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Suwannee Democrat
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028422/00010
 Material Information
Title: Suwannee Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: J.E. Pound
Place of Publication: Live Oak Fla
Creation Date: February 4, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
weekly[ former <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
Coordinates: 30.294444 x -82.985833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note: Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000398954
oclc - 33273856
notis - ACE4563
lccn - sn 95026787
lccn - 95026788
oclc - 33273861
System ID: UF00028422:00010
 Related Items
Preceded by: Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by: Suwannee leader
Preceded by: Suwannee citizen

Full Text


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
SERIAL SECTION FL HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


Serving Suwannee County since 1884


Weekend Edition - February 4, 2005


120th YEAR, NO. 29


50 CENTS


Governor proposes increased support for rural counties

Proposal includes $119.7 million for new prison facilities in three rural counties including Suwannee
SGov. Jeb Bush and Lt. Gov. Toni Jennings were in Jasper last week "Many rural counties in Florida are not experiencing the same robust
I - to hold office hours and hear from citizens. economic growth as the rest of the state, which is why we must provide


7t.


"Mommy Laid

An Egg" still

topic of review

Susan K. Lamb
Democrat Managing Editor
A committee chosen last year to review a book
at the Suwannee River Regional Library (SRRL)
entitled "Mommy Laid An Egg" hopefully will
return its decision on the book soon.
A committee was appointed nearly a year ago
to review the book and return a decision on its
placement in the library. However, most of those
appointed declined to serve. When another group
accepted appointments to the committee and a
meeting was called, there weren't enough people
at the meeting to make that decision, according to
Suwannee County Coordinator Johnny Wooley.
Now, he said, another meeting will soon be held
and hopefully a decision can be made.
Meanwhile, the book remains on the shelves of
the library in the juvenile, nonfiction section
while'the review is being conducted, This process
has been ongoing since early 2004. ,., .
The issue came before th6 Suwannee County
Board of County Commissioners last year when
SRRL Director Danny Hales brought it to the
SEE MOMMY, PAGE 7A


After nearly 70 people visited with them between 8 a.m. and noon, a
press conference was held where Bush and Jennings announced a se-
ries of initiatives aimed at enhancing the commitment to Florida's eco-
nomically distressed rural counties and communities. While other
counties' budgets are experiencing rapid increases as property values
rise, rural counties, which are limited in their growth potential, often
have difficulty simply meeting basic needs, the Governor said. As part
of their policy and budget recommendations, Bush and Jennings are
proposing $301 million for small rural communities.
"Prosperity and opportunity are the hallmark of our state, and it is our
responsibility to ensure they are a reality for all Floridians," said Bush.


the assistance necessary for essential services and future growth," ne
said. "I am committed to our rural counties as they strive to meet the,
needs of their citizens."
"The proposed $301 million will assist fiscally constrained rural
communities meet critical needs for their residents, like building addi-
tional schools, infrastructure and health needs," Jennings said. "Gov.
Bush and I recognize the many challenges our small rural counties face
and are committed to providing significant support."
Bush and Jennings outlined their initiatives Jan. 28 in Jasper in


SEE GOVERNOR, PAGE 7A,


Step Up, Florida


Suwannee style

Physical activity promoted



, , . -.-





Have you already blown your NeW
Year's resolution? It's not too late to get
back on the band wagon. The entire state
of Florida is promoting physical activity.
during the month of February and en-
couraging residents to live a healthier
lifestyle.
Throughout February, all 67 counties
are participating in the 'Step Up Florida'
campaign. Locally county officials, dig-
nitaries and residents x ill be partaking in
this special e\ ent. Three US flags began
their journey Feb. 1 in separate directions
as each route was carefully planned and
the flags began their trip from county to
SEE STEP UP, PAGE 7A


Dairy Queen

installs new


driveway

Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
If you're like many of the
folks who have spoken to Dairy
Queen owner Roy Guercio,
you're wondering what all that
work on the access to Dairy
Queen's extra parking is all
about. Guercio said he has
heard many interesting theo-
ries. He even heard one that
said the county had bought the
property and was putting in a
new road. The truth of the road-
work is simple--Dairy Queen
has fixed up its driveway.
Guercio has wanted to fix up
the access to the extra parking
ldt for several years. He started
trying to accomplish what
seems like an easy project three
years ago. The first obstacle
was the law. There is a law that
says if a driveway hasn't been
used for over one year; the.
owner must start from scratch
with permitting for any im-
provements on that driveway.
Guercio had to work closely
with the Florida Department of

SEE DAIRY QUEEN, PAGE 2A


School district moving toward

new school contractor selection


Yvette Hannon
Democrat Reporter
During the regular monthly
meeting of the Suwannee


DAIRY QUEEN'S NEW PARKING LOT ACCESS! All these im-
provements, including changing the light at Eleventh Street, and
US 129 are just to make Dairy.Queen's extra parking more ac-.
cessible. The improvements were planned and implemented by
Dairy Queen owner Roy Guercio. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Boyd unveils landmark

bipartisan Social

Security reform bill


On, Feb. 1, Congressman
Allen Boyd (D-North Flori-
da), along with Congressman
'Jim Kolbe (R-AZ), intro-
duced the Bipartisan Retire-
ment Security Act (HR 440)
to preserve and sustain the
Social Security system. This


legislation is the only biparti-
san bill in Congress and mod-
ernizes the Social Security
program so that it can remain
beneficial for future retirees.
"I look forward to working


SEE BOYD, PAGE 3A


County School Board in Janu-
ary, Architects in Association
Rood & Zwick, Inc. advised
the district it is not too early to
begin the process of searching
for construction firms for the


construction of the new ele-
mentary school in Live Oak
and additional classrooms at
Branford Elementary School.

SEE SCHOOL, PAGE 3A


THE ART OF JUDGING CHILI: The Suwannee County Museum Association held its second Chili
Challenge on Saturday, Jan. 29, on the loading dock of the old Atlantic Coastline Freight Depot. This
year there were three classes in the competition as restaurants and businesses, civic organizations
and individuals competed in separate classes. County Commission Chairman Billy Maxwell, left, City
Administrator Matt Brock and former culinary arts teacher Naomi Hart partake in a blind judging of
chili entries during the Chili Challenge. Proceeds from the event go to support the Suwannee Coun-
ty Historical Museum. - Photo:Yvette Hannon


STo see why it makes sense to get ready for retirement now, call me today.
Keith Scott-- ,
I tIt


Representative
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC


Serving Individual Investors Since 1871
Call or stop by today.
306 South Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
(386) 364-3699 (800) 927-0734


TODAY'S
WEATHER


Sun and few passing clouds. High 640F. Winds N at 10 to 20
mph. For up to the minute weather information go to
� iw.nUadIII nUWIUUtdremI


INDEX
Classifieds ....................................1-3C
Church ..........................................7-9
Sports ............................................1-6
Suwannee Living ...... . . .................5A
Viewpoint ...................... ................. 4A
TV Guide............... ................ 10-11B
Legal Notices .. .......................3-4C


ARFA nD


FEATURED ON PAGE 5B

HATH~S B coOKIa


For Kids
12 &.Under


No Purchase Necessary
Must Present Coupon
Limit 1 Per Person
Good 2-4-05 Only


www.suwanneedemocrat.com


SUWANNEE
AMERICAN
CEMENT
TOURED:
Suwannee County
Commissioners
and area business
people recently
were invited for a
tour of Suwannee
American Cement
Plant in Branford.
The tour took
several hours
where the visitors
'.'ere able to see
how the plant
operates now that
it's online and
fully operational.
- Pholo George Petrena


Velma Dorothy Penn, 96, Dowling Park
Mary Anna Protsman, 61, Live Oak
Jewell Williams, 89, Live Oak
OBITUARIES ON PAGE 6A


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ON THE FLIPSIDE


HOW TO REACH US

Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, www.suwanneedemocrat.com
Mail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
* Publisher,
Myra Regan, ext. 122



CONTACT US WITH

YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, contact us by phone or
make contact through the
Internet through our web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com



NEWSROOM
* Managing Editor,
Susan K. Lamb, ext. 131
* Sports Reporter,
Janet Schrader-Seccafico, ext. 134
* Reporter,
Yvette Hannon, ext. 130
* Editorial Clerk,
Marsha Hitchcock, ext. 132



ADVERTISING
M Retail Advertising Manager,
Monja Robinson, ext. 105
* Advertising Representative,
Bill Regan, ext. 107
* Advertising Representative,.
Joel Turner, ext. 109
M Advertising Representative,
Kathy Sasser, ext. 160
* Classified Advertising Manager /
Telesales Ad Representative,
Myrtle Parnell, ext. 103
N Classified/Legal,
Louise Sheddan, ext. 102
* Classified/Legal,
Elizabeth Halloran, ext. 100


CIRCULATION
* Circulation Manager,
Angie Sparks, ext. 152
* CircUlatil n1'" fl ' .' 1 1 ,"' I.
Service Hours, M-F 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Subscription Rates,
In-county, $30 Out-of-county, $40



D umannri

Shmnmir+t


Serving Suwannee
County Since 1884


The Suwannee Democrat, published
Wednesday and Friday.
Periodicals postage paid at
Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located
at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
FL. Publication number 530180.

"POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL
32064' Annual subscription rate is
$30 in county, $40 out of county and
$40 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.

OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday - Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Letters, comments and opinions on
the Viewpoint & Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Suwannee Democrat.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters may be mailed, faxed or
e-mailed to our office. All letters are
read. Not all letters are published.
Letters may be edited to fit available
space. The editor should not alter the
writer's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
the point, an ideal range is 150 to
200 words. Please include your
name, address, and day and evening
phone numbers for verification.
Letters MUST be signed. Letters to
the Editor can be limited to one
letter per quarter per individual.


SPEAK OUT SUWANNEE
Call 386-208-8314. Comments to
Speak Out Suwannee MUST include
your name and day and evening
phone numbers for verification. We will
include your name with your
comment. Speak Out Suwannee
comments can be
limited to one comment .-
per quarter per individual.
Su'.ann.-erCuntn Parni '.
"The Or iginoal Fliriao ' )


BRIEFLY


The Isaacs will be in
concert at Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park
on Feb. 5
Gospel greats the 2005
Grammy nominated The
Isaacs will be in concert at the
Spirit of the Suwannee Music
Park, Live Oak at 7 p.m. on
Saturday, Feb. 5. Tickets at the
door are $10 with children six
and under free. Also appearing
are Diane Anders & Family.
For more info, call 386-364-
1683 or visit www.musi-
cliveshere.com.
Lady of the Lake
Quilters' Guild to exhibit
quilts at the Columbia
County Library, Lake City
Now thru Feb. 21
Attention: Quilters and
Lover of Quilts! The members
of the Lady of the Lake Quil-
ters' Guild will exhibit some
their quilts at the Columbia
County Library, 308 NW Co-
lumbia Avenue, Lake City
from Jan. 26 until Feb. 21.
Come by for a visual treat!
Buy tickets now!
Turkey Federation Banquet
to be held Feb. 26
The Suwannee River
LONGBEARDS Chapter of
the National Wild Turkey Fed-
eration (NWTF) will hold its
annual Hunting Heritage
Fund-raiser Banquet on Feb.
26 at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds in Lake City.
Doors will open at 6 p.m. and
dinner will be served at 7 p.m.
Please contact Todd Kennon at
386-755-1334 or Tom Kennon
at 386-362-6353. The banquet
will include over 15 guns, art-
work, turkey calls and turkey
theme furniture. Revenues
from the banquet will finance
projects at the local, state and
federal level. ifij iTjkie -,
$55; Couples Ticket - $90;
Jakes Ticket - $20; Sponsor,
Ticket - $275; Sponsor Cou-
ples Ticket - $300. Tickets can
be purchased in advance or at
the door. There are advertising
opportunities for individuals
and businesses. We look for-
ward to seeing you at the ban-
quet. Please bring your spouse
and children as they are wel-
come.
Register now
Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley will hold volunteer
training in Jasper
Whether you like to work
with patients or "behind the
scenes," come and learn how
you can use your 'talents and
extra time to help those facing
a terminal illness. If you would
like to volunteer, please join


other volunteers for this 12-
hour training series from 1-4
p.m. on Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday and Friday, Feb.-
14, 15, 16 and 18, at the Jasper
Public Library, 311 Hatley St.
NE, Jasper. Registration re-
quired. To register or for more
info, contact Carolyn Long at
386-752-9191.
Register Now
Dog Obedience School at
Dowling Park begins
Feb. 15
A 10-week school in dog
obedience training will be held
at Rumph Pavilion at Camp
Suwannee at Dowling Park be-
ginning Feb. 15 at 5 p.m. The
cost is $20 for ACV members
and $23 for non-members. The
sessions are open to the public.
Register at Copeland Commu-
nity Center (CCC) on Marvin
Jones Blvd. or call 386-658-
5555. Upon registering, re-
quest an instruction sheet. The
instructor is Gloria Gram, a
certified dog trainer. David
Burch, CCC Director.
Fifth Annual Roast and
Toast set for Feb. 5,
The African American De-
velopment Council will hold
its Fifth Annual Roast and
Toast to honor four of Livel
Oak's finest at 6 p.m., on Sat-
urday, Feb. 5, at Sheryl's Noon
Buffet & Catering, Fifth
'Street, Live Oak. It will be a
night for the community rec-
ognize and thank four local
residents, Vinnie King, Cora
Owens, Clayton "Pete" Sneed
and P.L. Owens, for their dedi-
cation and contributions to the
community. Tickets are $15
each and are available from
Yvonne Scott, 386-362-2789,
the Rev. Tommie Jefferson,
386-647-5984 or Bill Leit-
head, 36-658-3359. -
Art show featuring woik's of
Lorraine Selbv at Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park Feb. 6
Portraiture and botanicals
artist Lorraine Selby will
showcase her work during a
one-day art show from 10
a.m.-5 p.m. on Feb. 6 in Craft
Square at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park,
White Springs located on US
41, three miles from 1-75 and
nine miles from I-10. For
more info, call Craft Square at
386-397-1920 or visit the web
site at www.stephenfosterc-
so.org.
Suwannee High School
Class of 1985 will hold
planning meeting Feb. 7
Suwannee High School
Class of 1985 will'hold a plan-


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ning meeting for its 20-year
reunion at 7 p.m. on Monday,
Feb. 7 at the Suwannee High
School Media Center in Live
'Oak.
Feb. 8
American Red Cross
will hold an Adult
CPR class in Lake City
The American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley will hold an
Adult CPR class from 6-10
p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 8, at their
office at 264 NE Hernando
Ave., Suite 102, Lake City.
For info and to register, call
386-752-0650.
Suwannee River
Water Management
District's governing board
will meet Feb. 8
Suwannee River Water
Management District's (Dis-
trict) governing board will
meet at 9 a.m. on Tuesday,
Feb. 8, at District headquar-
ters, SR 49 and US 90 East,
,Live Oak. The meeting is to
consider District business and
conduct public hearings on
regulatory and land acquisi-
tion matters. A workshop will
follow the governing board
meeting. All meetings, work-
shops and hearings are open to
the public.
Suwannee District
Schools will administer
Spring 2005 Assessments -
FCAT Writing Test
Feb. 8-10
' Suwannee District Schools
will administer Spring 2005
Assessments - FCAT Writing
Test - Feb. 8-10. FCAT is for
grades 3-10 (Grade 11-Adult
rETAKES). Each school has
~ore detailed testing informa-
tion available. Daily student
attendance is critical during
these assessment periods.
The Trialj or-Faith drama..
Swill be held at Adient
Christian Village on Feb. 11
The venerable Apostle Paul
will step out of history at 7
p.m. on Friday, Feb.. 11, and
onto the platform of Camp
Suwannee's Rumph Pavilion,
to re-enact his martyrdom and
bring a message to 21st Centu-
ry Christians. The moving dra-
mh will be performed by stu-
dents of Corinth Christian
School, Lake City Christian
Academy, and home schoolers
of Live Oak and Lake City.
The Academy of Arts of
Greenville, S.C. will direct the
student actors. Trials of Faith
is a Biblical drama of the
Apostle Paul and a young man
named Timothy. The story is
set against the backdrop of 1st
Century dangers and persecu-
tions. Tickets are $6.50 for
adults and $3.50 for students
and are now available from
student actors and also at The
ACV Cashier's Office, 386-
658-3333. Hurry to buy yours
while they last.


Arrest Record


Editor's note: The Suwan-
nee'Democrat prints the entire
arrest record each week. If
your name appears here and
you are later found not guilty
or the charges are dropped, we
will be happy to make note of
this in the newspaper when ju-
dicial proof is presented to us
by you or the authorities.
The following abbreviations
are used below:
SCSO-Suwannee County
Sheriffs Office
LOPD-Live Oak Police De-
partment.
FDLE-Florida Department
of Law Enforcement.
FHP-Florida Highway Pa-
trol.
DOT-Department of Trans-
portation
P and P-Probation and Pa-
role
Feb. 1, Eugene Anthony
Bates, 32, 14219 97th Road,
worthless checks - two counts,
possession of cocaine, posses-
sion of cannabis, giving
worthless check to obtain
property more than $150,
dealing in stolen property,
LOPD J. Rountree.
Feb. 1, Robert Brewer, 41,
1.4219 97th Road, obtaining
property for worthless check
more than $150, dealing in
stolen property, LOPD J.
Rountree.
Feb. 1, Jeffrey Scott Crow-
son, 18, Wellborn, possession
of less than 20 grams marijua-.
na, possession of drug para-
phernalia, SCSO R. Morris.
Feb. 1, Leroy Duval Jr., 41,
10570 128th St., remanded
awaiting sentencing, SCSO H.
Tucker.
Feb. 1, Kasey Elaine Hart,
18, Bell, petit theft, SCSO M.
Clark.
,.eb., 1l,Gregory James.Klir r
b., 1'Sl 36.8'CR 795, failure to,
appear ooh b1rigimtl charge of
possession of tobacco by mi-


no, - four counts, LOPD J.
Rountree.
Feb. 1, Michael Alan Ogles,
30, 10635 161st Road, driving
under the. influence, leaving
scene of crash, driving while
license suspended, FHP K.
Brookins.
Feb. 1, Merril Max Raper
Jr., 25, Wellborn, violation of
probation on original charges
of no valid drivers license, vi-
olation of injunction domestic
violence, SCSO T. Ford.
Feb. 1, Penny Ratliff-John-
son, 25, Lake City, failure to
appear/comply on original
charge of expired tag more
than six months, SCSO T. Lee,
Feb., 1, Lusiano Rivera, 23,
Branford, sentenced to 60
days in county jail, SCSO T.
Ford.
Feb. 1, Paul Timothy Wash-
ington, 41, Ocala, violation of
probation on original charge
of aggravated assault, posses-
sion of cocaine, SCSO S. Law.
Feb. 2, Juanita Harper
Albritton, 44, 5411 189th Rd.,
possession of cocaine para-
phernalia, purchase of co-
caine/conspiracy, LOPD D.
Slaughter.
Feb. 2, Delmar R. Barrett,
60, Wellborn, aggravated as-
sault with firearm, SCSO J.
Zimmerman.
Feb. 2, Joseph Timothy
Bass, 22, O'Brien, grand theft
(Lafayette County), P and P A.
Tolle.
Feb. 2, Daisy Mancilla, 22,
21569 76th St., failure to ap-
pear on original charge of pe-
tit/retail theft, SCSO D. Falgo-
ut.
Feb. 2, Robin Rebecca
Strickland, 43, 20314 68th
Street, purchase/possession of
cocaine, possession of cocaine
paraphernalia, introduction of
contraband, into a 'cofity d~i'
tentiop facility, LOPD D)
Slaughter.


Dairy Queen


Continued From Page 1A

Transportation (DOT) officials
in Lake City to get the changes
done. The changes to the drive-
way and the intersection are a
result of Guercio and DOT of-
ficials coming to an uneasy
agreement.
There is a new left-turn lane
adjacent to southbound US
129 at the intersection of
Eleventh Street and US 129.
Guercio had to put in three
lanes for his driveway. One
lane turns right, one lane goes
straight and one lane goes left.
Guercio paid for all of these
improvements. He also had to
put up the poles that stop traf-
fic from going straight into the
parking lot. This was to stop
people from driving straight
through the light and into the


lot accidentally.
The light at the intersection
of Eleventh Street and US 129
had to be changed, It now has a
left turn signal for the south-
bound lanes. And exiting the
parking lot, there is a signal.
Unless you're standing in the
parking lot, it's hard to notice
the new side of the light.
"In all fairness, the DOT's
main concern was for the wel-
fare of anyone driving through
the intersection," Guercio said.
Guercio wants to thank CTG
Engineering and Sam Carter
for the part they played in
making this project a success.

Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or by
e-mail at
janet.schrader @ gaflnews.com


on sale at



i Furniture 1052 SW Main Blvd.
SLake City
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I , - i -


- ?- I


PAGE 2A


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


L.1






PAGE 3A


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK
r I


Suwannee County



School board



meeting briefs


Yvette Hannon
Democrat Reporter

*The Suwannee County
school district has teamed up
with Valdosta State Universi-
ty and St. Leo University for
an 11 week program hosting
five interns for education.
These interns will work
along with a teacher in a vol-
unteer capacity to earn cred-
its towards furthering their
education. "In return, we can
learn some of the latest tech-
niques as we provide the
teacher, the students and the
environment," stated Suwan-
nee County School Superin-
tendent Walter Boatright.
*A three-week. exchange
student program will be of-
fered as a cultural exchange
with students from Wipper-
furth, Germany. Dawn
Lamb, principal at Suwannee
High School (SHS), is famil-
iar with this program and
participated in it while she
was principal in Mayo.
Fifteen students will come
to Suwannee County in the
fall of 2005 at no obligation
to the district. The exchange
students will stay with SHS
students and their families as
a cultural experience, living
in their homes and attending
the same classes for one
week.
During the second part of
the experience, the exchange
students will participate in
local field trips to Tallahas-
see and/or St. Augustine at
the expense of a bus and dri-
ver tothe, district. '"The field
trips will provide an histori-
cal'vieW'arid cultural experi-"
ences for the German stu-
dents about our area, state
and country," Boatright said.
In return, the SHS host stu-
dents will have the opportu-
nity in early summer of 2006
to travel to Wipperfurth,
Germany for the same cul-
tural exchange experience.
*Due to the growth in
technology the board has de-
cided the Information Tech-
nology Director position,
(formerly Network Manager)
and the Assistant Informa-
tion Technology Director,
(formerly Asst. Network
Manager), and the Informa-


Boyd
Continued From Page 1A

on this vital piece of legisla-
tion to save a program that has
helped so many Americans,"
said Congressman Boyd. "In
less than 15 years, Social Se-
curity will begin paying out
more money in benefits than
is being collected through
payroll tax revenues. Our
plan addresses the long term
shortfalls of Social Security
so that all Americans can have
a safe and secure retirement."
"Ignoring the problem is no
longer an option if this invalu-
able program will continue to
be beneficial for our children
and grandchildren," Boyd
stated. "Keeping Social Secu-
rity intact, for those who de-
pend on it today and in the fu-
ture, is a commitment I will
not ignore."
The Bipartisan Retiremient
Security Act is a comprehen-
sive plan that takes tlfe best of
both worlds by pr&erving the
basic benefit while also en-
couraging individual respon-
. sibfity. The plan provides a
' strong guaranteed benefit for
low income retirees and pro-
tects women, minorities and
the disabled from poverty.
The Bipartisan Retirement
Security Act also:
* Preserves existing bene-


fits for current and near-re-
tirees.
* Strengthens the govern-


tion Technology Technician
position will be combined.
The district will then hire two
technicians that will serve as
tech-workers in the school
system effective July 1. Boa-
tright stated, "We would like
to provide more technical as-
sistance and support to our
teachers."
Many of the district's posi-
tions and responsibilities
have been shifted around due
to school employees retiring
or leaving. Terry Garrett for-
mer Grant Writer/Title I di-
rector is now the new direc-
tor of education assessment.
Mel McMullin, is the new di-
rector of secondary educa-
tion replacing Shirley
Allbritton who retired in De-
cember. Garrett will continue
the responsibilities of the Ti-
tle 1 position and the board
will look for a new grant
writer.
"We are always looking for
ways we can better ourselves
while maintaining a cost sav-
ings to the district," Boa-
tright said.
*In keeping with the Flori-
da Statutes a bill was passed
in the last session of the leg-
islature to fingerprint all in-
struction, non instruction and
substitute school employees
every five years. According
to the superintendent, the
plan is to have teachers
whose certification expires
during the present year to
also be required to be re-fin-
gerprinted. Boatright esti-
mates one-fifth of the em-
ployees will be fingerprinted
each, year. over .the next. five
years and the cycle will be-'
gin 'agaif.' fIt Ii'ill 'be 'legs"
cumbersome and more logi-
cal to do it on five year cy-
cles since we have two dis-
tricts to contend with," Boa-
tright said.
*Boatright commended the
administration, faculty and
staff of Branford High
School for all their hard
work in addressing the seri-
ous concerns Branford has
faced lately. "I also want to
commend our board, admin-
istration and district person-
nel for all their support in
stepping up to the plate in
helping deal with the crisis
and start the healing




ment safety net for low-in-
come workers through a mini-
mum benefit provision.
* Provides individuals with
ownership of and control over
part of their retirement assets
through personal accounts.
* Does not increase payroll
tax rates.


process," Boatright said.
Chairman of the Board, Jer-
ry Taylor stated he is very,
very proud to be from
Suwannee County and the
state of Florida.
Taylor stated he was very,
very proud to be from
Suwannee County and from
the state of Florida and ap-
plauded the way staff and the
community has responded to
this unfortunate situation.
Boatright stated that a sev-
en member team headed up
by Peggy Kelly from NEFEC
(North East Florida Consor-
tium), would convene Jan.
31 - Feb. 2 for intensive
workshops on how to deal
with such a crisis The pur-
pose is for the team to work
with the students and also
help faculty receive ad-
vanced training using the
Gate Keeper Program.
Yanossy met with the princi-
pals of all the schools, facul-
ty, psychologists and social
workers at an in service held
Feb. 2 since it was an early
release day.
The in-service was to help
school personnel learn the
signs of suicidal tendencies
and students at risk of harm-
ing themselves, as well as
how to address the problem.
"We are excited about
them coming to address our
immediate needs. We hope
and anticipate that our dis-
trict will be better prepared
to help identify students with
suicidal tendencies," Boa-
tright said.
*With football coach Jay
�Walls accepting.a position in
Tifton Ga., it leaves a crucial
'vddariby" in Su'ainnee High
School's football department.
A search committee will be
put together, including a
member of the Quarterback
Club, school administration,
the administration district
and chaired by Suwannee
High Principal Dawn Lamb.
Boatright said the vacancy
will be posted this week and
applicants will be screened
sometime in mid-February.
Lamb and the committee will
make a recommendation to
the superintendent in March.
"We are proactive about the
situation and wish Coach
Walls well; and we are mov-
ing the process forward,"
Boatright said.





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MEGA MONEY ...... 9,24,28,44
LOTTO ........ 4,8,22,25,29,42


Lake City: 754-8302


Karin Todd newly employed


pharmacist at Cheek & Scott


Karin L. Todd, R.Ph. joins the staff at
Cheek & Scott Drugs, Inc. as a pharmacist.
She is a 1987 graduate of Suwannee High
School, received her associates degree from
the University of Florida in 1990 and her
bachelor's degree in pharmacy from the Uni-
versity of Florida in 1994.
Todd worked as a pharmacist for Rite Aid
from 1994 until 1997 when Rite Aid sold to
Eckerd's. She worked for Eckerd's/CVS from
1997 until 2005.
Todd has been married to Ron Todd for 16-
1/2 years, They have two children, Monika,
14, in the ninth grade at Suwannee .High
School and Alexis, 7, in the second grade at
Suwannee Primary School. Her parents are
Ed and Eveline Snipes of Luraville.
Todd stated, "I consider it a great honor to
be invited to join the "first class" team at
Cheek & Scott Pharmacy. I am committed to
my goal of providing excellent care and ser-
vice in this profession."


CHEEK AND SCOTT DRUGS, INC.: Pharmacist
Karin L. Todd, formerly with Eckerd's/CVS,
joins the staff of Cheek.& Scott Drugs, Inc. as
a pharmacist. - Photo: Monja Robinson


Suwannee County Animal
Services will hold open
house Feb. 5 from 8 a.m. un-
til 2 p.m. at 11150 144th
Street (old landfill road off
US 129) with free food, a
yard sale, a live radio remote
with Q98.1's Kickin' Kevin
from 10 a.m. until noon and
donated prizes!
You'll know you're there
when you head south on US
129 to the landfill road and
see a red flashing light at
144th and US 129 with
grand opening and yard sale
sign.
The public is invited and
encouraged to come .out and :
see the facility, check- out
the animals that are up for
adoption, meet members of
the governing board and reg-
ister to win a prize.
Among the prizes and
contributors are a carrier,
collar, pet toy, pig-ear leash
and flea comb donated by
Branford Pet Shop; Hoof-n-
Paw, seven collars, is donat-
ing 10 collars; an aquarium
and setup donated by
Ralph's Rainbow Birdland; a


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Live Oak: 362-3535
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halter and lead rope donated
by Huffman and Gilmore as
well as: donations from
Wal-Mart, Farmer's Furni-
ture and Publix and a silent
auction where local artists
have donated items;
*All Springs Veterinary
hospital - One free cat
neuter and one free dog
neuter
*Live Oak Animal Clinic -
Free neuter of a dog or cat
*Companion Animal Hos-
pital - $30 off a spay or
neuter of a dog or cat


*Suwannee Oaks Animal
Clinic - free cat spay
*Addison Animal Hospi-
tal of Lake City - Spay or
neuter of a dog or cat
*Mayo Town and Country
Animal Hospital - $30 off
spay or neuter of dog or cat
*You must meet criteria
for spay/neuter raffle
There will also be free kit-
tens and hamsters for adop-
tion while they last.
Your donations to the fa-
cility are tax deductible as it
is a 501(C)(3) charity.


Sc-hool ... '


Con'flnied"Ftom' Pag 1A

The district will begin the
process of advertising for bids
from the construction firms
immediately. The district is
also working with the legisla-
ture to seek funding for the
new school and added class-
rooms.
Once the deadline is closed,
the qualifications of the firms
and their bids will be re-


'viewed by the school, board at
a workshop. Three to five
firms will be reviewed and a
recommendation will be made
to Superintendent of Schools
Walter Boatright.
An additional construction
firm will be sought for small-
er minor projects, mostly at
the Douglass Center to in-
clude electric, sewer, roofing
infrastructure and technical
jobs.


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Current customers refer a friend and receive a
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email: service @ koonscomputer.com
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County animal services


to hold open house,


yard sale Saturday


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


ane...










VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


BIBLE VERSE

"This is how God showed His love
among us: He sent His one and only
Son into the world that we might live
through Him." --1 John 4:9


Suumanniee 3emarrat


MYRA C. REGAN
Publisher

SUSAN K. LAMB
Managing Editor


Members of the Suwannee
Democrat editorial board are Myra
C. Regan publisher, and Susan K.
Lamb, managing editor. Our
View is formed by that board


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Dear Editor,
Food Check-Out Day will be celebrated this year on Feb.
7 and to commemorate the date, 10 County Farm Bureau's
from north Florida will be donating over $1,000 in meat,
dairy products, and fruits and vegetables to the Tallahassee
Ronald McDonald House.
Food Check-Out Day, according to USDA statistics, is the
number of days that it takes the average American family to
work, in order to earn enough money to purchase groceries
for the entire year.
Tax Freedom Day is celebrated sometimes in April or May.
This date signifies the number of days that same American
family will have to work, in order to make enough money
just to pay for all their taxes, which includes local, state and
national.
It is a known fact that we have the safest and most abun-
dant food supply of any nation in the world. The only time
we have food shortages, is due to things like the hurricanes
our state experienced this past year.
But, the most important fact about agriculture is its afford-
ability. We Americans spend less of our income on feeding
our families, than any nation on the face of the earth. Food is
definitely a bargain in America, and that is something we all
need to be proud of!
Agriculture is the backbone of America.
SSincerely,
George Poucher, President
Suwannee County Farm Bureau

Dear Editor:
My wife and I moved from Stuart to Suwannee County
about seven months ago. We chose Suwannee County be-
cause we liked the small town atmosphere that we enjoyed
many years ago in Stuart. We just recently had need for some
medical attention and my wife started to call around Live
Oark and. Lak-eiCityuf6Y:'.a, family doctor for-,:us.~vWeiwre
amazed.that;.almost all the doctors in Live.Oak would not
take new patient or patients without insurance. They would
not take cash! We also found this fact to be true in the Lake
City area. We are a middle-aged couple who have worked in
our own business almost all our lives and as with most small
businesses we cannot afford, the $10,000 per year just for
health insurance. So all these years we have paid our own
way when it comes to health care. My wife became very
emotional because she could not find a doctor for me. Then
we called the Shands at Live Oak Hospital to see if they
could help us with our dilemma. The lady who spoke with
my wife was very cordial and helpful. She suggested we con-
tact the Shands Medical Group next to the hospital and con-
nected her with that group.
On Jan. 20 I had my first visit with the professionals at
Shands Medical Group. I also needed X-rays at the hospital.
These professionals were just that, PROFESSIONAL. I
would like to thank these people publicly for treating me and
my wife with the greatest dignity. The doctors in Live Oak
should take a day out of their self-centered schedules and go
to Shands Medical Group and learn how to treat honest peo-
ple who are only requesting medical help and will pay for the
same. Oh yes, we did pay cash (debit card) and we were glad
to do so.
Thank you Shands Medical Group and Shands at Live Oak
Hospital for your help.
Sincerely,
* Frank and Sherry Castellano


State Oficials


State Representative
(2-year terms)


State Senator
(4-year terms)


'4,
'':I


COMMENTARY


What an exciting time it is to be
working at City Hall, especially
with growth and economic devel-
opment matters. We are continu-
ously bombarded with inquiries


and requests concerning potential . -
economic development opportuni-
ties. Increased economic develop-
ment will provide much needed
jobs, housing and an expanded tax
base. The potential for growth right
now and in the near future is just BY SONNY
endless. I wish I could tell you
everything that I am privy to that could have a very impor-
tant and positive impact on our lifestyles. Who's out there
working, pushing, driving and supporting these efforts? Your
city and county governments are certainly there with sup-
port. The main player in much of this is your Suwannee
County Chamber of Commerce. You or I cannot do this as
individuals. Through the Chamber and the Council For
Progress our community has a unified voice and support sys-
tem in bringing these new jobs and business opportunities to
our community. It is time for our business community and
individuals to get on board with the Chamber and the Coun-
cil For Progress. Memberships and dues are so important to
these groups and their efforts. Without your monetary sup-
port, many things will go unattended and lacking. In last
week's Mayor's Corner, I informed you of the value of new
developments just within the city (in excess of $8.5 million)
over the last two years. It means new monies and relief for
you from higher taxes and fees. Your dues are not just dues.
This money is an investment in a brighter future for individ-
uals and businesses. Just one new $30,000 a year job, by the
time it rolls over several times in our economy, would have
enormous economic impact. Just think what hundreds of
these jobs can mean. This is not pie in the sky talk. The time
is right for us to take advantage of these opportunities. Just
last week, Chamber Director and Alliance President Dennis
Cason wanted to have a luncheon with some folks concern-
ing matters with multi-million dollar consequences for our
community. He said he did not know where the money would
come from to pay for the luncheon. This working meeting
was held and was extremely fruitful. There are other coun-
ties out there vying for these same developments and jobs.
We must be aggressive in order to capture them. The two or
three hundred dollar membership in the Chamber or a $700
membership in the Alliance is the best advertising dollars a
business can spend. Our community can continue to let oth-
ers get the goody, and we can take the leftovers, or we can
be aggressive and competitive to obtain our share. The key
to economic growth and a more abundant life for our folks is
through your membership and support of the Suwannee
County Chamber of Commerce and the Alliance for
Progress. You need them and they need you. By the way, the
city paid for that luncheon at the Chamber. That's the best
$70 we will ever spend!.


