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Suwannee Democrat
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028422/00015
 Material Information
Title: Suwannee Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: J.E. Pound
Place of Publication: Live Oak Fla
Creation Date: February 25, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
weekly[ former <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
Coordinates: 30.294444 x -82.985833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note: Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000398954
oclc - 33273856
notis - ACE4563
lccn - sn 95026787
lccn - 95026788
oclc - 33273861
System ID: UF00028422:00015
 Related Items
Preceded by: Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by: Suwannee leader
Preceded by: Suwannee citizen

Full Text


Look inside today's
edition for this week's
American Profile


US Senator Bill Nelson to hold public
meeting Monday, Feb. 28 at City Hall.
See Page 2A Briefly


Suwannee wrestling
Regional Champs!
Sports Page 1B


a....... .. . . ,:. 0,0

Si'-.IATHER, . . L1.1 S SPECIAL ST.U
L-'l ii--';.U T i 1 .'__ .-- ~5; _ i "-.'7 { 2;';;'


Serving Suwannee County since 1884 Weekend Edition - February 25, 2005


120th YEAR, NO. 35


50 CENTS


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SPRING HAS SPRUNG: This tulip tree on US 129 is covered in blooms from the early spring warmer
weather locals are experiencing. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


USDA sign-up for

tobacco buyout

begins March 14

Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns has an-
nounced that sign-up for the Tobacco Transition
Payment Program (TTPP) will begin March 14 and
extend through June 17.
"We are pleased to be able to announce the be-
ginning of the sign-up period for this historic pro-
gram," Johanns said. "The Tobacco Transition Pay-
ment Program will end the decades old tobacco
SEE USDA, PAGE 2A


FCATS begin Feb.28
Suwannee District Schools will administer the
2005 Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test
(FCAT), reading, math and science tests beginning
- Feb. 28 through March 11.
FCAT is for grades 3 -10 (and grade 11 - adult re-
takes).
Regular attendance on these testing dates is ex-
tremely important. '
Parents are urged to make sure your child gets a


SEE FCAT, PAGE 3A


Bulldog players: We



won't play for new coach!


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
Suwannee High is in an uproar over the hir-
ing of Bobby Bennett from Ozark, Ala. The
football players have joined to-
gether to protest this hiring of
an outsider.
Terrell Roman, a starting of- SOC r
fensive and defensive player
for the Dogs, and a winner of
the Mercantile Bank Hustle
Award, acted as spokesman for
the players.
"The biggest problem we have, " Romans
said, "Is we don't .think the players' opinions,
and wishes were taken into consideration."
At the top of a petition signed by 49 Suwan-
nee High football players, it says "We the foot-


SPELLING BEE WINNERS: A district spelling bee was held Feb. 15 at the Suwannee
Court School Board Office. Four representatives from each school were present for
the final showdown to see who was the best speller. Representing Branloid Elementary
was Jacob Hall, Larry Huskins from Suwannee Elementary, Paige Rodriguez from
Melody Christian Academy and Ronnie Turner from Suwannee Middle School. After
three rounds Turner, pi,:tuied right. and Rodriguez, left, were the last ones standing. Af-
ter Rodnrguez misspelled a woid, Turner went on to spell 'attuned correctly winning
the spelling bee Turner will go on to represent Suwannee County in a state competi-
tion in Jack.sonville for the Times Union Regional on Saturday, March 5 The winner ol
that spelling bee will go to Washington DC to participate in the 78th Scripps National
Spelling Bee May, 29-June 2 i P.':.t, .eti Harnonr


ball players of Suwannee
High School, refuse to play
for an outside coach. We
have made it perfectly clear
that we, the players, were in


favor of an 'Inside
Coach.' This is
an official peti-
tion stating we
will not play
for the new
coach. We feel
the coaching se-


election was strictly politi-
cal and the concerns of the
athletes were never taken
into consideration."
"All this is just small-town


Terrell Roman


T.J. Westberry


SEE BULLDOG, PAGE 3A


Review committee

says no one laid

an egg with book

Susan K. Lamb
Democrat Managing Editor

A review committee of four people said unan-
imously this week that the local library director
followed proto- Laid
col and appropri-
ately placed the 4
book "Mommy . r[:
Laid An Egg" in
the children's
section of the
Suwannee River
Regional Library
(SRRL), accord-
ing to County
Coordinator Johnny Wooley.
Not all may agree, including the County Com-
mission, which has final say on the matter.
The book, "Mommy Laid An Egg," is explicit
in its description of how babies are made and has
detailed drawings supposedly done by children
showing different ways parents may use to
SEE REVIEW, PAGE 3A


Students from the Douglass Center got to sit in the dentist chair
and learned how to 'open wide' at a recent visit to the dentist's of-
fice Feb. 18. The students visited Dr. Harold Arthur's office on
Eleventh Street to see different gadgets they will see when they
come to the dentist's office. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


Steve Ward named

Florida OALE Officer

of the year for 2004
-- Suwannee County Interstate 10 Agricultural Interdiction
Station officer selected from over 200 nominees state wide --


Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Ser-
vices Commissioner Charles
H. Bronson and Office of
Agricultural Law Enforcement
Director Colonel Darrell Li-
ford presented the 2004 OALE


Officer of the Year award to
Officer Steve Wood of Suwan-
nee County. He was selected
and unanimously voted for by
the Executive Saff from nomi-


SEE STEVE, PAGE 3A


Taylor reports to

board on traffic safety
� At Tuesday night's Suwannee County
"School Board meeting in Branford, School
Board Chairman Jerry Taylor reported on a
board representative traffic safety meeting.
. ' The purpose of the meeting was to dis-
.'. " cuss options and find solutions to the con-
gested traffic surrounding the schools espe-
Board Chairman cially during peak hours.'
Board Chairman SEE TAYLOR, PAGE 3A
Jerry Taylor SEE TAYLOR, PAGE 3A


2004 OALE OFFICER OF THE YEAR: Suwannee County Interstate
10 Agricultural Interdiction Station Officer Steve Wood, center,
accepts the 2004 OALE Officer of the Year award from Florida De-
partment of Agriculture Commissioner Charles H. Bronson, left,
and Office of Agriculture Law Enforcement (OALE) Director
Colonel Darrell Liford, right. - Photo: Submitted


TODAY'S
WEATHER


LIVE OAK
FORD * MERCURY


Hwy. 129 North, Live Oak
(386) 362-1112
waltsliveoakford.coin
'W.A.C.- See dealer for complete details,


Suwannee County should see consideralbe cloudiness with
occasional rain showers. High 66TF. For up to the minute
i.iinthpr infrirmn inn nn wi.uwi oainneademocratrcom


INDEX
C lassifieds ......... ..... ............. 1-4C
C church .........................................7-9B
.Sports ............................................ 1-5 B
Suwannee Living ........ .............5A
Viewpoint ... ............. 4A
TV Guide ....................... .. 10-11 B,
Legal Notices.........................4....... 4C


FEATURED ON PAGE 4B

AREA DEATH OOKI
Gary Michael Thurman Sr., 49, Live Oak For Kids I
OBITUARIES ON PAGE 6A Publix, 12 & Under
_____________'� rublixA�


No Purchase Necessary
Page 6C Must Present Coupon
Limit 1 Per Person
S Good 2-25-05 Only


www.suwanneedemocrat.com


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ON THE FLIPSIDE


HOW TO REACH US

Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, www.suwanneedemocrat.com
Mail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
* Publisher,
Myra Regan, ext. 122


CONTACT US WITH

YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, contact us by phone or
make contact through the
Internet through our web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com



NEWSROOM
* Managing Editor,
Susan K. Lamb, ext. 131
* Sports Reporter,
Janet Schrader-Seccafico, ext. 134
* Reporter,
Yvette Hannon, ext. 130
* Editorial Clerk,
Marsha Hitchcock, ext. 132


ADVERTISING
* Retail Advertising Manager,
Monja Robinson, ext. 105
* Advertising Representative,
Bill Regan, ext. 107
* Advertising Representative,
JoelTurner, ext. 109
* Advertising Representative,
Kathy Sasser, ext. 160
N Classified Advertising Manager /
Telesales Ad Representative,
Myrtle Parnell, ext. 103
* Classified/Legal,
Louise Sheddan, ext. 102



CIRCULATION
N Circulation Manager,
Angie Sparks, ext. 152
* Circulation
Service Hours, M-F 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Subscription Rates,
In-county, $30 Out-of-county, $40



u mannat

Ormorrat


Serving Suwannee
County Since 1884


The Suwannee Democrat, published
Wednesday and Friday.
Periodicals postage paid at
Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located
at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
FL. Publication number 530180.

"POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL
32064." Annual subscription rate is
$30 in county, $40 out of county and
$40 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.

OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday - Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Letters, comments and opinions on
the Viewpoint & Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Suwannee Democrat.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters may be mailed, faxed or
e-mailed to our office. All letters are
read. Not all letters are published.
Letters may be edited to fit available
space. The editor should not alter the
writer's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
the point, an ideal range is 150 to
200 words. Please include your
name, address, and day and evening
phone numbers for verification.
Letters MUST be signed. Letters to
the Editor can be limited to one
letter per quarter per individual.


SPEAK OUT SUWANNEE
Call 386-208-8314. Comments to
Speak Out Suwannee MUST include
your name and day and evening
phone numbers for verification. We will
include your name with your
comment. Speak Out Suwannee
comments can be --.
limited to one comment - A*
per quarter per individual. ) \
Suv.anneeCr. unrI,' E rl , .,
hile' OrlIgDal Fl.r,,1 ' j


BRIEFLY


Senator Nelson to be in
Live Oak this month for
Town Hall meeting Feb. 28
Sen. Bill Nelson will be at
City Hall Feb. 28 from 1 until
2 p.m. The public is invited to
attend the Town Hall meeting
and express your concerns.
Register now!
Voluntary Prekindergarten
Program
Early Learning Coalition of
Florida's Gateway; Voluntary
Prekindergarten (VPK); Chil-
dren four on or before Sept. 1,
are eligible to receive 540
hours of developmentally ap-
propriate preschool instruc-
tion free this coming school
year (beginning in August).
Info/registration: Enrollment
Manager Jamie Witzman,
386-752-9770, ext. 24 or
Gateway Executive Director
Dr. Thomas Logan, ext. 12.
www.elc-fg.org.
Buy tickets now!
Suwannee County
Cattlemen's Association
Heifer Raffle
Suwannee County Cattle-
men's Association Heifer
Raffle. Tickets $1 each. Pro-
ceeds support Beef Heifer
Show. Drawing at Suwannee
County Fair in March. Info or
tickets:Dottie Barfuss, 386-
364-3266 or Joe Jordan, 386-
362-4724.
Buy tickets now!
Turkey Federation Banquet
to be held Feb. 26
The Suwannee River
LONGBEARDS Chapter of
the National Wild Turkey
Federation (NWTF) annual
Hunting Heritage Fund-raiser





CASH 3 PLAY 4
2/23/05 .8,88,1 2/23/05 .. 9,1,6,8-
FANTASY' 5
2/23/05 ....... . . 9,30,31,32,35
MEGA MONEY ...... 3,25,27,28
LOTTO ....... 4,13,17,18,25,38


mmh


Banquet, Feb. 26, Columbia for info: Marianne Wood,
County Fairgrounds, Lake 386-364-3575; Pete Sneed,
City. Doors open at 6 p.m., 386-362-2122; Joan Fewox,
dinner at 7 p.m. Info or tick- 386-776-2555; Pat Bryant,
ets: Todd Kennon, 386-755- 386-776-2231; or Karen
1334 or Tom Kennon, 386- Willis - 386-935-1317.
362-6353. NFCC auditions for
RSVP by March 1 theater production
28th Annual Tri-County Feb. 28
Peanut Production Meeting NFCC Community The-
March 3 ater; auditions; supporting
28th Annual Tri-County roles; 7 p.m., Monday, Feb.
Peanut Production Meeting; 5 28; Neil Simon's "The Odd
p.m., Thursday, March 3: Couple," female version;
Branford High School Cafe- NFCC Student Center, Madi-
teria; Info/RSVP: Pam Burke: son campus; Info: Jessica
Suwannee County Extension Webb, 850-973-1683, Web-
Office, 386-372-2771, by bJ@nfcc.edu
March 1. NFCC hosts one-hour town
Submit by March 11 hall meeting with U.S.
Attention NFCC Senator Bill Nelson Feb. 28
students, alumni NFCC; one-hour town hall
North Florida Community meeting; U.S. Senator Bill
College's (NFCC) literary Nelson; 11 a.m.-noon, Mon-
and arts magazine, the "Sen- day, Feb. 28; open to the pub-
tinel Review," invites all lic; NFCC Student Center
NFCC students, employees Lakeside Room, Madison
and alumni to enter poetry, campus; Info: Gerri Bucher,
fiction and pen and ink art- 8 5 0 - 9 7 3- 1 6 0 7 ,
work by March 11. Info: Lin- BucherG@nfcc.edu
da Brown, 850-973-9456 or Suwannee District Schools,
brownlin@nfcc.edu, or John will administer Spring 2005
Grosskopf, 850-973-9455, Assessments - FCAT
grosskopf@nfcc.edu. Reading, Math and Science
Suwannee FFA Alumni Tests Feb. 28 - March 11
Golf Tournament set for Suwannee District Schools
Feb. 26 will administer Spring 2005
Suwannee FFA Alumni Assessments - FCAT Read-
Golf Tournament-Suwannee ing, Math and Science Tests -
Country Club, Live Oak, Feb. 28-March .11. FCAT is
Saturday, Feb. 26. Info or to for grades 3-10 (Grade 11-
enter: Richard Marable, 386- Adult RETAKES). Each
364-6554, please leave a school has more detailed test-
message. ing information available.
RSVP by March 12 Daily student attendance is
School bus drivers former critical during these assess-
and retired are invited to ment periods.
retirement celebration Helping Hands Volunteer
All former and retired Orientation March 2
Suwannee County school bus Helping Hands Volunteer
drivers are invited to help cel- Orientation, 10-11 a.m.,
ebrate the retirement of Hugh Wednesday, March 2, (first
Mills and Diana Evans. Cele- Wednesday of every month),
bratiion at 6, p.m., Saturday, Hospice of the Sun anniee
March 19, Sheryl's Bdfet'r "t Valley,"6'1` SW\ FL ateway
515 SW Fifth Street, Live" Drive,'Lale'City.Ifif6'oi'reg-
Oak. Tickets: $12.50 per per- istration: Carolyn Long, 386-
son. RSVP by March 12 or 752-9191.


D


Eom-


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www.BobbyCorbetts.com www.BobbyCorbetts.com

& I~ :i . I I I'


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. . . ......'-.



* Side by Side Refrigerator * Raised Panel Doors - '
Smooth Top Range/Self Clean * Dishwasher '
* Fireplace * Upgrade Carpeting i _



1'Xu0 E .x yW 6i, l SrORAOEBUILDI 8rOTO HAULER

Financing Available on Complete Housing Packages Including:
Site Clearing, Well, Septic & Power Pole


* Metal Roofing ' Plumbing * Electrical
* Doors Windows * Awnings * Steps
SRV Supplies * Skirting - Vinyl Siding
. Wide Width Carpet & Vinyl Flooring


THE ONLY DEALS WE CAN'T BEAT ARE THE ONES WE DON'T SEE!!)


We Also Carry ooo t. Parts Warehou Hors: M-F 8-8
RV Parts! " Sat 8-5; Sunday by Appt.
It's Worth the Drive . corge s
to Live Oak for the - - - -.- -_ E . 9ow
Lake City Live Oak
386-362-4061 145123JRS-F


Arrest Record

Editor's note: The Suwan- lewd/lascivious molestation -
nee Democrat prints the entire 20 counts, SCSO W. Mus-
arrest record each week. If grove.
your name appears here and Feb. 22, Jason Leonard
you are later found not guilty Poucher, 22, 17692 189th Rd.,
or the charges are dropped, driving under the influence -
we will be happy to make note second offense, possession of
of this in the newspaper when drug paraphernalia, FHP K.
judicial proof is presented to Weaver.
us by you or the authorities. Feb. 22, William Ray Yaun
The following abbrevia- Jr., 24, 614 Helvenston .St.,
tions are used below: burglary, battery, assault (do-
SCSO-Suwannee County mestic violence), return or
Sheriffs Office court, SCSO S. Greaves.
LOPD-Live Oak Police De- Feb. 23, Bobby Arrington,
apartment. 45, 176 Goldberg Circle, fail-
FDLE-Florida Department ure to appear on original
of Law Enforcement. charge of grand theft by pass-
FHP-Florida Highway Pa- ing, worthless bank check
trol. (Leon County), SCSO D.
DOT-Department of Trans- Watson.
portation Feb. 23, Steven Kerns
P and P-Probation and Pa- Ashcraft, 34, 19106 54th Ter-
role race, cultivation of marijuana,
Feb. 22, Willie Henderson, possession of drug parapher-
29, Valdosta, Ga., sentenced nalia, LOPD A. Land.
to five years Department of Feb. 23, Brian Edward Cas-
Corrections, SCSO T.K. cadden, 39, Mayo, violation
Roberts. of probation on original
Feb. 22, Marcus Tyron charge of battery on law en-
Hutchinson, 31, Uthis forcement officer (Union
Springs, Ga., failure to stop County), P and P S. O'Hara.
for inspection, felony driving Feb. 23, Tony Lee Griffin,
while license suspended, 29, 818 Floyd St., attaching
OALE B. Starling. - registration plate not as-
Feb. 22, James Dean Miller, signed, SCSO T. Smith.
42, 16757 96th St., sexual bat- Feb. 23, Tina Marie Gur-
tery - three counts, lewd las- ney, 33, Lake City, worthless
civious battery - 10 counts, check, SCSO T. Lee.


USDA
Continued From Page 1A holders and/or producers are re-
quested to provide verifiable in-
marketing quotas and provide formation to their USDA Ser-
transition payments over a 10- vice Center personnel at sign-
year period. All tobacco quota up. The regulations concerning
holders and producers are urged payments to quota holders and
to visit their local USDA Ser- producers for this program will
vice Center and sign up for be available in March.
these benefits." The Act also authorized
Congressional passage late USDA to use a financial institu-
last year of the -Fair and Equi- - tion to help carry out the pro-
table Toiba'cco Refotbn'Aoit off'Ygrim provisions.r^Following a
.:2004: (the. Act), commonly re- .' competitive ,bidding process,
ferred to as the "Tobacco Pro- USDA awarded a contract to
gram Buyout," ended the feder- Wachovia Corporation to help
al tobacco marketing quota and conduct an information cam-
price support loan programs paign to ensure that all potential
with the 2004 marketing year beneficiaries are made aware of
for all quota tobaccos. The mar- the program and procedures.
keting year for flue-cured tobac- The campaign includes sending
co ends June 30, 2005, and Sept. letters to every quota holder and
30, 2005, for all other tobaccos. producer who participates in the
"Growers who were quota program. Particular emphasis is
holders or producers will need being placed upon efforts to
to contact their local Farm Ser- contact small and minority pro-
vice Agency as soon as possible ducers. Wachovia also will
if they want to be paid as stated place magazine and newspaper
in the tobacco buyout legisla- ads, radio spots, and television
tion," advised Kevin Morgan, ads in rural and agricultural me-
director of Florida Farm Bureau dia; and provide informational
Federation's Ag Policy division, brochures at key gathering
To locate the nearest Farm Ser- places. Town hall meetings will
vice Agency, visit also be hosted in key tobacco-
http://www.fsa.usda.gov/fl/ or growing states, and a toll-free
call (352) 379-4500. call center will go into service
The payment rate for quota March 1, 2005. For more infor-
holders is $7 per pound times mation, please contact your lo-
the Base Quota Level (BQL) for cal USDA Service Center, the
quota held as of Oct. 22, 2004. National Tobacco Call Center at
Producers receive $3 per pound 1-866-887-0140 beginning
times the BQL based upon the March 1, or the Farm Service
producer's share of the risk in- Agency Web site at
curred for 2002, 2003 or 2004 http://www.fsa.usda.gov/tobac-
crops. Payments will be made in co.
10 annual installments but may Florida Farm Bureau Federa-
be assigned or a successor-in-in- tion is the state's largest general-
terest to the contract may be per- interest agricultural association
mitted. If quota holders or pro- with more than 150,000 mem-
ducers have interests in farms in ber-families statewide. There are
more than one county, contracts Farm Bureaus representing 64
for each of these farms must be counties in Florida, where agri-
entered into in the appropriate culture comprises a stable, vital
USDA Service Center. leg of Florida's economy, rival-
Prior to sign-up, all known ing the tourism industry in eco-
quota holders and/or producers nomic importance. Headquar-
will receive a letter providing tered in Gainesville, the Federa-
more detailed information on tion is an independent, non-prof-
the program. The letter also will it agricultural organization and
include Farm Service Agency is not associated with any arm of
records of poundage of BQL for the government. More informa-
individual quota holders and/or tion is available on the organiza-
producers. If the information is tion's website, http://Florida-
inaccurate or incomplete, quota FarmBureau.org.


Touchton's


Sales * Service * Installation
10156 U.S. Hwy. 90 East, Live Oak'
0l.] Commitment to Excellence
Owners: Jan www.Touchtons.com
& Sarah Touchton O11 'd3 JlIbvJ CAC058747
Is 140408JRS-F


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25,2005


PAGE 2A


......... I









FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 3A


Bulldog


Continued From Page 1A

politics," Bulldog player T.J.
Westberry said. "Why even


The choice of the players is
Tommy Chambers, Suwannee
High's current Dean of Stu-
dents. Chambers was the


We, thc Football PlayersCN of Suwmanee High School, refusc to
play for an outside coach. We have made it perfectly clethat we,
the Players, were in favor ofan "Inside Coach"-
This is an official petition stating that we will not play for the
new coach. We el that the coaching selection was strictly
political and the concern ofthe athletes wene never a
consideration. ,01n



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have a committee if Mr. Boa-
tright is going to pick the
coach anyway?"
The players are deeply con-
cerned about Bennett's record.
Bennett, 61-65 over his 20-
year career and 4-7 for .last
season.
"We don't want to play for a
loser," Westberry said.


Schools Walter Boatright
made the decision to go with
their alternate selection, Bob-
by Bennett.


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Lee t*4~od mJf,



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2004 quarterback coach and
coached the kickers as well.
He has been a head coach of a
football program in his career.
He received the majority of
the selection committee's
votes. According to committee
member Randy Ethridge, the
vote. was 5-3 in favor of
Chambers. Superintendent of


"I understand there is a lot
of controversy surrounding
this decision. It is one a great
deal of thought and prayer has
gone into," Boatright said this
week when asked about the
controversy. "Coach Bennett
has served as head football
coach/athletic director in
Ozark, Ala., and has experi-


Review


Continued From Page 1A


achieve conception.
The Library Materials Re-
view Board, composed of
Janie Philpot, Jessie Philpot,
Bonita Swain, Juettie Kelly
and Cheryl Mae Brinson met
Feb. 23 at the County Office
building to consider a request
by a local mother that the.book


The Commission then ap-
pointed a committee to decide
if the book should be moved or
left in the section where SRRL
Administrator Danny Hales
had placed it. However, It took
several tries before a commit-
tee or at least a full committee
would show up to deal with the
situation. After the first mem-
bers to the board were select-
ed, .some quit without ever


was..-inappropriately placed meeting, on,,the delicate issue,
and .should';be moved ato >an -.according to the county. Final-


older age group section.
Brinson was out of town
and could not attend the meet-
ing.
The mother, Jennifer Jemi-
gan, had complained the book
was too explicit for small chil-
dren and was placed where
they could readily access the
book by themselves, a com-
plaint that went to the Suwan-
nee County Commission.
Jemigan asked that the book
be moved to another section
for children eight and above
rather than in the section for
ages four to eight.
"I'm very disappointed in the
decision made by the commit-
tee and interested to know
what qualification those com-
mittee members had," said
Jennifer Jernigan, the Live
Oak mother and wife who
asked that the book be moved
to another section of the li-
brary. "Are they parents of
young children?" Jemigan said
she had asked for the book to
be moved to an older age sec-
tion or to a parenting section
where the child would have to
have permission from the par-
ent to check it out.


ly, five members were seated.
Now that a decision has
been made that "Hales has fol-
lowed the library's collection
development policy which has
been approved by the Board of
County Commissioners, in the
placement of the book "Mom-
my Laid An Egg" in the chil-
dren's section of the library"
by a unanimous vote of the
four board members present,
the recommendation will be
brought to the County Com-
mission meeting March 1. The
board could then decide if it
wishes to accept the recom-
mendation or have the book
moved to another section.
Jernigan said she has about
320 signatures on a petition
she plans to present to the
County Commission that op-
poses the decision of the re-
view committee. She also
wants the board to hold off on
making a decision on the issue
until the night meeting March
15 so citizens who have to
work can be available to at-
tend that meeting and voice
their opinions directly to the
board.
Jernigan said she's not hap-


py with the way the situation
was handled. "Mr. Hales has
been very adamant in address-
ing it as a censorship issue,"
Jernigan said. "We rate
movies and TV shows, why is
it censorship to move the book
to another section?"
Jernigan said she believes
that if her child were to draw
some of the drawings at
school found in the book they
'"nighti possibly'e seif to the
principal's office,. She ques-
tions why then would a library
allow a book with drawings
supposedly done by children
of parents "fitting together" to
be placed in the 4-8-year-old
section of the library.i
When WCTV Channel 6 TV
in Tallahassee aired the seg-
ment 'they filmed regarding
the issue the morning of Feb.
24, those drawings were not
shown and the reporter said
they could not show them. "If
they are not allowed by their
editors (at WCTV channel 6)
to show it on their television at
11 p.m., why are they allowed
to show it to children in the li-
brary?" Jernigan questioned.
"I'm pro free speech, I just
want it moved where my
young child cannot handle it,"
Jemigan stated. "When my
young son, age 5, brought this
book to me in the library while
I was pregnant, I was flabber-
gasted," Jemigan stated. "It's
hard to raise young boys to
men today in a Godly fashion
today but I believe I as a par-
ent I should have the right to
decide when my own child is
mature enough to hear some
areas of sex education."


Steve


Continued From Page 1A

nees of over 200 officers and
investigators state wide.
Officer Wood has been em-
ployed in his current position
since April, 2000. He is cur-
rently assigned to the Agricul-
tural Interdiction Station lo-
cated on Interstate 10 in
Suwannee County. Officer
Wood was nominated for this
award by his immediate su-
pervisor, Sergeant Lamar
Kent and two co-workers. He
is married with two children.
The Department of Rev-
enue collected over $12 mil-
lion in tax during the last fis-
cal year from bills of lading
transmitted to them by offi-
cers at Agricultural Interdic-
tion Stations. During 2004,
Officer Wood imaged 1,351
bills of lading. His action con-
tribuited significantly to the
collection of the taxes which


would have otherwise gone
uncollected.
During 2004, Officer Wood
conducted 2,230 regulatory
inspections of commercial ve-
hicles, 799 regulatory inpec-
tions of livestock and-inter-
cepted 419 vehicles that at-
tempted to bypsss the station
and avoid inspection. The
most notable of these resulted
in the seizure of over 500
pounds of marijuana con-
cealed behind a false wall in a
panel truck. The marijuana
was valued at approximately
$550,000. The false compart-
ment and marijuana was dis-
covered after anomalies were
discovered in the cargo sec-
tion of the vehicle. The indi-
vidual arrested was subse-
quently convicted and sen-
tenced to prison. The case
also resulted in teh forfeiture
of the panel truck.
Officer Wood is an impor-


tant member of a work group
stationed at Interstate 10 that
was collectively responsible
for the recovery and seizure
of approximately $8 million
in narcotics, currency and
stolen property during 2004.
Officer Wood is responsible
for field training new officer
assigned to his squad andis al-
ways available to assit other
officers when required. He
conducts himself in a profes-
sional manner both on and off
the job.He has performed the
unique duties assigned to an
officer employed by the De-
partment ast a high level his
entire career.
The decision to select Steve
Wood as 2004 OALE Officer
of the Year was the result of
no single arrest or accom-
plishment. The decision was
based on his outstanding and
professional performance sus-
tained throughout 2004.


enced playoff successes as a
head coach," Boatright added.
"Coach Bennett has imple-
mented a year-round football
program, staffing, booster club
relations 'and organization,
budget, scheduling, player-
placement in college and over-
all football operations."
Roman said the seniors who
will not be playing next year
said they feel coach Tommy
Chambers, the man the selec-
tion committee voted for 5-3,
would have given the younger
players a better chance to win.
"Why bring in an outsider,
when there is a perfectly good
candidate from the school that
was qualified," Roman said.,
New coach Bobby Bennett,
contacted Feb. 23 at Carroll
High in Ozark, Ala., said he
doesn't know enough about the


Taylor

Continued From Page 1A

"The biggest problem we
have is everyone is strapped
for money!" Taylor said.
"We hope that collectively,
all of us can find a solution
to the problem."
For hours, City of Live
Oak Mayor Sonny Nobles,
city and county officials, and
Department of Transporta-
tion sat around a table dis-
cussing possible solutions.
"We have a county com-
missioner who is willing to
put aside some funding to
help pay for Bass Road to be
paved," Taylor said.
."I hope you will encourage


situation to make a comment.
He said he didn't know the
players and the coaches were
upset about his hiring. "Until I
get down there and meet folks,
I can't say what's going on. I
haven't met the coaches, and I
haven't met the players. I won't
know how to fix it until I get
there," Bennett said.
Westberry said the players
think the team will have to
start all over from scratch,
learn new plays and a new sys-
tem.
"The seniors are going to
lose this whole next year,"
Westberry said.
The players are also unhap-
py with Bennett's affiliation
with the "Wing-T" offense.
The last time Suwannee ran
the Wing-T, the team's record
was 0-10. But, according to


your county commissioner in
your district to follow suit. I
hope the commissioners re-
alize if we ever had a disas-
ter especially around the
schools during the early
morning hours before school
or after school when parents
are picking up their children,
ad the bus congestion and
this is a real big issue."
Taylor reported several
things are being done to help
find solutions.
"At the beginning of the
school year we had a air-
plane fly over and took pic-
tures of the traffic conges-
tion during peak hours and
the pictures tell a tale!" Tay-


Bennett, he runs a wide-open,
shot-gun type offense. Still, on
Jan. 28, he conducted and
hosted a Wing-T clinic in
Ozark.
"I don't plan to run a Wing-
T," Bennett said. "We'll run
some I-formations, some shot-
gun type offense." Bennett
added that he had begun fazing
the shot-gun into his 2004 4-7
team.
"The Wing-T is not wanted
in Suwannee," Westberry said.
Roman summed up his com-
ments by saying. "Why hire a
losing coach when we have a
winning tradition."

Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or by
e-mail at
janet. schrader@ gaflnews. coin.


lor said.
Taylor told the board a
study done two years ago is
being updated.
"One thing that will com-
plicate things in that area is
the new 110 housing units
that will be built behind the
Sportsplex," Taylor said.
Taylor suggested to the
board the possibility of using
moving pictures, "Since
movement tends to speak a
little louder than still photos."
"Everyone had their say, I
think it was a cooperative ef-
fort, everyone was very con-
genial. I think it was a pro-
ductive start, most of all we'
need to be patient!"


FCAT


Continued From Page 1A

good night's sleep the night be-
fore and a well balanced break-
fast the day of testing.
Suwannee County Superin-
tendent of Schools Walter Boa-
>r,,tright amnouncec1laDesday, Feb.
22 that all students taking the
;FAP' WiTl be servedt" free
breakfast.
While Florida has had an exit
test for more than two decades,


this will be the third year that
passing the 10th grade FCAT
will be a requirement for gradu-
ation.
"Florida students are respond-
ing to the challenges set before
them," Lt. Governor Toni Jen-
nings said.
S"We want ti 6sL.LIrC tht '.' hen
a student leavestheelassroom at
the end of the year, they have
achieved the necessary skills to
succeed in school and in life."


LivstokShowandSa


~ILt~ KL _


*". " " " " - Bi
Inside todiy's 'ditiib
of the Suwannee
Democrat


PAGE 3A


FRIDAY., FEBRUARY 25,2005


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


�p











VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


BIBLE VERSE

"The fear of the LORD is a fountain of
life, turning a man from the snares of
death." --Proverbs 14:27


umann l4rmonrrat
MYRA C. REGAN Memoers of the Suwannee'
Publisher Democrat edilonal 3oard are Myra
C Regan, publisner, and Susan K
SUSAN K. LAMB Lamb. managing editor. Our
Managing Editor View is formed by that board


GOVERNMENT

Suwannee County Board of

County Commissioners

Tentative Agenda for Tuesday,

March 1, 2005 meeting, 9 a.m.
Live Oak City Hall
101 Southeast White Avenue
Live Oak, FL 32064
InvocationPledge to American Flag
ATTENTION:
* The Board may add emergency items to this agenda.
* Lunch Break - Approximately Noon until 1 p.m.
CONSENT
1. Approve payment of invoices.
2. Approval of payment, upon receipt of D.O.T. funds, of Pay
Application No. 6 in the amount of $54,837.86 to Slone Asso-
ciates, Inc. for work on Airport T-Hangar Project. (D.O.T.
Grant)
3. Approval of payment, upon receipt of D.O.T. funds, of Pay
Application No. 7 in the amount of $47,645.50 to Slone Asso-
ciates, Inc. for work on Airport T-Hangar Project. (D.O.T.
Grant)
4. Approval to advertise for bids to resurface swimming pool.
5. Authorization to purchase a van for $3,000 from Sheriff's
Office.
6. Approval to advertise for bids for waste tire removal.
TIME SPECIFIC ITEMS
7. At 9 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard,
discuss, with possible Board action, approval of an easement to
Wellborn Springs LLC. (Chris Howard and Attorney Austin
Peele)
8. At 9 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard,
discuss current county land use and zoning for dairies. (Sandy
Killian)
9. At 9 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard,
discuss alleged violation of construction of carport attached to
mobile ho e without ia permit and accessonr structure permit
required for shed:. (Felicia Perry)
10. At 9 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard,
reconsider decision by Board during Feb. 15, 2005 meeting
concerning maintenance of 91st Drive. (Ed Kilpatrick)
GENERAL BUSINESS
11. Chairman calls for emergency agenda items. Any item this
Board agrees to consider will be heard under Agenda Item No.
20, Emergency Agenda Items.
12. Approval of minutes of Feb. 3 workshop and Feb. 15 regu-
lar meeting.
13. Public Concerns and Comments. (Come forward to podium
- limit comments to five minutes.)
14. Representative from the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court to present report,
15. Staff Reports
a) John G. Wooley, County Coordinator
b) T. Jerry Sikes, Public Works Director
c) John D. Hales Jr., Director of Libraries
d) Hal A. Airth, County Attorney
e) Greg Scott, Recreation Department Director
16. Request letter in opposition to HB0611. (John D. Hales Jr.,
Director of Libraries)
17. Adoption of joint resolution with City of Live Oak and Eco-
nomic Alliance for working together for economic develop-
ment. (John G. Wooley, County Coordinator)
18. Set date and time for public hearing for CDBG grant. (John
G. Wooley, County Coordinator)
19. Set workshop to discuss establishing "No Thru-Truck
Zones" in the county. (Commissioner Jesse Caruthers)
20. Emergency Agenda Items.,
21. Board Members' Inquiries, Requests and Comments.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION
Public Service Commission Consumer Hotline
1/800/342-3552
Local government meeting times
Suwannee County Commission
1st Tuesday @ 9 a.m. & 3rd Tuesday @ 4 p.m.
Live Oak City Hall located at the comer of US 90 east and
White Avenue
1/386/364-3450
Live Oak Council
2nd Tuesday/7 p.m.
Live Oak City Hall
East Howard at the comer of White Street
1/386/362-2276
Suwannee County School Board
4th Tuesday/6 p.m.
Suwannee County Schools District Office
702 2nd Street NW at North Walker Street
1/386/364-2601


Suwannee River Water Management District
2nd Tuesday/9 a.m. except November
and May when meetings are out of town on the
2nd Tuesday. SWRMD offices located in Live Oak at US 90
and CR 49. .........................1/386/362-1001

Please address letters to:
Letters To The Editor, Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Please include your name, full address and daytime
phone number. We ask this so we can varify your letter
and discuss any questions about it with you.


