith & the Cra Ile'r-s. The
R.h',thm Pi.s. The Gra'.e-
.iard Boogie Band. L-c-n-
Load and John llarrison &
Friends. Event includes
poi.er run. bikc gaic�,. bike
shov'. .car & truck sho',..
vc-ndoi. coinmiercial dts-
pla; and lots more. For
lcket 3S6-3--4- 16 ',3 or on-
line at \\ , \ musi-
clhi here coin or
�\ wxwv.hioanentei tainiienit.n
et
*April 7 - 9, Thuirsdav,
through Saturday: The
Lonesome River Band Mu-
,sic Fest featuring The
Lonesome River Band. 11-
Ird T inme Out. Mountain
Heart. Seldom Scene. Lairy,
Sparks, King \ilkie. Wild-
fire. Blue Moon Rising.
Southern Lite. Ernie
Thacker & Route 23. Mo-
ron Brothers. BliuerIass
Parlor Band. Boone Broth-
ers & Co The Boohers,
S\ inging Bridge. The Scott
Anderson Band. For tick-
ets-, call 3,6-364--16S3 or
\ w-'\ .musicli\ eshere coin


for more information visit
\\ : ._.ju trighiproductions.c

April 15 -lb - Friday &
Saturday. Wanee Music
Festival featuring on Friday
Ortcil & The Peacemakers,
Max Creek. Roberi Ran-
dolph & The Familx Band.
Go' Mule. ALL NIAN
BROTHERS BAND. Dark
Star Orchestra. and The
Derek Tru,;ks Band. On
Saturday , Tea Leaf Green.
Oteil & The Peacemakers.
The John Popper Project
'.\lth DJ Logic, Galactic,
Go t Nluie. ALL MAN
BROTHERS BAND. Yel-
low man. Ekoosunk Hookah.
Dark Star Orchestra & The
Derek Trucks Band. Tickets
can be obtained online at
i' ., ' \\x anneefestival.com
or call 38h-364-1683.
April 21-24 - Thursday
though Sunda.- SUWAN-
NEE RIVER JAM! Best
concert ,alue featuring
L,.nvrd Skynyd. Sammy
Kershaw. Phil Vassar. Dar-
trl W\orle', Tan\a Tucker,
Lonestar. Chel \Wright.
Restless Heart. John Ander-
son. and more! Tickets call
3Sf5-364-1683 or online at
v. -,\ \.musicliveshere.com
& ww'\.suivwanneeriver-
jam.comr
MAKE YOUR PLANS
FOR GREAT TIMES
THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR ENJOYING OUT-
DOOR RECREATION
AND MUSIC ENTER-
TAINMENT VISIT OUR
CONCERT AND EVENTS
SCHEDULE ONLINE AT
V vwv.inusicli. eshere.comi


Maximum Refund Guaranteed.


It's estimated Americans overpaid their taxes by nearly a billion dollars. Don't be one of
them. H&R Block will get ou the maximum refund you're entitled to, or your tax
preparation is free. So all the money you've earned is where it belongs. In your pocket.
Call 1-800-HRBLOCK or visit hrblock.com for an office near you.

386-362-3757 - H&R BLOCK�
6826 Suwannee Plaza Lane, m
Wal-Mart Shopping Center, Live Oak, FL 32060
*Fees will apply if you choose to re-file. Individual results may vary. Valid for past three years tax returns only. At participating locations. �2004 H&R
Block Tax Services, Inc. 14785as H-F


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&s ~


Gloria A. Chin, MD
Board Certified in Plastic Surgery

The medical staff and employees of Shands Medical Group of Live Oak are
pleased to welcome Dr. Gloria A. Chin to our healthcare team. Dr. Chin completed
her residency in Plastic Surgery and is fellowship-trained in Hand Surgery. She
provides a range of specialized services including:

Reconstructive surgery * Cosmetic surgery
Hand surgery


386.362.1809
11llb SW l th Street
Live Oak, FL 3206 4
hands. org


HANDS
Medical Group of Live Oak


The Passion of


The Christ

Mel Gibson's great epic film of the
final 12 hours in the life of Christ.
Film showing from 7:00-9:00 p.m.
Good Friday, March 25th
in the sanctuary of
Mount Olive Baptist Church
5314 98th Terrace
Live Oak, FL 32060
PH: 963-5603
(Viewer discretion is advised for children
under 10 years of age)
The Church is located off west Hwy. 90.
-Coming from the Live Oak area, turn on CR417 then follow signs.
Also, out of Wellborn, go north on CR136, turn left at
garbage collection site and follow signs.

\________________


M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK


PAGE 11A


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16,2005


, e.


opsI







N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2005


O onE
FROM THE PAGES OF THE SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT


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is proud to be a parl of the

community l)we sertie

932 N. Ohio Ave., Live Oak

(386) 364-5115


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mauwnn Brremocrat

Section B
Wednesday, March 16, 2005


First Federal Suwannee Invitational Track Meet Saturday
Check outthe Suwannee track and field stars Saturday. It's an all-day affair
sponsored by First Federal Savings Bank at the track next to Suwannee High.
Action begins bright and early Saturday morning at 9 a.m. with field events.
There will be refreshments and lots of action. o D~y!


Quaramos Ross in the long jump.
S- Photo: Janet Schrader


i-i-- -


Bulldog

wrestling

has an

awesome

year
After being semi-retired for
the past five years, it was an-
other Cinderella story for
David Laxton and the Bulldog
wrestlers
It was just like the 1982
championships when Laxton
first came to Live Oak and
surprised everyone by win-
ning the region one and state
3-A wrestling championships.
That was the first FHSAA
sanctioned regional and state
championship ever won by the
Bulldogs in any sport.
"I knew then as I knew this
year that we could have a
championship team," Laxton
said. "If the kids bought into
what I was teaching and the
experience I had to offer."
Laxton said he really want-
ed to give all the credit to
God. "God has been really
good to me and my family and
we have been blessed," Lax-
ton said
Laxton said the rest of the
credit goes to Randy McMan-

SEE BULLDOG, PAGE 2B


e4 dw







Trout fishing has been
spotty, however it took
a 5.43 pound trout to win
the fishing tourney held at
Keaton Beach last Saturday.
These cold-fronts are real-
ly hampering the trout fish-
ing and keeping the \nater
temperatures and the trout
down .
Fish Saltwater Assassins
in Candy Corn, electric
chicken and limetreuse and
live shrimp all under Cajun
Thunders in 4-6 feet of water
for best results.
A few folks were fishing
with topwater baits and jerk-
baits in water less than two
feet, as well, for larger fish.
Expect these to be few and
far between if this current
cold front has it's way.
Ralph and Jackie Ward
of Orlando had 17
Sheepshead on live shrimp
Sunday while fishing at the
Steinhatchee Reef. Several
other boats has less.success
while trying for sheepies.
Sherrie and Herb Davie of
Keaton Beach had two - 21"
trout while fishing with live
shrimp under Cajun Thun-
ders.
Tony McKee and Sheree
McKee of Tifton, Ga. had
their limit of trout using
Saltwater Assassins in candy
corn under Cajun Thunders
in two feet of water.
Stephen and Landon
Crown of Valdosta, Ga.
caught 12 trout, kept three.
They were fishing in 8'-9'
water on artificial grubs.
Wesley Lynch family from
Macon, GA, aboard "Beats
Working" Charter Service,
Capt. Danny Ellison had 17
trout using live shrimp, jigs

SEE KEATON BEACH, PAGE 3B


Suwannee puts the big bite on Columbia


Rheed Baldwin gets the win against Columbia. Baldwin pitched
four innings in the 17-5 massacre of the Tigers. - Photo: Paul Buchanan


'" "- -, , - . - - -




perfect innings. - Photo:. Paul Buchanan


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
Suwannee High baseball
has not given up a win to
Tiger baseball in six Nears.
Thursday, March 10 was no
different. The Dogs took a
chunk out ofthe Tigers win-
ning 17-5 and 10-run ruling
them. Over-all, Coach Ron-
nie Gray's record is 16-2 over
Columbia.
Rheed Baldwin started for
Suwannee and picked up the
win. Michael Keen came in
as relief and pitched two per-
fect innings.
The Tigers got off to a 2-0
lead after two innings: But
Suwannee snagged three runs
in the third to send the score
to 3-2.
Columbia came back in the
bottom of the third and came
back, but the Dogs scored
four runs in the fourth and
blew Columbia out of the wa-
ter scoring seven runs in the
fifth to trot out the 10-run
mercy rule. The final score
was 17-5 with the Dogs tak-
ing home and impressive
win.
Leading hitters for Su% an-

SEE SUWANNEE, PAGE 2B


Suwannee softball beats


Mayo on their home turf


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
Suwannee softball has been
having a hard-hitting hack of a
season so far. The Lady Dogs
squeaked by Mayo Thursday,
March 10 6-5 to send their
record to 5-2 for the season.
According to coach Jan
Schenck, the Lady Dogs
ix eren't sure what kind of team
Mayo vounld present this year.,
But they were sure of one
thing, M layo's Gainesville Sun'
Player of the Year Natalie
Land: The Lady Dogs knew the
key to their success against the
Lady Hornets was going to be
shutting down- Land, a ninth-
grade powerhouse at the plate..
In the first inning, Suwannee
had two outs % hen Kate
Townsend drew a walk. Lea
Schenck hit one to the third


baseman who fumbled the ball
allowing Schenck to make first
base. Jenna Jordan, the next
batter up, wailed a hard line-
drive down the third baseline to
drive Townsend in for the
night's first run.,
Mayo's first three batters
were struck out by Lea
Schenck, Suwannee's hard and
fast pitcher. The three included
Land. Three up and three down,
and Suwannde was at bat
again.
George Foster led off with a
bunt that the third baseman
once again bobbled, allowing
Foster to make first. Courtney
Ross walked. Deanne Wain-
wright bunted and the Mayo,
catcher stepped on the ball al-
lowing Wainwright to reach
first. The bases were loaded
when With .Stephanie Starling
at.bat, the Mayo pitcher threw a
wild one that allowed Ross to


score. Sitarling hit one to third
and two more rLuns scored \\ ith
Al Cash stealing home in a stu-
pendous head-first side.
Suwannee ended the inning up
4-0.
Mayo scored one in the sec-
ond inning to make the score 4-
1. The Lad\ Dogs \\ent score-
less for the top of the third and
so did N laNo.
Ma\o got hot in the fourth
led off b\. Land Land scored
and Schenck struck out the
next two batters to end the in-
ning with the Lad\ Dogs hold-
ing on to their lead 4-2.
Schenck dre%% a v.alk in the
fifth and scored %%when Kane
Smith hit a double. Suiannee
added ore more run to their tal-
ly inthe f-fihli to make it 5-2. But
Mayo got hot again in the fifth
and tied the Lad3 Dogs 5-5.


SEE SOFTBALL, PAGE 2B


Lea Schenck struck out eight Mayo batters including their star hitter.
- Photo: Paull Buchanan






1A FLORIDA SHERIFFS BOYS
RANCH RECEIVES 50 LAKE
CITY RODEO TICKETS FROM
COLUMBIA COUNTY
RESOURCES:
The tickets were donated by
Columbia County Resources,
the governing body of the
Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo.
Bob Smith of Smitty's Western
Store, left, presents Dustin
Jones, farm manager for the
Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch,
with 50 rodeo tickets for the
boys. The tickets will be given
to the boys who earn them
through meritous behavior.
Boys I to r: Ranchers Steven,
, Jonathan, Seth, Brian, Sean
and Jeremy.
"Pnoto: Janet Scraoer-Seccafico
a,,.ere.,y


4000,

S.








PAGE 2B U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2005


Softball


Continued From Page 1B

Suwannee entered the sixth
needing a score. Courtney
Ross led off with a walk. Wain-
wright hit one to second but
Ross got thrown out. Wain-
wright advanced on a passed
ball with Starling at bat. Star-
ling hit a double and drove in
Wainwright to score what
would be the winning run.
Suwannee's defense stepped
their game up a notch in the
sixth determined to take home
the win. Mayo did not score.
The Lady Dogs went into the
final inning up by one run 6-5.
Three Lady Dog batters went
to the plate and right back to
the dugout. That left the win in
the hands of Schenck and the
Suwannee defense.
The defense held to take
home the win. The Lady Dogs
final score was 6-5. Land was
the final batter for Mayo. she
popped to left field and Star-
ling caught the ball for the fi-
nal out of the game.
Schenck struck out eight,
gave up two hits and was suc-
cessful pitching to Mayo's
phenom Natalie Land. Wain-
wright had a great night catch-
ing two pop fly balls and


fielding a ground ball to throw
the runner out at first. Jenna
Jordan and Starling both made
key catches for the defense.
Offensively, Suwannee
only had four hits. Starling
went 1 for 4 with one double
and two RBIs. Kate
Townsend walked three times
and scored one run. Schenck
went 1 for 3 and scored once.
Jenna Jordan hit I for 3 with a
- ,.^': " ". ^ IH'
-X..


double and one RBI. Smith
hit I for 3 with a double and
one RBI.
Look for the Lady Dogs at
home on Friday, March 18
against Baker. Game time is 5
p.m. Go Lady Dogs!
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@ gaflinews. corn.
"-' .-


a,, ,,,. "'' ' ',r,~-..~4~a-re" ,'nL-'. ~ ~ 44%
, a' yd~t~O tgaw-,1
a"44-


Kate Townsend - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


&


Suwannee Parks & Recreation
offers Umpire Clinic March 19


Volunteer today!!! Posi-
tions open for: coaches, as-
sistant coaches, team moms,
concession workers, team
sponsors and scorekeepers
Did you play baseball or soft-
ball growing up and still have a
love for the game? You can still,
be a big part of it by being an
umpire for the upcoming Babe
Ruth program. Suwannee Parks
& Recreation will help you get
the training you need at no cost.
Suwannee Parks & Recre-
ation will offer a one-day Um-
pire Clinic on Saturday, March

S., nee, 4
Continued From Page 1B'

nee were Ross Aretino who
went 3-3, with a double and
two RBIs. Ryan Stovall went
2-2 with a two-run home run.
Zack Davis went 3-4 with an
RBI double.
Look for more exciting


19, at the First Federal Sport-
splex, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. This
is a free clinic offered to anyone
interested in umpiring baseball
or softball games for the Babe
Ruth program.
Regular Babe Ruth season be-
gins in April, after Spring Break,
and runs through the end of
May. (All-star games will be
played in June and July.)
Get involved! Volunteer
coaches, assistant coaches, team
moms, concession workers,
team sponsors and scorekeepers
are also needed. If you don't feel
confident enough, Suwannee



Suwannee baseball a't home
against Bishop Kenny
Wednesday, March 23. Game
time is 5 p.m. Go Dogs!
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@gaflnews.com.


ON -A 10OC55W .TAT'

XTR EGE EROIY


OPEN HOUSE!


Friday & *Poker Run
* Refreshments
Saturday * Customer
Appreciation Sale
April 1 & 2 . ..

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accessories, riding gear o1 other purchases, and are responsible ot r related sales lax. Bonus Bucks offer good Ihrough 5/31/05 Check with participallng
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Parks & Recreation can help you
get the training and resources
you need. Ask how you can get
involved today!
For more information and to
volunteer, call Suwannee Parks
& Recreation at 386-362-3004.


Lea Schenck re Photo: Janet haeea
Lea Schenck scoreS - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Bulldog


Continued From Page 1B


away, the Suwannee Middle
School wrestling coach and
provider of great wrestlers and
his assistant Larry Hart. Both
coaches did such a great job
last year and this year with the
team motivation, strategies
mid'slills.t ',
Also behind the scenes and
assisting was former coach
and wrestler Rod Howard,
Timmy Morgan and college
All-American and presently
the coach at Clewiston High
School Jesse Alford who gave
a one day camp for the kids.
"We have had an excellence
following of fans this year for
the kids," Laxton said. "They
followed us to districts, re-
gions and close to 200 fans
were at the state champi-
onship," The administration


and many local businesses sup-
ported the wrestlers this year.
"I want to thank them for the
team and on behalf of the
coaching staff for all their sup-
port," Laxton said.
According to Laxton, it was-
n't until after the district lost
that the team really begin to
believe. They really, t.trnedi &
on at regions' afid won by a 65
point margin, qualifying 10 to
participate in the state champi-
onship finals.
"The kids wrestled really
well at state but never got any
breaks or help from the other
schools. You have to be good,
but you have to be really lucky
to win a state title and Cardinal
Gibbons was both," Laxton
said.
"We had built up winning
state so much that the kids
haven't realized the magnitude
of their accomplishment,"
Laxton said. "They finished
second, ahead of over 100 oth-
er schools. They don't realize
that they went undefeated in
duel meets, placed second in
two invitational tournaments,
won two invitational tourna-
ments, were regional champs
and state runner-ups. I think
they had a great season"
"Coach Hart and myself are
very proud of the boys' perfor-
mance. We had a good run,"
Laxton said.
Several wrestlers lost close
matches. Junior David
Sanders lost in the first round
at state to Cory Bondedistal,


the defending state champion,
now a two-time winner. Peter
Kyne also lost two close
matches and was eliminated
from competition.
Scoring points for the Dogs
were Justin Mowls, a junior,
winning two matches.
Top eight finishers were
Levi- ! Waihwright,l a'q sopho,"--
more, and Michael Wright a
junior. Both lost very close
matches in the consolation
semi- finals.
Greg Boyle a junior had a
good tournament advancing
through the medal round and
placing fifth in 152 weight
class.
Barney Wainwright, a
sophomore, also had a good
tournament losing an extreme-
ly close match in the semi-fi-
nal of the championship
bracket. But Wainwright
racked up on pin points in the
wrestle-backs to place third in
the state at 130 weight class .
Caleb Wainwright had a
great semi-final match domi-
nating his foe with a pin and
advancing into the finals to
wrestle the defending state
champion. "After a series of
take downs and escapes by the
champ, Caleb caught the
champ in a throw to excite the
Suwannee fans one more time
for the season. But time ran
out a the match was over.
Caleb lost by a decision,"
Wainwright said.
Next up was sophomore Lee
Laxton wrestling a very smart


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and then very physical match
at the end. Laxton beat him 6-
0 and advanced into the cham-
pionship finals. In the champi-
onship finals, Lee wrestled
against the returning state run-
ner-up and senior Blake Ger-
maine from Sebring "It
was a very well wrestled
match but the seahiT Gernaiiffi
out aggressed Lee 'and dfeat-
ed him in the first period of
over time," Laxton said.
Preston Hart had another
great tournament pinning and
teaching his way to the cham-
pionship finals for his second
state title. His loss had to be
the biggest up-set of the state
1-A tournament. "While lift-
ing and fixing to take Mr.
Cross of Cardinal Gibbons to
what looked like a for-sure pin,
Preston slipped and fell under
.his spider-like opponent's legs
and lost the title," Laxton said.
No state champions for the
Bulldogs, but a great second.
place finish.
This made Laxton's fourth.
state runner-up title, his sixth
undefeated season and sixth
straight regional championship
title at Suwannee High. In Au-
gust Laxton will be inducted
into the Florida Chapter of the
National Wrestling Hall of
Fame, a well-deserved honor.
Congratulations to Coach
David Laxton and the Suwan-
nee Bulldog wrestlers. An
awesome year!
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.Schrad-
er@gaflnews. Com.

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important that your dentist know of any
health condition you have so that the
treatment he administers doesn't
compromise any existing condition.
Dentists, of course, are trained to treat
patients with other medical conditions. In
some cases they will consult with a
patient's general physician to devise the
proper course of treatment. Generally they
will get the information they need by
asking questions of their patients. Dentists
also often detect conditions unknown to
the patient. For instance, while some 16
million people have diabetes, only about
half of them have been diagnosed. It is
often during the course of an oral exam
that a dentist may notice a symptom that
ultimately leads to a diagnosis. So share
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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16,2005


PAGE 2B


I N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


1




f


F


I










Willits wins Wal-Mart Bass Fishing league event on Harris Chain


- Join a tournament, contact the BFL


Boater J. Nobel Willits of
Altamonte Springs earned
$3,711 Saturday as winner of
the Wal-Mart Bass Fishing
League Seminole Division
event on the Harris Chain of
Lakes. The tournament was
the second of five regular-
season Seminole Division
events and featured 115
boaters vying for the win,
which earned Willits 200
points in the Boater Division.
Willits's winning catch of
five bass weighed 18 pounds,
4 ounces. Willits was fishing
the mouth of a canal with a
Carolina Rig when he caught


his limit. He said he caught
three of his bass in the first
45 minutes of the tourna-
ment.
Finishing second was Rick
Bak of Clermont with five
bass weighing 18 pounds, 3
ounces that earned him
$1,855. Christopher Lane of
Winter Haven claimed
$1,215 as the third-place fin-
isher thanks to four bass
weighing 16 pounds, 7
ounces. Lane won an addi-
tional $500 as the Ranger
Cup award winner and $250
as the Powered by Yamaha
award winner. In fourth was


Florida strengthens


protection for


Pinhook Swamp

- Acquisition increases

critical black bear habitat -

Governor , ., project pre-
Jeb Bush 4.1 .is serves criti-
and the c, al habitat
Florida . for threat-
Cabinet e n e d
recently - : \ ' , wildlife
voted to . i includ-
acquire .. FLOR A . ing the
S r , . Florida


9,400
acres of the Pinhook Swamp
through perpetual conserva-
tion easements. Six separate
owners sold the development
rights to the State, providing
permanent protection to the
land and water that flows
into the Suwannee and St.
Mary's Rivers. �


IN FO0

WHO: State of Florida
WHAT: acquisition of 9,4
acres of the Pinhook Swai
for $1.9 million
WHEN: recently '
WHERE: Pinhook Swam
215,216 acres link Oscec
National Forest in North
Florida to the Okeefenok
National Wildlife Refuge
in Georgia
Info: www.floridaforever.org

"By acquiring these lands,
we can be sure that the qual-
ity of the water flowing
down from the Okeefenokee
Swamp and into two impor-
tant north Florida rivers
stays healthy," said Depart-
ment of Environmental Pro-
tection Secretary Colleen M.
Castille. "We are also ensur-
ing that the habitats of Flori-
da wildlife are protected and
preserved for future genera-
tions."
The 215,216-acre Pinhook
Swamp "Florida Forever"


sandhill craig


black
b e a rc,
bear,t and
nes, bobcat and


red-cockaded woodpecker.
Pinhook Swamp also pro-
vides drinking water for
northeast Florida and is con-
nected to the Suwanee River,
St. Mary's River and the
Okeefenokee Swamp.
Linking Osceola National
Forest to the Okeefeno-
kee National Wildlife
Refuge in Georgia, Pin-
hook Swamp creates
the largest wildlife cor-
.00 ridor east of the Missis-
mp sippi River. Fifty-nine
percent of the Pinhook
Swamp "Florida Forev-
, er" project is now pro-
tected through public
ownership or conserva-
tion easements. Con-
:ee servation easements al-
low property owners to
continue to use the land
I while protecting it from
development.
The six parcels, varying in
size from 1,000 to 2,300
acres, were purchased for
$1.9 million - 98 percent of
their approved value.
The 10-year, $3 billion
"Florida Forever" program
established by Governor
Bush and the Florida Legis-
lature conserves environ-
mentally sensitive land, re-
stores waterways and pre-
serves important cultural and
historical resources. For
more information, visit
www. floridaforever.org.


Keaton Beach


Continued From Page 1B

with shrimp teasers under
Cajuns.
Offshore Report:
Kayla Chapman, Cale,
Caurtni, Ryan, Jerome and
Alex O'Neal of Hahira, Ga.
had five grouper, a bunch of
pinks and blacks in 40' .of
water on squid, jigs and cigar
minnows
Kerry Patrick of Quitman,
Ga. and Jessie and Jodi
Wooten of Lake City had 15
grouper, 54'-58' water Span-
ish sardines.
Butch McQuaig, Donny
Carter, Brantley Crosby
Waycross, Ga. seven grouper
in 50' of water, trolling
stretch 30.


Kerry, Rejinia and Drew
Patrick had 13 grouper from
51 feet of water using Span-
ish sardines.
Gerald and Bill Wilson,
Claude Crocker and Phillip
Napier all of lle, Ga. had 17
grouper in 40' of water off
squid and cigar minnows.
Billy Pillow and two
which shall be named later
had a good day Monday and
landed 15 grouper with one
fish over 17 pounds and were
back at Pouncey's Restaurant
in Perry with the fish cleaned
eating hamburgers at 1 p.m.
Where how and what one ...
. . well if I can't tell you
who? I guess they must have
all been in 45 feet of water,
on quid . . of course.


7ht~ btst tf


' Page 8D


Jason McKinnie of Umatilla
with five bass weighing 15
pounds, 6 ounces worth
$945, and finishing fifth and
earning $776 was Gary
Simpson of Gainesville with
five bass weighing 15
pounds, 4 ounces.
In addition, Lane took
Boater Division big-bass
award honors, earning $570
for an 11-pound bass. He
caught his big bass on a wa-
termelon-colored BB Crick-
et.
Edwin Howe of Jack-
sonville bested 107 Co-an-
gler Division competitors to
earn $1,765 as the co-angler
winner, thanks to five bass
weighing 13 pounds, 9
ounces that he caught on a
Rapala and a Senko.
Rounding out the top five
co-anglers are Dennis
Badzinski of Kissimmee
(four bass, 12 pounds, 8
ounces, $882); David Cook
of Lake Ariel, Pa. (five bass,
12 pounds, $577); Jesse
Williams of Lake City (two
bass, 9 pounds, 12 ounces,
$449); and George Pridgeon
of Perry (four bass, 9
pounds, 10 ounces, $369).In


addition, Williams earned
$268 as the co-angler big-
bass award winner with a 7-
pound, 9-ounce bass he
caught on a June Bug Gam-
bler Craw.
The Seminole Division's
next event will be held April
23 on Lake Apalachicola
near Wewahitchka, followed
by an event on Seminole
Lake near Bainbridge, Ga.,
June 4. The Seminole Divi-
sion will wrap up its regular
season Sept. 17-18 with a
two-day Super Tournament
on the St. John's River in
Palatka. Following the regu-
lar season, the Seminole Di-
vision boater with the most
points will earn $1,000 as the
Yamaha "Be the Best" points
champion. The co-angler
amassing the most points
will earn $500 as the Yamaha
"Be the Best" points champi-
on in the Co-angler Division.
Every angler who receives
weight credit in a tourna-
ment earns points, with 200
points going to the winner,
199 for second, 198 for third,
and so on except for Super
Tournaments, which award
300 points to the winner, 299


today


for second, 298 for third, and
so on. The top 40 Seminole
Division boaters and co-an-
glers based on year-end
points standings will ad-
vance to the Lake Toho Re-
gional near Kissimmee Oct.
4-8, where they will compete
against Bama, Bulldog and
South Carolina Division an-
glers for one of six slots in
the 2006 All-American. With
a total purse of $1 million
and a potential $140,000
cash prize going to the win-
ning boater and $70,000 go-
ing to the winning co-angler,
the All-American is one of
the most prestigious and lu-
crative events in bass fish-
ing.
The $8.4 million Wal-Mart
Bass Fishing League features
28 divisions nationwide. In
BFL competition, boaters
and co-anglers are randomly
paired, with boaters supply-
ing the boat and fishing
against other boaters and co-
anglers fishing from the back
deck against other co-an-
glers. For more information
or to enter a tournament, call
270-252-1000 or visit
FLWOutdoors.com.


Named after the legendary
founder of Ranger Boats,
Forrest L. Wood, FLW Out-
doors administers the Wal-
Mart Bass Fishing League
and seven other national
tournament circuits offering
a combined $30 million in
awards through 214 events in
2005. The 27-year-old orga-
nization is the purveyor of
America's largest and most
prestigious fishing tourna-
ments, including the Wal-
Mart FLW Tour, EverStart
Series, Wal-Mart Bass Fish-
ing League, Wal-Mart Texas
Tournament Trail, Wal-Mart
FLW Walleye Tour, Wal-
Mart FLW Walleye League,
Wal-Mart FLW Kingfish
Tour and Wal-Mart FLW
Redfish Series.
Wal-Mart and many of
America's largest and most
respected companies support
FLW Outdoors and its tour-
nament trails. Wal-Mart
signed on as title sponsor of
the FLW Tour in 1997 and
today is the title sponsor of
all FLW Outdoors events.
For more information on
Wal-Mart, visit Wal-
Mart.com.


Fish experts announce

best Black Crappie sites


Three things you should
know about black crappie
fishing before you go: how
to pronounce their name;
why some people call them
"papermouths;" and where
you find the best places to
catch them.
First of all, crappie
rhymes with choppy. It does
not rhyme with snappy.
Secondly, try to set the
hook like you would with a
bass when you have a crap-
pie on the line, and you'll
find out all about that "pa-
permouth" appellation.
Finally, the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation


Commission's (FWC's)
freshwater fisheries biolo-
gists have done all the work
to find Florida's 10 best
crappie fishing holes for
2005. Dedicated profession-
als that they are, FWC biolo-
gists also have gone to the
trouble of actually fishing
for black crappie in these
fishing holes, so they could
develop the most effective
techniques and share them
with the rest of us here in the
Fishing Capital of the World.
Incidentally, if you live in
south Florida, change "black
crappie" to "speckled perch"
throughout this manuscript,


and you'll understand a little
better. It's the same fish -
different name.
One thing freshwater fish-
eries biologists (the FWC
just calls them "fish heads"
for short) have figured out
about black crappie is that
just about any advice you
can come up with about
catching them can be ab-
solutely right or absolutely
wrong. It just depends on
where you are and what the
fish feel like doing.
For instance, some experts
will tell you that' in warmer
months, crappie gather
around deep underwater


structures that will show on
electronic fish finders,
which is true sometimes. It's
also true that you can catch
them by slow trolling or
drifting.
"Use live bait," some ex-
perts insist.
"Nah, use small jigs," oth-
ers say.
"Use one hook per
line....No, use tandem
hooks....No, don't listen to
them....Fish for crappie at
night with lanterns and Hy-
dro Glor, '12'-\1i light fix-
tures," and on7�and on goes


SEE FISH, PAGE 9B


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PAGE 3B


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


wFnl\IFqDAY. MARCH 16.2005




PA(C: 140 M AR vvm -4IWANNFF LFLflCRAT/IIVFOA.,..D...MARCH.16,2005


iHANDS at Live Oak K


Presents:


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Lots of Fun,
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The cost is only
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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16,2005


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 4B


49)






at Live Oak

� Annual
^o Community

0. Easter Egg


Saturday, March 19 at
Shands at Live Oak
The Easter Bunny will be here
< s from 10:00- 10:30 a.m.
* ' The Egg Hunt will begin
at 10:45 a.m. .