MAYOR'S

CORNER


I


I commend the Board of County
Commissioners for their more ag-
gressive attitude and spirit of coop-
eration in support of economic de-
velopment in our county. In a meet-


ing this week they made important
movement in that direction. There
Share hurdles that must be jumped and
our county government is making
strides to overcome them. It is im-
perative that the county and city
NOBLES governments work together to bring
about economic prosperity to our
area. Both governmental bodies now seem to be headed in
the same direction. A big THANK YOU goes out to our
Commissioners for their efforts in improving the living for
our residents.
Two events are in the works that will recognize and pro-
mote our community. We have been selected as a "Best of
America" location by the folks that do trail rides on horse-
back. The riders will be here on Feb. 21 and 22 for a ride at
the Spirit of the Suwannee. Time permitting, they will visit
schools and some of our civic groups. They will make a pre-
sentation to the city recognizing Live Oak as a "Best of
America" location. As the group travels, they will film a
documentary featuring "the most beautiful and scenic places
in America." The film will be aired on national TV begin-
ning in July. The production will promote tourism in the Best
of America's selected locations. The city has also been asked
by WCTV, Channel 6 of Tallahassee, to help celebrate their
50th anniversary. WCTV will highlight cities and counties in
their coverage area that have been vital to their success over
the years. These are great opportunities to showcase what we
have in our county. A committee has been formed to support
both of these opportunities to promote our community.
January was National Mentoring Month. It is a time set
aside to recognize volunteers for service to their communi-
ties. Suwannee County's Take Stock In Children program
sponsored by The Suwannee County Foundation for Excel-
lence In Education provides an opportunity for students to
attend college by providing scholarships to some 33 students
in Suwannee County. Each student is mentored by individu-
als from our community and meet with them weekly to pro-
vide guidance and direction. This is quite a commitment on
the mentor's part. I recognize and thank these mentors for
their concern and efforts. I also wanted to recognize John
Strayer of John's Lawn Equipment for sponsoring the stu-
dent/mentor Christmas Party. Foundation funds cannot be
used for these occasions. If you would be interested in being
a sponsor for a Take Stock In Children event, contact Nancy
Daniels at 364-2456.
Don't forget your "honey" and other loved ones on Valen-
tine's Day, Feb. 14. A special "I Love You" might work but
you may want to play it safe with a gift or outing. Be safe in
your Valentine's travel and make sure you wear those seat
bS'.


OPINION


Watch out for that 'whampus cat!'


Official symbolism runs rampant in America. It runs the
gamut from National Potato Week to Egg Nog Day and Na-
tional Hypnosis Week. We have official flowers, official birds,
official songs and official rocks. And if you run out of real
stuff to declare with officialism, you can just make some up
and keep right on trucking.
And that's what's going on in Wyoming right now. The
Wyoming House of Representatives has voted to make the
"jackalope" the state's "Official Mythical Creature."
The jackalope is supposed to be a cross between a jack rab-
bit and an antelope. In real life this is biologically impossible,
but back in 1939 taxidermist Doug Herrick screwed antelope
horns onto a stuffed jack rabbit as a joke and the legend was
born. The idea of the bill is to boost retail sales via tourism.
Now I don't have any problem with people making up yarns
about such things as the LockNess Monster or Bigfoot or even
a balanced national budget as long as they don't really expect
me to believe it.
You see I grew up in the time and place of "hog bears" and
"whampus cats." As a kid these mythical creatures were cre-
ated to scare us, or perhaps just to caution us to be careful
when we wandered off into the woods. They had no zoologi-
cal confirmation, but the old folks with a twinkle in their eyes
could describe them right down to their snarls, twisted toes
and shiny claws. It helped if the old folks were dipping snuff
and spitting the juice in the fireplace at the time. Spitting snuff
juice during an oration of this type is like putting an exclama-
tion point at the end of a sentence. You might even have called
it an "Official Spit" on a subject.
Of course, as we got a little older we knew these creatures
didn't exist except in yars around the fireplace on a cold
night. However that did not keep us from hunting them when
our city cousins came to visit. You can be really bold when
you're packing only a single-shot .22 rifle and hunting some-
thing that doesn't exist. You didn't have to worry about only
wounding one on first shot and it turning on you before you
could reload. But your city cousin didn't have to know that.
And besides, almost any track you found could be construed


as "Old Three Toes." I'm not
even sure how many toes a
"whampus cat" or a "hog bear" ..
were supposed to have. That's
the grand beauty of mythical
creatures.
But I take umbrage (I -"
promise this is the only big
word I will use in this com-
ment) when someone physical-
ly takes a previously alive ani-
mal and distorts its dead like-
ness into something like a
"jackalope." To me this is the
equivalent of natural blasphe- Dwain Walden
my approaching bestiality. It
mocks Mother Nature, and I would not be anywhere around it
without wearing rubber soled shoes. Tourism be damned.
And while most people will recognize the "jackalope" as
latter-day folk lore, there are bound to be a couple of drunks
in a tavern somewhere who will swear they saw one cross the
highway one dark night.
But then there are people today who say they have seen a
Bigfoot or a LockNess Monster. But even they have to match
their imaginations with the natural surroundings. What I mean
is, you wouldn't want to report a Loch Ness Monster in a
stream that goes dry at least once a year. And you couldn't sell
Bigfoot as an inhabitant of a 10-acre forest. Neither of these
instances would aid and abet the local chambers of commerce
or'tourism boards.
Now the "jackalope" bill must go to the Wyoming state Sen-
ate and likely it will pass because it's promoted as being "all
in good fun" which, if Wyoming is like some other state Leg-
islatures, might be hard to tell from the integrity of many oth-
er bills. I would not be surprised if the California Legislature
doesn't pass a law to prohibit the importation of "jackalopes."
(Dwain Walden is editor/publisher of the Moultrie (GA) Ob-
server, 229-985-4545, e-mail: dwain.walden@gaflnews.com)


Suwannee County Constitutional Officiers


Rep. Dwight Stansel (11th
Dist.. D-Wellborn)
208 North Ohio Ave., Live
Oak, Fla. 32064
1/386/362-2136
1/850/488-9835
E-mail:
stansel.dwight@ leg.state.fl.us


State Sen. Nancy Argenziano
(R) Crystal River
6216 West Corporate Oaks Dr.
Crystal River, Fl 34429
Phone: 1/352/563-6003 or
Toll free 1/866/538-2831
E-mail:
nancy.argenziano.web@leg.state.fl.us


Please address letters to:
Letters To The Editor, Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Please include your name, full address and daytime
phone number. We ask this so we can varify your letter
and discuss any questions about it with you.


Sheriff
Tony Cameron
362-2222


Clerk of Court
Kenneth Dasher
362-0500


Property Appraiser
Lamar Jenkins
362-1385


Tax Collector
George Burham
364-3414


Supervisor of Elections
Glenda Williams
362-2616


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 4A


I��,\;:
:�,






FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 5A






UWANNEE LIVING

I --O O. 1.1 1 ri P2 I


Here's a peek at what's in-
side the Friday, Feb. 4, Amer-
ican Profile, which is a bonus
newsmagazine in each week-
end edition of the Suwannee
Democrat.
Cover Story: Richard "The
King" Petty has seen the sport
of stock car racing from every
vantage. Over his lifetime,
Petty has been in the driver's
seat and the spectator's seat,
he's watched NASCAR
evolve from a dirt-track hob-


along the Big
The Capital Area Chapter
of the American Red Cross
recently installed 50 hurri-
cane storm surge markers
along the coastline of
Franklin, Jefferson, Taylor
and Wakulla Counties. On the
heals of the 2004 Hurricane
Season this project was de-
signed to demonstrate to area
residents and visitors to our
area the threat that a Hurri-
cane has to the Big Bend Re-
gion.
"A Category Five storm on
a high tide can push a 22-foot
wall of water far inland along
some parts of the. Big Bend's
Coastline reaching event into
southern Leon County" said
Chris Floyd, American Red
Cross Capital Area Chapter
Emergency Services Director.
By installing these markers
the American Red Cross is
working to demonstrate just
how severe a hurricane storm
surge could be.






Are We There Yet? (PG) 1:4014:2517:1519:40
The Aviator(PG-13) 1:10 14:4518:30
Boogeyman (PG-13) 1:4514:1517:201 9:45
Coach Carter (PG-13) 1:0014:0517:10110:10
Finding Neverland (PG) 7:0019:35
Hide and Seek (R) 1:3014:3017:30110:00
Racing Stripes (PG) 1:2014:20
139774-P


Profile
by into a multi-billion dol-
i lar industry, and he's expe-
rienced triumph and
Tragedy on the track. At 67,
King Richard still loves the
sport, remains a devoted
fan, and continues to spon-
sor drivers and build race-
cars as owner of Petty En-
terprises in Level Cross, N.C.
Hometown Hero: Artist
Bill Covitz, 35, of Cheshire,
Conn.,
(pop .
28,543)
carves ice for a living. Covitz,
the 2004 winner of the Na-
tional Ice Carving Champi-
onship, can sculpt a 200 block
of ice into a frozen master-
piece that eventually melts.
Made In America: Five
generations of the Bishop
family have had their hands


Florida Department ot Health awards Suwannee Uounty

an Emergency Medical Services grant for $9,737

- Grant to enhance local EMS service -


The Florida Department of
Health (DOH) recently an-
nounced the awarding of
Emergency Medical Services
(EMS) grants totaling
$1,479,333 to the following
counties: Alachua, Baker,
Bradford, Collier, Escambia,
Hendry, Highlands, Hillsbor-
ough, Jefferson, Liberty,
Madison, Okaloosa, Okee-
chobee, Orange, Pasco, St.
Johns, Suwannee, Taylor, Vo-
lusia and Walton. The grants


readers!
in the Oregon woolen manu-
facturing business since C.P.
Bishop married the daughter
of English weaver Thomas
Kay in 1863. Today, Portland-
based Pendleton Woolen
Mills owns and operates nine
manufacturing and distribu-
tion facilities and 53 retail
shops across the nation.
Finances: The five biggest
mistakes people make filing



their tax returns.
Recipes: A Nebraska read-
er shares the recipes for Ger-
man Chocolate Pie which she
has made for 36 years. Fami-
ly and friends all.love it. Her
daughter even wants this pie
for her birthday instead of
cake.


Bend's coastline
For additional infonmatio n lowing web site:
on the Hurricane Storm Surge http://www.tallytown.com/
Markers please visit the fol- redcross/ssm.html

Buy tickets now!

Suwannee County Cattlemen's

Association Heifer Raffle


Suwannee County Cattle-
men's Association Heifer
Raffle prizes: First Prize -
$500 or Beef Heifer; Second
and Third Prize - one hind
quarter each; Fourth and Fifth
Prize - one front quarter each.
Show steer cut and wrapped
by Mobley's Custom Cuts,


Inc. Additional gift certifi-
cates from Publix and Wal-
Mart. Drawing will be held
the night of the Youth Beef
Heifer Show at the Suwannee
County Fair in March. Tickets
$1 each. Proceeds support
Beef Heifer Show. You do not
have to be present to win.


Golf Insider
- PAGE 7C





Missing Male Border Collie.
Mostly black with some
white and short hair.
Answers to Sam last seen
1/28/05 12 miles down
Hughs Hwy. off Hwy. 51.
No questions asked.
Call James Woods

(386) 776-2766li. ,,


%* m"t9 memau 4o




Feb. 3. 1985 - Dec. 5. 2002

Another Christmas, another new
year and now another birthday.

They will never be the same
without you here.

\,e miss 'you so mnuch.
Our tears come and go but that
ache in our hearts remain.

Love,
Moms & Pops


Marriage applications for

Jan. 1 -Jan. 31, 2005
Earl Allen Moore and Wendy Ann Lolley
Clark Grantham Fitzgerald and Meghan Emily Avery
Robert Earl Suber and Micheal Lynn Sexton
Scot Anthony Dryer and Robbie Suzanne Burris
Larry Lee Owens and Louise Wilson Daniels
Wayne Doyan Michael and Linda Diane Greene
Jerome Glen Johnson and Nicole Brandie Marie Brunelle
Amiel Anthony Montemurro and Jamie Elaine Phelps
Carl Wayne Mendheim and Nancy Victoria Mendheim
Jeffery Benjamin Turner and Amanda Nicole Stevens
Andrew Hamilton McGee and Jennifer Earlene Bailey
'Wayne Anthonie Clark and Kathy Lynn Durant
John Terrell Simpson Jr. and Angeleque Fulton
Wesley Densel Durrance and Elizabeth Fortin
Gary Lee Berger Sr. and Lisa Lynn Corbin


munities are created."
These grants were made
possible through the EMS
County Grant Program, au-
thorized by Chapter 401, Part
II, Florida Statutes and fund-
ed by the Legislature annual-
ly. Funds for the program
are generated from a sur-
charge on fines for major
traffic violations.
All 67 counties are eligible
to participate. Applications
for the current grant cycle,
Oct. 1, 2004 to Sept. 30,
2005, will be accepted until
Jan. 28.
Funds must be used to en-
hance and improve EMS and


can include: upgrading com-
munication systems; pur-
chasing ambulance or rescue
vehicles; providing training
to EMS personnel and first
responders; purchasing med-
ical equipment and supplies,
addressing needs for re-
sponding to mass casualty
incidents, and purchasing
computer software and com-
puters for patient records.
For more information on
these grants, visit the DOH
website at
www.doh.state.fl.us, and
choose "emergency medical
services" from the subject
list.


Mark Newton Band to perform at Music Park


.-..... -.....


Band will teach at Kid's
Evening Music Camp also
Mark Newton may not have
been a household name to fans
of roots/acoustic music a few
years ago, but the release of
his first solo CD in 1998, Liv-
ing a Dream, and its subse-
quent success, went a long
way toward "re-introducing"
this bluegrass veteran to the
public. Originally from Paduc-
ah, Ky., Mark Newton was


born into a musical family.
Mark's father played man-
dolin, guitar and fiddle and his
mother was an accomplished
pianist, so it was no surprise
that Mark took to music as
well, first appearing on stage
at the age of fourteen. The
family moved to Fredericks-
burg, Va. in 1960 where Mark
was lucky enough to grow up
surrounded by a culture rich in
music. The DC area of Vir-
ginia in the mid-60's was a


booming scene for festivals,
and Mark took advantage of
this, traveling every weekend
to take in shows.
The Mark Newton Band
will be guest teachers at the
Kid's Evening Music Camp
Feb. 21, 22, 23. Enroll your
children FREE under age 16
call the park's office. Enjoy
The Mark Newton Band on
Thursday, Feb. 24, 2005 at the
Spirit of the Suwannee Music
Park 386-364-1683.


We want your stories!
Want to become a published author? Think you have the talent? Read on...


We know you have some
wonderful stories - stories
l., d it c 'Old ays, stop s:
about the day your life!
changed forever, stories about
your own unsung hero or hero-
ine, people who do good for
others and are never recog-
nized. Would you like to share
your favorite story with the
Suwannee Democrat readers?
If you do, people will come up
to you and say, "I didn't know
you were a writer!" You'll
beam with pride and feel real-
ly good inside. However, you
won't be any richer because
we can't offer payment for the
story. Your name as the byline
is all the glory we can offer.
It's easy to become a "pub-
lished author." Sit down and
write your story of about 500
words about the old days, the
way things were, the day your


DERMATOLOGY

zU date

IVY
Benefy, MD.

Dermatologist
BoardC certified .'


ADDICTED TO TANNING?
Those who find it difficult to keep
out of tanning salons may have a
dangerous habit. According to new
research, "ultraviolet light addiction"
involves habitual patronage of tanning
parlors for the purpose of boosting
mood. Experts speculate that
endorphins ("feel-good" chemicals
released in the brain during exercise)
may be released when the body is
exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light.
Previous laboratory studies have
shown endorphin release with UV
light exposure. - This finding is
confirmed with human subjects'
preference for tanning lights that emit
UV rays over placebo lights. The
problem is the UV radiation induces
mutations, some of which lead to skin
cancer. Exposure to radiation from a
tanning booth may be even more risky
than exposure to natural sunlight.
Over time, the effects of too much
UV exposure can lead to eye
damage, changes in your immune
system, cataracts, wrinkles and
premature aging of the skin, and skin
cancer. A safe alternative to tanning
salons is to use a bronzing spray or
lotion. A dermatologist is an excellent
resource for further
recommendations. To schedule an
appointment, contact GAINESVILLE
DERMATOLOGY & SKIN SURGERY.
We are conveniently located at 114
N.W. 76th Drive. New patients are
gladly accepted.


life changed, your most em-
barrassing moment, when you
Fell ini,6v.e,piyou~" unsung hero
',r heroine,. or a 'historical,
event you witnessed. Send a
copy, (we won't return it) not
an original, to Reader Stories,
The Suwannee Democrat, P.O.
Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064,
attention Susan K. Lamb. You
may e-mail it to Lamb at su-
san.lamb@gaflnews.com or


fax it to her at 386-364-5578.
If we accept your story,
Swe'llunTh apicthred o'f you with
Sit. Send us a picture, or come
down to the Democrat and
we'll take one of you. What
we can offer is a chance to
share your story with thou-
sands of readers. We don't
guarantee we'll run your story
and the decision is not nego-
tiable.


Fv6Irvi


Is


i'4 All goat show
exhibitors for the
* Suwannee County
Fair, there will be
Sa mandatory
meeting February 7
at 7 p.m. in the
coliseum.
For more
information please
call 362-7366.
138919DH-F


will assist in the purchase of
equipment and supplies to
enhance and improve EMS
in local communities.
Suwannee County receive-
da grant in the amount of
$9,737 for paramedic train-
ing for staff emergency man-
agement team and staff para-
medics.
"These grants encourage
an investment in Florida's
public health structure," said
DOH Secretary John O. Ag-
wunobi, M.D., M.B.A.,
M.P.H. "By receiving grant
funds, development of ser-
vices essential to the health
and well-being of our com-


rAttention American


Hurricane storm surge markers installed


Pt


Happy Birthday Honey
In Loving Memory of W.A. Green
February 5, 1937 - January 17, 2005
Honey, on February 5th, you would .,,
have turned 68, just 19 more days v. :.i ; '''
all we had to wait. Kathy, Cindy and ''
I, was planning in our heads what e v
can do to make this birthday special i! '''
for my husband and their dad!
Granddaughter Michelle, who A as
also born on this date always shared
your birthday with you and could
hardly wait, and even though now , ou
won't be here we know you would
say, Michelle, I'm counting on yo:.j i.:
still carry on for Papa loves you arid i.neds, -.l1. i, celehbrjite .,.,ur dJa,
because it's very special now and al; , a,
Because God had another kind of' .elcbr:L,'ijri planned \.. 3', ahead.
he planned to take me to Heaven irintad \\ hii .i :h:'.rloui elebral.'n
he has planned for me, the best birrhda,, present oinli he could gine
me. A brand new body with no more pain Ino\. I ni iunriinii and
jumping and praising God's name' Reuniied nIih 1al ni., h1Ied ones
gone on ahead and sharing my birtihda.l.i nh itihci inr icad
Leaving behind the ones I 1.?ed. .o d1e., 11 ., hcl'l..ed 'li'e.
children, grand & great grandchildren. l.;...iliei ;'ieir .. neigihbor jnd
all my dear friends.
I'm extending an invitation to all .. hen Go.d caill ',ou hli-miii It be
with me again to celebrate our homecon.'ingri iii. Ic Jsu.i and I.o 1 ll
my family and friends.
This will be the best birthday pieleit each .." .,ou n riCr e I,', miie.
to be ready when Jesus calls. So Ih.-in il,;e.i. .nd be ie.d', and
don't miss the boat because the Ri\-i of l-, I.-, l ,, ilie diiecLi.': n i.,
float. I'll be here fishing and prais'n( C.:.d' II name until I ,ee each o1
you and are with you again.
We Lo'.e .ind Mh.,- \.>iu.
Your 1, ring 'i tle .ind cliididen.
grand & gie.ii i.,indcliildien
1 '


..,...,~,~,,.,..


'-,"- .


A n�
�'*





�: '- i, i
.. . .'



1 ,2- - .


. .. ":'7 *, &*' *,







FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


P-AE 6A U S


OBITUARIES


LaVera Benefield
Sept. 24, 1909 -
Feb. 2, 2005

aVera Benefield, 95,
of Live Oak, passed
away on Wednesday,
Feb. 2, 2005 in the Surrey Place
Nursing Center in Live Oak, af-
ter a short illness. The Suwan-
nee County native moved to
Live Oak from Columbus, Ga.
in 1965, was a homemaker and
a member of Orange Baptist
Church, Live Oak.
Survivors include two
daughters, Betty (J.H.) Brown
of Live Oak and Jo Ann
(Harold) Baker of Buford, Ga.;
four grandchildren, Dennis
Brown, Pam (Frank) Nobles,
Sandy Pugh and Suzanne Bak-
er; six great-grandchildren, Ali-
cia Pugh, Tara (Luke) Warner,
Krystyna Nobles, Matthew
Baker, Alex Nobles and Jordyn
Baker; and many nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 10 a.m., today, Friday,
Feb. 4, at Orange Baptist
Church with the Rev. J.H.
Brown, Clarence Parker and the
Rev. Morgan Campbell offici-
ating. Interment will follow in
the church cemetery.
Daniels Funeral Home of
Live Oak is in charge of all
arrangements.

Mary Anna Protsman
May 28, 1943 -
Jan. 25, 2005

ary Anna Protsman,
61, of Live Oak,
passed away on Tues-


day, Jan. 25, in her home.
The Melbourne native was a
teacher, a graduate of Suwan-
nee High School and Florida
State University where she
received her bachelor's de-
gree and graduated from
Ohio State University where
she received her master's de-
gree. She was of Presbyterian
faith.
Survivors include her fa-
ther, Norman O. (Lee) Prots-
man of Live Oak and her
mother, Faith Protsman of
Dowling Park.
Memorial services will be
conducted at 3 p.m., today,
Friday, Feb. 4, at the First
Presbyterian Church in Live
Oak with the Rev. Pedro
Rivera officiating.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily requests donations be
made to the First Presbyter-
ian Church of Live Oak or
the Advent Christian Village
at Dowling Park.
Daniels Funeral Home of
Live Oak is in charge of all
arrangements.

Jewell Williams
Sept. 13, 1915 -
Jan.31,2005

Sewell Williams, 89,
of Live Oak, passed
away on Monday,
Jan. 31, 2005, in Baptist Hos-
pital, Pensacola, after a brief
illness. The Wellborn native
was a homemaker and a
member of Westwood Baptist
Church, Live Oak.
Survivors include her son,
Winston "Hambone" (Bobbi)


Prce godFeriai 41, 200


Now Accepting Credit, Debit and EBT Cards
Locally Owned & Operated
By Ray Hayes .5
Conveniently located Corner
of Hwy. 90 & Walker Ave. 6 4r5 2 4
Open until 2 p.m. on Saturdays 14 3JRS-F


Williams ofApopka; her son-
in-law, Clint Downing of
Live Oak; her sister, Gradie
Lee of Lake City; grandchil-
dren, Kim and David
Seckinger of Pensalcoa, War-
rren and Tracie Williams of
Ocoee, Chad and Jo Marie
Williams of Denham Springs,
La.; grandson-in-law, John
Hollie of Live Oak; great-
grandchildren, Brandon and
Brittany Hollie, David
Seckinger III and Justin
Seckinger, Jordon, Jessica,
Jenna and Sarah Williams;
and great-granddaughter
Kiersten Williams.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, W.E. "Dub"
Williams and daughter, Nor-
ma Jean Downing and grand-
daughter, Rhonda Hollie.
Funeral services will be
conducted at 1 p.m. today,
Friday, Feb. 4, at Westwood
Baptist Church, Live Oak
with Dr. Charles D. Fouraker
and Dr. Jimmy Deas officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in
Mt. Pisgah Baptist Church
Cemetery, Live Oak.
Daniels Funeral Home of
Live Oak is in charge of all
arrangements.


DEATH

NOTICES

Velma Dorothy Penn
March 19, 1908 -
Jan.28,2005

elma Dorothy Penn,
96, of Dowling Park,
passed away on Jan.
28, 2005. She is survived by
her husband Carl and son,
Charles Penn.
Daniels Funeral Home of
Live Oak was in charge of all
arrangements.

Odelya Kelly
Jan. 27, 1918 -
Feb. 2, 2005

''/ delya Kelly, 87, of
S Branford, passed
away on Wednes-
day, Feb. 2, 2005. Services
will be held at 11 a.m. on Sat-
urday, Feb. 5, in Branford
Church of God.
Daniels Funeral Home of
Branford is in charge of all
arrangements.


Everyone is invited to the first Suwannee

County United Way Auction


United WaU
United Way of Suwannee
Valley will hold its first
Suwannee County United
Way Auction on Friday, Feb.
18. The event will be held at
the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park. Viewing of the


items available for auction,
along with a silent auction,
begin at 5:30 p.m. The live
auction begins at 6:30 p.m.
John W. Hill will serve as the
auctioneer.
Don Miller,' known to
many through his perfor-
mance of bluegrass music on
Power Country 102, will pro-
vide entertainment prior to
the live auction.


All businesses, agencies
and individuals are invited to
donate new or used items in
good condition for the auc-
tion, and all are invited to at-
tend the auction. Contact
Monja Robinson, Suwannee
County Auction chair at 386-
362-1734 or United Way of
Suwannee Valley, 386-752-
5604, for additional informa-
tion or to donate an item.


Donations needed for Pregnancy Crisis

Center yard sale scheduled for May


The Pregnancy Crisis Cen-
ter staff are beginning prepara-
tions for its annual yard sale to
be held on May 13.
They are now accepting do-
nations of good, clean quality






Tlhe -oundaiinLn fi Fd-
ucation1 v,.ould like to
thank John's Lawn Equip-
inent toil ponsoring the
2U004 -ike Stock in Chil-
die, C'l-rirmna Luncheon
Thank . iu toi r supporting
education' John's Latn
Equipment i- located at
162Q Norli Ohio \Ave


household items and clothing.
Items may be dropped off at
the Center's location at 212
Piedmont St., or for more in-
formation call 386-330-2229.
The Pregnancy Crisis Cen-


ter is a non-profit organization
operating 100 percent on pri-
vate donations, serving the
needs of over 1,000 women
and babies in crisis situations
alone last year.


Order Now!

Live Oak Garden Club Caladium sale cooling up


Live Oak Garden Club mem-
bers are taking orders for No. 1
Caladium bulbs to be delivered
in mid-March. Choose reds,
pinks, whites or a mix of all
three. All have green edges. Ten
bulbs for $5 to be paid as the
caladiums are picked up. Mem-
bers will be taking orders until
Feb. 14. Don't take a chance on
forgetting. Place your order to-


day by contacting any Garden
Club member or call Sheryl
Kirby at 386-364-4586. You'll
be glad you did!! Gardening
Tip: If you plant your bulbs in
stages it lengthens the colorful
display time. Plant some in late
April and May. Hold some out
to plant in late June to maintain
a fresh colorful display in your
garden into the fall months.


Frozen pipes: the winter water menace

- Take two minutes to prevent weeks of agony -


As cold air moves toward
Florida it's a good time to re-
member that each year, 10s
of thousands of families are
victims of a preventable dis-
aster - frozen pipes. This de-
bacle does millions of dol-
lars of damage to homes
each year.
With just a few simple pre-
cautions, thousands of
horneo,'. )c,r , , ill b ,b e t
prevent thousands of dollars
in damage and untold mental
stress this winter from dam-
age caused by water pipes
freezing and bursting.
"Every winter, homeown-
ers have the most control
over whether life goes on as
normal or whether they face
the chore of cleaning up


when a frozen, burst pipe
sends water cascading into
their house," said Otis
Black, loss mitigation chair-
man for State Farm Florida
Insurance Company.
Even a one-eighth-inch
(three millimeter) crack in a
pipe can send more than 250
gallons (946 liters) of water
cascading onto your carpets,
furnjiit le and personalna, be-
longings in one day.
As winter sets in and tem-
peratures dip below 20 de-
grees Fahrenheit (minus six
degrees Celsius), water pipes
in homes without adequate
insulation may freeze and
break. Homes in warmer cli-
mates are typically at great-
est risk because pipes are of-


ten not well insulated in
crawl spaces and attics.
Since uninsulated pipes are
the most.vulnerable to cold
temperatures, homeowners
can prevent damage caused
by frozen pipes by wrapping
exposed pipes with insula-
tion.
Other tips for preventing
your pipes from freezing are:
1. Let the hot and cold
,faucets drip overnight and,.
open cabinet doors to allow
heat to get to uninsulated
pipes under sinks on exterior
walls.
2. Insulate pipes in your
home's crawl space or attic.
3. Seal leaks that allow
cold air inside. Look for air
leaks around electrical
wiring, dryer vents and
pipes. Disconnect garden
hoses and, if practical, use an
indoor valve to shut off and
drain water from pipes lead-
ing to outside faucets
4. If you're going away for
an extended period of time, it
makes sense to shut off and
drain the water system. You
must be aware, however, that
if you have a fire protection
sprinkler system in your
house, it will be deactivated
when the water is shut off.
For a free brochure that
includes additional tips for
preventing frozen pipes,
write: No Frozen Pipes, Pub-
lic Affairs Department NR,
State Farm Insurance, One
State Farm Plaza, Blooming-
ton, IL 61710. You can also
get these tips on the Web at
statefarm.com�.

School bus
drivers former
and retired are
invited to
retirement

celebration
All former and retired
Suwannee County ghbol. bus
drivers are invited to help ce-'
ebrate the retirement of Hugh
Mills and Diana Evans. The
event will be held at 6 p.m. on
Saturday, March 19 at Sh-
eryl's Buffet, 515 SW Fifth
Street, Live Oak. Dinners will
be $12.50 per person. Please
RSVP by March 12 to: Mari-
anne Wood - 386-364-3575;
Pete Sneed - 386-362-2122;
Joan Fewox - 386-776-2555;
Pat Bryant - 386-776-2231;
or Karen Willis - 386-395-
1317. Checks may be made
payable to: Suwannee County
Bus Driver's Club.


" 1 t Bd ' - . ...... . '"*' '





F- j- ' eb. 5 p
Sand
' i r ', ,/'


.. ....Feb 7 10 a.m.
' ' ' " . , ! , � , ,


Hwy 129 South, Live Oak * 364-4800
139083-F I



Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce
proudly presents

The 57th Annual Meeting and Installation
Banquet, Dinner and Entertainment
with Special Guest Speaker Luther Beauchamp,
Lawyer, Humorist and Author
.Thursday,

February 10, 2005
S' , 6:30 pm at the
SFirst Baptist Church,
.- Snlii 1Fir 1/i niS r


L'a't.IIy "V'JL yOLLJ
Building
$25.00 per person
RSVP by 2/7/2005
For More Information call
the Chamber at 362-3071
(table and guest speaker
sponsorships available)
137345DH-F


Now serving Suwannee and Columbia counties
Tank Set
120 Gal.Tank /(i@
Set & Filled
Only 1.29 gal. ,
We Run A Route System
OFFICE
(386) 792-1012
TOLL FREE (877) 203-2871
P 0 BOX 625, JASPER, FLORIDA 32052 , :.. - 1


. A-+',,.' ., ,


--


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 6A


gp ,,,







FRIAY.FERUAY , 205 SWANEEDEMCRA/LVE AKPAG 7


Governor
Continued From Page 1A

Hamilton County, which is one
of the 14 rural counties in the
third designated Rural Area of
Critical Economic Concern.
Suwannee County is one of
those 14 counties.
The Governor said his initia-
tives would provide additional,
targeted and flexible funding
assistance to those rural coun-
ties and communities in need
throughout the state. Joining
Bush and Jennings at the event
were Sen. Carey Baker, Rep.
Joe Pickens and Rep. Will
Kendrick, who represents
Hamilton County, as well as
Madison and other counties
westward.
The proposal includes:
* $15 million in new recur-
ring funds that would be dis-
tributed to fiscally constrained
counties on a formula basis to
be used by the counties to meet
their greatest needs.
* $9 million in additional
funds in recognition of the rel-
atively higher operating cost of
smaller school districts due to
sparse student population. This
brings total funding for educa-:
tion sparsity to $40 million, a
29 percent increase over the
current year. Rural counties
can use this funding for any ed-
ucation operating need.
* $55 million for construc-
tion of schools:
* $46 million in grants to
rural counties and small com-
munities for infrastructure,
needs such as transportation,
wastewater treatment and rural
infrastructure grants:
* $25 million for Small
County Road Assistance Pro-
gram (SCRAP)
* $5.3 million for Small
County Outreach Program
(SCOP)
* $13 million for Small
Community Wastewater Treat-
ment Grants, an increase of
$9.5 million or 271 percent
* $2.7 million for Rural In-
frastructure Grants, a $550,000
increase
* ' 5''mi';iron for commu-
nity assets, including:
* $1 million for a new rural
health development initiative
that would award grants to
fund capital improvements for
rural hospitals, county health
departments, Federally Quali-
fied Rural Health Centers and
other safety net providers
* $119..7 million for new
;prison facilities in three rural
counties (Suwannee, Columbia
and Wakulla)
* $5 millionto defer juvenile


Step Up


detention cost shift impacts in
fiscally constrained counties
* $19.3 million for rural
community development, li-
brary, recycling and environ-
mental grants.
* $10 million for statewide
projects, a 39 percent increase
from fiscal year 2004-05
* $6.5 million to continue
fiscal year 2004-05 funding of
solid waste management grants
(recycling grants) to small
counties
* $1.3 million to continue
fiscal year 2004-05 funding of
the Rural Community Devel-
opment Grants Program

For more information
on the Bush
Administration's
recommended budget
for the coming fiscal
year please visit,
www.myflorida.com

* $100,000 to continue fiscal
year 2004-05 funding of the
Community Libraries in Car-
ing Program
* $1 million to continue de-
velopment of the Suwannee
River Wilderness Trail
* $350,000 to continue fund-
ing the Small County Techni-
cal Assistance Program in the
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services.
Additionally the Florida De-
partment of Transportation has
a number of rural transporta-
tion projects scheduled within
the Rural Counties of Critical
Economic Concern in its Five-
Year Work Program totaling
$303 million for 2005. These
projects include:
* $2.3 million for the design
phase to widen a portion of US
17 in Desoto County from two
lanes to four lanes
* The beginning of a $5.3
million right-of-way purchase
to widen a portion of US 90 in
Columbia County
* $50 million for right-of-
way and construction on SR 20
Sin Putnam Coun. '
"I applaud Go, BuIsh and
Lt.. Gov. Jennings for their
commitment to our rural coun-
ties," said Sen, Baker, who is
co-sponsoring the legislation
in the Florida Senate. "From
devoting increased staff re-
sources to establishing a range
of funding and priority pro-
grams to address rural needs,
Gov. Bush and Lt. Gov. Jen-
nings have been clear leaders
and advocates for rural Flori-
da," Sen. Baker said. "I look


forward to working with them
and the rest of the Legislature
on this important bill."
Since 1999, rural counties
have experienced a substantial
increase in the number of eco-
nomic development projects
facilitated with state assis-
tance. Under the leadership of
Gov. Bush, the state has pro-
vided more than $62.6 million
in economic development as-
sistance and related programs
to rural communities-support-
ing more than 91 projects in 27
rural counties and communi-
ties, creating 8,930 jobs, and
infusing approximately $894
million in new capital invest-
ment. Comparatively, from
1995 to 1999, only 12 projects
in 8 rural counties were sup-
ported by the state resulting in
only 718 jobs and $53.6 mil-
lion of capital investment, ac-
cording to the Governor's of-
fice.
"Rural Florida should be
most appreciative of the fact
that we have a Governor with
the vision to recognize the spe-
cial needs of Florida's fiscally
constrained counties," Rep
Pickens said.
"These counties have
demonstrated a willingness to
do everything they can locally
and, frankly, the millages they
are levying to meet their own
needs proves that," Rep. Pick-
ens said. "I give my personal
thanks to Governor Bush for
his thoughtful attention to the
needs of rural Florida."
Most recently, on Dec. 2,
2004, Gov. Bush continued the
designation of an eight county
area in northwest Florida as a
Rural Area of Critical Eco-
nomic Concern. This area,
originally designated in 1999,
includes Calhoun, Franklin,
Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes, Jack-
son Liberty and Washington
counties.
In the re-designation, the
Governor included the city of
Freeport in Walton County.
The Governor cited the
progress that has been made in
the region during the firt five
years of designation but recog-
nized the significant chal-
lenges that still remain. Three
such areas have been designat-
ed since 1999. In addition to
the northwest Florida region,
Gov. Bush has also designated
areas in the south central and
north central part of the state.
For more information on the
Bush Administration's recom-
mended budget for the coming
fiscal year please visit,
www.myflorida.com.