How'd they do that? I heard that
over and over again at the Andre Kole
magic show at the First Baptist Church
this past weekend. He wowed the audi-
ences with his tricks and illusions. As
part of his program, he gave his Chris-
tian testimony. He relayed to the folks
in attendance about how he spent his
first 25 years working day and night to
acquire "stuff." He realized later there
was more to life than material things BY SONNY
and found inner peace and satisfaction
through his Christian beliefs. Everything went well when I got my
head cut off. It did not hurt a bit. No, I don't know how 'he did it.
This weekend I watched a documentary about the battle of Iwo
Jima and the monument that was erected to commemorate that
event. Approximately 6,800 soldiers lost their lives and another
18,000 were wounded in this one battle over that barren piece of
land. I continue to be amazed and overwhelmed with the bravery
of those soldiers. How they unselfishly challenged death swells
me with gratitude and a never ending remembrance of their sacri-
fices. We loose about 1,500 WW II veterans a day. We must re-
member their sacrifices and that of those that continue to serve and
die in the name of democracy. We now have our own monument
to remember those in the military that have served our country.
This monument was erected at the Live Oak Cemetery to recog-
nize the various branches of our military. A big THANK YOU
goes out to Live Oak Elks Lodge and Janet DaSilva who spear-
headed the building of the monument. We are truly a caring and
giving community.
Congressman Allen Boyd visited our community this week to
enlighten the public, on matters concerning healthcare and to re-
ceive input from his constituents. We welcome Congressman
Boyd's visit and appreciate his attention. Senator Bill Nelson will
be at City Hall on Monday Feb. 28 from 1 p.m until 2 p.m. Make
your plans to attend and express your thoughts to the senator. A big
THANK YOU goes out to both members of our congressional del-
egation for the representation they give us.
I'm not a die hard race fan but I did manage to watch the Day-
tona 500 off and on Sunday. I'll admit that the last six laps were
very exciting. My grandson is a Gordon fan so Jeff's victory made
him happy. Evidently some travelers on our city streets think they
are on a race track from the way they speed. I felt like a race car


Dear Editor:
Here are some sobering facts on alcohol.
America's Alcohol Scoreboard
*.Beverage alcohol - America's number one drug choice
* Alcohol consumption - America's number one drug problem
* There are 15-20 million Americans who are alcoholics
* $50 billion annually spent on alcohol
* 80 percent of all alcohol is consumed by 20 percent of all
drinkers
* Alcohol problems cost the American economy $75 billion
annually
*Seven out ofli0 adult, Anericans consume the-addictive drug
alcohol - one out of three who continue to drink will become al-
coholic, if they live long enough
* 250,000 Americans lost their lives in alcohol related auto
crashes over the past decade (26,000 this year)
* One American dies every 21 minutes in alcohol related auto
wrecks (70 die a day)
* 65 percent of traffic fatalities are alcohol related
* On average weekend night - one out of every 10 cars you
meet is driven by a drunk driver
* Alcohol consumption is the leading cause of death of ages
15-25
* 80 percent of all fire fatalities are alcohol related
* 65 percent of all drownings are alcohol related
* 80 percent of all suicides are alcohol related
* 40 percent of all fatal industrial accident are alcohol related
* 60 percent of people who die from falls have been drinking
* 70 percent of robbers are drinking (just prior to or during of-
fense)
* 85 percent of murders are alcohol related
* 75 percent of prison inmates have drinking problems
* 65 percent of child and wife abuse are alcohol related


WALTER WILLIAMS
�2005 Creators Syndicate


Part two of a
At the end of the previous article,
you were left with this question:
Which is the best method of resolv-
ing conflict over what's produced,
how and when it's produced, and
who's going to get it? Among the
methods for doing so were the mar-
ket mechanism, government fiat,
gifts or violence. The answer is that
economic theory can't answer nor-
mative questions.
Normative questions deal with
what is better or worse. No theory


can answer normative questions. Try asking a physics teacher
which is the better or worse state: a solid, gas, liquid or plasma
state. He'll probably look at you as if you're crazy. On the other
hand, if you ask your physics teacher which is the cheapest state
for pounding a nail into a board, he'd probably answer that the
solid state is. It's the same with economic theory, as opposed to
economists. That is, if you asked most economists which method
of conflict resolution produces the greater overall wealth, they'd
probably answer that the market mechanism does.
The bottom line is that economic theory is objective or non-
normative and doesn't make value judgments. Economic policy
questions are normative or subjective and do make. value judg-
ments - questions such as: Should we fight unemployment or
inflation, should we spend more money on education, and should
the capital gains tax be 15 percent or 20 percent? It's in the area
of value judgments where there's so much disagreement among
economists.
Keeping the distinction between non-normative and normative
in mind is very important, so let me elaborate a bit. Take the
statement: The dimensions of this room are 30 feet by 40 feet.
That's an objective statement. Why? If there's any disagreement,
'there are facts to which we can appeal to settle the disagreement,
namely getting out a measuring instrument. Contrast that state-
ment with: The dimensions of this room should be 20 feet by 80


driver at times this week. I was going
around in circles. Boy, was it busy but it
was a good busy. Congressman Boyd
was at City Hall Monday morning. The


.


* 200,000 plus a year die due to their own or someone else's
alcohol consumption
So, why drink???
The man takes the drink, then the drink takes the man.
Sincerely,
Lee Raymond Wolfe

Dear Editor:
I have listened to the news all week, concerning the treatment
of children. Today, I learned about a one-hour-old baby thrown
from a moving car in Ft. Lauderdale. Why has the treatment of
children by 'parents becomesomething that has become so hor-
rible that they no longer worry about being held accountable?
We watch the court case of Michael Jackson's alleged, until
found guilty in a court of law, abuse of children, and wonder
why the parents who allegedly sold their children to him are not
mentioned as being prosecuted for breaking the law. We think
Children's Services should have stepped in, not realizing that
there are neither enough field people nor money available to
help all the children in danger. We ask, "Why didn't the teach-
ers say something about a child who is being starved to death?"
Perhaps, because they are afraid that someone will sue them for
trying to help. I think there are more people like me, willing to
help but not knowing how, than there are those who say, "not my
problem, it will go away if ignored." We hope and pray that the
law will step in, but then it seems that it gets to the point that we
have lost the power to prosecute the terrible people who gave
birth to these babies. We have turned our backs on the helpless
and the people who care do not know what to do. We can pray,
but it says, "God helps those who help themselves," and I think
it is time someone figures out how we can help the children.
Thank you,
Josette Banks


10-part series
feet. Another person disagrees, saying it should be 50 feet by 50
feet. There are no facts to resolve such disagreement. Similarly,
there are no facts to which we can appeal to resolve a disagree-
ment over whether the capital gains tax should be 15 percent or
20 percent, or whether it's more important to fight inflation or
unemployment.
The importance of knowing whether a statement is non-nor-
mative or normative is that, in the former, there are facts to settle
any dispute, but in the latter, there are none. It's just a matter of
opinion, and one person's opinion is just as good as another. A
good clue to telling whether a statement is normative is whether
it contains the words should and ought.
At the beginning of each semester, I tell students that my eco-
nomic theory course will deal with positive, non-normative eco-
nomic theory. I also tell them that if they hear me making a nor-
mative statement without first saying, "In my opinion," they are
to raise their hands and say, "Professor Williams, we didn't take
this class to be indoctrinated with your personal opinions passed
off as economic theory; that's academic dishonesty." I also tell
them that as soon as they hear me say, "In my opinion," they can
stop taking notes because my opinion is irrelevant to the subject
of the class - economic theory.
Another part of this particular lecture to my students is that by
no means do I suggest that they purge their vocabulary of nor-
mative or subjective statements. Such statements are useful tools
for tricking people into doing what you want them to do. You tell
your father that you need a cell phone and he should buy you one.
There's no evidence whatsoever that you need a cell phone. Af-
ter all, George Washington managed to lead our nation to defeat
Great Britain, the mightiest nation on Earth at the time, without
owning a cell phone.
Our next discussion will be a bit more interesting. We'll talk
about what kinds of behavior can be called economic behavior.
Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Ma-
son University. To find out more about Walter E. Williams and
read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoon-
ists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.


LETTER TO THE EDITOR


COMMENTARY

Economics for the Citizen


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


PAGE 4A


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK


VIAYOR'S

CORNER


dedication of the monument at the
cemetery followed at 10:30 a.m.. Also,
News Channel 27 was in town shooting
some footage to be aired on its station.
At noon the city was presented with a
plaque from the Best of America by
NOBLES Horseback organization for being one
of the 10 best places in America for
horseback riding. Two reasons for this designation are the camping
and stable facilities at the Spirit of the Suwannee and the vast
amount of public lands owned by Water Management available to
riders. As this group continues on their ride they are filming a doc-
umentary that will be aired on national TV in the future. This dis-
tinction has already given us two additional leads on future events
that could come to our community.
Bids were opened last week on what we call the Conner Street
drainage project. It includes piping from the downtown area to the
proposed drainage reservoir between Wes Haney and St. Francis
Church. The first time we bid this project the bids came in
$580,000 above what we had to spend. This time we are only
$298,000 short. I don't know from where or how we will get the
money to complete this project. It's just so expensive to do any-
thing anymore.
We ran into a little snafu in acquiring funding for the new sew-
er plant that must, yes must be built by 2007. Okay it was a big sna-
fu, $3.5 million worth. We were anticipating borrowing the $3.5
million from the State Revolving Loan Program at a very low in-
terest rate. This program gets its money from the interest paid by
larger cities on loans they have made. This interest money goes
into a pool for the use of smaller cities. The City of Miami paid off
a $20 million loan early. Therefore, none of these interest monies
went into the pool for loans. No money, no loans. We have devel-
oped another strategy to try and find other funding sources. We
traveled to Tallahassee yesterday to meet with our Legislative lead-
ers to try and recover from this misfortune. I'll keep you informed.
How are your sinuses? Prepare yourself for the pollen season. I
have seen a lot of that yellow dust around lately. Take care of your
health. Protect yourself by wearing those seatbelts. You knew that
was coming.






FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 5A






SUWANNEE LIVING
...e.. ..................................... .****e*********e****e-*****e***********


Kyndal Brooke Lanier
Eric and Stacie Lanier announce the birth of their daughter,
Kyndal Brooke Lanier, on Nov. 26, 2004 at the Women's Center
in Gainesville. She weighed 8 pounds, 1 ounce and measured 19-
1/2 inches long. She is welcomed by big brother, Kade Lanier.
Maternal grandparents are Seng and Teresa Baker.
Paternal grandparents are Lee and Martha McGauley and Hal
and Melinda Lanier.


A 100th birthday party for Naomi Mallory Dennard ofDowl-
ing Park, formerly of Wellborn, will be held Saturday, March 12
from 3-4:30 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church at 973 S.
I i ii 9, .





















Dennard taught school for 37 years, 17 of those years she
taught first grade in Wellborn. .



Naomi Mallory Dennard
A 100th birthday party for Naomi Mallory Dennard of Dowl-
ing Park, formerly of Wellborn, will be held Saturday, March 12
from 3-4:30 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church at 973 S.
Marion Ave. in Lake City.
Dennard taught school for 37 years, 17 of those years she
taught first gradq in Wellborn.


Words can not express how grateful we are for the multitude
of help and concern shown during our time of crisis. Thank you
for your unselfish acts of bravery and kindness. It is because of
you, Lawrence is still here.
God bless,
Lawrence Corbin and family



Thank you for the cards, gifts, good wishes and especially for
your presence at our 50th Anniversary Celebration. You made
our day extra special.
God bless you.
Donna and Bob Wade

Suwannee River Valley

Archaeology Society will hold open

meetings and membership drive

March 15, April, 19 and May 17


Suwannee River Valley Ar-
chaeology Society will host
open meetings and member-
ship drive at 7 p.m., Tuesday,
March 15, April 19 and May
17 at the public library on US
129 in Branford.
If you are interested in ar-
chaeology, anthropology, ge-
nealogy, history or are just a
plain old treasure hunter, plan
to attend the meetings, sched-
uled to be held the third Tues-
day of each month.


Residents of Suwannee,
Lafayette, Hamilton and sur-
rounding counties are invited
to join.
As an individual you will
bring your expertise and as a
group enhance the individu-
als knowledge, so come and
meet some friends you didn't
even know you have. For
more information call 386-
935-4901 or write SRVAS,
4396 286th Terrace, Bran-
ford, FL 32008.


r''-nana s iamny memn ers, wouta IIeto ov ite an ie n a y
friends, fellow teachers and students to celebrate this great mile- Senator Nelson to be in Live Oak this
S, . stone. month for Town Hall meeting Feb. 28
If you would like additional information, contact Emily
Kade Lanier and Kyndal Brooke Lanier Roberts at 386-752-7384. Sen. Bill Nelson will be at ed to attend the Town Hall
City Hall Feb. 28 from 1 un- meeting and express your

Suwannee Valley Humane Society Adoptables tilp.m. The public is invit- concerns.
fIIIA~pm. Th public i invit--� utm n lr-i-


The ' Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society (a no kill shelter)
and a limited space shelter. They
depends on adoptions for avail-
ability of space. Adoption fee of
$45 includes spay/neuter, de-
worming, heartworm/feline
(leukemia) testing and rabies
shot. Please visit the shelter;, theta
animals would love to meet you.
The shelter is located two miles
south of Lee in Madison County,
just of CR 255 on Bisbee Loop.
(Exit 262 off I-10 or from US 90
turn onto CR 255, go south to
Bisbee Loop.) Call for direc-
tions. You must check with them
prior to bringing a drop-off ani-
mal to the shelter.
REMINDER: DO NOT
LEAVE PETS IN VEHICLES
FOR ANY LENGTH OF TIME
DUE TO THE HEAT AND HU-
MIDITY.
Visit the Suwannee Valley
Humane Society web-site and
see the animals that need a real-
ty good home at
geocities.com/suwanneehs.
Due to the generous gift of a
new building, we are now able
to accept donations of furniture
... and we now have some nice
pieces to sell.
WE REALLY CAN USE
FURNITURE DONATIONS!!!
Attention: If you have lost a
pet or found one, the humane so-
ciety will help you find your pet.
Call 850-971-9904 or toll-free at



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Because of Winn-Dixie (PGa)
1:3014:3016:5019:30
Constantine (R) 1:1514:1517:15110:05
Cursed (PG-13) 1:4514:1017:201 9:35
Hitch (PG-13) 1:0014:001 7:00 I 9:50
Man of the House (PG-13)
1:40 14:2517:10 I 19:40
Son of the Mask (PG) 1:35 14:201 7:25 I 9:45
139774-F


866-236-7812. Leave a message
if we are closed, we will return
your call. They will do what they
can to help you find your pet.
Please check with your local an-
imal control if you have lost a
pet.
LOST OR FOUND ANI-
MALS: . .
LOST: Bull Terrier, ZEUS,
male, brindle with white mark-
ing, no collar, lost near
McAlpin.
LOST: gray and white goat, a
child's pet, greatly missed. Lost
from Rocky Ford Road, Madi-
son,
LOST: Red and white Boxer,
lost in Lee area, wearing red col-
lar.
LOST: Two dogs: No. 1, Lab,
black, female, wearing two col-
lars - red and black; No. 2, Box-
er Wiland, one brindle ear, male,
wearing black collar. If found
call 386-362-2170 or toll-free
866-236-7812.
LOST: Chihuahua, male,
brown, wearing collar with I.D.


DERMATOLOGY
kU date


'BenKe4,yM.D. W|
Board Certified
Dermatologist

SCAR TISSUE
White it is always important to
wear sunscreen and protective
clothing to protect your skin from
the sun's rays. It is even more
important to do so when scars are
present. Scars are particularly
sensitive to sunlight and can burn
faster than healthy skin. If a scar
were to become burned, it can
remain discolored or darkened and
may not fade back to match the
color of healthy skin. Factors such
as genetics and the nature of the
wound play large roles in
determining how visible a scar will
be once the healing process ends.
These factors may be beyond our
control, and shielding the scar from
the sun's rays is one factor that we
can do something about.,
If clothing doesn't cover the scar,
make sure to use a sunscreen.
,Although sun blocks that contain
zinc and titanium are better, any
sunscreens that have a sun
protection factor (SPF) of 15 or
greater are acceptable. For
professional medical care for your
skin, call GAINESVILLE
DERMATOLOGY & SKIN
SURGERY at 352-332-4442 to
schedule an appointment. Our
office is conveniently located at
114 N.W. 76th Drive. We are
accepting new patients


tag. If found call 904-226-0442.
LOST: Two dogs: Staffshire
mix, No. 1, white, brown spot
on tail and ear; No. 2, black,
brown spot around eyes. If
found call 386-965-6055 or
386-688-2867.
FOUND: Small Beagle mix, .
female, about 10 pounds, wear-
ing flea collar and harness.
These are just a few of the kit-
tens and cats, puppies and dogs
available. Featured animals for
adoption:
DOGS:
#2079 - MISCHIEF - Two



'A \
1<


Un ~/1/(i~


years old, tan, female. The right
name for the right puppy. Likes
to run and play, and give kisses.
. #2080 - EVA - Two years old,
black, female. Not everyone
wants a wiggling puppy. For
those who want a mature lady to
.be? their friend-and companion...
come meet the engaging EVA.
#2345 - MORRIS - One year
old, black and brown, male.
This is a lad whose heart is just
jumping with love. Wants to
please; wants a loving home.

SEE SUWANNEE, PAGE 10A


-.3-..-,
'3

~o'ry of


SLana a 9*adtrmann ,
1956-200

Forever sailing on peaceful waters.
You will be missed by all who knew you.
7/ Love, Mom, Dad,
Paulette Bud and Wanda


























.e^ e
-: . , ,, - . ,



,,, ,,


sUWUanBIe wresl niligI
Regional Champs!
SPORTS PAGE 1B

Now serving Suwannee and Columbia counties
Tank Set
l120Gal.3Tank (@NiT@ N f

Only 1.29 gal. , , o
We Run A Route System
OFFICE
(386) 792-1012 N
TOLL FREE (877) 203-2871
P.O. BOX 625, JASPER, FLORIDA 32052 136855DH-F




Baby Contest &
Model/Beauty Search,
Amenca's Cover Miss , -
" CoverBoy.USA- , -

Age Division
Girts: Binh-flmo, 12-23mo, 2-3yr. 4-6y,7-yr,
10-12y, 13-15yr, s16up. Boys: B;rth-2yr. & 3-yr..
Over 2 MILLION SSS in cash and pnzes aware ed
yearid Qualify today to win a Sto 10,000.00 bond at
2005 finals.
For information or a
brochure call: ' Event Location
(850) 476-3270 or March 12- Orange Park Mall
(850) 206-4569 . March 13- Lake City Mall
Forms available at ourwebsite /"-- Register: 1:30 p.m.
www.florldacovermiss.com
Email: covermlss@aol.com_.


Prce godFbury,-a 3, 20


Now Accepting Credit. Debit and EBT Cards
Locally Owned & Operated-
By Ray lHayes
Conveniently located Corner
of Hwy. 90 & Walker Ave. *3
Open until 2 p.m. on Saturdays 41,,JRS-F


M6W


GAWW./


'.. * *,. ..-






FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


Dentist Awareness Month


CAN YOU FIND THE CAVITIES: This young boy from the Douglass Center points out cavities in 'Boa'
the puppets mouth at Dr Arthur's office Feb. 18. The students visited the dentist office in celebration
of Dentist Awareness Month. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


READ ME A STORY: Kay Butler, a receptionist at Dr. Arthur's, office read the story 'Just going to the
dentist,' to a group of youngsters from the Douglass Center Feb.18. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


OBITUARY


Gary Michael Thurman Sr.
Sept. 19, 1955-
., Fth, 21. 2005

/ ary Michael Thur-
man Sr., 49, of Live
Oak, passed away at
Shands of Gainesville on
Feb. 21, 2005. He was born
in Roanoke, Va. and made


Live Oak his home for the
past 25, years aftei iro:ving
!,from qrtrLaudJerdrale.l He
was of the Baptist faith and
the son of the late Earl
Bryant Thurman.
Survivors include his
mother, Ruth M. Parson Mc-
Murtrey of Live Oak; one
daughter, Mary Melissa


V Todd & Amber Ferreira, Proprietors
Our family serving yours
with a thoughtful, professional purpose.
932 N. Ohio Ave., Live Oak * (386) 364-5115 E


-v; - Memonalsconr
I' b- !.i ,p, '.re thahii .q,,.,uui v e b tild temorias."'
GRANITE * MARBLE * BRONZE
We can design and
build the unusual
memorial for you.
Do you have a horse,
,.I ..,, cat, or even an elephant
you would like to honor?
H. o.,.)r your best friend with a


* Free Home Consultations
* Serving Lake City, Live Oak,
Madison, and Valdosta Areas


pet memorial from
ValdostaMemorials.com.


Thurman of Live Oak; two
'1n.s. GaryMichael Thurman
.Tr, of ant .la p0,, Kp, I'yle"
Fargo of Live Oak; three sis-
ters, Melinda Jenkins of Live
Oak, Debra Beckner of Live
Oak and Pamela Childs of
Fort Lauderdale; one brother,
Leslie Thurman of Roanoke,
Va., maternal grandmother,
Mollie Parson of Live Oak;
three grandsons; and one
granddaughter.
A graveside service will be
held at 11 a.m., today, Fri-
day, Feb. 25, at the Live Oak
Cemetery with Pastor Wayne
Godsmark of Christ Central
Ministries officiating.
Suwannee Funeral Home,
Live Oak is in charge of all
arrangements.


TRIBUTE TO THE VETERANS' MEMORIAL: Friends gathered together at the veterans' memorial ded-
ication Feb. 21. Pictured I - r, BPOE 1165 Elk member Lee Perry, Elks Exalted Ruler Janet DA Silva,
American Legion member Richard Lees and Yankee Major Dick Shogren from Orlando.
- Photo: Yvette Hannon






- ..,=:-^ - *;"-= .. ..
2, . ,..,- ; .


- . .4~
is. ,'v,.
-F-


I- F
~


"Diane D. Morris and Gloria
Darling Presley have served
this great community for 20
years as employees of Pizza
Hut, from Feb. 26, 1985 to
Feb. 26, 2005.
They have seen people
through grade school, high
school, college and marriage.
They would like to take this
time to say thank you for al-
lowing them to serve you and


be a part of your lives for 20
years and for -making Pizza
Hut your home away from
home.
They would like to give a
special thanks to Sherry Strick-
land, Robin Lamm, Ryan Font
and Ryan Avery. While work-
ing at Pizza Hut, Morris was
able to attend Lake City Com-
munity College and complete
a two-year degree in medical


coding. She is planning to start
a second career in the medical
field.
Presley is presently attend-
ing Suwannee-Hamilton Tech-
nical Center to pursue a career
in child care development.
They want to say thank you,
they love you and God bless
this community.
Diane D. Morris
and Gloria Darling Presley


Nation hits the scales for the Third Annual American

Cancer Society�'s Great American Weigh In March 2


The American Cancer So-
ciety's Great American
Weigh In� offers free, no
obligation weigh ins and


BMI checks - a calculation
that uses both height and
weight to determine if
you're at a healthy weight.


Double Check Challenge.


H&R Block will double check your past returns for free and find the mistakes our
competitors make. If we find more money, we can telefile your past tax return.*
Those who did re-file got back an average of $1,500 more.
Call 1-800-HRBLOCK or visit hrblock.com for an office near you.

386-362-3757 U H&R BLOCK�
6826 Suwannee Plaza Lane,
Wal-Mart Shopping Center, Live Oak, FL 32060
*Fees will apply if you choose to re-file. Individual results may vary. Valid for past three years tax returns only. At participating locations. �@2004 H&R
Block Tax Services, Inc. 144316DH-F


Join us at local, participating
Weight Watchers� locations
from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on
Wednesday, March 2, to
learn about BMI, 'learn tips
to eat better, be more active,
and to lose weight in a
healthy way and join the
fight against cancer. To learn
more about weight manage-
ment or to find the nearest
Weight Watchers center, call
toll-free 800-651-6000 or log
on to WeightWatchers.com.




SPECIAL SECTION
FEATURED
INSIDE TODAY'S
SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT


I --^-.-. ' ' " ' -..-- .. -- : r- -.- ';.- - , 7 " '-,- , .--:



GED Test Dates
March 7 & 8 at 4 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday

You must attend the registration sess
a--l Monday. February 28, 6 p.m.
.Wednesday, March 2 at 9 a.m.
S-- Call Lvnn Lee at

- 364-2782
Sto sign up for registration.
SuftannnaA -l mrnill


i


inn


Technical Center
Live Oak, FL


PAGE 6A


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


- '-


229-245-8858 Burton Fletcher, Owner


�oll


-"., - .
.. .t, ,, -^ ,, Y ,,-


'lr
, " I ,'. , I
,' ,* d ' ' '-


' -- - - ' ' r; '-, ' - S-v 'i - ' " '' 'S v" --- -v2



Ladies "Nigt Out" Men's Breakfast

Friday, feb. 25th Sunday, Feb. 27th

6p.m. 8:45 a.m.
Hy19StLvOkR3-
Hwy 129 South, Live Oak * 364-4800
139QB3-F


, ,-**,:* v. ,
,:2






PAGE 7A


Black History Month



Brigadier General Burgs retires from South Carolina State Guard


Brigadier General James A. Burgs
Brigadier General James A.
Burgs has retired as deputy
commander from the South
Carolina State Guard (SCSG).
Commissioned in the SCSG in
1986, General Burgs' assign-
ments included Management
Systems Officer, Adjutant,'
Deputy Commander 1 st


Florida is celebrating Black
History Month and commemo-
rated the 141st anniversary of
the 1864 Battle of Olustee with
a reenactment and historic skir-
mish. In Florida's largest battle
during the Civil War, three
African American units fought
for the Union Army at Olustee.
More than 2,300 people partic-
ipate in the annual reenact-
ment, drawing more than
20,000 spectators to the Olus-
tee Battlefield Historic State
Park.
"The reenactment of the Bat-
tle of Olustee honors the sol-
diers who fought on Florida's
battlefields," said Florida Park
Service Director Mike Bullock.
"This park is a tribute to our na-
tion's history and celebrates
Florida's rich and diverse cul-
tural legacy."
The Battle of Olustee was
waged on February 20, 1864,


Brigade and Chief of Staff.
Said SCSG Commander Ma-
jor General Eli Wishart, "Gen-
eral Burgs has had a long and
distinguished career in service
to his country and to his state.
His leadership will be missed in
the State Guard, and we wish
him well in his retirement."
General Burgs' State Guard
awards include the Medal of
Unit, Commendation Medal
with Oak Leaf Cluster, Individ-
ual Achievement Ribbon, Gov-
ernor's Unit Citation, Longevi-
ty Service Medal, Federal Ser-
vice Ribbon, Volunteer Service
Ribbon, Military Readiness,
Military Proficiency Ribbon,
the Golden Anniversary Rib-
bon, and more.
General Burgs attended
Florida A&M University and
graduated from Park College
with degrees in science. He is
also a graduate of the National
Defense University, Washing-


when 5,000 Confederate sol-
diers defended their post near
Olustee from an attack by
Union forces. The Union
armies had launched an opera-
tion into Florida, attempting to
occupy Jacksonville. From
there, the forces could disrupt
transportation links and deprive
the Confederacy of food sup-
plies, secure black recruits for
the Union army and seize cot-
ton, turpentine and timber. The
Battle of Olustee resulted in
nearly 3,000 casualties.
Florida's first state park,
Olustee Battlefield, is listed on
the National Register of His-
toric Places. In addition, Olus-
tee Battlefield received the
prestigious 2003 Congressional
Black Caucus Veterans' Brain-
trust Award, established by
General Colin Powell in 1990.
The award recognizes out-
standing national and commnu-


ton, D.C.
He served nearly 28 years in
the U.S. Army, specializing in
personnel and administration.
After retiring from the Army,
General Burgs was employed at
various organizations including
Fort Jackson, Bendix-Siyanco
Corporation (Saudi Arabia), the
Columbia Housing Authority,
and the Richland Sheriff's De-
partment (part time).
General Burgs is also an ac-
tive member of the Veterans of
Foreign Wars, Disabled Ameri-
can Veterans, American Le-
gion, Free and Accepted Ma-
sons, Florida A&M University
Alumni Association, the Amer-
ican Red Cross Advisory Coun-
cil, Board of Directors Alston
Wilkes Home for Veterans.
He is also a member of the
Sovereign Order of Saint
Stanislas and has been awarded
Knight Commander with Star.
General Burgs' military


nity commitment to African
American veterans.
Olustee Battlefield Historic
State Park is located on U.S.
90, 15 miles east of Lake City
and 50 miles west of Jack-
sonville. The park has an inter-
pretive center, interpretive trail
and monuments to the Union
and Confederate Armies.
Florida's state park system is
one of the largest in the country
with 158 parks covering more
than 700,000 acres. Over the
last five years, Florida added
eight new parks, more than
203,000 acres and increased at-
tendance at its nationally-
renowned park system by five
million visitors. In 1999, the
Florida state park system was
awarded the National Gold
Medal for Excellence as the na-
tion's best park system.
For more information, visit
www.floridastateparks.org.


IL~


II._ , .

S I 'ITALIAN CHEESE BREAD
_. J FRESHLY BAKED BREAD, COVERED
"*rf^ WITH MELTED CHEESE AND TOPPED
ORIGINAL ROUND WITH ITALIAN SPICES
CARRY OUT I 10 DELICIOUS PIECES!
PLUSTAX 5 CARRY OUT
^ PLUSTAX
,- I Expires 3/3105 Valid only at
S participating locations.,


76e ataf Asuc


1540SouhOhoAve, LveOa
0 S S Shopig enerSout Oas-Suar


awards include the Bronze Star,
Meritorious Service Medal,
Army Commendation Medal
with Oak Leaf Cluster, Joint
Service Commendation Medal,
Good Conduct Medal #8, Na-
tional Service Defense Medal
with Oak Leaf Cluster, Armed
Forces Expeditionary Medal,
Vietnam Service Medal, Com-
bat Infantry Badge, United Na-
tions Service Medal, Vietnam
Campaign Medal with Device
60, Vietnam Cross of Gallantry


David James Harris was
born on Feb. 11, 1952, in
Suwannee County. He attend-
ed Douglass Elementary
- School from 1958-1964.
From 1964-1969, Harris at-
y tended middle and high
school at Douglass High
School. From 1969-1970 he
attended Suwannee High
School. In 1970 Harris gradu-


with Palm, Meritorious Unit
Commendation and the Korean
Service Medal.
General Burgs resides in Co-
lumbia, S.C. with his wife,
Juanita Perlata. They have two
children and five grandchil-
dren. He was honored by the
State Guard with a dinner, Sept.
3, 7 p.m., at the SCSG Armory,
551 Granby Lane, Columbia,
S.C.
An all-volunteer force of
1,500 men and women, the


ated from Suwannee High
School. From 1970-1972 he
served in the U.S. Navy. Har-
ris was a firefighter for two
years while he was stationed
in Atlanta and the Naval Air
Station in Jacksonville. In
1972, he married Mary Flem-
ing and two sons, David and
Dexter, were born to this
union.


SCSG last year provided
50,000 hours of community
service at a value of $1 million.
The State Guard is open to any
South Carolina citizen between
the ages of 17-70. A branch of
the Military Department of
South Carolina, the State Guard
reports to the governor through
the Adjutant General of South
Carolina.
Submitted by his sister local
resident and retired teacher
Gertrude B. Jones, Live Oak.


Helen Britt Bentley


Helen Britt Bentley was bom
on June 16, 1915. She attended
elementary school at Gifford El-
ementary in Gifford. From
1931-1935 Bentley attended
school at Booker T. Washington
Junior and Senior High Schools
in Miami. Upon graduating
from high school Bentley at-
tended Henry Grady Hospital
School of Nursing in Atlanta,
Ga. from 1936-1938. From
1961-1963. Bentley attended the
University of Miami.
Bentley is the widow of E.
Walker Bentley. The couple was
blessed with two children, Earl
Warren Bentley and Audrey De-_
lores Bentley. Bentley has one
granddaughter and one great-
grandchild.
Bentley has had a number of
jobs throughout her life. Some
of her professional experiences
are: adult ,advisor -
parenting/child-rearing classes
for Miami-Dade Community
College, North Campus; com-
munity organizer - self-help pro-
ject, social service specialist,
community participation and
services coordinator, center
manager and area coordinator
for the Dade County Communi-
ty Action Agency; area coordi-
nator for Economic Opportunity
Program, Inc. in Coconut
Grove; Bentley also worked as a
public health nurse for Dade
County Department of Public


Health, nurse technician for the
John Elliott Blood Bank, staff
nurse at Christian Hospital and
Dade County Hospital (Kendall)
and charge nurse of TB ward,
and industrial nurse at E.J. Hall
Clinic.
Bentley is a member of
African Missionary Baptist
Church, where she has served as
superintendent of Sunday
school, the Missionary Society
and of the Deaconess Board, and
is the church mother.
Other charitable and civic or-
ganizations that Bentley is con-
nected with are historian of Nu
Chapter - Chi Eta Phi Sorority,
Inc.; member of the American
Heart Association, member of
Family Christian Association of
America, Inc.; organized the
first black Senior Girl Scout
Troop in Coconut Grove, served
as adult advisor from 1962-
1968.
On April 2, 1997, the Helen
B. Bentley Family Health Cen-
ter, Inc. was dedicated in Co-
conut Grove. The Mayor of Mi-
ami Joe Carollo proclaimed
April 2, 1997 as Helen B. Bent-
ley Family Health Center Day.
Upon relocating to Suwannee
County Bentley got involved
with the community. Bentley
was one of the organizers of the
Outreach Ministry at African
Baptist Church, helping in feed-
ing the sick and shut-in, cloth-


,. -.







BLACK HISTORY MONTH PRO-
FILE: Helen Britt Bentley, front,
89, helped organize and contin-
ues to work with the Outreach
Ministry at African Missionary
Baptist Church helping in feed-
ing the sick and shut-in, cloth-

care for youth and adults.
-Photo: Submitted

ing, pre-natal care and post-natal
care for youth and adults. These
are just a few of her concerns.
At the age of 12, Bentley lost
her mother. Being the eldest girl,
Bentley helped her father raise
her 11 siblings. Upon comple-
tion of her college education,
Bentley helped send the others
to college, making sure they ob-
tained an education.
Submitted by Suwannee
County Women of Color


Harris worked for many
businesses from 1973-1979.
these businesses included
Mott Buick, Cannon & Wolfe
and Kirby Appliance Store.
Harris became the first black
firefighter in Suwannee Coun-
ty when he was hired Dec. 11,
1975 by the Live Oak Fire
Department where he worked
until Aug. 10, 1980.


Olustee Battlefield significant

in Florida's Black heritage

29th Reenactment of Battle of Olustee draws 2,000 participants


David James Harris


Notice is hereby given that:

1. The City of Live Oak City Council intends to conduct a pubic
hearing on March 9th, 2005, at Live Oak City hall, to use the ad valorem
method of collecting non-ad valorem assessments levied by the City of
Live Oak, Florida, as provided in Section 197.3632, Florida Statutes.
2. The geographic depiction of the property subject to the assessment is
the city limits of Live Oak.
3. The proposed schedule of the assessment is:

Vacant residential - $14.00 per year per parcel
Single family residential - $14.00 per year per parcel
Mobile homes - $14.00 per year per parcel
Multi-family - $50.00 per year per parcel
Vacant commercial - $55.00 per EDU per year per parcel
Commercial - $55.00 per EDU per year per parcel
Commercial Miscellaneous - $55.00 per EDU per year per parcel
Agricultural & Mining - $55.00 per EDU per year per parcel
Churches - $55.00 per EDU per year per parcel
Government buildings - $55.00 per EDU per year per parcel

4. The assessment will be collected by the tax collector.
5. All affected property owners have the right to appear at the public
hearing and the right to file a written objection with the local governing
board within 20 days of the publication of this notice.
6. At the public hearing, the local governing board shall receive the
written objections to roll adoption, hear testimony from all interested
persons, and may adjourn or recess the hearing from time to time. If the
City Council adopts the non-ad valorem assessment roll, it shall specify the
unit of assessment as provided in the ordinance or resolution which levied
or imposed the non-ad valorem assessment.
7. The Live Oak City Council may increase or decrease the amount of
the assessment or the application of the assessment to any affected property
based on the benefit which the Council will provide, or has provided, to the
property with the revenue generated by the assessment.

Matthew D. Brock
City Administrator145134DH-F
1451 34DH-


M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005






FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


PAGE BA U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Scenes from Blood Drag 7 Feb. 12.13

The Suwannee County Airport was the site of Blood Drag 7, a custom auto show and blood drive Feb. 12-13.
Over 4,000 spectators visited the car show over the weekend and 1500 vehicles were on display. - Photos: Yvette Hannon


r-,. . . . '. .


CARS ON DISPLAY AT THE CAR SHOW


CARS ON DISPLAY AT THE CAR SHOW


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INTERESTING SET OF WHEELS


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0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK


PAGE 8A


4


WHEELS






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PAGE 9A


i SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


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Special Finance &Si i:lki Manager






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FPinAV FFRP[ JARY 2.9. 2005








PAGE 10A U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


On Dec. 16, 2004, Mer-
cedes Carmichael, fourth
grade student at Suwannee
Elementary School, gave the
gift of love to a child when
she donated a 12-inch pony-
tail of her own hair to Locks
of Love, an organization that
makes kids', 18 and under,
dreams come true. Lynn
Warner of Country Carousel
generously prepared Mer-
cedes' hair and made the cut.
Mercedes later took the pack-
aged gods to the post office
to send to the Locks of Love
organization.
Nine-year-old Mercedes
and her mother first learned

._.'V "}-i-: @_: :


about the opportunity to do-
nate hair on the Internet. The
Locks of Love's Web site
shows pictures of children
who will benefit and explains
how to go about donating
hair. These children have lost
their hair as a result of
chemotherapy or some type
of illness. This cause is espe-
cially near and ear to the
hearts of their family, since
Mercedes' grandmother,
Margaret Ann Bowers, died
of leukemia.
Mercedes' parents Delina
and Reyn Carmichael, along
with younger sister Alexis,
are very proud of her, stating,


"We are honored that Mer-
cedes has given a gift of hope
and happiness from a pony-
tail of hair that did not cost
her anything to grow, cut or
give to a child that dreams of
one day having hair."
Mercedes and her family
hope that this article will
bring a greater awareness of
the Locks of Love organiza-
tion and that others will want
to make the decision to help
make a child's dream come
true, too.
To obtain information
about the Locks of Love or-
ganization, visit www.lock-
soflove.org.


-; %?~-'t


(above) MAILING THE PACKAGE: Post office
employee Mark Stewart. left. accepts ite pack-
age for nailing trom Mercedes Carmichael for
her donation ol a 12-inch ponytail to the Lock's
of Love organ action . *n.:.,.:. it,.rin,,.
(left) MAKING THE CUT: Fourhn grade Suwan-
nee Elemeniiary Schloi:l student. Mercedes
Carminchael visits Lnn's Country Carousel
where owner Lynnri Warner generously rcut a
12-inLhi ponytlai of her rair for donation to the
Loc olf Love orgianrialion For more Inlorma-
tion on the Loi.:k., of LOve organization visit
w rj/w l Iol .: oa love org . h'ri,:,i,:, ;itn,,i,>,


ABC NewsChannel 27 increases

storm team for hurricane season


ABC NewsChannel 27 Storm
Team now has two weather
watchers in Suwannee County.
As Florida approaches the 2005
hurricane season, ABC
NewsChannel 27 will be relying
on its weather watchers in all of
the coverage counties to provide
ABC NewsChannel 27 with up-


dated weather information.
ABC NewsChannel 27 has
four trained on-air meteorolo-
gists, 16 plus storm team weath-
er watchers and plans on having
more than 50 weather watchers
by June 1. More people
watched ABC NewsChannel 27
last September during hurricane


season than ever-before. ABC
NewsChannel 27 is getting
ready to provide even more
weather related information, if
you are interested in being a
weather watcher, log onto
www.wtxl.com. ABC
NewsChannel 27 ... On Your
Side!


r.-


WARREN WINS VIP JAM TICKETS: Donald Warren, center, is the winner of a drawing sponsored by
the Suwannee Democrat and Big 98.1. Warren wins two VIP Gold Tickets for the Suwannee River
Jam April 21-24 and a Meet and Greet with Lone Star. Pictured I -r, WQHL Big 98.1's Kickin' Kevin
Thomas, Warren and Suwannee Democrat Advertising Manager Monja Robinson.
- Photo: Yvette Hannon


P Brothers -


LECTRONIC


13358 US 90 West ds
Live Oak ., woR0K,

86-364-1557.
f~~~~~~ ff PPq � 3 g.
m^Hof^^^ ^ - & -^ f * *^Bk f fB~b''*-


Suwannee County Home and Community


Education Association Annual County


Commissioner's Luncheon


The Suwannee County
Home and Community Educa-
tion (HCE) Association hosted
members of the Suwannee
County Commission as guests
at its annual County Commis-
sioner's Luncheon on Tuesday,
Feb. 1, at the Coliseum Com-
plex in Live Oak.
HCE members presented a
program on keeping our "en-
gines" or bodies tuned up for


better living. Six members
talked about tuning, fueling,
exercising, cleaning, maintain-
ing and resting our bodies.
HCE Vice-president Evelyn
Wallace was in charge of the
presentation.
HCE President Claudia
Smedley informed the guests
what the Pleasant Hill Club
and the County Association ac-
complished the previous year.