. Refreshments provided
Oak to be put on display


Easter Egg Hnt

i nThe health care professionals,
B Physicians and staff are pleased


to present these pages and the
annual Community Easter Egg
Hunt.
HunBBECAUSE WE CARE !!
1509470H F
" - 7>-- 1 ---... /-. - - -
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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16,2005


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WFDNFSDAY. MARCH 16.2005










AGRICULTURE


FFA AG


CONNECTION









Last year was such an en-
joyable and educational ex-
perience competing in the
Florida State Youth Steer Fu-
turity, this year I decided to
double the fun and knowl-
edge. So. I showed a hog as
well as a steer. I competed in
the Florida State Youth-Bar-
row only - Swine Show this
year from Feb. 10, Thursday
through Feb. 13, Sunday.
The reason you are there so
long is you compete in some-
thing different everyday.
Thursday is the day you
weigh your hog in and turn in
your record book/pre-fair
talks/educational posters and
a mandatory exhibitor meet-
ing followed by a social get
together. Friday, was the
Record Book Skills Test,
along with the swine skil-
. lathon competition.
The topic of the posters,
-skillathon and ask-me talks
this year was Products and
Marketing. Last year it was
reproduction. Saturday from
11 a.m.-11:45 a.m. was my
scheduled time to work/exer-
cise my hog for the benefitof
the public, for a 20 minute in-
terval followed by a three
minute swine marketing talk.
Saturday night at 6 p.m.
was the Showmanship Con-
test. I ended up placing in the
top 10 seniors out of 125 se-
nior exhibitors. Sunday at 1
p.m. was show day, I placed
3rd in my class with my 253
lb Black Hampshire cross


By Justin Johns
barrow hog. The jud,
he needed more cover
agreed with him.
Erin Zimmerman fro
rant FFA won with her
blue butt cross barro
judge called the hog tl
package.
Other youth from th
who showed in the
Show were Rance and
Brown of Branford,
with Clay and Will S
Madison. Clay won h
with his 255 lb barrio
Will placed in the top
showmanship.
The intent and purp
the Florida State Youth
show is to provide co
tive events where 4-
FFA projects help sho
Florida's Livestock In
Where emphasis is pla
the educational aspects
program with premium
ing paid for all comp
relating to each animi
each exhibitors par
tion. All exhibitor'
competed in this year's
show had to attend a
come certified in the
Quality Assurance Pr
I attended the progi
January at the Farm t
building in Alachua. I
very educational pr
that provided informal
all aspects of selection
ing, record keeping,
manship, etc. The p:
was taught by Rick Ah
Brooksville.


I entered the Florida State
Fair Youth Steer Futurity on
June 14, 2004. The calf se-
lection was held on August
15, 2004 at Riverview High
School. I drew pen "G" and
, then my name was pulled out
I of a hat last. However, I did-
. n't get my first pick calf, I
did get my second. He was a
yellow 630 lb CharX and the
producer was Jim Farley of
Penney Farms. I checked in
ge said and weighed "Charlie" into
r, and I the Florida State Fair on
Tuesday, Feb. 15, he weighed
om Du- in at 1280 lbs. I had hoped
r 274 lb that he would weigh at least
w. The 1330 lbs. He needed the
he total weight for his frame and to
be finished. Only 44 steers
ais area made it back for the final
Swine judging out of 57. The hurri-
Kelsey canes had something to do
along with several of them not
5app of making it back. The Show-
is class manship Contest was held at
ow and 4 p.m. on Tuesday, I won my
p 10 in heat to make it back for the
final drive and ended up plac-
)ose of ing in the top 10 seniors.
h swine Matthew Huesman of Ft.
)mpeti- White, placed second in
H and Showmanship.
owcase Wednesday, Feb. 16 I gave
idustry. my Illustrated talk/Demon-
iced on station on Beef Marketing at
s of the 1 p.m. The show was on
ms be- Wednesday, at 7 p.m.. There
petition were six classes, and I was in
lal and the last one. Charlie
rticipa- ended up placing second
s who place to Crystal Hale from.
s swine Sante Fe FFA with her fin-
nd be- ished 1365 lb CharX steer
e Pork produced by Duck Smith,
ogram. Bar S Crescent "S" Ranch
ram in out of Wauchula. It ended up
Bureau winning Reserve Champion.
t was a The grand champion honors
program went to Joshua Rivers from
tion on McClenny with his 1135 lb
., feed- CharX steer produced by


show-
rogram
rens of


Herman Laramore of Mari-
anna.
Thursday, Feb. 17 was the
Record Book Skills test,
along with the Skillathon fol-
lowed by the Awards Ban-
quet at 7 p.m..
I won the Most Weight
Gain for the second year in a
row with a gain of 3.53
pounds a day. My steer went
from 630 lbs to 1280 lbs in
117 days! I also placed sec-
ond in the steer Champion of
Champions with the second
highest premium points
earned.
I received a $750 Savings
Bond and was invited to
compete in the overall
Champion of Champions
Skillathon on Monday, Feb.
21.
I had the pleasure to meet
the producers of my steer,
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Farley of
Farley Cattle Company out
of Penney Farms. I found
out just how small of world
this is. Mr. Farley owns all
the cattle at Suwannee Farms
and a few of his steers will
be shown at the Suwannee
Valley Youth Livestock
Show and Sale next week.
Mr. Farley said, he was
proud of the fact that from
the carcass information, our
steer and one other where the
only ones to have 0.5 back-
fat thickness, and he was
proud that we won weight
gain!
I expressed my apprecia-
tion to Mr. Farley for provid-
ing such top quality Florida
feeder calves to the Florida
State Youth Steer Futurity.
Mr. Farley had three calves
that were selected at the calf
selection in August but only
two made it back for the
show.


The intent and purpose of
the Florida State Youth Steer
Futurity is to provide top
quality Florida feeder calves
to 4-H and FFA youngsters at
a reasonable price based on
current market conditions
thus affording students the
opportunity for a profitable
steer project. Only steers
purchased at the Florida State
Fair Futurity Calf Sale will
be eligible for the entry of
this show. Also, to provide
carcass data to the participat-
ing Florida producers in an
effort to assist them with
their breeding programs.
I had two hogs entered to
show at the North Florida
Livestock Show and Sale in
Madison on Monday, Feb.
21. However, I made the de-
cision to go back to Tampa
and compete in the Overall
Champion of Champions.
Out of a total of 1200 ex-
hibitors in steer, beef, dairy,
goats, sheep, rabbit, poultry
and pig only the top four in
each event were invited back
to compete for Scholarships
and over $3,000 in Savings
Bonds.
There were eight skillathon
stations representing each of
the events. They started four
Champion of Champions out
in the event they won it in,
with 15 minutes at each sta-
tion. The steer station was to
name the 10 cuts of meat on
display. The next station was
the pig booth which was sort
of like a quiz bowl you had to
hit a buzzer the quickest to
answer the question. Next,
was the rabbit station and it
was showmanship--I actu-
ally had to show a rabbit and
answer some questions (I
didn't do too good at this-
booth).


Then, we moved on to the
dairy station. Here you were
tested on the different kinds
of milk. Next was the poul-
try station. We had to grade
four eggs and judge four
whole chickens, then name a
variety of cuts of a chicken.
Then there was the sheep sta-
tion where we had to grade
wool. Next, was the goat sta-
tion. There was a skeleton of
a goat in a glass case, you
had to name the skeleton
parts that were marked.
Last, was the beef station
which was testing us on our
knowledge of by-products.
There was a table full of
things like crayons, medi-
cine, fish food, fertilizer,
neatsfoot oil, glue, sugar and
we had to know where they
came from. Needless to say,
I did not place in the top six,
but it was a great learning ex-
perience and I WILL know
what to expect next year!
The competition ended at 6
p.m. with an awards banquet.
I received a trophy and a
$750 savings bond for plac-
ing second in the Steer
Champion of Champions. I
would highly recommend for
all youth to participate at the
Florida State Fair by compet-
ing in the pig, steer, beef,
goat, rabbit, chicken, sheep
or dairy cow competitions. I
just thought I knew some-
thing about steers and pigs!!!
I learned just how much I
didn't know, and I know that
there is more to learn. That is
why I will be- entered again
next year! For more informa-
tion, contact Mrs. Vina Jean
Banks at,l1-800-345-FAIR or
go to the web site at
"http://www.floridastatefair.c
om" www.floridastatefair.co-
mand click on agribusiness.


Bronson announces appointment of

Ag Law Officer to top state post


Fresh From the Farm

Extension Service creates a market
guide for Suwannee County


The Suwannee County Ex-
tension Service is in the
process of creating a market
guide to help the general pub-
lic locate products straight
from the farm. This publica-
tion will also identify various
agricultural custom services.
In order for this publication
to be most effective, it should
contain all local agriculture-
related products and services,
and this is where we need your
help. If you have a farm prod-
uct and/or custom service you
would like to include in this
directory, we need your infor-
mation.
We have a form available to
list this your products and or
services. This form is avail-
able at our office or you may
call and we will put one in the
mail to you. Please fill out the


requested information and
send back to us, listing your
farm name, location (911 ad-
dress), and contact informa-
tion including your business
phone number. When listing
products and/or services,
please include the approxi-
mate dates available on your
farm in order to advise the
public when they can expect to
find these products.
This guide is intended for all
agriculture products including
livestock, produce, small ani-
mals, services and anything
else that would fit in the agri-
culture category.
If you have any questions,
please contact the Suwannee
County Extension Service at
386-362-2771. Our office is
located at 1302 Eleventh
Street SW, Live Oak.


,,Look

What


You


Missed...

...if you missed the last edition of
S4t *uwannee emrocrat

Z~ L'_D:T to hold tobacco bilul out meeting Marltrcf 16
~ leet thie nea' 5,91 footbaff coach --IMarch 15
~ Tund -raiser fr :iaflaekyI reenman venl successfid[
~ Sun'annee Schooldistrict receives $300,000 rant
� i rl' Oal.wI toan ftns breast cancer au.'areness
support ijroip
r---------------,--.-------
To subscribe to itmantm e Beimorat call (386) 362-1734 or complete this
coupon and mail to: numannee Bemdtrat, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064

0 1 Year, In-County 'D 1 Year, Out-of-County
130.00 *40.00
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP
PHONE We Acce-,, 4
L - Payment must accompany coupon 133809JRS-Fj


Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services Commis-
sioner .
Charles H. Bronson today
announced that a law enforce-
ment captain with the Office
of Agricultural Law Enforce-
ment (OALE) was installed
as President of the Florida
Police Accreditation Coali-


tion at the organization's an-
nual conference last week.
Captain Cheryl DeGroff-
Berry, OALE's accreditation
manager, has assumed the
Coalition's top position.
"Captain DeGroff-Berry's
elevation to this important
position is testimony to the
skill and professionalism she


brings to our department,"
Bronson said.
Before joining OALE in
2003, DeGroff-Berry served
for 20 years in the Orlando
Police Department. While
there, she served in a variety
of positions, including over-
seeing the department's re-ac-
creditation and ultimately su-


pervising the department's In-
ternal Affairs, Planning and
Evaluation, and Fiscal units.
In her current position with
OALE, DeGroff-Berry, a
University of Miami gradu-
ate, is in the process of guid-
ing the Office into becoming
an accredited state law en-
forcement agency.


Antique Tractor Show at Stephen Foster State Park

Educational exhibits and demonstrations on America's farming history


Antique tractors and farm-
ing equipment reflecting 200
years of rural American his-
tory will be on display from
9 a.m. until 5 p.m., Friday,


Saturday and Sunday, April
1-3, during the 17th Annual
Antique Tractor and Engine
Show at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park,


INFORMATION

WHO: Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park
WHAT: 17th Annual Antique Tractor and Engine Show
WHEN: 9 a.m. until 5 p.m., April 1-3
WHERE: White Springs
EVENTS: farming history displays of antique equip-
ment, demonstrations, competitions, races', a parade on
Saturday, food and more
COST: admission $4 for a vehicle with up to eight
passengers
Contact: 386-397-2733, www.floridastateparks.org

Live Oak
Si PA I MN
CENTER



SWe have latex and enamel paint drips on
Sour hardwood floors. Do you have any
Suggestions on how to remove without
Q damaging?
A This \\ill work especially if you hald a
0 good finish on thle floor to start, but e\en
if you didn't you can try ..... Use a razor
0 blade to shave the drip off. It may take a
small amount of the floors finish with it...
and that may have to be touched up. And
in case you catch some wood grains,
always scrape with the grain.









1512 South Ohio Avenue, 362-7066
147733DH-F


White Springs, located on
US 41, .three miles from 1-75
and nine miles from I-10.
Demonstrating the crafts-
manship and durability of
American farm machinery,
the show's participants will
operate working equipment
and compete in tractor races.
Visitors will be able to watch
demonstrations of threshing,
hay baling, wood sawing and
working steam engines.
Competitions for adults in-
clude tractor pulls, barrel
races and a blind race. Chil-
dren can participate in pedal-
powered tractor races, an
old-fashioned game of nee-
dle-in-a-haystack or a roost-


er-crowing contest. Friday is
an educational day and
school groups are admitted
free of charge. Food conces-
sions will include root beer
floats, hamburgers, barbe-
cue, kettle corn, and break-
fast.
On Saturday afternoon, an
antique tractor parade will
feature everything from cus-
tomized lawn tractors to re-
stored farm machinery. Ex-
hibitors are admitted free of
charge. Admission to the
public is $4 for a vehicle
with up to eight passengers.
For more information, call
386-397-2733 or visit
www.floridastateparks.org.


ihe Lbest qof



/ / Page C,


SUWANNEE-
HAMILTON
TECHNICAL CENTER


School Advisory


Committee Meeting




6:30 p.m. @ Student Center

415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 364-2750
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING BENEFITS.
ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.
148654JRS-F


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16,2005


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 6B










SCHOOL



Cub Scout Pack 408 goes bowling


By Thomas R. Burnett,
Webelos Den Leader
Cub Scout Pack 408 met at
the Live Oak Bowling Cen-
ter, 1605 S. Ohio Avenue, to
have a morning of fun and
food. Not only did the Scouts
participate, but members of
their families also played. In-
structions were given to
those needing it. The Bowl-
ing Center's electronic scor-
ing system relieved the play-
ers and their parents from the
old way of scoring...by hand!
It also eliminated any
chances of making a mistake
in recording the scores. (Ah,
for the good-old days when
one had a reason for knowing
how to 'cipher!)
As part of the program, the
bowling center provided
lunch consisting of hot dogs,
chips and a drink for the
bowlers.
The Scouts' sisters had a
bowling lane designated just
for them. They took special
pride in being able to play
without their brothers and
parents!
The Scouts earned the
"Bowling" belt loop which
was awarded at the following
Pack meeting.


This was really a great way
to have fun as well as to so-
cialize with your friends!
The Cub Scout dens meet
weekly during the school-
year. The monthly pack meet-
ing is held on the fourth
Thursday night, 6:30- 8 p.m.
during which time the dens
perform skits and the scouts
receive awards earned during
the previous month. There are
numerous pack activities dur-
ing the school year, e.g., hik-
ing, picnics, camping, bike
trips and camping! Summer-
time activities include two or
three pack activities. The Cub
Scout activities involve both
the scout and his family. All
family members are welcome
to participate in the activities
such as camping, bike rides,
car washes, etc. While the a
Tiger Cub (first grader) must
have his adult
parent/guardian with him dur-
ing den meetings, the older
scouts (second - fifth graders)
do not. First through fifth
graders must have a
parent/guardian along for
campouts. A scout may not
sleep in a tent by himself, or
with any adult that is not his
parent/guardian. He may


share a tent with other Cub
Scouts. For additional infor-
mation, visit the pack's Web
site at www.pack408.net, or
contact Cubmaster John
Good, 386-362-3953, or by e-
mail, cubmaster@pack408.n
et.
Boy Scout Troop 693
meets on Monday nights, 7-
8:30 p.m., at the Shriner's
Club on 100th Street, just
east of US 129 south. It is for
boys 11 - 17. The troop has
monthly activities, e.g., cam-
pouts. The Scouts just recent-
ly returned from mentoring
Cub Scouts, at a Webelos-
Akela weekend held at Camp
Blanding, the Florida Nation-
al Guard's training
facility. For additional infor-
mation, contact the Scout-
master Harry Reeve, at 386-
776-2863 or e-mail him at
smtroop693@alltel.net.
Venture Crew 693 is made
up of 14 - 18 years, coed,
who plan their own activities
under the direction of adult
leadership. For additional in-
formation, contact Yvette
Hannon, 386-362-2275, or
birdman9@alltel.net or Patty
Roach, 386-963-4962, patty-
roach@hotmail.com.


GETTING READY TO THROW:
Sarah Collins shows her newly-ac-
quired talents in directing the ball
to its targets. - Photo: Thomas R. Burnett















STRIKING THE PINS: Caleb
Smart watches his ball strike
the pins, awaiting a score.
- Photo: Thomas R. Burnett


Live Oak area gifted students invited to


study at Princeton University this Summer


The Summer Institute for the
Gifted (SIG) is thrilled to an-
nounce it will be offering a
three-week residential program
held at the world-renowned
Princeton University for the
summer of 2005 for gifted stu-
dents in the Live Oak area.
Princeton University's ex-
ceptional facilities and campus
make it a fantastic three-week
learning environment and
home for SIG students. The
Princeton University residen-
tial program will run from July
17 to Aug. 6. There will be an
open house at Princeton on
April 2.
Located in Princeton, New
Jersey, Princeton University is
the highest rated university in
the United States and the
newest campus to host SIG's
residential program. The pres-
tigious three-week, co-educa-
tional summer programs are
offered to academically talent-
ed students in grades four
through 11. The deadline for
applications is May 1 and stu-
dents are encouraged to apply
soon as space and classes are
filling up quickly.
SIG's residential programs
blend a strong and challenging
academic program of introduc-
tory through college-level
courses, an opportunity for cul-
tural exposure and social
growth, and traditional recre-
ational summer camp activities
to create a well balanced, re-
warding and enjoyable sum-
mer experience. Students
choose from more than 80 aca-
demic, cultural and recreation-
al courses on eight college
campuses: Amherst College,
Bryn Mawr College, Drew
, -_i'- ,-T- em-^-- --- . . i


HURRY
SALE ENDS
SoON!
Plush Pillow Top Plush

QUEEN set 499 QUEEN set $6 9
Tw .n Se,...... $349 TS. ..... 499
Full spe. ........ $479 FullSe, ... .. 659
Kingt3 pT.lSet .699 King 3pc Set 999


University, Oberlin College,
UC Berkeley, UCLA, Vassar
College, and now, Princeton
University.
"We bring students who
share intellectual, creative, and
cultural interests together, cre-
ating an atmosphere of learn-
ing, sharing, and commit-
ment," said Stephen Gessner,
president of the Summer Insti-
tute for the Gifted.
In addition to its residential
programs, SIG offers a, very
popular day program for stu-
dents in kindergarten through
sixth grade. The SIG day pro-


?ARM FRESH 4-H CLUB
MEMBERS SEND ITEMS
TO SOLDIERS IN IRAQ:
Members bring in items to be
sent to the soldiers in Iraq in
appreciation of what they are
doing to protect us. Two mem-
bers have an uncle, just re-
turned to Iraq for a second time
and their mom sent the items
to him and he is going to share
with the others. - Photo: Submitted


Cushion i-irm !
QUEEN set 599
T.i. SI . . 398
Full S- t .559
King 13 pc Set 849


FURNITURE IRE SHOWN\PL.A,( :E.
Wholwes~ale Sleep IDistribitiors-


grams are held at Moorestown
Friends School in
Moorestown, New Jersey,
Manhattanville College in
Purchase, NY, Fairfield Uni-
versity in Fairfield, CT, and
Hofstra University in Hemp-
stead, NY.
*The summer of 2005 marks
the 22nd year that SIG has pro-
vided programs for academi-
cally advanced students, pro-
viding challenging, engaging,
and meaningful learning op-
11ortunities.: In 2004, more than
1,600 student frbiri lnore than
43 states and 20 countries par-


I

I

I

I

z

0


I

I

I

I


ticipated in SIG programs. SIG
is a subsidiary of the American
Institute For Foreign Study
(AIFS).
For additional information
about the residential program at
Princeton University and all of
the Summer Institute for the
Gifted programs, contact Aman- ,
da Ritz at (866) 303-4744 ext.
5159 or by email at
aritz@aifs.com; or visit our web-
site at www.giftedstudy.com.
SIG is a division of the
American Institute For For-
w'igh Study rnid i 'o tnrUiviTied
with Princeton University.


Specaae Off--


(COUPON)



Eyeglasses




8t~ (


4




4
!1


Includes Frame and Single Vision lenses. Offer only
good for Lake City Store. Some restrictions apply.
Coupon required. Regular price $49.
Offer expires March 31, 2005.
(COUPON)


4mae4


I

I

I

I
*



0
I
�I



r

i


7ewe O9#ez


Eyeglass Food I
Express x yLion m -f
Hwy. 90 \ I. * ** Os
\ -.,. :


WATCHING THE BALL STRIKE
THE PINS: David Collins watch-
es his ball strike the pins, await-
ing a score. - Photo: Thomas R. Burnett


Crestview 70
Daytona Beach 80
Fort Lauderdale 82
Fort Myers 82
Gainesville 75
Hollywood 84
Jacksonville 74
Key West 81
Lady Lake 78
Lake City 72
Madison 70
Melbourne 82
Miami 82
N Smyrna Beach 79


rain
t-storm
cloudy
t-storm
t-storm
cloudy
t-storm
pt sunny
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
cloudy
t-storm


MORE PRACTICE NEEDED: Joe
Good reacting to a throw that
did not go as planned.
- Photo:.Thomas R. Burnett


SNACKS ENJOYED BETWEEN GAMES: Pictured, I to r, Caleb
Smart, Teresa Collins, Erin Smart, and Jaysen Good enjoying a
snack between games. - Photo: Thomas R. Burnett


Today's Weather


.,ed Thu F1
3/16 3/17 3/18




71/55 68/50 71/46
Scattered thunder- Showers possible. Times of sun and
storms in the morning, Highs in the upper 60s clouds. Highs in the
then mainly cloudy and lows in the low low 70s and lows in
during the afternoon 50s. the mid 40s.
with thunderstorms
likely.

Sunrise: Sunrise: Sunrise:
6:40 AM 6:39 AM 6:38 AM
Sunset: Sunset: Sunset:
6:41 PM 6:42 PM 6:42 PM
W'*&, . .' C(ch i-a rt, lihh.mto-n Lifo
. 'S .-.;: L, ir.j d i boru honnietc.,rns ljst r,e yours.
Looki tor us eich weel |n ties paper


Florida At A Glance


Pen zacola N


Jacks~onvifle


';*|c 7.:,.
Orlando 82
Panama City 71
Pensacola 67
Plant City 81
Pompano Beach 82
Port Charlotte 82
Saint Augustine 75
Saint Petersburg 79
Sarasota 77
Tallahassee 70
Tampa 78
Titusville 81
Venice 79
W Palm Beach 82


i-Lorm
t-storm
rain
t-storm
t-storm
cloudy
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
cloudy


National Cities


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


rain
mst sunny
mixed
rain
mst sunny
rain
sunny
cloudy


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


pt sunny
mst sunny
sunny
pt sunny
rain
pt sunny
cloudy


Moon Phases





New First Full Last
Mar 10 Mar 17 Mar 25 Apr 2


UV Index
Wed Thu Fri
3/16 3/17 3/18

Moderate Moderate High
The UV Index is measured on a 0 - 11 number scale, O .'a? 11
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.

�2005 American Profile Hometown Content Service


T ilIah a.see
Live Oak'


1,1 .~,..'


Orlando


Tamnpa(






5273


p


PAGE 7B


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16,2005


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK


-F --- -


II


- .- MMEMILWAYA - AIMEREEK - UAM
I-IS ()1 1 him I -i i Lit k.- l'it N. )_113113









BUSINESS


Publix is top supermarket for customer satisfaction


For the eleventh consecu-
tive year, Publix Super Mar-
kets is the highest-ranking
supermarket for customer
satisfaction according to the
American Customer Satis-
faction Index (ACSI). Publix
scored 81 points, compared
to 82 points last year.


Meredith L. Severance has
joined First Federal Savings
Bank of Florida as a mortgage
loan originator. Severance's re-
sponsibilities include originating
mortgage loans and building and
servicing relationships with Re-
altors and builders. Severance
will be serving the Amelia Is-
land, Femandina Beach, Yulee
markets in Nassau County.
Severance will be working
from a new First Federal loan
production office located on
Amelia Island. The new office is
located at 961687 Gateway
Blvd., Gateway. to Amelia, Suite
101D.
Severance has an extensive
background in mortgage origi-
nation, lending, underwriting
and banking. Prior to joining
First Federal, Severance was a
mortgage loan officer with
SouthTrust in Femandina


The ranking is determined
through customer interviews
measuring factors such as
customer expectations, per-
ceived quality, perceived
value, customer complaints
and customer retention.
"We're pleased with this
year's score, especially be-


Beach. She has been a top mort-
gage producer attaining the
Chairman's Club in 2004 and
the President's Club since 2000.
First Federal President and
CEO Keith Leibfried stated,
"Meredith's. extensive back-
ground and knowledge of fi-
nancing options, mortgages and
Amelia Island will greatly en-
hance arid compliment our new
mortgage loan processing capa-
bilities in the Nassau County
area."
Severance has lived in Nassau
County for over 25 years. She
graduated from Fernandina
Beach High School. She and her
husband Robert, and children,
Jimi Elizabeth and Bobby, are
active in local sports and First
Baptist Church of Femandina
Beach. Severance is a member
of the Nassau County Board of
Realtors.


cause the ranking is based on
actual customer experi-
ences," said Publix Spokes-
woman Brenda Reid.
The ACSI is produced
through a partnership of the
University of Michigan
Business School, the Ameri-
can Society for Quality and


* .j' ~0~'
* - ,.


- M

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
BANK OF FLORIDA: VMeiedil,
Severance will serve mrarketsr in
Nassau County at the rnew
Amelia Island loan pir. uctionr
office. -Photo: Submit-,
For mortgage in:onr,.irmtin and
rates, contact Meredith Se- .r-
ance at 904-321-233-. miobile
904-556-6645 or e-mail se'.ei-
ancem@ffsb.com.