Continued From Page 1A

county across the state. After
completing the three routes
covering north, central and
south Florida, the flags will
come together for a wrap up
celebration in Orlando at the
end of the month. Each county
is encouraged to be creative in
implementing their activities.
Suwannee County will par-
ticipate in the statewide initia-
tive Saturday Feb. 5. The
planned route will start from
US 51, near the Luraville store
where cyclists will transport
the flag from the Lafayette
County line to the First Federal
Sportsplex on Silas Drive
which is 18 miles. Anyone in-
terested in bicycling from Lu-
raville store must be at the
store at 7:30 a.m. for a safety
check and sign a consent form.


Cyclists will leave the store
promptly at 8 a.m. Any cyclist
wishing to participate must
wear a helmet. Cyclists and the
flag are expected to arrive at
the First Federal Sportsplex at
10 a.m. followed by a kick-off
ceremony with special guests
and a proclamation read by
County Commission Chairman
Billy Maxwell.
After the kick-off ceremony
participants wishing to partici-
pate in the walking portion of
the campaign will leave Silas
Avenue, take a left on Walker
Avenue, a right on Pinewood
Drive, and then a left on US
129. The Live Oak Police De-
partment will escort walkers to
the Wal-Mart parking lot,
which is four miles. Walkers
will be expected to stay on the
sidewalk on US 129 north. Re-
strooms and water will be


available at the Live Oak Fire
Department, which will be
used as a pit stop for the walk.
The Suwannee County Transit
trolley will be available to ush-
er participants back to the com-
plex once they have reached
the Wal-Mart parking lot. Once
the flag arrives at Wal-Mart the
Suwannee County Sheriff's
Posse will escort the flag to the
Hamilton County line.
Step Up Florida in Suwan-
nee County has been a com-
bined effort of the Department
of Health, Suwannee County
Sheriff's Office and Posse,
Live Oak Fire Department,
Suwannee Parks and Recre-
ation, Suwannee County Tran-
sit, Wal-Mart and Publix.
Put on your exercise suit and
sneakers and come out and join
your fellow citizens to Step Up
Suwannee County!


Mommy


Continued From Page 1A

board's attention. Hales said he
had a complaint about where
the book was placed. That com-
plaint came from Jennifer
Jemigan, who had found the
book while searching for infor-
mation to sharewith her child
while she and her husband
were expecting another child.
Once Jernigan read the book,
she wrote and asked that it be
removed from the juvenile,
nonfiction section. Hales de-
clined the request, saying it was
properly placed, and brought it
to the commission for further
instruction. The board sent the
matter to a book review com-
mittee for a decision.
In the book "Mommy Laid
An Egg," author/artist Babette
Cole explains how daddy's and
mommy's start a baby. The
book goes on to illustrate how
that might happen. The dia-
grams in the book are por-
trayed to be drawn by the chil-
dren (story characters) who are
trying to tell their parents they
know where babies come
from.
In reviews the book is said to
be written for children in
grades K-3 and is placed in the


Live Oak library where this
age child can retrieve it on
their own.
Hales said this week the
committee reports to the coun-


ty commission, not him, and-he
is not involved in the process.
When the committee makes a
recommendation, it will be to
the county commission.


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PAGE 7A


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005











"God and Country" and Cub Scouting


Al Plymel
Tiger Cub Den Leader, Pack 408
Cub Scouts have long been
an active part of the communi-
ties in which they live, and for
our local Pack 408, they are no
different. We live in an age
where we need to slow down
for a reflection of what's im-
portant. We are so fast-paced in
our progressive society that we
don't stop to remember those in
nursing homes who were so
much a part of yesterday's
life. The Cub Scouts did. On
Dec. 23, 2004, those Cub
Scouts of the Christian faith


within Pack 408 from Live
Oak, along with their parents,
grandparents, and siblings,
went to the Suwannee Health
Care nursing home and shared
part of their time with those
they had never met. Cub Scouts
from the pack met there and
sang songs of the season to
many of the guests and resi-
dents. They gave out handmade
greeting cards to the guests and
residents.
The Cub Scouts, many of
them only a young age of six or
seven, learned the real reason
for the season: The Christmas
Story of Christ being
bor. They also learned how to


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share that gift with others. They
only needed to take the time to
do a good deed or share a kind
word to share that gift.
God and Country are the
backbone of Scouting and
young Scouts taking a few mo-
ments to share with the ones in
nursing homes should make
both proud. I'm sure God was
pleased with young Scouts
singing Joy to the World, the
Lord has Come, as the spirits of
the elderly were lifted
high. Many smiles, hugs, and
handshakes were given as they
handed out the cards they
made. Our country should learn
and take pride, knowing that to-
morrow's leaders are being
built today through programs
such as Cub Scouts, for our
country was founded on the be-


lief that God would bless our
fledgling nation. As long as we
keep God first our country will
be blessed.
The Cub Scout dens have the
opportunity to meet weekly
during the school-year on
Thursday nights at the Live
Oak Church of Christ or at
some other convenient time at a
different location. The monthly
pack meeting is held on the
fourth Thursday night, 6:30-8
p.m. during which time the
dens perform skits and the
Scouts receive awards earned
during the previous month.
There are numerous pack activ-
ities during the school year,
e.g., hiking, picnics, camping,
bike trips, and camping! Sum-
mertime activities include two
or three pack activities. The


CUB SCOUTS GO CAROLING: Cub Scouts and parents get orga-
nized to sing for the residents at Suwannee Health Care.


TIGER CUB: A resident reads a Christmas card given to her by a
Tiger Cub.


Public Invited



February 18, 2005


SUnited Way of Suwannee Valley

yn First Anual Suwannee County Auction
# Auctioneer: John W. Hill, #AU2847

Auction Chair: Monja Robinson


Hosted by and held at
Spirit of the Suwannee

Entertainment will be provided by
Bluegrass Musician Don Miller


Preview and
Silent Auction
begins at 5:30 p.m.
Live Auction
begins at 6:30 p.m.


Quality items donated by individuals and businesses in
Suwannee County. We welcome your donated items.
Items available include an entertainment center from
Suwannee Emporium, W.B. Howland Gift Certificate,
Dinner for Two at the White Lake Yacht Club, and

a vehicle from Rountree-Moore
and MORE!

Come and join the fun.
To donate an item call United Way of
Suwannee Valley at 752-5604 or Monja Robinson,
Live Oak Publications, 362-1734 ext. 105


Cub Scouting activities involve
both the Scout and his
family. All family members are
welcome to participate in the
activities such as camping, bike
rides, car washes, etc.
While the a Tiger Cub (first
grader) must have his adult par-
ent/guardian with him during
den meetings, the older Scouts
(second - fifth graders) do
not. First through third graders
must have a parent/guardian
along for campouts. Fourth
and fifth graders (Webelos
scouts) may camp without a
parent/guardian. A Scout may
not sleep in a tent by himself,
nor with any adult that is not
his parent/guardian. He may
share a tent with other Cub
Scouts. For additional informa-
tion, visit the pack's web site


at: www.pack408.net, or con-
tact the Cubmaster, John Good,
386-362-3953, or by e-mail,
cubmaster@pack408.net.
Boy Scout Troop 693 meets
on Monday nights, 7- 8:30
p.m., at the Shriner's Club on
100th Street, just east of US
129 south. It is for boys 11 - 17
years old. It has monthly activ-
ities, mostly campouts. For ad-
ditional information, contact
the Scoutmaster, Harry Reeve,
at 386-776-2863, or via e-
mail, smtroop693@alltel.net.'
Venture Crew 693 is made
up of 14 - 18 years, coed, who
plan their own activities under
the direction of adult leader-
ship. For additional informa-
tion, contact Yvette Hannon,
386-362-2275, or Patty Roach,
386-963-4962.


CUB SCOUTS CAROLING AT SUWANNEE HEALTH CARE: Resi-
dents listen to the singing.


-REFRESHMENT FOR CUB
SCOUTS: Michael Hicks,
Matthew Ernst, Dylan Wilson
Enjoy refreshments after their
concert.
AFTER CONCERT REFRESH-
' MENTS FOR CUB SCOUTS:
Sq Damon Bonds, Patrick Kelley
and Hayden Plymel enjoy rL-
So;"ig freshments after their concert.
- Photos: Thomas R. Burnett






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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


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PAGE 9A


I F 4


BUSINESS


Uncle Sam


can make some

birthdays less taxing


As you go through life, your
,birthday may seem less impor-
tant. But for financial planning,
*tax or retirement reasons, your
,.birthday may be significant.
.Here's a list from the Florida In-
_stitute of Certified Public Ac-
countants (FICPA) to alert you
to those birthdays that change
your tax treatment and give you
.cause to celebrate.
_ DAY ONE - Shortly after
_your child is born, he or she will
need a Social Security number
in order to be claimed as a de-
pendent on your income tax re-
turn. A Social Security number
:also is required to open a bank
;account or buy savings bonds
"for a child.
AGE 14 - When your child
reaches age 14, the "kiddie tax"
disappears. Under the kiddie tax,
net unearned income exceeding
[a specific threshold ($1,600 for
2005) that is received by a child
under age 14 is taxed at the par-
rents' highest marginal tax rate.
At age 14 and older, income tax
is paid at the child's tax rate, re-
"gardless of its source or the
ani:'nt.
AGE 17 - If your child turns
�age 17 during 2005, you no
- longer can claim the child tax
credit ($1,000 for tax year 2005
in accordance with the Working
families Tax Relief Act of
2004). This also is the last year
&for contributions to a child's
Coverdell education savings ac-
;count, unless the beneficiary
qualifiess as a "special needs ben-
Lficiary."
SAGE 18 or 21 - Depending on
'the state in which you live, age
,18 or 21 is the age of majority,
which means your child can do
whatever he or she wants with
any money you have put into a
custodial account in his or her
name.
.AGE 30 - All funds in a
toverdell education savings ac-
'ount must be distributed to the
Account's beneficiary 30 days
,after his or her 30th birthday.
(The balance of any unused
, funds in the account can be
rolled over to a Coverdell for an-
other qualified family member
..nder the age of 30. This age
, )imit does not apply to beneficia-
'ries with special needs.
SAGE 50 - Age 50 is the first
year you're eligible to take ad-
vantage of the "catch-up" retire-
hhent provisions. Catch-up
;monLilts vary according to the
type of retirement plan. For
2005, anyone age 50 or older
'can contribute an extra $500 to
an IRA. The catch-up amount
for qualified retirement plans,
such as a 401(k) plans, is $4,000.
AGE 55 - If you leave your
job at any time during or after
the calendar year in which you
turn 55, withdrawals from your
401(k) or other qualified retire-
ment plan are not subject to the
10 percent early distribution
penalty. Distributions are subject
to regular income tax.
AGE 59-1/2 - After reaching
-age 59-1/2, you may be able to
make withdrawals from an IRA
or qualified retirement plan
without incurring the 10 percent
early distribution penalty. Ordi-
nary income taxes may apply.
AGE 60 - Sixty is the age at
which a surviving spouse be-
comes eligible for Social Securi-
ty benefits based on the de-
ceased spouse's work record. If
you elect to receive benefits at
Sge 60, you will receive less than .
Ihe full benefit your spouse
vould have received upon
reaching full retirement age.
AGE 62 - You can start col-
,lecting Social Security at age 62,
though your benefits will be re-
Iduced by 20 percent or more. At. -
age 62, you also become eligible
for a rever-se mbrtgaige, a special
'type-df'loan that lets older home-
,owners convert the equity in
'their home into cash to help
meet financial needs.


ginning in the month you turn
65.
AGE 70 - If you postponed
collecting Social Security bene-
fits beyond your normal retire-
ment age to maximize your pay-
ments, don't delay any longer.
Your benefit amount stops in-
creasing after you reach age 70.
AGE 70-1/2 - If you are a par-
ticipant in a company retirement
plan or a Keogh plan and you
are not more than a five percent
owner, the required beginning
date for distributions is generally
the later ofApril 1 following the
year you reach age 70-1/2 or
April 1 following the year you
retire. If you own a business in-
terest of more than five percent,-
your beginning distribution date
is April 1 of the year following
the year you reach age 80-1/2
even if you are still working.
Regardless of whether or not
you are still working, if you
reached age 70-1/2 last year, you
must begin to take minimum re-
quired distributions from your
traditional IRA. Only money in
a Roth IRA can continue to
avoid taxation by April 1 of the
year following the year you
reach age 70-1/2. Owners of a
Roth IRA are not subject to min-
imum distribution requirements,
but beneficiaries of a Roth IRA
are.
If this seems like a lot to re-
member, keep in mind that a
CPA can help you address your
tax and financial needs, whatev-
er your age. Be sure to consult
with a CPA in your area to learn
more about using savings plans
wisely.
The FICPA is the professional as-
sociation representing the interests
of more than 18,400 CPAs with over
4,400 offices throughout Florida.

* ,, , ' - , - - .. - -:
, -.
# .-.,


CIVIC SUWANNEE

.. . .- _. . .-_ - - -~--- .... - -, -- .--- --
~ i~-~s� _


NEW OFFICE FOR TEEN
COURT: Suwaneee County
Teen Court Program Coordina-
tor Jean Fieler presents a pro-
gram on the Teen Court Progr-
ram at a recent Kiwanis meet-
ing. Its new office in the
Suwannee Plaza is a great as-
set for preparing cases and
other Teen Court functions. -
Photo: Myrtle Parnell.


SAGE 65 TO 67 - The age
when you begin to collect full
Social Security benefits gradual-
ly is being shifted from 65 to 67.
'You're eligible for Medicare be-


TEEN COURT: Teen Court members attend a recent Kiwanis meeting. Pictured, I to r, Defense Co-
ordinator Matt Reynolds, Defense Attorney Brian Smith, Attorney Zack Poppell, Bailiff Coordinator
Johnny Reynolds, sponsor Pam Howland, Teen Court Program Coordinator Jean Fieler and Prose-
cutions Coordinator Josh Reynolds. - Photo: Myrtle Parnell


*" ^' ^- ".' .' '"'..
' ' 2.P" "' r~-~~~' .-..,-',,� ~
,_~ ., . & -2 ,','


ROTARY HAS FOUR NEW MEMBERS: Four new members of the Live Oak Rotary Club told the assembled members about them-
selves, their work, their background and their plans for Jan. 10. Pictured 1-r: Jim Wade Jr.; minister First United Methodist
Church, Charles Allen; Suwannee River Water Management District, Matthew VunCannon; loan officer Farm Credit, Joe McLeod;
special events manager Florida Sheriff's Youth Ranches and Live Oak Rotary President Jeff Lee. - Photo: Submitted


FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 4, 2005


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK







FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


NFCC announces personnel additions and promotions

- Five new instructors begin Spring Term -


North Florida Community
College announces the addi-
tion of new instructors and a
grant case manager, as well as
staff promotions for the Spring
2005 term.
Matthew Desloge, formerly
with Tallahassee Community
College, will teach mathemat-
ics. Marie Guest, formerly an
economics and finance in-
structor with Central Missouri
State University in Warrens-
burg, Mo., will teach business
courses. J. Wayne Lewis of
Lake City will also teach busi-
ness courses. He formerly
taught at Florida Keys Com-
munity College.
Art instructor Lisa Frank of
Tallahassee was an instructor
Florida State University.
Kathy Fields of Pinetta joins
NFCC as a patient care techni-
cian instructor. Fields was em-
ployed by Madison County


Memorial Hospital.
Lonnie Ford of Live Oak
has been appointed College
Reach Out Program (CROP)
case manager. He previously
taught in the Columbia County
School System.
In other staff changes, Jessi-
ca Webb is now Director of
Academic Planning and Dis-
tance Learning. Webb is coor-
dinating the development of
the NFCC Quality Enhance-
ment Plan for accreditation
through the Southern Associa-
tion of Colleges and Schools.
Nita Fico is now Director of
Registered Nursing Program.
Fico is overseeing the devel-
opment of a two-year R.N.
program expected to com-
mence January, 2006.
For more information con-
tact NFCC College Advance-
ment at 850-973-1653 or e-
mail news@nfcc.edu.


..-'3 -

PATIENT CARE TECHNICIAN
INSTRUCTOR: Kathy Fields will
teach patient care technician
courses at NFCC beginning in
the Spring Term. - Photo: Submitted


~-t'


BUSINESS INSTRUCTOR: J.
Wayne Lewis will teach busi-
ness courses at NFCC begin-
ning in the Spring Term.
- Photo: Submitted


BUSINESS INSTRUCTOR:
Marie Guest will teach business
courses at NFCC beginning in
the Spring Term. - Photo: Submitted


ART INSTRUCTOR: Lisa Frank
will teach art courses at NFCC
beginning in the Spring Term.
- Photo: Submitted


:,'_'. '
b- "^* ..:...

-* . *r ' ," .. .^ .


3'3


Volunteer Positions


If you enjoy working with
children and have an hour or
two to donate each week,
Suwannee Primary School
needs you!
Tutors - School personnel
will train you for this posi-
tion. Each child requires 15
minutes of tutoring per
day. Contact Carol Yanoussi
at 386-364-2650.
Cafeteria Buddys - Be a
friend to little ones as they eat
their lunch. Hand out stickers
for good behavior, help them
open their ketchup packets,
etc. Contact Betty Ann Sum-
ner at 386-364-2650.
Readers - For Books on


Tape program. Contact Carol
Yanoussi at 386-364-2650.
**Urgent Need!! Class-
room Helpers - Come on a
scheduled basis...one hour
per day, one hour per week,
or even all day every
day! Contact Barbara Barker
at 386-362-9089.
Emergency Chaperones -
Fill in when a parent be-
comes ill or has to work and
can't chaperone a field
trip. Contact Barbara Barker
at 386-362-9089.
Library - Shelve books
and/or help children select
books. Contact Barbara
Barker at 386-362-9089.


Look inside today's
Suwannee Democrat
for this week's
American Profile


tered Nursing Program at mathematics at NFCC begin-
NFCC beginning in the Spring ning in the Spring Term.
Term. - Photo: Submitted - Photo: Submitted


CASE MANAGER FOR COL-
LEGE REACH OUT PROGRAM:
Lonnie Ford has been appoint-
ed College Reach Out Program
(CROP) case manager at NFCC
beginning in the Spring Term.
- Photo: Submitted


DIRECTOR OF ACADEMIC&
PLANNING AND DISTANCE
LEARNING: Jessica Webb is)
now the Director of Academic
Planning and Distance Learning.
at NFCC beginning in the
Spring Term. - Photo: Submitted


Tineke Swart wins 4-H

Speech Contest


SWART WINS 4-H SPEECH CONTEST: Tineke Swart - 4-H speech
winner receives a check. from last years. Area .peechi contest
winner John Walt Boatright. - Photo submitted


The Suwannee County Con-
servation District sponsors an
annual Speech Contest for 6-
12th graders.
The theme is determined
yearly by the Conservation Dis-
trictis State Board of Directors.
The theme this year 'Celebrat-
ing Florida Conservation' is
taken from the National Associ-
ation's Soil Stewardship Week
theme 'Celebrate Conservation'
in hnirl h 1 'v50'it anniversary.
Tineke Swart will represent


the Suwannee County 4-H at
the County Speech Contest on
Feb 3, 9 a.m. at the Extension
Office Complex. Swart will be
competing against winners
from the Branford High School,'
Suwannee Middle & High
Schools.
For more information on how
you can be more involved with
the conservation of our natural
resources, call your. local Con-
servation District' Offie,' 386-
362-2622, x 3.


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Today Best Country


Listen to Kickin' Kevin on the

BIG 98.1 Monday thru Friday for

clues about our Mystery Artist
All correct entries will be entered into a drawing to be held
February 16 at 5 p.m. Entryforms must be an original, no copies.



Artist's Name_

Your Name

SAddress

Phone
I All entries must be received by February 16, 2005

Mail to Suwannee Democrat; P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 or
drop off at the Suwannee Democrat; 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 10A


1C I�.


4~~44~~~44~~~44~ M.- T~4~ ~k~ i






FRIDAYFEBRUARY 4 20 5


PAGE 11A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


SUWANNEE RIVER
WATER MANAGEMENT
DISTRICT
RECOGNIZES
EMPLOYEE FOR 10
YEARS SERVICE:
Jon Wood, lett,
receives a plaque from
Governing Board
Chairman David Pope,
in recognition of 10
years of service with
the Suwannee River
-Water Management
District. Wood is the
District's information
technology coordinator,
and a resident of Live
Oak, where he coaches
soccer and is active
in Kiwanis
- Prol S-utnirteda


Cotillion expansion plans


Suwannee's sure a friendly place


Suwannee County is sure a
friendly place. I've discovered
all you have to do in Suwannee
County to make a ton of friends
is buy a white Dodge truck.
Everyone and their brother will
give you Suwannee's original
one-finger hello, because, hey,
you never know who's driving
that white Dodge, it could be
your best friend. Every other
truck in the county seems to be
a white Dodge.
The one-finger hello has sev-
eral versions. There is the sim-
ple lift of the forefinger off the
steering wheel of the truck.
Sometimes you have to look
quickly to catch it. When a
Suwannee Countian is absolute-


ly sure they know you and well
at that, you may see that finger
lifted into the air. You could
even get the whole hand.
Because I drive that white
truck, I get saluted and waved at
everywhere. But this is a truly
friendly place to live and I think
a lot of the waves I get are from
people who genuinely wave at
most vehicles they see. The peo-
ple in Suwannee County are all
neighbors.
So, the next time you see a
white Dodge, or maybe just an-
other resident of our lovely
county, raise a finger and give
them that good old Suwannee
County one-finger hello.
Janet \Schrader-Seccafico


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or by e-
mail at
janet.schrader@gaflnews.com
Only in Suwannee County is
an occasional commentary by
local resident and Democrat re-
porter Janet Schrader-Seccafico
on the lives and times of Suwan-
nee countians and is intended to
remind us of the wonderful
county we live in.


include Suwannee County
e kruT Federation Banquet to be held Feb. 26


.The National League of
Junior Cotillions (NLJC), a
program of etiquette, char-
acter education and social
dance training for middle
and junior high school stu-
dents, has announced plans
to expand its program in
Florida to include Suwan-
nee County.
.Says Anne Colvin Win-
ters, NLJC National Direc-
tor; "We will be selecting a
director for a local chapter
who will receive complete
training and an exclusive
territory for expansion.
The organization current-
ly has active chapters in
Charlotte, Volusia, Orange,
Pinellas, Indian River, San-
ta Rosa, Tampa and other
communities in Florida.
Says. Laurie Coventry
Payne, Director of the NLJC
Charlotte Area Chapter,
"This program is. making.a
positive impact on students
in our area and we are de-
lighted to 'know that more
young people will have the
opportunity for this vital
training."
"in today's competitive
avd ever changing society,
I'
r'.


and the growing trend of the
lack of courtesy and respect
in our schools NLJC is ded-
icated to making tools avail-
able to regain a sense of
honor, dignity, and respect
in our young people.
The purpose of the Na-
tional League of Junior
Cotillions' program is to
give students instruction
and practice in the courte-
sies that make life more
pleasant for them and those
around them. Students ac-
tively learn courtesies
through a creative method
employing role-playing,
skits and games. Standard
ballroom and line dancing is
taught using nationally ap-
proved top 40 music.
In addition to the usual
courtesies connected with
dancing, etiquette and char-
acter instruction are also
provided regarding the fol-
lowing: honor, respect,
ethics, sportsmanship, ac-
knowledgments of gifts, be-
havior at cultural and civic
events, correspondence, in-
teraction in groups, intro-
ductions, paying and receiv-
ing compliments, receiving


lines, table manners, in-
structional dinners, tele-
phone courtesy and many
other area of social conduct.
In addition to Junior
Cotillion, NLJC offers three
related programs: Pre-Cotil-
lion for grades K-5, High
School for grades 9-12, and
a Corporate Cotillion pro-
gram for adults.
The program, with head-
quarters in Charlotte, was
established in 1979 and has
licensed local cotillions na-
tionwide. The cotillion in-
cludes five monthly classes
plus a Holly Ball and Spring
Ball. Says Winters, "The
program has met with equal
success in metropolitan ar-
eas including Atlanta, Or-
lando, Minneapolis, Hous-
ton, and in small communi-
ties across the country. We
believe it will be an impor-
tant addition to the training
of young people in this
area."
Application or nomina-
tions for cotillion director
are being received. For de-
tails, call 800-633-7947, see
www.nljc.com, or e-mail to
cotillions@nljc.com.


'- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
t 140593JRS-F


. f M mwI a- ---- ------ ---- - -I-


The Suwannee River LONG-
BEARDS Chapter of the Na-
tional Wild Turkey Federation
(NWTF) will hold its annual
Hunting Heritage Fund-raiser
Banquet on Feb. 26 at the Co-
lumbia County Fairgrounds in
Lake City. Doors will open at 6
p.m. and dinner will be served at
7 p.m. Please contact Todd Ken-


non at 386-755-1334 or Tom
Kennon at 386-362-6353.
The banquet will include over
15 guns, artwork, turkey calls
and turkey theme furniture. Rev-
enues from the banquet will fi-
nance projects at the local, state
and federal level.
Single Ticket - $55; Couples
Ticket - $90; Jakes Ticket - $20;


Sponsor Ticket - $275; Sponsor
Couples Ticket - $300. Tickets
can be purchased in advance or
at the door. There are advertising
opportunities for individuals and
businesses.
We look forward to seeing
you at the banquet. Please bring
your spouse and children as they
are welcome.


SThe Suwannee Democrat

Newspapers in Education Literacy

Program is giving you a chance to



WIN DINNER FOR TWO AT














r Come to the Suwannee Democrat office at
'; 211 Howard St. East or mail in an entry form with $1.00
Sto NIE; P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 and you could


SWIN DINNER FOR TWO
All proceeds go to Newspaper in Education Literacy Program
SThe "Newspaper In Education" program provides your local newspaper to
classrooms every Wednesday and Friday during the school year with the support
tf our sponsors. Teachers use this tool to help the students with reading and
;keeping up with the current events of our area.

SDrawing will be held Friday, February 24, 2005 at noon.


CD M O - S - S


NAME:

a ADDRESS:




PHONE:


C\TCH OCUU




FRIDAY - ALL DAY LONG

SOS20 364-1703
FREE PARK ADMISSION FOR SOS CAFE & SPIRIT CLUB -


Auce Mullet
Grits, Slaw '

and Hush Puppies

$ e95,
plus tax / p '"'


Relax and share your fishing stories
with your pals in our Spirit Club. ' 4
Watch your favorite fishing ' : t
show on our TVs. :






Located at 3076 95th Drive, Live Oak FL
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park .a-, -


II I I


Only in Suwannee, County


An occasional column


,k&


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I


....... .............. .... n- -





PAGE 12A U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


IJaw


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PAGE 12A


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK






****Undefeated 2004-2005 Season****
Suwannee High School Wrestling Versus Columbia High
School Wrestling tonight, Feb. 4. JV starts at 6:30 p.m.
and Varsity starts at 7:30 p.m. In the SHS Bulldog Gym.


uumannete Demcrrat

Section B
Friday, February 4, 2005


I .


Free hunter

safety

courses

offered
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission is
offering free pre-spring turkey
season hunter safety courses.
"Some are traditional classes
and some are online
courses. Interested hunters can
Theck out
Swww.MyFWC.com/huntered
ri call the Lake City Regional
Office at 386-758-0525 for
j~tes and times," said Steve
Robbins, Regional Hunter
Safety Coordinator.
Traditional Courses:
Clay County: Feb. 8, 10, 15,
17 and 19 at the Agriculture
Center off Highway 16 in
Green Cove Springs. Classes
begin at 6 p.m. and all classes
Must be attended to complete
the course.
Union County: Feb. 7, 8, 10
and 11 at the First Baptist
Church in Raiford. Classes be-
gin at 6 p.m. The range date
will be determined later and
will be held at Bradford Sport-
ing Clays in Graham.
'Lafayette County: Feb. 12
pnd 13 at the Mayo Correction-
lnstitute on Highway 27, sev-
en miles west of Mayo. Classes
start at 8 a.m. and both classes
must be attended.
Bradford County: Feb. 22,
P4, March 1 and 3 in Starke at
he Bradford Vocational Tech-
tical Institute on Orange
Street. The range date will be
determined. All classes must be
htttended to receive certifica-

SEE HUNTER, PAGE 5B


Wrestling


on Saturday
Su\wannee High is host-
ing the State NHSCA
"Wrestling Tournament on
Sarurda\. Feb 5. Come
do'n and enjoy the action
as kids elementary school
Sige to ninth grade compete
or j a state title. There ' ill
be kids competing from
Sukannee Elementarn
School. Suwannee Middle
School as \Vell as Su\;an-
nee High It's jn all-da\ af-
fair. Come and catch
i' resting fever.


Lady Dogs

lose to

Madison

Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
The Lady Dog basketball
ieam played .the Madison
Cowgirls right before the
Bulldogs took to the court.
'he Lady Dogs took an early
five point lead, but the score
ind the game went downhill
afterr that. The girls pulled to
within one point in the sec-
3nd period, down 20-21. But
the Madison fast break and
easy lay-ups had the Lady
Dogs down 22-30 at the half.
The final score was 47-61.
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
nay be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
or@gaflnews. com.


Lady Dog soccer makes regional finals


IT WAS ALL UP TO AL! The district championship came down to a kick-off, laying the burden of pro-
tecting the Suwannee goal upon Lady Dog keeper Al Cash. Cash did great, but gave up one-too many
goals. The Lady Dogs lost the championship in the final kick-off 2-1. - Photo: Paul Buchanan


Jon Wood
Special to the Democrat
The SHS Lady Bulldogs soccer
team qualified for the FHSAA Class
3A girls soccer championship re-
gional tournament last week by de-
feating Florida High 3-2 in the dis-
trict 2-3A semifinals. The Lady


Kyle Thompson is

Hoop Shoot winner


-.
' *rt


THOMPSON IS HOOP SHOOT WINNER: Kyle
Thompson is the winner of the Elks District
Lodge Hoop Shoot. The Elks Lodge #1165 host-
ed the Hoop Shoot at Suwannee Middle School
gymnasium Jan. 15. Thompson will go on to
compete in the North Regional Hoop Shoot Feb.
19 at the Fred Hendricks Recreation Center in Ft.
Walton Beach. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


Dogs lost a heartbreaker on Thurs-
day night when Wakulla claimed the
district championship after edging
Suwannee 3-2 in a penalty kick
shootout following a two-overtime
game that ended in a 1-1 tie.
Suwannee was the host of the dis-
trict 2-3A tournament and faced
Florida High on Tuesday night after
the Lady Noles defeated Hamilton


PLAYER OF THE WEEK-KATIE PREVATT: Prevatt scored all three
goals in the come-from-behind victory over Florida High. - Photo:
Paul Buchanan


County 6-0 on Monday. After a hot-
ly contested initial 20 minutes of
*play the Lady Noles got on the
scoreboard first when a Florida High
player was fouled in the Suwannee
18-yard box and awarded a penalty
kick. Florida High converted the PK
into a goal, giving them a 1-0 lead.
Suwannee answered quickly, scor-
ing less than a minute later when


Elks Lodge Hoop

Shoot Results
The Live Oak Elks Lodge #1165 hosted a
District Hoop Shoot at the Suwannee Middle
School gymnasium Jan. 15. Elks District
Chairman Charles Walker released the fol-
lowing results:
First Place Winners:
(8-9 year olds)
Girls Division: Ranicka Givens from
Lake City Elks Lodge #893
Boys Division: Marquez Marshall from
Lake City Elks Lodge #893
(10-11 year olds)
Girls Division: Briya McGuire from Lake
City Elks Lodge #893
Boys Division: Nicholas Richardson
from Lake City Elks Lodge #893
(12-13 year olds)
Girls Division: Sharmyne Edwards from
Lake City Elks Lodge #893
Boys Division:
Kyle Thompson from Live Oak Elks Lodge
# 1165
Second Place Winners:
(8-9 year olds)
Girls Division: Kelsey Gronbeck Marianna


SEE HOOP SHOOT, PAGE 4B


sophomore forward Katie Prevatt
knocked in a cross from senior for-
ward Jenna Jordan. The score would
remain tied until less.than two min-
utes remained in the half, when a
Florida High shot deflected off of a
Lady Dog defender and just out of
keeper Alicia Cash's grasp.