Happy Homemakers Club
President Dorie Peterson did
the same for her club.
County Commission Chair
Billy Maxwell spoke for a few
minutes about the cooperation
between the Commission
Board and HCE in the past and
hopefully to continue in the fu-
ture.
Submitted by Bill Smedley,
HCE Publicity Chair


HOME AND COMMUNITY EDUCATION ASSOCIATION: Pictured, Ito r, HCE members Evelyn Wallace,
Betty Hicks, Carlene Polk, Bettye Bracewell, Joan Stanton, Louise Clements and Donna Wade pre-
sent a program on keeping our "engines," or bodies, tuned up for better living to members and
guests. - Photo: Bill Smedley


HCE ANNUAL COUNTY COMMISSIONER'S
LUNCHEON: Suwannee County Home and Com-
munity Education (HCE) Association President
Claudia Smedley addresses members and
guests at the Annual County Commissioner's
Luncheon. - Photo: Bill Smedley


.- - 1. 4 i..--,

HCE ANNUAL COUNTY COMMISSIONER'S
LUNCHEON: County Commission Chair Billy
Maxwell speaks to the HCE members and Com-
mission members. - Photo: Bill Smedley


Suwannee


Continued From Page 5A

#2670 - BEAR - Retriever
mix, beige in color. Needs kids.
W, Will make a good family dog.
. #26'->s - TEQI ilL - Nine
months old, tan, female. This
wiry and wily lady is a lovely
mixture of enthusiasm and af-
fection, perfect for a "home
girl."
#2689 - REX - Six months
old, black, brown and white,
-male. Energetic and full of
beans with a great love of life!
Knows there's a place for him.
Do you have that place?
#2692 - NEMO - Seven
weeks old, male, black and
brown. Come see him and his
brother BOOTS today!
#2693 - BOOTS - Seven
weeks old, black and white
male, So adorable! This baby,
brother to NEMO, is cuddly,
sweet natured and just a full-out
pleasure.
#2695 - SPOT - Four and a
half months old, black and
white, male. An adorable pack-
age of love looking for the right
place to call home.
#2696 - DAISY MAE - Three
months old, beige and white, fe-
male. As cut as a young lady
can be. You're invited to meet
her and fall in love.
#2697 - JITTERBUG - Two
and a half months old, cream
color, male. Charming young


boy with a playful attitude and
an air of independence.
Many more beautiful pup-
pies and large dogs to choose
from. ...
C \TS
#2212 - MANDY - One and a
half years old, tabby, female. A
lady of charming and captivat-
ing personality. A precious addi-
tion to any home.
#2213 - CRICKET - One and
a half years old, Tortoise shell,
female. You could look the
world over and NEVER find a
more lovable girl.
#2497 - KALUHA - Nine
months old, tabby, male. This
delightful boy is ready to bond
with a family. He'll play, he'll
sleep ... just tell him what you
like.
#2506 - MIKEY - Ten
months old, Tabby, male. Just a
big bundle of love ... on the
lookout for a friend to share that
love. Oh! and handsome!!!
#2592 - MILLIE - One year
old, light Tabby and white, fe-
male. A suave and swishy beau-
ty with an eye to being cuddled.
#2635 - DORA - One and a
half year old, grey, female. This
is such a lovable lady and would
make a wonderful addition to
your household. Come and
meet her soon.
#2665 - TANK - Two and a
half years old, Tabby, white,
male. A real gentleman, longing


for a home and a loving owner.
#2667 - ERMA - Five months
old, tabby, female. Ready to rule
the roost with her regal manner.
Cann play and. prance and, purr
and do all that kitty stuff!
#2684 - ABE - Three years
old, orange, male. Handsome
with a placid outlook that makes
everyone around him feel calm
and content.
#2690 - BINDI - One and a
half years old, female, orange. A
serene spirit and a loving out-
look. Would love to have a
home to call her own.
Many more kittens and cats
available for adoption.
Please help care for the ani-
mals.
Visit our newly expanded
thrift store. Tuesday-Saturday,
10 a.m.-2 p.m. Closed Sunday
and open by appointment only
on Monday. ALL PROCEEDS
SUPPORT THE HUMANE
SOCIETY.
The Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society also recycles alu-
minum cans. Take them to the
shelter.
Recycle, recycle, recycle!
Please recycle newspapers
for the Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society. The recycle
dumpster is located at 305
Pinewood Dr. in Live Oak, next
to Johnson's Appliance Center.
ALL PROCEEDS SUPPORT
THE HUMANE SOCIETY.


Fo AdlsOtoHihS ol



8:3a amo1:0a ama
MathadCmuniaton

Mst av icur 0 Dayof.Tst


C all(36)36-278 o- m reifomain. 1482D-


Mercedes Carmichael -

making the cut


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0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


PAGE 10A







PAGE 11A


IFRIIlAIFIRII I IR25. 2005 SUWmANNEEDEMOCRAT/LIVE-OAK


The ups and downs

of selling cows


VIVID VISIONS POKER RUN: A successful Vivid Visions Poker Run was held Saturday Feb. 18 at the
Big Oak Sportsbar. The Poker Run is sponsored by owners Patsy and Mike Richards. Big Oak Sportsbar
manager Noreen Jenkins, right, presents over $200 to Vivid Visions Shelter Coordinator Jennie Lyons.
- Photo: Yvette Hannon


Legal Specialist Line:

A bi-weekly information service brought to you by The Florida Bar's Board-Certified Lawyers


Five ways to customize
By Kurt E. Lee, Board Certi-
fied Business Litigation Attor-
ney
When you find the perfect
house and your real estate agent
is pushing you to make an offer,
take time to customize the "stan-
dard" real estate contract to help
avoid problems down the road.
Here are five possible modifica-
tions:
1. Specify remedies to protect
both seller and buyer for breach-
es of contract. Most standard
contracts include a default para-
graph specifying remedies avail-
able if either party fails to per-
form as promised. Keeping a
buyer's earnest money deposit
often is the only practical relief
available for sellers, so a seller'
might want to eliminate all other
remedy language and seek a
greater deposit. Buyers might
want remedies that ensure a re-
turn of deposits or "specific per-
formance" remedies to compel
sellers to convey the property.
Ambiguities in the remedy para-
graph don't benefit either party
and generally lead to litigation.
2. Clarify the "as is" language
to protect your interests if prob-
lems arise after closing. Florida
law requires residential sellers to
disclose to prospective buyers
any "facts materially affecting
the value of the property which
are not readily observable and
are not known to the buyer."
Standard contracts generally in-
clude language to this effect, but
can also state that the property is
taken "as is" by the buyer if in-
spections do not reveal prob-
lems. Sellers should consider
eliminating the contractual war-
ranty and adding an "as is" ad-
dendum because buyers who
purchase "as is" property are less
likely to bring later claims. Buy-
ers should consider eliminating
the "as is" language in the con-
tract because inspections might
not reveal problems known to
the seller (e.g., flooding at the
property during the rainy sea-
son).
3. Include information about
mold, the potential for mold
growth in the home and the need
for preventive maintenance to
avoid mold growth. An increas-
ing number of legal actions in
Florida involve claims by buyers
contending sellers failed to dis-
close the presence of mold. Sell-
ers might want to include lan-
guage to encourage buyers to
conduct mold inspections. Buy-
ers, again, should consider elim-
inating any "as is" provisions in
the agreement. Buyers' mold in-
spections should note connec-
tions between mold growth and
water intrusion and observe that
undisclosed water leaks may
contribute to mold growth.
4. Carefully review provisions
that mandate dispute resolution
by arbitration. Standard con-
tracts routinely state that disputes
will be resolved by arbitration
and that the parties will bear their
own attorneys' fees and costs.
How these provisions should be
altered, if at all, largely depends
upon the financial position and
risk tolerance of the parties. The
cost savings attributed to arbitra-
tion are largely anecdotal and
there is no meaningful right of
appeal from an arbitration
award. Arbitration will, howev-
er, generally produce a result in
less time than litigation and the
process gives parties the oppor-
tunity to have someone with ex-
pertise in real estate law decide


the standard residential real estate contract


the dispute.
5. Specify an adequate cost al-
lowance and description of con-
ditions included for repairs dis-
covered during the inspection
process. Most standard contract
forms provide that the seller will
make certain repairs discovered
during the inspection process so
long as the repairs do not exceed
a certain sum. Sellers generally
prefer a low repair limit. No
matter what the limit, buyers of-
ten are frustrated by the exclu-
sion of "cosmetic conditions"
from the repair provision and by
the breadth of the definition of
cosmetic conditions. Buyers
may want to consider greater re-
pair limits and the elimination of
some of the excluded "cosmetic
conditions."
Buying or selling a home gen-


erally is the largest and most im-
portant financial transaction in
which a person will be involved.
It is therefore a good idea to seek
legal advice before signing any
"standard" real estate contract to
ensure that your contract meets
your needs.
Kurt E. Lee is a board-certi-
fied business litigation lawyer in
Nokomis. Certification is the
highest level of recognition by
The Florida Bar of the compe-
tency and experience of attor-
neys in the areas of lawapproved
for certification by the Supreme
Court of Florida. Lee has suc-
cessfully represented clients in
mediations, arbitrations, settle-
ment negotiations and trials in
diverse areas of law. Contact
him at 941-486-8783 or
kurtlee@kurtleelaw.com.


There are three cattle mar-
kets close b, T\o are in Co-
lumbia Count', and one is in
Madison Count.. Live Oak
used to haxe one, but the\
closed it. If you've never
been to a cow sale, you're
missing out. They are
smelly, noisy (mooing, bawl-
ing and such), and interest-
ing. There is a man there
who makes his living "arm-
ing" cows., That means preg-
nancy testing cows for so
much a head. Now that's one
of those jobs you never
thought you'd have when
you grew up! Cow sales are
a tradition and still the best
way to sell cattle when you
need some extra money or
it's just time to take the
calves to market.
One of the secrets I've dis-
covered for making money
with cows is ridiculously
simple. It's like on the stock
market, you need to buy low
and sell high. But that's


here it gets trick,.
The cattle market is as
fickle as a man picking out a
ne%\ pair of boots. You ne oer
know %hen the bottom is go-
ing to drop out of the thing
and prices fall to rock bot-
tom. I can assure you, it's
usually the day I decide to
sell.
The man of the house al-
ways says buy thin, sell fat.
This is a lot more complicat-
ed than it sounds. Some thin
cows are sick, some are old.
The smart cattle man knows
which is which.
Last year was one of the
best years in memory for cat-
tle prices. They were on the
roof all year. Cattle men all
over the county made good
money last year. That was
because of the embargo on
Canadian cattle due to
Bovine Spongiform En-
cephalopathy, mad cow dis-
ease. But the border has been
reopened to Canadian beef


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
and who knows what will
happen this year.
So, if you've got nothing
to do on a Monday, Tuesday
or Wednesday, head out to
the cow sales. You might just
enjoy yourself or bring home
a cow.
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@gaflnews.com
Only in Suwannee County
is an occasional commentary
by local resident and Democ-
rat reporter Janet Schrader-
Seccafico on the lives and
times of Suwannee countians
and is intended to remind us
of the wonderful county we
live in.


RSVP by March 12
School bus drivers former and retired
are invited to retirement celebration
All former and retired Suwan- p.m., Saturday, March 19,' Sh- Wood, 386-364-3575; Pete
nee County school bus drivers eryl's Buffet, 515 SW Fifth Sneed, 386-362-2122; Joan Fe-
are invited to help celebrate the Street, Live Oak. Tickets: wox, 386-776-2555; Pat Bryant,
retirement of Hugh Mills and $12.50 per person. RSVP by 386-776-2231; or Karen Willis -
Diana Evans. Celebratiion at 6 March 12 or for info: Marianne 386-935-1317.


Come celebrate with us March 3, 2005 from 4-7 p.m. at your neighborhood Publix.

For 75 years now, it's been our pleasure serving customers like you. You've made this
special occasion possible, so we'd like you to join us for our anniversary celebration.


P ublix.







IT'S BEEN OUR P L EA S U R E.


141283ctv


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 25,2005





FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


PG2\A --N D


FORD o~luER0,& Nw"


- ,.~-


US 129 NORTH, LIVE OAK, FL (386) 362-1112
4


Past Credit
Concerns,
Divorce,
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Doctor Bills


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2005 FORO EXPLORER
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2005 FORD


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one 'Prnter 922. Utter Vali0 tiru
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2004 EXPLORER SPORT TRACK XLT 2002 FORD F-250 XLT 2003 FC
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Factory Warranty, P2675 -495 26 411

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2002 EXPLORER SPORT 2001 FORD F-150 2000 F(
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1996 FORD F-150 2003 FORD EXPEDITION 4X4 2003
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2004 LINCOLN TOWNCAR 2002 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS 2004 NISS
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IRD F-150 XLT 2004 FORD F-150 XLT 2004 FORD F-150 FX4 4X4
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)RD F-150 XLT 2003 FORD F-150 XLT 1997 CLASS A MOTORHOME
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t ,ow din bed amoerda nd % i U Generator, Micro Fdgeo r id
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OVER 1 MILLION DOLLARS IN QUALITY
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US 129 NORTH, LIVE OAK, FL


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 12A


C ';"U R Y







inuamince rcmrrat

Section B
Friday, February 25, 2005


Suwannee softball tonight!
Suwannee Lady Dog sohtball faces district oppcinent East Gadsden tonight at the
Suwannee High softball field. Come out arid .vatch some great sohball action. The
JV take the field at 5 p m and the v'ariity Lady Dogs hit the green at 7 p.m.
40 i A4y D054!


I.


Suwannee


tennis

notches two

more wins

Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
Suwannee tennis took on
Madison Friday, Feb. 18 at
home. The boys team logged an
tough 4-3 victory while the
Lady Dogs hammered the Cow-
girls, shutting them out 7-0.
Number-one John Janousek
won 8-4, making him 2-0 so far
this season.
New to the Bulldog tennis
team this year, but playing in
the number-two position, soccer
player Cameron Ridgeway lost
6-8 He is 1-1.
Number-three for Suwannee,
Jordan Budwick won 8-6, mak-
ing his season record 2-0.
Number-four Suwannee
player Noah Walker won 8-2.

SEE TENNIS, PAGE 4B

Suwannee

FFA Alumni

Golf Tourney

set for

tomorrow
Thie 'Suwannee'.FiA Alumni
Golf Tournament will be held
at the Suwannee Country
Club, Live Oak, on Saturday,
Feb. 26. The four person team
scramble (one player, 0-8
handicap, team handicap 40
minutes) will have 8 a.m. and
1 p.m. tee times. Lunch and
door prize drawings will be
held from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
The 2005 tournament title
sponsor is Allbritton's Pontiac-
GMC Trucks and corporate
sponsors are: ALLTEL, Gold
Kist Farms, W.B. Howland
Co., Quality Plus Communica-
tions, Mercantile Bank, Cotton
States Insurance, Eddie Accar-
di Chevrolet-Mazda, Kelly's
Auto Sales, Lafayette State
Bank, First Federal Savings

SEE FFA, PAGE 4B

Payne Pickles

places twice

at Crossroads
Results from Cross Road
Motorplex for Feb. 19, 2005

BRIGGS JR. SPORTSMAN
CHAMP HEAVY:
1st - Brady Todd, Chatsworth,
Ga.
2nd - Tyler Dyer, Pell City,
Ala.
3rd - Adam Dyer, Pell City,
Ala.
4th - Hayden Campbell,
Monte Verde
5th - David Cody Smith, Holt
6th - Matthew Warren, Or-
mond Beach
7th - Dillon Baker, Tampa
8th - Haley Poole, Bessemer,
Ala.
BRIGGS JR. HEAVY:
1st - Brandon Wells, Jack-
sonville
2nd - Buck Ridley, Newnan,
Ga.
3rd - Evan Becton, Valdosta,
Ga.
4th - Payne Pickles, Live Oak
5th - Jacob Lecson, Ocala
6th - Bill Palmeri, St. Cloud


Suwannee wrestling Regional Champs!


2005 REGIONAL WRESTLING CHAMPIONS-THE SUWANNEE BULLDOGS! Back row I to r: Casey Osborne, Justin Mowls, Regional runner-up, District champion
Michael Wright, District runner-up Kris Kearns, Octavious Granville, Regional and District champion Caleb Wainwright, stat girl Deanne Wainwright. Second row I to r:
Coach David Laxton, Regional champ Greg Boyle, Peter Kyne, Regional and District champion Levi Wainwright, Regional champion and district runner-up Lee Laxton,
Greg Jones, William McCrimon, Coach Larry Hart, Front row I to r: David Sanders, Regional and District champion Barney Wainwright, Regional and 'District champion
Presion. Hart, Caleb Sanders,..Cory.Rilegy,i d Stat girl rB l ttny Laxti).. j- a.. ..a r r e, .,a,:i .. . �..,CO, L . ,, , ,


-M
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
According to the Suwan-
nee Bulldog wrestling
coaches, the Dogs got hoo-
dooed out of the district


championship. BLu it '.as
Suwannee doing the hoo-
dooing at the Regional
Championship in Panama
City. The Dogs took the big
"W" over Wakulla, who
placed third and Bay placing
second. Suwannee took first


i. \th 215 points, 6S more
points than second-place
Bay. Wakulla scored 144.5.
This was an important vic-
tory for the Dogs. Before the
game, the wrestlers and
coaches prayed and dedicat-
ed their victory to Brad


Wainwright and his family.
Brad Wainwright is the fa-
ther of Caleb and Levi Wain-
wright.
"Coach Hart and myself
are very proud of the team's
performance," Coach David
Laxton said. "However, it


does not make up for last
week's loss at district. We
wanted to dedicate this vic-
tory to Brad Wainwright and
his family. It was a sincere
effort from the team on their

SEE SUWANNEE, PAGE 3B


Danielle Smith medals at state


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
Two Suwannee Lady Dog
weightlifters traveled to De-
land for the State Girls
Weightlifting Tournament.
Danielle Smith competed in
the unlimited category and
Kayla Gandiana, only a
sophomore, competed in the


199 class. Both girls had done
well over the season and were
prepared to do well. Danielle
Smith came home with a sixth
place medal.
, "Both Kayla and Danielle
did very good. Kayla is
pumped and I believe she will
be at least top three next year
at state. Kayla believes in her-
self," Coach Jimmy Clay said.
According to Clay, Gandi-


ana beat the records that Smith
set last year.
Smith has the second best
lift in the clean and jerk in the
state in her class with 180
pounds. The record is 185.
"Danielle will beat that
record next year," Clay said. I
believe she will be cleaning
200 next year. Danielle needs


SEE STATE, PAGE 4B:


Weekend Sports in Suwannee


Friday afternoon, Feb. 25,
Softball - Suwannee Lady Dogs take on
East Gadsden in a district match at home.
Game time is 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 26,
FFA Alumni Golf Tournament at
Suwannee Country Club.
Saturday night, Feb. 26
At 2 p.m. the JV Bulldog baseball team
takes on Madison's JV.


Saturday, Feb. 26,
Bulldog baseball versus Madison
County at 5 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 19,
Bulldog baseball takes on Madison at
home at 2 p.m.


0


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
It was an awesome game.
Suwannee faced Florida
High in the second round of
district playoffs. Suwannee
was second seed. The winner


of the game advanced to the
final playoff game Saturday.
The Dogs went into the
game without back-up center
Shaun Brewer and starting
guard Nate Herring. Jevon
Smith started for Suwannee

SEE DISTRICT, PAGE 5B


*i

.- "
' * " *'
.;+sit-


* ~tuv


-~
* --.', ..


Suwannee loses


out in the district


SEE CROSSROADS, PAGE 4B


Philip Clark, Suwannee's starting center. - Photo: Paul Buchanan


4p 15.








rFA Wt _-- --�---Q-- ----I- -- -


Golfl


By T.J. TOMASI


Insider
-**-~~~ ~ ________


BIRDIES AND BOGEYS
Bemoans from Beman
According to Deane Beman, former
PGA Tour commissioner: "By the year
2020, they (tour players) will add an-
other 50 yards in the long drive to an
average of 350 yards. The deck is
stacked in favor of the guy who hap-
pened to come out of the womb bigger
and stronger."
Beman, a ,ood
player who, a t a
short hitter, "e-Ld
on his accuracy, and I
short game, ;hi t il
that the very ra e a
of the game is
threatened by the
improvements O i
equipment, espet ia.i
ly the golf ball. BEMAN
He goes on to say:
"I'm going to be 67, and I carry it far-
ther and hit it longer than I ever had,
and that doesn't make any sense at
all."
Hold on now, this is a negative? Tell
that to the average male golfer who
hits the ball about 230 yards. And
while you're at it, tell him that the ball
goes too far and that golf is too easy
Basically the problem is not that the
game is too easy but that some of the
patricians who guide the game care lit-
tle about the struggles of the golfing
public.
Beman need not worry because it's
possible that the game has already
reached the outer limits of perfection.
There are more players playing well
today but no one hits the ball better
than the champions from 50 years ago,
the likes of Hogan, Nelson and Snead.
With the margin of errorinherent to
the game and the technology limited
by rule, the game is already safe.
In the year 2050, we may have a hun-
dred Hogans and a thousand Woodses,
but they will still be shooting the same
winning scores they are now. The only
difference will be that the average
golfer will be playing better golf, and
who can argue with that?

GOLF BY THE NUMBERS

$174.7 million
The Thunderbirds, hosts of the FBR
Open in Phoenix, requested a study
of the tournament's economic im-
pact on Arizona. Conducted by Ari-
zona State University's WP Carey
School of Business and the Center
for Business Research, it showed
that the event pumped $174.7 million
into the state. This number includes
$69 million spent by non-local atten-
dees (at $319 per person per day) and
a proven "multiplier effect"-- the
spending and re-spending of money
throughout the local economy The
PGA should expand its motto from
"These guys are good" to "These
guys are good-- for the economy"


15.2
Over the last decade, the average
handicap for men has dropped from
17 to 15.2. This is the first significant
drop since the USGA has kept
records. Most people claim the main
reason is improved technology, but
as a teacher, I feel that the fact that
more golfers are taking lessons is
part of the reason.



$340,000

Jack Nicklaus won the made-for-TV
Senior Skins Game this winter and,
ironically the biggest winner's check
of his storied, 50-some-year career -
$340,000. It was his first win in five
years (the last win was a team event
with Tom Watson as a partner).


18
Of the last 21 winners of the Pebble
Beach National Pro-Am 18 have won
a major championship - the most of
any regular tour event. During that
time frame the Players Champi-
onship is next with 16.


IT'S GOOD FOR YOUR GAME


On the left, Stuart Appleby's hips have a tilt to them, while Jill Finland's hips are turning
parallel to the ground. Also, his right elbow is in front of his right hip, while Jill's is lagging
behind, providing evidence that these players use different downswing sequences.





Small mistakes






add up quickly


he player at left above is
Stuart Appleby. He's a great
golfer, a six-time winner on
the PGA Tour and member of
three Presidents Cup teams.
The player on the right is Jill
Finland, a good golfer who has
won a college scholarship and
regional tournaments, and
competes on the LPGA Tour's
developmental tour, the Futures
Tour. But she has some work to
do if she wants make it on the
LPGA Tour.
One example of an area Jill
needs to work on is illustrated by
the near-impact positions
pictured. There are two glaring
differences.
Appleby's hips have a tilt to
them, while Jill's hips are
turning parallel to the ground.
Also, his right elbow is in front
of his right hip, while Jill's is
lagging well behind.
These differences are evidence
that these players use different
downswing sequences.
In order to get to the impact
position Appleby demonstrates,


ABOUT THE WRITER
Dr TJ Tomasi is
director of instruc-
tion at Lyman Or-
chards Golf Club in
Middlefield, Conn.
To ask him a ques-
tion about golf e-
mail him at: TJIn-
sider@aol.com.

he must have done the following:
reached the peak rate of rotation
with his hips first, followed in
close order (about 35 milliseconds
later) by the peak rate of rotation
of his shoulders; followed (about
40 milliseconds later) by his peak
hand speed, which occurred about
30 milliseconds before impact.
This sequence is the most
efficient for transferring power
from the body through the shaft
and finally into the ball at impact.
Jill, on the other hand reached
the peak rate of rotation with her
shoulders first, 15 milliseconds


before the peak rate of rotation of
her hips (as her shoulders slowed
down and her hips continued to
pick up speed), followed by her
peak hand speed, which occurred
about 50 milliseconds before
impact, severely decreasing her
club head speed.
These small errors in sequence,
measured in mere milliseconds,
are big enough to keep Jill:
1. from maximizing her
potential club head speed at
impact and that costs her
distance;.
2. from maintaining the loft on
her club face at impact, making
distance control difficult.
To fix her swing, Jill must work
on her hip tilt at impact.
Measurements using state-of-the-
art equipment show that great
ball strikers are tilted about 12
degrees at impact. This will slow
her hips after they have reached
their peak rate of rotation,
achieved early in the downswing,
and allow her shoulders to catch
up so she can deliver the club
head on time.


SCHEDULE
All times Eastemrn


WORLD GOLF
CHAMPIONSHIPS
Accenture Match Play
Championship
* Site: Carlsbad, Calif.
* Schedule: Wednesday-Sunday.
* Course: La Costa Resort and Spa (7,247
yards, par 72).
* Purse: $7.5 million. Winner's share: $1.3
million.
* Television: ESPN (Wednesday-Friday, 2-6
p.m.; Saturday, 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.), ABC
(Saturday, 3-7 p.m.; Sunday, 2-6 p.m.) and
ESPN2 (Sunday, 10 a.m.-l:30 p.m.).


PGA TOUR
Chrysler Classic
of Tucson
* Site: Tucson, Ariz.
* Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
* Course: Omni Tucson Nation-
al Golf Resort & Spa (7,109
yards, par 72).
* Purse: $3 million. Winner's
share: $540,000.
* Television: USA (Thursday-
Friday, 6-8 p.m.; Saturday-Sun-
day, 11 p.m.-l a.m.).


LPGA-TOUR
SBS Open at Turtle Bay
* Site: Kahuku, Hawaii.
* Schedule: Thursday-Saturday.
* Course: Turtle Bay Resort, Palmer
Course (6,520 yards, par 72).
* Purse: $1 million. Winner's share:
$150,000.
* Television: The Golf Channel
(Thursday, 6:30-9 p.m.; Friday, 3:30-
5 a.m., 6:30-9 p.m.; Saturday, 3-4:30
a.m., 6-9 p.m.; Sunday, 2:304 a.m.).


CHAMPIONS TOUR
Outback Steakhouse.
Pro-Am
* Site: Lutz, Fla.
* Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
* Course: TPC of Tampa Bay
(6,638 yards, par 71).
* Purse: $1.6 million. Winner's
share: $240,000.
* Television: The Golf Channel
(Friday-Sunday, 1:304 p.m.,
9:30-11:30 p.m.; Saturday, 1:30-
4 p.m., 9-11:30 p.m.).


I


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TEEING OFF

Your swing


is only half

the battle
n a study published in the
journal The Sciences, British
biochemist Guy C. Brown re-
ports on the effects of stress on
gymnasts. He notes a significant
decline in performance as stress
increases. Brown says that "ten-
sion and doubt trigger biochemi-
cal changes that interrupt the
muscles' automatic motor re-
sponse, the 'muscle memory'
honed by years of practice."
No golfer should be surprised
by the conclusion that stress can
ruin performance. In fact, I write
extensively about these biochemi-
cal changes in my book "The 30-
Second Golf Swing: How to Train
Your Brain to Improve Your
Game."
Under pressure, your body is
flooded with powerful chemicals.
It's called the fight/flight re-
sponse, and it is hard-wired into
your brain. Sugar pours into your
bloodstream as muscle glycogen
breaks down for a burst of energy,
your blood pressure increases to
drive more blood into your mus-
cles, and your breathing quickens
to maximize your carbon dioxide
and oxygen exchange rates. It's all
very necessary if you have to flee
from a lion, but detrimental to
sinking a 3-foot putt for the club
championship.
The point is that although you
may have taken the time to hone
the technical skill of swinging a
golf club, and that skill pattern is
captured in the neural networks of
your brain, if you interpret a situ-
ation to be stressful then you will
flood yourself in a bath of anti-
golf chemicals. And it is this
chemical bath that blocks your ac-
cess to your golf swing.
So learning how to swing a golf
club solves only half the problem.
The other half is controlling your
stress response so that you can
make your stress-free driving
range swing on the golf course.
This means that to be a player,
first you learn how to control your
swing, then you learn how to con-
trol yourself.

ASK THE PRO

Q: I read your instructional
section in which you described an
exercise to correctly judge how far
away from the ball you should be
when you are in the proper golf
posture. The exercise makes a lot
of sense and has helped me a lot.
However, it starts while holding
the club shaft parallel to the
ground, and I can't figure how far
away from my body my hands
should be in this position. I would
appreciate any help you can give
me with this. - Robert G.,
Georgetown, Ky.
A: First, your upper arms
should be braced against your up-
per chest. To get the feel of how far
your hands should be from your
body, brace your upper arms and
then (without a club in your
hands) extend your arms and turn
your forearms so that your palms
are pointing at the sky Then imag-
ine someone is about to hand you
something of substantial weight
(like your golf bag with all the
clubs in it). The distance you in-
stinctively hold your hands away
from your body under this circum-
stance is the correct distance.
If you want further verification,
place a mirror down the target
line, address the ball and then take
a look in the mirror to make sure
that an imaginary line drawn per-
pendicular to the ground passes
through the butt of the grip handle
and the balls of your feet. This re-
lationship may vary somewhat for
different body types, but it is in the
ball park. For more detail, see my
book, "The LAWs of the Golf
Swing."


i.!'


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25,2005


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK


EAr 2







PAGE 36


FRIDA.Y . .. FERUR 25 05USWNE EORTLV A


Matchups for the


State Wrestling


Tournament


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter


DaIi'.o r S cra,,li Heia : I, t ite : 'i.'i lle t ho 1 ' n
:i.in ,,j, -,i Schrader-Seccafico


Michael Wright goes into state as the district champ and the re-
gional runner-up. Wright wrestles in the 215 weightclass. - Photo:
Janet Schrader-Seccafico





1, ^ _. . .







. . .







Barney Wainwright is District and Regional champ. Wainwright is
going to state to wrestle in the 130 weightclass. - Photo: Janet Schrad
er-Seccafico


~k ~
'Ct


'A' ',~ ~'
k ~


,~41


PR tp r K 'ne '..ill ,..i .tlI ,t : t,ite in1 tri 1 5 '..seigli-t, l ':i
.Schrader-Seccafico


~ -


*1 t~


Suwannee has 10 wrestlers
Sin Lakeland right now
wrestling for the state title.
These are the matchups for
the first round.
d111 I j In the 112 weightclass,
sophomore, Levi Wainwright
....r . with a 31-8 record, will wres-
tle Kurt Spranger a 43-5 ju-
nior from Tampa Jesuit.
In the 119 weightclass, ju-
nior Caleb Wainwright with a
29-4 record, wrestles Ashley
. Charles, a senior from Forest
Hill with a 26-6 record.
In the 125 weightclass,
David Sanders, a junior with a
16-13 record, will wrestle
.'' Cory Baudendistel, a sopho-
more from Clay with a 32-9
record.
In the 130 weightclass,
Barney Wainwright, a sopho-
more with a 31-1 record,
takes on Leslie Mosley, a ju-
nior from Sarasota with a 34-
HI:, i. 6 record.
In the 135 weightclass, Pe-
ter Kyne, a junior with an 11-
5 record, takes on Osvaldo
Frigo, a junior from Arch-
S . bishop Carrol with a 25-1
, record.


In the 145 weightclass, Lee
Laxton, a sophomore with a
29-3 record, takes on Yevsev-
ly Korol, a junior from North
Port with a 25-12 record.
In the 152 weightclass,
Greg Boyle a junior with a
17-5 record, takes on a junior
Mike Kuenzier from West
Boca Raton with a 26-9
record.
In the 160 weightclass, state
champ Preston Hart, a senior
undefeated in 27 matches,
takes on John Eden, a senior
from Gulf New Port Richey
with a 40-6 record.
In the 189 weightclass, Justin
Mowls a junior with a 20-10
record, takes on Christopher
Martinez, a senior from mon-
signor Pace with a 32-2 record.
In the 215 weightclass,
Michael Wright a junior with a
23-4 record takes on Douglas
Brazil a junior with a 5-1
record from Atlantic Port Or-
ange.
Look for complete results
with photos from your Suwan-
nee Democrat in next week's
Friday edition.
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached 'by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er @gaflnews.com.


'~4.?"
'A


jt~t


.1'


!., T . � .??*... ., -.,,. - .

.. ,, *..,. . - ,. . . . .., -'.:.-- . ,

Justin IMovlv i ea i:ls to state to wrestle in the 1it,':i v.'i,:iiIit'i :I , .i:
Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico



.











Lee Laxton is the district runner-up and the Regional champ. He will
wrestle at state in the 145 weightclass. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


., ,






v @ " ,'.. .. . .. . " '" - ""' . .

Preston Hart, last year's state champ in the 152 weightclass goes
undefeated into the state tournament, wrestling in the 160 weight-
class this year. Hart is the district and the regional champ. - Pho-


Al ~ ~ -~
S..

t:~.


r .


~i~K

I.
S t
.1
(K
I S

a
'S
'4
7
I
'Kr. 1'


sit


Greg Boyle regional champ will wrestle at state in the 152 weight-
class. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


t"- .:.. " ' '


K,-----K-4%- - 4-'-
771 c 'I.
Z51


N 67n


Caleb Wainwright is the district and the regional champ in the 119
weightclass. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Suwannee


Continued From Page 1B

behalf."
Ten Dog wrestlers quali-
fied to represent Suwannee
at state. This number gives
the Dogs an even chance to
win the state title as well as
the regional.
"The boys are mentally
and physically ready for
state," said Laxton. "If they
wrestle as a team, they could
very well win it all."
In the 112 category, Levi
Wainwright qualified to go
to state with a third place
finish after winning his con-
solation match in a 4-2 deci-
sion.
In the 119 weightclass,
Caleb Wainwright took the
regional championship.
In the 125 weightclass,
David Sanders qualified to
go to state with a fourth
place finish, losing in the
consolation finals.
In the 130 weightclass,
Barney Wainwright took the
regional championship.
Peter Kyne qualified to go
to state by placing fourth in
the regionals in the 135
weightclass.
Lee Laxton took regional
champ in the 145 weight-
class, beating his Wakulla
nemesis for the win.
In the 152 weightclass,
Greg Boyle is the regional
champ.
In the 160 weightclass,
Preston Hart is the regional


champ.
'In the 189 weightclass,
Justin Mowls took fourth
place qualifying to wrestle at
state.
In the 215 weightclass,
Michael Wright took second
place, losing to a wrestler
from Forrest in a decision.
"We are looking forward to


this week's state competition
in Lakeland and feel we have
as good a chance as any one
at winning it all," Laxton
said. "We will need to wres-
tle well, and we need a cou-
ple of lucky breaks."
Suwannee's 10 awesome
wrestlers will compete
Thursday, Feb. 24-Saturday


Feb. 26 in Lakeland at the
Lakeland Civic Center. The
finals will be held Saturday
night. Come down and cheer
for the Dogs.
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@gaflnewis.com.


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Levi Wainwright is the district and regional champ. Levi will wres-
tle at state in the 112 weightclass. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico



.. ,'Look


What


3 You


Missed...

...if you missed the last edition of


~ Congressman Boid fists first iealdthicare meeting
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~ 'Es dedicate veteran's memorial
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~ United'Way auction raises more than $4,000
~ Live Oaknamed Best of America By Horsebacf
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0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


**i', *:*: *?


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Seven Suwannee High sports move Miami to host 2005 and


into new class and new district 2006 football finals


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter

Seven Suwannee High
sports teams will be playing
in a new class and a new dis-
trict next year. Soccer, boys
and girls baseball, softball,


Moon Phases

. �f

Full Last
Feb 24 Mar 3


* @
New First
Mar 10 Mar 17


UV Index

Fri 2/25 Moderate
Sat 2/26 5 Moderate
Sun 2/27 5 Moderate
The U .7 Ir.j . ,rouli,',3 ,:r. .3 I
nurr.c.r i cal - ir,,Ih ri.gr.ler .v ,r,' -"
M,." , r .. 1 "a j i ]


Area
Clearwater 75 CO i-sicrm
Crestview 62 42 rain
Daytona Beach 69 56 t-storm
Fort Lauderdale 79 65 t-storm
Fort Myers 79 60 t-storm
Gainesville 67 50 rain
Hollywood 81 63 t-storm
Jacksonville 64 53 rain
Key West 79 69 t-storm
Lady Lake 69 55 rain

National Cities


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver


32 pt sunny
17 sn shower
28 sn shower
41 pt sunny
30 mst sunny


boys and girls basketball and
volleyball are all climbing
into Class 4-A for the 2005-
06 season.
The changes have to do
with the number of students
attending Suwannee high.
Classifications are based on
school population.