With today's current social security


concerns, are you ready fo


Whether retirement is five or
25 years away, are you ready fi-
* nancially? New polls, including
the annual Allstate "Retirement
Reality Check" survey, found
that many Americans don't
think they are. But it's not too
late to get those savings started.
If you're looking to save for
retirement, you may want to
consider seeking the assistance
of a financial professional.
Mark Olson, Allstate Financial,
recommends on average,
putting away at least seven to
10 percent of your annual in-
come - and sticking with the
plan so that your savings can
grow.
"If you're in your 20s or 30s,
you have more time and may
wish to be more aggressive in
your investments," explains 0l-
son. "As you age, you may
wish to invest more conserva-
tively. And if you're older and
don't have much saved, you
should consult with a financial
professional to see what op-
tions you may have."
Haven't even begun to con-
sider how much in retirement
savings you'll need? Allstate
offers the following steps to
help get you started.
Educate yourself on the dif-
ferent savings options available
and what might work for you.
One investment may work for
certain individuals or situa-
tions, but not for others.
Discuss with your spouse


how the two of you want to
spend retirement. Don't wait
until retirement to learn you
have conflicting goals.
Decide on an age to retire
and how much you will need to
save each month until then.
Saving even a small amount
can add up to a lot over time.
Determine how much you
will spend each year in your re-
tirement to maintain the
lifestyle you want.
Set up aplap to automatical,
ly save a fixed amount each
month. Remember, if you be-
gin saving less than the desig-
nated monthly amount, you
may have to add significantly
to your savings later in life.
Decide which savings vehi-
cles will help you best prepare
for retirement; keeping in mind
how many years remain before
retirement, and the kind of
lifestyle you'd like to have.
Monitor your savings and in-
vestments over time to deter-
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make adjustments to keep on
track with your goal.
Estimate how much you will
receive from Social Security
and from any employer-spon-
sored retirement plans.
Work with a financial profes-
sional to help ensure your in-
surance needs are adequate and
keeping up with changes in
your life.
Make sure your plan for re-
tirement has a financial cushion


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WTI ERE Sf1 OPP~ikG IS A PLLASLIIRE


Life Line Screening applauds


United States Preventive


Services Task Force

- Task Force announIcemelnt Oil the benefits of

routine abdominal aortic anevllTsm screenings -


P r,'.-,n ti e iltra.iouind
screening for abdominal
aortic anLeur, simW- ha'.c been
found to be benefic-til b'i the
United State. Pre'entip e Sci-
SiLces Task Forie.
The tah k tfrce "found oood
e idence that s;creeniiiin for
AAA. and surgMial repair of
larec .\.AAs in me.n a.cd i:5-
-5 v. ho h lW e e\cr smoked
Icn enrt and f.inner sinmokers i
leads to decreased AA.\-spe-
cific mort.li, "
Life Line Screenin ._com-
inend.i the acinri taken i, the
ta.sk force as an important
step in .I . illn. t thOliusids of
Ii'.v ', that are needle.sl - lost
to this disorder. "Tihe results
pro.icd b;, the t.i?.k torce ate
\ er. encOtuiragin� aind I hope
that the general public under-
stands the importance of
ihe.e sc eenin-.." aid An-
dre". Maiariga.aro. NM D
Board Ccietified C ardiotho-
r.atic .iand V asctiLir Surgeon.
Life line Sci'cening. ithe
iin ioln', lajige- pro\ idur tof
mobile s'-icenin s.eiice.s.
has identified thouis.mds of
dIanIir\ s inI llirotiLgh t e usce of
ultrJsoitund in .addition to re-
ducirig the nIl for si iol.e pc-.


ripberal arterial disease :ind
osteopyrou s.
"'i p I, aImportant that all
consumers. ', hoe are a. risk for
dinei.e hai'e in opportnimi,
to he screened." Dr Mang>a-
naro said "TThe report is a
treat first step to'\ard- di-
rectinig the public to'.'.ards
pre'. itlon bit it I; important
that .ill people '" ho are at
rnil:. legardle - -. if gender or
habit,, should ailo be
s'crened."
Ovcr 2.5 million people
lh-e raken .id'.iantaee of Life
Line Screening's ipre\cnti\e
seriMcet.. In thei past three
0,1...4, Life Line Screeniri.
has identified aortic
nerl.urnsi. in o''.ier 10, 00"i
participants
Life Line Scieenin ofTers
foul preienti c screenings.
cach sLreeninil lequiics teCl
nulllnutle Oless to e1.opletc
The Complete \\e lnes-.
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.Abdominal Aoi ti c
.\neu I ,,Iu,l P nl iphelal .-AIten-
al Diseaec (hardeniiun of tlhe
miLte iii and Osteopoirosi..
L.fe Line Screening pro-
' ide, lov. co;t high cui lit)


pie',.enrtic screenings direct-
1I, to conswuners. Screenings
range in price from S45 for
an mdi, idual screening to as
little as '$129 for the Com-
plete illnessss Pickage
Sharon Fenters of NIMrtle
Beach S.C . * as disco ered
to hame ain abdominal aortic
anrieur sm and is grateful that
she had the opporniun, to be
screened "I deeply,' appreci-
are hai, ing had this screening
uther�.kie I couldn'tt have
kino'.n about this."
Life Line Screenine v.as
established int lo433. and has
_.!iice becoile the nation's
leLadin pri',ider of \a_;cular
scieenin.Ls. Life Line Screen-
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dilectl, to loca.i commnuni-
ties These non-in\asti'.e, in-
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cedurcs
For more information re-
gairding the ,crecnings. visitt
ouw \ ebsite .at :.iv\\\.lifeline-
screening.com 01 c1all 877-
237'-12s.'.


Bronson launches planning effort to

determine future of forests in Florida


Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services Commis-
sioner Charles H. Bronson
announced today that his de-
partment is launching a ma-
jor planning project to help
shape the future of forests in
Florida.
"How are our forests going
to continue to provide the
wood, clean water, recre-
ation and diversity of
wildlife 25 years from now?"
Bronson is asking. "And
what do we want them to
look like 25 years from
now?"
As a result of develop-
ment, hurricanes, wildfires,
insect and disease outbreaks
and the demand for forestry
products, Florida's forests
today comprise only 14 mil-
lion acres - down from more
than 20 million acres in the
1930's. Officials estimate
that the figure will decline to
12 million acres by the year


2030.
The planning effort that is
getting underway will focus
on how the state manages
what are inevitable changes
- rather than merely reacting
to those changes.
Division of Forestry (DOF)
officials have already taken
the first step, assessing the
present conditions of forests
in Florida, and the public can
review that assessment by
visiting DOF's website at
www.fl-dof.com.
The public is encouraged
to participate by attending
one of a series of six work-
shops that will be held
around the state later this
month to solicit opinions o'n
the future of forests in Flori-
da . The dates, cities and lo-
cations are as follows:
March 22nd - Milton -
Pensacola Junior College,
University of Florida Bldg,
Room 4902.


March 23 - Tallahassee -
Eyster Auditorium, Conner
Bldg., 3125 Conner Blvd.
March 24 - Lake City - Co-
lumbia County Extension
Service, 164 SW Mary Ethel
Lane.
March 29th - Tavares -
Lake County Ag/Horticulture
Ext. Service, 30205 State
Road 19.
March 30 - Palmetto- Man-
atee County Ag Center/Fair-
grounds, Kendrick Auditori-
Pm, 1303 17th St. West.
March 31 - Lantana - Lan-
tana Recreation Center, 418
South Dixie Highway
The regional workshops
will be held from 6 p.m. to 9
p.m. and will be lead by a
professional facilitator.
A draft plan on the future
of forests in Florida is ex-
pected to be posted on the
DOF website next fall, and
the public will be asked to
comment on it.


PBE ATYI AUONAld ILES


1983 Ford Fairmont.................$600


1986 Ford Econoline.............$1495 1995 Chrysler LeBaron Conv..$2995

1987 Isuzu Trooper.......... ....$1750 1996 Chevrolet Tahoe..............$5995


1987 Mazda B2000 ..................$995


1991 Ford Probe.................. $1495 1998 Mercury Tracer.................$3195


1993 Pontiac Grand Prix.........$850

1993 Toyota Camry...............$3495

1994 Pontiac Transport...........$1995.


(386) 364-3206 or (386) 590-6328


West fLv ak a.1 5 10IR-


Meredith Severance joins

First Federal Savings Bank


Now THAT'S Something

To Smile About!























Thank you Angie Fortney of Live Oak
for submitting this week's SMILE photograph!

Submit your photo for publication to:

uumannr iremorrat
P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 14146 JRSF


1995 G20 Chevy Work Van......$2000


1997 Mercury Cougar..............$3495


1998 Hyundai Accent..............$1995

*AII prices subject to
tax, tag, and title


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16,2005


PAGE 8B


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK








VVELJI'E.L .JMIU , vIfIAU M 10', Z O'-'-"-"-' C u.Ilww-l l � ..-


N SUIWANNEE nFMOCRAT/LIVE OAK




'I N
6


4 ~
a
"xi. e~


JESSIE GALLAHAR RIDING HER MUSTANG WEED: Jessie Gallahar has ridden horses since she
could walk. Jessie has been a member of the Suwannee 4-H Pony Express Horse Club for the past
five years. Before she was old enough to join the 4-H she attended the shows just to watch the oth-
ers ride and hand out ribbons. Gallahar did very well this year, winning several "Grands" in the Tri-
County 4-H Horse Shows. She plans to show horses for many years to come. - Photo: Submitted


JESSIE GALLAHAR RIDING HER ARABIAN DIAMOND


Photo: Submitted


FWC asking anglers Fish


"How's the fishing"


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission's (FWC's) recently
restructured Division of
Freshwater Fisheries Manage-
ment is opening communica-
tion lines with anglers. The
agency wants to learn more
about what it would take to
improve fishing opportunities
here.
"We're trying to evaluate
the performance of the previ-
ous fisheries division over the
past five years and find ways
to improve it," said Darrell
Scovell, who heads the new
division. "We hope to measure
our progress, identify areas


Suwannee Legals

THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2004-266-CA
DIVISION NONE
SOVEREIGN BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JERRY C. HAMAN, et al,
Defendants)

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated
March 03, 2005 and entered in Case NO.
2004-266-CA of the Circuit Court of the
THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for SUWANNEE
County, Florida wherein SOVEREIGN BANK
is the Plaintiff and JERRY C. HAMAN: NANCY
HAMAN; THE CHASE MANHATTAN BANK;
are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at FRONT STEPS IN
FRONT OF THE SUWANNEE COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 19th day
of April, 2005, the following described proper-
ty as set forth in said Final Judgment:
A PORTION OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF
SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE
13 EAST, MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SAID
SECTION 7 AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 0
DEGREES, 47 MINUTES, 29 SECONDS
EAST, ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY
OF SAID NORTHEAST 1/4 50.02 FEET TO
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE A
GRADED COUNTY ROAD; THENCE NORTH
89 DEGREES, 29 MINUTES, 00 SECONDS
WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTHERLY
BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTHEAST 1/4
1491.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 89 DE-
GREES, 29 MINUTES, 00 SECONDS WEST
ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE 150.00
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES, 31
MINUTES, 00 SECONDS WEST 365.92
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 68 DEGREES, 13
MINUTES, 30 SECONDS EAST 160.95
FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES, 31
MINUTES, 00 SECONDS EAST 424.38 FEET
TO SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
A/K/A 14722 208th Street, O'Brien, FL
32071
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on March 4, 2005.


03/16,23


Dasher, Kenneth
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Arlene D, Ivey
Deputy Clerk
Arlene D. Ivey


IN THE CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 61-2005-CA-000003
AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
V.
MICHAEL J. MIKLAUTSCH, et. al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MICHAEL J. MIKLAUTSCH
CONNIE L. MIKLAUTSCH
Residences Unknown
Last Known Mailing Address:
1248 S.E. Lanvale
Lake City, FL
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property in
Suwannee county, Florida:
Commence at the NW corner of the SE 1/4 of
the NE 1/4 of Section 16, Township 4 South,
Range 15 East, Suwannee County, Florida,


that need attention and work
with communities to make
things better."
Scovell said the FWC is
committed to conservation
programs that are based on
scientific research and pro-
duce the kinds of results an-
glers want to see.,
As a first step in this
process, the FWC is asking
anglers to take part in a survey
it has posted online at
www.surveyroom.com/Fish-
erieslnput/. Most people are
able to complete the question-
naire in about 15 minutes. Re-
sponses and comments are
confidential. Later, the FWC


Suwannee Legals

and run N 89 degrees 44'47" East, along the
North line of said SE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 a dis-
tance of 332.41 feet to the Point of Beginning;
thence continue N 89 degrees 44'47" East, still
along said North line 331.72 feet; thence S 00
degrees 27'24" West, 600.83 feet; thence S 89
degrees 43'31"West, 301.72 feet; thence S 00
degrees 27'24" West, 723.54 feet to a point of
the South line of the NE 1/4 of said Section 16;
thence S 89 degrees 43'34" West, along said
South lihe a distance of 30.00 feet; thence N
00 degrees 27'24" East, 1324.50 feet to the
point of Beginning.
TOGETHER with a 1982 CEDA Mobile Home
ID#TW1FLHS2117A&B
has been filed against you and THE UN-
KNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION OF 3367
172ND STREET, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, and
you are required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on SIDNEY E.
LEWIS, ESQUIRE, plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is 300 West Adams Street, Suite 300,
Jacksonville, Florida, 32202, within 30 days af-
ter the first publication of this notice, and file
the original with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on plaintiff's attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court, on
the 7th day of March, 2005.
(SEAL) KENNETH DASHER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY:/s/Arlene D. Ivev
Deputy Clerk
03/16,23




THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY FLORIDA
Case No.: 6120 04CA 000234 0001XX
GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC f/k/a
GREEN TREE FINANCIAL SERVICING
CORP.
1400 Turbine Drive
Rapid City, SD 57703
Plaintiff,
v.
LINDA LAVERNE MATTHEWS; JOHN
CHARLES MATTHEWS; JOYCE MICHELLE
KIRBY, alk/a JOYCE MATTHEWS; and CITI-
FINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES, INC.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE -
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant
to Plaintiff's Final Judgment of Foreclosure
and Re-Establishment of Note entered in the
above-captioned action, I will sell the property
situated in Suwannee County, Florida, de-
scribed as follows, to wit:
Tract 18: The South 1/2 of the Southwest 1/4
of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of
Section 17, Township 2 South, Range 13 East,
Suwannee County, Florida. Subject to a road
easement over the East 30 feet thereof.


will publish a summary of
what anglers say about the
state of freshwater fishing
here in the Fishing Capital of
the World and what the agency
needs to do to make it better.
In a second step, the FWC
will host a series of public
meetings to discuss survey re-
sults and develop plans and
priorities for the future. Sur-
vey participants will be asked
about their willingness to par-
ticipate in a future planning
meeting and about when and
where such meetings should
take place.
Deadline for completing the
survey is May 1.


Suwannee Legals

LEGAL NOTICE
The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc.
BoEad of Directois will hold a meeting for the
Executive Committee Members on Monday,
March .21, 2005, 11:00 A.M. at the Quality Inn
& Conference Center in Lake City, Florida.
03/16

PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE
The Storage Place, Highway 27, in Branford,
Florida announces a Public Sale to be held on
Saturday, March 26, 2005 at 9:00 AM. The
sale will be held at The 'Storage Place Facility
located on Hwy 27 in Branford, Florida.
The sale is being held to satisfy a landlord's
lien. Everything sold is purchased "AS IS",
"WHERE IS" for CASH. The Storage Place re-
serves the right to cancel any Public Sale that
is advertised. The Units being sold are as fol-
lows:
U04-Tina Rodes U09,U14-Jenny
Arnold
UIO-Mike Grieff U18-Joe Stephens
U22-Tiffany Radford U29-Hershell
Ducksworth
U30-Melissa Wolferts U34-Steve Donato
U40-Linda Loyd U42-Brad White
U43-Akeysha Russ U47-Chris Durden
U67-Carissa Clemons U69-Rebecca Jones
U81-Gary Mullinax U97-Trina Fletcher
U107-Glenda Schofield
U119-Sandra McGee
U127-Andrew & Dawn Wiesen
U149-Natasha Bair U150-Samantha
Adams
03/16, 18, 23, 25


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 612005CP0000480001XX
IN RE: Estate of
SUSIE LORD WILLIAMS,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE ESTATE of
SUSIE LORD WILLIAMS, deceased, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court, Third Judicial Circuit,
in and for Suwannee County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is Suwannee
County Courthouse, 200 South Ohio Avenue,
Live Oak, Florida 32064. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and
the attorney for the personal representative
are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE RE-
QUIRED pursuant to � 733.212, Florida
Statutes, to file with this Court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate, and (2) any objection by an
interested person on whom this notice was
mailed that challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal representa-
tive, venue or jurisdiction of this Court.


Continued From Page 3B

the advice from the scientif-
ic experts and others that
know such things. They are
all correct sometimes and
wrong sometimes depending
on what day it is.
In no particular order, the
10 best crappie-fishing holes
in Florida this year are:
* Orange Lake (between
Gainesville and Ocala) -
The water level on this lake
is back up after being down
for years. As a result, crap-
pie fishing is back up. Crap-
pie were biting in open wa-
ter through October and No-
vember,, and they'll start
again when the weather
warms up this spring. Crap-
pie in this lake like to hit
jigs and minnows.
-Lochloosa. Lake (north-
east of, and connected to,
Orange Lake) - FWC biolo-
gists poured some intensive
lake management talent into
this 5,500-acre body as
Mother Nature raised the
water level back to what it
needs to be, and crappie
have responded. Fish around
the lily pads in the southeast
and northwest parts of the
lake and in the narrow con-
nection to Little Lake
Lochloosa when you're after
crappie. Also, the maiden
cane patches are good spots
when crappie get ready to
spawn.
*Lake Monroe (near San-
ford) - The FWC's habitat-
restoration wizards have
been tuning up this 9,400-
acre sweetie-pie since the
late 1980s, and they've got
her really purring. Until July
1, this lake's black crappie
have to be at least 12 inches
long before anglers can keep
them, but there's plenty of
the qualifiers to go around.
The minimum size limit will
go away July 1. Big crappie
go for small jigs, Bream
Killers, Hal-Flies or Beetle-
spins. Missouri minnows
and grass shrimp also work.
* Lake Jessup (south of
Sanford) - You can wear
yourself out, catching crap-
pie on this 10,000-acre hon-
eyhole. They run a little
smaller than the crappie you
find in other lakes in this


at public sale, to the highest and best bidder,
for cash at the Suwannee County Court-
house, Live Oak, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., on the
19th day of April, 2005.
Kenneth Dasher
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/Arlene D. Ivev
Deputy Clerk
Arlene D. Ivey
03/16, 23

LEGAL NOTICE
The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc.
Board of Directors will hold a meeting of the
Board of Directors on Monday, March 28,
2005, 7:00 P.M. at the Quality Inn & Confer-
ence Center in Lake City, Florida.
03/16


Publication of this Notice has begun on March
16, 2005.
Personal Representative:
/s/William H. Williams. Jr
WILLIAM H. WILLIAMS, JR.
624 Suwannee Street
Live Oak, Florida 32064
Attorney for Personal Representative:
LAW OFFICE OF
ANDREW J. DECKER, III, PA.
320 White Avenue
Post Office Box 1288
Live Oak, Florida 32064
Telephone: (386) 364-4440
Telecopier: (386) 364-4508
Attorney for Personal Representative
WILLIAM H. WILLIAMS, JR.
/s/Andrew J. Decker. III
ANDREW J. DECKER, Iit
Attorney at Law
Florida Bar No. 0267211
03/16,23


part of central -Florida, but
there are zillions of them
looking to get caught on
minnows by anglers who
drift-fish in the middle of
the lake and near Bird Is-
land. Lots of crappie also
hang out in the Soldier
Creek area and the north end
of the lake, where it con-
nects to the St. Johns River.
- Lake Talquin (west of
Tallahassee) - Think about
it. This 8,800-acre reservoir
is just outside Tallahassee.
It's where the FWC's top
brass goes fishing, so you
know they're going to make
sure this baby doll gets all
the attention it can use. Is it
any surprise the state record
3-pound, 13 '-ounce black
crappie came out of Lake
Talquin? This lake has lots
of submerged stumps and
whatnot, so you don't want
to go hot-rodding around it
in a boat, but if you want to
catch some nice crappie, and
you're willing to abide by
the 10-inch minimum size
limit, you'll love it here.
- Lake Okeechobee (If you
don't already know where
Lake Okeechobee is, you're
no fisherman! South Florida.
You can't. miss it.) - A lake
this big can't help but pro-
duce slab-sized crappie and
plenty of them. People who
know this lake suggest crap-
pie anglers fish in the
Kissimmee River/Fisheating
Bay/Taylor Creek areas on
the north end of the lake.
Also, jigging along the grass
lines and dropping minnows
into holes in the vegetation
work well. If you're more in
the mood for a laid-back-
style of fishing, try drift-
fishing around Little Grassy,
Eagle Bay Island and Kings
Bar.
- Tenoroc Fish Manage-
ment Area (near Lakeland) -
This 14-lake complex is one
of the best crappie fishing
holes in the country, and
that's a fact. It's open to the
public four days a week. If
you want to fish in this an-
gler paradise, it's best to call
ahead and make a reserva-
tion. The number is (941)
499-2421. There is a 10-inch
minimum size limit and a 10-
fish bag limit in this fish


management area. Fish with
Missouri minna.s, Beetle-
spins, tiny curly- il and tube
jigs or Hal-Flies when you
want to have the fishing ex- ,
perience of a lifetime at
Tenoroc.
* Lake Istokpoga (near Se-
bring) - Winter is the best
time to catch crappie in this
28,000-acre wonder. From
November through April, an-
glers troll open water with
Hal-Flies, doll flies, spinner
jigs and Napier jigs to locate
schools of crappie and then
pounce on them like ugly on
a baby 'possum. When the
water temperature stabilizes
around 65 degrees, crappie
move into bulrush and spat-
terdock along the shoreline
to spawn. There's a trick to
catching them when that hap-
pens. Move slowly through
the vegetation in three to six
feet of water and fish with a
crappie jig around the vege-
tation. .. ' '
-Lake Kissimmee (south of
the city of the same name) -
A few years ago, you would-
n't have seen 35,000-acre
Lake Kissimmee on this list,
but ...boom... things changed
about three years ago, and
crappie fishing here has been
excellent ever since. Anglers
are catching big ones too.
Some of them throw the 10-
inchers back, and say things
like "That one was tiny." To
catch your share of crappie in
this lake, fish with minnows
and jigs along the grass line
and offshore. The deeper
holes off the grass lines are
good spots too.
. Lake Marian :(east of
Lake Kissimmee) - This is
the lake to fish when you
want to catch lots of crappie,
and you don't care if they're
not the biggest fish you've
ever seen. They're big
enough at 9 inches or more,
and they're packed into this
5,739-acre lake, so it's not
hard to find them with min-
nows, small jigs and such.
Troll, drift fish... whatever
works for you, and go home
and have fresh fish for din-
ner. Then, just for fun, call i
somebody up north, who is in
the middle of a blizzard, and
-tell him about your fishing
trip.


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ERIC ORDINARIO, D.O.

BOARD CERTIFIED UROLOGY AND

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Perry Elks Lodge No. 1851 hosts Poker Run April 30


Perry Elks Lodge No. 1851
will host its second "Poker
Run" for all motorcyclists in
the Big Bend area on April 30,
beginning at 9 a.m.
The 115-mile event will be-
gin and end in Perry and in-
clude stops in Tennille, Mayo,
Buckville, Madison and Shady
Grove as bikers compete for
$200 in cash before being
treated to a grilled chicken
lunch, "Loudest Bike," "Best
Dressed" and "Best of Show"
judging.

*_ ...:. f-


In addition to having a
chance to win cash for draw-
ing one of the three best (or
worst) five-card poker hands,
participants will have a chance
to win cash or prizes with 50-
50 raffle, door prize drawing
or one of the three judged
events.
The annual fund-raiser will
include a dance and live band
"Faster than Flash" at 9 p.m. at
the Perry Elks Lodge banquet
room.
All motorcycle owners, rid-

---. . , J


ers and recreational vehicles
are invited to participate in the
fund-raiser, which will benefit
the Perry Elks Lodge renova-
tion fund. Entry fee is $20 per
motorcycle and $5 per addi-
tional rider.
For more information, con-
tact Wendy Cruce at 850-838-
5190, Richard Johnson at 850-
584-9288 or Aaron Portwood
at 850-838-4834.
Entry forms can be picked
up at the Perry Elks Lodge lo-
cated at 304 Puckett Road.
. . . . ,."r" 7 '--


I


~~A. P:.


~. -e


* ~ *~-Wit,


PERRY ELKS POKER RUN: Perry Elks Lodge No. 1851 Poker Run participants get ready to ride. Sec-
ond Elks Poker Run fund-raiser scheduled for April 30 to benefit building renovation. - Photo: Submitted
. -- T. --

- _ , - --:


-4


PERRY ELKS POKER RUN RIDERS: Perry Elks Lodge No. 1851
raising event.- Photo: Submitted


Poker Run riders enjoy the fund-


RIDERS IN PERRY ELKS POKER RUN: Perry Elks Lodge No. 1851 Poker Run fund-raising event
draws many motorcycle enthusiasts. - Photo: Submitted


PERRY ELKS POKER RUN: Perry Elks Lodge No. 1851 Pokei Run participants enjoy the run.
- Photo: Submitted


?P: Perry Elks Lodge No. 1851
dOa.: Second Poker Run fund-raiser
Vde;, April 30
'vew.:- 115-mile event begins and ends in Perry and includes stops in
Tennille, Mayo, Buckville, Madison and Shady Grove
dt,'acte Wendy Cruce at 850-838-5190, Richard Johnson at
850-584-9288 or Aaron Portwood at 850-838-4834


The news readers




of today are the



------ -... news makers of


tomorrow


-Saeth ae w~I~IiA'Iith yur Cildr[en~


V--


- - - - - - - - - - - - -


.......
- - - - - - - - - . . . . . . .- -


- --
5-~I


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1 ea ubciptin


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P.O. Box 340, Live Oak, FL 32064


A


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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16,2005


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


AP GE 10B











North Florida


March 16-17, 2005
Live Oak Publications, Inc. I
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Race fans from South Georgia and North Florida attend


inaugural race at South Georgia Motorsports Park


#72 Mikie Stalford's crew does air pressure check before qualify-
ing efforts Saturday, March 12 al South Georgia Motorsports Park.


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As the sun sets, Hooter's Pro
Cup stars line up for the start of
a 250-lap race at South Georgia
Motorsports Park north of Val-
dosta, Ga. Inset - #99 Ken But-
ler Ill smacks the wall during
qualifying prior to the Hooters
Pro Cup 250. - P-..i:.: Bi.l F'.'-i


United Speed Alliance Racing
official posts qualifying times

Staff .'"
\\With track owner Larry
Dean declaring to the sell-;
out- crowd that the South
Georgia % version of the "Day-
tona 500" was ready to be-
gin, last Saturda 's Hooters
Pro Cup 250 inaugural race
at South Georgia Motor-
sports Park took the green
flag.
Thirty-five cars began the
250-lap marathon over the
slightly banked half-mile
oval short track.:
South Georgia Mlotorsports
Park is an impressive facility
located 12 miles north of
Valdosta, Ga. off 1-75 exit
32.
The nationally known
Hooters Pro Cup (HPC) se-
ries is sanctioned bN United
Speed .Alliance Racing. It
was an impressive event to
'-"rev-up" the track season.
Fans from both South
Georgia and North Florida
watched as the HPC cars and
stars negotiated the;60-foot
wide turns and 70-foot wide
straightaways.
Speed TV filmed the race.
It will be televised March 26
at 10 p.m.
SaturdaN . race was the
second stop for the Southern
Division of HPC. The sea-

SEE INAUGURAL RACE, PAGE 3C


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NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - MARCH 16-17, 2005, PAGE 3C


LL.


'., ; 1


Hooter's Pro Cup series cars line up for qualifying.

Inaugural race


Continued From Page 1C
son began last week at Lake-
land.
Shane Huffman in his No.
81 Knight's Companies Ford
took the lead on lap 209 and
went on to win his second
race of the season.
"Anytime you go some-
where for the first time you
always want to win," Huff-
man said.
"It's an awesome feeling
and an awesome place, and I
thank the owners for building
the place and inviting Hoot-
ers Pro Cup Series guys to
run," Huffman said.
The win for Huffman did
not come without a tussle.


On the restart after a late
caution on lap 244, Mark Mc-
Farland, whose #32 JR Mo-
torsports car led the first 100
laps of the race after starting
on the pole, got Huffman
loose coming out of turn two
and made the pass for the
lead.
"It was my fault to be hon-
est with you," Huffman stated.
"I got loose getting into one
and let him get under me
there."
But in the corner of turn
four, McFarland's right front
went down and he slide up
into Huffman, nearly spinning
him out.
Huffman held on at the
start-finish line as the cau-


tion flag flew with just three
laps left.
"He was running hard and
just got in too deep and got
into me," Huffman said.
"The half-mile speedway's
opener went off without a
hitch, but the track surface
was a mystery from time tri-
als to the waving of the green
flag."
Four cars spun in turns two
and four during timed-runs.
"It threw me for a curve-
ball," Huffman said of the
track. "My car was really
good in practice, and I quit
early and I don't ever quit
early.
"Then, tonight it just got
real free in the middle."


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PAGE 4C, MARCH 16-17, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


M- immunity Calendar


Monthly Meetings
Allen Boyd (D-North
Florida) Staff - Live Oak -
Third Wednesday; City
Council Chambers, City Hall,
101 SE White Ave., Live
Oak; 9:30-11:30 a.m.; trained
staff visits to assist con-
stituents; Info: 202-225-
5235, www.house.gov/boyd/.
Alzheimer's Support
Group - Third Thursday;
3:30 p.m.; Marvin E. Jones
Building, Dowling Park;
Info: Cindy Erskin, 386-658-
5700.
American Legion Post
107 - First Thursday; 12-2
p.m., Suwannee River Re-
gional Library, South Ohio
Ave., Live Oak; Info: Clair
McLauchlin, 386-362-3524;
Richard Buffington, 386-
364-5985.
Branford Camera Club -
Third Thursday; 7:30 p.m.;
Branford Library; Info: Car-
olyn Hogue, 386-935-2044.
Cub Scout Pack No. 408
Committee - Second Tues-
day; 6:30 p.m.; Live Oak
Church of Christ. 1497 Ir- in
Ave.. SR 51 South; Info: Alan
Stefanik, Committee Chair-


"I want to be there when
my customers are ready to buy."


- First Monday; 7 p.m.;
Woman's Club, Eleventh
Street, Live Oak; Info: Mary
Check-Cason, 386-362-4475.
Hamilton County Gov-
ernmental, Bellville Volun-
teer Fire/Rescue executive
board - Second Monday, 7
p.m.