SEE LADY, PAGE 2B


Suwannee ropes and rides

the Madison Cowboys


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter


the contest. Madison fans and
Suwannee fansjammed into the
Suwannee High gym for the ex-
citing game. Unfortunately for


Suwannee kept their unde- the Madison fans, the trip to
feated-in-the-Dog-House status Live Oak ended with a 20-point
Friday night with a massive dis- loss for the Cowboys.
trict win over Madison 75-53. Starting the game for Suwan-
With this win, the Dogs secured nee at guard, Quaramos Ross, at
the second or third seed in the guard, Nate Herring, at forward
district playoffs next week in Mario Hawthorne, at forward
Wakulla. The Cowboys are al- Jevon Smith and starting at cen-
ways a tough game for Suwan- ter Philip Clark.
nee. The gym was packed with a
standing-room-only crowd for SEE SUWANNEE, PAGE 4B
'..v


#3 QUARAMOS ROSS WAS HIGH-POINT SCORER FOR SUWAI
NEE WITH AN AMAZING 27 POINTS. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


.. . . - , ... ... . - ,. . . . -
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Suwannee Mens soccer

beats Rickards 3-2


Suwannee player, Miguel Rodriguez, right, stays on his man during the final varsity game
against Rickards Saturday Jan. 29. Suwannee men's varsity went on to beat Rickards 3-2 at a
home game at Langford Stadium. - Photo: Yvette Hannon LOOK FOR MORE PHOTOS PAGE 38


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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 2B


Lady

Continued From Page 1B

Coming out of the locker
room for the second half,
down 2-1, the Lady Dogs
knew they had to get more
shots if they were to have a
chance to advance to Thurs-
day's championship match.
Florida High played tena-
cious defense and turned
away numerous Suwannee
shots, but with 18 minutes
left in the half Suwannee
won a corner kick off of a
deflected shot and Debra
Craig placed a perfect ball in
front of the goal that Katie
Prevatt kicked in for the
equalizing goal.
Suwannee got several
more shots on goal and cor-
ner kicks and with 11 min-
utes left in the game, the
Lady Dogs converted anoth-
er Craig corner kick into a
goal when Prevatt headed in
the winning goal.
Suwannee had six shots on
goal and six corner kicks in
the second half while the de-
fense yielded only one shot
for Florida High. This game
was also an anniversary of
sorts for Prevatt, .who in-
curred a season-ending ACL
injury after scoring one goal
in the district semifinal
match against Florida High a
year ago.
Thursday's championship
match between the Lady
Dogs and the Wakulla Lady
War Eagles was the result of
Wakulla upsetting the #2
seed Taylor County 2-1 on
Tuesday. Wakulla was the
only team in the district to
defeat Suwannee this sea-
son, winning a 2-1 contest at
Wakulla in December.
Suwannee seemed to have
all the advantages, playing
at home and being the #1
seed, and after scoring first
only three minutes into
game on sophomore mid-
fielder Kelsey Bowen's
goal, it looked like the Lady
Dogs were on their way to
their second championship.
But 10 minutes later a
Wakulla player was fouled
in the 18-yard box and a


penalty kick was awarded.
The kick was blocked by
keeper Al Cash, but the re-
bound was picked up by a
Wakulla player. Cash
blocked her shot as well, but
the next Wakulla shot went
in, knotting the game at 1-1.
The next 87 minutes would
be what one Suwannee
coach called "the most frus-
trating match I've ever been
involved in." Suwannee
would outshoot Wakulla 30-
3, have a 12-0 advantage in
corner kicks, two break-
aways and several crosses to
open shooters, go through
the entire second half and
two 10-minute overtime pe-
riods where the ball rarely
crossed the midfield line, yet
could not score another goal.
The Wakulla keeper kept
coming up with saves and, in
every chaotic instance in
front of the Wakulla goal
where cheap goals are usual-
ly the result, the Lady War
Eagles were able to clear the
ball out of danger.
At the end of 100 minutes
of regulation and overtime
play, the score still tied 1-1.
The game would be decided
in a penalty kick shootout.
Each team selected five
players to kick penalty kicks
against the opposing keeper.
Suwannee would kick first,
then a Wakulla player would
follow, and the team with an
advantage after five shooters
would be the winner.
Suwannee's lineup had
three seniors kicking first,
then sophomore Kelsey
Bowen and junior Jami Ker-
rigan. The first three shots
for the Lady Dogs were a
save, a narrow miss wide
left and another save, while
Wakulla netted their first
two shots, giving them a 2-0
advantage.
After the potential game
winning shot was saved by
Suwannee's Cash, Bowen
put in a. low shot that went
under the diving Wakulla
keeper. Cash saved the next
potential game winner, and
Kerrigan nailed her shot into
the left side net to tie it up at


2-2. In a night when Suwan-
nee couldn't seem to catch a
break, the last kicker for
Wakulla put her shot in, giv-
ing Wakulla the win and the
district championship tro-
phy.
"This was a very difficult
loss to take," said Coach
Kathy Wood. "This is the
game we've prepared for all
season and the girls did
everything we told them
they had to do to win the
game except put in the win-
ning goal. Not to take any-
thing away from Wakulla,
but we dominated play for
the entire match and even
going into the shootout felt
like we had the advantage.
That's one of the quirks of
soccer: a team can dominate
play and still lose the game."
However, all is not lost for
the Lady Dogs, who will
travel to Pensacola on
Thursday, Feb. 3, as the dis-
trict 2-3A runner-up to face
district 1-3A champ Pen-
sacola Catholic, a team
Suwannee defeated 1-0 in
last year's regional quarter-
final match. A win on
Thursday would put the
Lady Dogs in a match
against the Episcopal/Key-
stone Heights winner on the
following Tuesday.
"We are still where we want-
ed to be at the end of the
season (in the Regional
Tournament), we're just on
the road instead of at home."
Coach Wood said.
Player of the Week for the
distirct tournament is sopho-
more forward Katie Prevatt.
Prevatt scored all three
Suwannee g9als in a dramat-
ic, come-from-behind victo-
ry over Florida High in the
district playoffs. Prevatt is
the second leading scorer on
the team with 14 goals for
the season.


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#8 Kate Townsend
Kelsey Bowen was one of the kickers in the kick- --------a..
off with Wakulla for the district championship.
-Photo: Paul Buchanan


- Photo: Paul Buchanan


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Kelsey Bowen fights off a Wakulla player.
-, Photo: Paul Buchanan


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#12 Debra Craig - Photo: Paul Buchanan


Katherine Wilding - Photo: Paul Buchanan


Kendra Chavis goes one-on-one with Florida
High player. - Photo: Paul Buchanan


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Debra Craig takes out a Florida High player.
- Photo: Paul Buchanah


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Suwannee Mens soccer beats Rickards 3-2


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Suwannee player Tim Smith
player. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


jumps for the ball with a Rickards #6 Suwannee player Billy Moran #10 makes a shot on goal to-
wards Rickards goalie. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


Players share an intense moment waiting for the ball.
- Photo: Yvette Hannon


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Cullen Boggus races for the ball. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


Suwannee Mens JV Soccer vs. Rickards


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-Rl~~b~ S pl]'! t ge s 3,., lo d � .-,,, ,- : ....


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Suwannee player first to reach the ball. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


Suwannee players Josh Hanusek and
Rickie Hannon, right, charge after the
ball. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


44- -.-� -
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AJ Carter, tront and: Jioshi


HarinuIe dlenrid the ball agairin Pl RIclardc Sui.ravn-
nee went on to beat Rickards 2-1 Saturday, Jan
29 at Langford Stadium. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


3,/-.


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Suwanntee player AJ Carter i#-
and Justin Budwick are ready to
defend. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


Small but mighty, Austin Leavitt, right, takes c
three Rickards players. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


'1


Suwannee player Rickie Hannon #25 heads the ball as he is sur-
rounded by Rickards players. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


SIN CONCERT


mIN CONCERT


SSaturday, March 19, 2005
S7:30 pm at the
Suwannee County Fair


Tickets on Sale


SNOW!!
VIP & General Admission
v. , tickets available


Order by phone...
, Now taking Visa/lMC

S ,- Call for more ilfo.

i : (386) 362-7366


Yard Care Made Easy


149 BG55
Iw


4- -�,
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, "


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Makes cleanup work easier. Primer bulb and throttle lock ensure fast starts. Two-stage air
filter is easy to remove and replace. Easily converts to a leaf vac with optional kit.


JOHN'S LAWN EQUIPMENT

1629 Ohio Ave. N. * Live Oak, FL 32064
[386] 362-5020 * 1-800-648-2856


Are you ready for a


PAGE 3B


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


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PAGE4B SUWNNE DEOCRA/LIE OK FRDAY FERUAR 4,200


Suwannee


Continued From Page 1B

Suwannee got off to a fantas-
tic start. The Dogs held the ex-
tremely frustrated Madison
Cowboys to a mere two points
until the period had only a
minute and 50 seconds left. The
score at the end of one period
was 21-4. The Cow-
boys would gain little ground
throughout the game. The usu-
ally noisy and boisterous Madi-
son fans, sat quietly through
most of the game having little
to cheer.
At the end of the half,
Suwannee was up 34-20.
Madison came out raring to
go after the half-time break.
The Cowboys scored first in


the second half, but it was all
downhill after that. At the end
of three periods, the score was
61-33. The Dogs almost had
the Cowboys down by 30, mer-
cy-rule time, in the third, but
Madison came back and made
some headway in the fourth.
The game ended the same way
the Ft. White game ended.
Philip Clark snagged the ball,
raced down court and scored
the last goal with a beautiful
slam-dunk that had all Suwan-
nee fans on their feet. The final
score for this game was 73-53.
The Dogs beat Madison by a
very respectable 20-point mar-
gin.
Quaramos Ross was the hot
scorer for the Dogs against


Madison. Ross scored 27
points. Mario Hawthorne
scored 15 points. Philip Clark
scored 14 points. Jevon Smith
scored 10 points and Nate Her-
ring scored seven points.
Suwannee travels to Ft.
White next week for a rematch
with the powerful Indians on
Thursday, Feb. 10. On Friday,
Suwannee will play Columbia
County in Lake City. Game
time for both games is 7:30
p.m. Take a short drive to lake
City and support this fantastic
Suwannee Bulldog basketball
team. Go Dogs!
Janet Schrader-Seccafico may
be reached by calling 1/386/362-
1734 ext. 134 or by e-mail at
janet.schrader@gaflnews.com.


�1k


r --


L--6


f-i


sosPot
,reats

Don't Miss the 2005
GRAMMY
Nominated Isaacs!


The Isaacs, as
featured on
CMT.com


This talented group
has toured with
' Vince Gill, Reba
Mclntyre & Alison
, Krauss to name a
'few!


In Concert at the


SPIRIT OF THE SUWANNEE


MUSIC PARK





Tickets at the door $10.00
(Children 6 and under free)

Also appearing: DIANE ANDERS & FAMILY









Call (386) 364-1683
www.musicliveshere.com
139795JRS-F


---5


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3t
-. ,2';4


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T Ti r
nilr
!,-atOF 91


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- .,, ,
#50 Philip Clark can jump. Clark scored 14 points
against Madison. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico
fS*-"- " . ,. -,


. -* - ,-. :. . .- -.
#3 Quaramos Ross is surrounded by Madison
Cowboys. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Chris Jackson shoots
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


oI M&M Auto and LIBERTY'


Liberty Tax Service


t
Let M&M Auto pay your
CARS
01 Chevy Metro LSI, 4dr., A ...............................5,995
96 Cadillac Sedan Deville, 4,., .u, 76k ...........6,850
00 Saturn SC-2 .................................................... 8,495
00 Pontiac Grand Prix, 4dr., S, White .............. 8,995
03 Dodge Neon ............................................... 8,995
01 Ford Taurus SES, white, loaded, 52k ..............$9,850
01 Buick Regal LS, leather, champagne ......... ...$9,995
00 Chevy Impala ............................................... 9,995
01 Buick Regal Limited ....................................$9,995
99 Honda Prelude, owner ..............................11,988


'3,995 & UNDER
96 Ford Windstar ................................................3,995
92 Nissan Sentra ................................................3,995
91 Toyota Corolla ............................................. 3,995
2000 Mitsubishi Galant.................................. 3,995
1986 Toyota Celica ............................................ 3,995
1989 Dodge Conversion Van ............................3,995
Fresh Start, New Start
Bankruptcy V OK
Medical Problems v OK
Financing for Everyone
Wholesale To The Public


TRUCKS
97 Pontiac Transport SE Van ..........................$5,995
00 Ford F-150, auto ...........................................6,650
97 Chevy Tahoe................................................... 6,995
01 Nissan Frontier XE King Cab ......................7,995
01 Ford Windstar ................................................8,995
02 Chevy Astro Van ............................................9,995
00 Dodge Durango, SLT plus, leather ................11,995
99 GMC Sonoma 4x4........................................ $ ,995
02 Olds Brevada...............................................13,595
.01 Chevy Silverado, 2 to choose from ..............15,995


ll, i avis Konny Bryan Avon Daniel Andy Bill
Sales Mgr. McKinley Wachob Koon Smith Macarages Lipthrott
Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales

0 l Srhort forns, otly!

M&M Auto SalesHwy 90, Lake City

... 4 758-6171 * 1-800-358-8482
141538-F


, * ., . t ,, . -

He shoots he scores. #3 Quaramos Ross shoots. #50 Philip Clark
goes for the possible rebound. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico

Hoop Shoot
Continued From Page 1B

Elks Lodge #1516
Boys Division: Austin Hadden Live Oak Elks Lodge #1165
(10-11 year olds)
Girls Division: Haley Boggs Marianna Elks Lodge #1516
Boys Division: Jaquavius Royster Marianna Elks Lodge
#1516
(12-13 year olds)
Girls Division: Marlene Whatley Live Oak Elks Lodge #1165
3rd. Place Winners:
(8-9 year olds)
Girls Division: Emily Winburn Live Oak Elks Lodge #1165
Boys Division: Danny Tate Marianna Elks Lodge #1516
(10-11 year olds)
Girls Division: Lindsey Garland Live Oak Elks Lodge #1165
Boys Division: DeJaun A. Barnes Tallahassee Elks Lodge
#937
(12-13 year olds)
Girls Division: none participated
Boys Division: Quantez Wilson Lake City Elks L6dge #893
The first place winners will be competing at the North Re-
gional Hoop Shoot at Fred Hendricks Recreation Center in Ft.
Walton Beach February 19. This competition will involve all
first place winners in the North Region.


eam up to offer Tax Time Rebate.
tax bill when you use a portion towards your down payment.


_ I ___ __


I -�


PAGE 4B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


PAGE 5B


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Hunter


Get It Now-


SContinued From Page 1B field day
report an
tion. Gilchr
Taylor County: Feb. 26 and the Gild
27 at the Taylor Correctional In- Range, I
stitute in Perry. Classes begin at Trenton
8 a.m. Both classes musf be at- 8 a.m. S
tended, an Onlini
Field Day Courses: attending
Duval County: Feb. 12 at the out the fi
Jacksonville Gun Club, 12125 to the cla
SNew Berlin Road or Feb. 19, at Alachu
Gateway Rifle and Pistol Club, Beckwith
9301 North Zambito Road. way 441
SClass starts at 8 a.m. Students starts at
Must complete an Online or CD complete
. course prior to attending the course p












Well, trout season is closed over 20
now at Keaton Beach, as it is for largest tr
; the entire coast of the North- They wer
west region, namely, the Gulf Catch 20
waters from Tarpon Springs to water. Fr
the Alabama line. March first, keeper, ag
Syou can go back to keeping
your trout catch. and Wayn
Due to situations beyond my Ga. caught
control, (memory failure) I with two
failed to pick up the reports They use
from Keaton Beach Marina, last 2000 and
week, so I will include them, jun Thun(
this week, to help "spruce up" ter to land
the report, which otherwise Larrys
* would include only two an- -Dixie, Ga
Sgler's days on the water. Nubia h
Last weekend (Jan. 21 and while fish
,22) plenty of folks had good two feet o
days and here are those reports. Saturday
Randy and Midge Bright of Donna, K
Valdosta, Ga. had a limit of of Moultr
Trout and two reds, fishing with and mana
�.the Dorky Mullet and Catch bottom fis
2000's by MirrOlure, in two nows, in 6
feet of water. This pa
Jason Blaskiewicz and Mike 29, Joe
Goode of Jessup, Ga. had four Gainesvill
, trout Friday. This pair had a trout. His
trout 26-inches long and report- was caug
ed they used MirrOlure's Catch Corky Mu
i, 2000's in two feet of water. feet of wa
Saturday Timothy Bell and the rain to
. Harold Eidson, of Doerun, Ga. trout for th
caught a limit of trout and Billy Pi
threw back another six trout Woods 'N


and print out the final
d bring it to the class.
ist County: Feb. 19, at
hrist County. Sheriff's
Highway 129 between
ad Bell. Class starts at
students must complete
e or CD course prior to
;the field day and print
final report and bring it
ss.
la County: Feb. 26, at
I's Pistol Range, High-
in Micanopy. Class
noon. Students must
San Online or CD
rior to attending the


field day and print out
report and bring it to the
Baker County: Feb.
March 6 at Terry's Hun
Fishin,' Highway 90
Chevron Station in Ma
Class starts at 8 a.m. Y
attend both classes to
certification.
For the classes and
days, all children under
of 16 must be accompi
an adult.
These classes have
space; therefore, student
pre-register by calling t
City Office at (386) 758


Vda -etwrt
~at~t ^eNc


u^n ; y t


-inches long. Their
rout was 26 inches!
re fishing jerkbaits and
00's in three feet of
iday they landed six
;ain, on plugs.
Friday, Teddy Fletcher
ne Saylor of Sycamore,
it their limit of 10 trout
over 20 inches long.
;d MirrOlure's Catch
live shrimp under Ca-
ders in 2-3 feet of wa-
I their fish.
nd Nubia Edwards of
i. had nine trout, ardd
ad a, nice redfish,:
ihggrubs and plugs in
f water.
ly, the 22nd, Rene,
eith and Toby Wilkes
ie, Ga. went offshore
ged 14 grouper, while
;hing with cigar min-
60 feet of water.
ist Saturday, January
y Landrenau, of
e caught his limit of
largest a 5.75 pounder
;ht on the original
llet. Joe fished in two
ter, over the rocks, in
Island his last mess of
ie season.
illow and I took the
Water Fishing Team


boat his 2985 Triton
Monday, and while the
man gave 2-3 ft. seas, a
w-i-n-d forecast, with a
65 degrees. We wonder
folks in Costa Rico s
kind of balmy weather
never got less than 15 ki
the wind chill was belo'
ing for two hours and f
maybe, got 45, maybe
grees out there. BRrrrr..
Oh yeah, we brought
grouper ... in spite of I
Where? and what o
asked?
Why. ..45 feet of w
squid... of course
Hey another Notice
nounce:
The Taylor County
School Senior class is h
Saltwater Fishing Tour
to raise money for their
Trip to New York Ci
Tournament will be I
Keaton Beach, Saturday
5, 2005 and will award p
the top trout, redfis
grouper. Tickets are $10
person and all proceeds
wards'the Senior trip. Fi
information call Sandy
Manning at Go Fis]
lectibles 850-578-289
611.


the final
class.
26 and


ntin' and The Spring season for Ameri-
at the can red snapper season will
icclenny. open at noon, Eastern Time,
ou must February 1, 2005. The 2005
receive Gulf of Mexico commercial red
snapper quota is 4.65 million
the field pounds. The commercial fish-
r the age ing season is divided into spring
anied by and fall seasons. The spring
season begins at noon Eastern
limited time on February 1, with 3.10
nts must million pounds available. The
he Lake fall season begins at noon East-
3-0525. em time, on October 1, with the
remainder of the annual quota
available. During the season,
commercial fishing is allowed
from noon on the 1st, until noon
on the 10th of each month, until
the quota is caught.
To enjoy one of the most de-
lectable fish from Florida wa-
ters, visit your local seafood
supplier and ask for Fresh from
Florida red snapper. Red snap-
out this per is often imported, so be cer-
weather tain of what you purchase. Al-
10-knot ways ask, "Is it Fresh from
High of Florida"? This fish is made to
ed if the
aw that FWC announces
r, as we
nots and The Florida Fish and Wildlife
w freez- Conservation Commission
finally, it (FWC) has scheduled a series of
50, de- public workshops regarding
management of blue crabs. The
in eight Commission is seeking public
NOAA.. input on proposals regarding a
>n? you draft rule to develop a limited-
entry program for the blue crab
rater, on fishery.
The FWC encourages all in-
to An- terested persons to participate in
the workshops, which will take
y High place from 6-8 p.m. as follows:
having a Wednesday, Feb. 16
rnament Brevard County Government
SSenior Complex North Brevard Room,


ty. The
held in
,March
rizes to
sh and
).00 per
Sgo to-
or more
Beach
h Col-
'7 ext.


order for almost any recipe and
will delight your gastronomic
senses. Whether you bake,
broil, grill or fry red snapper,
you will be pleased with the end
result. Florida waters yield the
finest red snapper in the nation
so be sure to treat yourself to
some before time runs out. The
mild flavored Florida red snap-
per promises to be a gratifying
culinary experience.
Red snapper is also a very
health food source. Four
ounces of uncooked red snapper
contain just 110 calories, mere-
ly one gram of fat, only 45
grams of cholesterol and no sat-
urated fat. Red snapper is equal
in protein to shrimp (23 grams)
and also contains calcium and
iron.
Florida's commercial fisher-
men make every effort to bring
the freshest red snapper and oth-
er Florida seafood from their
boats to your table. To ensure
healthy stocks and maintain its
place as a renewable and sus-


tainable resource, red snapper
harvested in Florida is closely
monitored and regulated.
Florida red snapper can be
purchased fresh or frozen and
should always be stored in the
coldest part of the refrigerator
and used within two days.
Frozen red snapper should be
stored at 0 degrees F and used
within six months. For the best
product quality, make sure you
thaw frozen seafood in the re-
frigerator for at least twenty-
four hours or until completely
thawed.
Consumers can request cook-
ing tips, recipes and proper care
and handling of snapper by
sending a self addressed
stamped envelope to the Bureau
of Seafood and Aquaculture,
2051 East Dirac Drive, Talla-
hassee, Fl 32310 or e-mail the
Bureau at
seafood@doacs.state.fl.us.
Recipes are also available on
the Bureau's website: www.fl-
seafood.com


public workshops on blue crabs


518 South Palm Ave. Titusville
Thursday, Feb. 17
Board of County Commission-
ers Main Meeting Room Ad-
ministration Building, fourth
floor 477 Houston St. Green
Cove Springs
Monday, Feb. 21
East Room, Old County Court-
house
2115 Second St. Ft. Myers
Tuesday, Feb. 22
Tampa Bay Regional Planning
Council 4000 Gateway Center
Blvd., #100 Pinellas Park
Wednesday, Feb. 23,
Crystal River City Hall Council


Chambersl23 N.W. Hwy. 19
Crystal. River
Thursday, Feb. 24
Franklin County Courthouse
Annex 34 Forbes St.
Apalachicola
Anyone requiring special ac-
commodations to participate in
the workshops should advise
the agency at least five calendar
days before the workshop by
contacting the FWC coordinator
at (850) 488-6411. Hearing- or
speech-impaired persons should
contact the agency by calling
(850) 488-9542 to arrange assis-
tance.


Today's Weather


Fn Sat Sun Mon Tue
2/4 2/5 2/6 2/7 2/8

"- , ' - ,1'-'


64/39 65/43 70/48 75/50 68/53
.Sun and a few pass- More sun than Mix of sun and Times of sun and Showers. Highs in
ing clouds. High clouds. Highs in the clouds. Highs in the clouds. Highs in the the upper 60s and
64F. Winds N at 10 mid 60s and lows in low 70s and lows in mid 70s and lows in lows in the low 50s.
to 20 mph. the low 40s. the upper 40s. the low 50s.
Sunrise Sunset Sunrise Sunset Sunrise Sunset Sunrise Sunset Sunrise I Sunset
7:21 AM 6:11 PM 7:20AM 6:12PM 7:19AM 6:13PM 7:18AM 6:14PM 7:18AM 6:15PM

e Get reacquainted with your sweet tooth. &
o Visit oolwh apom fr dessert Idea with k"is than 100 c0 i ,do


Florida At A Glance


Tallahassee


Jacksonville
S 58/44


60/41


Moon Phases




Last New
Feb 2 Feb 8


Orlando
62/47


Tampa
63/44


First Full
Feb 16 Feb 24


UV Index

Fri 2/4 5 Moderate
Sat 2/5 5 Moderate
Sun 2/6 5 Moderate
Mon 2/7 5 Moderate
Tue 2/8 - Moderate
Tnr UV Index ls measured on a 0-11
number scale, with a higher UV Index
shc.i.;rig ihe need for gre iAer Irn proc
tec, or. j - i0 11


Area Cre ',
Clearwater 63 -15 msl sunny
Crestview 63 36 sunny
Daytona Beach 59 46 pt sunny
Fort Lauderdale 70 52 mst sunny
Fort Myers 66 45 mst sunny
Gainesville 62 36 pt sunny
Hollywood 71 51 pt sunny
Jacksonville 58 44 windy
Key West 70 58 mst sunny
Lady Lake 57 39 pt sunny


Lake City
Madison
Melbourne
Miami
N Smyrna Beach
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Plant City


60 38 ptsunny
63 39 mst sunny
63 49 ptsunny
69 54 mst sunny
59 46 ptsunny
62 40 ptsunny
62 47 ptsunny
62 41 sunny
60 41 sunny
64 44 ptsunny


Pompano Beach 70
Port Charlotte 67
Saint Augustine 55
Saint Petersburg 63
Sarasota 65
Tallahassee 64
Tampa 63
Titusville 61
Venice 64
W Palm Beach 69


52 mst sunny
44 mst sunny
45 pt sunny
49 mst sunny
45 mst sunny
37 mst sunny
44 pt sunny
46 ptsunny
45 mst sunny
51 pt sunny


National Cities
L " � ,~~Fn~


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver


32 sunny
31 sn shower
30 mst sunny
40 mst sunny
31 sunny


Houston
Los Angeles
Miami
Minneapolis
New York


61 44 pt sunny
74 50 windy
69 54 mst sunny
44 32 mst sunny
41 32 mixed


phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


50 mst sunny
47 sunny
39 rain
33 sunny
32 mst sunny


�2005 American Profile Hometown Content Service


Red snapper season is open


, Presidential


,.- ,. '."":1




Look for the Special Section & Bingo Cards

in your paper.


i \ February

S23 B 24







'\ ,F EI " ,






i/ if'







For your chance to enter and win














Bingo Cards and the special section may also be

picked up at the unwanned Bemocrat,
I llUnflcrd News, Ma I n rr 1ri.ss and 3asper Muws

offices on February 23 & 24. 139730JR -F


I Ci. H iL nd�


1 City Hi Lo Cond.


� '
~















The Racing Zone


Unprecedented field in
iA~rIa hjcr * r� t djc^rxT Cret


Ashton Kutcher named Honorary


IAeiircanIu L "t for Daytona 511ncUXrY00
for historic Rolex 24 at Daytona Starter 47th for Daytona 500


Drivers representing more
than 100 major auto racing
championships and a record
29 Daytona Prototypes will
make up the strongest start-
ing grid in American sports
car history for the 43rd an-
niversary Rolex 24 At Day-
tona on Feb. 5-6 at historic
Daytona International Speed-
way.
"Without exaggeration,
you would have to say this is
probably the best depth of a
field that I've ever seen, even
in the GTP heyday when
there were probably 15 or so
(Porsche) 962s. There
weren't this many cars within
this tight of a group," said
Butch Leitzinger, a three-
time Rolex 24 champion
who'll co-drive the No. 4
Howard-Boss Motorsports
Pontiac Crawford. "If you're
a little bit off in the setup, as
we've seen on the time sheet
(during testing), instead of
being fourth, you're all of a
sudden 16th. It's going to be
something where the team is
going to have to work incred-
ibly hard and the driver is go-
ing to have to work incredi-
bly hard just to keep on pace
with everyone."
The list of drivers features
high-profile names such as
five NASCAR NEXTEL Cup
Series champions - Kurt
Busch, Matt Kenseth, Tony
Stewart and Bobby and Terry
Labonte - open-wheel stars
Paul Tracy and Dario Fran-
chitti and 2004 Indianapolis
500 wiiner Budd Rice.
The field also includes
Academy Award-winning ac-


tor Paul Newman, two more look through the entry list,
Champ Car World Series it's pretty intimidating but
champions (Cristiano da I'm looking forward to the
Matta and Sebastien Bour- challenge. Just look at any of
dais) and two Indy Racing the cars, you're going to see
League IndyCar Series cham- one or more guys in there that
pions (Scott Sharp and Scott have done amazing things in
Dixon). their careers."
Sports car stars looking to Said Haywood: "This is
guard their home turf include undoubtedly the best driver
five-time Rolex 24 champion lineup I've seen for a 24-hour
Hurley Haywood, 2004 Day- race, anywhere. It has repre-
tona Prototype co-champions sentation from all of the dif-
Scott Pruett and Max Papis, ferent fields of motorsports
Leitzinger, Andy Wallace, and it's going to be a heck of
Terry Borcheller, Boris Said, a show."
Wayne Taylor and Rob and One of the most exciting
Chris Dyson. Rolex 24s will be presented
"This is without a doubt a in front of a festival atmos-
star-studded cast of drivers phere in the new Daytona In-
and cars," Speedway Presi- ternational Speedway infield.
dent Robin Braig said. Last July, the Speedway un-
"We're thrilled that our new- derwent a multi-million dol-
ly renovated infield will lar, multi-faceted infield ren-
serve as the backdrop to a ovation, which included new
competitive Rolex 24 that garages, new Turn 1 tunnel,
will surely go down as a his- new Gatorade Victory Lane,
toric weekend in the sports waterfront specialty vehicle
car world." parking and a uniquely de-
And unlike previous Rolex signed FanZone.
24 events, the elite drivers Besides enjoying the
competing in this year's thrilling side-by-side racing
twice-around-the-clock chal- on Daytona's legendary 3.56-
lenge will be spread out mile road course, sports en-
among the 29 entries in the thusiasts attending the Rolex
Daytona Prototype class, the 24 will also enjoy the largest
premier division of the Grand Ferris Wheel on the East
American Rolex Series. Coast in the Midway, a
"I recognize a lot of faces screening of the Rocky Hor-
for sure from all different ar- ror Picture Show, car corrals
eas in the world," said Fran- and a wine and cheese tasting
chitti, an Indy Racing League and participate in the Day-
IndyCar star who'll co-drive tona 5K run.
the No. 2 CITGO Howard- Tickets to the Rolex 24 At
Boss Motorsports Pontiac Daytona are available online
Crawford in his fifist Rolexl . at http://www.daytonainter-
24 start. "I think to have them nationalspeedway.com or call
all here in one place *you just 1-800-PITSHOP.


BRANFORD HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
BRANFORD, FLORIDA





-GENERAL ADMISSION $7.00-


a - M :el .o , 1 8 4-4


Ashton Kutcher. the popu-
lar star of FOX's "That '70s
Sho.'" and the star of the up-
coming feature film "Guess
Who" v.ill serve as Hon-
orary Starter for the 47th an-
nual Daytona 500 (February
2i. Fox. 1 p.m.. NASCAR's
biggest. richest and most
prestigious race. As Hon-
orary Starter. Kutcher \\ill
"\ave the green flag to start
the 43 NASCAR NEXTEL
Cup Series drivers in the
200-lap. 500-mile race.
"We're excited to have
Ashton Kutcher here to start
the Daytona 500 and the
2005 NASCAR NEXTEL
Cup Series season." Speed-
way President Robin Braig
said. "Attracting a star of
Ashton's caliber proves once
again the Daytona 500 is one
of the premier sports events
in the \world."
Kutcher vill co-star with
actor comedian Bernie Mac
in Columbia Pictures and
Regency Enterprises'
"Guess Who." which will be
released March 25 of this
year. In the mo\ ie. in an ef-
fort to impress his prospec-


live father-in-lad Percy
Jones (Mac). Simon Green
(Kutcher). who has already
secretly proposed to Jones'
daughter, boasts of his
nonexistent ) past as a
NASCAR driver. Slnon's
repeated attemptss to make a
good impression are futile as
Perc', rebuffs him at etery
turn and makes it his mission
to undermine his daughter's
ne\\ relationship. The film
also stars Zol SaldaOa and
Judith Scott.
Kutcher will also star in
another 2005 release "A Lot
Like Lo\e" which is sched-
uled for release in April. His
past movie credits ha.e in-
cluded -The Butterfly Ef-
fect." "Cheaper By The
Dozen" "lM} Boss' Daugh-
ter." "Just Married" and
"Dude. Where's My Car?"
He is also the creator of
MTV's popular reality series
"Punk'd"
"'Being Honorary Starter
for the Daytona 500 is great
way' to experience NASCAR
and come together ",iith
more than 2110,000 fans at
the Super Bowl of racing."


Kutcher said. "As a fan of
NASCAR. I'm excited to be
involved and to wave the
green flag in NASCAR's
signature event."
Kutcher continues the tra-
dition of high-profile actors,
athletes and politicians that
have participated in the Day-
tona 500 pre-race cere-
monies. Comedian Whoopi
Goldberg served as Hon-
orary Starter for the 2004
Daytona 500 and singer
Mariah Carey sang the Na-
tional Anthem and ser-ed as
Honorary Starter for the
2003 Daytona 500.
President George \. Bush
and Ac.idemy A\ard-win-'
ning actor Ben Aftleck
served as the Co-Grand Mar-
shals and the President gave
the starting command, "Dri-
\ers, start your engines." for
the 2004 Daytona 500.
Tickets for Speedweeks
2005 and the 47th annual
Daytona 500, which will be
televised live by FOX
Sports. are available online
at http: \\ww.daytonainter-
nationalspeed\\ay.com or by
calling I -800-PITSHOP.


Pete Orr Memorial Orange

Blossom 100 set for this Saturday

at New Smyrna Speedway


This Saturday night, Feb-
ruary 5th, New Smyrna
Speedway will host the Third
Annual Pete Orr Memorial
Orange Blossom 100. It was
November 2002 when we
lost saw Pete Orr at the 37th
Governor's Cup, happy and
smiling that smile that no
other had like Pete's. One
minute he was with us, the
next gone.
Pete Orr was well known
and loved and most of all re-
spected in the world of stock-
car racing not only in Florida
but many states.
When Pete died that No-
vember 2002, everyone
mourned and to this day, we
all still miss "our" Pete. To
honor the man who loved
nothing more than racing and
the Orange Blossom 100, the
race was renamed the Pete
Orr Memorial Orange Blos-
som 100 in January 2003.
"Pete Orr was a great man
and a great Crew Chief," said
Travis Kittleson last week-
end at USA International at
Speedfest 2005. "If I had but
one race I really wanted to


win, it would be Pete's race."
"Pete got me where I am to-
day and I will never forget
,him. Hewas a true gentle-
man in every way."
Those sentiments are held
by many and that is why you
see so many Super Lates out
for "his race". Past students
of Pete's are Travis Kittle-
son, Justin Drawdy, David
Froehlich, B.J. McLeod and
the list goes on. And you
will see those drivers and
many more this Saturday
night at New Smyrna Speed-
way.
Last year, 2003,
karnac.com stepped forward
and began the Pete Orr
Sportsmanship Award. The
driver who was honored with
this very special award was
Jay Middleton. This year an-
other driver will receive the
Pete Orr Sportsmanship
Award but the name of the
driver won't be known until
Saturday.
"Pete was one of a kind
and when we lost him, I
knew the world of stockcar
racing really lost a legend.


What is Step Up, Florida!
Step Up, Florida!' is a time for you to get
active and get healthy by taking advantage
of the great physical activity opportunities
that Florida has to offer.
In the month of February every
county will be hosting a Step Up,
Florida!'' event. That means that
wherever you hive, you have an
opportunity to get involved and
get active with people in your
community.

Call Contact our local heath
Melinda Scott department to find out what is
362-2708 et. 221 n on in your neighborhood,
362-2708 e. 22111
_141


727-F


Pete was a gentleman and
definitely a sportsman on the
track and off. To win this"
award takes alot of different
qualities but sportsmanship is,
key," said Jack Smith, web-
master and owner of,
karnac.com.
There are alot of factors
that we consider when we
think of this award and. the
winner this year has shown,
all of them. But you will.
have to be there to find out
who because we are not
telling before then," adde4c
Smith.
Wayne Anderson of Wild-
wood, Florida has won both
of the Pete Orr Memorial
races but it is a goal of every.
driver in the field to get this-
win. To say you have won
the Pete Orr Memorial Or-
ange Blossom 100 is some-
thing very special for all Su-
per Late drivers.

Past winners of the
Orange Blossom 100 are:
Pete Orr Memorial 125
2003 - Wayne Anderson
2004 - Wayne Anderson

Orange Blossom
100 Winners List
1989 - Leroy Porter
1990 - Jack Cook
1991 - Pete Orr
1992 - Pete Orr
1993 - Pete Orr
1994 - David Russell
1995 - Jack Cook
1996 - David Russell
1997 - Jack Cook
1998 - Jack Cook
1999 - David Rogers
2000 - Pete Orr
2001 - Jack Cook
2002 -Travis Kittleson

Also on the program Satur-
day will be the Late Models,
Open Wheel Modifieds,
Sportsman, . Super Stock,
Mini Stock and Strictly
Stocks. Also a number of
drivers getting ready for the
World Series of Asphalt
Stock Car Racing may be in
the field.
Reserved seating is avail-,:
abe by calling 386-427-4129
ext. 0. General admission is,
$15.00, students and seniors
$10.00 and children 11 andi
under are free in the grand-i
stands. Racing starts at 7:30
p.m.


-,, --P - ' ,


Look inside today's Suwannee Democrat
for this week's American Profile


I


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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


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CHURCH


Candlelight prayer vigil to be held in Branford on Feb. 13


By Doris Hancher
Our community has been
shocked and saddened by the re-
cent deaths of several of our
young men. Our personal grief
and prayers go to each of their
families. We can't recall any
time in our lifetime when so
many young lives have ended so
tragically in such a small com-
munity and short space of time.


Because of the rapid succession
in five separate instances our
community is stunned and hurt-
ing.
Area politicians, educators,
lawmen, citizens and clergy as
well as parents, grandparents,
siblings and extended families
all agree that we need spiritual
and emotional healing.
From toddlers to our military,


it seems an attack has been
waged on our precious young
males. As Christian contempo-
rary artist Carmen says in song,
"the only hope for America is
Jesus."
It is time for us to join our
hearts and voices and turn to
God, our source, for comfort
and guidance. We need to pray,
especially for our educators,


parents, and our precious chil-
dren.
On Sunday, Feb. 13, at 5:15
p.m., plans are made so that
everyone in Suwannee County
may participate in such an
event.
It will begin with prayer at
both Branford High School and
Branford Elementary School.
You may go to either location.