Boys soccer will be in
Class 4-A, District 3. Their
competition for next sea-
son's district title will in-
clude three teams, Middle-
burg, Ridgeview and Santa
Fe.
Girls soccer will also
climb into Class 4-A. The


FWC changes spring creek


WMA's hunting format


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) converted the
Big Bend Wildlife Manage-
ment Area (WMA) Spring
Creek Unit, located in Taylor
County, to a still hunt area
during the February commis-
sion meeting held in Panama
City Beach.
The approved rule prohibits
dogs other than bird dogs or
retrievers except during small
game season. Nighttime hunt-
ing of raccoon during small
game season will continue to
be allowed. The new rule no
longer allows the use of dogs


for hunting
loading gun
established
rule.


deer. A muzzle-
season was also
under the new


According to John Ault, Re-
gional Public Hunting Areas
Coordinator, the FWC com-
missioners adopted the recom-
mendation to change the
14,600-acre WMA to a still
hunt area because there had
been complaints of deer dogs
trespassing onto private prop-
erty from the WMA.
"For several years, the
Commission has taken various
types of actions to solve the
problem but was only margin-


ally successful. Law Enforce-
ment officers focused their at-
tention on the area, but the
trespass problems continued.
The commission felt the only
way to solve the problem was
to stop deer dog hunting on the
area," Ault explained.
A public input meeting was
held in Perry during early De-
cember between the FWC,
deer dog hunters and property
leasees; however, no new so-
lutions were proposed that
were acceptable to both
groups, according to Ault.
The new rules become ef-
fective July 1, 2005.


Weekend Sports in Suwannee


Friday afternoon, Feb. 25,
Softball - Suwannee Lady Dogs take on
East Gadsden in a district match at home.
Game time is 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 26,
FFA Alumni Golf Tournament at
Suwannee Country Club.
Saturday night, Feb. 26
At 2 p.m. the JV Bulldog baseball team
takes on Madison's JV.


Saturday, Feb. 26,
Bulldog baseball versus Madison
County at 5 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 19,
Bulldog baseball takes on Madison at
home at 2 p.m.


0A


Today's Weather


Fr, Sat Sun
2/25 2/26 2/27




66/47 67/52 66/54
Considerable cloudiness with occa- More clouds than sun. Highs in the Rain with a few rumbles of thunder.
sional rain showers. High 66F. upper 60s and lows in the low 50s.


Sunrise Sunset Sunrise Sunset Sunrise Sunset
7:02 AM 6:28 PM 7:01 AM 6:29 PM 7:00 AM 6:30 PM

ig Get reacquainted with your sweet tooth.
S Visit. cooIlwhip.com for dessert ideas with less than 100 calories. f "


Florida At A Glance


\Tallahassee
n o 62/43
Pensacola 0 *. "
_- .- i' ^A


Jacksonville
64/53


Orlando
74/60 . -,-


Tampa / . M
76/59 --




S 4

Miami
79/66
^\^1 *





. -


Lj- e Ciry 6-1 48 rair,
Madison 64 47 rain
Melbourne 76 60 t-storm
Miami 79 66 t-storm
N Smyrna Beach 70 58 t-storm
Ocala 71 54 rain
Orlando 74 60 t-storm
Panama City 62 49 rain
Pensacola 59 45 rain
Plant City 76 58 t-storm


IL ' ;I p sunnyfa


Houston
Los Angeles
Miami
Minneapolis
New York


pt sunny
pt sunny
t-storm
pt sunny
sn shower


Pompano Beach 79
Port Charlotte 79
Saint Augustine 63
Saint Petersburg 75
Sarasota 75
Tallahassee 62
Tampa 76
Titusville 73
Venice 76
W Palm Beach 79


hei pi sunny


Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


t-storm
t-storm
rain
t-storm
t-storm
rain
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm


pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
sunny
pt sunny


�2005 American Profile Hometown Content Service


girls will face Middleburg,
Santa Fe, Bradford Stark and
Ridgeview.
The Bulldog baseball team
climbs into 4-A. They face
Baker, Bradford Starke, Mid-
dleburg, Ridgeview and San-
ta Fe. Softball will take on
the same district competi-
tors.
Bulldog basketball and
Lady Dog basketball also
moves into Class 4-A. They
also face district competition
from Bradford Starke, Baker,
Middleburg, Ridgeview and
Santa Fe.
Volleyball will also fall
into the same 4-A classifica-
tion facing Bradford Starke,
Middleburg, Ridgeview,
Baker and Santa Fe.
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@gaflnews.com.


State

Continued From Page 1


to get about 25 more pounds on her
bench. I would love to get Danielle
benching 200 by state next year, which is
very possible. If she can bench 200, she
will definitely win state."
Gandiana lifted 135 on the bench and
135 in the clean and jerk for a total of 270
and 11th place.
Smith benched 165 and clean and
jerked 180 for a total of 345 and a sixth-
place medal.
Look for both of these girls to come
back strong next year and do well for
Suwannee.
Janet Schrader-Seccafico may be
reached by calling 1/386/362-1734 ext.
134 or by e-mail at
janet. schrader @ gaflnews. com.


Janet Schrader-
Seccafico
Democrat Reporier
Miami-Dade Sports
Commission and the
Greater Miamin Athletic
Conference will host this
year's and next ',eA.r's s;ate
high school football finals
Class I-A. 1-B. 2-A and
2-B state championship
games will be playe','d :t
Florida International 1lni-
\ersily's Communriiy Sta-
dium on Dec. 2-3. iN015
and Dec. 1-2. 201(6 Class
3-A. -4-A. 5-A and d-A
state championship games
N\ill be played mat Dolphin
Studiium
Organizations represient-
ing Fuit Lauderdale.
Gamesiille. Orlando and
Tallahassee submitted pro-


po:als
Dade
mitted
Sports
11n tlice
140


Adung with lMiami-
The proposal sub-
b\ the Gainesville
Organizing Com-
was the other final-


Recertl, the state cham-
pionships have been hosted
by, Tallahassee and Day-
torn. Beach. Miami last
hosted a championship in

fH-i Community Stdiuin
seats 1 ".000 and is home to
the NCAA Di'msion I FILI
Golden panthers.
Dolphins Stadium is the
home of the NFL's Miami
Dolphins It has a natural
Prescription Athletic Turf
-tsr face
Jdit' St. l, -d'l ,- S cL L t 'I.' It�
at\' be, fa hcLd \- caliinsg
I 5.% 362-1 74 .1.. 134 oi
Ch --l, lil ,I . l c/.'.i hll. ad.
c;,i' V tii// cwis.co t.rf.


Kayla Gandiana


Tennis


Continued From Page 1B

He is now 1-1.
Madison forfeited the num-
ber-five match.
In doubles play results, num-
ber-one Janousek/ Ridgeway


lost 4-6. Number-two team
Pate'Shen lost 3-6.
The Bfllldogs are now. 2-.1
for the season.
The Lady Dogs shut out
Madison with a great 7-0
showing. Number-one Emily


FFA


Continued From Page 1B

Bank, Walt's Live Oak Ford-
Mercury, Lightning Access
Net, Inc., Progress Energy,
PCS Phosphate, Live Oak
Tractor Co. Inc., Tri-County
Irrigation, Inc., Farmers Co-
Op, and School Board Super-
intendent Walter Boatright Jr.
Entry fee is $200 per team
and includes golf, cart, lunch
and prizes. There will also be
individual hole prizes for men


Crossroads


and women. This year's tour-
nament will feature a special
hole-in-one prize on hole
number 14 only for a $10,000
tractor courtesy of Suwannee
Equipment. Allbritton's will
also feature a hole-in-one
prize for a set of Ping irons to
the first hole-in-one made on
any hole.
For infonnation and entry
. contact Richard Marable at
386-364-6554, please leave a
message.


Continued From Page 1B

7th - Drew Maharrey, Birmingham, Ala.
BRIGGS JR CHAMP HEAVY:
1 st - Blake Lehr, Lakeland
2nd - David Davis, Brookville
3rd - A.J. Insister, St. Petersburg
4th - Tony Armstrong, Pell City, Ala.
5th - Sean Bernard, Largo
6th - Chris Bernard, Lakeland
7th - Buck Ridley, Newnan, Ga.
BRIGGS JUNIOR LITE:
1st - Brandon Wells, Jacksonville
2nd - Buck Ridley, Newnan, Ga.
3rd - Evan Becton, Valdosta, Ga.
4th - Jacob Lecson, Ocala
5th - Bill Palmeri, St. Cloud
5th - Payne Pickles, Live Oak
Drew Maharrney, Birmingham, Ala.
Briggs Jr Animal Champ
Blake Lehr, Lakeland
Buck Ridley, Newnan, Ga.
BRIGGS LITE:
1st - Joey Collins, Largo
2nd - Corey Holley, Ocala
3rd - Brian Davis, Jacksonville
BRIGGS HEAVY:
1st - Tony Sanson, Orlando
2nd - Kevin Tillman, Alma, Ga.
3rd - Thomas Carter, Ocala
BRIGGS JUNIOR SPORTSMAN I LITE:
1st - Hayden Campbell, Monte Verde
BRIGGS JR. SPORTS II LITE:
1st - Taylor Dyer, Pell City, Ala.
2nd - Amber Colvin, Tallahassee
3rd - Haley Poole, Bessmer, Ala.
BRIGGS SUPER HEAVY:
1 st - Christopher Morrision, Rocky Face, Ga.
2nd - Tony Sanson, Orlando
3rd - Thomas Carter, Ocala
V


Graham won 8-5, making her
season record now 2-0.
Number-two Kelsey Sellgrer
won 8-2. She is 2-0
Number-three Christen Woo-
ley won 8-0. She is 2-0.
Number-four Rebecca Wilkes
won 8-0. She is 2-0
Number-five Katherine Wild-
ing won 8-1. She is 2-0
Suwannee had already won
the match by the time doubles
play came up. The team of Sell-
gren/Wooley won 6-1.
The number-two team of
Wilkes/Poole won 6-0 in their
first outing as a doubles team.
The Lady Dog's record
stands at 2-0 for the season.
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@gaflnews.conm.


4th - Edwin Sides, Wetumpka, Ala.
5th - Lee Harrell, Dalton, Ga.
6th - Ralph Maharrey, Birmingham, Ala.
BRIGGS ANIMAL HEAVY:
1st - Joey Collins, Largo
2nd - Paul Palmer, Thomasville, Ga.
3rd - Will Palmer, Thomasville, Ga.
BRIGGS JR. SPORTS CHAMP LITE:
1st - Brady Todd, Chatsworth, Ga.
2nd - Adam Dyer, Pell City, Ala.
3rd - A.J. Carlisi, Dalton, Ga.
4th - Matthew Warren, Ormond Beach
5th - David Cody Smith, Holt
6th - Hayden Campbell, Monte Verde
7th - Dillon Baker, Tampa
8th - Tyler Dyer, Pell City, Ala.
9th - Haley Poole, Bessmer, Ala.
BRIGGS JR. CHAMP LITE:
1st - David Davis, Hudson
2nd - Blake Lehr, Lakeland
3rd - Tony Armstrong, Pell City, Ala.
4th - Sean Bernard, Largo
5th - Chris Bernard, Lakeland
6th - Buck Ridley, Newnan, Ga.
7th - A.J. Isbister, St. Petersburg
BRIGGS MEDIUM:
1st - Corey Holley, Ocala
2nd - Justin Devane, Quitman, Ga.
BRIGGS JR. SPORTS LL HEAVY:
1st - Taylor Dyer, Pell City, Ala.
2nd - Amber Colvin, Tallahassee
3rd - Haley Poole, Bessemer, Ala.
SR. CHAMP LITE:
1st - Ryan Watkins, Tallahassee
2nd - Lee Harrell, Dalton, Ga.
3rd - Ryan Williams, Lithia
4th - Rance Williams, Lithia
KID KART:
1st - Austin Carter, Ocala


59/45 N ' A --


w


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGFt 4R






PAGE 5B


I II-'I- I L l Jl, r 40,i- ---JIi . . . ... ... . ....


District


Continued From Page 1B

with a broken hand. Even
with all their handicaps, the
Dogs gave it their best shot,
coming back from a 15-
point deficit in the third pe-
riod to tying the game in the
final moments of the fourth.
The final score was 67-71.
A large crowd of fans ac-
companied the Dogs. The
fans cheered the Dogs to a
comeback in the fourth peri-
od as Suwannee slowly ate
into the Florida High 15-
point lead and eventually
tied the game in the last
minutes of the fourth. The
crowd came in a pep bus
arranged for by new coach
Chris Martello. It was a sad
loss for Martello, who has
done a lot for the program in
just this first year.
Starting for Suwannee
were Quaramos Ross, Mario
Hawthorne, Alfonso Ross,
Jevon Smith and Philip
Clark. The Dogs took an ear-
ly lead with a three-point
goal by Hawthorne. But by
the end of the first period
Suwannee was down 10-14.
The second period killed the
Dogs. They lost their focus.
By the half, Suwannee was


down 21-36.
Smith came out and
scored first in the second
half. Suwannee's offense
struggled against a tough
Florida High defense. The
officiating was strange to
say the least. An official was
about to allow the wrong
Florida High player to shoot
penalty free throws, but the
crowd called him to account
and the right man took the
shots.
At the end of the third pe-
riod, Suwannee had gnawed
off five points of Florida
High's 15 point lead. The
score was 47-57.
The fourth round was in-
tense with each possession
of the ball hotly contested.
With 3:55 left in the game,
Suwannee had closed to
within five. Quaramos Ross
was fouled with 2:30 left to
play and made both shots
drawing the Dogs to within
two points 62-64.
Mario Hawthorne hit a
three-point goal and tied the
game at 65-65 with 53 sec-
onds left to play. The
Suwannee crowd was on
their feet urging the players
to win. And they tried their
best. The final score was 67-


NFCC women's

basketball still strong

despite recent losses

Petrina Goodman leads

team against Gulf Coast


NFCC LADY SENTINELS: Petri-
na Goodman led NFCC with 13
points and 6 assists against
Okaloosa Feb. 2 and posted an
amn:ing 25 points and led the
Lad'.,d Sentinels with 3 steals
and 6 assists despite losing to
Gull Coast Feb. 5. - Photo: Submitted


71.
Florida High went on to
play in the finals Saturday
night against East Gadsden.
Florida High lost and will
travel to play Walton (DeFu-
niak Springs) in the first
round of the regional finals.


East Gadsden, district
champs, hosts Bolles in the
first round of the finals.
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@gaflnews.com.


gn.


v


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Alfonso Ross gets hammered during a game against Columbia.
- Photo: Paul Buchanan









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Mario Hawthorne shootS. - Photo: Paul Buchanan #50 Philip Clark - Photo: Paul Buchanan


The North Florida Com-
munity College women's
basketball team fell 81-64 to
Panhandle Conference oppo-
nent Okaloosa-Walton Feb. 2
and again faced defeat, 89-
54, against Gulf Coast on
Feb. 5. The Lady Sentinels
are now 7-16 for the season.
NFCC held its own against
.Okaloosa Feb. 2 finishing the
first half 38-31, but the op-
posing bench was too strong
in the second half. Ashley
Williams (Jacksonville), the
leading scorer in the state,
was double teamed through-
out the game and restricted
to 14 points. Petrina Good-
man (Gainesville) led NFCC
with 13 points and 6 assists
with LaRhonda Chambers
(Havana) leading in points
with 15. Also scoring for
NFCC were Kenya Butts
(Cartersville, Ga.) with 8,
Wikneka Gorsuch (Adel,
Ga.) and Shanan Weeks
(Lake Butler) with 6 each
and Ronnisha Jerido (Jack-
sonville) adding 2 points.
The Lady Sentinels took a
hard loss to Panhandle Con-
ference opponent Gulf Coast
Feb. 5.
"Gulf Coast double and
triple teamed our post play-
ers all night," said Clyde
Alexander, NFCC women's
basketball coach.
Despite the loss, NFCC
forward Petrina Goodman
posted an amazing 25 points
and led the Lady Sentinels
with 3 steals and 6 assists.
The Lady Sentinels have
four remaining home games
Feb. 11 against Pensacola,
5:30 p.m.; 'Feb. 12 against
Pensacola, 2 p.m.; Feb. 16
against Chipola, 5:30 p.m.;
and Feb. 21 against Gulf
Coast, 5:30 p.m. All home
games are free and open to
the public. NFCC ends the
season with two road games,
Tallahassee Feb. 23 and Pen-
sacola Feb. 26.
Visit NFCC Athletics at
www.nfcc.edu or contact
Clyde Alexander at 850-973-
1609.


- .' .
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AN AM


M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FPinAY FFRRI IARY 25 2005







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Sandi Bartolotti takes Sweet Pea on an outing


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SANDI BARTOLOTTI TAKES SWEET PEA ON AN OUTING: Bartolotti took "Nevada Sweet Pea," her adopted wild mustang, to Jacksonville where she displayed her Feb. 19, at the Jacksonville Equestri-
an Center, where a B.L.M. Wild Mustang Adoption was being held. Bartolotti wanted people thinking about adopting a wild horse to see a "broke" mustang. "I was especially proud of her, since this was
her very first outing," Bartolotti said. "And to think, six months ago, she was a totally untamed wild horse." - Photo: Submitted

MILITARY NEWS


Air Force Airman Mary A. Bryan Army Pvt. Benjamin R. Maguire Jr.


Air Force Airman Mary A.
Bryan has arrived for duty at
Whiteman Air Force Base,
Knob Noster, Mo.
Bryan is a financial manage-
ment apprentice assigned to the
509th Comptroller Squadron.
She is the daughter of Penny


(LIVE OAKi IfflH -P-PIl (5.'00 AM-
E. HOWARD STREET
STEAKS & SEAFOODS
Friday & Saturday Nights - Prime Rib
"Good Home Cooked Meals"
364-2810


A. Watkins of CR 137, Well-
born. Her husband, Jason, is the
son of Curtis Bryan of Live
Oak.
The airman graduated in the
year 2000 from Suwannee High
School and in 2004 from Lake
City Community College.


ak h-.11IlIiJ12
t min hI Ole. 1. ic V.Ct idifli'
[JHM L [Ie MHII~~


tr Great Steakst
'fY-J KCiler 131S
Sand Ice Cold Beer
Lunch and Dinner 7 Days A Week
US 90 West at 1-75 Lake City


BHEEMBI


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[ra, ~ .i w I.jI h u le '. a1.lt ec

iCe Ill 1~LCnuh11-t l kihh'.
111111ta- A a.1l.ch mia
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.ind tield rr.ia inL e\eciIses
He is the son ot Beni.inumn
R. aind Helen iMagume oI 'CR
I 3o. Li\e Oak.
NAL.,iire Lr.idtiated in the
.e.ir .21.1l troim Suii anni-e
High SCLh,,ol. Li\e Oak.

Navy Petty

Officer

2nd Class

James F. Beard
Navy Petty Officer 2nd
Class James F. Beard, son of
Lawanna G. and David Lee
Beard of Live Oak, is current-
ly in the middle of a routine
scheduled deployment, while
assigned to the aircraft carrier
USS Harry S. Truman, home-
ported in Norfolk, Va.
Beard and more than 7,600
of his fellow shipmates of the
Truman Carrier Strike Group
(CSG), deployed in support of
the global war on terrorism.
Carriers like the Harry S.
Truman are deployed through-
out the world to maintain U.S.
presence and provide rapid re-
sponse in times of crisis. They
serve as a highly visible deter-
rent to would-be aggressors,
and are equipped with the most
versatile and powerful
weapons and aircraft available.
Beard joined the Navy in
September 1998.


LININ [AV UIU uiu
To place your ad in our Dining Guide,
call Myrtle at The Suwannee Democrat at 362-1734.


I


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25,2005


W.qllWANNFF DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


mAr,17 no


1









CHURCH


They just returned from their honeymoon,
and the husband said, "Now that we're mar-
ried, it might be helpful if I pointed out your
defects."
"Don't bother, darling," she replied. "I


Register Now!
Southside Baptist Church
Florida Founder's
Conference Feb. 24-26
Southside Baptist Church,
10413 US 129 South, Live
Oak; first Florida Founder's
Conference Feb. 24-26;
Info-registration: 386-362-
5 2 3 9 ,
www.floridafounder.org.
First United Methodist
Church of Lake City
will hold homecoming
Feb. 26-27
First United Methodist
Church, S. Marion Ave.,
Lake City, homecoming,
Feb. 26-27; Saturday, Feb.
26, 5:30 p.m., covered dish
meal; 6:30 p.m., hymn-
along; Sunday, Feb. 27, 9:30
a.m., coffee-donuts; 10 a.m.,
worship service-special mu-
sic, speaker the Rev. Carl
Shafer. Info: all 386-752-
4488.
Indoor flea market Alton
Church of God Family
Life Center, Mayo Feb. 26
Indoor flea market; Alton
Church of God Family Life
Center, Mayo; Feb. 26, 7
a.m.-3 p.m. Open to the pub-
lic; Info: Susan Hutchins,
386-294-3198.
Pregnancy Crisis
Center, Live Oak post
abortion Bible study
March 1
Pregnancy Crisis Center,
112 Piedmont, Live Oak; 9
a.m.-3 p.m.; March 1, free
post abortion Bible study,
based on "Forgiven and Set
Free" by Linda Cochrane.
Confidential; Info-registra-
tion: 386-330-2229.
Mission Action Ladies,
Philadelphia Baptist
Church yard sale
March 4-5
Mission Action Ladies,
Philadelphia Baptist
Church; yard sale to benefit
Comprehensive Community
Services (CCS), 8 a.m.-2
p.m., March 4-5, at CCS,
511 Gold Kist Blvd., Live
Oak. Info-donations: 386-
362-7143. Note: Deliver do-
nations to CCS March 3.
Gethsemane Church
of God in Christ will
hold its Annual Youth
Summit April 16
Annual Youth Summit,
April 16, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.;
Gethsemane Church of God
in Christ, 917 NE Duval


know them. They kept me from getting a bet-
ter man."
The rose has its thorns, the diamond has its
specks. and everyone has his defects. The
Bible says, "All have sinned, and come short
of the glory of God."
But God doesn't want you to be destroyed
by your defects or to be a slave to sin. Come
to Christ, and He'll forgive your sins, free you
from its slavery, and fit you for heaven.
With His Spirit within you, His strength be-
hind you, you'll be more than sufficient for
the days ahead of you.


Street, Live Oak; Theme: "If
It's To Be, It's Up To Me."
The summit will deal with
AIDS, peer pressure, drugs,
black history brain bowl,
door prizes etc. Speakers:
Yvonne Scott and others.
FoodSource
FoodSource, a Christian
based Christian food coop-
erative, is in your area!
Stretch your food dollars!
Info: Live Oak Church of
God: 386-362-2483; Well-
born United Methodist
Church: 386-963-5023;
Ebenezer AME Church:
386-362-6383 or 386-364-
4323 or 386-362-4808;
Jasper: 386-792-3965;
White Springs: 386-752-
2196 or 386-397-1228; Bell:
352-463-7772 or 352-463-
.1963; Lake City: 386-752-
7976, toll-free 800-832-
5020, www.foodsource.org.
Community Christian
Center Food Assistance
Program
Community Christian
Center Food Assistance Pro-
gram, five miles west of 1-75
on US 90, on the north side
of the road; open to the pub-
lic; Info: 386-6113. "Faith
without works is dead"
James 2:26
Live Oak Church of
God "Prayer at the Gates
of the City"
Live Oak Church of God;
"Prayer at the Gates of the
City," every Friday, 7-9:45
a.m., 9828 US 129 South
and the roundabout. Info:
386-362-2483.
Word Alive Church
monthly Preserve Freedom
Prayer Rally
Join Word Alive Church,
11239 SR 51, Live Oak, for
a monthly Preserve Freedom
Prayer Rally; third Wednes-
day, .7:30 p.m. Info: 386-
362-2092.
St. Luke's Episcopal
Church ALPHA
St. Luke's Episcopal
Church, 1391 Eleventh
Street, Live Oak; ALPHA;
free dinner; nursery; youth
program; open to anyone,
Wednesday, 6:30 p.m. Info:
386-362-1837.
First Advent Christian
Church of Live Oak
SWORD SEEKERS after
school for children K-5
The First Advent Christian
Church of Live Oak, 699


Pinewood Drive, SWORD
SEEKERS for children K-5,
Wednesday, after school-
5:30 p.m. Info: 386-362-
1802.
Mothers Morning Out
program at First
Presbyterian Church of
Live Oak
The First Presbyterian
Church of Live Oak, 421
White Ave, Live Oak; Moth-
ers Morning Out program;
Tuesday and Thursdays; 9
a.m.-12:30 p.m. Teacher/di-
rector: Elke Day, Certified
Pre-school teacher/CDA.
Info: 386-362-3199.
MOPS, Mothers of
Preschoolers
MOPS, Mothers of
Preschoolers, for mothers of
children birth-5; second and
fourth Tuesday, September
through May; 9:30 a.m.-12
noon: First Baptist Church,
Howard St., Live Oak; Info:
386-362-1583.
Fellowship of Christian
Cowboys meeting
Fellowship of Christian
Cowboys meeting; 5:30
p.m.; first Saturday; SRRC
Arena in Branford; and 5:30
p.m., second Saturday;
Suwannee County Coliseum
Arena, Live Oak.
"Coming to terms with
your divorce"
First Baptist Church of
Live Oak, Howard Street;
nine-week course, "Coming
to Terms with Your Di-
vorce;" Info: 386-362-1583.
Broken Lance Church
First American Indian
church, Live Oak; nine
miles south on US 129; open
to all persons; services: 10
a.m. and 11 a.m. Info: Bro-
ken Lance Church, 386-364-
5998 or 386-364-6547.
Services at noon on
Wednesday at Ebenezer
AME Church
Ebenezer AME Church,
corner Houston Avenue and
Parshely Street; worship ser-
vices at noon each Wednes-
day for one hour; lunch
served by church staff; The
Rev. Clifton Riley, pastor,
Sister Sonja Riley, coordina-
tor.
Wanted - Wanted -
Wanted!
Pregnancy Crisis Center,
112 Piedmont Street, Live
Oak needs volunteers. Info:
386-330-2229


British baby survives 2-day


abortion
By Baptist Press Staff
Sometimes an abortion does
not produce a dead child. In a re-
cently reported case from Great
Britain, even multiple attempts
at an abortion failed to do so.
A baby boy who survived re-
peated efforts to kill him while
he was in the womb is doing
well as a 2-year-old, according
to a report in a British medical
journal. Physicians at Salford's
Hope Hospital, where the infant
was treated after his birth 24
weeks into his mother's preg-
nancy, believe he is the most
prematurely bom baby to sur-
vive abortion long term.
The infant's travails began
when his mother, 24 and already
the single parent of a 19-month-
old child, learned she was preg-
nant at 22 weeks, according to a
Feb. 14 online article of the
Manchester News. The newspa-
per reported she chose to have
an abortion and was given four
different drugs during a two-day
span for the purpose of taking
her child's life.
The clinic informed the
woman the baby was dead and
she should return in four days
for the body to be removed, ac-
cording to the report. On a train
ride home, however, she felt her
child move and quickly changed
her mind about the abortion.
She went into labor the same
day and gave birth four days lat-
er. The boy, bom in November
2002, weighed only a pound and


procedure
a half. Though he was on a ven-
tilator for more than seven
weeks and had to overcome
blood infections and chronic
lung problems, the infant left the
hospital at seven months of age.
He had only a mild development
delay by 10 months.
"It has defeated all the odds,"
said Paul Clarke, a former doc-
tor at the hospital and one of
four physicians who wrote on
the case for the Journal of Ob-
stetrics and Gynecology, accord-
ing to the News. The mother
"had guilt stemming from the
fact she knew if she had not
gone through with the [abortion]
procedure it would not have
been born prematurely," he said.
A British pro-life leader laud-
ed the mother, whose name and
that of her son have not been re-
vealed."One can only praise this
woman for the courage she
showed in having the baby in
what was a very difficult situa-
tion," Julia Millington of the
ProLife Alliance told the news-
paper. "The public is becoming
increasingly aware of what ex-
actly we are permitting when ba-
bies are aborted at 22, 23 or 24
weeks when they could sur-
vive."
About 2 percent of abortions
in England and Wales are done
at 20 weeks or later in pregnan-
cy, but the number of babies
who are bom alive despite the
procedure is unknown, the
newspaper reported.According


to the News, Mike Robinson, a
coauthor with Clarke of the re-
port, said, "[W]hen a woman
goes to have a termination she
should be aware that, while the
pregnancy will end, the life of
the baby may not."The survival
of a baby despite an abortion has
been labeled the "dreaded com-
plication" for those who per-
form the procedure. Instead of
seeking to save such children,
doctors in the United States and
other countries often have per-
mitted their death through ne-
glect or starvation or killed them
through such means as suffoca-
tion.
Several years ago, it was re-
vealed some doctors in the Unit-
ed States were using a late-term
abortion method that frequently
produced surviving children.
The procedure, which nurses
testified was used at Christ Hos-
pital in Chicago, is called live-
birth abortion. In the method,
delivery is induced. If the baby
survives the procedure, he is left
unattended to die.
Congress passed and Presi-
dent Bush signed into law in
2002 a bill designed to prohibit
such a practice. The Bom Alive
Infants Protection Act clarified a
newborn child fully outside his
mother's womb is a person to be
protected under federal law. This
includes every human infant
"born alive at any stage of de-
velopment," according to the
measure.


The top of the piano


Derek Maul.
maulhall@aol.com,
Sunbelt Newspapers
When I was growing up, my
paternal grandparents displayed
the latest family photographs in
the hallowed front room. New
family portraits miraculously ap-
peared within minutes of being
processed. They were perched
on tables, shelves, mantles,
bookcases, Grandma's sewing
cabinet and the top of Grandpa's
enormous upright concert grand.
With four children and 13
grandchildren, an unwritten hier-
archy evolved over the years.
Certain vigilant family members
kept score of the relational peck-
ing-order, evidently coded via a
complex scheme - a caste sys-
tem of sorts revealed by exactly
where each family's latest por-
trait might appear.
One day I walked in behind
my cousin Kathleen. She uttered
an audible gasp and stood -
transfixed by joy - in the exact
middle of the room.
"What's up?" I ventured. My
cousin didn't answer, but instead
called to her parents. "Mum!
Dad!" she shrieked. "Come
quickly. We've finally made it to
the piano!"
Today, we have a lot of family
photos around our house. The
one above my desk is probably
my favorite. Rebekah and the


children, reading together oirca
1988.
Daylight from an open win-
dow is reflected in the pages of
the book. The image is captured
in such a way that it appears their
faces are illuminated by light
emanating from the open vol-
ume. I love it, I think, because it
captures so much more than one
magical moment. It captures the
daily adventure of learning,
reading and discovery that char-
acterized those early years in
the welcoming house on Pied-
mont Road.
Our great trek out west is fea-
tured in the family room. An-
drew exploring Fort Bowie in
Arizona, Naomi picture perfect
on a rock in Zion, Rebekah hik-
ing the Grand Canyon, me in the
heat of the Painted Desert. The
series is rounded out with a clas-
sic family grouping snapped
halfway down the Navajo Trail
deep into Utah's Bryce Canyon.
It made me wonder, thinking
about it all and checking the var-
ious photographs of generations
past, what picture some future
offspring of a younger Maul
might lean against their wall or
bookcase? How will they re-
member me when the essence of
this mortal frame is reduced to
some collection of pixels, a
snapshot, or a faded daguerreo-
type?


To be honest, I could care less
what the rendition looks like,
just so long as someone knows
the true story of what this good
life really means to me.
One distant day, when some
six year old in the year 2070
traces the layer of dust with a
grubby finger and asks who it is
that she has unearthed, I want
someone to say, "Why, that's
your great-great grandfather
Derek. People say his life was so
rich and so full of thankfulness
that everyone who knew him felt
grateful too. They say that few
people ever lived who loved
God so well."
I wish I could leave a photo-
graph of my story that would tell
so much more than the cheesy
grin or the place where I am
standing.
But maybe that is what I am
doing when I write my column
- painting a picture of this as-
tonishing life. Indeed, if you
look closely you can see how
genuinely happy I am, and you
can make out my family gath-
ered all around me. Look, we
even made it to the top of the pi-
ano!
Columnist Derek Maul is a
Tampa based writer You can
reach him at
maulhall@aol.com, or check out
more of his work at Derek-
Maul.com


IN CONCERT


Saturday, March 19, 2005

7:30 pm at the

Suwannee County Fair


Tickets on Sale


mNO W!!
VIP & General Admission
tickets available

Order by phone...

^i Now taking Visa/MC


P* Call for more info.

(386) 362-7366
138576-F


IN CONCERT


Saturday, March 19, 2005

7:30 pm at the

Suwannee County Fair


Tickets on Sale


NOW!!
VIP & General Admission
tickets available

Order by phone...

Now taking Visa/MC


* Call for more info.

(386) 362-7366
138576-F


CHURCH CALENDAR


i


PAGE 7B


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK







PA( R0 0 m.A- EMCR LV OAKRDAYFEBRUARY25-,-00


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Sevn th comniysic 18


(386) 362-1734


129174JS-F


Beaty Auto Sales

Located next door to Beaty's Truck Parts
Off Hwy. 90W. ~ Live Oak
386-364-4110 ~ 386-364-3206
Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday 12 p.m.-5 p.m.




Jifly Food Stores

LIVE OAK * WELLBORN * MAYO * BRANFORD
* DOWLING PARK

STORE ON NORTH OHIO OPEN 24 HOURS
"The Store Around The Corner From Where You Live"129145JS-F


North Florida Printing Co., Inc.
P.O. Drawer 850,
Live Oak, Florida 32060
Edward Howell, owner 362-1080 FLA. * WATS 1-800-431-1034 129147JS-F



Duncan Tire & Auto
Complete One Stop Service For Your Vchicle'


*MAPS


To advertise on


LENA.DUNCAN
362-4743
422 E. HOWARD ST. * LIVE OAK PLAZA
www.marketplace24.com
129159DH-F


this page,


please call

Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103








. :j










Howard Street Dry Clean

Quality Laundry and Dry Cleaning
* Same Day Service *


705 West Howard Street
Live Oak, Florida 32064


(386) 364-5211
129164JS-F


S JORDAN AGENCY, INC.