,Pair. ' \ Hamilton County Alcohol
and Other Drug Prevention
Da V Coalition - fourth Wednes-
7 day; 9:30-11 a.m., Hamilton
Ie*;C' County School Board meet-
._^- ing room, JRE Lee Adminis-
trative Complex, Jasper; Info:
Grace McDonald, 386-938-
4911, mcdonaldgl@alltel.net
Hamilton County Board
of Commissioners - First
S ' Tuesday, 9 a.m., and third
S-. 4 Tuesday at 6 p.m., County
i'O ' Commissioners' Board
S ' T. ,, Room, courthouse, Jasper.
, 20 ^Hamilton County' Cham-
ber of Commerce, Inc. -
First Thursday; 6 p.m.; 204
^ N. Hatley St., Jasper; Info:
386-792-1300.
Hamilton County Council
on Aging, Inc. - Needs vol-
unteer drivers; home-deliv-
man, 386-362-3032, ered meals program; Info:
commchair@pack408.net, Dorsey Stubbs; 1509 S.W.
www.pack408.net; Tiger, First Street, Jasper, 386-792-
Wolf, Bears and Webelos 1136.
dens (grades one - five) - Hamilton County Devel-
Every Thursday; at the opment Authority - Second
church; 6:30-8 p.m.; Aug.- Thursday; 7 p.m., at 204 NE
May; Pack meeting - Fourth 1st St., Sandlin Building,
Thursday; at the church; Jasper; Info: 386-792-6828.
6:30-8 p.m., Aug.-May; en- Hamilton County Tourist
tire group meets; awards, Development Council - Sec-
skits and fun. ond Wednesday; noon; 204
Disabled American Veter- NE 1st St., Sandlin Building,
ans Chapter No. 126 - Sec- Jasper; Info: 386-792-6828.
ond Thursday; 6 p.m.; 226 Home and Community
Parshley St., S.W, Live Oak; Educators (HCE) - First Fri-
Info: 386-362-1701. day; 9:30-a.m.; Suwannee
Florida Gateway Charter County Extension Office,
Chapter of the American Coliseum Complex, Eleventh
Business Women's Associa- Street, Live Oak; new mem-
tion - Second Thursday; 6 bers welcome; Info: 386-362-
p.m.; locations change; Info: 27-71.
Sandy Harrison at 386-754- Jasper City Council
0434 or 386-752-0516. Meeting - Second Monday; 6
Friends of Suwannee Riv- p.m.; Jasper City Hall.
er State Park - Second Tues- Jasper Lions Club Meet-
day; 7 p.m., board meeting; ing - Second and fourth Tues-
Suwannee River State Park, day, 7 -p.m., Roosters Diner.
US 90 West, Live Oak; Info: Info: Jim Taitt, 386-938-
Membership Chair Walter 3582.
Schoenfelder 850-971-5354, Jennings Town Council
xbsi.surfbe-t net ' Meeting - First Tues4ay; 7
Girl Scout Leaders, Girl p.m.; Jennings Town Hall.
Scouts of Gateway Council MainStreet Hamilton


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County, Inc. - Third Thurs-
day; 6 p.m.; MainStreet Of-
fice, Jasper,
Hamilton County School
Board - Fourth Tuesday; 6
p.m.
White Springs Town
Council Meeting: Third
Tuesday; 7 p.m.; White
Springs Town Hall.
I Can Cope (cancer) -
Third Tuesday; 7 p.m.; Mar-
vin E. Jones Building, Dowl-
ing Park; Info: Cindy, 386-
658-5700; educational sup-
port group for any type of
cancer for patients, families
and friends.
Leona 4-H Community
Club - First Monday; 7 p.m.;
home of Avon and Betty
Hicks, 6107 180th St.,
'McAlpin; Info: Betty Hicks,
386-963-4205; Pam Nettles,
386-963-1236.
Lion's Club - Second
Tuesday and fourth Tuesday;
7 p.m.; Farm Bureau meeting
room; Info: Richard Tucker,
386-963-4577.
Live Oak Artist Guild -
First Tuesday; 7 p.m.; St.
Luke's Episcopal Church,
Live Oak; Info: Don Strick-
land, 386-362-5146.
Live Oak Christian Home
Educators - First Thursday
of every month. Info: Pat,
386-364-1734; strong home
school support group.
Live Oak Garden Club -
Sept.-May; Morning Glories
- third Friday; Night
Bloomers - third Tuesday,
1302 S.W. Eleventh Street,
Live Oak.
Live Oak Senior Citizens
- first Monday; 10:30 a.m.;
Exhibition II Building, Coli-
seum Complex, 1302 SW
Eleventh St., Live Oak; es-
corted tours, prices vary;
Info: Lula Herring, 386-364-
1510.
Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society - Animal
Shelter - Second Monday;
noon; at the shelter located
on Bisbee Loop, south en-
trance, in Lee off CR 255,
Madison County; Info: toll-
free 866-Adoptl2, 866-236-
7 8 1 2. ,
www.geocities.com/suwan�,
neehs.
Live Oak, Suwannee
County Recreation Board -
Second Wednesday; 5 p.m.;
Suwannee Parks & Recre-
ation offices, 1201 Silas Dri-
ve, Live Oak; Info: 386-362-
3004.
MADD Dads - Third
Thursday; 7 p.m.; Suwannee
County Courthouse.
Man To Man Group - sec-
ond Thursday; 7 p.m:; Mar-
vin E. Jones Building, Dowl-
ing Park; free; refreshments
provided; Info: American
Cancer Society toll-free 800-
ACS-2345 or the local office
toll-free 888-295-6787 (Press
2) Ext. 114.
Market Days - Advent
Christian Village - First Sat-
urday; 8 a.m.-1 p.m.; Space-
first-come, first-serve basis,
$5 each; Village Square
shops open; Info: Lodge Of-
fice 386-658-5200.
McAlpin Community
Club - Second Monday; 7
p.m.; covered dish dinner
first; everyone welcome; pur-
pose.- to acquaint members
of the community services
available in the county; Info:
Grant Meadows Jr., 386-935-
9316 or Shirley Jones, 386-
963-5357; building rental:
Kristie Harrison. 386-364-
3400.
MOMS Club - Second
Wednesday; 11:15 a.m. at the
fellowship hall of Bethel
Missionary Baptist Church,
go West on US 90 - seven
miles from 1-75, and 1-1/2
miles from the


Columbia/Suwannee County
line, 12 miles from Live Oak;
Info: 386-397-1254, MOM-
SC I u b o fLiveOak-
LakeCityFl@alltel.net
National Association of
Retired Federal Employees
(N.A.R.F.E.) Chapter 1548 -
Third Tuesday; 11:30 a.m.;
Quail Heights Country Club,
Lake City; guest speakers; all
present and retired federal
employees invited; Info: 386-
755-8570 or 386-752-6593.
Nursing Mom's Group -
Second Friday; 10 a.m.;
Suwannee River Regional Li-


brary, Live Oak; Info:
Michelle, 386-776-2955.
Remembering the Loss of
Your Baby - first Thursday;
11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Hospice of
North Central Florida, North
Building Counseling Room,
4305 NW 90th Blvd.,
Gainesville; open support
group for families who have
experienced the loss of a
baby; Info: Cheryl Bailey,
352-692-5107, toll-free 800-
816-0596.
SHINE - Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders -
Volunteers needed; compre-
hensive training provided to
assist elders and their care-
givers receive information
and assistance on health in-
surance and Medicare; Flori-
da Department of Elder Af-
fairs; no charge for services;
Info: toll-free 800-262-2243,
Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m.-
4:30 p.m.
SHINE - Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders -
Branford - first Wednesday;
9-11 a.m.; Library, US 129
North, Branford; free; trained
volunteers help elders and
their caregivers in Suwannee
County to understand
Medicare and other health in-
surance programs make in-
formed decisions on insur-
ance, Medicare Prescription
Drug Cards and on discount-
ed prescription drug pro-
grams and eligibility require-
ments; Info: Florida Depart-
ment of Elder Affairs toll-
free 800-262-2243,'Monday -
Friday, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
SHINE - Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders -
Advent Christian Village -
Dowling Park - trained vol-
unteers help elders and their
caregivers in Dowling Park
area of Suwannee County to
understand Medicare and
other health insurance pro-
grams make informed deci-
sions on insurance, Medicare
Prescription Drug Cards and
on discounted prescription
drug programs and eligibility
requirements; free; Info: ap-
pointment - 386-658-3333 or
386-658-5329; Florida De-
partment of Eldei, AFfai'.
toll-free 800-262-2243, Mon-
day - Friday, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30
p.m.
SHINE - Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders -
Live Oak - Second Monday,
12:30-2:30 p.m. or second
Thursday, 1:30-2:30 p.m.;
Suwannee River Regional Li-
brary, US 129 South, Live
,Oak; trained volunteers help
elders and their caregivers in
Suwannee County to under-
stand Medicare and other
health insurance programs
make informed decisions on
insurance, Medicare Pre-
scription Drug Cards and on
discounted prescription drug
programs and eligibility re-
quirements; free; Info: Flori-
da Department of Elder Af-
fairs toll-free 800-262-2243,
Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m.-
4:30 p.m.
SHINE - Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders -
Mayo - First Wednesday,
12:30-2:30 p.m., Library, SR
51, Mayo; trained volunteers
help elders and their care-
givers in Lafayette County to
understand Medicare and
other health insurance pro-
grams make informed deci-
sions on insurance, Medicare
Prescription Drug Cards and
on discounted prescription
drug programs and eligibility
requirements; free; Info:
Florida Department of Elder
Affairs toll-free 800-262-
2243, Monday - Friday, 8:30
a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Small Scale Farmers and
Craft Designers Market
Committee - Third Thurs-


day; 7 p.m.; Coliseum exten-
sion offices.
Suwannee Chapter of the
Florida Trail Association -
Second Monday; 7 p.m.;
Suwannee River Water Man-
agement District; Info: Don
Neale, 386-362-4850; Sylvia
Dunnam,.386-362-3256.
Suwannee County Tourist
Development Council -
Fourth Tuesday; 1 p.m.;
Chamber of Commerce
Building, 816 S. Ohio Ave.,
Live Oak.
Suwannee County Cattle-


men's Association - Third
Thursday; 6:30 p.m.; Farmers
Co-op meeting room; Info:
Herb Rogers, 386-362-4118.
Suwannee County Senior
Citizens - First Monday;
10:30 a.m., Exhibition II
Building, Coliseum Com-
plex, 1302 SW Eleventh St.,
Live Oak; escorted tours,
prices vary; Info: Lula Her-
ring, 386-364-1510.
Suwannee River Valley
Archaeology Society - Third
Tuesday; public library,
Branford; Info: 386-935-
4901.
Suwannee Valley Builders
Association - Second Thurs-
day; 6 p.m.; Farm Bureau
meeting room, 407 Dowling
Ave., Live Oak; $5 per per-
son for meal and meeting.
Suwannee Valley Ge-
nealogical Society - First
Thursday; 7 p.m., Wilbur St.
Live Oak; Open Tuesdays
and Thursdays, 9 a.m.-noon
and 1-5 p.m.; Info: 386-330-
0110.
Suwannee Valley Quilters
- First and third Thursday; 10
a.m.; Info: Jane, 386-776-
2909 - after 4 p.m.
Suwannee Valley Kennel
Club - Third Tuesday; 7:30
p.m.; Hospitality and Recre-
ational Building, Columbia
County Fairgrounds, Lake
City, Lake City.
Tobacco-Free Partner-
ship of Suwannee County -
quarterly, Info: Mary Jordan
Taylor, 386-362-2708, ext.
232.
Vivid Visions, Inc. - First
Monday; 5:30 p.m.; Douglass
Center Conference Room; a
shelter and outreach agency
for victims of domestic vio-
lence; Info: 386-364-5957.
Wellborn Community As-
sociation '(WCA) - Second
Thursday; 7 p.m.; Wellborn
Community Center; Info:
Bonnie Scott, 386-963-4952,
386-208-1733-leave a mes-
sage. WCA fund-raiser to
benefit building fund -
Blueberry Pancake Break-
fast - First Saturday; center
of Wellborn, Andrews
Square; blueberry pancakes,
'sausage anid oraige juice 'or
coffee.
Wellborn Neighborhood
Watch - last Thursday, 7
p.m., Blake Lowe Building,
1517 4th Ave., Wellborn;
Info: Bruce or Jane, 386-963-
3196.
Weekly Meetings
Al-Anon/Mayo Al-Anon
Group - meets each Thurs-
day, 8 p.m., Mayo Manna
House, Pine Street - for fam-
ily members and friends to
show support. For more info,
call Barbara, 386-294-3348
or Marcia, 386-208-1008.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
Branford - meets Tuesday
and Friday, 7:30 p.m., Bran-
ford United Methodist
Church, Express and Henry
St., Branford. For more info,
call 386-935-2242 or the Dis-
trict 16 Help Line toll-free,
800-505-0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
Live Oak - meets Tuesday
and Friday, 8 p.m., Precinct
Voting Building, Nobles Fer-
ry Road, Live Oak. For more
info, call District 16 Help
.Line toll-free, 800-505-0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
Mayo Group - meets Sun-
day, Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday at 8 p.m. The
meetings are held at Manna
House, Pine Street, Mayo.
Info: 386-294-2423 or Dis-
trict 16 Help Line toll-free,
800-505-0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
White Springs - Courage to
Change - Monday, 8 p.m.,
Methodist Church, White
Springs. Info: 386-397-1410


or District 16 Help Line toll-
free, 800-505-0702.
Bluegrass Association -
Saturdays; 6 p.m.; Pickin'
Shed; Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park; covered dish on
first and third Saturday. Info:
386-364-1683.
Bridge Club - Monday,
6:45 p.m., Golden Corral
Restaurant, Live Oak. Info:
386-362-3200.
Boy Scout Troop #693 -
Every Monday, 7 p.m.,
Shrine Club, Bass Road, until


SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 5C


I







NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - MARCH 16-17, 2005, PAGE 5C


Calendar


Continued From Page 4C

further notice. Info: 386-776-
2863.
Live Oak Singles Group -
Friday, 7:30 p.m., Live Oak
Christian Church fellowship
hall on US 129 North (next to
Walt's Ford). This not a
church sponsored event.
Info: Bob, 386-935-6595 or
Carla, 386-758-1802;
http://groups.yahoo.com/gro
up/SuwanneeSingles/
" Narcotics Anonymous -
The Gratitude Group -
Meetings held Monday, 7
p.m., at St. Luke's Episcopal
Church, 1391 S.W. Eleventh
St. (in the back), Live Oak,
FL 32060.
Over Eaters Anonymous
- We care. Meets Mondays
11:35 a.m.- 12:50 p.m., Mon-
days, at Suwannee River Re-
gional Library, 129 South,
Live Oak. For more info, call
386-364-4749.
Quarterback Club Meet-
ing - Old Nettie Baisden
school next to the football
stadium, 6:30 p.m., every
Monday.
Square Dance - With
Vagabond Squares, Thurs-
day, 7-9:30 p.m., St. Luke's
Episcopal Church, Newbem
Road. Loyce Harrell, 386-
963-3225, or Ralph Beek-
man, 386-752-2544.
Suwannee River Riding
Club - Membership fee $25
per year. Team roping first
and third Friday night. Speed
events first and third Satur-
day night. Call 386-935-
2622.
Suwannee Valley Barber-
shop Chorus - Every Tues-
day, Crapps Meeting Room,
Suwannee River Regional
Library, US 129 South, Live
Oak at 7 p.m. Call Fred
Phillips, 386-362-1886.
TOPS - Take Off Pounds
Sensibly (TOPS); Live Oak
Community Church of God,
Thursday; 8:30 a.m. weigh-
in; meeting 9 a.m.; Info: Bar-
bara Crain, 386-362-5933;
Sharon Martin, 386-364-
5423.
Weight Watchers - Mon-
day, 9:30 a.m. and 6 p.m., St.
Luke's Episcopal, toll-free
800-651-6000.
FYI
AARP Taxaide Program -
Free tax service; all taxpay-
ers; low or middle income;
special attention 60 and old-
er; Community Presbyterian
Church, every Tuesday; 10
a.m.-1 p.m.; Suwannee River
Regional Library, every Sat-
urday, 9 a.m.-noon. No ap-
pointment needed. Info: Jack
Wilson, 386-963-5023.
Advent Christian Village
- 2004-2005 Artist Series -
Events include: Cotton Patch
Gospel, Monday, March 21,
at the Village Church, 7 p.m.
(Based on Clarence Jordan's
version of the book of
Matthew); The Phillips-Las-
siter Guitar Duo, Friday,
April 22, at the Village
Church, 7 p.m. ACV season
tickets are available at Ad-
vent Christian Village, The
Music Center in Live Oak,
and the Suwannee County
Chamber of Commerce.
Cost: Adults $80; Students
(ages 13-18) $35; Children
(ages 5-12) $25.
Another Way, Inc. Sup-
port Groups - Another Way,
Inc. offers support groups for
victims and survivors of do-
mestic violence. For info re-
garding dates and times, call
386-792-2747 or the toll-free
hotline at 800-500-1119.
'Before You Tie The
Knot' - four-hour class for
couples who will marry soon.
The cost is $10 per couple.
Completion of this course is
required when couples re-


duce their marriage license
fee by $32.50. Pre-registra-
tion is required. Registration
forms are available at the
Clerk of the Court's office or
the Suwannee County Exten-
sion Service office, 386-362-
2771.
Childbirth classes - of-
fered at the Suwannee Coun-
ty Health. Department on
Tuesday from 6 - 8 p.m.
Please call to registerr at 386-.


362-2708, ext. 218 - Coleen
Cody. The classes are free of
charge.
Department of Children
and Families - can assist you
in applying to register to vote
or update your voter registra-
tion record. If you receive or
apply for public assistance
benefits, your local Depart-
ment of Children and Fami-
lies service center can assist
you in completing a voter
registration application to
your local Supervisor of elec-
tions for you. Remember,
voting is a right. Your local
service center is at 501 De-
morest St., Live Oak, 386-
362-1483.
Disaster Action Team
Volunteers Needed - The
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley is looking
for volunteers to join the Dis-
aster Action Team to assist
victims of fires and other nat-
ural disasters. If you are in-
terested and would like to
learn more, call 386-752-
0650.
The Story of Dowling
Park - Do you want to know
more about the Advent Chris-
tian Village (ACV) at Dowl-
ing Park? ACV representa-
tives are available to meet
with you and share the story
of Dowling Park. If you're
interested in arranging a
speaking engagement or a
tour for your organization,
club or church, please contact
us at 386-658-5110 or toll-
free, 800-714-3134 or e-mail
ccarter@acvillage.net. For an
ACV preview, visit
www.acvillage.net. Or re-
quest a free videotape.
Experience Works - a na-
tional nonprofit organization,
(formerly Green Thumb) pro-
vides training and employ-
ment services to older work-
ers - over 5.5 and with a lim-
ited income - in Suwannee
County through the Senior
Community Service Employ-


ment Program (SCSEP). Par-
ticipants are paid the mini-
mum wage for an average of
20 hours per week. For more
info, visit www.experience-
works.org or call the Lake
City One Stop, 386-755-
9026, ext. 3129 for Loretta or
ext. 3134 for Ronald.
Florida Museum of Nat-
ural History in Gainesville -
Florida's state natural history
museum, located near the in-
tersection of Southwest 34th
Street and Hull Road in the
University of Florida Cultur-
al Plaza in Gainesville. Hours
are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
day-Saturday and 1-5 p.m.
Sunday. Closed on Thanks-
giving and Christmas. For
more info, including ticket
prices, directions and parking
info, call 352-846-2000. Vis-
it www.flmnh.ufl.edu.
Florida Museum of Nat-
ural History in Gainesville -
Wigglers and Walkers for
children ages 2-5 is offered
the second Wednesday of
every month. The children
learn about exhibits through
stories, games, hands-on ob-
jects and other age-appropri-
ate activities. Adult volun-
teers are needed to give Wig-
glers and 'Walkers tours and
no experience is required. To
volunteer, applicants must be
available to meet the first
Wednesday of each month
from 3-4 p.m. and to give
tours every second Wednes-
day from 3:30-4:30 p.m. For
more info, call 352-846-
2000, ext. 277.
FoodSource - a Christian
based Christian food cooper-
ative, is in your area! Stretch
your food dollars! With the
help of dedicated volunteers,
FoodSource is able to pro-
vide quality foods at low
prices while promoting
Christian values and volun-
teerism in your community.
This is NOT a needy only
program; it is for EVERY-


ONE. For questions or to or-
der, call your local coordina-
tor. Live Oak: Live Oak
Church of God - 386-362-
2483; Wellborn United
Methodist Church - 386-963-
5023; Ebenezer AME Church
- 386-362-6383 or 386-364-
4323 or 386-362-4808;
Jasper: 386-792-3965; White
Springs: 386-752-2196 or
386-397-1228; Bell: 352-
463-7772 or 352-463-1963;
Lake City 386-752-7976 or
FoodSource toll-free at 800-
832-5020 or visit Web site at
www.foodsource.org for
questions or to become a lo-
cal host site.
Friends of Suwannee
River State Park - Join the
Friends of Suwannee River
State Park, a non-profit
501(c)3 charitable organiza-
tion. Help keep the State Park
the gem of the Suwannee
River. The park is located 13
miles West of Live Oak off
US 90. Quarterly newsletter,
quarterly meetings, monthly
board meetings and an annu-
al luncheon meeting. Mem-
bership brochures may be
picked up at the State Park or
mail your membership to:
Friends of Suwannee River
State Park, 20185 CR 132,
Live Oak, FL 32060. Phone:
386-362-2746. Individual
Friend-$15; Family-$25;
Business Sponsor-$50; Cor-
porate Friend-$100-$250;
Lifetime Friend-$300. For
more info contact the mem-
bership chair Walter Schoen-
felder at 850-971-5354, or e-
mail him at wbsesurfbest.net
GED Tests - A person
wanting to take the GED test
must call to reserve a seat in
the registration session. At-
tendance in a registration
session is mandatory in or-
der to take the GED test. To
reserve seat for registration
session and pay fees, call
386-364-2782-Lynn Lee. To
inquire about age waivers,


call 386-384-2763-Lynne
Roy, counselor, and 386-364-
2619-Kim Boatright, GED
examiner at Suwannee-
Hamilton Technical Center.
Harsonhill Inc., a pre-
scription information pub-
lishing company - Financial
help for those who can't af-
ford their prescription drugs
is available right now. Steve
Reynolds, President of Har-
sonhill Inc., a prescription in-
formation publishing compa-
ny, states assistance pro-
grams have been established
by more than 100 U.S. drug
manufacturers to assist low
income people. These pro-
grams cover over 1,400 com-
monly prescribed medicines.
Reynolds states his company
publishes a 85+ page manual
that contains all the informa-
tion required to apply to
these assistance programs.
For more information about
these programs or to obtain
the manual e-mail: harsonhill
@earthlink.net or contact
Reynolds toll-free at 888-
240-9240 or write to Harson-
hill Inc., 22425 Ventura
Blvd., No. 190, Woodland
Hills, CA 91364. For imme-
diate info, visit www.Pre-
scriptions4Free.com.
Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley - Helping Hands Vol-
unteer Orientation - first
Wednesday, 10-11 a.m. at
Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley, 618 SW FL Gateway
Drive, Lake City. After at-
tending orientation and com-
pleting the screening process,
you will be eligible for vol-
unteering in the Hospice At-
tic thrift store, administrative
offices as well as helping at
special events, educational
fairs, community events and
fund raising. To register or
for more info contact Car-
olyn Long, 386-752-9191.
Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley - Helping Hands Vol-
unteer Orientation - third


Tuesday, 5-6:30 p.m. at Hos-
pice of the Suwannee Valley,
618 SW FL Gateway Drive,
Lake City. After attending
orientation and completing
the screening process, you
will be eligible for volunteer-
ing in the Hospice Attic thrift
store, administrative offices
as well as helping at special
events, educational fairs,
community events and fund
raising. To register or for
more info contact Carolyn
Long, 386-752-9191.
Lafayette County Veter-
ans - All veterans of
Lafayette County for your
protection, your military
records DD Form 214, "Cer-
tificate of Release or Dis-
charge from Active Duty"
can be recorded in the
Lafayette County Court-
house. Please see the Clerk of
Court's office.
LillyAnswers Program -
Available to Floridians 65
and older who are enrolled in
Medicare, have an annual in-
come below 200 percent of
the federal poverty level and
have no other drug coverage.
Seniors may apply for the
program at no cost by calling
a toll-free number, 877-RX-
LILLY, or by filling out an
application. LillyAnswers
card enables them to receive
a 30-day supply of Lilly
pharmaceutical products that
are sold at participating retail
pharmacies for a flat fee of
$12. Info about the LillyAn-
swers program is available at
www.lillyanswers.com or by
calling toll-free 877-RX-
LILLY.
Love INC - A non-profit
Christian group that repre-
sents local churches in find-
ing help for valid needs. Call
Ginny Peters, 386-364-4673,
Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. -
noon
MDA - Assists people with

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 8C


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in Winter Haven, FL and both Splash Island Water Parks* through December 31, 2005. It's your ticket to over
100 all-star concerts and special events, monthly member only mailers and special discounts throughout the year.
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Vote for your favorite Baby of 260oTe.acategory. I

A Baby's Name iln
- Funniest Photo Cutest I
C3 BestSnmile M Most Personable Photo I
Entries must be received by friday March 18 at 5 p.m.
-*Remember please choose only obe category.
* If more than one is marked, the entry sil be placed in the first category box marked.


Sance Douglas Shaw















One site, one password - All SulizanetMcMiDan


* I t n B k - -:,rn . . " l .i .v . -.


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Enroll online or
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386 754-0090 or 386 362-7990 Nathan Ada
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PAGE 8C, MARCH 16-17, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Calendar


Continued From Page 5C

ALS through help with pur-
chase and repair of wheel-
chairs, support groups, ex-
pert-led seminars, an ALS
Web site
(www.als.mdausa.org) and
ALS-specific chat rooms
(www.mdausa.org/chat).
MOPS - Mothers of
Preschoolers - a gathering of
moms for encouragement
and fun. All mothers of chil-
dren from birth to age five
are invited to attend. The
meetings are the second and
fourth Tuesday of the month,
September through May,
from 9:30 a.m. to noon. They
are held at the First Baptist
Church on Howard St. in
Live Oak. For more info,
please call 386-362-1583.
Marine Corps League
meets in Lake City - First
Tuesday of each month The
Suwannee Valley Detach-
ment of the Marine Corps
League of the United States
meets monthly in Lake City.
Even months are met in Live
Oak at the Shriners Club, odd
months are in Lake City at
Quality Inn (formerly Holi-
day Inn). Marines in Suwan-
nee County should call Dale
Condy, 386-776-2002 or
John Meyers, 386-935-6784.


POOL CHLORINE
W $225
)Refill
SEAMAN'S AQUA CLEAN
230 W. Howard St., Live Oak
r-4853JSF 362-4043



Hwy 90 W., Lake City
752-0054
www.Tire-Mart.com
Oil Change

Tire Rotation

Wheel Alignment

Virestone




Get the credit you need...
for the tires you want today.