Immediately afterward we will
join in a prayer walk to the town
square in Branford where a can-
dlelight prayer vigil will be held.
Please join us as we experience
healing, comfort and strength.
Lapel pins, designed to re-
mind us of Gods' love and to
pray for one another, are avail-
able at Suwannee River Assem-
bly of God. Please have your


pastor call 36-93Y5-l/13 to
arrange for pick-up or delivery.
Please wear these to encourage
and comfort one another and as
a sign of solidarity and kindred
spirits on Feb. 13.
May the God of peace be with
you and guide you. Please be in
prayer as we ready ourselves to
join together in His loving pres-
ence.


CHURCH CALENDAR


Register Now!
Post abortion Bible study
sponsored by Pregnancy
Crisis Center begins on
March 1
If you have had an abortion
and are having difficulty forgiv-
ing yourself and believing God
has forgiven you. If you have
kept your secret hidden from
everyone because it's the only
way you can deal with the pain,
shame and guilt of your regret-
table decision, then please con-
tact the Pregnancy Crisis Center
at 386-330-2229 or come by the
center located at 112 Piedmont
Street, Live Oak. Hours are 9
a.m. to 3 p.m., Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday. March 1
begins a post abortion Bible
study which is based on "For-
given and Set Free" by Linda
Cochrane. Pre-registration for
the free study is required. Com-
plete confidentiality for any
caller!
Reserve space now!
Indoor flea market will be
held at the Alton Church of
God Family Life Center in
Mayo on Feb. 26
An indoor flea market will be
held at the Alton Church of God
Family Life Center in Mayo on
Feb. 26, from 7 a.m. until 3 p.m.
Open to the public, so bring
your treasures that you would
like to sell and join us. Space is
free, but there is a $15 refund-
able'clean up deposit. You will
be responsible for cleaning up
the space 'ihkt lyou 'se. We ask
that a minimum of 20 percent of
your profit be donated to the Al-
ton Church of God Children's
Ministries. Children's Ministries
will have coffee and muffins for
sale at breakfast and hotdogs,
chips and drinks for sale at
lunch. Bring your own tables)
and chairss. Please contact Su-
san Hutchins at 386-294-3198
by Feb. 19 for more info or to re-
serve your space.
Divonia Baptist Church
wvill host The Believers
on Feb. 12
Divionia Baptist Church will
hold'a Gospel sing featuring The
Believers from 7 p.m. until... on
Feb. 12.-The church is located
on US 129 South between Live
Oak and Jasper. Refreshments
after the sing!
Azalea City Church of God
in Valdosta will host The
Hinsons Feb. 13
The Hinsons will be in con-
cert on Sunday, Feb. 13 at 6 p.m.
at Azalea City Church of God in
Valdosta, Ga. Azalea City
Church of God is located at the
comer of River Street and Saint
Augustine Road. Pastor Ray-
mond Gabbard and congrega-


tion encourage everyone to at-
tend. The Hinsons consist of Bo
Hinson, wife, Rhonda and Stan
Dailey. They currently perform
over 250 dates each year. The
Hinsons have garnered numer-
ous awards since their inception.
Their single "Oasis" was the
Singing News Magazine's song
of the year for 1996 and re-
mained on the charts for seven
months in that year. They have
recorded nine albums and will
be releasing a new project later
this year. Come and be a part of
this anointed groups' ministry.
FoodSource
FoodSource, a Christian
based Christian food coopera-
tive, is in your area! Stretch your
food dollars! With the help of
dedicated volunteers, Food-
Source is able to provide quality
foods at low prices while pro-
moting Christian values and
volunteerism in your communi-
ty. This is NOT a needy only
program; it is for EVERYONE.
There are no qualifications to
participate! FoodSource accepts
cash, checks, Visa, Mastercard,
Debit, EBT and money orders.
Menu is subject to change! Each
item is proportioned for 4-6
people. This months tentative
menu is: hamburger steaks,
chicken tenders, family sized
Lil' Smokies, family sized piz-
zas, green bean casserole, Liber-
ty Sweet Peas, South Gate Red
Beans & Rice, mushroom
gravy, Mrs. Smith's Fire Roast-
ed Apple Pie, fresh eggs, cab-"
bage, carrots, sliced cheese,
strawberry lemonade, oranges,
bananas, five pounds fresh pota-
toes, and an unknown produce
item. Pick Up Date: Feb. 26.
Regular package price - $25.
Meat package available $25.
Tentative meat box menu: rib-
eye steaks, pork chops, salmon
fillets, ground beef, teriyaki
chicken breasts, smoked
sausage links and chicken
nuggets. TO ORDER AND PAY
BY CREDIT/DEBIT/CHECK
CARD, CALL TOLL-FREE
800-832-5020. PICK UP OR-
DER AT LOCAL SITE. For
questions or to order, call your
local coordinator. Live Oak:
Live Oak Church of God - 386-
362-2483; Wellborn United
Methodist Church - 386-963-
5023; Ebenezer AME Church -
386-362-6383 or 386-364-4323
or 386-362-4808; Jasper: 386-
792-3965; White Springs: 386-
752-2196 or 386-397-1228;
Bell: 352-463-7772 or 352-463-
1963; Lake City 386-752-7976
or FoodSource toll-free at 800-
832-5020 or visit website at
www.foodsource.org for ques-
tions or to become a local host
site.


Community Christian Center
Food Assistance Program
Community Christian Cen-
ter's Food Assistance announces
the addition of breads and
frozen meats. The main program
is set up on a co-operative basis
which allows it to help others in
need on a weekly basis instead
of periodic or monthly. The pro-
gram is open to the public as
well. Community Christian
Center is located five miles west
of 1-75 on US 90, on the north
side of the road. For more info,
call 386-6113. "Faith without
works is dead" James 2:26
Live Oak Church of God
will hold "Prayer at the Gates
of the City" from
7-9:45 a.m. on Fridays
Live Oak Church of God will
hold "Prayer at the Gates of the
City" every Friday from 7-9:45
a.m., at the church on 129 South,
the Roundabout and other loca-
tions. Volunteers will be praying
for everyone entering and leav-
ing the city. People are being
blessed and have called to ex-
press their gratitude for the
prayers saying it made a differ-
ence in their lives. Bring your
chair join them each Friday to
pray at the gates of the city. For
more info, call 362-2483.
Word Alive Church will
host a monthly Preserve
Freedom Prayer Rally
Word Alive Church, 11239
SR 51, Live Oak, invites all
churches and the community to
' mfonthly Preserve F'redomi
Prayer Rally the third Wednes-
day of every month at 7:30 p.m.
The prayer focus will be elec-
tions, our federal, state and local
leaders, pending laws/amend-
ments, the Supreme Court, local
law enforcement personnel, lo-
cal schools, administrators and
students, local prisons and chap-
lains, terrorism and the military.
If you would like to submit
names of loved ones involved in
any of the above, please call the
church at 386-362-2092, and/or
join us as "requests, prayer, in-
tercession and thanksgiving is
made for everyone - kings, and
those in authority that we may
live peaceful and quiet lives in
all godliness and holiness." I
Timothy 2:1,2.
St. Luke's Episcopal
Church will hold ALPHA
sessions
Skeptics welcome! St. Luke's
Episcopal Church is hosting
ALPHA, a non-denominational
course exploring Christianity in
11 thought-provoking sessions.
Each weekly session begins
with a free dinner, and a nursery
and youth program are avail-
able. ALPHA is open to anyone,
Christian or non-Christian. Lis-


ten, learn, discuss and discover.
Ask anything! ALPHA is a
place where no questions is too
tough. St. Luke's is located at
1391 Eleventh Street, just across
from the Coliseum. They invite
everyone to join them in AL-
PHA on Wednesday evenings at
6:30 p.m. Call 386-362-1837 for
more info.
First Advent Christian
Church of Live Oak invites
children K-5 to join SWORD
SEEKERS on Wednesdays
The First Advent Christian
Church of Live Oak invites your
child (K-5) to join SWORD
SEEKERS, a program of crafts,
music, games and Bible study
from the dismissal of school un-
til 5:30 p.m. The program will
continue on each Wednesday
that school is in session. For
more info, call the church office
at 386-362-1802. The Rev. Tim
Carver is pastor of the church lo-
cated at 699 Pinewood Drive,
Live Oak.
Wellborn United Methodist
Church sponsors "Kid's
Time" on Wednesdays
Wellborn United Methodist
Church sponsors "Kid's Time"
on Wednesday from 4-6 p.m. at
the fellowship hall on CR 137.
Adult supervision for programs,
games - indoor and out, age re-
lated groups, music (maybe they
will do special music for our
Sunday worship service) and of
course we expect the children.
attending to come up with lots of
fun things they would like to
teach us. The school bus stops at
the fellowship hall and we will
supply transportation for their
return to home at 6 p.m. They


will have a short form for the
children to bring home "Youth
Protection Policy." Fill in and
return to the "Overseer" (Pastor
Tim) who needs the information
that is necessary for us to have
on hand in case of any kind of
emergency. These must be filled
in to protectthe children and the
church workers. We will have
snacks and drinks available for
all. Parents are welcome to visit
or work along with us. We will
have a "prayer warrior" and
"fun master." If you would like
to attend and need transporta-
tion, please call our transporta-
tion group - Christine WhItmore
- 386-963-5289 or the church
numbers: Pastor Tim - 386-963-
3071; fellowship hall - 386-963-
2154. All of this is FREE!
FREE! FREE!
Mothers Morning Out
program at First
Presbyterian Church
of Live Oak
The First Presbyterian Church
of Live Oak, 421 White Ave,
Live Oak holds its Mothers
Morning Out program twice a
week, Tuesdays and Thursdays


from 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. The
teacher/director is Elke Day,
Certified Pre-school
teacher/CDA 10 and 20 clock
hours. For more info, call the
church office: 386-362-3199.
MOPS, Mothers of
Preschoolers
MOPS, Mothers of
Preschoolers, is a gathering of
moms for encouragement and
fun. All mothers of children
from birth to.age 5 are invited to
attend. The meetings are the sec-
ond and fourth Tuesday of the
month, September through May,
from 9:30 a.m. to 12 noon. They
are held at the First Baptist
Church on Howard St. in Live
Oak. For more information,
please call 386-362-1583.
Fellowship of Christian
Cowboys Meeting
Fellowship of Christian Cow-
boys meeting will be held on the
first Saturday of every month at
the SRRC Arena in Branford at
5:30 p.m. The meetings also will
be held every second Saturday
of every month at the Suwannee
County Coliseum Arena in Live
Oak at 5:30 p.m.


First Presbyterian Church will

hold Ash Wednesday Service
Pastor Pedro Ri\era and the beginning of Lent, which
the congregation of the leads up to Easter Sunday
First Presbvterian ; .. I March 271. Ashes
Church invite , will be distrib-
\ol to an Ash - uted ' Te
\\'ed, . da, .- church la iJo-',
Ser ice on t 1 u cated at 421
'We dnesda3. ' bri 9 i \\ hite Ave.
Feb. aill 7 p.m. Live Oak ione
Ash Wednesday marks block south of citl hall).


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Dai is o aFeuy at0 m


PAGE 7B


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAYFEBRUARY 4 2005







PAG'F RR U% %IJWA E DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4,I200 -5


Ewtio ta


an


o e #uuwannm ilemocrat


Slervingthecomunitysn*eM4


(386) 362-1734


1291 74J5-lj


Beatv Auto Sales

Located next door to Beaty's Truck Parts
Off Hwy. 90W. - Live Oak
386-364-4110 ~ 386-364-3206
Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday 12 p.m.-5 p.m.




Jiff Food Stores

LIVE OAK * WELLBORN * MAYO * BRANFORD
* DOWLING PARK

STORE ON NORTH OHIO OPEN 24 HOURS
"The Store Around The Corner F-om Whtere You Live"114-F
-- --- - _129145JS-F


North Florida Printing Co., Inc.
P.O. Drawer 850,
Live Oak, Florida 32060
Edward Howell, owner 362-1080 FLA. * WATS 1-800-431-1034 129147J



Duncan Tire & Auto


a LENA. DUNCAN
362-4743
S 422 E. HOWARD ST. LIVE OAK PLAZA
Smau ketplcee24 conm
,'li Ii rH h


-t









Howard Street Dry Clean

Quality Laundry and Dry Cleaning
* Same Day Service *


705 West Howard Street
Live Oak, Florida 32064


(386) 364-5211
129164JS-F


JORDAN AGENCY, INC.

SLife * Home * Car * Business

Joe Jordan & Bruce Tillman


203 E. Howard St.
362-4724


Branford
935-6385
12M9166S-F


Dixie Grill
"Specializing in Steaks & Seafood"
DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS (WITH VEGETABLE)
Open 7 Days - 5:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
364-2810 CATERING SERVICE & PRIVATE PARTIES
S129143JS-F
/


To advertise on this page,

please call

Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103


To love someone unconditionally means that one's love is absolute
and is without limits. Human emotions are such that we usually
distance ourselves from those with unpleasant attitudes or
behaviors, so at times loving someone regardless of their actions or
feelings toward us is extremely difficult. An example of this could
be a married couple - they may be so much in love on their
wedding day, but later get a divorce because they no longer care
for each other. Unconditional love is a blessing
o from our Heavenly Father and
* -involves forgiveness,
. \ �. understanding, wisdom, and
praying for our loved ones. A
parent's love for their children, or
Sa child's love for their parents can
be unconditional, and God's love
0o for His chosen people is also
unconditional. The Bible tells us
I that there is nothing in all creation
that will ever be able to separate us
from the love of God, which is ours
through Christ Jesus our Lord.

SLive a life of love,just as Christ
o loved us and gave Himself up
for us as a fragrant offering and
sacrifice to God.

N.I.V Ephesians 5:2


BIXLER MEMORIAL
ADVENT CHRISTIAN
Advent Christian Village, Dowling Park.
Rev. Steve Lawson & Rev. Rosemary
Humbles & Rev. John Harper
SUNDAY
Christian Education Hour.................9:30 am
Morning Worship.......................... 10:45 am
Evening Service.......... ........6:00 pm
129035JS-F
FIRST ADVENT
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
699 Pinewood Street
(386) 362-1802
Rev. Tim Carver, Pastor

SUNDAY
Sunday School............................... 9:15 am
Morning Service.............................. 10:30 am
Evening Service.......................6:30 pm
. .. WEDNESDAY
Midweek Service......:.................... ...6:30 pm
129036JS-F


BAPTIST

VICTORY BAPTIST CHURCH
10475 State Rd. 51-Approx. 3 miles South
Jerry Ownes - Pastor
(386) 362-6357 (386) 362-5313
SUNDAY
Sunday School......:.........................10:00 am
Worship Service...............................1:00 am
Evening Worship............................7:00 pm
1"r Sun. Morning Men's Breakfast 8:00 am
" S & 3RD Monday Visitation 7:00 pm
2nd Friday Night Ladies Meeting 7:00 pm
(Quilting)
Sunday Evening
Children's Choir..... ...........................5:00 pm
Adult Choir....................................... 6:00 pm

WEDNESDAY
Wednesday Bible Study....................6:45 pm
Master Clubs (Children's - Youth).....6:45 pm
Nursery Available All Services
"Where there is life, there is growth"
129037JS-F

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF DOWLING PARK
"Sharing the Joy of Jesus"
Rev. Shawn Johnson - Pastor
11274 235th Lane
(In Dowling Park on Hwy. 250)
Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 658-2360 or (386) 658-3715
E-Mail: fbcdp@hotmail.com
www.dowlingparkbaptist.org
SUNDAY
Team Kids & Adult Life Study..................9:45 am
Worship Service........... .................. .. 11:00 am
Evening Bible
Exploration Services................................6:00 pm
Nursery Available all Services
Pre-K to 2nd Grade Junior Church conducted
during 11:00 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship
Service
MONDAY
"Quilters for Christ".....................................6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Mid Week Prayer Service.......................6:00 pm
12903BJS-F


SUWANNEE STATION
BAPTIST CHURCH
Everybody Welcomed
3289 101st Lane, Live Oak, FL 32060
Bro. Wilbur Wood, (386) 362-2553
SUNDAY
Sunday School.............................. 10:00 am
Morning Worship..........................11:00 am
Choir Practice.... ...... ............ .. 6:00 pm
Evening Worship............................7:00 pm
. WEDNESDAY
Prayer & Worship..............................7:00 pm
Children & Youth Program................7:00 pm
129176JS-F


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Comer of U.S. 90 and Church Street
362-1583


Rev. Phillip Herrington
Minister of Students/Children
Rev. Clare Parker, Minister to Senior Adults
Rev. Alan Lott, Music and Worship
SUNDAY
Early Worship.................................... 8:30 am
Sunday School......................................... 9:45 am
Morning Worship............................... 11:00 am
Live Broadcast on WLVO 106.1 FM
Discipleship Training ...............................6:00 pm
Evening Worship.............................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Music & Missions for Children................6:00 pm
Crossfire (Students).................. ..........7:00 pm
Mid-Week Bible Study...........................7:00 pm
129039JS-F

SPINEMOUNT BAPTIST CHURCH
US 129 South (Across from the S&S Store)
Post Office Box 129-McAlpin, Florida
(386) 362-5634
Nursery provided for each worship service
Worship and Fellowship Opportunities of the Week
Pastor: Greg Vickers
SUNDAY
Bible School.............................. ......... ...9:45 am
Morning Worship............................ ...........11:00 am
Choir Practice.......................... ............ 5:30 pm
Evening Worship...........................6:30 pm
WEDNESDAY
Family Night Supper....................................6:00 pm
AW ANA Club..............................................6:30 pm
Prayer Meeting..... .... ......................... 7:00pm
THURSDAY
F.A.I.T.H. M inistry.......................................6:30 pm
Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves
together... but encouraging one another.
Hebrews 10:25
129398JS-F

WESTWOOD BAPTIST
920 11th Street, SW (Newbern Road)
362-1120
Pastor - Dr. Jimmy Deas
Rev. Jim McCoy
SUNDAY
Sunday School...............................9:30 hm
Morning Worship Service............ 10:55 am
Discipleship Training
Adults & Youth..............................5:10 pm
Children's Choirs........................5..:00 pm
Evening Worship Service..............6:30 pm
TUESDAY
Prayer Breakfast-Dixie Grill..........6:30 am
WEDNESDAY
Youth Group GA's, RA's, Mission Friends
& Youth Group..............................6:30 pm
Mid-Week Service.......................6:30 pm
Adult Choir Rehearsal ...................7:30 pm
12904W0S-F

ANTIOCH BAPTIST CHURCH
5203 County Road 795
362-3101 -Church
SUNDAY
Sunday School...................................9:45 am
Morning Worship............................ 1:00 am
Church Training................................. 6:00 pm
Evening Worship...............................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Service................................... 7:00 pm
129043JS-F

MOUNT OLIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Growing Together As Family"
5314 98th Terrace, Live Oak, FL 32060
(From US 90, take 137N to Hogan Road and follow signs)
Pastors Dan Allan and Brent Kuykendall
www.mtolivebaptistchurch.com
SUNDAY
Small Groups (Sunday School).........9:45 am
Celebration Worship.......................... 11:00 am
"G-Force" Children's
Family Worship................................. 6:00 pm
Youth Choir........................................6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY


Family Supper.................................... 5:30 pm
Kidzclub/Graded Choirs....................6:00 pm
Adult Discipleship.......................... 6:30pm
Student "Impact" Worship.................:30 pm
Celebration Choir Rehearsal..............7:30 pm


BAPTIST (SOUTHERN)


WELLBORN BAPTIST CHURCH
"A warm place in a Cold World."
Rev. Louis Gooch
U.S. 90 West & Lowe Lake Rd., Wellborn
Church Phone 963-2231
SUNDAY 3
Early Worship............... ............................8:3 am
Sunday Bible Study....... ............................9:45 am
Second Morning Worship..............................I.... am
Evening Worship............................6:f pm
WEDNESDAY
Youth..... .................................... .......7:00 pm
Prayer W orship.................................................7:0vpm
"Come Worship With Us" A
12904MpH-F
SHADY GROVE
MISSIONARY BAPTIST
15 miles West Hwy.90 -
2 Miles Down River Road
Rev. David Hingson, 658-2547
SUNDAY


�?
a


EPISCOPAL
ST. LUKE'S EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
11th and Coliseum Streets
Rev. Don Woodrum, Rector, 362-1831'

SUNDAY
Sunday School............................... 9:45 am
W orship................................9:00 & 11:0(dam
WEDNESDAY \
Holy Communion................ ....10:0 am
& 6:OC(pm
THURSDAY
Holy Communion........................7:0 am
12 116JS-F

INDEPENDENT B AP1T
TABERNACLE BAPTIST
CHURCH
Pastor Gill Roser 362-7800
Gold Kist Blvd. (across from armory)

SUNDAY
Sunday School.............................. 0:00 am
Morning Worship............................. I :0 am
Evening Worship...........................6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY ';
Wednesday Service.......................7:30 pm
12I20JS-F
loom , \'%


To advertise on this page,

please call Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103


129029JS-F


"Quality Printing is the
Only Printing Worth
Buying"


To advertise on this page,

please call

Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103


cc


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT K


PAGF 8BR


Sunday School................................... 9:45 am
Worship.......................................... :00am
Church Training................................6:00pm
Evening Worship.............................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Prayer & Bible Study.......................7:0(0pm
129046JS-F
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST
CHURCH
(386) 362-5239
10413 Hwy. 129 South
Aaron Turner, Pastor
Clay Ross, Music
Hardy Tillman, Awana Commander
SUNDAY ,i
Morning Worship............................. 10:30/am
Awana................................................ 6:00 pm
School of the Scriptures.....................7:09.pm
WEDNESDAY -
Care Group........................................ 7:00 pm
FRIDAY
*Singles Bible Study......................6:30 pm
(First Friday of each month)
SATURDAY
Nursing Home Ministry*
(First & third Saturday of each month)
[A pre-school nursery is provided at each worship service]
"Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves
together, as the manner of some is; but exhorting
one-another: and so much the more, as you see
the day approaching" (Hebrews 10:25),
la94Js-F
CATHOLIC
ST. FRANCIS XAVIER -
CATHOLIC CHURCH
928 East Howard St. U.S. 90 East
Rev. Michael Pendergraft
P.O. Box 1179 Live Oak, Florida 32050
(386) 364-1108
SUNDAY
Sunday M ass......................................9:00 am
Sunday (Spanish) Mass..................... 1:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Wednesday Mass............................7:00 pm
THURSDAY
Thursday Mass..................... ..........9:0 am
FRIDAY 3
Friday M ass................................... 9:00 am
SATURDAY
Saturday (Vigil) Mass.......................6:00 pm
129114JS-F


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LZecoZO


: INTERDENOMINATIONAL

MELODY CHRISTIAN CENTER
& Melody Christian Academy K-12
Highway 129 South * Live Oak, FL
(386) 364-4800
Children's Ministry-Youth Ministry-Adults
"r Services:
"' sunday 10:00 am and 6:00 pm
,,wVednesday 7:00 pm - Adults
Children's Ministry
riq Av Revolution Youth Church
ic:N'ursery Available All Services
Melody Christian Bookstore - Open daily
-~P'astor Frank C. Davis 129121JS-F


WORD ALIVE CHURCH
11239 State Rd. 51 * Live Oak, FL 32060
Pastor's Dale and Connie Naiman
(386) 294-3100
rm, ? SUNDAY
m children's Ministrys.................... 10:45 am
frrqWorship Service.........;................... 10:45 am
nmq ' Nursery provided
WEDNESDAY
mqBible Study........................................ 7:30 pm
Youth services 2nd & 4th Sundays....6:00 pm
129123JS-F

CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
1550 Walker Avenue SE * Live Oak, FL
(386) 208-1345
"A Church on the Move"
Sunday Morning...................... 10:30 am
mrnWednesday Night............................. 7:00 pm
fniq (
rnmqlstor Wayne Godsmark
Senior Pastor 129124DH-F
nlq C

"NAZARENE

LIVE OAK CHURCH OF
(,- THE NAZARENE
1-i'n915 Church Ave., SW 1 Block So. of Mayo
Road North of High School
%' ' Rev. Louis J. Medaris
2niflc
" ; SUNDAY
9 . a nday School ................................. 9:45 am
SMorning Worship.........................11:00 am
E ening Worship............................. 6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Evening Prayer Meeting............7:00 pm
S-129125JS-F

. NON-DENOMINATIONAL

LIVE OAK CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Joseph Schmidt, Minister
msi' Corner of Hamilton and OhioAves.
m' (Hwy. 129 N)
(386) 362-1085 (386) 362-3982
SUNDAY
mr" lMorning Worship............................. 11:00 am
Evening Worship............................... 6:00 pm
ni (' WEDNESDAY
Bible Study........................................7:00 pm
mq (" 129126JS-F
LIVE OAK CHURCH OF CHRIST
Minister: Craig Williams
Home: (386) 362-6409
1497 Irvin (S.R. 51)
P.O. Box 281 Live Oak, FL 32060
Church: (386) 364-5922
Bible Classes.............................. 10:0 am
Morning Worship............................ 11:00 am
Evening Worship............................. 6:00 pm
Wednesday Bible Class.....................7:00 pm
Featuring Mentoring Program for Youth
129127JS-F

SUWANNEE RIVER
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Rev. Ray Brown
17750 16th Street, Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 842-2446

SERVICES
Sunday School..................................10:00 am
Sunday Morning Worship................1:00 am
The distance makes the difference.
12 miles North of CR249, Nobles Ferry Rd.
129352JS-F


PENTECOSTAL

DOWLING PARK
CHURCH OF GOD
658-1158/658-3151
Pastor: Frank D. Jones
SUNDAY
Sunday School...........................................9:45 am
Morning Worship.............................. 11:00 am
Children's Church....................... ........ 11:00 am
Sunday Evening.....6......... ............. 6:30 pm
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Dinner..................................5:30 pm
Family Hour.............................................. 7:00 pm
Nursery Provided
129136JS-F
LIVE OAK CHURCH OF GOD
US 129 South
Rev. Fred R. Watson 362-2483
SUNDAY
Sunday School...................................9:45 am
Children's Church............................ 10:45 am
Morning Worship...........................10:45 am
Evening Worship............................6:30 pm
Children Choir............................... 6:00 pm
Sunday Evening Childrens Church...6:30 pm
Wednesday Night ~
Family Training Hour................7:00 pm
Wednesday Night Dinner..................5:45 pm
Children's Classes, V.I.B.E. Youth Church,
Adult Bible Study129131JS
129131JS-F
LIVE OAK FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
13793 76th St. (Mitchell Rd.)
Live Oak, FL
Rev. Donald Suggs
362-2189
SUNDAY
Sunday School................................... 9:30 am
Children's Church............................ 10:30 am
Morning Worship............................. 10:30 am
Evening Worship.............................6:00 pm
Wednesday Night............................... 7:00 pm
129132JS-F
REFUGE PENTECOSTAL
TABERNACLE
12280 Co. Rd. 137
(386) 688-2791
Wellborn, FL
Pastor: Darin Wilson
SUNDAY
Sunday ............................................ 10:00 am
Sunday Evening............................. 6:00 pm
Wednesday Night.........................7:30 pm
'"'' ' . . ' , ' , i ,' ; M ' . * : . , ' ," 129867-F

METHODIST

WELLBORN METHODIST
12005 CR 137
963-3071, 963-2154
Pastor Timothy Plant
Music: Geiger Family
SUNDAY
Sunday School............................... 10:00 am
W orship.......................................... 11:00 am
Prayer Request Boxes
at Jiffy, Annettes, All Springs and at
Dumpsters
PRAYER INTERCESSION
Tuesday at the altar
at 7 a.m., noon, and at 7 p.m.
CHURCH OPEN ALL DAY
Everyone Welcome
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study............................... 7:00 p.m.
129399JS-F

PINE GROVE UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
5300 CR 136A, Live Oak
**Need Pianist/Organist**
Phone (386) 362-5595
SUNDAY
Sunday School................................... 9:45 am
Morning Worship..........................1..1:00 am
Evening Worship...............................6:00 pm
TUESDAY
Men's Digging Deeper Bible Study..6:30 pm
Women for Christ Bible Study..........6:30 pm
WEDNESDAY
Mid-Week Service.............................7:00 pm
"COME WORSHIP WITHI US"
135090DH-F


PRESBYTERIAN
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
U.SA.
421 White Avenue, Live Oak
(386) 362-3199
Rev. Pedro Rivera
SUNDAY
Sunday School............................................9:45 am
W orship..... ........................ ........ 11:00 am
Communion First Sunday of every month
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study....... ..................... ............7:00 pm
129133DH-F


SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST

LIVE OAK SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
Pastor
Brandon White
364-6540

SATURDAY SERVICES
Sabbath School........9:30 am.......Bible Study
Worship Service............................... 11:00 am
Call for more information on Prayer Meeting
15451 129 South, Live Oak, FL
129134JS-F



UNITED METHODIST

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
311 S. Ohio Avenue, Live Oak * 362-2047
Pastor: Jim Wade
"COME WORSHIP WITH US"

SUNDAY
Early Worship.................................. 8:30 am
Sunday School Assembly..............9:30 am
Sunday School............................. 9:45 am
Worship......... ................... 11:00 am
Youth Fellowship.............................4:30 pm

TUESDAY
Children's Choir................................. 5:00 pm

WEDNESDAY
Bible Study. ..................10:00 am
Youth Fellowshipl.....................6:00 pm
Irth'ancel Ringers (Adult)...t...;..:..:.6.00'pm
M en's Chorus..................................... 7:00 pm
Chancel Choir................................... 7:30 pm
129141JS-F
NEW HARMONY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
160th St.
(Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right)
Pastor: Stan Posey
Phone (386) 776-1806

SUNDAY
Sunday Worship.......................... 9:30 am
Bible Study................................ 10:30 am

WEDNESDAY
Women's Bible Study............................ 10 am
129158JS-F

To place your church
on this page, please
call Myrtle Parnell at
(386) 362-1734
ext. 103


oI ad the ZIt Th&4 9

Doing the right thing is not always easy. It may involve a
sacrifice on our part, or having to do something that we
really don't feel like doing. Going to your child's little
league ball game after a hard days' work; attending a
church function; or visiting a sick friend may involve extra
effort on our part, but it may be the right thing to do. There O
are also thousands of worthwhile organizations requesting
and needing our financial support, and trying to determine
where we will donate our hard-earned money is not an
easy task. We know that we should pray about everything,
and the Bible tells us that our purpose is to do what is
right, not only in the sight of the Lord, but also in the sight
of man (2 Cor. 8:21). Everyone needs help and support at
times, and being there for those in need reflects God's love
and is the right thing to do. God loves a cheerful giver -
that includes our time, talents and money.


You know that Christ is righteous; you
should know, then, that everyone who
does what is right is God's child


Good News. Bible


1 John 2:29


The Historic TELFORD
HOTEL-RESTAURANT
' Monday- Thursday 11am -2:30pm
Friday- Saturday 11am- 9pm
Sunday 1lam-3pm
P.O. Box 407, White Springs, FL 32096
' (386) 397-2000 Fax: (386) 884-9902


To advertise on this page,

please call

Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103



Bayway Services

Steam Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning
* IICRC Certified * Fire & Water Damage
Restoration Specialists * 24 Hour Emergency Serv ice
Residential & Commercial 362-2244 12912 F


SNAPAof Live Oak

Cars * Trucks * Imports Farm * Auto paint
Machine Shop Service

209 Duval * (386) 362-2329






S;PAl ND lME WITH LCOU



r" Tr N HEATING & AIR
1TOUCHT1ON'1 CONDITIONiNG
Service * Sales * Installation

386-362-4509 Residential & Commercial
34 Licensed & Insured

Locatedat: 1056 US 9 E. - ive0 ,F 26


M-F 8:30-6:00 1291



nRa O Rt

Annette B. Land Realtor
Specializing In Real Estate Sales & Services In The Suwannee River Valley
U.S. 27 EAST * P.O. BOX 394
386-935-0824 BRANFORD, FLORIDA 32008 1-800-426-8369
8 - www.landbrokeragerealtor.com 129161-F


To advertise on this page,

please call

Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103


t- - L ORD ttR U UR PR URt


129034DH-I


I


PAGE 9B


FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 4, 2005


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


T ,






PAGE 10B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Friday Evening February 4,2005

WTXLIABC 8 Simple Savages Hope Fail Less Than 2020 Local Local Local Local
WCTVICBS Joan of Arcadia CSI Numbers Local Late Show Late Lale
WTWC/NBC Dateline Third Watch Medical Investigation Local Tonight Show Conan
WTLHIFOX Bernie Ma Bernie Ma Johnny Zero Local Local Local Local Local Local

A & E Biography Biography Biography American Justice Biography
AMC Smokey & The Bandit II The Golden Child M Club Blood From the Mummy s Tomb
CMT Great Outdoors Greatest Mylhs 2 Muzikmafi Funniest Videos Funniest
DISN Disney vMoaie TBA Lilo & Stitch Raven Raven Raven
ESPN NBA Friday: Coast To Coast Australian Sporiscenter Outside Films
ESPN2 Friday Night Fights NBA Friday Coast To Coast Faslbreak
FAM Austin Powers International Man ol Mystery Whose Whose The 700 Club Family Matters
FOOD Emeril Live Inside Dis 1$40 A Day Kitchen Accomplished Iron Chef Emeril Live
FX Fear Factor Fear Factor Me, Myself and Irene Cops Cops

S Get reacquainted with your sweet tooth.
*A Visit coolwhip.com for dessert ideas with less than 100 calories. r =
HGTV" D Travis TBA TBA Paint Chic D Travis
LIFE Obsessed Her Married Lover Merge What Should You Do?
MTV Ashlee Simpson Show True Life Wanna Come In? Room Raiders
SCI Stargate SG-1 Stargale Allantis Battlestar Galactica Slargale SG-1 Stargate Atlantis
TBS Friends Friends A Knights Tale Analyze This
TCM Devil ano Miss Jones The Farmers Daughter Notorious
TLC Overhaulin' Overhaulin' Overhaulin' Overhaulin' Overhaulln'
NT Law & Order Donnie Brasco Get Carter
USA Law & Order SVU Monk Monk Law & Order SVU Monk

The Matrix Unscripte TheRundown
�2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service

Saturday Evening February 5, 2005

TBA Desperate Housewive Desperate Housewive Local Local Local Local
W S. The Will Cold Case Local Local | Local Local
Law & Order Law & Order Cl Law & Order SVU Local SNL
Cops ICops America's Most Wante Local Local MAD TV . Local Local

SCity Confidential Cold Case Files M1-5 American Justice City Confidential
A,. AIC Lake Placid . Volcano - ,___Orca- Tne Killer Whal
CMrT All ine Rignh Moes Muzi,.knahl Insider Greatest Myelhs Grealest Tour Buses
DISN Brandy Brandy Lilo Dave Raven Phil Lizzie Boy Kim IBracelace
ESPN Big East Conference Baskelball Winter Games Nine Sporlscenter College Gameday
ESPN2 Friday Night Fights NBA Friday Coast To Coast Fastbreak
FAM Death Becomes Her Whose Line'' Funniest Videos
FOOD Emeril Live Unwrapped Iron Chel Unwrappe Top 5 Emeril Live
FX TBA Movie TBA Cops Cops
HGTV Remix Decor Ce Dsgn Fina Dsgn Chal Dsgn Di Divine Ds Smrn Dsn IHome2Go Remix Decor Ce
LIFE Widow on ihe Hill A Friendship To Die F Strong Medicine Extremities
M'TV Real World IRW RR Newlyweds Nick & Je Wanna Come In' Room Raiders
SCI Urban Legend Jason X Disturbing Behavior
TBS Analyze This What Women Want Divine Secrets ol the Ya-Ya Sisler
TCM The Paper Chase Ouiz Show A Fish Called Wanda
TLC Trading Spaces While You Were Out While You Were Oul Trading Spaces Trading Spaces
TNT Screen Actors Guild Awards Screen Aclors Guild Awards I Am Sam
USA Law & Order SVU Law & Order SVU Law & Order SVU Law & Order Cl The District

a Matrix Revolutions Taxicab Confessions Carnivale 16 Bad Boys
�2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service

Sunday Evening February 6, 2005

Funniest Home Video Extreme Makeover Desperate Housewive Local Local Local Local
Cold Case TBA , Local Local Local Local
Law & Order CI Law & Order Law & Order Cl Local Local Local
SO Super Bowl XXXIX Local Local Local Local

SGotti Chocolat CSI Miami Gotti Chocolat
AMC K-19. The Widowmaker Force 10 From Navarone
CMT Top 20 Countdown Brians Song Lynyrd Skynyrds
DISN Disney Movie TBA Raven Phil Bug Juice Lizzie Boy Meets Braceface
ESPN Poker Sportscenier Pnmetime
ESPN2 Figure Skating _Fasibreak SIreelball
FAM When In Rome Whose Lin Whose Lin Funniest Funniest J Osteen Feed
FOOD Emeril Live TBA TBA TBA Emeril Live
FX Lile Or Something Like II Nip Tuck The Shield Fear Factor
HGTV Designed Amer Ho Romantic Bedrooms Beautiful Homes Gen Ren Kilchen Tr Designed Amer Ho
LIFE Another Woman s Husband The Three Lives ol Ka Missing Wild Card
MTV The Ashlee Simpson Show Newlyweds: Nick.Jess Advance RW RR
SCI Jason X Thir 13en Ghost Scare Tactics Outer Limits
TBS The American President IStepmom
TCM The Uninvited Portrait of Jennie Picture ol Dorian Gray
TLC David Blane - Street Jump London Sports Disasters Trading Spaces Famil David Blane
TNT Charmed Charmed Charmed The Craft
USA Monk Monk Monk Law & Order SVU The Dead Zone

HBO Sex and the City Carnivale 17 Unscripte Secret Windowv Real Sport
@2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service


ACROSS DOWN -
1. Sings like Ella 1. Cul-de-_ _
6. Rice Krispies 2. Caveman's weapon
sound 3. Height: Prefi\
10. Doorframe part 4. Slave awa -
14. Give the OK to 5. "Neato!" .
15. New Ager John 6. Key grip, e.g. -'
16. Quarter-miler's path 7. "Quo Vadi<.?" emperor_ .
17. Living doll 8. Songwriters' org.
18. Big name in oil 9. Vacation memorabilia. _
19. Putter's target 10. Cornmeal bread ,
20. Bearded farm animal 11. Keep clear of
22. Cairo's river ,12. "Atlantic City'
23. Artist Krasner director Louis ,
24. Whacked hard 13. Extort money from
26. Meat loaf serving 21. Orbital periods "
30. "I see!" 25. FedEx rival
32. U-2 pilot, e.g. 26. Healthful resorts
33. Walt Kelly critter 27. Tribal history
34. Four-star review 28. Petri dish gel .
36. Suffix with land or 29. '40s teen girl
moon 31. Be of use to
40. Al-Jazeera viewer 35. Gofer
41. Traffic tangle 37. Gung-ho -
43. Stratford's river 38. Yankee Doodle's
44. _-Croatian mount
46. In _ straits 39. Some pass catchers
47. Warm-hearted 42. Wallace's 1968
4r8 ,Starchy tuber :" running mate'
50. Hightail it 45. Granola tidbit _
51. Breyers rival 49. Teenagers' rooms, -
52. Act the blowhard often -
56. Slowpoke at the track 52. Wacko -
58. Packard or Kaiser 53. Angler's boxful
59. New Jersey 54. Of service
peninsula 55. Dude's place
64. Cereal "for kids" 57. Casper of.
65. Snooty one cartoondom, e.g.
66. Significant person? 60. "creature was
68. Prefix with cast or stirring ..."
commute 61. Grid great Graham '.
69. Opposite of endo-70. 62. State with a
"Goosebumps" author R. L. five-sided flag .
71. River of Flanders 63. Role for Reeve or ,
72. One-horse carriage Reeves
73. Honeybunch 67. Hi-_ graphics

Crossword Puzzle Anwer.