* Life * Home * Car * Business

Joe Jordan & Bruce Tillman


203 E. Howard St.
362-4724


Branford
935-6385
I *1SSICt I


Dixie Grill
"Specializing in Steaks & Seafood"
DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS (WITH VEGETABLE)
Open 7 Days - 5:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
364-2810 CATERING SERVICE & PRIVATE PARTIES
129143JS-F


To advertise on this page,

please call

Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103


ADVENT CHRISTIAN


BIXLER MEMORIAL
ADVENT CHRISTIAN
Advent Christian Village, Dowling Park
Rev. Steve Lawson & Rev. Rosemary
Humbles & Rev. John Harper
SUNDAY
Christian Education Hour................9:30 am
Morning Worship...........................10:45 am
Evening Service............................... 6:00 pm
129035JS-F
FIRST ADVENT
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
699 Pinewood Street
(386) 362-1802
Rev. Tim Carver, Pastor

SUNDAY
Sunday School ............................... 9:15 am
Morning Service..............................10:30 am
Evening Service.......................6:30 pm
WEDNESDAY
M idweek Service...............................6:30 pm
129036JS-F
BAPTIST

VICTORY BAPTIST CHURCH
10475 State Rd. 51-Approx. 3 miles South
Jerry Ownes - Pastor
(386) 362-6357 (386) 362-5313

SUNDAY
Sunday School........................... 10:00 am
Worship Service............................. 11:00 am
Evening Worship............................. 7:00 pm
1"s Sun. Morning Men's Breakfast 8:00 am
1T & 3RD Monday Visitation 7:00 pm
2nd Friday Night Ladies Meeting 7:00 pm
(Quilting)
Sunday Evening
Children's Choir...................5:00 pm
Adult Choir...................................... 6:00 pm

WEDNESDAY
Wednesday Bible Study...................6:45 pm
Master Clubs (Children's - Youth).....6:45 pm
Nursery Available All Services
"Where there is life, there is growth"
129037JS-F
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF DOWLING PARK
"Sharing the Joy of Jesus"
Rev. Shawn Johnson - Pastor
11274 235th Lane
(In Dowling Park on Hwy. 250)
Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 658-2360 or (386) 658-3715
E-Mail: fbcdp@hotmail.com
www.dowlingparkbaptist.org
SUNDAY
Team Kids & Adult Life Study.....................9:45 am
W orship Service......... ......................... 11:00 am
Evening Bible
Exploration Services.................. ........... 6:00 pm
* Nursery Available all Services
* Pre-K to 2nd Grade Junior Church conducted
during 11:00 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship
Service
MONDAY
"Quilters for Christ...... ...... .............. 6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Mid Week Prayer Service.....................6:00 pm
129038JS-F
SUWANNEE STATION
BAPTIST CHURCH
Everybody Welcomed
3289 101st Lane, Live Oak, FL 32060
Bro. Wilbur Wood, (386) 362-2553
SUNDAY
Sunday School............................... 10:00 am
Morning Worship.............................11:00 am
Choir Practice..................... ......... 6:00 pm
Evening Worship............................. 7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Prayer & Worship........................7:00 pm
Children & Youth Program..............7:00 pm
129176JS-F


BAPTIST

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor: Rev. David Teems .
14364 140th St., Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 776-1010
email address: Suwannee baptasso@alltel.net
SUNDAY SERVICES
Bible Study..................................................9:45 am
W orship Service.......... ......................... 11:00 am
(Children's Church during Morning Worship),
Discipleship Training..... .... ............ 6:00 pm
Women's Bible Study, Men's Bible Study,
Youth Choir & Bible Study, Children's Choir
Evening W orship...........................................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY SERVICES
A w anas.........................................................6:30 pm
Wednesday Evening Supper........................5:45 pm
Bible Study & Prayer Time ..........................7:00 pm
Nursery available during all services
144788DH-F

BAPTIST (SOUTHERN)

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Comer of U.S. 90 and Church Street
362-1583 ..
Rev. Phillip Herrington
Minister of Students/Children
Rev. Clare Parker, Minister to Senior Adults
Rev. Alan Lott, Music and Worship
SUNDAY
Early W orship....... .................. ............8:30 am
Sunday School..........................................9:45 am
M morning W orship....................................11:00 am
Live Broadcast on WLVO 106.1 FM
Discipleship Training...............................6:00 pm
Evening Worship................ ................ 7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Music & Missions for Children................6:00 pm
Crossfire (Students).............................. 7:00 pm
Mid-Week Bible Study...........................7:00 pm
129039JS-F

PINEMOUNT BAPTIST CHURCH
US 129 South (Across from the S&S Store)
Post Office Box 129-McAlpin, Florida
(386) 362-5634
Nursery provided for each worship service
Worship and Fellowship Opportunities of the Week
Pastor: Greg Vickers
SUNDAY
Bible School..... ................. ............ 9:45 am
M morning W orship..... ........................... 11:00 am
Choir Practice............................................. 5:30 pm
Evening W orship........................................... 6:30 pm
WEDNESDAY
Family Night Supper................... 6:00 pm
AW ANA Club ...............................................6:30 pm
Prayer M eeting........................................... 7:00 pm
THURSDAY
F.A.I.T.H. M inistry..................................... 6:30 pm
Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves
together... but encouraging one another.
Hebrews 10:25
129398JS-F

WESTWOOD BAPTIST
920 11th Street, SW (Newbern Road)
362-1120
Pastor - Dr. Jimmy Deas
Rev. Jim McCoy
SUNDAY
Sunday School.............................9:30 am
Morning Worship Service............10:55 am
Discipleship Training
Adults & Youth............................5:10 pm
Children's Choirs............................5:00 pm
Evening Worship Service............6:30 pm
TUESDAY
Prayer Breakfast-Dixie Grill..........6:30 am
WEDNESDAY
Youth Group GA's, RA's, Mission Friends
& Youth Group............................6:30 pm
Mid-Week Service.......................6:30 pm
Adult Choir Rehearsal .................7:30 pm
129040JS-F
MOUNT OLIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Growing Together As Family"
5314 98th Terrace, Live Oak, FL 32060
(From US 90, take 137N to Hogan Road and follow signs)
.Pastors Dan Allan and Brent Kuykendall
www.mtolivebaptistchurch.com
SUNDAY
Small Groups (Sunday School)......... 9:45 am
Celebration Worship........................11:00 am
"G-Force" Children's
Family Worship.............................. 6:00 pm
Youth Choir.... .....................6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Family Supper....................................5:30 pm
Kidzclub/Graded Choirs....................6:00 pm
Adult Discipleship.............................6:30 pm
Student "Impact" Worship.................6:30 pm
Celebration Choir Rehearsal..............7:30 pm
129178JS-F


BAPTIST (SOUTHERN)


It is natural for us to fear death; we love life ., .
and hope to enjoy it as long as possible.
Perhaps what we fear most about death is the
uncertainty of it. In the face of death, we are
J like children, not knowing what the experience
of dying will be like and wondering whether r
we will "live" on after our deaths. For a
variety of reasons, many of us are confident
that we will live on after our deaths. We
may feel the presence of our loved ones
who have gone before us. There are7 . H
many who have had "near death" '
experiences or who have actually died
and were revived, who tell us that they felt
as if they were being transported toward a warm 0
and radiant light. Sometimes we are powerfully 0
struck by the feeling that this physical life
can't possibly be all there is; we feel 0
surrounded by God, bathed in an ocean of
spirit. We have the idea of eternity within us and
we sense eternity in the stars. What a cruel cosmic
joke it would be if eternity were nothing but a figment of
our imagination. However, these experiences, along with the fact that
religions around the world almost universally assure us of a future life,
give us faith that death is not the end of life, but a new beginning. Fear
not: although we may not know what lies in store for us after we die, our
faith gives us hope that this life is but a glimmer of a wondrous eternity.
Faith is the substance of things hoped for,
the evidence of things not seen.
R.S.V. Hebrews 11:1


Wednesday Service...........................7:30 pm
129120JS-F
129029JS-F


I


"Quality Printing is the
Only Printing Wiorth
Buying"


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25,2005


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


DAGF 8R


ANTIOCH BAPTIST CHURCH
5203 County Road 795
362-3101 - Church
SUNDAY
Sunday School............. ...............i9:45 am
Morning Worship.............................11:00 am
Church Training... ........................6:00 pm
Evening W orship ...............................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Service.................................. 7:00 pm
129043JS-F


WELLBORN BAPTIST CHURCH
"A warm place in a Cold World."
Dr. Donald Minshew
U.S. 90 West & Lowe Lake Rd., Wellborn
Church Phone 963-2231
SUNDAY
Early W orship........................ ...................... 8:30 am
Sunday Bible Study........................................ 9:45 am
Second Morning Worship............................. 11:00 am
Evening W orship........................................... 6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Youth.............................................................. 7:00 pm
Prayer W orship .... ..... .... .......................7:00 pm
"Come Worship With Us" 129044DH-F
SHADY GROVE
MISSIONARY BAPTIST
15 miles West Hwy.90 -
2 Miles Down River Road
Rev. David Hingson, 658-2547
SUNDAY
Sunday School.................. ................ 9:45 am
W orship............................................p11:00 am
Church Training...............................6:00 pm
Evening Worship...............................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Prayer & Bible Study.......................7:00 pm
129046JS-F
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
(386) 362-5239
10413 Hwy. 129 South
Aaron Turner, Pastor
Clay Ross, Music
Hardy Tillman, Awana Commander
SUNDAY
Morning Worship.......................10:30 am
Aw ana................................................6:00 pm
School of the Scriptures.....................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Care Group.................... ................. 7:00 pm
FRIDAY
*Singles Bible Study .................. 6:30 pm
(First Friday of each month)
SATURDAY
Nursing Home Ministry*
(First & third Saturday of each month)
[A pre-school nursery is provided at each worship service]
"N,,i i..r, ,,, the assembling of ourselves
together, as the manner of some is; but exhorting
one another: and so much the more, as you see
the day approaching" (Hebrews 10:25).
129048JS-F
ROCKY SINK BAPTIST CHURCH
Where the "Son" always shines
8422 169th Rd., Live Oak, Florida 32060
(386) 362-3971
Rev. Justin Young
(US 129 S to 11th W half circle and continue
on 11th travel approx 7 miles turn right onto
169th Rd at signs.)
SUNDAY
Sunday School..................................9:45 am
Morning Worship...........................11:00 am
Choir Practice.... ......................... 5:00 pm
Evening W orship...............................6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Meeting................................ 7:00 pm
Nursery & "Little Children's Church"
is provided 144786DH-F

CATHOLIC
ST. FRANCIS XAVIER
CATHOLIC CHURCH
928 East Howard St. U.S. 90 East
Rev. Michael Pendergraft
P.O. Box 1179 Live Oak, Florida 32060
(386) 364-1108
SUNDAY
Sunday M ass.......................................9:00 am
Sunday (Spanish) Mass ................1:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Wednesday Mass.............................7:00 pm
THURSDAY
Thursday M ass................................. 9:00 am
FRIDAY
Friday M ass..................................... 9:00 am
SATURDAY
Saturday (Vigil) Mass......................6:00 pm
129114JS-F
EPISCOPAL
ST. LUKE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
1391 SW llth Street, Live Oak
WEDNESDAY
Eucharist & Unction.....................10:30 am
& 6:00 pm
THURSDAY
Eucharist.......................... ...............7:00 am
SUNDAY
Eucharist.......................... ...............9:00 am
Sunday School..................... ...........9:45 am
Eucharist........................ ...............11:00 am
Nursery provided for both services.
Parish hall available for community activities
For more information call (386) 362-1837
The Rev. Donald L. Woodrum - Rector
129116JS-F

INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
TABERNACLE BAPTIST
CHURCH
Pastor Gill Roser 362-7800
Gold Kist Blvd. (across from armory)

SUNDAY
Sunday School.................................. 10:00 am
M morning W orship .............................11:00 am
Evening W orship ...............................6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY


WFCi







PAGE 9B


FPrIflAYFRI AY2 20 WNE DMCA/LV A


INTERDENOMINATIONAL

MELODY CHRISTIAN CENTER
& Melody Christian Academy K-12
Highway 129 South * Live Oak, FL
(386) 364-4800
Children's Ministry-Youth Ministry-Adults
Services:
Sunday 10:00 am and 6:00 pm
Wednesday 7:00 pm - Adults
Children's Ministry
Revolution Youth Church
Nursery Available All Services
Melody Christian Bookstore - Open daily
Pastor Frank C. Davis 129121JS-F


WORD ALIVE CHURCH
11239 State Rd. 51 * Live Oak, FL 32060
Pastor's Dale and Connie Naiman
(386) 294-3100
SUNDAY
Children's Ministrys........................ 10:45 am
Worship Service...............................10:45 am
Nursery provided
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study...................................... 7:30 pm
Youth services 2nd & 4th Sundays....6:00 pm
129123JS-F


CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
1550 Walker Avenue SE * Live Oak, FL
(386) 208-1345
"A Church on the Move"
Sunday Morning............... 10:30 am
Wednesday Night........................... 7:00 pm
Pastor Wayne Godsmark
Senior Pastor 129124DH-F


NAZARENE

LIVE OAK CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
915 Church Ave., SW 1 Block So. of Mayo
Road North of High School
Rev. Louis J. Medaris

SUNDAY
Sunday School................................. 9:45 am
Morning Worship.... ................11:00 am
Evening Worship............................. 6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY '
Evening Prayer Meting........... 7:00 pm
129125JS-F


NON-DENOMINATIONAL


LIVE OAK CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Joseph Schmidt, Minister
Corner of Hamilton and Ohio Aves.
(Hwy. 129 N)
(386) 362-1085 (386) 362-3982
SUNDAY
Morning Worship........................... 11:00 am
Evening Worship............................. 6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study...................................... 7:00 pm
129126JS-F
LIVE OAK CHURCH OF CHRIST
Minister: Craig Williams
Home: (386) 362-6409
1497 Irvin (S.R. 51)
P.O. Box 281 Live Oak, FL 32060
Church: (386) 364-5922
Bible Classes.................. ................10:00 am
Morning Worship.............................11:00 am
Evening Worship.................6:00 pm
Wednesday Bible Class...................7:00 pm
Featuring Mentoring Program for Youth
129127JS-F

SUWANNEE RIVER
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Rev. Ray Brown
17750 16th Street, Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 842-2446

SERVICES
Sunday.School............................... 10:00 am
Sunday Morning Worship..............11:00 am
The distance makes the difference.
12 miles North of CR249, Nobles Ferry Rd.
129352JS-F


PENTECOSTAL

DOWLING PARK
CHURCH OF GOD
658-1158/658-3151
Pastor: Frank D. Jones
SUNDAY
Sunday School........ . ............ ............ 9:45 am
M morning Worship.... .......................... 11:00 am
Children's Church.... .......................... 11:00 am
Sunday Evening.... .............................. 6:30 pm
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Dinner.. .................................5:30 pm
Fam ily H our ................................................7:00 pm
Nursery Provided
129136JS-F
LIVE OAK CHURCH OF GOD
US 129 South
Rev. Fred R. Watson 362-2483

SUNDAY
Sunday School................................. 9:45 am
Children's Church.......................... 10:45 am
M morning Worship.............................10:45 am
Evening Worship............ ............. :30 pm
Children Choir................................. 6:00 pm
Sunday Evening Childrens Church...6:30 pm
Wednesday Night ~
Family Training Hour...............7:00 pm
Wednesday Night Dinner.................5:45 pin
Children's Classes, V.I.B.E. Youth Church,
Adult Bible Study 129131JS-F

LIVE OAK FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
13793 76th St. (Mitchell Rd.)
Live Oak, FL
Rev. Donald Suggs
362-2189

SUNDAY
Sunday School................................. 9:30 am
Children's Church.......................... 10:30 am
Morning Worship........................... 10:30 am
Evening Worship...............................6:00 pm
Wednesday Night............................. 7:00 pm
129132JS-F
'REFUGE PENTECOSTAL
TABERNACLE
12280 Co. Rd. 137
(386) 688-2791
Wellborn, FL
Pastor: Darin Wilson
SUNDAY
Sunday ............................................10:00 am
Sunday Evening............................. 6:00 pm
Wednesday Night. ........................7:30 pm
129867-F

METHODIST

WELLBORN METHODIST
12005 CR 137
963-3071, 963-2154
Pastor Timothy Plant
Music: Geiger Family
SUNDAY
Sunday School............................... 10:00 am
W orship.........................................11:00 am
Prayer Request Boxes
at Jiffy, Annettes, All Springs and at
Dumpsters
PRAYER INTERCESSION
Tuesday at the altar
at 7 a.m., noon, and at 7 p.m.
CHURCH OPEN ALL DAY
Everyone Welcome
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study................... 7:00 p.m.
129399JS-F


PINE GROVE UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
5300 CR 136A, Live Oak
**Need Planlst/Organist*
Phone (386) 362-5595
SUNDAY
Sunday School................................. 9:45 an
Morning Worship...........................11:00 an
Evening Worship............................. 6:00 pn
TUESDAY
Men's Digging Deeper Bible Study..6:30 pn
Women for Christ Bible Study..........6:30 pr
WEDNESDAY
Mid-Week Service........................... 7:00 pr
"COME WORSHIlIP I17TH0 US"
135090DH-F


PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
U.SA.
421 White Avenue, Live Oak
(386) 362-3199
Rev. Pedro Rivera
SUNDAY
Sunday School..... ........ ... 9:45 am
Worship...... ..... ......... 11:00 am
Communion First Sunday of every month
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study........ .................................... 7:00 pm
129133DH-F



SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST

LIVE OAK SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
Pastor
Brandon White
364-6540

SATURDAY SERVICES
Sabbath School........9:30 am.......Bible Study
Worship Service............................ 11:00 am
Call for more information on Prayer Meeting
15451 129 South, Live Oak, FL
129134JS-F



UNITED METHODIST

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
311 S. Ohio Avenue, Live Oak * 362-2047
Pastor: Jim Wade .
"COME WORSHIP WITH (IS"

SUNDAY
Early Worship....................................8:30 am
Sunday School Assembly................9:30 am
Sunday School....................................9:45 am
W orship......................................... 11:00 am
Youth Fellowship............................ 4:30 pm

TUESDAY
Children's Choir.............................. 5:00 pm

WEDNESDAY
Bible Si.id,' 10 00 am
Youth Fell,,1 sh . . .? . .... : pm
Chancel Ringers (Adult).................6:00 pm
Men's Chorus.................................. 7:00 pm
Chancel Choir................................. 7:30 pm
129141JS-F
NEW HARMONY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
160th St.
(Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right)
Pastor: Stan Posey
Phone (386) 776-1806

SUNDAY
Sunday Worship.............................. 9:30 am
Bible Study....... ........................ 10:30 am

WEDNESDAY
Women's Bible Study.........................10 am
129158JS.-F

To place your church
on this page, please
call Myrtle Parnell at
(386) 362-1734
ext. 103


386-935-0824


It is never too late to return to God. In
the parable of the prodigal son (Luke 15:11-32), we are
told of a young man returning home after leading a
dissolute life in a foreign land. He is welcomed home with
open arms by his father, as we are by God. In another
parable, Jesus speaks of laborers who are hired at
different times of the day, and all are given a full day's -- "
pay (Matthew 20:1-16). This parable illustrates that God
wants to reward us, regardless of when we have decided
to follow Him. Finally, in the parable of the lost sheep y L2 -
(Matthew 18:12-14), we are told that the good shepherd
will leave all of his sheep in search of the one that is lost,
which indicates how much God loves and cares for each of
us. In each case, we see that God's justice is not the same as
man's. The brother of the prodigal son feels betrayed by his
father's loving acceptance of his brother, and the laborers who
worked all day feel they should be given more than those who only
worked for a few hours. Is it not foolish to leave the flock to search for A-
the one that is lost? The point of all these parables is simple: God loves
us unconditionally and wants us to return to Him, no matter what we may
have done or when we make the decision to live a godly life.

It was fitting to make merry and be glad, for this your brother was dead,
and is alive; he was lost, and is found.
R.S.V. Luke 15:32


129034DH.1


The Historic TELFORD
HOTEL- RESTAURANT
" ' Monday - Thursday 11am -2:30pm
, . Friday - Saturday 11am - 9pm
Sunday 11am - 3pm
P.O. Box 407, White Springs, FL 32096
S' .- (386) 397-2000 Fax: (386) 884-9902


To advertise on this page,

please call

Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103



Bayway Services

Steam Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning
* IICRC Certified * Fire & Water Damage
Restoration Specialists * 24 Hour Emergency Service


Residential & Commercial


362-2244 1291e2-F


NPA NAPA of Live Oak

Cars * Trucks * Imports * Farm * Auto paint

Machine Shop Service

209 Duval * (386) 362-2329










T- 9 HEATING & AIR
TOU CH 1 TONi S3 CONDITIONING

Service * Sales * Installation

DB D30 2450S9 Residential & Commercial
3883250 "Licensed & Insured

Locte at 11016 S 9 E - iv Oa, L 306 n


M-F 8:30-6:00 16Js-F


N # @@g NN.


Annette B. Land Realtor 'l
Specializing In Real Estate Sales & Services In The Suwannee River Valley


U.S. 27 EAST * P.O. BOX 394
BRANFORD, FLORIDA 32008
www. landbrokeragerealtor.comn


1-800-426-8369
129161-F


-4 LOflf 4nR Ut UOR PRflR


To advertise on this page,

please call

Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 25,2005








P ^----FU --- s I E DMORA/ IVE OA FRDY FE R 25




4 AI" S / f>^^>


Friday Evening February 25, 2005

Funniest Home Videos 20/20 Local Local Local Local
W Joan of Arcadia CSI Numbers Local Late Show Late Late
Dateline Third Watch Medical Investigation Local Tonight Show Conan
W ' Bernie Ma Bernie Ma Johnny Zero Local Local Local Local Local Local

A & E Biographyr Biograpn; Biography American Justice Biography
AMC Eas, Rider The Omen M Club TBA
CMT AII Tre R.gnt M...veD MuziKmafia TV Most Shocking CMT Music
DISN Disney, Movie TBA Lico & Stitch Raven Raven Raven
ESPN NBA Fridjay. C.-iasl T,:. Coast |Australian Sportscenter Outside Films
ESPN2 TBA Friday Night Fighis Sportscenter NFL Live Matchup
FAM Linle G,.anri Whose |Whose The 700 Club Precious in His Sight.
FOOD Emeri Live inside Dis $40 A Day Kitchen Accomplished Iron Chef Emeril Live
FX Fear Faclor Fear Facior Fear Factor Marked For Death

(.-J Get reacquainted with your sweet tooth.
1 � Visit cootwhip.com for dessert ideas with less than 100 calories. - .
HGTV Dec Cents Sens Chic To Sell Remix Divine Design D Travis Dec Cenis Sens Chic
LIFE Dcina Time On Maple Drive Road Rage Merge WVhat Sihoiuld Ycou Do"
MTV Asriee Simpson Show True Liie Wanna Come In0 Room Raiders
SCl Stargate SG-1 Stargaie Atlantis Baniestar Galactica Siargale SG-1 Stargale Atlanrls
TBS Friends iFnends Twisler Turbulence
TCM The Sing |Rocky
TLC Overhaulin OOverhaulin' IOverhauiin |0.erraulir Overhaulin
TNT Law & Order John O Panic
USA Law & Order SVU Law & Order SVU Monk ILaw & Order Ci fMlonk

HBO Sphere Unscnpte Real Time Taxicab C,rnessions
�2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service

Saturday Evening February 26, 2005

X Forrest Gump Local Local Local Local
wgcI Wickedly Perfect Cold Case Local Local Local Local
w /N Law & Order Law & Order CI Law & Order SVU Local SNL
WTL.,OX Cops Cops America's Most Wante Local Local MAD TV Local Local

A & E City Conlidenial Cold Case Filess M. 1-5 American Juslice Cily Conlidenlial
SAC Partcn - -- -- - - -- - Siraegic Air Crrmar
CMT Jurrimn., Bunei Uncu. Cr:.. ,ads uzikmai, Insider Jirn,. B tel-i Uncul Cro'ssrcado.
DISN Brand', Brandy Lilt' IDa'.e Raven Phil Lizzie IBoy ,Kim Bracetace
ESPN Big East Conference Baskeiball Winter Games Nine Sponr.cenier College Garmed-ay
ESPN2 Spitning The Rock Track & Field NHRA Ouaiilying IFasibreak
FAM Gilmore Gilmore Whose Line9 Funniest Videc's
FOOD Emeril Live Unwrapped Iron Chel Unwrappe |Top 5 Emeril Live
FX Nascar Cops Cops Rescue Me Rescue Me
HGTV Remix Decor Ce Dsgn Fina Dsgn Chal Dsgn Dim iOn A Dim Dsgn Fina |Daie Desi Remix IDecor Ce
LIFE Motie TBA Movve: TBA Sirorng Medicine True Romance.
MTV Real World IRW'RR Newvlyweds- Nick & Je Wanna Come in" Room Raiders
scI Event Horizon Alien Siege rImposier
TBS Twister Deep Blue Sea IDeep Rising
TCM Our of Airnca Rain Man
TLC Trading Spaces While You Were Outr While You Were Out Trading Spaces |Trading Spaces.
TNT The Repiacrnenls The Whole rJne Yards Tin Cup
USA Law & Order SVU Law & Order SVU Law & Order SVU PGA Tour

HBO Win A Date With Tad Hamnilon HBO Boxing9 Real Sex
n'-' o-' �.- riCan Pr,:.hlc H.:,m r[r.:..rn C.:"|,, i � r, ,:


Sunday Evening February 27, 2005

`WT(L/AB Oscar Co 177th Annual Academy Awards Local Local Local
WCTVc Cold Case Collateral Damage Local Local Local Local
TWCN Law & Order CI Law & Order Local Local Local
W -PI~ Independence Day Local Local Local Local

A & E Dog the Bounly Hunter CSi Miami Dog the Bounly Hunte
AMC Apocalypse MNow.' Flying Tigers
CMT Dukes ol Hazzard Top 20 Cournidown
DISN Disney Mo.vie TBA IRaven Phil Bug Juice ILizze Boy Meeis Bracelace
ESPN NBA Special Edition TBA Sporiscenter College G
ESPN2 Kragen NHRA Nationals Tilt Fasibreak Sireelbail
FAM The Birdcage IWhose Lin Funniest Funniest J Osleen Feed
FOOD Emeril Live ITBA TBA TBA Emeril Live
FX Like Me Nip Tuck The Shield Fear Factor
HGTV Designed |Amer Ho Reel Homes HTMH Gen Rin |Kilchen Tr Designed |Amer Hco
LIFE Too Rich Wild Card
MTV The Ashlee Sirrmpson Show rJNewlyweds Nick Jess Advance RW RR
SCl Resident Evil Queen ol the Damned Scare Scare Ouler Limits
TBS Bad Boys Bad Boys Bait
TCM Kapo La Sirada Umbrellas or Chert.ou
TLC TBA ITBA TBA Trading Spaces Family TBA
TNT Romeo Must Die Romeo Mlusl Die
USA Silence ol the Lambs Monk PGA Tour

HBO Sex and the Cilty Carnivale 20 Unscriple Johnson Family Vacalion
@2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service


ACROSS
1. Healthful resorts
5. Whimper like ababy
9. Kid-lit elephant
14. Rhinoceros feature
15. Healing plant
16. Mimickingbehavior
17. Height: Prefix
18. Prison uprising
19. Quench, as thirst
20. Vigorous, and then some
23. Have a go at
24. Spike or Ang
25. Appear to be
26. _ capital income
27. Super-quiet,musically
28. carotene
32. _ boom (sound
from an SST)
35. Andrea . (ill-fated ship)
37. Chest muscle, in gym
lingo
38. Punch in the
mouth, slangily
41. Sort
42. Like bar snacks
43. Nouveau _
44. Tie-_ (designs,
hippie-style)
46. Homes on wheels, or short
47. Grid great Marino
48. Zoo home
50. Watched junior
51. Snake eyes
54. Spot to slow down,
perhaps
58. "Gay" city
59. "Hud" star Patricia
60. Castaway's home
61. Indy 500 familyname
62. Amos or Spelling
63. Delta sediment
64. _-eyed
(suspicious-looking)
65. Fit for active duty
66. Mound stats


DOWN
1. Golf club part
2. Like ice caps
3. _-craftsy
4. Peeved mood
5. Eliot's Silas
6. Slur over
7. Hound sound
8. Request from the reverend
9. Musical Count
10. Self-confidence
11. Belle's man
12. Clumsy ships
13. Deliloaf
21. Smart _
wisenheimerss)
22. Fasten anew
26. Snapshot, for short
27. Fence supports
29. Cast-of-thousands film
30. Georgia -
(Ramblin' Wreck's school)
31. Need an aspirin
32. Lose traction
33. Part of SRO
34. Zap in the microwave
35. Study intently
36. Cost of classified
39. T-shirt size
40. Take the gold
45. Windbag's speech
47. Showy perennial
49. New York's _
Fisher Hall
50. Glassy look
51. "_, with Love"
(Sidney Poitier movie)
52. When repeated, a
Washington city
53. "Waiting for Lefty"
playwright
54. Chaplin prop
55. Celestial bear
56. Sign gas
57. Heed the alarm
58. Place for a pint


Crossword Puzzle Anwers


U Bu1qoL11d

TIME WARNER Current Channel Line-Up 362-3535
CABLE ' LIVE OAK

2 ShopNBC 21 Information 38 Discovery Channel 55 Cartoon Network
3 WCJB (ABC) Gainesville (20) 22 Marketplace 39 TBS 56 Fox Sports Net
4 WJXT (IND) Jacksonville (4) 23 Home Shopping Network 40 Headline News 57 PAXtv
5 WUFT (PBS) Gainesville (5) 24 CNN 41 Fox News 58 Sci-fi Channel
6 WCTV (CBS) Tallahassee (6) 25 TNT 42 MSNBC 59 Game Show Network
7 WFXU (UPN) Live Oak (57) 16 Nickelodeon 43 CNBC 60 AMC
8 Community Bulletin Board 27 MTV 44 C-Span 2 61 Lifetime Movie Network
9 WB 28 Spike TV 45 E! 62 Comedy Central
10 WTLH (FOX) Tallahassee (49) 29 A&E 46 The Travel Channel 63 CMT
11 The Weather Channel 30 ABC Family 47 HGTV 64 Oxygen
12 WTWC (NBC) Tallahassee (40) 31 Disney Channel 48 The Learning Channel 65 Bravo
13 QVC 32 Lifetime 49 The History Channel 66 WE (Women's Entertainment)
14 C-Span 33 USA Network 50 Animal Planet 67 FX
15 TV-Guide 34 BET 51 Food Network 68 CNBC
16 WGN (IND) Chicago 35 ESPN 52 TBN 69 TV Land
,17 Special Events 36 ESPN 2 53 INSP 70 Fit tv
20 Local 37 Sunshine Network 54 VH-1 71 Discovery Health


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


AP GE 10B


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK







PAGE 11B


A guide for your The Diet Detective

viewing pleasure -. picky eating syndrome


Monday Evening February 28, 2005

WTXLJABC Bachelreiie '.ea- ;,' n Finale. BBach All.-r Final R:- LOCal L :al IJmrr, , K
WCTVICBS S1il1 Sl.and ILrien Up i Ra.-mnd -"2 1 . .2 er7 C i r.1ihim, L,:al Late Sh,. Lai L.ale
WTWC/NBC Fear F. i.:,-r .led.irni L : al Tonigni Srh-. C,':nr,
WTLHIFOX Am,-er. ian 1 1 24 L.cal Lcal LOCal Local Lo ,al L,, ii

A & E ,, rlinre (--,i-G G.':t C .aesar- :? "_ Cr.:. 7 nrig Jordanr. Airl.ne.
AMC Thre :l,-,:r ,-,I r.1 ne, r__i-[JIghl- a%-yk
CMT Irn i-- F rine J irnrn, BLutte .I Uncut Cr..:-,:ir':-,id'_ Du'e s ',1 Hazzard Inide Fame.
DISN Dir.', f.1,-, .,ie TB. RA .ern I'js Bug .luiCe |Lizze Bc'y Lleel. |EIE',en
ESPN BQ Ea:l C.r,'rieren,.e Bas- eilb.ll TBA
ESPN2 IJpa F'.r. Tc,ur C rian-:: :.hip Fure Skalnr. Sireelball F..iltbreak
FAM Wvr. ,.e Lin |V'h,.:e Lin V.rho.e Lin Wr,:,e Ln Wr,o.e L,, Whrse Lin The -00 Clutb Funnies- Funrnie.-
FOOD Emeril L,.e Unr.'.'rapped,7 S 1ere Lite Iron Crel Emeril Li.e-
FX True Li ,e-, True Le-.
HGTV H-i.-,rre- AC[: DeI': n C eni Kil Trend.r-. IT.::. Seil De:.g Firna |D ,gnr Fr, Dme D Tra'.-ia Horen, A,- De,: Cenri.s
LIFE The Sec:reiar, C ri,me. O P0 _a,,-'n Halow Cle.a How Clea lNanny, C-.:lden
MTVI RVW IiR Ro-'m Raiders WaVan.ao
sd Slrara e SG-i. 1 Sl.ar,:cale SG-1 B.alile .ar G~ .acii.:.3 Inlernc.
TBS Frr-n |i IFrier,- Fn. -n Frien-ds' Farm .i-..iy Fan-i Guy l.1aiionali L mrri.p,':n vci'.: ai.,.r,
TCM The Ba3 *See -d Prince cl Holyw.',o:ri Hunchbtac ol riha-ire D
TLC Uiniarol Sl-.rei :o rie B.:., W,-.rF., F.akr.i II Unil.d S :orie' :.,s i ie B,:d Work
TNT La. .', Or der La.w .' Order L3',' & Order WlhOcui A Trace -JYF'PDO Blue&
USA La.. & Order S'.'U Ir Hell Law & Order SVu r.,lonk

HBO R-eal Sp.:,nrs Deadw:Jod 12 The f.lairix 7la r- R,7
,-,'_' 1_ m e ,_" r, r,:,hl H..,rr-T .. r, - ,-rT.- , _ r r ,'

Tuesday Evening March 1, 2005

WTXLJABC vWile KJids G LGopez Y PD Bu BuL PD Blu-e L,.ai Lal J Imrn-i, Krrrrmei
WCTVICBS tiJC IS TB% JJuain, Aim ny Lo:-al Laie Sn.'ow L.aTe L.aile
WTWC/NBC L3,A. & Order CI S:-ru Corrn-iile Law ,'. Order SVU LOjC31l Torighl Sh:r,,,w Cr::-r.an
WTLH/FOX Anirr,eL-cr, 3-:ol House L.al LOCal Local L:L local L..-al

A & E Cold Ca.e File, Cold Case Files D. i he Bounty Hume Crossing .Iordan Col C-ase File-
AMC Ir-e..a7 a' Sminr Bend ol ihe R,.er
CMT .Irinrmyv Eurfel LUr"nul L Skyrnyrd. Super Be' Inside Fame Dukes * Hazzard Jinirmmi Buliei Ur cul
DISN D,.ine, Tr.l.'e TBA Ra.ern Sis Sis Bug Jumce Lizze Boy Mleeis Even
ESPN S,.iir ea-e.irr, Cornifrerec,e Baskeiball Big Ten Cconrlerence B Spori cenler COulside
ESPN2 C-nre-ren.ce Ba-Ekeeall 1r IBA Nanion Seas.:'rn Sireeiball Fasibreak Dre.arn J.',
FAM Trh-e Sarni:oi Wr:ose Ln Whose Lin The r. i00 Club Funresi Hmrre V.de-i
FOOD Errieri L.e R .eSr SUcce- - - :i A Day ,,Iro.n rC ef Barttle ErE eril Li,.e
FX 'ert:c =i Lirri Life or Someirinr Like Fear Fa(:i.:,r
HGTV T.- Seii |Design Fi IDec':r C-. Ir.l1.srn Dsgn Cral IDsgr Cral Dime D Travisi To Sell Desian Fi
LIFE O.erkll 1.Allr-Ameri.an Girl r'lanny GoIldern Nanny Goldern
MTV F , ..:.-i ii I|:.'--i. 1i. Tne Ahe rei e S.-n---_-,,n Shr...
SCI Leqend .: Earnhea - Pan 1 Legrn o01 Eanih Sea - Clan o0 ire Cave Btar
TBS Frienr.ds Frienods Sex Civ |Se\ Civ Aullin Powers Spy Who Shagged Mle Siripes
TCM Criarade S':'metc: Up, There Likes M.le Kharloun,
TLC O. erraulr,n C).erriauln Rices. O'. erriauliri Overhaulin
TNT Law S Order Law & Order Crnarmed La', & Order X Files.
USA CocOie Uqly, .lNas.ville Slar Law & Order Cl The Dead Z'one

HBO Wrn rA Da[e WVnrn Tad Harrnill.:-, Real Time Carn.ale 20 The Firmr
,',l' " mr r .:ar,- r. :r.n' o- MHorri,..,.', n'.- .rnle :ier- ..:-er

Wednesday Evening March 2, 2005

WTX/AB Lost Alias Wife Swap Local Local Jimmy Kimmel
w BS 60 Minutes King Universe CSI: NY Local Late Show Late Late
WTwCM'B Dateline Special West Wing Law & Order Local Tonight Show Conan
WT"/Fox 70's Show Simple Lif American Idol Local Local Local Local Local

A&E American .lusii-ce 1,Michael Jackson Cas Biicirapr-y ,Amercar Jus.lce
AMC Tne rjney Pa FThe Breakltasi Club Deah Betcome.- Her
CMT Gr-eat Bii allO Fire mr.us-c Dukes ol Hazzard innidie Fame
DISN D-,ney 0 .,r.,..ie TBA Ravern Sis. Si- Bug Juice Lizzie Boy IE'.en
ESPN Allanhi, C,:as. Conrerence Baz&eibal NIIBA Wednesday SpOn-.-enlc-er
ESPN2 C .1,ee Ba-.kelball Fasibreal. Gamenigh
FAM L:.e .. Bai-.elball WhoSe Lin Whose- LDr The 700 Club Funrie-,t Funrinel
FOOD Ermrile LiB.e IB,-,bble FI |F,':od Nai Good Eat Good Eat Iron Chef Emeril Liv..e
FX There = Scorneming. Atou ul ary Fear Factor King Kingq

f 111e Celebratc Hometown Life
Stories from hometowns just like yours. Look for us each week in this paper.