Lake City representatives,
John Parker, 386-754-1980
or Bob Edgar, 386-755-1354.
Marriage? Help me! - A
program presented by Solid
Rock Ministries, Inc. of
Jasper; at no charge to any-
one. Call for appointment at
386-792-2603. Helping to
apply Christian principles to
our every day living...
Morningside Nature Cen-
ter Living History Farm,
Gainesville - Barnyard Bud-
dies, free admission, 3 p.m.
every Wednesday and Satur-
day to meet and greet the
farm animals. After the ani-
mal introductions, help with
the afternoon feeding. Tod-
dlers and preschoolers will
love learning about the barn-
yard buddies. Meet at the
barn. For more info, call 352-
334-2170 or visit www.na-
tureoperations.org.
Morningside Nature Cen-
ter Living History Farm,
Gainesville - Living History
Days, every Saturday, from 9
a.m. - 5 p.m. with staff in pe-
riod dress interpreting day-
to-day life on a Florida farm
in 1870. Sample homemade
biscuits on the woodstove
with fresh butter and cane
syrup grown and made on the
farm. Help feed the farm ani-
mals at 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. dai-
ly. Free admission. For more
info call 352-334-2170 or
v i s i t


www.natureoperations.org.
Morningside Nature Cen-
ter Living History Farm,
Gainesville - Discover & Do,
third Sunday of the month,
kids bring your favorite adult
for a fun activity and make a
cool craft to take home. Meet
at Loblolly Environmental
Facility on NW 34th Street
between University and NW
8th Ave. Reservations re-
quired. Free admission. For
more info and to RSVT .11
352-334-2170 or visit
www.natureoperations.org.
Morningside Nature Cen-
ter Living History Fa m,.
Gainesville - Who's Who-in-
the Woods, last Saturday of
the month, naturalist-guided
walk at 9 a.m. 1-1.5 hours


walk, wear comfortable
walking shoes. Meet at the
education office, 3540 E.
University Ave. Free admis-
sion. For more info call 352-
334-2170 or visit www.na-
tureoperations.org.
Morningside Nature Cen-
ter Living History Farm,
Gainesville - A Night at the
Owlery, By the light of the
silvery moon with the owls
and frogs we'll croon...each
Saturday nearest the full
moon. Come at 7 p.m. with
family and friends for a live-
ly variety of talks, songs,
hikes, fires, and fun! Florida
Wildlife Care's Leslie Straub
will help us meet and greet
our noisy nocturnal neigh-
bors, the owls, at Boulware
Springs Historic Waterworks,
3300 SE 15th St.,
Gainesville. Free admission.
For more info call 352-334-
2170 or visit www.natureop-
erations.org.
NFCC offers ed2go -
more than 290 on-line cours-
es in 30 different subject ar-
eas; six week intervals; April
20, May 18 and June 15; in-
structor-led, affordable, in-
formative, convenient and
highly interactive; requires
Internet access, e-mail and
Netscape Navigator or Mi-
crosoft Internet Explorer;
course fees vary; Info: Suzie
Godfrey, 850-973-9453,
communityed@nfcc.edu,
www.ed2go.com/nfcc.
NFCC Children's The-
ater performances - NFCC
will present "The Adventures
of Lewis and Clark" by GMT
Productions, Inc. on April 18,
with two performances for
sixth - eighth graders in
NFCC's six county service
area. Performance will be
held at the Van H. Priest Au-
ditorium on the Madison
campus. For more info visit
www.nfcc.edu/NewsEv-
ents/ArtistSeries/childrenthe-
ater.html or contact the
NFCC College Advancement
Office, 850-973-1613.
. NFCC College Placement
Tests - NFCC will conduct
College Placement Tests
(CPT), on computer every


Thursday at 8:30 a.m. and
1:30 p.m. in the NFCC Tech-
nical Center, Bldg. 13, on the
Madison campus. Persons
taking the tests will be re-
quired to register in NFCC
Student Services 24 hours
before testing. There is a fee
of $10 for the test. For more
info, please call 850-973-
1612.
NFCC E-Spotlight pro-
vides weekly information -
Interested in North Florida
Community College events?
Have current college news
and happenings delivered di-
rectly to your e-mail address
* through NFCC's e-Spotlight.
Alumni, former faculty or
staff and community mem-
bers interested in keeping up
with NFCC's calendar of
events and news are invited
to join the list of e-Spotlight
recipients. To receive
NFCC's weekly e-Spotlight
call the Office of Institution-
al Advancement at 850-973-
1613 or e-mail Kim Scarboro
at scarborok@nfcc.cc.
Narconon Arrowhead -
Drug addiction can leave an
individual feeling helpless
and out of control. Especially
if you are the family member
or friend of an addict. Nar-
conon Arrowhead can help.
Narconon offers free coun-
seling, assessments and re-
ferrals to rehabilitation cen-
ters nationwide by calling
toll-free, 800-468-6933 or
logging onto www.stopaddic-
* tion.com. Don't wait until it's
too late. Call Narconon now!
North Central Florida
Sexual Assault Center, Inc.
- provides individual and
group counseling for victims
of rape and incest. Any man.
or woman who is 18 years
old or older and is a victim of
rape, sexual abuse or incest is
eligible to participate. All
services are free and confi-
dential. Call Victim Advo-
cate, Erica Nix toll-free at
Pager Number, 800-400-
7140. For other, info,..call
386-719-9287. - - ---.......
North Florida Workforce
Development - AWI person-
nel, as part of the'one-stop


system, strive to help dislo-
cated workers and other job
seekers find employment in a
prompt manner. AWI staff
now have office hours at the
One-Stop Centers in Hamil-
ton: 386-792-1229, Jeffer-
son: 850-342-3338,
Lafayette: 386-294-1055,
Madison: 850-973-9675,
Suwannee: 386-364-7952
and Taylor: 850-584-7604
counties as follows: 8 a.m.-5
p.m. Monday through Friday,
and alternate Saturdays 9
a.m.-1 p.m.
Parents of ADD and
ADHD Children - If you are
interested in joining a sup-
port group call Lea-Anne
Elaine, 386-362-7339.
Pregnancy Crisis Center -
The Live Oak Pregnancy Cri-
sis Center at 112 Piedmont
St. (behind the Amoco) is
open on Wednesday through
Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
The center will offer confi-
dential counseling, free preg-
nancy tests, clothes for ex-
pectant mothers and infants.
The center will also offer re-
ferrals to pro-life doctors.
Groups and churches might
want to have a baby shower
and donate all the items to
the center. Also needed: Ma-
ternity clothes and hangers.
Telephone 386-330-2229; or
toll-free 800-696-4580.
Rainbow Acres Animal
Shelter - A nonprofit, no kill,
animal shelter, needs dona-
tions of all kinds, shelter ma-
terial, wood, fencing, etc.
Food, old pots, pans, etc. Al-
most anything you no longer
need, we can put to good use.
Cash is also accepted to keep,
our kittens and puppies
healthy. Our animals are free.
Donations accepted, not re-
quired. Free!!!!! Puppies and
Dogs. Kittens and Cats. Con-
tact Carolynn or Matt, 386-
362-3338.
Reach To Recovery -
breast cancer survivors visit-
ing breast cancer patients
with. information and hope.
One on one visits. Free of
charge. Call toll-free, 800-
ACS-2345 to schedule a vis-
it. Sponsored by the Ameri-


can Cancer Society.
Regional Heart Disease
and Stroke Prevention
Coalition - serving Suwan-
nee, Lafayette, Hamilton,
Madison, Jefferson and Tay-
lor counties - meets quarter-
ly. Please call Diana King at
850-342-0170 ext. 220 for
more info.
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park & Camp-
ground upcoming events in-
clude - March 18 - Cherry
Holmes Family; March 24-27
- Suwannee Spring Fest;
March 27 - Craft Village
Easter Egg Hunt.
Stephen Foster State Cul-
ture Center State Park -
monthly Cracker Coffee-
house from 7-9 p.m. in the
Auditorium. Upcoming
events: Antique Tractor and
Engine Show - April 1-3;
Florida Folk Festival - May
27-29. Open stage night held
the first Saturday of every
month with songs, stories,
yodeling, music and much
more. Coffee and desserts
available for sale. Free ad-
mission at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park, White Springs. Located
on US 41, three miles from I-
75 and nine miles from 1-10.
For info on additional pro-
grams and times, contact the
park at 386-397-4331, or vis-
i t
www.FloridaStateParks.org/s
tephenfoster/
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park - The Suwan-
nee Valley Bluegrass Asso-
ciation - every Saturday
night; 6:30 p.m.; bluegrass
jam; Pickin' Shed; Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park,
US 129 North, Live Oak;
covered dish pot luck, first
and third Saturday, 6 p.m.;
Info: 386-842-5786.
Suwannee Primary
School - Lost and Found -
Parents may check with the
school office to see if their
child's missing coat,
sweater, hat, gloves, lunch
bags, etc. are in the items
that are overflowing in the


SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 9C


F9,1311,11






NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - MARCH 16-17, 2005, PAGE 9C


Calendar


Continued From Page 8C

storage area.
Suwannee Primary
School - Emergency
Clothes Closet - The closet
is in desperate need of small
..pants and underwear for
.boys and girls. Sizes 4, 5, 6
and 7 are needed to help
with "accidents" at school.
Clean clothes are welcome.
.,Drop off at the school of-
-fice. Thank you.
Suwannee Valley
Builders Association
(SVBA) - A non profit orga-
nization, is a group of ap-
proximately 80 local citi-
.;zens dedicated to building a
- stronger community, whose
_.members volunteer their
time with active involve-
ment with associate spon-
.sorships of worthwhile
.*community activities and
.associate members of the
'-Council for Progress and
� Suwannee County Chamber
.of Commerce. SVBA do-
nates two academic scholar-
.,ships each year, donates
.-Christmas gift/food baskets
.each year and sponsor of
the children's playhouse
,raffle at Christmas. Fea-
,tured speakers from local
businesses and a catered
,dinner are the highlights of
the evening at monthly
.meetings. The general pub-
lic is invited to attend and
become members. Dona-
tions of $5 a person are ac-
,cepted at the door to help
.cover catering expenses.
-For more info on joining the
Organization, contact Ron-
nie Poole, 386-362-4539.
* Wanted - Volunteer posi-
tions open; Surrey Place,
-'US 90 East, Live Oak; ex-
,,tensive seven-day-a-week
activity program; volun-
teers needed: calling out
bingo or pokeno, reading to
residents who no longer see
well or sharing scriptures,
giving wheel chair rides in
the courtyard, helping with
special events or being a


"helper/partner" on outings
out of the facility; goal: to
keep residents lives fulfilled
by being busy and happy;
Info: 386-364-5961.
Wild Adventures upcom-
ing events include: Collec-
tive Soul and Low Millions
- March 26; Charlie Daniels
Band and Trick Pony - April
2; Ryan Cabrera with Aslyn
and Bonnie McKee - April
16; Switchfoot - April 30;
Gary Allan and Chris Cagle
- May 7. Wild Adventures
Theme Park is located at
3766 Old Clyattville Rd.
Valdosta, Ga. For more info,
visit www.wild-
adventure.com.
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
Through March 28
Driver's license and
vehicle inspection
checkpoints scheduled
The Florida Highway Pa-
trol will conduct driver's
license and vehicle inspec-
tion checkpoints through
March 28, on Brown Road,
CR 252, CR 252-A, CR
252-B, CR 25-A, SR 47,
SR 341, US 441, US 41,
CR 245, CR 238, CR 135,
Turner Road, SR 100, Trot-


ter's Road, Fairfield Farms
Road, CR 250, CR 349, SR
247 and SR 25 in Colum-
bia County; CR 132, CR
136, CR 136-A, CR 137,
CR 249, CR 250, CR 252,
CR 349, CR 49, CR 795,
SR 20, SR 247, SR 10, SR
51, US 129 and Mitchell
'Road in Suwannee County;
and CR 136, CR 152, CR
143, CR 249, CR 137, CR
251, CR 146, CR 135, CR
141, CR 150, CR 145 and
US 41, SR 6, SR 25 in
Hamilton County. Recog-
nizing the danger present-
ed to the public by defec-
tive vehicle equipment,
troopers will concentrate
their efforts on vehicles
being operated with de-
fects such as bad brakes,
worn tires and defective
lighting equipment. In ad-
dition, attention will be di-
rected to drivers who
would violate the driver li-
cense laws of Florida. The
Patrol has found these
checkpoints to be an effec-
tive means of enforcing the
equipment and driver's li-
cense laws of Florida
while ensuring the protec-
tion of all motorists.


cS-wannE i t
----------' ',, . * '. - r--


ag . ..-, . '. , .


Course: The course begins at the Suwannee County Fairgrounds and
winds through one of Live Oak's finest neighborhood. The 3.1 mile
course out and back is fast and flat with two water stops.
When: Saturday, March 19, 2005.
Registration: 8 a.m. Race starts: 9 a.m.
Cost: $7 Individual open class - $6 Special Category Team member
* Awards to the top 3 in all age groups and top finishers on each team.
* Award ceremony 30 minutes after race.
* Refreshments at finish line.
* Race packets may be picked up at registration on March 19, 2005


Classifications: Age Groups: Male and Female
12 years & under 31-39
13-17 40-49
-4tl1 P-01:1 r )-1- ^H c^^


-- geCont


24-30 60 & over i
n
Special Categories: Corporate, Local business, Handicapped,
walkers, Walkers with Baby Strollers, Clubs, Fraternities and Celebrities.


Register Now!
Voluntary
Prekindergarten Program
Early Learning Coalition
of Florida's Gateway; Vol-
untary Prekindergarten


(VPK); Children four on or
before Sept. 1, are eligible
to receive 540 hours of de-
velopmentally appropriate
preschool instruction free
this coming school year (be-


ginning in August). INFO:
Enrollment Manager Jamie
Witzman, 386-752-9770,
ext. 24 or Gateway Execu-

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 10C


M&M AUTO SALES.-.
YOUR PRE- OWNED HEADPOfUARTERS 1. 1


00 Mazda Millenia, leather, alloy wheels, sunroof, CD player............................... 10,995
92 Honda Accord Wagon, power locks, CD player--............................................. 4,999
00 Saturn SC-2, power locks, CD player................................................................. 9,995
99 Mitsubishi Galant, sunroof, power....................----------..............---------------------..............-................---.. 8,380
98 Ford Mustang GT, convertible, CD player-r........................................................$9,995
99 Nissan Altima GXE, AT, CD & cassette............................................................. 9,750
98 Saturn SLI, auto, AM/FM cassette.....................................................................-$6,850
00 Ford Contour, AT, PW, PDL, alloy wheels............................................... ............8--,999
99 Pontiac Grand Prix GTP, fully loaded............................................................. 9,250
01 Buick Century, AT, PW, PDL, cruise....................................................................8,995
01 Chevy Malibu, AT, PW, PDL, cruise................................................................... 10,995


00 Chrysler Town & Country, leather, power, CDO..............................................11,350
99 Mercury Villager, 73k. 7 passenger.................................................................11,250
01 Nissan Pathfinder, leather.............................................................................$14,995
01 Ford Windstar, 65k, all power........................................................................... 9,995
99 Ford Ranger, extra cab, bed liner-.....................................................................- 9,995
01 Nissan Pathfinder, PW, running boards..........................................................*15,995
99 Dodge Ram 1500, 85K, quad cab..................................................................$14,995
99 Toyota Tacoma, 74k, ext. cab ........................................................................b$15,995
99 Ford Ranger, 4x4, ext. cab-................................................................................8,995
98 Ford Ranger, 80k, camper topperr.......................................................................$8,750
01 Ford Explorer, 75k, all power.........................................................................10---,895
00 Mitsubishi Montero, 79k, 4x4............................................................--.........12,998


88 Mazda B2200...................................$3,875 92 Nissan Sentra........................ .........$3,995
92 Toyota 4 Runner.............................. 4,995 91 Toyota Corolla...........................-.......$3,995
92 Dodge Caravan................................$2,995 98 Dodge Conversion Van..................$9,995

[' Fresh Start, New Start, Credit
Bankruptcy M~I Medical Problems Mis Financing For Everyone!


Keith Ronny Bryan Avon Daniel Andy Bill
Wachob ; McKinley Wachob Koon Smith Macarages Lipthrott
Sales Man. Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales

M&M Auto Sales Hwy 90, Lake City
758-6171 - 1 -800-358-8482 s151687.-F


$25 Cowboy Bucks, $35 Gift Certificate To Smitty's Western Store, !

Plus A Full Car Detail From CC&C Auto Detailing



WOW!


WHAT A WEEKEND!


RULES:

Know the answer to the trivia question,

Listen to BIG 98.1 throughout the day for your chance to

qualify for the drawing. It's that easy. 4

There will be a new trivia question

every Wednesday and Friday in the Suwannee Democrat.


Which group has earned more #1 and more top 10
records this decade according to Billboard Magazine?
Listen to BIG 98.1 throughout the day to qualify


-i


i/


Giveaway sponsored by:


Dmarn crat s~rr'
WESTERN STORE


I


~sr-8 Qu~


Today's Bm Countrye L


9mp


I


OReq


I


i






PAGE 10C, MARCH 16-17, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Calendar


Continued From Page 9C

tive Director Dr. Thomas
Logan, ext. 12. www.elc-
fg.org.





extend your reac c

Register Now!
NFCC offers ed2go
on-line courses
March 16
NFCC offers ed2go, more
than 290 on-line courses in
30 different subject areas;
six week intervals beginning
March 16, April 20, May 18
and June 15; instructor-led,
affordable, informative, con-
venient and highly interac-
tive; requires Internet ac-
cess, e-mail and Netscape
Navigator or Microsoft In-
ternet Explorer; course fees
vary; Info: Suzie Godfrey,
850-973-9453, communi-
tye d@ n fcc . e du ,
www.ed2go.com/nfcc.
Enter now!
NFCC seeks
entries for !
annual Quilt
Show
April 16 and
April 18-20
Call for entries;
quilts - new or old,
treasured heirloom
or a recent gift; for
annual NFCC Quilt . -


Show in conjunction with the day through April 11, 10-
Madison County Four Free- 10:45 a.m.; fun stories, play
doms Festival, Madison; games, make crafts, and
April 16 and April 18-20; much more; Info: 386-362-
Info or applications to enter: 2317.
Maria Greene, WSG Confer- Register Now!
ence Center Coordinator, at SHS Class of 1954 2005
850-973-9432 or e-mail Beach Bash April 4-6
greenem@nfcc.edu. Suwannee High School,
Make donations now! Live Oak, class of 1954,
Items needed for porch Beach Bash, Monday-
sale to benefit Puppy Place Wednesday, April 4-6, at the
CARES, White Springs Sea Horse Oceanfront Inn,
March 19 Jacksonville Beach. Info/reg-
Items needed; porch sale; istration: 'Ken Voyles, 352-
March 19; White Springs 861-8650 or Erma Evans-
Bed and Breakfast, US 41 Parker, 904-221-1203.
and KendrickAve.; donations Register now!
tax deductible; benefits Pup- Lafayette High School
py Place CARES; Info: 386- class of 1980 is looking
397-1665 or www.nflpuppy- for classmates
place.org. Lafayette High School
March - April class of 1980; looking for
Storytime free for ages 3-5 classmates; 25th class re-
at Suwannee River Region- union; Info: Susan Harris
al Library Branford and Allen, 386-935-0901, Pam
Live Oak March and April Zimmerman Corbin, 386-
Storytime; free for ages 3- 935-3118, Jean Williams,
5; Suwannee River Regional 386-294-1241.
Library; Branford: first Tues- Buy tickets now!
day until May, 10-10:45 Suwannee County
a.m.; Live Oak: every Mon- Cattlemen's Association
Heifer Raffle
.. . *" Suwannee County
01 "''A ,.'' iv Cattlemen's Associa-
'.,.' tion Heifer Raffle.
STickets $1 each. Pro-
S.-.. -ceeds support Beef
S,. . Heifer Show. Draw-
to ing at Suwannee
i:i County Fair in
-..March. Info or tick-
ets:Dottie Barfuss,


386-364-3266 or Joe Jordan,
386-362-4724.
Register now!
Suwannee Parks &
Recreation offers Umpire
Clinic March 19
Suwannee Parks & Recre-
ation; volunteer umpires
needed for Babe Ruth pro-
gram; free, one-day Umpire
Clinic; 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Satur-
day, March 19, First Federal
Sportsplex; season: April-
May; All-star games: June-
July. Volunteer positions
open: coaches, assistant
coaches, team moms, conces-
sion workers, team sponsors
and scorekeepers; training
available; Info: 386-362-
3004.
Artists apply by May 20
24th Annual Downtown
Festival & Art Show Nov.
12-13
24th Annual Downtown
Festival & Art Show;
Gainesville; Saturday and
Sunday, Nov. 12-13; Artists
apply by May 20; Info:
www.gvlculturalaffairs.org
or Linda Piper, 352-334-
5064.
Suwannee District
Schools will administer
Spring 2005 Assessments -
SAT 10 March 21-23
Suwannee District Schools


mation available. Daily stu-
dent attendance is critical
during these assessment peri-
ods.
April 9
Friends of the Library,
Gainesville book sale
opens April 9
Friends of the Library,
Gainesville; Spring Book
Sale; April 9-13; Friends of
the Library Book House, 430
North Main Street,
Gainesville.
Apply now to be listed!
Fresh From the Farm a
market guide for Suwan-
nee County
The Suwannee County Ex-
tension Service is in the
process of creating a market
guide - Fresh From the Farm
- to help the general public
locate products straight from
the farm. Info/application:
386-362-2771.
Now - April 1
Ten Star All Star
Basketball Camp
Ten Star All Star Summer
Basketball Camp; appllica-
tions taken thru April 1; nvi-
tation only. Boys/girls ages
10-19; College basketball
scholarships; Where: Babson
Park and Atlanta, Ga.'
Info/brochure: 704-373-
0873.


will administer Spring 2005 The 5th Army Associa-
Assessments - SAT 10 - tion tour of Italy, depart-
March 21-23. SAT 10 isfor ing New York on June 15
Grade K-2. Each school has The 5th Army Association
more detailed testing infor- World War II, Italy, will con-


duct a 10 day final tour of
Italy, departing New York on
June 15 visiting Rome,
Venice, Florence, Pisa, Sor-
rento and a special stop at the
American Military Cemetery
near Anzio. Former members
of the many combat divisions
and support groups, their
families, friends and those in-
terested in the history of the
U.S. 5th Army can contact
Sny Canton at 5277B Lake-
front Blvd., Delray Beach, FL
33484 or call 561-865-8495.
Register Now!
Suwannee High School
Class of 1975 plans
30-year reunion
Suwannee High School
Class of 1975 plans 30-year
class reunion. Info: Jane
Gamble Lew, 386-776-1459
or Wayne Mitchell, 386-330-
2554.
Register Now!
Suwannee High School
Class of 1986 plans
20-year reunion
Suwannee High School
Class of 1986; 20-year re-
union; Info: Angela Hunter
Mandrell, Mandr003@bell-
south.net., Catrena Francis,
VanessaFrancis@msn.com as
soon as possible.
Sign up now!
Live Oak Senior Citizens
schedule tours
Live Oak Senior Citizens
schedule escorted tours to:
San Antonio Experience, Oct.
19-23. Costs and deadlines
for payment vary for each
trip.. The group meets the first
Monday, 10:30 a.m., Exten-
sion Building II, Agriculture
Center. Visitors welcome.
Info: Lula Herring, 386-364-
1510.
March 16
NFCC will conduct
GED tests
NFCC; GED tests; 6 p.m.,
March 16, NFCC Technical
Center; Madison campus;
Photo ID required; prepara-
tion courses free; fee for test;
Info/registration: 850-973-
1629.
March 16
.Office hours with
Congressman Boyd's
staff in Live Oak
A member of Congressman
Allen Boyd's (D-North Flori-
da) staff will be visiting Live
Oak on the third Wednesday
of every month so the people
of Suwannee County have the
opportunity to personally dis-
cuss issues concerning them.
Congressman Boyd's staff is
trained to assist constituents
with a variety of issues relat-
ing to various federal agen-
cies. It is important to Con-
gressman Boyd that his staff
is available for those who are
not able to travel to either his
Panama City or Tallahassee
offices. Office hours with
Congressman Boyd's staff
this month will be Wednes-
day, March 16, from 9:30
a.m. - 11:30 a.m., Live Oak
City Hall, Live Oak.
March 17
American Red Cross will
hold an Adult, Infant and
Child CPR and First Aid
class in Lake City
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley; Adult, In-
fant and Child CPR and First
Aid class; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Thursday, March 17; 264 NE
Hernando Ave., Suite 102,
Lake City. Info: 386-752-
0650.
March 17
NFCC will conduct Col-
lege Placement Tests (CPT)
NFCC; College Placement
Tests (CPT); on computer;
8:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. and 6
p.m. Thursday, March 17,
NFCC Technical Center,
Building No. 13; Madison
campus. Info/registration:


850-973-9451.
March 18-20
2005 Florida Trail
Conference, Live Oak
2005 Florida Trail Confer-










SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 11C


ZA. "l:rf


"-. wl,







NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - MARCH 16-17, 2005, PAGE 11C


Calendar


Continued From Page 10C

ence; March 18-20, Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park
and Campground, Live Oak;
Info/registration: 877-HIKE-
FLA; www.floridatrail.org
or 386-362-3256.
March 18-20
Basket classes at
Craft Square
Basket makers Rich
Prange and Jeanette Bieder-
man; basket classes; 9 a.m.-5
p.m., Friday-Sunday, March
18-20, Craft Square, Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park, White Springs;
$20 per day, plus materials of
$15 to $25 per basket; Info:
3 8 6 - 3 9 7 - 1 9 2 0 ,
www.StephenFosterCSO.org
o r
www.FloridaStateParks.org/s
tephenfoster/
, March 19
Porch sale to benefit
Puppy Place CARES,
'.White Springs
- Porch sale to benefit Puppy
Place CARES, a nonprofit
animal support group; 9 a.m.-
3 p.m., Saturday, March 19;
White Springs Bed and
Breakfast, US 41 and
Kendrick Ave.; all new mer-
chandise; Info, donations,
newsletter: 386-397-1665.
March 19
International F.&A.M.
Masons and Order of
Eastern Star, Lake City
presents a free barbecue
International F.&A.M.
Masons and Order of East-
ern Star presents a free bar-
becue for anyone 21 and
older at 5 p.m., March 19, at
the Lodge and Chapter on
SW Sisters Welcome Road,
off U.S. 90, Lake City; free
barbecue sandwiches,
drinks, music and door
prizes; Bring a date, a friend
or a relative. Info: Karla,
386-752-6266 or 386-754-
9461.
March 19
Third Annual New York
Day in Lake City
Third Annual New York
Day, 12:30-4 p.m., Saturday,
March 19, Tucker's Fine
Dining, Lake City.


Info/reservations: Mau-
reen/Vern Lloyd, 386-752-
4885, Ed Pettie. 386-752-
8520.
March 19
Fifth Annual
Wild Azalea Festival
Fifth Annual Wild Azalea
Festival; Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center, White
Springs; Saturday, March
19, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., folk
singers, musicians, dancers,
cloggers and more; Little
Miss Azalea Contest;
Suwanne'e River Duck Race
and much more; Street Craft
Fair, Bridge Street, White
Springs, begins at 9 a.m.;
Info: 386-397-2310 or 386-
397-4461.
March 19
American Red Cross
will hold an Adult, Infant
and Child CPR and First
Aid class in Lake City
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley; Adult, In-
fant and Child CPR and First
Aid class; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Saturday, March 19; 264 NE
Hernando Ave., Suite 102,
Lake City. Info: .386-752-
0650.
March 20
Florida Museum experts
host Calusa Indian lecture
and book signing
Florida Museum of Natur-
al History, Gainesville; lec-
ture and book signing by
Darcie MacMahon and
William Marquardt authors
of "The Calusa and Their
Legacy: South Florida Peo-
ple and Their Environ-
ments;" 2-3:30 p.m., Sun-
day, March 20; Sunday
Snoop available for children
4-10; pre-registration re-
quired; $5 fee; Info: 352-
846-2000.
March 21-23
Suwannee District Schools
will administer Spring
2005 Assessments - SAT 10
Suwannee District
Schools will administer
Spring 2005 Assessments -
SAT 10 - March 21-23. SAT
10 is for Grade K-2. Each
school has more detailed
testing information avail-
able. Daily student atten-


dance is critical during these
assessment periods.
March 22
American Red Cross will
hold an Adult CPR class in
Lake City
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley; Adult CPR
class; 6-9 p.m., Tuesday,
March 22; 264 NE Hernando
Ave., Suite 102, Lake City.
Info: 386-752-0650.
March 24
American Red Cross will
hold an Infant and Child
CPR and First Aid class in
Lake City
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley; Infant and
Child CPR and First Aid
class; 6-10 p.m., Thursday,
March 24; 264 NE Hernando
Ave., Suite 102, Lake City.
Info: 386-752-0650.
March 24-27
SpringFest
SpringFest; Spirit of
Suwannee Music Park
(SOSMP), Live Oak, March
24-27; Scheduled appear-
ances: The Bela Fleck
Acoustic Trio, Rodney
Crowell with Bryan Sutton
and Casey Driessen, Donna
the Buffalo, Vassar
Clements, Peter Rowan and
Tony Rice, Guy Clark, Ver-
lon .Thompson, Jim Laud-
erdale, Laura Love Band,
The Duhks, Reeltime Travel-
ers, Darol Anger and Mike
Marshall and many, many
others. Info: 386-364-1683,
www.musicliveshere.com,
www.magmusic.com.

i, ,'g:. ..- . " - . ' ".. ,:


March 26
Old Timers Day at Troy
Springs State Park
Troy Springs State Park,
CR 435, Lafayette County;
Annual Old Timers Day; Sat-
urday, March 26, 10 a.m.-5
p.m.; need copies of old pho-
tos, newspaper clippings,
dive logs or stories. Info:
Mebane Cory-Ogden, 386-


935-4835.
March 28
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult Basic
Education)
NFCC; TABE (Test of
Adult Basic Education);
Monday, March 28, 6 p.m.,
NFCC Technical Center;
Madison campus; Photo ID
required; Info/registration:
850-973-9451.
March 29
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult Basic
Education)
NFCC; TABE (Test of
Adult Basic Education);
Tuesday, March 29, 1:30
p.m., NFCC Technical Cen-
ter; Madison campus; Photo
ID required; Info/registra-
tion: 850-973-9451.
March 31
NFCC will conduct
College Placement Tests
(CPT)
NFCC; College Placement
Tests (CPT); on computer;
8:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.,
Thursday, March 31, NFCC
Technical Center, Building
No. 13; Madison campus.
Info/registration: 850-973-
9451.
April 1-2
Third Annual Florida
State Bluegrass Festival
The Perry-Taylor County
Chamber of
Commerce/Tourism Develop-
ment Council, Third Annual
Florida State Bluegrass Festi-
val, Forest Capital State Park,
Perry; Friday-Saturday April
1-2; Friday 4-
11 p.m., Satur-
day noon-11
p.m.; and
Third Annual
Rotary Club
SChili Cook-
off. Info/ven-
dors: Dawn Taylor, toll-free
866-584-5366.
April 1-3
17th Annual Antique
Tractor and Engine Show
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park, White


Springs; 17th Annual Antique
Tractor and Engine Show; 9
a.m. until 5 p.m., April 1-3;
farming history displays of an-
tique equipment, demonstra-
tions, competitions, races, a
parade on Saturday, food and
more; admission $4 for a vehi-
cle with up to eight passen-
gers; Info: 386-397-2733,
www.floridastateparks.org
April 9-13
Friends of the Library,
Gainesville book sale opens
April 9
Friends of the Library,
Gainesville; Spring Book Sale;
April 9-13; Friends of the Li-
brary Book House, 430 North
Main Street, Gainesville.
April 16
Gethsemane Church of
God in Christ will hold its
Annual Youth Summit
Annual Youth Summit,
April 16, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Geth-
semane Church of God in
Christ, 917 NE Duval Street,
Live Oak; Theme: "If It's To
Be, It's Up To Me." The sum-
mit will deal with AIDS, peer
pressure, drugs, black history
brain bowl, door prizes etc.
Speakers: Yvonne Scott and
others.
April 30
Perry Elks Lodge
Poker Run
Perry Elks Lodge No. 1851;
Poker Run; April 30, 9 a.m.;
115-miles; win cash or prizes;
entry fee, $20/motorcycle,
$5/additional rider; 9 p.m.,
dance, live band "Faster than
Flash," Perry Elks Lodge ban-
quet room; Info: Wendy


Cruce, 850-838-5190, Richard
Johnson, 850-584-9288,
Aaron Portwood, 850-838-
4834; entry forms: Perry Elks
Lodge, 304 Puckett Road.


Emmylou Harris


May 27-29
53rd annual Florida
Folk Festival
53rd annual Florida Folk
Festival; Stephen Foster Folk
Cultural Center, White
Springs; May 27-29; Emmy-
lou Harris headlines; Tick-
ets: in advance $15 a day or
$35 for the weekend; at the
gate $20 a day/$40 for the
weekend; Info or tickets:
Elaine McGrath, Marketing
Director; toll-free 877-635-
3655 or www.FloridaFolkFes-
tival.com.
June 25
Suwannee High School
Class of 1975 reunion
Suwannee High School
Class of 1975; 30-year re-
union; June 25; Info: Jane
Gamble Lee, 386-776-1459,
Wayne Mitchell, 386-330-
2554.


IEEE.