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CABLEurrent LIVE OA

2 ShopNBC 21 Information 38 Discovery Channel 55 Cartoon Network-
3 WCJB (ABC) Gainesville (20) 22 Marketplace 39 TBS 56 Fox Sports Net ''
4 WJXT (IND) Jacksonville (4) 23 Home Shopping Network 40 Headline News 57 PAXtv
5 WUFT (PBS) Gainesville (5) 24 CNN 41 Fox News 58 Sci-fi Channel ,
6 WCTV (CBS) Tallahassee (6) 25 TNT 42 MSNBC 59 Game Show Network
7 WFXU (UPN) Live Oak (57) 16 Nickelodeon 43 CNBC 60 AMC
8 Community Bulletin Board 27 MTV 44 C-Span 2 61 Lifetime Movie Network
9 WB 28 Spike TV 45 E! 62 Comedy Central '
10 WTLH (FOX) Tallahassee (49) 29 A&E 46 The Travel Channel 63 CMT -
11 The Weather Channel 30 ABC Family 47 HGTV 64 Oxygen
12 WTWC (NBC) Tallahassee (40) 31 Disney Channel 48 The Learning Channel 65 Bravo
13 QVC 32 Lifetime 49 The History Channel 66 WE (Women's Entertainment)
14 C-Span 33 USA Network 50 Animal Planet 67 FX
15 TV-Guide 34 BET 51 Food Network 68 CNBC -"
16 WGN (IND) Chicago 35 ESPN 52 TBN 69 TV Land
17 Special Events 36 ESPN 2 53 INSP 70 Fit tv
20 Local 37 Sunshine Network 54 VH-1 71 Discovery Health


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 20&.1









Naming Names.


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A guide for your

viewing pleasure


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Monday Evening February 7, 2005

.gXUJABC Exlrerme MPIakeoier H The Bachelorelle Super Nanny Local LiCal Jirnrmy K
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Tuesday Evening February 8, 2005

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The Diet


New "Super Be
By Charles Stuart Platkin
In an effort to combat obesi-
ty and become your next diet
guru, the U.S. government has
issued new dietary guidelines
- eat fewer calories and ex-
ercise more. Yet, people have
known that for years - and as
a country we're still getting
fatter. Why? Maybe it's be-
cause we have no idea what a
calorie really represents.
We need some way to com-
pare the relative "values" of
the foods we eat. For instance,
what if the Food and Drug
Administration required
restaurants and food manufac-
turers to put an "exercise
equivalent" on menus and
food labels? Instead of calo-
ries, they would tell you how
long you'd have to exercise to
bum off what you're about to
eat.
Just think about the impli-
cations. Knowing that we
have to walk for 14 hours,
roughly 43 miles, in order to
bum off 1 pound of fat -
well, that would certainly dis-
courage me from eating. After
all, it's much easier to imagine
passing up a day of overeating
ice cream, chips and fried
chicken than it is to see your-
self walking 43 miles.
And when would be the
perfect time to launch this
new food label? How about
the biggest snacking event of
the year - the Super Bowl?
The following will give you
an idea of the exercise equiva-
lents for some of your favorite
Super Bowl snacks.
SINGLE TORTILLA
CHIP TOPPED WITH
7-LAYER DIP = 9.5
MINUTES OF
CLIMBING THE
STADIUM STAIRS
To make seven-layer dip -
perfect for dipping tortilla
chips - refried beans are lay-
ered with guacamole, sea-
soned sour cream, veggies
and cheese. That's some seri-
ous calorie damage! Every
time you dip into this combi-
nation, you're looking at
about 10 minutes of climbing
the stadium stairs (based on
60 to 70 calories per ounce,
depending on the recipe, plus
one restaurant-style chip,
which has about 22 calories,
for a grand total of almost 90
calories).
Diet Pro: Use light or baked
chips and switch to salsa - 2
tablespoons have only about
15 calories.
SINGLE RITZ
CRACKER WITH
CHEEZ WHIZ = 13
MINUTES OF
PERFORMING IN A
MARCHING BAND
Yes, that's right, a simple
Ritz cracker has 16 calories,
and just a tablespoon of Kraft
Cheez Whiz contains 45 calo-
ries, for a grand total of 61
calories in a single bite.
Diet Pro: Avoid the cracker
altogether and cut up small
squares of low-fat cheese -
you really won't notice the
difference. In fact, you would
probably eat cardboard if
someone put it in front of you
during the game.
"NICE SIZE" HELPING
OF MEAT LASAGNA =
RUNNING 89
FOOTBALL FIELDS
You're looking at pasta,
mozzarella, creamy ricotta,
meat and other assorted high-
calorie goodies. A 9-ounce
portion (which is pretty large)
has about 500 to 700 calories,
again depending on the ingre-
dients used.


Diet Pro: Skip the meat, cut
back on the cheese and bulk
up on extra vegetables.
TWO HANDFULS OF
POTATO CHIPS =
RUNNING 45
FOOTBALL FIELDS
Two handfuls of chips -
about 2 ounces - have about
300 calories. Oh, and if you
add just 2 tablespoons of
onion dip (about 60 calories),
you'll be running another nine
football fields.
Diet Pro: Make homemade
pita chips with margarine
spray, or try Low Fat Kettle


Detective


iwl" food label
Chips and save more than a
few football fields. Use plain
non-fat yogurt instead of sour
cream to mix up the dip.
TWO SLICES OF PIZZA
= DOING "THE WAVE"
1,182 TIMES
A typical slice has at least
260 calories, but don't forget
about the toppings which
would require additional
"waves."
Diet Pro: Try cheeseless
pizza with plenty of veggies
- broccoli, spinach, toma-
toes, zucchini, mushrooms or
even artichoke hearts - on
top. Or go for thin-crust pizza
with vegetable toppings in-
stead of meat and extra
cheese. Also, avoid personal
pan and stuffed-crust pizza:
The thick, oily crust equals
added fat and calories.
HANDFUL OF BEER
NUTS = 21 MINUTES OF
CHEERLEADING
While nuts are a good
source of "healthy" fat and
protein, they are packed with
calories. Beer nuts have, bout
170 calories per ounce, which
is just about a handful.
Diet Pro: Munch your heart
out on Kashi, Cheerios or
some other delicious low-cal
cereal.
SINGLE NACHO CHIP
WITH FIXINGS =
9 MINUTES OF
FOOTBALL TRAINING
CAMP
You're talking serious calo-
ries here - 85 per tortilla
chip, mainly because it's
topped with beef, chili sauce,
refried beans, melted cheddar,
tomatoes, sour cream and
guacamole.
Diet Pro: Use reduced- or
non-fat cheese, baked chips,
non-fat refried beans and non-
fat sour cream.
ONE CUP OF CHILI =
149 TOUCHDOWN
DANCES IN THE END
ZONE
A cup of clul, packed, withl
beef, beans, peppers, onions
and other assorted vegetables
comes to about 350 calories.
A blob of sour cream and
some shredded cheese adds
150 calories or more, for a
grand total of 500 calories.
Diet Pro: Replace the beef
with ground turkey breast, or
make the chili vegetarian. Top
it with non-fat sour cream and
cheese.
ONE FRIED CHICKEN
DRUMSTICK =
PLAYING PRO
FOOTBALL FOR 13
MINUTES
It's about 140 to 160 calo-
ries per drumstick - not bad
if that's all you eat. But keep
in mind all the fat you get
from deep-frying.
Diet Pro: Make grilled
chicken breast strips in the
oven using cooking spray and
some spices. Serve with a
ketchup dipping sauce.
ONE OREO DOUBLE
STUF COOKIE = PRO
FOOTBALL COACHING
FOR 15 MINUTES
You think it's easy? With
the stress, pacing up and down
the sidelines, waving your
arms and screaming, coaching
pro. football takes its toll. But
in the end, you're still only
burning one 70-calorie Oreo
Double Stuf for 15 minutes.
Diet Pro: Have a few
chocolate meringue cookies
instead. Try Miss Meringue's
sugar-free, fat-free cookies -
they're amazing. (www.miss-
meringue.com)
Note: These activities
would only be necessary if


you've exceeded your recom-
mended daily calorie al-
lowance based on your height
and weight.
Charles Stuart Platkin is a
nutrition and public health
advocate, author of the best-
selling book "Breaking the
Pattern" (Plume, 2005), the
book "The Automatic Diet"
(Hudson Street Press/Pen-
guin Group USA, 2005) and
founder of Integrated Well-
ness Solutions. Copyright
2005 by Charles Stuart
Platkin. Write to info@thedi-
etdetective.coin


PAGE 11B


FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 4, 2005


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK





FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


BUSINESS


Gold Kist employees recognized as Employee of the Year200


Gold Kist employees
recognized as Employee
of the Year 2004 are: Out-
standing Supervisory Em-
ployee - Broiler Flock Su-
pervisor George Haas;
Outstanding Administra-
tive Support Employee -
Feed Haul Operations
Scheduling Clerk Kathy
Bechet; and Outstanding
Operations Support Em-
ployee - Feed Mill Opera-
tions Lead Maintenance
Darren Boswell.
Fellow employees
throughout its 1600 mem-
ber Florida Division oper-


nations submit each year
nominations for Employee
of the Year. Outstanding
employees can be nomi-
nated as either Outstand-
ing Supervisory Employ-
ee, Outstanding Staff Sup-
port Employee or Ous-
tanding Operations Sup-
port Employee.
As part of the process,
fellow employees are se-
lected by various depart-.
ment managers to be mem-
bers of a selection com-
mittee comprised of a
cross section of units and
groups. Prior to the selec-


tion process each entry is
coded to insure anonymi-
ty. Entries are evaluated
using three factors: job
competence, impact and
special efforts. Using cri-
teria for each, specific fac-
tors of the nominations are
reviewed, and ranked. Af-
ter all entries are ranked,
the top scorer in each cat-
egory is the employee of
the year.
Each winner is present-
ed with a certificate, a
plaque commemorating
the selection and a $500
savings bond.


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GOLD KIST OUTSTANDING ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT AWARD: Pictured, I to r, Division Manag-
er Gerald Driggers, Feed Mill Manager Doug Chastain, Field Operations Manager Harold Hunt,
Scheduling Clerk Kathy Bechet and President John Bekkers. - Photo: Submitted
DOWLIGPARK Look for the Dowling Park

" . : Gazette in the Feb. 16 edition

f theSuuwannee Democrat


GOLD KIST OUTSTANDING OPERATIONS SUPPORT AWARD: Pictured, I to r, Division Mahler
Gerald Driggers, Feed Mill Superintendent Hyman Frier, Feed Mill Lead Maintenance Dafren
Boswell, Field Operations Manager Harold Hunt and President John Bekkers. - Photo: Submitted
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GOLD KIST OUTSTANDING SUPERVISORY AWARD: Pictured, I to r, Division Manager Gerald - io-
ager arol Hut ad resist Joh Bekkers. - hoto: Submitte


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PAGE 12B


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AGRICULTURE


Double-digit growth for Florida Ag in the classroom in 2004


SIntroducing innovative pro-
grams and tapping grassroots
rmtworks helped Florida Agri-
culiure in the Classroom, Inc.
increase the number of teach-
ers and students reached last
year Florida Ag in the Class-
room grew by 71 percent the
i;nimber of teachers reached,
and b\ 26 percent the number
IfStudents affected in 2004.
'\heln we called on our
!dticated industry volunteers,
6tey came through in a big,
''," said Scott Emerson,
Ocairman of Florida Ag in the
.Tassroom. "They understand
ttie importance of the pro-
griam and are eager to help ed-
caite and expose teachers and
$Stdents to Florida agricul-
ture. We appreciate very
miich all they do for us."
Florida Ag in the Class-
rgom's mission: Expand
yquth awareness and under-
standing of Florida agricul-
ture and natural resources by
integ-r.ang agricultural con-
cepts into core educational
discipline and Florida Ag in
the Classroom's supporting
program-..
it's top priorities: To devel-
op, promote and disseminate
current curricula, materials
and programs to increase
agricultural literacy among
edic:uiors and youth; to culti-
vate and maintain partner-


ships between Florida Ag in
the Classroom and Florida's
agricultural community, edu-
cators and the National Ag in
the Classroom program; to
build financial strength for
Florida Ag in the Classroom
programs; and to be account-
able for the educational and
financial efficacy of Florida
Ag in the Classroom pro-
grams.
Gainesville-based Florida
Ag in the Classroom is fund-
ed by the agriculture specialty
tag - the Ag Tag - and takes
seriously its responsibility to
educate students and teachers
who are unfamiliar with agri-
culture. It offers curricula and
materials that help teachers
incorporate agricultural con-
cepts in their language arts,
math, science and social stud-
ies classes in kindergarten
through 12th grade.
To support teachers and
grassroots efforts, Florida Ag
in the Classroom introduced
three new programs and
events: AgriSmarts, Ag
Learning Barns and Agricul-
ture Literacy Day. These pro-
grams helped raise awareness
of Florida agriculture to more
than 5,800 teachers and more
than 229,000 students in
2004, up from 3,391 teachers
and 181,758 students in 2003.
Florida Agriculture Com-


missioner Charles Bronson
congratulated Florida Ag in
the Classroom for its success-
ful industry partnerships and
its growing number of student
and teacher constituents.
"Reaching Florida's stu-
dents and teachers with the
message of the importance of
agriculture is a key part of
preserving Florida's farming
heritage," Commissioner
Bronson said. "It's clear
Florida Ag in the Classroom
is working hard to reach out
to as many students and
teachers as possible with the
help of its partners, and we
wish them continued success
as they try to reach out to
even more."
To continue to grow the
number of students and teach-
ers it reaches in 2005, Florida
Ag in the Classroom is re-
designing and relocating its
web site to make ordering
materials and participating in
workshops and other pro-
grams easier. In addition, it is
improving its existing pro-
grams and introducing new
ones with the help of its board
of directors of industry repre-
sentatives and its new Educa-
tor and Volunteer advisory
panels.
"We believe the best way to
improve on what we're doing
is to ask the advice of the


teachers and industry volun-
teers who are using our mate-
rials and programs," Emerson
said.
As part of its grassroots
network, Florida Ag in the
Classroom has partnered with
students who are already fa-
miliar with Florida agricul-
ture - FFA members. To help
spread the word about the im-
portance of Florida agricul-
ture, Florida Ag in the Class-
room and Florida FFA devel-
oped AgriSmarts, an educa-
tional program used by FFA
chapters to teach school chil-
dren and civic organizations
about Florida Ag in the Class-
room and Florida agriculture.
Florida Ag in the Class-
room has spent $13,000 on
AgriSmarts since its inception
in 2002. It reached 15 schools
and nearly 1,200 students dur-
ing the 2003-04 school year,
Florida Ag in the Classroom
estimates. It's being offered
again this school year.
In addition, Florida Ag in
the Classroom has awarded
agriscience teachers $20,000
in grant money for outreach
programs since the 2001-02
school year, and $100,000 for
the initial funding of the
Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Ser-
vices' AgriScience Leader-
ship Program.


Another new program, Ag
Learning Barn, has taken off
since its inception in mid
2003. Thirty-five counties
have signed up for barns,
about half of which have built
their barns and are moving
them to schools. Two more
counties are waiting for ap-
proval.
Ag Learning Barns are mo-
bile units built to look like red
barns and outfitted with
shelves that hold books,
videos, games and toys that
teachers can borrow to teach
their students the importance
of agriculture. Florida Ag in
the Classroom reimburses
each county representative's
organization up to $1,000 to
build and stock the barn, and
offers $350 after the first
school year to restock it.
County Farm Bureau mem-
bers, University of
Florida/IFAS extension
agents, Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services representatives and
industry association represen-
tatives have taken the lead on
building Ag Learning Barns
in their counties. In addition
to building and stocking the
barns, these industry partners
move the barns to five
schools during the school
year.
These industry partners, to-


gether with FFA students and
teachers, are the key partici-
pants involved in another new
Florida Ag in the Classroom
initiative, Agriculture Litera-
cy Day.
Florida's first Ag Literacy
Day held March 16, 2004
generated interest from 282
industry volunteers, more
than Florida Ag in the Class-
room expected. It's set for
March 17 this year.
In honor of that day, indus-
try volunteers read a designat-
ed book about agriculture and
distribute book marks listing
Florida farmers' contributions
to the state's economy and en-
vironment to elementary
school students around the
state.
Industry participants visited
more than 2,000 classrooms
and 41,000 students in honor
of Ag Literacy Day in 2004.
Florida Ag in the Classroom
spent about $10,000 on the
event, much of it on buying
the books that were donated
to school libraries.
Florida Ag in the Class-
room reached even more
teachers and students through
other special efforts.
"We are proud of the
strong growth we experienced
in 2004, and we will work
hard to do the same in 2005,
"Emerson said.


Bronson announces increased wildfire threat


'Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services Commis-
stoner Charles H. Bronson
today announced an elevated
wildfire threat in Florida
forests dJmaged by the 2004
hurricanes.
"From Naples to Pensaco-
I.i;imany once-scenic stands
of trees are now tangled
masses of trunks and limbs,"
B oir,'i.n ' ijd. "This addi-
tional debris will make wild-
fires more difficult to control
-and more dangerous for our
firefighters."


Many trees damaged by
high winds or inundated by
heavy rains are expected to
die from insect and disease
infestations over the next
two years. This scenario,
combined with tinder-dry
grasses and frost-damaged
brush, means conditions in
Florida are conducive to an
active wildfire season.
Bronson is urging people
who visit parks or forests to
be especially careful with
lighted materials, such as
cigarettes.


In addition, smoke from
wildfires can contribute to
reduced visibility on the
highways.
"The best decision is to
not drive in poor visibility,"
Bronson said. "But, if smoke
or fog is encountered on the
highway, motorists should
slow down, turn on the low-
beam headlights and remain
alert."
When visibility deterio-
rates to the point that contin-
ued travel is unsafe, mo-
torists are advised to pull all


the way off of the roadway
and turn on their emergency
flashers until the smoke sub-
sides.
Bronson is also reminding
people to be very careful
when burning yard trash out-
doors. Outdoor burning to
reduce yard trash and house-
hold paper products is al-
lowed in most Florida coun-
ties (daylight-hours only)
provided the fire is enclosed


in a noncombustible contain-
er or excavated pit and cov-
ered by a metal mesh or grill.
The fire must be located
away from any occupied
buildings and any nearby
woodlands and must be at-
tended at all times. Resi-
dents are .urged' to contact
their local Division of
Forestry office to find out if
weather conditions make
outdoor burning unsafe.


Wildfires can occur
throughout the year in Flori-
da, but the most active part
of the wildfire season is usu-
ally from January through
May. Florida averages about
5,000 wildfires each year.
Since January 1, Florida has
experienced 191 wildfires
that burned 1,547 acres.
Many of those fires were the
result of .-capcd outdoor
yard trash burning.


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PAGE 13B


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005








PAGE 14B U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


By The

NUMBERS /i

Through games of Jan. 31


Il I


UI4 week


EASTERN DIVISION
SEC All Top 25 PF
Kentucky 7-0 16-2 1-2 75.1
Florida 5-1 13-4 0-1 82.1
South Carolina 3-4 11-7 0-4 69.3
Vanderbilt 3-4 12-8 1-2 72.5
Tennessee 3-4 10-10 1-4 70.0
Georgia 1-6 7-10 0-3 63.8
WESTERN DIVISION
SEC All Top 25 PF
Alabama 6-1 17-3 1-2 78.7
LSU 4-2 11-6 1-3 75.6
Miss. State 4-3 16-5 0-3 74.0
Arkansas 2-5 14-6 0-4 76.9
Ole Miss 2-6 11-10 0-3 66.2
Auburn 1-5 10-9 0-3 74.4


Average per game
FIELD-GOAL PCT.
Florida. ............ . ..
Alabama ...................
Arkansas ...................
South Carolina ................
Vanderbilt. ...................
Tennessee ...................
Kentucky ...................
FREE-THROW PCT.


LSU ...........
Alabama. .........
Auburn .........
Tennessee ........
Florida. . . . . . . . ..
Vanderbilt ........
Miss. State.......


02005 Longwing Publications Inc
GAME OF THE WEEK

Alabama at Florida


. . . . . . . . 756
. . . . . . . . .734
. . . . . . . . .723
. . . . . . . . 699
. . . . . . . . .694
. . . . . . . .690
. . . . . . . . . . 678


FIELD-GOAL PCT. DEFENSE


Kentucky . . .
Miss. State ...
Arkansas. . . .
Alabama. . . .
Vanderbilt . ..
Florida. . . . .
South Carolina


Miss. State.
Alabama. .
Florida. ..
Kentucky .
LSU. ....
Arkansas. .
Vanderbilt .


S . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .393
..... . . . . . . . . . . . .394
..... . . . . . . . . . . . . .407
... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .413
.... . . . . . . . . . . . . .415
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 1


REBOUNDING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41.9
. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..38.4
. . . . . . . . . . . . ..37.8
. . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . 37.6
......... . . ...... 35.9
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35.5
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 33.8
BLOCKS


Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... 6.1
Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... 5.0
Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.8
Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.5
LSU. ................... .... 4.3
South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1
Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.7
ASSISTS
Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 16.6
Kentucky ..... . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 16.3
Florida. .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 16.2
Arkansas. .... . . . . . . . . . . ..... 15.9
LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.5
Ole Miss. .................. . 15.3
Miss. State. . ................. 15.0
' -, - . : . *; ; .* 1 . " -: - ..'*

SCORING
Lawrence Roberts, Miss. State . . . . . . 18.6
Anthony Roberson, Florida. . . . . . . . 18.2
Toney Douglas, Auburn. . . . . . . . . . 17.8
Kennedy Winston, Alabama . . . . . . . . .. 17.8
Earnest Shelton, Alabama. . . . . . . . . 17.4
Brandon Bass, LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.2
REBOUNDING
Lawrence Roberts, Miss. State . . . . . ... 11.3
Brandon Bass, LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.8
Chuck Hayes, Kentucky . . . . . . . . . ... 8.7
Glen Davis, LSU ................ 8.7
Jermareo Davidson, Alabama ......... 8.6
David Lee, Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.9
FIELD-GOAL PCT.
Brandon Bass, LSU. . . . . . . . . . . ... .585
Carlos Powell, South Carolina . . . . . ... ..573
Anthony Roberson, Florida. ......... ..502
Ronnie Brewer, Arkansas . . . . . . . .... ..494
Kennedy Winston, Alabama . . . . . . ... ..480
Lawrence Roberts, Miss. State . . . . . . . . .477
FREE-THROW PCT.
Anthony Roberson, Florida. .......... . .898
Ian Young, Auburn . ............. .884
Matt Walsh, Florida. ........ .... . . . . .872
Darrel Mitchell, LSU .............. 868
Brandon Bass, LSU. . . . . . . . . . . ... .835
Chuck Davis, Alabama . . . . . . . . .... ..825
ASSISTS


Tack Minor, LSU ....
Gary Ervin, Miss. State
Ronald Steele, Alabama .
Patrick Sparks, Kentucky
C.J. Watson, Tennessee. .
lan Young, Auburn . . . .


. . . . . . . . . 5.4
. . . . . . . . . . . 5.3
. . . . . . . . . 5.2
. ........ . 4.9
......... . 4.9
. . . . . . . . . 4.6


BLOCKS
Steven Hill, Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6
Shagari Alleyne, Kentucky . . . . . . . .... 2.1
Chuck Davis, Alabama. . . . . . . . . . ... 2.0
Brandon Bass, LSU . . . . . . . . . . .... .1.8
Darian Townes, Arkansas . . . . . . . . .1.8
Brandon Wallace, South Carolina .. . . . ..1.6


pair of teams with aspirations of winning the Southeastern
Conference's outright championship meet on Saturday
when the University of Florida hosts Alabama.
After opening conference play with a blowout loss to
Vanderbilt, the Crimson Tide has won six straight league games
and is currently sitting on top of the SEC West standings. Among
those conference victories were wins at Arkansas, Ole Miss and
Auburn, but the Crimson Tide could be in for their toughest road
test of the season at the O'Connell Center.
A win Saturday would not only strengthen Alabama's grip on
the SEC West, but also would move Mark Gottfried closer to what
could be a winner-take-all bout Feb. 26 against Kentucky.
Despite their 13-4 record and 5-1 mark in league play, the
Gators have had trouble gaining respect. Perhaps the national
pollsters still feel like they were burned for annointing Florida as
the nation's top team early in the 2003-04 season, which ended
with a first-round loss to Manhattan in the NCAA tournament.
SSome expected the Qators to struggle after they lost Matt Walsh
to a foot injury in early January. Florida was upetl . FlindJ.iESiie
on Jan. 2, but still managed to win four out of its first five SEC
games.
With Walsh back in the lineup, Florida is back at full strength
and ready to make a run at Kentucky. However, Saturday is a
must-win situation if Billy Donovan's club plans to keep pace
with the Wildcats.
% Records: Alabama 17-3 (6-1 SEC West); Florida 13-4 (5-1 SEC
Ea:,1 I Coaches: Alabama's Mark Gottfried (204-102); Florida's
Billy Donovan (217-10 SI Tip-off: 3 p.m. ET Saturday. g TV:
Jefferson Pilot.
Keys for Alabama: Knock down the outside shot. In last
Sunday's win over Georgia, the Crimson Tide was 3-of-16 from
behind the arc.... Avoid turnovers. In the Georgia game, Alabama
committed a season-high 26 turnovers.
Keys for Florida: Dominate the glass. Florida has outrebounded
its last four conference foes.... A solid defensive effort. The
Gators held South Carolina to 39.3 percent shooting in the first
half, and finished with five blocked shots.


The Rest of the Matchups

Mississippi State at Auburn
SRecords: Mississippi State 16-5 (4-3 SEC West); Auburn 10-9
(1-5 SEC West). I Coaches: Mississippi State's Rick Stansbury
(142-69); Auburn's Jeff Lebo (125-72). Tip-off: 1 p.m. CT
Saturday. g TV: None.
Keys for Mississippi State: Stansbury needs to use the game as
an opportunity to find the right mix. He has experimented with
several lineups since losing guard Winsome Frazier last
month... Forget about taking outside shots. All the Bulldogs
have to do is go inside and exploit Auburn's lack of height.
Keys for Auburn: Production from Toney Douglas, the
conference's top freshman, who was held to nine and five points,
respectively, last week against Alabama and Tennessee.... Put
the ball on the floor, drive to the hoop and get to the line. Auburn
is averaging a little more than 12 free-throw attempts in
conference play.

Kentucky at Vanderbilt
Records: Kentucky 16-2 (7-0 SEC East); Vanderbilt 12-8 (3-4
SEC E.l . Coaches: Kentucky's Tubby Smith (331-116);


Illustration by Bruce Plante � 2005



ek respect

Vanderbilt's Kevin Stallings (220-140). a Tip-off: 2 p.m. CT
Saturday. g TV: Jefferson Pilot.
Keys for Kentucky: Take away the 3-point line. In the
Wildcats' 69-54 victory over Vanderbilt earlier this year,
Vanderbilt hit nine 3-pointers against eight two-point field
goals.... Keep Vanderbilt off the boards. The Commodores
grabbed only 21 rebounds at Rupp Arena.
Keys for Vanderbilt: No lapses. In the earlier loss at Kentucky,
the Commodores trailed by only three points before missing a
layup and four straight 3-pointers.... Dawid Przybyszewski has
to provide something inside. It's amazing that a 7-foot-2 player is
considered a 3-point threat rather than a dominant post player.

South Carolina at Georgia
Records: South Carolina 11-7 (3-4 SEC East); Georgia 7-10
(1-6 SEC E.at. : Coaches: South Carolina's Dave Odom
(346-223); Georgia's Dennis Felton (123-78).a Tip-off: 4 p.m.
ET SaturdJ\. T\ : None. . , . . _
ke, ; oi Souitl Carolina: Deny Georgia second chances. The
Bulldogs were able to grab 10 offensive rebounds in a 74-54 loss
at South Carolina on Jan. 8.... Make Georgia find options other
than Levi Stukes and Sundiata Gaines.
Keys for Georgia: Avoid foul trouble. Georgia had six players
foul out against Alabama, allowing the Crimson Tide to take 42
free throws .... Get off to a good start. The Bulldogs, who scored
47 points in losses to Florida and Alabama last week, were
outscored 44-24 in the first half of their first meeting against
South Carolina.

Arkansas at Ole Miss
Records: Arkansas 14-6 (2-5 SEC West); Ole Miss 11-10 (2-6
SEC West). g Coaches: Arkansas' Stan Heath (65-47); Ole Miss'
Rod Barnes (124-86). g. Tip-off: 4 p.m. CT S.iurd':, TV: Fox
Sports Net and Sun Sports.
Keys for Arkansas: Better shooting. The Razorbacks hit 36.4
percent of their shots against a Kentucky team that shot 56.5
percent yet won by only one point last Saturday.... Production
from the bench. The reserves have accounted for over 40 percent
of Arkansas' points this season.
Keys for Ole Miss: Watch the turnovers. In a 69-46 loss to the
Razorbacks in the conference opener, the Rebels committed 24
turnovers.... Compete inside. Usually a perimeter-oriented
team, Vanderbilt outscored the Rebels 34-16 in the paint last
Saturday..

LSU at Tennessee
g Records: LSU 11-6 (4-2 SEC West); Tennessee 10-10 (3-4
SEC East.... Coaches: LSU's John Brady (220-175);
Tennessee's Buzz Peterson (162-102). ,g Tip-off: 7 p.m. ET
Saturday TV: Fox Sports Net and Sun Sports.
Keys for LSU: Darrel Mitchell has to complement the inside
play of Brandon Bass and Glen Davis with his shooting. Mitchell
had 20 points on 6-of-12 shooting, including three 3-pointers, in
last Saturday's win over Mississippi State .... Contain Tennessee
point guard C.J. Watson, a candidate for the Bob Cousy
Collegiate Point Guard of the Year, who is coming off a 17-point
effort against Auburn.
Keys for Tennessee: Center Major Wingate has to compete
inside. Wingate failed to score a field goal and grabbed only three
rebounds in last Saturday's loss at Auburn ... Better shooting
from Scooter McFadgon, who is 9-of-35 in his last three games.


ALABAMA The Crimson Tide had to
wait one day to put on its
best defensive performance of the season. In
last Sunday's 75-47 victory over Georgia,
which was postponed a day after Georgia
was unable to get to the game because of icy
weather, Alabama held the Bulldogs to 31.5
percent shooting. Alabama also forced 24 .,
turnovers, including a season-best 15 steals.

, RKANSAS Acrowdof20,268,the
"\ eighth largest in Bud.
WaltonArena history, witnessed the
Razorbacks' 68-67 loss to Kentucky last
Saturday. It was the fourth consecutive home
game that the Razorbacks have drawn better
than 18,000, something the program hasn't
done in four years.