HGTV Gen R en Weekend Anmer Ho Land Chal CurbAppe CurbAppe Dime D Travis Gen Ren Weekend
LIFE Twitled De-ire L,'ve : Deadly Triangil anny Goldanny nny C-.noldern
MTV i Je,'A''.,is: JIrck . Jessica Real W:rl Rm Rdrs
SCI Ripley s Beie'.'e I -r Ntji Devil s Pre,
TBS Ravi'riond i Rayrrmord Senrteld Seinieid Se S. Trie Cily IDa,.ve
TCM Oper.a-Mirn Pel-iic::al To Caicri A Thielf lronht B, llonrthwesl
TLC r lM, ing Upl, In A Fix While Y,:ou We-re Oui M,1oving Up. In 4 Fi:x
TNT Law & Order Law 6& Order True Crimrne True Crim
USA Law . Order S'.'U Law & Order SVU Law & Order SVU Law 8. Order Cl Ladies Jighi,

HBO In America Unscripte Out For Justice Real Time
�2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service

Thursday Evening March 3, 2005

WWTLJABC Life As We Know It Extreme Makeover Primetime Live Local Local Jimmy Kimmel
WCTvIS_ j Survivor Palau CSI Without A Trace Local Late Show Late Late
WJwNIBT Joey PWill/Grace The Apprentice Law & Order Local Tonight Show Conan
WTLgIFPX The O.C. Point Pleasant Local Local Local Local Local Local

A & E Cold Case File.s_ The Firsi 48 Crossina Jordan Cold Case Files
AMC Deairth VVarrerni Li:'rnnean Bruce Lee A Warnror::
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We all know at least one noto-
riously "picky eater." I have a
cousin who refuses to eat vegeta-
bles in any form - including the
lettuce or tomato on his cheese-
burgers. Actually, he's just agreed
to start eating peas - as long as
they're part of his canned beef
stew.
You might even say we're a na-
tion of picky eaters. Americans
eat the same 14 to 18 dishes over
and over, says Cary Neff, famed
spa chef, author of "Conscious
Cuisine" (Sourcebooks, 2004)
and consultant to Jenny Craig.
Typically, we eat the same break-
fast, vary our lunches slightly, and
for dinner have about eight to 10
different meals over the course of
a month.
In fact, despite the variety of
foods we have to choose from, we
seem to be creatures of habit.
"Food choices entail decisions
that are automatic, habitual and
subconscious - leading to 'un-
creativeness' and monotony,"
says Anna Huotilainen, re-
searcher at the University of
Helsinki in Finland. And while
many cultures eat certain staple
foods out of necessity, in the Unit-
ed States, "It's mostly done be-
cause of habit, and those habits
can alter one's taste preferences,
making it less appealing to try
healthy foods and more difficult
to acquire a taste for them," says
Neff.
Picky eating can be a problem
when you're trying to introduce
healthy behaviors into your life.
But there are some strategies that
can help you increase the variety
of foods you eat and make room
for some new, healthier choices.
REPEAT IT
We come to prefer what we eat
regularly, which means that food
preference is primarily an ac-
quired taste. Therefore, most ex-
perts agree that repeated exposure
to new foods helps make them
part of a regular diet. It can take as
many as 10 to 15 exposures for
either children or adults to devel-
op a food fondness, says Marcia
Pelchat, Ph.D., a food expert at
Monell Chemical Senses Center
in Philadelphia.
INCREASE VARIETY
Although research shows that
the more variety of unhealthy
foods available, the more you
overeat, that same principle can
also be applied to eating an as-
sortment of healthy vegetables. In
fact, people who eat the widest
variety of vegetables have less
body fat than others because they
can eat a lot more of them for a lot
fewer calories. Plus, eating a vari-
ety of healthy foods helps ensure
that we get all the vitamins, min-
erals and nutrients we need.
KEEP THEM HANDY,
AND START SMALL
.One way to learn to like
healthy foods is to make them
readily available so they become
your "reach-for" foods. "Have the
desired food - say, vegetables
- around the house and present
at every meal," says Amy T. Gal-
loway, Ph.D., professor of psy-
chology at Appalachian State
University in North Carolina.
Buy and prepare healthier foods,
such as asparagus, broccoli,
grilled chicken, roasted vegeta-
bles, beans and soups, and keep
them front-and-center in your
fridge, freezer and pantry. Make
unhealthy foods scarce. And as
you're developing a taste for
these healthier foods, start small
and go with the "one-bite" rule,
meaning don't push it - have
just a taste.
FOODS YOU KNOW
Try to introduce new foods
along with a familiar one. For in-
stance, use your favorite season-
ings the first time you're hying
couscous, and serve it with your
usual vegetables. Pelchat also
suggests sticking within your
own ethnic or cultural back-
ground. So if you're Italian, use
Italian flavorings and preparation
when trying a new food. Another
suggestion: Use foods you know
and enjoy as a base. If, for exam-


pie, you're ordering Pad Thai for
the first time, ask for it to be made
with chicken - assuming chick-
en is a food you know and like.
And finally, look for the variety of
new food that's closest to what
you normally eat. If you're a
steak lover who's trying fish, opt
for a dense "meaty" fish that's as
close to the taste and consistency
of steak as possible.
IN THE BEGINNING
Introduce new foods at the be-


ginning of the meal, when your
appetite is greatest. Some people
tend to be less picky when they're
really hungry, says Kathleen Zel-
man, R.D., M.P.H., director of nu-
trition for WebMD Health.
MIX IT UP
When introducing a reduced-
fat or lower-calorie version of a
familiar food, mix the two at first.
For instance, instead of eating
.plain egg whites, combine one-
third egg whites with two-thirds
whole eggs, and then gradually
reduce the amount of whole eggs.
You can do the same with a vari-
ety of foods, including whole
milk and skim milk, as well as
low-calorie whole-grain and reg-
ular cereal. Eventually you won't
know the difference, and you will
be eating or drinking only the
healthy choice.
SNEAK IT IN
Stealth nutrition is a great way
to hide or disguise nutritious
foods. Sneak fruits and vegeta-
bles into familiar dishes, such as
casseroles, soups, stews and
omelets; shred carrots or zucchini
into muffins, suggests Zelman. In
addition, pureeing foods can
make them unrecognizable, lead-
ing to better'acceptance.
USE SEASONINGS
AND SPICES
"Add ingredients to the food
that will enhance the taste: garlic
powder; onion flakes; salsa; low-
salt soy sauce; orange or other
fruit slices; almond, walnut or
cashew pieces," recommends
Neff. Ketchup and mustard are
great nonfat condiments.
EAT OUT
Fear of cooking new foods in-
correctly is one reason we avoid
trying them. Another issue is the
actual preparation: If it looks or
feels strange before it's prepared,
it could create feelings of disgust
and food aversions. Therefore, if
you're feeling ready to try a new
healthy food, visit a restaurant
known for serving it. That way
you'll see exactly how it should
be prepared and will be able to try
it in the best possible light. Also,
restaurants pay particular atten-
tion to presentation, which makes
the food more appealing and may
.nrn.ill'. m ia'e !it s..ecm, tj;rier It
doesn't hurt toi licd ihe "'lormn-
tic" and tempting descriptions on
the menu either. Neff suggests
putting "uncommon foods center
stage and creating a fun and ex-
citing environment around the
food." Much of eating, after all, is
about socializing.
SHAPE IT
We like to distance ourselves
from the "weird" or unfamiliar
parts of foods, especially whefi
the food comes from an animal.
Research shows we are more
likely to try new plant-based
foods than different or unique an-
imal-based foods. Just look at
how we eat chicken, with all the
awkwardly shaped parts taken
out. Pelchat suggests making the
food more rectangular: The more
it is separated from its natural
form, the less scary it will be. This
is another good reason to try new
foods in a restaurant, where all
the prep work and cooking is
done for you.
DON'T FORCE IT
Don't force kids or adults to eat
foods they don't want, says Gal-
loway. A journal article in "Ap-
petite" reported that when an au-
thority figure, such as a parent or
teacher, forced a child to eat "a
novel, disliked or aversive food,"
72% of those currently in college
said they wouldn't eat the food to-
day.
COPYCAT
Kids mimic the eating behavior
of parents, siblings, peers and
people on TV and in advertise-
ments - but in the early years,
it's mostly their parents. "Child-
hood is when you're developing
eating habits that will carry you
throughout life," says New York
City nutritionist Shira Isenberg,
R.D. So if you don't eat healthy
foods, there is a strong chance
your children won't either. In fact,
one study has shown that when


parents offered food to young
children without tasting it first,
the children were less likely to eat
the new food.
Charles Stuart Platkin is a nu-
trition and public health advo-
cate, author of "The Automatic
Diet" (Hudson Street Press,
2005) and founder of Integrated
Wellness Solutions. Copyright
2005 by Charles Stuart Platkin.
Write to
inf @ thedietdetective.com


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005









BUSINESS

'Because of Winn-Dixie' worth a trip to the theater


By Phil Boatwright
Baptist Press
Who isn't a sucker for a
good dog-and-his/her-sidekick
story?
"Because of Winn-Dixie,"
which opens in theaters Feb.
18, is the latest winner in this
tried-and-true genre.
Even USA Today topped its
review with the headline,
"'Winn-Dixie' is a winner,"
describing the film as "a sweet,
family-friendly retelling of a
touching and funny Newbery
Award-winning children's
book."
USA Today described the
film as "close enough to the
original work to please most
fans, and it's sufficiently enter-
taining for those unfamiliar
with Kate DiCamillo's story."
Because of Winn-Dixie's
storyline centers around a
lonely 10-year-old girl, aban-
doned by her alcoholic mother
and ignored by her grieving
minister father, who prays for a
friend. Soon after, an energetic
stray pooch scampers his way
into her heart while she shops
for macaroni and cheese at the
local Winn-Dixie. As the two
bond, she finds that they are
having a positive effect on the
friendless and disenfranchised
in her small, rural community,
as well as her own troubled re-
lationship with her father.
The film is the latest venture
from Walden Media, a relative-
ly unknown film company that
has produced some significant
fare -- such as "Holes,"
"Around the World in 80
Days" or "I Am David."
Walden Media's aim in those
and other films is to entertain
family audiences, while also
helping to encourage kids to
embrace the world of litera-
ture. What's more, its co-
founder is a believer.
Micheal Flaherty (I didn't
have the nerve to ask him why
he inverts the ae in his given
name), along with one-time
college, friend Cary Granat (I


kid you not), formed Walden
Media five years ago with the
purpose of making great films
from celebrated literature.
"My partner, Cary Granat,
had once been the president of
Dimension Films, making
mostly R-rated horror movies.
But he had a young daughter
and he wanted to make some-
thing that she could enjoy, that
he could bring his whole fami-
ly to.
"I was doing things in the
world of education and was
trying to find ways to make
learning more interesting to
kids," Flaherty continued. "To-
gether we formed a company
that would produce good sto-
ries that didn't shy away from
spiritual truths.
"We constructed a business
plan to make films based on
great historical subjects ('The
Question of God'), IMAX
films that would make science
come alive ('Aliens of the
Deep') and feature films based
on books kids were reading in
school ('The Lion, The Witch,
and The Wardrobe')," Flaherty
said.
"We got laughed at by every
venture capital office from
New York to San Francisco.
And then finally we met Phil
Anschutz, who understood
what we were doing right away
and did a lot to help develop
our vision."
The direction of Walden Me-
dia is not taken lightly by the
company's founders. "We
want to be the next great trust-
ed brand for families, particu-
larly for teachers, libraries and
parents," Flaherty said. "And
we have to deliver on our mis-
sion to use the film and the
book to make learning more
exciting for kids."
Asked why he wanted to add
to a movie genre already
stuffed with classics like
"Lassie Come Home," "Ladd
A Dog" and "My Dog Skip,"
Flaherty said there is always
room for one more dog-lovers'


. "


movie: "1 love the story be-
cause I'm a dog lover and I
think it has a great message
about how we are all broken
and we should share each oth-
er's burden and each other's
joy.
"20th Century Fox already
had the rights and we begged
to let us come in and co-pro-
duce it and they were nice
enough to bring us aboard.
And I am very happy with the
outcome."
As for the studio's I Am
David, .which won festival
awards and raves from review-
ers but was missed by most
filmgoers, Flaherty recounted
that Lions Gate was the dis-
tributor "and they had a strate-
gy to start with a limited re-
lease, hoping it would gain
some popularity. Unfortunate-
ly, it wasn't in major markets
like Boston, Los Angeles or
New York. But it's coming out
in DVD this spring and we're
happy because we have a great


number of educational materi-
als that go along with the
film." (Go to walden.com
website for further details.)
I Am David is a powerful
film adaptation of Anne
Holm's internationally ac-
claimed novel "North to Free-
dom," about a 12-year-old boy
who escapes a communist la-
bor camp and is thrust into the
free world for the first time in
his young life. His trek across
Europe is a physical test of
will as well as a spiritual voy-
age during which he slowly
sheds his cynical view of hu-
manity and begins to trust and,
ultimately, love.
Walden Media has even big-
ger projects ahead. The C.S.
Lewis allegory "The Lion, The
Witch and The Wardrobe" will
be released in December. "The
last two versions didn't really
measure up to the power of the
story," Flaherty said. "We did-
n't cut any comers. I think we
succeeded in getting the best


directing, writing and special
effects talents possible.
"Andrew Adamson is direct-
ing. It's his first live action
film after having success as
co-writer/co-director of
'Shrek' and 'Shrek II.'And our
special effects and creature de-
velopment man is fresh from
doing 'Lord of the Rings.'"
As for Because of Winn-
Dixie, the film manages to
charm even us old fogies. Its
main strengths: a floppy-eared
canine who appears to be able
to smile, and newcomer Anna-
Sophia Robb, a preteen with
smudged knees, bright, saucer
eyes and a sincere demeanor.
(Little Miss- Robb also will be
featured in Warner Brothers'
"Charlie and the Chocolate
Factory" scheduled for release
in July.)
Despite the low budget and
occasional corny comedy, Be-
cause of Winn-Dixie develops
into a well-told story about a
child's coping with her moth-


her's desertion. Without being
preachy, it addresses poignant
themes, including reaching out
to others and how small
thoughtfulness can alter a life.
What's more, it achieves these
goals while never neglecting
its aim of amusing the child in
all of us.
While rated PG, Because of
Winn-Dixie is respectful of
Christian values (there's even
a reverent prayer that acknowl-
edges our Lord), while the
closest it gets to harsh lan-
guage is the expression, "What
in the Sam Hill is going on?"
Younger ones should be ac-
companied by a parent to dis-
pel any fears at a juncture in
the film when the dog is fright-
ened by a thunderstorm and
later when Winn-Dixie gets
lost.
Oh by the way, do you have
a dog? If not, expect to hear,
"Daddy, can we...."
Courtesy of the Baptist
Press


The news readers




of today are the




.. news makers of


I~I


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A. ~
~ ~......


m,,'.....


~ALL .


I hr h ae it orCide


iS 1


-I
I Name





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C -i N.________
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1 Year

In County

Subscription

nI Year

-4 Out of Count)'


* - -
I


Zip


nICheck D Cash lNMone\ Order
p. Date
--EpDi-- --n i


Mail to:


muianniee ernocrat
P.O. Box 340, Live Oak, FL 32064


tomorrow


I ea ubciption0


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK


AP GE 12B


ilk










SCHOOL


Suwannee Elementary fourth graders learn about owls


-~--

- .; 4' -h'-
~


2~


FOURTH GRADERS LEARN ABOUT OWLS: Kim Warren's fourth grade students at Suwannee Elementary School recently learned about owls. For two weeks the students learned about the various types
of owls, their habitats and the life cycle of an owl. Students also learned how an owl fits into the food chain sometimes eating its prey whole. The owl cannot digest certain parts of animals such as
feathers, bones and fur. The owl coughs up these contents in what is called a pellet. Students were given a bone chart to match up the bones to see what type of animals the owl ingested.
SI .. I .. , . - Photos: Submitted


Voluntary Pre-kindergarten Program


The Earl,, Learningt
CO,:lttion of Florida's Gatc-
'. ayi i fortmierl' the Gate.'. ;,
School Readines._. CialI-
Hin I ,I' .oUld like everyonee
in the tGate'.'.a rc.gion (Co-
lumbia. Hamilton.
Laft''.iette. Su..annice and
ULImon Counrtiesi to kn,: '
about the ncxt. free, educa-
tionjl pr-oram that is beineu
offered to Florida's fami-
lie V Voluntarx Pre-kinder-
garten I\ PK.1
.An' child residing in
Florida. '. ho twill! rin ftiur
u.i or before Sepi 1. 14 eli-
gible to rece,.e 5-li)40 hours-
of deielopmentalli appro-
priate preschool instruction
this coming school 'ear
(beninnine in AuLusti The
instruction ican be pro ded
ihroughulit the school year


ie t' hree hours per ddi, i.
or it can he pro\ ided in a
shoitcr period ie g, s\
hour. per day, for half a
;cjri, rthis i i up tO the
pro'. ider.
VPK can be provided by
an, licensed pri\,ate
pio',ider or b,> the local
public school district. .Any-
one wanting g to pro\ ide
Pk '. ill hai:te to register
with the Gaie\xay Coali-
tion. and Gate\.a, w ill
i:ork w ith the private
providers to see t.-. it they
ha'.e the necessary require-
nmet.s in place tfr the pro-
graiiln.
Private proxy iders (for-
profit centers, not-for-prof-
it centers. faith-based cen-
ters. non-public schools or
amnil', child caic hoine in-


terested in \PK should
contact Earl,\ Learning
Coalition of Florida's Gaie-
way. 48-1 SW C(ommeice
Drixe. Suite 105. Lake
(Cit. FL 32025. 316-"52-
U7"(. ext. 2-1, and ask for
Jamie \\izman. the enroll-
ment manager. The) can
also submit a provider pre-
application form directly to
Gatexai, through it, \\eb
site. u ., v. elc-fg.org.
Parents of four-' ear-olds
should imniediately contact
\\ itzman. 3S6-52-91"7.,
ext. 24 or go on the \\eb
site to subinit a child pre-
application forn for \'PK.
If ',ou ha,.i any ques-
tions. call \\ itmian. 3.S6-
"52-9770, exl. 24 or Gate-
v, a' E\ecuti e Director Dr
Thomar.i Logan. e\i 12.


. f ,, ' ", "-',, , . Special section featured inside
....L - '.. ..... i'- .... :.7.. -. _ today's Suwannee Democrat



Come SEE why more and more

people are finding their best deal at

-e eluuuv Celurl


FEMA SBA application

assistance available

Deadline for FEMA registrations is Feb. 28;
applications, appeals still being accepted


Community residents
whose property was dam-
aged as a result of last fall's
hurricanes must apply to
FEMA by Feb. 28. Residents
whose claims have been de-
nied or who received assis-
tance inadequate to
meet repair needs
must submit an ap- I N
peal by Feb. 28. Res-
idents who registered WH
with FEMA and re- WH
ceived an SBA appli-
cation must submit app
the application to re- WH
ceive assistance,
whether the resident WH
is eligible for a grant CO!
or for a loan. COM
Representatives of
United Way, Ameri-
can Red Cross, Catholic
Charities, Three Rivers Le-
gal Services,,,Florida Crown
and Suwannee Valley 4Cs
received application training


from FEMA Voluntary
Agency Liaison (VAL) Joan
Lewin to assist those still in
need to complete their Small
Business Administration
(SBA) applications.
Residents eligible for as-


IFORMATIO_

0: FEMA
AT: assistance completing
locations for hurricane dama(
EN: registration deadline Feb.
ERE: United Way
ST: no charge
NTACT: 386-752-5604

distance must complete and
submit the SBA application.
Those who are denied a loan
are eligible to be considered
for the FEMA Other Needs


Assistance (ONA), which is
a grant the recipient does not
have to pay back. In the
Suwannee Valley only 17
percent of those who applied
for FEMA assistance have
returned their SBA applica-
tions.
Receipt of FEMA
N assistance will not im-
- pact residents' Social
Security or disability
benefits. Those with
insurance may also
ge apply.
28 If a residents' SBA
paperwork is outdated
or misplaced, call the
SBA toll-free at 800-
359-2227 to receive a
replacement applica-
tion. Applicants then
have 60 days to return the
application. If assistance is
needed to complete the ap-
plication, call the United
Way office at 386-752-5604.


PAGE 13B


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY FFRRUARY 25. 2005





PA(~F 14R U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


.'',ir


.1


CHRYSLER * JEEP * DODGE

of Lake City


February Sales Drive Ends Monday!

" - "l�


Pati


""---- THE ONLY DEAL
WE CAN'T BEAT,
IS THE ONE WE DON'T SEE!


I


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DODGE RAM


1500


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Monthly Payments Monthly Payments I
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isn't On Your


CHRYSLER 300


Paid Too Much!


SRAM SRT 10
, a - m .......'.. :'I W - " " .
...- ^ ^ -. . "
\ ",: I y
,:,,'.. " . :I , : , 5


with lender approval, tax, lag & title and $199.50 admin. tee with $3UUUcash down or trade equity, dealer retains all rebates, Ereowned
title and $199.50 admin. fee with $3000 cash down or trade equity. Photos for illustration purposes only.


17


I"
(~l~ ~ A


386-755-3444


3, /2 mos @(3.3% AK wit t lender approval, plus tax, tag, &


Sales Dept. Open: Mon.-Fr. 8:30- 7 * Sat 9-6
Service Hours: Mon. - ri. 7:30 - 5:30 * Sat 8-2


www.sunbeltcdj.comn
US 90 West * Lake City, Florida


CHRYSLER


Jeep DD
JEEP DODGE


SCHRY L .1
LODGE JEEI


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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


AP GE 14B


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386-362-1734



NoAKsith ON

STHE

- R- -- MOVE?
Real Estates Listings


Car, Trucks and Motorcycles


ANNOUNCEMENTS

Card of Thanks

THANK YOU! FROM ALL THE
FREEDOM HOMES FAMILY.





BUSINESS SERVICES


1)

FINANCIAL SERVICES
Real Estate
Land for Sale-6.8 Acres. Live
Oak/Dowling Park. Beautifully
wooded. Just off paved CR 250.
Owner financing, no downpayment.
$560./mo. Total price $54,500. 352-
215-1018.
OWNER FINANCE
3BD/2BA DWMH w/family room
addition, on 1 acre. 7852 137th
Place, Live Oak, FL. 386-867-0048.
WANTED-CUTOVER TIMBERLAND
Cash paid. Call 386-365-3865.


WANTED
TO BUY
River Property
in Lafayette or
surrounding
counties. No larger
than 10 acres.
Please call
(850) 251-9174






PERSONAL SERVICES


POLILTRY FARM


ol'.Florida. Inc.W

.U (h~ntrand Lic. Ra ,aII ut Br, -Atr
Mlaw ,Lie Oak
(3861 244- 1576 (386 1364-157 6
IToll Frt~:, Still I j6615-15'6 TMtI [nt: iSltli 822-15"6



We'll find- the right home for you.
MOTEL SUWAN~NEERMIR


1I~


i~5~9~UI


Trt: iarn-i tri l ,e p n ,:t ii- !.:.r lmi .y I,:,
run. Plenty of room to diversify. Farm
offers 2 DWMH's. There are (2) 37 X 500
and (1) 40 X 600 chicken houses.
MLS#42836 $575,000
BELL FLORIDA





Tr,, : i, , 1- , m ,I l ,. i,- rlin,i [] FL Ira3. I
ra l, Il 311 bturijrinl '., a- r Iurj e,' hi.j.lS
1l' . 3a l I '. r h u n- r .n ,: ,r p r i .- ^ r .' in r , n d ,l ] ht ,)r
tLuil.3 ,.ur .lram r,,i.:m - !.ILS.4 41,
$437,500


Motel has 8 carpeted units w/ceramic tile
baths. 2 full size beds in all rooms,
additional laundry room w/washer & dryer,
ice machine is only 2 yrs. old. Turn key
operation ML-W43352 ?2.q0 000


__J


Ccor, ,.pci iteo carI w ,.,iria zmif0e. .
:~:Li. ,.,,.CuTfeni1%tefi C~etC
adl.,f~j ii.:,r,, L'~,Id rl-~v


"- TfllNW 11W INnDNTA I


IUU Il t lUll IlUIU
S)Ji.: . ..:.:ded 1 acre lot in The Rolling Hills
:.r Tirritier Lake Sub. Private access to
Timt-.r Lake. Great Fishing. MLS#42331
.1. I.lil. l 139144JRS-F


. t..d.. . *, ; ,,. * .i;'; .o-m' .. .7.-XA-.'a ,.; , ' . ..*_


For more information about this Featured Home

of the Week, call Lighthouse Realty at 386-294-2131.


I ~ ~ NICE BRICK HO'\IF on
NE%%LN (CONSI;RL'( IF[1... .h..,. K-Ihi,. h N.-i-,.r, 1 iIIn .. I,

. I II.". i j C h fc . .-.j I .... II: , d .1 i


BE %U' I IFLLHIS IORIC HON I L...I,...,i


V.r' II.. -' ha I h~ hr T



Poole F
1 1, 3u 41.3


iir~Jiiirj7uiFriirrmi F*J uTI ~ U..I~iIkl .A Z.gI~iiJI 1 ~jL~J~ ~


OPIOID TREATMENT SERVICES
, are now available at Meridian
Behavioral Healthcare, located at
4310 SW 13th Street in Gainesville.
Please Call 352-374-5600 or 1-800-
330-5615, option #2 to schedule an
appointment.





EDUCATIONAL SERVICES


PETS


LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072. M-F
from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.

Pets for Free
FREE TO GOOD HOME Small
female Chihuahua mix, friendly. Call
386-364-8318.
FREE TO THE RIGHT HOME! 3 year
old male Jack Russell terrier. "Broken
Coat". House trained & neutered.
Call for more info (eves/wkends) 386-
938-2556. Lv. msg. if no answer.
Handsome, playful & loves to cuddle.
Green eyes & Russian blue-gray
hair. All around fabulous CAT.
Looking for stable & loving home.
Neutered & trained for indoor living.
386-935-0064.


RE
REALTOHf


529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990
Realtor AssoC. - NI Elizabeth Elliott, E\ening 842-2372


(1) Lee, FL: * 7.3 Acres on
US 90 near I+10! with a 3/4
bedroom CH/AC home
containing approximately
1,750 sq. ft. under roof
together with a C.B.S.
Commercial Building
containing approximately
12,500 with 11,500 sq. ft. of
packing. $250,000.
(2) 75 acres on paved road
on pasture with some live
oaks, fenced and cross
fenced, two wells, 1/4 mile on
paved Rd. 1/4 mile on county
grade, good area. $3,995 per
acre.
(3) 177th Drive: 3 Bedroom,
2 bath central heat and air.
Home containing
approximately 1,350 sq. ft.
Kitchen furnished 225'137
lot. $72,000.
(4) (5) Off CR 51 S.W.: 20
acres wooded with large oaks,
and a 3BR/2BA, CH/CA
DWMH in excellent
condition, contact office.
2000 sq. ft. under roof,
detached storage $149,500.
(5) 161 /St Rd.: 10 acres with
a four bedroom, three bath,
CH/CA, brick home
containing approximately
2,500 sq. ft. under roof,
kitchen furnished, 3 car
garage. REDUCED to
$215,000.
(6) Harrell Heights: Check
out the new home under
construction, three bedroom,
two bath., central heat and air
condition, city sewer & water.
100% financing to qualified
buyers will work for S.H.I.P.
(7) Hunting Tract: 13 acres
+, wooded, Steinhatchee


Springs area, river access, and
Hwy. 51 access,. recent
survey. $26,000.
(8) Near Walmart, 70th St.,
Skeen Rd.: 5.81 acres with a
3 bedroom, 2 bath CH&AC
1999 Doublewide mobile
home, kitchen furnished, 4"
well, double car canopy,
34x20 storage etc. Good Buy
@ $69,900.
(9) Camping Lot: One acre
riverview lot in the Blue
Springs area, river access.
$5,995.
(10) Harrell Heights: New
three bedroom, two bath
central heat and air
conditional home containing
1104 sq. ft. of living area.
Parking pad. $82,500. 100%
financing to qualified buyer.
(11) Perry Fla: Nice two
bedroom, CH/CA, brick
home with garage, good area.
$51,900.
(12) Perry Fla: 3 bedroom,
central heat and air,
218x170' lot, nice trees,
numerous updates, new
carpet, paint, stove & refrig.
100% financing. $61,900.
(13) US 90 West & 1-10: 32
Acres, zoned C.H.I., corner
tract, will divide.
(14) Hamilton County:
Two 2 acre wooded lots on
paved road. $12,000 per
tract.
(15) Old Sugar Mill Farm:
Nice one acre tract on paved
road with a 2001 CH&AC
DW mobile home, kitchen
furnished. 12x20 storage
building. Good area.
$67,500.


139087-F


ILIh



Realty Inc..j


I Section C
February 25, 2005

S800-525-4182

EED A RIDE?

nli^Afml-', - ~�


S.C. SuWan Agency[


I ;l .. . 'A . I. - , : ., S A1. , . . ..


i**


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- -







PA(~~~~~~F 2C~~~~~~ U.. SUANEDMCA/IEOKFIA ERAY2.20


362-1734


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE


1-800-525-4182


1.~ S General gGeneral
GO BUY CASH CASH$ i 'U IMMEDIATE T
GO- n O-
CLASSIFIEDS U,- ^ A.



1HOW TO WRITE A CLASSIFIED ADl

8 Simple Steps to Creating a Classified Ad That Sells:

SWhat do you have to offer? Start your, Have you covered all of your bases? Make
advertisement by naming the item or service sure you are providing sufficient information
you are presenting, about the merchandise or service you are
offering, including the price! Does the reader
_ i_ Are you being clear? Complete, concise know what you are selling, why they should
information will encourage a quick response buy it and how they can contact you for more
from readers. information?out the most beneficial feature of
the product or service you are advertising.
-iJ Can the reader reach you? Be sure to include
your telephone number or address. - How can you reach the greatest number of
If necessary, list a preferred time to have prospective buyers? Place your classified ad
potential buyers contact you. with The Classified Marketplace.


S Are you giving your ad enough exposure?
10 i Consecutive publication of your ad will j Call 1-800-525-4182 today!
generate the greatest amount of reader
attention. Generally, a 15-day run time is the
best and most cost-effective arrangement.


D What's the best part of your offer? Identify
and write about the most beneficial feature
of the product or service you are advertising.


First Day


AGRICULTURE





MERCHANDISE

Furniture

First Day
FOR SALE- Super-Twin Size bed,
complete. Very good, like new, with 2
sets of sheets. $60.00. Call (386)
362-7438.

Musical Instruments

First Day







FOR SALE Baldwin Piano. Good
condition, kept tuned regularly. $600.
OBO. Live Oak, FL (386) 362-1732.


FOR SALE Yamaha Electone FS-
100 Organ. Combination Digital and
FM Excellent condition. $900. OBO.
Live Oak, FL (386) 362-1732.

Garage/Yard Sales

IT HAS TO GO!
Chris White is having a MOVING
SALE on Saturday, February 26.
Lots to choose from; including
glassware, kitchen items, books-
hardback and paperback novels,
clothing-mostly women' size 8 to 12
business and casual, and some
children's, odds and ends of
decorating decor, and some furniture
including an early art deco bedroom
set with vanity that has round mirror,
tall dresser, head and foot boards,
and wicker porch furniture. Furniture
may be seen on Friday, February 25-
please call 364-6028 before coming.
DIRECTIONS: From Live Oak take
Hwy 90 West to 76th Street (Mitchell
Road) and turn left. Go 5.3 miles
from Jiffy store; house is on left in
planted pines. Sign in front yard.


2806 West US Highway 90 W Ni
Suite 101, Lake City, FL 32055
I a HYPERLINK
'rP-P "http://www.FloridaAcreage.com"
DANIEL CRAPPS
agency, inc. 1-800-805-7566

(1) 20 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property is located a short distance from
Charles Springs and a boat ramp on the Suwannee River. $3,350 per acre - owner financing
available (Owner/Broker)
(2) 84.50 (+/-) - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property has frontage on CR #49 and has scattered
oak and pine trees. Great home site! $3,000 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(3 65 ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property has frontage on CR #49 and has scattered
oak and pine trees. Great home site! $3,000 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(4) 155 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - gently rolling land located next to Peacock
Springs State Park. Ideal for home site or hunting! $2,995 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(5) 210 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property is located on State Road #51 about 3
miles north of the Suwannee River. Great location for home site! $3,500 per acre
(Owner/Broker)
(6) 645 ACRES - MADISON COUNTY - gently rolling land with majestic hardwoods along the
meandering of a creek that runs through the property. Land is in 19 & 20 year old planted
pines and has paved road frontage. Ideal for hunting, other recreational uses or home site.
$2,725 per acre
(7) 674 ACRES - MADISON.COUNTY - this tract has some cut over land, about 195 acres of
2001 planted sand pines and some beautiful hardwood hammocks surrounding the Sand Pond.
Ideal for deer and turkey hunting. Property is a short drive from 1-10. $1,995 per acre
(Owner/Broker)
For additional information, contact
BAYNARD WARD, KATRINA BLALOCK or CHUCK DAVIS
E-mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:ward@danielcrapps.com"


-- Lighthouse Realty
of North Florida, Inc.
Corner of Hwy. 27 & Clyde Avenue, Mayo, Florida
Heather M. Neill, Broker
PHONE: (386) 294-2131 MOBILE: (386) 208-5394
, Search the MLS at WWW.LIGHTHOUSEREALTY.US


LOVELY HISTORIC HOME IN TOWN -
Well-kept, 1,737 sq. ft. 3/2 on .50 acre
inside city limits. Dining room, appliances,
laundry room/pantry. Great front porch,
tidy fenced yard, shade & fruit trees.
Motivated seller, home warranty. $97,000.
#43388.





LAKEFRONT LOT - Wooded .46 ac. lot
with beautiful oak and cypress trees.
Quiet, peaceful area. $42,000. #44208
Ask for Ricky.

:'"REDUCED!" j




SPACIOUS HOME ON 13 ACRES - 4/2,
stone FP, over 2,100 sq. ft., With room to
run inside and out. Needs TLC but has
lots of potential. $135,000. #43491. Add'
5 ac. available.


BEAUTIFUL 10-ACRE PARCEL - Lots of
granddaddy oaks. Located in a
subdivision with boat ramp to the
Suwannee River. $65,000. #44187.


AFFORDABLE - 2/1 home on 1 acre.
New paint, carpet and high performance
AC/heat unit. Nice view. $35,000. #43914
Ask for Tonya.






LAKE LOT WITH BEAUTIFUL VIEW -
Peaceful surroundings and quiet
neighborhood. 1.24 ac. lot, ready to build
or place yourplace your manufactured home. Great
owner financing. $55,000. #429193ao29J s-F


BSuINESS IS
_____ BOOMING!
SCHEDULING *C*A~**,oU .,
DEPARTMENT CA
WO U *~fl UO 1-dA 3mM )PM
O1vPPORTUNITY fIand w t.nel M *'*a -M ' V ''
~F~ KNOCKSI AU .M.A?
M.A pSI,.,,,, J ~ ftcfn~tr CM0Ph-,.,.,. 'H~.*
AnA' *o'I ~ ..M-naflxt NIPIVI Mal Wl.. mU ',


MOVING SALE- 22' side-by-side
refrig. $150., oak dinette w/4 chairs
$100., washer $50., 10-gun gun
cabinet $150., beds, kings & queens,
electric range $150., microwave $40.
Call 386-658-3961


REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


Apartments


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal to
advertise "any preference, limitation
or discrimination based on ' race,
color, religion, sex, disability, familial
status or national origin, or an
intention, to make any such
preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of 18
living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all



OPPORTUNITY
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain of
discrimination call HUD toll-free 1-
800-669-9777. The toll-free number
for the hearing impaired is 1-800-
927-9275



FOR RENT-
3BR, 2BA DWMH,
CENTRAL H/A.
FIRST MONTH'S
RENT PLUS
DEPOSIT TO
MOVE IN.
WATER, SEWER
& GARBAGE
INCLUDED.
NO PETS
386-330-2567
133339-F


(


Houses for Rent
First Day
FOR RENT Country Cottage. 1
BR/1 BA, LR, Equipped kitchen.
Linens furnished. Water, elec. trash &
yard care furnished. Sleeps one. No
smoking, drinking, or drugs on
premises. $115.00/wk+dep. Call 386-
362-1561.
FOR RENT Near Mayo. Lg. 2/2 home
with enclosed Florida porch. Fridge,
D/W, Stove. Newly remodeled. No
pets. $650./mo. Deposit req'd.
Attached efficiency also available.
Call 386-294-1236 Mon.-Sat., noon-
7p.m. only.
FOR RENT: 2bd/1 ba House just out
of the City limits of Live Oak
$400/mo plus deposit. 386-963-5616
Mobile Homes for rent
First Day
Mobile Home for rent. 3 bedroom. In
Live Oak, FL. $200.00/mo with sec.
dep. of $200.00. Call 386-208-1018.
Two Bedroom/Two Bath, CH&A,
$400.00/mo. plus deposit, lease. No
pets. Call 386-842-2346.

Vacation Rentals


SMOKY MOUNTAIN CABIN
Two BD/One Bath. Trout stream, near
Cherokee, NC & DollyWood,
Gatlinburg & Maggie Valley. $325.00
per week. Call 386-752-0013.

Commercial
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
FOR RENT SOON.
At 90 on CR 137, by B&B Food,
Wellborn. Can be Barber & Beauty.
Shop, Office, Sales, Florist & Plant
Nursery, Crafts, Gifts, Radio TV
Rental Repair, Insurance Thrift Shop.
Call 386-364-1319.

Wanted to Rent
First Day
WANTED:
WILL RENTYOUR WOOD
CHIPPER
CALL: (386) 362-7438

-FOR RENT-

2 BR, singlewide

mobile home,

central H/A.

First month's

rent plus deposit

to move in.
Water, sewer, &

garbage included.

No pets

386-330-2567


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
Homes for Sale
First Day
Country Home 2001 3BD/2BA in
Live Oak, FL. Open plan overlooking
3+ quiet acres. Sep. gar. w/ apt. over.
Front & Back Porches. Asking
$250,000. OBO. Call 386-364-8094.
ENJOY the great view of the
Suwannee River from your beautiful
3/2 dream home located on 5 acres.
$375,000.00 (Land Brokerage
Realtor) Call 386-935-0824 or 800-
426-8369.
Mobile Homes
First Day
BIG SALE 32X80 Fleetwood 4+2
with living room and den. Set up and
delivery for only $49,995. Call Mike
1-352-378-6024.
Custom built DWMH-2002 Fleetwood
28'X76'. 5 BD/4BA in mint condition.
All appliances, CH&A. Take over
payments of $405.00 per month &
move. Located in Jasper, FL. Call
352-628-7303.
DoubleWide, 2005, 2300 square
feet, 4 bedroom, 2 bath, setup on lot,
2 miles from Walmart $645.00
month. Call Ken 386-365-5370
DWMH 24'X48' on 4.08 Acres.
3BD/2BA. in Live Oak, FL. Fireplace,
new metal roof. All new appliances ,
carpet redone.Asking $65,000.00.
Call 386-362-6647.
First Day
Fleetwood, 28X52, 3+2, loaded, very
nice. Includes setup, a/c, skirting,
and two mini decks for only $36,995.
Call Mike 1-352-373-5428.
First Day
HUGE 2005 model, 28X64, left over
from old pricing. Living room, den,
glamour bath, and huge utility room.
Includes a/c, skirting, and 2 mini
decks, for only $43,995. Call Mike 1-
352-376-1008.
IF YOU OWN LAND OR HAVE A
LARGE DOWN PAYMENT I MAY
OWNER FINANCE A
MANUFACTURED HOME FOR
YOU! CALL STEVE 386-365-8549.
LAND AND HOME PACKAGES
CLOSE TO LAKE CITY.. ITS WHAT
WE DO BEST! PAVED ST, CITY
WATER AND SEWER, YOU PICK
THE HOME, WE DO THE REST
AND FREEDOM HOMES MAY
OWNER FINANCE! 386-752-5355
First Day


Must sell 28' wide 4+2 Fleetwood
that was ordered. We will heavily
discount to $32,995. Mike 1-352-376-
1008.
NO .MONEY .DQWNJ, .New 2005
doublewide. On your land. $334. per
month. Call Lee 386-365-8988.
One of a kind Manufactured Log
home 4 bedroom. Perfect for a
country setting. Call Jim 386-303-
1557.
First Day
Problems with land permits! So, I will
let this 2005 4+2 go for 30% less
than the price was! Call Mr. Van
Etten @ 1-386-688-7577.
Remodeled manufactured home on
land. Call Ron 386-397-4960.
TRIPLEWIDE ON 1.8 ACRES LAND
MUST SELL! 386-397-4930.
First Day
Used Fleetwood, 14X80, in good
shape, for $8,995.00. Call Mike @
352-373-5428.
We love CASHI We will give you the
very best price for a new or used
manufactured home! 386-752-5355


-FOR RENT-

3BR, Singlewide

mobile home.

Central H/A.

First month's

rent plus deposit

to move in.

Water, sewer &

garbage included.

No pets.

386-330-2567
133437 -F


Make a big splash all
over town and attract
more customers with an
advertisement in color. It's
a fact that more people
read ads with color. Color
is lively, appealing,
assertive-and

it sells!


Call now for information.



Classified Marketplace

386-362-1734 or 800-525-4182I


Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Louise at

386-362-1734
134698DH-F


WOODED 1.38 acres with 2/2 mobile
home, has accessible rights to Santa
Fe & Itchetucknee River, comes fully
furnished. $154,500. (Land
Brokerage Realtor) Call 386-935-
0824 or 800-426-8369.