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IBM


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Tikket

www.irbmiUsic
www.musiciv<
336-364- 1683

NWo;thend Fr.,irei

. Children 6 &- uNrdi







-North Florida Sales


MUSIC FEST

rit of the Suwannee Music Park

Live Oak i'-- i.ida

April 7dh, 8th & 9th oo005

featuring Performances By:


Dme Riuer Band

Illrd Tyme Out

Mountain Heart

Seldom Scene

Larry Sparks
fl Uocalist of the Year

King Wilkie
going artist of the Year

Wildfire


Blue moon Rising

Southern Lite

Ernie Thacker 6 Route 23

moron Brothers

Bluegrass Parlor Band

Boone Brothers 6 Co.

The Boohers

Swinging Bridge

The Scott fnderson Band


In formation:


iesheexornor call
5 or nmore informai~on


-'11 pce LdY W- $15-130 eeq~k~ld
'er free wirb aduhi ticket


FOOD STORES




PAGE 12C, MARCH 16-17, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


I I I I i ~ 1 ; III I I b'~ ; i ; I


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NEVER KNOW

WHAT YOU'LL

DISCOVER
General Merchandise
and Services


March 16-17, 2005

S800-525-4182

EED A RIDE?


Car, Trucks and Motorcycles


More PrOfitS will be heading your way

when vou advertise in color. It's a fact that
more people read ads with color. Color is

- appealing, I l01V, eye-catching-and

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Call now for rates and Information:
306-362-1734 ext.102.
The Classified Marketplace
Suwannee Democrat
P.O. Box 370 Live Oak, FL 32064


Sou . n Sky Realty
of Florida, Inc.


la:
1386,129.
Toll Free: Sal)
Co.rnrieCtofLis 'T,
MaN C.. Ft
S4Jet'c'le .w.oulrl


haren Barnhill
Owner and Lic. Real EstateBroker
1o Live Oak
'4-1576 (386) 364-1576
0 1 605-1576 Toll Free: (800) 822-1576
aid M,:N.rioe Si South Oaks Square Shopping Center
L 31 16o 1554 South Ohio Avenue
rerrns yrealT ':.:,m Live Oak, FL 32062


We'll find the right home for you.
l = ,i-i ti uiva r , ownp r rni rvi-rv


S LrNANNEE RIVER



4.:




A4vESOME '1,2 rurne with 4 arre-� located
rei jhP anr,Ee Ri er Ottor*i2eated
anid a Ir uorilditioried Thop&, ir, flouse
printn -r~ : - , , i j r r itrwe proi�-iv.tc , ML,-e
L-C 21�1 W~.~A~. Ir
TIMBER LAKESUB.
I TnH HIU I IOu HTn i


Coin operated car w a-,i3sn h ia single wide
mobile home currently being rented ICr
addltrinai income MLS, 42319 1,64 900


This is a flag lot with 166+ feet of US Hwy
27 frontage possible to re-zone to
commercial. MLS#42323 $114,900
HORSESHOE BEACH


I UU ILW Ull n IU IU: ...
U ILI Greal location' Large 4 bedroom 2 balh This 2 bedroom 1 bath home has, all new
Nice wooded lot in The Rolling Hills of DWMH. This one acre lots is covered in carpet and vinyl. Is in move in condition.
Timber Lake Sub. Private access to shade trees. On paved road. Close to And is in walking distance to the gulf and
Timber Lake. Great Fishing. Home school and shopping. All it needs is a new boat ramp. MLS# 42567 $149,900
owners association. MLSt42331 $10,000 family. MLS#42253 $99,000 146234JRS-F


- k~4~*' -4~~'.


For more information about this Featured Home of the Week,
call the associates of Southern Sky Realty at 386-364-1576.


NICE BRIC K HOME onr11lAi..c- Tr,; Larlge 4
bed.Jor.'. I b~trh mchf- , .i I j r .C hLc r,, . palc ,,.u ;
be,.roo.rn;.. aind .At!-1,_.,_,r: .fc tried Ha. l3 j.arg tjml
rwr'.' u rid a *a I e.,aygi�c 'If 1-IIIiiiN ILS444 I' I 1
[r, , V,, . -ria'* r

-Mc ,. .iled .,,, HOM E .. (0%e

ruourn, ti'rmsilding r., ro..r.ii.trigrr rmvrIfaeplicc.
lofi & s pjc ,4I,]. kitchenr%%.IFh r,rnle-. a
appikar..-cz. rzr,niie cr~umerio~p%..huiif lk in %ri
& ti-J. qiufiiriumL'c~ated -in ..-ir -1 acre, -th. ,ih~e T.~
detjchad hu:p & iA. ~p-..rr $135.sZ'rNsiILSiI4'5111
C -all Keffle Sh
rtrimm~ed cui Poole Realty, Inc. 17
y'rit porch hal:. (386) 362-4539 or 13861208-3847
on 3 i cm. - II lot:,O a



In 'The

Buy I0sell Mrketplac

llit! it, 1,..
wj)5. 4i16.


2806 West US Highway 90
Suite 101, Lake City, FL 32055


~j~ii


HYPERLINK
"http://www.FloridaAcreage.com"


DANIEL RAPPS
Sagency.nc. 1-800-805-7566
(1) 5 ACRES - COLUMBIA COUNTY - If you are looking for a beautiful home and lush pasture
for your horse this is it. Located justf5 minutes outside Lake City this 4 BD, 3BA, home has too
many extras to list. A fenced pasture and a beautiful view compliment the rear of the property.
$309,000.
(2) 55 (+/-) SUWANNEE COUNTY - Country close to town and to Interstate 10. 15 acres of
established pasture a hardwood hammock and the balance in an old cultivated field suitable for
pasture, hay or crops $275,000.
(3) 674 ACRES - MADISON COUNTY - This tract has some cut over land, about 195 acres of
2001-planted sand pines and some beautiful hardwood hammocks surrounding the Sand Pond.
Ideal for deer and turkey hunting. Property is situated on a paved road about 5 miles south of an
interchange on Interstate 10. $3,200 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(4) 166 ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - Unique property located on a paved road, this
property would be ideal for someone that wants a private spot for their home site. Includes some
planted pines, some cut over land and natural hardwoods. $3,495 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(5) 43 (+/-) ACRES - COLUMBIA COUNTY - Land has frontage on a county paved road and is
located south of Lake City. Property has about 40 acres of 5-year-old planted slash pines and
has pine straw income potential. $4,500 per acre.
(6) 482 ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - TWO SPRINGS - That's right this property has two
springs located on the interior of the property that are not accessible to the public. The property
has paved & graded road frontage and is comprised of young planted slash pine and
hardwoods. It joins State owned property on one side. $4,500 per acre.
For more details about these properties or if you would like to receive our monthly
featured property list sent by e-mail, call BAYNARD WARD, CHUCK DAVIS or 8
KATRINA BLALOCK at (386) 755-9715. E-mail: ward@danielcraoDs.com


I .U

-* -
, J








rPAVI.F rfL MAvRCH1617I205I ORHILOIAIOCSI CAlIFEDMAKEPaCE-SRIGNRH ORDaN OT ERI


Lost & Found
FOUND-Black dog with four puppies.
If they belong to you or if you know of
someone that has lost these dogs,
please call 386-776-2746.




BUSINESS SERVICES
First Day
A & B Professional Fence Company
Fencing-Installation & Repairs
Wood/Chain Link/Farm Fence
Free Estimates 386-963-4861
Senior Citizen Discount




FINANCIAL SERVICES

Real Estate

Land for Sale-6.8 Acres. Live
Oak/Dowling Park. Beautifully
wooded. Just off paved CR 250.
Owner financing, no downpayment.
$560./mo. Total price $54,500. 352-
215-1018.

OWNER FINANCE
3BD/2BA DWMH w/family room
addition, on 1 acre. 7852 137th
Place, Live Oak, FL. 386-867-0048.
WANTED TO BUY
5 TO 10 ACRES
HIGH & DRY
PARTIALLY CLEARED
386-776-1266





PERSONAL SERVICES


Health Care
First Day
DIABETIC BREAKTHROUGH
You can beat diabetes!
Call (386) 935-0678
or 877-320-5455 (toll-free).
NEW MOTORIZED Wheelchairs,
Diabetic Supplies at "NO COST", if
eligible. Free Delivery! Medicare or
Private Insurance accepted. We
come to you! TLC Medical Supplies,
1-888-601-0641




EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
Music
First Day
FOR SALE 1000 Watt Memphis
Amp. & Four Rockford Fosqate
(sixes). $500.00 OBO. Call 386-984-
0521.




A PETST
LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072. M-F
from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Suwannee Valley Humane Society
The Suwannee Valley Humane
Society (a no kill shelter) and a
limited space shelter depends on
adoptions for availability of space.
Adoption fee of $45 includes
spay/neuter, deworming,
heartworm/feline (leukemia) testing
and rabies shot. Please visit the
shelter, the animals would love to
meet you. The shelter is located two
miles south of Lee in Madison
County, just of CR 255 on Bisbee
Loop. (Exit 262 off 1-10 or from US
90 turn onto CR 255, go south to
Bisbee Loop.) Call for directions. You
must check with them prior to
bringing a drop-off animal to the
shelter.
REMINDER: DO NOT LEAVE PETS
IN VEHICLES FOR ANY LENGTH
OF TIME DUE TO THE HEAT AND


HUMIDITY.
Visit the Suwannee Valley Humane
Society web-site and see the
animals that need a really good
home at geocities.com/suwanneehs.
Due to the generous gift of a new
building, we are now able to accept
donations of furniture ... and we now
have some nice pieces to sell.
WE REALLY CAN USE FURNITURE
DONATIONS!!!
Attention: If you have lost a pet or
found one, the humane society will
help you find your pet. Call 850-971-
9904 or toll-free at 866-236-7812.
Leave a message if we are closed,
we will return your call. They will do
what they can to help you find your
pet. Please check with your local
animal control if you have lost a pet.
LOST OR FOUND ANIMALS:
LOST DOG: BLACKIE - Large Black
German Shepherd. Healthy and
friendly. Lost in Live Oak on 152nd
Terrace.
LOST DOG: BANDIT - Solid white
Pyrenees,. male, 145 pounds, two
years old. Lost near 50th Street in
Live Oak.
These are just a few of the kittens
and cats, puppies and dogs
available. Featured animals for
adoption:
DOGS:
#2699 - DEZI - Nine week old,
female, chocolate and black. Now
here we have a lady who is frankly
looking for a place in a loving home.
Yours?
#2700 - DEMETREE - Three month
old, white, brown and black, male.
There is something about this puppy
that is irresistible! Come see for
yourself!
#2707 - JESSE - Eight week old,
male, red. Cold nose, warm heart
and bright shining eyes. Captivating.
#2708 - ROSCO - Eight week old,
brown and black, male. Pure love in
a wiggly little body. Would like a
chance to win your heart. Come on
out!
#2710 - PRECIOUS - Four month
old, white with black, female. This
plucky girl will cover you with kisses
and worm her way into your heart.
Many more beautiful puppies and
large dogs to choose from.
CATS:
#2635 - DORA -' One-and-a-half-year
old, grey, female. A playful shadow
with a heart of pure love. Would love

1..11


FOR RENT- -FOR RENT-
3BR, 2BA DWMH, Mobile Homes 2 BR, singlewide
CENTRAL H/A. and mobile home,


FIRST MONTH'S
RENT PLUS
DEPOSIT TO
MOVE IN.
WATER, SEWER
& GARBAGE
INCLUDED.
NO PETS
386-330-2567
133339-F


Land for sale.
Financed

by owner.

Ask for
Larry Olds.

386-362-2720

imml$]lBi


central H/A.
First month's
rent plus deposit
-to move in.
Water, sewer, &,
garbage included
No pets
386-330-2567 I


For more information about this Featured Home of the Week,
call the associates of Lighthouse Realty at 386-208-5394.


to meet you and capture your heart.
#2667 - ERMA - Six month old,
tabby, female. A stand-out in the
feline world. A sweet nature and a
bundle of personality, with purrs on
demand.
#2684 - ABE - Three year old,
orange, male. A dignified man of the,
world with an affectionate and loyal
personality. This is a cat to cherish.
#2709 - ONYX - One-and-a-half year
old, black, female. A slinky
enchantress who is delightful in
every way. Meet her and fall in love!
#2710 - FONZI - One year old silver
and tabby, male. Handsome as a lad
can be, this fine fellow will be a
graceful and loving addition to your
home.
Many more kittens and cats available
for adoption.
Please help care for the animals.
Visit our newly expanded thrift store.


-FOR RENT-
3BR, Singlewide

mobile home.
Central H/A.
First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
No pets.
386-330-2567
113 37l-


Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Closed Sunday and open by
appointment only on Monday. ALL
PROCEEDS SUPPORT THE
HUMANE SOCIETY.
The Suwannee Valley Humane
Society also recycles aluminum
cans. Take them to the shelter.
Recycle, recycle, recycle!
Please recycle newspapers for the
Suwannee Valley Humane Society.
The recycle dumpster is located at
305 Pinewood Dr. in Live Oak, next
to Johnson's Appliance Center. ALL
PROCEEDS SUPPORT THE
HUMANE SOCIETY.
Pets for Sale
FOR SALE American/Red Nose
Bulldog puppies. $125.00 ea. Have
shots, worming, health certificates &
exams. Call 386-776-1093.
FOR SALE Chihuahuas, AKC, M/F,
Cute & cuddly, Looking for happy
homes. $350.00. Call 386-776-2233.




AGRICULTURE




MERCHANDISE


You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Louise at

386-362-1734
134698DH-F


Miscellaneous
BEDS, Queen Orthopedic Pillow Top,
mattress, box. Name brand, with
warranty, new in plastic. $140.00.
Also new King size Pillow Top
mattress set, $200. Can delver. Call
229-630-7013




RECREATION
Selling due to Health. Two brand new
scooters, 2003 & 2004. Speeds up to
50 & 80 mph. Hates gas! Will take
best offer. Call 386-776-1867.
Boats/Supplies
AIRBOAT FOR SALE
14' Apache with 160hp
Lycoming motor, runs great,
new starter, new battery.
Priced to sell $3,500.
Call 386-938-1218




REAL ESTATE FOR RENT
Apartments
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal to
adverse "any preference limitation
"or discrmnai'jon" based onr TIrce,
color, religion, sex, disability, familial
status or national origin, or an
intention, to make any such
preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of 18
living . with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
dwellings advertised


in this




REALTY


529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax= (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990
Realtor Assoc. - M. Elizabeth Elliott, Evening 842-2372


(1) Lee, FL: 7.3 Acres on
US 90 near 1-10 with a 3/4
bedroom CH/AC home
containing approximately
1,750 sq. ft. under roof
together with a C.B.S.
Commercial Building
containing approximately
12,500 with 11,500 sq. ft. of
packing. $250,000.
(2) 169th Road: Five acres
in grass with a three
bedroom, two bath central
heat and air condition
doublewide mobile home in
excellent condition cont.
approx. 1,850 sq. ft. under
roof. Kitchen furnished
24'x36' detached garage &
shop, fenced. Good buy at
$105,000.
(3) 177th Drive: 3
Bedroom, 2 bath central
heat and air. Home
containing approximately
1,350 sq. ft. Kitchen
furnished 225'137 lot.
$72,000.
(4) (5) Off CR 51 S.W.: 20
acres wooded with large
oaks, and a 3BR/2BA,
CH/CA DWMH in
excellent condition, contact
office. 2000 sq. ft. under
roof, detached storage
$149,500.
(5) CR 249: 11.67 acres
with a three bedroom, two
bath central heat & air
condition brick home
containing approx. 1,500 sq.
ft. under roof, detached
storage (22x25 and 28x22)
good location $235,000.
(6) Harrell Heights: Check


out the new homes under
construction, three
bedroomni two bath, central
heat and air condition, city
sewer & water. 100%
financing to qualified
buyers will work for
S.H.I.P.
(7) Hunting Tract: 13 acres
+, wooded, Steinhatchee
Springs area, river access,
and Hwy. 51 access, recent
survey. $26,000.
(8) Five acres on paved
road: wooded, homes only.
Good area. Priced to sell at
$5,995 per acre.
(9) Camping Lot: One
acre riverview lot in the
Blue Springs area, river
access. $5,995.
(10) US 129: near Spirit
of Suwannee 1.4 ac +-
$10,000.
(11) Azalea Park: Three
bedroom, two bath, central
heat and air conditioned
home on two lots. Good
area. $69,900. Financing
available.
(12) Azalea Park: Three
bedroom, two bath, central
heat & air condition home,
priced to sell @ $60,000.
Financing available.
(13) US 90 West & 1-10:
32 Acres, zoned C.H.I.,
corner tract, will divide.
(14) Old Sugar Mill
Farm: Nicffre tract
on pa 0 Pa 2001
CH&XIrwT i e home,
kitchen furnished. 12x20
storage building. Good
area. $67,500.
146187-F


to Subscribe?


La.,,


I SC. uliva Aen


The Suwannee Democrat, The

Jasper News, The Mayo Free

Press and The Branford News is

online, so it's easier than every

to stay informed.


I


I


PAGE 2D. MARCH 16-17,2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


E CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


low 4


96@


V@A


?M�6W4


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il







NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - MARCH 16-17, 2005, PAGE 3D


N CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


You are just a call away... call 1-800-525-4182, ext. 102 to place your ad * FAX 386-364-5578


Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. *You are just a click away... find the classified marketplace online at www.nflaonline.com


ANNOUNCEMENTS



EMPLOYMENT




BUSINESS SERVICES




FINANCIAL SERVICES


We Will Help You

GAIN EXTRA ATTENTION
To Your Classified Ad On
MERCHANDISE The First Day It Runs!
With the _ES r


PERSONAL SERVICES RECREATION Logo in the Classified Marketplace


EDUCATIONAL SERVICES RENT -l
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES REAL ESTATE FOR RENT I W� 'y AL Us


J PETS




AGRICULTURE


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE




TRANSPORTATION


,u ray-r-


To Place Your Ad
Monday through Friday by calling 386-362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182, faxing to 386-364-5578 or mailing to:
Classified Marketplace, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064



WI AlCCErP I. Money Orders * Personal Checks


S-


Your Classified Ad can

appear in 5 paid

newspapers:

The Suwannee Democrat

on both Wed. & Fri.,

PR the Jasper News,

\ The Branford News &

The Mayo Free Press on

Thursday; a total of

15,200 issues weekly!
Increase your promotional reach and tap into
potential new markets... Ask about placing your
advertising message into: The Valdosta Daily
Times, The Thomasville Times-Enterprise; The
Lowndes Edition-Mailbox Post; The Thomas
County Buyer's Guide; or a network of over 20
other publications, serving over 30 counties; with
over 20,000 readers in South Georgia.
Ask about our
"Service Directory" rates


-iUmUZWM

FLORIDA (386) 208 Live Oak *294 Mayo *303
White Springs * 362, 364 Live Oak * 397 White
Springs 454 High Springs 497 Fort White 658
Dowling Park 752, 755,758 Lake City 776
Luraville * 792 Jasper 842 Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch (Live Oak) 935 Branford ' 938 Jennings
, 961 Lake City 963 Welborn 965 Lake City
GEORGIA (229) 219 Valdosta * 224,225,226,
227,228 Thomasville 241,242,244,245,247,
249,251,253,257,259 Valdosla 263 Quitman '
268 Vienna 268 Lilly * 271, 273 Cordele * 282,
283, 285,287 Waycross * 293 Valdosta * 324 Berlin
* 333 Valdosta o 345 Nicholls * 346 Coolidge* 359
Ambrose * 362 Milan * 363 Lumber City 365
Rochelle * 367 Baxley * 375 Hazelhurst * 377, 378
Cairo 381 Douglas * 382 Titon 383, 384
Douglas. 385 Rhine - .386,387 Tillon 389, 393
Douglas � 422 Pearson 423,424 Filzgerald * 433
Byromville 449 Blackshear 455 Ray City * 467
Abbeville * 468 Ocilla *472 Monlezuma 472
Oglethorpe * 482 Lakeland * 487 Homerville * 498
Boston * 528 Omega 532 Alapaha 533 Enigma
534 Willacoochee * 535 Warwick � 546 Lenox
* 549 Sparks * 559 Lake Park *567 Ashburn *574
Ocklochnee * 594 Uvalda * 624 Pineview*627
Unadilla* 632 Alma * 637 Fargo 643 Rebecca
* 648 Pitts *649 Buena Vista * 683 Meigs *686
Nashville *735 Barwick * 762 Whigham 769
Norman Park 775 Morven* 776 Sylvester 782
Doerun * 794 Hahira * 824 Plains * 831 winville
S833 Jacksonville 6 846 Smithville * 853 Cobb *
859 Pavo 863 Blackshear * 868 McRae * 873
Moultrie * 874 Leslie 887 Richland 890,891
Moultrie * 896 Adel * 899 Moultrie* 924,928
Americus * 929 Pineta 938 Jennings *941
Funston * 973 Madison -985 Moultrie -


n nfeature.orA For Wednesday Publication 11 a.m.,
ur ad wth a border L U Friday (prior),
only $O.SO U ln For Friday Publication, 11 a.m.,
'W e re erhI Ht O t I a c la or1 1 Op ti on W e d n e s d a y (p r io r).
We reserve the right to cancel any special offer or promotion in the Classified Marketplace upon a 30-day notice'nti


newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain of
discrimination call HUD toll-free 1-
800-669-9777. The toll-free number
for the hearing impaired is 1-800-
927-9275


Houses for Rent
First Day
Large House for rent in Jennings, FL.
4BD/2BA. $700./mo plus 1st & last &
deposit. No pets in house. Call 386-
938-4610 or 386-938-2529.
First Day
Three BD/One BA home with CH&A.
In Town (Live Oak, FL). Nice lot,
porch, carport. $550./mo plus 1st,
last, & sec. dep. No pets. References
& lease required. Call 386-330-5274.
Mobile Homes for rent
FOR RENT: 2 Bedroom Mobile
Home. $350.00 plus deposit. NO
PETS! Call 386-362-1171.

Classifieds

Work!

Call Louise at

386-362-1734

to place your

ad today!


Vacation Rentals




" * - , . . .. ... l ; ',-_


North Carolina. Easy access, great
view, 10 min to Maggie Valley, 30 min
to Cherokee, 2 min to Parkway,
Mountain Stream with picnic area,
Fireplace, Sleeps 10. All Amenities.
$500/wk, $1600/mo. (386) 330-4207
Lucy




REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Mobile Homes
First Day
Big sale. 32X80 Fleetwood, 4+2 with
living room and den. Set up and
delivery for only $49,995.00.Call
Mike: 1-352-378-6024.
First Day
Brand new Fleetwood, 16X80, 2+2
or' 3+2, set up and delivery for
$28,995.00. Call Mike : 352-373-
5428.
First Day
Fleetwood, 28X52, 3+2, loaded very
nice. Includes setup, a/c, skirting,
and two mini decks for only
$36,995.00. Call Mike: 1-352-373-
5428.
FOR SALE- 1980 Homette Mobile
Home w/669 sq. ft. & a 1980 Crowe
Mobile Home w/905 sq. ft. You move
to your lot. Asking $5,000.00 each.
Call 386-658-5291.


First Day
Must sell, never titled, 32' wide
Fleetwood. All manufactured
warranties applied includes setup
and delivery for only $39,995.00. Call
Mike: 352-376-1008.

Lots
FIVE, TEN AND TWENTY ACRE
LOTS with well & septic. Owner
financing. Call 386-752-4339.
www.deasbullardbkl.com






EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted


CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
needed, two (2) years experience
required Drug Free Work Place.
Call (386) 294-3411.


S.E. Regional Drivers







DAVIS EXPRESS
Hwy. 301 S.
Starke, FL
is looking for drivers to run SE.
Requires Class A CDL w/hazmat.

-$500.00 Sign-on Bonus
-98% miles in FL, GA, TN, S.C.,
& Alabama
-Start up to .36 cpm with 3 yrs.
experience
-100% Lumper Reimbursement
-Safety bonus
-Guaranteed sometime
-Health, Life, Dental, & Disability
Insurance
-401 K Available

Call 1-800-874-4270 #6
www.davis-express.com

First Day
FIBERGLASS/GELCOTE
FINISHERS
Experience preferred but not
required. Apply in person M-F 8am at
Baha Cruiser Boats in Mayo, FL.


First Day
Accounting Instructor
NORTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE

ACCOUNTING INSTRUCTOR
needed at North Florida
Community College, Madison, FL.
Master's degree in accounting with
18 graduate hours in additional
discipline preferred. Experience in
use of technology in classroom
highly desirable. Duties: Teach 15
credit-hours each semester in
accounting and other qualified
area. Candidates chosen for
interview will give sample
presentation utilizing instructional
technology. Duties commence
8/1/2005.
Position also requires having
established office hours,
participating in department and
College activities. Teaching may be
night and/or dual enrollment
courses on NFCC campus and/or
at satellite locations.
Applications to:
Director HR,
North Florida Community College,
1000 Turner Davis Drive,
Madison, Florida 32340.

Only complete application packets
considered: letter of interest;
resume and application; copy of
transcripts (unofficial okay).
Application available at:
www.nfcc.edu
Questions call 850-973-9487
Application packet must be
received by 03/25/2005. (Deadline
extended). EOE


First Day
Avalon Healthcare Center
is currently accepting applications
for the following positions:
CNA
3/11 and 11 p/7a shifts available

Competitive Salary.
Shift and Weekend Differential.

Please apply at Avalon Healthcare
and Rehabilitation Center, Selena
Cameron-Young.

1270 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City,. Florida 32025
(386) 752-7900
DFWP/EOE


First Day
Area Foreman Maintenance
PCS PHOSPHATE
WHITE SPRINGS, FL
is seeking a candidate for position
of Area Foreman Maintenance to
be filled by April 8, 2005. This
position reports to the
Superintendent Mechanical
Maintenance.

Experienced supervisor of
mechanical maintenance crew in
industrial or chemical facilities. The
individual must be a dynamic self-
starter who has the ability to
handle multiple work priorities,
tasks and planning in a safe and
productive, manner. Effective
communication . skills with
subordinates, peers and superiors
are required. The individual must
be a good steward of the resources
and equipment provided. Personal
and professional references will be
needed and checked. Preferred
varied experience with the
maintenance, fabrication and
operation of pumps, vessels,
piping, valves, conveyors, and
other process equipment.

An attractive salary/benefit
package accompanies this
position. For confidential
consideration, forward your
resume, with salary history to:

PCS Phosphate-White Springs
ATTN: Human Resources
P. . Box 300
White Springs, FL 32096

PCS Phosphate - White Springs is
engaged in phosphate-mining and
manufacturing of fertilizer and
animal feed products in Hamilton
County, Florida. The operation is a
subsidiary of Potash Corp., the
world's largest integrated producer
of basic plant and animal nutrients.



CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANTS
Day Shift Openings
Call Amelia Tompkins
At 386-362-7860
Or apply at
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston Street
Live Oak, FL 32064
EOE/D/V/M/F


First Day
CNA
Professional & Skilled CNA
for private In-home care.
Excellent Pay.
For more info. Call 386-688-0547.
Serious Inquiries Only
CUSTOMER SERVICE REP.
Career opportunity in
a sales/service environment
available for qualified individual
with a strong work ethic and
dedication to the job.
Min. 3 years Customer Service
exp. in a fast paced
working environment.
Must enjoy working
'with people.
Computer Daia Eniry
? .ol'l required ,a well as
Windows proficiency
Minimum 50 wpm.
No phone calls, please.
Resumes Att: Joy
ws4140@earthlink.net

Customer Service/Sales Position
available. Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Outgoing, friendly personality
required. Call Lisa @ Howell's
Office Supply, 386-362-4406 or
apply in person.

First Day
Driver-O/O and Company
Great Opportunities!
HOME WEEKLY!
Excellent compensation packages!
Class A CDL w/HazMat & 1 yr.
Exp.
1-800-299-4744
www.arnoldtrans.com
Driver/Laborer
Waste Management, Inc.
Lake City/Gainesville
Has an immediate opening for a
hard working, flexible individual to
fill the position of Driver/Laborer
for Lake City and Gainesville. This
position requires a minimum Class
B CDL with air brake endorsement.
Waste Management offers a full
benefits package including health
insurance and 401-K plan. If you feel
you meet the requirements, please
apply by phone
1-877-220-JOBS (5627)
or online at
WWW.WMCAREERS.COM
EOE/ADA/DFWP


Accepting Applications 1
ood, bad and no credit.
li for Ist & 2nd mortgages. l
established full service co. V W W W


WE BUY MORTGAGES.
(R )0) 226-6044
,622 NW 43rd St. Suite A-1
Licensed Mtg. Lender


R FOR

HUD Vouchers Welcome
,2 & 3 BR HC & Non-HC
Accessible Apartments


705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housing Opportunity


FOR

Rental Assistance
1, 2,3, & 4 BR HC & Non-
HC Accessible Apartmrnents

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY 711
tEqual Housing Opportunity -h


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living 2
bedroom duplex. Call
362-3110.
128545JS-F


Retired
Telephone
Man
will do telephone
installation, repair,
TV Cable installation,
& phone wiring,
jacks and repairs
or other small jobs. 5
Call Tom @
658-2611. '


General General
IGOOD UY , CASH- s ..SH '" IM MMEDIA




HOW TO WRITE A CLASSIFIED AS

8 Simple Steps to Creating a Classified Ad That Sells:


What do you have to offer? Start your
advertisement by naming the item or service
you are presenting.

Are you being clear? Complete, concise
information will encourage a quick response
from readers.

Can the reader reach you? Be sure to include
your telephone number or address.
If necessary, list a preferred time to have
potential buyers contact you.
Are you giving your ad enough exposure?
Consecutive publication of your ad will
generate the greatest amount of reader
attention. Generally, a 15-day run time is the
best and most cost-effective arrangement.

What's the best part of your offer? Identify
and write about the most beneficial feature
of the product or service you are advertising.