\ mBURN Thanks to a late 7-0 run, the
Tigers picked up their first
SEC win with a 62-59 victory at Tennessee
last Saturday. "It was nice for our players to
get a W in the SEC," Auburn first-year head
coach JeffLebo said. "I am proud of the
effort that our team gave."
i RfLRIDI A With last Saturday's 80-72
victory over South Carolina,
the Gators found themselves at 5-1 in thie'>
conference standings. "This was an
important game, because of what we talked
about the last couple of weeks," said forwatr
David Lee, who had 18 points and 10 .
rebounds against South Carolina. "It's a
home game, and we really need to protect
our home court if we want to win an SEC
title this year."
, JORGIA Levi Stakes returned to the
Bulldogs' lineup and scored,
seven points in last Sunday's game at
Alabama after missing two games. Stukels
sat out the Bulldogs'lone SEC win at
Vanderbilt on Jan. 22 due to a sprained
ankle, but was suspended for Georgia's
game at Florida on Jan. 25.
ENTUCKIY Forward Chuck Hayes
was 2-of-2 from the'fieltd
and finished last Saturday's victory at
Arkansas with four points and a season-low
two rebounds. Hayes, who entered the game
averaging 11.1 points and 9.1 rebounds per
game, was wearing a protective mask to
protect a broken nose suffered in an 84-62
win at Tennessee on Jan 25.
The Tigers held Mississippi State
\ All-America forward Lawrence
Roberts to 15 points on 3-of-12 shooting
from the field in last Saturday's 69-62 .
victory. "We carried out the game plan,"
LSU head coach John Brady said. "We
shared the ball for the most part, we made it'
tough for them to score, we changed
defenses from time to time."
MISSISSIPPI The Rebels shot just
35.4 percent from the
floor and Tommie Eddie, who had been their
leading scorer in the previous games, was
Held to just two points.,"They did an
excellent job of preventing us from getting
easy baskets. A lot of things we do go
through Tommie Eddie," Ole Miss head
coach Rod Barnes said.
tiiSS STATE Last Saturday's setback
at LSU marked the;,
Bulldogs'third consecutive road loss. - -
Before a 64-63 loss at Tennessee on Jan. 12,
Mississippi State had won a national-best 16
straight on the road. The Bulldogs went 12-0
on the road last season and secured an 80 --
mark in conference play.

~GCAROLINA Freshman reserve
Dwayne Day, who had,
scored only 13 points prior to the
Gamecocks' loss at Florida, scored 14 points
in a span of three minutes in the second half
last Saturday. Day received playing.time'
because Josh Gonner was suspended at ,
halftime after commenting on his lack of
playing time in the first half.
aLrBNNESSEE The Volunteers may'
S N. S have to wait until the
end of the month for senior forward Brandon
Crump to return. Tennessee head coach
Buzz Peterson announced on Jan. 27 that
Crump, who sustained a sprained ankle in a
loss to Louisville on Jan. 22, would be out at
least 2-4 weeks.
VANDERBILT Alex Metcalfe and '-
Alex Gordon replaced
center Dawid Przybyszewski and point
guard Mario Moore in the starting lineup for
last Saturday's game against Ole Miss. .' -
Metcalfe finished with five points and one
rebound in 17 minutes of action, while.
Gordon was held scoreless in 14 minutes.,
"Shaking things is expected when you're .
losing," said Corey Smith, who had a team-
high 14 points as the Commodores snapped
a four-game losing streak.


Gators s


e4


PAGE 14B


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK







1F1, uiti Section C
All February 4, 2005


386-362-1734


Real Estates Listings


b(


INCREASE YOUR

CASH FLO




Employment Opportunities


Make a big splash all over
town and attract more customers
with an advertisement in color. It's
/ a fact that more people read ads
/ - ge with color. Color is lively,
appealing, assertive-and
--" it sells!


NEVER KNOW

WHAT YOU'LL

DISCOVER
General Merchandise
and Services


Mayo
(386) 294-1576
Toll Free: (800) 605-1576
Corner of US 27 and Monroe St.
Mayo, FL 32066
Website: www.southernskyrealty.com


Live Oak
(386) 364-1576
Toll Free: (800) 822-1576
South Oaks Square Shopping Center
1554 South Ohio Avenue
Live Oak, FL 32062


We'll find the right home for you.


HUNTING PROPERTY!! Loaded with :.
Deer, Turkey, and Hogs. Or a great place .
for family camping and getaways. NOTE!! Coin operated car wash with a single wide
Electric in area. AND close to fishing on mobile home currently being rented for
the Gulf. MLS#42136 $35,000 additional income. MLS#42319 $64,900
COZY COTTAGE HEART OF TOWN


- -- ~ -


CUTE!! doesn't begin to describe this
furnished cottage across from the park on
1/2 of a city block. Upgraded kitchen,
windows, roof, and siding to many extras
to mention. MLS#42866 $45,000


This 2 bdrm 1 1/2 bath home can either be
used as commercial or as your residence.
Has an adjacent building currently being
rented. HWY 27 frontage. MLS#43616
$175,000


800-525-4182

FED A RIDE?


Car, Trucks and Motorcycles


For more information about this home, call the

associates of Poole Realty at 386-362-4539.


ANNOUNCEMENTS BUSINESS SERVICES


Card of Thanks
THANK YOU! FROM ALL THE
FREEDOM HOMES FAMILY.
Lost & Found


FSCVRSICNANCIFLSRIE


BRINDLE BULLDOG: Cross puppy
with white markings, male, missing Real Estate
from 119th Rd. on 1/27/05, wearing a
blue collar, needs medication, child First Day
is very upset the dog is missing. WANTED-CUTOVER TIMBERLAND
Reward for his return or location. Cash paid. Call 386-365-3865.
Call 386-362-4477.


Classifieds Work!



REALTOf
529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990
Realtor Assoc. - M. Elizabeth Elliott, Evening 842-2372


(1) Lee, FL: 7.3 Acres on US
90 near I-10 with a 3/4
bedroom CH/AC home
containing approximately
1,750 sq. ft. under roof together
with a C.B.S. Commercial
Building containing
approximately 12,500 with
11,500 sq. ft. of packing.
$250,000.
(2) 75 acres on paved road on
pasture with sbme live oaks,
fenced and cross fenced, two
wells, 1/4 mile on paved Rd.
1/4 mile on county grade, good
area. $3,995 per acre.
(3) 177th Drive: 3 Bedroom, 2
bath central heat and air. Home
containing approximately
1,350 sq. ft. Kitchen furnished
225'137 lot. $72,000.
(4) Jasper, FL: 3 Bedroom, 2
Bath, CH/AC, brick, containing
approximately 1,700 sq. ft., tender
roof. Kitchen furnished 147x97
lot, pool, $95,000..
(5) Off CR 51 S.W.: 20 acres
wooded with large oaks, and a
3BR/2BA, CH/CA DWMH in
excellent condition, contact
office. 2000 sq. ft. under roof,
detached storage $149,500.
(6) 161 /St Rd.: 10 acres with a
four bedroom, three bath,
CH/CA, brick home containing
approximately 2,500 sq. ft.
under roof, kitchen furnished, 3
car garage. REDUCED to
$215,000.
(7) Off CR 249: 3 Bedroom, 1
1/2 bath, CH/AC, home
contains approximately 1,180
sq. ft. 1 1/2 acres of land
(paved road) $55,000. Would
work for S.H.I.P.
(8) Hunting Tract: 13 acres +,
wooded, Steinhatchee Springs
area, river access, and Hwy. 51
access, recent survey. $26,000.
(9) Near Walmart, 70th St.,


Skeen Rd.: 5.81 acres with a 3
bedroom, 2 bath CH&AC 1999
Doublewide mobile home,
kitchen furnished, 4" well,
double car canopy, 34x20
storage etc. Good Buy @
$69,900.
(10) Camping Lot: Ond acre
riverview lot in the Blue
Springs area, river access.
$5,995.
(11) Suwannee at the Gulf:
Nice two bedroom, 1 bath
single wide mobile home,
kitchen furnished on large
canal with approved concrete
bulkhead. Excellent condition.
$97,500.
(12) Perry Fla: Nice two
bedroom, CH/CA, brick home
with garage, good area.
$51,900.
(13) Perry Fla: 3 bedroom,
central heat and air, 218x170'
lot, nice trees, numerous
updates, new carpet, paint,
stove & refrig. 100%
financing. $61,900.
(14) Suwannee River: Four
plus acres with 220 ft. on the
water, 4' well, septic tank,
20x32 and 10x20 buildings.
$110,000.
(15) Meadow Lake: Two four
acre tracts, $20,000 each.
Good area.
(16) US 90 West & 1-10: 32
Acres, zoned C.H.I., corner
tract, will divide.
(17) Houston & Sixth St.:
Two bedroom, one bath frame
home with a 100x160 lot and
75'x120' lot, good buy@
$39,500.
(18) Old Sugar Mill Farm:
Nice one acre tract on paved
road with a 2001 CH&AC DW
mobile home, kitchen
furnished. 12x20 storage
building. Good area. $67,500.
139087-F


Call now for information.


SClassified Marketplace
386-362-1734 or 800-525-4182)


onSy RptRealty
cg . "of Florida, Inc
S. ' Karen Barnhill
Owner and Lic. Real Estate Broker


LEVi


I -


- ~-------~--- I - - I-







-'PAGE 2C VV nFl I ... F....A. FE.BR I UARY- 4. 2005
I-IAUIZ ,-


Win dinner

for two at









See ad in today's "A"section
of the Suwannee Democrat


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
10 nicely wooded Acres, sq. lot on
high ground above 100 yr. flood
zone, approved, for MH or house.
Pwr. line @ front prop. line on road.
Nice hunting area. 3 mi. from dntwn
Jasper & 2 mi. from Hamilton Co.
Jail on Hwy. 51. Land located @
Hwy. 51 & 32nd take a right to
Hamilton Forrest Subdivision LOT
#9. Asking $3500.00 per acre. Call
Jim Strunk @(909) 376-8942.


Ten Acres Pasture/Oak Grove. 1994
23X40 DWMH. 3BD/2BA. New roof,
skirting, CH/A, W/D, Well, Septic &
Power Pole. Lg Shed. On paved rd. 8
mi. to Live Oak, FL, off Hwy 90.
Minutes to proposed year 2007 QH,
TB, Harness Track. Close to
Suwannee River . & Falmouth
Springs. $75,000. Call 561-389-
7695. H. Claire Scott, Broker/Owner.
BK185655.





PERSONAL SERVICES





EDUCATIONAL SERVICES





=ZPETS

LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call .Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072. M-F
from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Pets for Sale
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES
CKC REGISTERED
3 male, 1 female. $200.00 each.
Will hold w/deposit until ready to be
picked up. 386-792-2188





'AGRICULTURE

Feed & Seed

PERENNIAL PEANUT HAY, cattle
grade, 50-55 pound bales, $2.50.
each. Other grades available.
Madison 850-464-3948


Cattle
First Day
Registered Pqlled Hereford Bulls.
For Sale. AgeI: Weaning to 2 yrs.
Call 386-776-?163 evenings.


Collector Items
First Day
FOR SALE Collection of figurines
(miniature pigs). At least 100 single
ones & many sets. Made of assorted
materials-ceramic, porcelain, metal,
etc. 2 curio cabinets included.
$1,000.00. Call 386-362-3123.
Garage/Yard Sales
GARAGE/MOVING SALE
Saturday, Feb. 5, 2005, 8 am-12 pm
Located on 1006 Darrow Ave. Corner
of Westmoreland Street, Live Oak,
FL.
KIWANIS
YARD SALE
February 5, 2005
Old Train Depot in Live Oak, FI.
8 a.m. til 12
Books, clothes, old bikes,
headboard & matching dresser
top. Appartment size stove, &
much more!!
WHITE AVENUE 1402
Live Oak
Sat. Feb. 5th & Sunday Feb. 6th
8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

ESTATE SALE!! Cash Preferred.
Items Include: Beautiful bedroom,
living and dining sets, lounges,
kitchenwares, china, new piano, TV's
and
Lots of Misc. Itemsl!!!
YARD SALE Fri. Feb 4th & Sat. Feb.
5th. 8 a.m.-?. Lots of good stuff! At
5943 Pine Crest, off CR 136. Follow
signs.

Flea Markets
First Day
WILKINSON
a manufacturer of
Fashion Bedding & Accessories
WAREHOUSE SALE
Factory Overruns and Seconds
Decorator Print Fabrics
Comforter Sets-Bedspreads-
Window Coverings- Pillows-
Decorator Chairpads & Placemats.
Saturday, February 5, 2005
DOORS OPEN 8 am - 12 noon
1701 West Gordon Street,
Valdosta, GA
Call for Directions 800-633-2215


Boats/Supplies

FOR SALE 1968 19 ft. Skiff Craft I/O
Boat , Motor & Trailer. $3500. OBO.
Like new. Call 386-364-5589.


Campers/Motor Homes
FOR SALE Camper, 1994 Prowler
24'. Separate bedroom, Queen Bed,
also sleeper couch. Very clean.
Hitch, awning. Must See! $4500.
firm. Phone 386-963-2817.





REAL ESTATE FOR RENT
Apartments
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal to
advertise "any preference, limitation
or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability, familial
status or national origin, or an
intention, to make any such
preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of 18
living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain of
discrimination call HUD toll-free 1-
800-669-9777. The toll-free number
for the hearing impaired is 1-800-
927-9275


Houses for Rent
First Day
HOUSE FOR RENT 1BR/1BA Brand
New House CHA Screened Porch,
$600/mo, 1st, last & $300. sec. dep.
1 mi. from Live Oak, Fl city limits. NO
PETS! 386-362-3002
First Day
One Bedroom/One Bath. Small
Home in Live Oak, FL. Furnished,
w/washer & dryer, central heat & air.
$425. per mo. 1st & last plus $200.00
deposit.Call 386-867-1097.
Mobile Homes for rent
First Day
Single Wide Mobile Home for rent in
O'Brien, FL. 2BD/2BA, $350.00 per
mo. 1st, last & security dep. req'd.
Call 386-935-2921 or 386-362-4311.

First Day
Two Bedroom/One Bath 14X70.
Furnished, central heat & air. In Live
Oak, FL. $425. per mo. 1st & last
I.u~s._$2.0 _d.eppo.it. Cal[._386-867-
1097. ,.., ; ,., -.


Storage

CUSTOM CONTAINER
& STORAGE
www.customstorage2u.com
40X8X8 steel, ground level, dry,
lockable, storage at your location
Commercial or residential,
FREE delivery/pickup
with annual rental.
Call (386) 935-6933





REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


FOR SALE BY OWNER
WITH FINANCING

1) 4 AC. on 35th just off 137,
$30,000.
2) 5 AC. on 193rd just offf 90W
$30,000. (Well, Septic & Pwr. Pole).
3) 2 AC. two miles off 90 in Eastern
Madison Co. $12,500.00. 4) 1/4 AC.
Northern Suwannee Co. $5,000.
Mobile Homes or Houses.
(386) 935-2301



-FOR RENT-
2 RR c;in lewide


S" 111, You can Reach
mobile home, Over 4 Million

central H/A. Potential Buyers

First month's for your product

rent plus deposit through our Internet
and Newspaper
to move in. Network in Florida

Water, sewer, & and throughout

garbage included, the Nation.
NAn tn Call Louise at


386-330-2567


-FOR RENT-

3BR, Singlewide

mobile home.

Central H/A.

First month's

rent plus deposit

to move in.

Water, sewer &

garbage included.

No pets.

386-330-2567
133437-F


OWNER FINANCE
O'Brien - Spacious 3BR/2BA on
2.03 acres. Beautiful Oak Trees Sm.
down & $695.00 mo.
Call (386) 758-9785

Homes for Sale
Country Home 2001 3BD/2BA in
Live Oak, FL. Open plan overlooking
3+ quiet acres. Sep. gar. w/ apt. over.
Front & Back Porches. Asking
$250,000. OBO. Call 386-364-8094.
FOR SALE 3BD/1&1/2BA home,
brick veneer. Recently renovated,
excellent condition. 630 Colonial
St., Live Oak, FL. $82,500.00. Call
386-963-3445 or 386- 365-1130.

Mobile Homes
DoubleWide, 2005, 2300 square
feet, 4 bedroom, 2 bath, setup on lot,
2 miles from Walmart $645.00
month. Call Ken 386-365-5370
IF YOU OWN LAND OR HAVE A
LARGE DOWN PAYMENT I MAY
OWNER FINANCE A
MANUFACTURED HOME FOR
YOU! CALL STEVE 386-365-8549.
LAND AND HOME PACKAGES
CLOSE TO LAKE CITY.. ITS WHAT
WE DO BEST PAVED ST, CITY
WATER AND SEWER, YOU PICK
THE HOME, WE DO THE REST
AND FREEDOM HOMES MAY
OWNER FINANCE! 386-752-5355
NO MONEY DOWN! New 2005
doublewide. On your land. $334. per
month. Call Lee 386-365-8988.
One of a kind Manufactured Log
home 4 bedroom. Perfect for a
country setting. Call Jim' 386-303-
1557.
OWNER FINANCE
E. of Branford-close to beautiful
Itchetucknee River- 3BD/2BA MH
Small down, $625/mo. 386-758-9785

Remodeled manufactured home on
land. Call Ron 386-397-4960.
TRIPLEWIDE ON 1.8 ACRES LAND
MUST SELL! 386-397-4930.
We love CASHI We will give you the
very best price for a new or used
manufactured home! 386-752-5355
Lots
FIVE, TEN AND TWENTY ACRE
LOTS with well & septic. Owner
financing. Call 386-752-4339.
www.deasbullardbkl.com







EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
needed, two (2) years experience
required Drug Free Work Place.
Call (386) 294-3411.




ii[ I -1 n i i


386-362-1734
134698DH-F


FOR RENT-

3BR, 2BA DWMH,

CENTRAL H/A.
FIRST MONTH'S

RENT PLUS

DEPOSIT TO

MOVE IN.

WATER, SEWER
& GARBAGE

INCLUDED.
NO PETS

386-330-2567
133339-F


First Day
SUWANNEE RIVER
ECONOMIC COUNCIL, INC.

Position: Accountant
Location: Suwannee County-
Administrative Office

GENERAL RESPONSIBILITIES:
The incumbent will process
financial transactions of the
organization on the General
Ledger computer system, perform
audit and checking functions in
accordance with instructions, issue
vendor payments and travel
reimbursements as necessary and
prepare and issue financial reports
as directed.

Submit resume to:
Suwannee River Economic
Council, Inc.,
P.O. Box 70
Live Oak, Florida 32064.

Equal Opportunity Employer.
Persons with disabilities are
encouraged to apply for
employment. Should special
accommodations be necessary,
please call (386)362-4115-
Voice/TDD.

Deadline for Receipt of Resume:
February 7, 2005- 4:30 PM.

First Day
LIVE OAK LAB
AGRICULTURAL
TECHNICIAN I
LOCAL
ADVERTISEMENT

Agricultural Technician I- OPS -
Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services, Division of
Animal Industry, Live Oak Animal
disease Diagnostic Laboratory
invites applications for this full-time
position. Main duties will include
assisting and supporting various
animal disease testing procedures,
conducting routine maintenance on a
variety of equipment and machinery,
and performing light construction and
maintenance of facilities and
buildings. Salary range is $9.00-
$9.50 an hour. Normal duty hours
are 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, Monday
through Friday. Minimum
qualifications: a high school diploma
or its equivalent-experience in
farming or livestock operations can
substitute on a year-for-year basis for
the required high school education.
Facilities maintenance experience
preferred. Deadline is Friday,
February 18, 2005, for submitting a
completed State of Florida
Employment Application to Live Oak
Animal Disease Diagnostic
Laboratory (P.O. Drawer 0/912
Nobles Ferry Road, Live Oak, FL
32064). contact person: Dr. James
Maxwell, 386-362-1216.
AN EEO/AA EMPLOYER


Secretarial/Data Input
Desirable Qualification:
1. High School Diploma, including
supplemented by courses in typing
and general business subjects.
2. Two years experience
performing receptionist and/or data
input functions.
3. Attain a minimum typing score
of 45 correct words per minute.
4. Mature and emotional stability
with the ability to get along with
people and follow instructions.
5. Experience with the operation
of a computer and knowledge of
Microsoft Word/Excel and
Database.
Apply at:
Suwannee River Economic
Council, Inc.
1171 Nobles Ferry Road, Bldg. 2
Live Oak, FL 32064

DEADLINE: February 11, 2005
(386) 362-4115 Voice/TDD
Affirmative Action Employer

FT Electrician or A/C Technician
Advent Christian Village
658-JOBS (5627)

FT electrician or A/C technician.
High school diploma or equivalent
desired. Applicable Florida license
as required. Competitive benefits
include health, dental, life,
disability, savings, AFLAC
supplemental policies, access to
onsite daycare and fitness
facilities. EOE; Drug Free
Workplace, Criminal background
checks required. Apply in person at
ACV Personnel Department Mon.
thru Fri, 9:00a.m. until 4:00p.m.,
Carter Village Hall, 10680 CR 136,
Dowling Park, FL; fax resume to
(386) 658-5160 or visit
www.ACVillage.net


First Day






LAKE CITY
CBIMMNNTY CILliE
AVAILABLE POSITIONS

Lake City, Community College
seeks quality employees who
share a commitment to teaching
and learning and developing the
potential that lies within each
student. LCCC is a comprehensive
public, two-year college in North
Central Florida serving a district
the size of Rhode Island.
Successful candidates should
possess a commitment to serving
a culturally diverse student
population.

DEAN. ARTS AND SCIENCES
To begin July 1, 2005- Community
College experience preferred.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR.
TEACHER PREPARATION
ACADEMY
To begin July 1, 2005-Masters
degree w/minimum 6 years in
teaching and leadership position.

INSTRUCTOR/COORDINATOR
TEACHER PREPARATION
ACADEMY
To begin Fall Term-Requires
Masters degree with minimum 18
graduate credit hours in field and
teaching e'r rier, ie- . '. .

MATHEMATICS INSTRUCTOR
To begin Fall Term-Requires
Masters degree with minimum 18
graduate credit hours in field.

Application Deadline: Review of
applications will begin April 1,
2005. Persons interested should
provide application, resume, and
photocopies of transcripts.

Human Resources Development,
Lake City Community College, 149
S.E. College Place, Lake City, FL
32025-2007; Phone (386) 754-
4314; FAX: (386) 754-4594; E-
MAIL: Boettcherg@lakecitycc.edu.

Position details and applications
available on WEB at
www.lakecitycc.edu.

Lake City Community College is
accredited by the Commission on
Colleges of the Southern
Association of Colleges and
Schools.

AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE
ACTION COLLEGE IN
EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT
VETERAN'S PREFERENCE.


CLERICAL
LAKE CITY &
SURROUNDING AREAS
MANY POSITIONS AVAILABLE
CALL FOR APPT
386-755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREENS/BACKGRD REQ.

First Day
driver
3 IMMEDIATE OPENINGS!
NEW PAY PACKAGE
HOME EVERY WEEKEND
GUARANTEED!
Avg. 2444 miles/wkly. CDL-A
required
1-877-428-5627
Jacksonville, FI Terminal
www.ctdrivers.com
First Day
DRIVER: A big WOW!
Start up to $.36 with 4 days off!
KLLM-CDLA-EOE
Lease/Purchase available
866-357-7351
farm help
HELP WANTED
Knowledge of tractor and equipment
is a must. Call 386-330-2567 to
enquire. Drug Free Work Place.
Food Service
COUNTRY KITCHENS
Now hiring, all positions open.
Call 850-971-0024.

MECHANIC
W. B. HOWLAND CO. INC.
Mechanic w/ diesel engine and
hydraulic experience needed
@ W.B. Howland Company.
Full time position with excellent
benefits package. Apply in person
@ Howlands corner of Walker &
1 1th St. or call (386) 362-1235.


For more information about this home, call the

associates of Poole Realty at 386-362-4539.


2806 West US Highway 90
Suite 101, Lake City, FL 32055HYP
HYPERLINK
- "http://www.FloridaAcreage.com"
DANIEL CRAPPS
agency, nc. 1-800-805-7566

(1) 20 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property is located a short distance from
Charles Springs and a boat ramp on the Suwannee River. $3,350 per acre - owner financing
available (Owner/Broker)
(2) 84.50 (+/-) - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property has frontage on CR #49 and has scattered
oak and pine trees. Great home site! $3,000 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(3 65 ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property has frontage on CR #49 and has scattered
oak and pine trees. Great home site $3,000 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(4) 155 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - gently rolling land located next to Peacock
Springs State Park. Ideal for home site or hunting! $2,995 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(5) 210'(+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property is located on State Road #51 about 3
miles north of the Suwannee River. Great location for home site $3,500 per acre
(Owner/Broker)
(6) 645 ACRES - MADISON COUNTY - gently rolling land with majestic hardwoods along the
meandering of a creek that runs through the property. Land is in 19 & 20 year old planted
pines and has paved road frontage. Ideal for hunting, other recreational uses or home site.
$2,725 per acre '
(7) 674 ACRES - MADISON COUNTY - this tract has some cut over land, about 195 acres of
2001 planted sand pines and some beautiful hardwood hammocks surrounding the Sand Pond.
Ideal for deer and turkey hunting. Property is a short drive from 1-10. $1,995 per acre
(Owner/Broker)
For additional information, contact
BAYNARD WARD, KATRINA BLALOCK or CHUCK DAVIS
E-mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:ward@danielcrapps.com"


M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT K


FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 4, 2005


r) t�E: t


Atm(S&% s f(







FRIDAY, rFEBR-UAR eY 4UL, - --- - - - -


You are just a call away... call 1-800-525-4182, ext. 102 to place your ad * FAX 386-364-5578


Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m..*You are just a click away... find the classified marketplace online at www.nflaonline.com


ANNOUNCEMENTS




EMPLOYMENT





BUSINESS SERVICES





FINANCIAL SERVICES


We Will Help You


To Your Classified Ad On
MERCHANDISE The First Day It Runs!

With the

PERSONAL SERVICES RECREATION Logo in the classifed Marketplace



EDUCATIONAL SERVICES REAL IFSTATE FR RENT
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


2 PETS





AGRICULTURE


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE





TRANSPORTATION


jr rejjoi, ---
1.^"


To Place Your Ad

Monday through Friday by calling 386-362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182, faxing to 386-364-5578 or mailing to:
Classified Marketplace, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064



SHney ers Persnl Chks
W AlET money Orders * Personal Checks


Your Classified Ad can

appear in 5 paid

newspapers:

The Suwannee Democrat

on both Wed. & Fri.,

Pae the Jasper News,

The Branford News &

The Mayo Free Press on

Thursday; a total of

15,200 issues weekly!

Increase your promotional reach and tap into
potential new markets... Ask about placing your
advertising message into: The Valdosta Daily
Times, The Thomasville Times-Enterprise; The
Lowndes Edition-Mailbox Post; The Thomas
County Buyer's Guide; or a network of over 20
other publications, serving over 30 counties; with
over 20,000 readers in South Georgia.
Ask about our
"Service Directory" rates


FLORIDA (386) 208 Live Oak 294 Mayo 303
White Springs 362, 364 Live Oak * 397 White
Springs '454 High Springs 497 Fort White 658
Dowling Park* 752, 755, 758 Lake City 776
Luraville . 792 Jasper . 842 Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch (Live Oak) 935 Branford ' 938 Jennings
* 961 Lake City 963 Welborn * 965 Lake City
GEORGIA (229)219 Valdosta 224, 225, 226,
227,228 Thomasville * 241,242, 244,245,247,
249, 251,253, 257, 259 Valdosta * 263 Quitman
268 Vienna 268 Lilly ' 271,273 Cordele * 282,
283, 285, 287 Waycross . 293 Valdosta * 324 Berlin
* 333 Valdosta * 345 Nicholls, 346 Coolidge * 359
Ambrose * 362 Milan * 363 Lumber City 365
Rochelle 367 Baxley 375 Hazelhurst 377,378
Cairo 381 Douglas, 382 Titons 383,384
Douglas - 385 Rhine - 386, 387 Tifton 389, 393
Douglas - 422 Pearson * 423,424 Fitzgerald , 433
Byromville 449 Blackshear 455 Ray City 467
Abbeville 468 Ocilla *472 Montezuma * 472
Oglethorpe *482 Lakeland *487 Homerville * 498
Boston 528 Omega 532 Alapaha 533 Enigma *
534 Willacoochee 535 Warwick * 546 Lenox
*549 Sparks *559 Lake Park *567 Ashburn 574
Ocklochnee 594 Uvalda * 624 Pineview, 627
Unadilla ' 632 Alma, 637 Fargo ' 643 Rebecca
S648 Pitts 649 Buena Vista 683 Meigs 686
Nashville *735 Barwick *762 Whigham 769
Norman Park *775 Morven 776 Sylvester' 782
Doerun * 794 Hahira 824 Plains 831 Irwinvilte
'833 Jacksonville ' 846 Smilhville * 853 Cobb
859 Pavo 863 Blackshear * 868 McRae ' 873
Moullrie' 874 Leslie 887 Richland' 890,891
Moulrie 896 Adel 899 Moullrie 924,928
Americus 929 Pineta ' 938 Jennings 941
Funslon ' 973 Madison '985 Moultrie


with a border e eA I For Wednesday Publication 11 a.m.,
aIdt abo Friday (prior),
, oi n i For Friday Publication, 11 a.m.,
J U II IUll 11 A Wednesday (prior).
*We reserve the right to cancel any special offer or promotion in the Classified Marketplace upon a 30-day notice.'


Groundskeeper
VILLAGE OAKS APARTMENTS
has an immediate opening for a
groundskeeper-24 hours per week.
Must have experience in grounds
maintenance and grounds
equipment maintenance. Drug free
work place. Must have valid dr.
license & own car or truck. Some
travel will be required. Apply at the
rental office. 705 Northwest Drive,
Live Oak, FL. Equal Opportunity
Employer. Call 386-364-7936.
TDDTTY 711.


Win dinner

for two at









See ad in today's "A"section
of the Suwannee Democrat


Housekeeper
Full time position in O'Brien area in
Suwannee County. Duties include
housecleaning, laundry and running.
errands. Must be experienced, have
dependable transportation and
excellent references. Call 800-704-
7397.

First Day
Housekeeper
Position Available
Part-time Housekeeper
Apply in person, no phone calls,
please. Must be 18 years of age
and pass criminal background
check.
Apply at:
CAMP WEED & the CERVENY
CENTER
11057 Camp Weed Place
Live Oak, FL 32060


First Day
Laborer
Part-time: 1-2 days per week.
For outside odd jobs.
Call 386-938-2269.
LABORERS NEEDED
MANY POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
FOR MORE INFO CALL:
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
(386) 755-1991 APPT. ONLY
BACKGRD/DRUGSCREEN
REQ.

First Day
LEGAL SECRETARY
Legal office experience preferred.
Excellent skills a must. Corel
WordPerfect 12 .r.:..r arr, Good
dictation, .telephone, and people
skills required. Please mail your
resume to 106 White Ave., Suite C,
Live Oak, FL 32064 or FAX to (386)
362-6194. No telephone inquiries
please!

Licensed Real Estate Agents
Positions available. Variable
commission structures available.
Call Century 21 Rankin Realty at
386-362-7080 or fax resume to
386-362-7649.
maintenance
HELP WANTED maintenance man
with knowledge of plumbing, electric
and carpentry. Tools required.
Transportation a must. Drug free
workplace.
Call (386) 330-2567
First Day
Mechanical abilities a plus!
ASCENT PRECISION GEAR
is now accepting applications for
multiple positions. Both full & part
time available. Call for appt. (386)
364-1030.
Multi positions available @
Jennings GP Motorsports Park.
Apply in person @ 4960 NW CR
152, Jennings, FL. or call Jamie or
Bill @ 386-938-1110.


&a(t 4eC44e4

Accepting Applications
Good, bad and no credit.
Call for 1st & 2nd mortgages.
Established full service co. B
WE BUY MORTGAGES.
t800) 226-6044
(Q~ j t .622 NW43rdSt. SuileA-I
MLicensed Mtg. Lender


FOR

Rental Assistance
1, 2, 3, & 4 BR HC & Non-
HC Accessible Apartments
diage Cad I laM
705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY 711
Equal Housing Opportunity



LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living 2
bedroom duplex. Call
362-3110.
128545JS.F


FOR

HUD Vouchers Welcome!
1,2 & 3 BR HC& Non-HC
Accessible Apartments

<^age Cad II
705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housing OpportUnity 9


TRAILER HARBOR
MOBILE HOME PARK
A Family Park with
rentals. Drug Free
in-town location.Single
and Double lots
available. 362-3868
128497JS-F


First Day
Personnel Specialist
Advent Christian Village
658-JOBS for
Current Opportunities


PT personnel specialist; HS
diploma or equivalent required.
Must be proficient in MS Office
Suite, including Access & Excel.
Personnel and benefits
administration experience
preferred. Good organizational and
customer service skills required.
Good benefits, great working
environment. EOE; Drug Free
Workplace, Criminal background
verification required. Apply in
person at ACV Personnel
Department Mon. thru Fri, 9:00a.m.
until 4:00p.m., Carter Village Hall,
10680 CR 136, Dowling Park, FL.
Fax resume to (386) 658-5160 or
visit www.ACVillage.net

First Day
PTA
Advent Christian Village
658-JOBS for
Current Opportunities

PT PTA to assist with physical
therapy/physical rehabilitation and
related activities. FL PTA license
required. Prior experience
preferred. EOE; Drug Free
Workplace, Criminall, background
verification required. Apply in
person at ACV Personnel
Department Mon. thru Fri, 9:00a.m.
until 4:00p.m., Carter Village Hall,
10680 CR 136, Dowling Park, FL.
Fax resume to (386) 658-5160 or
visit www.ACVillage.net

First Day
Sales help
MAYO FERTILIZER &
FARM SUPPLY
is now taking applications for counter
help and sales. Good PR necessary,
agricultural background a plus. Go to
work immediately for competitive pay
and available health insurance. Call
386-294-2024 for more information.
Mayo Fertilizer is an equal
opportunity employer and a drug free
workplace.

First Day
WANTED! WANTED!
WANTED!
HARDWORKERS ONLY
NEED APPLY ALL SHIFTS
MUST BE ABLE TO LIFT
50LBS-70LBS
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
BACKGRD/DRUG SCREEN REQ.


Sales
WALT'S LIVE OAK
FORD-MERCURY

Looking for Experienced
Sales People
or Right People with no Experience
Will Train

*Up To 35% Commissions
* Demo Program for Sales
People
* Health Insurance
* Great Work Environment
* Paid 3% on F&l
*Paid Salary During Training

Please call Bobby Cogswell
at 386-362-1112

Secretary/Receptionist
Full time position in busy real estate
office in Mayo. Must have excellent
computer skills with emphasis on
Windows, Word and Excel with
experience in general office duties.
Send resume to: PO Box 268, Mayo,
FL 32066
STOCKING/INVENTORY
POSITIONS AVAILABLE
CALL FOR APPT.
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREEN/BACKGROUND
REQ.

TANKER DRIVERS

A Truck Line has immediate
openings for experienced Tanker
Drivers in Branford, FL. Must have
Florida CDL A Hazmat and no more
than 7 points on license. DOT
physical & drug screening required.
Apply in person at 4783 US Highway
27, Branford, FL or 871 Guerdon
Road, Lake City, FL
DFWP/EOE



First Day
TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED (CDL)
Must be Drug Free, Dependable &
have 3 years Exp. Hauling Pine
Straw & Misc. Freight. Call (386) 935-
2773 or Fax Resume (386) 935-6838
(FL)
TRUCK DRIVERS Needed Full and
Part-time at Garrison Farms. Good
CDL a must. Call 386-364-1493.
First Day
TWENTY-THREE PEOPLE
Needed to lose 5-30 pounds
this month
1-888-458-4157
www.health386.com


TRANSPORTATION
Autos for Sale
FOR SALE '98 Ford Contour SE
Sport, 4dr. Low mi., good condition,
clean, well maintained,good tires.
AC/AM/FM/CD/power everything.
Asking $4000. , 386-842-2006
days/eves.
TAKE OVER PAYMENTS of $450.00
per month on a 2004 Chevy Max.
DVD, leather, sunroof, skid control,
XM satellite radio, 38 MPG. Call 386-
362-1734 ext. 107.

Trucks fQrSale
FOR SALE 1998 GMC Jimmy. Re-
built engine w/less than 10,000
miles, new tie rods. See @ 13366
Hwy 136W. Call 386-362-3357.
FOR SALE 2002 Ford Ranger.
$10,500.00. Good condition. Can be
seen @ 122 W. Duval, Live Oak,
across from bread store. Call for
more info 386-362-7084.

Motorcycles
FOR SALE 2004 50cc GY50 dirt
bike. Disk brakes, electric start, 4-
speed trans. Like new. $800.00. Call
386-362-4491.