Commercial
FOR LEASE Commercial Property
2 Buildings on big lot. US 90 East,
Lake City, FL. $1,000.00 per month.
Call 386-752-0013.
Lots
FIVE, TEN AND TWENTY ACRE
LOTS with well & *septic. Owner
financing. Call 386-752-4339.
www.deasbullardbkl.com

Acreage
First Day
FOR SALE BY OWNER
WITH FINANCING
1) One 4 ac lot on 35th just off 137,
$30,000.
2) Two 4 ac. lots near O'Brien, FL.
1 Lot for $22,000., 1 Lot for $24,000.
Call:
(386) 935-2301






EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted





LAKE CITY
COMMUNITY CILLES
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007

COORDINATOR-
LAW ENFORCEMENT
Re-Advertisement
Directs, coordinates, supports,
schedules and provides instruction
for all basic and advanced training
programs offered by the Law
Enforcement Division at Lake City
Community College. Salary based
on experience, plus benefits.
Requires Bachelor's degree.
Exemplary experience with Law
Enforcement programs can
substitute for final year of degree.
Two years teaching experience.
Deadline for applications:
March 10, 2005.
Requires College Application,
Resume & Transcripts
Applications available on WEB at:
www.lakecitycc.edu
INdtUIRIES:
HUMAI" RESOURCE ES
DEVELOPMENT
LAKE CITY COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone: (386) 754-4314
FAX: (386) 754-4594
E-MAIL:
boettcherg @ lakecitycc.edu
Lake City Community College is
accredited by the Commission on
Colleges of the Southern
Association of Colleges and
Schools.
AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE
ACTION COLLEGE IN
EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT
VETERAN'S PREFERENCE.
ACCOUNTING MANAGER
LAKE CITY AREA
MUST HAVE B.A. DEGREE
3 YEARS WORKING EXP. AS
ACCOUNTING SUPERVISOR OR
STAFF ACCOUNTING REQUIRED
GREAT GROUNDFLOOR
OPPORTUNITY. RESUMES TO:
WS4140@EARTHLINK.NET
B.O.K. ENTERPRISES, LLC
Rapidly expanding trucking
company seeking qualified,
dependable CDL drivers with a
minimum of two years experience.
Drivers home every weekend.
Contact Buddy or Tricia (386) 776-
1846
BE PART OF THE RACING
INDUSTRY. Our team is looking for
CNC operators, a bookkeeper and
sales professionals. Experience is
preferred. Apply at BRC Performance
615 Industrial Ave., Live Oak, FI
32064
First Day
CATV TECHNICIAN NEEDED with
experience. Must be knowledgeable
in all aspects of cable tv. Fax all
resumes to 931-707-9007 or email to
vccat'@ charterbn.com
farm help
HELP WANTED
Knowledge of tractor and equipment
is a must. Call 386-330-2567 to
enquire. Drug Free Work Place.




You can Reach


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


PAGEF 92.


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK











You are just a call away... call 1-800-525-4182, ext. 102 to place your ad * FAX 386-364-5578


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. . GAIN EXTRA ATTENTION
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MERCHANDISE The First Day It Runs!
With the _



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EDUCATIONAL SERVICES REAL ESTATE FOR RENT I ----, - . -


AGRCULTURE


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE




TRANSPORTATION


To Place Your Ad
Monday through Friday by calling 386-362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182, faxing to 386-364-5578 or mailing to:
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WE ACCEPT. -rPl
II L H U~l I* Money Orders * Personal Cbecks


Your Classified Ad can

appear in 5 paid

newspapers:

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on both Wed. & Fri.,

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Thursday; a total of

15,200 issues weekly!
Increase your promotional reach and tap into
potential new markets... Ask about placing your
advertising message into: The Valdosta Daily
Times, The Thomasville Times-Enterprise; The
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other publications, serving over 30 counties; with
over 20,000 readers in South Georgia.
Ask about our
"Service Directory" rates


FLORIDA (386) 208 Live Oak* 294 Mayo 303
White Springs * 362, 364 Live Oak * 397 White
Springs *454 High Springs 497 Fort White* 658
Dowling Park 752, 755, 758 Lake City 776
Luraville 792 Jasper 842 Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch (Live Oak)* 935 Branford 938 Jennings
* 961 Lake City 963 Welborn *965 Lake City
GEORGIA (229) 219 Valdosta *224, 225, 226,
227, 228 Thomasville 241,242, 244, 245, 247,
24, -i, , _''-." .' '- - .A ,I hI.l.I. I !"
268 Vienna 268 Lilly' 271,273 Cordele * 282,
283, 285, 287 Waycross 293 Valdosta * 324 Berlin
*333 Valdosta' 345 Nicholls *346 Coolidge* 359
Ambrose *362 Milan 363 Lumber City 365
Rochele * 367 Baxley *375 Hazelhurst, 377, 378
Cairo* 381 Douglas 382 Tifton 383,384
Douglas 385 Rhine 386,387 Tifton 389,393
Douglas, 422 Pearson * 423,424 Fitzgerald 433
Byromville 449 Blackshear * 455 Ray City 467
Abbeville * 468 Ocilla *472 Montezuma 472
Oglethorpe *482 Lakeland *487 Homerville* 498
Boston * 528 Omega* 532 Alapaha * 533 Enigma
534 Willacoochee * 535 Warwick * 546 Lenox
*549 Sparks * 559 Lake Park * 567 Ashburn * 574
Ocklochnee 594 Uvalda 624 Pineview * 627
*648 Pits * 649 Buena Vista * 683 Meigs* 686
Nashville 735 Barwick 762 Whigham *769
Norman Park * 775 Morven 776 Sylvester *782
Doerun * 794 Hahira * 824 Plains * 831 Irwinville
*833 Jacksonville 846 Smithville *853 Cobb
859 Pavo *863 Blackshear *868 McRae 873
Moultrie' 874 Leslie* 887 Richland -890,891
Moultrie * 896 Ade * 899 Moultrie * 924, 928
Americus 929 Pinetta *938 Jennings *941
Funston*'973 Madison '985 Moultrie


your adwith a border | lIE Friday (prior),
nl 0 U For Friday Publication, 11 a.m.,
'We R eNSe f" e g I U o n s n[e Ap W e dnesday (prior).
SWe reserve the right to cancel any special offer or promotion in the Classified Marketplace upon a a 30-day notice.'


First Day
CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
needed, two (2) years experience
required Drug Free Work Place.
Call (386) 294-3411.
Clerical & Management
HOMETOWN JEWELRY & LOAN
is seeking 2 part-time sales clerks &
1 full-time manager. Retail sales
experience & some computer skills
are required. Must be dependable &
able to work on Saturdays. Contact
Allan @ 386-362-7296.
CUSTOMER SERVICE REP.
Career opportunity in
a sales/service environment
available for qualified individual
with a strong work ethic and
dedication to the job.
Min. 3 years Customer Service'
exp. in a fast paced
working environment.
Must enjoy working
with people.
Computer/Data Entry
skills required as well as
Windows proficiency
Minimum 50 wpm.
No phone calls, please.
Resumes Att: Joy
ws4140@earthlink.net
Driver
CDL Licensed driver wanted. Must
have a clean MVR & able to pass
drug & alcohol test. For more info.
call 386-362-4122.
maintenance
HELP WANTED maintenance man
with knowledge of plumbing, electric
and carpentry. Tools required.
Transportation a must. Drug free
workplace.
Call (386) 330-2567


Driver
FUEL TANK DRIVER NEEDED
Sunday-Thursday PM shift (6p to
6a). Off Friday & Saturday.
Must have Class A CDL, Tanker,
Hazmat, Clean MVR, 2 years tanker
experience. Truck based in Columbia
& Suwannee Counties. Full Health
Insurance, 401K, Uniforms, Paid
Vacation, Late Model Equipment.
Apply in person Mon-Fri between
3pm & 6pm @:
Johnson & Johnson, Inc.
1607 US 90 East
Madison, Florida 32340
CONTACT person: Ronnie Blanton

Driver
WALT'S LIVE OAK
FORD-MERCURY

Looking for Experienced
Tow Truck Driver
Must have CDL
*Benefits
* Health Insurance
* Great Work Environment
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER
Please call Rick at 386-362-1112

LABORERS NEEDED
MANY POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
FOR MORE INFO CALL:
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
(386) 755-1991 APPT. ONLY
BACKGRD/DRUGSCREEN
REQ.


APHW TO WRITE A



CLASSIFIED

AUTOMOTIVE AD...

INCLUDE THE FEATURES
DESCRIBE THE VEHICLE The extras tr,6f your car has
A prospective buever Wili tanl tr3y be its so9ngest selling
to know the basics aboul Ine point Include features like
vehicle including make. year. power equipment. custom
model. bocy style motor. inleriors, air condllioning.
transmission \ AmFM.etc.

MAKE IT EASY
TO ANSWER
Give your phone MERCUR COUOAR.
number and .-I; ,:r , ro:.,.,, ,.,,, r EAGE
bg8t.~' -\..;y at.-iyFM n ie.i.r VehicMaeitual'
reached. 5 ''.. :: "O:.'d mileage is one of tne
key pomhs of interest
a']; A fter FIt I, it II an imporlani
-"^ element of your ad


GIVE CONDITION
Th i will work to your oenetir if the PRICE
car ,s in good condition. Itit a noL This is iMotrtart.
don I exaggerale A prospect vIld The prospective buyer
respond more favoraotle i not misled. wanis to know your asking
price and any special
terms that you're willing to
make. Don I leave IthF.'


WE ARE HERE TO HELP YOU WRITE A
CLASSIFIED AD THAT'S
I ------ , -







SELL IT IN THE CLASSISIFEDS!
As low as $18.95 per month.



386-362-1734 * 800-525-41821


First Day
Driver/Laborer
Waste Management, Inc.
Lake City/Gainesville
Has an immediate opening for a
hard working, flexible individual to
fill the position of Driver/Laborer
for Lake City and Gainesville. This
position requires a minimum Class
B CDL with air brake endorsement.
Waste Management offers a full
benefits package including health
insurance and 401-K plan. If you feel
you meet the requirements, please
apply by phone
1-877-220-JOBS (5627)
or online at
WWW.WMCAREERS.COM
EOE/ADA/DFWP
DRIVERS: Home every weekend!l
Start up to .40 cpm. Dedicated runs
available. Great benefits/equipment!
CDL-A. McElroy Truck Lines
800-992-7863 Ext. 126
Food Service
COUNTRY KITCHENS
Now hiring, all positions open.
Call 850-971-0024.
Front Desk Person
Dental terminology a must.
Live Oak/Lake City. $9.25 an hour.
Fax resume to: (386) 961-9086.
STOCKING/INVENTORY
POSITIONS AVAILABLE
CALL FOR APPT.
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREEN/BACKGROUND
REQ.









orgg Si,




miiiOL


First Day
FT DIETARY TECHNICIAN
For 180-Bed Facility
Must have minimum of 2 year
degree in Nutrition Therapy or a
related field and at least 1 year
experience.
Contact Bette Forshaw NHA
@ 386/362-7860 or apply at
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston Street
Live Oak, FL 32064
EOE/D/V/M/F
Groundskeeper
VILLAGE OAKS APARTMENTS
has an immediate opening for a
groundskeeper-24 hours per week.
Must have experience in grounds
= maintenance 'and ,,'-grounds
equipment maintenance. Drug free
work place. Must have valid dr.
license & own car or truck. Some
travel will be required. Apply at the
rental office. 705 Northwest Drive,
Live Oak, FL. Equal Opportunity
Employer. Call 386-364-7936.
TDD/TTY 711.

First Day
Maids wanted. Involves weekends,
up to 32 hrs or more per week. Must
have steady work history. Apply at
Best Western in Live Oak, FL.


JOIN OUR TEAM!
Actively seeking qualified
Managers
for area locations. Resumes may
be faxed to (386) 755-2296 or
applications may be obtained at
any location.
LPN/RN
Seeking individual for team
environment t with , above.. average
leadership, including, teaching skills.
.Medicarei S.N:F. documentation
knowledge, and history of good time
management skills a plus. One
fulltime 6am-2pm position and one
future opening for 2pm-10pm.
Smaller size skilled nursing facility
with very good history of surveys and
customer satisfaction. Contact Lyn
Shine, Lafayette Health Care
Center, 512 W. Main St., Mayo, FL
386-294-3300.

Mason, experienced, wanted to work
in the Gainesville area. Call 352-376-
5314. M-F 8 a.m.-5 p.m.


Accepting Applications
Good, bad and no credit.
Call for 1st & 2nd mortgages.
Established full service co.
WE BUY MORTGAGES.
(960) 226-6044
622NW43rd StSuite A-I
LiWcensed Mtg. Lender


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living 2
bedroom duplex. Call
362-3110.
128545JS-F


First Day
MAINTENANCE
Smithfield Packing plant in
Madison, FL is looking for
refrigeration mechanics and
maintenance mechanics.
Engineer/Refrigeration Mechanics
Experience with ammonia and steam
generating Systems preferred.
Maintenance Mechanics
Individuals must be able to read and
understand machinery prints,
electrical schematics, blueprints &
voltage meters.. Experience in
industrial maintenance is preferred.
Fax resume to 850-973-1877 or mail
resume to 294 SW Harvey Greene
DR, Madison, FL 32340: Applications
also accepted at the plant.
AA/EOE/M/F/D/V


First Day
MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR for
growing production facility in
Madison, FL. Industrial maintenance
experience in food industry
preferred. Send resume to Smithfield
Madison, 294 SW Harvey Greene
Dr, Madisen, FL 32340 or email to
Aprilbrack@smithfield.com


HUD Vouchers Welcome!
1, 2 & 3 BR HC & Non-HC
Accessible Apartments


705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936 o
TDD/TTY/711 |
Equal Housing Opportunity 4


Help Wanted Are You

Circulation Customer I f tn Vti'-


II


Service Representative
The Suwannee Democrat

is seeking an individual with good
communication skills and computer
knowledge for a part-time circulation
position. Job responsibilities will
include but are not limited to:
daily interaction with customers,
sales, making daily deposits and data
entry. Must be able to work in a fast
paced environment, work under
deadlines and type a minimum of
30 cwpm. Apply in person at
The Suwannee Democrat,
211 Howard St. East, Live Oak, FL.
We are a drug-free workplace
J 147114-F L


3h A


IA .JL V %
If you are, then you may be the kind of
pl.i son "ite're looking for. We have an
immedul:te opening tor a ternmpoa ir
full-time position in tthe compo irioni i
department at the Suwannee Democrat.



Kno'\ ledge of computers, preferably Macintosh &
t pin, -p.e, d of 40 CWPM.

Experience in Adobe Photoshop, Quark Xpress,
Multi-Ad Creator a plus.

Self-motivation. Acceptance of multiple deadlines.
Ability to complete tasks in a limited time frame.

Pride, dedication and 100% given to every job.

iumanr 7 - rCmotrrat
If you fit our mold, come by and fill out an application
or email resume to myra.regan@gaflnews.com
211 Howard St. East * Live Oak, FL 32064
P.O. Box 370 * Live Oak, FL 32064
We Are A Drug Free Workplace 146176-F


ANNOUNCEMENTS



EMPLOYMENT




BUSINESS SERVICES




FINANCIAL SERVICES


eeh44e a"d Sewtoe4


Housekeeper for Hire
Excellent References
Commercial or Residential
Licensed & Insured
Senior Citizen Discount
Call (386) 288-3918 or
(386) 397-4114


FOR

Rental Assistance
1, 2, 3, & 4 BR HC & Non-
HC Accessible Apartnents

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY 711
Eqtual Housing Opportunity n,


1


ur reauy
ii0ow


Glass,
OPPOB-Foutirv
IMMEDIATE
� m


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 3C


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


I









PAGE 4C i UVV/II iiiVI- SUW a "IVE Ul r/"LlVE u ,i\ i ......, . -. ..I. . -;, --



362-1734 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE 1-800-525-4182


MECHANIC
W. B. HOWLAND CO. INC.
Mechanic w/ diesel engine and
hydraulic experience needed
@ W.B. Howland Company.
Full time position with excellent
benefits package. Apply in person
@ Howlands corner of Walker &
11th St. or call (386) 362-1235.

Medical Assistant or LPN needed
Full time for IM Clinic in
Live Oak, Florida. Please fax
resumes to 386-362-6403.
First Day
Nursery worker/Salesperson
ENJOY WORKING OUTSIDE
this Spring, surrounded by beauty!
Spring Salesperson and Nursery
Worker needed. Apply in person at:
NOBLES GREENHOUSE
9248 129th Road
Live Oak, FL


OT & LPTA Positions
Advent Christian Village
658-JOBS for
Current Opportunities

PT PTA to assist with physical
therapy/physical rehabilitation and
related activities. Valid Florida PTA
license required. Prior experience
preferred.

PT OT to assist for long-term care
facility. Valid Florida OT license
required. Prior experience
preferred.

EOE; Drug Free Workplace,
Criminal background verification
required. Apply in person at ACV
Personnel Department Mon. thru
Fri, 9:00a.m. until 4:00p.m., Carter
Village Hall, 10680 CR 136,
Dowling Park, FL; fax resume to
(386) 658-5160; or visit
www.ACVillage.net.


SALES POSITION
MUST HAVE STRONG SALES
EXPERIENCE
PLEASE CALL FOR APPT.
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DRUGSCREEN & BACKGRD REQ.

First Day

Security officers needed.
YARBOROUGH CORPORATION
Must have State security license.
Call Jim Tucker 386-364-7780 or Joe
Peavy 850-929-4747.
WANTED!!!
ASSISTANT
EXPERIENCED WITH
TILE AND MARBLE
MUST BE ABLE TO LIFT
UP TO 70 LBS.
NON-SMOKER
PLEASE CALL FOR APPT.
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DRUGSCREEN & BACKGRD REQ.


Want to Subscribe?
� IIJMl


A00


The Suwannee Democrat,

is online, so it's

easier than every

to stay informed.


I!w~ww.suwanneee mocratO[]110110Eco]lm


Announcements

CENTRALFLORIDA'SBEAD,JEWELRYANDARTEX-
TRAVAGANZA Findbeads,jewelry, art,andclasses.March5th
and 6th. Volusia County Fairgrounds, Exit 114 off of 1-4.
www.beadsl.com/deland or call (866)667-3232 also see us in



Auctions

17 CABINS NEAR PIGEON FORGE, TN, selling at Auction
March 12, 10:30 a.m. Guaranteed financing available with 25%
down. FurrowAuction Co.(800)4FURROW;
S -:, f.'r.- . -.-.- - T. ' T i - .-

ABSOLUTEAUCTION!LakefrontRealEstate237NELakeview
Dr, Sebring,FL 11AM, SatMar 12.2spacious homes 2 lakefront
homesites Directly on Lake Jackson. Call for details: (800)257-
4161 Higgenbotham Auctioneers www.higgenbotham.com
MEHiggenbotham, CAI FLLic#AU305/AB 158.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE$$$ Buy Direct From Manufacturer.
20 colors in stock with all Accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery Available Toll Free (888)393-0335.

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/day? 30 Ma-
chines, Free Candy All for$9,995. (800)814-6323 B02000033.
CALL US: We will not be undersold!

Are you dissatisfied with your present job and income? Do
you-want to have more freedom, time and money? Success is
just aclick away. www.startuppower.com.

. 20 1'tndinng MIhin., with Custom Locations. $2995. Call
'Toll Free (800)261-9001.

THOUSANDS OFBUSINESSES ForSale By Owners Nation-
wide. Preview Business for free! Interested In Buying or Selling
A Business Call:- GW Merger - (877)217-8231 or visit
www.gwmerger.com.

#1 CASH COW! 90 Vending Machine Hd. You approve Loc's-
$10,670 (800)836-3464 #B02428.

An Incredible Opportunity. FREE 20 minute evaluation.
www.startuppower.com. Save time and money-Visit Today!


Financial


FUNDS FOR YOU,www.cwfundinEservices.com. Cash advance
for pending lawsuits, structured payments, seller held
mortgage notes, we purchase receivables. More on website or
call Cindy (813)885-1501.


For Sale


CHURCH FURNITURE. Does yourchurch need pews, pulpit
set, baptistery, steeple, windows, carpet? Big Sale on new
cushioned pews and cushions for hard pews. (800)231-8360.


Help Wanted


Driver-COVENANTTRANSPORT. ExcellentPay& Benefits
for Experienced Drivers, 0/0, Solos, Teams & Graduate
Students. Bonuses Paid Weekly, Equal Opportunity Employer.
(888)MOREPAY (888-667-3729).

Florida Licensed Physical Therapist AND Physical Therapist
Assistant wanted in Rural Hospital in North Florida Call
(850)973-2271 or Fax Resume to (850)973-8158.


WANTED:PAIDPARTICIPANTSEARN$400-$1150/WEEK.
GUARANTEED! Medical researchstudies on new products. Our
Fortune 500 clients. No physical work involved. Easy
qualification. Start Now. CALL NOW (800)689-2076.

STARTNOW! PaidTraining $12.50/hr+-bonus! $25-$41kyr!
Portrait Fund-raising for Volunteer Emergency Services. Mgt
Opt! Local Area! Auto Required! (200)644-2822 Ext 137.

$1500 WEEKLY GUARANTEEDNOWACCEPTING APPLI-
CATIONS$50CASHHIRINGBONUSGUARANTEEDIN
WRITING(888)318-1638Ext 107 www.USMailingGroup.com.

UPTO $4,000 WEEKLY!! Exciting Weekly Paycheck! Written
Guarantee! 11 Year Nationwide Company Now Hiring! Easy
Work, Sending Out Our Simple One Page Brochure! Free Post-
age, Supplies! Awesome Bonuses!! FREEINFORMATION,CALL
NOW!! (800)242-0363 Ext. 3800.

DELIVERTRAVELTRAILERSFORPAY! Thousandsof30ft
travel trailers originating from Florida cities. We need pickup
truck owners to deliver, www.horizontransport.com.

Drivers- OwnerOps & Co. Drivers Needed Now! Run SEOnly
orSE, Mid-Atl, MW Regional, 0/0's-NoForced Dispatch, Good
Pay plus Fuel (866)250-4292.

Hunting

ARGENTINA,WINGSHOOTING andBigGame Hunting:The
Best Bang for the $ anywhere in the world. Winter season:
April-August, 2005. Weekdays: (314)209-9800;
Evenings: (314)894-3776.

HUNT ELK, WILD BOAR, Red Stag and Buffalo in Missouri
until 3/31/05. Guaranteed Hunting License, Only $5.00. Our
policy NO Game, NO Pay, Reasonable Rates,
Call (314)293-0610.

Legal Services

DIVORCE$175-$275*COVERS children, etc. Only onesigna-
ture required! *Excludes govt. fees! Call weekdays (800)462-
2000, ext.600. (8am-7pm) Divorce Tech. Established 1977.

ACCIDENT VICTIM,INJURED,HURT,DISABLED? Weare
here to help any ACCIDENTS involving INJURY or LOSS OF
LIFE.AAAATTORNEYREFERRALSERVICE
(800)733-5342 CALL 24 hrs. PROTECT YOUR RIGHTS.


Miscellaneous


FREE4-ROOMDIRECTV SYSTEM includes standard instal-
lation. 2 MONTHS FREE HBO& Cinemax! Access to over225
channels! Limited time offer, S&H. Restrictions Apply.
(866)500-4056.

Real Estate

BEAUTIFULNORTHICAROLINA.WINTERSEASONISHERE!
MUSTSEETHEBEAUTIFULPEACEFULMOUNTAINS OF
WESTERNNCMOUNTAINS. Homes, Cabins,Acreage&lnvest-
ments. Cherokee Mountain Realty GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
cherokeemountainrealty.com Call for Free Brochure
(800)841-5868.

WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS North CarolinaWhere there is:
Cool Mountain Air, Views & Stream, Homes, Cabins & Acreage.
CALLFOR FREEBROCHUREOFMOUNTAIN PROPERTY
SALES. (800)642-5333. Realty Of Murphy 317 Peachtree St.
Murphy, N.C. 28906. www.realtvofmurphy.com.

KENTUCKY 50-1000 acres. Incredible trophy deer & turkey
hunting. Some w/lakes, creeks, rivers, ponds, & timber. Great
retreat/investment. New survey, starting $795 per acre. Owner
will finance. (270)791-2538 www.aclionoutfitler,com.


First Day
Service Technician
LIVE OAK
PEST CONTROL
Expanding local pest control
company needs service technician.
Drug free workplace program.
Excellent driving record required.
Retirement and insurance benefits
available. Apply in person at Live
Oak Pest Control, Inc. 8am-4pm,
Monday -Friday.

First Day

ST. AUGUSTINE
YOUTH SERVICES
Houseparent Couples for
therapeutic group home for
emotionally handicapped boys. F/T,
live-in position, Thurs-Mon. Good
pay, great benefits. F/T MH
Counselor,Master's level, exp. req.
F/T Program Director, MSW or
related degree. Fax resume to
(904) 825-0604, call (904) 829-
1770, or apply at 50 Saragossa
Street, St. Augustine, Florida.
EOE/DFWP.


First Day

Supervisor/Trainers
Positions require experience in
janitorial maintenance and the'
ability to work a very flexible
schedule and have dependable
transportation. Duties: On site
working supervision, hands on
training and public interaction.
High school diploma required.
AND:
Attendants for local highway
rest areas
Training will be provided. Must be
willing to work a flexible schedule,
have dependable transportation,
home phone and capable of
performing the required duties as
directed by supervision. Duties:
cleaning, sanitation, trash removal
(ability to lift 35 Ibs). Persons with
disabilities are encouraged to
apply.

ADA/EOE/Drug free workplace.
Apply at:
COMPREHENSIVE COMMUNITY
SERVICES, INC.
506 S. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak, FL 32064

TEN OWNERS/OPERATORS Med
Cert. CDL/A. Good MVR, 2 years
experience. Tampa to Charlotte area.
Good Pay Rate plus Fuel surcharge.
800-585-4400 or 912-379-9134

WAREHOUSE SUPERVISOR
/PURCHASING AGENT
needed for Smithfield Packing plant
in Madison, FL. Must be able to
maintain supply inventory and
supervise daily operations of Dry
Goods Storage. Candidate must be
experienced in warehouse
operations and inventory control.
Mail resumes to 294 SW Harvey
Greene Dr., Madison, FL. 32340 or
email Aprilbrack@Smithfield.com
AA/EOE/M/F/D/V


NEW LOG HOMESHELL-$99,900. Beautiful log homeshell
nestled on private wooded lot off Parkway north of Boone.
Won't last! 1st time offered. (800)455-1981, x125.

WEDORENTALS!SOUTHERNVERMONTSRENTALCEN-
TER.MOUNTSNOW,WESTDOVER,VERMONT.BY WEEK/
WEEKEND/MONTHORSEASON!INCLUDESRECREATIONAUL
CULTURALACTIVITIES. WEOFFERHILLSIDECONDOS,
TOWNHOUSES,CHALETS,(LARGE/SMALLHOMES.)MOUN-
TAINRESORTRENTALS,P.O.BOX 1804,WESTDOVER,VER-
MONT 05356. www.mountainresortrentals.com, email:
rentverm@sover.net. (888)336-1445, (802-464-1445).

N.C. MOUNTAINS: 2.3 acres with new log cabin shell in se-
cluded setting $89,900. Acreage available with stunning moun-
tain views! Free info available. (828)247-0081.

Golf View Home $249,900. Spectacular new Carolina moun-
tain home at 18 hole course near Ashville, NC. Enjoy mild
climate, great golf, low taxes, low cost of living! Call toll-free
(866)334-3253 x790 www.cherokeevalley.com.

N.C. WATERFRONT $39,900. Coming soon on All-sports
Lake. Boat, fish & swim. Will sell fast! Call MLC to get on the
priority list today! (866)920-5263..

ASHEVILLE,NCAREA. SpectacularMountain view & River
homesites. Paved roads, clubhouse & more. NEW RELEASE!
Homesites from $49,900. Bear River Community Call Now
(866)411-5263.

LAKE VIEW BARGAIN $29,900. Free boat slip! High eleva-
tion beautifully wooded parcel. Across from national forest on
35,000 acre recreational lake in TN. Paved roads, u/g utils,
central water, sewer, more. Excellent financing. Call now
(800)704-3154, ext. 608. Sunset Bay, LLC.

FORECLOSED GOV'T HOMES $0 or Low down ! Tax repos
and bankruptcies! No Credit O.K. $0 to low down. For listings
(800)501-1777 ext. 1299.

RVs/Campers

GIANT RV- SELLOFF- #1 Selling RV's- Remaining 2004
Models...Low Selloff Prices- Florida's Motorhome- Towable
Headquarters- Giant Recreation World. Melbourne- (800)700-
1021. Daytona- (800)893-2552. Orlando- (800)654-8475.


Steel Buildings


BUILDING SALE! "Rock Bottom Prices!" Last chance. Beat
Next Price Increase. Go direct/save. 20x26. 25x30. 30x40.
35x50. 40x60. 45x90. 50x100. 60x180. Others. Pioneer
(800)668-5422.

STEEL BUILDINGS. Factory Deals * Save $$$. 40x60' to
100x200'. Example: 50x100xl2' is $3.60/sq ft. (800)658-2885
www.rigidbuilding.com.


Your Ad Could Be Here


ONECALLSTANDSBETWEENYOURBUSINESSand mil-
lions of potential customers. Place your advertisement in the
FL Classified Advertising Network. For $450 your ad will be
placed in over 150 papers. Check out our 2x2 and 2x4 display
network too! Call this paper, or Heather Mola, FL Statewide
Network Director at (866)742-1373, or e-mail
hmola@flpress.com for more information. (Out of State place-
ment is also available.) Visit us online at www.florida-
classifieds.com.



FCAN


Week of February 21, 2005
133320-F -


First Day




V CABLE "


Time Warner Cable has four (4)
positions open at this time.
Please visit our website at:
www.timewarner.com/careers
to apply. No paper applications or
phone calls can be accepted.

EOE/AA Employer
Drug Free Workplace
M/F/D/V


First Day
TRUCK DRIVERS Needed Full and
Part-time at Garrison Farms. Good
CDL a must. Call 386-364-1493.
First Day
WANT A NEW CAREER?
Will train for security officer license.
Call Jim Tucker @ 386-364-7780
or Joe Peavey @ 850-929-4747.
WANTED! WANTED!
WANTED!
HARDWORKERS ONLY
NEED APPLY ALL SHIFTS
MUST BE ABLE TO LIFT
50LBS-70LBS
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
BACKGRD/DRUG SCREEN REQ.

First Day

WAYNE FRIER
CORPORATE OFFICE
Mature individual needed to fill
multi-task position. Background in
Finance or mortgage lending
helpful. Knowledge of the trucking
industry a plus. Call Larry J. Olds at
386-362-2720.






TRANSPORTATION

Autos for Sale
TAKE OVER PAYMENTS of $450.00
per month on a 2004 Chevy Max.
DVD, leather, sunroof, skid control,
XM satellite radio, 38 MPG. Call 386-
362-1734 ext. 107.

Trucks for Sale
Two Trucks For Sale: 1979 Dodge,
318 engine, has topper, runs. Other
for parts, 1971-1978 step-side, body
good, Dodge. Serious inquiries, only.
$600. for both. Call 386-208-0058.

Motorcycles
FOR SALE Brand new dirt bikes,
still in crates. 50, 90, & 125 cc.
$750.00 to $1,599.00. Different
colors to choose from. Also, used
street bikes. Call 386-362-4491:
ATVs coming soon.

Suwannee Legals
NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING AN AMENDMENTTOTHE
CITY OF LIVE OAK LAND DEVELOPMENT
REGULATIONS

BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF CITY OF LIVE
OAK, FLORIDA, SERVING AS THE LOCAL
PLANNING AGENCY OF THE CITY OF LIVE
OAK, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161 through
163.3215, Florida Statutes, as amended,
objections, recommendations

and comments concerning an amendment, as
described below, will be heard by the City
Council of the City of Live Oak, Florida,
serving as the Local Planning Agency of the
City of Live Oak, Florida, at a public hearing
on March 8, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. or as soon
thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the
City Council Meeting Room, City Hall located
at 101 White Avenue Southeast, Live Oak,
Florida.

LDR 05-3, an application by Brian V. and
Nancy N. Metzger, to amend the Official
Zoning Atlas of the Land Development
Regulations by changing the zoning district
from RESIDENTIAL, SINGLE FAMILY-2 (RSF-
2) to RESIDENTIAL,, OFFICE (RO) on
property described, as follows:

A parcel of land lying within Section 23,
Township 2 South, Range 13 East, Suwannee
County, Florida. Being more particularly
described, as follows: Lot 3, Block 13,

Northwest Division of the City of Live Oak, as
recorded in the Public Records of Suwannee
County, Florida.

Containing .39 acre, more or less.
The public hearing may be continued to one or
more future dates. Any interested party shall
be advised that the date, time and place of
any continuation of the public hearing shall be
announced during the public hearing and that
no further notice concerning the matter will be
published, unless said continuation exceeds
six calender weeks from the date of the above
referenced public hearing.

At the aforementioned public hearing, all
interested parties may appear to be heard
with respect to the amendment.

Copies of the amendment are available for
public inspection at the Office of the Land
Development Regulation Administrator, City
Hall located at 101 White Avenue Southeast,
Live Oak, Florida, during regular business
hours.

All persons are advised that if they decide to
appeal any decision made at the above
referenced public hearing, they will need a
record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
which record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
02/25
SUWANNEE RIVER WATER
MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
PUBLIC NOTICE OF APPLICATION

Notice is hereby given that pursuant to


Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the following
application for permit was received on
February 17, 2005:

Hines Place Subdivision, Daniel Crapps, 2806
West U. S. Highway 90, Suite 101, Lake City,
Florida 32055, has submitted an application
for an Environmental Resource Permit
Number 05-0029, for a total project area of
323 acres. The project is located in Township
2 South, Range 11 East, Sections 14 and 23,
in Suwannee County.

Interested persons may comment upon the
application or submit a written request for a
staff report containing proposed agency action
regarding the application by writing to the
Suwannee River Water Management District,
Attn: Resource Management, 9225 C.R. 49,
Live Oak, Florida 32060. Such comments or
requests must be received by 5:00 PM within
21 days from the date of publication.


No further public notice will be provided
regarding this application. A copy of the staff
report must be requested in order to remain
advised of further proceedings. Substantially
affected persons are entitled to request an'
administrative hearing, pursuant to Title 28,
Florida Administrative Code, regarding the
proposed agency action by submitting a
written request after reviewing the staff report.
02/25

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 612005CP 0000150001 XX

IN RE: ESTATE OF
VAUGHN ALEXANDER SIMMONS,

Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of VAUGHN
ALEXANDER SIMMONS, deceased, who died
on December 13, 2004, is pending in the
Circuit Court, for Suwannee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the mailing address of which
is 160 S. Ohio/MLK Jr. Avenue, Live Oak,
Florida 32064. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this
notice is served must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL 'BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publication of this Notice to
Creditors is February 25, 2005.
Personal Representatives:

VAUGHN EDWARD SIMMONS, JR.
17611 53rd Road
McAlpin, FL 32062

AMY MARGARET SIMMONS
17611 53rd Road
McAlpin; FL 32062

Attorneys for Personal Representatives:

ROBERTA. DAWKINS, ESQUIRE
Florida Bar No. 307122
Fisher, Tousey, Leas & Ball
One Independent Drive, Suite 2600
Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 356-2600
02/25, 03/04
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 612004CA000241001XX

CATHERINE ROBERTS,
Plaintiff
vs.

DAVID GERALD TURNER and
JENNIFER ROSE AGAPITO and
HECTOR AGAPITO, her husband,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to
a Final Judgment dated February 18, 2005, in
the above styled case in which DAVID
GERALD TURNER,. JENNIFER ROSE
AGAPITO and HECTOR AGAPITO, her
husband are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at the front
door of the Courthouse in Suwannee County,
Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on Wednesday, March
16, 2005, the following described property set
forth in the Final Judgment; to-wit:

Lot 3B, Block 22, of the Northwest Division of
the CITY OF LIVE OAK, FLORIDA, according
to the map or plat thereof prepared by George
G. Ehrenborg Co., and on file in the office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court, in and for
Suwannee County, Florida.

WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this
Court, this 18th day of February, 2005.


(SEAL)



02/25, 03/04


KENNETH DASHER
Clerk of the Court
By:/s/Arlene D. vev
Deputy Clerk
Arlene D. Ivey


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2005-020-CP

IN RE: The Estate of
MARIE C. WATKINS,
Deceased

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the Estate of MARIE C.
WATKINS, Deceased, Case No.: 2005-020-
CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for
Suwannee County, Florida, Probate Division,
Suwannee County Courthouse, 200 South
Ohio, Live Oak, FL 32064. The names and
addresses of the Personal Representative and
the attorney for the estate are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including unmatured,
contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a
copy of this notice is served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.

The date of the first publication of this Notice
is February 25, 2005.

Personal Representative:
JANICE C. GILBERT
9440 Glen Abby Lane
Sarasota, FL 34238

Attorney for Personal Representative:
JOHN MOXLEY, P.A.
John Moxley
2320 NE 2nd Street, Suite 4
Ocala, FL 34470
Florida Bar Number: 124157
Tel. (352) 732-8085
02/25, 03/04


Classifieds



Work!


To place your ad

in the Classified

Marketplace,

call Louise at

386-362-1734

today!


FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 25.2005


0111RIAKIKI== n=Rfint-MATII IVP: nAV







FRIDAY, I-BRlUAflT 2b, LOU~bO V6 i


N jI 1 2 4I 'ro 11


v 4

4j4~ ~ Awn,
J-1; ~
Ail


Fp�s
find'


The kitchen can be a great place for fami-
lies to get together and practice teamwork.
One of the best ways to get children in-
volved in the baking process is to bake with
yeast dough. It's fun to play with, easy to
make and can also inspire creativity in kids,
say experts at www.baking911 .com. For tips
and recipes the family can make together,
visit Fleischmann's Yeast at www.bread-
world.com.
With all the recent emphasis on how im-
portant it is for adults and children to add
whole grains to their diets, it comes as a sur-
prise to most people that the popular snack
food-popcorn-is a whole grain. In fact, a re-
cent survey by Orville Redenbacher's Smart
Pop! reveals that less than 10 percent of
Americans are aware of this tasty bit of
knowledge. More information, popcorn
recipes and whole-grain tips can be found at
www.orvillereden bacher.com.
If you've been cooking up ways to save
time in the kitchen, you may want to take a
minute to look at your knives. The right cut-
lery can help speed up the prep and cooking
process. For instance, J.A. Henckels makes a
dual-edge 8-inch Chef's knife that's de-
signed to serve as two knives in one. It pro-
vides a fine edge for traditional cutting and


dicing, as well as a serrated section for slic-
ing foods such as tomatoes and bagels. For
more information visit
www.jahenckels.com.
', The DASH eating plan, developed by the
National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute,
calls for a diet rich with fruits and vegeta-
bles, and low in sodium-a major contributor
to hypertension. The DASH eating plan rec-
ommends four to five servings of fruit and
four to six servings of veggies every day,
about six to 12 daily servings of grain prod-
ucts, smaller amounts of low-fat or nonfat
dairy products and no more than two 3-
ounce servings of lean meat, poultry or fish
per day. For information on the eating plan
or for flavorful and healthy recipe ideas, vis-
it mrsdash.com.


milk
butter
granulated sugar
salt
FLEISCHMANN'S Active
Dry Yeast
2 cups all-purpose flour


eggs, beaten


S "..Combine milk, but-
. '' ter, granulated sugar
and salt in a medium
saucepan. Place over
medium heat and stir un-
til mixture is warm and but-
ter begins to melt.
Combine yeast and 2 cups of the
fi.,uir in a large mixing bowl. Add milk
Imn\L0tre. \tir until blended. Add eggs;
buat thorouglily; about 200 strokes. Stir in
the remaining flour, 1 cup at a time, until
you have a cohesive dough. Turn dough out
onto a lightly floured surface. Knead about 5
minutes, adding more flour to keep the.
dough workable, until you have a soft dough
that is smooth and elastic.
Rinse the mixing bowl. Grease the surface
of the dough and place it in the bowl. Cover
with a clean towel and let rise in a warm,
draft-free place about 1 hour, or until dou-
bled in bulk.
When the dough is nearly doubled, prepare
the filling. Place brown sugar, granulated
sugar, flour, cinnamon and butter in a small
bowl. Using a pastry blender or two knives,
cut butter into sugar mixture until the mix-
ture resembles coarse crumbs.
Set the chopped apple and peanuts aside
until you are ready to sprinkle them on the
filling.
Punch down dough; knead lightly one
minute. Let dough rest while you prepare the


te -. vi I


- Fm �ILTP


NTIACC3In I


an autographed CD and two VIP tickets to

see Blake Shelton in concert at the

Suwannee County Fair

March 19 at 7:30 p.m.


r~ " ~ '~
~ '' j-7i iJ
~ ~ ~.