Have you covered all of your bases? Make
sure you are providing sufficient information
about the merchandise or service you are
offering, including the price! Does the reader
know what you are selling, why they should
buy it and how they can contact you for more
information?out the most beneficial feature of
the product or service you are advertising.

How can you reach the greatest number of
prospective buyers? Place your classified ad
with The Classified Marketplace.

Call 1-800-525-4112 today!



, BUSINESS IS
' . ... BOOMING
.,."'O'"' ' DEPARTMENT S.C'HEULN

.^SS" m, . , ,.lt ,, ,, .... IM ,. ftn ,,u M tM, . ,,-,., , .;t."nw .'r. , *:, mt


CaE
E







PAGE 4D, MARCH 16-17, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS 0 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


362-1734 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE 1-800-525-4182

First Day First Da _____First Da WANTED!!! New Beginnings Credit Program o
First Day irst ay First Day ASSISTANT Buy Here, Pay Here will put you in


DRIVERS- Home EVERY Weekend!
Start up to 40cpm. Great Benefits
/Equipment! Multiple .Insurance
Choices. Dedicated Runs Available;
CLASS-A 800-992-7863 ext. 126
First Day
DRIVERS- W-2 LOOKS BAD? We
cure bad W-2's. It's all about the
money. Is yours enough? CDL-A 6
months T/T expereince. Call Sunday
or anytime 800-893-6791.
farm help
HELP WANTED
Knowledge of tractor and equipment
is a must. Call 386-330-2567 to
enquire. Drug Free Work Place.

Food Service
COUNTRY KITCHENS
Now hiring, all positions open.
Call 850-971-0024.

Front Office
People & detail oriented, basic math
& spelling skills, pleasant phone
voice a must. FT/PT day/eve. Apply

SPIRIT OF THE SUWANNEE
PARK OFFICE
between 2pm-4pm
Hwy 129 N. of Live Oak, FL
E.O.E.

Housekeeping
Laundry & Bathhouse Attendant
needed 20-40 hours per week.
Some unit cleaning. Apply @
SPIRIT OF THE SUWANNEE PARK
between 2pm-4pm
Hwy 129 N. of Live Oak, FL
E.O.E.
Paramedic
Lafayette County EMS is seeking a
full time Paramedic or EMT-B. (Either
may apply). Benefits include health
insurance, dental insurance option,
FRS, vacation and sick allowance.
Applicant must be certified with the
State .of Florida and have a good
driving record. Please submit an
application to John Bell, Lafayette
Co. Courthouse, 386-294-4178 or at
the EMS station. Deadline for
applications will be March 31, 2005.


S Includes
52 D Shampoo
0U &Style
It's a new method of cutting and
shaping that makes hair grow
thicker. Gives great body,
thickness and vitality, your hair will
stay in place. The "CARVED CUT'
actually eliminates permanent
waving for three out of five
women, makes teasing almost
unnecessary. Results: A perfectly
balanced, contoured cut -
regardless of style choice will stay
in place. Try it now...and enjoy the.
:eaury ui iveIy 3rnd wie t'el e hair
117 . Central Ave.,
S Jape3r, FL
atno& V ., 792-3056


LPN, 10pm-6am and PRN Position
Seeking individual for fulltime
position. Shift differential. Must like
being a hands-on leader. Must have
history of being able to function at
high level with minimal direction, and
excellent attendance. Also, seeking
person with flexibility to assist to
cover the scheduled days off of
fulltime staff and for call in
assistance. Must have history of
excellent attendance. Contact Lyn
Shine. Lafayette Health Care Center,
512 W. Main St., Mayo, FL. 386-294-
3300.

WANT A NEW CAREER?
Will train for security officer license.
Call Jim Tucker @ 386-364-7780
or Joe Peavey @ 850-929-4747.


First Day
TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED (CDL)
Must be Drug Free, Dependable &
have 3 years Exp. Hauling Pine
Straw & Misc. Freight. Call (386) 935-
2773 or Fax Resume (386) 935-6838
(FL)

WANTED! WANTED!
WANTED!
HARDWORKERS ONLY
NEED APPLY ALL SHIFTS
MUST BE ABLE TO LIFT
50LBS-70LBS
(386) 755-1991
� WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
BACKGRD/DRUG SCREEN REQ.

maintenance
HELP WANTED maintenance man
with knowledge of plumbing, electric
and carpentry. Tools required.
Transportation a must. Drug free
workplace. Call (386) 330-2567

MECHANIC
W. B. HOWLAND CO. INC.
Mechanic w/ diesel engine and
hydraulic experience needed
@ W.B. Howland Company.
Full time position with excellent
benefits package. Apply in person
@ Howlands corner of Walker &
11th St. or call (386) 362-1235.


HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT







Bulldozers, Backhoes, Loaders,
Dump Trucks, Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Next Class: March 28th
-N.ation.al Certir :,lion.
-Fnanc,.l A.,-i-'arte
.l._h Pi , -,. e.- ,
800-383-7364
Associated Training Services o
www.atsn-schools.com .


Medical Positions
The following positions are
available with Meridian
Behavioral Healthcare:

Counselor II:
FT Lake City
Counselor III:
F/T Lake City
Counselor IV/Sr. Clin'n:
Outpatient Adults/Child'n, FT
G'ville,
Lake City, Jasper, Lake Butler &
Starke
Add Specialist:
MIST & Adult Programs-
FT/PT G'ville & PRN Lake City
Children's Welfare Supervisor:
FT Starke
Adult Case Manager:
FT G'ville
Emergency Svcs Intake
Evaluator:
FT G'ville, Lake City
Program Director, Acute Care
FT G'ville
Sr. Client Relations Specialist:
PT Lake City
Comp Assessor:
PRN G'ville, Lake City
Staff Psychiatrist:
FT G'ville
RN:
FT G'ville & Lake City
LPN:
FT/PRN G'ville & Lake City
Psych Tech: ,
PRN G'ville & Lake City
Family Support Worker:
FT G'ville
Driver:
FT G'ville

Excellent benefits. For details visit
www.meridian-healthcare.org or call
(352) 374-5600 ext. 8277. Send
resumes to Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare, Inc., Human
Resources, 4300 SW 13th St.,
Gainesville, FL 32608, fax (352)
374-5608. EOE, DFWP.


Prep/Cook, skilled. PT-hourly, for
high volume kitchen. Opportunity for
advancement. Must work at a fast
pace & have the ability to multi-task.
A great place to work! Call Camp
Weed @ 386-364-5250.

Restaurant Mgmt.
Asst. Mgr. for Night Shift:
3pm-10:30pm
Starting Salary: $7.00 per hour
Qualifications: Must be at least 18
years old, have your own
transportation, willing to work and
learn, be enthusiastic, able to work
with public, must be responsible
enough to supervise other
employees. A high school.diploma or
GED is preferred. Previous mgmt. or
supervisory skills would be a plus,
but not necessary. Valid driver's
license required.
Send a completed resume to:
Restaurant Mgmt.
6468 57th Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32060
SALES POSITION
MUST HAVE STRONG SALES
EXPERIENCE
PLEASE CALL FOR APPT.
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DRUGSCREEN & BACKGRD REQ.

Security officers needed.
YARBOROUGH CORPORATION
Must have State security license.
Call Jim Tucker 386-364-7780 or Joe
Peavy 850-929-4747.


MUSGROVE
CONSTRUCTION INC.
Has an immediate opening for
experienced mechanic. Hydraulic
knowledge a plus. Must have own
hand tools. Call 386-362-7048 or
come by the office of Musgrove
Construction, 8708 US 90 Live
Oak. Drug Free Workplace.


fi n Buy Sell



ilt it! it!


In The
Classified
Marketplace

ir Troe C ?o.siiI,.J
l.,'9etplc ae.
C.311 u. ,3
- 1... . - '. ':- . ,


I. "-",. ,- ". ' "' 1
S RVIC s A S
:z AA A -E


EXPERIENCED WITH
TILE AND MARBLE
MUST BE ABLE TO LIFT
UP TO 70 LBS.
NON-SMOKER
PLEASE CALL FOR APPT.
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DRUGSCREEN & BACKGRD REQ.





TRANSPORTATION


Autos for Sale
Cadillac Catera, 1998, Excellent
Condition. Must see! $6,500.00. Call
386-362-7237 or 386-697-9385.
Ford Mustang, 2004, 40th
anniversary edition, only 14,000
miles, power seats and windows,
power steering tinted windows, ac/cd
$16,500 Call 386-362-7652
New Beginnings Credit Program or
Buy Here, Pay Here will have you in
this 2000 Ford Contour today. Call
local 386-590-6151 for details.
Pontiac Firebird, 2002. Good, clean
car. T-tops, rear spoiler, good miles.
Shaky credit or no money down?
Call local 386-867-0694.
First Day
Saturn, LW300 Wagon, 2002. Runs
good, looks good. Very good
condition, like new! $18,000.00 OBO.
Call 850-971-5465.
TAKE OVER PAYMENTS of $450.00
per month on a 2004 Chevy Max.
DVD, leather, sunroof, skid control,
XM satellite radio, 38 MPG. Call 386-
362-1734 ext. 107.
Toyota Celica GTS, 2000, nice car.
Ask for the OK Deal. Shaky Credit or
no money down? Call local 386-867-
0694.

TruQks for Sale
Choice of Trucks: Ford F150 XLT,
2WD or 4WD 2002 nice trucks. If you
have been on your job for one year &
have a phone, come pick out your
truck! Shaky credit or no money
down. Ask for the OK Deal. Call 386-
867-0694.
New Beginnings Credit Program or
Buy Here, Pay Here has this 2002
Ford F150 regular cab, 5-speed. Call
local 386-590-6151 for details.

Utility
For Sale Ford Explorer Sport 2001,
or Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo.
Both are nice SUVs with nice miles.
Many happy trouble free miles. Your
choice, ask for the OK Deal. Shaky
credit or no money down? Call local
386-867-0694.
First Day
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 1993,
2nd owner, 133k, dark green, good
cond everything works limited
r',,:,del wilh leaner inler,.:r arid cd
player, located dowling park, $3900.
386-658-2380


this 1999 Ford Explorer, 4-dr, loaded.
Call local 386-590-6151 for details.

Vans for Sale
Family vehicle. Ford Windstar, 2002,
minivan, clean cold AC. Shaky credit
or no money down? Ask for the OK
Deal. Call local 386-867-0694.
FOR SALE- 2001 Pontiac Montana
Van. Extended model-seats seven.
65K miles. In great condition, silver in
color. $12,000.00 firm. Call 386-294-
1722, if no ans., leave msg.


- 4
: . _- '; . -: .. . . " -







FOR SALE-1998 DODGE RAM
2500
8 Passenger Van. 75,300 miles-V8.
A/C, AM/FM/Cassette Radio,
Automatic Transmission, Captain's
chairs-2 removable bench seats,
cruise control, power brakes, mirrors,
steering & windows. $7,895.00 OBO.
Contact Dean Papapetrou @ 386-
362-7955 or 386-208-9864.

Ford Van, Club Wagon XLT, 1989. 5L
*V8 engine, 136,500 mi., Captain
chairs, bench/bed. No rust-excellent
body & interior. Runs well. $2,900.00.
Call (386) 364-6952.
New Beginnings Credit Program or
Buy Here, Pay Here has a 1999 Ford
Windstar Van. Could be yours! Call
local 386-590-6151 for details.

Accessories/Parts
FOR SALE Four 15" Chrome Rims.
Used for 2 months. Paid $1,000.00.'
Asking $700.00. Call 386-590-6357.
First Day
FOR SALE-.Large Car-top luggage
carrier. $50.00. Call 386-364-2824.

Motorcycles
Honda Shadow Ace 750, 2002,
excellent condition. Black with lots of
chrome. Only 2,200 miles. $4,500.00
OBO. Call 386-362-1849 between
5pm-9pm.

Find It, Buy it

and Sell it

in the

Classified

Marketplace

Call Louise at

386-362-1734

to place your

ad today!


Announcements


Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read DIANETICS by Ron
L. Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send $7.99 to Dianetics,
3102 N. Habana Ave., Tampa FL 33607.


Auctions


LAND & GROVE AUCTION! Lake Placid, FL 11AM, Sat
Mar 26 443.9+/- Total Acres 3 Tracts Offered in 16 Parcels.
Preview: 1-5PM, Sat. March 19 Call for details:
(800)257-4161 Higgenbotham Auctioneers
www.hignenbotham.com ME Higgenbotham, CAI FL Lic
#AU305/AB158.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ Buy Direct From
Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock with all Accessories. Quick
turn around! Delivery Available Toll Free (888)393-0335.


Business Opportunities


INCREDIBLE OPPORTUNITY!!! Looking for a few
exceptional people to make an above average income.
Call (800)489-8930.

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/day? 30
Machines, Free Candy All for $9,995. (800)814-6323
B02000033. CALL US: We will not be undersold!

$$$$$ Weekly Use eBay to get Paid. Get $250 in FREE
products to Start No Inventory Required No Experience
Required Call OnlineSupplier (800)940-4948 Ext. 5314.

. #1 CASH COW! 90 Vending Machine Hd. You approve
Loc's-$10,670 (800)836-3464 #B02428.


Financial


.$ CASH ADVANCES $ Personal Injury Lawsuits-Struc-
tured Settlements- Annuities-Pensions-Inheritances-Lottery-
Prize Winnings-We Buy Mortgage, Real Estate, Business
notes. Se Habla Espanol. Jerry (866)767-2270.

Loans by phone. Up to $1000 in 24hrs. No Credit Check!
Bank Account Req. (888)350-3722 www.paychecktoday.com.


For Sale


STEEL BUILDINGS - EZ BUILD AISC Certification -
Office/Warehouse, Shop/Garage, Arena/Barn, Hangers. A
plant near you! Will beat any price or $205. (800)993-4660,
www.universalsteel.com.

Help Wanted

Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay &
Benefits for Experienced Drivers, 0/0, Solos, Teams &
Graduate Students. Bonuses Paid Weekly. Equal
Opportunity Employer. (888)MORE PAY (888-667-3729).

Drivers- Owner Ops & Co. Drivers Needed Now! Run SE
Only or SE, Mid-Atl, MW Regional, 0/0's -No Forced
Dispatch, Good Pay plus Fuel (866)250-4292.

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS PT/FT no exp
necessary $50 Cash hiring bonus Guaranteed in writing
(888)318-1638 ext 107 www.USMailingGroup.com.

POSTAL POSITIONS AVAILABLE!! Federal, State,
Local. $14.00-$48.00+hr. No Experience necessary. Paid
Training and Full Benefits. Entry Levels. Call 7 days for
information. (888)826-2513 ext. 111.


UP TO $4,000 WEEKLY!! Exciting Weekly Paycheck!
Written Guarantee! 11 Year Nationwide Company Now
Hiring! Easy Work, Sending Out Our Simple One Page
Brochure! Free Postage, Supplies! Awesome Bonuses!!
FREE INFORMATION, CALL NOW!!
(800)242-0363 Ext. 3800.


Legal Services


DIVORCE$175-$275*COVERS children, etc. Only one,
signature required! *Excludes govt. fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-2000, ext.600. (8am-7pm) Divorce Tech.
. Established 1977.


Miscellaneous


FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT SYSTEM includes standard
installation. 2 MONTHS FREE 50+ Premium Channels.
Access to over 225 channels! Limited time offer. S&H.
Restrictions Apply. (866)500-4056.

EARN DEGREE online from home. *Business, *Parale-
gal, *Computers. Job Placement Assistance. Computer &
Financial aid if qualify. (866)858-2121
www.tidewatertechonline.com..

SPA! Overstocked! New 7 person spa-Loaded! Includes
cover, delivery & warranty. $2999, was $5999.
(888)397-3529.


Real Estate


BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. WINTER SEASON
IS HERE! MUST SEE THE BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL
MOUNTAINS OF WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS. Homes,
Cabins, Acreage & Investments. Cherokee Mountain
Realty GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
www.cherokeemountainrealty.com Call for Free Brochure
(800)841-5868.

LAND WANTED Land Investment company seeks large
. acreage in Florida and Georgia. Interested in waterfront,
timber, and agricultural lands. Must have road frontage or
good access. Cash buyer with quick closings.
Call (877)426-2326 or e-mail: landyetiveg@aol.com.

ATTENTION INVESTORS: Waterfront lots in the Foot-
hills of NC. Deep water lake with 90 miles of shoreline. 20%
redevelopment discounts and 90% financing. NO PAY-
MENTS for 1: year. Call now for best selection.
www.nclakefrontproperties.com (800)709-LAKE.

40 AC w/creek near Peace River. 1/2 pasture; 1/2 pines. Street
ends at preserve. Power, well; 3400 sq. ft. house foundation
and kit house, ready to go. $485,000 (239)340-0501.

FREE LAND LIST- NC MOUNTAINS- Custom built log
homes, river frontage and beautiful secluded land off Blue
Ridge Parkway. Call now. (800)455-1981, ext. 133.

FORECLOSED GOV'T HOMES $0 or Low down! Tax
repos and bankruptcies! No Credit O.K. $0 to low down. For
listings (800)501-1777 ext. 1299.

Grand Opening Land Sale! SO. FLORIDA 10+ ACRES
Only $294,900. Huge savings on big ranch acreage in South
Florida! Gorgeous mix of mature oaks, palms, & pasture.
Miles of bridle paths. Near Lake Okeechobee. Quiet,
secluded, yet close to 1-95 & coast. Also, 5 acres $174,900.
Great financing, little down. Call now. (866)352-2249 x379.

LAKE VIEW BARGAIN $29,900. Free boat slip! High
elevation beautifully wooded parcel. Across from national
forest on 35,000 acre recreational lake in TN. Paved roads,
u/g utils, central water, sewer, more. Excellent financing.
Call now (800)704-3154, ext. 609. Sunset Bay, LLC.


COASTAL NORTH CAROLINA. Phase I sold out. Now
offering new homesites in Phase It at Shine Landing, a gated
waterfront community. Be a proud owner in this upscale
community with boating access to the Neuse River, Pamlico
Sound and Atlantic Ocean, plus clubhouse, fitness center,
tennis, swimming pool and private marina. Homesites as low
as $29,900. Financing available. Coastal Marketing &
Development Company, New Bern, NC (800)566-5263,
www,shinelanding.com.

NORTH CAROLINA LAKEFRONT ONLY $39,900.
Great All Sports lake to fish, boat, swim or just relax. Call
for details, MLC (866)920-5263.

COASTAL GEORGIA- GATED COMMUNITY Large
wooded water access and marshfront homesites. Ancient Live
oaks, pool, tennis, golf. Water access. From $64,900.
Pre-construction discounts, www.cooperspoint.com
(877)266-7376.

SERENE MOUNTAIN GOLF HOMESITE $208.03/
MO. Upscale Golf Community set amid Dye designed
18 hole course in Carolina Mountains. Breathtaking views.
Near Asheville NC. A sanctioned Golf Digest Teaching
Facility! Call toll-free (866)334-3253 ext 832
www.cherokeevalleysc.com Price: $59,900, 10% down,
balance financed 12 months at 4.24% fixed, one year balloon,
OAC.

Lake View Bargain! 2 Acres $19,900. New waterfront
community on one of largest, cleanest, mountain lakes in
America! Hardwoods, views, common area w/ beach!
Country road, water, utilities. Low financing. Lakefront
available. Call (800)564-5092 x96.


RVs/Campers


ST. PATTY'S RV SALE! March 17th-20th. Nation's #1
Selling RV's! Low Sale Prices! Giant Recreation World
*Melbourne- (800)700-1021. *Orlando- (800)654-8475.
*Daytona- (800)893-2552. www.grwrvocom.


, Steel Buildings


PIONEER BUILDING SALE! "Rock Bottom Prices!"
Beat Next Price Increase. Go direct/save. 20x26. 25x30.
30x40 30x44. 35x50. 40x60. 45x90. 50x100. 60x180.
Others. Pioneer (800)668-5422.

STEEL BUILDINGS. Factory Deals * Save $$$. 40 x 60'
to 100 x 200'. Example: 50 x 100 x 12' = $3.60/sq ft.
(800)658-2885 www.rigidbuilding.com.

Steel Arch Buildings! Genuine SteelMaster� Buildings,
factory direct at HUGE Savings! 20x24, 30x60, 35x50.
Perfect Garage/Workshop/Barn. Call (800)341-7007.
www.SteelMasterUSA.com.

Your Ad Could Be Here

ONE CALL STANDS BETWEEN YOUR BUSINESS
and millions of potential customers. Place your advertise-
ment in the FL Classified Advertising Network. For $450
your ad will be placed in over 150 papers. Check out our 2x2
and 2x4 display network too! Call this paper, or Heather Mola,
FL Statewide Network Director at (866)742-1373, or e-mail
hmola@flpress.com for more information. (Out of State
placement is also available.) Visit us online at
www.flori.I f ,Id,',Iled': �.m




FCAN


Week of March 14, 2005
S133320-F


Career Opportunities


FORTUNE 500 COMPANIES

LOOKING FOR REPS IN THIS AREA

To see if you qualify
Attend a 30 min. free seminar
March 18 - 7:00 p.m.
Location:
Quality Inn, Hwy. 90 W.
Lake City, FL

Please present this ad at door 149151JRS-F







NO EX PEIRIENC E!

MALE & FEMALE












WE WILL TEACH YOU HOW TO SELL CARS
& MAKE BIG $$$$!
EARN FROM *42,000 - *68,000
Most dealers do not offer PROFESSIONAL training but we
believe that the true professionals will sell more cars, make
more money, and take better car of our.customers.
YES, NO EXPERIENCE!

WE OFFER:

EXCITING TRAINING PROGRAM

5 DAY WORK WEEK!

HEALTH & DENTAL PLAN!

PAID VACATION!

SUPER OPPORTUNITY TO ADVANCE!




Jeff Mosley, 6 U
Sales Manager R
G US 90 WEST 362-4012
LIVEOAK, FL 362.4012
S % Service Department Hours: Mon.-Fri 8-5:30
nParlvs&S erslnn * m ieN


. -- W A A N 0 _g - YL �qNo 4 R4 -0 r 4 - 4 4


i-_ -- ^ * -^ ^


)r








These local businesses are here to take good care of you.


Trees. Trimmed or Removed * Fire\\ ood
Licensed & Insured * Free Estimates

TREE WORK
Bucket Truck I, nd Climibil,';

963-5026


SMetal Roofing
Quail Meal Roohng & Accessores At Discount Prices"


j L I'd, paintej
itIe5- 1


Cut to N our desited length-.!
*Deli~erN Servkie A~ailable
4k Aout c'ureel t'uildrinos


Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg. Inc.
CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-393-0335


DUNCAN TIRE & AUTO
"Complete One Stop Service For Your Vehicle "
Alignment Specialists


24 HOUR TOWING
&362-4743 1-888-362-2568
422 E. HOWARD ST. * LIVE OAK PLAZA
LEN A. DUNCAN


LITVE OAK

MINI STORAGE
* 5x15 * 5x20 * 10x15 * 10x20
CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE
5x5 * 5x10 *10x10 *10x20
inils located on Gold Kist Road
Rental office: 121 an Burn Buren St. L e Oak 64-6626




DREAM DESIGN
INCORPORATED
| Residential Mlake-overs * Free Estimates
Licensed and Insured

SCabinets. Ceramic
F nr manr oFof iuir home Til-. -'m...n� Trri-


repairs and needs call
John & Trish Adanims
0386 362-7916


! ieq. - counter tops.
Floor Comering,
Painting, Decks,
Screened Enclosure,.


VI 'i ;Itk91T Mir"1


J.D. KASTOR INC.


* IP'ol & Ptiio Dt'ck
* Spracrtel.'Rirter Rock
* Painting & Sllt'co
* uIntrior,'E.\ierior
386-362-3107
386-362-2526


" LicA'niedl Contractor
" Hiehl ' v Experieniced
" Free 'Esdi~natt s

/55V(\j. L 32.11.


IiEcckkeeniin
b�'by *aren

kssbooklri'alliel.nei h.A.M[[E L, 0 OLtM I \N I
A DIVISION OF kARIDA IENIERPRIES[, IN(
COMPLETE BOOK FIEEPIN', \ l i' INM-Ni ELR\ii .S
'MNfALL & MLDILU'M 6lSi,,rLL
MOIONTHLY REPORTING
STATE & FEDERAL SALES & PAYROLL RETURNS
STATE & FEDERAL BUSINESS RELATED InCOME TAX RETuRIIS


To place
an ad on
this page,
please
call Myrtle at
(386) 362-1734,
ext. 103.


Cl~fimih of Live Ouk
Roofs * Mobile Homes
* Brick Homes * Stucco Homes
* Decks * Driveways
?F-c Esjreta,...
No job Too Big... AoJob loo Small
386-776-2067


MI' hu i/ c wrkc owu , urt nu" ,ii.


550S Count', Road 252
Wellborn. FL 321194
(386) 963-2282
( 356 )963-20926 r Fax\
Call its for a tlf'r t intiatt
Fla. NMover Rea. No. 1 1 1174


-1 GEI JER-TII' IS, O(F E.- FERIEI ICE"
24 HR. EMERGENCY PUMP SERVICE
I PEI 61f{l II.kI M7


Well Drilling
F .1 L : a


ONE CALL DOES IT ALL
For Your
David HOME
McLaughlin Improvements & Repairs
Remodeling & Renovations
386-963-1391
Licensed & Insured
SD ENTERPRISESn INC E
KARDAV ENTERPRISES. INC. FEI 06 - -0.,00


LAKEWOOD
APARTMENTS
IN LIVE OAK


Quiet countrI living 2 bedroom
Call 362-3110


duplex


Stump Grinding


Jim Sellers 386-776-2522


ABBEY MINI STORAGE
All New Units
* 5X15 * 5X20 * 10X15 * 10X20 * 15X20
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd.
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak

364-5300


THE GODE IUL I


Drigger's Heating.
Air Conditioning
and Refrigeration
Re-idenral and C ..!Trr icil


3'i 3613,4 -5'3 4


L it~ O a k. I- L 3 2116.4


- [


tDiviglifLawii

loin Cniilan


Drigers & Sons ustom Meat Cutting

lIs ,Jasper, Florida 's


- (ustoinl
Slaughter, Cuttint.,
%% rapping
I'atN.& Sau~g
I-;l-.:N- I ImIII


""W" V"7" I-pwl


- I


E-LIMB-INATORS, INC.
Complete Tree Senice
Licensed & Insured


J.R. FARNUM
STATE CERTIFIED
CONTRACTOR
* Root Repairs* Fascia & Soffit
METAL ROOFING
SPECIALISTS
(386) 362-3320
CCC057785
WWWEFN- TR "Tm


JT's Transmissions
James Tullis, O\\ner
I 2i'IO N CR 25n
\\elborn, Florida 32104
"TAKING CARE OF ALL YOUR
TRKiNSMISSIO\N EEDS "
Phone: 3n.S6-9 ?-361)6
C'c Cell: 3I(-f ) -Q-44


ADKINS
LANDCLEARING LLC
Owner.,Jhne Ad us . A'" A s
Free Estimates ,. ,
n ,m ..... . ( <� *?. " -t' .',.'


L NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - MARCH 16-17,2005, PAGE 5D


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* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


An ancient luxury becomes a modern morning necess


0 m "


A look at the cascading evolution of the shower


Count yourself lucky for
living in the modem world. If
you're like most people, you
begin every day by taking for
granted something that was not
even available to some of the
most wealthy and powerful
people throughout history -- a
shower.
Today, going without a
shower for even a day is out of
the question for most people,
and to not shower for a week or
more would be unthinkable.
But most of us have ancestors
who probably shunned bathing
to the greatest extent possible.
Even the Romans, who loved to
bathe, took their baths in
stagnant pools of dirty water
that they shared with hundreds
of their fellow citizens. They
had no concept of bacteria of
course.
In ancient times, the best a
rich or royal person could do
was to have a servant dump
cold water over them as they
stood in a basin -- hardly a
relaxing experience by modem
standards.
Today, manufacturers spend
millions finding ways to make
water do magical things in
order to make showering a
luxurious, invigorating and
revitalizing experience.
"The soothing massage of a
specially engineered stream of
hot water is what people seek in
their showers today," says
David Lingafelter, Moen
Incorporated's vice president of
product marketing. "We spend a
lot of time figuring out how to
make water create the sensation
of a massage when designing
shower fixtures," he adds. "Our
Revolution showerhead
actually spins each drop of
water that it puts out and then
twirls the whole shower stream
so that users feel enveloped in
water. Making the water
droplets larger makes them feel
warmer and the increased speed
and movement of each drop
gives the sensation of higher
flow and higher pressure."
You don't get that sort of
feeling from your average
ancient servant with a bucket.
But, at various times
throughout history, ancient
cultures have embraced the
notion of showering for
cleansing. During excavation of
the Egyptian city of Akhenaten
at Tel-el-Amama, which dates
back to 1350 B.C., a small,
bathroom was found. Lawrence
Wright's "Clean & Decent: The
Fascinating History of the
Bathroom and the Water-
Closet" reports that it was
determined from the design of
the basin, complete with
splashbacks, that it was a
simple form of a shower. It is
believed that the water was


most likely poured on the
bather from servants holding
vases.
Babylon had a series of
aqueducts (the earliest ones on
record) laboriously maintained
to provide the well-to-do with
water for their bathrooms,
according to "The History of
Plumbing - Babylon" on
PlumbingSupply.com. While
the common people were
bathing and washing clothes on
the banks of canals or in
cisterns, King
Nebuchandnezzar (605 to 562
B.C.) bathed in a shower room
where, you guessed it, slaves
poured water over him as he
washed with soap made of
ashes and animal fat. The
plumbing was advanced
enough that a drainpipe took
away the wastewater,
something modem plunmbers
wouldn't accomplish until the
19th century.
In ancient Greece, citizens
took outdoor showers by
standing under a stream of
water coming from spouts
found on the sides of large
fountains built in the cities,
according to Penny Colman's,
"Toilets, Bathtubs, Sinks, and
Sewers." Grecian vases with
paintings of people showering
in this manner were found by
archaeologists.
Unfortunately, the Western
world's showering
advancements stopped when
people began to think that
bathing itself was not altogether
necessary. Queen Isabella of
Spain, who funded the voyage
of Christopher Columbus, was
proud of the fact she had taken
only two showers in her
lifetime, reported Colman. In
fact, early Christians equated
bathing with vanity and
avoided it in order to be more
holy. Colman wrote that St.
Francis of Assisi listed dirtiness
as one of the signs of a holy
perso n;St: Catherine of Siena
avoided washing, and St.
Agnes, who died at the age of
13, had never taken a bath.
Eventually, cleanliness began
to come into vogue again, but
only long after a third of
Europe had succumbed to the
Plague. In 1598, Wright reports,
bathing rooms were added to
Windsor Castle in London. It
was here that Queen Elizabeth
took a bath once a month
whether she needed to or not.
As recently as 1812, bathing
was looked upon as frivolous.
When the Lord Mayor of
London requested a simple
shower bath in the mansion
house, he was turned down by
the Common Council on the
grounds that no one had ever
wanted one before. It would
take 20 more years before one


would be installed.
Showers, as we know them
today without the pouring
servants, came into use in the
late 18th century, according to
Rebecca Weaver and Rodney
Dale's, "Machines in the
Home." The first patent for a
shower was granted in 1767
and owned by William
Feetham. The earliest showers
usually had a hand pump and
became popular because they
required a smaller water supply.,
Frank Muir's "An Irreverent
and Almost Complete Social
History of the Bathroom,"
reports that showers had other
advantages over the
commonplace bathtubs. They
were smaller, taking up less
room in ah-eady tight areas, and
they were cheaper to install.
With showers, servants had a
wider area to clean, but they
also had less wastewater to
carry away.
But by far the biggest
drawback of the shower was
the cold water shock that
accompanied pulling the cord
on the overhead tank. That
reason alone kept many people
in baths until the advent of
piped hot water. They reasoned
it was easier to slowly drop into
a tub of cold water than to pull
the cord and let it rain down
upon them.
This shower Renaissance
was brought on, in great part,
by doctors prescribing water
cures to their patients. The
water was applied in a number
of ways, including the Rain
Bath -- simply a shower where
the patient would walk in and
the doctor would pull the cord
on the nozzle to shower the
patient.
Lawrence Wright includes
this quote: "It is no rare thing to
see a subject who at this first
shower betrays, actual terror,
shouts, struggles, runs away,
experiences frightening
suffocation and p.ilpiLtti.n, and
it is not rare to hear him say,
after a moment, 'so that's all it
is.'"
Shortly thereafter, showers
started becoming
commonplace. The plumbing
industry responded with what
some consider the first designer
shower, the English Regency
Shower. According to "The
Stand-Up Bath" on
theplumber.com this 12-foot-
high luxury shower was made
of metal painted to look like
bamboo. At its base was a basin
with a drain and above it was a
tank. A hand pump forced water
from the basin into the tank and
then over the bather's head. The
main drawback of this design
was that the same water re-
circulated over the bather.
In the 1830s, another unique


is,~


showering device hit the
market, the American Virginia
Stool Shower. This all-wood
device resembled a quality
piano stool with a rotating seat.
Placed in the bathtub, the
Shower Stool had a hand-
operated lever that pumped
water from the tub and over the
bather's head and back. A scrub
brush, attached to a vertical
pipe, could be worked up and
down the user's body with the
accompanying foot pedal.
Advances in plumbing in the
mid-1800s led to advancements
in showering capabilities. It was
about this time that pIutbers
began -making freestanding
showers with both hot and cold
water, according to
theplumber.com.
In 1879, Warren Wasson and
Charles Harris, of Carson City,
Nev., patented a shower that
required the bather to maintain
a constant treading motion with
the feet to operate a pump
which recirculated water from
the tub, according to Weaver
and Dale.
They go on to report on
William Luther's 1891 shower
patent in which a pump
compressed air in a reservoir to
force water up to a showerhead.
In 1882 was the first
appearance of Ewart's
Improved Spray Bath with no
fewer than 10 controls that
manipulated various body


spray
In
Work
unit
bathe
comp
the s
the
desce
and
manu
and
show
heads
body
"TI
show
chang
comp
with
today
at del
wants
Th
spout
and b
Moen
with i
every
Th
betwe
and 2
the p
and tl
reliab
can th
of tl
Comr
inven
water
it be


What's old is new again, even in


By Judith Nasatir
In design, as in life, what
goes around comes around.
Every style follows a cycle: in,
out and in again. Designs are
revised, refined and updated
with the latest technology. As
each generation discovers the
pleasures of the past, what's
old becomes new again.
Bathroom design is no
exception to this rule.


Minimalism and eclecticism
are popular. But the vintage
look is also "in" for bathrooms,
taking its style cues from the
Art Deco era of the 1920s and
1930s.
The Treasure Hunt: Creating
, Vintage Bathrooms
Creating period-style
bathrooms poses its own set of
challenges. Whether the bath of
your dreams is Art Deco or


. ,, - - ' ., .

Porcher's Calla II Suite features refined, alluring shapes reminiscent
Art Deco style of the 1930s era. All of the new Calla pieces, include
cabinet, mirror, whirlpool, pedestal lavatory and toilet, are currently ava


other style, you must first
ad appropriate vintage fittings
ad fixtures, or those that look
:e the originals. Consider this
rst phase as the treasure hunt
cause you'll be poking
rough salvage yards and
arching the Internet for
iginal elements such as tubs,
iks, mirrors and hardware.
nce you've found them, most
ntage fittings must be
retrofitted to meet
today's codes and
. standards. In
' " addition, you'll
" probably. want to
refinish many of
these pieces. Some
signs of time's
J passage may be
appealing, but
chipped enamel or
yellowing porcelain
is not.
New Fixtures,
Vintage Look
Luckily, today's
homeowners have
many options if
they don't want to
spend the time and
effort pursuing and
upgrading vintage
of the fixtures. Some
ing the companies have
ailable. resurrected models


first introduced in the 1920s
and 1930s. Others, such as
Porcher, offer designs that
feature up-to-the-minute
functional features wrapped in
period-style packages.
Porcher's Calla II Suite
features refined shapes and
beveled edges recalling themes
from the Art Deco style of the
1930s. Adding modern
conveniences, the Calla 6-foot
oval whirlpool features
StayClean technology that
helps reduce the time needed to
clean and increases the time
spent enjoying the relaxing
experience.
A Splash of Art Deco Color
American bathrooms of the
1920s and 1930s reflected our
growing obsession with
cleanliness. Until late in the
1920s, bathroom walls were
tiled with subway-style
rectangular tiles in bright,
glossy white. With the
emergence of Art Deco, color
flooded the bath. Square,
smooth porcelain tiles with a
high-gloss glaze in bright
white, soft pink or a shade of
green generally lined the walls,
along with lavender, plum and
everything in between. Black
trim pieces added a thin accent
line usually about halfway up


the
featui
mosa
patter
or oci
You'l
tiles
you
above
like I
Just
and
appro
Fit
Furn
Bey
fixture
fitting
eleme
Deco
garde
sports
fashic
featui
These
and m
work
in m
chroi
Bui
and
an6th
chara
bath,
attach
omam
and sc


's. water well in advance of a b h,
1889, J. L. Mott Iron or stand under the shoVer
:s followed suit, offering a awaiting the shock of frid
that could shower the water.
-r from every angle. The In fact, today's showeiig
?any's catalog touted that technology has even been qale
hower would provide for to remove the dreaded shl6k
bather "needle, shower, that accompanies the untiniely
ending douche, liver spray flushing of a toilet or running pf
bidet" functions. Other the kitchen faucet when anoIl r
ifacturers got in on the act household member is in the
provided a variety of shower. Pressure-balanckiig
ering options like multiple thermostatic valves like Mo m's
s, waterfall spouts and ExactTemp are able to main.in
sprays. a steady flow-rate and consl ht
he desires of the water temperature, even ;if
ering public really haven't someone decides to start Ae
ged much".- v.liKn i-you dishkw.islcror':udb i load! f
)are these antique showers laundry while you're was hg
shower suites available away the cares of the day.
. We've just gotten better Shortly after the szlhowyr
ivering what the consumer renaissance in the late 'Ih
i," Lingafelter says. century, showers moved bacl to
ere are still waterfall being thought of as striily
ts, rain-like showerheads utilitarian devices and the fas y
)ody sprays. For example, designs disappeared until, t4e
n's Vertical Spa is available 1980s when manufactu rs
multiple body sprays to hit began responding to the desire's
'part of the body. of their customers for more
e biggest difference versatility in the shower.
een showers of the 19th "Today, manufacturers i"e
Z1st centuries is that today, continually coming up with
ipes are behind the walls advances in showed g
he hot water is a little more technology," Lingafelter s4's.
)le. For the hot water, we "Manufacturers are constaody
hank Edwin Ruud, founder working on ways to deliver e
he Ruud Manufacturing optimal shower to keep t e
pany, who in 1898 showering public clean as Vl 11
ted the automatic storage as happy."
'heater. No longer would Or, you could just get
necessary to begin boiling yourself a servant and a bucQk!


the bathroom

wall. Floor tiles, often metals. Restored lighting
ring .a black-and-white fixtures and frosted glass
ic border or checkerboard reproductions provide mady
n, were often hexagonal choices. And don't forget light
tagonal rather than square. dimmers, which allow yoiu to
1 have no trouble finding convert your everyday 6a$h
to meet your needs, and into a romantic retreat. :
can use more than the Bathroom furniture Was
e-mentioned colors just created as early as the 1''ih
the Art Deco decorators. century to help consumers
remember: Crisp corners hide the unmentionables ' in
white grout are period- high style. If you're working
privatee musts, on a bath with an Art De o,
things, Finishings and feel, you might consider omie,
niture: The Final Touch or all of the pieces .in
yond finding the right Porcher's Calla II Suite, whiih
res, colors and tiles, puts a modern spin on ' inftie
gs are another important furniture with a pedestal �iik
ent in recreating an Art top built into a cheny-firoish
bathroom. The common, cabinet with pull-out drawei
n variety of this era and shelf space.
ed four annrms; the Whether you're restoring a
enable, fancy version old house or building a ne'y,
red a five-pronged "star." home, any period styl .
e styles remain popular, provide a wonderful source .6j
models with updated inner inspiration for designing *thl
ings are widely available bath. If you want to create a
iany finishes including authentic look, you car
ne, porcelain and enamel, research, find and restore
ilt-ins, such as storage vintage pieces. You also car
medicine chests, are find vintage styles in new,: at,
er distinctive the-ready bathroom fixtures
cteristic of the vintage The resources are endless, aiu
as are towel bars the rules are flexible. Eithi;
led to the sink and way, you won't have
mental ceiling fixtures problem making what's ol
conces in frosted glass or new again in your bath.


PAGE 6D, MARCH 16-17,2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS






L.. ML SN L ATIH DSH ,


Take


Health


Quic, -afa skez Counkt , tcoun fT iEttn.
Pziva.taz ooms, a teneiesz, 24 houw aze.
Visit us on the web at www.oakridgealf.com
Email: oakridgealf@alltel.net
Mayo, FL* County Rd. 251-A (386 294-5050
License #AL9863 (386) 294-5050

Lake City
Ph�Eye

ap igPhysicians
Conirehei E yei care
fiorB ~HiStSeetSBSiSr9EMini . 6,1S1


SherriA. Cole, L.D.O.
Owner
Licensed Optician
621 SW Baya D
Lake City.
0386) 71
or (386) 7
www.coleoF


Reaves C. Cole, O.D.
Board Certified
Optometric Physician
rive, Suite 101
FL 32025
9-9292
54-6616
ptics.com ,,.,l


Counseling
ANDREW HARRELL
Licensed Mental Health Counselor
Certified Addiction Prevention
Professional
Blue Cross Blue Shield
Accepted
Live Oak, FL

(386) 362-8825
147830DH-F

CancerHope
Treatment Centers
LakeCity &
Li\e Oak
-+ - .
" " "' " 'll " Lcalicerhore corn

Specializing in Oncology since 1989
Comprehensive and Personalized Care
*Best equipment
*Most advanced treatment
.Treat all types of cancers
.IMRT PET CT Eric C. Rost, M.D.
David S. Cho, M.D.
Purendra P. Sinha, M.D.
Board Certified - All Insurances Accepted - No Referral Necessary


Suwannee Valley
Cancer Center
795 SW State Road 47
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 758-SVCC (7822)


Ronald R. Foreman, O.D., P.RA.
rKimberly M. Broome, O.D.


CancerHope of
Live Oak
1500 Ohio Ave. North
.Live Oak, FL 32060
(386)362-1174
131387JRS-F


Frank A. Broom, Ill, O.D.
Julie L. Owens. O.D.


North


Florida


EyeCare

Examination and Treatment of the Eye
Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses


PHONE (386) 362-5055
FAX (386) 208-8660


625 Helvenston
Live Oak, Florida 32066
147761DH-F


to


Your




Heart


Assisted Living


422-6237); TTY (for deaf and hard of hearing
callers): (800) 332-8615, or go online and visit
their Web site at www.cancer.gov.

f'EYE CENTER of North Florida
SGeneral Eye Care & Surgery
EYE EXAMS * CATARACT SURGERY
*GLAUCOMA * MACULAR DEGENERATION
* DIABETES * LASERS
Eduardo M. Bedoya, MD
Board Certified, American Board of Ophthalmology
Eye Physician & Surgeon

.... ... . ' " ..... ^ w^ '-^ ....., A. , i ed,
1-S Blue Croc.Blue Shield
, 7 ,lher irniurarne .cceplied
SN m Se habla espaiol.

9-75W Duval St.
SO 3 7Lake City7
. 386-75547595


K


It'


r


Dr. Rios


OBGYN
Midwife Services Available
Marlene Summers, CNM


Hours:
Mon. - Thur. 8:30 - 5:00
Closed 12:30-1:30

(386) 755-0500
Fax (386) 755-9217


449 SE Baya Dr.
Lake City, FL 32055


131407-F


Cancer Care of North Florida


We are a
total care
medical
oncology &
hematology
practice.


Now seeing patients at Shands at Live Oak
P. Welcoming New Patients at
S' our two offices at:
. Shands @ Live Oak or Lake City.
Please call (386) 755-1655
W,,senm ha,,,, M.D. for an appointment or information
All Chemotherapy administration and management


Specializing in:
'Anemia
*Thrombocytopenia
Bleeding or clotting disorders
Breast Cancer.
Colon Cancer
Ovarian Cancer
Multiple Myeloma
Leukemia
Lymphoma
* Accelino Medicae &Mot Ilansfance


'V


Ophthalmology
GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
Located In SHANDS At Live Oak
1100 SW llth St. Live Oak
(904) 373-4300 or 1-800-435-3937

amily Bentistry
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH,
D.D.S, P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL .,
(386) 362-6556
1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County) 131390JS-F

Occupational Medicine

General Orthopaedics

Edward J.
Sambey, M.D.


tI Ol LTCU.


Melanoma is on the rise:
Learn how to protect yourself
When unprotected skin is exposed to the sun, it can not only be damaged, it significantly increases
the risk of melanoma, currently the most serious type of skin cancer. In the United States alone, the
percentage of people who develop melanoma has more than doubled in the past 30 years, according to
the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Each year, more than 50,000 people in the United States learn
they have melanoma. In some parts of the world, especially in Western countries, melanoma is
becoming more common every year, reports the NCI.
With those alarming numbers and the summer weather hef ,- hen our skin is more likely to be
exposed to damaging UVA and UVB rays, we need to learn about melanoma and take the necessary
precautions to protect our skin.
DEVELOPMENT
Melanoma is a type of skin cancer that begins in cells in the skin called melanocytes. Melanocytes
produce melanin, the pigment that gives skin its natural color. When skin is exposed to the sun,
melanocytes produce more pigment,
causing the skin to tan. Sometimes,
clusters of melanocytes and
surrounding tissue form
noncancerous growths called moles.
Melanoma occurs when
melanocytes become malignant. The
chance of developing melanoma
increases with age, but the disease
. affects people of all ages. It can
S' 'ccur on any skin surface. In men,
, W"1' f " - melanoma is often found on the area
S- 'between the shoulders and the hips,
." the head or the neck. In women, it
often develops on the lower legs.
. .._.-. ...M elan o m a is rare in A frican
Americans aid in others with dark
:skin, When it does develop, it tends
Experts believe that much of the worldwide increase in to occur under the fingernails,.
melanoma correlates with an increased amount of time toenails or on the palms or soles.
spent in the sun. To reduce your risk, limit your sun RISK FACTORS
exposure and always protect your skin. The exact causes of melanoma are
unknown, and doctors can seldom
explain why one person gets it and another does not. However, research has shown that people with the
following risk factors are more likely than others to develop melanoma.
* Abnormal moles: These are more likely than ordinary moles to become cancerous.
* Many (more than 50) ordinary moles: Having a high number of moles increases the risk of
developing melanoma.
* Fair skin: Melanoma occurs more frequently in people who have skin that burns or freckles easily
(these people also usually have red or blond hair and blue eyes) than in those with darker skin.
* Personal history of melanoma or skin cancer: People who have been treated for melanoma have a
high risk of developing a second melanoma.
* Family history of melanoma: Having two or more close relatives with the disease increases one's
risk.
* Weak immune system: People whose immune system is weakened by illness or drug treatment are
at risk.
* Severe, blistering sunburns: People who have had at least one severe, blistering sunburn as' a child,
teenager or adult are at increased risk.
* Ultraviolet (UV) radiation: Spending large amounts of time in the sun causes premature aging of
the skin and damage that can lead to melanoma. Artificial sources of UV radiation, such as sunlamps
and tanning booths, also increase the risk of melanoma.
SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
Often, the first sign of melanoma is'a change in the size, shape, color or feel of an existing mole.
Melanomas may be black, abnormal, or just "ugly looking." Newly formed fine scales and itching in a
mole also are common symptoms of early melanoma. Melanomas may feel different from regular
moles. In more advanced stages, the texture of the mole may become hard or lumpy. More advanced
tumors may itch, ooze or bleed.
THE ABCD METHOD ..
OF CHECKING MOLES
The NCI advises that we check our skin regularly for new growths or other changes, using the
ABCD method.
Asymmetry -- The shape of one half does not match the other.
Border -- The edges are often ragged, notched, blurred, or irregular in outline; the pigment may
spread into the surrounding skin.
Color -- The color is uneven. Shades of black, brown and tan may be present. Areas of white, grey,
red, pink or blue also may be seen.
Diameter -- There is a change in size, usually an increase. Melanomas are usually larger than the..
eraser of a pencil (1/4 inch or five millimeters).
Melanomas can vary greatly in appearance. Many shom all the ABCD fearures. However, some may
show changes or abnormalities in only one or two of the-ABCD Te.ures
A SKIN SELF-EXAM
Check the skin after a shower or bath in a well-lit room using a full-length and hand-held mirrors.
Learning where our birthmarks, moles and blemishes are and what they look and feel like helps ease
the process.
Check for anything new:
* A new mole (that looks abnormal)
* A change in the size, shape, color, or texture of a mole
* A sore that does not heal
Examine yourself from head to toe. Check all areas of the skin, including the back, the scalp,
between the buttocks, the genital area, the feet, including soles, between the toes and nails..
By checking your skin regularly, you will become familiar with what is normal for yoi. It may be
helpful to record the dates of your skin exams and write down how your skin looks.. The NCI
recommends seeing a doctor immediately if you have questions or find anything unusual.
PREVENTION
The sun can damage our skin year-round, not just during the summer. UV radiation can penetrate
light clothing, windshields and windows, and it can be reflected by sand, water, snow and ice. That's
why doctors recommend we protect our skin at all times by:
* Avoiding sun exposure from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. whenever possible.
* Wearing long sleeves, long pants, a hat with a wide brim and sunglasses with UV-absorbing lenses
when outdoors.
* Using a "broad-spectrum coverage" sunscreen which reflects, absorbs and/or scatters all types of
ultraviolet radiation.
To learn more about melanoma, call the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at (800) 4-CANCER (800-


Physical Therapy


"'Aiiii cj G4LZouz c/Jo jadi.itaiuj. ed's*d"
* Physical Therapy * Occupational Therapy * Speech Therapy
* Specializing In Arthritis* Fibromyalgia * Geriatrics* Spinal &
Joint Pain * Sports Injuries * Work Injuries � Pediatrics
* Manual Therapy * Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 * Medicare, Protegrity
Lake City 755-8680 ' Blue Cross, Av Med
Jasper 792-2426 * Medicaid-pediatrics
Branford 935-1449 ' Workers Comp
Mayo 294-1407 * Most Other Insurance Plans

A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore .






REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA

PROFESSIONAL TOUCH
PHYSICAL THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis
Orthopedic/Sports Medicine, Pediatrics
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS
Providers
, 1506 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051
131397JS-F

Urology, Urologic Surgery
6I impotence Center


ROBERT G. BUSCH, D.O.
ERIC ORDINARIO, D.O.
Board Certified Urology and Urological Surgery
Common Problems Treated:
* Infections * Prostate Problems * Kidney Stones * Sexual
Problems * Genital Surgery * Cancer of the Urinary Tract *
Impotence * Infertility * Urinary Incontinence
Common Surgical Procedures In Office:
* Cystoscopy * No Scapel Vasectomy * Treatment of
Condyloma * Prostate Ultrasound/Biopsy * Bladder
Ultrasound ' Penil Vascular Studies
Common Surgical Problems In
Hospital or Ambulatory Surgical Center:
Prostate, Kidney and Bladder Cancer Surgery
* Kidney Stone and Surgery Lithotripsy * Microscopic
Vasectomy Reversal * Impotence Surgery * Hernia Surgery
Specializing in the evaluation and treatment of Male
Impotence Surgical and Medical Therapies
All patients are given
personal and confidential attention.

131382JS-F


We


I


* Occupational Medicine
* General Orthopaedics
* Sports Medicine


Orthopaedic
r ' Center


4137 IN. U no rAve.


North Ilorida

Pharmacy of Branford

* Medical
Equipment
* Oxygen

"Everything For iour
Home Recoverv "

Locally Owned & Operated
101 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL 32008
(386) 935-6905
229 W. Main St., Mayo, FL:32066
(386) 294-3777 ...SF


I


119D -F


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - MARCH 16-17,2005, PAGE 7D


I CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Vb VVII n


413 NW 5th Ave.


I V. r-


Lake City Office - 4367 NW American Lane
Phone 386-755-9215 - Toll Free 1-888-860-7050
Workers compensation and
Most Insurance Plans Accepted 135952 ,-

Internal - General
Medicine
a*< ^*--:....



RENALDAS A. SMIDTAS, M.D. AND ASSOCIATES
American Board of Internal Medicine certified,
Fellow of American Board of Balance Medicine.
SHELIAY. ROBERTS, A.R.N.P., C.S.
KATHY NEWMAN, A.R.N.P
Heart, Cardiovascular Diseases * Diabetes management
Allergy and Asthma * Lung diseases * Women's Health
Invasive Pain Management for Arthritis of the Knee, Shoulders,
Back Pain * Ultrasound Diagnostic and More
Live Oak Jasper
362-5840 792-0753
1 A'1 XT 1,;' - A I MW DulA-we












PAGE 8D, MARCH16.flH-17,2005~- I'4UH I Hri UMI~iA r EIIlI* ** - -------- ---


I,


A spring is here. aiid t's time to t)iliink '
aboui garden parents and colourid ways to brit'
jo to Your nex gai heiting of ftnlil and rtoendls.
Keeping it simple bY' using shortcuts with readv-
madh ini.e awd lspiinhime cand\ tav'otihei' will
create ltl thie right "pizza::".tor 'omnit lie i parrm .
e For giving cookies and cupcakes a \istial
bnost, Siarbm st Jelh'beans provide a low tar decorating al rnantC. Plus, lollipop cook-
ies are sre to be a trat tfor iomnn and old ahke. They can be aued as a centerpiece
and then your gnestis can take them home as party favors.
Be sure to stock upon tht pastel colors ofM&A 'S so you can design a vari-
en- of flowers and shapes in the cuoinkt ,nntf/hs. Think about ithe bridal and
baby vhoweris voull soon be planning - and preparing --toar fandl\ lmem-
bers and special.triends.
For more recipes. decorating. gifr and amtilyh run ideas, g to10
t i, ,.bri/ghmdeas.co.n,


I 118-ouncei roll refrigerated
sugar cookie dough or
ten 4 1/2-inch cookies
10 12 1/2-inchi medium cupcakes, store
bought or homemade
2 (16-ounce each i containers white frosting
Food coloring
1 (14-ounce) bag M&M'S Milk Chocolate
Candies for Easter
Starburst Jellybeans
Skittles Candies for Easter
Starburst Fruit Chews
1. Roll sugar cookie dough to 1/4 inch thickness and
press out ten 4 1/2-inch cookies. Bake the cookies.
according to directions on the package. Set aside.
2. Remove paper cupcake liner from cupcakes. Slice
off rounded top of cupcake.
3. Ice top of cupcake with 1 tablespoon frosting. Turn
cupcake upside down and place on the cookie. Set
*"cookie hats" on v. itre rack.
4. Divide icing intu 4 bos Is. Beginning s ith a fese
drops of food coloring, tint icing to desired pastel
shade. One at a time, place icing into microwave
for 15 seconds Stir icing and check consistency
for pourable consistency
5 Pour frosung oser "hats." covering them complete-
ly. Set aside for 10 minute
6. Decorate using candies.
7. To make hat ribbons.


unws rap fruit chews
and soften in
microwave
for 5 seconds.
Then thin.l
roll and cut
into thin
ribbons
and wrap
around
the hats
Makes 10 boanits


Springtime Strawberry Cake
'1 18-ouncei box favorite cake mix
1 cup strawberry jam
2 12-ounce each) containers shipped vanilla frosting.'
Red food coloring, paste or gel
1 14-ounce) bag Starburst Jellybeans " -
I t16-ouncei bag StarbursI Tropical Fruit Chews
1. Prepare cake according to package directions. Bake in to -
8-inch round cake pans.
2. Let cakes come to room temperature Cut both into matching
strawberry shapes. Lay er \ ith strawberry) jam sandwiched be-
t\een
3. Tint frosting " ith red food coloring to desired shade, then
frost entire cake.
4. Separate .ello%% jellybeans from bag and arrange on cake,
follow ing photograph as a guide. to appear as straw berr -
seeds.
5. Select and un\s rap 14 green fruit chews. Warm in microwave
3 to 4 seconds, ]ust to soften Using lingers, press all fruit
chess into one piece and slightly flatten. Using a rolling pin,
roll out chesss until %wafer thin. Cut out tswo leases. Gather up .
remainder and form stem. Place stem and leaves at top of
cake
Note: Can also be baked in 8-inch heart-shaped cake pans.
Makes 12 se 'vings


Springtime
Strawberry Cake


Flower Cupcakes
1 (18.25-ounce) box yellow cake mix
1 (16-ounce) container white frosting
1 (16-ounce) Starburst Jelly beans,
Original or Tropical Fruits
1. Make cupcakes according to package direc-
tions.
2. Spread frosting onto cooled cupcakes
and place jellybeans
on top in a flower
design.
Alakes 1 doze'
cupcakes .


Flower
Cupcakes


Garden Cookies
I (18-ounce) roll
refrigerated
sugar cookie
dough
2/3 cup all-purpose flour
6 large green craft sticks
1 (16-ounce. container prepared
vanilla frosting
Assorted food coloring
2 t14-ounce each) bags MN&M'S Milk
Chocolate Candies for Easter
6 (6-inch) flowerpots or containers


Garden Cookies


6 Styrofoam squares or norai oasis / ,
I Preheat oven to 3500F. Knead cookie dough and flour together until smooth.
2. Roll'out dough to 1/4-inch thickness. Cut out 6 tulip shapes approximatelyy 4 inches high and 3 inches
wide) from dough., and transfer to cookie sheet. Gather up dough scraps and re-roll, if necessary
3. Slide a craft suck underneath each cookie, and press it into dough. Bake until golden bross n. about
12 to 15 minutes. Transfer cookie sheet to wire rack.
4. While cookies are cooling, divide vanilla frosting among 4 bowls. Using food coloring, tint to pink,
light blue. yellow and pale purple. Spread frosting over each cookie, and arrange chocolate candies
on top. Let dr\. about 30 minutes.
5. Fill flowerpots with Styrofoam.
6. Press craft sucks into Styrofoam. Arrange green candies around craft sticks.
Takes 6 lar e cookies


MABEL'S OUTLIVED NINE PRESIDENTS, EIGHT DOGS AND TWENTY-SEVEN CATS.s"
BUT SHE'LL ALWAYS HAVE HER MARATHON."


* BUY THE WATER HEATER YOU CAN HOLD ONT


S .. ' " a t 11340 lo00th Street, Lie Oak. Florid
b i""'s ' __"_ 0 ._ ______


There are \ery fes things today still being made to withstand the test of time.
The Marathon" Water Heater is one of them. Or as Mabel likes to call it,
"my perpetual hot water machine."


O MUCH, MUCH LONGER.


la 32060 * 362-2226


* 30, 50 and 85 gallon units in stock
* Special Pricing to the member: of i
SuaYannee alley Electnc Colop i-i ..%..)
*Call 362-2226 at E t 122 for detaild,
*Saie Your Energy.. and Call Today! "


"-~ ':-



S

I


Bonneti


M e'l AQQig:is:n MARKSTPLACE - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


MA�� nr% RMAIMfLJ la-17 3nnn - MnPT14 1=1 ()RinA FOCUS