Suwannee Legals

NOTICE OF SALE
The following vehicles will be sold at Public
Auction for cash at NORTH FLORIDA
CLASSICS
13308 US 90 West, Live Oak, FI. 32060
on FEBRUARY 17, 2005 at 11:00 A.M.
Phone (386) 364-8360
1956 Ford VIN# M6EV155538
1953 GMC VIN# FC253-8583
1949 Ford VIN# 6MP22B163
1951 Chevy VIN# 2KR-F2851
1978 Chevrolet VIN# 1T19M8150137
1952 Ford VIN# B2LB-1 03256
1955 Ford VIN# F75J5H79672
1981 Check Cab VIN# 1CMTS4227BK002512
1992 GMC VIN# 1GTCS14R4N8516263
1980 Ford p/u VIN# FIOENCC7013
1965 Ford 2-ton VIN# FOORU685083
1951 Chevy VIN# 143KH121710
1998 Ford Escort VIN#
1FAFP13PXWW130061
1986 Toyota Tercel VIN# JT2AL326560426003
1965 Ford 2-door VIN# 5U66X100663
1956 Ford 4-door VIN# M6AT129036
1980 Ford p/u VIN# F10EVJC0799
1969 Ford p/u VIN# F10YCE01896
1956 Ford wagon VIN# M6NX116920
1983 Ford p/u VIN# 1 FTEF14F6DNA35613
unknown year Glastron boat VIN#
GLA50840M76D
unknown year Glastron boat VIN# FLO946GC
02/02, 04


G , e...r., Ge... .. nera
GO D-BUY CASH" C ASH .'',



IHOW TO WRITEl A CLASSIC IEDI AD
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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE 3RD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY
Case No. 04-225-CA
Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota, National
Association, as Trustee for Option One
Woodbridge Loan Trust 2002-2, Asset-
Backed Certificates, Series 2002-2,
PLAINTIFF.
Vs.

Robert A. Griggs; William E. Boyer alk/a
William E. Boyer, Sr., et a.,
DEFENDANTS.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to that
Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January
20, 2005, and entered in civil case number 04-
225-CA, of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial
Circuit in and for Suwannee County, Florida,
wherein WELLS FARGO BANK MINNESOTA,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR OPTION ONE WOODBRIDGE LOAN
TRUST 2002-2, ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2002-2, is Plaintiff
and Robert A. Griggs; William E. Boyer a/k/a
William E. Boyer, Sr.; Unknown persons) in
possession of the subject real property, is/are
Defendantss, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the Suwannee County
Courthouse, Live Oak, Florida, Suwannee
County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m, on the 21st day
of March, 2005, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to
wit:
THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 11 AND ALL OF
LOTS 12, 13 AND 14, BLOCK 49, TOWN OF
BRANFORD, A SUBDIVISION IN SECTION
16, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 14 EAST
AS RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME VIN #
2G610310HA AND VIN # 2G610310HB.
NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act you are advised that this law
firm is deemed to be a debt collector
attempting to collect a debt and any
information obtained will be used for that
purpose.
Dated the 20th day of January,
2005.
KENNETH DASHER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: /s/ Arlene D. vev
Arlene D. Ivey
01/28, 02/04

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE is hereby given that the City of Live
Oak will hold a public hearing Tuesday,
February 8, 2005 at 8:00 P.M. in the City
Council Meeting Room located in the Live Oak
City Hall, on the final reading of ORDINANCE
N: 1076.
AN ORDINANCE VOLUNTARILY ANNEXING
CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY INTO THE CITY
LIMITS OF LIVE OAK, FLORIDA AND
REDEFINING THE BOUNDARY LINES OF
THE MUNICIPALITY TO INCLUDE SAID
PROPERTY; AND PROVIDING AN
EFFECTIVE DATE,
Real property description:
Part of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4
of Section 22, Township 2 South, Range 13
East, Suwannee County, Florida, containing
0.28 acres more or less, and


PAGE 3C


M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT K


r-Onr-^ \/ r-rnln IA\ A 9)V r







* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


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FCAN



Week of Janauary 31, 2005

133320-F


The South 20.00 feet of Lot 2, Block 3 of Town
& Country Estates, Unit 1 and the East 182.00
feet of Lot 1, Block 3 of Town & Country
Estates, Unit 1, less the East 100.00 Feet,
said subdivision recorded in Plat Book 1, Page
157, of the Public Records of Suwannee
County, Florida.


The complete legal description by metes and
bounds and the ordinance can be obtained
from the office of the city clerk.

At the aforementioned hearing, all interested
parties may appear and be heard with respect
to the above matter.

Don Boyette
President of the Live Oak City Council

ATTEST;
William J. McCullers, Sr.
City Clerk
01/26, 02/04

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 6120 04CA 000246 0001XX

GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC f/k/a
CONSECO FINANCE SERVICING CORP.
1400 Turbine Drive
Rapid City, SD 57703

Plaintiff,

v.

DAVID ROSARIO

Defendant.

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: DAVID ROSARIO

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a foreclosure action
has been filed against you on the following
described property:

Lot 22, Whitfield Acres Subdivision, a
subdivision according the plat thereof
recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 151, Public
Records of Suwannee County, Florida.

TOGETHER WITH that certain 1996 52 x 28
Signature Mobile Home, Serial No.
PSHGA18420AB.

and you are required to file a written response
with the Court and serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D.
Padgett, Plaintiff's Attorney, whose address is
2810 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee,
FL 32308, at least thirty (30) days from the
date of first publication or on or before March
7, 2005, and file the original with the clerk of
this court either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.

Dated this 20th day of January, 2005.
Kenneth Dasher
CLERK OF COURT
By:/s/Arlene D. Ivey
Deputy Clerk
Arlene D. Ivey
01/28, 02/04


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.01-004-CJ

IN THE INTEREST OF:
WHATLEY, Marlene (F) DOB: 09-20-92
WHATLEY, Shawn (M) DOB: 01-03-95
BRACKENBURY, Michael (M) DOB: 10-18-
89
MINOR CHILD

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY
HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP

STATE OF FLORIDA

TO: Michael Brackenbury, Sr.
(Address Unknown)

Last Known Address:
18542 136th Street
Live Oak, Florida 32060

WHEREAS a Petition for Termination of
Parental Rights under oath has been filed in
this court regarding the above-referenced
children, a copy of which is available at the
office of the Suwannee County Clerk of Court
in Live Oak, Florida,

YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED TO
APPEAR BEFORE THE HONORABLE
'WILLIAM R. SLAUGHTER, II, ACTING
CIRCUIT JUDGE FOR THIS COURT, AT THE
SUWANNEE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, IN
LIVE OAK, FLORIDA ON FEBRUARY 21.
2005 AT 9:00 A.M. for a TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING.
You must appear on the date and at the time
specified.

FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT
THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES
CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD (OR
CHILDREN). IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON
THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU MAY
LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD
(OR CHILDREN) NAMED IN THE PETITION
ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. YOU ARE
ENTITLED TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY
PRESENT TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS
MATTER. IF YOU WANT AN ATTORNEY BUT
ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD ONE, YOU MUST
APPEAR TO NOTIFY THE COURT AND THE
COURT MAY APPOINT AN ATTORNEY TO
REPRESENTYOU.

In the Interest of Whatley/Brackenbury

Witness my hand and seal of this court
at , , County, Florida, on
this_ day of 2005.


Clerk of Circuit Court


By:
Deputy Clerk

Joann Humburg, Esquire
Florida Bar No. 831328
Attorney for the Department of
Children and Family Services
Child Welfare Legal Services
2649 U. S. Hwy 90, West
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a
special accommodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact Court
Administrator, no later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceeding, at 386-758-2163
01/14,21,28,02/04

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned
Kenneth Dasher, Clerk of Circuit Court of
Suwannee County, Florida, will, on the 18th
day of February, 2005, at Eleven (11) o'clock
A.M., at the East Door of the Suwannee
County Courthouse, Suwannee County, in the
City of Live Oak, Florida, offer for sale and sell
at public outcry to the highest and best bidder
for cash, the following described property
situated in Suwannee County, Florida, to-wit:

PARCEL 1
Parcel A:

The West 80 feet of the NE 1/4 of NE 1/4 of
NW 1/4; the West 500 feet of the SE 1/4 of NE
1/4 of NW 1/4, Section 10, Township 1 South,


01/28,02/04


Dasher, Kenneth
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Arlene D. Ivey
Deputy Clerk
Arlene D. Ivey


DA( I- A(-


h.1


Classifieds


Work!

To place your ad in

the Classified

Marketplace,

call Louise at

386-362-1734 today!


PrAUL 4 i


I


9i"i~ ~


Range 12 East, Suwannee County, Florida.

Parcel B:

The E 1/2 of the SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section
10, Township 1 South, Range 12 East,
Suwannee County, Florida.

Parcel C:

The East 580 feet of the NE 1/4 of NE 1/4 of
NW 1/4; The East 160 feet of the SE 1/4 of NE
1/4 of NW 1/4; the W 1/2 of NW 1/4 of NE 1/4;
The W 1/2 of the E 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of NE
1/4; the W 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of NE 1/4; and
the W 1/2 of the E 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of NE 1/4
of Section 10, Township 1 South, Range 12
East.

LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING
DESCRIBED PARCELS OF LANDS:

The North 396 feet of the West 550 feet of the
E 1/2 of NE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 10,
Township 1 South, Range 12 East, Suwannee
County, Florida, subject to existing county
road right of way along the North boundary
thereof.

And:

Commence at the Northwest corner of the E
1/2 of NE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 10,
Township 1 South, Range 12 East; thence S
00 deg. 16'02" West along the West line of
said E 1/2 a distance of 396.00 feet to the
point of beginning; thence S 89 deg. 41'25"
East parallel to the North line of said Section
10, a distance of 550.00 feet; thence N 00
deg. 16'02" East parallel to said West line a
distance of 396.00 feet to a point on the North
line of said Section 10; thence S 89 deg.
41'25" East along said North line a distance of
100.00 feet; thence S 00 deg. 16'02" West
parallel to said West line a distance of 1187.98
feet to a point which lies 142.81 feet North of
the South line of said E 1/2; thence N 89 deg.
42'39" West parallel to said South line a
distance of 650.00 feet to a point on said West
line; thence N 00 deg. 16'02" East along said
West line a distance of 792.21 feet to the point
of beginning, subject to existing County Road
right of way along the North 100.00 feet
thereof, said lands lying and being in
Suwannee County, Florida.

Parcel 1 is subject to Mortgage in favor of
Farm Credit of North Florida, ACA dated
August 31, 2001, recorded in O.R. Book 886,
Page 201, Public Records of Suwannee
County, Florida.

PARCEL 2

PART OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 22,
TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 13 EAST,
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS; FOR POINT OF REFERENCE
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF
THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
MADISON STREET (OLD STATE ROAD NO.
1) AND THE WEST LINE OF RAILROAD
ADDITION AS SHOWN ON SHEET 14 OF
THE OLD CITY TAX ASSESSORS MAP
BOOK OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SAID
COUNTY; THENCE RUN NORTH 45021'00"
WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE, A DISTANCE OF 15.87 FEET TO ITS'
INTERSECTION WITH THE WEST RIGHT-
OF-WAY LINE OF HORNE STREET AND
THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 02*03'57" WEST ALONG SAID
WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE
OF 316.92 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH
89049'37' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 508.89
FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 00014'12"
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 501.38 FEET;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 89054'44" EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 330.26 FEET TO SAID
SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 45�21'00" EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE
OF 264.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. CONTAINING 5.54 ACRES
MORE OR LESS

pursuant to the fini .j:.-:,"i :.f :i ,.l: ure
entered in a case pi.-lr. n . . ai. Courln ir.
style of which is
LAFAYETTE STATE BANK
Post Office Box 108
Mayo, Florida 32066
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARC VALLIERES & ANNE VALLIERES
Defendants.

and the docket number of which Is number
2004-113-CA.

Witness my hand and the official seal of said
Court, this 24th day of January, 2005.
Hon. Kenneth Dasher, Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Suwannee
County, Florida
By:/s/Arlene D. Ivey
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiffs:
E. Bailey Browning, III
Fla. Bar No. 0083630
Post Office Drawer 652
Madison, Florida 32341
(850)973-4186
Fax No. (850) 973-8564
01/28, 02/04

THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHETHIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 61-2004-CA-228
DIVISION

ALTEGRA CREDIT COMPANY,
Plaintiff,

vs.

LINDA MARY WARWICK, et al,
Defendants)


FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Final Judgment of 'Mortgage Foreclosure
dated January 20, 2005 and entered in Case
NO. 61-2004-CA-228 of the Circuit Court of
the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for
SUWANNEE County, Florida wherein
ALTEGRA CREDIT COMPANY is the Plaintiff
and LINDA MARY WARWICK; are the
Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at FRONT STEPS IN FRONT
OF THE SUWANNEE COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 22ND
day of February, 2005, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment:

THE SOUTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST
QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER
OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH,
RANGE 13 EAST, SUWANNEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. CONTAINING 20 ACRES, MORE
OR LESS. SUBJECT TO EXISTING ROAD
RIGHT OF WAYS. TOGETHER WITH A
MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A
FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO.

A/K/A 2881 145th Road, Live Oak, FL 32060

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on January 20, 2005.






Fl-IAYtl DI- U IADIR , SOU .MO



Handmade Valentine's Day creations for those you love


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Rotary cutter or scissors
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Ruler
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Clothespin
For the bottom layer (closest to
the vase), cut a piece of fabric
large enough to wrap around the
vase with a 1/4 inch allowance on
all four sides. Fold edge of fabric
over 1/4 inch on top and bottom
edges and iron.
Cut another piece of fabric nar-
rower than the first, with the
same 1/4 inch allowance. Fold
over and iron edges as before.
Apply a thin line of Perfect Glue
1 to top and bottom edges of nar-
rower piece of fabric; glue to bot-
tom inside layer of fabric. Layer
ribbon over fabric and glue. Once


dry (approximately 1 hour), wrap
layered fabric band around vase.
Apply a thin line of glue to one
end and glue to vase. Glue one
end over the other; secure with a
clothespin at the top edge while
drying.
Heart Cards
Create homemade Valentines
with a personal touch by gluing
embellishments such as buttons,
velvet ribbon and rhinestone
clips to heart-shaped cardstock.
Write a personalized note and
leave them in unexpected places,
like your children's backpacks
and your co-worker's desk or
briefcase. These unique Valentine
surprises are easy to make and
are versatile enough to be used
for greeting cards, gift tags and
place holders on a Valentine's
Day dinner table.
Perfect Glue offers several in-
spirational ideas for craft enthusi-
asts. Visit www.perfectglue.com
for more information.


Junk Drawer Warriors: Multi-purpose


products for household emergencies


Americans todaj ha' e lotl
of stuff. Yet finding a place
to store all their stuff is al-
ways a challenge. For that
reason it seems that a "catch
all" or "junk" drawer is as
common in kitchens today as
a faucet and sink. Housing
everything from caulks to
coupons, this kitchen stash is
a homeowner's refuge for
storing those necessary
items for maintenance and
mishaps.
To cut down on the items
in your junk drawer, but still
ensure that you'll be pre-
pared for those everyday
home maintenance issues,
there are several all-purpose
S products to keep on hand to
help with life's hiccups.
These items include:
* Polyseamseal All-Pur-
pose Mini -- This all-pur-
pose adhesive caulk, now
available in a small, reseal-
able package, is perfect for
any quick fixes. From re-ad-
hering a loose ceramic tile to
sealing cracks and gaps
around baseboards, door
frames, sinks and counter-
tops, the water-based adhe-.
sive caulk is often referred
to as the "toolbox in a tube"
since it has 1001 uses around
the house or on the job. Plus,
it's paintable, flexible,
mildew-resistant when cured
and cleans up easily with
soap and water. Website:
www.polyseamseal.com.
* All Purpose Duct Tape --
Known for its rock-solid
quick fix performance, duct
tape is versatile enough for
projects ranging from home
repairs to pant hems. In fact,
duct tape uses may include:
repairing tree trunks and
limbs, shower curtains, hems
on dresses and pants, sweep-
er bags or hoses, vinyl inflat-
able toys, tents, holding
down floor mats and loose
carpet, covering exposed
bolts and more. Website:
www.duckproducts.com.
* Loctite Quicktite Super
Glue -- Creating a strong
hold to nearly all surfaces,
SLoctite super glue quickly


t,.es litfe's little mInihs aps,
from broken figurines to
cracked jewelry, in a matter
of minutes. It can be used on
metal, ceramic, china,
leather, vinyl, wood, tex-
tiles, paper, and hard plas-
tics. Website: www.loc-
titeproducts.com
* WD-40 -- Known as "the
can with a thousand uses,"
WD-40 protects metal from
rust and corrosion, pene-
trates stuck parts, displaces


moisture, aid lubricates just
about anything. WD-40 is
great for anything from lu-
bricating squeaky doors and
tight overcoat zippers to
rust-proofing tools and cars.
There's always another use
for WD-40. Website:
www.wd40.com.
Since you never know
when one of these little life-
savers will come in handy,
it's a good idea to keep them
all on hand.


Sunbelt Honda of Lake City is looking for 3
sharp, success-driven individuals to join our
award-winning sales team.
If...
/ If you're tired of a desk job
/ You like people
/ You're not earning what you're worth

Then...
/ We offer a career, not just a job
/ Sell the hottest product on the market
/ Earn incredible commissions & bonuses
/ Qualify for complete benefits package


SUNBELT HONDA
Apply in person Mon.-Fri., 9 am-4 pm; See Tony
Business Attire, Come Dressed to Begin Training
Hwy. 41 S., Lake City - No Phone Calls Please
140677JRS-F


LL


an autographed CD and two VIP tickets to

see Blake Shelton in concert at the

Suwannee County Fair

March 19 at 7:30 p.m.


~'~''i CA








1I


Here's


How...
E\el�e lime
(,ou place a
classified line
ad between now
and March 11,
\ou %\ill be
entered into a
drawing to %%in
t\o VIP tickets.
The drawing
\\ill be held
March 14.

Private partI
ads only.
iI \iamplk: \ard
a. les. ;iiiotliobileh
lor ;ale. animal for
il.. el . e ic. I



i a ...... .., I r .., . .- . I ., ( f
fll i. i ,, i, 1 1 ,. .,,- , t,,i , ,-,i, ,-i

S. . .. .... .1 , , ,. ,, 11 ,1 , , ,-l , .ll
,- ",r ,',- II. ( L


Now THAT'S Something

To Smile About!


"A trip to Chicago with the Suwannee Democrat"

Thank you, Lorraine Sharpless of Live Oak
for submitting this week's SMILE photograph!
Submit your photo for publication to:


Burwannrie a3rmotrat
P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064


H ' ll I


'~"' "~"~~'


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 5C


FEBRUARY 4 2005


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Glaucoma takes sight without warning


Glaucoma affects the eyes
gradually and usually without
pain. Because the disease has
no warning signs or symp-
toms, the American Optomet-
ric Association (AOA) recom-
mends scheduling regular,
comprehensive eye exams as
the best defense against this


vision-threatening disease.
The optic nerve carries visu-
al information from the eye to
the brain. Glaucoma occurs
when optic nerve cells begin
to degenerate. As the nerve
cells die, vision is slowly lost,
usually beginning in the side,
or peripheral, vision. The con-


cern with glaucoma is that
without symptoms, vision loss
can occur before an individual
notices any changes in vision.
A cure does not exist; how-
ever, early detection is the key
to controlling the disease.
Medicare patients at high risk
for glaucoma can receive di-


lated eye examinations as a
benefit of Medicare coverage.
The AOA provides a Glauco-
ma/Diabetes Hotline program
which matches patients with a
participating optometrist in
their area; contact the Hotline
at (800) 262-3947.
It is estimated that 3 million


Americans have glaucoma and
one-half of that population is
unaware that they have it.
African Americans over age
40, everyone over age 60, and
individuals with a family his-
tory of glaucoma are at risk.
If you or a loved one have
not had a comprehensive eye


exam in over a year, or are at
high risk for developing glau-
coma, make an appointment
with your eye care profession-
al today. It could be the most
important appointment you
put on your new calendar. For
more information, please visit
www.aoa.org.


These local businesses are here to take good care of you.


Plumb-Level
Construction Co., LLC.
Construction
SSpecializing in all your
roofing needs
- ' (New, Re-roofing,
S' Screen Enclosures
",,- .C 792.40610 938-5588
* R.C 0067079 Ask lor Kevin


DREAM DESIGN
INCORPORATED
Residential MNake-overs * Free Estimates
Licensed and Insured

Cabinets. Ceramic
For an o our home Tile Counter Tops,
S repairs and needs call Floor Co% ring,
John & Trish Adams Painting, Decks.
13861 362-7916 Screened Enclosures.


J.D. KASTOR INC.
* Pool & Patrit DMe A * LAtic-t ui Cidontracri'r
* Spracr( e/Ritr Riock * Highly/ Exp.ai lct t
* Painting & StuccoI * Frt EStuinaiu
* nlIerior/EInv i ior
386-362-3107 ,, , Si, .'i,
3863 4717 Lal FL( Aid. a ;0ll
*: 386-330-4717 i\.' a . 'i\
*: WVMZMU


I I


lCuiijiii^ of Live O(3a
Roofs * Mobile Homes
SBrick Homes * Stucco Homes
SDecks * Driveways

N.ojob Too Big... No Job Too Small
386-776-2067


JT's Transmissions IEcckkeepilii
James Tullis, )\\ ner bl� IViaren
(10(1.1 NCR. 25( 3 1391
S\\cllborn. Fl k-book-i.:lliel.nel h . [IEl Fl .,(COLINTrINT
"'TAKING CARE OF ALL YOL'R I rDII ONOf riR ENIF'RPISE. IM:
TR.\4SMISSIOV \EEDS" ; ..MPLLfiLj ,a"_,i.LuEI;:..' \,lli.' sL.R\lEs -
| |\ILL & .LlilM bi..NINENAEM I
" - Phone: 386-963-3616 MONTHLY REPORTIING
ce ll: s -'- ) " STATAT& FEDERAL SALES . PAYROLL RETURNS
S- STATE & FEDERAL BUSIrESS RELATED iNfCOME TA RETURNS

I -O[ -UU[


"4 GEl JER/TIOr il OF E PERIEI ICE"
24 HR. EMERGENCY PUMP SERVICE

;~~ Inr MMn


Well Drilling
FI -.r L .: #- .,,,


E l B ii:


\.i ror your
David HOME
McLaughlin Improvements & Repa
IRemodeling & Renovations
386-963-1391
Licensed & Insured


-1 'it ron ,1or
KARDAV ENTERPRISES. INC. FEI . -


ONE CALL DOES IT Al
C%- VAN ow


LAKEWOOD
irs APARTMENTS
SIN LIVE OAK


Quiet country li ing 2 bedroom duplex
Call 362-3110


Slaughter, Cutting
Wrapping
&' Sausage
Momn N,,. P


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.liiin li IiLxi i
l-;Ili-!l:15-'.5li
Ililw llll IIII ,'r~h
I -: ;SI;- 'I: .'- III,


I .: rA ri l. iJ:, h, tr'.l ' �

Office (386) 364-5045
Mobile (386) 362-9178
Michael Guenther, .:.n,,,.


Interior
Exterior
Drywall
Wallpaper
Licensed
Insured
Pressure
Cleaning
Site
Clean


CARROLL Stump Grinding

CONCRETE
* Curbing * Gutters * Monolithic Slabs
Patios * Driveways & Sidewalks
*Commercial & Residential
Licensed & Insured
Rt. 2 Box 166 938-1156 ,,, Slle 86-776-25
Jennings, FL 320533869381 J Sellers 386776252


DUNCAN TIRE & AUTO
"Complete One Stop Service For Your Vehicle "
Alignment Specialists


24 HOUR TOWING
62-4743 1-888-362-2568
422 E. HOWARD ST. LIVE OAK PLAZA .
LEN A. DUNCAN
I .''- "


ABBEY MINI STORAGE
All New Units
* 5X15 * 5X20 * 10X15 * 10X20 * 15X20
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd.
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak

364-5300
3 8I 4 r - -- -


I Metal Roofing
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Qualht/ Metal Rooflng & Accessores .At Discount Prces!! \
3 tide od3halume Cut to \our desired lengths!
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Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg. Inc.
CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-393-0335


LIVE OAK

MINI STORAGE
* 5x15 * 5x20 * 10x15 * 10x20
CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE
5x5 *5x1010x10 *10x20
Units located on Gold Kist Road
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-6626


To place an ad on this

page, please call
Myrtle at

(386) 362-1734, ext. 103. ,


To place an ad on this

page, please call
Myrtle at
(386) 362-1734, ext. 103.


ADKINS
LANDCLEARING LLC
SOwtner, Johnny .4 dkins '
Free Estimates
Phone: .r . . ' ;' ' "^f". ,".'' '


"
HIRE


"HE" g


IF=.


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' ',.' . *WWW,,,


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


PAGE 6C


193-032


I


I


I IWIG "I ,


NEW F--i [. " [wM- sMmIuq.I,- I






FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2UU 005 M . .....- -... ........-. - -....-


Golf


By T.J. TOMASI


Insider


$00 anSIM.
239 aGl6"Bar! --- -

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A great home owner chain saw loaded with features including the new
STIHL Easy2Start starting system - NO MORE HARD PULLS!
JOHN'S LAWN EQUIPMENT
1629 Ohio Ave. N. * Live Oak, FL 32064 STIHIA
[3861 362-5020 - 1-800-648-2856 141469F


BIRDIES AND BOGEYS
Hold that Tiger
If you want to play the Old
Course at St. Andrews, you
have to apply two years in ad-
vance, so you might think
they'd leave well enough alone,
but the powers that be are
changing the course in prepa-
ration for the British Open to
be held there this summer.
First, 93 of the bunkers have
been reworked. On the famous
"Road Hole," No. 17, one of the
toughest holes in the world,
the bunker was made wider so
it would "gather" the ball a lit-
tle bit more. And on No. 12, the
bunker that guards the green
was lowered a foot so you can't
see it from
the tee
(the hole
was also
length-
ened 35
yards).
The last
time the
Open was
held at the
Old
Course WOODS
Tiger
Woods did
not hit into a single bunker
over 72 holes (there are more
than 400 on the course), an in-
credible feat that may never be
matched - especially with the
new changes.
The course will also play
about 200 yards longer (at 7,200
yards) than it did five years
ago. The par-5 14th, for exam-
ple, is now 616 yards -- the
longest hole ever in a British
Open.
First, Tiger's great play led
to changes at Augusta Nation-
al, then it was Carnoustie, and
now it's St. Andrews.
Tsunami relief
If you would like to join oth-
er golfers from the United
States and around the world to
help the rebuilding efforts fol-
lowing the devastating tsuna-
mi in South Asia, send a tax-
deductible he'ck to:
The U.S. Golf Tsunami Re-
lief Fund
c/o PGA Tour Charities, Inc.
P.O. Box 2904
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL
32004-2904
Or go to www.pgatour.com
'and contribute online.


.ASKTHE PRO
Q: You answered the play-
er whose swing plane was too
shallow; mine is too steep,
and I have yet to find a swing
thought, training aid or drill
that can help me break the
habit. Any ideas? -- Mark E,
from Birmingham, Ala.
A: To the player whose
swing plane was too shallow, I
suggested he try to hit balls
out of a thin divot hole to
force him to feel a steeper an-
gle of attack (out of a divot
hole it is impossible to get the
ball airborne unless you hit it
with a descending blow). Your
cure is just the opposite in
that you want to deliver a
more horizontal blow.
Take your normal setup po-
sition for a driver with the
ball teed up extra high (at
least an inch off the surface).
Using a 5-metal, line up the
club head even with the ball,
and using 80 percent of your
normal speed, make a swing
with a level, roundhouse-feel-
ing shoulder turn.
At first, with your steep
swing, you'll hit a few pop-
ups, but after a while you'll
get the feel of the longer flat
spot through impact that's
needed to sweep the ball into
the air without disturbing the
tee.
If you would like a training
aid that can help, try Dream
Swing; you can find it online
at www.dreamswing.com.


IT'S GOOD FOR YOUR GAME


Even experienced golfers should periodically take their "measure to the ball." If done correctly,
your rear end sticks out behind you and your knees are bent so they are over your shoelaces.


The







of



any golfers have trouble figur-
ing out how far to stand from
the ball, and problems can de-
velop if you position your body incor-
rectly Stand too far away and you'll
develop a swing that's too much
"around" your body; crowd the ball
and you'll tend to swing the club too
vertically
Here is an exercise to help you
gauge the correct distance. I start all
my beginning students with this pro-
cedure, but even experienced golfers
should periodically check their "mea-
sure to the ball" to make sure they
haven't slipped into any bad habits.
This exercise has three parts. First,
stand with your heels about shoulder
width apart, back vertical, knees
locked straight, and hold the club
shaft parallel to the ground as I am in
the left-hand photo above.
Second, keeping your back straight


measure


a


golfer


ABOUT THE WRITER
Dr TJ Tomasi is di-
rector of instruction
at Lyman Orchards
Golf Club in Middle-
field, Conn. To ask
him a question about
golf e-mail him at:
TJlnsider@aol.com.


and your knees locked, bend from
your hips (not from your waist) and
let the club drop toward the ground
until it hovers near the back of the
ball.
Third, unlock your knees so they
are now slightly bent, allowing the
club to drop the rest of the way to the
ground so that it rests directly behind


the ball. When you are finished you
should look as I do in the second pho-
to.
If you have done this correctly, your
rear end sticks out behind you and
your knees are bent so they are over
your shoelaces. If they extend out
over your toes, they're bent too much.
Also, if you are using a short iron
as I am in the photos, your arms
should hang straight down. With
longer clubs, as the club shaft length-
ens, you'll be farther away from the
ball. However, and this is key you
should be in the same body posture
for all of your full swings.
Your upper body should feel loose
and relaxed, your lower body heavy
and springy Your weight should be
distributed evenly between your heels
and the balls of your feet, and your
body should feel athletic and perfectly
in balance.


THE GOLF DOCTOR


Faulty concepts block your ability to learn


our golf swing will be no better
than your concept of what a good
golf swing should be, so it is very
important to harbor the correct notions
about your swing. Below is a common mis-
conception that will ruin your game.
* The misconception: There is some-
thing called a "natural golf swing," imply-
ing a pre-wired expertise waiting for
birth. All golfers have a natural athlete
trapped inside and all they have to do it let
it out.
The result of this misconception is slow
improvement, if any, and ingrained bad
habits. Players who subscribe to this falla-


cy waste years and cash searching for a
natural golf swing that doesn't exist.
* The correct concept: "Natural" is a
word used when understanding is at a
minimum, as in, "He's just a natural."
There is no such thing as a natural golf
swing. In fact, the golf swing is an unnat-
ural motion that goes against many of our
basic tendencies. Only motions related to
survival, such as throwing or striking, are
wired into the DNA.
The golf swing is counterintuitive be-
cause golfers stand to the side of a ball
that's on the ground, so it's unlike any of
the other motor sequences we're familiar


with. The brain must learn (or be taught)
the golf swing from scratch, one step at a
time, for maximum performance to occur.
This concept should lead you to a
teacher who understands the importance
of breaking down your golf swing into
manageable "chunks" composed of specif-
ic tasks to be performed (learned) one at a
time until the entire blueprint is in-
stalled.
It is in this way that the vague (talent)
is made functional by the introduction of
the specific (technique). Said another way,
your talent emerges from your technique
and technique is a learned skill.


TEEING OFF


Targeted


practice
There are two distinct
types of practice: (1)
working on swing funda-
mentals, and (2) practice de-
signed to train you to hunt tar-
gets ("target practice"). To
maximize your practice time
you need to separate the two.
Here's the cardinal rule:
When you're working on swing
fundamentals, such as grip or
takeaway, don't use a target,
and when you are taking target
practice, don't be concerned
with your swing.
This doesn't mean that your
entire practice session must be
devoted exclusively to one type
of practice or the other, but if
you are going to do both during
the same session, you must be
able to keep them distinct in
your mind.
Let's assume you start off do-
ing some target practice. You
are keeping things fresh -
switching targets with every
shot, and changing clubs often
to make your practice more
like playing on the course.
You're not thinking about your
swing because the task is to get
the ball from point A to point
B.
But suppose you start slicing
the ball. In this circumstance,
after the slice has become a
trend (five slices in a row), it's
time to switch to "fundamental
practice" where you focus on
the part of your swing that's re-
sponsible for the bad ball flight.
Ideally, you've been working
with your pro on adjustments
to cure the slice. This is the
time to concentrate on those
adjustments until the trend is
reversed.
However (and here is the im-
portant part), when you switch
to the "fundamental" mode, re-
mind yourself that y6tfare no
longer concerned with the tar-
get. In this example, your goal
is to put the correct spin on the
ball. Once this is done you can
switch back to target practice,
reminding yourself, "Now I'm
going to pay attention only to
where the ball goes rather than
my swing."
I When you play you should be
thinking about the target, but
it's not going to happen unless
you practice the technique on
the range. Keep in mind what 6-
year-old Tiger Woods said when
asked by his father what he was
thinking about when he hit a
golf ball: "I'm thinking about
where I want it to go, Daddy"
Out of the mouths of babes.

SCHEDULE
All Times EST
PGA TOUR
FBR Open
* Site: Scottsdale, Ariz.
* Schedule: Thursday-Sunday
* Course: TPC of Scottsdale
(7,216 yards, par 71).
* Purse: $5.2 million. Winner's
share: $936,000.
* Television: USA (Thursday-
Friday, 4-6 p.m.) and CBS (Satur-
day-Sunday, 3-6 p.m.).
CHAMPIONS TOUR
* Site: Maui, Hawaii.
* Schedule: Saturday.
* Course: Wailea Golf Club, Gold
Course (6,844 yards, par 72).
* Purse: $600,000 (Nos. 1-6,
$20,000 each; Nos. 7-12, $30,000
each; Nos. 13-17, $40,000 each;
No. 18, $100,000).
* Television: ABC (Saturday, 4-6
p.m.; Sunday 1-3 p.m.).
LPGA TOUR
* Next event: Women's World
Cup of Golf, Feb. 11-13, Fancourt
Hotel and Country Club Estate,
The Links, George, South
Africa.


SJienville Plantation

S*n White Springs, Florida

SNow Offering Full Memberships

O iers fine dining, lu\ur\ accommodations, guided quail, guided fishing, exotic high fence hunts, hog, deer, and even alligator.
One ol the best aspects ol visitingg Bien\ille Plantation is the ability\ to mi\ and match hunting and fishing opportunities into a single
da\ Hunt deer, duck, and quail on the same day or spend a morning in a duck blind or walking behind stylish southern Pointers
before switching to a bass rod and reel [or the afternoon hours: there is so much for hunters to enjoy at Bienville Plantation.

Call today to reserve the ultimate adventure or become a member. 386-397-.1989,


r I I I I I I


:,,',...:, '., ,, .; . ,Tt,,,.,,,. t


PAGE 7C


WANNEE DEMOCRAT/ K


----� �--�� � ----





I n, �for our i- o
re 6 .wa9i
'Y a
tax efun-� -a:-new.ca


al


386-7


-8


and let Gateway Auto Sales
help you file your tax returnI NOW!


2000 Chevy
Suburban
$459,,o.


2003 Chevy
Cavalier
1 67,,o.


2002 Pontiac
Montana
A21 5,o.


2001 Ford
Sportrac
$324o,.


2000 Isuzu
Rodeo
254,,o.


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Lake City, Florida


386755-8909


Purchaser must pay sales tax, tag and title. All payments ad prices quoted are plus tax, tag and title. Your credit may affect your final payment and term. All prices quoted are strictly cash prices. All payments
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~B~UBls~lsPPl%~e~~�� I
IB~lls~l~a~EIFEaQP*~ghl~i~(rm~8p~ SF~.;r ,,rl


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2005


DAG-E Q8(