~ ~ U



%~\1 ~


Here's


How...
L% er~ l ime
pm pUjlace a
class.ilie(I line
ad1 lbem~eenno%%
and( Mda rch11.
)ou'il %ilbe
eiiieed inb a


The dra%%iiig
%%ill l)e held
March 14.

Prihale par1o

r17ample. lard
l'or �,ali. anirnak fuor


Apple Cinnamon Filling
1 / 2 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1 / 2 cup granulated sugar
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1-1 / 2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
1 / 2 cup butter, cut into chunks
1-1 / 2 cups chopped, peeled
cooking apples
1 cup chopped unsalted dry-
roasted peanuts*

Caramel Syrup
1 / 2 cup butter
1 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1 / 4 cup KARO light corn syrup

caramel syrup. Place butter, brown sugar and
corn syrup in a saucepan. Cook over medium
heat, stirring constantly, until sugar melts.
Remove from heat and set aside until need-
ed.
Roll out dough on a lightly floured surface
to a rectangle about 24 by 18 inches. Sprin-
kle the filling on the dough; top with
chopped apple and peanuts. Starting from
the long side, roll up jelly-roll style. Pinch
the edges to seal. Brush edges of dough with
some milk if you have trouble getting the
dough to seal.
Evenly pour caramel syrup into a lightly
greased 13 x 9 x 4-inch baking pan.** Using
a very sharp knife, cut the dough into 12
pieces. Place pieces, cut-side down, on syrup
in pan. Cover and let rise 30 to 45 minutes,
or until nearly doubled.
While rolls are rising, preheat oven to 350
degrees. Place a baking sheet on the bottom
shelf of the oven to catch any drips. Bake
rolls 50 minutes, or until they are lightly
brown and sound hollow when tapped. While
they are still warm, invert onto a serving
plate.
* If desired, substitute pecans for peanuts.
** If you don't have a pan that deep, or if
you want rolls of a more modest size, cut the
dough into 18 pieces, use two 9-inch round
cake pans and bake 40 to 45 minutes.
Reprinted with the permission of KETC TV
and Father Dominic Garramone ....


., 'I, i -, '
1 ' , . . *,*.*<

-* 9 "'


1 d1 Cooking Ideas


PAGE 5C


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


CI- M i.AW \ :: 0 / --r~ iiAb or,\ o~ni~ rr


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PAt-A.GE 6C M ~m m l ,.-v--I..I.......-. ....A..,R.. 5 0 ----,


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By The

NUMBERS

Games through Feb. 20


t. . ee/


�2005 Longwing Publications


GAME OF THE WEEK

LSU at Auburn


. . . .508
. . . .490
. . . .478
. 470
.. . 465
. 463
. . . .458


. .749
. .730
. .715
. .697
. .690
. .690
. .661
. .661


FIELD-GOAL PCT. DEFENSE


Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . .
Miss. State . . . . . . . . . . .
Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . . . ..
South Carolina . . . . . . . ..
Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . .
REBOUNDING


Miss. State ..........
Alabama . . . . . . . . . .
Florida . . . . . . . . . . .
Kentucky . . . . . . . . . .
LSU .............
Arkansas . . . . . . . . . .
South Carolina. . . . . . .
ASSISTS


Vanderbilt.
Florida . .
Kentucky .
LSU . . . .
Ole Miss .
Arkansas.
Alabama .


BLOCKS


Arkansas. . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Kentucky. . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
South Carolina . . . .......
LSU. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . ..


SCORING
Anthony Roberson, Florida . . .
Brandon Bass, LSU . . . . . . .
Kennedy Winston, Alabama. . .
Lawrence Roberts, Miss. State .
Toney Douglas, Auburn . . . . .
Earnest Shelton, Alabama . . .
REBOUNDING
Lawrence Roberts, Miss. State .
Glen Davis, LSU. . . . . . . . ..
Chuck Hayes, Kentucky . . . .
Brandon Bass, LSU . . . . . ..
Jermareo Davidson, Alabama .
David Lee, Florida. . . . . . . ..
FIELD-GOAL PCT.


Brandon Bass, LSU . . . .
Chuck Davis, Alabama . .
Carlos Powell, South Caroli
Anthony Roberson, Florida
Ronnie Brewer, Arkansas.
Kelenna Azubuike, Kentuck
FREE-THROW
Anthony Roberson, Florida
lan Young, Auburn . . . . .
Darrel Mitchell, LSU . . . .
Scooter McFadgon, Tennes
Matt Walsh, Florida . . . .
Earnest Shelton, Alabama.
ASSISTS
Tack Minor, LSU. . . . . ..
Ronald Steele, Alabama .
Gary Ervin, Miss. State . .
C.J. Watson, Tennessee. .
Ian Young, Auburn. . . . .
Patrick Sparks, Kentucky.
BLOCKS
Steven Hill, Arkansas. . .
Chuck Davis, Alabama ..
Shagari Alleyne, Kentucky
Brandon Bass, LSU. . . .
Darian Townes, Arkansas.
Brandon Wallace, South Ca


ina . . . .


y . . . . .
PCT.


. .405
. .407
. .408
. .410
. .411
. .415
. .419


. . .. . 41.2
. . . . . 37.4
. . . . . 37.2
. . .. . 36.7
...... 35.3
...... 34.4
...... 33.9


16.5
16.1


Illustration by Bruce Plante @ 2005



Battle of Tigers on tap


15.5 n the verge of earning itself an at-large bid to the NCAA
15.3 tournament, LSU visits Auburn this Saturday in the battle
14.9 of the Tigers.
14.7 After starting the season at 6-5, LSU has won six out its last
eight games and currently is second in the SEC West standings.
This season has been the opposite of the 2003-04 season for
* 5.4 LSU. Despite an 18-11 finish, the Tigers had to settle for a bid to
* 4.7 the National Invitation Tournament last year after folding down
* 4.6 the stretch. Instead of fading, LSU appears to be getting better as
. 4 the year progresses, and head coach John Brady feels his squad is
S4.4 already a lock to earn an invitation to the Big Dance.
S4.2. LSU can end any doubts by closing out three of the weaker
3.5 SEC foes down the stretch - starting with Auburn.
Jeff Lebo's first season on the Plains has been a struggle. The
former North Carolina guard frequently speaks of how Auburn
High School has more size than his Tigers.
18.3 Auburn only has one player who stands 6-foot-6, and the Tigers
17.5 rely on a four-guard lineup. With virtually no shot at competing
17.5 inside, the Tigers have to bomb from the outside to win games.
17.4 Auburn is looking to the future, while LSU hopes to gain
16.9 momentum as it heads into the month of March.
16.99 Records: LSU 15-8 (8-4 SEC West); Auburn 12-13 (3-9 SEC
West). m Coaches: LSU's John Brady (224-177); Auburn's Jeff
11.0 Lebo (127-76) S Tip-off: 3 p.m. CT Saturday. i TV: Jefferson
. 8.7 Pilot.
. 8.6 Keys for LSU: Pound the ball inside. Either Brandon Bass or
. 8.6 Glen Davis should touch the ball on every offensive
. 8.2 possession.... Capitalize on turnovers. In a 90-69 win over
S8.1 Auburn, LSU scored 20 points off 14 Auburn turnovers.
Keys for Auburn: Compete on the boards. In their previous
.583 meeting, LSU outrebounded Auburn by only one, 30-29.
.581 ... Defend the 3-point arc. LSU hit 9 of its 17 3-point attempts
.551 against Auburn.


.495
.481
.481

.886


The Rest of the Matchups

Kentucky at Alabama


. . . . . . .863 0 Records: Kentucky 20-3 (11-1 SEC East); Alabama 21-4
. . . . . . .842 (10-2 SEC West). i Coaches: Kentucky's Tubby Smith
see . . . .824 (335-117); Alabama's Mark Gottfried (208-103). N Tip-off:
. . . . . : .814 12:30 p.m. CT Saturday. N TV: CBS.
. . . . . . .809 Keys for Kentucky: Balanced scoring. Seven Kentucky
players reached double figures in last Saturday's win over
. . . . . . . 5.2 Mississippi State.... Get second-chance shots. Kentucky's Chuck
. . . . . . . 5.1 Hayes averages 3.2 offensive rebounds in conference games,
. . . . . . . 5.0 while Alabama's Jermareo Davidson is good for 6.1 defensive
. . . . . . . 4.7 rebounds.
. . . . . . . 4.4 Keys for Alabama: Solid perimeter defense. In conference
. . . . . . . 4.1 action, Alabama is the top team in field-goal percentage
defense .... Ronald Steele has to do the little things to help his
S2.0 team win. Steele was 3-of-3 from 3-point range and had nine
. n assists in last Saturday's 21-point victory over South Carolina.


Tennessee at Arkansas
0 Records: Tennessee 11-14 (4-8 SEC East); Arkansas 17-9
(5-8 SEC West). N Coaches: Tennessee's Buzz Peterson


. . . . . �

rolina . .


(166-106); Arkansas' Stan Heath (68-50)M Tip-off: 3 p.m. CT
Saturday. H TV: Jefferson Pilot.
Keys for Tennessee: Win for Peterson. With the Vols having
lost seven of their last eight games, Peterson has little-job
security .... Take care of the basketball. In the 60-58 loss to Ole
Miss last Saturday, the Volunteers committed 22 turnovers.
Keys for Arkansas: Respond to runs. Vanderbilt had a 1.0-2
first-half run and a 12-5 run in the second in lact Saturday's
victory over Arkansas .... More shots by J.najiahn MNdica.

Georgia at Vanderbilt
N Records: Georgia 8-15 (2-10 SEC East); Vandeibill 16-110
(6-6 SEC East). 9 Coaches: Georgia's Dennri FeIni l2t.'.. 3,
Vanderbilt's Kevin Stallings (224-142). 0 Tip-off: 3 p.m. CT
Saturday. S TV: None.
Keys for Georgia: The big guys have to make an impact.
Forward Steve Newman had 13 points and center David Bliss
added eight points and 10 rebounds in last Saturday's win over
Auburn.... Put the ball in the bucket. Georgia shot only 26
percent from the floor against Auburn.
Keys for Vanderbilt: Hit from the outside. Vanderbilt was
2-of-16 from behind the arc in an earlier 68-59 loss to Georgia.
... Mario Moore has to put the ball on the floor and make
something happen. Of his 20 points against Arkansas, 16' came on
the charity stripe.

Ole Miss at Mississippi State
N Records: Ole Miss 13-13 (4-9 SEC West); Mississippi State
18-8 (6-6 SEC East). 9 Coaches: Ole Miss' Rod Bames
(126-89); Mississippi State's Rick Stansbury (144-72). l Tip-off:
6 p.m. CT Saturday. N TV: Fox Sports Net and Sun Sports.
Keys for Ole Miss: Kendrick Fox has to continue to find the
open man. The forward had 13 points and seven assists in last
Saturday's win over Tennessee.... Be active on defense. Fox,
Justin Johnson and Cavadas Nunnery each had three steals against
the Volunteers.
Keys for Mississippi State: Take care of the basketball.
The Bulldogs are 12th in the conference in turnover margin at
minus-2.42 in SEC games .... Don't let the Rebels establish
anything inside. In Mississippi State's 87-76 win o'. er ili Rebels
earlier this season, the Bulldogs outscored Ole % Ii. 36- 34 in the
paint.
Florida at South Carolina
0 Records: Florida 16-7 (8-4 SEC East); South Carolina 14-9
(6-6 SEC East). 2 Coaches: Florida's Billy Donovan (220-111);
South Carolina's Dave Odom (349-225). H Tip-off: 2 p.m. ET
Sunday. TV: CBS.
Keys for Florida: Don't let the Gamecocks dominate the
paint. In Florida's 80-72 victory over South Carolina earlier this
season, the Gamecocks outscored the Gators 46-34 in the
paint. ... Josh Gonner has to knock down some outside shots.
Gonner was 5-of-8 from 3-point range in the loss to Alabama.
Keys for South Carolina: Carlos Powell needs some help.
Against Alabama, Powell had 17 points and the other four starters
combined for 10 points.... Stop Florida's Big Three - Matt
Walsh, David Lee and Anthony Roberson.


EASTERN DIVISION
SEC All Top 25 PF
Kentucky 11-1 20-3 2-2 74.8
Florida 8-4 16-7 1-2 80.4
S. Carolina 6-6 14-9 1-5 68.8
Vanderbilt 6-6 16-10 1-4 72.2
Tennessee 4-8 11-14 1-5 69.0
Georgia 2-10 8-15 0-4 61.4
WESTERN DIVISION
SEC All Top 25 PF
Alabama 10-2 21-4 1-3 77.2
LSU 8-4 15-8 1-3 75.9
Miss. State 6-6 18-8 1-4 73.5
Arkansas 5-8 17-9 0-5 73.5
Ole Miss 4-9 13-13 0-4 64.7
Auburn 3-9 12-13 0-2 71.6

T " , - " .. ,,, - .. .- . . ' .
Average per game
FIELD-GOAL PCT.


Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vanderbilt. . . . . . . . . . . . ..
South Carolina . . . . . . . . .
Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . .
FREE-THROW PCT.
LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Alabama .............
Auburn ..............
Florida . . .. . . . . . . . . . .
Tennessee ............
Vanderbilt..............
Kentucky .............
Arkansas .............


M..


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25,2005


0 SHWANINIFF DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


MAI-Ir- �t-


nfc.


JtABAMA Head coach Mark
Gottfried ripped the
Alabama faithful after only 9,410 showed
up at Coleman Coliseum to see the Crimson
Tide beat Arkansas 72-63 on Feb. 16. "I was
disappointed in our crowd," Gottfried said.
"They need to understand that's tough for
these kids, for our team. They're in the hunt
for something special, and it's disheartening
to walk out there and see the arena like it
was."
Il ANSAS The Razorbacks, who
lead the conference in
3-point field-goal percentage defense,
allowed Vanderbilt to shoot 44.4 percent (12
of 27) from behind the arc in last Saturday's
79-65 loss. "We have been defending the
3-point shot well all year," said Arkansas
head coach Stan Heath, whose team has
limited opponents to 29 percent from
3-point range. "In the second half we were
slow to get out to the 3-point line and
defend."
U RN The Tigers had only 43 and
WURN 45 points in losses to
Vanderbilt and Georgia last week, marking
the fewest points scored in consecutive
games since 1951, when Auburn had 35 and
51 against Kentucky and Vanderbilt,
respectively. Auburn was l-of-17 from
3-point range against Georgia, and was
2-of- 11 in the second half of the loss to
Vanderbilt.
1IhRIDA With Houston Rockets head
coach Jeff Van Gundy in
attendance, the Gators defeated visiting Ole
Miss 90-53 on Feb. 16. "No one wins a
game in their conference this late in the
season by this much," said Van Gundy, who
is a good friend of Florida head coach Billy
Donovan.
S RGIA Levi Stukes came off the
bench and scored a game-
high 15 points in the Bulldogs' 57-45
victory overAuburn last Saturday. Stukes
hadn't played since Feb. 6 because of a
stress fracture in his right foot. "He was a
difference-maker," Auburn head coach Jeff
Lebo said.
NJTUCKY Rajon Rondo tied a
school record with eight
steals and the Wildcats picked up their 50th
20-win season with last Saturday's 94-78
victory over Mississippi State. Rondo tied
the record set by Wayne Turner on Nov. 24,
1998, against George Washington.
Kentucky has earned at least 20 wins each
of the last 15 seasons.
The Tigers picked up their third
straight win over Florida with a
"."3 icio'.r:, last Saturday. Florida head
coach Bil l) Donovan was upset that the
Tigers had 34 free throw attempts compared
to 15 fi.r die Giaor- "I think the game was
very-clear c, 3-1 tree throws to 15,"
Donovan said.
Vt TSISSIPPI The Rebels rebounded
from the loss to Florida
with a 60-58 win over Tennessee last
Saturday. Tommie Eddie, who had been
hampered by an injured right wrist, came off
the bench and scored 21 points against the
Volunteers, including 17 in the second half.
"I knew it was going to come back around
for me," Eddie said.
cmixSS STATE All-America power
forward Lawrence
Roberts suffered a bruised and strained
quadriceps in the Bulldogs' loss at
Kentucky last Saturday. "It was a shock
when it happened," Roberts said. "I was
hoping it wasn't an ACL. I didn't even know
what happened."
Sg*AROLINA The SEC fined the
South Carolina athletic
department $5,000 last Friday because fans
stormed the court following a 73-61 win
over Kentucky on Feb. 15. According to the
league's policy, "access to competition
areas shall be limited to participating
student athletes, coaches, officials, support
personnel and properly credentialed
individuals at all times..."
IMI NESSEE The Volunteers were
without leading scorer
Scooter McFadgon for last Saturday's loss
at Ole Miss. McFadgon has an undisclosed
leg injury and injured left wrist. "When he is
in the game, other teams have to focus on
him defensively because he is such a
scoring threat," Tennessee head coach Buzz
Peterson said prior to the Ole Miss game.
McFadgon is averaging 14.1 points per
game this season.
At,]ERBILTT Shan Foster had a
career-high 25, while
Mario Moore had 20 points and a career-
high 13 assists in last Saturday's win over
Arkansas. "Someone sprinkled some
Memorial (Gymnasium) Magic in here,"
Moore said.





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0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK


PAGE 7C


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005






Pfli U ANNEE D.-EMO--CRAT/LIVEIOAK FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 25.-2005


Danish Pastry

Makes 24 pastries
4 cups all-purpose flour
1 / 2 cup sugar
2 envelopes FLEISCHMANN'S RapidRise Yeast
1-1 / 2 teaspoons salt
1-1 / 2 teaspoons grated lemon peel
3 / 4 cup milk
1 / 2 cup water
1 / 4 cup butter or margarine
1 egg, large
1 egg yolk, reserve egg white for Egg Glaze
2 tablespoons ARGO cornstarch
1-1/ 2 cups butter or margarine
Egg Glaze (recipe follows)
Fruit jelly or preserves, any flavor
Sugar


ia'bPf;'


Makes 2 loaves
2 1 / 2 to 3 cups all-
3 cups wh
1 / 2 cup wh
1 / 4 cup mi
1 / 4 cup fla:
2 tablespoons sun
1 envelope FL
1 1 / 2 teaspoons sal
2 cups wa
1 / 4 cup + 2 tablespoons ve2
2 tablespoons mo
2 tablespoons KA
1 tablespoon vin
Me
In large bowl, combine 2 cups all-purpose
flour, whole wheat flour, wheat bran, seeds,
undissolved yeast, and salt. Heat water, oil,
molasses; corn syrup, and vinegar until very
warm (120o to 130o F). Gradually add to dry
ingredients. Beat 2 minutes at medium speed
of electric mixer, scraping bowl occasional-
ly. Stir in enough remaining flour to make a
soft dough. Knead on lightly floured surface
until smooth and elastic, about 8 to 10 min-
utes. Cover; let rest 10 minutes.


-purpose flour
hole wheat flour
heat bran
llet seed
x seed
flower seed
EISCHMANN'S RapidRise Yeast
t
ter
getable oil
classes
ARO corn syrup
negar
elted butter or margarine (optional)
Divide dough in half. Roll each half to 12
x 7-inch rectangle. Beginning at short end of
each rectangle, roll up- tightly as for jelly
roll. P h 'earns and ends to seal. Place,
seam slues down, in 2 greased 8 1 / 2 x 4 1 /
2-inch loaf pan. Cover; let rise in warm,
draft-free place until doubled in size, about 1
hour.
Bake at 375oF for 35 minutes or until
done. Remove from loaf pans; cool on wire
racks. Brush with melted butter, if desired.


'Al


Pro ;Nft-


What matters most to moms


Ask any new mom what
the most important thing in
their life is and you're likely
to get the same answer: "my
baby." It only makes sense.
As soon as the baby arrives,
the focus changes from tak-
ing care of yourself, to mak-
ing sure all the needs and de-


sires of the little one you
brought into the , orld are
met.
Caly Wood, 27, of Abing-
ton, Mass., remembers being
overwhelmed with questions
when she brought her daugh-
ter, Maria, home from the
hospital in January 2004. So


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506 N. Ohio Ave. * Live Oak, FL ....jRs


does Tami Battell, 25, of
Bridgewater, Mass., whose
son, Conor, came home
around the same time. Both
women turned to The First
Years Parents Council for
answers.
The Council is a national,
online community --
300,000 members strong --
that provides parenting in-
sights and helpful baby
product feedback. Through
participation in online sur-
veys and in-home testing of


products, Parents Council
members help to ensure
products offered by The First
Years are developed with the
features they and other par-
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"The Parents Council is a
great place to turn for an-
swers," says Wood. She
logged on to the Web site
one day to try and find out if
something was wrong when
all her daughter wanted to do
was nurse for 5 hours
straight. "Other moms told


me she was probably just go-
ing through a growth spurt,
and that put my mind at
ease."
"I like the fact that I can
get honest feedback about
baby products before I bring
them into my home," says
Battell.
To become a member of
the Parents Council, log on
to The First Years Parents
Council Web site at
http://www.thefirstyears.co


These local businesses are here to take good care of you.


Sl

Ox


S


-mo
-g, , ' ' ' ' ' ' 'J1 -


"; ... "" A. Cameron Farms
Drgger Heating, Fill Dirt * Limerock* Land Clearing TO PLACE AN
Air Conditioning
Air o itinigPonds * Driveways Culverts
and Refrigeration AD, CALL
S.,,iiC.,oi , mnd Cnmercial Tree & Stump Removal (386) 362-1734
i3 , ,U, n ... e. ,3,s6,, ,,., Phone (386) 963.5679 Cell (386) 590.1279
(,,I,. f.I.. .. .,4 h-irk - rig,.ger . ,,, D EA D LIN E
' : 'Nextel 195 105*5537
,.. IS FRIDAY
NAT 2:00 P.M.


14- 4JDM-F


a'.. '~


p


I /t l /c \k / li"I'(-',rk out (ifiiwi,'int
Dwight Law
C5 5i (C -ount', Roaid 252 Iioving Consultanti
\\ellhb-irn. FL 320Ci4 4'.
(386) 963-2282
I .,xS- | o3- ': � ( Fa, % ..
Call us fin a frie estimated,
Fla. IMoer Reg. No. IM 1174 - ..


J.R. FARNUM

STATE CERTIFIED

CONTRACTOR
* Roof Repairs * Fascia & Sofil
METAL ROOFING
SPECIALISTS
(386) 362-3320
CCC057785
fe.B we


1--117,995vi


.sssa


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


Y-


DAG2 E R(


plastic wrap; chill 1 hour. Repeat procedure of'
two rolling, foldings, turnings, and chilling
twice more. Refrigerate overnight.
Divide dough in half; returning half to refrig-
erator. Shape gently but quickly into spiral rolls
or jelly triangles as described below. Place on?
greased baking sheets. Chill 1 hour. Brush with
Egg Glaze; sprinkle lightly with sugar.
Bake at 375oF for 15 minutes or until gold-
en. Remove from sheets; cool on wire rack.
Spiral Rolls: Roll half of dough to 12 x 6--
inch rectangle. Cut into 12 (6 x 1-inch) strips;!
twist each strip 3 times. Coil; tuck end under
coil. Make deep indentation in the center of
rolls; fill with 1 / 2 teaspoon jelly.
Jelly Triangles: Roll half of dough to 12 x,
9-inch rectangle; cut into 3-inch'
Squl.reNs Pul I 2 teaspoon lel-;
-, in te 'le nter f l'- each


In a large bowl, combine 1-1/4 cups flour, 1
/ 2 cup sugar, undissolved yeast, salt, and
lemon peel. Heat milk, water, and 1 / 4 cup but-
ter until very warm (1200 to 130oF). Gradually
add to flour mixture. Beat 2 minutes at medium
speed of electric mixer, scraping bowl occa-
sionally. Add egg, egg yolk, and 1 / 2 cup flour;
beat 2 minutes at high speed. Stir in cornstarch
and remaining flour to make a soft batter. Cov-
er tightly with plastic wrap; refrigerate 2 hours.
Spread 1-1 / 2 cups butter on waxed paper to
12 x 10-inch rectangle. Chill 1 hour.
Roll chilled dough to 16 x 12-inch rectangle.
Place chilled butter at the center of dough. Fold
ends over center. Give dough a quarter turn; roll
to 16 x 12-inch rectangle and fold as
above. Turn, roll, and
fold once more
\\Virp Lighil', in


c:p I


4ra I


!At I






TheIsIfYV I --L.sIse/lll II e4 W=t...OJAK ..J t k -g o c"

These local businesses are here to take good care of you.


(LIt tO sOUr de~iii'd lent.th-*!


metal Roofing
L, )t '~ i HIt I Rooing S Accessor-' A, Discount Prices


o ie piJ&' tuntej


Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg. Inc.
CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-393-0335


Trees. Trimmed or Remo\ed * Fire\\ ood
Licensed & Insured * Free Estimate s

TREE WORK
Buckct Ti-ruLI alind CIrnh bii1'

963-5026


Si


1T


DUNCAN TIRE & AUTO
"Complete One Stop Service For Your Vehicle "
Alignment Specialists


24 HOUR TOWING
m062-4743 1-888-362-2568
422 E. HOWARD ST. * LIVE OAK PLAZA
LEN A. DUNCAN


DREAM DESIGN
INCORPORATED
Residential Make-overs * Free Estimates
Licensed and Insured

C' Cabinels, Ceramic
For ni fll i" himnl -, T :I. - .. T


ior Im n IILmII . r nII II m I I
repairs and needs call
Johni & lrish Adam'.
3X6i 362-7')16


- I


Floor C,'neriiip.
Paintling. De~cks.
Screened EFnclusu re,;.


77- -- * -- -, -


JT's Transmissions
James Tullis, ()xner
!2 ''J'' N (CR 1''
\\e!ll .:.rii. Fl.:.nd-I'i 3 LJ4
TAKING\G CARE OF ALL YOUR
TR.AN MISSION NEEDS"


Phone: 3N,-M9eot"-"u, I (I


"4 iE IEIP-TI|,[I'_:. F-F F P RIE I l- E'
24 HR. EMERGENCY PUMP SERVICE
wul3a


Well Drilling
F1 :J l, '_- ,,


ONE CALL DOES IT ALL
For Your
David HOME
MeLaughlih Improvements & Repairs
Remodeling & Renovations
386-963-1391
Licensed & Insured
KARDAV ENTERPRISES. INC. FE , --'-i ,:
--,- , I,,


Dnggrs i Sons CustomfiMefat Cttn


I ~


,Jasper, Florida


�% rapping
& Sausage
Ma -: Nl-.l -II!I


ONiiit i i'ii~


I


I


CARROLL

CONCRETE
* Curbing * GuLtIers * MorOlithic: Slabs
* Palios * Drivewavs & Sidlewalks
* Commercial & Residential
* Licensed &. Insured
Rt. 2 Box 166 (386) 938-1156
Jennings, FL 32053 86) 938-1156


I


I


Stump Grinding


I[Jim Sellers 386-776-2.5224."


J.D. KASTOR INC.


* P.Il & P/,&ai, [lt,
* pratht Roig Rptl
* A nlllllin . 'lL hin. ,

386-362-3107
386-330-4717


*"u i Lit *'l Girait b'i
" lH~icl' ivXJ't rit ntlit


lo i l .1.', 1.1/.


Tl, Ir


Of North Florida
L.:, E #IEHI 1 - '.1
RICHARD H SAPP - Owner


I'.'' - LL


' i '. :.n -i


-l1
-,I 1


II~~~ p,, .-j~u~aj


UNWINKHMKNW -IM^NIM


ABBEY MINI STORAGE
All New Units
* 5X15 * 5X20 * 10X15 * 10X20 * 15X20
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd.
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak

364-5300


LIVE OAK

MINI STORAGE
* 5x15 * 5x20 * 10x15 * 10x20
CLINILATE CONTROLLED STORAGE
5x5 * 5x10*10x10*10x20
Uinils located on Gold Kist Road
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Lihe Oak 364-6626


W. S


To place an ad on
this page, please
call Myrtle at
(386) 362-1734,
ext. 103.
L^77


['c'kkeeplinQ u



il-kl N k %I I I IP I I NI I.N
�l L&NION 01 k M4 1 ,1 1' - NIIII[ %. 1I e
NIOrTHLN AEPOiRTirjG
TlATE FED -RAL SALES iPA'. OLL RETURNS~
STATE ~ FEDERAL Bu~EirES 'AELATED' NCONIETA. RETURIJ


Ceramic

Tile Work
and Brick Pavers
Call Al
(386)
697-6813


I ~


J and J

Bait & Tackle
All types of baits including '
minnows and shiners
Hwy. 252 31st Road
Taylorville, FL 32094 '
(386) 9634244


John re yw Ar
0Cljni( ofA Liv9 OIlK
Roofs * Mobile Homes
* Brick Homes * Stucco Homes
* Decks * Driveways

Nfo Job Too Big... No job oo Snmall
386-776-2067
� -- _ . . , - .. *; - :^ * ^ * ;.l' . - . . ..l I l . L .1 .


HOWARD & SONS
SEPTIC TANK SERVICE, INC.
* Aerobic: Systems
* Pump Out Serice,'
* Pre Cast Septic TankS
* Drain Fields Relaid
"PortaLle Rest RIomon
386i 935-1518
Brdanord, FL 32'08 Cell. (3861 208-5205
PO Box 181:, Fax i3.36i 935-6829
7 - 0 :-- -^


LAKEWOOD
APARTMENTS
IN LIVE OAK

Quiet couintr\ lix ing 2 bedroom duplex
Call 362-3110
InlHvi ||lnc 1111 .HI. lm ...l I I I11|ll|l I| 11111. il.11.ur .ln 11 il..11 �llij| I 111| IIl l~ j


E-LIMB-INATORS, INC.
Complete Tree Senice
Licensed & Insured

21653 \\. Shekinah Place --
O'Brien. FL. 32071 '
Phone 386-935-1993
Fa\ 38)-935-3321 's.


I


ADKINS
LANDCLEARING LLC
Owner. J,,h l', Ath i . ,l
Free Estimates
Phone:
386-29)4-3837
Cell: 9"- - "
3s h-5(90-)(.7.11(15- . ' . '


- , ,. ,.. ,, -.


..-,mmm.. ,mmsmm


11 935-093U]


I Residential & Commercial I


r-


� tP ',r .


-R"wr"-


^W^ywy


*>SE;i5


U.1.1 I


PAU


V-11-0-pol


"z': : !"


col


PAGE 9C


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FPinAv FFRPI IARY 2.1; 2005


I








PAGE 10C m. -- --- ------- -------- -- --- -- - - -- --


,m" .... -- i' ....... ... ''..J.. . .J"2 :1 -.. L i "-U - Li'.A

Look for this special section inside
today's Suwannee Democrat


. .
u4~~
4 4~.
b~4
.4w.

m m S I

I ~ - S
.jv.
"44~.
41. .~ I, 0


a,~


Interstate CYCLES


T 580 Southwest Gateway Drive, Lake City, FL
Open: Tues. - Fri., 9-6; Sat. 9-4
(386) 758-2453 e2ToValdosta

1-877-596-2453 Exit 82
M t 'See dealer
= for dlalls


Offer ends March 31


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'-iih bl-,, at - f -, r3t4 cf 1 9"' 2 FR Off.: ,:,:,] inu . ?1 .. :,,- inv, n3f. :'-' . ,J pri.:or m,:.d-l ,-ar ,T,,:.:i,:,[.| I k AT'.' FW C
ar,,1 ".-,:,::.;| e ,m,,-,,J,- I ; hr,:,,..i C; E i : ,.l I l ,i:. ,, . ri : [ i , a ',: ,1-1 l-, H ,ii,- , i : , rd Jp:..:ri aj :, ,,, .-, i: I. r-..11 i n'-,, :, 2.rir, |:,irl.; pahn-i' . d, ' .- le I i


Strawberry Danish Tarts
Makes 24 tarts


5-3./ 4 cups all-purpose
1 / 3 cup sugar
1 envelope FLEISCHT
2 tablespoons ARGO cor
1 / 2 teaspoon grated lem,
1 teaspoon sal
1 cup milk
1 / 4 cup water
1 cup butter or ir
2 eggs, large
Strawberry Filling (recipe follow'v)
Powdered Sugar
In a large bowl, combine 2 cups flour, sug- round
ar, undissolved yeast, cornstarch, lemon place
peel, and salt. Heat milk, water, and butter minm
until very warm (120o to 130oF). Gradually Ba
add to flour mixture. Beat 2 minutes at medi- Stra
um speed of electric mixer, scraping bowl turn
occasionally: Add eggs and 1 cup flour; beat unti
2 minutes at high speed. Stir in remaining sheet
flour to make a stiff batter. Cover tightly ly w
with plastic wrap; refrigerate 2 to 24 hours. St
Remove dough from refrigerator; roll on bine
lightly floured surface to 1 / 4-inch thick- ries
ness. With a 3-inch cookie cutter, cut 24 cir- corn
cles; place on ungreased baking sheets. From corn
remaining dough, using a 3-inch doughnut to a
cutter, cut 24 circles and place on top of heat
., "&---


flour

MANN'S RapidRise Yeast
nstarch
on peel



margarine



ids., Cover; let rise in warm, draft-free
e until almost doubled in size, about 45
utes.
ake at 375o F for 10 minutes. Spoon
wberry Filling into center of tarts. Re-
,to oven; bake additional 5 minutes or
1 evenly golden. Remove from baking
;ts; cool on wire rack. Sprinkle generous-
'ith powdered sugar.
rawberry Filling: In a saucepan, com-
1 (10-ounce) package frozen strawber-
in heavy syrup, thawed and 1 tablespoon
starch. Cook over medium heat, stirring
stantly, until mixtures clears and comes
boil, about 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from
t; let cool.


NOT A SINGLE ONE OF THEM IN YOUR WALLET.


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*All packages lsted ncludone e 18-hole round a day and 2 nithis' stay at pre-sclccted hotels. 3 conscrutiv
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E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK


FRIDAY -FEBRUARY 25 2005


DtAr-<" M~-4 \


I






I I rILJr"lI, I I.-I--31lJ/-6IT Jl ..VZ)


-c Il p A
SNwm IFE Ns


..... . . . .


r~2'b


jjj:: .


I,


A -


; I


TICKET PRICES


Early Bird General Admission
iNo~i until larch 12. 20051
Advance General Admission


$60 piu.S ,

$75 plu. ..


(On sale March 13, 2005 - April 10, 2l1051


Gate General Admission
(On sale April 17, 2u05)


$85 pIls ui


Tickets Available at the
Spirit of Suwannee Music Park
(386) 364-1683
S&S Food Stores
Also available online at www.musicliveshere.com


Please call (386) 364-1683 for
VIP ticket & single day ticket prices
No pets


,~,. ~


..N^ ,


Artists subject lo change without notice. Show must go on rain or shine. No refunds.
Prices DO NOT include carr ping Please call Ihe park office to reserve camping sites early!
..... --- T'- T6 X
R p ,m% ,, , ,.. :#.',;,, ,-''-.,,,,, .
Z.., ,. . "


I I ' I


Also Featuring: ' '-
The Michael Stacey B~wd;
US Navy Band "Couttry Curreit"


,,Riding th the Legend


(386) 364-1683


Shyfa d
than U ymo~noversi y {fF, d FtOa l ) STORE


F~TF4 r7'*, TEms* FI


'16-"'


.1


6 V'- - - - -


A


J . 46


1(


PAGE 11C


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAPLIVE OAK


FRinAY FFRRt JARY 25 2005


PW7


;4mg
AW-5,





rPAGE 12C tj


GOOD CREDIT * BAD CREDIT * NO CREDIT


00 Pontiac Sunfire 03 Chevrolet Malibu
S/Mo, . /Mo.


/Mo.


01 Pontiac Grand Am
I5 3/Mo.


/Mo.


1"1 V


I
lIi


01 Mazda 626
20 900,


00 Toyota Camry
$3 Mo.


V~a


03 Chew Blazer
S 27400Mo


02 Ford Ranger
239%, /M


01 Ford Ranger XLT
421700,m


02 Ford Explorer
$30100/Mo,,


02 Nissan Frontie
XE Ext. Cab
^22600/Mo.


00 Olds lntrique
z~jo ks mo


03 Ford Escape
$27900/Mo.


04 Chevrolet Impala


S249


/Ivlo


S


02 Dodge Caravan
12 17 W UW
1941 West US Hwy 90


01 Chevrolet Venture
2495 ,-,
755-8909


Purchaser must pay sales tax, tag and title. All payments and prices quoted are plus tax, tag and title. Your credit may affect your final
payment and term. All prices quoted are strictly cash prices. All payments quoted are with approved credit.
'01 & '02 Models - 54 months @ 10% APR; '99 & '00 Models - 48 months @ 12% APR. '03 & '04 Models - 60 months @ 8% APR.
Must meet minimum income & job time requirements. 14710


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WE FINANCE


03 Ford Taurus
1 6900/Mo


04 Pontiac Grand Am 00 Saturn 4 dr.
$0 Z$0 $47000


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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


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